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Sample records for arginase ii restricts

  1. Effect of arginase II on L-arginine depletion and cell growth in murine cell lines of renal cell carcinoma

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    Patterson John R

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background L-arginine is the common substrate for the two isoforms of arginase. Arginase I, highly expressed in the liver and arginase II mainly expressed in the kidney. Arginase I-producing myeloid derived suppressor cells have been shown to inhibit T-cell function by the depletion of L-arginine. On the other hand, arginase II has been detected in patients with cancer and is thought to metabolize L-arginine to L-ornithine needed to sustain rapid tumor growth; however its role in L-arginine depletion is unclear. Thus, in tumor biology, L-arginine metabolism may play a dual role in tumor growth and in the induction of T cell dysfunction. Therefore, we studied in murine renal cell carcinoma (RCC cell lines, the effect of arginase II on tumor cell proliferation and L-arginine depletion. The effect of arginase inhibitors on cell proliferation was also tested. Methods Three murine renal cell carcinoma (mRCC cell lines were tested for the presence of arginase. nor-NOHA, an arginase inhibitor was used to substantiate the effect of arginase on cell growth and L-arginine depletion. Amino acid levels were tested by HPLC. Results Our results show that mRCC cell lines express only arginase II and were able to deplete L-arginine from the medium. Cell growth was independent of the amount of arginase activity expressed by the cells. nor-NOHA significantly (P = 0.01 reduced arginase II activity and suppressed cell growth in cells exhibiting high arginase activity. The depletion of L-arginine by mRCC induced the decrease expression of CD3ζ a key element for T-cell function. Conclusion The results of this study show for the first time that arginase II produced by RCC cell lines depletes L-arginine resulting in decreased expression of CD3ζ. These results indicate that RCC cell lines expressing arginase II can modulate the L-arginine metabolic pathway to regulate both cell growth and T-cell function. Blocking arginase may lead to a decrease in RCC cell

  2. Selective endothelial overexpression of arginase II induces endothelial dysfunction and hypertension and enhances atherosclerosis in mice.

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    Boris L Vaisman

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disorders associated with endothelial dysfunction, such as atherosclerosis, have decreased nitric oxide (NO bioavailability. Arginase in the vasculature can compete with eNOS for L-arginine and has been implicated in atherosclerosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of endothelial-specific elevation of arginase II expression on endothelial function and the development of atherosclerosis.Transgenic mice on a C57BL/6 background with endothelial-specific overexpression of human arginase II (hArgII gene under the control of the Tie2 promoter were produced. The hArgII mice had elevated tissue arginase activity except in liver and in resident peritoneal macrophages, confirming endothelial specificity of the transgene. Using small-vessel myography, aorta from these mice exhibited endothelial dysfunction when compared to their non-transgenic littermate controls. The blood pressure of the hArgII mice was 17% higher than their littermate controls and, when crossed with apoE -/- mice, hArgII mice had increased aortic atherosclerotic lesions.We conclude that overexpression of arginase II in the endothelium is detrimental to the cardiovascular system.

  3. Angiotensin II-induced arterial thickening, fibrosis and stiffening involves elevated arginase function.

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    Anil Bhatta

    Full Text Available Arterial stiffness (AS is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular morbidity/mortality. Smooth muscle cell (SMC proliferation and increased collagen synthesis are key features in development of AS. Arginase (ARG, an enzyme implicated in many cardiovascular diseases, can compete with nitric oxide (NO synthase for their common substrate, L-arginine. Increased arginase can also provide ornithine for synthesis of polyamines via ornithine decarboxylase (ODC and proline/collagen via ornithine aminotransferase (OAT, leading to vascular cell proliferation and collagen formation, respectively. We hypothesized that elevated arginase activity is involved in Ang II-induced arterial thickening, fibrosis, and stiffness and that limiting its activity can prevent these changes.We tested this by studies in mice lacking one copy of the ARG1 gene that were treated with angiotensin II (Ang II, 4 weeks. Studies were also performed in rat aortic Ang II-treated SMC. In WT mice treated with Ang II, we observed aortic stiffening (pulse wave velocity and aortic and coronary fibrosis and thickening that were associated with increases in ARG1 and ODC expression/activity, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, hydroxyproline levels, and collagen 1 protein expression. ARG1 deletion prevented each of these alterations. Furthermore, exposure of SMC to Ang II (1 μM, 48 hrs increased ARG1 expression, ARG activity, ODC mRNA and activity, cell proliferation, collagen 1 protein expression and hydroxyproline content. Treatment with ABH prevented these changes.Arginase 1 is crucially involved in Ang II-induced SMC proliferation and arterial fibrosis and stiffness and represents a promising therapeutic target.

  4. Role of arginase in vessel wall remodeling

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    William eDurante

    2013-01-01

    Arginase metabolizes the semi-essential amino acid L-arginine to L-ornithine and urea. There are two distinct isoforms of arginase, arginase I and II, which are encoded by separate genes and display differences in tissue distribution, subcellular localization, and molecular regulation. Blood vessels express both arginase I and II but their distribution appears to be cell-, vessel-, and species-specific. Both isoforms of arginase are induced by numerous pathologic stimuli and contribute to va...

  5. Role of Arginase in Vessel Wall Remodeling

    OpenAIRE

    Durante, William

    2013-01-01

    Arginase metabolizes the semi-essential amino acid l-arginine to l-ornithine and urea. There are two distinct isoforms of arginase, arginase I and II, which are encoded by separate genes and display differences in tissue distribution, subcellular localization, and molecular regulation. Blood vessels express both arginase I and II but their distribution appears to be cell-, vessel-, and species-specific. Both isoforms of arginase are induced by numerous pathologic stimuli and contribute to vas...

  6. Role of arginase in vessel wall remodeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William eDurante

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Arginase metabolizes the semi-essential amino acid L-arginine to L-ornithine and urea. There are two distinct isoforms of arginase, arginase I and II, which are encoded by separate genes and display differences in tissue distribution, subcellular localization, and molecular regulation. Blood vessels express both arginase I and II but their distribution appears to be cell-, vessel-, and species-specific. Both isoforms of arginase are induced by numerous pathologic stimuli and contribute to vascular cell dysfunction and vessel wall remodeling in several diseases. Clinical and experimental studies have documented increases in the expression and/or activity of arginase I or II in blood vessels following arterial injury and in pulmonary and arterial hypertension, aging, and atherosclerosis. Significantly, pharmacological inhibition or genetic ablation of arginase in animals ameliorates abnormalities in vascular cells and normalizes blood vessel architecture and function in all of these pathological states. The detrimental effect of arginase in vascular remodeling is attributable to its ability to stimulate vascular smooth muscle cell and endothelial cell proliferation, and collagen deposition by promoting the synthesis of polyamines and L-proline, respectively. In addition, arginase adversely impacts arterial remodeling by directing macrophages towards an inflammatory phenotype. Moreover, the proliferative, fibrotic, and inflammatory actions of arginase in the vasculature are further amplified by its capacity to inhibit nitric oxide synthesis by competing with nitric oxide synthase for substrate, L-arginine. Pharmacologic or molecular approaches targeting specific isoforms of arginase represent a promising strategy in treating obstructive fibroproliferative vascular disease.

  7. TNF-Mediated Restriction of Arginase 1 Expression in Myeloid Cells Triggers Type 2 NO Synthase Activity at the Site of Infection.

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    Schleicher, Ulrike; Paduch, Katrin; Debus, Andrea; Obermeyer, Stephanie; König, Till; Kling, Jessica C; Ribechini, Eliana; Dudziak, Diana; Mougiakakos, Dimitrios; Murray, Peter J; Ostuni, Renato; Körner, Heinrich; Bogdan, Christian

    2016-05-01

    Neutralization or deletion of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) causes loss of control of intracellular pathogens in mice and humans, but the underlying mechanisms are incompletely understood. Here, we found that TNF antagonized alternative activation of macrophages and dendritic cells by IL-4. TNF inhibited IL-4-induced arginase 1 (Arg1) expression by decreasing histone acetylation, without affecting STAT6 phosphorylation and nuclear translocation. In Leishmania major-infected C57BL/6 wild-type mice, type 2 nitric oxide (NO) synthase (NOS2) was detected in inflammatory dendritic cells or macrophages, some of which co-expressed Arg1. In TNF-deficient mice, Arg1 was hyperexpressed, causing an impaired production of NO in situ. A similar phenotype was seen in L. major-infected BALB/c mice. Arg1 deletion in hematopoietic cells protected these mice from an otherwise lethal disease, although their disease-mediating T cell response (Th2, Treg) was maintained. Thus, deletion or TNF-mediated restriction of Arg1 unleashes the production of NO by NOS2, which is critical for pathogen control.

  8. TNF-Mediated Restriction of Arginase 1 Expression in Myeloid Cells Triggers Type 2 NO Synthase Activity at the Site of Infection

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    Ulrike Schleicher

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Neutralization or deletion of tumor necrosis factor (TNF causes loss of control of intracellular pathogens in mice and humans, but the underlying mechanisms are incompletely understood. Here, we found that TNF antagonized alternative activation of macrophages and dendritic cells by IL-4. TNF inhibited IL-4-induced arginase 1 (Arg1 expression by decreasing histone acetylation, without affecting STAT6 phosphorylation and nuclear translocation. In Leishmania major-infected C57BL/6 wild-type mice, type 2 nitric oxide (NO synthase (NOS2 was detected in inflammatory dendritic cells or macrophages, some of which co-expressed Arg1. In TNF-deficient mice, Arg1 was hyperexpressed, causing an impaired production of NO in situ. A similar phenotype was seen in L. major-infected BALB/c mice. Arg1 deletion in hematopoietic cells protected these mice from an otherwise lethal disease, although their disease-mediating T cell response (Th2, Treg was maintained. Thus, deletion or TNF-mediated restriction of Arg1 unleashes the production of NO by NOS2, which is critical for pathogen control.

  9. Bone marrow cell derived arginase I is the major source of allergen-induced lung arginase but is not required for airway hyperresponsiveness, remodeling and lung inflammatory responses in mice

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    Rothenberg Marc E

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Arginase is significantly upregulated in the lungs in murine models of asthma, as well as in human asthma, but its role in allergic airway inflammation has not been fully elucidated in mice. Results In order to test the hypothesis that arginase has a role in allergic airway inflammation we generated arginase I-deficient bone marrow (BM chimeric mice. Following transfer of arginase I-deficient BM into irradiated recipient mice, arginase I expression was not required for hematopoietic reconstitution and baseline immunity. Arginase I deficiency in bone marrow-derived cells decreased allergen-induced lung arginase by 85.8 ± 5.6%. In contrast, arginase II-deficient mice had increased lung arginase activity following allergen challenge to a similar level to wild type mice. BM-derived arginase I was not required for allergen-elicited sensitization, recruitment of inflammatory cells in the lung, and proliferation of cells. Furthermore, allergen-induced airway hyperresponsiveness and collagen deposition were similar in arginase-deficient and wild type mice. Additionally, arginase II-deficient mice respond similarly to their control wild type mice with allergen-induced inflammation, airway hyperresponsiveness, proliferation and collagen deposition. Conclusion Bone marrow cell derived arginase I is the predominant source of allergen-induced lung arginase but is not required for allergen-induced inflammation, airway hyperresponsiveness or collagen deposition.

  10. Helicobacter pylori arginase mutant colonizes arginase Ⅱ knockout mice

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    Songhee H Kim; Melanie L Langford; Jean-Luc Boucher; Traci L Testerman; David J McGee

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the role of host and bacterial argi-nases in the colonization of mice by Helicobacter pylori (H. Pylori).METHODS: H. Pylori produces a very powerful urease that hydrolyzes urea to carbon dioxide and ammonium, which neutralizes acid. Urease is absolutely essential to H. Pylori pathogenesis; therefore, the urea substrate must be in ample supply for urease to work efficiently. The urea substrate is most likely provided by arginase activity, which hydrolyzes L-arginine to L-ornithine and urea. Previous work has demonstrated that H. Pylori arginase is surprisingly not required for colonization of wild-type mice. Hence, another in vivo source of the critical urea substrate must exist. We hypothesized that the urea source was provided by host arginase Ⅱ, since this enzyme is expressed in the stomach, and H. Pylori has previously been shown to induce the expres-sion of murine gastric arginase Ⅱ. To test this hypoth-esis, wild-type and arginase (rocF) mutant H. Pylori strain SS1 were inoculated into arginase Ⅱ knockout mice. RESULTS: Surprisingly, both the wild-type and rocF mutant bacteria still colonized arginase Ⅱ knock-out mice. Moreover, feeding arginase Ⅱ knockout mice the host arginase inhibitor S-(2-boronoethyl)-L-cysteine (BEC), while inhibiting > 50% of the host arginase Ⅰactivity in several tissues, did not block the ability of the rocF mutant H. Pylori to colonize. In con-trast, BEC poorly inhibited H. Pylori arginase activity. CONCLUSION: The in vivo source for the essential urea utilized by H. Pylori urease is neither bacterial arginase nor host arginase Ⅱ; instead, either residual host arginase Ⅰor agmatinase is probably responsible.

  11. Pulmonary arterial hypertension in rats due to age-related arginase activation in intermittent hypoxia.

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    Nara, Akina; Nagai, Hisashi; Shintani-Ishida, Kaori; Ogura, Sayoko; Shimosawa, Tatsuo; Kuwahira, Ichiro; Shirai, Mikiyasu; Yoshida, Ken-ichi

    2015-08-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is prevalent in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). Aging induces arginase activation and reduces nitric oxide (NO) production in the arteries. Intermittent hypoxia (IH), conferred by cycles of brief hypoxia and normoxia, contributes to OSAS pathogenesis. Here, we studied the role of arginase and aging in the pathogenesis of PAH in adult (9-mo-old) and young (2-mo-old) male Sprague-Dawley rats subjected to IH or normoxia for 4 weeks and analyzed them with a pressure-volume catheter inserted into the right ventricle (RV) and by pulsed Doppler echocardiography. Western blot analysis was conducted on arginase, NO synthase isoforms, and nitrotyrosine. IH induced PAH, as shown by increased RV systolic pressure and RV hypertrophy, in adult rats but not in young rats. IH increased expression levels of arginase I and II proteins in the adult rats. IH also increased arginase I expression in the pulmonary artery endothelium and arginase II in the pulmonary artery adventitia. Furthermore, IH reduced pulmonary levels of nitrate and nitrite but increased nitrotyrosine levels in adult rats. An arginase inhibitor (N(ω)-hydroxy-nor-1-arginine) prevented IH-induced PAH and normalized nitrite and nitrate levels in adult rats. IH induced arginase up-regulation and PAH in adult rats, but not in young rats, through reduced NO production. Our findings suggest that arginase inhibition prevents or reverses PAH. PMID:25490411

  12. Arginase activities and global arginine bioavailability in wild-type and ApoE-deficient mice: responses to high fat and high cholesterol diets.

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    Aaron Erdely

    Full Text Available Increased catabolism of arginine by arginase is increasingly viewed as an important pathophysiological factor in cardiovascular disease, including atherosclerosis induced by high cholesterol diets. Whereas previous studies have focused primarily on effects of high cholesterol diets on arginase expression and arginine metabolism in specific blood vessels, there is no information regarding the impact of lipid diets on arginase activity or arginine bioavailability at a systemic level. We, therefore, evaluated the effects of high fat (HF and high fat-high cholesterol (HC diets on arginase activity in plasma and tissues and on global arginine bioavailability (defined as the ratio of plasma arginine to ornithine + citrulline in apoE(-/- and wild-type C57BL/6J mice. HC and HF diets led to reduced global arginine bioavailability in both strains. The HC diet resulted in significantly elevated plasma arginase in both strains, but the HF diet increased plasma arginase only in apoE(-/- mice. Elevated plasma arginase activity correlated closely with increased alanine aminotransferase levels, indicating that liver damage was primarily responsible for elevated plasma arginase. The HC diet, which promotes atherogenesis, also resulted in increased arginase activity and expression of the type II isozyme of arginase in multiple tissues of apoE(-/- mice only. These results raise the possibility that systemic changes in arginase activity and global arginine bioavailability may be contributing factors in the initiation and/or progression of cardiovascular disease.

  13. Neuroblastoma Arginase Activity Creates an Immunosuppressive Microenvironment That Impairs Autologous and Engineered Immunity.

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    Mussai, Francis; Egan, Sharon; Hunter, Stuart; Webber, Hannah; Fisher, Jonathan; Wheat, Rachel; McConville, Carmel; Sbirkov, Yordan; Wheeler, Kate; Bendle, Gavin; Petrie, Kevin; Anderson, John; Chesler, Louis; De Santo, Carmela

    2015-08-01

    Neuroblastoma is the most common extracranial solid tumor of childhood, and survival remains poor for patients with advanced disease. Novel immune therapies are currently in development, but clinical outcomes have not matched preclinical results. Here, we describe key mechanisms in which neuroblastoma inhibits the immune response. We show that murine and human neuroblastoma tumor cells suppress T-cell proliferation through increased arginase activity. Arginase II is the predominant isoform expressed and creates an arginine-deplete local and systemic microenvironment. Neuroblastoma arginase activity results in inhibition of myeloid cell activation and suppression of bone marrow CD34(+) progenitor proliferation. Finally, we demonstrate that the arginase activity of neuroblastoma impairs NY-ESO-1-specific T-cell receptor and GD2-specific chimeric antigen receptor-engineered T-cell proliferation and cytotoxicity. High arginase II expression correlates with poor survival for patients with neuroblastoma. The results support the hypothesis that neuroblastoma creates an arginase-dependent immunosuppressive microenvironment in both the tumor and blood that leads to impaired immunosurveillance and suboptimal efficacy of immunotherapeutic approaches.

  14. Influence of βS-Globin Haplotypes and Hydroxyurea on Arginase I Levels in Sickle Cell Disease

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    J. A. Moreira

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Sickle cell disease (SCD is characterized by hemoglobin S homozygosity, leading to hemolysis and vasoocclusion. The hemolysis releases arginase I, an enzyme that decreases the bioavailability of nitric oxide, worsening the symptoms. The different SCD haplotypes are related to clinical symptoms and varied hemoglobin F (HbF concentration. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of the βS gene haplotypes and HbF concentration on arginase I levels in SCD patients. Methods. Fifty SCD adult patients were enrolled in the study and 20 blood donors composed the control group. Arginase I was measured by ELISA. The βS haplotypes were identified by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP. Statistical analyses were performed with GraphPad Prism program and the significance level was p<0.05. Results. Significant increase was observed in the arginase I levels in SCD patients compared to the control group (p<0.0001. The comparison between the levels of arginase I in three haplotypes groups showed a difference between the Bantu/Bantu × Bantu/Benin groups; Bantu/Bantu × Benin/Benin, independent of HU dosage. An inverse correlation with the arginase I levels and HbF concentration was observed. Conclusion. The results support the hypothesis that arginase I is associated with HbF concentration, also measured indirectly by the association with haplotypes.

  15. Arginase 1 and arginase 2 variations associate with asthma, asthma severity and beta(2) agonist and steroid response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vonk, Judith M.; Postma, Dirkje S.; Maarsingh, Harm; Bruinenberg, Marcel; Koppelman, Gerard H.; Meurs, Herman

    2010-01-01

    Rationale Arginase probably plays an important role in asthma development, severity and progression. Polymorphisms in arginase 1 and arginase 2 genes have been associated with childhood asthma and FEV1 reversibility to beta(2) agonists. Objectives We investigated the association between arginase 1 a

  16. Anesthetic Management of a Pediatric Patient with Arginase Deficiency

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    Abdulkadir Atım

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Arginase deficiency is an autosomal recessive disorder of the urea cycle in which a defect in conversion of arginine to urea and ornithine leads to hyperammonemia. Patients with urea cycle disorders may show increased protein catabolism due to inadequate intake of energy, protein and essential amino acids; infections, fever and surgery. A 12-year-old girl with arginase deficiency, ASA II who weighed 40 kg was scheduled for bilateral adductor, quadriceps and gastrocnemius tenotomies. She had mental retardation, spasticity and flexion posture of thelower limbs. Metabolic homeostasis was restored with appropriate diet. Successful anesthetic management allowed the patient to be discharged 48 hours after surgery. Increased levels of arginine and ammonia during or after surgery may lead to serious complications such as hypotension, cerebral edema, convulsions, hypothermia and spasticity. Thus special attention must be given to metabolic homeostasis and nutrition of the patients with arginase deficiency in the perioperative period. Primary goals should be to minimize stress levels by effective anxiolysis, provide an adequate amount of protein-free energy with proper fluid management and to obtain an effective preemptive and postoperative analgesia. In addition to a high level of knowledge, successful anesthesia requires professional communication among nursing staff, dietitians, pediatric metabolism specialist, surgeon and anesthesiologist.

  17. Inhibition of S6K1 accounts partially for the anti-inflammatory effects of the arginase inhibitor L-norvaline

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    Ruffieux Jean

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pharmacological inhibition of endothelial arginase-II has been shown to improve endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS function and reduce atherogenesis in animal models. We investigated whether the endothelial arginase II is involved in inflammatory responses in endothelial cells. Methods Human endothelial cells were isolated from umbilical veins and stimulated with TNFα (10 ng/ml for 4 hours. Endothelial expression of the inflammatory molecules i.e. vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1, and E-selectin were assessed by immunoblotting. Results The induction of the expression of endothelial VCAM-1, ICAM-1 and E-selectin by TNFα was concentration-dependently reduced by incubation of the endothelial cells with the arginase inhibitor L-norvaline. However, inhibition of arginase by another arginase inhibitor S-(2-boronoethyl-L-cysteine (BEC had no effects. To confirm the role of arginase-II (the prominent isoform expressed in HUVECs in the inflammatory responses, adenoviral mediated siRNA silencing of arginase-II knocked down the arginase II protein level, but did not inhibit the up-regulation of the adhesion molecules. Moreover, the inhibitory effect of L-norvaline was not reversed by the NOS inhibitor L-NAME and L-norvaline did not interfere with TNFα-induced activation of NF-κB, JNK, p38mapk, while it inhibited p70s6k (S6K1 activity. Silencing S6K1 prevented up-regulation of E-selectin, but not that of VCAM-1 or ICAM-1 induced by TNFα. Conclusion The arginase inhibitor L-norvaline exhibits anti-inflammatory effects independently of inhibition of arginase in human endothelial cells. The anti-inflammatory properties of L-norvaline are partially attributable to its ability to inhibit S6K1.

  18. Arginase treatment prevents the recovery of canine lymphoma and osteosarcoma cells resistant to the toxic effects of prolonged arginine deprivation.

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    James W Wells

    Full Text Available Rapidly growing tumor cells require a nutrient-rich environment in order to thrive, therefore, restricting access to certain key amino acids, such as arginine, often results in the death of malignant cells, which frequently display defective cell cycle check-point control. Healthy cells, by contrast, become quiescent and remain viable under arginine restriction, displaying full recovery upon return to arginine-rich conditions. The use of arginase therapy to restrict available arginine for selectively targeting malignant cells is currently under investigation in human clinical trials. However, the suitability of this approach for veterinary uses is unexplored. As a prelude to in vivo studies in canine malignancies, we examined the in vitro effects of arginine-deprivation on canine lymphoid and osteosarcoma cell lines. Two lymphoid and 2 osteosarcoma cell lines were unable to recover following 6 days of arginine deprivation, but all remaining cell lines displayed full recovery upon return to arginine-rich culture conditions. These remaining cell lines all proved susceptible to cell death following the addition of arginase to the cultures. The lymphoid lines were particularly sensitive to arginase, becoming unrecoverable after just 3 days of treatment. Two of the osteosarcoma lines were also susceptible over this time-frame; however the other 3 lines required 6-8 days of arginase treatment to prevent recovery. In contrast, adult progenitor cells from the bone marrow of a healthy dog were able to recover fully following 9 days of culture in arginase. Over 3 days in culture, arginase was more effective than asparaginase in inducing the death of lymphoid lines. These results strongly suggest that short-term arginase treatment warrants further investigation as a therapy for lymphoid malignancies and osteosarcomas in dogs.

  19. Arginase and Arginine Dysregulation in Asthma

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    Renée C. Benson

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, evidence has accumulated indicating that the enzyme arginase, which converts L-arginine into L-ornithine and urea, plays a key role in the pathogenesis of pulmonary disorders such as asthma through dysregulation of L-arginine metabolism and modulation of nitric oxide (NO homeostasis. Allergic asthma is characterized by airway hyperresponsiveness, inflammation, and remodeling. Through substrate competition, arginase decreases bioavailability of L-arginine for nitric oxide synthase (NOS, thereby limiting NO production with subsequent effects on airway tone and inflammation. By decreasing L-arginine bioavailability, arginase may also contribute to the uncoupling of NOS and the formation of the proinflammatory oxidant peroxynitrite in the airways. Finally, arginase may play a role in the development of chronic airway remodeling through formation of L-ornithine with downstream production of polyamines and L-proline, which are involved in processes of cellular proliferation and collagen deposition. Further research on modulation of arginase activity and L-arginine bioavailability may reveal promising novel therapeutic strategies for asthma.

  20. Evolutionary roots of arginase expression and regulation

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    Jolanta Maria Dzik

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Two main types of macrophage functions are known: classical (M1, producing nitric oxide, NO, and M2, in which arginase activity is primarily expressed. Ornithine, the product of arginase, is a substrate for synthesis of polyamines and collagen, important for growth and ontogeny of animals. M2 macrophages, expressing high level of mitochondrial arginase, have been implicated in promoting cell division and deposition of collagen during ontogeny and wound repair. Arginase expression is the default mode of tissue macrophages, but can also be amplified by signals, such as IL4/13 or TGF-β that accelerates wound healing and tissue repair. In worms, the induction of collagen gene is coupled with induction of immune response genes, both depending on the same TGF-β-like pathway. This suggests that the main function of M2 heal type macrophages is originally connected with the TGF-β superfamily of proteins, which are involved in regulation of tissue and organ differentiation in embryogenesis. Excretory-secretory products of metazoan parasites are able to induce M2 type of macrophage responses promoting wound healing without participation of Th2 cytokines IL4/IL13. The expression of arginase in lower animals can be induced by the presence of parasite antigens and TGF-β signals leading to collagen synthesis. This also means that the main proteins, which, in primitive metazoans, are involved in regulation of tissue and organ differentiation in embryogenesis are produced by innate immunity. The signaling function of NO is known already from the sponge stage of animal evolution. The cytotoxic role of NO molecule appeared later, as documented in immunity of marine mollusks and some insects. This implies that the M2-wound healing promoting function predates the defensive role of NO, a characteristic of M1 macrophages. Understanding when and how the M1 and M2 activities came to be in animals is useful for understanding how macrophage immunity, and immune

  1. Endonuclease specificity and sequence dependence of Type IIS restriction enzymes

    OpenAIRE

    Lundin, Sverker; Finn, Terje-Hegge; Foam, Napoleon; Pettersson, Erik; Käller, Max; Wirta, Valtteri; Lexow, Preben; Lundeberg, Joakim

    2015-01-01

    Restriction enzymes that recognize specific sequences but cleave unknown sequence outside the recognition site are extensively utilized tools in molecular biology. Despite this, systematic functional categorization of cleavage performance has largely been lacking. We established a simple and automatable model system to assay cleavage distance variation (termed slippage) and the sequence dependence thereof. We coupled this to massively parallel sequencing in order to provide sensitive and accu...

  2. Influence of βS-Globin Haplotypes and Hydroxyurea on Arginase I Levels in Sickle Cell Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, J A; Machado, R P G; Laurentino, M R; Lemes, Romelia Pinheiro Gonçalves; Barbosa, M C; Santos, T E; Bandeira, I C J; Martins, A M C

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Sickle cell disease (SCD) is characterized by hemoglobin S homozygosity, leading to hemolysis and vasoocclusion. The hemolysis releases arginase I, an enzyme that decreases the bioavailability of nitric oxide, worsening the symptoms. The different SCD haplotypes are related to clinical symptoms and varied hemoglobin F (HbF) concentration. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of the βS gene haplotypes and HbF concentration on arginase I levels in SCD patients. Methods. Fifty SCD adult patients were enrolled in the study and 20 blood donors composed the control group. Arginase I was measured by ELISA. The βS haplotypes were identified by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP). Statistical analyses were performed with GraphPad Prism program and the significance level was p haplotypes groups showed a difference between the Bantu/Bantu × Bantu/Benin groups; Bantu/Bantu × Benin/Benin, independent of HU dosage. An inverse correlation with the arginase I levels and HbF concentration was observed. Conclusion. The results support the hypothesis that arginase I is associated with HbF concentration, also measured indirectly by the association with haplotypes. PMID:27274608

  3. Endonuclease specificity and sequence dependence of type IIS restriction enzymes.

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    Sverker Lundin

    Full Text Available Restriction enzymes that recognize specific sequences but cleave unknown sequence outside the recognition site are extensively utilized tools in molecular biology. Despite this, systematic functional categorization of cleavage performance has largely been lacking. We established a simple and automatable model system to assay cleavage distance variation (termed slippage and the sequence dependence thereof. We coupled this to massively parallel sequencing in order to provide sensitive and accurate measurement. With this system 14 enzymes were assayed (AcuI, BbvI, BpmI, BpuEI, BseRI, BsgI, Eco57I, Eco57MI, EcoP15I, FauI, FokI, GsuI, MmeI and SmuI. We report significant variation of slippage ranging from 1-54%, variations in sequence context dependence, as well as variation between isoschizomers. We believe this largely overlooked property of enzymes with shifted cleavage would benefit from further large scale classification and engineering efforts seeking to improve performance. The gained insights of in-vitro performance may also aid the in-vivo understanding of these enzymes.

  4. Recombinant plasmids for encoding restriction enzymes DpnI and DpnII of streptococcus pneumontae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacks, Sanford A.

    1990-01-01

    Chromosomal DNA cassettes containing genes encoding either the DpnI or DpnII restriction endonucleases from Streptococcus pneumoniae are cloned into a streptococcal vector, pLS101. Large amounts of the restriction enzymes are produced by cells containing the multicopy plasmids, pLS202 and pLS207, and their derivatives pLS201, pLS211, pLS217, pLS251 and pLS252.

  5. EBR-II argon cooling system restricted fuel handling I and C upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The instrumentation and control of the Argon Cooling System (ACS) restricted fuel handling control system at Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) is being upgraded from a system comprised of many discrete components and controllers to a computerized system with a graphical user interface (GUI). This paper describes the aspects of the upgrade including reasons for the upgrade, the old control system, upgrade goals, design decisions, philosophies and rationale, and the new control system hardware and software

  6. Arginase inhibition reduces interleukin-1β-stimulated vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation by increasing nitric oxide synthase-dependent nitric oxide production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Jeongyeon; Ryoo, Sungwoo, E-mail: ryoosw08@kangwon.ac.kr

    2013-06-07

    Highlights: •Arginase inhibition suppressed proliferation of IL-1β-stimulated VSMCs in dose-dependent manner. •NO production from IL-1β-induced iNOS expression was augmented by arginase inhibition, reducing VSMC proliferation. •Incubation with cGMP analogues abolished IL-1β-dependent proliferation of VSMCs. -- Abstract: We investigated whether arginase inhibition suppressed interleukin (IL)-1β-stimulated proliferation in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and the possible mechanisms involved. IL-1β stimulation increased VSMC proliferation, while the arginase inhibitor BEC and transfection of the antisense (AS) oligonucleotide against arginase I decreased VSMC proliferation and was associated with increased protein content of the cell cycle regulator p21Waf1/Cip1. IL-1β incubation induced inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) mRNA expression and protein levels in a dose-dependent manner, but did not affect arginase I and II expression. Consistent with this data, IL-1β stimulation resulted in increase in NO production that was significantly augmented by arginase inhibition. The specific iNOS inhibitor 1400W abolished IL-1β-mediated NO production and further accentuated IL-1β-stimulated cell proliferation. Incubation with NO donors GSNO and DETA/NO in the presence of IL-1β abolished VSMCs proliferation and increased p21Waf1/Cip1 protein content. Furthermore, incubation with the cGMP analogue 8-Br-cGMP prevented IL-1β-induced VSMCs proliferation. In conclusion, arginase inhibition augmented iNOS-dependent NO production that resulted in suppression of IL-1β-induced VSMCs proliferation in a cGMP-dependent manner.

  7. Immunogenicity of HLA Class I and II Double Restricted Influenza A-Derived Peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Sara Ram; Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard; Buus, Søren;

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify influenza A-derived peptides which bind to both HLA class I and -II molecules and by immunization lead to both HLA class I and class II restricted immune responses. Eight influenza A-derived 9-11mer peptides with simultaneous binding to both HLA-A*02:0...... to both HLA class I and class I restricted responses, a quality which might be of potential interest for peptide-based vaccine development....... with this, peptide vaccination did not decrease virus titres in the lungs of intranasally influenza challenged mice. Our data show that HLA class I and class II double binding peptides can be identified by bioinformatics and biochemical technology. By immunization, double binding peptides can give rise...

  8. Vasomotor Regulation of Coronary Microcirculation by Oxidative Stress: Role of Arginase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lih eKuo

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Overproduction of reactive oxygen species, i.e., oxidative stress, is associated with the activation of redox signaling pathways linking to inflammatory insults and cardiovascular diseases by impairing endothelial function and consequently blood flow dysregulation due to microvascular dysfunction. This review focuses on the regulation of vasomotor function in the coronary microcirculation by endothelial nitric oxide (NO during oxidative stress and inflammation related to the activation of L-arginine consuming enzyme arginase. Superoxide produced in the vascular wall compromises vasomotor function by not only scavenging endothelium-derived NO but also inhibiting prostacyclin synthesis due to formation of peroxynitrite. The upregulation of arginase contributes to the deficiency of endothelial NO and microvascular dysfunction in various vascular diseases by initiating or following oxidative stress and inflammation. Hydrogen peroxide, a diffusible and stable oxidizing agent, exerts vasodilator function and plays important roles in the physiological regulation of coronary blood flow. In occlusive coronary ischemia, the release of hydrogen peroxide from the microvasculature helps to restore vasomotor function of coronary collateral microvessels with exercise training. However, excessive production and prolonged exposure of microvessels to hydrogen peroxide impairs NO-mediated endothelial function by reducing L-arginine availability through hydroxyl radical-dependent upregulation of arginase. The redox signaling can be a double-edged sword in the microcirculation, which helps tissue survival in one way by improving vasomotor regulation and elicits oxidative stress and tissue injury in the other way by causing vascular dysfunction. The impact of vascular arginase on the development of vasomotor dysfunction associated with angiotensin II receptor activation, hypertension, ischemia-reperfusion, hypercholesterolemia and inflammatory insults is discussed.

  9. Immunogenicity of HLA Class I and II Double Restricted Influenza A-Derived Peptides

    OpenAIRE

    Pedersen, Sara Ram; Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard; Buus, Søren; Rasmussen, Michael; Korsholm, Karen Smith; Nielsen, Morten; Claesson, Mogens Helweg

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify influenza A-derived peptides which bind to both HLA class I and -II molecules and by immunization lead to both HLA class I and class II restricted immune responses. Eight influenza A-derived 9-11mer peptides with simultaneous binding to both HLA-A*02:01 and HLA-DRB1*01:01 molecules were identified by bioinformatics and biochemical technology. Immunization of transgenic HLA-A*02:01/HLA-DRB1*01:01 mice with four of these double binding peptides gave ...

  10. Restricted dog leucocyte antigen (DLA) class II haplotypes and genotypes in Beagles

    OpenAIRE

    Soutter, Francesca; Kennedy, Lorna J; Ollier, William E R; Solano-Gallego, Laia; Catchpole, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Beagles are commonly used in vaccine trials as part of the regulatory approval process. Genetic restriction within this breed and the impact this might have on vaccine responses are rarely considered. This study was designed to characterise diversity of dog leucocyte antigen (DLA) class II genes in a breeding colony of laboratory Beagles, whose offspring are used in vaccine studies. DLA haplotypes were determined by PCR and sequence-based typing from genomic DNA extracted from blood. Breeding...

  11. Development of novel arginase inhibitors for therapy of endothelial dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jochen eSteppan

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Endothelial dysfunction and resulting vascular pathology have been identified as an early hallmark of multiple diseases, including diabetes mellitus. One of the major contributors to endothelial dysfunction is a decrease in nitric oxide (NO bioavailability, impaired NO signaling and an increase in the amount of reactive oxygen species (ROS. In the endothelium NO is produced by eNOS (endothelial nitric oxide synthase, for which L-arginine is a substrate. Arginase, an enzyme critical in the urea cycle also metabolizes L-arginine, thereby directly competing with eNOS for their common substrate and constraining its bioavailability for eNOS, thereby compromising NO production. Arginase expression and activity is upregulated in many cardiovascular diseases including ischemia reperfusion injury, hypertension, atherosclerosis, and diabetes mellitus. More importantly, since the 1990s, specific arginase inhibitors such as N-hydroxy-guanidinium or N-hydroxy-nor-L-arginine, and boronic acid derivatives, such as, 2(S-amino-6-boronohexanoic acid, and S-(2-boronoethyl-L-cysteine (BEC, that can bridge the binuclear manganese cluster of arginase have been developed. These highly potent and specific inhibitors can now be used to probe arginase function and thereby modulate the redox milieu of the cell by changing the balance between NO and ROS. Inspired by this success, drug discovery programs have recently led to the identification of α-α-disubstituted amino acid based arginase inhibitors (such as (R-2-amino-6-borono-2-(2-(piperidin-1-ylethylhexanoic acid, that are currently under early investigation as therapeutics. Finally, some investigators concentrate on identification of plant derived compounds with arginase inhibitory capability, such as piceatannol-3'-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (PG. All of these synthesized or naturally derived small molecules may represent novel therapeutics for vascular disease particularly that associated with diabetes.

  12. Golden gate shuffling: a one-pot DNA shuffling method based on type IIs restriction enzymes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carola Engler

    Full Text Available We have developed a protocol to assemble in one step and one tube at least nine separate DNA fragments together into an acceptor vector, with 90% of recombinant clones obtained containing the desired construct. This protocol is based on the use of type IIs restriction enzymes and is performed by simply subjecting a mix of 10 undigested input plasmids (nine insert plasmids and the acceptor vector to a restriction-ligation and transforming the resulting mix in competent cells. The efficiency of this protocol allows generating libraries of recombinant genes by combining in one reaction several fragment sets prepared from different parental templates. As an example, we have applied this strategy for shuffling of trypsinogen from three parental templates (bovine cationic trypsinogen, bovine anionic trypsinogen and human cationic trypsinogen each divided in 9 separate modules. We show that one round of shuffling using the 27 trypsinogen entry plasmids can easily produce the 19,683 different possible combinations in one single restriction-ligation and that expression screening of a subset of the library allows identification of variants that can lead to higher expression levels of trypsin activity. This protocol, that we call 'Golden Gate shuffling', is robust, simple and efficient, can be performed with templates that have no homology, and can be combined with other shuffling protocols in order to introduce any variation in any part of a given gene.

  13. Arginase Inhibitor in the Pharmacological Correction of Endothelial Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihail V. Pokrovskiy

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is about a way of correction of endothelial dysfunction with the inhibitor of arginase: L-norvaline. There is an imbalance between vasoconstriction and vasodilatation factors of endothelium on the basis of endothelial dysfunction. Among vasodilatation agents, nitrogen oxide plays the basic role. Amino acid L-arginine serves as a source of molecules of nitrogen oxide in an organism. Because of the high activity of arginase enzyme which catalyzes the hydrolysis of L-arginine into ornithine and urea, the bioavailability of nitrogen oxide decreases. The inhibitors of arginase suppress the activity of the given enzyme, raising and production of nitrogen oxide, preventing the development of endothelial dysfunction.

  14. Does quantum entanglement in DNA synchronize the catalytic centers of type II restriction endonucleases?

    CERN Document Server

    Kurian, P; Lindesay, J

    2014-01-01

    Several living systems have been examined for their apparent optimization of structure and function for quantum behavior at biological length scales. Orthodox type II endonucleases, the largest class of restriction enzymes, recognize four-to-eight base pair sequences of palindromic DNA, cut both strands symmetrically, and act without an external metabolite such as ATP. While it is known that these enzymes induce strand breaks by attacking phosphodiester bonds, what remains unclear is the mechanism by which cutting occurs in concert at the catalytic centers. Previous studies indicate the primacy of intimate DNA contacts made by the specifically bound enzyme in coordinating the two synchronized cuts. We propose that collective electronic behavior in the DNA helix generates coherent oscillations, quantized through boundary conditions imposed by the endonuclease, that provide the energy required to break two phosphodiester bonds. Such quanta may be preserved in the presence of thermal noise and electromagnetic in...

  15. Toward a network model of MHC class II-restricted antigen processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurence C Eisenlohr

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The standard model of Major Histocompatibility Complex class II (MHCII-restricted antigen processing depicts a straightforward, linear pathway: Internalized antigens are converted into peptides that load in a chaperone dependent manner onto nascent MHCII in the late endosome, the complexes subsequently trafficking to the cell surface for recognition by CD4+ T cells (TCD4+. Several variations on this theme, both moderate and radical, have come to light but these alternatives have remained peripheral, the conventional pathway generally presumed to be the primary driver of TCD4+ responses. Here we continue to press for the conceptual repositioning of these alternatives toward the center while proposing that MHCII processing be thought of less in terms of discrete pathways and more in terms of a network whose major and minor conduits are variable depending upon many factors, including the epitope, the nature of the antigen, the source of the antigen, and the identity of the antigen-presenting cell.

  16. Inhibition of Human Arginase I by Substrate adn Product Analogues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L Di Costanzo; M Ilies; K Thorn; D Christianson

    2011-12-31

    Human arginase I is a binuclear manganese metalloenzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of L-arginine to generate L-ornithine and urea. We demonstrate that N-hydroxy-L-arginine (NOHA) binds to this enzyme with K(d)=3.6 microM, and nor-N-hydroxy-L-arginine (nor-NOHA) binds with K(d)=517 nM (surface plasmon resonance) or K(d) approximately 50 nM (isothermal titration calorimetry). Crystals of human arginase I complexed with NOHA and nor-NOHA afford 2.04 and 1.55 A resolution structures, respectively, which are significantly improved in comparison with previously-determined structures of the corresponding complexes with rat arginase I. Higher resolution structures clarify the binding interactions of the inhibitors. Finally, the crystal structure of the complex with L-lysine (K(d)=13 microM) is reported at 1.90 A resolution. This structure confirms the importance of hydrogen bond interactions with inhibitor alpha-carboxylate and alpha-amino groups as key specificity determinants of amino acid recognition in the arginase active site.

  17. Probing the Specificity Determinants of Amino Acid Recognition by Arginase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shishova, E.; Di Costanzo, L; Emig, F; Ash, D; Christianson, D

    2009-01-01

    Arginase is a binuclear manganese metalloenzyme that serves as a therapeutic target for the treatment of asthma, erectile dysfunction, and atherosclerosis. In order to better understand the molecular basis of inhibitor affinity, we have employed site-directed mutagenesis, enzyme kinetics, and X-ray crystallography to probe the molecular recognition of the amino acid moiety (i.e., the ?-amino and ?-carboxylate groups) of substrate l-arginine and inhibitors in the active site of arginase I. Specifically, we focus on (1) a water-mediated hydrogen bond between the substrate ?-carboxylate and T135, (2) a direct hydrogen bond between the substrate ?-carboxylate and N130, and (3) a direct charged hydrogen bond between the substrate ?-amino group and D183. Amino acid substitutions for T135, N130, and D183 generally compromise substrate affinity as reflected by increased KM values but have less pronounced effects on catalytic function as reflected by minimal variations of kcat. As with substrate KM values, inhibitor Kd values increase for binding to enzyme mutants and suggest that the relative contribution of intermolecular interactions to amino acid affinity in the arginase active site is water-mediated hydrogen bond < direct hydrogen bond < direct charged hydrogen bond. Structural comparisons of arginase with the related binuclear manganese metalloenzymes agmatinase and proclavaminic acid amidinohydrolase suggest that the evolution of substrate recognition in the arginase fold occurs by mutation of residues contained in specificity loops flanking the mouth of the active site (especially loops 4 and 5), thereby allowing diverse guanidinium substrates to be accommodated for catalysis.

  18. How quantum entanglement in DNA synchronizes double-strand breakage by type II restriction endonucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurian, P; Dunston, G; Lindesay, J

    2016-02-21

    Macroscopic quantum effects in living systems have been studied widely in pursuit of fundamental explanations for biological energy transport and sensing. While it is known that type II endonucleases, the largest class of restriction enzymes, induce DNA double-strand breaks by attacking phosphodiester bonds, the mechanism by which simultaneous cutting is coordinated between the catalytic centers remains unclear. We propose a quantum mechanical model for collective electronic behavior in the DNA helix, where dipole-dipole oscillations are quantized through boundary conditions imposed by the enzyme. Zero-point modes of coherent oscillations would provide the energy required for double-strand breakage. Such quanta may be preserved in the presence of thermal noise by the enzyme's displacement of water surrounding the DNA recognition sequence. The enzyme thus serves as a decoherence shield. Palindromic mirror symmetry of the enzyme-DNA complex should conserve parity, because symmetric bond-breaking ceases when the symmetry of the complex is violated or when physiological parameters are perturbed from optima. Persistent correlations in DNA across longer spatial separations-a possible signature of quantum entanglement-may be explained by such a mechanism.

  19. Fast conversion of scFv to Fab antibodies using type IIs restriction enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanmark, Hanna; Huovinen, Tuomas; Matikka, Tero; Pettersson, Tiina; Lahti, Maria; Lamminmäki, Urpo

    2015-11-01

    Single chain variable fragment (scFv) antibody libraries are widely used for developing novel bioaffinity reagents, although Fab or IgG molecules are the preferred antibody formats in many final applications. Therefore, rapid conversion methods for combining multiple DNA fragments are needed to attach constant domains to the scFv derived variable domains. In this study we describe a fast and easy cloning method for the conversion of single framework scFv fragments to Fab fragments using type IIS restriction enzymes. All cloning steps excluding plating of the Fab transformants can be done in 96 well plates and the procedure can be completed in one working day. The concept was tested by converting 69 scFv clones into Fab format on 96 well plates, which resulted in 93% success rate. The method is particularly useful as a high-throughput tool for the conversion of the chosen scFv clones into Fab molecules in order to analyze them as early as possible, as the conversion can significantly affect the binding properties of the chosen clones.

  20. Overexpression of arginase in the aged mouse penis impairs erectile function and decreases eNOS activity: influence of in vivo gene therapy of anti-arginase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bivalacqua, Trinity J; Burnett, Arthur L; Hellstrom, Wayne J G; Champion, Hunter C

    2007-03-01

    Since both increased nitric oxide (NO) synthase (NOS) abundance and diminished NO signaling have been reported in the aging penis, the role of NO in the adaptations of aging remains controversial. Here we tested the hypothesis that arginase, an enzyme that competes with NOS for the substrate l-arginine, contributes to erectile dysfunction with advanced age in the B6/129 mouse strain. Arginase protein abundance, mRNA expression, and enzyme activity were elevated in aged compared with young penile endothelial cells. In addition, endothelial NOS (NOS3) protein abundance was greater in aged versus young penile endothelial cells, whereas NOS activity and cGMP levels were reduced. Calcium-dependent l-arginine-to-l-citrulline conversion and cGMP formation increased significantly in aged mouse penes in the presence of the arginase inhibitor 2(S)-amino-6-boronohexanoic acid (ABH). However, there was no effect on l-arginine-to-l-citrulline conversion or cGMP accumulation in the endothelium from young mouse penes. To assess the functional role of arginase in the inhibition of NOS pathway responsiveness in the penis, we evaluated the effects of ABH and an adeno-associated virus encoding an antisense sequence to arginase I (AAVanti-arginase) on erectile function in vivo. ABH and AAVanti-arginase enhanced endothelium-dependent erectile responses in the aged mice without altering endothelium-independent responses. Paralleling our in vitro observations, ABH or AAVanti-arginase did not affect vascular responses in the young mice. Inhibition of the arginase pathway improves endothelial function in the aging penile circulation, suggesting that the arginase pathway may be exploited to improve erectile dysfunction associated with aging. PMID:17071735

  1. Strategies to Rescue the Consequences of Inducible Arginase-1 Deficiency in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Ballantyne, Laurel L.; Yuan Yan Sin; Tim St Amand; Joshua Si; Steven Goossens; Lieven Haenebalcke; Haigh, Jody J; Lianna Kyriakopoulou; Andreas Schulze; Funk, Colin D

    2015-01-01

    Arginase-1 catalyzes the conversion of arginine to ornithine and urea, which is the final step of the urea cycle used to remove excess ammonia from the body. Arginase-1 deficiency leads to hyperargininemia in mice and man with severe lethal consequences in the former and progressive neurological impairment to varying degrees in the latter. In a tamoxifen-induced arginase-1 deficient mouse model, mice succumb to the enzyme deficiency within 2 weeks after inducing the knockout and retain

  2. Purification and Properties of the Constitutive Arginase of Evernia prunastri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Falquina, A; Legaz, M E

    1984-12-01

    Constitutive arginase (molecular weight 330,000) 920-fold purified from Evernia prunastri thallus, is activated by putrescine, l-ornithine, and agmatine with K(a) values of 2.7, 1.1, and 5.8 millimolar, respectively. Constitutive arginase is also activated by endogenous l-arginine, reaching its maximum activity at 16 hours of incubation on Tris-HCl (pH 9.15) with a subsequent decrease. Urea behaves as a mixed inhibitor of the enzyme with a K(i) value of 2.6 millimolar. Atranorin and evernic acid behave as in vitro activators of the enzyme; usnic acid does not have any significant effect as activator. PMID:16663950

  3. Binding of [alpha, alpha]-Disubstituted Amino Acids to Arginase Suggests New Avenues for Inhibitor Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilies, Monica; Di Costanzo, Luigi; Dowling, Daniel P.; Thorn, Katherine J.; Christianson, David W. (MIT); (Episcopal U); (Rutgers); (Drexel); (Penn)

    2011-10-21

    Arginase is a binuclear manganese metalloenzyme that hydrolyzes L-arginine to form L-ornithine and urea, and aberrant arginase activity is implicated in various diseases such as erectile dysfunction, asthma, atherosclerosis, and cerebral malaria. Accordingly, arginase inhibitors may be therapeutically useful. Continuing our efforts to expand the chemical space of arginase inhibitor design and inspired by the binding of 2-(difluoromethyl)-L-ornithine to human arginase I, we now report the first study of the binding of {alpha},{alpha}-disubstituted amino acids to arginase. Specifically, we report the design, synthesis, and assay of racemic 2-amino-6-borono-2-methylhexanoic acid and racemic 2-amino-6-borono-2-(difluoromethyl)hexanoic acid. X-ray crystal structures of human arginase I and Plasmodium falciparum arginase complexed with these inhibitors reveal the exclusive binding of the L-stereoisomer; the additional {alpha}-substituent of each inhibitor is readily accommodated and makes new intermolecular interactions in the outer active site of each enzyme. Therefore, this work highlights a new region of the protein surface that can be targeted for additional affinity interactions, as well as the first comparative structural insights on inhibitor discrimination between a human and a parasitic arginase.

  4. Multiple tissue-specific isoforms of sulfatide activate CD1d-restricted type II NKT cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blomqvist, Maria; Rhost, Sara; Teneberg, Susann;

    2009-01-01

    relevant isoforms C24:1 and C24:0, major constituents of the myelin sheet of the nervous system, and C16:0, prominent in the pancreatic islet beta-cells. The most potent sulfatide isoform was lysosulfatide (lacking a fatty acid). Shortened fatty acid chain length (C24:1 versus C18:1), or saturation...... isoforms by a CD1d-restricted NKT-cell clone, and suggest that sulfatide, a major component of the myelin sheet and pancreatic beta-cells, is one of several natural ligands for type II CD1d-restricted NKT cells....

  5. Purification, properties, and sequence specificity of SslI, a new type II restriction endonuclease from Streptococcus salivarius subsp. thermophilus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benbadis, L; Garel, J R; Hartley, D L

    1991-01-01

    SslI, a type II restriction endonuclease, was purified from Streptococcus salivarius subsp. thermophilus strain BSN 45. SslI is an isoschizomer of BstNI. SslI activity was maximum at pH 8.8, 0 to 50 mM NaCl, 2 to 8 mM Mg2+, and 42 degrees C. Activity against phage DNA in vitro was demonstrated. Images PMID:1785940

  6. Kinetics of expression of interleukin 2 receptors on class I and class II restricted murine T cell clones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The kinetics of interleukin 2 receptor (IL-2R) expression has been examined on various class I and class II restricted, influenza specific murine T cell clones. Expression and relative levels of IL-2R were examined by Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorter analysis utilizing 3 anti-murine IL-2R monoclonal antibodies. Receptor expression was analyzed by scatchard analysis using radiolabeled recombinant human interleukin 2 to access the number of high and low affinity IL-2R per cell as well as the affinity of binding. The clones tested bound all 3 monoclonal antibodies and were inhibited in an IL-2 dependent proliferation assay by the addition of the antibodies to the culture. There was, however, differing degrees of inhibition ranging up to 99%, depending on the clone and the antibody used. IL-2R expression was detectable as early as 4-6 hours after antigenic stimulation of quiescent cells. After maximal levels of receptors were expressed, which was about 24 hours after stimulation, expression of IL-2R decreased with time on all clones examined (both class I and class II restricted). Differing rates of receptor loss is seen however, with some class II restricted clones retaining relatively high levels of receptors

  7. DMPD: Regulation of nitric oxide synthesis and apoptosis by arginase and argininerecycling. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 17513437 Regulation of nitric oxide synthesis and apoptosis by arginase and arginine...on of nitric oxide synthesis and apoptosis by arginase and argininerecycling. PubmedID 17513437 Title Regula...tion of nitric oxide synthesis and apoptosis by arginase and argininerecycling. A

  8. Arginase 2 deficiency prevents oxidative stress and limits hyperoxia-induced retinal vascular degeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jutamas Suwanpradid

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hyperoxia exposure of premature infants causes obliteration of the immature retinal microvessels, leading to a condition of proliferative vitreoretinal neovascularization termed retinopathy of prematurity (ROP. Previous work has demonstrated that the hyperoxia-induced vascular injury is mediated by dysfunction of endothelial nitric oxide synthase resulting in peroxynitrite formation. This study was undertaken to determine the involvement of the ureahydrolase enzyme arginase in this pathology. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Studies were performed using hyperoxia-treated bovine retinal endothelial cells (BRE and mice with oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR as experimental models of ROP. Treatment with the specific arginase inhibitor 2(S-amino-6-boronohexanoic acid (ABH prevented hyperoxia-induced apoptosis of BRE cells and reduced vaso-obliteration in the OIR model. Furthermore, deletion of the arginase 2 gene protected against hyperoxia-induced vaso-obliteration, enhanced physiological vascular repair, and reduced retinal neovascularization in the OIR model. Additional deletion of one copy of arginase 1 did not improve the vascular pathology. Analyses of peroxynitrite by quantitation of its biomarker nitrotyrosine, superoxide by dihydroethidium imaging and NO formation by diaminofluoroscein imaging showed that the protective actions of arginase 2 deletion were associated with blockade of superoxide and peroxynitrite formation and normalization of NOS activity. CONCLUSIONS: Our data demonstrate the involvement of arginase activity and arginase 2 expression in hyperoxia-induced vascular injury. Arginase 2 deletion prevents hyperoxia-induced retinal vascular injury by preventing NOS uncoupling resulting in decreased reactive oxygen species formation and increased nitric oxide bioavailability.

  9. Arginase activity - a marker of disease status in patients with visceral leishmaniasis in ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abebe, Tamrat; Takele, Yegnasew; Weldegebreal, Teklu; Cloke, Tom; Closs, Ellen; Corset, Camille; Hailu, Asrat; Hailu, Workagegnehu; Sisay, Yifru; Corware, Karina; Corset, Margaux; Modolell, Manuel; Munder, Markus; Tacchini-Cottier, Fabienne; Müller, Ingrid; Kropf, Pascale

    2013-01-01

    The underlying mechanisms resulting in the profound immune suppression characteristic of human visceral leishmaniasis (VL) are not fully understood. Here, we tested the hypothesis that arginase, an enzyme associated with immunosuppression, is higher in patients with VL and contributes to impaired T cell responses. We recruited patients with VL before and after treatment and healthy controls and measured the arginase metabolism in the blood of these individuals. Our results show that arginase activity is significantly higher in the blood of patients with active VL as compared to controls. These high levels of arginase decline considerably once the patients are successfully treated. We identified the phenotype of arginase-expressing cells among PBMCs as neutrophils and show that their frequency was increased in PBMCs of patients before treatment; this coincides with reduced levels of L-arginine in the plasma and decreased expression levels of CD3ζ in T cells. PMID:23556019

  10. Arginase activity - a marker of disease status in patients with visceral leishmaniasis in ethiopia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamrat Abebe

    Full Text Available The underlying mechanisms resulting in the profound immune suppression characteristic of human visceral leishmaniasis (VL are not fully understood. Here, we tested the hypothesis that arginase, an enzyme associated with immunosuppression, is higher in patients with VL and contributes to impaired T cell responses. We recruited patients with VL before and after treatment and healthy controls and measured the arginase metabolism in the blood of these individuals. Our results show that arginase activity is significantly higher in the blood of patients with active VL as compared to controls. These high levels of arginase decline considerably once the patients are successfully treated. We identified the phenotype of arginase-expressing cells among PBMCs as neutrophils and show that their frequency was increased in PBMCs of patients before treatment; this coincides with reduced levels of L-arginine in the plasma and decreased expression levels of CD3ζ in T cells.

  11. Effect of ionizing radiation on the activity of restriction nucleases PvuII and HindIII

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research is focused on the influence of the ionizing radiation on the activity of the restriction enzymes PvuII and HindIII. Enzymes PvuII and HindIII are restriction endonucleases of type II. These enzymes can be found in bacteria and they have a significant role in defense mechanisms of bacteria against viruses. They cleave DNA double helix at specific recognition palindromic sequences in the presence of cofactor Mg2+. PvuII cleaves the sequence CAG↓CTG and HindIII cleaves the sequence A↓AGCTT in marked places. Plasmid pcDNA3 has been used as the DNA substrate for the whole experimental study. It is 5446 base pairs (bp) long, circular DNA molecule and it contains three recognition sites for enzyme PvuII and one recognition site for enzyme HindIII. After the correct interaction of pcDNA3 with PvuII, we thus have three plasmid fragments with lengths 1069, 1097 and 3280 bp. When HindIII is incubated with this plasmid, we shall obtain the linear form of the DNA plasmid.The method for processing the cleaved DNA samples is the agarose gel electrophoresis. The activity of the irradiated enzymes decreases with increasing dose of radiation, because a part of the enzymes is deactivated due to induced radiation damage. To determine effect of radiation quality, samples were irradiated using proton and gamma sources. The results of our experimental study will be presented and discussed with respect to molecular structure of both enzymes and particular sites of radical damage influencing their function. (authors)

  12. Strategies to rescue the consequences of inducible arginase-1 deficiency in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurel L Ballantyne

    Full Text Available Arginase-1 catalyzes the conversion of arginine to ornithine and urea, which is the final step of the urea cycle used to remove excess ammonia from the body. Arginase-1 deficiency leads to hyperargininemia in mice and man with severe lethal consequences in the former and progressive neurological impairment to varying degrees in the latter. In a tamoxifen-induced arginase-1 deficient mouse model, mice succumb to the enzyme deficiency within 2 weeks after inducing the knockout and retain <2 % enzyme in the liver. Standard clinical care regimens for arginase-1 deficiency (low-protein diet, the nitrogen-scavenging drug sodium phenylbutyrate, ornithine supplementation either failed to extend lifespan (ornithine or only minimally prolonged lifespan (maximum 8 days with low-protein diet and drug. A conditional, tamoxifen-inducible arginase-1 transgenic mouse strain expressing the enzyme from the Rosa26 locus modestly extended lifespan of neonatal mice, but not that of 4-week old mice, when crossed to the inducible arginase-1 knockout mouse strain. Delivery of an arginase-1/enhanced green fluorescent fusion construct by adeno-associated viral delivery (rh10 serotype with a strong cytomegalovirus-chicken β-actin hybrid promoter rescued about 30% of male mice with lifespan prolongation to at least 6 months, extensive hepatic expression and restoration of significant enzyme activity in liver. In contrast, a vector of the AAV8 serotype driven by the thyroxine-binding globulin promoter led to weaker liver expression and did not rescue arginase-1 deficient mice to any great extent. Since the induced arginase-1 deficient mouse model displays a much more severe phenotype when compared to human arginase-1 deficiency, these studies reveal that it may be feasible with gene therapy strategies to correct the various manifestations of the disorder and they provide optimism for future clinical studies.

  13. Arginase inhibition in airways from normal and nitric oxide synthase 2-knockout mice exposed to ovalbumin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arginase1 and nitric oxide synthase2 (NOS2) utilize L-arginine as a substrate, with both enzymes expressed at high levels in the asthmatic lung. Inhibition of arginase in ovalbumin-exposed C57BL/6 mice with the transition state inhibitor Nω-hydroxy-nor-L-arginine (nor-NOHA) significantly increased total L-arginine content in the airway compartment. We hypothesized that such an increase in L-arginine content would increase the amount of nitric oxide (NO) being produced in the airways and thereby decrease airway hyperreactivity and eosinophilic influx. We further hypothesized that despite arginase inhibition, NOS2 knockout (NOS2-/-) mice would be unable to up-regulate NO production in response to allergen exposure and would demonstrate higher amounts of airway hyperreactivity and eosinophilia under conditions of arginase inhibition than C57BL/6 animals. We found that administration of nor-NOHA significantly decreased airway hyperreactivity and eosinophilic airway inflammation in ovalbumin-exposed C57BL/6 mice, but these parameters were unchanged in ovalbumin-exposed NOS2-/- mice. Arginase1 protein content was increased in mice exposed to ovalbumin, an effect that was reversed upon nor-NOHA treatment in C57BL/6 mice. Arginase1 protein content in the airway compartment directly correlated with the degree of airway hyperreactivity in all treatment groups. NOS2-/- mice had significantly greater arginase1 and arginase2 concentrations compared to their respective C57BL/6 groups, indicating that inhibition of arginase may be dependent upon NOS2 expression. Arginase1 and 2 content were not affected by nor-NOHA administration in the NOS2-/- mice. We conclude that L-arginine metabolism plays an important role in the development of airway hyperreactivity and eosinophilic airway inflammation. Inhibition of arginase early in the allergic inflammatory response decreases the severity of the chronic inflammatory phenotype. These effects appear to be attributable to NOS2, which is a

  14. Cloning and characterization of the Bg/II restriction-modification system reveals a possible evolutionary footprint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anton, B P; Heiter, D F; Benner, J S; Hess, E J; Greenough, L; Moran, L S; Slatko, B E; Brooks, J E

    1997-03-10

    Bg/II, a type II restriction-modification (R-M) system from Bacillus globigii, recognizes the sequence 5'-AGATCT-3'. The system has been cloned into E. coli in multiple steps: first the methyltransferase (MTase) gene, bglIIM, was cloned from B. globigii RUB561, a variant containing an inactivated endonuclease (ENase) gene (bglIIR). Next the ENase protein (R.BglII) was purified to homogeneity from RUB562, a strain expressing the complete R-M system. Oligonucleotide probes specific for the 5' end of the gene were then synthesized and used to locate bglIIR, and the gene was isolated and cloned in a subsequent step. The nucleotide sequence of the system has been determined, and several interesting features have been found. The genes are tandemly arranged, with bglIIR preceding bglIIM. The amino acid sequence of M.BglII is compared to those of other known MTases. A third gene encoding a protein with sequence similarity to known C elements of other R-M systems is found upstream of bglIIR. This is the first instance of a C gene being associated with an R-M system where the R and M genes are collinear. In addition, open reading frames (ORFs) resembling genes involved with DNA mobility are found in close association with BglII. These may shed light on the evolution of the R-M system. PMID:9073062

  15. The effects of the calcium-restricted diet of urolithiasis patients with absorptive hypercalciuria type II on risk factors for kidney stones and osteopenia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faassen, A. van; Ploeg, E.M.C. van der; Habets, H.M.L.; Meer, R. van der; Hermus, R.J.J.; Janknegt, R.A.

    1998-01-01

    The calcium (Ca)-restricted diet of urolithiasis patients with absorptive hypercalciuria type II may decrease Ca excretion but increase biochemical markers of risk for osteopenia. We randomly allocated 25 patients from six hospitals into an experimental group (Ca restriction to 500 mg/day, oxalate-r

  16. A unique restriction site in the flaA gene allows rapid differentiation of group I and group II Clostridium botulinum strains by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Catherine J; Tran, Shulin; Tam, Kevin J; Austin, John W

    2007-09-01

    Clostridium botulinum produces the potent botulinum neurotoxin, the causative agent of botulism. Based on distinctive physiological traits, strains of C. botulinum can be divided into four groups: however, only groups I and II are associated with human illness. Alignment of the flaA gene sequences from 40 group I and 40 group II strains identified a single BsrG1 restriction cut site that was present at base pair 283 in all group II flaA sequences and was not found in any group I sequence. The flaA gene was amplified by rapid colony PCR from 22 group I strains and 18 group II strains and digested with BsrGI restriction enzyme. Standard agarose gel electrophoresis with ethidium bromide staining showed two fragments, following restriction digestion of group II flaA gene amplicons with BsrGI, but only a single band of uncut flaA from group I strains. Combining rapid colony PCR with BsrGI restriction digest of the flaA gene at 60 degrees C is a significant improvement over current methods, such as meat digestion or amplified fragment length polymorphism, as a strain can be identified as either group I or group II in under 5 h when starting with a visible plated C. botulinum colony.

  17. Arginase reciprocally regulates nitric oxide synthase activity and contributes to endothelial dysfunction in aging blood vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkowitz, Dan E.; White, Ron; Li, Dechun; Minhas, Khalid M.; Cernetich, Amy; Kim, Soonyul; Burke, Sean; Shoukas, Artin A.; Nyhan, Daniel; Champion, Hunter C.; Hare, Joshua M.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although abnormal L-arginine NO signaling contributes to endothelial dysfunction in the aging cardiovascular system, the biochemical mechanisms remain controversial. L-arginine, the NO synthase (NOS) precursor, is also a substrate for arginase. We tested the hypotheses that arginase reciprocally regulates NOS by modulating L-arginine bioavailability and that arginase is upregulated in aging vasculature, contributing to depressed endothelial function. METHODS AND RESULTS: Inhibition of arginase with (S)-(2-boronoethyl)-L-cysteine, HCl (BEC) produced vasodilation in aortic rings from young (Y) adult rats (maximum effect, 46.4+/-9.4% at 10(-5) mol/L, P<0.01). Similar vasorelaxation was elicited with the additional arginase inhibitors N-hydroxy-nor-L-arginine (nor-NOHA) and difluoromethylornithine (DFMO). This effect required intact endothelium and was prevented by 1H-oxadiazole quinoxalin-1-one (P<0.05 and P<0.001, respectively), a soluble guanylyl cyclase inhibitor. DFMO-elicited vasodilation was greater in old (O) compared with Y rat aortic rings (60+/-6% versus 39+/-6%, P<0.05). In addition, BEC restored depressed L-arginine (10(-4) mol/L)-dependent vasorelaxant responses in O rings to those of Y. Arginase activity and expression were increased in O rings, whereas NOS activity and cyclic GMP levels were decreased. BEC and DFMO suppressed arginase activity and restored NOS activity and cyclic GMP levels in O vessels to those of Y. CONCLUSIONS: These findings demonstrate that arginase modulates NOS activity, likely by regulating intracellular L-arginine availability. Arginase upregulation contributes to endothelial dysfunction of aging and may therefore be a therapeutic target.

  18. Genetic microheterogeneity and phenotypic variation of Helicobacter pylori arginase in clinical isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spadafora Domenico

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinical isolates of the gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori display a high level of genetic macro- and microheterogeneity, featuring a panmictic, rather than clonal structure. The ability of H. pylori to survive the stomach acid is due, in part, to the arginase-urease enzyme system. Arginase (RocF hydrolyzes L-arginine to L-ornithine and urea, and urease hydrolyzes urea to carbon dioxide and ammonium, which can neutralize acid. Results The degree of variation in arginase was explored at the DNA sequence, enzyme activity and protein expression levels. To this end, arginase activity was measured from 73 minimally-passaged clinical isolates and six laboratory-adapted strains of H. pylori. The rocF gene from 21 of the strains was cloned into genetically stable E. coli and the enzyme activities measured. Arginase activity was found to substantially vary (>100-fold in both different H. pylori strains and in the E. coli model. Western blot analysis revealed a positive correlation between activity and amount of protein expressed in most H. pylori strains. Several H. pylori strains featured altered arginase activity upon in vitro passage. Pairwise alignments of the 21 rocF genes plus strain J99 revealed extensive microheterogeneity in the promoter region and 3' end of the rocF coding region. Amino acid S232, which was I232 in the arginase-negative clinical strain A2, was critical for arginase activity. Conclusion These studies demonstrated that H. pylori arginase exhibits extensive genotypic and phenotypic variation which may be used to understand mechanisms of microheterogeneity in H. pylori.

  19. 2-Aminoimidazole Amino Acids as Inhibitors of the Binuclear Manganese Metalloenzyme Human Arginase I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilies, M.; Di Costanzo, L; North, M; Scott, J; Christianson, D

    2010-01-01

    Arginase, a key metalloenzyme of the urea cycle that converts L-arginine into L-ornithine and urea, is presently considered a pharmaceutical target for the management of diseases associated with aberrant L-arginine homeostasis, such as asthma, cardiovascular diseases, and erectile dysfunction. We now report the design, synthesis, and evaluation of a series of 2-aminoimidazole amino acid inhibitors in which the 2-aminoimidazole moiety serves as a guanidine mimetic. These compounds represent a new class of arginase inhibitors. The most potent inhibitor identified in this study, 2-(S)-amino-5-(2-aminoimidazol-1-yl)pentanoic acid (A1P, 10), binds to human arginase I with K{sub d} = 2 {micro}M and significantly attenuates airways hyperresponsiveness in a murine model of allergic airways inflammation. These findings suggest that 2-aminoimidazole amino acids represent new leads for the development of arginase inhibitors with promising pharmacological profiles.

  20. Arginase: a key enzyme in the pathophysiology of allergic asthma opening novel therapeutic perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Maarsingh, Harm; Zaagsma, Johan; Meurs, Herman

    2009-01-01

    Allergic asthma is a chronic inflammatory airways' disease, characterized by allergen-induced early and late bronchial obstructive reactions, airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), airway inflammation and airway remodelling. Recent ex vivo and in vivo studies in animal models and asthmatic patients have indicated that arginase may play a central role in all these features. Thus, increased arginase activity in the airways induces reduced bioavailability of L-arginine to constitutive (cNOS) and indu...

  1. Arginase activity in the blood of patients with visceral leishmaniasis and HIV infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yegnasew Takele

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Visceral leishmaniasis is a parasitic disease associated with high mortality. The most important foci of visceral leishmaniasis in Ethiopia are in the Northwest and are predominantly associated with high rates of HIV co-infection. Co-infection of visceral leishmaniasis patients with HIV results in higher mortality, treatment failure and relapse. We have previously shown that arginase, an enzyme associated with immunosuppression, was increased in patients with visceral leishmaniasis and in HIV seropositive patients; further our results showed that high arginase activity is a marker of disease severity. Here, we tested the hypothesis that increased arginase activities associated with visceral leishmaniasis and HIV infections synergize in patients co-infected with both pathogens. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We recruited a cohort of patients with visceral leishmaniasis and a cohort of patients with visceral leishmaniasis and HIV infection from Gondar, Northwest Ethiopia, and recorded and compared their clinical data. Further, we measured the levels of arginase activity in the blood of these patients and identified the phenotype of arginase-expressing cells. Our results show that CD4(+ T cell counts were significantly lower and the parasite load in the spleen was significantly higher in co-infected patients. Moreover, our results demonstrate that arginase activity was significantly higher in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and plasma of co-infected patients. Finally, we identified the cells-expressing arginase in the PBMCs as low-density granulocytes. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that increased arginase might contribute to the poor disease outcome characteristic of patients with visceral leishmaniasis and HIV co-infection.

  2. Condensin II subunit dCAP-D3 restricts retrotransposon mobilization in Drosophila somatic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew T Schuster

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Retrotransposon sequences are positioned throughout the genome of almost every eukaryote that has been sequenced. As mobilization of these elements can have detrimental effects on the transcriptional regulation and stability of an organism's genome, most organisms have evolved mechanisms to repress their movement. Here, we identify a novel role for the Drosophila melanogaster Condensin II subunit, dCAP-D3 in preventing the mobilization of retrotransposons located in somatic cell euchromatin. dCAP-D3 regulates transcription of euchromatic gene clusters which contain or are proximal to retrotransposon sequence. ChIP experiments demonstrate that dCAP-D3 binds to these loci and is important for maintaining a repressed chromatin structure within the boundaries of the retrotransposon and for repressing retrotransposon transcription. We show that dCAP-D3 prevents accumulation of double stranded DNA breaks within retrotransposon sequence, and decreased dCAP-D3 levels leads to a precise loss of retrotransposon sequence at some dCAP-D3 regulated gene clusters and a gain of sequence elsewhere in the genome. Homologous chromosomes exhibit high levels of pairing in Drosophila somatic cells, and our FISH analyses demonstrate that retrotransposon-containing euchromatic loci are regions which are actually less paired than euchromatic regions devoid of retrotransposon sequences. Decreased dCAP-D3 expression increases pairing of homologous retrotransposon-containing loci in tissue culture cells. We propose that the combined effects of dCAP-D3 deficiency on double strand break levels, chromatin structure, transcription and pairing at retrotransposon-containing loci may lead to 1 higher levels of homologous recombination between repeats flanking retrotransposons in dCAP-D3 deficient cells and 2 increased retrotransposition. These findings identify a novel role for the anti-pairing activities of dCAP-D3/Condensin II and uncover a new way in which dCAP-D3/Condensin

  3. Distinct facilitated diffusion mechanisms by E. coli Type II restriction endonucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollak, Adam J; Chin, Aaron T; Reich, Norbert O

    2014-11-18

    The passive search by proteins for particular DNA sequences involving nonspecific DNA is essential for gene regulation, DNA repair, phage defense, and diverse epigenetic processes. Distinct mechanisms contribute to these searches, and it remains unresolved as to which mechanism or blend of mechanisms best suits a particular protein and, more importantly, its biological role. To address this, we compare the translocation properties of two well-studied bacterial restriction endonucleases (ENases), EcoRI and EcoRV. These dimeric, magnesium-dependent enzymes hydrolyze related sites (EcoRI ENase, 5'-GAATTC-3'; EcoRV ENase, 5'-GATATC-3'), leaving overhangs and blunt DNA segments, respectively. Here, we demonstrate that the extensive sliding by EcoRI ENase, involving sliding up to ∼600 bp prior to dissociating from the DNA, contrasts with a larger reliance on hopping mechanism(s) by EcoRV ENase. The mechanism displayed by EcoRI ENase results in a highly thorough search of DNA, whereas the EcoRV ENase mechanism results in an extended, yet less rigorous, interrogation of DNA sequence space. We describe how these mechanistic distinctions are complemented by other aspects of these endonucleases, such as the 10-fold higher in vivo concentrations of EcoRI ENase compared to that of EcoRV ENase. Further, we hypothesize that the highly diverse enzyme arsenal that bacteria employ against foreign DNA involves seemingly similar enzymes that rely on distinct but complementary search mechanisms. Our comparative approach reveals how different proteins utilize distinct site-locating strategies. PMID:25350874

  4. Purification, properties and alternate substrate specificities of arginase from two different sources: Vigna catjang cotyledon and buffalo liver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Arginase was purified from Vigna catjang cotyledons and buffalo liver by chromatographic separations using Bio-Gel P-150, DEAE-cellulose and arginine AH Sepharose 4B affinity columns. The native molecular weight of an enzyme estimated on Bio-Gel P-300 column for Vigna catjang was 210 kDa and 120 kDa of buffalo liver, while SDS-PAGE showed a single band of molecular weight 52 kDa for cotyledon and 43 kDa for buffalo liver arginase. The kinetic properties determined for the purified cotyledon and liver arginase showed an optimum pH of 10.0 and pH 9.2 respectively. Optimal cofactor Mn++ ion concentration was found to be 0.6 mM for cotyledon and 2 mM for liver arginase. The Michaelis-Menten constant for cotyledon arginase and hepatic arginase were found to be 42 mM and 2 mM respectively. The activity of guanidino compounds as alternate substrates for Vigna catjang cotyledon and buffalo liver arginase is critically dependent on the length of the amino acid side chain and the number of carbon atoms. In addition to L-arginine cotyledon arginase showed substrate specificity towards agmatine and L-canavanine, whereas the liver arginase showed substrate specificity towards only L-canavanine.

  5. Sculpting MHC class II-restricted self and non-self peptidome by the class I Ag-processing machinery and its impact on Th-cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Charles T; Dragovic, Srdjan M; Conant, Stephanie B; Gray, Jennifer J; Zheng, Mu; Samir, Parimal; Niu, Xinnan; Moutaftsi, Magdalini; Van Kaer, Luc; Sette, Alessandro; Link, Andrew J; Joyce, Sebastian

    2013-05-01

    It is generally assumed that the MHC class I antigen (Ag)-processing (CAP) machinery - which supplies peptides for presentation by class I molecules - plays no role in class II-restricted presentation of cytoplasmic Ags. In striking contrast to this assumption, we previously reported that proteasome inhibition, TAP deficiency or ERAAP deficiency led to dramatically altered T helper (Th)-cell responses to allograft (HY) and microbial (Listeria monocytogenes) Ags. Herein, we tested whether altered Ag processing and presentation, altered CD4(+) T-cell repertoire, or both underlay the above finding. We found that TAP deficiency and ERAAP deficiency dramatically altered the quality of class II-associated self peptides suggesting that the CAP machinery impacts class II-restricted Ag processing and presentation. Consistent with altered self peptidomes, the CD4(+) T-cell receptor repertoire of mice deficient in the CAP machinery substantially differed from that of WT animals resulting in altered CD4(+) T-cell Ag recognition patterns. These data suggest that TAP and ERAAP sculpt the class II-restricted peptidome, impacting the CD4(+) T-cell repertoire, and ultimately altering Th-cell responses. Together with our previous findings, these data suggest multiple CAP machinery components sequester or degrade MHC class II-restricted epitopes that would otherwise be capable of eliciting functional Th-cell responses.

  6. Xenobiotic-induced changes in the arginase activity of zebrafish (Danio rerio) eleutheroembryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentealba González, Pablo; Llanos-Rivera, Alejandra; Carvajal Baeza, Nelson; Uribe Pérez, Elena

    2011-10-01

    The impact of xenobiotics in organisms at the biochemical level can be detected using specific or nonspecific biochemical markers. Activity of the enzyme arginase is used as a biochemical parameter of cell proliferation in mammals because of its importance in polyamine synthesis, which provides molecules for cellular growth and differentiation. Therefore, total arginase activity could indicate sublethal organism alterations induced by xenobiotics. In the present study, bioassays with early stages of Danio rerio were implemented using the pesticide malathion as a reference toxicant and a kraft pulp mill (KPM) effluent to assess their potential toxicity. The experimental design considered a 144-h static bioassay that involved incubation from an early 3-h postfertilization embryonic stage through to the eleutheroembryo stage. Growth variations and observations of organ development were evaluated and related to total arginase activity. The enzymatic activity in eleutheroembryo exposed to malathion exhibited a significant decrease at concentrations equal to or higher than 3 mg/L. Delays in the early development and morphometric parameters suggest metabolic depression in these conditions. A significant positive relationship between total arginase activity and eleutheroembryo development was observed, indicating that a decrease in total arginase activity might be related to sublethal alterations in eleutheroembryo growth. Bioassay results with KPM effluents resulted in a delay in organogenesis only in effluent concentrations of 100% and were related to a significant decrease in total arginase activity. In conclusion, total arginase activity has a higher sensitivity compared with morphological parameters in providing an early signal of the sublethal effects on early life stages of fish exposed to environmental stress. PMID:21766322

  7. Effect of arginase inhibition on pulmonary L-arginine metabolism in murine Pseudomonas pneumonia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Mehl

    Full Text Available RATIONALE: Infection of the lung with Pseudomonas aeruginosa results in upregulation of nitric oxide synthases (NOS and arginase expression, and both enzymes compete for L-arginine as substrate. Nitric oxide (NO production may be regulated by arginase as it controls L-arginine availability for NOS. We here studied the effect of systemic arginase inhibition on pulmonary L-arginine metabolism in Pseudomonas pneumonia in the mouse. METHODS: Mice (C57BL/6, 8-10 weeks old, female underwent direct tracheal instillation of Pseudomonas (PAO-1-coated agar beads and were treated by repeated intra-peritoneal injections of the arginase inhibitor 2(S-amino-6-boronohexanoic acid (ABH or PBS until lungs were harvested on day 3 of the infection. L-arginine metabolites were quantified using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, NO metabolites nitrate and nitrite by Griess reagent and cytokines by ELISA. RESULTS: NO metabolite concentrations (48.5±2.9 vs. 10.9±2.3 µM, p<0.0001, as well as L-ornithine (29.6±1.7 vs 2.3±0.4 µM, p<0.0001, the product of arginase activity, were increased in Pseudomonas infected lungs compared to naïve controls. Concentrations of the NOS inhibitor asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA were also increased (0.44±0.02 vs. 0.16±0.01 µM, p<0.0001. Arginase inhibition in the infected animals resulted in a significant decrease in L-ornithine (14.6±1.6 µM, p<0.0001 but increase in L-arginine concentration (p<0.001, L-arginine/ADMA ratio (p<0.001, L-arginine availability for NOS (p<0.001, and NO metabolite concentrations (67.3±5.7 µM, p<0.05. Arginase inhibitor treatment also resulted in an increase in NO metabolite levels in animals following intratracheal injection of LPS (p = 0.015. Arginase inhibition was not associated with an increase in inflammatory markers (IFN-γ, IL-1β, IL-6, MIP-2, KC or TNF-α in lung. Concentrations of the L-ornithine-dependent polyamines putrescine, spermidine and spermine were increased

  8. Molecular cloning and nucleotide sequence of cDNA for human liver arginase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haraguchi, Y.; Takiguchi, M.; Amaya, Y.; Kawamoto, S.; Matsuda, I.; Mori, M.

    1987-01-01

    Arginase (EC3.5.3.1) catalyzes the last step of the urea cycle in the liver of ureotelic animals. Inherited deficiency of the enzyme results in argininemia, an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by hyperammonemia. To facilitate investigation of the enzyme and gene structures and to elucidate the nature of the mutation in argininemia, the authors isolated cDNA clones for human liver arginase. Oligo(dT)-primed and random primer human liver cDNA libraries in lambda gt11 were screened using isolated rat arginase cDNA as a probe. Two of the positive clones, designated lambda hARG6 and lambda hARG109, contained an overlapping cDNA sequence with an open reading frame encoding a polypeptide of 322 amino acid residues (predicted M/sub r/, 34,732), a 5'-untranslated sequence of 56 base pairs, a 3'-untranslated sequence of 423 base pairs, and a poly(A) segment. Arginase activity was detected in Escherichia coli cells transformed with the plasmid carrying lambda hARG6 cDNA insert. RNA gel blot analysis of human liver RNA showed a single mRNA of 1.6 kilobases. The predicted amino acid sequence of human liver arginase is 87% and 41% identical with those of the rat liver and yeast enzymes, respectively. There are several highly conserved segments among the human, rat, and yeast enzymes.

  9. An alternative, arginase-independent pathway for arginine metabolism in Kluyveromyces lactis involves guanidinobutyrase as a key enzyme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Romagnoli, G.; Verhoeven, M.D.; Mans, R.; Fleury Rey, Y.; Bel-Rhlid, R.; Van den Broek, M.; Maleki Seifar, R.; Ten Pierick, A.; Thompson, M.; Müller, V.; Wahl, S.A.; Pronk, J.T.; Daran, J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Most available knowledge on fungal arginine metabolism is derived from studies on Saccharomyces cerevisiae, in which arginine catabolism is initiated by releasing urea via the arginase reaction. Orthologues of the S. cerevisiae genes encoding the first three enzymes in the arginase pathway were clon

  10. Disruption of the CAR1 gene encoding arginase enhances freeze tolerance of the commercial baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shima, Jun; Sakata-Tsuda, Yuko; Suzuki, Yasuo; Nakajima, Ryouichi; Watanabe, Hajime; Kawamoto, Shinichi; Takano, Hiroyuki

    2003-01-01

    The effect of intracellular charged amino acids on freeze tolerance in dough was determined by constructing homozygous diploid arginase-deficient mutants of commercial baker's yeast. An arginase mutant accumulated higher levels of arginine and/or glutamate and showed increased leavening ability during the frozen-dough baking process, suggesting that disruption of the CAR1 gene enhances freeze tolerance. PMID:12514069

  11. Arginase 1: an unexpected mediator of pulmonary capillary barrier dysfunction in models of acute lung injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudolf eLucas

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The integrity of epithelial and endothelial barriers in the lower airspaces of the lungs has to be tightly regulated, in order to prevent leakage and to assure efficient gas exchange between the alveoli and capillaries. Both G- and G+ bacterial toxins, such as LPS and pneumolysin, respectively, can be released in high concentrations within the pulmonary compartments upon antibiotic treatment of patients suffering from acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS or severe pneumonia. These toxins are able to impair endothelial barrier function, either directly, or indirectly, by induction of pro-inflammatory mediators and neutrophil sequestration. Toxin-induced endothelial hyperpermeability can involve myosin light chain phosphorylation and/or microtubule rearrangement. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS was proposed to be a guardian of basal barrier function, since eNOS knock-out mice display an impaired expression of inter-endothelial junction proteins and as such an increased vascular permeability, as compared to wild type mice. The enzyme arginase, the activity of which can be regulated by the redox status of the cell, exists in two isoforms - arginase 1 (cytosolic and arginase 2 (mitochondrial - both of which can be expressed in lung microvascular endothelial cells. Upon activation, arginase competes with eNOS for the substrate L-arginine, as such impairing eNOS-dependent NO generation and promoting ROS generation by the enzyme. This mini-review will discuss recent findings regarding the interaction between bacterial toxins and arginase during acute lung injury and will as such address the role of arginase in bacterial toxin-induced pulmonary endothelial barrier dysfunction.

  12. Arginase 1: an unexpected mediator of pulmonary capillary barrier dysfunction in models of acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Rudolf; Czikora, Istvàn; Sridhar, Supriya; Zemskov, Evgeny A; Oseghale, Aluya; Circo, Sebastian; Cederbaum, Stephen D; Chakraborty, Trinad; Fulton, David J; Caldwell, Robert W; Romero, Maritza J

    2013-01-01

    The integrity of epithelial and endothelial barriers in the lower airspaces of the lungs has to be tightly regulated, in order to prevent leakage and to assure efficient gas exchange between the alveoli and capillaries. Both G(-) and G(+) bacterial toxins, such as lipopolysaccharide and pneumolysin, respectively, can be released in high concentrations within the pulmonary compartments upon antibiotic treatment of patients suffering from acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) or severe pneumonia. These toxins are able to impair endothelial barrier function, either directly, or indirectly, by induction of pro-inflammatory mediators and neutrophil sequestration. Toxin-induced endothelial hyperpermeability can involve myosin light chain phosphorylation and/or microtubule rearrangement. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) was proposed to be a guardian of basal barrier function, since eNOS knock-out mice display an impaired expression of inter-endothelial junction proteins and as such an increased vascular permeability, as compared to wild type mice. The enzyme arginase, the activity of which can be regulated by the redox status of the cell, exists in two isoforms - arginase 1 (cytosolic) and arginase 2 (mitochondrial) - both of which can be expressed in lung microvascular endothelial cells. Upon activation, arginase competes with eNOS for the substrate l-arginine, as such impairing eNOS-dependent NO generation and promoting reactive oxygen species generation by the enzyme. This mini-review will discuss recent findings regarding the interaction between bacterial toxins and arginase during acute lung injury and will as such address the role of arginase in bacterial toxin-induced pulmonary endothelial barrier dysfunction. PMID:23966993

  13. Human HLA class I- and HLA class II-restricted cloned cytotoxic T lymphocytes identify a cluster of epitopes on the measles virus fusion protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Binnendijk, R S; Versteeg-van Oosten, J P; Poelen, M C; Brugghe, H F; Hoogerhout, P; Osterhaus, A D; Uytdehaag, F G

    1993-01-01

    The transmembrane fusion (F) glycoprotein of measles virus is an important target antigen of human HLA class I- and class II-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). Genetically engineered F proteins and nested sets of synthetic peptides spanning the F protein were used to determine sequences of F recognized by a number of F-specific CTL clones. Combined N- and C-terminal deletions of the respective peptides revealed that human HLA class I and HLA class II-restricted CTL efficiently recognize nonapeptides or decapeptides representing epitopes of F. Three distinct sequences recognized by three different HLA class II (DQw1, DR2, and DR4/w53)-restricted CTL clones appear to cluster between amino acids 379 and 466 of F, thus defining an important T-cell epitope area of F. Within this same region, a nonamer peptide of F was found to be recognized by an HLA-B27-restricted CTL clone, as expected on the basis of the structural homology between this peptide and other known HLA-B27 binding peptides. PMID:7680390

  14. Association of HY-restricting HLA class II alleles with pregnancy outcome in patients with recurrent miscarriage subsequent to a firstborn boy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henriette Svarre; Steffensen, Rudi; Varming, Kim;

    2009-01-01

    Healthy females, pregnant with a boy, generate immune responses against male-specific minor histocompatibility (HY) antigens. The clinical importance of these responses is evident in stem cell transplantation. Birth of a boy prior to a series of miscarriages reduces the chance of a subsequent live...... birth. This study explores the putative impact of known HY-presenting HLA alleles on future pregnancy outcome in women with at least three consecutive miscarriages following a birth [secondary recurrent miscarriage (SRM)]. HLA-A, -B, -DRB1, DRB3-5 and DQB1 genotyping was performed in 358 SRM patients...... and in 203 of their children born prior to the miscarriages. The subsequent live birth in women with boys prior to the miscarriages compared with girls is lower in women with HY-restricting HLA class II alleles [odds ratio (OR): 0.17 (0.1-0.4), P = 0.0001]. One HY-restricting HLA class II allele in...

  15. Effect of Two Ginger Varieties on Arginase Activity in Hypercholesterolemic Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinyemi, Ayodele Jacob; Oboh, Ganiyu; Ademiluyi, Adedayo Oluwaseun; Boligon, Aline Augusti; Athayde, Margareth Linde

    2016-04-01

    Recently, ginger has been used in traditional Chinese medicine as an herbal therapy for treating several cardiovascular diseases, however, information on its mechanism of action is limited. The present study assessed the effect of two ginger varieties (Zingiber officinale and Curcuma longa) on the arginase activity, atherogenic index, levels of liver thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARSs), and plasma lipids in rats fed with a high-cholesterol (2%) diet for 14 days. Following the treatment period, it was found that feeding a high-cholesterol diet to rats caused significant (p < 0.05) increases in arginase activity, atherogenic index, levels of TBARS, total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TGs), and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) with a concomitant decrease in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C). However, both ginger and turmeric (2% and 4%) caused significant (p < 0.05) decreases in arginase activity and the atherogenic index, and prevented hypercholesterolemia by decreasing the TC, TGs, and LDL-C while increasing the HDL-C when compared with the controls. In conclusion, dietary supplementation with both types of rhizomes (ginger and turmeric) inhibited arginase activity and prevented hypercholesterolemia in rats that received a high-cholesterol diet. Therefore, these activities of ginger and turmeric represent possible mechanisms underlying its use in herbal medicine to treat several cardiovascular diseases. PMID:27079229

  16. TIPE2 negatively regulates inflammation by switching arginine metabolism from nitric oxide synthase to arginase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunwei Lou

    Full Text Available TIPE2, the tumor necrosis factor (TNF-alpha-induced protein 8-like 2 (TNFAIP8L2, plays an essential role in maintaining immune homeostasis. It is highly expressed in macrophages and negatively regulates inflammation through inhibiting Toll-like receptor signaling. In this paper, we utilized RAW264.7 cells stably transfected with a TIPE2 expression plasmid, as well as TIPE2-deficient macrophages to study the roles of TIPE2 in LPS-induced nitric oxide (NO and urea production. The results showed that TIPE2-deficiency significantly upregulated the levels of iNOS expression and NO production in LPS-stimulated macrophages, but decreased mRNA levels of arginase I and urea production. However, TIPE2 overexpression in macrophages was capable of downregulating protein levels of LPS-induced iNOS and NO, but generated greater levels of arginase I and urea production. Furthermore, TIPE2-/- mice had higher iNOS protein levels in lung and liver and higher plasma NO concentrations, but lower levels of liver arginase I compared to LPS-treated WT controls. Interestingly, significant increases in IκB degradation and phosphorylation of JNK, p38, and IκB were observed in TIPE2-deficient macrophages following LPS challenge. These results strongly suggest that TIPE2 plays an important role in shifting L-arginase metabolism from production of NO to urea, during host inflammatory response.

  17. Recombinant human arginase I immobilized on gold and silver nanoparticles: preparation and properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Stasyuk

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Metal nanoparticles (NPs, such as gold (Au and silver (Ag, are important for chemistry, physics, and biology due to their unique optical, electrical, and photothermal properties. Such NPs are widely used for immobilization of various bioactive substances, including peptides, enzymes, antibodies and DNA. The synthesis of silver and gold nanoparticles was carried out by reduction of silver nitrate by glucose and reduction of tetrachloroauric acid by sodium citrate, respectively. The size and structure of the AgNPs and AuNPs were characterized using TEM, AFM and XRD methods. The average size of the AgNPs and AuNPs was between 8 and 15 nm. Recombinant arginase I was immobilized using the carbodiimidepentafluorophenol method on the surface of NPs functionalized with ω-mercaptohexadecanoic acid. It was shown that recombinant human liver arginase I isolated from the yeast Hansenula polymorpha maintains satisfactory stability after immobilization on both NPs. The immobilized arginase retained 40% of its activity on the surface of AuNPs and 25% on AgNPs compared to the free arginase after storage at +4 ºC during 25 days. The immobilized enzyme can be used for assay of arginine in pharmaceuticals, in food products and in blood.

  18. Augmentation of arginase 1 expression by exposure to air pollution exacerbates the airways hyperresponsiveness in murine models of asthma

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    Amatullah Hajera

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Arginase overexpression contributes to airways hyperresponsiveness (AHR in asthma. Arginase expression is further augmented in cigarette smoking asthmatics, suggesting that it may be upregulated by environmental pollution. Thus, we hypothesize that arginase contributes to the exacerbation of respiratory symptoms following exposure to air pollution, and that pharmacologic inhibition of arginase would abrogate the pollution-induced AHR. Methods To investigate the role of arginase in the air pollution-induced exacerbation of airways responsiveness, we employed two murine models of allergic airways inflammation. Mice were sensitized to ovalbumin (OVA and challenged with nebulized PBS (OVA/PBS or OVA (OVA/OVA for three consecutive days (sub-acute model or 12 weeks (chronic model, which exhibit inflammatory cell influx and remodeling/AHR, respectively. Twenty-four hours after the final challenge, mice were exposed to concentrated ambient fine particles plus ozone (CAP+O3, or HEPA-filtered air (FA, for 4 hours. After the CAP+O3 exposures, mice underwent tracheal cannulation and were treated with an aerosolized arginase inhibitor (S-boronoethyl-L-cysteine; BEC or vehicle, immediately before determination of respiratory function and methacholine-responsiveness using the flexiVent®. Lungs were then collected for comparison of arginase activity, protein expression, and immunohistochemical localization. Results Compared to FA, arginase activity was significantly augmented in the lungs of CAP+O3-exposed OVA/OVA mice in both the sub-acute and chronic models. Western blotting and immunohistochemical staining revealed that the increased activity was due to arginase 1 expression in the area surrounding the airways in both models. Arginase inhibition significantly reduced the CAP+O3-induced increase in AHR in both models. Conclusions This study demonstrates that arginase is upregulated following environmental exposures in murine models of

  19. Transcriptional profiling of gastric epithelial cells infected with wild type or arginase-deficient Helicobacter pylori

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    Kim Songhee H

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Helicobacter pylori causes acute and chronic gastric inflammation induced by proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines secreted by cells of the gastric mucosa, including gastric epithelial cells. Previous studies have demonstrated that the bacterial arginase, RocF, is involved in inhibiting T cell proliferation and CD3ζ expression, suggesting that arginase could be involved in a more general dampening of the immune response, perhaps by down-regulation of certain pro-inflammatory mediators. Results Global transcriptome analysis was performed on AGS gastric epithelial cells infected for 16 hours with a wild type Helicobacter pylori strain 26695, an arginase mutant (rocF- or a rocF+ complemented strain. H. pylori infection triggered altered host gene expression in genes involved in cell movement, death/growth/proliferation, and cellular function and maintenance. While the wild type strain stimulates host inflammatory pathways, the rocF- mutant induced significantly more expression of IL-8. The results of the microarray were verified using real-time PCR, and the differential levels of protein expression were confirmed by ELISA and Bioplex analysis. MIP-1B was also significantly secreted by AGS cells after H. pylori rocF- mutant infection, as determined by Bioplex. Even though not explored in this manuscript, the impact that the results presented here may have on the development of gastritis, warrant further research to understand the underlying mechanisms of the relationship between H. pylori RocF and IL-8 induction. Conclusions We conclude that H. pylori arginase modulates multiple host signaling and metabolic pathways of infected gastric epithelial cells. Arginase may play a critical role in anti-inflammatory host responses that could contribute to the ability of H. pylori to establish chronic infections.

  20. Stable overexpression of arginase I and ornithine transcarbamylase in HepG2 cells improves its ammonia detoxification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Nanhong; Wang, Yan; Wang, Xiaoqian; Zhou, Liangyi; Zhang, Feiyuan; Li, Xiujin; Chen, Yanlin

    2012-02-01

    HepG2 is an immortalized human hepatoma cell line that has been used for research into bioartificial liver systems. However, a low level of ammonia detoxification is its biggest drawback. In this work, a recombinant HepG2 cell line with stable overexpression of human arginase I (hArgI) and human ornithine transcarbamylase (hOTC), HepG2/(hArgI + hOTC)4, was developed using a eukaryotic dual gene expression vector pBudCE4.1. (1) The hArgI and hOTC enzymatic activity in HepG2/(hArgI + hOTC)4 cells were higher than in the control cells. (2) The ammonia tolerance capacity of HepG2/(hArgI + hOTC)4 cells was three times that of HepG2 cells and 37.5% of that of primary human hepatocytes in cultivation. In the experiment of ammonia detoxification, HepG2/(hArgI + hOTC)4 cells produced 3.1 times more urea (at 180 mM NH(4) Cl) and 3.1 times more glutamine (at 120 mM NH(4) Cl and 15 mM glutamate) than HepG2 cells, reaching 63.1% and 36.0% that of primary human hepatocytes, respectively. (3) The hArgI and hOTC overexpression did not influence the growth of HepG2 cells and also promoted the expression of other ammonia detoxification associated proteins including glutamine synthetase (GS), arginase II (ArgII), arginosuccinate synthase (ASS) and arginosuccinate lyase (ASL) in HepG2 cells. This work illustrates that the modification reported here made significant progress in the improvement of HepG2 cell function and the HepG2/(hArgI + hOTC)4 cells will provide a better selection for the application of bioartificial liver system. PMID:21938740

  1. A protective effect of the laminated layer on Echinococcus granulosus survival dependent on upregulation of host arginase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amri, Manel; Touil-Boukoffa, Chafia

    2015-09-01

    The role of nitric oxide (NO) in host defense against Echinococcus granulosus larvae was previously reported. However, NO production by NOS2 (inducible NO synthase) is counteracted by the expression of Arginase. In the present study, our aim is to evaluate the involvement of the laminated layer (external layer of parasitic cyst) in Arginase induction and the protoscoleces (living and infective part of the cyst) survival. Our in vitro results indicate that this cystic compound increases the Arginase activity in macrophages. Moreover, C-type lectin receptors (CLRs) with specificity for mannan and the TGF-β are implicated in this effect as shown after adding Mannan and Anti-TGFβ. Interestingly, the laminated layer increases protoscoleces survival in macrophages-parasite co-cultures. Our results indicate that the laminated layer protects E. granulosus against the NOS2 protective response through Arginase pathway, a hallmark of M2 macrophages.

  2. Age-related alteration of arginase activity impacts on severity of leishmaniasis.

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    Ingrid Müller

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The leishmaniases are a group of vector-borne parasitic diseases that represent a major international public health problem; they belong to the most neglected tropical diseases and have one of the highest rates of morbidity and mortality. The clinical outcome of infection with Leishmania parasites depends on a variety of factors such as parasite species, vector-derived products, genetics, behaviour, and nutrition. The age of the infected individuals also appears to be critical, as a significant proportion of clinical cases occur in children; this age-related higher prevalence of disease is most remarkable in visceral leishmaniasis. The mechanisms resulting in this higher incidence of clinical disease in children are poorly understood. We have recently revealed that sustained arginase activity promotes uncontrolled parasite growth and pathology in vivo. Here, we tested the hypothesis that arginase-mediated L-arginine metabolism differs with age. METHODOLOGY: The age distribution of patients with visceral or cutaneous leishmaniasis was determined in cohorts of patients in our clinics in endemic areas in Ethiopia. To exclude factors that are difficult to control in patients, we assessed the impact of ageing on the manifestations of experimental leishmaniasis. We determined parasite burden, T cell responses, and macrophage effector functions in young and aged mice during the course of infection. RESULTS: Our results show that younger mice develop exacerbated lesion pathology and higher parasite burdens than aged mice. This aggravated disease development in younger individuals does not correlate with a change in T helper cytokine profile. To address the underlying mechanisms responsible for the more severe infections in younger mice, we investigated macrophage effector functions. Our results show that macrophages from younger mice do not have an impaired capacity to kill parasites; however, they express significantly higher levels of

  3. The new LM-PCR/shifter method for the genotyping of microorganisms based on the use of a class IIS restriction enzyme and ligation mediated PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawczyk, Beata; Leibner-Ciszak, Justyna; Stojowska, Karolina; Kur, Józef

    2011-12-01

    This study details and examines a novel ligation-mediated polymerase chain reaction (LM-PCR) method. Named the LM-PCR/Shifter, it relies on the use of a Class IIS restriction enzyme giving restriction fragments with different 4-base, 5' overhangs, this being the Shifter, and the ligation of appropriate oligonucleotide adapters. A sequence of 4-base, 5' overhangs of the adapter and a 4- base sequence of the 3' end of the primer(s) determine a subset of the genomic restriction fragments, which are amplified by PCR. The method permits the differentiation of bacterial species strains on the basis of the different DNA band patterns obtained after electrophoresis in polyacrylamide gels stained with ethidium bromide and visualized in UV light. The usefulness of the LM-PCR/ Shifter method for genotyping is analyzed by a comparison with the restriction endonuclease analysis of chromosomal DNA by the pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (REA-PFGE) and PCR melting profile (PCR MP) methods for isolates of clinical origin. The clustering of the LM-PCR/Shifter fingerprinting data matched those of the REA-PFGE and PCR MP methods. We found that the LM-PCR/Shifter is rapid, and offers good discriminatory power and excellent reproducibility, making it a method that may be effectively applied in epidemiological studies.

  4. Stochastic user equilibrium with equilibrated choice sets: Part II - Solving the restricted SUE for the logit family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Thomas Kjær; Watling, David Paul; Prato, Carlo Giacomo;

    2015-01-01

    We propose a new class of path-based solution algorithms to solve the Restricted Stochastic User Equilibrium (RSUE), as introduced in Watling et al. (2015). The class allows a flexible specification of how the choice sets are systematically grown by considering congestion effects and how the flows...

  5. Type IIS restriction enzyme footprinting I. Measurement of a triple helix dissociation constant with Eco57I at 25 degrees C.

    OpenAIRE

    Ward, B

    1996-01-01

    A method is described to measure triple helix dissociation constants by inhibiting the cleavage of a plasmid constructed to contain a target sequence for the triplex forming oligonucleotide (TFO) dT20 by the type IIS restriction enzyme Eco57I. The method relies upon the TFO's ability to block the cleavage reaction by occupying the enzymes cleavage site but not its specific binding sequence. Using this protocol, the dissociation constant for dT20 bound to its target was 0.16 +/- 0.01 microM at...

  6. Inhibition of herpes simplex virus multiplication by activated macrophages: a role for arginase?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildy, P; Gell, P G; Rhodes, J; Newton, A

    1982-01-01

    Proteose-peptone-activated mouse macrophages can prevent productive infection by herpes simplex virus in neighboring cells in vitro whether or not those cells belong to the same animal species. The effect does not require contact between the macrophages and the infected cells, may be prevented by adding extra arginine to the medium, and may be reversed when extra arginine is added 24 h after the macrophages. Arginase activity was found both intracellularly and released from the macrophages. The extracellular enzyme is quite stable; 64% activity was found after 48 h of incubation at 37 degrees C in tissue culture medium. No evidence was found that the inefficiency of virus replication in macrophages was due to self-starvation by arginase. As might be predicted macrophages can, by the same mechanism, limit productive infection by vaccinia virus. PMID:6286497

  7. Purification and Properties of the Constitutive Arginase of Evernia prunastri1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Falquina, Angeles; Legaz, María Estrella

    1984-01-01

    Constitutive arginase (molecular weight 330,000) 920-fold purified from Evernia prunastri thallus, is activated by putrescine, l-ornithine, and agmatine with Ka values of 2.7, 1.1, and 5.8 millimolar, respectively. Constitutive arginase is also activated by endogenous l-arginine, reaching its maximum activity at 16 hours of incubation on Tris-HCl (pH 9.15) with a subsequent decrease. Urea behaves as a mixed inhibitor of the enzyme with a Ki value of 2.6 millimolar. Atranorin and evernic acid behave as in vitro activators of the enzyme; usnic acid does not have any significant effect as activator. PMID:16663950

  8. Diffusion Tensor Imaging in Arginase Deficiency Reveals Damage to Corticospinal Tracts

    OpenAIRE

    Oldham, Michael S.; VanMeter, John W.; Shattuck, Kyle F.; Cederbaum, Stephen D.; Gropman, Andrea L.

    2010-01-01

    Individuals with a proximal urea cycle disorder, such as carbamoyl phosphate synthetase deficiency 1 or ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency, may present with encephalopathy resulting from hyperammonemia. The clinical presentation of arginase deficiency is considerably different, characterized by progressive spasticity involving the lower extremities and usually dementia. Diagnosis may be delayed, and patients are often thought to have cerebral palsy. The true etiology of brain injury in arg...

  9. Long-term Survival of the Juvenile Lethal Arginase-deficient Mouse With AAV Gene Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Eun K.; Hu, Chuhong; Bhargava, Ragini; Rozengurt, Nora; Stout, David; Grody, Wayne W.; Cederbaum, Stephen D.; Lipshutz, Gerald S

    2012-01-01

    Arginase deficiency is characterized by hyperargininemia and infrequent episodes of hyperammonemia. Human patients suffer from neurological impairment with spasticity, loss of ambulation, seizures, and severe mental and growth retardation. In a murine model, onset of the phenotypic abnormality is heralded by weight loss beginning around day 15 with death occurring typically by postnatal day 17 with hyperargininemia and markedly elevated ammonia. The goal of this study was to address the devel...

  10. Carbon nanotube-based sensing devices for human Arginase-1 detection

    OpenAIRE

    S. Baldo; S. Buccheri; Ballo, A.; Camarda, M; La Magna, A.; M.E. Castagna; Romano, A.; D. Iannazzo; Di Raimondo, F.; Neri, G; Scalese, S.

    2016-01-01

    A new carbon nanotube-based device for detection of Arginase 1 (ARG-1) was produced. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were deposited between electrodes by dielectrophoresis (DEP) in an accurate and reproducible way. This deposition method has the advantages of low cost and room temperature conditions and therefore, can be used on different kinds of substrates (silicon, glass, plastics) allowing for large scale production of chemical or biological sensors. Scanning electrical microscope ...

  11. Arginase 2 Deficiency Prevents Oxidative Stress and Limits Hyperoxia-Induced Retinal Vascular Degeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Suwanpradid, Jutamas; Rojas, Modesto; Behzadian, M. Ali; Caldwell, R. William; Caldwell, Ruth B.

    2014-01-01

    Background Hyperoxia exposure of premature infants causes obliteration of the immature retinal microvessels, leading to a condition of proliferative vitreoretinal neovascularization termed retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). Previous work has demonstrated that the hyperoxia-induced vascular injury is mediated by dysfunction of endothelial nitric oxide synthase resulting in peroxynitrite formation. This study was undertaken to determine the involvement of the ureahydrolase enzyme arginase in thi...

  12. Arginase 2 deficiency reduces hyperoxia-mediated retinal neurodegeneration through the regulation of polyamine metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    S.P. Narayanan; Xu, Z.; Putluri, N; Sreekumar, A; Lemtalsi, T; Caldwell, R W; Caldwell, R B

    2014-01-01

    Hyperoxia treatment has been known to induce neuronal and glial death in the developing central nervous system. Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) is a devastating disease in premature infants and a major cause of childhood vision impairment. Studies indicate that, in addition to vascular injury, retinal neurons are also affected in ROP. Using an oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR) mouse model for ROP, we have previously shown that deletion of the arginase 2 (A2) significantly reduced neuro-glial ...

  13. A natural compound macelignan protects midbrain dopaminergic neurons from inflammatory degeneration via microglial arginase-1 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyofuji, Kana; Kurauchi, Yuki; Hisatsune, Akinori; Seki, Takahiro; Mishima, Satoshi; Katsuki, Hiroshi

    2015-08-01

    Inflammatory events involving activated microglia have been recognized to play an important role in pathogenesis of various neurodegenerative disorders including Parkinson disease. Compounds regulating activation profiles of microglia may provide therapeutic benefits for Parkinson disease characterized by degeneration of midbrain dopaminergic neurons. Here we examined the effect of macelignan, a compound derived from nutmeg, on inflammatory degeneration of midbrain dopaminergic neurons. Treatment of midbrain slice cultures with interferon (IFN)-γ and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) caused a substantial decrease in viable dopaminergic neurons and an increase in nitric oxide (NO) production indicated by extracellular nitrite accumulation. Application of macelignan (10 μM) concomitantly with LPS prevented the loss of dopaminergic neurons. Besides nitrite accumulation, up-regulation of inducible NO synthase protein expression in response to IFN-γ/LPS was confirmed by Western blotting, and immunohistochemical examination revealed expression of inducible NO synthase in a subpopulation of Iba-1-poitive microglia. However, macelignan did not affect any of these NO-related parameters. On the other hand, macelignan promoted expression of arginase-1 in midbrain slice cultures irrespective of the presence or the absence of IFN-γ/LPS treatment. Arginase-1 expression was mainly localized in a subpopulation of Iba-1-positive cells. Importantly, the neuroprotective effect of macelignan was antagonized by N(ω)-hydroxy-nor-L-arginine, a specific arginase inhibitor. The neuroprotective effect of macelignan was also prevented by GW9662, a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) antagonist. Overall, these results indicate that macelignan, a compound with PPARγ agonist activity, can provide neuroprotective effect on dopaminergic neurons in an arginase-dependent but NO-independent manner.

  14. The human tyrosine aminotransferase gene: characterization of restriction fragment length polymorphisms and haplotype analysis in a family with tyrosinemia type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westphal, E M; Natt, E; Grimm, T; Odievre, M; Scherer, G

    1988-07-01

    Deficiency in hepatic tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT) causes tyrosinemia type II, an autosomal recessively inherited disorder. Using a TAT cosmid clone, we have identified an MspI restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) 5' to the TAT gene, with allele frequencies of 0.63 and 0.37. Analysis of the cloned maternal and paternal TAT alleles from a patient with tyrosinemia type II led to the identification of a HaeIII RFLP at the 3' end of the TAT gene, with allele frequencies of 0.94 and 0.06. The two RFLPs are 27 kb apart and in no allelic association. From haplotype frequencies, a polymorphism information content (PIC) value of 0.44 was obtained. The two RFLPs have allowed the unambiguous identification of the mutant TAT alleles in the patient's pedigree by haplotype analysis.

  15. Influence of aerobic training on the reduced vasoconstriction to angiotensin II in rats exposed to intrauterine growth restriction: possible role of oxidative stress and AT2 receptor of angiotensin II.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Oliveira

    Full Text Available Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR is associated with impaired vascular function, which contributes to the increased incidence of chronic disease. The aim of this study was to investigate whether aerobic training improves AngII-induced vasoconstriction in IUGR rats. Moreover, we assess the role of superoxide dismutase (SOD isoforms and NADPH oxidase-derived superoxide anions in this improvement. Female Wistar rats were randomly divided into two groups on day 1 of pregnancy. A control group was fed standard chow ad libitum, and a restricted group was fed 50% of the ad libitum intake throughout gestation. At 8 weeks of age, male offspring from both groups were randomly assigned to 4 experimental groups: sedentary control (SC, trained control (TC, sedentary restricted (SRT, and trained restricted (TRT. The training protocol was performed on a treadmill and consisted of a continuous 60-min session 5 days/week for 10 weeks. Following aerobic training, concentration-response curves to AngII were obtained in endothelium-intact aortic rings. Protein expression of SOD isoforms, AngII receptors and the NADPH oxidase component p47phox was assessed by Western blot analysis. The dihydroethidium was used to evaluate the in situ superoxide levels under basal conditions or in the presence of apocynin, losartan or PD 123,319. Our results indicate that aerobic training can prevent IUGR-associated increases in AngII-dependent vasoconstriction and can restore basal superoxide levels in the aortic rings of TRT rats. Moreover, we observed that aerobic training normalized the increased p47phox protein expression and increased MnSOD and AT2 receptor protein expression in thoracic aortas of SRT rats. In summary, aerobic training can result in an upregulation of antioxidant defense by improved of MnSOD expression and attenuation of NADPH oxidase component p47phox. These effects are accompanied by increased expression of AT2 receptor, which provide positive effects

  16. DNA supercoiling enables the Type IIS restriction enzyme BspMI to recognise the relative orientation of two DNA sequences

    OpenAIRE

    Kingston, Isabel J.; Gormley, Niall A.; Halford, Stephen E.

    2003-01-01

    Many proteins can sense the relative orientations of two sequences at distant locations in DNA: some require sites in inverted (head-to-head) orientation, others in repeat (head-to-tail) orientation. Like many restriction enzymes, the BspMI endonuclease binds two copies of its target site before cleaving DNA. Its target is an asymmetric sequence so two sites in repeat orientation differ from sites in inverted orientation. When tested against supercoiled plasmids with two sites 700 bp apart in...

  17. Different periods of feed restriction before compensatory growth in Belgian Blue bulls: II. Plasma metabolites and hormones

    OpenAIRE

    Hornick, Jean-Luc; Van Eenaeme, Christian; Diez, Marianne; Minet, Vincent; Istasse, Louis

    1998-01-01

    Plasma metabolites and hormones were studied in 16 double-muscled Belgian Blue bulls maintained at low growth (.5 kg/d) for 114 (G2), 243 (G3), or 419 (G4) d (low growth period, LGP) before fattening (rapid growth period, RGP). Animals from the control group (CG) were fed a diet high in energy and protein. The animals from G2, G3, and G4 were fed a restricted amount of a diet low in energy and protein during LGP and the same diet as CG during RGP. Plasma glucose, alpha-amino nitrogen (AAN), N...

  18. Identification of MHC class II restricted T‐cell‐mediated reactivity against MHC class I binding Mycobacterium tuberculosis peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Mingjun; Tang, Sheila Tuyet; Stryhn, Anette;

    2011-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I restricted cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) are known to play an important role in the control of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection so identification of CTL epitopes from M. tuberculosis is of importance for the development of effective peptide....... The antigenicity of a total of 157 peptides with measured affinity for HLA‐I molecules of KD ≤ 500 nm were evaluated using peripheral blood T cells from strongly purified protein derivative reactive healthy donors. Of the 157 peptides, eight peptides (5%) were found to induce T‐cell responses. As judged from...

  19. Regulatory functions of self-restricted MHC class II allopeptide-specific Th2 clones in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Waaga, Ana Maria; Gasser, Martin; Kist-van Holthe, Joana E; Najafian, Nader; Müller, Angelika; Vella, John P.; Womer, Karl L.; Chandraker, Anil; Khoury, Samia J.; Sayegh, Mohamed H.

    2001-01-01

    We studied T-cell clones generated from grafts of rejecting and tolerant animals and investigated the regulatory function of Th2 clones in vitro and in vivo. To prevent allograft rejection, we treated LEW strain recipient rats of WF strain kidney grafts with CTLA4Ig to block CD28-B7 costimulation. We then isolated epitope-specific T-cell clones from the engrafted tissue, using a donor-derived immunodominant class II MHC allopeptide presented by recipient antigen-presenting cells. Acutely reje...

  20. Genotyping of major histocompatibility complex Class II DRB gene in Rohilkhandi goats by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism and DNA sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kush Shrivastava

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To study the major histocompatibility complex (MHC Class II DRB1 gene polymorphism in Rohilkhandi goat using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP and nucleotide sequencing techniques. Materials and Methods: DNA was isolated from 127 Rohilkhandi goats maintained at sheep and goat farm, Indian Veterinary Research Institute, Izatnagar, Bareilly. A 284 bp fragment of exon 2 of DRB1 gene was amplified and digested using BsaI and TaqI restriction enzymes. Population genetic parameters were calculated using Popgene v 1.32 and SAS 9.0. The genotypes were then sequenced using Sanger dideoxy chain termination method and were compared with related breeds/species using MEGA 6.0 and Megalign (DNASTAR software. Results: TaqI locus showed three and BsaI locus showed two genotypes. Both the loci were found to be in Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium (HWE, however, population genetic parameters suggest that heterozygosity is still maintained in the population at both loci. Percent diversity and divergence matrix, as well as phylogenetic analysis revealed that the MHC Class II DRB1 gene of Rohilkhandi goats was found to be in close cluster with Garole and Scottish blackface sheep breeds as compared to other goat breeds included in the sequence comparison. Conclusion: The PCR-RFLP patterns showed population to be in HWE and absence of one genotype at one locus (BsaI, both the loci showed excess of one or the other homozygote genotype, however, effective number of alleles showed that allelic diversity is present in the population. Sequence comparison of DRB1 gene of Rohilkhandi goat with other sheep and goat breed assigned Rohilkhandi goat in divergence with Jamanupari and Angora goats.

  1. 精氨酸酶Ⅰ的手性选择性%Chiral Selectivity of Arginase I

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李帅; 李兆龙; 胡玉琳; 高雪峰; 黄旭日

    2011-01-01

    The chiral selectivity of arginase was investigated by means of molecular dynamics and molecular docking in this study. By eomparing structures of the L-arginine arginase I complex with D-arginine-arginase I complex, L-arginine can bind closely to arginase I, further, the analysis of the molecular dynamics trajectories of the two complexes show that the L-Arginine-Arginase I complex has smaller fluctuations of RMSD and higher bin-ding energy than those of the D-Arginine-arginase I complex. In conclusion, the chiral selectivity of L-ar-ginine in catalytic reaction of arginine guanidine off was determined by the shape of active pocket.%运用分子对接和分子动力学模拟方法对精氨酸酶进行手性选择性研究.通过比较精氨酸酶Ⅰ与L,D型精氨酸复合物的结构,发现精氨酸酶Ⅰ与L型精氨酸结合得更紧密.进一步分析比较复合物分子动力学轨迹发现,精氨酸酶Ⅰ与L型精氨酸分子的复合物RMSD曲线的震荡较小,而且酶与L型底物的结合能大于酶与D型底物的结合能.在催化精氨酸脱胍基的反应中,精氨酸酶Ⅰ只选择L型精氨酸分子是基于酶的手性选择性,手性选择性是由酶的活性口袋形状决定的.

  2. Different periods of feed restriction before compensatory growth in Belgian Blue bulls: II. Plasma metabolites and hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornick, J L; Van Eenaeme, C; Diez, M; Minet, V; Istasse, L

    1998-01-01

    Plasma metabolites and hormones were studied in 16 double-muscled Belgian Blue bulls maintained at low growth (.5 kg/d) for 114 (G2), 243 (G3), or 419 (G4) d (low growth period, LGP) before fattening (rapid growth period, RGP). Animals from the control group (CG) were fed a diet high in energy and protein. The animals from G2, G3, and G4 were fed a restricted amount of a diet low in energy and protein during LGP and the same diet as CG during RGP. Plasma glucose, alpha-amino nitrogen (AAN), NEFA, urea, creatinine, thyroxine (T4), 3,3',5'-triiodothyronine (T3), and IGF-I were measured in blood samples taken fortnightly. Plasma GH and insulin (I) profiles were measured in serial blood samples obtained at three times during growth. The RGP was characterized by an initial compensatory growth, by higher plasma glucose, AAN, and urea levels, and by lower plasma NEFA and creatinine levels. Plasma GH concentration decreased after refeeding. Plasma T4 increased linearly during refeeding, as opposed to T3, which showed a different profile in each group. Plasma IGF-I showed a curvilinear increase during RGP and reached a plateau after 3 mo in each compensating group. In G4, changes of plasma metabolites and hormones differed often distinctly from G2 or G3. During refeeding, higher nutrient supply improved the functionality of the somatotropic axis and increased the concentration of anabolic hormones, allowing rapid muscle deposition. However, animals underfed the longest period behaved differently from the other groups, possibly because they reached a more complete sexual maturity.

  3. A Cladistic Analysis of Phenotype Associations with Haplotypes Inferred from Restriction Endonuclease Mapping. II. the Analysis of Natural Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Templeton, A. R.; Sing, C. F.; Kessling, A.; Humphries, S.

    1988-01-01

    Genes that code for products involved in the physiology of a phenotype are logical candidates for explaining interindividual variation in that phenotype. We present a methodology for discovering associations between genetic variation at such candidate loci (assayed through restriction endonuclease mapping) with phenotypic variation at the population level. We confine our analyses to DNA regions in which recombination is very rare. In this case, the genetic variation at the candiate locus can be organized into a cladogram that represents the evolutionary relationships between the observed haplotypes. Any mutation causing a significant phenotypic effect should be imbedded within the same historical structure defined by the cladogram. We showed, in the first paper of this series, how to use the cladogram to define a nested analysis of variance (NANOVA) that was very efficient at detecting and localizing phenotypically important mutations. However, the NANOVA of haplotype effects could only be applied to populations of homozygous genotypes. In this paper, we apply the quantitative genetic concept of average excess to evaluate the phenotypic effect of a haplotype or group of haplotypes stratified and contrasted according to the nested design defined by the cladogram. We also show how a permutational procedure can be used to make statistical inferences about the nested average excess values in populations containing heterozygous as well as homozygous genotypes. We provide two worked examples that investigate associations between genetic variation at or near the Alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) locus and Adh activity in Drosophila melanogaster, and associations between genetic variation at or near some apolipoprotein loci and various lipid phenotypes in a human population. PMID:3147219

  4. PM-16IMMUNOSUPPRESSIVE FACTORS, MDSC AND ARGINASE, ARE ELEVATED IN DOGS WITH MALIGNANT GLIOMA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pluhar, Liz; Goulart, Michelle; Seiler, Charles; Olin, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Immunotherapy for malignant gliomas has striking efficacy in rodent models but very limited effects in clinical trials, which may reflect immunological differences between induced and spontaneous tumors. The monocytes that heavily infiltrate GBM develop myeloid-derived suppressor cell (MDSC) phenotype, and these immunosuppressive cells are increased in GBM patients, but not in murine models. Canine primary brain tumors may offer a more faithful representation of the human disease due to similarities in clinical and pathobiological characteristics. We were recently first to identify MDSC in dogs and found significantly increased in number in dogs with advanced cancers. To add further support to pet dogs with glioma as a translational model, we assessed whether canine glioma patients also have elevated numbers of MDSC relative to healthy dogs. MDSC secrete arginase that removes L-arginine from the microenvironment profoundly impairing T cell proliferation and function. Therefore we also measured serum levels of arginase 1 in all dogs. The mean percentage of monocytic MDSC in peripheral blood of dogs with glioma (n = 26) was 7.51 ± 1.31, which was significantly greater than healthy controls (n = 10) with 0.74 ± 0.34 (P< 0.0001). The median percentages of granulocytic MDSC did not differ between dogs with glioma versus controls, 15.95% and 12.5% respectively. There were also significantly increased levels of arginase in the serum of dogs with gliomas, 8.00 ± 3.32 U/L, relative to that of healthy controls, 2.40 ± 1.40 U/L (P < 0.0001). These data demonstrate that some of the immunosuppressive mechanisms present in human gliomas patients are also found in dogs with malignant gliomas. These findings lend further support that the pet dog with spontaneous brain cancer that shares our environment is an excellent translational model for the human disease. We are currently working to correlate changes in numbers of MDSC and arginase levels in serum with disease burden as

  5. Purification, properties and alternate substrate specificities of arginase from two different sources: Vigna catjang cotyledon and buffalo liver

    OpenAIRE

    Dabir, Snehal; Dabir, Pankaj; Somvanshi, Baburao

    2005-01-01

    Arginase was purified from Vigna catjang cotyledons and buffalo liver by chromatographic separations using Bio-Gel P-150, DEAE-cellulose and arginine AH Sepharose 4B affinity columns. The native molecular weight of an enzyme estimated on Bio-Gel P-300 column for Vigna catjang was 210 kDa and 120 kDa of buffalo liver, while SDS-PAGE showed a single band of molecular weight 52 kDa for cotyledon and 43 kDa for buffalo liver arginase. The kinetic properties determined for the purified cotyledon a...

  6. FULL-LENGTH CDNA CLONING AND TISSUE EXPRESSION ANALYSIS OF ARGINASE GENE FROM HYRIOPSIS CUMINGII%三角帆蚌精氨酸酶基因的cDNA克隆与组织表达分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘巧林; 许宝红; 肖调义; 刘敏; 钟蕾; 苏建明

    2011-01-01

    Arginase (Arg) is a sign enzyme among organisms of urea cycle. It is not only related to many diseases in organisms, but also used to treat tumors and cancer as an important tool enzyme. According to the Hyriopsis cumingii (H. Cumingii) expressed sequence tags (EST) obtained by constructing subtractive hybridization cDNA library of H. Cumingii liver, the gene full-length cDNA sequence of arginase from H. Cumingii was cloned by RACE-PCR technique based on the designed gene-special primers. After analyzed by the software DNA Star and the bioinformatics technology, the results showed that the length of arginase gene cDNA sequence was 1720 bp, containing a complete open reading frame (65-1072) which was 1008 bp, encoding a peptide of 335 amino acid residues (aa), flanked by a 64 bp of 5' untranslated region (UTR) and a 648 bp of 3'-UTR. The deduced molecular weight of arginase was about 36.81 kD. At the transcriptional level, quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) was used to detect the expression of the arginase gene in different tissues. The result revealed that H. Cumingii arginase gene could be expressed in seven kinds of tissue containing liver, stomach, intestine, gill, heart, mantle, axe foot collected from H. Cumingii, especially strongly expressed in digestive organs, such as liver, stomach and intestine, but weakly in heart and mantle. So it concluded that the arginase from the H. Cumingii which belongs to lower invertebrate could possess the same characteristics and functions of arginase type I and II from the higher animals. That means the arginase from the H. Cumingii may not onlyparticipates in urea cycle, but also plays an important role in the processes of physiology and pathology. And the deduction will be verified in the next experiment.%精氨酸酶(Arginase,Arg)是生物体尿素循环当中一种标志性的酶类,它不但与生物体许多疾病相关,而且是目前用于治疗肿瘤和癌症的一种重要的工具酶.根据三角帆蚌消

  7. A putative Type IIS restriction endonuclease GeoICI from Geobacillus sp.--A robust, thermostable alternative to mezophilic prototype BbvI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zebrowska, Joanna; Zolnierkiewicz, Olga; Skowron, Marta A; Zylicz-Stachula, Agnieszka; Jezewska-Frackowiak, Joanna; Skowron, Piotr M

    2016-03-01

    Screening of extreme environments in search for novel microorganisms may lead to the discovery of robust enzymes with either new substrate specificities or thermostable equivalents of those already found in mesophiles, better suited for biotechnology applications. Isolates from Iceland geysers' biofilms, exposed to a broad range of temperatures, from ambient to close to water boiling point, were analysed for the presence of DNA-interacting proteins, including restriction endonucleases (REases). GeoICI, a member of atypical Type IIS REases, is the most thermostable isoschizomer of the prototype BbvI, recognizing/cleaving 5'-GCAGC(N8/12)-3'DNA sequences. As opposed to the unstable prototype, which cleaves DNA at 30°C, GeoICI is highly active at elevated temperatures, up to 73°C and over a very wide salt concentration range. Recognition/cleavage sites were determined by: (i) digestion of plasmid and bacteriophage lambda DNA (Λ); (ii) cleavage of custom PCR substrates, (iii) run-off sequencing of GeoICI cleavage products and (iv) shotgun cloning and sequencing of Λ DNA fragmented with GeoICI. Geobacillus sp. genomic DNA was PCR-screened for the presence of other specialized REases-MTases and as a result, another putative REase- MTase, GeoICII, related to the Thermus sp. family of bifunctional REases-methyltransferases (MTases) was detected. PMID:26949085

  8. A putative Type IIS restriction endonuclease GeoICI from Geobacillus sp. – A robust, thermostable alternative to mezophilic prototype BbvI

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Joanna Zebrowska; Olga Zołnierkiewicz; Marta A Skowron; Agnieszka Zylicz-Stachula; Joanna Jezewska-Frackowiak; Piotr M Skowron

    2016-03-01

    Screening of extreme environments in search for novel microorganisms may lead to the discovery of robust enzymes with either new substrate specificities or thermostable equivalents of those already found in mesophiles, better suited for biotechnology applications. Isolates from Iceland geysers’ biofilms, exposed to a broad range of temperatures, from ambient to close to water boiling point, were analysed for the presence of DNA-interacting proteins, including restriction endonucleases (REases). GeoICI, a member of atypical Type IIS REases, is the most thermostable isoschizomer of the prototype BbvI, recognizing/cleaving 5′-GCAGC(N8/12)-3′ DNA sequences. As opposed to the unstable prototype, which cleaves DNA at 30°C, GeoICI is highly active at elevated temperatures, up to 73°C and over a very wide salt concentration range. Recognition/cleavage sites were determined by: (i) digestion of plasmid and bacteriophage lambda DNA (λ); (ii) cleavage of custom PCR substrates, (iii) run-off sequencing of GeoICI cleavage products and (iv) shotgun cloning and sequencing of λ DNA fragmented with GeoICI. Geobacillus sp. genomic DNA was PCR-screened for the presence of other specialized REases-MTases and as a result, another putative REase-MTase, GeoICII, related to the Thermus sp. family of bifunctional REases-methyltransferases (MTases) was detected.

  9. Cationic amino acid transporter-2 regulates immunity by modulating arginase activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert W Thompson

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Cationic amino acid transporters (CAT are important regulators of NOS2 and ARG1 activity because they regulate L-arginine availability. However, their role in the development of Th1/Th2 effector functions following infection has not been investigated. Here we dissect the function of CAT2 by studying two infectious disease models characterized by the development of polarized Th1 or Th2-type responses. We show that CAT2(-/- mice are significantly more susceptible to the Th1-inducing pathogen Toxoplasma gondii. Although T. gondii infected CAT2(-/- mice developed stronger IFN-gamma responses, nitric oxide (NO production was significantly impaired, which contributed to their enhanced susceptibility. In contrast, CAT2(-/- mice infected with the Th2-inducing pathogen Schistosoma mansoni displayed no change in susceptibility to infection, although they succumbed to schistosomiasis at an accelerated rate. Granuloma formation and fibrosis, pathological features regulated by Th2 cytokines, were also exacerbated even though their Th2 response was reduced. Finally, while IL-13 blockade was highly efficacious in wild-type mice, the development of fibrosis in CAT2(-/- mice was largely IL-13-independent. Instead, the exacerbated pathology was associated with increased arginase activity in fibroblasts and alternatively activated macrophages, both in vitro and in vivo. Thus, by controlling NOS2 and arginase activity, CAT2 functions as a potent regulator of immunity.

  10. Arginase activity in mitochondria - An interfering factor in nitric oxide synthase activity assays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previously, in tightly controlled studies, using three independent, yet complementary techniques, we refuted the claim that a mitochondrial nitric oxide synthase (mtNOS) isoform exists within pure, rat liver mitochondria (MT). Of those techniques, the NOS-catalyzed [14C]-L-arginine to [14C]-L-citrulline conversion assay (NOS assay) with MT samples indicated a weak, radioactive signal that was NOS-independent . Aliquots of samples from the NOS assays were then extracted with acetone, separated by high performance thin-layer chromatography (HPTLC) and exposed to autoradiography. Results obtained from these samples showed no radioactive band for L-citrulline. However, a fast-migrating, diffuse, radioactive band was observed in the TLC lanes loaded with MT samples. In this manuscript, we identify and confirm that this radioactive signal in MT samples is due to the arginase-catalyzed conversion of [14C]-L-arginine to [14C]-urea. The current results, in addition to reconfirming the absence of NOS activity in rat liver MT, also show the need to include arginase inhibitors in studies using MT samples in order to avoid confounding results when using NOS activity assays.

  11. Arginase 2 deficiency reduces hyperoxia-mediated retinal neurodegeneration through the regulation of polyamine metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, S P; Xu, Z; Putluri, N; Sreekumar, A; Lemtalsi, T; Caldwell, R W; Caldwell, R B

    2014-01-01

    Hyperoxia treatment has been known to induce neuronal and glial death in the developing central nervous system. Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) is a devastating disease in premature infants and a major cause of childhood vision impairment. Studies indicate that, in addition to vascular injury, retinal neurons are also affected in ROP. Using an oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR) mouse model for ROP, we have previously shown that deletion of the arginase 2 (A2) significantly reduced neuro-glial injury and improved retinal function. In the current study, we investigated the mechanism of A2 deficiency-mediated neuroprotection in the OIR retina. Hyperoxia treatment has been known to induce neuronal death in neonates. During the hyperoxia phase of OIR, a significant increase in the number of apoptotic cells was observed in the wild-type (WT) OIR retina compared with A2-deficient OIR. Mass spectrometric analysis showed alterations in polyamine metabolism in WT OIR retina. Further, increased expression level of spermine oxidase was observed in WT OIR retina, suggesting increased oxidation of polyamines in OIR retina. These changes were minimal in A2-deficient OIR retina. Treatment using the polyamine oxidase inhibitor, N, N'-bis (2, 3-butadienyl)-1, 4-butanediamine dihydrochloride, significantly improved neuronal survival during OIR treatment. Our data suggest that retinal arginase is involved in the hyperoxia-induced neuronal degeneration in the OIR model, through the regulation of polyamine metabolism. PMID:24556690

  12. Crystal Structure of Arginase from Plasmodium falciparum and Implications for l-Arginine Depletion in Malarial Infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dowling, Daniel P.; Ilies, Monica; Olszewski, Kellen L.; Portugal, Silvia; Mota, Maria M.; Llinas, Manuel; Christianson, David W. (IMM-Portugal); (UPENN); (Princeton)

    2010-09-03

    The 2.15 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of arginase from Plasmodium falciparum, the parasite that causes cerebral malaria, is reported in complex with the boronic acid inhibitor 2(S)-amino-6-boronohexanoic acid (ABH) (K{sub d} = 11 {micro}M). This is the first crystal structure of a parasitic arginase. Various protein constructs were explored to identify an optimally active enzyme form for inhibition and structural studies and to probe the structure and function of two polypeptide insertions unique to malarial arginase: a 74-residue low-complexity region contained in loop L2 and an 11-residue segment contained in loop L8. Structural studies indicate that the low-complexity region is largely disordered and is oriented away from the trimer interface; its deletion does not significantly compromise enzyme activity. The loop L8 insertion is located at the trimer interface and makes several intra- and intermolecular interactions important for enzyme function. In addition, we also demonstrate that arg- Plasmodium berghei sporozoites show significantly decreased liver infectivity in vivo. Therefore, inhibition of malarial arginase may serve as a possible candidate for antimalarial therapy against liver-stage infection, and ABH may serve as a lead for the development of inhibitors.

  13. Short-term Correction of Arginase Deficiency in a Neonatal Murine Model With a Helper-dependent Adenoviral Vector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gau, Chia-Ling; Rosenblatt, Robin A; Cerullo, Vincenzo; Lay, Fides D; Dow, Adrienne C; Livesay, Justin; Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola; Lee, Brendan; Cederbaum, Stephen D; Grody, Wayne W; Lipshutz, Gerald S

    2009-01-01

    Neonatal gene therapy has the potential to ameliorate abnormalities before disease onset. Our gene knockout of arginase I (AI) deficiency is characterized by increasing hyperammonemia, neurological deterioration, and early death. We constructed a helper-dependent adenoviral vector (HDV) carrying AI and examined for correction of this defect. Neonates were administered 5 × 109 viral particles/g and analyzed for survival, arginase activity, and ammonia and amino acids levels. The life expectancy of arg−/− mice increased to 27 days while controls died at 14 days with hyperammonemia and in extremis. Death correlated with a decrease in viral DNA/RNA per cell as liver mass increased. Arginase assays demonstrated that vector-injected hepatocytes had ~20% activity of heterozygotes at 2 weeks of age. Hepatic arginine and ornithine in treated mice were similar to those of saline-injected heterozygotes at 2 weeks, whereas ammonia was normal. By 26 days, arginase activity in the treated arg−/− livers declined to <10%, and arginine and ornithine increased. Ammonia levels began increasing by day 25, suggesting the cause of death to be similar to that of uninjected arg−/− mice, albeit at a later time. These studies demonstrate that the AI deficient newborn mouse can be temporarily corrected and rescued using a HDV. PMID:19367256

  14. Restrictive cardiomyopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardiomyopathy - restrictive; Infiltrative cardiomyopathy ... In a case of restrictive cardiomyopathy, the heart muscle is normal size or slightly enlarged. Most of the time, it also pumps normally. However, it does not ...

  15. Detection and Quantification of CD4+ T Cells with Specificity for a New Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II-Restricted Influenza A Virus Matrix Protein Epitope in Peripheral Blood of Influenza Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Linnemann, Thomas; Jung, Günther; Walden, Peter

    2000-01-01

    FVFTLTVPS was identified as the core sequence of a new major histocompatibility complex class II-restricted T-cell epitope of influenza virus matrix protein. Epitope-specific CD4+ T cells were detected in the peripheral blood of patients with frequencies of up to 0.94%, depending on the number of additional terminal amino acids.

  16. Association of the estrogen receptor gene Pvu II restriction polymorphism with expected progeny differences for reproductive and performance traits in swine herds in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bárbara Amélia Aparecida Santana

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Estrogen has an important function in swine reproduction and growth. A Pvu II restriction enzyme polymorphism has been proven to be an important genetic variation in the estrogen receptor gene (ESR and may be considered as a candidate gene for use in pig production but there is no data regarding the prevalence of this polymorphism in the Brazilian pig population. We used DNA samples from the following three purebred pig breeds: Large White (336 females and 26 males, Landrace (304 females and 27 males and Pietrain (125 females and 11 males. The ESR genotyping was performed using PCR-RFLP. For each breed, genotypes for the ESR gene were compared independently for expected progeny differences (EPD in litter size (LS, average daily weight gain (DWG (g/day and back fat thickness (BT as measured in mm by ultrasound. In the Large White breed, but not the other breeds, the ESR genotype was significantly (p < 0.05 associated to LS, DWG and BT. Large Whites genotyped as AA or AB had higher EPD values for the LS and BT traits compared to BB Large Whites, while AA Large Whites had higher DWG EPD values than BB Large Whites. Our results for the Large White population showed that the A allele has a beneficial effect on LS, DWG and BT expected progeny differences.

  17. The Increase in Mannose Receptor Recycling Favors Arginase Induction and Trypanosoma Cruzi Survival in Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanina V. Garrido, Laura R. Dulgerian, Cinthia C. Stempin, Fabio M. Cerbán

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The macrophage mannose receptor (MR is a pattern recognition receptor of the innate immune system that binds to microbial structures bearing mannose, fucose and N-acetylglucosamine on their surface. Trypanosoma cruzi antigen cruzipain (Cz is found in the different developmental forms of the parasite. This glycoprotein has a highly mannosylated C-terminal domain that participates in the host-antigen contact. Our group previously demonstrated that Cz-macrophage (Mo interaction could modulate the immune response against T. cruzi through the induction of a preferential metabolic pathway. In this work, we have studied in Mo the role of MR in arginase induction and in T. cruzi survival using different MR ligands. We have showed that pre-incubation of T. cruzi infected cells with mannose-Bovine Serum Albumin (Man-BSA, MR specific ligand biased nitric oxide (NO/urea balance towards urea production and increased intracellular amastigotes growth. The study of intracellular signals showed that pre-incubation with Man-BSA in T. cruzi J774 infected cells induced down-regulation of JNK and p44/p42 phosphorylation and increased of p38 MAPK phosphorylation. These results are coincident with previous data showing that Cz also modifies the MAPK phosphorylation profile induced by the parasite. In addition, we have showed by confocal microscopy that Cz and Man-BSA enhance MR recycling. Furthermore, we studied MR behavior during T. cruzi infection in vivo. MR was up-regulated in F4/80+ cells from T. cruzi infected mice at 13 and 15 days post infection. Besides, we investigated the effect of MR blocking antibody in T. cruzi infected peritoneal Mo. Arginase activity and parasite growth were decreased in infected cells pre-incubated with anti-MR antibody as compared with infected cells treated with control antibody. Therefore, we postulate that during T. cruzi infection, Cz may contact with MR, increasing MR recycling which leads to arginase activity up-regulation and

  18. Restricted growth of U-type infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) in rainbow trout cells may be linked to casein kinase II activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J.-W.; Moon, C.H.; Harmache, A.; Wargo, A.R.; Purcell, M.K.; Bremont, M.; Kurath, G.

    2011-01-01

    Previously, we demonstrated that a representative M genogroup type strain of infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) from rainbow trout grows well in rainbow trout-derived RTG-2 cells, but a U genogroup type strain from sockeye salmon has restricted growth, associated with reduced genome replication and mRNA transcription. Here, we analysed further the mechanisms for this growth restriction of U-type IHNV in RTG-2 cells, using strategies that assessed differences in viral genes, host immune regulation and phosphorylation. To determine whether the viral glycoprotein (G) or non-virion (NV) protein was responsible for the growth restriction, four recombinant IHNV viruses were generated in which the G gene of an infectious IHNV clone was replaced by the G gene of U- or M-type IHNV and the NV gene was replaced by NV of U- or M-type IHNV. There was no significant difference in the growth of these recombinants in RTG-2 cells, indicating that G and NV proteins are not major factors responsible for the differential growth of the U- and M-type strains. Poly I:C pretreatment of RTG-2 cells suppressed the growth of both U- and M-type IHNV, although the M virus continued to replicate at a reduced level. Both viruses induced type 1 interferon (IFN1) and the IFN1 stimulated gene Mx1, but the expression levels in M-infected cells were significantly higher than in U-infected cells and an inhibitor of the IFN1-inducible protein kinase PKR, 2-aminopurine (2-AP), did not affect the growth of U- or M-type IHNV in RTG-2 cells. These data did not indicate a role for the IFN1 system in the restricted growth of U-type IHNV in RTG-2 cells. Prediction of kinase-specific phosphorylation sites in the viral phosphoprotein (P) using the NetPhosK program revealed differences between U- and M-type P genes at five phosphorylation sites. Pretreatment of RTG-2 cells with a PKC inhibitor or a p38MAPK inhibitor did not affect the growth of the U- and M-type viruses. However, 100 μm of the

  19. Carbon nanotube-based sensing devices for human Arginase-1 detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Baldo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A new carbon nanotube-based device for detection of Arginase 1 (ARG-1 was produced. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs were deposited between electrodes by dielectrophoresis (DEP in an accurate and reproducible way. This deposition method has the advantages of low cost and room temperature conditions and therefore, can be used on different kinds of substrates (silicon, glass, plastics allowing for large scale production of chemical or biological sensors. Scanning electrical microscope (SEM and electrical characterization have been performed on the biosensors before and after protein exposure. The devices were tested in the present work for the detection of ARG-1. They show high sensitivity and reproducibility, and can be easily and suitably modified to detect other proteins.

  20. Arginase 1 is an innate lymphoid-cell-intrinsic metabolic checkpoint controlling type 2 inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monticelli, Laurel A; Buck, Michael D; Flamar, Anne-Laure; Saenz, Steven A; Tait Wojno, Elia D; Yudanin, Naomi A; Osborne, Lisa C; Hepworth, Matthew R; Tran, Sara V; Rodewald, Hans-Reimer; Shah, Hardik; Cross, Justin R; Diamond, Joshua M; Cantu, Edward; Christie, Jason D; Pearce, Erika L; Artis, David

    2016-06-01

    Group 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2s) regulate tissue inflammation and repair after activation by cell-extrinsic factors such as host-derived cytokines. However, the cell-intrinsic metabolic pathways that control ILC2 function are undefined. Here we demonstrate that expression of the enzyme arginase-1 (Arg1) during acute or chronic lung inflammation is a conserved trait of mouse and human ILC2s. Deletion of mouse ILC-intrinsic Arg1 abrogated type 2 lung inflammation by restraining ILC2 proliferation and dampening cytokine production. Mechanistically, inhibition of Arg1 enzymatic activity disrupted multiple components of ILC2 metabolic programming by altering arginine catabolism, impairing polyamine biosynthesis and reducing aerobic glycolysis. These data identify Arg1 as a key regulator of ILC2 bioenergetics that controls proliferative capacity and proinflammatory functions promoting type 2 inflammation. PMID:27043409

  1. Inhibitory effect of mycoplasma-released arginase. Activity in mixed-lymphocyte and tumour cell cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Claesson, M H; Tscherning, T; Nissen, Mogens Holst;

    1990-01-01

    Non-fermenting mycoplasma species deplete culture media for arginine through arginase activity linked to their arginine deiminase pathway, resulting in proliferation arrest and cell death in mycoplasma-contaminated cell cultures. The presence of only 2-3 Mycoplasma (M.) arginini-contaminated T...... assayed in MLC and cell proliferation culture. SDS-PAGE followed by western blotting and reaction with antisera raised against non-fermenting mycoplasma species demonstrated a band at 43 kDa common for these micro-organisms....... cells in a one-way allogeneic mixed-lymphocyte culture (MLC) significantly inhibits development of cytotoxic T-cell activity. Likewise, strong degrees of inhibition are observed after addition of nanogram doses of M. arginini extracts (MAE) to MLC or cell proliferation cultures. M. arginini-induced cell...

  2. Metabolism via arginase or nitric oxide synthase: two competing arginine pathways in macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meera eRath

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages play a major role in the immune system, both as antimicrobial effector cells and as immunoregulatory cells, which induce, suppress or modulate adaptive immune responses. These key aspects of macrophage biology are fundamentally driven by the phenotype of macrophage arginine metabolism that is prevalent in an evolving or ongoing immune response. M1 macrophages express the enzyme nitric oxide synthase (NOS, which metabolizes arginine to nitric oxide (NO and citrulline. NO can be metabolized to further downstream reactive nitrogen species, while citrulline might be reused for efficient NO synthesis via the citrulline-NO cycle. M2 macrophages are characterized by expression of the enzyme arginase, which hydrolyzes arginine to ornithine and urea. The arginase pathway limits arginine availability for NO synthesis and ornithine itself can further feed into the important downstream pathways of polyamine and proline syntheses, which are important for cellular proliferation and tissue repair. M1 versus M2 polarization leads to opposing outcomes of inflammatory reactions, but depending on the context, M1 and M2 macrophages can be both pro- and antiinflammatory. Notably, M1/M2 macrophage polarization can be driven by microbial infection or innate danger signals without any influence of adaptive immune cells, secondarily driving the T helper (Th1/Th2 polarization of the evolving adaptive immune response. Since both arginine metabolic pathways cross-inhibit each other on the level of the respective arginine break-down products and Th1 and Th2 lymphocytes can drive or amplify macrophage M1/M2 dichotomy via cytokine activation, this forms the basis of a self-sustaining M1/M2 polarization of the whole immune response. Understanding the arginine metabolism of M1/M2 macrophage phenotypes is therefore central to find new possibilities to manipulate immune responses in infection, autoimmune diseases, chronic inflammatory conditions and cancer.

  3. Experimental validation of multi-epitope peptides including promising MHC class I- and class II-restricted epitopes of four known Leishmania infantum proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria eAgallou

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Leishmaniasis is a significant worldwide health problem for which no vaccine exists. Activation of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells is crucial for the generation of protective immunity against parasite. Recent trend in vaccine design has been shifted to epitope-based vaccines that are more specific, safe, and easy to produce. In the present study, four known antigenic Leishmania (L. infantum proteins, CPA, histone H1, KMP-11 and LeIF were analysed for the prediction of binding epitopes to H2d MHC class I and class II molecules, using online available algorithms. Based on in silico analysis, eight peptides including highly scored MHC class I- and class II-restricted epitopes were synthesized. Peptide immunogenicity was validated in MHC compatible BALB/c mice immunized with each synthetic peptide emulsified in CFA/IFA. CPA_p2, CPA_p3, H1_p1 and LeIF_p6 induced strong spleen cell proliferation upon in vitro peptide re-stimulation. In addition, the majority of the peptides, except of LeIF_p1 and KMP-11_p1, induced IFN-γ secretion, while KMP-11_p1 indicated a suppressive effect on IL-10 production. CPA_p2, CPA_p3, LeIF_p3 and LeIF_p6 induced IFN-γ-producing CD4+ T cells indicating a TH1 type response. In addition, CPA_p2, CPA_p3 and H1_p1 induced also the induction of CD8+ T cells. The induction of peptide-specific IgG in immunized mice designated also the existence of B cell epitopes in peptide sequences. Combining immunoinformatic tools and experimental validation, we demonstrated that CPA_p2, CPA_p3, H1_p1, H1_p3, CPA_p2, LeIF_p3 and LeIF_p6 are likely to include potential epitopes for the induction of protective cytotoxic and/or TH1-type immune responses supporting the feasibility of peptide-based vaccine development for leishmaniasis.

  4. Akita Spontaneously Type 1 Diabetic Mice Exhibit Elevated Vascular Arginase and Impaired Vascular Endothelial and Nitrergic Function

    OpenAIRE

    Haroldo A Toque; Kenia P Nunes; Lin Yao; Zhimin Xu; Dmitry Kondrikov; Yunchao Su; R Clinton Webb; Caldwell, Ruth B.; R William Caldwell

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Elevated arginase (Arg) activity is reported to be involved in diabetes-induced vascular endothelial dysfunction. It can reduce L-arginine availability to nitric oxide (NO) synthase (NOS) and NO production. Akita mice, a genetic non-obese type 1 diabetes model, recapitulate human diabetes. We determined the role of Arg in a time-course of diabetes-associated endothelial dysfunction in aorta and corpora cavernosa (CC) from Akita mice. METHODS AND RESULTS: Endothelium-dependent rela...

  5. Alternative activation of macrophages and induction of arginase are not components of pathogenesis mediated by Francisella species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda J Griffin

    Full Text Available Virulent Francisella tularensis ssp tularensis is an intracellular, Gram negative bacterium that causes acute lethal disease following inhalation of fewer than 15 organisms. Pathogenicity of Francisella infections is tied to its unique ability to evade and suppress inflammatory responses in host cells. It has been proposed that induction of alternative activation of infected macrophages is a mechanism by which attenuated Francisella species modulate host responses. In this report we reveal that neither attenuated F. tularensis Live Vaccine Strain (LVS nor virulent F. tularensis strain SchuS4 induce alternative activation of macrophages in vitro or in vivo. LVS, but not SchuS4, provoked production of arginase1 independent of alternative activation in vitro and in vivo. However, absence of arginase1 did not significantly impact intracellular replication of LVS or SchuS4. Together our data establish that neither induction of alternative activation nor expression of arginase1 are critical features of disease mediated by attenuated or virulent Francisella species.

  6. Restricted Airspace

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Redstone Technical Test Center has restricted airspace up to 30,000 feet ASL. Airspace encompasses R-2104 (Redstone). Airspace is used extensively for airborne/UAV...

  7. Type II restriction endonuclease R.Eco29kI is a member of the GIY-YIG nuclease superfamily

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feder Marcin

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The majority of experimentally determined crystal structures of Type II restriction endonucleases (REases exhibit a common PD-(D/EXK fold. Crystal structures have been also determined for single representatives of two other folds: PLD (R.BfiI and half-pipe (R.PabI, and bioinformatics analyses supported by mutagenesis suggested that some REases belong to the HNH fold. Our previous bioinformatic analysis suggested that REase R.Eco29kI shares sequence similarities with one more unrelated nuclease superfamily, GIY-YIG, however so far no experimental data were available to support this prediction. The determination of a crystal structure of the GIY-YIG domain of homing endonuclease I-TevI provided a template for modeling of R.Eco29kI and prompted us to validate the model experimentally. Results Using protein fold-recognition methods we generated a new alignment between R.Eco29kI and I-TevI, which suggested a reassignment of one of the putative catalytic residues. A theoretical model of R.Eco29kI was constructed to illustrate its predicted three-dimensional fold and organization of the active site, comprising amino acid residues Y49, Y76, R104, H108, E142, and N154. A series of mutants was constructed to generate amino acid substitutions of selected residues (Y49A, R104A, H108F, E142A and N154L and the mutant proteins were examined for their ability to bind the DNA containing the Eco29kI site 5'-CCGCGG-3' and to catalyze the cleavage reaction. Experimental data reveal that residues Y49, R104, E142, H108, and N154 are important for the nuclease activity of R.Eco29kI, while H108 and N154 are also important for specific DNA binding by this enzyme. Conclusion Substitutions of residues Y49, R104, H108, E142 and N154 predicted by the model to be a part of the active site lead to mutant proteins with strong defects in the REase activity. These results are in very good agreement with the structural model presented in this work and with our

  8. Epitopes associated with the MHC restriction site of T cells. II. Somatic generation of Iat epitopes on T cells in radiation bone marrow chimeras

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asano, Y.; Tada, T.

    1987-01-01

    We described in this paper systematic alterations in the expression of unique I region controlled epitopes on helper T cells (Th) in chimeras according to the changes in their H-2 restriction specificity. Taking advantage of the reactivity of monoclonal antibodies (anti-Iat) putatively specific for the epitopes indirectly controlled by I region and expressed in association with the Iak restriction site of Th, we examined the alterations of these epitopes on Th cells from various bone marrow chimeras. Iatk epitopes were physiologically expressed on Iak-restricted but not on Iab-restricted Th cells in (H-2k X H-2b)F1 mice. In the chimeric condition, the H-2k-restricted Th of B6----F1 chimera acquired the expression of Iatk even though B6 Th is unable to express Iatk when developed under the physiologic condition. Iatk are also found on Th of fully allogeneic chimera of B6----C3H, whereas Th cells of C3H----B6 completely lost the Iatk expression. These results indicate that Iat epitopes originally defined as unique I region-controlled determinants selectively expressed on T cells are not encoded by the I region genes but are associated with the T cell receptor that sees the self Ia. The epitopes undergo the adaptive alterations according to the acquisition of a new MHC restriction. This is the first example to demonstrate the epitope associated with T cell receptor which undergo the systematic adaptive differentiation.

  9. Epitopes associated with the MHC restriction site of T cells. II. Somatic generation of Iat epitopes on T cells in radiation bone marrow chimeras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We described in this paper systematic alterations in the expression of unique I region controlled epitopes on helper T cells (Th) in chimeras according to the changes in their H-2 restriction specificity. Taking advantage of the reactivity of monoclonal antibodies (anti-Iat) putatively specific for the epitopes indirectly controlled by I region and expressed in association with the Iak restriction site of Th, we examined the alterations of these epitopes on Th cells from various bone marrow chimeras. Iatk epitopes were physiologically expressed on Iak-restricted but not on Iab-restricted Th cells in (H-2k X H-2b)F1 mice. In the chimeric condition, the H-2k-restricted Th of B6----F1 chimera acquired the expression of Iatk even though B6 Th is unable to express Iatk when developed under the physiologic condition. Iatk are also found on Th of fully allogeneic chimera of B6----C3H, whereas Th cells of C3H----B6 completely lost the Iatk expression. These results indicate that Iat epitopes originally defined as unique I region-controlled determinants selectively expressed on T cells are not encoded by the I region genes but are associated with the T cell receptor that sees the self Ia. The epitopes undergo the adaptive alterations according to the acquisition of a new MHC restriction. This is the first example to demonstrate the epitope associated with T cell receptor which undergo the systematic adaptive differentiation

  10. Arginase-1 is expressed exclusively by infiltrating myeloid cells in CNS injury and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenhalgh, Andrew D; Passos Dos Santos, Rosmarini; Zarruk, Juan Guillermo; Salmon, Christopher K; Kroner, Antje; David, Samuel

    2016-08-01

    Resident microglia and infiltrating myeloid cells play important roles in the onset, propagation, and resolution of inflammation in central nervous system (CNS) injury and disease. Identifying cell type-specific mechanisms will help to appropriately target interventions for tissue repair. Arginase-1 (Arg-1) is a well characterised modulator of tissue repair and its expression correlates with recovery after CNS injury. Here we assessed the cellular localisation of Arg-1 in two models of CNS damage. Using microglia specific antibodies, P2ry12 and Fc receptor-like S (FCRLS), we show the LysM-EGFP reporter mouse is an excellent model to distinguish infiltrating myeloid cells from resident microglia. We show that Arg-1 is expressed exclusively in infiltrating myeloid cells but not microglia in models of spinal cord injury (SCI) and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Our in vitro studies suggest that factors in the CNS environment prevent expression of Arg-1 in microglia in vivo. This work suggests different functional roles for these cells in CNS injury and repair and shows that such repair pathways can be switched on in infiltrating myeloid cells in pro-inflammatory environments. PMID:27126514

  11. The ratios of human arginase activity to other biochemical parameters in the serum of pre- and post-hemodialysis patients as new clinical indices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Derazhi

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Prognosticators are indices which are used by medical specialists in early detection to make better decisions about treatment in hemodialysis patients. In this study the ratios of human arginase activity with other biochemical parameters in serum of pre- and post- dialysis patients were compared to healthy individuals. The ratios evaluated as new indices for diagnosis and treatment of the patients. Methods and Materials: In this study, 286 human serum specimens were evaluated, 206 of which belonged to the hemodialysis patients (103 of pre- and 103 of post- dialysis and 80 to the healthy individuals. Arginase activity were determined by urea method, blood urea nitrogen by urease method, uric acid by modified Folin method, creatinine by Jaffe method and total protein was measured by biuret method.Results: The results showed that the serum arginase activity of hemodialysis patients (pre- and post- dialysis was significantly higher than healthy subjects (p 0.01.Conclusion: This investigation suggests that in parallel with other serum biochemical tests, it is beneficial to measure arginase activity and using the ratios of arginase activity to other biochemical serum parameters as new indices in prognosis and treatment of hemodialysis patients.

  12. Growth factor and Th2 cytokine signaling pathways converge at STAT6 to promote arginase expression in progressive experimental visceral leishmaniasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Yaneth Osorio

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Host arginase 1 (arg1 expression is a significant contributor to the pathogenesis of progressive visceral leishmaniasis (VL, a neglected tropical disease caused by the intracellular protozoan Leishmania donovani. Previously we found that parasite-induced arg1 expression in macrophages was dependent on STAT6 activation. Arg1 expression was amplified by, but did not require, IL-4, and required de novo synthesis of unknown protein(s. To further explore the mechanisms involved in arg1 regulation in VL, we screened a panel of kinase inhibitors and found that inhibitors of growth factor signaling reduced arg1 expression in splenic macrophages from hamsters with VL. Analysis of growth factors and their signaling pathways revealed that the Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 1 (FGFR-1 and Insulin-like Growth Factor 1 Receptor (IGF-1R and a number of downstream signaling proteins were activated in splenic macrophages isolated from hamsters infected with L. donovani. Recombinant FGF-2 and IGF-1 increased the expression of arg1 in L. donovani infected hamster macrophages, and this induction was augmented by IL-4. Inhibition of FGFR-1 and IGF-1R decreased arg1 expression and restricted L. donovani replication in both in vitro and ex vivo models of infection. Inhibition of the downstream signaling molecules JAK and AKT also reduced the expression of arg1 in infected macrophages. STAT6 was activated in infected macrophages exposed to either FGF-2 or IGF-1, and STAT6 was critical to the FGFR-1- and IGF-1R-mediated expression of arg1. The converse was also true as inhibition of FGFR-1 and IGF-1R reduced the activation of STAT6 in infected macrophages. Collectively, these data indicate that the FGFR/IGF-1R and IL-4 signaling pathways converge at STAT6 to promote pathologic arg1 expression and intracellular parasite survival in VL. Targeted interruption of these pathological processes offers an approach to restrain this relentlessly progressive disease.

  13. Human leukocyte antigen-DO regulates surface presentation of human leukocyte antigen class II-restricted antigens on B cell malignancies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kremer, A.N.; Meijden, E.D. van der; Honders, M.W.; Pont, M.J.; Goeman, J.J.; Falkenburg, J.H.F.; Griffioen, M.

    2014-01-01

    Hematological malignancies often express surface HLA class II, making them attractive targets for CD4+ T cell therapy. We previously demonstrated that HLA class II ligands can be divided into DM-resistant and DM-sensitive antigens. In contrast to presentation of DM-resistant antigens, presentation o

  14. Deprivation of arginine by recombinant human arginase in prostate cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsueh Eddy C

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recombinant human arginase (rhArg has been developed for arginine deprivation therapy in cancer, and is currently under clinical investigation. During pre-clinical evaluation, rhArg has exhibited significant anti-proliferative activity in cancer cells deficient in the expression of ornithine carbamoyl transferase (OCT. Interestingly, a variety of cancer cells such as melanoma and prostate cancer deficient in argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS are sensitive to arginine deprivation by arginine deiminase. In this study, we investigated levels of gene expression of OCT and ASS, and the effects of rhArg in human prostate cancer cells: LNCaP (androgen-dependent, PC-3 and DU-145 (both androgen-independent. Results Quantitative real-time PCR showed minimal to absent gene expression of OCT, but ample expression of ASS expression in all 3 cell lines. Cell viability assay after 72-h exposure of rhArg showed all 3 lines had half maximal inhibitory concentration less than or equal to 0.02 U/ml. Addition of ornithine to cell culture media failed to rescue these cells from rhArg-mediated cytotoxicity. Decreased phosphorylation of 4E-BP1, a downstream effector of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR, was noted in DU-145 and PC-3 after exposure to rhArg. Moreover, there was no significant apoptosis induction after arginine deprivation by rhArg in all 3 prostate cancer cell lines. Conclusion rhArg causes significant cytotoxicity in LNCaP, DU-145 and PC-3 prostate cancer cells which all demonstrate decreased OCT expression. Inhibition of mTOR manifested by hypophosphorylation of 4E-BP1 suggests autophagy is involved as alternative cell death mechanism. rhArg demonstrates a promising novel agent for prostate cancer treatment.

  15. Gene knockout mice establish a primary protective role for major histocompatibility complex class II-restricted responses in Chlamydia trachomatis genital tract infection.

    OpenAIRE

    Morrison, R P; Feilzer, K; Tumas, D B

    1995-01-01

    Mice with disrupted beta 2-microglobulin (beta 2m-/-), I-A (class II-/-), or CD4 (CD4-/-) genes were examined for their capacity to resolve Chlamydia trachomatis genital tract infection. C57BL/6 and beta 2m-/- mice resolved infection similarly and were culture negative by 4 to 5 weeks following infection. Conversely, major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II-/- mice failed to resolve infection, and CD4-/- mice showed a significant delay (2 weeks). Secondary challenge of C57BL/6, beta 2m...

  16. Nonclassical antigen-processing pathways are required for MHC class II-restricted direct tumor recognition by NY-ESO-1-specific CD4(+) T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuzaki, Junko; Tsuji, Takemasa; Luescher, Immanuel; Old, Lloyd J; Shrikant, Protul; Gnjatic, Sacha; Odunsi, Kunle

    2014-04-01

    Tumor antigen-specific CD4(+) T cells that directly recognize cancer cells are important for orchestrating antitumor immune responses at the local tumor sites. However, the mechanisms of direct MHC class II (MHC-II) presentation of intracellular tumor antigen by cancer cells are poorly understood. We found that two functionally distinct subsets of CD4(+) T cells were expanded after HLA-DPB1*04 (DP04)-binding NY-ESO-1157-170 peptide vaccination in patients with ovarian cancer. Although both subsets recognized exogenous NY-ESO-1 protein pulsed on DP04(+) target cells, only one type recognized target cells with intracellular expression of NY-ESO-1. The tumor-recognizing CD4(+) T cells more efficiently recognized the short 8-9-mer peptides than the non-tumor-recognizing CD4(+) T cells. In addition to endosomal/lysosomal proteases that are typically involved in MHC-II antigen presentation, several pathways in the MHC class I presentation pathways, such as the proteasomal degradation and transporter-associated with antigen-processing-mediated peptide transport, were also involved in the presentation of intracellular NY-ESO-1 on MHC-II. The presentation was inhibited significantly by primaquine, a small molecule that inhibits endosomal recycling, consistent with findings that pharmacologic inhibition of new protein synthesis enhances antigen presentation. Together, our data demonstrate that cancer cells selectively present peptides from intracellular tumor antigens on MHC-II by multiple nonclassical antigen-processing pathways. Harnessing the direct tumor-recognizing ability of CD4(+) T cells could be a promising strategy to enhance antitumor immune responses in the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment.

  17. Known regulators of nitric oxide synthase and arginase are agonists at the human G-protein-coupled receptor GPRC6A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Bolette; Wellendorph, Petrine; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans

    2006-01-01

    and ornithine, we searched for commercially available analogues of these and other L-alpha-amino acids, and tested them for activity in a fluorescence-based calcium assay. The majority of the tested compounds are involved in the regulation of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and arginase enzymes. Altogether we...

  18. Equivalence of human and mouse CD4 in enhancing antigen responses by a mouse class II-restricted T cell hybridoma

    OpenAIRE

    1989-01-01

    We have examined the ability of hCD4 to interact functionally with mouse class II MHC molecules using the mouse T cell hybridoma BI-141, specific for beef insulin. We have previously shown that expression of mouse CD4 results in a marked enhancement of IL-2 release by BI-141 cells in response to beef insulin or, in a cross-reactive response, to pork insulin, on the appropriate mouse APCs. We now demonstrate that expression of hCD4 results in an equivalent stimulation of antigen responses by t...

  19. Angiotensin II AT1 receptor blockade decreases vasopressin-induced water reabsorption and AQP2 levels in NaCl-restricted rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kwon, Tae-Hwan; Nielsen, Jakob; Knepper, M.A.;

    2005-01-01

    Vasopressin and ANG II, which are known to play a major role in renal water and sodium reabsorption, are mainly coupled to the cAMP/PKA and phosphoinositide pathways, respectively. There is evidence for cross talk between these intracellular signaling pathways. We therefore hypothesized that...... vasopressin-induced water reabsorption could be attenuated by ANG II AT1 receptor blockade in rats. To address this, three protocols were used: 1) DDAVP treatment (20 ng/h sc for 7 days, n = 8); 2) DDAVP (20 ng/h sc for 7 days) and candesartan (1 mg·kg−1·day−1 sc for 7 days) cotreatment (n = 8); and 3......) vehicle infusion as the control (n = 8). All rats were maintained on a NaCl-deficient diet (0.1 meq Na+·200 g body wt−1·day−1) during the experiment. DDAVP treatment alone resulted in a significant decrease in urine output (3.1 ± 0.2 ml/day) compared with controls (11.5 ± 2.2 ml/day, P < 0.05), whereas...

  20. Surface Immobilization of Human Arginase-1 with an Engineered Ice Nucleation Protein Display System in E. coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhen; Tang, Rongxin; Bian, Lu; Mei, Meng; Li, Chunhua; Ma, Xiangdong; Yi, Li; Ma, Lixin

    2016-01-01

    Ice nucleation protein (INP) is frequently used as a surface anchor for protein display in gram-negative bacteria. Here, MalE and TorA signal peptides, and three charged polypeptides, 6×Lys, 6×Glu and 6×Asp, were anchored to the N-terminus of truncated INP (InaK-N) to improve its surface display efficiency for human Arginase1 (ARG1). Our results indicated that the TorA signal peptide increased the surface translocation of non-protein fused InaK-N and human ARG1 fused InaK-N (InaK-N/ARG1) by 80.7% and 122.4%, respectively. Comparably, the MalE signal peptide decreased the display efficiencies of both the non-protein fused InaK-N and InaK-N/ARG1. Our results also suggested that the 6×Lys polypeptide significantly increased the surface display efficiency of K6-InaK-N/ARG1 by almost 2-fold, while also practically abolishing the surface translocation of non-protein fused InaK-N, indicating the interesting roles of charged polypeptides in bacteria surface display systems. Cell surface-immobilized K6-InaK-N/ARG1 presented an arginase activity of 10.7 U/OD600 under the optimized conditions of 40°C, pH 10.0 and 1 mM Mn2+, which could convert more than 95% of L-Arginine (L-Arg) to L-Ornithine (L-Orn) in 16 hours. The engineered InaK-Ns expanded the INP surface display system, which aided in the surface immobilization of human ARG1 in E. coli cells. PMID:27479442

  1. Surface Immobilization of Human Arginase-1 with an Engineered Ice Nucleation Protein Display System in E. coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhen; Tang, Rongxin; Bian, Lu; Mei, Meng; Li, Chunhua; Ma, Xiangdong; Yi, Li; Ma, Lixin

    2016-01-01

    Ice nucleation protein (INP) is frequently used as a surface anchor for protein display in gram-negative bacteria. Here, MalE and TorA signal peptides, and three charged polypeptides, 6×Lys, 6×Glu and 6×Asp, were anchored to the N-terminus of truncated INP (InaK-N) to improve its surface display efficiency for human Arginase1 (ARG1). Our results indicated that the TorA signal peptide increased the surface translocation of non-protein fused InaK-N and human ARG1 fused InaK-N (InaK-N/ARG1) by 80.7% and 122.4%, respectively. Comparably, the MalE signal peptide decreased the display efficiencies of both the non-protein fused InaK-N and InaK-N/ARG1. Our results also suggested that the 6×Lys polypeptide significantly increased the surface display efficiency of K6-InaK-N/ARG1 by almost 2-fold, while also practically abolishing the surface translocation of non-protein fused InaK-N, indicating the interesting roles of charged polypeptides in bacteria surface display systems. Cell surface-immobilized K6-InaK-N/ARG1 presented an arginase activity of 10.7 U/OD600 under the optimized conditions of 40°C, pH 10.0 and 1 mM Mn2+, which could convert more than 95% of L-Arginine (L-Arg) to L-Ornithine (L-Orn) in 16 hours. The engineered InaK-Ns expanded the INP surface display system, which aided in the surface immobilization of human ARG1 in E. coli cells. PMID:27479442

  2. Arginase levels and their association with Th17-related cytokines, soluble adhesion molecules (sICAM-1 and sVCAM-1) and hemolysis markers among steady-state sickle cell anemia patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilas-Boas, Wendell; Cerqueira, Bruno A. V.; Zanette, Angela M. D.; Reis, Mitermayer G.; Barral-Netto, Manoel

    2010-01-01

    Sickle cell anemia (SCA) is characterized by a marked endothelial dysfunction, owing to many factors. Arginine metabolism can be related to the inflammatory chronic state presented by patients, playing a key role in their clinical outcome and vascular endothelium. We investigated the serum arginase levels in 50 SCA patients (22 men and 28 women, mean age of 17 ± 10.5 years) and 28 healthy controls. Serum arginase levels were associated with biochemical hemolysis markers and cytokines involved in Th17 response, as well as levels of soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (sVCAM-1). Arginase concentrations were higher in SCA patients, compared with controls (p = 0.005), and were significantly and positively associated with total bilirubin (p = 0.004), indirect bilirubin (p = 0.04), and aspartate aminotransferase (AST; p = 0.039) in the SCA patient group. Moreover, arginase was significantly and positively associated with transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta; p = 0.008) among SCA patients. sICAM-1 was significantly and positively associated to reticulocytes (p = 0.014) and AST (p = 0.04). sVCAM-1 was likewise associated with lactate dehydrogenase (p = 0.03). These data suggest a new insight into arginase metabolism, as we show here a shift in arginine catabolism, where TGF-beta may induces the arginase pathway instead of the nitric oxide pathway and a possible involvement of the vascular activation and the serum arginase in chronic hemolysis among SCA patients. Additional studies should be carried out in order to investigate the mechanisms by which TGF-beta participates in the metabolism of arginase in SCA patients. PMID:20405289

  3. Structural Basis for the Recognition of Mutant Self by a Tumor-Specific, MHC Class II-Restricted T Cell Receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng,L.; Langley, R.; Brown, P.; Xu, G.; Teng, L.; Wang, Q.; Gonzales, M.; Callender, G.; Nishimura, M.; et al.

    2007-01-01

    Structural studies of complexes of T cell receptor (TCR) and peptide-major histocompatibility complex (MHC) have focused on TCRs specific for foreign antigens or native self. An unexplored category of TCRs includes those specific for self determinants bearing alterations resulting from disease, notably cancer. We determined here the structure of a human melanoma-specific TCR (E8) bound to the MHC molecule HLA-DR1 and an epitope from mutant triosephosphate isomerase. The structure had features intermediate between 'anti-foreign' and autoimmune TCR-peptide-MHC class II complexes that may reflect the hybrid nature of altered self. E8 manifested very low affinity for mutant triosephosphate isomerase-HLA-DR1 despite the highly tumor-reactive properties of E8 cells. A second TCR (G4) had even lower affinity but underwent peptide-specific formation of dimers, suggesting this as a mechanism for enhancing low-affinity TCR-peptide-MHC interactions for T cell activation.

  4. Time-dependent restricted-active-space self-consistent-field theory for laser-driven many-electron dynamics. II. Extended formulation and numerical analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyagi, Haruhide; Madsen, Lars Bojer

    2014-06-01

    The time-dependent restricted-active-space self-consistent-field (TD-RASSCF) method is formulated based on the TD variational principle. The SCF based TD orbitals contributing to the expansion of the wave function are classified into three groups, between which orbital excitations are considered with the RAS scheme. In analogy with the configuration-interaction singles (CIS), singles-and-doubles (CISD), and singles-doubles-and-triples (CISDT) methods in quantum chemistry, the TD-RASSCF-S, -SD, and -SDT methods are introduced as extensions of the TD-RASSCF-doubles (-D) method [Phys. Rev. A 87, 062511 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevA.87.062511]. Based on an analysis of the numerical cost and test calculations for one-dimensional (1D) models of atomic helium, beryllium, and carbon, it is shown that the TD-RASSCF-S and -D methods are computationally feasible for systems with many electrons and more accurate than the TD Hartree-Fock (TDHF) and TDCIS methods. In addition to the discussion of methodology, an analysis of electron dynamics in the high-order harmonic generation (HHG) process is presented. For the 1D beryllium atom, a state-resolved analysis of the HHG spectrum based on the time-independent HF orbitals shows that while only single-orbital excitations are needed in the region below the cutoff, single- and double-orbital excitations are essential beyond, where accordingly the single-active-electron (SAE) approximation and the TDCIS method break down. On the other hand, the TD-RASSCF-S and -D methods accurately describe the multiorbital excitation processes throughout the entire region of the HHG spectrum. For the 1D carbon atom, our calculations show that multiorbital excitations are essential in the HHG process even below the cutoff. Hence, in this test system a very accurate treatment of electron correlation is required. The TD-RASSCF-S and -D approaches meet this demand, while the SAE approximation and the TDCIS method are inadequate.

  5. A mutational analysis of the Abetaz/Aalphad major histocompatibility complex class II molecule that restricts autoreactive T cells in (NZBxNZW)F1 mice. The critical influence of alanine at position 69 in the Aalphad chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sai, T; Mine, M; Fukuoka, M; Koarada, S; Kimoto, M

    1999-03-01

    Autoimmune symptoms of (NZBxNZW)F1 (H-2d/z) mice are reported to be critically related to the heterozygosity at the H-2 complex of the murine major histocompatibility complex (MHC). We previously showed that several Abetaz/Aalphad MHC class II molecule-restricted autoreactive T-cell clones from B/WF1 mice were pathogenic upon transfer to preautoimmune B/WF1 mice. In this study, to identify the crucial amino acid residues in Abetaz/Aalphad molecules for T-cell activation, we generated a panel of transfectant cell lines. These transfectant cell lines express the Abetaz/Aalphad MHC molecules with a mutation at each residue alpha11, alpha28, alpha57, alpha69, alpha70, alpha76 of Aalphad chain and beta86 of Abetaz chain. Replacing alpha69 alanine with threonine, valine or serine completely eliminated the ability to stimulate autoreactive T-cell clones without affecting the ability to present foreign antigen keyhole limpet haemocyanin (KLH) or L-plastin peptide to specific T-cell clones. Replacing beta86 valine with aspartic acid resulted in a decrease in the stimulation for antigen-reactive as well as autoreactive T-cell clones. Substitutions at other residues had minimal or no effect on the stimulation of either auto- or antigen-reactive T-cell clones. These results suggest that alanine at residue 69 of the Aalphad chain is critical for the activation of autoreactive Abetaz/Aalphad-restricted T-cell clones. Possible explanations for this are discussed. PMID:10233712

  6. Insulin-Like Growth Factor-I Induces Arginase Activity in Leishmania amazonensis Amastigote-Infected Macrophages through a Cytokine-Independent Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celia Maria Vieira Vendrame

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Leishmania (Leishmania amazonensis exhibits peculiarities in its interactions with hosts. Because amastigotes are the primary form associated with the progression of infection, we studied the effect of insulin-like growth factor (IGF-I on interactions between L. (L. amazonensis amastigotes and macrophages. Upon stimulation of infected macrophages with IGF-I, we observed decreased nitric oxide production but increased arginase expression and activity, which lead to increased parasitism. However, stimulation of amastigote-infected macrophages with IGF-I did not result in altered cytokine levels compared to unstimulated controls. Because IGF-I is present in tissue fluids and also within macrophages, we examined the possible effect of this factor on phosphatidylserine (PS exposure on amastigotes, seen previously in tissue-derived amastigotes leading to increased parasitism. Stimulation with IGF-I induced PS exposure on amastigotes but not on promastigotes. Using a PS-liposome instead of amastigotes, we observed that the PS-liposome but not the control phosphatidylcholine-liposome led to increased arginase activity in macrophages, and this process was not blocked by anti-TGF-β antibodies. Our results suggest that in L. (L. amazonensis amastigote-infected macrophages, IGF-I induces arginase activity directly in amastigotes and in macrophages through the induction of PS exposure on amastigotes in the latter, which could lead to the alternative activation of macrophages through cytokine-independent mechanisms.

  7. Life on Mars? II. Physical restrictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancinelli, R. L.; Banin, A.

    1995-01-01

    The primary physical factors important to life's evolution on a planet include its temperature, pressure and radiation regimes. Temperature and pressure regulate the presence and duration of liquid water on the surface of Mars. The prolonged presence of liquid water is essential for the evolution and sustained presence of life on a planet. It has been postulated that Mars has always been a cold dry planet; it has also been postulated that early mars possessed a dense atmosphere of CO2 (> or = 1 bar) and sufficient water to cut large channels across its surface. The degree to which either of these postulates is true correlates with the suitability of Mars for life's evolution. Although radiation can destroy living systems, the high fluxes of UV radiation on the martian surface do not necessarily stop the origin and early evolution of life. The probability for life to have arisen and evolved to a significant degree on Mars, based on the postulated ranges of early martian physical factors, is almost solely related to the probability of liquid water existing on the planet for at least hundreds of millions to billions of years.

  8. High-performance liquid chromatography method with radiochemical detection for measurement of nitric oxide synthase, arginase, and arginine decarboxylase activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volke, A; Wegener, G; Vasar, E; Volke, V

    2006-01-01

    Nitric oxide has been shown to be involved in numerous biological processes, and many studies have aimed to measure nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity. Recently, it has been demonstrated that arginase and arginine decarboxylase (ADC), two enzymes that also employ arginine as a substrate, may regulate NOS activity. We aimed to develop a HPLC-based method to measure simultaneously the products of these three enzymes. Traditionally, the separation of amino acids and related compounds with HPLC has been carried out with precolumn derivatization and reverse phase chromatography. We describe here a simple and fast HPLC method with radiochemical detection to separate radiolabeled L-arginine, L-citrulline, L-ornithine, and agmatine. 3H-labeled L-arginine, L-citrulline, agmatine, and 14C-labeled L-citrulline were used as standards. These compounds were separated in the normal phase column (Allure Acidix 250 x 4.6 mm i.d.) under isocratic conditions in less than 20 min with good sensitivity. Using the current method, we have shown the formation of L-citrulline and L-ornithine in vitro using brain tissue homogenate of rats and that of agmatine by Escherichia coli ADC. PMID:16541190

  9. Transgenic mice overexpressing arginase 1 in monocytic cell lineage are affected by lympho-myeloproliferative disorders and disseminated intravascular coagulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astigiano, Simonetta; Morini, Monica; Damonte, Patrizia; Fraternali Orcioni, Giulio; Cassanello, Michela; Puglisi, Andrea; Noonan, Douglas M; Bronte, Vincenzo; Barbieri, Ottavia

    2015-11-01

    Arginase (ARG) is a metabolic enzyme present in two isoforms that hydrolyze l-arginine to urea and ornithine. In humans, ARG isoform 1 is also expressed in cells of the myeloid lineage. ARG activity promotes tumour growth and inhibits T lymphocyte activation. However, the two ARG transgenic mouse lines produced so far failed to show such effects. We have generated, in two different genetic backgrounds, transgenic mice constitutively expressing ARG1 under the control of the CD68 promoter in macrophages and monocytes. Both heterozygous and homozygous transgenic mice showed a relevant increase in mortality at early age, compared with wild-type siblings (67/267 and 48/181 versus 8/149, respectively, both P < 0.005). This increase was due to high incidence of haematologic malignancies, in particular myeloid leukaemia, myeloid dysplasia, lymphomas and disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), diseases that were absent in wild-type mice. Atrophy of lymphoid organs due to reduction in T-cell compartment was also detected. Our results indicate that ARG activity may participate in the pathogenesis of lymphoproliferative and myeloproliferative disorders, suggest the involvement of alterations of L-arginine metabolism in the onset of DIC and confirm a role for the enzyme in regulating T-cell homeostasis.

  10. Toxoplasma gondii rhoptry kinase ROP16 activates STAT3 and STAT6 resulting in cytokine inhibition and arginase-1-dependent growth control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butcher, Barbara A; Fox, Barbara A; Rommereim, Leah M; Kim, Sung Guk; Maurer, Kirk J; Yarovinsky, Felix; Herbert, De'Broski R; Bzik, David J; Denkers, Eric Y

    2011-09-01

    The ROP16 kinase of Toxoplasma gondii is injected into the host cell cytosol where it activates signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)-3 and STAT6. Here, we generated a ROP16 deletion mutant on a Type I parasite strain background, as well as a control complementation mutant with restored ROP16 expression. We investigated the biological role of the ROP16 molecule during T. gondii infection. Infection of mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages with rop16-deleted (ΔROP16) parasites resulted in increased amounts of IL-12p40 production relative to the ROP16-positive RH parental strain. High level IL-12p40 production in ΔROP16 infection was dependent on the host cell adaptor molecule MyD88, but surprisingly was independent of any previously recognized T. gondii triggered pathway linking to MyD88 (TLR2, TLR4, TLR9, TLR11, IL-1ß and IL-18). In addition, ROP16 was found to mediate the suppressive effects of Toxoplasma on LPS-induced cytokine synthesis in macrophages and on IFN-γ-induced nitric oxide production by astrocytes and microglial cells. Furthermore, ROP16 triggered synthesis of host cell arginase-1 in a STAT6-dependent manner. In fibroblasts and macrophages, failure to induce arginase-1 by ΔROP16 tachyzoites resulted in resistance to starvation conditions of limiting arginine, an essential amino acid for replication and virulence of this parasite. ΔROP16 tachyzoites that failed to induce host cell arginase-1 displayed increased replication and dissemination during in vivo infection. We conclude that encounter between Toxoplasma ROP16 and the host cell STAT signaling cascade has pleiotropic downstream effects that act in multiple and complex ways to direct the course of infection. PMID:21931552

  11. Toxoplasma gondii rhoptry kinase ROP16 activates STAT3 and STAT6 resulting in cytokine inhibition and arginase-1-dependent growth control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara A Butcher

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The ROP16 kinase of Toxoplasma gondii is injected into the host cell cytosol where it activates signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT-3 and STAT6. Here, we generated a ROP16 deletion mutant on a Type I parasite strain background, as well as a control complementation mutant with restored ROP16 expression. We investigated the biological role of the ROP16 molecule during T. gondii infection. Infection of mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages with rop16-deleted (ΔROP16 parasites resulted in increased amounts of IL-12p40 production relative to the ROP16-positive RH parental strain. High level IL-12p40 production in ΔROP16 infection was dependent on the host cell adaptor molecule MyD88, but surprisingly was independent of any previously recognized T. gondii triggered pathway linking to MyD88 (TLR2, TLR4, TLR9, TLR11, IL-1ß and IL-18. In addition, ROP16 was found to mediate the suppressive effects of Toxoplasma on LPS-induced cytokine synthesis in macrophages and on IFN-γ-induced nitric oxide production by astrocytes and microglial cells. Furthermore, ROP16 triggered synthesis of host cell arginase-1 in a STAT6-dependent manner. In fibroblasts and macrophages, failure to induce arginase-1 by ΔROP16 tachyzoites resulted in resistance to starvation conditions of limiting arginine, an essential amino acid for replication and virulence of this parasite. ΔROP16 tachyzoites that failed to induce host cell arginase-1 displayed increased replication and dissemination during in vivo infection. We conclude that encounter between Toxoplasma ROP16 and the host cell STAT signaling cascade has pleiotropic downstream effects that act in multiple and complex ways to direct the course of infection.

  12. Deletion of Genes Encoding Arginase Improves Use of "Heavy" Isotope-Labeled Arginine for Mass Spectrometry in Fission Yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weronika E Borek

    Full Text Available The use of "heavy" isotope-labeled arginine for stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC mass spectrometry in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe is hindered by the fact that under normal conditions, arginine is extensively catabolized in vivo, resulting in the appearance of "heavy"-isotope label in several other amino acids, most notably proline, but also glutamate, glutamine and lysine. This "arginine conversion problem" significantly impairs quantification of mass spectra. Previously, we developed a method to prevent arginine conversion in fission yeast SILAC, based on deletion of genes involved in arginine catabolism. Here we show that although this method is indeed successful when (13C6-arginine (Arg-6 is used for labeling, it is less successful when (13C6(15N4-arginine (Arg-10, a theoretically preferable label, is used. In particular, we find that with this method, "heavy"-isotope label derived from Arg-10 is observed in amino acids other than arginine, indicating metabolic conversion of Arg-10. Arg-10 conversion, which severely complicates both MS and MS/MS analysis, is further confirmed by the presence of (13C5(15N2-arginine (Arg-7 in arginine-containing peptides from Arg-10-labeled cells. We describe how all of the problems associated with the use of Arg-10 can be overcome by a simple modification of our original method. We show that simultaneous deletion of the fission yeast arginase genes car1+ and aru1+ prevents virtually all of the arginine conversion that would otherwise result from the use of Arg-10. This solution should enable a wider use of heavy isotope-labeled amino acids in fission yeast SILAC.

  13. Arginase-1-dependent promotion of TH17 differentiation and disease progression by MDSCs in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hao; Zhen, Yu; Ma, Zhanchuan; Li, Huimin; Yu, Jinyu; Xu, Zhong-Gao; Wang, Xiang-Yang; Yi, Huanfa; Yang, Yong-Guang

    2016-03-23

    Expansion of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) has been documented in some murine models and patients with autoimmune diseases, but the exact role of MDSCs in this process remains largely unknown. The current study investigates this question in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Patients with active SLE showed a significant increase in HLA-DR(-)CD11b(+)CD33(+)MDSCs, including both CD14(+)CD66b(-)monocytic and CD14(-)CD66b(+)granulocytic MDSCs, in the peripheral blood compared to healthy controls (HCs). The frequency of MDSCs was positively correlated with the levels of serum arginase-1 (Arg-1) activity, T helper 17 (TH17) responses, and disease severity in SLE patients. Consistently, in comparison with MDSCs from HCs, MDSCs from SLE patients exhibited significantly elevated Arg-1 production and increased potential to promote TH17 differentiation in vitro in an Arg-1-dependent manner. Moreover, in a humanized SLE model, MDSCs were essential for the induction of TH17 responses and the associated renal injuries, and the effect of MDSCs was Arg-1-dependent. Our data provide direct evidence demonstrating a pathogenic role for MDSCs in human SLE. This study also provides a molecular mechanism of the pathogenesis of SLE by demonstrating an Arg-1-dependent effect of MDSCs in the development of TH17 cell-associated autoimmunity, and suggests that targeting MDSCs or Arg-1 may offer potential therapeutic strategies for the treatment of SLE and other TH17 cell-mediated autoimmune diseases. PMID:27009269

  14. Akita spontaneously type 1 diabetic mice exhibit elevated vascular arginase and impaired vascular endothelial and nitrergic function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haroldo A Toque

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Elevated arginase (Arg activity is reported to be involved in diabetes-induced vascular endothelial dysfunction. It can reduce L-arginine availability to nitric oxide (NO synthase (NOS and NO production. Akita mice, a genetic non-obese type 1 diabetes model, recapitulate human diabetes. We determined the role of Arg in a time-course of diabetes-associated endothelial dysfunction in aorta and corpora cavernosa (CC from Akita mice. METHODS AND RESULTS: Endothelium-dependent relaxation, Arg and NOS activity, and protein expression levels of Arg and constitutive NOS were assessed in aortas and CC from Akita and non-diabetic wild type (WT mice at 4, 12 and 24 wks of age. Systolic blood pressure (SBP was assessed by tail cuff. In aorta and CC, Akita mice exhibited a progressive impairment of vascular endothelial and nitrergic function increased Arg activity and expression (Arg1 in aorta and both Arg1 and Arg2 in CC compared with that of age-matched WT mice. Treatment of aorta and CC from Akita mice with an Arg inhibitor (BEC or ABH reduced diabetes-induced elevation of Arg activity and restored endothelial and nitrergic function. Reduced levels of phospho-eNOS at Ser(1177 (in aorta and CC and nNOS expression (in CC were observed in Akita mice at 12 and 24 wks. Akita mice also had decreased NOS activity in aorta and CC at 12 and 24 wks that was restored by BEC treatment. Further, Akita mice exhibited moderately increased SBP at 24 wks and increased sensitivity to PE-induced contractions in aorta and sympathetic nerve stimulation in CC at 12 and 24 wks. CONCLUSIONS: Over 24 wks of diabetes in Akita mice, both aortic and cavernosal tissues exhibited increased Arg activity/expression, contributing to impaired endothelial and nitrergic function and reduced NO production. Our findings demonstrate involvement of Arg activity in diabetes-induced impairment of vascular function in Akita mouse.

  15. Arginase 2 deletion reduces neuro-glial injury and improves retinal function in a model of retinopathy of prematurity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subhadra P Narayanan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP is a major cause of vision impairment in low birth weight infants. While previous work has focused on defining the mechanisms of vascular injury leading to retinal neovascularization, recent studies show that neurons are also affected. This study was undertaken to determine the role of the mitochondrial arginine/ornithine regulating enzyme arginase 2 (A2 in retinal neuro-glial cell injury in the mouse model of ROP. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Studies were performed using wild type (WT and A2 knockout (A2-/- mice exposed to Oxygen Induced Retinopathy (OIR. Neuronal injury and apoptosis were assessed using immunohistochemistry, TUNEL (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling and Western blotting. Electroretinography (ERG was used to assess retinal function. Neuro-glial injury in WT ROP mice was evident by TUNEL labeling, retinal thinning, decreases in number of rod bipolar cells and glial cell activation as compared with room air controls. Significant reduction in numbers of TUNEL positive cells, inhibition of retinal thinning, preservation of the rod bipolar cells and prevention of glial activation were observed in the A2-/- retinas. Retinal function was markedly impaired in the WT OIR mice as shown by decreases in amplitude of the b-wave of the ERG. This defect was significantly reduced in A2-/- mice. Levels of the pro-apoptotic proteins p53, cleaved caspase 9, cytochrome C and the mitochondrial protein Bim were markedly increased in WT OIR retinas compared to controls, whereas the pro-survival Mitochondrial protein BCL-xl was reduced. These alterations were largely blocked in the A2-/- OIR retina. CONCLUSIONS: Our data implicate A2 in neurodegeneration during ROP. Deletion of A2 significantly improves neuronal survival and function, possibly through the regulation of mitochondrial membrane permeability mediated apoptosis during retinal ischemia. These molecular events are associated with

  16. Restricting mutualistic partners to enforce trade reliance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, Gregory A. K.; Kiers, E. Toby; Gardner, Andy; West, Stuart A.

    2016-01-01

    Mutualisms are cooperative interactions between members of different species, often involving the trade of resources. Here, we suggest that otherwise-cooperative mutualists might be able to gain a benefit from actively restricting their partners' ability to obtain resources directly, hampering the ability of the restricted partner to survive and/or reproduce without the help of the restricting mutualist. We show that (i) restriction can be favoured when it makes the resources of the restricting individual more valuable to their partner, and thus allows them to receive more favourable terms of trade; (ii) restriction maintains cooperation in conditions where cooperative behaviour would otherwise collapse; and (iii) restriction can lead to either an increase or decrease in a restricted individual's fitness. We discuss the applicability of this scenario to mutualisms such as those between plants and mycorrhizal fungi. These results identify a novel conflict in mutualisms as well as several public goods dilemmas, but also demonstrate how conflict can help maintain cooperation. PMID:26813888

  17. Estimating Trade Restrictiveness Indices

    OpenAIRE

    Kee, Hiau Looi; Nicita, Alessandro; Olarreaga, Marcelo

    2009-01-01

    Studies of the impact of trade restrictiveness on growth, poverty, or unemployment are frequent in the academic literature. Few authors, however, provide a precise definition of what they mean by trade restrictiveness. When they do, the definition is unlikely to have tight links with trade theory. The objective of this article is to fill this gap by providing for 78 developing and developed countries clearly defined indicators of trade restrictiveness that are well grounded in trade theory. R...

  18. Restrictions and Proportionality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werlauff, Erik

    2009-01-01

    The article discusses three central aspects of the freedoms under European Community law, namely 1) the prohibition against restrictions as an important extension of the prohibition against discrimination, 2) a prohibition against exit restrictions which is just as important as the prohibition...... against host country restrictions, but which is often not recognised to the same extent by national law, and 3) the importance of also identifying and recognising an exit restriction, so that it is possible to achieve the required test of appropriateness and proportionality in relation to the rule...

  19. Short curcumin treatment modulates oxidative stress, arginase activity, aberrant crypt foci, and TGF-β1 and HES-1 transcripts in 1,2-dimethylhydrazine-colon carcinogenesis in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► 1,2-Dimethylhydrazine (DMH) toxicity was driven by oxidative stress. ► Arginase activity correlated to aberrant crypt foci (ACF). ► Curcumin diet restored redox status and induced apoptosis of dysplastic ACF. ► Curcumin reduced arginase activity and up regulated TGF-β1 and HES-1 transcripts. -- Abstract: This study investigated the effect of short curcumin treatment, a natural antioxidant on 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH)-induced aberrant crypt foci (ACF) in mice. The incidence of aberrant crypt foci (ACF) was 100%, with 54 ± 6 per colon, 10 weeks after the first DMH injection and reached 67 ± 12 per colon after 12 weeks. A high level of undifferentiated goblet cells and a weak apoptotic activity were shown in dysplastic ACF. The morphological alterations of colonic mucosa were associated to severe oxidative stress ratio with 43% increase in malondialdehyde vs. 36% decrease in GSH. DMH also increased inducible nitric synthase (iNOS) mRNA transcripts (250%), nitrites level (240%) and arginase activity (296%), leading to nitrosative stress and cell proliferation. Curcumin treatment, starting at week 10 post-DMH injection for 14 days, reduced the number of ACF (40%), iNOS expression (25%) and arginase activity (73%), and improved redox status by approximately 46%, compared to DMH-treated mice. Moreover, curcumin induced apoptosis of dysplastic ACF cells without restoring goblet cells differentiation. Interestingly, curcumin induced a parallel increase in TGF-β1 and HES-1 transcripts (42% and 26%, respectively). In conclusion, the protective effect of curcumin was driven by the reduction of arginase activity and nitrosative stress. The up regulation of TGF-β1 and HES-1 expression by curcumin suggests for the first time, a potential interplay between these signalling pathways in the chemoprotective mechanism of curcumin.

  20. Restrictions of stable bundles

    CERN Document Server

    Balaji, V

    2011-01-01

    The Mehta-Ramanathan theorem ensures that the restriction of a stable vector bundle to a sufficiently high degree complete intersection curve is again stable. We improve the bounds for the "sufficiently high degree" and propose a possibly optimal conjecture.

  1. Proteomic Identification of Oxidized Proteins in Entamoeba histolytica by Resin-Assisted Capture: Insights into the Role of Arginase in Resistance to Oxidative Stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preeti Shahi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Entamoeba histolytica is an obligate protozoan parasite of humans, and amebiasis, an infectious disease which targets the intestine and/or liver, is the second most common cause of human death due to a protozoan after malaria. Although amebiasis is usually asymptomatic, E. histolytica has potent pathogenic potential. During host infection, the parasite is exposed to reactive oxygen species that are produced and released by cells of the innate immune system at the site of infection. The ability of the parasite to survive oxidative stress (OS is essential for a successful invasion of the host. Although the effects of OS on the regulation of gene expression in E. histolytica and the characterization of some proteins whose function in the parasite's defense against OS have been previously studied, our knowledge of oxidized proteins in E. histolytica is lacking. In order to fill this knowledge gap, we performed a large-scale identification and quantification of the oxidized proteins in oxidatively stressed E. histolytica trophozoites using resin-assisted capture coupled to mass spectrometry. We detected 154 oxidized proteins (OXs and the functions of some of these proteins were associated with antioxidant activity, maintaining the parasite's cytoskeleton, translation, catalysis, and transport. We also found that oxidation of the Gal/GalNAc impairs its function and contributes to the inhibition of E. histolytica adherence to host cells. We also provide evidence that arginase, an enzyme which converts L-arginine into L-ornithine and urea, is involved in the protection of the parasite against OS. Collectively, these results emphasize the importance of OS as a critical regulator of E. histolytica's functions and indicate a new role for arginase in E. histolytica's resistance to OS.

  2. Proteomic Identification of Oxidized Proteins in Entamoeba histolytica by Resin-Assisted Capture: Insights into the Role of Arginase in Resistance to Oxidative Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahi, Preeti; Trebicz-Geffen, Meirav; Nagaraja, Shruti; Alterzon-Baumel, Sharon; Hertz, Rivka; Methling, Karen; Lalk, Michael; Ankri, Serge

    2016-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is an obligate protozoan parasite of humans, and amebiasis, an infectious disease which targets the intestine and/or liver, is the second most common cause of human death due to a protozoan after malaria. Although amebiasis is usually asymptomatic, E. histolytica has potent pathogenic potential. During host infection, the parasite is exposed to reactive oxygen species that are produced and released by cells of the innate immune system at the site of infection. The ability of the parasite to survive oxidative stress (OS) is essential for a successful invasion of the host. Although the effects of OS on the regulation of gene expression in E. histolytica and the characterization of some proteins whose function in the parasite's defense against OS have been previously studied, our knowledge of oxidized proteins in E. histolytica is lacking. In order to fill this knowledge gap, we performed a large-scale identification and quantification of the oxidized proteins in oxidatively stressed E. histolytica trophozoites using resin-assisted capture coupled to mass spectrometry. We detected 154 oxidized proteins (OXs) and the functions of some of these proteins were associated with antioxidant activity, maintaining the parasite's cytoskeleton, translation, catalysis, and transport. We also found that oxidation of the Gal/GalNAc impairs its function and contributes to the inhibition of E. histolytica adherence to host cells. We also provide evidence that arginase, an enzyme which converts L-arginine into L-ornithine and urea, is involved in the protection of the parasite against OS. Collectively, these results emphasize the importance of OS as a critical regulator of E. histolytica's functions and indicate a new role for arginase in E. histolytica's resistance to OS.

  3. Role of CD4 molecule in the induction of interleukin 2 and interleukin 2 receptor in class II major histocompatibility complex-restricted antigen-specific T helper clones. T cell receptor/CD3 complex transmits CD4-dependent and CD4-independent signals.

    OpenAIRE

    Oyaizu, N; Chirmule, N; Pahwa, S.

    1992-01-01

    The CD4 molecule plays an essential role in antigen-induced activation of T helper (Th) cells, but its contribution to signal transduction events resulting in physiologic T cell function is ill defined. By utilizing anti-CD4 monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) that recognize distinct epitopes of CD4, we have investigated the role of CD4 molecule in antigen-induced interleukin 2 (IL-2) and IL-2 receptor (IL-2R) alpha chain expression in class II major histocompatibility complex-restricted antigen-spe...

  4. Neuroaesthetics: range and restrictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Anjan

    2013-04-01

    Bullot & Reber (B&R) should be commended for highlighting tensions between scientific aesthetics and art history. The question of how each tradition can learn from the other is timely. While I am sympathetic to their views, their diagnosis of the problem appears exaggerated and their solution partial. They underestimate the reach of scientific aesthetics while failing to identify its inherent restrictions. PMID:23507092

  5. Training Restricted Boltzmann Machines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Asja

    Restricted Boltzmann machines (RBMs) are probabilistic graphical models that can also be interpreted as stochastic neural networks. Training RBMs is known to be challenging. Computing the likelihood of the model parameters or its gradient is in general computationally intensive. Thus, training...

  6. Calorie restriction and stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manzanero Silvia

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Stroke, a major cause of disability and mortality in the elderly, occurs when a cerebral blood vessel is occluded or ruptured, resulting in ischemic damage and death of brain cells. The injury mechanism involves metabolic and oxidative stress, excitotoxicity, apoptosis and inflammatory processes, including activation of glial cells and infiltration of leukocytes. In animal models, dietary energy restriction, by daily calorie reduction (CR or intermittent fasting (IF, extends lifespan and decreases the development of age-related diseases. Dietary energy restriction may also benefit neurons, as suggested by experimental evidence showing that CR and IF protect neurons against degeneration in animal models. Recent findings by our group and others suggest the possibility that dietary energy restriction may protect against stroke induced brain injury, in part by inducing the expression of neurotrophic factors, such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF; protein chaperones, including heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70 and glucose regulated protein 78 (GRP78; antioxidant enzymes, such as superoxide dismutases (SOD and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1, silent information regulator T1 (SIRT1, uncoupling proteins and anti-inflammatory cytokines. This article discusses the protective mechanisms activated by dietary energy restriction in ischemic stroke.

  7. Bilinear Fourier restriction theorems

    CERN Document Server

    Demeter, Ciprian

    2012-01-01

    We provide a general scheme for proving $L^p$ estimates for certain bilinear Fourier restrictions outside the locally $L^2$ setting. As an application, we show how such estimates follow for the lacunary polygon. In contrast with prior approaches, our argument avoids any use of the Rubio de Francia Littlewood--Paley inequality.

  8. DL-alpha-difluoromethyl[3,4-3H]arginine metabolism in tobacco and mammalian cells. Inhibition of ornithine decarboxylase activity after arginase-mediated hydrolysis of DL-alpha-difluoromethylarginine to DL-alpha-difluoromethylornithine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slocum, R D; Bitonti, A J; McCann, P P; Feirer, R P

    1988-10-01

    DL-alpha-Difluoromethylarginine (DFMA) is an enzyme-activated irreversible inhibitor of arginine decarboxylase (ADC) in vitro. DFMA has also been shown to inhibit ADC activities in a variety of plants and bacteria in vivo. However, we questioned the specificity of this inhibitor for ADC in tobacco ovary tissues, since ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) activity was strongly inhibited as well. We now show that [3,4-3H]DFMA is metabolized to DL-alpha-difluoromethyl[3,4-3H]ornithine [( 3,4-3H]DFMO), the analogous mechanism-based inhibitor of ODC, by tobacco tissues in vivo. Both tobacco and mammalian (mouse, bovine) arginases (EC 3.5.3.1) hydrolyse DFMA to DFMO in vitro, suggesting a role for this enzyme in mediating the indirect inhibition of ODC by DFMA in tobacco. These results suggest that DFMA may have other effects, in addition to the inhibition of ADC, in tissues containing high arginase activities. The recent development of potent agmatine-based ADC inhibitors should permit selective inhibition of ADC, rather than ODC, in such tissues, since agmatine is not a substrate for arginase.

  9. DAILY DYNAMICS OF THE ELEMENTS OF MULE DUCKS BEHAVIOR AT A DIFFERENT AGE, BRED IN INTEGRATED FISH PONDS UNDER DIFFERENT NUTRIENT REGIMES. II. AT APPLYING THE SCHEME OF FEEDING WITH PARTIAL RESTRICTION.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyudmila NIKOLOVA

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available An investigation upon the daily dynamics of the separate elements of mule ducks behavior has been carried out at the Institute of Fisheries and Acuaculture Plovdiv, Bulgaria, applying the schedule of feeding with partial restriction, at conditions of integrated fish-ducks technology. Our investigation has shown that the fishponds have been suitable for mule ducks rearing – the birds have had a good plumage status without demonstrations of cannibalism and aggressiveness. Together with the fattening period advance, ducks have spent less time for feeding and have reacted rather weakly to forage supply; the dry land stay time has been on the account of the fish-pond stay, having in mind that the swimming time has increased, as well as the rest time in the fish-pond together with the advance in age.

  10. Two loci in the genome of transposable phage B39 of Pseudomonas aeruginosa affecting integration. II. Mapping of the pdeX and pdeY loci by restriction and heteroduplex analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two loci termed pdeX and pdeY have previously been identified in the genome of transposable phage B39 of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Both of these loci must operate concomitantly for the normal expression of the phage. In the present study the pdeX (2.85-6.5 kb) and pdeY (6.4-16 kb) loci have been mapped by means of restriction and heteroduplex analysis of hybrid phages possessing the Pde+ and Pde- phenotypes and obtained from the transposable phage B39ts+ x PH132 cross. The EcoRV-sites in genomes of phages D3112, B39, B39ts+ and PH132 have been mapped and the previously undetermined EcoRI-sites in the phage B39 genome have also been mapped. The Kpn1 site in the phage Ph132 genome has been localized

  11. Restriction of Helmholtz Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.M. Polunin

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The results of the experimental studies of physical mechanisms of energy dissipation in the oscillating system in which air cavity held by the forces of magnetic levitation is used as the elastic element, and magnetic fluid prepared on the basis of dispersing media with different viscosity level is used as the inertial element are considered in the article. Based on the obtained results the conclusion on the restriction of the applicability of Helmholtz equation, caused by boundary effects is made.

  12. Late gestational nutrient restriction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tygesen, Malin Plumhoff; Nielsen, Mette Olaf; Nørgaard, Peder;

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the effect of 50% nutrient restriction during the last 6 weeks of gestation on twin-pregnant ewes' plasma glucose, non-esterified fatty acid, ß-hydroxybutyrate, insulin, IGF-1 and leptin concentrations and the effects on lamb birth weight and ewes' lactation performance. Plasma...... changes in feed intake and energy balance. It is concluded that severely reduced nutrient availability in late gestation affects fetal growth in utero and has a prolonged negative effect on lactation performance....

  13. License restrictions at Barnwell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Autry, V.R. [S.C. Dept. of Health and Environmental Control, Columbia, SC (United States). Bureau of Radiological Health

    1991-12-31

    The State of South Carolina was delegated the authority by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission to regulate the receipt, possession, use and disposal of radioactive material as an Agreement State. Since 1970, the state has been the principal regulatory authority for the Barnwell Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility operated by Chem-Nuclear Systems, Inc. The radioactive material license issued authorizing the receipt and disposal of low-level waste contains numerous restrictions to ensure environmental protection and compliance with shallow land disposal performance criteria. Low-level waste has evolved from minimally contaminated items to complex waste streams containing high concentrations of radionuclides and processing chemicals which necessitated these restrictions. Additionally, some waste with their specific radionuclides and concentration levels, many classified as low-level radioactive waste, are not appropriate for shallow land disposal unless additional precautions are taken. This paper will represent a number of these restrictions, the rationale for them, and how they are being dealt with at the Barnwell disposal facility.

  14. Human CD4-major histocompatibility complex class II (DQw6) transgenic mice in an endogenous CD4/CD8-deficient background: reconstitution of phenotype and human-restricted function

    OpenAIRE

    1994-01-01

    To reconstitute the human immune system in mice, transgenic mice expressing human CD4 and human major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II (DQw6) molecules in an endogenous CD4- and CD8-deficient background (mCD4/8-/-), after homologous recombination, have been generated. We report that expression of human CD4 molecule in mCD4/8-/- mice rescues thymocyte development and completely restores the T cell compartment in peripheral lymphoid organs. Upon vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) challen...

  15. Differences in non-MHC restricted cytotoxic activities of human peripheral blood lymphocytes after transfusion with allogeneic leukocytes or platelets possessing class I and/or class II MHC molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pócsik, E; Mihalik, R; Réti, M; Gyódi, E; Pálóczi, K; Mayer, K; Kassai, M; Herold, M; Huber, C; Petrányi, G G

    1990-12-01

    MHC-unrestricted cytotoxic activity of peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) from 4-6 healthy donors was investigated before and after transfusion with allogeneic leukocytes or platelets. Natural killer and lectin-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (LDCC) of PBL was tested against K562 and Raji target cells in a 4-h and 16-h 51Cr-release assay, respectively. After allotransfusion with leukocytes, we found increased cytotoxic activity of each donor's PBL against all the three targets on day 3 or 7. The highest non-specific cytotoxic activity was detected against the relatively NK resistant Raji target cells. The increase of cytotoxic activity was lowest against the LDCC target (PHA-treated Raji) cells. On the contrary, no changes in cytotoxic activity against any targets were observed after allotransfusion with platelets (possessing class I HLA antigens but no HLA class II molecules). Our results suggest that HLA class II molecules, presumably by inducing immune responses, are essential for activation/generation of non-specific killing of tumor targets after leukocyte transfusion. Thrombocytes, known to be less immunogenic than leukocytes, are not effective in in vivo enhancing of non-specific cytotoxicity. Cellular activation of PBL following leukocyte allotransfusion was confirmed by detection of elevated serum neopterin and beta-2-microglobulin levels on day 3. This was not the case after platelet allotransfusion. In addition, the expression of ICAM-1 antigen (as a molecule involved directly in MHC-unrestricted cytotoxicity) was also found to be increased in two donors' PBL on day 3 after leukocyte transfusion in contrast to transfusion with platelets.

  16. Paternally Inherited IGF2 Mutation and Growth Restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begemann, Matthias; Zirn, Birgit; Santen, Gijs; Wirthgen, Elisa; Soellner, Lukas; Büttel, Hans-Martin; Schweizer, Roland; van Workum, Wilbert; Binder, Gerhard; Eggermann, Thomas

    2015-07-23

    In humans, mutations in IGF1 or IGF1R cause intrauterine and postnatal growth restriction; however, data on mutations in IGF2, encoding insulin-like growth factor (IGF) II, are lacking. We report an IGF2 variant (c.191C→A, p.Ser64Ter) with evidence of pathogenicity in a multigenerational family with four members who have growth restriction. The phenotype affects only family members who have inherited the variant through paternal transmission, a finding that is consistent with the maternal imprinting status of IGF2. The severe growth restriction in affected family members suggests that IGF-II affects postnatal growth in addition to prenatal growth. Furthermore, the dysmorphic features of affected family members are consistent with a role of deficient IGF-II levels in the cause of the Silver-Russell syndrome. (Funded by Bundesministerium für Bildung und Forschung and the European Union.).

  17. Conforming restricted Delaunay mesh generation for piecewise smooth complexes

    OpenAIRE

    Engwirda, Darren

    2016-01-01

    A Frontal-Delaunay refinement algorithm for mesh generation in piecewise smooth domains is described. Built using a restricted Delaunay framework, this new algorithm combines a number of novel features, including: (i) a consistent, conforming restricted Delaunay representation for domains specified as a (non-manifold) collection of piecewise smooth surface patches and curve constraints, (ii) a `protection' strategy for domains containing 1-dimensional features that meet at sharply acute angle...

  18. GDP-fucose: beta-galactoside alpha1,2-fucosyltransferase, MFUT-II, and not MFUT-I or -III, is induced in a restricted region of the digestive tract of germ-free mice by host-microbe interactions and cycloheximide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, B; Hayashi, Y; Saito, M; Sakakibara, Y; Yanagisawa, M; Iwamori, M

    2000-09-27

    A shift from sialylation to fucosylation of mucosal glycoconjugates occurred in the mammalian digestive tract in the weaning period, but mice under germ-free conditions were found to express both fucosyl GM1 (FGM1) and fucosyl asialo GM1 (FGA1) in the stomach, cecum and colon, but not in the small intestine. By host-microbe interactions and administration of cycloheximide, FGA1 was quickly induced in the small intestine, but the concentrations of fucosylated glycolipids in the other regions were not altered significantly. Their expression coincided with the activity of GDP-fucose:GA1 alpha(1, 2)-fucosyltransferase (alpha1,2-FT), and we isolated a cDNA with an open reading frame encoding the murine alpha1,2-FT (MFUT-II) of 347 amino acids with a predicted molecular mass of 39.21 kDa. The intraperitoneal injection of cycloheximide induced the mRNA and activity of alpha1,2-FT (MFUT-II) in the small intestine of germ-free mice, whereas no change in the mRNA or activity was observed in the stomach, cecum and colon, indicating that expression of FGA1 in response to microbial colonization or cycloheximide is transcriptionally regulated in a restricted region of the murine digestive tract. At 24 h after the administration of cycloheximide, FGA1 was preferentially produced in the upper half of the duodenal microvilli. PMID:11018479

  19. Very strict selectional restrictions

    CERN Document Server

    Laporte, Eric; Dias, Maria Carmelita P

    2007-01-01

    We discuss the characteristics and behaviour of two parallel classes of verbs in two Romance languages, French and Portuguese. Examples of these verbs are Port. abater [gado] and Fr. abattre [b\\'etail], both meaning "slaughter [cattle]". In both languages, the definition of the class of verbs includes several features: - They have only one essential complement, which is a direct object. - The nominal distribution of the complement is very limited, i.e., few nouns can be selected as head nouns of the complement. However, this selection is not restricted to a single noun, as would be the case for verbal idioms such as Fr. monter la garde "mount guard". - We excluded from the class constructions which are reductions of more complex constructions, e.g. Port. afinar [instrumento] com "tune [instrument] with".

  20. Let-7a modulates particulate matter (≤ 2.5 μm)-induced oxidative stress and injury in human airway epithelial cells by targeting arginase 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Lei; Li, Dan; Gu, Yue; Li, Xiaoping; Peng, Liping

    2016-10-01

    Epidemiological studies show that particulate matter (PM) with an aerodynamic diameter ≤ 2.5 μm (PM2.5) is associated with cardiorespiratory diseases via the induction of excessive oxidative stress. However, the precise mechanism underlying PM2.5-mediated oxidative stress injury has not been fully elucidated. Accumulating evidence has indicated the microRNA let-7 family might play a role in PM-mediated pathological processes. In this study, we investigated the role of let-7a in oxidative stress and cell injury in human bronchial epithelial BEAS2B (B2B) cells after PM2.5 exposure. The let-7a level was the most significantly decreased in B2B cells after PM2.5 exposure. The overexpression of let-7a suppressed intracellular reactive oxygen species levels and the percentage of apoptotic cells after PM2.5 exposure, while the let-7a level decreased arginase 2 (ARG2) mRNA and protein levels in B2B cells by directly targeting the ARG2 3'-untranslated region. ARG2 expression was upregulated in B2B cells during PM2.5 treatment, and ARG2 knockdown could remarkably reduce oxidative stress and cellular injury. Moreover, its restoration could abrogate the protective effects of let-7a against PM2.5-induced injury. In conclusion, let-7a decreases and ARG2 increases resulting from PM2.5 exposure may exacerbate oxidative stress, cell injury and apoptosis of B2B cells. The let-7a/ARG2 axis is a likely therapeutic target for PM2.5-induced airway epithelial injury. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26989813

  1. Restricting retrotransposons: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodier, John L

    2016-01-01

    Retrotransposons have generated about 40 % of the human genome. This review examines the strategies the cell has evolved to coexist with these genomic "parasites", focussing on the non-long terminal repeat retrotransposons of humans and mice. Some of the restriction factors for retrotransposition, including the APOBECs, MOV10, RNASEL, SAMHD1, TREX1, and ZAP, also limit replication of retroviruses, including HIV, and are part of the intrinsic immune system of the cell. Many of these proteins act in the cytoplasm to degrade retroelement RNA or inhibit its translation. Some factors act in the nucleus and involve DNA repair enzymes or epigenetic processes of DNA methylation and histone modification. RISC and piRNA pathway proteins protect the germline. Retrotransposon control is relaxed in some cell types, such as neurons in the brain, stem cells, and in certain types of disease and cancer, with implications for human health and disease. This review also considers potential pitfalls in interpreting retrotransposon-related data, as well as issues to consider for future research. PMID:27525044

  2. Property Rights, Restrictions and Responsibilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enemark, Stig

    Land Administration Systems are the basis for conceptualizing rights, restrictions and responsibilities related to people, policies and places. Property rights are normally concerned with ownership and tenure whereas restrictions usually control use and activities on land. Responsibilities relate...... more to a social, ethical commitment or attitude to environmental sustainability and good husbandry. This paper provides an overall understanding of the concept of land administration systems for dealing with rights, restrictions and responsibilities in future spatially enabled government. Finally...

  3. 28 CFR 540.15 - Restricted general correspondence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... restricted general correspondence; (ii) Shall give the inmate the opportunity to respond to the... approved correspondence list, subject to investigation, evaluation, and approval by the Warden; with prior... investigation; and (3) Correspond with former business associates, unless it appears to the Warden that...

  4. Restriction endonucleases digesting DNA in PCR buffer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xue-dong; ZHENG Dong; ZHOU Yan-na; MAO Wei-wei; MA Jian-zhang

    2005-01-01

    Six commonly used restriction endonucleases (Res) (Acc I, Ban II, EcoR I, Hind III, Sac I, Sca I) were tested for their ability to directly digest DNA completely in the Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) buffers. The results showed that: with the requirement for additional magnesium supplemented as activator, Res, except EcoR I appeared star activity, completely digested unmethylated lambda DNA after overnight incubation in PCR buffer and functioned as equally well as in recommended Restriction Enzyme Buffer provided with each enzyme; all Res tested completely digested PCR products in PCR buffer, it implied digestion of PCR products may often be performed directly in the PCR tube without the requirement for any precipitation or purification steps; and the concentration of MgCl2 from 2.5 mmol·L-1 to 10 mmol·L-1 did not significantly affect activity of Res in PCR buffer. This simplified method for RE digestion of PCR products could have applications in restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis and single-stranded conformational polymorphism (SSCP) analysis of large PCR products. However, usage of this procedure for cloning applications needs further data.

  5. Streptomyces lipmanii expresses two restriction systems that inhibit plasmid transformation and bacteriophage plaque formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushima, P; Baltz, R H

    1989-06-01

    Bacteriophage host range studies suggested that several beta-lactam-producing streptomycetes express similar restriction-modification systems. Streptomyces lipmanii LE32 expressed two restriction-modification systems, designated SliI and SliII. A mutant strain, PM87, was defective only in SliI restriction but expressed both SliI and SliII modification. Streptomyces sp. strain A57986, a natural isolate partially deficient in the expression of SliI and SliII restriction, nevertheless modified bacteriophage DNA for both SliI and SliII specificities. Protoplasts of PM87 and A57986 were transformed by several plasmids, and the modified plasmids isolated from these strains transformed wild-type S. lipmanii efficiently.

  6. How harmful are adaptation restrictions

    OpenAIRE

    Bruin, de, B.; Dellink, R.B.

    2009-01-01

    The dominant assumption in economic models of climate policy remains that adaptation will be implemented in an optimal manner. There are, however, several reasons why optimal levels of adaptation may not be attainable. This paper investigates the effects of suboptimal levels of adaptation, i.e. adaptation restrictions, on the composition and level of climate change costs and on welfare. Several adaptation restrictions are identified and then simulated in a revised DICE model, extended with ad...

  7. Remarks on restricted Nevanlinna transforms

    CERN Document Server

    Jankowski, Lech

    2010-01-01

    The Nevanlinna transform K(z), of a measure and a real constant, plays an important role in the complex analysis and more recently in the free probability theory (boolean convolution). It is shown that its restriction k(it) (the restricted Nevanlinna transform) to the imaginary axis can be expressed as the Laplace transform of the Fourier transform (characteristic function) of the corresponding measure. Finally, a relation between the Voiculescu and the boolean convolution is indicated.

  8. Acute energy restriction triggers Wallerian degeneration in mouse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alvarez, Susana; Moldovan, Mihai; Krarup, Christian

    2008-01-01

    Acute exposure of peripheral axons to the free radical Nitric Oxide (NO) may trigger conduction block and, if prolonged, Wallerian degeneration. It was hypothesized that this neurotoxic effect of NO may be due primarily to energy restriction by inhibition of mitochondrial respiration. We compared......: (i) a transient conduction failure that rapidly normalized within one hour of washout and (ii) subsequent Wallerian degeneration of some axons confirmed at morphological studies. Taken together, these data support the hypothesis that neurotoxicity may be caused by energy restriction. Since...

  9. Pegylated derivatives of recombinant human arginase (rhArg1 for sustained in vivo activity in cancer therapy: preparation, characterization and analysis of their pharmacodynamics in vivo and in vitro and action upon hepatocellular carcinoma cell (HCC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wheatley Denys N

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein used in medicine, e.g. interferon, are immunogenic and quickly broken down by the body. Pegylation is a recognized way of preserving their integrity and reducing immune reactions, and works well with enzymes used to degrade amino acids, a recent focus of attention in controlling cancer growth. Of the two arginine-degrading enzymes being explored clinically, arginine deiminase is a decidedly foreign mycoplasm-derived enzyme, whereas human arginase 1 is a native liver enzyme. Both have been pegylated, the former with adjuncts of 20 kD, the latter with 5 kD PEG. Pegylation is done by several different methods, not all of which are satisfactory or desirable. Methods The preparation of novel polyethylene glycol (PEG derivatives for modifying proteins is described, but directed specifically at pegylation of recombinant human arginase 1 (rhArg1. rhArg1 expressed in Escherichia coli was purified and coupled in various ways with 5 different PEG molecules to compare their protective properties and the residual enzyme activity, using hepatocellular cell lines both in vitro and in vivo. Results Methoxypolyethylene glycol-succinimidyl propionate (mPEG-SPA 5,000 coupled with very high affinity under mild conditions. The resulting pegylated enzyme (rhArg1-peg5,000 mw had up to 6 PEG chains of 5K length which not only protected it from degradation and any residual immunogenicity, but most importantly let it retain >90% of its native catalytic activity. It remained efficacious in depleting arginine in rats after a single ip injection of 1,500 U of the conjugate as the native enzyme, plasma arginine falling to >0.05 μM from ~170 μM within 20 min and lasting 6 days. The conjugate had almost the same efficacy as unpegylated rhArg1 on 2 cultured human liver cancer (HCC cell lines. It was considerably more effective than 4 other pegylated conjugates prepared. Conclusion Valuable data on the optimization of the pegylation procedure and

  10. Genetics Home Reference: familial restrictive cardiomyopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Conditions familial restrictive cardiomyopathy familial restrictive cardiomyopathy Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... All Open All Close All Description Familial restrictive cardiomyopathy is a genetic form of heart disease. For ...

  11. IS-linked movement of a restriction-modification system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noriko Takahashi

    Full Text Available Potential mobility of restriction-modification systems has been suggested by evolutionary/bioinformatic analysis of prokaryotic genomes. Here we demonstrate in vivo movement of a restriction-modification system within a genome under a laboratory condition. After blocking replication of a temperature-sensitive plasmid carrying a PaeR7I restriction-modification system in Escherichia coli cells, the plasmid was found integrated into the chromosome of the surviving cells. Sequence analysis revealed that, in the majority of products, the restriction-modification system was linked to chromosomal insertion sequences (ISs. Three types of products were: (I apparent co-integration of the plasmid and the chromosome at a chromosomal IS1 or IS5 copy (24/28 analyzed; (II de novo insertion of IS1 with the entire plasmid except for a 1-3 bp terminal deletion (2/28; and (III reciprocal crossing-over between the plasmid and the chromosome involving 1-3 bp of sequence identity (2/28. An R-negative mutation apparently decreased the efficiency of successful integration by two orders of magnitude. Reconstruction experiments demonstrated that the restriction-dependence was mainly due to selection against cells without proper integration: their growth was inhibited by the restriction enzyme action. These results demonstrate collaboration of a mobile element and a restriction-modification system for successful joint migration. This collaboration may have promoted the spread and, therefore, the long-term persistence of these complexes and restriction-modification systems in a wide range of prokaryotes.

  12. Molecular motion in restricted geometries

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Siddharth Gautam; S Mitra; R Mukhopadhyay

    2008-10-01

    Molecular dynamics in restricted geometries is known to exhibit anomalous behaviour. Diffusion, translational or rotational, of molecules is altered significantly on confinement in restricted geometries. Quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) offers a unique possibility of studying molecular motion in such systems. Both time scales involved in the motion and the geometry of motion can be studied using QENS. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation not only provides insight into the details of the different types of motion possible but also does not suffer limitations of the experimental set-up. Here we report the effect of confinement on molecular dynamics in various restricted geometries as studied by QENS and MD simulations: An example where the QENS technique provided direct evidence of phase transition associated with change in the dynamical behaviour of the molecules is also discussed.

  13. Telomere Restriction Fragment (TRF) Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mender, Ilgen; Shay, Jerry W.

    2016-01-01

    While telomerase is expressed in ~90% of primary human tumors, most somatic tissue cells except transiently proliferating stem-like cells do not have detectable telomerase activity (Shay and Wright, 1996; Shay and Wright, 2001). Telomeres progressively shorten with each cell division in normal cells, including proliferating stem-like cells, due to the end replication (lagging strand synthesis) problem and other causes such as oxidative damage, therefore all somatic cells have limited cell proliferation capacity (Hayflick limit) (Hayflick and Moorhead, 1961; Olovnikov, 1973). The progressive telomere shortening eventually leads to growth arrest in normal cells, which is known as replicative senescence (Shay et al., 1991). Once telomerase is activated in cancer cells, telomere length is stabilized by the addition of TTAGGG repeats to the end of chromosomes, thus enabling the limitless continuation of cell division (Shay and Wright, 1996; Shay and Wright, 2001). Therefore, the link between aging and cancer can be partially explained by telomere biology. There are many rapid and convenient methods to study telomere biology such as Telomere Restriction Fragment (TRF), Telomere Repeat Amplification Protocol (TRAP) (Mender and Shay, 2015b) and Telomere dysfunction Induced Foci (TIF) analysis (Mender and Shay, 2015a). In this protocol paper we describe Telomere Restriction Fragment (TRF) analysis to determine average telomeric length of cells. Telomeric length can be indirectly measured by a technique called Telomere Restriction Fragment analysis (TRF). This technique is a modified Southern blot, which measures the heterogeneous range of telomere lengths in a cell population using the length distribution of the terminal restriction fragments (Harley et al., 1990; Ouellette et al., 2000). This method can be used in eukaryotic cells. The description below focuses on the measurement of human cancer cells telomere length. The principle of this method relies on the lack of

  14. CDRL - company dose restriction level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For a number of year's close constraints and controls have been used as effective measures in aiding restricting exposure to ionising radiation. Predecessor companies to British Energy Generation (BEG) originally established the Company Dose Restriction Level (CDRL) as a consequence of the revision of risk estimates, then with the revised Ionising Radiations Regulations 1999 (IRR99) the CDRL for BEG was also revised. The background, influences and consequences of CDRL appliance in a commercial organisation in calendar year 2000/1 are presented below. (author)

  15. HFB in a restricted space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A restricted Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov method is developed with a restriction on the angular momenta of the Cooper pairs that conform the vacuum (SD or SDG). The method is applied to 176Yb. The quadrupole moment in the SD subspace is found to be 80% for neutrons and 91% for protons of its value in the full space. The inclusion of the G part of the Cooper pairs improves that agreement. The descriptions in terms of boson condensate and coherent states are discussed. (author)

  16. Testing exclusion restrictions and additive separability in sample selection models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huber, Martin; Mellace, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Standard sample selection models with non-randomly censored outcomes assume (i) an exclusion restriction (i.e., a variable affecting selection, but not the outcome) and (ii) additive separability of the errors in the selection process. This paper proposes tests for the joint satisfaction of these......Standard sample selection models with non-randomly censored outcomes assume (i) an exclusion restriction (i.e., a variable affecting selection, but not the outcome) and (ii) additive separability of the errors in the selection process. This paper proposes tests for the joint satisfaction...... of these assumptions by applying the approach of Huber and Mellace (Testing instrument validity for LATE identification based on inequality moment constraints, 2011) (for testing instrument validity under treatment endogeneity) to the sample selection framework. We show that the exclusion restriction and additive...... separability imply two testable inequality constraints that come from both point identifying and bounding the outcome distribution of the subpopulation that is always selected/observed. We apply the tests to two variables for which the exclusion restriction is frequently invoked in female wage regressions: non...

  17. Space-restricted attribute grammars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Erik Meineche

    1980-01-01

    Restricting the size of attribute values, relative to the length of the string under consideration, leads to a model of attribute grammars in which grammars with both inherited and synthesized attributes can be significantly more economical than grammars with synthesized attributes only....

  18. Alphavirus Restriction by IFITM Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weston, Stuart; Czieso, Stephanie; White, Ian J; Smith, Sarah E; Wash, Rachael S; Diaz-Soria, Carmen; Kellam, Paul; Marsh, Mark

    2016-09-01

    Interferon inducible transmembrane proteins (IFITMs) are broad-spectrum antiviral factors. In cell culture the entry of many enveloped viruses, including orthomyxo-, flavi-, and filoviruses, is inhibited by IFITMs, though the mechanism(s) involved remain unclear and may vary between viruses. We demonstrate that Sindbis and Semliki Forest virus (SFV), which both use endocytosis and acid-induced membrane fusion in early endosomes to infect cells, are restricted by the early endosomal IFITM3. The late endosomal IFITM2 is less restrictive and the plasma membrane IFITM1 does not inhibit normal infection by either virus. IFITM3 inhibits release of the SFV capsid into the cytosol, without inhibiting binding, internalization, trafficking to endosomes or low pH-induced conformational changes in the envelope glycoprotein. Infection by SFV fusion at the cell surface was inhibited by IFITM1, but was equally inhibited by IFITM3. Furthermore, an IFITM3 mutant (Y20A) that is localized to the plasma membrane inhibited infection by cell surface fusion more potently than IFITM1. Together, these results indicate that IFITMs, in particular IFITM3, can restrict alphavirus infection by inhibiting viral fusion with cellular membranes. That IFITM3 can restrict SFV infection by fusion at the cell surface equivalently to IFITM1 suggests that IFITM3 has greater antiviral potency against SFV. PMID:27219333

  19. Restricted Morgan’s problem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈树中; 曹立

    1996-01-01

    A new list of regular feedback invariant integers called right independent orders is introduced.That the restricted Morgan’s problem is equivalent to a kind of nonlinear algebraic equations is proved and the condition that the nonlinear algebraic equations degenerate into linear algebraic equations is given.

  20. Restrictive dermopathy and fetal behaviour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, EJH; Beemer, FA; Stoutenbeek, P

    2001-01-01

    We report three siblings from consecutive pregnancies affected with restrictive dermopathy (RD). During the second pregnancy, fetal behavioural development and growth were studied extensively using ultrasound at 1-4 week intervals. Dramatic and sudden changes occurred in fetal body movements and gro

  1. 49 CFR 215.203 - Restricted cars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Restricted cars. 215.203 Section 215.203..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD FREIGHT CAR SAFETY STANDARDS Restricted Equipment § 215.203 Restricted cars. (a) This section restricts the operation of any railroad freight car that is— (1) More than...

  2. Management of fetal growth restriction

    OpenAIRE

    Alberry, M; Soothill, P

    2007-01-01

    Fetal growth restriction (FGR) is challenging because of the difficulties in reaching a definitive diagnosis of the cause and planning management. FGR is associated not only with a marked increased risk in perinatal mortality and morbidity but also with long‐term outcome risks. Combinations of fetal biometry, amniotic fluid volume, heart rate patterns, arterial and venous Doppler, and biophysical variables allow a comprehensive fetal evaluation of FGR. However, no evidence supports that the u...

  3. Enhanced water and salt intake in transgenic mice with brain-restricted overexpression of angiotensin (AT1) receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Lazartigues, Eric; Sinnayah, Puspha; Augoyard, Ginette; Gharib, Claude; Johnson, Alan Kim; Davisson, Robin L.

    2008-01-01

    To address the relative contribution of central and peripheral angiotensin II (ANG II) type 1A receptors (AT1A) to blood pressure and volume homeostasis, we generated a transgenic mouse model [neuron-specific enolase (NSE)-AT1A] with brain-restricted overexpression of AT1A receptors. These mice are normotensive at baseline but have dramatically enhanced pressor and bradycardic responses to intracerebroventricular ANG II or activation of endogenous ANG II production. Here our goal was to exami...

  4. Electromagnetic Fields Restrictions and Approximation

    CERN Document Server

    Katsenelenbaum, Boris Z

    2003-01-01

    The fields scattered by metallic bodies or radiated by some types of antennas are created by the surfaces currents and therefore they are subject to some restrictions. The book is the first one where the properties of these fields are investigated in details. The properties have the important significance for the antenna synthesis, body shape reconstruction and other diffraction problems. The material of the book lies in the meetingpoint of the antenna theory, highfrequency electrodynamics and inverse scattering problems. The author is an internationally renowned investigator in the field of e

  5. Restrictions on trade in distribution services

    OpenAIRE

    Kaleeswaran Kalirajan

    2001-01-01

    Identifies and quantifies restrictions affecting domestic and international trade in distribution services - mainly wholesaling and retailing - in 38 economies, including Australia. The paper also explores the price and cost implications of restrictions in food distribution services.

  6. Cleavage and protection of locked nucleic acid-modified DNA by restriction endonucleases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crouzier, Lucile; Dubois, Camille; Wengel, Jesper;

    2012-01-01

    Locked nucleic acid (LNA) is one of the most prominent nucleic acid analogues reported so far. We herein for the first time report cleavage by restriction endonuclease of LNA-modified DNA oligonucleotides. The experiments revealed that RsaI is an efficient enzyme capable of recognizing and cleaving...... LNA-modified DNA oligonucleotides. Furthermore, introduction of LNA nucleotides protects against cleavage by the restriction endonucleases PvuII, PstI, SacI, KpnI and EcoRI....

  7. Bronchial Responsiveness in Patients with Restrictive Spirometry

    OpenAIRE

    Keddissi, Jean I.; Elya, Marwan K.; Farooq, Saif U.; Youness, Houssein A.; Kellie R. Jones; Ahmed Awab; Kinasewitz, Gary T.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Improvement in PFT after bronchodilators is characteristic of obstructive airway diseases such as COPD. However, improvement in patients with restrictive pattern is occasionally seen. We aim to determine the clinical significance of a bronchodilator responsive restrictive defect. Methods. Patients with restrictive spirometry and a bronchodilator study were identified at the University of Oklahoma and Oklahoma City VAMC between September 2003 and December 2009. Restriction was defi...

  8. 42 CFR 73.13 - Restricted experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Restricted experiments. 73.13 Section 73.13 Public... SELECT AGENTS AND TOXINS § 73.13 Restricted experiments. (a) An individual or entity may not conduct a restricted experiment with a HHS select agent or toxin unless approved by and conducted in accordance...

  9. Restrictive Cardiomyopathy: A Rare Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bilal Bin Abdullah*, Mehboob.M.Kalburgi, Sahana Shetty and Satyasrinivas

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available We report a 28 years old male presenting with heart failure. A thorough clinical evaluation directed us towards restrictive heart disease. Doppler echocardiographic study was used as a main modality of diagnosis and cardiac catheterization confirmed the diagnosis of idiopathic restrictive cardiomyopathy. We express the contribution of clinical findings and appropriate diagnostic measures in approaching a case of Restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM.

  10. 50 CFR 648.204 - Possession restrictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Possession restrictions. 648.204 Section... Atlantic Herring Fishery § 648.204 Possession restrictions. (a) A vessel must be issued a valid limited... with no possession restriction from any of the herring management areas defined in §...

  11. Restriction of Retroviral Replication by Tetherin/BST-2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Hammonds

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Tetherin/BST-2 is an important host restriction factor that limits the replication of HIV and other enveloped viruses. Tetherin is a type II membrane glycoprotein with a very unusual domain structure that allows it to engage budding virions and retain them on the plasma membrane of infected cells. Following the initial report identifying tetherin as the host cell factor targeted by the HIV-1 Vpu gene, knowledge of the molecular, structural, and cellular biology of tetherin has rapidly advanced. This paper summarizes the discovery and impact of tetherin biology on the HIV field, with a focus on recent advances in understanding its structure and function. The relevance of tetherin to replication and spread of other retroviruses is also reviewed. Tetherin is a unique host restriction factor that is likely to continue to provide new insights into host-virus interactions and illustrates well the varied ways by which host organisms defend against viral pathogens.

  12. Restriction fragment polymorphisms in the major histocompatibility complex of diabetic BB rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kastern, W.; Dyrberg, T.; Scholler, J.;

    1984-01-01

    HI fragment was present in all the nondiabetic rats examined, but absent in the diabetic rats. Similar polymorphisms were observed with various other restriction enzymes, particularly XbaI, HindII, and SacI. There were no polymorphisms detected using either a human DR-alpha (class II antigen heavy chain......DNA isolated from diabetic BB (BB/Hagedorn) rats was examined for restriction fragment length differences within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) as compared with nondiabetic (W-subline) BB rats. Polymorphisms were detected using a mouse class I MHC gene as probe. Specifically, a 2-kb Bam...

  13. Gentile statistics and restricted partitions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    C S Srivatsan; M V N Murthy; R K Bhaduri

    2006-03-01

    In a recent paper (Tran et al, Ann. Phys. 311, 204 (2004)), some asymptotic number theoretical results on the partitioning of an integer were derived exploiting its connection to the quantum density of states of a many-particle system. We generalise these results to obtain an asymptotic formula for the restricted or coloured partitions $p_{k}^{s} (n)$, which is the number of partitions of an integer into the summand of th powers of integers such that each power of a given integer may occur utmost times. While the method is not rigorous, it reproduces the well-known asymptotic results for = 1 apart from yielding more general results for arbitrary values of .

  14. Stillbirth and fetal growth restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukowski, Radek

    2010-09-01

    The association between stillbirth and fetal growth restriction is strong and supported by a large body of evidence and clinically employed for the stillbirth prediction. However, although assessment of fetal growth is a basis of clinical practice, it is not trivial. Essentially, fetal growth is a result of the genetic growth potential of the fetus and placental function. The growth potential is the driving force of fetal growth, whereas the placenta as the sole source of nutrients and oxygen might become the rate limiting element of fetal growth if its function is impaired. Thus, placental dysfunction may prevent the fetus from reaching its full genetically determined growth potential. In this sense fetal growth and its aberration provides an insight into placental function. Fetal growth is a proxy for the test of the effectiveness of placenta, whose function is otherwise obscured during pregnancy.

  15. Asymptotics for restricted integer compositions

    CERN Document Server

    Malandro, Martin E

    2011-01-01

    We study the compositions of an integer n where the part sizes of the compositions are restricted to lie in a finite set. We obtain asymptotic formulas for the number of such compositions, the total and average number of parts among all such compositions, and the total and average number of times a particular part size appears among all such compositions. Several of our asymptotics have the additional property that their absolute errors---not just their percentage errors---go to 0 as n goes to infinity. Along the way we also obtain recurrences and generating functions for calculating several of these quantities. Our asymptotic formulas come from the meromorphic analysis of our generating functions. Our results also apply to questions about certain kinds of tilings and rhythm patterns.

  16. INTERPOLATION WITH RESTRICTED ARC LENGTH

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Petar Petrov

    2003-01-01

    For given data (ti,yi), I= 0,1,…,n,0 = t0 <t1 <…<tn = 1we study constrained interpolation problem of Favard type inf{‖f"‖∞|f∈W2∞[0,1],f(ti)=yi,i=0,…,n,l(f;[0,1])≤l0}, wherel(f";[0,1])=∫1 0 / 1+f'2(x)dx is the arc length off in [0,1]. We prove the existence of a solution f* of the above problem, that is a quadratic spline with a second derivative f"* , which coincides with one of the constants - ‖f"*‖∞,0,‖f"*‖∞ between every two consecutive knots. Thus, we extend a result ofKarlin concerning Favard problem, to the case of restricted length interpolation.

  17. Secondary amines containing one aromatic nitro group: preparation, nitrosation, sustained nitric oxide release, and the synergistic effects of released nitric oxide and an arginase inhibitor on vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Brandon; Payne, Thomas J; Ash, David E; Mohanty, Dillip K

    2013-03-01

    Atherosclerosis, a leading cause of death worldwide, is associated with the excessive proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells. Nitrogen monoxide, more commonly known as nitric oxide, inhibits this uncontrolled proliferation. Herein we report the preparation of two families of nitric oxide donors; beginning with the syntheses of secondary amine precursors, obtained through the reaction between 2 equiv of various monoamines with 2,4 or 2,6-difluoronitrobenzene. The purified secondary amines were nitrosated then subjected to a Griess reagent test to examine the slow and sustained nitric oxide release rate for each compound in both the absence and presence of reduced glutathione. The release rate profiles of these two isomeric families of NO-donors were strongly dependent on the number of side chain methylene units and the relative orientations of the nitro groups with respect to the N-nitroso moieties. The nitrosated compounds were then added to human aortic smooth muscle cell cultures, individually and in tandem with S-2-amino-6-boronic acid (ABH), a potent arginase inhibitor. Cell viability studies indicated a lack of toxicity of the amine precursors, in addition to anti-proliferative effects exhibited by the nitrosated compounds, which were enhanced in the presence of ABH. PMID:23375096

  18. Crowding during restricted and free viewing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Julian M; Chiu, Michael K; Nandy, Anirvan S; Tjan, Bosco S

    2013-05-24

    Crowding impairs the perception of form in peripheral vision. It is likely to be a key limiting factor of form vision in patients without central vision. Crowding has been extensively studied in normally sighted individuals, typically with a stimulus duration of a few hundred milliseconds to avoid eye movements. These restricted testing conditions do not reflect the natural behavior of a patient with central field loss. Could unlimited stimulus duration and unrestricted eye movements change the properties of crowding in any fundamental way? We studied letter identification in the peripheral vision of normally sighted observers in three conditions: (i) a fixation condition with a brief stimulus presentation of 250 ms, (ii) another fixation condition but with an unlimited viewing time, and (iii) an unrestricted eye movement condition with an artificial central scotoma and an unlimited viewing time. In all conditions, contrast thresholds were measured as a function of target-to-flanker spacing, from which we estimated the spatial extent of crowding in terms of critical spacing. We found that presentation duration beyond 250 ms had little effect on critical spacing with stable gaze. With unrestricted eye movements and a simulated central scotoma, we found a large variability in critical spacing across observers, but more importantly, the variability in critical spacing was well correlated with the variability in target eccentricity. Our results assure that the large body of findings on crowding made with briefly presented stimuli remains relevant to conditions where viewing time is unconstrained. Our results further suggest that impaired oculomotor control associated with central vision loss can confound peripheral form vision beyond the limits imposed by crowding.

  19. Achieving Salt Restriction in Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma J. McMahon

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available There is consistent evidence linking excessive dietary sodium intake to risk factors for cardiovascular disease and chronic kidney disease (CKD progression in CKD patients; however, additional research is needed. In research trials and clinical practice, implementing and monitoring sodium intake present significant challenges. Epidemiological studies have shown that sodium intake remains high, and intervention studies have reported varied success with participant adherence to a sodium-restricted diet. Examining barriers to sodium restriction, as well as factors that predict adherence to a low sodium diet, can aid researchers and clinicians in implementing a sodium-restricted diet. In this paper, we critically review methods for measuring sodium intake with a specific focus on CKD patients, appraise dietary adherence, and factors that have optimized sodium restriction in key research trials and discuss barriers to sodium restriction and factors that must be considered when recommending a sodium-restricted diet.

  20. Placental Adaptations in Growth Restriction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The placenta is the primary interface between the fetus and mother and plays an important role in maintaining fetal development and growth by facilitating the transfer of substrates and participating in modulating the maternal immune response to prevent immunological rejection of the conceptus. The major substrates required for fetal growth include oxygen, glucose, amino acids and fatty acids, and their transport processes depend on morphological characteristics of the placenta, such as placental size, morphology, blood flow and vascularity. Other factors including insulin-like growth factors, apoptosis, autophagy and glucocorticoid exposure also affect placental growth and substrate transport capacity. Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR is often a consequence of insufficiency, and is associated with a high incidence of perinatal morbidity and mortality, as well as increased risk of cardiovascular and metabolic diseases in later life. Several different experimental methods have been used to induce placental insufficiency and IUGR in animal models and a range of factors that regulate placental growth and substrate transport capacity have been demonstrated. While no model system completely recapitulates human IUGR, these animal models allow us to carefully dissect cellular and molecular mechanisms to improve our understanding and facilitate development of therapeutic interventions.

  1. Cardiac MRI in restrictive cardiomyopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, A. [Department of Cardiovascular Radiology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Ansari Nagar, Delhi (India); Singh Gulati, G., E-mail: gulatigurpreet@rediffmail.com [Department of Cardiovascular Radiology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Ansari Nagar, Delhi (India); Seth, S. [Department of Cardiology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Ansari Nagar, Delhi (India); Sharma, S. [Department of Cardiovascular Radiology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Ansari Nagar, Delhi (India)

    2012-02-15

    Restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM) is a specific group of heart muscle disorders characterized by inadequate ventricular relaxation during diastole. This leads to diastolic dysfunction with relative preservation of systolic function. Although short axis systolic function is usually preserved in RCM, the long axis systolic function may be severely impaired. Confirmation of diagnosis and information regarding aetiology, extent of myocardial damage, and response to treatment requires imaging. Importantly, differentiation from constrictive pericarditis (CCP) is needed, as only the latter is managed surgically. Echocardiography is the initial cardiac imaging technique but cannot reliably suggest a tissue diagnosis; although recent advances, especially tissue Doppler imaging and spectral tracking, have improved its ability to differentiate RCM from CCP. Cardiac catheterization is the reference standard, but is invasive, two-dimensional, and does not aid myocardial characterization. Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) is a versatile technique providing anatomical, morphological and functional information. In recent years, it has been shown to provide important information regarding disease mechanisms, and also been found useful to guide treatment, assess its outcome and predict patient prognosis. This review describes the CMR features of RCM, appearances in various diseases, its overall role in patient management, and how it compares with other imaging techniques.

  2. Measuring Regulatory Restrictions in Logistics Services

    OpenAIRE

    Hollweg, Claire; Marn-Heong WONG

    2009-01-01

    This study measures the extent of restrictions on trade in logistics services in the ASEAN+6 economies by constructing a logistics regulatory restrictiveness index for each economy that quantifies the extent of government regulations faced by logistics service providers. This is the first study of its kind to construct a regulatory index of the entire logistics sector, which includes the main modes of international transport and customs restrictions. The indices show that large differences ex...

  3. Massively parallel characterization of restriction endonucleases

    OpenAIRE

    Kamps-Hughes, Nick; Quimby, Aine; Zhu, Zhenyu; Johnson, Eric A.

    2013-01-01

    Restriction endonucleases are highly specific in recognizing the particular DNA sequence they act on. However, their activity is affected by sequence context, enzyme concentration and buffer composition. Changes in these factors may lead to either ineffective cleavage at the cognate restriction site or relaxed specificity allowing cleavage of degenerate ‘star’ sites. Additionally, uncharacterized restriction endonucleases and engineered variants present novel activities. Traditionally, restri...

  4. Correspondence between radioactive and functional methods in the quality control of DNA restriction and modifying enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trujillo, L E; Pupo, E; Miranda, F;

    1996-01-01

    We evaluated the use of two radiolabeled lambda DNA/Hpa II substrates to detect 5'-->3', 3'-->5' single and double stranded DNA dependent exonuclease and phosphatase activities found as contaminants in restriction and modifying enzyme preparations. Looking for the meaning of the radioactive assay...

  5. Arthrobacter luteus restriction endonuclease cleavage map of X174 RF DNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vereijken, J.M.; Mansfeld, A.D.M. van; Baas, P.D.; Jansz, H.S.

    1975-01-01

    Cleavage of X174 RF DNA with the restriction endonuclease from Arthrobacter luteus (Alu I) produces 23 fragments of approximately 24–1100 base pairs in length. The order of most of these fragments has been established by digestion of Haemophilus influenzae Rd (Hind II) and Haemophilus aegyptius (Hae

  6. 76 FR 11399 - Proposed Amendment to and Establishment of Restricted Areas, Warren Grove; NJ

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-02

    ..., NJ, can be traced back to World War II. Today, the Warren Grove Range consists of five restricted... and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26, 1979); and (3) does not warrant preparation of a regulatory.... 106(g), 40103, 40113, 40120; E.O. 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959-1963 Comp., p. 389. Sec. 73.50 2....

  7. Host Cell Tropism Underlies Species Restriction of Human and Bovine Cryptosporidium parvum Genotypes

    OpenAIRE

    Hashim, Amna; Clyne, Marguerite; Mulcahy, Grace; Akiyoshi, Donna; Chalmers, Rachel; Bourke, Billy

    2004-01-01

    It has been recognized recently that human cryptosporidiosis is usually caused by Cryptosporidium parvum genotype I (“human” C. parvum), which is not found in animals. Compared to C. parvum genotype II, little is known of the biology of invasion of the human-restricted C. parvum genotype I. The aims of the present study were (i) to explore and compare with genotype II the pathogenesis of C. parvum genotype I infection by using an established in vitro model of infection and (ii) to examine the...

  8. 40 CFR 1033.740 - Credit restrictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... restrictions. Use of emission credits generated under this part 1033 or 40 CFR part 92 is restricted depending on the standards against which they were generated. (a) Credits from 40 CFR part 92. NOX and PM credits generated under 40 CFR part 92 may be used under this part in the same manner as NOX and...

  9. 44 CFR 402.2 - Restricted commodities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Positive List (15 CFR part 399) (as amended from time to time) of the Comprehensive Export Schedule of the... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Restricted commodities. 402.2... SHIPMENTS ON AMERICAN FLAG SHIPS AND AIRCRAFT (T-1, INT. 1) § 402.2 Restricted commodities. The...

  10. 50 CFR 648.25 - Possession restrictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Possession restrictions. 648.25 Section 648.25 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC... Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries § 648.25 Possession restrictions. (a) Atlantic...

  11. 50 CFR 648.105 - Possession restrictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Possession restrictions. 648.105 Section... Summer Flounder Fisheries § 648.105 Possession restrictions. (a) Unless otherwise specified pursuant to... for a summer flounder moratorium permit are subject to this possession limit. The owner, operator,...

  12. 50 CFR 648.164 - Possession restrictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Possession restrictions. 648.164 Section... Atlantic Bluefish Fishery § 648.164 Possession restrictions. (a) No person shall possess more than 15... is not issued a bluefish commercial permit are subject to this possession limit. The owner,...

  13. Smoking restrictions in private workplaces in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Y H; Voo, Y O; Yong, L S

    1994-06-01

    This survey aims to determine the number and profile of private workplaces in Singapore which have a smoking restriction policy. The response rate was 43%. Of the companies which responded, 59% had some form of smoking restriction. Private companies are more likely to have a smoking restriction policy: (a) where smoking poses inherent fire risks, such as those dealing with inflammable chemicals or gases; (b) where smoking poses inherent detrimental effects to the quality of the products, such as those dealing with precision electronic microcomponents, where a smoke-free and dust-free environment is essential; (c) are larger companies; and (d) have strong management support in initiating and enforcing smoking restriction. Future programmes should give more emphasis to the service industries such as construction, insurance, banking and finance, and smaller companies (with fewer than 100 employees). They should involve the management who play an important role in implementing smoking restriction at their workplace. PMID:7997897

  14. Near BPS skyrmions and restricted harmonic maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speight, J. M.

    2015-06-01

    Motivated by a class of near BPS Skyrme models introduced by Adam, Sánchez-Guillén and Wereszczyński, the following variant of the harmonic map problem is introduced: a map φ :(M, g) →(N, h) between Riemannian manifolds is restricted harmonic if it locally extremizes E2 on its SDiff(M) orbit, where SDiff(M) denotes the group of volume preserving diffeomorphisms of (M, g), and E2 denotes the Dirichlet energy. It is conjectured that near BPS skyrmions tend to restricted harmonic maps in the BPS limit. It is shown that φ is restricted harmonic if and only if φ∗ h has exact divergence, and a linear stability theory of restricted harmonic maps is developed, from which it follows that all weakly conformal maps are stable restricted harmonic. Examples of restricted harmonic maps in every degree class R3 → SU(2) and R2 →S2 are constructed. It is shown that the axially symmetric BPS skyrmions on which all previous analytic studies of near BPS Skyrme models have been based, are not restricted harmonic, casting doubt on the phenomenological predictions of such studies. The problem of minimizing E2 for φ :Rk → N over all linear volume preserving diffeomorphisms is solved explicitly, and a deformed axially symmetric family of Skyrme fields constructed which are candidates for approximate near BPS skyrmions at low baryon number. The notion of restricted harmonicity is generalized to restricted F-criticality where F is any functional on maps (M, g) →(N, h) which is, in a precise sense, geometrically natural. The case where F is a linear combination of E2 and E4, the usual Skyrme term, is studied in detail, and it is shown that inverse stereographic projection R3 →S3 ≡ SU(2) is stable restricted F-critical for every such F.

  15. Measuring the Restrictiveness of Living Environments for Children and Youth: Reconceptualizing Restriction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauktis, Mary E.; Huefner, Jonathan C.; O'Brien, Kirk; Pecora, Peter J.; Doucette, Ann; Thompson, Ronald W.

    2009-01-01

    The "Restrictiveness of Living Environment Scale" has long been the primary way to conceptualize the "restrictiveness" of a child's living situation. However, changes in systems of care and other factors have created a need to revisit how restrictiveness is conceptualized and measured. A measure was created to assess an environment's level of…

  16. Temporal Alterations in Vascular Angiotensin Receptors and Vasomotor Response in Offspring of Protein-restricted Rat Dams

    Science.gov (United States)

    SATHISHKUMAR, Kunju; BALAKRISHNAN, Meena; CHINNATHAMBI, Vijayakumar; GAO, Haijun; YALLAMPALLI, Chandra

    2012-01-01

    Objective Examine temporal alterations in vascular angiotensin II (ANG II) receptors (AT1R and AT2R) and determine vascular response to ANG II in growth-restricted offspring. Study design Offspring of pregnant rats fed low-protein (6%) and control (20%) diet were compared. Results Prenatal protein restriction reprogrammed AT1aR mRNA expression in males’ mesenteric arteries to cause 1.7- and 2.3-fold increases at 3 and 6 months of age associated with arterial pressure increases of 10 and 33 mmHg, respectively; however, in females, increased AT1aR expression (2-fold) and arterial pressure (15 mmHg) occurred only at 6 months. Prenatal protein restriction did not affect AT2R expression. Losartan abolished hypertension, suggesting that AT1aR plays a primary role in arterial pressure elevation. Vasoconstriction to ANG II was exaggerated in all protein-restricted offspring, with greater potency and efficacy in males. Conclusion Prenatal protein restriction increased vascular AT1R expression and vasoconstriction to ANG II, possibly contributing to programmed hypertension. PMID:22537420

  17. TBscore II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudolf, Frauke; Lemvik, Grethe; Abate, Ebba;

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background: The TBscore, based on simple signs and symptoms, was introduced to predict unsuccessful outcome in tuberculosis patients on treatment. A recent inter-observer variation study showed profound variation in some variables. Further, some variables depend on a physician assessing...... them, making the score less applicable. The aim of the present study was to simplify the TBscore. Methods: Inter-observer variation assessment and exploratory factor analysis were combined to develop a simplified score, the TBscore II. To validate TBscore II we assessed the association between start...

  18. DNA polymorphism of HLA class II genes in alopecia areata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morling, N; Frentz, G; Fugger, L;

    1992-01-01

    We investigated the DNA restriction polymorphism (RFLP) of the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) class II genes: HLA-DQA, -DQB, -DPA, and -DPB in 20 Danish patients with alopecia areata (AA) and in healthy Danes. The frequency in AA of the DQB1*0301 and DQw7 associated DQB Bgl/II 4.2 kb...

  19. Restriction beyond the restriction point: mitogen requirement for G2 passage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    te Riele Hein

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cell proliferation is dependent on mitogenic signalling. When absent, normal cells cannot pass the G1 restriction point, resulting in cell cycle arrest. Passage through the G1 restriction point involves inactivation of the retinoblastoma protein family. Consequently, loss of the retinoblastoma protein family leads to loss of the G1 restriction point. Recent work in our lab has revealed that cells possess yet another mechanism that restricts proliferation in the absence of mitogens: arrest in the G2 phase of the cell cycle. Here, we discuss the similarities and differences between these restriction points and the roles of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors (CKIs herein.

  20. Urban water restrictions: Attitudes and avoidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Bethany; Burton, Michael; Crase, Lin

    2011-12-01

    In most urban cities across Australia, water restrictions remain the dominant policy mechanism to restrict urban water consumption. The extensive adoption of water restrictions as a means to limit demand, over several years, means that Australian urban water prices have consistently not reflected the opportunity cost of water. Given the generally strong political support for water restrictions and the likelihood that they will persist for some time, there is value in understanding households' attitudes in this context. More specifically, identifying the welfare gains associated with avoiding urban water restrictions entirely would be a nontrivial contribution to our knowledge and offer insights into the benefits of alternative policy responses. This paper describes the results from a contingent valuation study that investigates consumers' willingness to pay to avoid urban water restrictions. Importantly, the research also investigates the influence of cognitive and exogenous dimensions on the utility gain associated with avoiding water restrictions. The results provide insights into the impact of the current policy mechanism on economic welfare.

  1. Methionine restriction and life-span control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byung Cheon; Kaya, Alaattin; Gladyshev, Vadim N

    2016-01-01

    Dietary restriction (DR) without malnutrition is associated with longevity in various organisms. However, it has also been shown that reduced calorie intake is often ineffective in extending life span. Selecting optimal dietary regimens for DR studies is complicated, as the same regimen may lead to different outcomes depending on genotype and environmental factors. Recent studies suggested that interventions such as moderate protein restriction with or without adequate nutrition (e.g., particular amino acids or carbohydrates) may have additional beneficial effects mediated by certain metabolic and hormonal factors implicated in the biology of aging, regardless of total calorie intake. In particular, it was shown that restriction of a single amino acid, methionine, can mimic the effects of DR and extend life span in various model organisms. We discuss the beneficial effects of a methionine-restricted diet, the molecular pathways involved, and the use of this regimen in longevity interventions.

  2. Age-restricted housing in New England

    OpenAIRE

    Peter Francese

    2008-01-01

    Fair Housing Act amendments exempt housing restricted to “older persons” from provisions protecting families with children from discrimination. But municipal leaders who believe that promoting over-55 housing will reduce education costs are in for a rude awakening.

  3. Avoidant/Restrictive Food Intake Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Intake Disorder Binge Eating Disorder Bulimia Nervosa Pica Rumination Disorder Avoidant/restrictive food intake disorder is characterized ... Intake Disorder Binge Eating Disorder Bulimia Nervosa Pica Rumination Disorder NOTE: This is the Consumer Version. CONSUMERS: ...

  4. The Frattini Subalgebra of Restricted Lie Superalgebras

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liang Yun CHEN; Dao Ji MENG; Yong Zheng ZHANG

    2006-01-01

    In the present paper, we study the Frattini subalgebra of a restricted Lie superalgebra (L, [p]). We show first that if L = A1 (⊙) A2 (⊙) … (⊙) An, then φp (L) = φp (A1) + φp (A2) +… +φp (An),where each Ai is a p-ideal of L. We then obtain two results: F(L) = φ(L) = J(L) = L(1) if and only if L is nilpotent; Fp(L) and F(L) are nilpotent ideals of L if L is solvable. In addition, necessary and sufficient conditions are found for φp-free restricted Lie superalgebras. Finally, we discuss the relationships of E-p-restricted Lie superalgebras and E-restricted Lie superalgebras.

  5. Bound on m-restricted Edge Connectivity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-ping Ou; Fu-ji Zhang

    2003-01-01

    An m-restricted edge cut is an edge cut that separates a connected graph into a disconnected one with no components having order less than m. m-restricted edge connectivity λm is the cardinality of a minimum m-restricted edge cut. Let G be a connected k-regular graph of order at least 2m that contains m-restricted edge cuts and X be a subgraph of G. Let( )(X) denote the number of edges with one end in X and the other not in X and ξm = min{( )(X): X is a connected vertex-induced subgraph of order m}. It is proved in this paper that if G has girth at least m/2 + 2, then λm ≤ξm. The upper bound of λm is sharp.

  6. Restrictions on Database Use: Are They Necessary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molster, H. C.

    1979-01-01

    Discusses restrictions regarding use of bibliographic data bases, cites their rationale in terms of cooperation in input creation, economics and administrative control, and notes their effect on use. (Author/CWM)

  7. Restriction/modification polypeptides, polynucleotides, and methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westpheling, Janet; Chung, DaeHwan; Huddleston, Jennifer; Farkas, Joel A

    2015-02-24

    The present invention relates to the discovery of a novel restriction/modification system in Caldicellulosiruptor bescii. The discovered restriction enzyme is a HaeIII-like restriction enzyme that possesses a thermophilic activity profile. The restriction/modification system also includes a methyltransferase, M.CbeI, that methylates at least one cytosine residue in the CbeI recognition sequence to m.sup.4C. Thus, the invention provides, in various aspects, isolated CbeI or M.CbeI polypeptides, or biologically active fragments thereof; isolated polynucleotides that encode the CbeI or M.CbeI polypeptides or biologically active fragments thereof, including expression vectors that include such polynucleotide sequences; methods of digesting DNA using a CbeI polypeptide; methods of treating a DNA molecule using a M.CbeI polypeptide; and methods of transforming a Caldicellulosiruptor cell.

  8. Isolation of a new restriction enzyme, ApaCI, an isoschizomer of BamHI produced by Acetobacter pasteurianus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grones, J; Turna, J

    1992-01-01

    A new Type II restriction endonuclease ApaCI purified from Acetobacter pasteurianus is an isoschizomer of BamHI that cleaves at the nucleotide sequence 5'-G/GATCC-3' of double-stranded DNA. The single restriction activity present in this strain permits rapidly purified 30,000 units of cleavage activity from 10 g of freshly harvested cells. The resulting ApaCI preparation is free of contaminant nuclease activities that might interfere with in vitro manipulation of DNA.

  9. Behavioral and Physiological Consequences of Sleep Restriction

    OpenAIRE

    Banks, Siobhan; Dinges, David F.

    2007-01-01

    Adequate sleep is essential for general healthy functioning. This paper reviews recent research on the effects of chronic sleep restriction on neurobehavioral and physiological functioning and discusses implications for health and lifestyle. Restricting sleep below an individual's optimal time in bed (TIB) can cause a range of neurobehavioral deficits, including lapses of attention, slowed working memory, reduced cognitive throughput, depressed mood, and perseveration of thought. Neurobehavio...

  10. Public Investment, Revenue Shocks, and Borrowing Restrictions

    OpenAIRE

    Büttner, Thiess; David E. Wildasin

    2010-01-01

    This paper lays out a theory of taxation and public investment in an intertemporal setting under conditions of revenue shocks. Without borrowing restrictions, the optimal policy is characterized by smooth time paths of taxes and public investment. While the introduction of formal borrowing restrictions leads to some precautionary savings, it gives rise to fluctuations in public investment in response to adverse but also favorable revenue shocks. This theoretical result is tested empirically u...

  11. Cellular Restriction Factors of Feline Immunodeficiency Virus

    OpenAIRE

    Carsten Münk; Jörg Zielonka

    2011-01-01

    Lentiviruses are known for their narrow cell- and species-tropisms, which are determined by cellular proteins whose absence or presence either support viral replication (dependency factors, cofactors) or inhibit viral replication (restriction factors). Similar to Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), the cat lentivirus Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) is sensitive to recently discovered cellular restriction factors from non-host species that are able to stop viruses from replicating...

  12. Placental Nutrient Transport and Intrauterine Growth Restriction

    OpenAIRE

    Gaccioli, Francesca; Lager, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    Intrauterine growth restriction refers to the inability of the fetus to reach its genetically determined potential size. Fetal growth restriction affects approximately 5–15% of all pregnancies in the United States and Europe. In developing countries the occurrence varies widely between 10 and 55%, impacting about 30 million newborns per year. Besides having high perinatal mortality rates these infants are at greater risk for severe adverse outcomes, such as hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy and...

  13. Feed restriction in broiler chickens production

    OpenAIRE

    Sahraei M.

    2012-01-01

    The feed restriction program is on of the main techniques in growth curve manipulation for increasing production efficiency in broiler chicken. Quantities and qualitative feed restriction are procedures that can be used to manipulate the feeding strategies of poultry in order to decrease growth and metabolic rate to some extent and so alleviate the incidence of some metabolic diseases such as ascites, lameness, mortality, and sudden death syndrome and so im...

  14. Date restricted queries in web search engines

    OpenAIRE

    Lewandowski, Dirk

    2004-01-01

    Search engines usually offer a date restricted search on their advanced search pages. But determining the actual update of a web page is not without problems. We conduct a study testing date restricted queries on the search engines Google, Teoma and Yahoo!. We find that these searches fail to work properly in the examined engines. We discuss implications of this for further research and search engine development.

  15. Restricted three body problems at the nanoscale

    OpenAIRE

    Chan, Yue; Thamwattana, Ngamta; Hill, James M.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate some of the classical restricted three body problems at the nanoscale, such as the circular planar restricted problem for three C60 fullerenes, and a carbon atom and two C60 fullerenes. We model the van der Waals forces between the fullerenes by the Lennard-Jones potential. In particular, the pairwise potential energies between the carbon atoms on the fullerenes are approximated by the continuous approach, so that the total molecular energy between two fullerenes...

  16. Temporary Tariffs and Capital Market Restrictions

    OpenAIRE

    Saqib Jafarey; Sajal Lahiri

    2004-01-01

    We develop a two-period model with endogenous investment and credit flows. Credit is subject to quantitative restrictions. With an exogenous restriction, we analyze the welfare effects of temporary tariffs. We then consider three scenarios under which a monopoly lender optimally decides the level of credit and a borrower country chooses an import tariff: one in which the two parties act simultaneously and two scenarios where one of them has a first-mover advantage. The equilibrium under the l...

  17. Calorie restriction increases muscle mitochondrial biogenesis in healthy humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony E Civitarese

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Caloric restriction without malnutrition extends life span in a range of organisms including insects and mammals and lowers free radical production by the mitochondria. However, the mechanism responsible for this adaptation are poorly understood. METHODS AND FINDINGS: The current study was undertaken to examine muscle mitochondrial bioenergetics in response to caloric restriction alone or in combination with exercise in 36 young (36.8 +/- 1.0 y, overweight (body mass index, 27.8 +/- 0.7 kg/m(2 individuals randomized into one of three groups for a 6-mo intervention: Control, 100% of energy requirements; CR, 25% caloric restriction; and CREX, caloric restriction with exercise (CREX, 12.5% CR + 12.5% increased energy expenditure (EE. In the controls, 24-h EE was unchanged, but in CR and CREX it was significantly reduced from baseline even after adjustment for the loss of metabolic mass (CR, -135 +/- 42 kcal/d, p = 0.002 and CREX, -117 +/- 52 kcal/d, p = 0.008. Participants in the CR and CREX groups had increased expression of genes encoding proteins involved in mitochondrial function such as PPARGC1A, TFAM, eNOS, SIRT1, and PARL (all, p < 0.05. In parallel, mitochondrial DNA content increased by 35% +/- 5% in the CR group (p = 0.005 and 21% +/- 4% in the CREX group (p < 0.004, with no change in the control group (2% +/- 2%. However, the activity of key mitochondrial enzymes of the TCA (tricarboxylic acid cycle (citrate synthase, beta-oxidation (beta-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase, and electron transport chain (cytochrome C oxidase II was unchanged. DNA damage was reduced from baseline in the CR (-0.56 +/- 0.11 arbitrary units, p = 0.003 and CREX (-0.45 +/- 0.12 arbitrary units, p = 0.011, but not in the controls. In primary cultures of human myotubes, a nitric oxide donor (mimicking eNOS signaling induced mitochondrial biogenesis but failed to induce SIRT1 protein expression, suggesting that additional factors may regulate SIRT1 content

  18. PORT II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muniz, Beau

    2009-01-01

    One unique project that the Prototype lab worked on was PORT I (Post-landing Orion Recovery Test). PORT is designed to test and develop the system and components needed to recover the Orion capsule once it splashes down in the ocean. PORT II is designated as a follow up to PORT I that will utilize a mock up pressure vessel that is spatially compar able to the final Orion capsule.

  19. 精氨酸酶Ⅰ基因型与慢性牙周炎、冠心病的相关性研究%Relationship of arginase Ⅰprotein genetic polymorphisms with chronic periodontitis and coronary heart disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙继军; 王晶; 张燕; 王青山; 王爱芹

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the association of arginase Ⅰ(ArgⅠ)rs2781 666 G/T genotype with the susceptibility of mod-erate and severe chronic periodontitis(MSP)and coronary heart disease(CHD).Methods:DNA was obtained from buccal swabs of 50 patients with MSP,46 with CHD,42 with MSP and CHD,and 50 matched healthy controls.Genotypes of rs2781 666 G/T was analyzed by PCR-PFLP method.The genotype distribution in the 4 groups was compared.Results:Higher representation of ArgⅠrs2781 666 al-lele T was found in CHD group than that in the healthy control individuals(P <0.01 ),and there was no statistical differences among the other 3 groups.Conclusion:Allele T of ArgⅠrs2781 666 may be associated with CHD susceptibility.%目的:探讨精氨酸酶Ⅰ(ArgⅠ)rs2781666 G/T 基因型与中重度慢性牙周炎(MSP)、冠心病(CHD)易感性的关系。方法:收集 MSP 患者50例(MSP 组)、CHD 患者46例(CHD 组)、MSP 伴 CHD 患者42例(MSP +CHD 组)与50例同族健康对照组(HC)的颊黏膜拭子,提取 DNA,采用聚合酶反应-限制性片段长度多态性法(PCR-PFLP)对 ArgⅠrs2781666 G/T 位点的基因型进行检测,比较其在4组间检出率的差别。结果:ArgⅠ rs2781666等位基因 T 在 CHD 组中的检出率显著高于健康组,在其余各组间无统计学意义。结论:ArgⅠrs2781666等位基因 T 可能是 CHD 的一个易感基因。

  20. A New Method of Improving Transformer Restricted Earth Fault Protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KRSTIVOJEVIC, J. P.

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A new method of avoiding malfunctioning of the transformer restricted earth fault (REF protection is presented. Application of the proposed method would eliminate unnecessary operation of REF protection in the cases of faults outside protected zone of a transformer or a magnetizing inrush accompanied by current transformer (CT saturation. On the basis of laboratory measurements and simulations the paper presents a detailed performance assessment of the proposed method which is based on digital phase comparator. The obtained results show that the new method was stable and precise for all tested faults and that its application would allow making a clear and precise difference between an internal fault and: (i external fault or (ii magnetizing inrush. The proposed method would improve performance of REF protection and reduce probability of maloperation due to CT saturation. The new method is robust and characterized by high speed of operation and high reliability and security.

  1. Classifying orbits in the restricted three-body problem

    CERN Document Server

    Zotos, Euaggelos E

    2015-01-01

    The case of the planar circular restricted three-body problem is used as a test field in order to determine the character of the orbits of a small body which moves under the gravitational influence of the two heavy primary bodies. We conduct a thorough numerical analysis on the phase space mixing by classifying initial conditions of orbits and distinguishing between three types of motion: (i) bounded, (ii) escape and (iii) collisional. The presented outcomes reveal the high complexity of this dynamical system. Furthermore, our numerical analysis shows a remarkable presence of fractal basin boundaries along all the escape regimes. Interpreting the collisional motion as leaking in the phase space we related our results to both chaotic scattering and the theory of leaking Hamiltonian systems. We also determined the escape and collisional basins and computed the corresponding escape/collisional times. We hope our contribution to be useful for a further understanding of the escape and collisional mechanism of orbi...

  2. Crystal structure of the R-protein of the multisubunit ATP-dependent restriction endonuclease NgoAVII

    OpenAIRE

    Tamulaitiene, Giedre; Silanskas, Arunas; Grazulis, Saulius; Zaremba, Mindaugas; Siksnys, Virginijus

    2014-01-01

    The restriction endonuclease (REase) NgoAVII is composed of two proteins, R.NgoAVII and N.NgoAVII, and shares features of both Type II restriction enzymes and Type I/III ATP-dependent restriction enzymes (see accompanying paper Zaremba et al., 2014). Here we present crystal structures of the R.NgoAVII apo-protein and the R.NgoAVII C-terminal domain bound to a specific DNA. R.NgoAVII is composed of two domains: an N-terminal nucleolytic PLD domain; and a C-terminal B3-like DNA-binding domain i...

  3. Crystal Structure of the R-Protein of the Multisubunit ATP-Dependent Restriction Endonuclease NgoAVII

    OpenAIRE

    Tamulaitiene, G.; Silanskas, A.; Grazulis, S.; Zaremba, M.; Siksnys, V.

    2014-01-01

    The restriction endonuclease (REase) NgoAVII iscomposed of two proteins, R.NgoAVII and N.NgoAVII,and shares features of both Type II restriction en-zymes and Type I/III ATP-dependent restriction en-zymes (see accompanying paper Zaremba et al.,2014). Here we present crystal structures of theR.NgoAVII apo-protein and the R.NgoAVII C-terminaldomain bound to a specific DNA. R.NgoAVII is com-posed of two domains: an N-terminal nucleolytic PLDdomain; and a C-terminal B3-like DNA-binding do-main ide...

  4. Alternatives to restrictive feeding practices to promote self-regulation in childhood: a developmental perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollins, B Y; Savage, J S; Fisher, J O; Birch, L L

    2016-10-01

    Intake of energy-dense snack foods is high among US children. Although the use of restrictive feeding practices has been shown to be counterproductive, there is very limited evidence for effective alternatives to restriction that help children moderate their intake of these foods and that facilitate the development of self-regulation in childhood. The developmental literature on parenting and child outcomes may provide insights into alternatives to restrictive feeding practices. This review paper uses a model of parental control from the child development and parenting literatures to (i) operationally define restrictive feeding practices; (ii) summarize current evidence for antecedents and effects of parental restriction use on children's eating behaviours and weight status, and (iii) highlight alternative feeding practices that may facilitate the development of children's self-regulation and moderate children's intake of palatable snack foods. We also discuss recent empirical evidence highlighting the role of child temperament and food motivation related behaviours as factors that prompt parents to use restrictive feeding practices and, yet, may increase children's dysregulated intake of forbidden foods.

  5. Optimal control of entanglement under restrictions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haeberle, Thomas Stefan; Freyberger, Matthias [Institut fuer Quantenphysik, Universitaet Ulm, D-89069 Ulm (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    We present a novel iterative algorithm with a special presearching step that can optimize the entanglement of a coupled quantum system while fulfilling restrictions of the control function. As an example we regard two atoms in a harmonic trap which interact via point-like collisions. Our aim is to improve the entanglement at a fixed time by dynamically varying the trap frequency within a fixed interval. In order to get rid of the restrictions for the trap frequency, we use a suitable parameterization that transforms the optimization problem from a restricted to an unrestricted one. By applying the pre-searching step we get a reasonable initial guess for the optimal trap frequency. Finally, we use a standard method based on optimal control theory to further increase the entanglement.

  6. The Role of the Methyltransferase Domain of Bifunctional Restriction Enzyme RM.BpuSI in Cleavage Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Arthur Sarrade-Loucheur; Shuang-yong Xu; Siu-Hong Chan

    2013-01-01

    Restriction enzyme (REase) RM.BpuSI can be described as a Type IIS/C/G REase for its cleavage site outside of the recognition sequence (Type IIS), bifunctional polypeptide possessing both methyltransferase (MTase) and endonuclease activities (Type IIC) and endonuclease activity stimulated by S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) (Type IIG). The stimulatory effect of SAM on cleavage activity presents a major paradox: a co-factor of the MTase activity that renders the substrate unsusceptible to cleavag...

  7. Oleoyl-estrone metabolic effects in relation with caloric restriction in inbred Beta rats with spontaneous obesity and type 2 diabetes Efectos metabólicos de la oleoil-estrona en relación con la restricción calórica en ratas Beta endocriadas, con obesidad espontánea y diabetes tipo II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta D. Posadas

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneously hypertriacylglycerolemic obese and diabetic inbred IIM Beta rats were treated with oleoyl- estrone for 10 days. Pair-feeding was performed to determine some oleoyl-estrone effects dependent on the caloric restriction it promotes. Twenty-five 200 day-old Beta males receiving a daily gavage of 0.2 ml sunflower oil were divided into the following groups: 1 daily dose of 10 nmol/g oleoyl-estrone; 2 pair-fed; 3 control. The variables measured were: whole body protein, water and lipid; retroperitoneal and epididymal fat depot weights; plasma urea, glucose, insulin, triacylglycerols and cholesterol. Biomass and food intake were assessed daily. Oleoyl-estrone and pair-fed groups expressed similar variations in body composition and significant body weight losses due to reduction in food intake. Oleoyl-estrone and pair-fed treatments significantly reduced retroperitoneal fat depot weights, but not epididymal ones. In oleoyl-estrone and pair-fed groups hyperglycemia decreased and insulinemia lowered significantly. Plasma normal total cholesterolemia and hypertriacylglycerolemia values typical of Beta rats decreased strongly compared to controls, though attaining significantly different values between oleoyl-estrone and pair-fed groups. Plasma total cholesterol appeared as more sensitive to caloric restriction than triacylglycerols through a specific oleoyl-estrone- mediated effect.Ratas endocriadas de la línea IIMBeta con obesidad, hipertriacilglicerolemia y diabetes espontáneas fueron tratadas con oleoil-estrona durante 10 días. Un grupo con restricción alimentaria fue incluido en el estudio a fin de aislar algunos efectos de la oleoil-estrona dependientes de la restricción calórica que ésta promueve. Veinticinco ratas Beta macho de 200 días de edad a los que se suministró 0.2 ml de aceite de girasol por día se dividieron en los siguientes grupos: (1 dosis diaria de 10 nmol/g de oleoil-estrona; (2 restringido; (3 control. Las

  8. Quantum Game with Restricted Matrix Strategies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENBo; MAYing-Jun; LONGGui-Lu

    2003-01-01

    We study a quantum game played by two players with restricted multiple strategies. It is found that in this restricted quantum game Nash equilibrium does not always exist when the initial state is entangled. At the same time,we find that when Nasli equilibrium exists the payoff function is usually different from that in the classical counterpart except in some special cases. This presents an explicit example showing quantum game and classical game may differ.When designing a quantum game with limited strategies, the allowed strategy should be carefully chosen according to the type of initial state.

  9. Quantum Game with Restricted Matrix Strategies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Bo; MA Ying-Jun; LONG Gui-Lu

    2003-01-01

    We study a quantum game played by two players with restricted multiple strategies. It is found that in this restricted quantum game Nash equilibrium does not always exist when the initial state is entangled. At the same time,we find that when Nash equilibrium exists the payoff function is usually different from that in the classical counterpart except in some special cases. This presents an explicit example showing quantum game and classical game may differ.When designing a quantum game with limited strategies, the allowed strategy should be carefully chosen according to the type of initial state.

  10. Verification of Transformer Restricted Earth Fault Protection by using the Monte Carlo Method

    OpenAIRE

    KRSTIVOJEVIC, J. P.; DJURIC, M. B.

    2015-01-01

    The results of a comprehensive investigation of the influence of current transformer (CT) saturation on restricted earth fault (REF) protection during power transformer magnetization inrush are presented. Since the inrush current during switch-on of unloaded power transformer is stochastic, its values are obtained by: (i) laboratory measurements and (ii) calculations based on the input data obtained by the Monte Carlo (MC) simulation. To make a detailed assessment of the curre...

  11. Restricted total stability and total attractivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Zappala'

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the new concepts of restricted total stability and total attractivity is formulated. For this purpose the classical theory of Malkin with suitable changes and the theory of limiting equations, introduced by Sell developed by Artstein and Andreev, are used. Significant examples are presented.

  12. Real Moments of the Restrictive Factor

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Andrew Ledoan; Alexandru Zaharescu

    2009-09-01

    Let be a real number such that 0 < < 1. We establish asymptotic formulas for the weighted real moments $\\sum_{n≤ x}R^(n)(1-n/x)$, where $R(n)=\\prod^k_{v=1}p^{ v-1}_v$ is the Atanassov strong restrictive factor function and $n=\\prod^k_{v=1}p^{ v}_v$ is the prime factorization of .

  13. 45 CFR 400.44 - Restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Regulations Relating to Public Welfare OFFICE OF REFUGEE RESETTLEMENT, ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN AND FAMILIES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES REFUGEE RESETTLEMENT PROGRAM Immigration Status and Identification of Refugees Documentation of Refugee Status § 400.44 Restriction. An applicant for asylum is...

  14. 9 CFR 166.2 - General restrictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false General restrictions. 166.2 Section 166.2 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SWINE HEALTH PROTECTION SWINE HEALTH PROTECTION General Provisions § 166.2 General...

  15. Material and Cultural Restriction of Political Life

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马国祥

    2015-01-01

    Material and culture have a certain influence on the political life. In general, the higher level of economic development of the country, people's political life is more democratic. Culture has some negative effect on the political life. China's traditional cul-ture has restricted the people's political life in some ways.

  16. Restricted Liberty, Parental Choice and Homeschooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merry, Michael S.; Karsten, Sjoerd

    2010-01-01

    In this paper the authors carefully study the problem of liberty as it applies to school choice, and whether there ought to be restricted liberty in the case of homeschooling. They examine three prominent concerns that might be brought against homeschooling, viz., that it aggravates social inequality, worsens societal conflict and works against…

  17. Restricted liberty, parental choice and homeschooling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.S. Merry; S. Karsten

    2010-01-01

    In this paper the authors carefully study the problem of liberty as it applies to school choice, and whether there ought to be restricted liberty in the case of homeschooling. They examine three prominent concerns that might be brought against homeschooling, viz., that it aggravates social inequalit

  18. Epigenetic regulation of caloric restriction in aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Michael

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The molecular mechanisms of aging are the subject of much research and have facilitated potential interventions to delay aging and aging-related degenerative diseases in humans. The aging process is frequently affected by environmental factors, and caloric restriction is by far the most effective and established environmental manipulation for extending lifespan in various animal models. However, the precise mechanisms by which caloric restriction affects lifespan are still not clear. Epigenetic mechanisms have recently been recognized as major contributors to nutrition-related longevity and aging control. Two primary epigenetic codes, DNA methylation and histone modification, are believed to dynamically influence chromatin structure, resulting in expression changes of relevant genes. In this review, we assess the current advances in epigenetic regulation in response to caloric restriction and how this affects cellular senescence, aging and potential extension of a healthy lifespan in humans. Enhanced understanding of the important role of epigenetics in the control of the aging process through caloric restriction may lead to clinical advances in the prevention and therapy of human aging-associated diseases.

  19. Joint Venture Structuring in Restricted Industries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHRIS; DEVONSHIRE-ELLIS

    2008-01-01

    When investing in China’s restricted in- dustries, it is essential to have a joint venture (JV) partner. Often the maximum percent- age of equity allowed in foreign ownership can only be 50 percent. So what options are available to the foreign investor to mitigate the risk of not owning, on paper, a majority

  20. Observing Behavior and Atypically Restricted Stimulus Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dube, William V.; Dickson, Chata A.; Balsamo, Lyn M.; O'Donnell, Kristin Lombard; Tomanari, Gerson Y.; Farren, Kevin M.; Wheeler, Emily E.; McIlvane, William J.

    2010-01-01

    Restricted stimulus control refers to discrimination learning with atypical limitations in the range of controlling stimuli or stimulus features. In the study reported here, 4 normally capable individuals and 10 individuals with intellectual disabilities (ID) performed two-sample delayed matching to sample. Sample-stimulus observing was recorded…

  1. 12 CFR 575.11 - Operating restrictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ..., the reference in § 563b.510 of this chapter to five percent refers to minority shareholders. (d) Restrictions on waiver of dividends. No mutual holding company may waive its right to receive any dividend... holding company provides the OTS with written notice of its intent to waive its right to receive...

  2. Restrictive dermopathy - Report of 12 cases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smitt, JHS; van Asperen, CJ; Niessen, CM; Beemer, FA; van Essen, AJ; Hulsmans, RFHJ; Oranje, AP; Steijlen, PM; Wesby-van Swaay, E; Tamminga, P; Breslau-Siderius, EJ

    1998-01-01

    Background: This study describes 12 cases of restrictive dermopathy seen during a period of 8 years by the Dutch Task Force on Genodermatology. We present these unique consecutive cases to provide more insight into the clinical picture and pathogenesis of the disease. Observations: Clinical features

  3. 46 CFR 119.405 - Fuel restrictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Fuel restrictions. 119.405 Section 119.405 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS CARRYING MORE THAN 150 PASSENGERS OR WITH OVERNIGHT ACCOMMODATIONS FOR MORE THAN 49 PASSENGERS MACHINERY INSTALLATION...

  4. Design implications of extremely restricted patterning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidyanathan, Kaushik; Liu, Renzhi; Liebmann, Lars; Lai, Kafai; Strojwas, Andzrej J.; Pileggi, Larry

    2014-07-01

    Escalating manufacturing cost and complexity is challenging the premise of affordable scaling. With lithography accounting for a large fraction of wafer costs, researchers are actively exploring several cost-effective alternative lithographic techniques, such as directed self-assembly, self-aligned multiple patterning, etc. However, most of the alternative lithographic techniques are restrictive, and it is important to understand the impact of such pattering restrictions on system-on-chip (SoC) design. To this end, we artificially restricted all layers in a 14 nm process to be pure gratings and observed that the pure gratings approach results in an inefficient SoC design with several process integration concerns. To come up with a technology definition that is mindful of designer requirements, it is essential to undertake a holistic design technology co-optimization (DTCO) considering several SoC design elements, such as standard cell logic, static random access memory bitcells, analog blocks, and physical synthesis. Our DTCO on the IBM 14 nm process with additional 10- and 7-nm node-like pattern restrictions leads us to converge on a set of critical pattern constructs that are required for an efficient and affordable SoC design.

  5. 7 CFR 322.28 - General requirements; restricted articles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false General requirements; restricted articles. 322.28... EQUIPMENT Importation and Transit of Restricted Articles § 322.28 General requirements; restricted articles. (a) The following articles from any region are restricted articles: (1) Dead bees of any genus;...

  6. Target of rapamycin signalling mediates the lifespan-extending effects of dietary restriction by essential amino acid alteration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emran, S.; Yang, M.Y.; He, X.L.; Zandveld, J.; Piper, M.D.W.

    2014-01-01

    Dietary restriction (DR), defined as a moderate reduction in food intake short of malnutrition, has been shown to extend healthy lifespan in a diverse range of organisms, from yeast to primates. Reduced signalling through the insulin/IGF-like (IIS) and Target of Rapamycin (TOR) signalling pathways a

  7. Restriction fragment length polymorphisms of the DNA of selected Naegleria and Acanthamoeba amebae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, G L; Brandt, F H; Visvesvara, G S

    1988-09-01

    Fourteen strains of Naegleria fowleri, two strains of N. gruberi, and one strain each of N. australiensis, N. jadini, N. lovaniensis, Acanthamoeba sp., A. castellanii, A. polyphaga, and A. comandoni isolated from patients, soil, or water were characterized by restriction fragment length polymorphisms. Total cellular DNA (1 microgram) was digested with either HindIII, BglII, or EcoRI; separated on agarose gels; and stained with ethidium bromide. From 2 to 15 unusually prominent repetitive restriction fragment bands, totaling 15 to 50 kilobases in length and constituting probably more than 30% of the total DNA, were detected for all ameba strains. Each species displayed a characteristic pattern of repetitive restriction fragments. Digests of the four Acanthamoeba spp. displayed fewer, less intensely staining repetitive fragments than those of the Naegleria spp. All N. fowleri strains, whether isolated from the cerebrospinal fluid of patients from different parts of the world or from hot springs, had repetitive restriction fragment bands of similar total lengths (ca. 45 kilobases), and most repetitive bands displayed identical mobilities. However, polymorphic bands were useful in identifying particular isolates. Restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis generally was consistent with taxonomy based on studies of infectivity, morphology, isoenzyme patterns, and antibody reactivity and suggests that this technique may help classify amebae isolated from clinical specimens or from the environment.

  8. An unusual ECG pattern in restrictive cardimyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvaganesh, M; Arul, A S; Balasubramanian, S; Ganesan, N; Naina Mohammed, S; Sivakumar, G S; Veeramani, S R; Jeyasingh, P; Sathishkumar, S; Selvaraju, S

    2015-01-01

    Restrictive cardiomyopathy is the least common type of primary cardiomyopathies. Electrocardiographic recording is abnormal in 99% of patients with RCM. Biatrial enlargement, obliquely elevated ST segment with notched or biphasic late peaking T waves are considered characteristic ECG finding. Significant ST depression with T inversion mimicking subendocardial ischemia has also been reported in patients with RCM and is even suggested as a predictor of sudden cardiac death. We noted a similar ECG pattern in a 16 yr girl with Idiopathic restrictive cardiomyopathy. Coronaries were normal, stress perfusion imaging did not show any perfusion defect. This diffuse resting ST depression with T inversion in precordial & inferior leads along with ST elevation in aVR was persistent for more than six months. PMID:26304570

  9. A Property Restriction Based Knowledge Merging Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che, Haiyan; Chen, Wei; Feng, Tie; Zhang, Jiachen

    Merging new instance knowledge extracted from the Web according to certain domain ontology into the knowledge base (KB for short) is essential for the knowledge management and should be processed carefully, since this may introduce redundant or contradictory knowledge, and the quality of the knowledge in the KB, which is very important for a knowledge-based system to provide users high quality services, will suffer from such "bad" knowledge. Advocates a property restriction based knowledge merging method, it can identify the equivalent instances, redundant or contradictory knowledge according to the property restrictions defined in the domain ontology and can consolidate the knowledge about equivalent instances and discard the redundancy and conflict to keep the KB compact and consistent. This knowledge merging method has been used in a semantic-based search engine project: CRAB and the effect is satisfactory.

  10. Affective tone of mothers' statements to restrict their children's eating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesch, Megan H; Miller, Alison L; Appugliese, Danielle P; Rosenblum, Katherine L; Lumeng, Julie C

    2016-08-01

    Maternal restrictive feeding behaviors have been associated with child weight status. The affective tone of mothers' statements intended to restrict their children's eating has not been examined. The objectives of this study were to describe the affective tone of mothers' restrictive feeding behaviors (positive or negative), and to test the association of child and mother characteristics with rates of Restriction with Positive Affect, Restriction with Negative Affect and Total Restriction. A total of 237 low-income child-mother dyads (mean child age 5.9 years) participated in a videotaped standardized laboratory eating protocol, during which mothers and children were both presented with large servings of cupcakes. A coding scheme was developed to count each restrictive statement with a positive affective tone and each restrictive statement with a negative affective tone. To establish reliability, 20% of videos were double-coded. Demographics and anthropometrics were obtained. Poisson regression models were used to test the association between characteristics of the child and mother with counts of Restriction with Positive Affect, Restriction with Negative Affect, and Total Restriction. Higher rates of Restriction with Positive Affect and Total Restriction were predicted by child obese weight status, and mother non-Hispanic white race/ethnicity. Higher rates of Restriction with Negative Affect were predicted by older child age, child obese weight status, mother non-Hispanic white race/ethnicity, and lower mother education level. In conclusion, in this study mothers of obese (vs. non-obese) children had higher rates of restriction in general, but particularly higher rates of Restriction with Negative Affect. Rather than being told not to restrict, mothers may need guidance on how to sensitively restrict their child's intake. Future studies should consider the contributions of maternal affect to children's responses to maternal restriction. PMID:27090342

  11. Blood flow-restricted exercise in space

    OpenAIRE

    Hackney, Kyle J; Everett, Meghan; Scott, Jessica M; Ploutz-Snyder, Lori

    2012-01-01

    Prolonged exposure to microgravity results in chronic physiological adaptations including skeletal muscle atrophy, cardiovascular deconditioning, and bone demineralization. To attenuate the negative consequences of weightlessness during spaceflight missions, crewmembers perform moderate- to high-load resistance exercise in conjunction with aerobic (cycle and treadmill) exercise. Recent evidence from ground-based studies suggests that low-load blood flow-restricted (BFR) resistance exercise tr...

  12. Privacy-Preserving Restricted Boltzmann Machine

    OpenAIRE

    Yu Li; Yuan Zhang; Yue Ji

    2014-01-01

    With the arrival of the big data era, it is predicted that distributed data mining will lead to an information technology revolution. To motivate different institutes to collaborate with each other, the crucial issue is to eliminate their concerns regarding data privacy. In this paper, we propose a privacy-preserving method for training a restricted boltzmann machine (RBM). The RBM can be got without revealing their private data to each other when using our privacy-preserving method. We provi...

  13. Free vs. Restricted Immigration: Bilateral Country Study

    OpenAIRE

    Razin, Assaf; Wahba, Jackline

    2011-01-01

    This paper tests the differential effects of the generosity of the welfare state under free migration and under policy-controlled migration, distinguishing between source developing and developed countries. We utilize free-movement within the EU to examine the free migration regime and compare that to immigration into the EU from two other groups, developed and developing source countries, to capture immigration-restricted regimes. We standardize cross-country education quality differences by...

  14. Geometry of the restricted Boltzmann machine

    OpenAIRE

    Cueto, Maria Angelica; Morton, Jason; Sturmfels, Bernd

    2009-01-01

    The restricted Boltzmann machine is a graphical model for binary random variables. Based on a complete bipartite graph separating hidden and observed variables, it is the binary analog to the factor analysis model. We study this graphical model from the perspectives of algebraic statistics and tropical geometry, starting with the observation that its Zariski closure is a Hadamard power of the first secant variety of the Segre variety of projective lines. We derive a dimension formula for the ...

  15. Chronic calorie restriction attenuates experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    OpenAIRE

    Piccio, Laura; Stark, Jennifer L.; Cross, Anne H.

    2008-01-01

    Calorie restriction (CR) prevents many age-associated diseases and prolongs the lifespan. CR induces multiple metabolic and physiologic modifications, including anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and neuroprotective effects that may be beneficial in multiple sclerosis (MS). The present studies sought to determine whether CR or increased calorie intake alters the course of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), the leading animal model for MS. SJL and C57BL/6 mice were subjected to 40% ...

  16. Restricted Conformal Property of Compressive Sensing

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, Tao

    2014-01-01

    Energy and direction are tow basic properties of a vector. A discrete signal is a vector in nature. RIP of compressive sensing can not show the direction information of a signal but show the energy information of a signal. Hence, RIP is not complete. Orthogonal matrices can preserve angles and lengths. Preservation of length can show energies of signals like RIP do; and preservation of angle can show directions of signals. Therefore, Restricted Conformal Property (RCP) is proposed according t...

  17. Early postnatal caloric restriction protects adult male intrauterine growth-restricted offspring from obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Meena; Thamotharan, Manikkavasagar; Dai, Yun; Thamotharan, Shanthie; Shin, Bo-Chul; Stout, David; Devaskar, Sherin U

    2012-06-01

    Postnatal ad libitum caloric intake superimposed on intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) is associated with adult-onset obesity, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). We hypothesized that this paradigm of prenatal nutrient deprivation-induced programming can be reversed with the introduction of early postnatal calorie restriction. Ten-month-old male rats exposed to either prenatal nutrient restriction with ad libitum postnatal intake (IUGR), pre- and postnatal nutrient restriction (IPGR), or postnatal nutrient restriction limited to the suckling phase (50% from postnatal [PN]1 to PN21) (PNGR) were compared with age-matched controls (CON). Visceral adiposity, metabolic profile, and insulin sensitivity by hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamps were examined. The 10-month-old male IUGR group had a 1.5- to 2.0-fold increase in subcutaneous and visceral fat (P metabolic inflexibility (Vo(2)) versus CON. The IPGR group remained lean, euglycemic, insulin sensitive, and active while maintaining metabolic flexibility. The PNGR group was insulin sensitive, similar to IPGR, but less active while maintaining metabolic flexibility. We conclude that IUGR resulted in obesity without insulin resistance and energy metabolic perturbations prior to development of glucose intolerance and T2DM. Postnatal nutrient restriction superimposed on IUGR was protective, restoring metabolic normalcy to a lean and active phenotype. PMID:22461568

  18. Team Formation and Communication Restrictions in Collectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agogino, Adrian K.; Turner, Kagan

    2003-01-01

    A collective of agents often needs to maximize a "world utility" function which rates the performance of an entire system, while subject to communication restrictions among the agents. Such communication restrictions make it difficult for agents which try to pursue their own "private" utilities to take actions that also help optimize the world utility. Team formation presents a solution to this problem, where by joining other agents, an agent can significantly increase its knowledge about the environment and improve its chances of both optimizing its own utility and that its doing so will contribute to the world utility. In this article we show how utilities that have been previously shown to be effective in collectives can be modified to be more effective in domains with moderate communication restrictions resulting in performance improvements of up to 75%. Additionally we show that even severe communication constraints can be overcome by forming teams where each agent of a team shares the same utility, increasing performance an additional 25%. We show that utilities and team sizes can be manipulated to form the best compromise between how "aligned" an agent s utility is with the world utility and how easily an agent can learn that utility.

  19. Emergency building temperature restrictions. Final evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-11-01

    On July 5, 1979, DOE promulgated final regulations of the Emergency Building Temperature Restrictions program, placing emergency restrictions on thermostat settings for space heating, space cooling, and hot water in commercial, industrial, and nonresidential public buildings. The final regulations restricted space heating to a maximum of 65/sup 0/F, hot water temperature to a maximum of 105/sup 0/F, and cooling temperature to a minimum of 78/sup 0/F. A comprehensive evaluation of the entire EBTF program for a nine-month period from July 16, 1979 is presented. In Chapter 1, an estimate of the population of buildings covered by EBTR is presented. In Chapter 2, EBTR compliance by building type and region is reported. Exemptions are also discussed. In Chapter 3, the simulations of building energy use are explained and the relative impact of various building characteristics and effectiveness of different control strategies are estimated. Finally, in Chapter 4, the methodology for scaling the individual building energy savings to the national level is described, and estimated national energy savings are presented.

  20. Food restriction modifies ultrastructure of hippocampal synapses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babits, Réka; Szőke, Balázs; Sótonyi, Péter; Rácz, Bence

    2016-04-01

    Consumption of high-energy diets may compromise health and may also impair cognition; these impairments have been linked to tasks that require hippocampal function. Conversely, food restriction has been shown to improve certain aspects of hippocampal function, including spatial memory and memory persistence. These diet-dependent functional changes raise the possibility that the synaptic structure underlying hippocampal function is also affected. To examine how short-term food restriction (FR) alters the synaptic structure of the hippocampus, we used quantitative electron microscopy to analyze the organization of neuropil in the CA1 stratum radiatum of the hippocampus in young rats, consequent to reduced food. While four weeks of FR did not modify the density, size, or shape of postsynaptic spines, the synapses established by these spines were altered, displaying increased mean length, and more frequent perforations of postsynaptic densities. That the number of perforated synapses (believed to be an indicator of synaptic enhancement) increased, and that the CA1 spine population had on average significantly longer PSDs suggests that synaptic efficacy of axospinous synapses also increased in the CA1. Taken together, our ultrastructural data reveal previously unrecognized structural changes at hippocampal synapses as a function of food restriction, supporting a link between metabolic balance and synaptic plasticity.

  1. Elizabeth II uus kunstigalerii

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    1999-01-01

    Tähistamaks oma troonile asumise 50. aastapäeva, avab Elizabeth II 6. II 2002 Buckinghami palees uue kunstigalerii, mis ehitatakse palee tiibhoonena. Arhitekt John Simpson. Elizabeth II kunstikogust

  2. Classical simulation of restricted quantum computations

    OpenAIRE

    Nebhwani, Mrityunjaya

    2013-01-01

    Treball final de màster oficial fet en col·laboració amb Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (UAB), Universitat de Barcelona (UB) i Institut de Ciències Fotòniques (ICFO) [ANGLÈS] We study restricted models of measurement-based quantum computation; and we investigate whether their output probability distributions can be sampled from efficiently on a classical computer. We find that even for non-adaptive models of MBQC, if this task were feasible then a major conjecture of computational compl...

  3. Privacy-Preserving Restricted Boltzmann Machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available With the arrival of the big data era, it is predicted that distributed data mining will lead to an information technology revolution. To motivate different institutes to collaborate with each other, the crucial issue is to eliminate their concerns regarding data privacy. In this paper, we propose a privacy-preserving method for training a restricted boltzmann machine (RBM. The RBM can be got without revealing their private data to each other when using our privacy-preserving method. We provide a correctness and efficiency analysis of our algorithms. The comparative experiment shows that the accuracy is very close to the original RBM model.

  4. Privacy-preserving restricted boltzmann machine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yu; Zhang, Yuan; Ji, Yue

    2014-01-01

    With the arrival of the big data era, it is predicted that distributed data mining will lead to an information technology revolution. To motivate different institutes to collaborate with each other, the crucial issue is to eliminate their concerns regarding data privacy. In this paper, we propose a privacy-preserving method for training a restricted boltzmann machine (RBM). The RBM can be got without revealing their private data to each other when using our privacy-preserving method. We provide a correctness and efficiency analysis of our algorithms. The comparative experiment shows that the accuracy is very close to the original RBM model. PMID:25101139

  5. Restricted fish feeding reduces cod otolith opacity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høie, H.; Folkvord, A.; Mosegaard, Henrik;

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to examine the effect of reduced feeding and constant temperature on cod otolith opacity. Three groups of juvenile cod were given restricted food rations at different times for 4 months, resulting in depressed somatic growth. Otolith opacity was measured on pictures...... in otolith opacity were found between individual fish both within groups and between groups. In two of the three groups significantly more translucent otolith material was deposited in response to reduced feeding. Our results show that variations in feeding and hence fish growth resulted in variation...

  6. The Monetary Policy – Restrictive or Expansive?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Szafarczyk

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The monetary policy plays an important role in macroeconomic policy of government. There is a question concerning type of this policy expansive or restrictive (easy or tidy monetary policy. Unfortunately, we have a lot of criteria. Each of them gives us other answer. So due to equitation of Irving Fisher we have dominantly expansive monetary policy. This same situation exists when we use nominal value of rediscount interest rate of central bank. Opposite result appears when we use real value of this interest rate or level of obligatory reserve. Taking under consideration liquidity on money market we know, that level of interest rate is too high.

  7. Optimal Policy under Restricted Government Spending

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Anders

    2006-01-01

    Welfare ranking of policy instruments is addressed in a two-sector Ramsey model with monopoly pricing in one sector as the only distortion. When government spending is restricted, i.e. when a government is unable or unwilling to finance the required costs for implementing the optimum policy...... effectiveness canexceed the welfare loss from introducing new distortions. Moreover, it is found that the investment subsidy is gradually phased out of the welfare maximizing policy, which may be a policy combining the two subsidies, when the level of government spending is increased.Keywords: welfare ranking...

  8. 77 FR 24760 - Safety Advisory 2012-02; Restricted Speed

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-25

    ... Federal Railroad Administration Safety Advisory 2012-02; Restricted Speed AGENCY: Federal Railroad... speed. This safety advisory contains a preliminary discussion of recent train accidents involving a failure to operate at restricted speed and makes recommendations to railroads to ensure...

  9. Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS) Restricted Data Files

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Restricted Data Files Available at the Data Centers Researchers and users with approved research projects can access restricted data files that have not been...

  10. The actions of restriction endonucleases on lampbrush chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, D C; Callan, H G; Thomas, C A

    1976-07-01

    Lampbrush chromosomes from oocytes of Notophthalmus viridescens were dispersed in media containing restriction endonucleases isolated from Haemophilus and E. coli. These endonucleases cleave duplex DNAs at specific palindromic sequences of nucleotides, and several sensitive sites occur per micron of DNA. The overwhelming majority of the lateral loops of lampbrush chromosomes are extensively fragmented by these endonucleases, but an occasional pair of loops is refractory. A notable example of loops showing this refractory property are the giant loops on chromosome II in the presence of Hae. These loops, whose DNA-containing axes are several hundred micra long, are sensitive to other nucleases such as EcoB, endonuclease I and pancreatic DNase I; their refractory behavior towards Hae therefore indicates that the sequence sensitive to this particular endonuclease is systematically absent. This anomalous property can be comprehended if it be assumed that the axial DNA of the giant loops consists of tandem repeats of a sequence which happens not to include the sensitive site. PMID:987047

  11. Type I bHLH Proteins Daughterless and Tcf4 Restrict Neurite Branching and Synapse Formation by Repressing Neurexin in Postmitotic Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitchell D’Rozario

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Proneural proteins of the class I/II basic-helix-loop-helix (bHLH family are highly conserved transcription factors. Class I bHLH proteins are expressed in a broad number of tissues during development, whereas class II bHLH protein expression is more tissue restricted. Our understanding of the function of class I/II bHLH transcription factors in both invertebrate and vertebrate neurobiology is largely focused on their function as regulators of neurogenesis. Here, we show that the class I bHLH proteins Daughterless and Tcf4 are expressed in postmitotic neurons in Drosophila melanogaster and mice, respectively, where they function to restrict neurite branching and synapse formation. Our data indicate that Daughterless performs this function in part by restricting the expression of the cell adhesion molecule Neurexin. This suggests a role for these proteins outside of their established roles in neurogenesis.

  12. Repletion of TNFα or leptin in calorically restricted mice suppresses post-restriction hyperphagia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hambly, Catherine; Duncan, Jacqueline S.; Archer, Zoë A.; Moar, Kim M.; Mercer, Julian G.; Speakman, John R.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY The causes of post-restriction hyperphagia (PRH) represent a target for drug-based therapies to prevent obesity. However, the factors causing PRH are poorly understood. We show that, in mice, the extent of PRH was independent of the time under restriction, but depended on its severity, suggesting that PRH was driven by signals from altered body composition. Signals related to fat mass were important drivers. Circulating levels of leptin and TNFα were significantly depleted following caloric restriction (CR). We experimentally repleted their levels to match those of controls, and found that in both treatment groups the level of PRH was significantly blunted. These data establish a role for TNFα and leptin in the non-pathological regulation of energy homeostasis. Signals from adipose tissue, including but not limited to leptin and TNFα, regulate PRH and might be targets for therapies that support people engaged in CR to reduce obesity. PMID:21954068

  13. Programmed protection of foreign DNA from restriction allows pathogenicity island exchange during pneumococcal transformation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calum Johnston

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In bacteria, transformation and restriction-modification (R-M systems play potentially antagonistic roles. While the former, proposed as a form of sexuality, relies on internalized foreign DNA to create genetic diversity, the latter degrade foreign DNA to protect from bacteriophage attack. The human pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae is transformable and possesses either of two R-M systems, DpnI and DpnII, which respectively restrict methylated or unmethylated double-stranded (ds DNA. S. pneumoniae DpnII strains possess DpnM, which methylates dsDNA to protect it from DpnII restriction, and a second methylase, DpnA, which is induced during competence for genetic transformation and is unusual in that it methylates single-stranded (ss DNA. DpnA was tentatively ascribed the role of protecting internalized plasmids from DpnII restriction, but this seems unlikely in light of recent results establishing that pneumococcal transformation was not evolved to favor plasmid exchange. Here we validate an alternative hypothesis, showing that DpnA plays a crucial role in the protection of internalized foreign DNA, enabling exchange of pathogenicity islands and more generally of variable regions between pneumococcal isolates. We show that transformation of a 21.7 kb heterologous region is reduced by more than 4 logs in dpnA mutant cells and provide evidence that the specific induction of dpnA during competence is critical for full protection. We suggest that the integration of a restrictase/ssDNA-methylase couplet into the competence regulon maintains protection from bacteriophage attack whilst simultaneously enabling exchange of pathogenicicy islands. This protective role of DpnA is likely to be of particular importance for pneumococcal virulence by allowing free variation of capsule serotype in DpnII strains via integration of DpnI capsule loci, contributing to the documented escape of pneumococci from capsule-based vaccines. Generally, this finding is the

  14. Restrictive influence of SAMHD1 on Hepatitis B Virus life cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, Andreas F. R.; Rivière, Lise; Qu, Bingqian; Schott, Kerstin; Riess, Maximilian; Ni, Yi; Shepard, Caitlin; Schnellbächer, Esther; Finkernagel, Malin; Himmelsbach, Kiyoshi; Welzel, Karin; Kettern, Nadja; Donnerhak, Christian; Münk, Carsten; Flory, Egbert; Liese, Juliane; Kim, Baek; Urban, Stephan; König, Renate

    2016-01-01

    Deoxynucleotide triphosphates (dNTPs) are essential for efficient hepatitis B virus (HBV) replication. Here, we investigated the influence of the restriction factor SAMHD1, a dNTP hydrolase (dNTPase) and RNase, on HBV replication. We demonstrated that silencing of SAMHD1 in hepatic cells increased HBV replication, while overexpression had the opposite effect. SAMHD1 significantly affected the levels of extracellular viral DNA as well as intracellular reverse transcription products, without affecting HBV RNAs or cccDNA. SAMHD1 mutations that interfere with the dNTPase activity (D137N) or in the catalytic center of the histidine-aspartate (HD) domain (D311A), and a phospho-mimetic mutation (T592E), abrogated the inhibitory activity. In contrast, a mutation diminishing the potential RNase but not dNTPase activity (Q548A) and a mutation disabling phosphorylation (T592A) did not affect antiviral activity. Moreover, HBV restriction by SAMHD1 was rescued by addition of deoxynucleosides. Although HBV infection did not directly affect protein level or phosphorylation of SAMHD1, the virus upregulated intracellular dATPs. Interestingly, SAMHD1 was dephosphorylated, thus in a potentially antiviral-active state, in primary human hepatocytes. Furthermore, SAMHD1 was upregulated by type I and II interferons in hepatic cells. These results suggest that SAMHD1 is a relevant restriction factor for HBV and restricts reverse transcription through its dNTPase activity. PMID:27229711

  15. Respiratory Conditions Update: Restrictive Lung Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, H Coleman

    2016-09-01

    Restrictive lung diseases are a heterogeneous group of conditions characterized by a restrictive pattern on spirometry and confirmed by a reduction in total lung volume. Patients with more severe symptoms may have a reduced diffusing capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide. Etiologies can be intrinsic with lung parenchymal involvement, as in interstitial lung diseases, or extrinsic to the lung, as in obesity and neuromuscular disorders. Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is a chronic progressive interstitial pneumonia with fibrosis for which treatment is primarily supportive with oxygen therapy, pulmonary rehabilitation, and management of comorbid conditions. Newer drugs for idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, such as pirfenidone and nintedanib, can slow disease progression. Referral for evaluation for lung transplantation is recommended for appropriate patients. Obstructive sleep apnea and obesity hypoventilation syndrome increasingly are common health issues, with symptoms that can include snoring, daytime somnolence, difficulty concentrating, fatigue, witnessed apneas, and morning headaches. Serum bicarbonate may serve as a biomarker in screening for subclinical obesity hypoventilation syndrome. Preoperative evaluations should assess pulmonary risk in addition to cardiac risk with a thorough history, laboratory tests, and functional capacity assessments. Optimization of management may include weight loss, pulmonary rehabilitation, oxygen therapy, and respiratory support. PMID:27576233

  16. Restrictions on Purely Kinetic K-Essence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Rong-Jia; QI Jing-Zhao; YANG Bao-Zhu

    2011-01-01

    We restrict purely kinetic k-essence. Assuming that the equation of state is a power law of the kinetic energy, I.e. W = w0Xα, we find that a must be positive to obtain accelerated phases, constrained from the conditions for stability and causality. In this case the k-essence behaves like a phantom. We also study the evolutions of the equation of state and the speed of sound with numerical simulations.%We restrict purely kinetic k-essence.Assuming that the equation of state is a power law of the kinetic energy,i.e.ω =ω0Xα,we find that α must be positive to obtain accelerated phases,constrained from the conditions for stability and causality.In this case the k-essence behaves like a phantom.We also study the evolutions of the equation of state and the speed of sound with numerical simulations.In the last decade a convergence of independent cosmological observations have suggested that the Universe is experiencing accelerated expansion.An unknown energy component,dubbed as dark energy,has been proposed to explain this acceleration.

  17. Columbus Closure Project Released without Radiological Restrictions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Columbus Closure Project (CCP), a historic radiological research complex, was cleaned up for future use without radiological restriction in 2006. The CCP research and development site contributed to national defense, nuclear fuel fabrication, and the development of safe nuclear reactors in the United States until 1988 when research activities were concluded for site decommissioning. In November of 2003, the Ohio Field Office of the U.S. Department of Energy contracted ECC/E2 Closure Services, LLC (Closure Services) to complete the removal of radioactive contamination from of a 1955 era nuclear sciences area consisting of a large hot cell facility, research reactor building and underground piping. The project known as the Columbus Closure Project (CCP) was completed in 27 months and brought to a close 16 years of D and D in Columbus, Ohio. This paper examines the project innovations and challenges presented during the Columbus Closure Project. The examination of the CCP includes the project regulatory environment, the CS safety program, accelerated clean up innovation, project execution strategies and management of project waste issues and the regulatory approach to site release 'without radiological restrictions'. (authors)

  18. Expression of arginase Ⅰ in peripheral superficial lymph node of HIV-infected individuals%精氨酸酶Ⅰ在HIV感染者外周浅表淋巴结中表达的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张乃春; 黄磊; 王松山; 邓建宁; 卢祥婵; 吴峰耀; 赵敏

    2015-01-01

    目的 检测精氨酸酶Ⅰ (Arg 1)在HIV感染者外周浅表淋巴结中的表达并探究其与HIV/AIDS进展的关系.方法 根据HIV感染者外周血中CD4+T淋巴细胞计数将患者分组,应用免疫组化方法检测HIV感染者与非HIV感染者外周浅表淋巴结中精氨酸酶Ⅰ的表达,用SPSS17.0软件进行统计分析.结果 HIV感染者外周浅表淋巴结中精氨酸酶Ⅰ的表达明显高于非HIV感染者淋巴结(P<0.01).不同外周血CD4+T淋巴细胞计数的HIV感染者淋巴结中精氨酸酶Ⅰ的表达水平不同.CD4+T淋巴细胞计数≥350/ μl与200/μl≤CD4+T淋巴细胞计数<350/μl的HIV感染者淋巴结中精氨酸酶Ⅰ表达水平差异无统计学意义(P>0.05),而外周血CD4+T淋巴细胞计数≥350/μl,200/ μl≥CD4 +T淋巴细胞计数<350/ μl的HIV感染者外周浅表淋巴结中精氨酸酶Ⅰ较CD4+T淋巴细胞计数< 200/μl的AIDS患者高,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05).且外周血CD4+T淋巴细胞与精氨酸酶Ⅰ的表达水平呈负相关性.结论 以上结果提示Arg Ⅰ在外周浅表淋巴结中的高表达,并与AIDS疾病的进展具有相关性.%Objective To investigate the expression of arginase Ⅰ (.Arg Ⅰ) in peripheral superficial lymph nodes of HIV-infected individuals and to explore their correlation with HIV/AIDS disease progression.Methods All the patients were divided to two groups according to the CD4 + T cell counts in peripheral blood,immunohistochemistry was used to detect expression of Arg Ⅰ in peripheral superficial lymph node of non HIV-infected and HIV-infected individuals.The data were statistically analyzed with SPSS17.0.Results Levels of Arg Ⅰ expression in peripheral superficial lymph node of HIV-infected individuals were higher than those of non HIV-infected lymph nodes (P < 0.01).The expressions of Arg Ⅰ in patients with AIDS in different CD4 + T lymphocyte counts were distinct.Levels of Arg Ⅰ expression in peripheral superficial lymph

  19. 9 CFR 121.13 - Restricted experiments. 10

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Restricted experiments. 10 121.13... TRANSFER OF SELECT AGENTS AND TOXINS § 121.13 Restricted experiments. 10 10 For guidance, see the NIH... entity may not conduct a restricted experiment with a VS select agent or toxin unless approved by...

  20. 36 CFR 13.1174 - Whale water restrictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Whale water restrictions. 13... Vessel Operating Restrictions § 13.1174 Whale water restrictions. (a) May 15 through September 30, the following waters are designated as whale waters. (1) Waters north of a line drawn from Point Carolus...

  1. 48 CFR 552.203-71 - Restriction on Advertising.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Restriction on Advertising... Restriction on Advertising. As prescribed in 503.570-2, insert the following clause: Restriction on Advertising (SEP 1999) The Contractor shall not refer to this contract in commercial advertising or...

  2. 14 CFR 252.8 - Extent of smoking restrictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Extent of smoking restrictions. 252.8... PROCEEDINGS) ECONOMIC REGULATIONS SMOKING ABOARD AIRCRAFT § 252.8 Extent of smoking restrictions. The restrictions on smoking described in §§ 252.3 through 252.7 shall apply to all locations within the aircraft....

  3. 49 CFR 215.303 - Stenciling of restricted cars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Stenciling of restricted cars. 215.303 Section 215... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD FREIGHT CAR SAFETY STANDARDS Stenciling § 215.303 Stenciling of restricted cars. (a) Each restricted railroad freight car that is described in § 215.205(a)...

  4. 20 CFR 332.3 - Mileage and work restrictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... INSURANCE ACT MILEAGE OR WORK RESTRICTIONS AND STAND-BY OR LAY-OVER RULES § 332.3 Mileage and work... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Mileage and work restrictions. 332.3 Section... solely because of the application to him of a mileage or work restriction agreed upon in a...

  5. Oncogenic pathways impinging on the G2-restriction point

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Foijer, F; Simonis, M; van Vliet, M; Wessels, L; Kerkhoven, R; Sorger, P K; Te Riele, H

    2008-01-01

    In the absence of mitogenic stimuli, cells normally arrest in G(1/0), because they fail to pass the G1-restriction point. However, abrogation of the G1-restriction point (by loss of the retinoblastoma gene family) reveals a second-restriction point that arrests cells in G2. Serum-starvation-induced

  6. Isolated corneal pseudodendrites as the initial manifestation of tyrosinemia type II in monozygotic twins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kymionis, George D; Kankariya, Vardhaman P; Kontadakis, Georgios A; Ziakas, Nikolas G

    2012-05-08

    Fifteen-month-old twins presented with photophobia and bilateral corneal pseudodendrites, and tyrosinemia type II was suspected. Plasma tyrosine levels were elevated. After therapy with tyrosine-restricted diet, corneal lesions resolved. Bilateral pseudodendritic keratitis may be the initial or only manifestation of tyrosinemia type II.

  7. Restricted Edge Connectivity of BinaryUndirected Kautz Graphs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    OUJian-ping

    2004-01-01

    A restricted edge cut is an edge cut of a connected graph whose removal resultsin a disconnected graph without isolated vertices. The size of a minimum restricted edge cutof a graph G is called its restricted edge connectivity, and is denoted by λ′(G). Let ξ(G) bethe minimum edge degree of graph G. It is known that λ′(G) ≤ξ(G) if G contains restrictededge cuts. Graph G is called maximal restricted edge connected if the equality holds in thethe preceding inequality. In this paper, undirected Kautz graph UK(2, n) is proved to bemaximal restricted edge connected if n ≥ 2.

  8. A FORTRAN Program for Correcting Correlation Coefficients for Restriction in Range for Explicit or Implicit Restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Mary A.; Boone, James O.

    1979-01-01

    Restriction in range is a measurement problem frequently encountered in research studies that utilize correlation coefficients. A FORTRAN program is described that can compute the estimated unrestricted correlation coefficient in either the explicit or implicit case. The user selects the appropriate formula to be employed from five that are…

  9. Cobalt(II), nickel(II), copper(II), zinc(II), cadmium(II) and dioxouranium(II) complexes of thiophene-2-aldehyde-4-phenyl-thiosemicarbazone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present paper describes the synthesis and characterisation of thiophene-2-aldehyde-4-phenylthiosemicarbazone (TAPTSC) and its metal complexes with Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Zn(II), Cd(II) and UO(II). (author). 30 refs., 1 table

  10. HLA class II restricted minor histocompatibility antigens - identification, processing and biology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kremer, Anita Natalie

    2014-01-01

    Allogeneic stem cell transplantation is a potentially curative treatment for many hematological malignancies. The beneficial Graft-versus-Leukemia (GvL) effect is thereby mediated by donor-derived T-cells recognizing the malignant cells of the patient as foreign. However, the same T-cells might also

  11. Type II restriction-modification system methylation subunit of Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Brady D; Newby, Deborah T; Lacey, Jeffrey A; Thompson, David N; Thompson, Vicki S; Apel, William A; Roberto, Francisco F; Reed, David W

    2013-10-29

    Isolated and/or purified polypeptides and nucleic acid sequences encoding polypeptides from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius are provided. Further provided are methods for modulating or altering recombination inside or outside of a cell using isolated and/or purified polypeptides and/or nucleic acid sequences from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius.

  12. Type II restriction-modification system methylation subunit of Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Brady D; Newby, Deborah T; Lacey, Jeffrey A; Thompson, David N; Thompson, Vicki S; Apel, William A; Roberto, Francisco F; Reed, David W

    2015-05-12

    Isolated and/or purified polypeptides and nucleic acid sequences encoding polypeptides from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius are provided. Further provided are methods for modulating or altering recombination inside or outside of a cell using isolated and/or purified polypeptides and/or nucleic acid sequences from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius.

  13. Formation reconfiguration in restricted three body problem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shengping Gong; Junfeng Li; Hexi Baoyin; Yunfeng Gao

    2007-01-01

    Reconfiguration of formation flying around a halo orbit of the Sun-Earth restricted three body system is investigated with impulse maneuvers. For a short time reconfiguration, the two-impulse maneuver is investigated with both analytical and numerical methods and the BeginningEnding (BE) method is proven to be an energy-optimal one of all two-impulse (TI) reconfigurations, and the energy consumption of BE is independent of the position of the chief spacecraft, and decreases with the reconfiguration time.Then, genetic algorithm is adopted to optimize the energy consumption. The results show that the optimal energy increases with radius difference between the initial and final orbits, and decreases with the reconfiguration time.

  14. Membrane barriers for radon gas flow restrictions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research was performed to assess the feasibility of barrier membrane substances, for use within mining or associated high risk environments, in restricting the diffusion transport of radon gas quantities. Specific tests were conducted to determine permeability parameters of a variety of membrane materials with reference to radon flow capabilities. Tests were conducted both within laboratory and in-situ emanation environments where concentrations and diffusion flows of radon gas were known to exist. Equilibrium radon gas concentrations were monitored in initially radon-free chambers adjacent to gas sources, but separated by specified membrane substances. Membrane barrier effectiveness was demonstrated to result in reduced emanation concentrations of radon gas within the sampling chamber atmosphere. Minimum gas concentrations were evidenced where the barrier membrane material was shown to exhibit lowest radon permeability characteristics

  15. Caloric Restriction Mimetics Enhance Anticancer Immunosurveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrocola, Federico; Pol, Jonathan; Vacchelli, Erika; Rao, Shuan; Enot, David P; Baracco, Elisa E; Levesque, Sarah; Castoldi, Francesca; Jacquelot, Nicolas; Yamazaki, Takahiro; Senovilla, Laura; Marino, Guillermo; Aranda, Fernando; Durand, Sylvère; Sica, Valentina; Chery, Alexis; Lachkar, Sylvie; Sigl, Verena; Bloy, Norma; Buque, Aitziber; Falzoni, Simonetta; Ryffel, Bernhard; Apetoh, Lionel; Di Virgilio, Francesco; Madeo, Frank; Maiuri, Maria Chiara; Zitvogel, Laurence; Levine, Beth; Penninger, Josef M; Kroemer, Guido

    2016-07-11

    Caloric restriction mimetics (CRMs) mimic the biochemical effects of nutrient deprivation by reducing lysine acetylation of cellular proteins, thus triggering autophagy. Treatment with the CRM hydroxycitrate, an inhibitor of ATP citrate lyase, induced the depletion of regulatory T cells (which dampen anticancer immunity) from autophagy-competent, but not autophagy-deficient, mutant KRAS-induced lung cancers in mice, thereby improving anticancer immunosurveillance and reducing tumor mass. Short-term fasting or treatment with several chemically unrelated autophagy-inducing CRMs, including hydroxycitrate and spermidine, improved the inhibition of tumor growth by chemotherapy in vivo. This effect was only observed for autophagy-competent tumors, depended on the presence of T lymphocytes, and was accompanied by the depletion of regulatory T cells from the tumor bed. PMID:27411589

  16. Constrictive Pericarditis Versus Restrictive Cardiomyopathy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Mario J

    2016-05-01

    About one-half of the patients with congestive heart failure have preserved left ventricular ejection fraction (HFpEF). Although the etiology of HFpEF is most commonly related to long-standing hypertension and atherosclerosis, a significant number of suspected HFpEF patients have a restrictive cardiomyopathy or chronic pericardial disease. Recognizing these syndromes is important because early diagnosis may lead to instituting specific therapy that may prolong survival, improve quality of life, and/or recognize and treat an underlying systemic disorder. Advances in diagnostic imaging, biomarkers, and genetic testing today allow identification of the specific etiology in most cases. Novel pharmacological, immunologic, and surgical therapies are leading to improved quality of life and survival.

  17. Restriction modification systems as engines of diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sneppen, Kim; Semsey, Szabolcs; Seshasayee, Aswin S N; Krishna, Sandeep

    2015-01-01

    Restriction modification (RM) systems provide protection against a broad spectrum of phages. However, the likelihood of a phage permanently bypassing this can be as high as 0.1 per infection (Korona et al., 1993) which makes for a relatively weak defense. Here we argue that, apart from providing such transient defenses, RM systems can facilitate long-term coexistence of many bacterial strains. We show that this diversity can be as large as the burst size of the phage but no larger-a curious correspondence between a number at the level of species and another number at the level of individuals. Such a highly diverse and stably coexisting ecosystem is robust to substantial variation in both bacterial growth rates and strength of their RM systems, which might be one reason why quite weak RM systems exist in the wild. PMID:26082758

  18. Restriction Modification Systems as Engines of Diversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim eSneppen

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Restriction modification (RM systems provide protection against a broad spectrum of phages. However, the likelihood of a phage permanently bypassing this can be as high as 0.1 per infection (Korona et al., J. Gen. Microbiol. 139: 1283-1290, 1993 which makes for a relatively weak defence. Here we argue that, apart from providing such transient defences, RM systems can facilitate long-term coexistence of many bacterial strains. We show that this diversity can be as large as the burst size of the phage but no larger -- a curious correspondence between a number at the level of species and another number at the level of individuals. Such a highly diverse and stably coexisting ecosystem is robust to substantial variation in both bacterial growth rates and strength of their RM systems, which might be one reason why quite weak RM systems exist in the wild.

  19. Epitaxial growth by monolayer restricted galvanic displacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasilić Rastko

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of a new method for epitaxial growth of metals in solution by galvanic displacement of layers pre-deposited by underpotential deposition (UPD was discussed and experimentally illustrated throughout the lecture. Cyclic voltammetry (CV and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM are employed to carry out and monitor a “quasi-perfect”, two-dimensional growth of Ag on Au(111, Cu on Ag(111, and Cu on Au(111 by repetitive galvanic displacement of underpotentially deposited monolayers. A comparative study emphasizes the displacement stoichiometry as an efficient tool for thickness control during the deposition process and as a key parameter that affects the deposit morphology. The excellent quality of layers deposited by monolayer-restricted galvanic displacement is manifested by a steady UPD voltammetry and ascertained by a flat and uniform surface morphology maintained during the entire growth process.

  20. Autotagging music with conditional restricted Boltzmann machines

    CERN Document Server

    Mandel, Michael; Larochelle, Hugo; Bengio, Yoshua

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes two applications of conditional restricted Boltzmann machines (CRBMs) to the task of autotagging music. The first consists of training a CRBM to predict tags that a user would apply to a clip of a song based on tags already applied by other users. By learning the relationships between tags, this model is able to pre-process training data to significantly improve the performance of a support vector machine (SVM) autotagging. The second is the use of a discriminative RBM, a type of CRBM, to autotag music. By simultaneously exploiting the relationships among tags and between tags and audio-based features, this model is able to significantly outperform SVMs, logistic regression, and multi-layer perceptrons. In order to be applied to this problem, the discriminative RBM was generalized to the multi-label setting and four different learning algorithms for it were evaluated, the first such in-depth analysis of which we are aware.

  1. AGORA: Assembly Guided by Optical Restriction Alignment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Henry C

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome assembly is difficult due to repeated sequences within the genome, which create ambiguities and cause the final assembly to be broken up into many separate sequences (contigs. Long range linking information, such as mate-pairs or mapping data, is necessary to help assembly software resolve repeats, thereby leading to a more complete reconstruction of genomes. Prior work has used optical maps for validating assemblies and scaffolding contigs, after an initial assembly has been produced. However, optical maps have not previously been used within the genome assembly process. Here, we use optical map information within the popular de Bruijn graph assembly paradigm to eliminate paths in the de Bruijn graph which are not consistent with the optical map and help determine the correct reconstruction of the genome. Results We developed a new algorithm called AGORA: Assembly Guided by Optical Restriction Alignment. AGORA is the first algorithm to use optical map information directly within the de Bruijn graph framework to help produce an accurate assembly of a genome that is consistent with the optical map information provided. Our simulations on bacterial genomes show that AGORA is effective at producing assemblies closely matching the reference sequences. Additionally, we show that noise in the optical map can have a strong impact on the final assembly quality for some complex genomes, and we also measure how various characteristics of the starting de Bruijn graph may impact the quality of the final assembly. Lastly, we show that a proper choice of restriction enzyme for the optical map may substantially improve the quality of the final assembly. Conclusions Our work shows that optical maps can be used effectively to assemble genomes within the de Bruijn graph assembly framework. Our experiments also provide insights into the characteristics of the mapping data that most affect the performance of our algorithm, indicating the

  2. A New Humanized HLA Transgenic Mouse Model of Multiple Sclerosis Expressing Class II on Mouse CD4 T Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Mangalam, Ashutosh; Rodriguez, Moses; David, Chella

    2007-01-01

    Among all the genetic factors associated with MS susceptibility, strongest association has been seen with expression of certain MHC class II molecules, although analysis of their exact function remains complicated. In general expression of class II is restricted to professional antigen presenting cells, however human but not mice CD4+ T cells express class II on their surface. Functional studies of classII+CD4+ T cells have been hampered due to lack of proper animal model. Here we describe de...

  3. Sleep restriction alters the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal response to stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meerlo, P.; Koehl, M.; van der Borght, K.; Turek, F. W.

    2002-01-01

    Chronic sleep restriction is an increasing problem in many countries and may have many, as yet unknown, consequences for health and well being. Studies in both humans and rats suggest that sleep deprivation may activate the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, one of the main neuroendocrine stress systems. However, few attempts have been made to examine how sleep loss affects the HPA axis response to subsequent stressors. Furthermore, most studies applied short-lasting total sleep deprivation and not restriction of sleep over a longer period of time, as often occurs in human society. Using the rat as our model species, we investigated: (i) the HPA axis activity during and after sleep deprivation and (ii) the effect of sleep loss on the subsequent HPA response to a novel stressor. In one experiment, rats were subjected to 48 h of sleep deprivation by placing them in slowly rotating wheels. Control rats were placed in nonrotating wheels. In a second experiment, rats were subjected to an 8-day sleep restriction protocol allowing 4 h of sleep each day. To test the effects of sleep loss on subsequent stress reactivity, rats were subjected to a 30-min restraint stress. Blood samples were taken at several time points and analysed for adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and corticosterone. The results show that ACTH and corticosterone concentrations were elevated during sleep deprivation but returned to baseline within 4 h of recovery. After 1 day of sleep restriction, the ACTH and corticosterone response to restraint stress did not differ between control and sleep deprived rats. However, after 48 h of total sleep deprivation and after 8 days of restricted sleep, the ACTH response to restraint was significantly reduced whereas the corticosterone response was unaffected. These results show that sleep loss not only is a mild activator of the HPA axis itself, but also affects the subsequent response to stress. Alterations in HPA axis regulation may gradually appear under

  4. IgE production after antigen-specific and cognate activation of HLA-DPw4-restricted T-cell clones, by 78% of randomly selected B-cell donors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baselmans, PJ; Pollabauer, EM; van Reijsen, FC; Heystek, HC; Hren, A; Stumptner, P; Tilanus, MGJ; Vooijs, WC; Mudde, GC

    2000-01-01

    The frequency of expression of the MHC class II antigen, HLA-DPw4, in the caucasoid population is approximately 78%, and is unmatched by phenotypic frequencies of other HLA class II molecules. Here we describe three human Der-P1-specific T-cell clones (TCC), restricted by the HLA-DPw4-variant HLA-DP

  5. Restriction of bacteriophage plaque formation in Streptomyces spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, K L; Baltz, R H

    1984-08-01

    Several Streptomyces species that produce restriction endonucleases were characterized for their ability to propagate 10 different broad host range bacteriophages. Each species displayed a different pattern of plaque formation. A restrictionless mutant of S. albus G allowed plaque formation by all 10 phages, whereas the wild-type strain showed plaques with only 2 phages. DNA isolated from three of the phages was analyzed for the presence of restriction sites for Streptomyces species-encoded enzymes, and a very strong correlation was established between the failure to form plaques on Streptomyces species that produced particular restriction enzymes and the presence of the corresponding restriction sites in the phage DNA. Also, the phages that lacked restriction sites in their DNA generally formed plaques on the corresponding restriction endonuclease-producing hosts at high efficiency. The DNAs from the three phages analyzed also generally contained either many or no restriction sites for the Streptomyces species-produced enzymes, suggesting a strong evolutionary trend to either eliminate all or tolerate many restriction sites. The data indicate that restriction plays a major role in host range determination for Streptomyces phages. Analysis of bacteriophage host ranges of many other uncharacterized Streptomyces hosts has identified four relatively nonrestricting hosts, at least two of which may be suitable hosts for gene cloning. The data also suggest that several restriction systems remain to be identified in the genus Streptomyces.

  6. Reduction of mitochondrial electron transport complex activity is restricted to the ischemic focus after transient focal cerebral ischemia in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas; Diemer, Nils Henrik

    2003-01-01

    Using histochemical methods offering high topographical resolution for evaluation of changes in the ischemic focus and the penumbra, the mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) complexes I, II, and IV were examined in rats subjected to 2 h of proximal occlusion of the middle cerebral artery...... in the ipsilateral cortex and caudate putamen were measured by densitometric image analysis. Reductions in complex I, II, and IV activity were restricted to areas in the ischemic foci in cortex and caudate putamen, which microscopically displayed signs of early morphological damage. In cortex, the tissue volume...

  7. Lung Injury Combined with Loss of Regulatory T Cells Leads to De Novo Lung-Restricted Autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Stephen; Fernandez, Ramiro; Subramanian, Vijay; Sun, Haiying; DeCamp, Malcolm M; Kreisel, Daniel; Perlman, Harris; Budinger, G R Scott; Mohanakumar, Thalachallour; Bharat, Ankit

    2016-07-01

    More than one third of patients with chronic lung disease undergoing lung transplantation have pre-existing Abs against lung-restricted self-Ags, collagen type V (ColV), and k-α1 tubulin (KAT). These Abs can also develop de novo after lung transplantation and mediate allograft rejection. However, the mechanisms leading to lung-restricted autoimmunity remain unknown. Because these self-Ags are normally sequestered, tissue injury is required to expose them to the immune system. We previously showed that respiratory viruses can induce apoptosis in CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs), the key mediators of self-tolerance. Therefore, we hypothesized that lung-tissue injury can lead to lung-restricted immunity if it occurs in a setting when Tregs are impaired. We found that human lung recipients who suffer respiratory viral infections experienced a decrease in peripheral Tregs. Pre-existing lung allograft injury from donor-directed Abs or gastroesophageal reflux led to new ColV and KAT Abs post respiratory viral infection. Similarly, murine parainfluenza (Sendai) respiratory viral infection caused a decrease in Tregs. Intratracheal instillation of anti-MHC class I Abs, but not isotype control, followed by murine Sendai virus infection led to development of Abs against ColV and KAT, but not collagen type II (ColII), a cartilaginous protein. This was associated with expansion of IFN-γ-producing CD4(+) T cells specific to ColV and KAT, but not ColII. Intratracheal anti-MHC class I Abs or hydrochloric acid in Foxp3-DTR mice induced ColV and KAT, but not ColII, immunity, only if Tregs were depleted using diphtheria toxin. We conclude that tissue injury combined with loss of Tregs can lead to lung-tissue-restricted immunity. PMID:27194786

  8. Pig kidney legumain: an asparaginyl endopeptidase with restricted specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dando, P M; Fortunato, M; Smith, L; Knight, C G; McKendrick, J E; Barrett, A J

    1999-01-01

    Legumain was recently discovered as a lysosomal endopeptidase in mammals [Chen, Dando, Rawlings, Brown, Young, Stevens, Hewitt, Watts and Barrett (1997) J. Biol. Chem. 272, 8090-8098], having been known previously only from plants and invertebrates. It has been shown to play a key role in processing of the C fragment of tetanus toxin for presentation by the MHC class-II system [Manoury, Hewitt, Morrice, Dando, Barrett and Watts (1998) Nature (London) 396, 695-699]. We examine here the specificity of the enzyme from pig kidney by use of protein, oligopeptide and synthetic arylamide substrates, all determinations being made at pH 5.8. In proteins, only about one in ten of the asparaginyl bonds were hydrolysed, and these were mostly predicted to be located at turns on the protein surface. Bonds that were not cleaved in tetanus toxin were cleaved when presented in oligopeptides, sometimes faster than an equivalent oligopeptide based on a bond that was cleaved in the protein. Legumain cleaved the bait region of rat alpha1-macroglobulin and was 'trapped' by the macroglobulin, as most other endopeptidases are, but did not interact with human alpha2-macroglobulin, which contains no asparagine residue in its bait region. Glycosylation of asparagine totally prevented hydrolysis by legumain. Specificity for arylamide substrates was evaluated with reference to benzyloxycarbonyl-Ala-Ala-Asn-aminomethylcoumarin, and the preference for the P3-position amino acid was Ala>Tyr(tertiary butyl)>Val>Pro>Phe=Tyr>Leu=Gly. There was no hydrolysis of substrate analogues containing mono- or di-N-methylasparagines, l-2-amino-3-ureidopropionic acid or citrulline in the P1 position. We conclude that mammalian legumain appears to be totally restricted to the hydrolysis of asparaginyl bonds in substrates of all kinds. There seem to be no strong preferences for particular amino acids in other subsites, and yet there are still unidentified factors that prevent hydrolysis of many asparaginyl bonds

  9. Calorie restriction and methionine restriction in control of endogenous hydrogen sulfide production by the transsulfuration pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hine, Christopher; Mitchell, James R

    2015-08-01

    H2S is a gas easily identified by its distinctive odor. Although environmental exposure to H2S has been viewed alternately as therapeutic or toxic through the centuries, H2S has recently regained recognition for its numerous beneficial biological effects. Most experiments documenting such benefits, including improved glucose tolerance, increased stress resistance, and even lifespan extension, are based on exposure of experimental organisms to exogenous sources of H2S. However, appreciation is growing for the importance of H2S produced endogenously by the evolutionary conserved transsulfuration pathway (TSP) in health and longevity. Recent data implicate H2S produced by the TSP in pleiotropic benefits of dietary restriction (DR), or reduced nutrient/energy intake without malnutrition. DR, best known as the most reliable way to extend lifespan in a wide range of experimental organisms, includes various regimens aimed at either reducing overall calorie intake (calorie restriction, intermittent/every-other-day fasting) or reducing particular nutrients such as protein or the essential amino acid, methionine (methionine restriction), with overlapping functional benefits on stress resistance, metabolic fitness and lifespan. Here we will review the small but growing body of literature linking the TSP to the functional benefits of DR in part through the production of endogenous H2S, with an emphasis on regulation of the TSP and H2S production by diet and mechanisms of beneficial H2S action.

  10. Calorie restriction and methionine restriction in control of endogenous hydrogen sulfide production by the transsulfuration pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hine, Christopher; Mitchell, James R

    2015-08-01

    H2S is a gas easily identified by its distinctive odor. Although environmental exposure to H2S has been viewed alternately as therapeutic or toxic through the centuries, H2S has recently regained recognition for its numerous beneficial biological effects. Most experiments documenting such benefits, including improved glucose tolerance, increased stress resistance, and even lifespan extension, are based on exposure of experimental organisms to exogenous sources of H2S. However, appreciation is growing for the importance of H2S produced endogenously by the evolutionary conserved transsulfuration pathway (TSP) in health and longevity. Recent data implicate H2S produced by the TSP in pleiotropic benefits of dietary restriction (DR), or reduced nutrient/energy intake without malnutrition. DR, best known as the most reliable way to extend lifespan in a wide range of experimental organisms, includes various regimens aimed at either reducing overall calorie intake (calorie restriction, intermittent/every-other-day fasting) or reducing particular nutrients such as protein or the essential amino acid, methionine (methionine restriction), with overlapping functional benefits on stress resistance, metabolic fitness and lifespan. Here we will review the small but growing body of literature linking the TSP to the functional benefits of DR in part through the production of endogenous H2S, with an emphasis on regulation of the TSP and H2S production by diet and mechanisms of beneficial H2S action. PMID:25523462

  11. Inner complexes of Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Zn(II), Cd(II), Be(II) and dioxouranium(VI) with salicylaldehyde semicarbazone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maurya, P.L.; Agarwala, B.V.; Dey, A.K. (Allahabad Univ. (India). Dept. of Chemistry)

    1980-08-01

    Salicylaldehyde semicarbazone (SALSC), yields complexes, ML/sub 2/.2H/sub 2/O (M = Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Zn(II) and Cd(II)) and ML/sub 2/ (M = Be(II) and UO/sub 2/(VI)). The complexes have been characterized by analytical, spectral, magnetic and thermogravimetric studies. SALSC acts as a singly negatively charged bidentate anion, and two such anions coordinate to the metal ion through the hydroxyl oxygen and nitrogen of the C = N group yielding a neutral chelate. The complexes of Co(II), Ni(II) and Cu(II) are paramagnetic with magnetic moment values 4.93, 3.35 and 1.98 BM, respectively. The magnetic and spectral data suggest octahedral geometry of Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Zn(II), Cd(II) and UO/sub 2/(VI) complexes, whereas the Be(II) complex is tetrahedral. TG study reveals the order of thermal stability as : Zn(II) approximately equal to Ni(II) >Be(II) approximately equal to Cd(II) > UO/sub 2/(VI) approximately equal to Co(II) approximately equal to Cu(II).

  12. Blood Flow Restricted Exercise and Vascular Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Horiuchi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available It is established that regular aerobic training improves vascular function, for example, endothelium-dependent vasodilatation and arterial stiffness or compliance and thereby constitutes a preventative measure against cardiovascular disease. In contrast, high-intensity resistance training impairs vascular function, while the influence of moderate-intensity resistance training on vascular function is still controversial. However, aerobic training is insufficient to inhibit loss in muscular strength with advancing age; thus, resistance training is recommended to prevent sarcopenia. Recently, several lines of study have provided compelling data showing that exercise and training with blood flow restriction (BFR leads to muscle hypertrophy and strength increase. As such, BFR training might be a novel means of overcoming the contradiction between aerobic and high-intensity resistance training. Although it is not enough evidence to obtain consensus about impact of BFR training on vascular function, available evidences suggested that BFR training did not change coagulation factors and arterial compliance though with inconsistence results in endothelial function. This paper is a review of the literature on the impact of BFR exercise and training on vascular function, such as endothelial function, arterial compliance, or other potential factors in comparison with those of aerobic and resistance training.

  13. Near BPS Skyrmions and Restricted Harmonic Maps

    CERN Document Server

    Speight, J M

    2014-01-01

    Motivated by a class of near BPS Skyrme models introduced by Adam, S\\'anchez-Guill\\'en and Wereszczy\\'nski, the following variant of the harmonic map problem is introduced: a map $\\phi:(M,g)\\rightarrow (N,h)$ between Riemannian manifolds is restricted harmonic (RH) if it locally extremizes $E_2$ on its $SDiff(M)$ orbit, where $SDiff(M)$ denotes the group of volume preserving diffeomorphisms of $(M,g)$, and $E_2$ denotes the Dirichlet energy. It is conjectured that near BPS skyrmions tend to RH maps in the BPS limit. It is shown that $\\phi$ is RH if and only if $\\phi^*h$ has exact divergence, and a linear stability theory of RH maps is developed, whence it follows that all weakly conformal maps, for example, are stable RH. Examples of RH maps in every degree class $R^3\\to SU(2)$ and $R^2\\to S^2$ are constructed. It is shown that the axially symmetric BPS skyrmions on which all previous analytic studies of near BPS Skyrme models have been based, are not RH, so each such field can be deformed along $SDiff(R^3)$ ...

  14. Methionine restriction beyond life-span extension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ables, Gene P; Hens, Julie R; Nichenametla, Sailendra N

    2016-01-01

    Dietary methionine restriction (MR) extends life span across species via various intracellular regulatory mechanisms. In rodents, MR induces resistance against adiposity, improves hepatic glucose metabolism, preserves cardiac function, and reduces body size, all of which can affect the onset of age-related diseases. Recent studies have shown that MR-affected biomarkers, such as fibroblast growth factor 21, adiponectin, leptin, cystathionine β synthase, and insulin-like growth factor 1, can potentially alter physiology. The beneficial effects of MR could be explained in part by its ability to reduce mitochondrial oxidative stress. Studies have revealed that MR can reduce reactive oxygen species that damage cells and promote cancer progression. It has been demonstrated that either MR or the targeting of specific genes in the methionine cycle could induce cell apoptosis while decreasing proliferation in several cancer models. The complete mechanism underlying the actions of MR on the cell cycle during cancer has not been fully elucidated. Epigenetic mechanisms, such as methylation and noncoding RNAs, are also possible downstream effectors of MR; future studies should help to elucidate some of these mechanisms. Despite evidence that changes in dietary methionine can affect epigenetics, it remains unknown whether epigenetics is a mechanism in MR. This review summarizes research on MR and its involvement in metabolism, cancer, and epigenetics.

  15. Second law of thermodynamics under control restrictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilming, H; Gallego, R; Eisert, J

    2016-04-01

    The second law of thermodynamics, formulated as an ultimate bound on the maximum extractable work, has been rigorously derived in multiple scenarios. However, the unavoidable limitations that emerge due to the lack of control on small systems are often disregarded when deriving such bounds, which is specifically important in the context of quantum thermodynamics. Here we study the maximum extractable work with limited control over the working system and its interaction with the heat bath. We derive a general second law when the set of accessible Hamiltonians of the working system is arbitrarily restricted. We then apply our bound to particular scenarios that are important in realistic implementations: limitations on the maximum energy gap and local control over many-body systems. We hence demonstrate in what precise way the lack of control affects the second law. In particular, contrary to the unrestricted case, we show that the optimal work extraction is not achieved by simple thermal contacts. Our results not only generalize the second law to scenarios of practical relevance, but also take first steps in the direction of local thermodynamics. PMID:27176273

  16. Maternal dietary restriction alters offspring's sleep homeostasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noriyuki Shimizu

    Full Text Available Nutritional state in the gestation period influences fetal growth and development. We hypothesized that undernutrition during gestation would affect offspring sleep architecture and/or homeostasis. Pregnant female mice were assigned to either control (fed ad libitum; AD or 50% dietary restriction (DR groups from gestation day 12 to parturition. After parturition, dams were fed AD chow. After weaning, the pups were also fed AD into adulthood. At adulthood (aged 8-9 weeks, we carried out sleep recordings. Although offspring mice displayed a significantly reduced body weight at birth, their weights recovered three days after birth. Enhancement of electroencephalogram (EEG slow wave activity (SWA during non-rapid eye movement (NREM sleep was observed in the DR mice over a 24-hour period without changing the diurnal pattern or amounts of wake, NREM, or rapid eye movement (REM sleep. In addition, DR mice also displayed an enhancement of EEG-SWA rebound after a 6-hour sleep deprivation and a higher threshold for waking in the face of external stimuli. DR adult offspring mice exhibited small but significant increases in the expression of hypothalamic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (Pparα and brain-specific carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (Cpt1c mRNA, two genes involved in lipid metabolism. Undernutrition during pregnancy may influence sleep homeostasis, with offspring exhibiting greater sleep pressure.

  17. Intrauterine Growth Restriction: Antenatal and Postnatal Aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Deepak; Shastri, Sweta; Sharma, Pradeep

    2016-01-01

    Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), a condition that occurs due to various reasons, is an important cause of fetal and neonatal morbidity and mortality. It has been defined as a rate of fetal growth that is less than normal in light of the growth potential of that specific infant. Usually, IUGR and small for gestational age (SGA) are used interchangeably in literature, even though there exist minute differences between them. SGA has been defined as having birth weight less than two standard deviations below the mean or less than the 10th percentile of a population-specific birth weight for specific gestational age. These infants have many acute neonatal problems that include perinatal asphyxia, hypothermia, hypoglycemia, and polycythemia. The likely long-term complications that are prone to develop when IUGR infants grow up includes growth retardation, major and subtle neurodevelopmental handicaps, and developmental origin of health and disease. In this review, we have covered various antenatal and postnatal aspects of IUGR. PMID:27441006

  18. Minkowski flux vacua of type II supergravities

    CERN Document Server

    Andriot, David; Van Riet, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    We study flux compactifications of 10d type II supergravities to 4d Minkowski space-time, supported by parallel orientifold Op-planes with 3 $\\leq$ p $\\leq$ 8. Upon few geometric restrictions, the 4d Ricci scalar can be written as a negative sum of squares involving BPS-like conditions. Setting all squares to zero provides automatically a solution to 10d equations of motion. This way, we characterise a broad class, if not the complete set, of Minkowski flux vacua. We also conjecture an extension to include non-geometric fluxes. None of our results rely on supersymmetry.

  19. What you should know about restrictive covenants in health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Michael G; Grosack, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, many states have shown a greater inclination to enforce restrictive covenant provisions in contracts involving healthcare organizations and their employees, physicians, or other contacting parties. In general, an enforceable restrictive covenant is one that is deemed to have been reasonably drafted to do no more than to protect the company's legitimate business interest. Key areas of concern in health care that often fall under the protection of restrictive covenants include patient referral sources and relationships with patients. PMID:23360060

  20. How restriction enzymes became the workhorses of molecular biology

    OpenAIRE

    Roberts, Richard J.

    2005-01-01

    Restriction enzymes have proved to be invaluable for the physical mapping of DNA. They offer unparalleled opportunities for diagnosing DNA sequence content and are used in fields as disparate as criminal forensics and basic research. In fact, without restriction enzymes, the biotechnology industry would certainly not have flourished as it has. The first experiments demonstrating the utility of restriction enzymes were carried out by Danna and Nathans and reported in 1971. This pioneering stud...

  1. Earth system multi-body restriction dynamics model research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Qingxian; BI Siwen; GONG Huili

    2006-01-01

    Research provides a theoretical basis for an Earth system multi-body mechanics model and its dynamics, including the Earth system multi-body restriction function and its power, Earth system multi-body restriction under decreasing generalized velocity and decreasing partial palstance, the Earth system multi-body decreasing generalized force, a moving mechanics function, and the Earth system multi-body restriction's wattful and wattless forces.

  2. Health promotion by dietary restriction--a focus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramkumar, K M

    2006-01-01

    Food restriction, although long popular among gerontologists, has emerged as a new challenge in public health in postindustrial societies because this is the only intervention that repeatedly and strikingly increases maximum life span. The practice of food restriction is widespread for cosmetic, health, and economic reasons. The beneficial effects and the molecular mechanism of food restriction have been well established. The present review summarizes the rapidly accumulating evidence on the involvement of food restriction in various diseases and focuses on good dietary practices for health promotion in modern life style. PMID:16910315

  3. The water-water cycle in leaves is not a major alternative electron sink for dissipation of excess excitation energy when CO2 assimilation is restricted

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driever, S.M.; Baker, N.R.

    2011-01-01

    Electron flux from water via photosystem II (PSII) and PSI to oxygen (water–water cycle) may provide a mechanism for dissipation of excess excitation energy in leaves when CO2 assimilation is restricted. Mass spectrometry was used to measure O2 uptake and evolution together with CO2 uptake in leaves

  4. Restriction enzymes do not play a significant role in Haemophilus homospecific or heterospecific transformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuy, J.H.

    1976-10-01

    Competent Haemophilus influenzae Rd recipients, either as phage HP1 restricting (r/sup +/) or nonrestricting (r/sup -/) nonlysogens or defective lysogens, were exposed to deoxyribonucleic acids from various wild-type phage HP1 lysogenic H. influenzae serotype strains (non-encapsulated derivatives of serotypes a, b, c, d, and e), to DNA from lysogenic Haemophilus parahaemolyticus, and to DNA from modified and nonmodified phage HP1. Transformation of antibiotic resistance markers and of prophage markers in homospecific crosses were observed to be unaffected by the recipient restriction phenotype, whereas the transfection response was much reduced in r/sup +/ recipients. Heterospecific transformation of prophage markers was reduced by only 80 to 90 percent, whereas antibiotic resistance marker tranformation was 1,000 to 10,000 times lower. Heterospecific transfection was at least 100 times lower than the homospecific transfection in both r/sup +/ and r/sup -/ recipients. The general conclusion is that neither class I nor class II restriction enzymes affect significantly the transformation efficiency in homospecific and heterospecific crosses. The efficiency of heterospecific transformation may depend mainly on the deoxyribonucleic acid homology in the genetic marker region.

  5. Restriction-Modification systems interplay causes avoidance of GATC site in prokaryotic genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ershova, Anna; Rusinov, Ivan; Vasiliev, Mikhail; Spirin, Sergey; Karyagina, Anna

    2016-04-01

    Palindromes are frequently underrepresented in prokaryotic genomes. Palindromic 5[Formula: see text]-GATC-3[Formula: see text] site is a recognition site of different Restriction-Modification (R-M) systems, as well as solitary methyltransferase Dam. Classical GATC-specific R-M systems methylate GATC and cleave unmethylated GATC. On the contrary, methyl-directed Type II restriction endonucleases cleave methylated GATC. Methylation of GATC by Dam methyltransferase is involved in the regulation of different cellular processes. The diversity of functions of GATC-recognizing proteins makes GATC sequence a good model for studying the reasons of palindrome avoidance in prokaryotic genomes. In this work, the influence of R-M systems and solitary proteins on the GATC site avoidance is described by a mathematical model. GATC avoidance is strongly associated with the presence of alternate (methyl-directed or classical Type II R-M system) genes in different strains of the same species, as we have shown for Streptococcus pneumoniae, Neisseria meningitidis, Eubacterium rectale, and Moraxella catarrhalis. We hypothesize that GATC avoidance can result from a DNA exchange between strains with different methylation status of GATC site within the process of natural transformation. If this hypothesis is correct, the GATC avoidance is a sign of a DNA exchange between bacteria with different methylation status in a mixed population.

  6. Comparison of a Restricted and Unrestricted Vegan Diet Plan with a Restricted Omnivorous Diet Plan on Health-Specific Measures

    OpenAIRE

    Bloomer, Richard J; Gunnels, Trint A; JohnHenry M. Schriefer

    2015-01-01

    Background: We have previously noted beneficial health outcomes when individuals follow a dietary restriction plan in accordance with the Daniel Fast (DF). This is true whether individuals eliminate all animal products or include small amounts of meat and dairy in their plan. The present study sought to compare anthropometric and biochemical measures of health in individuals following a traditional DF (i.e., restricted vegan) or modified DF (i.e., restricted omnivorous; inclusive of ad libitu...

  7. Detection of disease-specific restriction fragment length polymorphisms in pemphigus vulgaris linked to the DQwl and DQw3 alleles of the HLA-D region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pemphigus vulgaris in Israeli Ashkenazi and non-Ashkenazi Jews and in Austrian non-Jewish patients is strongly associated with the DR4 and DRw6 alleles of the HLA-D region class II genes. Restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis was undertaken with DQβ, DQα, and DRβ cDNA probes. Hybridization with the DQβ probe identifies Pvu II, BamHI, and EcoRV fragments that absolutely discriminate pemphigus vulgaris patients from healthy DR-, DQ-, and ethnic-matched controls. In contrast the DQα and DRβ probes failed to identify disease-specific restriction fragment length polymorphism fragments. These studies indicate that DQw1 and DQw3 polymorphisms carried by pemphigus vulgaris patients may be directly involved in predisposition to the disease or may be tightly linked to the susceptibility gene itself. To our knowledge, this is the first example of an HLA restriction fragment length polymorphism that is highly associated with susceptibility to autoimmune disease

  8. Spectrophotometric study of Co(II, Ni(II, Cu(II, Zn(II, Pd(II and Hg(II complexes with isatin- β-thiosemicarbazone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SANDRA S. KONSTANTINOVIC

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The composition and stability of the complexes of isatin-b-thiosemicarba­zone with Co(II, Ni(II, Cu(II, Zn(II, Pd(II and Hg(II have been investigated us­ing spectrophotometric method at 30 °C and constant ionic strength of 0.1 mol dm-3 (KNO3 in 70 % ethanol. Experimental results indicate the formation of MeL and MeL2 complexes for Ni(II and Co(II, and MeL for Cu(II, Zn(II, Pd(II and Hg(II complexes, whose stability constants, bn, have been calculated using a com­puteri­zed iterative method of successive approximation.

  9. Acute Psychophysiological Relationships Between Mood, Inflammatory and Cortisol Changes in Response to Simulated Physical Firefighting Work and Sleep Restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolkow, Alexander; Aisbett, Brad; Reynolds, John; Ferguson, Sally A; Main, Luana C

    2016-06-01

    This study examined how changes in wildland firefighters' mood relate to cytokine and cortisol levels in response to simulated physical firefighting work and sleep restriction. Firefighters completed 3 days of simulated wildfire suppression work separated by an 8-h (control condition; n = 18) or 4-h sleep opportunity (sleep restriction condition; n = 17) each night. Firefighters' mood was assessed daily using the Mood Scale II and Samn-Perelli fatigue scale. Participants also provided samples for the determination of salivary cortisol and pro- (IL-6, IL-8, IL-1β, TNF-α) and anti-inflammatory (IL-4, IL-10) cytokine levels. An increase in the positive mood dimension Happiness was related to a rise in IL-8 and TNF-α in the sleep restriction condition. A rise in the positive mood dimension Activation among sleep restricted firefighters was also related to higher IL-6 levels. An increase in the negative mood dimension Fatigue in the sleep restriction condition was associated with increased IL-6, TNF-α, IL-10 and cortisol levels. In addition, an increase in Fear among sleep restricted firefighters was associated with a rise in TNF-α. Elevated positive mood and immune activation may reflect an appropriate response by the firefighters to these stressors. To further understand this relationship, subsequent firefighting-based research is needed that investigates whether immune changes are a function of affective arousal linked to the expression of positive moods. Positive associations between negative mood and inflammatory and cortisol levels to physical work and restricted sleep provide useful information to fire agencies about subjective fire-ground indicators of physiological changes.

  10. Acute Psychophysiological Relationships Between Mood, Inflammatory and Cortisol Changes in Response to Simulated Physical Firefighting Work and Sleep Restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolkow, Alexander; Aisbett, Brad; Reynolds, John; Ferguson, Sally A; Main, Luana C

    2016-06-01

    This study examined how changes in wildland firefighters' mood relate to cytokine and cortisol levels in response to simulated physical firefighting work and sleep restriction. Firefighters completed 3 days of simulated wildfire suppression work separated by an 8-h (control condition; n = 18) or 4-h sleep opportunity (sleep restriction condition; n = 17) each night. Firefighters' mood was assessed daily using the Mood Scale II and Samn-Perelli fatigue scale. Participants also provided samples for the determination of salivary cortisol and pro- (IL-6, IL-8, IL-1β, TNF-α) and anti-inflammatory (IL-4, IL-10) cytokine levels. An increase in the positive mood dimension Happiness was related to a rise in IL-8 and TNF-α in the sleep restriction condition. A rise in the positive mood dimension Activation among sleep restricted firefighters was also related to higher IL-6 levels. An increase in the negative mood dimension Fatigue in the sleep restriction condition was associated with increased IL-6, TNF-α, IL-10 and cortisol levels. In addition, an increase in Fear among sleep restricted firefighters was associated with a rise in TNF-α. Elevated positive mood and immune activation may reflect an appropriate response by the firefighters to these stressors. To further understand this relationship, subsequent firefighting-based research is needed that investigates whether immune changes are a function of affective arousal linked to the expression of positive moods. Positive associations between negative mood and inflammatory and cortisol levels to physical work and restricted sleep provide useful information to fire agencies about subjective fire-ground indicators of physiological changes. PMID:26698865

  11. Energy restriction during childhood and early adulthood and ovarian cancer risk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leo J Schouten

    Full Text Available Dietary energy restriction may protect against cancer. In parts of The Netherlands, mostly in larger cities, periods of chronically impaired nutrition and even severe famine (Hunger Winter 1944-1945 existed during the 1930s and World War II (1940-1945. We studied the association between energy restriction during childhood and early adulthood on the risk of ovarian cancer later in life. In 1986, the Netherlands Cohort Study was initiated. A self-administered questionnaire on dietary habits and other cancer risk factors was completed by 62,573 women aged 55-69 years at baseline. Follow-up for cancer was established by record linkage to the Netherlands Cancer Registry. After 16.3 years of follow-up, 364 invasive epithelial ovarian cancer cases and 2220 subcohort members (sampled from the total cohort directly after baseline with complete information confounders were available for case-cohort analyses. In multivariable analysis, ovarian cancer risk was lower for participants with an unemployed father during the 1930s (Hazard Ratio (HR, 0.70; 95% Confidence Interval (CI, 0.47-1.06 compared to participants with an employed father as well as for participants living in a city during World War II (HR, 0.69; 95% CI, 0.54-0.90 compared to participants living in the country-side. Residence in a Western City during the famine (Hunger Winter was not associated with a decreased risk. Our results show a relation between proxy variables for modest energy restriction over a longer period of time during childhood or early adulthood and a reduced ovarian cancer risk.

  12. 7 CFR 331.13 - Restricted experiments. 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Restricted experiments. 5 331.13 Section 331.13... Restricted experiments. 5 5 For guidance, see the NIH publication, “NIH Guidelines for Research Involving.../ag_selectagent/index.html. (a) An individual or entity may not conduct the following...

  13. The challenge of cost restrictions in smile design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feigenbaum, N

    1991-09-01

    This article demonstrates a method for smile enhancement involving the familiar "gummy" smile as well as irregular incisor gingival emergence levels. In this case study, financial considerations limited a comprehensive restorative treatment plan, restricting changes to several anterior teeth. Despite the restrictions, a solution was found.

  14. 29 CFR 530.2 - Restriction of homework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Restriction of homework. 530.2 Section 530.2 Labor... OF HOMEWORKERS IN CERTAIN INDUSTRIES General § 530.2 Restriction of homework. Except as provided in... special homework certificate issued and in effect pursuant to this part has been obtained for...

  15. 48 CFR 1403.570 - Restrictions on contractor advertising.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Restrictions on contractor advertising. 1403.570 Section 1403.570 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR... 1403.570 Restrictions on contractor advertising....

  16. 32 CFR 516.5 - Restriction on contact with DOJ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Restriction on contact with DOJ. 516.5 Section 516.5 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY AID OF CIVIL AUTHORITIES AND PUBLIC RELATIONS LITIGATION General § 516.5 Restriction on contact with DOJ. (a) General...

  17. 34 CFR 76.566 - Fixed costs-restricted rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fixed costs-restricted rate. 76.566 Section 76.566 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education STATE-ADMINISTERED PROGRAMS What Conditions Must Be Met by the State and Its Subgrantees? Indirect Cost Rates § 76.566 Fixed costs—restricted rate....

  18. Reduced Automatic Motivational Orientation Towards Food in Restricting Anorexia Nervosa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veenstra, Esther M.; de Jong, Peter J.

    2011-01-01

    A striking and characteristic feature of the restricting subtype of anorexia nervosa (AN) is that they are extremely successful in regulating their food intake in a destructive manner. A possible explanation for the persistent character of their restricted food intake could be a loss of the motivati

  19. Reverse triple I method of restriction for fuzzy reasoning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A theory of reverse triple I method of restriction for implication operator R0 is proposed.And the general computation formulas of infimum for fuzzy modus ponens and supremum for fuzzy modus tollens of a-reverse triple I method of restriction are obtained respectively.

  20. 7 CFR 319.75-2 - Restricted articles. 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... other provisions of 7 CFR part 319. For example, fresh whole chilies (Capsicum spp.) and fresh whole red... be subject to additional restrictions under the provisions in 7 CFR 319.8 et seq. (6) Used jute or... 7 Agriculture 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Restricted articles. 1 319.75-2 Section...

  1. 40 CFR 152.175 - Pesticides classified for restricted use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pesticides classified for restricted...) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS PESTICIDE REGISTRATION AND CLASSIFICATION PROCEDURES Classification of Pesticides § 152.175 Pesticides classified for restricted use. The following uses of pesticide products containing...

  2. Consequences of intrauterine growth restriction for the kidney

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.F. Schreuder; A. van Wijk (Ans); H.A. Delemarre-van de Waal (Henriette)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractLow birth weight due to intrauterine growth restriction is associated with various diseases in adulthood, such as hypertension, cardiovascular disease, insulin resistance and end-stage renal disease. The purpose of this review is to describe the effects of intrauterine growth restriction

  3. Effect of feed restriction on performance of growing rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cristina de Oliveira

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This experiment assessed the effect of feed restriction in rabbits on performance and economic viability of the activity. Sixty New Zealand White rabbits, weaned at 33 days and slaughtered at 81 days of age, were used. The design was of randomized blocks with four treatments and five replications. The treatments were, as follows: 1 - free feeding, 2 - feed restriction from 35 to 40 days of age (50 g/d/rabbit, 3 - feed restriction from 54 to 61 days of age (90 g/d/rabbit and 4 - feed restriction from 33 to 40 days (50 g/d/rabbit and from 54 to 61 days of age (90 g/d/rabbit. There was no difference in the performance and carcass parameters, indicating that there was compensatory growth in the rabbits that suffered feed restriction. The best gross margin was obtained with feed restriction from 54 to 61 days age. Feed restriction in growing rabbits can be adopted at different ages because it does not interfere negatively in the performance and carcass parameters. In two periods and from 51 to 61 days, feed restriction was more economically viable for the sale of live and slaughtered rabbits, respectively.

  4. 7 CFR 800.76 - Prohibited services; restricted services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Prohibited services; restricted services. 800.76..., PACKERS AND STOCKYARD ADMINISTRATION (FEDERAL GRAIN INSPECTION SERVICE), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE GENERAL REGULATIONS Kinds of Official Services § 800.76 Prohibited services; restricted services. (a)...

  5. On some Frobenius Restriction Theorems for Semistable Sheaves

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V B Mehta; V Trivedi

    2009-02-01

    We prove a version of an effective Frobenius restriction theorem for semistable bundles in characteristic . The main novelty is in restricting the bundle to the -fold thickening of a hypersurface section. The base variety is /, an abelian variety or a smooth projective toric variety.

  6. 30 CFR 57.4461 - Gasoline use restrictions underground.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Gasoline use restrictions underground. 57.4461... Prevention and Control Flammable and Combustible Liquids and Gases § 57.4461 Gasoline use restrictions underground. If gasoline is used underground to power internal combustion engines— (a) The mine shall...

  7. 32 CFR 538.3 - Restrictions on possession and use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Restrictions on possession and use. 538.3 Section... MILITARY PAYMENT CERTIFICATES § 538.3 Restrictions on possession and use. (a) Possession or use prohibited. Possession or use of military payment certificates is prohibited unless acquired in accordance with §§...

  8. 50 CFR 648.235 - Possession and landing restrictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Possession and landing restrictions. 648... Measures for the Spiny Dogfish Fishery § 648.235 Possession and landing restrictions. (a) Quota Period 1... calendar day. (c) Regulations governing the harvest, possession, landing, purchase, and sale of shark...

  9. 32 CFR 1903.16 - Restriction on animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Restriction on animals. 1903.16 Section 1903.16... AGENCY INSTALLATIONS § 1903.16 Restriction on animals. Animals, except for those animals used for the assistance of persons with disabilities, or animals under the charge and control of the Central...

  10. 32 CFR 234.12 - Restriction on animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Restriction on animals. 234.12 Section 234.12 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS CONDUCT ON THE PENTAGON RESERVATION § 234.12 Restriction on animals. Animals, except guide...

  11. 32 CFR 228.15 - Restriction regarding animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Restriction regarding animals. 228.15 Section 228.15 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS SECURITY PROTECTIVE FORCE § 228.15 Restriction regarding animals. No animals...

  12. Acute sleep restriction reduces insulin sensitivity in adolescent boys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klingenberg, Lars; Chaput, Jean-Philippe; Holmbäck, Ulf;

    2013-01-01

    Short sleep duration has been linked to impaired glucose metabolism in many experimental studies. Moreover, studies have reported indications of an increased metabolic stress following sleep restriction.......Short sleep duration has been linked to impaired glucose metabolism in many experimental studies. Moreover, studies have reported indications of an increased metabolic stress following sleep restriction....

  13. 24 CFR 2004.26 - Restrictions that apply to testimony.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Restrictions that apply to testimony. 2004.26 Section 2004.26 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban... Production of Documents § 2004.26 Restrictions that apply to testimony. (a) The Counsel may impose...

  14. 75 FR 61612 - Airports/Locations: Special Operating Restrictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-06

    ... ellen.crum@faa.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Background On November 30, 1999 (64 FR 66768), the FAA... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 91 Airports/Locations: Special Operating Restrictions AGENCY... amending its airports and locations special operating restrictions regulation to clarify a...

  15. Restriction endonuclease analysis and mapping of the genomes of granulosis viruses isolated from Xestia c-nigrum and five other noctuid species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, C; Minobe, Y; Iizuka, T

    1992-06-01

    Restriction endonuclease analysis was performed on the genomic DNA of granulosis viruses isolated from noctuid species of six genera: Xestia c-nigrum, Autographa gamma, Hydraecia amurensis, Celaena leucostigma, Aletia pallens and Pseudaletia separata. All of the isolates gave very similar restriction endonuclease profiles with only minor variations. An isolate obtained from X. c-nigrum was chosen as the reference genotype, and a genomic library was constructed for this isolate using plasmid vectors. The genome was mapped using EcoRI, BamHI and BglII, and Southern hybridization; the size of the genome was estimated to be 179 kbp. Hybridization of labelled clones to fragments of other isolates revealed that genotypic variation among isolates resulted from changes in restriction sites, and from deletion or insertion of DNA. Comparative restriction mapping revealed that all of the isolates were variants of one virus, even though they originated from different host species. PMID:1607867

  16. Recommendations of activity restriction in high-risk pregnancy scenarios

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendix, Jane; Hegaard, Hanne Kristine; Bergholt, Thomas;

    2015-01-01

    and the Danish Association of Midwives were asked to complete a tested, structured questionnaire. Results: We sent 1815 invitations; the overall response rate was 54%. A majority of clinicians recommended some form of activity restriction in the nine scenarios. The midwives recommended strict or moderate...... to the obstetricians, the midwives also reported that they expected the recommendation to be more effective. Most midwives and obstetricians reported that they thought strict activity restriction was associated with severe or moderate adverse effect, and recommended antithrombotic prophylaxis. Conclusions: Danish...... obstetricians and midwives prescribe activity restriction in most high-risk pregnancies. The degree of activity restriction and the presumed effect vary between clinicians. This may reflect different attitudes and lack of guidelines based on clinical studies of a possible benefit of activity restriction....

  17. Access to Minerals: WTO Export Restrictions and Climate Change Considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Switzer

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In the past few years, the Chinese government opted to restrict the export of selected minerals on environmental and health grounds, subsequently leading to an uproar in countries and regions that rely heavily on imports from China to develop their renewable industry sector. This paper places the focus on the law and policy of the Chinese export restrictions of critical minerals, and its implications for the global renewables energy industry. The paper critically assesses how such export restrictions have been dealt with under the dispute settlement system of the World Trade Organisation (WTO. Drawing on this WTO jurisprudence, we posit that litigation on export restrictions of the kind imposed by China poses a threat to the legitimacy of the WTO. We therefore conclude by exploring whether there are any alternatives to litigation as a means to deal with countries choosing to impose mineral export restrictions.

  18. Quadratic Loss of Isotonic Normal Means Under Simultaneous Order Restrictions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马艳萍; 史宁中

    2002-01-01

    For two normal populations with unknown means μ and unknown variances σ2,assume that there are simple order restrictions among the means and variances:μ1≤μ2 and σ12≥σ22>0,This case is said to be simultaneous order restriction by Shi (Maximum likelihood estimation of means and variances from normal populations under simultaneous order restrictions.J.Multivariate,Anal.50(1994),282-293.)and an iterative algorithm of computing the order restricted maximum likelihood estimates of μi and σi2 was given in that paper,This paper shows that the restricted maximum likelihood estimate of μi has smaller mean square loss than the usual estimate xi under some conditions.

  19. Constructing Restricted Patterson Measures for Geometrically Infinite Kleinian Groups

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kurt FALK; Bernd O. STRATMANN

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we study exhaustions, referred to as ρ-restrictions, of arbitrary nonelementary Kleinian groups with at most finitely many bounded parabolic elements. Special emphasis is put on the geometrically infinite case, where we obtain that the limit set of each of these Kleinian groups contains an infinite family of closed subsets, referred to as ρ-restricted limit sets, such that there in this family. Generalizing concepts which are well known in the geometrically finite case, we then introduce the notion of ρ-restricted Patterson measure, and show that these measures are non-atomic,δρ-harmonic, δρ-subconformal on special sets and δρ-conformal on very special sets. Furthermore, we obtain the results that each ρ-restriction of our Kleinian group is of δρ-divergence type and that the Hausdorff dimension of the ρ-restricted limit set is equal to δρ.

  20. Sequestration of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF Induces Late Restrictive Lung Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minna M Wieck

    Full Text Available Neonatal respiratory distress syndrome is a restrictive lung disease characterized by surfactant deficiency. Decreased vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, which demonstrates important roles in angiogenesis and vasculogenesis, has been implicated in the pathogenesis of restrictive lung diseases. Current animal models investigating VEGF in the etiology and outcomes of RDS require premature delivery, hypoxia, anatomically or temporally limited inhibition, or other supplemental interventions. Consequently, little is known about the isolated effects of chronic VEGF inhibition, started at birth, on subsequent developing lung structure and function.To determine whether inducible, mesenchyme-specific VEGF inhibition in the neonatal mouse lung results in long-term modulation of AECII and whole lung function.Triple transgenic mice expressing the soluble VEGF receptor sFlt-1 specifically in the mesenchyme (Dermo-1/rtTA/sFlt-1 were generated and compared to littermate controls at 3 months to determine the impact of neonatal downregulation of mesenchymal VEGF expression on lung structure, cell composition and function. Reduced tissue VEGF bioavailability has previously been demonstrated with this model.Triple transgenic mice demonstrated restrictive lung pathology. No differences in gross vascular development or protein levels of vascular endothelial markers was noted, but there was a significant decrease in perivascular smooth muscle and type I collagen. Mutants had decreased expression levels of surfactant protein C and hypoxia inducible factor 1-alpha without a difference in number of type II pneumocytes.These data show that mesenchyme-specific inhibition of VEGF in neonatal mice results in late restrictive disease, making this transgenic mouse a novel model for future investigations on the consequences of neonatal RDS and potential interventions.

  1. Quininium tetrachloridozinc(II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Zhuang Chen

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The asymmetric unit of the title compound {systematic name: 2-[hydroxy(6-methoxyquinolin-1-ium-4-ylmethyl]-8-vinylquinuclidin-1-ium tetrachloridozinc(II}, (C20H26N2O2[ZnCl4], consists of a double protonated quininium cation and a tetrachloridozinc(II anion. The ZnII ion is in a slightly distorted tetrahedral coordination environment. The crystal structure is stabilized by intermolecular N—H...Cl and O—H...Cl hydrogen bonds.

  2. Hydrosol II Project; El Proyecto Hydrosol II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez Martinez, A.

    2008-07-01

    At present energy production is based on the combustion of fossil fuels and is the main cause of greenhouse gas emissions, which is to say it is the main cause of the climate change that is affecting the planet. On a worldwide scale, the use of solar concentration systems with systems capable of dissociating water is considered, from both an energy and an economic standpoint, as the most important long-term goal in the production of solar fuels to reduce the costs of hydrogen and to ensure practically zero carbon dioxide emissions. The Hydrosol II project has the largest pilot plant of its kind, and the Hydrosol II reactors will be capable of breaking up the water molecule on the basis of thermochemical cycles at moderate temperatures. The Hydrosol II project pilot plant is now a reality, located in the SSPS heliostats field of the Almeria Solar Platform. (Author)

  3. MHC class II molecules regulate growth in human T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, M; Odum, Niels; Bendtzen, K;

    1994-01-01

    modulate several T cell responses. Here, we studied further the role of class II molecules in the regulation of T cell growth. Costimulation of class II molecules by immobilized HLA-DR mAb significantly enhanced interleukin (IL)-2-supported T cell growth of the majority of CD4+, CD45RAlow, ROhigh T cell......-like) as well as T cells producing both cytokines (THO-like) responded to class II mAb. The costimulatory effect was not restricted to IL-2-driven T cell growth, since TCR/CD3-induced T cell activation was also enhanced by HLA-DR mAb. Moreover, class II costimulation potentiated CD28-mAb-induced T cell...

  4. Type II universal spacetimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hervik, S.; Málek, T.; Pravda, V.; Pravdová, A.

    2015-12-01

    We study type II universal metrics of the Lorentzian signature. These metrics simultaneously solve vacuum field equations of all theories of gravitation with the Lagrangian being a polynomial curvature invariant constructed from the metric, the Riemann tensor and its covariant derivatives of an arbitrary order. We provide examples of type II universal metrics for all composite number dimensions. On the other hand, we have no examples for prime number dimensions and we prove the non-existence of type II universal spacetimes in five dimensions. We also present type II vacuum solutions of selected classes of gravitational theories, such as Lovelock, quadratic and L({{Riemann}}) gravities.

  5. Burkina Faso - BRIGHT II

    Data.gov (United States)

    Millenium Challenge Corporation — Millennium Challenge Corporation hired Mathematica Policy Research to conduct an independent evaluation of the BRIGHT II program. The three main research questions...

  6. Bis(thiosemicarbazonato) chelates of Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Pd(II) and Pt(II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Sulekh; Singh, R.

    1985-01-01

    Bis chelates of Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Pd(II) and Pt(II) with the enolic form of diethyl ketone and methyl n-propyl thiosemicarbazones were synthesized and characterized by elemental analyses, magnetic moments, i.r. and electronic and electron spin resonance spectral studies. All the complexes were found to have the composition ML 2 [where M = Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Pd(ii) and Pt(II) and L = thiosemicarbazones of diethyl ketone and methyl n-propyl ketone]. Co(II) and Cu(II) complexes are paramagnetic and may have polymeric six-coordinate octahedral and square planar geometries, respectively. The Ni(II), Pd(II) and Pt(II) complexes are diamagnetic and may have square planar geometries. Pyridine adducts (ML 2·2Py) of Ni(II) and Cu(II) complexes were also prepared and characterized.

  7. Economy of typical food: technical restrictions and organizative challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Viganò

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The economic analysis of typical agri-food products requires to be focused on the following issues: i the specific features of the offering system; ii the technical restrictions established by the EU regulations on Protected designation of origin (Pdo and Pgi and, iii the strategies aimed at product differentiation and for value creation for the consumer. Considering this latest aspect, it is important to notice that the specificity of the agricultural raw materials, the use of traditional production techniques of production coming from the tradition of the place and certification represent only a prerequisite for the differentiation of the product on the market against standard products. The problem is that the specificity of local product comes from attributes (tangible and intangible of quality which are not directly accessible, nor verifiable, by the consumer when he/she makes purchasing choices. This situation persists despite the greater propensity of modern consumer to make investments in information and his/her greater attention and larger background towards the acknowledgement of different offers based on quality. This paper tends to develop an analysis on a theoretical and operative basis upon open strategies that can be implemented at the enterprise level, and that of agro-food chain and of territorial system in order to promote the quality of products to consumers. In particular, the work addresses the problems connected to the establishment of competitive advantages for Protected Designation of Origin (Pdo and Protected Geographical Indication (Pgi, highlighting that in order to achieve those advantages, firms offering typical products need to differentiate their offering on both material and immaterial ground acting on intrinsic and extrinsic attributes of quality of products, on specific features (natural, historical, cultural, etc. of territorial, on the efficiency of the offering organizational structure, and finally on the

  8. Economy of typical food: technical restrictions and organizative challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Viganò

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The economic analysis of typical agri-food products requires to be focused on the following issues: i the specific features of the offering system; ii the technical restrictions established by the EU regulations on Protected designation of origin (Pdo and Pgi and, iii the strategies aimed at product differentiation and for value creation for the consumer. Considering this latest aspect, it is important to notice that the specificity of the agricultural raw materials, the use of traditional production techniques of production coming from the tradition of the place and certification represent only a prerequisite for the differentiation of the product on the market against standard products. The problem is that the specificity of local product comes from attributes (tangible and intangible of quality which are not directly accessible, nor verifiable, by the consumer when he/she makes purchasing choices. This situation persists despite the greater propensity of modern consumer to make investments in information and his/her greater attention and larger background towards the acknowledgement of different offers based on quality. This paper tends to develop an analysis on a theoretical and operative basis upon open strategies that can be implemented at the enterprise level, and that of agro-food chain and of territorial system in order to promote the quality of products to consumers. In particular, the work addresses the problems connected to the establishment of competitive advantages for Protected Designation of Origin (Pdo and Protected Geographical Indication (Pgi, highlighting that in order to achieve those advantages, firms offering typical products need to differentiate their offering on both material and immaterial ground acting on intrinsic and extrinsic attributes of quality of products, on specific features (natural, historical, cultural, etc. of territorial, on the efficiency of the offering organizational structure, and finally on the

  9. Effect of dietary protein restriction on renal ammonia metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyun-Wook; Osis, Gunars; Handlogten, Mary E; Guo, Hui; Verlander, Jill W; Weiner, I David

    2015-06-15

    Dietary protein restriction has multiple benefits in kidney disease. Because protein intake is a major determinant of endogenous acid production, it is important that net acid excretion change in parallel during protein restriction. Ammonia is the primary component of net acid excretion, and inappropriate ammonia excretion can lead to negative nitrogen balance. Accordingly, we examined ammonia excretion in response to protein restriction and then we determined the molecular mechanism of the changes observed. Wild-type C57Bl/6 mice fed a 20% protein diet and then changed to 6% protein developed an 85% reduction in ammonia excretion within 2 days, which persisted during a 10-day study. The expression of multiple proteins involved in renal ammonia metabolism was altered, including the ammonia-generating enzymes phosphate-dependent glutaminase (PDG) and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and the ammonia-metabolizing enzyme glutamine synthetase. Rhbg, an ammonia transporter, increased in expression in the inner stripe of outer medullary collecting duct intercalated cell (OMCDis-IC). However, collecting duct-specific Rhbg deletion did not alter the response to protein restriction. Rhcg deletion did not alter ammonia excretion in response to dietary protein restriction. These results indicate 1) dietary protein restriction decreases renal ammonia excretion through coordinated regulation of multiple components of ammonia metabolism; 2) increased Rhbg expression in the OMCDis-IC may indicate a biological role in addition to ammonia transport; and 3) Rhcg expression is not necessary to decrease ammonia excretion during dietary protein restriction. PMID:25925252

  10. Controlling pandemic flu: the value of international air travel restrictions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua M Epstein

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Planning for a possible influenza pandemic is an extremely high priority, as social and economic effects of an unmitigated pandemic would be devastating. Mathematical models can be used to explore different scenarios and provide insight into potential costs, benefits, and effectiveness of prevention and control strategies under consideration. METHODS AND FINDINGS: A stochastic, equation-based epidemic model is used to study global transmission of pandemic flu, including the effects of travel restrictions and vaccination. Economic costs of intervention are also considered. The distribution of First Passage Times (FPT to the United States and the numbers of infected persons in metropolitan areas worldwide are studied assuming various times and locations of the initial outbreak. International air travel restrictions alone provide a small delay in FPT to the U.S. When other containment measures are applied at the source in conjunction with travel restrictions, delays could be much longer. If in addition, control measures are instituted worldwide, there is a significant reduction in cases worldwide and specifically in the U.S. However, if travel restrictions are not combined with other measures, local epidemic severity may increase, because restriction-induced delays can push local outbreaks into high epidemic season. The per annum cost to the U.S. economy of international and major domestic air passenger travel restrictions is minimal: on the order of 0.8% of Gross National Product. CONCLUSIONS: International air travel restrictions may provide a small but important delay in the spread of a pandemic, especially if other disease control measures are implemented during the afforded time. However, if other measures are not instituted, delays may worsen regional epidemics by pushing the outbreak into high epidemic season. This important interaction between policy and seasonality is only evident with a global-scale model. Since the benefit of

  11. World War II Homefront.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Rachel

    2002-01-01

    Presents an annotated bibliography that provides Web sites focusing on the U.S. homefront during World War II. Covers various topics such as the homefront, Japanese Americans, women during World War II, posters, and African Americans. Includes lesson plan sources and a list of additional resources. (CMK)

  12. An Additive-Multiplicative Restricted Mean Residual Life Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mansourvar, Zahra; Martinussen, Torben; Scheike, Thomas H.

    2016-01-01

    The mean residual life measures the expected remaining life of a subject who has survived up to a particular time. When survival time distribution is highly skewed or heavy tailed, the restricted mean residual life must be considered. In this paper, we propose an additive-multiplicative restricted...... mean residual life model to study the association between the restricted mean residual life function and potential regression covariates in the presence of right censoring. This model extends the proportional mean residual life model using an additive model as its covariate dependent baseline...

  13. Intracerebral metastasis showing restricted diffusion: Correlation with histopathologic findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duygulu, G. [Radiology Department, Ege University Medicine School, Izmir (Turkey); Ovali, G. Yilmaz [Radiology Department, Celal Bayar University Medicine School, Manisa (Turkey)], E-mail: gulgun.yilmaz@bayar.edu.tr; Calli, C.; Kitis, O.; Yuenten, N. [Radiology Department, Ege University Medicine School, Izmir (Turkey); Akalin, T. [Pathology Department, Ege University Medicine School, Izmir (Turkey); Islekel, S. [Neurosurgery Department, Ege University Medicine School, Izmir (Turkey)

    2010-04-15

    Objective: We aimed to detect the frequency of restricted diffusion in intracerebral metastases and to find whether there is correlation between the primary tumor pathology and diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI) findings of these metastases. Material and methods: 87 patients with intracerebral metastases were examined with routine MR imaging and DWI. 11 hemorrhagic metastatic lesions were excluded. The routine MR imaging included three plans before and after contrast enhancement. The DWI was performed with spin-echo EPI sequence with three b values (0, 500 and 1000), and ADC maps were calculated. 76 patients with metastases were grouped according to primary tumor histology and the ratios of restricted diffusion were calculated according to these groups. ADCmin values were measured within the solid components of the tumors and the ratio of metastases with restricted diffusion to that which do not show restricted diffusion were calculated. Fisher's exact and Mann-Whitney U tests were used for the statistical analysis. Results: Restricted diffusion was observed in a total of 15 metastatic lesions (19, 7%). Primary malignancy was lung carcinoma in 10 of these cases (66, 6%) (5 small cell carcinoma, 5 non-small cell carcinoma), and breast carcinoma in three cases (20%). Colon carcinoma and testicular teratocarcinoma were the other two primary tumors in which restricted diffusion in metastasis was detected. There was no statistical significant difference between the primary pathology groups which showed restricted diffusion (p > 0.05). ADCmin values of solid components of the metastasis with restricted diffusion and other metastasis without restricted diffusion also showed no significant statistical difference (0.72 {+-} 0.16 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s and 0.78 {+-} 21 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s respectively) (p = 0.325). Conclusion: Detection of restricted diffusion on DWI in intracerebral metastasis is not rare, particularly if the primary tumor is lung or breast

  14. Company Law as a Restriction to Free Movement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Karsten Engsig

    2014-01-01

    Focusing on recent judgments from the Court of Justice of the European Union, this article investigates how the notion of ‘restriction’ – which is the first step in examining whether there is an infringement of the free movement rights – is used in cases involving company law measures....... There is evidence that non-discriminatory obstacles to free movement found in company law can be restrictions. However, recent cases show that the Court may be willing to apply a more restrictive approach where only non-discriminatory measures that have a qualified deterrent effect may constitute restrictions....

  15. A chromatin modifier integrates insulin/IGF-1 signalling and dietary restriction to regulate longevity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Anupama; Kumar, Neeraj; Matai, Latika; Jain, Vaibhav; Garg, Amit; Mukhopadhyay, Arnab

    2016-08-01

    Insulin/IGF-1-like signalling (IIS) and dietary restriction (DR) are the two major modulatory pathways controlling longevity across species. Here, we show that both pathways license a common chromatin modifier, ZFP-1/AF10. The downstream transcription factors of the IIS and select DR pathways, DAF-16/FOXO or PHA-4/FOXA, respectively, both transcriptionally regulate the expression of zfp-1. ZFP-1, in turn, negatively regulates the expression of DAF-16/FOXO and PHA-4/FOXA target genes, apparently forming feed-forward loops that control the amplitude as well as the duration of gene expression. We show that ZFP-1 mediates this regulation by negatively influencing the recruitment of DAF-16/FOXO and PHA-4/FOXA to their target promoters. Consequently, zfp-1 is required for the enhanced longevity observed during DR and on knockdown of IIS. Our data reveal how two distinct sensor pathways control an overlapping set of genes, using different downstream transcription factors, integrating potentially diverse and temporally distinct nutritional situations. PMID:27039057

  16. Identification of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans strains based on restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of 16S rDNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamimura, K; Wakai, S; Sugio, T

    2001-01-01

    The 16S rDNA sequences from ten strains of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans were amplified by PCR. The products were compared by performing restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis with restriction endonucleases Alu I, Hap II, Hha I, and Hae III. The RFLP patterns revealed that T. ferrooxidans could be distinguished from other iron- or sulphur-oxidizing bacteria such as T. thiooxidans NB1-3, T. caldus GO-1, Leptospirillum ferrooxidans and the marine iron-oxidizing bacterium strain KU2-11. The RFLP patterns obtained with Alu I, Hap II, and Hae III were the same for nine strains of T. ferrooxidans except for strain ATCC 13661. The RFLP patterns for strains NASF-1 and ATCC 13661 with Hha I were distinct from those for other T. ferrooxidans strains. The 16S rDNA sequence of T. ferrooxidans NASF-1 possessed an additional restriction site for Hha I. These results show that iron-oxidizing bacteria isolated from natural environments were rapidly identified as T. ferrooxidans by the method combining RFLP analysis with physiological analysis. PMID:11414499

  17. Maternal nutrient restriction between early-to-mid gestation and its impact upon appetite regulation following juvenile obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sébert, S.P.; Hyatt, M.A.; Chan, L.L.Y.; Patel, N.; Bell, R. C.; Keisler, D.; Stephenson, T.; Budge, H.; Symonds, M.E.; Gardner, D.S.

    2009-01-01

    The impact of maternal nutrient restriction during early-to-mid gestation, a period coinciding with early fetal brain development, on appetite regulation and energy balance in the offspring following juvenile obesity was examined. Pregnant sheep were either fed to fully meet their nutritional requirements throughout gestation or 50% of this amount between 30-80 days gestation. Following weaning, offspring were either made obese through exposure to a sedentary obesogenic environment or remained lean. Maternal nutrient restriction had no effect on birth weight or subsequent growth. At one week of age, only, gene expression for neuropeptide Y in the hypothalamus was reduced in nutrient restricted offspring. By 1 year of age, all obese animals had raised plasma leptin, non-esterified fatty acids and insulin, with the latter effect amplified in nutrient restricted offspring. Fasting plasma glucose, triglycerides and cortisol were unaffected by obesity. The entrained reduction in physical activity that led to obesity persisted when all animals were maintained within individual pens. Obese nutrient restricted offspring, however, exhibited reduced daily food intake and were, therefore, no longer in positive “energy balance”. This adaptation was accompanied by elevated hypothalamic gene expression for the melanocortin-4 and insulin receptors, AMP-activated kinase and acetyl CoA carboxylase α. In conclusion, nutrient restriction specifically targeted over the period of early fetal brain development, contributes to a profoundly different adaptation in energy balance following juvenile obesity. The extent to which this adaptive response may benefit the offspring or result in an exacerbated risk for type II diabetes remains to be established. PMID:18818297

  18. Biologically active new Fe(II, Co(II, Ni(II, Cu(II, Zn(II and Cd(II complexes of N-(2-thienylmethylenemethanamine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. SPÎNU

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Iron(II, cobalt(II, nickel (II, copper (II, zinc(II and cadmium(II complexes of the type ML2Cl2, where M is a metal and L is the Schiff base N-(2-thienylmethylenemethanamine (TNAM formed by the condensation of 2-thiophenecarboxaldehyde and methylamine, were prepared and characterized by elemental analysis as well as magnetic and spectroscopic measurements. The elemental analyses suggest the stoichiometry to be 1:2 (metal:ligand. Magnetic susceptibility data coupled with electronic, ESR and Mössbauer spectra suggest a distorted octahedral structure for the Fe(II, Co(II and Ni(II complexes, a square-planar geometry for the Cu(II compound and a tetrahedral geometry for the Zn(II and Cd(II complexes. The infrared and NMR spectra of the complexes agree with co-ordination to the central metal atom through nitrogen and sulphur atoms. Conductance measurements suggest the non-electrolytic nature of the complexes, except for the Cu(II, Zn(II and Cd(II complexes, which are 1:2 electrolytes. The Schiff base and its metal chelates were screened for their biological activity against Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa and the metal chelates were found to possess better antibacterial activity than that of the uncomplexed Schiff base.

  19. A comparative study on the restrictions of dynamic test methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majzoobi, GH.; Lahmi, S.

    2015-09-01

    Dynamic behavior of materials is investigated using different devices. Each of the devices has some restrictions. For instance, the stress-strain curve of the materials can be captured at high strain rates only with Hopkinson bar. However, by using a new approach some of the other techniques could be used to obtain the constants of material models such as Johnson-Cook model too. In this work, the restrictions of some devices such as drop hammer, Taylor test, Flying wedge, Shot impact test, dynamic tensile extrusion and Hopkinson bars which are used to characterize the material properties at high strain rates are described. The level of strain and strain rate and their restrictions are very important in examining the efficiency of each of the devices. For instance, necking or bulging in tensile and compressive Hopkinson bars, fragmentation in dynamic tensile extrusion and petaling in Taylor test are restricting issues in the level of strain rate attainable in the devices.

  20. A comparative study on the restrictions of dynamic test methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majzoobi GH.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic behavior of materials is investigated using different devices. Each of the devices has some restrictions. For instance, the stress-strain curve of the materials can be captured at high strain rates only with Hopkinson bar. However, by using a new approach some of the other techniques could be used to obtain the constants of material models such as Johnson-Cook model too. In this work, the restrictions of some devices such as drop hammer, Taylor test, Flying wedge, Shot impact test, dynamic tensile extrusion and Hopkinson bars which are used to characterize the material properties at high strain rates are described. The level of strain and strain rate and their restrictions are very important in examining the efficiency of each of the devices. For instance, necking or bulging in tensile and compressive Hopkinson bars, fragmentation in dynamic tensile extrusion and petaling in Taylor test are restricting issues in the level of strain rate attainable in the devices.

  1. 3-restricted connectivity of graphs with given girth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Li-tao; MENG Ji-xiang

    2008-01-01

    Let G = (V, E) be a connected graph. X C V(G) is a vertex set. X is a 3-restricted cut of G, if G-X is not connected and every component of G-X has at least three vertices. The 3-restricted connectivity k3(G) (in short k3) of G is the cardinality of a minimum 3-restricted cut of G. Χ is called κ3-cut, if Χ = κ3. A graph G is κa-connected, if a 3-restricted cut exists.Let G be a graph girth g ≥ 4, ξ3(G) is min{d(χ) + d(у) + d(z) - 4 : χуz is a 2-path of G}. It will be shown that κ3(G) = ξ3(G) under the condition of girth.

  2. United States: Funding restrictions threaten sex workers' rights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleifer, Rebecca

    2005-08-01

    Recent developments concerning the US government's restrictive policies on HIV/AIDS funding have drawn attention to how the government's mandatory "anti-prostitution pledge" endangers the lives of sex workers and trafficking victims. PMID:16365969

  3. Total sleep deprivation, chronic sleep restriction and sleep disruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Amy C; Banks, Siobhan

    2010-01-01

    Sleep loss may result from total sleep deprivation (such as a shift worker might experience), chronic sleep restriction (due to work, medical conditions or lifestyle) or sleep disruption (which is common in sleep disorders such as sleep apnea or restless legs syndrome). Total sleep deprivation has been widely researched, and its effects have been well described. Chronic sleep restriction and sleep disruption (also known as sleep fragmentation) have received less experimental attention. Recently, there has been increasing interest in sleep restriction and disruption as it has been recognized that they have a similar impact on cognitive functioning as a period of total sleep deprivation. Sleep loss causes impairments in cognitive performance and simulated driving and induces sleepiness, fatigue and mood changes. This review examines recent research on the effects of sleep deprivation, restriction and disruption on cognition and neurophysiologic functioning in healthy adults, and contrasts the similarities and differences between these three modalities of sleep loss.

  4. Miscarriage and early first trimester growth restriction by ultrasound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neelima Agarwal

    2016-05-01

    Conclusions: CRL was significantly smaller in pregnancies that subsequently ended in miscarriage. This suggests that early first trimester growth restriction is associated with subsequent intrauterine death. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2016; 5(5.000: 1558-1561

  5. Personal paths of fluid restriction in patients on hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tovazzi, Maria Elena; Mazzoni, Valentina

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the perspectives of patients on hemodialysis about their experience of fluid restriction. Qualitative interviews were conducted to grasp the patients' lived experience, and from a phenomenological analysis, several categories emerged that describe patients' understanding. Three themes in particular from patients' experiences are described and discussed because of their relevance for health professionals. These include (a) fluid restriction introduces the perception of individuals to see themselves as addicts who deal with a constant inner conflict, (b) the difficulty in finding the right boundaries between common sense and scientific knowledge about fluid restriction, and (c) the role of personal motivations and willingness in pursuit of compliance. Recognizing the force of personal meaning for individuals with renal disease will support health professionals to help patients in pursuing the regime of fluid restriction. PMID:22866360

  6. HCUP State Emergency Department Databases (SEDD) - Restricted Access File

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The State Emergency Department Databases (SEDD) contain the universe of emergency department visits in participating States. Restricted access data files are...

  7. Grout Treatment Facility Land Disposal Restriction Management Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document establishes management plans directed to result in the land disposal of grouted wastes at the Hanford Grout Facilities in compliance with Federal, State of Washington, and Department of Energy land disposal restrictions. 9 refs., 1 fig

  8. Caloric restriction and Metabolism in Lean and Obese rats.

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Data related to obese and lean strains of rat commonly used in the laboratory that are calorically restricted and its effects on physiologic parameters (Body...

  9. Flow-test device fits into restricted access passages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, J. J.; Oberschmidt, M.; Rosenbaum, B. J.

    1967-01-01

    Test device using a mandrel with a collapsible linkage assembly enables a fluid flow sensor to be properly positioned in a restricted passage by external manipulation. This device is applicable to the combustion chamber of a rocket motor.

  10. 48 CFR 225.7012 - Restriction on supercomputers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Restriction on supercomputers. 225.7012 Section 225.7012 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS... supercomputers....

  11. Status of selected nutrients in obese dogs undergoing caloric restriction

    OpenAIRE

    Linder, Deborah E; Freeman, Lisa M.; Holden, Shelley L; Biourge, Vincent; German, Alexander J.

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that dog plasma concentrations of selected nutrients decrease after undergoing caloric restriction for weight loss. Thirty-one overweight dogs that had successfully lost at least 15% of initial body weight were included in the study. Nutrients that had been previously identified to be at potential risk of deficiency during caloric restriction were measured in plasma (choline, amino acids) and urine (selenium) at the initiation an...

  12. Insights into restrictive cardiomyopathy from clinical and animal studies

    OpenAIRE

    Jean-Charles, Pierre-Yves; Li, Yue-Jin; Nan, Chang-Long; Huang, Xu-Pei

    2011-01-01

    Cardiomyopathies are diseases that primarily affect the myocardium, leading to serious cardiac dysfunction and heart failure. Out of the three major categories of cardiomyopathies (hypertrophic, dilated and restrictive), restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM) is less common and also the least studied. However, the prognosis for RCM is poor as some patients dying in their childhood. The molecular mechanisms behind the disease development and progression are not very clear and the treatment of RCM is...

  13. Supporting several levels of restriction in the UML

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Klaus Marius; Damm, Christian Heide; Thomsen, Michael;

    2000-01-01

    The emergence of the Unified Modeling Language (UML) has provided software developers with an effective and efficient shared language. However, UML is often too restrictive in initial, informal, and creative modelling, and it is in some cases not restrictive enough, e.g., for code generation. Based....... This approach potentially increases the usability of the UML, and thus ultimately leads to greater quality and adoption of UML models....

  14. Restriction Enzyme Digestion Exercise – An In-class Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Michelle Parent

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the concepts of molecular biology and then applying those concepts to laboratory experiments can be challenging to entry-level students. In order to facilitate the topics of restriction enzyme digestion and the generation of compatible ends in the process of gene cloning, an in-class activity was designed. This restriction enzyme digestion exercise, designed for an introductory undergraduate course in genetics, molecular biology and molecular diagnostics, can be utilized ...

  15. Neutron inelastic scattering from {sup 4}He in restricted geometries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibbs, M.R. [Keele Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics; Sokol, P.E. [Dept. of Physics, Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Azuah, R.T. [Keele Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics]|[Rutherford Appleton Lab., Chilton, Didcot (United Kingdom); Stirling, W.G. [Keele Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics; Adams, M.A. [Rutherford Appleton Lab., Chilton, Didcot (United Kingdom)

    1995-08-01

    When liquid {sup 4}He is condensed in porous aerogel glass (typical pore size {approx}5000 A), many of the superfluid properties are significantly altered. Measurements have been made of the dynamic structure factor S(Q,{omega}) of liquid {sup 4}He in restricted geometries. The collective phonon-roton excitations are shown to have an intrinsic broadening associated with the restricted geometry. The temperature dependence of the excitation spectrum is discussed. (orig.).

  16. Quons Restricted to the Antisymmetric Subspace Formalism and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Avancini, S S; Marinelli, J R; Peres-Menezes, D; Watanabe de Moraes, M M

    2003-01-01

    In this work we develop a formalism to treat quons restricted to the antisymmetric part of their many-body space. A model in which a system of identical quons interact through a pairing force is then solved within this restriction and the differences between our solution and the usual fermionic model solution are then presented and discussed in detail. Possible connections to physical systems are also considered.

  17. Benefits of short-term dietary restriction in mammals

    OpenAIRE

    Robertson, Lauren T.; Mitchell, James R.

    2013-01-01

    Dietary or calorie restriction (DR, CR), defined as reduced food intake without malnutrition, imparts many benefits in model organisms. Extended longevity is the most popularized benefit but the least clinically relevant due to the requirement for long-term food restriction. DR also promotes stress resistance and metabolic fitness. Emerging data in experimental models and in humans indicate that these benefits occur rapidly upon initiation of DR, suggesting potential clinical relevance. Here ...

  18. Unintended Pregnancies, Restrictive Abortion Laws, and Abortion Demand

    OpenAIRE

    Medoff, Marshall H.

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the effect restrictive state abortion laws have on the pregnancy resolution decisions of women with unintended pregnancies. The empirical results find that the abortion ratio and the abortion rate of unintended pregnancies are more sensitive to increases in the abortion price than previous estimates that analyzed total pregnancies (unintended and intended). A Medicaid funding restriction has very little effect on a state's abortion rate of unintended pregnancies, but cause...

  19. Cornering the market: restriction of retail supermarket locations

    OpenAIRE

    Nairne Cameron; Carl G Amrhein; Karen E Smoyer-Tomic; Raine, Kim D; Lee Yen Chong

    2010-01-01

    A major source of healthy foods, North American supermarkets have become larger in recent years, with new stores opening and older stores closing. Upon closure, there is evidence of some supermarket sites being placed under restrictive covenants, a practice that restricts future use of the site. The purpose is usually to limit food sales at the location, thus minimizing competition for a chain’s nearby stores. In Edmonton, Alberta eighteen covenants have been documented on former supermarket ...

  20. Personnel Tour Scheduling When Starting-Time Restrictions Are Present

    OpenAIRE

    Michael J. Brusco; Larry W. Jacobs

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents an effective solution strategy for an important category of personnel scheduling problems. Specifically, we address the restricted starting-time tour-scheduling problem (RSTP), which involves the determination of the hours of the day (shifts) and days of the week (days on) that employees are assigned to work. RSTP is characterized by restrictions on the number of daily time periods in which employees may begin their shifts. Moreover, the RSTP we consider contains constrain...

  1. Animal models of restricted repetitive behavior in autism

    OpenAIRE

    Lewis, Mark H.; Tanimura, Yoko; Lee, Linda W.; Bodfish, James W.

    2006-01-01

    Restricted, repetitive behavior, along with deficits in social reciprocity and communication, is diagnostic of autism. Animal models relevant to this domain generally fall into three classes: repetitive behavior associated with targeted insults to the CNS; repetitive behavior induced by pharmacological agents; and repetitive behavior associated with restricted environments and experience. The extant literature provides potential models of the repetitive behavioral phenotype in autism rather t...

  2. Agricultural Production Restrictions and Market Power: An Antitrust Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Bolotova, Yuliya

    2015-01-01

    During the recent decade the organizations of agricultural producers in the national dairy, potato, egg and mushroom industries implemented various pre-production and production restriction practices with the primary objective of agricultural output price stabilization. The buyers of the affected agricultural commodities have challenged the legal status of production restrictions in a number of recent and current antitrust lawsuits, arguing that the Capper-Volstead Act, a limited antitrust ex...

  3. Advanced Mean Field Theory of Restricted Boltzmann Machine

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Haiping; Toyoizumi, Taro

    2015-01-01

    Learning in restricted Boltzmann machine is typically hard due to the computation of gradients of log-likelihood function. To describe the network state statistics of the restricted Boltzmann machine, we develop an advanced mean field theory based on the Bethe approximation. Our theory provides an efficient message passing based method that evaluates not only the partition function (free energy) but also its gradients without requiring statistical sampling. The results are compared with those...

  4. Identification of leptospiral isolates by bacterial restriction endonuclease analysis (Brenda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkatesha M

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA samples from 19 reference serovars belonging to 19 different serogroups of Leptospira interrogans and two serovars belonging to Leptospira biflexa were examined by bacterial restriction endonuclease analysis using EcoR I and Hae III enzymes. All the serovars gave unique restriction patterns that differed from each other. DNA from 10 local isolates digested with these enzymes produced patterns which on comparison with the standard patterns produced by reference strains could be identified to serovar level.

  5. Chronic Maternal Dietary Chromium Restriction Modulates Visceral Adiposity

    OpenAIRE

    Padmavathi, Inagadapa J.N.; Rao, K Rajender; Venu, Lagishetty; Ganeshan, Manisha; Kumar, K. Anand; Rao, Ch. Narasima; Harishankar, Nemani; Ismail, Ayesha; Raghunath, Manchala

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE We demonstrated previously that chronic maternal micronutrient restriction altered the body composition in rat offspring and may predispose offspring to adult-onset diseases. Chromium (Cr) regulates glucose and fat metabolism. The objective of this study is to determine the long-term effects of maternal Cr restriction on adipose tissue development and function in a rat model. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Female weanling WNIN rats received, ad libitum, a control diet or the same with ...

  6. Belle II production system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, Hideki; Grzymkowski, Rafal; Ludacka, Radek; Schram, Malachi

    2015-12-01

    The Belle II experiment will record a similar quantity of data to LHC experiments and will acquire it at similar rates. This requires considerable computing, storage and network resources to handle not only data created by the experiment but also considerable amounts of simulated data. Consequently Belle II employs a distributed computing system to provide the resources coordinated by the the DIRAC interware. DIRAC is a general software framework that provides a unified interface among heterogeneous computing resources. In addition to the well proven DIRAC software stack, Belle II is developing its own extension called BelleDIRAC. BelleDIRAC provides a transparent user experience for the Belle II analysis framework (basf2) on various environments and gives access to file information managed by LFC and AMGA metadata catalog. By unifying DIRAC and BelleDIRAC functionalities, Belle II plans to operate an automated mass data processing framework named a “production system”. The Belle II production system enables large-scale raw data transfer from experimental site to raw data centers, followed by massive data processing, and smart data delivery to each remote site. The production system is also utilized for simulated data production and data analysis. Although development of the production system is still on-going, recently Belle II has prepared prototype version and evaluated it with a large scale simulated data production. In this presentation we will report the evaluation of the prototype system and future development plans.

  7. Temporary feed restriction partially protects broilers from necrotic enteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsiouris, V; Georgopoulou, I; Batzios, Chr; Pappaioannou, N; Ducatelle, R; Fortomaris, P

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of feed restriction on the intestinal ecosystem and on the pathogenesis of experimental necrotic enteritis in broiler chicks. To induce subclinical necrotic enteritis, an experimental challenge model using a specific diet formulation, Gumboro vaccination, oral inoculation of broilers with a 10-fold dose of attenuated anticoccidial vaccine and multiple oral inoculations with a specific strain of Clostridium perfringens was adopted. Two hundred and forty 1-day-old Cobb 500 broilers were randomly allocated to four groups: feed restricted, challenged, both feed restricted and challenged, and negative control. At 21, 22, 23 and 24 days of age, the intestines, gizzard and liver were collected from 15 birds in each group and scored for gross lesions. The intestinal digesta was collected for pH and viscosity determination. One caecum from each bird was taken for microbiological analysis. The application of feed restriction in birds challenged with C. perfringens reduced the necrotic enteritis lesion score significantly (P ≤ 0.05) and feed restriction significantly reduced (P ≤ 0.05) pH in the small intestine, the viscosity of the jejunum digesta as well as the C. perfringens counts in the caeca compared with the controls. In conclusion, feed restriction of broilers has a positive effect on the intestinal ecosystem and a significant protective effect against necrotic enteritis in the subclinical experimental model.

  8. Physiogenomic analysis of weight loss induced by dietary carbohydrate restriction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wood Richard J

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diets that restrict carbohydrate (CHO have proven to be a successful dietary treatment of obesity for many people, but the degree of weight loss varies across individuals. The extent to which genetic factors associate with the magnitude of weight loss induced by CHO restriction is unknown. We examined associations among polymorphisms in candidate genes and weight loss in order to understand the physiological factors influencing body weight responses to CHO restriction. Methods We screened for genetic associations with weight loss in 86 healthy adults who were instructed to restrict CHO to a level that induced a small level of ketosis (CHO ~10% of total energy. A total of 27 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs were selected from 15 candidate genes involved in fat digestion/metabolism, intracellular glucose metabolism, lipoprotein remodeling, and appetite regulation. Multiple linear regression was used to rank the SNPs according to probability of association, and the most significant associations were analyzed in greater detail. Results Mean weight loss was 6.4 kg. SNPs in the gastric lipase (LIPF, hepatic glycogen synthase (GYS2, cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP and galanin (GAL genes were significantly associated with weight loss. Conclusion A strong association between weight loss induced by dietary CHO restriction and variability in genes regulating fat digestion, hepatic glucose metabolism, intravascular lipoprotein remodeling, and appetite were detected. These discoveries could provide clues to important physiologic adaptations underlying the body mass response to CHO restriction.

  9. International Literature Review on WHODAS II (World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federici, Stefano

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available This review is a critical analysis regarding the study and utilization of the World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule II (WHODAS II as a basis for establishing specific criteria for evaluating relevant international scientific literature.The WHODAS II is an instrument developed by the World Health Organisation in order to assess behavioural limitations and restrictions related to an individual’s participation, independent from a medical diagnosis. This instrument was developed by the WHO’s Assessment, Classification and Epidemiology Group within the framework of the WHO/NIH Joint Project on Assessment and Classification of Disablements. To ascertain the international dissemination level of for WHODAS II’s utilization and, at the same time, analyse the studies regarding the psychometric validation of the WHODAS II translation and adaptation in other languages and geographical contests. Particularly, our goal is to highlight which psychometric features have been investigated, focusing on the factorial structure, the reliability, and the validity of this instrument. International literature was researched through the main data bases of indexed scientific production: the Cambridge Scientific Abstracts – CSA, PubMed, and Google Scholar, from 1990 through to December 2008.The following search terms were used:“whodas”, in the field query, plus “title” and “abstract”.The WHODAS II has been used in 54 studies, of which 51 articles are published in international journals, 2 conference abstracts, and one dissertation abstract. Nevertheless, only 7 articles are published in journals and conference proceedings regarding disability and rehabilitation. Others have been published in medical and psychiatric journals, with the aim of indentifying comorbidity correlations in clinical diagnosis concerning patients with mental illness. Just 8 out of 51 articles have studied the psychometric properties of the WHODAS II. The

  10. Identification of a polymorphic variant associated with HLA-DQw3 and characterized by specific restriction sites within the DQ beta-chain gene.

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, S J; Holbeck, S. L.; Nisperos, B; J. A. Hansen; Maeda, H.; Nepom, G T

    1985-01-01

    Restriction endonuclease digestion of genomic DNA from 24 lymphoblastoid cell lines homozygous for the HLA class II specificity DQw3, followed by hybridization with a DQ beta-chain cDNA probe, identified a genomic polymorphism with variable BamHI and HindIII recognition sites. This restriction fragment pattern was found for several haplotypes associated with the DQw3 specificity, including some haplotypes positive for the HLA-DR specificities DR4, DR5, DRw8, and DRw12. The variant fragment pa...

  11. How does the oblateness coefficient influence the nature of orbits in the restricted three-body problem?

    CERN Document Server

    Zotos, Euaggelos E

    2015-01-01

    We numerically investigate the case of the planar circular restricted three-body problem where the more massive primary is an oblate spheroid. A thorough numerical analysis takes place in the configuration $(x,y)$ and the $(x,E)$ space in which we classify initial conditions of orbits into three categories: (i) bounded, (ii) escaping and (iii) collisional. Our results reveal that the oblateness coefficient has a huge impact on the character of orbits. Interpreting the collisional motion as leaking in the phase space we related our results to both chaotic scattering and the theory of leaking Hamiltonian systems. We successfully located the escape as well as the collisional basins and we managed to correlate them with the corresponding escape and collision times. We hope our contribution to be useful for a further understanding of the escape and collision properties of motion in this interesting version of the restricted three-body problem.

  12. Unveiling the influence of the radiation pressure in nature of orbits in the photogravitational restricted three-body problem

    CERN Document Server

    Zotos, Euaggelos E

    2015-01-01

    The case of the planar circular photogravitational restricted three-body problem where the more massive primary is an emitter of radiation is numerically investigated. A thorough numerical analysis takes place in the configuration $(x,y)$ and the $(x,C)$ space in which we classify initial conditions of orbits into three main categories: (i) bounded, (ii) escaping and (iii) collisional. Our results reveal that the radiation pressure factor has a huge impact on the character of orbits. Interpreting the collisional motion as leaking in the phase space we related our results to both chaotic scattering and the theory of leaking Hamiltonian systems. We successfully located the escape as well as the collisional basins and we managed to correlate them with the corresponding escape and collision times. We hope our contribution to be useful for a further understanding of the escape and collision properties of motion in this interesting version of the restricted three-body problem.

  13. The Application of Restriction Landmark Genome Scanning Method for Surveillance of Non-Mendelian Inheritance in F1 Hybrids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoko Takamiya

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We analyzed inheritance of DNA methylation in reciprocal F1 hybrids (subsp. japonica cv. Nipponbare × subsp. indica cv. Kasalath of rice (Oryza sativa L. using restriction landmark genome scanning (RLGS, and detected differing RLGS spots between the parents and reciprocal F1 hybrids. MspI/HpaII restriction sites in the DNA from these different spots were suspected to be heterozygously methylated in the Nipponbare parent. These spots segregated in F1 plants, but did not segregate in selfed progeny of Nipponbare, showing non-Mendelian inheritance of the methylation status. As a result of RT-PCR and sequencing, a specific allele of the gene nearest to the methylated sites was expressed in reciprocal F1 plants, showing evidence of biased allelic expression. These results show the applicability of RLGS for scanning of non-Mendelian inheritance of DNA methylation and biased allelic expression.

  14. Gamble II Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Gamble II produces a high-voltage (2 MV), high-current (1 MA), short (100 ns) pulse of energy of either positive or negative polarity. This terawatt power...

  15. Leo II PC

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — LEO II is a second-generation software system developed for use on the PC, which is designed to convert location references accurately between legal descriptions...

  16. Escape and collision dynamics in the planar equilateral restricted four-body problem

    CERN Document Server

    Zotos, Euaggelos E

    2016-01-01

    We consider the planar circular equilateral restricted four body-problem where a test particle of infinitesimal mass is moving under the gravitational attraction of three primary bodies which move on circular orbits around their common center of gravity, such that their configuration is always an equilateral triangle. The case where all three primaries have equal masses is numerically investigated. A thorough numerical analysis takes place in the configuration $(x,y)$ as well as in the $(x,C)$ space in which we classify initial conditions of orbits into four main categories: (i) bounded regular orbits, (ii) trapped chaotic orbits, (iii) escaping orbits and (iv) collision orbits. Interpreting the collision motion as leaking in the phase space we related our results to both chaotic scattering and the theory of leaking Hamiltonian systems. We successfully located the escape and the collision basins and we managed to correlate them with the corresponding escape and collision times of orbits. We hope our contribut...

  17. VARIABLE RULES IN VERBAL AGREEMENT IN ADMISSION EXAMS TO THE UNIVERSITY: RESTRICTIONS AND EVALUATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Rodrigues Vieira

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This article presents results from a sociolinguistic investigation about the presence or absence of 3rd person morphological marks of verbs used by students in their admission exams to the University, which is a highly monitored linguistic situation. Taking into consideration the Theory of variation and change (WEINREICH, LABOV, HERZOG, 1968; LABOV, 1972, 1994, 2003, the investigation aims at (i describing the variable rule, according to linguistic factors (restrictions problem, and (ii characterizing social values of verbal forms in the context of formal evaluation (evaluation problem. The corpus consists of 400 compositions written to the admission exam at Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro. Texts have been divided into four concepts, depending on the grade obtained to the domain of cult patterns of writing. Through correlation between the grades compositions have receivedand the use of (non-verbal agreement, it will be possible to analyze the subjective appreciation of the alternative forms in the context of school evaluation.

  18. Calorie for calorie, dietary fat restriction results in more body fat loss than carbohydrate restriction in people with obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Kevin D.; Bemis, Thomas; Brychta, Robert; Chen, Kong Y.; Courville, Amber; Crayner, Emma J.; Goodwin, Stephanie; Guo, Juen; Howard, Lilian; Knuth, Nicolas D.; Miller, Bernard V.; Prado, Carla M.; Siervo, Mario; Skarulis, Monica C.; Walter, Mary; Walter, Peter J.; Yannai, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Summary Dietary carbohydrate restriction has been purported to cause endocrine adaptations that promote body fat loss more than dietary fat restriction. We selectively restricted dietary carbohydrate versus fat for 6 days following a 5 day baseline diet in 19 adults with obesity confined to a metabolic ward where they exercised daily. Subjects received both isocaloric diets in random order during each of two inpatient stays. Body fat loss was calculated as the difference between daily fat intake and net fat oxidation measured while residing in a metabolic chamber. Whereas carbohydrate restriction led to sustained increases in fat oxidation and loss of 53±6 g/d of body fat, fat oxidation was unchanged by fat restriction leading to 89±6 g/d of fat loss and was significantly greater than carbohydrate restriction (p=0.002). Mathematical model simulations agreed with these data, but predicted that the body acts to minimize body fat differences with isocaloric diets varying in carbohydrate and fat. PMID:26278052

  19. Ecuaciones Diferenciales II

    OpenAIRE

    Mañas Baena, Manuel; Martínez Alonso, Luis

    2015-01-01

    En este manual se revisan diferentes aspectos sobre las ecuaciones diferenciales en derivadas parciales de utilidad para los físicos. Se elaboraron como notas de clase de la asignatura Ecuaciones II, del plan 1993 de la Licenciatura de Física de la UCM. Actualmente cubre un 75% de la asignatura Métodos Matemáticos II del Grado de Física de la UCM.

  20. Apunts de Cartografia II

    OpenAIRE

    Membrado Tena, Joan Carles

    2013-01-01

    Aquest material docent ha rebut l’ajut del Servei de Política Lingüística de la Universitat de València Guia de l'assignatura Cartografia II per a alumnes de segon de grau de Geografia. Apunts sobre cartografia històrica i temàtica. Exercicis per a l'assignatura. Guide of the course "Cartography II" for second grade students.Notes on historical and thematic mapping. Exercises for the course.

  1. Milord II. Language description.

    OpenAIRE

    Puyol-Gruart, Josep; Sierra, Carles

    1997-01-01

    In this paper we describe the language Milord II. The description is made in terms of computer language concepts and not in terms of the logical semantics underlying it. In this sense the paper complements others in which the focus of the description has been either the object level multi-valued language description, or the reflective component of the architecture, or even the several applications built using it. All the necessary elements to understand how a system programmed in Milord II ex...

  2. ASTRID II satellit projekt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, John Leif; Primdahl, Fritz

    1997-01-01

    The report describes the instruments developed for the Swedish micro satellite "ASTRID II". Specifications of the two instruments realized under this contract, a Stellar Compass and a CSC magnetometer are given follwed by a description of the project status and plan.......The report describes the instruments developed for the Swedish micro satellite "ASTRID II". Specifications of the two instruments realized under this contract, a Stellar Compass and a CSC magnetometer are given follwed by a description of the project status and plan....

  3. II Infused Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin L. Wilson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The anti-inflammatory properties of PPAR-α plays an important role in attenuating hypertension. The current study determines the anti-hypertensive and anti-inflammatory role of PPAR-α agonist during a slow-pressor dose of Ang II (400 ng/kg/min. Ten to twelve week old male PPAR-α KO mice and their WT controls were implanted with telemetry devices and infused with Ang II for 12 days. On day 12 of Ang II infusion, MAP was elevated in PPAR-α KO mice compared to WT (161±4 mmHg versus 145±4 mmHg and fenofibrate (145 mg/kg/day reduced MAP in WT + Ang II mice (134±7 mmHg. Plasma IL-6 levels were higher in PPAR-α KO mice on day 12 of Ang II infusion (30±4 versus 8±2 pg/mL and fenofibrate reduced plasma IL-6 in Ang II-treated WT mice (10±3 pg/mL. Fenofibrate increased renal expression of CYP4A, restored renal CYP2J expression, reduced the elevation in renal ICAM-1, MCP-1 and COX-2 in WT + Ang II mice. Our results demonstrate that activation of PPAR-α attenuates Ang II-induced hypertension through up-regulation of CYP4A and CYP2J and an attenuation of inflammatory markers such as plasma IL-6, renal MCP-1, renal expression of ICAM-1 and COX-2.

  4. Alteration of placental haemostatic mechanisms in idiopathic intrauterine growth restriction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Eduardo Bernal Villegas

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Intrauterine growth restriction is a complication of pregnancy with a high probability of perinatal morbidity and mortality. It appears tobe caused by abnormal development of placental vasculature. Haemostatic processes are important for the development of the placenta,and an imbalance between procoagulant and anticoagulant factors has been associated with risk of intrauterine growth restriction.Objective. To evaluate coagulation abnormalities in placenta of pregnancies complicated with idiopathic intrauterine growth restriction.Materials and methods. Five placentas from pregnancies with idiopathic intrauterine growth restriction were compared to 19 controls.We performed gross and histological examination of the placenta. Analysis was made of both mRNA expression by real-time PCRand protein by ELISA of tissue factor and thrombomodulin in placental tissue. Results. Results based on histological evaluation wereconsistent with an increased prothrombotic state in placentas from pregnancies with idiopathic intrauterine growth restriction, andthrombosis of chorionic vessels was the most important finding. The study showed an increased expression of tissue factor protein(p=0.0411 and an increase in the ratio of tissue factor/thrombomodulin mRNA (p=0.0411 and protein (p=0.0215 in placentas frompregnancies with idiopathic intrauterine growth restriction. There were no statistically significant differences neither between cases andcontrols in the mRNA levels of tissue factor or thrombomodulin nor at the protein level of thrombomodulin. Conclusion. Evidence ofalteration of local haemostatic mechanisms at the level of the placenta, including abnormal expression of tissue factor and tissue factor/thrombomodulin ratio, in pregnancies that occur with idiopathic intrauterine growth restriction is presented.

  5. HIV restriction by APOBEC3 in humanized mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John F Krisko

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Innate immune restriction factors represent important specialized barriers to zoonotic transmission of viruses. Significant consideration has been given to their possible use for therapeutic benefit. The apolipoprotein B mRNA editing enzyme catalytic polypeptide 3 (APOBEC3 family of cytidine deaminases are potent immune defense molecules capable of efficiently restricting endogenous retroelements as well as a broad range of viruses including Human Immunodeficiency virus (HIV, Hepatitis B virus (HBV, Human Papilloma virus (HPV, and Human T Cell Leukemia virus (HTLV. The best characterized members of this family are APOBEC3G (A3G and APOBEC3F (A3F and their restriction of HIV. HIV has evolved to counteract these powerful restriction factors by encoding an accessory gene designated viral infectivity factor (vif. Here we demonstrate that APOBEC3 efficiently restricts CCR5-tropic HIV in the absence of Vif. However, our results also show that CXCR4-tropic HIV can escape from APOBEC3 restriction and replicate in vivo independent of Vif. Molecular analysis identified thymocytes as cells with reduced A3G and A3F expression. Direct injection of vif-defective HIV into the thymus resulted in viral replication and dissemination detected by plasma viral load analysis; however, vif-defective viruses remained sensitive to APOBEC3 restriction as extensive G to A mutation was observed in proviral DNA recovered from other organs. Remarkably, HIV replication persisted despite the inability of HIV to develop resistance to APOBEC3 in the absence of Vif. Our results provide novel insight into a highly specific subset of cells that potentially circumvent the action of APOBEC3; however our results also demonstrate the massive inactivation of CCR5-tropic HIV in the absence of Vif.

  6. A Type II Radio Burst without a Coronal Mass Ejection

    CERN Document Server

    Su, W; Ding, M D; Chen, P F; Sun, J Q

    2015-01-01

    Type II radio bursts are thought to be a signature of coronal shocks. In this paper, we analyze a short-lived type II burst that started at 07:40 UT on 2011 February 28. By carefully checking white-light images, we find that the type II radio burst is not accompanied by a coronal mass ejection, only with a C2.4 class flare and narrow jet. However, in the extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) images provided by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), we find a wave-like structure that propagated at a speed of $\\sim$ 600 km s$^{-1}$ during the burst. The relationship between the type II radio burst and the wave-like structure is in particular explored. For this purpose, we first derive the density distribution under the wave by the differential emission measure (DEM) method, which is used to restrict the empirical density model. We then use the restricted density model to invert the speed of the shock that produces the observed frequency drift rate in the dynamic spectrum. The ...

  7. Electrochemical biosensor modified with dsDNA monolayer for restriction enzyme activity determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zajda, Joanna; Górski, Łukasz; Malinowska, Elżbieta

    2016-06-01

    A simple and cost effective method for the determination of restriction endonuclease activity is presented. dsDNA immobilized at a gold electrode surface is used as the enzymatic substrate, and an external cationic redox probe is employed in voltammetric measurements for analytical signal generation. The assessment of enzyme activity is based on a decrease of a current signal derived from reduction of methylene blue which is present in the sample solution. For this reason, the covalent attachment of the label molecule is not required which significantly reduces costs of the analysis and simplifies the entire determination procedure. The influence of buffer components on utilized dsDNA/MCH monolayer stability and integrity is also verified. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements reveal that due to pinhole formation during enzyme activity measurement the presence of any surfactants should be avoided. Additionally, it is shown that the sensitivity of the electrochemical biosensor can be tuned by changing the restriction site location along the DNA length. Under optimal conditions the proposed biosensor exhibits a linear response toward PvuII activity within a range from 0.25 to 1.50 U/μL. PMID:26859430

  8. Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex differentiation using gyrB-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica Chimara

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC members are causative agents of human and animal tuberculosis. Differentiation of MTBC members is required for appropriate treatment of individual patients and for epidemiological purposes. Strains from six MTBC species - M. tuberculosis, M. bovis subsp. bovis, M. bovis BCG, M. africanum, M. pinnipedii, and "M. canetti" - were studied using gyrB-restriction fragment length polymorphism (gyrB-RFLP analysis. A table was elaborated, based on observed restriction patterns and published gyrB sequences. To evaluate applicability of gyrB-RFLP at Instituto Adolfo Lutz, São Paulo, Mycobacterial Reference Laboratory, 311 MTBC clinical isolates, previously identified using traditional methods as M. tuberculosis (306, M. bovis (3, and M. bovis BCG (2, were analyzed by gyrB-RFLP. All isolates were correctly identified by the molecular method, but no distinction between M. bovis and M. bovis BCG was obtained. Differentiation of M. tuberculosis and M. bovis is of utmost importance, because they require different treatment schedules. In conclusion, gyrB-RFLP is accurate and easy-to-perform, with potential to reduce time needed for conventional differentiation methods. However, application for epidemiological studies remains limited, because it cannot differentiate M. tuberculosis from M. africanum subtype II, and "M. canetti", M. africanum subtype I from M. pinnipedii, and. M. bovis from M. bovis BCG.

  9. Effects of Caloric Restriction and Exercise Training on Skeletal Muscle Histochemistry in Aging Fischer 344 Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David T. Lowenthal

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of calorie restriction and exercise on hindlimb histochemistry and fiber type in Fischer 344 rats as they advanced from adulthood through senescence. At 10 months of age, animals were divided into sedentary fed ad libitum, exercise (18 m/min, 8% grade, 20 min/day, 5 days/week fed ad libitum, and calorie restricted by alternate days of feeding. Succinic dehydrogenase, myosin adenosine triphosphatase (mATPase at pH 9.4, nicotine adenonine dinucleotide reductase, and Periodic Acid Shiff histochemical stains were performed on plantaris and soleus muscles. The results indicated that aging resulted in a progressive decline in plantaris Type I muscle fiber in sedentary animals, while exercise resulted in maintenance of these fibers. The percent of plantaris Type II fibers increased between 10 and 24 months of age. Exercise also resulted in a small, but significant, increase in the percentage of plantaris Type IIa fibers at 24 months of age. The soleus fiber distribution for Type I fibers was unaffected by increasing age in all groups of animals. The implications of these results suggest the implementation of exercise as a lifestyle modification as early as possible.

  10. Restrictions on Software for Personal and Professional Use

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    A growing number of computer security incidents detected at CERN are due to additional software installed for personal and professional use. As a consequence, the smooth operation of CERN is put at risk and often many hours are lost solving the problems. To reduce this security risk, installation and/or use of software on CERN's computing and network infrastructure needs to be restricted. Therefore: Do NOT install software for personal use Do NOT install 'free' or other software unless you have the expertise to configure and maintain it securely. Please comply to these rules to keep our computer systems safe. Further explanation of these restrictions is at http://cern.ch/security/software-restrictions Restricted software, known to cause security and/or network problems (e.g. KaZaA and other P2P/Peer-to-Peer file sharing applications, Skype P2P telephony software, ICQ, VNC, ...), is listed at: http://cern.ch/security/software-restrictions/list

  11. Restriction fragment length polymorphism of the HLA-DP subregion and correlations to HLA-DP phenotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hyldig-Nielsen, J J; Morling, Niels; Ødum, Niels;

    1987-01-01

    The restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) of the class II HLA-DP subregion of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) of humans has been unraveled by Southern blotting using DP alpha and DP beta probes in a study of 46 unrelated individuals with known HLA-DP types. Contrary to earlier...... preliminary findings with a limited number of enzymes, the RFLP appears to be quite extensive both with the DP beta (14 different DNA markers defined by individual fragments or clusters thereof) and the DP alpha (8 markers) probes, especially when enzymes recognizing only four base pairs were used. A few...

  12. Restricted Arm Swing Affects Gait Stability and Increased Walking Speed Alters Trunk Movements in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delabastita, Tijs; Desloovere, Kaat; Meyns, Pieter

    2016-01-01

    Observational research suggests that in children with cerebral palsy, the altered arm swing is linked to instability during walking. Therefore, the current study investigates whether children with cerebral palsy use their arms more than typically developing children, to enhance gait stability. Evidence also suggests an influence of walking speed on gait stability. Moreover, previous research highlighted a link between walking speed and arm swing. Hence, the experiment aimed to explore differences between typically developing children and children with cerebral palsy taking into account the combined influence of restricting arm swing and increasing walking speed on gait stability. Spatiotemporal gait characteristics, trunk movement parameters and margins of stability were obtained using three dimensional gait analysis to assess gait stability of 26 children with cerebral palsy and 24 typically developing children. Four walking conditions were evaluated: (i) free arm swing and preferred walking speed; (ii) restricted arm swing and preferred walking speed; (iii) free arm swing and high walking speed; and (iv) restricted arm swing and high walking speed. Double support time and trunk acceleration variability increased more when arm swing was restricted in children with bilateral cerebral palsy compared to typically developing children and children with unilateral cerebral palsy. Trunk sway velocity increased more when walking speed was increased in children with unilateral cerebral palsy compared to children with bilateral cerebral palsy and typically developing children and in children with bilateral cerebral palsy compared to typically developing children. Trunk sway velocity increased more when both arm swing was restricted and walking speed was increased in children with bilateral cerebral palsy compared to typically developing children. It is proposed that facilitating arm swing during gait rehabilitation can improve gait stability and decrease trunk movements in

  13. Interplay Between Bacteriophages and Restriction-Modification Systems in Enterococci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pristas Peter

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The complete genomes of Enterococcus faecalis bacteriophages were analyzed for tetranucleotide words avoidance. Very similar tetranucleotide composition was found in all tested genomes with strong underrepresentation of palindromic GATC and GGCC words. This avoidance could be explained as a protection mechanism against host restriction-modification systems as a clear correlation was found between avoidance of palindromic words and the specificity of E. faecalis restriction and modification systems. No similar avoidance of tetranucleotide words was observed for non-palindromic words. A weak correlation was observed between avoidance of tetranucleotide palindromes in bacteriophage genomes and the possession of phage encoded DNA methyltransferases confirming the interrelation between bacteriophage genomes composition and restriction and modification systems in enterococci

  14. Sequence specific inhibition of DNA restriction enzyme cleavage by PNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, P.E.; Egholm, M.; Berg, R.H.;

    1993-01-01

    Plasmids containing double-stranded 10-mer PNA (peptide nucleic acid chimera) targets proximally flanked by two restriction enzyme sites were challenged with the complementary PNA or PNAs having one or two mismatches, and the effect on the restriction enzyme cleavage of the flanking sites...... was assayed. The following PNAs were used: T10-LysNH2, T5CT4-LysNH2 and T2CT2CT4-LysNH2 and the corresponding targets cloned into pUC 19 were flanked by BamH1, Sal1 or Pstl sites, respectively. In all cases it was found that complete inhibition of restriction enzyme cleavage was obtained...

  15. II-VI semiconductor compounds

    CERN Document Server

    1993-01-01

    For condensed matter physicists and electronic engineers, this volume deals with aspects of II-VI semiconductor compounds. Areas covered include devices and applications of II-VI compounds; Co-based II-IV semi-magnetic semiconductors; and electronic structure of strained II-VI superlattices.

  16. Savannah River Site Approved Site Treatment Plan, 2001 Annual Update (Volumes I and II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence, B.

    2001-04-30

    The Compliance Plan Volume (Volume I) identifies project activity scheduled milestones for achieving compliance with Land Disposal Restrictions. Information regarding the technical evaluation of treatment options for SRS mixed wastes is contained in the Background Volume (Volume II) and is provided for information.

  17. Ankylosing spondylitis and HLA-B27: restriction fragment length polymorphism and sequencing of an HLA-B27 allele from a patient with ankylosing spondylitis

    OpenAIRE

    1993-01-01

    Two groups of patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) from England and Poland were examined for restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) associated with the disease. No preferential association was found between the 9.2 kb PvuII fragment in HLA-B27 positive patients with AS compared with HLA-B27 healthy subjects as had been previously reported. In the English group, however, a 14 kb PvuII fragment was more common in HLA-B27 positive subjects with AS than in normal controls. Also 4....

  18. Definability of restricted theta functions and families of abelian varieties

    CERN Document Server

    Peterzil, Ya'acov

    2011-01-01

    We consider some classical maps from the theory of abelian varieties and their moduli spaces and prove their definability, on restricted domains, in the o-minimal structure $\\Rae$. In particular, we prove that the embedding of moduli space of principally polarized ableian varierty, $Sp(2g,\\Z)\\backslash \\CH_g$, is definable in $\\Rae$, when restricted to Siegel's fundamental set $\\fF_g$. We also prove the definability, on appropriate domains, of embeddings of families of abelian varieties into projective space.

  19. Profiling of micrometer-sized laser beams in restricted volumes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miroshnychenko, Yevhen; Nielsen, Otto; Thorsen, Aske;

    2012-01-01

    micrometers across the measuring volume. We characterize the performance of the method and experimentally demonstrate profiling of micrometer-sized laser beams. We discuss the limiting factors and routes toward a further increase of the resolution and beam profiling in even more restricted volumes. Finally......, as an application example, we present profiling of laser beams inside a micro ion trap with integrated optical fibers.......We present a method for determining the three-dimensional intensity distribution of directed laser radiation with micrometer resolution in restricted volumes. Our method is based on the incoupling and guiding properties of optical fibers, with the current version requiring only a few hundred...

  20. Restricted use of antibiotics in organic pig farming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aabo, Søren; Jensen, Annette Nygaard

    2013-01-01

    Can the restricted use of antibiotics in organic pig farming be documented to provide a safer, high quality meat product with less antibiotic resistant bacteria? The project SafeOrganic aims to document that the restricted use of antimicrobials in organic pig production leads to lower levels...... of antibiotic resistant bacteria compared with the level in conventional pigs. However, the project will also address the risk of losing this quality parameter, due to a widespread practice of slaughtering organic pigs together with conventional pigs, implying a risk of cross-contamination....

  1. SNP-RFLPing: restriction enzyme mining for SNPs in genomes

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng Yu-Huei; Chang Phei-Lang; Yang Cheng-Hong; Chang Hsueh-Wei; Chuang Li-Yeh

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background The restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) is a common laboratory method for the genotyping of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Here, we describe a web-based software, named SNP-RFLPing, which provides the restriction enzyme for RFLP assays on a batch of SNPs and genes from the human, rat, and mouse genomes. Results Three user-friendly inputs are included: 1) NCBI dbSNP "rs" or "ss" IDs; 2) NCBI Entrez gene ID and HUGO gene name; 3) any formats of SNP-in-se...

  2. Extrauterine growth restriction: Universal problem among premature infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brunnella Alcantara Chagas de FREITAS

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To analyze the growth rate of premature infants in the first weeks of life and factors associated with extrauterine growth restriction. Methods: This is a cross-sectional study of 254 premature infants in a neonatal intensive care unit conducted from January 1, 2008 to December 31, 2010. Infants who died or had malformations incompatible with life were excluded. Median weight curves according to gestational age were constructed for the first four weeks of life. The Fenton growth chart calculations provided the weight Z-scores. Extrauterine growth restriction was defined as corrected weight-for-age Z-score ≤-2. Perinatal, morbidity, and health care variables were analyzed. The Poisson regression model yielded the prevalenceratios . Associations between extrauterine growth restriction and the perinatal, morbidity, and care variables were investigated. Poisson regression controlled possible confounding factors. Results: The frequency of extrauterine growth restriction was 24.0%. Most (85.0% small-for-gestational-age infants developed extrauterine growth restriction; 55.3% of extrauterine growth restriction cases involved small-for-gestational-age infants. Premature infants with gestational age >32 weeks did not recover the median birth weight until the third week of life and had a higher frequency of small-for-gestational-age. The Z-scores of non-small-for-gestational-age infants decreased more after birth than those of small-for-gestational-age infants. extrauterine growth restriction was associated with small-for-gestational-age (PR=6.14; 95%CI=3.33-11.33;p <0.001 and time without enteral diet (PR=1.08; 95%CI=1.04-1.13; p =0.010. Conclusion: Extrauterine growth restriction occurs in premature infants of all gestational age. The participation of small-for-gestational-age and nutritional practices in its genesis is noteworthy. We suggest prospective studies of all premature infants. The implementation of best care practices

  3. Human cellular restriction factors that target HIV-1 replication

    OpenAIRE

    Jeang Kuan-Teh; Luban Jeremy; Strebel Klaus

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Recent findings have highlighted roles played by innate cellular factors in restricting intracellular viral replication. In this review, we discuss in brief the activities of apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing enzyme 3G (APOBEC3G), bone marrow stromal cell antigen 2 (BST-2), cyclophilin A, tripartite motif protein 5 alpha (Trim5α), and cellular microRNAs as examples of host restriction factors that target HIV-1. We point to countermeasures encoded by HIV-1 for moderating the potency of th...

  4. Fiducial intervals of restricted parameters and their applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xinmin; LI Guoying; XU Xingzhong

    2005-01-01

    In practice, the unknown parameters are often restricted. This paper provides a general method for constructing the fiducial intervals of the restricted parameters. Applying the general method, the fiducial intervals are constructed for the location (scale)parameters and the difference (ratio) of two locations (scales) in a location (scale) family of distributions. The frequency properties of these intervals are verified. For a variance components model, the fiducial intervals for the three parameters of common interest are obtained. Their frequency properties are investigated theoretically and computationally.

  5. Institutional restriction to the trade of fuel materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Etemad, A. [Vattenfall Fuel, Vaellingby (Sweden); Bay, H. [Nordostschweizerische Kraftwerke AG, Baden (Switzerland)

    1995-12-31

    Very fundamental institutional restrictions have for many years governed for the trade of nuclear material. The NPT and the IAEA Safeguard agreements together with many bilateral or multilateral cooperation agreements have created a stable and over many years predictable working environment for the establishment of the civil nuclear fuel cycle. These restrictions have been very successful as they have resulted in a situation that there is no known diversion of special nuclear material from the civil fuel cycle of NPT member countries to support nuclear weapons programs. (orig./HP)

  6. Restricting factors of the development of SEA in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Xianghua; Zhu Xiaodong; LiYangfan; Chen Shanshan

    2006-01-01

    "Environmental Impact Assessment Law of P. R. China" was promulgated on Oct. 28th, 2002 and has been put into effect on Sep 1st, 2003. This paper puts forward some important factors which restrict the development of Strategic Environmental Assessment according to the preliminary practices of SEA in China. These restricting factors are: (1) potential resistance from some departments; (2) poor cooperation between different departments; (3) limited availability of information resources; (4) lack of well-developed SEA methods; (5) difficulties in public participation. The primary thought to solve these problems were proposed at policy and technique level.

  7. Study on modulation techniques free of orthogonality restriction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The Nyquist rate is a limit of transmission for traditional modulation methods from orthogonality restriction. Nonorthogonal modulation techniques (NMT) is proposed, which removes the orthogonality restriction, and as a result, higher bandwidth efficiency than the traditional methods can be achieved. First, the symbol error rate of NMT is introduced by using estimation theory. Then the relation between bandwidth efficiency and signal to noise ratio is discussed. Finally, a design instance of NMT is present and numerical experiment is made. This study explores for new modulation methods and points out a widened direction for modulation theory and applications.

  8. Semiparametric regression for restricted mean residual life under right censoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mansourvar, Zahra; Martinussen, Torben; Scheike, Thomas H.

    2015-01-01

    A mean residual life function (MRLF) is the remaining life expectancy of a subject who has survived to a certain time point. In the presence of covariates, regression models are needed to study the association between the MRLFs and covariates. If the survival time tends to be too long or the tail...... is not observed, the restricted mean residual life must be considered. In this paper, we propose the proportional restricted mean residual life model for fitting survival data under right censoring. For inference on the model parameters, martingale estimating equations are developed, and the asymptotic properties...

  9. MmoSTI restriction endonuclease, isolated from Morganella morganii infecting a tropical moth, Actias selene, cleaving 5'-|CCNGG-3' sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skowron, Marta A; Zebrowska, Joanna; Wegrzyn, Grzegorz; Skowron, Piotr M

    2016-02-01

    A type II restriction endonuclease, MmoSTI, from the pathogenic bacterium Morganella morganii infecting a tropical moth, Actias selene, has been detected and biochemically characterized, as a potential etiological differentiation factor. The described REase recognizes interrupted palindromes, i.e., 5'-CCNGG-3' sequences and cleaves DNA leaving 5-nucleotide (nt) long, single-stranded (ss), 5'-cohesive ends, which was determined by three complementary methods: (i) cleavage of custom and standard DNA substrates, (ii) run-off sequencing of cleavage products, and (iii) shotgun cloning and sequencing of bacteriophage lambda (λ) DNA digested with MmoSTI. MmoSTI, the first 5'-CCNGG-3' REase characterized from M. morganii, is a neoschizomer of ScrFI, which cleaves DNA leaving 1-nt long, ss, 5'-cohesive ends. It is a high-frequency cutter and can be isolated from easily cultured bacteria, thus it can potentially serve as a tool for DNA manipulations.

  10. About APPLE II Operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, T.; Zimoch, D.

    2007-01-01

    The operation of an APPLE II based undulator beamline with all its polarization states (linear horizontal and vertical, circular and elliptical, and continous variation of the linear vector) requires an effective description allowing an automated calculation of gap and shift parameter as function of energy and operation mode. The extension of the linear polarization range from 0 to 180° requires 4 shiftable magnet arrrays, permitting use of the APU (adjustable phase undulator) concept. Studies for a pure fixed gap APPLE II for the SLS revealed surprising symmetries between circular and linear polarization modes allowing for simplified operation. A semi-analytical model covering all types of APPLE II and its implementation will be presented.

  11. About APPLE II Operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The operation of an APPLE II based undulator beamline with all its polarization states (linear horizontal and vertical, circular and elliptical, and continous variation of the linear vector) requires an effective description allowing an automated calculation of gap and shift parameter as function of energy and operation mode. The extension of the linear polarization range from 0 to 180 deg. requires 4 shiftable magnet arrrays, permitting use of the APU (adjustable phase undulator) concept. Studies for a pure fixed gap APPLE II for the SLS revealed surprising symmetries between circular and linear polarization modes allowing for simplified operation. A semi-analytical model covering all types of APPLE II and its implementation will be presented

  12. Information on Asse II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The brochure published by BfS describes the actual situation of Asse II with respect to the debate on an interim storage and the status of the realization of a final repository search law. During the visit of the new environment minister Hendricks in the underground facility repository Asse II the issue interim storage site and the retrieval of the corroded casks with radioactive waste were discussed. The challenges for BFS include the acceleration of the retrieval process and the safety of the procedure.

  13. Type-II Leptogenesis

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Jihn E

    2016-01-01

    I will talk on our new theory on baryogenesis through type-II leptogenesis which is different from the well-known type-I leptogenesis. I will comment on the Jarlskog phases, $\\delta_{\\rm CKM}$ and $\\delta_{\\rm PMNS}$, in the CKM and PMNS matrices. In the type-II leptogenesis, the PMNS phase is used for Sakharov's condition on the global quantum number generation in the Universe. For this to be effective, the SU(2)$\\times$U(1) gauge symmetry must be broken during the leptogenesis epoch.

  14. Galaxy S II

    CERN Document Server

    Gralla, Preston

    2011-01-01

    Unlock the potential of Samsung's outstanding smartphone with this jargon-free guide from technology guru Preston Gralla. You'll quickly learn how to shoot high-res photos and HD video, keep your schedule, stay in touch, and enjoy your favorite media. Every page is packed with illustrations and valuable advice to help you get the most from the smartest phone in town. The important stuff you need to know: Get dialed in. Learn your way around the Galaxy S II's calling and texting features.Go online. Browse the Web, manage email, and download apps with Galaxy S II's 3G/4G network (or create you

  15. Complementary specificity of restriction endonucleases of Diplococcus pneumoniae with respect to DNA methylation. [Haemophilus influenzae, Escherichia coli, Paramecium aurelia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacks, S.; Greenberg, B.

    1977-01-01

    Restriction endonucleases Dpn I and Dpn II are produced by two distinct strains of Diplococcus pneumoniae. The two enzymes show complementary specificity with respect to methylation of sites in DNA. From the identity of its cleavage site with that of Mbo I, it appears that Dpn II cleaves at the unmodified sequence 5'-G-A-T-C-3'. Dpn I cleaves at the same sequence when the adenine residue is methylated. Both enzymes produce only double-strand breaks in susceptible DNA. Their susceptibility to Dpn I and not Dpn II shows that essentially all the G-A-T-C sequences are methylated in DNA from the pneumococcal strain that produces Dpn II as well as in DNA from Hemophilus influenzae and Escherichia coli. In the dam-3 mutant of E. coli none of these sequences appear to be methylated. Residual adenine methylation in the dam-3 mutant DNA most likely occurs at different sites. Different but characteristic degrees of methylation at G-A-T-C sites are found in the DNA of bacterial viruses grown in E. coli. DNAs from mammalian cells and viruses are not methylated at this sequence. Mitochondrial DNA from Paramecium aurelia is not methylated, but a small proportion of G-A-T-C sequences in the macronuclear DNA of this eukaryote appear to be methylated. Possible roles of sequence-specific methylation in the accommodation of plasmids, in the replication of DNA, in the regulation of gene function and in the restriction of viral infection are discussed.

  16. 17 CFR 1.22 - Use of customer funds restricted.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Use of customer funds... REGULATIONS UNDER THE COMMODITY EXCHANGE ACT Customers' Money, Securities, and Property § 1.22 Use of customer funds restricted. No futures commission merchant shall use, or permit the use of, the customer funds...

  17. Distribution Learning in Evolutionary Strategies and Restricted Boltzmann Machines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krause, Oswin

    The thesis is concerned with learning distributions in the two settings of Evolutionary Strategies (ESs) and Restricted Boltzmann Machines (RBMs). In both cases, the distributions are learned from samples, albeit with different goals. Evolutionary Strategies are concerned with finding an optimum...

  18. Associations between Schools' Tobacco Restrictions and Adolescents' Use of Tobacco

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oslash-Verland, Simon; Aaro, Leif Edvard; Lindbak, Rita Lill

    2010-01-01

    Schools are an important arena for smoking prevention. In many countries, smoking rates have been reduced among adolescents, but the use of smokeless tobacco is on the rise in some of these countries. We aimed to study the associations between schools' restrictions on smoking and snus and on the use of these tobacco products among students in…

  19. 76 FR 14083 - Proposed Exemptions From Certain Prohibited Transaction Restrictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-15

    ... are received, and they can be retrieved by most Internet search engines. The Department will make no..., and in accordance with procedures set forth in 29 CFR part 2570, subpart B (55 FR 32836, 32847, August..., subpart B (55 FR 32836, 32847, August 10, 1990).\\1\\ If the exemption is granted, the restrictions...

  20. Restrictions in social participation of young adults with spina bifida

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barf, H. A.; Post, M. W. M.; Verhoef, M.; Jennekens-Schinkel, A.; Gooskens, R. H. J. M.; Prevo, A. J. H.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose. To determine participation restrictions of young adults with spina bifida (SB) in relation to health condition and activity limitations. Method. A total of 179 persons aged 16-25 years and born with SB participated in a cross-sectional study. The main outcome on four domains of participatio