WorldWideScience

Sample records for arginine methyltransferase hmt1p

  1. Theoretical insights into catalytic mechanism of protein arginine methyltransferase 1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruihan Zhang

    Full Text Available Protein arginine methyltransferase 1 (PRMT1, the major arginine asymmetric dimethylation enzyme in mammals, is emerging as a potential drug target for cancer and cardiovascular disease. Understanding the catalytic mechanism of PRMT1 will facilitate inhibitor design. However, detailed mechanisms of the methyl transfer process and substrate deprotonation of PRMT1 remain unclear. In this study, we present a theoretical study on PRMT1 catalyzed arginine dimethylation by employing molecular dynamics (MD simulation and quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM calculation. Ternary complex models, composed of PRMT1, peptide substrate, and S-adenosyl-methionine (AdoMet as cofactor, were constructed and verified by 30-ns MD simulation. The snapshots selected from the MD trajectory were applied for the QM/MM calculation. The typical SN2-favored transition states of the first and second methyl transfers were identified from the potential energy profile. Deprotonation of substrate arginine occurs immediately after methyl transfer, and the carboxylate group of E144 acts as proton acceptor. Furthermore, natural bond orbital analysis and electrostatic potential calculation showed that E144 facilitates the charge redistribution during the reaction and reduces the energy barrier. In this study, we propose the detailed mechanism of PRMT1-catalyzed asymmetric dimethylation, which increases insight on the small-molecule effectors design, and enables further investigations into the physiological function of this family.

  2. Aflatoxin B1 induced upregulation of protein arginine methyltransferase 5 in human cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghufran, Md Sajid; Ghosh, Krishna; Kanade, Santosh R

    2016-09-01

    The exposure of naturally occurring mycotoxins affects human health and play a vital role in cancer initiation and progression. Aflatoxin B1 is a difuranocoumarin mycotoxin, classified as a group I carcinogen. The present study was conducted to assess the effect of aflatoxin B1 on epigenetic regulatory proteins. The protein arginine methyltransferase 5 expression was induced upon aflatoxin B1 treatment in a dose and time dependent manner. Further global arginine methylation was also increased in the same manner. This is the first report showing the induction of epigenetic regulatory protein, protein arginine methyltransferase 5 upon aflatoxin B1 treatment. Further study is required to establish the detailed pathway of PRMT5 induction. PMID:27242039

  3. Protein arginine methyltransferase 1 regulates herpes simplex virus replication through ICP27 RGG-box methylation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Protein arginine methylation is involved in viral infection and replication through the modulation of diverse cellular processes including RNA metabolism, cytokine signaling, and subcellular localization. It has been suggested previously that the protein arginine methylation of the RGG-box of ICP27 is required for herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) viral replication and gene expression in vivo. However, a cellular mediator for this process has not yet been identified. In our current study, we show that the protein arginine methyltransferase 1 (PRMT1) is a cellular mediator of the arginine methylation of ICP27 RGG-box. We generated arginine substitution mutants in this domain and examined which arginine residues are required for methylation by PRMT1. R138, R148 and R150 were found to be the major sites of this methylation but additional arginine residues serving as minor methylation sites are still required to sustain the fully methylated form of ICP27 RGG. We also demonstrate that the nuclear foci-like structure formation, SRPK interactions, and RNA-binding activity of ICP27 are modulated by the arginine methylation of the ICP27 RGG-box. Furthermore, HSV-1 replication is inhibited by hypomethylation of this domain resulting from the use of general PRMT inhibitors or arginine mutations. Our data thus suggest that the PRMT1 plays a key role as a cellular regulator of HSV-1 replication through ICP27 RGG-box methylation.

  4. Protein arginine methyltransferase 1 regulates herpes simplex virus replication through ICP27 RGG-box methylation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Jungeun; Shin, Bongjin; Park, Eui-Soon; Yang, Sujeong; Choi, Seunga [Department of Microbiology, Chungnam National University, 220 Gung-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); BK21 Bio Brain Center, Chungnam National University, 220 Gung-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Misun [Department of Microbiology, Chungnam National University, 220 Gung-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Rho, Jaerang, E-mail: jrrho@cnu.ac.kr [Department of Microbiology, Chungnam National University, 220 Gung-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); BK21 Bio Brain Center, Chungnam National University, 220 Gung-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); GRAST, Chungnam National University, 220 Gung-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-01-01

    Protein arginine methylation is involved in viral infection and replication through the modulation of diverse cellular processes including RNA metabolism, cytokine signaling, and subcellular localization. It has been suggested previously that the protein arginine methylation of the RGG-box of ICP27 is required for herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) viral replication and gene expression in vivo. However, a cellular mediator for this process has not yet been identified. In our current study, we show that the protein arginine methyltransferase 1 (PRMT1) is a cellular mediator of the arginine methylation of ICP27 RGG-box. We generated arginine substitution mutants in this domain and examined which arginine residues are required for methylation by PRMT1. R138, R148 and R150 were found to be the major sites of this methylation but additional arginine residues serving as minor methylation sites are still required to sustain the fully methylated form of ICP27 RGG. We also demonstrate that the nuclear foci-like structure formation, SRPK interactions, and RNA-binding activity of ICP27 are modulated by the arginine methylation of the ICP27 RGG-box. Furthermore, HSV-1 replication is inhibited by hypomethylation of this domain resulting from the use of general PRMT inhibitors or arginine mutations. Our data thus suggest that the PRMT1 plays a key role as a cellular regulator of HSV-1 replication through ICP27 RGG-box methylation.

  5. Two distinct arginine methyltransferases are required for biogenesis of Sm-class ribonucleoproteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonsalvez, Graydon B.; Tian, Liping; Ospina, Jason K.; Boisvert, François-Michel; Lamond, Angus I.; Matera, A. Gregory

    2007-01-01

    Small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs) are core components of the spliceosome. The U1, U2, U4, and U5 snRNPs each contain a common set of seven Sm proteins. Three of these Sm proteins are posttranslationally modified to contain symmetric dimethylarginine (sDMA) residues within their C-terminal tails. However, the precise function of this modification in the snRNP biogenesis pathway is unclear. Several lines of evidence suggest that the methyltransferase protein arginine methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5) is responsible for sDMA modification of Sm proteins. We found that in human cells, PRMT5 and a newly discovered type II methyltransferase, PRMT7, are each required for Sm protein sDMA modification. Furthermore, we show that the two enzymes function nonredundantly in Sm protein methylation. Lastly, we provide in vivo evidence demonstrating that Sm protein sDMA modification is required for snRNP biogenesis in human cells. PMID:17709427

  6. Protein arginine methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5) is a novel coactivator of constitutive androstane receptor (CAR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanno, Yuichiro; Inajima, Jun; Kato, Sayaka; Matsumoto, Maika; Tokumoto, Chikako; Kure, Yuki; Inouye, Yoshio

    2015-03-27

    The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) plays a key role in the expression of xenobiotic/steroid and drug metabolizing enzymes and their transporters. In this study, we demonstrated that protein arginine methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5) is a novel CAR-interacting protein. Furthermore, the PRMT-dependent induction of a CAR reporter gene, which was independent of methyltransferase activity, was enhanced in the presence of steroid receptor coactivator 1 (SRC1), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator 1 alpha (PGC-1α) or DEAD box DNA/RNA helicase DP97. Using tetracycline inducible-hCAR system in HepG2 cells, we showed that knockdown of PRMT5 with small interfering RNA suppressed tetracycline -induced mRNA expression of CYP2B6 but not of CYP2C9 or CYP3A4. PRMT5 enhanced phenobarbital-mediated transactivation of a phenobarbital-responsive enhancer module (PBREM)-driven reporter gene in co-operation with PGC-1α in rat primary hepatocytes. Based on these findings, we suggest PRMT5 to be a gene (or promoter)-selective coactivator of CAR by mediating the formation of complexes between hCAR and appropriate coactivators. PMID:25721668

  7. Role of type II protein arginine methyltransferase 5 in the regulation of Circadian Per1 gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jungtae Na

    Full Text Available Circadian clocks are the endogenous oscillators that regulate rhythmic physiological and behavioral changes to correspond to daily light-dark cycles. Molecular dissections have revealed that transcriptional feedback loops of the circadian clock genes drive the molecular oscillation, in which PER/CRY complexes inhibit the transcriptional activity of the CLOCK/BMAL1 heterodimer to constitute a negative feedback loop. In this study, we identified the type II protein arginine methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5 as an interacting molecule of CRY1. Although the Prmt5 gene was constitutively expressed, increased interaction of PRMT5 with CRY1 was observed when the Per1 gene was repressed both in synchronized mouse liver and NIH3T3 cells. Moreover, rhythmic recruitment of PRMT5 and CRY1 to the Per1 gene promoter was found to be associated with an increased level of histone H4R3 dimethylation and Per1 gene repression. Consistently, decreased histone H4R3 dimethylation and altered rhythmic Per1 gene expression were observed in Prmt5-depleted cells. Taken together, these findings provide an insight into the link between histone arginine methylation by PRMT5 and transcriptional regulation of the circadian Per1 gene.

  8. Protein arginine methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5) is a novel coactivator of constitutive androstane receptor (CAR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) plays a key role in the expression of xenobiotic/steroid and drug metabolizing enzymes and their transporters. In this study, we demonstrated that protein arginine methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5) is a novel CAR-interacting protein. Furthermore, the PRMT-dependent induction of a CAR reporter gene, which was independent of methyltransferase activity, was enhanced in the presence of steroid receptor coactivator 1 (SRC1), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator 1 alpha (PGC-1α) or DEAD box DNA/RNA helicase DP97. Using tetracycline inducible-hCAR system in HepG2 cells, we showed that knockdown of PRMT5 with small interfering RNA suppressed tetracycline -induced mRNA expression of CYP2B6 but not of CYP2C9 or CYP3A4. PRMT5 enhanced phenobarbital-mediated transactivation of a phenobarbital-responsive enhancer module (PBREM)-driven reporter gene in co-operation with PGC-1α in rat primary hepatocytes. Based on these findings, we suggest PRMT5 to be a gene (or promoter)-selective coactivator of CAR by mediating the formation of complexes between hCAR and appropriate coactivators. - Highlights: • Nuclear receptor CAR interact with PRMT5. • PRMT5 enhances transcriptional activity of CAR. • PRMT5 synergistically enhances transactivity of CAR by the co-expression of SRC-1, DP97 or PGC1α. • PRMT5 is a gene-selective co-activator for hCAR

  9. Protein arginine methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5) is a novel coactivator of constitutive androstane receptor (CAR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanno, Yuichiro, E-mail: ykanno@phar.toho-u.ac.jp; Inajima, Jun; Kato, Sayaka; Matsumoto, Maika; Tokumoto, Chikako; Kure, Yuki; Inouye, Yoshio

    2015-03-27

    The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) plays a key role in the expression of xenobiotic/steroid and drug metabolizing enzymes and their transporters. In this study, we demonstrated that protein arginine methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5) is a novel CAR-interacting protein. Furthermore, the PRMT-dependent induction of a CAR reporter gene, which was independent of methyltransferase activity, was enhanced in the presence of steroid receptor coactivator 1 (SRC1), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator 1 alpha (PGC-1α) or DEAD box DNA/RNA helicase DP97. Using tetracycline inducible-hCAR system in HepG2 cells, we showed that knockdown of PRMT5 with small interfering RNA suppressed tetracycline -induced mRNA expression of CYP2B6 but not of CYP2C9 or CYP3A4. PRMT5 enhanced phenobarbital-mediated transactivation of a phenobarbital-responsive enhancer module (PBREM)-driven reporter gene in co-operation with PGC-1α in rat primary hepatocytes. Based on these findings, we suggest PRMT5 to be a gene (or promoter)-selective coactivator of CAR by mediating the formation of complexes between hCAR and appropriate coactivators. - Highlights: • Nuclear receptor CAR interact with PRMT5. • PRMT5 enhances transcriptional activity of CAR. • PRMT5 synergistically enhances transactivity of CAR by the co-expression of SRC-1, DP97 or PGC1α. • PRMT5 is a gene-selective co-activator for hCAR.

  10. MTAP deletion confers enhanced dependency on the PRMT5 arginine methyltransferase in cancer cells | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    The discovery of cancer dependencies has the potential to inform therapeutic strategies and to identify putative drug targets. Integrating data from comprehensive genomic profiling of cancer cell lines and from functional characterization of cancer cell dependencies, we discovered that loss of the enzyme methylthioadenosine phosphorylase (MTAP) confers a selective dependence on protein arginine methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5) and its binding partner WDR77. MTAP is frequently lost due to its proximity to the commonly deleted tumor suppressor gene, CDKN2A.

  11. Protein arginine methyltransferase 5 is associated with malignant phenotype and peritoneal metastasis in gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanda, Mitsuro; Shimizu, Dai; Fujii, Tsutomu; Tanaka, Haruyoshi; Shibata, Masahiro; Iwata, Naoki; Hayashi, Masamichi; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Tanaka, Chie; Yamada, Suguru; Nakayama, Goro; Sugimoto, Hiroyuki; Koike, Masahiko; Fujiwara, Michitaka; Kodera, Yasuhiro

    2016-09-01

    Identification of novel gastric cancer (GC)-related molecules is necessary to improve management of patients with GC in both diagnostic and therapeutic aspects. The aim of the present study was to determine whether protein arginine methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5) acts as an oncogene in the progression of GC and whether it serves as a novel diagnostic marker and therapeutic target. We conducted global expression profiling of GC cell lines and RNA interference experiments to evaluate the effect of PRMT5 expression on the phenotype of GC cells. We analysed tissues of 179 patients with GC to assess the association of PRMT5 mRNA levels with clinicopathological factors. Differential expression of PRMT5 mRNA by GC cell lines correlated positively with the levels of GEMIN2, STAT3 and TGFB3. PRMT5 knockdown reduced the proliferation, invasion and migration of a GC cell line. PRMT5 mRNA levels were significantly higher in GC tissues than the corresponding adjacent normal tissues and were independent of tumour depth, differentiation and lymph node metastasis. High PRMT5 expression was an independent risk factor of positive peritoneal lavage cytology (odds ratio 3.90, P=0.003) and decreased survival. PRMT5 enhances the malignant phenotype of GC cell lines and its expression in gastric tissues may serve as a biomarker for patient stratification and a potential target of therapy. PMID:27315569

  12. Novel Protein Arginine Methyltransferase 8 Isoform Is Essential for Cell Proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Sarah; Dominko, Tanja

    2016-09-01

    Identification of molecular mechanisms that regulate cellular replicative lifespan is needed to better understand the transition between a normal and a neoplastic cell phenotype. We have previously reported that low oxygen-mediated activity of FGF2 leads to an increase in cellular lifespan and acquisition of regeneration competence in human dermal fibroblasts (iRC cells). Though cells display a more plastic developmental phenotype, they remain non-tumorigenic when injected into SCID mice (Page et al. [2009] Cloning Stem Cells 11:417-426; Page et al. [2011] Eng Part A 17:2629-2640) allowing for investigation of mechanisms that regulate increased cellular lifespan in a non-tumorigenic system. Analysis of chromatin modification enzymes by qRT-PCR revealed a 13.3-fold upregulation of the arginine methyltransferase PRMT8 in iRC cells. Increased protein expression was confirmed in both iRC and human embryonic stem cells-the first demonstration of endogenous human PRMT8 expression outside the brain. Furthermore, iRC cells express a novel PRMT8 mRNA variant. Using siRNA-mediated knockdown we demonstrated that this novel variant was required for proliferation of human dermal fibroblasts (hDFs) and grade IV glioblastomas. PRMT8 upregulation in a non-tumorigenic system may offer a potential diagnostic biomarker and a therapeutic target for cells in pre-cancerous and cancerous states. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2056-2066, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26851891

  13. Modulation of Epstein–Barr Virus Nuclear Antigen 2-dependent transcription by protein arginine methyltransferase 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Catalytic active PRMT5 substantially binds to the EBNA2 RG domain. ► PRMT5 augments the EBNA2-dependent transcription. ► PRMT5 triggers the symmetric dimethylation of the EBNA2 RG domain. ► PRMT5 enhances the promoter occupancy of EBNA2 on its target promoters. -- Abstract: Epstein–Barr Virus Nuclear Antigen (EBNA) 2 features an Arginine–Glycine repeat (RG) domain at amino acid positions 335–360, which is a known target for protein arginine methyltransferaser 5 (PRMT5). In this study, we performed protein affinity pull-down assays to demonstrate that endogenous PRMT5 derived from lymphoblastoid cells specifically associated with the protein bait GST-E2 RG. Transfection of a plasmid expressing PRMT5 induced a 2.5- to 3-fold increase in EBNA2-dependent transcription of both the LMP1 promoter in AKATA cells, which contain the EBV genome endogenously, and a Cp-Luc reporter plasmid in BJAB cells, which are EBV negative. Furthermore, we showed that there was a 2-fold enrichment of EBNA2 occupancy in target promoters in the presence of exogenous PRMT5. Taken together, we show that PRMT5 triggers the symmetric dimethylation of EBNA2 RG domain to coordinate with EBNA2-mediated transcription. This modulation suggests that PRMT5 may play a role in latent EBV infection

  14. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic study of isolated modules of the mouse coactivator-associated arginine methyltransferase 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isolated modules of mouse coactivator-associated arginine methyltransferase 1 encompassing the protein arginine N-methyltransferase catalytic domain have been overexpressed, purified and crystallized. X-ray diffraction data have been collected and have enabled determination of the structures by multiple isomorphous replacement using anomalous scattering. Coactivator-associated arginine methyltransferase 1 (CARM1) plays a crucial role in gene expression as a coactivator of several nuclear hormone receptors and also of non-nuclear receptor systems. Its recruitment by the transcriptional machinery induces protein methylation, leading to chromatin remodelling and gene activation. CARM128–507 and two structural states of CARM1140–480 were expressed, purified and crystallized. Crystals of CARM128–507 belong to space group P6222, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 136.0, c = 125.3 Å; they diffract to beyond 2.5 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation and contain one monomer in the asymmetric unit. The structure of CARM128–507 was solved by multiple isomorphous replacement and anomalous scattering methods. Crystals of apo CARM1140–480 belong to space group I222, with unit-cell parameters a = 74.6, b = 99.0, c = 207.4 Å; they diffract to beyond 2.7 Å resolution and contain two monomers in the asymmetric unit. Crystals of CARM1140–480 in complex with S-adenosyl-l-homocysteine belong to space P21212, with unit-cell parameters a = 74.6, b = 98.65, c = 206.08 Å; they diffract to beyond 2.6 Å resolution and contain four monomers in the asymmetric unit. The structures of apo and holo CARM1140–480 were solved by molecular-replacement techniques from the structure of CARM128–507

  15. Interplay among coactivator-associated arginine methyltransferase 1, CBP, and CIITA in IFN-γ-inducible MHC-II gene expression

    OpenAIRE

    Zika, Eleni; Fauquier, Lucas; Vandel, Laurence; Ting, Jenny P -Y

    2005-01-01

    Class II major histocompatibility (MHC-II) genes are prototype targets of IFN-γ. IFN-γ activates the expression of the non-DNA-binding master regulator of MHC-II, class II transactivator (CIITA), which is crucial for enhanceosome formation and gene activation. This report shows the importance of the histone methyltransferase, coactivator-associated arginine methyltransferase (CARM1/PRMT4), during IFN-γ-induced MHC-II gene activation. It also demonstrates the coordinated regulation of CIITA, C...

  16. Interplay among coactivator-associated arginine methyltransferase 1, CBP, and CIITA in IFN-gamma-inducible MHC-II gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zika, Eleni; Fauquier, Lucas; Vandel, Laurence; Ting, Jenny P-Y

    2005-11-01

    Class II major histocompatibility (MHC-II) genes are prototype targets of IFN-gamma. IFN-gamma activates the expression of the non-DNA-binding master regulator of MHC-II, class II transactivator (CIITA), which is crucial for enhanceosome formation and gene activation. This report shows the importance of the histone methyltransferase, coactivator-associated arginine methyltransferase (CARM1/PRMT4), during IFN-gamma-induced MHC-II gene activation. It also demonstrates the coordinated regulation of CIITA, CARM1, and the acetyltransferase cyclic-AMP response element binding (CREB)-binding protein (CBP) during this process. CARM1 synergizes with CIITA in activating MHC-II transcription and synergy is abrogated when an arginine methyltransferase-defective CARM1 mutant is used. Protein-arginine methyltransferase 1 has much less effect on MHC-II transcription. Specific RNA interference reduced CARM1 expression as well as MHC-II expression. The recruitment of CARM1 to the promoter requires endogenous CIITA and results in methylation of histone H3-R17; hence, CIITA is an upstream regulator of histone methylation. Previous work has shown that CARM1 can methylate CBP at three arginine residues. Using wild-type CBP and a mutant of CBP lacking the CARM1-targeted arginine residues (R3A), we show that arginine methylation of CBP is required for IFN-gamma induction of MHC-II. A kinetic analysis shows that CIITA, CARM1, and H3-R17 methylation all precede CBP loading on the MHC-II promoter during IFN-gamma treatment. These results suggest functional and temporal relationships among CIITA, CARM1, and CBP for IFN-gamma induction of MHC-II. PMID:16254053

  17. Tyrosine 87 is vital for the activity of human protein arginine methyltransferase 3 (PRMT3)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Handrková, H.; Petrák, J.; Halada, Petr; Pospíšilová, D.; Čmejla, R.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 1814, č. 2 (2011), s. 277-282. ISSN 1570-9639 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC07017 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : DIAMOND-BLACKFAN ANEMIA * SUBSTRATE-SPECIFICITY * N-METHYLTRANSFERASE Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 3.635, year: 2011

  18. The Critical Role of Protein Arginine Methyltransferase prmt8 in Zebrafish Embryonic and Neural Development Is Non-Redundant with Its Paralogue prmt1

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Yu-Ling; Tsai, Yun-Jung; Liu, Yu-Fang; Cheng, Yi-Chuan; Hung, Chuan-Mao; Lee, Yi-Jen; Pan, Huichin; Li, Chuan

    2013-01-01

    Protein arginine methyltransferase (PRMT) 1 is the most conserved and widely distributed PRMT in eukaryotes. PRMT8 is a vertebrate-restricted paralogue of PRMT1 with an extra N-terminal sequence and brain-specific expression. We use zebrafish (Danio rerio) as a vertebrate model to study PRMT8 function and putative redundancy with PRMT1. The transcripts of zebrafish prmt8 were specifically expressed in adult zebrafish brain and ubiquitously expressed from zygotic to early segmentation stage be...

  19. The arginine methyltransferase Rmt2 is enriched in the nucleus and co-purifies with the nuclear porins Nup49, Nup57 and Nup100

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arginine methylation is a post-translational modification of proteins implicated in RNA processing, protein compartmentalization, signal transduction, transcriptional regulation and DNA repair. In a screen for proteins associated with the nuclear envelope in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we have identified the arginine methyltransferase Rmt2, previously shown to methylate the ribosomal protein L12. By indirect immunofluorescence and subcellular fractionations we demonstrate here that Rmt2 has nuclear and cytoplasmic localizations. Biochemical analysis of a fraction enriched in nuclei reveals that nuclear Rmt2 is resistant to extractions with salt and detergent, indicating an association with structural components. This was supported by affinity purification experiments with TAP-tagged Rmt2. Rmt2 was found to co-purify with the nucleoporins Nup49, Nup57 and Nup100, revealing a novel link between arginine methyltransferases and the nuclear pore complex. In addition, a genome-wide transcription study of the rmt2Δ mutant shows significant downregulation of the transcription of MYO1, encoding the Type II myosin heavy chain required for cytokinesis and cell separation

  20. Identification of the methylation preference region in heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K by protein arginine methyltransferase 1 and its implication in regulating nuclear/cytoplasmic distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → Verifying by direct methylation assay the substrate sites of PRMT1 in the hnRNP K protein. → Identifying the preferred PMRT1 methylation regions in hnRNP K by kinetic analysis. → Linking methylation in regulating nuclear localization of hnRNP K. -- Abstract: Protein arginine methylation plays crucial roles in numerous cellular processes. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K) is a multi-functional protein participating in a variety of cellular functions including transcription and RNA processing. HnRNP K is methylated at multiple sites in the glycine- and arginine-rich (RGG) motif. Using various RGG domain deletion mutants of hnRNP K as substrates, here we show by direct methylation assay that protein arginine methyltransferase 1 (PRMT1) methylated preferentially in a.a. 280-307 of the RGG motif. Kinetic analysis revealed that deletion of a.a. 280-307, but not a.a. 308-327, significantly inhibited rate of methylation. Importantly, nuclear localization of hnRNP K was significantly impaired in mutant hnRNP K lacking the PRMT1 methylation region or upon pharmacological inhibition of methylation. Together our results identify preferred PRMT1 methylation sequences of hnRNP K by direct methylation assay and implicate a role of arginine methylation in regulating intracellular distribution of hnRNP K.

  1. Arginine Methyltransferases Are Regulated by Epstein-Barr Virus in B Cells and Are Differentially Expressed in Hodgkin’s Lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Leonard

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Although there is increasing evidence that aberrant expression of those enzymes which control protein arginine methylation contribute to carcinogenesis, their de-regulation by oncogenic viruses in primary cells has yet to be reported. We first show that the protein arginine methyltransferases, CARM1, PRMT1 and PRMT5 are strongly expressed in Hodgkin Reed-Sternberg (HRS cells, and up-regulated in Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL cell lines. Given that Epstein-Barr virus (EBV can be detected in approximately 50% of primary HL, we next examined how EBV infection of germinal centre (GC B cells, the presumptive precursors of HRS cells, modulated the expression of these proteins. EBV infection of GC B cells was followed by the up-regulation of CARM1, PRMT1 and PRMT5, and by the down-regulation of the arginine deiminase, PADI4. Latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1, the major EBV transforming gene was shown to induce PRMT1 in GC B cells and in a stably transfected B cell line. The recent development of compounds which inhibit PRMT-mediated reactions provides a compelling case for continuing to dissect the contribution of virus induced changes in these proteins to lymphomagenesis.

  2. The critical role of protein arginine methyltransferase prmt8 in zebrafish embryonic and neural development is non-redundant with its paralogue prmt1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-ling Lin

    Full Text Available Protein arginine methyltransferase (PRMT 1 is the most conserved and widely distributed PRMT in eukaryotes. PRMT8 is a vertebrate-restricted paralogue of PRMT1 with an extra N-terminal sequence and brain-specific expression. We use zebrafish (Danio rerio as a vertebrate model to study PRMT8 function and putative redundancy with PRMT1. The transcripts of zebrafish prmt8 were specifically expressed in adult zebrafish brain and ubiquitously expressed from zygotic to early segmentation stage before the neuronal development. Whole-mount in situ hybridization revealed ubiquitous prmt8 expression pattern during early embryonic stages, similar to that of prmt1. Knockdown of prmt8 with antisense morpholino oligonucleotide phenocopied prmt1-knockdown, with convergence/extension defects at gastrulation. Other abnormalities observed later include short body axis, curled tails, small and malformed brain and eyes. Catalytically inactive prmt8 failed to complement the morphants, indicating the importance of methyltransferase activity. Full-length prmt8 but not prmt1 cRNA can rescue the phenotypic changes. Nevertheless, cRNA encoding Prmt1 fused with the N-terminus of Prmt8 can rescue the prmt8 morphants. In contrast, N-terminus- deleted but not full-length prmt8 cRNA can rescue the prmt1 morphants as efficiently as prmt1 cRNA. Abnormal brain morphologies illustrated with brain markers and loss of fluorescent neurons in a transgenic fish upon prmt8 knockdown confirm the critical roles of prmt8 in neural development. In summery, our study is the first report showing the expression and function of prmt8 in early zebrafish embryogenesis. Our results indicate that prmt8 may play important roles non-overlapping with prmt1 in embryonic and neural development depending on its specific N-terminus.

  3. Severe Hypomyelination and Developmental Defects Are Caused in Mice Lacking Protein Arginine Methyltransferase 1 (PRMT1) in the Central Nervous System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Misuzu; Murata, Kazuya; Ishida, Junji; Kanou, Akihiko; Kasuya, Yoshitoshi; Fukamizu, Akiyoshi

    2016-01-29

    Protein arginine methyltransferase 1 (PRMT1) is involved in cell proliferation, DNA damage response, and transcriptional regulation. Although PRMT1 is extensively expressed in the CNS at embryonic and perinatal stages, the physiological role of PRMT1 has been poorly understood. Here, to investigate the primary function of PRMT1 in the CNS, we generated CNS-specific PRMT1 knock-out mice by the Cre-loxP system. These mice exhibited postnatal growth retardation with tremors, and most of them died within 2 weeks after birth. Brain histological analyses revealed prominent cell reduction in the white matter tracts of the mutant mice. Furthermore, ultrastructural analysis demonstrated that myelin sheath was almost completely ablated in the CNS of these animals. In agreement with hypomyelination, we also observed that most major myelin proteins including myelin basic protein (MBP), 2',3'-cyclic-nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase (CNPase), and myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG) were dramatically decreased, although neuronal and astrocytic markers were preserved in the brain of CNS-specific PRMT1 knock-out mice. These animals had a reduced number of OLIG2(+) oligodendrocyte lineage cells in the white matter. We found that expressions of transcription factors essential for oligodendrocyte specification and further maturation were significantly suppressed in the brain of the mutant mice. Our findings provide evidence that PRMT1 is required for CNS development, especially for oligodendrocyte maturation processes. PMID:26637354

  4. Protein arginine methyltransferase 1 may be involved in pregnane x receptor-activated overexpression of multidrug resistance 1 gene during acquired multidrug resistant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tingting; Kong, Ah-Ng Tony; Ma, Zhiqiang; Liu, Haiyan; Liu, Pinghua; Xiao, Yu; Jiang, Xuehua; Wang, Ling

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Pregnane x receptor (PXR) - activated overexpression of the multidrug resistance 1 (MDR1) gene is an important way for tumor cells to acquire drug resistance. However, the detailed mechanism still remains unclear. In the present study, we aimed to investigate whether protein arginine methyl transferase 1(PRMT1) is involved in PXR - activated overexpression of MDR1 during acquired multidrug resistant. Experimental Design Arginine methyltransferase inhibitor 1 (AMI-1) was used to pharmacologically block PRMT1 in resistant breast cancer cells (MCF7/adr). The mRNA and protein levels of MDR1 were detected by real-time PCR and western blotting analysis. Immunofluorescence microscopy and co-immunoprecipitation were used to investigate the physical interaction between PXR and PRMT1. Then, 136 candidate compounds were screened for PRMT1 inhibitors. Lastly, luciferase reporter gene and nude mice bearing resistant breast cancer xenografts were adopted to investigate the anti-tumor effect of PRMT1 inhibitors when combined with adriamycin. Results AMI-1 significantly suppressed the expression of MDR1 in MCF7/adr cells and increased cells sensitivity of MCF7/adr to adriamycin. Physical interaction between PRMT1 and PXR exists in MCF7/adr cells, which could be disrupted by AMI-1. Those results suggest that PRMT1 may be involved in PXR-activated overexpression of MDR1 in resistant breast cancer cells, and AMI-1 may suppress MDR1 by disrupting the interaction between PRMT1 and PXR. Then, five compounds including rutin, isoquercitrin, salvianolic acid A, naproxen, and felodipline were identified to be PRMT1 inhibitors. Finally, those PRMT1 inhibitors were observed to significantly decrease MDR1 promoter activity in vitro and enhance the antitumor effect of adriamycin in nude mice that bearing resistant breast cancer xenografts. Conclusions PRMT1 may be an important co-activator of PXR in activating MDR1 gene during acquired resistance, and PRMT1 inhibitor combined with

  5. Inhibition of Nonsmall Cell Lung Cancer Cell Migration by Protein Arginine Methyltransferase 1-small Hairpin RNA Through Inhibiting Epithelial-mesenchymal Transition, Extracellular Matrix Degradation, and Src Phosphorylation In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Protein arginine methyltransferases 1 (PRMT1 is over-expressed in a variety of cancers, including lung cancer, and is correlated with a poor prognosis of tumor development. This study aimed to investigate the role of PRMT1 in nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC migration in vitro. Methods: In this study, PRMT1 expression in the NSCLC cell line A549 was silenced using lentiviral vector-mediated short hairpin RNAs. Cell migration was measured using both scratch wound healing and transwell cell migration assays. The mRNA expression levels of matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2 and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1, 2 (TIMP1, 2 were measured using quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The expression levels of protein markers for epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT (E-cadherin, N-cadherin, focal adhesion kinase (FAK, Src, AKT, and their corresponding phosphorylated states were detected by Western blot. Results: Cell migration was significantly inhibited in the PRMT1 silenced group compared to the control group. The mRNA expression of MMP-2 decreased while TIMP1 and TIMP2 increased significantly. E-cadherin mRNA expression also increased while N-cadherin decreased. Only phosphorylated Src levels decreased in the silenced group while FAK or AKT remained unchanged. Conclusions: PRMT1-small hairpin RNA inhibits the migration abilities of NSCLC A549 cells by inhibiting EMT, extracellular matrix degradation, and Src phosphorylation in vitro.

  6. Inhibition of Nonsmall Cell Lung Cancer Cell Migration by Protein Arginine Methyltransferase 1-small Hairpin RNA Through Inhibiting Epithelial-mesenchymal Transition,Extracellular Matrix Degradation, and Src Phosphorylation In Vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ting Zhang; Ge Cui; Yun-Liang Yao; Yue Guo; Qi-Chun Wang; Xi-Ning Li; Wen-Ming Feng

    2015-01-01

    Background:Protein arginine methyltransferases 1 (PRMT1) is over-expressed in a variety of cancers,including lung cancer,and is correlated with a poor prognosis of tumor development.This study aimed to investigate the role of PRMT1 in nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) migration in vitro.Methods:In this study,PRMT1 expression in the NSCLC cell line A549 was silenced using lentiviral vector-mediated short hairpin RNAs.Cell migration was measured using both scratch wound healing and transwell cell migration assays.The mRNA expression levels of matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2) and tissue inhibitor ofmetalloproteinase 1,2 (TIMP l,2) were measured using quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction.The expression levels of protein markers for epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) (E-cadherin,N-cadherin),focal adhesion kinase (FAK),Src,AKT,and their corresponding phosphorylated states were detected by Western blot.Results:Cell migration was significantly inhibited in the PRMT1 silenced group compared to the control group.The mRNA expression of MMP-2 decreased while TIMP 1 and TIMP2 increased significantly.E-cadherin mRNA expression also increased while N-cadherin decreased.Only phosphorylated Src levels decreased in the silenced group while FAK or AKT remained unchanged.Conclusions:PRMT1-small hairpin RNA inhibits the migration abilities of NSCLC A549 cells by inhibiting EMT,extracellular matrix degradation,and Src phosphorylation in vitro.

  7. Proteome-wide analysis of arginine monomethylation reveals widespread occurrence in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Sara C; Sylvestersen, Kathrine B; Mund, Andreas; Lyon, David; Mullari, Meeli; Madsen, Maria V; Daniel, Jeremy A; Jensen, Lars J; Nielsen, Michael L

    2016-01-01

    The posttranslational modification of proteins by arginine methylation is functionally important, yet the breadth of this modification is not well characterized. Using high-resolution mass spectrometry, we identified 8030 arginine methylation sites within 3300 human proteins in human embryonic kidney 293 cells, indicating that the occurrence of this modification is comparable to phosphorylation and ubiquitylation. A site-level conservation analysis revealed that arginine methylation sites are less evolutionarily conserved compared to arginines that were not identified as modified by methylation. Through quantitative proteomics and RNA interference to examine arginine methylation stoichiometry, we unexpectedly found that the protein arginine methyltransferase (PRMT) family of arginine methyltransferases catalyzed methylation independently of arginine sequence context. In contrast to the frequency of somatic mutations at arginine methylation sites throughout the proteome, we observed that somatic mutations were common at arginine methylation sites in proteins involved in mRNA splicing. Furthermore, in HeLa and U2OS cells, we found that distinct arginine methyltransferases differentially regulated the functions of the pre-mRNA splicing factor SRSF2 (serine/arginine-rich splicing factor 2) and the RNA transport ribonucleoprotein HNRNPUL1 (heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein U-like 1). Knocking down PRMT5 impaired the RNA binding function of SRSF2, whereas knocking down PRMT4 [also known as coactivator-associated arginine methyltransferase 1 (CARM1)] or PRMT1 increased the RNA binding function of HNRNPUL1. High-content single-cell imaging additionally revealed that knocking down CARM1 promoted the nuclear accumulation of SRSF2, independent of cell cycle phase. Collectively, the presented human arginine methylome provides a missing piece in the global and integrative view of cellular physiology and protein regulation. PMID:27577262

  8. Measurement of arginine metabolites: regulators of nitric oxide metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustine, Molly S; Rogers, Lynette K

    2013-01-01

    Arginine is the substrate for nitric oxide synthases (NOS), and arginine availability regulates the production of nitric oxide. Through the activity of methyltransferases, arginine can be methylated to form monomethylarginine (NMMA), asymmetrical dimethylarginine (ADMA), and symmetrical dimethylarginine (SDMA). NMMA and ADMA directly inhibit NOS, whereas SDMA inhibits the cellular import of arginine through the cationic amino acid transporter. Increased levels of methylarginine compounds have been associated with many diseases including atherosclerosis, renal failure, pulmonary hypertension, and preeclampsia. Previous HPLC methods to measure these molecules rely on derivatization with ortho-phthalaldehyde, which is unstable and requires immediate pre- or post-column reactions. We have identified a new fluorometric agent that is stable for at least 1 week and provides chromatographic properties that facilitate separation of these chemically similar compounds by reverse phase chromatography. PMID:24510541

  9. Synthesis of Lysine Methyltransferase Inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Tao; Hui, Chunngai

    2015-07-01

    Lysine methyltransferase which catalyze methylation of histone and nonhistone proteins, play a crucial role in diverse biological processes and has emerged as a promising target for the development of various human diseases, including cancer, inflammation, and psychiatric disorders. However, inhibiting Lysine methyltransferases selectively has presented many challenges to medicinal chemists. During the past decade, lysine methyltransferase inhibitors covering many different structural classes have been designed and developed. In this review, we describe the development of selective, small-molecule inhibitors of lysine methyltransferases with an emphasis on their discovery and chemical synthesis. We highlight the current state of lysine methyltransferase inhibitors and discuss future directions and opportunities for lysine methyltransferase inhibitor discovery.

  10. The Histone Methyltransferase Inhibitor A-366 Uncovers a Role for G9a/GLP in the Epigenetics of Leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Pappano, William N.; Guo, Jun; He, Yupeng; Ferguson, Debra; Jagadeeswaran, Sujatha; Osterling, Donald J.; Gao, Wenqing; Spence, Julie K.; Pliushchev, Marina; Sweis, Ramzi F.; Buchanan, Fritz G.; Michaelides, Michael R.; Shoemaker, Alexander R.; Tse, Chris; Chiang, Gary G.

    2015-01-01

    Histone methyltransferases are epigenetic regulators that modify key lysine and arginine residues on histones and are believed to play an important role in cancer development and maintenance. These epigenetic modifications are potentially reversible and as a result this class of enzymes has drawn great interest as potential therapeutic targets of small molecule inhibitors. Previous studies have suggested that the histone lysine methyltransferase G9a (EHMT2) is required to perpetuate malignant...

  11. L-arginine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your health provider.Medications for high blood pressure (ACE inhibitors)L-arginine seems to decrease blood pressure. Taking ... with certain medications for high blood pressure, called ACE inhibitors might cause your blood pressure to go too ...

  12. An enzyme-coupled continuous spectrophotometric assay for S-adenosylmethionine-dependent methyltransferases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorgan, Kathleen M; Wooderchak, Whitney L; Wynn, Donraphael P; Karschner, Erin L; Alfaro, Joshua F; Cui, Yinqiu; Zhou, Zhaohui Sunny; Hevel, Joan M

    2006-03-15

    Modification of small molecules and proteins by methyltransferases affects a wide range of biological processes. Here, we report an enzyme-coupled continuous spectrophotometric assay to quantitatively characterize S-adenosyl-L-methionine (AdoMet/SAM)-dependent methyltransferase activity. In this assay, S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine (AdoHcy/SAH), the transmethylation product of AdoMet-dependent methyltransferases, is hydrolyzed to S-ribosylhomocysteine and adenine by recombinant S-adenosylhomocysteine/5'-methylthioadenosine nucleosidase (SAHN/MTAN, EC 3.2.2.9). Subsequently, adenine generated from AdoHcy is further hydrolyzed to hypoxanthine and ammonia by recombinant adenine deaminase (EC 3.5.4.2). This deamination is associated with a decrease in absorbance at 265 nm that can be monitored continuously. Coupling enzymes are recombinant and easily purified. The utility of this assay was shown using recombinant rat protein arginine N-methyltransferase 1 (PRMT1, EC 2.1.1.125), which catalyzes the mono- and dimethylation of guanidino nitrogens of arginine residues in select proteins. Using this assay, the kinetic parameters of PRMT1 with three synthetic peptides were determined. An advantage of this assay is the destruction of AdoHcy by AdoHcy nucleosidase, which alleviates AdoHcy product feedback inhibition of S-adenosylmethionine-dependent methyltransferases. Finally, this method may be used to assay other enzymes that produce AdoHcy, 5'-methylthioadenosine, or compounds that can be cleaved by AdoHcy nucleosidase. PMID:16460659

  13. Arginine and nitrogen storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llácer, José L; Fita, Ignacio; Rubio, Vicente

    2008-12-01

    When nitrogen is abundant, prokaryotic and eukaryotic oxygen-producing photosynthetic organisms store nitrogen as arginine, by relieving feedback inhibition of the arginine biosynthesis controlling enzyme, N-acetylglutamate kinase (NAGK). The signalling protein PII, an ancient and widely distributed nitrogen/carbon/ADP/ATP sensor, mediates feedback inhibition relief of NAGK by binding to this enzyme. PII phosphorylation or PII binding of ADP or 2-oxoglutarate prevents PII-NAGK complex formation. Crystal structures of NAGK, cyanobacterial and plant PII and corresponding PII-NAGK complexes have been recently determined. In these complexes, two polar PII trimers sandwich one ring-like NAGK hexamer. Each PII subunit contacts one NAGK subunit, triggering a symmetry-restricted narrowing of the NAGK ring, with concomitant adoption by the arginine sites of a low-affinity conformation. PMID:19013524

  14. Histone methyltransferases in cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albert, Mareike; Helin, Kristian

    2009-01-01

    Cancer is perceived as a heterogeneous group of diseases that is characterized by aberrant patterns of gene expression. In the last decade, an increasing amount of data has pointed to a key role for epigenetic alterations in human cancer. In this review, we focus on a subclass of epigenetic...... regulators, namely histone methyltransferases (HMTs). Several HMTs have been linked to different types of cancer; however, in most cases we only have limited knowledge regarding the molecular mechanisms by which the HMTs contribute to disease development. We summarize the current knowledge regarding some of...

  15. Arginine metabolism in wounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arginine metabolism in wounds was investigated in the rat in 1) lambda-carrageenan-wounded skeletal muscle, 2) Schilling chambers, and 3) subcutaneous polyvinyl alcohol sponges. All showed decreased arginine and elevated ornithine contents and high arginase activity. Arginase could be brought to the wound by macrophages, which were found to contain arginase activity. However, arginase was expressed by macrophages only after cell lysis and no arginase was released by viable macrophages in vitro. Thus the extracellular arginase of wounds may derive from dead macrophages within the injured tissue. Wound and peritoneal macrophages exhibited arginase deiminase activity as demonstrated by the conversion of [guanido-14C]arginine to radiolabeled citrulline during culture, the inhibition of this reaction by formamidinium acetate, and the lack of prokaryotic contamination of the cultures. These findings and the known metabolic fates of the products of arginase and arginine deiminase in the cellular populations of the wound suggest the possibility of cooperativity among cells for the production of substrates for collagen synthesis

  16. L-arginine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pain (angina pectoris). Leg pain associated with poor blood flow (peripheral arterial disease). Research suggests that taking L-arginine by mouth ... by IV) for up to 8 weeks increases blood flow in people with peripheral arterial disease. However, long-term use (up to 6 months) ...

  17. HISTONE H3 LYSINE 9 METHYLTRANSFERASE G9a IS A TRANSCRIPTIONAL COACTIVATOR FOR NUCLEAR RECEPTORS*

    OpenAIRE

    David Y. Lee; Northrop, Jeffrey P.; Kuo, Min-Hao; Stallcup, Michael R.

    2006-01-01

    Methylation of Lys-9 of histone H3 has been associated with repression of transcription. G9a is a histone H3 Lys-9 methyltransferase localized in euchromatin and acts as a corepressor for specific transcription factors. Here we demonstrate that G9a also functions as a coactivator for nuclear receptors, cooperating synergistically with nuclear receptor coactivators GRIP1, CARM1, and p300 in transient transfection assays. This synergy depends strongly on the arginine-specific protein methyltran...

  18. The Ergogenic Potential of Arginine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    La Bounty Paul M

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Arginine is a conditionally essential amino acid that is involved in protein synthesis, the detoxification of ammonia, and its conversion to glucose as well as being catabolized to produce energy. In addition to these physiological functions, arginine has been purported to have ergogenic potential. Athletes have taken arginine for three main reasons: 1 its role in the secretion of endogenous growth hormone; 2 its involvement in the synthesis of creatine; 3 its role in augmenting nitric oxide. These aspects of arginine supplementation will be discussed as well as a review of clinical investigations involving exercise performance and arginine ingestion.

  19. PRMT1-mediated arginine methylation controls ATXN2L localization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arginine methylation is a posttranslational modification that is of importance in diverse cellular processes. Recent proteomic mass spectrometry studies reported arginine methylation of ataxin-2-like (ATXN2L), the paralog of ataxin-2, a protein that is implicated in the neurodegenerative disorder spinocerebellar ataxia type 2. Here, we investigated the methylation state of ATXN2L and its significance for ATXN2L localization. We first confirmed that ATXN2L is asymmetrically dimethylated in vivo, and observed that the nuclear localization of ATXN2L is altered under methylation inhibition. We further discovered that ATXN2L associates with the protein arginine-N-methyltransferase 1 (PRMT1). Finally, we showed that neither mutation of the arginine–glycine-rich motifs of ATXN2L nor methylation inhibition alters ATXN2L localization to stress granules, suggesting that methylation of ATXN2L is probably not mandatory. - Highlights: • ATXN2L is asymmetrically dimethylated in vivo. • ATXN2L interacts with PRMT1 under normal and stress conditions. • PRMT1-mediated dimethylation of ATXN2L controls its nuclear localization. • ATXN2L localization to stress granules appears independent of its methylation state

  20. PRMT1-mediated arginine methylation controls ATXN2L localization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaehler, Christian; Guenther, Anika; Uhlich, Anja; Krobitsch, Sylvia, E-mail: krobitsc@molgen.mpg.de

    2015-05-15

    Arginine methylation is a posttranslational modification that is of importance in diverse cellular processes. Recent proteomic mass spectrometry studies reported arginine methylation of ataxin-2-like (ATXN2L), the paralog of ataxin-2, a protein that is implicated in the neurodegenerative disorder spinocerebellar ataxia type 2. Here, we investigated the methylation state of ATXN2L and its significance for ATXN2L localization. We first confirmed that ATXN2L is asymmetrically dimethylated in vivo, and observed that the nuclear localization of ATXN2L is altered under methylation inhibition. We further discovered that ATXN2L associates with the protein arginine-N-methyltransferase 1 (PRMT1). Finally, we showed that neither mutation of the arginine–glycine-rich motifs of ATXN2L nor methylation inhibition alters ATXN2L localization to stress granules, suggesting that methylation of ATXN2L is probably not mandatory. - Highlights: • ATXN2L is asymmetrically dimethylated in vivo. • ATXN2L interacts with PRMT1 under normal and stress conditions. • PRMT1-mediated dimethylation of ATXN2L controls its nuclear localization. • ATXN2L localization to stress granules appears independent of its methylation state.

  1. Dietary arginine and linear growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Vught, Anneke J A H; Dagnelie, Pieter C; Arts, Ilja C W;

    2013-01-01

    The amino acid arginine is a well-known growth hormone (GH) stimulator and GH is an important modulator of linear growth. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of dietary arginine on growth velocity in children between 7 and 13 years of age. Data from the Copenhagen School...

  2. Structural Biology of Human H3K9 Methyltransferases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, H.; Min, J; Lunin, V; Antoshenko, T; Dombrovsk, L; Zeng, H; Allali-Hassani, A; Campagna-Slater, V; Vedadi, M; et. al.

    2010-01-01

    SET domain methyltransferases deposit methyl marks on specific histone tail lysine residues and play a major role in epigenetic regulation of gene transcription. We solved the structures of the catalytic domains of GLP, G9a, Suv39H2 and PRDM2, four of the eight known human H3K9 methyltransferases in their apo conformation or in complex with the methyl donating cofactor, and peptide substrates. We analyzed the structural determinants for methylation state specificity, and designed a G9a mutant able to tri-methylate H3K9. We show that the I-SET domain acts as a rigid docking platform, while induced-fit of the Post-SET domain is necessary to achieve a catalytically competent conformation. We also propose a model where long-range electrostatics bring enzyme and histone substrate together, while the presence of an arginine upstream of the target lysine is critical for binding and specificity. Post-translational modifications of histone proteins regulate chromatin compaction, mediate epigenetic regulation of transcription, and control cellular differentiation in health and disease. Methylation of histone tails is one of the fundamental events of epigenetic signaling. Tri-methylation of lysine 9 of histone 3 (H3K9) mediates chromatin recruitment of HP1, heterochromatin condensation and gene silencing. Similarly, methylation of H3K27 and H4K20 are associated with a repressed state of chromatin, whereas expressed genes are methylated at H3K4, H3K36 and H3K79. Histone methyltransferases are divided into protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs) and histone lysine methyltransferases (HKMTs). HKMTs catalyze the transfer of a methyl group from the co-factor S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) to a substrate lysine and, with the exception of DOT1L, are all organized around a canonical SET domain. The structures of a number of HKMTs have been reported, including ternary complexes of human orthologs with co-factor and substrate peptides (SETD7-H3K4, SETD8-H4K20 and MLL1-H3K4), as well

  3. Methyltransferase PRMT1 Is a Binding Partner of HBx and a Negative Regulator of Hepatitis B Virus Transcription

    OpenAIRE

    Benhenda, Shirine; Ducroux, Aurélie; Rivière, Lise; Sobhian, Bijan; Ward, Michael D.; Dion, Sarah; Hantz, Olivier; Protzer, Ulrike; Michel, Marie-Louise; Benkirane, Monsef; Semmes, Oliver J.; Buendia, Marie-Annick; Neuveut, Christine

    2013-01-01

    The hepatitis B virus X protein (HBx) is essential for virus replication and has been implicated in the development of liver cancer. HBx is recruited to viral and cellular promoters and activates transcription by interacting with transcription factors and coactivators. Here, we purified HBx-associated factors in nuclear extracts from HepG2 hepatoma cells and identified protein arginine methyltransferase 1 (PRMT1) as a novel HBx-interacting protein. We showed that PRMT1 overexpression reduced ...

  4. Structural biology of human H3K9 methyltransferases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Wu

    Full Text Available UNLABELLED: SET domain methyltransferases deposit methyl marks on specific histone tail lysine residues and play a major role in epigenetic regulation of gene transcription. We solved the structures of the catalytic domains of GLP, G9a, Suv39H2 and PRDM2, four of the eight known human H3K9 methyltransferases in their apo conformation or in complex with the methyl donating cofactor, and peptide substrates. We analyzed the structural determinants for methylation state specificity, and designed a G9a mutant able to tri-methylate H3K9. We show that the I-SET domain acts as a rigid docking platform, while induced-fit of the Post-SET domain is necessary to achieve a catalytically competent conformation. We also propose a model where long-range electrostatics bring enzyme and histone substrate together, while the presence of an arginine upstream of the target lysine is critical for binding and specificity. ENHANCED VERSION: This article can also be viewed as an enhanced version in which the text of the article is integrated with interactive 3D representations and animated transitions. Please note that a web plugin is required to access this enhanced functionality. Instructions for the installation and use of the web plugin are available in Text S1.

  5. Protein lysine methyltransferase G9a acts on non-histone targets

    OpenAIRE

    Rathert, Philipp; Dhayalan, Arunkumar; Murakami, Marie; Zhang, Xing; Tamas, Raluca; Jurkowska, Renata; Komatsu, Yasuhiko; Shinkai, Yoichi; Cheng, Xiaodong; Jeltsch, Albert

    2008-01-01

    By methylation of peptide arrays, we determined the specificity profile of the protein methyltransferase G9a. We show that it mostly recognizes an Arg-Lys sequence and that its activity is inhibited by methylation of the arginine residue. Using the specificity profile, we identified new non-histone protein targets of G9a, including CDYL1, WIZ, ACINUS and G9a (automethylation), as well as peptides derived from CSB. We demonstrate potential downstream signaling pathways for methylation of non-h...

  6. Arginine transport in catabolic disease states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Ming; Choudry, Haroon A; Epler, Mark J; Meng, Qinghe; Karinch, Anne; Lin, Chengmao; Souba, Wiley

    2004-10-01

    Arginine appears to be a semiessential amino acid in humans during critical illness. Catabolic disease states such as sepsis, injury, and cancer cause an increase in arginine utilization, which exceeds body production, leading to arginine depletion. This is aggravated by the reduced nutrient intake that is associated with critical illness. Arginine depletion may have negative consequences on tissue function under these circumstances. Nutritional regimens containing arginine have been shown to improve nitrogen balance and lymphocyte function, and stimulate arginine transport in the liver. We have studied the effects of stress mediators on arginine transport in vascular endothelium, liver, and gut epithelium. In vascular endothelium, endotoxin stimulates arginine uptake, an effect that is mediated by the cytokine tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and by the cyclo-oxygenase pathway. This TNF-alpha stimulation involves the activation of intracellular protein kinase C (PKC). A significant increase in hepatic arginine transport activity also occurs following burn injury and in rats with progressive malignant disease. Surgical removal of the growing tumor results in a normalization of the accelerated hepatic arginine transport within days. Chronic metabolic acidosis and sepsis individually augment intestinal arginine transport in rats and Caco-2 cell culture. PKC and mitogen-activated protein kinases are involved in mediating the sepsis/acidosis stimulation of arginine transport. Understanding the regulation of plasma membrane arginine transport will enhance our knowledge of nutrition and metabolism in seriously ill patients and may lead to the design of improved nutritional support formulas. PMID:15465794

  7. Arginase and Arginine Dysregulation in Asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Renée C. Benson; Hardy, Karen A.; Morris, Claudia R.

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, evidence has accumulated indicating that the enzyme arginase, which converts L-arginine into L-ornithine and urea, plays a key role in the pathogenesis of pulmonary disorders such as asthma through dysregulation of L-arginine metabolism and modulation of nitric oxide (NO) homeostasis. Allergic asthma is characterized by airway hyperresponsiveness, inflammation, and remodeling. Through substrate competition, arginase decreases bioavailability of L-arginine for nitric oxide syn...

  8. Physiological implications of arginine metabolism in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Gudrun; Todd, Christopher D; Trovato, Maurizio; Forlani, Giuseppe; Funck, Dietmar

    2015-01-01

    Nitrogen is a limiting resource for plant growth in most terrestrial habitats since large amounts of nitrogen are needed to synthesize nucleic acids and proteins. Among the 21 proteinogenic amino acids, arginine has the highest nitrogen to carbon ratio, which makes it especially suitable as a storage form of organic nitrogen. Synthesis in chloroplasts via ornithine is apparently the only operational pathway to provide arginine in plants, and the rate of arginine synthesis is tightly regulated by various feedback mechanisms in accordance with the overall nutritional status. While several steps of arginine biosynthesis still remain poorly characterized in plants, much wider attention has been paid to inter- and intracellular arginine transport as well as arginine-derived metabolites. A role of arginine as alternative source besides glutamate for proline biosynthesis is still discussed controversially and may be prevented by differential subcellular localization of enzymes. Apparently, arginine is a precursor for nitric oxide (NO), although the molecular mechanism of NO production from arginine remains unclear in higher plants. In contrast, conversion of arginine to polyamines is well documented, and in several plant species also ornithine can serve as a precursor for polyamines. Both NO and polyamines play crucial roles in regulating developmental processes as well as responses to biotic and abiotic stress. It is thus conceivable that arginine catabolism serves on the one hand to mobilize nitrogen storages, while on the other hand it may be used to fine-tune development and defense mechanisms against stress. This review summarizes the recent advances in our knowledge about arginine metabolism, with a special focus on the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, and pinpoints still unresolved critical questions. PMID:26284079

  9. Caffeine synthase and related methyltransferases in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misako, Kato; Kouichi, Mizuno

    2004-05-01

    Caffeine (1,3,7-trimethylxanthine) is a purine alkaloid present in high concentrations in tea and coffee and it is also found in a number of beverages such as coca cola. It is necessary to elucidate the caffeine biosynthetic pathway and to clone the genes related to the production of caffeine not only to determine the metabolism of the purine alkaloid but also to control the content of caffeine in tea and coffee. The available data support the operation of a xanthosine-->7-methylxanthosine-->7-methylxanthine-->theobromine-->caffeine pathway as the major route to caffeine. Since the caffeine biosynthetic pathway contains three S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) dependent methylation steps, N-methyltransferases play important roles. This review focuses on the enzymes and genes involved in the methylation of purine ring. Caffeine synthase, the SAM-dependent methyltransferase involved in the last two steps of caffeine biosynthesis, was originally purified from young tea leaves (Camellia sinensis). The isolated cDNA, termed TCS1, consists of 1,483 base pairs and encodes a protein of 369 amino acids. Subsequently, the homologous genes that encode caffeine biosynthetic enzymes from coffee (Coffea arabica) were isolated. The recombinant proteins are classified into the three types on the basis of their substrate specificity i.e. 7-methylxanthosine synthase, theobromine synthase and caffeine synthase. The predicted amino acid sequences of caffeine biosynthetic enzymes derived from C. arabica exhibit more than 80% homology with those of the clones and but show only 40% homology with TCS1 derived from C. sinensis. In addition, they share 40% homology with the amino acid sequences of salicylic carboxyl methyltransferase, benzoic acid carboxyl methyltransferase and jasmonic acid carboxyl methyltransferase which belong to a family of motif B' methyltransferases which are novel plant methyltransferases with motif B' instead of motif B as the conserved region. PMID:14977590

  10. Mechanism of arginine regulation of acetylglutamate synthase, the first enzyme of arginine synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sancho-Vaello, Enea; Fernández-Murga, María L; Rubio, Vicente

    2009-01-01

    N-acetyl-L-glutamate synthase (NAGS), the first enzyme of arginine biosynthesis in bacteria/plants and an essential urea cycle activator in animals, is, respectively, arginine-inhibited and activated. Arginine binds to the hexameric ring-forming amino acid kinase (AAK) domain of NAGS. We show that arginine inhibits Pseudomonas aeruginosa NAGS by altering the functions of the distant, substrate binding/catalytic GCN5-related N-acetyltransferase (GNAT) domain, increasing K(m)(Glu), decreasing V(max) and triggering substrate inhibition by AcCoA. These effects involve centrally the interdomain linker, since we show that linker elongation or two-residue linker shortening hampers and mimics, respectively, arginine inhibition. We propose a regulatory mechanism in which arginine triggers the expansion of the hexameric NAGS ring, altering AAK-GNAT domain interactions, and the modulation by these interactions of GNAT domain functions, explaining arginine regulation. PMID:19084009

  11. Directed evolution of improved zinc finger methyltransferases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Chaikind

    Full Text Available The ability to target DNA methylation toward a single, user-designated CpG site in vivo may have wide applicability for basic biological and biomedical research. A tool for targeting methylation toward single sites could be used to study the effects of individual methylation events on transcription, protein recruitment to DNA, and the dynamics of such epigenetic alterations. Although various tools for directing methylation to promoters exist, none offers the ability to localize methylation solely to a single CpG site. In our ongoing research to create such a tool, we have pursued a strategy employing artificially bifurcated DNA methyltransferases; each methyltransferase fragment is fused to zinc finger proteins with affinity for sequences flanking a targeted CpG site for methylation. We sought to improve the targeting of these enzymes by reducing the methyltransferase activity at non-targeted sites while maintaining high levels of activity at a targeted site. Here we demonstrate an in vitro directed evolution selection strategy to improve methyltransferase specificity and use it to optimize an engineered zinc finger methyltransferase derived from M.SssI. The unusual restriction enzyme McrBC is a key component of this strategy and is used to select against methyltransferases that methylate multiple sites on a plasmid. This strategy allowed us to quickly identify mutants with high levels of methylation at the target site (up to ∼80% and nearly unobservable levels of methylation at a off-target sites (<1%, as assessed in E. coli. We also demonstrate that replacing the zinc finger domains with new zinc fingers redirects the methylation to a new target CpG site flanked by the corresponding zinc finger binding sequences.

  12. Arginine regulation of gramicidin S biosynthesis.

    OpenAIRE

    Poirier, A.; Demain, A L

    1981-01-01

    Several amino acids are known to affect the gramicidin S producer Bacillus brevis ATCC 9999 with respect ot growth, soluble gramicidin S synthetase formation, antibiotic production, or a combination of these. Our studies confirmed that arginine has paradoxical effects on the B. brevis fermentation; it markedly increased growth and antibiotic production, yet decreased the soluble heavy gramicidin S synthetase activity. We found that arginine did not repress heavy gramicidin S synthetase. The a...

  13. The Histone Methyltransferase Inhibitor A-366 Uncovers a Role for G9a/GLP in the Epigenetics of Leukemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William N Pappano

    Full Text Available Histone methyltransferases are epigenetic regulators that modify key lysine and arginine residues on histones and are believed to play an important role in cancer development and maintenance. These epigenetic modifications are potentially reversible and as a result this class of enzymes has drawn great interest as potential therapeutic targets of small molecule inhibitors. Previous studies have suggested that the histone lysine methyltransferase G9a (EHMT2 is required to perpetuate malignant phenotypes through multiple mechanisms in a variety of cancer types. To further elucidate the enzymatic role of G9a in cancer, we describe herein the biological activities of a novel peptide-competitive histone methyltransferase inhibitor, A-366, that selectively inhibits G9a and the closely related GLP (EHMT1, but not other histone methyltransferases. A-366 has significantly less cytotoxic effects on the growth of tumor cell lines compared to other known G9a/GLP small molecule inhibitors despite equivalent cellular activity on methylation of H3K9me2. Additionally, the selectivity profile of A-366 has aided in the discovery of a potentially important role for G9a/GLP in maintenance of leukemia. Treatment of various leukemia cell lines in vitro resulted in marked differentiation and morphological changes of these tumor cell lines. Furthermore, treatment of a flank xenograft leukemia model with A-366 resulted in growth inhibition in vivo consistent with the profile of H3K9me2 reduction observed. In summary, A-366 is a novel and highly selective inhibitor of G9a/GLP that has enabled the discovery of a role for G9a/GLP enzymatic activity in the growth and differentiation status of leukemia cells.

  14. Catechol-O-Methyltransferase Polymorphism and Endometriosis

    OpenAIRE

    Wieser, Fritz; Wenzl, Rene; Tempfer, Clemens; Worda, Christoph; Huber, Johannes; Schneeberger, Christian

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) inactivates the estradiol metabolites, 2-hydroxy and 4-hydroxy catechols, which have been implicated in the pathogenesis of endometriosis. A COMT valine to methionine polymorphism (G-to-A) in exon 4 of the COMT gene is polymorphic in the human population, with 25% of Caucasians being homozygous for the low-activity allele (COMT-L) of the enzyme. In a case-control study we investigated whether this COMT polymorphism is associated with endometriosis.

  15. Structural Chemistry of Human RNA Methyltransferases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schapira, Matthieu

    2016-03-18

    RNA methyltransferases (RNMTs) play important roles in RNA stability, splicing, and epigenetic mechanisms. They constitute a promising target class that is underexplored by the medicinal chemistry community. Information of relevance to drug design can be extracted from the rich structural coverage of human RNMTs. In this work, the structural chemistry of this protein family is analyzed in depth. Unlike most methyltransferases, RNMTs generally feature a substrate-binding site that is largely open on the cofactor-binding pocket, favoring the design of bisubstrate inhibitors. Substrate purine or pyrimidines are often sandwiched between hydrophobic walls that can accommodate planar ring systems. When the substrate base is laying on a shallow surface, a 5' flanking base is sometimes anchored in a druggable cavity. The cofactor-binding site is structurally more diverse than in protein methyltransferases and more druggable in SPOUT than in Rossman-fold enzymes. Finally, conformational plasticity observed both at the substrate and cofactor binding sites may be a challenge for structure-based drug design. The landscape drawn here may inform ongoing efforts toward the discovery of the first human RNMT inhibitors. PMID:26566070

  16. Arginine Adjunctive Therapy in Active Tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliasghar Farazi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Dietary supplementation has been used as a mechanism to augment the immune system. Adjunctive therapy with L-arginine has the potential to improve outcomes in active tuberculosis. Methods. In a randomized clinical trial 63 participants with smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis in Markazi Province of Iran were given arginine or placebo for 4 weeks in addition to conventional chemotherapy. The final treatment success, sputum conversion, weight gain, and clinical symptoms after one and two months were considered as primary outcomes and secondary outcomes were ESR, CRP, and Hg. Data were collected and analyzed with SPSS software (ver. 18. Results. Arginine supplementation reduced constitutional symptoms (P=0.032 in patients with smear-positive TB at the end of the first month of treatment. Arginine treated patients had significantly increased BMI at the end of the first and second months of treatment (P=0.032 and P=0.04 and a reduced CRP at the end of the first month of treatment (P=0.03 versus placebo group. Conclusion. Arginine is useful as an adjunctive therapy in patients with active tuberculosis, in which the effects are more likely mediated by the increased production of nitric oxide and improved constitutional symptoms and weight gain. This trial is registered with Clinical Trials Registry of Iran: IRCT201211179855N2.

  17. Arginase and Arginine Dysregulation in Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renée C. Benson

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, evidence has accumulated indicating that the enzyme arginase, which converts L-arginine into L-ornithine and urea, plays a key role in the pathogenesis of pulmonary disorders such as asthma through dysregulation of L-arginine metabolism and modulation of nitric oxide (NO homeostasis. Allergic asthma is characterized by airway hyperresponsiveness, inflammation, and remodeling. Through substrate competition, arginase decreases bioavailability of L-arginine for nitric oxide synthase (NOS, thereby limiting NO production with subsequent effects on airway tone and inflammation. By decreasing L-arginine bioavailability, arginase may also contribute to the uncoupling of NOS and the formation of the proinflammatory oxidant peroxynitrite in the airways. Finally, arginase may play a role in the development of chronic airway remodeling through formation of L-ornithine with downstream production of polyamines and L-proline, which are involved in processes of cellular proliferation and collagen deposition. Further research on modulation of arginase activity and L-arginine bioavailability may reveal promising novel therapeutic strategies for asthma.

  18. Arginine, scurvy and Cartier's "tree of life"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Durzan Don J

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Several conifers have been considered as candidates for "Annedda", which was the source for a miraculous cure for scurvy in Jacques Cartier's critically ill crew in 1536. Vitamin C was responsible for the cure of scurvy and was obtained as an Iroquois decoction from the bark and leaves from this "tree of life", now commonly referred to as arborvitae. Based on seasonal and diurnal amino acid analyses of candidate "trees of life", high levels of arginine, proline, and guanidino compounds were also probably present in decoctions prepared in the severe winter. The semi-essential arginine, proline and all the essential amino acids, would have provided additional nutritional benefits for the rapid recovery from scurvy by vitamin C when food supply was limited. The value of arginine, especially in the recovery of the critically ill sailors, is postulated as a source of nitric oxide, and the arginine-derived guanidino compounds as controlling factors for the activities of different nitric oxide synthases. This review provides further insights into the use of the candidate "trees of life" by indigenous peoples in eastern Canada. It raises hypotheses on the nutritional and synergistic roles of arginine, its metabolites, and other biofactors complementing the role of vitamin C especially in treating Cartier's critically ill sailors.

  19. Arginine: Its pKa value revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitch, Carolyn A; Platzer, Gerald; Okon, Mark; Garcia-Moreno E, Bertrand; McIntosh, Lawrence P

    2015-01-01

    Using complementary approaches of potentiometry and NMR spectroscopy, we have determined that the equilibrium acid dissociation constant (pKa value) of the arginine guanidinium group is 13.8 ± 0.1. This is substantially higher than that of ∼12 often used in structure-based electrostatics calculations and cited in biochemistry textbooks. The revised intrinsic pKa value helps explains why arginine side chains in proteins are always predominantly charged, even at pH values as great as 10. The high pKa value also reinforces the observation that arginine side chains are invariably protonated under physiological conditions of near neutral pH. This occurs even when the guanidinium moiety is buried in a hydrophobic micro-environment, such as that inside a protein or a lipid membrane, thought to be incompatible with the presence of a charged group. PMID:25808204

  20. Arginine: Its pKa value revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Fitch, Carolyn A.; Platzer, Gerald; Okon, Mark; Garcia-Moreno E, Bertrand; McIntosh, Lawrence P.

    2015-01-01

    Using complementary approaches of potentiometry and NMR spectroscopy, we have determined that the equilibrium acid dissociation constant (pKa value) of the arginine guanidinium group is 13.8 ± 0.1. This is substantially higher than that of ∼12 often used in structure-based electrostatics calculations and cited in biochemistry textbooks. The revised intrinsic pKa value helps explains why arginine side chains in proteins are always predominantly charged, even at pH values as great as 10. The hi...

  1. Distinction between the Cfr Methyltransferase Conferring Antibiotic Resistance and the Housekeeping RlmN Methyltransferase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Atkinson, Gemma C; Hansen, Lykke H; Tenson, Tanel;

    2013-01-01

    The cfr gene encodes the Cfr methyltransferase that primarily methylates C-8 in A2503 of 23S rRNA in the peptidyl transferase region of bacterial ribosomes. The methylation provides resistance to six classes of antibiotics of clinical and veterinary importance. The rlmN gene encodes the Rlm...

  2. Low plasma arginine:asymmetric dimethyl arginine ratios predict mortality after intracranial aneurysm rupture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staalsø, Jonatan Myrup; Bergström, Anita; Edsen, Troels; Weikop, Pia; Romner, Bertil; Olsen, Niels Vidiendal

    2013-01-01

    Asymmetrical dimethylarginine (ADMA), an endogenous inhibitor of nitric oxide synthases, predicts mortality in cardiovascular disease and has been linked to cerebral vasospasm after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). In this prospective study, we assessed whether circulating ADMA, arginine...

  3. Modulators of arginine metabolism support cancer immunosurveillance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freschi Massimo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tumor-associated accrual of myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSC in the blood, lymphoid organs and tumor tissues may lead to perturbation of the arginine metabolism and impairment of the endogenous antitumor immunity. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether accumulation of MDSC occurred in Th2 prone BALB/c and Th1 biased C57BL/6 mice bearing the C26GM colon carcinoma and RMA T lymphoma, respectively, and to investigate whether N(G nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME and sildenafil, both modulators of the arginine metabolism, restored antitumor immunity. Results We report here that MDSC accumulate in the spleen and blood of mice irrespective of the mouse and tumor model used. Treatment of tumor-bearing mice with either the phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitor sildenafil or the nitric-oxide synthase (NOS inhibitor L-NAME significantly restrained tumor growth and expanded the tumor-specific immune response. Conclusion Our data emphasize the role of MDSC in modulating the endogenous tumor-specific immune response and underline the anti-neoplastic therapeutic potential of arginine metabolism modulators.

  4. Lysine and arginine requirements of Salminus brasiliensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jony Koji Dairiki

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to determine the dietary lysine (DL and dietary arginine (DA requirements of dourado (Salminus brasiliensis, through dose-response trials using the amino acid profiles of whole carcasses as a reference. Two experiments were carried out in a completely randomized design (n=4. In the first experiment, groups of 12 feed-conditioned dourado juveniles (11.4±0.2 g were stocked in 60 L cages placed in 300 L plastic indoor tanks in a closed circulation system. Fish were fed for 60 days on diets containing 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5, 3.0, or 3.5 % dietary lysine. In the second experiment, dourado juveniles (27.0±0.8 g were fed for 60 days on semipurified diets containing arginine at 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5 or 3.0%, in similar conditions to those of the first experiment. Optimal DL requirements, as determined by broken-line analysis method for final weight, weight gain and specific growth rate, were 2.15% DL or 5% lysine in dietary protein, and 1.48% DA or 3.43% arginine in dietary protein. The best feed conversion ratio is attained with 2.5% DL or 5.8% lysine in dietary protein and 1.4% DA or 3.25% arginine in dietary protein.

  5. Biosynthesis of homoarginine (hArg) and asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) from acutely and chronically administered free L-arginine in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayacelebi, Arslan Arinc; Langen, Jennifer; Weigt-Usinger, Katharina; Chobanyan-Jürgens, Kristine; Mariotti, François; Schneider, Jessica Y; Rothmann, Sabine; Frölich, Jürgen C; Atzler, Dorothee; Choe, Chi-Un; Schwedhelm, Edzard; Huneau, Jean François; Lücke, Thomas; Tsikas, Dimitrios

    2015-09-01

    Asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) is an endogenous inhibitor of nitric oxide (NO) synthesis, whereas L-arginine (Arg) and L-homoarginine (hArg) serve as substrates for NO synthesis. ADMA and other methylated arginines are generally believed to exclusively derive from guanidine (N (G))-methylated arginine residues in proteins by protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs) that use S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) as the methyl donor. L-Lysine is known for decades as a precursor for hArg, but only recent studies indicate that arginine:glycine amidinotransferase (AGAT) is responsible for the synthesis of hArg. AGAT catalyzes the formation of guanidinoacetate (GAA) that is methylated to creatine by guanidinoacetate methyltransferase (GAMT) which also uses SAM. The aim of the present study was to learn more about the mechanisms of ADMA and hArg formation in humans. Especially, we hypothesized that ADMA is produced by N (G)-methylation of free Arg in addition to the known PRMTs-involving mechanism. In knockout mouse models of AGAT- and GAMT-deficiency, we investigated the contribution of these enzymes to hArg synthesis. Arg infusion (0.5 g/kg, 30 min) in children (n = 11) and ingestion of high-fat protein meals by overweight men (n = 10) were used to study acute effects on ADMA and hArg synthesis. Daily Arg ingestion (10 g) or placebo for 3 or 6 months by patients suffering from peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD, n = 20) or coronary artery disease (CAD, n = 30) was used to study chronic effects of Arg on ADMA synthesis. Mass spectrometric methods were used to measure all biochemical parameters in plasma and urine samples. In mice, AGAT but not GAMT was found to contribute to plasma hArg, while ADMA synthesis was independent of AGAT and GAMT. Arg infusion acutely increased plasma Arg, hArg and ADMA concentrations, but decreased the plasma hArg/ADMA ratio. High-fat protein meals acutely increased plasma Arg, hArg, ADMA concentrations, as well as the plasma h

  6. Dual role of arginine metabolism in establishing pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogoi, Mayuri; Datey, Akshay; Wilson, Keith T; Chakravortty, Dipshikha

    2016-02-01

    Arginine is an integral part of host defense when invading pathogens are encountered. The arginine metabolite nitric oxide (NO) confers antimicrobial properties, whereas the metabolite ornithine is utilized for polyamine synthesis. Polyamines are crucial to tissue repair and anti-inflammatory responses. iNOS/arginase balance can determine Th1/Th2 response. Furthermore, the host arginine pool and its metabolites are utilized as energy sources by various pathogens. Apart from its role as an immune modulator, recent studies have also highlighted the therapeutic effects of arginine. This article sheds light upon the roles of arginine metabolism during pathological conditions and its therapeutic potential. PMID:26610300

  7. Chemical modification of arginine residues in the lactose repressor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The lactose repressor protein was chemically modified with 2,3-butanedione and phenylglyoxal. Arginine reaction was quantitated by either amino aced analysis or incorporation of 14C-labeled phenylglyoxal. Inducer binding activity was unaffected by the modification of arginine residues, while both operator and nonspecific DNA binding activities were diminished, although to differing degrees. The correlation of the decrease in DNA binding activities with the modification of ∼ 1-2 equiv of arginine per monomer suggests increased reactivity of a functionally essential residue(s). For both reagents, operator DNA binding activity was protected by the presence of calf thymus DNA, and the extent of reaction with phenylglyoxal was simultaneously diminished. This protection presumably results from steric restriction of reagent access to an arginine(s) that is (are) essential for DNA binding interactions. These experiments suggest that there is (are) an essential reactive arginine(s) critical for repressor binding to DNA

  8. Knock-down of protein L-isoaspartyl O-methyltransferase increases β-amyloid production by decreasing ADAM10 and ADAM17 levels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Narkhyun BAE; Se Eun BYEON; Jihyuk SONG; Sang-Jin LEE; Moosik KWON; Inhee MOOK-JUNG; Jae Youl CHO; Sungyoul HONG

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To examine the role of protein L-isoaspartyl O-methyltransferase (PIMT; EC 2.1.1.77) on the secretion of Aβ peptides.Methods: HEK293 APPsw cells were treated with PIMT siRNA or adenosine dialdehyde (AdOX), a broad-spectrum methyltransferase inhibitor. Under the conditions, the level of Aβ secretion and regulatory mechanism by PIMT were examined.Results: Knock-down of PIMT and treatment with AdOX significantly increased Aβ40 secretion. Reductions in levels of PIMT decreased the secretion of soluble amyloid precursor protein alpha (sAPPα) without altering the total expression of APP or its membrane-bound C83 fragment. However, the levels of the C99 fragment generated by β-secretase were enhanced. Moreover, the decreased secretion of sAPPα resulting from PIMT knock-down seemed to be linked with the suppression of the expression of α-secretase gene products,α-disintegrin and metalloprotease 10 (ADAM10) and ADAM17, as indicated by Western blot analysis. In contrast, ADAM10 was not down-regulated in response to treatment with the protein arginine methyltransferase (PRMT) inhibitor, AMI-1.Conclusion: This study demonstrates a novel role for PIMT, but not PRMT, as a negative regulator of Aβ peptide formation and a potential protective factor in the pathogenesis of AD.

  9. Arginine methylation regulates the p53 response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jansson, Martin; Durant, Stephen T; Cho, Er-Chieh;

    2008-01-01

    Activation of the p53 tumour suppressor protein in response to DNA damage leads to apoptosis or cell-cycle arrest. Enzymatic modifications are widely believed to affect and regulate p53 activity. We describe here a level of post-translational control that has an important functional consequence on...... of p53. Furthermore, PRMT5 depletion triggers p53-dependent apoptosis. Thus, methylation on arginine residues is an underlying mechanism of control during the p53 response....

  10. Arginine, scurvy and Cartier's "tree of life"

    OpenAIRE

    Durzan Don J

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Several conifers have been considered as candidates for "Annedda", which was the source for a miraculous cure for scurvy in Jacques Cartier's critically ill crew in 1536. Vitamin C was responsible for the cure of scurvy and was obtained as an Iroquois decoction from the bark and leaves from this "tree of life", now commonly referred to as arborvitae. Based on seasonal and diurnal amino acid analyses of candidate "trees of life", high levels of arginine, proline, and guanidino compoun...

  11. Loading of PAX3 to Mitotic Chromosomes Is Mediated by Arginine Methylation and Associated with Waardenburg Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tsu-Fang; Yao, Ya-Li; Lai, I-Lu; Lai, Chien-Chen; Lin, Pei-Lun; Yang, Wen-Ming

    2015-08-14

    PAX3 is a transcription factor critical to gene regulation in mammalian development. Mutations in PAX3 are associated with Waardenburg syndrome (WS), but the mechanism of how mutant PAX3 proteins cause WS remains unclear. Here, we found that PAX3 loads on mitotic chromosomes using its homeodomain. PAX3 WS mutants with mutations in homeodomain lose the ability to bind mitotic chromosomes. Moreover, loading of PAX3 on mitotic chromosomes requires arginine methylation, which is regulated by methyltransferase PRMT5 and demethylase JMJD6. Mutant PAX3 proteins that lose mitotic chromosome localization block cell proliferation and normal development of zebrafish. These results reveal the molecular mechanism of PAX3s loading on mitotic chromosomes and the importance of this localization pattern in normal development. Our findings suggest that PAX3 WS mutants interfere with the normal functions of PAX3 in a dominant negative manner, which is important to the understanding of the pathogenesis of Waardenburg syndrome. PMID:26149688

  12. Loading of PAX3 to Mitotic Chromosomes Is Mediated by Arginine Methylation and Associated with Waardenburg Syndrome*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tsu-Fang; Yao, Ya-Li; Lai, I-Lu; Lai, Chien-Chen; Lin, Pei-Lun; Yang, Wen-Ming

    2015-01-01

    PAX3 is a transcription factor critical to gene regulation in mammalian development. Mutations in PAX3 are associated with Waardenburg syndrome (WS), but the mechanism of how mutant PAX3 proteins cause WS remains unclear. Here, we found that PAX3 loads on mitotic chromosomes using its homeodomain. PAX3 WS mutants with mutations in homeodomain lose the ability to bind mitotic chromosomes. Moreover, loading of PAX3 on mitotic chromosomes requires arginine methylation, which is regulated by methyltransferase PRMT5 and demethylase JMJD6. Mutant PAX3 proteins that lose mitotic chromosome localization block cell proliferation and normal development of zebrafish. These results reveal the molecular mechanism of PAX3s loading on mitotic chromosomes and the importance of this localization pattern in normal development. Our findings suggest that PAX3 WS mutants interfere with the normal functions of PAX3 in a dominant negative manner, which is important to the understanding of the pathogenesis of Waardenburg syndrome. PMID:26149688

  13. Protective Effects of Arginine on Saccharomyces cerevisiae Against Ethanol Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yanfei; Du, Zhaoli; Zhu, Hui; Guo, Xuena; He, Xiuping

    2016-01-01

    Yeast cells are challenged by various environmental stresses in the process of industrial fermentation. As the currently main organism for bio-ethanol production, Saccharomyces cerevisiae suffers from ethanol stress. Some amino acids have been reported to be related to yeast tolerance to stresses. Here the relationship between arginine and yeast response to ethanol stress was investigated. Marked inhibitions of ethanol on cell growth, expression of genes involved in arginine biosynthesis and intracellular accumulation of arginine were observed. Furthermore, extracellular addition of arginine can abate the ethanol damage largely. To further confirm the protective effects of arginine on yeast cells, yeast strains with different levels of arginine content were constructed by overexpression of ARG4 involved in arginine biosynthesis or CAR1 encoding arginase. Intracellular arginine was increased by 18.9% or 13.1% respectively by overexpression of ARG4 or disruption of CAR1, which enhanced yeast tolerance to ethanol stress. Moreover, a 41.1% decrease of intracellular arginine was observed in CAR1 overexpressing strain, which made yeast cells keenly sensitive to ethanol. Further investigations indicated that arginine protected yeast cells from ethanol damage by maintaining the integrity of cell wall and cytoplasma membrane, stabilizing the morphology and function of organellae due to low ROS generation. PMID:27507154

  14. Monolignol 4-O-methyltransferases and uses thereof

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Chang-Jun; Bhuiya, Mohammad-Wadud; Zhang, Kewei

    2014-11-18

    Modified (iso)eugenol 4-O-methyltransferase enzymes having novel capacity for methylation of monolignols and reduction of lignin polymerization in plant cell wall are disclosed. Sequences encoding the modified enzymes are disclosed.

  15. The inheritance of human erythrocyte catechol-O-methyltransferase activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erythrocyte catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) activity was analyzed in 107 individuals from 23 families. The observed activities were consistent with an autosomal codominant inheritance of the gene coding for erythrocyte COMT activity. (author)

  16. Arginine biosynthesis in Thermotoga maritima: characterization of the arginine-sensitive N-acetyl-L-glutamate kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Murga, M Leonor; Gil-Ortiz, Fernando; Llácer, José L; Rubio, Vicente

    2004-09-01

    To help clarify the control of arginine synthesis in Thermotoga maritima, the putative gene (argB) for N-acetyl-L-glutamate kinase (NAGK) from this microorganism was cloned and overexpressed, and the resulting protein was purified and shown to be a highly thermostable and specific NAGK that is potently and selectively inhibited by arginine. Therefore, NAGK is in T. maritima the feedback control point of arginine synthesis, a process that in this organism involves acetyl group recycling and appears not to involve classical acetylglutamate synthase. The inhibition of NAGK by arginine was found to be pH independent and to depend sigmoidally on the concentration of arginine, with a Hill coefficient (N) of approximately 4, and the 50% inhibitory arginine concentration (I0.5) was shown to increase with temperature, approaching above 65 degrees C the I0.50 observed at 37 degrees C with the mesophilic NAGK of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (the best-studied arginine-inhibitable NAGK). At 75 degrees C, the inhibition by arginine of T. maritima NAGK was due to a large increase in the Km for acetylglutamate triggered by the inhibitor, but at 37 degrees C arginine also substantially decreased the Vmax of the enzyme. The NAGKs of T. maritima and P. aeruginosa behaved in gel filtration as hexamers, justifying the sigmoidicity and high Hill coefficient of arginine inhibition, and arginine or the substrates failed to disaggregate these enzymes. In contrast, Escherichia coli NAGK is not inhibited by arginine and is dimeric, and thus the hexameric architecture may be an important determinant of arginine sensitivity. Potential thermostability determinants of T. maritima NAGK are also discussed. PMID:15342584

  17. Hypnotizability and Catechol-O-Methyltransferase (COMT) polymorphysms in Italians

    OpenAIRE

    Alessandro Gialluisi; Serena Barbuti; Giancarlo Carli; Enrica Laura Santarcangelo

    2014-01-01

    Higher brain dopamine content depending on lower activity of Catechol-O-Methyltransferase (COMT) in subjects with high hypnotisability scores (highs) has been considered responsible for their attentional characteristics. However, the results of the previous genetic studies on association between hypnotisability and the Catechol-O-Methyltransferase (COMT) single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs4680 (Val158Met) were inconsistent. Here, we used a selective genotyping approach to re-evaluate the ...

  18. An essential and evolutionarily conserved role of protein arginine methyltransferase 1 for adult intestinal stem cells during postembryonic development

    OpenAIRE

    Matsuda, Hiroki; Shi, Yun-Bo

    2010-01-01

    Organ-specific adult stem cells are critical for the homeostasis of adult organs and organ repair and regeneration. Unfortunately, it has been difficult to investigate the origins of these stem cells and the mechanisms of their development, especially in mammals. Intestinal remodeling during frog metamorphosis offers a unique opportunity for such studies. During the transition from an herbivorous tadpole to a carnivorous frog, the intestine is completely remodeled with the larval epithelial c...

  19. Methylation mediated by an anthocyanin, O-methyltransferase, is involved in purple flower coloration in Paeonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Hui; Wu, Jie; Ji, Kui-Xian; Zeng, Qing-Yin; Bhuiya, Mohammad-Wadud; Su, Shang; Shu, Qing-Yan; Ren, Hong-Xu; Liu, Zheng-An; Wang, Liang-Sheng

    2015-11-01

    Anthocyanins are major pigments in plants. Methylation plays a role in the diversity and stability of anthocyanins. However, the contribution of anthocyanin methylation to flower coloration is still unclear. We identified two homologous anthocyanin O-methyltransferase (AOMT) genes from purple-flowered (PsAOMT) and red-flowered (PtAOMT) Paeonia plants, and we performed functional analyses of the two genes in vitro and in vivo. The critical amino acids for AOMT catalytic activity were studied by site-directed mutagenesis. We showed that the recombinant proteins, PsAOMT and PtAOMT, had identical substrate preferences towards anthocyanins. The methylation activity of PsAOMT was 60 times higher than that of PtAOMT in vitro. Interestingly, this vast difference in catalytic activity appeared to result from a single amino acid residue substitution at position 87 (arginine to leucine). There were significant differences between the 35S::PsAOMT transgenic tobacco and control flowers in relation to their chromatic parameters, which further confirmed the function of PsAOMT in vivo. The expression levels of the two homologous AOMT genes were consistent with anthocyanin accumulation in petals. We conclude that AOMTs are responsible for the methylation of cyanidin glycosides in Paeonia plants and play an important role in purple coloration in Paeonia spp. PMID:26208646

  20. Spectrophotometric Determination of Arginine in Grape Juice Using 8-Hydroquinoline

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Hua; LIANG Xin-hong; ZHAO Rui-xiang; FENG Li-dan; LI Hua

    2008-01-01

    Arginine in grape juice can be metabolized by wine yeasts and malolactic bacteria to precursors of ethyl carbamate, known as carcinogen. The aim of this study was to develop a simple, fast, and accurate method for determining arginine in grape juice with Sakaguchi reaction by separating arginine with strong cation-exchange resins. Parameters were optimized including the concentrations of 8-hydroquinoline and sodium hydrobromite. The color stability lasted for 4 min, which is sufficient to finish the measurement. The method is simple, reproducible and accurate, and can be applied for quick measurement of arginine in grape juice to take necessary measures for controlling the level of ethyl carbamate.

  1. Characterization of arginine decarboxylase from Dianthus caryophyllus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Byung Hak; Cho, Ki Joon; Choi, Yu Jin; Park, Ky Young; Kim, Kyung Hyun

    2004-04-01

    Arginine decarboxylase (ADC, EC 4.1.1.9) is a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of polyamines in higher plants, whereas ornithine decarboxylase represents the sole pathway of polyamine biosynthesis in animals. Previously, we characterized a genomic clone from Dianthus caryophyllus, in which the deduced polypeptide of ADC was 725 amino acids with a molecular mass of 78 kDa. In the present study, the ADC gene was subcloned into the pGEX4T1 expression vector in combination with glutathione S-transferase (GST). The fusion protein GST-ADC was water-soluble and thus was purified by sequential GSTrap-arginine affinity chromatography. A thrombin-mediated on-column cleavage reaction was employed to release free ADC from GST. Hiload superdex gel filtration FPLC was then used to obtain a highly purified ADC. The identity of the ADC was confirmed by immunoblot analysis, and its specific activity with respect to (14)C-arginine decarboxylation reaction was determined to be 0.9 CO(2) pkat mg(-1) protein. K(m) and V(max) of the reaction between ADC and the substrate were 0.077 +/- 0.001 mM and 6.0 +/- 0.6 pkat mg(-1) protein, respectively. ADC activity was reduced by 70% in the presence of 0.1 mM Cu(2+) or CO(2+), but was only marginally affected by Mg(2+), or Ca(2+) at the same concentration. Moreover, spermine at 1 mM significantly reduced its activity by 30%. PMID:15120115

  2. Arginine Biosynthesis in Thermotoga maritima: Characterization of the Arginine-Sensitive N-Acetyl-l-Glutamate Kinase

    OpenAIRE

    Fernández-Murga, M. Leonor; Gil-Ortiz, Fernando; Llácer, José L.; Rubio, Vicente

    2004-01-01

    To help clarify the control of arginine synthesis in Thermotoga maritima, the putative gene (argB) for N-acetyl-l-glutamate kinase (NAGK) from this microorganism was cloned and overexpressed, and the resulting protein was purified and shown to be a highly thermostable and specific NAGK that is potently and selectively inhibited by arginine. Therefore, NAGK is in T. maritima the feedback control point of arginine synthesis, a process that in this organism involves acetyl group recycling and ap...

  3. Asymmetric arginine dimethylation of RelA provides a repressive mark to modulate TNFα/NF-κB response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reintjes, Anja; Fuchs, Julian E; Kremser, Leopold; Lindner, Herbert H; Liedl, Klaus R; Huber, Lukas A; Valovka, Taras

    2016-04-19

    Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) is an inducible transcription factor that plays critical roles in immune and stress responses and is often implicated in pathologies, including chronic inflammation and cancer. Although much has been learned about NF-κB-activating pathways, the specific repression of NF-κB is far less well understood. Here we identified the type I protein arginine methyltransferase 1 (PRMT1) as a restrictive factor controlling TNFα-induced activation of NF-κB. PRMT1 forms a cellular complex with NF-κB through direct interaction with the Rel homology domain of RelA. We demonstrate that PRMT1 methylates RelA at evolutionary conserved R30, located in the DNA-binding L1 loop, which is a critical residue required for DNA binding. Asymmetric R30 dimethylation inhibits the binding of RelA to DNA and represses NF-κB target genes in response to TNFα. Molecular dynamics simulations of the DNA-bound RelA:p50 predicted structural changes in RelA caused by R30 methylation or a mutation that interferes with the stability of the DNA-NF-κB complex. Our findings provide evidence for the asymmetric arginine dimethylation of RelA and unveil a unique mechanism controlling TNFα/NF-κB signaling. PMID:27051065

  4. Purification and properties of thioether methyltransferase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method to assay activity was developed which measures acceptance of methyl groups from [methyl-3H]-S-adenosylmethionine by dimethyl selenide. The product, [3H]trimethylselenonium ion, is separated by HPLC and quantitated by scintillation counting. Thioether methyltransferase from mouse liver and lung resides primarily in the cytosol. In terms of specific activity the enzyme is most active in the lung and liver. Purification from lung cytosol requires a three-step process of DEAE and gel filtration column chromatographies followed by chromatofocusing. SDS-Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis shows a single homogeneous band with a molecular mass of 28,000 daltons. Vmax and Km values for dimethyl selenide as a substrate are 15. 7 pmol/min and 0.44 μM, respectively. Our studies have also shown that this purified enzyme is capable of methylating a wide range of compounds. To further test the enzyme's role in detoxification, in vivo studies were performed by injecting mice with substrate and [methyl-3H]methionine and analyzing tissue extracts and urine for [methyl-3H]sulfonium

  5. Isolation of DNA methyltransferase from plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DNA methyltransferases (DMT) were isolated from nuclei of cauliflower, soybean, and pea by extraction with 0.35 M NaCl. Assays were performed on hemimethylated Micrococcus luteus DNA or on M. luteus DNA to test for maintenance or de novo methylase activity, respectively. Fully methylated DNA was used as a substrate to determine background levels of methylation. Based on these tests, yields of maintenance DMT activity in the crude extract from pea hypocotyl, soybean hypocotyl, and cauliflower inflorescence were 2.8, 0.9, and 1.6 units per g wet tissue (one unit equals 1 pmol of methyl from [3H]AdoMet incorporated into acid precipitable material per h at 300). Two peaks of DMT activity were detected in the soybean nuclear extract following phosphocellulose chromatography. One eluted at 0.4 M and the other at 0.8 M KCl. With both fractions maintenance activity was approximately 2 times that of the de novo activity. Using gel filtration the DMT eluted at 220,000 Daltons. The optimal pH for activity was between 6.5 and 7.0, and the optimal temperature was 300

  6. Possible involvement of a plasmid in arginine auxotrophic mutation of Streptomyces kasugaensis.

    OpenAIRE

    Nakano, M M; Ozawa, K; Ogawara, H

    1980-01-01

    Streptomyces kasugaensis gave arginine auxotrophic mutants at high frequency, The coupled loss and reappearance of plasmid deoxyribonucleic acid with arginine auxotrophy suggested that the insertion of the plasmid into chromosomal deoxyribonucleic acid caused the arginine auxotrophy.

  7. Structures of Bacterial Biosynthetic Arginine Decarboxylases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    F Forouhar; S Lew; J Seetharaman; R Xiao; T Acton; G Montelione; L Tong

    2011-12-31

    Biosynthetic arginine decarboxylase (ADC; also known as SpeA) plays an important role in the biosynthesis of polyamines from arginine in bacteria and plants. SpeA is a pyridoxal-5'-phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzyme and shares weak sequence homology with several other PLP-dependent decarboxylases. Here, the crystal structure of PLP-bound SpeA from Campylobacter jejuni is reported at 3.0 {angstrom} resolution and that of Escherichia coli SpeA in complex with a sulfate ion is reported at 3.1 {angstrom} resolution. The structure of the SpeA monomer contains two large domains, an N-terminal TIM-barrel domain followed by a {beta}-sandwich domain, as well as two smaller helical domains. The TIM-barrel and {beta}-sandwich domains share structural homology with several other PLP-dependent decarboxylases, even though the sequence conservation among these enzymes is less than 25%. A similar tetramer is observed for both C. jejuni and E. coli SpeA, composed of two dimers of tightly associated monomers. The active site of SpeA is located at the interface of this dimer and is formed by residues from the TIM-barrel domain of one monomer and a highly conserved loop in the {beta}-sandwich domain of the other monomer. The PLP cofactor is recognized by hydrogen-bonding, {pi}-stacking and van der Waals interactions.

  8. Arginine specific aminopeptidase from Lactobacillus brevis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arya Nandan

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The proteolytic system of lactic acid bacteria contribute to the development of flavor during the ripening of cheese through the generation of short peptides and free amino acids, which directly or indirectly act as flavor precursors. Newly isolated lactic acid bacteria (LAB as well as those procured from culture collection centers were screened for the production of various substrate specific aminopeptidases. Among all the strains screened, L. brevis (NRRL B-1836 was found to produce quantifiable amount of intracellular arginine specific aminopeptidase (EC 3.4.11.6. The productivity of arginine aminopeptidase in 5 L fermentor was 36 IU/L/h. The Luedeking and Piret model was tested for intracellular production of aminopeptidase and the data seemed to fit well, as the correlation coefficient was 0.9964 for MRS. The αAP and βAP was 0.4865 and 0.0046, respectively in MRS medium indicating that the yield was predominantly depended on growth. The culture produced lactic acid and also tolerated pH 2.0-3.0 and 0.3-0.5% bile salts, the most important probiotic features.

  9. Arginine Deiminase Resistance in Melanoma Cells Is Associated with Metabolic Reprogramming, Glucose Dependence and Glutamine Addiction

    OpenAIRE

    Long, Yan; Tsai, Wen-Bin; Wangpaichitr, Medhi; Tsukamoto, Takashi; Savaraj, Niramol; Feun, Lynn G.; Kuo, Macus Tien

    2013-01-01

    Many malignant human tumors, including melanomas are auxotrophic for arginine due to reduced expression of argininosuccinate synthetase1 (ASS1), the rate-limiting enzyme for arginine biosynthesis. Pegylated arginine deiminase (ADI-PEG20), which degrades extracellular arginine resulting in arginine deprivation, has shown favorable results in clinical trials for treating arginine-auxotrophic tumors. Drug resistance is the major obstacle for effective ADI-PEG20 usage. To elucidate mechanisms of ...

  10. Arginine Depletion by Arginine Deiminase Does Not Affect Whole Protein Metabolism or Muscle Fractional Protein Synthesis Rate in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marini, Juan C.; Didelija, Inka Cajo

    2015-01-01

    Due to the absolute need for arginine that certain cancer cells have, arginine depletion is a therapy in clinical trials to treat several types of cancers. Arginine is an amino acids utilized not only as a precursor for other important molecules, but also for protein synthesis. Because arginine depletion can potentially exacerbate the progressive loss of body weight, and especially lean body mass, in cancer patients we determined the effect of arginine depletion by pegylated arginine deiminase (ADI-PEG 20) on whole body protein synthesis and fractional protein synthesis rate in multiple tissues of mice. ADI-PEG 20 successfully depleted circulating arginine (<1 μmol/L), and increased citrulline concentration more than tenfold. Body weight and body composition, however, were not affected by ADI-PEG 20. Despite the depletion of arginine, whole body protein synthesis and breakdown were maintained in the ADI-PEG 20 treated mice. The fractional protein synthesis rate of muscle was also not affected by arginine depletion. Most tissues (liver, kidney, spleen, heart, lungs, stomach, small and large intestine, pancreas) were able to maintain their fractional protein synthesis rate; however, the fractional protein synthesis rate of brain, thymus and testicles was reduced due to the ADI-PEG 20 treatment. Furthermore, these results were confirmed by the incorporation of ureido [14C]citrulline, which indicate the local conversion into arginine, into protein. In conclusion, the intracellular recycling pathway of citrulline is able to provide enough arginine to maintain protein synthesis rate and prevent the loss of lean body mass and body weight. PMID:25775142

  11. Arginine, citrulline and nitric oxide metabolism in sepsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arginine has vasodilatory effects, via its conversion by nitric oxide (NO) synthase into NO, and immunomodulatory actions that play important roles in sepsis. Protein breakdown affects arginine availability, and the release of asymmetric dimethylarginine, an inhibitor of NO synthase, may therefore a...

  12. On the mechanism of arginine requirement for adenovirus synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of arginine deprivation on the synthesis and processing of viral proteins and the assembly of incomplete and complete virions were studied during infection with human adenovirus type 2. Arginine deprivation greatly reduced the synthesis of all viral proteins, particularly the precursor to core protein VII. The inhibition was completely reversible by the addition of arginine to the medium. Arginine deprivation between 7 and 20 hours post-infection inhibited the processing of PVII to VII, suggesting that PVII is not cleaved autocatalytically. The assembly of incomplete virions was sensitive to arginine deprivation only prior to 20 hours, while the assembly of complete virions was dependent on the continuous presence of arginine. This observation supports the hypothesis that incomplete virions are precursors of complete virions. The experiments on the PVII-specific endoprotease activity showed that arginine deprivation caused only slight reduction in the in vitro activity, although no activity was observed in vivo. The present results lead to the hypothesis that arginine deficiency inhibits the synthesis of a functional protein essential for virion maturation, other than the synthesis of processing of PVII. (author)

  13. Effects of dietary salt intake on plasma arginine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitiyakara, C; Chabrashvili, T; Jose, P; Welch, W J; Wilcox, C S

    2001-04-01

    Because L-arginine is degraded by hepatic arginase to ornithine and urea and is transported by the regulated 2A cationic amino acid y(+) transporter (CAT2A), hepatic transport may regulate plasma arginine concentration. Groups of rats (n = 6) were fed a diet of either low salt (LS) or high salt (HS) for 7 days to test the hypothesis that dietary salt intake regulates plasma arginine concentration and renal nitric oxide (NO) generation by measuring plasma arginine and ornithine concentrations, renal NO excretion, and expression of hepatic CAT2A, and arginase. LS rats had lower excretion of NO metabolites and cGMP, lower plasma arginine concentration (LS: 83 +/- 7 vs. HS: 165 +/- 10 micromol/l, P plasma ornithine concentration (LS: 82 +/- 6 vs. HS: 66 +/- 4 micromol/l, P plasma arginine concentration with increased plasma ornithine concentration and urea excretion during LS indicates increased arginine metabolism by arginase. This cannot be ascribed to changes in hepatic arginase expression but may be a consequence of increased hepatic arginine uptake via CAT2A. PMID:11247829

  14. Anti-aging effects of l-arginine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Z. Gad

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available l-Arginine is one of the most metabolically versatile amino acids. In addition to its role in the synthesis of nitric oxide, l-arginine serves as a precursor for the synthesis of polyamines, proline, glutamate, creatine, agmatine and urea. Several human and experimental animal studies have indicated that exogenous l-arginine intake has multiple beneficial pharmacological effects when taken in doses larger than normal dietary consumption. Such effects include reduction in the risk of vascular and heart diseases, reduction in erectile dysfunction, improvement in immune response and inhibition of gastric hyperacidity. This review summarises several positive studies and personal experiences of l-arginine. The demonstrated anti-aging benefits of l-arginine show greater potential than any pharmaceutical or nutraceutical agent ever previously discovered.

  15. DNA Methyltransferases Inhibitors from Natural Sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwergel, Clemens; Valente, Sergio; Mai, Antonello

    2016-01-01

    DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs) catalyze the methylation at cytosine-C5 mainly in a CpG dinucleotide context. Although DNA methylation is essential for fundamental processes like embryonic development or differentiation, aberrant expression and/or activities of DNMTs are involved in several pathologies, from neurodegeneration to cancer. DNMTs inhibition can arrest tumor growth, cells invasiveness and induce differentiation, whereas their increased expression is shown in numerous cancer types. Moreover, hypermethylated promoters of tumor suppressor genes lead to their silencing. Hence, the use of specific inhibitors of DNMT might reactivate those genes and stop or even reverse the aberrant cell processes. To date, the only approved DNMTs inhibitors for therapy belong to the nucleoside-based family of drugs, but they display relevant side effects as well as high chemical instability. Thus, there is a keen interest actually exists to develop novel, potent and safe inhibitors possessing a nonnucleoside structure. Increasing literature evidence is highlighting that natural sources could help the researchers to achieve this goal. Indeed, several polyphenols, flavonoids, antraquinones, and others are described able to inhibit DNMTs activity and/or expression, thus decreasing the methylation/silencing of different genes involved in tumorigenesis. These events can lead to re-expression of such genes and to cell death in diverse cancer cell lines. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (1) and laccaic acid A (11) resulted the most effective DNMT1 inhibitors with submicromolar IC50 values, acting as competitive inhibitors. Compound 1 and 11 both displayed gene demethylation and re-activation in several cancers. However, all of the natural compounds described in this review showed important results, from gene reactivation to cell growth inhibition. Moreover, some of them displayed interesting activity even in rodent cancer models and very recently entered clinical trials. PMID:26303417

  16. Multiple lysine methylation of PCAF by Set9 methyltransferase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The molecular functions of several non-histone proteins are regulated through lysine modification by histone methyltransferases. The p300/CBP-associated factor (PCAF) is an acetyltransferase that has been implicated in many cellular processes. Here, we report that PCAF is a novel substrate of Set9 methyltransferase. In vitro mapping experiments revealed six lysine residues could be methylated by Set9. A comparison of amino acid sequences of target sites revealed the novel consensus motif which differs from previously identified Set9-consensus sequence. Further methyltransferase assays focusing on the six lysine residues showed that K78 and K89 are preferentially methylated in full-length PCAF in vitro. Using specific antibodies recognizing mono-methylated K89, in vivo PCAF methylation and its nuclear localization were demonstrated. Our data may lead to a new insight into PCAF functions and provide additional information to identify unknown targets of Set9.

  17. Toxoplasma gondii lacks the enzymes required for de novo arginine biosynthesis and arginine starvation triggers cyst formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Barbara A; Gigley, Jason P; Bzik, David J

    2004-03-01

    Two separate carbamoyl phosphate synthetase activities are required for the de novo synthesis of pyrimidines and arginine in most eukaryotes. Toxoplasma gondii is novel in possessing a single carbamoyl phosphate synthetase II gene that corresponds to a glutamine-dependent form required for pyrimidine biosynthesis. We therefore examined arginine acquisition in T. gondii to determine whether the single carbamoyl phosphate synthetase II activity could provide both pyrimidine and arginine biosynthesis. We found that arginine deprivation efficiently blocks the replication of intracellular T. gondii, yet has little effect on long-term parasite viability. Addition of citrulline, but not ornithine, rescues the growth defect observed in the absence of exogenous arginine. This rescue with citrulline is ablated when parasites are cultured in a human citrullinemia fibroblast cell line that is deficient in argininosuccinate synthetase activity. These results reveal the absence of genes and activities of the arginine biosynthetic pathway and demonstrate that T. gondii is an arginine auxotroph. Arginine starvation was also found to efficiently trigger differentiation of replicative tachyzoites into bradyzoites contained within stable cyst-like structures. These same parasites expressing bradyzoite antigens can be efficiently switched back to rapidly proliferating tachyzoites several weeks after arginine starvation. We hypothesise that the absence of gene activities that are essential for the biosynthesis of arginine from carbamoyl phosphate confers a selective advantage by increasing bradyzoite switching during the host response to T. gondii infection. These findings are consistent with a model of host-parasite evolution that allowed host control of bradyzoite induction by trading off virulence for increased transmission. PMID:15003493

  18. Asymmetric Dimethyl Arginine in Hypothyroid Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thyroid diseases may lead to endothelial dysfunction, however, the mechanism underlying the endothelial dysfunction in thyroid disease is still not clear. Asymmetric dimethyl arginine (ADMA), a novel inhibitor of endothelial nitric oxide synthetase (eNOS), was reported to inhibit nitric oxide (NO) synthesis from L-arginine. The present study was carried out to investigate ADMA levels together with effects of dislipidemia in sub-clinical and overt hypothyroid females. There were significant increase in the levels of total cholesterol, low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-c), high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-c), thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and ADMA in hypothyroid females as compared to controls while the levels of NO and free T4 were significantly decreased than controls. Sub-clinical hypothyroid females had significant high TSH, LDL-c and non-significantly high ADMA levels and total cholesterol as compared to controls while they had significant decrease in NO, HDL-c and non-significant decrease in free T4 as compared to controls. There were significant negative correlations between NO and both ADMA (r2 = 0.84) and free T4 (r2 = 0.95) in overt hypothyroid group while significant positive correlation (r2 = 0.85) was detected between TSH and HDL-c in the same group. These results are highly suggestive that the decrease of nitric oxide secondary to accumulation of ADMA represent an important pathogenic factor together with dyslipidemia in endothelial dysfunction and increased cardiovascular risk especially in hypothyroid females

  19. Arginine affects appetite via nitric oxide in ducks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C; Hou, S S; Huang, W; Xu, T S; Rong, G H; Xie, M

    2014-08-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate the mechanism by which arginine regulates feed intake in Pekin ducks. In experiment 1, one hundred forty-four 1-d-old male Pekin ducks were randomly allotted to 3 dietary treatments with 6 replicate pens of 8 birds per pen. Birds in each group were fed a corn-corn gluten meal diet containing 0.65, 0.95, and 1.45% arginine. Ducks fed the diet containing 0.65% arginine had lower feed intake and plasma nitric oxide level (P Pekin ducks. PMID:24902706

  20. Arginine-aromatic interactions and their effects on arginine-induced solubilization of aromatic solutes and suppression of protein aggregation

    KAUST Repository

    Shah, Dhawal

    2011-09-21

    We examine the interaction of aromatic residues of proteins with arginine, an additive commonly used to suppress protein aggregation, using experiments and molecular dynamics simulations. An aromatic-rich peptide, FFYTP (a segment of insulin), and lysozyme and insulin are used as model systems. Mass spectrometry shows that arginine increases the solubility of FFYTP by binding to the peptide, with the simulations revealing the predominant association of arginine to be with the aromatic residues. The calculations further show a positive preferential interaction coefficient, Γ XP, contrary to conventional thinking that positive Γ XP\\'s indicate aggregation rather than suppression of aggregation. Simulations with lysozyme and insulin also show arginine\\'s preference for aromatic residues, in addition to acidic residues. We use these observations and earlier results reported by us and others to discuss the possible implications of arginine\\'s interactions with aromatic residues on the solubilization of aromatic moieties and proteins. Our results also highlight the fact that explanations based purely on Γ XP, which measures average affinity of an additive to a protein, could obscure or misinterpret the underlying molecular mechanisms behind additive-induced suppression of protein aggregation. © 2011 American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE).

  1. Chromosomal replication incompatibility in Dam methyltransferase deficient Escherichia coli cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Freiesleben, Ulrik Von

    1996-01-01

    Dam methyltransferase deficient Escherichia coli cells containing minichromosomes were constructed. Free plasmid DNA could not be detected in these cells and the minichromosomes were found to be integrated in multiple copies in the origin of replication (oriC) region of the host chromosome. The...

  2. Label-free electrochemical detection of human methyltransferase from tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furst, Ariel L; Muren, Natalie B; Hill, Michael G; Barton, Jacqueline K

    2014-10-21

    The role of abnormal DNA methyltransferase activity in the development and progression of cancer is an essential and rapidly growing area of research, both for improved diagnosis and treatment. However, current technologies for the assessment of methyltransferase activity, particularly from crude tumor samples, limit this work because they rely on radioactivity or fluorescence and require bulky instrumentation. Here, we report an electrochemical platform that overcomes these limitations for the label-free detection of human DNA(cytosine-5)-methyltransferase1 (DNMT1) methyltransferase activity, enabling measurements from crude cultured colorectal cancer cell lysates (HCT116) and biopsied tumor tissues. Our multiplexed detection system involving patterning and detection from a secondary electrode array combines low-density DNA monolayer patterning and electrocatalytically amplified DNA charge transport chemistry to measure selectively and sensitively DNMT1 activity within these complex and congested cellular samples. Based on differences in DNMT1 activity measured with this assay, we distinguish colorectal tumor tissue from healthy adjacent tissue, illustrating the effectiveness of this two-electrode platform for clinical applications. PMID:25288757

  3. Structure and Function of Flavivirus NS5 Methyltransferase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou,Y.; Ray, D.; Zhao, Y.; Dong, H.; Ren, S.; Li, Z.; Guo, Y.; Bernard, K.; Shi, P.; Li, H.

    2007-01-01

    The plus-strand RNA genome of flavivirus contains a 5' terminal cap 1 structure (m{sup 7}GpppAmG). The flaviviruses encode one methyltransferase, located at the N-terminal portion of the NS5 protein, to catalyze both guanine N-7 and ribose 2'-OH methylations during viral cap formation. Representative flavivirus methyltransferases from dengue, yellow fever, and West Nile virus (WNV) sequentially generate GpppA {yields} m{sup 7}GpppA {yields} m{sup 7}GpppAm. The 2'-O methylation can be uncoupled from the N-7 methylation, since m{sup 7}GpppA-RNA can be readily methylated to m{sup 7}GpppAm-RNA. Despite exhibiting two distinct methylation activities, the crystal structure of WNV methyltransferase at 2.8 {angstrom} resolution showed a single binding site for S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM), the methyl donor. Therefore, substrate GpppA-RNA should be repositioned to accept the N-7 and 2'-O methyl groups from SAM during the sequential reactions. Electrostatic analysis of the WNV methyltransferase structure showed that, adjacent to the SAM-binding pocket, is a highly positively charged surface that could serve as an RNA binding site during cap methylations. Biochemical and mutagenesis analyses show that the N-7 and 2'-O cap methylations require distinct buffer conditions and different side chains within the K{sub 61}-D{sub 146}-K{sub 182}-E{sub 218} motif, suggesting that the two reactions use different mechanisms. In the context of complete virus, defects in both methylations are lethal to WNV; however, viruses defective solely in 2'-O methylation are attenuated and can protect mice from later wild-type WNV challenge. The results demonstrate that the N-7 methylation activity is essential for the WNV life cycle and, thus, methyltransferase represents a novel target for flavivirus therapy.

  4. Engineering Monolignol 4-O-Methyltransferases to Modulate Lignin Biosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhuiya, M.W.; Liu, C.

    2010-01-01

    Lignin is a complex polymer derived from the oxidative coupling of three classical monolignols. Lignin precursors are methylated exclusively at the meta-positions (i.e. 3/5-OH) of their phenyl rings by native O-methyltransferases, and are precluded from substitution of the para-hydroxyl (4-OH) position. Ostensibly, the para-hydroxyls of phenolics are critically important for oxidative coupling of phenoxy radicals to form polymers. Therefore, creating a 4-O-methyltransferase to substitute the para-hydroxyl of monolignols might well interfere with the synthesis of lignin. The phylogeny of plant phenolic O-methyltransferases points to the existence of a batch of evolutionarily 'plastic' amino acid residues. Following one amino acid at a time path of directed evolution, and using the strategy of structure-based iterative site-saturation mutagenesis, we created a novel monolignol 4-O-methyltransferase from the enzyme responsible for methylating phenylpropenes. We show that two plastic residues in the active site of the parental enzyme are vital in dominating substrate discrimination. Mutations at either one of these separate the evolutionarily tightly linked properties of substrate specificity and regioselective methylation of native O-methyltransferase, thereby conferring the ability for para-methylation of the lignin monomeric precursors, primarily monolignols. Beneficial mutations at both sites have an additive effect. By further optimizing enzyme activity, we generated a triple mutant variant that may structurally constitute a novel phenolic substrate binding pocket, leading to its high binding affinity and catalytic efficiency on monolignols. The 4-O-methoxylation of monolignol efficiently impairs oxidative radical coupling in vitro, highlighting the potential for applying this novel enzyme in managing lignin polymerization in planta.

  5. Cellular Mechanisms of L-arginine Induced Experimental Acute Pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Masood, Omar

    2013-01-01

    AbstractThe University Of ManchesterOmar MasoodMD Thesis 2013Cellular Mechanisms of L-arginine Induced Experimental Acute Pancreatitis. IntroductionImpairment of cytosolic calcium ([Ca2+]i) signaling and in particular calcium overload has emerged as a possible unifying mechanism for precipitating acute pancreatitis (AP.)In the L-arginine (L-arg) experimental model of AP, nitric oxide (NO) has been implicated however the disease progression is largely unaffected by nitric oxide synthase (NOS) ...

  6. L-Arginine Pathway in COPD Patients with Acute Exacerbation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruzsics, Istvan; Nagy, Lajos; Keki, Sandor; Sarosi, Veronika; Illes, Balazs; Illes, Zsolt; Horvath, Ildiko; Bogar, Lajos; Molnar, Tihamer

    BACKGROUND: Acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD) remains a major cause of mortality. Clinical criteria of AECOPD are subjective. Biomarkers for AECOPD may aid in the initiation of early treatment. Increased production of asymmetric and symmetric dimethylarginine (A......-arginine, ADMA and SDMA serum levels. In patients with AECOPD, production of ADMA and SDMA are more pronounced presumably due to more severe hypoxic insult. Methylated arginine derivatives in the sera may help early recognition of AECOPD....

  7. Acellular matrix of bovine pericardium bound with L-arginine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyo Joo [Department of Molecular Science and Technology, Ajou University, Suwon 443-749 (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Jin Woo [Department of Molecular Science and Technology, Ajou University, Suwon 443-749 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Chun Ho [Laboratory of Tissue Engineering, Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul 139-240 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jin Woo [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, College of Medicine, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Jung Woog [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Inje University, Gimhae 621-749 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Ki Dong [Department of Molecular Science and Technology, Ajou University, Suwon 443-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-09-15

    Surface immobilization of bioactive molecules onto natural tissues has been interestingly studied for the development of new functional matrices for the replacement of lost or malfunctioning tissues. In this study, an acellular matrix of bovine pericardium (ABP) was chemically modified by the direct coupling of L-arginine after glutaraldehyde (GA) cross-linking. The effects of L-arginine coupling on durability and calcification were investigated and the biocompatibility was evaluated in vitro and in vivo. A four-step detergent and enzymatic extraction process has been utilized to remove cellular components from fresh bovine pericardium (BP). Microscopic observation confirmed that nearly all cellular constituents are removed. Thermal and mechanical properties showed that the durability of L-arginine-treated matrices increased as compared with control ABP and GA-treated ABP. Resistance to collagenase digestion revealed that modified matrices have greater resistance to enzyme digestion than control ABP and GA-treated ABP. The in vivo calcification study demonstrated much less calcium deposition on L-arginine-treated ABP than GA-treated one. In vitro cell viability results showed that ABP modified with L-arginine leads to a significant increase in attachment of human dermal fibroblasts. The obtained results attest to the usefulness of L-arginine-treated ABP matrices for cardiovascular bioprostheses.

  8. Molecular identification of carnosine N-methyltransferase as chicken histamine N-methyltransferase-like protein (hnmt-like.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakub Drozak

    Full Text Available Anserine (beta-alanyl-N(Pi-methyl-L-histidine, a naturally occurring derivative of carnosine (beta-alanyl-L-histidine, is an abundant constituent of skeletal muscles and brain of many vertebrates. Although it has long been proposed to serve as a proton buffer, radicals scavenger and transglycating agent, its physiological function remains obscure. The formation of anserine is catalyzed by carnosine N-methyltransferase which exhibits unknown molecular identity. In the present investigation, we have purified carnosine N-methyltransferase from chicken pectoral muscle about 640-fold until three major polypeptides of about 23, 26 and 37 kDa coeluting with the enzyme were identified in the preparation. Mass spectrometry analysis of these polypeptides resulted in an identification of histamine N-methyltransferase-like (HNMT-like protein as the only meaningful candidate. Analysis of GenBank database records indicated that the hnmt-like gene might be a paralogue of histamine N-methyltransferase gene, while comparison of their protein sequences suggested that HNMT-like protein might have acquired a new activity. Chicken HNMT-like protein was expressed in COS-7 cells, purified to homogeneity, and shown to catalyze the formation of anserine as confirmed by both chromatographic and mass spectrometry analysis. Both specificity and kinetic studies carried out on the native and recombinant enzyme were in agreement with published data. Particularly, several compounds structurally related to carnosine, including histamine and L-histidine, were tested as potential substrates for the enzyme, and carnosine was the only methyl group acceptor. The identification of the gene encoding carnosine N-methyltransferase might be beneficial for estimation of the biological functions of anserine.

  9. Arginine side chain interactions and the role of arginine as a gating charge carrier in voltage sensitive ion channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Craig T.; Mason, Philip E.; Anderson, J. L. Ross; Dempsey, Christopher E.

    2016-02-01

    Gating charges in voltage-sensing domains (VSD) of voltage-sensitive ion channels and enzymes are carried on arginine side chains rather than lysine. This arginine preference may result from the unique hydration properties of the side chain guanidinium group which facilitates its movement through a hydrophobic plug that seals the center of the VSD, as suggested by molecular dynamics simulations. To test for side chain interactions implicit in this model we inspected interactions of the side chains of arginine and lysine with each of the 19 non-glycine amino acids in proteins in the protein data bank. The arginine guanidinium interacts with non-polar aromatic and aliphatic side chains above and below the guanidinium plane while hydrogen bonding with polar side chains is restricted to in-plane positions. In contrast, non-polar side chains interact largely with the aliphatic part of the lysine side chain. The hydration properties of arginine and lysine are strongly reflected in their respective interactions with non-polar and polar side chains as observed in protein structures and in molecular dynamics simulations, and likely underlie the preference for arginine as a mobile charge carrier in VSD.

  10. L-Arginine Supplementation and Metabolism in Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Linderholm

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available L-Arginine, the amino acid substrate for nitric oxide synthase, has been tested as a therapeutic intervention in a variety of chronic diseases and is commonly used as a nutritional supplement. In this study, we hypothesized that a subset of moderate to severe persistent asthma patients would benefit from supplementation with L-arginine by transiently increasing nitric oxide levels, resulting in bronchodilation and a reduction in inflammation. The pilot study consisted of a 3 month randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of L-arginine (0.05 g/kg twice daily in patients with moderate to severe asthma. We measured spirometry, exhaled breath nitric oxide, serum arginine metabolites, questionnaire scores, daily medication use and PEFR with the primary endpoint being the number of minor exacerbations at three months. Interim analysis of the 20 subjects showed no difference in the number of exacerbations, exhaled nitric oxide levels or lung function between groups, though participants in the L-arginine group had higher serum L-arginine at day 60 (2.0 ± 0.6 × 10−3 vs. 1.1 ± 0.2 × 10−3 µmol/L, p < 0.05, ornithine at day 30 (2.4 ± 0.9 vs. 1.2 ± 0.3 µmol/L serum, p < 0.05 and ADMA at day 30 (6.0 ± 1.5 × 10−1 vs. 2.6 ± 0.6 × 10−1 µmol/L serum, p < 0.05 on average compared to the placebo group. The study was terminated prematurely. Supplementing asthma subjects with L-arginine increases plasma levels; whether subgroups might benefit from such supplementation requires further study.

  11. Inhibition of lytic infection of pseudorabies virus by arginine depletion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pseudorabies virus (PRV) is a member of Alphahepesviruses; it is an enveloped virus with a double-stranded DNA genome. Polyamines (such as spermine and spermidine) are ubiquitous in animal cells and participate in cellular proliferation and differentiation. Previous results of our laboratory showed that the PRV can accomplish lytic infection either in the presence of exogenous spermine (or spermidine) or depletion of cellular polyamines. The amino acid arginine is a precursor of polyamine biosynthesis. In this work, we investigated the role of arginine in PRV infection. It was found that the plaque formation of PRV was inhibited by arginase (enzyme catalyzing the conversion of arginine into ornithine and urea) treatment whereas this inhibition can be reversed by exogenous arginine, suggesting that arginine is essential for PRV proliferation. Western blotting was conducted to study the effect of arginine depletion on the levels of structural proteins of PRV in virus-infected cells. Four PRV structural proteins (gB, gE, UL47, and UL48) were chosen for examination, and results revealed that the levels of viral proteins were obviously reduced in long time arginase treatment. However, the overall protein synthesis machinery was apparently not influenced by arginase treatment either in mock or PRV-infected cells. Analyzing with native gel, we found that arginase treatment affected the mobility of PRV structural proteins, suggesting the conformational change of viral proteins by arginine depletion. Heat shock proteins, acting as molecular chaperons, participate in protein folding and translocation. Our results demonstrated that long time arginase treatment could reduce the expression of cellular heat shock proteins 70 (hsc70 and hsp70), and transcriptional suppression of heat shock protein 70 gene promoter was one of the mechanisms involved in this reduced expression

  12. Functional Role of G9a Histone Methyltransferase in Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Casciello, Francesco; Windloch, Karolina; Gannon, Frank; Lee, Jason S.

    2015-01-01

    Post-translational modifications of DNA and histones are epigenetic mechanisms, which affect the chromatin structure, ultimately leading to gene expression changes. A number of different epigenetic enzymes are actively involved in the addition or the removal of various covalent modifications, which include acetylation, methylation, phosphorylation, ubiquitination, and sumoylation. Deregulation of these processes is a hallmark of cancer. For instance, G9a, a histone methyltransferase responsib...

  13. Epigenetic Regulation of Autophagy by the Methyltransferase G9a

    OpenAIRE

    Artal-Martinez de Narvajas, Amaia; Gomez, Timothy S.; Zhang, Jin-San; Mann, Alexander O.; Taoda, Yoshiyuki; Gorman, Jacquelyn A.; Herreros-Villanueva, Marta; Gress, Thomas M; Ellenrieder, Volker; Bujanda, Luis; Kim, Do-Hyung; Kozikowski, Alan P.; Koenig, Alexander; Billadeau, Daniel D.

    2013-01-01

    Macroautophagy is an evolutionarily conserved cellular process involved in the clearance of proteins and organelles. Although the cytoplasmic machinery that orchestrates autophagy induction during starvation, hypoxia, or receptor stimulation has been widely studied, the key epigenetic events that initiate and maintain the autophagy process remain unknown. Here we show that the methyltransferase G9a coordinates the transcriptional activation of key regulators of autophagosome formation by remo...

  14. Histamine N-methyltransferase Modulates Human Bronchial Smooth Muscle Contraction

    OpenAIRE

    Tamaoki, J.; Chiyotani, A.; Tagaya, E; Isono, K; Konno, K

    1994-01-01

    To elucidate the modulatory role of histamine-degrading enzymes in airway constrictor responses, human bronchial strips were studied under isometric conditions in vitro. Pretreatment of tissues with the histamine N-methyltransferase (HMT) inhibitor SKF 91488 specifically potentiated the contractile responses to histamine, causing a leftward displacement of the concentration response curves, whereas the diamine oxidase inhibitor aminoguanidine had no effect. This potentiation was attenuated by...

  15. Betaine-homocysteine methyltransferase: human liver genotype-phenotype correlation

    OpenAIRE

    Feng, Qiping; Kalari, Krishna; Fridley, Brooke L.; Jenkins, Gregory; Ji, Yuan; Abo, Ryan; Hebbring, Scott; Zhang, Jianping; Nye, Monica D.; Leeder, J Steven; Weinshilboum, Richard M.

    2010-01-01

    Betaine-homocysteine methyltransferase (BHMT) catalyzes the remethylation of homocysteine. BHMT is highly expressed in the human liver. In the liver, BHMT catalyzes up to 50% of homocysteine metabolism. Understanding the relationship between BHMT genetic polymorphisms and function might increase our understanding of the role of this reaction in homocysteine remethylation and in S-adenosylmethionine-dependent methylation. To help achieve those goals, we measured levels of BHMT enzyme activity ...

  16. Plant isoflavone and isoflavanone O-methyltransferase genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broeckling, Bettina E.; Liu, Chang-Jun; Dixon, Richard A.

    2014-08-19

    The invention provides enzymes that encode O-methyltransferases (OMTs) from Medicago truncatula that allow modification to plant (iso)flavonoid biosynthetic pathways. In certain aspects of the invention, the genes encoding these enzymes are provided. The invention therefore allows the modification of plants for isoflavonoid content. Transgenic plants comprising such enzymes are also provided, as well as methods for improving disease resistance in plants. Methods for producing food and nutraceuticals, and the resulting compositions, are also provided.

  17. Structural characterization of the mitomycin 7-O-methyltransferase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Shanteri; Chang, Aram; Goff, Randal D.; Bingman, Craig A.; Grüschow, Sabine; Sherman, David H.; Phillips, Jr., George N.; Thorson, Jon S. (Michigan); (UW)

    2014-10-02

    Mitomycins are quinone-containing antibiotics, widely used as antitumor drugs in chemotherapy. Mitomycin-7-O-methyltransferase (MmcR), a key tailoring enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of mitomycin in Streptomyces lavendulae, catalyzes the 7-O-methylation of both C9{beta}- and C9{alpha}-configured 7-hydroxymitomycins. We have determined the crystal structures of the MmcR-S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) binary complex and MmcR-SAH-mitomycin A (MMA) ternary complex at resolutions of 1.9 and 2.3 {angstrom}, respectively. The study revealed MmcR to adopt a common S-adenosyl-L-methionine-dependent O-methyltransferase fold and the presence of a structurally conserved active site general acid-base pair is consistent with a proton-assisted methyltransfer common to most methyltransferases. Given the importance of C7 alkylation to modulate mitomycin redox potential, this study may also present a template toward the future engineering of catalysts to generate uniquely bioactive mitomycins.

  18. DNA repair methyltransferase (Mgmt) knockout mice are sensitive to the lethal effects of chemotherapeutic alkylating agents.

    OpenAIRE

    Glassner, Brian; Weeda, Geert; Allan, James; Broekhof, Jose'; Carls, Nick; Donker, Ingrid; Engelward, Bevin; Hampson, Richard; Hersmus, Remko; Hickman, Mark; Roth, Richard; Warren, Henry; Wu, Mavis; Hoeijmakers, Jan; Samson, Leona

    1999-01-01

    textabstractWe have generated mice deficient in O6-methylguanine DNA methyltransferase activity encoded by the murine Mgmt gene using homologous recombination to delete the region encoding the Mgmt active site cysteine. Tissues from Mgmt null mice displayed very low O6-methylguanine DNA methyltransferase activity, suggesting that Mgmt constitutes the major, if not the only, O6-methylguanine DNA methyltransferase. Primary mouse embryo fibroblasts and bone marrow cells from Mgmt -/- mice were s...

  19. Molecular Mechanism of Action of Plant DRM De Novo DNA Methyltransferases

    OpenAIRE

    Zhong, Xuehua; Du, Jiamu; Hale, Christopher J.; Gallego-Bartolome, Javier; Feng, Suhua; Vashisht, Ajay A.; Chory, Joanne; Wohlschlegel, James A.; Patel, Dinshaw J.; Jacobsen, Steven E.

    2014-01-01

    DNA methylation is a conserved epigenetic gene regulation mechanism. DOMAINS REARRANGED METHYLTRANSFERASE (DRM) is a key de novo methyltransferase in plants, but how DRM acts mechanistically is poorly understood. Here, we report the crystal structure of the methyltransferase domain of tobacco DRM (NtDRM) and reveal a molecular basis for its rearranged structure. NtDRM forms a functional homo-dimer critical for catalytic activity. We also show that Arabidopsis DRM2 exists in complex with the s...

  20. Arginine protection against ammonia toxicity in exhausted rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna Mohan, P; Indira, K; Rajendra, W

    1987-01-01

    Arginine administration (5 m moles/kg/day) to albino rats for 7 days, revealed that this vital basic amino acid possesses latent potentiality for the accentuation of urea cycle or at least for arginase activity. The mitigation of ammonia toxicity was observed to be more effective in the case of gastrocnemius and red vastus as compared to white vastus. Further, ammonia and lactate levels were also decreased by arginine in blood and thereby delaying the onset of fatigue by preventing ammonotoxemia and lactic acidemia. PMID:3666875

  1. The Arginine/ADMA Ratio Is Related to the Prevention of Atherosclerotic Plaques in Hypercholesterolemic Rabbits When Giving a Combined Therapy with Atorvastatine and Arginine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saskia J. H. Brinkmann

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Supplementation with arginine in combination with atorvastatin is more efficient in reducing the size of an atherosclerotic plaque than treatment with a statin or arginine alone in homozygous Watanabe heritable hyperlipidemic (WHHL rabbits. We evaluated the mechanism behind this feature by exploring the role of the arginine/asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA ratio, which is the substrate and inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase (NOS and thereby nitric oxide (NO, respectively. Methods: Rabbits were fed either an arginine diet (group A, n = 9, standard rabbit chow plus atorvastatin (group S, n = 8, standard rabbit chow plus an arginine diet with atorvastatin (group SA, n = 8 or standard rabbit chow (group C, n = 9 as control. Blood was sampled and the aorta was harvested for topographic and histological analysis. Plasma levels of arginine, ADMA, cholesterol and nitric oxide were determined and the arginine/ADMA ratio was calculated. Results: The decrease in ADMA levels over time was significantly correlated to fewer aortic lesions in the distal aorta and total aorta. The arginine/ADMA ratio was correlated to cholesterol levels and decrease in cholesterol levels over time in the SA group. A lower arginine/ADMA ratio was significantly correlated to lower NO levels in the S and C group. Discussion: A balance between arginine and ADMA is an important indicator in the prevention of the development of atherosclerotic plaques.

  2. Effect of oral L-arginine administration on exhaled nitric oxide (no) concentration in healthy volunteers

    OpenAIRE

    Ogata, Hiroshi; Yatabe, Midori; Misaka, Shingen; Shikama, Yayoi; Sato, Suguru; Munakata, Mitsuru; Kimura, Junko

    2013-01-01

    We previously reported a case of pulmonary hypertension, where the symptoms were improved by oral L-arginine (arginine) administration. Arginine may increase nitric oxide (NO) production in the pulmonary artery. Exhaled NO may reflect pulmonary artery NO production. It has been demonstrated that exhaled NO concentration is higher in patients with allergic diseases, but whether oral arginine administration alters exhaled NO is unknown. Therefore, in this study, we investigated whether oral arg...

  3. In vivo arginine production and intravascular nitric oxide synthesis in hypotensive sepsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arginine is important in the response to infections and is a precursor for the synthesis of the vasodilator nitric oxide (NO). Low plasma arginine is correlated with a worse prognosis in patients with sepsis, and increased NO has been implicated in the hypotension of sepsis. Data on in vivo arginine...

  4. Effect of iron, taurine and arginine on rat hepatic fibrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: The promotion role of iron on pathogenesis of hepatic fibrosis and the protective role of taurine and L-arginine against hepatic fibrosis were studied. Method: The model of rat radiation hepatic fibrosis was used. Experimental rats were divided into 0 Gy, 30 Gy, 30 Gy + iron, 30 Gy + taurine and 30 Gy + L-arginine groups. Serum iron, liver tissue hydroxyproline (Hyp) and malondialdehyde (MDA) were measured one and three months respectively after irradiation of hepatic tissue, production and distribution characteristics of hepatic tissue type I and III collagen were observed with a polarizing microscope. Results: Administration of iron agent could significantly increase hepatic tissue MDA content and serum iron concentration, one month after irradiation, hepatic tissue Hyp in 30 Gy + iron group began to increase, and collagen in hepatic tissue obviously increased. Taurine and L-arginine could reduce serum iron concentration and decrease production of hepatic fissure Hyp. Conclusion: Exogenous iron agent could promote early development of radiation hepatic fibrosis; taurine and arginine could diminish pathologic alteration of hepatic fibrosis to a certain extent

  5. A SABATH Methyltransferase from the moss Physcomitrella patens catalyzes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Nan [ORNL; Ferrer, Jean-Luc [Universite Joseph Fourier, France; Moon, Hong S [Department of Plant Sciences, University of Tennessee; Kapteyn, Jeremy [Institute of Biological Chemistry, Washington State University; Zhuang, Xiaofeng [Department of Plant Sciences, University of Tennessee; Hasebe, Mitsuyasu [Laboratory of Evolutionary Biology, National Institute for Biology, 38 Nishigounaka; Stewart, Neal C. [Department of Plant Sciences, University of Tennessee; Gang, David R. [Institute of Biological Chemistry, Washington State University; Chen, Feng [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

    2012-01-01

    Known SABATH methyltransferases, all of which were identified from seed plants, catalyze methylation of either the carboxyl group of a variety of low molecular weight metabolites or the nitrogen moiety of precursors of caffeine. In this study, the SABATH family from the bryophyte Physcomitrella patens was identified and characterized. Four SABATH-like sequences (PpSABATH1, PpSABATH2, PpSABATH3, and PpSABATH4) were identified from the P. patens genome. Only PpSABATH1 and PpSABATH2 showed expression in the leafy gametophyte of P. patens. Full-length cDNAs of PpSABATH1 and PpSABATH2 were cloned and expressed in soluble form in Escherichia coli. Recombinant PpSABATH1 and PpSABATH2 were tested for methyltransferase activity with a total of 75 compounds. While showing no activity with carboxylic acids or nitrogen-containing compounds, PpSABATH1 displayed methyltransferase activity with a number of thiols. PpSABATH2 did not show activity with any of the compounds tested. Among the thiols analyzed, PpSABATH1 showed the highest level of activity with thiobenzoic acid with an apparent Km value of 95.5 lM, which is comparable to those of known SABATHs. Using thiobenzoic acid as substrate, GC MS analysis indicated that the methylation catalyzed by PpSABATH1 is on the sulfur atom. The mechanism for S-methylation of thiols catalyzed by PpSABATH1 was partially revealed by homology-based structural modeling. The expression of PpSABATH1 was induced by the treatment of thiobenzoic acid. Further transgenic studies showed that tobacco plants overexpressing PpSABATH1 exhibited enhanced tolerance to thiobenzoic acid, suggesting that PpSABATH1 have a role in the detoxification of xenobiotic thiols.

  6. Archease from Pyrococcus abyssi improves substrate specificity and solubility of a tRNA m5C methyltransferase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Auxilien, Sylvie; El Khadali, Fatima; Rasmussen, Anette;

    2007-01-01

    reading frame (PAB1947), which is shown here to encode a tRNA m(5)C methyltransferase. In vitro, the purified recombinant methyltransferase catalyzes m(5)C formation at several cytosines within tRNAs with preference for C49. The specificity of the methyltransferase is increased by the archease...

  7. Human placental DNA methyltransferase: DNA substrate and DNA binding specificity.

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, R.Y.; Huang, L. H.; Ehrlich, M

    1984-01-01

    We have partially purified a DNA methyltransferase from human placenta using a novel substrate for a highly sensitive assay of methylation of hemimethylated DNA. This substrate was prepared by extensive nick translation of bacteriophage XP12 DNA, which normally has virtually all of its cytosine residues replaced by 5-methylcytosine (m5C). Micrococcus luteus DNA was just as good a substrate if it was first similarly nick translated with m5dCTP instead of dCTP in the polymerization mixture. At ...

  8. Expanding Cofactor Repertoire of Protein Lysine Methyltransferase for Substrate Labeling

    OpenAIRE

    Islam, Kabirul; Zheng, Weihong; Yu, Haiqiang; Deng, Haiteng; Luo, Minkui

    2011-01-01

    Protein lysine methyltransferases (PKMTs) play crucial roles in normal physiology and disease processes. Profiling PKMT targets is an important but challenging task. With cancer-relevant G9a as a target, we have demonstrated the success in developing S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) analogues, particularly (E)-hex-2-en-5-ynyl SAM (Hey-SAM), as cofactors for engineered G9a. Hey-SAM analogue in combination with G9a Y1154A mutant modifies the same set of substrates as their native counterparts with...

  9. Purification and characterization of DNA methyltransferases from Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    OpenAIRE

    Piekarowicz, A; Yuan, R.; Stein, D C

    1988-01-01

    Three DNA methyltransferases, M.NgoAI, and M.NgoBI and M.NgoBII, free of any nuclease activities were isolated from Neisseria gonorrhoeae strains WR220 and MUG116 respectively. M.NgoAI recognizes the sequence 5' GGCC 3' and methylates the first 5' cytosine on both strands. M.NgoBI and M.NgoBII recognize 5' TCACC 3' and 5' GTAN5CTC 3' respectively. M.NgoBII methylates cytosine on only one strand to produce 5' GTAN5mCTC 3'.

  10. High level expression and purification of HhaI methyltransferase.

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, J. C.; Santi, D V

    1988-01-01

    A cloning system for the DNA-(cytosine-5)-methyltransferase MHhaI and high level expression of the enzyme are described. A parent plasmid was constructed from fragments of the MHhaI gene and synthetic oligonucleotides. The construct permits introduction of various restriction sites for cloning at precise positions near the initiation codon, and beyond the termination codon. The entire MHhaI coding sequence was introduced as a 1042 b.p. NdeI-XbaI fragment into the vector pAR3040 which contains...

  11. Catalytic site remodelling of the DOT1L methyltransferase by selective inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Wenyu [Univ. of Toronto, ON (Canada); Chory, Emma J. [Dana-Farber Cancer Inst., Boston, MA (United States); Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA (United States); Wernimont, Amy K. [Univ. of Toronto, ON (Canada); Tempel, Wolfram [Univ. of Toronto, ON (Canada); Scopton, Alex [Univ. of Toronto, ON (Canada); Federation, Alexander [Dana-Farber Cancer Inst., Boston, MA (United States); Marineau, Jason J. [Dana-Farber Cancer Inst., Boston, MA (United States); Qi, Jun [Dana-Farber Cancer Inst., Boston, MA (United States); Barsyte-Lovejoy, Dalia [Univ. of Toronto, ON (Canada); Yi, Joanna [Dana-Farber Cancer Inst., Boston, MA (United States); Marcellus, Richard [Ontario Inst. for Cancer Research, Toronto, ON (Canada); Iacob, Roxana E. [Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA (United States); Engen, John R. [Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA (United States); Griffin, Carly [Ontario Inst. for Cancer Research, Toronto, ON (Canada); Aman, Ahmed [Ontario Inst. for Cancer Research, Toronto, ON (Canada); Wienholds, Erno [Univ. of Toronto, ON (Canada); Li, Fengling [Univ. of Toronto, ON (Canada); Pineda, Javier [Dana-Farber Cancer Inst., Boston, MA (United States); Univ. of Notre Dame, IN (United States); Estiu, Guillermina [Univ. of Notre Dame, IN (United States); Shatseva, Tatiana [Univ. of Toronto, ON (Canada); Hajian, Taraneh [Univ. of Toronto, ON (Canada); Al-awar, Rima [Ontario Inst. for Cancer Research, Toronto, ON (Canada); Dick, John E. [Univ. of Toronto, ON (Canada); Vedadi, Masoud [Univ. of Toronto, ON (Canada); Brown, Peter J. [Univ. of Toronto, ON (Canada); Arrowsmith, Cheryl H. [Univ. of Toronto, ON (Canada); Bradner, James E. [Dana-Farber Cancer Inst., Boston, MA (United States); Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Schapira, Matthieu [Univ. of Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2012-12-18

    Selective inhibition of protein methyltransferases is a promising new approach to drug discovery. An attractive strategy towards this goal is the development of compounds that selectively inhibit binding of the cofactor, S-adenosylmethionine, within specific protein methyltransferases. Here we report the three-dimensional structure of the protein methyltransferase DOT1L bound toEPZ004777, the first S-adenosylmethionine-competitive inhibitor of a protein methyltransferase with in vivo efficacy. This structure and those of four new analogues reveal remodelling of the catalytic site. EPZ004777 and a brominated analogue, SGC0946, inhibit DOT1L in vitro and selectively kill mixed lineage leukaemia cells, in which DOT1L is aberrantly localized via interaction with an oncogenic MLL fusion protein. These data provide important new insight into mechanisms of cell-active S-adenosylmethionine-competitive protein methyltransferase inhibitors, and establish a foundation for the further development of drug-like inhibitors of DOT1L for cancer therapy.

  12. Analysis of an Alanine/Arginine Mixture by Using TLC/FTIR Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We applied TLC/FTIR coupled with mapping technique to analyze an alanine/arginine mixture. Narrow band TLC plates prepared by using AgI as a stationary phase were used to separate alanine and arginine. The distribution of alanine and arginine spots was manifested by a 3D chromatogram. Alanine and arginine can be successfully separated by the narrow band TLC plate. In addition, the FTIR spectra of the separated alanine and arginine spots on the narrow band TLC plate are roughly the same as the corresponding reference IR spectra.

  13. Expression of arg genes of Escherichia coli during arginine limitation dependent upon stringent control of translation.

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, M.G.; Rogers, P

    1987-01-01

    The transcription and translation of operons for arginine biosynthetic enzymes after arginine removal (arginine down shift) were studied in relA and relA+ strains of Escherichia coli. After arginine down shift, derepression of synthesis of the arginine biosynthetic enzymes ornithine carbamoyltransferase (argF) and argininosuccinate lyase (argH) began at about 15 min in relA+ cells but was delayed in relA cells for more than 2 h. However, both relA+ and relA cells accumulated high levels of ar...

  14. Enthalpy-driven interactions with sulfated glycosaminoglycans promote cell membrane penetration of arginine peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takechi-Haraya, Yuki; Nadai, Ryo; Kimura, Hitoshi; Nishitsuji, Kazuchika; Uchimura, Kenji; Sakai-Kato, Kumiko; Kawakami, Kohsaku; Shigenaga, Akira; Kawakami, Toru; Otaka, Akira; Hojo, Hironobu; Sakashita, Naomi; Saito, Hiroyuki

    2016-06-01

    The first step of cell membrane penetration of arginine peptides is thought to occur via electrostatic interactions between positive charges of arginine residues and negative charges of sulfated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) on the cell surface. However, the molecular interaction of arginine peptides with GAG still remains unclear. Here, we compared the interactions of several arginine peptides of Tat, R8, and Rev and their analogues with heparin in relation to the cell membrane penetration efficiency. The high-affinity binding of arginine peptides to heparin was shown to be driven by large favorable enthalpy contributions, possibly reflecting multidentate hydrogen bondings of arginine residues with sulfate groups of heparin. Interestingly, the lysine peptides in which all arginine residues are substituted with lysine residues exhibited negligible binding enthalpy despite of their considerable binding to heparin. In CHO-K1 cells, arginine peptides exhibited a great cell-penetrating ability whereas their corresponding lysine peptides did not penetrate into cells. The degree of cell penetration of arginine peptides markedly decreased by the chlorate treatment of cells which prevents the sulfation of GAG chains. Significantly, the cell penetration efficiency of arginine peptides was found to be correlated with the favorable enthalpy of binding to heparin. These results suggest that the enthalpy-driven strong interaction with sulfated GAGs such as heparan sulfate plays a critical role in the efficient cell membrane penetration of arginine peptides. PMID:27003128

  15. Lipid substrate specificity of phosphatidylethanolamine N-methyltransferase of Tetrahymena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ciliate protozoan Tetrahymena thermophila forms about 60% of its phosphatidylcholine by methylation of phosphatidylethanolamine with S-adenosylmethionine using the enzyme phosphatidylethanolamine N-methyltransferase. Analogues of ethanolamine or of ethanolamine phosphate are incorporated into the phospholipids of Tetrahymena when cells are cultured in their presence. These compounds, 3-amino-1-propanol, 2-aminoethylphosphonate, 3-aminopropylphosphonate and N,N-dimethylaminoethylphosphonate replace from 50 to 75% of the ethanolamine phosphate in phosphatidylethanolamine. However, analysis of the phospholipids of lipid-altered Tetrahymena showed that none of the phosphatidylethanolamine analogues had been converted to the corresponding phosphatidylcholine analogue. No incorration of [14C-CH3]methionine into the phosphatidylcholine analogues could be demonstrated in vivo, nor was label from [3H-CH3]S-adenosylmethionine incorporated in virto. Thus, only phosphatidylethanolamine and its monomethyl and dimethyl derivatives have been found to be substrates for the phosphatidylethanoiamine N-methyltransferase. The enzyme therefore requires a phospholipid substrate containing an ester linkage between the alkylamine and phosphorus, with the amino group required to be β to the alcohol

  16. Hypnotizability and Catechol-O-Methyltransferase (COMT polymorphysms in Italians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Gialluisi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Higher brain dopamine content depending on lower activity of Catechol-O-Methyltransferase (COMT in subjects with high hypnotisability scores (highs has been considered responsible for their attentional characteristics. However, the results of the previous genetic studies on association between hypnotisability and the Catechol-O-Methyltransferase (COMT single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP rs4680 (Val158Met were inconsistent. Here, we used a selective genotyping approach to re-evaluate the association between hypnotisability and COMT in the context of a two-SNP haplotype analysis, considering not only the Val158Met polymorphism, but also the closely located rs4818 SNP. An Italian sample of 53 highs, 49 low hypnotizable subjects (lows and 57 controls, were genotyped for a segment of 805 bp of the COMT gene, including Val158Met and the closely located rs4818 SNP. Our selective genotyping approach had 97.1% power to detect the previously reported strongest association at the significance level of 5%. We found no evidence of association at the SNP, haplotype and diplotype levels. Thus, our results challenge the dopamine-based theory of hypnosis and indirectly support recent neuropsychological and neurophysiological findings reporting the lack of any association between hypnotisability and focused attention abilities.

  17. Gliclazide directly inhibits arginine-induced glucagon release

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cejvan, Kenan; Coy, David H; Holst, Jens Juul;

    2002-01-01

    Arginine-stimulated insulin and somatostatin release is enhanced by the sulfonylurea gliclazide. In contrast, gliclazide inhibits the glucagon response. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether this inhibition of glucagon release was mediated by a direct suppressive effect of...... specific antagonist of type 2 somatostatin receptor, DC-41-33 (2 micro mol/l), which fully antagonizes the suppressive somatostatin effect on rat A cells. Gliclazide (30 micro mol/l) inhibited glucagon release by 54% in the perfusion experiments, whereas the somatostatin response was nearly abolished. In...... islet perifusions with DC-41-33, arginine-induced glucagon release was inhibited by 66%. We therefore concluded that gliclazide inhibits glucagon release by a direct action on the pancreatic A cell....

  18. Arginine vasopressin in septic shock: supplement or substitute for norepinephrine?

    OpenAIRE

    Rehberg, Sebastian; Enkhbaatar, Perenlei; Traber, Daniel L

    2009-01-01

    In the current issue of Critical Care, Simon and coworkers investigated the effects of first-line arginine vasopressin (AVP) on organ function and systemic metabolism compared with norepinephrine in a pig model of fecal peritonitis. AVP was titrated according to the mean arterial pressure suggesting a vasopressor rather than a hormone replacement therapy. The study provides some evidence for the safety of this therapeutic approach. It needs to be determined whether AVP is most beneficial as a...

  19. Characterization of casein and Poly-L-arginine Multilayer Films

    OpenAIRE

    Warszynska, Lilianna Szyk; Kilan, Katarzyna; Socha, Robert P.

    2013-01-01

    Thin films containing casein appear to be a promising material for coatings used in the medical area to promote biomineralization. alfa- and beta-casein and poly-L-arginine multilayer films were formed by the layer-by layer technique and their thickness and mass were analyzed by ellipsometry and quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D). We investigated the effect of the type of casein used for the film formation and of the polyethyleneimine anchoring layer on the thickn...

  20. The regulatory PII protein controls arginine biosynthesis in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrario-Méry, Sylvie; Besin, Evelyne; Pichon, Olivier; Meyer, Christian; Hodges, Michael

    2006-04-01

    In higher plants, PII is a nuclear-encoded plastid protein which is homologous to bacterial PII signalling proteins known to be involved in the regulation of nitrogen metabolism. A reduced ornithine, citrulline and arginine accumulation was observed in two Arabidopsis PII knock-out mutants in response to NH4+ resupply after N starvation. This difference could be explained by the regulation of a key enzyme of the arginine biosynthesis pathway, N-acetyl glutamate kinase (NAGK) by PII. In vitro assays using purified recombinant proteins showed the catalytic activation of Arabidopsis NAGK by PII giving the first evidence of a physiological role of the PII protein in higher plants. Using Arabidopsis transcriptome microarray (CATMA) and RT-PCR analyses, it was found that none of the genes involved in the arginine biosynthetic or catabolic pathways were differentially expressed in a PII knock-out mutant background. In conclusion, the observed changes in metabolite levels can be explained by the reduced activation of NAGK by PII. PMID:16545809

  1. Substrate recognition and modification by the nosiheptide resistance methyltransferase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sitao Yin

    Full Text Available The proliferation of antibiotic resistant pathogens is an increasing threat to the general public. Resistance may be conferred by a number of mechanisms including covalent or mutational modification of the antibiotic binding site, covalent modification of the drug, or the over-expression of efflux pumps. The nosiheptide resistance methyltransferase (NHR confers resistance to the thiazole antibiotic nosiheptide in the nosiheptide producer organism Streptomyces actuosus through 2'O-methylation of 23S rRNA at the nucleotide A1067. Although the crystal structures of NHR and the closely related thiostrepton-resistance methyltransferase (TSR in complex with the cofactor S-Adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM are available, the principles behind NHR substrate recognition and catalysis remain unclear.We have analyzed the binding interactions between NHR and model 58 and 29 nucleotide substrate RNAs by gel electrophoresis mobility shift assays (EMSA and fluorescence anisotropy. We show that the enzyme binds to RNA as a dimer. By constructing a hetero-dimer complex composed of one wild-type subunit and one inactive mutant NHR-R135A subunit, we show that only one functional subunit of the NHR homodimer is required for its enzymatic activity. Mutational analysis suggests that the interactions between neighbouring bases (G1068 and U1066 and A1067 have an important role in methyltransfer activity, such that the substitution of a deoxy sugar spacer (5' to the target nucleotide achieved near wild-type levels of methylation. A series of atomic substitutions at specific positions on the substrate adenine show that local base-base interactions between neighbouring bases are important for methylation.Taken together these data suggest that local base-base interactions play an important role in aligning the substrate 2' hydroxyl group of A1067 for methyl group transfer. Methylation of nucleic acids is playing an increasingly important role in fundamental biological processes

  2. Systems pathway engineering of Corynebacterium crenatum for improved L-arginine production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Man, Zaiwei; Xu, Meijuan; Rao, Zhiming; Guo, Jing; Yang, Taowei; Zhang, Xian; Xu, Zhenghong

    2016-01-01

    L-arginine is an important amino acid in food and pharmaceutical industries. Until now, the main production method of L-arginine in China is the highly polluting keratin acid hydrolysis. The industrial level L-arginine production by microbial fermentation has become an important task. In previous work, we obtained a new L-arginine producing Corynebacterium crenatum (subspecies of Corynebacterium glutamicum) through screening and mutation breeding. In this work, we performed systems pathway engineering of C. crenatum for improved L-arginine production, involving amplification of L-arginine biosynthetic pathway flux by removal of feedback inhibition and overexpression of arginine operon; optimization of NADPH supply by modulation of metabolic flux distribution between glycolysis and pentose phosphate pathway; increasing glucose consumption by strengthening the preexisting glucose transporter and exploitation of new glucose uptake system; channeling excess carbon flux from glycolysis into tricarboxylic acid cycle to alleviate the glucose overflow metabolism; redistribution of carbon flux at α-ketoglutarate metabolic node to channel more flux into L-arginine biosynthetic pathway; minimization of carbon and cofactor loss by attenuation of byproducts formation. The final strain could produce 87.3 g L−1 L-arginine with yield up to 0.431 g L-arginine g−1 glucose in fed-batch fermentation. PMID:27338253

  3. Systems pathway engineering of Corynebacterium crenatum for improved L-arginine production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Man, Zaiwei; Xu, Meijuan; Rao, Zhiming; Guo, Jing; Yang, Taowei; Zhang, Xian; Xu, Zhenghong

    2016-01-01

    L-arginine is an important amino acid in food and pharmaceutical industries. Until now, the main production method of L-arginine in China is the highly polluting keratin acid hydrolysis. The industrial level L-arginine production by microbial fermentation has become an important task. In previous work, we obtained a new L-arginine producing Corynebacterium crenatum (subspecies of Corynebacterium glutamicum) through screening and mutation breeding. In this work, we performed systems pathway engineering of C. crenatum for improved L-arginine production, involving amplification of L-arginine biosynthetic pathway flux by removal of feedback inhibition and overexpression of arginine operon; optimization of NADPH supply by modulation of metabolic flux distribution between glycolysis and pentose phosphate pathway; increasing glucose consumption by strengthening the preexisting glucose transporter and exploitation of new glucose uptake system; channeling excess carbon flux from glycolysis into tricarboxylic acid cycle to alleviate the glucose overflow metabolism; redistribution of carbon flux at α-ketoglutarate metabolic node to channel more flux into L-arginine biosynthetic pathway; minimization of carbon and cofactor loss by attenuation of byproducts formation. The final strain could produce 87.3 g L(-1) L-arginine with yield up to 0.431 g L-arginine g(-1) glucose in fed-batch fermentation. PMID:27338253

  4. Solubilization of aromatic and hydrophobic moieties by arginine in aqueous solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianguo; Garg, Manju; Shah, Dhawal; Rajagopalan, Raj

    2010-08-01

    Experiments hold intriguing, circumstantial clues to the mechanisms behind arginine-mediated solubilization of small organic drugs and suppression of protein aggregation driven by hydrophobic or aromatic associations, but how exactly arginine's molecular structure and interactions contribute to its function remains unclear since attention has focused so far on the thermodynamics of the preferential exclusion or binding of arginine. Here, we examine, through molecular dynamics simulations, how arginine solubilizes nanoscale particles with hydrophobic surfaces or aromatic-ring-type surface interactions. We show that preferential, hydrophobic, and dispersion interactions of arginine's guanidinium group with the particles lead to a surfactant-like behavior of arginine around the particles and to a solvation layer with a protective polar mask creating a hydrophilic shell. Additionally, arginine-arginine association around the solvation layer further prevents aggregative contacts. The results shed some light on the mechanistic basis of arginine's function as a suppressant of protein aggregation, although the complex energy landscapes and kinetic pathways of aggregation are protein-dependent and pose formidable challenges to developing comprehensive mechanistic pictures. Our results suggest arginine's mode of interaction with hydrophobic patches and aromatic residues could reduce aggregation-prone intermediate states of proteins and shield protein-protein aggregative contacts. The approach used here offers a systematic way of exploring implications of other amino acid/excipient interactions by studying interactions of the excipient with particles grafted with amino acids.

  5. An Arginine Deprivation Response Pathway Is Induced in Leishmania during Macrophage Invasion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adele Goldman-Pinkovich

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Amino acid sensing is an intracellular function that supports nutrient homeostasis, largely through controlled release of amino acids from lysosomal pools. The intracellular pathogen Leishmania resides and proliferates within human macrophage phagolysosomes. Here we describe a new pathway in Leishmania that specifically senses the extracellular levels of arginine, an amino acid that is essential for the parasite. During infection, the macrophage arginine pool is depleted due to its use to produce metabolites (NO and polyamines that constitute part of the host defense response and its suppression, respectively. We found that parasites respond to this shortage of arginine by up-regulating expression and activity of the Leishmania arginine transporter (LdAAP3, as well as several other transporters. Our analysis indicates the parasite monitors arginine levels in the environment rather than the intracellular pools. Phosphoproteomics and genetic analysis indicates that the arginine-deprivation response is mediated through a mitogen-activated protein kinase-2-dependent signaling cascade.

  6. An Arginine Deprivation Response Pathway Is Induced in Leishmania during Macrophage Invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman-Pinkovich, Adele; Balno, Caitlin; Strasser, Rona; Zeituni-Molad, Michal; Bendelak, Keren; Rentsch, Doris; Ephros, Moshe; Wiese, Martin; Jardim, Armando; Myler, Peter J; Zilberstein, Dan

    2016-04-01

    Amino acid sensing is an intracellular function that supports nutrient homeostasis, largely through controlled release of amino acids from lysosomal pools. The intracellular pathogen Leishmania resides and proliferates within human macrophage phagolysosomes. Here we describe a new pathway in Leishmania that specifically senses the extracellular levels of arginine, an amino acid that is essential for the parasite. During infection, the macrophage arginine pool is depleted due to its use to produce metabolites (NO and polyamines) that constitute part of the host defense response and its suppression, respectively. We found that parasites respond to this shortage of arginine by up-regulating expression and activity of the Leishmania arginine transporter (LdAAP3), as well as several other transporters. Our analysis indicates the parasite monitors arginine levels in the environment rather than the intracellular pools. Phosphoproteomics and genetic analysis indicates that the arginine-deprivation response is mediated through a mitogen-activated protein kinase-2-dependent signaling cascade. PMID:27043018

  7. An audit of thiopurine methyltransferase genotyping and phenotyping before intended azathioprine treatment for dermatological conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, T; Bygum, A

    2009-01-01

    Summary Background. Determining thiopurine methyltransferase (TPMT) genotype and phenotype before azathioprine treatment predicts which patients are most likely to develop myelosuppression. Aim. To evaluate the course of azathioprine treatment in people with TPMT heterozygosity and whether this d...

  8. Arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase and the methylation of arsenicals in the invertebrate chordate Ciona intestinalis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biotransformation of inorganic arsenic (iAs) involves methylation catalyzed by arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase (As3mt), yielding mono- , di- , and trimethylated arsenicals. To investigate the evolution of molecular mechanisms that mediate arsenic biotransformation,...

  9. Erythrocuyte catechol-O-methyltransferase activity in related families with schizophrenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erythrocyte catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) activity has been analyzed in 72 individuals from 17 related families with 18 schizophrenic members. No association with any of the three COMT genotypes could be found in this pedigree. (author)

  10. “MGMT for pt mgmt”: Is Methylguanine-DNA Methyltransferase Testing Ready for Patient Management?

    OpenAIRE

    Iafrate, A. John; Louis, David N.

    2008-01-01

    This Commentary reports on a robust quantitative assay for the interpretation of O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) promoter methylation assays that should facilitate the comparison and implementation of such assays across laboratories.

  11. Expression pattern of a nuclear encoded mitochondrial arginine-ornithine translocator gene from Arabidopsis

    OpenAIRE

    Schneider Anja; Kunze Reinhard; Wipf Daniel; Hilpert Melanie; Desimone Marcelo; Catoni Elisabetta; Flügge Ulf-Ingo; Schumacher Karin; Frommer Wolf B

    2003-01-01

    Abstract Background Arginine and citrulline serve as nitrogen storage forms, but are also involved in biosynthetic and catabolic pathways. Metabolism of arginine, citrulline and ornithine is distributed between mitochondria and cytosol. For the shuttle of intermediates between cytosol and mitochondria transporters present on the inner mitochondrial membrane are required. Yeast contains a mitochondrial translocator for ornithine and arginine, Ort1p/Arg11p. Ort1p/Arg11p is a member of the mitoc...

  12. The arginine-ornithine antiporter ArcD contributes to biological fitness of Streptococcus suis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus eFulde

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The arginine-ornithine antiporter (ArcD is part of the Arginine Deiminase System (ADS, a catabolic, energy-providing pathway found in a variety of different bacterial species, including the porcine zoonotic pathogen Streptococcus suis. The ADS has recently been shown to play a role in the pathogenicity of S. suis, in particular in its survival in host cells. The contribution of arginine and arginine transport mediated by ArcD, however, has yet to be clarified. In the present study, we showed by experiments using [U-13C6]arginine as a tracer molecule that S. suis is auxotrophic for arginine and that bacterial growth depends on the uptake of extracellular arginine. To further study the role of ArcD in arginine metabolism, we generated an arcD-specific mutant strain and characterized its growth compared to the wild-type (WT strain, a virulent serotype 2 strain. The mutant strain showed a markedly reduced growth rate in chemically defined media supplemented with arginine when compared to the WT strain, indicating that ArcD promotes arginine uptake. To further evaluate the in vivo relevance of ArcD, we studied the intracellular bacterial survival of the arcD mutant strain in an epithelial cell culture infection model. The mutant strain was substantially attenuated, and its reduced intracellular survival rate correlated with a lower ability to neutralize the acidified environment. Based on these results, we propose that ArcD, by its function as an arginine-ornithine antiporter, is important for supplying arginine as substrate of the ADS and, thereby, contributes to biological fitness and virulence of S. suis in the host.

  13. Risk and risk reduction involving arginine intake and meat consumption in colorectal tumorigenesis and survival

    OpenAIRE

    Zell, Jason A.; Ignatenko, Natalia A.; Yerushalmi, Hagit F; Ziogas, Argyrios; Besselsen, David G; Gerner, Eugene W.; Anton-Culver, Hoda

    2007-01-01

    Elevated polyamine and nitric oxide levels (both derived from arginine) promote tumorigenesis, whereas non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) inhibit colorectal cancer (CRC) incidence in experimental and epidemiologic studies. We investigated dietary arginine-induced intestinal tumorigenesis and NSAID-inhibitory effects in Apc(Min/+) mice differentially expressing nitric oxide synthase-2 (Nos2). We also studied effects of estimated arginine exposures through meat consumption on tumor ...

  14. Remission of diabetes mellitus in cats cannot be predicted by the arginine stimulation test

    OpenAIRE

    Tschuor, F

    2011-01-01

    Background: Responsiveness of β-cells to arginine persists the longest during diabetes progression, making the intravenous arginine stimulation test (IVAST) a useful tool to assess residual insulin and glucagon secretion. Hypothesis: Diabetic cats with and without remission will have different arginine-induced insulin or glucagon response. Animals: 17 cats with diabetes, 7 healthy cats. Methods: Response to IVAST was assessed by calculating insulin and glucagon area under the c...

  15. Hyponatraemia in the first week of life in preterm infants. Part I. Arginine vasopressin secretion.

    OpenAIRE

    Rees, L; Brook, C G; Shaw, J C; Forsling, M L

    1984-01-01

    Continuous sequential urinary arginine vasopressin measurements in 14 preterm, ventilated infants suggest that both osmoreceptor and volume receptor systems are able to stimulate the prolonged secretion of arginine vasopressin from 26 weeks' gestation. The kidney is able to respond to arginine vasopressin stimulation from the first day of life and from 26 weeks' gestation. A maximum urine osmolality not exceeding 550 mOsm/kg was reached which varied with hydration of the infant. Excretion of ...

  16. Protective Effect of Arginine on Oxidative Stress in Transgenic Sickle Mouse Models

    OpenAIRE

    Dasgupta, Trisha; Hebbel, Robert P.; Kaul, Dhananjay K.

    2006-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is characterized by reperfusion injury and chronic oxidative stress. Oxidative stress and hemolysis in SCD result in inactivation of nitric oxide (NO) and depleted arginine levels. We hypothesized that augmenting NO production by arginine supplementation will reduce oxidative stress in SCD. To this end, we measured the effect of arginine (5% in mouse chow) on NO metabolites (NOx), lipid peroxidation (LPO) and selected antioxidants in transgenic sickle mouse models. U...

  17. Arginine Consumption by the Intestinal Parasite Giardia intestinalis Reduces Proliferation of Intestinal Epithelial Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Stadelmann, Britta; Merino, Maria C.; Persson, Lo; Svard, Staffan G.

    2012-01-01

    In the field of infectious diseases the multifaceted amino acid arginine has reached special attention as substrate for the host´s production of the antimicrobial agent nitric oxide (NO). A variety of infectious organisms interfere with this part of the host immune response by reducing the availability of arginine. This prompted us to further investigate additional roles of arginine during pathogen infections. As a model we used the intestinal parasite Giardia intestinalis that actively consu...

  18. Oral Arginine Metabolism May Decrease the Risk for Dental Caries in Children

    OpenAIRE

    Nascimento, M. M.; Liu, Y.; Kalra, R.; Perry, S.; Adewumi, A.; Xu, X.; Primosch, R.E.; Burne, R A

    2013-01-01

    Arginine metabolism by oral bacteria via the arginine deiminase system (ADS) increases the local pH, which can neutralize the effects of acidification from sugar metabolism and reduce the cariogenicity of oral biofilms. To explore the relationship between oral arginine metabolism and dental caries experience in children, we measured ADS activity in oral samples from 100 children and correlated it with their caries status and type of dentition. Supragingival dental plaque was collected from to...

  19. The RNA–Methyltransferase Misu (NSun2) Poises Epidermal Stem Cells to Differentiate

    OpenAIRE

    Sandra Blanco; Agata Kurowski; Jennifer Nichols; Watt, Fiona M.; Salvador Aznar Benitah; Michaela Frye

    2011-01-01

    Homeostasis of most adult tissues is maintained by balancing stem cell self-renewal and differentiation, but whether post-transcriptional mechanisms can regulate this process is unknown. Here, we identify that an RNA methyltransferase (Misu/Nsun2) is required to balance stem cell self-renewal and differentiation in skin. In the epidermis, this methyltransferase is found in a defined sub-population of hair follicle stem cells poised to undergo lineage commitment, and its depletion results in e...

  20. Engineering the DNA cytosine-5 methyltransferase reaction for sequence-specific labeling of DNA

    OpenAIRE

    Lukinavičius, Gražvydas; Lapinaitė, Audronė; Urbanavičiūtė, Giedrė; Gerasimaitė, Rūta; Klimašauskas, Saulius

    2012-01-01

    DNA methyltransferases catalyse the transfer of a methyl group from the ubiquitous cofactor S-adenosyl-L-methionine (AdoMet) onto specific target sites on DNA and play important roles in organisms from bacteria to humans. AdoMet analogs with extended propargylic side chains have been chemically produced for methyltransferase-directed transfer of activated groups (mTAG) onto DNA, although the efficiency of reactions with synthetic analogs remained low. We performed steric engineering of the co...

  1. Structure–function analysis of vaccinia virus mRNA cap (guanine-N7) methyltransferase

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Sushuang; Shuman, Stewart

    2008-01-01

    The guanine-N7 methyltransferase domain of vaccinia virus mRNA capping enzyme is a heterodimer composed of a catalytic subunit and a stimulatory subunit. Structure–function analysis of the catalytic subunit by alanine scanning and conservative substitutions (49 mutations at 25 amino acids) identified 12 functional groups essential for methyltransferase activity in vivo, most of which were essential for cap methylation in vitro. Defects in cap binding were demonstrated for a subset of lethal m...

  2. Crystal structure of dengue virus methyltransferase without S-adenosyl-L-methionine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, Christian G; Li, Shi-Hua; Dong, Hongping; Chew, Sock Hui; Shi, Pei-Yong

    2014-11-01

    Flavivirus methyltransferase is a genetically-validated antiviral target. Crystal structures of almost all available flavivirus methyltransferases contain S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM), the methyl donor molecule that co-purifies with the enzymes. This raises a possibility that SAM is an integral structural component required for the folding of dengue virus (DENV) methyltransferase. Here we exclude this possibility by solving the crystal structure of DENV methyltransferase without SAM. The SAM ligand was removed from the enzyme through a urea-mediated denaturation-and-renaturation protocol. The crystal structure of the SAM-depleted enzyme exhibits a vacant SAM-binding pocket, with a conformation identical to that of the SAM-enzyme co-crystal structure. Functionally, equivalent enzymatic activities (N-7 methylation, 2'-O methylation, and GMP-enzyme complex formation) were detected for the SAM-depleted and SAM-containing recombinant proteins. These results clearly indicate that the SAM molecule is not an essential component for the correct folding of DENV methyltransferase. Furthermore, the results imply a potential antiviral approach to search for inhibitors that can bind to the SAM-binding pocket and compete against SAM binding. To demonstrate this potential, we have soaked crystals of DENV methyltransferase without a bound SAM with the natural product Sinefungin and show that preformed crystals are capable of binding ligands in this pocket. PMID:25241250

  3. Bioinformatic evaluation of L-arginine catabolic pathways in 24 cyanobacteria and transcriptional analysis of genes encoding enzymes of L-arginine catabolism in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pistorius Elfriede K

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background So far very limited knowledge exists on L-arginine catabolism in cyanobacteria, although six major L-arginine-degrading pathways have been described for prokaryotes. Thus, we have performed a bioinformatic analysis of possible L-arginine-degrading pathways in cyanobacteria. Further, we chose Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 for a more detailed bioinformatic analysis and for validation of the bioinformatic predictions on L-arginine catabolism with a transcript analysis. Results We have evaluated 24 cyanobacterial genomes of freshwater or marine strains for the presence of putative L-arginine-degrading enzymes. We identified an L-arginine decarboxylase pathway in all 24 strains. In addition, cyanobacteria have one or two further pathways representing either an arginase pathway or L-arginine deiminase pathway or an L-arginine oxidase/dehydrogenase pathway. An L-arginine amidinotransferase pathway as a major L-arginine-degrading pathway is not likely but can not be entirely excluded. A rather unusual finding was that the cyanobacterial L-arginine deiminases are substantially larger than the enzymes in non-photosynthetic bacteria and that they are membrane-bound. A more detailed bioinformatic analysis of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 revealed that three different L-arginine-degrading pathways may in principle be functional in this cyanobacterium. These are (i an L-arginine decarboxylase pathway, (ii an L-arginine deiminase pathway, and (iii an L-arginine oxidase/dehydrogenase pathway. A transcript analysis of cells grown either with nitrate or L-arginine as sole N-source and with an illumination of 50 μmol photons m-2 s-1 showed that the transcripts for the first enzyme(s of all three pathways were present, but that the transcript levels for the L-arginine deiminase and the L-arginine oxidase/dehydrogenase were substantially higher than that of the three isoenzymes of L-arginine decarboxylase. Conclusion The evaluation of 24

  4. Expression and Characterization of ArgR, An Arginine Regulatory Protein in Corynebacterium crenatum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Xue Lan; ZHANG Bin; TANG Li; JIAO Hai Tao; XU Heng Yi; XU Feng; XU Hong; WEI Hua; XIONG Yong Hua

    2014-01-01

    Objective Corynebacterium crenatum MT, a mutant from C. crenatum AS 1.542 with a lethal argR gene, exhibits high arginine production. To confirm the effect of ArgR on arginine biosynthesis in C. crenatum, an intact argR gene from wild-type AS 1.542 was introduced into C. crenatum MT, resulting in C. crenatum MT. sp, and the changes of transcriptional levels of the arginine biosynthetic genes and arginine production were compared between the mutant strain and the recombinant strain. Methods Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction was employed to analyze the changes of the related genes at the transcriptional level, electrophoretic mobility shift assays were used to determine ArgR binding with the argCJBDF, argGH, and carAB promoter regions, and arginine production was determined with an automated amino acid analyzer. Results Arginine production assays showed a 69.9%reduction in arginine from 9.01±0.22 mg/mL in C. crenatum MT to 2.71±0.13 mg/mL (P Conclusion The arginine biosynthetic genes in C. crenatum are clearly controlled by the negative regulator ArgR, and intact ArgR in C. crenatum MT results in a significant descrease in arginine production.

  5. Evaluation of chemical labeling methods for identifying functional arginine residues of proteins by mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanigasekara, Maheshika S K; Chowdhury, Saiful M

    2016-09-01

    Arginine residues undergo several kinds of post-translational modifications (PTMs). These PTMs are associated with several inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, atherosclerosis, and diabetes. Mass spectrometric studies of arginine modified proteins and peptides are very important, not only to identify the reactive arginine residues but also to understand the tandem mass spectrometry behavior of these peptides for assigning the sequences unambiguously. Herein, we utilize tandem mass spectrometry to report the performance of two widely used arginine labeling reagents, 1,2-cyclohexanedione (CHD) and phenylglyoxal (PG) with several arginine containing peptides and proteins. Time course labeling studies were performed to demonstrate the selectivity of the reagents in proteins or protein digests. Structural studies on the proteins were also explored to better understand the reaction sites and position of arginine residues. We found CHD showed better labeling efficiencies compared to phenylglyoxal. Reactive arginine profiling on a purified albumin protein clearly pointed out the cellular glycation modification site for this protein with high confidence. We believe these detailed mass-spectrometric studies will provide significant input to profile reactive arginine residues in large-scale studies; therefore, targeted proteomics can be performed to the short listed reactive sites for cellular arginine modifications. PMID:27543028

  6. Dietary Arginine Requirements for Growth Are Dependent on the Rate of Citrulline Production in Mice123

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marini, Juan C; Agarwal, Umang; Didelija, Inka C

    2015-01-01

    Background: In many species, including humans, arginine is considered a semiessential amino acid because under certain conditions endogenous synthesis cannot meet its demand. The requirements of arginine for growth in mice are ill defined and seem to vary depending on the genetic background of the mice. Objective: The objective of this study was to determine the metabolic and molecular basis for the requirement of arginine in 2 mouse strains. Methods: Institute of Cancer Research (ICR) and C57BL/6 (BL6) male mice were fed arginine-free or arginine-sufficient diets (Expt. 1) or 1 of 7 diets with increasing arginine concentration (from 0- to 8-g/kg diet, Expt. 2) between day 24 and 42 of life to determine the arginine requirements for growth. Citrulline production and “de novo” arginine synthesis were measured with use of stable isotopes, and arginine requirements were determined by breakpoint analysis and enzyme expression by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. Results: In Expt. 1, ICR mice grew at the same rate regardless of the arginine concentration of the diet (mean ± SE: 0.66 ± 0.04 g/d, P = 0.80), but BL6 mice had a reduced growth rate when fed the arginine-free diet (0.25 ± 0.02 g/d, P < 0.001) compared to the 8-g arginine/kg diet (0.46 ± 0.03 g/d). ICR mice showed at least a 2-fold greater expression (P < 0.001) of ornithine transcarbamylase (OTC) than BL6 mice, which translated into a greater rate of citrulline (25%) and arginine synthesis (49%, P < 0.002). In Expt. 2, breakpoint analysis showed that the requirement for growth of BL6 mice was met with 2.32 ± 0.39 g arginine/kg diet; for ICR mice, however, no breakpoint was found. Conclusion: Our data indicate that a reduced expression of OTC in BL6 mice translates into a reduced production of citrulline and arginine compared with ICR mice, which results in a dietary arginine requirement for growth in BL6 mice, but not in ICR mice. PMID:25855119

  7. Intravenous Selenium Modulates L-Arginine-Induced Experimental Acute Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Hardman

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Context Oxidative stress is understood to have a critical role in the development of acinar injury in experimental acute pancreatitis. We have previously demonstrated that compound multiple antioxidant therapy ameliorates end-organ damage in the intra-peritoneal L-arginine rat model. As the principal co-factor for glutathione, selenium is a key constituent of multiple antioxidant preparations. Objective The intention of this study was to investigate the effect of selenium on pancreatic and remote organ injury in a wellvalidated experimental model of acute pancreatitis. Methods Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly allocated to one of 3 groups (n=5/group and sacrificed at 72 hours. Acute pancreatitis was induced by 250 mg per 100 g body weight of 20% L-arginine hydrochloride in 0.15 mol/L sodium chloride. Group allocations were: Group 1, control; Group 2, acute pancreatitis; Group 3, selenium. Main outcome measures Serum amylase, anti-oxidant levels, bronchoalveolar lavage protein, lung myeloperoxidase activity, and histological assessment of pancreatic injury. Results L-arginine induced acute pancreatitis characterised by oedema, neutrophil infiltration, acinar cell degranulation and elevated serum amylase. Selenium treatment was associated with reduced pancreatic oedema and inflammatory cell infiltration. Acinar degranulation and dilatation were completely absent. A reduction in bronchoalveolar lavage protein content was also demonstrated. Conclusion Intravenous selenium given 24 hours after induction of experimental acute pancreatitis was associated with a reduction in the histological stigmata of pancreatic injury and a dramatic reduction in broncho-alveolar lavage protein content. Serum selenium fell during the course of experimental acute pancreatitis and this effect was not reversed by exogenous selenium supplementation.

  8. Detection of a novel arginine vasopression defect by dideoxy fingerprinting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishnamani, M.R.S.; Phillips, J.A. III; Copeland, K.C. (Vanderbilt Univ. School of Medicine, Nashville, TN (United States) Univ. of Vermont College of Medicine, Burlington, VT (United States))

    1993-09-01

    Autosomal dominant neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus is a familial form of diabetes insipidus. This disorder is associated with variable levels of arginine vasopressin (AVP) and diabetes insipidus of varying severity, which responds to exogenous AVP. To determine the molecular basis of autosomal dominant neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus, the AVP genes of members of a large kindred were analyzed. A new method, called dideoxy fingerprinting, was used to detect an AVP mutation that was characterized by DNA sequencing. The novel defect found changes the last codon of the AVP signal peptide from alanine to threonine, which should perturb cleavage of mature AVP from its precursor protein and inhibit its secretion or action. 18 refs., 3 figs.

  9. Stability and resilience of oral microcosms toward acidification and Candida outgrowth by arginine supplementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koopman, Jessica E; Röling, Wilfred F M; Buijs, Mark J; Sissons, Christopher H; ten Cate, Jacob M; Keijser, Bart J F; Crielaard, Wim; Zaura, Egija

    2015-02-01

    Dysbiosis induced by low pH in the oral ecosystem can lead to caries, a prevalent bacterial disease in humans. The amino acid arginine is one of the pH-elevating agents in the oral cavity. To obtain insights into the effect of arginine on oral microbial ecology, a multi-plaque "artificial mouth" (MAM) biofilm model was inoculated with saliva from a healthy volunteer and microcosms were grown for 4 weeks with 1.6 % (w/v) arginine supplement (Arginine) or without (Control), samples were taken at several time-points. A cariogenic environment was mimicked by sucrose pulsing. The bacterial composition was determined by 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing, the presence and amount of Candida and arginine deiminase system genes arcA and sagP by qPCR. Additionally, ammonium and short-chain fatty acid concentrations were determined. The Arginine microcosms were dominated by Streptococcus, Veillonella, and Neisseria and remained stable in time, while the composition of the Control microcosms diverged significantly in time, partially due to the presence of Megasphaera. The percentage of Candida increased 100-fold in the Control microcosms compared to the Arginine microcosms. The pH-raising effect of arginine was confirmed by the pH and ammonium results. The abundances of sagP and arcA were highest in the Arginine microcosms, while the concentration of butyrate was higher in the Control microcosms. We demonstrate that supplementation with arginine serves a health-promoting function; it enhances microcosm resilience toward acidification and suppresses outgrowth of the opportunistic pathogen Candida. Arginine facilitates stability of oral microbial communities and prevents them from becoming cariogenic. PMID:25433583

  10. The subcellular compartmentalization of arginine metabolizing enzymes and their role in endothelial dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng eChen

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The endothelial production of nitric oxide (NO mediates endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation and restrains vascular inflammation, smooth muscle proliferation and platelet aggregation. Impaired production of NO is a hallmark of endothelial dysfunction and promotes the development of cardiovascular disease. In endothelial cells, NO is generated by endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS through the conversion of its substrate, L-arginine to L-citrulline. Reduced access to L-arginine has been proposed as a major mechanism underlying reduced eNOS activity and NO production in cardiovascular disease. The arginases (Arg1 and Arg2 metabolize L-arginine to generate L-ornithine and urea and increased expression of arginase has been proposed as a mechanism of reduced eNOS activity secondary to the depletion of L-arginine. Indeed, supplemental L-arginine and suppression of arginase activity has been shown to improve endothelium-dependent relaxation and ameliorate cardiovascular disease. However, L-arginine concentrations in endothelial cells remain sufficiently high to support NO synthesis suggesting additional mechanisms. The compartmentalization of intracellular L-arginine into poorly interchangeable pools has been proposed to allow for the local depletion of L-arginine. Indeed the subcellular location of L-arginine metabolizing enzymes plays important functional roles. In endothelial cells, eNOS is found in discrete intracellular locations and the capacity to generate NO is heavily influenced by its localtion. Arg1 and Arg2 also reside in different subcellular environments and are thought to differentially influence endothelial function. The plasma membrane solute transporter, CAT-1 and the arginine recycling enzyme, ASL, co-localize with eNOS and facilitate NO release. This review highlights the importance of the subcellular location of eNOS and arginine transporting and metabolizing enzymes to NO release and cardiovascular disease.

  11. Oral L-arginine supplementation impacts several reproductive parameters during the postpartum period in mares.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Dale E; Warren, Lori K; Mortensen, Christopher J

    2013-05-01

    L-arginine is an amino acid which can alter pituitary function and increase blood flow to the reproductive tract. The objective was to determine the effect of supplementing 100g of L-arginine on plasma arginine concentrations, follicular dynamics and ovarian and uterine artery blood flow during the estrus that occurs subsequent to foaling. In Experiment 1, mares were fed 100g L-arginine for 1 day during the last 3 weeks of pregnancy and plasma samples taken for every hour for the first 4h and every other hour until 12h.L-arginine supplementation elevated plasma arginine concentrations from 1 to 8h post feeding; arginine peaked at 6h (arginine: 515±33μmol/L; control: 80±33μmol/L). In Experiment 2, mares received either 100g L-arginine or control diets beginning 21 d before the expected foaling date and continued for 30 d postpartum. The reproductive tract was evaluated by transrectal Doppler ultrasonography from Day 1 postpartum through Day 30. There were no differences in ovarian follicular dynamics, ovarian or uterine resistance indices between groups. Vascular perfusion of the F1 follicular wall was greater in L-arginine supplemented mares (37.3±2.6%) than controls (25.4±2.7%; Pmares had a smaller uterine body and horns and accumulated less uterine fluid than controls (Pfollicular development, raises the possible use of L-arginine supplementation as a breeding management tool during the postpartum period to increase reproductive success. PMID:23523236

  12. Dietary arginine and linear growth: the Copenhagen School Child Intervention Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Vught, Anneke J A H; Dagnelie, Pieter C; Arts, Ilja C W; Froberg, Karsten; Andersen, Lars B; El-Naaman, Bianca; Bugge, Anna; Nielsen, Birgit M; Heitman, Berit L

    2013-03-28

    The amino acid arginine is a well-known growth hormone (GH) stimulator and GH is an important modulator of linear growth. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of dietary arginine on growth velocity in children between 7 and 13 years of age. Data from the Copenhagen School Child Intervention Study during 2001-2 (baseline), and at 3-year and 7-year follow-up, were used. Arginine intake was estimated via a 7 d precoded food diary at baseline and 3-year follow-up. Data were analysed in a multilevel structure in which children were embedded within schools. Random intercept and slopes were defined to estimate the association between arginine intake and growth velocity, including the following covariates: sex; age; baseline height; energy intake; puberty stage at 7-year follow-up and intervention/control group. The association between arginine intake and growth velocity was significant for the third and fourth quintile of arginine intake (2.5-2.8 and 2.8-3.2 g/d, respectively) compared with the first quintile ( < 2.2 g/d) (P for trend = 0.04). Protein intake (excluding arginine) was significantly associated with growth velocity; however, the association was weaker than the association between arginine intake and growth velocity (P for trend = 0.14). The results of the present study suggest a dose-dependent physiological role of habitual protein intake, and specifically arginine intake, on linear growth in normally growing children. However, since the study was designed in healthy children, we cannot firmly conclude whether arginine supplementation represents a relevant clinical strategy. Further research is needed to investigate whether dietary arginine may represent a nutritional strategy potentially advantageous for the prevention and treatment of short stature. PMID:23046689

  13. Adverse effects associated with arginine alpha-ketoglutarate containing supplements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosser, J M; Majlesi, N; Chan, G M; Olsen, D; Hoffman, R S; Nelson, L S

    2009-05-01

    The athletic performance supplement industry is a multibillion-dollar business and one popular category claims to increase nitric oxide (NO) production. We report three patients presenting to the emergency department with adverse effects. A 33-year-old man presented with palpitations, dizziness, vomiting, and syncope, after the use of NO(2) platinum. His examination and electrocardiogram (ECG) were normal. The dizziness persisted, requiring admission overnight. A 21-year-old man with palpitations and near syncope had used a "nitric oxide" supplement. He was tachycardic to 115 bpm with otherwise normal examination. Laboratory values including methemoglobin, and ECG were unremarkable. He was treated with 1 L of saline with no change in heart rate. He was admitted for observation. A 24-year-old man presented after taking NO-Xplode with palpitations and a headache. His examination, laboratory values, and ECG were normal. He was discharged. The purported active ingredient in these products is arginine alpha-ketoglutarate (AAKG), which is claimed to increase NO production by supplying the precursor L-arginine. The symptoms could be due to vasodilation from increased levels of NO, though other etiologies cannot be excluded. AAKG containing supplements may be associated with adverse effects requiring hospital admission. PMID:19755457

  14. DNA methyltransferase inhibitor CDA-II inhibits myogenic differentiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► CDA-II inhibits myogenic differentiation in a dose-dependent manner. ► CDA-II repressed expression of muscle transcription factors and structural proteins. ► CDA-II inhibited proliferation and migration of C2C12 myoblasts. -- Abstract: CDA-II (cell differentiation agent II), isolated from healthy human urine, is a DNA methyltransferase inhibitor. Previous studies indicated that CDA-II played important roles in the regulation of cell growth and certain differentiation processes. However, it has not been determined whether CDA-II affects skeletal myogenesis. In this study, we investigated effects of CDA-II treatment on skeletal muscle progenitor cell differentiation, migration and proliferation. We found that CDA-II blocked differentiation of murine myoblasts C2C12 in a dose-dependent manner. CDA-II repressed expression of muscle transcription factors, such as Myogenin and Mef2c, and structural proteins, such as myosin heavy chain (Myh3), light chain (Mylpf) and MCK. Moreover, CDA-II inhibited C1C12 cell migration and proliferation. Thus, our data provide the first evidence that CDA-II inhibits growth and differentiation of muscle progenitor cells, suggesting that the use of CDA-II might affect skeletal muscle functions.

  15. Characterization of the phospholipid methyltransferase in RBC ghost preparations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The activity of the phospholipid methyltransferase from human RBC ghosts was studied using radio-HPLC techniques to analyze the products. Both monomethyl phosphatidyl ethanolamine (MMPE) and dimethyl phosphatidyl ethanolamine (DMPE) were used as substrated. The reaction rate was linear for 45 min. Apparent K/sub M/s of 24-28 uM and 19-21 uM were measured for these two substrates, respectively. The reaction rate was not linear with protein. It appeared to increase logarithmic. An apparent K/sub M/ for S-adenosylmethionine was 36-45 uM. These K/sub M/ values are similar to those reported by others for liver. As the concentration of MMPE was increased, the ratio of DMPE/PC also increased due largely to a greater increase in DMPE formation. Optimal reaction rates for the formation of DMPE were 0.9-1.3 pmol/mg/min, and an optimal rate of about 1.7-2.4 pmol/min/mg was measured for the conversion of DMPE to phosphatidyl choline (PC). Freezing the ghost preparation did not affect the activity of the enzyme. When no exogenous phospholipid was added to the incubation, the sum of the formation rates of all three methylated products was about 26 pmol/mg/hr. The relative amount of each product was 46% MMPE, 32% DMPE and 22% PC. When either MMPE or DMPE was added as substrate, the formation of MMPE was reduced to less than 1%

  16. Thiopurine methyltransferase activity in red blood cells of dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidd, Linda Benjamin; Salavaggione, Oreste E; Szumlanski, Carol L; Miller, Jackie L; Weinshilboum, Richard M; Trepanier, Lauren

    2004-01-01

    Thiopurine methyltransferase (TPMT) is an important enzyme in the metabolism of thiopurine medications such as azathioprine. In humans, activity varies widely among individuals, primarily because of genetic polymorphisms. Low TPMT activity increases the risk of myelosuppression from azathioprine and 6-mercaptopurine, whereas high TPMT activity is associated with poor drug efficacy. The purpose of this study was to determine whether dogs also show a wide range of TPMT activity. Heparinized blood samples were obtained from 177 dogs associated with a veterinary teaching hospital. Red blood cell (RBC) TPMT activity was measured by means of a modification of a radiochemical method as established for use in people. TPMT activity varied across a 9-fold range (7.9-71.8 U of RBC per milliliter; median, 21.7). Variation in TPMT activity was not associated with age, sex, or neutering status. Giant Schnauzers had much lower TPMT activity (7.9-20 U of RBC per milliliter; median, 13.1; P dogs could affect thiopurine drug toxicity and efficacy in canine patients. PMID:15058773

  17. Human erythrocyte thiol methyltransferase: radiochemical microassay and biochemical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A radiochemical microassay for the measurement of thiol methyltransferase (TMT) activity in human red blood cell (RBC) membranes has been developed. Both 2-mercaptoethanol and dithiothreitol were used as substrates for the enzyme. The pH optimum of the reaction was approximately 9.0 when glycine-NaOH was used as a buffer. The apparent Michaelis-Menten (Ksub(M)) value for the methyl donor for the reaction, S-adenosyl-L-methionine, was 43 μmol/l. Human RBC TMT activity was neither activated nor inhibited by Ca2+, Mg2+, or tropolone, but the enzyme was inhibited by SKF 525A and by reagents that react with sulfhydryl grcups. The mean TMT activity in blood from 289 randomly selected adult white subjects was 10.93 +- 3.22 units per mg protein (mean +- S.D.). The activity was the same in samples from men and women. The results of experiments in which TMT activity was measured in mixtures of RBC membranes with relatively ''low'' and relatively ''high'' activities provided no evidence that individual variations in the enzyme activity were due to variations in endogenous TMT activators or inhibitors. (Auth.)

  18. Identification and functional characterization of lysine methyltransferases of Entamoeba histolytica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borbolla-Vázquez, Jessica; Orozco, Esther; Medina-Gómez, Christian; Martínez-Higuera, Aarón; Javier-Reyna, Rosario; Chávez, Bibiana; Betanzos, Abigail; Rodríguez, Mario A

    2016-07-01

    Lysine methylation of histones, a posttranslational modification catalyzed by lysine methyltransferases (HKMTs), plays an important role in the epigenetic regulation of transcription. Lysine methylation of non-histone proteins also impacts the biological function of proteins. Previously it has been shown that lysine methylation of histones of Entamoeba histolytica, the protozoan parasite that infects 50 million people worldwide each year and causing up to 100,000 deaths annually, is implicated in the epigenetic machinery of this microorganism. However, the identification and characterization of HKMTs in this parasite had not yet been determined. In this work we identified four HKMTs in E. histolytica (EhHKMT1 to EhHKMT4) that are expressed by trophozoites. Enzymatic assays indicated that all of them are able to transfer methyl groups to commercial histones. EhHKMT1, EhHKMT2 and EhHKMT4 were detected in nucleus and cytoplasm of trophozoites. In addition EhHKMT2 and EhHKMT4 were located in vesicles containing ingested cells during phagocytosis, and they co-immunoprecipitated with EhADH, a protein involved in the phagocytosis of this parasite. Results suggest that E. histolytica uses its HKMTs to regulate transcription by epigenetic mechanisms, and at least two of them could also be implicated in methylation of proteins that participate in phagocytosis. PMID:27062489

  19. DNA methyltransferase inhibitor CDA-II inhibits myogenic differentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Zirong [State Key Laboratory of Ophthalmology, Zhongshan Ophthalmic Center, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510060 (China); Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, Shands Cancer Center, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610 (United States); Jin, Guorong [State Key Laboratory of Ophthalmology, Zhongshan Ophthalmic Center, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510060 (China); Lin, Shuibin [Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, Shands Cancer Center, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610 (United States); Lin, Xiumei [Department of Hematology, Guangzhou First Municipal People' s Hospital, Guangzhou 510180 (China); Gu, Yumei [Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, Shands Cancer Center, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610 (United States); Zhu, Yujuan; Hu, Chengbin; Zhang, Qingjiong [State Key Laboratory of Ophthalmology, Zhongshan Ophthalmic Center, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510060 (China); Wu, Lizi [Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, Shands Cancer Center, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610 (United States); Shen, Huangxuan, E-mail: shenhx@mail.sysu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Ophthalmology, Zhongshan Ophthalmic Center, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510060 (China)

    2012-06-08

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CDA-II inhibits myogenic differentiation in a dose-dependent manner. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CDA-II repressed expression of muscle transcription factors and structural proteins. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CDA-II inhibited proliferation and migration of C2C12 myoblasts. -- Abstract: CDA-II (cell differentiation agent II), isolated from healthy human urine, is a DNA methyltransferase inhibitor. Previous studies indicated that CDA-II played important roles in the regulation of cell growth and certain differentiation processes. However, it has not been determined whether CDA-II affects skeletal myogenesis. In this study, we investigated effects of CDA-II treatment on skeletal muscle progenitor cell differentiation, migration and proliferation. We found that CDA-II blocked differentiation of murine myoblasts C2C12 in a dose-dependent manner. CDA-II repressed expression of muscle transcription factors, such as Myogenin and Mef2c, and structural proteins, such as myosin heavy chain (Myh3), light chain (Mylpf) and MCK. Moreover, CDA-II inhibited C1C12 cell migration and proliferation. Thus, our data provide the first evidence that CDA-II inhibits growth and differentiation of muscle progenitor cells, suggesting that the use of CDA-II might affect skeletal muscle functions.

  20. Synthesis, characterization and behaviour of trans-bis (argininate) copper (II) to gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The synthesis, the characterization and the behaviour to gamma radiation of trans-bis (argininate) copper (II) are presented. The synthesis is made from copper sulfate, sodium hydroxide and hydrochloride of L (+) arginine, in aqueous medium, and the characterization by infrared spectroscopy, visible and ultraviolet spectroscopy and elementary analysis. (C.G.C.)

  1. Acute hypothalamic administration of L-arginine increases feed intake in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Carlos Ricardo Maneck Malfatti; Luiz Augusto da Silva; Ricardo Aparecido Pereira; Renan Garcia Michel; André Luiz Snak; Fabio Seidel dos Santos

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study investigated the chronic (oral) and acute (hypothalamic infusion) effects of L-arginine supplementation on feed intake, body composition, and behavioral changes in rats. Methods: Twenty rats were divided into two groups treated orally for 60 days; one group received L-arginine (1 g/kg body weight) and one group received saline (1 mL/NaCl ...

  2. Facilitation of peptide fibre formation by arginine-phosphate/carboxylate interactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K Krishna Prasad; Sandeep Verma

    2008-01-01

    This study describes peptide fibre formation in a hexapeptide, derived from the V3 loop of HIV-1, mediated by the interactions between arginine residues and phosphate/carboxylate anions. This charge neutralization approach was further confirmed when the deletion of arginine residue from the hexapeptide sequence resulted in fibre formation, which was studied by a combination of microscopic techniques.

  3. Antibacterial action of a novel functionalized chitosan-arginine against Gram-negative bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Hong; Zhang, Peng; Kieft, Thomas L; Ryan, Shannon J; Baker, Shenda M; Wiesmann, William P; Rogelj, Snezna

    2010-07-01

    The antimicrobial activity of chitosan and chitosan derivatives has been well established. However, although several mechanisms have been proposed, the exact mode of action is still unclear. Here we report on the investigation of antibacterial activity and the antibacterial mode of action of a novel water-soluble chitosan derivative, arginine-functionalized chitosan, on the Gram-negative bacteria Pseudomonas fluorescens and Escherichia coli. Two different arginine-functionalized chitosans (6% arginine-substituted and 30% arginine-substituted) each strongly inhibited P. fluorescens and E. coli growth. Time-dependent killing efficacy experiments showed that 5000 mg l(-1) of 6%- and 30%-substituted chitosan-arginine killed 2.7 logs and 4.5 logs of P. fluorescens, and 4.8 logs and 4.6 logs of E. coli in 4h, respectively. At low concentrations, the 6%-substituted chitosan-arginine was more effective in inhibiting cell growth even though the 30%-substituted chitosan-arginine appeared to be more effective in permeabilizing the cell membranes of both P. fluorescens and E. coli. Studies using fluorescent probes, 1-N-phenyl-naphthylamine (NPN), nile red (NR) and propidium iodide (PI), and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) suggest that chitosan-arginine's antibacterial activity is, at least in part, due to its interaction with the cell membrane, in which it increases membrane permeability. PMID:20060936

  4. Endothelial arginine resynthesis contributes to the maintenance of vasomotor function in male diabetic mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chennupati, Ramesh; Meens, Merlijn J P M T; Marion, Vincent;

    2014-01-01

    : Absence of endothelial citrulline recycling to arginine did not affect blood pressure and systemic arterial vasomotor responses in healthy mice. EDNO-mediated vasodilatation was significantly more impaired in diabetic Ass-KOTie2 than in control mice demonstrating that endothelial arginine recycling...

  5. Arginine Catabolism by Sourdough Lactic Acid Bacteria: Purification and Characterization of the Arginine Deiminase Pathway Enzymes from Lactobacillus sanfranciscensis CB1

    OpenAIRE

    De Angelis, Maria; Mariotti, Liberato; Rossi, Jone; Servili, Maurizio; Fox, Patrick F.; Rollán, Graciela; Gobbetti, Marco

    2002-01-01

    The cytoplasmic extracts of 70 strains of the most frequently isolated sourdough lactic acid bacteria were screened initially for arginine deiminase (ADI), ornithine transcarbamoylase (OTC), and carbamate kinase (CK) activities, which comprise the ADI (or arginine dihydrolase) pathway. Only obligately heterofermentative strains such as Lactobacillus sanfranciscensis CB1; Lactobacillus brevis AM1, AM8, and 10A; Lactobacillus hilgardii 51B; and Lactobacillus fructivorans DD3 and DA106 showed al...

  6. The role of the arginine metabolome in pain: implications for sickle cell disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakshi N

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Nitya Bakshi,1–2 Claudia R Morris3–6 1Division of Pediatric Hematology-Oncology, Department of Pediatrics, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, USA; 2Aflac Cancer and Blood Disorders Center, Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta, Atlanta, GA, USA; 3Division of Pediatric Emergency Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, USA; 4Department of Emergency Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, USA; 5Emory-Children’s Center for Cystic Fibrosis and Airways Disease Research, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, USA; 6Pediatric Emergency Medicine, Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta, Atlanta, GA, USA Abstract: Sickle cell disease (SCD is the most common hemoglobinopathy in the US, affecting approximately 100,000 individuals in the US and millions worldwide. Pain is the hallmark of SCD, and a subset of patients experience pain virtually all of the time. Of interest, the arginine metabolome is associated with several pain mechanisms highlighted in this review. Since SCD is an arginine deficiency syndrome, the contribution of the arginine metabolome to acute and chronic pain in SCD is a topic in need of further attention. Normal arginine metabolism is impaired in SCD through various mechanisms that contribute to endothelial dysfunction, vaso-occlusion, pulmonary complications, risk of leg ulcers, and early mortality. Arginine is a semiessential amino acid that serves as a substrate for protein synthesis and is the precursor to nitric oxide (NO, polyamines, proline, glutamate, creatine, and agmatine. Since arginine is involved in multiple metabolic processes, a deficiency of this amino acid has the potential to disrupt many cellular and organ functions. NO is a potent vasodilator that is depleted in SCD and may contribute to vaso-occlusive pain. As the obligate substrate for NO production, arginine also plays a mechanistic role in SCD-related pain, although its

  7. Supplementation with l-arginine stabilizes plasma arginine and nitric oxide metabolites, suppresses elevated liver enzymes and peroxidation in sickle cell anaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaja, S I; Ogungbemi, S O; Kehinde, M O; Anigbogu, C N

    2016-06-01

    The effect of l-arginine on liver function in SCD has received little or no attention. The effect of a chronic, oral, low-dose supplementation with l-arginine (1gm/day for 6 weeks) on some liver enzymes, lipid peroxidation and nitric oxide metabolites was studied in 20 normal (non-sickle cell anaemia; NSCA) subjects and 20 sickle cell anaemia (SCA) subjects. Ten milliliters of blood was withdrawn from an ante-cubital vein for the estimation of plasma arginine concentration ([R]), alanine aminotransaminase (ALT), aspartate aminotransaminase (AST) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP), plasma total bilirubin concentration [TB], malondialdehyde concentration [MDA] and nitric oxide metabolites concentration [NOx]. Before supplementation, ALT, AST, ALP (pNOx] were higher in NSCA subjects (pNOX] in SCA than in NSCA subjects (plow-dose supplementation with l-arginine improved liver function, oxidative stress, plasma arginine concentration and nitric oxide metabolites levels in NSCA and SCA subjects. Responses in SCA subjects to l-arginine were more sensitive than in NSCA subjects. PMID:27156372

  8. A Picrinine N-Methyltransferase Belongs to a New Family of γ-Tocopherol-Like Methyltransferases Found in Medicinal Plants That Make Biologically Active Monoterpenoid Indole Alkaloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levac, Dylan; Cázares, Paulo; Yu, Fang; De Luca, Vincenzo

    2016-04-01

    Members of the Apocynaceae plant family produce a large number of monoterpenoid indole alkaloids (MIAs) with different substitution patterns that are responsible for their various biological activities. A novel N-methyltransferase involved in the vindoline pathway in Catharanthus roseus showing distinct similarity to γ-tocopherol C-methyltransferases was used in a bioinformatic screen of transcriptomes from Vinca minor, Rauvolfia serpentina, and C. roseus to identify 10 γ-tocopherol-like N-methyltransferases from a large annotated transcriptome database of different MIA-producing plant species (www.phytometasyn.ca). The biochemical function of two members of this group cloned from V. minor (VmPiNMT) and R. serpentina (RsPiNMT) have been characterized by screening their biochemical activities against potential MIA substrates harvested from the leaf surfaces of MIA-accumulating plants. The approach was validated by identifying the MIA picrinine from leaf surfaces of Amsonia hubrichtii as a substrate of VmPiNMT and RsPiNMT. Recombinant proteins were shown to have high substrate specificity and affinity for picrinine, converting it to N-methylpicrinine (ervincine). Developmental studies with V. minor and R. serpentina showed that RsPiNMT and VmPiNMT gene expression and biochemical activities were highest in younger leaf tissues. The assembly of at least 150 known N-methylated MIAs within members of the Apocynaceae family may have occurred as a result of the evolution of the γ-tocopherol-like N-methyltransferase family from γ-tocopherol methyltransferases. PMID:26848097

  9. Potentiality of application of the conductometric L-arginine biosensors for the real sample analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaffrezic-Renault N.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To determine an influence of serum components on the L-arginine biosensor sensitivity and to formulate practical recommendations for its reliable analysis. Methods. The L-arginine biosensor comprised arginase and urease co-immobilized by cross-linking. Results. The biosensor specificity was investigated based on a series of representative studies (namely, through urea determination in the serum; inhibitory effect studies of mercury ions; high temperature treatment of sensors; studying the biosensor sensitivity to the serum treated by enzymes, and selectivity studies. It was found that the response of the biosensor to the serum injections was determined by high sensitivity of the L-arginine biosensor toward not only to L-arginine but also toward two other basic amino acids (L-lysine and L-histidine. Conclusions. A detailed procedure of optimization of the conductometric biosensor for L-arginine determination in blood serum has been proposed.

  10. Sequestration and metabolism of host cell arginine by the intraerythrocytic malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobbold, Simon A; Llinás, Manuel; Kirk, Kiaran

    2016-06-01

    Human erythrocytes have an active nitric oxide synthase, which converts arginine into citrulline and nitric oxide (NO). NO serves several important functions, including the maintenance of normal erythrocyte deformability, thereby ensuring efficient passage of the red blood cell through narrow microcapillaries. Here, we show that following invasion by the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum the arginine pool in the host erythrocyte compartment is sequestered and metabolized by the parasite. Arginine from the extracellular medium enters the infected cell via endogenous host cell transporters and is taken up by the intracellular parasite by a high-affinity cationic amino acid transporter at the parasite surface. Within the parasite arginine is metabolized into citrulline and ornithine. The uptake and metabolism of arginine by the parasite deprive the erythrocyte of the substrate required for NO production and may contribute to the decreased deformability of infected erythrocytes. PMID:26633083

  11. Differential effects of cranial radiation on growth hormone response to arginine and insulin infusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The growth hormone responses to arginine infusion and to insulin-induced hypoglycemia were studied in 13 patients with neoplastic disease after treatment with radiation and chemotherapy. Patients who received intensive cranial radiation (greater than 2,400 rads) had no response to either arginine or insulin; those who received moderate cranial radiation (greater than or equal to 2,400 rads) had GH response to arginine but not to insulin; patients receiving no cranial radiation responded to both arginine and insulin. These data support the hypothesis that GH secretion in response to arginine infusion has a different mechanism in contrast to the response to insulin-induced hypoglycemia and that the latter is more vulnerable to cranial radiation

  12. Dietary arginine affects energy metabolism through polyamine turnover in juvenile Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Synne M; Holen, Elisabeth; Aksnes, Anders; Rønnestad, Ivar; Zerrahn, Jens-Erik; Espe, Marit

    2013-12-14

    In the present study, quadruplicate groups of juvenile Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) were fed plant protein-based diets with increasing arginine inclusions (range 28·8-37·4 g/kg DM) to investigate whether arginine supplementation affects growth and lipid accumulation through an elevated polyamine turnover. Dietary lysine was held at a constant concentration, just below the requirement. All other amino acids were balanced and equal in the diets. Arginine supplementation increased protein and fat accretion, without affecting the hepatosomatic or visceralsomatic indices. Dietary arginine correlated with putrescine in the liver (R 0·78, P= 0·01) and with ornithine in the muscle, liver and plasma (P= 0·0002, 0·003 and 0·0002, respectively). The mRNA of ornithine decarboxylase, the enzyme producing putrescine, was up-regulated in the white adipose tissue of fish fed the high-arginine inclusion compared with those fed the low-arginine diet. Concomitantly, spermidine/spermine-(N1)-acetyltransferase, the rate-limiting enzyme for polyamine turnover that consumes acetyl-CoA, showed an increased activity in the liver of fish fed the arginine-supplemented diets. In addition, lower acetyl-CoA concentrations were observed in the liver of fish fed the high-arginine diet, while ATP, which is used in the process of synthesising spermidine and spermine, did not show a similar trend. Gene expression of the rate-limiting enzyme for β-oxidation of long-chain fatty acids, carnitine palmitoyl transferase-1, was up-regulated in the liver of fish fed the high-arginine diet. Taken together, the data support that increased dietary arginine activates polyamine turnover and β-oxidation in the liver of juvenile Atlantic salmon and may act to improve the metabolic status of the fish. PMID:23656796

  13. Effect of oral take L-arginine on [Ca2+]i of human platelets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To study the effect of oral take L-arginine on [Ca2+]i of human platelet, ten male volunteers were selected to take L-arginine for 4 days (20g/three times/a day, the 4th day took about 7g). They are neither smokers nor drinkers and no drugs were taken by them during 2 weeks before study. Tests were performed before and after taking L-arginine. Before and after taking L-arginine, platelet intracellular cGMP were 1.91 ± 0.20 vs 2.14 ± 0.34pmol/109 platelets, P 2+]i (A/B value: 0.45 ± 0.14 vs 0.32 ± 0.09) were inhibited. The results has showed that oral take L-arginine could inhibit platelet activation. This inhibition should be ascribed to such two points: (1) The amount of NO released by endothelial cells has increased. A basal release of NO has been found to regulate the blood vessel intensity and inhibit platelet adhesion. After taking L-arginine, the endothelial cells released more NO and the plasma NO3- level also increased. (2) The platelet has synthesized more NO. There is an L-arginine/NO pathway in platelet and platelet could synthesize NO from L-arginine to inhibit its activation. Taking L-arginine has enhanced the negative effect of this pathway by producing more NO. The study will be helpful to further study on the possibility of oral take L-arginine to avoid thrombotic and hemorrhagic diseases

  14. Detection of the proteins with different arginine methylation status induced by low dose irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. Objective: The objective of this study is to detect the noble proteins that were functionally regulated by change of arginine methylation through irradiation of the low dose. The increase of the arginine methylation which is induced by low dose gamma-ray will have meaningful Introduction: Exposure of cells to low doses of radiation has well documented biological effect, but the underlying regulatory mechanisms are still poorly understood. Arginine methylation is a post translational modification that results in the formation of asymmetrical and symmetrical dimethylated arginines. Post-translational methylation of arginine residues of proteins involved in a growing number of cellular processes, including transcriptional regulation, cell signaling, RNA processing and DNA repair, biological influence. Methods: Human normal cell line Chang-liver was irradiation by gamma-ray of 0.02Gy, 0.2Gy. After irradiation, cells were incubated for 4h, 8h, 24h, and then harvested to prepare protein extracts. ASYM24(anti-dimethyl-Arginine, asymmetric) antibody was used to Western blot and immunoprecipitation. Proteins that show different degrees of intensity between the two samples were analyzed by Mass spectrometry. Results: We detected increased asymmetric arginine methylation of two proteins at 24h after a dose of 0.2Gy irradiation. The mass spectrometry identified that it is 27kDa and 73kDa proteins. The 27kDa is hypothetical protein that function does not know. The 73kDa protein is Mortalin, a member of the Heat shock 70 protein family, which correlate with the radioresistance response, control of cell proliferation and act as a chaperone. Conclusion: Low dose radiation induces the change of asymmetric arginine methylation modification of arginine residues of hypothetical protein and mortalin. We expect that increase of arginine methylation in mortarin and hypothetical protein correlates with the radioresistance, the functional study for

  15. Conservation and Functional Importance of Carbon-Oxygen Hydrogen Bonding in AdoMet-Dependent Methyltransferases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horowitz, Scott; Dirk, Lynnette M.A.; Yesselman, Joseph D.; Nimtz, Jennifer S.; Adhikari, Upendra; Mehl, Ryan A.; Scheiner, Steve; Houtz, Robert L.; Al-Hashimi, Hashim M.; Trievel, Raymond C. [Oregon State U.; (Michigan); (Utah SU); (HHMI); (Kentucky)

    2013-09-06

    S-Adenosylmethionine (AdoMet)-based methylation is integral to metabolism and signaling. AdoMet-dependent methyltransferases belong to multiple distinct classes and share a catalytic mechanism that arose through convergent evolution; however, fundamental determinants underlying this shared methyl transfer mechanism remain undefined. A survey of high-resolution crystal structures reveals that unconventional carbon–oxygen (CH···O) hydrogen bonds coordinate the AdoMet methyl group in different methyltransferases irrespective of their class, active site structure, or cofactor binding conformation. Corroborating these observations, quantum chemistry calculations demonstrate that these charged interactions formed by the AdoMet sulfonium cation are stronger than typical CH···O hydrogen bonds. Biochemical and structural studies using a model lysine methyltransferase and an active site mutant that abolishes CH···O hydrogen bonding to AdoMet illustrate that these interactions are important for high-affinity AdoMet binding and transition-state stabilization. Further, crystallographic and NMR dynamics experiments of the wild-type enzyme demonstrate that the CH···O hydrogen bonds constrain the motion of the AdoMet methyl group, potentially facilitating its alignment during catalysis. Collectively, the experimental findings with the model methyltransferase and structural survey imply that methyl CH···O hydrogen bonding represents a convergent evolutionary feature of AdoMet-dependent methyltransferases, mediating a universal mechanism for methyl transfer.

  16. Altered Nitrogen Balance and Decreased Urea Excretion in Male Rats Fed Cafeteria Diet Are Related to Arginine Availability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Sabater

    2014-01-01

    rats, but low arginine levels point to a block in the urea cycle between ornithine and arginine, thereby preventing the elimination of excess nitrogen as urea. The ultimate consequence of this paradoxical block in the urea cycle seems to be the limitation of arginine production and/or availability.

  17. Microwave heating of arginine yields highly fluorescent nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philippidis, Aggelos [Foundation for Research and Technology-Hellas, Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser (Greece); Stefanakis, Dimitrios [University of Crete, Department of Chemistry (Greece); Anglos, Demetrios, E-mail: anglos@iesl.forth.gr [Foundation for Research and Technology-Hellas, Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser (Greece); Ghanotakis, Demetrios, E-mail: ghanotakis@chemistry.uoc.gr [University of Crete, Department of Chemistry (Greece)

    2013-01-15

    Brightly fluorescent nanoparticles were produced via a single-step, single-precursor procedure based on microwave heating of an aqueous solution of the amino acid arginine. Key structural and optical properties of the resulting Arg nanoparticles, Arg-dots, are reported and discussed with emphasis on the pH dependence of their fluorescence emission. The surface of the Arg-dots was functionalised through coupling to folic acid, opening up ways for connecting fluorescent nanoparticles to cancer cells. The generality and versatility of the microwave heating procedure was further demonstrated by the synthesis of different types of carbon nanoparticles, such as CE-dots, that were produced by use of citric acid and ethanolamine as precursors and compared to the Arg-dots.

  18. Microwave heating of arginine yields highly fluorescent nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brightly fluorescent nanoparticles were produced via a single-step, single-precursor procedure based on microwave heating of an aqueous solution of the amino acid arginine. Key structural and optical properties of the resulting Arg nanoparticles, Arg-dots, are reported and discussed with emphasis on the pH dependence of their fluorescence emission. The surface of the Arg-dots was functionalised through coupling to folic acid, opening up ways for connecting fluorescent nanoparticles to cancer cells. The generality and versatility of the microwave heating procedure was further demonstrated by the synthesis of different types of carbon nanoparticles, such as CE-dots, that were produced by use of citric acid and ethanolamine as precursors and compared to the Arg-dots.

  19. Polymerization on the rocks: beta-amino acids and arginine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, R.; Orgel, L. E.; Bada, J. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    We have studied the accumulation of long oligomers of beta-amino acids on the surface of minerals using the 'polymerization on the rocks' protocol. We find that long oligopeptides of beta-glutamic acid which cannot be formed in homogeneous aqueous solution are accumulated efficiently on the surface of hydroxylapatite using 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDAC) as condensing agent. The EDAC-induced oligomerization of aspartic acid on hydroxylapatite proceeds even more efficiently. Hydroxylapatite can also facilitate the ligation of the tripeptide (glu)3. The 'polymerization on the rocks' scenario is not restricted to negatively-charged amino acids. Oligoarginines are accumulated on the surface of illite using carbonyldiimidizole (CDI) as condensing agent. We find that FeS2 catalyzes the CDI-induced oligomerization of arginine, although it does not adsorb oligoarginines. These results are relevant to the formation of polypeptides on the primitive earth.

  20. Haloarchaeal Protein Translocation via the Twin Arginine Translocation Pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pohlschroder Mechthild

    2009-02-03

    Protein transport across hydrophobic membranes that partition cellular compartments is essential in all cells. The twin arginine translocation (Tat) pathway transports proteins across the prokaryotic cytoplasmic membranes. Distinct from the universally conserved Sec pathway, which secretes unfolded proteins, the Tat machinery is unique in that it secretes proteins in a folded conformation, making it an attractive pathway for the transport and secretion of heterologously expressed proteins that are Sec-incompatible. During the past 7 years, the DOE-supported project has focused on the characterization of the diversity of bacterial and archaeal Tat substrates as well as on the characterization of the Tat pathway of a model archaeon, Haloferax volcanii, a member of the haloarchaea. We have demonstrated that H. volcanii uses this pathway to transport most of its secretome.

  1. Methyltransferases mediate cell memory of a genotoxic insult.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rugo, R E; Mutamba, J T; Mohan, K N; Yee, T; Chaillet, J R; Greenberger, J S; Engelward, B P

    2011-02-10

    Characterization of the direct effects of DNA-damaging agents shows how DNA lesions lead to specific mutations. Yet, serum from Hiroshima survivors, Chernobyl liquidators and radiotherapy patients can induce a clastogenic effect on naive cells, showing indirect induction of genomic instability that persists years after exposure. Such indirect effects are not restricted to ionizing radiation, as chemical genotoxins also induce heritable and transmissible genomic instability phenotypes. Although such indirect induction of genomic instability is well described, the underlying mechanism has remained enigmatic. Here, we show that mouse embryonic stem cells exposed to γ-radiation bear the effects of the insult for weeks. Specifically, conditioned media from the progeny of exposed cells can induce DNA damage and homologous recombination in naive cells. Notably, cells exposed to conditioned media also elicit a genome-destabilizing effect on their neighbouring cells, thus demonstrating transmission of genomic instability. Moreover, we show that the underlying basis for the memory of an insult is completely dependent on two of the major DNA cytosine methyltransferases, Dnmt1 and Dnmt3a. Targeted disruption of these genes in exposed cells completely eliminates transmission of genomic instability. Furthermore, transient inactivation of Dnmt1, using a tet-suppressible allele, clears the memory of the insult, thus protecting neighbouring cells from indirect induction of genomic instability. We have thus demonstrated that a single exposure can lead to long-term, genome-destabilizing effects that spread from cell to cell, and we provide a specific molecular mechanism for these persistent bystander effects. Collectively, our results impact the current understanding of risks from toxin exposures and suggest modes of intervention for suppressing genomic instability in people exposed to carcinogenic genotoxins. PMID:21057543

  2. Catechol-O-methyltransferase, dopamine, and sleep-wake regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauvilliers, Yves; Tafti, Mehdi; Landolt, Hans Peter

    2015-08-01

    Sleep and sleep disorders are complex and highly variable phenotypes regulated by many genes and environment. The catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) gene is an interesting candidate, being one of the major mammalian enzymes involved in the catabolism of catecholamines. The activity of COMT enzyme is genetically polymorphic due to a guanine-to-adenine transition at codon 158, resulting in a valine (Val) to methionine (Met) substitution. Individuals homozygous for the Val allele show higher COMT activity, and lower dopaminergic signaling in prefrontal cortex (PFC) than subjects homozygous for the Met allele. Since COMT has a crucial role in metabolising dopamine, it was suggested that the common functional polymorphism in the COMT gene impacts on cognitive function related to PFC, sleep-wake regulation, and potentially on sleep pathologies. The COMT Val158Met polymorphism may predict inter-individual differences in brain electroencephalography (EEG) alpha oscillations and recovery processes resulting from partial sleep loss in healthy individuals. The Val158Met polymorphism also exerts a sexual dimorphism and has a strong effect on objective daytime sleepiness in patients with narcolepsy-cataplexy. Since the COMT enzyme inactivates catecholamines, it was hypothesized that the response to stimulant drugs differs between COMT genotypes. Modafinil maintained executive functioning performance and vigilant attention throughout sleep deprivation in subjects with Val/Val genotype, but less in those with Met/Met genotype. Also, homozygous Met/Met patients with narcolepsy responded to lower doses of modafinil compared to Val/Val carriers. We review here the critical role of the common functional COMT gene polymorphism, COMT enzyme activity, and the prefrontal dopamine levels in the regulation of sleep and wakefulness in normal subjects, in narcolepsy and other sleep-related disorders, and its impact on the response to psychostimulants. PMID:25466290

  3. Demonstration of thiopurine methyltransferase activity in the erythrocytes of cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, A P; Shaw, S E; Duley, J A; Shobowale-Bakre, E M; Harbour, D A

    2000-01-01

    Azathioprine is a purine analogue used as an immunosuppressive and immunomodulator agent in various mammals, including cats. Several adverse reactions have been reported and have limited the use of the drug in the cat. Adverse reactions to azathioprine in humans have been correlated with reduced activity of thiopurine methyltransferase (TPMT) in erythrocytes. The purpose of this preliminary study was to determine if cats have TPMT activity in their erythrocytes and to compare the values obtained with the normal range for humans and the normal range for dogs in a preliminary report. Activity of the enzyme was measured in blood samples drawn from 41 cats. Blood also was taken from 5 dogs. The mean erythrocyte TPMT activity in the cats was 2.4 +/- 0.4 nmol (range, 1.2-3.9 nmol) per hour per milliliter of red blood cells (U/mL RBC) or 2-8 nmol per hour per gram of hemoglobin (U/g Hb). This range was far lower than the normal human range (8-15 U/mL RBC; 16-33 U/g Hb) and was of monopolar distribution. This observation apparently precludes any diagnostic purpose in assaying erythrocyte TPMT in this species. Erythrocyte TPMT activity in the 5 dogs ranged from 5.5 to 13.1 U/mL RBC (11-27 U/g Hb), which was comparable with normal and carrier ranges for humans, but proof of TPMT genetic polymorphism in either species will require genotyping studies. PMID:11012121

  4. Catabolism and safety of supplemental L-arginine in animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhenlong; Hou, Yongqing; Hu, Shengdi; Bazer, Fuller W; Meininger, Cynthia J; McNeal, Catherine J; Wu, Guoyao

    2016-07-01

    L-arginine (Arg) is utilized via multiple pathways to synthesize protein and low-molecular-weight bioactive substances (e.g., nitric oxide, creatine, and polyamines) with enormous physiological importance. Furthermore, Arg regulates cell signaling pathways and gene expression to improve cardiovascular function, augment insulin sensitivity, enhance lean tissue mass, and reduce obesity in humans. Despite its versatile roles, the use of Arg as a dietary supplement is limited due to the lack of data to address concerns over its safety in humans. Data from animal studies are reviewed to assess arginine catabolism and the safety of long-term Arg supplementation. The arginase pathway was responsible for catabolism of 76-85 and 81-96 % Arg in extraintestinal tissues of pigs and rats, respectively. Dietary supplementation with Arg-HCl or the Arg base [315- and 630-mg Arg/(kg BW d) for 91 d] had no adverse effects on male or female pigs. Similarly, no safety issues were observed for male or female rats receiving supplementation with 1.8- and 3.6-g Arg/(kg BW d) for at least 91 d. Intravenous administration of Arg-HCl to gestating sheep at 81 and 180 mg Arg/(kg BW d) is safe for at least 82 and 40 d, respectively. Animals fed conventional diets can well tolerate large amounts of supplemental Arg [up to 630-mg Arg/(kg BW d) in pigs or 3.6-g Arg/(kg BW d) in rats] for 91 d, which are equivalent to 573-mg Arg/(kg BW d) for humans. Collectively, these results can help guide studies to determine the safety of long-term oral administration of Arg in humans. PMID:27156062

  5. Arginine becomes an essential amino acid after massive resection of rat small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakabayashi, Y; Yamada, E; Yoshida, T; Takahashi, H

    1994-12-23

    We compared effects of feeding arginine- and/or proline- deficient diets (-Arg, -Pro, and -Arg, Pro) with those of a complete diet (Complete) in rats whose small intestine had been massively resected. After 4 weeks, the rats fed -Arg and -Arg, Pro lost weight (a mean of 28 and 32 g, respectively), whereas those fed Complete and -Pro gained 80 and 58 g, respectively. The average nitrogen balance was about 117,100, -20 and -14 mg/day for Complete, -Pro, -Arg, and -Arg, Pro diets, respectively. The concentration of arginine in skeletal muscle was about 310, 330, 91, and 65 nmol/g for Complete, -Pro, -Arg, and -Arg, Pro, respectively; while plasma arginine concentration averaged 95, 107, 56, and 46 microM, respectively. The weight loss, the negative nitrogen balance, and the markedly reduced arginine concentration in the muscle observed in rats fed -Arg and -Arg, Pro clearly indicate that arginine becomes a strictly essential amino acid in the rats with massive resection of the small intestine. However, sufficient proline can be synthesized from arginine in tissues such as the liver and kidney in the absence of the small intestine. Plasma glutamine, citrulline in the muscle and plasma, urinary excretion of orotic acid and nitrate (to assess nitric oxide formation from arginine) were also measured, and the changes in these metabolites are discussed. PMID:7798273

  6. One-pot green synthesis of biocompatible arginine-stabilized magnetic nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Zhongjun; Zhu Hui; Wang Xiaolei; Yang Fan; Yang Xiurong, E-mail: xryang@ciac.jl.c [State Key Laboratory of Electroanalytical Chemistry, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun, Jilin, 130022 (China)

    2009-11-18

    A green one-step approach has been developed for the synthesis of amino-functionalized magnetite nanoparticles. The synthesis was accomplished by simply mixing FeCl{sub 2} with arginine under ambient conditions. It was found that the Fe{sup 2+}/arginine molar ratio, reaction duration and temperature greatly influence the size, morphology and composition of magnetic nanoparticles. The arginine-stabilized magnetic nanoparticles were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy techniques. The results show that the prepared nanoparticles are spherically shaped with a nearly uniform size distribution and pure magnetite phase. The presence of arginine on the magnetic nanoparticle surface has been confirmed and the amount of surface arginine varies with the Fe{sup 2+}/arginine molar ratio. The surface amine densities are calculated to be 5.60 and 7.84 {mu}mol mg{sup -1} for magnetic nanoparticles prepared at 1:1 and 1:2 Fe{sup 2+}/arginine molar ratio, respectively. The as-synthesized nanoparticles show superparamagnetic behavior at room temperature and good solubility in water. In addition, using a similar synthesis procedure, we have been able to synthesize superparamagnetic manganese and cobalt ferrite nanoparticles.

  7. One-pot green synthesis of biocompatible arginine-stabilized magnetic nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A green one-step approach has been developed for the synthesis of amino-functionalized magnetite nanoparticles. The synthesis was accomplished by simply mixing FeCl2 with arginine under ambient conditions. It was found that the Fe2+/arginine molar ratio, reaction duration and temperature greatly influence the size, morphology and composition of magnetic nanoparticles. The arginine-stabilized magnetic nanoparticles were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy techniques. The results show that the prepared nanoparticles are spherically shaped with a nearly uniform size distribution and pure magnetite phase. The presence of arginine on the magnetic nanoparticle surface has been confirmed and the amount of surface arginine varies with the Fe2+/arginine molar ratio. The surface amine densities are calculated to be 5.60 and 7.84 μmol mg-1 for magnetic nanoparticles prepared at 1:1 and 1:2 Fe2+/arginine molar ratio, respectively. The as-synthesized nanoparticles show superparamagnetic behavior at room temperature and good solubility in water. In addition, using a similar synthesis procedure, we have been able to synthesize superparamagnetic manganese and cobalt ferrite nanoparticles.

  8. The effect of L-arginine on guinea-pig and rabbit airway smooth muscle function in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Perez A.C.; Paul W.; Harrison S.; Page C.P.; Spina D.

    1998-01-01

    We have investigated the effects of L-arginine, D-arginine and L-lysine on airway smooth muscle responsiveness to spasmogens in vitro. Both L-arginine and D-arginine (100 mM) significantly reduced the contractile potency and maximal contractile response to histamine but not to methacholine or potassium chloride in guinea-pig epithelium-denuded isolated trachea. Similarly, the contractile response to histamine was significantly reduced by L-arginine (100 mM) in rabbit epithelium-denuded isolat...

  9. Hepatic adaptation compensates inactivation of intestinal arginine biosynthesis in suckling mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Marion

    Full Text Available Suckling mammals, including mice, differ from adults in the abundant expression of enzymes that synthesize arginine from citrulline in their enterocytes. To investigate the importance of the small-intestinal arginine synthesis for whole-body arginine production in suckling mice, we floxed exon 13 of the argininosuccinate synthetase (Ass gene, which codes for a key enzyme in arginine biosynthesis, and specifically and completely ablated Ass in enterocytes by crossing Ass (fl and Villin-Cre mice. Unexpectedly, Ass (fl/fl /VilCre (tg/- mice showed no developmental impairments. Amino-acid fluxes across the intestine, liver, and kidneys were calculated after determining the blood flow in the portal vein, and hepatic and renal arteries (86%, 14%, and 33%, respectively, of the transhepatic blood flow in 14-day-old mice. Relative to control mice, citrulline production in the splanchnic region of Ass (fl/fl /VilCre (tg/- mice doubled, while arginine production was abolished. Furthermore, the net production of arginine and most other amino acids in the liver of suckling control mice declined to naught or even changed to consumption in Ass (fl/fl /VilCre (tg/- mice, and had, thus, become remarkably similar to that of post-weaning wild-type mice, which no longer express arginine-biosynthesizing enzymes in their small intestine. The adaptive changes in liver function were accompanied by an increased expression of genes involved in arginine metabolism (Asl, Got1, Gpt2, Glud1, Arg1, and Arg2 and transport (Slc25a13, Slc25a15, and Slc3a2, whereas no such changes were found in the intestine. Our findings suggest that the genetic premature deletion of arginine synthesis in enterocytes causes a premature induction of the post-weaning pattern of amino-acid metabolism in the liver.

  10. The RNA-methyltransferase Misu (NSun2 poises epidermal stem cells to differentiate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Blanco

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Homeostasis of most adult tissues is maintained by balancing stem cell self-renewal and differentiation, but whether post-transcriptional mechanisms can regulate this process is unknown. Here, we identify that an RNA methyltransferase (Misu/Nsun2 is required to balance stem cell self-renewal and differentiation in skin. In the epidermis, this methyltransferase is found in a defined sub-population of hair follicle stem cells poised to undergo lineage commitment, and its depletion results in enhanced quiescence and aberrant stem cell differentiation. Our results reveal that post-transcriptional RNA methylation can play a previously unappreciated role in controlling stem cell fate.

  11. H3K9 methyltransferase G9a and the related molecule GLP

    OpenAIRE

    Shinkai, Yoichi; Tachibana, Makoto

    2011-01-01

    The discovery of Suv39h1, the first SET domain-containing histone lysine methyltransferase (HKMT), was reported in 2000. Since then, research on histone methylation has progressed rapidly. Among the identified HKMTs in mammals, G9a and GLP are the primary enzymes for mono- and dimethylation at Lys 9 of histone H3 (H3K9me1 and H3K9me2), and exist predominantly as a G9a–GLP heteromeric complex that appears to be a functional H3K9 methyltransferase in vivo. Recently, many important studies have ...

  12. Novel Function of Lysine Methyltransferase G9a in the Regulation of Sox2 Protein Stability

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Jae-Young; Lee, Se-Hwan; Heo, Sun-Hee; Kim, Kwang-Soo; Kim, Changhoon; Kim, Dae-Kwan; Ko, Jeong-Jae; Park, Kyung-Soon

    2015-01-01

    G9a is a lysine methyltransferase (KMTase) for histone H3 lysine 9 that plays critical roles in a number of biological processes. Emerging evidence suggests that aberrant expression of G9a contributes to tumor metastasis and maintenance of a malignant phenotype in cancer by inducing epigenetic silencing of tumor suppressor genes. Here, we show that G9a regulates Sox2 protein stability in breast cancer cells. When G9a lysine methyltransferase activity was chemically inhibited in the ER(+) brea...

  13. Negative in vitro selection identifies the rRNA recognition motif for ErmE methyltransferase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, A K; Douthwaite, S; Vester, B

    1999-01-01

    the adjacent single-stranded region around A2058. An RNA transcript of 72 nt that displays this motif functions as an efficient substrate for the ErmE methyltransferase. Pools of degenerate RNAs were formed by doping 34-nt positions that extend over and beyond the putative Erm recognition motif within...... contained substitutions at single sites, and these are confined to 12 nucleotide positions. These nucleotides, corresponding to A2051-A2060, C2611, and A2614 in 23S rRNA, presumably comprise the RNA recognition motif for ErmE methyltransferase. The structure formed by these nucleotides is highly conserved...

  14. Mechanism of Allosteric Inhibition of N-Acetyl-L-glutamate Synthase by L-Arginine*

    OpenAIRE

    Min, Li; Jin, Zhongmin; Caldovic, Ljubica; Morizono, Hiroki; Allewell, Norma M.; Tuchman, Mendel; Shi, Dashuang

    2009-01-01

    N-Acetylglutamate synthase (NAGS) catalyzes the first committed step in l-arginine biosynthesis in plants and micro-organisms and is subject to feedback inhibition by l-arginine. This study compares the crystal structures of NAGS from Neisseria gonorrhoeae (ngNAGS) in the inactive T-state with l-arginine bound and in the active R-state complexed with CoA and l-glutamate. Under all of the conditions examined, the enzyme consists of two stacked ...

  15. Radiometric assay for phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase and catechol O-methyltransferase in a single tissue sample: application to rat hypothalamic nuclei, pineal gland, and heart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simple and highly sensitive method for simultaneous assay of phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase (PNMT) and catechol O-methyltransferase (COMT) is described. These enzymes are determined in a single tissue homogenate using S-[methyl-3H] adenosyl-L-methionine as methyl donor and sequentially incubating with the substrates phenylethanolamine and epinephrine. The radioactive products of the enzymatic reactions, N-methylphenylethanolamine and metanephrine, are extracted and then separated by thin-layer chromatography. The identity of the reaction products has been established chromatographically and the conditions for both enzymatic reactions in the assay procedure have been defined. Measurement of PNMT activity in the rat pineal gland or in minute fragments of other tissues (e.g., brain nuclei) has not been possible using previously described methods. Activities of PNMT and COMT in the rat pineal gland, various hypothalamic nuclei, and the auricular and ventricular myocardia are herein reported

  16. Betaine-homocysteine methyltransferase: human liver genotype-phenotype correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Qiping; Kalari, Krishna; Fridley, Brooke L.; Jenkins, Gregory; Ji, Yuan; Abo, Ryan; Hebbring, Scott; Zhang, Jianping; Nye, Monica D.; Leeder, J. Steven; Weinshilboum, Richard. M.

    2010-01-01

    Betaine-homocysteine methyltransferase (BHMT) catalyzes the remethylation of homocysteine. BHMT is highly expressed in the human liver. In the liver, BHMT catalyzes up to 50% of homocysteine metabolism. Understanding the relationship between BHMT genetic polymorphisms and function might increase our understanding of the role of this reaction in homocysteine remethylation and in S-adenosylmethionine-dependent methylation. To help achieve those goals, we measured levels of BHMT enzyme activity and immunoreactive protein in 268 human hepatic surgical biopsy samples from adult subjects as well as 73 fetal hepatic tissue samples obtained at different gestational ages. BHMT protein levels were correlated significantly (p<0.001) with levels of enzyme activity in both fetal and adult tissue, but both were decreased in fetal tissue when compared with levels in the adult hepatic biopsies. To determine possible genotype-phenotype correlations, 12 tag SNPs for BHMT and the closely related BHMT2 gene were selected from SNPs observed during our own gene resequencing studies as well as from HapMap data were used to genotype DNA from the adult hepatic surgical biopsy samples, and genotype-phenotype association analysis was performed. Three SNPs (rs41272270, rs16876512, and rs6875201), located 28 kb upstream, in the 5′-UTR and in intron 1 of BHMT, respectively, were significantly correlated with both BHMT activity (p=3.41E-8, 2.55E-9 and 2.46E-10, respectively) and protein levels (p=5.78E-5, 1.08E-5 and 6.92E-6, respectively). We also imputed 230 additional SNPs across the BHMT and BHMT2 genes, identifying an additional imputed SNP, rs7700790, that was also highly associated with hepatic BHMT enzyme activity and protein. However, none of the 3 genotyped or one imputed SNPs displayed a “shift” during electrophoretic mobility shift assays. These observations may help us to understand individual variation in the regulation of BHMT in the human liver and its possible relationship

  17. Synthesis, characterization and properties of L-arginine-passivated silver nanocolloids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunatkari, A. L.; Talwatkar, S. S.; Tamgadge, Y. S.; Muley, G. G.

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the effect of L-arginine-surface passivation on localised surface plasmon resonance (LSPR), size and stability of colloidal Silver Nanoparticles (AgNPs) synthesized by chemical reduction method. The surface Plasmon resonance absorption peak of AgNPs shows blue shift with the increase in L-arginine concentration. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis confirmed that the average size of AgNPs reduces from 10 nm to 6 nm as the concentration of L-Arginine increased from 1 to 5 mM. The X-ray diffraction study (XRD) confirmed the formation face-centred cubic (fcc) structured AgNPs. FT-IR studies revealed strong bonding between L-arginine functional groups and AgNPs.

  18. Streptococcus pneumoniae arginine synthesis genes promote growth and virulence in pneumococcal meningitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.R. Piet; M. Geldhoff; B.D.C. van Schaik; M.C. Brouwer; M. Valls Seron; M.E. Jakobs; K. Schipper; Y. Pannekoek; A.H. Zwinderman; T. van der Poll; A.H.C. van Kampen; F. Baas; A van der Ende; D. van de Beek

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) is a major human pathogen causing pneumonia, sepsis and bacterial meningitis. Using a clinical phenotype based approach with bacterial whole-genome sequencing we identified pneumococcal arginine biosynthesis genes to be associated with outcome in patients with

  19. L-Arginine and L-Glutamine as Immunonutrients and Modulating Agents for Erysipelothrix rusiopathiae Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haijun Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available L-arginine and L-glutamine were not only building blocks of proteins and polypeptides but also important regulators of key metabolic pathways that were necessary for maintenance, growth, reproduction and immunity in organisms. These compelling findings convinced us that L-arginine and L-glutamine play a vital role in virus and bacterium infection. However, scientific literature about its role on Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae (E. rhusiopathiae infection was unavailable. Thus, this study was conduct to research the effect of dietary L-arginine and L-glutamine supplementation on E. rhusiopathiae infection. According to the exciting results, researchers concluded that dietary L-arginine and L-glutamine supplementation ameliorated the cytokines profile and blood parameters and delayed the development process of E. rhusiopathiae infection in mouse model.

  20. Thermal, FT–IR and SHG efficiency studies of L-arginine doped KDP crystals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K D Parikh; D J Dave; B B Parekh; M J Joshi

    2007-04-01

    Potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP) is a well known nonlinear optical (NLO) material with different applications. Since most of the amino acids exhibit NLO property, it is of interest to dope them in KDP. In the present study, amino acid L-arginine was doped in KDP. The doping of L-arginine was confirmed by FT–IR and paper chromatography. Thermogravimetry suggested that as the amount of doping increases the thermal stability decreases as well as the value of thermodynamic and kinetic parameters decreases. The second harmonic generation (SHG) efficiency of L-arginine doped KDP crystals was found to be increasing with doping concentration of L-arginine. The results are discussed here.

  1. Resveratrol inhibits Trypanosoma cruzi arginine kinase and exerts a trypanocidal activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valera Vera, Edward A; Sayé, Melisa; Reigada, Chantal; Damasceno, Flávia S; Silber, Ariel M; Miranda, Mariana R; Pereira, Claudio A

    2016-06-01

    Arginine kinase catalyzes the reversible transphosphorylation between ADP and phosphoarginine which plays a critical role in the maintenance of cellular energy homeostasis. Arginine kinase from the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiologic agent of Chagas disease, meets the requirements to be considered as a potential therapeutic target for rational drug design including being absent in its mammalian hosts. In this study a group of polyphenolic compounds was evaluated as potential inhibitors of arginine kinase using molecular docking techniques. Among the analyzed compounds with the lowest free binding energy to the arginine kinase active site (market price; and (3) has as a well-defined target enzyme which is absent in the mammalian host, it is a promising compound as a trypanocidal drug for Chagas disease. PMID:26976067

  2. Inhibition of corrosion of carbon steel in well water by arginine-Zn2+ system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANTHONY SAMY SAHAYA RAJA

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The environmental friendly inhibitor system arginine-Zn2+, has been investigated by weight-loss method. A synergistic effect exists between arginine and Zn2+ system. The formulation consisting of 250 ppm of arginine and 5 ppm of Zn2+ offers good inhibition efficiency of 98 %. Polarization study reveals that this formulation functions as an anodic inhibitor. AC impedance spectra reveal that a protective film is formed on the metal sur­face. The FTIR spectral study leads to the conclusion that the Fe2+- DL-arginine complex, formed on anodic sites of the metal surface, controls the anodic reaction. Zn(OH2 formed on the cathodic sites of the metal surface controls the cathodic reaction. The surface morphology and the roughness of the metal surface were analyzed with Atomic Force Microscope. A suitable mechanism of corrosion inhibition is proposed based on the results obtained from weight loss study and surface analysis technique.

  3. Large-Scale Identification of the Arginine Methylome by Mass Spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sylvestersen, Kathrine B; Nielsen, Michael L

    2016-01-01

    The attachment of one or more methylation groups to the side chain of arginine residues is a regulatory mechanism for cellular proteins. Recent advances in mass spectrometry-based characterization allow comprehensive identification of arginine methylation sites by peptide-level enrichment...... strategies. Described in this unit is a 4-day protocol for enrichment of arginine-methylated peptides and subsequent identification of thousands of distinct sites by mass spectrometry. Specifically, the protocol explains step-by-step sample preparation, enrichment using commercially available antibodies......, prefractionation using strong cation exchange, and identification using liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry. A strategy for relative quantification is described using stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC). Approaches for analysis of arginine methylation site occupancy...

  4. Metabolomic analysis of plasma and liver from surplus arginine fed Atlantic salmon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Synne M.; Assaad, Houssein I.; Lin, Gang; Wang, Junjun; Aksnes, Anders; Wu, Guoyao; Espe, Marit

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the metabolic effect of surplus arginine (36.1 g/kg dry matter) compared to a control diet with required arginine (21.1 g/kg dry matter) in adult Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.). Although the feeding trial had no significant effect on growth, there were significant differences in the metabolite profile in both plasma and liver in experimental group as compared to the control group. There was increased concentrations of biliverdin, PGF-2 alpha, oxidized glutathione, selenocysteine, two monoacylglycerols and a tripeptide in the liver as well as decreased concentrations of valine and a vitamin D3 metabolite in plasma of arginine supplemented fish. These results indicate that while surplus arginine does not affect growth or body weight, it induces metabolic changes in Atlantic salmon. PMID:25553364

  5. Arginine does not exacerbate markers of inflammation in cocultures of human enterocytes and leukocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parlesak, Alexandr; Negrier, I.; Neveux, N.;

    2007-01-01

    Enteral arginine supplementation in the critically ill has become a matter of controversy. In this study, we investigated effects of the addition of 0.4 and 1.2 mmol/L arginine in a coculture model on markers of inflammation, enterocyte layer integrity, and amino acid transport. In this model, a...... transepithelial flux of 22 amino acids, their catabolism, and the integrity of the enterocyte layer assessed as permeability of fluorescein dextran (M(r) 4400). Bacterial stimulation of intestinal epithelial cells enhanced the basolateral concentration of nitric oxide and all cytokines measured. Supplementation...... the catabolism of serine, asparagine, and lysine, and reduced glutamine catabolism. Addition of arginine increased ornithine formation and moderately reduced transepithelial transport of methionine and other amino acids. Hence, arginine supplementation does not interfere with inflammation...

  6. Arginine metabolism by macrophages promotes cardiac and muscle fibrosis in mdx muscular dystrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Wehling-Henricks

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD is the most common, lethal disease of childhood. One of 3500 new-born males suffers from this universally-lethal disease. Other than the use of corticosteroids, little is available to affect the relentless progress of the disease, leading many families to use dietary supplements in hopes of reducing the progression or severity of muscle wasting. Arginine is commonly used as a dietary supplement and its use has been reported to have beneficial effects following short-term administration to mdx mice, a genetic model of DMD. However, the long-term effects of arginine supplementation are unknown. This lack of knowledge about the long-term effects of increased arginine metabolism is important because elevated arginine metabolism can increase tissue fibrosis, and increased fibrosis of skeletal muscles and the heart is an important and potentially life-threatening feature of DMD. METHODOLOGY: We use both genetic and nutritional manipulations to test whether changes in arginase metabolism promote fibrosis and increase pathology in mdx mice. Our findings show that fibrotic lesions in mdx muscle are enriched with arginase-2-expressing macrophages and that muscle macrophages stimulated with cytokines that activate the M2 phenotype show elevated arginase activity and expression. We generated a line of arginase-2-null mutant mdx mice and found that the mutation reduced fibrosis in muscles of 18-month-old mdx mice, and reduced kyphosis that is attributable to muscle fibrosis. We also observed that dietary supplementation with arginine for 17-months increased mdx muscle fibrosis. In contrast, arginine-2 mutation did not reduce cardiac fibrosis or affect cardiac function assessed by echocardiography, although 17-months of dietary supplementation with arginine increased cardiac fibrosis. Long-term arginine treatments did not decrease matrix metalloproteinase-2 or -9 or increase the expression of utrophin, which have

  7. Wolbachia prophage DNA adenine methyltransferase genes in different Drosophila-Wolbachia associations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saridaki, Aggeliki; Sapountzis, Panagiotis; Harris, Harriet L;

    2011-01-01

    . The importance of DNA methylation in cell fate and biology calls for in depth studying of putative methylation-related genes. We present a molecular and phylogenetic analysis of a putative DNA adenine methyltransferase encoded by a prophage in the Wolbachia genome. Two slightly different copies of the gene, met1...

  8. Structural basis for S-adenosylmethionine binding and methyltransferase activity by mitochondrial transcription factor B1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guja, Kip E; Venkataraman, Krithika; Yakubovskaya, Elena; Shi, Hui; Mejia, Edison; Hambardjieva, Elena; Karzai, A Wali; Garcia-Diaz, Miguel

    2013-09-01

    Eukaryotic transcription factor B (TFB) proteins are homologous to KsgA/Dim1 ribosomal RNA (rRNA) methyltransferases. The mammalian TFB1, mitochondrial (TFB1M) factor is an essential protein necessary for mitochondrial gene expression. TFB1M mediates an rRNA modification in the small ribosomal subunit and thus plays a role analogous to KsgA/Dim1 proteins. This modification has been linked to mitochondrial dysfunctions leading to maternally inherited deafness, aminoglycoside sensitivity and diabetes. Here, we present the first structural characterization of the mammalian TFB1 factor. We have solved two X-ray crystallographic structures of TFB1M with (2.1 Å) and without (2.0 Å) its cofactor S-adenosyl-L-methionine. These structures reveal that TFB1M shares a conserved methyltransferase core with other KsgA/Dim1 methyltransferases and shed light on the structural basis of S-adenosyl-L-methionine binding and methyltransferase activity. Together with mutagenesis studies, these data suggest a model for substrate binding and provide insight into the mechanism of methyl transfer, clarifying the role of this factor in an essential process for mitochondrial function. PMID:23804760

  9. Suz12 is essential for mouse development and for EZH2 histone methyltransferase activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pasini, Diego; Bracken, Adrian P; Jensen, Michael R;

    2004-01-01

    SUZ12 is a recently identified Polycomb group (PcG) protein, which together with EZH2 and EED forms different Polycomb repressive complexes (PRC2/3). These complexes contain histone H3 lysine (K) 27/9 and histone H1 K26 methyltransferase activity specified by the EZH2 SET domain. Here we show tha...

  10. Methyltransferase Erm(37) Slips on rRNA to Confer Atypical Resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Madsen, Ch. T.; Jakobsen, L.; Buriánková, Karolína; Doucet-Populaire, F.; Perdonet, J. L.; Douthwaite, S.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 280, č. 47 (2005), s. 38942-38947. ISSN 0021-9258 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA310/03/0292 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : methyltransferase erm * mycobacterium tuberculosis * rRNA Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 5.854, year: 2005

  11. Association of Catechol-O-Methyltransferase (COMT) Polymorphism and Academic Achievement in a Chinese Cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Ting-Kuang; Chang, Chun-Yen; Hu, Chung-Yi; Yeh, Ting-Chi; Lin, Ming-Yeh

    2009-01-01

    Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) is a methylation enzyme that catalyzes the degradation pathway and inactivation of dopamine. It is accepted widely as being involved in the modulation of dopaminergic physiology and prefrontal cortex (PFC) function. The COMT Val158Met polymorphism is associated with variation in COMT activity. COMT 158Met allele…

  12. Catechol-O-methyltransferase gene methylation and substance use in adolescents: The TRAILS study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.J. van der Knaap (Lisette); J.M. Schäfer (Johanna); I.H.A. Franken (Ingmar); F.C. Verhulst (Frank); F.V.A. van Oort (Floor); H. Riese (Harriëtte)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractSubstance use often starts in adolescence and poses a major problem for society and individual health. The dopamine system plays a role in substance use, and catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) is an important enzyme that degrades dopamine. The Val108/158Met polymorphism modul

  13. Effect of alternative temozolomide schedules on glioblastoma O 6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase activity and survival

    OpenAIRE

    Robinson, C G; Palomo, J M; Rahmathulla, G; McGraw, M; Donze, J; L. Liu; Vogelbaum, M A

    2010-01-01

    Background: O 6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) expression in glioblastoma correlates with temozolomide resistance. Dose-intense temozolomide schedules deplete MGMT activity in peripheral blood mononuclear cells; however, no published data exist evaluating the effect of temozolomide schedules on intracranial tumour MGMT activity. Methods: Human glioblastoma cells (GBM43) with an unmethylated MGMT promoter were implanted intracranially in immunodeficient rodents. Three weeks later, ...

  14. Clinical Pharmacogenetics Implementation Consortium guidelines for thiopurine methyltransferase genotype and thiopurine dosing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Relling, M V; Gardner, E E; Sandborn, W J;

    2011-01-01

    Thiopurine methyltransferase (TPMT) activity exhibits monogenic co-dominant inheritance, with ethnic differences in the frequency of occurrence of variant alleles. With conventional thiopurine doses, homozygous TPMT-deficient patients (~1 in 178 to 1 in 3,736 individuals with two nonfunctional TP...

  15. SABATH Methyltransferases from White Spruce (Picea glauca [Moench] Voss): Gene Cloning, Functional Characterization and Structural Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Known members of the plant SABATH family of methyltransferases have important biological functions by methylating hormones, signaling molecules and other metabolites. While all previously characterized SABATH genes were isolated from angiosperms, in this article, we report on the isolation and funct...

  16. Recognition elements in rRNA for the tylosin resistance methyltransferase RlmA(II)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lebars, Isabelle; Husson, Clotilde; Yoshizawa, Satoko; Douthwaite, Stephen; Fourmy, Dominique

    2007-01-01

    antibiotics. We have previously solved the solution structure of hairpin 35 in the conformation that is recognized by the RlmA(II) methyltransferase from Streptococcus pneumoniae. It was shown that while essential recognition elements are located in hairpin 35, the interactions between RlmA(II) and hairpin 35...

  17. DNA repair methyltransferase (Mgmt) knockout mice are sensitive to the lethal effects of chemotherapeutic alkylating agents.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.J. Glassner (Brian); G. Weeda (Geert); J.M. Allan (James); J.L.M. Broekhof (Jose'); N.H.E. Carls (Nick); I. Donker (Ingrid); B.P. Engelward (Bevin); R.J. Hampson (Richard); R. Hersmus (Remko); M.J. Hickman (Mark); R.B. Roth (Richard); H.B. Warren (Henry); M.M. Wu (Mavis); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); L.D. Samson (Leona)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractWe have generated mice deficient in O6-methylguanine DNA methyltransferase activity encoded by the murine Mgmt gene using homologous recombination to delete the region encoding the Mgmt active site cysteine. Tissues from Mgmt null mice displayed very low O6-methylguanine DNA methyltransf

  18. Functional characterization of cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase and caffeic acid O-methyltransferase in Brachypodium distachyon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lignin is a significant recalcitrant in the conversion of plant biomass to bioethanol. Cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD) and caffeic acid O-methyltransferase (COMT) catalyze key steps in the pathway of lignin monomer biosynthesis. Brown midrib mutants in Zea mays and Sorghum bicolor with impaired...

  19. Mutations in the DNA methyltransferase gene DNMT3A cause an overgrowth syndrome with intellectual disability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tatton-Brown, Katrina; Seal, Sheila; Ruark, Elise; Harmer, Jenny; Ramsay, Emma; Del Vecchio Duarte, Silvana; Zachariou, Anna; Hanks, Sandra; O'Brien, Eleanor; Aksglaede, Lise; Baralle, Diana; Dabir, Tabib; Gener, Blanca; Goudie, David; Homfray, Tessa; Kumar, Ajith; Pilz, Daniela T; Selicorni, Angelo; Temple, I Karen; Van Maldergem, Lionel; Yachelevich, Naomi; van Montfort, Robert; Rahman, Nazneen

    2014-01-01

    and histone binding. Similar mutations were not present in 1,000 UK population controls (13/152 cases versus 0/1,000 controls; P < 0.0001). Mutation carriers had a distinctive facial appearance, intellectual disability and greater height. DNMT3A encodes a DNA methyltransferase essential for...

  20. Local chromatin microenvironment determines DNMT activity : from DNA methyltransferase to DNA demethylase or DNA dehydroxymethylase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wijst, Monique G. P.; Venkiteswaran, Muralidhar; Chen, Hui; Xu, Guo-Liang; Plosch, Torsten; Rots, Marianne G.

    2015-01-01

    Insights on active DNA demethylation disproved the original assumption that DNA methylation is a stable epigenetic modification. Interestingly, mammalian DNA methyltransferases 3A and 3B (DNMT-3A and -3B) have also been reported to induce active DNA demethylation, in addition to their well-known fun

  1. Clinical Pharmacogenetics Implementation Consortium guidelines for thiopurine methyltransferase genotype and thiopurine dosing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Relling, M V; Gardner, E E; Sandborn, W J; Schmiegelow, K; Pui, C-H; Yee, S W; Stein, Paul C.; Carrillo, Maria Berrocal; Evans, W E; Klein, T E

    2011-01-01

    Thiopurine methyltransferase (TPMT) activity exhibits monogenic co-dominant inheritance, with ethnic differences in the frequency of occurrence of variant alleles. With conventional thiopurine doses, homozygous TPMT-deficient patients (~1 in 178 to 1 in 3,736 individuals with two nonfunctional TP...... recommendations (updates at http://www.pharmgkb.org) for azathioprine, mercaptopurine (MP), and thioguanine based on TPMT genotype....

  2. A mouse speciation gene encodes a meiotic histone H3 methyltransferase

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mihola, Ondřej; Trachtulec, Zdeněk; Vlček, Čestmír; Schimenti, J.C.; Forejt, Jiří

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 323, č. 5912 (2009), s. 373-375. ISSN 0036-8075 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : hybrid sterility * histone H3K4 methyltransferase * Prdm9 Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 29.747, year: 2009

  3. Tailored second line therapy in asthmatic children with the arginine-16 genotype

    OpenAIRE

    Lipworth, Brian J; Basu, Kaninika; Donald, Helen P; Tavendale, Roger; Macgregor, Donald F; Ogston, Simon A; Palmer, Colin N. A.; Mukhopadhyay, Somnath

    2012-01-01

    The arginine-16 beta-2 receptor genotype confers increased susceptibility to exacerbations in asthmatic children taking regular long acting beta-2 agonists. We therefore evaluated using montelukast as an alternative to salmeterol as tailored second line asthma controller therapy in children expressing this susceptible genotype. 62 persistent asthmatic children with the homozygous arginine-16 genotype were randomized to receive salmeterol 50ug bid or montelukast 5/10mg od as add on to inhaled ...

  4. Influence of in ovo injection of L-arginine on productive and physiological performance of quail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. K. Al–Hayani,

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the influence of inoculation of different levels of L–arginine into eggs of 0-day-old quail embryos. On 0 day of incubation, 480 eggs (120 for each treatment group were injected with 0% arginine (C group; 1% arginine (T1; 2% arginine (T2; or 3% arginine (T3. After hatching, 336 quail chicks (84 chicks produced from each in ovo injection treatment were placed in an experimental quail house and distributed into 4 treatment groups of 3 replicates each with 16 quail chicks for each replicate. Traits determined in this study were hatchability rate, initial body weight (7 days of age, final body weight (42 days old, feed intake, weight gain, feed conversion ratio, proportional weights of carcass, breast, legs, back bone, wings, neck, abdominal fat, liver, heart, and gizzard, blood serum glucose, protein, cholesterol, total lipids, triglycerides, calcium and phosphorus and Results revealed that in ovo injection with different levels of L–arginine on 0 day of incubation resulted in significant increase (P≤0.05 in hatchability rate, initial body weight, final body weight, feed conversion ratio and serum glucose, protein, total protein, calcium, phosphorus and proportional weights of carcass, breast, legs, liver, heart, and gizzard and significant decrease (P≤0.05 in serum cholesterol, total lipids, triglycerides and proportional weight of back bone, wings and abdominal fat. In conclusion, the inoculation of different levels of L–arginine into eggs of 0–day–old quail embryos especially at the levels of 2% and 3% resulted in significant improvement in productive and physiological performance of quail. Hence in ovo injection with L–arginine could be used as a beneficial tool for enhance productive performance of quail.

  5. Arginine and pyrimidine biosynthetic defects in Neisseria gonorrhoeae strains isolated from patients.

    OpenAIRE

    Shinners, E N; Catlin, B W

    1982-01-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae strains with nutritional requirements that include arginine (Arg-), uracil (Ura-), and hypoxanthine have attracted attention because of their tendency to cause disseminated infections, as a basis for genetic studies of arginine and pyrimidine biosynthesis, we examined the activities of four enzymes of these pathways in cell-free extracts of both prototrophic and Arg- Ura- strains. Activities of glutamate acetyltransferase, aspartate transcarbamylase, and orotate phosphor...

  6. Genetic and biochemical characterization of arginine biosynthesis in Sinorhizobium meliloti 1021.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Victor M; Girard, Lourdes; Hernández-Lucas, Ismael; Vázquez, Alejandra; Ortíz-Ortíz, Catalina; Díaz, Rafael; Dunn, Michael F

    2015-08-01

    L-Ornithine production in the alfalfa microsymbiont Sinorhizobium meliloti occurs as an intermediate step in arginine biosynthesis. Ornithine is required for effective symbiosis but its synthesis in S. meliloti has been little studied. Unlike most bacteria, S. meliloti 1021 is annotated as encoding two enzymes producing ornithine: N-acetylornithine (NAO) deacetylase (ArgE) hydrolyses NAO to acetate and ornithine, and glutamate N-acetyltransferase (ArgJ) transacetylates l-glutamate with the acetyl group from NAO, forming ornithine and N-acetylglutamate (NAG). NAG is the substrate for the second step of arginine biosynthesis catalysed by NAG kinase (ArgB). Inactivation of argB in strain 1021 resulted in arginine auxotrophy. The activity of purified ArgB was significantly inhibited by arginine but not by ornithine. The purified ArgJ was highly active in NAO deacetylation/glutamate transacetylation and was significantly inhibited by ornithine but not by arginine. The purified ArgE protein (with a 6His-Sumo affinity tag) was also active in deacetylating NAO. argE and argJ single mutants, and an argEJ double mutant, are arginine prototrophs. Extracts of the double mutant contained aminoacylase (Ama) activity that deacetylated NAO to form ornithine. The purified products of three candidate ama genes (smc00682 (hipO1), smc02256 (hipO2) and smb21279) all possessed NAO deacetylase activity. hipO1 and hipO2, but not smb21279, expressed in trans functionally complemented an Escherichia coli ΔargE : : Km mutant. We conclude that Ama activity accounts for the arginine prototrophy of the argEJ mutant. Transcriptional assays of argB, argE and argJ, fused to a promoterless gusA gene, showed that their expression was not significantly affected by exogenous arginine or ornithine. PMID:26271664

  7. Chiral pharmacokinetics and inversion of NG-nitro-arginine in the rat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan-feiXIN; RuiTONG; YangFANG; Xiang-junZHOU; Yong-xiangWANG

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To explore pharmacokinetics of NG-nitro-D-arginine (D-NNA) and NG-nitro-L-arginine (L-NNA) in conscious rats.METHODS: The plasma concentration of D-NNA and L-NNA were determined by chiral ligand exchange method with capillary electrochromatography (CEC). Pharmacokinetic parameters were estimated using non-compartment model and were fitted using a computer program DAS. Chiral inversion rate of D-NNA to L-

  8. Arginine intake and risk of coronary heart disease mortality in elderly men

    OpenAIRE

    Oomen, C.M.; Erk, van, M.J.; Feskens, E.J.M.; Kok, F.J.; Kromhout, D.

    2000-01-01

    From experimental studies, the hypothesis is derived that the amino acid arginine, the precursor of NO, could restore the impaired endothelial function and increased platelet activation observed in atherosclerosis. We investigated whether dietary intake of arginine is associated with reduced coronary heart disease risk in elderly persons. The study population consisted of 806 men aged 64 to 84 years at baseline who participated in the Zutphen Elderly Study, a population-based cohort followed ...

  9. L-Arginine but not L-glutamine likely increases exogenous carbohydrate oxidation during endurance exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowlands, David S; Clarke, Jim; Green, Jackson G; Shi, Xiaocai

    2012-07-01

    The addition of L-arginine or L-glutamine to glucose-electrolyte solutions can increase intestinal water, glucose, and sodium absorption in rats and humans. We evaluated the utility of L-arginine and L-glutamine in energy-rehydration beverages through assessment of exogenous glucose oxidation and perceptions of exertion and gastrointestinal distress during endurance exercise. Eight cyclists rode 150 min at 50% of peak power on four occasions while ingesting solutions at a rate of 150 mL 15 min(-1) that contained (13)C-enriched glucose (266 mmol L(-1)) and sodium citrate ([Na(+)] 60 mmol L(-1)), and either: 4.25 mmol L(-1) L-arginine or 45 mmol L(-1) L-glutamine, and as controls glucose only or no glucose. Relative to glucose only, L-arginine invoked a likely 12% increase in exogenous glucose oxidation (90% confidence limits: ± 8%); however, the effect of L-glutamine was possibly trivial (4.5 ± 7.3%). L-Arginine also led to very likely small reductions in endogenous fat oxidation rate relative to glucose (12 ± 4%) and L-glutamine (14 ± 4%), and relative to no glucose, likely reductions in exercise oxygen consumption (2.6 ± 1.5%) and plasma lactate concentration (0.20 ± 0.16 mmol L(-1)). Effects on endogenous and total carbohydrate oxidation were inconsequential. Compared with glucose only, L-arginine and L-glutamine caused likely small-moderate effect size increases in perceptions of stomach fullness, abdominal cramp, exertion, and muscle tiredness during exercise. Addition of L-arginine to a glucose and electrolyte solution increases the oxidation of exogenous glucose and decreases the oxygen cost of exercise, although the mechanisms responsible and impact on endurance performance require further investigation. However, L-arginine also increases subjective feelings of gastrointestinal distress, which may attenuate its other benefits. PMID:22048324

  10. Structural organization of the rat gene for the arginine vasopressin-neurophysin precursor

    OpenAIRE

    Schmale, H.; Heinsohn, S; Richter, D

    1983-01-01

    The rat arginine vasopressin-neurophysin precursor gene has been isolated from a genomic library cloned in lambda phage Charon 4A. Restriction mapping and nucleotide sequence analysis demonstrated that the gene is 1.85 kilobase pairs long and contains two intervening sequences located in the protein coding region. Exon A encodes a putative signal peptide, the hormone arginine vasopressin and the variable N terminus of the carrier protein neurophysin, exon B encodes the highly conserved middle...

  11. PRE-EXERCISE ARGININE SUPPLEMENTATION INCREASES TIME TO EXHAUSTION IN ELITE MALE WRESTLERS

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Dietary supplements containing arginine are among the most popular ergogenics intended to enhance strength, power and muscle recovery associated with both anaerobic and aerobic exercise. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the possible effect of pre-exercise acute intake of arginine on performance and exercise metabolism during incremental exhaustive exercise in elite male wrestlers. Nine volunteer elite male wrestlers (24.7±3.8 years) participated in this study. The test-retest prot...

  12. Nonspecific blockade of vascular free radical signals by methylated arginine analogues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro M.A.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Methylated arginine analogues are often used as probes of the effect of nitric oxide; however, their specificity is unclear and seems to be frequently overestimated. This study analyzed the effects of NG-methyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA on the endothelium-dependent release of vascular superoxide radicals triggered by increased flow. Plasma ascorbyl radical signals measured by direct electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy in 25 rabbits increased by 3.8 ± 0.7 nmol/l vs baseline (28.7 ± 1.4 nmol/l, P<0.001 in response to papaverine-induced flow increases of 121 ± 12%. In contrast, after similar papaverine-induced flow increases simultaneously with L-NMMA infusions, ascorbyl levels were not significantly changed compared to baseline. Similar results were obtained in isolated rabbit aortas perfused ex vivo with the spin trap a-phenyl-N-tert-butylnitrone (N = 22. However, in both preparations, this complete blockade was not reversed by co-infusion of excess L-arginine and was also obtained by N-methyl-D-arginine, thus indicating that it is not related to nitric oxide synthase. L-arginine alone was ineffective, as previously demonstrated for NG-methyl-L-arginine ester (L-NAME. In vitro, neither L-arginine nor its analogues scavenged superoxide radicals. This nonspecific activity of methylated arginine analogues underscores the need for careful controls in order to assess nitric oxide effects, particularly those related to interactions with active oxygen species.

  13. Abnormal mitochondrial L-arginine transport contributes to the pathogenesis of heart failure and rexoygenation injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Williams

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Impaired mitochondrial function is fundamental feature of heart failure (HF and myocardial ischemia. In addition to the effects of heightened oxidative stress, altered nitric oxide (NO metabolism, generated by a mitochondrial NO synthase, has also been proposed to impact upon mitochondrial function. However, the mechanism responsible for arginine transport into mitochondria and the effect of HF on such a process is unknown. We therefore aimed to characterize mitochondrial L-arginine transport and to investigate the hypothesis that impaired mitochondrial L-arginine transport plays a key role in the pathogenesis of heart failure and myocardial injury. METHODS AND RESULTS: In mitochondria isolated from failing hearts (sheep rapid pacing model and mouse Mst1 transgenic model we demonstrated a marked reduction in L-arginine uptake (p<0.05 and p<0.01 respectively and expression of the principal L-arginine transporter, CAT-1 (p<0.001, p<0.01 compared to controls. This was accompanied by significantly lower NO production and higher 3-nitrotyrosine levels (both p<0.05. The role of mitochondrial L-arginine transport in modulating cardiac stress responses was examined in cardiomyocytes with mitochondrial specific overexpression of CAT-1 (mtCAT1 exposed to hypoxia-reoxygenation stress. mtCAT1 cardiomyocytes had significantly improved mitochondrial membrane potential, respiration and ATP turnover together with significantly decreased reactive oxygen species production and cell death following mitochondrial stress. CONCLUSION: These data provide new insights into the role of L-arginine transport in mitochondrial biology and cardiovascular disease. Augmentation of mitochondrial L-arginine availability may be a novel therapeutic strategy for myocardial disorders involving mitochondrial stress such as heart failure and reperfusion injury.

  14. Histone arginine methylation in cocaine action in the nucleus accumbens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damez-Werno, Diane M; Sun, HaoSheng; Scobie, Kimberly N; Shao, Ningyi; Rabkin, Jaclyn; Dias, Caroline; Calipari, Erin S; Maze, Ian; Pena, Catherine J; Walker, Deena M; Cahill, Michael E; Chandra, Ramesh; Gancarz, Amy; Mouzon, Ezekiell; Landry, Joseph A; Cates, Hannah; Lobo, Mary-Kay; Dietz, David; Allis, C David; Guccione, Ernesto; Turecki, Gustavo; Defilippi, Paola; Neve, Rachael L; Hurd, Yasmin L; Shen, Li; Nestler, Eric J

    2016-08-23

    Repeated cocaine exposure regulates transcriptional regulation within the nucleus accumbens (NAc), and epigenetic mechanisms-such as histone acetylation and methylation on Lys residues-have been linked to these lasting actions of cocaine. In contrast to Lys methylation, the role of histone Arg (R) methylation remains underexplored in addiction models. Here we show that protein-R-methyltransferase-6 (PRMT6) and its associated histone mark, asymmetric dimethylation of R2 on histone H3 (H3R2me2a), are decreased in the NAc of mice and rats after repeated cocaine exposure, including self-administration, and in the NAc of cocaine-addicted humans. Such PRMT6 down-regulation occurs selectively in NAc medium spiny neurons (MSNs) expressing dopamine D2 receptors (D2-MSNs), with opposite regulation occurring in D1-MSNs, and serves to protect against cocaine-induced addictive-like behavioral abnormalities. Using ChIP-seq, we identified Src kinase signaling inhibitor 1 (Srcin1; also referred to as p140Cap) as a key gene target for reduced H3R2me2a binding, and found that consequent Srcin1 induction in the NAc decreases Src signaling, cocaine reward, and the motivation to self-administer cocaine. Taken together, these findings suggest that suppression of Src signaling in NAc D2-MSNs, via PRMT6 and H3R2me2a down-regulation, functions as a homeostatic brake to restrain cocaine action, and provide novel candidates for the development of treatments for cocaine addiction. PMID:27506785

  15. Cysteine and arginine-rich peptides as molecular carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirazi, Amir Nasrolahi; El-Sayed, Naglaa Salem; Mandal, Dindayal; Tiwari, Rakesh K; Tavakoli, Kathy; Etesham, Matthew; Parang, Keykavous

    2016-01-15

    A number of linear and cyclic peptides containing alternative arginine and cysteine residues, namely linear (CR)3, linear (CR)4, linear (CR)5, cyclic [CR]4, and cyclic [CR]5, were synthesized. The peptides were evaluated for their ability to deliver two molecular cargos, fluorescence-labeled cell-impermeable negatively charged phosphopeptide (F'-GpYEEI) and fluorescence-labeled lamivudine (F'-3TC), intracellularly in human leukemia cancer (CCRF-CEM) cells. We investigated the role of cyclization and the number of amino acids in improving the transporting ability of the peptides. The flow cytometry studies suggested that the synthesized peptides were able to work efficiently as transporters for both cargos. Among all compounds, cyclic [CR]4 was found to be the most efficient peptide in transporting the cargo into cells. For instance, the cellular uptake of F'-3TC (5μM) and F'-GpYEEI (5μM) was enhanced by 16- and 20-fold, respectively, in the presence of cyclic [CR]4 compared to that of the parent compound alone. The mechanism of F'-GpYEEI uptake by cells was found to be energy-independent. The results showed that the number of amino acids and their cyclic nature can impact the efficiency of the peptide in transporting the molecular cargos. PMID:26631317

  16. Urinary and metabolic clearances of arginine vasopressin in normal subjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synthetic arginine vasopressin (AVP) was infused into 11 hydrated normal subjects at five different infusion rates ranging from 10 to 350 μU kg-1 min-1. Each infusion rate was continued for 1 h, and urinary determinations were made on the 30- to 60-min specimens during which time there was no further rise in plasma AVP. Urinary AVP concentrations (μU/ml) and excretion rates (μU/min) increased linearly with increasing infusion rates, and the concentration of AVP in urine increased 120 times more rapid than plasma. Urinary and metabolic clearances of AVP also increased linearly with the maximum urinary clearance being 60.6% of the creatinine clearance. The total metabolic clearance of AVP (including urinary clearance) was 17.8 times that of the urinary clearance of AVP alone. These data clarify the relationships between plasma and urinary AVP in normal hydrated subjects during AVP infusion under steady-state conditions and emphasize the potential advantage of measuring urinary AVP as a monitor of endogenous AVP secretion. AVP was measured by radioimmunoassay

  17. tlpA gene expression is required for arginine and bicarbonate chemotaxis in Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar A Cerda

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available About half of the human population is infected with Helicobacter pylori, a bacterium causing gastritis, peptic ulcer and progression to gastric cancer. Chemotaxis and flagellar motility are required for colonization and persistence of H. pylori in the gastric mucus layer. It is not completely clear which chemical gradients are used by H. pylori to maintain its position. TlpA, a chemotaxis receptor for arginine/ bicarbonate, has been identified. This study aimed to find out whether tlpA gene expression is required for the chemotactic response to arginine/bicarbonate. Wild-type motile H. pylori ATCC 700392 and H. pylori ATCC 43504, a strain having an interrupted tlpA gene, were used. Also, a tlpA-knockout mutant of H. pylori 700392 (H. pylori 700-tlpA::cat was produced by homologous recombination. Expression of tlpA was assessed by a Reverse Transcriptase-Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR assay. Chemotaxis was measured as a Relative Chemotaxis Response (RCR by a modified capillary assay. H. pylori 700392 presented chemotaxis to arginine and sodium bicarbonate. H. pylori 700-tlpA::cat showed neither tlpA gene expression nor chemotaxis towards arginine and bicarbonate. Besides confirming that TlpA is a chemotactic receptor for arginine/bicarbonate in H. pylori, this study showed that tlpA gene expression is required for arginine/bicarbonate chemotaxis.

  18. Relationship of arginine with lysine in diets for laying Japanese quails

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata de Souza Reis

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available To determine the relationship of arginine with lysine for Japanese quails during the period of production, an experiment was conducted using 360 subspecies of Japanese quails (Coturnix coturnix japonica with 162 days of age, distributed in a completely randomized design. Diets were formulated with corn, soybean meal, sorghum and wheat bran containing 20.0% crude protein and 2,800 kcal ME/kg. The basal diet contained suboptimal level of lysine equal to 1% and was supplemented with five levels of L-arginine 99% (0.032; 0.083; 0.134; 0.185 and 0.236% to replace the glutamic acid, corresponding to the relationship of arginine with digestible lysine of 1.16, 1.21, 1.26, 1.31 and 1.36. The parameters studied were: feed intake, egg production per hen/day, egg production per hen housed, commercial egg production, egg weight, egg mass, feed conversion by egg mass, feed conversion per dozen eggs, weight and percentage of components of the eggs (yolk, albumen and shell and specific gravity. There was no significant effect on the relationship of arginine with digestible lysine in the diet of Japanese quails for any of the parameters examined. The arginine/lysine ratio of 1.16, which corresponds to a daily intake of 288.84 mg of arginine, provides satisfactory performance and egg quality of Japanese quails.

  19. Hypothalamic protein profiles associated with inhibited feed intake of ducks fed with insufficient dietary arginine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C; Zheng, A J; Xie, M; Huang, W; Xie, J J; Hou, S S

    2014-07-01

    An experiment was conducted to investigate the effect of arginine on feed intake regulation. One hundred and twenty six 1-day-old male White Pekin ducks (Anas platyrhynchos domestica) were randomly were allotted to one of two dietary treatments. The birds were fed diets containing 0.71% (deficient) or 1.27% (sufficient) arginine for 3 weeks. At 21 days of age, feed intake was determined and hypothalamic protein profiles were analyzed using isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification technique. The birds fed with arginine-deficient diet had a lower final live BW and cumulative feed intake (P1.5-fold expressional changes between arginine-deficient and -sufficient dietary treatments. Nine of these proteins were upregulated and seven of them were downregulated. The identified proteins could be regrouped into six categories: protein processing, carbohydrate metabolism and energy production, transporter, cytoskeleton, immunity and neuronal development. Dietary arginine deficiency decreased expression of proteins involved in energy production (glycine amidinotransferase, aldolase B fructose-bisphosphate, aconitase, transaldolase, 6-phosphofructokinase type C-like) and oxygen transportation (haemoglobin subunit α expression). The proteomic alterations described here provides valuable insights into the interactions of arginine with appetite. PMID:24804691

  20. Physiology and Posttranscriptional Regulation of Methanol:Coenzyme M Methyltransferase Isozymes in Methanosarcina acetivorans C2A ▿ §

    OpenAIRE

    Opulencia, Rina B.; Bose, Arpita; Metcalf, William W.

    2009-01-01

    Methanosarcina species possess three operons (mtaCB1, mtaCB2, and mtaCB3) encoding methanol-specific methyltransferase 1 (MT1) isozymes and two genes (mtaA1 and mtaA2) with the potential to encode a methanol-specific methyltransferase 2 (MT2). Previous genetic studies showed that these genes are differentially regulated and encode enzymes with distinct levels of methyltransferase activity. Here, the effects of promoter strength on growth and on the rate of methane production were examined by ...

  1. Basis of Arginine Sensitivity of Microbial N-Acetyl-l-Glutamate Kinases: Mutagenesis and Protein Engineering Study with the Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli Enzymes▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Murga, M. Leonor; Rubio, Vicente

    2008-01-01

    N-Acetylglutamate kinase (NAGK) catalyzes the second step of arginine biosynthesis. In Pseudomonas aeruginosa, but not in Escherichia coli, this step is rate limiting and feedback and sigmoidally inhibited by arginine. Crystal structures revealed that arginine-insensitive E. coli NAGK (EcNAGK) is homodimeric, whereas arginine-inhibitable NAGKs, including P. aeruginosa NAGK (PaNAGK), are hexamers in which an extra N-terminal kinked helix (N-helix) interlinks three dimers. By introducing single amino acid replacements in PaNAGK, we prove the functionality of the structurally identified arginine site, as arginine site mutations selectively decreased the apparent affinity for arginine. N-helix mutations affecting R24 and E17 increased and decreased, respectively, the apparent affinity of PaNAGK for arginine, as predicted from enzyme structures that revealed the respective formation by these residues of bonds favoring inaccessible and accessible arginine site conformations. N-helix N-terminal deletions spanning ≥16 residues dissociated PaNAGK to active dimers, those of ≤20 residues decreased the apparent affinity for arginine, and complete N-helix deletion (26 residues) abolished arginine inhibition. Upon attachment of the PaNAGK N-terminal extension to the EcNAGK N terminus, EcNAGK remained dimeric and arginine insensitive. We concluded that the N-helix and its C-terminal portion after the kink are essential but not sufficient for hexamer formation and arginine inhibition, respectively; that the N-helix modulates NAGK affinity for arginine and mediates signal transmission between arginine sites, thus establishing sigmoidal arginine inhibition kinetics; that the mobile αH-β16 loop of the arginine site is the modulatory signal receiver; and that the hexameric architecture is not essential for arginine inhibition but is functionally essential for physiologically relevant arginine control of NAGK. PMID:18263723

  2. Basis of arginine sensitivity of microbial N-acetyl-L-glutamate kinases: mutagenesis and protein engineering study with the Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Murga, M Leonor; Rubio, Vicente

    2008-04-01

    N-acetylglutamate kinase (NAGK) catalyzes the second step of arginine biosynthesis. In Pseudomonas aeruginosa, but not in Escherichia coli, this step is rate limiting and feedback and sigmoidally inhibited by arginine. Crystal structures revealed that arginine-insensitive E. coli NAGK (EcNAGK) is homodimeric, whereas arginine-inhibitable NAGKs, including P. aeruginosa NAGK (PaNAGK), are hexamers in which an extra N-terminal kinked helix (N-helix) interlinks three dimers. By introducing single amino acid replacements in PaNAGK, we prove the functionality of the structurally identified arginine site, as arginine site mutations selectively decreased the apparent affinity for arginine. N-helix mutations affecting R24 and E17 increased and decreased, respectively, the apparent affinity of PaNAGK for arginine, as predicted from enzyme structures that revealed the respective formation by these residues of bonds favoring inaccessible and accessible arginine site conformations. N-helix N-terminal deletions spanning > or = 16 residues dissociated PaNAGK to active dimers, those of arginine, and complete N-helix deletion (26 residues) abolished arginine inhibition. Upon attachment of the PaNAGK N-terminal extension to the EcNAGK N terminus, EcNAGK remained dimeric and arginine insensitive. We concluded that the N-helix and its C-terminal portion after the kink are essential but not sufficient for hexamer formation and arginine inhibition, respectively; that the N-helix modulates NAGK affinity for arginine and mediates signal transmission between arginine sites, thus establishing sigmoidal arginine inhibition kinetics; that the mobile alphaH-beta16 loop of the arginine site is the modulatory signal receiver; and that the hexameric architecture is not essential for arginine inhibition but is functionally essential for physiologically relevant arginine control of NAGK. PMID:18263723

  3. Intracellular L-arginine concentration does not determine NO production in endothelial cells: Implications on the “L-arginine paradox”

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Our findings provide a possible solution to the “L-arginine paradox”. ► Extracellular L-arginine concentration is the major determinant of NO production. ► Cellular L-arginine action is limited by cellular ARG transport, not the Km of NOS. ► We explain how L-arginine supplementation can work to increase endothelial function. -- Abstract: We examined the relative contributory roles of extracellular vs. intracellular L-arginine (ARG) toward cellular activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) in human endothelial cells. EA.hy926 human endothelial cells were incubated with different concentrations of 15N4-ARG, ARG, or L-arginine ethyl ester (ARG-EE) for 2 h. To modulate ARG transport, siRNA for ARG transporter (CAT-1) vs. sham siRNA were transfected into cells. ARG transport activity was assessed by cellular fluxes of ARG, 15N4-ARG, dimethylarginines, and L-citrulline by an LC–MS/MS assay. eNOS activity was determined by nitrite/nitrate accumulation, either via a fluorometric assay or by15N-nitrite or estimated 15N3-citrulline concentrations when 15N4-ARG was used to challenge the cells. We found that ARG-EE incubation increased cellular ARG concentration but no increase in nitrite/nitrate was observed, while ARG incubation increased both cellular ARG concentration and nitrite accumulation. Cellular nitrite/nitrate production did not correlate with cellular total ARG concentration. Reduced 15N4-ARG cellular uptake in CAT-1 siRNA transfected cells vs. control was accompanied by reduced eNOS activity, as determined by 15N-nitrite, total nitrite and 15N3-citrulline formation. Our data suggest that extracellular ARG, not intracellular ARG, is the major determinant of NO production in endothelial cells. It is likely that once transported inside the cell, ARG can no longer gain access to the membrane-bound eNOS. These observations indicate that the “L-arginine paradox” should not consider intracellular ARG concentration as a

  4. Effects of Arginine Vasopressin on musical short-term memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roni Y. Granot

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Previous genetic studies showed an association between variations in the gene coding for the 1a receptor of the neuro-hormone arginine vasopressin (AVP and musical working memory (WM. The current study set out to test the influence of intranasal administration (INA of AVP on musical as compared to verbal WM using a double blind crossover (AVP – placebo design. Two groups of 25 males were exposed to 20 IU of AVP in one session, and 20 IU of saline water (placebo in a second session, one week apart. In each session subjects completed the tonal subtest from Gordon's Musical Aptitude Profile, the interval subtest from the Montreal Battery for Evaluation of Amusias (MBEA, and the forward and backward digit span tests. Scores in the digit span tests were not influenced by AVP. In contrast, in the music tests there was an AVP effect. In the MBEA test, scores for the group receiving placebo in the first session (PV were higher than for the group receiving vasopressin in the first session (VP (p < .05 with no main Session effect nor Group * Session interaction. In the Gordon test there was a main Session effect (p < .05 with scores higher in the second as compared to the first session, a marginal main Group effect (p = .093 and a marginal Group X Session interaction (p = 0.88. In addition we found that the group that received AVP in the first session scored higher on scales indicative of happiness, and alertness on the Positive and Negative Affect Scale, (PANAS. Only in this group and only in the music test these scores were significantly correlated with memory scores. Together the results reflect a complex interaction between AVP, musical memory, arousal, and contextual effects such as session, and base levels of memory. The results are interpreted in light of music's universal use as a means to modulate arousal on the one hand, and AVP's influence on mood, arousal, and social interactions on the other.

  5. Transsulfuration pathway thiols and methylated arginines: the Hunter Community Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arduino A Mangoni

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Serum homocysteine, when studied singly, has been reported to be positively associated both with the endogenous nitric oxide synthase inhibitor asymmetric dimethylarginine [ADMA, via inhibition of dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase (DDAH activity] and with symmetric dimethylarginine (SDMA. We investigated combined associations between transsulfuration pathway thiols, including homocysteine, and serum ADMA and SDMA concentrations at population level. METHODS: Data on clinical and demographic characteristics, medication exposure, C-reactive protein, serum ADMA and SDMA (LC-MS/MS, and thiols (homocysteine, cysteine, taurine, glutamylcysteine, total glutathione, and cysteinylglycine; capillary electrophoresis were collected from a sample of the Hunter Community Study on human ageing [n = 498, median age (IQR = 64 (60-70 years]. RESULTS: REGRESSION ANALYSIS SHOWED THAT: a age (P = 0.001, gender (P = 0.03, lower estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR, P = 0.08, body mass index (P = 0.008, treatment with beta-blockers (P = 0.03, homocysteine (P = 0.02, and glutamylcysteine (P = 0.003 were independently associated with higher ADMA concentrations; and b age (P = 0.001, absence of diabetes (P = 0.001, lower body mass index (P = 0.01, lower eGFR (P<0.001, cysteine (P = 0.007, and glutamylcysteine (P < 0.001 were independently associated with higher SDMA concentrations. No significant associations were observed between methylated arginines and either glutathione or taurine concentrations. CONCLUSIONS: After adjusting for clinical, demographic, biochemical, and pharmacological confounders the combined assessment of transsulfuration pathway thiols shows that glutamylcysteine has the strongest and positive independent associations with ADMA and SDMA. Whether this reflects a direct effect of glutamylcysteine on DDAH activity (for ADMA and/or cationic amino acid transport requires further investigations.

  6. Genes, enzymes and regulation of arginine biosynthesis in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slocum, Robert D

    2005-08-01

    Arabidopsis genes encoding enzymes for each of the eight steps in L-arginine (Arg) synthesis were identified, based upon sequence homologies with orthologs from other organisms. Except for N-acetylglutamate synthase (NAGS; EC 2.3.1.1), which is encoded by two genes, all remaining enzymes are encoded by single genes. Targeting predictions for these enzymes, based upon their deduced sequences, and subcellular fractionation studies, suggest that most enzymes of Arg synthesis reside within the plastid. Synthesis of the L-ornthine (Orn) intermediate in this pathway from L-glutamate occurs as a series of acetylated intermediates, as in most other organisms. An N-acetylornithine:glutamate acetyltransferase (NAOGAcT; EC 2.3.1.35) facilitates recycling of the acetyl moiety during Orn formation (cyclic pathway). A putative N-acetylornithine deacetylase (NAOD; EC 3.5.1.16), which participates in the "linear" pathway for Orn synthesis in some organisms, was also identified. Previous biochemical studies have indicated that allosteric regulation of the first and, especially, the second steps in Orn synthesis (NAGS; N-acetylglutamate kinase (NAGK), EC 2.7.2.8) by the Arg end-product are the major sites of metabolic control of the pathway in organisms using the cyclic pathway. Gene expression profiling for pathway enzymes further suggests that NAGS, NAGK, NAOGAcT and NAOD are coordinately regulated in response to changes in Arg demand during plant growth and development. Synthesis of Arg from Orn is further coordinated with pyrimidine nucleotide synthesis, at the level of allocation of the common carbamoyl-P intermediate. PMID:16122935

  7. Effects of arginine vasopressin on musical working memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granot, Roni Y; Uzefovsky, Florina; Bogopolsky, Helena; Ebstein, Richard P

    2013-01-01

    Previous genetic studies showed an association between variations in the gene coding for the 1a receptor of the neuro-hormone arginine vasopressin (AVP) and musical working memory (WM). The current study set out to test the influence of intranasal administration (INA) of AVP on musical as compared to verbal WM using a double blind crossover (AVP-placebo) design. Two groups of 25 males were exposed to 20 IU of AVP in one session, and 20 IU of saline water (placebo) in a second session, 1 week apart. In each session subjects completed the tonal subtest from Gordon's "Musical Aptitude Profile," the interval subtest from the "Montreal Battery for Evaluation of Amusias (MBEA)," and the forward and backward digit span tests. Scores in the digit span tests were not influenced by AVP. In contrast, in the music tests there was an AVP effect. In the MBEA test, scores for the group receiving placebo in the first session (PV) were higher than for the group receiving vasopressin in the first session (VP) (p effect nor Group × Session interaction. In the Gordon test there was a main Session effect (p effect (p = 0.093) and a marginal Group × Session interaction (p = 0.88). In addition we found that the group that received AVP in the first session scored higher on scales indicative of happiness, and alertness on the positive and negative affect scale, (PANAS). Only in this group and only in the music test these scores were significantly correlated with memory scores. Together the results reflect a complex interaction between AVP, musical memory, arousal, and contextual effects such as session, and base levels of memory. The results are interpreted in light of music's universal use as a means to modulate arousal on the one hand, and AVP's influence on mood, arousal, and social interactions on the other. PMID:24151474

  8. Differential role of arginine mutations on the structure and functions of α-crystallin☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Alok Kumar; Nandi, Sandip Kumar; Chakraborty, Ayon; Nagaraj, Ram H.; Biswas, Ashis

    2016-01-01

    Background α-Crystallin is a major protein of the eye lens in vertebrates. It is composed of two subunits, αA- and αB-crystallin. α-Crystallin is an oligomeric protein having these two subunits in 3:1 ratio. It belongs to small heat shock protein family and exhibits molecular chaperone function, which plays an important role in maintaining the lens transparency. Apart from chaperone function, both subunits also exhibit anti-apoptotic property. Comparison of their primary sequences reveals that αA- and αB-crystallin posses 13 and 14 arginine residues, respectively. Several of them undergo mutations which eventually lead to various eye diseases such as congenital cataract, juvenile cataract, and retinal degeneration. Interestingly, many arginine residues of these subunits are modified during glycation and even some are truncated during aging. All these facts indicate the importance of arginine residues in α-crystallin. Scope of review In this review, we will emphasize the recent in vitro and in vivo findings related to congenital cataract causing arginine mutations in α-crystallin. Major conclusions Congenital cataract causing arginine mutations alters the structure and decreases the chaperone function of α-crystallin. These mutations also affect the lens morphology and phenotypes. Interestingly, non-natural arginine mutations (generated for mimicking the glycation and truncation environment) improve the chaperone function of α-crystallin which may play an important role in maintaining the eye lens transparency during aging. General significance The neutralization of positive charge on the guanidino group of arginine residues is not always detrimental to the functionality of α-crystallin. PMID:26080000

  9. Arginine deiminase resistance in melanoma cells is associated with metabolic reprogramming, glucose dependence, and glutamine addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Yan; Tsai, Wen-Bin; Wangpaichitr, Medhi; Tsukamoto, Takashi; Savaraj, Niramol; Feun, Lynn G; Kuo, Macus Tien

    2013-11-01

    Many malignant human tumors, including melanomas, are auxotrophic for arginine due to reduced expression of argininosuccinate synthetase-1 (ASS1), the rate-limiting enzyme for arginine biosynthesis. Pegylated arginine deiminase (ADI-PEG20), which degrades extracellular arginine, resulting in arginine deprivation, has shown favorable results in clinical trials for treating arginine-auxotrophic tumors. Drug resistance is the major obstacle for effective ADI-PEG20 usage. To elucidate mechanisms of resistance, we established several ADI-PEG20-resistant (ADI(R)) variants from A2058 and SK-Mel-2 melanoma cells. Compared with the parental lines, these ADI(R) variants showed the following characteristics: (i) all ADI(R) cell lines showed elevated ASS1 expression, resulting from the constitutive binding of the transcription factor c-Myc on the ASS1 promoter, suggesting that elevated ASS1 is the major mechanism of resistance; (ii) the ADI(R) cell lines exhibited enhanced AKT signaling and were preferentially sensitive to PI3K/AKT inhibitors, but reduced mTOR signaling, and were preferentially resistant to mTOR inhibitor; (iii) these variants showed enhanced expression of glucose transporter-1 and lactate dehydrogenase-A, reduced expression of pyruvate dehydrogenase, and elevated sensitivity to the glycolytic inhibitors 2-deoxy-glucose and 3-bromopyruvate, consistent with the enhanced glycolytic pathway (the Warburg effect); (iv) the resistant cells showed higher glutamine dehydrogenase and glutaminase expression and were preferentially vulnerable to glutamine inhibitors. We showed that c-Myc, not elevated ASS1 expression, is involved in upregulation of many of these enzymes because knockdown of c-Myc reduced their expression, whereas overexpressed ASS1 by transfection reduced their expression. This study identified multiple targets for overcoming ADI-PEG resistance in cancer chemotherapy using recombinant arginine-degrading enzymes. PMID:23979920

  10. Expression pattern of a nuclear encoded mitochondrial arginine-ornithine translocator gene from Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schneider Anja

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Arginine and citrulline serve as nitrogen storage forms, but are also involved in biosynthetic and catabolic pathways. Metabolism of arginine, citrulline and ornithine is distributed between mitochondria and cytosol. For the shuttle of intermediates between cytosol and mitochondria transporters present on the inner mitochondrial membrane are required. Yeast contains a mitochondrial translocator for ornithine and arginine, Ort1p/Arg11p. Ort1p/Arg11p is a member of the mitochondrial carrier family (MCF essential for ornithine export from mitochondria. The yeast arg11 mutant, which is deficient in Ort1p/Arg11p grows poorly on media lacking arginine. Results High-level expression of a nuclear encoded Arabidopsis thaliana homolog (AtmBAC2 of Ort1p/Arg11p was able to suppress the growth deficiency of arg11. RT-PCR analysis demonstrated expression of AtmBAC2 in all tissues with highest levels in flowers. Promoter-GUS fusions showed preferential expression in flowers, i.e. pollen, in the vasculature of siliques and in aborted seeds. Variable expression was observed in leaf vasculature. Induction of the promoter was not observed during the first two weeks in seedlings grown on media containing NH4NO3, arginine or ornithine as sole nitrogen sources. Conclusion AtmBAC2 was isolated as a mitochondrial transporter for arginine in Arabidopsis. The absence of expression in developing seeds and in cotyledons of seedlings indicates that other transporters are responsible for storage and mobilization of arginine in seeds.

  11. YccW is the m5C methyltransferase specific for 23S rRNA nucleotide 1962

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Purta, Elzbieta; O'Connor, Michelle; Bujnicki, Janusz M;

    2008-01-01

    . However, YccW does not methylate assembled 50S subunits, and this is somewhat surprising as the published crystal structures show nucleotide C1962 to be fully accessible at the subunit interface. YccW-directed methylation at nucleotide C1962 is conserved in bacteria, and loss of this methylation in E....... coli marginally reduces its growth rate. YccW had previously eluded identification because it displays only limited sequence similarity to the m(5)C methyltransferases RsmB and RsmF and is in fact more similar to known m(5)U (5-methyluridine) RNA methyltransferases. In keeping with the previously...... proposed nomenclature system for bacterial rRNA methyltransferases, yccW is now designated as the rRNA large subunit methyltransferase gene rlmI....

  12. N-6-Adenine-Specific DNA Methyltransferase 1 (N6AMT1) Polymorphisms and Arsenic Methylation in Andean Women

    OpenAIRE

    Harari, Florencia; Engström, Karin; Concha, Gabriela; Colque, Graciela; Vahter, Marie; Broberg, Karin

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In humans, inorganic arsenic is metabolized to methylated metabolites mainly by arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase (AS3MT). AS3MT polymorphisms are associated with arsenic metabolism efficiency. Recently, a putative N-6-adenine-specific DNA methyltransferase 1 (N6AMT1) was found to methylate arsenic in vitro. OBJECTIVE: We evaluated the role of N6AMT1 polymorphisms in arsenic methylation efficiency in humans. METHODS: We assessed arsenic methylation efficiency in 188 w...

  13. MOLECULAR AND FUNCTIONAL CHARACTERIZATION OF A JUVENILE HORMONE ACID METHYLTRANSFERASE EXPRESSED IN THE CORPORA ALLATA OF MOSQUITOES

    OpenAIRE

    Mayoral, Jaime G.; Nouzova, Marcela; Yoshiyama, Michiyo; Shinoda, Tetsuro; Hernandez-Martinez, Salvador; Dolghih, Elena; Turjanski, Adrian G; Roitberg, Adrian E.; Priestap, Horacio; Perez, Mario; Mackenzie, Lucy; Li, Yiping; Noriega, Fernando G.

    2008-01-01

    A juvenile hormone acid methyltransferase (JHAMT) was isolated as an abundant EST in a library of the corpora allata of the adult female mosquito Aedes aegypti. Its full-length cDNA encodes a 278-aa protein that has 43 % amino acid identity with BmJHAMT, a juvenile hormone acid methyltransferase previously cloned from Bombyx mori. Heterologous expression produced a recombinant protein that metabolizes farnesoic acid (FA) into methyl farnesoate, as well as juvenile hormone acid into juvenile h...

  14. Inhibition of G9a Histone Methyltransferase Converts Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells to Cardiac Competent Progenitors

    OpenAIRE

    Jinpu Yang; Keerat Kaur; Li Lin Ong; Eisenberg, Carol A; Leonard M. Eisenberg

    2015-01-01

    The G9a histone methyltransferase inhibitor BIX01294 was examined for its ability to expand the cardiac capacity of bone marrow cells. Inhibition of G9a histone methyltransferase by gene specific knockdown or BIX01294 treatment was sufficient to induce expression of precardiac markers Mesp1 and brachyury in bone marrow cells. BIX01294 treatment also allowed bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to express the cardiac transcription factors Nkx2.5, GATA4, and myocardin when subsequently exp...

  15. Deprivation of L-Arginine Induces Oxidative Stress Mediated Apoptosis in Leishmania donovani Promastigotes: Contribution of the Polyamine Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Abhishek; Das, Sushmita; Roy, Saptarshi; Ghosh, Ayan Kumar; Sardar, Abul Hasan; Verma, Sudha; Saini, Savita; Singh, Ruby; Abhishek, Kumar; Kumar, Ajay; Mandal, Chitra; Das, Pradeep

    2016-01-01

    The growth and survival of intracellular parasites depends on the availability of extracellular nutrients. Deprivation of nutrients viz glucose or amino acid alters redox balance in mammalian cells as well as some lower organisms. To further understand the relationship, the mechanistic role of L-arginine in regulation of redox mediated survival of Leishmania donovani promastigotes was investigated. L-arginine deprivation from the culture medium was found to inhibit cell growth, reduce proliferation and increase L-arginine uptake. Relative expression of enzymes, involved in L-arginine metabolism, which leads to polyamine and trypanothione biosynthesis, were downregulated causing decreased production of polyamines in L-arginine deprived parasites and cell death. The resultant increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS), due to L-arginine deprivation, correlated with increased NADP+/NADPH ratio, decreased superoxide dismutase (SOD) level, increased lipid peroxidation and reduced thiol content. A deficiency of L-arginine triggered phosphatidyl serine externalization, a change in mitochondrial membrane potential, release of intracellular calcium and cytochrome-c. This finally led to DNA damage in Leishmania promastigotes. In summary, the growth and survival of Leishmania depends on the availability of extracellular L-arginine. In its absence the parasite undergoes ROS mediated, caspase-independent apoptosis-like cell death. Therefore, L-arginine metabolism pathway could be a probable target for controlling the growth of Leishmania parasites and disease pathogenesis. PMID:26808657

  16. Effect of counter ions of arginine as an additive for the solubilization of protein and aromatic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshizawa, Shunsuke; Arakawa, Tsutomu; Shiraki, Kentaro

    2016-10-01

    Arginine is widely used in biotechnological application, but mostly with chloride counter ion. Here, we examined the effects of various anions on solubilization of aromatic compounds and reduced lysozyme and on refolding of the lysozyme. All arginine salts tested increased the solubility of propyl gallate with acetate much more effectively than chloride. The effects of arginine salts were compared with those of sodium or guanidine salts, indicating that the ability of anions to modulate the propyl gallate solubility is independent of the cation. Comparison of transfer free energy of propyl gallate between sodium and arginine salts indicates that the interaction of propyl gallate is more favorable with arginine than sodium. On the contrary, the solubility of aromatic amino acids is only slightly modulated by anions, implying that there is specific interaction between acetic acid and propyl gallate. Unlike their effects on the solubility of small aromatic compounds, the solubility of reduced lysozyme was much higher in arginine chloride than in arginine acetate or sulfate. Consistent with high solubility, refolding of reduced lysozyme was most effective in arginine chloride. These results suggest potential broader applications of arginine modulated by different anions. PMID:27234496

  17. Reduced arginine availability and nitric oxide synthesis in cancer is related to impaired endogenous arginine synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelen, Mariëlle P K J; Safar, Ahmed M; Bartter, Thaddeus; Koeman, Fari; Deutz, Nicolaas E P

    2016-07-01

    Reduced plasma arginine (ARG) concentrations are found in various types of cancer. ARG and its product nitric oxide (NO) are important mediators in the immune function and the defense against tumour cells. It remains unclear whether the diminished systemic ARG availability in cancer is related to insufficient endogenous ARG synthesis, negatively affecting NO synthesis, and whether a dietary amino acid mixture is able to restore this. In 13 patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and 11 healthy controls, whole body ARG and CIT (citrulline) rates of appearance were measured by stable isotope methodology before and after intake of a mixture of amino acids as present in whey protein. The conversions of CIT to ARG (indicator of de novo ARG synthesis) and ARG to CIT (marker of NO synthesis), and ARG clearance (reflecting ARG disposal capacity) were calculated. Plasma isotopic enrichments and amino acid concentrations were measured by LC-MS/MS. Conversions of CIT to ARG and ARG to CIT (P<0.05), and CIT rate of appearance (P=0.07) were lower in NSCLC. ARG rate of appearance and clearance were comparable suggesting no enhanced systemic ARG production and disposal capacity in NSCLC. After intake of the mixture, ARG rate of appearance and concentration increased (P<0.001), and ARG to CIT conversion was restored in NSCLC. In conclusion, an impaired endogenous ARG synthesis plays a role in the reduced systemic ARG availability and NO synthesis in advanced NSCLC. Nutritional approaches may restore systemic ARG availability and NO synthesis in cancer, but the clinical implication remains unclear. PMID:27129191

  18. Uncovering the protein lysine and arginine methylation network in Arabidopsis chloroplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alban, Claude; Tardif, Marianne; Mininno, Morgane; Brugière, Sabine; Gilgen, Annabelle; Ma, Sheng; Mazzoleni, Meryl; Gigarel, Océane; Martin-Laffon, Jacqueline; Ferro, Myriam; Ravanel, Stéphane

    2014-01-01

    Post-translational modification of proteins by the addition of methyl groups to the side chains of Lys and Arg residues is proposed to play important roles in many cellular processes. In plants, identification of non-histone methylproteins at a cellular or subcellular scale is still missing. To gain insights into the extent of this modification in chloroplasts we used a bioinformatics approach to identify protein methyltransferases targeted to plastids and set up a workflow to specifically identify Lys and Arg methylated proteins from proteomic data used to produce the Arabidopsis chloroplast proteome. With this approach we could identify 31 high-confidence Lys and Arg methylation sites from 23 chloroplastic proteins, of which only two were previously known to be methylated. These methylproteins are split between the stroma, thylakoids and envelope sub-compartments. They belong to essential metabolic processes, including photosynthesis, and to the chloroplast biogenesis and maintenance machinery (translation, protein import, division). Also, the in silico identification of nine protein methyltransferases that are known or predicted to be targeted to plastids provided a foundation to build the enzymes/substrates relationships that govern methylation in chloroplasts. Thereby, using in vitro methylation assays with chloroplast stroma as a source of methyltransferases we confirmed the methylation sites of two targets, plastid ribosomal protein L11 and the β-subunit of ATP synthase. Furthermore, a biochemical screening of recombinant chloroplastic protein Lys methyltransferases allowed us to identify the enzymes involved in the modification of these substrates. The present study provides a useful resource to build the methyltransferases/methylproteins network and to elucidate the role of protein methylation in chloroplast biology. PMID:24748391

  19. Effect of levo-dopa, arginine and exercise on pituitary growth hormone (GH) secretion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To assess the stimulation effect on GH secretion with different agents (levo-dopa, arginine, exercise) in dwarf subjects. Methods: Growth hormone provocative tests were performed with levo-dopa (42 times), arginine (33) and standardized exercise (35) in 78 subjects classified as dwarfs. Serum GH levels were determined with RIA before the test and several times (at 30 min, intervals) afterwards with the peak value noted. The test results were divided into 3 categories: 1) peak value 10 ng/ml, test positive (no GH deficiency). Results: Peak values of serum GH after stimulation test with respective agents were: levo-dopa 14.09 ± 9.62 ng/ml, arginine 13.77 ± 6.83 ng/ml and exercise 12.68 ± 7.81 ng/ml with no significant differences among them. Positive rate after drug stimulation was significantly higher than that after exercise: levo-dopa 35.71% (15/42), arginine 36.36% (12/33) vs exercise 14.20% (5/35) P0.05). Conclusion: Diagnosis of GH deficiency (stimulation test negative) is best established after two negative provocative tests with different stimulant each time. Levo-dopa and arginine may be the drug of choice. (authors)

  20. Mechanism of Allosteric Inhibition of N-Acetyl-L-glutamate Synthase by L-Arginine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, Li; Jin, Zhongmin; Caldovic, Ljubica; Morizono, Hiroki; Allewell, Norma M.; Tuchman, Mendel; Shi, Dashuang (GUW); (Maryland); (GWU); (Georgia)

    2010-01-07

    N-Acetylglutamate synthase (NAGS) catalyzes the first committed step in L-arginine biosynthesis in plants and micro-organisms and is subject to feedback inhibition by L-arginine. This study compares the crystal structures of NAGS from Neisseria gonorrhoeae (ngNAGS) in the inactive T-state with L-arginine bound and in the active R-state complexed with CoA and L-glutamate. Under all of the conditions examined, the enzyme consists of two stacked trimers. Each monomer has two domains: an amino acid kinase (AAK) domain with an AAK-like fold but lacking kinase activity and an N-acetyltransferase (NAT) domain homologous to other GCN5-related transferases. Binding of L-arginine to the AAK domain induces a global conformational change that increases the diameter of the hexamer by {approx}10 {angstrom} and decreases its height by {approx}20{angstrom}. AAK dimers move 5{angstrom} outward along their 2-fold axes, and their tilt relative to the plane of the hexamer decreases by {approx}4{sup o}. The NAT domains rotate {approx}109{sup o} relative to AAK domains enabling new interdomain interactions. Interactions between AAK and NAT domains on different subunits also change. Local motions of several loops at the L-arginine-binding site enable the protein to close around the bound ligand, whereas several loops at the NAT active site become disordered, markedly reducing enzymatic specific activity.

  1. L-arginine in combination with sildenafil potentiates the attenuation of hypoxic pulmonary hypertension in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hiti, H; Chovanec, M; Melenovský, V; Vajnerová, O; Baňasová, A; Kautzner, J; Herget, J

    2013-01-01

    Chronic hypoxia induces an increased production of nitric oxide (NO) in pulmonary prealveolar arterioles. Bioavailability of the NO in the pulmonary vessels correlates with concentration of L-arginine as well as activity of phosphodiesterase-5 enzyme (PDE-5). We tested a hypothesis whether a combination of L-arginine and PDE-5 inhibitor sildenafil has an additive effect in reduction of the hypoxic pulmonary hypertension (HPH) in rats. Animals were exposed to chronic normobaric hypoxia for 3 weeks. In the AH group, rats were administered L-arginine during chronic hypoxic exposure. In the SH group, rats were administered sildenafil during chronic hypoxic exposure. In the SAH group, rats were treated by the combination of L-arginine as well as sildenafil during exposure to chronic hypoxia. Mean PAP, structural remodeling of peripheral pulmonary arterioles (%DL) and RV/LV+S ratio was significantly decreased in the SAH group compared to hypoxic controls even decreased compared to the AH and the SH groups in first two measured parameters. Plasmatic concentration of cGMP and NOx were significantly lower in the SAH group compared to hypoxic controls. We demonstrate that NO synthase substrate L-arginine and phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitor sildenafil administered in combination are more potent in attenuation of the HPH compared to a treatment by substances given alone. PMID:23869884

  2. The impact of arginine-modified chitosan-DNA nanoparticles on the function of macrophages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been demonstrated that incorporation of arginine moieties into chitosan significantly elevates the transgenic efficacy of the chitosan. However, little is known about the impact of arginine-modified chitosan on the function of macrophages, which play a vitally important role in the inflammatory response of the body to foreign substances, especially particulate substances. This study was designed to investigate the impact of arginine-modified chitosan/DNA nanoparticles on the function of the murine macrophage through observation of phagocytic activity and production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12, and TNF-α). Results showed that both chitosan/DNA nanoparticles and arginine-modified chitosan/DNA nanoparticles, containing 20 μg/mL DNA, were internalized by almost all the macrophages in contact. This led to no significant changes, compared to the non-exposure group, in production of cytokines and phagocytic activity of the macrophages 24 h post co-incubation, whereas exposure to LPS induced obviously elevated cytokine production and phagocytic activity, suggesting that incorporation of arginine moieties into chitosan does not have a negative impact on the function of the macrophages.

  3. Mechanism of allosteric inhibition of N-acetyl-L-glutamate synthase by L-arginine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Li; Jin, Zhongmin; Caldovic, Ljubica; Morizono, Hiroki; Allewell, Norma M; Tuchman, Mendel; Shi, Dashuang

    2009-02-20

    N-Acetylglutamate synthase (NAGS) catalyzes the first committed step in l-arginine biosynthesis in plants and micro-organisms and is subject to feedback inhibition by l-arginine. This study compares the crystal structures of NAGS from Neisseria gonorrhoeae (ngNAGS) in the inactive T-state with l-arginine bound and in the active R-state complexed with CoA and l-glutamate. Under all of the conditions examined, the enzyme consists of two stacked trimers. Each monomer has two domains: an amino acid kinase (AAK) domain with an AAK-like fold but lacking kinase activity and an N-acetyltransferase (NAT) domain homologous to other GCN5-related transferases. Binding of l-arginine to the AAK domain induces a global conformational change that increases the diameter of the hexamer by approximately 10 A and decreases its height by approximately 20A(.) AAK dimers move 5A outward along their 2-fold axes, and their tilt relative to the plane of the hexamer decreases by approximately 4 degrees . The NAT domains rotate approximately 109 degrees relative to AAK domains enabling new interdomain interactions. Interactions between AAK and NAT domains on different subunits also change. Local motions of several loops at the l-arginine-binding site enable the protein to close around the bound ligand, whereas several loops at the NAT active site become disordered, markedly reducing enzymatic specific activity. PMID:19095660

  4. L-Arginine Intake Effect on Adenine Nucleotide Metabolism in Rat Parenchymal and Reproductive Tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Kocic

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available L-arginine is conditionally essetcial amino acid, required for normal cell growth, protein synthesis, ammonia detoxification, tissue growth and general performance, proposed in the treatment of men sterility and prevention of male impotence. The aim of the present paper was to estimate the activity of the enzymes of adenine nucleotide metabolism: 5′-nucleotidase (5′-NU, adenosine deaminase (ADA, AMP deaminase, and xanthine oxidase (XO, during dietary intake of L-arginine for a period of four weeks of male Wistar rats. Adenosine concentration in tissues is maintained by the relative activities of the adenosine-producing enzyme, 5′-NU and the adenosine-degrading enzyme-ADA adenosine deaminase. Dietary L-arginine intake directed adenine nucleotide metabolism in liver, kidney, and testis tissue toward the activation of adenosine production, by increased 5′-NU activity and decreased ADA activity. Stimulation of adenosine accumulation could be of importance in mediating arginine antiatherosclerotic, vasoactive, immunomodulatory, and antioxidant effects. Assuming that the XO activity reflects the rate of purine catabolism in the cell, while the activity of AMP deaminase is of importance in ATP regeneration, reduced activity of XO, together with the increased AMP-deaminase activity, may suggest that adenine nucleotides are presumably directed to the ATP regenerating process during dietary L-arginine intake.

  5. Arginine: A Potent Prey Attractant to Predatory Newts in Mountain Streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrer, R. P.; Zimmer, R. K.

    2005-05-01

    Chemoreception of aquatic organisms has been well-studied in the laboratory, but rarely in the field. The California newt, Taricha torosa, in natural stream habitats is an excellent animal for exploring behavioral responses to prey odors. Here, we selected 13 amino acids for field bioassays based on their concentrations in prey tissue extracts. Bioassays were calibrated for stimulus dilution by means of fluorescent dye releases and flow-through spectrofluorometry. Moreover, hydrodynamic properties of stream flows were determined using an electromagnetic current meter. Of all amino acids tested, only arginine, alanine and glycine were significantly attractive (relative to stream water controls). These three substances caused free-ranging newts to turn upstream and swim towards the odor sources. Additional experiments showed that arginine was the most effective attractant, evoking plume-tracking behavior at concentrations as low as 10 nM. In subsequent trials, nine arginine analogs were tested, but each compound failed to elicit a significant response. Even subtle changes to arginine, such as the addition of a single carbon to the side chain, destroyed all bioactivity. Within its natural habitat, the California newt thus exhibits keen sensitivity and narrow tuning to the free amino acid, arginine, a chemical signal of its prey.

  6. Discovery of sphingosine 1-O-methyltransferase in rat kidney and liver homogenates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Santosh J SACKET; Dong-soon IM

    2008-01-01

    Aim:To characterize sphingosine methyltransferase in rat tissues.Methods:By using S-adenosyl-L-(methyl-3H) methionine,enzymatic activity was measured in the rat liver and kidney homogenates.Results:The optimum pH and reaction time for the enzyme assay were pH 7.8 and 1 h.ZnCl2 inhibited the activity,but not MgCl2,CaCl2,CoCl2,or NiCl2.In the kidney homogenate,enzymatic activity was detectable in the cytosol and all membrane fractions from the plasma membrane and other organelles; however,in the liver homogenate,enzymatic activity was detectable in all membrane fractions,but not in the cytosol.We also tested the enzymatic activity with structurally-modified sphingosine derivatives.Conclusion:We found sphingosine l-O-methyltransferase activity in the rat liver and kidney homogenates.

  7. Super-resolution optical DNA Mapping via DNA methyltransferase-directed click chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vranken, Charlotte; Deen, Jochem; Dirix, Lieve;

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate an approach to optical DNA mapping, which enables near single-molecule characterization of whole bacteriophage genomes. Our approach uses a DNA methyltransferase enzyme to target labelling to specific sites and copper-catalysed azide-alkyne cycloaddition to couple a fluorophore...... to the DNA. We achieve a labelling efficiency of ∼70% with an average labelling density approaching one site every 500 bp. Such labelling density bridges the gap between the output of a typical DNA sequencing experiment and the long-range information derived from traditional optical DNA mapping. We lay...... the foundations for a wider-scale adoption of DNA mapping by screening 11 methyltransferases for their ability to direct sequence-specific DNA transalkylation; the first step of the DNA labelling process and by optimizing reaction conditions for fluorophore coupling via a click reaction. Three of 11 enzymes...

  8. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of a catechol-O-methyltransferase/inhibitor complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catechol-O-methyltransferase has been co-crystallized with a novel inhibitor, which has potential therapeutic application in the Parkinson’s disease therapy. Inhibitors of the enzyme catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) are used as co-adjuvants in the therapy of Parkinson’s disease. A recombinant form of the soluble cytosolic COMT from rat has been co-crystallized with a new potent inhibitor, BIA 8-176 [(3,4-dihydroxy-2-nitrophenyl)phenylmethanone], by the vapour-diffusion method using PEG 6K as precipitant. Crystals diffract to 1.6 Å resolution on a synchrotron-radiation source and belong to the monoclinic space group P21, with unit-cell parameters a = 52.77, b = 79.63, c = 61.54 Å, β = 91.14°

  9. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of a catechol-O-methyltransferase/inhibitor complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, M. L. [Instituto de Tecnologia Química e Biológica (ITQB), Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Av. República, Apt. 127, 2781-901 Oeiras (Portugal); Bonifácio, M. J.; Soares-da-Silva, P. [Department of Research and Development, BIAL, 4785 S. Mamede do Coronado (Portugal); Carrondo, M. A.; Archer, M., E-mail: archer@itqb.unl.pt [Instituto de Tecnologia Química e Biológica (ITQB), Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Av. República, Apt. 127, 2781-901 Oeiras (Portugal)

    2005-01-01

    Catechol-O-methyltransferase has been co-crystallized with a novel inhibitor, which has potential therapeutic application in the Parkinson’s disease therapy. Inhibitors of the enzyme catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) are used as co-adjuvants in the therapy of Parkinson’s disease. A recombinant form of the soluble cytosolic COMT from rat has been co-crystallized with a new potent inhibitor, BIA 8-176 [(3,4-dihydroxy-2-nitrophenyl)phenylmethanone], by the vapour-diffusion method using PEG 6K as precipitant. Crystals diffract to 1.6 Å resolution on a synchrotron-radiation source and belong to the monoclinic space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 52.77, b = 79.63, c = 61.54 Å, β = 91.14°.

  10. Targeting histone methyltransferases and demethylases in clinical trials for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morera, Ludovica; Lübbert, Michael; Jung, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    The term epigenetics is defined as heritable changes in gene expression that are not due to alterations of the DNA sequence. In the last years, it has become more and more evident that dysregulated epigenetic regulatory processes have a central role in cancer onset and progression. In contrast to DNA mutations, epigenetic modifications are reversible and, hence, suitable for pharmacological interventions. Reversible histone methylation is an important process within epigenetic regulation, and the investigation of its role in cancer has led to the identification of lysine methyltransferases and demethylases as promising targets for new anticancer drugs. In this review, we describe those enzymes and their inhibitors that have already reached the first stages of clinical trials in cancer therapy, namely the histone methyltransferases DOT1L and EZH2 as well as the demethylase LSD1. PMID:27222667

  11. Structural basis for S-adenosylmethionine binding and methyltransferase activity by mitochondrial transcription factor B1

    OpenAIRE

    Guja, Kip E.; Venkataraman, Krithika; Yakubovskaya, Elena; Hui SHI; Mejia, Edison; Hambardjieva, Elena; Karzai, A. Wali; Garcia-Diaz, Miguel

    2013-01-01

    Eukaryotic transcription factor B (TFB) proteins are homologous to KsgA/Dim1 ribosomal RNA (rRNA) methyltransferases. The mammalian TFB1, mitochondrial (TFB1M) factor is an essential protein necessary for mitochondrial gene expression. TFB1M mediates an rRNA modification in the small ribosomal subunit and thus plays a role analogous to KsgA/Dim1 proteins. This modification has been linked to mitochondrial dysfunctions leading to maternally inherited deafness, aminoglycoside sensitivity and di...

  12. Structure and possible mechanism of the CcbJ methyltransferase from Streptomyces caelestis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bauer, J.; Ondrovičová, G.; Najmanová, Lucie; Pevala, V.; Kameník, Zdeněk; Koštan, J.; Janata, Jiří; Kutejová, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 70, APR 2014 (2014), s. 943-957. ISSN 0907-4449 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0003; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : CATECHOL-O-METHYLTRANSFERASE * SN2-LIKE TRANSITION-STATE * CRYSTAL-STRUCTURES Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 7.232, year: 2013

  13. Selenium induced selenocysteine methyltransferase gene expression and antioxidant enzyme activities in Astragalus chrysochlorus

    OpenAIRE

    Çakir, Özgür; Turgut-Kara, Neslihan; Ari, Şule

    2016-01-01

    Astragalus sp. are used in folk medicine because of their biological activities and are known for the ability to accumulate high levels of selenium (Se). The purpose of this study was to explore gene expression of selenocysteine methyltransferase (SMT), responsible for forming MeSeCys, and activities of ascorbate peroxidase (APX), peroxidase (POX), catalase (CAT) and glutathione reductase (GR) enzymes in callus tissues of Astragalus chrysochlorus growing in different Se-containing media. Quan...

  14. Recombinant rat liver guanidinoacetate methyltransferase: Reactivity and function of sulfhydryl groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rat liver guanidinoacetate methyltransferase, produced in Escherichia coli by recombinant DNA technique, possesses five cysteine residues per molecule. No disulfide bond is present. Analysis of the chymotryptic peptides derived from the iodo[14C]acetate-modified enzyme shows that Cys-90, Cys-15, Cys-219, and Cys-207 are alkylated by the reagent in order of decreasing reactivity. Incubation of the enzyme with excess 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoate) (DTNB) in the absence and presence of cystamine [2,2'-dithiobis(ethylamine)] causes the appearance of 4 and 5 mol of 2-nitro-5-mercaptobenzoate/mol of enzyme, respectively. Reaction of the methyltransferase with an equimolar amount of DTNB results in an almost quantitative disulfide cross-linking of Cys-15 and Cys-90 with loss of a large portion of the activity. The methyltransferase is completely inactivated by iodoacetate following nonlinear kinetics. Comparison of the extent of inactivation with that of modification of cysteine residues and the experiment with the enzyme whose Cys-15 and Cys-90 are cross-linked suggest that alkylation of Cys-15 and Cys-90 results in a partially active enzyme and that carboxymethylation of Cys-219 completely eliminates enzyme activity. The inactivation of guanidinoacetate methyltransferase by iodoacetate or DTNB is not protected by substrates. Furthermore, disulfide cross-linking of Cys-15 and Cys-90 or carboxymethylation of Cys-219 does not impair the enzyme's capacity to bind S-adenosylmethionine. Thus, these cysteine residues appear to occur outside the active-site region, but their integrity is crucial for the expression of enzyme activity

  15. Vector design for expression of O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase in hematopoietic cells

    OpenAIRE

    Schambach, Axel; Baum, Christopher

    2007-01-01

    Enhancing DNA repair activity of hematopoietic cells by stably integrating gene vectors that express O(6)-methylguanine-DNA-methyltransferase (MGMT) is of major interest for innovative approaches in tumor chemotherapy and for the control of hematopoietic chimerism in the treatment of multiple other acquired or inherited disorders. Crucial determinants of this selection principle are the stringency of treatment with O(6)-alkylating agents and the level of transgenic MGMT expression. Attempts t...

  16. Identification, Characterization, and Ontogenic Study of a Catechol O-methyltransferase from Zebrafish

    OpenAIRE

    Alazizi, Adnan; Liu, Ming-Yih; Williams, Frederick E.; Kurogi, Katsuhisa; Sakakibara, Yoichi; Suiko, Masahito; Liu, Ming-Cheh

    2010-01-01

    To establish the zebrafish as a model for investigating the methylation pathway of drug metabolism, we embarked on the molecular cloning of the zebrafish catechol O-methyltransferase (COMT). By searching the GenBank database, a zebrafish nucleotide sequence encoding a putative COMT was identified. Based on the sequence information, we designed and synthesized oligonucleotides corresponding to its 5’- and 3’-coding regions of this zebrafish COMT. Using the first-strand cDNA reverse-transcribed...

  17. Expression of O6-methylguanine DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) and its clinical significance in gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasm

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Qiu-chen; Wang, Yu-Hong; Lin, Yuan; Xue, Ling; Chen, Yuan-Jia; Chen, Min-hu; Chen, Jie

    2014-01-01

    O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) is a widespread DNA repair enzyme defending against mutation caused by guanine O6-alkylating agents. Until now, we know only little about the expression of MGMT in gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasm (GEP-NEN). To study the expression of MGMT and its clinical significance in GEP-NEN, 174 specimens of GEP-NEN were examined, of which 152 specimens came from The First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University during October 1995 to Novem...

  18. Survival and tumorigenesis in O6-methylguanine DNA methyltransferase-deficient mice following cyclophosphamide exposure

    OpenAIRE

    Nagasubramanian, Ramamoorthy; Hansen, Ryan J.; Delaney, Shannon M.; Cherian, Mathew M.; Samson, Leona D.; Kogan, Scott C.; Dolan, M. Eileen

    2008-01-01

    O6-methylguanine DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) deficiency is associated with an increased susceptibility to alkylating agent toxicity. To understand the contribution of MGMT in protecting against cyclophosphamide (CP)-induced toxicity, mutagenesis and tumorigenesis, we compared the biological effects of this agent in transgenic Mgmt knockout and wild-type mice. In addition, neurofibromin (Nf1)+/− background was used to increase the likelihood of CP-induced tumorigenesis. Cohorts of Mgmt-profic...

  19. Somatic mutations in glioblastoma are associated with methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase methylation

    OpenAIRE

    McDonald, Kerrie L.; Tabone, Tania; Nowak, Anna K; Erber, Wendy N.

    2015-01-01

    The high level of methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) in glioblastoma is responsible for resistance to alkylating agents, such as temozolomide (TMZ). In glioblastomas with a methylated MGMT promoter, MGMT deficiency is presumed, resulting in an enhanced effect of TMZ. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether genomic alterations work synergistically with MGMT methylation status and contribute to the response to treatment and overall prognosis in glioblastoma. The current ...

  20. Deficiency of Glycine N-Methyltransferase Aggravates Atherosclerosis in Apolipoprotein E–Null Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Chien-Yu; Ching, Li-Chieh; Liao, Yi-Jen; Yu, Yuan-Bin; Tsou, Chia-Yuan; Shyue, Song-Kun; Chen, Yi-Ming Arthur; Lee, Tzong-Shyuan

    2012-01-01

    The mechanism underlying the dysregulation of cholesterol metabolism and inflammation in atherogenesis is not understood fully. Glycine N-methyltransferase (GNMT) has been implicated in hepatic lipid metabolism and the pathogenesis of liver diseases. However, little is known about the significance of GNMT in atherosclerosis. We showed the predominant expression of GNMT in foamy macrophages of mouse atherosclerotic aortas. Genetic deletion of GNMT exacerbated the hyperlipidemia, inflammation a...

  1. Nicotinamide N-methyltransferase knockdown protects against diet-induced obesity

    OpenAIRE

    Kraus, Daniel; Yang, Qin; Kong, Dong; Banks, Alexander S.; Zhang, Lin; Rodgers, Joseph T; Pirinen, Eija; Pulinilkunnil, Thomas C.; Gong, Fengying; Wang, Ya-chin; Cen, Yana; Sauve, Anthony A.; Asara, John M.; Peroni, Odile D.; Monia, Brett P.

    2014-01-01

    In obesity and type 2 diabetes, Glut4 glucose transporter expression is decreased selectively in adipocytes1. Adipose-specific knockout or overexpression of Glut4 alters systemic insulin sensitivity2. Here we show, using DNA array analyses, that nicotinamide N-methyltransferase (Nnmt) is the most strongly reciprocally regulated gene when comparing gene expression in white adipose tissue (WAT) from adipose-specific Glut4-knockout or adipose-specific Glut4-overexpressing mice with their respect...

  2. Homocysteine Induces Collagen I Expression by Downregulating Histone Methyltransferase G9a

    OpenAIRE

    Lei, Wenjing; Long, Yanjun; LI, Shuang; Liu, Ze; Zhu, Fengxin; Hou, Fan Fan; Nie, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy) leads to several clinical manifestations including hepatic fibrosis. Excess deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM) components including collagen is the eponymous lesion of liver fibrosis. In this study, we demonstrated that elevated concentration of Hcy induced the expression of collagen type I in cultured human liver cells as well as in liver tissue of HHcy mice. Meanwhile, Hcy inhibited the expression of histone methyltransferase G9a. Mechanistically, silencing...

  3. Histone H3K9 methyltransferase G9a represses PPARγ expression and adipogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Lifeng; Xu, Shiliyang; Lee, Ji-Eun; Baldridge, Anne; Grullon, Sean; Peng, Weiqun; Ge, Kai

    2012-01-01

    PPARγ promotes adipogenesis while Wnt proteins inhibit adipogenesis. However, the mechanisms that control expression of these positive and negative master regulators of adipogenesis remain incompletely understood. By genome-wide histone methylation profiling in preadipocytes, we find that among gene loci encoding adipogenesis regulators, histone methyltransferase (HMT) G9a-mediated repressive epigenetic mark H3K9me2 is selectively enriched on the entire PPARγ locus. H3K9me2 and G9a levels dec...

  4. The methyltransferase G9a regulates HoxA9-dependent transcription in AML

    OpenAIRE

    Lehnertz, Bernhard; Pabst, Caroline; Su, Le; Miller, Michelle; Liu, Feng; Yi, Lin; Zhang, Regan; Krosl, Jana; Yung, Eric; Kirschner, Jeanette; Rosten, Patty; Underhill, T. Michael; Jin, Jian; Hébert, Josée; Sauvageau, Guy

    2014-01-01

    Lehnertz et al. identify the histone methyltransferase G9a as a selective regulator of fast proliferating myeloid progenitors with no discernible function in hematopoietic stem cells. Loss of G9a significantly delays disease progression and reduces leukemia stem cell frequency in mouse models of acute myeloid leukemia. G9a interacts with the leukemogenic transcription factor HoxA9 and regulates HoxA9-dependent transcription. These results highlight G9a inhibition as a means to counteract the ...

  5. CCAAT displacement protein/cut homolog recruits G9a histone lysine methyltransferase to repress transcription

    OpenAIRE

    Nishio, Hitomi; Walsh, Martin J.

    2004-01-01

    CCAAT displacement protein/cut homolog (CDP/cut) is a highly conserved homeodomain protein that contains three cut repeat sequences. CDP/cut is a transcriptional factor for many diverse cellular and viral genes that are involved in most cellular processes, including differentiation, development, and proliferation. Here, we report that CDP/cut interacts with a histone lysine methyltransferase (HKMT), G9a, in vivo and in vitro. The deletion of the cut repeats within CDP/cut abrogates the intera...

  6. Negative Regulation of JAK2 by H3K9 Methyltransferase G9a in Leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Son, Hye-Ju; Kim, Ji-Young; Hahn, Yoonsoo; Seo, Sang-Beom

    2012-01-01

    Histone methylation at specific lysine residues is a crucial regulatory process in transcriptional regulation. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation with microarray technology (ChIP-chip) analysis, we found that the H3K9-me2 target gene JAK2 was an important factor during differentiation of the HL-60 promyelocytic leukemia cell line by all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA) treatment. Here, we report that the H3K9 methyltransferase G9a negatively regulated JAK2 transcription in histone methyltransferas...

  7. Three-dimensional culture sensitizes epithelial ovarian cancer cells to EZH2 methyltransferase inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amatangelo, Michael D.; Garipov, Azat; Li, Hua; Conejo-Garcia, Jose R.; Speicher, David W.; Zhang, Rugang

    2013-01-01

    Inhibitors of EZH2 methyltransferase activity have been demonstrated to selectively suppress the growth of diffused large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) cells with gain-of-function mutations in EZH2, while exhibiting very limited effects on the growth of DLBCL cells with wild-type EZH2. Given that EZH2 is often overexpressed but not mutated in solid tumors, it is important to investigate the determinants of sensitivity of solid tumor cells to EZH2 inhibitors. In the current study, we show that three-dimensional (3D) culture of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) cells that overexpress EZH2 sensitizes these cells to EZH2 methyltransferase inhibition. Treatment of EOC cells with GSK343, a specific inhibitor of EZH2 methyltransferase, decreases the level of H3K27Me3, the product of EZH2’s enzymatic activity. However, GSK343 exhibited limited effects on the growth of EOC cells in conventional two-dimensional (2D) culture. In contrast, GSK343 significantly suppressed the growth of EOC cells cultured in 3D matrigel extracellular matrix (ECM), which more closely mimics the tumor microenvironment in vivo. Notably, GSK343 induces apoptosis of EOC cells in 3D but not 2D culture. In addition, GSK343 significantly inhibited the invasion of EOC cells. In summary, we show that the 3D ECM sensitizes EOC cells to EZH2 methyltransferase inhibition, which suppresses cell growth, induces apoptosis and inhibits invasion. Our findings imply that in EZH2 wild-type solid tumors, the ECM tumor microenvironment plays an important role in determining sensitivity to EZH2 inhibition and suggest that targeting the ECM represents a novel strategy for enhancing EZH2 inhibitor efficacy. PMID:23759589

  8. Kupplung der DNA-Methyltransferase M.SssI mit Triplehelix-bildenden Oligodesoxynucleotiden

    OpenAIRE

    Monami, Amélie Joséphine

    2007-01-01

    DNA modifying enzymes, like DNA methyltransferases (DNA MTases) and restriction endonucleases (REases), could in principle be used to map or manipulate genomes. However, these enzymes are inappropriate for that purpose because of their generally short recognition sequences. An increase of their sequence specificity would therefore be desirable. One strategy to produce megaspecific DNA modifying enzymes is to couple them with triple helix forming oligodeoxynucleotide (TFO). These additional DN...

  9. Catecholamine-o-methyltransferase polymorphisms are associated with postoperative pain intensity.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lee, Peter J

    2011-02-01

    single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the genes for catecholamine-O-methyltransferase (COMT), μ-opioid receptor and GTP cyclohydrolase (GCH1) have been linked to acute and chronic pain states. COMT polymorphisms are associated with experimental pain sensitivity and a chronic pain state. No such association has been identified perioperatively. We carried out a prospective observational clinical trial to examine associations between these parameters and the development of postoperative pain in patients undergoing third molar (M3) extraction.

  10. Identification and Characterization of a Highly Conserved Crenarchaeal Protein Lysine Methyltransferase with Broad Substrate Specificity

    OpenAIRE

    Chu, Yindi; Zhang, Zhenfeng; Wang, Qian; Luo, Yuanming; Huang, Li

    2012-01-01

    Protein lysine methylation occurs extensively in the Crenarchaeota, a major kingdom in the Archaea. However, the enzymes responsible for this type of posttranslational modification have not been found. Here we report the identification and characterization of the first crenarchaeal protein lysine methyltransferase, designated aKMT, from the hyperthermophilic crenarchaeon Sulfolobus islandicus. The enzyme was capable of transferring methyl groups to selected lysine residues in a substrate prot...

  11. Genetic, physiological and biochemical characterization of multiple methanol methyltransferase isozymes in Methanosarcina acetivorans C2A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchett, Matthew A; Metcalf, William W

    2005-06-01

    Biochemical evidence suggests that methanol catabolism in Methanosarcina species requires the concerted effort of methanol:5-hydroxybenzimidazolylcobamide methyltransferase (MtaB), a corrinoid-containing methyl-accepting protein (MtaC) and Co-methyl-5-hydroxybenzimidazolylcobamide:2-mercapto-ethanesulphonic acid methyltransferase (MtaA). Here we show that Methanosarcina acetivorans possesses three operons encoding putative methanol-specific MtaB and corrinoid proteins: mtaCB1, mtaCB2 and mtaCB3. Deletion mutants lacking the three operons, in all possible combinations, were constructed and characterized. Strains deleted for any two of the operons grew on methanol, whereas strains lacking all three did not. Therefore, each operon encodes a bona fide methanol-utilizing MtaB/corrinoid protein pair. Most of the mutants were similar to the wild-type strain, with the exception of the DeltamtaCB1 DeltamtaCB2 double mutant, which grew more slowly and had reduced cell yields on methanol medium. However, all mutants displayed significantly longer lag times when switching from growth on trimethylamine to growth on methanol. This indicates that all three operons are required for wild-type growth on methanol and suggests that each operon has a distinct role in the metabolism of this substrate. The combined methanol:CoM methyltransferase activity of strains carrying only mtaCB1 was twofold higher than strains carrying only mtaCB2 and fourfold higher than strains carrying only mtaCB3. Interestingly, the presence of the mtaCB2 and mtaCB3 operons, in addition to the mtaCB1 operon, did not increase the overall methyltransferase activity, suggesting that these strains may be limited by MtaA availability. All deletion mutants were unaffected with respect to growth on trimethylamine and acetate corroborating biochemical evidence indicating that each methanogenic substrate has specific methyltransfer enzymes. PMID:15882413

  12. The histone methyltransferase and putative oncoprotein MMSET is overexpressed in a large variety of human tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hudlebusch, Heidi Rye; Santoni-Rugiu, Eric; Simon, Ronald;

    2011-01-01

    Multiple myeloma SET (Suppressor of variegation, Enhancer of zeste, and Trithorax) domain (MMSET) is a histone lysine methyltransferase deregulated in a subgroup of multiple myelomas with the t(4;14)(p16;q32) translocation and poor prognosis. With the aim of understanding, if MMSET can be involve...... in other types of cancer we investigated the expression of MMSET protein in different types of human tumors....

  13. Is catechol-o-methyltransferase gene polymorphism a risk factor in the development of premenstrual syndrome?

    OpenAIRE

    Deveci, Esma Ozturk; Incebiyik, Adnan; Selek, Salih; Camuzcuoglu, Aysun; Hilali, Nese Gul; Camuzcuoglu, Hakan; Erdal, Mehmet Emin; Vural, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to investigate whether there was a correlation between catechol-o-methyltransferase (COMT) gene polymorphism, which is believed to play a role in the etiology of psychotic disorders, and premenstrual syndrome (PMS). Methods Fifty-three women with regular menstrual cycles, aged between 18 and 46 years and diagnosed with PMS according to the American Congress of Obstetrics and Gynecology criteria were included in this study as the study group, and 53 he...

  14. Sensorimotor gating of schizophrenia patients depends on catechol O-methyltransferase Val158Met polymorphism

    OpenAIRE

    Quednow, B B; Wagner, M.; Mössner, R; Maier, W; Kühn, K U

    2010-01-01

    It has been recently shown that Catechol O-methyltransferase (COMT) Val(158)Met polymorphism strongly influences prepulse inhibition (PPI) of the acoustic startle response (ASR) in healthy human volunteers. Given that schizophrenia patients exhibit impairment in PPI and that COMT is a putative susceptibility gene for schizophrenia, we investigated the impact of the COMT Val(158)Met polymorphisms on PPI in schizophrenic inpatients. We analyzed COMT Val(158)Met polymorphisms and assessed startl...

  15. Genetic Contribution of Catechol-O-methyltransferase Polymorphism in Patients with Migraine without Aura

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Jeong Wook; Lee, Kwang Soo; Kim, Joong Seok; Kim, Yeong In; Shin, Hae Eun

    2007-01-01

    Background Recent genetic association studies have investigated the possible genetic role of the dopaminergic system in migraine. Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) is an enzyme that plays a crucial role in the metabolism of dopamine and its genetic polymorphism is associated with three- to fourfold variation of enzymatic activity. Objectives The objective of this study was to elucidate the role of the COMT polymorphism in the genetic susceptibility to migraine and its phenotypic expression ...

  16. Polymorphism of the catechol-O-methyltransferase gene in Han Chinese patients with psoriasis vulgaris

    OpenAIRE

    Lin Gao; Hong Li; Kai Li; Zhu Shen; Ling Liu; Chunying Li; Zhengdong Zhang; Yufeng Liu

    2009-01-01

    Psoriasis vulgaris is defined by a series of linked cellular changes in the skin: hyperplasia of epidermal keratinocytes, vascular hyperplasia and ectasia, and infiltration of T lymphocytes, neutrophils and other types of leukocytes in the affected skin. Catechol-O-methyltransferase ( COMT ) 158 polymorphism can reduce the activity of the COMT enzyme that may trigger defective differentiation of keratinocytes in psoriasis. Immunocytes can degrade and inactivate catecholamines via monamine oxi...

  17. Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) influences the connectivity of the prefrontal cortex at rest

    OpenAIRE

    Tunbridge, Elizabeth M.; Farrell, Sarah M.; Harrison, Paul J; Mackay, Clare E

    2013-01-01

    Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) modulates dopamine in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and influences PFC dopamine-dependent cognitive task performance. A human COMT polymorphism (Val158Met) alters enzyme activity and is associated with both the activation and functional connectivity of the PFC during task performance, particularly working memory. Here, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging and a data-driven, independent components analysis (ICA) approach to compare resting state funct...

  18. Polymorphism of the catechol-O-methyltransferase gene in Han Chinese patients with psoriasis vulgaris

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Lin; Li, Hong; Li, Kai; Shen, Zhu; Liu, Ling; Li, Chunying; Zhang, Zhengdong; Liu, Yufeng

    2009-01-01

    Psoriasis vulgaris is defined by a series of linked cellular changes in the skin: hyperplasia of epidermal keratinocytes, vascular hyperplasia and ectasia, and infiltration of T lymphocytes, neutrophils and other types of leukocytes in the affected skin. Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) 158 polymorphism can reduce the activity of the COMT enzyme that may trigger defective differentiation of keratinocytes in psoriasis. Immunocytes can degrade and inactivate catecholamines via monamine oxida...

  19. Towards more specific O6-Methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) inactivators

    OpenAIRE

    CORDEIRO MACHADO, ALESSANDRA; MC MURRY, THOMAS; Rozas, Isabel

    2011-01-01

    PUBLISHED Searching for a novel family of inactivators of the human DNA repair protein O6?methylguanine?DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) which is known to bind to the DNA minor groove, we have computationally modelled and synthesised two series of 2?amino?6?aryloxy?5?nitropyrimidines with morpholino or aminodiaryl substituents (potential minor groove binders) at the 4?position. Synthesis of these compounds was achieved by successive substitution of each of the two Cl atoms of 2?amino?4,6?dichl...

  20. miR-221/222 Target the DNA Methyltransferase MGMT in Glioma Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Cristina Quintavalle; Davide Mangani; Giuseppina Roscigno; Giulia Romano; Angel Diaz-Lagares; Margherita Iaboni; Elvira Donnarumma; Danilo Fiore; Pasqualino De Marinis; Ylermi Soini; Manel Esteller; Gerolama Condorelli

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is one of the most deadly types of cancer. To date, the best clinical approach for treatment is based on administration of temozolomide (TMZ) in combination with radiotherapy. Much evidence suggests that the intracellular level of the alkylating enzyme O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) impacts response to TMZ in GBM patients. MGMT expression is regulated by the methylation of its promoter. However, evidence indicates that this is not the only regula...

  1. O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT): can function explain a suicidal mechanism?

    OpenAIRE

    Gouws, Chrisna; Pretorius, Petrus Jacobus

    2011-01-01

    Why does O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), an indispensable DNA repair enzyme, have a mechanism which seems to run counter to its importance? This enzyme is key to the removal of detrimental alkyl adducts from guanine bases. Although the mechanism is well known, an unusual feature surrounds its mode of action, which is its so-called suicidal endpoint. In addition, induction of MGMT is highly variable and its kinetics is atypical. These features raise some questions on the seeming...

  2. Arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase and the inorganic arsenic methylation phenotype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inorganic arsenic is enzymatically methylated; hence, its ingestion results in exposure to the parent compound and various methylated arsenicals. Both experimental and epidemiological evidences suggest that some of the adverse health effects associated with chronic exposure to inorganic arsenic may be mediated by these methylated metabolites. If i As methylation is an activation process, then the phenotype for inorganic arsenic methylation may determine risk associated with exposure to this metalloid. We examined inorganic arsenic methylation phenotypes and arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase genotypes in four species: three that methylate inorganic arsenic (human (Homo sapiens), rat (Rattus norwegicus), and mouse (Mus musculus)) and one that does not methylate inorganic arsenic (chimpanzee, Pan troglodytes). The predicted protein products from arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase are similar in size for rat (369 amino acid residues), mouse (376 residues), and human (375 residues). By comparison, a 275-nucleotide deletion beginning at nucleotide 612 in the chimpanzee gene sequence causes a frameshift that leads to a nonsense mutation for a premature stop codon after amino acid 205. The null phenotype for inorganic arsenic methylation in the chimpanzee is likely due to the deletion in the gene for arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase that yields an inactive truncated protein. This lineage-specific loss of function caused by the deletion event must have occurred in the Pan lineage after Homo-Pan divergence about 5 million years ago

  3. Chromatin Targeting of de Novo DNA Methyltransferases by the PWWP Domain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying-ZiGe; Min-TiePu; HumairaGowher; Hai-PingWu; Jian-PingDing; AlbertJeltsch; Guo-LiangXu

    2005-01-01

    DNA methylation patterns of mammalian genomes are generated in gametogenesis and early embryonic development. Two de novo DNA methyltransferases, Dnmt3a and Dnmt3b, are responsible for the process. Both en-zymes contain a long N-terminal regulatory region linked to a conserved C-terminal domain responsible forthe catalytic activity. Although a PWWP domain in the N-terminal region has been shown to bind DNA in vitro, it is unclear how the DNA methyltransferases access their substrate in chromatin in vivo. We show here that the two proteins are associated with chromatin including mitotic chromosomes in mammalian cells, and the PWWP domain is essential for the chromatin targeting of the enzymes. The functional significance of PWWPmediated chromatin targeting is suggested by the fact that a missense mutation in this domain of human DNMT3B causes immunodeficiency, centromeric heterochromatin instability, facial anomalies (ICF) syndrome, which is characterized by loss of methylation insatellite DNA, pericentromeric instability, and immunodeficiency. We demonstrate that the mutant protein completely loses its chromatin targeting capacity. Our data establish the PWWP domain as a novel chromatin/chromosome-targeting module and suggest that the PWWP-mediated chromatin association is essential for the function of the de novo methyltransferases during development.

  4. Transcriptome profiling of Set5 and Set1 methyltransferases: Tools for visualization of gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glòria Mas Martín

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Cells regulate transcription by coordinating the activities of multiple histone modifying complexes. We recently identified the yeast histone H4 methyltransferase Set5 and discovered functional overlap with the histone H3 methyltransferase Set1 in gene expression. Specifically, using next-generation RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq, we found that Set5 and Set1 function synergistically to regulate specific transcriptional programs at subtelomeres and transposable elements. Here we provide a comprehensive description of the methodology and analysis tools corresponding to the data deposited in NCBI's Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO under the accession number GSE52086. This data complements the experimental methods described in Mas Martín G et al. (2014 and provides the means to explore the cooperative functions of histone H3 and H4 methyltransferases in the regulation of transcription. Furthermore, a fully annotated R code is included to enable researchers to use the following computational tools: comparison of significant differential expression (SDE profiles; gene ontology enrichment of SDE; and enrichment of SDE relative to chromosomal features, such as centromeres, telomeres, and transposable elements. Overall, we present a bioinformatics platform that can be generally implemented for similar analyses with different datasets and in different organisms.

  5. Rapid restriction enzyme free detection of DNA methyltransferase activity based on DNA-templated silver nanoclusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kermani, Hanie Ahmadzade; Hosseini, Morteza; Dadmehr, Mehdi; Ganjali, Mohammad Reza

    2016-06-01

    DNA methylation has significant roles in gene regulation. DNA methyltransferase (MTase) enzyme characterizes DNA methylation and also induces an aberrant methylation pattern that is related to many diseases, especially cancers. Thus, it is required to develop a method to detect the DNA MTase activity. In this study, we developed a new sensitive and reliable method for methyltransferase activity assay by employing DNA-templated silver nanoclusters (DNA/Ag NCs) without using restriction enzymes. The Ag NCs have been utilized for the determination of M.SssI MTase activity and its inhibition. We designed an oligonucleotide probe which contained an inserted six-cytosine loop as Ag NCs formation template. The changes in fluorescence intensity were monitored to quantify the M.SssI activity. The fluorescence spectra showed a linear decrease in the range of 0.4 to 20 U/ml with a detection limit of 0.1 U/ml, which was significant compared with previous reports. The proposed method was applied successfully for demonstrating the Gentamicin effect as MTase inhibitor. The proposed method showed convenient reproducibility and sensitivity indicating its potential for the determination of methyltransferase activity. PMID:27052776

  6. miR-29 Represses the Activities of DNA Methyltransferases and DNA Demethylases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izuho Hatada

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Members of the microRNA-29 (miR-29 family directly target the DNA methyltransferases, DNMT3A and DNMT3B. Disturbances in the expression levels of miR-29 have been linked to tumorigenesis and tumor aggressiveness. Members of the miR-29 family are currently thought to repress DNA methylation and suppress tumorigenesis by protecting against de novo methylation. Here, we report that members of the miR-29 family repress the activities of DNA methyltransferases and DNA demethylases, which have opposing roles in control of DNA methylation status. Members of the miR-29 family directly inhibited DNA methyltransferases and two major factors involved in DNA demethylation, namely tet methylcytosine dioxygenase 1 (TET1 and thymine DNA glycosylase (TDG. Overexpression of miR-29 upregulated the global DNA methylation level in some cancer cells and downregulated DNA methylation in other cancer cells, suggesting that miR-29 suppresses tumorigenesis by protecting against changes in the existing DNA methylation status rather than by preventing de novo methylation of DNA.

  7. Purification of homologous protein carboxyl methyltransferase isozymes from human and bovine erythrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have purified the two major isozymes of the L-isoaspartyl/D-aspartyl protein methyltransferase from both human and bovine erythrocytes. These four enzymes all have polypeptide molecular weights of approximately 26,500 and appear to be monomers in solution. Each of these enzymes cross-reacts with antibodies directed against protein carboxyl methyltransferase I from bovine brain. Their structures also appear to be similar when analyzed by dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis for the large fragments produced by digestion with Staphylococcus aureus protease V8 or when analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) for tryptic peptides. The structural relatedness of these enzymes was confirmed by sequence analysis of a total of 433 residues in 32 tryptic fragments of the human erythrocyte isozymes I and II and of the bovine erythrocyte isozyme II. They found sequence identity or probable identity in 111 out of 112 residues when they compared the human isozymes I and II and identities in 127 out of 134 residues when the human and bovine isozymes II were compared. These results suggest that the erythrocyte isozymes from both organisms may have nearly identical structures and confirm the similarities in the function of these methyltransferases that have been previously demonstrated

  8. Preliminary characterization of (nucleoside-2′-O-)-methyltransferase crystals from Meaban and Yokose flaviviruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mastrangelo, Eloise; Bollati, Michela; Milani, Mario [Department of Biomolecular Sciences and Biotechnology, CNR-INFM, University of Milano, Via Celoria 26, 20133 Milano (Italy); Lamballeire, Xavier de; Brisbare, Nadege [Unité des Virus Emergents, Faculté de Médecine, 27 Boulevard Jean Moulin, 13005 Marseille (France); Dalle, Karen; Lantez, Violaine; Egloff, Marie-Pierre; Coutard, Bruno; Canard, Bruno [Laboratoire Architecture et Fonction des Macromolécules Biologiques, UMR 6098 CNRS ESIL, Case 932, 163 Avenue de Luminy, 13288 Marseille CEDEX 9 (France); Gould, Ernest; Forrester, Naomi [CEH Oxford, Mansfield Road, Oxford OX1 3SR (United Kingdom); Bolognesi, Martino, E-mail: martino.bolognesi@unimi.it [Department of Biomolecular Sciences and Biotechnology, CNR-INFM, University of Milano, Via Celoria 26, 20133 Milano (Italy)

    2006-08-01

    Two methyltransferases from flaviviruses (Meaban and Yokose viruses) have been overexpressed and crystallized. Diffraction data and characterization of the two crystal forms are presented, together with a preliminary molecular-replacement solution for both enzymes. Viral methyltranferases (MTase) are involved in the third step of the mRNA-capping process, transferring a methyl group from S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM) to the capped mRNA. MTases are classified into two groups: (guanine-N7)-methyltransferases (N7MTases), which add a methyl group onto the N7 atom of guanine, and (nucleoside-2′-O-)-methyltransferases (2′OMTases), which add a methyl group to a ribose hydroxyl. The MTases of two flaviviruses, Meaban and Yokose viruses, have been overexpressed, purified and crystallized in complex with SAM. Characterization of the crystals together with details of preliminary X-ray diffraction data collection (at 2.8 and 2.7 Å resolution, respectively) are reported here. The sequence homology relative to Dengue virus 2′OMTase and the structural conservation of specific residues in the putative active sites suggest that both enzymes belong to the 2′OMTase subgroup.

  9. MtrA of the sodium ion pumping methyltransferase binds cobalamin in a unique mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Tristan; Ermler, Ulrich; Shima, Seigo

    2016-01-01

    In the three domains of life, vitamin B12 (cobalamin) is primarily used in methyltransferase and isomerase reactions. The methyltransferase complex MtrA-H of methanogenic archaea has a key function in energy conservation by catalysing the methyl transfer from methyl-tetrahydromethanopterin to coenzyme M and its coupling with sodium-ion translocation. The cobalamin-binding subunit MtrA is not homologous to any known B12-binding proteins and is proposed as the motor of the sodium-ion pump. Here, we present crystal structures of the soluble domain of the membrane-associated MtrA from Methanocaldococcus jannaschii and the cytoplasmic MtrA homologue/cobalamin complex from Methanothermus fervidus. The MtrA fold corresponds to the Rossmann-type α/β fold, which is also found in many cobalamin-containing proteins. Surprisingly, the cobalamin-binding site of MtrA differed greatly from all the other cobalamin-binding sites. Nevertheless, the hydrogen-bond linkage at the lower axial-ligand site of cobalt was equivalently constructed to that found in other methyltransferases and mutases. A distinct polypeptide segment fixed through the hydrogen-bond linkage in the relaxed Co(III) state might be involved in propagating the energy released upon corrinoid demethylation to the sodium-translocation site by a conformational change. PMID:27324530

  10. Deletion of Genes Encoding Arginase Improves Use of "Heavy" Isotope-Labeled Arginine for Mass Spectrometry in Fission Yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weronika E Borek

    Full Text Available The use of "heavy" isotope-labeled arginine for stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC mass spectrometry in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe is hindered by the fact that under normal conditions, arginine is extensively catabolized in vivo, resulting in the appearance of "heavy"-isotope label in several other amino acids, most notably proline, but also glutamate, glutamine and lysine. This "arginine conversion problem" significantly impairs quantification of mass spectra. Previously, we developed a method to prevent arginine conversion in fission yeast SILAC, based on deletion of genes involved in arginine catabolism. Here we show that although this method is indeed successful when (13C6-arginine (Arg-6 is used for labeling, it is less successful when (13C6(15N4-arginine (Arg-10, a theoretically preferable label, is used. In particular, we find that with this method, "heavy"-isotope label derived from Arg-10 is observed in amino acids other than arginine, indicating metabolic conversion of Arg-10. Arg-10 conversion, which severely complicates both MS and MS/MS analysis, is further confirmed by the presence of (13C5(15N2-arginine (Arg-7 in arginine-containing peptides from Arg-10-labeled cells. We describe how all of the problems associated with the use of Arg-10 can be overcome by a simple modification of our original method. We show that simultaneous deletion of the fission yeast arginase genes car1+ and aru1+ prevents virtually all of the arginine conversion that would otherwise result from the use of Arg-10. This solution should enable a wider use of heavy isotope-labeled amino acids in fission yeast SILAC.

  11. Proteomic analysis of arginine methylation sites in human cells reveals dynamic regulation during transcriptional arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sylvestersen, Kathrine B; Horn, Heiko; Jungmichel, Stephanie;

    2014-01-01

    contain regulated functions on their own. Collectively, we present a site-specific MMA dataset in human cells and demonstrate for the first time that MMA is a dynamic post-translational modification regulated during transcriptional arrest by a hitherto uncharacterized arginine demethylase....... mono-methylation (MMA) sites. We thereby identify 1,027 site-specific MMA sites on 494 human proteins, discovering numerous novel mono-methylation targets and confirming the majority of currently known MMA substrates. Nuclear RNA-binding proteins involved in RNA processing, RNA localization......, transcription, and chromatin remodeling are predominantly found modified with MMA. Despite this, MMA sites prominently are located outside RNA-binding domains as compared to the proteome-wide distribution of arginine residues. Quantification of arginine methylation in cells treated with Actinomycin D uncovers...

  12. GABA Production in Lactococcus lactis Is Enhanced by Arginine and Co-addition of Malate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laroute, Valérie; Yasaro, Chonthicha; Narin, Waranya; Mazzoli, Roberto; Pessione, Enrica; Cocaign-Bousquet, Muriel; Loubière, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis NCDO 2118 was previously selected for its ability to decarboxylate glutamate to γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), an interesting nutritional supplement able to improve mood and relaxation. Amino acid decarboxylation is generally considered as among the biochemical systems allowing lactic acid bacteria to counteracting acidic stress and obtaining metabolic energy. These strategies also include arginine deiminase pathway and malolactic fermentation but little is known about their possible interactions of with GABA production. In the present study, the effects of glutamate, arginine, and malate (i.e., the substrates of these acid-resistance pathways) on L. lactis NCDO 2118 growth and GABA production performances were analyzed. Both malate and arginine supplementation resulted in an efficient reduction of acidity and improvement of bacterial biomass compared to glutamate supplementation. Glutamate decarboxylation was limited to narrow environmental conditions (pH < 5.1) and physiological state (stationary phase). However, some conditions were able to improve GABA production or activate glutamate decarboxylation system even outside of this compass. Arginine clearly stimulated glutamate decarboxylation: the highest GABA production (8.6 mM) was observed in cultures supplemented with both arginine and glutamate. The simultaneous addition of arginine, malate, and glutamate enabled earlier GABA production (i.e., during exponential growth) at relatively high pH (6.5). As far as we know, no previous study has reported GABA production in such conditions. Although further studies are needed to understand the molecular basis of these phenomena, these results represent important keys suitable of application in GABA production processes. PMID:27458444

  13. Arginine-containing desensitizing toothpaste for the treatment of dentin hypersensitivity: a meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zheng-yan; Wang, Fei; Lu, Keke; Li, Yue-heng; Zhou, Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Objective To estimate the effect of arginine-containing desensitizing toothpaste on dentin hypersensitivity (DH). Methods Databases including China National Knowledge Infrastructure, VIP Database for Chinese Technical Periodicals, China Biology Medicine disc, Wangfang Data, PubMed, Web of Science, and Cochrane Trials Register were searched, and Google was used as a supplementary tool to search for information through February 2014. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of the treatment of DH with arginine-containing toothpaste were included. Relevant information was extracted, and a quality evaluation was performed. Meta-analyses were performed using RevMan 5.2 software. Results Eighteen RCTs with 1,423 patients were included. The results of the meta-analyses demonstrated that at days 0 and 3; weeks 2, 4, and 8; and more than 12 weeks, arginine-containing toothpaste led to significantly improved results on the tactile sensitivity test (standardized mean difference [SMD] =1.95, 95% confidence interval [CI] [1.14, 2.76]) and the air-blast test (SMD =−1.60, 95% CI [−2.14, −1.05]) at 4 weeks and the tactile sensitivity test (SMD =2.01, 95% CI [1.41, 2.61]) and the air-blast test (SMD =−1.41, 95% CI [−1.83, −0.98]) at 8 weeks compared to toothpastes containing other desensitizing components, thus indicating a superior therapeutic effect of arginine-containing desensitizing toothpaste. However, no significant differences between arginine-containing toothpaste and toothpastes containing other desensitizing components were observed in the air-blast test at days 0 and 3 and week 2 and in the tactile sensitivity and air-blast tests at more than 12 weeks. Conclusion The current evidence indicates that arginine-containing toothpaste is effective for DH. However, further high-quality, large-sample RCTs are needed. PMID:26793006

  14. Potential protective effect of arginine against 4-nitrophenol-induced ovarian damage in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wei-Feng; Li, Yan-Sen; Dai, Peng-Yuan; Li, Chun-Mei

    2016-01-01

    4-nitrophenol (PNP) is generally regarded as a diesel exhaust particle (DEP). Arginine plays an important role as a new feed additive, possessing highly efficient antioxidant activities. Here we investigated the effects of dietary supplementation with arginine against ovarian damage induced by PNP in rats. A total of thirty-two female rats postnatal day 28 (PND 28) were randomly divided into four groups. Two groups were fed with basal diet or 13 g/kg arginine in diet for 4 weeks, respectively; the other two groups were given PNP (100 mg/kg b.w.) daily by subcutaneous injection for 2 weeks following pretreatment with either basal diet or arginine diet for 2 weeks. The values of body weight gain (BWG), average daily gain (ADG) and percentage weight gain (PWG) upon PNP treatment were significantly reduced than those in other groups. The relative liver weight in the PNP group was significantly decreased compared with the control group. Treatment with PNP significant reduced the number of corpora lutea, although serum 17β-estradiol (E2) and progesterone (P4) concentrations were unchanged. The morphology of the ovaries in PNP-treated rats displayed necrosis, follicular deformation and granulosa cells irregular arrangement. Moreover, exposure to PNP enhanced production of malondialdehyde (MDA) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and decreased the activities of total superoxide dismutase (T-SOD) and catalase (CAT), and the co-administration of arginine can attenuate the oxidative stress caused by PNP. These results suggest that arginine may have a protective effect against ovarian damage induced by PNP owing to its antioxidant capacity effect. PMID:27193729

  15. Linear short histidine and cysteine modified arginine peptides constitute a potential class of DNA delivery agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Anita; Shukla, Vasundhara; Khanduri, Richa; Dabral, Spoorti; Singh, Harpal; Ganguli, Munia

    2014-03-01

    The success of gene therapy relies on the development of safe and efficient multifunctional carriers of nucleic acids that can overcome extra- and intracellular barriers, protect the nucleic acid and mediate its release at the desired site allowing gene expression. Peptides bear unique properties that are indispensable for any carrier, e.g., they can mediate DNA condensation, cellular targeting, membrane translocation, endosomal escape and nuclear localization. In an effort to design a multifunctional peptide, we have modified an arginine homopeptide R16 by replacement of seven arginines with histidines and addition of one cysteine at each end respectively to impart endosomal escape property while maintaining the DNA condensation and release balance. Addition of histidines imparts endosomal escape property to arginine homopeptide, but their arrangement with respect to arginines is more critical in controlling DNA condensation, release and transfection efficiency. Intriguingly, R5H7R4 peptide where charge/arginine is distributed in blocks is preferred for strong condensation while more efficient transfection is seen in the variants R9H7 and H4R9H3, which exhibit weak condensation and strong release. Addition of cysteine to each of these peptides further fine-tuned the condensation-release balance without application of any oxidative procedure unlike other similar systems reported in the literature. This resulted in a large increase in the transfection efficiency in all of the histidine modified peptides irrespective of the arginine and histidine positions. This series of multifunctional peptides shows comparable transfection efficiency to commercially available transfection reagent Lipofectamine 2000 at low charge ratios, with simple preparative procedure and exhibits much less toxicity. PMID:24476132

  16. The Metabolic Conversion of Arginine in the Rumen Wall and its Importance in Ruminant Nitrogen Metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The functions of arginase and urease of the rumen wall were investigated in vitro and in vivo. Surviving ruminal mucosae of cattle were incubated for four hours. 14C-arginine-HCl, uniformly labelled, was added to the serosal side at a concentration of 10 pmol/mi. About 25% of the added arginine was used during the incubation by the ruminal tissue. In comparison with controls an increased amount of 14C-omithine, urea, and ammonia were formed in the mucosa and appeared on both sides. The increase was due to arginase and urease functions. It was estimated that about 50% of the urea formed by arginine breakdown were present at the mucosa side, mainly in the form of ammonia. Of the omithine simultaneously formed, 85% remained on the serosa side. Remarkable individual variations of omithine and urea formation were found from animal to animal. The in-vivo experiments were performed using goats with catheters placed in the right ruminal artery and vein. We injected 90 μCi of 14C-arginine into the ruminal artery. When 80 g of soluble starch were added to the rumen the activity and concentration of ornithine increased in the ruminal venous blood showing an arterial-venous difference. The radioactivity of urea in blood taken from the ruminal vein and the carotid artery did not show any difference. When starch was omitted from the rumen a comparable difference of omithine concentration was not found. It is assumed that the enzymes arginase and urease of the rumen wall are involved in nitrogen recycling processes. Blood arginine may be hydrolysed in the rumen wall forming urea and ornithine. Urea formed by arginine breakdown may be split to CO2 and ammonia. The experiments produced evidence that the ammonia formed preferably enters the rumen content. The nitrogen transfer through the rumen wall may be affected by varying activities of arginase. (author)

  17. Effects of chronic oral L-arginine administration on the L-arginine/NO pathway in patients with peripheral arterial occlusive disease or coronary artery disease: L-Arginine prevents renal loss of nitrite, the major NO reservoir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Jessica Y; Rothmann, Sabine; Schröder, Frank; Langen, Jennifer; Lücke, Thomas; Mariotti, François; Huneau, Jean François; Frölich, Jürgen C; Tsikas, Dimitrios

    2015-09-01

    Despite saturation of nitric oxide (NO) synthase (NOS) by its substrate L-arginine (Arg), oral and intravenous supplementation of Arg may enhance NO synthesis, a phenomenon known as "The L-arginine paradox". Yet, Arg is not only a source of NO, but is also a source for guanidine-methylated (N (G)) arginine derivatives which are all inhibitors of NOS activity. Therefore, Arg supplementation may not always result in enhanced NO synthesis. Concomitant synthesis of N (G)-monomethyl arginine (MMA), N (G),N (G)-dimethylarginine (asymmetric dimethylarginine, ADMA) and N (G),N (G´)-dimethylarginine (symmetric dimethylarginine, SDMA) from supplemented Arg may outweigh and even outbalance the positive effects of Arg on NO. Another possible, yet little investigated effect of Arg supplementation may be alteration of renal function, notably the influence on the excretion of nitrite in the urine. Nitrite is the autoxidation product of NO and the major reservoir of NO in the circulation. Nitrite and Arg are reabsorbed in the proximal tubule of the nephron and this reabsorption is coupled, at least in part, to the renal carbonic anhydrase (CA) activity. In the present placebo-controlled studies, we investigated the effect of chronic oral Arg supplementation of 10 g/day for 3 or 6 months in patients suffering from peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD) or coronary artery disease (CAD) on the urinary excretion of nitrite relative to nitrate. We determined the urinary nitrate-to-nitrite molar ratio (UNOxR), which is a measure of nitrite-dependent renal CA activity before and after oral intake of Arg or placebo by the patients. The UNOxR was also determined in 6 children who underwent the Arg test, i.e., intravenous infusion of Arg (0.5 g Arg/kg bodyweight) for 30 min. Arg was well tolerated by the patients of the three studies. Oral Arg supplementation increased Arg (plasma and urine) and ADMA (urine) concentrations. No appreciable changes were seen in NO (in PAOD and CAD) and

  18. Untersuchungen zur Bedeutung von Arginin für die induzierte NO-Synthese im ZNS

    OpenAIRE

    Fischmann, Boris

    2005-01-01

    Die induzierbare NO-Synthase (iNOS) wird bei verschiedenen neurodegenerativen Erkrankungen verstärkt exprimiert und steht im Verdacht, an der Pathogenese dieser Erkrankungen beteiligt zu sein. Da Arginin der iNOS als Substrat dient, steht die induzierte NO-Produktion in engem Zusammenhang mit dem Argininstoffwechsel. In der vorliegenden Arbeit wurden in Modellsystemen für Microgliazellen (N11-Zellen) und für Astrocyten (C6-BU-1-Zellen) Aspekte der induzierten Produktion von NO und des Arginin...

  19. Effect of L-arginine on neuromuscular transmission of the chick biventer cervicis muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Esfandiar

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available biventer cervicis muscleD. Effect of L-arginine on neuromuscular transmission of the chick EsfandiarAbstractBackground and Purpose: NO is a short-lived gas molecule generated by degradation of L-arg to citrulline and by the activation of enzyme NOS Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent. There are multiple NOS isoforms that strongly are expressed in skeletal muscle, suggesting the crucial role of NO in regulating muscular metabolism and function. In this study, the effect of L-arginine was examined at the neuromuscular junction of the chick biventer cervicis muscle.Materials and Methods: Biventer cervicis muscle preparations from chick’s age of 3 weeks were set up in the organ bath. The organ bath had a vessel with volume of about 70 ml; it contained Tyrode solution aerated with oxygen and was kept at 37º C. NO levels was also measured in the chick biventer cervicis muscle homogenates, using spectrophotometer method for the direct detection of NO, nitrite and nitrate. Total nitrite (nitrite+nitrate was measured by a spectrophotometer at 540 nm after the conversion of nitrate to nitrite by copperized cadmium granules.Results: L-Arginine at 500 µg/ml, decreased twitch response to electrical stimulation, and produced rightward shift of the dose-response curve for acetylcholine or carbachol. L-arginine at 1000 µg/ml produced a strong shift to the right of the dose-response curve for acetylcholine or carbachol with a reduction in efficacy. The inhibitory effect of L-arginine on the twitch response was blocked by caffeine (200 µg/ml. NO levels were found to be significantly increased in concentrations 500 and 1000 µg/ml of L-arginine in comparison with the control group (p < 0.001.Conclusion: These findings indicate a possible role of increased NO levels in the suppressive action of L-arginie on the twitch response. In addition, the results indicate that the post-junctional antagonistic action of L-arginine is probably the result of impaired sarcoplasmic

  20. Performance and nitrogen balance of laying hens fed increasing levels of digestible lysine and arginine

    OpenAIRE

    Fabyola Barros de Carvalho; José Henrique Stringhini; Maíra Silva Matos; Roberto Moraes Jardim Filho; Marcos Barcellos Café; Nadja Susana Mogyca Leandro; Maria Auxiliadora Andrade

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this experiment was to evaluate the effect of two digestible lysine levels and four digestible arginine levels on laying hens from 24 to 48 weeks of age. Three hundred and twenty Lohmann LSL laying hens were allotted in a completely randomized design in a 2 × 4 factorial arrangement, with two levels of digestible lysine (700 and 900 mg/kg of diet) and four digestible arginine levels (700, 800, 900 and 1000 mg/kg of diet). Results indicated requirement of 884 and 830 mg of dig...

  1. Arginine vasopressin stimulates phosphoinositide turnover in an enriched rat Leydig cell preparation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, J.R.; Hansen, Harald S.; Jensen, B.

    1989-01-01

    An enriched rat Leydig cell preparation was preincubated with [C]arachidonic acid. Stimulation of the cells with arginine vasopressin (AVP) (1 µM) for 2 min caused a significant increase in labelled phosphatidic acid and a significant fall in radioactivity in phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidyl......An enriched rat Leydig cell preparation was preincubated with [C]arachidonic acid. Stimulation of the cells with arginine vasopressin (AVP) (1 µM) for 2 min caused a significant increase in labelled phosphatidic acid and a significant fall in radioactivity in phosphatidylinositol and...

  2. The Role of Arginin and Uric Acid on Portulaca Grandiflora Growth under Saline Conditions.

    OpenAIRE

    Mahmoud Yagi

    2014-01-01

    Seeds of Portulaca grandiflora were soaked in distilled water, NaCl or NaCl with uric acid or arginine or in one of the amino acids. Treatment of seeds of Portulaca grandiflora with arginine and uric acid under saline conditions increased the percent of seed germination from 55% to 80%. Incorporation of these amino acids in the nutrient medium also significantly enhanced the dry weights as well as the contents of chlorophyll and ascorbic acid in the seedlings. Levels of both total amino acids...

  3. Radiometric assay for determining the incorporation of L-canavanine or L-arginine into protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Procedures for a radiometric assay of L-[guanidinooxy-14C]canavanine were developed which provide a convenient and accurate measure of the incorporation of [14C]canavanine into de novo-synthesized proteins. These methods are also applicable to determining [14C]arginine incorporation into protein. These procedures have been employed to study the synthesis of L-[guanidinooxy-14C]canavanine- and L-[guanidino-14C]arginine-containing proteins from the hemolymph of Manduca sexta and Heliothis virescens, two highly destructive insect pests

  4. Reengineering of a Corynebacterium glutamicum l-Arginine and l-Citrulline Producer▿

    OpenAIRE

    Ikeda, Masato; Mitsuhashi, Satoshi; Tanaka, Kenji; Hayashi, Mikiro

    2009-01-01

    Toward the creation of a robust and efficient producer of l-arginine and l-citrulline (arginine/citrulline), we have performed reengineering of a Corynebacterium glutamicum strain by using genetic information of three classical producers. Sequence analysis of their arg operons identified three point mutations (argR123, argG92up, and argG45) in one producer and one point mutation (argB26 or argB31) in each of the other two producers. Reconstitution of the former three mutations or of each argB...

  5. Dietary l-Arginine Supplementation Protects Weanling Pigs from Deoxynivalenol-Induced Toxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Li Wu; Peng Liao; Liuqin He; Zemeng Feng; Wenkai Ren; Jie Yin; Jielin Duan; Tiejun Li; Yulong Yin

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the positive effects of dietary supplementation with l-arginine (Arg) on piglets fed a deoxynivalenol (DON)-contaminated diet. A total of eighteen, 28-day-old healthy weanling pigs were randomly assigned into one of three groups: uncontaminated basal diet (control group), 6 mg/kg DON-contaminated diet (DON group) and 6 mg/kg DON + 1% l-arginine (DON + ARG group). After 21 days of Arg supplementation, piglets in the DON and DON + ARG groups were challenged...

  6. Nonspecific blockade of vascular free radical signals by methylated arginine analogues

    OpenAIRE

    Pedro M.A.; Augusto O.; Barbeiro H.V.; Carvalho M.H.C.; da-Luz P.L.; Laurindo F.R.M.

    1998-01-01

    Methylated arginine analogues are often used as probes of the effect of nitric oxide; however, their specificity is unclear and seems to be frequently overestimated. This study analyzed the effects of NG-methyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA) on the endothelium-dependent release of vascular superoxide radicals triggered by increased flow. Plasma ascorbyl radical signals measured by direct electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy in 25 rabbits increased by 3.8 ± 0.7 nmol/l vs baseline (28.7 ± 1.4 nmol...

  7. Efficacy L-Arginine In Patients With Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis Associated With Metabolic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleksandr Fediv

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and Purpose Recent research in the field of hematology indicate that among the many pathogenic mechanisms of development and progression of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis NASH which occurs on the background of the metabolic syndrome an important role is played by endothelial dysfunction and violations of haemocoagulation. The aim of this research was to study the effectiveness of L-arginine as it corrects endothelial dysfunction and disorders of homeostasis haemocoagulation link in patients with NASH associated with the metabolic syndrome. Subjects and Methods 128 patients with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis associated with metabolic syndrome were examined. Some patients 63 persons received standard treatment according to national guidelines. To another group 65 patients on the background of basic therapy L-arginine hydrochloride followed by transition to oral form of L-arginine aspartate was administered. Blood levels of stable nitrogen monoxide metabolites nitrites nitrates endothelin-1 and plasma recalcification time prothrombin time thrombin time activated partial thromboplastin time fibrinogen plasma level activity of antithrombin III and coagulation factor XIII potential activity of plasminogen plasma fibrinolytic blood activity were studied. Results Originally significantly increased levels of endothelin-1 decreased after the therapy in all studied groups but more noticeable changes in the group with L-arginine appointment were observed p0.05. In the studied groups normalization of stable nitrogen monoxide metabolites after treatment was also noticed. Significant p0.05 increase in all haemocoagulation time characteristics and activities of antithrombin-III and factor XIII was found. The positive effect of L-arginine on blood fibrinolytic activity was noted. Discussion and Conclusion Combined therapy of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis associated with metabolic syndrome with a differentiated degreeal L-arginine assignment by

  8. The microbiome, intestinal function, and arginine metabolism of healthy Indian women are different from those of American and Jamaican women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indian women have slower arginine flux during pregnancy compared with American and Jamaican women. Arginine is a semi-essential amino acid that becomes essential during periods of rapid lean tissue deposition. It is synthesized only from citrulline, a nondietary amino acid produced mainly in the gut...

  9. Cationic amino acid transporters and Salmonella Typhimurium ArgT collectively regulate arginine availability towards intracellular Salmonella growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyanka Das

    Full Text Available Cationic amino acid transporters (mCAT1 and mCAT2B regulate the arginine availability in macrophages. How in the infected cell a pathogen can alter the arginine metabolism of the host remains to be understood. We reveal here a novel mechanism by which Salmonella exploit mCAT1 and mCAT2B to acquire host arginine towards its own intracellular growth within antigen presenting cells. We demonstrate that Salmonella infected bone marrow derived macrophages and dendritic cells show enhanced arginine uptake and increased expression of mCAT1 and mCAT2B. We show that the mCAT1 transporter is in close proximity to Salmonella containing vacuole (SCV specifically by live intracellular Salmonella in order to access the macrophage cytosolic arginine pool. Further, Lysosome associated membrane protein 1, a marker of SCV, also was found to colocalize with mCAT1 in the Salmonella infected cell. The intra vacuolar Salmonella then acquire the host arginine via its own arginine transporter, ArgT for growth. The argT knockout strain was unable to acquire host arginine and was attenuated in growth in both macrophages and in mice model of infection. Together, these data reveal survival strategies by which virulent Salmonella adapt to the harsh conditions prevailing in the infected host cells.

  10. The human neonatal small intestine has the potential for arginine synthesis; developmental changes in the expression of arginine-synthesizing and -catabolizing enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruijter Jan M

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Milk contains too little arginine for normal growth, but its precursors proline and glutamine are abundant; the small intestine of rodents and piglets produces arginine from proline during the suckling period; and parenterally fed premature human neonates frequently suffer from hypoargininemia. These findings raise the question whether the neonatal human small intestine also expresses the enzymes that enable the synthesis of arginine from proline and/or glutamine. Carbamoylphosphate synthetase (CPS, ornithine aminotransferase (OAT, argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS, arginase-1 (ARG1, arginase-2 (ARG2, and nitric-oxide synthase (NOS were visualized by semiquantitative immunohistochemistry in 89 small-intestinal specimens. Results Between 23 weeks of gestation and 3 years after birth, CPS- and ASS-protein content in enterocytes was high and then declined to reach adult levels at 5 years. OAT levels declined more gradually, whereas ARG-1 was not expressed. ARG-2 expression increased neonatally to adult levels. Neurons in the enteric plexus strongly expressed ASS, OAT, NOS1 and ARG2, while varicose nerve fibers in the circular layer of the muscularis propria stained for ASS and NOS1 only. The endothelium of small arterioles expressed ASS and NOS3, while their smooth-muscle layer expressed OAT and ARG2. Conclusion The human small intestine acquires the potential to produce arginine well before fetuses become viable outside the uterus. The perinatal human intestine therefore resembles that of rodents and pigs. Enteral ASS behaves as a typical suckling enzyme because its expression all but disappears in the putative weaning period of human infants.

  11. DNA strand break dependence on Tris and arginine scavenger concentrations under ultra-soft X-ray irradiation: the contribution of secondary arginine radicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souici, Mounir; Khalil, Talat Tariq; Boulanouar, Omar; Belafrites, Abdelfettah; Mavon, Christophe; Fromm, Michel

    2016-05-01

    In this study, we used a bench-top cold-cathode ultra-soft X-ray (USX) generator to expose aqueous DNA plasmid solutions to low-LET radiation under various scavenging conditions. Single- and double-strand breaks were assessed using classic gel electrophoresis quantification of linear, circular and supercoiled plasmid DNA topologies. With their very low penetration range in water, USX can only interact with matter up to short distances, of the order of 50 μm. We validated a stirring procedure which makes it possible to expose 100 µL of aqueous samples (2 mm thick). The scavenging of OH radicals by Tris buffer was studied at ambient temperature under aerobic conditions and compared to data gathered in the literature. A very good agreement was found with the rare data dealing with DNA plasmid exposed to Al Kα photons at low temperature (T ≤ 277 K), which therefore validated the experimental procedure. The yields for DNA single-strand breaks determined during this study enabled the ratio of indirect to direct effects to be determined at 96.2 %, in good agreement with the value of 97.7 % stemming from a study based on γ-ray irradiation of frozen solutions of plasmid DNA. Then, arginine was used both to create a "biological-like" chemical environment around the DNA plasmids and as an OH radical scavenger, in vitro. Although arginine has a greater scavenging (protecting) power than Tris, surprisingly, it led to higher rates of strand breakage. Based on the specific binding modes of arginine to DNA, we suggest that the side effects observed are due to the presence of arginine near to, but also inside, the DNA double helix. PMID:26994994

  12. Basis of Arginine Sensitivity of Microbial N-Acetyl-l-Glutamate Kinases: Mutagenesis and Protein Engineering Study with the Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli Enzymes▿

    OpenAIRE

    Fernández-Murga, M. Leonor; Rubio, Vicente

    2008-01-01

    N-Acetylglutamate kinase (NAGK) catalyzes the second step of arginine biosynthesis. In Pseudomonas aeruginosa, but not in Escherichia coli, this step is rate limiting and feedback and sigmoidally inhibited by arginine. Crystal structures revealed that arginine-insensitive E. coli NAGK (EcNAGK) is homodimeric, whereas arginine-inhibitable NAGKs, including P. aeruginosa NAGK (PaNAGK), are hexamers in which an extra N-terminal kinked helix (N-helix) interlinks three dimers. By introducing single...

  13. Uncovering the Protein Lysine and Arginine Methylation Network in Arabidopsis Chloroplasts

    OpenAIRE

    Alban, Claude; Tardif, Marianne; Mininno, Morgane; Brugiere, Sabine; Gilgen, Annabelle; Ma, Sheng; Mazzoleni, Meryl; Gigarel, Oceane; Martin-Laffon, Jacqueline; Ferro, Myriam

    2014-01-01

    Post-translational modification of proteins by the addition of methyl groups to the side chains of Lys and Arg residues is proposed to play important roles in many cellular processes. In plants, identification of non-histone methylproteins at a cellular or subcellular scale is still missing. To gain insights into the extent of this modification in chloroplasts we used a bioinformatics approach to identify protein methyltransferases targeted to plastids and set up a workflow to specifically id...

  14. The catechol-O-methyltransferase inhibitory potential of Z-vallesiachotamine by in silicoand in vitro approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina dos Santos Passos

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available AbstractZ-Vallesiachotamine is a monoterpene indole alkaloid that has a β-N-acrylate group in its structure. This class of compounds has already been described in different Psychotriaspecies. Our research group observed that E/Z-vallesiachotamine exhibits a multifunctional feature, being able to inhibit targets related to neurodegeneration, such as monoamine oxidase A, sirtuins 1 and 2, and butyrylcholinesterase enzymes. Aiming at better characterizing the multifunctional profile of this compound, its effect on cathecol-O-methyltransferase activity was investigated. The cathecol-O-methyltransferase activity was evaluated in vitro by a fluorescence-based method, using S-(5′-adenosyl-l-methionine as methyl donor and aesculetin as substrate. The assay optimization was performed varying the concentrations of methyl donor (S-(5′-adenosyl-l-methionine and enzyme. It was observed that the highest concentrations of both factors (2.25 U of the enzyme and 100 µM of S-(5′-adenosyl-l-methionine afforded the more reproducible results. The in vitro assay demonstrated that Z-vallesiachotamine was able to inhibit the cathecol-O-methyltransferase activity with an IC50 close to 200 µM. Molecular docking studies indicated that Z-vallesiachotamine can bind the catechol pocket of catechol-O-methyltransferase enzyme. The present work demonstrated for the first time the inhibitory properties of Z-vallesiachotamine on cathecol-O-methyltransferase enzyme, affording additional evidence regarding its multifunctional effects in targets related to neurodegenerative diseases.

  15. Diurnal changes in polyamine content, arginine and ornithine decarboxylase, and diamine oxidase in tobacco leaves

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gemperlová, Lenka; Nováková, Marie; Vaňková, Radomíra; Eder, Josef; Cvikrová, Milena

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 57, č. 6 (2006), s. 1413-1421. ISSN 0022-0957 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA206/03/0369 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : Arginine decarboxylase * diamine oxidase * ornithine decarboxylase Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 3.630, year: 2006

  16. Impaired endothelial function after aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage correlates with arginine:asymmetric dimethylarginine ratio

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergström, A; Staalsø, J M; Romner, B; Olsen, N V

    2014-01-01

    and arginine:ADMA ratio (r=0.43, P<0.005), but not with nitrite/nitrate, VMCA, or S-100B. CONCLUSIONS: Peripheral flow-mediated vasodilation is attenuated in the first days after SAH indicating acute systemic endothelial dysfunction. Impairment of endothelial function after SAH correlates with...

  17. [Antioxidant effects of L-arginine in the rat heart in experimental rhabdomyolysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filimonenko, V P; Nikitchenko, I V; Kaliman, P A

    2009-01-01

    The glycerol administration in a dose of 1 ml of 50% water solution/100 g b. w. was found to cause considerable accumulation of the total heme in the rat blood serum that is accompanied by an increase of TBA-reactive products and protein carbonyl derivates contents and by changes of protein level. Heme entering in the heart tissue is observed in the first hours after glycerol injection. The breaches of heart antioxidant-prooxidant balance are noted in twenty-four hours: TBA-reactive products and protein carbonyl derivates accumulation, heme oxygenase and catalase activation, superoxide dismutase activity lowering and reduction of glutathione content elevation. Pretreatment by L-arginine (0.5 h before glycerol administration) almost did not affect the blood serum changes caused by glycerol injection. However in the rat heart L-arginine administration prevents from TBA-reactive products and protein carbonyl derivates accumulation and the breaches of superoxide dismutase and catalase activities. Besides L-arginine causes the ealier heme oxygenase induction. Possible mechanisms of L-arginine protective action in the rat heart under experimental rhabdomyolysis are discussed. PMID:19877424

  18. Glutamine supplementation, citrulline production, and de novo arginine synthesis: Is there a relation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    We would like to comment on the recent publications by Buijs et al. The authors hypothesized that a parenteral supplement of glutamine stimulates citrulline formation and enhances de novo arginine synthesis. To test this hypothesis, they conducted an experiment with stable isotopes in patients under...

  19. Arginine-vasopressin stimulates the formation of phosphatidic acid in rat Leydig cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, J.R.; Hansen, Harald S.; Jensen, B.

    1987-01-01

    Arginine-vasopressin (AVP) stimulated the formation of labelled phosphatidic acid (PA) in [C]arachidonic acid-prelabelled rat Leydig cells. After addition of 10 M AVP [C]arachidonoylphosphatidic acid reached a maximum within 2 min. The increase was dose-dependent (10-10 M). No change in labelling...

  20. Levels of arginine-vasopressin in cerebrospinal fluid during passive avoidance behavior in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kloet, E.R. de; Laczi, F.; Gaffori, O.; Fekete, M.; Wied, D. de

    1984-01-01

    The concentration of immunoreactive arginine-vasopressin (IR-AVP) was measured in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) during acquisition and retention of passive avoidance behavior. IR-AVP level in CSF of male Wistar rats immediately after the learning trial was increased; the rate of which was related to

  1. Reduced preabsorptive insulin response in aged rats : differential effects of amphetamine and arginine-vasopressin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buwalda, B.; Strubbe, J.H.; Bohus, B.

    1991-01-01

    The experiments presented here have been designed to investigate whether the age-related attenuation of the vagal reactivity to emotional stressors and its modulation by amphetamine (Amph) or arginine-vasopressin (AVP) can be generalized for other physiological response patterns. We therefore studie

  2. Evidence for a metabolic shift of arginine metabolism in sickle cell disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schnog, JJB; Jager, EH; van der Dijs, FPL; Duits, AJ; Moshage, H; Muskiet, FD; Muskiet, FAJ

    2004-01-01

    Over the last few years, a pivotal role has been ascribed to reduced nitric oxide (NO) availability as a contributing factor to the vaso-occlusive process of sickle cell disease. We investigated whether arginine metabolism in sickle cell patients is different from healthy controls. Blood samples wer

  3. Watermelon enhances arginine availability in an animal model of type-II diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watermelon fruit contain lycopene, a red pigment known for its ability to scavenge free hydroxyl radicals. L-Citrulline, an amino acid that acts as a vasodilator and is a precursor of L-arginine, is found in all cucurbits, but is most plentiful in watermelon. In a study with Zucker diabetic fatty ...

  4. Synergistic Protection of L-Arginine and Vitamin E On Lipid Peroxidation of Asthenospermic Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudha Srivastava

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Lipid peroxidation is known to cause various impairments to sperm cells and mayplay a major role in the etiology of male infertility. Asthenospermia is the main factor of maleinfertility and has significantly higher level of peroxidation than in normozoospermic males.Materials and Methods: Using thiobarbituric acid (TBA assay procedure, we have determinedthe level of lipid peroxidation as indicated by malondialdehyde (MDA in the spermatozoa obtainedfrom asthenospermic male semen.Results: An inverse correlation of MDA concentration with sperm motility is observed. Treatmentof cells with L-arginine and vitamin E significantly decreases the MDA concentration and improvesthe sperm motility as compared to that in case of control samples. A combination of L-arginine andvitamin E shows synergistic effect on sperm motility and prevention of lipid peroxidation.Conclusion: L-arginine and vitamin E protect the cells against the loss of sperm motility by lipidperoxidation. Therefore, supplementation of both L-arginine and vitamin E may improve spermmotility and increase the possibility of fertilization in asthenospermic subjects.

  5. Guanidinium Cations Pair with Positively Charged Arginine Side Chains in Water

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kubíčková, A.; Křížek, T.; Coufal, P.; Wernersson, Erik; Heyda, Jan; Jungwirth, Pavel

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 2, č. 12 (2011), s. 1387-1389. ISSN 1948-7185 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/08/0114; GA MŠk LC512 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : guanidinium * cations * arginine * electrophoresis * water Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 6.213, year: 2011

  6. Effect of arginase inhibition on pulmonary L-arginine metabolism in murine Pseudomonas pneumonia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Mehl

    Full Text Available RATIONALE: Infection of the lung with Pseudomonas aeruginosa results in upregulation of nitric oxide synthases (NOS and arginase expression, and both enzymes compete for L-arginine as substrate. Nitric oxide (NO production may be regulated by arginase as it controls L-arginine availability for NOS. We here studied the effect of systemic arginase inhibition on pulmonary L-arginine metabolism in Pseudomonas pneumonia in the mouse. METHODS: Mice (C57BL/6, 8-10 weeks old, female underwent direct tracheal instillation of Pseudomonas (PAO-1-coated agar beads and were treated by repeated intra-peritoneal injections of the arginase inhibitor 2(S-amino-6-boronohexanoic acid (ABH or PBS until lungs were harvested on day 3 of the infection. L-arginine metabolites were quantified using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, NO metabolites nitrate and nitrite by Griess reagent and cytokines by ELISA. RESULTS: NO metabolite concentrations (48.5±2.9 vs. 10.9±2.3 µM, p<0.0001, as well as L-ornithine (29.6±1.7 vs 2.3±0.4 µM, p<0.0001, the product of arginase activity, were increased in Pseudomonas infected lungs compared to naïve controls. Concentrations of the NOS inhibitor asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA were also increased (0.44±0.02 vs. 0.16±0.01 µM, p<0.0001. Arginase inhibition in the infected animals resulted in a significant decrease in L-ornithine (14.6±1.6 µM, p<0.0001 but increase in L-arginine concentration (p<0.001, L-arginine/ADMA ratio (p<0.001, L-arginine availability for NOS (p<0.001, and NO metabolite concentrations (67.3±5.7 µM, p<0.05. Arginase inhibitor treatment also resulted in an increase in NO metabolite levels in animals following intratracheal injection of LPS (p = 0.015. Arginase inhibition was not associated with an increase in inflammatory markers (IFN-γ, IL-1β, IL-6, MIP-2, KC or TNF-α in lung. Concentrations of the L-ornithine-dependent polyamines putrescine, spermidine and spermine were increased

  7. L-arginine inhibits isoproterenol-induced cardiac hypertrophy through nitric oxide and polyamine pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yan; Wang, Li-Na; Xi, Yu-Hui; Li, Hong-Zhu; Xiao, Feng-Gang; Zhao, Ya-Jun; Tian, Ye; Yang, Bao-Feng; Xu, Chang-Qing

    2008-08-01

    Polyamines (putrescine, spermidine and spermine) are essential for cell growth and differentiation. Nitric oxide exhibits antihypertrophic functions and inhibits cardiac remodelling. However, the metabolism of polyamines and the potential interactions with nitric oxide in cardiac hypertrophy remain unclear. We randomly divided Wistar rats into four treatment groups: controls, isoproterenol (ISO), ISO and L-arginine, and L-arginine. Isoproterenol (5 mg/kg/day, subcutaneously) and/or L-arginine (800 mg/kg/day, intraperitoneally) was administered once daily for 7 days. The expression of atrial natriuretic peptide mRNA was determined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, and fibrogenesis of heart was assessed by Van Gieson staining. Polyamines were measured with high-performance liquid chromatography, and plasma nitric oxide content and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity were determined with a spectrophotometer. The expression levels of ornithine decarboxylase, spermidine/spermine N1-acetyltransferase (SSAT), endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) were analysed by Western blot. Heart-to-body weight ratio, left ventricle-to-body weight ratio, atrial natriuretic peptide mRNA expression, collagen fibres and LDH activity were elevated, both ornithine decarboxylase and SSAT proteins were up-regulated, and total polyamines were increased in the group treated with ISO. Additionally, the expression of iNOS was up-regulated, eNOS was down-regulated, and nitric oxide levels were low. Notably, cotreatment with L-arginine reversed most of these changes except for SSAT expression,which was further up-regulated. We propose that increased polyamines and decreased nitric oxide are involved in cardiac hypertrophy induced by ISO and suggest that L-arginine pre-treatment can attenuate cardiac hypertrophy through the regulation of key enzymes of the polyamine and nitric oxide pathways. PMID:18816294

  8. The effect of L-Arginine on the brain tissue of stressed rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Batoul Ebadi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available   Abstract  Introduction: This study was conducted to determine the possible beneficial results of L-arginine on prefrontal cortex of rats which impressed by immobilization stress to define the synchronous impression of stress and nitric oxide (NO on evolution of prefrontal cortex of rats after birth. Methods: Forty-eight one month, male Wistar rats were divided into two groups: stressed and non-stressed. L-Arginine (200 mg/kg as a NO synthase (NOS inducer and L-NAME (2O mg/kg were injected intraperitonealy (IP and 7- nitroindazde (25 mg/kg as non-specific was injected subcutaneously (S.C. for 4 weeks. The kind of stress was immobilization for 4 weeks, every other day. The brain was removed after this period and each brain divided into two parts in a coronal section manner. Anterior part used for histological studies with H&E staining and posterior part used for measurement of NO production using spectrophotometer at 540 nm wavelengh. Results: Statistical analysis of microscopic and light microscopic finding showed that thickness of prefrontal cortex and NO production were significantly decreased in stressed rats and especially in groups which received 7- nitroindazole and L-NAME and L-arginine could reverse these results. Discussion: According to this research, we could say that L-arginine decreases the cortical damages in stressed rats and 7-nitroindazole and L-NAME increase this damage in non-stressed group. Although in non stressed groups, L-arginine, L-NAME and 7- nitroindazole were all non-protective and damaging.

  9. Supplemental arginine above the requirement during suckling causes obesity and insulin resistance in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otani, Lila; Mori, Tomomi; Koyama, Ayaka; Takahashi, Shin-Ichiro; Kato, Hisanori

    2016-06-01

    Nutrition in early life is important in determining susceptibility to adult obesity, and arginine may promote growth acceleration in infants. We hypothesized that maternal arginine supplementation may promote growth in their pups and contribute to obesity and alteration of the metabolic system in later life. Dams and pups of Wistar rats were given a normal diet (15% protein) as a control (CN) or a normal diet with 2% arginine (ARG). Altered profiles of free amino acids in breast milk were observed in that the concentrations of threonine and glycine were lower in the ARG dams compared with the CN dams. The offspring of the CN and ARG dams were further subdivided into normal-diet (CN-CN and ARG-CN) groups and a high fat-diet groups (CN-HF and ARG-HF). In response to the high fat-diet feeding, the visceral fat deposits were significantly increased in the ARG-HF group (although not compared with the CN-HF group); no difference was observed between the CN-CN and ARG-CN groups. The blood glucose and insulin levels after glucose loading were significantly higher in the ARG-HF group compared with the CN-HF group. The results suggest that the offspring of dams supplemented with arginine during lactation acquired increased susceptibility to a high-fat diet, resulting in visceral obesity and insulin resistance. The lower supply of threonine and glycine to pups may be one of the contributing causes to the programming of lifelong obesity risk in offspring. Our findings also indicated that maternal arginine supplementation during suckling causes obesity and insulin resistance in rats. PMID:27188903

  10. Glutamine, glutamate, and arginine-based acid resistance in Lactobacillus reuteri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Januana S; Seeras, Arisha; Sanchez-Maldonado, Alma Fernanda; Zhang, Chonggang; Su, Marcia Shu-Wei; Gänzle, Michael G

    2014-09-01

    This study aimed to determine whether glutamine deamidation improves acid resistance of Lactobacillus reuteri, and to assess whether arginine, glutamine, and glutamate-mediated acid resistance are redundant or complementary mechanisms of acid resistance. Three putative glutaminase genes, gls1, gls2, and gls3, were identified in L. reuteri 100-23. All three genes were expressed during growth in mMRS and wheat sourdough. L. reuteri consistently over-expressed gls3 and the glutamate decarboxylase gadB. L. reuteri 100-23ΔgadB over-expressed gls3 and the arginine deiminase gene adi. Analysis of the survival of L. reuteri in acidic conditions revealed that arginine conversion is effective at pH of 3.5 while glutamine or glutamate conversion were effective at pH of 2.5. Arginine conversion increased the pHin but not ΔΨ; glutamate decarboxylation had only a minor effect on the pHin but increased the ΔΨ. This study demonstrates that glutamine deamidation increases the acid resistance of L. reuteri independent of glutamate decarboxylase activity. Arginine and glutamine/glutamate conversions confer resistance to lactate at pH of 3.5 and phosphate at pH of 2.5, respectively. Knowledge of L. reuteri's acid resistance improves the understanding of the adaptation of L. reuteri to intestinal ecosystems, and facilitates the selection of probiotic and starter cultures. PMID:24929734

  11. Genetic examination of SETD7 and SUV39H1/H2 methyltransferases and the risk of diabetes complications in patients with type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Syreeni, Anna; El-Osta, Assam; Forsblom, Carol;

    2011-01-01

    episodes of hyperglycemia. Epigenetic modifications mediated by histone methyltransferases are associated with gene-activating events that promote enhanced expression of key proinflammatory molecules implicated in vascular injury. In this study, we investigated genetic polymorphisms of the SETD7, SUV39H1......, and SUV39H2 methyltransferases as predictors of risk for micro- and macrovascular complications in type 1 diabetes....

  12. Insights into the structure, function and evolution of the radical-SAM 23S rRNA methyltransferase Cfr that confers antibiotic resistance in bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karminska, K. H.; Purta, E.; Hansen, L .H.; Bujnicki, J. M.; Vester, B.; Long, Katherine

    2010-01-01

    The Cfr methyltransferase confers combined resistance to five classes of antibiotics that bind to the peptidyl tranferase center of bacterial ribosomes by catalyzing methylation of the C-8 position of 23S rRNA nucleotide A2503. The same nucleotide is targeted by the housekeeping methyltransferase...

  13. Epigenetic changes of Arabidopsis genome associated with altered DNA methyltransferase and demethylase expressions after gamma irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ji Eun; Cho, Eun Ju; Kim, Ji Hong; Chung, Byung Yeoup; Kim, Jin Hong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    DNA methylation at carbon 5 of cytosines is a hall mark of epigenetic inactivation and heterochromatin in both plants and mammals. In Arabidopsis, DNA methylation has two roles that protect the genome from selfish DNA elements and regulate gene expression. Plant genome has three types of DNA methyltransferase, METHYLTRANSFERASE 1 (MET1), DOMAINREARRANGED METHYLASE (DRM) and CHROMOMETHYLASE 3 (CMT3) that are capable of methylating CG, CHG (where H is A, T, or C) and CHH sites, respectively. MET1 is a maintenance DNA methyltransferase that controls CG methylation. Two members of the DRM family, DRM1 and DRM2, are responsible for de novo methylation of CG, CHG, and CHH sites but show a preference for CHH sites. Finally, CMT3 principally carries out CHG methylation and is involved in both de novo methylation and maintenance. Alternatively, active DNA demethylation may occur through the glycosylase activity by removing the methylcytosines from DNA. It may have essential roles in preventing transcriptional silencing of transgenes and endogenous genes and in activating the expression of imprinted genes. DNA demetylation in Arabidopsis is mediated by the DEMETER (DME) family of bifunctional DNA glycosylase. Three targets of DME are MEA (MEDEA), FWA (FLOWERING WAGENINGEN), and FIS2 (FERTILIZATION INDEPENDENT SEED 2). The DME family contains DEMETER-LIKE 2 (DML2), DML3, and REPRESSOR OF SILENING 1 (ROS1). DNA demetylation by ROS1, DML2, and DML3 protect the hypermethylation of specific genome loci. ROS1 is necessary to suppress the promoter methylation and the silencing of endogenous genes. In contrast, the function of DML2 and DML3 has not been reported. Several recent studies have suggested that epigenetic alterations such as change in DNA methylation and histone modification should be caused in plant genomes upon exposure to ionizing radiation. However, there is a lack of data exploring the underlying mechanisms. Therefore, the present study aims to characterize and

  14. Epigenetic changes of Arabidopsis genome associated with altered DNA methyltransferase and demethylase expressions after gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DNA methylation at carbon 5 of cytosines is a hall mark of epigenetic inactivation and heterochromatin in both plants and mammals. In Arabidopsis, DNA methylation has two roles that protect the genome from selfish DNA elements and regulate gene expression. Plant genome has three types of DNA methyltransferase, METHYLTRANSFERASE 1 (MET1), DOMAINREARRANGED METHYLASE (DRM) and CHROMOMETHYLASE 3 (CMT3) that are capable of methylating CG, CHG (where H is A, T, or C) and CHH sites, respectively. MET1 is a maintenance DNA methyltransferase that controls CG methylation. Two members of the DRM family, DRM1 and DRM2, are responsible for de novo methylation of CG, CHG, and CHH sites but show a preference for CHH sites. Finally, CMT3 principally carries out CHG methylation and is involved in both de novo methylation and maintenance. Alternatively, active DNA demethylation may occur through the glycosylase activity by removing the methylcytosines from DNA. It may have essential roles in preventing transcriptional silencing of transgenes and endogenous genes and in activating the expression of imprinted genes. DNA demetylation in Arabidopsis is mediated by the DEMETER (DME) family of bifunctional DNA glycosylase. Three targets of DME are MEA (MEDEA), FWA (FLOWERING WAGENINGEN), and FIS2 (FERTILIZATION INDEPENDENT SEED 2). The DME family contains DEMETER-LIKE 2 (DML2), DML3, and REPRESSOR OF SILENING 1 (ROS1). DNA demetylation by ROS1, DML2, and DML3 protect the hypermethylation of specific genome loci. ROS1 is necessary to suppress the promoter methylation and the silencing of endogenous genes. In contrast, the function of DML2 and DML3 has not been reported. Several recent studies have suggested that epigenetic alterations such as change in DNA methylation and histone modification should be caused in plant genomes upon exposure to ionizing radiation. However, there is a lack of data exploring the underlying mechanisms. Therefore, the present study aims to characterize and

  15. 2'-O methylation of internal adenosine by flavivirus NS5 methyltransferase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongping Dong

    Full Text Available RNA modification plays an important role in modulating host-pathogen interaction. Flavivirus NS5 protein encodes N-7 and 2'-O methyltransferase activities that are required for the formation of 5' type I cap (m(7GpppAm of viral RNA genome. Here we reported, for the first time, that flavivirus NS5 has a novel internal RNA methylation activity. Recombinant NS5 proteins of West Nile virus and Dengue virus (serotype 4; DENV-4 specifically methylates polyA, but not polyG, polyC, or polyU, indicating that the methylation occurs at adenosine residue. RNAs with internal adenosines substituted with 2'-O-methyladenosines are not active substrates for internal methylation, whereas RNAs with adenosines substituted with N⁶-methyladenosines can be efficiently methylated, suggesting that the internal methylation occurs at the 2'-OH position of adenosine. Mass spectroscopic analysis further demonstrated that the internal methylation product is 2'-O-methyladenosine. Importantly, genomic RNA purified from DENV virion contains 2'-O-methyladenosine. The 2'-O methylation of internal adenosine does not require specific RNA sequence since recombinant methyltransferase of DENV-4 can efficiently methylate RNAs spanning different regions of viral genome, host ribosomal RNAs, and polyA. Structure-based mutagenesis results indicate that K61-D146-K181-E217 tetrad of DENV-4 methyltransferase forms the active site of internal methylation activity; in addition, distinct residues within the methyl donor (S-adenosyl-L-methionine pocket, GTP pocket, and RNA-binding site are critical for the internal methylation activity. Functional analysis using flavivirus replicon and genome-length RNAs showed that internal methylation attenuated viral RNA translation and replication. Polymerase assay revealed that internal 2'-O-methyladenosine reduces the efficiency of RNA elongation. Collectively, our results demonstrate that flavivirus NS5 performs 2'-O methylation of internal adenosine of

  16. Molecular Evolution of the Substrate Specificity of Chloroplastic Aldolases/Rubisco Lysine Methyltransferases in Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Sheng; Martin-Laffon, Jacqueline; Mininno, Morgane; Gigarel, Océane; Brugière, Sabine; Bastien, Olivier; Tardif, Marianne; Ravanel, Stéphane; Alban, Claude

    2016-04-01

    Rubisco and fructose-1,6-bisphosphate aldolases (FBAs) are involved in CO2 fixation in chloroplasts. Both enzymes are trimethylated at a specific lysine residue by the chloroplastic protein methyltransferase LSMT. Genes coding LSMT are present in all plant genomes but the methylation status of the substrates varies in a species-specific manner. For example, chloroplastic FBAs are naturally trimethylated in both Pisum sativum and Arabidopsis thaliana, whereas the Rubisco large subunit is trimethylated only in the former species. The in vivo methylation status of aldolases and Rubisco matches the catalytic properties of AtLSMT and PsLSMT, which are able to trimethylate FBAs or FBAs and Rubisco, respectively. Here, we created chimera and site-directed mutants of monofunctional AtLSMT and bifunctional PsLSMT to identify the molecular determinants responsible for substrate specificity. Our results indicate that the His-Ala/Pro-Trp triad located in the central part of LSMT enzymes is the key motif to confer the capacity to trimethylate Rubisco. Two of the critical residues are located on a surface loop outside the methyltransferase catalytic site. We observed a strict correlation between the presence of the triad motif and the in vivo methylation status of Rubisco. The distribution of the motif into a phylogenetic tree further suggests that the ancestral function of LSMT was FBA trimethylation. In a recent event during higher plant evolution, this function evolved in ancestors of Fabaceae, Cucurbitaceae, and Rosaceae to include Rubisco as an additional substrate to the archetypal enzyme. Our study provides insight into mechanisms by which SET-domain protein methyltransferases evolve new substrate specificity. PMID:26785049

  17. Human erythrocyte phenol O-methyltransferase: Radiochemical microassay and biochemical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A radiochemical microassay for the determination of phenol O-methyltransferase (PMT) activity in human red blood cell membranes has been developed. Acetaminophen was used as the substrate. The apparent Michaelis-Menten Ksub(M) value for acetaminophen was 21.2 X 10-3M. The apparent Ksub(M) value for S-adenosyl-L-methionine, a co-substrate for the reaction, was 4.8 X 10-6 M, and the pH optimum of the reaction was approximately 9.0 with four different buffer systems. Phenol was also tested as a substrate and had an apparent Ksub(M) value of 2.0 X 10-3 M. Human erythrocyte (RBC) membrane PMT activity did not have the biochemical characteristics of catechol O-methyltransferase, another RBC membrane methyltransferase enzyme activity. Blood samples obtained from 212 randomly selected adult white subjects had a mean activity of 134.5 +41.5 pmol of p-acetanisidide formed per mg protein per hour (mean +- S.D.). Activities varied from 44 to 282 units. There were no differences in the mean activities of samples from men and women. Experiments in which mixtures of 'low' and 'high' activity RBC membrane preparations were assayed for PMT provided no evidence that the variations in enzyme activity were due to the presence of endogenous PMT activators or inhibitors. RBC membrane PMT activity in blood from 9 patients with renal failure, a pathological state in which there are elevated circulating levels of phenols, was found to be significantly decreased with average activity of 76.2+-9.7 (mean +- S.E.M., P <0.001). (Auth.)

  18. Arabidopsis DNA methyltransferase AtDNMT2 associates with histone deacetylase AtHD2s activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DNA methyltransferase2 (DNMT2) is always deemed to be enigmatic, because it contains highly conserved DNA methyltransferase motifs but lacks the DNA methylation catalytic capability. Here we show that Arabidopsis DNA methyltransferase2 (AtDNMT2) is localized in nucleus and associates with histone deacetylation. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation and pull-down assays show AtDNMT2 interacts with type-2 histone deacetylases (AtHD2s), a unique type of histone deacetylase family in plants. Through analyzing the expression of AtDNMT2: ss-glucuronidase (GUS) fusion protein, we demonstrate that AtDNMT2 has the ability to repress gene expression at transcription level. Meanwhile, the expression of AtDNMT2 gene is altered in athd2c mutant plants. We propose that AtDNMT2 possibly involves in the activity of histone deacetylation and plant epigenetic regulatory network.

  19. Arabidopsis DNA methyltransferase AtDNMT2 associates with histone deacetylase AtHD2s activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Yuan [Key Laboratory of Arid and Grassland Agroecology, Ministry of Education, School of Life Science, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Southern Crop Protection and Food Research Centre, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, 1391 Sandford Street, London, ON, Canada N5V4T3 (Canada); Wu, Keqiang [Institute of Plant Biology, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Dhaubhadel, Sangeeta [Southern Crop Protection and Food Research Centre, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, 1391 Sandford Street, London, ON, Canada N5V4T3 (Canada); An, Lizhe, E-mail: lizhean@lzu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Arid and Grassland Agroecology, Ministry of Education, School of Life Science, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Tian, Lining, E-mail: tianl@agr.gc.ca [Southern Crop Protection and Food Research Centre, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, 1391 Sandford Street, London, ON, Canada N5V4T3 (Canada)

    2010-05-28

    DNA methyltransferase2 (DNMT2) is always deemed to be enigmatic, because it contains highly conserved DNA methyltransferase motifs but lacks the DNA methylation catalytic capability. Here we show that Arabidopsis DNA methyltransferase2 (AtDNMT2) is localized in nucleus and associates with histone deacetylation. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation and pull-down assays show AtDNMT2 interacts with type-2 histone deacetylases (AtHD2s), a unique type of histone deacetylase family in plants. Through analyzing the expression of AtDNMT2: ss-glucuronidase (GUS) fusion protein, we demonstrate that AtDNMT2 has the ability to repress gene expression at transcription level. Meanwhile, the expression of AtDNMT2 gene is altered in athd2c mutant plants. We propose that AtDNMT2 possibly involves in the activity of histone deacetylation and plant epigenetic regulatory network.

  20. Development of fed-batch profiles for efficient biosynthesis of catechol-O-methyltransferase

    OpenAIRE

    G.M. Espírito Santo; A.Q. Pedro; D. Oppolzer; Bonifácio, M J; Queiroz, J. A.; Silva, F.; L.A. Passarinha

    2014-01-01

    Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT, EC 2.1.1.6) plays a crucial role in dopamine metabolism which has intimately linked this enzyme to some neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson's disease. In recent years, in the attempt of developing new therapeutic strategies for Parkinson's disease, there has been a growing interest in the search for effective COMT inhibitors. In order to do so, large amounts of COMT in an active form are needed, and the best way to achieve this is by up-scaling it...

  1. Structural Basis for Binding of RNA and Cofactor by a KsgA Methyltransferase

    OpenAIRE

    Tu, Chao; Tropea, Joseph E.; Austin, Brian P; Court, Donald L.; Waugh, David S.; Ji, Xinhua

    2009-01-01

    Among methyltransferases, KsgA and the reaction it catalyzes are conserved throughout evolution. However, the specifics of substrate recognition by the enzyme remain unknown. Here, we report structures of Aquifex aeolicus KsgA, in its ligand-free form, in complex with RNA and in complex with both RNA and S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH, reaction product of cofactor S-adenosylmethionine), providing the first pieces of structural information on KsgA-RNA and KsgA-SAH interactions. Moreover, the stru...

  2. Inhibition of SUV39H1 Methyltransferase Activity by DBC1*

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Zhenyu; Chen, Lihong; Kabra, Neha; Wang, Chuangui; Fang, Jia; Chen, Jiandong

    2009-01-01

    SUV39H1 is a histone H3K9-specific methyltransferase important for heterochromatin formation, regulation of gene expression, and induction of senescence in premalignant cells. SUV39H1 forms a complex with SirT1, and its activity is stimulated by SirT1 binding. Here we present evidence that the product of the DBC1 (deleted in breast cancer 1) gene disrupts the SUV39H1-SirT1 complex. Furthermore, DBC1 binds to the SUV39H1 catalytic domain and inhibits its ability to ...

  3. Histone methyltransferase Suv39h1 represses MyoD-stimulated myogenic differentiation

    OpenAIRE

    Mal, Asoke K.

    2006-01-01

    Suv39h1 is a histone H3 lysine-9 (H3-K9) specific methyltransferase (HMT) that is associated with gene silencing through chromatin modification. The transition from proliferation into differentiation of muscle cell is accompanied by transcriptional activation of previously silent muscle genes. I report Suv39h1 interaction with myogenic regulator MyoD in proliferating muscle cells and its HMT activity, which is associated with MyoD, diminishes as differentiation proceeds. The Suv39h1–MyoD comp...

  4. The DmtA methyltransferase contributes to Aspergillus flavus conidiation, sclerotial production, aflatoxin biosynthesis and virulence

    OpenAIRE

    Kunlong Yang; Linlin Liang; Fanlei Ran; Yinghang Liu; Zhenguo Li; Huahui Lan; Peili Gao; Zhenhong Zhuang; Feng Zhang; Xinyi Nie; Shimuye Kalayu Yirga; Shihua Wang

    2016-01-01

    DNA methylation is essential for epigenetic regulation of gene transcription and development in many animals, plants and fungi. We investigated whether DNA methylation plays a role in the development and secondary metabolism of Aspergillus flavus, identified the DmtA methyltransferase from A. flavus, and produced a dmtA knock-out mutant by replacing the dmtA coding sequence with the pyrG selectable marker. The A. flavus dmtA null mutant lines produced white fluffy mycelium in liquid medium, a...

  5. Histone methyltransferase G9a contributes to H3K27 methylation in vivo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui Wu; Bing Zhu; Xiuzhen Chen; Jun Xiong; Yingfeng Li; Hong Li; Xiaojun Ding; Sheng Liu; She Chen; Shaorong Gao

    2011-01-01

    @@ Dear Editor, Histone modifications play a vital role in the conformation and function of their associated chromatin templates[1].Histone H3K27 methylation mediated by the PRC2 complex is critical for transcriptional regulation,Polycomb silencing,Drosophila segmentation,mammalian X inactivation and cancer[1].Interestingly,H3K27me1(H3 mono-methylated at residue K27)levels in vivo remain unaffected after PRC2 disruption[2,3],which is an indication for the existence of other contributing histone methyltransferase(s)to H3K27me1.

  6. EmtA, a rRNA methyltransferase conferring high-level evernimicin resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mann, P. A.; Xiong, L.; Mankin, A. S.;

    2001-01-01

    Enterococcus faecium strain 9631355 was isolated from animal sources on the basis of its resistance to the growth promotant avilamycin. The strain also exhibited high-level resistance to evernimicin, a drug undergoing evaluation as a therapeutic agent in humans. Ribosomes from strain 9631355...... exhibited a dramatic reduction in evernimicin binding, shown by both cell-free translation assays and direct-binding assays. The resistance determinant was cloned from strain 9631355; sequence alignments suggested it was a methyltransferase and therefore it was designated emtA for evernimicin...

  7. Juvenile hormone acid methyltransferase: A key regulatory enzyme for insect metamorphosis

    OpenAIRE

    Shinoda, Tetsuro; Itoyama, Kyo

    2003-01-01

    Juvenile hormone (JH) acid methyltransferase (JHAMT) is an enzyme that converts JH acids or inactive precursors of JHs to active JHs at the final step of JH biosynthesis pathway in insects. By fluorescent mRNA differential display, we have cloned a cDNA encoding JHAMT from the corpora allata (CA) of the silkworm, Bombyx mori (BmJHAMT). The BmJHAMT cDNA encodes an ORF of 278 aa with a calculated molecular mass of 32,544 Da. The predicted amino acid sequence contains a conserved S-adenosyl-l-me...

  8. Crystal structure of phosphoethanolamine methyltransferase from Plasmodium falciparum in complex with amodiaquine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Soon Goo; Alpert, Tara D.; Jez, Joseph M. (WU)

    2012-07-17

    Phosphoethanolamine N-methyltransferase (PMT) is essential for phospholipid biogenesis in the malarial parasite Plasmodium falciparum. PfPMT catalyzes the triple methylation of phosphoethanolamine to produce phosphocholine, which is then used for phosphatidylcholine synthesis. Here we describe the 2.0 {angstrom} resolution X-ray crystal structure of PfPMT in complex with amodiaquine. To better characterize inhibition of PfPMT by amodiaquine, we determined the IC{sub 50} values of a series of aminoquinolines using a direct radiochemical assay. Both structural and functional analyses provide a possible approach for the development of new small molecule inhibitors of PfPMT.

  9. O6-Methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase deficiency in developing brain: Implications for brain tumorigenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Bobola, Michael S.; Blank, A.; Berger, Mitchel S.; Silber, John R

    2007-01-01

    The DNA repair protein O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) is a cardinal defense against the mutagenic and carcinogenic effects of alkylating agents. We have reported evidence that absence of detectable MGMT activity (MGMT− phenotype) in human brain is a predisposing factor for primary brain tumors that affects ca. 12% of individuals [J.R. Silber, et. al. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 93 (1996) 6941–6946]. We report here that MGMT− phenotype in the brain of children and adults, and the...

  10. Verminderte Expression von O6-Methylguanin-DNA-Methyltransferase bei Gliomen durch Promotormethylierung

    OpenAIRE

    Nickolay, Carla

    2009-01-01

    Pro Jahr erkranken 10 von 100 000 Menschen an einem malignen Hirntumor. Die Prognose ist schlecht. Die Therapie schließt Chirurgie, Bestrahlung und Chemotherapie ein. Das DNA-Reparaturenzym O6-Methylguanin-DNA-Methyltransferase, MGMT, erkennt DNA-Schäden, die durch alkylierende Substanzen wie Temozolomid entstanden sind. Übermäßige Methylierung der Promotorregion von MGMT führt zum Funktionsverlust des Enzyms. Dieser kann zu einer erhöhten Sensibilität für Alkylanzien führen. In der Therapie ...

  11. DNA Methyltransferase Gene dDnmt2 and Longevity of Drosophila

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Meng-JauLin; Lin-YaTang; M.NarsaReddy; C.K.JamesShen

    2005-01-01

    The DNA methylation program of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster is carried out by the single DNA methyltransferase gene dDnmt2, the function of which is unknown before. We present evidence that intactness of the gene is required for maintenance of the normal life span of the fruit flies. In contrast, overexpression of dDnmt2 could extend Drosophila life span. The study links the Drosophila DNA methylation program with the small heatshock proteins and longevity/aging and has interesting implication on the eukaryotic DNA methyl-ation programs in general.

  12. Discovery of an in vivo Chemical Probe of the Lysine Methyltransferases G9a and GLP

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Feng; Barsyte-Lovejoy, Dalia; Li, Fengling; Xiong, Yan; Korboukh, Victoria; Huang, Xi-Ping; Allali-Hassani, Abdellah; Janzen, William P.; Roth, Bryan L.; Frye, Stephen V.; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H.; Brown, Peter J.; Vedadi, Masoud; Jin, Jian

    2013-01-01

    Among epigenetic “writers”, “readers”, and “erasers”, the lysine methyltransferases G9a and GLP, which catalyze mono- and dimethylation of histone H3 lysine 9 (H3K9me2) and non-histone proteins, have been implicated in a variety of human diseases. A “toolkit” of well-characterized chemical probes will allow biological and disease hypotheses concerning these proteins to be tested in cell-based and animal models with high confidence. We previously discovered potent and selective G9a/GLP inhibit...

  13. A chemical probe selectively inhibits G9a and GLP methyltransferase activity in cells

    OpenAIRE

    Vedadi, Masoud; Barsyte-Lovejoy, Dalia; Liu, Feng; Rival-Gervier, Sylvie; Allali-Hassani, Abdellah; Labrie, Viviane; Wigle, Tim J.; DiMaggio, Peter A.; Wasney, Gregory A.; Siarheyeva, Alena; Dong, Aiping; Tempel, Wolfram; Wang, Sun-Chong; Chen, Xin; Chau, Irene

    2011-01-01

    Protein lysine methyltransferases G9a and GLP modulate the transcriptional repression of a variety of genes via dimethylation of Lys9 on histone H3 (H3K9me2) as well as dimethylation of non-histone targets. Here we report the discovery of UNC0638, an inhibitor of G9a and GLP with excellent potency and selectivity over a wide range of epigenetic and non-epigenetic targets. UNC0638 treatment of a variety of cell lines resulted in lower global H3K9me2 levels, equivalent to levels observed for sm...

  14. Quantitative proteomics reveals direct and indirect alterations in the histone code following methyltransferase knockdown

    OpenAIRE

    Plazas-Mayorca, Mariana D.; Bloom, Joshua S.; Zeissler, Ulrike; LeRoy, Gary; Young, Nicolas L.; DiMaggio, Peter A.; Krugylak, Leonid; Schneider, Robert; Garcia, Benjamin A

    2010-01-01

    Histones are highly conserved proteins that organize cellular DNA. These proteins, especially their N-terminal domains, are adorned with many post-translational modifications (PTMs) such as lysine methylation, which are associated with active or repressed transcriptional states. The lysine methyltransferase G9a and its interaction partner Glp1 can mono- or dimethylate histone H3 on lysine (H3K9me1 or me2); possible cross-talk between these modifications and other PTMs on the same or other his...

  15. A fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based method for histone methyltransferases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Devkota, Kanchan; Lohse, Brian; Nyby Jakobsen, Camilla;

    2015-01-01

    A simple dye–quencher fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based assay for methyltransferases was developed and used to determine kinetic parameters and inhibitory activity at EHMT1 and EHMT2. Peptides mimicking the truncated histone H3 tail were functionalized in each end with a dye and a...... quencher, respectively. When lysine-9 residues in the peptides were methylated, they were protected from cleavage by endoproteinase–EndoLysC, whereas unmethylated peptides were cleaved, resulting in an increase in fluorescent intensity....

  16. Regioselectivity of catechol O-methyltransferase confers enhancement of catalytic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsao, Douglas; Liu, Shubin; Dokholyan, Nikolay V.

    2011-04-01

    Catechol O-methyltransferase (COMT) metabolizes catechol moieties by methylating a single hydroxyl group at the meta- or para- hydroxyl position. Hydrophobic amino acids near the active site of COMT influence the regioselectivity of this reaction. Our sequence analysis highlights their importance by showing that these residues are highly conserved throughout evolution. Reaction barriers calculated in the gas phase reveal a lower barrier during methylation at the meta- position, suggesting that the observed meta-regioselectivity of COMT can be attributed to the substrate itself, and that COMT has evolved residues to orient the substrate in a manner that increases the rate of catalysis.

  17. Small RNA-mediated DNA (cytosine-5) methyltransferase 1 inhibition leads to aberrant DNA methylation

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Guoqiang; Estève, Pierre-Olivier; Chin, Hang Gyeong; Terragni, Jolyon; Dai, Nan; Corrêa, Ivan R.; Pradhan, Sriharsa

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian cells contain copious amounts of RNA including both coding and noncoding RNA (ncRNA). Generally the ncRNAs function to regulate gene expression at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional level. Among ncRNA, the long ncRNA and small ncRNA can affect histone modification, DNA methylation targeting and gene silencing. Here we show that endogenous DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) co-purifies with inhibitory ncRNAs. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) bind directly to DNMT1 with high affinity. The bi...

  18. Queen pheromones modulate DNA methyltransferase activity in bee and ant workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, Luke; Trontti, Kalevi; Helanterä, Heikki

    2016-01-01

    DNA methylation is emerging as an important regulator of polyphenism in the social insects. Research has concentrated on differences in methylation between queens and workers, though we hypothesized that methylation is involved in mediating other flexible phenotypes, including pheromone-dependent changes in worker behaviour and physiology. Here, we find that exposure to queen pheromone affects the expression of two DNA methyltransferase genes in Apis mellifera honeybees and in two species of Lasius ants, but not in Bombus terrestris bumblebees. These results suggest that queen pheromones influence the worker methylome, pointing to a novel proximate mechanism for these key social signals. PMID:26814223

  19. DNA methyltransferase-dependent transcription of the phage Mu mom gene.

    OpenAIRE

    Hattman, S

    1982-01-01

    The phage Mu mom gene controls an unusual DNA modification. Expression of the mom function requires an active host (dam+) DNA adenine methylase [S-adenosyl-L-methionine:DNA (6-aminopurine)-methyltransferase]; in dam- hosts, Mu development is normal except that the viral DNA does not undergo the mom modification. The present communication compares transcription of the mom gene in dam+ versus dam- cells. 32P-labeled probes were prepared by nick-translation of a purified mom gene-containing rest...

  20. New erythromycin derivatives from Saccharopolyspora erythraea using sugar O-methyltransferases from the spinosyn biosynthetic gene cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaisser, S; Lill, R; Wirtz, G; Grolle, F; Staunton, J; Leadlay, P F

    2001-09-01

    Using a previously developed expression system based on the erythromycin-producing strain of Saccharopolyspora erythraea, O-methyltransferases from the spinosyn biosynthetic gene cluster of Saccharopolyspora spinosa have been shown to modify a rhamnosyl sugar attached to a 14-membered polyketide macrolactone. The spnI, spnK and spnH methyltransferase genes were expressed individually in the S. erythraea mutant SGT2, which is blocked both in endogenous macrolide biosynthesis and in ery glycosyltransferases eryBV and eryCIII. Exogenous 3-O-rhamnosyl-erythronolide B was efficiently converted into 3-O-(2'-O-methylrhamnosyl)-erythronolide B by the S. erythraea SGT2 (spnI) strain only. When 3-O-(2'-O-methylrhamnosyl)-erythronolide B was, in turn, fed to a culture of S. erythraea SGT2 (spnK), 3-O-(2',3'-bis-O-methylrhamnosyl)-erythronolide B was identified in the culture supernatant, whereas S. erythraea SGT2 (spnH) was without effect. These results confirm the identity of the 2'- and 3'-O-methyltransferases, and the specific sequence in which they act, and they demonstrate that these methyltransferases may be used to methylate rhamnose units in other polyketide natural products with the same specificity as in the spinosyn pathway. In contrast, 3-O-(2',3'-bis-O-methylrhamnosyl)-erythronolide B was found not to be a substrate for the 4'-O-methyltransferase SpnH. Although rhamnosylerythromycins did not serve directly as substrates for the spinosyn methyltransferases, methylrhamnosyl-erythromycins were obtained by subsequent conversion of the corresponding methylrhamnosyl-erythronolide precursors using the S. erythraea strain SGT2 housing EryCIII, the desosaminyltransferase of the erythromycin pathway. 3-O-(2'-O-methylrhamnosyl)-erythromycin D was tested and found to be significantly active against a strain of erythromycin-sensitive Bacillus subtilis. PMID:11555300

  1. Bioactive products of arginine in sepsis: tissue and plasma composition after LPS and iNOS blockade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lortie, M J; Ishizuka, S; Schwartz, D; Blantz, R C

    2000-06-01

    Blockade or gene deletion of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) fails to fully abrogate all the sequelae leading to the high morbidity of septicemia. An increase in substrate uptake may be necessary for the increased production of nitric oxide (NO), but arginine is also a precursor for other bioactive products. Herein, we demonstrate an increase in alternate arginine products via arginine and ornithine decarboxylase in rats given lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The expression of iNOS mRNA in renal tissue was evident 60 but not 30 min post-LPS, yet a rapid decrease in blood pressure was obtained within 30 min that was completely inhibited by selective iNOS blockade. Plasma levels of arginine and ornithine decreased by at least 30% within 60 min of LPS administration, an effect not inhibited by the iNOS blocker L-N(6)(1-iminoethyl)lysine (L-NIL). Significant increases in plasma nitrates and citrulline occurred only 3-4 h post-LPS, an effect blocked by L-NIL pretreatment. The intracellular composition of organs harvested 6 h post-LPS reflected tissue-specific profiles of arginine and related metabolites. Tissue arginine concentration, normally an order of magnitude higher than in plasma, did not decrease after LPS. Pretreatment with L-NIL had a significant impact on the disposition of tissue arginine that was organ specific. These data demonstrate changes in arginine metabolism before and after de novo iNOS activity. Selective blockade of iNOS did not prevent uptake and can deregulate the production of other bioactive arginine metabolites. PMID:10837347

  2. The Drosophila G9a gene encodes a multi-catalytic histone methyltransferase required for normal development

    OpenAIRE

    Stabell, Marianne; Eskeland, Ragnhild; Bjørkmo, Mona; Larsson, Jan; Aalen, Reidunn B.; Imhof, Axel; Lambertsson, Andrew

    2006-01-01

    Mammalian G9a is a histone H3 Lys-9 (H3–K9) methyltransferase localized in euchromatin and acts as a co-regulator for specific transcription factors. G9a is required for proper development in mammals as g9a−/g9a− mice show growth retardation and early lethality. Here we describe the cloning, the biochemical and genetical analyses of the Drosophila homolog dG9a. We show that dG9a shares the structural organization of mammalian G9a, and that it is a multi-catalytic histone methyltransferase wit...

  3. Functional analysis of the N- and C-terminus of mammalian G9a histone H3 methyltransferase

    OpenAIRE

    Estève, Pierre-Olivier; Patnaik, Debasis; Chin, Hang Gyeong; Benner, Jack; Teitell, Michael A.; Pradhan, Sriharsa

    2005-01-01

    Methylation of lysine 9 (K9) in the N-terminus tail of histone H3 (H3) in chromatin is associated with transcriptionally silenced genes and is mediated by histone methyltransferases. Murine G9a is a 1263 amino acid H3-K9 methyltransferase that possesses characteristic SET domain and ANK repeats. In this paper, we have used a series of green fluorescent protein-tagged deletion constructs to identify two nuclear localization signals (NLS), the first NLS embedded between amino acids 24 and 109 a...

  4. CpG underrepresentation and the bacterial CpG-specific DNA methyltransferase M.MpeI

    OpenAIRE

    Wojciechowski, Marek; Czapinska, Honorata; Bochtler, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    Cytosine methylation promotes deamination. In eukaryotes, CpG methylation is thought to account for CpG underrepresentation. Whether scarcity of CpGs in prokaryotic genomes is diagnostic for methylation is not clear. Here, we report that Mycoplasms tend to be CpG depleted and to harbor a family of constitutively expressed or phase variable CpG-specific DNA methyltransferases. The very CpG poor Mycoplasma penetrans and its constitutively active CpG-specific methyltransferase M.MpeI were chosen...

  5. Inversion of allosteric effect of arginine on N-acetylglutamate synthase, a molecular marker for evolution of tetrapods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cabrera-Luque Juan

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The efficient conversion of ammonia, a potent neurotoxin, into non-toxic metabolites was an essential adaptation that allowed animals to move from the aquatic to terrestrial biosphere. The urea cycle converts ammonia into urea in mammals, amphibians, turtles, snails, worms and many aquatic animals and requires N-acetylglutamate (NAG, an essential allosteric activator of carbamylphosphate synthetase I (CPSI in mammals and amphibians, and carbamylphosphate synthetase III (CPSIII in fish and invertebrates. NAG-dependent CPSI and CPSIII catalyze the formation of carbamylphosphate in the first and rate limiting step of ureagenesis. NAG is produced enzymatically by N-acetylglutamate synthase (NAGS, which is also found in bacteria and plants as the first enzyme of arginine biosynthesis. Arginine is an allosteric inhibitor of microbial and plant NAGS, and allosteric activator of mammalian NAGS. Results Information from mutagenesis studies of E. coli and P. aeruginosa NAGS was combined with structural information from the related bacterial N-acetylglutamate kinases to identify four residues in mammalian NAGS that interact with arginine. Substitutions of these four residues were engineered in mouse NAGS and into the vertebrate-like N-acetylglutamate synthase-kinase (NAGS-K of Xanthomonas campestris, which is inhibited by arginine. All mutations resulted in arginine losing the ability to activate mouse NAGS, and inhibit X. campestris NAGS-K. To examine at what point in evolution inversion of arginine effect on NAGS occur, we cloned NAGS from fish and frogs and examined the arginine response of their corresponding proteins. Fish NAGS were partially inhibited by arginine and frog NAGS were activated by arginine. Conclusion Difference in arginine effect on bacterial and mammalian NAGS most likely stems from the difference in the type of conformational change triggered by arginine binding to these proteins. The change from arginine

  6. The Hydrophobic Region of the DmsA Twin-Arginine Leader Peptide Determines Specificity with Chaperone DmsD

    OpenAIRE

    Winstone, Tara M. L.; Tran, Vy A.; Turner, Raymond J.

    2013-01-01

    The system specific chaperone DmsD plays a role in the maturation of the catalytic subunit of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) reductase, DmsA. Pre-DmsA contains a 45-amino acid twin-arginine leader peptide that is important for targeting and translocation of folded and cofactor-loaded DmsA by the twin-arginine translocase. DmsD has previously been shown to interact with the complete twin-arginine leader peptide of DmsA. In this study, isothermal titration calorimetry was used to investigate the the...

  7. Arginine-based cationic liposomes for efficient in vitro plasmid DNA delivery with low cytotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarker SR

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Satya Ranjan Sarker, Yumiko Aoshima, Ryosuke Hokama, Takafumi Inoue, Keitaro Sou, Shinji Takeoka Department of Life Science and Medical Bioscience, Graduate School of Advanced Science and Engineering, Waseda University (TWIns, Tokyo, Japan Background: Currently available gene delivery vehicles have many limitations such as low gene delivery efficiency and high cytotoxicity. To overcome these drawbacks, we designed and synthesized two cationic lipids comprised of n-tetradecyl alcohol as the hydrophobic moiety, 3-hydrocarbon chain as the spacer, and different counterions (eg, hydrogen chloride [HCl] salt or trifluoroacetic acid [TFA] salt in the arginine head group. Methods: Cationic lipids were hydrated in 4-(2-hydroxyethyl-1-piperazineethanesulfonic acid (HEPES buffer to prepare cationic liposomes and characterized in terms of their size, zeta potential, phase transition temperature, and morphology. Lipoplexes were then prepared and characterized in terms of their size and zeta potential in the absence or presence of serum. The morphology of the lipoplexes was determined using transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. The gene delivery efficiency was evaluated in neuronal cells and HeLa cells and compared with that of lysine-based cationic assemblies and Lipofectamine™ 2000. The cytotoxicity level of the cationic lipids was investigated and compared with that of Lipofectamine™ 2000. Results: We synthesized arginine-based cationic lipids having different counterions (ie, HCl-salt or TFA-salt that formed cationic liposomes of around 100 nm in size. In the absence of serum, lipoplexes prepared from the arginine-based cationic liposomes and plasmid (p DNA formed large aggregates and attained a positive zeta potential. However, in the presence of serum, the lipoplexes were smaller in size and negative in zeta potential. The morphology of the lipoplexes was vesicular. Arginine-based cationic liposomes with HCl-salt showed the

  8. Insight on an arginine synthesis metabolon from the tetrameric structure of yeast acetylglutamate kinase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio de Cima

    Full Text Available N-acetyl-L-glutamate kinase (NAGK catalyzes the second, generally controlling, step of arginine biosynthesis. In yeasts, NAGK exists either alone or forming a metabolon with N-acetyl-L-glutamate synthase (NAGS, which catalyzes the first step and exists only within the metabolon. Yeast NAGK (yNAGK has, in addition to the amino acid kinase (AAK domain found in other NAGKs, a ~150-residue C-terminal domain of unclear significance belonging to the DUF619 domain family. We deleted this domain, proving that it stabilizes yNAGK, slows catalysis and modulates feed-back inhibition by arginine. We determined the crystal structures of both the DUF619 domain-lacking yNAGK, ligand-free as well as complexed with acetylglutamate or acetylglutamate and arginine, and of complete mature yNAGK. While all other known arginine-inhibitable NAGKs are doughnut-like hexameric trimers of dimers of AAK domains, yNAGK has as central structure a flat tetramer formed by two dimers of AAK domains. These dimers differ from canonical AAK dimers in the -110° rotation of one subunit with respect to the other. In the hexameric enzymes, an N-terminal extension, found in all arginine-inhibitable NAGKs, forms a protruding helix that interlaces the dimers. In yNAGK, however, it conforms a two-helix platform that mediates interdimeric interactions. Arginine appears to freeze an open inactive AAK domain conformation. In the complete yNAGK structure, two pairs of DUF619 domains flank the AAK domain tetramer, providing a mechanism for the DUF619 domain modulatory functions. The DUF619 domain exhibits the histone acetyltransferase fold, resembling the catalytic domain of bacterial NAGS. However, the putative acetyl CoA site is blocked, explaining the lack of NAGS activity of yNAGK. We conclude that the tetrameric architecture is an adaptation to metabolon formation and propose an organization for this metabolon, suggesting that yNAGK may be a good model also for yeast and human NAGSs.

  9. Insight on an arginine synthesis metabolon from the tetrameric structure of yeast acetylglutamate kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Cima, Sergio; Gil-Ortiz, Fernando; Crabeel, Marjolaine; Fita, Ignacio; Rubio, Vicente

    2012-01-01

    N-acetyl-L-glutamate kinase (NAGK) catalyzes the second, generally controlling, step of arginine biosynthesis. In yeasts, NAGK exists either alone or forming a metabolon with N-acetyl-L-glutamate synthase (NAGS), which catalyzes the first step and exists only within the metabolon. Yeast NAGK (yNAGK) has, in addition to the amino acid kinase (AAK) domain found in other NAGKs, a ~150-residue C-terminal domain of unclear significance belonging to the DUF619 domain family. We deleted this domain, proving that it stabilizes yNAGK, slows catalysis and modulates feed-back inhibition by arginine. We determined the crystal structures of both the DUF619 domain-lacking yNAGK, ligand-free as well as complexed with acetylglutamate or acetylglutamate and arginine, and of complete mature yNAGK. While all other known arginine-inhibitable NAGKs are doughnut-like hexameric trimers of dimers of AAK domains, yNAGK has as central structure a flat tetramer formed by two dimers of AAK domains. These dimers differ from canonical AAK dimers in the -110° rotation of one subunit with respect to the other. In the hexameric enzymes, an N-terminal extension, found in all arginine-inhibitable NAGKs, forms a protruding helix that interlaces the dimers. In yNAGK, however, it conforms a two-helix platform that mediates interdimeric interactions. Arginine appears to freeze an open inactive AAK domain conformation. In the complete yNAGK structure, two pairs of DUF619 domains flank the AAK domain tetramer, providing a mechanism for the DUF619 domain modulatory functions. The DUF619 domain exhibits the histone acetyltransferase fold, resembling the catalytic domain of bacterial NAGS. However, the putative acetyl CoA site is blocked, explaining the lack of NAGS activity of yNAGK. We conclude that the tetrameric architecture is an adaptation to metabolon formation and propose an organization for this metabolon, suggesting that yNAGK may be a good model also for yeast and human NAGSs. PMID:22529931

  10. Dysregulated expression of arginine metabolic enzymes in human intestinal tissues of necrotizing enterocolitis and response of CaCO2 cells to bacterial components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Kam Tong; Chan, Kathy Yuen Yee; Ma, Terence Ping Yuen; Yu, Jasmine Wai Sum; Tong, Joanna Hung Man; Tam, Yuk Him; Cheung, Hon Ming; To, Ka Fai; Lam, Hugh Simon; Lee, Kim Hung; Li, Karen; Ng, Pak Cheung

    2016-03-01

    The small intestine is the exclusive site of arginine synthesis in neonates. Low levels of circulating arginine have been associated with the occurrence of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) but the mechanism of arginine dysregulation has not been fully elucidated. We aimed to investigate (i) expressional changes of arginine synthesizing and catabolic enzymes in human intestinal tissues of NEC, spontaneous intestinal perforation (SIP) and noninflammatory surgical conditions (Surg-CTL) and to investigate the (ii) mechanisms of arginine dysregulation and enterocyte proliferation upon stimulation by bacterial components, arginine depletion, ARG1 overexpression and nitric oxide (NO) supplementation. Our results showed that expressions of arginine synthesizing enzymes ALDH18A1, ASL, ASS1, CPS1, GLS, OAT and PRODH were significantly decreased in NEC compared with Surg-CTL or SIP tissues. Catabolic enzyme ARG1 was increased (>100-fold) in NEC tissues and histologically demonstrated to be expressed by infiltrating neutrophils. No change in arginine metabolic enzymes was observed between SIP and Surg-CTL tissues. In CaCO2 cells, arginine metabolic enzymes were differentially dysregulated by lipopolysaccharide or lipoteichoic acid. Depletion of arginine reduced cell proliferation and this phenomenon could be partially rescued by NO. Overexpression of ARG1 also reduced enterocyte proliferation. We provided the first expressional profile of arginine metabolic enzymes at the tissue level of NEC. Our findings suggested that arginine homeostasis was severely disturbed and could be triggered by inflammatory responses of enterocytes and infiltrating neutrophils as well as bacterial components. Such reactions could reduce arginine and NO, resulting in mucosal damage. The benefit of arginine supplementation for NEC prophylaxis merits further clinical evaluation. PMID:26895666

  11. Hippocampal dysfunction in the Euchromatin histone methyltransferase 1 heterozygous knockout mouse model for Kleefstra syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balemans, Monique C M; Kasri, Nael Nadif; Kopanitsa, Maksym V; Afinowi, Nurudeen O; Ramakers, Ger; Peters, Theo A; Beynon, Andy J; Janssen, Sanne M; van Summeren, Rik C J; Eeftens, Jorine M; Eikelenboom, Nathalie; Benevento, Marco; Tachibana, Makoto; Shinkai, Yoichi; Kleefstra, Tjitske; van Bokhoven, Hans; Van der Zee, Catharina E E M

    2013-03-01

    Euchromatin histone methyltransferase 1 (EHMT1) is a highly conserved protein that catalyzes mono- and dimethylation of histone H3 lysine 9, thereby epigenetically regulating transcription. Kleefstra syndrome (KS), is caused by haploinsufficiency of the EHMT1 gene, and is an example of an emerging group of intellectual disability (ID) disorders caused by genes encoding epigenetic regulators of neuronal gene activity. Little is known about the mechanisms underlying this disorder, prompting us to study the Euchromatin histone methyltransferase 1 heterozygous knockout (Ehmt1(+/-)) mice as a model for KS. In agreement with the cognitive disturbances observed in patients with KS, we detected deficits in fear extinction learning and both novel and spatial object recognition in Ehmt1(+/-) mice. These learning and memory deficits were associated with a significant reduction in dendritic arborization and the number of mature spines in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons of Ehmt1(+/-) mice. In-depth analysis of the electrophysiological properties of CA3-CA1 synapses revealed no differences in basal synaptic transmission or theta-burst induced long-term potentiation (LTP). However, paired-pulse facilitation (PPF) was significantly increased in Ehmt1(+/-) neurons, pointing to a potential deficiency in presynaptic neurotransmitter release. Accordingly, a reduction in the frequency of miniature excitatory post-synaptic currents (mEPSCs) was observed in Ehmt1(+/-) neurons. These data demonstrate that Ehmt1 haploinsufficiency in mice leads to learning deficits and synaptic dysfunction, providing a possible mechanism for the ID phenotype in patients with KS. PMID:23175442

  12. PML-RARA requires DNA methyltransferase 3A to initiate acute promyelocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Christopher B; Verdoni, Angela M; Ketkar, Shamika; Leight, Elizabeth R; Russler-Germain, David A; Lamprecht, Tamara L; Demeter, Ryan T; Magrini, Vincent; Ley, Timothy J

    2016-01-01

    The DNA methyltransferases DNMT3A and DNMT3B are primarily responsible for de novo methylation of specific cytosine residues in CpG dinucleotides during mammalian development. While loss-of-function mutations in DNMT3A are highly recurrent in acute myeloid leukemia (AML), DNMT3A mutations are almost never found in AML patients with translocations that create oncogenic fusion genes such as PML-RARA, RUNX1-RUNX1T1, and MLL-AF9. Here, we explored how DNMT3A is involved in the function of these fusion genes. We used retroviral vectors to express PML-RARA, RUNX1-RUNX1T1, or MLL-AF9 in bone marrow cells derived from WT or DNMT3A-deficient mice. Additionally, we examined the phenotypes of hematopoietic cells from Ctsg-PML-RARA mice, which express PML-RARA in early hematopoietic progenitors and myeloid precursors, with or without DNMT3A. We determined that the methyltransferase activity of DNMT3A, but not DNMT3B, is required for aberrant PML-RARA-driven self-renewal ex vivo and that DNMT3A is dispensable for RUNX1-RUNX1T1- and MLL-AF9-driven self-renewal. Furthermore, both the PML-RARA-driven competitive transplantation advantage and development of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) required DNMT3A. Together, these findings suggest that PML-RARA requires DNMT3A to initiate APL in mice. PMID:26595813

  13. Thiopurine methyltransferase activity in the erythrocytes of adults and children: and HPLC-linked assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micheli, V; Jacomelli, G; Fioravanti, A; Morozzi, G; Marcolongo, R; Pompucci, G

    1997-03-18

    A non-radioactive method that uses reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography is described for the determination of thiopurine methyltransferase (E.C. 2.1.1.67) activity in human erythrocytes. The method is based on the direct quantitation of 6-methyl-mercaptopurine produced from 6-mercaptopurine by crude erythrocyte lysates. The method is accurate and reliable and suitable for diagnostic use. Activity values in control adults ranged from 5 to 32 pmol/h/mg haemoglobin. The activity in the erythrocytes of adult males was significantly higher compared to females (21 +/- 5 and 15 +/- 8 pmol/h/mg haemoglobin, respectively). The activity measured in the erythrocytes of children (22 +/- 5 pmol/h/mg haemoglobin) did not show any significant difference compared to adults. Thiopurine methyltransferase activity was measured in a female patient with systemic sclerosis who developed severe bone marrow depression after treatment with azathioprine and allopurinol. Activity (6.3 +/- 0.5 pmol/h/mg haemoglobin) was found in the lowest range of controls thus supporting the hypothesis that it could be responsible for increased azathioprine cytotoxicity. PMID:9086303

  14. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic studies of O-methyltransferase from Anabaena PCC 7120

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The O-methyltransferase (OMT) from the Anabaena PCC 7120 has been overexpressed in a soluble form in E. coli, purified and crystallized. The crystals belonged to space group C2221 and diffracted to 2.4 Å resolution. O-Methyltransferase (OMT) is a ubiquitous enzyme that exists in bacteria, plants and humans and catalyzes a methyl-transfer reaction using S-adenosyl-l-methionine as a methyl donor and a wide range of phenolics as acceptors. To investigate the structure and function of OMTs, omt from Anabaena PCC 7120 was cloned into expression vector pET21a and expressed in a soluble form in Escherichia coli strain BL21 (DE3). The recombinant OMT protein was purified to homogeneity using a two-step strategy. Crystals of OMT that diffracted to a resolution of 2.4 Å were obtained using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystals belonged to space group C2221, with unit-cell parameters a = 131.620, b = 227.994, c = 150.777 Å, α = β = γ = 90°. There are eight molecules per asymmetric unit

  15. Identification and expression profiling of DNA methyltransferases during development and stress conditions in Solanaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rahul; Chauhan, Pankaj Kumar; Khurana, Ashima

    2016-09-01

    DNA methyltransferase (DMTase) enzymes contribute to plant development and stress responses by de novo establishment and subsequent maintenance of DNA methylation during replication. However, the molecular mechanism underlying this activity remains obscure, especially in crop species. Using DMTase homolog complement in six Solanaceae species, we demonstrated here that their number remained conserved in Solanum lineage, whereas it was expanded in both pepper and Nicotiana benthamiana. Non-synonymous vs synonymous (Ka/Ks) substitution ratio revealed that most of the Solanaceous DMTase homologs undergo purifying selection. The genomic sequences of tomato DMT homologs in its wild relative, Solanum pennellii, remained highly conserved in their exons and methyltransferase domains. Structure analysis further revealed highly similar folding of DMTase homologs and conservation in the residues participating in protein-protein interaction in Solanum lineage, whereas a considerable diversification was observed of pepper homologs. Transcript profiling of DMTases highlighted both similar and distinct expression patterns of tomato homologs in other species during fruit development and stress responses. Overall, our analysis provides a strong basis for in-depth exploration of both conserved as well as distinct functions of tomato DMTase homologs in other economically important Solanaceae species. PMID:27380018

  16. The Histone Methyltransferase Activity of MLL1 Is Dispensable for Hematopoiesis and Leukemogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bibhu P. Mishra

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Despite correlations between histone methyltransferase (HMT activity and gene regulation, direct evidence that HMT activity is responsible for gene activation is sparse. We address the role of the HMT activity for MLL1, a histone H3 lysine 4 (H3K4 methyltransferase critical for maintaining hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs. Here, we show that the SET domain, and thus HMT activity of MLL1, is dispensable for maintaining HSCs and supporting leukemogenesis driven by the MLL-AF9 fusion oncoprotein. Upon Mll1 deletion, histone H4 lysine 16 (H4K16 acetylation is selectively depleted at MLL1 target genes in conjunction with reduced transcription. Surprisingly, inhibition of SIRT1 is sufficient to prevent the loss of H4K16 acetylation and the reduction in MLL1 target gene expression. Thus, recruited MOF activity, and not the intrinsic HMT activity of MLL1, is central for the maintenance of HSC target genes. In addition, this work reveals a role for SIRT1 in opposing MLL1 function.

  17. Human catechol-O-methyltransferase: Cloning and expression of the membrane-associated form

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A cDNA clone for human catechol-O-methyltransferase was isolated from a human hepatoma cell line (Hep G2) cDNA library by hybridization screening with a porcine cDNA probe. The cDNA clone was sequenced and found to have an insert of 1226 nucleotides. The deduced primary structure of hCOMT is composed of 271 amino acid residues with the predicted molecular mass of 30 kDa. At its N terminus it has a hydrophobic segment of 21 amino acid residues that may be responsible for insertion of hCOMT into the endoplasmic reticulum membrane. The primary structure of hCOMT exhibits high homology to the porcine partial cDNA sequence (93%). The deduced amino acid sequence contains two tryptic peptide sequences (T-22, T-33) found in porcine liver catechol-O-methyltransferase (CEMT). The coding region of hCOMT cDNA was placed under the control of the cytomegalovirus promoter to transfect human kidney 293 cells. The recombinant hCOMT was shown by immunoblot analysis to be mainly associated with the membrane fraction. RNA blot analysis revealed one COMT mRNA transcript of 1.4 kilobases in Hep G2 poly(A)+ RNA

  18. Biochemical characterization of maintenance DNA methyltransferase DNMT-1 from silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsudome, Takumi; Mon, Hiroaki; Xu, Jian; Li, Zhiqing; Lee, Jae Man; Patil, Anandrao Ashok; Masuda, Atsushi; Iiyama, Kazuhiro; Morokuma, Daisuke; Kusakabe, Takahiro

    2015-03-01

    DNA methylation is an important epigenetic mechanism involved in gene expression of vertebrates and invertebrates. In general, DNA methylation profile is established by de novo DNA methyltransferases (DNMT-3A, -3B) and maintainance DNA methyltransferase (DNMT-1). DNMT-1 has a strong substrate preference for hemimethylated DNA over the unmethylated one. Because the silkworm genome lacks an apparent homologue of de novo DNMT, it is still unclear that how silkworm chromosome establishes and maintains its DNA methylation profile. As the first step to unravel this enigma, we purified recombinant BmDNMT-1 using baculovirus expression system and characterized its DNA-binding and DNA methylation activity. We found that the BmDNMT-1 preferentially methylates hemimethylated DNA despite binding to both unmethylated and hemimethylated DNA. Interestingly, BmDNMT-1 formed a complex with DNA in the presence or absence of methyl group donor, S-Adenosylmethionine (AdoMet) and the AdoMet-dependent complex formation was facilitated by Zn(2+) and Mn(2+). Our results provide clear evidence that BmDNMT-1 retained the function as maintenance DNMT but its sensitivity to metal ions is different from mammalian DNMT-1. PMID:25623240

  19. Bacteriophage adenine methyltransferase: a life cycle regulator? Modelled using Vibrio harveyi myovirus like.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochow, S; Elliman, J; Owens, L

    2012-11-01

    The adenine methyltransferase (DAM) gene methylates GATC sequences that have been demonstrated in various bacteria to be a powerful gene regulator functioning as an epigenetic switch, particularly with virulence gene regulation. However, overproduction of DAM can lead to mutations, giving rise to variability that may be important for adaptation to environmental change. While most bacterial hosts carry a DAM gene, not all bacteriophage carry this gene. Currently, there is no literature regarding the role DAM plays in life cycle regulation of bacteriophage. Vibrio campbellii strain 642 carries the bacteriophage Vibrio harveyi myovirus like (VHML) that has been proven to increase virulence. The complete genome sequence of VHML bacteriophage revealed a putative adenine methyltransferase gene. Using VHML, a new model of phage life cycle regulation, where DAM plays a central role between the lysogenic and lytic states, will be hypothesized. In short, DAM methylates the rha antirepressor gene and once methylation is removed, homologous CI repressor protein becomes repressed and non-functional leading to the switching to the lytic cycle. Greater understanding of life cycle regulation at the genetic level can, in the future, lead to the genesis of chimeric bacteriophage with greater control over their life cycle for their safe use as probiotics within the aquaculture industry. PMID:22681538

  20. Improved radioenzymatic assay for plasma norepinephrine using purified phenylethanolamine n-methyltransferase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioenzymatic assays have been developed for catecholamines using either catechol O-methyltransferase (COMT) or phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase (PNMT). Assays using PNMT are specific for norepinephrine (NE) and require minimal manipulative effort but until now have been less sensitive than the more complex procedures using COMT. The authors report an improved purification scheme for bovine PNMT which has permitted development of an NE assay with dramatically improved sensitivity (0.5 pg), specificity and reproducibility (C.V. < 5%). PNMT was purified by sequential pH 5.0 treatment and dialysis and by column chromatographic procedures using DEAE-Sephacel, Sepharcryl S-200 and Phenyl-Boronate Agarose. Recovery of PNMT through the purification scheme was 50%, while blank recovery was <.001%. NE can be directly quantified in 25 ul of human plasma and an 80 tube assay can be completed within 4 h. The capillary to venous plasma NE gradient was examined in 8 normotensive male subjects. Capillary plasma (NE (211.2 +/- 61.3 pg/ml)) was lower than venous plasma NE (366.6 +/- 92.5 pg/ml) in all subjects (p < 0.005). This difference suggests that capillary (NE) may be a unique indicator of sympathetic nervous system activity in vivo. In conclusion, purification of PNMT has facilitated development of an improved radioenzymatic for NE with significantly improved sensitivity

  1. X-ray crystal structure of N-6 adenine deoxyribose nucleic acid methyltransferase from Streptococcus pneumoniae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Phidung Hong

    X-ray diffraction by using resonant anomalous scattering has become a popular tool for solving crystal structures in the last ten years with the expanded availability of tunable synchrotron radiation for protein crystallography. Mercury atoms were used for phasing. The crystal structure of N-6 deoxyribose nucleic acid methyltransferase from Streptoccocus pneumoniae (DpnM) was solved by using the Multiple Anomalous Diffraction technique. The crystal structure reveals the formation of mercaptide between the mercury ion and the thiol group on the cysteine amino acid in a hydrophobic environment. The crystal structure contains the bound ligand, S- adenosyl-l-methionine on the surface of the concave opening. The direction of the β-strands on the beta sheets are identical to other solved methyltransferases. The highly conserved motifs, DPPY and the FxGxG, are found to be important in ligand binding and possibly in methyl group transfer. The structure has a concave cleft with an opening on the order of 30 Å that can accommodate a DNA duplex. By molecular modelling coupled to sequence alignment, two other highly conserved residues Arg21 and Gly19 are found to be important in catalysis.

  2. Inactivating mutations of the histone methyltransferase gene EZH2 in myeloid disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Thomas; Chase, Andrew J; Score, Joannah; Hidalgo-Curtis, Claire E; Bryant, Catherine; Jones, Amy V; Waghorn, Katherine; Zoi, Katerina; Ross, Fiona M; Reiter, Andreas; Hochhaus, Andreas; Drexler, Hans G; Duncombe, Andrew; Cervantes, Francisco; Oscier, David; Boultwood, Jacqueline; Grand, Francis H; Cross, Nicholas C P

    2010-08-01

    Abnormalities of chromosome 7q are common in myeloid malignancies, but no specific target genes have yet been identified. Here, we describe the finding of homozygous EZH2 mutations in 9 of 12 individuals with 7q acquired uniparental disomy. Screening of a total of 614 individuals with myeloid disorders revealed 49 monoallelic or biallelic EZH2 mutations in 42 individuals; the mutations were found most commonly in those with myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasms (27 out of 219 individuals, or 12%) and in those with myelofibrosis (4 out of 30 individuals, or 13%). EZH2 encodes the catalytic subunit of the polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2), a highly conserved histone H3 lysine 27 (H3K27) methyltransferase that influences stem cell renewal by epigenetic repression of genes involved in cell fate decisions. EZH2 has oncogenic activity, and its overexpression has previously been causally linked to differentiation blocks in epithelial tumors. Notably, the mutations we identified resulted in premature chain termination or direct abrogation of histone methyltransferase activity, suggesting that EZH2 acts as a tumor suppressor for myeloid malignancies. PMID:20601953

  3. High-performance liquid chromatography method with radiochemical detection for measurement of nitric oxide synthase, arginase, and arginine decarboxylase activities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Volke, A; Wegener, Gregers; Vasar, E;

    2006-01-01

    Nitric oxide has been shown to be involved in numerous biological processes, and many studies have aimed to measure nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity. Recently, it has been demonstrated that arginase and arginine decarboxylase (ADC), two enzymes that also employ arginine as a substrate, may...... simple and fast HPLC method with radiochemical detection to separate radiolabeled L-arginine, L-citrulline, L-ornithine, and agmatine. 3H-labeled L-arginine, L-citrulline, agmatine, and 14C-labeled L-citrulline were used as standards. These compounds were separated in the normal phase column (Allure...... Acidix 250 x 4.6 mm i.d.) under isocratic conditions in less than 20 min with good sensitivity. Using the current method, we have shown the formation of L-citrulline and L-ornithine in vitro using brain tissue homogenate of rats and that of agmatine by Escherichia coli ADC. Udgivelsesdato: null-null...

  4. Effects of a food supplement rich in arginine in patients with smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis--a randomised trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schön, T; Idh, J; Westman, A;

    2011-01-01

    In tuberculosis (TB), the production of nitric oxide (NO) is confirmed but its importance in host defense is debated. Our aim was to investigate whether a food supplement rich in arginine could enhance clinical improvement in TB patients by increased NO production. Smear positive TB patients from...... Gondar, Ethiopia (n = 180) were randomized to a food supplementation rich in arginine (peanuts, equivalent to 1 g of arginine/day) or with a low arginine content (wheat crackers, locally called daboqolo) during four weeks. The primary outcome was cure rate according to the WHO classification and...... secondary outcomes. In the subgroup analysis according to HIV status, peanut supplemented HIV+/TB patients showed increased cure rate (83.8% (31/37) vs 53.1% (17/32), p <0.01). A low baseline eNO (...

  5. One-Pot Green Synthesis and Bioapplication of l-Arginine-Capped Superparamagnetic Fe3O4 Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Yongchao; Yin, Weiwei; Liu, Jinting; Xi, Rimo; Zhan, Jinhua

    2010-02-01

    Water-soluble l-arginine-capped Fe3O4 nanoparticles were synthesized using a one-pot and green method. Nontoxic, renewable and inexpensive reagents including FeCl3, l-arginine, glycerol and water were chosen as raw materials. Fe3O4 nanoparticles show different dispersive states in acidic and alkaline solutions for the two distinct forms of surface binding l-arginine. Powder X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were used to identify the structure of Fe3O4 nanocrystals. The products behave like superparamagnetism at room temperature with saturation magnetization of 49.9 emu g-1 and negligible remanence or coercivity. In the presence of 1-ethyl-3-(dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide hydrochloride, the anti-chloramphenicol monoclonal antibodies were connected to the l-arginine-capped magnetite nanoparticles. The as-prepared conjugates could be used in immunomagnetic assay.

  6. Conversion of nicotinic acid to trigonelline is catalyzed by N-methyltransferase belonged to motif B′ methyltransferase family in Coffea arabica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizuno, Kouichi, E-mail: koumno@akita-pu.ac.jp [Faculty of Bioresource Sciences, Akita Prefectural University, Akita City, Akita 010-0195 (Japan); Matsuzaki, Masahiro [Faculty of Bioresource Sciences, Akita Prefectural University, Akita City, Akita 010-0195 (Japan); Kanazawa, Shiho [Graduate School of Humanities and Sciences, Ochanomizu University, Otsuka, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 112-8610 (Japan); Tokiwano, Tetsuo; Yoshizawa, Yuko [Faculty of Bioresource Sciences, Akita Prefectural University, Akita City, Akita 010-0195 (Japan); Kato, Misako [Graduate School of Humanities and Sciences, Ochanomizu University, Otsuka, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 112-8610 (Japan)

    2014-10-03

    Graphical abstract: Trigonelline synthase catalyzes the conversion of nicotinic acid to trigonelline. We isolated and characterized trigonelline synthase gene(s) from Coffea arabica. - Highlights: • Trigonelline is a major compound in coffee been same as caffeine is. • We isolated and characterized trigonelline synthase gene. • Coffee trigonelline synthases are highly homologous with coffee caffeine synthases. • This study contributes the fully understanding of pyridine alkaloid metabolism. - Abstract: Trigonelline (N-methylnicotinate), a member of the pyridine alkaloids, accumulates in coffee beans along with caffeine. The biosynthetic pathway of trigonelline is not fully elucidated. While it is quite likely that the production of trigonelline from nicotinate is catalyzed by N-methyltransferase, as is caffeine synthase (CS), the enzyme(s) and gene(s) involved in N-methylation have not yet been characterized. It should be noted that, similar to caffeine, trigonelline accumulation is initiated during the development of coffee fruits. Interestingly, the expression profiles for two genes homologous to caffeine synthases were similar to the accumulation profile of trigonelline. We presumed that these two CS-homologous genes encoded trigonelline synthases. These genes were then expressed in Escherichiacoli, and the resulting recombinant enzymes that were obtained were characterized. Consequently, using the N-methyltransferase assay with S-adenosyl[methyl-{sup 14}C]methionine, it was confirmed that these recombinant enzymes catalyzed the conversion of nicotinate to trigonelline, coffee trigonelline synthases (termed CTgS1 and CTgS2) were highly identical (over 95% identity) to each other. The sequence homology between the CTgSs and coffee CCS1 was 82%. The pH-dependent activity curve of CTgS1 and CTgS2 revealed optimum activity at pH 7.5. Nicotinate was the specific methyl acceptor for CTgSs, and no activity was detected with any other nicotinate derivatives, or

  7. Conversion of nicotinic acid to trigonelline is catalyzed by N-methyltransferase belonged to motif B′ methyltransferase family in Coffea arabica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: Trigonelline synthase catalyzes the conversion of nicotinic acid to trigonelline. We isolated and characterized trigonelline synthase gene(s) from Coffea arabica. - Highlights: • Trigonelline is a major compound in coffee been same as caffeine is. • We isolated and characterized trigonelline synthase gene. • Coffee trigonelline synthases are highly homologous with coffee caffeine synthases. • This study contributes the fully understanding of pyridine alkaloid metabolism. - Abstract: Trigonelline (N-methylnicotinate), a member of the pyridine alkaloids, accumulates in coffee beans along with caffeine. The biosynthetic pathway of trigonelline is not fully elucidated. While it is quite likely that the production of trigonelline from nicotinate is catalyzed by N-methyltransferase, as is caffeine synthase (CS), the enzyme(s) and gene(s) involved in N-methylation have not yet been characterized. It should be noted that, similar to caffeine, trigonelline accumulation is initiated during the development of coffee fruits. Interestingly, the expression profiles for two genes homologous to caffeine synthases were similar to the accumulation profile of trigonelline. We presumed that these two CS-homologous genes encoded trigonelline synthases. These genes were then expressed in Escherichiacoli, and the resulting recombinant enzymes that were obtained were characterized. Consequently, using the N-methyltransferase assay with S-adenosyl[methyl-14C]methionine, it was confirmed that these recombinant enzymes catalyzed the conversion of nicotinate to trigonelline, coffee trigonelline synthases (termed CTgS1 and CTgS2) were highly identical (over 95% identity) to each other. The sequence homology between the CTgSs and coffee CCS1 was 82%. The pH-dependent activity curve of CTgS1 and CTgS2 revealed optimum activity at pH 7.5. Nicotinate was the specific methyl acceptor for CTgSs, and no activity was detected with any other nicotinate derivatives, or with

  8. Oral L-Arginine Stimulates GLP-1 Secretion to Improve Glucose Tolerance in Male Mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemmensen, Christoffer; Smajilovic, Sanela; Smith, Eric P;

    2013-01-01

    Pharmacological and surgical interventions that increase glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) action are effective to improve glucose homeostasis in type 2 diabetes mellitus. In light of this, nutritional strategies to enhance postprandial GLP-1 secretion, particularly in the context of diet-induced o......Pharmacological and surgical interventions that increase glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) action are effective to improve glucose homeostasis in type 2 diabetes mellitus. In light of this, nutritional strategies to enhance postprandial GLP-1 secretion, particularly in the context of diet......-induced obesity, may provide an alternative therapeutic approach. Importantly, recent evidence suggests the amino acid l-arginine, a well-known insulin secretagogue, can also stimulate release of GLP-1 from isolated rat intestine. Here we tested the hypothesis that oral l-arginine acts as a GLP-1 secretagogue in...

  9. Twin-arginine-dependent translocation of SufI in the absence of cytosolic helper proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzapfel, Eva; Moser, Michael; Schiltz, Emile; Ueda, Takuya; Betton, Jean-Michel; Müller, Matthias

    2009-06-16

    The twin-arginine translocation (Tat) machinery present in bacterial and thylakoidal membranes is able to transport fully folded proteins. Folding of some Tat precursor proteins requires dedicated chaperones that also sequester the signal sequence during the maturation process. Whether or not signal sequence-binding chaperones are a general prerequisite for all Tat substrate proteins is not known. Here, we have studied the propensity of Tat signal sequences of Escherichia coli to interact with general chaperones and peptidyl-prolyl-cis,trans-isomerases. Site-specific photocross-linking revealed a clear specificity for FK506-binding proteins. Nevertheless transport of the Tat substrate SufI into inverted inner membrane vesicles of E. coli was found to occur in the bona fide absence of any cytosolic chaperone. Our results suggest that in E. coli, cytosolic chaperones are not essential for the twin-arginine-dependent export of cofactor-less substrates. PMID:19432418

  10. Atomic-Resolution Structure of an N(5) Flavin Adduct in D-Arginine Dehydrogenase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Guoxing; Yuan, Hongling; Wang, Siming; Gadda, Giovanni; Weber, Irene T. (GSU)

    2011-09-06

    D-Arginine dehydrogenase (DADH) catalyzes the flavin-dependent oxidative deamination of D-arginine and other D-amino acids to the corresponding imino acids. The 1.07 {angstrom} atomic-resolution structure of DADH crystallized with D-leucine unexpectedly revealed a covalent N(5) flavin adduct, instead of the expected iminoleucine product in the active site. This acyl adduct has been successfully reproduced by photoreduction of DADH in the presence of 4-methyl-2-oxopentanoic acid (ketoleucine). The iminoleucine may be released readily because of weak interactions in the binding site, in contrast to iminoarginine, converted to ketoleucine, which reacts with activated FAD to form the covalently linked acyl adduct.

  11. Atomic-resolution structure of an N5 flavin adduct in D-arginine dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Guoxing; Yuan, Hongling; Wang, Siming; Gadda, Giovanni; Weber, Irene T

    2011-07-26

    D-Arginine dehydrogenase (DADH) catalyzes the flavin-dependent oxidative deamination of D-arginine and other D-amino acids to the corresponding imino acids. The 1.07 Å atomic-resolution structure of DADH crystallized with D-leucine unexpectedly revealed a covalent N(5) flavin adduct, instead of the expected iminoleucine product in the active site. This acyl adduct has been successfully reproduced by photoreduction of DADH in the presence of 4-methyl-2-oxopentanoic acid (ketoleucine). The iminoleucine may be released readily because of weak interactions in the binding site, in contrast to iminoarginine, converted to ketoleucine, which reacts with activated FAD to form the covalently linked acyl adduct. PMID:21707047

  12. Selection of Arginine-Rich Anti-Gold Antibodies Engineered for Plasmonic Colloid Self-Assembly

    CERN Document Server

    Jain, Purvi; Narayanan, S Shankara; Sharma, Jadab; Girard, Christian; Dujardin, Erik; Nizak, Clément

    2014-01-01

    Antibodies are affinity proteins with a wide spectrum of applications in analytical and therapeutic biology. Proteins showing specific recognition for a chosen molecular target can be isolated and their encoding sequence identified in vitro from a large and diverse library by phage display selection. In this work, we show that this standard biochemical technique rapidly yields a collection of antibody protein binders for an inorganic target of major technological importance: crystalline metallic gold surfaces. 21 distinct anti-gold antibody proteins emerged from a large random library of antibodies and were sequenced. The systematic statistical analysis of all the protein sequences reveals a strong occurrence of arginine in anti-gold antibodies, which corroborates recent molecular dynamics predictions on the crucial role of arginine in protein/gold interactions. Once tethered to small gold nanoparticles using histidine tag chemistry, the selected antibodies could drive the self-assembly of the colloids onto t...

  13. Arginine-assisted synthesis and catalytic properties of single-crystalline palladium tetrapods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Geng-Tao; Jiang, Xian; Wu, Rui; Wei, Shao-Hua; Sun, Dong-Mei; Tang, Ya-Wen; Lu, Tian-Hong; Chen, Yu

    2014-12-24

    Noble metallic nanocrystals (NMNCs) with highly branched morphologies are an exciting new class of nanomaterials because of their great potential application in catalysis, sensing, optics, and electronics originating from their unique structures. Herein, we report a facile water-based method to synthesize high-quality palladium (Pd) tetrapods with the assistance of arginine molecule, which is more economical and environmentally friendly than the previous reported carbon monoxide (CO)-assisted synthesis in the organic system. During the synthesis, arginine molecule plays an essential role in controlling the tetrapod-like morphology. The as-synthesized Pd tetrapods have a potential application in the formic acid (HCOOH)-induced reduction of highly toxic hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) owing to their improved catalytic performance for the HCOOH decomposition. PMID:25469763

  14. Solid-state properties and dissolution behaviour of tablets containing co-amorphous indomethacin-arginine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenz, Elisabeth; Jensen, Katrine Birgitte Tarp; Blaabjerg, Lasse Ingerslev;

    2015-01-01

    Co-amorphous drug formulations provide the possibility to stabilize a drug in its amorphous form by interactions with low molecular weight compounds, e.g. amino acids. Recent studies have shown the feasibility of spray drying as a technique to manufacture co-amorphous indomethacin–arginine in a...... larger production scale. In this work, a tablet formulation was developed for a co-amorphous salt, namely spray dried indomethacin–arginine (SD IND–ARG). The effects of compaction pressure on tablet properties, physical stability and dissolution profiles under non-sink conditions were examined....... Dissolution profiles of tablets with SD IND–ARG (TAB SD IND–ARG) were compared to those of tablets containing a physical mixture of crystalline IND and ARG (TAB PM IND–ARG) and to the dissolution of pure spray dried powder. Concerning tableting, the developed formulation allowed for the preparation of tablets...

  15. Arginine Vasopressin V1a Receptor Antagonist Impairs Maternal Memory in Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Nephew, Benjamin C.; Bridges, Robert S.

    2008-01-01

    Primiparous female rats rapidly respond to foster pups following an extended separation from pups after an initial maternal experience. This consolidation of maternal behavior has been referred to as maternal memory. The neurochemical regulation of maternal memory is not clearly understood. One neuropeptide that may mediate maternal memory is arginine vasopressin (AVP), a neuropeptide which is modulated around the time of parturition and has an established role in learning and memory processe...

  16. Comparison of L-Arginine and Hydroxyurea Interactractions with Transitional Metal Ions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangeeta Parab

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available No* is a free radical with one free electron and as such it is very highly reactive and particularly it interacts with transitional metals. Nitric oxide, gas is an important signaling molecule in the body of mammals, including humans and is an extremely important intermediate in chemical industry In biological systems there are many enzymes, which contain transitional elements like iron, copper and manganese, which are the most probable sites for nitric oxide to react. Such type of interactions results in considerable mod ification of the enzyme functions resulting pathological and even genetic disorders. This needs a critical amount of nitric oxide in the system for proper functioning. To observe the effects of NO*, various NO* donor compounds are used. Hydroxyurea (HU is shown to increase the levels of NO*.L- arginine is one of the non - essential amino acids. In the body L- arginine is used to make nitric oxide, which reduces blood vessel stiffness, increases blood flow and improves blood vessel function. The visible spectra of some transitional metals Cu, Fe(II,Fe(III,Cr, Mn, Ni have been studied individually in presence of hydroxyurea (HU with varying amounts .The spectra are also studied for the effect of varying amounts of metal ion on hydroxyurea. To observe how arginine itself acts on transitional metal ions. Even effect of Hydroxyurea on metal - arginine binding is also studied. The evaluation of these spectra is carried out for its binding parameters with the help of scatchard plots. The work has revealed certain very significant and interesting data which can have a lot of bearing on many chemical, biological and environmental aspects.

  17. Unique Photobleaching Phenomena of the Twin-Arginine Translocase Respiratory Enzyme Chaperone DmsD

    OpenAIRE

    Rivardo, Fabrizio; Leach, Thorin G.H.; Chan, Catherine S.; Winstone, Tara M. L.; Ladner, Carol L.; Sarfo, Kwabena J.; Turner, Raymond J.

    2014-01-01

    DmsD is a chaperone of the redox enzyme maturation protein family specifically required for biogenesis of DMSO reductase in Escherichia coli. It exists in multiple folding forms, all of which are capable of binding its known substrate, the twin-arginine leader sequence of the DmsA catalytic subunit. It is important for maturation of the reductase and targeting to the cytoplasmic membrane for translocation. Here, we demonstrate that DmsD exhibits an irreversible photobleaching phenomenon upon ...

  18. Effect of L- Arginine On Electrocardiographic Changes Induced By Hypercholesterolemia And Isoproterenol In Rabbits

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Pradeep; Goyal, Manish; Agarwal, J L

    2009-01-01

    Hypercholesterolemia, a well-known cardiovascular risk factor, is associated with prolonged action potential duration, longer QTc intervals (rate controlled QT interval), suggested that Hypercholesterolemia may have a direct effect on ventricular repolarization. Hypercholesterolemia was induced in rabbits and L-arginine was given orally to animals for sixteen weeks. The isoproterenol was injected in all the animals to produce electrocardiographic changes. ECG was recorded in lead II at start ...

  19. Surprising Arginine Biosynthesis: a Reappraisal of the Enzymology and Evolution of the Pathway in Microorganisms

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Ying; Labedan, Bernard; Glansdorff, Nicolas

    2007-01-01

    Summary: Major aspects of the pathway of de novo arginine biosynthesis via acetylated intermediates in microorganisms must be revised in light of recent enzymatic and genomic investigations. The enzyme N-acetylglutamate synthase (NAGS), which used to be considered responsible for the first committed step of the pathway, is present in a limited number of bacterial phyla only and is absent from Archaea. In many Bacteria, shorter proteins related to the Gcn5-related N-acetyltransferase family ap...

  20. Arginine and proline applied as food additives stimulate high freeze tolerance in larvae of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koštál, Vladimír; Korbelová, Jaroslava; Poupardin, Rodolphe; Moos, Martin; Šimek, Petr

    2016-08-01

    The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster is an insect of tropical origin. Its larval stage is evolutionarily adapted for rapid growth and development under warm conditions and shows high sensitivity to cold. In this study, we further developed an optimal acclimation and freezing protocol that significantly improves larval freeze tolerance (an ability to survive at -5°C when most of the freezable fraction of water is converted to ice). Using the optimal protocol, freeze survival to adult stage increased from 0.7% to 12.6% in the larvae fed standard diet (agar, sugar, yeast, cornmeal). Next, we fed the larvae diets augmented with 31 different amino compounds, administered in different concentrations, and observed their effects on larval metabolomic composition, viability, rate of development and freeze tolerance. While some diet additives were toxic, others showed positive effects on freeze tolerance. Statistical correlation revealed tight association between high freeze tolerance and high levels of amino compounds involved in arginine and proline metabolism. Proline- and arginine-augmented diets showed the highest potential, improving freeze survival to 42.1% and 50.6%, respectively. Two plausible mechanisms by which high concentrations of proline and arginine might stimulate high freeze tolerance are discussed: (i) proline, probably in combination with trehalose, could reduce partial unfolding of proteins and prevent membrane fusions in the larvae exposed to thermal stress (prior to freezing) or during freeze dehydration; (ii) both arginine and proline are exceptional among amino compounds in their ability to form supramolecular aggregates which probably bind partially unfolded proteins and inhibit their aggregation under increasing freeze dehydration. PMID:27489218

  1. Arginine vasopressin versus norepinephrine: will the stronger one win the race?

    OpenAIRE

    Ertmer, Christian; Bone, Hans-Georg; Westphal, Martin

    2006-01-01

    In the current issue of Critical Care, Friesenecker and colleagues present a well-designed comparative study on the microvascular effects of arginine vasopressin (AVP) and norepinephrine (NE) in a physiological, unanesthetized hamster model. The authors clearly demonstrate that AVP, but not NE, has marked vasoconstrictive effects on large arterioles, whereas the impact on small arterioles is comparable for both vasopressors. However, it remains unclear if these results, per se, reflect a stro...

  2. Levels of arginine-vasopressin in cerebrospinal fluid during passive avoidance behavior in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Kloet, E.R. de; Laczi, F.; Gaffori, O.; Fekete, M.; Wied, D. de

    1984-01-01

    The concentration of immunoreactive arginine-vasopressin (IR-AVP) was measured in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) during acquisition and retention of passive avoidance behavior. IR-AVP level in CSF of male Wistar rats immediately after the learning trial was increased; the rate of which was related to the intensity of the electric footschock during the learning trial and the avoidance latency as measured 1 day after the learning trial. Immediately after the 24 h retention test IR-AVP levels wer...

  3. Arteriolar vasoconstrictive response: comparing the effects of arginine vasopressin and norepinephrine

    OpenAIRE

    Friesenecker, Barbara E; Tsai, Amy G; Martini, Judith; Ulmer, Hanno; Wenzel, Volker; Hasibeder, Walter R; Intaglietta, Marcos; Dünser, Martin W

    2006-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: This study was designed to examine differences in the arteriolar vasoconstrictive response between arginine vasopressin (AVP) and norepinephrine (NE) on the microcirculatory level in the hamster window chamber model in unanesthetized, normotonic hamsters using intravital microscopy. It is known from patients with advanced vasodilatory shock that AVP exerts strong additional vasoconstriction when incremental dosage increases of NE have no further effect on mean arterial blood pre...

  4. Methylation of CenH3 arginine 37 regulates kinetochore integrity and chromosome segregation

    OpenAIRE

    Samel, Anke; Cuomo, Alessandro; Bonaldi, Tiziana; Ehrenhofer-Murray, Ann E

    2012-01-01

    Centromeres of eukaryotic chromosomes mark the site for kinetochore formation and microtubule attachment and are essential for accurate chromosome segregation. Although centromere identity is defined by the presence of the histone H3 variant CenH3/centromere protein A (CENP-A), little is known about how epigenetic modifications on CenH3 might regulate kinetochore assembly and centromere function. Here we show that CENP-A from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, termed Cse4, is methylated on arginine 37...

  5. A mutation in the human phospholamban gene, deleting arginine 14, results in lethal, hereditary cardiomyopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Haghighi, Kobra; Kolokathis, Fotis; Gramolini, Anthony O.; Waggoner, Jason R.; Pater, Luke; Lynch, Roy A.; Fan, Guo-Chang; Tsiapras, Dimitris; Parekh, Rohan R.; Dorn, Gerald W., II; MacLennan, David H.; Kremastinos, Dimitrios Th; Kranias, Evangelia G.

    2006-01-01

    The sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-cycling proteins are key regulators of cardiac contractility, and alterations in sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-cycling properties have been shown to be causal of familial cardiomyopathies. Through genetic screening of dilated cardiomyopathy patients, we identified a previously uncharacterized deletion of arginine 14 (PLN-R14Del) in the coding region of the phospholamban (PLN) gene in a large family with hereditary heart failure. No homozygous individuals were ide...

  6. Degradation of Arginine and Other Amino Acids by Eubacterium nodatum ATCC 33099

    OpenAIRE

    Uematsu, H.; Hoshino, E.

    2011-01-01

    The utilisation of a total of 20 amino acids by Eubacterium nodatum, a predominant asaccharolytic anaerobe isolated from human periodontal pockets, was studied. Washed cells of the microorganism produced substantial amounts of acetate, butyrate and ammonia from lysine, and butyrate and ammonia from arginine as main products under anaerobic conditions. They also produced a small amount of formate from histidine. Metabolic products were not detected from any of the other 17 amino acids. These r...

  7. The development of poly-L-arginine-coated liposomes for gene delivery

    OpenAIRE

    Opanasopit P; Tragulpakseerojn J; Apirakaramwong A; Ngawhirunpat T; Rojanarata T; Ruktanonchai U

    2011-01-01

    Praneet Opanasopit1, Jintana Tragulpakseerojn1, Auayporn Apirakaramwong1, Tanasait Ngawhirunpat1, Theerasak Rojanarata1, Uracha Ruktanonchai21Faculty of Pharmacy, Silpakorn University, Nakhon Pathom, Thailand; 2National Nanotechnology Center, Thailand Science Park, Pathumthani, Thailand Abstract: In this study, liposomes coated with cationic polymers, poly-L-arginine (PLA), were assessed as a promising gene transfer system in human cervical carcinoma (HeLa) cells and human h...

  8. Arginine ADP-ribosylation mechanism based on structural snapshots of iota-toxin and actin complex

    OpenAIRE

    Tsurumura, Toshiharu; Tsumori, Yayoi; Qiu, Hao; Oda, Masataka; Sakurai, Jun; Nagahama, Masahiro; Tsuge, Hideaki

    2012-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens iota-toxin (Ia) mono-ADP ribosylates Arg177 of actin, leading to cytoskeletal disorganization and cell death. To fully understand the reaction mechanism of arginine-specific mono-ADP ribosyl transferase, the structure of the toxin-substrate protein complex must be characterized. Recently, we solved the crystal structure of Ia in complex with actin and the nonhydrolyzable NAD+ analog βTAD (thiazole-4-carboxamide adenine dinucleotide); however, the structures of the NAD+...

  9. Efficacy L-Arginine In Patients With Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis Associated With Metabolic Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Oleksandr Fediv; Volodymyr Shevchuk; Oksana Olinyk

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background and Purpose Recent research in the field of hematology indicate that among the many pathogenic mechanisms of development and progression of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis NASH which occurs on the background of the metabolic syndrome an important role is played by endothelial dysfunction and violations of haemocoagulation. The aim of this research was to study the effectiveness of L-arginine as it corrects endothelial dysfunction and disorders of homeostasis haemocoagulation ...

  10. Arginine-Rich Cationic Polypeptides Amplify Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Monocyte Activation

    OpenAIRE

    Bosshart, Herbert; Heinzelmann, Michael

    2002-01-01

    The human neutrophil-derived cationic protein CAP37, also known as azurocidin or heparin-binding protein, enhances the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced release of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) in isolated human monocytes. We measured the release of the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-8 (IL-8) in human whole blood and found that in addition to CAP37, other arginine-rich cationic polypeptides, such as the small structurally related protamines, enhance LPS-induced monocyte activation....

  11. A novel virulence strategy for Pseudomonas aeruginosa mediated by an autotransporter with arginine-specific aminopeptidase activity

    OpenAIRE

    Luckett, Jeni C. A.; Owen Darch; Chase Watters; Manal Abuoun; Victoria Wright; Esteban Paredes-Osses; Jenny Ward; Hana Goto; Stephan Heeb; Stéphanie Pommier; Rumbaugh, Kendra P.; Miguel Cámara; Hardie, Kim R.

    2012-01-01

    Author Summary We present a new Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence factor that promotes chronic skin wound infections. We propose the name AaaA for this cell-surface tethered autotransporter. This arginine-specific aminopeptidase confers a growth advantage upon P. aeruginosa, providing a fitness advantage by creating a supply of arginine in chronic wounds where oxygen availability is limited and biofilm formation is involved. To our knowledge, this is the first mechanistic evidence linking the ...

  12. Nitric Oxide Synthase Inhibition by NG-Nitro-l-Arginine Methyl Ester Inhibits Tumor-Induced Angiogenesis in Mammary Tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Jadeski, Lorraine C.; Lala, Peeyush K.

    1999-01-01

    Using a murine breast cancer model, we earlier found a positive correlation between the expression of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and tumor progression; treatment with inhibitors of NOS, NG-methyl-l-arginine (NMMA) and NG-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), had antitumor and antimetastatic effects that were partly attributed to reduced tumor cell invasiveness. In the present study, we used a novel in vivo model of tumor angiogenesis using subcutaneous implants of tumor cells suspended in ...

  13. Acute L-arginine alpha ketoglutarate supplementation fails to improve muscular performance in resistance trained and untrained men

    OpenAIRE

    Wax Benjamin; Kavazis Andreas N; Webb Heather E; Brown Stanley P

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Dietary supplements containing L-arginine are marketed to improve exercise performance, but the efficacy of such supplements is not clear. Therefore, this study examined the efficacy of acute ingestion of L-arginine alpha-ketoglutarate (AAKG) muscular strength and endurance in resistance trained and untrained men. Methods Eight resistance trained and eight untrained healthy males ingested either 3000mg of AAKG or a placebo 45 minutes prior to a resistance exercise protocol...

  14. Arginine-Rich Peptides Destabilize the Plasma Membrane, Consistent with a Pore Formation Translocation Mechanism of Cell-Penetrating Peptides

    OpenAIRE

    Herce, H.D.; Garcia, A. E.; Litt, J.; Kane, R. S.; Martin, P.; Enrique, N.; Rebolledo, A.; Milesi, V.

    2009-01-01

    Recent molecular dynamics simulations (Herce and Garcia, PNAS, 104: 20805 (2007)) have suggested that the arginine-rich HIV Tat peptides might be able to translocate by destabilizing and inducing transient pores in phospholipid bilayers. In this pathway for peptide translocation, arginine residues play a fundamental role not only in the binding of the peptide to the surface of the membrane but also in the destabilization and nucleation of transient pores across the bilayer, despite being char...

  15. Comparison of the effect of topical versus systemic L-arginine on wound healing in acute incisional diabetic rat model

    OpenAIRE

    Alireza Zandifar; Sima Seifabadi; Ehsan Zandifar; Sajedeh Sohrabi Beheshti; Abolfazl Aslani; Shaghayegh Haghjooy Javanmard

    2015-01-01

    Background: Diabetes is associated with endothelial dysfunction and impaired wound healing. The amino acid L-arginine is the only substrate for nitric oxide (NO) synthesis. The purpose of this study was to compare the topical versus systemic L-arginine treatment on total nitrite (NO x ) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) concentrations in wound fluid and rate of wound healing in an acute incisional diabetic wound model. Materials and Methods: A total of 56 Sprague-Dawley rats were ...

  16. A Selective V1A Receptor Agonist, Selepressin, Is Superior to Arginine Vasopressin and to Norepinephrine in Ovine Septic Shock*

    OpenAIRE

    He, Xinrong; Su, Fuhong; Taccone, Fabio Silvio; Laporte, Régent; Kjølbye, Anne Louise; Zhang, Jing; Xie, Keliang; Moussa, Mouhamed Djahoum; Reinheimer, Torsten Michael; Vincent, Jean-Louis

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Selective vasopressin V1A receptor agonists may have advantages over arginine vasopressin in the treatment of septic shock. We compared the effects of selepressin, a selective V1A receptor agonist, arginine vasopressin, and norepinephrine on hemodynamics, organ function, and survival in an ovine septic shock model. Design: Randomized animal study. Setting: University hospital animal research laboratory. Subjects: Forty-six adult female sheep. Interventions: Fecal peritonitis was in...

  17. Effect of L-arginine on renal blood flow in normal subjects and patients with hypoxic chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Howes, T. Q.; Keilty, S. E.; Maskrey, V. L.; Deane, C. R.; Baudouin, S. V.; Moxham, J

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: L-arginine is the precursor of endothelium derived nitric oxide (NO) and increasing the available substrate may increase the production of NO. This has been shown by local infusion in peripheral vascular beds but there are few studies of the effects during systemic infusion. Renal vasoconstriction is known to be important in the pathogenesis of cor pulmonale in patients with hypoxic chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The effects of a systemic infusion of L-arginine on r...

  18. Burkholderia glumae ToxA Is a Dual-Specificity Methyltransferase That Catalyzes the Last Two Steps of Toxoflavin Biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenwick, Michael K; Philmus, Benjamin; Begley, Tadhg P; Ealick, Steven E

    2016-05-17

    Toxoflavin is a major virulence factor of the rice pathogen Burkholderia glumae. The tox operon of B. glumae contains five putative toxoflavin biosynthetic genes toxABCDE. ToxA is a predicted S-adenosylmethionine-dependent methyltransferase, and toxA knockouts of B. glumae are less virulent in plant infection models. In this study, we show that ToxA performs two consecutive methylations to convert the putative azapteridine intermediate, 1,6-didemethyltoxoflavin, to toxoflavin. In addition, we report a series of crystal structures of ToxA complexes that reveals the molecular basis of the dual methyltransferase activity. The results suggest sequential methylations with initial methylation at N6 of 1,6-didemethyltoxoflavin followed by methylation at N1. The two azapteridine orientations that position N6 or N1 for methylation are coplanar with a 140° rotation between them. The structure of ToxA contains a class I methyltransferase fold having an N-terminal extension that either closes over the active site or is largely disordered. The ordered conformation places Tyr7 at a position of a structurally conserved tyrosine site of unknown function in various methyltransferases. Crystal structures of ToxA-Y7F consistently show a closed active site, whereas structures of ToxA-Y7A consistently show an open active site, suggesting that the hydroxyl group of Tyr7 plays a role in opening and closing the active site during the multistep reaction. PMID:27070241

  19. Thirteen new patients with guanidinoacetate methyltransferase deficiency and functional characterization of nineteen novel missense variants in the GAMT gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mercimek-Mahmutoglu, Saadet; Ndika, Joseph; Kanhai, Warsha;

    2014-01-01

    Guanidinoacetate methyltransferase deficiency (GAMT-D) is an autosomal recessively inherited disorder of creatine biosynthesis. Creatine deficiency on cranial proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and elevated guanidinoacetate levels in body fluids are the biomarkers of GAMT-D. In 74 patients 5...

  20. Impaired Homocysteine Transmethylation and Protein-Methyltransferase Activity Reduce Expression of Selenoprotein P: Implications for Obesity and Metabolic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obesity causes Metabolic Syndrome and Type-II Diabetes, disrupting hepatic function, methionine (Met)/homocysteine (Hcy) transmethylation and methyltransferase (PRMT) activities. Selenoprotein P (SEPP1), exported from the liver, is the predominate form of plasma selenium (Se) and the physiological S...

  1. The Cfr rRNA methyltransferase confers resistance to Phenicols, Lincosamides, Oxazolidinones, Pleuromutilins, and Streptogramin A antibiotics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Long, K. S.; Poehlsgaard, Jacob; Kehrenberg, C.; Schwarz, S.; Vester, B.

    2006-01-01

    A novel multidrug resistance phenotype mediated by the Cfr rRNA methyltransferase is observed in Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. The cfr gene has previously been identified as a phenicol and lincosamide resistance gene on plasmids isolated from Staphylococcus spp. of animal origin and...

  2. No up-regulation of the phosphatidylethanolamine N-methyltransferase pathway and choline production by sex hormones in cats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valtolina, Chiara; Vaandrager, Arie B; Favier, Robert P; Robben, Joris H; Tuohetahuntila, Maidina; Kummeling, Anne; Jeusette, Isabelle; Rothuizen, Jan

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Feline hepatic lipidosis (FHL) is a common cholestatic disease affecting cats of any breed, age and sex. Both choline deficiency and low hepatic phosphatidylethanolamine N-methyltransferase (PEMT) activity are associated with hepatic lipidosis (HL) in humans, mice and rats. The PEMT expr

  3. Implications of fast-time scale dynamics of human DNA/RNA cytosine methyltransferases (DNMTs) for protein function

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Evans, D. A.; Bronowska, Agnieszka Katarzyna

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 125, 3/6 (2010), s. 407-418. ISSN 1432-881X Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : MD simulations * DNA/RNA methyltransferase * enthalpy-entropy compensation Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.903, year: 2010

  4. Flexible double-headed cytosine-linked 2'-deoxycytidine nucleotides. Synthesis, polymerase incorporation to DNA and interaction with DNA methyltransferases

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kielkowski, Pavel; Cahová, Hana; Pohl, Radek; Hocek, Michal

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. 6 (2016), s. 1268-1276. ISSN 0968-0896 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP206/12/G151 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : nucleosides * nucleotides * pyrimidines * DNA methyltransferases * DNA polymerases Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.793, year: 2014

  5. An assay for human erythrocyte catechol-O-methyltransferase activity using a catechol estrogen as the substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A radiometric assay for catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) activity in human erythrocytes is described that employs 2-hydroxy[3H]estrone, and nonradiolabeled S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) as the cosubstrates. The ease of separation of the product of the reaction, 2-methoxy[3H)estrone from 2-hydroxy-[3H]estrone makes it possible to achieve low reaction blanks. The assay is very sensitive, and only 200 μl of whole blood are used per determination. The assay is highly reproducible. The interassay variability (coefficient of variation) was 6.5% for 24 assays of COMT activity in red blood cells in blood obtained daily for 24 days from one person. In incubations conducted at 370C for 30 min, the catechol-O-methyltransferase activity was a linear function of enzyme concentration (equivalent to 11 to 180 μl of packed red blood cells). Employing this assay, we evaluated the catalytic conversion of 2-hydroxyestrone to 2-methoxy-estrone by catechol-O-methyltransferase from human red blood cells and found that the apparent Michaelis constant and the apparent maximal rate of reaction were 3 X 10-7 M and 6.7 X 10-9 mol.ml-1 erythrocytes . h-1, respectively. The catechol-O-methyltransferase activity measured in erythrocytes obtained from 100 healthy subjects (men and nonpregnant women) was 8.2 +- 0.17 (mean +- S.E.) nmol 2-methoxyestrone . ml-1 erythrocytes. h-1. (Auth.)

  6. Phylogenetic, molecular, and biochemical characterization of caffeic aicd O-methyltransferase (COMT) gene family in Brachypodium distachyon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caffeic acid O-methyltransferase (COMT) is one of the important enzymes controlling lignin monomer production in plant cell wall synthesis. Analysis of the genome sequence of new grass model Brachypodium distachyon identified four COMT gene homologues, designated as BdCOMT1, BdCOMT2, BdCOMT3, and ...

  7. Molecular cloning, characterization and expression of the caffeic acid O-methyltransferase (COMT) ortholog from kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    We cloned the full-length of the gene putatively encoding caffeic acid O-methyltransferase (COMT) from kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus L.) using degenerate primers and the RACE (rapid amplification of cDNA ends) method. Kenaf is an herbaceous and rapidly growing dicotyledonous plant with great potential ...

  8. Current understanding of the interplay between catechol-O-methyltransferase genetic variants, sleep, brain development and cognitive performance in schizophrenia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tucci, Valter; Lassi, Glenda; Kas, Martien J

    2012-01-01

    Abnormal sleep is an endophenotype of schizophrenia. Here we provide an overview of the genetic mechanisms that link specific sleep physiological processes to schizophrenia-related cognitive defects. In particular, we will review the possible relationships between catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT)

  9. Comparative Distribution and Retention of Arsenic in Arsenic (+3 Oxidation State) Methyltransferase Knockout and Wild Type Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    The mouse arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase (As3mt) gene encodes a ~ 43 kDa protein that catalyzes conversion of inorganic arsenic into methylated products. Heterologous expression of AS3MT or its silencing by RNA interference controls arsenic methylation phenotypes...

  10. Identification of 8-methyladenosine as the modification catalyzed by the radical SAM methyltransferase Cfr that confers antibiotic resistance in bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giessing, Anders; Jensen, Søren Skov; Rasmussen, Anette;

    2009-01-01

    The Cfr methyltransferase confers combined resistance to five different classes of antibiotics that bind to the peptidyl transferase center of bacterial ribosomes. The Cfr-mediated modification has previously been shown to occur on nucleotide A2503 of 23S rRNA and has a mass corresponding to an a...

  11. Polymorphisms in O-methyltransferase genes are associated with stover cell wall digestibility in European maize (Zea mays L.)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brenner, Everton A; Zein, Imad; Chen, Yongsheng;

    2010-01-01

    Background OMT (O-methyltransferase) genes are involved in lignin biosynthesis, which relates to stover cell wall digestibility. Reduced lignin content is an important determinant of both forage quality and ethanol conversion efficiency of maize stover. Results Variation in genomic sequences codi...

  12. An integrated epigenetic and genetic analysis of DNA methyltransferase genes (DNMTs) in tumor resistant and susceptible chicken lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Both epigenetic alterations and genetic variations play essential roles in tumorigenesis. The epigenetic modification of DNA methylation is catalyzed and maintained by the DNA methyltransferases (DNMT3a, DNMT3b and DNMT1). DNA mutations and DNA methylation profiles of DNMTs themselves and their rela...

  13. Using FT-NIR spectroscopy technique to determine arginine content in fermented Cordyceps sinensis mycelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Chuanqi; Xu, Ning; Shao, Yongni; He, Yong

    2015-10-01

    This research investigated the feasibility of using Fourier transform near-infrared (FT-NIR) spectral technique for determining arginine content in fermented Cordyceps sinensis (C. sinensis) mycelium. Three different models were carried out to predict the arginine content. Wavenumber selection methods such as competitive adaptive reweighted sampling (CARS) and successive projections algorithm (SPA) were used to identify the most important wavenumbers and reduce the high dimensionality of the raw spectral data. Only a few wavenumbers were selected by CARS and CARS-SPA as the optimal wavenumbers, respectively. Among the prediction models, CARS-least squares-support vector machine (CARS-LS-SVM) model performed best with the highest values of the coefficient of determination of prediction (Rp(2)=0.8370) and residual predictive deviation (RPD=2.4741), the lowest value of root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP=0.0841). Moreover, the number of the input variables was forty-five, which only accounts for 2.04% of that of the full wavenumbers. The results showed that FT-NIR spectral technique has the potential to be an objective and non-destructive method to detect arginine content in fermented C. sinensis mycelium. PMID:26010565

  14. Study on mutual interactions and electronic structures of hyaluronan with Lysine, 6-Aminocaproic acid and Arginine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chytil, Martin; Trojan, Martin; Kovalenko, Alexander

    2016-05-20

    Interactions between polyelectrolytes and oppositely charged surfactants have been in a great interest for several decades, yet the conventional surfactants may cause a problem in medical applications. Interactivity between polysaccharide hyaluronan (HA) and amino acids Lysine, 6-Aminocaproic acid (6-AcA), and Arginine as an alternative system is reported. The interactions were investigated by means of rheology and electric conductance and the electronic structures were explored by the density functional theory (DFT). Lysine exhibits the strongest interaction of all, which was manifested, e.g. by nearly 6-time drop of the initial viscosity comparing with only 1.3-time lower value in the case of 6-AcA. Arginine interaction with HA was surprisingly weaker in terms of viscosity than that of Lysine due to a lower and delocalized charge density on its guanidine group. According to the DFT calculations, the binding of Lysine to HA was found to be more flexible, while Arginine creates more rigid structure with HA. PMID:26917367

  15. Effect of oral arginine supplementation on GH secretion and lipid metabolism in Wistar trained rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Luciano

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The Oral Arginine Supplementation (OAS and exercise are able to modify the secretion of the Growth Hormone (GH that stimulates the lipid metabolism. The aim of the study was to verify the effect of the OAS, the aerobic exercise and the combination of the OAS with the aerobic exercise on the GH secretion and lipid metabolism in rats. The sample was composted for 40 male wistar rats, divided in four groups: Sedentary control (SC, sedentary arginine (SA, trained control (TC and trained arginine (TA. The AS and AT received the oral supplementation in alternated days and the groups CT and AT realized swimming exercise for 1hour/day with overload equivalent to 5% of body mass five days per week during 4 weeks. The concentrations of GH were significantly difference between the sedentary groups (SC and AS and (TC and AT and the lipid metabolism did not change throughout all groups. In conclusions, aerobic physical training did not modify the lipid metabolism and diminishes the values of GH concentration and the OAS did not modify the concentration of GH in Wistar rats.

  16. Arginine and antioxidant supplement on performance in elderly male cyclists: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carpenter Catherine L

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human exercise capacity declines with advancing age. These changes often result in loss of physical fitness and more rapid senescence. Nitric oxide (NO has been implicated in improvement of exercise capacity through vascular smooth muscle relaxation in both coronary and skeletal muscle arteries, as well as via independent mechanisms. Antioxidants may prevent nitric oxide inactivation by oxygen free radicals. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of an L-arginine and antioxidant supplement on exercise performance in elderly male cyclists. Methods This was a two-arm prospectively randomized double-blinded and placebo-controlled trial. Sixteen male cyclists were randomized to receive either a proprietary supplement (Niteworks®, Herbalife International Inc., Century City, CA or a placebo powder. Exercise parameters were assessed by maximal incremental exercise testing performed on a stationary cycle ergometer using breath-by-breath analysis at baseline, week one and week three. Results There was no difference between baseline exercise parameters. In the supplemented group, anaerobic threshold increased by 16.7% (2.38 ± 0.18 L/min, p 2 max between control and intervention groups at either week 1 or week 3 by comparison to baseline. Conclusion An arginine and antioxidant-containing supplement increased the anaerobic threshold at both week one and week three in elderly cyclists. No effect on VO2 max was observed. This study indicated a potential role of L-arginine and antioxidant supplementation in improving exercise performance in elderly.

  17. Promoting siRNA delivery via enhanced cellular uptake using an arginine-decorated amphiphilic dendrimer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoxuan; Liu, Cheng; Zhou, Jiehua; Chen, Chao; Qu, Fanqi; Rossi, John J.; Rocchi, Palma; Peng, Ling

    2015-02-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) with small interfering RNA (siRNA) is expected to offer an attractive means to specifically and efficiently silence disease-associated genes for treating various diseases provided that safe and efficient delivery systems are available. In this study, we have established an arginine-decorated amphiphilic dendrimer composed of a hydrophobic alkyl chain and a hydrophilic PAMAM dendron bearing arginine terminals as nonviral vector for siRNA delivery. Indeed, this dendrimer proved to be very effective at delivering siRNAs in human prostate cancer PC-3 cells and in human hematopoietic CD34+ stem cells, leading to improved gene silencing compared to the corresponding nonarginine decorated dendrimer. Further investigation confirmed that this dendrimer was granted with the capacity to form stable nanoparticles with siRNA and significantly enhance cellular uptake of siRNA. In addition, this dendrimer revealed no discernible cytotoxicity. All these findings demonstrate that decoration of the dendrimer surface with arginine residues is indeed a useful strategy to improve the delivery ability of dendrimers.

  18. Kinetics for Cu(2+) induced Sepia pharaonis arginine kinase inactivation and aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xiao-Yu; Zhang, Li-Li; Wu, Feng; Fu, Yang-Yong; Yin, Shang-Jun; Si, Yue-Xiu; Park, Yong-Doo

    2016-10-01

    Arginine kinase plays an important role in cellular energy metabolism and is closely related to the environmental stress response in marine invertebrates. We studied the Cu(2+)-mediated inhibition and aggregation of Sepia pharaonis arginine kinase (SPAK) and found that Cu(2+) markedly inhibited the SPAK activity along with mixed-type inhibition against the arginine substrate and noncompetitive inhibition against the ATP cofactor. Spectrofluorimetry results showed that Cu(2+) induced a tertiary structure change in SPAK, resulting in exposure of the hydrophobic surface and increased aggregation. Cu(2+)-mediated SPAK aggregation followed first-order kinetics consistent with monophasic and a biphasic processes. Addition of osmolytes, including glycine and proline, effectively blocked SPAK aggregation and restored SPAK activity. Our results demonstrated the effects of Cu(2+) on SPAK catalytic function, conformation, and aggregation, as well as the protective effects of osmolytes on SPAK folding. This study provided important insights into the role of Cu(2+) as a negative effector of the S. pharaonis metabolic enzyme AK and the possible responses of cephalopods to unfavorable environmental conditions. PMID:27318110

  19. Mass spectrometry-based identification and characterisation of lysine and arginine methylation in the human proteome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bremang, Michael; Cuomo, Alessandro; Agresta, Anna Maria; Stugiewicz, Magdalena; Spadotto, Valeria; Bonaldi, Tiziana

    2013-09-01

    Protein methylation is a post-translational modification (PTM) by which a variable number of methyl groups are transferred to lysine and arginine residues within proteins. Despite increased interest in this modification due to its reversible nature and its emerging role in a diverse set of biological pathways beyond chromatin, global identification of protein methylation has remained an unachieved goal. To characterise sites of lysine and arginine methylation beyond histones, we employed an approach that combines heavy methyl stable isotope labelling by amino acids in cell culture (hmSILAC) with high-resolution mass spectrometry-based proteomics. Through a broad evaluation of immuno-affinity enrichment and the application of two classical protein separation techniques prior to mass spectrometry, to nucleosolic and cytosolic fractions separately, we identified a total of 501 different methylation types, on 397 distinct lysine and arginine sites, present on 139 unique proteins. Our results considerably extend the number of known in vivo methylation sites and indicate their significant presence on several protein complexes involved at all stages of gene expression, from chromatin remodelling and transcription to splicing and translation. In addition, we describe the potential of the hmSILAC approach for accurate relative quantification of methylation levels between distinct functional states. PMID:23748837

  20. Lysozyme affects the microbial catabolism of free arginine in raw-milk hard cheeses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Incecco, P; Gatti, M; Hogenboom, J A; Bottari, B; Rosi, V; Neviani, E; Pellegrino, L

    2016-08-01

    Lysozyme (LZ) is used in several cheese varieties to prevent late blowing which results from fermentation of lactate by Clostridium tyrobutyricum. Side effects of LZ on lactic acid bacteria population and free amino acid pattern were studied in 16 raw-milk hard cheeses produced in eight parallel cheese makings conducted at four different dairies using the same milk with (LZ+) or without (LZ-) addition of LZ. The LZ-cheeses were characterized by higher numbers of cultivable microbial population and lower amount of DNA arising from lysed bacterial cells with respect to LZ + cheeses. At both 9 and 16 months of ripening, Lactobacillus delbrueckii and Lactobacillus fermentum proved to be the species mostly affected by LZ. The total content of free amino acids indicated the proteolysis extent to be characteristic of the dairy, regardless to the presence of LZ. In contrast, the relative patterns showed the microbial degradation of arginine to be promoted in LZ + cheeses. The data demonstrated that the arginine-deiminase pathway was only partially adopted since citrulline represented the main product and only trace levels of ornithine were found. Differences in arginine degradation were considered for starter and non-starter lactic acid bacteria, at different cheese ripening stages. PMID:27052697

  1. Caries-free subjects have high levels of urease and arginine deiminase activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelyn REYES

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study investigated the relationship between urease and arginine deiminase system (ADS activities and dental caries through a cross-sectional study. Material and Methods: Urease and ADS activities were measured in saliva and plaque samples from 10 caries-free subjects and 13 caries-active. Urease activity was obtained from the ammonia produced by incubation of plaque and saliva samples in urea. ADS activity was obtained from the ammonia generated by the arginine-HCl and Tris-maleate buffer. Specific activity was defined as micromoles of ammonia per minute per milligram of protein. Shapiro-Wilk statistical test was used to analyze the distribution of the data, and Mann-Whitney test was used to determine the significance of the data. Results: The specific urease activity in saliva and plaque was significantly higher in individuals with low DMFT scores. ADS activity in saliva (6.050 vs 1.350, p=0.0154 and plaque (8.830 vs 1.210, p=0.025 was also higher in individuals with low DMFT scores. Conclusions: Caries-free subjects had a higher ammonia generation activity by urease and arginine deiminase system for both saliva and plaque samples than low caries-active subjects. High levels of alkali production in oral environment were related to caries-free subjects.

  2. Effects of Arginine Supplementation on Amino Acid Profiles in Blood and Tissues in Fed and Overnight-Fasted Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Holecek

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Chronic arginine intake is believed to have favorable effects on the body. However, it might be hypothesized that excessive consumption of an individual amino acid exerts adverse effects on distribution and metabolism of other amino acids. We evaluated the effect of chronic intake of arginine on amino acid concentrations in blood plasma, liver, kidneys, and soleus and extensor digitorum longus muscles. Rats were fed a standard diet or a high-arginine diet (HAD for two months. Half of the animals in each group were sacrificed in the fed state, and the other half after fasting overnight. HAD increased blood plasma concentrations of urea, creatinine, arginine, and ornithine and decreased most other amino acids. Arginine and ornithine also increased in muscles and kidneys; an increase of lysine was observed in both muscle types. Methionine, phenylalanine, threonine, asparagine, glycine, serine, and taurine decreased in most tissues of HAD fed animals. Most of the effects of HAD disappeared after overnight fasting. It is concluded that (i enhanced dietary arginine intake alters distribution of almost all amino acids; and (ii to attain a better assessment of the effects of various nutritional interventions, an appropriate number of biochemical measurements must be performed in both postprandial and postabsorptive states.

  3. Effects of Arginine Supplementation on Amino Acid Profiles in Blood and Tissues in Fed and Overnight-Fasted Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holecek, Milan; Sispera, Ludek

    2016-01-01

    Chronic arginine intake is believed to have favorable effects on the body. However, it might be hypothesized that excessive consumption of an individual amino acid exerts adverse effects on distribution and metabolism of other amino acids. We evaluated the effect of chronic intake of arginine on amino acid concentrations in blood plasma, liver, kidneys, and soleus and extensor digitorum longus muscles. Rats were fed a standard diet or a high-arginine diet (HAD) for two months. Half of the animals in each group were sacrificed in the fed state, and the other half after fasting overnight. HAD increased blood plasma concentrations of urea, creatinine, arginine, and ornithine and decreased most other amino acids. Arginine and ornithine also increased in muscles and kidneys; an increase of lysine was observed in both muscle types. Methionine, phenylalanine, threonine, asparagine, glycine, serine, and taurine decreased in most tissues of HAD fed animals. Most of the effects of HAD disappeared after overnight fasting. It is concluded that (i) enhanced dietary arginine intake alters distribution of almost all amino acids; and (ii) to attain a better assessment of the effects of various nutritional interventions, an appropriate number of biochemical measurements must be performed in both postprandial and postabsorptive states. PMID:27070638

  4. The Effects Of L-Arginine And L-Name On Coronary Flow And Oxidative Stress In Isolated Rat Hearts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sobot Tanja

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this experimental study was to assess the effects of the acute administration of L-arginine alone and in combination with L-NAME (a non-selective NO synthase inhibitor on the coronary flow and oxidative stress markers in isolated rat hearts. The experimental study was performed on hearts isolated from Wistar albino rats (n=12, male, 8 weeks old, body mass of 180-200 g. Retrograde perfusion of the isolated preparations was performed using a modified method according to the Langendorff technique with a gradual increase in the perfusion pressure (40–120 cmH2O. The following values were measured in the collected coronary effluents: coronary flow, released nitrites (NO production marker, superoxide anion radical and the index of lipid peroxidation (measured as thiobarbiturate reactive substances. The experimental protocol was performed under controlled conditions, followed by the administration of L-arginine alone (1 mmol and L-arginine (1 mmol + L-NAME (30 μmol. The results indicated that L-arginine did not significantly increase the coronary flow or the release of NO, TBARS and the superoxide anion radical. These effects were partially blocked by the joint administration of L-arginine + L-NAME, which indicated their competitive effect. Hence, the results of our study do not demonstrate significant effects of L-arginine administration on the coronary flow and oxidative stress markers in isolated rat hearts.

  5. Influence of phenolic compounds on the growth and arginine deiminase system in a wine lactic acid bacterium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María R. Alberto

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The influence of seven phenolic compounds, normally present in wine, on the growth and arginine deiminase system (ADI of Lactobacillus hilgardii X1B, a wine lactic acid bacterium, was established. This system provides energy for bacterial growth and produces citrulline that reacts with ethanol forming the carcinogen ethyl carbamate (EC, found in some wines. The influence of phenolic compounds on bacterial growth was compound dependent. Growth and final pH values increased in presence of arginine. Arginine consumption decreased in presence of protocatechuic and gallic acids (31 and 17%, respectively and increased in presence of quercetin, rutin, catechin and the caffeic and vanillic phenolic acids (between 10 and 13%, respectively. ADI enzyme activities varied in presence of phenolic compounds. Rutin, quercetin and caffeic and vanillic acids stimulated the enzyme arginine deiminase about 37-40%. Amounts of 200 mg/L gallic and protocatechuic acids inhibited the arginine deiminase enzyme between 53 and 100%, respectively. Ornithine transcarbamylase activity was not modified at all concentrations of phenolic compounds. As gallic and protocatechuic acids inhibited the arginine deiminase enzyme that produces citrulline, precursor of EC, these results are important considering the formation of toxic compounds.

  6. Noncanonical Myo9b-RhoGAP Accelerates RhoA GTP Hydrolysis by a Dual-Arginine-Finger Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Fengshuang; Kong, Ruirui; Ren, Jinqi; Zhu, Li; Lou, Jizhong; Wu, Jane Y; Feng, Wei

    2016-07-31

    The GTP hydrolysis activities of Rho GTPases are stimulated by GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs), which contain a RhoGAP domain equipped with a characteristic arginine finger and an auxiliary asparagine for catalysis. However, the auxiliary asparagine is missing in the RhoGAP domain of Myo9b (Myo9b-RhoGAP), a unique motorized RhoGAP that specifically targets RhoA for controlling cell motility. Here, we determined the structure of Myo9b-RhoGAP in complex with GDP-bound RhoA and magnesium fluoride. Unexpectedly, Myo9b-RhoGAP contains two arginine fingers at its catalytic site. The first arginine finger resembles the one within the canonical RhoGAP domains and inserts into the nucleotide-binding pocket of RhoA, whereas the second arginine finger anchors the Switch I loop of RhoA and interacts with the nucleotide, stabilizing the transition state of GTP hydrolysis and compensating for the lack of the asparagine. Mutating either of the two arginine fingers impaired the catalytic activity of Myo9b-RhoGAP and affected the Myo9b-mediated cell migration. Our data indicate that Myo9b-RhoGAP accelerates RhoA GTP hydrolysis by a previously unknown dual-arginine-finger mechanism, which may be shared by other noncanonical RhoGAP domains lacking the auxiliary asparagine. PMID:27363609

  7. Monomeric Corynebacterium glutamicum N-acetyl glutamate kinase maintains sensitivity to L-arginine but has a lower intrinsic catalytic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yuanyuan; Li, Cheng; Zhang, Hao; Liang, Shuli; Han, Shuangyan; Lin, Ying; Yang, Xiaorong; Zheng, Suiping

    2016-02-01

    N-acetyl glutamate kinase (NAGK) is a key enzyme in the synthesis of L-arginine, and L-arginine-sensitive NAGK typically has hexameric architecture. Defining the relationship between this architecture and L-arginine inhibition can provide a foundation to identify the key amino acids involved in the allosteric regulation network of L-arginine. In the present study, the key amino acids in the N-terminal helix (N-helix) of Corynebacterium glutamicum (Cg) NAGK required for hexamer formation were determined using structural homology modeling and site-directed mutagenesis. It was also verified that hexameric architecture is required for the positive cooperativity of inhibition by L-arginine and for efficient catalysis, but that it is not the determinant of inhibition by L-arginine. Monomeric mutants retained a similar sensitivity to L-arginine as the hexameric form, indicating that monomers contain an independent, sensitive signal transduction network of L-arginine to mediate allosteric regulation. Mutation studies of CgNAGKs also revealed that amino acid residues 18-23 of the N-helix are required for inhibition by L-arginine, and that E19 may be an essential amino acid influencing the apparent affinity of L-arginine. Collectively, these studies may illuminate the basic mechanism of metabolic homeostasis of C. glutamicum. PMID:26512006

  8. Methanol:coenzyme M methyltransferase from Methanosarcina barkeri. Zinc dependence and thermodynamics of the methanol:cob(I)alamin methyltransferase reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, K; Thauer, R K

    1997-10-01

    In Methanosarcina barkeri, methanogenesis from methanol is initiated by the formation of methyl-coenzyme M from methanol and coenzyme M. This methyl transfer reaction is catalyzed by two enzymes, designated methyltransferases 1 (MT1) and 2 (MT2). Transferase MT1, which is composed of a 50-kDa subunit, MtaB, and a 27-kDa corrinoid-harbouring subunit, MtaC, has been shown recently to catalyze the methylation of free cob(I)alamin with methanol [Sauer, K., Harms, U. & Thauer, R. K. (1997) Eur. J. Biochem. 243, 670-677]. We report here that this reaction is catalyzed by subunit MtaB overproduced in Escherichia coli. MtaB also catalyzed the formation of methanol from methylcobalamin and H2O, the hydrolysis being associated with a free-energy change deltaG(o)' of approximately +7.0 kJ/mol. MtaB was found to contain 1 mol zinc, and its activity to be zinc dependent (pK(Zn2+) = 9.3). The zinc dependence of the MT2 (MtaA)-catalyzed reaction is also described (pK(Zn2+) = 9.6). PMID:9363780

  9. Concurrent supplementation of arginine, vitamin E, and vitamin C improve cardiopulmonary performance in broilers chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Feria, C A

    2009-03-01

    Two experiments were conducted to evaluate the effects of arginine, vitamin E (VE), and vitamin C (VC) on cardiopulmonary performance and ascites parameters of broilers reared under a cold environmental temperature. One-day-old male broilers were fed a basal corn-soybean meal diet (control, 1.2% arginine and 40 IU of VE), or the basal diet supplemented with 1% arginine and either 200 IU vitamin E (AE), 500 mg of vitamin C (AC), or a combination of VE and VC at the same amounts (AEC) per kilogram of feed. Pulmonary arterial pressure (PAP) and mean arterial pressure were recorded in clinically healthy, anesthetized birds (28 to 42 d old) before and after an epinephrine (Epi) challenge (0.5 mg/kg of BW, i.v.), an aminoguanidine hemisulfate challenge (100 mg/kg of BW, i.v.), and an N-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester challenge (50 mg/kg of BW, i.v.) at 20-min intervals. Data were analyzed by repeated measures ANOVA, and the Student Newman-Keuls test was used to separate means within groups. The PAP increased 30 s after the Epi challenge in all birds, but the peak PAP was lower in the AEC group than in all the other groups, whereas birds in the AE and AC groups had lower PAP peaks than did the control group. After 120 s of challenge, the PAP was lower in AEC birds compared with the other birds. The PAP returned to pre-Epi amounts within 300 s in all groups. The PAP was increased (P < 0.05) within 60 s after the aminoguanidine hemisulfate and N-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester challenges in all groups, but no differences were found among groups. The mean arterial pressure responses did not differ among groups. Plasma NO was greater in the AEC group than in all the other groups before and after the Epi challenge. These results showed that Epi elicited lower amplitude PAP and less prolonged increases in PAP in birds from the AEC group, and this may have been related to the increased vasodilation attributable to NO production. The AEC may have had complementary effects against

  10. O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT): can function explain a suicidal mechanism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouws, Chrisna; Pretorius, Pieter J

    2011-11-01

    Why does O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), an indispensable DNA repair enzyme, have a mechanism which seems to run counter to its importance? This enzyme is key to the removal of detrimental alkyl adducts from guanine bases. Although the mechanism is well known, an unusual feature surrounds its mode of action, which is its so-called suicidal endpoint. In addition, induction of MGMT is highly variable and its kinetics is atypical. These features raise some questions on the seemingly paradoxical mechanism. In this manuscript we point out that, although there is ample literature regarding the "how" of the MGMT enzyme, we found a lack of information on "why" this specific mechanism is in place. We then ask whether we know all there is to know about MGMT, or if perhaps there is a further as yet unknown function for MGMT, or if the suicidal mechanism may play some kind of protective role in the cell. PMID:21864987

  11. Structural Basis for Binding of RNA and Cofactor by a KsgA Methyltransferase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tu, Chao; Tropea, Joseph E.; Austin, Brian P.; Court, Donald L.; Waugh, David S.; Ji, Xinhua; (NCI)

    2009-03-27

    Among methyltransferases, KsgA and the reaction it catalyzes are conserved throughout evolution. However, the specifics of substrate recognition by the enzyme remain unknown. Here we report structures of Aquifex aeolicus KsgA, in its ligand-free form, in complex with RNA, and in complex with both RNA and S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH, reaction product of cofactor S-adenosylmethionine), revealing critical structural information on KsgA-RNA and KsgA-SAH interactions. Moreover, the structures show how conformational changes that occur upon RNA binding create the cofactor-binding site. There are nine conserved functional motifs (motifs IVIII and X) in KsgA. Prior to RNA binding, motifs I and VIII are flexible, each exhibiting two distinct conformations. Upon RNA binding, the two motifs become stabilized in one of these conformations, which is compatible with the binding of SAH. Motif X, which is also stabilized upon RNA binding, is directly involved in the binding of SAH.

  12. Biochemical and Computational Analysis of the Substrate Specificities of Cfr and RlmN Methyltransferases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ntokou, Eleni; Hansen, Lykke Haastrup; Kongsted, Jacob;

    2015-01-01

    -ray structure of RlmN. We used a trinucleotide as target sequence and assessed its positioning at the active site for methylation. The calculations are in accordance with different poses of the trinucleotide in the two enzymes indicating major evolutionary changes to shift the C2/C8 specificities. To explore......Cfr and RlmN methyltransferases both modify adenine 2503 in 23S rRNA (Escherichia coli numbering). RlmN methylates position C2 of adenine while Cfr methylates position C8, and to a lesser extent C2, conferring antibiotic resistance to peptidyl transferase inhibitors. Cfr and RlmN show high sequence...... interchangeability between Cfr and RlmN we constructed various combinations of their genes. The function of the mixed genes was investigated by RNA primer extension analysis to reveal methylation at 23S rRNA position A2503 and by MIC analysis to reveal antibiotic resistance. The catalytic site is expected to be...

  13. Adding a Lysine Mimic in the Design of Potent Inhibitors of Histone Lysine Methyltransferases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Yanqi; Ganesh, Thota; Horton, John R.; Spannhoff, Astrid; Liu, Jin; Sun, Aiming; Zhang, Xing; Bedford, Mark T.; Shinkai, Yoichi; Snyder, James P.; Cheng, Xiaodong (Emory); (Kyoto); (Texas)

    2010-07-19

    Dynamic histone lysine methylation involves the activities of modifying enzymes (writers), enzymes removing modifications (erasers), and readers of the histone code. One common feature of these activities is the recognition of lysines in methylated and unmethylated states, whether they are substrates, reaction products, or binding partners. We applied the concept of adding a lysine mimic to an established inhibitor (BIX-01294) of histone H3 lysine 9 methyltransferases G9a and G9a-like protein by including a 5-aminopentyloxy moiety, which is inserted into the target lysine-binding channel and becomes methylated by G9a-like protein, albeit slowly. The compound enhances its potency in vitro and reduces cell toxicity in vivo. We suggest that adding a lysine or methyl-lysine mimic should be considered in the design of small-molecule inhibitors for other methyl-lysine writers, erasers, and readers.

  14. Molecular basis for oncohistone H3 recognition by SETD2 methyltransferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shuang; Zheng, Xiangdong; Lu, Chao; Li, Guo-Min; Allis, C David; Li, Haitao

    2016-07-15

    High-frequency point mutations of genes encoding histones have been identified recently as novel drivers in a number of tumors. Specifically, the H3K36M/I mutations were shown to be oncogenic in chondroblastomas and undifferentiated sarcomas by inhibiting H3K36 methyltransferases, including SETD2. Here we report the crystal structures of the SETD2 catalytic domain bound to H3K36M or H3K36I peptides with SAH (S-adenosylhomocysteine). In the complex structure, the catalytic domain adopts an open conformation, with the K36M/I peptide snuggly positioned in a newly formed substrate channel. Our structural and biochemical data reveal the molecular basis underying oncohistone recognition by and inhibition of SETD2. PMID:27474439

  15. Multi-site-specific 16S rRNA methyltransferase RsmF from Thermus thermophilus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demirci, Hasan; Larsen, Line H G; Hansen, Trine;

    2010-01-01

    Cells devote a significant effort toward the production of multiple modified nucleotides in rRNAs, which fine tune the ribosome function. Here, we report that two methyltransferases, RsmB and RsmF, are responsible for all four 5-methylcytidine (m(5)C) modifications in 16S rRNA of Thermus...... thermophilus. Like Escherichia coli RsmB, T. thermophilus RsmB produces m(5)C967. In contrast to E. coli RsmF, which introduces a single m(5)C1407 modification, T. thermophilus RsmF modifies three positions, generating m(5)C1400 and m(5)C1404 in addition to m(5)C1407. These three residues are clustered near...

  16. Nucleosome Binding Alters the Substrate Bonding Environment of Histone H3 Lysine 36 Methyltransferase NSD2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulin, Myles B; Schneck, Jessica L; Matico, Rosalie E; Hou, Wangfang; McDevitt, Patrick J; Holbert, Marc; Schramm, Vern L

    2016-06-01

    Nuclear receptor-binding SET domain protein 2 (NSD2) is a histone H3 lysine 36 (H3K36)-specific methyltransferase enzyme that is overexpressed in a number of cancers, including multiple myeloma. NSD2 binds to S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM) and nucleosome substrates to catalyze the transfer of a methyl group from SAM to the ε-amino group of histone H3K36. Equilibrium binding isotope effects and density functional theory calculations indicate that the SAM methyl group is sterically constrained in complex with NSD2, and that this steric constraint is released upon nucleosome binding. Together, these results show that nucleosome binding to NSD2 induces a significant change in the chemical environment of enzyme-bound SAM. PMID:27183271

  17. Imatinib causes epigenetic alterations of PTEN gene via upregulation of DNA methyltransferases and polycomb group proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have recently reported the possible imatinib-resistant mechanism; long-term exposure of leukemia cells to imatinib downregulated levels of phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) via hypermethylation of its promoter region (Leukemia 2010; 24: 1631). The present study explored the molecular mechanisms by which imatinib caused methylation on the promoter region of this tumor suppressor gene in leukemia cells. Real-time reverse transcription PCR found that long-term exposure of chronic eosinophilic leukemia EOL-1 cells expressing FIP1L1/platelet-derived growth factor receptor-α to imatinib induced expression of DNA methyltransferase 3A (DNMT3A) and histone-methyltransferase enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2), a family of polycomb group, thereby increasing methylation of the gene. Immunoprecipitation assay found the increased complex formation of DNMT3A and EZH2 proteins in these cells. Moreover, chromatin immunoprecipitation assay showed that amounts of both DNMT3A and EZH2 proteins bound around the promoter region of PTEN gene were increased in EOL-1 cells after exposure to imatinib. Furthermore, we found that levels of DNMT3A and EZH2 were strikingly increased in leukemia cells isolated from individuals with chronic myelogenous leukemia (n=1) and Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia (n=2), who relapsed after treatment with imatinib compared with those isolated at their initial presentation. Taken together, imatinib could cause drug-resistance via recruitment of polycomb gene complex to the promoter region of the PTEN and downregulation of this gene's transcripts in leukemia patients

  18. Characterization of three O-methyltransferases involved in noscapine biosynthesis in opium poppy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Thu-Thuy T; Facchini, Peter J

    2012-06-01

    Noscapine is a benzylisoquinoline alkaloid produced in opium poppy (Papaver somniferum) and other members of the Papaveraceae. It has been used as a cough suppressant and more recently was shown to possess anticancer activity. However, the biosynthesis of noscapine in opium poppy has not been established. A proposed pathway leading from (S)-reticuline to noscapine includes (S)-scoulerine, (S)-canadine, and (S)-N-methylcanadine as intermediates. Stem cDNA libraries and latex extracts of eight opium poppy cultivars displaying different alkaloid profiles were subjected to massively parallel pyrosequencing and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, respectively. Comparative transcript and metabolite profiling revealed the occurrence of three cDNAs encoding O-methyltransferases designated as SOMT1, SOMT2, and SOMT3 that correlated with the accumulation of noscapine in the eight cultivars. SOMT transcripts were detected in all opium poppy organs but were most abundant in aerial organs, where noscapine primarily accumulates. SOMT2 and SOMT3 showed strict substrate specificity and regiospecificity as 9-O-methyltransferases targeting (S)-scoulerine. In contrast, SOMT1 was able to sequentially 9- and 2-O-methylate (S)-scoulerine, yielding (S)-tetrahydropalmatine. SOMT1 also sequentially 3'- and 7-O-methylated both (S)-norreticuline and (S)-reticuline with relatively high substrate affinity, yielding (S)-tetrahydropapaverine and (S)-laudanosine, respectively. The metabolic functions of SOMT1, SOMT2, and SOMT3 were investigated in planta using virus-induced gene silencing. Reduction of SOMT1 or SOMT2 transcript levels resulted in a significant decrease in noscapine accumulation. Reduced SOMT1 transcript levels also caused a decrease in papaverine accumulation, confirming the selective roles for these enzymes in the biosynthesis of both alkaloids in opium poppy. PMID:22535422

  19. Functional characterisation of three o-methyltransferases involved in the biosynthesis of phenolglycolipids in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roxane Simeone

    Full Text Available Phenolic glycolipids are produced by a very limited number of slow-growing mycobacterial species, most of which are pathogen for humans. In Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the etiologic agent of tuberculosis, these molecules play a role in the pathogenicity by modulating the host immune response during infection. The major variant of phenolic glycolipids produced by M. tuberculosis, named PGL-tb, consists of a large lipid core terminated by a glycosylated aromatic nucleus. The carbohydrate part is composed of three sugar residues, two rhamnosyl units and a terminal fucosyl residue, which is per-O-methylated, and seems to be important for pathogenicity. While most of the genes responsible for the synthesis of the lipid core domain and the saccharide appendage of PGL-tb have been characterized, the enzymes involved in the O-methylation of the fucosyl residue of PGL-tb remain unknown. In this study we report the identification and characterization of the methyltransferases required for the O-methylation of the terminal fucosyl residue of PGL-tb. These enzymes are encoded by genes Rv2954c, Rv2955c and Rv2956. Mutants of M. tuberculosis harboring deletion within these genes were constructed. Purification and analysis of the phenolglycolipids produced by these strains, using a combination of mass spectrometry and NMR spectroscopy, revealed that Rv2954c, Rv2955c and Rv2956 encode the methyltransferases that respectively catalysed the O-methylation of the hydroxyl groups located at positions 3, 4 and 2 of the terminal fucosyl residue of PGL-tb. Our data also suggest that methylation at these positions is a sequential process, starting with position 2, followed by positions 4 and 3.

  20. Expression of a functional jasmonic acid carboxyl methyltransferase is negatively correlated with strawberry fruit development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preuß, Anja; Augustin, Christiane; Figueroa, Carlos R; Hoffmann, Thomas; Valpuesta, Victoriano; Sevilla, José F; Schwab, Wilfried

    2014-09-15

    The volatile metabolite methyl jasmonate (MeJA) plays an important role in intra- and interplant communication and is involved in diverse biological processes. In this study, we report the cloning and functional characterization of a S-adenosyl-l-methionine:jasmonic acid carboxyl methyltransferase (JMT) from Fragaria vesca and Fragaria×ananassa. Biochemical assays and comprehensive transcript analyses showed that JMT has been erroneously annotated as gene fusion with a carboxyl methyltransferase (CMT) (gene15184) in the first published genome sequence of F. vesca. Recombinant FvJMT catalyzed the formation of MeJA with KM value of 22.3μM while FvCMT and the fusion protein were almost inactive. Activity of JMT with benzoic acid and salicylic acid as substrates was less than 1.5% of that with JA. Leucine at position 245, an amino acid missing in other JMT sequences is essential for activity of FvJMT. In accordance with MeJA levels, JMT transcript levels decreased steadily during strawberry fruit ripening, as did the expression levels of JA biosynthesis and regulatory genes. It appears that CMT has originated by a recent duplication of JMT and lost its enzymatic activity toward JA. In the newest version of the strawberry genome sequence (June 2014) CMT and JMT are annotated as separate genes in accordance with differential temporal and spatial expression patterns of both genes in Fragaria sp. In conclusion, MeJA, the inactive derivative of JA, is probably involved in early steps of fruit development by modulating the levels of the active plant hormone JA. PMID:25046752