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Sample records for areva group facilities

  1. Status of safety at Areva group facilities. 2007 annual report; Areva, etat de surete des installations nucleaires. Rapport annuel 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-07-01

    This report describes the status of nuclear safety and radiation protection in the facilities of the AREVA group and gives information on radiation protection in the service operations, as observed through the inspection programs and analyses carried out by the General Inspectorate in 2007. Having been submitted to the group's Supervisory Board, this report is sent to the bodies representing the personnel. Content: 1 - A look back at 2007 by the AREVA General Inspector: Visible progress in 2007, Implementation of the Nuclear Safety Charter, Notable events; 2 - Status of nuclear safety and radiation protection in the nuclear facilities and service operations: Personnel radiation protection, Event tracking, Service operations, Criticality control, Radioactive waste and effluent management; 3 - Performance improvement actions; 4 - Description of the General Inspectorate; 5 - Glossary.

  2. AREVA group overview; Presentation du groupe AREVA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-02-08

    This document presents the Group Areva, a world nuclear industry leader, from a financial holding company to an industrial group, operating in two businesses: the nuclear energy and the components. The structure and the market of the group are discussed, as the financial assets. (A.L.B.)

  3. The Areva Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document provides information on the Areva Group, a world nuclear industry leader, offering solutions for nuclear power generation, electricity transmission and distribution and interconnect systems to the telecommunications, computer and automotive markets. It presents successively the front end division including the group business lines involved in producing nuclear fuel for electric power generation (uranium mining, concentration, conversion and enrichment and nuclear fuel fabrication); the reactors and services division which designs and builds PWR, BWR and research reactors; the back end division which encompasses the management of the fuel that has been used in nuclear power plants; the transmission and distribution division which provides products, systems and services to the medium and high voltage energy markets; the connectors division which designs and manufactures electrical, electronic and optical connectors, flexible micro circuitry and interconnection systems. Areva is implemented in Europe, north and south america, africa and asia-pacific. (A.L.B.)

  4. Status of safety at Areva group facilities. 2006 annual report; Etat de surete des installations nucleaires. Rapport annuel 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-07-01

    This report presents a snapshot of nuclear safety and radiation protection conditions in the AREVA group's nuclear installations in France and abroad, as well as of radiation protection aspects in service activities, as identified over the course of the annual inspections and analyses program carried out by the General Inspectorate in 2006. This report is presented to the AREVA Supervisory Board, communicated to the labor representation bodies concerned, and made public. In light of the inspections, appraisals and coordination missions it has performed, the General Inspectorate considers that the nuclear safety level of the AREVA group's nuclear installations is satisfactory. It particularly noted positive changes on numerous sites and efforts in the field of continuous improvement that have helped to strengthen nuclear safety. This has been possible through the full involvement of management teams, an improvement effort initiated by upper management, actions to increase personnel awareness of nuclear safety culture, and supervisors' heightened presence around operators. However, the occurrence of certain events in facilities has led us to question the nuclear safety repercussions that the changes to activities or organization on some sites have had. In these times of change, drifts in nuclear safety culture have been identified. The General Inspectorate considers that a preliminary analysis of the human and organizational factors of these changes, sized to match the impact the change has on nuclear safety, should be made to ensure that a guaranteed level of nuclear safety is maintained (allowance for changes to references, availability of the necessary skills, resources of the operating and support structures, etc.). Preparations should also be made to monitor the changes and spot any telltale signs of drift in the application phase. Managers should be extra vigilant and the occurrence of any drift should be systematically dealt with ahead of

  5. Export Control in the AREVA Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After the Second World War the nuclear technology was mostly considered inappropriate for the export. It remains strictly regulated today, but the development of the civil applications urged states to facilitate the peaceful uses while establishing a strict control in the domains of the internal security and the nuclear proliferation. AREVA decided to set up an Export Control program applied to all the products and in all the countries where the group operates. AREVA can export products or make transfer of technology considered as sensitive for the non-proliferation and the risks linked to the terrorism. This sensitiveness results from the nature of the products or from the country of destination and in certain cases both of them. AREVA has set up an Export Control program and an interactive e-learning training within the Group to make exports of sensitive products, raw materials and technologies more secure. The subject is rather complex, the regulations are constantly evolving, and becoming familiar with them is necessarily a gradual process, but it must be made in-depth, hence the idea of regular training sessions. The implementation of the Export Control in the AREVA Group declines in four fundamental stages: -) Policy and procedure; -) Appointment of Export Control Officers (ECO); -) Training; and -) Audit and Self Assessment. The training program is composed by the following elements: Ethics (Value Charter) of the Group, Non-proliferation, international regulations and more particularly those that are applicable in Europe (Germany and France) and in the United States. Particular attention is devoted to the Export Control practice in China, Japan and India. (A.C.)

  6. 1. half results 2003 - AREVA group; Resultats du 1. semestre 2003 - groupe AREVA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-10-01

    This financial presentation of the Areva group, the world nuclear industry leader, results for the first half 2003 highlights the good level of activity, the negotiations with URENCO in final stages concerning the enrichment, the revision of estimates and negotiations underway concerning the dismantling and the operating income positive in Q2 2003 concerning the connectors division. (A.L.B.)

  7. AREVA Technical Days (ATD) session 1: Energy outlook and presentation of the Areva Group; AREVA Technical Days (ATD) session 1: enjeux energetiques et presentation du groupe AREVA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    These technical days organized by the Areva Group aims to explain the group activities in a technological and economic point of view, to provide an outlook of worldwide energy trends and challenges and to present each of their businesses in a synthetic manner. This first session deals with energy challenges and nuclear, public acceptance of nuclear power, mining activities, chemistry activities, enrichment activities, fuel assembly, reactors and services activities, nuclear measurements activities, reprocessing and recycling activities, logistics activities and connectors activities. (A.L.B.)

  8. The Areva Group back-end division - challenges and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document presents the Areva Group back-end division challenges and prospects. Areva, a world nuclear industry leader, analyzes in this document, the high-profile mix of complementary activities of the nuclear energy industry, concerning the back-end division the full range of services for the end of the fuel cycle, the fuel cycle back-end markets, the economic and financial associated considerations. (A.L.B.)

  9. Areva group. Result, first half 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Areva, a world nuclear industry leader, provides by this document information and key data on the performance and detailed financial data of the first half 2004. The transmission and distribution integration plan 2004-2006 is also detailed. (A.L.B.)

  10. The Areva Group back-end division - challenges and prospects; Le pole aval dans le groupe Areva - enjeux et perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-06-01

    This document presents the Areva Group back-end division challenges and prospects. Areva, a world nuclear industry leader, analyzes in this document, the high-profile mix of complementary activities of the nuclear energy industry, concerning the back-end division the full range of services for the end of the fuel cycle, the fuel cycle back-end markets, the economic and financial associated considerations. (A.L.B.)

  11. Complementary safety assessment assessment of nuclear facilities - Tricastin facility - AREVA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This complementary safety assessment analyses the robustness of the Areva part of the Tricastin nuclear site to extreme situations such as those that led to the Fukushima accident. This study includes the following facilities: Areva NC Pierrelatte, EURODIF production, Comurhex Pierrelatte, Georges Besse II plant and Socatri. Robustness is the ability for the plant to withstand events beyond which the plant was designed. Robustness is linked to safety margins but also to the situations leading to a sudden deterioration of the accidental sequence. Moreover, safety is not only a matter of design or engineered systems but also a matter of organizing: task organization (including subcontracting) as well as the setting of emergency plans or the inventory of nuclear materials are taken into consideration in this assessment. This report is divided into 10 main chapters: 1) the feedback experience of the Fukushima accident; 2) description of the site and its surroundings; 3) featuring of the site's activities and installations; 4) accidental sequences; 5) protection from earthquakes; 6) protection from floods; 7) protection from other extreme natural disasters; 8) the loss of electrical power and of the heat sink; 9) the management of severe accidents; and 10) subcontracting policy. This analysis has identified 5 main measures to be taken to limit the risks linked to natural disasters: -) continuing the program for replacing the current conversion plant and the enrichment plant; -) renewing the storage of hydrofluoric acid at the de-fluorination workshop; -) assessing the seismic behaviour of some parts of the de-fluorination workshop and of the fluorine fabrication workshop; -) improving the availability of warning and information means in case of emergency; and -) improving the means to mitigate accidental gaseous releases. (A.C.)

  12. Large valve test facilities of AREVA NP GmbH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beisiegel, A.; Wagner, T.; Stecher, W.

    2011-07-01

    As market leader in the field of nuclear power plant technology, AREVA runs an internationally-unique test and qualification infrastructure for power plant components. The associated Thermal-Hydraulic Platform with different test facilities in Karlstein and Erlangen has been recognized as a test body according to ISO 17025. The DAkkS the German Society for Accreditation has now also certified the Thermal-hydraulic Platorm as an independent inspection body Type C according to ISO 17020.

  13. Investments in new nuclear fuel cycle facilities. AREVA long term supply insurance approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a leading provider of technological solutions for nuclear power generation and electricity transmission, the AREVA group and its partners can offer a unique range of products and services from one single step to a fully integrated fuel supply, as requested by its customers. At the core of AREVA, the Front end division is an essential part of the overall fuel supply chain. To address its customers' needs for their existing and future nuclear power plants, the AREVA group has already launched and is further planning very significant investments to build new facilities in the front end, based on the most advanced technologies: - in conversion: the Comurhex 2 project is now approved and started. - in enrichment: our 3 billion euros GB II centrifuge plants project is well on its construction schedule, now allowing us to start a project in the USA based upon the same design. - We are also investing in fuel fabrication at our existing plants in Europe and in the US. Current uranium market evolutions put natural uranium supply under pressure: we are also investing in mining, - Canada, Kazakhstan, Niger, Namibia, South Africa, etc - and also in exploration. Because AREVA is convinced of a fast growing future for nuclear power generation, it has proactively opted to massively invest in the fuel cycle facilities of the 21st century in order to be prepared to fulfil its customer needs. (author)

  14. AREVA Technical Days (ATD) session 1: Energy outlook and presentation of the Areva Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    These technical days organized by the Areva Group aims to explain the group activities in a technological and economic point of view, to provide an outlook of worldwide energy trends and challenges and to present each of their businesses in a synthetic manner. This first session deals with energy challenges and nuclear, public acceptance of nuclear power, mining activities, chemistry activities, enrichment activities, fuel assembly, reactors and services activities, nuclear measurements activities, reprocessing and recycling activities, logistics activities and connectors activities. (A.L.B.)

  15. Areva group. Result, first half 2004; Resultats du 1. semestre 2004. Groupe Areva

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-09-01

    Areva, a world nuclear industry leader, provides by this document information and key data on the performance and detailed financial data of the first half 2004. The transmission and distribution integration plan 2004-2006 is also detailed. (A.L.B.)

  16. Status of safety in nuclear facilities - 2012. AREVA General Inspectorate Annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After a message from the Areva's Chief Executive Officer and a message from the senior Vice President of safety, health, security, sustainable development, a text by the inspector general comments the key safety results (events, dose levels, radiological impacts), the inspection findings, the areas of vigilance (relationship with the ASN, the management of the criticality risk, and facility compliance), some significant topics after the Fukushima accident. Then this report addresses the status of nuclear safety and radiation protection in the group's facilities and operations. It more specifically addresses the context and findings (lessons learned from the inspections, operating experience from event, employee radiation monitoring, environmental monitoring), crosscutting processes (safety management, controlling facility compliance, subcontractor guidance and management, crisis management), specific risks (criticality risk, fire hazards, transportation safety, radioactive waste management, pollution prevention, liability mitigation and dismantling), and areas for improvement and outlook

  17. Annual report 2014. Report on subcontracting within the AREVA group in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents quantitative data and actions undertaken by the AREVA group regarding subcontracting in its nuclear activities in France in 2014. After a presentation of AREVA, it addresses innovative practices in the 'commissioner-supplier' relationship, describes how the subcontracting option corresponds to an industrial choice, describes how subcontracting is supervised through an operational acquisition process, how abilities and training of external interveners are controlled, how operations performed by external interveners are prepared and accompanied. It outlines how issues related to health, safety and security are addressed exactly the same way for all interveners, and finally comments how observations made by the different stakeholders are sources of progress

  18. AREVA General Inspectorate Annual Report 2013 - Status of safety in nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This annual report by AREVA's General Inspectorate deals with the status of nuclear safety and radiation protection in the group's facilities and operations over the course of 2013. Based on the findings made during implementation of the annual inspection program, this annual report also includes the results of the analysis of significant events and the observations and assessments of specialists in the Safety Health Security Sustainable Development Department (SHSSDD), supplemented by regular interaction with the safety regulators, different government agencies, stakeholders and other nuclear operators. Additionally, this report presents the action plans put into motion and the directions taken for continuous improvement in risk prevention for operations conducted in France and internationally. In 2013, the level of safety in the group's nuclear facilities and operations remained satisfactory, although improvements are necessary in some domains. This report is based on established indicators, analyses of reported events, responses to commitments made to the regulators, and the results of different improvement actions reported on in the inspected and supported entities. In 2013, no level 2 event on the International Nuclear and Radiological Event Scale (INES) was reported, the bottom-up reporting of weak signals was confirmed, dose levels were low and there were no radiological impacts on the environment. The General Inspectorate conducted 45 inspections in 30 of the group's entities in 2013. Of these, 10 concerned sites outside France and 7 were conducted following events or particular situations. These inspections gave rise to 176 recommendations, which the inspected entities have translated into action plans. Verification of these different action plans according to planned procedures and announced schedules gave rise to 16 follow-up inspections. The major lessons learned from these inspections relate to project management, facility compliance and operational

  19. First half 2006 financial results; Resultats du 1er semestre 2006 Groupe Areva

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-09-15

    Areva provides technological solutions for highly reliable nuclear power generation and electricity transmission and distribution. The group is the world leader in nuclear power and the only company to cover all industrial activities in this field. This Press release presents the first half 2006 financial results: the overall performance and the performance by division (front end, reactors and services, back end, transmission and distribution). (A.L.B.)

  20. Areva 2005 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This annual report contains information on AREVA's objectives, prospects and strategies, particularly in Chapters 4 and 7, as well as contains information on the markets, market shares and competitive position of the AREVA group. Content: 1 - Person responsible for the annual report and persons responsible for auditing the financial statements; 2 - Information pertaining to the transaction; 3 - General information on the company and share capital: Information on AREVA, Information on share capital and voting rights, Investment certificate trading, Dividends, Organizational chart of the AREVA group, Equity interests, Shareholders' agreements; 4 - Information on company operations, 5 - New developments and future prospects: Overview and strategy of the AREVA group, The Nuclear Power and Transmission and Distribution markets, AREVA group energy businesses, Front End Division, Reactors and Services Division, Back End Division, Transmission and Distribution Division, Major Contracts, The Group's principal sites, AREVA's customers and suppliers, Human resources, Sustainable Development and Continuous Improvement, Capital spending programs, Research and development, intellectual property and brand name programs, Risk and insurance; 6 - Assets - Financial position - financial performance: Analysis of and comments on the Group's financial position and performance, Human Resources report 2005, Environmental report, Consolidated financial statements, Notes to the consolidated financial statements, AREVA SA Financial statements 2005, Notes to the corporate financial statements; 7 - Corporate governance: Composition and functioning of administrative bodies, Executive compensation, Profit-sharing plans, AREVA Values Charter, Annual General Meeting of Shareholders of May 2, 2006; 8 - Recent developments and outlook: Events subsequent to year-end closing for 2005, Outlook

  1. Year 2006. GRNC's appreciation of the dose estimates presented in the annual environmental monitoring report of Areva-NC La Hague facility. Forth GRNC viewpoint. Detailed report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 'Groupe Radioecologie Nord Cotentin' (GRNC) has carried out a very thorough evaluation of the assessment of doses due to discharges from the Cap de la Hague nuclear site carried out by Areva NC, the site operators. The group has looked at all aspects of the assessment methods and data to ensure that they agree with the results presented in the 2006 annual environmental report of the operator. The computer tool, ACADIE, developed to assess the doses, has been used by the GRNC members to carry out their own calculations. This document comprises the detailed report of the GRNC and its synthesis. The detailed report includes: 1 - a critical analysis of the 2006 source term; a note about the uranium content in liquid effluents; the data transmitted by Areva NC (status of atmospheric effluents, status of liquid effluents at sea, fuel data); the data transmitted by the IRSN - the French institute of radiation protection and nuclear safety (status of the radioactive effluents of Areva La Hague facility); the history of liquid and gaseous effluents between 1966 and 2006; 2 - detailed comparison between model and 2006 measurements; critical analysis of 14C and tritium data available for the Nord Cotentin and the English Channel area; 3 - detail of the 2006 efficient dose calculations; presentation of the environmental dispersion of tritium and of its effects on living organisms. (J.S.)

  2. Areva, reference document 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This reference document contains information on the AREVA group's objectives, prospects and development strategies, particularly in Chapters 4 and 7. It contains information on the markets, market shares and competitive position of the AREVA group. Content: - 1 Person responsible for the reference document and persons responsible for auditing the financial statements; - 2 Information pertaining to the transaction (Not applicable); - 3 General information on the company and its share capital: Information on AREVA, on share capital and voting rights, Investment certificate trading, Dividends, Organization chart of AREVA group companies, Equity interests, Shareholders' agreements; - 4 Information on company operations, new developments and future prospects: Overview and strategy of the AREVA group, The Nuclear Power and Transmission and Distribution markets, The energy businesses of the AREVA group, Front End division, Reactors and Services division, Back End division, Transmission and Distribution division, Major contracts, The principal sites of the AREVA group, AREVA's customers and suppliers, Sustainable Development and Continuous Improvement, Capital spending programs, Research and development programs, intellectual property and trademarks, Risk and insurance; - 5 Assets - Financial position - Financial performance: Analysis of and comments on the group's financial position and performance, 2006 Human Resources Report, Environmental Report, Consolidated financial statements, Notes to the consolidated financial statements, AREVA SA financial statements, Notes to the corporate financial statements; 6 - Corporate Governance: Composition and functioning of corporate bodies, Executive compensation, Profit-sharing plans, AREVA Values Charter, Annual Combined General Meeting of Shareholders of May 3, 2007; 7 - Recent developments and future prospects: Events subsequent to year-end closing for 2006, Outlook; 8 - Glossary; 9 - Table of concordance

  3. Areva, annual report 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This annual report contains information on AREVA objectives, prospects and strategies, particularly in chapters 4 and 7. This information is a not meant as a presentation of past performance data and should not be interpreted as a guarantee that events or data set forth herein are assured or that objectives will be met. Forward looking statements made in this document also address known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors that could, were they to translate into fact, cause AREVA future financial performance, operating performance and production to differ significantly from the objectives presented or suggested herein. Those factors include, in particular, changes in international, economic or market conditions, as well as risk factors presented in Section 4.14.3. Neither AREVA nor the AREVA group is committing to updating forward looking statements or information contained in the annual report. This annual report contains information on the markets, market shares and competitive position of the AREVA group. Unless otherwise indicated, all historical data and forward looking information are based on Group estimates (source: AREVA) and are provided as examples only. To AREVA knowledge, no report is available on the AREVA group markets that is sufficiently complete or objective to serve as a sole reference source. The AREVA group developed estimates based on several sources, including in-house studies and reports, statistics provided by international organizations and professional associations, data published by competitors and information collected by AREVA subsidiaries. The main sources, studies and reports used include (i) the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), the International Energy Agency (IEA), the World Nuclear Association (WNA), the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEA), Nuclear Assurance Corporation (NAC), the European Atomic Energy Community (Euratom) and the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA) for the nuclear business; and (ii) the

  4. Areva, annual report 2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    This annual report contains information on AREVA objectives, prospects and strategies, particularly in chapters 4 and 7. This information is a not meant as a presentation of past performance data and should not be interpreted as a guarantee that events or data set forth herein are assured or that objectives will be met. Forward looking statements made in this document also address known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors that could, were they to translate into fact, cause AREVA future financial performance, operating performance and production to differ significantly from the objectives presented or suggested herein. Those factors include, in particular, changes in international, economic or market conditions, as well as risk factors presented in Section 4.14.3. Neither AREVA nor the AREVA group is committing to updating forward looking statements or information contained in the annual report. This annual report contains information on the markets, market shares and competitive position of the AREVA group. Unless otherwise indicated, all historical data and forward looking information are based on Group estimates (source: AREVA) and are provided as examples only. To AREVA knowledge, no report is available on the AREVA group markets that is sufficiently complete or objective to serve as a sole reference source. The AREVA group developed estimates based on several sources, including in-house studies and reports, statistics provided by international organizations and professional associations, data published by competitors and information collected by AREVA subsidiaries. The main sources, studies and reports used include (i) the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), the International Energy Agency (IEA), the World Nuclear Association (WNA), the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEA), Nuclear Assurance Corporation (NAC), the European Atomic Energy Community (Euratom) and the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA) for the nuclear business; and (ii

  5. Areva reference document 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This reference document contains information on the AREVA group's objectives, prospects and development strategies, particularly in Chapters 4 and 7. It contains also information on the markets, market shares and competitive position of the AREVA group. Content: 1 - Person responsible for the reference document and persons responsible for auditing the financial statements; 2 - Information pertaining to the transaction (not applicable); 3 - General information on the company and its share capital: Information on Areva, Information on share capital and voting rights, Investment certificate trading, Dividends, Organization chart of AREVA group companies, Equity interests, Shareholders' agreements; 4 - Information on company operations, new developments and future prospects: Overview and strategy of the AREVA group, The Nuclear Power and Transmission and Distribution markets, The energy businesses of the AREVA group, Front End division, Reactors and Services division, Back End division, Transmission and Distribution division, Major contracts 140 Principal sites of the AREVA group, AREVA's customers and suppliers, Sustainable Development and Continuous Improvement, Capital spending programs, Research and Development programs, Intellectual Property and Trademarks, Risk and insurance; 5 - Assets financial position financial performance: Analysis of and comments on the group's financial position and performance, Human Resources report, Environmental report, Consolidated financial statements 2007, Notes to the consolidated financial statements, Annual financial statements 2007, Notes to the corporate financial statements; 6 - Corporate governance: Composition and functioning of corporate bodies, Executive compensation, Profit-sharing plans, AREVA Values Charter, Annual Ordinary General Meeting of Shareholders of April 17, 2008; 7 - Recent developments and future prospects: Events subsequent to year-end closing for 2007, Outlook; Glossary; table of concordance

  6. AREVA in Gabon. Inquiry report on the situation of workers of the COMUF, Gabonese subsidy of the AREVA-COGEMA group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After a recall of the development of uranium mining activities by the COMUF Company which is now a subsidy company of the AREVA-COGEMA group, and a presentation of the inquiry, this document reports the inquiry performed in Gabon about the medical issue (with notably inadequate security measures) and about the environmental issue related to the site rehabilitation. It also reports the analysis of questionnaires sent to ex-workers in Gabon, as well as of testimonies obtained from expatriates who are suffering from health problems. The report discusses the possibilities to take legal actions for different reasons: unintentional injuries and homicide, endangering the life of others, or inexcusable error. In conclusion the report outlines that the risk was known, that there was no information about it, and that people were deliberately maintained in ignorance

  7. Areva: experiences in outage services

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As the world leader in the nuclear industry, Areva is firmly committed to the safe and reliable operation of the Spanish nuclear power plants. Following this commitment, Areva has established the subsidiary Areva NP Services Spain as a local platform to provide nuclear services for the Spanish nuclear power plants. being integrated and supported by the global Areva Group, Areva NP Services Spain is able to offer services solutions to all customers demands while maintaining close and sustainable relationships with them. This integration also allows the Spanish personnel of Areva to employ their skills by working in multinational teams in international projects. This article will present the capacities, and the most important recent national and international project performed by Areva NP Services Spain in the field of outage services. (Author)

  8. AREVA Logistics Business Unit Transportation Risk Management Initiative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A safe, secure and reliable transportation organization is a key component for the success of the nuclear industry. With the forecasted increase of radioactive material transport flows in future and the changing environment, AREVA Logistic Business Unit (L-BU) must ensure that safety and security risks are minimized but also ensure of the chain supply for its various facilities (mines, conversion, enrichment, fuel manufacturing, reprocessing, etc). AREVA L-BU Unit is implementing a transportation risk management initiative for the radioactive shipments of the AREVA group across all the Business Unit involved in shipments of radioactive and nuclear materials. The paper will present the four main components of the risk management. (authors)

  9. Areva - 2011 Annual results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Areva's backlog established at 45.6 billion euros at the end of 2011, significantly increasing at the end of a year marked by the Fukushima accident, confirms the commercial dynamism of the group alongside its customers and reinforces the visibility on its future business level. In a difficult context, the slight decline in revenue in 2011 demonstrates the robustness of Areva's integrated model, resting mainly on recurring business generated in relation to Areva's customers' nuclear installed base, and benefiting from the development of Areva's renewable energies operations. Free operating cash flow before tax, although down over the whole year in 2011, improved in the second half, showing the first effects of Areva's stronger focus on cash generation and debt management. After the success of Areva's bond issue in September 2011, the Group's liquidity remains high at the end of 2011. The Areva teams are now dedicating all of their efforts to the deployment of the 'Action 2016' strategic action plan, which had already yielded its first positive results at the end of 2011, with an improvement in the cost structure of Areva's operations, an increase in order intake, and the launch of several disposals of minority interests. Summary of the 2011 financial results: - Backlog: euro 45.6 bn, +3.1% vs. 2010, i.e +6.7% over 3 months; - Revenue: euro 8.872 bn, i.e -2.6% vs. 2010; - Operating income: - euro 1.923 bn; - Net income attributable to equity owners of the parent: - euro 2.424 bn; - EBITDA: euro 1.068 bn ( euro 420 m excluding Siemens impact); - Free operating cash flow before tax: - euro 2.397 bn (- euro 1.366 bn excluding Siemens impacts), improvement over the second half; - Decrease in net debt of euro 124 m for the year; - Significant drop in general and administrative expenses, with a noticeable reduction between the first and the second half; - Launch of several disposals of minority interests

  10. Areva, reference document 2006; Areva, document de reference 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-07-01

    This reference document contains information on the AREVA group's objectives, prospects and development strategies, particularly in Chapters 4 and 7. It contains information on the markets, market shares and competitive position of the AREVA group. Content: - 1 Person responsible for the reference document and persons responsible for auditing the financial statements; - 2 Information pertaining to the transaction (Not applicable); - 3 General information on the company and its share capital: Information on AREVA, on share capital and voting rights, Investment certificate trading, Dividends, Organization chart of AREVA group companies, Equity interests, Shareholders' agreements; - 4 Information on company operations, new developments and future prospects: Overview and strategy of the AREVA group, The Nuclear Power and Transmission and Distribution markets, The energy businesses of the AREVA group, Front End division, Reactors and Services division, Back End division, Transmission and Distribution division, Major contracts, The principal sites of the AREVA group, AREVA's customers and suppliers, Sustainable Development and Continuous Improvement, Capital spending programs, Research and development programs, intellectual property and trademarks, Risk and insurance; - 5 Assets - Financial position - Financial performance: Analysis of and comments on the group's financial position and performance, 2006 Human Resources Report, Environmental Report, Consolidated financial statements, Notes to the consolidated financial statements, AREVA SA financial statements, Notes to the corporate financial statements; 6 - Corporate Governance: Composition and functioning of corporate bodies, Executive compensation, Profit-sharing plans, AREVA Values Charter, Annual Combined General Meeting of Shareholders of May 3, 2007; 7 - Recent developments and future prospects: Events subsequent to year-end closing for 2006, Outlook; 8 - Glossary; 9 - Table of concordance.

  11. Areva in 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document is the 2006 activity report of the Areva group and presents the 2006 highlights of the nuclear division (front end of the nuclear cycle, pressurized water reactors, treatment and recycling of used nuclear fuel) and of the Transmission and Distribution division. Content: Message from the Chairman of the Supervisory Board; Message from the Chief Executive Officer; the World in 2006; Areva 2006 highlights; business review; key data; Areva around the World; policy of continuous innovation; five years of sustainable development; governance; Continuous improvement; Financial performance; Innovation; Customer satisfaction; Commitment to employees; Environmental protection; Risk management and prevention; Dialogue and consensus building; Community involvement; corporate governance; organization of the group; Share information and shareholder relations; glossary; learn more

  12. The 2003 essential. AREVA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document presents the essential activities of the Areva Group, a world nuclear industry leader. This group proposes technological solutions to produce the nuclear energy and to transport the electric power. It develops connection systems for the telecommunication, the computers and the automotive industry. Key data on the program management, the sustainable development activities and the different divisions are provided. (A.L.B.)

  13. Areva: 2014 annual results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The scale of the net loss for 2014 illustrates the twofold challenge confronting AREVA: continuing stagnation of the nuclear operations, lack of competitiveness and difficulties in managing the risks inherent in large projects. The group understands how serious this situation is. A comprehensive strategic review of operations was undertaken beginning in November 2014 and is being carried out without compromise. As a result, AREVA is now able to announce a solid transformation plan that sets a challenging but economically realistic course for its teams. First, AREVA will refocus on its core business: mastery of key nuclear processes essential to operators around the globe. This strategic redeployment will lead to the revision of certain goals, whether in the management of new reactor projects or in renewable energies. AREVA's objective is to achieve excellence as a high value-added supplier of products and services. Secondly, AREVA, whose resources had been marshaled to support a spurt of growth in nuclear power, must now adapt to new market realities and become competitive once again. The group's most urgent task is recovery and securing its future by immediately launching a far-reaching competitiveness plan founded on organizational simplification, quality of operations, and a completely revamped approach to managing risk in large projects. Last but not least, AREVA must ensure sustainable financing for its activities. A financing plan will be clarified before publication of the half-year financial statements. This document presents the key financial data of the group, its strategic road-map and its operating and financing plans

  14. Areva reference document 2007; Areva document de reference 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-07-01

    This reference document contains information on the AREVA group's objectives, prospects and development strategies, particularly in Chapters 4 and 7. It contains also information on the markets, market shares and competitive position of the AREVA group. Content: 1 - Person responsible for the reference document and persons responsible for auditing the financial statements; 2 - Information pertaining to the transaction (not applicable); 3 - General information on the company and its share capital: Information on Areva, Information on share capital and voting rights, Investment certificate trading, Dividends, Organization chart of AREVA group companies, Equity interests, Shareholders' agreements; 4 - Information on company operations, new developments and future prospects: Overview and strategy of the AREVA group, The Nuclear Power and Transmission and Distribution markets, The energy businesses of the AREVA group, Front End division, Reactors and Services division, Back End division, Transmission and Distribution division, Major contracts 140 Principal sites of the AREVA group, AREVA's customers and suppliers, Sustainable Development and Continuous Improvement, Capital spending programs, Research and Development programs, Intellectual Property and Trademarks, Risk and insurance; 5 - Assets financial position financial performance: Analysis of and comments on the group's financial position and performance, Human Resources report, Environmental report, Consolidated financial statements 2007, Notes to the consolidated financial statements, Annual financial statements 2007, Notes to the corporate financial statements; 6 - Corporate governance: Composition and functioning of corporate bodies, Executive compensation, Profit-sharing plans, AREVA Values Charter, Annual Ordinary General Meeting of Shareholders of April 17, 2008; 7 - Recent developments and future prospects: Events subsequent to year-end closing for 2007, Outlook; Glossary; table of

  15. Areva 2005 annual report; Areva rapport annuel 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-07-01

    This annual report contains information on AREVA's objectives, prospects and strategies, particularly in Chapters 4 and 7, as well as contains information on the markets, market shares and competitive position of the AREVA group. Content: 1 - Person responsible for the annual report and persons responsible for auditing the financial statements; 2 - Information pertaining to the transaction; 3 - General information on the company and share capital: Information on AREVA, Information on share capital and voting rights, Investment certificate trading, Dividends, Organizational chart of the AREVA group, Equity interests, Shareholders' agreements; 4 - Information on company operations, 5 - New developments and future prospects: Overview and strategy of the AREVA group, The Nuclear Power and Transmission and Distribution markets, AREVA group energy businesses, Front End Division, Reactors and Services Division, Back End Division, Transmission and Distribution Division, Major Contracts, The Group's principal sites, AREVA's customers and suppliers, Human resources, Sustainable Development and Continuous Improvement, Capital spending programs, Research and development, intellectual property and brand name programs, Risk and insurance; 6 - Assets - Financial position - financial performance: Analysis of and comments on the Group's financial position and performance, Human Resources report 2005, Environmental report, Consolidated financial statements, Notes to the consolidated financial statements, AREVA SA Financial statements 2005, Notes to the corporate financial statements; 7 - Corporate governance: Composition and functioning of administrative bodies, Executive compensation, Profit-sharing plans, AREVA Values Charter, Annual General Meeting of Shareholders of May 2, 2006; 8 - Recent developments and outlook: Events subsequent to year-end closing for 2005, Outlook.

  16. Areva. 2005 half year report; Areva. Rapport semestriel 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-07-01

    With manufacturing facilities in over 40 countries and a sales network in over 100, AREVA offers customers technological solutions for nuclear power generation and electricity transmission and distribution. The group also provides interconnect systems to the telecommunications, computer and automotive markets. This half-year report of Areva group presents the key financial data of the group for the first half of 2005: 1 - Highlights of the period; 2 - Transition to the International Financial Reporting Standards: Group's application of IFRS, Impact of IAS 32 and 39 adoption on the Group's financial statements; 3 - Key data: summary data, summary data by business Division, backlog, income statement, review by business Division, cash flow statement, balance sheet items; 4 - events subsequent to the half-year-end; 5 - consolidated financial statements: statutory Auditors' report on the 2005 half-year financial statements - period from January 1 to June 30, 2005, consolidated income statement, consolidated balance sheet, consolidated cash flow statement, change in consolidated shareholders' equity, data by business Division and region, notes to the consolidated financial statements; 6 - Outlook.

  17. AREVA 2009 reference document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Reference Document contains information on the AREVA group's objectives, prospects and development strategies. It contains information on the markets, market shares and competitive position of the AREVA group. This information provides an adequate picture of the size of these markets and of the AREVA group's competitive position. Content: 1 - Person responsible for the Reference Document and Attestation by the person responsible for the Reference Document; 2 - Statutory and Deputy Auditors; 3 - Selected financial information; 4 - Risks: Risk management and coverage, Legal risk, Industrial and environmental risk, Operating risk, Risk related to major projects, Liquidity and market risk, Other risk; 5 - Information about the issuer: History and development, Investments; 6 - Business overview: Markets for nuclear power and renewable energies, AREVA customers and suppliers, Overview and strategy of the group, Business divisions, Discontinued operations: AREVA Transmission and Distribution; 7 - Organizational structure; 8 - Property, plant and equipment: Principal sites of the AREVA group, Environmental issues that may affect the issuer's; 9 - Analysis of and comments on the group's financial position and performance: Overview, Financial position, Cash flow, Statement of financial position, Events subsequent to year-end closing for 2009; 10 - Capital Resources; 11 - Research and development programs, patents and licenses; 12 -trend information: Current situation, Financial objectives; 13 - Profit forecasts or estimates; 14 - Administrative, management and supervisory bodies and senior management; 15 - Compensation and benefits; 16 - Functioning of corporate bodies; 17 - Employees; 18 - Principal shareholders; 19 - Transactions with related parties: French state, CEA, EDF group; 20 - Financial information concerning assets, financial positions and financial performance; 21 - Additional information: Share capital, Certificate of incorporation and by-laws; 22 - Major

  18. Areva. 2005 half year report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With manufacturing facilities in over 40 countries and a sales network in over 100, AREVA offers customers technological solutions for nuclear power generation and electricity transmission and distribution. The group also provides interconnect systems to the telecommunications, computer and automotive markets. This half-year report of Areva group presents the key financial data of the group for the first half of 2005: 1 - Highlights of the period; 2 - Transition to the International Financial Reporting Standards: Group's application of IFRS, Impact of IAS 32 and 39 adoption on the Group's financial statements; 3 - Key data: summary data, summary data by business Division, backlog, income statement, review by business Division, cash flow statement, balance sheet items; 4 - events subsequent to the half-year-end; 5 - consolidated financial statements: statutory Auditors' report on the 2005 half-year financial statements - period from January 1 to June 30, 2005, consolidated income statement, consolidated balance sheet, consolidated cash flow statement, change in consolidated shareholders' equity, data by business Division and region, notes to the consolidated financial statements; 6 - Outlook

  19. AREVA in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    India is the sixth largest energy consumer in the world and its demand is rising rapidly. To support its economic growth, estimated to be 8% on average over the last three years and to ensure access to electricity for all, the country foresees massive investments in its power sector over the next five years. India is therefore an essential market for the AREVA Group, where its Transmission and Distribution division plays a leading role on the strategic grid modernization market. This document presents: 1 - the economic situation in India: Key figures, Growth, India's growing need for electricity, India's energy sources and policy: current mix, driving role of the State, the financial reorganization of the SEBs, the 'Mega-Power' projects, the electricity act, the rural electrification program, the Investments. 2 - Civil nuclear energy: a strong potential for development; 3 - India's transmission and distribution network: the power challenge of the transmission network, the efficiency challenge of the distribution network. 4 - AREVA T and D in India: AREVA T and D profile, Areva's presence in India, market share, T and D customers and flagship projects

  20. Proceedings of the Areva Technical Days. Session 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document presents the proceedings of the Areva technical days, presented during the session 5 the 9 and 10 december 2004, at Istanbul. It deals with the operations of the transmission and distribution division. With manufacturing facilities in over 40 countries and a sales network in over 100, Areva offers customers technological solutions for nuclear power generation and electricity transmission and distribution (the Group also provides interconnect systems to the telecommunications, computer and automotive markets). It provides five topics: a general presentation of Areva, the strategic stakes for transmission and distribution by world-zone, economic and strategic stakes of business unit products, business unit systems and business unit automation. (A.L.B.)

  1. Proceedings of the Areva Technical Days. Session 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    This document presents the proceedings of the Areva technical days, presented during the session 5 the 9 and 10 december 2004, at Istanbul. It deals with the operations of the transmission and distribution division. With manufacturing facilities in over 40 countries and a sales network in over 100, Areva offers customers technological solutions for nuclear power generation and electricity transmission and distribution (the Group also provides interconnect systems to the telecommunications, computer and automotive markets). It provides five topics: a general presentation of Areva, the strategic stakes for transmission and distribution by world-zone, economic and strategic stakes of business unit products, business unit systems and business unit automation. (A.L.B.)

  2. Year 2005. GRNC's appreciation of the dose estimates presented in the annual environmental monitoring report of Areva-NC La Hague facility. Third GRNC viewpoint. Detailed report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 'Groupe Radioecologie Nord Cotentin' (GRNC) has carried out a very thorough evaluation of the assessment of doses due to discharges from the Cap de la Hague nuclear site carried out by Areva NC, the site operators. The group has looked at all aspects of the assessment methods and data to ensure that they agree with the results presented in the 2005 annual environmental report of the operator. The computer tool, ACADIE, developed to assess the doses, has been used by the GRNC members to carry out their own calculations. This document comprises the detailed report of the GRNC and its synthesis. The detailed report includes: 1 - critical analysis of the 2005 source term, the data transmitted by Areva NC (status of atmospheric effluents, status of liquid effluents at sea, fuel data, presentation of the work progress of the Areva NC working group), the history of liquid and gaseous effluents between 1966 and 2005; 2 - detailed comparison between model and 2005 measurements; 3 - detail of the 2005 efficient dose calculations. (J.S.)

  3. Facilities removal working group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    This working group`s first objective is to identify major economic, technical, and regulatory constraints on operator practices and decisions relevant to offshore facilities removal. Then, the group will try to make recommendations as to regulatory and policy adjustments, additional research, or process improvements and/or technological advances, that may be needed to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of the removal process. The working group will focus primarily on issues dealing with Gulf of Mexico platform abandonments. In order to make the working group sessions as productive as possible, the Facilities Removal Working Group will focus on three topics that address a majority of the concerns and/or constraints relevant to facilities removal. The three areas are: (1) Explosive Severing and its Impact on Marine Life, (2) Pile and Conductor Severing, and (3) Deep Water Abandonments This paper will outline the current state of practice in the offshore industry, identifying current regulations and specific issues encountered when addressing each of the three main topics above. The intent of the paper is to highlight potential issues for panel discussion, not to provide a detailed review of all data relevant to the topic. Before each panel discussion, key speakers will review data and information to facilitate development and discussion of the main issues of each topic. Please refer to the attached agenda for the workshop format, key speakers, presentation topics, and panel participants. The goal of the panel discussions is to identify key issues for each of the three topics above. The working group will also make recommendations on how to proceed on these key issues.

  4. Annual report 2001. A (AREVA) for.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This annual report 2001, on the group Areva, provides data and information on the Areva emerges, overview of operations, sustainable development policy, research and development programs, nuclear power activities (front-end, reactors and services back-end divisions), components (connectors division and STMicroelectronics, human resources, share data and the financial report. (A.L.B.)

  5. Reference document 2001. A (AREVA) for.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This reference document 2001, on the group Areva, provides data and information on the Areva emerges, overview of operations, sustainable development policy, research and development programs, nuclear power activities (front-end, reactors and services back-end divisions), components (connectors division and STMicroelectronics, human resources, share data and financial information (financial report 2001, financial report first-half 2002). (A.L.B.)

  6. The 2003 essential. AREVA; L'essentiel 2003. AREVA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    This document presents the essential activities of the Areva Group, a world nuclear industry leader. This group proposes technological solutions to produce the nuclear energy and to transport the electric power. It develops connection systems for the telecommunication, the computers and the automotive industry. Key data on the program management, the sustainable development activities and the different divisions are provided. (A.L.B.)

  7. AREVA General Inspectorate 2010 Annual Report. Status of safety in nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After messages by different managers, this report proposes a description of the context for nuclear safety: group's policy in matters of nuclear safety and radiation protection, regulatory changes (in France, with respect to information, changes in administrative organization, overhaul of general technical regulations, international context). It describes the organizational changes which occurred within the company. It reports actions regarding transparency, briefly describes actions and principles aimed at improving safety, indicates and comments noteworthy nuclear events, discusses their assessment from a HOF (human and organizational factors) perspective, comments lessons learned from inspections, comments data regarding radiation protection and actions aimed at improving radiation protection. It discusses environmental impact issues. It addresses the different processes and factors which transversely appear in nuclear safety: safety management, human and organizational factors, safety in design, project management, and emergency management. Several specific risks are discussed: criticality control, nuclear materials safeguards, fire, spill prevention, transportation, radioactive waste, shutdown and dismantling, service operations, mining, and environmental liabilities. Document in French and in English

  8. Areva - 2011 Annual results; Areva - Resultats annuels 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marie, Patricia; Briand, Pauline; Michaut, Maxime; Scorbiac, Marie de; Repaire, Philippine du

    2012-03-01

    Areva's backlog established at 45.6 billion euros at the end of 2011, significantly increasing at the end of a year marked by the Fukushima accident, confirms the commercial dynamism of the group alongside its customers and reinforces the visibility on its future business level. In a difficult context, the slight decline in revenue in 2011 demonstrates the robustness of Areva's integrated model, resting mainly on recurring business generated in relation to Areva's customers' nuclear installed base, and benefiting from the development of Areva's renewable energies operations. Free operating cash flow before tax, although down over the whole year in 2011, improved in the second half, showing the first effects of Areva's stronger focus on cash generation and debt management. After the success of Areva's bond issue in September 2011, the Group's liquidity remains high at the end of 2011. The Areva teams are now dedicating all of their efforts to the deployment of the 'Action 2016' strategic action plan, which had already yielded its first positive results at the end of 2011, with an improvement in the cost structure of Areva's operations, an increase in order intake, and the launch of several disposals of minority interests. Summary of the 2011 financial results: - Backlog: euro 45.6 bn, +3.1% vs. 2010, i.e +6.7% over 3 months; - Revenue: euro 8.872 bn, i.e -2.6% vs. 2010; - Operating income: - euro 1.923 bn; - Net income attributable to equity owners of the parent: - euro 2.424 bn; - EBITDA: euro 1.068 bn ( euro 420 m excluding Siemens impact); - Free operating cash flow before tax: - euro 2.397 bn (- euro 1.366 bn excluding Siemens impacts), improvement over the second half; - Decrease in net debt of euro 124 m for the year; - Significant drop in general and administrative expenses, with a noticeable reduction between the first and the second half; - Launch of several disposals of minority interests

  9. Environmental, social, and corporate report 2012 - Cezus Jarrie (Areva)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CEZUS, an AREVA group subsidiary, is the global leader in the market for nuclear-grade zirconium. Zirconium is a metal used for fuel cladding, among other applications. CEZUS operates at six sites; the Jarrie site in the Isere department of France produces zirconium sponge. This document shows details of the CEZUS Jarrie facility and its 2012 initiatives on: consumption and waste management, risk management, environmental and safety management, social and corporate responsibilities

  10. AREVA annual results 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AREVA expanded its backlog and increased its revenues compared with 2008, on strong installed base business and dynamic major projects, fostering growth in operating income of 240 million euros. As announced previously, Areva is implementing a financing plan suited to its objectives of profitable growth. The plan was implemented successfully in 2009, including the conclusion of an agreement, under very satisfactory terms, to sell its Transmission and Distribution business for 4 billion euros, asset sales for more than 1.5 billion euros, and successful bond issues of 3 billion euros. The plan will continue in 2010 with a capital increase, the completion of asset disposals and cost reduction and continued operational performance improvement programs. Areva bolstered its Renewable Energies business segment by supplementing its offshore wind power and biomass businesses with the acquisition of Ausra, a California-based leader in concentrated solar power technology. Despite the sale of T and D, Areva is maintaining its financial performance outlook for 2012: 12% average annual revenue growth to 12 billion euros in 2012, double digit operating margin and substantially positive free operating cash flow. Annual results 2009: - For the group as a whole, including Transmission and Distribution: Backlog: euros 49.4 bn (+2.5%), Revenues: euros 14 bn (+6.4%), Operating income: euros 501 m (+20.1%); - Nuclear and Renewable Energies perimeter: Backlog: euros 43.3 bn (+1.8%), Strong revenue growth: +5.4% to euros 8.5 bn, Operating income before provision for the Finnish project in the first half of 2009: euros 647 m, Operating income: euros 97 m, for a euros 240 m increase from 2008; - Net income attributable to equity holders of the parent: euros 552 m, i.e. euros 15.59 per share; - Net debt: euros 6,193 m; - Pro-forma net debt, including net cash to be received from the sale of T and D in 2010: euros 3,022 m; - Dividend of euros 7.06 per share to be proposed during the Annual

  11. AREVA - 2013 Reference document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Reference Document contains information on the AREVA group's objectives, prospects and development strategies, as well as estimates of the markets, market shares and competitive position of the AREVA group. Content: 1 - Person responsible for the Reference Document; 2 - Statutory auditors; 3 - Selected financial information; 4 - Description of major risks confronting the company; 5 - Information about the issuer; 6 - Business overview; 7 - Organizational structure; 8 - Property, plant and equipment; 9 - Situation and activities of the company and its subsidiaries; 10 - Capital resources; 11 - Research and development programs, patents and licenses; 12 - Trend information; 13 - Profit forecasts or estimates; 14 - Management and supervisory bodies; 15 - Compensation and benefits; 16 - Functioning of the management and supervisory bodies; 17 - Human resources information; 18 - Principal shareholders; 19 - Transactions with related parties; 20 - Financial information concerning assets, financial positions and financial performance; 21 - Additional information; 22 - Major contracts; 23 - Third party information, statements by experts and declarations of interest; 24 - Documents on display; 25 - Information on holdings; Appendix 1: report of the supervisory board chairman on the preparation and organization of the board's activities and internal control procedures; Appendix 2: statutory auditors' reports; Appendix 3: environmental report; Appendix 4: non-financial reporting methodology and independent third-party report on social, environmental and societal data; Appendix 5: ordinary and extraordinary general shareholders' meeting; Appendix 6: values charter; Appendix 7: table of concordance of the management report; glossaries

  12. Annual report 2001. A (AREVA) for..; Rapport annuel 2001. A (AREVA) comme..

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    This annual report 2001, on the group Areva, provides data and information on the Areva emerges, overview of operations, sustainable development policy, research and development programs, nuclear power activities (front-end, reactors and services back-end divisions), components (connectors division and STMicroelectronics, human resources, share data and the financial report. (A.L.B.)

  13. Reference document 2001. A (AREVA) for..; Document de reference 2001. A (AREVA) comme..

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    This reference document 2001, on the group Areva, provides data and information on the Areva emerges, overview of operations, sustainable development policy, research and development programs, nuclear power activities (front-end, reactors and services back-end divisions), components (connectors division and STMicroelectronics, human resources, share data and financial information (financial report 2001, financial report first-half 2002). (A.L.B.)

  14. AREVA 2010 Reference document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After a presentation of the person responsible for this document, and of statutory auditors, this report proposes some selected financial information. Then, it addresses, presents and comments the different risk factors: risk management and coverage, legal risk, industrial and environmental risk, operational risk, risks related to major projects, liquidity and market risk, and other risk. Then, after a presentation of the issuer, it proposes a business overview (markets for nuclear and renewable energies, AREVA customers and suppliers, strategy, activities), a presentation of the organizational structure, a presentation of AREVA properties, plants and equipment (sites, environmental issues), an analysis and comment of the group's financial position and performance, a presentation of its capital resources, an overview of its research and development activities, programs, patents and licenses. It indicates profit forecast and estimates, presents the administrative, management and supervisory bodies, and compensation and benefits amounts, reports of the functioning of corporate bodies. It describes the human resource company policy, indicates the main shareholders and transactions with related parties. It proposes financial information concerning assets, financial positions and financial performance. This document contains its French and its English versions

  15. AREVA 2010 annual results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Areva's 44-billion euro backlog at the end of 2010 gives the group excellent visibility, enabling it to confirm its outlook for 2012: 12 billion euros in revenue, double-digit operating margin and significantly positive free operating cash flow. Revenue rose by 575 million euros in 2010, or 6.7%, in comparison to 2009 and operating income excluding particular items improved by 201 million euros, nearly 2 points of revenue. In the past two years, Areva has raised 7.1 billion euros and secured its liquidity to ensure its development. In 2011, Areva is going to simplify the group's capital structure by listing ordinary shares of AREVA. At that time, the group may launch the employee share-holding plan, something it has ardently sought for several years as a way for its employees to share in AREVA's growth. The consolidated backlog stood at 44.204 billion euros at December 31, 2010, up 2.0% compared with that at December 31, 2009. The group's consolidated revenue came to 9.104 billion euros in 2010, up 6.7% on a reported basis and 5.1% like-for-like compared with 2009. Excluding particular items, operating income rose by 1.9 point, going from 3.9% in 2009 to 5.8% in 2010, giving operating income of 532 million euros (331 million euros in 2009). Net income attributable to equity owners of the parent came to 883 million euros in 2010, an increase of 331 million euros compared with 2009. Operating cash flow before capex was 923 million euros, an increase of 548 million euros compared with 2009, when it was 375 million euros, due to the visible improvement in EBITDA and working capital requirement. The change in gross capex (excluding acquisitions) from 1.780 billion euros in 2009 to 1.966 billion euros in 2010 is due to the ramp-up of construction programs, particularly in Enrichment. In 2010, almost 60% of the group's capital spending was on sites in France. The acquisitions made in Renewable Energies in 2010 in the amount of 210 million euros (100% of Ausra and the

  16. Report on responsible growth. AREVA in 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    All over the world, AREVA supplies its customers with solutions for carbon-free power generation and electricity transmission and distribution. With its knowledge and expertise in these fields, the group has a leading role to play in meeting the world's energy needs. Ranked first in the global nuclear power industry, AREVA's unique integrated offering covers every stage of the fuel cycle, reactor design and construction, and related services. In addition, the group is expanding its operations in renewable energies. AREVA is also a world leader in electricity transmission and distribution and offers its customers a complete range of solutions for greater grid stability and energy efficiency. Sustainable development is a core component of the group's industrial strategy. Its 75,000 employees work every day to make AREVA a responsible industrial player that is helping to supply ever cleaner, safer and more economical energy to the greatest number of people. Sustainable development is a keystone of AREVA's industrial strategy for achieving growth that is profitable, socially responsible and respectful of the environment. To translate this choice into reality, AREVA integrates sustainable development into its management practices via a continuous improvement initiative revolving around ten commitments: customer satisfaction, financial performance, governance, community involvement, environmental protection, innovation, continuous improvement, commitment to employees, risk management and prevention, dialogue and consensus building. This document is Areva's 2008 report on responsible growth. After the Messages from the Chairman of the Supervisory Board and from the Chief Executive Officer, the report presents the Key data and Highlights of the period, the Corporate governance, the Organization of the group, the Share information and shareholder relations, the uranium reserves, the growing energy demand and the World's population demographic growth, Areva's actions to

  17. AREVA Technical Days (ATD) session 4: operations of the front-end division of the nuclear fuel cycle; AREVA Technical Days (ATD) session 4: les activites du pole Amont

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    These technical days organized by the Areva Group aims to explain the group activities in a technological and economic point of view, to provide an outlook of worldwide energy trends and challenges and to present each of their businesses in a synthetic manner. This fourth session deals with the strategic and financial significance of the Areva mining operations, the Areva chemistry business, the Areva enrichment business and the Areva fuel business. (A.L.B.)

  18. AREVA Technical Days (ATD) session 4: operations of the front-end division of the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    These technical days organized by the Areva Group aims to explain the group activities in a technological and economic point of view, to provide an outlook of worldwide energy trends and challenges and to present each of their businesses in a synthetic manner. This fourth session deals with the strategic and financial significance of the Areva mining operations, the Areva chemistry business, the Areva enrichment business and the Areva fuel business. (A.L.B.)

  19. Areva - 2008 results: yet another year of growth for AREVA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper summarizes the 2008 financial results of the Areva group: Backlog: 48.2 billion euros, up 21.1%; Revenue: 13.2 billion euros, up 10.4%; Operating income: - Operating income excluding provision on OL3 contract in Finland: 1,166 million euros, i.e. operating margin of 8.9%; - Additional provision on OL3 contract of 749 million euros; - Operating income: 417 million euros, i.e. operating margin of 3.2%. Net income attributable to equity holders of the parent: 589 million euros, i.e. euros 16.62 per share; Net debt of 3.45 billion euros before recognition of the SIEMENS put; Dividend of euros 7.05 to be proposed during the Annual General Meeting of Shareholders of April 30, 2009. After publication of these figures Siemens announced its decision to withdraw from AREVA NP

  20. Areva at September 30, 2015:

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After the phase of strategic choices and definition of competitiveness objectives, AREVA entered the phase of operational execution of its transformation plan. Despite a still depressed market environment, the Group is beginning to measure the first results of its efforts to restore its financial situation. Thanks to the actions undertaken, the cash consumption pace was sharply slowed down compared to what had been anticipated. In summary: Rise in revenue to euro 2.947 bn: +10.3% vs. September 2014 (+8.7% like for like); - Backlog of euro 31.595 bn; - Discontinued operations, including AREVA NP: - Revenue of euro 2.732 bn: -7.5% vs. September 2014, - Backlog of euro 12.872 bn. Progress on the transformation plan in the third quarter: - Social dialogue: signature of the group agreement on the employment plan and submittal of documents describing the group's reorganization plans to employee representation bodies as part of a job-saving plan; - Continued deployment of actions for operational performance; - Strategic partnership with EDF: finalization of due diligence for the sale of AREVA NP; - Decisions on capital increase taken before the end of 2015

  1. Areva - 2008 results: yet another year of growth for AREVA; Areva - Resultats 2008: une nouvelle annee de croissance pour AREVA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-02-15

    This paper summarizes the 2008 financial results of the Areva group: Backlog: 48.2 billion euros, up 21.1%; Revenue: 13.2 billion euros, up 10.4%; Operating income: - Operating income excluding provision on OL3 contract in Finland: 1,166 million euros, i.e. operating margin of 8.9%; - Additional provision on OL3 contract of 749 million euros; - Operating income: 417 million euros, i.e. operating margin of 3.2%. Net income attributable to equity holders of the parent: 589 million euros, i.e. euros 16.62 per share; Net debt of 3.45 billion euros before recognition of the SIEMENS put; Dividend of euros 7.05 to be proposed during the Annual General Meeting of Shareholders of April 30, 2009. After publication of these figures Siemens announced its decision to withdraw from AREVA NP.

  2. Areva. Half-year 2015 results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document presents the financial statements of Areva Group for the period ended June 30, 2015. During the first half, AREVA made determining decisions in refocusing on its core business, the nuclear fuel cycle direction. The group has announced an ambitious competitiveness plan, is engaged in strong social dialogue with its social partners, and has worked to improve the management of its large projects, which up to now have weighed heavily on its financial trajectory. It pursued its strategic roadmap for its refocusing and the redefinition of the partnership with EDF. The agreements found with EDF represent very significant progress. The group also worked on its financing plan whose aim is to allow AREVA to refinance its mid-term needs on the markets. Content: Key figures, Highlights of the period, Transformation plan (Performance plan, Strategic roadmap, Financing plan, Financial outlook)

  3. AREVA in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    China has a great need for secure, safe, and economic energy supplies that combat the greenhouse effect and global warming. Since January 2002, China, the most heavily populated country with more than 1.3 billion inhabitants in a territory of 9.5 million km2 (17 times larger than France), has a nuclear capacity of 9 GWe with 11 nuclear plants on line. Forecasts of electricity consumption report a need for 900 to 1,000 GWe per year through 2020, and at this time the country's objective is to increase nuclear generated electricity from 1% to 4% of its total output. This means a need for additional 30 GWe, which is the equivalent of twenty 1,500 MWe reactors. In addition to nuclear power, China is pushing renewable energy. With the passage of the 2005 Renewable Energy Law, China's government imposed a national renewable energy requirement that is expected to boost the use of renewable energy capacity from 10 to 12 percent by 2020, up from 3% in 2003. This law requires power operators to buy electricity from alternative energy providers and gives economic incentives to these providers. Consequently, China is expanding its interests in renewable energy sources including wind and bio-energies, among others. It is in this context that AREVA, a world expert in energy, creates and offers solutions to generate, transmit, and distribute electricity for China. Based on its long experience and global presence, AREVA has become the worldwide leader for nuclear energy in the areas of construction, equipment, and services for nuclear power plants, and for the whole nuclear fuel cycle. AREVA is also a world leader in electrical power-grid equipment and systems. This document presents: China's need for energy; the Sources of China's energy mix; the challenges of China's nuclear program; AREVA's action in supporting China's ambitious nuclear program; the strong opportunities in renewable energy; and the high potential market for AREVA's T and D Division

  4. AREVA's nuclear reactors portfolio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A reasonable assumption for the estimated new build market for the next 25 years is over 340 GWe net. The number of prospect countries is growing almost each day. To address this new build market, AREVA is developing a comprehensive portfolio of reactors intended to meet a wide range of power requirements and of technology choices. The EPR reactor is the flagship of the fleet. Intended for large power requirements, the four first EPRs are being built in Finland, France and China. Other countries and customers are in view, citing just two examples: the Usa where the U.S. EPR has been selected as the technology of choice by several U.S utilities; and the United Kingdom where the Generic Design Acceptance process of the EPR design submitted by AREVA and EDF is well under way, and where there is a strong will to have a plant on line in 2017. For medium power ranges, the AREVA portfolio includes a boiling water reactor and a pressurized water reactor which both offer all of the advantages of an advanced plant design, with excellent safety performance and competitive power generation cost: -) KERENA (1250+ MWe), developed in collaboration with several European utilities, and in particular with Eon; -) ATMEA 1 (1100+ MWe), a 3-loop evolutionary PWR which is being developed by AREVA and Mitsubishi. AREVA is also preparing the future and is deeply involved into Gen IV concepts. It has developed the ANTARES modular HTR reactor (pre-conceptual design completed) and is building upon its vast Sodium Fast Reactor experience to take part into the development of the next prototype. (author)

  5. AREVA 2010 annual results; AREVA resultats annuels 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-07-01

    Areva's 44-billion euro backlog at the end of 2010 gives the group excellent visibility, enabling it to confirm its outlook for 2012: 12 billion euros in revenue, double-digit operating margin and significantly positive free operating cash flow. Revenue rose by 575 million euros in 2010, or 6.7%, in comparison to 2009 and operating income excluding particular items improved by 201 million euros, nearly 2 points of revenue. In the past two years, Areva has raised 7.1 billion euros and secured its liquidity to ensure its development. In 2011, Areva is going to simplify the group's capital structure by listing ordinary shares of AREVA. At that time, the group may launch the employee share-holding plan, something it has ardently sought for several years as a way for its employees to share in AREVA's growth. The consolidated backlog stood at 44.204 billion euros at December 31, 2010, up 2.0% compared with that at December 31, 2009. The group's consolidated revenue came to 9.104 billion euros in 2010, up 6.7% on a reported basis and 5.1% like-for-like compared with 2009. Excluding particular items, operating income rose by 1.9 point, going from 3.9% in 2009 to 5.8% in 2010, giving operating income of 532 million euros (331 million euros in 2009). Net income attributable to equity owners of the parent came to 883 million euros in 2010, an increase of 331 million euros compared with 2009. Operating cash flow before capex was 923 million euros, an increase of 548 million euros compared with 2009, when it was 375 million euros, due to the visible improvement in EBITDA and working capital requirement. The change in gross capex (excluding acquisitions) from 1.780 billion euros in 2009 to 1.966 billion euros in 2010 is due to the ramp-up of construction programs, particularly in Enrichment. In 2010, almost 60% of the group's capital spending was on sites in France. The acquisitions made in Renewable Energies in 2010 in the amount of 210 million euros

  6. AREVA fatigue concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modern state-of-the-art fatigue monitoring approaches gain in importance as part of the ageing management of nuclear power plant components. Consequently, lots of operators have to deal with demanding security requirements to ensure the safe operation of power plants. AREVA disposes of a long tradition in the development of fatigue and structural health monitoring solutions. Nuclear power plant applications require the qualified assessment of measured thermo-mechanical loads. The core challenge is the identification and qualified processing of realistic load-time histories. The related methodological requirements will be explained in detail within this contribution. In terms of the nuclear industry, the ageing management of power plant components is nowadays a main issue for all actors: states, regulatory agencies, operators, designers or suppliants. As regards fatigue assessment of nuclear components stringent safety standards imply the consideration of new parameters in the framework of the fatigue analysis process: new design fatigue curves, consideration of environmental fatigue (EAF) parameters and stratification effects. In this general context AREVA developed the integral approach AREVA Fatigue Concept (AFC) with new tools and methods in order to live up to operators’ expectations: Simplified Fatigue Estimation (SFE), Fast Fatigue Evaluation (FFE) and Detailed Fatigue Check (DFC). Based on real measured thermal loads (FAMOSi Local Measurements) and superposed mechanical loads the Fast Fatigue Evaluation (FFE) process allows a highly automated and reliable data processing to evaluate cumulative usage factors of mechanical components. Calculation and management of results are performed within the software frontend FAMOSi, thus impact of operating cycles on components in terms of stress and fatigue usage can be taken into account in order to plan optimized decisions relating to the plant operation or maintenance activities. The paper mainly describes the

  7. AREVA invests 610 million euro in new uranium conversion plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AREVA today announced the launch of the Comurhex II project which will see the group build new uranium conversion facilities on the Malvesi site in Narbonne and Tricastin. Through this 610 million euro investment, AREVA aims to maintain its position as world no. 1 for conversion within a context of global nuclear energy. COMURHEX II integrates technological innovations from major R and D programs and return of experience from processes in operation for over forty years. Nuclear safety and reducing the impact on the environment were top priorities when designing the project. These future facilities will also lead to major savings of water and energy consumption and reduce effluents. The groundwork of the Comurhex II project has taken 150,000 hours of engineering over the past three years. Four hundred people will work on the site which will be launched in summer 2007. First industrial production is scheduled for 2012, based on 15,000 metric tons of uranium per year. This figure may be increased to 21,000 tons to meet market requirements

  8. Fuel Services Germany - AREVA NP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langenberger, Jan; Seidel, Jana [AREVA, AREVA NP, P.O Box 11 09, 91001 Erlangen (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    AREVA NP has over 30 years of nuclear fuel inspection and repair experience. Our service staff is trained regularly and holds a long lasting experience in their field of work. Our services comprise all activities within examinations of lead test assemblies, all necessary inspections and tests of fuel assemblies and other core components during an outage, reconstitution of fuel assemblies for further use in the reactor and activities within the disposal of fuel assemblies and core components. Furthermore we deliver facilities and systems that are necessary for the above mentioned services. These are in particular facilities for inspections, sipping, repair and for disposal (e.g. conditioning equipment, facility for encapsulation of leaking fuel rods). Continuous research and development guarantee that the applied facilities always comply with the latest state of the art. They are suitable for a variety of fuel assembly designs of AREVA's and external supplier's latest and conventional technology. The facilities are applicable in different BWR-, PWR and VVER nuclear power plants. Inspections in PWR- and BWR Plants: - Measurements with contact and contact less measuring methods of fuel assemblies, fuel rods, fuel channels and other core components; - High-definition video inspections; - Mast-, In-core- and Box-sipping to detect defective fuel assemblies; - Support (e.g. measurements on site) for post irradiation examinations; - Sampling of material (e.g. taking CRUD or material probes) and fuel rod preparation for hot cell examination. Repair in PWR- and BWR Plants: - Exchange of defective fuel rods of a fuel assembly for further use in the reactor and preparation of the fuel assembly or defective fuel rod for disposal; - Reconstitution of fuel assemblies with damaged structure parts (spacer, springs, upper-and lower end fitting). We offer products that meet the requirements of pressure-tightness under water (e. g. for use in the fuel storage pool), that are

  9. Areva - First half 2008 sales revenue; Areva - Chiffre d'affaires du 1. semestre 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-07-01

    As of June 30, 2008, AREVA's backlog stood at 38.1 billion euro, for 13.6% growth since June 30, 2007, with 9.9% growth in Nuclear and 40.7% growth in Transmission and Distribution. In Nuclear, the backlog came to 32.3 billion euro as of the end of June 2008. In the front end of the cycle, AREVA signed multi-year contracts in the first half of the year with Japanese and American utilities and with EDF, for a combined total of more than 1 billion euro. Of note in the back end of the cycle is the contract AREVA signed with the U.S. Department of Energy to build a MOX fuel fabrication facility. In Transmission and Distribution, the backlog came to 5.8 billion euro as of the end of period. A total of 3.2 billion euro in orders was booked in the first half, an increase of 20.0% year-on-year. The division won several important contracts, most notably a contract with Dubai Electricity (more than 130 million euro), a contract with National Grid and RTE for the renovation of the IFA 2000 grid interconnection between France and Great Britain (more than 60 million euro), and, in the industrial field, a contract with Rio Tinto Alcan (close to 65 million euro). The group cleared revenue of 6.2 billion euro in the first half of 2008, up 14.8% (+16.4% like-for-like) compared with the first half of 2007. Sales outside France were up 14.3% to 4.2 billion euro or 68.6% of total sales; the latter were stable compared with the first half of 2007. All businesses were up, with growth of 15.9% in Nuclear operations (+19.1% LFL1) - particularly in Reactors and Services (+31.3% LFL1) - and 13.0% growth in Transmission and Distribution operations (+12.0% LFL T 1). Foreign exchange had a negative impact of 155 million euro, primarily due to the change in the U.S. dollar in relation to the euro. Changes in the consolidated group had a positive impact of 97 million euro, mainly reflecting acquisitions in the Transmission and Distribution division and in Renewable Energies. Sales revenue

  10. Areva in 2007, growth and profitability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This annual report 2007, presents the AREVA Group activities during the year. It contents the messages of the Chairman and Chief executive officer, the solutions offered by the group for CO2 free power generation and reliable electricity transmission and distribution, the governance, the financial performance, the innovation, the environmental protection, the risk management and prevention, the audit's report and key data for the year 2007. (A.L.B.)

  11. Areva at March 31, 2016

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the first quarter of 2016, AREVA generated consolidated revenue of 826 million euros, a decrease of 0.8% (-2.2% like for like) compared with the same period in 2015, due in particular to the schedule of uranium deliveries. Foreign exchange had a positive impact of 12 million euros over the period. At March 31, 2016, the group's backlog reached 33.6 billion euros, up sharply compared to December 31, 2015 (29 billion euros), and represented eight years of revenue. It reflects in particular multi-year commercial agreements signed with EDF in early 2016. The order intake for the first quarter of 2016 totaled 6.1 billion euros, a strong increase in relation to the first quarter of 2015 (0.3 billion euros)

  12. Areva in Niger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-02-01

    Niger is the second poorest country in the world but it has natural resources underground in the form of uranium ores deposits. This uranium is currently mined by two companies incorporated under Nigerian law: Somair and Cominak, operated by the principal shareholder Areva (through its subsidiary Cogema). After a presentation of Somair and Cominak key figures, this document details the working conditions and radiological protection, the environmentally friendly operations, the production traceability, the local economic development, the strengthening of the health care system and the development of the infrastructure. (A.L.B.)

  13. Areva in Niger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niger is the second poorest country in the world but it has natural resources underground in the form of uranium ores deposits. This uranium is currently mined by two companies incorporated under Nigerian law: Somair and Cominak, operated by the principal shareholder Areva (through its subsidiary Cogema). After a presentation of Somair and Cominak key figures, this document details the working conditions and radiological protection, the environmentally friendly operations, the production traceability, the local economic development, the strengthening of the health care system and the development of the infrastructure. (A.L.B.)

  14. Areva 2009 responsible growth report: more energy, less CO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document is the 2009 annual responsible growth report of AREVA which presents itself as having consolidated its leadership position in its original business of nuclear power while expanding considerably in renewable energies (wind, solar, bio-energies and hydrogen/storage) to become a leading provider of solutions for carbon-free power generation. The main chapters of the report are: the group and its strategy, Areva's nuclear power solutions (is nuclear a sustainable energy source?, supply, technological excellence, safety, recycling and waste, acceptability, non-proliferation), Areva's renewable energy solutions (how much of the energy mix should be renewable?, rising demand, competitiveness and efficiency, responsible development), Areva's human resources (gender balance, health and safety, diversity and opportunity, hiring and training). Data and balanced scorecard for sustainable development are also given

  15. AREVA net income: 649 million euros

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-03-15

    This document presents the financial statements for 2006 of Areva group: net income: 649 million euros; backlog up by 24.6% to 25.6 billion euros; steady growth of sales revenue: + 7.3%1 to 10.863 billion euros; operating income of 407 million euros: excellent divisional performance and constitution of a significant provision for the OL3 project in Finland; dividend proposed to Annual General Meeting of Shareholders: 8.46 euros per share.

  16. AREVA net income: 649 million euros

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document presents the financial statements for 2006 of Areva group: net income: 649 million euros; backlog up by 24.6% to 25.6 billion euros; steady growth of sales revenue: + 7.3%1 to 10.863 billion euros; operating income of 407 million euros: excellent divisional performance and constitution of a significant provision for the OL3 project in Finland; dividend proposed to Annual General Meeting of Shareholders: 8.46 euros per share

  17. Areva - 2012 Annual Report. Forward looking energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After an interview of the Chief Executive Officer, a presentation of the company's governance and organization, and a brief overview of its strategy (with its five pillars: safety and security, operation and customers, economic competitiveness, technology and innovation, people), this report indicates and presents the various projects across the world. It outlines the main activities and objectives: preservation of nuclear and occupational safety, service to customer over the long term, fuel supply security, expertise, sustainability of nuclear power, contribution to the energy mix of tomorrow. It outlines the belief of Areva in the future of nuclear and renewable energies (brief presentations of activities and examples in different countries and in different domains), describes how Areva offers comprehensive solutions for power generation with less carbon, and indicates the distribution of revenues by business group and by geographic area. It comments a year of mining operations, the activities concerning the front end of the fuel cycle, those related to reactors and nuclear services, to recycling (fuel recycling, site dismantling and reuse, material storage and disposal), to the booming business of renewable energies, to engineering services. The report proposes some key figures concerning greenhouse gas emissions, environmental footprint, occupational safety, and radiation protection within the group. It outlines the importance of innovation in terms of investment, personnel and patents. It comments the activities related to nuclear safety and to the control of the environment. It outlines the human resource policy, evokes the activity of the Areva foundation. A summarized presentation of financial statements is given

  18. Areva - 2011 Reference document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After having indicated the person responsible of this document and the legal account auditors, and provided some financial information, this document gives an overview of the different risk factors existing in the company: law risks, industrial and environmental risks, operational risks, risks related to large projects, market and liquidity risks. Then, after having recalled the history and evolution of the company and the evolution of its investments over the last five years, it proposes an overview of Areva's activities on the markets of nuclear energy and renewable energies, of its clients and suppliers, of its strategy, of the activities of its different departments. Other information are provided: company's flow chart, estate properties (plants, equipment), an analysis of its financial situation, its research and development policy, the present context, profit previsions or estimations, management organization and operation

  19. AREVA: Growing Engineers through Education

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Liz [AREVA Inc, 3315 Old Forest Road, 24501 Lynchburg - Virginia (United States)

    2008-07-01

    The demand for engineers is of global proportions, and the need for engineers at AREVA has never been greater. The availability of qualified resources is of strategic concern to the company as it meets the energy challenges of the 21. century. The nuclear energy company will require up to 800 additional engineers by 2011 to support the growth of the business, especially in the area of new nuclear plants. Competition for college graduates at engineering schools is intense and talented students are moving away from central Virginia to pursue degrees at engineering universities. The cost to recruit new engineers from other areas is increasing. In response to these challenges, AREVA and area businesses, the University of Virginia (U.Va.) and the Central Virginia Community College (CVCC) have formed a partnership to provide undergraduate engineering education at the two-year college in Lynchburg. The program allows students to earn an engineering associate's degree at CVCC and then complete their bachelor of science through U.Va.'s School of Engineering and Applied Science. Students can earn a prestigious engineering degree from U.Va. while still in Lynchburg. Nearly 150 students are in the program, including 50 AREVA employees. Flexible courses are arranged for AREVA employees who work at nuclear power plants during outages. AREVA also sponsors interns who learn on the job in close mentor-ships with engineers while studying engineering. These students have the advantage of getting to know AREVA and can work effectively part time during studies and immediately upon graduation as an engineer. Students with family ties prefer to stay in central Virginia, and the strong bonds they form with AREVA during their studies increase loyalty to the company. AREVA is 'Growing Its Own Engineers' starting in middle and high school and through this unique college program in order to meet tomorrow's demand for resources. (author)

  20. AREVA: Growing Engineers through Education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The demand for engineers is of global proportions, and the need for engineers at AREVA has never been greater. The availability of qualified resources is of strategic concern to the company as it meets the energy challenges of the 21. century. The nuclear energy company will require up to 800 additional engineers by 2011 to support the growth of the business, especially in the area of new nuclear plants. Competition for college graduates at engineering schools is intense and talented students are moving away from central Virginia to pursue degrees at engineering universities. The cost to recruit new engineers from other areas is increasing. In response to these challenges, AREVA and area businesses, the University of Virginia (U.Va.) and the Central Virginia Community College (CVCC) have formed a partnership to provide undergraduate engineering education at the two-year college in Lynchburg. The program allows students to earn an engineering associate's degree at CVCC and then complete their bachelor of science through U.Va.'s School of Engineering and Applied Science. Students can earn a prestigious engineering degree from U.Va. while still in Lynchburg. Nearly 150 students are in the program, including 50 AREVA employees. Flexible courses are arranged for AREVA employees who work at nuclear power plants during outages. AREVA also sponsors interns who learn on the job in close mentor-ships with engineers while studying engineering. These students have the advantage of getting to know AREVA and can work effectively part time during studies and immediately upon graduation as an engineer. Students with family ties prefer to stay in central Virginia, and the strong bonds they form with AREVA during their studies increase loyalty to the company. AREVA is 'Growing Its Own Engineers' starting in middle and high school and through this unique college program in order to meet tomorrow's demand for resources. (author)

  1. T and D on sale, Areva on punishment; T and D a la vente, Areva a la peine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maincent, G

    2009-05-15

    Areva group, the world leader of the nuclear industry, is looking for 5 billion euros to finance its investments. However, the French government which owns 90% of the group, mainly through the CEA, is not willing to supply this financial help. Therefore, about 40% of Areva group's turnover could change hands soon. In fact, the French government has asked Areva to consider the selling of its daughter company T and D (Transmission and Distribution) which is one of the major poles of the group's activity. Thanks to T and D, Areva can propose a complete range of products, services and systems from the low- to the extra-high voltage, and can be present on other energy markets, from the conventional to the renewable power generation. Already weakened by the departure of Siemens, Areva, without T and D would lose its full power in front of competitors like GE-Hitachi, Toshiba-Westinghouse or Rosatom-Siemens. (J.S.)

  2. AREVA and sustainable development. 2002 report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The performance indicators in this report reflect the major sustainable development impacts and challenges that Areva is facing as a group due to the very nature of its operations. They chose the calendar year as reporting period, from January 1 to December 31. This report covers all of the group operations in France and abroad. This report presents an overview of the major financial, social and environmental challenges facing the group. This report is a companion document to the annual activity report. (A.L.B.)

  3. Areva as of December 31, 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 2011, AREVA's consolidated revenue came to 8.872 billion euros, down slightly (-2.6%) compared with 2010 (-1.2% like for like). The decrease in revenue in nuclear operations was partially offset by significant growth in the renewable energies business. Foreign exchange and changes in the scope of consolidation had respectively a negative impact of 113 million euros and 16 million euros over the period. Revenue totaled 2.922 billion euros in the fourth quarter of 2011, stable compared with the fourth quarter of 2010 (-0.5% on a reported basis and -0.5% like for like). Foreign exchange had a negligible impact during the period. Led by nuclear operations, the group's backlog was 45.6 billion euros at December 31, 2011, up 3.1% year on year and 6.7% in relation to September 30, 2011. Order cancellations since Fukushima were limited to 464 million euros as of December 31, 2011. In accordance with the requirements of IFRS 8, AREVA's business segment information is presented for each operating Business Group (BG), which is the level of information examined by the group's governance bodies. Subsequent to the establishment of a subsidiary combining all of the group's mining operations, data for the Mining Business Group are now reported separately from those of the Front End Business Group. Data used for comparisons with 2010 were restated to reflect this new organization. The business segment information therefore corresponds to AREVA's five operating Business Groups: Mining, Front End, Reactors and Services, Back End and Renewable Energies

  4. AREVA in Mongolia - Press kit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mongolia is going through a crucial period in its history and setting up a strategic policy for uranium. The choices that are being made will affect the country and its future. Mongolia, since the mid-2000's, has benefited from significant mining development that has nourished the strong growth of the country. The giant Oyu Tolgoi (gold and copper) and Tavan Tolgoi (coal) deposits are the symbols of this mining potential. Uranium in particular has a major strategic role. The exploration programmes have revealed the presence of exploitable resources. On 26 February 2013, the Professional Council of Mineral Resources with the Ministry of Mines officially classified the Zoovch Ovoo deposit's with more than 50 000 tons of uranium. Following classification of the deposit of Dulaan Uul in 2011, the Zoovch Ovoo classification makes Mongolia officially one of the top 10 countries with the largest uranium resources. Mongolia has set about making the uranium industry a centrepiece of its strategy and its policy of independence. This new approach is founded in the Nuclear Energy Act adopted in the summer of 2009. The Mongolian State wants to create a uranium industry that makes Mongolia a nuclear fuel supplier for the Asian market. The choice of partners with whom the country associates to mine the uranium deposits is therefore important. Agreements have notably entered into with France, through AREVA which is a public company, as well as with Russia, China, Japan and India. AREVA has been present in Mongolia since 1997. AREVA is today represented in Mongolia by AREVA Mongol, its 100% subsidiary. AREVA Mongol carries out its exploration activities through Cogegobi and will manage its mining licences through AREVA Mines LLC. AREVA holds several exploration licences in Mongolia covering over 9,000 km2 in the provinces of Dornogobi and Sukbaatar, where COGEGOBI is conducting its drilling programmes. This first phase has led to the first project-development steps (hydrogeological

  5. AREVA Business and Strategy overview April, 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document is a series of slides presenting AREVA's activities in the framework of CO2-free power generation: 2005-2009 Group Performance; 2010-2012 Development Plan (Build 1/3 of the new nuclear generating capacity, Secure the fuel cycle for current and future customers, Expand renewable energies offering, Ensure strong profitable growth in the T and D Division); Performances and objectives by division (Front-End, Mines and Enrichment, Reactors and Service, renewable energies, Back-End); latest key financial results; Appendices (Financial, Nuclear power, Mining business details, Conversion/Enrichment/Fuel business details, Reactors and Services business details, Back-End business details, Renewable business details)

  6. Areva in China - Press kit April 2013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    increasingly key market for the AREVA Group. AREVA, which is focused on and committed to both nuclear and renewable energies, supports the Chinese utilities to reach the ambitious targets set by their government. This document summarizes the present activities of Areva in China: 1 - More than 30 years of cooperation with China: Key Dates; AREVA Group in China and partnerships with the Chinese Nuclear Industry; 2 - Chinese energy and policies: Economy and Energy in China, Nuclear energy in China, Overview of the Chinese nuclear fleet, Renewable energies in China; 3 - Activities in China: Mining, Front-End, Reactors and Services, Back-End, Renewable Energies; 4 - Taishan 1 and 2 EPRTM project: General Description, Scope of AREVA, AREVA Supply Chain, Key Milestones, Progress of Taishan 1 and 2, at the end of 2012

  7. AREVA and sustainable development. 2002 report; AREVA et le developpement durable. Rapport 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-07-01

    The performance indicators in this report reflect the major sustainable development impacts and challenges that Areva is facing as a group due to the very nature of its operations. They chose the calendar year as reporting period, from January 1 to December 31. This report covers all of the group operations in France and abroad. This report presents an overview of the major financial, social and environmental challenges facing the group. This report is a companion document to the annual activity report. (A.L.B.)

  8. Areva as of December 31, 2011; Areva au 31 decembre 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marie, Patricia; Briand, Pauline; Michaut, Maxime; Scorbiac, Marie de; Repaire, Philippine du

    2012-01-26

    In 2011, AREVA's consolidated revenue came to 8.872 billion euros, down slightly (-2.6%) compared with 2010 (-1.2% like for like). The decrease in revenue in nuclear operations was partially offset by significant growth in the renewable energies business. Foreign exchange and changes in the scope of consolidation had respectively a negative impact of 113 million euros and 16 million euros over the period. Revenue totaled 2.922 billion euros in the fourth quarter of 2011, stable compared with the fourth quarter of 2010 (-0.5% on a reported basis and -0.5% like for like). Foreign exchange had a negligible impact during the period. Led by nuclear operations, the group's backlog was 45.6 billion euros at December 31, 2011, up 3.1% year on year and 6.7% in relation to September 30, 2011. Order cancellations since Fukushima were limited to 464 million euros as of December 31, 2011. In accordance with the requirements of IFRS 8, AREVA's business segment information is presented for each operating Business Group (BG), which is the level of information examined by the group's governance bodies. Subsequent to the establishment of a subsidiary combining all of the group's mining operations, data for the Mining Business Group are now reported separately from those of the Front End Business Group. Data used for comparisons with 2010 were restated to reflect this new organization. The business segment information therefore corresponds to AREVA's five operating Business Groups: Mining, Front End, Reactors and Services, Back End and Renewable Energies

  9. Areva 2007 results: accelerated growth and significantly improved profitability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The AREVA group recorded accelerated growth and increased profitability in 2007, meeting both of its objectives for the year. The group made strategic inroads in fast growing markets. AREVA's integrated model met with record success in China, where GGNPC acquired two EPR nuclear islands in a combined order including both the reactors and the fuel, and the creation of a joint venture in engineering. Its T and D division was awarded the largest contract of its history in Qatar, making it the leader in a region where T and D was not even present a few years ago. For more than three years, AREVA has built up its capacity to meet surging demand in the nuclear power and T and D markets through an active policy of research and development and by capitalizing on the diversity and strength of its partnerships. Areva hired 8,600 people in 2006 and 11,500 people in 2007; this represents an investment in recruitment, training and integration of approximately euro 200 million per year. For 2008, the group foresees a further increase in its backlog, sales revenue and operating income. The Areva Group financial statements for 2007 are summarized below: - Backlog: euro 39.8 billion, up 55%; - Sales revenue: euro 11.9 billion, up 9.8% (up 10.4% like-for-like); - Operating income: euro 751 million, i.e. 6.3% operating margin, up 2.6 points compared with 2006; - Net income attributable to equity holders of the parent: euro 743 million (euro 20.95 per share), up from euro 649 million in 2006 (euro 18.31 per share); - Net debt: euro 1.954 billion, linked to the acquisition of UraMin; - Dividend: euro 6.77, to be proposed to the Annual General Meeting of Shareholders convening on April 17, 2008

  10. AREVA: Operating performance shows distinct improvement; Results heavily impacted by the cost of remedial measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 2015 results illustrate the progress AREVA made in 2015 and open up favorable prospects for 2016 and the following years in view of its fundamentals. The group's competitiveness plan had a very positive impact on its costs and cash, despite the heavy net loss situation which continues and in a market environment that remained difficult in 2015. Half of this loss of 2 billion Euro is due to additional provisions for OL3 and half to provisions for restructuring and impairment related to market conditions. Concerning the group's liquidity, 2016 is funded and the capital increase which will be launched in the coming months will enable AREVA to gradually regain the group's positive profile. A new phase awaits the Group in 2016 with clarity and confidence in the implementation of the restructuring announced in 2015 and in particular the autonomy of AREVA NP and the creation of New AREVA

  11. Environmental, social, and corporate report 2012 - Cezus Rugles (Areva)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CEZUS, a subsidiary of AREVA, is the global leader in the zirconium market, the metal used, among other things, for fuel assembly tube cladding in the heart of nuclear reactors. CEZUS's operations are distributed over six sites: the Rugles site manufactures flat products originated from the pilgering of rectangular billets. This document shows details of the CEZUS Rugles facility and its 2012 initiatives on: consumption and waste management, risk management, environmental and safety management, social and corporate responsibilities

  12. Environmental, social, and corporate report 2010 - Cezus Ugine (Areva)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CEZUS, a subsidiary of AREVA, is the global leader in the market for zirconium, the metal used, among other things, for nuclear fuel cladding. CEZUS's operations are distributed over six sites. The site in Ugine handles production of ingots and transformation of zirconium, titanium, tantalum, and hafnium into semi-finished products. This document shows details of the CEZUS Ugine facility and its 2010 initiatives on: consumption and waste management, risk management, environmental and safety management, social and corporate responsibilities

  13. Areva half-year report june 30, 2006; Areva rapport semestriel 30 juin 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-07-01

    This document is the half-year financial report of the Areva group for 2006. It presents: 1 - Highlights of the period; 2 - Key data: Summary data, Segment reporting, Backlog, Income statement, Review by business division, Cash flow, Balance sheet data; 3 - Outlook; 4 - Events subsequent to the half-year end; 5 - Consolidated financial statements: Statutory auditors' report on the interim consolidated financial statements for the period January 1, 2006 to June 30, 2006, Consolidated income statement, Consolidated balance sheet, Consolidated cash flow statement, Consolidated statement of changes in equity, Segment reporting, Notes to the consolidated financial statements.

  14. Areva half-year report June 30, 2008; Areva rapport semestriel 30 juin 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-07-01

    This document is the half-year financial report of the Areva group for 2008. It presents: 1 - the highlights of the period: key data (Summary data, Segment reporting, Backlog, Income statement, Review by division, Cash flow, Balance sheet data); Outlook; 2 - the events subsequent to half-year closing; 3 - the consolidated financial statements: Statutory Auditors' report on half-year 2008 information for the period January 1, 2008 to June 30, 2008, Consolidated income statement, Consolidated balance sheet, Consolidated cash flow statement, Consolidated statement of change in equity, Segment reporting, Notes to the consolidated financial statements for the period ending June 30, 2008.

  15. AREVA in 2007, growth and profitability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document is the 2007 activity report of the Areva group, the nuclear division of which is Number 1 worldwide in the front end of the nuclear cycle, in pressurized water reactors (in terms of installed capacity), and in the treatment and recycling of used nuclear fuel. The Transmission and Distribution division is Number 1 worldwide in market management software and grid management software, number 2 in high voltage products, and number 3 in medium voltage products. Content: Message from the Chairman of the Supervisory Board; Message from the Chief Executive Officer; Key data; 2007 highlights; Corporate governance; Organization of the group; Share information and shareholder relations; Solutions for CO2-free power generation; Solutions for reliable electricity transmission and distribution; Governance; Continuous improvement; Financial performance; Innovation; Customer satisfaction; Commitment to employees; Environmental protection; Risk management and prevention; Dialogue and consensus building; Community involvement; Auditors' report; Reporting methodology; Data verified in 2007; Glossary; and 'to learn more' references

  16. AREVA first half 2007 sales revenue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The AREVA group's backlog as of June 30, 2007 was euros 33.5 billion, up 31% compared with that of December 31, 2006. On average, the Group's backlog increased by more than 20% annually over the last three years. It is now at the highest level since AREVA was established in 2001. All divisions contributed to this performance: - The Front End division signed in particular a major enrichment contract with KHNP (South Korea), a fuel supply contract with EDF covering the 2008-2012 period and other significant contracts with Japanese and Swedish utilities. - The Reactors and Services division added the Flamanville 3 EPR, ordered by EDF, to the backlog. Flamanville 3 is AREVA's 100. reactor order. - The Back End division also concluded a major contract with Sogin to treat used fuel stored at Italian nuclear sites. - The Transmission and Distribution division continued to record strong growth. New orders were up 24% compared with the first half of 2006 (+25.1% like-for-like). Important contracts were signed in the Middle East, Russia and with large industrial users of electricity. First half 2007 sales revenue was up 6.7% (+6.4% like-for-like) to euros 5373 million, compared with euros 5036 million for the first half of 2006. Major developments in the first half of 2007 include: - Sales revenue was down 2.8% to euros 1342 million in the Front End division (-3.6% like-for- like) due to uneven distribution of deliveries in the Fuel business unfavorable during the period. This timing issue has no impact on projected annual growth. The division continues to benefit from a gradual price increase for long-term uranium supply contracts. - Sales revenue was up 4.8% to euros 1154 million in the Reactors and Services division (+3% like-for-like). The Services business unit, especially, was a major contributor to growth on all its markets after a 2006 fiscal year marked by a weak demand. The start of construction of a second EPR reactor for EDF, Flamanville 3, also contributed to

  17. Areva - 2014 Half-year results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The group posted a net loss in the first half of the year. This is the consequence of losses recorded in renewable operations, additional project-related provisions, asset write-downs and a nuclear market environment that has still deteriorated. Areva's backlog has strengthened thanks to the signing of the agreement through 2020 with EDF for used fuel treatment and MOX fuel production. Though it has a short-term adverse impact on the group's results, it provides these operations with long-term visibility and strengthens our strategic partnership with EDF. Despite a decline in revenue that was greater than anticipated, the group achieved positive free operating cash flow, an increase compared with the first half of 2013. The success of Areva's recovery actions partially offset the downturn in activity. These actions will be reinforced in the second half of the year to adapt to market conditions. The group continues to restructure its operations in renewable energies by entering into partnerships in promising markets, such as offshore wind and energy storage, and by discontinuing loss-making operations, such as concentrated solar power. 2014 Half-year results: - Backlog: euro 44.9 bn (euro +3.5 bn vs. 12/31/2013 thanks to the treatment-recycling agreement with EDF); - Negative net income attributable to equity owners of the parent (euro -694 m): Losses in discontinued renewable activities (euro -373 m), One-off impact of treatment-recycling agreement with EDF (euro -95 m), Provisions and assets impairment: - Positive free operating cash flow despite lower activity level: Revenue: euro 3.889 bn (-12.4% LFL), EBITDA: euro 256 m (euro -231 m vs. H1 2013), Free operating cash flow: euro 98 m (euro +256 m vs. H1 2013); - Strengthened recovery actions in an unfavorable economic environment: 2015 cost reduction objective secured and raised to euro 1.2 bn by 2016, Capital expenditure reduced over 2014-16; - Revised financial outlook

  18. AREVA in the Republic of South Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    field of nuclear energy, will play a vital role to be the anchor for the coordination of all nuclear energy R and D and innovation, to undertake and lead the development of uranium conversion capabilities, to develop nuclear fuel fabrication capabilities and obtain established fuel fabrication technologies, and to investigate the viability of building an indigenous reprocessing facility. Already, NECSA has managed a low and medium level waste storage site in Vaalputs since 1986. In 2005, the government issued the national radwaste management policy based on the recycling of used fuel and minimizing packaging and storage of waste volumes. On January, 2008, AREVA submitted its proposal for the construction of two EPRs within the scope of the 'Nuclear-1' program and possibly 10 other EPR within the scope of 'Fleet' program. The proposal is accompanied by the first elements of a global partnership aiming at the joint development of a South African nuclear industry and related skills development. AREVA achieved overall revenues of 94 million euros in South Africa in 2007, comprising 55 million euros in its Reactors and Services Division, 12 million euros in its Fuel Division and 27 million euros in its T and D Division in 2006. AREVA built the twin units of the Koeberg nuclear power plant. In 2006, the two reactors provided 10 TWh net of electricity, which represents 4.4% of the country's total electricity production. Today AREVA is present in Koeberg in the fields of utility services, technical assistance and fuel supply. Utility services mainly comprise inspection operations, maintenance, repair and component replacement as well as engineering and upgrading services. AREVA supplies fuel to the Koeberg nuclear power plant and provides NECSA with technical support for the conversion and fabrication of low enriched uranium for the SAFARI research reactor. Half of the installed transmission and distribution base in South Africa has been supplied by AREVA 's T and D Division

  19. AREVA - 2012 Reference document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After a presentation of the person responsible for this Reference Document, of statutory auditors, and of a summary of financial information, this report address the different risk factors: risk management and coverage, legal risk, industrial and environmental risk, operational risk, risk related to major projects, liquidity and market risk, and other risks (related to political and economic conditions, to Group's structure, and to human resources). The next parts propose information about the issuer, a business overview (markets for nuclear power and renewable energies, customers and suppliers, group's strategy, operations), a brief presentation of the organizational structure, a presentation of properties, plants and equipment (principal sites, environmental issues which may affect these items), analysis and comments on the group's financial position and performance, a presentation of capital resources, a presentation of research and development activities (programs, patents and licenses), a brief description of financial objectives and profit forecasts or estimates, a presentation of administration, management and supervision bodies, a description of the operation of corporate bodies, an overview of personnel, of principal shareholders, and of transactions with related parties, a more detailed presentation of financial information concerning assets, financial positions and financial performance. Addition information regarding share capital is given, as well as an indication of major contracts, third party information, available documents, and information on holdings

  20. AREVA. Operating and financial results for the first half of 2011; AREVA. Resultats du 1er semestre 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marie, Patricia; Briand, Pauline; Floquet-Daubigeon, Fleur; Michaut, Maxime; De Scorbiac, Marie

    2011-07-27

    The first half of 2011 was marked by the accident at the Fukushima power plant following the unprecedented natural disasters that struck Japan. AREVA drew the first consequences from these events as early as June 2011 and recorded provisions and impairment in its half-year financial statements, related in particular to the expected short-term level of activity of some facilities. Close to 200 million euros in orders were canceled out of a total in backlog of more than 43 billion euros, which was down by a little more than 1 billion euros compared with the end of 2010. The longer term consequences of these events for AREVA are being assessed. They could concern all operations in the nuclear cycle and will be included in the strategic plan to be prepared by the end of the second half of the year. The fundamentals underpinning the development of the nuclear market are unchanged: strong growth in demand for electricity in the coming decades, diminished fossil resources, the search by many countries for energy independence, and the growing need to address climate issues. Through its efficient integrated business model, AREVA is present in every segment of the nuclear chain and is positioned in high-tech renewable energies with an offering that is perfectly suited to the requirements of the world's power companies. Decisions by governments on energy policy and by the safety authorities in different countries will influence market developments and the schedule for executing certain projects. Germany announced its decision to withdraw permanently from nuclear power and Switzerland intends to do the same, while Italy has opted not to restart its program. And yet the majority of countries have confirmed their decision to pursue nuclear power programs, present and future. In the first half, the group continued to draw down debt, achieving a net debt level of less than 3 billion euros at the end of June, thanks in particular to the conclusion of the proceedings with

  1. Areva 2006 figures - Economic, social, societal and environmental data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document presents the 2006 economic, social, societal and environmental data of the Areva Group. Content: 1 - Improvement initiative: Continuous improvement, Innovation, stakeholder relations, local economic development, Financial performance; 2 - Commitment to employees: Health and safety, Radiation protection, Radiological impacts, Technological risks, employees and training; 3 - Environment: Water, Energy, Gaseous releases, Liquid releases, Conventional waste, Radioactive waste; 4 - Reporting and performance indicators: Reporting methodology, Auditors' report, Social indicators, Environmental indicators

  2. Areva. 2007 figures economic, social, societal and environmental data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document presents the 2007 economic, social, societal and environmental data of the Areva Group. Content: 1 - Improvement initiative: Continuous improvement, Innovation; 2 - Financial performance: 2007 results; 3 - Commitment to employees: Stakeholder relations, Health and safety, Radiation protection, Radiological impacts, Technological risks, Workforce, Workforce and training; 4 - Environment: Water, Energy, Gaseous releases, Liquid releases, Conventional waste, Radioactive waste; 5 - Reporting and performance indicators: Reporting methodology, Auditors' report, Social indicators, Environmental indicators

  3. Areva. 2007 figures economic, social, societal and environmental data; Areva. Chiffres 2007 donnees economiques, sociales, societales et environnementales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-07-01

    This document presents the 2007 economic, social, societal and environmental data of the Areva Group. Content: 1 - Improvement initiative: Continuous improvement, Innovation; 2 - Financial performance: 2007 results; 3 - Commitment to employees: Stakeholder relations, Health and safety, Radiation protection, Radiological impacts, Technological risks, Workforce, Workforce and training; 4 - Environment: Water, Energy, Gaseous releases, Liquid releases, Conventional waste, Radioactive waste; 5 - Reporting and performance indicators: Reporting methodology, Auditors' report, Social indicators, Environmental indicators.

  4. AREVA and sustainable development - 2003 report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first report helped establish the status of Areva entities sustainable development performance and identify areas for improvement. This second report will report on the continuous improvement process, including accomplishments and projects initiated as well as difficulties encountered and ground yet to be covered. It includes, the Areva role in key sustainable development issues, the commitments and the governance, the risk management, the economic responsibility, the social responsibility and the environmental responsibility. (A.L.B.)

  5. Areva - Results for the first half of 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Areva Group's results for the first half of 2009 can be summarized as follows: - Backlog of 48,876 million euro: +28% compared to June 30, 2008; - Sales revenue of 6,522 million euro: + 6% compared to the first half of 2008; - Operating income before additional provision for the Finnish OL3 project: 566 million euro, representing an operating margin of 8.7%; - Operating income: 16 million euro; - Net income attributable to equity holders of the parent: 161 million euro, or 4.55 euro per share; - Net debt of 6,414 million euro; - AREVA capital increase and opening of capital to strategic and industrial partners and launch of an open call for bids for the T and D activity; - Granting of a long-term Standard and Poor's 'A' rating and confirmation of the short-term 'A1' rating - stable outlook. Based on the consolidation scope as at June 30, 2009, AREVA anticipates for the financial year 2009: - strong growth in the backlog; - strong growth in sales revenue; - operating income close to that of the financial year 2008. The document includes the transparencies of the presentation of the first half 2009 results

  6. Environmental, social, and corporate report 2009 - Cezus Montreuil- Juigne (Areva)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CEZUS, a subsidiary of AREVA, is the global leader in the market for zirconium, the metal used, among other things, for the cladding on fuel assembly tubes. CEZUS's operations are distributed over six sites. The site in Montreuil-Juigne, in western France, pilgers zirconium and titanium alloy tubes and blanks for the fabrication of fuel assembly tubes. This document shows details of the CEZUS Montreuil-Juigne facility and its 2009 initiatives on: consumption and waste management, risk management, environmental and safety management, social and corporate responsibilities

  7. Areva half-year report june 30, 2007; Areva rapport semestriel 30 juin 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-07-01

    Information provided in this document concerns the AREVA group as a whole. It presents the highlights and Key data of the first half of 2007, the outlook, the events subsequent to half-year closing, and the Consolidated financial statements. Contents: 1 - Highlights of the period; 2 - Key data: Summary data, Segment reporting, Backlog, Income statement, Review by division, Cash flow, Balance sheet data; 3 - Outlook; 4 - Events subsequent to half-year closing; 5 - Consolidated financial statements: Statutory Auditors' report on half-year information for the period January 1, 2007 to June 30, 2007, Consolidated income statement, Consolidated balance sheet, Consolidated cash flow statement, Consolidated statement of change in equity, Segment reporting, Notes to the consolidated financial statements for the period ending June 30, 2007.

  8. AREVA in 2007, growth and profitability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-07-01

    This document is the 2007 activity report of the Areva group, the nuclear division of which is Number 1 worldwide in the front end of the nuclear cycle, in pressurized water reactors (in terms of installed capacity), and in the treatment and recycling of used nuclear fuel. The Transmission and Distribution division is Number 1 worldwide in market management software and grid management software, number 2 in high voltage products, and number 3 in medium voltage products. Content: Message from the Chairman of the Supervisory Board; Message from the Chief Executive Officer; Key data; 2007 highlights; Corporate governance; Organization of the group; Share information and shareholder relations; Solutions for CO{sub 2}-free power generation; Solutions for reliable electricity transmission and distribution; Governance; Continuous improvement; Financial performance; Innovation; Customer satisfaction; Commitment to employees; Environmental protection; Risk management and prevention; Dialogue and consensus building; Community involvement; Auditors' report; Reporting methodology; Data verified in 2007; Glossary; and 'to learn more' references.

  9. Areva - first half 2007 financial results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document presents the financial statements of Areva group for the first half of 2007 as submitted by the Executive Board: Sales revenue: euro 5.373 billion, up by 6.7%; Operating income: euro 207 million, i.e. 3.9% operating margin, up 1.6 point compared with H1 2006; Consolidated net income: euro 295 million, i.e. euro 8.31 per share in H1 2007 against euro 6.92 per share in H1 2006, a 20% increase. All Group performance indicators were up the first half of 2007. Growth was robust and profitability strengthened significantly in terms of both operating income and net income. Consolidated sales revenue rose 6.7% for the first half of 2007 alone, after growth of more than 7% in 2006. This positive trend will continue: the backlog grew by 31% in the first half to more than euro 33 billion, compared with euro 26 billion six months ago and euro 21 billion at year-end 2005. Business is up sharply in the Transmission and Distribution division, which had operating margin of 8.7% in the first half of the year

  10. 'Action 2016': AREVA's strategic action plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On December 13, 2011, Luc Oursel, CEO, and Pierre Aubouin, Chief Financial Officer presented the group's strategic plan for the period 2012-2016. The plan has been drawn up collectively and is based on a thorough-going analysis and a realistic assessment of perspectives for all group activities and associated resources. Development of nuclear and renewable energies: the fundamentals are unchanged. In this context, the German decision remains an isolated case and the great majority of nuclear programs around the world have been confirmed. More conservative in its projections than the International Energy Agency, the group expects growth of 2.2% annually, reaching 583 GW of installed nuclear capacity by 2030, against 378 GW today. However, the Fukushima accident will lead to delays in launching new programs. 'Action 2016' plan aims to consolidate AREVA's leadership in nuclear energy and become a leading player in renewable energy. The group's strategic action plan 'Action 2016' is based on the following strategic choices: - commercial priority given to value creation, - selectivity in investments, - strengthening of the financial structure. These demand an improvement in the group's performance by 2015. This plan makes nuclear safety a strategic priority for the industrial and commercial performance of the group. This ambitious performance plan for the period 2012-2016 will give the group the wherewithal to withstand a temporary slowdown in the market resulting from the Fukushima accident and to deliver safe and sustainable growth of the business. The plan sets out the strategic direction for the group's employees for the years ahead: taking advantage of the expected growth in nuclear and renewable energies, targeted investment programs, and return to self-financing as of 2014

  11. AREVA - 2012 annual results: significant turnaround in performance one year after launching the Action 2016 plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One year after launching Areva's Action 2016 strategic plan, the first results are in. AREVA is ahead of schedule in executing its recovery plan. While pursuing its efforts in the management of a few difficult projects (such as OL3), Areva group was able to return to a virtuous performance cycle rooted in strong growth in nuclear order intake and good progress on its cost reduction program. Commercially, despite the difficult economic environment, AREVA was able to capitalize on its leadership in the installed base and on its long-term partnerships with strategic customers, beginning with EDF, with which AREVA renewed a confident and constructive working relationship. Areva has secured 80% of its objective of one billion euros of savings by the end of 2015 to improve its competitiveness. The group also continued efforts to optimize working capital requirement and control the capital expenditure trajectory. Together, these results enabled AREVA to exceed the objectives set for 2012 for two key indicators of its strategic plan: EBITDA and free operating cash flow. Nearly 60% of the 2.1 billion euros devoted to capital expenditures for future growth in 2012 were funded by operations, a quasi-doubled share compared to 2011. Areva's floor target for asset disposals was achieved one year ahead of schedule, also helping the Group to control its net debt, which remained below 4 billion euros. In 2013, Areva is continuing to implement the Action 2016 plan to keep its turnaround on track. In summary: - Backlog renewed over the year 2012 to euro 45.4 bn thanks to the increase in nuclear order intake; - Sales revenue growth: euro 9.342 bn (+5.3% vs. 2011), led by nuclear and renewables operations; - Very sharp upturn in EBITDA: euro 1.007 bn (+euro 586 m vs. 2011) - Very net improvement in free operating cash flow: -euro 854 m (+euro 512 m vs. 2011); - Back to positive reported operating income: euro 118 m (+euro 1.984 bn vs. 2011); - 2012-2013 floor target for asset disposals

  12. Waste Estimates for a Future Recycling Plant in the US Based Upon AREVA Operating Experience - 13206

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foare, Genevieve; Meze, Florian [AREVA E and P, SGN - 1, rue des Herons, 78182 Montigny-le-Bretonneux (France); Bader, Sven; McGee, Don; Murray, Paul [AREVA Federal Services LLC, 7207 IBM Drive, Mail Code CLT- 1D, Charlotte NC 28262 (United States); Prud' homme, Pascal [AREVA NC SA - 1, place Jean Millier, 92084 Paris La Defense CEDEX (France)

    2013-07-01

    Estimates of process and secondary wastes produced by a recycling plant built in the U.S., which is composed of a used nuclear fuel (UNF) reprocessing facility and a mixed oxide (MOX) fuel fabrication facility, are performed as part of a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored study [1]. In this study, a set of common inputs, assumptions, and constraints were identified to allow for comparison of these wastes between different industrial teams. AREVA produced a model of a reprocessing facility, an associated fuel fabrication facility, and waste treatment facilities to develop the results for this study. These facilities were divided into a number of discrete functional areas for which inlet and outlet flow streams were clearly identified to allow for an accurate determination of the radionuclide balance throughout the facility and the waste streams. AREVA relied primarily on its decades of experience and feedback from its La Hague (reprocessing) and MELOX (MOX fuel fabrication) commercial operating facilities in France to support this assessment. However, to perform these estimates for a U.S. facility with different regulatory requirements and to take advantage of some technological advancements, such as in the potential treatment of off-gases, some deviations from this experience were necessary. A summary of AREVA's approach and results for the recycling of 800 metric tonnes of initial heavy metal (MTIHM) of LWR UNF per year into MOX fuel under the assumptions and constraints identified for this DOE study are presented. (authors)

  13. 'Action 2016': AREVA's strategic action plan to improve performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On December 12, 2011, Luc Oursel, Executive Officer of AREVA, and Pierre Aubouin, Chief Financial Executive Officer, presented the group's 'Action 2016' strategic action plan based on an in-depth analysis of the market's outlook. This document makes, first, a Detailed presentation of the 'Action 2016' plan and then presents the group's financial outlook: - Full-year 2011 immediate accounting consequences of the new market environment: operating losses expected in 2011; - 2012-2013 transition period Objective: self-finance capex in cumulative terms; - 2014-2016: safe growth and cash generation, free operating cash flow at break-even beginning in 2013, above euro 1 bn per year beginning in 2015

  14. Our energies have a future. A future without CO2. Areva in 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document is the sustainable development and 2005 annual report altogether of Areva group. It presents first the challenges of energy for economical development, the climate change threat and the sustainability of nuclear power in particular with respect to radioactive wastes management and power blackouts. Then follows a presentation of Areva's 10 commitments for sustainable development (governance and continuous improvement, financial performance, innovation, customer satisfaction, commitment to employees, risk management and prevention, environmental protection, dialogue and consensus building, community involvement). The annual report presents: the 2005 highlights, Areva around the world, key data, corporate governance, organisation of the group, share information and shareholder relations, business review (front end division, reactors and services division, back end division, transmission and distribution division), financial report and glossary. (J.S.)

  15. Areva 2009 responsible growth report: more energy, less CO{sub 2}; Areva rapport de croissance responsable 2009: plus d'energie moins de CO{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-07-01

    This document is the 2009 annual responsible growth report of AREVA which presents itself as having consolidated its leadership position in its original business of nuclear power while expanding considerably in renewable energies (wind, solar, bio-energies and hydrogen/storage) to become a leading provider of solutions for carbon-free power generation. The main chapters of the report are: the group and its strategy, Areva's nuclear power solutions (is nuclear a sustainable energy source?, supply, technological excellence, safety, recycling and waste, acceptability, non-proliferation), Areva's renewable energy solutions (how much of the energy mix should be renewable?, rising demand, competitiveness and efficiency, responsible development), Areva's human resources (gender balance, health and safety, diversity and opportunity, hiring and training). Data and balanced scorecard for sustainable development are also given

  16. Areva will work the Imouraren mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Areva has signed an agreement with the government of Niger about the exploitation of the Imouraren uranium mine. The agreement settles a capital share of 66.65% for Areva and 33.35% for the Niger state. The production is assessed to be 5000 tonnes a year for 35 years and about 1400 jobs will be created. The initial investment amounts to 1.2 milliard euros and the production will begin in 2012. The Imouraren mine will enable Niger to double its present uranium production and to rank second worldwide as an uranium producer. Areva has been operating 2 mines in Niger for 40 years, one located at Arlit, the other one at Akokan, the 2 mines production reached 2260 tonnes of uranium in 2006. (A.C.)

  17. Areva 2007 results: accelerated growth and significantly improved profitability; Areva resultats 2007: acceleration de la croissance et hausse significative de la profitabilite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-02-15

    The AREVA group recorded accelerated growth and increased profitability in 2007, meeting both of its objectives for the year. The group made strategic inroads in fast growing markets. AREVA's integrated model met with record success in China, where GGNPC acquired two EPR nuclear islands in a combined order including both the reactors and the fuel, and the creation of a joint venture in engineering. Its T and D division was awarded the largest contract of its history in Qatar, making it the leader in a region where T and D was not even present a few years ago. For more than three years, AREVA has built up its capacity to meet surging demand in the nuclear power and T and D markets through an active policy of research and development and by capitalizing on the diversity and strength of its partnerships. Areva hired 8,600 people in 2006 and 11,500 people in 2007; this represents an investment in recruitment, training and integration of approximately euro 200 million per year. For 2008, the group foresees a further increase in its backlog, sales revenue and operating income. The Areva Group financial statements for 2007 are summarized below: - Backlog: euro 39.8 billion, up 55%; - Sales revenue: euro 11.9 billion, up 9.8% (up 10.4% like-for-like); - Operating income: euro 751 million, i.e. 6.3% operating margin, up 2.6 points compared with 2006; - Net income attributable to equity holders of the parent: euro 743 million (euro 20.95 per share), up from euro 649 million in 2006 (euro 18.31 per share); - Net debt: euro 1.954 billion, linked to the acquisition of UraMin; - Dividend: euro 6.77, to be proposed to the Annual General Meeting of Shareholders convening on April 17, 2008.

  18. Areva half-year report june 30, 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document is the half-year financial report of the Areva group for 2006. It presents: 1 - Highlights of the period; 2 - Key data: Summary data, Segment reporting, Backlog, Income statement, Review by business division, Cash flow, Balance sheet data; 3 - Outlook; 4 - Events subsequent to the half-year end; 5 - Consolidated financial statements: Statutory auditors' report on the interim consolidated financial statements for the period January 1, 2006 to June 30, 2006, Consolidated income statement, Consolidated balance sheet, Consolidated cash flow statement, Consolidated statement of changes in equity, Segment reporting, Notes to the consolidated financial statements

  19. Areva half-year report June 30, 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document is the half-year financial report of the Areva group for 2008. It presents: 1 - the highlights of the period: key data (Summary data, Segment reporting, Backlog, Income statement, Review by division, Cash flow, Balance sheet data); Outlook; 2 - the events subsequent to half-year closing; 3 - the consolidated financial statements: Statutory Auditors' report on half-year 2008 information for the period January 1, 2008 to June 30, 2008, Consolidated income statement, Consolidated balance sheet, Consolidated cash flow statement, Consolidated statement of change in equity, Segment reporting, Notes to the consolidated financial statements for the period ending June 30, 2008

  20. AREVA and sustainable development - 2003 report; Rapport developpement durable 2003 - AREVA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lauvergeon, A

    2003-07-01

    The first report helped establish the status of Areva entities sustainable development performance and identify areas for improvement. This second report will report on the continuous improvement process, including accomplishments and projects initiated as well as difficulties encountered and ground yet to be covered. It includes, the Areva role in key sustainable development issues, the commitments and the governance, the risk management, the economic responsibility, the social responsibility and the environmental responsibility. (A.L.B.)

  1. Intensive post operation clean out (Poco) in AREVA NC Cadarache dismantling projects: economic value and sustainable development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After fabricating plutonium fuels for 40 years (Fast Breeder Reactor, MOX), commercial operations at the AREVA NC Cadarache plant ended in 2003 and post operation clean out of its production buildings and laboratory started. AREVA objective is to achieve IAEA level 2 cleanup of the process facilities and transfer them to their owner, the French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA). There are two main opposite dismantling scenarios: very limited cleanup to optimize man power, or intensive cleanup of the facilities to optimize the quantity of long lived level waste as much as possible. Economic and environmental considerations lead the choice between these two options. (author)

  2. EPR by Areva. The path of greatest certainty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AREVA's Evolutionary Power Reactor (EPR) is the first Generation III+ reactor design currently being built to answer the world's growing demand for clean and reliable electricity generation. Already under construction in Finland, France and China, the EPR is also being considered by America, United Kingdom, South Africa and other countries for the development of their nuclear fleet. The EPR is now clearly destined to become the mainstay of standardized, efficient reactor fleets around the globe. AREVA's EPR incorporates unbeatable know-how provided by an uninterrupted track record of reactor building activities and backed by decades of feedback experience from operating PWRs, including the most recent. The EPR is a Franco-German initiative which benefited from the stringent scrutiny of safety authorities from both countries, at each stage of the project. The EPR has already secured construction licenses from two of the world's most demanding safety authorities in France and Finland and is currently in line for a design certification and a combined construction and operating license (COL) in the USA. It is also taking part in the licensing process recently launched in the United Kingdom. Europe's leading utilities have granted the EPR their approval under the 'European Utilities Requirements' and have further expressed individual interest in the design and performance of the EPR for their businesses. AREVA is the only Gen III+ reactor constructor in the world with ongoing building experience. To date, AREVA is the only vendor who has the necessary field experience that future customers can benefit: - Detailed design completed; - Experience feedback from 87 PWR; - 3 projects going on; - Continuous PWR experience in design and construction. Close to 100% of the EPR primary circuit heavy components are sourced directly from AREVA's integrated plants. Engineering, manufacturing, services and fuel cycle management are totally integrated and mastered by AREVA. From its

  3. Assisted Living Facilities, group homes, Published in 2006, Washoe County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Assisted Living Facilities dataset, was produced all or in part from Published Reports/Deeds information as of 2006. It is described as 'group homes'. Data by...

  4. Areva - first half 2007 financial results; Areva - resultats du 1. semestre 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-07-01

    This document presents the financial statements of Areva group for the first half of 2007 as submitted by the Executive Board: Sales revenue: euro 5.373 billion, up by 6.7%; Operating income: euro 207 million, i.e. 3.9% operating margin, up 1.6 point compared with H1 2006; Consolidated net income: euro 295 million, i.e. euro 8.31 per share in H1 2007 against euro 6.92 per share in H1 2006, a 20% increase. All Group performance indicators were up the first half of 2007. Growth was robust and profitability strengthened significantly in terms of both operating income and net income. Consolidated sales revenue rose 6.7% for the first half of 2007 alone, after growth of more than 7% in 2006. This positive trend will continue: the backlog grew by 31% in the first half to more than euro 33 billion, compared with euro 26 billion six months ago and euro 21 billion at year-end 2005. Business is up sharply in the Transmission and Distribution division, which had operating margin of 8.7% in the first half of the year.

  5. Areva. Nine-month 2007 sales revenue and data; Areva. Informations et chiffre d'affaires relatifs au neuf premiers mois de l'exercice 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-10-15

    The main information concerning the nine-month 2007 financial data of the Areva group is a steady growth of 9-month sales revenue, at euro 8.066 billion (+6.8% like-for-like), including euro 2.692 billion in the 3. quarter, i.e. +7.6% like-for-like. The group confirms its strong sales revenue growth objective for 2007.

  6. Developing talent at AREVA: Investing in people and building our future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vivien, Philippe [Human Resources AREVA (France)

    2008-07-01

    AREVA employs 65,000 people today and will recruit 12,000 new employees worldwide in 2008 to support business strategy. The group forecasts that recruitment needs will significantly rise to 40,000 by 2012, representing 50% of the workforce. In order to meet the challenges of rapid international expansion and a highly competitive talent market, AREVA has developed initiatives to accelerate its investment in people, to reinforce recruitment and retain high quality talents and valuable skills and knowledge. The group human resources department's mission is based on shaping talents for sustainable business performance. It established its five-point human resources policy, Talent Builder, to attract, develop, retain, reward and mobilize employees across all businesses. In the context of a global talent market, dynamic recruitment programs are implemented to attract top talent. A global Campus Management program builds on relationships with colleges and universities to attract the future generation of engineers and managers. Talent development initiatives include processes and management tools, such as the People Review to identify and nurture key skills and talents, a group-wide integration program, professional training, and priority to internal mobility. AREVA places particular importance to diversity, a keystone of HR policy, and a socio-economic lever of development. The rich variety of people and cultures in the group reflect the markets, customers and the civil society in which AREVA operates. The group is actively committed to equal opportunities for all. The European agreement on equal opportunities in the workplace sets out measures for promoting gender equality and professional career paths, with the principal themes of recruitment, career development, training, remuneration and parental support. In addition, the WE network of men and women was set up with the support of Anne Lauvergeon, Chief Executive of AREVA with the objectives of promoting gender

  7. Developing talent at AREVA: Investing in people and building our future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AREVA employs 65,000 people today and will recruit 12,000 new employees worldwide in 2008 to support business strategy. The group forecasts that recruitment needs will significantly rise to 40,000 by 2012, representing 50% of the workforce. In order to meet the challenges of rapid international expansion and a highly competitive talent market, AREVA has developed initiatives to accelerate its investment in people, to reinforce recruitment and retain high quality talents and valuable skills and knowledge. The group human resources department's mission is based on shaping talents for sustainable business performance. It established its five-point human resources policy, Talent Builder, to attract, develop, retain, reward and mobilize employees across all businesses. In the context of a global talent market, dynamic recruitment programs are implemented to attract top talent. A global Campus Management program builds on relationships with colleges and universities to attract the future generation of engineers and managers. Talent development initiatives include processes and management tools, such as the People Review to identify and nurture key skills and talents, a group-wide integration program, professional training, and priority to internal mobility. AREVA places particular importance to diversity, a keystone of HR policy, and a socio-economic lever of development. The rich variety of people and cultures in the group reflect the markets, customers and the civil society in which AREVA operates. The group is actively committed to equal opportunities for all. The European agreement on equal opportunities in the workplace sets out measures for promoting gender equality and professional career paths, with the principal themes of recruitment, career development, training, remuneration and parental support. In addition, the WE network of men and women was set up with the support of Anne Lauvergeon, Chief Executive of AREVA with the objectives of promoting gender equality

  8. AREVA - first half 2005 sales figures; AREVA - chiffre d'affaires du 1. semestre 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-07-01

    First half 2005 sales for the AREVA group were up 1.1% to 5,396 million euros and 2.6% like-for-like, compared with 5,339 million euros for the same period in 2004.The change in foreign exchange rates had a negative impact of nearly (34) million euros between these two periods, which was much less than between the first half of 2003 and the same period in 2004. Sales are up 1.1% compared with the first half of 2004 (up 2.6% like-for-like); the euros (17.3) M impact of IFRS adoption is limited to the Front End division; Energy is up: Nuclear Power: up 4.4% (up 5.5% like-for-like), driven by the Front End and Reactors and Services divisions; T and D: down 3.9% (-2.1% like-for-like) due to the one time peak observed in early 2004; Connectors sales are stable (+0.3% like-for-like): Automotive performed well, while the communication market continued to be a difficult one.

  9. Research Reactor Business at AREVA TA: Status and Perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research reactors offer essential support for a country's nuclear power generation industry. They have for many years now provided this support in countless ways: They have made it possible to test new developments, to act as the forerunners for pressurised water reactor operations, for qualifying components, training operators as well as allowing the production of radioactive elements for medical or industrial purposes and they have also be used to perform tests on materials. In a word, they have definitively made a difference in our everyday life. For some forty years now, through its various iterations, AREVA TA has taken part in, or led the design and production of more than twenty research reactors and today, within AREVA, has the leading role in energies that generate lower CO2 emissions and in the range of engineering specialties and services offered by the group in this field, alongside CERCA, the world leader in the supply of fuel for research reactors. All of this, in a competitive worldwide market that is more than ever dominated by the need to meet the expectations of the general public. (author)

  10. The Fifth Omega Laser Facility Users Group Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrasso, R. D.

    2015-10-01

    A capacity gathering of over 100 researchers from 25 universities and laboratories met at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) for the Fifth Omega Laser Facility Users Group (OLUG) workshop. The purpose of the 2.5-day workshop was to facilitate communications and exchanges among individual Omega users and between users and the LLE management; to present ongoing and proposed research; to encourage research opportunities and collaborations that could be undertaken at the Omega Laser Facility and in a complementary fashion at other facilities [such as the National Ignition Facility (NIF) or the Laboratoire pour l’Utilisation des Lasers Intenses (LULI)]; to provide an opportunity for students, postdoctoral fellows, and young researchers to present their research in an informal setting; and to provide feedback to LLE management from the users about ways to improve the facility and future experimental campaigns.

  11. The Sixth Omega Laser Facility Users Group Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrasso, R. D.

    2014-10-01

    A capacity gathering of over 100 researchers from 25 universities and laboratories met at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) for the Sixth Omega Laser Facility Users Group (OLUG) workshop. The purpose of the 2.5-day workshop was to facilitate communications and exchanges among individual OMEGA users, and between users and the LLE management; to present ongoing and proposed research; to encourage research opportunities and collaborations that could be undertaken at the Omega Laser Facility and in a complementary fashion at other facilities [such as the National Ignition Facility (NIF) or the Laboratoire pour l’Utilisation des Lasers Intenses (LULI)]; to provide an opportunity for students, postdoctoral fellows, and young researchers to present their research in an informal setting; and to provide feedback from the users to LLE management about ways to improve and keep the facility and future experimental campaigns at the cutting edge.

  12. Environmental and Quality Management System at AREVA/COGEMA Resources, Inc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    COGEMA Resources Inc. (part of the Areva Group) is a Canadian company with its head office in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan. It owns and operates mining and milling facilities in Northern Saskatchewan, where it produces uranium concentrate. The company is also active in uranium exploration, decommissioning and joint ventures with other organizations at various operating sites within Canada. The company has adopted an integrated approach to environmental and quality management of all its operational activities, which comprise a complete cycle from uranium exploration to development to mining and milling through to decommissioning. This commences with exploration projects mainly in the Athabasca Basin of Northern Saskatchewan, continues with the McClean Lake site - a uranium mining and milling facility that started production in 1999 and closes with the decommissioning of the Cluff Lake site - a uranium mine which ceased production in 2002. The system is designed to provide an integrated approach to ensure that: All activities are conducted in a safe and efficient manner, meeting all applicable regulatory and internal requirements; the requirements of the ISO 14001 standard are met; The principles of sustainable development are implemented throughout the organization. To this end, the McClean Lake site and exploration activities (both were the first for the uranium industry within Canada) are ISO 14001 certified, while the Cluff Lake site should follow very shortly. The development of the integrated management system and operational experience are discussed with examples drawn from the various operating activities. Challenges and further development opportunities will be mentioned. (author)

  13. Our energies have a future. A future without CO{sub 2}. Areva in 2005; Nos energies ont de l'avenir. Un avenir sans CO{sub 2}. Areva en 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-07-01

    This document is the sustainable development and 2005 annual report altogether of Areva group. It presents first the challenges of energy for economical development, the climate change threat and the sustainability of nuclear power in particular with respect to radioactive wastes management and power blackouts. Then follows a presentation of Areva's 10 commitments for sustainable development (governance and continuous improvement, financial performance, innovation, customer satisfaction, commitment to employees, risk management and prevention, environmental protection, dialogue and consensus building, community involvement). The annual report presents: the 2005 highlights, Areva around the world, key data, corporate governance, organisation of the group, share information and shareholder relations, business review (front end division, reactors and services division, back end division, transmission and distribution division), financial report and glossary. (J.S.)

  14. Does multinationals socially responsible in Sub-Sahara Africa? Case of AREVA in Niger

    OpenAIRE

    Youssoufou, Hamadou Daouda

    2014-01-01

    Societal actions in terms of CSR of the French nuclear group in Niger contrast with stakeholders charges against him (pollution, degradation of the environment, groundwater contamination, etc.) and certain realities observed on the field (armed conflict, poverty, social inequalities, disintegration of the local economy). This paper proposes to shed light on the issues and controversies related to the practice of CSR in Africa in general, those related to Areva group in Niger in...

  15. Areva - Press release from the Supervisory Board

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During its meeting held on December 12, 2011, devoted in particular to the examination of the 2011 closing estimates, the AREVA Executive Board indicated that it expected to book a provision of 1.46 billion euros (2.025 billion US dollars) in the company's accounts for fiscal year 2011 for impairment of assets for the reporting entity UraMin, a mining company acquired by AREVA in 2007, which, given the provision booked in 2010 (426 million euros), brings the value of these assets on the AREVA balance sheet down to 410 million euros. Given the size of these provisions, the Supervisory Board decided to make three of its members, meeting as an ad hoc committee, in charge of analyzing the terms of acquisition of this company, as well as the key decisions made in this reporting entity up to 2011 and, based on the outcome of these analyses, to recommend to it any appropriate measures in AREVA's interest. This committee reported on its work during the Supervisory Board meeting held on February 14, 2012. In light of this report, the Supervisory Board found that the fairness and reliability of the financial statements of previous years were not in question. Nevertheless, considering the malfunctions raised, the Board considers it appropriate to thoroughly review AREVA's governance in order to ensure that decisions concerning large acquisitions or investments be reviewed and validated in the future under conditions ensuring better legal and financial security and enabling a more transparent dialogue between management and the Supervisory Board. It thus asked the Executive Board to recommend, at the next General Meeting of Shareholders, that the by-laws of the company be modified to make the Supervisory Board's prior approval of investments, stake acquisitions and acquisitions mandatory above a threshold of 20 million euros. It also decided to set up a business ethics committee within the Supervisory Board responsible for ensuring that rules of conduct are properly applied

  16. Areva half-year report june 30, 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Information provided in this document concerns the AREVA group as a whole. It presents the highlights and Key data of the first half of 2007, the outlook, the events subsequent to half-year closing, and the Consolidated financial statements. Contents: 1 - Highlights of the period; 2 - Key data: Summary data, Segment reporting, Backlog, Income statement, Review by division, Cash flow, Balance sheet data; 3 - Outlook; 4 - Events subsequent to half-year closing; 5 - Consolidated financial statements: Statutory Auditors' report on half-year information for the period January 1, 2007 to June 30, 2007, Consolidated income statement, Consolidated balance sheet, Consolidated cash flow statement, Consolidated statement of change in equity, Segment reporting, Notes to the consolidated financial statements for the period ending June 30, 2007

  17. MFFF project in Savannah River: AREVA's role in the project - construction status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Within the framework of a bilateral agreement between the USA and the Russian federation during the 90s (Start agreement), both parties decided to eliminate 34 metric tons of surplus weapon-grade plutonium each. On the American side, the Department of Energy (DOE) is in charge of implementing the agreement. In 1999, the DOE signed a contract with DCS (Duke, Cogema, Stone and Webster), to design, build and operate a facility, MFFF, that would transform the American weapon-grade plutonium in MOX fuel. This plant, located in Savannah River in South Carolina, will fabricate civil fuel to be loaded in existing US commercial reactors. AREVA signed technology transfer with the DOE, allowing MFFF to be an US copy of AREVA's fuel recycling facilities (La Hague for material purification and MELOX for fuel fabrication). 10 years after the signing of the initial agreement, project is now a reality. Shaw AREVA MOX services, that succeeded to the former DCS, undertook building the MFFF plant the 1. of August 2007. Process equipments are being achieved and testing has begun. From the beginning of the project, AREVA mobilized the best of its expertise to ensure its success. Engineering and operating teams integrate their experience of recycling technologies in the SA MOX Project to carry out the technology transfer. The presentation will trace history of the project and set various stages from its beginning. It will focus on the progress of construction and develop the last prospects of the project. A first feedback of the execution of the technology transfer from France to the USA will be presented. (authors)

  18. Areva - 2013 annual results: breakeven free operating cash flow objective reached despite a difficult environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Areva group reached a major milestone in 2013 in turning performance around by meeting a key objective of its Action 2016 plan: the return to breakeven of free operating cash flow. For the first time since 2005, cash generated by the Group's operations allowed it to fully fund strategic capital expenditures essential to the group's profitable growth. To achieve this result, Areva built on robust growth in nuclear operations, on contributions from its cost reduction plan and on strict management of capital spending. However, two projects launched in the previous decade (OL3 and a power plant modernization) and the Renewable Energies business impacted negatively the group's 2013 net income. On the Renewable Energies market, in a situation marked by a reduction of capital spending by customers, AREVA anticipated the consolidation required in the sector by implementing industrial partnerships such as the joint venture project with Gamesa, which aims to create a European champion in offshore wind. Similar initiatives were undertaken in solar energy and energy storage. The Group continues to implement the Action 2016 plan to pursue its recovery. While the economic environment remains uncertain and projects launched in the previous decade remain a burden, the Group forecasts further performance improvement and significant growth in cash flow generation by the end of the plan

  19. Sharing Experiences within AREVA D and D Project Portfolio: Four Illustrations - 13049

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chabeuf, Jean-Michel; Varet, Thierry [AREVA Site Value Development Business Unit, La Hague Site (France); AREVA Site Value Development Business Unit, La Hague Site

    2013-07-01

    Over the past ten years, AREVA has performed D and D operations on a wide range of nuclear sites, such as Marcoule and La Hague recycling plants, to Cadarache MOX fuel fabrication plant or Veurey and Annecy metallic Uranium machining plants. Each site is different from the other but some lessons can be shared through this D and D portfolio. In that respect, knowledge management is one of AREVA D and D Technical Department main missions. Four illustrations demonstrate the interest of knowledge share. Waste management is one of the key activities in D and D; It requires a specific characterization methodology, adapted logistics, and optimized waste channels, all of which have been developed over the years by AREVA teams on the site of Marcoule while they are rather new to La Hague, whose main activity remains fuel reprocessing despite the launch of UP2 400 D and D program. The transfer of know how has thus been organized over the past two years. Plasma cutting has been used extensively in Marcoule for years, while prohibited on the site of La Hague following questions raised about the risks associated wit Ruthenium sublimation. La Hague Technical Department has thus developed an experimental protocol to quantify and contain the Ruthenium risk, the result of which will then be applied to Marcoule where the Ruthenium issue has appeared in recent operations. Commissioning and operating fission products evaporators is a rather standard activity on UP2 800 and UP3, while the associated experience has been decreasing in Marcoule following final shutdown in 1998. When the French atomic Energy commission decided to build and operate a new evaporator to concentrate rinsing effluents prior to vitrification in 2009, AREVA La Hague operators were mobilized to test and commission the new equipment, and train local operators. Concrete scabbling is the final stage prior to the free release of a nuclear facility. In the context of Veurey and Annecy final cleanup and declassification

  20. AREVA. Operating and financial results for the first half of 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first half of 2011 was marked by the accident at the Fukushima power plant following the unprecedented natural disasters that struck Japan. AREVA drew the first consequences from these events as early as June 2011 and recorded provisions and impairment in its half-year financial statements, related in particular to the expected short-term level of activity of some facilities. Close to 200 million euros in orders were canceled out of a total in backlog of more than 43 billion euros, which was down by a little more than 1 billion euros compared with the end of 2010. The longer term consequences of these events for AREVA are being assessed. They could concern all operations in the nuclear cycle and will be included in the strategic plan to be prepared by the end of the second half of the year. The fundamentals underpinning the development of the nuclear market are unchanged: strong growth in demand for electricity in the coming decades, diminished fossil resources, the search by many countries for energy independence, and the growing need to address climate issues. Through its efficient integrated business model, AREVA is present in every segment of the nuclear chain and is positioned in high-tech renewable energies with an offering that is perfectly suited to the requirements of the world's power companies. Decisions by governments on energy policy and by the safety authorities in different countries will influence market developments and the schedule for executing certain projects. Germany announced its decision to withdraw permanently from nuclear power and Switzerland intends to do the same, while Italy has opted not to restart its program. And yet the majority of countries have confirmed their decision to pursue nuclear power programs, present and future. In the first half, the group continued to draw down debt, achieving a net debt level of less than 3 billion euros at the end of June, thanks in particular to the conclusion of the proceedings with Siemens

  1. AREVA revenue and data for the first nine months of 2008; AREVA informations et chiffre d'affaires relatifs aux neuf premiers mois de l'exercice 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-07-01

    This public information sheet presents financing data of the group AREVA for the first nine months of 2008. It shows a high increase of the revenue (12,9%). The data are detailed for each activity sector, front end, reactors and services, back end, transmission and distribution. Consolidated revenue for the years 2007 are also provided. (A.L.B.)

  2. Experience of Areva in fuel services for PWR and BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AREVA being an integrated supplier of fuel assemblies has included in its strategy to develop services and solutions to customers who desire to improve the performance and safety of their fuel. These services go beyond the simple 'after sale' services that can be expected from a fuel supplier: The portfolio of AREVA includes a wide variety of services, from scientific calculations to fuel handling services in a nuclear power plant. AREVA is committed to collaborate and to propose best-in-class solutions that really make the difference for the customer, based on 40 years of Fuel design and manufacturing experience. (Author)

  3. Areva's water chemistry guidebook with chemistry guidelines for next generation plants (AREVA EPRTM reactors)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the years, AREVA globally has maintained a strong expertise in LWR water chemistry and has been focused on minimizing short-term and long-term detrimental effects of chemistry for startup, operation and shutdown chemistry for all key plant components (material integrity and reliability, promote optimal thermal performances, etc.) and fuel. Also AREVA is focused on minimizing contamination and equipment/plant dose rates. Current Industry Guidelines (EPRI, VGB, etc.) provide utilities with selected chemistry guidance for the current operating fleet. With the next generation of PWR plants (e.g. AREVA's EPRTM reactor), materials of construction and design have been optimized based on industry lessons learned over the last 50+ years. To support the next generation design, AREVA water chemistry experts, have subsequently developed a Chemistry Guidebook with chemistry guidelines based on an analysis of the current international practices, plant operating experience, R and D data and calculation codes now available and/or developed by AREVA. The AREVA LWR chemistry Guidebook can be used to help resolve utility and safety authority questions and addresses regulation requirement questions/issues for next generation plants. The Chemistry Guidebook provides water chemistry guidelines for primary coolant, secondary side circuit and auxiliary systems during startup, normal operation and shutdown conditions. It also includes conditioning and impurity limits, along with monitoring locations and frequency requirements. The Chemistry Guidebook Guidelines will be used as a design reference for AREVA's next generation plants (e.g. EPRTM reactor). (authors)

  4. Commissioning of Nuclear Power Plants. The AREVA approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georges Mateo, Fellow Expert at AREVA, closed the last day of conferences by detailing deeply the different phases of NPPs commissioning. He insisted on the skills required to be a Commissioning engineer and on the carrier opportunities that it offers

  5. Areva, Chalon/St-Marcel site, Environment, social and societal report for 2010-2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After a brief indication of Areva's activities and a map locating Areva's implantations, and the distribution of turnover and personnel in the different continents, a brief recall of safety commitments, and a presentation of the activity of the Reactors and Services Business Group (turnover, personnel, number of reactors in charge), this report briefly presents the different AREVA sites in Burgundy, and more precisely the Chalon/St-Marcel site which comprises a technical centre and a plant of production of heavy components. The activities of the technical centre concern welding technology, nuclear fusion, corrosion and chemistry, fluid and structure mechanics, and technologies related to the development of new energies and to the environment. Fields of intervention and clients are evoked. The activity of the plant of production of heavy components (vapor generators, pressurizers, vessels, etc.) and some characteristics of these components are presented. The environmental aspect is then addressed: evolution of resource consumption (gas, water, electricity, paper), and of releases (greenhouse gases, used waters, waste management). The social aspect comprises social relationships, health (involved actors, prevention, safety, evolution of labour accidents), ability and job management (training, career management, education). The societal commitments have been acknowledged by several labels related to social inclusion and local activities, support of sporting and cultural activities

  6. Treatment of Fukushima contaminated waters TEPCO selected Areva and Veolia solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Actiflo-RadTM system successfully contributed to treat the contaminated wastewaters from the damaged Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. The decontamination system jointly designed by AREVA and Veolia Water treated about 77 500 m3 of high activity wastewater (∼106 Bq/cm3), combining radionuclides adsorbents developed by AREVA and the know-how of Veolia in water treatment for the settlement of the adsorbed radioactive elements, producing sludge with a weight concentration of 80 g/L. Both companies delivered the treatment facility quickly with an efficient joint organization - in a very complex environment. Assembled on Fukushima site - badly damaged by the tsunami following the earthquake of March 11th - the system was designed, built and started in a record time of 2 month 1/2, instead of several years in a classical nuclear engineering project. The Actiflo-RadTM was a key equipment to achieve a stable situation of reactors, allowing treated water to be reused for core cooling. Commissioned with the on-site support of Veolia experts, the system reduced by 10 000 the Cs-activity of the wastewater even with significant salt content (seawater diluted twice) at a flow-rate slightly below the design value of 50 m3/hr. The implemented technologies are already used separately on AREVA sites (la Hague, fuel reprocessing plant) and for many water treatment projects by Veolia all over the world (ActifloTM and MultifloTM processes, using lamellar settling devices - in addition, the first one making use of micro-sand for a better floc quality). The complete treatment process selected by TEPCO features a physico-chemical treatment and water desalination, in five steps. After de-oiling, wastewater is primarily decontaminated through zeolite columns (Kurion process). This pre-decontaminated water is then treated on the AREVA-Veolia two stages system; at each stage, more than 30 minutes contact time with radionuclides adsorbents is needed, adsorbed radioactive particles

  7. Areva - Press release from the Supervisory Board; Areva - Communique de presse du Conseil de Surveillance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marie, Patricia; Briand, Pauline; Floquet-Daubigeon, Fleur; Michaut, Maxime; Scorbiac, Marie de; Repaire, Philippine du

    2012-02-14

    During its meeting held on December 12, 2011, devoted in particular to the examination of the 2011 closing estimates, the AREVA Executive Board indicated that it expected to book a provision of 1.46 billion euros (2.025 billion US dollars) in the company's accounts for fiscal year 2011 for impairment of assets for the reporting entity UraMin, a mining company acquired by AREVA in 2007, which, given the provision booked in 2010 (426 million euros), brings the value of these assets on the AREVA balance sheet down to 410 million euros. Given the size of these provisions, the Supervisory Board decided to make three of its members, meeting as an ad hoc committee, in charge of analyzing the terms of acquisition of this company, as well as the key decisions made in this reporting entity up to 2011 and, based on the outcome of these analyses, to recommend to it any appropriate measures in AREVA's interest. This committee reported on its work during the Supervisory Board meeting held on February 14, 2012. In light of this report, the Supervisory Board found that the fairness and reliability of the financial statements of previous years were not in question. Nevertheless, considering the malfunctions raised, the Board considers it appropriate to thoroughly review AREVA's governance in order to ensure that decisions concerning large acquisitions or investments be reviewed and validated in the future under conditions ensuring better legal and financial security and enabling a more transparent dialogue between management and the Supervisory Board. It thus asked the Executive Board to recommend, at the next General Meeting of Shareholders, that the by-laws of the company be modified to make the Supervisory Board's prior approval of investments, stake acquisitions and acquisitions mandatory above a threshold of 20 million euros. It also decided to set up a business ethics committee within the Supervisory Board responsible for ensuring that rules of conduct are

  8. AREVA Back-End Possibilities for the Used Fuel of Research Test Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the major issues faced by the Research and Test Reactor (RTR) operators is the back end management of the used fuel elements. RTR used fuel for both HEU and LEU types are problematic for storing and disposal as their Aluminium cladding degrades leading to activity release, possible loss of containment and criticality concerns. Thus, direct disposal of RTR used fuel, (without prior treatment and conditioning) is in this respect hardly suitable. In the same manner, long term interim storage of RTR used fuel has to take into account the issue of fuel corrosion. Treating RTR used fuel allows separating the content into recyclable materials and residues. It offers many advantages as compared to direct disposal such as the retrieval of valuable fissile material, the reduction of radio-toxicity and a very significant reduction of the volume of the ultimate waste package (reduction factor between 30 and 50). In addition, the vitrification of the residues provides a package that has been specifically designed to ensure long term durability for long term interim storage as well as final disposal (99% of the activity is encapsulated into a stable matrix). RTR fuel treatment process was developed several decades ago by AREVA with now thirty years of experience at an industrial level. The treatment process consists in dissolving the whole assembly (including the Al cladding) in nitric acid and then diluting it with standard Uranium Oxide fuel dissolution liquor prior to treatment with the nominal Tributylphosphate solvent extraction process. A wide range of RTR spent fuel has already been treated in the AREVA facilities. First, at the Marcoule plant over 18 tons of U-Al type RTR fuel from 21 reactors in 11 countries was processed. The treatment activities are now undertaken at the La Hague plant where 17 tons of RTR used fuel from Australia Belgium, and France aligned for treatment. In June 2005, AREVA started to treat at La Hague ANSTO's Australian RTR used fuel from

  9. Facilities offered by the CEA group for training foreign specialists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    First set up in 1945, the CEA (French Atomic Energy Commission) opened its doors to foreign scientists and technicians as long ago as the 1950s, and particularly so since 1960. Among the 15 000 foreigners concerned, some have come in the capacity of co-workers, while others - approximately 10 000 - have taken courses for the purpose of receiving training. Since the CEA constitutes both a public scientific institution and an industrial group, especially by virtue of its branch organizations and specialized production units, it possesses incomparably varied facilities. This is why almost all the countries of the world, at some time or other, have had nationals at the Saclay, Fontenay-aux-Roses, Grenoble and Cadarache research centres, or the National Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology (INSTN) at Saclay, a specialized establishment set up in 1956, or else at the Razes Information and Further Training Centre (CIPRA), specializing in the uranium ore industry. Most of the trainees received over the last few years by the CEA Group stem from the developing countries, those coming to receive practical technological training being ever more numerous. Several of the training programmes devised have involved participation in industrial operations, either in conjunction with Technicatome, a branch organization specializing in nuclear engineering (Iran, Iraq) or in association with other CEA Group units (South Korea). The trainees usually receive fellowships through the intermediary of French diplomatic missions, in which case it is enough if they continue to receive the salary normally paid to them by the public organization employing them. On the other hand, technological training sometimes involves payment because of the expense involved (intensive supervision and expensive experimental work). Finally, courses in French are organized in France by specialized institutions, but English is acceptable for very brief training periods. (author)

  10. Areva - Half year financial report June 30, 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This half-year financial report contains statements on the objectives, prospects and growth areas for the AREVA group. It gives a view of the net worth, the financial position and the income of the company and all the companies included in consolidation. It presents the major events that occurred during the first six months of the fiscal year, of their effect on the financial statements and of the main transactions between related parties. It gives a description of the main risks and main uncertainties for the remaining six months of the financial year. Content: 1 - Half-year business report: Significant events, Summary data, Segment reporting, Backlog, Income statement, Review by division, Cash flow, Balance sheet items, Events subsequent to closing, Outlook; 2 - Statutory auditors' report on the financial information for the 2009 half-year - period January 1 to June 30, 2009: Condensed consolidated financial statements at June 30, 2009, Consolidated income statement, Consolidated comprehensive income, Consolidated balance sheet, Consolidated cash flow statement, Consolidated statement of changes in equity, Segment reporting, Notes to the consolidated financial statements for the period ending June 30, 2009

  11. AREVA Technical Days (ATD) session 3: operations of the reactors and services division, technical and economic aspects; AREVA Technical Days (ATD) session 3: les activites du pole reacteurs et services, aspects techniques et economiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-07-01

    These technical days organized by the Areva Group aims to explain the group activities in a technological and economic point of view, to provide an outlook of worldwide energy trends and challenges and to present each of their businesses in a synthetic manner. This third session deals with the reactors technologies basics, the EPR and SWR 1000 issues and outlook, the nuclear systems of the future, the business opportunities and business models. (A.L.B.)

  12. Joining the Nuclear Renaissance with the Engineering Business Unit of AREVA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hubert, Nathalie; Menguy, Stephane [SGN, AREVA Group, 1 rue des Herons, 78182 Saint-Quentin en Yvelines Cedex (France); Valery, Jean-Francois [AREVA NC, AREVA Group, Tour AREVA, 1 place de la Coupole, 92084 Paris La Defense Cedex (France)

    2008-07-01

    The reality of the nuclear renaissance is no longer a question. All over the world, new nuclear plants are going to be deployed; the whole fuel cycle has to be adjusted to fulfil their needs, the front-end to produce the fuel and the back-end to properly manage radioactive waste. AREVA fuel cycle engineering teams have been involved in the design of a variety of industrial plants covering the entire fuel cycle for 50 years. The consistency of the French nuclear policy has been a major factor to acquire and renew the competencies and workforce of AREVA Engineering Business Unit. Our partnership with our customers, French ones but also Japanese, Americans and from other countries, has led us to develop a comprehensive approach of the services that we can deliver, in order to give them the best answer. SGN teams have been involved in the R and D phases in order to take into account the industrialisation aspects as early as possible, and our work does not end with the delivery of the plants; it includes assistance to the operators to optimise and keep their facilities in line with the changing rules and constraints, which ensures the integration of a wide operational experience feedback and the ability to design flexible facilities. This paper will present through our experience how this global approach has been developed and continuously improved and how we are preparing our teams to be ready to answer to the coming needs. (authors)

  13. Joining the Nuclear Renaissance with the Engineering Business Unit of AREVA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reality of the nuclear renaissance is no longer a question. All over the world, new nuclear plants are going to be deployed; the whole fuel cycle has to be adjusted to fulfil their needs, the front-end to produce the fuel and the back-end to properly manage radioactive waste. AREVA fuel cycle engineering teams have been involved in the design of a variety of industrial plants covering the entire fuel cycle for 50 years. The consistency of the French nuclear policy has been a major factor to acquire and renew the competencies and workforce of AREVA Engineering Business Unit. Our partnership with our customers, French ones but also Japanese, Americans and from other countries, has led us to develop a comprehensive approach of the services that we can deliver, in order to give them the best answer. SGN teams have been involved in the R and D phases in order to take into account the industrialisation aspects as early as possible, and our work does not end with the delivery of the plants; it includes assistance to the operators to optimise and keep their facilities in line with the changing rules and constraints, which ensures the integration of a wide operational experience feedback and the ability to design flexible facilities. This paper will present through our experience how this global approach has been developed and continuously improved and how we are preparing our teams to be ready to answer to the coming needs. (authors)

  14. Responsible Development of Areva's Mining Activities. 2010 report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After a map indicating the location of the main Areva's mining sites, this report provides several key figures and data and discusses the evolution of this activity which is part of the business core of the AREVA company. It gives a statement of values and principles, governance and commitments related to this activity. In order to report this activity, it addresses several topics: reduction of industrial risks, protection of workers and populations, rational consumption of water and energy resources, biodiversity preservation, management over time of waste rock and mining tailings, sustainable integration into territories, and contribution to social development. This document is proposed in French and in English

  15. Responsible Development of AREVA's Mining Activities - Report 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By defining AREVA's strategy and policies, this report aims to demonstrate the company's performance in the key areas of mining activity responsibility: ethics and governance, social report, the environment, occupational health and safety, community involvement, commitments to stakeholders. The data given cover the assets for which AREVA acts as operator in uranium mining activities: exploration, project development, production and rehabilitation. The consolidated data target activities in France, Canada, Niger, Kazakhstan, Mongolia, Gabon and Namibia. Activities in the Central African Republic and those linked to La Mancha no longer fall within the scope of this report (sale of assets in 2012). This report is the third edition of this annual exercise

  16. Nuclear renaissance in the reactor training of Areva

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Braquilanges, Bertrand [Reactor Training Center/France Manager, La Tour Areva - 1, place Jean Millier - 92084 Paris - La Defense (France); Napior, Amy [Reactor Training Center/USA Manager, 1300 Old Graves Mill Road - Lynchburg VA, 2450 (United States); Schoenfelder, Christian [Reactor Training Center/Germany Manager, Kaiserleistrasse 29 - 63067 Offenbach (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    Because of the perspectives of new builds, a significant increase in the number of design, construction and management personnel working in AREVA, their clients and sub-contractors has been estimated for the next future. In order to cope with the challenge to integrate newly hired people quickly and effectively into the AREVA workforce, a project - 'Training Task Force (TTF)' - was launched in 2008. The objective was to develop introductory and advanced courses and related tools harmonized between AREVA Training Centers in France, Germany and USA. First, a Global Plants Introductory Session (GPIS) was developed for newly hired employees. GPIS is a two weeks training course introducing in a modular way AREVA and specifically the activities and the reactors technical basics. As an example, design and operation of a nuclear power plant is illustrated on EPRTM. Since January 2009, these GPIS are held regularly in France, Germany and the US with a mixing of employees from these 3 regions. Next, advanced courses for more experienced employees were developed: - Advanced EPR{sup TM}, giving a detailed presentation of the EPR{sup TM} reactor design; - Codes and Standards; - Technical Nuclear Safety. Finally, feasibility studies on a Training Material Management (TMM) system, able to manage the training documentation, and on a worldwide training administration tool, were performed. The TTF project was completed mid of 2009; it transferred their recurrent activities to a new AREVA training department. This unit now consists of the French, German and US Reactors Training Centers. In particular, all courses developed by the TTF are now implemented worldwide with an opening to external trainees. The current worldwide course catalogue includes training courses for operation and maintenance personnel as well as for managers, engineers and non technical personnel of nuclear operators, suppliers, safety authorities and expert organizations. Training delivery is supported

  17. TAO2000 V2 computer-assisted force feedback tele-manipulators used as maintenance and production tools at the AREVA NC-La Hague fuel recycling plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During a 15-year joint research program, French Atomic Energy Agency Interactive Robotics Laboratory (CEA LIST) and AREVA have developed several remote operation devices, also called tele-robots. Some of them are now commonly used for maintenance operations at the AREVA NC (Nuclear Cycle) La Hague reprocessing plant. Since the first maintenance operation in 2005, several other successful interventions have been realized using the industrial MA23/RX170 tele-manipulation system. Moreover, since 2010, the through-the-wall tele-robot named MT200 TAO based on the slave arm of the MSM MT200 (La CalheneTM), has been evaluated in an active production cell at the AREVA NC La Hague fuel recycling plant. Although these evaluations are ongoing, the positive results obtained have led to an update and industrialization program. All these developments are based on the same generic control platform, called TAO2000 V2. TAO2000 V2 is the second release of the CEA LIST core software platform dedicated to computer aided force-feedback tele-operation (TAO is the French acronym for computer aided tele-operation). This paper presents all these developments resulting from the joint research program CEA LIST/AREVA. The TAO2000 V2 controller is first detailed, and then two maintenance operations using the industrial robot RX170 are presented: the removal of the nuclear fuel dissolver wheel rollers and the cleanup of the dissolver wheel inter-bucket spaces. Finally, the new MT200 TAO system and its evaluations at the AREVA NC La Hague facilities are discussed. (authors)

  18. Responsible Development of Areva's Mining Activities. Report 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After a presentation of the approach to responsibility adopted by AREVA to be a responsible mining stake holder (charter of values, implemented policies, risk prevention and management, best practices), this report gives an overview of mining activities (international presence, production in constant increase) with a focus on uranium mining which is the core business (the different phases are briefly presented: exploration, project development, mining, site decommissioning). It outlines personnel qualification and commitment, actions and policy in the field of personnel health and safety. It addresses the environmental policy: key levers, environmental management system, examples throughout the entire mining life cycle, changes in site consumptions and emissions, promotion of biodiversity. The next part concerns Areva's social commitment (dialogue, development aid in mining territories). Then, performance is expressed in terms of indicators for these different issues (teams, environmental policy, social involvement)

  19. Former radioactive waste storage sites: the case of the AREVA NC La Hague plant; Les anciens sites d'entreposage de dechets radioactifs: le cas de l'usine AREVA NC de La Hague

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houdre, Th. [Autorite de Surete Nucleaire, chef de la Division de Caen, 75 - Paris (France)

    2011-02-15

    Unlike AREVA NC's new UP2-800 and UP3 plants at La Hague, where the waste is conditioned in-line, the majority of waste produced while its first UP2-400 plant was still in service was stored without final packaging, at installations that no longer meet the safety requirements currently applicable. ASN believes that such storage facilities pose major safety problems. These problems are mainly related to the fact that little is known about the exact condition of certain storage facilities and the waste they contain, nor how they will evolve over time, as well as to former facility design and the inadequacy of early leak detection systems. Operations to recover this waste are technically complicated and require considerable resources and investment. As a result, the main issue as far as ASN is concerned is to ensure that the deadlines declared by AREVA are met, given that they are often dependent on the development of waste recovery procedures that do not as yet exist. For several years now, in view of the considerable delays affecting the majority of waste recovery projects, ASN has enforced the binding provisions set out under the TSN Act to set a schedule for the recovery of this old waste by prescribed dates. This situation serves to consolidate ASN's actions in requiring operators to assess, for all projects, the amount of waste generated, and to take measures for it to be processed and packaged as and when it is produced. (author)

  20. AREVA in Niger, a long term uranium producer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Niger ranks number three amongst uranium producing countries and holds the fourth world resources. Niger Uranium story started fifty years ago and AREVA is its first partner since. AREVA/COGEMA inherited the exploration programs conducted by former 'Bureau Minier de la France d'Outre-mer' and 'Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique' in the early sixties. Arlit's deposits came out of that. In association with other partners (Niger government through ONAREM, Japan and Spain), uranium production started in 1967 with joint venture company SOMAIR followed by COMINAK. That partnership stands sound through the 1980-2003 market depression and production rate never slows since. Near by prospects allow extension and keeping activities ahead as it is the case now where the two companies have more than ten years production assured reserves. New major project is also on hand with more than 100 000 tons of uranium. AREVA/COGEMA foresaw the current market upraise when it launched a large exploration program three years ago in its previous allotted area. Regulatory agreement is underway for more prospecting areas allocation. More decades of uranium production resources are expected. This long partnership is supported by a sustainable development commitment in a hard to live desert area: health care, school, training, water supply, energy and employment. (author)

  1. AREVA Technical Days (ATD) session 2: operations of the back-end of the nuclear fuel cycle; AREVA Technical Days (ATD) session 2: les activites du pole Aval du cycle du combustible nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    These technical days organized by the Areva Group aims to explain the group activities in a technological and economic point of view, to provide an outlook of worldwide energy trends and challenges and to present each of their businesses in a synthetic manner. This second session deals with the reprocessing business, back-end financing mechanisms, technology transfer, environmental management, risk management programs, research and development contribution to waste volume reductions, issues and outlook of nuclear wastes, comparison of the open and closed cycles. (A.L.B.)

  2. AREVA Technical Days (ATD) session 2: operations of the back-end of the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    These technical days organized by the Areva Group aims to explain the group activities in a technological and economic point of view, to provide an outlook of worldwide energy trends and challenges and to present each of their businesses in a synthetic manner. This second session deals with the reprocessing business, back-end financing mechanisms, technology transfer, environmental management, risk management programs, research and development contribution to waste volume reductions, issues and outlook of nuclear wastes, comparison of the open and closed cycles. (A.L.B.)

  3. Areva first half 2008 financial results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Operating income: 539 million euros; net income attributable to equity holders of the parent: up 465 million euros to 760 million euros, i.e. 21.45 euros per share; net debt of 2.385 billion euros, i.e. 30.1% of equity (26.2% at 12/31/2007). For 2008 as a whole, the group confirms its outlook for a sharp increase in backlog and in revenue and rising operating income. The backlog rose to 38.123 billion euros at June 30, 2008, up 13.6% compared with the 33.553 billion euros recognized at June 30, 2007. In Nuclear, contributors to growth were the Reactors and Services division (+36%) and the Front End division (+11%). The Transmission and Distribution division posted growth of 41%. First half 2008 revenue rose to 6.168 billion euros, for 14.8% reported growth and 16.0% organic growth. In the nuclear businesses, organic growth was 18.6%, including 31.3% growth in Reactors and Services as new power plant construction projects moved forward and 12.0% growth in Transmission and Distribution business. The group's operating income rose to 539 million euros in the first half of 2008, for a margin rate of 8.7%, compared with 207 million euros in the first half of 2007 and a margin rate of 3.9%. This 332 million euro increase includes: - the strong volume increase in our commercial and industrial operations and the positive impact this had on profitability for all of our divisions; - a substantial operational gain in the Front End division, including a significant dilution gain related to acquisition by Suez of an equity interest in the GB II enrichment plant; - an additional provision on the OL3 contract, made necessary by: cost overruns generated by the use of additional resources needed to meet the schedule and offset the customer's operating practices; and the difficulties and risks on operations managed by some subcontractors. Operating income for the Back End division rose to 400 million euros, an increase of 177 million euros compared with the first half of 2007. The

  4. EPR by Areva. EPR the 1600+ MWe reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-07-01

    This brochure presents the GEN III+ EPR reactor designed by the Areva and Siemens consortium. The EPR reactor is a direct descendent of the well-proven N4 and KONVOI reactors, the most modern reactors in France and Germany. The EPR was designed by teams from KWU/Siemens and Framatome, EDF in France and the major German utilities, working in collaboration with both French and German safety authorities. The EPR integrates the results of decades of R and D programs, in particular those performed by the CEA (French Atomic Energy Commission) and the Karlsruhe Research Center in Germany. The EPR benefits from the experience of several thousand reactor-years of operation of pressurized water reactor technology. This experience has put 87 AREVA PWRs online throughout the world. Innovative Features: - An outer shell covering the reactor building, the spent fuel building and two of the four safeguard buildings provides protection against large commercial or military aircraft crash. - A heavy neutron reflector that surrounds the reactor core lowers uranium consumption. - An axial economizer inside the steam generator allows a high level of steam pressure and therefore high plant efficiency. - A core catcher allows passive collection and retention of the molten core should the reactor vessel fail in the highly unlikely event of a core melt. - A digital technology and a fully computerized control room with an operator friendly man-machine interface improve the reactor protection system.

  5. 'Action 2016': AREVA's strategic action plan; AREVA presente son Plan d'Actions Strategique 'Action 2016'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marie, Patricia; Briand, Pauline; Floquet-Daubigeon, Fleur; Michaut, Maxime; De Scorbiac, Marie; Du Repaire, Philippine

    2011-12-13

    On December 13, 2011, Luc Oursel, CEO, and Pierre Aubouin, Chief Financial Officer presented the group's strategic plan for the period 2012-2016. The plan has been drawn up collectively and is based on a thorough-going analysis and a realistic assessment of perspectives for all group activities and associated resources. Development of nuclear and renewable energies: the fundamentals are unchanged. In this context, the German decision remains an isolated case and the great majority of nuclear programs around the world have been confirmed. More conservative in its projections than the International Energy Agency, the group expects growth of 2.2% annually, reaching 583 GW of installed nuclear capacity by 2030, against 378 GW today. However, the Fukushima accident will lead to delays in launching new programs. 'Action 2016' plan aims to consolidate AREVA's leadership in nuclear energy and become a leading player in renewable energy. The group's strategic action plan 'Action 2016' is based on the following strategic choices: - commercial priority given to value creation, - selectivity in investments, - strengthening of the financial structure. These demand an improvement in the group's performance by 2015. This plan makes nuclear safety a strategic priority for the industrial and commercial performance of the group. This ambitious performance plan for the period 2012-2016 will give the group the wherewithal to withstand a temporary slowdown in the market resulting from the Fukushima accident and to deliver safe and sustainable growth of the business. The plan sets out the strategic direction for the group's employees for the years ahead: taking advantage of the expected growth in nuclear and renewable energies, targeted investment programs, and return to self-financing as of 2014

  6. An effective and sustainable D&D concept. Competencies and experiences of AREVA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Business Unit created in 2008 to manage nuclear sites dismantling projects for AREVA and external clients through: Assistance during post-closure phase /deregulation; D&D planning and assistance; Project- and Site-Management; Decontamination; Dismantling; Waste management

  7. 75 FR 62895 - Notice of Availability of Safety Evaluation Report; AREVA Enrichment Services LLC, Eagle Rock...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-13

    ... criticality safety, chemical process safety, fire safety, emergency management, environmental protection... COMMISSION Notice of Availability of Safety Evaluation Report; AREVA Enrichment Services LLC, Eagle Rock... of availability of safety evaluation report. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Breeda Reilly,...

  8. The nuclear data, A key component for reactor studies, Overview of AREVA NP needs and applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravaux Simon

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The quality of the nuclear data is essential for AREVA NP. Indeed, many AREVA NP activities such as reactor design, safety studies or reactor instrumentation use them as input data. So, the nuclear data can be considered as a key element for AREVA NP. REVA NP’s contribution in the improvement of the nuclear data consists in a joint effort with the CEA. It means a financing and a sharing of information which can give an orientation to the future research axis. The aim of this article is to present the industrial point of view from AREVA NP on the research on nuclear data. Several examples of collaborations with the CEA which have resulted in an improvement of the nuclear data are presented.

  9. Transmission and Distribution: AREVA takes further action to reinforce its presence in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Following the recent opening of its new gas-insulated switchgear factory last month in Suzhou, China, AREVA's Transmission and Distribution (T and D) division has announced additional actions to increase its market share in the country. The division has just signed an agreement to form a 50/50 joint venture with the Chinese company, Sunten Electric Co. Ltd., a leading manufacturer of distribution transformers, whose 2006 annual sales reached circa euro 120 million. Through this joint venture, AREVA T and D will become No 1 in China for dry-type transformers, Sunten Electric Co. Ltd.'s specialization. AREVA T and D has also established a partnership with the China Electric Power Research Institute (C-EPRI), a leading Chinese organization specialized in electrical technologies. Under the agreement, C-EPRI will be the official licensee for AREVA T and D's H-400 high-voltage direct current (HVDC) Thyristor valves in China. The partnership will enable AREVA T and D to enter the fast-growing domestic HVDC market. The T and D sector in China represents 24% of the worldwide transmission and distribution market. AREVA T and D's turnover in China, where demand for T and D equipment is growing strongly, should significantly contribute to the division's objective to reach euro 5 billion in sales by 2010

  10. Task Order 22 – Engineering and Technical Support, Deep Borehole Field Test. AREVA Summary Review Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denton, Mark A. [AREVA Federal Services, Charlotte, NC (United States)

    2016-01-19

    radiological release due to off-normal events are relatively low; (4) costs are relatively low; and (5) maintenance activities are relatively simple. The primary drawback associated with the wireline emplacement mode for DBD is the number of emplacement trips-in to the borehole, which results in a relatively higher probability for a drop event. Fortunately, the WPs can be engineered with impact limiters that will minimize the likelihood of a breach of the WP due to a drop. The WP designs presented in the M2 report appear to be focused on compatibility with the drill-string emplacement mode (e.g., the threaded connections). With the recommendation that the wireline emplacement mode be utilized for the DBFT, some changes may be warranted to these WPs. For example, the development of a WP release connection that is more reliable than the currently credited connection, which is considered to have a high failure probability, and the integration of an impact limiter into its design. The M2 report states the engineering demonstration of the DBFT will occur in the FTB over a 4-year period. AREVA recommends development and testing of the WP emplacement handling equipment occur separately (but concurrently, if not earlier) from the FTB at a mock-up facility. The separation of this activity would prevent schedule interference between the science and engineering thrusts of the project. Performing tests in a mock-up facility would allow additional control and observation compared to the FTB. The mock-up facility could also be utilized as a training facility for future operations. Terminal velocity and impact limiter testing would require the FTB for testing, since these areas would be difficult to reproduce in a limited depth mock-up. Although only at the end of the conceptual stage of design development, DBD appears to be a viable solution for some waste forms produced by the nuclear industry. However, regulatory requirements have yet to be established for pre- and post

  11. Task Order 22 – Engineering and Technical Support, Deep Borehole Field Test. AREVA Summary Review Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denton, Mark A. [AREVA Federal Services, Charlotte, NC (United States)

    2016-01-19

    radiological release due to off-normal events are relatively low; (4) costs are relatively low; and (5) maintenance activities are relatively simple. The primary drawback associated with the wireline emplacement mode for DBD is the number of emplacement trips-in to the borehole, which results in a relatively higher probability for a drop event. Fortunately, the WPs can be engineered with impact limiters that will minimize the likelihood of a breach of the WP due to a drop. The WP designs presented in the M2 report appear to be focused on compatibility with the drill-string emplacement mode (e.g., the threaded connections). With the recommendation that the wireline emplacement mode be utilized for the DBFT, some changes may be warranted to these WPs. For example, the development of a WP release connection that is more reliable than the currently credited connection, which is considered to have a high failure probability, and the integration of an impact limiter into its design. The M2 report states the engineering demonstration of the DBFT will occur in the FTB over a 4-year period. AREVA recommends development and testing of the WP emplacement handling equipment occur separately (but concurrently, if not earlier) from the FTB at a mock-up facility. The separation of this activity would prevent schedule interference between the science and engineering thrusts of the project. Performing tests in a mock-up facility would allow additional control and observation compared to the FTB. The mock-up facility could also be utilized as a training facility for future operations. Terminal velocity and impact limiter testing would require the FTB for testing, since these areas would be difficult to reproduce in a limited depth mock-up. Although only at the end of the conceptual stage of design development, DBD appears to be a viable solution for some waste forms produced by the nuclear industry. However, regulatory requirements have yet to be established for pre- and post

  12. The Integral Test Facility Karlstein

    OpenAIRE

    Stephan Leyer; Michael Wich

    2012-01-01

    The Integral Test Facility Karlstein (INKA) test facility was designed and erected to test the performance of the passive safety systems of KERENA, the new AREVA Boiling Water Reactor design. The experimental program included single component/system tests of the Emergency Condenser, the Containment Cooling Condenser and the Passive Core Flooding System. Integral system tests, including also the Passive Pressure Pulse Transmitter, will be performed to simulate transients and Loss of Coolant A...

  13. AREVA announces US$ 7.75 Per share friendly cash offer for UraMin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AREVA and UraMin Inc. ('UraMin') entered on June 15, 2007 into an agreement in respect of AREVA's friendly cash offer for 100% of the share capital of UraMin. UraMin is listed in London (AIM) and Toronto (TSX). AREVA (Euronext Paris) already owns 5.5% of UraMin's share capital. This cash offer of AREVA will be made through its indirect wholly-owned subsidiary CFMM Development ('AREVA') based on a price of US$ 7.75 per UraMin share. The total offer consideration amounts to more than USD 2.5 billion for 100% of the fully diluted share capital of UraMin. This represents a premium of 21% over UraMin 20-day weighted average trading price ending on June 8, 2007. The UraMin Board of Directors, after consulting with its financial advisors, has determined that the offer is fair and in the best interest of the UraMin shareholders and it has resolved to recommend acceptance of the Offer. BMO Capital Markets has provided an opinion that the offer is fair, from a financial point of view, to the UraMin shareholders. In connection with the offer, all directors and certain other shareholders representing approximately 25% of the outstanding UraMin shares (calculated on a fully diluted basis) have entered into lock-up agreements with AREVA pursuant to which they have agreed to tender all their UraMin shares to AREVA's offer. The support agreement entered into between AREVA and UraMin provides for, among other things, in case a superior proposal is accepted by UraMin, a right to match in favour of AREVA. The support agreement also includes a break up fee in favour of AREVA of US$ 75 million under certain circumstances. Concurrently with the closing of the proposed offer, UraMin will declare a dividend payable in shares of the capital of Niger Uranium Limited held by UraMin (where permitted by law) or a cash equivalent of the value of such shares

  14. Areva revenue and data for the first quarter of 2008; Areva informations et chiffre d'affaires relatifs au 1. trimestre de l'exercice 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-07-01

    First quarter 2008 revenue was up 12.1% year-on-year, to 2.769 billion euros. Like-for-like (at constant exchange rates and consolidation scope), growth came to 14.5%. Foreign exchange had a negative impact of 2.5%, or -69 million euros, mainly due to currency translation tied to the US dollar drop compared with the euro. The consolidation scope had a positive impact of +0.7% or 18 million euros, chiefly as a result of the consolidation of VEI Distribution (specializing in medium voltage distribution) and Passoni and Villa (world leader in the manufacture of high voltage bushings) in the Transmission and Distribution division. The main growth engines for first quarter revenue were the Reactors and Services division and the Back End division, with growth of 29.7% (+36.8% LFL1) and 13.8% (+14.1% LFL1) respectively. Outside France, revenue rose to 1.857 billion euros, compared with 1.753 billion euros in the first quarter of 2007. This represents 67% of total revenue. As a reminder, the group points out that: - revenue can vary significantly from one quarter to the next in the nuclear businesses, and quarterly operations should therefore not be taken as a reliable basis for annual projections; - the foreign exchange impact mentioned in this release comes from the translation of subsidiary accounts into the group's unit of account, and primarily reflects the US dollar in relation to the euro. AREVA also points out that its foreign exchange hedging policy for commercial operations aims to shield profitability from fluctuations in exchange rates in relation to the euro.

  15. 'Action 2016': AREVA's strategic action plan to improve performance; 'Action 2016': le plan d'actions strategique d'AREVA pour ameliorer sa performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marie, Patricia; Floquet-Daubigeon, Fleur; Michaut, Maxime; De Scorbiac, Marie; Du Repaire, Philippine

    2011-12-12

    On December 12, 2011, Luc Oursel, Executive Officer of AREVA, and Pierre Aubouin, Chief Financial Executive Officer, presented the group's 'Action 2016' strategic action plan based on an in-depth analysis of the market's outlook. This document makes, first, a Detailed presentation of the 'Action 2016' plan and then presents the group's financial outlook: - Full-year 2011 immediate accounting consequences of the new market environment: operating losses expected in 2011; - 2012-2013 transition period Objective: self-finance capex in cumulative terms; - 2014-2016: safe growth and cash generation, free operating cash flow at break-even beginning in 2013, above euro 1 bn per year beginning in 2015

  16. Areva first half 2008 financial results; Areva - Resultats du 1. semestre 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-07-01

    Operating income: 539 million euros; net income attributable to equity holders of the parent: up 465 million euros to 760 million euros, i.e. 21.45 euros per share; net debt of 2.385 billion euros, i.e. 30.1% of equity (26.2% at 12/31/2007). For 2008 as a whole, the group confirms its outlook for a sharp increase in backlog and in revenue and rising operating income. The backlog rose to 38.123 billion euros at June 30, 2008, up 13.6% compared with the 33.553 billion euros recognized at June 30, 2007. In Nuclear, contributors to growth were the Reactors and Services division (+36%) and the Front End division (+11%). The Transmission and Distribution division posted growth of 41%. First half 2008 revenue rose to 6.168 billion euros, for 14.8% reported growth and 16.0% organic growth. In the nuclear businesses, organic growth was 18.6%, including 31.3% growth in Reactors and Services as new power plant construction projects moved forward and 12.0% growth in Transmission and Distribution business. The group's operating income rose to 539 million euros in the first half of 2008, for a margin rate of 8.7%, compared with 207 million euros in the first half of 2007 and a margin rate of 3.9%. This 332 million euro increase includes: - the strong volume increase in our commercial and industrial operations and the positive impact this had on profitability for all of our divisions; - a substantial operational gain in the Front End division, including a significant dilution gain related to acquisition by Suez of an equity interest in the GB II enrichment plant; - an additional provision on the OL3 contract, made necessary by: cost overruns generated by the use of additional resources needed to meet the schedule and offset the customer's operating practices; and the difficulties and risks on operations managed by some subcontractors. Operating income for the Back End division rose to 400 million euros, an increase of 177 million euros compared with the first half of

  17. Factors associated with group bullying and psychopathology in elementary school students using child-welfare facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim JW

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Jun Won Kim,1,2 KounSeok Lee,3 Young Sik Lee,4 Doug Hyun Han,4 Kyung Joon Min,4 Sung Hwan Song,5 Ga Na Park,6 Ju Young Lee,1 Jae Ock Kim5 1Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Department of Neuropsychiatry, College of Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul, South Korea; 2Department of Psychiatry, Graduate School, Chung-Ang University, Seoul, South Korea; 3Department of Psychiatry, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul, South Korea; 4Department of Psychiatry, Chung-Ang University, College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea; 5Department of Psychiatry, Gongju National Hospital, Gongju, South Korea; 6Department of Special Education, Graduate School, Dankook University, Jukjeon, South Korea Purpose: Low socioeconomic status is an important risk factor for child psychiatric problems. Low socioeconomic status is also associated with psychiatric problems later in life. We investigated the effects of group bullying on clinical characteristics and psychopathology in elementary school students using child-welfare facilities.Methods: Three hundred and fifty-eight elementary school students using child-welfare facilities were recruited. The School Bullying Self Rating Questionnaire was used to assess group bullying. To evaluate related psychopathology, the Children’s Problem-Behavior Screening Questionnaire, the Children’s Depression Inventory, the Beck Anxiety Inventory, the Suicidal Ideation Questionnaire, Young’s Internet Addiction Scale, and Conners–Wells’ Adolescent Self-Report Scale were applied. Samples were classified according to school grade (lower or upper, and each group’s characteristics were compared as they related to bullying victims versus non-victims.Results: The prevalence rate of group bullying was 22% in the lower-grade group and 12% in the higher-grade group. Bullying victims in lower grades reported high somatization, depressive symptoms, Internet addiction, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder tendencies, whereas

  18. AREVA NP Inc next generation fresh UO2 fuel assembly shipping cask: SCALE - CRISTAL comparisons lead to safety criticality confidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AREVA NP as a worldwide PWR fuel provider has to have a fleet of fresh UO2 shipping casks being agreed within a lot of countries including USA (France), Germany, Belgium, Sweden, China, and South Africa... and to accommodate foreseen EPR Nuclear Power Plants fuel buildings. To reach this target the AREVA NP Fuel Sector decided to develop an up to date shipping cask gathering experience feedback of the today fleet and an improved safety allowing the design to comply with international regulations (NRC and IAEA) and local Safety Authorities. Based on pre design features a safety case was set up to highlight safety margins. Criticality hypothetical accidental assumptions were defined: -Preferential flooding - Fuel rod lattice pitch expansion for full length of fuel assemblies - Neutron absorber penalty -... Well known computer codes, American SCALE package and French CRISTAL package, were used to check configurations reactivity and to ensure that both codes lead to coherent results. Basic spectral calculations are based on similar algorithms with specific microscopic cross sections ENDF/BV for SCALE and JEF2.2 for CRISTAL. The main differences between the two packages is on one hand SCALE's three dimensional fuel assembly geometry is described by a pin by pin model while an homogenized fuel assembly description is used by CRISTAL and on the other hand SCALE is working with either 44 or 238 neutron energy groups while CRISTAL is with a 172 neutron energy groups. Those two computer packages rely on a wide validation process helping defining uncertainties as required by regulations in force. The shipping cask with two fuel assemblies is designed to maximize fuel isolation inside a cask and with neighboring ones even for large array configuration cases. Proven industrial products are used: - BoralTM as neutron absorber - High density polyethylene (HDPE) or Nylon as neutron moderator - Foam as thermal and mechanical protection The cask is designed to handle the complete

  19. AREVA NP next generation fresh UO2 fuel assembly shipping cask: SCALE - CRISTAL comparisons lead to safety criticality confidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AREVA NP as a worldwide PWR fuel provider has to have a fleet of fresh UO2 shipping casks being agreed within a lot of countries including USA, France, Germany, Belgium, Sweden, China, and South Africa - and to accommodate foreseen EPR Nuclear Power Plants fuel buildings. To reach this target the AREVA NP Fuel Sector decided to develop an up-to-date shipping cask (so called MAP project) gathering experience feedback of the today fleet and an improved safety allowing the design to comply with international regulations (NRC and IAEA) and local Safety Authorities. Based on pre design features a safety case was set up to highlight safety margins. Criticality hypothetical accidental assumptions were defined: - Preferential flooding; - Fuel rod lattice pitch expansion for full length of fuel assemblies; - Neutron absorber penalty; -... Well known computer codes, American SCALE package and French CRISTAL package, were used to check configurations reactivity and to ensure that both codes lead to coherent results. Basic spectral calculations are based on similar algorithms with specific microscopic cross sections ENDF/BV for SCALE and JEF2.2 for CRISTAL. The main differences between the two packages is on one hand SCALE's three dimensional fuel assembly geometry is described by a pin by pin model while an homogenized fuel assembly description is used by CRISTAL and on the other hand SCALE is working with either 44 or 238 neutron energy groups while CRISTAL is with a 172 neutron energy groups. Those two computer packages rely on a wide validation process helping defining uncertainties as required by regulations in force. The shipping cask with two fuel assemblies is designed to maximize fuel isolation inside a cask and with neighboring ones even for large array configuration cases. Proven industrial products are used: - BoralTM as neutron absorber; - High density polyethylene (HDPE) or Nylon as neutron moderator; - Foam as thermal and mechanical protection. The cask is

  20. Final Design Report for the RH LLW Disposal Facility (RDF) Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Austad, Stephanie Lee [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The RH LLW Disposal Facility (RDF) Project was designed by AREVA Federal Services (AFS) and the design process was managed by Battelle Energy Alliance (BEA) for the Department of Energy (DOE). The final design report for the RH LLW Disposal Facility Project is a compilation of the documents and deliverables included in the facility final design.

  1. Final Design Report for the RH LLW Disposal Facility (RDF) Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The RH LLW Disposal Facility (RDF) Project was designed by AREVA Federal Services (AFS) and the design process was managed by Battelle Energy Alliance (BEA) for the Department of Energy (DOE). The final design report for the RH LLW Disposal Facility Project is a compilation of the documents and deliverables included in the facility final design.

  2. Final Design Report for the RH LLW Disposal Facility (RDF) Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Austad, S. L. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-05-01

    The RH LLW Disposal Facility (RDF) Project was designed by AREVA Federal Services (AFS) and the design process was managed by Battelle Energy Alliance (BEA) for the Department of Energy (DOE). The final design report for the RH LLW Disposal Facility Project is a compilation of the documents and deliverables included in the facility final design.

  3. Press kit. Cooperation between Areva and South Africa in the nuclear energy field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-07-01

    This document presents the nuclear industry business developed by Areva in South Africa. The first part offers general information on the country (political context, economy which fuels African growth, social situation and South Africa in search of sustainable development). An other part deals with the electricity supply (predominance of coal and the issue of global warming, electricity for everyone. The last parts detail the nuclear energy development (the new PBMR reactor project, the exploitation of all nuclear technology) and how Areva consolidates its presence in South Africa. (A.L.B.)

  4. Press kit. Cooperation between Areva and South Africa in the nuclear energy field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document presents the nuclear industry business developed by Areva in South Africa. The first part offers general information on the country (political context, economy which fuels African growth, social situation and South Africa in search of sustainable development). An other part deals with the electricity supply (predominance of coal and the issue of global warming, electricity for everyone. The last parts detail the nuclear energy development (the new PBMR reactor project, the exploitation of all nuclear technology) and how Areva consolidates its presence in South Africa. (A.L.B.)

  5. Areva T and D market opportunities after the US and EU Blackouts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document presents the events on the transmission systems during August 2003 in Usa and in September 2003 in Italy. The author analyzes the causes of the blackouts (small margins in transmission system, not adequate control, weaknesses in interconnections between regions), the market opportunity arising out of the blackouts, the economic regulatory and environmental structure/issues today and developments, the scenario for Areva after the blackout (the market size today and in the future) and Areva strength in relation to blackout. (A.L.B.) opportunities

  6. A facile method to synthesize magnetic polymer nanospheres with multifunctional groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Xiaojuan, E-mail: xixi@jit.edu.c [School of Material Engineering, Jinling Institute of Technology, Nanjing 211169 (China); Jiang Wei [National Special Superfine Powder Engineering Research Center, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China); Ye Yuanfeng; Feng Zhiqiang [School of Material Engineering, Jinling Institute of Technology, Nanjing 211169 (China); Sun Zhendong; Li Fengsheng [National Special Superfine Powder Engineering Research Center, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China); Hao Lingyun [School of Material Engineering, Jinling Institute of Technology, Nanjing 211169 (China); Chu Jianjun [Fourth Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Wuxi 214062 (China)

    2011-06-15

    Magnetic poly(styrene methyl methacrylate)/Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanospheres with ester groups were prepared by a modified one-step mini-emulsion polymerization in the presence of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} ferrofluids. The effects of monomer dose, surfactant content, ferrofluid concentration and initiator content on the particle characteristics such as the size, morphology and magnetic properties were investigated by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis and vibrating sample magnetometer. The results indicated that magnetic nanospheres were superparamagnetic with high saturation magnetization of 51.0 emu/g and corresponding magnetite content of 61.5 wt%. Subsequently, magnetic nanospheres with carboxyl and amino groups were also obtained by hydrolysis and ammonolysis reaction. These magnetic nanospheres with multifunctional groups have biomedical applications. - Research highlights: Facile way of synthesis of ester-functionalized superparamagnetic nanospheres. Wide scope of synthesis for other kinds of functional magnetic polymer nanospheres. The modification bilayer is the key factor controlling the encapsulation of products. Potential application of biomedical field.

  7. Facile synthesis and characterization of novel biodegradable amphiphilic block copolymers bearing pendant hydroxyl groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novel amphiphilic block copolymers bearing pendant hydroxyl groups polylactide-b–poly(3,3-bis(Hydroxymethyl–triazolylmethyl) oxetane)-b–polylactide (PLA-b–PHMTYO-b–PLA) were synthesized via a facile and efficient method. First, the block copolymer intermediates polylactide-b–poly(3,3-Diazidomethyloxetane)-b–polylactide (PLA-b–PBAMO-b–PLA) were synthesized through ring-opening polymerization of lactide using PBAMO as a macroinitiator. Following “Click” reaction of PLA-b–PBAMO-b–PLA with propargyl alcohol provided the targeted amphiphilic block copolymers PLA-b–PHMTYO-b–PLA with pendant hydroxyl groups. The composition and structure of prepared copolymers were characterized by 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR) spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and gel permeation chromatography (GPC). The self-assembly behavior of the copolymers in water was investigated by transmission electron microscope (TEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS) and static light scattering (SLS). The results showed that the novel copolymers PLA-b–PHMTYO-b–PLA self-assembled into spherical micelles with diameters ranging from 100 nm to 200 nm in aqueous solution. These copolymers also exhibited low critical micellar concentrations (CMC: 6.9 × 10−4 mg/mL and 3.9 × 10−5 mg/mL, respectively). In addition, the in vitro cytotoxicity of these copolymers was determined in the presence of L929 cells. The results showed that the block copolymers PLA-b–PHMTYO-b–PLA exhibited better biocompatibility. Therefore, these well-defined copolymers are expected to find some applications in drug delivery or tissue engineering. - Highlights: • The method to synthesize PLA-b–PHMTYO-b–PLA is relatively facile and efficient. • PLA-b–PHMTYO-b–PLA self-assembles into spherical micelles with low CMC in water. • PLA-b–PHMTYO-b–PLA exhibits better biocompatibility and biodegradability

  8. Facile synthesis and characterization of novel biodegradable amphiphilic block copolymers bearing pendant hydroxyl groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Gaicen; Fan, Xiaoshan; Xu, Bingcan; Zhang, Delong; Hu, Zhiguo, E-mail: zghu@htu.cn

    2014-10-01

    Novel amphiphilic block copolymers bearing pendant hydroxyl groups polylactide-b–poly(3,3-bis(Hydroxymethyl–triazolylmethyl) oxetane)-b–polylactide (PLA-b–PHMTYO-b–PLA) were synthesized via a facile and efficient method. First, the block copolymer intermediates polylactide-b–poly(3,3-Diazidomethyloxetane)-b–polylactide (PLA-b–PBAMO-b–PLA) were synthesized through ring-opening polymerization of lactide using PBAMO as a macroinitiator. Following “Click” reaction of PLA-b–PBAMO-b–PLA with propargyl alcohol provided the targeted amphiphilic block copolymers PLA-b–PHMTYO-b–PLA with pendant hydroxyl groups. The composition and structure of prepared copolymers were characterized by {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance ({sup 1}H NMR) spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and gel permeation chromatography (GPC). The self-assembly behavior of the copolymers in water was investigated by transmission electron microscope (TEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS) and static light scattering (SLS). The results showed that the novel copolymers PLA-b–PHMTYO-b–PLA self-assembled into spherical micelles with diameters ranging from 100 nm to 200 nm in aqueous solution. These copolymers also exhibited low critical micellar concentrations (CMC: 6.9 × 10{sup −4} mg/mL and 3.9 × 10{sup −5} mg/mL, respectively). In addition, the in vitro cytotoxicity of these copolymers was determined in the presence of L929 cells. The results showed that the block copolymers PLA-b–PHMTYO-b–PLA exhibited better biocompatibility. Therefore, these well-defined copolymers are expected to find some applications in drug delivery or tissue engineering. - Highlights: • The method to synthesize PLA-b–PHMTYO-b–PLA is relatively facile and efficient. • PLA-b–PHMTYO-b–PLA self-assembles into spherical micelles with low CMC in water. • PLA-b–PHMTYO-b–PLA exhibits better biocompatibility and biodegradability.

  9. 76 FR 9054 - Notice of Availability of Final Environmental Impact Statement for the AREVA Enrichment Services...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-16

    ... commercial nuclear power reactors. In the Final EIS, the NRC staff assessed the potential environmental... COMMISSION Notice of Availability of Final Environmental Impact Statement for the AREVA Enrichment Services... Commission. ACTION: Notice of Availability of Final Environmental Impact Statement. SUMMARY: Notice is...

  10. D-Side: A Facility and Workforce Planning Group Multi-criteria Decision Support System for Johnson Space Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavana, Madjid

    2005-01-01

    "To understand and protect our home planet, to explore the universe and search for life, and to inspire the next generation of explorers" is NASA's mission. The Systems Management Office at Johnson Space Center (JSC) is searching for methods to effectively manage the Center's resources to meet NASA's mission. D-Side is a group multi-criteria decision support system (GMDSS) developed to support facility decisions at JSC. D-Side uses a series of sequential and structured processes to plot facilities in a three-dimensional (3-D) graph on the basis of each facility alignment with NASA's mission and goals, the extent to which other facilities are dependent on the facility, and the dollar value of capital investments that have been postponed at the facility relative to the facility replacement value. A similarity factor rank orders facilities based on their Euclidean distance from Ideal and Nadir points. These similarity factors are then used to allocate capital improvement resources across facilities. We also present a parallel model that can be used to support decisions concerning allocation of human resources investments across workforce units. Finally, we present results from a pilot study where 12 experienced facility managers from NASA used D-Side and the organization's current approach to rank order and allocate funds for capital improvement across 20 facilities. Users evaluated D-Side favorably in terms of ease of use, the quality of the decision-making process, decision quality, and overall value-added. Their evaluations of D-Side were significantly more favorable than their evaluations of the current approach. Keywords: NASA, Multi-Criteria Decision Making, Decision Support System, AHP, Euclidean Distance, 3-D Modeling, Facility Planning, Workforce Planning.

  11. Information report issued in application of the article 146 of the regulation by the Commission for Finances, General Economy, and Budgetary Control on the development perspectives of AREVA and the future of the nuclear sector. Nr 2952

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As AREVA displays an unprecedented loss, and is facing a durable and persistent stagnation of its nuclear activities after the Fukushima accident, and as these losses are the consequences of misguided strategic decisions and disputable mining acquisitions, as well as of a problematic management of the main big industrial projects, this report comes after an intervention of the French President on the future of this company. The objectives are a restoration of Areva's competitiveness, and the elaboration of a new partnership between EDF and AREVA with a new definition of their respective roles in the design, manufacturing and selling of nuclear reactors. Notably based on hearings, and on visits of the Flamanville EPR site and of the La Hague reprocessing plant this reports aims at informing the French parliament on the different faced challenges and opportunities. The authors thus give an overview of the group financial situation and describe the important reorganisation issues. They analyse how the group has been weakened by its economic performance and a development mode with uncertain results. They try to define a possible future within the frame of a reorganised nuclear sector based on a high performance group, a good governance of the nuclear sector, an industrially consistent solution, and a relevant position for the French nuclear sector

  12. AREVA's fuel assemblies addressing high performance requirements of the worldwide PWR fleet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taking advantage of its presence in the fuel activities since the start of commercial nuclear worldwide operation, AREVA is continuing to support the customers with the priority on reliability, to: >participate in plant operational performance for the in core fuel reliability, the Zero Tolerance for Failure ZTF as a continuous improvement target and the minimisation of manufacturing/quality troubles, >guarantee the supply chain a proven product stability and continuous availability, >support performance improvements with proven design and technology for fuel management updating and cycle cost optimization, >support licensing assessments for fuel assembly and reloads, data/methodologies/services, >meet regulatory challenges regarding new phenomena, addressing emergent performance issues and emerging industry challenges for changing operating regimes. This capacity is based on supplies by AREVA accumulating very large experience both in manufacturing and in plant operation, which is demonstrated by: >manufacturing location in 4 countries including 9 fuel factories in USA, Germany, Belgium and France. Up to now about 120,000 fuel assemblies and 8,000 RCCA have been released to PWR nuclear countries, from AREVA European factories, >irradiation performed or in progress in about half of PWR world wide nuclear plants. Our optimum performances cover rod burn ups of to 82GWD/tU and fuel assemblies successfully operated under various world wide fuel management types. AREVA's experience, which is the largest in the world, has the extensive support of the well known fuel components such as the M5'TM'cladding, the MONOBLOC'TM'guide tube, the HTP'TM' and HMP'TM' structure components and the comprehensive services brought in engineering, irradiation and post irradiation fields. All of AREVA's fuel knowledge is devoted to extend the definition of fuel reliability to cover the whole scope of fuel vendor support. Our Top Reliability and Quality provide customers with continuous

  13. AGS SUPER NEUTRINO BEAM FACILITY ACCELERATOR AND TARGET SYSTEM DESIGN (NEUTRINO WORKING GROUP REPORT-II).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DIWAN,M.; MARCIANO,W.; WENG,W.; RAPARIA,D.

    2003-04-21

    This document describes the design of the accelerator and target systems for the AGS Super Neutrino Beam Facility. Under the direction of the Associate Laboratory Director Tom Kirk, BNL has established a Neutrino Working Group to explore the scientific case and facility requirements for a very long baseline neutrino experiment. Results of a study of the physics merit and detector performance was published in BNL-69395 in October 2002, where it was shown that a wide-band neutrino beam generated by a 1 MW proton beam from the AGS, coupled with a half megaton water Cerenkov detector located deep underground in the former Homestake mine in South Dakota would be able to measure the complete set of neutrino oscillation parameters: (1) precise determination of the oscillation parameters {Delta}m{sub 32}{sup 2} and sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 32}; (2) detection of the oscillation of {nu}{sub {mu}}-{nu}{sub e} and measurement of sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 13}; (3) measurement of {Delta}m{sub 21}{sup 2} sin 2{theta}{sub 12} in a {nu}{sub {mu}} {yields} {nu}{sub e} appearance mode, independent of the value of {theta}{sub 13}; (4) verification of matter enhancement and the sign of {Delta}m{sub 32}{sup 2}; and (5) determination of the CP-violation parameter {delta}{sub CP} in the neutrino sector. This report details the performance requirements and conceptual design of the accelerator and the target systems for the production of a neutrino beam by a 1.0 MW proton beam from the AGS. The major components of this facility include a new 1.2 GeV superconducting linac, ramping the AGS at 2.5 Hz, and the new target station for 1.0 MW beam. It also calls for moderate increase, about 30%, of the AGS intensity per pulse. Special care is taken to account for all sources of proton beam loss plus shielding and collimation of stray beam halo particles to ensure equipment reliability and personal safety. A preliminary cost estimate and schedule for the accelerator upgrade and target system are also

  14. AREVA ''Sustainable Cycle Solutions''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    capabilities are on track to expand in some countries there will be a growing need, to move forward efficiently, to smartly mix proven and evolving solutions (recycling, on site dry storage, pools, centralized storage, advanced technologies). These shall be combined in an optimized manner taking into account key criteria related to non proliferation, minimization of environmental impact, economics, fleet performance, responsibility towards future generations... The recommendations from Safety Authorities to deepen the question of very long term dry storage have also reactivated the debate about the available options for the short and long terms, including recycling, which is therefore likely to play an increasing role, especially if flexibility is required to ensure a cost-effective fast reactor ramp-up. Such an approach is aimed at meeting needs that may differ, even diverge depending on the concerned stakeholders. The paper will in particular illustrate how AREVA 'Sustainable Cycle Solutions' may optimize fuel cycle schemes for the short and longer terms and fulfill the stakeholders' needs. It will also pinpoint the related limits and conditions that have to be met to fulfill the above mentioned criteria. (author)

  15. Facile synthesis and characterization of novel biodegradable amphiphilic block copolymers bearing pendant hydroxyl groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Gaicen; Fan, Xiaoshan; Xu, Bingcan; Zhang, Delong; Hu, Zhiguo

    2014-10-01

    Novel amphiphilic block copolymers bearing pendant hydroxyl groups polylactide-b-poly(3,3-bis(Hydroxymethyl-triazolylmethyl) oxetane)-b-polylactide (PLA-b-PHMTYO-b-PLA) were synthesized via a facile and efficient method. First, the block copolymer intermediates polylactide-b-poly(3,3-Diazidomethyloxetane)-b-polylactide (PLA-b-PBAMO-b-PLA) were synthesized through ring-opening polymerization of lactide using PBAMO as a macroinitiator. Following "Click" reaction of PLA-b-PBAMO-b-PLA with propargyl alcohol provided the targeted amphiphilic block copolymers PLA-b-PHMTYO-b-PLA with pendant hydroxyl groups. The composition and structure of prepared copolymers were characterized by (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR) spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and gel permeation chromatography (GPC). The self-assembly behavior of the copolymers in water was investigated by transmission electron microscope (TEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS) and static light scattering (SLS). The results showed that the novel copolymers PLA-b-PHMTYO-b-PLA self-assembled into spherical micelles with diameters ranging from 100 nm to 200 nm in aqueous solution. These copolymers also exhibited low critical micellar concentrations (CMC: 6.9 × 10(-4)mg/mL and 3.9 × 10(-5)mg/mL, respectively). In addition, the in vitro cytotoxicity of these copolymers was determined in the presence of L929 cells. The results showed that the block copolymers PLA-b-PHMTYO-b-PLA exhibited better biocompatibility. Therefore, these well-defined copolymers are expected to find some applications in drug delivery or tissue engineering. PMID:25175206

  16. AREVA - Results for the first half of 2012: performance materializes as 'Action 2016' plan is rolled out

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results for the first half of 2012 demonstrate the effectiveness of Areva's 'Action 2016' plan, in particular with a sharp rise in EBITDA and a significant improvement in free operating cash flow after capex. Moreover, net debt remains stable even though the Group invested more than 900 million euros in strategic projects and in improvements to safety and to competitiveness of industrial assets. Several factors made this first phase towards restoring the Group's financial performance possible: - revenue growth in the nuclear businesses together with the ramp-up of operations in renewable energies, with the Group continuing to benefit from the strong visibility provided by its backlog, which has also grown over the past twelve months; - ongoing efforts begun in late 2011 to reduce operating costs, with savings measures at the end of June 2012 implemented for nearly 20% of the objective set for the Group through 2015, on an annual basis, another 45% of the objective being secured in addition. - execution ahead of schedule in Areva's asset disposal program, with 961 million euros mainly collected during the first half year and the objective of at least 1.2 billion euros for the 2012- 2013 period to be met this year with the recently announced disposal of La Mancha Resources for about 315 million Canadian dollars. After booking provisions, in accordance with the principle of prudent management, in two areas (construction of the Olkiluoto 3 EPR reactor and the Bakouma and Ryst Kuil mining sites), the Group reports positive operating income and positive net income for the first half of 2012. Results can be summarized as follows: Backlog rises 4.8% year on year to euro 45.2 bn; - Significant revenue growth to euro 4.329 bn, up 8.3% vs. H1 2011; - Strong increase in EBITDA to euro 725 m: +euro 508 m vs. H1 2011; - Marked improvement in FCF to -euro 591 m: +euro 328 m vs. H1 2011; - Net debt stable for the half year; - Positive operating income and net income to owners

  17. Areva new fuel designs; increased reliability, operating margins and operating efficiency; Nuevos disenos de combustible Areva: aumento de fiabilidad, margenes operativos y eficiencia del funcionamiento

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mollard, P.; Vollmer, N.; Curca-Tivig, F.; Cole, S.; Louf, H. P.

    2015-07-01

    AREVA is continuously working on the improvement of the fuel design to address immediate and future needs of the utilities. This improvement process regularly leads to incremental changes but also to breakthrough changes addressing the next needs of the market. Since a few years now, the improvements of the fuel design and licensing benefit from the improvement and upgrade in codes and methods and computational capabilities. Changes in design are sustained by these more powerful and phenomenological tools which secure and fasten the fuel design optimization and its implementation. (Author)

  18. EPR construction at China's Taishan progressing well, Says Areva

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitev, Lubomir [NucNet, Brussels (Belgium)

    2014-04-15

    Construction of two EPR units at the Taishan nuclear site in China's southern Guangdong province is 'progressing well', with 95 percent of procurement orders placed and 82 percent of engineering work completed, Areva has said. All primary heavy components have been delivered and installed for the first unit, Taishan-1, and the delivery of heavy components for Taishan-2 is under way. Areva is nuclear island supplier for the two 1,600 MW units. Its customer is the China Guangdong Nuclear Power Holding Corporation (CGNPC), represented by the Taishan Nuclear Power Company (TNPJVC). TNPJVC is a joint venture between CGNPC and France's EDF. Negotiations for Taishan-3 and -4 are expected to restart soon following the suspension of new-build authorisations after the Fukushima-Daiichi accident in March 2011. China plans to have 58,000 MW of installed nuclear capacity. (orig.)

  19. Concept and operational experience of the Areva DMT process for preventive maintenance of steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The AREVAs DMT process is a preventive chemical cleaning of the steam generators (SG) that provides the required features to keep the SG in good operative conditions. -Very low carbon steel corrosion -Innocuous towards stainless steel and nickel base alloys -Inherently safe process -Efficient magnetite dissolution -No use of CMR (i.e Carcinogenic, Mutagenic and toxic to Reproduction) Chemicals (e. g. Hydrazine) -No ammonia emissions -Easy decomposition of waste Several applications have been performed world-wide over the last 5 years. The results were fully satisfying in all the above stated points. The removal of up to 800 kg of dry deposits per SG was realized. A positive effect on fouling factor was observed, showing that AREVAs DMT process is a safe, easy and successful way to maintain the steam generators in excellent operative conditions. (Author)

  20. Participation in the IAEA Coordinated Research Project Fumex III: Final Report of AREVA NP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After the Coordinated Research Project (CRP) FUMEXII, participants asked for a new exercise within an IAEA CRP. This CRP started in December 2008 in Vienna with the first Research Coordination Meeting (RCM). The CRP is titled ''Improvement of Computer Codes Used for Fuel Behaviour Simulation FUMEX III''. The object of FUMEX III were the improvement of fuel rod performance codes for modeling high burnup phenomena in modern fuel. This includes transient behavior, as well as mechanical interaction between pellet and cladding and, in progression to the FUMEX II exercise, fission gas release during various conditions (steady state, load follow, transient). AREVA NP agreed on participating in this exercise under the IAEA research agreement no. 15369 and expressed interest in the modeling of pelletclad mechanical interactions as well as fission gas release under steady state and transient conditions. In this exercise AREVA NP used its new global fuel rod code GALILEO, which is still under development (formerly known under the project name COPERNIC 3). During a Consultants Meeting potential topics and a proposed selection of cases have been prepared, which were discussed during the 1st Research Coordination Meeting (RCM) in Vienna in December 2008. During the discussions a number of additional cases motivated by the participants have been identified. Finally, a case table has been agreed upon, which included several cases for the different topics. Most of the cases have been based on the International Fuel Performance Experiments (IFPE) database, but additional cases have been provided during the exercise (e.g., the AREVA idealized case

  1. Effects o f Electronic Banking Facilities, Employment Sector and Age - Group on Customers’ Choice o f Banks in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Audu Maiyaki

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper aims at investigating the relationships between the effects of electronic banking facilities, customers’ employment sector and customers’ age - group on th eir choice of banks. Both descriptive and inferential statistics were use. Five hundred copies of questionnaire were distributed and eventually 81.4 percent response rate was achieved. A multi - stage sampling design was employed; delivery and collection str ategy of data collection was also used. Chi - square statistical test of independence was employed. The results show that there is no significant relationship between electronic banking facilities and customers’ choice of banks. It was however found that the re is significant relationship between customers’ employment sector and customers’ age - group on one hand and their choice of banks on the other hand. It was recommended that the management of Nigerian commercial banks should find the relevant factors that are considered important by customers of various age group to appropriately segmenting the target market

  2. Establishing a LEU MTR fuel manufacturing facility in South Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The South African MTR Fuel Manufacturing Facility was established in the 1970's to supply SAFARI-1 with Fuel Elements and Control Rods. South African capability was developed in parallel with the uranium enrichment program to meet the needs of the Reactor. Further to the July 2005 decision by the South African Governmnent to convert both SAFARI-1 and the Fuel Plant to LEU, the SAFARI-1 phase has been successfully completed and Necsa has commenced with the conversion of the MTR Fuel Manufacturing Facility. In order to establish, validate and qualify the facility, Necsa has entered into a co-operation and technology transfer agreement with AREVA CERCA, the French manufacturer of Research Reactor fuel elements. Past experiences, conversion challenges and the status of the MTR Fuel Facility Project are discussed. On-going co-operation with AREVA CERCA to implement the local manufacture of LEU fuel is explained and elaborated on. (author)

  3. Complementary safety assessment assessment of nuclear facilities - FBFC Romans plant - AREVA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This complementary safety assessment analyses the robustness of the FBFC Romans plant to extreme situations such as those that led to the Fukushima accident. This plant is dedicated to the fabrication of nuclear fuels for experimental reactors. Robustness is the ability for the plant to withstand events beyond which the plant was designed. Robustness is linked to safety margins but also to the situations leading to a sudden deterioration of the accidental sequence. Moreover, safety is not only a matter of design or engineered systems but also a matter of organizing: task organization (including subcontracting) as well as the setting of emergency plans or the inventory of nuclear materials are taken into consideration in this assessment. This report is divided into 10 main chapters: 1) the feedback experience of the Fukushima accident; 2) description of the site and its surroundings; 3) featuring of the site's activities and installations; 4) accidental sequences; 5) protection from earthquakes; 6) protection from floods; 7) protection from other extreme natural disasters; 8) the loss of electrical power and of the heat sink; 9) the management of severe accidents; and 10) subcontracting policy. This analysis has identified 4 main measures to be taken to limit the risks linked to natural disasters: -) the implementation of a seismic detection and cutting system; -) the seismic reinforcement of the recycling workshop (R1 building); -) the suppression of the use of recycled water in the AP2 building; -) the determination of the critical water levels admitted in the buildings in case of strong rain periods. (A.C.)

  4. RCRA Facility Investigation report for Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents compiled information concerning a facility investigation of waste area group 6(WAG-6), of the solid waste management units (SWMU'S) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The WAG is a shallow ground disposal area for low-level radioactive wastes and chemical wastes. The report contains information on hydrogeological data, contaminant characterization, radionuclide concentrations, risk assessment from doses to humans and animals and associated cancer risks, exposure via food chains, and historical data

  5. RCRA Facility Investigation report for Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-09-01

    This report presents compiled information concerning a facility investigation of waste area group 6(WAG-6), of the solid waste management units (SWMU's) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The WAG is a shallow ground disposal area for low-level radioactive wastes and chemical wastes. The report contains information on hydrogeological data, contaminant characterization, radionuclide concentrations, risk assessment and baseline human health evaluation including a toxicity assessment, and a baseline environmental evaluation.

  6. RCRA Facility Investigation report for Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents compiled information concerning a facility investigation of waste area group 6(WAG-6), of the solid waste management units (SWMU's) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The WAG is a shallow ground disposal area for low-level radioactive wastes and chemical wastes. The report contains information on hydrogeological data, contaminant characterization, radionuclide concentrations, risk assessment and baseline human health evaluation including a toxicity assessment, and a baseline environmental evaluation

  7. RCRA Facility Investigation report for Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-09-01

    This report presents compiled information concerning a facility investigation of waste area group 6(WAG-6), of the solid waste management units (SWMU'S) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The WAG is a shallow ground disposal area for low-level radioactive wastes and chemical wastes. The report contains information on hydrogeological data, contaminant characterization, radionuclide concentrations, risk assessment from doses to humans and animals and associated cancer risks, exposure via food chains, and historical data. (CBS)

  8. AREVA Adhesive Technology. A method to mitigate and/or prevent leaks in pools with stainless steel liners Georg Kramer AREVA GmbH IBOC-G

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraemer, G.

    2013-07-01

    Repair methods with conventional welding technique are not promising as a preventative measure mostly due to cost and time issues. With the provided repair method, the AREVA adhesive technology, it is possible to stop existing leaks and work as a prophylactic measure against future penetration from the concrete side of the pool. This technique can cover the failure mechanisms from weld failures over corrosion to mechanical stresses. Another advantage of the adhesive technology is the possibility of using remote-controlled underwater repair methods which are particularly beneficial in the repair of leaks in spent fuel pools. Extensive laboratory testing and longstanding successful experience in nuclear power plants have proved the suitability of the adhesive technology as active and proactive methods to minimize leakages in pools.

  9. AREVA Adhesive Technology. A method to mitigate and/or prevent leaks in pools with stainless steel liners Georg Kramer AREVA GmbH IBOC-G

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Repair methods with conventional welding technique are not promising as a preventative measure mostly due to cost and time issues. With the provided repair method, the AREVA adhesive technology, it is possible to stop existing leaks and work as a prophylactic measure against future penetration from the concrete side of the pool. This technique can cover the failure mechanisms from weld failures over corrosion to mechanical stresses. Another advantage of the adhesive technology is the possibility of using remote-controlled underwater repair methods which are particularly beneficial in the repair of leaks in spent fuel pools. Extensive laboratory testing and longstanding successful experience in nuclear power plants have proved the suitability of the adhesive technology as active and proactive methods to minimize leakages in pools.

  10. AREVA's thermo-hydraulic platform qualified as test and inspection body

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganzman, Ingo; Herr, Wolfgang; Schmidt, Holger; Stecher, Willi; Walter, Dirk; Umminger, Klaus [AREVA NP GmbH, Erlangen (Germany); Beisiegel, Achim; Wich, Michael [AREVA NP GmbH, Karlstein (Germany); Dolleans, Phillipe; Muller, Thierry [AREVA NP S.A.S., Le Creusot (France)

    2011-07-01

    AREVA runs an internationally unique test and qualification infrastructure for power plant components. The associated thermo-hydraulic platform has been certified as test and inspection body according to ISO 17025 and ISO 17020. It comprises integral test loops for pressurised water reactors and boiling water reactors. The maximum operational parameters of the test loops in the thermo-hydraulic platform are heating capacities of up to 22 megawatts, electrical currents of up to 80 kilo amperes, pressures of up to 300 bar and temperatures of up to 600 C. The accreditation thereby covers tests and assessments as well as expert concept evaluations with appropriate support programmes. (orig.)

  11. Areva new fuel designs; increased reliability, operating margins and operating efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AREVA is continuously working on the improvement of the fuel design to address immediate and future needs of the utilities. This improvement process regularly leads to incremental changes but also to breakthrough changes addressing the next needs of the market. Since a few years now, the improvements of the fuel design and licensing benefit from the improvement and upgrade in codes and methods and computational capabilities. Changes in design are sustained by these more powerful and phenomenological tools which secure and fasten the fuel design optimization and its implementation. (Author)

  12. AREVA solutions to licensing challenges in PWR and BWR reload and safety analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curca-Tivig, Florin [AREVA GmbH, Erlangen (Germany)

    2016-05-15

    Regulatory requirements for reload and safety analyses are evolving: new safety criteria, request for enlarged qualification databases, statistical applications, uncertainty propagation.. In order to address these challenges and access more predictable licensing processes, AVERA is implementing consistent code and methodology suites for PWR and BWR core design and safety analysis, based on first principles modeling and extremely broad verification and validation data base. Thanks to the high computational power increase in the last decades methods' development and application now include new capabilities. An overview of the main AREVA codes and methods developments is given covering PWR and BWR applications in different licensing environments.

  13. Areva At December 31, 2010: Revenue rises to euros 9.104 bn: + 6.7% Backlog rises to euros 44.2 bn: + 2.0%

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 2010, AREVA's consolidated revenue rose 6.7% to 9.104 billion euros (+ 5.1% growth like-for-like) compared with 2009. The Mining-Front End Business Group and the Reactors and Services Business Group were the leading growth engines, with revenue growth of 6.7% and 8.9% respectively. Foreign exchange had a positive impact of 141 million euros and the scope of consolidation remained stable over the period. Fourth quarter 2010 revenue totaled 2.936 billion euros, an increase of 7.7% (+4.8% like-for-like) compared with the fourth quarter of 2009, due in particular to 18.1% growth in the Mining-Front End BG. Foreign exchange had an impact of 58 million euros over the period. The group's backlog came to 44.2 billion euros at December 31, 2010, up 2.0% in relation to December 31, 2009. The backlog grew in the Mining-Front End and Renewable Energies BGs. Installed Base Business operations held up well, replenishing the backlog for the Reactors and Services BG. The agreement with the Indian utility NPCIL concerning the construction of two EPRTM reactors and fuel cycle supply for 25 years was not recorded in the backlog at December 31, 2010. The change in the Back End BG's backlog reflects the implementation of contracts signed in previous years. Nearly one billion euros in letters of intent signed in 2010 with US utilities corresponding to pre-sold production from the future enrichment plant were not included in the Mining-Front End BG's backlog. The backlog of the Mining-Front End BG came to 28.902 billion euros at December 31, 2010, up 4% compared with the end of 2009. Contracts won in 2010 include: - the 10-year uranium supply contract with CGNPC for approximately 3.5 billion dollars; - several other multi-year contracts signed in the front end of the cycle with US and Asian utilities. For the full year of 2010, the Mining-Front End BG reported revenue of 3.704 billion euros, an increase of 6.7% on a reported basis and of 4.2% LFL. Foreign exchange had a positive

  14. A Facile Synthesis of N-Phosphoryl Amino Acids Containing Hydroxy Group

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian Chen ZHANG; Shu Xia CAO; Xiao Li YANG; Yu Fen ZHAO

    2004-01-01

    three kinds of N-(diisopropyloxyphosphoryl) amino acids containing hydroxyl group were prepared in high yield by using diisopropyl phosphite as the phosphorylating agent, sodium hypochlorite as the chlorinating agent and tetrabutyl ammonium bromide as the phase transfer catalyst in basic aqueous media.

  15. On (Group) Strategy-Proof Mechanisms without Payment for Facility Location Games

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thang, Nguyen Kim

    2010-01-01

    in an allowable location that minimizes the utilitarian social cost — the sum of agents costs. A mechanism is strategyproof (SP) if no agent may misreport its locations and be better off; it is group-strategyproof (GSP) if no coalition of agents benefits by jointly misreporting their locations The requirement...

  16. Areva at September 30, 2013: Backlog of euro 42 bn Robust revenue growth to euro 6.847 bn: +4.7% vs. Sept. 2012 (+7.6% like for like) Strong organic growth (+9.9%) in the nuclear operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After a remarkable first half and as anticipated, Areva's third quarter revenue was stable in the nuclear operations compared with the third quarter of 2012. Globally, Areva's nuclear operations generated organic growth of 10% in the first nine months of 2013. This performance demonstrates the strength of Areva's commercial positions in the installed base market, where the company continues to innovate while improving its competitiveness. The success of Areva's integrated offers and of its Safety Alliance and Forward Alliance programs are perfect examples of this. Moreover, agreements signed for the EDF project at Hinkley Point strengthen Areva's position in the new builds market and bolster the credibility of Areva's EPRTM offers to other customers. In the Renewable Energies BG, revenue is below Areva's Action 2016 plan outlook, mainly due to the current indecisiveness in the renewable markets. Based on Areva's performance over the past nine months, the company confirms its revenue outlook for its business as a whole in 2013. AREVA generated consolidated revenue of 6.847 billion euros in the first nine months of 2013, representing growth of 4.7% (+7.6% like for like) compared with the same period in 2012. Revenue growth was fueled by a 7.7% increase in recurring business (+11.0% like for like). Revenue from nuclear operations was 6.453 billion euros in the first nine months of 2013, compared with 6.035 billion euros in the first nine months of 2012, a 6.9% increase (+9.9% like for like). Revenue was led by growth in all nuclear Business Groups (BG): the Mining BG (+31.8% like for like), the Front End BG (+9.8% like for like), the Reactors and Services BG (+1.5% like for like) and the Back End BG (+10.3% like for like). Revenue fell 24.6% like for like in the renewable operations. Foreign exchange had a negative impact of 71 million euros during the period. The change in consolidation scope had a negative impact of 106 million euros. In the third quarter of 2013

  17. An effective and sustainable D and D concept - competencies and experiences of AREVA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The decommissioning and dismantling (D and D) projects - as large projects generally - are influenced by a variety of different topics. Strategy and planning are very demanding as they are defining the costs of the project for a long period of time. Addressing the political and legal framework is key as D and D projects depending on final disposal concepts usually handled by governmental organizations. If the conditions as described are fulfilled, i.e. contractor and customer collaborate already during the licensing process and the project starts with a fast minimization of the radiological inventory, the overall project duration will be reduced. Again, this offers an enormous potential to save costs. Moreover, remaining operational systems can be reduced much earlier and replaced by mobile operating systems due to the loss of radioactive inventory. AREVA as a major company in the nuclear business has a lot of experience from New Builds-, Service- and D and D projects worldwide. The presentation on the ECED Conference will also give some examples and will demonstrate the competencies and experiences AREVA gained in the last years. (author)

  18. Phase 1A Final Report for the AREVA Team Enhanced Accident Tolerant Fuels Concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrell, Mike E. [AREVA Federal Services LLC, Charlotte, NC (United States)

    2015-03-19

    In response to the Department of Energy (DOE) funded initiative to develop and deploy lead fuel assemblies (LFAs) of Enhanced Accident Tolerant Fuel (EATF) into a US reactor within 10 years, AREVA put together a team to develop promising technologies for improved fuel performance during off normal operations. This team consisted of the University of Florida (UF) and the University of Wisconsin (UW), Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), Duke Energy and Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA). This team brought broad experience and expertise to bear on EATF development. AREVA has been designing; manufacturing and testing nuclear fuel for over 50 years and is one of the 3 large international companies supplying fuel to the nuclear industry. The university and National Laboratory team members brought expertise in nuclear fuel concepts and materials development. Duke and TVA brought practical utility operating experience. This report documents the results from the initial “discovery phase” where the team explored options for EATF concepts that provide enhanced accident tolerance for both Design Basis (DB) and Beyond Design Basis Events (BDB). The main driver for the concepts under development were that they could be implemented in a 10 year time frame and be economically viable and acceptable to the nuclear fuel marketplace. The economics of fuel design make this DOE funded project very important to the nuclear industry. Even incremental changes to an existing fuel design can cost in the range of $100M to implement through to LFAs. If this money is invested evenly over 10 years then it can take the fuel vendor several decades after the start of the project to recover their initial investment and reach a breakeven point on the initial investment. Step or radical changes to a fuel assembly design can cost upwards of $500M and will take even longer for the fuel vendor to recover their investment. With the projected lifetimes of the current generation of nuclear power

  19. Areva At September 30, 2010: Revenue growth to euro 6.168 bn: + 6.3%. Backlog growth to euro 42.7 bn: + 2.2%

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AREVA generated consolidated revenue of 6.168 billion euros over the first nine months of 2010 for growth of 6.3% (+5.2% like-for-like) compared with the same period in 2009. The main revenue growth engines were the Reactors and Services Business Group and the Back End Business Group, with growth of 11.5% and 7.1% respectively. Foreign exchange had a positive impact of 82 million euros over the period, while changes in consolidation scope had negligible impact. Third quarter 2010 revenue amounted to 2.011 billion euros for growth of 6.1% (+4.4% LFL) compared with the third quarter of 2009. The Reactors and Services Business Group and the Back End Business Group, posting increases of 11.2% and 9.0% respectively, continued to lead this growth. Foreign exchange had a positive impact of 39 million euros, while changes in consolidation scope had negligible impact. The group's backlog came to 42.7 billion euros at September 30, 2010, an increase of 2.2% compared with September 30, 2009 (41.8 billion euros). For the full year of 2010, the group confirms its outlook for significant revenue and backlog growth, increased operating performance excluding particular items, negative operating income, and strong growth in net income attributable to owners of the group with the contribution of the gain on the sale of the Transmission and Distribution business

  20. Site characterization summary report for the Old Hydrofracture Facility, Waste Area Grouping 5, at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-04-01

    This site characterization summary report summarizes the operational history and other information on the Old Hydrofracture Facility located in the Waste Area Grouping 5 at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The Old Hydrofracture Facility was a waste disposal facility that operated from the 1960s until 1979. Intermediate-level radioactive waste was mixed with grout and injected deep underground for permanent disposal. Facilities at the site include various buildings, pipes, waste pits, and five underground storage tanks that contain liquid and sludge that have been characterized as low-level, hazardous, and mixed wastes.

  1. 36 CFR 1280.102 - When do NARA regional records services facilities allow other groups to use their public areas...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... services facility. (b) Your event at the NARA regional records services facility must be for the benefit of... area at a NARA regional records services facility from the director of that facility (see 36 CFR 1253.6... advertising and sales; (3) Partisan political activities; (4) Sectarian activities, or other...

  2. Dual Exchange in PCN-333: A Facile Strategy to Chemically Robust Mesoporous Chromium Metal-Organic Framework with Functional Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jihye; Feng, Dawei; Zhou, Hong-Cai

    2015-09-16

    A facile preparation of a mesoporous Cr-MOF, PCN-333(Cr) with functional group, has been demonstrated through a dual exchange strategy, involving a sequential ligand exchange and metal metathesis process. After optimization of the exchange system, the functionalized PCN-333(Cr), N3-PCN-333(Cr) shows well maintained crystallinity, porosity, as well as much improved chemical stability. Because of the exceptionally large pores (∼5.5 nm) in PCN-333(Cr), a secondary functional moiety, Zn-TEPP with a size of 18 Å × 18 Å, has been successfully clicked into the framework. In this article, we have also analyzed kinetics and thermodynamics during dual exchange process, showing our attempts to interpret the exchange event in the PCN-333. Our findings not only provide a highly stable mesoporous Cr-MOF platform for expanding MOF-based applications, but also suggest a route to functionalized Cr-MOF which may have not been achievable through conventional approaches.

  3. Information report on nuclear safety and radiation protection of the Tricastin AREVA site - Issue 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Published in compliance with the French code of the environment, this report first presents different aspects of the Areva's Tricastin site which comprises five basic nuclear installations or INBs, and seven ICPE (installation classified for the protection of the environment). The activities are dedicated to uranium conversion, uranium enrichment, uranium chemistry, industrial services, and fuel manufacturing. The report presents this important industrial site, describes the various measures regarding nuclear safety and radiation protection, reports nuclear events which occurred on this site and had to be declared, reports the management of releases by this site and the control of the environment. The next part addresses the management of the various wastes produced by the different installations present on this site. The management of other impacts is also reported. The last chapter reviews the actions undertaken in the field of transparency and information

  4. Information report on nuclear safety and radiation protection of La Hague AREVA site. Issue 2014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Published in compliance with the French code of the environment, this report first presents the Areva's La Hague site which comprises several basic nuclear installations (INB), is dedicated to several activities related to the nuclear fuel cycle, is submitted to a constraining legal and regulatory framework, and implements a policy for a sustainable development and continuous progress. The document describes the various measures regarding nuclear safety and radiation protection, reports nuclear events which are classified according to the INES scale and occurred and had to be declared in 2014, describes the management of effluents by the different installations present on this site and the control of the environment. It addresses the waste management and the management of other impacts. It gives an overview of actions undertaken regarding information and transparency. Recommendations of the CHSCT are reported

  5. The AREVA customized chemical cleaning C3-concept as part of the steam generator asset management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    with various chemical cleaning methods and their world wide applications AREVA has developed the 'C3' Customized Chemical Cleaning concept. This concept covers the entire range of steam generator chemical cleaning. With this approach, also specific problems like removal of sludge piles from tube sheet can be adequately addressed. At European PWRs the above presented overall approach was applied successfully in 2009 and 2010. Prior to the chemical cleaning the steam generator status was investigated and evaluated in a common approach of all relevant AREVA departments. For example, as a result of one plant specific evaluation, a hard sludge problem was identified combined with denting indications mainly on the tube sheet. Based on this SG assessment and the expected amount of deposits an individually tailored and site specific cleaning approach was developed in close cooperation with the plant operator. Prior to the chemical cleaning an inner bundle lancing was performed to mechanically weaken the hard deposits, which allows deep penetration of the cleaning agent into the deposits. The chemical cleaning methodology for this site specific SG problem was the AREVA DART HT process selected from the C3 toolbox. The DART HT process allows an efficient removal of hard deposits, while keeping the average corrosion below 50 μm. After the chemical cleaning a subsequent tube sheet lancing was performed, effectively removing the chemically softened deposits. This approach removed the targeted amount of deposits, thus eliminating the hard sludge denting of tubes at the tube sheet. This paper describes the joint approach of the plant operator and AREVA for the on-site chemical cleaning to the improve steam generator condition. (authors)

  6. Information report on nuclear safety and radiation protection of La Hague AREVA site. Issue 2013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Published in compliance with the French code of the environment, this report first presents the Areva's La Hague site which comprises several basic nuclear installations (INB), is dedicated to several activities related to the nuclear fuel cycle, is submitted to a constraining legal and regulatory framework, and implements a policy for a sustainable development and continuous progress. The document describes the various measures regarding nuclear safety and radiation protection, reports nuclear events which are classified according to the INES scale and occurred and had to be declared in 2013, describes the management of effluents by the different installations present on this site and the control of the environment. It addresses the waste management and the management of other impacts. It gives an overview of actions undertaken regarding information and transparency. Recommendations of the CHSCT are reported

  7. Areva - Environmental, social and societal report 2014, Zirconium sites: Jarrie, Ugine, Rugles, Montreuil-Juigne, Paimboeuf

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report first gives an overview of Areva's zirconium-related activities: those integrated into the nuclear fuel cycle, industrial activities distributed among five production sites (Jarrie, Ugine, Rugles, Montreuil-Juigne, Paimboeuf) with an indication of the various products produced on each site (from zirconia to tubes and sheets). The history and activities of these five plants are briefly described. The next part addresses issues related to health, safety, and the environment: health and safety at work, risk prevention and management, improvement of environmental performance (consumption management, waste control and management), material flows and their management modes in the different plants (indication of input products, activities, output products, and destination). The last part addresses social and societal issues: recruiting, training, ability management, actions for local economic development

  8. Report on transparency and nuclear safety 2013 - Cadarache CEA centre - Tome 1. INB 32 (ATPu) et 54 (LCP) AREVA NC - Tome 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A first volume proposes a presentation of the Cadarache CEA centre, of its activities and installations, gives a rather detailed overview of measures related to safety and to radiation protection within these activities and installations. It also reports significant events related to safety and to radiation protection which occurred in 2013 and have been declared to the ASN. It discusses the results of release measurements (liquid and gaseous effluents, radiological assessment, and chemical assessment for various installations) and the control of the chemical and radiological impact of these gaseous and liquid effluents on the environment. It addresses the issue of radioactive wastes which are stored in the different nuclear base installations of the Centre, indicates the different measures aimed at limiting the volume of these warehoused wastes and addresses their impact on health and on the environment. Nature and quantities of warehoused wastes are specified. The second volume concerns some specific installations (INB 32 or ATPu, and INB 54 or LPC) which belong to AREVA NC. The same topics are addressed: presentation of the facilities, arrangements regarding safety and radiation protection, significant events related to safety and radiation protection, measurements of effluents and their impact on the environment, warehoused wastes. Remarks and recommendations of the CHSCT are given

  9. Concept and operational experience of the Areva DMT process for preventive maintenance of steam generators; Concepto y experiencia operacional del proceso DMT de Areva para el mantenimiento preventivo de generadores de vapor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, S.; Gaspar, J. D.; Potier, P.; Jones, D.

    2015-07-01

    The AREVAs DMT process is a preventive chemical cleaning of the steam generators (SG) that provides the required features to keep the SG in good operative conditions. -Very low carbon steel corrosion -Innocuous towards stainless steel and nickel base alloys -Inherently safe process -Efficient magnetite dissolution -No use of CMR (i.e Carcinogenic, Mutagenic and toxic to Reproduction) Chemicals (e. g. Hydrazine) -No ammonia emissions -Easy decomposition of waste Several applications have been performed world-wide over the last 5 years. The results were fully satisfying in all the above stated points. The removal of up to 800 kg of dry deposits per SG was realized. A positive effect on fouling factor was observed, showing that AREVAs DMT process is a safe, easy and successful way to maintain the steam generators in excellent operative conditions. (Author)

  10. Application of Safety Assessment Methodology for Near Surface Waste Disposal Facilities (ASAM) - Regulatory Review Working Group Safety Case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vincent Nys (AVN, Belgium) presented the IAEA international projects ISAM/ASAM. ASAM (application of methodology developed under ISAM) began in 2002 as a follow-up of ISAM (project to develop methodology for near-surface disposals e.g. scenarios). One of the objectives of the working group of the ISAM project was to provide definitions, to look at the integration of the safety assessment and at the review procedure. The NEA international FEP's database was used and adapted to the near-surface context. The so-called 'design scenario' might be defined as the expected scenario according to functions. Building confidence in each stage is related to the confidence in the system, the scenarios process, and the assessment context. With regards to the on-going ASAM project, participants acknowledged that the safety case contains both a safety assessment and a confidence statement. Additionally, traceability and transparency are of importance. The management framework, e.g. clear regulatory framework and clear regulatory process (review procedure), is a key element for the success of a safety case. The use of what-if scenarios could be helpful for testing the robustness of the design. It was also noted that at each stage of a safety case, the implementers should always give alternatives and should argue the choice of the reference (reversibility of the process). IGSC members noted that the safety case of near-surface disposal facilities has much in common with the safety case for deep disposal facilities. Discussion suggested that the definition and achievement of 'optimization' are open issues in the post-closure safety context. Optimisation has a generally accepted meaning in the context of achieving safety in the operational phase

  11. CSR and Sustainable Development: Multinationals are they Socially Responsible in Sub-Saharan Africa? The case of Areva in Niger

    OpenAIRE

    Daouda, Youssoufou Hamadou

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to contribute in understanding issues related to Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) in Sub-Saharan Africa. The paper demonstrates that even though multinationals strategies participate with economic and social development, there still is much to do given environmental, social and economic expectations. The case of Areva discussed here illustrates the discrepancy that exists between such companies’ CSR strategies and the local conditions in which they evolve (ar...

  12. AREVA's toolbox for long-term best performance and reliable operation of nuclear steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long-term integrity and high performance of major plant systems and components are of uppermost importance for the successful operation of any power plant. AREVA's experience gathered with water-steam cycle chemistry treatments in more than 40 years yields the conclusion: Accumulation of corrosion products in SGs may result in local overheating and enrichment of impurities up to critical levels. This can lead to several degradation phenomena of the structural materials of the SGs. Therefore, minimization of corrosion product generation and prevention of deposit accumulation is required. The objective of AREVA's asset management program is to support operators by minimizing corrosion damage and performance losses of water-steam cycle systems and components and thereby to maximize the availability and economic performance of the plant. Such asset management program is in principle a closed cycle process. It is based on control, corrective and preventive measures. The objective of control measure is deriving a widespread assessment of the corrosion status of the steam-water cycle which yields to weak points and identifying the best suited corrective and/or preventive measures. In the subsequent steps appropriate measures which improve the current status or counteract on identified issues are identified and applied. Corrective measures, likes mechanical and/or chemical cleaning are targeting the minimization of negative influence on plant performance caused by corrosion in the steam-water cycle. Complementary to corrective measures are preventive ones, like optimization of pH strategy and AREVA's FFA technology could by applied. They are focusing on the origin of corrosion product generation. AREVA is offering a toolbox for long-term best performance and reliable operation of NPPs. (author)

  13. New Method for Hard Sludge Removal from Tube Plate Surfaces: The AREVA Enhanced Inner Bundle Lancing Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoss, J.; Santibanez, M.

    2014-07-01

    AREVA is currently conducting the final steps to start-up an enhanced technology to remove hard sludge deposits from the inner bundle area of the tube sheets. This inner bundle area at the top of the tube plate is the location with the lowest flow velocity of the circulating water at the secondary closed loop. The reduced water speed causes increased accumulation of ferrite oxides at these locations. (Author)

  14. Processing of the GALILEO fuel rod code model uncertainties within the AREVA LWR realistic thermal-mechanical analysis methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The availability of reliable tools and associated methodology able to accurately predict the LWR fuel behavior in all conditions is of great importance for safe and economic fuel usage. For that purpose, AREVA has developed its new global fuel rod performance code GALILEO along with its associated realistic thermal-mechanical analysis methodology. This realistic methodology is based on a Monte Carlo type random sampling of all relevant input variables. After having outlined the AREVA realistic methodology, this paper will be focused on the GALILEO code benchmarking process, on its extended experimental database and on the GALILEO model uncertainties assessment. The propagation of these model uncertainties through the AREVA realistic methodology is also presented. This GALILEO model uncertainties processing is of the utmost importance for accurate fuel design margin evaluation as illustrated on some application examples. With the submittal of Topical Report GALILEO to the U.S. NRC in 2013, GALILEO and its methodology are on the way to be industrially used in a wide range of irradiation conditions. (authors)

  15. RCRA Facility investigation report for Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report provides a detailed summary of the activities carried out to sample groundwater at Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6. The analytical results for samples collected during Phase 1, Activity 2 of the WAG 6 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Facility Investigation (RFI) are also presented. In addition, analytical results for Phase 1, activity sampling events for which data were not previously reported are included in this TM. A summary of the groundwater sampling activities of WAG 6, to date, are given in the Introduction. The Methodology section describes the sampling procedures and analytical parameters. Six attachments are included. Attachments 1 and 2 provide analytical results for selected RFI groundwater samples and ORNL sampling event. Attachment 3 provides a summary of the contaminants detected in each well sampled for all sampling events conducted at WAG 6. Bechtel National Inc. (BNI)/IT Corporation Contract Laboratory (IT) RFI analytical methods and detection limits are given in Attachment 4. Attachment 5 provides the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)/Analytical Chemistry Division (ACD) analytical methods and detection limits and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) quarterly compliance monitoring (1988--1989). Attachment 6 provides ORNL/ACD groundwater analytical methods and detection limits (for the 1990 RCRA semi-annual compliance monitoring)

  16. RCRA Facility investigation report for Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-09-01

    This report provides a detailed summary of the activities carried out to sample groundwater at Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6. The analytical results for samples collected during Phase 1, Activity 2 of the WAG 6 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Facility Investigation (RFI) are also presented. In addition, analytical results for Phase 1, activity sampling events for which data were not previously reported are included in this TM. A summary of the groundwater sampling activities of WAG 6, to date, are given in the Introduction. The Methodology section describes the sampling procedures and analytical parameters. Six attachments are included. Attachments 1 and 2 provide analytical results for selected RFI groundwater samples and ORNL sampling event. Attachment 3 provides a summary of the contaminants detected in each well sampled for all sampling events conducted at WAG 6. Bechtel National Inc. (BNI)/IT Corporation Contract Laboratory (IT) RFI analytical methods and detection limits are given in Attachment 4. Attachment 5 provides the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)/Analytical Chemistry Division (ACD) analytical methods and detection limits and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) quarterly compliance monitoring (1988--1989). Attachment 6 provides ORNL/ACD groundwater analytical methods and detection limits (for the 1990 RCRA semi-annual compliance monitoring).

  17. Codes and Methods Supporting AREVA Fuel Solutions for the Future - Development Strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Energy suppliers are keenly interested in effective margin management in their nuclear operations. They also need to accurately predict the capabilities and behavior of their reactors. For example, the inability to accurately predict thermal limit margins during reactor start-ups or the onset of reactor coast-down at the end of cycle can significantly impact their ability to deliver on their power generation commitments and, ultimately, impacts the power generation revenues. Fuel suppliers are expected to increase (1) availability factors (flawless fuel operation, short time reloading..), (2) fuel performance (reliability, flexibility, burn-up, thermal hydraulic performance..), (3) safety margins. The present evolution of fuel assembly and core designs towards greater heterogeneity, higher enrichments and burnup, Gd-loading, MOX loading, low leakage, etc., challenge the codes and methods (C and M) development. Safety Authority requirements are evolving (e.g. new RIA criteria, request for enlarged qualification databases..); fuel suppliers have to anticipate these evolutions and to come up with methods that properly meet the new needs, such that penalties on products or on limits in operation are avoided. Anticipating customer's needs for the future, the Fuel Sector of AREVA NP took up the challenge to significantly advance the state-of-the-art in nuclear methods and started in 2002 a series of large R and D programs preparing the next generation of C and M for fuel assembly design, core design, safety analysis and core monitoring. An overview is given over the strategic R and D axis of the Fuel Sector of AREVA NP. The domains of neutronics, core thermal-hydraulics and fuel rod thermal-mechanics are covered. The main goals of the C and M development strategy are: a) Providing the targeted market with the state-of-the-art C and M that meet customer needs and give appropriate answers to safety authority requirements. b) Anticipate future market needs in order to keep

  18. AREVA NP's advanced Thermal Hydraulic Methods for Reactor Core and Fuel Assembly Design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main objective of the Thermal Hydraulic (TH) analysis of reactor core and fuel assembly design is the determination of pressure loss and critical heat flux (CHF). Especially the description of the latter effect requires the modeling of a large variety of physical phenomena starting with single phase quantities like turbulence or fluid-wall friction, two phase quantities like void distributions, heat transfer between fuel rod and fluid and ultimately the CHF mechanism itself. Additional complexity is added by the fact that the relevant geometric scales which have to be resolved, cover a wide range from the length of the fuel assembly (∼ 4000 mm), over the typical dimensions of sub-channel cross sections and the vanes on the spacer grids (∼ 10 mm) down to the microscopic scales set by bubble sizes and boundary layers (mm to sub mm). Due to the above described situation the necessary TH quantities are often determined by measurements. The main advantage of this technique is that measurements are widely accepted and trusted if the geometry and flow conditions are sufficiently close to real reactor conditions. The main disadvantage of experiments is that they are expensive both with respect to time and money; especially in high pressure tests they give only limited access to the test object. Consequently there is a strong interest to develop computer codes with the goal of minimizing the need of experiments, and hence, speeding up and reducing costs of fuel assembly and core design. Today most of the design work is based on sub-channel codes, originally developed in the 70's; they provide an effective description of the TH in fuel assemblies by regarding the fuel assembly as a system of communicating channels (the volume enclosed by four fuel rods = one sub-channel). Further development of these codes is one main focus of AREVA NP's Thermal Hydraulic method and code development strategy. To focus the know-how and resources existing in the different regions of

  19. Phase 1A Final Report for the AREVA Team Enhanced Accident Tolerant Fuels Concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrell, Mike E. [AREVA Federal Services LLC, Charlotte, NC (United States)

    2015-03-19

    In response to the Department of Energy (DOE) funded initiative to develop and deploy lead fuel assemblies (LFAs) of Enhanced Accident Tolerant Fuel (EATF) into a US reactor within 10 years, AREVA put together a team to develop promising technologies for improved fuel performance during off normal operations. This team consisted of the University of Florida (UF) and the University of Wisconsin (UW), Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), Duke Energy and Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA). This team brought broad experience and expertise to bear on EATF development. AREVA has been designing; manufacturing and testing nuclear fuel for over 50 years and is one of the 3 large international companies supplying fuel to the nuclear industry. The university and National Laboratory team members brought expertise in nuclear fuel concepts and materials development. Duke and TVA brought practical utility operating experience. This report documents the results from the initial “discovery phase” where the team explored options for EATF concepts that provide enhanced accident tolerance for both Design Basis (DB) and Beyond Design Basis Events (BDB). The main driver for the concepts under development were that they could be implemented in a 10 year time frame and be economically viable and acceptable to the nuclear fuel marketplace. The economics of fuel design make this DOE funded project very important to the nuclear industry. Even incremental changes to an existing fuel design can cost in the range of $100M to implement through to LFAs. If this money is invested evenly over 10 years then it can take the fuel vendor several decades after the start of the project to recover their initial investment and reach a breakeven point on the initial investment. Step or radical changes to a fuel assembly design can cost upwards of $500M and will take even longer for the fuel vendor to recover their investment. With the projected lifetimes of the current generation of nuclear power

  20. Site characterization summary report for the Old Hydrofracture Facility, Waste Area Grouping 5, at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    The Old Hydrofracture (OHF) Facility was an experimental waste disposal test site located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. ORNL is a research facility owned by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and managed by Lockheed Martin Energy Research Corp. Legacy environmental restoration sites, such as the OHF Facility, are managed for DOE by Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc. This report summarizes the known conditions at the OHF Facility located in the southwest comer of Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 5 at ORNL. The facility covers about I acre within the approximate ORNL grid coordinates N17100-N17300 and E28500-E28700. The facility was used for the injection of liquid intermediate-level wastes (ILW) into a shale formation well below ground surface as a means of permanent disposal. Wastes remaining at the site after the last series of injections in 1980 can be found in buildings, waste pits, the retention pond, tanks, and piping. Based on a recent assessment of risk posed by these wastes, the contents of the tanks will be removed. Characterization data collected to date are provided in this report to facilitate waste removal activities.

  1. Areva - 2013 revenue of euro 9.3 bn thanks to sustained level of activity. Organic growth in the nuclear operations: + 7%, above our financial outlook. Backlog of euro 41.6 bn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two years after Fukushima, AREVA's level of activity was especially strong in 2013. The group outperformed its revenue outlook for nuclear operations with an organic growth of 7.1%. With more than 9 billion euros, the group's revenue benefited from the robustness of the recurring activities and from temporary elements, such as exceptionally high uranium sales. This growth demonstrates the resilience of Areva's end market, despite unfavourable current conditions, and the efficient match between its commercial offers and customers' expectations. Capitalizing on this dynamic, the group will continue its recovery in order to sustainably self-finance its capital expenditures. After the announcement on January 20, 2014 of exclusive negotiations with Gamesa for the creation of a joint company in the offshore wind field (50% AREVA, 50% Gamesa), and in accordance with IFRS 5 accounting standard, revenue generated by the Wind Energy business is not included in group revenue for 2012 and 2013 and the result of this business will be presented on a separate line, 'net income from discontinued operations' in the 2013 financial statements. In 2013, AREVA had consolidated revenue of 9.303 billion euros, an increase of 3.8% (+6.3% like for like) compared with 2012 benefiting from strong organic growth in the nuclear operations: - Revenue in the nuclear operations was 9.042 billion euros in 2013, compared with 8.633 billion euros in 2012, a 7.1% increase (+4.7% on a reported basis). Revenue was led by the Mining BG (+40.6% like for like) and the Front End BG (+7.5% like for like), offsetting the expected business downturn in the Reactors and Services BG (-1.5% like for like). Revenue was stable in the Back End BG (-0.6% like for like). - The Renewable Energies BG had 132 million euros in revenue, down from 2012 (-24.7% like for like). - Foreign exchange had a negative impact of 101 million euros, while the change in consolidation scope and accounting methods had a negative impact of

  2. The Integral Test Facility Karlstein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Leyer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The Integral Test Facility Karlstein (INKA test facility was designed and erected to test the performance of the passive safety systems of KERENA, the new AREVA Boiling Water Reactor design. The experimental program included single component/system tests of the Emergency Condenser, the Containment Cooling Condenser and the Passive Core Flooding System. Integral system tests, including also the Passive Pressure Pulse Transmitter, will be performed to simulate transients and Loss of Coolant Accident scenarios at the test facility. The INKA test facility represents the KERENA Containment with a volume scaling of 1 : 24. Component heights and levels are in full scale. The reactor pressure vessel is simulated by the accumulator vessel of the large valve test facility of Karlstein—a vessel with a design pressure of 11 MPa and a storage capacity of 125 m3. The vessel is fed by a benson boiler with a maximum power supply of 22 MW. The INKA multi compartment pressure suppression Containment meets the requirements of modern and existing BWR designs. As a result of the large power supply at the facility, INKA is capable of simulating various accident scenarios, including a full train of passive systems, starting with the initiating event—for example pipe rupture.

  3. AREVA announces US$ 7.75 Per share friendly cash offer for UraMin; Offre publique d'achat amicale d'AREVA sur UraMin sur la base d'un prix de 7,75US$ par action

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-07-01

    AREVA and UraMin Inc. ('UraMin') entered on June 15, 2007 into an agreement in respect of AREVA's friendly cash offer for 100% of the share capital of UraMin. UraMin is listed in London (AIM) and Toronto (TSX). AREVA (Euronext Paris) already owns 5.5% of UraMin's share capital. This cash offer of AREVA will be made through its indirect wholly-owned subsidiary CFMM Development ('AREVA') based on a price of US$ 7.75 per UraMin share. The total offer consideration amounts to more than USD 2.5 billion for 100% of the fully diluted share capital of UraMin. This represents a premium of 21% over UraMin 20-day weighted average trading price ending on June 8, 2007. The UraMin Board of Directors, after consulting with its financial advisors, has determined that the offer is fair and in the best interest of the UraMin shareholders and it has resolved to recommend acceptance of the Offer. BMO Capital Markets has provided an opinion that the offer is fair, from a financial point of view, to the UraMin shareholders. In connection with the offer, all directors and certain other shareholders representing approximately 25% of the outstanding UraMin shares (calculated on a fully diluted basis) have entered into lock-up agreements with AREVA pursuant to which they have agreed to tender all their UraMin shares to AREVA's offer. The support agreement entered into between AREVA and UraMin provides for, among other things, in case a superior proposal is accepted by UraMin, a right to match in favour of AREVA. The support agreement also includes a break up fee in favour of AREVA of US$ 75 million under certain circumstances. Concurrently with the closing of the proposed offer, UraMin will declare a dividend payable in shares of the capital of Niger Uranium Limited held by UraMin (where permitted by law) or a cash equivalent of the value of such shares.

  4. DMT - Areva's steam generator maintenance cleaning process concept and experiences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steam generators (SGs) are one of the key components for plant performance and plant availability of nuclear power plants. Depending on numerous factors (e.g. material concept, water chemistry, operational procedures) a certain amount of metal oxides and impurities are transported into the SG's via the feed water. Accumulation of these deposits is intrinsic during the operation of steam generators in PWRs. In order to maintain the integrity or to maintain or regain the performance of the steam generators, chemical cleaning is an essential part of the asset management. Recently the industry moves from curative (removing all SG deposits with one chemical application) cleanings to preventive (i.e. maintenance - removal of a portion of the SG deposits with one chemical application) cleanings. The intention of such preventive cleanings is to maintain the deposit inventory on a low level or even better to reduce the deposit inventory by repeated applications. Preventive cleanings remove only a part of the sludge inventory during each application. Nevertheless such cleanings still need to be efficient and most of all it is mandatory that the corrosion is very low - not only to minimize steam generator base metal corrosion but also to increase the efficiency of the cleaning. The AREVA developed proprietary Deposit Minimization Treatment (DMT) technology uses a different chemistry than EDTA. The technical advantage provided by DMT's different chemistry, besides the innocuousness towards Ni-alloys and stainless steels, is its self-inhibiting property. The in situ formation of a protective layer on the carbon steel surfaces limits the average carbon steel corrosion during a typical chemical cleaning campaign to values far below 10 μm. Due to this very low carbon steel corrosion, less than 5 % of the dissolved iron originates from SG base metal corrosion, while this portion can be more than 30 % in a comparable uninhibited EDTA solution. The DMT process protective

  5. Narrow gap mechanised arc welding in nuclear components manufactured by AREVA NP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear components require welds of irreproachable and reproducible quality. Moreover, for a given welding process, productivity requirements lead to reduce the volume of deposited metal and thus to use narrow gap design. In the shop, narrow gap Submerged Arc Welding process (SAW) is currently used on rotating parts in flat position for thicknesses up to 300 mm. Welding is performed with one or two wires in two passes per layer. In Gas Tungsten Arc Welding process (GTAW), multiple applications can be found because this process presents the advantage of allowing welding in all positions. Welding is performed in one or two passes per layer. The process is used in factory and on the nuclear sites for assembling new components but also for replacing components and for repairs. Presently, an increase of productivity of the process is sought through the use of hot wire and/or two wires. Concerning Gas Metal Arc Welding process (GMAW), its use is growing for nuclear components, including narrow gap applications. This process, limited in its applications in the past on account of the defects it generated, draws benefit from the progress of the welding generators. Then it is possible to use this efficient process for high security components such as those of nuclear systems. It is to be noted that the process is applicable in the various welding positions as it is the case for GTAW, while being more efficient than the latter. This paper presents the state of the art in the use of narrow gap mechanised arc welding processes by AREVA NP units. (author)

  6. Areva's Actiflo trademark -Rad water treatment system for the Fukushima nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the wake of the March 11th 2011 earthquake and tsunami and the subsequent flooding of several of the Fukushima Daiichi reactor units, Japan and the Japanese utility Tepco faced a crisis situation with incredible challenges. Sea water and later desalted sea water used for open circuit post-accident reactor cooling accumulated in the basements of four reactor buildings as well as in the basements of the turbine buildings on the site. The water had been heavily contaminated due to the fact that it had been in contact with molten fuel assemblies in the reactor cores. The water from flooding and subsequent cooling needed to be collected, along with rainwater. Despite the use of additional water storage systems brought to the site, a shortage of water storage capacity was expected in a 3-month timeframe, especially in view of the coming rain season in Japan. The overall water inventory was estimated at around 110,000 tons with a contamination up to the order of 1 Ci/l (3.7 x 1010 Bq/l). To avoid an over-flow of highly contaminated water into the sea Tepco envisaged establishing a water treatment system. This article focuses on the Actiflo trademark -Rad water treatment project implemented by Areva as part of the Tepco general water treatment scheme. It presents a detailed look at the functional principle of the Actiflo trademark -Rad process, related on-the-fly research and development, an explanation of system implementation challenges and a brief summary of operation results. (orig.)

  7. Report on transparency and nuclear safety, Cadarache 2011, Volume 1 + Volume 2 INB 32 and 54 Areva NC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For respectively different sites all situated in Cadarache, the CEA Centre on the one hand, and the AREVA nuclear base installation INB 32 and 54 on the other hand, these volumes propose a presentation of their activities and installations, a description of measures regarding safety and radiation protection, a description of significant events regarding nuclear safety and radiation protection, a presentation and discussion of results of measurements of releases and of their impact on the environment, and a description of the different radioactive wastes stored on the concerned site

  8. RCRA Facility Investigation report for Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 3. Appendixes 1 through 8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1991-09-01

    This report presents compiled information concerning a facility investigation of waste area group 6(WAG-6), of the solid waste management units (SWMU'S) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The WAG is a shallow ground disposal area for low-level radioactive wastes and chemical wastes. The report contains information on hydrogeological data, contaminant characterization, radionuclide concentrations, risk assessment from doses to humans and animals and associated cancer risks, exposure via food chains, and historical data. (CBS)

  9. RCRA Facility Investigation report for Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 2. Sections 4 through 9

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1991-09-01

    This report presents compiled information concerning a facility investigation of waste area group 6(WAG-6), of the solid waste management units (SWMU's) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The WAG is a shallow ground disposal area for low-level radioactive wastes and chemical wastes. The report contains information on hydrogeological data, contaminant characterization, radionuclide concentrations, risk assessment and baseline human health evaluation including a toxicity assessment, and a baseline environmental evaluation.

  10. RCRA Facility Investigation report for Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 2, Sections 4 through 9: Environmental Restoration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-09-01

    This report presents compiled information concerning a facility investigation of waste area group 6(WAG-6), of the solid waste management units (SWMU`s) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The WAG is a shallow ground disposal area for low-level radioactive wastes and chemical wastes. The report contains information on hydrogeological data, contaminant characterization, radionuclide concentrations, risk assessment and baseline human health evaluation including a toxicity assessment, and a baseline environmental evaluation.

  11. RCRA Facility Investigation report for Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 3, Appendixes 1 through 8: Environmental Restoration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-09-01

    This report presents compiled information concerning a facility investigation of waste area group 6(WAG-6), of the solid waste management units (SWMU`S) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The WAG is a shallow ground disposal area for low-level radioactive wastes and chemical wastes. The report contains information on hydrogeological data, contaminant characterization, radionuclide concentrations, risk assessment from doses to humans and animals and associated cancer risks, exposure via food chains, and historical data. (CBS)

  12. 75 FR 10525 - In the Matter of: AREVA Enrichment Services, LLC (Eagle Rock Enrichment Facility) and All Other...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-08

    ... Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC 20555. In addition, licensees shall mark their responses as ``Security... February 2010. For the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Michael F. Weber, Director, Office of...

  13. AREVA coating and adhesive technology. A method to mitigate and/or prevent leaks in pools with stainless steel liners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraemer, Georg [AREVA NP GmbH, Erlangen (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    Worldwide experience shows that stainless steel liners of concrete pools tend to leak primarily due to corrosion phenomena, although weld failure leakage can also occur. Extensive investigations by AREVA showed that mechanical defects are usually caused by mechanical impact and that the affected location is obvious. However, in the case of corrosion, which is the root cause in most of the cases, the defect in the liner begins from the concrete side and is only detected when a complete penetration occurs. Therefore, in the case of corrosion defects, it is not only vital to identify the location and repair the actual leak, but it is advantageous to apply a technology that works as a preventive measure. Repair methods based on conventional welding techniques are not promising as a preventive measure, mostly due to cost and time issues. With the AREVA coating and adhesive technology, a repair method is provided which is able to stop existing leaks. It also works as a prophylactic measure against future penetration from the concrete side of the pool. This technique covers the failure mechanisms from weld failures over corrosion to mechanical stresses. A further advantage of the coating and adhesive technology is the possibility to use remote-controlled underwater repair methods. These are particularly beneficial in the repair of leaks in spent fuel pools. Extensive laboratory testing and longstanding successful experience in nuclear power plants have proven the suitability of the coating and adhesive technology as an active and proactive method to minimize leakages in pools. (orig.)

  14. Energy infrastructure of the United States and projected siting needs: Scoping ideas, identifying issues and options. Draft report of the Department of Energy Working Group on Energy Facility Siting to the Secretary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-12-01

    A Department of Energy (DOE) Working Group on Energy Facility Siting, chaired by the Policy Office with membership from the major program and staff offices of the Department, reviewed data regarding energy service needs, infrastructure requirements, and constraints to siting. The Working Group found that the expeditious siting of energy facilities has important economic, energy, and environmental implications for key Administration priorities.

  15. Control and maintenance of the Superphenix knowledge and its specific sodium skills through an innovative partnership between EDF and AREVA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Superphenix is a 1200 MWe sodium cooled Fast Breeder Reactor (FBR) located in Creys-Malville (France). Its grid coupling occurred in 1986 and its final shutdown pronounced through a decree, 12 years later, in 1998. This Superphenix final shutdown decision marked a new stage in the life of the nuclear plant. Decommissioning activities were highly challenging due to the following: - Non recurrent and first-of-a-kind (FOAK) characteristics; - Environment constraints: radiation level, high temperatures, presence of argon, sodium, NaK, soda, hydrogen, etc.; - Complexity of the primary vessel internal structures; - Numerous interfaces to manage; - Numerous technical uncertainties due to the difficulty in anticipating the effective state of components (sodium and aerosols retentions, tritium concentration, NaK alteration, etc.). At the end of 1998, exchanges took place between EDF as 'Superphenix nuclear operator' and AREVA as 'Superphenix Nuclear Steam System Supply (NSSS) designer' in order to find the best way to meet the new challenge of decommissioning Superphenix. A key ingredient to achieving success was to ensure that existing local and specific sodium skills were controlled and maintained. AREVA was selected by EDF as its industrial partner for the sodium activities on this project being entrusted with the following missions: - Maintaining and adapting a strong EDF / AREVA partnership within the project duration; - Supplying support as the 'NSSS Designer'; - Rolling-out multidisciplinary skills from the design to the on-site operations; - Relying on its best technical experts to solve each technical challenge; - Developing and adapting durable specific skills of its technical team (sodium, mechanical, process, I and C, statutory, etc.) following each stage of the decommissioning. This EDF/AREVA partnership on the sodium activities has taken different forms according to the different stages of the project. From 1998 to 2005, AREVA was

  16. The AREVA integrated and sustainable concept of fatigue design, monitoring and re-assessment; AREVA FATIGUE CONCEPT - ein geschlossenes Konzept zur Verfolgung und Optimierung der auf Ermuedung basierenden Schaedigungseffekte von thermisch und mechanisch beanspruchten Kraftwerksbauteilen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Begholz, Steffen; Rudolph, Juergen [AREVA NP GmbH, Erlangen (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    Prevention of fatigue damage of components is an important topic with respect to safety and availability of a nuclear power plant. The issue of fatigue monitoring should be of primary interest throughout service life. Based on the changing general framework, i.e. planning of new plants with a projected lifetime of 60 years and the lifetime extension of existing plants AREVA is focussing R and D activities on improved detection methods. Primary objective is the realistic determination of the actual usage level of reactor components. The fatigue monitoring is supposed to enhance cost optimization and minimize inspection frequency. Fatigue monitoring should be implemented at the beginning of start-up period since the high loads during this phase introduce a significant contribution to the usage level. AREVA recommends the use of the FAMOS (fatigue monitoring system) for the assessment of the realistic transient loads and the data processing with respect to fatigue evaluation. Every 10 years the actual usage levels should be evaluated in detail according to the standards, based on measured load data. The fatigue evaluation is usually performed using finite element analyses taking into account the transient temperature loads at the component, dependent on the component demands based on elastic or elasto-plastic material behaviour. Potential problematic areas can be identified reliably. Direct measurement of fatigue damage, refined analysis concepts (short crack fracture mechanics, and ratcheting simulation) are supposed to support the concept. [German] Die Vermeidung von Ermuedungsschaeden an Komponenten der nuklearen Kraftwerkstechnik ist ein wichtiges Thema in Hinblick auf die Aufrechterhaltung der Anlagensicherheit sowie auf die Erhoehung der Verfuegbarkeit. Das Thema Ermuedungsueberwachung sollte somit waehrend der gesamten Laufzeit eines Kraftwerkes mit hoher Aufmerksamkeit verfolgt werden. Vor diesem Hintergrund und den sich aendernden Rahmenbedingungen, wie z

  17. Information report on nuclear safety and radiation protection of the Tricastin AREVA site - Issue 2013. Figures and information about nuclear safety and radiation protection of the Tricastin AREVA site - Issue 2013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Published in compliance with the French code of the environment, this report first presents different aspects of the Areva's Tricastin site which comprises five basic nuclear installations or INBs, and seven ICPE (installation classified for the protection of the environment). The activities are dedicated to uranium conversion, uranium enrichment, uranium chemistry, industrial services, and fuel manufacturing. The report presents this important industrial site, describes the various measures regarding nuclear safety and radiation protection, reports nuclear events which occurred on this site and had to be declared, reports the management of releases by this site and the control of the environment. The next part addresses the management of the various wastes produced by the different installations present on this site. The management of other impacts is also reported. The last chapter reviews the actions undertaken in the field of transparency and information

  18. Permanent group of experts for nuclear pressure equipment (GPESPN) - Session of the 14 September 2011: Repair operations of the vessel cover for the Flamanville 3 PWR reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report discusses elements stated by AREVA to justify the management of the process which has been defined to repair the vessel cover of the Flamanville PWR, and whether controls and measures aimed at the detection and correction of possible shifts of this process are adapted. The different steps of this process are discussed: buttering and welding, thermal treatment operations, design of the repaired cover. Recommendations are given by the expert group. Some related documents sent by the ASN to AREVA are present in appendix

  19. Facility with the English language and problem-based learning group interaction: findings from an Arabic setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mpofu, D J; Lanphear, J; Stewart, T; Das, M; Ridding, P; Dunn, E

    1998-09-01

    The Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences (FMHS), United Arab Emirates (UAE) University is in a unique position to explore issues related to English language proficiency and medical student performance. All students entering the FMHS have English as a second language. This study focused on the issues of students' proficiency in English as measured by the TOEFL test, student background factors and interaction in problem-based learning (PBL) groups. Using a modification of Bales Interaction Process Analysis, four problem-based learning groups were observed over four thematic units, to measure the degree of student interaction within PBL groups and to compare this to individual TOEFL scores and key background variables. The students' contributions correlated highly with TOEFL test results in the giving of information (range r = 0.67-0.74). The female students adhered to interacting in English during group sessions, whereas the male students were more likely to revert to using Arabic in elaborating unclear phenomena (p TOEFL scores for the male students, but not for female students. Multivariate analysis was undertaken to analyse the relative contribution of the TOEFL, parental education and years of studying in English. The best predictor of students' contributions in PBL groups was identified as TOEFL scores. The study demonstrates the importance of facilitating a locally acceptable level of English proficiency prior to admission to the FMHS. However, it also highlights the importance of not focusing only on English proficiency but paying attention to additional factors in facilitating medical students in maximizing benefits from interactions in PBL settings.

  20. RCRA Facility Investigation report for Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    WAG 6 comprises a shallow land burial facility used for disposal of low-level radioactive wastes (LLW) and, until recently, chemical wastes. As such, the site is subject to regulation under RCRA and the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA). To comply with these regulations, DOE, in conjunction with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC), developed a strategy for closure and remediation of WAG 6 by 1997. A key component of this strategy was to complete an RFI by September 1991. The primary objectives of the RFI were to evaluate the site's potential human health and environmental impacts and to develop a preliminary list of alternatives to mitigate these impacts. The WAG 6 one of three solid waste management units evaluated Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) existing waste disposal records and sampling data and performed the additional sampling and analysis necessary to: describe the nature and extent of contamination; characterize key contaminant transport pathways; and assess potential risks to human health and the environment by developing and evaluating hypothetical receptor scenarios. Estimated excess lifetime cancer risks as a result for exposure to radionuclides and chemicals were quantified for each hypothetical human receptor. For environmental receptors, potential impacts were qualitatively assessed. Taking into account regulatory requirements and base line risk assessment results, preliminary site closure and remediation objectives were identified, and a preliminary list of alternatives for site closure and remediation was developed

  1. Paleomagnetic correlation and ages of basalt flow groups in coreholes at and near the Naval Reactors Facility, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champion, Duane E.; Davis, Linda C.; Hodges, Mary K.V.; Lanphere, Marvin A.

    2013-01-01

    Paleomagnetic inclination and polarity studies were conducted on subcore samples from eight coreholes located at and near the Naval Reactors Facility (NRF), Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These studies were used to characterize and to correlate successive stratigraphic basalt flow groups in each corehole to basalt flow groups with similar paleomagnetic inclinations in adjacent coreholes. Results were used to extend the subsurface geologic framework at the INL previously derived from paleomagnetic data for south INL coreholes. Geologic framework studies are used in conceptual and numerical models of groundwater flow and contaminant transport. Sample handling and demagnetization protocols are described, as well as the paleomagnetic data averaging process. Paleomagnetic inclination comparisons among NRF coreholes show comparable stratigraphic successions of mean inclination values over tens to hundreds of meters of depth. Corehole USGS 133 is more than 5 kilometers from the nearest NRF area corehole, and the mean inclination values of basalt flow groups in that corehole are somewhat less consistent than with NRF area basalt flow groups. Some basalt flow groups in USGS 133 are missing, additional basalt flow groups are present, or the basalt flow groups are at depths different from those of NRF area coreholes. Age experiments on young, low potassium olivine tholeiite basalts may yield inconclusive results; paleomagnetic and stratigraphic data were used to choose the most reasonable ages. Results of age experiments using conventional potassium argon and argon-40/argon-39 protocols indicate that the youngest and uppermost basalt flow group in the NRF area is 303 ± 30 ka and that the oldest and deepest basalt flow group analyzed is 884 ± 53 ka. A south to north line of cross-section drawn through the NRF coreholes shows corehole-to-corehole basalt flow group correlations derived from the paleomagnetic inclination data. From stratigraphic top to bottom, key results

  2. The MELOX MOX fabrication facility: history of an industrial success and future prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Along with the La Hague reprocessing plant, MELOX is part of the two industrial facilities that ensure the closure of the nuclear fuel cycle in France. Since started up in 1995, MELOX has specialized into recycling separated plutonium recovered from reprocessing operations performed at La Hague on spent UO2 fuel. Capitalizing on the unique know-how acquired through thirty years of plutonium-based fuel fabrication at the Cadarache plant, this subsidiary of AREVA group has quickly become a worldwide expert in the industrial process of fabricating MOX: a fuel blend comprised of both uranium and plutonium oxides that allows at safely exploiting the energetic potential of plutonium. In order to address the various factors responsible for this industrial breakthrough, we will first present an overview of MELOX's history in regards of the emergence of a global MOX market. The added-value provided through treatment and recycling operations on spent fuel will be further described in terms of waste volume and radiotoxicity reduction. The emphasis will then be put on the total quality management policy that is at the core of MELOX's corporate strategy. Because MELOX has succeeded in meeting both productivity requirements and stringent quality constraints, it has won confidence from its European and Japanese clients. With increased production capacity of diversified MOX designs, MELOX is demonstrating the industrial efficiency of a new concept of MOX plants that is inspiring large construction projects in Japan, the US, and Russia. (authors)

  3. Adapting Dismantling and Decommissioning Strategies to a Variety of Nuclear Fuel Cycle Facilities - 12237

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AREVA has accumulated over 20 years of experience in managing and operating fuel cycle facilities Decontamination and Decommissioning (D and D) projects of many different types and a variety of scales, both as facility owner (at La Hague for example) and as prime contractor to external customers such as the French Atomic Energy Commission (at Marcoule). A specific Business Unit was created in 2008 to capitalize on this experience and to concentrate - in one division - the specific skills required to be successful and cost effective in decommissioning projects. Indeed one of the key lessons learned in the past decades is that decommissioning is a significantly different business as compared to normal operations of a nuclear facility. Almost all the functions of a project need to be viewed from a different angle, challenged and adapted consequently in order to optimize costs and schedule. Three examples follow to illustrate the point: Safety management needs to take into account the ever changing configuration of a plant under D and D (a quite new situation for the authorities). Production of waste is significantly different in term of volume, activities, conditioning and disposal path. Technology is important but technical issues are often less critical than good management and planning. Further examples and lessons learned are developed through reviewing the projects experience basis. AREVA has a long and vast experience in the cleanup and dismantling of a number of very large and complex nuclear facilities. This effort focused initially on AREVA's own plants and is expanding now to other customers. The setup of a specific Business Unit in 2008 to takeover this business allowed concentration of the skills and the lessons learned in a dedicated division so as to provide the best means to optimize safety, performance, costs and schedules. Indeed transitioning from operations to D and D of a nuclear facility is a quantum leap. The assistance from specialized teams can

  4. Impact of uranium exploitation by Cogema-Areva subsidiaries in Niger. Assessment of analyses performed by the CRIIRAD laboratory in 2004 and at the beginning of 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After a description of the uranium exploitation context (involved companies, production) in Arlit, Niger, by Cogema-Areva subsidiary companies, this report describes the context of controls performed by the CRIIRAD laboratory. Then, it reports and comments the contamination of underground so-called drinkable waters (contamination risks, Cogema statement, detection of a rather high concentration of alpha emitters, measurements performed in 2004 and 2005). The authors notice that water contamination is known by Cogema. Then, the report analyzes the issue of contaminated scrap metal dispersal, comments and criticizes the attitude of Cogema with respect to the associated risks. It comments the uranate transport accident which occurred in February 2004, the subsequent contamination, actions performed by Cogema, the associated health risks, and the statements made by Areva and Cogema. It also comments and analyzes the risks related to radioactive radon dusts inhalation around different sites and because of some technical practices, and Cogema statements about this issue. In conclusion, the authors outline the need of reinforced controls and of an epidemiological study, and outlines how Areva propagates wrong ideas

  5. Tailings Management Best Practice: A Case Study of the McClean Lake Jeb Tailings Management Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    COGEMA Resources Inc. (part of the Areva Group) is a Canadian company with its head office in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan. It owns and operates mining and milling facilities in Northern Saskatchewan, where it produces uranium concentrate. McClean Lake Operation commenced production in 1999, and its tailings management facility represents the state of the art for tailings management in the uranium industry in Canada. Tailings disposal has the potential to cause effects in the surrounding receiving environment primarily through migration of soluble contaminants from the facility to surface water receptors. In-pit disposal of mill tailings has become the standard in the uranium mining industry in Northern Saskatchewan. This method of tailings management demonstrates advances in terms of worker radiation protection and containment of soluble contaminants both during operations and into the long term. Sub-aqueous deposition of tailings protects personnel from exposure to radiation and airborne emissions and prevents freezing of tailings, which can hinder consolidation. The continuous inflow of groundwater to the facility is achieved during operations through control of water levels within the facility. This ensures hydrodynamic containment, which prevents migration of soluble radionuclides and heavy metals into the surrounding aquifer during operations. The environmental performance of the decommissioned facility depends upon the rate of release of contaminants to the receiving environment. The rate of contaminant loading to the receiving environment will ultimately be governed by the concentrations of soluble contaminants within the tailings mass, the mechanisms for contaminant release from the tailings to the surrounding groundwater system and transport of contaminants within the groundwater pathway to the receiving environment. The tailings preparation process was designed to convert arsenic into a stable form to reduce soluble concentrations within the tailings mass

  6. Presentation of 2004 earnings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This presentation offers financial information on the AREVA Group earnings for the year 2004. With manufacturing facilities in over 40 countries and a sales network in over 100, Areva offers customers technological solutions for nuclear power generation and electricity transmission and distribution. The Group also provides interconnect systems to the telecommunications, computer and automotive markets. (A.L.B.)

  7. Presentation of 2004 earnings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-03-01

    This presentation offers financial information on the AREVA Group earnings for the year 2004. With manufacturing facilities in over 40 countries and a sales network in over 100, Areva offers customers technological solutions for nuclear power generation and electricity transmission and distribution. The Group also provides interconnect systems to the telecommunications, computer and automotive markets. (A.L.B.)

  8. Measurement of two-phase flow parameters with multi-channel gamma densitometry and local void probes at the INKA test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At AREVA's integral test facility INKA, different passive safety systems of the generation III+ boiling water reactor KERENA™ are being tested. For the detailed analysis of condensation phenomena, an improved understanding and quantitative assessment of the occurring two-phase flow phenomena is essential. In this paper, we describe the special instrumentation of the INKA test facility with high-temperature high-pressure thermo needle probes and a special multichannel gamma densitometer. The paper gives a short overview of the passive safety concept of the KERENA™ system, the fundamentals of the special instrumentation and discusses some experimental results from the INKA test facility in Karlstein. (author)

  9. Measurement of two-phase flow parameters with multi-channel gamma densitometry and local void probes at the INKA test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schleicher, E.; Bieberle, A.; Tschofen, M.; Hampel, U. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany); Lineva, N.; Maisberger, F.; Leyer, S. [AREVA NP GmbH, Offenbach (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    At AREVA's integral test facility INKA, different passive safety systems of the generation III+ boiling water reactor KERENA™ are being tested. For the detailed analysis of condensation phenomena, an improved understanding and quantitative assessment of the occurring two-phase flow phenomena is essential. In this paper, we describe the special instrumentation of the INKA test facility with high-temperature high-pressure thermo needle probes and a special multichannel gamma densitometer. The paper gives a short overview of the passive safety concept of the KERENA™ system, the fundamentals of the special instrumentation and discusses some experimental results from the INKA test facility in Karlstein. (author)

  10. Narrow gap mechanised arc welding in nuclear components manufactured by AREVA NP; Le soudage mecanise a l'arc en chanfrein etroit dans les constructions nucleaires realisees par AREVA NP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peigney, A. [Departement Soudage AREVA Centre Technique - 71380 Saint-Marcel (France)

    2007-07-01

    Nuclear components require welds of irreproachable and reproducible quality. Moreover, for a given welding process, productivity requirements lead to reduce the volume of deposited metal and thus to use narrow gap design. In the shop, narrow gap Submerged Arc Welding process (SAW) is currently used on rotating parts in flat position for thicknesses up to 300 mm. Welding is performed with one or two wires in two passes per layer. In Gas Tungsten Arc Welding process (GTAW), multiple applications can be found because this process presents the advantage of allowing welding in all positions. Welding is performed in one or two passes per layer. The process is used in factory and on the nuclear sites for assembling new components but also for replacing components and for repairs. Presently, an increase of productivity of the process is sought through the use of hot wire and/or two wires. Concerning Gas Metal Arc Welding process (GMAW), its use is growing for nuclear components, including narrow gap applications. This process, limited in its applications in the past on account of the defects it generated, draws benefit from the progress of the welding generators. Then it is possible to use this efficient process for high security components such as those of nuclear systems. It is to be noted that the process is applicable in the various welding positions as it is the case for GTAW, while being more efficient than the latter. This paper presents the state of the art in the use of narrow gap mechanised arc welding processes by AREVA NP units. (author) [French] Les constructions nucleaires necessitent des soudures de qualite irreprochable et reproductible. Par ailleurs les imperatifs de productivite conduisent, pour un procede donne, a reduire le volume de metal a deposer et donc a utiliser des chanfreins etroits. En atelier, le soudage fil-flux en chanfrein etroit est couramment utilise sur des pieces tournantes en position a plat pour des epaisseurs atteignant 300 mm. On

  11. Theme day: corrosion and surface treatments in nuclear facilities. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document brings together the available presentations given at the theme day organized by the Bourgogne Nuclear Pole on the topic of corrosion and surface treatments in nuclear facilities. Eleven presentations (slides) are compiled in this document: 1 - Introduction - PNB centre of competitiveness and R and D activities (A. Mantovan, PNB); 2 - Corrosion damage (M. Foucault, Areva NP - Centre Technique Le Creusot); 3 - Corrosion mechanisms (R. Oltra, UB-ICB); 4 - Examples of expertise management (C. Duret-Thual, Institut de la corrosion/Corrosion Institute); 5 - General framework of surface treatments (C. Nouveau, ENSAM Cluny Paris Tech); 6 - Surfaces et interfaces characterisation - Part A (C. Langlade, Y. Gachon, UTBM and HEF); 7 - Surfaces et interfaces characterisation - Part B (C. Langlade, Y. Gachon, UTBM and HEF); 8 - Ion beam surface treatment (Y. Le Guellec, Quertech Ingenierie); 9 - Impact surface treatment (G. Saout, Sonats); 10 - Metal oxides Characterisation by US laser (R. Oltra, UB-ICB); 11 - Detection and Characterisation of intergranular corrosion (Y. Kernin, Stephane Bourgois, Areva Intercontrole)

  12. The decommissioning of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This file includes five parts: the first part is devoted to the strategies of the different operators and includes the following files: the decommissioning of nuclear facilities Asn point of view, decommissioning of secret nuclear facilities, decommissioning at the civil Cea strategy and programs, EDF de-construction strategy, Areva strategy for decommissioning of nuclear facilities; the second one concerns the stakes of dismantling and includes the articles as follow: complete cleanup of buildings structures in nuclear facilities, decommissioning of nuclear facilities and safety assessment, decommissioning wastes management issues, securing the financing of long-term decommissioning and waste management costs, organizational and human factors in decommissioning projects, training for the decommissioning professions: the example of the Grenoble University master degree; the third part is devoted to the management of dismantling work sites and includes the different articles as follow: decommissioning progress at S.I.C.N. plant, example of decommissioning work site in Cea Grenoble: Siloette reactor decommissioning, matters related to decommissioning sites, decommissioning of french nuclear installations: the viewpoint of a specialist company, specificities of inspections during decommissioning: the Asn inspector point of view; the fourth part is in relation with the international approach and includes as follow: IAEA role in establishing a global safety regime on decommissioning, towards harmonization of nuclear safety practices in Europe: W.E.N.R.A. and the decommissioning of nuclear facilities, EPA superfund program policy for decontamination and decommissioning, progress with remediation at Sellafield, progress and experiences from the decommissioning of the Eurochemic reprocessing plant in Belgium, activities of I.R.S.N. and its daughter company Risk-audit I.r.s.n./G.r.s. international in the field of decommissioning of nuclear facilities in eastern countries

  13. Benchmarking of AREVA BWR FDIC-PEZOG model against first BFE3 cycle 15 application of On-Line NobleChem results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The combination of AREVA's BWR FDIC-PEZOG tools allows the calculation of the total liftoff as a measure of fuel performance and a risk indicator for fuel reliability. The AREVA BWR FDIC tool is a crud modeling tool. The PEZOG tool models the platinum-enhanced zirconium oxide growth of fuel cladding when exposed to platinum during operation. Continuous effort to improve these tools used for the total liftoff calculations is illustrated by the benchmarking of the tools after the application of On-Line NobleChemTM at TVA Browns Ferry Unit 3 during Cycle 15. A set of runs using the modified FDIC-PEZOG model and actual plant water chemistry for Cycle 15 and partial data for Cycle 16 were performed. The updated results' deposit thickness and deposit composition predictions for EOC15 were compared to the measured data from EOC15 and are presented in this paper. The updated predicted deposit thickness matched the actual, measured value exactly. Predicted deposit composition near the fuel rod boundary, nearer to the bulk reactor water, and as an averaged deposit, as presented in the paper, compared extremely well with the measured data at EOC15. The updated AREVA methodology resulted in lower fuel oxide thickness predictions over the life of the fuel as compared to the initial evaluations for BFE3 by incorporating more recent experimental data on the thermal conductivity of zirconia; unnecessary conservatism in the prediction of the fuel oxide thickness over the life of the fuel was removed in the improved model. (authors)

  14. Global expertise of the ten-year environmental situation of AREVA N.C..2. part: environmental impact at the level of catchment basins and surveillance evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The second step of the expertise of the ten-year environmental assessment 1994-2003 of Areva NC allowed to complete the work on the themes and the sites that were not treated during the first step. The analysis concerned the impacts on the mine installations of the mine division of La Crouzille and more particularly of impacts observed since the sites refitting. The detail of this analysis and the results to which it allowed to achieve are the object of this present report. (N.C.)

  15. The integral test facility Karlstein - INKA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The INKA (INtegral Test Facility KArlstein) test facility was designed and erected to test and demonstrate performance of the passive safety systems of KERENA™, the new AREVA Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) design. The experimental program within the KERENA™ development program included single component/system tests of the Emergency Condenser, the Containment Cooling Condenser and the Passive Core Flooding System. Integral system tests will be performed to simulate transients and LOCA (Loss of Coolant Accident) scenarios at the INKA test facility. These tests will test and demonstrate the interaction between the passive components/systems and demonstrate their ability to perform their design function. For the integral tests, the Passive Pressure Pulse Transmitter will be included. The INKA test facility represents the KERENA™ Containment with a volume scaling of 1:24. Component heights and levels are full scale in order to match the driving forces for natural circulation. The reactor pressure vessel is simulated by the accumulator vessel of the large valve test facility of Karlstein - a vessel with a design pressure of 11 MPa and a storage capacity of 125 m3. The vessel is fed by a benson boiler with a maximum power supply of 22 MW. The drywell of the INKA containment is divided into two compartments and connected to the wetwell (Pressure Suppression System) via a full scale vent pipe. Therefore, the INKA pressure suppression system meets the requirements of modern and existing BWR designs. As a result of the large power supply at the facility, INKA is capable of simulating various accident scenarios starting with the initiating event - for example pipe rupture. At INKA a full train of passive safety systems is available. INKA is also able to simulate the functions of active safety system such as containment heat removal. Therefore accident scenarios relevant to modern Gen III as well as for operating Gen II design can be simulated in order to validate system and

  16. Effects of marketing group on the variability of fresh loin, belly, and fresh and processed ham quality from pigs sourced from a commercial processing facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective was to quantify the effect of marketing group (MG) on the variability of primal quality. Pigs (N=7,684) were slaughtered in 3 MGs from 8 barns. Pigs were from genetic selection programs focused on lean growth (L; group 1 n=1,131; group 2 n=1,466; group 3 n=1,030) or superior meat qua...

  17. Areva at March 31, 2012: 2.4% revenue growth to 2026 million euros (+1.3% on a comparable basis); Backlog growth of 12 months to 45.1 billion euros (+3.7%), down slightly over 3 months (-1.0%)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AREVA generated consolidated revenue of 2.026 billion euros in the first quarter of 2012, up 2.4% (+1.3% like for like) compared with the same period in 2011. The increase in revenue in the Mining Business Group (+11.9% reported, +6.5% like for like), the Reactors and Services Business Group (+5.8% reported, +6.0% like for like) and the Renewable Energies Business Group (+198.2% reported, +199.8% like for like) offsets the expected decrease in revenue in the Front End Business Group (-17.2% reported, -18.3% like for like). Foreign exchange had a positive impact of 29 million euros over the period, while changes in consolidation scope had a negative impact of 8 million euros. The Group had 45.1 billion euros in backlog at March 31, 2012, up 3.7% in relation to March 31, 2011 and down slightly (-1.0%) from December 31, 2011. Backlog growth in the Front End, Reactors and Services and Back End Business Groups offsets the decrease in backlog in the Mining and Renewable Energies Business Groups. Order cancellations as a result of the Fukushima accident totaled 612 million euros at March 31, 2012, compared with 464 million euros at December 31, 2011

  18. Inter-CLI work-group: safety after Fukushima; GT inter-CLI 'surete post Fukushima'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-11-03

    This document contains a whole set of questions asked about nuclear safety and security by a work-group made of members of associations belonging to local information commissions. These questions are asked either to the French State, or to EDF, or to AREVA. They bear on general issues common to La Hague and Flamanville nuclear installations, notably public information, emergency plans, post-accident management, subcontracting, loss of electricity supply, public health, governance, computer hacking, extreme meteorological events. A set of questions concerns the AREVA processing plant in La Hague (warehousing, pools for irradiated fuels, plutonium oxide storage and warehousing, and so on), and another set concerns the Flamanville nuclear power plant (different aspects of the management of a crisis situation). The last set of questions concerns the Manche nuclear waste storage centre

  19. Preliminary engineering report waste area grouping 5, Old Hydrofracture Facility Tanks content removal project, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-06-01

    The Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) requires a Federal Facilities Agreement (FFA) for federal facilities placed on the National Priorities List. The Oak Ridge Reservation was placed on that list on December 21, 1989, and the agreement was signed in November 1991 by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Operations Office, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region IV, and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC). The effective date of the FFA is January 1, 1992. One objective of the FFA is to ensure that liquid low-level waste (LLLW) tanks that are removed from service are evaluated and remediated through the CERCLA process. Five inactive LLLW tanks, designated T-1, T-2, T-3, T-4, and T-9, located at the Old Hydrofracture (OHF) Facility in the Melton Valley area of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) have been evaluated and are now entering the remediation phase. As a precursor to final remediation, this project will remove the current liquid and sludge contents of each of the five tanks (System Requirements Document, Appendix A). It was concluded in the Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis [EE/CA] for the Old Hydrofracture Facility Tanks (DOE 1996) that sluicing and pumping the contaminated liquid and sludge from the five OHF tanks was the preferred removal action. Evaluation indicated that this alternative meets the removal action objective and can be effective, implementable, and cost-effective. Sluicing and removing the tank contents was selected because this action uses (1) applicable experience, (2) the latest information about technologies and techniques for removing the wastes from the tanks, and (3) activities that are currently acceptable for storage of transuranic (TRU) mixed waste.

  20. Areva excellent business volume: backlog as of december 31, 2008: + 21.1% to 48.2 billion euros. 2008 revenue: + 10.4% to 13.2 billion euros; Areva excellent niveau d'activite: carnet de commandes au 31/12/2008: + 21,1% a 48,2 Mds d'euros. Chiffre d'affaires de l'exercice 2008: + 10,4% a 13,2 Mds d'euros

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-07-01

    AREVA's backlog stood at 48.2 billion euros as of December 31, 2008, for 21.1% growth year-on-year, including 21.8% growth in Nuclear and 16.5% growth in Transmission and Distribution. The Nuclear backlog came to 42.5 billion euros at December 31, 2008. The Transmission and Distribution backlog came to 5.7 billion euros at year-end. The group recognized revenue of 13.2 billion euros in 2008, for year-on-year growth of 10.4% (+9.8% like-for-like). Revenue outside France was up 10.5% to 9.5 billion euros, representing 72% of total revenue. Revenue was up 6.5% in the Nuclear businesses (up 6.3% LFL), with strong performance in the Reactors and Services division (+10.9% LFL) and the Front End division (+7.2% LFL). The Transmission and Distribution division recorded growth of 17% (+15.8% LFL). Revenue for the fourth quarter of 2008 rose to 4.1 billion euros, up 5.2% (+1.6% LFL) from that of the fourth quarter of 2007. Revenue for the Front End division rose to 3.363 billion euros in 2008, up 7.1% over 2007 (+7.2% LFL). Foreign exchange (currency translations) had a negative impact of 53 million euros. Revenue for the Reactors and Services division rose to 3.037 billion euros, up 11.8% over 2007 (+10.9% LFL). Foreign exchange (currency translations) had a negative impact of 47 million euros. Revenue for the Back End division came to 1.692 billion euros, a drop of 2.7% (-2.5% LFL). Foreign exchange (currency translations) had a negative impact of 3.5 million euros. Revenue for the Transmission and Distribution division rose to 5.065 billion euros in 2008, up 17.0% (+15.8% LFL)

  1. Facilities & Leadership

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The facilities web service provides VA facility information. The VA facilities locator is a feature that is available across the enterprise, on any webpage, for the...

  2. Summary of the annual report 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With manufacturing facilities in over 40 countries and a sales network in over 100, AREVA offers customers technological solutions for nuclear power generation and electricity transmission and distribution. The group also provides interconnect systems to the telecommunications, computer and automotive markets. These businesses engage AREVA 70000 employees in the 21 century greatest challenges: making energy and communication resources available to all, protecting the planet, and acting responsibly towards future generations. This annual report of the Areva group activities contents : Key data, milestones of the group, AREVA global operations in 2003, Corporate governance, organization of the group, share information, the financial responsibility, the environmental responsibility, the social responsibility, the business overview, the global challenges in AREVA energy business, the research and development programs, the front end division reactors and services division, the back end division, the transmission and distribution division. (A.L.B.)

  3. Summary of the annual report 2003; Synthese du rapport annuel 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-07-01

    With manufacturing facilities in over 40 countries and a sales network in over 100, AREVA offers customers technological solutions for nuclear power generation and electricity transmission and distribution. The group also provides interconnect systems to the telecommunications, computer and automotive markets. These businesses engage AREVA 70000 employees in the 21 century greatest challenges: making energy and communication resources available to all, protecting the planet, and acting responsibly towards future generations. This annual report of the Areva group activities contents : Key data, milestones of the group, AREVA global operations in 2003, Corporate governance, organization of the group, share information, the financial responsibility, the environmental responsibility, the social responsibility, the business overview, the global challenges in AREVA energy business, the research and development programs, the front end division reactors and services division, the back end division, the transmission and distribution division. (A.L.B.)

  4. Biochemistry Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Biochemistry Facility provides expert services and consultation in biochemical enzyme assays and protein purification. The facility currently features 1) Liquid...

  5. Argonne's performance assessment of major facility systems to support semiconductor manufacturing by the National Security Agency/R Group, Ft. Meade, Maryland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, W.; Miller, G.M.

    1990-12-01

    The National Security Agency (NSA) was authorized in 1983 to construct a semiconductor and circuit-board manufacturing plant at its Ft. Meade, Maryland, facility. This facility was to become known as the Special Process Laboratories (SPL) building. Phase I construction was managed by the US Army Corps of Engineers, Baltimore District (USACE/BD) and commenced in January 1986. Phase I construction provided the basic building and support systems, such as the heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning system, the deionized-water and wastewater-treatment systems, and the high-purity-gas piping system. Phase II construction involved fitting the semiconductor manufacturing side of the building with manufacturing tools and enhancing various aspects of the Phase I construction. Phase II construction was managed by NSA and commenced in April 1989. Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) was contracted by USACE/BD midway through the Phase I construction period to provide quality-assured performance reviews of major facility systems in the SPL. Following completion of the Phase I construction, ANL continued its performance reviews under NSA sponsorship, focusing its attention on the enhancements to the various manufacturing support systems of interest. The purpose of this document is to provide a guide to the files that were generated by ANL during its term of technical assistance to USACE/BD and NSA and to explain the quality assurance program that was implemented when ANL conducted its performance reviews of the SPL building's systems. One set of the ANL project files is located at NSA, Ft. Meade, and two sets are at Argonne, Illinois. The ANL sets will be maintained until the year 2000, or for the 10-year estimated life of the project. 1 fig.

  6. [Social rehabilitation in day care facilities for psychiatrically ill and handicapped patients--results of a concomitant study of a model program by the Rhine-Land District Group].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regus, M; Gürtler, A

    1997-05-01

    Within the extension of new services for mentally ill and disabled peoples outside of inpatient settings, the Landschaftsverband Rheinland (LVR) decided in 1990 to finance day care facilities especially for those patients who could previously not be integrated in the existing community psychiatry service structure due to the severity of their illness or handicap. A cost reducing effect in the clinical and residential service area was also intended. The first ten of these facilities were included in a 2-year research project. This report includes findings in various sectors: characteristics of the user group, functions and focal points of care, association with other community psychiatry services, cost effectiveness, and user opinions. Most visitors experienced a stabilisation of their personal situation and improvement of their quality of life. The average length of hospital stays was reduced from 102 to 25 days per year. The hopes accompanied with the programme were only partially fulfilled; possible consequences are discussed. PMID:9289222

  7. Integral Test Facility PKL: Experimental PWR Accident Investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus Umminger

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Investigations of the thermal-hydraulic behavior of pressurized water reactors under accident conditions have been carried out in the PKL test facility at AREVA NP in Erlangen, Germany for many years. The PKL facility models the entire primary side and significant parts of the secondary side of a pressurized water reactor (PWR at a height scale of 1 : 1. Volumes, power ratings and mass flows are scaled with a ratio of 1 : 145. The experimental facility consists of 4 primary loops with circulation pumps and steam generators (SGs arranged symmetrically around the reactor pressure vessel (RPV. The investigations carried out encompass a very broad spectrum from accident scenario simulations with large, medium, and small breaks, over the investigation of shutdown procedures after a wide variety of accidents, to the systematic investigation of complex thermal-hydraulic phenomena. This paper presents a survey of test objectives and programs carried out to date. It also describes the test facility in its present state. Some important results obtained over the years with focus on investigations carried out since the beginning of the international cooperation are exemplarily discussed.

  8. Exploring the Development of Competence in Lean Management through Action Learning Groups: A Study of the Introduction of Lean to a Facilities Management Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyton, Paul; Payne, Robin

    2014-01-01

    The introduction of a Lean approach to management requires the development of understanding and capability. This in turn requires a structured training intervention and other supporting activities. This paper explores, through a case study, the way in which action learning groups (ALGs) supported the development of Lean capabilities in the…

  9. Site characterization summary report for Waste Area Grouping 10 Wells at the Old Hydrofracture Facility, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-03-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, is operated for the Department of Energy (DOE) by Martin Marietta Energy Systems (Energy Systems). As part of its DOE mission, ORNL has pioneered waste disposal technologies throughout the years of site operations since World War II. In the late 1950s, efforts were made to develop a permanent disposal alternative to the surface impoundments at ORNL at the request of the National Academy of Sciences. One such technology, the hydrofracture process, involved forming fractures in an underlying geologic host formation (a low-permeability shale) at depths of up to 1000 ft and subsequently injecting a grout slurry containing low-level liquid waste, cement, and other additives at an injection pressure of about 2000 psi. The objective of the effort was to develop a grout slurry that could be injected as a liquid but would solidify after injection, thereby immobilizing the radioisotopes contained in the low-level liquid waste. The scope of this site characterization was the access, sampling, logging, and evaluation of observation wells near the Old Hydrofracture Facility (OHF) in preparation for plugging, recompletion, or other final disposition of the wells.

  10. RCRA Facility Investigation report for Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 1. Sections 1 through 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1991-09-01

    WAG 6 comprises a shallow land burial facility used for disposal of low-level radioactive wastes (LLW) and, until recently, chemical wastes. As such, the site is subject to regulation under RCRA and the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA). To comply with these regulations, DOE, in conjunction with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC), developed a strategy for closure and remediation of WAG 6 by 1997. A key component of this strategy was to complete an RFI by September 1991. The primary objectives of the RFI were to evaluate the site's potential human health and environmental impacts and to develop a preliminary list of alternatives to mitigate these impacts. The WAG 6 one of three solid waste management units evaluated Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) existing waste disposal records and sampling data and performed the additional sampling and analysis necessary to: describe the nature and extent of contamination; characterize key contaminant transport pathways; and assess potential risks to human health and the environment by developing and evaluating hypothetical receptor scenarios. Estimated excess lifetime cancer risks as a result for exposure to radionuclides and chemicals were quantified for each hypothetical human receptor. For environmental receptors, potential impacts were qualitatively assessed. Taking into account regulatory requirements and base line risk assessment results, preliminary site closure and remediation objectives were identified, and a preliminary list of alternatives for site closure and remediation was developed.

  11. RCRA Facility Investigation report for Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 1, Sections 1 through 3: Environmental Restoration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-09-01

    WAG 6 comprises a shallow land burial facility used for disposal of low-level radioactive wastes (LLW) and, until recently, chemical wastes. As such, the site is subject to regulation under RCRA and the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA). To comply with these regulations, DOE, in conjunction with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC), developed a strategy for closure and remediation of WAG 6 by 1997. A key component of this strategy was to complete an RFI by September 1991. The primary objectives of the RFI were to evaluate the site`s potential human health and environmental impacts and to develop a preliminary list of alternatives to mitigate these impacts. The WAG 6 one of three solid waste management units evaluated Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) existing waste disposal records and sampling data and performed the additional sampling and analysis necessary to: describe the nature and extent of contamination; characterize key contaminant transport pathways; and assess potential risks to human health and the environment by developing and evaluating hypothetical receptor scenarios. Estimated excess lifetime cancer risks as a result for exposure to radionuclides and chemicals were quantified for each hypothetical human receptor. For environmental receptors, potential impacts were qualitatively assessed. Taking into account regulatory requirements and base line risk assessment results, preliminary site closure and remediation objectives were identified, and a preliminary list of alternatives for site closure and remediation was developed.

  12. COGEMA in Niger. Inquiry report on the situation of workers of SOMAiR and COMINAK, Niger's subsidies of the AREVA-COGEMA group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After having briefly recalled the activities of COGEMA's subsidies in Niger, presented the context of the inquiry, and made some remarks about COGEMA's attitude with respect to this inquiry, this report gives an extremely critical analysis of security measures and working conditions: non existent information about risks related to radioactivity, non existent or insufficient security equipment, exposure of workers to ionizing radiation by water, ignored security orders, random dosimetry controls. The second part recalls the radiological risks present in uranium mines, gives a critical analysis of the worker medical follow-up quality, considers as inexplicable the absence of professional diseases, and discusses the issue of work accidents. It finally outlines that control structures (Mine Direction, Work Inspection) are inadequate

  13. Experimental facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have completed an engineering feasibility study of a major modification of the HFIR facility and are now beginning a similar study of an entirely new facility. The design of the reactor itself is common to both options. In this paper, a general description of the modified HFIR is presented with some indications of the additional facilities that might be available in an entirely new facility

  14. Facility Microgrids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, Z.; Walling, R.; Miller, N.; Du, P.; Nelson, K.

    2005-05-01

    Microgrids are receiving a considerable interest from the power industry, partly because their business and technical structure shows promise as a means of taking full advantage of distributed generation. This report investigates three issues associated with facility microgrids: (1) Multiple-distributed generation facility microgrids' unintentional islanding protection, (2) Facility microgrids' response to bulk grid disturbances, and (3) Facility microgrids' intentional islanding.

  15. 6th July 2010 - United Kingdom Science and Technology Facilities Council W. Whitehorn signing the guest book with Head of International relations F. Pauss, visiting the Computing Centre with Information Technology Department Head Deputy D. Foster, the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with Technology Department P. Strubin,the Centre Control Centre with Operation Group Leader M. Lamont and the CLIC/CTF3 facility with Project Leader J.-P. Delahaye.

    CERN Multimedia

    Teams : M. Brice, JC Gadmer

    2010-01-01

    6th July 2010 - United Kingdom Science and Technology Facilities Council W. Whitehorn signing the guest book with Head of International relations F. Pauss, visiting the Computing Centre with Information Technology Department Head Deputy D. Foster, the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with Technology Department P. Strubin,the Centre Control Centre with Operation Group Leader M. Lamont and the CLIC/CTF3 facility with Project Leader J.-P. Delahaye.

  16. Areva at September 30, 2012: Backlog at a record level of euros 47 bn (+10.1% year on year). Revenue up sharply to euros 6.542 bn (+10.0% compared with September 2011, +8.5% like for like)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AREVA generated consolidated revenue of 6.542 billion euros over the first nine months of 2012, representing growth of 10.0% (+8.5% growth like for like) compared with the same period in 2011. Revenue growth was fueled by a 7.0% increase in recurring business (+5.6% like for like) and ramp-up of the renewable business. Revenue from nuclear operations was 6.035 billion euros over the first nine months of 2012, compared with 5.731 billion euros for the first nine months of 2011, representing a 5.3% increase (+3.9% like for like). Like for like, revenue was led by the Mining BG (+28.0%), the Reactors and Services BG (+2.1%) and the Back End BG (+11.8%), offsetting the downturn in business in the Front End BG (-12.1%). Revenue was up 272% like for like in renewable energies. Foreign exchange had a positive impact of 130 million euros over the period. The change in consolidation scope had a negative impact of 52 million euros. Revenue growth was balanced between France and internationally, reflecting AREVA's ability to capture market opportunities while capitalizing on long-standing relations with its customers. Sales revenue for the third quarter of 2012 was 2.214 billion euros, an increase of 13.4% (+12.4% like for like) compared with the third quarter of 2011. Foreign exchange had a positive impact of 52 million euros over the period, while the change in consolidation scope had a negative impact of 34 million euros. At September 30, 2012, the consolidated backlog for the nuclear and renewable energy businesses was the highest since the Group was established, at a total of 47 billion euros. This represents an increase of 10.1% in relation to September 30, 2011 (42.7 billion euros) and an increase of 4.1% in relation to June 30, 2012 (45.2 billion euros). The increase is attributable mainly to the Mining, Front End and Reactors and Services BGs. Order intakes over the first nine months of the year were up 87% compared with first nine months of 2011. Order cancellations

  17. Near-field krypton-85 measurements in stable meteorological conditions around the AREVA NC La Hague reprocessing plant: estimation of atmospheric transfer coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this work was to study the near-field dispersion of 85Kr around the nuclear fuel reprocessing plant at La Hague (AREVA NC La Hague – France) under stable meteorological conditions. Twenty-two 85Kr night-time experimental campaigns were carried out at distances of up to 4 km from the release source. Although the operational Gaussian models predict for these meteorological conditions a distance to plume touchdown of several kilometers, we almost systematically observed a marked ground signal at distances of 0.5–4 km. The calculated atmospheric transfer coefficients (ATC) show values (1) higher than those observed under neutral conditions, (2) much higher than those proposed by the operational models, and (3) higher than those used in the impact assessments. - Highlights: • Measurements of 85Kr in air around reprocessing plant. • Measurement in stable meteorological conditions. • Determination of Atmospheric Transfer Coefficients (ATC). • Comparison with operational models. • ATC in stable conditions are higher than data from models

  18. AREVA - First quarter 2011 revenue: 2.7% growth like for like to 1.979 billion euros

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The group reported consolidated revenue of 1.979 billion euros in the 1. quarter of 2011, for 2.2% growth compared with the 1. quarter of 2010 (+ 2.7% like for like). The increase was driven by the Mining / Front End Business Group (+ 20.8% LFL). Revenue from outside France rose 12.0% to 1.22 billion euros and represented 62% of total revenue. The impacts of foreign exchange and changes in consolidation scope were negligible during the period. The March 11 events in Japan had no significant impact on the group's performance in the 1. quarter of 2011. The group's backlog of 43.5 billion euros at March 31, 2011 was stable in relation to March 31, 2010. The growth in the backlog of the Mining / Front End and Renewable Energies Business Groups offset the partial depletion of the backlog in the Reactors and Services and Back End Business Groups as contracts were completed

  19. Presentation of the GIE INTRA Group's operational means

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Located on the Chinon nuclear power plant site, the Intra Group is an economic interest grouping which has been created by the three French nuclear operators (EDF, CEA, and COGEMA now AREVA) after the Chernobyl accident. Its missions are to possess permanently available means of intervention in case of severe accident or radiological situation, to be able to intervene at any time on the French territory, to develop a European network of expertise, and to build up an ability centre for robotic intervention in hostile environment. This document briefly presents its different available means: remotely controlled equipment (inside and outside equipment, public works equipment), and radiological characterization equipment. Other aspects are briefly evoked: organization, information transmission, exercises and interventions, international relationships, future trends

  20. Animal facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The animal facilities in the Division are described. They consist of kennels, animal rooms, service areas, and technical areas (examining rooms, operating rooms, pathology labs, x-ray rooms, and 60Co exposure facilities). The computer support facility is also described. The advent of the Conversational Monitor System at Argonne has launched a new effort to set up conversational computing and graphics software for users. The existing LS-11 data acquisition systems have been further enhanced and expanded. The divisional radiation facilities include a number of gamma, neutron, and x-ray radiation sources with accompanying areas for related equipment. There are five 60Co irradiation facilities; a research reactor, Janus, is a source for fission-spectrum neutrons; two other neutron sources in the Chicago area are also available to the staff for cell biology studies. The electron microscope facilities are also described

  1. Energy infrastructure of the United States and projected siting needs: Scoping ideas, identifying issues and options. Documentation report for Chapter 2: Draft report of the Working Group on Energy Facility Siting to the Secretary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-12-01

    This report documents the sources and derivation of the energy demand and infrastructure estimates found in Chapter 2 of ENERGY INFRASTRUCTURE OF THE UNITED STATES AND PROJECTED SITING NEEDS: SCOPING IDEAS, IDENTIFYING ISSUES AND OPTIONS Draft Report of the Department of Energy Working Group on Energy Facility Siting to the Secretary. The first part of this report provides an explanation in narrative form of each table, figure, or infrastructure estimate in Chapter 2, including a complete list of references and personal contacts. Appendix A contains a print out of the calculations used to derive the figures, including references to data sources. Appendix B contains the results of a sensitivity analysis that uses an alternative energy use forecast as its basis. This report should only be used in conjunction with the full contents of Chapter 2.

  2. DeBeNe Test Facilities for Fast Breeder Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report gives an overview and a short description of the test facilities constructed and operated within the collaboration for fast breeder development in Germany, Belgium and the Netherlands. The facilities are grouped into Sodium Loops (Large Facilities and Laboratory Loops), Special Equipment including Hot Cells and Reprocessing, Test Facilities without Sodium, Zero Power Facilities and In-pile Loops including Irradiation Facilities

  3. Mammography Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Mammography Facility Database is updated periodically based on information received from the four FDA-approved accreditation bodies: the American College of...

  4. Health Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Health facilities are places that provide health care. They include hospitals, clinics, outpatient care centers, and specialized care centers, such as birthing centers and psychiatric care centers. When you ...

  5. Canyon Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — B Plant, T Plant, U Plant, PUREX, and REDOX (see their links) are the five facilities at Hanford where the original objective was plutonium removal from the uranium...

  6. Advanced reactor experimental facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For many years, the NEA has been examining advanced reactor issues and disseminating information of use to regulators, designers and researchers on safety issues and research needed. Following the recommendation of participants at an NEA workshop, a Task Group on Advanced Reactor Experimental Facilities (TAREF) was initiated with the aim of providing an overview of facilities suitable for carrying out the safety research considered necessary for gas-cooled reactors (GCRs) and sodium fast reactors (SFRs), with other reactor systems possibly being considered in a subsequent phase. The TAREF was thus created in 2008 with the following participating countries: Canada, the Czech Republic, Finland, France, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Japan, Korea and the United States. In a second stage, India provided valuable information on its experimental facilities related to SFR safety research. The study method adopted entailed first identifying high-priority safety issues that require research and then categorizing the available facilities in terms of their ability to address the safety issues. For each of the technical areas, the task members agreed on a set of safety issues requiring research and established a ranking with regard to safety relevance (high, medium, low) and the status of knowledge based on the following scale relative to full knowledge: high (100%-75%), medium (75 - 25%) and low (25-0%). Only the issues identified as being of high safety relevance and for which the state of knowledge is low or medium were included in the discussion, as these issues would likely warrant further study. For each of the safety issues, the TAREF members identified appropriate facilities, providing relevant information such as operating conditions (in- or out-of reactor), operating range, description of the test section, type of testing, instrumentation, current status and availability, and uniqueness. Based on the information collected, the task members assessed prospects and priorities

  7. AREVA at December 31, 2012: Sales revenue growth to euro 9.342 bn (+5.3% vs. 2011), led by nuclear and renewables operations; Backlog replenished in 2012 to euro 45.4 bn thanks to the increase in order intake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AREVA had 9.342 billion euros in consolidated sales revenue in 2012, an increase of 5.3% compared with 2011 (+4.4% like for like). This increase reflects growth in both nuclear and renewables operations: - the nuclear operations reported sales revenue of 8.633 billion euros in 2012, compared with 8.426 billion euros in 2011, a 2.4% increase. On a reported basis, growth was led by the Mining Business Group (+5.5%), the Reactors and Services BG (+7.1%) and the Back End BG (+9.5%), offsetting the expected decrease in business in the Front End BG (-10.2%); - the Renewable Energies BG reported 572 million euros in sales revenue, a sharp increase in relation to 2011 (+92.3%); - foreign exchange had a positive impact of 159 million euros over the period, while changes in consolidation scope had a negative impact of 83 million euros. Fourth quarter 2012 sales revenue totaled 2.799 billion euros. It was down 4.2% on a reported basis (-4.1% like for like), chiefly due to a lower level of activity in the Mining BG compared with a particularly high fourth quarter 2011 and following three consecutive quarters of strong growth for the BG. Foreign exchange had a positive impact of 29 million euros over the period. Changes in consolidation scope had a negative impact of 31 million euros for the quarter. The group's backlog of 45.4 billion euros at December 31, 2012 was stable in relation to December 31, 2011 (45.6 billion euros). The 10.4% increase in nuclear order intake (a total of 8% for the group) compensated for the activity level growth in 2012 and cancellations of orders in nuclear operations following the Fukushima accident (for a total amount of 936 million euros, compared with 464 million euros at December 31, 2011 and 742 million euros at September 30, 2012)

  8. The CUTLASS database facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The enhancement of the CUTLASS database management system to provide improved facilities for data handling is seen as a prerequisite to its effective use for future power station data processing and control applications. This particularly applies to the larger projects such as AGR data processing system refurbishments, and the data processing systems required for the new Coal Fired Reference Design stations. In anticipation of the need for improved data handling facilities in CUTLASS, the CEGB established a User Sub-Group in the early 1980's to define the database facilities required by users. Following the endorsement of the resulting specification and a detailed design study, the database facilities have been implemented as an integral part of the CUTLASS system. This paper provides an introduction to the range of CUTLASS Database facilities, and emphasises the role of Database as the central facility around which future Kit 1 and (particularly) Kit 6 CUTLASS based data processing and control systems will be designed and implemented. (author)

  9. Hazard Baseline Downgrade Effluent Treatment Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Hazard Baseline Downgrade reviews the Effluent Treatment Facility, in accordance with Department of Energy Order 5480.23, WSRC11Q Facility Safety Document Manual, DOE-STD-1027-92, and DOE-EM-STD-5502-94. It provides a baseline grouping based on the chemical and radiological hazards associated with the facility. The Determination of the baseline grouping for ETF will aid in establishing the appropriate set of standards for the facility

  10. RCRA Facility investigation report for Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 6, Technical memorandums 06-13, 06-14, and 06-15

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kannard, J. R.; Wilson, R. C.; Zondlo, T. F.

    1991-09-01

    This report describes the borehole geophysical logging performed at selected monitoring wells at waste area grouping (WAG) 6 of Oak Ridge National Laboratory in support of the WAG 6 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Facility Investigation (RFI). It identifies the locations and describes the methods, equipment used in the effort, and the results of the activity. The actual logs for each well logged are presented in Attachment 1 through 4 of the TM. Attachment 5 provide logging contractor service literature and Attachment 6 is the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Procedure for Control of a Nuclear Source Utilized in Geophysical logging. The primary objectives of the borehole geophysical logging program were to (1) identify water-bearing fractured bedrock zones to determine the placement of the screen and sealed intervals for subsequent installation, and (2) further characterize local bedrock geology and hydrogeology and gain insight about the deeper component of the shallow bedrock aquifer flow system. A secondary objective was to provide stratigraphic and structural correlations with existing logs for Hydraulic Head Monitoring Station (HHMS) wells, which display evidence of faulting.

  11. RCRA Facility investigation report for Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 6, Technical memorandums 06-13, 06-14, and 06-15: Environmental Restoration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-09-01

    This report describes the borehole geophysical logging performed at selected monitoring wells at waste area grouping (WAG) 6 of Oak Ridge National Laboratory in support of the WAG 6 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Facility Investigation (RFI). It identifies the locations and describes the methods, equipment used in the effort, and the results of the activity. The actual logs for each well logged are presented in Attachment 1 through 4 of the TM. Attachment 5 provide logging contractor service literature and Attachment 6 is the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Procedure for Control of a Nuclear Source Utilized in Geophysical logging. The primary objectives of the borehole geophysical logging program were to (1) identify water-bearing fractured bedrock zones to determine the placement of the screen and sealed intervals for subsequent installation, and (2) further characterize local bedrock geology and hydrogeology and gain insight about the deeper component of the shallow bedrock aquifer flow system. A secondary objective was to provide stratigraphic and structural correlations with existing logs for Hydraulic Head Monitoring Station (HHMS) wells, which display evidence of faulting.

  12. RCRA Facility investigation report for Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 5, Technical Memorandums 06-09A, 06-10A, and 06-12A: Environmental Restoration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-09-01

    This report provides a detailed summary of the activities carried out to sample groundwater at Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6. The analytical results for samples collected during Phase 1, Activity 2 of the WAG 6 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Facility Investigation (RFI) are also presented. In addition, analytical results for Phase 1, activity sampling events for which data were not previously reported are included in this TM. A summary of the groundwater sampling activities of WAG 6, to date, are given in the Introduction. The Methodology section describes the sampling procedures and analytical parameters. Six attachments are included. Attachments 1 and 2 provide analytical results for selected RFI groundwater samples and ORNL sampling event. Attachment 3 provides a summary of the contaminants detected in each well sampled for all sampling events conducted at WAG 6. Bechtel National Inc. (BNI)/IT Corporation Contract Laboratory (IT) RFI analytical methods and detection limits are given in Attachment 4. Attachment 5 provides the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)/Analytical Chemistry Division (ACD) analytical methods and detection limits and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) quarterly compliance monitoring (1988--1989). Attachment 6 provides ORNL/ACD groundwater analytical methods and detection limits (for the 1990 RCRA semi-annual compliance monitoring).

  13. Direct C-C Coupling of CO2 and the Methyl Group from CH4 Activation through Facile Insertion of CO2 into Zn-CH3 σ-Bond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yuntao; Cui, Chaonan; Han, Jinyu; Wang, Hua; Zhu, Xinli; Ge, Qingfeng

    2016-08-17

    Conversion of CO2 and CH4 to value-added products will contribute to alleviating the green-house gas effect but is a challenge both scientifically and practically. Stabilization of the methyl group through CH4 activation and facile CO2 insertion ensure the realization of C-C coupling. In the present study, we demonstrate the ready C-C coupling reaction on a Zn-doped ceria catalyst. The detailed mechanism of this direct C-C coupling reaction was examined based on the results from density functional theory calculations. The results show that the Zn dopant stabilizes the methyl group by forming a Zn-C bond, thus hindering subsequent dehydrogenation of CH4. CO2 can be inserted into the Zn-C bond in an activated bent configuration, with the transition state in the form of a three-centered Zn-C-C moiety and an activation barrier of 0.51 eV. The C-C coupling reaction resulted in the acetate species, which could desorb as acetic acid by combining with a surface proton. The formation of acetic acid from CO2 and CH4 is a reaction with 100% atom economy, and the implementation of the reaction on a heterogeneous catalyst is of great importance to the utilization of the greenhouse gases. We tested other possible dopants including Al, Ga, Cd, In, and Ni and found a positive correlation between the activation barrier of C-C coupling and the electronegativity of the dopant, although C-H bond activation is likely the dominant reaction on the Ni-doped ceria catalyst. PMID:27452233

  14. Direct C-C Coupling of CO2 and the Methyl Group from CH4 Activation through Facile Insertion of CO2 into Zn-CH3 σ-Bond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yuntao; Cui, Chaonan; Han, Jinyu; Wang, Hua; Zhu, Xinli; Ge, Qingfeng

    2016-08-17

    Conversion of CO2 and CH4 to value-added products will contribute to alleviating the green-house gas effect but is a challenge both scientifically and practically. Stabilization of the methyl group through CH4 activation and facile CO2 insertion ensure the realization of C-C coupling. In the present study, we demonstrate the ready C-C coupling reaction on a Zn-doped ceria catalyst. The detailed mechanism of this direct C-C coupling reaction was examined based on the results from density functional theory calculations. The results show that the Zn dopant stabilizes the methyl group by forming a Zn-C bond, thus hindering subsequent dehydrogenation of CH4. CO2 can be inserted into the Zn-C bond in an activated bent configuration, with the transition state in the form of a three-centered Zn-C-C moiety and an activation barrier of 0.51 eV. The C-C coupling reaction resulted in the acetate species, which could desorb as acetic acid by combining with a surface proton. The formation of acetic acid from CO2 and CH4 is a reaction with 100% atom economy, and the implementation of the reaction on a heterogeneous catalyst is of great importance to the utilization of the greenhouse gases. We tested other possible dopants including Al, Ga, Cd, In, and Ni and found a positive correlation between the activation barrier of C-C coupling and the electronegativity of the dopant, although C-H bond activation is likely the dominant reaction on the Ni-doped ceria catalyst.

  15. Marina Facilities

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The CIRPAS main facility and headquarters are at Marina Municipal Airport (formerly Fritchie Field, Fort Ord) in Marina, California. CIRPAS has a 30,000 sq. ft. maintenance hanger there, which houses staff offices, an instrument and calibration laboratory, maintenance and payload integration shops, conference rooms, and flight planning and operations control center.

  16. FACILITIES MANAGEMENT AT CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Recently we have been confronted with difficulties concerning services which are part of a new contract for facilities management. Please see below for some information about this contract. Following competitive tendering and the Finance Committee decision, the contract was awarded to the Swiss firm 'Facilities Management Network (FMN)'. The owners of FMN are two companies 'M+W Zander' and 'Avireal', both very experienced in this field of facilities management. The contract entered into force on 1st July 2002. CERN has grouped together around 20 different activities into this one contract, which was previously covered by separate contracts. The new contract includes the management and execution of many activities, in particular: Guards and access control; cleaning; operation and maintenance of heating plants, cooling and ventilation equipment for buildings not related to the tunnel or the LHC; plumbing; sanitation; lifts; green areas and roads; waste disposal; and includes a centralised helpdesk for these act...

  17. COMMUNICATIONS GROUP

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Taylor

    2011-01-01

    The CMS Communications Group has been busy in all three areas of its responsibility: (1) Communications Infrastructure, (2) Information Systems, and (3) Outreach and Education. Communications Infrastructure The 55 CMS Centres worldwide are well used by physicists working on remote CMS shifts, Computing operations, data quality monitoring, data analysis and outreach. The CMS Centre@CERN in Meyrin, is the centre of the CMS Offline and Computing operations, and a number of subdetector shifts can now take place there, rather than in the main Control Room at P5. A new CMS meeting room has been equipped for videoconferencing in building 42, next to building 40. Our building 28 meeting room and the facilities at P5 will be refurbished soon and plans are underway to steadily upgrade the ageing equipment in all 15 CMS meeting rooms at CERN. The CMS evaluation of the Vidyo tool indicates that it is not yet ready to be considered as a potential replacement for EVO. The Communications Group provides the CMS-TV (web) cha...

  18. Theme day: corrosion and surface treatments in nuclear facilities. Proceedings; Journee Thematique: Corrosion et Traitements de surface dans les Installations Nucleaires. Recueil des presentations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-02-15

    This document brings together the available presentations given at the theme day organized by the Bourgogne Nuclear Pole on the topic of corrosion and surface treatments in nuclear facilities. Eleven presentations (slides) are compiled in this document: 1 - Introduction - PNB centre of competitiveness and R and D activities (A. Mantovan, PNB); 2 - Corrosion damage (M. Foucault, Areva NP - Centre Technique Le Creusot); 3 - Corrosion mechanisms (R. Oltra, UB-ICB); 4 - Examples of expertise management (C. Duret-Thual, Institut de la corrosion/Corrosion Institute); 5 - General framework of surface treatments (C. Nouveau, ENSAM Cluny Paris Tech); 6 - Surfaces et interfaces characterisation - Part A (C. Langlade, Y. Gachon, UTBM and HEF); 7 - Surfaces et interfaces characterisation - Part B (C. Langlade, Y. Gachon, UTBM and HEF); 8 - Ion beam surface treatment (Y. Le Guellec, Quertech Ingenierie); 9 - Impact surface treatment (G. Saout, Sonats); 10 - Metal oxides Characterisation by US laser (R. Oltra, UB-ICB); 11 - Detection and Characterisation of intergranular corrosion (Y. Kernin, Stephane Bourgois, Areva Intercontrole)

  19. Main Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This chapter discuss on main nuclear facilities available in the Malaysian Institute for Nuclear Technology Research (MINT). As a national research institute whose core activities are nuclear science and technology, MINT are made up of main commercializable radiation irradiators, pilot plant and fully equipped laboratories. Well elaboration on its characteristics and functions explain for RTP (PUPSPATI TRIGA reactors), Cobalt-60 gamma irradiator, electron beam accelerators, and radioactive waste management center

  20. Nuclear facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In nuclear facilities with a fuel storage pool in a spent fuel pit building there is a filter to each pool through which the fuel pit water is pumped. According to the invention the filter is provided with an independently movable housing placed beneath the surface of the pool water and fixed to the lateral side of the pool by means of detachable fixtures. (orig./RW)

  1. ORNL calibrations facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ORNL Calibrations Facility is operated by the Instrumentation Group of the Industrial Safety and Applied Health Physics Division. Its primary purpose is to maintain radiation calibration standards for calibration of ORNL health physics instruments and personnel dosimeters. This report includes a discussion of the radioactive sources and ancillary equipment in use and a step-by-step procedure for calibration of those survey instruments and personnel dosimeters in routine use at ORNL

  2. Evaluation of health risks related to the operation of the AREVA sites of the Tricastin platform: Georges Besse plants I and II, SOCATRI, COGEMA Pierrelatte and COMURHEX (first level approach) Assessment of health studies. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document reports the study of health risks related to the chemical toxicity of species related to the operation of several AREVA installations in Tricastin. A qualitative and quantitative inventory of the species released in the atmosphere and in waters is based on data supplied by the operator. A selection of health tracers has lead to a global investigation of nitrogen oxides, sulphur dioxide, fluorine, uranium, arsenic, hexavalent chromium, mercury and nickel. The hazard associated with each of these species has been characterized. Different exposure ways have been considered: inhalation, soil ingestion, by vegetable, fruit and crop ingestion, ingestion of meat, milk and eggs produced by local breeding, fish ingestion, and ingestion of water sampled from the Tricastin aquifer. Atmospheric concentrations, soil deposits, surface soil layer concentrations, and other concentrations (in meat, milk, eggs, crops, vegetables, fruits, and drinking water) have been either modelled or measured. Different exposure scenarios have been defined, and the different risks (carcinogen or not) have been assessed

  3. Dismantling of the 904 Cell at the HAO/Sud Facility - 13466

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaudey, C.E.; Crosnier, S. [AREVA Clean-Up BU, 1 route de la Noue 91196 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Renouf, M.; Gaspard, N. [AREVA Clean-Up BU, Site de La Hague - BV 35 - 50444 Beaumont Hague (France); Pinot, L. [AREVA D and D BU, Site de La Hague - 50444 Beaumont Hague (France)

    2013-07-01

    La Hague facility, in France, is the spent fuel recycling plant wherein a part of the fuel coming from some of the French, German, Belgian, Swiss, Dutch and Japanese nuclear reactors is reprocessed before being recycled in order to separate certain radioactive elements. The facility has been successively handled by the CEA (1962-1978), Cogema (1978-2006), and AREVA NC (since 2006). La Hague facility is composed of 3 production units: The UP2-400 production unit started to be operated in 1966 for the reprocessing of UNGG metal fuel. In 1976, following the dropout of the graphite-gas technology by EDF, an HAO workshop to reprocess the fuel from the light water reactors is affiliated and then stopped in 2003. - UP2-400 is partially stopped in 2002 and then definitely the 1 January 2004 and is being dismantled - UP2-800, with the same capacity than UP3, started to be operated in 1994 and is still in operation. And UP3 - UP3 was implemented in 1990 with an annual reprocessing capacity of 800 tons of fuel and is still in operation The combined licensed capacity of UP2-800 and UP3 is 1,700 tons of used fuel. (authors)

  4. Facility Management

    OpenAIRE

    Král, David

    2012-01-01

    Tématem bakalářské práce je nalezení cesty ke zvýšení dlouhodobé efektivnosti a prosperity společnosti, která v rámci své podnikatelské činnosti spravuje a udržuje vlastní nemovitosti v centru Brna. Práce vychází z aktuálního stavu facility managementu společnosti a definování jejich silných a slabých stránek. Základem pro návrh efektivního řízení facility managementu je zpracování finanční analýzy společnosti a sledování nákladů včetně jejich optimalizace. Hlavním přínosem mé bakalářské prác...

  5. Theme: Laboratory Facilities Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Glen M.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Includes "Laboratory Facilities Improvement" (Miller); "Remodeling Laboratories for Agriscience Instruction" (Newman, Johnson); "Planning for Change" (Mulcahy); "Laboratory Facilities Improvement for Technology Transfer" (Harper); "Facilities for Agriscience Instruction" (Agnew et al.); "Laboratory Facility Improvement" (Boren, Dwyer); and…

  6. LAMPF: a nuclear research facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A description is given of the recently completed Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) which is now taking its place as one of the major installations in this country for the support of research in nuclear science and its applications. Descriptions are given of the organization of the Laboratory, the Users Group, experimental facilities for research and for applications, and procedures for carrying on research studies

  7. Remedial site evaluation report for the waste area grouping 10 wells associated with the new hydrofracture facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 1: Evaluation, interpretation, and data summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-08-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, is operated for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) by Lockheed Martin Energy System (Energy Systems). ORNL has pioneered waste disposal technologies since World War II as part of its DOE mission. In the late 1950s, at the request of the National Academy of Sciences, efforts were made to develop a permanent disposal alternative to the surface and tanks at ORNL. One such technology, the hydrofracture process, involved inducing fractures in a geologic host formation (a low-permeability shale) at depths of up to 1100 ft and injecting a radioactive grout slurry containing low-level liquid or tank sludge waste, cement, and other additives at an injection pressure of 2000 to 8500 psi. The objective of the effort was to develop a grout dig could be injected as a slurry and would solidify after injection, thereby entombing the radioisotopes contained in the low-level liquid or tank sludge waste. Four sites at ORNL were used: two experimental (HF-1 and HF-2); one developmental, later converted to batch process [Old Hydrofracture Facility (BF-3)]; and one production facility [New Hydrofracture Facility (BF-4)]. This document provides the environmental, restoration program with information about the the results of an evaluation of WAG 10 wells associated with the New Hydrofracture Facility at ORNL.

  8. Linac working group technical summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The working group looked at linac injectors for a Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) or Hadron Facility. Discussion includes rf power, a possible strawman linac, ion source/injector, radio-frequency quadrupole, and coupled-cavity linac

  9. North Slope, Alaska ESI: FACILITY (Facility Points)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains data for oil field facilities for the North Slope of Alaska. Vector points in this data set represent oil field facility locations. This data...

  10. Air Quality Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research FacilityFacilities with operating permits for Title V of the Federal Clean Air Act, as well as facilities required to submit an air emissions inventory, and other...

  11. Basic Research Firing Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Basic Research Firing Facility is an indoor ballistic test facility that has recently transitioned from a customer-based facility to a dedicated basic research...

  12. Facility Registry Service (FRS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Facility Registry Service (FRS) provides an integrated source of comprehensive (air, water, and waste) environmental information about facilities across EPA,...

  13. Licensed Healthcare Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The Licensed Healthcare Facilities point layer represents the locations of all healthcare facilities licensed by the State of California, Department of Health...

  14. High Throughput Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Argonne?s high throughput facility provides highly automated and parallel approaches to material and materials chemistry development. The facility allows scientists...

  15. New radiation protection calibration facility at CERN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brugger, Markus; Carbonez, Pierre; Pozzi, Fabio; Silari, Marco; Vincke, Helmut

    2014-10-01

    The CERN radiation protection group has designed a new state-of-the-art calibration laboratory to replace the present facility, which is >20 y old. The new laboratory, presently under construction, will be equipped with neutron and gamma sources, as well as an X-ray generator and a beta irradiator. The present work describes the project to design the facility, including the facility placement criteria, the 'point-zero' measurements and the shielding study performed via FLUKA Monte Carlo simulations.

  16. Wet spent fuel interim storage facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The article deals with the Spent Fuel Complementary Storage Unit, which was designed for the Almirante Alvaro Alberto Nuclear Power Station situated near Rio de Janeiro. The aim of the article is to present the technical solution of complementary storage. The design deals with different reactor technologies made by Areva and Westinghouse. The article also deals with the technically interesting solution of the storage tank heat removal and its dimensioning. (author)

  17. Group X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fields, Susannah

    2007-08-16

    This project is currently under contract for research through the Department of Homeland Security until 2011. The group I was responsible for studying has to remain confidential so as not to affect the current project. All dates, reference links and authors, and other distinguishing characteristics of the original group have been removed from this report. All references to the name of this group or the individual splinter groups has been changed to 'Group X'. I have been collecting texts from a variety of sources intended for the use of recruiting and radicalizing members for Group X splinter groups for the purpose of researching the motivation and intent of leaders of those groups and their influence over the likelihood of group radicalization. This work included visiting many Group X websites to find information on splinter group leaders and finding their statements to new and old members. This proved difficult because the splinter groups of Group X are united in beliefs, but differ in public opinion. They are eager to tear each other down, prove their superiority, and yet remain anonymous. After a few weeks of intense searching, a list of eight recruiting texts and eight radicalizing texts from a variety of Group X leaders were compiled.

  18. Reliable Facility Location Problem with Facility Protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Luohao; Zhu, Cheng; Lin, Zaili; Shi, Jianmai; Zhang, Weiming

    2016-01-01

    This paper studies a reliable facility location problem with facility protection that aims to hedge against random facility disruptions by both strategically protecting some facilities and using backup facilities for the demands. An Integer Programming model is proposed for this problem, in which the failure probabilities of facilities are site-specific. A solution approach combining Lagrangian Relaxation and local search is proposed and is demonstrated to be both effective and efficient based on computational experiments on random numerical examples with 49, 88, 150 and 263 nodes in the network. A real case study for a 100-city network in Hunan province, China, is presented, based on which the properties of the model are discussed and some managerial insights are analyzed. PMID:27583542

  19. AOV Facility Tool/Facility Safety Specifications

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — Develop and maintain authorizing documents that are standards that facilities must follow. These standards are references of FAA regulations and are specific to the...

  20. Report of study group 3.1 ''technological and economical developments for cost reduction of LNG facilities''; Rapport du groupe d'etude 3.1 ''developpements economiques et technologiques pour la reduction des couts dans les installations de GNL''

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rapallini, R.

    2000-07-01

    The design, engineering and operation of LNG base load liquefaction and re-gasification facilities is now considered a mature technology. However, process efficiency at these plants is limited by fundamental thermodynamic principles and no radical technology breakthroughs are expected in the near future. Three important aspects affecting the cost of production are the molecular weight of the gas, the amount of nitrogen in the feed and the acid gas composition. Variations in composition will also affect the design of the facilities and production rate. Previous projects have optimised economies of scale, using processes based on large industrial gas turbines, to achieve the minimum unit cost for LNG production. LNG producers have continued to focus on larger train designs to further capitalize on economies of scale as well as continued expansion of existing facilities. The latest plant designs expect the optimum integration with existing facilities to be a major factor in optimising specific capital costs. Whilst design codes and standards have not been discussed in many papers on LNG cost reduction, it is generally accepted that project specifications can significantly impact the project cost. The cost of equipment can be significantly inflated by onerous specifications with non standard requirements that vendors have trouble meeting. The possibility of developing gas projects will mainly be determined by the requirements of power generation and/or the industrial sector. As far as power generation is concerned, expansion will rely greatly on combined cycle plants. The competitiveness of LNG as regards power generation can be further improved by adopting integrated solutions. As in all other industrial projects, one of the first concerns for the investor when he envisages building an LNG liquefaction or re-gasification terminal is the selection of the site where the terminal will be located. (author)

  1. Hot Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vail, Kathleen

    1996-01-01

    Collaborators sparked by creative ideas and obsessed by a common task may not realize they're part of a "hot group"--a term coined by business professors Harold J. Leavitt and Jean Lipman-Blumen. Spawned by group decision making and employee empowerment, hot groups can flourish in education settings. They're typically small, short lived, and goal…

  2. Abelian Groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishina, A.P.

    1995-10-15

    This fifth survey of reviews on abelian groups comprises papers reviewed in 1985-1992. Just as in the preceding surveys, the issues concerning finite abelian groups, topological groups, ordered groups, group algebras, modules (with rare exceptions), and topics on logic are not considered. The issues on the lattice of subgroups of an abelian group are included in Section 11. In contrast to the fourth survey, this one does not contain Sections 6 (N-high subgroups), 9 (rings with a given additive group), and 10 (valuated groups); since only a few papers treated these topics, the material discussed earlier in Sections 9, and 10 is now included in Section 11 and the material of the former Section 6 will be found in Sections 1, 7, 8, and 11 of this survey. On the other hand, the fifth survey has three new sections devoted to separable groups (a new Sect. 5), Butler groups (a new Sect. 6), and the endormorphism rings and automorphism groups of abelian groups (a new Sect. 9).

  3. Group morphology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roerdink, Jos B.T.M.

    2000-01-01

    In its original form, mathematical morphology is a theory of binary image transformations which are invariant under the group of Euclidean translations. This paper surveys and extends constructions of morphological operators which are invariant under a more general group TT, such as the motion group

  4. Metabolomics Research Group 2011 Study

    OpenAIRE

    Asara, J. M.; Tolstikov, V.V.; Aronov, P.; Kesler, B.; Shulaev, V.; Turck, C. W.; Wikoff, W R

    2011-01-01

    The ABRF Metabolomics Research Group (MRG) was formed in 2009 and aims to educate research scientists and resource facilities in the analytical approaches and management of data resulting from comprehensive metabolite studies and to promote the science and standardization of metabolomic analyses for a variety of applications. Last year the MRG conducted a ‘Survey Study’ on the current use of metabolomics technologies and procedures in core facilities. This year the MRG is organizing a ‘Resear...

  5. Permutation groups

    CERN Document Server

    Passman, Donald S

    2012-01-01

    This volume by a prominent authority on permutation groups consists of lecture notes that provide a self-contained account of distinct classification theorems. A ready source of frequently quoted but usually inaccessible theorems, it is ideally suited for professional group theorists as well as students with a solid background in modern algebra.The three-part treatment begins with an introductory chapter and advances to an economical development of the tools of basic group theory, including group extensions, transfer theorems, and group representations and characters. The final chapter feature

  6. Technology Development Facility (TDF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have been studying small, driven, magnetic-mirror-based fusion reactors for the Technology Development Facility (TDF), that will test fusion reactor materials, components, and subsystems. Magnetic mirror systems are particularly interesting for this application because of their inherent steady-state operation, potentially high neutron wall loading, and relatively small size. Our design is a tandem mirror device first described by Fowler and Logan, based on the physics of the TMX experiments at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The device produces 20 MW of fusion power with a first-wall, uncollided 14-MeV neutron flux of 1.4 MW/m2 on an area of approximately 8 m2, while consuming approximately 250 MW of electrical power. The work was done by a combined industrial-laboratory-university group

  7. Galaxy Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tully, R. Brent

    2015-02-01

    Galaxy groups can be characterized by the radius of decoupling from cosmic expansion, the radius of the caustic of second turnaround, and the velocity dispersion of galaxies within this latter radius. These parameters can be a challenge to measure, especially for small groups with few members. In this study, results are gathered pertaining to particularly well-studied groups over four decades in group mass. Scaling relations anticipated from theory are demonstrated and coefficients of the relationships are specified. There is an update of the relationship between light and mass for groups, confirming that groups with mass of a few times {{10}12}{{M}⊙ } are the most lit up while groups with more and less mass are darker. It is demonstrated that there is an interesting one-to-one correlation between the number of dwarf satellites in a group and the group mass. There is the suggestion that small variations in the slope of the luminosity function in groups are caused by the degree of depletion of intermediate luminosity systems rather than variations in the number per unit mass of dwarfs. Finally, returning to the characteristic radii of groups, the ratio of first to second turnaround depends on the dark matter and dark energy content of the universe and a crude estimate can be made from the current observations of {{Ω}matter}˜ 0.15 in a flat topology, with a 68% probability of being less than 0.44.

  8. Galaxy groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brent Tully, R. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States)

    2015-02-01

    Galaxy groups can be characterized by the radius of decoupling from cosmic expansion, the radius of the caustic of second turnaround, and the velocity dispersion of galaxies within this latter radius. These parameters can be a challenge to measure, especially for small groups with few members. In this study, results are gathered pertaining to particularly well-studied groups over four decades in group mass. Scaling relations anticipated from theory are demonstrated and coefficients of the relationships are specified. There is an update of the relationship between light and mass for groups, confirming that groups with mass of a few times 10{sup 12}M{sub ⊙} are the most lit up while groups with more and less mass are darker. It is demonstrated that there is an interesting one-to-one correlation between the number of dwarf satellites in a group and the group mass. There is the suggestion that small variations in the slope of the luminosity function in groups are caused by the degree of depletion of intermediate luminosity systems rather than variations in the number per unit mass of dwarfs. Finally, returning to the characteristic radii of groups, the ratio of first to second turnaround depends on the dark matter and dark energy content of the universe and a crude estimate can be made from the current observations of Ω{sub matter}∼0.15 in a flat topology, with a 68% probability of being less than 0.44.

  9. Galaxy Groups

    CERN Document Server

    Tully, R Brent

    2014-01-01

    Galaxy groups can be characterized by the radius of decoupling from cosmic expansion, the radius of the caustic of second turnaround, and the velocity dispersion of galaxies within this latter radius. These parameters can be a challenge to measure, especially for small groups with few members. In this study, results are gathered pertaining to particularly well studied groups over four decades in group mass. Scaling relations anticipated from theory are demonstrated and coefficients of the relationships are specified. There is an update of the relationship between light and mass for groups, confirming that groups with mass of a few times 10^12 Msun are the most lit up while groups with more and less mass are darker. It is demonstrated that there is an interesting one-to-one correlation between the number of dwarf satellites in a group and the group mass. There is the suggestion that small variations in the slope of the luminosity function in groups are caused by the degree of depletion of intermediate luminosi...

  10. Energetics Conditioning Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Energetics Conditioning Facility is used for long term and short term aging studies of energetic materials. The facility has 10 conditioning chambers of which 2...

  11. Dialysis Facility Compare

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Dialysis Facility Compare helps you find detailed information about Medicare-certified dialysis facilities. You can compare the services and the quality of care...

  12. Facility Response Plan (FRP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — A Facility Response Plan (FRP) demonstrates a facility's preparedness to respond to a worst case oil discharge. Under the Clean Water Act, as amended by the Oil...

  13. Projectile Demilitarization Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Projectile Wash Out Facility is US Army Ammunition Peculiar Equipment (APE 1300). It is a pilot scale wash out facility that uses high pressure water and steam...

  14. Explosive Components Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The 98,000 square foot Explosive Components Facility (ECF) is a state-of-the-art facility that provides a full-range of chemical, material, and performance analysis...

  15. Armament Technology Facility (ATF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Armament Technology Facility is a 52,000 square foot, secure and environmentally-safe, integrated small arms and cannon caliber design and evaluation facility....

  16. Wastewater Treatment Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research Facility — Individual permits for municipal, industrial, and semi-public wastewater treatment facilities in Iowa for the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System...

  17. The Educational Facilities Charrette

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chase, William W.

    1970-01-01

    The deputy director for the Division of Facilities Development of the U.S. Office of Education discusses a technique for studying and resolving educational facilities development problems within the context of total community planning needs." (Author/AA)

  18. Financing Professional Sports Facilities

    OpenAIRE

    Baade, Robert A.; Victor A. Matheson

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines public financing of professional sports facilities with a focus on both early and recent developments in taxpayer subsidization of spectator sports. The paper explores both the magnitude and the sources of public funding for professional sports facilities.

  19. Ouellette Thermal Test Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Thermal Test Facility is a joint Army/Navy state-of-the-art facility (8,100 ft2) that was designed to: Evaluate and characterize the effect of flame and thermal...

  20. Hydra groups

    CERN Document Server

    Dison, Will

    2010-01-01

    We give examples of CAT(0), biautomatic, free-by-cyclic, one-relator groups which have finite-rank free subgroups of huge (Ackermannian) distortion. This leads to elementary examples of groups whose Dehn functions are similarly extravagant. This behaviour originates in manifestations of Hercules-versus-the-hydra battles in string-rewriting.

  1. Transfer of Tritium in the Environment after Accidental Releases from Nuclear Facilities. Report of Working Group 7 Tritium Accidents of EMRAS II Topical Heading Approaches for Assessing Emergency Situations. Environmental Modelling for Radiation Safety (Emras II) Programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Environmental assessment models are used for evaluating the radiological impact of actual and potential releases of radionuclides to the environment. They are essential tools for use in the regulatory control of routine discharges to the environment and also in planning measures to be taken in the event of accidental releases. They are also used for predicting the impact of releases which may occur far into the future, for example, from underground radioactive waste repositories. It is important to verify, to the extent possible, the reliability of the predictions of such models by a comparison with measured values in the environment or with predictions of other models. The IAEA has been organizing programmes of international model testing since the 1980s. These programmes have contributed to a general improvement in models, in the transfer of data and in the capabilities of modellers in Member States. IAEA publications on this subject over the past three decades demonstrate the comprehensive nature of the programmes and record the associated advances which have been made. From 2009 to 2011, the IAEA organized a programme entitled Environmental Modelling for RAdiation Safety (EMRAS II), which concentrated on the improvement of environmental transfer models and the development of reference approaches to estimate the radiological impacts on humans, as well as on flora and fauna, arising from radionuclides in the environment. Different aspects were addressed by nine working groups covering three themes: reference approaches for human dose assessment, reference approaches for biota dose assessment and approaches for assessing emergency situations. This publication describes the work of the Tritium Accidents Working Group

  2. One-pot facile synthesis of highly photoluminescent graphene quantum dots with oxygen-rich groups%一步法合成富氧基团石墨烯量子点及光致发光特性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    代云茜; 孙贻白; 龙欢; 柴蕴玲; 孙岳明

    2014-01-01

    To achieve a new type of carbon-based quantum dots with unique photoluminescence PL a simple approach for fabrication of graphene quantum dots GQDs with oxygen-rich groups was developed via the hydrothermal reaction by using graphene oxides GOs as a precursor. Transmission electron microscope TEM and atomic force microscope AFM characterizations confirmed that the sizes and heights of GQDs were 5.02 ±0.92 nm and 0.6 nm respectively.A strong PL emission exhibited unique excitation wavelength dependent features.Also the carbene-like free zigzag edge sites were proposed to be the origin of the strong PL emission.The GQDs were demonstrated to be a superior probe for Fe3+ detection in aqueous solution with a high sensitivity and feasibility due to the special coordinate interaction between Fe3+and the phenolic hydroxyl group at GQDs.%为获得独特的光致发光特性的碳基量子点,以氧化石墨烯( GOs )为前驱物,采用水热反应合成了一类富氧官能团修饰的石墨烯量子点(GQDs).TEM和AFM表征GQDs平均粒径为(5.02±0.92) nm,厚度为0.6 nm.GQDs呈现特有的光致发光峰位随激发波长移动的特性,其光致发光机理来源于量子点边缘的类卡宾zigzag活性位.由于Fe3+与GQDs表面羟基的配位作用使GQDs呈现出对Fe3+离子检测的高灵敏度和快速响应,有望成为高效检测Fe3+离子的新型荧光探针.

  3. Group Grammar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Karen

    2015-01-01

    In this article Karen Adams demonstrates how to incorporate group grammar techniques into a classroom activity. In the activity, students practice using the target grammar to do something they naturally enjoy: learning about each other.

  4. MUYANG GROUP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ With its headquarters in the historic city of Yangzhou,Jiangsu Muyang Group Co.,Ltd has since its founding in 1967 grown into a well-known group corporation whose activities cover research&development.project design,manufacturing,installation and services in a multitude of industries including feed machinery and engineering,storage engineering,grain machinery and engineering,environmental protection,conveying equipment and automatic control systems.

  5. Abelian groups

    CERN Document Server

    Fuchs, László

    2015-01-01

    Written by one of the subject’s foremost experts, this book focuses on the central developments and modern methods of the advanced theory of abelian groups, while remaining accessible, as an introduction and reference, to the non-specialist. It provides a coherent source for results scattered throughout the research literature with lots of new proofs. The presentation highlights major trends that have radically changed the modern character of the subject, in particular, the use of homological methods in the structure theory of various classes of abelian groups, and the use of advanced set-theoretical methods in the study of undecidability problems. The treatment of the latter trend includes Shelah’s seminal work on the undecidability in ZFC of Whitehead’s Problem; while the treatment of the former trend includes an extensive (but non-exhaustive) study of p-groups, torsion-free groups, mixed groups, and important classes of groups arising from ring theory. To prepare the reader to tackle these topics, th...

  6. Group dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scandiffio, A L

    1990-12-01

    Group dynamics play a significant role within any organization, culture, or unit. The important thing to remember with any of these structures is that they are made up of people--people with different ideas, motivations, background, and sometimes different agendas. Most groups, formal or informal, look for a leader in an effort to maintain cohesiveness of the unit. At times, that cultural bond must be developed; once developed, it must be nurtured. There are also times that one of the group no longer finds the culture comfortable and begins to act out behaviorally. It is these times that become trying for the leader as she or he attempts to remain objective when that which was once in the building phase of group cohesiveness starts to fall apart. At all times, the manager must continue to view the employee creating the disturbance as an integral part of the group. It is at this time that it is beneficial to perceive the employee exhibiting problem behaviors as a special employee, as one who needs the benefit of your experience and skills, as one who is still part of the group. It is also during this time that the manager should focus upon her or his own views in the area of power, communication, and the corporate culture of the unit that one has established before attempting to understand another's point of view. Once we understand our own motivation and accept ourselves, it is then that we may move on to offer assistance to another. Once we understand our insecurities recognizing staff dysfunction as a symptom of system dysfunction will not be so threatening to the concept of the manager that we perceive ourselves to be. It takes a secure person to admit that she or he favors staff before deciding to do something to change things. The important thing to know is that it can be done. The favored staff can find a new way of relating to others, the special employee can find new modes of behavior (and even find self-esteem in the process), the group can find new ways

  7. Group dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scandiffio, A L

    1990-12-01

    Group dynamics play a significant role within any organization, culture, or unit. The important thing to remember with any of these structures is that they are made up of people--people with different ideas, motivations, background, and sometimes different agendas. Most groups, formal or informal, look for a leader in an effort to maintain cohesiveness of the unit. At times, that cultural bond must be developed; once developed, it must be nurtured. There are also times that one of the group no longer finds the culture comfortable and begins to act out behaviorally. It is these times that become trying for the leader as she or he attempts to remain objective when that which was once in the building phase of group cohesiveness starts to fall apart. At all times, the manager must continue to view the employee creating the disturbance as an integral part of the group. It is at this time that it is beneficial to perceive the employee exhibiting problem behaviors as a special employee, as one who needs the benefit of your experience and skills, as one who is still part of the group. It is also during this time that the manager should focus upon her or his own views in the area of power, communication, and the corporate culture of the unit that one has established before attempting to understand another's point of view. Once we understand our own motivation and accept ourselves, it is then that we may move on to offer assistance to another. Once we understand our insecurities recognizing staff dysfunction as a symptom of system dysfunction will not be so threatening to the concept of the manager that we perceive ourselves to be. It takes a secure person to admit that she or he favors staff before deciding to do something to change things. The important thing to know is that it can be done. The favored staff can find a new way of relating to others, the special employee can find new modes of behavior (and even find self-esteem in the process), the group can find new ways

  8. Facilities projects performance measurement system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The two DOE-owned facilities at Hanford, the Fuels and Materials Examination Facility (FMEF), and the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test Facility (FMIT), are described. The performance measurement systems used at these two facilities are next described

  9. Group Anonymity

    CERN Document Server

    Chertov, Oleg; 10.1007/978-3-642-14058-7_61

    2010-01-01

    In recent years the amount of digital data in the world has risen immensely. But, the more information exists, the greater is the possibility of its unwanted disclosure. Thus, the data privacy protection has become a pressing problem of the present time. The task of individual privacy-preserving is being thoroughly studied nowadays. At the same time, the problem of statistical disclosure control for collective (or group) data is still open. In this paper we propose an effective and relatively simple (wavelet-based) way to provide group anonymity in collective data. We also provide a real-life example to illustrate the method.

  10. Lego Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller Larsen, Marcus; Pedersen, Torben; Slepniov, Dmitrij

    2010-01-01

    The last years’ rather adventurous journey from 2004 to 2009 had taught the fifth-largest toy-maker in the world - the LEGO Group - the importance of managing the global supply chain effectively. In order to survive the largest internal financial crisis in its roughly 70 years of existence......, the management had, among many initiatives, decided to offshore and outsource a major chunk of its production to Flextronics. In this pursuit of rapid cost-cutting sourcing advantages, the LEGO Group planned to license out as much as 80 per cent of its production besides closing down major parts...

  11. Facility transition instruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Bechtel Hanford, Inc. facility transition instruction was initiated in response to the need for a common, streamlined process for facility transitions and to capture the knowledge and experience that has accumulated over the last few years. The instruction serves as an educational resource and defines the process for transitioning facilities to long-term surveillance and maintenance (S and M). Generally, these facilities do not have identified operations missions and must be transitioned from operational status to a safe and stable configuration for long-term S and M. The instruction can be applied to a wide range of facilities--from process canyon complexes like the Plutonium Uranium Extraction Facility or B Plant, to stand-alone, lower hazard facilities like the 242B/BL facility. The facility transition process is implemented (under the direction of the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office [RL] Assistant Manager-Environmental) by Bechtel Hanford, Inc. management, with input and interaction with the appropriate RL division and Hanford site contractors as noted in the instruction. The application of the steps identified herein and the early participation of all organizations involved are expected to provide a cost-effective, safe, and smooth transition from operational status to deactivation and S and M for a wide range of Hanford Site facilities

  12. Nuclear Physics accelerator facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nuclear Physics program requires the existence and effective operation of large and complex accelerator facilities. These facilities provide the variety of projectile beams upon which virtually all experimental nuclear research depends. Their capability determine which experiments can be performed and which cannot. Seven existing accelerator facilities are operated by the Nuclear Physics program as national facilities. These are made available to all the Nation's scientists on the basis of scientific merit and technical feasibility of proposals. The national facilities are the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) at Los Alamos National Laboratory; the Bates Linear Accelerator Center at Massachusetts Institute of Technology; the Bevalac at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory; the Tandem/AGS Heavy Ion Facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory; the ATLAS facility at Argonne National Laboratory; the 88-Inch Cyclotron at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory; the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The Nuclear Physics Injector at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) enables the SLAC facility to provide a limited amount of beam time for nuclear physics research on the same basis as the other national facilities. To complement the national facilities, the Nuclear Physics program supports on-campus accelerators at Duke University, Texas A and M University, the University of Washington, and Yale University. The facility at Duke University, called the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL), is jointly staffed by Duke University, North Carolina State University, and the University of North Carolina. These accelerators are operated primarily for the research use of the local university faculty, junior scientists, and graduate students

  13. Fifteenth LAMPF users group meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Fifteenth LAMPF Users Group Meeting was held November 2-3, 1981 at the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physical Facility. The program of papers scheduled to be presented was amended to include a Report from Washington by Clarence R. Richardson, US Department of Energy. The general meeting ended with a round-table working group discussion concerning the Planning for a Kaon Factory. Individual items from the meeting were prepared separately for the data base

  14. Fifteenth LAMPF users group meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cochran, D.R.F. (comp.)

    1982-03-01

    The Fifteenth LAMPF Users Group Meeting was held November 2-3, 1981 at the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physical Facility. The program of papers scheduled to be presented was amended to include a Report from Washington by Clarence R. Richardson, US Department of Energy. The general meeting ended with a round-table working group discussion concerning the Planning for a Kaon Factory. Individual items from the meeting were prepared separately for the data base.

  15. Group Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Susan

    1992-01-01

    Research suggests that cooperative learning works best when students are first taught group-processing skills, such as leadership, decision making, communication, trust building, and conflict management. Inadequate teacher training and boring assignments can torpedo cooperative learning efforts. Administrators should reassure teachers with…

  16. Tectaria group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holttum, R.E.

    1991-01-01

    Polypodiaceae subfam. Dryopteridoideae section A, auct.: C. Chr. in Verdoorn, Man. Pteridol. (1938) 543, p.p. Aspidiaceae tribe Aspidieae auct.: Ching, Sunyatsenia 5 (1940) 250, excl. Lomariopsis and related genera. — Aspidiaceae, group of Ctenitis Copel., Gen. Fil. (1947) 153. Aspidiaceae auct.: Pi

  17. Promoting Diversity in the Core Facility

    OpenAIRE

    Person, M.

    2011-01-01

    Diversity is encouraged to counter historical bias against a variety of groups and has emerged as a positive attribute of the workplace. However, among pressing economic and scientific outcome pressures, issues not tied to measurable rewards are often overlooked in the core facility. This poster will present an overview of diversity issues and strategies relevant to core facilities. The variety of types of diversity is discussed, including sex, race, ethnicity, nationality, socioeconomic back...

  18. ICT Adoption in Facilities Management Supply Chain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scupola, Ada

    2012-01-01

    This article involves a qualitative study of factors impacting the adoption of ICT solutions in the Danish facility management supply chain. The results show that there are a number of drivers and barriers that influence the adoption of ICT solutions in this service sector. These have been grouped...... concerned with ICT adoption, operations and service management (especially facilities management) as well as operation managers and ICT managers....

  19. In-facility transport code review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spore, J.W.; Boyack, B.E.; Bohl, W.R. [and others

    1996-07-01

    The following computer codes were reviewed by the In-Facility Transport Working Group for application to the in-facility transport of radioactive aerosols, flammable gases, and/or toxic gases: (1) CONTAIN, (2) FIRAC, (3) GASFLOW, (4) KBERT, and (5) MELCOR. Based on the review criteria as described in this report and the versions of each code available at the time of the review, MELCOR is the best code for the analysis of in-facility transport when multidimensional effects are not significant. When multi-dimensional effects are significant, GASFLOW should be used.

  20. 340 Facility compliance assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study provides an environmental compliance evaluation of the RLWS and the RPS systems of the 340 Facility. The emphasis of the evaluation centers on compliance with WAC requirements for hazardous and mixed waste facilities, federal regulations, and Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) requirements pertinent to the operation of the 340 Facility. The 340 Facility is not covered under either an interim status Part A permit or a RCRA Part B permit. The detailed discussion of compliance deficiencies are summarized in Section 2.0. This includes items of significance that require action to ensure facility compliance with WAC, federal regulations, and WHC requirements. Outstanding issues exist for radioactive airborne effluent sampling and monitoring, radioactive liquid effluent sampling and monitoring, non-radioactive liquid effluent sampling and monitoring, less than 90 day waste storage tanks, and requirements for a permitted facility

  1. University multi-user facility survey-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Melissa B

    2011-12-01

    Multi-user facilities serve as a resource for many universities. In 2010, a survey was conducted investigating possible changes and successful characteristics of multi-user facilities, as well as identifying problems in facilities. Over 300 surveys were e-mailed to persons identified from university websites as being involved with multi-user facilities. Complete responses were received from 36 facilities with an average of 20 years of operation. Facilities were associated with specific departments (22%), colleges (22%), and university research centers (8.3%) or were not affiliated with any department or college within the university (47%). The five most important factors to succeed as a multi-user facility were: 1) maintaining an experienced, professional staff in an open atmosphere; 2) university-level support providing partial funding; 3) broad client base; 4) instrument training programs; and 5) an effective leader and engaged strategic advisory group. The most significant problems were: 1) inadequate university financial support and commitment; 2) problems recovering full service costs from university subsidies and user fees; 3) availability of funds to repair and upgrade equipment; 4) inability to retain highly qualified staff; and 5) unqualified users dirtying/damaging equipment. Further information related to these issues and to fee structure was solicited. Overall, there appeared to be a decline in university support for facilities and more emphasis on securing income by serving clients outside of the institution and by obtaining grants from entities outside of the university. PMID:22131888

  2. Synchrotron radiation facilities

    CERN Multimedia

    1972-01-01

    Particularly in the past few years, interest in using the synchrotron radiation emanating from high energy, circular electron machines has grown considerably. In our February issue we included an article on the synchrotron radiation facility at Frascati. This month we are spreading the net wider — saying something about the properties of the radiation, listing the centres where synchrotron radiation facilities exist, adding a brief description of three of them and mentioning areas of physics in which the facilities are used.

  3. Air gun test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes a facility that is potentially useful in providing data for models to predict the effects of nuclear explosions on cities. IIT Research Institute has a large air gun facility capable of launching heavy items of a wide variety of geometries to velocities ranging from about 80 fps to 1100 fps. The facility and its capabilities are described, and city model problem areas capable of investigation using the air gun are presented

  4. Textiles Performance Testing Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Textiles Performance Testing Facilities has the capabilities to perform all physical wet and dry performance testing, and visual and instrumental color analysis...

  5. Materials Characterization Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Materials Characterization Facility enables detailed measurements of the properties of ceramics, polymers, glasses, and composites. It features instrumentation...

  6. Region 9 NPDES Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Point geospatial dataset representing locations of NPDES Facilities. NPDES (National Pollution Discharge Elimination System) is an EPA permit program that regulates...

  7. Neutron Therapy Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Neutron Therapy Facility provides a moderate intensity, broad energy spectrum neutron beam that can be used for short term irradiations for radiobiology (cells)...

  8. DUPIC facility engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, J. J.; Lee, H. H.; Kim, K. H. and others

    2000-03-01

    The objectives of this study are (1) the refurbishment for PIEF(Post Irradiation Examination Facility) and M6 hot-cell in IMEF(Irradiated Material Examination Facility), (2) the establishment of the compatible facility for DUPIC fuel fabrication experiments which is licensed by government organization, and (3) the establishment of the transportation system and transportation cask for nuclear material between facilities. The report for this project describes following contents, such as objectives, necessities, scope, contents, results of current step, R and D plan in future and etc.

  9. High Combustion Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — At NETL's High-Pressure Combustion Research Facility in Morgantown, WV, researchers can investigate new high-pressure, high-temperature hydrogen turbine combustion...

  10. Target Assembly Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Target Assembly Facility integrates new armor concepts into actual armored vehicles. Featuring the capability ofmachining and cutting radioactive materials, it...

  11. Pavement Testing Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Comprehensive Environmental and Structural Analyses The ERDC Pavement Testing Facility, located on the ERDC Vicksburg campus, was originally constructed to provide...

  12. Composite Structures Manufacturing Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Composite Structures Manufacturing Facility specializes in the design, analysis, fabrication and testing of advanced composite structures and materials for both...

  13. Joint Computing Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Raised Floor Computer Space for High Performance Computing The ERDC Information Technology Laboratory (ITL) provides a robust system of IT facilities to develop and...

  14. Geodynamics Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This GSL facility has evolved over the last three decades to support survivability and protective structures research. Experimental devices include three gas-driven...

  15. DUPIC facility engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objectives of this study are 1) the refurbishment for PIEF(Post Irradiation Examination Facility) and M6 hot-cell in IMEF(Irradiated Material Examination Facility), 2) the establishment of the compatible facility for DUPIC fuel fabrication experiments which is licensed by government organization, and 3) the establishment of the transportation system and transportation cask for nuclear material between facilities. The report for this project describes following contents, such as objectives, necessities, scope, contents, results of current step, R and D plan in future and etc

  16. Universal Drive Train Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This vehicle drive train research facility is capable of evaluating helicopter and ground vehicle power transmission technologies in a system level environment. The...

  17. Manufacturing Demonstration Facility (MDF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The U.S. Department of Energy Manufacturing Demonstration Facility (MDF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) provides a collaborative, shared infrastructure to...

  18. Proximal Probes Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Proximal Probes Facility consists of laboratories for microscopy, spectroscopy, and probing of nanostructured materials and their functional properties. At the...

  19. GPS Test Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Global Positioning System (GPS) Test Facility Instrumentation Suite (GPSIS) provides great flexibility in testing receivers by providing operational control of...

  20. COMMUNICATIONS GROUP

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Taylor

    2011-01-01

    The CMS Communications Group, established at the start of 2010, has been busy in all three areas of its responsibility: (1) Communications Infrastructure, (2) Information Systems, and (3) Outreach and Education. Communications Infrastructure There are now 55 CMS Centres worldwide that are well used by physicists working on remote CMS shifts, Computing operations, data quality monitoring, data analysis and outreach. The CMS Centre@CERN in Meyrin, is the centre of the CMS offline and computing operations, hosting dedicated analysis efforts such as during the CMS Heavy Ion lead-lead running. With a majority of CMS sub-detectors now operating in a “shifterless” mode, many monitoring operations are now routinely performed from there, rather than in the main Control Room at P5. The CMS Communications Group, CERN IT and the EVO team are providing excellent videoconferencing support for the rapidly-increasing number of CMS meetings. In parallel, CERN IT and ...

  1. Group therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: In his review 'Genesis of Unified Gauge Theories' at the symposium in Honour of Abdus Salam (June, page 23), Tom Kibble of Imperial College, London, looked back to the physics events around Salam from 1959-67. He described how, in the early 1960s, people were pushing to enlarge the symmetry of strong interactions beyond the SU(2) of isospin and incorporate the additional strangeness quantum number. Kibble wrote - 'Salam had students working on every conceivable symmetry group. One of these was Yuval Ne'eman, who had the good fortune and/or prescience to work on SU(3). From that work, and of course from the independent work of Murray Gell- Mann, stemmed the Eightfold Way, with its triumphant vindication in the discovery of the omega-minus in 1964.' Yuval Ne'eman writes - 'I was the Defence Attaché at the Israeli Embassy in London and was admitted by Salam as a part-time graduate student when I arrived in 1958. I started research after resigning from the Embassy in May 1960. Salam suggested a problem: provide vector mesons with mass - the problem which was eventually solved by Higgs, Guralnik, Kibble,.... (as described by Kibble in his article). I explained to Salam that I had become interested in symmetry. Nobody at Imperial College at the time, other than Salam himself, was doing anything in groups, and attention further afield was focused on the rotation - SO(N) - groups. Reacting to my own half-baked schemes, Salam told me to forget about the rotation groups he taught us, and study group theory in depth, directing me to Eugene Dynkin's classification of Lie subalgebras, about which he had heard from Morton Hamermesh. I found Dynkin incomprehensible without first learning about Lie algebras from Henri Cartan's thesis, which luckily had been reproduced by Dynkin in his 1946 thesis, using his diagram method. From a copy of a translation of Dynkin's thesis which I found in the British Museum Library, I

  2. Local Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateo, M.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Not long after EDWIN HUBBLE established that galaxies are `island universes' similar to our home galaxy, the MILKY WAY, he realized that a few of these external galaxies are considerably closer to us than any others. In 1936 he first coined the term `Local Group' in his famous book The Realm of the Nebulae to identify our nearest galactic neighbors. More than 60 yr later, the galaxies of the Loca...

  3. 32 CFR 643.129 - Youth groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Youth groups. 643.129 Section 643.129 National... Additional Authority of Commanders § 643.129 Youth groups. (a) Installation commanders may grant revocable-at... facilities, without monetary consideration, to on-post youth groups such as the Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts,...

  4. Development and introduction of a modular training and qualification concept for maintenance personnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The presentation entitled ''Development and Introduction of a Modular Training and Qualification Concept for Maintenance Personnel'' presents the background, concept and training modules of a reactor services training concept that was jointly elaborated by a working group consisting of the ''Maintenance manager workshop'' working panel of the VGB, the Kraftwerksschule (KWS) PowerTech Training Center, and AREVA NP GmbH in Erlangen and Offenbach. This concept is part of AREVA's comprehensive training and qualification approach which comprises inter alia extensive introduction sessions for new employees, the corporation-wide highly appreciated AREVA University as well as specialized training facilities as for example the CETIC in Chalon-sur-Saone, France and the training center in Lynchburg, USA, or the worldwide largest integration center for digital I and C equipment for safety applications in nuclear power plants in Erlangen. AREVA NP's training concept for maintenance personnel addresses not only employees from AREVA NP working in nuclear maintenance but also personnel from nuclear power plants as well as independent experts, representatives from authorities and other interest groups. (orig.)

  5. PROJECTIZING AN OPERATING NUCLEAR FACILITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, N

    2007-07-08

    This paper will discuss the evolution of an operations-based organization to a project-based organization to facilitate successful deactivation of a major nuclear facility. It will describe the plan used for scope definition, staff reorganization, method estimation, baseline schedule development, project management training, and results of this transformation. It is a story of leadership and teamwork, pride and success. Workers at the Savannah River Site's (SRS) F Canyon Complex (FCC) started with a challenge--take all the hazardous byproducts from nearly 50 years of operations in a major, first-of-its-kind nuclear complex and safely get rid of them, leaving the facility cold, dark, dry and ready for whatever end state is ultimately determined by the United States Department of Energy (DOE). And do it in four years, with a constantly changing workforce and steadily declining funding. The goal was to reduce the overall operating staff by 93% and budget by 94%. The facilities, F Canyon and its adjoined sister, FB Line, are located at SRS, a 310-square-mile nuclear reservation near Aiken, S.C., owned by DOE and managed by Washington Group International subsidiary Washington Savannah River Company (WSRC). These facilities were supported by more than 50 surrounding buildings, whose purpose was to provide support services during operations. The radiological, chemical and industrial hazards inventory in the old buildings was significant. The historical mission at F Canyon was to extract plutonium-239 and uranium-238 from irradiated spent nuclear fuel through chemical processing. FB Line's mission included conversion of plutonium solutions into metal, characterization, stabilization and packaging, and storage of both metal and oxide forms. The plutonium metal was sent to another DOE site for use in weapons. Deactivation in F Canyon began when chemical separations activities were completed in 2002, and a cross-functional project team concept was implemented to

  6. PROJECTIZING AN OPERATING NUCLEAR FACILITY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper will discuss the evolution of an operations-based organization to a project-based organization to facilitate successful deactivation of a major nuclear facility. It will describe the plan used for scope definition, staff reorganization, method estimation, baseline schedule development, project management training, and results of this transformation. It is a story of leadership and teamwork, pride and success. Workers at the Savannah River Site's (SRS) F Canyon Complex (FCC) started with a challenge--take all the hazardous byproducts from nearly 50 years of operations in a major, first-of-its-kind nuclear complex and safely get rid of them, leaving the facility cold, dark, dry and ready for whatever end state is ultimately determined by the United States Department of Energy (DOE). And do it in four years, with a constantly changing workforce and steadily declining funding. The goal was to reduce the overall operating staff by 93% and budget by 94%. The facilities, F Canyon and its adjoined sister, FB Line, are located at SRS, a 310-square-mile nuclear reservation near Aiken, S.C., owned by DOE and managed by Washington Group International subsidiary Washington Savannah River Company (WSRC). These facilities were supported by more than 50 surrounding buildings, whose purpose was to provide support services during operations. The radiological, chemical and industrial hazards inventory in the old buildings was significant. The historical mission at F Canyon was to extract plutonium-239 and uranium-238 from irradiated spent nuclear fuel through chemical processing. FB Line's mission included conversion of plutonium solutions into metal, characterization, stabilization and packaging, and storage of both metal and oxide forms. The plutonium metal was sent to another DOE site for use in weapons. Deactivation in F Canyon began when chemical separations activities were completed in 2002, and a cross-functional project team concept was implemented to successfully

  7. Eighteenth LAMPF users group meeting: proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Eighteenth Annual LAMPF Users Group Meeting was held October 29-30, 1984, at the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility. The program included a number of invited talks on various aspects of nuclear and particle physics as well as status reports on LAMPF and discussions of upgrade options. The LAMPF working groups met and discussed plans for the secondary beam lines, experimental programs, and computing facilities

  8. Eighteenth LAMPF users group meeting: proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradbury, J.N. (comp.)

    1985-03-01

    The Eighteenth Annual LAMPF Users Group Meeting was held October 29-30, 1984, at the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility. The program included a number of invited talks on various aspects of nuclear and particle physics as well as status reports on LAMPF and discussions of upgrade options. The LAMPF working groups met and discussed plans for the secondary beam lines, experimental programs, and computing facilities.

  9. School Facilities Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Harry B.

    This survey of facility needs includes an evaluation of staff organization and operating procedures for the Philadelphia Public School District. The educational policies adopted by the Philadelphia Board of Education relating to school facilities are discussed, and existing sites and buildings, population enrollment data, and financial data are…

  10. Science Facilities Bibliography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Science Foundation, Washington, DC.

    A bibliographic collection on science buildings and facilities is cited with many different reference sources for those concerned with the design, planning, and layout of science facilities. References are given covering a broad scope of information on--(1) physical plant planning, (2) management and safety, (3) building type studies, (4) design…

  11. FACILITIES FOR PHYSICAL FITNESS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MUSIAL, STAN

    THIS ARTICLE CITES THE LOW PRIORITY THAT PHYSICAL EDUCATION GENERALLY HAS IN CURRICULUM AND SCHOOL FACILITY PLANNING. IT ALSO CITES THE REASONS FOR DEVELOPING MORE ADEQUATE PHYSICAL EDUCATION FACILITIES--(1) OUR WAY OF LIFE NO LONGER PROVIDES VIGOROUS PHYSICAL ACTIVITY NECESSARY FOR HEALTHY DEVELOPMENT, (2) A DIRECT RELATIONSHIP EXISTS BETWEEN…

  12. Florida Educational Facilities, 1999.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee. Office of Educational Facilities.

    This publication describes Florida school and community college facilities completed in 1999, including photographs and floor plans. The facilities profiled are: Buchholz High School (Alachua County); Gator Run Elementary School (Broward); Corkscrew Elementary School (Collier); The 500 Role Models Academy of Excellence (Miami-Dade); Caribbean…

  13. Bevalac biomedical facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the physical layout of the Bevalac Facility and the research programs carried out at the facility. Beam time on the Bevalac is divided between two disciplines: one-third for biomedical research and two-thirds for nuclear science studies. The remainder of the paper discusses the beam delivery system including dosimetry, beam sharing and beam scanning

  14. COMMUNICATIONS GROUP

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Taylor

    2010-01-01

    The CMS Communications Group, established at the start of 2010, has been strengthening the activities in all three areas of its responsibility: (1) Communications Infrastructure, (2) Information Systems, and (3) Outreach and Education. Communications Infrastructure The Communications Group has invested a lot of effort to support the operations needs of CMS. Hence, the CMS Centres where physicists work on remote CMS shifts, Data Quality Monitoring, and Data Analysis are running very smoothly. There are now 55 CMS Centres worldwide, up from just 16 at the start of CMS data-taking. The latest to join are Imperial College London, the University of Iowa, and the Università di Napoli. The CMS Centre@CERN in Meyrin, which is now full repaired after the major flooding at the beginning of the year, has been at the centre of CMS offline and computing operations, most recently hosting a large fraction of the CMS Heavy Ion community during the lead-lead run. A number of sub-detector shifts can now take pla...

  15. Grout treatment facility operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper summarizes the operation of the Grout Treatment Facility from initial testing to the final disposal to date of 3.8 x 103 m3 (1 Mgal) of low-level radioactive waste. It describes actual component testing and verification, testing of the full-scale system with simulated waste feed, summary of the radioactive disposal operation, lessons learned and equipment performance summary, facility impacts from safety analyses, long-term performance assessments, the Part B application, and projected facility modifications. The Grout Treatment Facility is one of two operations for permanently disposing of liquid defense wastes at the Hanford site near Richland, Washington, for the U.S. Department of Energy. High- and low-level radioactive wastes have been accumulating from defense material production since the mid-1940s at the Hanford site. All radioactive low-level and low-level mixed liquid wastes will be disposed of at the future Hanford Vitrification Facility

  16. Nuclear physics accelerator facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes many of the nuclear physics heavy-ion accelerator facilities in the US and the research programs being conducted. The accelerators described are: Argonne National Laboratory--ATLAS; Brookhaven National Laboratory--Tandem/AGS Heavy Ion Facility; Brookhaven National Laboratory--Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) (Proposed); Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility; Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory--Bevalac; Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory--88-Inch Cyclotron; Los Alamos National Laboratory--Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF); Massachusetts Institute of Technology--Bates Linear Accelerator Center; Oak Ridge National Laboratory--Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility; Oak Ridge National Laboratory--Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator; Stanford Linear Accelerator Center--Nuclear Physics Injector; Texas AandM University--Texas AandM Cyclotron; Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL); University of Washington--Tandem/Superconducting Booster; and Yale University--Tandem Van de Graaff

  17. Conditioning hulls and end fittings of recycled used fuel: the La Hague ACC facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the early 1990's, an objective was established to significantly reduce the volume of residual waste spent fuel, via the process of compaction, combined with the idea of achieving a standard canister CSD-C as its brother, the so called CSD-V (Conteneur Standard de Dechets Vitrifies in French or Universal Canister of Vitrified Waste), the concept of the Hulls and Ends Compaction Facility (ACC Atelier de Compactage des Coques in French) was born. It took ten years to design, build and develop this facility before hot start up in May 2002, at the AREVA NC La Hague site. In this paper, we explain the solutions devised to reduce waste volume by a factor of 4 through compaction and without the addition of a matrix such as concrete. Moreover the external shape of the CSD-C, identical to the CSD-V one, allows optimized handling and transfer operations of the canisters throughout all stages from production to disposal. Each step of the process will be presented: reception of hulls and ends fittings, separation and filling of casings, drying, compaction, welding. Operating results achieved from 2002 to 2008 will also be presented from both the perspective of the number of canisters produced and the volume reduction factor. During these years, improvements have been made to increase the performance of equipment and to optimize the structure of running and automation. So more than 7500 CSD C have been produced during this time. Thanks to the original design of ACC the production line can process technological waste devoted to intermediate level waste disposal. In this way, melters issued from vitrification facilities may be compacted in order to benefit from this volume reduction. Finally we present the extension of ACC's operating capabilities to include other kind of waste, such as technological waste containing a small quantity of organic, or future fuels currently in development (new types of cladding) or. with increased burn-up. Thus, the ACC facility meets its

  18. Cardiovascular group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blomqvist, Gunnar

    1989-01-01

    As a starting point, the group defined a primary goal of maintaining in flight a level of systemic oxygen transport capacity comparable to each individual's preflight upright baseline. The goal of maintaining capacity at preflight levels would seem to be a reasonable objective for several different reasons, including the maintenance of good health in general and the preservation of sufficient cardiovascular reserve capacity to meet operational demands. It is also important not to introduce confounding variables in whatever other physiological studies are being performed. A change in the level of fitness is likely to be a significant confounding variable in the study of many organ systems. The principal component of the in-flight cardiovascular exercise program should be large-muscle activity such as treadmill exercise. It is desirable that at least one session per week be monitored to assure maintenance of proper functional levels and to provide guidance for any adjustments of the exercise prescription. Appropriate measurements include evaluation of the heart-rate/workload or the heart-rate/oxygen-uptake relationship. Respiratory gas analysis is helpful by providing better opportunities to document relative workload levels from analysis of the interrelationships among VO2, VCO2, and ventilation. The committee felt that there is no clear evidence that any particular in-flight exercise regimen is protective against orthostatic hypotension during the early readaptation phase. Some group members suggested that maintenance of the lower body muscle mass and muscle tone may be helpful. There is also evidence that late in-flight interventions to reexpand blood volume to preflight levels are helpful in preventing or minimizing postflight orthostatic hypotension.

  19. Reactor coolant cleanup facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A depressurization device is disposed in pipelines upstream of recycling pumps of a reactor coolant cleanup facility to reduce a pressure between the pressurization device and the recycling pump at the downstream, thereby enabling high pressure coolant injection from other systems by way of the recycling pumps. Upon emergency, the recycling pumps of the coolant cleanup facility can be used in common to an emergency reactor core cooling facility and a reactor shutdown facility. Since existent pumps of the emergency reactor core cooling facility and the reactor shutdown facility which are usually in a stand-by state can be removed, operation confirmation test and maintenance for equipments in both of facilities can be saved, so that maintenance and reliability of the plant are improved and burdens on operators can also be mitigated. Moreover, low pressure design can be adopted for a non-regenerative heat exchanger and recycling coolant pumps, which enables to improve the reliability and economical property due to reduction of possibility of leakage. (N.H.)

  20. DUPIC facility engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J. S.; Choi, J. W.; Go, W. I.; Kim, H. D.; Song, K. C.; Jeong, I. H.; Park, H. S.; Im, C. S.; Lee, H. M.; Moon, K. H.; Hong, K. P.; Lee, K. S.; Suh, K. S.; Kim, E. K.; Min, D. K.; Lee, J. C.; Chun, Y. B.; Paik, S. Y.; Lee, E. P.; Yoo, G. S.; Kim, Y. S.; Park, J. C.

    1997-09-01

    In the early stage of the project, a comprehensive survey was conducted to identify the feasibility of using available facilities and of interface between those facilities. It was found out that the shielded cell M6 interface between those facilities. It was found out that the shielded cell M6 of IMEF could be used for the main process experiments of DUPIC fuel fabrication in regard to space adequacy, material flow, equipment layout, etc. Based on such examination, a suitable adapter system for material transfer around the M6 cell was engineered. Regarding the PIEF facility, where spent PWR fuel assemblies are stored in an annex pool, disassembly devices in the pool are retrofitted and spent fuel rod cutting and shipping system to the IMEF are designed and built. For acquisition of casks for radioactive material transport between the facilities, some adaptive refurbishment was applied to the available cask (Padirac) based on extensive analysis on safety requirements. A mockup test facility was newly acquired for remote test of DUPIC fuel fabrication process equipment prior to installation in the M6 cell of the IMEF facility. (author). 157 refs., 57 tabs., 65 figs.

  1. DUPIC facility engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the early stage of the project, a comprehensive survey was conducted to identify the feasibility of using available facilities and of interface between those facilities. It was found out that the shielded cell M6 interface between those facilities. It was found out that the shielded cell M6 of IMEF could be used for the main process experiments of DUPIC fuel fabrication in regard to space adequacy, material flow, equipment layout, etc. Based on such examination, a suitable adapter system for material transfer around the M6 cell was engineered. Regarding the PIEF facility, where spent PWR fuel assemblies are stored in an annex pool, disassembly devices in the pool are retrofitted and spent fuel rod cutting and shipping system to the IMEF are designed and built. For acquisition of casks for radioactive material transport between the facilities, some adaptive refurbishment was applied to the available cask (Padirac) based on extensive analysis on safety requirements. A mockup test facility was newly acquired for remote test of DUPIC fuel fabrication process equipment prior to installation in the M6 cell of the IMEF facility. (author). 157 refs., 57 tabs., 65 figs

  2. Communication in reducing facility siting risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bisconti, A.S. (Council for Energy Awareness, Washington, DC (United States))

    1992-01-01

    Today, social considerations are as important as technical ones in siting new nuclear facilities. Siting any industrial facility has become extremely difficult in this era of not in my backyard (NIMBY). Even if NIMBY does not arise locally, well-organized national opposition groups can be counted on to step in to fan the flames, especially when the industrial facility has to do with anything nuclear. It is now generally recognized that the greatest risk of failure for new nuclear facilities is not technical but social. Applying lessons gained from past experience and social science research can help reduce that risk. From these lessons, six principles for public interaction and communication stand out: (1) create goodwill now; (2) involve the community early; (3) establish the need; (4) communicate controls, not risk; (5) avoid jargon; (6) understand your public.

  3. Biotechnology Facility: An ISS Microgravity Research Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonda, Steve R.; Tsao, Yow-Min

    2000-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) will support several facilities dedicated to scientific research. One such facility, the Biotechnology Facility (BTF), is sponsored by the Microgravity Sciences and Applications Division (MSAD) and developed at NASA's Johnson Space Center. The BTF is scheduled for delivery to the ISS via Space Shuttle in April 2005. The purpose of the BTF is to provide: (1) the support structure and integration capabilities for the individual modules in which biotechnology experiments will be performed, (2) the capability for human-tended, repetitive, long-duration biotechnology experiments, and (3) opportunities to perform repetitive experiments in a short period by allowing continuous access to microgravity. The MSAD has identified cell culture and tissue engineering, protein crystal growth, and fundamentals of biotechnology as areas that contain promising opportunities for significant advancements through low-gravity experiments. The focus of this coordinated ground- and space-based research program is the use of the low-gravity environment of space to conduct fundamental investigations leading to major advances in the understanding of basic and applied biotechnology. Results from planned investigations can be used in applications ranging from rational drug design and testing, cancer diagnosis and treatments and tissue engineering leading to replacement tissues.

  4. Spent Fuel Working Group Report. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O`Toole, T.

    1993-11-01

    The Department of Energy is storing large amounts of spent nuclear fuel and other reactor irradiated nuclear materials (herein referred to as RINM). In the past, the Department reprocessed RINM to recover plutonium, tritium, and other isotopes. However, the Department has ceased or is phasing out reprocessing operations. As a consequence, Department facilities designed, constructed, and operated to store RINM for relatively short periods of time now store RINM, pending decisions on the disposition of these materials. The extended use of the facilities, combined with their known degradation and that of their stored materials, has led to uncertainties about safety. To ensure that extended storage is safe (i.e., that protection exists for workers, the public, and the environment), the conditions of these storage facilities had to be assessed. The compelling need for such an assessment led to the Secretary`s initiative on spent fuel, which is the subject of this report. This report comprises three volumes: Volume I; Summary Results of the Spent Fuel Working Group Evaluation; Volume II, Working Group Assessment Team Reports and Protocol; Volume III; Operating Contractor Site Team Reports. This volume presents the overall results of the Working Group`s Evaluation. The group assessed 66 facilities spread across 11 sites. It identified: (1) facilities that should be considered for priority attention. (2) programmatic issues to be considered in decision making about interim storage plans and (3) specific vulnerabilities for some of these facilities.

  5. Sustainable Facilities Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Susanne Balslev; Elle, Morten; Hoffmann, Birgitte;

    2004-01-01

    The Danish public housing sector has more than 20 years of experience with sustainable facilities management based on user involvement. The paper outlines this development in a historical perspective and gives an analysis of different approaches to sustainable facilities management. The focus...... is on the housing departments and strateies for the management of the use of resources. The research methods used are case studies based on interviews in addition to literature studies. The paper explores lessons to be learned about sustainable facilities management in general, and points to a need for new...

  6. Studying facility siting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, R.J. [PSRG Consultants Inc. (United States)

    2001-02-01

    The article relates to safety in facility siting and the many factors to be taken into account at an early planning stage. Outline flowcharts for analysing the process for a potential explosion show: Stage 1 -building and hazard identification; Stage 2 -building evaluation and Stage 3 -Risk management. A similar chart relates to analysis for a potential toxic release. A 68-point checklist of factors to be considered in a facility siting study is given. It is pointed out that apart from meeting regulatory requirements, a sound facility siting study can lead to more effective use of resources.

  7. COMMUNICATIONS GROUP

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Taylor

    2010-01-01

    The recently established CMS Communications Group, led by Lucas Taylor, has been busy in all three of its main are areas of responsibility: Communications Infrastructure, Information Systems, and Outreach and Education Communications Infrastructure The damage caused by the flooding of the CMS Centre@CERN on 21st December has been completely repaired and all systems are back in operation. Major repairs were made to the roofs, ceilings and one third of the floor had to be completely replaced. Throughout these works, the CMS Centre was kept operating and even hosted a major press event for first 7 TeV collisions, as described below. Incremental work behind the scenes is steadily improving the quality of the CMS communications infrastructure, particularly Webcasting, video conferencing, and meeting rooms at CERN. CERN/IT is also deploying a pilot service of a new videoconference tool called Vidyo, to assess whether it might provide an enhanced service at a lower cost, compared to the EVO tool currently in w...

  8. COMMUNICATIONS GROUP

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Taylor

    2011-01-01

    Communications Infrastructure The 55 CMS Centres worldwide are well used by physicists working on remote CMS shifts, Computing operations, data quality monitoring, data analysis and outreach. The CMS Centre@CERN in Meyrin is particularly busy at the moment, hosting about 50 physicists taking part in the heavy-ion data-taking and analysis. Three new CMS meeting room will be equipped for videoconferencing in early 2012: 40/5B-08, 42/R-031, and 28/S-029. The CMS-TV service showing LHC Page 1, CMS Page 1, etc. (http://cmsdoc.cern.ch/cmscc/projector/index.jsp) is now also available for mobile devices: http://cern.ch/mcmstv. Figure 12: Screenshots of CMS-TV for mobile devices Information Systems CMS has a new web site: (http://cern.ch/cms) using a modern web Content Management System to ensure content and links are managed and updated easily and coherently. It covers all CMS sub-projects and groups, replacing the iCMS internal pages. It also incorporates the existing CMS public web site (http:/...

  9. COMMUNICATIONS GROUP

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Taylor

    2012-01-01

      Outreach and Education We are fortunate that our research has captured the public imagination, even though this inevitably puts us under the global media spotlight, as we saw with the Higgs seminar at CERN in December, which had 110,000 distinct webcast viewers. The media interest was huge with 71 media organisations registering to come to CERN to cover the Higgs seminar, which was followed by a press briefing with the DG and Spokespersons. This event resulted in about 2,000 generally positive stories in the global media. For this seminar, the CMS Communications Group prepared up-to-date news and public material, including links to the CMS results, animations and event displays [http://cern.ch/go/Ch8thttp://cern.ch/go/Ch8t]. There were 44,000 page-views on the CMS public website, with the Higgs news article being by far the most popular item. CMS event displays from iSpy are fast becoming the iconic media images, featuring on numerous major news outlets (BBC, CNN, MSN...) as well as in the sci...

  10. Skilled nursing or rehabilitation facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000435.htm Skilled nursing or rehabilitation facilities To use the sharing features ... facility. Who Needs to go to a Skilled Nursing or Rehabilitation Facility? Your health care provider may ...

  11. Design of Children Entertainment Facilities

    OpenAIRE

    Mei Li

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, mainly through analysis of problems on existing children entertainment facilities and the impact of children entertainment facilities on children psychological development, it is to be discussed about the key point of children entertainment facilities design.

  12. Hydrography - Water Pollution Control Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — A Water Pollution Control Facility is a DEP primary facility type related to the Water Pollution Control Program. The sub-facility types related to Water Pollution...

  13. National Solar Thermal Test Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The National Solar Thermal Test Facility (NSTTF) is the only test facility in the United States of its type. This unique facility provides experimental engineering...

  14. GPS Satellite Simulation Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The GPS satellite simulation facility consists of a GPS satellite simulator controlled by either a Silicon Graphics Origin 2000 or PC depending upon unit under test...

  15. Frost Effects Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Full-scale study in controlled conditions The Frost Effects Research Facility (FERF) is the largest refrigerated warehouse in the United States that can be used for...

  16. Mark 1 Test Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Mark I Test Facility is a state-of-the-art space environment simulation test chamber for full-scale space systems testing. A $1.5M dollar upgrade in fiscal year...

  17. Combustion Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — For more than 30 years The Combustion Research Facility (CRF) has served as a national and international leader in combustion science and technology. The need for a...

  18. The Birmingham Irradiation Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the end of 2012 the proton irradiation facility at the CERN PS will shut down for two years. With this in mind, we have been developing a new ATLAS scanning facility at the University of Birmingham Medical Physics cyclotron. With proton beams of energy approximately 30 MeV, fluences corresponding to those of the upgraded Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) can be reached conveniently. The facility can be used to irradiate silicon sensors, optical components and mechanical structures (e.g. carbon fibre sandwiches) for the LHC upgrade programme. Irradiations of silicon sensors can be carried out in a temperature controlled cold box that can be scanned through the beam. The facility is described in detail along with the first tests carried out with mini (1×1 cm2) silicon sensors

  19. Dialysis Facility Compare Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — These are the official datasets used on the Medicare.gov Dialysis Facility Compare Website provided by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. These data...

  20. IHS Facility Locator

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This map can be used to find an Indian Health Service, Tribal or Urban Indian Health Program facility. This map can be used to: Zoom in to a general location to...

  1. Electra Laser Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: The Electra Laser Facility is used to develop the science and technology needed to develop a reliable, efficient, high-energy, repetitively pulsed krypton...

  2. College/University Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athletic Business, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Describes the building designs of 117 state-of-the-art of college athletic and recreational facilities, including the educational contexts and design goals. Includes information on architects and designers, construction cost, size, and occupancy date. Also provides photographs. (EV)

  3. Decontamination of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thirty-seven papers were presented at this conference in five sessions. Topics covered include regulation, control and consequences of decontamination; decontamination of components and facilities; chemical and non-chemical methods of decontamination; and TMI decontamination experience

  4. The Birmingham Irradiation Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Dervan, P; Hodgson, P; Marin-Reyes, H; Wilson, J

    2013-01-01

    At the end of 2012 the proton irradiation facility at the CERN PS [1] will shut down for two years. With this in mind, we have been developing a new ATLAS scanning facility at the University of Birmingham Medical Physics cyclotron. With proton beams of energy approximately 30 MeV, fluences corresponding to those of the upgraded Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) can be reached conveniently. The facility can be used to irradiate silicon sensors, optical components and mechanical structures (e.g. carbon fibre sandwiches) for the LHC upgrade programme. Irradiations of silicon sensors can be carried out in a temperature controlled cold box that can be scanned through the beam. The facility is described in detail along with the first tests carried out with mini (1 x 1 cm^2 ) silicon sensors.

  5. Coastal Inlet Model Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Coastal Inlet Model Facility, as part of the Coastal Inlets Research Program (CIRP), is an idealized inlet dedicated to the study of coastal inlets and equipped...

  6. FacilitiesSchools_PTSCHOOL

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — FacilitiesSchools_PTSCHOOL is designed to provide point locations of every Vermont School along with the established school ID (PSID) for geographic analysis of...

  7. Laser Guidance Analysis Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This facility, which provides for real time, closed loop evaluation of semi-active laser guidance hardware, has and continues to be instrumental in the development...

  8. FDA Certified Mammography Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Products Radiation-Emitting Products Home Radiation-Emitting Products Mammography Quality Standards Act and Program Consumer Information (MQSA) ... it Email Print This list of FDA Certified Mammography Facilities is updated weekly. If you click on ...

  9. Environmental Test Facility (ETF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Environmental Test Facility (ETF) provides non-isolated shock testing for stand-alone equipment and full size cabinets under MIL-S-901D specifications. The ETF...

  10. Water Tunnel Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — NETL’s High-Pressure Water Tunnel Facility in Pittsburgh, PA, re-creates the conditions found 3,000 meters beneath the ocean’s surface, allowing scientists to study...

  11. Wind Tunnel Testing Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — NASA Ames Research Center is pleased to offer the services of our premier wind tunnel facilities that have a broad range of proven testing capabilities to customers...

  12. Liquid Effluent Retention Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Liquid Effluent Retention Facility (LERF) is located in the central part of the Hanford Site. LERF is permitted by the State of Washington and has three liquid...

  13. Hypersonic Tunnel Facility (HTF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Hypersonic Tunnel Facility (HTF) is a blow-down, non-vitiated (clean air) free-jet wind tunnel capable of testing large-scale, propulsion systems at Mach 5, 6,...

  14. Healthcare Facility Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — MAP:http://tinyurl.com/HealthcareFacilityLocationsMap The California Department of Public Health (CDPH), Center for Health Care Quality, Licensing and Certification...

  15. Pittsburgh City Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — Pittsburgh City FacilitiesIncludes: City Administrative Buildings, Police Stations, Fire Stations, EMS Stations, DPW Sites, Senior Centers, Recreation Centers,...

  16. Indoor Ground Ejection Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This climate controlled facility is used to evaluate air stores and equipment to determine ejection velocities, store pitch rates, and arming wire and device system...

  17. Robotics Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This 60 feet x 100 feet structure on the grounds of the Fort Indiantown Gap Pennsylvania National Guard (PNG) Base is a mixed-use facility comprising office space,...

  18. Advanced Microscopy Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Provides a facility for high-resolution studies of complex biomolecular systems. The goal is an understanding of how to engineer biomolecules for various...

  19. Air Data Calibration Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This facility is for low altitude subsonic altimeter system calibrations of air vehicles. Mission is a direct support of the AFFTC mission. Postflight data merge is...

  20. Skilled Nursing Facility PPS

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Section 4432(a) of the Balanced Budget Act (BBA) of 1997 modified how payment is made for Medicare skilled nursing facility (SNF) services. Effective with cost...

  1. Ballistic Test Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Ballistic Test Facility is comprised of two outdoor and one indoor test ranges, which are all instrumented for data acquisition and analysis. Full-size aircraft...

  2. Structural Test Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Provides a wide variety of testing equipment, fixtures and facilities to perform both unique aviation component testing as well as common types of materials testing...

  3. Facilities Management and Added Value

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Per Anker

    2010-01-01

    Aim: This paper aims to present different models of the concept of the added value of Facilities Management (FM), including the FM Value Map, which forms the basis of research group in EuroFM, and to present some of the results of this research collaboration. Approach and methodology: The paper...... is based on literature reviews of the most influential journals within the academic fields of FM, Corporate Real Estate Management and Business to Business Marketing and discussions between participants of the research group working on a further exploration and testing of the FM Value Map. Conclusions......: The research shows a number of different definitions and focus points of Added Value of FM, dependent on the academic field and the area of application. The different research perspectives explored a holistic view on the added value of FM by the integration of an external market based view (with a focus...

  4. Nuclear physics accelerator facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brief descriptions are given of DOE and Nuclear Physics program operated and sponsored accelerator facilities. Specific facilities covered are the Argonne Tandem/Linac Accelerator System, the Tandem/AGS Heavy Ion Facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory, the proposed Continuous Beam Accelerator at Newport News, Virginia, the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory at Duke University, the Bevalac and the SuperHILAC at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, the 88-Inch Cyclotron at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory, the Bates Linear Accelerator Center at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the Nuclear Physics Injector at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, the Texas A and M Cyclotrons, the Tandem/Superconducting Booster Accelerator at the University of Washington and the Tandem Van de Graaff at the A.W. Wright Nuclear Structure Laboratory of Yale University. Included are acquisition cost, research programs, program accomplishments, future directions, and operating parameters of each facility

  5. Mound facility physical characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tonne, W.R.; Alexander, B.M.; Cage, M.R.; Hase, E.H.; Schmidt, M.J.; Schneider, J.E.; Slusher, W.; Todd, J.E.

    1993-12-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a baseline physical characterization of Mound`s facilities as of September 1993. The baseline characterizations are to be used in the development of long-term future use strategy development for the Mound site. This document describes the current missions and alternative future use scenarios for each building. Current mission descriptions cover facility capabilities, physical resources required to support operations, current safety envelope and current status of facilities. Future use scenarios identify potential alternative future uses, facility modifications required for likely use, facility modifications of other uses, changes to safety envelope for the likely use, cleanup criteria for each future use scenario, and disposition of surplus equipment. This Introductory Chapter includes an Executive Summary that contains narrative on the Functional Unit Material Condition, Current Facility Status, Listing of Buildings, Space Plans, Summary of Maintenance Program and Repair Backlog, Environmental Restoration, and Decontamination and Decommissioning Programs. Under Section B, Site Description, is a brief listing of the Site PS Development, as well as Current Utility Sources. Section C contains Site Assumptions. A Maintenance Program Overview, as well as Current Deficiencies, is contained within the Maintenance Program Chapter.

  6. Permitting of Wind Energy Facilities: A Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NWCC Siting Work Group

    2002-08-01

    This handbook has been written for individuals and groups involved in evaluating wind projects: decision-makers and agency staff at all levels of government, wind developers, interested parties and the public. Its purpose is to help stakeholders make permitting wind facility decisions in a manner which assures necessary environmental protection and responds to public needs.

  7. Risk management activities at the DOE Class A reactor facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharp, D.A. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Hill, D.J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Linn, M.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Atkinson, S.A. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Hu, J.P. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1993-12-31

    The probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) and risk management group of the Association for Excellence in Reactor Operation (AERO) develops risk management initiatives and standards to improve operation and increase safety of the DOE Class A reactor facilities. Principal risk management applications that have been implemented at each facility are reviewed. The status of a program to develop guidelines for risk management programs at reactor facilities is presented.

  8. Risk management activities at the DOE Class A reactor facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharp, D.A. (Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)); Hill, D.J. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Linn, M.A. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Atkinson, S.A. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)); Hu, J.P. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States))

    1993-01-01

    The probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) and risk management group of the Association for Excellence in Reactor Operation (AERO) develops risk management initiatives and standards to improve operation and increase safety of the DOE Class A reactor facilities. Principal risk management applications that have been implemented at each facility are reviewed. The status of a program to develop guidelines for risk management programs at reactor facilities is presented.

  9. Race, Wealth, and Solid Waste Facilities in North Carolina

    OpenAIRE

    Norton, Jennifer M.; Wing, Steve; Lipscomb, Hester J.; Jay S. Kaufman; Marshall, Stephen W.; Cravey, Altha J.

    2007-01-01

    Background Concern has been expressed in North Carolina that solid waste facilities may be disproportionately located in poor communities and in communities of color, that this represents an environmental injustice, and that solid waste facilities negatively impact the health of host communities. Objective Our goal in this study was to conduct a statewide analysis of the location of solid waste facilities in relation to community race and wealth. Methods We used census block groups to obtain ...

  10. Risk management activities at the DOE Class A reactor facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) and risk management group of the Association for Excellence in Reactor Operation (AERO) develops risk management initiatives and standards to improve operation and increase safety of the DOE Class A reactor facilities. Principal risk management applications that have been implemented at each facility are reviewed. The status of a program to develop guidelines for risk management programs at reactor facilities is presented

  11. Euratom Neutron Radiography Working Group

    OpenAIRE

    Domanus, Joseph Czeslaw

    1986-01-01

    In 1979 a Neutron Radiography Working Group (NRWG) was constituted within Buratom with the participation of all centers within the European Community at which neutron facilities were available. The main purpose of NRWG was to standardize methods and procedures used in neutron radiography of nuclear reactor fuel as well as establish standards for radiographic image quality of neutron radiographs. The NRWG meets once a year in each of the neutron radiography centers to review the progress made ...

  12. 40 CFR 60.560 - Applicability and designation of affected facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... (including expandable polystyrene) manufacturing processes, the affected facilities are each group of... apply to affected facilities involved in the manufacture of polypropylene, polyethylene, polystyrene, or... that are emitted intermittently. (2) For process emissions from polystyrene manufacturing...

  13. AREVA-Aging Management Concepts and Tools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zander, A.; Nopper, H.

    2014-07-01

    n case of long term operation (LTO) it is necessary to ensure that safety and safety relevant systems, structures and components continue to perform their intended functions during long term operation. In order to fulfill these requirements a plant-wide and systematic Aging and Plant Life Management is essential. (Author)

  14. Framatome Owners Group achievement after 15 years of operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braquilanges, Bertrand de; Delporte, Rene [Electrabel s.a., boulevard du Regent 8, 1000 Bruxelles (Belgium); Van Schalkwyk, Andries C. [Eskom, PO Box 1091, Johannesburg 2001 (South Africa)

    2006-07-01

    The Framatome Owners Group was created in 1991 to share the operating experience of five utilities having Framatome plants: - GNPJVC, operating Daya Bay units (China); - EDF with the 900 and 1300 MWe units (France); - Electrabel, operating Tihange 1 and 2 and Doel 3 (Belgium); - Eskom, operating Koeberg 1 and 2 (South Africa); - KHNP, operating Ulchin 1 and 2 (South Korea). LANPC, future operator of Ling Ao units (China) joined the FROG in 2000. The FROG was also opened to operators having bought main components to Framatome ANP, like Ringhals AB (1997 - Sweden) or British Energy (2003 - UK). When requested by operators, working groups and networks of correspondents have been initiated when specific issues needed to be investigated. Today there are five working groups: - Steam Generator Technical Committee, which has been joined also by non full FROG Members: NEK (Krsko, Slovenia), NOK (Beznau, Switzerland), NSP (Prairie Island, USA); - Emergency Operating Procedures WG, in which the non full FROG Member Fortum (Loviisa, Finland) participates; - The Corrosion WG; - The Risk Informed Applications WG; - The Outage Optimization WG. Two networks of specialists operate on aging of mechanical equipment and transformers failures. Through these working groups and networks, Framatome ANP worldwide representatives answer the requests of the FROG members. The assistance of the whole group AREVA is also possible (e.g. T and D coordinates technically the network on transformers). Joint Programs can be initiated when there is a common interest to investigate a topic more deeply, for instance, recent programs in the SGTC aim at reducing sludge amount in the Steam Generator. As regards EOP WG, Members currently focus on a guidance to reduce the risk of sumps clogging issue. The Corrosion Working Group performs an experimental program aiming at studying the effects of surface conditions on the Stress Corrosion Cracking of 182/22 Ni base welds. This induces a large documentation

  15. Facility Environmental Vulnerability Assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From mid-April through the end of June 2001, a Facility Environmental Vulnerability Assessment (FEVA) was performed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The primary goal of this FEVA was to establish an environmental vulnerability baseline at ORNL that could be used to support the Laboratory planning process and place environmental vulnerabilities in perspective. The information developed during the FEVA was intended to provide the basis for management to initiate immediate, near-term, and long-term actions to respond to the identified vulnerabilities. It was expected that further evaluation of the vulnerabilities identified during the FEVA could be carried out to support a more quantitative characterization of the sources, evaluation of contaminant pathways, and definition of risks. The FEVA was modeled after the Battelle-supported response to the problems identified at the High Flux Beam Reactor at Brookhaven National Laboratory. This FEVA report satisfies Corrective Action 3A1 contained in the Corrective Action Plan in Response to Independent Review of the High Flux Isotope Reactor Tritium Leak at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, submitted to the Department of Energy (DOE) ORNL Site Office Manager on April 16, 2001. This assessment successfully achieved its primary goal as defined by Laboratory management. The assessment team was able to develop information about sources and pathway analyses although the following factors impacted the team's ability to provide additional quantitative information: the complexity and scope of the facilities, infrastructure, and programs; the significantly degraded physical condition of the facilities and infrastructure; the large number of known environmental vulnerabilities; the scope of legacy contamination issues [not currently addressed in the Environmental Management (EM) Program]; the lack of facility process and environmental pathway analysis performed by the accountable line management or facility owner; and poor

  16. Facility Environmental Vulnerability Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Hoesen, S.D.

    2001-07-09

    From mid-April through the end of June 2001, a Facility Environmental Vulnerability Assessment (FEVA) was performed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The primary goal of this FEVA was to establish an environmental vulnerability baseline at ORNL that could be used to support the Laboratory planning process and place environmental vulnerabilities in perspective. The information developed during the FEVA was intended to provide the basis for management to initiate immediate, near-term, and long-term actions to respond to the identified vulnerabilities. It was expected that further evaluation of the vulnerabilities identified during the FEVA could be carried out to support a more quantitative characterization of the sources, evaluation of contaminant pathways, and definition of risks. The FEVA was modeled after the Battelle-supported response to the problems identified at the High Flux Beam Reactor at Brookhaven National Laboratory. This FEVA report satisfies Corrective Action 3A1 contained in the Corrective Action Plan in Response to Independent Review of the High Flux Isotope Reactor Tritium Leak at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, submitted to the Department of Energy (DOE) ORNL Site Office Manager on April 16, 2001. This assessment successfully achieved its primary goal as defined by Laboratory management. The assessment team was able to develop information about sources and pathway analyses although the following factors impacted the team's ability to provide additional quantitative information: the complexity and scope of the facilities, infrastructure, and programs; the significantly degraded physical condition of the facilities and infrastructure; the large number of known environmental vulnerabilities; the scope of legacy contamination issues [not currently addressed in the Environmental Management (EM) Program]; the lack of facility process and environmental pathway analysis performed by the accountable line management or facility owner; and

  17. The Decommissioning Facility Characterization DB System (DEFACS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The computer system for the characterization on the nuclear facilities is established as the name of the DEFACS (DEcommissioning FAcility Characterization DB System). his system is consist of the four main part with the grouping of the items and it's code creation and management system, data input system, data processing and data out put system. All the data was processed by a simplified and formatted manner to provide useful information to the decommissioning planner. The four nuclear facilities are objected for the system; the KRR-1 and 2 (Research reactor), Uranium conversion plant (Nuclear chemical plant), UF4 pilot plant and the North Korea nuclear facility (5MWe Research Reactor). All the data from a nuclear facility was categorized and inputted into the several data fields in the input system, which were chosen by considering the facility characteristics. All the hardware is workstation for Web and DB server and PC grade computers for the users and the software 'ORACLE, RDBMS 11g' operated on the WINDOW 2008 O/S, was selected

  18. Berkeley Low Background Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, K. J.; Norman, E. B. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of California-Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, CA 94720 (United States); Smith, A. R.; Poon, A. W. P.; Chan, Y. D. [Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, CA 94720 (United States); Lesko, K. T. [Physics Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, CA 94720 (United States)

    2015-08-17

    The Berkeley Low Background Facility (BLBF) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) in Berkeley, California provides low background gamma spectroscopy services to a wide array of experiments and projects. The analysis of samples takes place within two unique facilities; locally within a carefully-constructed, low background laboratory on the surface at LBNL and at the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Lead, SD. These facilities provide a variety of gamma spectroscopy services to low background experiments primarily in the form of passive material screening for primordial radioisotopes (U, Th, K) or common cosmogenic/anthropogenic products; active screening via neutron activation analysis for U,Th, and K as well as a variety of stable isotopes; and neutron flux/beam characterization measurements through the use of monitors. A general overview of the facilities, services, and sensitivities will be presented. Recent activities and upgrades will also be described including an overview of the recently installed counting system at SURF (recently relocated from Oroville, CA in 2014), the installation of a second underground counting station at SURF in 2015, and future plans. The BLBF is open to any users for counting services or collaboration on a wide variety of experiments and projects.

  19. Comprehensive facilities plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-09-01

    The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory`s Comprehensive Facilities Plan (CFP) document provides analysis and policy guidance for the effective use and orderly future development of land and capital assets at the Berkeley Lab site. The CFP directly supports Berkeley Lab`s role as a multiprogram national laboratory operated by the University of California (UC) for the Department of Energy (DOE). The CFP is revised annually on Berkeley Lab`s Facilities Planning Website. Major revisions are consistent with DOE policy and review guidance. Facilities planing is motivated by the need to develop facilities for DOE programmatic needs; to maintain, replace and rehabilitate existing obsolete facilities; to identify sites for anticipated programmatic growth; and to establish a planning framework in recognition of site amenities and the surrounding community. The CFP presents a concise expression of the policy for the future physical development of the Laboratory, based upon anticipated operational needs of research programs and the environmental setting. It is a product of the ongoing planning processes and is a dynamic information source.

  20. Berkeley Low Background Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Berkeley Low Background Facility (BLBF) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) in Berkeley, California provides low background gamma spectroscopy services to a wide array of experiments and projects. The analysis of samples takes place within two unique facilities; locally within a carefully-constructed, low background laboratory on the surface at LBNL and at the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Lead, SD. These facilities provide a variety of gamma spectroscopy services to low background experiments primarily in the form of passive material screening for primordial radioisotopes (U, Th, K) or common cosmogenic/anthropogenic products; active screening via neutron activation analysis for U,Th, and K as well as a variety of stable isotopes; and neutron flux/beam characterization measurements through the use of monitors. A general overview of the facilities, services, and sensitivities will be presented. Recent activities and upgrades will also be described including an overview of the recently installed counting system at SURF (recently relocated from Oroville, CA in 2014), the installation of a second underground counting station at SURF in 2015, and future plans. The BLBF is open to any users for counting services or collaboration on a wide variety of experiments and projects

  1. Power Systems Development Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of the PSDF would be to provide a modular facility which would support the development of advanced, pilot-scale, coal-based power systems and hot gas clean-up components. These pilot-scale components would be designed to be large enough so that the results can be related and projected to commercial systems. The facility would use a modular approach to enhance the flexibility and capability for testing; consequently, overall capital and operating costs when compared with stand-alone facilities would be reduced by sharing resources common to different modules. The facility would identify and resolve technical barrier, as well as-provide a structure for long-term testing and performance assessment. It is also intended that the facility would evaluate the operational and performance characteristics of the advanced power systems with both bituminous and subbituminous coals. Five technology-based experimental modules are proposed for the PSDF: (1) an advanced gasifier module, (2) a fuel cell test module, (3) a PFBC module, (4) a combustion gas turbine module, and (5) a module comprised of five hot gas cleanup particulate control devices. The final module, the PCD, would capture coal-derived ash and particles from both the PFBC and advanced gasifier gas streams to provide for overall particulate emission control, as well as to protect the combustion turbine and the fuel cell

  2. Business working group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The workshop of 26-27 june 2000, on nuclear power Plant LIfe Management (PLIM), also included working groups in which major issues facing PLIM activities for nuclear power plants were identified and discussed. The third group was on Business. The discussion concerned the following points: There are concerns about retaining experienced/trained personnel, and maintaining a good working relationship among them, as well as about the closure of research facilities, the reduction in staff numbers under increasing economic pressure and the lack of new nuclear power plant constructions. The marginal cost of producing electricity is lower for most existing nuclear power plants than for almost all other energy sources. Refurbishment costs are usually relatively small compared with new investments. The ongoing regulatory reform of the electricity market will bring increasing competition. Although PLIM has been carried out in many countries with favourable results, there are still uncertainties which affect business decisions regarding financial and market risks in PLIM activities. Recommendations were made. (author)

  3. Fifty cell test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arntzen, J. D.; Kolba, V. M.; Miller, W. E.; Gay, E. C.

    1980-07-01

    This report describes the design of a facility capable of the simultaneous testing of up to 50 high-temperature (400 to 500/sup 0/C) lithium alloy/iron sulfide cells; this facility is located in the Chemical Engineering Division of Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The emphasis will be on the lifetime testing of cells fabricated by ANL and industrial contractors to acquire statistical data on the performance of cells of various designs. A computer-based data-acquisition system processes the cell performance data generated from the cells on test. The terminals and part of the data-acquisition equipment are housed in an air-conditioned enclosure adjacent to the testing facility; the computer is located remotely.

  4. Mirror Fusion Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On October 1, 1977 work began at LLL on the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF), an advanced experimental fusion device. Scheduled for operation in late 1981, MFTF is designed as an intermediate step between present mirror machines, such as 2XIIB, and an experimental fusion reactor. This design incorporates improved technology and a better theoretical understanding of how neutral beam injection, plasma guns, and gas injection into the plasma region compensate for cooling and particle losses. With the new facility, we expect to achieve a confinement factor (n tau) of 1012 particles . sm/cm3--a tenfold increase over 2XIIB n tau values--and to increase plasma temperature to over 500 million K. The following article describes this new facility and reports on progress in some of the R and D projects that are providing the technological base for its construction

  5. FUEL HANDLING FACILITY WORKER DOSE ASSESSMENT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this design calculation is to estimate radiation doses received by personnel working in the Fuel Handling Facility (FHF) of the Monitored Geological Repository (MGR). The FHF is a surface facility supporting waste handling operations i.e. receive transportation casks, transfer wastes, prepare waste packages, and ship out loaded waste packages and empty casks. The specific scope of work contained in this calculation covers both collective doses and individual worker group doses on an annual basis, and includes the contributions due to external and internal radiation. The results are also limited to normal operations only. Results of this calculation will be used to support the FHF design and License Application

  6. ICT Adoption in Facilities Management Supply Chain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scupola, Ada

    2012-01-01

    This article involves a qualitative study of factors impacting the adoption of ICT solutions in the Danish facility management supply chain. The results show that there are a number of drivers and barriers that influence the adoption of ICT solutions in this service sector. These have been grouped...... under three major categories: organizational factors including strategic and operational factors; external environmental factors including supplier interdependence and industry characteristics; and technological factors including compatibility and complexity. The study is relevant to researchers...... concerned with ICT adoption, operations and service management (especially facilities management) as well as operation managers and ICT managers....

  7. Line facilities outline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book deals with line facilities. The contents of this book are outline line of wire telecommunication ; development of line, classification of section of line and theory of transmission of line, cable line ; structure of line, line of cable in town, line out of town, domestic cable and other lines, Optical communication ; line of optical cable, transmission method, measurement of optical communication and cable of the sea bottom, Equipment of telecommunication line ; telecommunication line facilities and telecommunication of public works, construction of cable line and maintenance and Regulation of line equipment ; regulation on technique, construction and maintenance.

  8. Bevalac Radiotherapy Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patient Treatment Room at the Bevalac is now in full operation. In the design of this facility, emphasis has been placed on creating an atmosphere appropriate to a clinical facility; the usual features of an irradiation cave have been hidden behind carpets, curtains and paint. Patient positioning is done with a Philips Ram-style couch, with additional fixtures to accommodate a patient in the seated or standing, as well as the supine, position. Dosimetry apparatus, collimators, ion chambers and the beam flattening system used to produce the highly uniform 20 cm diameter therapy field are described

  9. uc(Pegasus) Facility Upgrades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, J. C.; Lewicki, B. T.; Burke, S. P.; Eidietis, N. W.; Fonck, R. J.; Ford, B. A.; Garstka, G. D.; Unterberg, E. A.; Winz, G. R.

    2003-10-01

    Extensive new capabilities have been installed on the uc(Pegasus) ST facility. A new laboratory configuration allows separation of all power systems from the experimental hall. Data acquisition, control, and support facilities have been improved. New magnetic field power supplies utilize unique high-power 2700V IGCT switch modules to provide bipolar waveform control for the high-stress solenoid magnet, while 900V IGBTs provide uni/bipolar control of the PF and TF systems. The coil sets are independently controlled by pulse-width-modulated circuits developed by the HIT group. Capacitor charging, dumping, and monitoring are controlled by a PCI-based multichannel data acquisition and control system. These upgrades will provide: 1) increased V-s and loop voltage control for higher plasma current and suppression of MHD modes; 2) increased toroidal field with fast-ramp capability for improved access to the low-q, high βt regime; and 3) flexible equilibrium field control for radial position and modest shape control.

  10. Food irradiation: Gamma processing facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunstadt, P. [MDS Nordion International, 447 March Road. Kanata, Ontario, K2K148 (Canada)

    1997-12-31

    The number of products being radiation processed is constantly increasing and today include such diverse items as medical disposable, fruits and vegetables, bulk spices, meats, sea foods and waste effluents. Not only do the products differ but also many products, even those within the same groupings, require different minimum and maximum radiation doses. These variations create many different requirements in the irradiator design. The design of Cobalt-60 radiation processing facilities is well established for a number of commercial applications. Installations in over 40 countries, with some in operation since the early 1960s, are testimony to the fact that irradiator design, manufacture, installation and operation is a well established technology. However, in order to design gamma irradiators for the preservation of foods one must recognize those parameters typical to the food irradiation process as well as those systems and methods already well established in the food industry. This paper discusses the basic design concepts for gamma food irradiators. They are most efficient when designed to handle a limited product density range at an established dose. Safety of Cobalt-60 transport, safe facility operation principles and the effect of various processing parameters on economics, will also be discussed. (Author)

  11. Food irradiation: Gamma processing facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The number of products being radiation processed is constantly increasing and today include such diverse items as medical disposable, fruits and vegetables, bulk spices, meats, sea foods and waste effluents. Not only do the products differ but also many products, even those within the same groupings, require different minimum and maximum radiation doses. These variations create many different requirements in the irradiator design. The design of Cobalt-60 radiation processing facilities is well established for a number of commercial applications. Installations in over 40 countries, with some in operation since the early 1960s, are testimony to the fact that irradiator design, manufacture, installation and operation is a well established technology. However, in order to design gamma irradiators for the preservation of foods one must recognize those parameters typical to the food irradiation process as well as those systems and methods already well established in the food industry. This paper discusses the basic design concepts for gamma food irradiators. They are most efficient when designed to handle a limited product density range at an established dose. Safety of Cobalt-60 transport, safe facility operation principles and the effect of various processing parameters on economics, will also be discussed. (Author)

  12. The building of a pluralist expertise group about uranium mines in Limousin (France)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium mining and milling industry once played a major strategic and economic role in France. After the definitive cessation of mining and milling activity in 2001, more than 200 sites are currently under closure and post-closure phases. Decisions required in this frame raise particular difficulties because of the sensitivity of some technical issues and the strong scrutiny and requirements of local and national NGOs. This is particular true in Limousin, the region that stands for the cradle and the heart of the national uranium history. In order to deal with this complex and disputed topic, the ministries of environment, health and industry recently decided to set up a pluralist expertise group with the aim to come to analyze and give a critical point of view on the various technical documents prepared by AREVA NC about the surveillance and control of its mining sites in the department of Haute-Vienne in the Limousin region and than provide recommendations to public authorities to improve current situation. (author)

  13. Facility effluent monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gleckler, B.P.

    1995-06-01

    This section of the 1994 Hanford Site Environmental Report summarizes the facility effluent monitoring programs and provides an evaluation of effluent monitoring data. These evaluations are useful in assessing the effectiveness of effluent treatment and control systems, as well as management practices.

  14. Decommissioning of Nuclear Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic Energy Regulatory Board (AERB) is of the view that every organisation should focus attention on the decommissioning of nuclear facilities after completion of their useful life. AERB is aware that, internationally there is a growing interest in plant life extension due to economic considerations. Regulatory bodies stipulate upgradation of safety features based on international experience and current safety standards. However, decommissioning becomes a necessity at some time after the extended life of the plant. Nuclear industry has demonstrated that, with modern technological developments, decommissioning of nuclear facilities can be carried out without undue risk to the occupational workers, members of the public and protection of the environment. In view of limited experience in the field of decommissioning, this document is being issued as a safety manual instead of a safety guide. This manual elaborates the various technical and safety considerations in the decommissioning of nuclear facilities including ultimate disposal of radioactive materials/ wastes generated during decommissioning. Details that are required to be furnished to the regulatory body while applying for authorisation for decommissioning and till its completion are enumerated. This manual is issued to assist Department of Atomic Energy (DAE) units in formulating a decommissioning programme. Since the subject of decommissioning of nuclear facilities is a continuously evolving process, AERB is of the view, that provisions of this manual will apply for a period of five years from the date of issue and will be subsequently revised, if necessary

  15. Dismantling of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear facilities have a long estimable lifetime but necessarily limited in time. At the end of their operation period, basic nuclear installations are the object of cleansing operations and transformations that will lead to their definitive decommissioning and then to their dismantling. Because each facility is somewhere unique, cleansing and dismantling require specific techniques. The dismantlement consists in the disassembly and disposing off of big equipments, in the elimination of radioactivity in all rooms of the facility, in the demolition of buildings and eventually in the reconversion of all or part of the facility. This article describes these different steps: 1 - dismantling strategy: main de-construction guidelines, expected final state; 2 - industries and sites: cleansing and dismantling at the CEA, EDF's sites under de-construction; 3 - de-construction: main steps, definitive shutdown, preparation of dismantling, electromechanical dismantling, cleansing/decommissioning, demolition, dismantling taken into account at the design stage, management of polluted soils; 4 - waste management: dismantlement wastes, national policy of radioactive waste management, management of dismantlement wastes; 5 - mastery of risks: risk analysis, conformability of risk management with reference documents, main risks encountered at de-construction works; 6 - regulatory procedures; 7 - international overview; 8 - conclusion. (J.S.)

  16. Facility Modernization Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, D; Ackley, R

    2007-05-10

    Modern and technologically up-to-date facilities and systems infrastructure are necessary to accommodate today's research environment. In response, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has a continuing commitment to develop and apply effective management models and processes to maintain, modernize, and upgrade its facilities to meet the science and technology mission. The Facility Modernization Pilot Study identifies major subsystems of facilities that are either technically or functionally obsolete, lack adequate capacity and/or capability, or need to be modernized or upgraded to sustain current operations and program mission. This study highlights areas that need improvement, system interdependencies, and how these systems/subsystems operate and function as a total productive unit. Although buildings are 'grandfathered' in and are not required to meet current codes unless there are major upgrades, this study also evaluates compliance with 'current' building, electrical, and other codes. This study also provides an evaluation of the condition and overall general appearance of the structure.

  17. TNO HVAC facilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hammink, H.A.J.

    2015-01-01

    TNO has extensive knowledge of heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC), and can offer its services through theoretical studies, laboratory experiments and field measurements. This complete scope, made possible through our test facilities, enables the effective development of new products, i

  18. Facilities of Environmental Distinction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascopella, Angela

    2011-01-01

    Three of nine school buildings that have won the latest Educational Facility Design Awards from the American Institute of Architects (AIA) Committee on Architecture for Education stand out from the crowd of other school buildings because they are sustainable and are connected to the nature that surrounds them. They are: (1) Thurston Elementary…

  19. Multipurpose dry storage facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SGN has gained considerable experience in the design and construction of interim storage facilities for spent fuel and various nuclear waste, and can therefore propose single product and multiproduct facilities capable of accommodating all types of waste in a single structure. The pooling of certain functions (transport cask reception, radiation protection), the choice of optimized technologies to meet the specific needs of the clients (automatic transfer by shielded cask or nuclearized crane) and the use of the same type of well to cool the heat releasing packages (glass canisters, fuel elements) make it possible to propose industrially proven and cost effective solutions. The studies conducted by SGN on behalf of the Dutch company COVRA (Centrale Organisatie Voor Radioactif Afval), offer an example of the application of this new concept. This paper first presents the SGN experience through a short description of reference storage facilities for various types of products (MLW, HLW and Spent Fuel). It goes on with a typical application to show how these proven technologies are combined to obtain single product or multiproduct facilities tailored to the client's specific requirements. (author)

  20. Basic nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document reprints the text of the French by-law from February 21, 2002 relative to the information of populations living in the vicinity of a facility for which a particular emergency plan exists. The by-law precises the content of the information documents intended for the populations living in the area of application of the plan. (J.S.)