WorldWideScience

Sample records for argentina mineralogical geochemical

  1. Geochemical and mineralogical characteristics of Lithomargic clay

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    Geochemical and mineralogical characteristics of Lithomargic clay. GEOCHEMICAL AND .... tries, as filling material in the pulp and paper, toothpaste and paint industries as well ..... tions very vital to human health and other ac- tivities of man.

  2. Mineralogical, IR-spectral and geochemical monitoring of hydrothermal alteration in a deformed and metamorphosed Jurassic VMS deposit at Arroyo Rojo, Tierra del Fuego, Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biel, C.; Subías, I.; Acevedo, R. D.; Yusta, I.; Velasco, F.

    2012-04-01

    The Arroyo Rojo Zn-Pb-Cu volcanogenic massive sulfide deposit is the main deposit of the Fin del Mundo District in the Fuegian Andes, Argentina. This deposit is hosted by a Middle Jurassic volcanic and volcanoclastic sequence forming the Lemaire Formation. The latter consists, from the base up, of the following: rhyolitic and dacitic porphyritic rocks, ignimbrite, tuff, and flow. It is underlain by a pre-Jurassic basement and overlain by the hyaloclastic andesites of the Yahgán Formation. The Arroyo Rojo consists of stacked lenticular lenses that are associated with disseminated mineralization in both the footwall and the hanging wall. The internal structure of the ore lenses is marked by the occurrence of massive, semi-massive and banded facies, along with stringer and brecciated zones and minor ore disseminations. The mineral assemblage comprises mainly pyrite and sphalerite, with minor amounts of galena and chalcopyrite and rare pyrrhotite, arsenopyrite, tetrahedrite and bournonite. The ores and the volcanic host rocks have metamorphosed to greenschist facies and were overprinted by a penetrative tectonic foliation, which led to the development of mylonitic, and cataclastic textures, recrystallization and remobilization. Primary depositional characteristics and regional and hydrothermal alteration patterns were preserved despite deformation and metamorphism. Therefore, primary banding was preserved between facies boundaries. In addition, some remnants of magmatic origin are recognizable in preserved phenocrysts and volcaniclastic phenoclasts. Most of the volcanic and volcaniclastic rocks of the host sequence show a rhyolitic to rhyo-dacitic composition. Regional seafloor alteration, characterized by the presence of clinozoisite, Fe-chlorite and titanite, along with quartz and albite, is partially obliterated by hydrothermal alteration. The hydrothermal alteration is stratabound with the following assemblages, which developed from the base to top: (1) Quartz

  3. Mineralogical and geochemical studies of phosphorite nodules in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mineralogical and geochemical studies of phosphorite nodules in the Dange Formation Sokoto Basin, Northwestern Niveria. OA Adekeye, SO Akande. Abstract. No Abstract Available Journal of Mining and Geology Vol.40(2) 2004: 101-106. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT ...

  4. A national-scale geochemical and mineralogical survey of soils of the conterminous United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, David B.; Cannon, William F.; Woodruff, Laurel G.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Sampling for national-scale soil geochemical and mineralogical survey completed for conterminous USA. → Natural variation for most elements is approximately three orders of magnitude. → Composition of soil parent material is the major controlling factor. → Climate (average annual precipitation) is also an important controlling factor for some elements. → Sample archive (4800 sites) available for future investigations. - Abstract: In 2007, the US Geological Survey initiated a low-density (1 site per 1600 km 2 , c. 4800 sites) geochemical and mineralogical survey of soils of the conterminous USA. The ideal sampling protocol at each site includes a sample from 0-5 cm depth, a composite of the soil A horizon, and a sample from the soil C horizon. The 3 , HClO 4 and HF. Separate methods are used for As, Hg, Se and total C on this same size fraction. The major mineralogical components are determined by a quantitative X-ray diffraction method. Sampling was completed in 2010 with chemical and mineralogical analysis currently underway. Preliminary results for a swath from the central USA to Florida clearly show the effects of soil parent material and climate on the chemical and mineralogical composition of soils. A sample archive will be established and made available for future investigations.

  5. Mineralogical and geochemical characterization of the Jurassic coal from Egypt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baioumy, H.M. [Central Metallurgical Research and Development Institute, Cairo (Egypt)

    2009-06-15

    The Jurassic coal deposit in the Maghara area, Sinai, Egypt contains at least 11 coal seams of lenticular shape. The thickness of the main coal seams ranges from 130 cm to 2 m and are underlain and overlain by thin black shale beds. Mineralogical analysis indicated that this coal is characterized by low mineral matter with traces of quartz in some samples. However, coal ash is made up of quartz with traces of calcite, anhydrite, and hematite. Analysis of coal rank parameters indicated that the Maghara coal can be classified as medium volatile bituminous coal. The high sulfur contents and the relatively high proportion of pyritic sulfur suggest a possible marine transgression after the deposition of precursor peat. This interpretation is supported by the relatively high B contents. The relatively high Ge in the Maghara coal could be attributed to an infiltration of Ge enriched water from the surrounding siliceous sediments probably during diagenesis. The high Au contents were contributed to an Au-rich provenance of the ash contents of this coal. Rare earth elements geochemistry indicated low concentrations of these elements with slight enrichment of light rare earth elements (LREEs), slight negative Eu anomaly, and relatively flat heavy rare earth elements (HREEs) patterns. The low contents of trace and rare earth elements, particularly those with environmental relevance, compared to the usual concentration ranges in worldwide coal gives an advantage for this coal.

  6. Expected Geochemical and Mineralogical Properties of Meteorites from Mercury: Inferences from Messenger Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCubbin, F. M.; McCoy, T. J.

    2016-01-01

    Meteorites from the Moon, Mars, and many types of asteroid bodies have been identified among our global inventory of meteorites, however samples of Mercury and Venus have not been identified. The absence of mercurian and venusian meteorites could be attributed to an inability to recognize them in our collections due to a paucity of geochemical information for Venus and Mercury. In the case of mercurian meteorites, this possibility is further supported by dynamical calculations that suggest mercurian meteorites should be present on Earth at a factor of 2-3 less than meteorites from Mars [1]. In the present study, we focus on the putative mineralogy of mercurian meteorites using data obtained from the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft, which has provided us with our first quantitative constraints on the geochemistry of planet Mercury. We have used the MESSENGER data to compile a list of mineralogical and geochemical characteristics that a meteorite from Mercury is likely to exhibit.

  7. Mineralogical, geochemical and hydrocarbon potential of subsurface Cretaceous shales, Northern Western Desert, Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.A. Mousa

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Twenty four Cretaceous shale core samples of Gibb Afia-1, Betty-1, Salam-1X and Mersa Matruh-1 wells were mineralogically and geochemically studied using XRD, XRF and Rock Eval Pyrolysis. Kaolinite, smectite and illite are the main clay minerals in addition to rare chlorite, while the non-clay minerals include quartz, calcite, dolomite and rare siderite. The shales were derived through intensive chemical weathering of mafic basement and older sedimentary rocks. These sediments were deposited in a near-shore shallow marine environment with some terrestrial material input. The shales have poor to fair organic content. It is marginally to rarely mature.

  8. Mineralogical and geochemical study of contaminated soils on abandoned Sb deposits Dubrava and Poproc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klimko, T.; Jurkovic, L.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we present initial results of mineralogical and geochemical study of secondary mineral phases, often with a high content of Sb and As, resulting from oxidation of sulphide minerals in the soil environment on two, now abandoned Sb deposits. Dubrava deposit is situated on the northern slopes of the Dumbier Low Tatras and Poproc deposit is located in the eastern part of Spis-Gemer Rudohorie. Both studied sites were in the past (second half of 20 th century) significant producers of antimony ore and Dubrava deposit belonged to medium-sized Sb deposits in the world.

  9. Petrological mineralogical and geochemical characterization of the granitoids and fracture fillings developed in Ratones Mines (Spain)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buil Gutierrez, B.

    2002-01-01

    The petrological, mineralogical and geochemical characterisation of the granitoids and fracture fillings developed in the Ratones Mine (Caceres, Spain) has been done in order to understand rock-water interaction processes which control water geochemical parameters. Special interest has been devoted to the analysis and interpretation of REE patterns in the solid phase (granitoids and fracture fillings) because they constitute geochemical tracers in water-rock interaction process. Moreover, REE are considered as actinide analogues. In order to characterise the solid phase (granitoids and fracture fillings) several investigation scales (system, outcrop, whole rock, mineral and geochemical components) have been considered and different types of samples have been analysed. These factors control the methodological approach used in this investigation. The analytical methods we have used in this investigation are microscope, qualitative and semi-quantitative methods (XRD, SEM,EDAX) and quantitative methods (ICP-MS, XRF, EM, LAM-IC-MS). The bulk of the granitoids located around the Ratones Mine Belongs to the alkaline feldspar granite-sienogranite lihotype and they show a peraluminous and subalkaline pattern. From the mineralogical point of view, they are composed by quartz, K-feldspar (Or>90%), showing sericitation, moscovitization and turmolinization altherations, alkaline plagioclase (An-=-3%), usually altered to sericite, saussirite and less frequently affected by moscovitization processes, Fe-Al biotite, frequently affected by chloritization processes and sometimes replaced by muscovite, and finally muscovite (>2% celadonite and <4% paragonite) both of primary and secondary origin. The differences observed between the different lithotypes are related with the modal proportion of the principal minerals,with the presence or absence of certain accessory minerals ( turmaline, cordierite), with specific textural patterns, grain size and also with the richness in specific

  10. Simulation of radionuclide retardation at Yucca Mountain using a stochastic mineralogical/geochemical model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birdsell, K.H.; Campbell, K.; Eggert, K.; Travis, B.J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents preliminary transport calculations for radionuclide movement at Yucca Mountain. Several different realizations of spatially distributed sorption coefficients are used to study the sensitivity of radionuclide migration. These sorption coefficients are assumed to be functions of the mineralogic assemblages of the underlying rock. The simulations were run with TRACRN 1 , a finite-difference porous flow and radionuclide transport code developed for the Yucca Mountain Project. Approximately 30,000 nodes are used to represent the unsaturated and saturated zones underlying the repository in three dimensions. Transport calculations for a representative radionuclide cation, 135 Cs, and anion, 99 Tc, are presented. Calculations such as these will be used to study the effectiveness of the site's geochemical barriers at a mechanistic level and to help guide the geochemical site characterization program. The preliminary calculations should be viewed as a demonstration of the modeling methodology rather than as a study of the effectiveness of the geochemical barriers. The model provides a method for examining the integration of flow scenarios with transport and retardation processes as currently understood for the site. The effects on transport of many of the processes thought to be active at Yucca Mountain may be examined using this approach. 11 refs., 14 figs., 1 tab

  11. Mineralogical and geochemical patterns of urban surface soils, the example of Pforzheim, Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norra, Stefan; Lanka-Panditha, Mahesh; Kramar, Utz; Stueben, Doris

    2006-01-01

    This study presents a combined geochemical and mineralogical survey of urban surface soils. Many studies on urban soils are restricted to purely chemical surveys in order to investigate soil pollution caused by anthropogenic activities such as traffic, heating, industrial processing, waste disposal and many more. In environmental studies, chemical elements are often distinguished as lithogenic and anthropogenic elements. As a novel contribution to those studies, the authors combined the analysis of a broad set of chemical elements with the analysis of the main mineralogical phases. The semi-quantification of mineralogical phases supported the assignment of groups of chemical elements to lithogenic or anthropogenic origin. Minerals are important sinks for toxic elements. Thus, knowledge about their distribution in soils is crucial for the assessment of the environmental hazards due to pollution of urban soils. In Pforzheim, surface soils (0-5 cm depth) from various land use types (forest, agriculture, urban green space, settlement areas of various site densities) overlying different geological units (clastic and chemical sediments) were investigated. Urban surface soils of Pforzheim reflect to a considerable degree the mineral and chemical composition of parent rocks. Irrespective of the parent rocks, elevated concentrations of heavy metals (Zn, Cu, Pb, Sn, Ag) were found in soils throughout the whole inner urban settlement area of Pforzheim indicating pollution. These pollutants will tend to accumulate in inner urban surface soils according to the available adsorption capacity, which is normally higher in soils overlying limestone than in soils overlying sandstone. However, inner urban surface soils overlying sandstone show elevated concentrations of carbonates, phyllo-silicates and Fe and elevated pH values compared with forest soils overlying sandstone. Thus, in comparison to forest soils overlying sandstones, inner urban soils overlying sandstone affected by

  12. Lithology and mineralogy recognition from geochemical logging tool data using multivariate statistical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konaté, Ahmed Amara; Ma, Huolin; Pan, Heping; Qin, Zhen; Ahmed, Hafizullah Abba; Dembele, N'dji Dit Jacques

    2017-10-01

    The availability of a deep well that penetrates deep into the Ultra High Pressure (UHP) metamorphic rocks is unusual and consequently offers a unique chance to study the metamorphic rocks. One such borehole is located in the southern part of Donghai County in the Sulu UHP metamorphic belt of Eastern China, from the Chinese Continental Scientific Drilling Main hole. This study reports the results obtained from the analysis of oxide log data. A geochemical logging tool provides in situ, gamma ray spectroscopy measurements of major and trace elements in the borehole. Dry weight percent oxide concentration logs obtained for this study were SiO 2 , K 2 O, TiO 2 , H 2 O, CO 2 , Na 2 O, Fe 2 O 3 , FeO, CaO, MnO, MgO, P 2 O 5 and Al 2 O 3 . Cross plot and Principal Component Analysis methods were applied for lithology characterization and mineralogy description respectively. Cross plot analysis allows lithological variations to be characterized. Principal Component Analysis shows that the oxide logs can be summarized by two components related to the feldspar and hydrous minerals. This study has shown that geochemical logging tool data is accurate and adequate to be tremendously useful in UHP metamorphic rocks analysis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Mineralogy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, C.

    2006-01-01

    The classic in the field since 1848, this extraordinary reference offers readers unsurpassed coverage of mineralogy and crystallography. The book is known for integrating complete coverage of concepts and principles with a more systematic and descriptive treatment of mineralogy. The revised edition now includes a CD-ROM to let readers see the minerals and crystals, while also viewing chemical composition, symmetry, and morphological crystallography.

  14. Mineralogical, geochemical and radiological characterisation of Selmo Formation in Batman area, Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isik, Umit; Damla, Nevzat; Akkoca, Dicle Bal; Cevik, Uğur

    2012-06-01

    This work deals with the mineralogical, geochemical and radiological characterisations of Selmo Formation in Batman neighbourhood. The upper Miocene-Pliocene Selmo Formation is common in the centre of Batman and composed of carbonated sandy claystones and silty-sandy stone lenses. The common whole minerals of the samples are quartz, feldspars, calcite and dolomite. The clay minerals are smectite, illite, chlorite and mixed-layer clay (chlorite-smectite). The geochemical mean values of the samples are 51.7% SiO(2); 12.6% Al(2)O(3); 6.2% Fe(2)O(3); 3.6% MgO; 6.3% CaO; 1.1% Na(2)O; 1.7% K(2)O; 0.8% TiO(2); 0.2% P(2)O(5); 0.1% MnO; and 0.03% Cr(2)O(3). In addition, baseline maps for the concentrations of each radionuclide, the radium equivalent activity and the outdoor gamma dose rate distributions have been plotted for the study area. The mean activity concentrations of (226)Ra, (232)Th, (40)K and (137)Cs were determined to be 32, 24, 210 and 9 Bq kg(-1), respectively. The assessments of the radiological hazard indices, such as radium equivalent activity, absorbed dose rate in air, annual effective dose equivalent, excess lifetime cancer risk, external hazard index and internal hazard index, were calculated and compared with the internationally accepted reference values. This study shows that the concentrations of radioactivities in the measured samples were within the recommended safety limits and did not pose to be any significant source of radiation hazard.

  15. Mineralogy of auriferous deposits of the quaternary deposits in the San Luis Province, Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karlsson, A.; Ayala, R. . E mail: Karlsson@arnet.com.ar

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this work is to study the mineralogy of the sands and clays of the quaternary deposits in the San Luis Mountain, Argentina. A series of algorithms applied to the sand fraction has permitted to determine sedimentary discontinuities. The two micron fraction of the sediments has been studied by a quantification technique based on X-ray diffraction by means of oriented preparations and run with copper tube. These quaternary silts have received fluvial lateral contributions. The high cristalinidad of non expandibles and fireclay clay show the antique of the silts. The polygenic processes have generated a great variety of clay mineral species like a large quantities of illite and in lesser extend kaolinite and smectites. The illite was probably generated by diagenetic changes. The high cristalinidad of non expandibles and fireclay clay show the antique of the silts [es

  16. Mineralogical and geochemical aspects of nickeliferous laterite of Vermelho region, Serra dos Carajas (State of Para)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida Correa, S.L. de.

    1982-01-01

    Mineralogical and geochemical studies were carried out on the nickeliferous laterite of Vermelho region (Serra of Carajas, state of Para). A total of 64 samples were analysed by X-ray fluorescence analysis and atomic absorption, spectrophotometry, including bed-rock specimens. The laterite is derived from ultramafic rocks (serpentinites) and there horizons were recognized towards the top: saprolitic horizon with a thickness of more than 4 meters, clay horizon 6,1 meters thick and limonitic horizon with a thickness of 8,3 meters. The process of weathering affected both major and trace elements which were bleached, transported and reprecipitated. This caused variations in the concentration of the elements with depth, except for magnesium which was extensively bleached. Nickel concentrations in the clay horizon probably was a result of ion exchange between smectite and Ni-bearing solutions, the source of this Ni being goethite. Cobalt and zinc were also strongly enriched during the process of laterization, although maximum concentrations of these elements are found in different horizons. (author)

  17. Río Tinto: A Geochemical and Mineralogical Terrestrial Analogue of Mars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Amils

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The geomicrobiological characterization of the water column and sediments of Río Tinto (Huelva, Southwestern Spain have proven the importance of the iron and the sulfur cycles, not only in generating the extreme conditions of the habitat (low pH, high concentration of toxic heavy metals, but also in maintaining the high level of microbial diversity detected in the basin. It has been proven that the extreme acidic conditions of Río Tinto basin are not the product of 5000 years of mining activity in the area, but the consequence of an active underground bioreactor that obtains its energy from the massive sulfidic minerals existing in the Iberian Pyrite Belt. Two drilling projects, MARTE (Mars Astrobiology Research and Technology Experiment (2003–2006 and IPBSL (Iberian Pyrite Belt Subsurface Life Detection (2011–2015, were developed and carried out to provide evidence of subsurface microbial activity and the potential resources that support these activities. The reduced substrates and the oxidants that drive the system appear to come from the rock matrix. These resources need only groundwater to launch diverse microbial metabolisms. The similarities between the vast sulfate and iron oxide deposits on Mars and the main sulfide bioleaching products found in the Tinto basin have given Río Tinto the status of a geochemical and mineralogical Mars terrestrial analogue.

  18. Mineralogical-geochemical specificity of the uranium mineralization superposed on the oxidized rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulatov, S.G.; Shchetochkin, V.N.

    1975-01-01

    Taking as an example a uranium deposit connected with oxidation zones developing along the strata, the author examines the mineralogical and geochemical features of a pitchblende-sooty uraninite mineralization superimposed on limonitized sandstones. The typical relations between ore mineralization with new formations of the infiltration oxidation process and the changes caused by the action of rising thermal solutions on the rocks are given. Based on these relations, two generations of different ages of rich pitchblende-sooty uraninite ores are distinguished, separated by the time of development of the oxidation processes. The typical change around the ore is a reduction of limonitized rocks, accompanied by their pyritization, clarification and hematitization. The ore concentrations were formed as a result of the action of rising thermal solutions that had interacted with oxidized rocks. The development of late oxidation processes caused the redistribution of these ore concentrations and their downward shift along the stratum slope following the limonitization boundary. On the basis of the data presented, comments of a forecasting and prospecting nature are made. (author)

  19. Organic petrographical, mineralogical and geochemical features of the Achlada and Mavropigi lignite deposits, NW Macedonia, Greece

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koukouzas, Nikolaos [Centre for Research and Technology Hellas, Institute for Solid Fuels Technology and Applications, Mesogeion Ave. 357-359, GR-15231 Halandri, Athens (Greece); Kalaitzidis, Stavros P. [Geological Services, BHP Billiton Mitsubishi Alliance, Central Queensland Office, Peak Downs Mine, Moranbah, QLD 4744 (Australia); Ward, Colin R. [School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia)

    2010-09-01

    The Achlada and Mavropigi lignite deposits in northern Greece provide the main coal source for the next generation of Greek power plants. A comparative characterization of these two lignite deposits is presented, covering the coal rank and the features of the maceral components, based on detailed coal petrography, and the mineralogical and geochemical features of the coals and their ashes, based on XRF and XRD analyses. The data are used to interpret the palaeoenvironments of the lignite beds, as well as factors that may affect their burnout behavior. Both deposits have a lignite C rank. The Mavropigi lignite is mainly a matrix lignite lithotype, whereas the Achlada deposit consists both of matrix and xylite-rich lithotypes. The Achlada lignite was formed in a fluviatile environment, mainly in the abandoned channels of a meandering river system during flooding periods; hence it is enriched in inorganic matter, with ash values > 30 wt.%. The Mavropigi lignite formed in a reed-marsh environment under limno-telmatic conditions, and displays ash values < 30 wt.%. The inorganic matter of the two deposits is different in composition due to the contrasting environments, and these differences should be taken into account in optimizing their utilization for power production. A preliminary assessment indicates that the Achlada lignite may have more favorable slagging and fouling properties than the Mavropigi lignite, although experimental studies are required for more solid conclusions to be reached. (author)

  20. Rare Earth Elements (La, Ce, Pr, Nd, and Sm from a Carbonatite Deposit: Mineralogical Characterization and Geochemical Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Edahbi

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Geochemical characterization including mineralogical measurements and kinetic testing was completed on samples from the Montviel carbonatite deposit, located in Quebec (Canada. Three main lithological units representing both waste and ore grades were sampled from drill core. A rare earth element (REE concentrate was produced through a combination of gravity and magnetic separation. All samples were characterized using different mineralogical techniques (i.e., quantitative evaluation of minerals by scanning electron microscopy (QEMSCAN, X-ray diffraction (XRD, and scanning electron microscopy with X-ray microanalysis (SEM-EDS in order to quantify modal mineralogy, liberation, REE deportment and composition of REE-bearing phases. The REE concentrate was then submitted for kinetic testing (weathering cell in order to investigate the REE leaching potential. The mineralogical results indicate that: (i the main REE-bearing minerals in all samples are burbankite, kukharenkoite-Ce, monazite, and apatite; (ii the samples are dominated by REE-free carbonates (i.e., calcite, ankerite, and siderite; and (iii LREE is more abundant than HREE. Grades of REE minerals, sulfides and oxides are richer in the concentrate than in the host lithologies. The geochemical test results show that low concentrations of light REE are leached under kinetic testing conditions (8.8–139.6 µg/L total light REE. These results are explained by a low reactivity of the REE-bearing carbonates in the kinetic testing conditions, low amounts of REE in solids, and by precipitation of secondary REE minerals.

  1. Application of Ground Penetrating Radar Supported by Mineralogical-Geochemical Methods for Mapping Unroofed Cave Sediments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teja Čeru

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Ground penetrating radar (GPR using a special unshielded 50 MHz Rough Terrain Antenna (RTA in combination with a shielded 250 MHz antenna was used to study the capability of this geophysical method for detecting cave sediments. Allochthonous cave sediments found in the study area of Lanski vrh (W Slovenia are now exposed on the karst surface in the so-called “unroofed caves” due to a general lowering of the surface (denudation of carbonate rocks and can provide valuable evidence of the karst development. In the first phase, GPR profiles were measured at three test locations, where cave sediments are clearly evident on the surface and appear with flowstone. It turned out that cave sediments are clearly visible on GPR radargrams as areas of strong signal attenuation. Based on this finding, GPR profiling was used in several other places where direct indicators of unroofed caves or other indicators for speleogenesis are not present due to strong surface reshaping. The influence of various field conditions, especially water content, on GPR measurements was also analysed by comparing radargrams measured in various field conditions. Further mineralogical-geochemical analyses were conducted to better understand the factors that influence the attenuation in the area of cave sediments. Samples of cave sediments and soils on carbonate rocks (rendzina were taken for X-ray diffraction (XRD and X-ray fluorescence (XRF analyses to compare the mineral and geochemical compositions of both sediments. Results show that cave sediments contain higher amounts of clay minerals and iron/aluminium oxides/hydroxides which, in addition to the thickness of cave sediments, can play an important role in the depth of penetration. Differences in the mineral composition also lead to water retention in cave sediments even through dry periods which additionally contribute to increased attenuation with respect to surrounding soils. The GPR method has proven to be reliable for

  2. Geochemical and Mineralogical Changes in Compacted MX-80 Bentonite Submitted to Heat and Water Gradients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez-Espina, R.; Villar, M. V.

    2010-01-01

    A 20-cm high column of MX80 bentonite compacted at dry density 1.70 g/cm 3 with an initial water content of 16 percent was submitted to heating and hydration by opposite ends for 496 days (TH test). The temperature at the bottom of the column was set at 140 degree centigrade and on top at 30 degree centigrade, and deionised water was injected on top at a pressure of 0.01 MPa. Upon dismantling water content, dry density, mineralogy, specific surface area, cation exchange capacity, content of exchangeable cations, and concentration of soluble salts and pH of aqueous extracts were determined in different positions along the bentonite column. The pore water composition was modelled with a geochemical software. The test tried to simulate the conditions of an engineered barrier in a deep geological repository for high-level radioactive waste. The water intake and distribution of water content and dry density along the bentonite were conditioned by the thermal gradient. Liquid water did not penetrate into the column beyond the area in which the temperature was higher than 100 degree centigrade. A convection cell was formed above this area, and liquid water loaded with ions evaporated towards cooler bentonite as it reached the area where the temperature was too high. In this area precipitation of mineral phases took place, Advection, interlayer exchange and dissolution/precipitation processes conditioned the composition of the pore water along the column. In most of the column the pore water was Na-SO 4 2 - type, and changed to Na-Cl near the heater. TH treatment did not cause significant changes in the smectite content or the other mineral phases of the bentonite. (Author) 41 refs.

  3. Mineralogical-Geochemical Peculiarities of Ores in Pyritaceous Fields of Filizchai Type in the Greater Caucasus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NOVRUZ A. NOVRUZOV

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Pyritaceous fields of the south slope of the Greater Caucasus confined to the Lower-Middle Jurassic sandy clayey deposits are: polygenic polychrone formations which were formed by a complex of hydrothermal sedimentary, hydrothermal metasomatic and hydrothermal metamorphogenic processes of ore formation. Filizchai pyritaceous polymetallic field is the largest in the region and can be characterized by diversity of texture-mineralogical types of ores, rich mineral composition and with geochemical spectrum. Some of the admixture components (Cd, In, Tl, Ga, Ge, Se, Hg are only in isomorphic forms in ores, others (Te, Bi, Au, Ag, Co, Sn, As along with it characterize in their own minerals. The Co is mainly concentrated in pyrite, pyrrhotine; Ag, Bi and also Te – in galenite and chalcopyrite; Se – in pyrite, pyrrhotine and galenite; in sphalerite (mainly in marmatite and chalcopyrite; Cd, Ga, Ge – in sphalerite, mainly in cleiophane; Au – in pyrite and chalcopyrite; Tl – in galenite and colloform pyrite. In all sulphides selenium prevails over tellurium (excepting the late chalcopyrite and cobalt over nickel. Maximum amount of cobalt is confined to pyrite from pyritaceous polymetallic ores and late generation of pyrrhotine. The nature of the connection between chemical elements in ores coordinates with determined stages of minerals formation. The main productive stage of ore formation bringing the main mass of gold, silver, rare and other precious components of ores are sulphosalt polymetallic stage of sulphur ploymetallic stage. Comparative analysis of absolute content of gold, silver and values of gold-silver relation in pyrite fields ores of region with appropriate values in meteorite standard indirectly indicates the relationship between gold-silver mineralization and assimilation crust source.

  4. Geochemical and Mineralogical Changes in Compacted MX-80 Bentonite Submitted to Heat and Water Gradients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez-Espina, R.; Villar, M. V.

    2010-05-01

    A 20-cm high column of MX80 bentonite compacted at dry density 1.70 g/cm{sup 3} with an initial water content of 16 percent was submitted to heating and hydration by opposite ends for 496 days (TH test). The temperature at the bottom of the column was set at 140 degree centigrade and on top at 30 degree centigrade, and deionised water was injected on top at a pressure of 0.01 MPa. Upon dismantling water content, dry density, mineralogy, specific surface area, cation exchange capacity, content of exchangeable cations, and concentration of soluble salts and pH of aqueous extracts were determined in different positions along the bentonite column. The pore water composition was modelled with a geochemical software. The test tried to simulate the conditions of an engineered barrier in a deep geological repository for high-level radioactive waste. The water intake and distribution of water content and dry density along the bentonite were conditioned by the thermal gradient. Liquid water did not penetrate into the column beyond the area in which the temperature was higher than 100 degree centigrade. A convection cell was formed above this area, and liquid water loaded with ions evaporated towards cooler bentonite as it reached the area where the temperature was too high. In this area precipitation of mineral phases took place, Advection, interlayer exchange and dissolution/precipitation processes conditioned the composition of the pore water along the column. In most of the column the pore water was Na-SO{sub 4} {sup 2}- type, and changed to Na-Cl near the heater. TH treatment did not cause significant changes in the smectite content or the other mineral phases of the bentonite. (Author) 41 refs.

  5. Mineralogical and geochemical characteristics of the Noamundi-Koira basin iron ore deposits (India)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirza, Azimuddin; Alvi, Shabbar Habib; Ilbeyli, Nurdane

    2015-04-01

    with kaolinite and gibbsite, which make it low grade. Massive iron ores are devoid of any lamination and usually associated with BHJ and lower shale. The thickness of the massive ore layer varies with the location. The massive iron ore grades in to well-developed bedded BHJ in depth. Blue dust occurs in association with BHJ as pockets and layers. Although blue dust and friable ore are both powdery ores, and subjected to variable degree of deformation, leading to the formation of folding, faulting and joints of complex nature produce favourable channels. Percolating water play an important role in the formation of blue dust and the subterranean solution offers the necessary acidic environment for leaching of quartz from the BHJ. The dissolution of silica and other alkalis are responsible for the formation of blue dust. The friable and powdery ore on the other hand are formed by soft laminated ore. As it is formed from the soft laminated ore, its alumina content remains high similar to soft laminated ore compaired to blue dust. Mineralogy study suggests that magnetite was the principal iron oxide mineral, now a relict phase whose depositional history is preserved in BHJ, where it remains in the form of martite. The platy hematite is mainly the product of martite. The different types of iron ores are intricately related with the BHJ. Hard laminated ores, martite-goethite ore and soft laminated ore are resultant of desilicification process through the action of hydrothermal fluids. Geochemistry of banded iron-formations of the Noamundi-Koira iron ore deposits shows that they are detritus-free chemical precipitates. The mineralogical and geochemical data suggest that the hard laminated, massive, soft laminated ores and blue dust had a genetic lineage from BIF's aided with certain input from hydrothermal activity. The comparative study of major elemental composition of the basin samples and while plotting a binary diagram, it shows a relation between major oxides against

  6. Results of geochemical and mineralogical studies on uranium in Zechstein copper-bearing strata from Lubin-Polkowice area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bareja, E.

    1977-01-01

    The paper presents the results of geochemical and mineralogical studies on uranium in Zechstein copper-bearing strata from the Lubin-Polkowice area. It was found that particular lithofacial varietes of Zechstein copper-bearing strata are characterized by different concentration of uranium. The mineralogical studies made possible determination of the nature of uranium mineralization and the interdependence between uranium and lithology of copper-bearing strata. An interesting uranium mineralization was found in tectonic breccias which yield black blende and schroeckingerite as well as calcite, gypsum, pyrite, hematite and geothite. Secondary minerals such as schroeckingerite and geothite evidence intense weathering processes acting in the copper deposit. The highest value of geochemical background of uranium in the copper-bearing series is displayed by basel copper-bearing shales (so called pitch-black shales) - 68.10 x 10 -40 /0 U. Statistical distribution of that element is unimodal. Distribution of uranium is polymodal in basal sandstones of the copper-bearing series. The geochemical background of red-coloured sandstones (Rotliegendes) is low, equalling 0.39 x 10 40 /0 U, whilst that of gray-coloured sandstones (Zechstein) - 2.32 x 10 -40 /0 U. An anomallous population (344.0 x 10 -40 /0 U) found in the case of gray sandstones of the Lubin-Polkowice area evidences the effects of secondary processes on concentration of uranium. In sandstones occur black blende, carburanes as well as calcite, hematite and goethite. A bimodal distribution of uranium was found in carbonate series. Limestones are characterized by low value of geochemical background (Dsub(x1) = 0.78 x 10 -40 /0 U) whilst dolomites by markedly higher values of the background (Dsub(x2) = 2.73 x 10 -40 /0 U). (author)

  7. MINERALOGICAL AND GEOCHEMICAL EVIDENCE FOR MULTI-STAGE FORMATION OF THE CHERTOVO KORYTO DEPOSIT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. I. Tarasova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The Lena gold province is one of the largest known gold resources in the world. The history of its exploration is long, but the genesis of gold mineralization hosted in black shales in the Bodaibo synclinorium still remains unclear. The studies face the challenge of discovering sources for the useful component and mechanisms of its redistribution and concentration. This study aims to clarify the time sequence of the ore mineralization in the Chertovo Koryto deposit on the basis of detailed mineralogical and geochemical characteristics of the ore, wallrock metasomatites and the Early Proterozoic host black shales, and to assess the applicability of the Sukhoi Log model for clarifying the Chertovo Koryto origin.Geological setting. The Lena gold province is located in the junction area of the Siberian platform and the Baikal mountain region (Fig. 1. The main element of its geological structure is the Chuya-Tonoda-Nechera anticline. Its axial segment is marked by horsts composed of the Early Proterozoic rocks with abundant granitoid massifs. The Chertovo Koryto deposit is located within the Kevakta ore complex at the Tonoda uplift, the largest tectonically disturbed block between the Kevakta and Amandrak granitoids massifs. The 150 m thick and 1.5 km long ore zone of the Chertovo Koryto deposit is confined to the hanging wall of the fold-fault zone feathering the Amandrak deep fault (Fig. 2.Composition. In the ore zone, rocks of the Mikhailovsk Formation include carbonaceous shales of the feldspar-chlorite-sericite-quartz composition with nest-shaped ore accumulations of the pyrite-quartz composition and quartz veinlets. In our study, we distinguish five mineral associations resulting from heterochronous processes that sequentially replaced each other:- The earliest association related with the quartz-muscovite-sericite metasomatism and the removal of REE and other elements from the rocks and their partial redeposition;- Metamorphic

  8. Leaching of APC residues from secondary Pb metallurgy using single extraction tests: the mineralogical and the geochemical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettler, Vojtech; Mihaljevic, Martin; Sebek, Ondrej; Strnad, Ladislav

    2005-05-20

    Two air-pollution-control (APC) residues--one from flue gas cooling with alkaline water and one from deionized water cooling--from secondary lead metallurgy were submitted to two different standardized short-term leaching protocols: US EPA toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) and static leaching according to Czech/European norm EN 12457-2. The experimental procedure was coupled with detailed mineralogical investigation of the solid material (SEM, XRPD) and speciation-solubility calculations using the PHREEQC-2 geochemical code. Both types of residues were considered as hazardous materials exhibiting substantial leaching of Pb (up to 7130 mg/l) and other inorganic contaminants. However, the APC residue produced by flue gas cooling with alkaline water (sample B) exhibits more favourable leaching and environmental characteristics than that produced by simple deionised water cooling (sample A). At pH 6, phosgenite (PbCl2.PbCO3) became the dominant secondary phase. The results are consistent with the mineralogical and geochemical studies focused on acidic forest soils highly polluted by smelter emissions, where anglesite, as a unique Pb-bearing phase, has been detected. From the technological point of view, the mixing of APC residue with alkaline water, followed by an increase in the suspension pH and equilibration with atmospheric CO2, may be used to ensure the precipitation of less soluble Pb carbonates, which are more easily recycled in the Pb recovery process in the metallurgical plant.

  9. Geochemical and mineralogical characterization of a neutral, low-sulfide/high-carbonate tailings impoundment, Markušovce, eastern Slovakia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiller, Edgar; Petrák, Marián; Tóth, Roman; Lalinská-Voleková, Bronislava; Jurkovič, L'ubomír; Kučerová, Gabriela; Radková, Anežka; Sottník, Peter; Vozár, Jaroslav

    2013-11-01

    Tailings deposits generated from mining activities represent a potential risk for the aquatic environment through the release of potentially toxic metals and metalloids occurring in a variety of minerals present in the tailings. Physicochemical and mineralogical characteristics of tailings such as total concentrations of chemical elements, pH, ratio of acid-producing to acid-neutralizing minerals, and primary and secondary mineral phases are very important factors that control the actual release of potentially toxic metals and metalloids from the tailings to the environment. The aims of this study are the determination of geochemical and mineralogical characteristics of tailings deposited in voluminous impoundment situated near the village of Markušovce (eastern Slovakia) and identification of the processes controlling the mobility of selected toxic metals (Cu, Hg) and metalloids (As, Sb). The studied tailings have unique features in comparison with the other tailings investigated previously because of the specific mineral assemblage primarily consisting of barite, siderite, quartz, and minor sulfides. To meet the aims, samples of the tailings were collected from 3 boreholes and 15 excavated pits and subjected to bulk geochemical analyses (i.e., determination of chemical composition, pH, Eh, acid generation, and neutralization potentials) combined with detailed mineralogical characterization using optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), electron microprobe analysis (EMPA), and micro-X-ray diffraction (μ-XRD). Additionally, the geochemical and mineralogical factors controlling the transfer of potentially toxic elements from tailings to waters were also determined using short-term batch test (European norm EN 12457), sampling of drainage waters and speciation-equilibrium calculations performed with PHREEQC. The tailings mineral assemblage consists of siderite, barite, quartz, and dolomite. Sulfide minerals constitute only a minor proportion of the tailings

  10. Early middle Miocene tectonic uplift of the northwestern part of the Qinghai–Tibetan Plateau evidenced by geochemical and mineralogical records in the western Tarim Basin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Chaowen; Hong, Hanlie; Abels, Hemmo A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304848018; Li, Zhaohui; Cao, Kai; Yin, Ke; Song, Bowen; Xu, Yadong; Ji, Junliang; Zhang, Kexin

    The Tarim Basin in western China has been receiving continuous marine to lacustrine deposits during the Cenozoic as a foreland basin of the Qinghai–Tibetan Plateau (QTP). Clay mineralogy and geochemical proxy data from these sedimentary archives can shed light on climate and tectonic trends. Here we

  11. Geochemical and mineralogical characterization of the Eagle Ford Shale: Results from the USGS Gulf Coast #1 West Woodway core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birdwell, Justin E.; Boehlke, Adam; Paxton, Stanley T.; Whidden, Katherine J.; Pearson, Ofori N.

    2017-01-01

    The Eagle Ford shale is a major continuous oil and gas resource play in southcentral Texas and a source for other oil accumulations in the East Texas Basin. As part of the U.S. Geological Survey’s (USGS) petroleum system assessment and research efforts, a coring program to obtain several immature, shallow cores from near the outcrop belt in central Texas has been undertaken. The first of these cores, USGS Gulf Coast #1 West Woodway, was collected near Waco, Texas, in September 2015 and has undergone extensive geochemical and mineralogical characterization using routine methods to ascertain variations in the lithologies and chemofacies present in the Eagle Ford at this locale. Approximately 270 ft of core was examined for this study, focusing on the Eagle Ford Group interval between the overlying Austin Chalk and underlying Buda Limestone (~20 ft of each). Based on previous work to identify the stratigraphy of the Eagle Ford Group in the Waco area and elsewhere (Liro et al., 1994; Robison, 1997; Ratcliffe et al., 2012; Boling and Dworkin, 2015; Fairbanks et al., 2016, and references therein), several lithological units were expected to be present, including the Pepper Shale (or Woodbine), the Lake Waco Formation (or Lower Eagle Ford, including the Bluebonnet, Cloice, and Bouldin or Flaggy Cloice members), and the South Bosque Member (Upper Eagle Ford). The results presented here indicate that there are three major chemofacies present in the cored interval, which are generally consistent with previous descriptions of the Eagle Ford Group in this area. The relatively high-resolution sampling (every two ft above the Buda, 432.8 ft depth, and below the Austin Chalk, 163.5 ft depth) provides great detail in terms of geochemical and mineralogical properties supplementing previous work on immature Eagle Ford Shale near the outcrop belt.

  12. Geochemical interpretation of gamma-ray spectrometry images from the Achala granite (Cordoba, Argentina)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, Luis E.

    1998-01-01

    Data of an old spectrometry gamma-ray survey carried out in the Sierras Pampeanas Range by the National Atomic Energy Commission (Argentina) were reprocessed to obtain a corrected digital archive. The geochemical interpretation of the 250 x 250 meters spectrometric grids from the Achala batholith area was based on the behaviour of the radioelements in a peraluminous magma. Spectrometric maps of potassium, uranium, thorium and their ratios were used. In particular, the Th grid was very useful to define the primary magmatic evolution of the granitoids. K and U correlate roughly with Th distribution. The observed positive correlation between Th and U is thought to be the result of surficial leaching of U from uraninite. Finally, U/Th ratio allows to determine both, the magmatic evolution of the rocks and the mineral phase responsible for U content. (author)

  13. Kaolin clays from Patagonia - Argentina. Relationship between the mineralogy and ceramic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Factorovich, J.C.; Badino, D.; Cravero, F.; Dominguez, E.

    1997-01-01

    The mineralogy, grain size distribution, chemical composition, S and C contents, plasticity, and cationic exchange capacity are determined in the sedimentary kaolinitic clays from the clay pits Puma Negra, Puma Gris, Tincar Super; and Chenque and Cardenal located in Santa Cruz and Chubut Provinces. Mineralogy and Particle size distribution of > 5, 5-2 and <2μ fractions are determined. Modulus of rupture, 1100 and 1250 deg C shrinkage and water absorption and whiteness are found. It is accomplished a statistics correlation between the characteristics of grain size distribution, mineralogy, and other physical properties with the main ceramic properties to understand its influence in the ceramic process. (author)

  14. Mineralogical, textural, structural and geochemical aspects of Nakhlak lead mine, Isfahan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ali Jazi

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Nakhlak lead mine is located at the Nakhlak mountain 55 km NE of Anarak town in Isfahan province. The mineralogy is simple; galena and barite are the main primary minerals and cerussite is the main secondary mineral. Sphalerite, pyrite, chalcopyrite, tetrahedrite-tennantite and acanthite occur as minor and trace mineral inclusions in galena. Secondary minerals are anglesite, plattnerite, wulfenite and malachite. The host rock has undergone a pre-mineralization dolomitization process. Four types of dolomite have been identified which saddle dolomite is the most distinguished. Open space filling textures occur in the form of breccia, cockade, crustification and colloform. Analysis of the galena samples indicates presence of many trace elements in galena among which silver is the most important. Element pairs such as Ag-As, Zn-Cd, As-Cu and As-Sb are highly correlated. This correlation may be explained by the presence of inclusions. Ag-Sb-Bi ternary diagram indicates that galena samples from Nakhlak are rich in Ag and Sb and poor in Bi. Sb/Bi (3773 ratio in galena is suggestive of a low temperature of formation for the deposit. The Upper Cretaceous carbonate host rocks and their dolomitization, the stratabound and epigenetic mineralization, the absence of igneous activity, the open space filling texture, the simple mineralogy and geochemistry all point to a Mississippi valley type model for the Nakhlak Pb deposit.

  15. Geochemical and mineralogical studies of dinosaur bone from the Morrison Formation at Dinosaur Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modreski, P.J.

    2001-01-01

    The dinosaur bones first discovered in 1877 in the Upper Jurassic Morrison Formation at Morrison, Colorado were the first major find of dinosaur skeletons in the western U.S. and led to the recognition of four new dinosaur genera (Apatosaurus, Allosaurus, Diplodocus, and Stegosaurus). Eight articles dealing with these bones which appeared as research reports in the annual reports of the Friends of Dinosaur Ridge from 1990-1999 are condensed and summarized with some additional comments. Two of the articles are about the mineralogy and preservation of the bones; two are about the physical description of the bone occurrence; two are about the history of the site, and two are about use of novel instrumental methods (ground-penetrating radar and a directional scintillometer) to search for new bones.

  16. Post-Eocene volcanics of the Abazar district, Qazvin, Iran: Mineralogical and geochemical evidence for a complex magmatic evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asiabanha, A.; Bardintzeff, J. M.; Kananian, A.; Rahimi, G.

    2012-02-01

    The style of volcanism of post-Eocene volcanism in the Alborz zone of northern Iran is different to that of Eocene volcanism (Karaj Formation). Indeed, the volcanic succession of the Abazar district, located in a narrow volcanic strip within the Alborz magmatic assemblage, is characterized by distinct mineralogical and chemical compositions linked to a complex magmatic evolution. The succession was produced by explosive eruptions followed by effusive eruptions. Two main volcanic events are recognized: (1) a thin rhyolitic ignimbritic sheet underlain by a thicker lithic breccia, and (2) lava flows including shoshonite, latite, and andesite that overlie the first event across a reddish soil horizon. Plagioclase in shoshonite (An 48-92) shows normal zoning, whereas plagioclase in latite and andesite (An 48-75) has a similar composition but shows reverse and oscillatory zoning. QUILF temperature calculations for shoshonites and andesites yield temperatures of 1035 °C and 1029 °C, respectively. The geothermometers proposed by Ridolfi et al. (2010) and Holland and Blundy (1994) yield temperatures of 960 °C and 944 °C for latitic lava, respectively. The samples of volcanic rock show a typical geochemical signature of the continental arc regime, but the andesites clearly differ from the shoshonites, the latites and the rhyolites. The mineralogical and chemical characteristics of these rocks are explained by the following petrogenesis: (1) intrusion of a hot, mantle-depth mafic (shoshonitic) magma, which differentiated in the magma chamber to produce a latitic and then a rhyolitic liquid; (2) rhyolitic ignimbritic eruptions from the top of the magma chamber, following by shoshonitic and then latitic extrusions; (3) magma mingling between the latitic and andesitic magmas, as indicated by the occurrence of andesite clasts within the latite; and (4) andesitic effusions. The youngest volcanic events in the Alborz zone show a close chemical relationship with continental arc

  17. Mineralogical and Geochemical Compositions of the No. 5 Coal in Chuancaogedan Mine, Junger Coalfield, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Yang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the mineralogy and geochemistry of the Early Permian No. 5 coal from the Chuancaogedan Mine, Junger Coalfield, China, using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, Low-temperature ashing X-ray diffraction (LTA-XRD in combination with Siroquant software, X-ray fluorescence (XRF, and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS. The minerals in the No. 5 coal from the Chuancaogedan Mine dominantly consist of kaolinite, with minor amounts of quartz, pyrite, magnetite, gypsum, calcite, jarosite and mixed-layer illite/smectite (I/S. The most abundant species within high-temperature plasma-derived coals were SiO2 (averaging 16.90%, Al2O3 (13.87%, TiO2 (0.55% and P2O5 (0.05%. Notable minor and trace elements of the coal include Zr (245.89 mg/kg, Li (78.54 mg/kg, Hg (65.42 mg/kg, Pb (38.95 mg/kg, U (7.85 mg/kg and Se (6.69 mg/kg. The coal has an ultra-low sulfur content (0.40%. Lithium, Ga, Se, Zr and Hf present strongly positive correlation with ash yield, Si and Al, suggesting they are associated with aluminosilicate minerals in the No. 5 coal. Arsenic is only weakly associated with mineral matter and Ge in the No. 5 coals might be of organic and/or sulfide affinity.

  18. Mineralogical, petrological and geochemical aspects of alkaline and alkaline-carbonatite associations from Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morbidelli, L.; Gomes, C. B.; Beccaluva, L.; Brotzu, P.; Conte, A. M.; Ruberti, E.; Traversa, G.

    1995-12-01

    A general description of Mesozoic and Tertiary (Fortaleza) Brazilian alkaline and alkaline-carbonatite districts is presented with reference to mineralogy, petrology, geochemistry and geochronology. It mainly refers to scientific results obtained during the last decade by an Italo-Brazilian research team. Alkaline occurrences are distributed across Brazilian territory from the southern (Piratini, Rio Grande do Sul State) to the northeastern (Fortaleza, Ceará State) regions and are mainly concentrated along the borders of the Paraná Basin generally coinciding with important tectonic lineaments. The most noteworthy characteristics of these alkaline and alkaline-carbonatite suites are: (i) prevalence of intrusive forms; (ii) abundance of cumulate assemblages (minor dunites, frequent clinopyroxenites and members of the ijolite series) and (iii) abundance of evolved rock-types. Many data demonstrate that crystal fractionation was the main process responsible for magma evolution of all Brazilian alkaline rocks. A hypothesis is proposed for the genesis of carbonatite liquids by immiscibility processes. The incidence of REE and trace elements for different major groups of lithotypes, belonging both to carbonatite-bearing and carbonatite-free districts, are documented. Sr and preliminary Nd isotopic data are indicative of a mantle origin for the least evolved magmas of all the studied occurrences. Mantle source material and melting models for the generation of the Brazilian alkaline magma types are also discussed.

  19. Mineralogical association in the zone of argillic advanced alteration in a kaolin deposit of Patagonia Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rainoldi, A; Oviedo, P.; Maiza, P.; Marfil, S.

    2010-01-01

    This work is about the mineralogical and petrological relations of the para genetic association of advanced argillic zone in the kaolin deposit in Patagonia.This study allowed to establish the sequence of events that took place in the deposit as well as the conditions under which they were generated

  20. Mineralogical and geochemical characteristics of uranium-rich fluoriteinEl-Missikat mineralized granite,Central Eastern Desert, Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Fahmy Raslan

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available A unique, highly radioactive variety of fluor it emineral has been recorded in the uranium occurrence of El-Missikat sheared granite pluton. In this occurrence, the uranium assumes different forms, including its presence as discrete, visible, secondary minerals, rare uraninite and its association with the jasperoid and silica veinlets. However,in some other parts of the sheared zone, the uranium was found to be solely incorporated with fluorite crystals,filling veinlet sand fractures with out any other manife station.This paper focuses ont her elevant mineralogical and geochemical characteristics of this unique fluorite variety.In addition to an investigation with binocular and polarizing microscopes, the separated fluorite grains were analyzed usingan environmental scanning electronmicroscope(ESEM and a field-emission scanning electron microscope.In addition to this,some fluorite crystals were subjected to electron microprobe analyses. While the fluorite accounted for as much as 20% of the sheared granite samples studied, it was found to range from 82 to 96 % in the different size fractions of the separated heavy mineral content. In some parts of the separated fluorite crystals,uranium inquantities of up to 2200 ppm was found to be heterogeneously distributed in the fluoritelattice,regardless of its coloration.

  1. Characterization of water reservoirs affected by acid mine drainage: geochemical, mineralogical, and biological (diatoms) properties of the water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valente, T; Rivera, M J; Almeida, S F P; Delgado, C; Gomes, P; Grande, J A; de la Torre, M L; Santisteban, M

    2016-04-01

    This work presents a combination of geochemical, mineralogical, and biological data obtained in water reservoirs located in one of the most paradigmatic mining regions, suffering from acid mine drainage (AMD) problems: the Iberian Pyrite Belt (IPB). Four water reservoirs located in the Spanish sector of the IBP, storing water for different purposes, were selected to achieve an environmental classification based on the effects of AMD: two mining dams (Gossan and Águas Ácidas), a reservoir for industrial use (Sancho), and one with water used for human supply (Andévalo). The results indicated that the four reservoirs are subject to the effect of metallic loads from polluted rivers, although with different levels: Águas Ácidas > Gossan > Sancho ≥ Andévalo. In accordance, epipsammic diatom communities have differences in the respective composition and dominant taxa. The dominant diatoms in each reservoir indicated acid water: Pinnularia acidophila and Pinnularia aljustrelica were found in the most acidic dams (Gossan and Águas Ácidas, with pH <3), Pinnularia subcapitata in Sancho (pH 2.48-5.82), and Eunotia exigua in Andévalo (pH 2.34-6.15).

  2. Ust-Ishim Bone: Mineralogical and Geochemical Characteristics as the Source of the Paleontological, Paleoecological, and Paleoanthropological Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. I. Silaev

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Ust-Ishim man was the representative of one of the ancestral groups of the Homo sapiens, Neanderthals and Denisovans. The first results of a comprehensive mineralogical and geochemical study of fossil bones using a wide range of physical, chemical and physico-chemical methods: thermal analysis, optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, atomic-force microscopy, nitrogen capillary condensation method, X-ray fluorescence analysis, ISP-MS, gas chromatography method, amino acid chromatography analysis’s, X-ray microprobe method, X-ray diffraction method, Raman and infrared spectroscopy, isotope spectrometry are presented in this article. The studied fragment of the skeleton is of higher preservation rate than the common bone detritus of this age and even the fossils of younger Pleistocene animals that allowed determining almost all its primary properties. The unique preservation presumably was provided by the favorable environment and a special way the Ust-Ishim man originally was buried. Results of study of the chemical and mineral composition of the bone fossils allowed a reconstruction of the Ust-Ishim man life history.

  3. Mineralogical and Geochemical Characteristics of Late Permian Coals from the Mahe Mine, Zhaotong Coalfield, Northeastern Yunnan, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xibo Wang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the mineralogical and geochemical compositions of the Late Permian C2, C5a, C5b, C6a, and C6b semianthracite coals from the Mahe mine, northeastern Yunnan, China. Minerals in the coals are mainly made up of quartz, chamosite, kaolinite, mixed-layer illite/smectite (I/S, pyrite, and calcite; followed by anatase, dolomite, siderite, illite and marcasite. Similar to the Late Permian coals from eastern Yunnan, the authigenic quartz and chamosite were precipitated from the weathering solution of Emeishan basalt, while kaolinite and mixed-layer I/S occurring as lenses or thin beds were related to the weathering residual detrital of Emeishan basalt. However, the euhedral quartz and apatite particles in the Mahe coals were attributed to silicic-rock detrital input. It further indicates that there has been silicic igneous eruption in the northeastern Yunnan. Due to the silicic rock detrital input, the Eu/Eu* value of the Mahe coals is lower than that of the Late Permian coals from eastern Yunnan, where the detrital particles were mainly derived from the basalt. The high contents of Sc, V, Cr, Co, Ni, Cu, Ga, and Sn in the Mahe coals were mainly derived from the Kangdian Upland.

  4. Investigation on type and origin of iron mineralization at Mesgar occurrence, south of Zanjan, using petrological, mineralogical and geochemical data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ebrahimi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Mesgar iron occurrence is located in northwestern part of the Central Iran, 115 km south of Zanjan. Although there is a sequence of volcanic-pyroclastic rocks accompanied by iron mineralization, no detailed works had been conducted in the area. The present paper provides an overview of the geological framework, the mineralization characteristics, and the results of geochemical study of the Mesgar iron occurrence with an application to the ore genesis. Identification of these characteristics can be used as a model for exploration of this type of iron mineralization in the Central Iran and elsewhere. Materials and methods Detailed field work has been carried out at different scales in the Mesgar area. About 16 polished thin and thin sections from host rocks and mineralized and altered zones were studied by conventional petrographic and mineralogic methods at the Department of Geology, University of Zanjan. In addition, a total of 3 samples from least-altered volcanic host rocks and 2 samples from ore zones from the Mesgar occurrence were analyzed by ICP-MS and ICP-OES for whole-rock major and trace elements and REE compositions at the Zarazma Laboratories, Tehran, Iran. Results and Discussion Based on field observation, rock units exposed in the Mesgar area consist of Miocene sedimentary rocks and volcanic-pyroclastic units (Rādfar et al., 2005. The pyroclastic units consist of volcanic breccia and agglomerate. They lie concordantly on the Miocene sedimentary units, and are in turn concordantly overlain by andesitic basalt lavas. The lavas show porphyritic texture consisting of plagioclase (up to 3 mm in size and pyroxene phenocrysts set in a fine-grained to glassy groundmass. Seriate, cumulophyric, glomeroporphyritic and trachytic textures are also observed. Iron mineralization occurs as vein and lens-shaped bodies within and along the contacts of pyroclastic (footwall and andesitic basalt lavas (hanging wall. The veins reach up to

  5. New mineralogical and geochemical evidence for the Middle Eocene Climatic Optimum (MECO) in the Neo-Tethys (Central Turkey)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rego, E. S.; Jovane, L.; Giorgioni, M.; Hein, J. R.; Sant'Anna, L. G.; Rodelli, D.; Özcan, E.; Frontalini, F.; Coccioni, R.

    2016-12-01

    The Middle Eocene Climatic Optimum (MECO) is one of several climate warming events that occurred during the Paleogene. It started at 40.5 Ma and produced a global temperature increase over a period of 500 kyr. However, the duration and the d13C signature of this event are not consistent with the models commonly proposed to explain warming events in the Cenozoic, and thus challenge our understanding of carbon cycling and climatic processes. Here we present data of a new section from central Turkey, recording the MECO in the eastern part of the Neo-Tethys. The stratigraphic extent and continuity, as well as the exceptional preservation of various types of microfossils, allow us to obtain a multi-proxy record of unprecedented high resolution for this interval. We integrate data from stable isotopes, X-ray diffraction mineralogy, XRF chemistry, and magnetic properties to obtain a complete paleoclimatic and paleoceanographic reconstruction. Stable isotopes (d13C and d18O) allow us to clearly define the geochemical signature of the MECO. A divergence between the d18O curves of the shallow- and deep-water dwelling planktonic foraminifera after the event suggests a more stratified water column in the Neo-Tethys. Bulk and clay mineralogy reveal changing weathering conditions on land. Higher amounts of chlorite and illite (physical weathering) occur prior and after the event, while the MECO interval displays greater amounts of illite and smectite (chemical weathering). Additionally, the inverse relationship between detrital minerals and calcite suggests that carbonate productivity might have suffered at that time, or an increase in detrital input could have diluted the carbonate fraction. An increase in ARM and magnetic particle grain size also suggests an increase in productivity or preservation of biogenic magnetite. Our results confirm the global nature of the MECO, affecting both oceans and continents. However, different from other events, warming conditions were not

  6. The Stypsi-Megala Therma porphyry-epithermal mineralization, Lesvos Island, Greece: new mineralogical and geochemical data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Periferakis, Argyrios; Voudouris, Panagiotis; Melfos, Vasilios; Mavrogonatos, Constantinos; Alfieris, Dimitrios

    2017-04-01

    Lesvos Island is located at the NE part of the Aegean Sea and mostly comprises post-collisional Miocene volcanic rocks of shoshonitic to calc-alkaline geochemical affinities. In the northern part of the Island, the Stypsi Cu-Mo±Au porphyry prospect, part of the Stypsi caldera, is hosted within hydrothermally altered intrusives and volcanics [1]. Porphyry-style mineralization is developed in a microgranite porphyry that has intruded basaltic trachyandesitic lavas. Propylitic alteration occurs distal to the mineralization, whereas sodic-calcic alteration related to quartz-actinolite veinlets, and a phyllic overprint associated with a dense stockwork of banded black quartz±carbonate veinlets, characterizes the core of the system. Alunite-kaolinite advanced argillic alteration occurs at higher topographic levels and represents a barren lithocap to the porphyry mineralization. Intermediate-sulfidation (IS) milky quartz-carbonate veins overprint the porphyry mineralization along a NNE-trending fault that extends further northwards to Megala Therma, where it hosts IS base metal-rich Ag-Au mineralization [2]. New mineralogical data from the Megala Therma deposit suggest Ag-famatinite, Te-polybasite and Ag-tetrahedrite as the main carriers of Ag in the mineralization. Porphyry-style ores at Stypsi consist of magnetite postdated by pyrite and then by chalcopyrite, molybdenite, sphalerite, galena and bismuthinite within the black quartz stockworks or disseminated in the wallrock [1]. The dark coloration of quartz in the veinlets is due to abundant vapor-rich fluid inclusions. Quartz is granular and fine-grained and locally elongated perpendicular to the vein walls. Botryoidal textures are continuous through quartz grains, suggesting quartz recrystallization from a silica gel, a feature already described by [3] from banded quartz veinlets in porphyry Au deposits at Maricunga, Chile. Bulk ore analyses from porphyry-style mineralization at Stypsi displayed similar geochemical

  7. Experimental investigation of geochemical and mineralogical effects of CO2 sequestration on flow characteristics of reservoir rock in deep saline aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathnaweera, T. D.; Ranjith, P. G.; Perera, M. S. A.

    2016-01-01

    Interactions between injected CO2, brine, and rock during CO2 sequestration in deep saline aquifers alter their natural hydro-mechanical properties, affecting the safety, and efficiency of the sequestration process. This study aims to identify such interaction-induced mineralogical changes in aquifers, and in particular their impact on the reservoir rock’s flow characteristics. Sandstone samples were first exposed for 1.5 years to a mixture of brine and super-critical CO2 (scCO2), then tested to determine their altered geochemical and mineralogical properties. Changes caused uniquely by CO2 were identified by comparison with samples exposed over a similar period to either plain brine or brine saturated with N2. The results show that long-term reaction with CO2 causes a significant pH drop in the saline pore fluid, clearly due to carbonic acid (as dissolved CO2) in the brine. Free H+ ions released into the pore fluid alter the mineralogical structure of the rock formation, through the dissolution of minerals such as calcite, siderite, barite, and quartz. Long-term CO2 injection also creates a significant CO2 drying-out effect and crystals of salt (NaCl) precipitate in the system, further changing the pore structure. Such mineralogical alterations significantly affect the saline aquifer’s permeability, with important practical consequences for the sequestration process. PMID:26785912

  8. Mineralogical and geochemical studies on borate deposits from the Shahr- e - Babak playa (Khatoonabad and Robat - Marvast, Kerman province - Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atefeh Ghaedi

    2017-11-01

    , boron is very abundant. Good correlation between the elements, such as B and Ca confirms the formation of Calcium bearing borate mineral in the studied areas. Origin Field observations show that in the studied areas, borate bearing basins are fed by rivers which have originated from the Sanandaj – Sirjan metamorphic rocks, Nain – Baft colored mélanges and igneous rocks of the Urumieh – Dokhtar magmatic belt. Result The XRD results show that the studied borate minerals mainly are hydrated ones and contain ulexite, borax, gowerite, sassolite and inyoite. Geochemichal data confirm the frequency of boron in the playa. Good correlation between the elements such as B and Ca verifies the formation of Calcium bearing borate mineral in the studied areas. Acknowledgements The authors wish to thank IMIDRO for performing XRD analyses. References ‏‏ Allen, R.D. and Kramer, H., 1957. Ginorite and sassolite from Death Valley, California. American Mineralogist, 42(1-2: 56-61.‏ Christ, C.L., 1953. Studies of borate minerals, 2. X-ray crystallography of inyoite and meyerhofferite -x-ray and morphological crystallography of 2CaO. 3B2O3. 9H2O. American Mineralogist, 38(1 - 11: 912-918. Erd, R.C., McAllister, J.F. and Almond, H., 1959. Gowerite, a new hydrous calcium borate, from the Death Valley Region, California. American Mineralogist, 44(9-10: 911-919.‏ Floyd, P.A., Helvaci, C. and Mittwede, S.K., 1998. Geochemical discrimination of volcanic rocks associated with borate deposits: an exploration tool? Journal of Geochemical Exploration, 60(3: 185-205.‏ Garrett, D.E., 1998. Borates: handbook of deposits, processing, properties, and use. Academic Press, USA, 483 pp. Ghaedi, A., Moradian, A. and Ahmadipour, H., 2014. Reviewing and introduction of mineralogical properties of Ulexite an unknown gem in Khatoonabad (Shahr Babak, Kerman Province. The 1st National Symposium of Gemology- Crystallography of Iran, Shahid Bahonar University of Kerman, Kerman, Iran. Ghose, S., Wan, C

  9. On the rocks and buried : comparative assessment of the mineralogical, geochemical and archaeological evidence at Walkunder Arch, Chillagoe, north-eastern Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mardaga-Campbell, M.; Watchman, A.; Campbell, J.B.

    2001-01-01

    The mineralogical and geochemical changes in finely laminated rock surface crusts as well as evidence of Aboriginal painting indicate changes in environment and human use of Walkunder Arch rockshelter near Chillagoe. Similar changes within the floor deposits of organic remains and inorganic sediments together with signs of extensive living-floors define episodes of human occupation. Comparisons of the two data sets reveal a broadly consistent pattern, supporing evidence for intermittent occupation and use of the rockshelter over the last 16,000 years from the floors and the last 28,000 years from the rock surface accretions. (author). 22 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs

  10. Mineralogical and geochemical features of the coarse saprolite developed on orthogneiss in the SW of Yaoundé, South Cameroon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndjigui, P.-D.; Badinane, M. F. B.; Nyeck, B.; Nandjip, H. P. K.; Bilong, P.

    2013-03-01

    A petrological investigation was performed in the coarse saprolite on orthogneiss in Yaoundé (South Cameroon) using combined whole rock geochemical (XRF, ICP-MS) and mineralogical (XRD, SEM) techniques. The orthogneiss has high contents in SiO2 (61.56 wt.%), Ba (916 ppm) and REE (209 ppm), moderate content in Al2O3 (14.34 wt.%) and negative Eu anomaly (Eu/Eu* = 0.68). The weathering leads to the formation of three main constituents in the coarse saprolite: (i) the loose materials (∼85 vol.%) are basically clayey silty with relic structure. They are composed of kaolinite, quartz and goethite. The loose materials have high contents in SiO2 (56-64.83 wt.%) and Al2O3 (21.48-23.96 wt.%), and moderate contents in V (163-236 ppm), Ba (95-340 ppm) and Zr (160-313 ppm). The REE content is low (∼49-169 ppm) relative to the parent rock with LREE-enrichment (LREE/HREE ∼ 7-17). Positive Ce anomaly (Ce/Ce* ∼ 3.35) is observed in the white veins and slight positive Eu anomalies (Eu/Eu* ∼ 1.2-1.4) are noted in all loose samples. The (La/Yb)N ratios (∼0.8-1.5) indicate high REE-fractionation. The mass balance calculation reveals the depletion of several elements except Al, Ti, Sc, Y, Th, Sb and Hf; (ii) the iron duricrust (∼10 vol.%) is located at the bottom and the top of the horizon. The mineral assemblage is dominated by hematite and goethite. The upper iron duricrust has high contents in Fe2O3 (45.60 wt.%) and Cr (1641 ppm), moderate contents in V (459 ppm) and Zn (143 ppm), and low REE content (47 ppm) with low LREE/HREE ratio (4.28). The upper iron duricrust is more enriched in Fe2O3 (53.26 wt.%) than the lower one. Vanadium, Cr and Zr have high contents relative to other trace elements. The REE content is low (39 ppm) as well as the LREE/HREE ratio (2.94). The iron duricrust has negative Ce anomalies (Ce/Ce* ∼ 0.66-0.69) and very low (La/Yb)N ratios (0.1-0.3). Several elements reported in the iron duricrust are highly leached except Fe, Cr, Zn, Sc, V, Pb, Zr

  11. Kaolin clays from Patagonia - Argentina. Relationship between the mineralogy and ceramic properties; Arcillas caolinicas de la Patagonia argentina. Relacion entre la mineralogia y las propiedades ceramicas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Factorovich, J.C.; Badino, D. [Piedra Grande S.A., Buenos Aires (Argentina); Cravero, F.; Dominguez, E. [Universidad Nacional del Sur, Bahia Blanca (Argentina). Dept. de Geologia

    1997-12-31

    The mineralogy, grain size distribution, chemical composition, S and C contents, plasticity, and cationic exchange capacity are determined in the sedimentary kaolinitic clays from the clay pits Puma Negra, Puma Gris, Tincar Super; and Chenque and Cardenal located in Santa Cruz and Chubut Provinces. Mineralogy and Particle size distribution of > 5, 5-2 and <2{mu} fractions are determined. Modulus of rupture, 1100 and 1250 deg C shrinkage and water absorption and whiteness are found. It is accomplished a statistics correlation between the characteristics of grain size distribution, mineralogy, and other physical properties with the main ceramic properties to understand its influence in the ceramic process. (author) 5 refs., 2 tabs.

  12. Control of As and Ni releases from a uranium mill tailings neutralization circuit: Solution chemistry, mineralogy and geochemical modeling of laboratory study results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahoney, John [MWH Americas, Inc., 1801 California Street, Denver, CO 80202 (United States)], E-mail: john.j.mahoney@mwhglobal.com; Slaughter, Maynard [Earth Science, University of Northern Colorado, Greeley, CO 80639 (United States); Langmuir, Donald [Hydrochem Systems Corp., P.O. Box 23257, Silverthorne, CO 80498 (United States); Rowson, John [AREVA Resources Canada Inc., P.O. Box 9204, Saskatoon, SK, S7K 3X5 (Canada)

    2007-12-15

    Processing U ores in the JEB Mill of the McClean Lake Operation in northern Saskatchewan produces spent leaching solutions (raffinates) with pH {<=} 1.5, and As and Ni concentrations up to 6800 and 5200 mg L{sup -1}, respectively. Bench-scale neutralization experiments (pH 2-8) were performed to help optimize the design of mill processes for reducing As and Ni concentrations in tailings and raffinates to {<=}1 mg L{sup -1} prior to their disposal. Precipitate mineralogy determined by chemical analysis, XRD, SEM, EM, XM and EXAFS methods, included gypsum (the dominant precipitate), poorly crystalline scorodite (precipitated esp. from pH 2-4), annabergite, hydrobasaluminite, ferrihydrite, green rust II and theophrastite. The As was mostly in scorodite with smaller amounts in annabergite and trace As adsorbed and/or co-precipitated, probably by ferrihydrite. Geochemical modeling indicated that above pH 2, the ion activity product (IAP) of scorodite lies between the solubility products of amorphous and crystalline phases (log K{sub sp} = -23.0 and -25.83, respectively). The IAP decreases with increasing pH, suggesting that the crystallinity of the scorodite increases with pH. Forward geochemical models support the assumption that during neutralization, particles of added base produce sharp local pH gradients and disequilibrium with bulk solutions, facilitating annabergite and theophrastite precipitation.

  13. Mineralogical and geochemical characterization of the Old Tailings Dam, Australia: Evaluating the effectiveness of a water cover for long-term AMD control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, Laura M.; Parbhakar-Fox, Anita

    2016-01-01

    Establishing a shallow water cover over tailings deposited in a designated storage facility is one option to limit oxygen diffusion and retard oxidation of sulfides which have the potential to form acid mine drainage (AMD). The Old Tailings Dam (OTD) located at the Savage River mine, western Tasmania contains 38 million tonnes of pyritic tailings deposited from 1967 to 1982, and is actively generating AMD. The OTD was constructed on a natural gradient, resulting in sub-aerial exposure of the southern area, with the northern area under a natural water cover. This physical contrast allowed for the examination of tailings mineralogy and geochemistry as a function of water cover depth across the OTD. Tailings samples (n = 144, depth: ≤ 1.5 m) were collected and subjected to a range of geochemical and mineralogical evaluations. Tailings from the southern and northern extents of the OTD showed similar AMD potential based on geochemical (NAG pH range: 2.1 to 4.2) and bulk mineralogical parameters, particularly at depth. However, sulfide alteration index (SAI) assessments highlighted the microscale contrast in oxidation. In the sub-aerial zone pyrite grains are moderately oxidized to a depth of 0.3 m (maximum SAI of 6/10), under both gravel fill and oxidized covers, with secondary minerals (e.g., ferrihydrite and goethite) developed along rims and fractures. Beneath this, mildly oxidized pyrite is seen in fresh tailings (SAI = 2.9/10 to 5.8/10). In the sub-aqueous zone, the degree of pyrite oxidation demonstrates a direct relationship with cover depth, with unoxidized, potentially reactive tailings identified from 2.5 m, directly beneath an organic-rich sediment layer (SAI = 0 to 1/10). These findings are broadly similar to other tailings storage facilities e.g., Fox Lake, Sherritt-Gordon Zn−Cu mine, Canada and Stekenjokk mine, Sweden where water covers up to 2 m have successfully reduced AMD. Whilst geotechnical properties of the OTD restrict the extension

  14. Results of isotopic geochemical and mineralogical investigations of crystalline rocks of the Carpathian Massif in 1973-1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shcherbak, N.P.; Bartnitskij, E.N.; Eliseeva, G.D.

    1979-01-01

    The most frequent accesory mineral in crystalline rocks in the Czechoslovak and Ukrainian Carpathians is zircon, the least frequent is monazite. The differences are described in the mineralogical properties of zircon of different origin. For dating volcanism, the content and the isotope composition was determined of U and Pb in zircon and of U, Pb and Th in monazite. The earliest volcanic processes occurred in the Eastern Carpathians approximately 600 to 640 million years ago, in the Western Carpathians approximately 400 million years ago. (Ha)

  15. The Ndop plain clayey materials (Bamenda area – NW Cameroon: Mineralogical, geochemical, physical characteristics and properties of their fired products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rose Yongue-Fouateu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The physicochemical, mineralogical and technological properties of clayey materials from the Ndop plain (NW Cameroon have been investigated, for their ceramic applications. The clayey materials have mixed facies with colour ranging from brown, grey, mottled and yellowish brown. The thickness of the exploitable clay layer is more than 5 m. Their mineralogical constituents are quartz, kaolinite, illite and feldspars, with kaolinite as major clay mineral. Based on the geochemistry, their source rocks might be felsic, with a mafic rock inference. These materials display high percentage in fine particles and high Atterberg limits. For all the firing temperatures, flexural strength (1.2–11 MPa, water absorption (8.03–24.27%, linear shrinkage (2.10%, weight loss (4.88–16.54% and bulk density (1.57–2.03 g/cm3 indicate good ceramic properties for firing samples between 900 and 1100 °C. Most of the fired test bricks show a brick red colour with good to very good cohesion. The studied clays were thus, suitable as raw materials for roof tiles, light weight blocks and hollow bricks; however, mixing of high clayey and highly silty materials could improve the quality of the products.

  16. Investigation of the geochemical and mineralogical characteristics of the dikes associated with copper mineralization at the southeastern Ardestan (NE Isfahan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Salehi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The Ardestan study area lies in the northeast of Isfahan and at the outer margin of Urumieh -Dokhtar Volcanic Arc (UDMA. In this area, copper mineralization is associated with dikes. Mineralization occurred as sulfides (chalcocite, chalcopyrite and bornite and oxides (malachite and azurite. According to field studies as well as petrographic and geochemical investigations, two different types of dikes are present. The first type, trending NW-SE and comprising fine crystalline gabbro, whereas the second type with relatively E-W trend are gabbro and pyroxene diorite. Geochemically, these rock are characterized by SiO2 = 45.8 to 52.8 wt.%, MgO with 6.9 wt.% (average, Na2O+K2O = 5.6 wt.%, and Al2O3/TiO2 = 16.8%. All dikes are alkaline, related to back-arc tectonic setting in a wider concept associated with changing in source of magmatism. The second type shows enrichment in Ba, Sr, Rb, K, Zr, Nb, Ti, Cr and Ni in comparison to the first type. The first type is generated as a result of a subducted modified mantle while the latter shows an enriched astenospheric mantle source. It appears that there is a weak correlation between ore-forming and volatile elements in the mafic dikes. Overall, the same tectonic stresses are an essential controlling factor for the formation of second type E-W dikes associated with mineralization.

  17. Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-06-01

    This discussion of Argentina covers geography, the people, history and political conditions, government, economy, foreign relations, and relations between the US and Argentina. In 1985, the population of Argentina was estimated to be 30.6 million with an estimated annual growth rate of 1.5%. The infant mortality rate is 34.1/1000, and life expectancy is 70.2 years. Argentina, which shares land borders with Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Paraguay, and Uruguay, is bounded by the Atlantic and the Antarctic Oceans. Descendants of Italian and Spanish immigrants predominate in Argentina, but many trace their origins to British and West and East European ancestors. In recent years, there has been a substantial influx of immigrants from neighboring Latin American countries. The native Indian population, estimated to be 50,000, is concentrated in the peripheral provinces of the north, northwest, and south. What is now Argentina was discovered in 1516 by the Spanish navigator Juan de Solia. The formal declaration of independence from Spain was made on July 9, 1816. In the late 19th century, 2 forces worked to create the modern Argentine nation: the introduction of modern agricultural techniques and the integration of Argentina into the world economy. Argentina has impressive human and natural resources, but political conflict and uneven economic performance since World War II have impeded full realization of its considerable potential. Yet, it is one of the wealthiest countries in Latin America. Among the reasons for the military coup of March 1976 was the deteriorating economy, caused by declining production and rampant inflation. Under the leadership of the Minister of the Economy, the military government focused attention on those immediate problems, and, in 1978, embarked on a new development strategy focusing on the establishment of a free market economy. There was little improvement in the economy, and a new economic plan was introduced in 1985 which has capped inflation by

  18. Sedimentological, mineralogical, and geochemical results from surface sediments and the sediment record from Site 2 of the ICDP drilling project at Lake Towuti, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasberg, A. K.; Melles, M.; Wennrich, V.; Vogel, H.; Just, J.; Russell, J. M.; Bijaksana, S.; Morlock, M.; Opitz, S.

    2017-12-01

    More than 1000 m of sediment core were recovered in spring 2015 from three different drill sites in tropical Lake Towuti (2.5°S, 121°E), Indonesia, during the Towuti Drilling Project (TDP) of the International Continental Scientific Drilling Program (ICDP). Furthermore, a set of 84 lake surface sediment samples, distributed over the entire lake, was collected in order to better understand modern sedimentary processes. The surface samples were investigated for physical, chemical, mineralogical, and biological properties at the University of Cologne (UoC), Germany. On the sediment cores macro- and microscopical lithological descriptions, line-scan imaging, logging of physical properties (MSCL), and subsampling was conducted at the National Lacustrine Core Facility of the University of Minnesota, USA, in November 2015 and January 2016. Afterwards, the archive core halves and 672 subsamples of TDP Site 2 were shipped to the UoC for X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) scanning and sedimentological, geochemical, and mineralogical analyses, respectively, supplemented by visible to near-infrared spectroscopy (VNIR) at Brown University, USA. The data from the surface samples evidence that allochthonous sedimentation in Lake Towuti today is dominated by fluvial supply from five distinguishable source areas: (i) the Mahalona River to the north, which drains lakes Mahalona and Matano, (ii) inlets around the village of Timampu to the northwest, (iii) the Loeha River to the east, (iv) the Lengke River to the south, and (v) the Lemo-Lemo River to the northeast of Lake Towuti. Of these, source areas (ii) and (iii) as well as (iv) and (v) have similar geochemical compositions, respectively. In addition, the lake sedimentation is significantly influenced by gravitational sediment supply from steep slopes as well as lake-internal gravitational and density-driven processes. The uppermost 41 m of sediment core 2A consist of pelagic sediments (totaling 11 m) and event layers from mass movement

  19. Origin of the Sinai-Negev erg, Egypt and Israel: mineralogical and geochemical evidence for the importance of the Nile and sea level history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhs, Daniel R.; Roskin, Joel; Tsoar, Haim; Skipp, Gary; Budahn, James R.; Sneh, Amihai; Porat, Naomi; Stanley, Jean-Daniel; Katra, Itzhak; Blumberg, Dan G.

    2013-01-01

    The Sinai–Negev erg occupies an area of 13,000 km2 in the deserts of Egypt and Israel. Aeolian sand of this erg has been proposed to be derived from the Nile Delta, but empirical data supporting this view are lacking. An alternative source sediment is sand from the large Wadi El Arish drainage system in central and northern Sinai. Mineralogy of the Negev and Sinai dunes shows that they are high in quartz, with much smaller amounts of K-feldspar and plagioclase. Both Nile Delta sands and Sinai wadi sands, upstream of the dunes, also have high amounts of quartz relative to K-feldspar and plagioclase. However, Sinai wadi sands have abundant calcite, whereas Nile Delta sands have little or no calcite. Overall, the mineralogical data suggest that the dunes are derived dominantly from the Nile Delta, with Sinai wadi sands being a minor contributor. Geochemical data that proxy for both the light mineral fraction (SiO2/10–Al2O3 + Na2O + K2O–CaO) and heavy mineral fraction (Fe2O3–MgO–TiO2) also indicate a dominant Nile Delta source for the dunes. Thus, we report here the first empirical evidence that the Sinai–Negev dunes are derived dominantly from the Nile Delta. Linkage of the Sinai–Negev erg to the Nile Delta as a source is consistent with the distribution of OSL ages of Negev dunes in recent studies. Stratigraphic studies show that during the Last Glacial period, when dune incursions in the Sinai–Negev erg began, what is now the Nile Delta area was characterized by a broad, sandy, minimally vegetated plain, with seasonally dry anastomosing channels. Such conditions were ideal for providing a ready source of sand for aeolian transport under what were probably much stronger glacial-age winds. With the post-glacial rise in sea level, the Nile River began to aggrade. Post-glacial sedimentation has been dominated by fine-grained silts and clays. Thus, sea level, along with favorable climatic conditions, emerges as a major influence on the timing of dune

  20. An integrated geochemical, geophysical and mineralogical study of river sediments in alpine area and soil samples near steel plant, in Austria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irfan, M. I.; Meisel, T.

    2012-04-01

    Concentration of nickel and chromium in any part of the ecosystem is important for environmental concerns in particular human health due to the reason that some species of them can cause health problem e.g. dermatitis and cancer. Sediment samples collected form a river Vordernberger Bach (Leoben, Austria) in an alpine region and soil samples collected in an area adjacent to steel production unit in same narrow valley were investigated. In previous studies a correlation between magnetic susceptibility values and concentration of nickel and chromium showed that a magnetic susceptibility meter can be used to point out the contaminated areas as in-situ device. The purpose of the whole study is to understand the real (point or diffuse, anthropogenic or geogenic) sources of contamination of soils, water and river sediments through heavy metal deposition. Unseparated, magnetic and non-magnetic fractions of soil samples were investigated for geochemical and mineralogical aspects with XRF, ICP-MS, EMPA, Multi-Functional Kappabridge (MFK1) and laser ablation coupled with ICP-MS. Mineralogical study of sediment samples for several sampling points with higher Ni and Cr content was performed. Sediment samples were sieved below 1.4 mm and then a concentrate of heavy minerals was prepared in the field through panning. Concentrated heavy minerals were then subjected for heavy liquid separation in the laboratory. Separated magnetic and non-magnetic fractions below 0.71/0.1 mm and density greater than 2.9 g/cm3 were selected for mineralogical investigation. The abundance of typical anthropogenic particles, e.g., spherical, tinder, roasted ores, iron and steel mill slag was observed under the microscope. Magnetite (mostly anthropogenic), maghemite, chromspinel, chromite (type I & II), (Ca,Al)-ferrite, wustite, apatite (anthropogenic), olivine mixed crystals, calcium silicate and spinel (anthropogenic) are found in magnetic fraction. Non-magnetic fractions contain hematite, siderite

  1. Geochemical and mineralogical characteristics of percolates and its evaporates from Technosols before and after limestone filler stabilisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Sirvent, Carmen; Martinez-Sanchez, Maria Jose; Garcia-Lorenzo, Maria Luz; Hernandez-Cordoba, Manuel

    2017-04-01

    The chemistry of waters is recognized as a relevant monitoring tool when assessing the adverse effects of acid mine drainage. The weathering of sulphide minerals produces a great variety of efflorescences of soluble sulphate salts. These minerals play an important role for environmental pollution, since they can be either a sink or a source for acidity and trace elements. This communication deals with the leachability of potentially toxic elements (PTE) eluting from technosols formed from soils affected by mining activities and limestone filler. A total of three contaminated soils affected by opencast mining were selected and mixed with limestone filler at three percentages: 10 %, 20 % and 30 %, providing nine stabilised samples. These samples were stored in containers and moistened simulating rainfall. The percolates obtained were collected, and the PTEs content (As, Cd, Cu, Fe, Pb and Zn) was determined. Evaporation-precipitation experiments were carried out in these waters, and the mineralogical composition of efflorescences was evaluated. The study area is heavily polluted as a result of historical mining and processing activities, producing large amount of wastes, characterised by high trace elements content and acidic pH. The results obtained for the percolates after the rain episode showed that, before the stabilization approach, waters had an acidic pH, high electrical conductivity and high PTEs content. When these soils were mixed with 10, 20 and 30 % of limestone filler, the pH was neutral and the soluble trace element content strongly decreased, being under the detection limit when limestone percentage was 20 % and 30 %. The mineralogical composition of efflorescences before the stabilisation approach showed that predominant minerals were copiapite, followed by gypsum and bilinite. Other soluble sulphates were determined in lower percentage, such as hexahydrite, halotriquite or pickeringite. After the mixing with 10 % of limestone filler, the evaporates

  2. Mineralogical and geochemical characterization of supergene Cu-Pb-Zn-V ores in the Oriental High Atlas, Morocco

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhaert, Michèle; Bernard, Alain; Dekoninck, Augustin; Lafforgue, Ludovic; Saddiqi, Omar; Yans, Johan

    2017-10-01

    In the Moroccan High Atlas, two sulfide deposits hosted by Jurassic dolostones underwent significant weathering. In the Cu deposit of Jbel Klakh, several stages of supergene mineralization are distinguished: (1) the replacement of hypogene sulfides in the protolith (chalcopyrite) by secondary sulfides in the cementation zone (bornite, digenite, chalcocite, covellite), (2) the formation of oxidized minerals in the saprolite (malachite, azurite, brochantite) where the environment becomes more oxidizing and neutral, and (3) the precipitation of late carbonates (calcite) and iron (hydr-)oxides in the laterite. The precipitation of carbonates is related to the dissolution of dolomitic host rocks, which buffers the fluid acidity due to the oxidation of sulfides. In the Jbel Haouanit Pb-Zn deposit, the mineral assemblage is dominated by typical calamine minerals, Cu minerals (chalcocite, covellite, malachite), and a Cu-Pb-Zn vanadate (mottramite). Galena is successively weathered in anglesite and cerussite. Sphalerite is weathered in smithsonite, which is rapidly replaced by hydrozincite. Late iron (hydr-)oxides are mainly found at the top of both deposits (laterite). Both deposits are thus characterized by specific mineral zoning, from laterite to protolith, related to variations in the mineralogy and ore grades and probably caused by varying Eh-pH conditions.

  3. Mineralogical data on angelaite, Cu2AgPbBiS4, from the Los Manantiales District, Chubut, Argentina

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Topa, D.; Paar, W.H.; Putz, H.

    2010-01-01

    Angelaite, ideally Cu2AgPbBiS4, occurs as a hypogene mineral in polymetallic ores at the Ángela groups of veins in the mining district of Los Manantiales, in the province of Chubut, Argentina. The new mineral species is predominantly associated with pyrite, sphalerite, chalcopyrite, hematite...

  4. Characterization of Paleoredox Changes In Nw-pacific Deep-sea Sediments Using Environmental Magnetic In Combination With Geochemical-mineralogic Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbat, M.; Pletsch, T.

    The understanding of environmental and oceanic controls on deep-sea sediments in the NW Pacific Ocean (ODP Site 1149A, Nadezhda Basin) benefits from the inte- gration of environmental magnetic methodology with geochemical-mineralogic XRD (x-ray defraction) and XRF (x-ray fluorescence) data. Crucially, the inherently grad- ual diagenetic processes related to paleo-redox changes in the sediment column may be more sensitively monitored using the integration of non-magnetic and magnetic data, because they do reflect various aspects of the entire postdepositional alteration. The studied 32 m long quaternary interval at Hole ODP 1149A provides an expanded record of eolian dust supply from the Asian continent, siliceous plankton accumulation and varying contributions of both discrete ash layers and disperse ash to a truly deep- sea environment (Plank et al. 2000). Recurrent diagenetic intervals appear to be related to changes in the Ocean water circulation (Kuriosho current) and concomitant produc- tivity variations as a function of glacial-interglacial paleoclimatic changes. Diagenetic intervals correspond to paleo-redox boundaries, where suboxic conditions promoted the destruction of the primary magnetic signal (iron oxides) and the precipitation of rhodochrosite (MnCO3). We used simple normative calculations on the basis of of Al and Cr contents to discriminate between the major groups of components (terrigenous, volcanogenic, biogenic, diagenetic) in combination with our magnetic results. These results form the grounds for the discrimation and independent interpretation of the genetically various sediment components in the paleoceanograhic context.

  5. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy - An emerging chemical sensor technology for real-time field-portable, geochemical, mineralogical, and environmental applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harmon, Russell S.; DeLucia, Frank C.; McManus, Catherine E.; McMillan, Nancy J.; Jenkins, Thomas F.; Walsh, Marianne E.; Miziolek, Andrzej

    2006-01-01

    Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is a simple spark spectrochemical sensor technology in which a laser beam is directed at a sample surface to create a high-temperature microplasma and a detector used to collect the spectrum of light emission and record its intensity at specific wavelengths. LIBS is an emerging chemical sensor technology undergoing rapid advancement in instrumentation capability and in areas of application. Attributes of a LIBS sensor system include: (i) small size and weight; (ii) technologically mature, inherently rugged, and affordable components; (iii) real-time response; (iv) in situ analysis with no sample preparation required; (v) a high sensitivity to low atomic weight elements which are difficult to determine by other field-portable sensor techniques, and (vi) point sensing or standoff detection. Recent developments in broadband LIBS provide the capability for detection at very high resolution (0.1 nm) of all elements in any unknown target material because all chemical elements emit in the 200-980 nm spectral region. This progress portends a unique potential for the development of a rugged and reliable field-portable chemical sensor that has the potential to be utilized in variety of geochemical, mineralogical, and environmental applications

  6. Mineralogical, micromorphological and geochemical transformations in the initial steps of the weathering process of charnockite from the Caparaó Range, southeastern Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Caroline Cibele Vieira; Varajão, Angélica Fortes Drummond Chicarino; Varajão, César Augusto Chicarino; Boulangé, Bruno

    2014-12-01

    X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray Fluorescence (XRF), optical microscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy coupled with Energy Dispersive Spectrometry (SEM-EDS) and Electron Probe micro-analyser (EPMA) and Wavelength-Dispersive Spectroscopy (WDS) were conducted on charnockite from the Caparaó Suite and its alteration cortex to determine the mineralogical, micromorphological and geochemical transformations resulting from the weathering process. The hydrolysis of the charnockite occurred in different stages, in accordance with the order of stability of the minerals with respect to weathering: andesine/orthopyroxene, pargasite and alkali feldspar. The rock modifications had begun with the formation of a layer of incipient alteration due to the percolation of weathering solutions first in the pressure relief fractures and then in cleavage and mineral edges. The iron exuded from ferromagnesian minerals precipitated in the intermineral and intramineral discontinuities. The layer of incipient alteration evolves into an inner cortex where the plagioclase changes into gibbsite by direct alitisation, the ferromagnesian minerals initiate the formation of goethitic boxworks with kaolinitic cores, and the alkali feldspar initiates indirect transformation into gibbsite, forming an intermediate phase of illite and kaolinite. In the outer cortex, mostly traces of alkali feldspar remain, and they are surrounded by goethite and gibbsite as alteromorphics, characterising the formation of the isalteritic horizon that occurs along the slope and explains the bauxitization process at the Caparaó Range, SE Brazil.

  7. Engineered analogues of cement/clay interactions in the Tournemire experimental platform (France): a coupled mineralogical and geochemical approach to track tiny disturbances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Techer, Isabelle; Michel, Pauline; Tinseau, Elisabeth; Devol-Brown, Isabelle; Bartier, Daniele; Boulvais, Philippe; Suchorski, Krzysztof

    2012-01-01

    A scientific program has been especially established to better understand the high-pH fluids / clay interactions through a mineralogical and geochemical study of three engineered analogues available by means of the IRSN Tournemire experimental platform. This platform, located in Aveyron (France), is based on a tunnel, excavated between 1882 and 1886 through Domerian marls and Toarcian argillites, and is dedicated since 1990 to multidisciplinary research programs. Different contexts presenting the argillite formation in contact with a cementitious material are encountered and are linked to its historical construction and scientific evolution. These rare examples of cement / clay contacts maintained over time scales ranging from a few years to a hundred of years are studied as engineered analogues of a deep geological storage. This approach is moreover completed by experiments (diffusion and advection) performed in laboratory over shorter time and smaller space scales in order to discriminate and control the major parameters involved in such interactions (details are given in another paper). This paper presents the scientific program developed on the three engineered analogues: tunnel walls recovered by lime after excavation; four concreted exploration boreholes; two experimental research galleries excavated in 2003

  8. The formation of auriferous quartz-sulfide veins in the Pataz region, northern Peru: A synthesis of geological, mineralogical, and geochemical data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, D. W.; Amstutz, G. C.; Fontboté, L.

    1990-12-01

    The Pataz region in the eastern part of the North Peruvian Department La Libertad hosts a number of important gold mining districts like La Lima, El Tingo, Pataz, Parcoy, and Buldibuyo. Economic gold mineralization occurs in quartz-sulfide veins at the margin of the calc-alkaline Pataz Batholith, that mainly consists of granites, granodiorites, and monzodiorites. The batholith is of Paleozoic age and cuts the Precambrian to Early Paleozoic low-grade metamorphic basement series. Its intrusion was controlled by a NNW-trending fault of regional importance. The gold-bearing veins are characterized by a two-stage sulfide mineralization. Bodies of massive pyrite and some arsenopyrite were formed in stage 1, and after subsequent fracturing they served as sites for deposition of gold, electrum, galena, sphalerite, and chalcopyrite. It is concluded that gold was transported as a AuCl{2/-}-complex by oxidizing chloride solutions and deposited near older pyrite by micro-scale redox changes and a slight temperature decrease. Mineralogical, textural, geochemical, and microthermometric features are interpreted as a consequence of mineralization at considerable depth produced by a hydrothermal system linked with the emplacement of the Pataz Batholith. acteristics in order to outline a general physicochemical model of the hydrothermal ore-forming processes.

  9. Geochemical and mineralogical constraints on the distribution and enrichment of the rare earth elements during pedogenesis and tropical weathering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Liam; Smith, Martin; Moles, Norman; Marsellos, Antonios

    2015-04-01

    Current European manufacturing relies heavily on imports from the USA & China for unprocessed rare earth elements (REEs) and rare earth oxides (REOs). It has been suggested that the EU holds viable reserves of REEs that, with adequate research, could satisfy 10% of EU industrial demand, by the recycling of mine waste from bauxite production (red muds) alone (Deady, E. (BGS), 2014). Focus has been turned to the potential for Mount Weld type laterite deposits being exploited in the EU, but limited exploration and understanding of EU laterite (& paleo laterite) formations currently makes them unattractive to investment. Although previously researched, the full range of factors influencing the transition of rare earth (primarily lanthanide series, Y & Sc) elements between mineral and clay phases in allochthonous soils, saprolites and laterites is not fully understood, especially in present and Paleo-European environments (Herrington, Boni, Skarpelis, & Large, 2007) (Deady, E. (BGS), 2014) but several deposits globally are suggested to have formed at economically viable concentrations due to this secondary remobilisation & transition from mineral to clay phase and subsequent seasonal leaching and evaporation system, to form depositional buffer zones other than the soil base. (Hoatson, Jaireth, & Miezitis, 2011) (Berger, Janots, Gnos, Frei, & Bernier, 2014). This project intends to use new techniques in sequential extractions, ICP-MS, Quantitative XRD & SEM analysis to expand current knowledge around lateritic & allochtonous ore forming, & weathering processes. Heavy REE content and mineralogical variations in clays will be examined, with examples from a selection of profiles across Southern Europe (and potentially paleo soils from Scandinavia) to define the main influencing factors on REE concentration. Are the specific sites enriched simply by the nature of their source rock (protolith), by the soil formation (pedogenesis), or by biogenic & meteorological factors

  10. Beyond the obvious limits of ore deposits: The use of mineralogical, geochemical, and biological features for the remote detection of mineralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, D.L.; Kelley, K.D.; Coker, W.B.; Caughlin, B.; Doherty, M.E.

    2006-01-01

    Far field features of ore deposits include mineralogical, geochemical, or biological attributes that can be recognized beyond the obvious limits of the deposits. They can be primary, if formed in association with mineralization or alteration processes, or secondary, if formed from the interaction of ore deposits with the hydrosphere and biosphere. This paper examines a variety of far field features of different ore deposit types and considers novel applications to exploration and discovery. Primary far field features include mineral and rock chemistry, isotopic or element halos, fluid pathways and thermal anomalies in host-rock sequences. Examples include the use of apatite chemistry to distinguish intrusive rocks permissive for iron oxide copper gold (IOCG) and porphyry deposits; resistate mineral (e.g., rutile, tourmaline) chemistry in exploration for volcanogenic massive sulfide (VMS), orogenic gold, and porphyry deposits; and pyrite chemistry to vector toward sedimentary exhalative (sedex) deposits. Distinctive whole-rock geochemical signatures also can be recognized as a far field feature of porphyry deposits. For example, unique Sr/Y ratios in whole-rock samples, used to distinguish barren versus fertile magmas for Cu mineralization, result from the differentiation of oxidized hydrous melts. Anomalous concentrations of halogen elements (Cl, Br, and I) have been found for distances of up to 200 m away from some mineralized centers. Variations in isotopic composition between ore-bearing and barren intrusions and/or systematic vertical and lateral zonation in sulfur, carbon, or oxygen isotope values have been documented for some deposit types. Owing to the thermal aureole that extends beyond the area of mineralization for some deposits, detection of paleothermal effects through methods such as conodont alteration indices, vitrinite or bitumen reflectance, illite crystallinity, and apatite or zircon thermochronology studies also can be valuable, particularly for

  11. Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masters, R.

    1997-01-01

    This article provides information on the energy resources, government, electricity supply, nuclear industry and fuel cycle of Argentina. About 12% of electric power produced is generated from nuclear power plants. The operating capacity, history and partial privatisation of the nuclear industry are covered, and fuel cycle facilities described. These include uranium mining and processing, enrichment, fuel fabrication and heavy water production. (UK)

  12. Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-04-01

    This economical study summarizes the energy situation of Argentina: energy institutions and policy, energy companies (oil, electricity, gas, coal), energy supplies (resources, power production, petroleum, natural gas), prices and tariffs, consumption, economical stakes and perspectives (investments, agreements, projects). Energy data for the 1971-1999 period are summarized in graphs and tables. (J.S.)

  13. Identifying and quantifying geochemical and mixing processes in the Matanza-Riachuelo Aquifer System, Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armengol, S; Manzano, M; Bea, S A; Martínez, S

    2017-12-01

    The Matanza-Riachuelo River Basin, in the Northeast of the Buenos Aires Province, is one of the most industrialized and populated region in Argentina and it is worldwide known for its alarming environmental degradation. In order to prevent further damages, the aquifer system, which consists of two overlaid aquifers, is being monitored from 2008 by the river basin authority, Autoridad de la Cuenca Matanza-Riachuelo. The groundwater chemical baseline has been established in a previous paper (Zabala et al., 2016), and this one is devoted to the identification of the main physical and hydrogeochemical processes that control groundwater chemistry and its areal distribution. Thirty five representative groundwater samples from the Upper Aquifer and thirty four from the deep Puelche Aquifer have been studied with a multi-tool approach to understand the origin of their chemical and isotopic values. The resulting conceptual model has been validated though hydrogeochemical modeling. Most of the aquifer system has fresh groundwater, but some areas have brackish and salt groundwater. Water recharging the Upper Aquifer is of the Ca-HCO 3 type as a result of soil CO 2 and carbonate dissolution. Evapotranspiration plays a great role concentrating recharge water. After recharge, groundwater becomes Na-HCO 3 , mostly due to cation exchange with Na release and Ca uptake, which induces calcite dissolution. Saline groundwaters exist in the lower and upper sectors of the basin as a result of Na-HCO 3 water mixing with marine water of different origins. In the upper reaches, besides mixing with connate sea water other sources of SO 4 exist, most probably gypsum and/or sulfides. This work highlights the relevance of performing detailed studies to understand the processes controlling groundwater chemistry at regional scale. Moreover, it is a step forward in the knowledge of the aquifer system, and provides a sound scientific basis to design effective management programs and recovery plans

  14. Alteration Mineralogy and Geochemical Characteristics of Porphyry Cu-Mo Mineralization in Domaniç (Kütahya) Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sariiz, K.; Sendir, H.

    2012-04-01

    The study area is located at 30 km northwest of Domaniç (Kütahya) and covers on approximately 250 square kilometers. The Devonian (Paleozoic) schists which are composed of gneiss, mica schist and chlorite schist is the oldest unit of the study area. This units are overlain unconformably by the Permian Allıkaya Marbles. Eocene granodioritic intrusives cut other rock series and located as a batholite. Magmatic units present porphyric and holocrystalline textures. Granodioritic intrusions are represented by tonalite, tonalite porphyr, granodiorite, granodiorite porphyr, granite, diorite, diorite porphyries. Potassic, phyllitic and prophyllitic hydrothermal alteration zones are determined in host rocks and wallrocks. Mineralizations are observed as disseminated, and stockwork types within the granodioritic rocks. Ore minerals are pyrotine, pyrite, chalcopyrite, molybdenite, rutile, bornite, sphalerite, marcasite and limonite. Geochemically, it is of sub-alkaline affinity, belongs to the high-K, calc-alkaline series and displays features of typical I-type affinity. They show enrichment in large-ion lithophile elements (LIL) and depletion Nb and Ti indicating a subduction zone related magmatic signature for their origin. δ18O (quartz) values range from 8,8 to 12,1 ‰. δ18O (biotite) and δD (biotite) values range from 2,6 to 6,1 ‰ and -87 - -125 (SMOW). These values indicate that mixture magmatic-meteoric of hydrothermal solutions origin which are potassic to propylitic zones. δ13C (calcite) values range from 1,9 to 3,3 ‰ (PDB). Calcite values within the marine carbonates in the study area.

  15. Geochemical Assessment of Groundwater in the Peri-urban Environment of Buenos Aires, Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallardo, A.

    2014-12-01

    Groundwater pollution is a major concern in peri-urban environments. Thus, water quality is being investigated at several domestic wells in Brandsen, 70 km south of Buenos Aires, Argentina. To present, about 20 water sources were sampled in orchards and small farms of the area. There is limited data about the wells construction, although collected information suggests that groundwater is derived from the superficial sandy loams of the Pampean Aquifer. Samples were analysed for major inorganic elements using ion chromatography and ICP-MS. Titration was used to estimate alkalinity. Physical characteristics (EC, pH, temperature) were measured on site. Results show that groundwater pH ranges from 6.5 to 7.8, with a specific conductance of 180 to 255 mS/m. A peak of 360 mS/m in one horticultural parcel is associated to local NO3- concentrations up to 140 mg/L. This value exceeds the maximum recommendations set by the WHO (50 mg/L). Considering that fertilizer inputs in that property are negligible, the high levels of NO3- might be attributed to effluents from a neighbour septic tank. An increase in NO3- (>150mg/L) was also detected in two conventional farms. This increase correlates to elevated SO42- concentrations (>300 mg/L) suggesting thus, fertilizers percolation into the saturated zone. The leaching of these fluids might be exacerbated by irrigation during new planting, and accumulations of fertilizer-solids in the root zones from previous seasons. Chloride concentrations average ~90 mg/L and would not pose a threat to health at the moment. Its main origin would be related to connate waters in the loam matrix, although some anthropogenic inputs might occur in the previously described farms. In general, the rest of the analysed elements fall within acceptable levels for drinking purposes as well. Nevertheless, further work is still necessary to better define the fate of the potential harmful elements and assess seasonal variations in water quality.

  16. Deposition of talc - kerolite-smectite - smectite at seafloor hydrothermal vent fields: Evidence from mineralogical, geochemical and oxygen isotope studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekov, V.M.; Cuadros, J.; Shanks, Wayne C.; Koski, R.A.

    2008-01-01

    Talc, kerolite-smectite, smectite, chlorite-smectite and chlorite samples from sediments, chimneys and massive sulfides from six seafloor hydrothermal areas have been analyzed for mineralogy, chemistry and oxygen isotopes. Samples are from both peridotite- and basalt-hosted hydrothermal systems, and basaltic systems include sediment-free and sediment-covered sites. Mg-phyllosilicates at seafloor hydrothermal sites have previously been described as talc, stevensite or saponite. In contrast, new data show tri-octahedral Mg-phyllosilicates ranging from pure talc and Fe-rich talc, through kerolite-rich kerolite-smectite to smectite-rich kerolite-smectite and tri-octahedral smectite. The most common occurrence is mixed-layer kerolite-smectite, which shows an almost complete interstratification series with 5 to 85% smectitic layers. The smectite interstratified with kerolite is mostly tri-octahedral. The degree of crystal perfection of the clay sequence decreases generally from talc to kerolite-smectite with lower crystalline perfection as the proportion of smectite layers in kerolite-smectite increases. Our studies do not support any dependence of the precipitated minerals on the type/subtype of hydrothermal system. Oxygen isotope geothermometry demonstrates that talc and kerolite-smectite precipitated in chimneys, massive sulfide mounds, at the sediment surface and in open cracks in the sediment near seafloor are high-temperature (> 250????C) phases that are most probably the result of focused fluid discharge. The other end-member of this tri-octahedral Mg-phyllosilicate sequence, smectite, is a moderate-temperature (200-250????C) phase forming deep within the sediment (??? 0.8??m). Chlorite and chlorite-smectite, which constitute the alteration sediment matrix around the hydrothermal mounds, are lower-temperature (150-200????C) phases produced by diffuse fluid discharge through the sediment around the hydrothermal conduits. In addition to temperature, other two

  17. Natural weathering in dry disposed ash dump: Insight from chemical, mineralogical and geochemical analysis of fresh and unsaturated drilled cores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinyemi, S A; Akinlua, A; Gitari, W M; Khuse, N; Eze, P; Akinyeye, R O; Petrik, L F

    2012-07-15

    Some existing alternative applications of coal fly ash such as cement manufacturing; road construction; landfill; and concrete and waste stabilisation use fresh ash directly collected from coal-fired power generating stations. Thus, if the rate of usage continues, the demand for fresh ash for various applications will exceed supply and use of weathered dry disposed ash will become necessary alternative. As a result it's imperative to understand the chemistry and pH behaviour of some metals inherent in dry disposed fly ash. The bulk chemical composition as determined by XRF analysis showed that SiO2, Al2O3 and Fe2O3 were the major oxides in fresh ash and unsaturated weathered ashes. The unsaturated weathered ashes are relatively depleted in CaO, Fe2O3, TiO2, SiO2, Na2O and P2O5 due to dissolution and hydrolysis caused by chemical interaction with ingressing CO2 from the atmosphere and infiltrating rain water. Observed accumulations of Fe2O3, TiO2, CaO, K2O, Na2O and SO3 and Zn, Zr, Sr, Pb, Ni, Cr and Co in the lower layers indicate progressive downward movement through the ash dump though at a slow rate. The bulk mineralogy of unsaturated weathered dry disposed ash, as determined by XRD analysis, revealed quartz and mullite as the major crystalline phases; while anorthite, hematite, enstatite, lime, calcite, and mica were present as minor mineral phases. Pore water chemistry revealed a low concentration of readily soluble metals in unsaturated weathered ashes in comparison with fresh ash, which shows high leachability. This suggests that over time the precipitation of transient minor secondary mineral phases; such as calcite and mica might retard residual metal release from unsaturated weathered ash. Chloride and sulphate species of the water soluble extracts of weathered ash are at equilibrium with Na+ and K+; these demonstrate progressive leaching over time and become supersaturated at the base of unsaturated weathered ash. This suggests that the ash dump does not

  18. Petrographic, mineralogical and geochemical characterization of the Serrinha coal waste pile (Douro Coalfield, Portugal) and the potential environmental impacts on soil, sediments and surface waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribeiro, J. [Centro de Geologia, Faculdade de Ciencias, Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre, 687, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal); Ferreira da Silva, E. [GeoBioTec, Geobiosciences, Geotechnologies and Geoengineering Research Center, Universidade de Aveiro, Campus de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Li, Z.; Ward, C. [School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of New South Wales. Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia); Flores, D. [Departamento de Geociencias, Ambiente e Ordenamento do Territorio, Faculdade de Ciencias, Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre, 687, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal)

    2010-09-01

    Serrinha is the largest coal waste pile resulting from mining activities in the Douro Coalfield, Portugal. The exploitation of anthracite in tens of small mines caused some environmental impacts, as is the case of the coal waste piles that exist in old mines and adjacent areas. The Serrinha waste pile is essentially made up of 2 million tonnes of shales and carbonaceous shales, deposited in a topographical depression over about 30 years. Despite the environmental restoration accomplished in the Serrinha waste pile, some environmental problems seem to persist. In this study a petrographic, mineralogical and geochemical characterization was done in order to recognize and understand these problems. The materials studied were coal waste, sediments and waters from the drainage system and decanting basins, soils from the surrounding areas, leachates from waste material and neoformed minerals formed at the bottom of the waste pile. The main lithologies (carbonaceous shale and lithic arenite) and coal from the Douro Coalfield were also analyzed. Petrographic analysis shows some evidence of weathering (on organic and inorganic matter) related to the time of exposure to the weathering agents and the easy access of air within the waste pile (due to both the poor compaction and the heterogeneity of the material). Mineralogically, the composition of coal waste material has contributions from both the coal and the associated lithologies. R-type cluster analysis of the waste pile material allows two distinct clusters to be identified. In the first cluster a sulfide fraction is represented by the association of As, Cd, Cu, Pb, Ni and Zn, while Fe clustered with Al, Co, and Ti indicates that some of the Fe and the other elements are likely associated with silicate minerals such as clays. The second cluster, represented by Cr, V, Zr, Rb, REE, Mn, Li and Ba, probably represent a silicate fraction, perhaps detrital accessory minerals. The waste pile material, leachates, soils

  19. Argentina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1999-09-01

    This report presents a brief overview of the socio-economic, energy and environmental context in which climate change mitigation actions in Argentina shall be inserted. To that end, the dynamic of the Argentine economic development, its influence on the energy system and environmental impacts is summarised. From the environmental standpoint, emphasis shall only be made on the impact of economic development patterns and energy policies on GHG emission. (au) 73 refs.

  20. Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanis, S.; Ramberg, B.

    1990-01-01

    Argentina has embarked on an ambitious domestic nuclear research and energy program. The venture promises to provide the nation with the infrastructure to play an important role in the nuclear export market in the years ahead. Buenos Aires built its program on a foundation of international support and assistance that overlay an emerging sophisticated industrial and scientific establishment. The foreign contribution sensitized Argentina to opportunities in the global market. This paper reports that Argentina operates two heavy-water/natural uranium reactors, Atucha I and Embalse. Producing, respectively, 320 MW(e) and 600 MW(e), they supply roughly 10 percent of the country's electricity. With a capacity factor of 84 percent, Atucha I is among the best operated plants in the world. Plans call for a third, 745 MW(e) power plant, Atucha II, to go on line in the early 1990s. During this period, construction also may begin on three 300 MW(e) plants, although the country's foreign indebtedness plus cost overruns in earlier construction will place a heavy burden on these plans

  1. Sediment-peridotite interactions in a thermal gradient: mineralogic and geochemical effects and the "sedimentary signature" of arc magmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodland, Alan; Girnis, Andrei; Bulatov, Vadim; Brey, Gerhard; Höfer, Heidi; Gerdes, Axel

    2017-04-01

    directly above the sediment/peridotite boundary and defines the region of maximum metasomatic alteration. With a low Tmin, fluid-mobile Ba, Rb, Sr and Li are more strongly transported into the melt zone compared to HFSE and REE. At Tmin > 700˚ C, all incompatible elements are extracted from the solid into the melt. However, the mineral assemblage controls which elements are held back in the solid residue (i.e. MREE, HREE, Y, Sc, and to a lesser extent Ti, Zr and Hf in garnet). Peridotite-sediment interaction can produce humite-group minerals, particularly in the presence of F. Negative Nb-Ta anomalies are caused by rutile and/or humite phases. Transport of melt or fluid from the sediment to the overlying mantle wedge produces metasomatized magma sources from which basaltic melts with sedimentary geochemical signatures can be derived. Adding even 1% of melt or fluid to depleted mantle peridotite is sufficient to produce basaltic melts with incompatible element contents similar to those observed in natural subduction-related magmas. Such signatures are retained at 6.5 and even 10 GPa when Tmin < 700˚ C. Plank, T., Langmuir C., 1998. Chem. Geol. 145, 325-394.

  2. The flotation tailings of the former Pb-Zn mine of Touiref (NW Tunisia): mineralogy, mine drainage prediction, base-metal speciation assessment and geochemical modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othmani, Mohamed Ali; Souissi, Fouad; Bouzahzah, Hassan; Bussière, Bruno; da Silva, Eduardo Ferreira; Benzaazoua, Mostafa

    2015-02-01

    The underground extraction of Pb-Zn mineralization in the Touiref area stopped in 1958. A large volume of flotation tailings (more than 500 Mt) containing sulfides were deposited in a tailings impoundment. The goals of this study are to evaluate the neutralization capacity of the unoxidized and oxidized tailings, to assess the speciation of metals between the different components of the tailings material, and to assess the mobility of metals and the secondary minerals' precipitation in pore waters using geochemical modeling. To accomplish these objectives, representative samples from both fresh and oxidized zones were collected along a vertical profile through the tailings pile. Physical, chemical (ICP-MS), and mineralogical characterization (X-ray diffraction (XRD), reflected light microscopy, scanning electron microscope (SEM)) of these samples was performed. Grain size analysis shows that the tailings are dominated by silt- to sand-sized fractions. The microscopic observation highlights the presence of pyrite, marcasite, galena, and sphalerite as primary minerals in a carbonated matrix. The study reveals also the presence of secondary minerals represented by cerussite, smithsonite, anglesite, and Fe oxi-hydroxides as important scavengers for trace elements. The static tests show that the presence of calcite in the tailing samples ensures acid-neutralizing capacity (ANC), which is significantly greater than the acidity potential (PA). The geochemical characterization of the unoxidized samples shows higher Cd, Pb, and Zn concentrations than the oxidized samples containing the highest values for Fe and SO4. Sequential extraction tests show that significant percentages of metals are distributed between the acid-soluble fractions (Cd, Pb, and Zn) and the reducible one (Zn). Pore water analysis indicates that Ca is the dominant cation (8,170 and 6,200 mg L(-1), respectively), whereas sulfate is the principal anion (6,900 and 5,100 mg L(-1), respectively). Saturation

  3. Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that like so many other countries, Argentina is in the throes of privatization and restructuring of its economic programs. This has had a direct effect on the LPG industry. Argentina is a country with many natural resources. However, natural gas and crude, while present, are not in abundance. Imports of these and their associated products are needed to satisfy the growing need of the population from time to time. This is especially true with LPGs. Production of the fuel averages about 1 million tons, not enough to satisfy internal needs in the winter but enough to permit some exports in the summer to nearby Brazil. The Country's Congress approved a plan to sell-off or lease parts of the natural gas distribution network and other businesses of Gas del Estado. Subsequent new legislation has called for ten new natural gas distribution zones. Included in the sell-off is the company's propane distribution division. What is left of Gas del Estado and YPF will become a corporation in the true sense of the word. Stocks in YPF are to be sold to the public

  4. Geomorphic and geochemical controls on leaf wax biomarker transport and preservation in alluvial river systems: Rio Bermejo, Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repasch, M. N.; Sachse, D.; Hovius, N.; Scheingross, J. S.; Szupiany, R. N.

    2017-12-01

    Rivers are the primary conduits for organic carbon (OC) transfer from vegetation-rich uplands to long-term sinks, and thus are responsible for significant fluxes among different reservoirs of the carbon cycle. Fluxes of terrestrial OC out of river systems are generally less than fluxes into the systems, indicating loss of OC either during active fluvial transport, during residence in the active channel belt, or in older deposits outside of the active channel belt. Sedimentary biomarkers can be used to elucidate the mechanisms of transport, preservation, and/or transformation of OC during its passage from source to sink. In this study we evaluate the influence of fluvial sediment transport on preservation of terrestrial leaf wax n-alkanes. Our natural laboratory is the Rio Bermejo in northern Argentina, which transports sediment and organic matter from the central Andes over 700 km across the foreland basin without input of foreign material from tributaries. Rapid channel migration rates in a region of flexural foreland basin uplift (the forebulge) are responsible for remobilization of floodplain sediment and terrestrial OC. By sampling suspended sediment, river bank sediment, and soil from several locations along the length of the Rio Bermejo, and analyzing the dissolved chemistry, biomarker composition, and compound-specific stable isotopes, we can evaluate the geomorphic and geochemical processes that act to influence the preservation of terrestrial biomarkers through the river system. Data suggest that concentrations of long-chain terrestrial (C25-C33) alkanes decrease downstream, while concentrations of short-chain (C15-C19) alkanes increase. This trend is corroborated by a downstream increase in suspended sediment δ13C values, suggesting a replacement of terrestrial OC by microbial OC. It is likely that microbial degradation is responsible for loss of terrestrial biomarkers as their residence time in the river system increases. Controlled laboratory

  5. Mineralogical and geochemical characterization of weathering profiles developed on mylonites in the Fodjomekwet-Fotouni section of the Cameroon Shear Zone (CSZ), West Cameroon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tematio, P.; Tchaptchet, W. T.; Nguetnkam, J. P.; Mbog, M. B.; Yongue Fouateu, R.

    2017-07-01

    The mineralogical and geochemical investigation of mylonitic weathering profiles in Fodjomekwet-Fotouni was done to better trace the occurrence of minerals and chemical elements in this area. Four representative soil profiles were identified in two geomorphological units (upland and lowland) differentiating three weathering products (organo-mineral, mineral and weathered materials). Weathering of these mylonites led to some minerals association such as vermiculite, kaolinite, goethite, smectite, halloysite, phlogopite and gibbsite. The minerals in a decreasing order of abundance are: quartz (24.2%-54.8%); kaolinite (8.4%-36.0%); phlogopite (5.5%-21.9%); goethite (7.8%-16.1%); vermiculite (6.7%-15.7%); smectite (10.2%-11.9%); gibbsite (9.0%-11.8%) and halloysite (5.6%-11.5%) respectively. Patterns of chemical elements allow highlighting three behaviors (enriched elements, depleted elements and elements with complex behavior), depending on the landscape position of the profiles. In the upland weathering products, K, Cr and REEs are enriched; Ca, Mg, Na, Mn, Rb, S and Sr are depleted while Si, Al, Fe, Ti, Ba, Co, Cu, Ga, Mo, Nb, Ni, Pb, Sc, V, Y, Zn and Zr portray a complex behavior. Contrarily, the lowland weathering profiles enriched elements are Fe, Ti, Co, Cr, Cu, V, Zr, Pr, Sm, Tb, Dy, Er and Yb; while depleted elements are Ca, Mg, K, Na, Mn, Ba, Ga, S, Sr, Y, Zn, La, Ce and Nd; and Si, Al, Mo, Nb, Ni, Pb, Rb, Sc evidenced complex behaviors. In all the studied weathering products, the REEs fractionation was also noticeable with a landscape-position dependency, showing light REEs (LREEs) enrichment in the upland areas and heavy REEs (HREEs) in lowland areas. SiO2, Al2O3 and Fe2O3 are positively correlated with most of the traces and REEs (Co, Cu, Nb, Ni, Mo, Pb, Sc, V, Zn, Zr, La, Ce, Sm, Tb, Dy, Er, Yb), pointing to the fact that they may be incorporated into newly formed clay minerals and oxides. Ba, Cr, Ga, Rb, S, Sr, Y, Pr and Nd behave like alkalis and

  6. Effect of mineralogical, geochemical and biological properties on soils reflectance to assess temporal and spatial dynamics of BSCs in Sahelian ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourguignon, A.; Cerdan, O.; Desprats, J. F.; Marin, B.; Malam Issa, O.; Valentin, C.; Rajot, J. L.

    2012-04-01

    pressure on land use Soil surface disturbances due to the intensification of human activities. Spectral field and laboratory data were acquired in 2009, 2010 and 2011 with the FieldSpec Pro®. The spectra of soils with respect to different parameters are studied in details and their separability from BSCs, vegetation and vegetation residue as well are be analysed. First, the effect of the mineralogy and the geochemical variables on the soil reflectance properties is studied and then the feasibility to resolve some of these effects with satellite imagery (e. g., ASTER) will be tested in order to define the potential capability for identifying the locations of sensitive areas affected by soil degradation and appearance of BSCs.

  7. Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-02-01

    Background notes on Argentina provide a profile of the geography, selected demographic features, government and economic conditions. Descriptive text includes a discussion of the people, their history and political conditions, the government and officials, the state of the economy, their defense, foreign relations, and relations with the US. The 1992 estimated population was about 33 million of whom 97% are European (mostly Spanish and Italian). Religions represented are Roman Catholic (92%), Protestant (2%), Jewish (2%), and other (4%). Adult literacy is 95%. 36% are engaged in industry and commerce, 20% in services, 19% in agriculture, 6% in transport and communications, and 19% other. Per capita gross domestic product was $4,500. There are only 50,000 native Indians remaining in peripheral provinces. The population enjoys a high standard of living and a low growth rate. The country was shaped by dominant forces: modern agricultural techniques and the integration of the country into the world economy. Foreign investment aided the economic revolution. Conservative and radical rule has swung the country back and forth politically since 1916. Colonel Juan Domingo Peron led a successful military coup in 1943 and was elected in 1946. Policies were instituted to give a greater voice to the working class, and with the influences of his wife, women's groups. In 1955, he was ousted by the military, which failed to revive the economy and quiet increasing terrorism. After a number of difficult elections, Peron was reinstated as president in 1973. Extremists on the left and right threatened public order; the military as a consequence imprisoned persons indefinitely. Peron's wife succeeded him after his death, but was removed from office in the military coup of 1976. Basic human rights were violated during this period. By 1983, a fair election was held and support increased for a democratic system. In 1989, Carlos Saul Menem, a Peronist candidate, won and established

  8. Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Benedetti

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available El presente trabajo tiene como objetivo realizar un diagnóstico ambiental de un sector de la ciudad de Bahía Blanca, Argentina basado en el arbolado urbano de alineación. El arbolado constituye un componente fundamental de los paisajes artifi ciales ya que contribuye al aumento del confort y al mejoramiento de la calidad del medio. En este sentido, actúa como un factor moderador de las condiciones climáticas, la contaminación y la salud de la población. El municipio de la ciudad de Bahía Blanca tiene como proyecto la realización de inventarios del arbolado en los distintos barrios, para lograr optimizar la relación entre la cantidad de ejemplares arbóreos y la densidad poblacional. Es importante considerar la variedad de ejemplares en función del uso del suelo y de las características ambientales de cada sector. Por lo tanto, este trabajo presenta un diseño metodológico para la elaboración del plano verde de la ciudad.

  9. Mineralogical and geochemical studies on apatites and phosphate host rocks of Esfordi deposit, Yazd province, to determine the origin and geological setting of the apatite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ali Rajabzadeh

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Iron-apatite ore deposits well known as Kiruna iron type formed in association with calc-alkaline volcanism from Proterozoic to Tertiary (Hitzman et al., 1992. Liquid immiscibility in an igneous system was proposed to explain the formation of the iron oxides accompanying apatite in mineralized zones (Förster and Jafarzadeh, 1994; Daliran, 1999. The mode of ore formation however, is a matter in debate. Bafq region in Central Iran is one of the greatest iron mining regions in Iran with 750 million tons of reservoir. The majority of the iron deposits contains apatite as minor mineral and underwent metamorphism-alteration in varying degrees. The mode of formation and geological setting of Esfordi iron-apatite deposit in this region with an average of 13.9 wt% apatite are discussed using geochemical and mineralogical data along with field description. Materials and methods Fifty-three samples of mineralized zones and host rocks collected from 7 cross sections were studied by conventional microscopic methods. Seven representative samples were determined by XRD at Department of Physics, Shiraz University. Fifteen and six samples were also analyzed for major and trace elements using XRF at Binaloud Co. Iran, and ICP-MS at Labwest Minerals Analysis, Australia, respectively. Microprobe analyses were carried out on apatite in Geo Forschungs Zentrum Telegrafenberg at Potsdam University, Germany. Results Field observation shows that igneous host rocks in Esfordi were intensively altered by hydrothermal fluids. The ores are surrounded by wide altered halos. Petrographic investigation indicated that the most important alterations are of potassic, carbonatitic and silicification types. Magnetite and apatite occur as major minerals, accompanied by minor hematite and goethite in the mineralized zones. Rare Earth Element (REE minerals are present as minor phases in the ores. Three apatite mineralization types (vein, massive, and disseminated were

  10. Novel imaging techniques, integrated with mineralogical, geochemical and microbiological characterizations to determine the biogeochemical controls on technetium mobility in FRC sediments. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lloyd, Jonathan R.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this research program was to take a highly multidisciplinary approach to define the biogeochemical factors that control technetium (Tc) mobility in FRC sediments. The aim was to use batch and column studies to probe the biogeochemical conditions that control the mobility of Tc at the FRC. Background sediment samples from Area 2 (pH 6.5, low nitrate, low 99 Tc) and Area 3 (pH 3.5, high nitrate, relatively high 99 Tc) of the FRC were selected (http://www.esd.ornl.gov/nabirfrc). For the batch experiments, sediments were mixed with simulated groundwater, modeled on chemical constituents of FRC waters and supplemented with 99 Tc(VII), both with and without added electron donor (acetate). The solubility of the Tc was monitored, alongside other biogeochemical markers (nitrate, nitrite, Fe(II), sulfate, acetate, pH, Eh) as the 'microcosms' aged. At key points, the microbial communities were also profiled using both cultivation-dependent and molecular techniques, and results correlated with the geochemical conditions in the sediments. The mineral phases present in the sediments were also characterized, and the solid phase associations of the Tc determined using sequential extraction and synchrotron techniques. In addition to the batch sediment experiments, where discrete microbial communities with the potential to reduce and precipitate 99 Tc will be separated in time, we also developed column experiments where biogeochemical processes were spatially separated. Experiments were conducted both with and without amendments proposed to stimulate radionuclide immobilization (e.g. the addition of acetate as an electron donor for metal reduction), and were also planned with and without competing anions at high concentration (e.g. nitrate, with columns containing Area 3 sediments). When the columns had stabilized, as determined by chemical analysis of the effluents, we used a spike of the short-lived gamma emitter 99m Tc (50-200 MBq; half life 6 hours) and its

  11. Novel imaging techniques, integrated with mineralogical, geochemical and microbiological characterizations to determine the biogeochemical controls on technetium mobility in FRC sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jonathan R. Lloyd

    2009-02-03

    The objective of this research program was to take a highly multidisciplinary approach to define the biogeochemical factors that control technetium (Tc) mobility in FRC sediments. The aim was to use batch and column studies to probe the biogeochemical conditions that control the mobility of Tc at the FRC. Background sediment samples from Area 2 (pH 6.5, low nitrate, low {sup 99}Tc) and Area 3 (pH 3.5, high nitrate, relatively high {sup 99}Tc) of the FRC were selected (http://www.esd.ornl.gov/nabirfrc). For the batch experiments, sediments were mixed with simulated groundwater, modeled on chemical constituents of FRC waters and supplemented with {sup 99}Tc(VII), both with and without added electron donor (acetate). The solubility of the Tc was monitored, alongside other biogeochemical markers (nitrate, nitrite, Fe(II), sulfate, acetate, pH, Eh) as the 'microcosms' aged. At key points, the microbial communities were also profiled using both cultivation-dependent and molecular techniques, and results correlated with the geochemical conditions in the sediments. The mineral phases present in the sediments were also characterized, and the solid phase associations of the Tc determined using sequential extraction and synchrotron techniques. In addition to the batch sediment experiments, where discrete microbial communities with the potential to reduce and precipitate {sup 99}Tc will be separated in time, we also developed column experiments where biogeochemical processes were spatially separated. Experiments were conducted both with and without amendments proposed to stimulate radionuclide immobilization (e.g. the addition of acetate as an electron donor for metal reduction), and were also planned with and without competing anions at high concentration (e.g. nitrate, with columns containing Area 3 sediments). When the columns had stabilized, as determined by chemical analysis of the effluents, we used a spike of the short-lived gamma emitter {sup 99m}Tc (50

  12. Geochemical and mineralogical analysis of stone anchors from west coast of India: Provenance study using thin sections, XRF and SEM-EDS

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Tripati, S.; Mudholkar, A.V.; Vora, K.H.; Rao, B.R.; Gaur, A.S.; Sundaresh

    for petrographical and geochemical analysis. One surface of the rock chip was ground to finesmoothnessandwasmountedontotheglassslidewithhelp of Araldite C210 (resin & hardner) and then clamped to prevent developmentof air bubbles. After overnight cooling and curing...

  13. Mineralogía de arcillas y nanofósiles calcáreos de las formaciones Jagüel y Roca en el sector oriental del lago Pellegrini, Cuenca Neuquina, República Argentina Clay mineralogy and calcareous nannofossils from Jagüel and Roca formations in the eastern sector of Pellegrini Lake, Neuquen Basin, República Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Telma Musso

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Se presentan nuevos datos mineralógicos, sedimentológlcos, y micropaleontológlcos de las sedimentitas de las formaciones Jagüel (Maastrichtiano Tardío-Daniano temprano y Roca (Daniano, en el sector oriental del lago Pellegrini, provincia de Río Negro, República Argentina. En función de las características físicas de las sedimentitas que integran estas formaciones y su edad, se definieron dos litofacies siliciclásticas y una litofacies carbonática: litofacies de fangolitas calcáreas amarillas grisáceas maastrichtianas, litofacies de fangolitas calcáreas gris oliva claro danianas y litofacies de rocas carbonáticas danianas. Las rocas pertenecientes a las litofacies siliciclásticas, que constituyen la mayor parte de los perfiles estudiados, se clasificaron como fangolitas aloquímicas y están constituidas principalmente por argilominerales y, en menor proporción, por calcita. La asociación de minerales arcillosos se encuentra dominada por un interestratificado illita/esmectita (I/S tipo R0 (70-90% Sm acompañado por proporciones menores de illita y caolinita. La mineralogía y microfábrica de las fangolitas reflejan que los sedimentos no habrían sido modificados significativamente por diagénesis. Los minerales arcillosos serían de origen detrítico y el predominio del I/S altamente esmectítico a lo largo de todas las secciones estaría asociado al vulcanismo activo existente en el arco magmático situado al oeste de la Cuenca Neuquina, durante el Cretácico Tardío y Paleoceno. El análisis micropaleontológico de las litofacies definidas confirmó la presencia del límite Cretácico-Paleógeno (K/P en las sedimentitas de la Formación Jagüel. Los nanofósiles calcáreos hallados permitieron establecer una correspondencia entre edades y tipos de asociaciones mineralógicas. De esta manera, fue posible detectar que en posiciones estratigráficas próximas al límite K/P existe un incremento de caolinita (>10% que disminuye

  14. Geochemical features of the Cretaceous alkaline volcanics in the area of Morado hill, Jachal town, San Juan, Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez, L.

    2010-01-01

    This paper is about the alkaline volcanic rocks that crop out at the Morado hill located in the southern end of the Mogna ranges, which are part of the Eastern border of the pre mountain in the San Juan province, Argentina.The petrography and geochemistry study of the alkaline volcanics has allowed to classify them as tephrite basanite or basanite nephelinite, with strong alkaline chemical affinity, showing a characteristic composition of within plate geochemistry environment. The radimetric analysis, K-Ar data, has shown an average 90 ∓ 8 m.y. age for this rocks, (Cingolani et al. 1984) pointing out the Upper Cretaceous (lower section) stratigraphical position for the suite. The discussion of the results makes conspicuous the relationships of these alkaline rocks with others of the central and northwestern regions of the country that allowed to establish an alkaline petrographic province

  15. Exploring innovative techniques for identifying geochemical elements as fingerprints of sediment sources in an agricultural catchment of Argentina affected by soil erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres Astorga, Romina; de Los Santos Villalobos, Sergio; Velasco, Hugo; Domínguez-Quintero, Olgioly; Pereira Cardoso, Renan; Meigikos Dos Anjos, Roberto; Diawara, Yacouba; Dercon, Gerd; Mabit, Lionel

    2018-05-15

    Identification of hot spots of land degradation is strongly related with the selection of soil tracers for sediment pathways. This research proposes the complementary and integrated application of two analytical techniques to select the most suitable fingerprint tracers for identifying the main sources of sediments in an agricultural catchment located in Central Argentina with erosive loess soils. Diffuse reflectance Fourier transformed in the mid-infrared range (DRIFT-MIR) spectroscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) were used for a suitable fingerprint selection. For using DRIFT-MIR spectroscopy as fingerprinting technique, calibration through quantitative parameters is needed to link and correlate DRIFT-MIR spectra with soil tracers. EDXRF was used in this context for determining the concentrations of geochemical elements in soil samples. The selected tracers were confirmed using two artificial mixtures composed of known proportions of soil collected in different sites with distinctive soil uses. These fingerprint elements were used as parameters to build a predictive model with the whole set of DRIFT-MIR spectra. Fingerprint elements such as phosphorus, iron, calcium, barium, and titanium were identified for obtaining a suitable reconstruction of the source proportions in the artificial mixtures. Mid-infrared spectra produced successful prediction models (R 2  = 0.91) for Fe content and moderate useful prediction (R 2  = 0.72) for Ti content. For Ca, P, and Ba, the R 2 were 0.44, 0.58, and 0.59 respectively.

  16. Net Acid Production, Acid Neutralizing Capacity, and Associated Mineralogical and Geochemical Characteristics of Animas River Watershed Igneous Rocks Near Silverton, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yager, Douglas B.; Choate, LaDonna; Stanton, Mark R.

    2008-01-01

    This report presents results from laboratory and field studies involving the net acid production (NAP), acid neutralizing capacity (ANC), and magnetic mineralogy of 27 samples collected in altered volcanic terrain in the upper Animas River watershed near Silverton, Colo., during the summer of 2005. Sampling focused mainly on the volumetrically important, Tertiary-age volcanic and plutonic rocks that host base- and precious-metal mineralization in the study area. These rocks were analyzed to determine their potential for neutralization of acid-rock drainage. Rocks in the study area have been subjected to a regional propylitic alteration event, which introduced calcite, chlorite (clinochlore), and epidote that have varying amounts and rates of acid neutralizing capacity (ANC). Locally, hydrothermal alteration has consumed any ANC and introduced minerals, mainly pyrite, that have a high net acid production (NAP). Laboratory studies included hydrogen pyroxide (H2O2) acid digestion and subsequent sodium hydroxide (NaOH) titration to determine NAP, and sulfuric acid (H2SO4) acid titration experiments to determine ANC. In addition to these environmental rock-property determinations, mineralogical, chemical, and petrographic characteristics of each sample were determined through semiquantitative X-ray diffractometry (Rietveld method), optical mineralogy, wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence, total carbon-carbonate, and inductively coupled plasma?mass spectrometric analysis. An ANC ranking was assigned to rock samples based on calculated ANC quantity in kilograms/ton (kg/t) calcium carbonate equivalent and ratios of ANC to NAP. Results show that talus near the southeast Silverton caldera margin, composed of andesite clasts of the Burns Member of the Silverton Volcanics, has the highest ANC (>100 kg/t calcium carbonate equivalent) with little to no NAP. The other units found to have moderate to high ANC include (a) andesite lavas and volcaniclastic rocks of the San Juan

  17. Sedimentological, textural, mineralogical and geochemical study of surface sediments and suspension material in Baia da Ribeira, Angra dos Reis, RJ, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, Samuel do Carmo

    1985-01-01

    The geochemistry dispersion of the metals in aquatic environment is related to the physical chemistry proprieties of these elements as to their interaction by sorption on and desorption from solid particles. These interaction must be understood within the environmental dynamic, with its hydrological, sedimentological, chemical, physical and biological processes that may take the toxic elements (stables metals and radionuclides) to the bio alimentary chain. It was observed at the Ribeira Bay, its hydrodynamic behaviour through the suspension material and particulate organic carbon dispersion. And, through the textural, mineralogical and chemical parameters it was observed the behaviour of the geochemistry processes of the sedimentary materials and the influence that they may submit to the metals dispersion. (author)

  18. Petrographic, mineralogical, geochemical and paleo environmental characterization of radioactive anomaly associated to carbonate rocks from Jandaira formation of high cretaceous from Potiguar basin - Rio Grande do Norte - Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, N.S.

    1988-01-01

    The Jandaira Formation (Turonian/Maastrichtian - Potiguar Basin, Brazil) presents an anomalous radioactive marker in the upper part of its carbonatic section. This marker of 3-20 m in thickness, comprises an area of about 3500 Km 2 and shows a radioactivity of 470 UAPI, against a background of 20 UAPI on the Gamma Ray Log. In the effort of characterizing this marker, petrological, mineralogical, geological and paleontological, analyses were made in ditch samples of selected 23 wells. This marker is composed by bioclastics packstones to mudstones, mainly constituted of planktonic and bentonic forams, deposited in relatively deep water. Chemical analysis of the P 205 richest samples, the ones show that they are also enriched on U, F, As, Cr, Cu, Mo, Ni, Pb, S, Se, V, Y, Yb and on all rare-earth elements. The origin of the radioactive anomaly is due to the presence of sedimentary phosphates (phosphorite) made-up of uraniferous coloform apatite. (author)

  19. Mineralogical and geochemical investigation of the Oligocene sedimentary series of Saint-Agoulin; Etude mineralogique et geochimique de la serie sedimentaire oligocene de Saint-Agoulin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohadjer, K [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, 92 - Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires, direction des productions; Faculte des Sciences de l' Universite de Paris, 75 (France)

    1967-07-05

    The mineralogical investigation is based on determination of the amounts of quartz, clays, feldspars and on grain size analysis. A distinction was established between two lithological groups: the lower group with dominant silica the upper with dominant carbonates. Clays of the two groups are comparable with dominant illite, and accessory kaolinite and montmorillonite. The amounts of the elements Si, Al, Fe, Ca, Mg, Na, K, Ti, Mn, P, Ba, Sr, Rb, Pb, Cu, Ni, Co, V, Be, B, Zr, U, were determined by several analytical methods: chemistry, X ray fluorescence, spectrography and fluorimetry. Correlations between the chemical elements and the mineralogical components were computed and plotted. Lastly the conditions of filling up of the basin are defined, taking into account the Oligocene climatic conditions. (author) [French] L'etude mineralogique est basee sur les dosages du quartz, de la calcite, des argiles, des feldspaths et sur les granulometries. On a distingue 2 familles lithologiques: l'une riche en quartz dans la partie inferieure, l'autre riche en carbonate dans la partie superieure. Les argiles des 2 familles sont comparables: illite predominante, kaolinite et montmorillonite accessoires. Les elements: Si, Al, Fe, Ca, Mg, Na, K, Ti, Mn, P, Ba, Sr, Rb, Pb, Cu, Ni, Co, V, Be, B, Zr, U, ont ete doses par differentes methodes d'analyse: analyse chimique, fluorescence X, spectrographie et fluorimetrie. Une etude de correlation entre les elements chimiques et les constituants mineralogiques a ete realisee. Enfin, les conditions de remplissage du Bassin sont definies, en tenant compte du contexte climatique oligocene. (auteur)

  20. Sedimentary evolution of the Mesozoic continental redbeds using geochemical and mineralogical tools: the case of Upper Triassic to Lowermost Jurassic Monte di Gioiosa mudrocks (Sicily, southern Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perri, Francesco; Critelli, Salvatore; Mongelli, Giovanni; Cullers, Robert L.

    2011-10-01

    The continental redbeds from the Internal Domains of the central-western Mediterranean Chains have an important role in the palaeogeographic and palaeotectonic reconstructions of the Alpine circum-Mediterranean orogen evolution since these redbeds mark the Triassic-Jurassic rift-valley stage of Tethyan rifting. The composition and the sedimentary evolution of the Middle Triassic to Lowermost Jurassic continental redbeds of the San Marco d'Alunzio Unit (Peloritani Mountains, Southern Italy), based on mineralogical and chemical analyses, suggests that the studied mudrock sediments share common features with continental redbeds that constitute the Internal Domains of the Alpine Mediterranean Chains. Phyllosilicates are the main components in the mudrocks. The 10 Å-minerals (illite and micas), the I-S mixed layers, and kaolinite are the most abundant phyllosilicates. The amount of illitic layers in I-S mixed layers coupled with the illite crystallinity values (IC) are typical of high degree of diagenesis, corresponding to a lithostatic/tectonic loading of about 4-5 km. The mineralogical assemblage coupled with the A-CN-K plot suggest post-depositional K-enrichments. Palaeoweathering proxies (PIA and CIW) record intense weathering at the source area. Further, the studied sediments are affected by reworking and recycling processes and, as consequence, it is likely these proxies monitor cumulative effect of weathering. The climate in the early Jurassic favoured recycling and weathering occurred under hot, episodically humid climate with a prolonged dry season. The source-area is the low-grade Paleozoic metasedimentary basement. Mafic supply is minor but not negligible as suggested by provenance proxies.

  1. Source areas of the Grybów sub-basin: micropaleontological, mineralogical and geochemical provenance analysis (Outer Western Carpathians, Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oszczypko-Clowes Marta

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The Grybów Unit occurring in the Ropa tectonic window was the subject of micropaleontological and geochemical investigation. Studies, based on calcareous nannofossils, proved that the level of reworked microfossil is not higher than 22 % and it varies between two sections. Quantitative analyses of the reworked assemblages confirmed the domination of Cretaceous and Middle Eocene species. The Sub-Grybów Beds, Grybów Marl Formation and Krosno Beds were assigned to the Late Oligocene and represent the terminal flysch facies. Detrital material accumulated in the Oligocene sediments originated from the Marmarosh Massif, which is the eastern prolongation of the Fore-Magura Ridge. The microscopically obtained petrological features agree with the chemical composition of the samples. Mica flakes, rounded grains of glauconite, heavy mineral assemblage, including abraded grains of zircon, rutile and tourmaline as well as charred pieces of plant tissues are reworked components. Enrichment in zircon and rutile is confirmed geochemically by positive correlation between Zr and SiO2. Zr addition is illustrated on 10×Al2O3–Zr–200×TiO2 and Zr/Sc vs. Th/Sc diagrams. Interpretation of the A–CN–K diagram and variety of CIA and CPA values indicate that the source rocks were intensely weathered granite-type rocks.

  2. A high-pyrite semianthracite of Late Permian age in the Songzao Coalfield, southwestern China: Mineralogical and geochemical relations with underlying mafic tuffs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, S.; Wang, X.; Chen, W.; Li, D.; Chou, C.-L.; Zhou, Y.; Zhu, Chen; Li, H.; Zhu, Xudong; Xing, Y.; Zhang, W.; Zou, J.

    2010-01-01

    The No. 12 Coal (Late Permian) in the Songzao Coalfield, Chongqing, southwestern China, is characteristically high in pyrite and some trace elements. It is uniquely deposited directly above mafic tuff beds. Samples of coal and tuffs have been studied for their mineralogy and geochemistry using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry, X-ray fluorescence, plasma low-temperature ashing plus powder X-ray diffraction, and scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy-dispersive X-ray analysis.The results show that the minerals of the No. 12 Coal are mainly composed of pyrite, clay minerals (kaolinite, chamosite, and illite), ankerite, calcite, and trace amounts of quartz and boehmite. Kaolinite and boehmite were mainly derived from sediment source region of mafic tuffs. Chamosite was formed by the reaction of kaolinite with Fe-Mg-rich fluids during early diagenesis. The high pyrite (Sp,d=8.83%) in the coal was related to marine transgression over peat deposits and abundant Fe derived from the underlying mafic tuff bed. Ankerite and calcite were precipitated from epigenetic fluids.Chemical compositions of incompatible elements indicate that the tuffs were derived from enriched mantle and the source magmas had an alkali-basalt character. Compared to other coals from the Songzao Coalfield and common Chinese coals, the No. 12 Coal has a lower SiO2/Al2O3 (1.13) but a higher Al2O3/Na2O (80.1) value and is significantly enriched in trace elements including Sc (13.5??g/g), V (121??g/g), Cr (33.6??g/g), Co (27.2??g/g), Ni (83.5??g/g), Cu (48.5??g/g), Ga (17.3??g/g), Y (68.3??g/g), Zr (444??g/g), Nb (23.8??g/g), and REE (392??g/g on average). Above mineralogical compositions, as well as similar ratios of selected elements (e.g., SiO2/Al2O3 and Al2O3/Na2O) and similar distribution patterns of incompatible elements (e.g., the mantle-normalized diagram for incompatible elements and chondrite-normalized diagram for rare earth elements) of coal and tuff, indicated that

  3. A high-pyrite semianthracite of Late Permian age in the Songzao Coalfield, southwestern China: Mineralogical and geochemical relations with underlying mafic tuffs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Shifeng; Wang, Xibo; Chen, Wenmei [State Key Laboratory of Coal Resources and Safe Mining, China University of Mining and Technology, Beijing 100083, (China); Li, Dahua [Research Center of State Key Laboratory of Coal Resources and Safe Mining, Chongqing 400042, (China); Chou, Chen-Lin [Illinois State Geological Survey (Emeritus), 615 East Peabody Drive, Champaign, IL 61820, (United States); Zhou, Yiping [Yunnan Institute of Coal Geology Prospection, Kunming 650218, (China); Zhu, Changsheng; Li, Hang [Research Center of State Key Laboratory of Coal Resources and Safe Mining, Chongqing 400042, (China); Zhu, Xingwei; Xing, Yunwei; Zhang, Weiguo; Zou, Jianhua [State Key Laboratory of Coal Resources and Safe Mining, China University of Mining and Technology, Beijing 100083, (China)

    2010-09-01

    The No. 12 Coal (Late Permian) in the Songzao Coalfield, Chongqing, southwestern China, is characteristically high in pyrite and some trace elements. It is uniquely deposited directly above mafic tuff beds. Samples of coal and tuffs have been studied for their mineralogy and geochemistry using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry, X-ray fluorescence, plasma low-temperature ashing plus powder X-ray diffraction, and scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy-dispersive X-ray analysis. The results show that the minerals of the No. 12 Coal are mainly composed of pyrite, clay minerals (kaolinite, chamosite, and illite), ankerite, calcite, and trace amounts of quartz and boehmite. Kaolinite and boehmite were mainly derived from sediment source region of mafic tuffs. Chamosite was formed by the reaction of kaolinite with Fe-Mg-rich fluids during early diagenesis. The high pyrite (S{sub p,d} 8.83%) in the coal was related to marine transgression over peat deposits and abundant Fe derived from the underlying mafic tuff bed. Ankerite and calcite were precipitated from epigenetic fluids. Chemical compositions of incompatible elements indicate that the tuffs were derived from enriched mantle and the source magmas had an alkali-basalt character. Compared to other coals from the Songzao Coalfield and common Chinese coals, the No. 12 Coal has a lower SiO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (1.13) but a higher Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Na{sub 2}O (80.1) value and is significantly enriched in trace elements including Sc (13.5 {mu}g/g), V (121 {mu}g/g), Cr (33.6 {mu}g/g), Co (27.2 {mu}g/g), Ni (83.5 {mu}g/g), Cu (48.5 {mu}g/g), Ga (17.3 {mu}g/g), Y (68.3 {mu}g/g), Zr (444 {mu}g/g), Nb (23.8 {mu}g/g), and REE (392 {mu}g/g on average). Above mineralogical compositions, as well as similar ratios of selected elements (e.g., SiO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Na{sub 2}O) and similar distribution patterns of incompatible elements (e.g., the mantle-normalized diagram for

  4. Mineralogical, geochemical and geomechanical characterization of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-08-28

    Aug 28, 2016 ... JOURNAL OF THE CAMEROON ACADEMY OF SCIENCES Vol. ... of degreasers in order to reduce their plasticity before being used as building materials. ... Research Article ...... compositions using two china clays from.

  5. Mineralogical and Geochemical Characterization of Clay and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bheema

    which include soil horizons, continental and marine sediments, geothermal fields, volcanic ... water, air, or steam and the type of clay however is controlled by the composition of pre-existing ... the lake basin is characterized by biannual nature of precipitation with a mean annual ...... isotope record from LakeAshenge.

  6. Petrological mineralogical and geochemical characterization of the granitoids and fracture fillings developed in Ratones Mines (Spain); Caracterizacion petrologica, mineralogica, geoquimica y evaluacion del comportamiento geoquimico de las REE en la fase solida (granitoides y rellenos fisurales) del sistema de interaccion agua-roca delentorno de la Mina Ratones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buil Gutierrez, B [Ciemat. Madrid (Spain)

    2002-07-01

    The petrological, mineralogical and geochemical characterisation of the granitoids and fracture fillings developed in the Ratones Mine (Caceres, Spain) has been done in order to understand rock-water interaction processes which control water geochemical parameters. Special interest has been devoted to the analysis and interpretation of REE patterns in the solid phase (granitoids and fracture fillings) because they constitute geochemical tracers in water-rock interaction process. Moreover, REE are considered as actinide analogues. In order to characterise the solid phase (granitoids and fracture fillings) several investigation scales (system, outcrop, whole rock, mineral and geochemical components) have been considered and different types of samples have been analysed. These factors control the methodological approach used in this investigation. The analytical methods we have used in this investigation are microscope, qualitative and semi-quantitative methods (XRD, SEM,EDAX) and quantitative methods (ICP-MS, XRF, EM, LAM-IC-MS). The bulk of the granitoids located around the Ratones Mine Belongs to the alkaline feldspar granite-sienogranite lihotype and they show a peraluminous and subalkaline pattern. From the mineralogical point of view, they are composed by quartz, K-feldspar (Or>90%), showing sericitation, moscovitization and turmolinization altherations, alkaline plagioclase (An-=-3%), usually altered to sericite, saussirite and less frequently affected by moscovitization processes, Fe-Al biotite, frequently affected by chloritization processes and sometimes replaced by muscovite, and finally muscovite (>2% celadonite and <4% paragonite) both of primary and secondary origin. The differences observed between the different lithotypes are related with the modal proportion of the principal minerals,with the presence or absence of certain accessory minerals ( turmaline, cordierite), with specific textural patterns, grain size and also with the richness in specific

  7. Statistical behavior and geological significance of the geochemical distribution of trace elements in the Cretaceous volcanics Cordoba and San Luis, Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daziano, C.

    2010-01-01

    Statistical analysis of trace elements in volcanics research s, allowed to distinguish two independent populations with the same geochemical environment. For each component they have variable index of homogeneity resulting in dissimilar average values that reveal geochemical intra telluric phenomena. On the other hand the inhomogeneities observed in these rocks - as reflected in its petrochemical characters - could be exacerbated especially at so remote and dispersed location of their pitches, their relations with the enclosing rocks for the ranges of compositional variation, due differences relative ages

  8. Lytological characterization and hydrothermal alteration Infiernillo porphyry, provincia Mendoza, Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez, A.; Rubinstein, N.; Kleiman, L.. E.mail: kleiman@cae.cnea.gov.ar

    2007-01-01

    El Infiernillo porphyry copper and Mo deposit, in southern Mendoza, Argentina is hosted by ignimbrites of the Cochico Group (lower Permian). The alteration zone consists of a small central quartz neck with appreciable hematite surrounded by an intense quartz-injected zone with local pervasive potassic alteration. Outwards, there is a well-developed phyllic halo with intense bleaching which consists of pervasive and vein-type silicification, sericitization and pyritization. In the outer part of the alteration zone, small polymetallic veins with pyrite, arsenopyrite, galena and minor, chalcopyrite, sphalerite and electrum in quartz gangue crop out. New field, petro-mineralogic and geochemical data confirmed that the host rocks are equivalent to the dacitic and rhyodacitic ignimbrites of the Toba Vieja Gorda Member (Yacimiento Los Reyunos Formation, Cochico Group)

  9. Petrological and geochemical characterization of the plutonic rocks of the Sierra de La Aguada, Province of San Luis, Argentina: Genetic implications with the Famatinian magmatic arc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Cristofolini

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This study presents a synthesis on the geology of the crystalline complex that constitute the Sierra de la Aguada, San Luis province, Argentine, from an approach based on field relations, petrologic and structural features and geochemical characteristic. This mountain range exposes a basement dominated by intermediate to mafic calcalkaline igneous rocks and peraluminous felsic granitoids, both emplaced in low to medium grade metamorphic rocks stabilized under low amphibolite facies. All this lithological terrane has been grouped in the El Carrizal-La Aguada Complex. Field relations, petrographic characterization and geochemical comparison of the plutonic rocks from the study area with those belonging to the Ordovician Famatinian suit exposed in the Sierra Grande de San Luis, suggest a genetic and temporal relation linked to the development of the Famatinian magmatic arc.

  10. PRIMEROS AVANCES EN LA CARACTERIZACIÓN GEOQUÍMICA DE VULCANITAS DE AFLORAMIENTOS DE ANTOFAGASTA DE LA SIERRA (PROV. DE CATAMARCA, ARGENTINA / First advances in the geochemical characteristics of volcanic outcrops of Antofagasta de la Sierra (Catamarca

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandra M. Elías

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available En distintos sectores de la microrregión de Antofagasta de la Sierra (Provincia de Catamarca, Puna Meridional Argentina se registran afloramientos de vulcanitas (rocas volcánicas con proporciones de vidrio menores a 80%, sensu Aschero et al. 2002/2004 macroscópicamente muy similares. Con el objetivo de diferenciarlas y aportar, de esta forma, a su identificación en el registro arqueológico, se aplicaron diversos métodos y técnicas sobre muestras de estas rocas procedentes de los distintos afloramientos. En esta instancia, se exponen los resultados obtenidos a partir de caracterización geoquímica por medio de Fluorescencia de Rayos X de Energía Dispersiva. Las vulcanitas procedentes de los diferentes afloramientos tienden a presentar disímiles concentraciones de ciertos elementos. Estos resultados son prometedores y estimulan a continuar investigando la aplicación de métodos geoquímicos en la diferenciación y determinación de la procedencia de estas rocas volcánicas. Cabe destacar que en el Noroeste Argentino los métodos geoquímicos fueron exclusivamente aplicados sobre una roca volcánica específica, la obsidiana, y aún no habían sido utilizados en otras rocas volcánicas anisótropas, con superficies, texturas y estructuras más irregulares. Abstract   In different sectors of the Antofagasta de la Sierra micro-region (Catamarca Province, Southern Argentine Pune outcrops of macroscopically very similar vulcanites (volcanic rocks with ratios of glass below 80%, sensu Aschero et al. 2002/2004 have been recorded. In order to differentiate between these and contribute to their identification in the archaeological record, various methods and techniques were applied to samples of these rocks. In this instance, the initial results obtained from geochemical characterization, through Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence, are presented. The vulcanites from different outcrops tend to show different concentrations for some elements

  11. Mineralogical, Geochemical and Isotopic Characterisation of the Travertine Formation Associated with the Alicun de las Torres Thermal System (Province of Granada): Palaeoclimatic and Palaeoenvironmental Implications.; Caracterizacion Mineralogica, Geoquimica e Isotopica de los Travertinos Asociados al Sistema Termal de Alicun de las Torres (Provincia de Granada): Implicaciones Paleoclimaticas y Paleoambientales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prado, A. J.; Delgado, A.; Crespo, M. T.; Martin, A.; Perez del Villar, L.

    2010-12-24

    In the framework of a Singular Strategic Project entitled: Advanced Technologies of Carbon, Capture and Storage (CCS), supported by the MICINN (Spain) and the FEDER founds (EU), specifically in the Carbon Storage Task, a comprehensive study on the CO{sub 2} leakage as DIC (Dissolved Inorganic Carbon) in the Alicun de Las Torres (Prov. of Granada) natural analogue Thermal System was envisaged. This analogous system is characterised by the presence of a very important travertine formation. In order to explain the formation of these travertine mass a detailed mineralogical, petrographic, geochemical and isotopic, including stable and radioactive isotopes, characterisation has been carried out. Based on these data, paleoclimatic and palaeoenvironmental conditions under which this travertine formation was formed, during a period of approximately 230Ky, have also been deduced. (Author) 234 refs.

  12. Petrographical and geochemical characterization and deformation conditions of the San Cristobal pluton, Sierra de Velasco, La Rioja, Argentina; Caracterizacion petrografica y geoquimica y condiciones de deformacion del pluton San Cristobal, Sierra de Velasco, La Rioja, Argentina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellos, L.I.; Toselli, A.J.; Rossi, J.N.; Grosse, P.; Rosa, J.D. de la; Castro, A.

    2010-07-01

    The San Cristobal pluton is a 35 km2 granitic body that outcrops at the southestern tip of the Sierra de Velasco, located west of La Rioja city, Argentina. It is formed by monzogranites and syenogranites, together with scarce granodiorites, with medium to fine-grained, equigranular to slightly porphyritic textures. Their mineral assemblage consists of quartz + microcline + plagioclase + biotite {+-} muscovite + zircon + apatite + magnetite. The granite contains dioritic to tonalitic mafic enclaves. The central and eastern parts of the granite have been deformed by the NNW-SSE trending South Mylonitic shear zone formed by mylonitic rocks. The metamorphic host-rock is represented by scarce greenschist facies xenoliths and hornfels with the high T/P assemblage K-feldspar - cordierite - biotite {+-} sillimanite. The granites are calc-alkaline, weak- to moderately peraluminous, and formed as part of a continental magmatic arc developed along the active margin of western Gondwana during the Early Paleozoic. The depth of emplacement of the San Cristobal pluton is estimated at {approx}12 km. (Author).

  13. Structural characterization of the mineralogical transitions in the argillaceous formations: geochemical controls and implications of the conversion to illite processes. Particular case of an alkaline disturbance in the Callovian-Oxfordian of the Meuse / Haute-Marne underground laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Claret, F.

    2001-11-01

    The Callovian-Oxfordian argillaceous formation covers a mineralogical transition between a disordered illite/smectite interstratified bed (R0 - upper part) and an ordered one (R1 - lower part). The mineralogy of these clays influences the conditions of retention of the formation and their reactivity with respect to physico-chemical disturbances potentially induced by the disposal. In order to make a fine characterization of the Callovian-Oxfordian clay minerals, the simplified conventional methods have been rejected. The method retained consists in the direct comparison of calculated X-ray diffraction spectra with those recorded on a given sample after several processes, and in reproducing all its characteristics (peaks position, intensity ratios, profiles) using a unique structural model. The clay minerals of the EST104 borehole can be described as a mixture of three main phases: an illite, a smectite and an interstratified illite/disordered expansible mineral (R0) with a fixed composition (35% exp.). The physical characteristics of these phases are constant with depth. The mineralogical transition described above corresponds to a change in the relative proportion of the different phases. This description differs from the one classically proposed for the diagenetic conversion to illite of sedimentary series. However, the use of the same tools on a reference diagenetic series leads to a similar description. These new results imply to reconsider the reaction mechanisms proposed for these minerals and their kinetic modeling. Finally, the reactivity of Callovian-Oxfordian clay minerals as a response to an alkaline disturbance is strongly limited by the presence of the organic matter covering the argillaceous particulates and which protects the reactive sites of the clay minerals. (J.S.)

  14. The Rietveld method applied to the quantitative mineralogical analysis of some soil samples from Argentina Aplicación del método de Rietveld al análisis mineral��gico cuantitativo de algunas muestras de suelos de la Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stella M Zabala

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The mineralogical quantification of soils species is mainly obtained by analysis of X-ray diffraction (XRD patterns. The classic method, for these analyses, is limited to semi quantitative determinations due to the overlapping of different specie's peaks and processes of absorption of the constituents, the wide range of particle size distribution, etc. The use of the Rietveld method for XRD quantitative analysis, in mixtures of minerals, has allowed to improve the accuracy of the quantitative results and to extend it to complex systems, as soils, transforming it in a meaningful tool for soils investigation. In this work, quantitative results obtained by the application of classic and Rietveld methods, are compared in different soils samples from Argentina. A set of mixtures of minerals with similar composition to three studied samples, was also quantified by Rietveld method, with absolute error lower than 3%. Obtained results indicate that quantitative analysis by Rietveld method, can improve the results found by XRD classic method and may be used for the quantitative determination of soil minerals.La cuantificación mineralógica de componentes del suelo es obtenida principalmente por análisis de espectros de difracción de rayos X (DRX. El método clásico aplicado para dicho análisis está limitado a determinaciones semi-cuantitativas debido a la superposición de picos de las distintas especies y procesos de absorción de los constituyentes, el amplio rango de distribución de tamaño de partícula, etc. El uso del método de Rietveld para el análisis cuantitativo por DRX, en mezclas de minerales, ha permitido mejorar la exactitud de los resultados cuantitativos y extenderlo a sistemas complejos, como lo son los suelos, transformándose en una herramienta significativa para su investigación. En este trabajo se comparan los resultados cuantitativos obtenidos por la aplicación del método clásico y de Rietveld, a diferentes muestras de

  15. Evolução geoquímica e mineralógica em perfis de alteração sobre rochas serpentinizadas no sudoeste de Minas Gerais Geochemical and mineralogical evolution in alteration profiles on serpentinized rocks in southwestern Minas Gerais, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Vidal-Torrado

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Estudou-se a evolução geoquímica e mineralógica em três perfis distintos de alteração de rochas serpentinizadas que ocorrem nas imediações dos municípios de Alpinópolis e Fortaleza de Minas, no sudoeste do Estado de Minas Gerais, sob regimes de umidade e de temperatura údico e térmico, respectivamente. Nas condições atuais, o grau de evolução química e mineralógica é moderado em relação ao desenvolvido sobre outros tipos de rochas básicas e ultrabásicas da mesma área, caracterizando-se por uma importante perda de Na e Mg e, em menor proporção, de Ca e Si. O Al (localmente também o Fe é o elemento menos móvel dos sistemas. O K é escasso no material de origem e nas zonas de alteração, e ocorre enriquecimento desse elemento nos horizontes superficiais por aporte externo. Os minerais primários mais facilmente intemperizáveis, como o talco, a tremolita e a clorita trioctaédrica, são abundantes ainda na fração argila desses solos tropicais com composição mineralógica pouco comum, mas são todos termodinamicamente instáveis. Do ponto de vista geoquímico, o processo de alteração atual pode ser definido como uma bissialitização, que pode coincidir com ferruginização, com formação de minerais trioctaédricos secundários por transformação direta de estrutura e também por neoformação, todos coexistindo com os minerais primários residuais. No entanto, as fases de maior evolução, em volumes com drenagem mais eficiente, tendem à monossialitização, com formação de caulinitas de diferentes graus de cristalinidade. A assembléia mineralógica existente evidencia a metaestabilidade e o caráter incipiente do sistema pedogenético.The geochemical and mineralogical evolution was studied in three different alteration profiles of ultramafic (serpentine rocks near Alpinópolis and Fortaleza de Minas, in southwestern Minas Gerais State (Brazil. Soil moisture and temperature regimes are udic and thermic

  16. Mineralogy and geochemistry of bauxite and bentonite deposits from Mozambique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dos Muchangos, A.C.

    2000-01-01

    Results of mineralogical and geochemical studies of bauxites, kaolinitic clays and bentoniteS from Mozambique are presented in this thesis. The bauxite and kaolinitic clay deposits in Penhalonga area (in the central western part of Mozambique) are associated with Precambrian magmatic rocks and

  17. Clays as tracers of diagenetic and hydrothermal paleo-conditions. Search for mineralogical and geochemical evidences of hydrothermal circulations in clayey, sandstone-like and carbonated diagenetic Triassic formations of the Paris Basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ploquin, Florian

    2011-01-01

    Within the framework of the multi-organization TAPSS 2000 program - GNR-FORPRO, led on the Bure site (Meuse-France), the ANDRA Company realized a deep drilling (named EST 433) to investigate the local Trias because the grounds Triassic levels constituting the bed rock of Clayey level for the storage of the nuclear waste. The drilling cut the Trias rocks on a total thickness of 700 m, successively from the bottom up: (1) the Buntsandstein (120 m) is characterized by sandy-conglomerate facies; (2) the Muschelkalk (150 m) is essentially consisted of clayey-sandy-siltstone series headed by a dolomitic deposit system; (3) the Keuper part (450 m) is an alternation of sandy clay-stone or silty clay-stone deposits with insertions of saliferous levels; (4) finally the Rethian part of the drilling associated with Hettangian (80 m), are characterized by clayey-shale facies. This litho-stratigraphy can redraw the evolution of the sedimentary paleo-environments since fluviatile circles (Buntsandstein) then lagoon (upper Muschelkalk), to large floods plains systems occasionally invaded by sea (Keuper) and, finally, in an epi-continental sea context (Rhetian-Hettangian) announcing the generalized transgressive phase of which the progressive evolution coming from the border towards the center of the basin. The nearness of the continental areas is recorded in the detrital fraction of the Triassic sediments. The geochemistry of these materials signs their continental crust character and their associated isotopic Nd-Sm values gives a Hercynian meta-sediments and granites origin with from time to time a contribution of young forming rock. The mineralogy of the clayey fraction (< 0,2μm) shows that only the conglomerate on the base of the drilling consists of an assembly of dickite and illites strictly associated with regular illite / smectite mixed-layer of R=1 type illite-rich. These last ones are the main part of the clayey mineralogy of the draining facies of Buntsandstein and are

  18. Geochemical and Mineralogical Profiles Across the Listvenite- Metamorphic Transition in the Basal Megathrust of the Oman Ophiolite: First Results from Drilling at Oman Drilling Project Hole BT1B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godard, M.; Bennett, E.; Carter, E.; Kourim, F.; Lafay, R.; Noël, J.; Kelemen, P. B.; Michibayashi, K.; Harris, M.

    2017-12-01

    The transition from the base of the Oman ophiolite to the underlying metamorphic sole was drilled at Hole BT1B (Sumail Massif) during Phase 1 of Oman Drilling Project (Winter 2016-2017). 74 samples were collected from the 300m of recovered cores for whole rock geochemical and XRD analyses. 55 listvenites, ophicarbonates and serpentinites, and 19 schists and greenstones were analyzed for major and minor elements (XRF) and for CO2 and S concentrations (CHNS) aboard DV Chikyu (ChikyuOman, Summer 2017). Analyses for trace elements (ICP-MS) at the University of Montpellier are in progress. The composition of listvenites, ophicalcites and serpentinites recovered at Hole BT1B record extensive interactions between CO2-rich fluids and the serpentinized peridotites. These reactions involved addition of SiO2 and formation of carbonates at the expense of the serpentinized peridotite protolith. All samples recovered from the mantle section are enriched in fluid mobile and incompatible trace elements compared to the mean composition of the Oman mantle. These enrichments are up to 103 times the Oman mantle for Rb and Ba. They mimic the pattern of the samples from the metamorphic sole. This suggests that the composition of the listvenites in these elements is controlled by that of contaminating fluids that may have originated in the same lithologies as those drilled at the base of Hole BT1B. Listvenites, ophicalcites and serpentinites also show notable downhole chemical variations, with listvenites showing marked variations in Al2O3 and TiO2. Occurrence of lherzolites and cpx-harzburgites has been reported at the base of the Oman dominantly harzburgitic mantle section. The observed variations in the listvenites (Al2O3 and TiO2) could be related to the composition of their protolith, the deepest having more fertile compositions. Alternatively, the observed downhole changes in the composition of listvenites may relate to the progressive equilibration of the reacting ultramafic

  19. Study of the argillaceous fraction of sedimentary sequences of Meuse and Gard. Reconstitution of the diagenetic history and of the physico-chemical characteristics of the targets. Mineralogical, geochemical and isotopic aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rousset, D.

    2002-01-01

    within the sequence favors a confined-sequence behaviour: Indeed, no migrations of elements and especially of REE took place during fluid flows, the clay minerals preserving their geochemical properties. All the results favor reliable confinement properties of the low-permeable argillaceous sequences. (author)

  20. Uranium geochemistry, mineralogy, geology, exploration and resources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Vivo, B.

    1984-01-01

    This book comprises papers on the following topics: history of radioactivity; uranium in mantle processes; transport and deposition of uranium in hydrothermal systems at temperatures up to 300 0 C: Geological implications; geochemical behaviour of uranium in the supergene environment; uranium exploration techniques; uranium mineralogy; time, crustal evolution and generation of uranium deposits; uranium exploration; geochemistry of uranium in the hydrographic network; uranium deposits of the world, excluding Europe; uranium deposits in Europe; uranium in the economics of energy; role of high heat production granites in uranium province formation; and uranium deposits

  1. Contenido pseudototal de Cobre, Cinc, Hierro y Manganeso como estimador del fondo geoquímico en suelos de la Llanura Chaco-Pampeana de Córdoba, Argentina Pseudototal Copper, Zinc, Iron and Manganese content in soils for assessing the geochemical background of the Chaco-Pampean Plain of Cordoba, Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo V Buffa

    2009-12-01

    cristalinidad. El carbono orgánico en superficie como segunda variable en la mayoría de los modelos para los cuatro elementos confirma la importancia de la materia orgánica como fuente de estos microelementos.Data on the total nutrient content of soils is essential for assessing potential fertility and is fundamental to environmental and edaphogenetic studies. The aim of this paper was to measure Cu, Zn, Fe y Mn in soils of the Chaco Pampean Plain in Argentina using the simultaneous acid nitric (HNO3 4 M extraction procedure (called pseudototal to infer geochemical background and geochemical baseline data by analysing surface and subsurface samples. The results can be related with other edaphic features such as organic carbon, acidity, salinity and carbonates. Average values of 11.3 to 19.2 mg Cu kg-¹, 29.4 to 61.5 mg Zn kg-¹, 285 to 626 mg Mn kg-¹ g-¹ and 9 to 19.9 g Fe kg-¹ were found at a soil depth of 0-60 cm, falling within the range reported in worldwide literature. The lowest values were found in sandy soils. The values at a soil depth of 0-20 cm were 17 mg Cu kg-1, 55 mg Zn kg-¹, 562 mg Mn kg-¹ and 16 g Fe kg-¹ in loessic and loam loessic soils and 12 Cu kg-¹, 36 mg Zn kg-¹, 347 mg Mn kg-¹ and 11 g Fe kg-¹in loam sandy soils. The textural difference between loessic and sandy soils reflects different background values for the four elements studied, the lowest values corresponding to sandy soils. Multiple regression analysis included Fe and Mn as the main variables to explain the amounts found for each of the four elements at each depth which is related to the high affinity between transition metals and their tendency to co-precipitate as low cristallinity oxides.The second variable in most of the models for the studied elements was organic carbon, confirming the importance of organic matter as a primary source of these micronutrients.

  2. SITE-94. Mineralogy of the Aespoe site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, Karin

    1996-12-01

    The water composition has several impacts on the repository. It will influence the behaviour of the engineered materials (e.g. corrosion). It may also determine the possible solubility and speciation of released radionuclides. It also acts as a transport medium for the released elements. The groundwater composition and the potential development of the composition due to the presence of the repository as well as due to external variations is thus an important issue in a safety analysis. The development of the groundwater composition is strongly dependent on reactions with the minerals present in water bearing fractures. Here equilibrium chemistry may be of importance, but also reaction kinetics is important to the long-term behaviour. Within the SITE-94 project, a safety analysis is performed for the conditions at the Aespoe site. The mineralogy of the area has been evaluated from drill cores at various places at the site. In this report a recommendation for selection of mineralogy to be used in geochemical modelling of the repository is given. Calcite and iron containing minerals dominate the fracture filling mineralogy at the Aespoe site. Some typical fracture filling mineralogies may be identified in the fractures: epidote, chlorite, calcite, hematite, some illite/smectite + quartz, fluorite, pyrite and goethite. In addition to these a number of minor minerals are found in the fractures. Uncertainties in the fracture filling data may be due to problems when taking out the drill cores. Drilling water may remove important clay minerals and sealed fractures may be reopened mechanically and treated as water conducting fractures. The problem of determining the variability of the mineralogy along the flow paths also remains. This problem will never be solved when the investigation is performed by drilling investigation holes

  3. Argentina [Country report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreyra, R.

    2005-01-01

    The airborne geophysical surveys developed in Argentina are described. They have got more than 500.000 km 2 acquiring data for U, Th, K and total background activity. Other types of published data are also mentioned (satellite imagery, seismic hazard, climate, soil distributions, etc.). The availability of maps with the abundances of elements analyzed at the country and also at laboratories from Canada is described, as well as data of analysis of several elements at two study areas proposed at the outset of the project. The availability of process rate data and epidemiological data is also explained. Argentina intended fully to participate in the CRP at the outset of the project. Due, however, to external resource constraints imposed on the participating organization (Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, CNEA), the level of participation had to be significantly reduced. Nonetheless, in the first period of the CRP, Argentina undertook to collate existing geological and geochemical information within the country, and began to define potential areas for site specific natural systems safety indicator studies. (author)

  4. Characterization of agua de Ramon marbles, Cordoba Province, Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tourn, S.; Castro, L. . E mail: selvia@fcen.uba.ar, lilianacastro@fibertel.com.ar

    2004-01-01

    Agua de Ramon district is located in the NW of Cordoba, Argentina, between 3 49' and 30 0 52' S and 65 0 21' and 65 0 24' W, in the Eastern Pampean Range setting. It was a very important tungsten district until the end of 1950'decade when tungsten mining became of no economic interest. The objective is to report for the first time the petrological, mineralogical and geochemical characteristics of several marble lenses located in the sourthern of the area. Marble outcrops are lenticular ranging from 1 m to 80 m in length and 0.50 m to 20 m width. They appear massive, fine-grained and in light colors (white, pale green, very light brown and pale gray). These last varieties show a distinct banded structure due to little differences in color. These marbles are mainly composed of magnesian calcite accompanied by minor amounts of dolomite, forsterite, humite group minerals, tremolite, talc, serpentine and clinochlore, and scheelite, sphene, apatite and opaque minerals like hematite, magnetite, illmenite, pirrothite and pyrite as accessory minerals. Major chemical analyses indicate a relatively high SiO2 and MgO content, and minor CaO, in comparison with marbles of this type. Mineral paragenesis was useful to evaluate metamorphism conditions in this area [es

  5. Sharp fronts within geochemical transport problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grindrod, P.

    1995-01-01

    The authors consider some reactive geochemical transport problems in groundwater systems. When incoming fluid is in disequilibrium with the mineralogy sharp transition fronts may develop. They show that this is a generic property for a class of systems where the timescales associated with reaction and diffusion phenomena are much shorter than those associated with advective transport. Such multiple timescale problems are relevant to a variety of processes in natural systems: mathematically methods of singular perturbation theory reduce the dimension of the problems to be solved locally. Furthermore, they consider how spatial heterogeneous mineralogy can impact upon the propagation of sharp geochemical fronts. The authors developed an asymptotic approach in which they solve equations for the evolving geometry of the front and indicate how the non-smooth perturbations due to natural heterogeneity of the mineralogy on underlying ground water flow field are balanced against the smoothing effect of diffusion/dispersive processes. Fronts are curvature damped, and the results here indicate the generic nature of separate front propagation within both model (idealized) and natural (heterogeneous) geochemical systems

  6. Mineralogical and geochemical study of mud volcanoes in north ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The gulf of Cadiz is one of the most interesting areas to study mud volcanoes and structures related to cold fluid seeps since their discovery in 1999. In this study, we present results from gravity cores collected from Ginsburg and Meknes mud volcanoes and from circular structure located in the gulf of Cadiz (North Atlantic ...

  7. Mineralogical and geochemical trends in lateritic weathering profiles ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The absence of bauxite minerals like gibbsite and diaspora in the profiles shows that the trend of weathering is towards iron enrichment (ferralitization) and not aluminum accumulation (bauxitization). The CIA values of the lateritic layers shows that the weathering process is matured and has reached advanced stage.

  8. Mineralogical and geochemical aspects of the marine sediments off Goa

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Paropkari, A.L.

    -Mati beaches and off Mandovi and Zuari Rivers indicates predominant metamorphic source rocks. In the nearshore areas the concentrations of organic carbon and phosphorus have been controlled by detrital supply and organic productivity and that of carbonate...

  9. Geochemistry and mineralogy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plecas, I.; Dimovic, S.; Orta, M.M.; Alba, M.D.; Alvero, R.; Becerro, A.I.; Castro, M.A.; Chain, P.; Escudero, A.; Naranjo, M.; Pavon, E.; Trillo, J.M.; Vejsada, J.; Vokal, A.; Zadvernyuk, H.P.; Fedorenko, Y.G.; Zlobenko, B.P.; Koromyslichenko, T.I.; Battaglia, S.; Cervelli, M.; Millot, R.; Girard, J.P.; Missana, T.; Garcia-Gutierrez, M.; Alonso, U.; Muurinen, A.; Carlsson, T.; Chain, P.; Alba, M.D.; Becerro, A.I.; Castro, M.A.; Escudero, A.; Gonzalez-Carrascosa, T.; Hurtado, S.; Pavon, E.; Villa, M.; Bourg, I.C.; Sposito, G.; Bourg, A.C.M.; Marques Fernandes, M.; Rabung, Th.; Dahn, R.; Baeyens, B.; Bradbury, M.H.; Breynaert, E.; Maes, A.; Bruggeman, C.; Maes, I.A.; Vancluysen, J.; Credoz, A.; Bildstein, O.; Jullien, M.; Raynal, J.; Petronin, J.C.; Trotignon, L.; Pokrovsky, O.; Jacquier, P.; Beaucaire, C.; Vuillaume, A.L.; Wittebroodt, Ch.; Ly, J.; Page, J.; Savoye, S.; Pitsch, H.; Jacques, D.; Wang, L.; Galunin, E.; Chain, P.; Alba, M.D.; Vidal, M.; Grandia, F.; Domenech, C.; Arcos, D.; Duro, L.; Bruno, J.; Andre, L.; Pauwels, H.; Azaroual, M.; Albrecht, A.; Romero, M.A.; Aerts, S.; Boven, P.; Van Geet, M.; Boever, P. de; Alonso, U.; Albarran, N.; Missana, T.; Garcia-Gutierrez, M.; Truche, L.; Berger, G.; Guillaume, D.; Jacquot, E.; Tournassat, Ch.; Lerouge, C.; Brendle, J.; Greneche, J.M.; Touzelet, St.; Blanc, Ph.; Gaucher, E.C.; Thoenen, T.; Klinkenberg, M.; Kaufhold, S.; Dohrmann, R.; Siegesmund, S.; Liu, D.J.; Bruggeman, C.; Maes, N.; Weber, T.; Trotignon, L.; Pozo, C.; Bildstein, O.; Combarieu, G. de; Frugier, P.; Menut, D

    2007-07-01

    This session gathers 52 articles (posters) dealing with: the influence of natural sorbents immobilization of spent ion exchange resins in cement; the chemical stability of rare-earth silicate; the mineralogical heterogeneity of Rokle bentonite and radionuclide adsorption: A case study for cesium; the rheological and sorption properties of clay-polymer composites; the clay mineral interactions with leachate solutions in landfills; the lithium isotope fractionation during adsorption onto mineral surfaces; the sorption of Sr{sup 2+} onto mixed smectite / illite clays; Eh and pH in the pore water of compacted bentonite; the chemical interaction of {sup 152}Eu with the clay barrier; the modeling of the acid-base surface chemistry of Montmorillonite; a time resolved laser fluorescence and X-ray absorption spectroscopy study of lanthanide/actinide sorption on clay minerals: influence of carbonate complexation; the structure elucidation and occurrence of Tc(IV) pyrogallol complexes; the geochemistry of Se(0) under boom clay conditions; an experimental and modelling study of pure secondary silicate minerals reactivity in geological CO{sub 2} sequestration conditions; an experimental evaluation of a retention model for major groundwater elements on the Tournemire argillite; modelling the long term interaction of cementitious pore water with Boom clay; the sorption-desorption of radionuclides and analogues in clays suitable for barriers; the modelling of the Redox evolution in the tunnel backfill of a high level nuclear waste repository; the reactivity of nitrates in the different storage compartments of type-b wastes; an investigation into the biodiversity of sulphate reducing bacteria in Boom clay; the colloid generation mechanisms from compacted bentonite under different geochemical conditions; the experimental reduction of aqueous sulphate by hydrogen in the context of the Callovo-Oxfordian argillite; cation exchanged Fe(II) and Sr as compared to other divalent cations

  10. Fe-Ni Micrometorites from Upper Jurassic Cañadon Asfalto Fm., Patagonia, Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matteini, M.; Hauser, N.; Cabaleri, N.; Silva Nieto, D.; Cuadros, F. A.; Reyes, S.

    2014-09-01

    Microspherules from an upper Jurassic sediments from Patagonia, show mineralogical, geochemical and textural features very similar to those reported for I-type micrometeorites whereas some spherules are interpreted as typical G-type micrometeorites.

  11. Characterization of 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami induced deposits along the Chennai coast using magnetic and geochemical techniques

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Veerasingam, S.; Venkatachalapathy, R.

    , and reflect changes in the detrital component mineralogy which is largely influenced by the tsunami event To identify t he connection between the tsunami deposit and different sedimentologic units present in the study area, textural, geochemical and rock...

  12. Mineralogy of Rocks and Sediments at Gale Crater, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achilles, Cherie; Downs, Robert; Blake, David; Vaniman, David; Ming, Doug; Rampe, Elizabeth; Morris, Dick; Morrison, Shaunna; Treiman, Allan; Chipera, Steve; Yen, Albert; Bristow, Thomas; Craig, Patricia; Hazen, Robert; Crisp, Joy; Grotzinger, John; Des Marias, David; Farmer, Jack; Sarrazin, Philippe; Morookian, John Michael

    2017-04-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory rover, Curiosity, is providing in situ mineralogical, geochemical, and sedimentological assessments of rocks and soils in Gale crater. Since landing in 2012, Curiosity has traveled over 15 km, providing analyses of mudstones and sandstones to build a stratigraphic history of the region. The CheMin X-ray diffraction (XRD) instrument is the first instrument on Mars to provide quantitative mineralogical analyses of drilled powders and scooped sediment based on X-ray crystallography. CheMin identifies and determines mineral abundances and unit-cell parameters of major crystalline phases, and identifies minor phases at abundances >1 wt%. In conjunction with elemental analyses, CheMin-derived crystal chemistry allows for the first calculations of crystalline and amorphous material compositions. These mineralogy, crystal chemistry, and amorphous chemistry datasets are playing central roles in the characterization of Gale crater paleoenvironments. CheMin has analyzed 17 rock and sediment samples. In the first phase of the mission, Curiosity explored the sedimentary units of Aeolis Palus (Bradbury group), including two mudstones from Yellowknife Bay. CheMin analyses of the Yellowknife Bay mudstones identified clay minerals among an overall basaltic mineral assemblage. These mineralogical results, along with imaging and geochemical analyses, were used to characterize an ancient lacustrine setting that is thought to have once been a habitable environment. Following the investigations of the Bradbury group, Curiosity arrived at the lower reaches of Aeolis Mons, commonly called Mt. Sharp. A strategic sample campaign was initiated, drilling bedrock at X-ray amorphous phases. Adjacent to fractures, light-toned, halo-like zones are thought to result from significant aqueous alteration of the primary sandstone and show decreased abundances of feldspar and pyroxene, and an increase in the amorphous component, specifically high-silica phases. The Murray

  13. Argentina; Argentine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-04-01

    This economical study summarizes the energy situation of Argentina: energy institutions and policy, energy companies (oil, electricity, gas, coal), energy supplies (resources, power production, petroleum, natural gas), prices and tariffs, consumption, economical stakes and perspectives (investments, agreements, projects). Energy data for the 1971-1999 period are summarized in graphs and tables. (J.S.)

  14. Journal of Mineralogical and Petrological Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Official journal of Japan Association of Mineralogical Sciences (JAMS), focusing on mineralogical and petrological sciences and their related fields. Journal of Mineralogical and Petrological Sciences (JMPS) is the successor journal to both “Journal of Mineralogy, Petrology and Economic Geology” and “Mineralogical Journal”. Journal of Mineralogical and Petrological Sciences (JMPS) is indexed in the ISI database (Thomson Reuters), the Science Citation Index-Expanded, Current Contents/Physical, Chemical & Earth Sciences, and ISI Alerting Services.

  15. Geochemistry and mineralogy of recent sediments of Guanabara Bay (NE sector) and its major rivers - Rio de Janeiro State - Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    FARIA, MARCIA DE MELO; SANCHEZ, BRAZ A.

    2001-01-01

    Geochemical and clay mineralogical studies of bottom sediments collected along the Macacu and Caceribu rivers and Guanabara Bay were carried out in order to investigate the relationship between major source areas and recent sediments of the bay. Clay mineralogy includes different groups with selective distribution conditioned by geomorphic features and depositional settings. Micaceous clay minerals are abundant near parent rock in the upper course, whereas kaolinite derived from varied source...

  16. Temporal and geochemical evolution of Miocene volcanism in the Andean back-arc between 36°S and 38°S and U-series analyses of young volcanic centers in the arc and back-arc, Argentina

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyhr, Charlotte Thorup

    New 40Ar/39Ar, major and trace element, and Sr, Nd and Pb isotopic data for the c. 24-7 Ma volcanic rocks from the Andean back-arc (35°S – 38°S) in the Mendoza and Neuquén (Argentina) regions shed light on the Miocene evolution of the back-arc of the Southern Volcanic Zone. Incipient shallowing......-Sr-Pb isotopic compositions. The arc-like component that dominates the geochemistry of the Palaoco rocks is absent in both the Early Miocene and the Pliocene-Pleistocene in the same area. Young volcanic Provinces in the main arc, retro-arc and back-arc are further investigated by U-series analyses which confirm...... the fluid-enriched nature of arc-related rocks (U-excess are found in most rocks) and the more OIB-like nature of the Payún Matrú complex (Th-exsess is observed in all rocks). The fluid addition to the mantle source is modeled revealing timescales of 10 – 100 ka for the fluid enrichment. For the back...

  17. Alaska Geochemical Database (AGDB)-Geochemical data for rock, sediment, soil, mineral, and concentrate sample media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granitto, Matthew; Bailey, Elizabeth A.; Schmidt, Jeanine M.; Shew, Nora B.; Gamble, Bruce M.; Labay, Keith A.

    2011-01-01

    The Alaska Geochemical Database (AGDB) was created and designed to compile and integrate geochemical data from Alaska in order to facilitate geologic mapping, petrologic studies, mineral resource assessments, definition of geochemical baseline values and statistics, environmental impact assessments, and studies in medical geology. This Microsoft Access database serves as a data archive in support of present and future Alaskan geologic and geochemical projects, and contains data tables describing historical and new quantitative and qualitative geochemical analyses. The analytical results were determined by 85 laboratory and field analytical methods on 264,095 rock, sediment, soil, mineral and heavy-mineral concentrate samples. Most samples were collected by U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) personnel and analyzed in USGS laboratories or, under contracts, in commercial analytical laboratories. These data represent analyses of samples collected as part of various USGS programs and projects from 1962 to 2009. In addition, mineralogical data from 18,138 nonmagnetic heavy mineral concentrate samples are included in this database. The AGDB includes historical geochemical data originally archived in the USGS Rock Analysis Storage System (RASS) database, used from the mid-1960s through the late 1980s and the USGS PLUTO database used from the mid-1970s through the mid-1990s. All of these data are currently maintained in the Oracle-based National Geochemical Database (NGDB). Retrievals from the NGDB were used to generate most of the AGDB data set. These data were checked for accuracy regarding sample location, sample media type, and analytical methods used. This arduous process of reviewing, verifying and, where necessary, editing all USGS geochemical data resulted in a significantly improved Alaska geochemical dataset. USGS data that were not previously in the NGDB because the data predate the earliest USGS geochemical databases, or were once excluded for programmatic reasons

  18. Mineralogy. 2. rev., enlarged ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthes, S.

    1987-01-01

    The textbook is intended for students with a basic knowledge of descriptive mineralogy and crystallography who wish to enhance their knowledge in the fields of determinative mineralogy, petrology, and the geology and genesis of mineral deposits. The material presented concentrates on the essential aspects of the subject fields and is completed by up-to-date information concerning the technical and economic significance of the minerals, rocks and ores as raw materials. With 165 figs., 2 tabs [de

  19. Predictive geochemical mapping using environmental correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilford, John; Caritat, Patrice de; Bui, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    The distribution of chemical elements at and near the Earth's surface, the so-called critical zone, is complex and reflects the geochemistry and mineralogy of the original substrate modified by environmental factors that include physical, chemical and biological processes over time. Geochemical data typically is illustrated in the form of plan view maps or vertical cross-sections, where the composition of regolith, soil, bedrock or any other material is represented. These are primarily point observations that frequently are interpolated to produce rasters of element distributions. Here we propose the application of environmental or covariate regression modelling to predict and better understand the controls on major and trace element geochemistry within the regolith. Available environmental covariate datasets (raster or vector) representing factors influencing regolith or soil composition are intersected with the geochemical point data in a spatial statistical correlation model to develop a system of multiple linear correlations. The spatial resolution of the environmental covariates, which typically is much finer (e.g. ∼90 m pixel) than that of geochemical surveys (e.g. 1 sample per 10-10,000 km 2 ), carries over to the predictions. Therefore the derived predictive models of element concentrations take the form of continuous geochemical landscape representations that are potentially much more informative than geostatistical interpolations. Environmental correlation is applied to the Sir Samuel 1:250,000 scale map sheet in Western Australia to produce distribution models of individual elements describing the geochemical composition of the regolith and exposed bedrock. As an example we model the distribution of two elements – chromium and sodium. We show that the environmental correlation approach generates high resolution predictive maps that are statistically more accurate and effective than ordinary kriging and inverse distance weighting interpolation

  20. A Guide for Using Geochemical Methods in Dredged Material, Sediment Tracking, and Sediment Budget Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-26

    geochemical markers such as radioisotopes and stable isotopes, organic matter, and mineralogy/elemental composition are recognized and established methods ...further elucidate the original erosion source of accumulating sediment (Hoefs 2009). 2.3 Radioisotopes Radioisotopic dating is based on measuring the...ER D C TR -1 7- 3 Dredging Operations and Environmental Research Program A Guide for Using Geochemical Methods in Dredged Material

  1. Geochemical Constraints for Mercury's PCA-Derived Geochemical Terranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockstill-Cahill, K. R.; Peplowski, P. N.

    2018-05-01

    PCA-derived geochemical terranes provide a robust, analytical means of defining these terranes using strictly geochemical inputs. Using the end members derived in this way, we are able to assess the geochemical implications for Mercury.

  2. Mineralogy affects geoavailability, bioaccessibility and bioavailability of zinc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molina, Ramon M.; Schaider, Laurel A.; Donaghey, Thomas C.; Shine, James P.; Brain, Joseph D.

    2013-01-01

    We correlated mineralogical and particle characteristics of Zn-containing particles with Zn geoavailability, bioaccessibility, and bioavailability following gavage and intranasal (IN) administration in rats. We compared samples of Zn/Pb mine waste and five pulverized pure-phase Zn minerals ( 65 Zn. We assessed geoavailability using sequential extractions and bioaccessibility using in vitro extraction tests simulating various pH and biological conditions. Zn in vivo bioavailability and in vitro bioaccessibility decreased as follows: mine waste > hydrozincite > hemimorphite > zincite ≈ smithsonite >> sphalerite. We found significant correlations among geoavailability, bioaccessibility and bioavailability. In particular, Zn bioavailability post-gavage and post-IN was significantly correlated with bioaccessibility in simulated phagolysosomal fluid and gastric fluid. These data indicate that solid phase speciation influences biological uptake of Zn and that in vitro tests can be used to predict Zn bioavailability in exposure assessment and effective remediation design. Highlights: •Zinc particle mineralogy influences bioaccessibility and bioavailability. •Zn bioavailability via gavage was 1.2–1.6 times higher than via intranasal route. •Zn particle geoavailability correlates with bioaccessibility. •In vitro bioaccessibility tests can predict in vivo Zn bioavailability. •Metal speciation and geochemical alterations can impact Zn bioavailability. -- Zinc mineralogy influences in vitro bioaccessibility and in vivo bioavailability and in vitro extraction tests can be used to predict Zn bioavailability from particles

  3. Geochemical exploration for uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    This Technical Report is designed mainly to introduce the methods and techniques of uranium geochemical exploration to exploration geologists who may not have had experience with geochemical exploration methods in their uranium programmes. The methods presented have been widely used in the uranium exploration industry for more than two decades. The intention has not been to produce an exhaustive, detailed manual, although detailed instructions are given for a field and laboratory data recording scheme and a satisfactory analytical method for the geochemical determination of uranium. Rather, the intention has been to introduce the concepts and methods of uranium exploration geochemistry in sufficient detail to guide the user in their effective use. Readers are advised to consult general references on geochemical exploration to increase their understanding of geochemical techniques for uranium

  4. The mineralogic evolution of the Martian surface through time: Implications from chemical reaction path modeling studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plumlee, G. S.; Ridley, W. I.; Debraal, J. D.; Reed, M. H.

    1993-01-01

    Chemical reaction path calculations were used to model the minerals that might have formed at or near the Martian surface as a result of volcano or meteorite impact driven hydrothermal systems; weathering at the Martian surface during an early warm, wet climate; and near-zero or sub-zero C brine-regolith reactions in the current cold climate. Although the chemical reaction path calculations carried out do not define the exact mineralogical evolution of the Martian surface over time, they do place valuable geochemical constraints on the types of minerals that formed from an aqueous phase under various surficial and geochemically complex conditions.

  5. Mineralogical applications of Mossbauer spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fysh, S.A.; Clark, P.E.

    1981-01-01

    The Mossbauer effect has been used to study a variety of bauxites, and has been shown to be capable of accurately characterizing the iron mineralogy of bauxite. Such studies may prove to be of great use in determining the suitability of bauxite for aluminium extraction, and in optimizing extraction conditions

  6. Mineralogical zonation and radiochronological relations in a large sulfide chimney from the East Pacific Rise at 18 degrees 25 minutes S

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchig, V.; Rosch, H.; Lalou, C.; Brichet, E.

    1988-01-01

    The top metre of a large inactive sulfide chimney from a hydrothermal field in the central Graben of the East Pacific Rise has been investigated using mineralogical, geochemical and 210 Pb/Pb dating methods. Four main mineralization stages have been identified. From age determinations, as well as chemical and mineralogical studies, it is concluded that the hydrothermal activity is either a continuous process with cyclical maxima of activity, or a discontinuous process. (43 refs., 4 tabs., 6 figs.)

  7. An attempt to reconstruct geodynamically the Belgian palaeogene basin from mineralogical clay data, from radioelement (U, Th, K2O) geochemistry and palynology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quinif, Yves; Mercier, Monique; Dupuis Christian; Roche, Emile

    1983-01-01

    By analysing clay mineralogy, U-Th-K 2 O geochemistry and palynology data, we find that the Belgian Palaeogene is dominated by the action of a biostasic period toward the end of the lower Eocene. At the middle Eocene starts a new phase, at least a rhexistasic one at the begining. In the Basin, the geochemical and mineralogical traces of this phase just start from the upper Eocene [fr

  8. Reconnaissance Geochemical Study

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    distribution patterns. The geochemical distribution maps of the elements reveal that Cu, Pb, Zn, Co, Sc, Ni, Cr, .... After filtration, the leached solutions were diluted with ultra ...... some other rare earth elements in the study area. The occurrence ...

  9. Mineralogy and pore water chemistry of a boiler ash from a MSW fluidized-bed incinerator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodénan, F; Guyonnet, D; Piantone, P; Blanc, P

    2010-07-01

    This paper presents an investigation of the mineralogy and pore water chemistry of a boiler ash sampled from a municipal solid waste fluidized-bed incinerator, subject to 18 months of dynamic leaching in a large percolation column experiment. A particular focus is on the redox behaviour of Cr(VI) in relation to metal aluminium Al(0), as chromium may represent an environmental or health hazard. The leaching behaviour and interaction between Cr(VI) and Al(0) are interpreted on the basis of mineralogical evolutions observed over the 18-month period and of saturation indices calculated with the geochemical code PhreeqC and reviewed thermodynamic data. Results of mineralogical analyses show in particular the alteration of mineral phases during leaching (e.g. quartz and metal aluminium grains), while geochemical calculations suggest equilibria of percolating fluids with respect to specific mineral phases (e.g. monohydrocalcite and aluminium hydroxide). The combination of leaching data on a large scale and mineralogical analyses document the coupled leaching behaviour of aluminium and chromium, with chromium appearing in the pore fluids in its hexavalent and mobile state once metal aluminium is no longer available for chromium reduction. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Mineralogy and pore water chemistry of a boiler ash from a MSW fluidized-bed incinerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodenan, F.; Guyonnet, D.; Piantone, P.; Blanc, P.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents an investigation of the mineralogy and pore water chemistry of a boiler ash sampled from a municipal solid waste fluidized-bed incinerator, subject to 18 months of dynamic leaching in a large percolation column experiment. A particular focus is on the redox behaviour of Cr(VI) in relation to metal aluminium Al 0 , as chromium may represent an environmental or health hazard. The leaching behaviour and interaction between Cr(VI) and Al 0 are interpreted on the basis of mineralogical evolutions observed over the 18-month period and of saturation indices calculated with the geochemical code PhreeqC and reviewed thermodynamic data. Results of mineralogical analyses show in particular the alteration of mineral phases during leaching (e.g. quartz and metal aluminium grains), while geochemical calculations suggest equilibria of percolating fluids with respect to specific mineral phases (e.g. monohydrocalcite and aluminium hydroxide). The combination of leaching data on a large scale and mineralogical analyses document the coupled leaching behaviour of aluminium and chromium, with chromium appearing in the pore fluids in its hexavalent and mobile state once metal aluminium is no longer available for chromium reduction.

  11. Long-term landscape evolution of the South Atlantic "passive" continental margin in Eastern Argentina using apatite fission-track thermochronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfister, Sabrina; Kollenz, Sebastian; Glasmacher, Ulrich A.

    2015-04-01

    spontaneous fission-tracks and were used to test geological t-T models against the AFT data set. These models will lead to a more detailed insight on the cooling history and tectonic activities in the research area. In addition there will be an outlook on further models including AFT, ZrFT and ZrHe data, which show that the Sierras Septentrionales seems to be influenced by the folding and wrenching of the neighboring Sierras Australes (Rosello et al. 1997). References Cingolani, C. A. The Tandilia System of Argentina as a southern extension of the Río de la Plata craton: an overview. International Journal of Earth Sciences 100, 221-242 (2011). Demoulin, A., Zarate, M., Rabassa, J. Longterm landscape development: a perspective from the southern Buenos Aires ranges of east central Argentina. Journal of South American Earth Sciences 19, 193-204 (2005). Ketcham, R. A. Forward and inverse modeling of low-temperature thermochronometry data, in Low-Temperature Thermochronology: Techniques, Interpretations, and Applications (eds. by Reiners, P. W. & Ehlers, T. A.) 275-314 (Mineralogical Society of America/Geochemical Society Reviews in Mineralogy and Geochemistry, Chantilly, Virginia, 2005). Ketcham, R. A., et al. Improved modeling of fission-track annealing in apatite. American Mineralogist, 92, 789-798 (2007). Ketcham, R. A., Donelick, R. A., Balestrieri, M. L., Zattin, M. Reproducibility of apatite fission-track length data and thermal history reconstruction, Earth and Planetary Science Letters 284, 504-515 (2009). Rossello, E.A.; Massabie, C.; Lopez- Gamundi, O.R.; Cobbold, P.R.; Gapais, d.; 1997: Late Paleozoic transpression in Buenos Aires and northeast Patagonia ranges, Argentina Journal of South American Earth Sciences, 10 (5-6), pp.389-402. Zalba, P. E., Manassero, M., La Verret, E., Beaufort, D., Meunier, A., Morosi, M., Segovia, L. Middle Permian telodiagenetic processes in Neoproterozoic sequences, Tandilia System, Argentina. Int. J. of Sed. Res. 77, 525-538 (2007).

  12. Exploration for uranium in Argentina: New policies of reactivation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bianchi, R.E.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: The policy established by the National Government of Argentina in August 2006 related to resuming the Nuclear activity in the country, lead the CNEA trough the Exploration of Raw Materials Manager (ERMM) to establish working strategies for the next 10 years. These strategies together with the assignment of an adequate budget will contribute to define new uranium resources, which together with the already known ones, will be used to supply the requirements of Nuclear Power and Research Plants in the future. Thus, the ERMM is applying a policy of human resources hiring new personnel in order to count with the minimum necessary workforce to reach these tasks. In Argentina known U resources are related to sedimentary, igneous and metamorphic environments. Considering the geology of the different regions, Argentina has been divided into 57 units in which the geological, geochemical, mineralogical and structural information is evaluated in order to estimate the uranium geological favorability of each unit. The final pursuit of this regional study is to circumscribe new areas with anomalous uranium contents in which prospection and exploration should be carried out. These studies together with prospection and exploration works are performed in the country by four exploration centers based in Salta (RN), Cordoba (R.Ce), Mendoza (R.Cu) and Trelew (RP). The works planned for each exploration center includes: Regional Noroeste, Mina Franca Deposit: peri-granitic vein- type mineralization: 25% of surface exploration has been performed. Mineralized areas: Istataco and San Buenaventura correspond to an igneous-metamorphic environment, Sierra de Vaqueria to a sedimentary one: Prospection stage. Regional Centro, Mineralized areas: El Gallo: drilling stage and Donato: prospection stage, correspond to an igneous-metamorphic environment with intra and peri-granitic anomalies. Noya: prospection stage, sedimentary environment. Regional Cuyo, Mineralized area: Western Sierra

  13. GEOCHEMISTRY AND MINERALOGICAL EVALUATION OF ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Osondu

    2011-11-05

    Nov 5, 2011 ... mica-schist. AAS and XRD techniques were employed in the determination of chemical and mineralogical composition of ten .... Sample %. British Standard. Institution (BSI). %. American standard. (ASTM) %. SiO2. Al2O3. Fe2O3. TiO2. CaO. MgO. Na2O. K2O. P2O5. LO I. 46.65. 47.67. 1.02. 1.28. 0.10. 0.02.

  14. Geologic and geochemical studies of the New Albany Shale Group (Devonian-Mississippian) in Illinois. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergstrom, R.E.; Shimp, N.F.

    1980-06-30

    The Illinois State Geological Survey is conducting geological and geochemical investigations to evaluate the potential of New Albany Group shales as a source of hydrocarbons, particularly natural gas. Geological studies include stratigraphy and structure, mineralogic and petrographic characterization; analyses of physical properties; and development of a computer-based resources evaluation system. Geochemical studies include organic carbon content and trace elements; hydrocarbon content and composition; and adsorption/desorption studies of gas through shales. Separate abstracts have been prepared for each task reported.

  15. Multivariate analysis of the geochemistry and mineralogy of soils along two continental-scale transects in North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drew, L.J.; Grunsky, E.C.; Sutphin, D.M.; Woodruff, L.G.

    2010-01-01

    Soils collected in 2004 along two North American continental-scale transects were subjected to geochemical and mineralogical analyses. In previous interpretations of these analyses, data were expressed in weight percent and parts per million, and thus were subject to the effect of the constant-sum phenomenon. In a new approach to the data, this effect was removed by using centered log-ratio transformations to 'open' the mineralogical and geochemical arrays. Multivariate analyses, including principal component and linear discriminant analyses, of the centered log-ratio data reveal the effects of soil-forming processes, including soil parent material, weathering, and soil age, at the continental-scale of the data arrays that were not readily apparent in the more conventionally presented data. Linear discriminant analysis of the data arrays indicates that the majority of the soil samples collected along the transects can be more successfully classified with Level 1 ecological regional-scale classification by the soil geochemistry than soil mineralogy. A primary objective of this study is to discover and describe, in a parsimonious way, geochemical processes that are both independent and inter-dependent and manifested through compositional data including estimates of the elements and corresponding mineralogy. ?? 2010.

  16. Methods for geochemical analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baedecker, Philip A.

    1987-01-01

    The laboratories for analytical chemistry within the Geologic Division of the U.S. Geological Survey are administered by the Office of Mineral Resources. The laboratory analysts provide analytical support to those programs of the Geologic Division that require chemical information and conduct basic research in analytical and geochemical areas vital to the furtherance of Division program goals. Laboratories for research and geochemical analysis are maintained at the three major centers in Reston, Virginia, Denver, Colorado, and Menlo Park, California. The Division has an expertise in a broad spectrum of analytical techniques, and the analytical research is designed to advance the state of the art of existing techniques and to develop new methods of analysis in response to special problems in geochemical analysis. The geochemical research and analytical results are applied to the solution of fundamental geochemical problems relating to the origin of mineral deposits and fossil fuels, as well as to studies relating to the distribution of elements in varied geologic systems, the mechanisms by which they are transported, and their impact on the environment.

  17. Significance of geochemical characterization to performance at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simmons, A.M.

    1993-01-01

    The U.S. concept for permanent disposal of high-level radioactive waste resembles those of other countries in that it relies upon burial in a deep geologic medium. This concept relies upon multiple barriers to retard transport of radionuclides to the accessible environment; those barriers consist of the waste form, waste container, engineered barrier system (including possible backfill) and retardant properties of the host rock. Because mobilization of radionuclides is fundamentally a geochemical problem, an understanding of past, present, and future geochemical processes is a requisite part of site characterization studies conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Geochemical information is needed for evaluating three favorable conditions (the rates of geochemical processes, conditions that promote precipitation or sorption of radionuclides or prohibit formation of colloids, and stable mineral assemblages) and four potentially adverse conditions of the site (groundwater conditions that could increase the chemical reactivity of the engineered barried system or reduce sorption, potential for gaseous radionuclide movement, and oxidizing groundwaters) for key issues of radionuclide release, groundwater quality, and stability of the geochemical environment. Preliminary results of long-term heating experiments indicate that although zeolites can be modified by long-term, low temperature reactions, their beneficial sorptive properties will not be adversely affected. Mineral reactions will be controlled by the aqueous activity of silica in groundwater with which the minerals are in contact. Geochemical barriers alone may satisfy release requirements to the accessible environment for many radionuclides; however, additional site specific geochemical and mineralogical data are needed to test existing and future radionuclide transport models

  18. Geochemical prospecting in Guiana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coulomb, R.

    1957-01-01

    During the last few years geochemical prospecting techniques have become common usage in the field of mineral deposit prospecting. The real scope of these methods lies in their use in the prospecting of large areas. The most promising use of the geochemistry and hydro-geochemistry of uranium is in heavily forested tropical territories, with few outcrops, where radiometry is strongly handicapped. (author) [fr

  19. Precious metal-bearing epithermal deposits in western Patagonia (NE Lago Fontana region), Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanfranchini, Mabel Elena; Etcheverry, Ricardo Oscar; de Barrio, Raúl Ernesto; Recio Hernández, Clemente

    2013-04-01

    Precious metal-bearing quartz veins occur at the northeastern sector of the Lago Fontana region in southwestern Argentina, within the context of the Andean continental magmatic arc environment. The deposits and their associated alteration zones are spatially related to a Cretaceous calc-alkaline magmatism represented by silicic dikes and hypabyssal intrusions, and hosted by a Late Jurassic to Cretaceous volcano-sedimentary sequence. The veins and related veinlets crop out discontinuously, in general terms in a NW-SE belt. The primary vein mineral assemblage is composed mostly of pyrite ± galena ± chalcopyrite > hematite ± arsenopyrite in silica gangue minerals. Chemical analyses of grab samples from selected quartz veins show as much as 5.7 ppm Au and 224 ppm Ag, as well as elevated Pb, Cu, and Zn. Hydrothermal fluids caused an innermost silicification and adularia-sericite alteration assemblage, and an external propylitic halo. Sulfur isotope values measured for sulfides (δSS from -1.90 to +1.56‰), and oxygen and hydrogen isotopes measured on quartz crystals and extracted primary fluid inclusion waters (δOO = -2.85 to +5.40‰; δDO = -106.0 to -103.4‰) indicate that mineralization probably formed from magmatic fluids, which were mixed with meteoric waters. Also, fluid inclusion data from quartz veins point out that these fluids had low salinity (1.7-4.2 wt% NaCl equiv.), and temperatures of homogenization between 180 and 325 °C. Mineralogical, petrographic and geochemical features for mineralized surface exposures indicate a typical adularia-sericite, low sulfidation epithermal system in the Lago Fontana area that represents a promising target for further exploration programs.

  20. Medical revolution in Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballarin, V L; Isoardi, R A

    2010-01-01

    The paper discusses the major Argentineans contributors, medical physicists and scientists, in medical imaging and the development of medical imaging in Argentina. The following are presented: history of medical imaging in Argentina: the pioneers; medical imaging and medical revolution; nuclear medicine imaging; ultrasound imaging; and mathematics, physics, and electronics in medical image research: a multidisciplinary endeavor.

  1. Argentina's nuclear red herring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perera, J.

    1983-01-01

    The article deals with Argentina's nuclear power programme over the last 30 years, including the country's efforts to be nuclear independent of the United States, as well as its aspirations to be a nuclear supplier to latin America. The latter policy on economic, rather than military grounds for nuclear weapons, has led to Argentina's decision to build a uranian enrichment plant. (U.K.)

  2. Reflectance spectroscopy and asteroid surface mineralogy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaffey, M.J.; Bell, J.F.; Cruikshank, D.P.

    1989-01-01

    Information available from reflectance spectroscopy on the surface mineralogy of asteroids is discussed. Current spectral interpretive procedures used in the investigations of asteroid mineralogy are described. Present understanding of the nature and history of asteroids is discussed together with some still unresolved issues such as the source of ordinary chondrites. 100 refs

  3. Quartzites beneath pyroclastic flows – mineralogical aspects

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Malý, Karel; Cajz, Vladimír

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 37, č. 3 (2005), s. 370-371 ISSN 0369-2086 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA3013302 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30130516 Keywords : quartzite * ignimbrite * mineralogy Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy

  4. Geomicrobiology; inseparable from low temperature geochemistry & mineralogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southam, G.

    2009-05-01

    Bacteria play an important role in catalyzing a wide array of biogeochemical processes that affect the dissolution of minerals, the aqueous geochemistry of their surroundings and secondary mineral formation. Processes occurring at the bacteria-mineral interface can occur on the scale of nanoenvironments and will normally extend to microenvironments or even, to macroscopic features where extensive growth of bacteria is supported. The action of bacteria in these systems can produce a wide range of biomarkers that can be preserved over geologic time periods. Possible biomarkers include dissolution features in mineral substrates, fossil structures of individual cells to complex cell-cell associations, and chemical (isotopic and organic) signatures. In any system, we need to focus at the scale of the bacteria themselves to appreciate the actual chemistry of their surroundings and the kinds of reactions that they can catalyse. For example, photosynthetic microbial mats in an Atlin, BC wetland create ideal conditions for biologically induced precipitation of magnesium carbonates, specifically dypingite Mg5(CO3)4(OH)25H2O, which we were unable to reproduce abiotically. The preservation of biosignatures over geologic time presents obvious challenges, and the effect of diagenesis on fossils and their mineralogical assemblages deserves attention, especially with respect to the preservation and analysis of materials on (or from) Mars. For this, we need to rely on our Earth analogue sites as a way to triage the wide range of samples that are available for collection and analysis. The preservation of organic materials and cells in salts is particularly interesting. Conversely, the hematite nodules on Mars may not be good samples to target in the search for a Martian biosphere. The possibility of finding an extant biosphere increases with depth; however, evidence from Earth's deep subsurface demonstrates that it does not contain an abundant biosphere. Bacteria thrive in

  5. Geochemical investigations and results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herbert, H.J.; Sander, W.

    1986-01-01

    The following information can be derived from results so far for a final store: - With known mineralogy, precise information can be given on the solution metamorphosis processes to be expected. The previous results of this in-situ experiment have confirmed the theoretical considerations. - Sensors were developed and tested, which make possible continuous monitoring under hydrostatic pressure in a final store in the case of incoming solution, i.e. for exploration bores. - The collection of physical and chemical parameters in open sections and shafts creates the basis for assessing the effect of backfilling from the chemical point of view. (orig./PW) [de

  6. Influence of mineralogical and heavy metal composition on natural radionuclide concentrations in the river sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suresh, G., E-mail: gsureshphy_1983@yahoo.co.in [Department of Physics Thiruvalluvar College of Engg and Tech, Ponnur hills, Vandavasi, Tamilnadu 604 505 (India); Ramasamy, V. [Department of Physics, Annamalai University, Tamilnadu (India); Meenakshisundaram, V. [Health and Safety Division, IGCAR, Kalpakkam, Tamilnadu (India); Venkatachalapathy, R. [CAS in Marine Biology, Faculty of Marine Sciences, Annamalai University, Tamilnadu (India); Ponnusamy, V. [Department of Physics, MIT Campus, Anna University Chennai, Tamilnadu (India)

    2011-10-15

    The natural radiation level has been determined for the sediment samples of the Ponnaiyar River with an aim of evaluating the radiation hazard. The mineralogical characterizations of the sediments have been carried out using the Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic technique. The relative distribution of major minerals is determined by calculating extinction coefficient. The concentration and spatial distribution of heavy metals (Pb, Cr, Cu, Zn and Ni) have been studied to understand the heavy metal contamination and its level of toxicity. To evaluate the potential toxicity, heavy metal concentrations are compared with different toxicological and geological reference values. The comparison results suggest that the present metals create an adverse effect on the aquatic ecosystems associated with this river. To assess the sediment contamination due to the studied heavy metals, the Pollution Load Index (PLI) is calculated. Multivariate Statistical analyses (Pearson Correlation, Cluster and Factor analysis) were carried out between the parameters obtained from radioactivity, mineralogical and geochemical analysis to know the existing relations. Obtained results showed that the effect of mineralogy on level of radioactivity should be significant. However, mineralogy effect on heavy metal composition in the sediments should be limited, indicating that other factors such as vicinity of the pollution sources are more important. Also, the influence of mineralogical characterization on level of radioactivity is significant, whereas the influence of the heavy metal composition on level of radioactivity should be limited. - Highlights: >Sediments radioactivity, mineralogical and heavy metal characterization have been analyzed. > Absorbed dose rate, PLI and kaolinite increase towards the river mouth. > Influence of minerals and heavy metals on level of radioactivity is assessed.

  7. Influence of mineralogical and heavy metal composition on natural radionuclide concentrations in the river sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suresh, G.; Ramasamy, V.; Meenakshisundaram, V.; Venkatachalapathy, R.; Ponnusamy, V.

    2011-01-01

    The natural radiation level has been determined for the sediment samples of the Ponnaiyar River with an aim of evaluating the radiation hazard. The mineralogical characterizations of the sediments have been carried out using the Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic technique. The relative distribution of major minerals is determined by calculating extinction coefficient. The concentration and spatial distribution of heavy metals (Pb, Cr, Cu, Zn and Ni) have been studied to understand the heavy metal contamination and its level of toxicity. To evaluate the potential toxicity, heavy metal concentrations are compared with different toxicological and geological reference values. The comparison results suggest that the present metals create an adverse effect on the aquatic ecosystems associated with this river. To assess the sediment contamination due to the studied heavy metals, the Pollution Load Index (PLI) is calculated. Multivariate Statistical analyses (Pearson Correlation, Cluster and Factor analysis) were carried out between the parameters obtained from radioactivity, mineralogical and geochemical analysis to know the existing relations. Obtained results showed that the effect of mineralogy on level of radioactivity should be significant. However, mineralogy effect on heavy metal composition in the sediments should be limited, indicating that other factors such as vicinity of the pollution sources are more important. Also, the influence of mineralogical characterization on level of radioactivity is significant, whereas the influence of the heavy metal composition on level of radioactivity should be limited. - Highlights: →Sediments radioactivity, mineralogical and heavy metal characterization have been analyzed. → Absorbed dose rate, PLI and kaolinite increase towards the river mouth. → Influence of minerals and heavy metals on level of radioactivity is assessed.

  8. Geochemical modeling: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenne, E.A.

    1981-06-01

    Two general families of geochemical models presently exist. The ion speciation-solubility group of geochemical models contain submodels to first calculate a distribution of aqueous species and to secondly test the hypothesis that the water is near equilibrium with particular solid phases. These models may or may not calculate the adsorption of dissolved constituents and simulate the dissolution and precipitation (mass transfer) of solid phases. Another family of geochemical models, the reaction path models, simulates the stepwise precipitation of solid phases as a result of reacting specified amounts of water and rock. Reaction path models first perform an aqueous speciation of the dissolved constituents of the water, test solubility hypotheses, then perform the reaction path modeling. Certain improvements in the present versions of these models would enhance their value and usefulness to applications in nuclear-waste isolation, etc. Mass-transfer calculations of limited extent are certainly within the capabilities of state-of-the-art models. However, the reaction path models require an expansion of their thermodynamic data bases and systematic validation before they are generally accepted

  9. Geochemical modeling: a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jenne, E.A.

    1981-06-01

    Two general families of geochemical models presently exist. The ion speciation-solubility group of geochemical models contain submodels to first calculate a distribution of aqueous species and to secondly test the hypothesis that the water is near equilibrium with particular solid phases. These models may or may not calculate the adsorption of dissolved constituents and simulate the dissolution and precipitation (mass transfer) of solid phases. Another family of geochemical models, the reaction path models, simulates the stepwise precipitation of solid phases as a result of reacting specified amounts of water and rock. Reaction path models first perform an aqueous speciation of the dissolved constituents of the water, test solubility hypotheses, then perform the reaction path modeling. Certain improvements in the present versions of these models would enhance their value and usefulness to applications in nuclear-waste isolation, etc. Mass-transfer calculations of limited extent are certainly within the capabilities of state-of-the-art models. However, the reaction path models require an expansion of their thermodynamic data bases and systematic validation before they are generally accepted.

  10. Detailed description of oil shale organic and mineralogical heterogeneity via fourier transform infrared mircoscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washburn, Kathryn E.; Birdwell, Justin E.; Foster, Michael; Gutierrez, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Mineralogical and geochemical information on reservoir and source rocks is necessary to assess and produce from petroleum systems. The standard methods in the petroleum industry for obtaining these properties are bulk measurements on homogenized, generally crushed, and pulverized rock samples and can take from hours to days to perform. New methods using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy have been developed to more rapidly obtain information on mineralogy and geochemistry. However, these methods are also typically performed on bulk, homogenized samples. We present a new approach to rock sample characterization incorporating multivariate analysis and FTIR microscopy to provide non-destructive, spatially resolved mineralogy and geochemistry on whole rock samples. We are able to predict bulk mineralogy and organic carbon content within the same margin of error as standard characterization techniques, including X-ray diffraction (XRD) and total organic carbon (TOC) analysis. Validation of the method was performed using two oil shale samples from the Green River Formation in the Piceance Basin with differing sedimentary structures. One sample represents laminated Green River oil shales, and the other is representative of oil shale breccia. The FTIR microscopy results on the oil shales agree with XRD and LECO TOC data from the homogenized samples but also give additional detail regarding sample heterogeneity by providing information on the distribution of mineral phases and organic content. While measurements for this study were performed on oil shales, the method could also be applied to other geological samples, such as other mudrocks, complex carbonates, and soils.

  11. The geodynamic evolution of the eastern Sierras Pampeanas based on geochemical, Sm-Nd, Pb-Pb and SHRIMP data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drobe, M; Lopez de Luchi, M; Steenken, A

    2011-01-01

    , have been carried out to unravel the provenance and the geodynamic history of the Eastern Sierras Pampeanas, Central Argentina. The geochemical and the Sm–Nd data point to a slightly stronger mafic and less-fractionated material in the provenance area of the Sierras de Co´rdoba when compared...

  12. Mineralogical characterization of selected shales in support of nuclear waste repository studies: Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S.Y.; Hyder, L.K.; Alley, P.D.

    1987-12-01

    Because baseline characterization of shale mineralogy is critical to the interpretation of results from experiments on radionuclide retardation, groundwater-shale interactions, and physicochemical characteristics, a protocol for quantitative mineralogical analyses has been developed by integrating geochemical and instrumental techniques for the investigation of properties related to repository performance. Thermal analyses were used to estimate total organic matter and carbonate mineral contents. Scanning electron microscope backscattering and elemental mapping of polished sectors and particle-size distribution data were used to estimate the amounts of quartz plus feldspar and pyrite in the shales. X-ray diffraction, neutron activation, and size-distribution data were utilized to estimate phyllosilicate mineral contents. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy was used to identify clay mineral components.

  13. Mineralogical characterization of selected shales in support of nuclear waste repository studies: Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.Y.; Hyder, L.K.; Alley, P.D.

    1987-12-01

    Because baseline characterization of shale mineralogy is critical to the interpretation of results from experiments on radionuclide retardation, groundwater-shale interactions, and physicochemical characteristics, a protocol for quantitative mineralogical analyses has been developed by integrating geochemical and instrumental techniques for the investigation of properties related to repository performance. Thermal analyses were used to estimate total organic matter and carbonate mineral contents. Scanning electron microscope backscattering and elemental mapping of polished sectors and particle-size distribution data were used to estimate the amounts of quartz plus feldspar and pyrite in the shales. X-ray diffraction, neutron activation, and size-distribution data were utilized to estimate phyllosilicate mineral contents. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy was used to identify clay mineral components

  14. Predictive geophysics: geochemical simulations to geophysical targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopping, R. G.; Cleverley, J.

    2017-12-01

    With an increasing focus on deep exploration for covered targets, new methods are required to target mineral systems under cover. Geophysical responses are driven by physical property contrasts; for example, density contrasts provide a gravity signal, acoustic impedance contrasts provide a seismic reflection signal. In turn, the physical properties for basement, crystalline rocks which host the vast majority of mineral systems are determined almost wholly by the mineralogy of the rocks in question. Mineral systems, through the transport of heat and reactive fluids, will serve to modify the physical properties of country rock as they chemically alter the hosting strata. To understand these changes, we have performed 2D reactive transport modelling that simulates the formation of Archean gold deposits of the Yilgarn Craton, Western Australia. From this, we derive a model of mineralogy that we can use to predict the density, magnetic susceptibility and seismic reflection changes associated with ore formation. It is then possible to predict the gravity, magnetic and seismic reflection responses associated with these deposits. Scenario mapping, such as testing the ability to resolve buried ore bodies or the geophysical survey spacing required to resolve the mineral system, can be performed to produce geophysical targets from these geochemical simulations. We find that there is a gravity response of around 9% of the unaltered response for deposits even buried by 1km of cover, and there is a magnetic spike associated with proximal alteration of the ore system. Finally, seismic reflection response is mostly characterised by additional reflections along faults that plumb the alteration system.

  15. The Nasca and Palpa geoglyphs: geophysical and geochemical data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartsch, Kerstin; Weller, Andreas; Rosas, Silvia; Reppchen, Gunter

    2009-10-01

    The Nasca geoglyphs in the stone desert in southern Peru are part of our world cultural heritage. These remarkable drawings have roused the interest of scientists from different disciplines. Here we report the results of integrated geophysical, petrophysical, mineralogical, and geochemical investigations of the geoglyphs at six test sites in the stone desert around Nasca and Palpa. The geomagnetic measurements revealed clear indications of subsurface structures that differ from the visible surface geoglyphs. The high-resolution geoelectrical images show unexpected resistivity anomalies underneath the geoglyphs down to a depth of about 2 m. Remarkable structures were revealed in both vertical and lateral directions. No evidence was found of geochemical or mineralogical alterations of the natural geogenic materials (desert pavement environment versus geoglyphs). Neither salts nor other mineral materials were used by the Nasca people to alter or prepare the surfaces of geoglyphs. This supports the hypothesis that the Nasca people simply removed stone material down to the natural hard pan horizon to create the geoglyphs.

  16. Mineralization and geochemical studies in the Kalchouyeh occurrence, southwest of Naein

    OpenAIRE

    Hengameh Hosseini Dinani; Hashem Bagheri; Reza Shamsipour Dehkordi

    2012-01-01

    Kalchouyeh area in southwest of Naein is located in the Urumieh-Dokhtar volcano-plutonic belt. Mineralization occurred mainly as disseminations and veinlets hosted by trachy-andesite and pyroxene andesites. For mineralogy, alteration, fluid inclusion and geochemical studies, the two major mineralized zones: A (larger vein) from the north-northwest and B (smaller vein) from the east-southeast of the area were sampled. Alteration studies revealed that the main alteration assemblages are silicif...

  17. GEOCHEMICAL CONTROLS ON NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE MEASUREMENTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knight, Rosemary

    2008-01-01

    Proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is used in the Earth Sciences as a means of obtaining information about the molecular-scale environment of fluids in porous geological materials. Laboratory experiments were conducted to advance our fundamental understanding of the link between the NMR response and the geochemical properties of geological materials. In the first part of this research project, we studied the impact of both the surface-area-to-volume ratio (S/V) of the pore space and the surface relaxivity on the NMR response of fluids in sand-clay mixtures. This study highlighted the way in which these two parameters control our ability to use NMR measurements to detect and quantify fluid saturation in multiphase saturated systems. The second part of the project was designed to explore the way in which the mineralogic form of iron, as opposed to simply the concentration of iron, affects the surface relaxation rate and, more generally, the NMR response of porous materials. We found that the magnitude of the surface relaxation rate was different for the various iron-oxide minerals because of changes in both the surface-area-to-volume ratio of the pore space, and the surface relaxivity. Of particular significance from this study was the finding of an anomalously large surface relaxivity of magnetite compared to that of the other iron minerals. Differences in the NMR response of iron minerals were seen in column experiments during the reaction of ferrihydrite-coated quartz sand with aqueous Fe(II) solutions to form goethite, lepidocrocite and magnetite; indicating the potential use of NMR as a means of monitoring geochemical reactions. The final part of the research project investigated the impact of heterogeneity, at the pore-scale, on the NMR response. This work highlighted the way in which the geochemistry, by controlling the surface relaxivity, has a significant impact on the link between NMR data and the microgeometry of the pore space.

  18. LDC nuclear power: Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tweedale, D.L.

    1982-01-01

    Argentina's 31-year-old nuclear research and power program makes it a Third World leader and the preeminent Latin American country. Easily accessible uranium fuels the heavy water reactor, Atucha I, which provides 10% of the country's electric power. Atucha II and III are under construction. Several domestic and international factors combined to make Argentina's program succeed, but achieving fuel-cycle independence and the capacity to divert fissionable material to military uses is a cause for some concern. 60 references

  19. The uranium source-term mineralogy and geochemistry at the Broubster natural analogue site, Caithness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milodowski, A.E.; Pearce, J.M.; Basham, I.R.; Hyslop, E.K.

    1991-01-01

    The British Geological Survey (BGS) has been conducting a coordinated research programme at the Broubster natural analogue site in Caithness, north Scotland. This work on a natural radioactive geochemical system has been carried out with the aim of improving our confidence in using predictive models of radionuclide migration in the geosphere. This report is one of a series being produced and it concentrates on the mineralogical characterization of the uranium distribution in the limestone unit considered as the 'source-term' in the natural analogue model

  20. History and progress of the North American Soil Geochemical Landscapes Project, 2001-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David B.; Cannon, William F.; Woodruff, Laurel G.; Rivera, Francisco Moreira; Rencz, Andrew N.; Garrett, Robert G.

    2012-01-01

    In 2007, the U.S. Geological Survey, the Geological Survey of Canada, and the Mexican Geological Survey initiated a low-density (1 site per 1600 km2, 13323 sites) geochemical and mineralogical survey of North American soils (North American Soil Geochemical Landscapes Project). Sampling and analytical protocols were developed at a series of workshops in 20032004 and pilot studies were conducted from 20042007. The ideal sampling protocol at each site includes a sample from 05 cm depth, a composite of the soil A horizon, and a sample from the soil C horizon. The 3, HClO4, and HF. Separate methods are used for As, Hg, Se, and total C on this same size fraction. The major mineralogical components are determined by a quantitative X-ray diffraction method. Sampling in the conterminous U.S. was completed in 2010 (c. 4800 sites) with chemical and mineralogical analysis currently underway. In Mexico, approximately 66% of the sampling (871 sites) had been done by the end of 2010 with completion expected in 2012. After completing sampling in the Maritime provinces and portions of other provinces (472 sites, 7.6% of the total), Canada withdrew from the project in 2010. Preliminary results for a swath from the central U.S. to Florida clearly show the effects of soil parent material and climate on the chemical and mineralogical composition of soils. A sample archive will be established and made available for future investigations.

  1. Mineralogy of the rare earth elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, A.M.

    1984-01-01

    This paper contains mineralogic properties of the rare earth elements (REE). Notes are given on total REE abundances, distribution patterns, and modes of occurrence. References are confined as far as possible to papers containing usable REE data. The minerals are grouped alphabetically within each major cationic group. The paper includes an alphabetic table of mineral names, chemical formulas, crystal system and section number. It functions as a handy entrance to the mineralogic and bibliographic paper. (G.J.P.)

  2. Mineralogical conversion of asbestos containing materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulsford, S.K.; Foltz, A.D.; Ek, R.B.

    1996-01-01

    The principal objective of the Technical Task Plan (TTP) is to demonstrate a thermal-chemical mineralogical asbestos conversion unit at the Hanford Site, which converts non-radiological asbestos containing materials (ACMs) into an asbestos-free material. The permanent thermal-chemical mineralogical conversion of ACMs to a non-toxic, non-hazardous, potentially marketable end product should not only significantly reduce the waste stream volumes but terminate the open-quotes cradle to graveclose quotes ownership liabilities

  3. Low temperature thermochronology and topographic evolution of the South Atlantic passive continental margin in the region in eastern Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfister, Sabrina; Kollenz, Sebastian; Glasmacher, Ulrich A.

    2014-05-01

    Plata craton: an overview. Int. J. Earth Sci. (Geol. Rundsch.) (2011) 100:221-242, doi 10.1007/s00531-010-0611-5. Demoulin, A., Zarate, M., Rabassa, J.; (2005) Longterm landscape development: a perspective from the southern Buenos Aires ranges of east central Argentina; Journal of South American Earth Sciences, Vol. 19, pp. 193-204. Ketcham, R. A. (2005): Forward and inverse modeling of low-temperature thermochronometry data, in Low-Temperature Thermochronology: Techniques, Interpretations, and Applications, edited by P. W. Reiners and T. A. Ehlers, pp. 275-314, Mineralogical Society of America/Geochemical Society, Chantilly, Virginia. Ketcham, R. A., et al. (2007): Improved modeling of fission-track annealing in apatite, American Mineralogist, 92, 789-798. Ketcham, R. A., Donelick, R. A., Balestrieri, M. L., Zattin, M. (2009): Reproducibility of apatite fission-track length data and thermal history reconstruction, Earth and Planetary Science Letters 284 (2009), 504-515.

  4. Characterization of rock samples and mineralogical controls on leachates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammarstrom, Jane M.; Cravotta, Charles A.; Galeone, Daniel G.; Jackson, John C.; Dulong, Frank T.; Hornberger, Roger J.; Brady, Keith B.C.

    2009-01-01

    Rocks associated with coal beds typically include shale, sandstone, and (or) limestone. In addition to common rock-forming minerals, all of these rock types may contain sulfide and sulfate minerals, various carbonate minerals, and organic material. These different minerals have inherently different solubility characteristics, as well as different acid-generating or acid-neutralizing potentials. The abundance and composition of sulfur- and carbonate-bearing minerals are of particular interest in interpreting the leaching column data because (1) pyrite and carbonate minerals are the primary controls on the acid-base account of a sample, (2) these minerals incorporate trace metals that can be released during weathering, and (3) these minerals readily react during weathering due to mineral dissolution and oxidation of iron.Rock samples were collected by the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection (PaDEP) from five different sites to assess the draft standardized leaching column method (ADTI-WP2) for the prediction of weathering rates and water quality at coal mines. Samples were sent to USGS laboratories for mineralogical characterization and to ActLabs for chemical analysis. The samples represent a variety of rock types (shales, sandstones, and coal refuse) that are typical of coal overburden in the eastern United States. These particular samples were chosen for testing the weathering protocols because they represent a range of geochemical and lithologic characteristics, sulfur contents, and acid-base accounting characteristics (Hornberger et al., 2003). The rocks contain variable amounts of pyrite and carbonate minerals and vary in texture.This chapter includes bulk rock chemical data and detailed mineralogical and textural data for unweathered starting materials used in the interlaboratory validation study, and for two samples used in the early phases of leaching column tests (Wadesville Sandstone, Leechburg Coal Refuse). We also characterize some of the

  5. Studies of mineralogy and geochemistry of Rare Earth Elements in permo-Triassic Bauxite deposit, Northeast of Bukan, North West of Iran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abedini, A.; Calagari, A. A.; Hadjalilu, B.; Jahangiri, A.

    2008-01-01

    Bauxite deposit of Permo-Triassic age in northeast of Bukan was developed stratiformly along the boundary between Ruteh and Elika formations, and includes four distinct rock units. This deposit was affected by tectonic and morphological processes. Mineralogical and geochemical investigations showed that during weathering processes, two mechanisms of ferrugenization and deferrugenization played crucial role in formation of minerals such as Diaspora, boehmite, hematite, goethite, kaolinite, pyrophyllite, clinochlore, illite, montmorillonite, anatase, rutile, albite, sanidine, quartz, and calcite in this deposit. By taking notice of field evidence and of mineralogical and geochemical data, the basalts (whose remnants are still present along the contact of this deposit with carbonate bedrock) are the potential parent rock of this deposit. The distribution pattern of rare earth elements (normalized to chondrite and basaltic parent rock) along with anomaly variations of Eu, Ce, and (La/Yb) N indicates differentiation of LREEs from HREEs during bauxitization processes. Further geochemical considerations indicate that the concentrations of LREEs were occurred by hematite, goethite, manganese oxides, cerianite, and secondary phosphates (rhabdophane, vitusite, gorceixite, monazite) and of HREEs by clay minerals; rutile, anatase, zircon, euxenite, and fergusonite. Incorporation of the results obtained from mineralogical and geochemical investigations suggests that in addition to factors such as p H of weathering solutions, ionic potential, composition of the parent rock, and fixation by residual minerals, adsorption processes also played crucial role in enrichment of rare earth elements during moderate to intense lateritization in the study area

  6. Geochemical Survey of Pernambuco

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horowitz, A.; Duarte, P.J.; Almeida, M.G. de; Medeiros, M.O.

    1988-01-01

    The area studied i this work is located in a triangle formed by the Sibiro and Boca da Mata Sugar-Mills and Serinhaem country. In the Cabo Formation the search determinated conglomerates, arcos and clays. Although the highest geochemical activity have been done in the decomposed crystalin, and the values from Cabo Formation don't be encourager, this formation has lithology compatible with uranium mineralization. The Cabo Formation's sediments presents lithologic variations very expressives, with conglomerates, arcoses and clay silts, which determinate the choise of the area. This area presented favorable to uranium prospecting and to others elements interesting to ragional geochemistry. The atomic absorption analysis, fluorimetry and spectrometry were done for the following elements: Zn, V, Ti, Ni, Pb, Mn, Ga, Cu, Co, Bi, Ag, B, Mo, and U. (C.D.G.) [pt

  7. Mineralogical diversity and geology of Humboldt crater derived using Moon Mineralogy Mapper data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martinot, M.; Besse, S.; Flahaut, J.; Quantin-Nataf, C.; Lozac'h, L.; van Westrenen, W.

    2018-01-01

    Moon Mineralogy Mapper (M3) spectroscopic data and high-resolution imagery data sets were used to study the mineralogy and geology of the 207 km diameter Humboldt crater. Analyses of M3 data, using a custom-made method for M3 spectra continuum removal and spectral parameters calculation, reveal

  8. Helosis (Balanophoraceae en Argentina Helosis (Balanophoraceae in Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luis Fontana

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Se cita por primera vez para Argentina Helosis cayennensis (Swartz Sprengel var. cayennensis en base a colecciones hechas por los autores en la Isla argentina de Apipé Grande, Ituzaingó, provincia de Corrientes. Se describe e ilustra la especie, el desarrollo de la planta y su estado de conservación. Esta cita de Helosis corresponde a un género nuevo para la flora argentina.Helosis cayennensis var. cayennensis is reported for the first time for Argentina. The species is described and ilustrated. Developement and ecology are also given. Helosis is also a new generic record for Argentina.

  9. Basic data for uranium prospecting in Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belluco, A.; Rodriguez, E.; Martinez, C.; Marinkeff, K.

    1977-01-01

    After dealing briefly with the geochemical cycle of uranium in the earth's crust, and indicating the principal conditions under which different types of deposits are formed, the paper goes on to determine the uraniferous are of mainland Argentina (approximately 900000 km 2 ). Since evidence for the presence of uranium and other radioactive elements in many parts of the country has long been available, an attempt was made to systemize the existing information and classify the uraniferous sites so as to determine their temporal, spatial and genetic relationships with the different containing rocks. In addition, a study was made of the factors which contribute to the concentration of uranium in rocks which are accessible to prospecting (litho-stratigraphy, geological history, mettallogenic cycles, etc.). On the basis of these studies and considering the regional geology of Argentina, 21 ''regional environments'' were defined with varying degrees of probability of containing uranium; these environments will be submitted to long-term regional prospecting studies. It was necessary, however, to make a further sub-division into more homogeneous units with more clearly graded levels of priority, with the result that there are 65 ''prospecting units''. Each of these units, in order of priority, will be subjected to systematic prospecting. Exploratory work on a suitable scale will be carried out in the ''uraniferous'' districts of the ''prospecting units''. The main features of Argentine geology relating to the likelihood of uranium occurrences are briefly described, and maps of the large geotechtonic areas and the ''regional environments'' are included. (author)

  10. Landslide: Mineralogical and Physical Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tudor, Viluș; Grozav, Adia; Rogobete, Gheorghe

    2017-10-01

    In order to construct a road bed foundation, if land has moved, on an area with old landslides, there is a high chance of it moving again. The investigation was made in a region with hilly relief, in which the parent materials of soils are argillaceous marls of Pliocene age. Because the slope is scarped and the versant has been cut, the soil mass slide favoured of the particle-size distribution dominated by heavy clay. With a reiteratedly percolative moisture regime, the soil material is saturated in water fora long period (700-800 mm precipitation/year), and that can increase the slope mass, thereby increasing the driving forces. In a soil profile situated on the top of the hill, with landslide for about 40 m length of the road, disturbed and undisturbed soil samples were analysed physic-chemical and mineralogical. For the heavy and light minerals from the sand fraction a polarized light analyser is used, and for clay minerals X-ray, differential thermal and infrared absorption method are used. The particle-size distribution in the soil profile is dominated by the clay fraction, which reached 53.2% in the ABt horizon and 63.0% in the Bt horizon (67-93 cm depth). The structure of the light minerals, consists of quartz (41-58%); feldspar (10.16-18.10%); muscovite (14.10-26.04). The heavy minerals are oxides (2.61-15.26%), hornblende (0.58-2.87%) and biotite (0.51-2.68%). It must be mentioned the presence of the metamorphic minerals, with the source of the Poiana Rusca mountains. These minerals are epidote (1.01-1.86%), disthene (0.70-1.86%), staurolite (0.73-2.46%) and sillimanite (0.35-0.45%). The clay minerals, inherited from the parent material or formed during the soil-forming process are dominated by smectite, which represent (71-85%) from the total clay minerals, illite 10-21%, and Kaolinite, 4-12%. Rheological properties, like plastic index (53.8%), activity index (1.01%) and consistency index (0.99-1.00%) show that the shrinkage - swelling processes are

  11. Long term mineralogical changes in salt formations due to water and brine interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herbert, H.J.; Brewitz, W.

    1996-01-01

    Four very common long term mineralogical changes in salt formations are discussed in the view of the safety considerations for underground repositories. Two of these processes, the 'Hartsalz' and 'Carnallite' dissolution were studied in two scale in situ experiments. The results are presented and compared with the results of the geochemical modelling with the computer code EQ3/6. Furthermore the reactions leading to the formation of the gypsum cap rock on the top of the Zechstein salt formations and to the polyhalitization of anhydrite are discussed. Geological field observations and mineral assemblages agree well with the results of the geochemical modelling employing the Pitzer formalism along with the Harvie, Moller and Weare database. We conclude that once the mechanisms of the chemical reactions are well understood it becomes possible to evaluate realistically whether such processes, when encountered in the repository, are still active or whether they are finished. It also becomes possible to estimate the volume changes associated with the reactions and thus the impact of these reactions on the integrity and the geomechanical stability of the salt formation. The intimate knowledge of the reaction mechanisms of the short and long term changes in the mineralogical assemblages and the associated brine chemistry is a first prerequisite for the correct evaluation of the origin of brines. Thus, it is essential for the correct assessment of the hazards which brine inflows may pose for the safety of a repository in salt formations. (authors). 8 refs., 14 figs., 8 tabs

  12. An integrated rock-magnetic and geochemical approach to loess/paleosol sequences from Bohemia and Moravia (Czech Republic): Implications for the Upper Pleistocene paleoenvironment in central Europe

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hošek, J.; Hambach, U.; Lisá, Lenka; Matys Grygar, Tomáš; Horáček, I.; Meszner, S.; Knésl, I.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 418, 15 January (2015), s. 344-358 ISSN 0031-0182 Institutional support: RVO:67985831 ; RVO:61388980 Keywords : loess/paleosols sequences * rock-magnetism * geochemical proxies * Upper Pleistocene * paleoclimate * Central Europe Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy; DD - Geochemistry (UACH-T) Impact factor: 2.525, year: 2015

  13. Geochemical characterization of the middle and late Pleistocene alluvial fan-dominated infill of the northern part of the Weihe Basin, Central China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rits, Daniël S.; Beets, Christiaan J.; Prins, Maarten A.; van Balen, Ronald T.; Troelstra, Simon R.; Luo, Chao; Wang, B.; Li, Xiaoqiang; Zhou, Jie; Zheng, Hongbo

    2017-01-01

    Major reorganizations in climate and tectonic regime occurred in East Asia during the Pleistocene, resulting in large-scale environmental changes. In this paper a detailed geochemical and mineralogical record of these changes is presented from a distal alluvial fan sedimentary sequence in the

  14. Mineralogical Plasticity Acts as a Compensatory Mechanism to the Impacts of Ocean Acidification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Jonathan Y S; Russell, Bayden D; Connell, Sean D

    2017-03-07

    Calcifying organisms are considered particularly susceptible to the future impacts of ocean acidification (OA), but recent evidence suggests that they may be able to maintain calcification and overall fitness. The underlying mechanism remains unclear but may be attributed to mineralogical plasticity, which modifies the energetic cost of calcification. To test the hypothesis that mineralogical plasticity enables the maintenance of shell growth and functionality under OA conditions, we assessed the biological performance of a gastropod (respiration rate, feeding rate, somatic growth, and shell growth of Austrocochlea constricta) and analyzed its shell mechanical and geochemical properties (shell hardness, elastic modulus, amorphous calcium carbonate, calcite to aragonite ratio, and magnesium to calcium ratio). Despite minor metabolic depression and no increase in feeding rate, shell growth was faster under OA conditions, probably due to increased precipitation of calcite and trade-offs against inner shell density. In addition, the resulting shell was functionally suitable for increasingly "corrosive" oceans, i.e., harder and less soluble shells. We conclude that mineralogical plasticity may act as a compensatory mechanism to maintain overall performance of calcifying organisms under OA conditions and could be a cornerstone of calcifying organisms to acclimate to and maintain their ecological functions in acidifying oceans.

  15. Mineralogical controls on aluminum and magnesium in uranium mill tailings: Key Lake, Saskatchewan, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, M A; Hendry, M J; Koshinsky, J; Essilfie-Dughan, J; Paikaray, S; Chen, J

    2013-07-16

    The mineralogy and evolution of Al and Mg in U mill tailings are poorly understood. Elemental analyses (ICP-MS) of both solid and aqueous phases show that precipitation of large masses of secondary Al and Mg mineral phases occurs throughout the raffinate neutralization process (pH 1-11) at the Key Lake U mill, Saskatchewan, Canada. Data from a suite of analytical methods (ICP-MS, EMPA, laboratory- and synchrotron-based XRD, ATR-IR, Raman, TEM, EDX, ED) and equilibrium thermodynamic modeling showed that nanoparticle-sized, spongy, porous, Mg-Al hydrotalcite is the dominant mineralogical control on Al and Mg in the neutralized raffinate (pH ≥ 6.7). The presence of this secondary Mg-Al hydrotalcite in mineral samples of both fresh and 15-year-old tailings indicates that the Mg-Al hydrotalcite is geochemically stable, even after >16 years in the oxic tailings body. Data shows an association between the Mg-Al hydrotalcite and both As and Ni and point to this Mg-Al hydrotalcite exerting a mineralogical control on the solubility of these contaminants.

  16. Geochemical and mineralogical controls on mine tailings rehabilitation and vegetation, Otago Schist, New Zealand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craw, D.; Rufaut, C.

    2017-01-01

    Large areas (square kilometre scale) of mine tailings have been deposited from placer gold mines in Central Otago, and are being deposited at Macraes orogenic gold mine in east Otago. Establishment of vegetation on these tailings involves at least some provision of plant nutrients from the rock. Phosphorus is the principal limiting nutrient, as the c. 1000 mg/kg P in accessory apatite, most abundant in micaceous schist, is only sparingly bioavailable on timescales of weeks to months. Nitrogen is an important limiting nutrient but schist, especially micaceous schist, typically contains 500-1000 mg/kg N, and this nitrogen is readily leachable with water on timescales of weeks to months. Arsenic uptake from tailings by pasture species is significant (< 90 mg/kg dry weight), but elevated As in tailings substrates (c. 1500 mg/kg) does not adversely affect plant health. Capping of tailings with variably oxidised schist is the most effective way of facilitating revegetation, and some addition of phosphatic fertiliser is desirable but other nutrients, including nitrogen, are adequately bioavailable in a schist cap and underlying tailings. (author).

  17. Pseudotachylitic breccia from the Dhala impact structure, north-central India: Texture, mineralogy and geochemical characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pati, J. K.; Reimold, W. U.; Greshake, A.; Schmitt, R. T.; Koeberl, C.; Pati, P.; Prakash, K.

    2015-05-01

    Pseudotachylitic breccia (PTB) occurs in a drill core from the crater floor of the 11 km diameter, Proterozoic Dhala impact structure, India. PTBs were intersected in late Archean granitoids between 348.15 m and 502.55 m depth in the MCB-10 drill core from the center of the Dhala structure. The breccias comprise both cataclastic-matrix as well as melt breccias. The presence of microlites and vesicles in the groundmass and a widely observed flow fabric in the PTB support the presence of melt in the groundmass of some samples. Clasts in PTB are derived from the Archean granitoid basement. PTB matrix, the matrix of impact melt breccia also occurring between 256.50 m and 502.55 m depth, and the target granitoids vary in terms of silica, total alkali, magnesium and iron oxide contents. Chondrite-normalized REE patterns of PTB and target granitoids are similar, but the elemental abundances in the PTB are lower. The restricted size of PTB as veins and pods of up to 2.5 cm width, their occurrence at varied depths over a core length of 150 m, the clast population, and the chemical relationships between PTB and their host rocks all suggest the derivation of these breccias locally from the fractured basement granitoids involving in-situ melting. We favor that this took place due to rapid decompression during the collapse and modification stage of impact cratering, with, locally, additional energy input from frictional heating. Locally, amphibolite and dioritic mylonite occur in the host granitoids and their admixture could have contributed to the comparatively more mafic composition of PTB. Alteration of these crater floor rocks could have involved preferential reduction of silica and alkali element abundances, possibly due to impact-induced hydrothermal activity at crater floor level. This process, too, could have resulted in more mafic compositions.

  18. Mineralogical and geochemical characters of surface sediments from the central Indian Basin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Banerjee, R.

    are enriched in trace metal (e.g. Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Co) inhomogeneously. Ni, Cu and Co are well correlated with Mn in terrigenous, siliceous and pelagic clay sediments. However, metal enrichment processes differ. The enrichment process is diagenetic in siliceous...

  19. Geochemical and mineralogical investigation of uranium in multi-element contaminated, organic-rich subsurface sediment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qafoku, Nikolla P.; Gartman, Brandy N.; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Arey, Bruce W.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Mouser, Paula J.; Heald, Steve M.; Bargar, John R.; Janot, Noémie; Yabusaki, Steve; Long, Philip E.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Subsurface naturally reduced zones (NRZ) contain U and other potential co-contaminants. • The NRZ has a remarkable assortment of chemically complex, potential U hosts. • Micron-scale, multi-contaminant areas were discovered in NRZ. • U(IV) occurs as biogenic UO 2 (82%), or biomass – bound monomeric U(IV) (18%). • NRZs may exhibit contaminant sink-source complex behavior. - Abstract: Subsurface regions of alluvial sediments characterized by an abundance of refractory or lignitic organic carbon compounds and reduced Fe and S bearing minerals, which are referred to as naturally reduced zones (NRZ), are present at the Integrated Field Research Challenge site in Rifle, CO (a former U mill site), and other contaminated subsurface sites. A study was conducted to demonstrate that the NRZ contains a variety of contaminants and unique minerals and potential contaminant hosts, investigate micron-scale spatial association of U with other co-contaminants, and determine solid phase-bounded U valence state and phase identity. The NRZ sediment had significant solid phase concentrations of U and other co-contaminants suggesting competing sorption reactions and complex temporal variations in dissolved contaminant concentrations in response to transient redox conditions, compared to single contaminant systems. The NRZ sediment had a remarkable assortment of potential contaminant hosts, such as Fe oxides, siderite, Fe(II) bearing clays, rare solids such as ZnS framboids and CuSe, and, potentially, chemically complex sulfides. Micron-scale inspections of the solid phase showed that U was spatially associated with other co-contaminants. High concentration, multi-contaminant, micron size (ca. 5–30 μm) areas of mainly U(IV) (53–100%) which occurred as biogenic UO 2 (82%), or biomass – bound monomeric U(IV) (18%), were discovered within the sediment matrix confirming that biotically induced reduction and subsequent sequestration of contaminant U(VI) via natural attenuation occurred in this NRZ. A combination of assorted solid phase species and an abundance of redox-sensitive constituents may slow U(IV) oxidation rates, effectively enhancing the stability of U(IV) sequestered via natural attenuation, impeding rapid U flushing, and turning NRZs into sinks and long-term, slow-release sources of U contamination to groundwater

  20. Río Tinto : A geochemical and mineralogical terrestrial analogue of Mars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amils, Ricardo; Fernández-Remolar, David; Parro, Victor; Rodríguez-Manfredi, José Antonio; Oggerin, Monike; Sánchez-Román, Mónica; López, Francisco J.; Fernández-Rodríguez, José Pablo; Puente-Sánchez, Fernando; Briones, Carlos; Prieto-Ballesteros, Olga; Tornos, Fernando; Gómez, Felipe; García-Villadangos, Miriam; Rodríguez, Nuria; Omoregie, Enoma; Timmis, Kenneth; Arce, Alejandro; Sanz, José Luis; Gómez-Ortiz, David

    2014-01-01

    The geomicrobiological characterization of the water column and sediments of Río Tinto (Huelva, Southwestern Spain) have proven the importance of the iron and the sulfur cycles, not only in generating the extreme conditions of the habitat (low pH, high concentration of toxic heavy metals), but also

  1. Geochemical and mineralogical study of a site severely polluted with heavy metals (Maatheide, Lommel, Belgium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horckmans, L.; Swennen, R.; Deckers, J.

    2006-07-01

    The former zinc smelter site ‘de Maatheide’ in Lommel (Belgium) was severely polluted with heavy metals and the pollution spread into the surroundings by rain water leaching and wind transportation. This study focuses on the processes of immobilization and natural attenuation that took place on the site. Three important factors were found. Firstly, the high pH values (pH 7-8) in the topsoil influence the mobility of heavy metals. Secondly, the spodic horizons below the polluted top layer seem to accumulate heavy metals, thereby slowing down their release into the environment. Finally, the glassy phases and iron oxi/hydroxides that are present can encapsulate heavy metals during their formation/recrystallization, thereby immobilizing them. An additional shielding effect results from the reaction rims of goethite around the contaminant phases, which partially inhibit the weathering process and release of contaminants. This shielding effect is an important factor to take into account when modelling contaminant release.

  2. The El Horror uranium anomaly in northeastern Sonora, Mexico: Constraints from geochemical and mineralogical approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grijalva-Rodríguez, T.; Valencia-Moreno, M.; Calmus, T.; Del Rio-Salas, R.; Balcázar-García, M.

    2017-12-01

    This work reviews the characteristics of the El Horror uranium prospect in northeastern Sonora, Mexico. It was formerly detected by a radiometric anomaly after airborne gamma ray exploration carried out in the 70's by the Mexican government. As a promising site to contain important uranium resources, the El Horror was re-evaluated by CFE (Federal Electricity Commission) by in situ gamma ray surveys. The study also incorporates rock and stream sediment ICP-MS geochemistry, X-ray diffraction, X-ray fluorescence, Raman spectrometry and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) to provide a better understanding of the radiometric anomaly. The results show that, instead of a single anomaly, it comprises at least five individual anomalies hosted in hydrothermally altered Laramide (80-40 Ma) andesitic volcanic rocks of the Tarahumara Formation. Concentrations for elemental uranium and uranium calculated from gamma ray surveys (i.e., equivalent uranium) are not spatially coincident within the anomaly, but, at least at some degree, they do so in specific sites. X-ray diffraction and Raman spectrometry revealed the presence of rutile/anatase, uvite, bukouvskyte and allanite as the more likely mineral phases to contain uranium. SEM studies revealed a process of iron-rich concretion formation, suggesting that uranium was initially incorporated to the system by adsorption, but was largely removed later during incorporation of Fe+3 ions. Stream sediment geochemistry reveals that the highest uranium concentrations are derived from the southern part of the Sierra La Madera batholith (∼63 Ma), and decrease toward the El Horror anomaly.

  3. Geochemical and mineralogical study of selected weathered samples from Olkiluoto site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindberg, A.

    2009-02-01

    Optical microscopy, chemical analyses and X-ray diffraction method were used to study the influence of weathering from 11 drill core samples from shallow depths (< 25 m). The samples, 4 to 22 cm in length were drilled from Olkiluoto study site, Eurajoki, and they represent the common rock types of local bedrock: mica gneiss, tonalitic and granodioritic gneiss. Two of the samples were macroscopically unweathered and 9 of them were remarkably altered. The alteration was shown as porosity, the abundance of chlorite instead of biotite and pink, unclear feldspars. Many samples also contained red-brown hematite and fractures, some of them coated with secondary minerals, even clay. Microscopically the most visible feature of weathering was the total alteration of plagioclase and cordierite to sericite. In many samples also biotite was richly altered to chlorite and opaque minerals. Microfractures were common and they were filled by hematite, kaolinite and fine-grained muscovite (sericite). Hematite was, in some cases, also largely replacing the weathered minerals, feldspars and cordierite. Chemical alteration was not clear, because the alteration of main minerals have produced secondary minerals with almost the same chemical composition without any reasonable depleting or enrichment of certain elements. X-ray diffraction determination of samples proved, that often plagioclase was replaced by mica and biotite by chlorite. In some cases the samples contained products of chemical weathering, kaolinite and smectite. (orig.)

  4. Mineralogical and Geochemical Characterization of the Kimmeria Intrusion-Related Deposit, Xanthi, NE Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodoridou, Stella; Melfos, Vasilios; Voudouris, Panagiotis; Miskovic, Aleksandar

    2016-04-01

    Although intrusion-related systems have not been previously recognized in the European segment of the Tethyan Metallogenic Belt, the Rhodope metallogenic province of SE Balkan peninsula hosts numerous such occurrences. The Kimmeria hydrothermal system incorporates two styles of ore mineralization: i) a massive Au-bearing magnetite-pyrrhotite skarn and ii) a Mo-Cu-Bi-W quartz vein-hosted mineralization, both of which are related to the Oligocene Xanthi pluton (25.5±1.2 to 30±1 My, K-Ar in hornblende and biotite). The Xanthi pluton, consisting of I-type gabbros, monzonites and amphibole-biotite granodiorites, intrudes the basement gneisses, mica schists, amphibolites and marbles of the Southern Rhodope Core Complex; a dome that has gradually exhumed from Paleocene/mid Eocene to Miocene (starting between 65 and >42 to 10 My). The Xanthi pluton emplacement and the magmatically derived hydrothermal fluid circulation were controlled by two major regional structures: the low-angle Kavala-Xanthi-Komotini detachment fault and the Nestos thrust fault. The Kimmeria Au-Cu-Fe skarn mineralization features a well-preserved aureole at the contact between the granodiorite and the surrounding marbles. It consists of two paragenetic stages comprising magnetite and pyrrhotite-rich assemblages. Alteration minerals comprise chlorite and sericite. Bulk chemical analyses of the skarn mineralization revealed relatively high concentration of Cu (1 wt.%), Pb (288 ppm) and Zn (0.74 wt.%). The mineralization is also enriched in As (molybdenite as dominant sulfides. Minor sphalerite, tetrahedrite-tennantite, galena and rutile are also present, while sericite and chlorite as the alteration minerals. The Cu and Mo content of the vein type mineralization exceed 1.0 and 0.2 wt.% respectively, along with < 2.7 ppm Au, 1.3 to 79.5 ppm W and 0.6 to 456 ppm Bi. A first approach fluid study has revealed small variations in δ34S values of sulfides (0 - 2.3 ‰ VCDT) from both types of mineralization suggesting a magmatic source of sulfur. Silicate δ18O values of quartz show a narrow range between 10.3 and 11.2 ‰ (VSMOW) suggesting similar quartz formation for both mineralization types, at relatively low temperatures and probably from the same fluid. Oxygen isotopes values in calcite from the unmineralized marbles and ore specimens are scattered over a wide range from 12.1 to 41.7 ‰ (V-SMOW). They have relatively low carbon isotopic values (-4.8 to 2.1 ‰ V-PDB), indicative of a magmatic δ13C signature and a restricted isotopic exchange with hydrothermal fluids. Primary fluid inclusion studies have revealed the presence of CO2 in the ore fluid, which might have played an important role during the ore genesis irrespective of the mineralization style. This work was financially supported by the Western Tethyan Metallogeny Project (MDRU - The University of British Columbia).

  5. Mineralogical and geochemical evidence for multi-stage formation of the Chertovo Koryto deposit

    OpenAIRE

    TARASOVA YULIA I.; SOTSKAYA OLGA T.; SKUZOVATOV SERGEI YU.; VANIN VADIM A.; KULIKOVA ZOYA I.; BUDYAK ALEKSANDER E.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. The Lena gold province is one of the largest known gold resources in the world. The history of its exploration is long, but the genesis of gold mineralization hosted in black shales in the Bodaibo synclinorium still remains unclear. The studies face the challenge of discovering sources for the useful component and mechanisms of its redistribution and concentration. This study aims to clarify the time sequence of the ore mineralization in the Chertovo Koryto deposit on the basis ...

  6. MINERALOGY AND GEOCHEMICAL PROPERTIES OF ISPIRTEPE (NİĞDE CARBONACEOU'S LEAD-ZINC DEPOSITS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Gürhan YALÇIN

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Aladag region had precipitated in Devonian Alt Creatse time interval in middle Taurus. This region had been tectonic events along with long durations. Because of ıt contains nappe structured allocton Yahyalı, Siyah Aladag, Minaretepler, Cataloturan, Beyaz Aladağ nappes and ophiolitic melange stocks in Aladağ region. Around Ispirtepe of Aladag region two types of mineralization had been found. First mineralization is seen in Mineratepe's stocks Upper Trias aged dolomitic limestone and Kretase aged ophiolitic melange intersection. Ore is seen by being fault filling through North and South directed faults. Second mineralization is structured as sulphide ore part which has been carried by morens to the area. The galenite blocks have been about one meter. There is a moren cover an ore blocks in northern part of mineralization in the area. Paragenesis has been found in ored-samples with respect to microscopic ore workings it is found that first ore minerals are galenite, sphalerite, pyrite, fahlerz (tetrahedrite, chalcopyrite and their alterational products which are smithsonite, gotite, malachite, seruzite, anglezite, lepidocrosite, gang mineralization of calsit, dolomite and quartz.

  7. Skeletal carbonate mineralogy of Scottish bryozoans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer Jones, Mary; Najorka, Jens; Smith, Abigail M.

    2018-01-01

    This paper describes the skeletal carbonate mineralogy of 156 bryozoan species collected from Scotland (sourced both from museum collections and from waters around Scotland) and collated from literature. This collection represents 79% of the species which inhabit Scottish waters and is a greater number and proportion of extant species than any previous regional study. The study is also of significance globally where the data augment the growing database of mineralogical analyses and offers first analyses for 26 genera and four families. Specimens were collated through a combination of field sampling and existing collections and were analysed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and micro-XRD to determine wt% MgCO3 in calcite and wt% aragonite. Species distribution data and phylogenetic organisation were applied to understand distributional, taxonomic and phylo-mineralogical patterns. Analysis of the skeletal composition of Scottish bryozoans shows that the group is statistically different from neighbouring Arctic fauna but features a range of mineralogy comparable to other temperate regions. As has been previously reported, cyclostomes feature low Mg in calcite and very little aragonite, whereas cheilostomes show much more variability, including bimineralic species. Scotland is a highly variable region, open to biological and environmental influx from all directions, and bryozoans exhibit this in the wide range of within-species mineralogical variability they present. This plasticity in skeletal composition may be driven by a combination of environmentally-induced phenotypic variation, or physiological factors. A flexible response to environment, as manifested in a wide range of skeletal mineralogy within a species, may be one characteristic of successful invasive bryozoans. PMID:29897916

  8. Geochemical of clay formations : study of Spanish clay REFERENCE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turrero, M. J.; Pena, J.

    2003-01-01

    Clay rocks are investigated in different international research programs in order to assess its feasibility for the disposal of high level radioactive wastes. This is because different sepcific aspects: they have low hydraulic conductivity (10''-11-10''-15 m/s), a high sorption capacity, self-sealing capacity of facults and discontinuities and mechanical resistance. Several research programs on clay formations are aimed to study the chemistry of the groundwater and the water-rock reactions that control it: e. g. Boom Clay (Mol, Belgium), Oxford Clay /Harwell, United Kingdom), Toarcian Clay (Tournemire, France), Palfris formation (Wellenberg, Switzerland), Opalinus Clay (Bure, France). Based on these studies, considerable progress in the development of techniques for hydrologic, geochemical and hydrogeochemical characterization of mudstones has been accomplished (e. g. Beaufais et al. 1994, De Windt el al. 1998. Thury and Bossart 1999, Sacchi and Michelot 2000) with important advances in the knowledge of geochemical process in these materials (e. g. Reeder et al. 1993, Baeyens and Brandbury 1994, Beaucaire et al. 2000, Pearson et al., 2003).Furtermore, geochemical modeling is commonly used to simulate the evolution of water chemistry and to understand quantitatively the processes controlling the groundwater chemistry (e. g. Pearson et al. 1998, Tempel and Harrison 2000, Arcos et al., 2001). The work presented here is part of a research program funded by Enresa in the context of its R and D program. It is focused on the characterization of a clay formation (reference Argillaceous Formation, RAF) located within the Duero Basin (north-centralSpain). The characterisation of th ephysical properties,, fluid composition, mineralogy, water-rock reaction processes, geochemical modelling and sorption properties of the clays from the mentioned wells is the main purpose of this work. (Author)

  9. Statistical interpretation of geochemical data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carambula, M.

    1990-01-01

    Statistical results have been obtained from a geochemical research from the following four aerial photographies Zapican, Carape, Las Canias, Alferez. They have been studied 3020 samples in total, to 22 chemical elements using plasma emission spectrometry methods.

  10. Sustainable rehabilitation of mining waste and acid mine drainage using geochemistry, mine type, mineralogy, texture, ore extraction and climate knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anawar, Hossain Md

    2015-08-01

    The oxidative dissolution of sulfidic minerals releases the extremely acidic leachate, sulfate and potentially toxic elements e.g., As, Ag, Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Ni, Pb, Sb, Th, U, Zn, etc. from different mine tailings and waste dumps. For the sustainable rehabilitation and disposal of mining waste, the sources and mechanisms of contaminant generation, fate and transport of contaminants should be clearly understood. Therefore, this study has provided a critical review on (1) recent insights in mechanisms of oxidation of sulfidic minerals, (2) environmental contamination by mining waste, and (3) remediation and rehabilitation techniques, and (4) then developed the GEMTEC conceptual model/guide [(bio)-geochemistry-mine type-mineralogy- geological texture-ore extraction process-climatic knowledge)] to provide the new scientific approach and knowledge for remediation of mining wastes and acid mine drainage. This study has suggested the pre-mining geological, geochemical, mineralogical and microtextural characterization of different mineral deposits, and post-mining studies of ore extraction processes, physical, geochemical, mineralogical and microbial reactions, natural attenuation and effect of climate change for sustainable rehabilitation of mining waste. All components of this model should be considered for effective and integrated management of mining waste and acid mine drainage. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Economy Profile of Argentina

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank Group

    2017-01-01

    Doing Business 2018 is the 15th in a series of annual reports investigating the regulations that enhance business activity and those that constrain it. This economy profile presents the Doing Business indicators for Argentina. Doing Business presents quantitative indicators on business regulation and the protection of property rights that can be compared across 190 economies; for 2018 Arge...

  12. Radiation vulcanization in Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferenaz, Guillermo W.; Smolko, Eduardo E.

    1999-01-01

    The possibilities of using in Argentina the radiation process to vulcanize natural latex are analyzed. Experimental studies to define the irradiation conditions have been carried out and the preliminary elaboration of an irradiation device that includes the chemical reactor has been started. (author)

  13. El IDRC en Argentina

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    comercio capaces de sostener el crecimiento y reducir la pobreza. ... Rosario, en Argentina, se ha convertido en un ejemplo internacional para la agricultura urbana gracias a la ... para evaluar los riesgos y beneficios de esta tecnología para ...

  14. Mineralogy and geochemistry of soils from glass houses and solariums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulgariu, Dumitru; Filipov, Feodor; Rusu, Constantin; Bulgariu, Laura

    2010-05-01

    The experimental studies have been performed on soil samples from Copou-Iaşi, Bacău and Bârlad (România) glass houses. We have specially follow the aspects concerning to the distribution of occurrence forms, composition and structure of mineral and organic components, and the genetic correlations between these in conditions of soils from glass houses, respectively. The results regarding the distribution tendencies on profile and the correlations between mineral and organic components of studied soils have been correlated with the results of microscopic, spectral (IR and Raman) and X-ray diffraction studies, and with the results of thermodynamic modelling of mineral equilibriums and dynamics of pedogenesis processes, in conditions of soils from glass houses. The utilization of intensive cultivation technologies of vegetables in glass houses determined the degradation of morphological, physical and chemical characteristics of soils, by fast evolution of salted processes (salinization and / or sodization), compaction, carbonatation, eluviation-illuviation, frangipane formation, stagnogleization, gleization, etc. Under these conditions, at depth of 30-40 cm is formed a compact and impenetrable horizon with frangipane characteristics, expresses more or less. The aspects about the formation of frangipane horizon in soils from glasshouses are not yet sufficiently know. Whatever of the formation processes, the frangipane horizons determined a sever segregation in pedo-geochemical evolution of soils from glasshouses, with very important consequences on the agrochemical quality of these soils. The soils from glass houses are characterized by a very large variability of mineralogy and chemistry, which are traduced by intense modifications of superior horizons, in many cases there are conditions for the apparition of new pedogenetic horizons through new-pedogenesis processes. Under these conditions the definition of some general characteristics of soils from glasshouses is

  15. Lateritinga project: a geochemical orientation study for Amazon lateritic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, M.L. da

    1990-01-01

    The aim of this project is the development of systematic geochemical orientation survey in lateritic weathered terrain, like those form Amazon Region. The main selected targets (sheets) are: Turiacu, Cajuapara and Serra dos Carajas, with 690 samples collected (soils and lateritic rocks). For the Aurizona-Serra do Pirocaua target (Turiacu sheet), within the purpose of this work, 49 samples were collected in a 100x 200m regular grid. From all samples the fraction minor than 200 mesh was taken to analyses (by XRF, AA, OES, ICP and fire assay) for SiO sub(2), Fe sub(2) O sub(3), TiO sub(2), P sub(2) O sub(5), Sr, Ba, Y, Nb, Zr, Ga, Sc, Ni, Co, Cr, Cu, Mn, V, As, Bi, Pt, Pd, Th, Au and REE, as well for their mineralogy by XRD. The chemical results were submitted to statistical treatment with the Geoquant-software for IBM-compatible microcomputer. (author)

  16. Geochemical exploration for uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rose, A.W.

    1977-01-01

    The processes and types of dispersion that produce anomalies in stream water, stream sediment, and ground water, and the factors that must be considered in planning and interpreting geochemical surveys are reviewed. Examples of surveys near known deposits show the types of results to be expected. Background values depend mainly on the content of U in rocks of the drainage area. In igneous rocks, U tends to increase with potassium from ultramafic rocks (0.01 ppM) to granitic rocks (1 to 5 ppM). Some alkalic rocks have unusually high contents of U (15 to 100 ppM). Uranium-rich provinces marked by igneous rocks unusually rich in U are recognized in several areas and appear to have a deep crustal or mantle origin. In western U.S., many tertiary tuffaceous rocks have a high U content. Sandstones, limestones, and many shales approximate the crustal abundance at 0.5 to 4 ppM, but black shales, phosphates, and some organic materials are notably enriched in U. Uranium is very soluble in most oxidizing waters at the earth's surface, but is precipitated by reducing agents (organic matter, H 2 S) and adsorbed by organic material and some Fe oxides. In most surface and ground waters, U correlates approximately with the total dissolved solids, conductivity, and bicarbonate concentration of the water, and with the U content of rocks it comes into contact with. Most surveys of stream water near known districts show distinct anomalies extending a few km to tens of km downstream. A complication with water is the large variability with time, up to x 50, as a result of changes in the ratio of ground water to direct runoff, and changes in rate of oxidation and leaching. Collection and analysis of water samples also pose some difficulties

  17. Mineralogical correlation of surficial sediment from area drainages with selected sedimentary interbeds at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartholomay, R.C.

    1990-08-01

    Ongoing research by the US Geological Survey at the INEL involves investigation of the migration of radioactive elements contained in low-level radioactive waste, hydrologic and geologic factors affecting waste movement, and geochemical factors that influence the chemical composition of the waste. Identification of the mineralogy of the Snake River Plain is needed to aid in the study of the hydrology and geochemistry of subsurface waste disposal. The US Geological Surveys project office at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, in cooperation with the US Department of Energy, used mineralogical data to correlate surficial sediment samples from the Big Lost River, Little Lost River, and Birch Greek drainages with selected sedimentary interbed core samples taken from test holes at the RWMC (Radioactive Waste Management Complex), TRA (Test Reactors Area), ICPP (Idaho Chemical Processing Plant), and TAN (Test Area North). Correlating the mineralogy of a particular present-day drainage area with a particular sedimentary interbed provides information on historical source of sediment for interbeds in and near the INEL. Mineralogical data indicate that surficial sediment samples from the Big Lost River drainage contained a larger amount of feldspar and pyroxene and a smaller amount of calcite and dolomite than samples from the Little Lost River and Birch Creek drainages. Mineralogical data from sedimentary interbeds at the RWMC, TRA, and ICPP correlate with surficial sediment of the present-day big Lost River drainage. Mineralogical data from a sedimentary interbed at TAN correlate with surficial sediment of the present-day Birch Creek drainage. 13 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Mineralogical correlation of surficial sediment from area drainages with selected sedimentary interbeds at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartholomay, R.C.

    1990-08-01

    Ongoing research by the US Geological Survey at the INEL involves investigation of the migration of radioactive elements contained in low-level radioactive waste, hydrologic and geologic factors affecting waste movement, and geochemical factors that influence the chemical composition of the waste. Identification of the mineralogy of the Snake River Plain is needed to aid in the study of the hydrology and geochemistry of subsurface waste disposal. The US Geological Surveys project office at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, in cooperation with the US Department of Energy, used mineralogical data to correlate surficial sediment samples from the Big Lost River, Little Lost River, and Birch Greek drainages with selected sedimentary interbed core samples taken from test holes at the RWMC (Radioactive Waste Management Complex), TRA (Test Reactors Area), ICPP (Idaho Chemical Processing Plant), and TAN (Test Area North). Correlating the mineralogy of a particular present-day drainage area with a particular sedimentary interbed provides information on historical source of sediment for interbeds in and near the INEL. Mineralogical data indicate that surficial sediment samples from the Big Lost River drainage contained a larger amount of feldspar and pyroxene and a smaller amount of calcite and dolomite than samples from the Little Lost River and Birch Creek drainages. Mineralogical data from sedimentary interbeds at the RWMC, TRA, and ICPP correlate with surficial sediment of the present-day big Lost River drainage. Mineralogical data from a sedimentary interbed at TAN correlate with surficial sediment of the present-day Birch Creek drainage. 13 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs

  19. Mineralogical and particulate morphological characterization of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Six representative geophagic clayey soils from Botswana were mineralogically characterized using X-ray powder diffractometry (XRPD), optical microscopy, and environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM). Results of identified mineral phases revealed quartz (SiO2) as the most dominant in all samples constituting ...

  20. Chemical and mineralogical characterization and ceramic suitability ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The chemical and mineralogical characterization of raw feldspathic materials from Dschang (Cameroon) was realized by means of X-ray diffraction, differential thermal analyses, optical and scanning electron microscopies, and analytical techniques. It was found that these materials consist of albite (43 ± 3 wt.%), microcline ...

  1. Mineralogical Studies Related to Endemic Diseases in Rural P. R. China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkin, H. E.; Zheng, B.; Finkelman, R. B.

    2003-12-01

    Domestic combustion of coal for heating and cooking is mostly confined to the world's developing countries and probably involves about 1 billion persons in China, India, Indonesia, and Africa. Various endemic diseases affecting millions of people involving arsenic, selenium, and fluorine poisoning have been associated with domestic coal combustion in rural China. We have investigated the relationship between mineralized coals (and stone coals) and disease occurrences in Guizhou and Hubei Provinces. The mineralogy of the coals has been studied by a wide variety of techniques, including optical petrography, scanning electron microscopy, electron microprobe analysis, ion probe, Synchrotron XANES-EXAFS, and Raman spectroscopy. Arsenic enrichment (up to 3 weight percent) in Upper Permian Longtan Formation coals, southwestern Guizhou Province, occurs in both 3+ and 5+ valence states. Arsenic occurs in arsenopyrite, pyrite, Al-phosphate, scorodite, Fe-oxides, and as an organically-bound species. Fluorine poisoning, much more widespread than arsenic-poisoning, is related to burning F-rich coals and F-rich clays as admixtures. Mineralogical and chemical analysis suggests that the clays contain the fluorine probably substituting for the hydroxyl group. Localized selenium poisoning in Hubei Province is related to Se-rich stone coals. The selenium occurs as a native element and in rare mandarinoite. In these three cases, knowledge of the paragenesis and mineralogy of the element enrichment in coal was vital to help understand and mitigate the endemic diseases. For the situation concerning arsenic and selenium poisoning, suspect coals have been identified and mining from these deposits has been curtailed. Fluorine has been a much more difficult problem for the local public health officials as both the coal and clay in the burning admixture can contain high fluorine. Regional geochemical and mineralogical studies will help to define coal and clay with low fluorine, suitable for

  2. Compilation of kinetic data for geochemical calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arthur, R.C.; Savage, D.; Sasamoto, Hiroshi; Shibata, Masahiro; Yui, Mikazu

    2000-01-01

    Kinetic data, including rate constants, reaction orders and activation energies, are compiled for 34 hydrolysis reactions involving feldspars, sheet silicates, zeolites, oxides, pyroxenes and amphiboles, and for similar reactions involving calcite and pyrite. The data are compatible with a rate law consistent with surface reaction control and transition-state theory, which is incorporated in the geochemical software package EQ3/6 and GWB. Kinetic data for the reactions noted above are strictly compatible with the transition-state rate law only under far-from-equilibrium conditions. It is possible that the data are conceptually consistent with this rate law under both far-from-equilibrium and near-to-equilibrium conditions, but this should be confirmed whenever possible through analysis of original experimental results. Due to limitations in the availability of kinetic data for mine-water reactions, and in order to simplify evaluations of geochemical models of groundwater evolution, it is convenient to assume local-equilibrium in such models whenever possible. To assess whether this assumption is reasonable, a modeling approach accounting for couple fluid flow and water-rock interaction is described that can be use to estimate spatial and temporal scale of local equilibrium. The approach is demonstrated for conditions involving groundwater flow in fractures at JNC's Kamaishi in-situ tests site, and is also used to estimate the travel time necessary for oxidizing surface waters to migrate to the level of a HLW repository in crystalline rock. The question of whether local equilibrium is a reasonable assumption must be addressed using an appropriate modeling approach. To be appropriate for conditions at the Kamaishi site using the modeling approach noted above, the fracture fill must closely approximate a porous mine, groundwater flow must be purely advective and diffusion of solutes across the fracture-host rock boundary must not occur. Moreover, the mineralogical and

  3. Petrologic and geochemical characterization of the Bullfrog Member of the Crater Flat Tuff: outcrop samples used in waste package experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knauss, K.G.

    1983-09-01

    In support of the Waste Package Task within the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigation (NNWSI), experiments on hydrothermal rock/water interaction, corrosion, thermomechanics, and geochemical modeling calculations are being conducted. All of these activities require characterization of the initial bulk composition, mineralogy, and individual phase geochemistry of the potential repository host rock. This report summarizes the characterization done on samples of the Bullfrog Member of the Crater Flat Tuff (Tcfb) used for Waste Package experimental programs. 11 references, 17 figures, 3 tables

  4. Las pizarras de la faja piritica Ibérica (zona sur-Portuguesa: geología, mineralogía y aplicaciones industriales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galán, E.

    1991-12-01

    Full Text Available The geochemical, mineralogical and petrographical features of slates from the Iberian Pyrite Belt (SW Spain are studied. On the basis of these data, the origin and metamorphic conditions undergone by these materials are discussed. Finally, the infiuence of mineralogical, textural and microstructural factors on their use as industrial rocks (roofing slates is estimated.Se describen las características geoquímicas, mineralógicas y petrográficas de los materiales pizarrosos de un sector de la Faja Pirítica y, en base a estos datos, se discuten sus condiciones de formación y evolución durante el metamorfismo. Finalmente, se analiza la incidencia de la mineralogía y de los factores texturales y microestructurales en la calidad de las pizarras como rocas industriales.

  5. Geochemical factors influencing vault design and layout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gascoyne, M.; Stroes-Gascoyne, S.; Sargent, F.P.

    1995-01-01

    The design and construction of a vault for used nuclear fuel in crystalline rock may be influenced by a number of geochemical factors. During the siting stage, information is needed regarding the rock type, heterogeneities in its composition and the mineralogy of permeable zones because these will cause variations in thermal conductivity, strength and radionuclide sorptive properties of the rock. These factors may affect decisions regarding depth of vault construction, tunnel dimensions and spacing of panels and waste containers. The decision on whether groundwaters are allowed to flow freely into a planned excavation may depend on measurements of their chemical compositions, microbiological contents and presence of hazardous or corrosive constituents. During site characterization, borehole drilling from the surface and subsequent hydraulic testing will introduce both chemical and microbiological contaminants that may further influence this decision. During vault construction, the geochemistry of the rock may cause changes to the characterization, design and construction of the vault. For example, high salinity fluids in micropores in the rock could prevent the use of radar surveys to detect fractures in the surrounding rock. High rock salinity may also cause unacceptably high total dissolved solids loadings in water discharged from the facility. Again, the presence of toxic, corrosive or radioactive constituents in inflowing groundwater may require grouting or, if inflow is needed for service operations, development of treatment facilities both above and below ground. In addition, the use of explosives will cause high organic and nitrate loadings in service water as well as the possible impregnation of these chemicals in the damaged wall-rock surrounding an excavation. These chemicals may remain despite cleaning efforts and act as nutrients to promote microbial activity in the post-closure phase. In the operational phase, further design and construction, changes

  6. Geochemical controls on shale groundwaters: Results of reaction path modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Von Damm, K.L.; VandenBrook, A.J.

    1989-03-01

    The EQ3NR/EQ6 geochemical modeling code was used to simulate the reaction of several shale mineralogies with different groundwater compositions in order to elucidate changes that may occur in both the groundwater compositions, and rock mineralogies and compositions under conditions which may be encountered in a high-level radioactive waste repository. Shales with primarily illitic or smectitic compositions were the focus of this study. The reactions were run at the ambient temperatures of the groundwaters and to temperatures as high as 250/degree/C, the approximate temperature maximum expected in a repository. All modeling assumed that equilibrium was achieved and treated the rock and water assemblage as a closed system. Graphite was used as a proxy mineral for organic matter in the shales. The results show that the presence of even a very small amount of reducing mineral has a large influence on the redox state of the groundwaters, and that either pyrite or graphite provides essentially the same results, with slight differences in dissolved C, Fe and S concentrations. The thermodynamic data base is inadequate at the present time to fully evaluate the speciation of dissolved carbon, due to the paucity of thermodynamic data for organic compounds. In the illitic cases the groundwaters resulting from interaction at elevated temperatures are acid, while the smectitic cases remain alkaline, although the final equilibrium mineral assemblages are quite similar. 10 refs., 8 figs., 15 tabs

  7. Geochemical Characterization of Copper Tailings after Legume Revegetation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justine Perry T. Domingo

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge on the geochemistry of mine tailings is important in understanding the challenges in establishing vegetation cover on tailings dumps and mined out areas. In this study, the mineralogy and trace element composition of copper tailings were examined. Two legume species, Calopogonium mucunoides and Centrosema molle, were utilized to investigate the possible effects of these plants in the geochemical development of mine tailings into soil-like material. The initial mineralogical and chemical analysis of the tailings samples indicated poor conditions for plant growth—minimal levels of major nutrients and organic matter as well as elevated copper concentrations. Despite these conditions, the two legume species exhibited good growth rates. Both legumes have likewise signif icantly reduced heavy metal concentrations in the tailings, indicating the possibility of metal hyperaccumulation in the plant tissue. The mineral composition has been retained even after revegetation; nevertheless, breakdown of primary minerals and subsequent formation of clay minerals were detected. These results provide insights on the transformation of toxic materials into habitable substrates for sustained plant growth.

  8. The interpretation of geochemical logs from the oceanic basement: mineral modelling in Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Hole 735B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harvey, P.K.; Lovell, M.A.; Bristow, J.F.

    1991-01-01

    Leg 118 of the Ocean Drilling Program was carried out in the vicinity of the Southwest Indian Ridge. Of the boreholes drilled, by far the most important and scientifically spectacular is Hole 735B which was located on a shallow platform adjacent to the Atlantis II Transform. This hole penetrates some 500 m of gabbroic rocks representing Layer 3 of the oceanic crust. The recovered gabbros show considerable variation both in mineralogy and in the degree of deformation. Core recovery averages 87% and there is excellent control and correlation between the core and the wide range of logs obtained. Mineralogy logs are derived and presented using both core sample data and downhole geochemical logs for Hole 735B. The problems of transforming these data for the particular mineralogy encountered are discussed. (Author)

  9. Geochemical computer codes. A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, K.

    1987-01-01

    In this report a review of available codes is performed and some code intercomparisons are also discussed. The number of codes treating natural waters (groundwater, lake water, sea water) is large. Most geochemical computer codes treat equilibrium conditions, although some codes with kinetic capability are available. A geochemical equilibrium model consists of a computer code, solving a set of equations by some numerical method and a data base, consisting of thermodynamic data required for the calculations. There are some codes which treat coupled geochemical and transport modeling. Some of these codes solve the equilibrium and transport equations simultaneously while other solve the equations separately from each other. The coupled codes require a large computer capacity and have thus as yet limited use. Three code intercomparisons have been found in literature. It may be concluded that there are many codes available for geochemical calculations but most of them require a user that us quite familiar with the code. The user also has to know the geochemical system in order to judge the reliability of the results. A high quality data base is necessary to obtain a reliable result. The best results may be expected for the major species of natural waters. For more complicated problems, including trace elements, precipitation/dissolution, adsorption, etc., the results seem to be less reliable. (With 44 refs.) (author)

  10. Argentina set for privatization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chynoweth, E.

    1992-01-01

    Buyers are lining up for Argentina's two big state-controlled petrochemical groups, Buenos Aires-based Petroquimica General Mosconi (PGM) and Petroquimica Bahia Blance (PBB). However, feedstock supply contracts with government-owned oil group Yacientos Petroliferos Fiscales (YPG) and gas group Gas del Estado hold the key to both sales. Shell Compania Argentina Petroleo SA (CAPSA), Perez Companc, and Global Petroleum have already bought PGM tender documentation. Shell says it will bid for PGM if the feedstock contract with YPF is acceptable. In addition to price and volume, Shell says the length is critical; it wants a 15-year deal, but would settle for 11. YPF initially sought a five-year contract. PGM, which produces 300,000 m.t./year of aromatics, plus oxo alcohols, methanol, and methyl tert-butyl ether, has sales of $150 million/year

  11. Crisis cambiaria en Argentina

    OpenAIRE

    Féliz, Mariano

    2009-01-01

    El análisis de la articulación entre el proceso de valorización exitosa de capital y la tendencia a la desvalorización de las mercancías se aplica a una de las manifestaciones de la crisis argentina: la devaluación del peso. Se estudia la relación entre la determinación del tipo de cambio y la valorización del capital. Se discuten las tendencias concretas de la economía argentina en la década de 1990 y se muestra cómo la devaluación de 2001-2002 fue producto necesario del propio proceso de va...

  12. Fruit fly eradication: Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    Fruit exports account for 9% of Argentina's total agricultural exports and generate annually close to $450 million. This could be increased but for fruit flies that cause damage equivalent to 15% to 20% of present production value of fruit and also deny export access to countries imposing quarantine barriers. The Department of Technical Co-operation is sponsoring a programme, with technical support from the Joint FAO/IAEA Division, to eradicate the Mediterranean fruit fly using the Sterile Insect Technique (SIT). (IAEA)

  13. de la sociedad argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Galeano

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo trata sobre un período de la historia argentina en el cual la "mirada médica", a través de un grupo de prestigiosos intelectuales, se convirtió en una clave de interpretación de la sociedad argentina. El análisis gira en torno a la obra de uno de los médicos higienistas más influyentes, José María Ramos Mejía, deteniéndose especialmente en su libro más famoso: Las multitudes argentinas (1899. La hipótesis principal que recorre el texto es la siguiente: la medicalización de la sociedad, acentuada luego de las epidemias de cólera y fiebre amarilla de mediados del siglo XIX, ofreció a las elites públicas la posibilidad de construir dominios legítimos de intervención estatal. Intromisiones del Estado en la vida privada que, además de ser algo resistidas por la población, entraban en tensión con los principios teóricos del liberalismo que los propios miembros de la elite defendían.

  14. Characterization of agua de Ramon marbles, Cordoba Province, Argentina; Caracterizacion de los marmoles de agua de Ramon Provincia de Cordoba, Argentina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tourn, S; Castro, L. [Departamento de Ciencias Geologicas, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de buenos Aires, (Argentina)]. E mail: selvia@fcen.uba.ar, lilianacastro@fibertel.com.ar

    2004-09-01

    Agua de Ramon district is located in the NW of Cordoba, Argentina, between 3 49' and 30{sup 0}52' S and 65{sup 0}21' and 65{sup 0}24' W, in the Eastern Pampean Range setting. It was a very important tungsten district until the end of 1950'decade when tungsten mining became of no economic interest. The objective is to report for the first time the petrological, mineralogical and geochemical characteristics of several marble lenses located in the sourthern of the area. Marble outcrops are lenticular ranging from 1 m to 80 m in length and 0.50 m to 20 m width. They appear massive, fine-grained and in light colors (white, pale green, very light brown and pale gray). These last varieties show a distinct banded structure due to little differences in color. These marbles are mainly composed of magnesian calcite accompanied by minor amounts of dolomite, forsterite, humite group minerals, tremolite, talc, serpentine and clinochlore, and scheelite, sphene, apatite and opaque minerals like hematite, magnetite, illmenite, pirrothite and pyrite as accessory minerals. Major chemical analyses indicate a relatively high SiO2 and MgO content, and minor CaO, in comparison with marbles of this type. Mineral paragenesis was useful to evaluate metamorphism conditions in this area. [Spanish] El distrito Agua de Ramon se localiza en el departamento de Minas al noroeste de la provincia de Cordoba, Argentina, entre los paralelos 30{sup 0}49' y 30{sup 0}52' de latitud sur y los meridianos 65{sup 0}21' y 65{sup 0}24' de longitud oeste, en el ambito de las Sierras Pampeanas Orientales. En el pasado constituyo un importante distrito de explotacion wolframifera, pero dicha actividad se halla paralizada desde fines de la decada del '50. El objetivo de este trabajo es hacer conocer por primera vez las caracteristicas de los marmoles localizados en el sector sur desde el punto de vista petrografico, mineralogico y geoquimico de manera que permita realizar un analisis petrogenetico. Los cuerpos son

  15. Geochemical behaviour of uranium in the cycle of alteration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chervet, J.; Coulomb, R.

    1958-01-01

    The investigation of the genesis of secondary mineralized accumulations, and the prospecting of deposits from microchemical anomalies in the surface material, is requiring a well-developed knowledge of the geochemical properties of the uranium during the alteration phase. In the present work, the authors tried to track the uranium history during a part of his natural creeping. a) They describe some most typical mineralogical observations of alteration phenomena and material migration, picked up in place on the deposits. b) They give experimental results concerning the solubilities of the uranium minerals and the factors affecting this solubility. c) They study the water circulation in granitic batholites, and the influence of the occurrence of the uranium deposits on their composition. d) They observe the amplitude of phenomena restricting the dispersions: fixations, precipitations, etc., and the behaviour of growth in uraniferous areas. e) Finally, the opposition chemical alteration-radioactive equilibrium results in an important imbalance in altered materials. The authors tried to use the measurement of this imbalance to explain geochemical processes. (author) [fr

  16. Mineralogy, early marine diagenesis, and the chemistry of shallow-water carbonate sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, J. A.; Blättler, C. L.; Lundstrom, E. A.; Santiago-Ramos, D. P.; Akhtar, A. A.; Crüger Ahm, A.-S.; Bialik, O.; Holmden, C.; Bradbury, H.; Murray, S. T.; Swart, P. K.

    2018-01-01

    Shallow-water carbonate sediments constitute the bulk of sedimentary carbonates in the geologic record and are widely used archives of Earth's chemical and climatic history. One of the main limitations in interpreting the geochemistry of ancient carbonate sediments is the potential for post-depositional diagenetic alteration. In this study, we use paired measurements of calcium (44Ca/40Ca or δ44Ca) and magnesium (26Mg/24Mg or δ26Mg) isotope ratios in sedimentary carbonates and associated pore-fluids as a tool to understand the mineralogical and diagenetic history of Neogene shallow-water carbonate sediments from the Bahamas and southwest Australia. We find that the Ca and Mg isotopic composition of bulk carbonate sediments at these sites exhibits systematic stratigraphic variability that is related to both mineralogy and early marine diagenesis. The observed variability in bulk sediment Ca isotopes is best explained by changes in the extent and style of early marine diagenesis from one where the composition of the diagenetic carbonate mineral is determined by the chemistry of the fluid (fluid-buffered) to one where the composition of the diagenetic carbonate mineral is determined by the chemistry of the precursor sediment (sediment-buffered). Our results indicate that this process, together with variations in carbonate mineralogy (aragonite, calcite, and dolomite), plays a fundamental and underappreciated role in determining the regional and global stratigraphic expressions of geochemical tracers (δ13C, δ18O, major, minor, and trace elements) in shallow-water carbonate sediments in the geologic record. Our results also provide evidence that a large shallow-water carbonate sink that is enriched in 44Ca can explain the mismatch between the δ44/40Ca value of rivers and deep-sea carbonate sediments and call into question the hypothesis that the δ44/40Ca value of seawater depends on the mineralogy of primary carbonate precipitations (e.g. 'aragonite seas' and

  17. Subsurface variations in arsenic mineralogy and geochemistry following long-term weathering of gold mine tailings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeSisto, Stephanie L.; Jamieson, Heather E.; Parsons, Michael B.

    2016-01-01

    Variations in arsenic (As) mineralogy and geochemical controls on its mobility were evaluated in subsurface tailings at the historical Montague and Goldenville mine sites in Nova Scotia, Canada. Tailings at these sites contain some of the highest As concentrations in Nova Scotia and are located in close proximity to local communities. Pore water in the subsurface tailings is characterized by circumneutral to alkaline pH (6.2 to 8.7) and mildly reducing to oxidizing redox conditions (+130 mV to +347 mV). Bulk chemistry, scanning electron microscopy, and synchrotron micro-X-ray diffraction analyses showed As mineral hosts differ with depth. The deepest tailings (max. 2 m) are in direct contact with partially decomposed vegetation, which supports reducing conditions and the precipitation of authigenic As and Fe sulfides. Under reducing conditions, dissolved As concentrations are also controlled by desorption of As from dissolution of Fe and Mn oxides and the sorption or co-precipitation of As with carbonates. These geochemical controls differ from those influencing dissolved As concentrations under oxidizing conditions. In the near surface, As mobility is controlled by oxidative dissolution of primary arsenopyrite, precipitation of secondary Fe arsenates, Fe oxyhydroxides and Mn oxides, secondary Ca-Fe arsenates, and sorption onto Fe oxyhydroxides and gangue minerals. Some of these mineral species are stable under different conditions yet occur in close association, indicating the importance of microenvironments. The results of this study show that the weathering characteristics of these tailings vary with depth, leading to the formation of new As hosts that are distinct from those observed in the near surface. Identification of these As hosts provides an understanding of current controls on As mobility and has implications for future reprocessing and/or remediation efforts. - Highlights: • Subsurface mineralogy does not reflect surface tailings end

  18. Mineralogical characterization of uranium yellow cake concentrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hausen, D.M.

    1992-01-01

    Uranium yellow cake concentrates have been analyzed and characterized mineralogically by means of differential thermal analysis, X-ray diffraction, infrared spectra and wet chemical methods. On the basis of mineralogical methods of characterization, the following four major structural types of yellow cake may be classified: Uranyl Hydroxide Hydrate, UO 2 (OH) 2 nH 2 O; Basic Uranyl Sulfate Hydrate, (UO 2 ) x (SO 4 ) y (OH) s(x-y ).nH 2 O; Sodium Para-Uranate, Na 5 U 7 O 24 and Uranyl Peroxide Hydrate, UO 4 .nH 2 O. In this paper conditions of yellow cake preparation and characterization are described, along with discussion of significance of structural types to the physical and chemical properties of yellow cake production

  19. Mineralogical characterization of West Chestnut Ridge soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.Y.; Kopp, O.C.; Lietzke, D.A.

    1984-12-01

    The morphological, physicochemical, and mineralogical properties of the soils and residua from the proposed site of the Central Waste Disposal Facility were characterized. The proposed site is underlain by cherty dolostones, limestones, and shales of the Knox Group covered by a thick residuum. Three diagnostic horizons from four soil profiles and six samples from residuum cores were selected for mineralogical analysis. The coarse fractions (gravel and sand) of the samples included different types of chert, iron-manganese oxide nodules, and quartz. The samples were high in clay content (except those from the A and E horizons) and low in pH and base saturation. The clay fractions were composed of varying amounts of kaolinite, mica, vermiculite, aluminum hydroxy-interlayered vermiculite, amorphous iron and aluminum oxides, gibbsite, and quartz. Aluminum hydroxy-interlayered vermiculite is the major component in surface horizons, but kaolinite becomes dominant in subsurface horizons of the soils. Degradation of kaolinite and formation of aluminum hydroxy-interlayered vermiculite and iron and aluminum oxides are pronounced chemical weathering processes in the surface soils. The aluminum hydroxy interlayering of vermiculite reduces cation exchange and selective sorption capacities of soils. In the residua, micaceous minerals free of aluminum hydroxy interlayering, kaolinite, and amorphous iron and aluminum oxides are major components in the clay fraction. The sorption ratios of 137 Cs, 90 Sr, 60 Co, and the uranium isotopes expected to be in the radioactive wastes should be very high for the clays having such mineralogical composition. The low acid-buffering capacity (base saturation) of the residua suggest that the fragile chemical and mineralogical equilibria can be easily broken if an extreme chemical condition is imposed on the residua

  20. Geochemical modeling of uranium mill tailings: a case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, S.R.; Felmy, A.R.; Serne, R.J.; Gee, G.W.

    1983-08-01

    Liner failure was not found to be a problem when various acidic tailings solutions leached through liner materials for periods up to 3 y. On the contrary, materials that contained over 30% clay showed a decrease in permeability with time in the laboratory columns. The decreases in permeability noted above are attributed to pore plugging resulting from the precipitation of minerals and solids. This precipitation takes place due to the increase in pH of the tailings solution brought about by the buffering capacity of the soil. Geochemical modeling predicts, and x-ray characterization confirms, that precipitation of solids from solution is occurring in the acidic tailings solution/liner interactions studied. X-ray diffraction identified gypsum and alunite group minerals, such as jarosite, as having precipitated after acidic tailings solutions reacted with clay liners. The geochemical modeling and experimental work described above were used to construct an equilibrium conceptual model consisting of minerals and solid phases. This model was developed to represent a soil column. A computer program was used as a tool to solve the system of mathematical equations imposed by the conceptual chemical model. The combined conceptual model and computer program were used to predict aqueous phase compositions of effluent solutions from permeability cells packed with geologic materials and percolated with uranium mill tailings solutions. An initial conclusion drawn from these studies is that the laboratory experiments and geochemical modeling predictions were capable of simulating field observations. The same mineralogical changes and contaminant reductions observed in the laboratory studies were found at a drained evaporation pond (Lucky Mc in Wyoming) with a 10-year history of acid attack. 24 references, 5 figures 5 tables

  1. Argentina: a mature urbanization pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rofman, A B

    1985-02-01

    "This article describes the historical development of Argentina's cities, pointing out the traditional dominance of the 'centre-litoral' region and...[of] Buenos Aires. Recent trends such as the population increase in the southern region are described and demographic trends are related to economic developments. The article concludes by examining Argentina's contemporary urban patterns, including the current low rate of urbanization." excerpt

  2. Argentina's radioactive waste disposal policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palacios, E.

    1986-01-01

    The Argentina policy for radioactive waste disposal from nuclear facilities is presented. The radioactive wastes are treated and disposed in confinement systems which ensure the isolation of the radionucles for an appropriate period. The safety criteria adopted by Argentina Authorities in case of the release of radioactive materials under normal conditions and in case of accidents are analysed. (M.C.K.) [pt

  3. Mineralogical Diversity and Geology of Humboldt Crater Derived Using Moon Mineralogy Mapper Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinot, M.; Besse, S.; Flahaut, J.; Quantin-Nataf, C.; Lozac'h, L.; van Westrenen, W.

    2018-02-01

    Moon Mineralogy Mapper (M3) spectroscopic data and high-resolution imagery data sets were used to study the mineralogy and geology of the 207 km diameter Humboldt crater. Analyses of M3 data, using a custom-made method for M3 spectra continuum removal and spectral parameters calculation, reveal multiple pure crystalline plagioclase detections within the Humboldt crater central peak complex, hinting at its crustal origin. However, olivine, spinel, and glass are observed in the crater walls and rims, suggesting these minerals derive from shallower levels than the plagioclase of the central peak complex. High-calcium pyroxenes are detected in association with volcanic deposits emplaced on the crater's floor. Geologic mapping was performed, and the age of Humboldt crater's units was estimated from crater counts. Results suggest that volcanic activity within this floor-fractured crater spanned over a billion years. The felsic mineralogy of the central peak complex region, which presumably excavated deeper material, and the shallow mafic minerals (olivine and spinel) detected in Humboldt crater walls and rim are not in accordance with the general view of the structure of the lunar crust. Our observations can be explained by the presence of a mafic pluton emplaced in the anorthositic crust prior to the Humboldt-forming impact event. Alternatively, the excavation of Australe basin ejecta could explain the observed mineralogical detections. This highlights the importance of detailed combined mineralogical and geological remote sensing studies to assess the heterogeneity of the lunar crust.

  4. Mineralogical Diversity and Geology of Humboldt Crater Derived Using Moon Mineralogy Mapper Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinot, M; Besse, S; Flahaut, J; Quantin-Nataf, C; Lozac'h, L; van Westrenen, W

    2018-02-01

    Moon Mineralogy Mapper (M 3 ) spectroscopic data and high-resolution imagery data sets were used to study the mineralogy and geology of the 207 km diameter Humboldt crater. Analyses of M 3 data, using a custom-made method for M 3 spectra continuum removal and spectral parameters calculation, reveal multiple pure crystalline plagioclase detections within the Humboldt crater central peak complex, hinting at its crustal origin. However, olivine, spinel, and glass are observed in the crater walls and rims, suggesting these minerals derive from shallower levels than the plagioclase of the central peak complex. High-calcium pyroxenes are detected in association with volcanic deposits emplaced on the crater's floor. Geologic mapping was performed, and the age of Humboldt crater's units was estimated from crater counts. Results suggest that volcanic activity within this floor-fractured crater spanned over a billion years. The felsic mineralogy of the central peak complex region, which presumably excavated deeper material, and the shallow mafic minerals (olivine and spinel) detected in Humboldt crater walls and rim are not in accordance with the general view of the structure of the lunar crust. Our observations can be explained by the presence of a mafic pluton emplaced in the anorthositic crust prior to the Humboldt-forming impact event. Alternatively, the excavation of Australe basin ejecta could explain the observed mineralogical detections. This highlights the importance of detailed combined mineralogical and geological remote sensing studies to assess the heterogeneity of the lunar crust.

  5. NOAA and MMS Marine Minerals Geochemical Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Marine Minerals Geochemical Database was created by NGDC as a part of a project to construct a comprehensive computerized bibliography and geochemical database...

  6. Oak Ridge Geochemical Reconnaissance Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arendt, J.W.

    1977-03-01

    The Oak Ridge reconnaissance program is responsible for the geochemical survey in a 12-state area covering Texas, Oklahoma, Kansas, Nebraska, South Dakota, North Dakota, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Michigan, Iowa, Indiana, and Illinois as part of the National Uranium Resource Evaluation Program. The program concept is outlined and the planning and organization of the program is discussed

  7. Granite-repository - geochemical environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-04-01

    Some geochemical data of importance for a radioactive waste repository in hard rock are reviewed. The ground water composition at depth is assessed. The ground water chemistry in the vicinity of uranium ores is discussed. The redox system in Swedish bedrock is described. Influences of extreme climatic changes and of repository mining and construction are also evaluated

  8. Mineralogy of soils from two continental-scale transects across the United States and Canada and its relation to soil geochemistry and climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberl, D.D.; Smith, D.B.

    2009-01-01

    Quantitative mineralogy correlates with major-, minor- and trace-element chemistry for 387 samples of A-horizon and deeper soils collected from east-west and north-south transects across the USA and Canada, where the deeper soils were collected beneath the A-horizon samples. Concentrations of the major elements correlate with specific mineral phases. Minor- and trace-element concentrations correlate with the same phases as the major elements with which they share similar geochemical behavior. Concentrations of quartz and feldspar correlate with precipitation trends east of the Rocky Mountains, and are independent of the underlying rock type and age, indicating that the weathering of soils in this region may have reached a steady-state mineralogy. Other trends in mineralogy relate to physiographic province. The combination of quantitative mineralogy and chemical analysis yields a much richer portrait of soils than can be gained from chemistry alone, because the origins of chemical trends and the chemical availability of specific elements are related to mineralogy.

  9. RERTR activities in Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adelfang, P.; Alvarez, L.; Pasqualini, E.

    2002-01-01

    The Atomic Energy Commission of Argentina has been an active participant of the RERTR program since 1978. An important milestone of the Argentinean RERTR program was the development and manufacturing at industrial scale of U 3 O 8 dispersed fuel and its subsequent application to the conversion of the RA-3 reactor core to LEU fuel. More recently, our activities were focused on the development of U 3 Si 2 fuel with a density of 4.8 gU/cm 3 and the improvement of the manufacturing process of this type of fuel. The program to qualify CNEA as a supplier U 3 Si 2 dispersed fuels is scheduled to finalize by mid 2003. To hasten this program the main research reactor of Argentina, the RA3, raised its power from 5 MW to 8 Mw in October this year. This is an intermediate step in the program to increase RA-3 power to 10 MW Currently, one of the main objectives is to develop and qualify the technology for the production of high-density LEU fuel elements using U-Mo alloy. An original way to produce U-Mo powder (the HMD process) was developed and its being upgraded to plant scale production. Another significant progress was the development of LEU targets for the production of 99 Mo, in the form of miniplates prepared with dispersed LEU U-Al x . The shipment to USA of 207 MTR spent fuels containing US origin highly enriched uranium, successfully carried out in the end of 2000, is another remarkable achievement of the Argentinean RERTR program. This activity was carried out in the framework of the United States Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel Acceptance Program. The fuels were fabricated in Argentina and used in the RA-3 reactor from 1968 to 1987. The inventory of the shipped HEU spent fuel consisted in 166 standard assemblies and 41 control assemblies. (author)

  10. Case study - Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz, E.

    1986-01-01

    Antecedents and experience of nuclear activities in Argentina; the Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA). First development and research activities. Research reactors and radioisotopes plants. Health physics and safety regulations. - Feasibility studies for the first nuclear power plant. Awarding the first plant CNA I (Atucha I). Relevant data related to the different project stages. Plant performance. - Feasibility study for the second nuclear power plant. Awarding the second plant CNE (Central Nuclear Embalse). Relevant data related to established targets. Differences compared with the first station targets. Local participation. Plant performance. (orig./GL)

  11. Field-based tests of geochemical modeling codes: New Zealand hydrothermal systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruton, C.J.; Glassley, W.E.; Bourcier, W.L.

    1993-12-01

    Hydrothermal systems in the Taupo Volcanic Zone, North Island, New Zealand are being used as field-based modeling exercises for the EQ3/6 geochemical modeling code package. Comparisons of the observed state and evolution of the hydrothermal systems with predictions of fluid-solid equilibria made using geochemical modeling codes will determine how the codes can be used to predict the chemical and mineralogical response of the environment to nuclear waste emplacement. Field-based exercises allow us to test the models on time scales unattainable in the laboratory. Preliminary predictions of mineral assemblages in equilibrium with fluids sampled from wells in the Wairakei and Kawerau geothermal field suggest that affinity-temperature diagrams must be used in conjunction with EQ6 to minimize the effect of uncertainties in thermodynamic and kinetic data on code predictions

  12. Field-based tests of geochemical modeling codes usign New Zealand hydrothermal systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruton, C.J.; Glassley, W.E.; Bourcier, W.L.

    1994-06-01

    Hydrothermal systems in the Taupo Volcanic Zone, North Island, New Zealand are being used as field-based modeling exercises for the EQ3/6 geochemical modeling code package. Comparisons of the observed state and evolution of the hydrothermal systems with predictions of fluid-solid equilibria made using geochemical modeling codes will determine how the codes can be used to predict the chemical and mineralogical response of the environment to nuclear waste emplacement. Field-based exercises allow us to test the models on time scales unattainable in the laboratory. Preliminary predictions of mineral assemblages in equilibrium with fluids sampled from wells in the Wairakei and Kawerau geothermal field suggest that affinity-temperature diagrams must be used in conjunction with EQ6 to minimize the effect of uncertainties in thermodynamic and kinetic data on code predictions

  13. Geochemical modelling of CO2-water-rock interactions for carbon storage : data requirements and outputs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirste, D.

    2008-01-01

    A geochemical model was used to predict the short-term and long-term behaviour of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ), formation water, and reservoir mineralogy at a carbon sequestration site. Data requirements for the geochemical model included detailed mineral petrography; formation water chemistry; thermodynamic and kinetic data for mineral phases; and rock and reservoir physical characteristics. The model was used to determine the types of outputs expected for potential CO 2 storage sites and natural analogues. Reaction path modelling was conducted to determine the total reactivity or CO 2 storage capability of the rock by applying static equilibrium and kinetic simulations. Potential product phases were identified using the modelling technique, which also enabled the identification of the chemical evolution of the system. Results of the modelling study demonstrated that changes in porosity and permeability over time should be considered during the site selection process.

  14. Estimation of erosion amount by geochemical characteristic in the Horonobe area, northern Hokkaido

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Kazuharu; Niizato, Tadafumi; Yasue, Ken-ichi; Ishii, Eiichi

    2005-08-01

    This article presents the results of the estimated amount of erosion and uplifting based on mineralogy and organic geochemical characters of the Neogene siliceous rock (Wakkanai and Koetoi Formations) in Horonobe. As a result of the transformational change of silica minerals, it was clarified that the erosion amount was about 0.66 [m ky -1 ] or more at the large uplift site, and about 0.21 [m ky -1 ] or more at the small uplift site at Hokushin region, Horonobe area. In this case of the correlation with the palaeo-geothermal temperature and the sterane/sterene ratio, the ratio is effective measure to estimate the burial depth and erosion amount. We think that the estimation of the amount of erosion and uplifting became possible in high resolution by the organic geochemical character. (author)

  15. The lateritic profile of Balkouin, Burkina Faso: Geochemistry, mineralogy and genesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giorgis, Ilaria; Bonetto, Sabrina; Giustetto, Roberto; Lawane, Abdou; Pantet, Anne; Rossetti, Piergiorgio; Thomassin, Jean-Hugues; Vinai, Raffaele

    2014-02-01

    This study reports on the geochemical and mineralogical characterization of a lateritic profile cropping out in the Balkouin area, Central Burkina Faso, aimed at obtaining a better understanding of the processes responsible for the formation of the laterite itself and the constraints to its development. The lateritic profile rests on a Paleoproterozoic basement mostly composed of granodioritic rocks related to the Eburnean magmatic cycle passing upwards to saprolite and consists of four main composite horizons (bottom to top): kaolinite and clay-rich horizons, mottled laterite and iron-rich duricrust. In order to achieve such a goal, a multi-disciplinary analytical approach was adopted, which includes inductively coupled plasma (ICP) atomic emission and mass spectrometries (ICP-AES and ICP-MS respectively), X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD), scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive spectrometry (SEM-EDS) and micro-Raman spectroscopy.

  16. Petrographic and mineralogical features of the uraniferous pink granites in the north eastern desert of egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atawiya, M.Y.; Salman, A.B.; El-Bayyomi, R.M.

    1998-01-01

    The present work is concerned with the petrological, mineralogical and geochemical studies of some uranium bearing younger granites in the north eastern desert of egypt particularly Gebel Gattar area. The area around Gebel Gattar comprises the following rock units (starting from the oldest): meta volcanic, diorite-grano-diorite complex- Dokhan volcanics- Hammamat sediments, younger granites and dykes. The most significant structural features are represented by NNE-ENE dominantly trending faults and joints. Petrographicaly, the pink granites are divided into normal and mineralized (uraniferous) granites. Normal granites are classified into three types; a) leucocratic perthitic granite, b) hornblende- biotite perthitic granite and c) two feldspars perthitic granite. Mineralized granites are sheared, deformed, pinkish brown in colour and strongly altered. A remarkable secondary uranium mineralization has been recorded along fault and fracture zones

  17. Mineralogy and crystal chemistry of iron in the Timan bauxite and products of their technological processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotova, O.; Silaev, V.; Lutoev, V.; Vakhrushev, A.

    2016-04-01

    Mineralogical and geochemical features of two series of samples of typical bauxites from two deposits of Middle Timan mining area (Vezhayu-Vorykva and Svetlinskoe) were studied. The phase composition of ferrous bauxites generally is boehmite, hematite, ultradisperse low-ordered goethite and berthierine. In a boehmite and kaolinite structural impurity of iron to 10%, and in the iron oxidehydroxides aluminum impurity is revealed. On iron content bauxites are subdivided into three mineral types for which quantitative data on valence states of ions of iron and proportions of their distribution last on nonequivalent structural positions in hematite, goethite and berthierine are obtained. Noble metals (Ag, Au, Ir, Rh, Pd) concentrating in bauxites are revealed for the first time. Obtained data can lead to decrease of power consumption during aluminum production and high quality ceramics, to provide production of valuable iron oxide, and also to minimize the ecological harm from accumulation of bauxite wastes.

  18. Activities with Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    In 1989, the US Department of Energy (DOE) responded to the need to redirect resources from weapons production to environmental restoration and waste management by establishing the Office of Environmental Management (EM) and delegated to this office the responsibility of cleaning up the US nuclear weapons complex. Now in its eight year, EM's mission has three central facets: (1) to assess, remediate, and monitor contaminated sites and facilities; (2) to store, treat, and dispose of waste from past and current operations; and (3) to develop and implement innovative technologies for environmental cleanup. To this end, EM has established domestic and international cooperative technology development programs, including one with the Republic of Argentina. Cooperating with Argentine scientific institutes and industries meets US cleanup objectives by: (1) identifying and accessing Argentine EM-related technologies, thereby leveraging investments and providing cost-savings; (2) improving access to technical information, scientific expertise, and technologies applicable to EM needs; and (3) fostering the development of innovative environmental technologies by increasing US private sector opportunities in Argentina in EM-related areas

  19. QUBIC in Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, B.; Harari, D.; Etchegoyen, A.; Medina, M. C.; Romero, G. E.; Qubic Collaboration

    2017-10-01

    QUBIC (QU Bolometric Interferometer for Cosmology) is an experimental cosmology project to measure the modes in the polarization of the cosmic background radiation (CBR), the fossil relic that reveals the properties at the Universe 380,000 years after the Planck Era. Discovery of the CBR in 1964 and measurement of tiny temperature anisotropies in 1992 were major breakthroughs in our understanding of the Universe. The next challenge is to measure the polarization of the CBR accurately enough to detect modes that would reveal the existence of primordial gravitational waves produced in the first stages of the Planck Era and probe inflation theory, that assumes an accelerated expansion during the first seconds. The mode signal is however extremely weak and its measurement requires complex instruments. The QUBIC collaboration has developed the concept of interferometric bolometry, that brings together the sensitivity of bolometric detectors with the control of systematic effects provided by interferometry. QUBIC is an international collaboration involving several universities and laboratories in France, Italy, United Kingdom and USA. Recently, Argentina has suggested Alto Chorrillo (Salta), as candidate site for the installation of the experiment, next to the LLAMA site. Here we describe the scientific objectives and the main features of the experiment and we detail the process through which the international collaboration decided to install in Argentina its first module as well as the challenges for our country in this project.

  20. RERTR activities in Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adelfang, P.; Alvarez, L.; Boero, N.; Calabrese, R.; De La Fuente, M.; Echenique, P.; Markiewicz, M.; Pasqualini, E.; Perez, A.; Piazza, A.; Ruggirello, G.; Taboada, H.

    2000-01-01

    The Atomic Energy Commission of Argentina has been involved in the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors Program since 1978. The most relevant milestones of the program, regarding fuel R and D activities, were the development and manufacturing at industrial scale of U 3 O 8 dispersed fuel assemblies and the conversion of the RA-3 reactor core to LEU fuel. More recently, the activities were focused in the development of high density U 3 Si 2 fuel with a density of 4.8 gU/cm 3 and the improvement of the manufacturing process of U 3 Si 2 powder. Currently one of the main objectives is to develop and qualify the technology for the production of high-density LEU fuel elements using U-Mo alloy. Several alternative ways to obtain U-Mo powder are under development with the aim of evaluating plant scale production and costs. To boost this program the main research reactor of Argentina, the RA-3, will be upgraded to 10 MW early in 2001 and the hot cells at the Ezeiza Atomic Center are fully operational after important investments. Significant progresses were also carried out in the development of LEU targets for the production of Mo 99 . Experimental work has demonstrated the feasibility of the manufacturing and radiochemical processing of miniplate targets prepared with dispersed UAl x , maintaining the geometry and the alkaline processing of the HEU targets used so far. (author)

  1. Population structure in Argentina.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Muzzio

    Full Text Available We analyzed 391 samples from 12 Argentinian populations from the Center-West, East and North-West regions with the Illumina Human Exome Beadchip v1.0 (HumanExome-12v1-A. We did Principal Components analysis to infer patterns of populational divergence and migrations. We identified proportions and patterns of European, African and Native American ancestry and found a correlation between distance to Buenos Aires and proportion of Native American ancestry, where the highest proportion corresponds to the Northernmost populations, which is also the furthest from the Argentinian capital. Most of the European sources are from a South European origin, matching historical records, and we see two different Native American components, one that spreads all over Argentina and another specifically Andean. The highest percentages of African ancestry were in the Center West of Argentina, where the old trade routes took the slaves from Buenos Aires to Chile and Peru. Subcontinentaly, sources of this African component are represented by both West Africa and groups influenced by the Bantu expansion, the second slightly higher than the first, unlike North America and the Caribbean, where the main source is West Africa. This is reasonable, considering that a large proportion of the ships arriving at the Southern Hemisphere came from Mozambique, Loango and Angola.

  2. Estimation of Supraglacial Dust and Debris Geochemical Composition via Satellite Reflectance and Emissivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Kimberly Ann; Kaab, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate spectral estimation of supraglacial dust, debris, ash and tephra geochemical composition from glaciers and ice fields in Iceland, Nepal, New Zealand and Switzerland. Surface glacier material was collected and analyzed via X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) for geochemical composition and mineralogy. In situ data was used as ground truth for comparison with satellite derived geochemical results. Supraglacial debris spectral response patterns and emissivity-derived silica weight percent are presented. Qualitative spectral response patterns agreed well with XRF elemental abundances. Quantitative emissivity estimates of supraglacial SiO2 in continental areas were 67% (Switzerland) and 68% (Nepal), while volcanic supraglacial SiO2 averages were 58% (Iceland) and 56% (New Zealand), yielding general agreement. Ablation season supraglacial temperature variation due to differing dust and debris type and coverage was also investigated, with surface debris temperatures ranging from 5.9 to 26.6 C in the study regions. Applications of the supraglacial geochemical reflective and emissive characterization methods include glacier areal extent mapping, debris source identification, glacier kinematics and glacier energy balance considerations.

  3. Estimation of Supraglacial Dust and Debris Geochemical Composition via Satellite Reflectance and Emissivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly Casey

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate spectral estimation of supraglacial dust, debris, ash and tephra geochemical composition from glaciers and ice fields in Iceland, Nepal, New Zealand and Switzerland. Surface glacier material was collected and analyzed via X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF and X-ray diffraction (XRD for geochemical composition and mineralogy. In situ data was used as ground truth for comparison with satellite derived geochemical results. Supraglacial debris spectral response patterns and emissivity-derived silica weight percent are presented. Qualitative spectral response patterns agreed well with XRF elemental abundances. Quantitative emissivity estimates of supraglacial SiO2 in continental areas were 67% (Switzerland and 68% (Nepal, while volcanic supraglacial SiO2 averages were 58% (Iceland and 56% (New Zealand, yielding general agreement. Ablation season supraglacial temperature variation due to differing dust and debris type and coverage was also investigated, with surface debris temperatures ranging from 5.9 to 26.6 C in the study regions. Applications of the supraglacial geochemical reflective and emissive characterization methods include glacier areal extent mapping, debris source identification, glacier kinematics and glacier energy balance considerations.

  4. Mineralogic Model (MM3.0) Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, A.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a three-dimensional (3-D) representation of the mineral abundance within the geologic framework model domain. The mineralogic model enables project personnel to estimate mineral abundances at any position, within the model region, and within any stratigraphic unit in the model area. The model provides the abundance and distribution of 10 minerals and mineral groups within 22 stratigraphic sequences or model layers in the Yucca Mountain area. The uncertainties and limitations associated with this model are discussed in Section 6.4. Model validation accomplished by corroboration with data not cited as direct input is discussed in Section 7

  5. Advances and Opportunities in Ore Mineralogy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nigel J. Cook

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The study of ore minerals is rapidly transforming due to an explosion of new micro- and nano-analytical technologies. These advanced microbeam techniques can expose the physical and chemical character of ore minerals at ever-better spatial resolution and analytical precision. The insights that can be obtained from ten of today’s most important, or emerging, techniques and methodologies are reviewed: laser-ablation inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry; focussed ion beam-scanning electron microscopy; high-angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy; electron back-scatter diffraction; synchrotron X-ray fluorescence mapping; automated mineral analysis (Quantitative Evaluation of Mineralogy via Scanning Electron Microscopy and Mineral Liberation Analysis; nanoscale secondary ion mass spectrometry; atom probe tomography; radioisotope geochronology using ore minerals; and, non-traditional stable isotopes. Many of these technical advances cut across conceptual boundaries between mineralogy and geochemistry and require an in-depth knowledge of the material that is being analysed. These technological advances are accompanied by changing approaches to ore mineralogy: the increased focus on trace element distributions; the challenges offered by nanoscale characterisation; and the recognition of the critical petrogenetic information in gangue minerals, and, thus the need to for a holistic approach to the characterization of mineral assemblages. Using original examples, with an emphasis on iron oxide-copper-gold deposits, we show how increased analytical capabilities, particularly imaging and chemical mapping at the nanoscale, offer the potential to resolve outstanding questions in ore mineralogy. Broad regional or deposit-scale genetic models can be validated or refuted by careful analysis at the smallest scales of observation. As the volume of information at different scales of observation expands, the level of complexity

  6. Research reactors in Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlos Ruben Calabrese

    1999-01-01

    Argentine Nuclear Development started in early fifties. In 1957, it was decided to built the first a research reactor. RA-1 reactor (120 kw, today licensed to work at 40 kW) started operation in January 1958. Originally RA-1 was an Argonaut (American design) reactor. In early sixties, the RA-1 core was changed. Fuel rods (20% enrichment) was introduced instead the old Argonaut core design. For that reason, a critical facility named RA-0 was built. After that, the RA-3 project started, to build a multipurpose 5 MW nuclear reactor MTR pool type, to produce radioisotopes and research. For that reason and to define the characteristics of the RA-3 core, another critical facility was built, RA-2. Initially RA-3 was a 90 % enriched fuel reactor, and started operation in 1967. When Atucha I NPP project started, a German design Power Reactor, a small homogeneous reactor was donated by the German Government to Argentina (1969). This was RA-4 reactor (20% enrichment, 1W). In 1982, RA-6 pool reactor achieved criticality. This is a 500 kW reactor with 90% enriched MTR fuel elements. In 1990, RA-3 started to operate fueled by 20% enriched fuel. In 1997, the RA-8 (multipurpose critical facility located at Pilcaniyeu) started to operate. RA-3 reactor is the most important CNEA reactor for Argentine Research Reactors development. It is the first in a succession of Argentine MTR reactors built by CNEA (and INVAP SE ) in Argentina and other countries: RA-6 (500 kW, Bariloche-Argentina), RP-10 (10MW, Peru), NUR (500 kW, Algeria), MPR (22 MW, Egypt). The experience of Argentinian industry permits to compete with foreign developed countries as supplier of research reactors. Today, CNEA has six research reactors whose activities have a range from education and promotion of nuclear activity, to radioisotope production. For more than forty years, Argentine Research Reactors are working. The experience of Argentine is important, and argentine firms are able to compete in the design and

  7. Fine particle magnetic mineralogy of archaeological ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atkinson, D; King, J A

    2005-01-01

    This study investigated the magnetic mineralogy of a worldwide collection of archaeological pottery. The mineral types, the mass fractions and the domain states of the constituent magnetic fine particles were elucidated from a range of measurements including magnetic hysteresis behaviour, the acquisition of isothermal remanence, low field susceptibility and thermomagnetic curves. The magnetic mineralogy of most samples was dominated by magnetite. Titanomagnetites with limited titanium substitution and cation deficient magnetites (indicative of low temperature oxidation) were dominant in some samples. Haematite was detected in 53% of the samples, but seldom contributed much to the saturation magnetization. Magnetic particle sizes are skewed to smaller sizes, with sherds mostly having a large superparamagnetic or a stable single domain fraction. Low temperature susceptibility data suggest that 30% of samples had some multidomain component. The percentage by mass of magnetic material in the ancient pottery studied was less than 0.8% for all but one of the samples and the majority of samples contain less than 0.3% by weight of magnetic fine particles. The presence of low temperature oxidation in many samples and the occurrence of a multidomain component in a third of the collection suggest that ancient pottery may not always be suitable for determining the intensity of the ancient geomagnetic field

  8. History of radiobiology in Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayo, Jose

    2004-01-01

    Radiobiology is a multidisciplinary science dealing with ionising radiation effects on biological material. The history of Radiobiology begins in Germany and France around 1886. Radiobiology was introduced in Argentina in 1926 at the Institute of Oncology Angel H. Roffo as a biomedical research branch. Later on in 1957 was incorporated at the National Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA) of Argentina as a result of the newly started nuclear activities in Argentina. Prior that time no Radiobiology research existed in Argentina. To fill this need a Project to create new laboratories was elaborated by the CNEA. New laboratories in Radiobiodosimetry, Cellular Radiobiology, Radiopathology, Radiomicrobiology, Genetics and Somatic Effects were created. Human resources on different areas of Radiobiology were formed with the assistance of IAEA. With professional and technical personnel specialized in Radiobiology at the beginning of the 1970 decade, the transference of fundamental and applied research to others laboratories started. (author)

  9. Mineralogical characteristics of sediments and heavy metal mobilization along a river watershed affected by acid mine drainage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingying Xie

    Full Text Available Trace-element concentrations in acid mine drainage (AMD are primarily controlled by the mineralogy at the sediment-water interface. Results are presented for a combined geochemical and mineralogical survey of Dabaoshan Mine, South China. Developed sequential extraction experiments with the analysis of the main mineralogical phases by semi-quantitative XRD, differential X-ray diffraction (DXRD and scanning electron microscopy (SEM were conducted to identify the quantitative relationship between iron minerals and heavy metals. Results showed that schwertmannite, jarosite, goethite and ferrihydrite were the dominant Fe-oxyhydroxide minerals which were detected alternately in the surface sediment with the increasing pH from 2.50 to 6.93 along the Hengshi River. Decreasing contents of schwertmannite ranging from 35 wt % to 6.5 wt % were detected along the Hengshi River, which was corresponding to the decreasing metal contents. The easily reducible fractions exert higher affinity of metals while compared with reducible and relatively stable minerals. A qualitative analysis of heavy metals extracted from the sediments indicated that the retention ability varied: Pb > Mn > Zn > As ≈ Cu > Cr > Cd ≈ Ni. Results in this study are avail for understanding the fate and transport of heavy metals associated with iron minerals and establishing the remediation strategies of AMD systems.

  10. Mineralogical characteristics of sediments and heavy metal mobilization along a river watershed affected by acid mine drainage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yingying; Lu, Guining; Yang, Chengfang; Qu, Lu; Chen, Meiqin; Guo, Chuling; Dang, Zhi

    2018-01-01

    Trace-element concentrations in acid mine drainage (AMD) are primarily controlled by the mineralogy at the sediment-water interface. Results are presented for a combined geochemical and mineralogical survey of Dabaoshan Mine, South China. Developed sequential extraction experiments with the analysis of the main mineralogical phases by semi-quantitative XRD, differential X-ray diffraction (DXRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were conducted to identify the quantitative relationship between iron minerals and heavy metals. Results showed that schwertmannite, jarosite, goethite and ferrihydrite were the dominant Fe-oxyhydroxide minerals which were detected alternately in the surface sediment with the increasing pH from 2.50 to 6.93 along the Hengshi River. Decreasing contents of schwertmannite ranging from 35 wt % to 6.5 wt % were detected along the Hengshi River, which was corresponding to the decreasing metal contents. The easily reducible fractions exert higher affinity of metals while compared with reducible and relatively stable minerals. A qualitative analysis of heavy metals extracted from the sediments indicated that the retention ability varied: Pb > Mn > Zn > As ≈ Cu > Cr > Cd ≈ Ni. Results in this study are avail for understanding the fate and transport of heavy metals associated with iron minerals and establishing the remediation strategies of AMD systems.

  11. Geochemical Investigations of Groundwater Stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bath, Adrian

    2006-05-01

    The report describes geochemical parameters and methods that provide information about the hydrodynamic stability of groundwaters in low permeability fractured rocks that are potential hosts for radioactive waste repositories. Hydrodynamic stability describes the propensity for changes in groundwater flows over long timescales, in terms of flow rates and flow directions. Hydrodynamic changes may also cause changes in water compositions, but the related issue of geochemical stability of a potential repository host rock system is outside the scope of this report. The main approaches to assessing groundwater stability are numerical modelling, measurement and interpretation of geochemical indicators in groundwater compositions, and analyses and interpretations of secondary minerals and fluid inclusions in these minerals. This report covers the latter two topics, with emphasis on geochemical indicators. The extent to which palaeohydrogeology and geochemical stability indicators have been used in past safety cases is reviewed. It has been very variable, both in terms of the scenarios considered, the stability indicators considered and the extent to which the information was explicitly or implicitly used in assessing FEPs and scenarios in the safety cases. Geochemical indicators of hydrodynamic stability provide various categories of information that are of hydrogeological relevance. Information about groundwater mixing, flows and water sources is potentially provided by the total salinity of groundwaters, their contents of specific non-reactive solutes (principally chloride) and possibly of other solutes, the stable isotopic ratio of water, and certain characteristics of secondary minerals and fluid inclusions. Information pertaining directly to groundwater ages and the timing of water and solute movements is provided by isotopic systems including tritium, carbon-14, chlorine-36, stable oxygen and hydrogen isotopes, uranium isotopes and dissolved mobile gases in

  12. Geochemical Investigations of Groundwater Stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bath, Adrian [Intellisci Ltd., Loughborough (United Kingdom)

    2006-05-15

    The report describes geochemical parameters and methods that provide information about the hydrodynamic stability of groundwaters in low permeability fractured rocks that are potential hosts for radioactive waste repositories. Hydrodynamic stability describes the propensity for changes in groundwater flows over long timescales, in terms of flow rates and flow directions. Hydrodynamic changes may also cause changes in water compositions, but the related issue of geochemical stability of a potential repository host rock system is outside the scope of this report. The main approaches to assessing groundwater stability are numerical modelling, measurement and interpretation of geochemical indicators in groundwater compositions, and analyses and interpretations of secondary minerals and fluid inclusions in these minerals. This report covers the latter two topics, with emphasis on geochemical indicators. The extent to which palaeohydrogeology and geochemical stability indicators have been used in past safety cases is reviewed. It has been very variable, both in terms of the scenarios considered, the stability indicators considered and the extent to which the information was explicitly or implicitly used in assessing FEPs and scenarios in the safety cases. Geochemical indicators of hydrodynamic stability provide various categories of information that are of hydrogeological relevance. Information about groundwater mixing, flows and water sources is potentially provided by the total salinity of groundwaters, their contents of specific non-reactive solutes (principally chloride) and possibly of other solutes, the stable isotopic ratio of water, and certain characteristics of secondary minerals and fluid inclusions. Information pertaining directly to groundwater ages and the timing of water and solute movements is provided by isotopic systems including tritium, carbon-14, chlorine-36, stable oxygen and hydrogen isotopes, uranium isotopes and dissolved mobile gases in

  13. The health crisis in Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escudero, José Carlos

    2003-01-01

    The health crisis in Argentina is part of the larger crisis that has resulted from a collapse in the country's economic and political systems. After a brief review of the country's history over the last century, from international success story to economic failure, the author explains the health crisis in particular and the social crisis in general in terms of failed neoliberal policies imposed on Argentina by the United States and International Monetary Fund through the mediation of the country's political class.

  14. Operating practical experience at Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quihillalt, Oscar

    1997-01-01

    Operating experiences of Atucha-1 and Embalse Nuclear Power Plants were discussed in this work. The technical and economic aspects, such as reliability, availability, personnel training, operating costs, prices and market, which exercise influence upon Argentina nuclear energy policy, mainly on the power electric generation by nuclear power plants were considered. Finally the current status of the nucleoelectric sector in Argentina and forecasting were analysed

  15. Study of the argillaceous fraction of sedimentary sequences of Meuse and Gard. Reconstitution of the diagenetic history and of the physico-chemical characteristics of the targets. Mineralogical, geochemical and isotopic aspects; Etude de la fraction argileuse de sequences sedimentaires de la Meuse et du Gard. Reconstitution de l'histoire diagenetique et des caracteristiques physico-chimiques des cibles. Aspects mineralogiques, geochimiques et isotopiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rousset, D

    2002-01-01

    within the sequence favors a confined-sequence behaviour: Indeed, no migrations of elements and especially of REE took place during fluid flows, the clay minerals preserving their geochemical properties. All the results favor reliable confinement properties of the low-permeable argillaceous sequences. (author)

  16. Study of the argillaceous fraction of sedimentary sequences of Meuse and Gard. Reconstitution of the diagenetic history and of the physico-chemical characteristics of the targets. Mineralogical, geochemical and isotopic aspects; Etude de la fraction argileuse de sequences sedimentaires de la Meuse et du Gard. Reconstitution de l'histoire diagenetique et des caracteristiques physico-chimiques des cibles. Aspects mineralogiques, geochimiques et isotopiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rousset, D

    2002-01-01

    within the sequence favors a confined-sequence behaviour: Indeed, no migrations of elements and especially of REE took place during fluid flows, the clay minerals preserving their geochemical properties. All the results favor reliable confinement properties of the low-permeable argillaceous sequences. (author)

  17. Vein-type and similar uranium deposits of Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stipanicic, P.

    1982-01-01

    Some vein-type and similar uranium deposits and occurrences are briefly described to show different models identified in Argentina. Practically all of them were formerly thought to be related to hydrothermal-magmatic processes, but at present few are considered to be so; some are classified as typically exogenous and opinions differ about the genesis of the remaining ones, especially because of a lack of sufficient research on the matter since this group of accumulations only contributes less than 10% to the entire uranium resources of Argentina. The typical vein-type ore bodies are small (including less than 200t U) with grades varying from 0.1 to near 1%U. Other deposits, resolved as stockworks, could be from small to medium size (more than 200t U to 2000t U) with a uranium content from 0.7 to 0.03%, respectively. The mineralogical associations are variable, from complex ones in veins considered as magmatic-endogenous (with U, Ni, Co, Pb, Cu, Zn, etc.) to very simple ones in the exogenetic accumulations, which only comprise uranium minerals. The paragenetic studies available are not complete enough to define the possible relation of uranium with the other metals in the complex ores. The age of the mineralization has been defined in some cases, but not in others. There are examples of mineralizing processes occurring from Palaeozoic to very recent times. Some of the uranium deposits mentioned here have been exploited in the past; one of them will be re-opened very shortly; and a new one will be put into operation in 1981. The geological composition of Argentina is not favourable for uranium deposits related to the Proterozoic unconformity, and the best possibilities for finding interesting accumulations of vein and similar type are in the large Hercynian granitic environments which have outcrops that cover more than 150,000km 2 (Pampean Hills and North Patagonian Massif). (author)

  18. Geochemical characteristics of oil sands fluid petroleum coke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nesbitt, Jake A.; Lindsay, Matthew B.J.; Chen, Ning

    2017-01-01

    The geochemical characteristics of fluid petroleum coke from the Athabasca Oil Sands Region (AOSR) of northern Alberta, Canada were investigated. Continuous core samples were collected to 8 m below surface at several locations (n = 12) from three coke deposits at an active oil sands mine. Bulk elemental analyses revealed the coke composition was dominated by C (84.2 ± 2.3 wt%) and S (6.99 ± 0.26 wt%). Silicon (9210 ± 3000 mg kg"−"1), Al (5980 ± 1200 mg kg"−"1), Fe (4760 ± 1200 mg kg"−"1), and Ti (1380 ± 430 mg kg"−"1) were present in lesser amounts. Vanadium (1280 ± 120 mg kg"−"1) and Ni (230 ± 80 mg kg"−"1) exhibited the highest concentrations among potentially-hazardous minor and trace elements. Sequential extractions revealed potential for release of these metals under field-relevant conditions. Synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction revealed the presence of Si and Ti oxides, organically-complexed V and hydrated Ni sulfate, and provided information about the asphaltenic carbon matrix. X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy at the V and Ni K-edges revealed that these metals were largely hosted in porphyrins and similar organic complexes throughout coke grains. Minor differences among measured V and Ni K-edge spectra were largely attributed to slight variations in local coordination of V(IV) and Ni(II) within these organic compounds. However, linear combination fits were improved by including reference spectra for inorganic phases with octahedrally-coordinated V(III) and Ni(II). Sulfur and Fe K-edge XANES confirmed that thiophenic coordination and pyritic-ilmenitic coordination are predominant, respectively. These results provide new information on the geochemical and mineralogical composition of oil sands fluid petroleum coke and improve understanding of potential controls on associated water chemistry. - Highlights: • Oil sands fluid petroleum coke contains wide range of major, minor and

  19. The Variscan calc-alkalic plutonism of western Corsica: mineralogy and major and trace element geochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocherie, A.; Rossi, Ph.; Le Bel, L.

    1984-10-01

    Petrographic and structural observations on the calc-alkalic plutonism of western Corsica revealed the existence of several successively emplaced units associated with large basic bodies. The present mineralogical and geochemical study deals with the genesis, evolution and relationships of these different units. Basic plutonism is represented by three genetically linked types of rock: norites and troctolites with cumulate textures characterized by low REE contents and either no Eu anomaly or a positive Eu anomaly; gabbros with enriched LREE relatively to HREE patterns, probably close to an initial basaltic liquid; and diorites ranging up to charnockites which represent liquids evolved to varying degrees, mainly by fractional crystallization. Trace element data and studies on the evolution of pyroxene pairs demonstrate the consanguinity of these calc-alkaline basic rocks which are derived from a high alumina basaltic melt. The various granitoids (granodiorites, monzogranites and leucocratic monzogranites, i.e., adamellites) have distinct evolution trends as shown by the composition of their mafic minerals and by trace element distributions. They cannot be considered as being derivatives of the basic suite and they cannot be related by a common fractionation sequence. Rather, they represent distinctive batches of crustal anatexis. In addition, hybridization phenomena with the basic melt are noticed in granodiorites. The particular problem of the low La/Yb, Eu/Eu∗ and the high U, Th, Cs leucocratic monzogranites is discussed in detail. In addition to more conventional trace element diagrams, the simultaneous statistical treatment of all the geochemical data by correspondence factor analysis is shown to be a very use tool in distinguishing between the different units and to classify the elements according to their geochemical properties.

  20. Contribution to chemical-mineralogical study of carbonatites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, M.Q. da; Lima, W.N. de; Correa, S.L.A.

    1982-01-01

    A preliminary chemical-mineralogical study of carbonatites from Jacupiranga (SP,Brazil) and Alto Pinheiros (SC,Brazil) enabled not only to ratify hypotheses previously described by Brazilian researchers but also made clear certain aspects related to the geochemistry of carbonatites concerning their occurrence, the probable genesis of these species and their chemical and mineralogical characteristics.(Author) [pt

  1. Mineralogical composition and functionality of clays used for pottery ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mineralogical composition and functionality of clays used for pottery education by physically challenged learners at the Ikwezi-Lokusa Educational Centre, Eastern Cape, South Africa. ... The clays were mineralogically characterised using Munsell Soil Color Chart, X-ray powder diffractometry (XRPD) and optical microscopy.

  2. Environmental mineralogy - Understanding element behavior in ecosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown Jr, G.E.; Calas, G.

    2011-01-01

    Environmental Mineralogy has developed over the past decade in response to the recognition that minerals are linked in many important ways with the global ecosystem. Minerals are the main repositories of the chemical elements in Earth's crust and thus are the main sources of elements needed for the development of civilization, contaminant and pollutant elements that impact global and local ecosystems, and elements that are essential plant nutrients. These elements are released from minerals through natural processes, such as chemical weathering, and anthropogenic activities, such as mining and energy production, agriculture and industrial activities, and careless waste disposal. Minerals also play key roles in the biogeochemical cycling of the elements, sequestering elements and releasing them as the primary minerals in crustal rocks undergo various structural and compositional transformations in response to physical, chemical, and biological processes that produce secondary minerals and soils. These processes have resulted in the release of toxic elements such as arsenic in groundwater aquifers, which is having a major impact on the health of millions of people in South and Southeast Asia. The interfaces between mineral surfaces and aqueous solutions are the locations of most chemical reactions that control the composition of the natural environment, including the composition of natural waters. The nuclear fuel cycle, from uranium mining to the disposition of high-level nuclear waste, is also intimately related to minerals. A fundamental understanding of these processes requires molecular-scale information about minerals, their bulk structures and properties such as solubility, their surfaces, and their interactions with aqueous solutions, atmospheric and soil gases, natural organic matter, and biological organisms. Gaining this understanding is further complicated by the presence of natural, incidental, and manufactured nano-particles in the environment, which

  3. Mineralogy and Geochemistry from Trollveggen Vent Field Chimneys and Metalliferous Sediments (Mohns Ridge, West Jan Mayen Fracture Zone at 71°N)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, S.; Cruz, I.; Fonseca, R.; Barriga, F. J.; Pedersen, R.

    2010-12-01

    The Jan Mayen vent fields were discovered in the Mohns Ridge during an expedition with the Norwegian research vessel "G.O. Sars" in July 2005. They comprise two main active areas: (1) Soria Moria and (2) Gallionella Garden & Trollveggen. The Trollveggen vent field is located at depths of 700-750 m. Venting takes place mainly through white smoker chimneys with fluid temperatures reaching up to 260-270°C. Here we present mineralogical and geochemical data from vent chimneys and metalliferous sediments collected at the Trollveggen vent field with an ROV. Cross-sections of chimneys present evident mineralogical zonation, showing acicular barite crystals in the outer parts and sulfide enrichments in the interior (Sph + Cpy +/- Py - Po). Sediments are mainly formed by vent fragments but also by minerals precipitated by diffuse fluid circulation, showing a mineral assemblage similar to that of chimneys. Microprobe analyses were obtained both in sulfates and sulphides revealing a particular sphalerite composition, characterized by low Fe (< 2%) and high total trace metal contents (up to 4%, including Cu, Ag and Au). Geochemical profiles of gravity cores collected in the area surrounding Jan Mayen were also performed in order to investigate the presence of additional hydrothermal activity in the area. Total geochemical analyses showed a slight enrichment in trace metals, such as Cu, Zn and Fe, with exception of one core that reached 85 ppm for Cu, 150 ppm for Zn and 20% for Fe. The metal enrichment in this core suggests hydrothermal activity in the neighboring area.

  4. Geochemical behavior of uranium mill tailings leachate in the subsurface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brookins, D.G.

    1993-01-01

    Leachate generated from surface disposal of acidic uranium mill tailings at Maybell, CO has impacted groundwater quality within the underlying mineralized Browns Park Formation. The extent of groundwater contamination, however, is located directly beneath the tailings impoundment. The milling process consisted of sulfuric acid extraction of uranium from the feed ore by a complex chemical leaching and precipitation process. Tailings leachate at the site contains elevated concentrations of Al, As, Cd, Mo, Ni, NO 3 , Se, U, and other solutes. From column leach tests, the concentrations of contaminants within tailings pore fluid are SO 4 >NH 4 >NO 3 >U>Se>Ni>As>Cd at pH 4.0. The carbonate buffering capacity of the tailings subsoil has decreased because of calcite dissolution in the presence of acidic leachate. Groundwater quality data, mineralogical and microbiological studies, and geochemical modeling suggest that As, NO 3 , Se, U and other solutes are being removed from solution through precipitation, adsorption, and denitrification processes under reducing conditions. Presence of hydrogen sulfide, liquid and gaseous hydrocarbons, dissolved organic, and abundant pyrite within the Browns Park Formations have maintained reducing conditions subjacent to the tailings impoundment. Groundwater is in close equilibrium with coffinite and uraninite, the primary U(IV) minerals extracted from the Browns Parks Formation. Denitrifying bacteria identified in this study catalyze redox reactions involving NO 3 . Subsequently, contaminant distributions of NO 3 decrease 1000 times beneath the tailings impoundment. Applying geochemical and biochemical processes occurring at Maybell provides an excellent model for in situ aquifer restoration programs considered at other uranium tailings and heavy-metal-mixed waste contaminated sites. (author) 4 figs., 4 tabs., 27 refs

  5. Mineralogy of Non-Silicified Fossil Wood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George E. Mustoe

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The best-known and most-studied petrified wood specimens are those that are mineralized with polymorphs of silica: opal-A, opal-C, chalcedony, and quartz. Less familiar are fossil woods preserved with non-silica minerals. This report reviews discoveries of woods mineralized with calcium carbonate, calcium phosphate, various iron and copper minerals, manganese oxide, fluorite, barite, natrolite, and smectite clay. Regardless of composition, the processes of mineralization involve the same factors: availability of dissolved elements, pH, Eh, and burial temperature. Permeability of the wood and anatomical features also plays important roles in determining mineralization. When precipitation occurs in several episodes, fossil wood may have complex mineralogy.

  6. Mineralogical aspects of the laterites of Maicuru

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemos, V.P.; Costa, M.C. da

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents the prelimary mineralogical data of the weathering materials derived from the alkaline-ultramafic-carbonatitic Maicuru complex, State of Para. These material include several minerals species: iron, titanium and aluminium oxides/hydroxides as aluminous goethite, geothite, hematite, maghemite, lepidocrocite, anatase; and gibbsite; clay minerals of the smectite, chlorite, vermiculite and kaolinite groups and interstratified chlorite-smectite, mica-vermiculite, vermiculite-chlorite and Kaolinite-smectite; and aluminous phosphates of the crandalite group, wardite, augelite, senegalite, wavelite and variscite. The principal characteristics of these minerals were obtained by X-ray diffraction, optical methods, electron probe microanalysis, energy dispersive scanning electron microscope, X-ray fluorescence, atomic absorption, inductively coupled plasma-ICP source spectrometry and colorimetric methods. (author) [pt

  7. Formative pre-Hispanic agricultural soils in northwest Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampietro Vattuone, María Marta; Roldán, Jimena; Neder, Liliana; Maldonado, Mario Gabriel; Vattuone, Marta Amelia

    2011-01-01

    Our study area is from an early agricultural archaeological site named "El Tolar" (1st to 9th century AD), located in Tafí Valley (Tucumán, northwest Argentina). The objective was to identify geochemical signatures generated by the sustained agrarian use of soils. Chemical and pedological studies were made in different archaeological contexts. Physical and chemical features, such as bulk density, pH, organic and inorganic phosphorus, and available copper, manganese and iron, were taken into account. The results suggested that a buried paleosol identified was contemporary with the occupation of the site. It also showed characteristics clearly related to pre-Hispanic agrarian production. The concentrations of organic phosphorus and iron in agricultural soils probably reflect the use of fertilizers. The application of geoscience techniques allowed us to obtain important information on their behaviour and socio-economic development. This paper constitutes the first pedogeochemical approach to the study of Argentinean pre-Hispanic agricultural soils.

  8. Multiscale characteristics of mechanical and mineralogical heterogeneity using nanoindentation and Maps Mineralogy in Mancos Shale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, H.; Mook, W. M.; Dewers, T. A.

    2017-12-01

    Multiscale characteristics of textural and compositional (e.g., clay, cement, organics, etc.) heterogeneity profoundly influence the mechanical properties of shale. In particular, strongly anisotropic (i.e., laminated) heterogeneities are often observed to have a significant influence on hydrological and mechanical properties. In this work, we investigate a sample of the Cretaceous Mancos Shale to explore the importance of lamination, cements, organic content, and the spatial distribution of these characteristics. For compositional and structural characterization, the mineralogical distribution of thin core sample polished by ion-milling is analyzed using QEMSCAN® with MAPS MineralogyTM (developed by FEI Corporoation). Based on mineralogy and organic matter distribution, multi-scale nanoindentation testing was performed to directly link compositional heterogeneity to mechanical properties. With FIB-SEM (3D) and high-magnitude SEM (2D) images, key nanoindentation patterns are analyzed to evaluate elastic and plastic responses. Combined with MAPs Mineralogy data and fine-resolution BSE images, nanoindentation results are explained as a function of compositional and structural heterogeneity. Finite element modeling is used to quantitatively evaluate the link between the heterogeneity and mechanical behavior during nanoindentation. In addition, the spatial distribution of compositional heterogeneity, anisotropic bedding patterns, and mechanical anisotropy are employed as inputs for multiscale brittle fracture simulations using a phase field model. Comparison of experimental and numerical simulations reveal that proper incorporation of additional material information, such as bedding layer thickness and other geometrical attributes of the microstructures, may yield improvements on the numerical predictions of the mesoscale fracture patterns and hence the macroscopic effective toughness. Sandia National Laboratories is a multimission laboratory managed and operated by

  9. Influence of mineralogy and microstructures on strain localization and fault zone architecture of the Alpine Fault, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichiba, T.; Kaneki, S.; Hirono, T.; Oohashi, K.; Schuck, B.; Janssen, C.; Schleicher, A.; Toy, V.; Dresen, G.

    2017-12-01

    The Alpine Fault on New Zealand's South Island is an oblique, dextral strike-slip fault that accommodated the majority of displacement between the Pacific and the Australian Plates and presents the biggest seismic hazard in the region. Along its central segment, the hanging wall comprises greenschist and amphibolite facies Alpine Schists. Exhumation from 35 km depth, along a SE-dipping detachment, lead to mylonitization which was subsequently overprinted by brittle deformation and finally resulted in the fault's 1 km wide damage zone. The geomechanical behavior of a fault is affected by the internal structure of its fault zone. Consequently, studying processes controlling fault zone architecture allows assessing the seismic hazard of a fault. Here we present the results of a combined microstructural (SEM and TEM), mineralogical (XRD) and geochemical (XRF) investigation of outcrop samples originating from several locations along the Alpine Fault, the aim of which is to evaluate the influence of mineralogical composition, alteration and pre-existing fabric on strain localization and to identify the controls on the fault zone architecture, particularly the locus of brittle deformation in P, T and t space. Field observations reveal that the fault's principal slip zone (PSZ) is either a thin (< 1 cm to < 7 cm) layered structure or a relatively thick (10s cm) package lacking a detectable macroscopic fabric. Lithological and related rheological contrasts are widely assumed to govern strain localization. However, our preliminary results suggest that qualitative mineralogical composition has only minor impact on fault zone architecture. Quantities of individual mineral phases differ markedly between fault damage zone and fault core at specific sites, but the quantitative composition of identical structural units such as the fault core, is similar in all samples. This indicates that the degree of strain localization at the Alpine Fault might be controlled by small initial

  10. Norm survey in Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canoba, Analia Cecilia; Gnoni, Gabriela Alejandra; Truppa, W.

    2008-01-01

    The oil and gas industry, which is especially significant in Argentina, is one industry that concentrates natural radionuclides during its processes. In addition, there are a few underground mines under development, where radon levels may be high. The Nuclear Regulatory Authority of Argentina (ARN) carried out a project with the objective of evaluating NORM, mainly in these types of industries. Eight facilities were characterized, three related to the gas industry, four related to the oil industry and a survey of radon gas in a gold underground mine. First, background measurements were made and then a screening survey was carried out to detect values above background. Of the values obtained, 57% were in the background range, 19% were below 2 μSv/h, 15% were in the range 2-10 μSv/h and 9% were above 10 μSv/h. Some values were as high as 400 μSv/h. The annual effective doses were estimated to be in the range 0.02-1.6 mSv/a. Samples were taken and later analysed by gamma spectrometry, liquid scintillation and fluorimetry. It was confirmed that the main radionuclides involved in the oil and gas extraction process are 226 Ra and 228 Ra. The radium isotope concentrations measured in some samples were above the exemption values established by the International Basic Safety Standards. Elevated radon levels were detected in gas facilities and in the gold mine under development. The values obtained in gas facilities showed that radon concentrates in the ethane and propane flows. As the flows in the gas industry are confined, it does not mean an exposure during normal operation. In the case of the gold mine, the values detected were informed to the pertinent authorities as well as the facility in order to take actions to reduce concentrations below the action levels. Finally, protective measures to reduce occupational doses in the cleaning and maintenance processes were suggested, as well as for storage of NORM-contaminated items. (author)

  11. Identification and characterization of tsunami deposits off southeast coast of India from the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami: Rock magnetic and geochemical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veerasingam, S.; Venkatachalapathy, R.; Basavaiah, N.; Ramkumar, T.; Venkatramanan, S.; Deenadayalan, K.

    2014-06-01

    The December 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami (IOT) had a major impact on the geomorphology and sedimentology of the east coast of India. Estimation of the magnitude of the tsunami from its deposits is a challenging topic to be developed in studies on tsunami hazard assessment. Two core sediments (C1 and C2) from Nagapattinam, southeast coast of India were subjected to textural, mineral, geochemical and rock-magnetic measurements. In both cores, three zones (zone I, II and III) have been distinguished based on mineralogical, geochemical and magnetic data. Zone II is featured by peculiar rock-magnetic, textural, mineralogical and geochemical signatures in both sediment cores that we interpret to correspond to the 2004 IOT deposit. Textural, mineralogical, geochemical and rock-magnetic investigations showed that the tsunami deposit is featured by relative enrichment in sand, quartz, feldspar, carbonate, SiO 2, TiO 2, K 2O and CaO and by a depletion in clay and iron oxides. These results point to a dilution of reworked ferromagnetic particles into a huge volume of paramagnetic materials, similar to what has been described in other nearshore tsunami deposits (Font et al. 2010). Correlation analysis elucidated the relationships among the textural, mineral, geochemical and magnetic parameters, and suggests that most of the quartz-rich coarse sediments have been transported offshore by the tsunami wave. These results agreed well with the previously published numerical model of tsunami induced sediment transport off southeast coast of India and can be used for future comparative studies on tsunami deposits.

  12. Status report on geochemical modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Read, D.

    1991-12-01

    This report describes the findings of a review undertaken on behalf of the project management group of the programme 'Endlagersicherheit in der Nachbetriebsphase' based at GSF-IfT (Forschungszentrum fuer Umwelt und Gesundheit - Institut fuer Tieflagerung) to establish the current status of research into the simulation of geochemical processes relevant to radiological assessment. The review is intended to contribute to Stage 1 of a strategy formulated to enhance the use of geochemical models in Germany. Emphasis has been placed on processes deemed to be of greatest relevance to performance assessment for a HLW-repository in a salt dome principally, speciation-solubility in high salinity solutions, complexation by natural organics and generation-transport of colloids. For each of these and other topics covered, a summary is given of fundamental concepts, theoretical representations and their limitations, highlighting, where appropriate, the advantages and disadvantages of alternative approaches. The availability of data to quantify any given representation is addressed, taking into account the need for information at elevated temperatures and pressures. Mass transfer is considered in terms of aqueous, particulate and gas-mediated transport, respectively. (orig.) [de

  13. TAPIR--Finnish national geochemical baseline database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarva, Jaana; Tarvainen, Timo; Reinikainen, Jussi; Eklund, Mikael

    2010-09-15

    In Finland, a Government Decree on the Assessment of Soil Contamination and Remediation Needs has generated a need for reliable and readily accessible data on geochemical baseline concentrations in Finnish soils. According to the Decree, baseline concentrations, referring both to the natural geological background concentrations and the diffuse anthropogenic input of substances, shall be taken into account in the soil contamination assessment process. This baseline information is provided in a national geochemical baseline database, TAPIR, that is publicly available via the Internet. Geochemical provinces with elevated baseline concentrations were delineated to provide regional geochemical baseline values. The nationwide geochemical datasets were used to divide Finland into geochemical provinces. Several metals (Co, Cr, Cu, Ni, V, and Zn) showed anomalous concentrations in seven regions that were defined as metal provinces. Arsenic did not follow a similar distribution to any other elements, and four arsenic provinces were separately determined. Nationwide geochemical datasets were not available for some other important elements such as Cd and Pb. Although these elements are included in the TAPIR system, their distribution does not necessarily follow the ones pre-defined for metal and arsenic provinces. Regional geochemical baseline values, presented as upper limit of geochemical variation within the region, can be used as trigger values to assess potential soil contamination. Baseline values have also been used to determine upper and lower guideline values that must be taken into account as a tool in basic risk assessment. If regional geochemical baseline values are available, the national guideline values prescribed in the Decree based on ecological risks can be modified accordingly. The national geochemical baseline database provides scientifically sound, easily accessible and generally accepted information on the baseline values, and it can be used in various

  14. Geochemical Astro- and Geochronological Constraints on the Early Jurassic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storm, M.; Condon, D. J.; Ruhl, M.; Jenkyns, H. C.; Hesselbo, S. P.; Al-Suwaidi, A. H.; Percival, L.

    2017-12-01

    The Early Jurassic Hettangian and Sinemurian time scales are poorly defined due to the lack of continuous geochemical records, and the temporal constrain of the Toarcian Oceanic Anoxic Event and associated global carbon cycle perturbation is afflicted by geochemical and biostratigraphical uncertainties of the existing radiometric dates from various volcanic ash bearing sections. Here we present a continuous, orbitally paced Hettangian to Pliensbachian carbon-isotope record of the Mochras drill-core (Cardigan bay Basin, UK). The record generates new insights into the evolution and driving mechanisms of the Early Jurassic carbon cycle, and is contributing to improve the Hettangian and Sinemurian time scale. Furthermore, we introduce a new high-resolution carbon-isotope chemostratigraphy, integrated with ammonite biostratigraphy and new U/Pb single zircon geochronology of the Las Overas section (Neuquén Basin, Argentina). The studied section comprises sediments from the tenuicostatum to Dumortiera Andean Ammonite zone (tenuicostatum to levesqui European standard zones). A stratigraphically expanded negative shift in d13Corg values, from -24‰ down to -32­‰, appears in the tenuicostatum and hoelderi ammonite zone, coeval to the negative excursion in European realm which is associated with the Toarcian Oceanic Anoxic Event. The negative isotope excursion appears concomitant with an increase in sedimentary mercury levels, indicating enhanced volcanic activity. TOC values and elemental data suggest a high sedimentation dilution in the tenuicostatum to pacificum zone. The new geochronological data from several volcanic ash beds throughout the section are further improving the temporal correlation between the Early Toarcian isotope event and causal mechanisms

  15. Coccocypselum pulchellum (Rubiaceae, nuevo registro para Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsa L. Cabral

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Se cita Coccocypselum pulchellum por primera vez para Argentina, en Predio Guaraní, Misiones. Esta es la tercera especie de Coccocypselum registrada para la flora de Argentina junto con C. hasslerianum y C. lanceolatum. Se incluyen descripciones, ilustraciones y una clave para reconocer las tres especies argentinas de Coccocypselum.

  16. Argentina: Background and U.S. Relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-11-05

    Comercio Internacional, Y Culto, Comunicado de la Cancillería Argentina, September 11, 2008. 43 A. Rebossio, "Fernández Acusa al FBI de Desestablizar...Argentina," El País (Madrid), September 13, 2008. 44 “Argentina Slams Witness in Cash Suitcase Scandal,” Associated Press Newswires, November 4, 2008

  17. Climatology of hail in Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezher, Romina N.; Doyle, Moira; Barros, Vicente

    2012-10-01

    The annual cycle, annual and seasonal frequency and geographical distribution of hail in Argentina during the 1960-2008 period are examined. Eight regions covering the whole territory were defined based on the correlation of the mean annual hail frequency between all weather stations. Regions lying between 30° and 40°S as well as those dominated by mountains present the highest hail frequencies in Argentina. The eastern and coastal areas of the country experience hail events mainly during springtime but they may start in late winter and continue through the beginning of summer. Events in western and central Argentina also predominate in spring but the maximum frequencies are observed during summer months. Trends in the annual number of hail events calculated for each region indicate that events in northwestern and northeastern Argentina have been increasing as well as in southern Patagonia. On the other hand, in central Argentina, southern Buenos Aires-La Pampa, northern Buenos Aires-Litoral and northern Patagonia trends are negative and statistically significant in the first two regions, basically by the decrease of events during spring and summer.

  18. Nuclear Activities in Argentina, 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreri, J.C.; Ferreri, J.C.; Clausse, A.; Clausse, A.; Clausse, A.; Ordonez, J.P.; Mazzantini, O.A.

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear activities in Argentina are restarted. After almost two decades of near stagnation, the governments political decision of August 2006 regarding electrical energy production, considered the nuclear option as a valid one to solve the problems of the growing demand of electrical energy. This decision triggered again the activities related to the finalization of the third nuclear power reactor (Atucha-II), now actively progressing, the construction of a prototype of the CAREM integral advanced reactor, the life extension of the Embalse CANDU nuclear power plant (NPP) and the studies for the emplacement of a fourth NPP in an appropriate site. In all those years of near stagnation, there were notable exceptions related to the design and construction of experimental and radioisotope production reactors, led by INVAP, a state-owned industry, which exported its production. The accompanying industries of nuclear fuel elements production also remained active, given the demand of the two active NPPs. Meanwhile, the National Atomic Energy Commission of Argentina continued the efforts on research and development that were at the base of the technological achievements of the nuclear activities in Argentina. Nuclear safety studies associated with Atucha II and Embalse NPPs and radiological safety were also a substantive part of the continued efforts by Nucleo-Electrica de Argentina SA and the Nuclear Regulatory Authority of Argentina

  19. Country watch. Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, P

    1994-01-01

    The Argentine Network of Women Living with HIV/AIDS (ANW) provides general information about acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), assistance in assessing medications through state and private services, and information concerning and referrals to nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) and governmental social services to low income women who have been diagnosed with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Workshops allow the women to become more active on their own behalf and contribute to the reorientation of health and social services to better meet their needs. Due to the stigma attached to AIDS in Argentina, ANW works to ensure the human rights of these women through participation in the Ministry of Interior Programme against Discrimination and in public events that inform the community about the concerns of HIV positive women with regard to discrimination. A bulletin provides scientific and medical information, news on activities, model advocacy and policy statements, and addresses of support agencies. Contributions are accepted from all HIV positive women. In order to reach isolated cases outside of the capital, links are maintained with other AIDS organizations in the nation.

  20. Argentina and Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamba-Stonehouse, V.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports that security is defined in different ways by many international actors. To some, security is tied to the definition of an external threat to borders, as in the case of the NATO countries. To other, security is related to development, as in the case of most Third World countries. but notwithstanding different definitions, all countries recognize that the essence of security is the survival of the nation-state itself. The nuclear programs of Argentina and Brazil are among the oldest, most sophisticated and advanced nuclear programs anywhere in the Third World. The programs have never been explained on the basis of threat perception, and in this regard perhaps they constitute the most atypical form of nuclear proliferation known to date. Not surprisingly, any attempt to explain the rationale for the Brazilian and Argentine nuclear programs based on common issues of threat =merely confuses the issue. Thus, nationalism, the search for national identity and pride, the need to express self-sufficiency and the desire to keep options open in an insecure and evolving world order must all be analyzed to comprehend the likelihood of future types of nuclear proliferation. Meanwhile, the study of the contemporary era of Argentine-Brazilian nuclear rapprochement may provide new insights into the complex reasoning behind the decision of countries to go nuclear

  1. Pampa Húmeda, Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Néstor C. Di Leo

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available La radiación fotosintéticamente activa (PAR es importante como variable de entrada de energía en diversos procesos biológicos y su evaluación temporal tiene particular interés en el monitoreo de cultivos. Los datos de reflectancia espectral, obtenidos mediante sensores remotos, son adecuados para proporcionar observaciones de fenómenos que se relacionan con aspectos ecofisiológicos de las cubiertas vegetales, incluyendo a la productividad primaria neta (NPP. Ésta constituye una de las pocas fuentes de información acerca de los procesos del ciclo del carbono en escalas regionales o globales. La NPP se relaciona con la eficiencia del uso de la luz a través de la radiación fotosintéticamente activa absorbida (APAR y representa un indicador agroecológico de utilidad para valorar la utilización productiva del territorio. El objetivo de este trabajo es presentar un aporte metodológico a la agroecología, mediante las caracterizaciones de la NPP y la APAR, en tres situaciones geográficas y productivas de la Pampa Húmeda, Argentina.

  2. Automated Quantitative Rare Earth Elements Mineralogy by Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sindern, Sven; Meyer, F. Michael

    2016-09-01

    Increasing industrial demand of rare earth elements (REEs) stems from the central role they play for advanced technologies and the accelerating move away from carbon-based fuels. However, REE production is often hampered by the chemical, mineralogical as well as textural complexity of the ores with a need for better understanding of their salient properties. This is not only essential for in-depth genetic interpretations but also for a robust assessment of ore quality and economic viability. The design of energy and cost-efficient processing of REE ores depends heavily on information about REE element deportment that can be made available employing automated quantitative process mineralogy. Quantitative mineralogy assigns numeric values to compositional and textural properties of mineral matter. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) combined with a suitable software package for acquisition of backscatter electron and X-ray signals, phase assignment and image analysis is one of the most efficient tools for quantitative mineralogy. The four different SEM-based automated quantitative mineralogy systems, i.e. FEI QEMSCAN and MLA, Tescan TIMA and Zeiss Mineralogic Mining, which are commercially available, are briefly characterized. Using examples of quantitative REE mineralogy, this chapter illustrates capabilities and limitations of automated SEM-based systems. Chemical variability of REE minerals and analytical uncertainty can reduce performance of phase assignment. This is shown for the REE phases parisite and synchysite. In another example from a monazite REE deposit, the quantitative mineralogical parameters surface roughness and mineral association derived from image analysis are applied for automated discrimination of apatite formed in a breakdown reaction of monazite and apatite formed by metamorphism prior to monazite breakdown. SEM-based automated mineralogy fulfils all requirements for characterization of complex unconventional REE ores that will become

  3. A new and improved methodology for qualitative and quantitative mineralogical analysis of Boom Clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeelmaekers, E.; Vandenberghe, N.; Honty, M.; De Craen, M.; Derkowski, A.; Van Geet, M.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. A good knowledge of the mineralogy of any host formation studied for geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste, is a prerequisite for understanding the geochemical environment which will determine the migration and retention behaviour of radionuclides. In this respect, the Boom Clay mineralogical composition has been extensively studied last decades as reference host formation (e.g. ARCHIMEDEARGILE project, OECD-NEA clay catalogue report) with the aim to provide reliable data for a safety assessment. However, a comparison of the available literature data clearly showed a serious discrepancy among studies, not only in the quantitative, but also in the qualitative mineralogical composition of the Boom Clay (SAFIR II). The reason for such a huge disagreement could be related, among others, to variable grain size distributions of the studied samples (sample heterogeneity) and differences in the methodological approaches. In particular, the unambiguous characterisation of clay minerals and the quantification of mixed-layer phases appeared as an everlasting problem. This study is aimed at achieving a consensus on the qualitative and quantitative mineralogical data of the Boom Clay using the most advanced techniques currently available in the clay science. A new sampling campaign was performed in such a way that samples are (20 in total) more or less regularly distributed over Boom Clay Formation, ensuring that variations in the grain size distributions due to silty clay-clayey silt layers alternations are accounted for. The novel concept based on an analysis at two levels was applied: (1) bulk rock and (2) clay fraction analysis. (1) A bulk rock analysis consists of conventional XRD analysis with the identification of the principal mineral phases. As a next step, the bulk rock was mixed with a ZnO internal standard and experimental diffraction patterns of randomly oriented powders were analyzed using &apos

  4. Coupled geochemical and solute transport code development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrey, J.R.; Hostetler, C.J.

    1985-01-01

    A number of coupled geochemical hydrologic codes have been reported in the literature. Some of these codes have directly coupled the source-sink term to the solute transport equation. The current consensus seems to be that directly coupling hydrologic transport and chemical models through a series of interdependent differential equations is not feasible for multicomponent problems with complex geochemical processes (e.g., precipitation/dissolution reactions). A two-step process appears to be the required method of coupling codes for problems where a large suite of chemical reactions must be monitored. Two-step structure requires that the source-sink term in the transport equation is supplied by a geochemical code rather than by an analytical expression. We have developed a one-dimensional two-step coupled model designed to calculate relatively complex geochemical equilibria (CTM1D). Our geochemical module implements a Newton-Raphson algorithm to solve heterogeneous geochemical equilibria, involving up to 40 chemical components and 400 aqueous species. The geochemical module was designed to be efficient and compact. A revised version of the MINTEQ Code is used as a parent geochemical code

  5. Proceedings of the workshop on geochemical modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    The following collection of papers was presented at a workshop on geochemical modeling that was sponsored by the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The LLNL Waste Management Program sponsored this conference based on their belief that geochemical modeling is particularly important to the radioactive waste disposal project because of the need to predict the consequences of long-term water-rock interactions at the proposed repository site. The papers included in this volume represent a subset of the papers presented at the Fallen Leaf Lake Conference and cover a broad spectrum of detail and breadth in a subject that reflects the diverse research interests of the conference participants. These papers provide an insightful look into the current status of geochemical modeling and illustrate how various geochemical modeling codes have been applied to problems of geochemical interest. The emphasis of these papers includes traditional geochemical modeling studies of individual geochemical systems, the mathematical and theoretical development and refinement of new modeling capabilities, and enhancements of data bases on which the computations are based. The papers in this proceedings volume have been organized into the following four areas: Geochemical Model Development, Hydrothermal and Geothermal Systems, Sedimentary and Low Temperature Environments, and Data Base Development. The participants of this symposium and a complete list of the talks presented are listed in the appendices

  6. Proceedings of the workshop on geochemical modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-01-01

    The following collection of papers was presented at a workshop on geochemical modeling that was sponsored by the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The LLNL Waste Management Program sponsored this conference based on their belief that geochemical modeling is particularly important to the radioactive waste disposal project because of the need to predict the consequences of long-term water-rock interactions at the proposed repository site. The papers included in this volume represent a subset of the papers presented at the Fallen Leaf Lake Conference and cover a broad spectrum of detail and breadth in a subject that reflects the diverse research interests of the conference participants. These papers provide an insightful look into the current status of geochemical modeling and illustrate how various geochemical modeling codes have been applied to problems of geochemical interest. The emphasis of these papers includes traditional geochemical modeling studies of individual geochemical systems, the mathematical and theoretical development and refinement of new modeling capabilities, and enhancements of data bases on which the computations are based. The papers in this proceedings volume have been organized into the following four areas: Geochemical Model Development, Hydrothermal and Geothermal Systems, Sedimentary and Low Temperature Environments, and Data Base Development. The participants of this symposium and a complete list of the talks presented are listed in the appendices.

  7. Determination of sampling constants in NBS geochemical standard reference materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filby, R.H.; Bragg, A.E.; Grimm, C.A.

    1986-01-01

    Recently Filby et al. showed that, for several elements, National Bureau of Standards (NBS) Fly Ash standard reference material (SRM) 1633a was a suitable reference material for microanalysis (sample weights 2 , and the mean sample weight, W vector, K/sub s/ = (S/sub s/%) 2 W vector, could not be determined from these data because it was not possible to quantitate other sources of error in the experimental variances. K/sub s/ values for certified elements in geochemical SRMs provide important homogeneity information for microanalysis. For mineralogically homogeneous SRMs (i.e., small K/sub s/ values for associated elements) such as the proposed clays, it is necessary to determine K/sub s/ by analysis of very small sample aliquots to maximize the subsampling variance relative to other sources of error. This source of error and the blank correction for the sample container can be eliminated by determining K/sub s/ from radionuclide activities of weighed subsamples of a preirradiated SRM

  8. Crisis de la prensa Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Rey Lennon

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available La magnitud de la crisis económica Argentina es enorme y difícil saber hasta cuando se extenderá, agravada por una situación política frágil. La actual recesión ha hecho caer la inversión publicitaria a los niveles más bajos de los últimos años. De 1997 al 2001 la circulación de la prensa Argentina cayó en el 36 por ciento. El riesgo en Argentina es la eventual extranjerización de casi todos los medios de comunicación.

  9. Mineralogy, geochemistry, and palynology of modern and late Tertiary mangrove deposits in the Barreiras Formation of Mosqueiro Island, northeastern Pará state, eastern Amazonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behling, Hermann; da Costa, Marcondes Lima

    2004-12-01

    A coastal environment has been interpreted from 110 cm thick mudstone deposits found at the base of a 10 m immature laterite profile, which forms the modern coastal cliff on Mosqueiro Island in northeastern Pará state, northern Brazil. The late Tertiary sediment deposits of the Barreiras Formation are studied by multi-element geochemistry and pollen analyses. The mineralogical and geochemical results show that the gray, organic-rich deposits are composed of kaolinite, quartz, and illite/muscovite, as well as pyrite and anatase. They are rich in SiO 2, Al 2O 3, and some FeO. The composition is homogenous, indicating that the detritus source area is formed of lateritic soils derived from acid rock composition. Their chemical composition, including trace elements, is somewhat comparable to continental shale, and the values are below the upper continental Earth crust composition. The pollen analytical data document that the mudstone deposits were formed by an ancient mangrove ecosystem. Mineralogical, geochemical, and pollen analytical data obtained from late Tertiary mangrove deposits are compared with modern mangrove deposits from the Bragança Peninsula of the northeastern coast of Pará state. Although the pollen composition of the deposits is very similar to the modern one, the geochemical and mineralogical composition is different. Smectite was only found in the modern deposit; illite/mica occurs in the ancient deposit, along with Mg, K, and Na. The pollen signature and detrital minerals (kaolinite, quartz and anatase) found in both mangrove deposits show that during the Miocene, a humid tropical climate condition prevailed, similar to modern conditions.

  10. Geochemical prospecting for uranium and thorium deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyle, R.W.

    1980-01-01

    A brief review of analytical geochemical prospecting methods for uranium and thorium is given excluding radiometric techniques, except those utilized in the determination of radon. The indicator (pathfinder) elements useful in geochemical surveys are listed for each of the types of known uranium and thorium deposits; this is followed by sections on analytical geochemical surveys based on rocks (lithochemical surveys), unconsolidated materials (pedochemical surveys), natural waters and sediments (hydrochemical surveys), biological materials (biogeochemical surveys) and gases (atmochemical surveys). All of the analytical geochemical methods are applicable in prospecting for thorium and uranium, particularly where radiometric methods fail due to attenuation by overburden, water, deep leaching and so on. Efficiency in the discovery of uranium and/or thorium orebodies is promoted by an integrated methods approach employing geological pattern recognition in the localization of deposits, analytical geochemical surveys, and radiometric surveys. (author)

  11. Mineralogy of the Hydrous Lower Mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, S. H.; Chen, H.; Leinenweber, K. D.; Kunz, M.; Prakapenka, V.; Bechtel, H.; Liu, Z.

    2017-12-01

    The hydrous ringwoodite inclusions found in diamonds suggest water storage in the mantle transition zone. However, water storage in the lower mantle remains unclear. Bridgmanite and magnesiowustite appear to have very little storage capacity for water. Here, we report experimental results indicating significant changes in the lower-mantle mineralogy under the presence of water. We have synthesized Mg2SiO4 ringwoodite with 2 wt% water in multi-anvil press at 20 GPa and 1573 K at ASU. The hydrous ringwoodite sample was then loaded to diamond anvil cells with Ar or Ne as a pressure medium. We heated the pure hydrous ringwoodite samples at lower-mantle pressure using a CO2 laser heating system at ASU. We measured X-ray diffraction patterns at the GSECARS sector of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) and 12.2.2 sector of the Advanced Light Source (ALS). For the separate Pt-mixed samples, we have conducted in situ heating at the beamlines using near IR laser heating systems. We measured the infrared spectra of the heated samples at high pressure and after pressure quench at 1.4.4 sector of ALS. In the in situ experiments with hydrous ringwoodite + Pt mixture as a starting material, we found formation of stishovite together with bridgmanite and periclase during heating with a near IR laser beams at 1300-2500 K and 35-66 GPa. However, some hydrous ringwoodite still remains even after a total of 45 min of heating. In contrast, the hydrous ringwoodite samples heated without Pt by CO2 laser beams are transformed completely to bridgmanite, periclase and stishovite at 31-55 GPa and 1600-1900 K. We have detected IR active OH mode of stishovite from the samples heated at lower-mantle pressures. The unit-cell volume of stishovite measured after pressure quench is greater than that of dry stishovite by 0.3-0.6%, supporting 0.5-1 wt% of H2O in stishovite in these samples. Stishovite is a thermodynamically forbidden phase in the dry lower mantle because of the existence of periclase and

  12. Petrologic and geochemical characterization of the Topopah Spring Member of the Paintbrush Tuff: outcrop samples used in waste package experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knauss, K.G.

    1984-06-01

    This report summarizes characterization studies conducted with outcrop samples of Topopah Spring Member of the Paintbrush Tuff (Tpt). In support of the Waste Package Task within the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigation (NNWSI), Tpt is being studied both as a primary object and as a constituent used to condition water that will be reacted with waste form, canister, or packing material. These studies directly or indirectly support NNWSI subtasks concerned with waste package design and geochemical modeling. To interpret the results of subtask experiments, it is necessary to know the exact nature of the starting material in terms of the intial bulk composition, mineralogy, and individual phase geochemistry. 31 figures, 5 tables

  13. Petrologic and geochemical characterization of the Topopah Spring Member of the Paintbrush Tuff: outcrop samples used in waste package experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knauss, K.G.

    1984-06-01

    This report summarizes characterization studies conducted with outcrop samples of Topopah Spring Member of the Paintbrush Tuff (Tpt). In support of the Waste Package Task within the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigation (NNWSI), Tpt is being studied both as a primary object and as a constituent used to condition water that will be reacted with waste form, canister, or packing material. These studies directly or indirectly support NNWSI subtasks concerned with waste package design and geochemical modeling. To interpret the results of subtask experiments, it is necessary to know the exact nature of the starting material in terms of the intial bulk composition, mineralogy, and individual phase geochemistry. 31 figures, 5 tables.

  14. Mineralogical microanalysis of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monso, E.; Tura, J.M.; Marsal, M.; Morell, F.; Pujadas, J.; Morera, J.

    1990-01-01

    A mineralogical analysis of lung tissue was conducted on 25 samples from patients who had been diagnosed as having idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) at low magnification and energy-dispersive x-ray analysis (EDXA) was used. In all samples, the surface silicon/sulfur (Si/S) ratio was calculated. The Si/S ratio for 25 samples of normal lung and 6 samples of pneumoconiotic lung was also determined (upper limit of normal Si/S ratio = 0.3). The difference between the Si/S ratio in the group with IPF and group with normal lung tissue was significantly significant (p less than .007, Wilcoxon test). Six of 12 patients with a previous diagnosis of IPF and a Si/S ratio greater than 0.3 had an exposure history that could imply inhalation of silica/silicates, and the correct diagnosis for these patients is most probably pneumoconiosis. The silica/silicate deposits detected in patients with IPF, and who had a ratio and no past exposure to dusts, could be either a cause or an effect of the disease

  15. Mineralogical microanalysis of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monso, E.; Tura, J.M.; Marsal, M.; Morell, F.; Pujadas, J.; Morera, J. (Hospital Germans Trias i Pujol, Badalona (Spain))

    1990-05-01

    A mineralogical analysis of lung tissue was conducted on 25 samples from patients who had been diagnosed as having idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) at low magnification and energy-dispersive x-ray analysis (EDXA) was used. In all samples, the surface silicon/sulfur (Si/S) ratio was calculated. The Si/S ratio for 25 samples of normal lung and 6 samples of pneumoconiotic lung was also determined (upper limit of normal Si/S ratio = 0.3). The difference between the Si/S ratio in the group with IPF and group with normal lung tissue was significantly significant (p less than .007, Wilcoxon test). Six of 12 patients with a previous diagnosis of IPF and a Si/S ratio greater than 0.3 had an exposure history that could imply inhalation of silica/silicates, and the correct diagnosis for these patients is most probably pneumoconiosis. The silica/silicate deposits detected in patients with IPF, and who had a ratio and no past exposure to dusts, could be either a cause or an effect of the disease.

  16. chemical and mineralogical characterization of lateritic iron ore

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DJFLEX

    2010-04-22

    Apr 22, 2010 ... The laterite iron ore deposit at Auchi, Edo State, Nigeria was studied chemically and mineralogically. The results of the chemical ... SAMPLE PREPARATION. The samples .... 2µm) and were subjected to X-ray diffraction using.

  17. Mineralogy of halloysites and their interaction with porphyrine

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vašutová, V.; Bezdička, Petr; Lang, Kamil; Hradil, David

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 57, č. 3 (2013), s. 243-250 ISSN 0862-5468 Institutional support: RVO:61388980 Keywords : organoclays * mineralogy * porphyrine * CEC Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 0.434, year: 2013

  18. The mineralogy of ordinary chondrites and implications for asteroid spectrophotometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcsween, Harry Y., Jr.; Bennett, Marvin E., III; Jarosewich, Eugene

    1991-01-01

    Published data from bulk chemical analyses of 94 ordinary chondrites are compiled in a table of normative mineralogy and discussed in detail. Significant variations in olivine, pyroxene, and metal abundance ratios are found within each chondrite class and attributed to redox processes superimposed on initial differences in metal/silicate ratios. The use of the diagrams constructed here to predict the mineralogic characteristics of asteroids on the basis of spectrophotometric observations is suggested.

  19. Mineralogy, geochemistry and petrophysics of red coloured granite adjacent to fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eliasson, T.

    1993-03-01

    Mineralogical, geochemical and petrophysical investigations were conducted of red-coloured alteration rims and of the neighbouring unaltered equivalents along fractures within granite from Aespoe. An investigation was made also of a weak to rather strong, red-coloured granite from the Stripa mine, as well as a weak brownish-red colouration, definitely no hydrothermal in origin, of weathered rinds at a glacial polished rock surface in the Bohus granite. When approaching the fracture planes in the Aespoe granite, the most diagnostic alteration features are * the saussuritisation and Fe-oxyhydroxide staining of plagioclase, * the crystallisation chlorite pseudomorphs after biotite and * the hematisation of magnetite. The porosity within the alteration zones increases generally 2 to 3 times compared with the protolith rock, whereas the densities decrease by some 5 to 10%. The oxidation of magnetite gives as much as a tenfold lowering of the magnetic susceptibility. The red colouration of the Stripa granite is caused by hematite ± Fe-oxyhydroxide formation along microfractures, grain boundaries and, subordinately, the main minerals. Oxidation and re-precipitation of iron liberated during a retrograde muscovitisation of principally chlorite is interpreted to be the cause of the formation of the ferric oxides. The rather homogeneous density and porosity values of the grey and of the red-coloured granites reflect the minor change in the mineralogy when going from fresh into altered granite. Weathering and whitening of plagioclase in the bleached, outer zone and precipitation of small quantities of Fe-oxyhydroxides/hydroxides in the brownish-red zone cause the macroscopic colouration of the weathering rind below the glacial polished rock surface of Bohus granite. There is a marked increase in porosity from the interior fresh (c. 0.4-0.5%) towards the exterior bleached zone (c.1.5-2%) of the subaerialy, weathered Bohus granite surface. The incipient decomposition of

  20. NREL technical assistance to Argentina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lilienthal, P. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1997-12-01

    This paper describes assistance to Argentina from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory which has touched on four programs: tariff analysis for rural concessions programs; wind/diesel hybrid retrofits in Patagonia; small hybrid systems designs for rural schools; an assessment of wind resources. The paper expands briefly on the first two points.

  1. Mineralogy and heavy metal content of secondary mineral salts: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Secondary minerals associated with acid mine drainage play an important role in metal cycling and may pose a geochemical hazard. The occurrence of secondary minerals indicates prevailing and past geochemical conditions. Detecting and characterising secondary minerals is necessary to the planning of remediation ...

  2. Arsenic mineralogy and mobility in the arsenic-rich historical mine waste dump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filippi, Michal; Drahota, Petr; Machovič, Vladimír; Böhmová, Vlasta; Mihaljevič, Martin

    2015-01-01

    A more than 250 year-old mine dump was studied to document the products of long-term arsenopyrite oxidation under natural conditions in a coarse-grained mine waste dump and to evaluate the environmental hazards associated with this material. Using complementary mineralogical and chemical approaches (SEM/EDS/WDS, XRD, micro-Raman spectroscopy, pore water analysis, chemical extraction techniques and thermodynamic PHREEQC-2 modeling), we documented the mineralogical/geochemical characteristics of the dumped arsenopyrite-rich material and environmental stability of the newly formed secondary minerals. A distinct mineralogical zonation was found (listed based on the distance from the decomposed arsenopyrite): scorodite (locally associated with native sulfur pseudomorphs) plus amorphous ferric arsenate (AFA/pitticite), kaňkite, As-bearing ferric (hydr)oxides and jarosite. Ferric arsenates and ferric (hydr)oxides were found to dissolve and again precipitate from downward migrating As-rich solutions cementing rock fragments. Acidic pore water (pH 3.8) has elevated concentrations of As with an average value of about 2.9 mg L −1 . Aqueous As is highly correlated with pH (R 2 = 0.97, p < 0.001) indicating that incongruent dissolution of ferric arsenates controls dissolved As well as the pH of the percolating waste solution. Arsenic released from the dissolution of ferric arsenates into the pore water is, however, trapped by latter and lower-down precipitating jarosite and especially ferric (hydr)oxides. The efficiency of As sequestration by ferric (hydr)oxides in the waste dump and underlying soil has been found to be very effective, suggesting limited environmental impact of the mine waste dump on the surrounding soil ecosystems. - Highlights: • More than 250 year-old arsenopyrite-rich mine waste dump was studied. • Mineral transformation and the environmental stability of different secondary arsenic mineral phases were assessed. • High efficiency of As

  3. Magnetic and geochemical characterization of Andosols developed on basalts in the Massif Central, France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grison, Hana; Petrovsky, Eduard; Stejskalova, Sarka; Kapicka, Ales

    2015-05-01

    Identification of Andosols is primarily based upon the content of their colloidal constituents—clay and metal-humus complexes—and on the determining of andic properties. This needs time and cost-consuming geochemical analyses. Our primary aim of this study is to describe the magnetic and geochemical properties of soils rich in iron oxides derived from strongly magnetic volcanic basement (in this case Andosols). Secondary aim is to explore links between magnetic and chemical parameters of andic soils with respect to genesis factors: parent material age, precipitation, and thickness of the soil profile. Six pedons of andic properties, developed on basaltic lavas, were analyzed down to parent rock by a set of magnetic and geochemical methods. Magnetic data of soil and rock samples reflect the type, concentration, and particle-size distribution of ferrimagnetic minerals. Geochemical data include soil reaction (pH in H2O), cation exchange capacity, organic carbon, and different forms of extractable iron and aluminum content. Our results suggest the following: (1) magnetic measurements of low-field mass-specific magnetic susceptibility can be a reliable indicator for estimating andic properties, and in combination with thermomagnetic curves may be suitable for discriminating between alu-andic and sil-andic subtypes. (2) In the studied Andosols, strong relationships were found between (a) magnetic grain-size parameters, precipitation, and exchangeable bases; (b) concentration of ferrimagnetic particles and degree of crystallization of free iron; and (c) parameters reflecting changes in magneto-mineralogy and soil genesis (parent material age + soil depth).

  4. Geochemical patterns and microbial contribution to iron plaque formation in the rice plant rhizosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maisch, Markus; Murata, Chihiro; Unger, Julia; Kappler, Andreas; Schmidt, Caroline

    2015-04-01

    Rice is the major food source for more than half of the world population and 80 percent of the worldwide rice cultivation is performed on water logged paddy soils. The establishment of reducing conditions in the soil and across the soil-water interface not only stimulates the microbial production and release of the greenhouse gas methane. These settings also create optimal conditions for microbial iron(III) reduction and therefore saturate the system with reduced ferrous iron. Through the reduction and dissolution of ferric minerals that are characterized by their high surface activity, sorbed nutrients and contaminants (e.g. arsenic) will be mobilized and are thus available for uptake by plants. Rice plants have evolved a strategy to release oxygen from their roots in order to prevent iron toxification in highly ferrous environments. The release of oxygen to the reduced paddy soil causes ferric iron plaque formation on the rice roots and finally increases the sorption capacity for toxic metals. To this date the geochemical and microbiological processes that control the formation of iron plaque are not deciphered. It has been hypothesized that iron(II)-oxidizing bacteria play a potential role in the iron(III) mineral formation along the roots. However, not much is known about the actual processes, mineral products, and geochemical gradients that establish within the rhizosphere. In the present study we have developed a growth set-up that allows the co-cultivation of rice plants and iron(II)-oxidizing bacteria, as well as the visual observation and in situ measurement of geochemical parameters. Oxygen and dissolved iron(II) gradients have been measured using microelectrodes and show geochemical hot spots that offer optimal growth conditions for microaerophilic iron(II) oxidizers. First mineral identification attempts of iron plaque have been performed using Mössbauer spectroscopy and microscopy. The obtained results on mineraology and crystallinity have been

  5. Collected radiochemical and geochemical procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleinberg, J [comp.

    1990-05-01

    This revision of LA-1721, 4th Ed., Collected Radiochemical Procedures, reflects the activities of two groups in the Isotope and Nuclear Chemistry Division of the Los Alamos National Laboratory: INC-11, Nuclear and radiochemistry; and INC-7, Isotope Geochemistry. The procedures fall into five categories: I. Separation of Radionuclides from Uranium, Fission-Product Solutions, and Nuclear Debris; II. Separation of Products from Irradiated Targets; III. Preparation of Samples for Mass Spectrometric Analysis; IV. Dissolution Procedures; and V. Geochemical Procedures. With one exception, the first category of procedures is ordered by the positions of the elements in the Periodic Table, with separate parts on the Representative Elements (the A groups); the d-Transition Elements (the B groups and the Transition Triads); and the Lanthanides (Rare Earths) and Actinides (the 4f- and 5f-Transition Elements). The members of Group IIIB-- scandium, yttrium, and lanthanum--are included with the lanthanides, elements they resemble closely in chemistry and with which they occur in nature. The procedures dealing with the isolation of products from irradiated targets are arranged by target element.

  6. Proceedings of 2. Brazilian Geochemical Congress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    Some works about geochemistry are presented, including themes about geochemical exploration, lithogeochemistry and isotope geochemistry, environmental geochemistry, analytical geochemistry, geochemistry of carbonatites and rare earth elements and organic geochemistry. (C.G.C.) [pt

  7. Coupling of transport and geochemical models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noy, D.J.

    1986-01-01

    This report considers mass transport in the far-field of a radioactive waste repository, and detailed geochemical modelling of the ground-water in the near-field. A parallel approach to this problem of coupling transport and geochemical codes is the subject of another CEC report (ref. EUR 10226). Both studies were carried out in the framework of the CEC project MIRAGE. (Migration of radionuclides in the geosphere)

  8. Remote Raman - laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) geochemical investigation under Venus atmospheric conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clegg, Sanuel M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Barefield, James E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Humphries, Seth D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wiens, Roger C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Vaniman, D. T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sharma, S. K. [UNIV OF HAWAII; Misra, A. K. [UNIV OF HAWAII; Dyar, M. D. [MT. HOLYOKE COLLEGE; Smrekar, S. E. [JET PROPULSION LAB.

    2010-12-13

    The extreme Venus surface temperatures ({approx}740 K) and atmospheric pressures ({approx}93 atm) create a challenging environment for surface missions. Scientific investigations capable of Venus geochemical observations must be completed within hours of landing before the lander will be overcome by the harsh atmosphere. A combined remote Raman - LIBS (Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy) instrument is capable of accomplishing the geochemical science goals without the risks associated with collecting samples and bringing them into the lander. Wiens et al. and Sharma et al. demonstrated that both analytical techniques can be integrated into a single instrument capable of planetary missions. The focus of this paper is to explore the capability to probe geologic samples with Raman - LIBS and demonstrate quantitative analysis under Venus surface conditions. Raman and LIBS are highly complementary analytical techniques capable of detecting both the mineralogical and geochemical composition of Venus surface materials. These techniques have the potential to profoundly increase our knowledge of the Venus surface composition, which is currently limited to geochemical data from Soviet Venera and VEGA landers that collectively suggest a surface composition that is primarily tholeiitic basaltic with some potentially more evolved compositions and, in some locations, K-rich trachyandesite. These landers were not equipped to probe the surface mineralogy as can be accomplished with Raman spectroscopy. Based on the observed compositional differences and recognizing the imprecise nature of the existing data, 15 samples were chosen to constitute a Venus-analog suite for this study, including five basalts, two each of andesites, dacites, and sulfates, and single samples of a foidite, trachyandesite, rhyolite, and basaltic trachyandesite under Venus conditions. LIBS data reduction involved generating a partial least squares (PLS) model with a subset of the rock powder standards to

  9. Similarity in Evolutionary Histories of Eocene Sediments from Subathu and Cambay Basins: Geochemical and Palaeontological Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhuri, S.; Halder, K.; Sarkar, S.

    2017-12-01

    A systematic comparative study of microfaunal assemblage and representative geochemical elements from two Cenozoic basins of India, Mangrol-Valia Lignite Mine section (21°30'52''N:73°12'20.5''E) of Cambay Shale Formation, western India and Jigni section (33°14'45"N:74°22'0"E) from Subathu Formation in northern India was undertaken to infer the paleoenvironment, palaeobathymetry and paleoclimate of these successions. Despite a gamut of work already carried out in these two basins, the sedimentary successions still await a correlative-detailed process-based facies, geochemical characterization and paleoenvironmental analysis. With a view to fulfill this gap, the present work was carried out by studying bulk rock XRD, XRF, clay mineralogy and analyzing calcareous microfossil foraminifera from samples at equivalent depth of these two basins which are situated thousands of kilometers apart and in different tectonic settings. The faunal assemblage of Eocene sediments of Mangrol-Valia section is indicative of shallow marine and inner shelf deposition with medium oxygen supply, while that of the Jigni section suggests primarily a shallow marine condition, which gradually changes to open marine condition with time. It is pertinent to note that the two basins of Cenozoic India started their lithosuccession with coal bearing strata. Well preserved pectin aragonite shells also indicate that primarily these two basins experienced low energy lagoonal environment. The fossil assemblage in both basins also suggests a tropical moist to terrestrial lowland environment. Geochemical analysis shows that the Mangrol-Valia section mineralogically comprises of kaolinite, siderite, quartz, smectite and kaolinite with higher abundance throughout the succession indicating chemical weathering of Deccan basement and high erosional environment. Calcite is the main constituent of Jigni section that indicates intracratonic rift settings. Medium to high quartz content and other detrital

  10. Rare earth element mineralogy, geochemistry, and preliminary resource assessment of the Khanneshin carbonatite complex, Helmand Province, Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Robert D.; Belkin, Harvey E.; Schulz, Klaus J.; Peters, Stephen G.; Buttleman, Kim P.

    2011-01-01

    There is increased concern about the future availability of rare earth elements (REE) because of China's dominance as the supplier of more than 95 percent of world REE output, their decision to restrict exports of rare earth products, and the rapid increase in world-wide consumption of rare earth product. As a result, countries such as the United States, Japan, and member nations of the European Union face a future of tight supplies and high prices for rare earth products unless other sources of REE are found and developed (Long and others, 2010; U.S. Geological Survey, 2011, p. 128-129, 184-185). We report and describe a significant new deposit of light rare earth elements (LREE), estimated at 1 Mt, within the Khanneshin carbonatite complex of south Afghanistan. The potential resource is located in a remote and rugged part of the igneous complex in a region previously identified by Soviet geologists in the 1970s. This report reviews the geologic setting of LREE deposit, presents new geochemical data documenting the grade of LREE mineralization, briefly describes the mineralogy and mineralogical associations of the deposit, and presents a preliminary estimate of LREE resources based on our current understanding of the geology.

  11. Assessment of diagenetic alteration of dinosaur eggshells through petrography and geochemical analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enriquez, M. V.; Eagle, R.; Eiler, J. M.; Tripati, A. K.; Ramirez, P. C.; Loyd, S. J.; Chiappe, L.; Montanari, S.; Norell, M.; Tuetken, T.

    2012-12-01

    Carbonate clumped isotope analysis of fossil eggshells has the potential to constrain both the physiology of extinct animals and, potentially, paleoenvironmental conditions, especially when coupled with isotopic measurements of co-occurring soil carbonates. Eggshell samples from both modern vertebrates and Cretaceous Hadrosaurid, Oviraptorid, Titanosaur, Hypselosaurus, Faveoolithus, dinosaur fossils have been collected from Auca Mahuevo, Argentina and Rousett, France, amongst other locations, for geochemical analysis to determine if isotopic signatures could be used to indicate warm- or cold-bloodedness. In some locations soil carbonates were also analyzed to constrain environmental temperatures. In order to test the validity of the geochemical results, an extensive study was undertaken to establish degree of diagenetic alteration. Petrographic and cathodoluminescence characterization of the eggshells were used to assess diagenetic alteration. An empirical 1-5 point scale was used to assign each sample an alteration level, and the observations were then compared with the geochemical results. Specimens displayed a wide range of alteration states. Some of which were well preserved and others highly altered. Another group seemed to be structural intact and only under cathodoluminescence was alteration clearly observed. In the majority of samples, alteration level was found to be predictably related to geochemical results. From specimens with little evidence for diagenesis, carbonate clumped isotope signatures support high (37-40°C) body temperature for Titanosaurid dinosaurs, but potentially lower body temperatures for other taxa. If these data do, in fact, represent original eggshell growth temperatures, these results support variability in body temperature amongst Cretaceous dinosaurs and potentially are consistent with variations between adult body temperature and size — a characteristic of 'gigantothermy'.

  12. Mineralogical and Geochemical Study of Titanite Associated With Copper Mineralization in the Hopper Property, Yukon Territory, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenthal, V. H.; Linnen, R. L.

    2009-05-01

    Copper mineralization in central Yukon is well known, but the metallogeny of the Ruby Range batholith, west of the copper belt, is poorly understood. The Hopper property, situated in the south western part of the Yukon in the Yukon-Tanana terrane, contains copper mineralization hosted by granodiorite and quartz feldspar porphyry of cal-alkaline affinity. These rock units, interpreted to be part of the Ruby Range batholith, intruded metasediments of the Ashihik Metamorphic Suite rocks. Mafic dykes cross cut the intrusion followed by aplite dykes. Small occurrences of skarn also occur in the area and some of these contain copper mineralization. The copper mineralization at the Hopper property appears to have a porphyry-type affinity. However, it is associated with a shear zone and propylitic alteration unlike other typical copper porphyry-type deposits. This raises the question whether or not the mineralization is orthomagmatic in origin, i.e., whether or not this is a true porphyry system. The main zone of mineralization is 1 kilometer long and 0.5 kilometer wide. It is characterized by disseminated chalcopyrite and pyrite, which also occur along fractures. Molybdenite mineralization was found to be associated with slickensides. Alteration minerals associated with the copper mineralization are chlorite, epidote-clinozoisite, carbonate and titanite. Chlorite and epidote-clinozoisite are concentrated in the mineralized zone, whereas an earlier potassic alteration shows a weaker spatial correlation with the mineralization. The association of the mineralization with propylitic alteration leads us to believe the mineralization is shear related, although a deeper porphyritic system may be present at depth. Two populations of titanite at the Hopper property are recognized based on their shape, size and association with other minerals. The first population, defined by a length of 100 micrometers to 1 centimeter, euhedral boundaries, and planar contacts with other magmatic phases, is interpreted to be magmatic in origin. The second population is 10 to 500 micrometers long, anhedral and shows a close association with chlorite and chalcopyrite. This type of titanite is hydrothermal in origin. Preliminary electron microprobe analyses of titanite show the magmatic titanite grains have higher concentrations of Al, Fe, Nb, Ce, Zr and Mn, and lower concentrations of Ti and Ca compared to hydrothermal titanite grains. This corresponds with substitutions of Al, Fe, Nb, and Ce to Ti and substitutions of Ce, Zr to Ca. The association of titanite with propylitic alteration and its susceptibility to trace element substitutions make this an ideal test case to evaluate magmatic versus hydrothermal titanite.

  13. Mineralization model for Chahar Gonbad copper-gold deposit (Sirjan, using mineralogical, alteration and geochemical data and multivariate statistical methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seayed Jaber Yousefi

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The study area is located in southeastern Iran, about 110 km southwest of Kerman. Geologically, the area is composed of ophiolitic rocks, volcanic rocks, intrusive bodies and sedimentary rocks. Vein mineralization within andesite, andesitic basalt, andesitic tuffs occurred along the Chahar Gonbad fault. Sulfide mineralization in the ore deposit has taken place as dissemination, veins and veinlets in which pyrite and chalcopyrite are the most important ores. In this area, argillic, phyllic and propylitic alteration types are observed. Such elements as Au, Bi, Cu, S and Se are more enriched than others and the enrichment factors for these elements in comparison with background concentration are 321, 503, 393, 703 and 208, and with respect to Clark concentration are 401, 222, 532, 101 and 156, respectively. According to multivariate analysis, three major mineralization phases are recognized in the deposit. During the first phase, hydrothermal calcite veins are enriched in As, Cd, Pb, Zn and Ca, the second phase is manifested by the enrichment of sulfide veins in Cu, Au, Ag, Bi, Fe and S and the third phase mineralization includes Ni, Mn, Se and Sb as an intermediate level between the two previous phases.

  14. Geochemical mineralogical and nuclear survey of petrogenetic formations of the Czechoslovak Carpathians in the years 1970-1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cambel, B.

    1979-01-01

    A brief review is given of the works performed including the application of nuclear methods. The radioactivity was studied of granitoid rocks and the determination of uranium content using tracks from its decay. For chemical analysis of the minerals and rocks several methods were applied including X-ray fluorescence analysis and atomic absorption. In cooperation with institutes in the USSR work was started on the radiometric dating of samples from the Western Carpathians. In cooperation with Poland research was started of minerals using uranium fission tracks. (Ha)

  15. Geochemically structural characteristics of municipal solid waste incineration fly ash particles and mineralogical surface conversions by chelate treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitamura, Hiroki; Sawada, Takaya; Shimaoka, Takayuki; Takahashi, Fumitake

    2016-01-01

    Leaching behaviors of heavy metals contained in municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) fly ash have been studied well. However, micro-characteristics of MSWI fly ash particles are still uncertain and might be non-negligible to describe their leaching behaviors. Therefore, this study investigated micro-characteristics of MSWI fly ash particles, especially their structural properties and impacts of chelate treatment on surface characteristics. According to SEM observations, raw fly ash particles could be categorized into four types based on their shapes. Because chelate treatment changed the surface of fly ash particles dramatically owing to secondary mineral formations like ettringite, two more types could be categorized for chelate-treated fly ash particles. Acid extraction experiments suggest that fly ash particles, tested in this study, consist of Si-base insoluble core structure, Al/Ca/Si-base semi-soluble matrices inside the body, and KCl/NaCl-base soluble aggregates on the surface. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) observations of the same fly ash particles during twice moistening treatments showed that KCl/NaCl moved under wet condition and concentrated at different places on the particle surface. However, element mobility depended on secondary mineral formations. When insoluble mineral like gypsum was generated and covered the particle surface, it inhibited element transfer under wet condition. Surface characteristics including secondary mineral formation of MSWI fly ash particles are likely non-negligible to describe trace element leaching behaviors.

  16. Geochemical and mineralogical characteristics of REE in granite-derived regolith: a model for the Southeast United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Nora K.; Bern, Carleton R.; Ayuso, Robert A.; Hubbard, Bernard E.; Shah, Anjana K.

    2015-01-01

    Rare earth element (REE) ion-adsorption clay deposits are of global economic importance because they currently supply a significant portion of the world’s annual production of both light (LREE) and heavy REE (HREE). There is considerable ambiguity regarding the origin of

  17. Mineralogical, geochemical characteristics and origin of Late Cretaceous phosphorite in Duwi Formation (Geble Duwi Mine, Red Sea region, Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esmat A. Abou El-Anwar

    2017-03-01

    Generally, the enrichment of the trace elements, REEs and uranium may have occurred during diagenesis. The studied phosphate samples were compared to the average of the Average World Phosphorite (AWP and the Average Shale Composition (ASC. The major, trace and rare earth elements contents are compared with those in Egypt, North African, Asian and other localities. The ratios V/Cr, V/(V + Ni and Mo/Al and the high concentrations of the redox sensitive elements revealed that the studied phosphates were deposited under anoxic reducing marine environments coupled with hydrothermal solutions, which is comparable to the environmental condition of the associated black shales. The concentration of the trace and toxic elements in the studied samples are considered to be below the limits for most field-grown crops.

  18. Geochemical and mineralogical investigation of domestic archaeological soil features at the Tiel-Passewaaij site, The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oonk, S.; Slomp, C.P.; Huisman, D.J.; Vriend, S.P.

    2008-01-01

    Archaeological soil features can be defined as areas of staining in ancient cultural soil horizons and are frequently used in surveys to locate sites and activity areas. Visual observation of these features, however, provides only limited information on their origin and the processes leading to

  19. Geochemical and mineralogical investigation of domestic archaeological soil features at the Tiel-Passewaaij sit, The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oonk, S.; Slomp, C.P.; Huisman, D.J.; Vriend, S.P.

    2009-01-01

    Archaeological soil features can be defined as areas of staining in ancient cultural soil horizons and are frequently used in surveys to locate sites and activity areas. Visual observation of these features, however, provides only limited information on their origin and the processes leading to

  20. Geochemical and mineralogical investigation of domestic archaeological soil features at the Tiel-Passewaaij site, The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oonk, S.; Slomp, C.P.; Huisman, D.J.; Vriend, S.P.

    2009-01-01

    Archaeological soil features can be defined as areas of staining in ancient cultural soil horizons and are frequently used in surveys to locate sites and activity areas. Visual observation of these features, however, provides only limited information on their origin and the processes leading to

  1. Quantification of Hydrological, Geochemical, and Mineralogical Processes Governing the Fate and Transport of Uranium over Multiple Scales in Hanford Sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fendorf, Scott; Mayes, Melanie A.; Perfect, Edmund; van den Berg, Elmer; Parker, Jack C.; Jardine, Philip M.; Tang, Guoping

    2006-01-01

    A long-term measure of the DOE Environmental Remediation Sciences Division is to provide sufficient scientific understanding to allow a significant fraction of DOE sites to incorporate coupled biological, chemical, and physical processes into decision making for environmental remediation and long-term stewardship by 2015. Our research targets two related, major obstacles to understanding and predicting contaminant transport at DOE sites: the heterogeneity of subsurface geologic media, and the scale dependence of experimental and modeled results

  2. Geophysical and geochemical models of the Earth's shields and rift zones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, D.H.

    1977-01-01

    This report summarizes a collection of, synthesis of, and speculation on the geophysical and geochemical models of the earth's stable shields and rift zones. Two basic crustal types, continental and oceanic, and two basic mantle types, stable and unstable, are described. It is pointed out that both the crust and upper mantle play a strongly interactive role with surface geological phenomena ranging from the occurrence of mountains, ocean trenches, oceanic and continental rifts to geographic distributions of earthquakes, faults, and volcanoes. On the composition of the mantle, there is little doubt regarding the view that olivine constitutes a major fraction of the mineralogy of the earth's upper mantle. Studies are suggested to simulate the elasticity and composition of the earth's lower crust and upper mantle

  3. Geochemical and biological research at the NEA dumpsite for low-level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutgers van der Loeff, M.M.; Lavaleye, M.S.S.

    1984-01-01

    A geochemical and biological study of the sea floor at the NEA dumpsite for low-level radioactive waste is reported. The sea bottom has rather steep hillsides. Slumps are usual phenomena and could be triggered by the dumping operations. The sediment is described in terms of its mineralogical and elemental composition. The variation in CaCO 3 content accounts for most of the variation in the elemental composition and cation exchange capacity. The present depth of the lysocline is shown to be about 4700 m. A description is given of the early diagenetic processes: (1) Mineralization of organic material, (2) Cation exchange, (3) Change in redox conditions and (4) Carbonate dissolution and recrystallization; and discussed in terms of their effects on the redistribution and transport of trace elements and radionuclides within the sediment and between sediment and overlying water. (orig.)

  4. The EQ3/6 software package for geochemical modeling: Current status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Worlery, T.J.; Jackson, K.J.; Bourcier, W.L.; Bruton, C.J.; Viani, B.E.; Knauss, K.G.; Delany, J.M.

    1988-07-01

    EQ3/6 is a software package for modeling chemical and mineralogic interactions in aqueous geochemical systems. The major components of the package are EQ3NR (a speciation-solubility code), EQ6 (a reaction path code), EQLIB (a supporting library), and a supporting thermodynamic data base. EQ3NR calculates aqueous speciation and saturation indices from analytical data. It can also be used to calculate compositions of buffer solutions for use in laboratory experiments. EQ6 computes reaction path models of both equilibrium step processes and kinetic reaction processes. These models can be computed for closed systems and relatively simple open systems. EQ3/6 is useful in making purely theoretical calculations, in designing, interpreting, and extrapolating laboratory experiments, and in testing and developing submodels and supporting data used in these codes. The thermodynamic data base supports calculations over the range 0-300 degree C. 60 refs., 2 figs

  5. The EQ3/6 software package for geochemical modeling: Current status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolery, T.J.; Jackson, K.J.; Bourcier, W.L.; Bruton, C.J.; Viani, B.E.; Knauss, K.G.; Delany, J.M.

    1988-07-01

    EQ3/6 is a software package for modeling chemical and mineralogic interactions in aqueous geochemical systems. The major components of the package are EQ3NR (a speciation-solubility code), EQ6 (a reaction path code), EQLIB (a supporting library), and a supporting thermodynamic data base. EQ3NR calculates aqueous speciation and saturation indices from analytical data. It can also be used to calculate compositions of buffer solutions for use in laboratory experiments. EQ6 computes reaction path models of both equilibrium step processes and kinetic reaction processes. These models can be computed for closed systems and relatively simple open systems. EQ3/6 is useful in making purely theoretical calculations, in designing, interpreting, and extrapolating laboratory experiments, and in testing and developing submodels and supporting data used in these codes. The thermodynamic data base supports calculations over the range 0-300{degree}C. 60 refs., 2 figs.

  6. Nuclear Energy Stakeholders in Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gadano, Julian

    2017-01-01

    Mr Gadano, Undersecretary for Nuclear Energy, Argentina spoke from the perspective of a country looking forward to becoming a member of the NEA. He reviewed the place of nuclear energy in his country's energy mix and called attention to its role in positively addressing the global challenges of climate change and energy security. Mr Gadano also described the federal system which governs Argentina. Drawing on his expertise as a lawmaker and nuclear regulator but also as an academic sociologist, he stressed that reaching agreement on siting initiatives for example requires a sustainable relation with stakeholders, including regional governments. This is important because in the end, 'the best project is the one you can finish'

  7. Public information activities in Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espejo, Hector

    1998-01-01

    This is a presentation involving a description of the main guidelines and conditions under which nuclear activities have been performed in Argentina, both concerning the autonomous development for the peaceful use of nuclear energy and with regard to the way in which the community was informed of the attained levels. The particulars of each approach are shown as to delineate historical evolution as a function of the various stages of technological development. (author)

  8. Applied nuclear γ-resonance as fingerprint technique in geochemistry and mineralogy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Constantinescu, S.

    2003-01-01

    The aim of the present paper is to evidence the new developments of one of the most refined technique, the nuclear γ resonance or the well-known Moessbauer effect, in the field of mineralogical and geo-chemical investigation. There are many Moessbauer studies on minerals, but the development, the new performance of the Moessbauer equipment and of the computers impose to review more profoundly and more thoroughly the information, which this non-destructive technique offers. This task became more and more pressingly because a lot of minerals contain in high proportion, the Moessbauer isotopes. Generally, the mineralogists, physicists and chemists hope to obtain more refined and complete information about the physics and chemistry synthesis aspects in solid state transformation of some natural and synthetic materials and also about the structural aspects, by these kind of techniques. On this line, the authors very shortly review the principal aspects of the Moessbauer spectroscopy and underline the most important information one can obtain from spectra. The recent results, which have been obtained on minerals extracted from Romanian geological deposits by the authors, will be discussed in detail in the second part of this article. (authors)

  9. Geochemistry, Mineralogy and Economic Potential of a Pan-African Pegmatite from Wadi Huwar, Southwest Jordan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saffarini, G.; Jarrar, G.

    2002-01-01

    The Wadi Huwar pegmatite (WHP) is hosted in a two-mice monzogranite (TMG). The host rock is a post-tectonic granitoid intrusion, belongs to the Rahma suite of the Aqaba complex and represents a late stage of the Pan-African orogeny. The emplacement of the pegmatite was controlled by the late Pan-African tectonics. The pegmatites and their host are mainly composed of quartz, alkali feldspar, Na-plagioclase, muscovite and biotite. Garnet and zircon are accessories in the monzogranite, whereas in the hosted pegmatites both minerals are abundant. Major, minor and trace element geochemistries indicate that the pegmatites and their host are peraluminous in nature and were intruded under a syn-collision tectonic regime. The mineralogical simplicity, decrease in abundance of ferromagnesian minerals in pegmatite and the sharp contacts with the host, as well as phase equilibria calculations using muscovite chemistry imply that the studied pegmatites might have crystallized during magma ascent to low crustal levels (2 Kbar and 550 deg C). Based on pegtrographic, geochemical and economic evaluation, the studied pegmatites were found to be unprofitable. (authors) 32., 9 figs., 6 tabs

  10. The energy sector in Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    This article first outlines that Argentina produces an important part of its hydrocarbon consumption and comment various aspects of this production: hydrocarbons are at the heart of the Argentinian energetic model; conventional hydrocarbon reserves are however decreasing; the public operator remains the main actor even though the market is opened to multinational companies. The article then describes the crisis faced by this energetic model: the energy balance is now a burden; the increasing unbalance between production and consumption can be explained by supply-related as well as demand-related factors; authorities must intervene on hydrocarbon prices and subsidize the oil price on the domestic market. It appears that the future for hydrocarbons in Argentina relies on non-conventional hydrocarbons. Bio-fuels, a key sector of the Argentinian economy, are a matter of trade dispute with the EU and the USA. Apart from hydroelectricity (some new projects are planned), renewable energies are very few developed in Argentina. Appendices propose a graph of the distribution of energy consumption among the different sources, a map indicating locations of the main exploited hydrocarbon deposits, a presentation of mechanisms implemented to subsidize hydrocarbon production

  11. Automated quantitative micro-mineralogical characterization for environmental applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kathleen S.; Hoal, K.O.; Walton-Day, Katherine; Stammer, J.G.; Pietersen, K.

    2013-01-01

    Characterization of ore and waste-rock material using automated quantitative micro-mineralogical techniques (e.g., QEMSCAN® and MLA) has the potential to complement traditional acid-base accounting and humidity cell techniques when predicting acid generation and metal release. These characterization techniques, which most commonly are used for metallurgical, mineral-processing, and geometallurgical applications, can be broadly applied throughout the mine-life cycle to include numerous environmental applications. Critical insights into mineral liberation, mineral associations, particle size, particle texture, and mineralogical residence phase(s) of environmentally important elements can be used to anticipate potential environmental challenges. Resources spent on initial characterization result in lower uncertainties of potential environmental impacts and possible cost savings associated with remediation and closure. Examples illustrate mineralogical and textural characterization of fluvial tailings material from the upper Arkansas River in Colorado.

  12. X-ray Spectroscopy and Magnetism in Mineralogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sainctavit, Philippe; Brice-Profeta, Sandrine; Gaudry, Emilie; Letard, Isabelle; Arrio, Marie-Anne

    The objective of this paper is to present the kind of information that can be gained in the field of mineralogy from the use of x-ray magnetic spectroscopies. We review some of the questions that are unsettled and that could benefit from an interdisciplinary approach where magnetism, spectroscopy and mineralogy could be mixed. Most of the attention is focused on iron and some other 3d transition elements. The mineralogy of planetary cores and its relation with known meteorites are exemplified. The various oxide phases in the mantle and the nature of iron in these phases is also underlined. The presence of transition elements in insulating minerals and its relation with macroscopic properties such as the color of gemstones are reviewed. Finally an introduction to paleomagnetism is given with a special attention to nanomaghemites.

  13. Geochemical interpretation of Kings Mountain, North Carolina, orientation area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, V.; Ferguson, R.B.

    1977-01-01

    An orientation study has been made of uranium occurrences in the area of Kings Mountain, North Carolina. This is one of the orientation studies of known uranium occurrences that are being conducted in several geologic provinces and under various climatic (weathering) conditions to provide the technical basis for design and interpretation of NURE geochemical reconnaissance programs. The Kings Mountain area was chosen for study primarily because of the reported presence of high-uranium monazite. This 750-mi 2 area is in the deeply weathered southern Appalachian Piedmont and spans portions of the Inner Piedmont, Kings Mountain, and Charlotte geologic belts. Uranium concentration maps for ground and surface water samples clearly outline the outcrop area of the Cherryville Quartz Monzonite with highs up to 10 ppb uranium near the reported uraninite. Several surface water samples appear to be anomalous because of trace industrial contamination. Uranium concentration maps for -100 to +200 mesh stream sediments indicate the area of monazite abundance. Several samples with >100 ppM uranium content appear to be high in uranium-rich resistate minerals. When the uranium content of sediment samples is ratioed to the sum of Hf, Dy, and Th, the anomaly pattern shifts to coincide with uranium highs in ground and surface water samples. False anomalies from concentrations of monazite (Ce,ThPO 4 ), xenotime (Y,DyPO 4 ), and zircon (Zr,HfSiO 4 ) in stream sediment samples can thus be eliminated. Residual anomalies should be related to unusual uranium enrichment of these common minerals or to the presence of an uncommon uranium-rich mineral. Tantalum, beryllium, and tin in stream sediments correspond to high concentrations of uranium in stream and ground water but not to uranium in sediments. In an initial reconnaissance, several media should be sampled, and it is essential to correct uranium in sediments for the sample mineralogy

  14. Uranium-bearing and associated minerals in their geochemical and sedimentological context, Elliot Lake, Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theis, N.J.

    1979-01-01

    The depositional energy environment of the Rio Algom-Denison ore reef was investigated on a regional scale using several parameters including pebble size. Regional trends of decreasing pebble size coincide with the regional direction of sediment transport. Pebble size was also used to characterize the depositional energy environment at the sample level. Quartz-pebble size and pyrite-grain size as determined from the same samples have a correlation coefficient of 0.93 which indicates that the coarse granular pyrite is detrital. Bulk chemical analyses of selected elements (U, Th, Pb, Ti, Ce, La, Y and Zr) which were chosen to reflect specific minerals (uraninite, brannerite, monazite and zircon), showed strong correlation with quartz-pebble size of the respective samples. Electron microprobe analyses of uraninite and brannerite are reported. The uraninites have typical pegmatitic compositions. Several types of brannerite are described; the conclusion reached is that although some brannerite may be detrital, most of it formed by adsorption of uranium onto titania collectors. Redistribution of some of the uranium has not changed the placer nature of the ore reef. Genesis of individual minerals (pyrite, uraninite, brannerite, zircon and monazite) is discussed. It is concluded that the mineralogy and its geochemical expression have been controlled by processes of fluvial deposition. As a result of the regional patterns in depositional environment, the ore reef shows a broad mineralogical zoning. Fluctuations in depositional energy have also produced lithologically related mineral zoning on a smaller scale. (author)

  15. Geochemical and sedimentologic problems of uranium deposits of Texas Gulf Coastal Plain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, W.H.

    1978-01-01

    Exploration targets for sedimentary uranium ore bodies in the Texas Gulf Coastal Plain include: (1) favorable source rocks for uranium, (2) favorable conditions for uranium leached and transported out of the source rocks, and (3) favorable geologic characteristics of the host rocks for the accumulation of uranium of economic importance. However, data available from known deposits point out more questions of research than answers. Mobility and accumulation of uranium of economic importance in host rocks are controlled by at least three factors - physical, chemical-mineralogic, and hydrologic - that interact dynamically. Physical factors include the nature (viscosity) of the transporting fluid, the permeability of host rock with respect to transporting solution in terms of medium rate, potential differentials, and temperature of the uranium-bearing solution in the macroenvironment. Chemical-mineralogic factors include the ionic strength of solution, chemical activities of species in the solution, chemical activities of pore water in host rocks, surface activity and surface energy of mineral constituents in host rocks, solubilities of ore and gangue minerals, pH, and Eh in the microenvironment. Hydrologic factors include fluctuation of the depth of the oxidation-reduction interfaces in the paleoaquifer host rocks, and their subsequent modification by present hydrologic factors. Geochemical mechanisms that are likely to have been in operation for uranium accumulation are precipitation, adsorption, and/or complexing. 4 figures

  16. 49 The Geology and Mineralogy of Clay Occurrences Around Kutigi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    `123456789jkl''''#

    The above results and an earlier geochemical analysis suggest that it can be utilized in .... His chemical analysis show the high dominance of SiO2 ... mortar and pestle, the sample was pulverized .... Economic Evaluation of the Kaolin Deposits.

  17. Hydrothermal surface alteration in the Copahue Geothermal Field (Argentina)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mas, Graciela R.; Mas, Luis C.; Bengochea, Leandro

    1996-01-24

    In the area of the Copahue Geothermal Field, there are five active geothermal manifestations, which mainly consist of fumaroles, hot springs and mud pots. Four of these manifestations are located in Argentina: Las Máquinas, Termas de Copahue, Las Maquinitas and El Anfiteatro, and the fifth on the Chilean side: Chancho Co. All of them present a strong acid sulfate country rock alteration, characterized by the assemblage alunite + kaolinite + quartz + cristobalite + pyrite + sulfur + jarosite, as the result of the base leaching by fluids concentrated in H2SO4 by atmospheric oxidation at the water table in a steam heated environment of H2S released by deeper boiling fluids. Another alteration zone in this area, called COP-2, is a fossil geothermal manifestation which shows characteristics of neutral to alkaline alteration represented mainly by the siliceous sinter superimposed over the acid alteration. The mineralogy and zoning of these alteration zones, and their relation with the hidrothermal solutions and the major structures of the area are analized.

  18. Mineralogical and geological study of fault rocks and associated strata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jeon Jin; Jeong, Gyo Cheol; Bae, Doo Won; Park, Seong Min; Kim, Jun Yeong

    2007-01-01

    Mineralogical characterizations of fault clay and associated strata in fault zone with field study and analytical methods. Mineral composition and color of fault clay and rock occur in fracture zone different from bed rocks. Fault clay mainly composed of smectite with minor zeolite such as laumontite and stilbite, and halloysite, illite, Illite and halloysite grow on the surface of smectite, and laumontite and stilbite result from precipitation or alteration of Ca rich bed rock. The result of mineralogical study at Ipsil, Wangsan, Gaegok, Yugyeori, Gacheon in Gyeongju area, the detail research of microstructure in the fault clay making it possible for prediction to age of fault activity

  19. Mineralogical and geological study of fault rocks and associated strata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jeon Jin; Jeong, Gyo Cheol; Bae, Doo Won; Park, Seong Min; Kim, Jun Yeong [Andong Univ., Andong (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-01-15

    Mineralogical characterizations of fault clay and associated strata in fault zone with field study and analytical methods. Mineral composition and color of fault clay and rock occur in fracture zone different from bed rocks. Fault clay mainly composed of smectite with minor zeolite such as laumontite and stilbite, and halloysite, illite, Illite and halloysite grow on the surface of smectite, and laumontite and stilbite result from precipitation or alteration of Ca rich bed rock. The result of mineralogical study at Ipsil, Wangsan, Gaegok, Yugyeori, Gacheon in Gyeongju area, the detail research of microstructure in the fault clay making it possible for prediction to age of fault activity.

  20. Caracterización petrográfica y geoquímica del batolito Cerro Aspero-Alpa Corral (32°34'-32°42' LS y 64°43'-64°52' LO, provincia de Córdoba, Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Porta, G.

    1992-12-01

    Full Text Available The Cerro Aspero-Alpa Corral (CA-AC batholith is a 440 km2 granite body present in the Southern edge of the Eastern Pampean Ranges, Córdoba province, central Argentina. The intrusive body of probably paleozoic age shows both post-tectonic and epizonal character. Country rocks include Upper Precambrian-Lower Paleozoic metasedimentary rocks mainly represented by mica-schists, gneisses and migmatites, locally interrupted by minor amphibolite and marble outcrops.This paper deals with representative petrographic and geochemical data that characterize a 150 km2 central stripe between 32°34'-32°42'S and 64°43'-64°52'W.Three granitic facies have been distinguished based on their distinctive modal mineralogy and texture, and upon well known chemical parameters.A K-feldspar megacryst porphydic-type is the areally prevalent facies, but dykes of micro- leucogranites and biotite-phenocryst bearing granite are also well represented. They are all monzogranites of subalkaline and peraluminous chemistry. Their mineralogy shows variable proportions of QAP constituents and micas, with minor phases represented by Fe-Ti oxides, apatite (Ap, titanite (Tt, allanite (Aln.Microgranular enclaves, abundantly distributed in the porphydic facies, provide valuable information for a better understanding of parental magma evolution.The high-Ca content of the melt makes this body quite distinctive compared to its larger northern neighbour, the Achala batholith.Pegmatite and aplite bodies, as well as fluorite bearing breccias and quartz veins, barren or mineralized, are also present within the CA-AC batholith.El batolito Cerro Aspero-Alpa Corral (CA-AC es un cuerpo granítico que aflora en el extremo sur de las Sierras Pampeanas Orientales, en la provincia de Córdoba, República Argentina, cubriendo una superficie cercana a los 440 km2.Es un cuerpo intrusivo postcinemático de probable edad paleozoica. Las rocas encajantes son metamorfitas correspondientes al Prec

  1. The geochemical atlas of Alaska, 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Gregory K.; Yager, Douglas B.; Mauk, Jeffrey L.; Granitto, Matthew; Denning, Paul; Wang, Bronwen; Werdon, Melanie B.

    2016-06-21

    A rich legacy of geochemical data produced since the early 1960s covers the great expanse of Alaska; careful treatment of such data may provide significant and revealing geochemical maps that may be used for landscape geochemistry, mineral resource exploration, and geoenvironmental investigations over large areas. To maximize the spatial density and extent of data coverage for statewide mapping of element distributions, we compiled and integrated analyses of more than 175,000 sediment and soil samples from three major, separate sources: the U.S. Geological Survey, the National Uranium Resource Evaluation program, and the Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys geochemical databases. Various types of heterogeneity and deficiencies in these data presented major challenges to our development of coherently integrated datasets for modeling and mapping of element distributions. Researchers from many different organizations and disparate scientific studies collected samples that were analyzed using highly variable methods throughout a time period of more than 50 years, during which many changes in analytical techniques were developed and applied. Despite these challenges, the U.S. Geological Survey has produced a new systematically integrated compilation of sediment and soil geochemical data with an average sample site density of approximately 1 locality per 10 square kilometers (km2) for the entire State of Alaska, although density varies considerably among different areas. From that compilation, we have modeled and mapped the distributions of 68 elements, thus creating an updated geochemical atlas for the State.

  2. Rock Geochemistry and Mineralogy from Fault Zones and Polymetallic Fault Veins of the Central Front Range, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caine, Jonathan S.; Bove, Dana J.

    2010-01-01

    During the 2004 to 2008 field seasons, approximately 200 hand samples of fault and polymetallic vein-related rocks were collected for geochemical and mineralogical analyses. The samples were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey as part of the Evolution of Brittle Structures Task under the Central Colorado Assessment Project (CCAP) of the Mineral Resources Program (http://minerals.cr.usgs.gov/projects/colorado_assessment/index.html). The purpose of this work has been to characterize the relation between epithermal, polymetallic mineral deposits, paleostress, and the geological structures that hosted fluid flow and localization of the deposits. The data in this report will be used to document and better understand the processes that control epithermal mineral-deposit formation by attempting to relate the geochemistry of the primary structures that hosted hydrothermal fluid flow to their heat and fluid sources. This includes processes from the scale of the structures themselves to the far field scale, inclusive of the intrusive bodies that have been thought to be the sources for the hydrothermal fluid flow. The data presented in this report are part of a larger assessment effort on public lands. The larger study area spans the region of the southern Rocky Mountains in Colorado from the Wyoming to New Mexico borders and from the eastern boundary of the Front Range to approximately the longitude of Vail and Leadville, Colorado. Although the study area has had an extensive history of geological mapping, the mapping has resulted in a number of hypotheses that are still in their infancy of being tested. For example, the proximity of polymetallic veins to intrusive bodies has been thought to reflect a genetic relation between the two features; however, this idea has not been well tested with geochemical indicators. Recent knowledge regarding the coupled nature of stress, strain, fluid flow, and geochemistry warrant new investigations and approaches to test a variety of

  3. Boll weevil invasion process in Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    The boll weevil, Anthonomus grandis grandis Boheman, is the most destructive cotton pest in the Western Hemisphere. In 1993, the pest was reported in Argentina, and in 1994 boll weevils were captured in cotton fields in the Formosa Province on the border between Argentina and Paraguay. The pest ha...

  4. Communications received from Argentina and Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    The document reproduces the Joint Statement on Nuclear Policy signed by the President of Argentina and the President of Brazil on 29 November 1988 at Ezeiza, Argentina, concerning the decision of the two countries to undertake a joint fast breeder reactor project

  5. Mida õpetab Argentina finantskriis? / Karsten Staehr

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Staehr, Karsten, 1962-

    2002-01-01

    Norra majandusanalüütik kirjeldab Argentina majanduspoliitikat, analüüsib tehtud vigu ning hoiatab avatud majandusega Eestit võimalike tulevaste välisshokkide eest. Diagramm: SKP kasv ja üleüldine riigieelarve tasakaal 1991-2001 Argentinas

  6. Mineralogy: a modern approach to teaching a traditional discipline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, G. W.

    2011-12-01

    Mineralogy has traditionally been a primary component in undergraduate geoscience curriculum. In recent years, there has been a trend in which mineralogy and petrology have been combined into Earth Materials courses. This is unfortunate as these disciplines each have much to offer students, and content once considered essential is eliminated out of necessity. Mineralogy is still fundamental to students' understanding of the Earth and Earth processes. Using a modern approach to time-honored concepts, I teach a quarter-long Introductory Mineralogy class offered through the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California, San Diego. Student evaluations of this course unequivocally indicate a high degree of learning and interest in the material, confirming that mineralogy continues to be a valuable class into the 21st century. While much of the content remains similar to what has been taught over the last century, my strategy involves a well-balanced approach to old and new. The first third of the course is background including the relevance of mineralogy, crystal chemistry, and crystallography; the second third of the course is systematic mineralogy using the Dana system; the last third of the course is devoted to understanding optical mineralogy, using modern analytical equipment such as XRD and SEM, and learning to use the petrographic microscope. Throughout the quarter, a strong emphasis is placed on the importance of hand-sample identification. Field work, traditionally not emphasized in mineralogy courses, has been re-introduced to the curriculum. I use modern technology to facilitate and support student learning. A lecture-based approach is employed with carefully crafted and organized PowerPoint presentations. PowerPoint lectures can be effective and highly engaging. The key is to ensure that the lectures are not overly reliant on text, instead relying on diagrams, charts, photos, and embedded media such as 3-D animations (ex. to teach

  7. GLOBAL AND REGIONAL GEOCHEMICAL INDEXES OF PRODUCTION OF CHEMICAL ELEMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolay S. Kasimov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a geochemical assessment of the primary involvement of chemical elements in technogenesis in the world and individual countries. In order to compare the intensity of production of various chemical elements in different countries, the authors have introduced a number of new terms and parameters. The new term is “abstract rock” (AR - an elemental equivalent, whose average composition corresponds to the average chemical composition of the upper continental crust. The new parameters are: “conditional technophility of an element” (TY, “specific technophility” (TYN “regional conditional technophility” (TYR, “specific regional technophility” (TN, and “density of regional conditional technophility” (TS. TY equals to the tons of AR per year necessary for the production of the current level of the element. TY of different elements has been estimated for 2008-2010. The highest TY values are associated with C, S, N, Ra, and Au. TY of many micro- and ultramicroelements is of the order of n•1011t. TYN reflects the volume of AR per the world’s capita. TYN changes from the 1960s to 2010 indicates that the Earth’s population is growing much faster than its demand for many chemical elements. TYR, TN, and TS were used for the integrated assessment of technogenesis at the regional scale; they reflect the intensity of the technogenesis process at the level of individual countries and allow comparing countries with different levels of elements production, population, and areas. The TN and TS levels of the leaders in extraction of natural resources are below these values in other countries due to the large territories (Russia, USA, Canada, Australia, Saudi Arabia, Kazakhstan, Argentina, Bolivia, Venezuela, Colombia, Zambia, Mali, Libya, Mongolia, and Sudan, to the large population (Indonesia, Vietnam, the Philippines, Bangladesh, Nigeria, or to both high spatial and demographic dimensions (India, Brazil, France, Egypt

  8. Geochemical modelling baseline compositions of groundwater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Postma, Diederik Jan; Kjøller, Claus; Andersen, Martin Søgaard

    2008-01-01

    and variations in water chemistry that are caused by large scale geochemical processes taking place at the timescale of thousands of years. The most important geochemical processes are ion exchange (Valreas and Aveiro) where freshwater solutes are displacing marine ions from the sediment surface, and carbonate......Reactive transport models, were developed to explore the evolution in groundwater chemistry along the flow path in three aquifers; the Triassic East Midland aquifer (UK), the Miocene aquifer at Valreas (F) and the Cretaceous aquifer near Aveiro (P). All three aquifers contain very old groundwaters...... dissolution (East Midlands, Valreas and Aveiro). Reactive transport models, employing the code PHREEQC, which included these geochemical processes and one-dimensional solute transport were able to duplicate the observed patterns in water quality. These models may provide a quantitative understanding...

  9. Geochemical prospecting for thorium and uranium deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyle, R.W.

    1982-01-01

    The basic purpose of this book is to present an analysis of the various geochemical methods applicable in the search for all types of thorium and uranium deposits. The general chemistry and geochemistry of thorium and uranium are briefly described in the opening chapter, and this is followed by a chapter on the deposits of the two elements with emphasis on their indicator (pathfinder) elements and on the primary and secondary dispersion characteristics of thorium and uranium in the vicinity of their deposits. The next seven chapters form the main part of the book and describe geochemical prospecting for thorium and uranium, stressing selection of areas in which to prospect, radiometric surveys, analytical geochemical surveys based on rocks (lithochemical surveys), unconsolidated materials (pedochemical surveys), natural waters and sediments (hydrochemical surveys), biological materials (biogeochemical surveys), gases (atmochemical surveys), and miscellaneous methods. A final brief chapter reviews radiometric and analytical methods for the detection and estimation of thorium and uranium. (Auth.)

  10. Current status of application of Moessbauer effect in geology and mineralogy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Binfu

    1995-01-01

    The paper briefly introduces the current status of the application of Moessbauer effect in geology and mineralogy. It shows that geology and mineralogy are very active fields in the application of Moessbauer effect

  11. Robust statistics and geochemical data analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di, Z.

    1987-01-01

    Advantages of robust procedures over ordinary least-squares procedures in geochemical data analysis is demonstrated using NURE data from the Hot Springs Quadrangle, South Dakota, USA. Robust principal components analysis with 5% multivariate trimming successfully guarded the analysis against perturbations by outliers and increased the number of interpretable factors. Regression with SINE estimates significantly increased the goodness-of-fit of the regression and improved the correspondence of delineated anomalies with known uranium prospects. Because of the ubiquitous existence of outliers in geochemical data, robust statistical procedures are suggested as routine procedures to replace ordinary least-squares procedures

  12. Coupling of transport and geochemical models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noy, D.J.

    1985-01-01

    This contract stipulated separate pieces of work to consider mass transport in the far-field of a repository, and more detailed geochemical modelling of the groundwater in the near-field. It was envisaged that the far-field problem would be tackled by numerical solutions to the classical advection-diffusion equation obtained by the finite element method. For the near-field problem the feasibility of coupling existing geochemical equilibrium codes to the three dimensional groundwater flow codes was to be investigated. This report is divided into two sections with one part devoted to each aspect of this contract. (author)

  13. Mineralogical Results from the Mars Science Laboratory Rover Curiosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, David Frederick.

    2017-01-01

    NASA's CheMin instrument, the first X-ray Diffractometer flown in space, has been operating on Mars for nearly five years. CheMin was first to establish the quantitative mineralogy of the Mars global soil (1). The instrument was next used to determine the mineralogy of a 3.7 billion year old lacustrine mudstone, a result that, together with findings from other instruments on the MSL Curiosity rover, documented the first habitable environment found on another planet (2). The mineralogy of this mudstone from an ancient playa lake was also used to derive the maximum concentration of CO2 in the early Mars atmosphere, a surprisingly low value that calls into question the current theory that CO2 greenhouse warming was responsible for the warm and wet environment of early Mars. CheMin later identified the mineral tridymite, indicative of silica-rich volcanism, in mudstones of the Murray formation on Mt. Sharp. This discovery challenges the paradigm of Mars as a basaltic planet and ushers in a new chapter of comparative terrestrial planetology (3). CheMin is now being used to systematically sample the sedimentary layers that comprise the lower strata of Mt. Sharp, a 5,000 meter sequence of sedimentary rock laid down in what was once a crater lake, characterizing isochemical sediments that through their changing mineralogy, document the oxidation and drying out of the Mars in early Hesperian time.

  14. Moessbauer mineralogy on the Moon: The lunar regolith

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, Richard V.; Klingelhoefer, Goestar; Korotev, Randy L.; Shelfer, Tad D.

    1998-01-01

    A first-order requirement for spacecraft missions that land on solid planetary objects is instrumentation for mineralogical analyses. For purposes of providing diagnostic information about naturally-occurring materials, the element iron is particularly important because it is abundant and multivalent. Knowledge of the oxidation state of iron and its distribution among iron-bearing mineralogies tightly constrains the types of materials present and provides information about formation and modification (weathering) processes. Because Moessbauer spectroscopy is sensitive to both the valence of iron and its local chemical environment, the technique is unique in providing information about both the relative abundance of iron-bearing phases and oxidation state of the iron. The Moessbauer mineralogy of lunar regolith samples (primarily soils from the Apollo 16 and 17 missions to the Moon) were measured in the laboratory to demonstrate the strength of the technique for in-situ mineralogical exploration of the Moon. The regolith samples were modeled as mixtures of five iron-bearing phases: olivine, pyroxene, glass, ilmenite, and metal. Based on differences in relative proportions of iron associated with these phases, volcanic-ash regolith can be distinguished from impact-derived regolith, impact-derived soils of different geologic affinity (e.g., highlands and maria) can be distinguished on the basis of their constituent minerals, and soil maturity can be estimated. The total resonant absorption area of the Moessbauer spectrum can be used to estimate total FeO concentrations

  15. Mineralogy and geochemistry of density-separated Greek lignite fractions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iordanidis, A.; Doesburg, van J.D.J.

    2006-01-01

    In this study, lignite samples were collected from the Ptolemais region, northern Greece, homogenized, crushed to less than I nun, and separated in three density fractions using heavy media. The mineralogical investigation of the density fractions showed a predominance of pyrite in the light

  16. Mineralogy of Tailings Dump around Selebi Phikwe Nickel-Copper ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study aimed at mineralogically characterizing the tailings dump emanating from the mining and smelting of nickel-copper (Ni-Cu) at Selebi Phikwe, Botswana, Southern Africa. Samples of tailings dump around the Selebi Phikwe Ni-Cu plant were studied using petrographic microscopy and X-ray Powder Diffraction ...

  17. Mineralogy and pedogenesis in a soil chronosequence on a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Studies on soils of the floodplain of lower Niger river are scanty although this floodplain forms a very important agricultural resource base in Nigeria. The objective of this study is to provide comprehensive information on the characteristics of the soils with respect to their mineralogy and the effect of seasonal flooding on their ...

  18. Clay mineralogy of the mud banks of Cochin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nair, R.R.; Murty, P.S.N.

    The mineralogy of the sediments constituting the mud banks formed off Cochin, Kerala, India was studied. The clay mineral composition was used as a means of understanding the nature and source of origin of the muds. Fine fraction of the mud samples...

  19. Mineralogy and trace element chemistry of the Siliceous Earth of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    We report the presence of a 3–5 cm thick loose fragmental layer in the Siliceous Earth at Matti ka. Gol in the Barmer basin of Rajasthan. Petrographic, chemical and mineralogical study reveals the presence of abundant volcanic debris such as glass shards, agglutinates, hollow spheroids, kinked biotites, feldspars showing ...

  20. Physico-chemical and Mineralogical Characterisation of Subsurface ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Studies were carried out on subsurface sediments obtained around the Gaborone landfill area Botswana, in order to characterize their mineralogy and physico-chemistry, appraise any contaminant inputs from the landfill and assess their ability to attenuate contaminants from the landfill. Physico-chemical properties ...

  1. Characterization of North American lignite fly ashes. II. XRD Mineralogy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCarthy, G.J.; Johansen, D.M.; Thedchanamoorthy, A.; Steinwand, S.J.; Swanson, K.D.

    1988-01-01

    X-ray powder diffraction has been used to determine the crystalline phase mineralogy in samples of fly ash from each of the lignite mining areas of North America. The characteristic phases of North Dakota lignite fly ashes were periclase, lime, merwinite and the sulfate phases anhydrite, thenardite and a sodalite-structure phase. Mullite was absent in these low-Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ ashes. Montana lignite ash mineralogy had characteristics of ND lignite and MT subbituminous coal fly ashes; mullite and C/sub 3/A were present and the alkali sulfates were absent. Texas and Louisiana lignite fly ashes had the characteristic mineralogy of bituminous coal fly ash: quartz, mullite, ferrite-spinel (magnetite) and minor hematite. Even though their analytical CaO contents were 7-14%, all but one lacked crystalline CaO-containing phases. Lignite fly ashes from Saskatchewan were generally the least crystalline of those studied and had a mineralogy consisting of quartz, mullite, ferrite spinel and periclase. Quantitative XRD data were obtained. The position of the diffuse scattering maximum in the x-ray diffractograms was indicative of the glass composition of the lignite fly ash

  2. Greenstone: uso actual en Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela Fushimi

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Este trabajo presenta las características e historia del software para crear y gestionar bibliotecas digitales Greenstone, desarrollado inicialmente por la Universidad de Waikato, Nueva Zelandia en 1997. En primer lugar, se describe la comunidad de usuarios a nivel global, focalizando en el uso actual que el software ha alcanzado en Argentina: la cantidad de implementaciones disponibles, su evolución, el tipo, tamaño y variedad de los desarrollos existentes, así como su aplicación a la gestión de repositorios digitales de ciencia y tecnología en el ámbito de las instituciones científicas, tecnológicas y de educación superior en Argentina. En segundo lugar, se detallan las acciones llevadas a cabo a partir de la creación del Centro Nacional de Promoción de Greenstone en Argentina en 2009. Datos recabados en encuestas realizadas permitieron observar que las razones predominantes para elegir esta plataforma fueron, entre otras, su facilidad de instalación y configuración, su bajo nivel de requerimiento tecnológico, la generalizada escasez de recursos humanos dedicados a esta actividad, y la complejidad que presentaban los softwares alternativos existentes en ese momento. A lo largo de estos 8 años, tanto los repositorios digitales como los sistemas que los soportan evolucionaron drásticamente, modificando el escenario actual. Paralelamente, en 2016 la nueva versión mayor de Greenstone implementó una reingeniería completa del software para su adaptación a las tecnologías en uso: XML, XSLT, Web-services y Java. Como consecuencia de esto, la comunidad de desarrollo local se plantea nuevos desafíos para la migración de las bibliotecas digitales y repositorios implementados con versiones anteriores.

  3. Geochemical analysis of brine samples for exploration of Borate deposits in the South of Sabzevar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Bemani

    2016-07-01

    suggested for detailed exploration (Bemani et al., 2014. Generally speaking, for considering the spatial distribution of data the fractal method could better identify the anomalies. Also, EDA is a quick and easy method to detect anomalies. Acknowledgment The authors are grateful to the Kaniran Mining Company and the south Khorasan branch of the Iranian Mining Engineering Organization for their financial support of this study. References Bemani, M., 2012. Prospecting and Exploring of Borax in the south of Sabzevar, combination of remote sensing, field surveying and geochemical studying. M.Sc. Thesis, University of Yazd, Yazd, Iran, 137 pp (in Persian with English abstract. Bemani, M., Mojtahedzadeh, S.H. and Kohsari, A.H., 2014. Investigation of geology, mineralogy and genesis of Mohammadabad-Oryan index boron (south of Sabzevar. Iranian Journal of Crystallography and Mineralogy 22(1: 173- 186 (in Persian with English abstract. Carranza, E.J.M., 2009. Geochemical Anomaly and Mineral Prospectivity Mapping in GIS. In: M. Hale (Editor, Handbook of exploration and environmental geochemistry. Elsevier, Amsterdam, pp. 51-115. Filliben, J.J. and Heckert, A., 2005. Exploratory data analysis. Engineering Statistics Handbook, Internet, National Institute of Standards and Technology, http://www.itl.nist.gov/div898/handbook/eda/section3/eda356.htm. Hasanipak, A.A. and Sharafaddin, M., 2005. Exploratory Data Analysis.Tehran University press, Tehran 996 pp (in Persian.

  4. Thermodynamic Data for Geochemical Modeling of Carbonate Reactions Associated with CO2 Sequestration – Literature Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krupka, Kenneth M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Cantrell, Kirk J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); McGrail, B. Peter [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2010-09-01

    Permanent storage of anthropogenic CO2 in deep geologic formations is being considered as a means to reduce the concentration of atmospheric CO2 and thus its contribution to global climate change. To ensure safe and effective geologic sequestration, numerous studies have been completed of the extent to which the CO2 migrates within geologic formations and what physical and geochemical changes occur in these formations when CO2 is injected. Sophisticated, computerized reservoir simulations are used as part of field site and laboratory CO2 sequestration studies. These simulations use coupled multiphase flow-reactive chemical transport models and/or standalone (i.e., no coupled fluid transport) geochemical models to calculate gas solubility, aqueous complexation, reduction/oxidation (redox), and/or mineral solubility reactions related to CO2 injection and sequestration. Thermodynamic data are critical inputs to modeling geochemical processes. The adequacy of thermodynamic data for carbonate compounds has been identified as an important data requirement for the successful application of these geochemical reaction models to CO2 sequestration. A review of thermodynamic data for CO2 gas and carbonate aqueous species and minerals present in published data compilations and databases used in geochemical reaction models was therefore completed. Published studies that describe mineralogical analyses from CO2 sequestration field and natural analogue sites and laboratory studies were also reviewed to identify specific carbonate minerals that are important to CO2 sequestration reactions and therefore require thermodynamic data. The results of the literature review indicated that an extensive thermodynamic database exists for CO2 and CH4 gases, carbonate aqueous species, and carbonate minerals. Values of ΔfG298° and/or log Kr,298° are available for essentially all of these compounds. However, log Kr,T° or heat capacity values at temperatures above 298 K exist for less than

  5. Thermodynamic Data for Geochemical Modeling of Carbonate Reactions Associated with CO2 Sequestration - Literature Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krupka, Kenneth M.; Cantrell, Kirk J.; McGrail, B. Peter

    2010-01-01

    Permanent storage of anthropogenic CO 2 in deep geologic formations is being considered as a means to reduce the concentration of atmospheric CO 2 and thus its contribution to global climate change. To ensure safe and effective geologic sequestration, numerous studies have been completed of the extent to which the CO 2 migrates within geologic formations and what physical and geochemical changes occur in these formations when CO 2 is injected. Sophisticated, computerized reservoir simulations are used as part of field site and laboratory CO 2 sequestration studies. These simulations use coupled multiphase flow-reactive chemical transport models and/or standalone (i.e., no coupled fluid transport) geochemical models to calculate gas solubility, aqueous complexation, reduction/oxidation (redox), and/or mineral solubility reactions related to CO 2 injection and sequestration. Thermodynamic data are critical inputs to modeling geochemical processes. The adequacy of thermodynamic data for carbonate compounds has been identified as an important data requirement for the successful application of these geochemical reaction models to CO 2 sequestration. A review of thermodynamic data for CO 2 gas and carbonate aqueous species and minerals present in published data compilations and databases used in geochemical reaction models was therefore completed. Published studies that describe mineralogical analyses from CO 2 sequestration field and natural analogue sites and laboratory studies were also reviewed to identify specific carbonate minerals that are important to CO 2 sequestration reactions and therefore require thermodynamic data. The results of the literature review indicated that an extensive thermodynamic database exists for CO 2 and CH 4 gases, carbonate aqueous species, and carbonate minerals. Values of Δ f G 298 o and/or log K r,298 o are available for essentially all of these compounds. However, log K r,T o or heat capacity values at temperatures above 298 K exist

  6. Bioceres: AG Biotechnology from Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Feeney

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In this case we present a business decision-making situation in which the CEO of an Argentine Ag Biotech company, Bioceres, has to decide the best way to commercialize a new drought-tolerant transgenic technology. The company was founded by twenty three farmers, who shared a common dream that Argentina could become a benchmark in the development of Ag biotechnology. The case has strategic and financial implications, as well as decision-making situation involving a joint venture with an American biotechnology company. It also introduces to discussion the business models of Ag biotechnology companies in developing countries.

  7. Soybean biomass produced in Argentina

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Semino, Stella Maris; Paul, Helena; Tomei, Julia

    2009-01-01

    Soybean biomass for biodiesel, produced in Argentina amongst other places, is considered by some to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and mitigate climate change when compared with fossil fuel. To ensure that the production of biofuels is ‘sustainable', EU institutions and national governments...... are currently designing certification schemes for the sustainable production of biomass. This paper questions the validity of proposed environmental standards, using the production of Argentine soybean as a case study. The production of soybean production is associated with profound environmental impacts...

  8. Determination of geochemical characters of insterstitial waters of pleistocene Italian clay formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fontanive, A.; Gragnani, R.; Mignuzzi, C.; Spat, G.

    1985-01-01

    The geochemical characters of clay formations and of their pore water are fundamental with regards to the mobility of the radionuclides as well as to the corrosion processes on enginered barriers. Experimental researches have been carried out in different types of clay, which represent Italian formations, for the characterization of pore water. A squeezer system, which reaches 1500 Kg/cm 2 in pressure, and an analytical micro-scale methodology, for the determination of dissolved constituents in pore water, were set up. The extracted pore water ranges from 60% to 85% in relation to consolidation state of clay. The chemical composition of the extracted fluid has been checked during the squeezing. During this step the observed variations were smaller than those between the different specimens of the same sample. The comparison between the results obtained by squeezing and by a multiple washing technique, using increasing water/sediment ratios, shows that the last one does not give reliable results on the chemical composition of pore water. This is due to the presence of easily weatherable minerals and to the exchange processes between the clayey minerals and the solution. Nevertheless both these techniques have supplied complementary information about geochemical processes in water-rock interaction. The salinity of pore water ranges from 0.45 g/l to 24.5 g/l and the chemism always shows a high content of calcium-magnesium sulfate, or sodium chloride or calcium-magnesium-sulfate with sodium chloride. The correlation between geochemical composition of pore water and mineralogical composition of clay is not significant

  9. Geochemical prospect ion results of Treinta y Tres aerial photo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeegers, H.; Bonnefoy, D.; Garau, M.; Spangenberg, J.

    1981-01-01

    This report shows the geochemical prospect ion results carried out within the framework of the multielemental geochemical strategy. The samples were studied by e spectrometry in the laboratories of Orleans.

  10. Geochemical fingerprints and pebbles zircon geochronology

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 125; Issue 7. Geochemical fingerprints and pebbles zircon geochronology: Implications for the provenance and tectonic setting of Lower Cretaceous sediments in the Zhucheng Basin (Jiaodong peninsula, North China). Jin-Long Ni Jun-Lai Liu Xiao-Ling Tang ...

  11. Kriging - a challenge in geochemical mapping

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Štojdl, J.; Matys Grygar, Tomáš; Elznicová, J.; Popelka, J.; Váchová, T.; Hošek, Michal

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 19, APR (2017) ISSN 1607-7962. [EGU General Assembly 2017. 23.04.2017-28.04.2017, Vienna] Institutional support: RVO:61388980 Keywords : kriging * geochemical mapping Subject RIV: DD - Geochemistry http://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EGU2017/EGU2017-3615.pdf

  12. Appliance of geochemical engineering in radioactive waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Shuang; Zhang Chengjiang; Ni Shijun; Li Kuanliang

    2008-01-01

    The basic foundation of applying geochemical engineering to control environment, common engineering models of disposal radioactive waste and the functions of the engineering barriers are introduced in this paper. The authors take the geochemical engineering barrier materiel research of a radioactive waste repository as an example to explain the appliance of geochemical engineering in the disposal of radioactive waste. And the results show that it can enhance the security of the nuclear waste repository if we use geochemical engineering barrier. (authors)

  13. Facies and carbon/oxygen isotopes of the Calabozo Formation (Middle Jurassic), Arroyo La Vaina, Mendoza, Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabaleri, N.G.; Valencio, S.A.; Cagnoni, M.C.; Ramos, A.M.; Armella, C.; Panarello, H.O; Riccardi, A.C

    2001-01-01

    Facial / microfacial studies and geochemical isotopic analyses on marine jurassic carbonates of the Calabozo Formation (Dessanti, 1973) were carried out to reconstruct the palaeoenvironment and postdepositional history of the unit. This study is part of a project which purpose is the sedimentological and geochemical characterization of the Jurassic carbonate sequences of Cuenca Neuquina, in the southwestern Mendoza, Argentina. A detailed description about this basin can be found in Legarreta and Uliana (1999) and Riccardi et al. (2000). During the Late Bathonian and Early Callovian, the basin showed a reduction of the sedimentation area and a marked marginal facies progradation. West of Malargue, in areas with low detritic contribution, limestones of the Calabozo Formation were deposited. At the end of the Early Callovian, the basin was isolated, prevailing hypersaline conditions which caused the accumulation of the evaporites of the Tabanos Formation (Stipanicic, 1966) (au)

  14. Education in acoustics in Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyara, Federico

    2002-11-01

    Over the last decades, education in acoustics (EA) in Argentina has experienced ups and downs due to economic and political issues interfering with long term projects. Unlike other countries, like Chile, where EA has reached maturity in spite of the acoustical industry having shown little development, Argentina has several well-established manufacturers of acoustic materials and equipment but no specific career with a major in acoustics. At the university level, acoustics is taught as a complementary--often elective--course for careers such as architecture, communication engineering, or music. In spite of this there are several research centers with programs covering environmental and community noise, effects of noise on man, acoustic signal processing, musical acoustics and acoustic emission, and several national and international meetings are held each year in which results are communicated and discussed. Several books on a variety of topics such as sound system, architectural acoustics, and noise control have been published as well. Another chapter in EA is technical and vocational education, ranging between secondary and postsecondary levels, with technical training on sound system operation or design. Over the last years there have been several attempts to implement master degrees in acoustics or audio engineering, with little or no success.

  15. Comment on the Long-Term Chemical and Mineralogical Stability of the Buffer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arthur, Randy; Apted, Mick; Stenhouse, Mike

    2005-03-01

    is assumed either to be stable or to alter to a less expandable mineral at an extremely slow, but predictable, rate. Unfortunately, this approach appears to have two inherent limitations: 1) it cannot be used to relate specific conditions of smectite stability/instability to evolving geochemical conditions in the near field, and 2) it may overemphasize the importance of accessory minerals and surface reactions in controlling the long-term chemical and mineralogical evolution of bentonite barriers. Dissolution, transport and precipitation processes during the resaturation phase and transient thermal period of repository evolution could cause individual clay particles in the buffer to become cemented together. Cementation could adversely affect the physical and microstructural properties of this barrier. SKB's current approach for modeling bentonite-water interactions may not be an appropriate basis for evaluating the potential long-term effects of cementation on buffer performance, due to the basic limitations in this approach noted above.

  16. Mineralogy and environmental stability of slags from the Tsumeb smelter, Namibia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ettler, Vojtech; Johan, Zdenek; Kribek, Bohdan; Sebek, Ondrej; Mihaljevic, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Three types of smelting slags originating from historically different smelting technologies in the Tsumeb area (Namibia) were studied: (i) slags from processing of carbonate/oxide ore in a Cu-Pb smelter (1907-1948), (ii) slags from Cu and Pb smelting of sulphide ores (1963-1970) and (iii) granulated Cu smelting slags (1980-2000). Bulk chemical analyses of slags were combined with detailed mineralogical investigation using X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM/EDS) and electron microprobe (EPMA). The slags are significantly enriched in metals and metalloids: Pb (0.97-18.4 wt.%), Cu (0.49-12.2 wt.%), Zn (2.82-12.09 wt.%), Cd (12-6940 mg/kg), As (930-75,870 mg/kg) and Sb (67-2175 mg/kg). Slags from the oldest technology are composed of primary Ca- and Pb-bearing feldspars, spinels, complex Cu-Fe and Cu-Cr oxides, delafossite-mcconnellite phases and Ca-Pb arsenates. The presence of arsenates indicates that these slags underwent long-term alteration. More recent slags are composed of high-temperature phases: Ca-Fe alumosilicates (olivine, melilite), Pb- and Zn-rich glass, spinel oxides and small sulphide/metallic inclusions embedded in glass. XRD and SEM/EDS were used to study secondary alteration products developed on the surface of slags exposed for decades to weathering on the dumps. Highly soluble complex Cu-Pb-(Ca) arsenates (bayldonite, lammerite, olivenite, lavendulan) associated with litharge and hydrocerussite were detected. To determine the mineralogical and geochemical parameters governing the release of inorganic contaminants from slags, two standardized short-term batch leaching tests (European norm EN 12457 and USEPA TCLP), coupled with speciation-solubility modelling using PHREEQC-2 were performed. Arsenic in the leachate exceeded the EU regulatory limit for hazardous waste materials (2.5 mg/L). The toxicity limits defined by USEPA for the TCLP test were exceeded for Cd, Pb and As. The PHREEQC-2 calculation predicted that

  17. Proceedings of 13. International Geochemical Exploration Symposium. 2. Brazilian Geochemical Congress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    Some works about geochemistry are presented, including themes about geochemical exploration, lithogeochemistry and isotope geochemistry, environmental geochemistry, analyical geochemistry, geochemistry of carbonatites and rare earth elements and organic geochemistry. (C.G.C.) [pt

  18. Sistema de salud de Argentina The health system of Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Belló

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available En este artículo se describe el sistema de salud de Argentina, que está compuesto por tres sectores: público, de seguridad social y privado. El sector público está integrado por los ministerios nacional y provincial, y la red de hospitales y centros de salud públicos que prestan atención gratuita a toda persona que lo demande, fundamentalmente a personas sin seguridad social y sin capacidad de pago. Se financia con recursos fiscales y recibe pagos ocasionales de parte del sistema de seguridad social cuando atiende a sus afiliados. El sector del seguro social obligatorio está organizado en torno a las Obras Sociales (OS, que aseguran y prestan servicios a los trabajadores y sus familias. La mayoría de las OS operan a través de contratos con prestadores privados y se financian con contribuciones de los trabajadores y patronales. El sector privado está conformado por profesionales de la salud y establecimientos que atienden a demandantes individuales, a los beneficiarios de las OS y de los seguros privados. Este sector también incluye entidades de seguro voluntario llamadas Empresas de Medicina Prepaga que se financian sobre todo con primas que pagan las familias y/o las empresas. En este trabajo también se describen las innovaciones recientes en el sistema de salud, incluyendo el Programa Remediar.This paper describes the health system of Argentina.This system has three sectors: public, social security and private.The public sector includes the national and provincial ministries as well as the network of public hospitals and primary health care units which provide care to the poor and uninsured population. This sector is financed with taxes and payments made by social security beneficiaries that use public health care facilities. The social security sector or Obras Sociales (OS covers all workers of the formal economy and their families. Most OS operate through contracts with private providers and are financed with payroll

  19. Geochemical modelling: what phenomena are missing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacquier, P.

    1989-12-01

    In the framework of safety assessment of radioactive waste disposal, retention phenomena are usually taken into account by the Kd concept. It is well recognized that this concept is not enough for safety assessment models, because of the several and strong assumptions which are involved in this kind of representation. One way to have a better representation of the retention phenomena, is to substitute for this Kd concept an explicit description of geochemical phenomena and then couple transport codes with geochemical codes in a fully or a two-step procedure. We use currently such codes, but the scope of this paper is to display the limits today of the geochemical modelling in connection with sites analysis for deep disposal. In this paper, we intend to give an overview of phenomena which are missing in the geochemical models, or which are not completely introduced in the models. We can distinguish, on one hand phenomena for which modelling concepts exist such as adsorption/desorption and, on the other hand, phenomena for which modelling concepts do not exist for the moment such as colloids, and complexation by polyelectrolyte solutions (organics). Moreover we have to take care of very low concentrations of radionuclides, which can be expected from the leaching processes in the repository. Under those conditions, some reactions may not occur. After a critical review of the involved phenomena, we intend to stress the main directions of the wishful evolution of the geochemical modelling. This evolution should improve substantially the quality of the above-mentioned site assessments

  20. Geochemical mapping study of Panjang island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutisna; Sumardjo

    2010-01-01

    Impact of industrial and regional development are not only related to an improvement of socio-economic, but also to an environmental conservation and sustainable. This impact could be observed on a change of geochemical mapping before and after an operational of the industry. In the relation with a regional development and resources utilization, the geochemical mapping have been done in the aim to know a resources and an elemental distribution at Panjang island. In this research, ko-Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (k_0-INAA) have been applied in an elemental quantification on the geochemical mapping. Pencuplikan of geochemical sample have been carried out by using a grid systematic method with a sample density of about 10 sample per square kilometre involved 85 pencuplikan point. The geochemical sample of sediment and soil have been provided as a dry weight of 100 mesh. Internal quality control have done by using a number of Standard Reference Materials obtained from US. Geological Survey. Fifteen elements of Sc, Co, In, Rb, Mo, Ba, Ce, Nd, Eu, La, Yb, Th, U, lr and Hf contained in standard materials have been evaluated. The analysis result show that a relative standard deviation less than 11 %, except for Mo (13 %) and lr (26 %). Fourteen elements of Al, Br, Ca, Co, Eu, Fe, La, U, Na, Ce, Mn, As, Sc and Th have been mapped and presented in this paper. The major elements of Ca, Al and Fe, and minor elements of Mn, U and Sc are distributed at all region. The lanthanide elements of La, Ce and Eu have vary concentration and could be found at the middle to the north of the island. (author)

  1. Geochemical baseline studies of soil in Finland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pihlaja, Jouni

    2017-04-01

    The soil element concentrations regionally vary a lot in Finland. Mostly this is caused by the different bedrock types, which are reflected in the soil qualities. Geological Survey of Finland (GTK) is carrying out geochemical baseline studies in Finland. In the previous phase, the research is focusing on urban areas and mine environments. The information can, for example, be used to determine the need for soil remediation, to assess environmental impacts or to measure the natural state of soil in industrial areas or mine districts. The field work is done by taking soil samples, typically at depth between 0-10 cm. Sampling sites are chosen to represent the most vulnerable areas when thinking of human impacts by possible toxic soil element contents: playgrounds, day-care centers, schools, parks and residential areas. In the mine districts the samples are taken from the areas locating outside the airborne dust effected areas. Element contents of the soil samples are then analyzed with ICP-AES and ICP-MS, Hg with CV-AAS. The results of the geochemical baseline studies are published in the Finnish national geochemical baseline database (TAPIR). The geochemical baseline map service is free for all users via internet browser. Through this map service it is possible to calculate regional soil baseline values using geochemical data stored in the map service database. Baseline data for 17 elements in total is provided in the map service and it can be viewed on the GTK's web pages (http://gtkdata.gtk.fi/Tapir/indexEN.html).

  2. Alligator Rivers Analogue project. Geochemical Data Bases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, D.G.; Read, D.

    1992-01-01

    The Koongarra uranium deposit in the Northern Territory of Australia is being studied to evaluate the processes involved in the geochemical alteration of the ore body and the formation of the uranium dispersion fan. A broad range of research is being undertaken into the geochemistry and hydrology of the site with the aim of understanding the transport of radionuclides through the system. During the project a range of geochemical and hydrogeochemical models have been developed to account for measured data from the site and with which to predict site evolution. The majority of these models are based on the premise of thermodynamic chemical equilibrium and employ fundamental thermodynamic data to characterise the chemistry of the system. From the differences which exist between the thermodynamic data bases (Appendices I and II) it is possible to gain a view of the level of uncertainty associated with thermodynamic data in each set of calculations. This report gives a brief introduction to the geochemical processes underlying the models, and details the equations used to quantify the more common of these processes (e.g. aqueous speciation and mineral solubility). A description is given of the computer codes (EQ3/6, PHREEQE, MINTEQ) most commonly used during the project for geochemical modelling. Their key features are highlighted and comparisons made. It is concluded that the degree of uncertainty in geochemical modelling studies arising as a result of using one code rather than another is relatively insignificant when compared to that related to differences in the underlying data bases. 73 refs., 3 figs

  3. Argentina to fully privatize state owned YPF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    Argentina's Congress has voted to fully privatize state petroleum company Yacimientos Petroliferos Fiscales (YPF), a move the government expects to net at least $8 billion. Despite some political opposition, the vote was 119-10 in favor, with one abstention and opposition party members refusing to participate in the vote. Argentina's President Carlos Menem had threatened to authorize YPF privatization by decree if there was no quorum for a vote. YPF is responsible for 40% of Argentina's oil production. The country h as been self-sufficient in crude since 1982. Current production is 563,472 b/d, and proved reserves of oil and gas are valued at $7 billion

  4. The utilization of geochemical parameters for the environmental monitoring of the Nuclear Power Center of Angra I, Ribeira Bay, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bidone, E.D.; Carmo Lima, S. do.

    1984-01-01

    In order that a geochemical balance be as complete as possible and thus, reach predictive values for toxic chemical dispersion, an understanding of the hydrological, sedimentological and geological contexts is fundamental. The dispersion of a polluent (in this case radionuclides) is dependent, in part, on its chemical properties and its interaction by sorption and desorption from solid particles (in particular, sediments). This interaction needs to be incorporated in dispersion models and can influence the passage of a pollutant along the food chain. In the case of Ribeira Bay, near the nuclear power center of Angra I, it was observed, through the analysis of sedimentological and geochemical parameters (TOC, TSS, chemical and mineralogical compositions, and granularity): an increase in absorption capacity of surface sediments owing to a homogeneous grain size distribution and a varying clay composition; a possibility of remobilization and transfer of particulate material to areas outside the bay. (Author) [pt

  5. Biostimulation of Iron Reduction and Uranium Immobilization: Microbial and Mineralogical Controls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joel E. Kostka; Lainie Petrie; Nadia North; David L. Balkwill; Joseph W. Stucki; Lee Kerkhof

    2004-01-01

    The overall objective of our project is to understand the microbial and geochemical mechanisms controlling the reduction and immobilization of U(VI) during biostimulation in subsurface sediments of the Field Research Center (FRC) which are cocontaminated with uranium and nitrate. The focus will be on activity of microbial populations (metal- and nitrate-reducing bacteria) and iron minerals which are likely to make strong contributions to the fate of uranium during in situ bioremediation. The project will: (1) quantify the relationships between active members of the microbial communities, iron mineralogy, and nitrogen transformations in the field and in laboratory incubations under a variety of biostimulation conditions, (2) purify and physiologically characterize new model metal-reducing bacteria isolated from moderately acidophilic FRC subsurface sediments, and (3) elucidate the biotic and abiotic mechanisms by which FRC aluminosilicate clay minerals are reduced and dissolved under environmental conditions resembling those during biostimulation. Active microbial communities will be assessed using quantitative molecular techniques along with geochemical measurements to determine the different terminal-electron-accepting pathways. Iron minerals will be characterized using a suite of physical, spectroscopic, and wet chemical methods. Monitoring the activity and composition of the denitrifier community in parallel with denitrification intermediates during nitrate removal will provide a better understanding of the indirect effects of nitrate reduction on uranium speciation. Through quantification of the activity of specific microbial populations and an in-depth characterization of Fe minerals likely to catalyze U sorption/precipitation, we will provide important inputs for reaction-based biogeochemical models which will provide the basis for development of in situ U bioremediation strategies. In collaboration with Jack Istok and Lee Krumholz, we have begun to study the

  6. Geochemical behavior under tropical weathering of the Barama-Mazaruni greenstone belt at Omai gold mine, Guiana Shield

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voicu, G. [Universite du Quebec a Montreal (Canada). Dept. des Sciences de la Terre et de l' Atmosphere; Omai Gold Mines, Georgetown (Guyana); Bardoux, M. [Universite du Quebec a Montreal (Canada). Dept. des Sciences de la Terre et de l' Atmosphere

    2002-07-01

    Mineralogical, petrographical, and geochemical studies of the weathering profile have been carried out at Omai Au mine, Guyana. The area is underlain by felsic to mafic volcanic and sedimentary rocks of the Barama-Mazaruni Supergroup, part of the Paleoproterozoic greenstone belts of the Guiana Shield. Tropical rainy climate has favoured extensive lateritization processes and formation of a deeply weathered regolith. The top of the weathering profile consists of lateritic gravel or is masked by the Pleistocene continental-deltaic Berbice Formation. Mineralogical composition of regolith consists mainly of kaolinite, goethite and quark, and subordinately sericite, feldspar, hematite, pyrite, smectite, heavy minerals, and uncommon mineral phases (nacrite, ephesite, corrensite, guyanaite). A specific feature of the weathering profile at Omai is the preservation of fresh hydrothermal pyrite in the saprolith horizon. Chemical changes during the weathering processes depend on various physicochemical and structural parameters. Consequently, the depth should not be the principal criterion for comparison purposes of the geochemical behavior within the weathering profile, but rather an index that measures the degree of supergene alteration that has affected each analyzed sample, independently of the depth of sampling. Thus, the mineralogical index of alteration (MIA) can provide more accurate information about the behavior of major and trace elements in regolith as opposed to unweathered bedrock. It can also aid in establishing a quantitative relationship between intensity of weathering and mobility (leaching or accumulation) of each element in each analyzed sample. At Omai, some major and trace elements that are commonly considered as immobile (ex: TiO{sub 2}, Zr, etc.) during weathering could become mobile in several rock types and cannot be used to calculate the mass and volume balance. In addition, due to higher ''immobile element'' ratios, the

  7. The effects of metamorphism on iron mineralogy and the iron speciation redox proxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slotznick, Sarah P.; Eiler, John M.; Fischer, Woodward W.

    2018-03-01

    As the most abundant transition metal in the Earth's crust, iron is a key player in the planetary redox budget. Observations of iron minerals in the sedimentary record have been used to describe atmospheric and aqueous redox environments over the evolution of our planet; the most common method applied is iron speciation, a geochemical sequential extraction method in which proportions of different iron minerals are compared to calibrations from modern sediments to determine water-column redox state. Less is known about how this proxy records information through post-depositional processes, including diagenesis and metamorphism. To get insight into this, we examined how the iron mineral groups/pools (silicates, oxides, sulfides, etc.) and paleoredox proxy interpretations can be affected by known metamorphic processes. Well-known metamorphic reactions occurring in sub-chlorite to kyanite rocks are able to move iron between different iron pools along a range of proxy vectors, potentially affecting paleoredox results. To quantify the effect strength of these reactions, we examined mineralogical and geochemical data from two classic localities where Silurian-Devonian shales, sandstones, and carbonates deposited in a marine sedimentary basin with oxygenated seawater (based on global and local biological constraints) have been regionally metamorphosed from lower-greenschist facies to granulite facies: Waits River and Gile Mountain Formations, Vermont, USA and the Waterville and Sangerville-Vassalboro Formations, Maine, USA. Plotting iron speciation ratios determined for samples from these localities revealed apparent paleoredox conditions of the depositional water column spanning the entire range from oxic to ferruginous (anoxic) to euxinic (anoxic and sulfidic). Pyrrhotite formation in samples highlighted problems within the proxy as iron pool assignment required assumptions about metamorphic reactions and pyrrhotite's identification depended on the extraction techniques

  8. Mineralogy of the Martian Surface: Crustal Composition to Surface Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustard, John F.

    1999-01-01

    Over the course of this award we have: 1) Completed and published the results of a study of the effects of hyperfine particles on reflectance spectra of olivine and quartz, which included the development of scattering codes. Research has also progressed in the analysis of the effects of fine particle sizes on clay spectra. 2) Completed the analysis of the mineralogy of dark regions, showed the insitu compositions are highly correlated to the SNC meteorites, and determined that the martian mantle was depleted in aluminum prior to 2-3 GA ago; Studies of the mineralogic heterogeneity of surficial materials on Mars have also been conducted. and 3) Performed initial work on the study of the physical and chemical processes likely to form and modify duricrust. This includes assessments of erosion rates, solubility and transport of iron in soil environments, and models of pedogenic crust formation.

  9. Measured radon inside housings the Republic Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canoba, A.; Arnaud, M.; Lopez, F.; Oliveira, A.A.

    1998-01-01

    They have been measured the radon concentration in houses in different city's in Argentina Republic. For they were used it as method mensuration detectors appearances nuclear detecting electrets and detectors based on the adsorption radon in activated carbon

  10. Nuclear Data in Argentina (1992 -1993)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ricabarra, G. H.

    1993-03-01

    A progress report of nuclear data research in Argentina is given for the years 1992/1993, including the WIMS nuclear data library update project, and measurements and evaluations of selected neutron induced nuclear reactions. (author)

  11. Fracture mineralogy of the Forsmark site. SDM-Site Forsmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandstroem, Bjoern (Dept. of Earth Sciences, Univ. of Goeteborg (Sweden)); Tullborg, Eva-Lena (Terralogica AB, Graabo (Sweden)); Smellie, John (Conterra AB, Luleaa (Sweden)); MacKenzie, Angus B. (SUERC, Scottish Enterprise Technology Park, East Kilbride (United Kingdom)); Suksi, Juhani (Dept. of Chemistry, Univ. of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland))

    2008-08-15

    Detailed investigations of the fracture mineralogy and altered wall rock have been carried out as part of the site characterisation programme between 2003 and 2007 at Forsmark. The results have been published in a number of P-reports and in contributions to scientific journals. This report summarises and evaluates the data obtained during the detailed fracture mineralogical studies. The report includes descriptions of the identified fracture minerals and their chemical composition. A sequence of fracture mineralisations has been distinguished and provides information of the low to moderate temperature (brittle) geological and hydrogeological evolution at the site. Special focus has been paid to the chemical and stable isotopic composition of calcite to obtain palaeohydrogeological information. Chemical analyses of bulk fracture filling material have been carried out to identify possible sinks for certain elements and also to reveal the presence of minor phases rich in certain elements which have not been possible to detect by X-ray diffraction (XRD). Statistical analysis of the mineralogy in fractures outside deformation zones (i.e. within fracture domains FFM01, FFM02, FFM03 and FFM06) have been carried out concerning variation of fracture mineral distribution at depth and in different fracture domains. Uranium contents and uranium-series isotopes have been analysed on fracture coating material from hydraulically conductive fractures. Such analyses are also available from the groundwaters and the results are combined in order to reveal recent (< 1 Ma) removal/deposition of uranium in the fracture system. The redox conditions in the fracture system have been evaluated based on mineralogical and chemical indicators as well as Moessbauer analyses

  12. Clay Mineralogy of Brazilian Oxisols with Shrinkage Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samara Alves Testoni

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Shrinkage capacity (caráter retrátil in Portuguese is a new diagnostic characteristic recently introduced in the Brazilian System of Soil Classification (SiBCS to indicate shrink and swell properties observed in subtropical soils from highland plateaus in southern Brazil, specifically in Oxisols with brown colors. In soils located in road cuts exposed to drying for some weeks, strong shrinkage of soil volume is observed in these soils, resulting in the formation of pronounced vertical cracks and large and very large prismatic structures, which crumble in blocks when handled. We hypothesize that such properties are related to their clay mineralogy, although there are no conclusive studies about this, the motive for the present study. Samples of the A and B horizons from six Oxisols with expansive capacity from the states of Santa Catarina and Rio Grande do Sul were analyzed. One Rhodic Hapludox, from the state of Paraná, without expansive capacity, was used for comparison. All the soils are very clayey, originated from basalt, and have similar iron oxide content. For identification of clay mineralogy, X-ray diffraction techniques were employed, together with the use of NEWMOD® software to investigate and describe the interstratified minerals. The results showed that most expansive soils have a similar mineralogical composition, with kaolinite, interstratified kaolinite-smectite (K-S, and hydroxy-Al interlayered smectites (HIS, unlike the non-expansive Rhodic Hapludox, which exhibited kaolinite with significant amounts of gibbsite and low amount of interstratified K-S. According to the mineralogical assemblage identified in the expansive soils, we can affirm that the mechanism of smectite expansion and contraction is related to the shrinkage capacity of the soil, considering that the level of hydroxy-Al intercalation is low. In addition, these mechanisms also are related to the presence of quasicrystals and domains that control the

  13. Transnational Crime Fictions and Argentina's Criminal State

    OpenAIRE

    Caballero, Juan

    2013-01-01

    My dissertation, titled "Transnational Crime Fictions and Argentina's Criminal State," proposes a new understanding of the dictatorship novels of Ricardo Piglia, Juan José Saer, and Manuel Puig grounded in their shared appropriation from popular crime fiction. Across the 1940's, 50's, and 60's, a wide range of popular crime fiction was translated, written, theorized, printed and reprinted in Argentina, and these popular genres grew steadily in readership, visibility, and cultural legitimacy....

  14. Update on women in physics in Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brudny, Vera; Lagorio, Cecilia; Frechero, Marisa; Tamarit, Francisco

    2013-03-01

    Data collected 10 years ago in Argentina concluded that women in physics were underrepresented in many instances and that a "crystal ceiling" was firmly in place. We have collected updated data for several indicators and compared them with those obtained 10 years ago. Although there is not a clear conclusion to be drawn from this comparison, we try to explain the results within the framework of the changes in scientific policies in Argentina.

  15. Update on women in physics in Argentina

    OpenAIRE

    Brudny, Vera Leonor; Lagorio, Cecilia; Frechero, Marisa Alejandra; Tamarit, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Data collected 10 years ago in Argentina concluded that women in physics were underrepresented in many instances and that a “crystal ceiling” was firmly in place. We have collected updated data for several indicators and compared them with those obtained 10 years ago. Although there is not a clear conclusion to be drawn from this comparison, we try to explain the results within the framework of the changes in scientific policies in Argentina. Fil: Brudny, Vera Leonor. Universidad de Buenos...

  16. China, Argentina agree to further strategic ties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    According to Xinhua,China and Argentina have agreed to further enhance mutual trust and their strategic partnership as the two emerging economies are playing an increasingly important role in the world arena.“China will work with Argentina to strengthen strategic mutual trust,expand cooperation and coordination within multilateral frameworks in order to promote bilateral ties and benefit the two peoples,” Vice President Xi Jinping told Argentine Foreign Minister Hector Timerman on September 9.

  17. Poverty and Health in Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Alejandra Silva

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available This article examines health conditions in the rural areas of Central Argentina, the country’s main region for soy-bean production and export. Health conditions are analyzed through the concepts of emerging and re-emerging diseases in a context of increasing poverty. Data on poverty and health was obtained from both primary sources (trade union, government officials, rural doctors and the South Watch/FA/FODEPAL/UNR working group and secondary sources (IPEC/INDEC, IDESA, Consultora Equis, the Argentine Ministry of Employment, ILO, the Ministry of Health, the Ministry of the Environment, toxicology centers and rural doctors. Analysis of rural health conditions gives cause for concern. There is evidence of deterioration in the social determinants of health such as an increase in rural and urban poverty associated with informal employment and child labor. At the same time lack of government epidemiological and toxicological data appears to hide or distort the reality of health conditions.

  18. An Energy Overview of Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The DOE Office of Fossil Energy is maintaining a web site that is meant to provide useful business- and energy-related information about countries and regions of the world for exporters, project developers, and researchers. The site consists of more than 130 country pages (organized into seven different world regions), with each country page having its own set of links to information sources about that country. There are also more than 30 Country Energy Overviews at the web site -- each of these is a comprehensive review of a specific country's entire energy situation, including sections on Energy Policy, Oil, Natural Gas, Coal, Hydroelectric/Renewables, Nuclear Power, Energy Transmission Infrastructure, Electricity, Electric Industry Overview, Environmental Activities, Privatization, Trade, and Economic Situation. The specific country highlighted in this Country Energy Overview is Argentina. The site is designed to be dynamic. Updates to the overviews will be made as need and resources permit

  19. Nano-mineralogy of suspended sediment during the beginning of coal rejects spill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Civeira, Matheus S; Ramos, Claudete G; Oliveira, Marcos L S; Kautzmann, Rubens M; Taffarel, Silvio R; Teixeira, Elba C; Silva, Luis F O

    2016-02-01

    Ultrafine and nanometric sediment inputs into river systems can be a major source of nutrients and hazardous elements and have a strong impact on water quality and ecosystem functions of rivers and lakes regions. However, little is known to date about the spatial distribution of sediment sources in most large scale river basins in South America. The objective of this work was to study the coal cleaning rejects (CCRs) spill that occurred from a CCRs impoundment pond into the Tubarão River, South Brazil, provided a unique occasion to study the importance and role of incidental nanoparticles associated with pollutant dispersal from a large-scale, acute aquatic pollution event. Multifaceted geochemical research by X-ray diffraction (XRD), High Resolution-Transmission Electron microscopy (HR-TEM)/(Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy) EDS/(selected-area diffraction pattern) SAED, Field Emission-Scanning Electron Microscopy (FE-SEM)/EDS, and Raman spectroscopy, provided an in-depth understanding of importance of a nano-mineralogy approach of Aqueous Pollution Scenarios. The electron beam studies showed the presence of a number of potentially hazardous elements (PHEs) in nanoparticles (amorphous and minerals). Some of the neoformed ultrafine/nanoparticles found in the contaminated sediments are the same as those commonly associated with oxidation/transformation of oxides, silicates, sulfides, and sulfates. These data of the secondary ultra/nanoparticles, puts in evidence their ability to control the mobility of PHEs, suggesting possible presentations in environmental technology, including recuperation of sensitive coal mine. The developed methodology facilitated the sediment transport of the catchment providing consistent results and suggesting its usefulness as a tool for temporary rivers management. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Mineralogical Characterization of The Alteration Facies at Gabal El-Missikat Area, Central Eastern Desert, Egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Sherif, A.M.

    2013-01-01

    The present study deals with the petrographical, mineralogical and geochemical characteristics of the alteration facies zones recognized around the shear zone at Gabal El-Missikat area, Central Eastern Desert, Egypt. Petrographically, the fresh granitic samples are composed mainly of quartz, K-feldspars (microcline and microcline perthite), plagioclase, biotite. The secondary minerals are sericite, kaolinite, muscovite, chlorite and epidote as well as zircon, apatite, fluorite, titanite and iron oxides as accessory minerals. Two alteration facies zones are recognized and namely as propylitic and advanced argillic. The propylitic facies zone is composed mainly of sericite with minor kaolinite, muscovite, quartz, relics of plagioclases, chlorite and rare epidote as well as zircon, hematite, goethite, magnetite, ilmenite, ilmenorutile, rutile, titanite, apatite, columbite and fluorite and secondary uranium minerals, the advanced argillic facies zone is composed mainly of kaolinite with minor sericite, quartz, muscovite, chlorite and rare epidote as well as zircon, hematite, goethite, magnetite, ilmenite, ilmenorutile, rutile, titanite, apatite and garnet of spessartine type as accessory minerals. The identified minerals in the studied two alteration facies zones can be grouped into three mineral groups which are: the primary minerals (pyrite, magnetite, galena, columbite and gold), the secondary minerals (uranophane, kasolite and wulfenite) and the gangue minerals (anhydrite, barite, celestine, hematite, goethite and fluorite). The identified mineral assemblage of the studied propylitic alteration facies zone may be attributed to strongly alkaline hydrothermal solutions at ph value of more than 7 with temperature varying between 350 and 450°C, while the advanced argillic alteration facies zone is essentially associated with strongly acidic hydrothermal solutions at ph value less than 7 with temperature varying between 150 and 400°C

  1. Ma_MISS on ExoMars: Mineralogical Characterization of the Martian Subsurface

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Sanctis, Maria Cristina; Altieri, Francesca; Ammannito, Eleonora; Biondi, David; De Angelis, Simone; Meini, Marco; Mondello, Giuseppe; Novi, Samuele; Paolinetti, Riccardo; Soldani, Massimo; Mugnuolo, Raffaele; Pirrotta, Simone; Vago, Jorge L.; Ma_MISS Team

    2017-07-01

    The Ma_MISS (Mars Multispectral Imager for Subsurface Studies) experiment is the visible and near infrared (VNIR) miniaturized spectrometer hosted by the drill system of the ExoMars 2020 rover. Ma_MISS will perform IR spectral reflectance investigations in the 0.4-2.2 μm range to characterize the mineralogy of excavated borehole walls at different depths (between 0 and 2 m). The spectral sampling is about 20 nm, whereas the spatial resolution over the target is 120 μm. Making use of the drill's movement, the instrument slit can scan a ring and build up hyperspectral images of a borehole. The main goal of the Ma_MISS instrument is to study the martian subsurface environment. Access to the martian subsurface is crucial to our ability to constrain the nature, timing, and duration of alteration and sedimentation processes on Mars, as well as habitability conditions. Subsurface deposits likely host and preserve H2O ice and hydrated materials that will contribute to our understanding of the H2O geochemical environment (both in the liquid and in the solid state) at the ExoMars 2020 landing site. The Ma_MISS spectral range and sampling capabilities have been carefully selected to allow the study of minerals and ices in situ before the collection of samples. Ma_MISS will be implemented to accomplish the following scientific objectives: (1) determine the composition of subsurface materials, (2) map the distribution of subsurface H2O and volatiles, (3) characterize important optical and physical properties of materials (e.g., grain size), and (4) produce a stratigraphic column that will inform with regard to subsurface geological processes. The Ma_MISS findings will help to refine essential criteria that will aid in our selection of the most interesting subsurface formations from which to collect samples.

  2. Mineralogy, petrology and geochemistry of the Pocos de Caldas analogue study sites, Minas Gerais, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waber, M.

    1991-01-01

    The thorium-rare-earth element deposit at Morro do Ferro is of supergene origin and was formed under lateritic weathering conditions. The ore body forms shallow NW-SE elongated argillaceous lenses that extend from the top of the hill downwards along its south-eastern slope. The deposit is capped by a stockwork of magnetite veins which have protected the underlying, highly argillaceous host rock from excessive erosion. The surrounding country rocks comprise a sequence of subvolcanic phonolite intrusions that have been strongly altered by hydrothermal and supergene processes. From petrological, mineralogical and geochemical studies and mass balance calculations, it is inferred that the highly weathered host rock was originally carbonatic in composition and was initially enhanced in thorium and rare-earth elements compared to the surrounding silicate rocks. Intrusion of the carbonatite produced fenitic alteration of the surrounding phonolites, consisting of an early potassic alteration followed by a vein-type Th-REE mineralization with associated fluorite, carbonate, pyrite and zircon. Subsequent lateritic weathering has completely destroyed the carbonatite, forming a residual supergene enrichment of Th and REEs. Initial weathering of the carbonatite leading to solutions enriched in carbonate and phosphate may have appreciably restricted the dissolution of the primary Th-REE phases. Strongly oxidic weathering has resulted in a fractionation between cerium and the other light rare-earth elements. Ce 3+ is oxidized to Ce 4+ and retained together with thorium by secondary mineral formation and adsorption on poorly crystalline iron- and aluminium-hydroxides. In contrast, the trivalent LREEs are retained to a lesser degree and are thus more available for secondary mineral formation and adsorption at greater depths down the weathering column. (author) figs., tabs., 60 refs

  3. Application of cluster analysis to geochemical compositional data for identifying ore-related geochemical anomalies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Shuguang; Zhou, Kefa; Wang, Jinlin; Yang, Genfang; Wang, Shanshan

    2017-12-01

    Cluster analysis is a well-known technique that is used to analyze various types of data. In this study, cluster analysis is applied to geochemical data that describe 1444 stream sediment samples collected in northwestern Xinjiang with a sample spacing of approximately 2 km. Three algorithms (the hierarchical, k-means, and fuzzy c-means algorithms) and six data transformation methods (the z-score standardization, ZST; the logarithmic transformation, LT; the additive log-ratio transformation, ALT; the centered log-ratio transformation, CLT; the isometric log-ratio transformation, ILT; and no transformation, NT) are compared in terms of their effects on the cluster analysis of the geochemical compositional data. The study shows that, on the one hand, the ZST does not affect the results of column- or variable-based (R-type) cluster analysis, whereas the other methods, including the LT, the ALT, and the CLT, have substantial effects on the results. On the other hand, the results of the row- or observation-based (Q-type) cluster analysis obtained from the geochemical data after applying NT and the ZST are relatively poor. However, we derive some improved results from the geochemical data after applying the CLT, the ILT, the LT, and the ALT. Moreover, the k-means and fuzzy c-means clustering algorithms are more reliable than the hierarchical algorithm when they are used to cluster the geochemical data. We apply cluster analysis to the geochemical data to explore for Au deposits within the study area, and we obtain a good correlation between the results retrieved by combining the CLT or the ILT with the k-means or fuzzy c-means algorithms and the potential zones of Au mineralization. Therefore, we suggest that the combination of the CLT or the ILT with the k-means or fuzzy c-means algorithms is an effective tool to identify potential zones of mineralization from geochemical data.

  4. Mineralogical and geological study of quaternary deposits and weathering profiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Gi Young; Lee, Bong Ho [Andong National Univ., Andong (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-01-15

    Movement history of a quaternary reverse fault cutting marine terrace deposit and tertiary bentonite in the Yangnammyon, Gyoungju city was studied by the mineralogical and microtextural analysis of the fault clays and weathered terrace deposits. Two types of fault clays were identified as greenish gray before the deposition of the marine terrace deposits and reddish brown after deposition. Greenish gray fault clay is composed mostly of smectite probably powdered from bentonite showing at least two events of movement from microtextures. After the bentonite was covered by quaternary marine gravel deposits, the reverse fault was reactivated cutting marine gravel deposits to form open spaces along the fault plane which allowed the hydrological infiltration of soil particles and deposition of clays in deep subsurface. The reddish brown 'fault' clays enclosed the fragments of dark brown ultrafine varved clay, proving two events of faulting, and slicken sides bisecting reddish brown clays suggest another faulting event in the final stage. Mineralogical and microtextural analysis of the fault clay show total five events of faulting, which had not been recognized even by thorough conventional paleoseismological investigation using trench, highlighting the importance of microtextural and mineralogical analysis in paleoseismology.

  5. Martian Surface Mineralogy from Rovers with Spirit, Opportunity, and Curiosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Richard V.

    2016-01-01

    Beginning in 2004, NASA has landed three well-instrumented rovers on the equatorial martian surface. The Spirit rover landed in Gusev crater in early January, 2004, and the Opportunity rover landed on the opposite side of Mars at Meridian Planum 21 days later. The Curiosity rover landed in Gale crater to the west of Gusev crater in August, 2012. Both Opportunity and Curiosity are currently operational. The twin rovers Spirit and Opportunity carried Mossbauer spectrometers to determine the oxidation state of iron and its mineralogical composition. The Curiosity rover has an X-ray diffraction instrument for identification and quantification of crystalline materials including clay minerals. Instrument suites on all three rovers are capable of distinguishing primary rock-forming minerals like olivine, pyroxene and magnetite and products of aqueous alteration in including amorphous iron oxides, hematite, goethite, sulfates, and clay minerals. The oxidation state of iron ranges from that typical for unweathered rocks and soils to nearly completely oxidized (weathered) rocks and soils as products of aqueous and acid-sulfate alteration. The in situ rover mineralogy also serves as ground-truth for orbital observations, and orbital mineralogical inferences are used for evaluating and planning rover exploration.

  6. Nuclear security standard: Argentina approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonet Duran, Stella M.; Rodriguez, Carlos E.; Menossi, Sergio A.; Serdeiro, Nelida H.

    2007-01-01

    Argentina has a comprehensive regulatory system designed to assure the security and safety of radioactive sources, which has been in place for more than fifty years. In 1989 the Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety branch of the National Atomic Energy Commission created the 'Council of Physical Protection of Nuclear Materials and Installations' (CAPFMIN). This Council published in 1992 a Physical Protection Standard based on a deep and careful analysis of INFCIRC 225/Rev.2 including topics like 'sabotage scenario'. Since then, the world's scenario has changed, and some concepts like 'design basis threat', 'detection, delay and response', 'performance approach and prescriptive approach', have been applied to the design of physical protection systems in facilities other than nuclear installations. In Argentina, radioactive sources are widely used in medical and industrial applications with more than 1,600 facilities controlled by the Nuclear Regulatory Authority (in spanish ARN). During 2005, measures like 'access control', 'timely detection of intruder', 'background checks', and 'security plan', were required by ARN for implementation in facilities with radioactive sources. To 'close the cycle' the next step is to produce a regulatory standard based on the operational experience acquired during 2005. ARN has developed a set of criteria for including them in a new standard on security of radioactive materials. Besides, a specific Regulatory Guide is being prepared to help licensees of facilities in design a security system and to fulfill the 'Design of Security System Questionnaire'. The present paper describes the proposed Standard on Security of Radioactive Sources and the draft of the Nuclear Security Regulatory Guidance, based on our regulatory experience and the latest international recommendations. (author)

  7. Rare earth element mineralogy and geochemistry in a laterite profile from Madagascar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, Alfons; Janots, Emilie; Gnos, Edwin; Frei, Robert; Bernier, Felix

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Secondary REE-mineralogy depend on redox conditions inside a laterite. • Detailed mineralogy in different layers of a laterite is given. • A Gd-sulfate is described. • Change in bulk rock chemistry control REE mineralogy. - Abstract: In this study, rare earth element (REE) distribution has been investigated in a weathering profile from central Madagascar. Combination of bulk rock geochemical data (elements and isotopes) with mineral characterization reveals a remarkable evolution of the REE abundances and REE-minerals in the vertical weathering profile. In the fresh tonalite (bedrock), REE + Y concentrations are typical of granitoids (299–363 ppm) and the main REE-minerals are allanite and chevkinite. In the C-horizon (saprolite), primary REE-minerals disappear and REEs are transported via fluid to precipitate rhabdophane group minerals in cracks and pores. The presence of sulfate ligands, produced by sulfide oxidation, may be responsible for the REE speciation, as suggested by the composition of the secondary REE-minerals. Rhabdophane group minerals contain up to 9 wt% SO 3 and 7 wt% CaO, indicating a mixture between rhabdophane sensu stricto, (REE)PO 4 ·H 2 O, and tristamite, (Ca,U,Fe (III) )(PO 4 ,SO 4 )·2H 2 O. Due to intense Ca-leaching, rhabdophane disappears and Al-phosphates (alunite–jarosite group) are found in the soil. Cerianite (Ce (IV) O 2 ) also precipitates in the B-horizon of the soil. Mass transfer calculations based on immobile Ti indicate significant REE leaching in A-horizon with preferential leaching of the heavy REE. REEs accumulate partly in the B-horizon. The uniform Nd isotope compositions and the constant proportion of immobile elements do not reveal external input. In the B-horizon, total REE + Y reach 2194 ppm with high Ce concentrations (1638 ppm; 9 * Ce bedrock ) compared to other REE (3–4 * REE bedrock ). Tetravalent Ce state is dominant in the B-horizon and requires oxidizing conditions that likely

  8. Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermina Fernández Zambón

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available La actividad industrial, de cualquier época, tiene una gran importancia para el hombre, pues al igual que el resto de los procesos económicos, es el reflejo del accionar cotidiano de la sociedad sobre el espacio. Considerando esto, el presente articulo tiene como objetivo presentar al patrimonio industrial como recurso para organizar rutas turísticas que permitan en algunos casos recuperar espacios industriales abandonados o usar establecimientos industriales en funcionamiento pero que pueden incorporarse a este tipo de desarrollo turístico. La creación de rutas turísticas puede permitir la reactivación de las economías locales, por constituirse en definitiva en una nueva actividad económica. Para lograr esto es necesario articular el sector público y el privado. De esta forma es posible, a través de la creación de rutas turísticas del patrimonio industrial, generar un desarrollo turístico local sustentable.

  9. Uranium geochemical exploration in northwestern Luzon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, G. Jr.; Fernandez, L.; Ogena, M.; Tauli, G.

    1980-01-01

    A reconnaissance geochemical stream water and sediment survey which was conducted in northwestern Luzon was able to detect ten (10) uranium anomalous areas. These anomalous areas are located along a north-south trending zone of Miocene marine clastics and sedimentary rocks with tuffaceous sediment intercalations. In general, northwest Luzon has low radioactivity except for two anomalous areas which have 3 to 6 times background radioactivity. Radon anomalies occur in sparsely scattered locations. The anomalous zones appear to be related to major north-south faults and secondary northeast-southwest trending structures. Geochemical correlations between uranium and other elements such as copper, lead, zinc, manganese, silver, cobalt and nickel are generally very poor. (author)

  10. Retention/sorption and geochemical modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arcos, D.; Grandia, F.; Domenech, C. [Enviros Spain, S.L., Barcelona (Spain); SCK-CEN, Mol (Belgium); Sellin, P. [SKB - Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management, SE, Stockholm (Sweden); Hunter, F.M.I.; Bate, F.; Heath, T.G.; Hoch, A. [Serco Assurance, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom); Werme, L.O. [SKB - Svensk Karnbranslehantering AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Bruggeman, C.; Maes, I.A.; Breynaert, E.; Vancluysen, J. [Leuven Katholieke Univ., Lab. for Colloid Chemistry (Belgium); Montavon, G.; Guo, Z. [Ecole des Mines, 44 - Nantes (France); Riebe, B.; Bunnenberg, C.; Meleshyn, A. [Leibniz Univ. Hannover, Zentrum fur Strahlenschutz und Radiookologie, Hannover (Germany); Dultz, S. [Leibniz Univ. Hannover, Institut fur Bodenkunde, Hannover (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    This session gathers 4 articles dealing with: the long-term geochemical evolution of the near field of a KBS-3 HLNW repository: insights from reactive transport modelling (D. Arcos, F. Grandia, C. Domenech, P. Sellin); the investigation of iron transport into bentonite from anaerobically corroding steel: a geochemical modelling study (F.M.I. Hunter, F. Bate, T.G. Heath, A. Hoch, L.O. Werme); SeO{sub 3}{sup 2-} adsorption on conditioned Na-illite: XAS spectroscopy, kinetics, surface complexation model and influence of compaction (C. Bruggeman, A. Maes, G. Montavon, E. Breynaert, Z. Guo, J. Vancluysen); the influence of temperature and gamma-irradiation on the anion sorption capacity of modified bentonites (B. Riebe, C. Bunnenberg, A. Meleshyn, S. Dultz)

  11. Linkages between mineralogy, fluid chemistry, and microbial communities within hydrothermal chimneys from the Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, T. J.; Ver Eecke, H. C.; Breves, E. A.; Dyar, M. D.; Jamieson, J. W.; Hannington, M. D.; Dahle, H.; Bishop, J. L.; Lane, M. D.; Butterfield, D. A.; Kelley, D. S.; Lilley, M. D.; Baross, J. A.; Holden, J. F.

    2016-02-01

    Rock and fluid samples were collected from three hydrothermal chimneys at the Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge to evaluate linkages among mineralogy, fluid chemistry, and microbial community composition within the chimneys. Mössbauer, midinfrared thermal emission, and visible-near infrared spectroscopies were utilized for the first time to characterize vent mineralogy, in addition to thin-section petrography, X-ray diffraction, and elemental analyses. A 282°C venting chimney from the Bastille edifice was composed primarily of sulfide minerals such as chalcopyrite, marcasite, and sphalerite. In contrast, samples from a 300°C venting chimney from the Dante edifice and a 321°C venting chimney from the Hot Harold edifice contained a high abundance of the sulfate mineral anhydrite. Geochemical modeling of mixed vent fluids suggested the oxic-anoxic transition zone was above 100°C at all three vents, and that the thermodynamic energy available for autotrophic microbial redox reactions favored aerobic sulfide and methane oxidation. As predicted, microbes within the Dante and Hot Harold chimneys were most closely related to mesophilic and thermophilic aerobes of the Betaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria and sulfide-oxidizing autotrophic Epsilonproteobacteria. However, most of the microbes within the Bastille chimney were most closely related to mesophilic and thermophilic anaerobes of the Deltaproteobacteria, especially sulfate reducers, and anaerobic hyperthermophilic archaea. The predominance of anaerobes in the Bastille chimney indicated that other environmental factors promote anoxic conditions. Possibilities include the maturity or fluid flow characteristics of the chimney, abiotic Fe2+ and S2- oxidation in the vent fluids, or O2 depletion by aerobic respiration on the chimney outer wall.

  12. Superficial alteration mineralogy in active volcanic systems: An example of Poás volcano, Costa Rica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Alejandro; van Bergen, Manfred J.

    2017-10-01

    The alteration mineralogy in the crater area of Poás volcano (Costa Rica) has been studied to constrain acid fluid-rock interaction processes and conditions relevant for the formation of sulphate-bearing mineral assemblages found on the surface of Mars. Individual sub-environments, which include the hyperacid lake (Laguna Caliente), ephemeral hot springs, fumarole vents and areas affected by acid rain and/or spray from the lake, are marked by distinct secondary mineral associations, with sulphates commonly as prevailing component. The sulphates occur in a wide mineralogical diversity comprising gypsum/anhydrite, various polyhydrated Al-sulphates, alunite-jarosite group minerals, halotrichite-, voltaite- and copiapite-group minerals, epsomite and römerite. Depending on the sub-environment, they are variably associated with clay minerals (kaolinite-group and smectite-group), zeolites, SiO2-polymorphs, Fe-(hydro)oxides, Ti-oxides, native sulphur, sulphides, chlorides, fluorides, phosphates and carbonates. Geochemical modelling was performed to identify mechanisms responsible for the formation of the secondary minerals found in the field, and to predict their possible stability under conditions not seen at the surface. The results indicate that the appearance of amorphous silica, hematite, anhydrite/gypsum, pyrite, anatase and kaolinite is relatively insensitive to the degree of acidity of the local aqueous system. On the other hand, alunite-jarosite group minerals, elemental sulphur and Al(OH)SO4 only form under acidic conditions (pH rain or brine spray. Modelling suggests that their formation required a repetitive sequence of olivine dissolution and evaporation in an open system involving limited amounts of fluid. The mineral variety in the crater of Poás is remarkably similar to sulphate-bearing assemblages considered to be the product of acid-sulphate alteration on Mars. The analogy suggests that comparable fluid-rock interaction controls operated in Martian

  13. The Star–Planet Connection. I. Using Stellar Composition to Observationally Constrain Planetary Mineralogy for the 10 Closest Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinkel, Natalie R.; Unterborn, Cayman T.

    2018-01-01

    The compositions of stars and planets are connected, but the definition of “habitability” and the “habitable zone” only take into account the physical relationship between the star and planet. Planets, however, are made truly habitable by both chemical and physical processes that regulate climatic and geochemical cycling between atmosphere, surface, and interior reservoirs. Despite this, an “Earth-like” planet is often defined as a planet made of a mixture of rock and Fe that is roughly 1 Earth-density. To understand the interior of a terrestrial planet, the stellar abundances of planet-building elements (e.g., Mg, Si, and Fe) can be used as a proxy for the planet’s composition. We explore the planetary mineralogy and structure for fictive planets around the 10 stars closest to the Sun using stellar abundances from the Hypatia Catalog. Although our sample contains stars that are both sub- and super-solar in their abundances, we find that the mineralogies are very similar for all 10 planets—since the error or spread in the stellar abundances create significant degeneracy in the models. We show that abundance uncertainties need to be on the order of [Fe/H] < 0.02 dex, [Si/H] < 0.01 dex, [Al/H] < 0.002 dex, while [Mg/H] and [Ca/H] < 0.001 dex in order to distinguish two unique planetary populations in our sample of 10 stars. While these precisions are high, we believe that they are possible given certain abundance techniques, in addition to methodological transparency, that have recently been demonstrated in the literature. However, without these precisions, the uncertainty in planetary structures will be so high that we will be unable to confidently state that a planet is like the Earth, or unlike anything we have ever seen. We made some cuts and ruled out a number of stars, but these 10 are still rather nearby.

  14. Geochemical approach to evaluate deforest of mangroves

    OpenAIRE

    Ishiga, Hiroaki; Diallo, Ibrahima M'bemba; Bah Mamadou Lamine Malick,; Ngulimi. Faustine Miguta,; Magai. Paschal Justin,; Shati Samwel Stanley,

    2016-01-01

    Processes of mangrove deforest related human activities were examined. To evaluate changes of soil feature, multielements geochemical compositions of mangrove muds and soils of deforest were analyzed. To describe present situation of the mangrove, Conakry in Guinea, Dar es Salaam in Tanzania, Sundarbans of Bangladesh and Nago in Okinawa of Japan were selected. Soil samples of the forests were evaluated enrichment of biologically concentrated heavy metals such as Zn, Cu and Fe, and TS (total s...

  15. Geochemical indicators of gold ore fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shcherbakov, Yu.G.

    1995-01-01

    The principles of selection of indicators for genetic reconstructions and prognostic valuations of gold mineralization of diverse morphological and geochemical types have been substantiated. The neutron-activation analysis with radiochemical separation and detection limit of 1-10 -8 %, instrumental neutron-activation analysis and atomic-absorption analysis are the main methods of determination of gold low contents in the rocks, as well as diverse elements, including transition, rare earth elements and tellurium, in gold. 50 refs.; 1 fig.; 3 tabs

  16. Synthesizing Earth's geochemical data for hydrogeochemical analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brantley, S. L.; Kubicki, J.; Miller, D.; Richter, D.; Giles, L.; Mitra, P.

    2007-12-01

    For over 200 years, geochemical, microbiological, and chemical data have been collected to describe the evolution of the surface earth. Many of these measurements are data showing variations in time or in space. To forward predict hydrologic response to changing tectonic, climatic, or anthropogenic forcings requires synthesis of these data and utilization in hydrogeochemical models. Increasingly, scientists are attempting to synthesize such data in order to make predictions for new regions or for future time periods. However, to make such complex geochemical data accessible requires development of sophisticated cyberinfrastructures that both invite uploading as well as usage of data. Two such cyberinfrastructure (CI) initiatives are currently developing, one to invite and promote the use of environmental kinetics data (laboratory time course data) through ChemxSeer, and the other to invite and promote the use of spatially indexed geochemical data for the Earth's Critical Zone through CZEN.org. The vision of these CI initiatives is to provide cyber-enhanced portals that encourage domain scientists to upload their data before publication (in private cyberspace), and to make these data eventually publicly accessible (after an embargo period). If the CI can be made to provide services to the domain specialist - e.g. to provide data analysis services or data comparison services - we envision that scientists will upload data. In addition, the CI can promote the use and comparison of datasets across disciplines. For example, the CI can facilitate the use of spatially indexed geochemical data by scientists more accustomed to dealing with time-course data for hydrologic flow, and can provide user-friendly interfaces with CI established to facilitate the use of hydrologic data. Examples of the usage of synthesized data to predict soil development over the last 13ky and its effects on active hydrological flow boundaries in surficial systems will be discussed for i) a N

  17. Summary report on geochemical barrier special study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-12-01

    Long-term management of uranium mill tailings must provide assurance that soluble contaminants will not migrate beyond the Point of Compliance. Conventional management alternatives provide containment through the use of physical barriers which are designed to prevent migration of water through the tailings pile. An alternative is to geochemically modify the tailings to immobilize the contaminants. This investigation examined three potential geochemical modifiers to determine their ability to immobilize inorganic groundwater contaminants found in uranium mill tailings. These modifiers were hydrated lime (Ca(OH) 2 ), limestone (CaCO 3 ), and a sphaegnum peat moss. This investigation focused on both the geochemical interactions between the tailings and the modifiers, and the effects the modifiers had on the physical strength of the tailings. The geochemical investigations began with characterization of the tailings by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. This was followed by batch leaching experiments in which various concentrations of each modifier were added to tailings in shaker flasks and allowed to come to equilibrium. Finally, column experiments were conducted to simulate flow through a tailings pile. The results show that all of the modifiers were at least moderately effective at immobilizing most of the groundwater contaminants of concern at uranium mill tailings sites. Hydrated lime was able to achieve 90 percent concentration reduction of arsenic, cadmium, selenium, uranium, and sulfate when added at a two percent concentration. Limestone was somewhat less effective and peat removed greater than 90 percent of arsenic, lead, uranium, and sulfate at a one percent concentration. The column tests showed that kinetic and/or mass transfer limitations are important and that sufficient time must be allowed for the immobilization reactions to occur

  18. Mineral Precipitation in Fractures: Multiscale Imaging and Geochemical Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajirezaie, S.; Peters, C. A.; Swift, A.; Sheets, J. M.; Cole, D. R.; Crandall, D.; Cheshire, M.; Stack, A. G.; Anovitz, L. M.

    2017-12-01

    For subsurface energy technologies such as geologic carbon sequestration, fractures are potential pathways for fluid migration from target formations. Highly permeable fractures may become sealed by mineral precipitation. In this study, we examined shale specimens with existing cemented fractures as natural analogues, using an array of imaging methods to characterize mineralogy and porosity at several spatial scales. In addition, we used reactive transport modeling to investigate geochemical conditions that can lead to extensive mineral precipitation and to simulate the impacts on fracture hydraulic properties. The naturally-cemented fractured rock specimens were from the Upper Wolfcamp formation in Texas, at 10,000 ft depth. The specimens were scanned using x-ray computed tomography (xCT) at resolution of 13 microns. The xCT images revealed an original fracture aperture of 1.9 mm filled with several distinct mineral phases and vuggy void regions, and the mineral phase volumes and surface areas were quantified and mapped in 3D. Specimens were thin-sectioned and examined at micron- and submicron-scales using petrographic microscopy (PM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). Collectively these methods revealed crystals of dolomite as large as 900 microns in length overlain with a heterogeneous mixture of carbonate minerals including calcite, dolomite, and Fe-rich dolomite, interspersed at spatial scales as small as 5 microns. In addition, secondary precipitation of SiO2 was found to fill some of the void space. This multiscale imaging was used to inform the reactive transport modeling employed to examine the conditions that can cause the observed mineral precipitation in fractures at a larger scale. Two brines containing solutions that when mixed would lead to precipitation of various carbonate minerals were simulated as injectants into a fracture domain. In particular, the competing

  19. Magnetic and Geochemical Properties of Andic Soils from the Massif Central, France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grison, H.; Petrovsky, E.; Dlouha, S.; Kapicka, A.

    2014-12-01

    Ferrimagnetic iron oxides are the key magnetic minerals responsible for enhancement of the magnetic susceptibility in soils. Soils with andic properties contain high amount of Fe-oxides, but only few attempts were made to characterize these soils using magnetic methods. Magnetic susceptibility is in particular suitable for its sensitivity and fast measurement; the presence of Fe-oxides can be easily identified directly in the field. The aim of our study is to describe main magnetic and geochemical properties of soils rich in Fe oxides derived from strongly magnetic volcanic basement. The studied sites are located at the basalt parent rock formed during Pleistocene, Pliocene and Miocene. Investigated soils are exposed to the mountainous climate with the perudic soil moisture regime and cryic temperature soil regime. Seven basalt soil profiles with typical andic properties were analyzed down to parent rock by a set of magnetic and geochemical methods. The magnetic susceptibility was measured in situ and in laboratory using the Bartington MS2D and AGICO MFK1. Its temperature dependence was measured in order to assess phase transformations of magnetic minerals using the KLY4. Magnetic data were completed by the hysteresis, IRM and DCD measurements using ADE EV9 VSM. Geochemical data include soil reaction (pH), organic carbon, cations exchange capacity, and extractable iron and aluminium in the soil extracted by a dithionite-citrate, acid-ammonium oxalate and a pyrophosphate solution. Scanning electron microscopy was done for top/sub-soil and rock samples. Geochemical soil properties reflecting iron oxide stability correlate well with mass-specific magnetic susceptibility. Well pronounced relationship was observed between magnetic grain size, precipitation and soil pH, second group is reflecting concentration of feri-magnetic particles and age of parent rock, and the third group reflects degree of weathering and the thermomagnetic indices expressing changes in magneto-mineralogy

  20. Geochemical evaluation of the near-field for future HLW repository at Olkiluoto

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Idiart, A.; Maia, F.; Arcos, D.

    2013-10-01

    The concept for the final disposal of spent nuclear fuel in Finland considers an engineered and natural (crystalline rock) multi-barrier system surrounding the spent fuel. This work aims at predicting and making a quantitative assessment of the geochemical evolution of the near-field (canister, buffer, backfill and adjacent fractured bedrock) during the unsaturated thermal period and in the long-term, after saturation has been completed. The groundwater/bentonite buffer interaction during the unsaturated thermal period is tackled through a two-dimensional (2D) axisymmetric scheme using the thermo-hydro-geochemical code TOUGHREACT. In turn, the long-term interaction of the fully water-saturated buffer and backfill with groundwater is assessed through 3D numerical models using the reactive transport code PHAST under isothermal conditions. A set of base cases have been set up based on the most plausible set of input data. In addition, a limited number of sensitivity cases have been conducted to analyse the influence of key parameters controlling the system and reduce uncertainty. Predicted mineralogical changes of accessory minerals in the bentonite for the thermal period are controlled by the dependence of mineral solubilities on temperature and on the solute transport by advection during the saturation process, and diffusion during the whole period. The results of the thermal period indicate that a small amount of the primary amorphous silica is redistributed in the buffer: dissolution close to the canister and precipitation close to the buffer - rock interface. Primary calcite dissolution/precipitation is minimal, remaining stable throughout the simulation time in all cases. Anhydrite precipitates near the canister due to the elevated temperature, while it dissolves from the outside of the buffer. The results indicate that there is no significant evaporation of water near the copper canister and thus no chloride salt reaches saturation. The geochemical changes of

  1. Monitoring active volcanoes: The geochemical approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Ohba

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available

    The geochemical surveillance of an active volcano aims to recognize possible signals that are related to changes in volcanic activity. Indeed, as a consequence of the magma rising inside the volcanic "plumbing system" and/or the refilling with new batches of magma, the dissolved volatiles in the magma are progressively released as a function of their relative solubilities. When approaching the surface, these fluids that are discharged during magma degassing can interact with shallow aquifers and/or can be released along the main volcano-tectonic structures. Under these conditions, the following main degassing processes represent strategic sites to be monitored.

    The main purpose of this special volume is to collect papers that cover a wide range of topics in volcanic fluid geochemistry, which include geochemical characterization and geochemical monitoring of active volcanoes using different techniques and at different sites. Moreover, part of this volume has been dedicated to the new geochemistry tools.

  2. An unpublished text of Jovellanos about mineralogy Notas inéditas de Jovellanos sobre mineralogía

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge ORDAZ GARGALLO

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An unpublished manuscript of Gaspar Melchor de Jovellanos about the history of mineralogy, written during his captivity in Bellver Castle (Palma de Mallorca is presented and analyzed. In this writing the importance of the chemical knowledge as a source of other branches of science and its applications in different fields of agriculture, mining and industry is considered. The author made a historical synthesis reviewing the men of science that contributed in a great extent to the advance of the chemistry and mineralogy. The text clearly supports the new contributions of Lavoisier and other supporters of experimentation as a scientific method, which agrees with Jovellanos’ ideas about the development of the «useful» sciences for the progress of the countries.Se presenta y analiza un manuscrito inédito de Gaspar Melchor de Jovellanos sobre la historia de la mineralogía, que redactó durante su cautiverio en el Castillo de Bellver (Palma de Mallorca. En el escrito considera de gran importancia los conocimientos químicos como fuente de otras ramas del saber científico y sus aplicaciones en distintos ámbitos de la agricultura, minería e industria. El autor hace una síntesis histórica repasando los hombres de ciencia que en mayor medida contribuyeron al avance de la química y la mineralogía. El texto apoya claramente las nuevas aportaciones de Lavoisier y otros químicos partidarios de la experimentación como método científico, y es acorde con las ideas de Jovellanos acerca del cultivo de las ciencias «útiles» para el progreso de los pueblos.

  3. Geochemical sensitivity analysis: Identification of important geochemical parameters for performance assessment studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siegel, M.; Guzowski, R.; Rechard, R.; Erickson, K.

    1986-01-01

    The EPA Standard for geologic disposal of high level waste requires demonstration that the cumulative discharge of individual radioisotopes over a 10,000 year period at points 5 kilometers from the engineered barrier system will not exceed the limits prescribed in 40 CFR Part 191. The roles of the waste package, engineered facility, hydrogeology and geochemical processes in limiting radionuclide releases all must be considered in calculations designed to assess compliance of candidate repositories with the EPA Standard. In this talk, they will discuss the geochemical requirements of calculations used in these compliance assessments. In addition, they will describe the complementary roles of (1) simple models designed to bound the radionuclide discharge over the widest reasonable range of geochemical conditions and scenarios and (2) detailed geochemical models which can provide insights into the actual behavior of the radionuclides in the ground water. Finally, they will discuss development of sensitivity/uncertainty techniques designed to identify important site-specific geochemical parameters and processes using data from a basalt formation

  4. Site investigation SFR. Fracture mineralogy and geochemistry of borehole sections sampled for groundwater chemistry and Eh. Results from boreholes KFR01, KFR08, KFR10, KFR19, KFR7A and KFR105

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandstroem, Bjoern (WSP Sverige AB (Sweden)); Tullborg, Eva-Lena (Terralogica AB, Grabo (Sweden))

    2011-01-15

    This report is part of the complementary site investigations for the future expansion of SFR. The report presents the results obtained during a detailed mineralogical and geochemical study of fracture minerals in drill cores from borehole section sampled for groundwater chemistry and where downhole Eh measurements have been performed. The groundwater redox system comprises not only the water, but also the bedrock/fracture mineral system in contact with this water. It is thus important to gain knowledge of the solid phases in contact with the groundwater, i.e. the fracture minerals. The samples studied for mineralogy and geochemistry, here reported, were selected to represent the fracture surfaces in contact with the groundwater in the sampled borehole sections and will give input to the hydrogeochemical model (SFR SDM). The mineralogy was determined using SEM-EDS and XRD and the geochemistry of fracture filling material was analysed by ICP-AES and ICP-QMS. The most common fracture minerals in the samples are mixed layer clay (smectite-illite), illite, chlorite, calcite, quartz, adularia and albite. Other minerals identified in the borehole sections include laumontite, pyrite, barite, chalcopyrite, hematite, Fe-oxyhydroxide, muscovite, REE-carbonate, allanite, biotite, asphaltite, galena, sphalerite, arsenopyrite, uranium phosphate, uranium silicate, Y-Ca silicate, monazite, xenotime, harmotome and fluorite. There are no major differences between the fracture mineralogy of the investigated borehole sections from SFR and the fracture mineralogy of the Forsmark site investigation area. The four fracture mineral generations distinguished within the Forsmark site investigation are also found at SFR. However, some differences have been observed: 1) Barite and uranium minerals are more common in the SFR fractures, 2) clay minerals like mixed layer illite-smectite and illite dominates in contrast to Forsmark where corrensite is by far the most common clay mineral and, 3

  5. Site investigation SFR. Fracture mineralogy and geochemistry of borehole sections sampled for groundwater chemistry and Eh. Results from boreholes KFR01, KFR08, KFR10, KFR19, KFR7A and KFR105

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandstroem, Bjoern; Tullborg, Eva-Lena

    2011-01-01

    This report is part of the complementary site investigations for the future expansion of SFR. The report presents the results obtained during a detailed mineralogical and geochemical study of fracture minerals in drill cores from borehole section sampled for groundwater chemistry and where downhole Eh measurements have been performed. The groundwater redox system comprises not only the water, but also the bedrock/fracture mineral system in contact with this water. It is thus important to gain knowledge of the solid phases in contact with the groundwater, i.e. the fracture minerals. The samples studied for mineralogy and geochemistry, here reported, were selected to represent the fracture surfaces in contact with the groundwater in the sampled borehole sections and will give input to the hydrogeochemical model (SFR SDM). The mineralogy was determined using SEM-EDS and XRD and the geochemistry of fracture filling material was analysed by ICP-AES and ICP-QMS. The most common fracture minerals in the samples are mixed layer clay (smectite-illite), illite, chlorite, calcite, quartz, adularia and albite. Other minerals identified in the borehole sections include laumontite, pyrite, barite, chalcopyrite, hematite, Fe-oxyhydroxide, muscovite, REE-carbonate, allanite, biotite, asphaltite, galena, sphalerite, arsenopyrite, uranium phosphate, uranium silicate, Y-Ca silicate, monazite, xenotime, harmotome and fluorite. There are no major differences between the fracture mineralogy of the investigated borehole sections from SFR and the fracture mineralogy of the Forsmark site investigation area. The four fracture mineral generations distinguished within the Forsmark site investigation are also found at SFR. However, some differences have been observed: 1) Barite and uranium minerals are more common in the SFR fractures, 2) clay minerals like mixed layer illite-smectite and illite dominates in contrast to Forsmark where corrensite is by far the most common clay mineral and, 3

  6. REE Distribution in Cultivated and No Cultivated Soils in Two Viticultural Areas of Central Chile: Mineralogical, Pedological and Anthropic Influences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, P.; Townley, B.; Aburto, F.

    2017-12-01

    Within the scope of a Corfo-Innova Project (I+D Wines of Chile-University of Chile) we have recognized remarkable REE patterns in soils of two vineyards located in traditional vinicultural areas: Casablanca and Santa Cruz. Both vineyards have granitic parent rock, with similar petrographic features and REE patterns. We studied REE distribution on twelve cultivated soil profiles at each vineyard, where a full mineralogical, geochemical and pedogenic sampling and characterization was performed. To establish the effect of management no cultivated soil profiles were included from each vineyard location. REE in soil samples were measured by ICP-MS using two digestion methods: lithium metaborate/tetraborate fusion to obtain REE contents in total soil and MMI® partial extraction technique for REE contents on bioavailable phases.Soils display similar signatures of REEs respect to the rock source at both vineyards, but showing relative enrichments in soils of Casablanca and depletion in soils of Santa Cruz. Bioavailable phase data indicates a relative depletion of LREEs compared to HREEs and different anomalies for Ce (positive vs negative) in different areas of the same vineyard. Similar patterns of soils and parent rock suggest that REEs are adequate tracers of lithological source. Enrichments and/or depletions of REE patterns in soils respect to the rock source and Ce anomalies, evidence differential pedogenetic processes occurring at each sampled site. Results of bioavailable phase are coherent with the immobilization and fractionation of LREEs by stable minerals within soils as clays and Fe oxides. Mineralogical results in soil thin sections of Casablanca evidence the occurrence of Ti phases as sphene, ilmenite and rutile, which probably control the relative REE enrichment, since these minerals are considered more stable under pedogenic conditions.Finally, cultivated soils show a depleted but analogous pattern of REE regarding to no cultivated soil, indicating the

  7. Shock-induced microdeformations in quartz and other mineralogical indications of an impact event at the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohor, B.F.

    1990-01-01

    The event terminating the Cretaceous period and the Mesozoic era caused massive extinctions of flora and fauna worldwide. Theories of the nature of this event can be classed as endogenic (volcanic, climatic, etc.) or exogenic (extraterrestrial causes). Mineralogical evidence from the boundary clays and claystones strongly favor the impact of an extraterrestrial body as the cause of this event. Nonmarine KT boundary claystones are comprised of two separate layers-an upper layer composed of high-angle ejecta material (shocked quartz, altered glass and spinel) and a basal kaolinitic layer containing spherules, clasts, and altered glass, together with some shocked grains. Recognition of this dual-layered nature of the boundary clay is important for the determination of the timing and processes involved in the impact event and in the assignment and interpretation of geochemical signatures. Multiple sets of shock-induced microdeformations (planar features) in quartz grains separated from KT boundary clays provide compelling evidence of an impact event. This mineralogical manifestation of shock metamorphism is associated worldwide with a large positive anomaly of iridium in these boundary clays, which has also been considered indicative of the impact of a large extraterrestrial body. Global distributions of maximum sizes of shocked quartz grains from the boundary clays and the mineralogy of the ejecta components favor an impact on or near the North American continent. Spinel crystals (magnesioferrite) occur in the boundary clays as micrometer-sized octahedra or skeletal forms. Their composition differs from that of spinels found in terrestrial oceanic basalts. Magnesioferrite crystals are restricted to the high-angle ejecta layer of the boundary clays and their small size and skeletal morphology suggest that they are condensation products of a vaporized bolide. Hollow spherules ranging up to 1 mm in size are ubiquitously associated with the boundary clays. In nonmarine

  8. Elemental and mineralogical changes in soils due to bioturbation along an earthworm invasion chronosequence in Northern Minnesota

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Resner, Kathryn [Dept. of Soil, Water, and Climate, University of Minnesota, 439 Borlaug Hall, 1991 Upper Buford Circle, St. Paul, MN, 55108-6028 (United States); Yoo, Kyungsoo, E-mail: kyoo@umn.edu [Dept. of Soil, Water, and Climate, University of Minnesota, 439 Borlaug Hall, 1991 Upper Buford Circle, St. Paul, MN, 55108-6028 (United States); Hale, Cindy [University of Minnesota Duluth, The Natural Resources Research Institute, 5013 Miller Trunk Hwy. Duluth, MN 55811 (United States); Aufdenkampe, Anthony [Assistant Research Scientist - Isotope and Organic Geochemistry, Stroud Water Research Center, 970 Spencer Road, Avondale, PA 19311 (United States); Blum, Alex [US Geological Survey, 3215 Marine St., Boulder, CO 80303 (United States); Sebestyen, Stephen [Research Hydrologist, USDA Forest Service, Northern Research Station, Grand Rapids, MN 55744-3399 (United States)

    2011-06-15

    Minnesota forested soils have evolved without the presence of earthworms since the last glacial retreat. When exotic earthworms arrive, enhanced soil bioturbation often results in dramatic morphological and chemical changes in soils with negative implications for the forests' sustainability. However, the impacts of earthworm invasion on geochemical processes in soils are not well understood. This study attempts to quantify the role of earthworm invasion in mineral chemical weathering and nutrient dynamics along an earthworm invasion chronosequence in a sugar maple forest in Northern Minnesota. Depth and rates of soil mixing can be tracked with atmospherically derived short lived radioisotopes {sup 210}Pb and {sup 137}Cs. Their radioactivities increase in the lower A horizon at the expense of the peak activities near the soil surface, which indicate that soil mixing rate and its depth reach have been enhanced by earthworms. Enhanced soil mixing by earthworms is consistent with the ways that the vertical profiles of elemental and mineralogical compositions were affected by earthworm invasion. Biologically cycled Ca and P have peak concentrations near the soil surface prior to earthworm invasion. However, these peak abundances significantly declined in the earthworm invaded soils presumably due to enhanced soil mixing. It is clear that enhanced soil mixing due to earthworms also profoundly altered the vertical distribution of most mineral species within A horizons. Though the mechanisms are not clear yet, earthworm invasion appears to have contributed to net losses of clay mineral species and opal from the A horizons. As much as earthworms vertically relocated minerals and elements, they also intensify the contacts between organic matter and cations as shown in the increased amount of Ca and Fe in organically complexed and in exchangeable pools. With future studies on soil mixing rates and elemental leaching, this study will quantitatively and mechanically

  9. Elemental and mineralogical changes in soils due to bioturbation along an earthworm invasion chronosequence in Northern Minnesota

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Resner, Kathryn; Yoo, Kyungsoo; Hale, Cindy; Aufdenkampe, Anthony; Blum, Alex; Sebestyen, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Minnesota forested soils have evolved without the presence of earthworms since the last glacial retreat. When exotic earthworms arrive, enhanced soil bioturbation often results in dramatic morphological and chemical changes in soils with negative implications for the forests' sustainability. However, the impacts of earthworm invasion on geochemical processes in soils are not well understood. This study attempts to quantify the role of earthworm invasion in mineral chemical weathering and nutrient dynamics along an earthworm invasion chronosequence in a sugar maple forest in Northern Minnesota. Depth and rates of soil mixing can be tracked with atmospherically derived short lived radioisotopes 210 Pb and 137 Cs. Their radioactivities increase in the lower A horizon at the expense of the peak activities near the soil surface, which indicate that soil mixing rate and its depth reach have been enhanced by earthworms. Enhanced soil mixing by earthworms is consistent with the ways that the vertical profiles of elemental and mineralogical compositions were affected by earthworm invasion. Biologically cycled Ca and P have peak concentrations near the soil surface prior to earthworm invasion. However, these peak abundances significantly declined in the earthworm invaded soils presumably due to enhanced soil mixing. It is clear that enhanced soil mixing due to earthworms also profoundly altered the vertical distribution of most mineral species within A horizons. Though the mechanisms are not clear yet, earthworm invasion appears to have contributed to net losses of clay mineral species and opal from the A horizons. As much as earthworms vertically relocated minerals and elements, they also intensify the contacts between organic matter and cations as shown in the increased amount of Ca and Fe in organically complexed and in exchangeable pools. With future studies on soil mixing rates and elemental leaching, this study will quantitatively and mechanically address the role of

  10. User’s guide for GcClust—An R package for clustering of regional geochemical data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellefsen, Karl J.; Smith, David B.

    2016-04-08

    GcClust is a software package developed by the U.S. Geological Survey for statistical clustering of regional geochemical data, and similar data such as regional mineralogical data. Functions within the software package are written in the R statistical programming language. These functions, their documentation, and a copy of the user’s guide are bundled together in R’s unit of sharable code, which is called a “package.” The user’s guide includes step-by-step instructions showing how the functions are used to cluster data and to evaluate the clustering results. These functions are demonstrated in this report using test data, which are included in the package.

  11. Mineralogy and chemical composition and distribution of rare earth elements of clay-rich sediments, Central Uganda

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyakairu, G.W.A.

    2001-02-01

    of the Buganda-Toro System rocks, whereas the felsic sediments are derivatives of granitoid rocks of the basement. The most significant geochemical finding is that despite intense weathering, which has affected most elements, the REE, Th, and Sc remain immobile. Analysis of the > 63, 32-63, and 63 μm are quartz rich. The whole-rock chemistry shows that the 2 , Al 2 O 3 , and Fe 2 O 3 compared to Upper Continental Crust (UCC) with the trace element content comparable to the bulk samples. The chondrite-normalized REE distribution patterns are remarkably similar for the grain size fractions, with a general enrichment of LREE and a depletion of Eu. The > 63 μm fractions have the lowest REE abundances and show no LREE-HREE fractionation with a negative Eu anomaly. The shape of the REE pattern of 2 and Al 2 O 3 , with the other oxides being present only in trace amounts. Depletion in oxides of Ti, Fe, Mn, Mg, Ca, Na, and K not only shows the extent of kaolinization, but also gives the kaolin an almost white color. The kaolinization and weathering processes have enriched Ni and depleted other trace element contents in the Buwambo kaolin. The chondrite normalized REE patterns show LREE enrichment with a negative Ce anomaly. The enrichment and depletion of the different trace elements appear to be caused by differentiation processes during kaolinization and leaching with meteoric water. From its mineralogical and chemical composition, the kaolin is suitable for earthen and sanitary ware production. (author)

  12. The Ignimbritic tertiary volcanism of the Andes (Peru, Bolivia, Argentina): its characteristics and uraniferous potentiality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leroy, J.L.; George-Aniel, B.

    1988-01-01

    The petrographic and geochemical characteristics of the volcanism and the primary U distribution at the magmatic stage: alkali-rich volcanic rocks (Peru) appear to be fertile source-rocks, whereas sub alkaline and calc-alkaline rocks (Bolivia and Argentina) are less favorable. Uranium can only be leached from the matrix, due to the stability of the accessory minerals during all the following events. The fertility of a volcanic rock is thus directly controlled by the volume proportion of the matrix and the U fractionation between glass and accessory minerals. The preconcentration and concentration stages: the existence of mineralizations in relation with a fertile rock will depend on other events which must occur successively at the same place: the cooling type and rate of the volcanic pile (pre-concentration stage), the intensity and the duration of the hydrothermal circulations, the presence of reducing agents and trapps. (author)

  13. Control of nuclear materials and materials in Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arbor G, A.; Fernandes M, S.

    1988-01-01

    A general view about the safeguards activities in Argentina is presented. The national system of accounting for and control of nuclear materials is described. The safeguards agreement signed by Argentina are presented. (E.G.) [pt

  14. Geology, mineralogy and geochemistry of Ferezneh ferromanganese anomaly, east of Sangan mines complex, NE Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazi Mazhari

    2015-04-01

    ., 2015, there is no evidence of limestone skarnification, skarn minerals and magnetite mineralization in the Ferezneh prospect area. Based on the listed data and interpretations, there is no relationship and similarity between Sangan mineralization and Ferezneh ferromanganese anomaly. This anomaly may be related to a younger mineralization and might be associated with the function of supersion fluid by leaching the sulfide hydrothermal deposits that form in the fault zones. References Crerar, D.A., Namson, J., Chyi, M.S., Williams, L. and Feigenson, M.D., 1982. Manganiferous cherts of the Franciscan Assemblage: I. General geology, ancient and modern analogues and implications for hydrothermal convection at oceanic spreading centers. Economic Geology, 77(3: 519-540. Golmohammadi, A., Karimpour, M.H., Malekzadeh Shafaroudi, A. and Mazaheri S.A., 2015. Alteration-mineralization, and radiometric ages of the source pluton at the Sangan iron skarn deposit, northeastern Iran. Ore Geology Reviews, 65(2: 545-563. Karimpour, M.H. and Malekzadeh Shafaroudi, A., 2006. Comparison of the geochemistry of source rocks at Tannurjeh Au-bearing magnetite and Sangan Au-free magnetite deposits, Khorasan Razavi, Iran. Iranian Journal of Crystallography and Mineralogy, 13(1: 3–26. (in Persian with English abstract Karimpour, M.H. and Malekzadeh Shafaroudi, A., 2008. Skarn geochemistry – mineralogy and petrology of source rock, Sangan iron mine, Khorasan Razavi, Iran. Scientific Quarterly Journal of Geosciences, 17(65, 108–125. (in Persian with English abstract Xu Bao, S., Yang Zhou, H., Tong Peng, X., Wu Ji, F. and Qiang Yao, H., 2008. Geochemistry of REE and yttrium in hydrothermal fluids from the Endeavour segment. Juande Fuca Ridge. Geochemical Journal, 42(4: 359–370.

  15. Process recognition in multi-element soil and stream-sediment geochemical data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunsky, E.C.; Drew, L.J.; Sutphin, D.M.

    2009-01-01

    Stream-sediment and soil geochemical data from the Upper and Lower Coastal Plains of South Carolina (USA) were studied to determine relationships between soils and stream sediments. From multi-element associations, characteristic compositions were determined for both media. Primary associations of elements reflect mineralogy, including heavy minerals, carbonates and clays, and the effects of groundwater. The effects of groundwater on element concentrations are more evident in soils than stream sediments. A "winnowing index" was created using ratios of Th to Al that revealed differing erosional and depositional environments. Both soils and stream sediments from the Upper and Lower Coastal Plains show derivation from similar materials and subsequent similar multi-element relationships, but have some distinct differences. In the Lower Coastal Plain, soils have high values of elements concentrated in heavy minerals (Ce, Y, Th) that grade into high values of elements concentrated into finer-grain-size, lower-density materials, primarily comprised of carbonates and feldspar minerals (Mg, Ca, Na, K, Al). These gradational trends in mineralogy and geochemistry are inferred to reflect reworking of materials during marine transgressions and regressions. Upper Coastal Plain stream-sediment geochemistry shows a higher winnowing index relative to soil geochemistry. A comparison of the 4 media (Upper Coastal Plain soils and stream sediments and Lower Coastal Plain soils and stream sediments) shows that Upper Coastal Plain stream sediments have a higher winnowing index and a higher concentration of elements contained within heavy minerals, whereas Lower Coastal Plain stream sediments show a strong correlation between elements typically contained within clays. It is not possible to calculate a functional relationship between stream sediment-soil compositions for all elements due to the complex history of weathering, deposition, reworking and re-deposition. However, depending on

  16. Sensitivity analysis of alkaline plume modelling: influence of mineralogy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaboreau, S.; Claret, F.; Marty, N.; Burnol, A.; Tournassat, C.; Gaucher, E.C.; Munier, I.; Michau, N.; Cochepin, B.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. In the context of a disposal facility for radioactive waste in clayey geological formation, an important modelling effort has been carried out in order to predict the time evolution of interacting cement based (concrete or cement) and clay (argillites and bentonite) materials. The high number of modelling input parameters associated with non negligible uncertainties makes often difficult the interpretation of modelling results. As a consequence, it is necessary to carry out sensitivity analysis on main modelling parameters. In a recent study, Marty et al. (2009) could demonstrate that numerical mesh refinement and consideration of dissolution/precipitation kinetics have a marked effect on (i) the time necessary to numerically clog the initial porosity and (ii) on the final mineral assemblage at the interface. On the contrary, these input parameters have little effect on the extension of the alkaline pH plume. In the present study, we propose to investigate the effects of the considered initial mineralogy on the principal simulation outputs: (1) the extension of the high pH plume, (2) the time to clog the porosity and (3) the alteration front in the clay barrier (extension and nature of mineralogy changes). This was done through sensitivity analysis on both concrete composition and clay mineralogical assemblies since in most published studies, authors considered either only one composition per materials or simplified mineralogy in order to facilitate or to reduce their calculation times. 1D Cartesian reactive transport models were run in order to point out the importance of (1) the crystallinity of concrete phases, (2) the type of clayey materials and (3) the choice of secondary phases that are allowed to precipitate during calculations. Two concrete materials with either nanocrystalline or crystalline phases were simulated in contact with two clayey materials (smectite MX80 or Callovo- Oxfordian argillites). Both

  17. Automated mineralogy and petrology - applications of TESCAN Integrated Mineral Analyzer (TIMA)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hrstka, Tomáš; Gottlieb, P.; Skála, Roman; Breiter, Karel; Motl, D.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 63, č. 1 (2018), s. 47-63 ISSN 1802-6222 Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) StrategieAV21/4 Program:StrategieAV Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : TIMA * Automated SEM/EDS * applied mineralogy * modal analysis * artificial intelligence * neural networks Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy OBOR OECD: Mineralogy Impact factor: 0.609, year: 2016

  18. Mineralogical and micro-thermometric features of the Los Humeros geothermal reservoir, Pue., Mexico; Caracteristicas mineralogicas y microtermometricas del yacimiento geotermico de Los Humeros, Pue., Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izquierdo, Georgina; Arellano, Victor M; Aragon, Alfonso [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)]. E-mail: gim@iie.org.mx

    2008-07-15

    Studies on many topics have been undertaken during the exploratory and exploitation stages of the development of Los Humeros geothermal field. From a geochemical and mineralogical view-including hydrothermal mineralogy and fluid-inclusion micro-thermometry, features have been reported differing from those observed in other geothermal fields. Sometimes this has led to ambiguous conclusions. Studies of fluid-inclusion micro-thermometry have shown low-salinity and high-temperature fluids, suggesting a slight temperature decrease in the deepest portion associated with a boiling process rather than a cooling process. In 1998, Arellano et al. performed a multi-disciplinary study and proposed the existence of at least two, distinct reservoirs at depth. Mineralogical data from wells drilled at the Colapso Central zone tend to support this idea. However wells drilled in the zone known as Corredor Mastaloya seemingly show evidence of a single reservoir. [Spanish] Durante las etapas de exploracion y explotacion del campo geotermico de Los Humeros se han realizado diversos estudios cubriendo distintos topicos. Desde el punto de vista geoquimico y mineralogico (mineralogia hidrotermal y microtermometria de inclusiones fluidas) se han reportado comportamientos diferentes a los observados en otros campos del mundo, los que en ocasiones han llevado a conclusiones imprecisas. La microtermometria de inclusiones fluidas ha mostrado fluidos poco salinos de alta temperatura, asi como una ligera disminucion de temperatura en la parte profunda la cual se asocia a un proceso de ebullicion mas que a un enfriamiento del sistema. En 1998 Arellano et al realizaron un estudio multidisciplinario proponiendo la existencia de al menos dos reservorios. La informacion mineralogica de pozos perforados en la zona del Colapso Central fortalece esta propuesta. Sin embargo, para pozos localizados en la zona conocida como Corredor Mastaloya se tiene evidencia de lo que parece ser un solo yacimiento.

  19. Psychiatry and humanism in Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niño Amieva, Alejandra

    2016-04-01

    The authors of the present selection of Latin American Psychiatry texts were characterized by a common deep humanistic attitude. These prolific writers were able to establish or extend the scope of the discipline in which they chose to act, questioning the establishment of rigid boundaries within the framework of a rigorous epistemological reflection. Thus the systematizing spirit of Jose Ingenieros' in the context of positivist evolutionism, resulted in the act of founding a discipline that integrated the biological and the social. In the case of Guillermo Vidal his conception of mental health went beyond the biomedical to consider psychotherapies as an emotional commitment, continence and empathic understanding; with regard to César Cabral his formation and extensive clinical practice resulted in a work defined by the inquiring into the theoretical concepts underlying Psychiatry and Clinical Psychology. This brief selection does not exhaust the issues or the level of ideas and discussions of Psychiatry in Argentina, but constitutes a textual corpus representative of a disciplinary conception understood as scientific and humanistic endeavor.

  20. Argentina chiama Italia: Friuli risponde

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvana Serafin

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The study analyzes the migratory waves from Friuli which, from the 1870s up to the post-World War II years, extensively moved towards Argentina, settling in the areas around the cities of Santa Fe, Cordoba, Entre Ríos, Chaco and Buenos Aires, but reaching also regions as far away as Patagonia. The accurate and well diffused net of the Fogolār Furlan, besides its function as friendly society, also provides to the promulgation of ancient traditions and mores among the new generations, transmitting on to them the cultural, linguistic and ethnic memory of the motherland. Epistles, tales, novels and poems form a paideia which is thus constantly being enlivened, eveng among those who assumed Argentinian nationality or were born in the country. Of utmost interest is, therefore, the resulting literary corpus, representing as it does a renewed search for identity in the form of a dialogue with the world, extending itself well beyond the contingency of boundaries and transmitting the universal essence of logos.

  1. Influence of clay mineralogy on clay based ceramic products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radzali Othman; Tuan Besar Tuan Sarif; Zainal Arifin Ahmad; Ahmad Fauzi Mohd Noor; Abu Bakar Aramjat

    1996-01-01

    Clay-based ceramic products can either be produced directly from a suitable clay source without the need further addition or such products can be produced from a ceramic body formulated by additions of other raw materials such as feldspar and silica sand. In either case, the mineralogical make-up of the clay component plays a dominating role in the fabrication and properties of the ceramic product. This study was sparked off by a peculiar result observed in one of five local ball clay samples that were used to reformulate a ceramic body. Initial characterisation tests conducted on the clays indicated that these clays can be classified as kaolinitic. However, one of these clays produced a ceramic body that is distinctively different in terms of whiteness, smoothness and density as compared to the other four clays. Careful re-examination of other characterisation data, such as particle size distribution and chemical analysis, failed to offer any plausible explanation. Consequently, the mineralogical analysis by x-ray diffraction was repeated by paying meticulous attention to specimen preparation. Diffraction data for the clay with anomalous behaviour indicated the presence of a ∼ 10A peak that diminished when the same specimen was re-tested after heating in an oven at 12O degree C whilst the other four clays only exhibit the characteristic kaolinite (Al sub 2 O sub 3. 2SiO sub 2. 2H sub 2 0) and muscovite peaks at ∼ 7A and ∼ 10A before and after heat treatment. This suggests the presence of the mineral halloysite (A1 sub 2 0 sub 3. 2SiO sub 2.4H sub 2 0) in that particular clay. This difference in mineralogy can be attributed to account for the variations in physical properties of the final product. Consequently, this paper reviews in general the precautionary measures that must be adhered to during any mineralogical investigation of clay minerals or clay-based materials. The common pitfalls during specimen preparation, machine settings and interpretation of

  2. Temperature buffer test. Hydro-mechanical and chemical/ mineralogical characterizations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aakesson, Mattias; Olsson, Siv; Dueck, Ann; Nilsson, Ulf; Karnland, Ola; Kiviranta, Leena; Kumpulainen, Sirpa; Linden, Johan

    2012-01-01

    The Temperature Buffer Test (TBT) is a joint project between SKB/ANDRA and supported by ENRESA (modeling) and DBE (instrumentation), which aims at improving the understanding and to model the thermo-hydro-mechanical behavior of buffers made of swelling clay submitted to high temperatures (over 100 deg C) during the water saturation process. The test has been carried out in a KBS-3 deposition hole at Aspo HRL. It was installed during the spring of 2003. Two steel heaters (3 m long, 0.6 m diameter) and two buffer arrangements have been investigated: the lower heater was surrounded by rings of compacted Wyoming bentonite only, whereas the upper heater was surrounded by a composite barrier, with a sand shield between the heater and the bentonite. The test was dismantled and sampled during the winter of 2009/2010. This report presents the hydro-mechanical and chemical/mineralogical characterization program which was launched subsequent to the dismantling operation. The main goal has been to investigate if any significant differences could be observed between material from the field experiment and the reference material. The field samples were mainly taken from Ring 4 (located at the mid-section around the lower heater), in which the temperature in the innermost part reached 155 deg C. The following hydro-mechanical properties have been determined for the material (test technique within brackets): hydraulic conductivity (swelling pressure device), swelling pressure (swelling pressure device), unconfined compression strength (mechanical press), shear strength (triaxial cell) and retention properties (jar method). The following chemical/mineralogical properties (methods within brackets) were determined: anion analysis of water leachates (IC), chemical composition (ICP/AES+MS, EGA), cation exchange capacity (CEC, Cu-trien method) and exchangeable cations (exchange with NH4, ICPAES), mineralogical composition (XRD and FTIR), element distribution and microstructure (SEM and

  3. Application of Moessbauer spectrum to geological and mineralogical problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korovushkin, V.V.

    1985-01-01

    Main parameters of γ-resonance spectra (resonance effect value, chemical isomer shift, quadrupole splitting, nuclear Zeeman splitting) are considered. Methods of the sample preparation and technique for geological sample analysis using nuclear gamma-resonance (NGR) spectroscopy are described in brief. Possibility of direct application of the above method to determine the iron valence in minerals, their diagnosis and determination of quantitative distribution of iron between the mineral forms in rocks in the process of uranium ore formation and destruction, are discussed. Prospects for NGR-spectroscopy application to geology and mineralogy are pointed out

  4. Petrology, mineralogy and geochemistry of surficial uranium deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pagel, M.

    1984-01-01

    A comprehensive understanding of the petrology, mineralogy, and geochemistry of surficial uranium ore deposits is important for developing prospecting and evaluation strategies. Carnotite is the main uranium mineral and is found in those deposits that have the greatest potential uranium resources. The following uranium-bearing minerals have been reported to occur in surficial deposits: carnotite, tyuyamunite, soddyite, weeksite, haiweeite, uranophane, betauranophane, metaankoleite, torbernite, autunite, phosphuranylite, schroeckingerite, Pb-V-U hydroxide (unnamed mineral), uraninite and organourano complexes. The interrelationships between some of the minerals of the host rocks (especially the clays) are not well understood. (author)

  5. Some results of NURE uranium geochemical studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, V. Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Some technical developments of the National Uranium Resource Evaluation Program which are of general application in geochemical exploration are being studied. Results of stream water and suspended and bottom sediment analyses are compared for an area near Williamsport, Pennsylvania. Variations of uranium content of water samples with time in the North Carolina Piedmont are seen to correlate with rainfall. Ground water samples from coastal and piedmont areas were analyzed for helium. All media sampled provide useful information when properly analyzed and interpreted as part of a total geological analysis of an area

  6. Panay carborne radiometric and geochemical surveys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, G. Jr.

    1981-09-01

    A carborne radiometric survey and stream sediments collection were conducted in Panay and Guimaras Islands. An area in Nabas, Aklan, situated in the northwestern tip of Panay (Buruanga Peninsula) which indicated 2 to 3 times above background radioactivity was delineated. Uranium content in the stream sediment samples collected from Buruanga Peninsula was generally higher than those obtained in other parts of the island. Radioactivity measurements and uranium content in stream sediments were found to be within background levels. It is recommended that follow-up radiometric and geochemical surveys be undertaken in Buruanga Peninsula and additional stream sediments samples be collected in Panay to achieve better sampling density and coverage. (author)

  7. Landscape-geochemical factors of deposit formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batulin, S.G.

    1980-01-01

    Effect of landscape-geochemical factors on hydrogenic formation of uranium ores is considered. The primary attention is paid to finding reasons for hydrogeochemical background increase in the regions of arid climate. Problems of uranium distribution in alluvial landscapes, hydrogeochemical regime of ground waters, reflecting the effect of waters of the zone of aeration are revealed. Chemical composition of porous solutions in the zone of aeration, as well as historical geochemindstry of landscape a its role from the view point of uranium solution formation in the arid zone are considered [ru

  8. DNA-based methods of geochemical prospecting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashby, Matthew [Mill Valley, CA

    2011-12-06

    The present invention relates to methods for performing surveys of the genetic diversity of a population. The invention also relates to methods for performing genetic analyses of a population. The invention further relates to methods for the creation of databases comprising the survey information and the databases created by these methods. The invention also relates to methods for analyzing the information to correlate the presence of nucleic acid markers with desired parameters in a sample. These methods have application in the fields of geochemical exploration, agriculture, bioremediation, environmental analysis, clinical microbiology, forensic science and medicine.

  9. Geochemical modelling. Pt.1, Pt.2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skytte Jensen, B.; Jensen, H.; Pearson, F.J.

    1992-01-01

    This work is carried out under cost-sharing contract with the European Atomic Energy Community in the framework of its fourth research programme on radioactive waste management and radioactive waste storage. This final report is subdivided into two parts. In the first part, JENSEN, a computer code for the computation of chemical equilibria in aqueous systems, describes the structure, function and use of a new geochemical computer program intended for PC's. The program, which is written in Turbo Pascal, version 4, is fundamentally similar to most other geochemical programs, but combines in one program several of the merits these programs have. The intention has been to make an advanced program, which also should be user friendly and fast, and to attain this several new algorithms have been developed and implemented. The program has a built-in database mainly based on the CHEMVAL compilation containing data for 395 soluble species and 149 minerals. The program can find equilibria in the presence of all or some of these soluble species, under conditions or fixed or floating pH and / or Redox potential. The program by itself eliminates a bad guess of a candidate for precipitation. In the present version, the program can identify which minerals and how much of them there will be formed when equilibrium is established. In the second part, LITTLE JOE, an expert system to support geochemical modelling, describes the construction of a minor expert system for use in the evaluation of analytical data for the composition of ground waters from limestone formation. Although the example given is rather limited in scope, the application of the expert system for the evaluation of the analytical data clearly demonstrates the mature expert knowledge imbedded in the system which is contrasted with the uncritical acceptance of analytical or theoretical data. With the overall neglect of ion-exchange and the formation of solid solutions in geochemical calculations, geochemistry is

  10. Geochemical homogeneity of tuffs at the potential repository level, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterman, Zell E.; Cloke, Paul

    2001-01-01

    In a potential high-level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, radioactive waste and canisters, drip shields protecting the waste from seepage and from rock falls, the backfill and invert material of crushed rock, the host rock, and water and gases contained within pores and fractures in the host rock together would form a complex system commonly referred to as the near-field geochemical environment. Materials introduced into the rock mass with the waste that are designed to prolong containment collectively are referred to as the Engineered Barrier System, and the host rock and its contained water and gases compose the natural system. The interaction of these component parts under highly perturbed conditions including temperatures well above natural ambient temperatures will need to be understood to assess the performance of the potential repository for long-term containment of nuclear waste. The geochemistry and mineralogy of the rock mass hosting the emplacement drifts must be known in order to assess the role of the natural system in the near-field environment. Emplacement drifts in a potential repository at Yucca Mountain would be constructed in the phenocryst-poor member of the Topopah Spring Tuff which is composed of both lithophysal and nonlithophysal zones. The chemical composition of the phenocryst-poor member has been characterized by numerous chemical analyses of outcrop samples and of core samples obtained by surface-based drilling. Those analyses have shown that the phenocryst-poor member of the Topopah Spring Tuff is remarkably uniform in composition both vertically and laterally. To verify this geochemical uniformity and to provide rock analyses of samples obtained directly from the potential repository block, major and trace elements were analyzed in core samples obtained from drill holes in the cross drift, which was driven to provide direct access to the rock mass where emplacement drifts would be constructed

  11. Alligator Rivers Analogue project. Geochemical modelling of present-day groundwaters. Final Report - Volume 12

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sverjensky, D A [The John Hopkins Univ, Dept of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Baltimore (United States)

    1993-12-31

    The main purpose of this report is to summarize geochemical modeling studies of the present-day Koongarra groundwaters. Information on the present-day geochemistry and geochemical processes at Koongarra forms a basis for a present-day analogue for nuclear waste migration. The present-day analogue is built on studies of the mineralogy and petrology of the Koongarra deposit, and chemical analyses of present-day groundwaters from the deposit. The overall approach taken in the present study has been to carry out a series of aqueous speciation and state of saturation calculations, including chemical mass transfer calculations, to address the possible control over the chemistry of the present-day for the groundwaters at Koongarra. The most important implication of the present study for the migration of radionuclides is the strong role played by the water-rock interactions, both above and below the water table, influencing the overall chemical evolution of the groundwaters. Thus, the results show that the chemical evolution of waters is strongly controlled by the initial availability of CO{sub 2} and the mineral assemblage encountered, which together determine the major element evolution of the waters by controlling the pH. The relative rates of evolution of the pH and the oxidation state of the groundwaters are also critical to the mobility of uranium. The shallow Koongarra waters are sufficiently oxidising that they can dissolve and transport uranium even under acidic conditions. Under the more reducing condition of the deep groundwaters, is the pH level that permits uranium transport as carbonate complexes. However, if the oxidation state decreases to much lower levels, it would be expected that uranium become immobile. All the speciation and state of saturation calculations carried out in the present study are available from the author, on request 22 refs., 7 tabs., 18 figs.

  12. Alligator Rivers Analogue project. Geochemical modelling of present-day groundwaters. Final Report - Volume 12

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sverjensky, D. A. [The John Hopkins Univ, Dept of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Baltimore (United States)

    1992-12-31

    The main purpose of this report is to summarize geochemical modeling studies of the present-day Koongarra groundwaters. Information on the present-day geochemistry and geochemical processes at Koongarra forms a basis for a present-day analogue for nuclear waste migration. The present-day analogue is built on studies of the mineralogy and petrology of the Koongarra deposit, and chemical analyses of present-day groundwaters from the deposit. The overall approach taken in the present study has been to carry out a series of aqueous speciation and state of saturation calculations, including chemical mass transfer calculations, to address the possible control over the chemistry of the present-day for the groundwaters at Koongarra. The most important implication of the present study for the migration of radionuclides is the strong role played by the water-rock interactions, both above and below the water table, influencing the overall chemical evolution of the groundwaters. Thus, the results show that the chemical evolution of waters is strongly controlled by the initial availability of CO{sub 2} and the mineral assemblage encountered, which together determine the major element evolution of the waters by controlling the pH. The relative rates of evolution of the pH and the oxidation state of the groundwaters are also critical to the mobility of uranium. The shallow Koongarra waters are sufficiently oxidising that they can dissolve and transport uranium even under acidic conditions. Under the more reducing condition of the deep groundwaters, is the pH level that permits uranium transport as carbonate complexes. However, if the oxidation state decreases to much lower levels, it would be expected that uranium become immobile. All the speciation and state of saturation calculations carried out in the present study are available from the author, on request 22 refs., 7 tabs., 18 figs.

  13. The nuclear research centre at Bariloche, Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abriata, J.P.

    2001-01-01

    The nuclear research centre at Bariloche (CAB) is one of the four centres under the Atomic Energy Commission of Argentina (CNEA). The research programme of CAB addresses various issues like nuclear reactor development, nuclear fuel and fuel cycle, applications of radioisotopes and radiation, and waste management. There is also a basic nuclear science component. The human resource development in the areas of physics and nuclear engineering is done in an associated Balseiro Institute which has undergraduate and graduate programmes as well as doctoral and postdoctoral research. The Centre interacts well with the society and provides services in the nuclear area. It has a close interaction with the nuclear sector of Argentina as also with many international organisations. Regulatory control over the Centre is carried out by the Nuclear Regulatory Authority of Argentina. (author)

  14. Clay mineralogy indicates a mildly warm and humid living environment for the Miocene hominoid from the Zhaotong Basin, Yunnan, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chunxia; Guo, Zhengtang; Deng, Chenglong; Ji, Xueping; Wu, Haibin; Paterson, Greig A.; Chang, Lin; Li, Qin; Wu, Bailing; Zhu, Rixiang

    2016-01-01

    Global and regional environmental changes have influenced the evolutionary processes of hominoid primates, particularly during the Miocene. Recently, a new Lufengpithecus cf. lufengensis hominoid fossil with a late Miocene age of ~6.2 Ma was discovered in the Shuitangba (STB) section of the Zhaotong Basin in Yunnan on the southeast margin of the Tibetan Plateau. To understand the relationship between paleoclimate and hominoid evolution, we have studied sedimentary, clay mineralogy and geochemical proxies for the late Miocene STB section (~16 m thick; ca. 6.7–6.0 Ma). Our results show that Lufengpithecus cf. lufengensis lived in a mildly warm and humid climate in a lacustrine or swamp environment. Comparing mid to late Miocene records from hominoid sites in Yunnan, Siwalik in Pakistan, and tropical Africa we find that ecological shifts from forest to grassland in Siwalik are much later than in tropical Africa, consistent with the disappearance of hominoid fossils. However, no significant vegetation changes are found in Yunnan during the late Miocene, which we suggest is the result of uplift of the Tibetan plateau combined with the Asian monsoon geographically and climatically isolating these regions. The resultant warm and humid conditions in southeastern China offered an important refuge for Miocene hominoids. PMID:26829756

  15. Clay mineralogy and geochemistry of the soils derived from metamorphic and mafic igneous parent rocks in Lahijan area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramezanpour, H.; Hesami, R.; Zanjanchi, M. A.

    2007-01-01

    The mineralogical and geochemical composition of the soils of three representative pedons formed on basaltic andesite, andesitic basalt and phyllite were investigated. Results by x-ray diffraction showed that progressive weathering of rocks have been marked by gradual accumulation of Al, Fe, Ti, Mg, H 3 O + and depletion of Na, K, Ca and Si in the soil; although, predominant clay, loss and gain trend of elements was different on the various rocks. Based on x-ray diffraction analysis, minerals in basaltic andesite and andesitic basalt were similar but, the intensity of mica to smectite or vermiculite transformation for latter was relatively higher than the former. This process revealed the degradation mineral because of two reasons: (i) - smectite and vermiculite increased whereas mica decreased in surface horizons. (i i)-Irregular mixed layer of mica-smectite or vermiculite was present in deeper part (170 cm) of the soils from andesitic basalt but shallower depth (75 em) of the soils from basaltic andesite. Clay minerals in phyllite were mica and chlorite that stratified with vermiculite. However, the absence of smectite in phyllite might be attributed to more acidic condition or position of the Fe ion in the mineral lattice of chlorite (higher Fe in the interlayer hydroxide sheet)

  16. Geochemical Controls on Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knight, Rosemary; Prasad, Manika; Keating, Kristina

    2003-01-01

    OAK-B135 Our research objectives are to determine, through an extensive set of laboratory experiments, the effect of the specific mineralogic form of iron and the effect of the distribution of iron on proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation mechanisms. In the first nine months of this project, we have refined the experimental procedures to be used in the acquisition of the laboratory NMR data; have ordered, and conducted preliminary measurements on, the sand samples to be used in the experimental work; and have revised and completed the theoretical model to use in this project. Over the next year, our focus will be on completing the first phase of the experimental work where the form and distribution of the iron in the sands in varied

  17. Thermodynamic modeling of mineralogical phases formed by continuous casting powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romo-Castaneda, Julio; Cruz-Ramirez, Alejandro; Romero-Serrano, Antonio; Vargas-Ramirez, Marissa; Hallen-Lopez, Manuel

    2011-01-01

    A great amount of mineralogical phases were predicted and represented in stability phase diagrams, which were obtained by the use of the thermodynamic software FACTSage considering both the chemical composition and the melting temperature of the mould flux. Melting-solidification tests on commercial mould flux glasses for thin slab casting of steel revealed the existence of cuspidine (Ca 4 Si 2 O 7 F 2 ) as the main mineralogical phase formed during the flux solidification by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD). This phase directly influences the heat transfer phenomena from the strand to the mould and it is obtained with higher fluorite content (22% CaF 2 ). Cuspidine is desirable only in fluxes to produce medium carbon (included peritectic grade) steels, because it reduces the heat flux from the strand to the mould, thus controlling the shrinkage rate during the flux solidification. The experimental results are in agreement with those obtained by the thermodynamic software. The stability phase diagrams could be used as an important tool in the flux design for continuous casting process.

  18. Thermodynamic modeling of mineralogical phases formed by continuous casting powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romo-Castaneda, Julio [Metallurgy and Materials Department, Instituto Politecnico Nacional-ESIQIE, Apdo. P. 118-431, 07051 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Cruz-Ramirez, Alejandro, E-mail: alcruzr@ipn.mx [Metallurgy and Materials Department, Instituto Politecnico Nacional-ESIQIE, Apdo. P. 118-431, 07051 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Romero-Serrano, Antonio; Vargas-Ramirez, Marissa; Hallen-Lopez, Manuel [Metallurgy and Materials Department, Instituto Politecnico Nacional-ESIQIE, Apdo. P. 118-431, 07051 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2011-01-10

    A great amount of mineralogical phases were predicted and represented in stability phase diagrams, which were obtained by the use of the thermodynamic software FACTSage considering both the chemical composition and the melting temperature of the mould flux. Melting-solidification tests on commercial mould flux glasses for thin slab casting of steel revealed the existence of cuspidine (Ca{sub 4}Si{sub 2}O{sub 7}F{sub 2}) as the main mineralogical phase formed during the flux solidification by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD). This phase directly influences the heat transfer phenomena from the strand to the mould and it is obtained with higher fluorite content (22% CaF{sub 2}). Cuspidine is desirable only in fluxes to produce medium carbon (included peritectic grade) steels, because it reduces the heat flux from the strand to the mould, thus controlling the shrinkage rate during the flux solidification. The experimental results are in agreement with those obtained by the thermodynamic software. The stability phase diagrams could be used as an important tool in the flux design for continuous casting process.

  19. Automated mineralogical logging of coal and coal measure core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephen Fraser; Joan Esterle; Colin Ward; Ruth Henwood; Peter Mason; Jon Huntington; Phil Connor; Reneta Sliwa; Dave Coward; Lew Whitbourn [CSIRO Exploration & Mining (Australia)

    2006-06-15

    A mineralogical core logging system based on spectral reflectance (HyLogger{trademark}) has been used to detect and quantify mineralogies in coal and coal measure sediments. The HyLogger{trademark} system, as tested, operates in the visible-to-shortwave infrared spectral region, where iron oxides, sulphates, hydroxyl-bearing and carbonate minerals have characteristic spectral responses. Specialized software assists with mineral identification and data display. Three Phases of activity were undertaken. In Phase I, carbonates (siderite, ankerite, calcite) and clays (halloysite, dickite) were successfully detected and mapped in coal. Repeat measurements taken from one of the cores after three months demonstrated the reproducibility of the spectral approach, with some spectral differences being attributed to variations in moisture content and oxidation. Also, investigated was HyLogger{trademark} ability to create a 'brightness-profile' on coal materials, and these results were encouraging. In Phase II, geotechnically significant smectitic clays (montmorillonite) were detected and mapped in cores of clastic roof and floor materials. Such knowledge would be useful for mine planning and design purposes. In Phase III, our attempts at determining whether phosphorus-bearing minerals such as apatite could be spectrally detected were less than conclusive. A spectral index could only be created for apatite, and the relationships between the spectrally-derived apatite-index, the XRD results and the analytically-derived phosphorus measurements were ambiguous.

  20. Mineralogical behaviour of bentonites in open and closed systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herbert, H.J.; Kasbohm, J.

    2004-01-01

    Mineralogical and chemical changes of bentonites were investigated in a natural analogue study and in laboratory experiments. As a working hypothesis we assumed that in geological, i.e. open systems, bentonites may be penetrated over geological time scales by larger water volumes than high compacted bentonites used as technical barriers in repositories in salt formations. Under this assumption open geological systems are characterised by low solid/liquid ratios and closed repository systems by high solid/liquid ratios. Consequently in laboratory experiments the mineralogical changes were investigated under different solid/liquid ratios and compared with results of a natural analogue study. In the natural analogue study in deep boreholes in the East Slovakian Basin the expandability of montmorillonite and the degree of transformation in illite-smectite (IS) mixed layer structures was found to be dependent not only on depth and temperature but also on the salinity of the pore waters. In this open geological system with a comparatively low solid/liquid ratio the observed changes in the montmorillonite were significantly different than those observed in the laboratory study on compacted MX-80 bentonite. (authors)

  1. Iron concretions in Brazilian Soils. 2. Mineralogical characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fontes, M.R.; Silva, E.G. da

    1985-01-01

    The mineralogy of six concretionary material from several pedological domains in Brazil were examined by x-ray diffratometry analysis and room temperature (RT) 57 Fe Moessbauer Spectroscopy. In two samples (from 'Quadrilatero Ferrifero' and Itaituba, in the state of Para) hematite was the predominant mineralogical phase, while in the other samples, from Chapada do Apodi (State of Rio Grande do Norte), Calciolandia (State of Minas Gerais), and Vicosa (State of Minas Gerais), goethite appeared as the main occurring mineral, in the (hydr) oxide crystallized fraction. The goethitic character was related to the manganese content in the concretions. The Moessbauer patterns exhibited superparamagnetic relaxation effects, although a six line hyperfine magnetic splitting, and a central doublet appeared at least in three cases. Exceptionally, in the two samples from Chapada do Apodi the six line pattern collapsed completely, and only a central doublet remained. The hyperfine magnetic field was drastically reduced both by particle size and isomorphically substituted aluminum in the iron oxide structure, probably, of Al-hematites. From the Moessbauer parameters, Al-goethite seemed to be present only in the sample from Vicosa, although it should be emphasized that the RT measurements do not always permit access to the hyperfine strucutre in this kind of material, as a result of small size particle effects. (Author) [pt

  2. Mineralogical and chemical characteristics of marble of Bela Pola deposite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shijakova-Ivanova, Tena; Boev, Blazho; Panov, Zoran; Pavlov, Dejan

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents mineralogical characteristics of marbles from the Bela Pola deposit. We have made mineralogical-chemical analyses of marbles and associated minerals in them. The investigation was carried out at the Faculty of natural and technical sciences - Shtip. Marbles from Bela Pola are dolomite and dolomite-calcite types. Microscope investigations have shown that marbles from Bela Pola have granoblastic structure but at some places it can be found with porphyroblastic structures. Percentage on calcite and dolomite is: 94.08% dolomite, 6.25% is calcite in white marbles. On the other hand calcite is present with 93% in gray marbles. Except dolomite and calcite also appear the following accessoring minerals: quartz, fluorite, corundum and paragonite. In general, after summarizing all the facts, which have resulted from this research we could say that, the Bela Pola marbles are massive, compact and white with high quality. In accordance to all formerly mentioned features, this marbles can be classified in the commercial group of marbles suitable for external application or internal design

  3. Mineralogic studies of tuff for high-level waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaniman, D.; Bish, D.; Broxton, D.; Byers, F.; Carlos, B.; Levy, S.

    1986-01-01

    The volcanic rocks at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, consist predominantly of tuff that originated 12 to 14 million years ago as flows and airfalls of hot volcanic particulates. On cooling these units formed two major rock types: crystallized zones formed mostly of feldspar and silica minerals, and zones of glass. Alteration of glass to zeolite minerals occurred largely during structural tilting of Yucca Mountain in the ∼1-3 million years following the major eruptions. The compositions of zeolites formed from glasses strongly indicate open-system chemical exchange. Superimposed on this general alteration of glasses are areas of local high-temperature alteration. High-temperature alteration ended by 11 million years ago. Zeolites such as clinoptilolite persisted during high-temperature alteration at temperatures up to 100 degree C, suggesting that clinoptilolite at Yucca Mountain close to the thermally disturbed zone around a repository may also survive heating to temperatures at least this high. The mineralogic data from tuff at Yucca Mountain will ultimately be used by the Department of Energy Nevada Nuclear Waste storage Investigations for (1) defining the mineralogic component in estimating waste element travel times away from the repository and (2) determining the past history of alteration and the anticipated stability of minerals near the repository

  4. Argentina's YPF hones in on privatization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on Argentina's push to privatize and attract more foreign investment to its petroleum sector which continues to gather momentum. The Argentine government plans by year end 1992 to sell unprofitable assets of Yacimientos Petroliferos Fiscales, then sell as much as 50% of the state oil company through an international stock offering. If privatization proceeds as expected, YPF Pres. Jose Estenssoro the, the company's stock will be offered to private investors early in 1993. The company was founded in 1922. By March 1992, Argentina also will begin selling all assets of state owned Gas del Estado (GDE) through an international bidding process expected to take about 18 months

  5. Communications received from Argentina and Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-05-01

    The document reproduces the Joint Declaration on Nuclear Policy signed by the Presidents of Argentina and Brazil on 30 November 1985, the Protocol on Nuclear Co-operation between Argentina and Brazil signed on 10 December 1986, the Joint Declaration on Nuclear Policy signed by the two Presidents on 10 December 1986, the Joint Declaration on Nuclear Policy signed by the two Presidents on 17 July 1987 and the Joint Declaration on Nuclear Policy (IPERO Declaration) signed by the two Presidents on 8 April 1988

  6. Archean crust-mantle geochemical differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilton, G. R.

    Isotope measurements on carbonatite complexes and komatiites can provide information on the geochemical character and geochemical evolution of the mantle, including the sub-continental mantle. Measurements on young samples establish the validity of the method. These are based on Sr, Nd and Pb data from the Tertiary-Mesozoic Gorgona komatiite and Sr and Pb data from the Cretaceous Oka carbonatite complex. In both cases the data describe a LIL element-depleted source similar to that observed presently in MORB. Carbonatite data have been used to study the mantle beneath the Superior Province of the Canadian Shield one billion years (1 AE) ago. The framework for this investigation was established by Bell et al., who showed that large areas of the province appear to be underlain by LIL element-depleted mantle (Sr-85/Sr-86=0.7028) at 1 AE ago. Additionally Bell et al. found four complexes to have higher initial Sr ratios (Sr-87/Sr-86=0.7038), which they correlated with less depleted (bulk earth?) mantle sources, or possibly crustal contamination. Pb isotope relationships in four of the complexes have been studied by Bell et al.

  7. Archean crust-mantle geochemical differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilton, G. R.

    1983-01-01

    Isotope measurements on carbonatite complexes and komatiites can provide information on the geochemical character and geochemical evolution of the mantle, including the sub-continental mantle. Measurements on young samples establish the validity of the method. These are based on Sr, Nd and Pb data from the Tertiary-Mesozoic Gorgona komatiite and Sr and Pb data from the Cretaceous Oka carbonatite complex. In both cases the data describe a LIL element-depleted source similar to that observed presently in MORB. Carbonatite data have been used to study the mantle beneath the Superior Province of the Canadian Shield one billion years (1 AE) ago. The framework for this investigation was established by Bell et al., who showed that large areas of the province appear to be underlain by LIL element-depleted mantle (Sr-85/Sr-86=0.7028) at 1 AE ago. Additionally Bell et al. found four complexes to have higher initial Sr ratios (Sr-87/Sr-86=0.7038), which they correlated with less depleted (bulk earth?) mantle sources, or possibly crustal contamination. Pb isotope relationships in four of the complexes have been studied by Bell et al.

  8. Research on geochemical exploration in geotherm development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirowatari, Kazuo; Imaizumi, Yukio; Koga, Akito; Iwanaga, Tatsuto.

    1987-01-01

    The decisive factor of geotherm development is to improve the exploration techniques. By effectively carrying out the selection of promising development spots and the decision of well drilling positions, the geotherm development exceeding existing energy sources becomes feasible. There have been many problems in conventional geotherm exploration such as the high cost and long work period, therefore, it was decided to advance the research on geochemical exploration techniques which are relatively simple and can be carried out with low cost. When the techniques of geochemistry are used, for example, in the case that there are hot springs or fumaroles, the temperature, origin, properties and so on of underground hot water reservoirs can be estimated from their chemical composition. The method of examining the mercury concentration in soil and soil air has been in practical use in the geothermal districts where the ground surface symptom lacks. This time, the method of investigation using radon, thoron and gamma ray as the exploration indices was newly studied. The index compositions for geochemical exploration, new exploration index compositions, the method of measurement, the basic investigation and on-the-spot investigation are reported. (Kako, I.)

  9. Geochemical signature of radioactive waste: oil NORM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Gilberto T. de Paula; Costa-de-Moura, Jorge; Gomes, Carlos de Almeida; Sampaio, Emidio A. Lopes, E-mail: gilberto.costa@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: jcmoura@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: cgomes@cnen.gov.br [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Div. de Controle de Rejeitos e Transporte de Materiais Radioativos

    2017-07-01

    The Brazilian Nuclear Agency (CNEN) rules all nuclear activity in Brazil as demanded by the Federal Constitution, articles 21, XXIII, and 177, V, and by the Federal Acts 4.118/62 and 10.308/2001. Therefore, the CNEN is responsible for any radioactive waste disposal in the country. Oil Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (Oil NORM) in this paper refers to waste coming from oil exploration. Oil NORM has called much attention during the last decades, mostly because it is not possible to determine its primary source due to the actual absence of regulatory control mechanism. There is no efficient regulatory tool which allows determining the origin of such NORM wastes even among those facilities under regulatory control. This fact may encourage non-authorized radioactive material transportation, smuggling and terrorism. The aim of this project is to provide a geochemical signature for each oil NORM waste using its naturally occurring isotopic composition to identify its origin. The here proposed method is a specific geochemical modeling of oil sludge NORM samples which are analyzed for radioisotopes normally present in oil pipes, such as {sup 228}Ac, {sup 214}Bi and {sup 214}Pb. The activity ratios are plotted in scatter diagrams. This method was successfully tested with data of different sources obtained from analysis reports from the Campos Basin/Brazil and from literature. (author)

  10. Neutron activation analysis of geochemical samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenberg, R.; Zilliacus, R.; Kaistila, M.

    1983-06-01

    The present paper will describe the work done at the Technical Research Centre of Finland in developing methods for the large-scale activation analysis of samples for the geochemical prospecting of metals. The geochemical prospecting for uranium started in Finland in 1974 and consequently a manually operated device for the delayed neutron activation analysis of uranium was taken into use. During 1974 9000 samples were analyzed. The small capacity of the analyzer made it necessary to develop a completely automated analyzer which was taken into use in August 1975. Since then 20000-30000 samples have been analyzed annually the annual capacity being about 60000 samples when running seven hours per day. Multielemental instrumental neutron activation analysis is used for the analysis of more than 40 elements. Using instrumental epithermal neutron activation analysis 25-27 elements can be analyzed using one irradiation and 20 min measurement. During 1982 12000 samples were analyzed for mining companies and Geological Survey of Finland. The capacity is 600 samples per week. Besides these two analytical methods the analysis of lanthanoids is an important part of the work. 11 lanthanoids have been analyzed using instrumental neutron activation analysis. Radiochemical separation methods have been developed for several elements to improve the sensitivity of the analysis

  11. Geochemical signature of radioactive waste: oil NORM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, Gilberto T. de Paula; Costa-de-Moura, Jorge; Gomes, Carlos de Almeida; Sampaio, Emidio A. Lopes

    2017-01-01

    The Brazilian Nuclear Agency (CNEN) rules all nuclear activity in Brazil as demanded by the Federal Constitution, articles 21, XXIII, and 177, V, and by the Federal Acts 4.118/62 and 10.308/2001. Therefore, the CNEN is responsible for any radioactive waste disposal in the country. Oil Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (Oil NORM) in this paper refers to waste coming from oil exploration. Oil NORM has called much attention during the last decades, mostly because it is not possible to determine its primary source due to the actual absence of regulatory control mechanism. There is no efficient regulatory tool which allows determining the origin of such NORM wastes even among those facilities under regulatory control. This fact may encourage non-authorized radioactive material transportation, smuggling and terrorism. The aim of this project is to provide a geochemical signature for each oil NORM waste using its naturally occurring isotopic composition to identify its origin. The here proposed method is a specific geochemical modeling of oil sludge NORM samples which are analyzed for radioisotopes normally present in oil pipes, such as 228 Ac, 214 Bi and 214 Pb. The activity ratios are plotted in scatter diagrams. This method was successfully tested with data of different sources obtained from analysis reports from the Campos Basin/Brazil and from literature. (author)

  12. Investigation of a natural geochemical barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-02-01

    Groundwater data from lysimeters and monitor wells in the vicinity of the Bowman, North Dakota, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site indicated that there is a mechanism in the subsurface which cleans up downward-percolating fluids. It was hypothesized that clays and organic materials in the sediments sequestered hazardous constituents from infiltrating fluids. A program was designed to collect sediment cores from various locations on and around the site and to analyze the sediments to determine whether there has been a build up of hazardous constituents in any specific type of sedimentary material. Materials that concentrate the hazardous constituents would be potential candidates to be used in constructed geochemical barriers. The water quality of the groundwater contained within the sedimentary section indicates that there is a transport of contaminants down through the sediments and that these contaminants are removed from solution by the iron-bearing minerals in the organic-rich lignite beds. The data gathered during the course of this investigation indicate that the lignite ashing operations have added very little of the hazardous constituents of concern--arsenic, chromium, molybdenum, selenium, or uranium--to the sediments beneath the UMTRA Project site. At both locations, the hazardous constituents are concentrated in the upper most lignite bed. These data offer a natural analog for laboratory tests in which sphagnum peat was used to sequester hazardous constituents. Constructed geochemical barriers are a viable mechanism for the clean-up of the majority of hazardous constituents from uranium mill tailings in groundwater

  13. Geochemical controls on groundwater chemistry in shales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Von Damm, K.L.

    1989-01-01

    The chemistry of groundwaters is one of the most important parameters in determining the mobility of species within a rock formation. A three pronged approach was used to determine the composition of, and geochemical controls, on groundwaters specifically within shale formations: (1) available data were collected from the literature, the US Geological Survey WATSTORE data base, and field sampling, (2) the geochemical modeling code EQ3/6 was used to simulate interaction of various shales and groundwaters, and (3) several types of shale were reacted with synthetic groundwaters in the laboratory. The comparison of model results to field and laboratory data provide a means of validating the models, as well as a means of deconvoluting complex field interactions. Results suggest that groundwaters in shales have a wide range in composition and are primarily of the Na-Cl-HCO 3 - type. The constancy of the Na:Cl (molar) ratio at 1:1 and the Ca:Mg ratio from 3:1 to 1:1 suggests the importance of halite and carbonates in controlling groundwater compositions. In agreement with the reaction path modeling, most of the groundwaters are neutral to slightly alkaline at low temperatures. Model and experimental results suggest that reaction (1) at elevated temperatures, or (2) in the presence of oxygen will lead to more acidic conditions. Some acetate was found to be produced in the experiments; depending on the constraints applied, large amounts of acetate were produced in the model results. 13 refs., 1 tab

  14. Mineralogic Model (MM3.0) Analysis Model Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. Lum

    2002-02-12

    The purpose of this report is to document the Mineralogic Model (MM), Version 3.0 (MM3.0) with regard to data input, modeling methods, assumptions, uncertainties, limitations and validation of the model results, qualification status of the model, and the differences between Version 3.0 and previous versions. A three-dimensional (3-D) Mineralogic Model was developed for Yucca Mountain to support the analyses of hydrologic properties, radionuclide transport, mineral health hazards, repository performance, and repository design. Version 3.0 of the MM was developed from mineralogic data obtained from borehole samples. It consists of matrix mineral abundances as a function of x (easting), y (northing), and z (elevation), referenced to the stratigraphic framework defined in Version 3.1 of the Geologic Framework Model (GFM). The MM was developed specifically for incorporation into the 3-D Integrated Site Model (ISM). The MM enables project personnel to obtain calculated mineral abundances at any position, within any region, or within any stratigraphic unit in the model area. The significance of the MM for key aspects of site characterization and performance assessment is explained in the following subsections. This work was conducted in accordance with the Development Plan for the MM (CRWMS M&O 2000). The planning document for this Rev. 00, ICN 02 of this AMR is Technical Work Plan, TWP-NBS-GS-000003, Technical Work Plan for the Integrated Site Model, Process Model Report, Revision 01 (CRWMS M&O 2000). The purpose of this ICN is to record changes in the classification of input status by the resolution of the use of TBV software and data in this report. Constraints and limitations of the MM are discussed in the appropriate sections that follow. The MM is one component of the ISM, which has been developed to provide a consistent volumetric portrayal of the rock layers, rock properties, and mineralogy of the Yucca Mountain site. The ISM consists of three components: (1

  15. Mineralogic Model (MM3.0) Analysis Model Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lum, C.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to document the Mineralogic Model (MM), Version 3.0 (MM3.0) with regard to data input, modeling methods, assumptions, uncertainties, limitations and validation of the model results, qualification status of the model, and the differences between Version 3.0 and previous versions. A three-dimensional (3-D) Mineralogic Model was developed for Yucca Mountain to support the analyses of hydrologic properties, radionuclide transport, mineral health hazards, repository performance, and repository design. Version 3.0 of the MM was developed from mineralogic data obtained from borehole samples. It consists of matrix mineral abundances as a function of x (easting), y (northing), and z (elevation), referenced to the stratigraphic framework defined in Version 3.1 of the Geologic Framework Model (GFM). The MM was developed specifically for incorporation into the 3-D Integrated Site Model (ISM). The MM enables project personnel to obtain calculated mineral abundances at any position, within any region, or within any stratigraphic unit in the model area. The significance of the MM for key aspects of site characterization and performance assessment is explained in the following subsections. This work was conducted in accordance with the Development Plan for the MM (CRWMS M and O 2000). The planning document for this Rev. 00, ICN 02 of this AMR is Technical Work Plan, TWP-NBS-GS-000003, Technical Work Plan for the Integrated Site Model, Process Model Report, Revision 01 (CRWMS M and O 2000). The purpose of this ICN is to record changes in the classification of input status by the resolution of the use of TBV software and data in this report. Constraints and limitations of the MM are discussed in the appropriate sections that follow. The MM is one component of the ISM, which has been developed to provide a consistent volumetric portrayal of the rock layers, rock properties, and mineralogy of the Yucca Mountain site. The ISM consists of three components

  16. Mineralogical composition changes of postagrogenic soils under different plant communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churilin, Nikita; Chizhikova, Natalia; Varlamov, Evgheni; Churilina, Alexandra

    2017-04-01

    Plant communities play the leading role in transformation of soil. The need of studying former arable lands increases due to large number of abandoned lands in Russia. It is necessary to study mineralogical composition of soils involved into natural processes to understand the trends of their development after agricultural activities in the past. The aim of the study is to identify changes in mineralogical composition of soils under the influence of different plant communities. Soils were sampled in the south of Arkhangelsk region, Ustyansky district, near Akichkin Pochinok village. Soils are formed on clay moraine of Moscow glaciation. Soil profiles were dug on interfluve. We selected 4 plant communities on different stages of succession: upland meadow with domination of sod grasses (Phleum pratense, Agrostis tenuis), 16-year-old birch forest where dominants are herbaceous plants such as Poa sp., Chamerion angustiflium, Agrostis tenuis, 16-year-old spruce forest with no herbaceous vegetation and 70-year-old bilberry spruce forest with domination of Vaccinium myrtillus and Vaccinium vitis-idaea. To separate soil fractions mineral content. We noticed a clear differentiation of studied soils both in the content of fraction and composition of minerals. Mineralogical composition and major mineral phases correlation of profiles under 70 years and 16 years of spruce forests are different. Mineralogical content in upper part of profile under the young spruce is more differentiated than in old spruce forest: the amount of quartz and kaolinite increases in upper horizon, although in this case the overall pattern of profile formation of clay material during podzolization remains unchanged. There is more substantial desilting under the birch forest, compared with profile under the spruce of same age within top 50 cm. Under the meadow vegetation we've discovered differentiation in mineral composition. Upper horizons contain smectite phase and differ from the underlying

  17. Discovery of Ni-smectite-rich saprolite at Loma Ortega, Falcondo mining district (Dominican Republic): geochemistry and mineralogy of an unusual case of "hybrid hydrous Mg silicate - clay silicate" type Ni-laterite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tauler, Esperanç