WorldWideScience

Sample records for arenavirus species indigenous

  1. Sympatric Occurrence of 3 Arenaviruses, Tanzania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Bellocq, Joëlle Goüy; Borremans, Benny; Katakweba, Abdul; Makundi, Rhodes; Baird, Stuart J E; Becker-Ziaja, Beate; Günther, Stephan; Leirs, Herwig

    2010-01-01

    To determine the specificity of Morogoro virus for its reservoir host, we studied its host range and genetic diversity in Tanzania. We found that 2 rodent species other than Mastomys natalensis mice carry arenaviruses. Analysis of 340 nt of the viral RNA polymerase gene showed sympatric occurrenc...... of 3 distinct arenaviruses....

  2. Non-indigenous marine and estuarine species in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolff, W.J.

    2005-01-01

    An overview is presented of non-indigenous marine and estuarine plant and animal species recorded from The Netherlands. In this list both exotic species from outside NW Europe and non-indigenous species from elsewhere in NW Europe are enumerated. Species that have been suggested to be non-indigenous

  3. Predatory efficiency of crayfish: comparison between indigenous and non-indigenous species.

    OpenAIRE

    Renai, B.; Gherardi, F.

    2004-01-01

    The invasive crayfish Procambarus clarkii is highly dispersed within lentic waters in northern and central Italy. It is a polytrophic predator, exerting a strong influence on animal communities, including amphibians, fish, gastropods, and insect larvae. The indigenous speciesAustropotamobius italicus, inhabiting loticwaters, behaves as a generalist – but not opportunistic – species. The object of this study was to compare the predatory pressure exercised by the two species on potential prey, ...

  4. Reverse genetics approaches to combat pathogenic arenaviruses

    OpenAIRE

    de la Torre, Juan C.

    2008-01-01

    Several arenaviruses cause hemorrhagic fever (HF) in humans, and evidence indicates that the worldwide-distributed prototypic arenavirus lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) is a neglected human pathogen of clinical significance. Moreover, arenaviruses pose a biodefense threat. No licensed anti-arenavirus vaccines are available, and current anti-arenavirus therapy is limited to the use of ribavirin, which is only partially effective and is associated with anemia and other side effects. T...

  5. Isolation and characterization of a novel arenavirus harbored by Rodents and Shrews in Zhejiang province, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine the biodiversity of arenaviruses in China, we captured and screened rodents and shrews in Wenzhou city, Zhejiang province, a locality where hemorrhagic fever diseases are endemic in humans. Accordingly, arenaviruses were detected in 42 of 351 rodents from eight species, and in 12 of 272 Asian house shrews (Suncus murinus), by RT-PCR targeting the L segment. From these, a single arenavirus was successfully isolated in cell culture. The virion particles exhibited a typical arenavirus morphology under transmission electron microscopy. Comparison of the S and L segment sequences revealed high levels of nucleotide (>32.2% and >39.6%) and amino acid (>28.8% and >43.8%) sequence differences from known arenaviruses, suggesting that it represents a novel arenavirus, which we designated Wenzhou virus (WENV). Phylogenetic analysis revealed that all WENV strains harbored by both rodents and Asian house shrews formed a distinct lineage most closely related to Old World arenaviruses. - Highlights: • A novel arenavirus (Wenzhou virus) was identified in Zhejiang province, China. • The virus is highly circulating in five species of rats and one species of shrews • More efforts are needed to infer whether it is pathogenic to humans or not

  6. Isolation and characterization of a novel arenavirus harbored by Rodents and Shrews in Zhejiang province, China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Kun [State Key Laboratory for Infectious Disease Prevention and Control, Department of Zoonoses, National Institute for Communicable Disease Control and Prevention, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Changping, Beijing (China); Collaborative Innovation Center for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases, Hangzhou (China); Lin, Xian-Dan [Wenzhou Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Wenzhou, Zhejiang Province (China); Wang, Wen [State Key Laboratory for Infectious Disease Prevention and Control, Department of Zoonoses, National Institute for Communicable Disease Control and Prevention, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Changping, Beijing (China); Collaborative Innovation Center for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases, Hangzhou (China); Shi, Mang [State Key Laboratory for Infectious Disease Prevention and Control, Department of Zoonoses, National Institute for Communicable Disease Control and Prevention, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Changping, Beijing (China); Wencheng Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Wenzhou, Zhejiang Province (China); Guo, Wen-Ping [State Key Laboratory for Infectious Disease Prevention and Control, Department of Zoonoses, National Institute for Communicable Disease Control and Prevention, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Changping, Beijing (China); Collaborative Innovation Center for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases, Hangzhou (China); Zhang, Xiao-He [Wenzhou Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Wenzhou, Zhejiang Province (China); Xing, Jian-Guang [Wencheng Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Wenzhou, Zhejiang Province (China); and others

    2015-02-15

    To determine the biodiversity of arenaviruses in China, we captured and screened rodents and shrews in Wenzhou city, Zhejiang province, a locality where hemorrhagic fever diseases are endemic in humans. Accordingly, arenaviruses were detected in 42 of 351 rodents from eight species, and in 12 of 272 Asian house shrews (Suncus murinus), by RT-PCR targeting the L segment. From these, a single arenavirus was successfully isolated in cell culture. The virion particles exhibited a typical arenavirus morphology under transmission electron microscopy. Comparison of the S and L segment sequences revealed high levels of nucleotide (>32.2% and >39.6%) and amino acid (>28.8% and >43.8%) sequence differences from known arenaviruses, suggesting that it represents a novel arenavirus, which we designated Wenzhou virus (WENV). Phylogenetic analysis revealed that all WENV strains harbored by both rodents and Asian house shrews formed a distinct lineage most closely related to Old World arenaviruses. - Highlights: • A novel arenavirus (Wenzhou virus) was identified in Zhejiang province, China. • The virus is highly circulating in five species of rats and one species of shrews • More efforts are needed to infer whether it is pathogenic to humans or not.

  7. Benthic non-indigenous species among indigenous species and their habitat preferences in Puck Bay (southern Baltic Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urszula Janas

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available To date 11 non-indigenous benthic taxa have been reported in Puck Bay (southern Baltic Sea. Five of the 34 taxa forming the soft bottom communities are regarded as non-indigenous to this area. They are Marenzelleria spp., Mya arenaria, Potamopyrgus antipodarum, Gammarus tigrinus and Amphibalanus improvisus. Non-indigenous species comprised up to 33% of the total number of identified macrofaunal taxa (mean 17%. The average proportion of aliens was 6% (max 46% in the total abundance of macrofauna, and 10% (max 65% in the biomass. A significant positive relationship was found between the numbers of native taxa and non-indigenous species. The number of native taxa was significantly higher on a sea bed covered with vascular plants than on an unvegetated one, but no such relationship was found for their abundance. No significant differences were found in the number and abundance of non-indigenous species between sea beds devoid of vegetation and those covered with vascular plants, Chara spp. or mats of filamentous algae. G. tigrinus preferred a sea bed with vegetation, whereas Marenzelleria spp. decidedly preferred one without vegetation.

  8. Morphological Research on Indigenous Sambucus Species Pollen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mircea TAMAS

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The pollen grains have a definite shape, size, colour, structure for each species, genus and family and these characters are useful for systematical botany. The pollen has nutritive properties due to its content: proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, vitamins, hormones and minerals. In the Romanian flora vegetate three species of Sambucus, but only S. nigra L. (elder or black elder supplies a vegetal medical product, Sambuci flos or elder flowers, whereas the others species S. ebulus L. (dwarf elder and S. racemosa L. (mountain elder or red elder are considered adulterations. The pollen of Sambucus species were already studied using optical microscopy (Tarnavschi et al., but the images are in one single layout, therefore the structure details cannot be easily notice. In this context the pollen grains of the three species already mentioned above were studied by SEM (Scanning Electron Microscopy. The results demonstrated that this pollen have a small-middle size, oblat-sphaeroidal-prolat shape, threecolpat and the exine adornments are of reticulate type, haemitectate with sticks in the meshs of polygonale net. The flavonoids content is lower than in others species (0.146-0.564 %. The SEM analyse of Sambucus pollen allow a reliable identification of the genus but less for the species.

  9. New insights into the evolutionary relationships between arenaviruses provided by comparative analysis of small and large segment sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arenaviruses are rodent-borne negative-stranded bisegmented RNA viruses. Five arenaviruses are etiologic agents of hemorrhagic fever in humans and are potential agents of bioterrorism. They are classified as Biosafety level 4 agents and listed in the category A of the Pathogen Agents edited by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention. To date, evolution and phylogeny of arenaviruses have been based on the analysis of sequences derived from structural genes (small RNA segment) exclusively, due to the lack of sequences available for the large RNA segment. In this study, partial sequences of the polymerase gene were determined for 18 species of arenaviruses and used to investigate phylogenetic relationships. Comparative analysis of topologies obtained from polymerase and structural gene analyses permitted us to determine the evolutionary origin of the major parent of the North American recombinant arenaviruses, and to investigate the role of genetic exchange (reassortment and recombination) in the evolutionary mechanisms driving the evolution of the genus Arenavirus

  10. Isolation, identification, and characterization of novel arenaviruses, the etiological agents of boid inclusion body disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hetzel, Udo; Sironen, Tarja; Laurinmäki, Pasi; Liljeroos, Lassi; Patjas, Aino; Henttonen, Heikki; Vaheri, Antti; Artelt, Annette; Kipar, Anja; Butcher, Sarah J; Vapalahti, Olli; Hepojoki, Jussi

    2013-10-01

    Boid inclusion body disease (BIBD) is a progressive, usually fatal disease of constrictor snakes, characterized by cytoplasmic inclusion bodies (IB) in a wide range of cell types. To identify the causative agent of the disease, we established cell cultures from BIBD-positive and -negative boa constrictors. The IB phenotype was maintained in cultured cells of affected animals, and supernatants from these cultures caused the phenotype in cultures originating from BIBD-negative snakes. Viruses were purified from the supernatants by ultracentrifugation and subsequently identified as arenaviruses. Purified virus also induced the IB phenotype in naive cells, which fulfilled Koch's postulates in vitro. One isolate, tentatively designated University of Helsinki virus (UHV), was studied in depth. Sequencing confirmed that UHV is a novel arenavirus species that is distinct from other known arenaviruses including those recently identified in snakes with BIBD. The morphology of UHV was established by cryoelectron tomography and subtomographic averaging, revealing the trimeric arenavirus spike structure at 3.2-nm resolution. Immunofluorescence, immunohistochemistry, and immunoblotting with a polyclonal rabbit antiserum against UHV and reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) revealed the presence of genetically diverse arenaviruses in a large cohort of snakes with BIBD, confirming the causative role of arenaviruses. Some snakes were also found to carry arenavirus antibodies. Furthermore, mammalian cells (Vero E6) were productively infected with UHV, demonstrating the potential of arenaviruses to cross species barriers. In conclusion, we propose the newly identified lineage of arenaviruses associated with BIBD as a novel taxonomic entity, boid inclusion body disease-associated arenaviruses (BIBDAV), in the family Arenaviridae. PMID:23926354

  11. Reverse Genetics Approaches to Control Arenavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Sobrido, Luis; Cheng, Benson Yee Hin; de la Torre, Juan Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Several arenavirus cause hemorrhagic fever disease in humans and pose a significant public health problem in their endemic regions. To date, no licensed vaccines are available to combat human arenavirus infections, and anti-arenaviral drug therapy is limited to an off-label use of ribavirin that is only partially effective. The development of arenavirus reverse genetics approaches provides investigators with a novel and powerful approach for the investigation of the arenavirus molecular and cell biology. The use of cell-based minigenome systems has allowed examining the cis- and trans-acting factors involved in arenavirus replication and transcription and the identification of novel anti-arenaviral drug targets without requiring the use of live forms of arenaviruses. Likewise, it is now feasible to rescue infectious arenaviruses entirely from cloned cDNAs containing predetermined mutations in their genomes to investigate virus-host interactions and mechanisms of pathogenesis, as well as to facilitate screens to identify anti-arenaviral drugs and development of novel live-attenuated arenavirus vaccines. Recently, reverse genetics have also allowed the generation of tri-segmented arenaviruses expressing foreign genes, facilitating virus detection and opening the possibility of implementing live-attenuated arenavirus-based vaccine vector approaches. Likewise, the development of single-cycle infectious, reporter-expressing, arenaviruses has provided a new experimental method to study some aspects of the biology of highly pathogenic arenaviruses without the requirement of high-security biocontainment required to study HF-causing arenaviruses. In this chapter we summarize the current knowledge on arenavirus reverse genetics and the implementation of plasmid-based reverse genetics techniques for the development of arenavirus vaccines and vaccine vectors. PMID:27076139

  12. Fuelwood characteristics of selected indigenous tree species from central India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, R.K.; Singh, B. [National Botanical Research Institute, Lucknow (India)

    1999-06-01

    Thirty tree species indigenously growing in their natural habitat in subtropical forest of central India were collected and fuelwood properties viz, moisture, silica, ash, density, carbon, nitrogen, volatile matter, calorific value and fuel value index (FVI) calculated to screen desirable species for potential production of fuelwood in these areas. The present study revealed that Acer oblongum, Betula alonoides, Grevillea robusta, Limonia acidissima, Lyonia ovalifolia, Madhuca indica, Melia azedarch, Morinda tinctoria, Myrica sapida, Prunus cornuta, Pyrus pashia, Quercus langinosa, Rhamnus triqueter and Stereospermum xylocarpum possess excellent fuelwood qualities. (Author)

  13. Arenavirus Coinfections Are Common in Snakes with Boid Inclusion Body Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepojoki, J; Salmenperä, P; Sironen, T; Hetzel, U; Korzyukov, Y; Kipar, A; Vapalahti, O

    2015-08-01

    Recently, novel arenaviruses were found in snakes with boid inclusion body disease (BIBD); these form the new genus Reptarenavirus within the family Arenaviridae. We used next-generation sequencing and de novo sequence assembly to investigate reptarenavirus isolates from our previous study. Four of the six isolates and all of the samples from snakes with BIBD contained at least two reptarenavirus species. The viruses sequenced comprise four novel reptarenavirus species and a representative of a new arenavirus genus. PMID:26041290

  14. REVIEW:Species diversity of indigenous fruits in Indonesia and its potential.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TAHAN UJI

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Indonesia is rich of species diversity of indigenous fruits. The results of study reported that there are 266 species of indigenous fruits encountered in Indonesia and 62 species of them are cultivated. Four genera of indigenous fruits are recommended to developed in Indonesia, i.e. Durio, Mangifera, Garcinia and Nephelium. This study also reported that duku (Lansium domesticum, salak (Salacca zalacca, buah merah (Pandanus conoideus, and matoa (Pometia pinnata have a good prospect also to be developed in Indonesia.

  15. Comments on increasing number and abundance of non-indigenous aquatic macrophyte species in Germany

    OpenAIRE

    Hussner, Andreas; van de Weyer, Klaus; Gross, Elisabeth; Hilt, Sabine

    2010-01-01

    Non-indigenous aquatic plants are a major cause of biodiversity loss in many countries. In this study, our own field data and a literature review have been used to get an overview of the history and the present distribution of non-indigenous aquatic plant species in Germany. Results show that the number of non-indigenous aquatic plant species in Germany rose from 1 in 1860 to 12 in 1980, but doubled to 24 during the following 29 years. Thirteen of these species are naturalised in at least one...

  16. Indigenous fish species in the modern ichthyofauna of the Balkhash basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadir Shamilevich Mamilov

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Indigenous fish fauna of the Balkhash basin was mostly formed in the postglacial period and consists of 10 species from Cyprinidae family, 5 from Balitoridae, and 1 from Percidae. More than 20 alien fish species were introduced here during XXth century that led to eradication of indigenous fishes from the Balkhash Lake and the Ili River. Our investigations of the fish fauna during last 25 years revealed permanent shortage of living area of indigenous fishes. Nowadays fish communities from only indigenous fish species exist in some remote and isolated water bodies. Areas of all indigenous fish species are become disconnected. Reduction of habitats goes relatively slow for naked osman Gymnodiptychus dybowskii (Kessler, 1874, spotted thicklip loach Triplophysa strauchii (Kessler, 1874, and gray loach Triplophysa dorsalis (Kessler, 1872. Drastic reductions of areas were revealed for Ili marinka Schizothorax pseudoaksaiensis Herzenstein 1889, Balkhash marinka Schizothorax argentatus Kessler 1874, Severtsov’s loach Triplophysa sewerzowii (G.Nikolskii, 1938, Seven River’s minnow Phoxinus brachyurus Berg 1912, Balkhsh minnow Rhynchocypris poljakowii Kessler 1879, and Balkhash perch Perca schrenkii Kessler 1874. Marinkas, osmans and perch often become victims of overfishing and poaching of local people. In that region water resources usually are used by wasteful way and loaded with pollutants. Many indigenous fish species are able to bear relatively high level of environment pollution. Hence, the main threats for indigenous fishes are introductions of trout and sander, habitats lose and unstable hydrological regimen.

  17. Molecular Mechanism of Arenavirus Assembly and Budding

    OpenAIRE

    Shuzo Urata; Jiro Yasuda

    2012-01-01

    Arenaviruses have a bisegmented negative-strand RNA genome, which encodes four viral proteins: GP and NP by the S segment and L and Z by the L segment. These four viral proteins possess multiple functions in infection, replication and release of progeny viruses from infected cells. The small RING finger protein, Z protein is a matrix protein that plays a central role in viral assembly and budding. Although all arenaviruses encode Z protein, amino acid sequence alignment showed a huge variety ...

  18. Novel arenavirus sequences in Hylomyscus sp. and Mus (Nannomys setulosus from Cote d'Ivoire: implications for evolution of arenaviruses in Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Coulibaly-N'Golo

    Full Text Available This study aimed to identify new arenaviruses and gather insights in the evolution of arenaviruses in Africa. During 2003 through 2005, 1,228 small mammals representing 14 different genera were trapped in 9 villages in south, east, and middle west of Côte d'Ivoire. Specimens were screened by pan-Old World arenavirus RT-PCRs targeting S and L RNA segments as well as immunofluorescence assay. Sequences of two novel tentative species of the family Arenaviridae, Menekre and Gbagroube virus, were detected in Hylomyscus sp. and Mus (Nannomys setulosus, respectively. Arenavirus infection of Mus (Nannomys setulosus was also demonstrated by serological testing. Lassa virus was not found, although 60% of the captured animals were Mastomys natalensis. Complete S RNA and partial L RNA sequences of the novel viruses were recovered from the rodent specimens and subjected to phylogenetic analysis. Gbagroube virus is a closely related sister taxon of Lassa virus, while Menekre virus clusters with the Ippy/Mobala/Mopeia virus complex. Reconstruction of possible virus-host co-phylogeny scenarios suggests that, within the African continent, signatures of co-evolution might have been obliterated by multiple host-switching events.

  19. REVIEW: The Diversity of Indigenous Honey Bee Species of Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SOESILAWATI HADISOESILO

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been known that Indonesia has the most diverse honey bee species in the world. At least five out of nine species of honey bees are native to Indonesia namely Apis andreniformis, A. dorsata, A. cerana, A. koschevnikovi, and A. nigrocincta. One species, A. florea, although it was claimed to be a species native to Indonesia, it is still debatable whether it is really found in Indonesia or not. The new species, A. nuluensis, which is found in Sabah, Borneo is likely to be found in Kalimantan but it has not confirmed yet. This paper discusses briefly the differences among those native honey bees.

  20. The Marine Live Bait Trade in California: A Pathway for Introduction of Non-Indigenous Species?

    OpenAIRE

    Passarelli, Bruno

    2010-01-01

    Several species of marine invertebrates are imported into California for use as live bait in recreational fishing. I investigated the marine live bait trade in California as a potential introduction pathway for non-indigenous species (NIS). I estimated that ~1,900,000 ghost shrimp (Neotrypaea californiensis), ~575,000 bloodworms (Glycera dibranchiata), ~600,000 pileworms Nereis virens), and ~1,100,000 lugworms (Perinereis sp.), and are imported annually into California from different parts of...

  1. Animal Models, Prophylaxis, and Therapeutics for Arenavirus Infections

    OpenAIRE

    Eric Vela

    2012-01-01

    Arenaviruses are enveloped, bipartite negative single-stranded RNA viruses that can cause a wide spectrum of disease in humans and experimental animals including hemorrhagic fever. The majority of these viruses are rodent-borne and the arenavirus family can be divided into two groups: the Lassa-Lymphocytic choriomeningitis serocomplex and the Tacaribe serocomplex. Arenavirus-induced disease may include characteristic symptoms ranging from fever, malaise, body aches, petechiae, dehydration, he...

  2. Arenavirus Coinfections Are Common in Snakes with Boid Inclusion Body Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Hepojoki, J.; Salmenperä, P.; Sironen, T.; Hetzel, U.; Korzyukov, Y.; Kipar, A.; Vapalahti, O.

    2015-01-01

    Recently, novel arenaviruses were found in snakes with boid inclusion body disease (BIBD); these form the new genus Reptarenavirus within the family Arenaviridae. We used next-generation sequencing and de novo sequence assembly to investigate reptarenavirus isolates from our previous study. Four of the six isolates and all of the samples from snakes with BIBD contained at least two reptarenavirus species. The viruses sequenced comprise four novel reptarenavirus species and a representative of...

  3. Saussurea species in Indian Himalayan Region: diversity, distribution and indigenous uses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jitendra Singh Butola

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available In spite of the high economic value of the Saussurea species in the Indian Himalayan Region (IHR, the potential of most of the species is yet to be investigated. Therefore, an attempt has been made to study the diversity, distribution, habitat preference, nativity, endemism, status and indigenous uses of Saussurea species in the IHR. A total of 62 species were recorded from the IHR; of these, 37 species were native to the Himalayan region, 8 were endemic and 21 were near endemic to the IHR. Twenty-seven of the 28 species that were known to have indigenous uses also had medicinal value and are used for the treatment of various diseases/ailments. Many species, e.g., S. affinis (Ganga Mula*, S. auriculata (Pachak Kut, S. bracteata (Prerak Mul, S. costus (Kuth, S. gossypiphora (Kasturi Kamal and S. obvallata (Brahm Kamal, have multiple uses. The genus showed high habitat specificity in that 16 species were recorded to be restricted to one or two habitats only. As many as 44 species were identified as rare in the study region. Considering the high industrial demand for raw materials and the endangered status of S. costus, S. gossypiphora, S. obvallata and S. simpsoniana (Fen Kamal, these species should be prioritized for conservation (in situ and ex situ throughout the IHR. Population assessment of the rare-endangered, native, endemic and economically important species using standard ecological methods has been suggested for the quantification of the existing stock of these species in their natural habitats. Further, phyto-chemical investigations for the identification of active ingredients are suggested. Propagation and cultivation techniques are lacking for most of the species of Saussurea except for S. costus, S. obvallata and S. medusa (Snow Lotus. Furthermore, the native communities need to be sensitized to the sustainable use and conservation value of the species in this genus. *Local names given in parentheses throughout are in the Pahari

  4. Abundance modelling of invasive and indigenous Culicoides species in Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Els Ducheyne

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present a novel methodology applied in Spain to model spatial abundance patterns of potential vectors of disease at a medium spatial resolution of 5 x 5 km using a countrywide database with abundance data for five Culicoides species, random regression Forest modelling and a spatial dataset of ground measured and remotely sensed eco-climatic and environmental predictor variables. First the probability of occurrence was computed. In a second step a direct regression between the probability of occurrence and trap abundance was established to verify the linearity of the relationship. Finally the probability of occurrence was used in combination with the set of predictor variables to model abundance. In each case the variable importance of the predictors was used to biologically interpret results and to compare both model outputs, and model performance was assessed using four different accuracy measures. Results are shown for C. imicola, C. newsteadii, C. pulicaris group, C. punctatus and C. obsoletus group. In each case the probability of occurrence is a good predictor of abundance at the used spatial resolution of 5 x 5 km. In addition, the C. imicola and C. obsoletus group are highly driven by summer rainfall. The spatial pattern is inverse between the two species, indicating that the lower and upper thresholds are different. C. pulicaris group is mainly driven by temperature. The patterns for C. newsteadii and C. punctatus are less clear. It is concluded that the proposed methodology can be used as an input to transmission-infection-recovery (TIR models and R0 models. The methodology will become available to the general public as part of the VECMAPTM software.

  5. Comparison of ecophysiological characteristics between introduced and indigenous mangrove species in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Luzhen; Tam, Nora F. Y.; Huang, Jianhui; Zeng, Xueqin; Meng, Xiangli; Zhong, Cairong; Wong, Yuk-shan; Lin, Guanghui

    2008-09-01

    Due to its rapid growth, the introduced mangrove species Sonneratia apetala from Bangladesh has been widely used in mangrove restoration in southeastern China since 1985. As an indigenous mangrove species in Hainan, China, Sonneratia caseolaris was also planted in Guangdong Province for afforestation purposes. Both species have developed well in their new habitats, but their ecophysiological differences with the native mangrove species have not been studied. In this study, leaf gas exchange, water and nitrogen use efficiencies of two Sonneratia species were compared with those of selected native mangrove species ( Avicennia marina, Aegiceras corniculatum, Kandelia candel, and Excoecaria agallocha) in Hainan and Shenzhen. The introduced S. apetala maintained lower carbon assimilation rate ( A) and photosynthetic nitrogen use efficiency (PNUE) than the indigenous S. caseolaris. In Shenzhen, the two introduced Sonneratia had comparable photosynthetic rates and water use efficiency (WUE) with the native mangrove species, except that PNUE in S. caseolaris was significantly higher than in the native mangrove species. The two Sonneratia species showed significant overlap in PNUE and long-term WUE. Photosynthetic parameters derived from leaf photosynthetic light-response curves and A- Ci curves also suggested lower carbon assimilation capacities for the introduced Sonneratia than for the native mangrove species in both study sites. The lower light compensation point (LCP) of two introduced Sonneratia in both study sites also indicated a better adaptation to a low light regime than the native mangrove species. The results of photosynthetic capacities indicated that the introduced mangrove species have little competitive advantage over local native mangrove species in their respective new habitats.

  6. Antioxidant Activities and Phytochemical Study of Leaf Extracts from 18 Indigenous Tree Species in Taiwan

    OpenAIRE

    Ho, Shang-Tse; Tung, Yu-Tang; Chen, Yong-Long; Zhao, Ying-Ying; Chung, Min-Jay; Wu, Jyh-Horng

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study is to assess antioxidant activities of methanolic extracts from the leaves of 18 indigenous tree species in Taiwan. Results revealed that, among 18 species, Acer oliverianum exhibited the best free radical scavenging activities. The IC50 values were 5.8 and 11.8 μg/mL on DPPH radical and superoxide radical scavenging activities, respectively. In addition, A. oliverianum also exhibited the strongest ferrous ion chelating activity. Based on a bioactivity-guided isola...

  7. A review of the ever increasing threat to European crayfish from non-indigenous crayfish species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.M. Holdich

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Non-indigenous crayfish species (NICS in Europe now outnumber indigenous crayfish species (ICS 2:1, and it has been predicted that they may dominate completely in the next few decades unless something is done to protect them. Of the ten NICS introduced at least nine have become established in areas occupied by four of the five ICS. A decline in stocks of ICS has been recorded in many countries in the face of increasing populations of NICS. Most European countries retain at least one ICS but all are under threat from habitat loss, deteriorating water quality, overfishing, climate change, and most importantly from NICS and crayfish plague. The threat to ICS is so great in some countries that “ark”sanctuary sites are being established.The three most widely-spread NICS are the North American species: Pacifastacus leniusculus, Orconectes limosus and Procambarus clarkii. These can be considered as “Old NICS”, which were introduced before 1975, compared with the “New NICS”, which were introduced after 1980, such as the North American species: Orconectes immunis, Orconectes juvenilis, Orconectes virilis, Procambarus sp. and Procambarus acutus; and the Australian species: Cherax destructor and Cherax quadricarinatus, all of which have much narrower ranges in Europe. The North American species are potentially capable of acting as vectors of crayfish plague. Outbreaks of this disease occur regularly where there are high concentrations of vectors.In addition to the NICS currently established in the wild, a further threat exists through the aquarium trade, where many American and Australian species are available via the internet and in aquarist centres. Owners of such species may discard them into the freshwater environment when they grow too big as with some Cherax spp. and Orconectes spp., or multiply too frequently as with Procambarus sp. (a parthenogenetic species. A conceptual model is presented as a possible way forward for protecting the

  8. Radionuclides in the indigenous fish species of the Chernobyl exclusion zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of the specific activity of 90Sr and 137Cs estimation at the indigenous representatives of fish fauna in water bodies of the Chernobyl exclusion zone are presented during 2006 - 2011. The data of species specificity of radionuclide accumulation and distributing in different organs and tissues of pray and predatory fishes in water bodies with different hydrological regime and level of radioactive contamination are analyzed. The size, weight and age dynamics of radionuclide accumulation in fish are evaluated. It is note, that presently 90Sr is main dose-formed radionuclide for fishes of stagnant water bodies of the Chernobyl exclusion zone.

  9. Socio-economic drivers and non-indigenous freshwater crayfish species in Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perdikaris Costas

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Non-indigenous freshwater crayfish species (NICS outnumber the indigenous ones in many European countries, representing a major threat to biodiversity via the spread of crayfish ‘plague’ and aggressive invasion and antagonism performance. Although the biological basis of this situation is well studied, the possible role of social, economic and demographic factors on this situation has been ignored. In an attempt to explore such relationships, we suggest that human population density and economic growth (measured as gross domestic product (GDP per capita are positively related to the increased number of NICS in the EU area. Moreover, this pattern is evident in countries with higher overall footprint (i.e. the human demand of biologically productive land and sea in global hectares required to provide resources and services on waste assimilation compared to biocapacity. Within the above context, actions are urgently needed to restore/balance existing and projected metabolic rifts (i.e. ruptures in the normal metabolic processes in natural systems created by the presence of NICS.

  10. In vitro antimicrobial activity and phytochemical screening of clematis species indigenous to Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Hawaze

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The leaves extracts of two indigenous plants of Ethiopia: Clematis longicauda steud ex A. Rich. and Clematis burgensis Engl. are used in Southwestern Ethiopia to treat otorrhoea and eczema. Antimicrobial activity and MIC of crude extracts were determined by disk diffusion and broth dilution. Phytochemical screening was performed on the extracts. The methanol and petroleum ether extracts of both plants showed antibacterial and antifungal activity. Sensitivity of reference strains was concentration dependent. Methanol and petroleum ether extracts of C. burgensis leaves exerted greater inhibitory effects than C. longicauda extracts whereas aqueous extracts of both plants were inactive. The MIC study revealed a concentration of 0.78 mg/ml on bacteria and 3.125 mg/ml on fungi for methanol extract and 1.56 mg/ml on both fungi and bacteria for petroleum ether extract. Phytochemical screening results indicated the presence of proteins, fixed oils, carbohydrates, tannins, saponins, flavonoids, and steroids. Preliminary chromatographic investigation showed fluorescing spots with R f values that ranged from 0.05 to 0.96 for phenolic compounds and saponins. As the study is one of the first reports on the two indigenous species of Clematis; isolation, purification and characterization of the different primary and secondary metabolites may further yield alternative options to the microbial chemotherapy.

  11. In vitro Antimicrobial Activity and Phytochemical Screening of Clematis Species Indigenous to Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawaze, S; Deti, H; Suleman, S

    2012-01-01

    THE LEAVES EXTRACTS OF TWO INDIGENOUS PLANTS OF ETHIOPIA: Clematis longicauda steud ex A. Rich. and Clematis burgensis Engl. are used in Southwestern Ethiopia to treat otorrhoea and eczema. Antimicrobial activity and MIC of crude extracts were determined by disk diffusion and broth dilution. Phytochemical screening was performed on the extracts. The methanol and petroleum ether extracts of both plants showed antibacterial and antifungal activity. Sensitivity of reference strains was concentration dependent. Methanol and petroleum ether extracts of C. burgensis leaves exerted greater inhibitory effects than C. longicauda extracts whereas aqueous extracts of both plants were inactive. The MIC study revealed a concentration of 0.78 mg/ml on bacteria and 3.125 mg/ml on fungi for methanol extract and 1.56 mg/ml on both fungi and bacteria for petroleum ether extract. Phytochemical screening results indicated the presence of proteins, fixed oils, carbohydrates, tannins, saponins, flavonoids, and steroids. Preliminary chromatographic investigation showed fluorescing spots with R(f) values that ranged from 0.05 to 0.96 for phenolic compounds and saponins. As the study is one of the first reports on the two indigenous species of Clematis; isolation, purification and characterization of the different primary and secondary metabolites may further yield alternative options to the microbial chemotherapy. PMID:23204619

  12. Assessment of potential indigenous plant species for the phytoremediation of arsenic-contaminated areas of Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmud, Rezwanul; Inoue, Naoto; Kasajima, Shin-Ya; Shaheen, Riffat

    2008-01-01

    Soil and water contaminated with arsenic (As) pose a major environmental and human health problem in Bangladesh. Phytoremediation, a plant-based technology, may provide an economically viable solution for remediating the As-polluted sites. The use of indigenous plants with a high tolerance and accumulation capacity for As may be a very convenient approach for phytoremediation. To assess the potential of native plant species for phytoremediation, plant and soil samples were collected from four As-contaminated (groundwater) districts in Bangladesh. The main criteria used for selecting plants for phytoremediation were high bioconcentration factors (BCFs) and translocation factors (TFs) of As. From the results of a screening of 49 plant species belonging to 29 families, only one species of fern (Dryopteris filix-mas), three herbs (Blumea lacera, Mikania cordata, and Ageratum conyzoides), and two shrubs (Clerodendrum trichotomum and Ricinus communis) were found to be suitable for phytoremediation. Arsenic bioconcentration and translocation factors > 1 suggest that these plants are As-tolerant accumulators with potential use in phytoextraction. Three floating plants (Eichhornia crassipes, Spirodela polyrhiza, and Azolla pinnata) and a common wetland weed (Monochoria vaginalis) also showed high BCF and TF values; therefore, these plants may be promising candidates for cleaningup As-contaminated surface water and wetland areas. The BCF of Oryza sativa, obtained from As-contaminated districts was > 1, which highlights possible food-chain transfer issues for As-contaminated areas in Bangladesh. PMID:18709925

  13. Methanogen Diversity in Indigenous and Introduced Ruminant Species on the Tibetan Plateau.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiao Dan; Martinez-Fernandez, Gonzalo; Padmanabha, Jagadish; Long, Ruijun; Denman, Stuart E; McSweeney, Christopher S

    2016-01-01

    Host factors are regarded as important in shaping the archaeal community in the rumen but few controlled studies have been performed to demonstrate this across host species under the same environmental conditions. A study was designed to investigate the structure of the methanogen community in the rumen of two indigenous (yak and Tibetan sheep) and two introduced domestic ruminant (cattle and crossbred sheep) species raised and fed under similar conditions on the high altitude Tibetan Plateau. The methylotrophic Methanomassiliicoccaceae was the predominant archaeal group in all animals even though Methanobrevibacter are usually present in greater abundance in ruminants globally. Furthermore, within the Methanomassiliicoccaceae family members from Mmc. group 10 and Mmc. group 4 were dominant in Tibetan Plateau ruminants compared to Mmc. group 12 found to be highest in other ruminants studied. Small ruminants presented the highest number of sequences that belonged to Methanomassiliicoccaceae compared to the larger ruminants. Although the methanogen community structure was different among the ruminant species, there were striking similarities between the animals in this environment. This indicates that factors such as the extreme environmental conditions and diet on the Tibetan Plateau might have a greater impact on rumen methanogen community compared to host differences. PMID:27274707

  14. Energetic evaluation of indigenous tree and shrub species in Basilicata, Southern Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todaro L

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available An evaluation of energetic characteristics such as high calorific value (on ash-free dry weight basis, ash, carbon, nitrogen, and moisture content of 12 indigenous tree and shrub species of Southern Italy (Basilicata Region was carried out. The studied species are the most abundant in this area: Quercus cerris L., Quercus pubescens Willd., Fraxinus ornus L., Populus canescens (Aiton Smith, Salix alba L., Alnus cordata L., Robinia pseudoacacia L., Olea europaea L., Spartium junceum L., Rubus hirtus W., Onopordum illirium L., Arundo donax L. For Q. cerris, Q. pubescens and O. europaea L., the energetic characteristics were measured by separating the wood components from the leaves. Q. cerris leaves contained the greatest high calorific value. F. ornus leaves had a greater ash content than the other samples while the lowest values were measured for S. junceum, Q. pubescens and R. pseudoacacia. The highest content of Carbon was in O. europaea leaves. A. donax and O. illirium had the lower level of high calorific value and Carbon than all the other species. The highest Nitrogen content was measured in Q. cerris leaves and the lowest one in F. ornus wood components.

  15. Methanogen Diversity in Indigenous and Introduced Ruminant Species on the Tibetan Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiao Dan; Martinez-Fernandez, Gonzalo; Padmanabha, Jagadish; Long, Ruijun; Denman, Stuart E.; McSweeney, Christopher S.

    2016-01-01

    Host factors are regarded as important in shaping the archaeal community in the rumen but few controlled studies have been performed to demonstrate this across host species under the same environmental conditions. A study was designed to investigate the structure of the methanogen community in the rumen of two indigenous (yak and Tibetan sheep) and two introduced domestic ruminant (cattle and crossbred sheep) species raised and fed under similar conditions on the high altitude Tibetan Plateau. The methylotrophic Methanomassiliicoccaceae was the predominant archaeal group in all animals even though Methanobrevibacter are usually present in greater abundance in ruminants globally. Furthermore, within the Methanomassiliicoccaceae family members from Mmc. group 10 and Mmc. group 4 were dominant in Tibetan Plateau ruminants compared to Mmc. group 12 found to be highest in other ruminants studied. Small ruminants presented the highest number of sequences that belonged to Methanomassiliicoccaceae compared to the larger ruminants. Although the methanogen community structure was different among the ruminant species, there were striking similarities between the animals in this environment. This indicates that factors such as the extreme environmental conditions and diet on the Tibetan Plateau might have a greater impact on rumen methanogen community compared to host differences. PMID:27274707

  16. Methanogen Diversity in Indigenous and Introduced Ruminant Species on the Tibetan Plateau

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Dan Huang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Host factors are regarded as important in shaping the archaeal community in the rumen but few controlled studies have been performed to demonstrate this across host species under the same environmental conditions. A study was designed to investigate the structure of the methanogen community in the rumen of two indigenous (yak and Tibetan sheep and two introduced domestic ruminant (cattle and crossbred sheep species raised and fed under similar conditions on the high altitude Tibetan Plateau. The methylotrophic Methanomassiliicoccaceae was the predominant archaeal group in all animals even though Methanobrevibacter are usually present in greater abundance in ruminants globally. Furthermore, within the Methanomassiliicoccaceae family members from Mmc. group 10 and Mmc. group 4 were dominant in Tibetan Plateau ruminants compared to Mmc. group 12 found to be highest in other ruminants studied. Small ruminants presented the highest number of sequences that belonged to Methanomassiliicoccaceae compared to the larger ruminants. Although the methanogen community structure was different among the ruminant species, there were striking similarities between the animals in this environment. This indicates that factors such as the extreme environmental conditions and diet on the Tibetan Plateau might have a greater impact on rumen methanogen community compared to host differences.

  17. Environmental Correlates of Distribution of the 25 Broad-leaved Tree Species Indigenous to Guangdong Province, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Su Zhiyao; Chen Beiguang; Chang Yong; Yang Jiazhi

    2004-01-01

    Twenty-five tree species indigenous to Guangdong Province were chosen in this study to portray their distribution patterns in relation to environmental factors. Both data of species distribution and environmental factors were tabulated based on a digitized map of Guangdong Province gridded at 0.5° latitude × 0.5° longitude. Grid-based diversity was mapped using DMAP, a distribution mapping program, and horizontal patterns were assessed using Kruskal-Wallis tests. The diversity center of the indigenous tree species under study is located north of 23° N. These tree species exhibit significant latitudinal variation (P = 0.007 4), but no significant longitudinal difference (P = 0.052 2). Non-metric Multidimensional Scaling (NMS) identified five different ecological species groups, while Canonical Correspondence Analysis (CCA) showed the distribution of tree species along each of the five environmental gradients. An understanding of the environmental correlates of distribution patterns has great implication for the introduction of the indigenous tree species for afforestation.

  18. Quantifying non-indigenous species in accumulated ballast slurry residuals (swish) arriving at Vancouver, British Columbia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, T. F.; Levings, C. D.

    2013-08-01

    Ballast tank “swish” samples were collected from ships following their arrival at Vancouver (British Columbia, Canada) after undergoing either a trans-oceanic or a Pacific-coastal voyage. The ballast swish consisted of a residual slurry mixture of sediment and water that remained trapped in ballast tanks following water discharge at port. The ballast tanks of 27 ships were sampled and ballast swish was found on 19 of the 27 ships. These ships were categorized according to ballast water management type: (1) Trans-oceanic = 7 trans-oceanic ships undergoing ballast water exchange (BWE) > 200 nm from shore; (2) Coastal-exchange = 7 Pacific-coastal ships traveling from ports south of Cape Blanco, Oregon undergoing coastal exchange > 50 nm from shore south of Cape Blanco; and (3) Coastal-no-exchange = 5 Pacific-coastal ships traveling from ports north of Cape Blanco, Oregon, without undergoing BWE. Invertebrate abundance and taxa richness were directly correlated with ballast-swish turbidity suggesting that highly-productive coastal source waters and ballast tank retention processes contributed to this trend. In turn, invertebrate taxa diversity increased with increasing invertebrate abundance. A Principal Component Analysis of the trans-oceanic data revealed that length of voyage showed a strong inverse relationship with invertebrate abundance for this category. Within the coastal-exchange voyage category, voyage length and ballast water age tended to be of the same magnitude and were directly correlated with both crustacean and nematode taxa. Finally, the coastal-no-exchange PCA results revealed that voyage length and salinity were inversely related due to the high number of river ports located at the southern border of the regulatory BWE exemption zone. Coastal voyages not undergoing BWE and undertaking a direct river-to-river route should be considered risky for the introduction of non-indigenous species, if the source waters contain potentially invasive species

  19. Chemotaxonomic Metabolite Profiling of 62 Indigenous Plant Species and Its Correlation with Bioactivities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sarah; Oh, Dong-Gu; Lee, Sunmin; Kim, Ga Ryun; Lee, Jong Seok; Son, Youn Kyoung; Bae, Chang-Hwan; Yeo, Joohong; Lee, Choong Hwan

    2015-01-01

    Chemotaxonomic metabolite profiling of 62 indigenous Korean plant species was performed by ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC)-linear trap quadrupole-ion trap (LTQ-IT) mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (MS/MS) combined with multivariate statistical analysis. In partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA), the 62 species clustered depending on their phylogenetic family, in particular, Aceraceae, Betulaceae, and Fagaceae were distinguished from Rosaceae, Fabaceae, and Asteraceae. Quinic acid, gallic acid, quercetin, quercetin derivatives, kaempferol, and kaempferol derivatives were identified as family-specific metabolites, and were found in relatively high concentrations in Aceraceae, Betulaceae, and Fagaceae. Fagaceae and Asteraceae were selected based on results of PLS-DA and bioactivities to determine the correlation between metabolic differences among plant families and bioactivities. Quinic acid, quercetin, kaempferol, quercetin derivatives, and kaempferol derivatives were found in higher concentrations in Fagaceae than in Asteraceae, and were positively correlated with antioxidant and tyrosinase inhibition activities. These results suggest that metabolite profiling was a useful tool for finding the different metabolic states of each plant family and understanding the correlation between metabolites and bioactivities in accordance with plant family. PMID:26540030

  20. Chemotaxonomic Metabolite Profiling of 62 Indigenous Plant Species and Its Correlation with Bioactivities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Lee

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Chemotaxonomic metabolite profiling of 62 indigenous Korean plant species was performed by ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC-linear trap quadrupole-ion trap (LTQ-IT mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (MS/MS combined with multivariate statistical analysis. In partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA, the 62 species clustered depending on their phylogenetic family, in particular, Aceraceae, Betulaceae, and Fagaceae were distinguished from Rosaceae, Fabaceae, and Asteraceae. Quinic acid, gallic acid, quercetin, quercetin derivatives, kaempferol, and kaempferol derivatives were identified as family-specific metabolites, and were found in relatively high concentrations in Aceraceae, Betulaceae, and Fagaceae. Fagaceae and Asteraceae were selected based on results of PLS-DA and bioactivities to determine the correlation between metabolic differences among plant families and bioactivities. Quinic acid, quercetin, kaempferol, quercetin derivatives, and kaempferol derivatives were found in higher concentrations in Fagaceae than in Asteraceae, and were positively correlated with antioxidant and tyrosinase inhibition activities. These results suggest that metabolite profiling was a useful tool for finding the different metabolic states of each plant family and understanding the correlation between metabolites and bioactivities in accordance with plant family.

  1. Non-indigenous species in Portuguese coastal areas, coastal lagoons, estuaries and islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chainho, Paula; Fernandes, António; Amorim, Ana; Ávila, Sérgio P.; Canning-Clode, João; Castro, João J.; Costa, Ana C.; Costa, José L.; Cruz, Teresa; Gollasch, Stephan; Grazziotin-Soares, Clarissa; Melo, Ricardo; Micael, Joana; Parente, Manuela I.; Semedo, Jorge; Silva, Teresa; Sobral, Dinah; Sousa, Mónica; Torres, Paulo; Veloso, Vera; Costa, Maria J.

    2015-12-01

    Trends in abundance, temporal occurrence and spatial distribution of marine and brackish non-indigenous species (NIS) are part of the indicators to assess the compliance of Good Environmental Status in the European Marine Strategy Framework Directive (EU-MSFD). European-wide regional and national databases for NIS will be useful for the implementation of the EU-MSFD but there are still spatial gaps for some regions and taxonomic groups. In 2009, Portugal was among the countries with the lowest reported numbers of NIS in Europe and a national online database on NIS was not available. This study provides an updated list of NIS registered in Portuguese coastal and estuarine waters, including mainland Portugal and the Azores and Madeira archipelagos. A list of 133 NIS was cataloged, most of which recorded in the last three decades, showing that this area of the North Atlantic is no less prone to introductions than neighboring areas. Most NIS reported in the current inventory are native in the Indo-Pacific region. Fouling and ballast water are the most likely introduction vectors of NIS in the studied area but shipping routes connecting to the NIS native regions are rare, indicating that most species are secondary introductions. The high number of NIS in the Azores and Madeira islands indicates that this ecosystem type seems to be more susceptible to invasions but these preliminary results might be biased by a higher number of studies and knowledge on the NIS occurrence on the islands.

  2. Antioxidant Activities and Phytochemical Study of Leaf Extracts from 18 Indigenous Tree Species in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shang-Tse Ho

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to assess antioxidant activities of methanolic extracts from the leaves of 18 indigenous tree species in Taiwan. Results revealed that, among 18 species, Acer oliverianum exhibited the best free radical scavenging activities. The IC50 values were 5.8 and 11.8 μg/mL on DPPH radical and superoxide radical scavenging activities, respectively. In addition, A. oliverianum also exhibited the strongest ferrous ion chelating activity. Based on a bioactivity-guided isolation principle, the resulting methanolic crude extracts of A. oliverianum leaves were fractionated to yield soluble fractions of hexane, EtOAc, BuOH, and water. Of these, the EtOAc fraction had the best antioxidant activity. Furthermore, 8 specific phytochemicals were isolated and identified from the EtOAc fraction. Among them, 1,2,3,4,6-O-penta-galloyl-β-D-glucopyranose had the best free radical scavenging activity. These results demonstrate that methanolic extracts and their derived phytochemicals of A. oliverianum leaves have excellent antioxidant activities and thus they have great potential as sources for natural health products.

  3. Antioxidant activities and phytochemical study of leaf extracts from 18 indigenous tree species in taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Shang-Tse; Tung, Yu-Tang; Chen, Yong-Long; Zhao, Ying-Ying; Chung, Min-Jay; Wu, Jyh-Horng

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study is to assess antioxidant activities of methanolic extracts from the leaves of 18 indigenous tree species in Taiwan. Results revealed that, among 18 species, Acer oliverianum exhibited the best free radical scavenging activities. The IC(50) values were 5.8 and 11.8 μg/mL on DPPH radical and superoxide radical scavenging activities, respectively. In addition, A. oliverianum also exhibited the strongest ferrous ion chelating activity. Based on a bioactivity-guided isolation principle, the resulting methanolic crude extracts of A. oliverianum leaves were fractionated to yield soluble fractions of hexane, EtOAc, BuOH, and water. Of these, the EtOAc fraction had the best antioxidant activity. Furthermore, 8 specific phytochemicals were isolated and identified from the EtOAc fraction. Among them, 1,2,3,4,6-O-penta-galloyl-β-D-glucopyranose had the best free radical scavenging activity. These results demonstrate that methanolic extracts and their derived phytochemicals of A. oliverianum leaves have excellent antioxidant activities and thus they have great potential as sources for natural health products. PMID:22454657

  4. Combustion properties of slow pyrolysis bio-oil produced from indigenous Australian species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stamatov, V.; Honnery, D.; Soria, J. [Laboratory for Turbulence Research in Aerospace and Combustion (LTRAC), Department of Mechanical Engineering, Monash University, Clayton, VIC 3800 (Australia)

    2006-10-15

    Bio-oil derived via slow pyrolysis process of two indigenous Australian tree species, red gum (Eucalyptus camaldulensis) from the basin of Murray, Victoria, and blue gum (Eucalyptus globulus) wood from the region of Mount Gambier, South Australia was blended with ethanol and burned in a circular jet spray at atmospheric pressure. Bio-oil flames were shorter, wider and brighter than diesel fuel flames at the same conditions. Adding of flammable polar additives (e.g. ethanol) to bio-oil improved some of the undesired properties of the fuel such as poor atomisation, low calorific value, and high NO{sub x} emission from the flame. Nevertheless, adding of ethanol should be carried out with caution since it leads to a reduction of the heat flux from the flame. Changing the concentration of flammable polar additives in bio-oil can be an optimising factor in achieving the proper balance between the best spray formation and the maximal heat flux from the flame. (author)

  5. Effect of Cooking on the Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid and Antioxidant Properties of Small Indigenous Fish Species of the Eastern Himalayas

    OpenAIRE

    Wahengbam Sarjubala Devi; Ch. Sarojnalini

    2014-01-01

    The effect of cooking method on the polyunsaturated fatty acid and antioxidant properties of small indigenous freshwater fish species, Amblypharyngodon mola and Puntius sophore of the Eastern Himalayas were determined. In the raw and fried samples, docosahexaenoic acid was significantly higher (2.907 and 1.167mg/100g) in Amblypharyngodon mola and lowest (0.749 and 0.291mg/100g) were recorded in Puntius sophore. The eicosapentaenoic acid of raw, fried and curried samples of Amb...

  6. Direct PCR of indigenous and invasive mosquito species: a time- and cost-effective technique of mosquito barcoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werblow, A; Flechl, E; Klimpel, S; Zittra, C; Lebl, K; Kieser, K; Laciny, A; Silbermayr, K; Melaun, C; Fuehrer, H-P

    2016-03-01

    Millions of people die each year as a result of pathogens transmitted by mosquitoes. However, the morphological identification of mosquito species can be difficult even for experts. The identification of morphologically indistinguishable species, such as members of the Anopheles maculipennis complex (Diptera: Culicidae), and possible hybrids, such as Culex pipiens pipiens/Culex pipiens molestus (Diptera: Culicidae), presents a major problem. In addition, the detection and discrimination of newly introduced species can be challenging, particularly to researchers without previous experience. Because of their medical importance, the clear identification of all relevant mosquito species is essential. Using the direct polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method described here, DNA amplification without prior DNA extraction is possible and thus species identification after sequencing can be achieved. Different amounts of tissue (leg, head; larvae or adult) as well as different storage conditions (dry, ethanol, -20 and -80 °C) and storage times were successfully applied and showed positive results after amplification and gel electrophoresis. Overall, 28 different indigenous and non-indigenous mosquito species were analysed using a gene fragment of the COX1 gene for species differentiation and identification by sequencing this 658-bp fragment. Compared with standard PCR, this method is time- and cost-effective and could thus improve existing surveillance and control programmes. PMID:26663040

  7. Hierarchical demographic approaches for assessing invasion dynamics of non-indigenous species: An example using northern snakehead (Channa argus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Y.; Lapointe, N.W.R.; Angermeier, P.L.; Murphy, B.R.

    2009-01-01

    Models of species' demographic features are commonly used to understand population dynamics and inform management tactics. Hierarchical demographic models are ideal for the assessment of non-indigenous species because our knowledge of non-indigenous populations is usually limited, data on demographic traits often come from a species' native range, these traits vary among populations, and traits are likely to vary considerably over time as species adapt to new environments. Hierarchical models readily incorporate this spatiotemporal variation in species' demographic traits by representing demographic parameters as multi-level hierarchies. As is done for traditional non-hierarchical matrix models, sensitivity and elasticity analyses are used to evaluate the contributions of different life stages and parameters to estimates of population growth rate. We applied a hierarchical model to northern snakehead (Channa argus), a fish currently invading the eastern United States. We used a Monte Carlo approach to simulate uncertainties in the sensitivity and elasticity analyses and to project future population persistence under selected management tactics. We gathered key biological information on northern snakehead natural mortality, maturity and recruitment in its native Asian environment. We compared the model performance with and without hierarchy of parameters. Our results suggest that ignoring the hierarchy of parameters in demographic models may result in poor estimates of population size and growth and may lead to erroneous management advice. In our case, the hierarchy used multi-level distributions to simulate the heterogeneity of demographic parameters across different locations or situations. The probability that the northern snakehead population will increase and harm the native fauna is considerable. Our elasticity and prognostic analyses showed that intensive control efforts immediately prior to spawning and/or juvenile-dispersal periods would be more effective

  8. A microcosm test of adaptation and species specific responses to polluted sediments applicable to indigenous chironomids (Diptera)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chironomids may adapt to pollution stress but data are confined to species that can be reared in the laboratory. A microcosm approach was used to test for adaptation and species differences in heavy metal tolerance. In one experiment, microcosms containing different levels of contaminants were placed in polluted and reference locations. The response of Chironomus februarius to metal contaminants suggested local adaptation: relatively more flies emerged from clean sediment at the reference site and the reverse pattern occurred at the polluted site. However, maternal effects were not specifically ruled out. In another species, Kiefferulus intertinctus, there was no evidence for adaptation. In a second experiment, microcosms with different contaminant levels were placed at two polluted and two unpolluted sites. Species responded differently to contaminants, but there was no evidence for adaptation in the species where this could be tested. Adaptation to heavy metals may be uncommon and species specific, but more sensitive species need to be tested across a range of pollution levels. Factors influencing the likelihood of adaptation are briefly discussed. - A field test for adaptation applicable to indigenous chironomids suggests adaptation to metal contaminants in one species but not in other species

  9. Comparing differential tolerance of native and non-indigenous marine species to metal pollution using novel assay techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent research suggests anthropogenic disturbance may disproportionately advantage non-indigenous species (NIS), aiding their establishment within impacted environments. This study used novel laboratory- and field-based toxicity testing to determine whether non-indigenous and native bryozoans (common within marine epibenthic communities worldwide) displayed differential tolerance to the common marine pollutant copper (Cu). In laboratory assays on adult colonies, NIS showed remarkable tolerance to Cu, with strong post-exposure recovery and growth. In contrast, native species displayed negative growth and reduced feeding efficiency across most exposure levels. Field transplant experiments supported laboratory findings, with NIS growing faster under Cu conditions. In field-based larval assays, NIS showed strong recruitment and growth in the presence of Cu relative to the native species. We suggest that strong selective pressures exerted by the toxic antifouling paints used on transport vectors (vessels), combined with metal contamination in estuarine environments, may result in metal tolerant NIS advantaged by anthropogenically modified selection regimes. - Greater tolerance to pollutants in marine NIS may increase the risk of invasion in port and harbours worldwide by providing a competitive advantage over native taxa.

  10. In vitro Antimicrobial Activity and Phytochemical Screening of Clematis Species Indigenous to Ethiopia

    OpenAIRE

    S Hawaze; Deti, H.; Suleman, S.

    2012-01-01

    The leaves extracts of two indigenous plants of Ethiopia: Clematis longicauda steud ex A. Rich. and Clematis burgensis Engl. are used in Southwestern Ethiopia to treat otorrhoea and eczema. Antimicrobial activity and MIC of crude extracts were determined by disk diffusion and broth dilution. Phytochemical screening was performed on the extracts. The methanol and petroleum ether extracts of both plants showed antibacterial and antifungal activity. Sensitivity of reference strains was concentra...

  11. Highly Sensitive Assay for Measurement of Arenavirus-cell Attachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaus, Joseph P; Botten, Jason

    2016-01-01

    Arenaviruses are a family of enveloped RNA viruses that cause severe human disease. The first step in the arenavirus life cycle is attachment of viral particles to host cells. While virus-cell attachment can be measured through the use of virions labeled with biotin, radioactive isotopes, or fluorescent dyes, these approaches typically require high multiplicities of infection (MOI) to enable detection of bound virus. We describe a quantitative (q)RT-PCR-based assay that measures Junin virus strain Candid 1 attachment via quantitation of virion-packaged viral genomic RNA. This assay has several advantages including its extreme sensitivity and ability to measure attachment over a large dynamic range of MOIs without the need to purify or label input virus. Importantly, this approach can be easily tailored for use with other viruses through the use of virus-specific qRT-PCR reagents. Further, this assay can be modified to permit measurement of particle endocytosis and genome uncoating. In conclusion, we describe a simple, yet robust assay for highly sensitive measurement of arenavirus-cell attachment. PMID:26966937

  12. The Curious Case of Arenavirus Entry, and Its Inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanne York

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Arenaviruses comprise a diverse family of enveloped negative-strand RNA viruses that are endemic to specific rodent hosts worldwide. Several arenaviruses cause severe hemorrhagic fevers in humans, including Junín and Machupo viruses in South America and Lassa fever virus in western Africa. Arenavirus entry into the host cell is mediated by the envelope glycoprotein complex, GPC. The virion is endocytosed on binding to a cell-surface receptor, and membrane fusion is initiated in response to physiological acidification of the endosome. As with other class I virus fusion proteins, GPC-mediated membrane fusion is promoted through a regulated sequence of conformational changes leading to formation of the classical postfusion trimer-of-hairpins structure. GPC is, however, unique among the class I fusion proteins in that the mature complex retains a stable signal peptide (SSP as a third subunit, in addition to the canonical receptor-binding and fusion proteins. We will review the curious properties of the tripartite GPC complex and describe evidence that SSP interacts with the fusion subunit to modulate pH-induced activation of membrane fusion. This unusual solution to maintaining the metastable prefusion state of GPC on the virion and activating the class I fusion cascade at acidic pH provides novel targets for antiviral intervention.

  13. Indirect solid-phase immunosorbent assay for detection of arenavirus antigens and antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, A.P.; Rezapkin, G.V.; Dzagurova, T.K.; Tkachenko, E.A. (Institute of Poliomyelitis anU Viral Encephalities of the U.S.S.R. Academy of Medical Sciences, Moscow)

    1984-05-01

    Indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and solid phase radioimmunoassay (SPRIA) using either enti-human or anti-mouse IgG labelled with horseradish peroxidase and /sup 125/I, respectively, were developed for the detection of Junin, Machupo, Tacaribe, Amapari, Tamiami, Lassa and LCM arenaviruses. Both methods allow high sensitivity detection of arenavirus antigens and antibodies.

  14. Mopeia Virus-related Arenavirus in Natal Multimammate Mice, Morogoro, Tanzania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Günther, Stephan; Hoofd, Guy; Charrel, Remi; Röser, Christina; Becker-Ziaja, Beate; Lloyd, Graham; Sabuni, Christopher; Verhagen, Ron; van der Groen, Guido; Kennis, Jan; Katakweba, Abdul; Machang'u, Robert; Makundi, Rhodes; Leirs, Herwig

    2009-01-01

    A serosurvey involving 2,520 small mammals from Tanzania identified a hot spot of arenavirus circulation in Morogoro. Molecular screening detected a new arenavirus in Natal multimammate mice (Mastomys natalensis), Morogoro virus, related to Mopeia virus. Only a small percentage of mice carry...

  15. Evaluating the potential of ecological niche modelling as a component in marine non-indigenous species risk assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leidenberger, Sonja; Obst, Matthias; Kulawik, Robert; Stelzer, Kerstin; Heyer, Karin; Hardisty, Alex; Bourlat, Sarah J

    2015-08-15

    Marine biological invasions have increased with the development of global trading, causing the homogenization of communities and the decline of biodiversity. A main vector is ballast water exchange from shipping. This study evaluates the use of ecological niche modelling (ENM) to predict the spread of 18 non-indigenous species (NIS) along shipping routes and their potential habitat suitability (hot/cold spots) in the Baltic Sea and Northeast Atlantic. Results show that, contrary to current risk assessment methods, temperature and sea ice concentration determine habitat suitability for 61% of species, rather than salinity (11%). We show high habitat suitability for NIS in the Skagerrak and Kattegat, a transitional area for NIS entering or leaving the Baltic Sea. As many cases of NIS introduction in the marine environment are associated with shipping pathways, we explore how ENM can be used to provide valuable information on the potential spread of NIS for ballast water risk assessment. PMID:26066862

  16. 浅谈昆明优质乡土树种繁殖%A Brief Discussion on Propagation of High quality Indigenous Tree Species in Kunming

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贾晨辉; 毛昆明

    2014-01-01

    With the advantages of stronger ecological adaptability and economic management costs , indigenous tree species has been adopted and attracted people's attention in the process of urban afforestation and ecological environmental protection .This article proposes some suggestions for the propagation of the high quality indigenous tree species in Kunming as well as for the promotion and industrialization manage‐ment of the high quality indigenous tree species .%指出了乡土树种以其较强的生态适应性和较低的管理成本,逐渐在城市绿化和生态环境保护过程中受到较多采用和重视。对昆明优质乡土树种的繁殖,以及优质树种的推广和产业化经营提出了相关的建议。

  17. Antimicrobial activity of two South African honeys produced from indigenous Leucospermum cordifolium and Erica species on selected micro-organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grobler Sias R

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Honey has been shown to have wound healing properties which can be ascribed to its antimicrobial activity. The antimicrobial activity can be effective against a broad spectrum of bacterial species especially those of medical importance. It has also been shown that there is considerable variation in the antimicrobial potency of different types of honey, which is impossible to predict. With this in mind we tested the antimicrobial activity of honeys produced from plants grown in South Africa for their antibacterial properties on selected standard strains of oral micro-organisms. Methods The honeys used were produced from the blossoms of Eucalyptus cladocalyx (Bluegum trees, an indigenous South African plant Leucospermum cordifolium (Pincushion, a mixture of wild heather shrubs, mainly Erica species (Fynbos and a Leptospermum scoparium (Manuka honey. Only pure honey which had not been heated was used. The honeys were tested for their antimicrobial properties with a broth dilution method. Results Although the honeys produced some inhibitory effect on the growth of the micro-organisms, no exceptionally high activity occurred in the South African honeys. The carbohydrate concentration plays a key role in the antimicrobial activity of the honeys above 25%. However, these honeys do contain other antimicrobial properties that are effective against certain bacterial species at concentrations well below the hypertonic sugar concentration. The yeast C. albicans was more resistant to the honeys than the bacteria. The species S. anginosus and S. oralis were more sensitive to the honeys than the other test bacteria. Conclusion The honeys produced from indigenous wild flowers from South Africa had no exceptionally high activity that could afford medical grade status.

  18. Nutritional effects of indigenous arbuscular mycorrhizal associations on the sclerophyllous species Agathosma betulina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Pèrez-Fernández

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Relatively little is currently known about the seedling physiology of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM Agathosma betulina, a sclerophyllous crop plant cultivated for its high-value essential oils and food additives. In addition, virtually nothing is known about the AM associations of this plant. Consequently, the effect of an indigenous community of AM fungi on P nutrition and C economy in seedlings, grown in nursery conditions, was determined during different stages of host and AM fungal establishment. AM fungal ribosomal gene sequence analyses were used to identify some of the fungi within the roots, responsible for the nutritional changes. During the early stages of host and AM fungal establishment (0 to 77 days after germination, host growth was reduced, whereas the rate of P-uptake and growth respiration was increased. Beyond 77 days of growth, the rate of P-uptake and growth respiration declined. These findings, together with results obtained after molecular analyses of root associated fungal DNA, indicate that AM fungi belonging to the genera Acaulospora and Glomus, improve P-uptake and costs of utilization during the early stages of seedling establishment in a nutrient-poor soil.

  19. Enhanced passive bat rabies surveillance in indigenous bat species from Germany--a retrospective study.

    OpenAIRE

    Juliane Schatz; Conrad Martin Freuling; Ernst Auer; Hooman Goharriz; Christine Harbusch; Nicholas Johnson; Ingrid Kaipf; Thomas Christoph Mettenleiter; Kristin Mühldorfer; Ralf-Udo Mühle; Bernd Ohlendorf; Bärbel Pott-Dörfer; Julia Prüger; Hanan Sheikh Ali; Dagmar Stiefel

    2014-01-01

    In Germany, rabies in bats is a notifiable zoonotic disease, which is caused by European bat lyssaviruses type 1 and 2 (EBLV-1 and 2), and the recently discovered new lyssavirus species Bokeloh bat lyssavirus (BBLV). As the understanding of bat rabies in insectivorous bat species is limited, in addition to routine bat rabies diagnosis, an enhanced passive surveillance study, i.e. the retrospective investigation of dead bats that had not been tested for rabies, was initiated in 1998 to study t...

  20. Enhanced passive bat rabies surveillance in indigenous bat species from Germany--a retrospective study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliane Schatz

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In Germany, rabies in bats is a notifiable zoonotic disease, which is caused by European bat lyssaviruses type 1 and 2 (EBLV-1 and 2, and the recently discovered new lyssavirus species Bokeloh bat lyssavirus (BBLV. As the understanding of bat rabies in insectivorous bat species is limited, in addition to routine bat rabies diagnosis, an enhanced passive surveillance study, i.e. the retrospective investigation of dead bats that had not been tested for rabies, was initiated in 1998 to study the distribution, abundance and epidemiology of lyssavirus infections in bats from Germany. A total number of 5478 individuals representing 21 bat species within two families were included in this study. The Noctule bat (Nyctalus noctula and the Common pipistrelle (Pipistrellus pipistrellus represented the most specimens submitted. Of all investigated bats, 1.17% tested positive for lyssaviruses using the fluorescent antibody test (FAT. The vast majority of positive cases was identified as EBLV-1, predominately associated with the Serotine bat (Eptesicus serotinus. However, rabies cases in other species, i.e. Nathusius' pipistrelle bat (Pipistrellus nathusii, P. pipistrellus and Brown long-eared bat (Plecotus auritus were also characterized as EBLV-1. In contrast, EBLV-2 was isolated from three Daubenton's bats (Myotis daubentonii. These three cases contribute significantly to the understanding of EBLV-2 infections in Germany as only one case had been reported prior to this study. This enhanced passive surveillance indicated that besides known reservoir species, further bat species are affected by lyssavirus infections. Given the increasing diversity of lyssaviruses and bats as reservoir host species worldwide, lyssavirus positive specimens, i.e. both bat and virus need to be confirmed by molecular techniques.

  1. Biogeography and evolutionary history of hantaviruses and arenaviruses in Africa. Call for participation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Goüy de Bellocq, Joëlle; Leirs, H.; Bryja, Josef; Makundi, R.; Madebo, M.; Patzenhauerová, Hana; Šumbera, R.; Čížková, Dagmar; Mazoch, V.; Zima Jr., J.; Gryseels, S.; Akaibe, D.; Amundala, N.; Kennis, J.; Verheyen, E.; Laudisoit, A.; Schmidt-Chanasit, J.; Günther, S.

    Kwaluseni: University of Swaziland, 2011. s. 79-80. [African Small Mammal Symposium /11./. 03.08.2011-08.08.2011, Kwaluseni] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60930519 Keywords : arenaviruses * hantaviruses * Africa Subject RIV: EG - Zoology

  2. Design of indirect solid-phase immunosorbent methods for detecting arenavirus antigens and antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, A.P.; Rezapkin, G.V.; Dzagurova, T.K.; Tkachenko, E.A.

    1984-05-01

    Specifications have been elaborated for formulating indirect solid-phase enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and radioimmunoassay (SPRIA) methods that employ anti-human and anti-mice G class immunoglobulin (IgG), conjugated with horseradish peroxidase and /sup 125/I for detecting the arenaviruses Junin, Machupo, Tacaribe, Amalpari, Tamiami, Lassa, and LCM (lymphocytic choriomeningitis). These methods make it possible to identify with a high degree of sensitivity arenavirus antigens and antibodies in various kinds of material.

  3. Old World Arenavirus Infection Interferes with the Expression of Functional α-Dystroglycan in the Host Cell

    OpenAIRE

    Rojek, Jillian M.; Campbell, Kevin P.; Oldstone, Michael B A; Kunz, Stefan

    2007-01-01

    α-Dystroglycan (α-DG) is an important cellular receptor for extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins as well as the Old World arenaviruses lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) and the human pathogenic Lassa fever virus (LFV). Specific O-glycosylation of α-DG is critical for its function as receptor for ECM proteins and arenaviruses. Here, we investigated the impact of arenavirus infection on α-DG expression. Infection with an immunosuppressive LCMV isolate caused a marked reduction in express...

  4. Replication of Boid Inclusion Body Disease-Associated Arenaviruses Is Temperature Sensitive in both Boid and Mammalian Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Hepojoki, Jussi; Kipar, Anja; Korzyukov, Yegor; Bell-Sakyi, Lesley; Vapalahti, Olli; Hetzel, Udo

    2014-01-01

    Boid inclusion body disease (BIDB) is a fatal disease of boid snakes, the etiology of which has only recently been revealed following the identification of several novel arenaviruses in diseased snakes. BIBD-associated arenaviruses (BIBDAV) are genetically divergent from the classical Old and New World arenaviruses and also differ substantially from each other. Even though there is convincing evidence that BIBDAV are indeed the etiological agent of BIBD, the BIBDAV reservoir hosts—if any exis...

  5. Chapare virus, a newly discovered arenavirus isolated from a fatal hemorrhagic fever case in Bolivia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Delgado

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available A small focus of hemorrhagic fever (HF cases occurred near Cochabamba, Bolivia, in December 2003 and January 2004. Specimens were available from only one fatal case, which had a clinical course that included fever, headache, arthralgia, myalgia, and vomiting with subsequent deterioration and multiple hemorrhagic signs. A non-cytopathic virus was isolated from two of the patient serum samples, and identified as an arenavirus by IFA staining with a rabbit polyvalent antiserum raised against South American arenaviruses known to be associated with HF (Guanarito, Machupo, and Sabiá. RT-PCR analysis and subsequent analysis of the complete virus S and L RNA segment sequences identified the virus as a member of the New World Clade B arenaviruses, which includes all the pathogenic South American arenaviruses. The virus was shown to be most closely related to Sabiá virus, but with 26% and 30% nucleotide difference in the S and L segments, and 26%, 28%, 15% and 22% amino acid differences for the L, Z, N, and GP proteins, respectively, indicating the virus represents a newly discovered arenavirus, for which we propose the name Chapare virus. In conclusion, two different arenaviruses, Machupo and Chapare, can be associated with severe HF cases in Bolivia.

  6. The potential of Thai indigenous plant species for the phytoremediation of arsenic contaminated land.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visoottiviseth, P; Francesconi, K; Sridokchan, W

    2002-01-01

    To assess the potential of the native plant species for phytoremediation, plant and soil samples were collected from two areas in Thailand that have histories of arsenic pollution from mine tailings. The areas were the Ron Phibun District (Nakorn Si Thammarat province) and Bannang Sata District (Yala province), and samples were taken in 1998 and 1999 and analysed for total arsenic by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Arsenic concentrations in soil ranged from 21 to 14,000 microg g(-1) in Ron Phibun, and from 540 to 16,000 microg g(-1) in Bannang Sata. The criteria used for selecting plants for phytoremediation were: high As tolerance, high bioaccumulation factor, short life cycle, high propagation rate, wide distribution and large shoot biomass. Of 36 plant species, only two species of ferns (Pityrogramma calomelanos and Pteris vittata), a herb (Mimosa pudica), and a shrub (Melastoma malabrathricum), seemed suitable for phytoremediation. The ferns were by far the most proficient plants at accumulating arsenic from soil, attaining concentrations of up to 8350 microg g(-1) (dry mass) in the frond. PMID:12009144

  7. Effect of Cooking on the Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid and Antioxidant Properties of Small Indigenous Fish Species of the Eastern Himalayas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wahengbam Sarjubala Devi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The effect of cooking method on the polyunsaturated fatty acid and antioxidant properties of small indigenous freshwater fish species, Amblypharyngodon mola and Puntius sophore of the Eastern Himalayas were determined. In the raw and fried samples, docosahexaenoic acid was significantly higher (2.907 and 1.167mg/100g in Amblypharyngodon mola and lowest (0.749 and 0.291mg/100g were recorded in Puntius sophore. The eicosapentaenoic acid of raw, fried and curried samples of Amblypharyngodon mola were recorded higher. In DPPH (1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl free radical scavenging assay of IC50 value of the raw fish extract were 2.9µg/ml and 1.66µg/ml respectively. The highest antioxidant activity was found in fish curry of Amblypharyngodon mola (0.11µg/ml. It shows that the Maillard reaction product forms the melanoidin during cooking, increases the antioxidant property of the fish curry and also improved the taste.

  8. Dispersed oil toxicity tests with biological species indigenous to the Gulf of Mexico. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fucik, K.W.; Carr, K.A.; Balcom, B.J.

    1994-08-01

    Static and flowthrough aquatic acute toxicity testing protocols were utilized on eggs and larvae of seven commercially important invertebrates and fishes from the Gulf of Mexico. Test organisms were exposed to Central and Western Gulf oils, dispersed oil, and Corexit 9527. Species included brown shrimp (Penaeus aztecus), white shrimp (Penaeus setiferus), blue crab (Callinectes sapidus), eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica), red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus), inland silverside (Menidia berylina), and spot (Leiosomus xanthurus). Atlantic menhaden (Brevoortia tyrannus) was also tested because gulf menhaden were not available. Mysids (Mysidopsis bahia) were evaluated as part of a chronic toxicity assessment.

  9. A tale of two spartinas: Climatic, photobiological and isotopic insights on the fitness of non-indigenous versus native species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, B.; Baeta, A.; Rousseau-Gueutin, M.; Ainouche, M.; Marques, J. C.; Caçador, I.

    2015-12-01

    Salt marshes are facing a new threat: the invasion by non-indigenous species (NIS), Although its introduction time is not established yet, in 1999 Spartina versicolor was already identified as a NIS in the Mediterranean marshes, significantly spreading its area of colonization. Using the Mediterranean native Spartina maritima as a reference, the present research studied the ecophysiological fitness of this NIS in its new environment, as a tool to understand its potential invasiveness. It was found that Spartina versicolor had a stable photobiological pattern, with only minor fluctuations during an annual cycle, and lower efficiencies comparated to S. maritima. The NIS seems to be rather insensitive to the observed abiotic factors fluctuations (salinity and pH of the sediment), and thus contrasts with the native S. maritima, known to be salinity dependent with higher productivity values in higher salinity environments. Most of the differences observed between the photobiology of these species could be explained by their nitrogen nutrition (here evaluated by the δ15N stable isotope) and directly related with the Mediterranean climate. Enhanced by a higher N availability during winter, the primary production of S. maritima which lead to dilution of the foliar δ15N concentration in the newly formed biomass, similarly to what is observed along a rainfall gradient. On the other hand, S. versicolor showed an increased δ15N in its tissues along the annual rainfall gradient, probably due to a δ15N concentration effect during low biomass production periods (winter and autumn). Together with the photobiological traits, these isotopic data point out to a climatic misfit of S. versicolor to the Mediterranean climate compared to the native S. maritima. This appears to be the major constrain shaping the ecophysiological fitness of this NIS, its primary production and consequently, its spreading rate along the Mediterranean marshes.

  10. A survey of the indigenous microbiota (bacteria) in three species of mussels from the Clinch and Holston Rivers, Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starliper, Clifford E.; Neves, Richard J.; Hanlon, Shane; Whittington, Pamela

    2008-01-01

    Freshwater mussel conservation efforts by many federal and state agencies have increased in recent years. This has led to a greater number of stream surveys, in which mussel die-offs involving high numbers of dead and moribund animals are being observed and reported with greater frequency. Typically, die-offs have been incidentally observed while research was being done for other purposes, therefore, accurate mortality data have been difficult to obtain. Specifically, seasonal die-offs were noted in localized areas of the Clinch and Holston Rivers, Virginia, and to lesser degrees, in neighboring rivers in this geographic region, including southeast Virginia. The observed mussel species affected were primarily the slabside pearlymussel (Lexingtonia dolabelloides) and to lesser extents, the pheasantshell (Actinonaias pectorosa), rainbow mussel (Villosa iris), and the endangered shiny pigtoe (Fusconaia cor). To determine if a bacterial pathogen might be involved in these recurring mussel die-offs, this study examined characteristics of the indigenous microbiota (bacteria) from healthy mussels from sites on the Clinch and Holston Rivers where die-offs were previously observed. These baseline data will allow for recognition of bacterial pathogens in future mussel die-offs. Means for total bacteria from soft tissues ranged from 1.77 × 105 to 3.55 × 106 cfu/g; whereas, the range in means from fluids was 2.92 × 104 to 8.60 × 105 cfu/mL. A diverse microbiota were recovered, including species that are common in freshwater aquatic environments. The most common bacterial groups recovered were motile Aeromonas spp. and nonfermenting bacteria. Flavobacterium columnare, a pathogen to cool- and warm-water fishes was recovered from one specimen, a Villosa iris from the Clinch River.

  11. Tree biomass and soil carbon stocks in indigenous forests in comparison to plantations of exotic species in the Taita Hills of Kenya

    OpenAIRE

    Omoro, Loice M A; Starr, Mike; Pellikka, Petri K. E.

    2013-01-01

    Carbon (C) densities of the tree biomass and soil (0-50 cm) in indigenous forest and plantations of eucalyptus, cypress and pine in the Taita Hills, Kenya were determined and compared. The cypress and pine plantations were about 30-years-old and eucalyptus plantations about 50-years-old. Biomass C densities were estimated from breast height diameter and wood density using allometric functions developed for tropical species and an assumed C content of 50 %. Belowground biomass C densities were...

  12. Non-indigenous freshwater plants

    OpenAIRE

    Larson, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    Non-indigenous species (NIS) are species that are moved by man outside their native range. NIS that successfully pass through a number of invasion phases (i.e. introduction, establishment and invasion) are referred to as invasive species. Invasive species potentially cause severe environmental and economic impacts. This thesis highlights the invasion process of non-indigenous aquatic plant species. Patterns and processes in the establishment phase were assessed with a general focus. The impor...

  13. Use of indigenous plant species as treatments for helminthes in farm animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herbal extracts of of prairie sagewort (Artemisia frigida, family Asteraceae), tansy (Tanacetum vulgare) and garlic (Allium sativum) were infussed to test against ovine internal parasites such as Nematodirus and Haemonchus species in sheep. Twenty-five local Mongolian sheep, infected naturally with Nematodirus oiratianus and Haemonchus contortus, were selected for the trial. Sheep were allowed to graze on pasture in Taryalan soum (county) of Khuvsgul aimag (province) during the trial period. The efficiency of herbal infusions measured as the percentage reduction of eggs per gram (EPG) of N.oiratianus was 13.3%, 15.8% and 11.3m by prairie sagewort, tansy and garlic, respectively. Number of EPG of H.contortus was reduced by 22, 20.5 and 17.8% respectively in 5 days later of administration of the infusions. While, infection of sheep with N.oiratianus and H.contortus from the untreated (control) group were 97.8-100%. The results of the present trial indicated that administration of Prairie sagewort (Artemisia frigida, family Asteraceae), tansy (Tanacetum vulgare) and garlic (Allium sativum) infusions to sheep could reduce N. oiratianus and H.contortus egg shedding 11.3 to 22%. (author)

  14. Serological assays based on recombinant viral proteins for the diagnosis of arenavirus hemorrhagic fevers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushi, Shuetsu; Tani, Hideki; Yoshikawa, Tomoki; Saijo, Masayuki; Morikawa, Shigeru

    2012-10-01

    The family Arenaviridae, genus Arenavirus, consists of two phylogenetically independent groups: Old World (OW) and New World (NW) complexes. The Lassa and Lujo viruses in the OW complex and the Guanarito, Junin, Machupo, Sabia, and Chapare viruses in the NW complex cause viral hemorrhagic fever (VHF) in humans, leading to serious public health concerns. These viruses are also considered potential bioterrorism agents. Therefore, it is of great importance to detect these pathogens rapidly and specifically in order to minimize the risk and scale of arenavirus outbreaks. However, these arenaviruses are classified as BSL-4 pathogens, thus making it difficult to develop diagnostic techniques for these virus infections in institutes without BSL-4 facilities. To overcome these difficulties, antibody detection systems in the form of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and an indirect immunofluorescence assay were developed using recombinant nucleoproteins (rNPs) derived from these viruses. Furthermore, several antigen-detection assays were developed. For example, novel monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to the rNPs of Lassa and Junin viruses were generated. Sandwich antigen-capture (Ag-capture) ELISAs using these mAbs as capture antibodies were developed and confirmed to be sensitive and specific for detecting the respective arenavirus NPs. These rNP-based assays were proposed to be useful not only for an etiological diagnosis of VHFs, but also for seroepidemiological studies on VHFs. We recently developed arenavirus neutralization assays using vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV)-based pseudotypes bearing arenavirus recombinant glycoproteins. The goal of this article is to review the recent advances in developing laboratory diagnostic assays based on recombinant viral proteins for the diagnosis of VHFs and epidemiological studies on the VHFs caused by arenaviruses. PMID:23202455

  15. Serological Assays Based on Recombinant Viral Proteins for the Diagnosis of Arenavirus Hemorrhagic Fevers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masayuki Saijo

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The family Arenaviridae, genus Arenavirus, consists of two phylogenetically independent groups: Old World (OW and New World (NW complexes. The Lassa and Lujo viruses in the OW complex and the Guanarito, Junin, Machupo, Sabia, and Chapare viruses in the NW complex cause viral hemorrhagic fever (VHF in humans, leading to serious public health concerns. These viruses are also considered potential bioterrorism agents. Therefore, it is of great importance to detect these pathogens rapidly and specifically in order to minimize the risk and scale of arenavirus outbreaks. However, these arenaviruses are classified as BSL-4 pathogens, thus making it difficult to develop diagnostic techniques for these virus infections in institutes without BSL-4 facilities. To overcome these difficulties, antibody detection systems in the form of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA and an indirect immunofluorescence assay were developed using recombinant nucleoproteins (rNPs derived from these viruses. Furthermore, several antigen-detection assays were developed. For example, novel monoclonal antibodies (mAbs to the rNPs of Lassa and Junin viruses were generated. Sandwich antigen-capture (Ag-capture ELISAs using these mAbs as capture antibodies were developed and confirmed to be sensitive and specific for detecting the respective arenavirus NPs. These rNP-based assays were proposed to be useful not only for an etiological diagnosis of VHFs, but also for seroepidemiological studies on VHFs. We recently developed arenavirus neutralization assays using vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV-based pseudotypes bearing arenavirus recombinant glycoproteins. The goal of this article is to review the recent advances in developing laboratory diagnostic assays based on recombinant viral proteins for the diagnosis of VHFs and epidemiological studies on the VHFs caused by arenaviruses.

  16. Widespread recombination, reassortment, and transmission of unbalanced compound viral genotypes in natural arenavirus infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark D Stenglein

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Arenaviruses are one of the largest families of human hemorrhagic fever viruses and are known to infect both mammals and snakes. Arenaviruses package a large (L and small (S genome segment in their virions. For segmented RNA viruses like these, novel genotypes can be generated through mutation, recombination, and reassortment. Although it is believed that an ancient recombination event led to the emergence of a new lineage of mammalian arenaviruses, neither recombination nor reassortment has been definitively documented in natural arenavirus infections. Here, we used metagenomic sequencing to survey the viral diversity present in captive arenavirus-infected snakes. From 48 infected animals, we determined the complete or near complete sequence of 210 genome segments that grouped into 23 L and 11 S genotypes. The majority of snakes were multiply infected, with up to 4 distinct S and 11 distinct L segment genotypes in individual animals. This S/L imbalance was typical: in all cases intrahost L segment genotypes outnumbered S genotypes, and a particular S segment genotype dominated in individual animals and at a population level. We corroborated sequencing results by qRT-PCR and virus isolation, and isolates replicated as ensembles in culture. Numerous instances of recombination and reassortment were detected, including recombinant segments with unusual organizations featuring 2 intergenic regions and superfluous content, which were capable of stable replication and transmission despite their atypical structures. Overall, this represents intrahost diversity of an extent and form that goes well beyond what has been observed for arenaviruses or for viruses in general. This diversity can be plausibly attributed to the captive intermingling of sub-clinically infected wild-caught snakes. Thus, beyond providing a unique opportunity to study arenavirus evolution and adaptation, these findings allow the investigation of unintended anthropogenic impacts on

  17. Inhibition of Innate Immune Responses Is Key to Pathogenesis by Arenaviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Bjoern; Ly, Hinh

    2016-04-15

    Mammalian arenaviruses are zoonotic viruses that cause asymptomatic, persistent infections in their rodent hosts but can lead to severe and lethal hemorrhagic fever with bleeding and multiorgan failure in human patients. Lassa virus (LASV), for example, is endemic in several West African countries, where it is responsible for an estimated 500,000 infections and 5,000 deaths annually. There are currently no FDA-licensed therapeutics or vaccines available to combat arenavirus infection. A hallmark of arenavirus infection (e.g., LASV) is general immunosuppression that contributes to high viremia. Here, we discuss the early host immune responses to arenavirus infection and the recently discovered molecular mechanisms that enable pathogenic viruses to suppress host immune recognition and to contribute to the high degree of virulence. We also directly compare the innate immune evasion mechanisms between arenaviruses and other hemorrhagic fever-causing viruses, such as Ebola, Marburg, Dengue, and hantaviruses. A better understanding of the immunosuppression and immune evasion strategies of these deadly viruses may guide the development of novel preventative and therapeutic options. PMID:26865707

  18. Pathogenic Mechanisms Involved in the Hematological Alterations of Arenavirus-induced Hemorrhagic Fevers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto G. Pozner

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Viral hemorrhagic fevers (VHFs caused by arenaviruses are acute diseases characterized by fever, headache, general malaise, impaired cellular immunity, eventual neurologic involvement, and hemostatic alterations that may ultimately lead to shock and death. The causes of the bleeding are still poorly understood. However, it is generally accepted that these causes are associated to some degree with impaired hemostasis, endothelial cell dysfunction and low platelet counts or function. In this article, we present the current knowledge about the hematological alterations present in VHF induced by arenaviruses, including new aspects on the underlying pathogenic mechanisms.

  19. Investigation of type-I interferon dysregulation by arenaviruses : a multidisciplinary approach.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozina, Carol L.; Moorman, Matthew Wallace; Branda, Catherine; Wu, Meiye; Manginell, Ronald Paul; Ricken, James Bryce; James, Conrad D.; Negrete, Oscar A.; Misra, Milind; Carson, Bryan D.

    2011-09-01

    This report provides a detailed overview of the work performed for project number 130781, 'A Systems Biology Approach to Understanding Viral Hemorrhagic Fever Pathogenesis.' We report progress in five key areas: single cell isolation devices and control systems, fluorescent cytokine and transcription factor reporters, on-chip viral infection assays, molecular virology analysis of Arenavirus nucleoprotein structure-function, and development of computational tools to predict virus-host protein interactions. Although a great deal of work remains from that begun here, we have developed several novel single cell analysis tools and knowledge of Arenavirus biology that will facilitate and inform future publications and funding proposals.

  20. Non-indigenous macroinvertebrate species in Lithuanian fresh waters, Part 2: Macroinvertebrate assemblage deviation from naturalness in lotic systems and the consequent potential impacts on ecological quality assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arbačiauskas K.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The biological pressure represented by non-indigenous macroinvertebrate species (NIMS should be addressed in the implementation of EU Water Framework Directive as this can have a direct impact on the ’naturalness’ of the invaded macroinvertebrate assemblage. The biocontamination concept allows assessment of this deviation from naturalness, by evaluation of abundance and disparity contamination of an assemblage. This study aimed to assess the biocontamination of macroinvertebrate assemblages in Lithuanian rivers, thereby revealing the most high-impact non-indigenous species, and to explore the relationship between biocontamination and conventional metrics of ecological quality. Most of the studied rivers appeared to be impacted by NIMS. The amphipods Pontogammarus robustoides, Chelicorophium curvispinum and snail Litoglyphus naticoides were revealed as high-impact NIMS for Lithuanian lotic systems. Metrics of ecological quality which largely depend upon the richness of indicator taxa, such as the biological monitoring working party (BMWP score and Ephemeroptera/Plecoptera/Trichoptera (EPT taxa number, were negatively correlated with biocontamination, implying they could provide unreliable ecological quality estimates when NIMS are present. Routine macroinvertebrate water quality monitoring data are sufficient for generation of the biocontamination assessment and thus can provide supplementary information, with minimal extra expense or effort. We therefore recommend that biocontamination assessment is included alongside established methods for gauging biological and chemical water quality.

  1. An indigenous hyperproductive species of Aureobasidium pullulans RYLF-10: influence of fermentation conditions on exopolysaccharide (EPS) production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Kanchan L; Rahi, Deepak K; Soni, Sanjeev K

    2014-02-01

    In recent years, a significant interest has been generated in discovering and developing exopolysaccharides (EPS) produced by microorganisms, especially fungi due to their multifaceted industrial and pharmacological applications. A number of filamentous and cellular fungi have been explored for this; however, according to the existing literature, the work on exopolysaccharide production by indigenous culture on this aspect is still very less and requires a serious attention. The present work is an attempt in this regard and aims to optimize the submerged culture conditions to produce the exopolysaccharides from an indigenous yeast Aureobasidium pullulans RYLF-10 with respect to several operating parameters in shake flask fermentation. The yeast A. pullulans RYLF-10 was identified by 18s RNA sequencing and detailed study on its nutritional requirements, and environmental conditions for submerged culture have been optimized. The optimal temperature and pH for both the vegetative growth and EPS production were found to be 28 ± 1 °C and 5.0, respectively, while the agitation speed and inoculum size were reported to be 150 rpm and 1 % (v/v), respectively. Sucrose (50 g/l) and yeast extract (1 g/l) were found to be the most suitable carbon and nitrogen sources which worked best in the ratio of 60:1 and resulted in the maximum EPS yield. Similarly, the other variables like growth regulator (riboflavin) and minerals (NaCl + K2HPO4 + MgSO4) altogether resulted in a noteworthy EPS yield of 45.24 g/l which is the maximum yield from this indigenous isolate of A. pullulans RYLF-10. PMID:24293276

  2. Participation of the indigenous vs. alien herbaceous species to the constitution of vegetal layer on the Bozanta Mare tailing ponds

    OpenAIRE

    Monica MARIAN; Camelia NICULA; Leonard MIHALY-COZMUTA; Anca PETER; Anca MIHALY-COZMUTA

    2010-01-01

    This study explored the distribution of different species of native and alien herbaceous species on the tailing pond Bozânta Mare (Maramureş county in NW Romania) and the differences in heavy metal uptake in the roots and shoots relative to: 1. herbaceous species; 2. differential metal uptake and variation within single-species; 3. metal content of soil substrate. In 2007-2009 the contribution of native and alien species to the herbaceous layer forming, were studied on the Bozânta Mare tailin...

  3. Participation of the indigenous vs. alien herbaceous species to the constitution of vegetal layer on the Bozanta Mare tailing ponds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica MARIAN

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available This study explored the distribution of different species of native and alien herbaceous species on the tailing pond Bozânta Mare (Maramureş county in NW Romania and the differences in heavy metal uptake in the roots and shoots relative to: 1. herbaceous species; 2. differential metal uptake and variation within single-species; 3. metal content of soil substrate. In 2007-2009 the contribution of native and alien species to the herbaceous layer forming, were studied on the Bozânta Mare tailing pond, resulted after heavy metal extraction process. The heavy metals found at elevated level in the herbaceous species included for environmental interest are: Pb, Cu, Ni, Zn, Co, Cd, Fe, Cr, Mn, Na, K. Also, the aim of this research is to evaluate the impact of the native vs. alien species presence in the colonization process on the tailing pond.

  4. Benthic non-indigenous species among indigenous species and their habitat preferences in Puck Bay (southern Baltic Sea* This work was carried out under the ‘Ecosystem Approach to Marine Spatial Planning – Polish Marine Areas and the Natura 2000 Network’ project founded by an EEA grant from Iceland, Lichtenstein and Norway and partly by research grant BW/G 220-5-0232-9.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urszula Janas

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available To date 11 non-indigenous benthic taxa have been reported in Puck Bay (southern Baltic Sea. Five of the 34 taxa forming the soft bottom communities are regarded as non-indigenous to this area. They are Marenzelleria spp., Mya arenaria, Potamopyrgus antipodarum, Gammarus tigrinus and Amphibalanus improvisus. Non-indigenous species comprised up to 33% of the total number of identified macrofaunal taxa (mean 17%. The average proportion of aliens was 6% (max 46% in the total abundance of macrofauna, and 10% (max 65% in the biomass. A significant positive relationship was found between the numbers of native and non-indigenous taxa. The number of native taxa was significantly higher on a sea bed covered with vascular plants than on an unvegetated one, but no such relationship was found for their abundance. No significant differences were found in the number and abundance of non-indigenous species between sea beds devoid of vegetation and those covered with vascular plants, Chara spp. or mats of filamentous algae. G. tigrinus preferred a sea bed with vegetation, whereas Marenzelleria spp. decidedly preferred one without vegetation.

  5. Indigenous religions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geertz, Armin W.

    2009-01-01

    Dette essay diskuterer en publikation af James L. Cox med titlen From Primitive to Indigenous (2007). Bogen analyserer forskellige forfatteres holdninger til studiet af indfødte kulturers religioner. Cox's analyser tages op i dette essay og de problematiseres i forhold til mit eget arbejde....

  6. Serological Assays Based on Recombinant Viral Proteins for the Diagnosis of Arenavirus Hemorrhagic Fevers

    OpenAIRE

    Masayuki Saijo; Shigeru Morikawa; Tomoki Yoshikawa; Hideki Tani; Shuetsu Fukushi

    2012-01-01

    The family Arenaviridae, genus Arenavirus, consists of two phylogenetically independent groups: Old World (OW) and New World (NW) complexes. The Lassa and Lujo viruses in the OW complex and the Guanarito, Junin, Machupo, Sabia, and Chapare viruses in the NW complex cause viral hemorrhagic fever (VHF) in humans, leading to serious public health concerns. These viruses are also considered potential bioterrorism agents. Therefore, it is of great importance to detect these pathogens rapidly and s...

  7. Pathogenicity of two recent Western Mediterranean West Nile virus isolates in a wild bird species indigenous to Southern Europe: the red-legged partridge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sotelo Elena

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract West Nile virus (WNV is an emerging zoonotic pathogen whose geographic spread and incidence in humans, horses and birds has increased significantly in recent years. WNV has long been considered a mild pathogen causing self-limiting outbreaks. This notion has changed as WNV is causing large epidemics with a high impact on human and animal health. This has been particularly noteworthy since its introduction into North America in 1999. There, native bird species have been shown to be highly susceptible to WNV infection and disease with high mortalities. For this reason, the effect of WNV infection in North American bird species has been thoroughly studied by means of experimental inoculations in controlled trials. To a lesser extent, European wild birds have been shown to be affected clinically by WNV infection. Yet experimental studies on European wild bird species are lacking. The red-legged partridge (Alectoris rufa is a gallinaceous bird indigenous to the Iberian Peninsula, widely distributed in South Western Europe. It plays a key role in the Mediterranean ecosystem and constitutes an economically important game species. As such it is raised intensively in outdoor facilities. In this work, red-legged partridges were experimentally infected with two recent WNV isolates from the Western Mediterranean area: Morocco/2003 and Spain/2007. All inoculated birds became viremic and showed clinical disease, with mortality rates of 70% and 30%, respectively. These results show that Western Mediterranean WNV variants can be pathogenic for some European bird species, such as the red-legged partridge.

  8. Measuring the Economic Value of a Marine Protection Program against the Introduction of Non-Indigenous Species in the Netherlands

    OpenAIRE

    Paulo A.L.D. Nunes; van den Bergh, Jeroen C. J. M.

    2002-01-01

    Harmful algal bIoom species are the cause of important damages to marine living resources and human beings. These marine species are primarily introduced in North-European waters through ballast water, i.e. water trans-ported across the oceans so as to keep a vessel in balance. Port authorities can impose standards on ballast water treatment, which are associated with costs. This, in turn, leads to the question which benefits are associated with the commitment of such standards. Monetary valu...

  9. Assisting Australian indigenous resource management and sustainable utilization of species through the use of GIS and environmental modeling techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorman, Julian; Pearson, Diane; Whitehead, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Information on distribution and relative abundance of species is integral to sustainable management, especially if they are to be harvested for subsistence or commerce. In northern Australia, natural landscapes are vast, centers of population few, access is difficult, and Aboriginal resource centers and communities have limited funds and infrastructure. Consequently defining distribution and relative abundance by comprehensive ground survey is difficult and expensive. This highlights the need for simple, cheap, automated methodologies to predict the distribution of species in use, or having potential for use, in commercial enterprise. The technique applied here uses a Geographic Information System (GIS) to make predictions of probability of occurrence using an inductive modeling technique based on Bayes' theorem. The study area is in the Maningrida region, central Arnhem Land, in the Northern Territory, Australia. The species examined, Cycas arnhemica and Brachychiton diversifolius, are currently being 'wild harvested' in commercial trials, involving sale of decorative plants and use as carving wood, respectively. This study involved limited and relatively simple ground surveys requiring approximately 7 days of effort for each species. The overall model performance was evaluated using Cohen's kappa statistics. The predictive ability of the model for C. arnhemica was classified as moderate and for B. diversifolius as fair. The difference in model performance can be attributed to the pattern of distribution of these species. C. arnhemica tends to occur in a clumped distribution due to relatively short distance dispersal of its large seeds and vegetative growth from long-lived rhizomes, while B. diversifolius seeds are smaller and more widely dispersed across the landscape. The output from analysis predicts trends in species distribution that are consistent with independent on-site sampling for each species and therefore should prove useful in gauging the extent of

  10. Solid-substrate fermentation of wheat grains by mycelia of indigenous species of the genus Ganoderma (higher Basidiomycetes) to enhance the antioxidant activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Sarasvathy; Sabaratnam, Vikineswary; Kuppusamy, Umah Rani; Tan, Yee Shin

    2014-01-01

    Species of the genus Ganoderma are a cosmopolitan wood decaying white rot fungi, which has been used by the Asians for therapeutic purposes for centuries. In the present study, solid-substrate fermentation (SSF) of wheat grains (Triticum aestivum L.) was carried out with indigenous Ganoderma australe (KUM60813) and G. neo-japonicum (KUM61076) selected based on ethnomycological knowledge. G. lucidum (VITA GL) (a commercial strain) was also included in the study. Antioxidant activities of the crude ethanol and aqueous extracts of the fermented and unfermented wheat grains were investigated by ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP), Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC), diphenyl-1-picryl-hydrazyl (DPPH) free radical scavenging ability, and lipid peroxidation assay. Among the six mycelia extracts tested, the ethanol extract from wheat fermented with KUM61076 mycelia showed the most potent antioxidant activities, whereas the ethanol extract of wheat grains fermented with KUM60813 mycelia has a good potential in protecting frying oils against oxidation. Total phenolic content (TPC) in the ethanol extracts were higher than that in the aqueous extract. The wheat grains fermented with G. australe (KUM60813) and G. neo-japonicum KUM61076 have greater antioxidant potential compared to the commercially available G. lucidum (VITA GL). The antioxidant activities of the mycelia extracts had a positive correlation with their phenolic contents. Thus phenolic compounds may play a vital role in the antioxidant activities of the selected Ganoderma spp. PMID:24941167

  11. Attenuation of lead leachability in shooting range soils using poultry waste amendments in combination with indigenous plant species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Yohey; Matsufuru, Hiroki; Sato, Takeshi

    2008-10-01

    Chemical immobilization technology utilizing poultry waste (PW) along with a native plant (Panicum maximum Jacq.) application was assessed for the attenuation of downward Pb dissolution and modification of Pb speciation in solid and liquid phases in the soil. A large column study with and without plant and PW applications was conducted using a Pb contaminated soil collected from a shooting range area. The PW application reduced water-extractable Pb by about 43% of that of the treatment without the PW and plant applications (Control). The cumulative Pb amount in column leachates over 100d was increased by the PW amendment (0.32mg) compared to Control (0.27mg), but was reduced to 0.23mg by the combined use of plant and PW amendment. Sequential extraction analysis revealed that the Pb fractions of PW-amended soils were shifted to less soluble phases as indicated by an increased residual fraction (20%) and decreased exchangeable and carbonate fractions (22%) than those in the Control soil. Thermodynamic equilibrium calculations demonstrated that predicted Pb(2+) activity was saturated with respect to cerussite in the Control soil and was supersaturated with respect to chloropyromorphite in the PW-amended soils. Our results suggest that the use of plant in combination with PW as a Pb immobilizing amendment attenuated downward Pb leaching and altered Pb species to more geochemically stable phases. PMID:18752832

  12. Empowering Indigenous Women

    OpenAIRE

    Quesada, Helena

    2014-01-01

    Indigenous People movements are present in Latin American regions since the 80’s (Betancur, 2011:7) In the case of Peru, the State has incorporated international treatments related to indigenous people rights, such as ILO 169 Convention as well as the United Nation’s Declaration of Indigenous people rights. (Chirif and García, 2011:116) Despite of this, indigenous people are still victims of racism, exploitation and discrimination nowadays. Recently, inside indigenous people own movement,...

  13. Diagnóstico virológico y molecular de virus transmitidos por roedores. Hantavirus y arenavirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvana Levis

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Los hantavirus (familia Bunyaviridae y arenavirus (familia Arenaviridae son virus de roedores; cada uno de ellos parece estar estrictamente asociado con una especie de roedor en la que causa una infección persistente y asintomática. En las Américas tienen como reservorios primarios a roedores de la sub-familia Sigmodontinae, y son causantes de síndrome pulmonar por Hantavirus (SPH y fiebres hemorrágicas, respectivamente (1,2. El número de estos virus identificados en los últimos años ha aumentado significativamente; actualmente, el género Hantavirus está compuesto por más de 28 tipos diferentes, mientras que al menos 23 arenavirus conforman el género Arenavirus. Entre los hantavirus asociados con SPH se destacan el virus Sin Nombre en Norteamérica, y los virus Andes, Laguna Negra, Caño Delgadito, Araraquara y Juquitiba, en el cono sur de América, entre otros (2. Los arenavirus asociados a fiebres hemorrágicas reconocidos en Sud América al presente son: Junín (Argentina, Guanarito (Venezuela, Sabiá (Brasil, y Machupo y Chapare (Bolivia (3.

  14. An antiviral disulfide compound blocks interaction between arenavirus Z protein and cellular promyelocytic leukemia protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The promyelocytic leukemia protein (PML) forms nuclear bodies (NB) that can be redistributed by virus infection. In particular, lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) influences disruption of PML NB through the interaction of PML with the arenaviral Z protein. In a previous report, we have shown that the disulfide compound NSC20625 has antiviral and virucidal properties against arenaviruses, inducing unfolding and oligomerization of Z without affecting cellular RING-containing proteins such as the PML. Here, we further studied the effect of the zinc-finger-reactive disulfide NSC20625 on PML-Z interaction. In HepG2 cells infected with LCMV or transiently transfected with Z protein constructs, treatment with NSC20625 restored PML distribution from a diffuse-cytoplasmic pattern to punctate, discrete NB which appeared identical to NB found in control, uninfected cells. Similar results were obtained in cells transfected with a construct expressing a Z mutant in zinc-binding site 2 of the RING domain, confirming that this Z-PML interaction requires the integrity of only one zinc-binding site. Altogether, these results show that the compound NSC20625 suppressed Z-mediated PML NB disruption and may be used as a tool for designing novel antiviral strategies against arenavirus infection.

  15. Old World and Clade C New World Arenaviruses Mimic the Molecular Mechanism of Receptor Recognition Used by α-Dystroglycan's Host-Derived Ligands▿

    OpenAIRE

    Rojek, Jillian M.; Spiropoulou, Christina F.; Campbell, Kevin P.; Kunz, Stefan

    2007-01-01

    α-Dystroglycan (DG) is an important cellular receptor for extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins and also serves as the receptor for Old World arenaviruses Lassa fever virus (LFV) and lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) and clade C New World arenaviruses. In the host cell, α-DG is subject to a remarkably complex pattern of O glycosylation that is crucial for its interactions with ECM proteins. Two of these unusual sugar modifications, protein O mannosylation and glycan modifications involv...

  16. Old World Arenaviruses Enter the Host Cell via the Multivesicular Body and Depend on the Endosomal Sorting Complex Required for Transport

    OpenAIRE

    Pasqual, Giulia; Rojek, Jillian M.; Masin, Mark; Chatton, Jean-Yves; Kunz, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    The highly pathogenic Old World arenavirus Lassa virus (LASV) and the prototypic arenavirus lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) use α-dystroglycan as a cellular receptor and enter the host cell by an unusual endocytotic pathway independent of clathrin, caveolin, dynamin, and actin. Upon internalization, the viruses are delivered to acidified endosomes in a Rab5-independent manner bypassing classical routes of incoming vesicular trafficking. Here we sought to identify cellular factors in...

  17. Old world arenaviruses enter the host cell via the multivesicular body and depend on the endosomal sorting complex required for transport.

    OpenAIRE

    Pasqual G.; Rojek J.M.; Masin M.; Chatton J.Y.; Kunz S.

    2011-01-01

    The highly pathogenic Old World arenavirus Lassa virus (LASV) and the prototypic arenavirus lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) use α-dystroglycan as a cellular receptor and enter the host cell by an unusual endocytotic pathway independent of clathrin, caveolin, dynamin, and actin. Upon internalization, the viruses are delivered to acidified endosomes in a Rab5-independent manner bypassing classical routes of incoming vesicular trafficking. Here we sought to identify cellular facto...

  18. Indigenous Education in Mexico: Indigenous Students' Voices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Despagne, Colette

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to investigate whether, despite a shift in political and educational discourses over the last decades that suggests that Indigenous cultures and languages are recognized, any real change has occurred in terms of Indigenous education in Mexico. It is possible that official bilingual intercultural education is still…

  19. Why Indigenous Nations Studies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Robert; Yellow Bird, Michael

    2000-01-01

    The development of a new Indigenous Nations Studies program at the University of Kansas is described. Success depended on a critical mass of Indigenous and non-Indigenous faculty and students that had a sense of political and social justice and understood the need for institutional change. The biggest challenge was countering the entrenched…

  20. Indigenous Storytelling in Namibia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodil, Kasper; Winschiers-Theophilus, Heike

    2016-01-01

    fairytales to outsiders with little relevance to the physical world, they are very functional and foundational for communities where storytelling is enacted. This paper debates concepts related to indigenous storytelling and its relevance to knowledge and learning for indigenous youths. In an attempt to...... understand indigenous youths’ own conception of storytelling the paper presents empirical data from a study with indigenous Khoisan children in Namibia. This is followed by a discussion of an effort of digitizing indigenous intangible cultural heritage in relation to technologies’ embodied bias and...

  1. Gairo virus, a novel arenavirus of the widespread Mastomys natalensis: Genetically divergent, but ecologically similar to Lassa and Morogoro viruses

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gryseels, S.; Rieger, T.; Oestereich, L.; Cuypers, B.; Borremans, B.; Makundi, R.; Leirs, H.; Günther, S.; Goüy de Bellocq, Joëlle

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 476, February (2015), s. 249-256. ISSN 0042-6822 R&D Projects: GA ČR GCP502/11/J070; GA MŠk EE2.3.20.0303 Institutional support: RVO:68081766 Keywords : Arenavirus * Mastomys natalensis * Tanzania * Virology * Phylogeny * Ecology * Zoonotic infections * Hemorrhagic fevers Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 3.321, year: 2014

  2. Posttranslational Modification of α-Dystroglycan, the Cellular Receptor for Arenaviruses, by the Glycosyltransferase LARGE Is Critical for Virus Binding

    OpenAIRE

    Kunz, Stefan; Rojek, Jillian M.; Kanagawa, Motoi; Spiropoulou, Christina F.; Barresi, Rita; Campbell, Kevin P.; Oldstone, Michael B A

    2005-01-01

    The receptor for lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV), the human pathogenic Lassa fever virus (LFV), and clade C New World arenaviruses is α-dystroglycan (α-DG), a cell surface receptor for proteins of the extracellular matrix (ECM). Specific posttranslational modification of α-DG by the glycosyltransferase LARGE is critical for its function as an ECM receptor. In the present study, we show that LARGE-dependent modification is also crucial for α-DG's function as a cellular receptor for a...

  3. Indigenous actinorhizal plants of Australia

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nishath K Ganguli; Ivan R Kennedy

    2013-11-01

    Indigenous species of actinorhizal plants of Casuarinaceae, Elaeagnaceae and Rhamnaceae are found in specific regions of Australia. Most of these plants belong to Casuarinaceae, the dominant actinorhizal family in Australia. Many of them have significant environmental and economical value. The other two families with their indigenous actinorhizal plants have only a minor presence in Australia. Most Australian actinorhizal plants have their native range only in Australia, whereas two of these plants are also found indigenously elsewhere. The nitrogen-fixing ability of these plants varies between species. This ability needs to be investigated in some of these plants. Casuarinas form a distinctive but declining part of the Australian landscape. Their potential has rarely been applied in forestry in Australia despite their well-known uses, which are being judiciously exploited elsewhere. To remedy this oversight, a programme has been proposed for increasing and improving casuarinas that would aid in greening more regions of Australia, increasing the soil fertility and the area of wild life habitat (including endangered species). Whether these improved clones would be productive with local strains of Frankia or they need an external inoculum of Frankia should be determined and the influence of mycorrhizal fungi on these clones also should be investigated.

  4. Detection of arenavirus in a peripheral odontogenic fibromyxoma in a red tail boa (Boa constrictor constrictor) with inclusion body disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellebuyck, Tom; Pasmans, Frank; Ducatelle, Richard; Saey, Veronique; Martel, An

    2015-03-01

    A captive bred red tail boa (Boa constrictor constrictor) was presented with a large intraoral mass originating from the buccal gingiva, attached to the right dentary teeth row. Based on the clinical features and histological examination, the diagnosis of a peripheral odontogenic fibromyxoma was made. Sections of liver biopsies and circulating lymphocytes contained relatively few eosinophilic intracytoplasmic inclusion bodies, indistinguishable from those observed in inclusion body disease-affected snakes. Inclusion bodies were not observed in cells comprising the neoplastic mass. Using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), arenavirus was detected in the neoplastic tissue. Two years after surgical removal of the mass, recurrence of the neoplastic lesion was observed. Numerous large inclusion body disease inclusions were abundantly present in the neoplastic cells of the recurrent fibromyxoma. Sections of liver biopsies and circulating lymphocytes contained relatively few intracytoplasmic inclusions. The RT-PCR revealed the presence of arenavirus in blood, a liver biopsy, and neoplastic tissue. The present case describes the co-occurrence of an arenavirus infection and an odontogenic fibromyxoma in a red tail boa. PMID:25776548

  5. Uncovering Viral Protein-Protein Interactions and their Role in Arenavirus Life Cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nora López

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The Arenaviridae family includes widely distributed pathogens that cause severe hemorrhagic fever in humans. Replication and packaging of their single-stranded RNA genome involve RNA recognition by viral proteins and a number of key protein-protein interactions. Viral RNA synthesis is directed by the virus-encoded RNA dependent-RNA polymerase (L protein and requires viral RNA encapsidation by the Nucleoprotein. In addition to the role that the interaction between L and the Nucleoprotein may have in the replication process, polymerase activity appears to be modulated by the association between L and the small multifunctional Z protein. Z is also a structural component of the virions that plays an essential role in viral morphogenesis. Indeed, interaction of the Z protein with the Nucleoprotein is critical for genome packaging. Furthermore, current evidence suggests that binding between Z and the viral envelope glycoprotein complex is required for virion infectivity, and that Z homo-oligomerization is an essential step for particle assembly and budding. Efforts to understand the molecular basis of arenavirus life cycle have revealed important details on these viral protein-protein interactions that will be reviewed in this article.

  6. Diagnóstico virológico y molecular de virus transmitidos por roedores. Hantavirus y arenavirus

    OpenAIRE

    Silvana Levis

    2010-01-01

    Los hantavirus (familia Bunyaviridae) y arenavirus (familia Arenaviridae) son virus de roedores; cada uno de ellos parece estar estrictamente asociado con una especie de roedor en la que causa una infección persistente y asintomática. En las Américas tienen como reservorios primarios a roedores de la sub-familia Sigmodontinae, y son causantes de síndrome pulmonar por Hantavirus (SPH) y fiebres hemorrágicas, respectivamente (1,2). El número de estos virus identificados en los últimos años ha a...

  7. The role of proteolytic processing and the stable signal peptide in expression of the Old World arenavirus envelope glycoprotein ectodomain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burri, Dominique J.; Pasquato, Antonella; da Palma, Joel Ramos; Igonet, Sebastien; Oldstone, Michael B.A.; Kunz, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    Maturation of the arenavirus GP precursor (GPC) involves proteolytic processing by cellular signal peptidase and the proprotein convertase subtilisin kexin isozyme 1 (SKI-1)/site 1 protease (S1P), yielding a tripartite complex comprised of a stable signal peptide (SSP), the receptor-binding GP1, and the fusion-active transmembrane GP2. Here we investigated the roles of SKI-1/S1P processing and SSP in the biosynthesis of the recombinant GP ectodomains of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) and Lassa virus (LASV). When expressed in mammalian cells, the LCMV and LASV GP ectodomains underwent processing by SKI-1/S1P, followed by dissociation of GP1 from GP2. The GP2 ectodomain spontaneously formed trimers as revealed by chemical cross-linking. The endogenous SSP, known to be crucial for maturation and transport of full-length arenavirus GPC was dispensable for processing and secretion of the soluble GP ectodomain, suggesting a specific role of SSP in the stable prefusion conformation and transport of full-length GPC. PMID:23218200

  8. The role of proteolytic processing and the stable signal peptide in expression of the Old World arenavirus envelope glycoprotein ectodomain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burri, Dominique J.; Pasquato, Antonella; Ramos da Palma, Joel [Institute of Microbiology, University Hospital Center and University of Lausanne, Lausanne CH-1011 (Switzerland); Igonet, Sebastien; Oldstone, Michael B.A. [Department of Immunology and Microbial Science, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA 92037 (United States); Kunz, Stefan, E-mail: Stefan.Kunz@chuv.ch [Institute of Microbiology, University Hospital Center and University of Lausanne, Lausanne CH-1011 (Switzerland)

    2013-02-05

    Maturation of the arenavirus GP precursor (GPC) involves proteolytic processing by cellular signal peptidase and the proprotein convertase subtilisin kexin isozyme 1 (SKI-1)/site 1 protease (S1P), yielding a tripartite complex comprised of a stable signal peptide (SSP), the receptor-binding GP1, and the fusion-active transmembrane GP2. Here we investigated the roles of SKI-1/S1P processing and SSP in the biosynthesis of the recombinant GP ectodomains of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) and Lassa virus (LASV). When expressed in mammalian cells, the LCMV and LASV GP ectodomains underwent processing by SKI-1/S1P, followed by dissociation of GP1 from GP2. The GP2 ectodomain spontaneously formed trimers as revealed by chemical cross-linking. The endogenous SSP, known to be crucial for maturation and transport of full-length arenavirus GPC was dispensable for processing and secretion of the soluble GP ectodomain, suggesting a specific role of SSP in the stable prefusion conformation and transport of full-length GPC.

  9. The role of proteolytic processing and the stable signal peptide in expression of the Old World arenavirus envelope glycoprotein ectodomain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maturation of the arenavirus GP precursor (GPC) involves proteolytic processing by cellular signal peptidase and the proprotein convertase subtilisin kexin isozyme 1 (SKI-1)/site 1 protease (S1P), yielding a tripartite complex comprised of a stable signal peptide (SSP), the receptor-binding GP1, and the fusion-active transmembrane GP2. Here we investigated the roles of SKI-1/S1P processing and SSP in the biosynthesis of the recombinant GP ectodomains of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) and Lassa virus (LASV). When expressed in mammalian cells, the LCMV and LASV GP ectodomains underwent processing by SKI-1/S1P, followed by dissociation of GP1 from GP2. The GP2 ectodomain spontaneously formed trimers as revealed by chemical cross-linking. The endogenous SSP, known to be crucial for maturation and transport of full-length arenavirus GPC was dispensable for processing and secretion of the soluble GP ectodomain, suggesting a specific role of SSP in the stable prefusion conformation and transport of full-length GPC.

  10. High vitamin A content in some small indigenous fish species in Bangladesh: perspectives for food-based strategies to reduce vitamin A deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roos, N.; Leth, Torben; Jakobsen, Jette

    2002-01-01

    Recognising the importance of fish in the Bangladeshi diet, the objective of the present study was to screen commonly consumed fish species for vitamin A content to evaluate the potential of fish as a vitamin A source in food-based strategies to combat vitamin A deficiency. Samples of 26 commonly...... (Colisa lalia; an alternative scientific name is Colisa lalius). The vitamin A content in cultured species, silver carp (Hypophthalmichthys molitrix), rui (Labeo rohita), mrigal (Cirrhinus mrigala) and tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) was low,...

  11. The future of the indigenous freshwater crayfish Austropotamobius italicus in Basque Country streams: Is it possible to survive being an inconvenient species?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. García-Arberas

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The white-clawed freshwater crayfish Austropotamobius italicus is listed as “vulnerable” in the Spanish Red List of threatened species, but local legislation varies among Spanish regions. Thus, while in some places the species is classified as “in risk of extinction” and various plans of conservation and restoration have been implemented, in the Basque Country and other regions the species is not listed. The distribution of the white-clawed crayfish in the province of Biscay (Basque Country was studied from 1993 to 2007 at more than 600 sampling locations. Results show that 108 streams were inhabited by the native crayfish species A. italicus while 137 streams were inhabited by non-native signal crayfish Pacifastacus leniusculus or red-swamp crayfish Procambarus clarkii. The spread of non-native crayfish is not the only threat to the native species whose survival is also closely dependent on how watersheds are managed. Most A. italicus populations inhabit headwaters, where forestry activities are very important. The presence of native crayfish in heavily forested areas results in a conflict of interests and makes its conservation particularly difficult. We employed a SWOT analysis – an assessment and decision tool commonly used in marketing and business – to evaluate the situation of the native white-clawed crayfish in Biscay, a province characterized by very high demographic pressure. SWOT analysis has proved to be a useful diagnostic tool and can help develop better and more accurate management strategies for the conservation of native crayfish threatened by multiple stressors.

  12. Modelos animales de fiebres hemorrágicas humanas producidas por arenavirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan D. Rodas

    2004-03-01

    ón cruzada entre las dos cepas de LCMV se observó también cuando 2 primates inoculados iv o ig con la cepa Armtrong (ARM sobrevivieron el desafío letal con la cepa WE. Tres de los 7 monos que experimentaron protección al desafío letal fueron también los mismos que exhibieron la más fuerte inmunidad medida por células.

     

    REFERENCIAS

    1. SALVATO, M. S., AND S. K. RAI. 1997. Arenaviruses, p. 629-650. In B. Mahy (ed., Topley and Wilson’s microbiology and microbiology and microbial infections, 9th ed. Arnold, London, United Kingdom.

    2. LUKASHEVICH, I. S., M. DJAVANI, J. D. RODAS, J. C. ZAPATA, A. USBORNE, C. EMERSON, J. MITCHEN, P. B. JAHRLING, AND M. S. SALVATO. Hemorrhagic fever occurs after intravenous, but not after intragastric, inoculation of rhesus macaques with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus. J Med Virol 2002; 67: 171-86.

    3. LUKASHEVICH, I. S., I. TIKHONOV, J. D. RODAS, J. C. ZAPATA, Y. YANG, M. DJAVANI, AND M. S. SALVATO. Arenavirus-mediated liver pathology: acute lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus infection of rhesus macaques is characterized by high-level interleukin-6 expression and hepatocyte proliferation. J Virol 2003; 77: 1727-37.

    4. RODAS JD, LUKASHEVICH I, ZAPATA JC, CAIRO C, TIKHONOV I, DJAVANI M, PAUZA D AND SALVATO M. Mucosal arenavirus infection of primates can protect from lethal hemorrhagic fever. J Med Virol 2004. 72: 424-435.

  13. [Effects of introducing Eucalyptus on indigenous biodiversity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ping, Liang; Xie, Zong-Qiang

    2009-07-01

    Eucalyptus is well-known as an effective reforestation tree species, due to its fast growth and high adaptability to various environments. However, the introduction of Eucalyptus could have negative effects on the local environment, e. g., inducing soil degradation, decline of groundwater level, and decrease of biodiversity, and especially, there still have controversies on the effects of introduced Eucalyptus on the understory biodiversity of indigenous plant communities and related mechanisms. Based on a detailed analysis of the literatures at home and abroad, it was considered that the indigenous plant species in the majority of introduced Eucalyptus plantations were lesser than those in natural forests and indigenous species plantations but more than those in other exotic species plantations, mainly due to the unique eco-physiological characteristics of Eucalyptus and the irrational plantation design and harvesting techniques, among which, anthropogenic factors played leading roles. Be that as it may, the negative effects of introducing Eucalyptus on local plant biodiversity could be minimized via more rigorous scientific plantation design and management based on local plant community characteristics. To mitigate the negative effects of Eucalyptus introduction, the native trees and understory vegetation in plantations should be kept intact during reforestation with Eucalyptus to favor the normal development of plant community and regeneration. At the same time, human disturbance should be minimized to facilitate the natural regeneration of native species. PMID:19899483

  14. Indigenous Continuance: Collaboration and Syncretism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Simon J.

    2011-01-01

    In this keynote address, the author talks about Indigenous peoples who are presently in a dynamic circumstance of constant change that they are facing courageously with creative collaboration and syncretism. In the address, the author speaks "of" an Indigenous consciousness and he speaks "with" an Indigenous consciousness so that Indigenous…

  15. Indigenous knowledge for plant species diversity: a case study of wild plants' folk names used by the Mongolians in Ejina desert area, Inner Mongolia, P. R. China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khasbagan; Soyolt

    2008-01-01

    Folk names of plants are the roots of traditional plant biodiversity knowledge. This paper mainly records and analyses the wild plant folk names of the Mongolians in the Ejina desert area based on a field survey for collection and identification of voucher specimens. The results show that a total of 121 folk names of local plants have correspondence with 93 scientific species which belong to 26 families and 70 genera. The correspondence between plants' Mongol folk names and scientific species may be classified as one to one correspondence, multitude to one correspondence and one to multitude correspondence. The Ejina Mongolian plant folk names were formed on the basis of observations and an understanding of the wild plants growing in their desert environment. The high correspondence between folk names and scientific names shows the scientific meaning of folk botanical nomenclature and classification. It is very useful to take an inventory of biodiversity, especially among the rapid rural appraisal (RRA) in studying biodiversity at the community level. PMID:18199323

  16. Indigenous knowledge for plant species diversity: a case study of wild plants' folk names used by the Mongolians in Ejina desert area, Inner Mongolia, P. R. China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soyolt

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Folk names of plants are the roots of traditional plant biodiversity knowledge. This paper mainly records and analyses the wild plant folk names of the Mongolians in the Ejina desert area based on a field survey for collection and identification of voucher specimens. The results show that a total of 121 folk names of local plants have correspondence with 93 scientific species which belong to 26 families and 70 genera. The correspondence between plants' Mongol folk names and scientific species may be classified as one to one correspondence, multitude to one correspondence and one to multitude correspondence. The Ejina Mongolian plant folk names were formed on the basis of observations and an understanding of the wild plants growing in their desert environment. The high correspondence between folk names and scientific names shows the scientific meaning of folk botanical nomenclature and classification. It is very useful to take an inventory of biodiversity, especially among the rapid rural appraisal (RRA in studying biodiversity at the community level.

  17. Designing Indigenous Language Revitalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermes, Mary; Bang, Megan; Marin, Ananda

    2012-01-01

    Endangered Indigenous languages have received little attention within the American educational research community. However, within Native American communities, language revitalization is pushing education beyond former iterations of culturally relevant curriculum and has the potential to radically alter how we understand culture and language in…

  18. Population structure of four Thai indigenous chicken breeds

    OpenAIRE

    Mekchay, Supamit; Supakankul, Pantaporn; Assawamakin, Anunchai; Wilantho, Alisa; Chareanchim, Wanwisa; Tongsima, Sissades

    2014-01-01

    Background In recent years, Thai indigenous chickens have increasingly been bred as an alternative in Thailand poultry market. Due to their popularity, there is a clear need to improve the underlying quality and productivity of these chickens. Studying chicken genetic variation can improve the chicken meat quality as well as conserving rare chicken species. To begin with, a minimal set of molecular markers that can characterize the Thai indigenous chicken breeds is required. Results Using AFL...

  19. Indigenous community-based fisheries in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Jennifer; Hill, Greg

    2007-12-01

    The commercial sea cucumber species known as Sandfish (Holothuria scabra) occurs intertidally and subtidally in the Northern Territory of Australia, on or adjacent to Aboriginal land. A 4-yr program of community-based fisheries research with Aboriginal Australians was implemented to assess the viability of indigenous Australians' involvement in the wild-stock fishery. The research involved extensive and intensive indigenous participation, unusual in Australian biophysical sciences research, during field survey and habitat mapping, complemented by commercial catch data modelling and discussion of its implications. Field surveys produced Sandfish distribution and site-specific density, and revealed some areas that were not commercially fished. Catch data modelling results suggested that no additional effort could be sustained, however commercial fishers increased their effort, expanding their operations into the newly mapped areas. These actions effectively precluded indigenous peoples' aspirations of entry into the commercial fishery. The efficacy and outcomes of participatory program design with indigenous Australians need critique in the absence of the political will and statutory backing to provide equitable access to resources. PMID:17175093

  20. An attenuated Lassa vaccine in SIV-infected rhesus macaques does not persist or cause arenavirus disease but does elicit Lassa virus-specific immunity

    OpenAIRE

    Zapata, Juan C.; Poonia, Bhawna; Bryant, Joseph; Davis, Harry; Ateh, Eugene; George, Lanea; Crasta, Oswald R.; Yan ZHANG; Slezak, Tom; Jaing, Crystal; Pauza, C D; Goicochea, Marco; Moshkoff, Dmitry; Lukashevich, Igor S.; Salvato, Maria S.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Lassa hemorrhagic fever (LHF) is a rodent-borne viral disease that can be fatal for human beings. In this study, an attenuated Lassa vaccine candidate, ML29, was tested in SIV-infected rhesus macaques for its ability to elicit immune responses without instigating signs pathognomonic for arenavirus disease. ML29 is a reassortant between Lassa and Mopeia viruses that causes a transient infection in non-human primates and confers sterilizing protection from lethal Lassa viral...

  1. Indigenous Australian Education and Globalisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Wendy

    1997-09-01

    This article focuses on the impact of colonisation and its associated impact on Indigenous teaching and learning. Western European institutions have dominated Indigenous ways of knowing and in Australia this has led to barriers which restrict the participation of Aboriginal people in education systems. Globally Indigenous people are attempting to bring into the introduced educational systems culturally appropriate teaching and learning practices so that a more holistic approach to education can become the norm rather than the exception. The relationship between Indigenous knowledge and western European concepts of knowledge and knowing need to placed in a framework of mutual interaction so that not only do Indigenous people benefit, but so do non-Indigenous educators and students.

  2. Indigenous Language Immersion Schools for Strong Indigenous Identities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyhner, Jon

    2010-01-01

    Drawing on evidence from indigenous language immersion programs in the United States, this article makes the case that these immersion programs are vital to healing the negative effects of colonialism and assimilationist schooling that have disrupted many indigenous homes and communities. It describes how these programs are furthering efforts to…

  3. The Double Binds of Indigeneity and Indigenous Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francis Ludlow

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available During the twentieth century, indigenous peoples have often embraced the category of indigenous while also having to face the ambiguities and limitations of this concept. Indigeneity, whether represented by indigenous people themselves or others, tends to face a “double bind”, as defined by Gregory Bateson, in which “no matter what a person does, he can’t win.” One exit strategy suggested by Bateson is meta-communication—communication about communication—in which new solutions emerge from a questioning of system-internal assumptions. We offer case studies from Ecuador, Peru and Alaska that chart some recent indigenous experiences and strategies for such scenarios.

  4. Indigenous innovation in China

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jin, Jun; Slepniov, Dmitrij

    2012-01-01

    their own in-house resources. The development and implementation of indigenous innovation solutions for these companies is an imperative which has not been adequately addressed in the literature. Therefore, by employing an explorative case of a Chinese company behind an innovative logistics concept......In the past two decades, China has earned the reputation of ‘manufacturing power house’ of the world. Chinese companies in their vast numbers have been very successful in exploiting their access to low-cost labour and have established themselves as unbeatable high volume low-cost manufacturing...

  5. Information Technology and Indigenous People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyson, Laurel, Ed.; Hendriks, Max, Ed.; Grant, Stephen, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    Information Technology and Indigenous People provides theoretical and empirical information related to the planning and execution of IT projects aimed at serving indigenous people. It explores many cultural concerns with IT implementation, including language issues and questions of cultural appropriateness, and brings together cutting-edge…

  6. Indigenous Empowerment through Collective Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enn, Rosa

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to draw attention to an indigenous community that lives in the periphery of Taiwan. The Dao on Orchid Island have had to face serious abuse of their human rights in terms of ecological exploitation and environmental injustice. The article highlights the empowerment of the indigenous group through collective…

  7. Plasmin: indigenous milk proteinase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samir Kalit

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available The most important characteristic of plasmin, as significant indigenous milk proteinase, its concentration, concentration measuring procedure and activity of plasmin are described. The most important factors, which have an influence on concentration and plasmin activity in milk, are stage of lactation and mastitis (high somatic cell count – SCC. In high SCC milk indigenous proteinase activity increased, especially in plasmin and plasminogen system.Specific hydrolytic activity of plasmin during primary proteolysis of some casein fractions is described. ß-CN is most susceptible fraction, but αs1-CN and αs2-Cn are less susceptible to degradation by plasmin. Almost all fractions of κ-CN are resistant to degradation by plasmin. Activation of plasminogen to plasmin is very complex biochemical process influenced by activators and inhibitors in milk, and can be increased in high SCC milk. There are many various types of inhibitors in milk serum and ßlactoglobulin is the most important after its thermal denaturation. Addition of aprotinin and soybean tripsin inhibitors in milk inhibits plasmin activity. Most important characteristic of plasmin is its thermostability onpasteurisation and even sterilisation. Mechanism of thermal inactivation of plasmin with developing covalent disulphide interaction between molecule of plasmin and serum proteins (mostly ß-laktoglobulin is described. Thermosensitive inhibitors of plasminogen activators and inhibitors of plasmin are inactivated by short pasteurisation and therefore increase plasmin activity,while higher temperature and longer treatment time inactivate plasmin activity.

  8. Indigenous Educational Attainment in Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine E. Gordon

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this article, the educational attainment of Indigenous peoples of working age (25 to 64 years in Canada is examined. This diverse population has typically had lower educational levels than the general population in Canada. Results indicate that, while on the positive side there are a greater number of highly educated Indigenous peoples, there is also a continuing gap between Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples. Data also indicate that the proportion with less than high school education declined, which corresponds with a rise of those with a PSE; the reverse was true in 1996. Despite these gains, however, the large and increasing absolute numbers of those without a high school education is alarming. There are intra-Indigenous differences: First Nations with Indian Status and the Inuit are not doing as well as non-Status and Métis peoples. Comparisons between the Indigenous and non-Indigenous populations reveal that the documented gap in post-secondary educational attainment is at best stagnant. Out of the data analysis, and based on the history of educational policy, we comment on the current reform proposed by the Government of Canada, announced in February of 2014, and propose several policy recommendations to move educational attainment forward.

  9. Old world arenaviruses enter the host cell via the multivesicular body and depend on the endosomal sorting complex required for transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasqual, Giulia; Rojek, Jillian M; Masin, Mark; Chatton, Jean-Yves; Kunz, Stefan

    2011-09-01

    The highly pathogenic Old World arenavirus Lassa virus (LASV) and the prototypic arenavirus lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) use α-dystroglycan as a cellular receptor and enter the host cell by an unusual endocytotic pathway independent of clathrin, caveolin, dynamin, and actin. Upon internalization, the viruses are delivered to acidified endosomes in a Rab5-independent manner bypassing classical routes of incoming vesicular trafficking. Here we sought to identify cellular factors involved in the unusual and largely unknown entry pathway of LASV and LCMV. Cell entry of LASV and LCMV required microtubular transport to late endosomes, consistent with the low fusion pH of the viral envelope glycoproteins. Productive infection with recombinant LCMV expressing LASV envelope glycoprotein (rLCMV-LASVGP) and LCMV depended on phosphatidyl inositol 3-kinase (PI3K) as well as lysobisphosphatidic acid (LBPA), an unusual phospholipid that is involved in the formation of intraluminal vesicles (ILV) of the multivesicular body (MVB) of the late endosome. We provide evidence for a role of the endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) in LASV and LCMV cell entry, in particular the ESCRT components Hrs, Tsg101, Vps22, and Vps24, as well as the ESCRT-associated ATPase Vps4 involved in fission of ILV. Productive infection with rLCMV-LASVGP and LCMV also critically depended on the ESCRT-associated protein Alix, which is implicated in membrane dynamics of the MVB/late endosomes. Our study identifies crucial cellular factors implicated in Old World arenavirus cell entry and indicates that LASV and LCMV invade the host cell passing via the MVB/late endosome. Our data further suggest that the virus-receptor complexes undergo sorting into ILV of the MVB mediated by the ESCRT, possibly using a pathway that may be linked to the cellular trafficking and degradation of the cellular receptor. PMID:21931550

  10. Factors Affecting Indigenous West Australians' Health Behavior: Indigenous Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waterworth, Pippa; Dimmock, James; Pescud, Melanie; Braham, Rebecca; Rosenberg, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The factors driving the disparity in health outcomes between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians include socio-economic factors, racism, and history. The current study focused on exploring Indigenous participants' perspectives of the factors that affect the health behavior of their community members. Participatory action research methodology and a grounded theory approach were utilized. In total, 120 members of two urban West Australian Indigenous communities participated in focus group discussions. There was substantial similarity between the themes that emerged within the discussions held in the two communities. Factors relating to culture, social connections, racism, communication, and personal aspects were particularly salient to health behavior of the participants. Several of the themes including culture, racism, communication, and distrust highlight the tension caused by being a member of a minority cultural group that has been marginalized by the practices and attitudes of the dominant cultural group. Personal choice was sometimes prioritized over health. PMID:25847855

  11. Indigenous plant remedies in Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinemana, F; Drummond, R B; Mavi, S; de Zoysa, I

    1985-01-01

    Two household surveys undertaken in Zimbabwe between 1981 and 1983 revealed extensive use of indigenous plant remedies in the home-management of childhood diarrhoea and many adult illnesses. Names of the local plants, trees and shrubs are listed, together with the part of the plant used and the type of condition treated. The usage of medicinal plants underscores the need for further study of indigenous pharmacopoeias and the therapeutic properties of plants. The role of indigenous plant remedies within local health care systems is also worthy of closer investigation. PMID:4094463

  12. STUDY OF NEMATODES IN INDIGENOUS CHICKENS IN SWAT DISTRICT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.S. Sayyed, M. S. Phulanl, W.M. Bhatti1, M. Pardehi1 and Shamsher Ali

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Research was conducted on IO< indigenous chickens. Examination of guts revealed that out of 100 guts. 51 per cent were positive for nematodes. Mixed infestation was 16 per cent. Two species i.e., Ascaridia galli and Heterakis gallinarum were identified. The incidence rate of Ascaridia galli was higher (42 % as compared to Heterakis gallinarum (9 %.

  13. Indigenous knowledge and science revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aikenhead, Glen S.; Ogawa, Masakata

    2007-07-01

    This article provides a guided tour through three diverse cultural ways of understanding nature: an Indigenous way (with a focus on Indigenous nations in North America), a neo-indigenous way (a concept proposed to recognize many Asian nations' unique ways of knowing nature; in this case, Japan), and a Euro-American scientific way. An exploration of these three ways of knowing unfolds in a developmental way such that some key terms change to become more authentic terms that better represent each culture's collective, yet heterogeneous, worldview, metaphysics, epistemology, and values. For example, the three ways of understanding nature are eventually described as Indigenous ways of living in nature, a Japanese way of knowing seigyo-shizen, and Eurocentric sciences (plural). Characteristics of a postcolonial or anti-hegemonic discourse are suggested for science education, but some inherent difficulties with this discourse are also noted.

  14. The viral transmembrane superfamily: possible divergence of Arenavirus and Filovirus glycoproteins from a common RNA virus ancestor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buchmeier Michael J

    2001-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent studies of viral entry proteins from influenza, measles, human immunodeficiency virus, type 1 (HIV-1, and Ebola virus have shown, first with molecular modeling, and then X-ray crystallographic or other biophysical studies, that these disparate viruses share a coiled-coil type of entry protein. Results Structural models of the transmembrane glycoproteins (GP-2 of the Arenaviruses, lymphochoriomeningitis virus (LCMV and Lassa fever virus, are presented, based on consistent structural propensities despite variation in the amino acid sequence. The principal features of the model, a hydrophobic amino terminus, and two antiparallel helices separated by a glycosylated, antigenic apex, are common to a number of otherwise disparate families of enveloped RNA viruses. Within the first amphipathic helix, demonstrable by circular dichroism of a peptide fragment, there is a highly conserved heptad repeat pattern proposed to mediate multimerization by coiled-coil interactions. The amino terminal 18 amino acids are 28% identical and 50% highly similar to the corresponding region of Ebola, a member of the Filovirus family. Within the second, charged helix just prior to membrane insertion there is also high similarity over the central 18 amino acids in corresponding regions of Lassa and Ebola, which may be further related to the similar region of HIV-1 defining a potent antiviral peptide analogue. Conclusions These findings indicate a common pattern of structure and function among viral transmembrane fusion proteins from a number of virus families. Such a pattern may define a viral transmembrane superfamily that evolved from a common precursor eons ago.

  15. ``Just Another Hoop to Jump Through?'' Using Environmental Laws and Processes to Protect Indigenous Rights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, Beth Rose

    2013-11-01

    Protection of culturally important indigenous landscapes has become an increasingly important component of environmental management processes, for both companies and individuals striving to comply with environmental regulations, and for indigenous groups seeking stronger laws to support site protection and cultural/human rights. Given that indigenous stewardship of culturally important sites, species, and practices continues to be threatened or prohibited on lands out of indigenous ownership, this paper examines whether or not indigenous people can meaningfully apply mainstream environmental management laws and processes to achieve protection of traditional sites and associated stewardship activities. While environmental laws can provide a “back door” to protect traditional sites and practices, they are not made for this purpose, and, as such, require specific amendments to become more useful for indigenous practitioners. Acknowledging thoughtful critiques of the cultural incommensurability of environmental law with indigenous environmental stewardship of sacred sites, I interrogate the ability of four specific environmental laws and processes—the Uniform Conservation Easement Act; the National Environmental Policy Act and the California Environmental Quality Act; the Pacific Stewardship Council land divestiture process; and Senate Bill 18 (CA-2004)—to protect culturally important landscapes and practices. I offer suggestions for improving these laws and processes to make them more applicable to indigenous stewardship of traditional landscapes.

  16. The World Indigenous Research Alliance (WIRA): Mediating and Mobilizing Indigenous Peoples' Educational Knowledge and Aspirations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitinui, Paul; McIvor, Onowa; Robertson, Boni; Morcom, Lindsay; Cashman, Kimo; Arbon, Veronica

    2015-01-01

    There is an Indigenous resurgence in education occurring globally. For more than a century Euro-western approaches have controlled the provision and quality of education to, and for Indigenous peoples. The World Indigenous Research Alliance (WIRA) established in 2012, is a grass-roots movement of Indigenous scholars passionate about making a…

  17. Using Modern Technologies to Capture and Share Indigenous Astronomical Knowledge

    OpenAIRE

    Nakata, N. M.; Hamacher, D. W.; Warren, J.; Byrne, A; Pagnucco, M.; Harley, R.; Venugopal, S.; Thorpe, K.; Neville, R.; Bolt, R.

    2014-01-01

    Indigenous Knowledge is important for Indigenous communities across the globe and for the advancement of our general scientific knowledge. In particular, Indigenous astronomical knowledge integrates many aspects of Indigenous Knowledge, including seasonal calendars, navigation, food economics, law, ceremony, and social structure. We aim to develop innovative ways of capturing, managing, and disseminating Indigenous astronomical knowledge for Indigenous communities and the general public for t...

  18. Indigenous Research on Chinese Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Peter Ping; Leung, Kwok; Chen, Chao C.;

    2012-01-01

    We attempt to provide a definition and a typology of indigenous research on Chinese management as well as outline the general methodological approaches for this type of research. We also present an integrative summary of the four articles included in this special issue and show how they illustrate...... our definition and typology of indigenous research on Chinese management, as well as the various methodological approaches we advocate. Further, we introduce a commentary on the four articles from the perspective of engaged scholarship, and also three additional articles included in this issue...

  19. Mapping in the Oiapoque Indigenous Territories

    OpenAIRE

    Mazurek, Rosélis Remor de Souza

    2016-01-01

    Participatory mapping for land use planning in the Indigenous Territories (Terras Indígenas) of Oiapoque, in northeastern Amazonia has been carried out by governmental and non-governmental organizations in partnership with indigenous institutions. The first mapping exercise was carried out through regional workshops with a selected group of indigenous (Indigenous Environmental Agents) using a georeferenced Landsat satellite image and drawing physical and cultural aspects of the territory over...

  20. Indigenous Intelligence: Have We Lost Our Indigenous Mind?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumont, Jim

    2002-01-01

    Eurocentric intelligence is restricted to rational, linear, competitive, and hierarchical thinking. Indigenous intelligence encompasses the body, mind, heart, and experience in total responsiveness and total relationship to the whole environment, which includes the seven generations past and future. Implementation of major changes to indigenous…

  1. More Like Ourselves: Indigenous Capitalism through Tourism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunten, Alexis Celeste

    2010-01-01

    Through a comparison of Indigenous-owned cultural tourism businesses in southeastern Alaska and New Zealand as well as secondary data examining Indigenous tourism across the Pacific, this article introduces the concept of "Indigenous capitalism" as a distinct strategy to achieve ethical, culturally appropriate, and successful Indigenous…

  2. Indigenous Studies and the Politics of Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGloin, Colleen; Carlson, Bronwyn L.

    2013-01-01

    Language use changes over time. In Indigenous contexts, language alters to suit the shifting nature of cultural expression as this might fit with Indigenous peoples' preference or as a consequence of changes to outdated and colonial modes of expression. For students studying in the discipline of Indigenous Studies, learning to use appropriate…

  3. Availability, preference, and consumption of indigenous forest foods in the Eastern Arc Mountains, Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Msuya, Tuli S; Kideghesho, Jafari R; Mosha, Theobald C E

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the availability, preference, and consumption of indigenous forest foods in Uluguru North (UNM) and West Usambara Mountains (WUM) of Tanzania. Data collection techniques involved focus group discussion, structured questionnaires, and botanical identification. Results revealed (1) there were 114 indigenous forest food plant species representing 57 families used by communities living adjacent to the two mountains; (2) sixty-seven species supplied edible fruits, nuts and seeds: 24 and 14 species came from WUM and UNM, respectively, while 29 came from both study areas; (3) of the 57 identified vegetable species, 22 were found in WUM only, 13 in UNM only, and 12 in both areas; (4) there were three species of edible mushrooms and five species of roots and tubers; (5) unlike the indigenous roots and tubers, the preference and consumption of indigenous vegetables, nuts, and seeds/oils was higher than exotic species in both study areas; and (6) UNM had more indigenous fruits compared to WUM, although preference and consumption was higher in WUM. We recommend increased research attention on forest foods to quantify their contribution to household food security and ensure their sustainability. PMID:21883080

  4. Sustained by First Nations: European newcomers' use of Indigenous plant foods in temperate North America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy J. Turner

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Indigenous Peoples of North America have collectively used approximately 1800 different native species of plants, algae, lichens and fungi as food. When European explorers, traders and settlers arrived on the continent, these native foods, often identified and offered by Indigenous hosts, gave them sustenance and in some cases saved them from starvation. Over the years, some of these species – particularly various types of berries, such as blueberries and cranberries (Vaccinium spp., wild raspberries and blackberries (Rubus spp., and wild strawberries (Fragaria spp., and various types of nuts (Corylus spp., Carya spp., Juglans spp., Pinus spp., along with wild-rice (Zizania spp. and maple syrup (from Acer saccharum – became more widely adopted and remain in use to the present day. Some of these and some other species were used in plant breeding programs, as germplasm for hybridization programs, or to strengthen a crop's resistance to disease. At the same time, many nutritious Indigenous foods fell out of use among Indigenous Peoples themselves, and along with their lessened use came a loss of associated knowledge and cultural identity. Today, for a variety of reasons, from improving people's health and regaining their cultural heritage, to enhancing dietary diversity and enjoyment of diverse foods, some of the species that have dwindled in their use have been “rediscovered” by Indigenous and non-Indigenous Peoples, and indications are that their benefits to humanity will continue into the future.

  5. Defining of a Peace Process within Indigenous Research, Indigenous Ethics and the Implications in Psychology.

    OpenAIRE

    Hains, Shaun L, Ph.D.

    2013-01-01

    An Indigenous Research process over sixteen years and during this time, a peace process emerged as a key element within Indigenous Research. The Indigenous Research included a school where and 100% of Native Students stayed in school (large urban school), work with mediators, and work with youth with special needs. The Indigenous Research was also during a time as Indigenous Ethics was being defined. When applied, it became clear that a working understanding of a peace process was needed. A p...

  6. Indigenous development of nuclear instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electronics Division, BARC has a long tradition of developing detectors, nuclear instrumentation modules and systems which have been exploited in many large scale experiments in DAE. Much of this technology has been transferred to industry. Recent developments emphasise high density and low power consumption. Latest devices such as FPGAs and indigenously developed hybrid microcircuits and ASICs have been used towards this end. (author)

  7. Indigenous autonomy in the Americas

    OpenAIRE

    Xanthaki, A.

    2015-01-01

    The American continent has a long tradition of autonomous regimes, both territorial and non-territorial. Autonomous regimes of American indigenous communities in particular have not been the subject of intense discussion and comparison, partly because the task of discussing such autonomous regimes in the whole of the Americas represents a huge challenge.

  8. Mapping Indigenous Depth of Place

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, Margaret Wickens; Louis, Renee Pualani

    2008-01-01

    Indigenous communities have successfully used Western geospatial technologies (GT) (for example, digital maps, satellite images, geographic information systems (GIS), and global positioning systems (GPS)) since the 1970s to protect tribal resources, document territorial sovereignty, create tribal utility databases, and manage watersheds. The use…

  9. Indigenous 6 MV medical LINAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linear Accelerators were made for physics research all over the world; in India too the first indigenous accelerator was made for research of materials using the 3.5 MeV Linear Accelerator in the 1960s at the Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai. Prof. R.V.S. Sitaram was the leading scientist who contributed in the development of the first indigenous linac that served research scholars for more than two decades. The travelling wave S-band Linac using a magnetron as a source of high power microwaves was a significant development towards the indigenous accelerator. The accelerating structure had magnetic coils for beam focusing, the HV modulator, microwave system and control unit were indigenously developed by TIFR scientists. Dr. Homi Bhabha, Director, TIFR had taken keen interest in the project and an appropriate room in the basement was selected for the accelerator facility. The Iinac tube cavities, magnetic coils and pulse transformer were designed and fabricated in TIFR laboratory and only raw material was imported. The group working on Radar transmitters developed the transmission line type modulator using components such as charging choke and locally available HV transformers. However, the rectifier diodes, cores switching tubes were imported. The complete system design was done in-house and also included operation and maintenance of the facility. Over its life of two decades, a second generation of technologists were developed with a first hand knowledge of an accelerator system

  10. Conservation genetics in Chinese sheep: diversity of fourteen indigenous sheep (Ovis aries) using microsatellite markers

    OpenAIRE

    E, Guang‐Xin; Zhong, Tao; Ma, Yue‐Hui; Gao, Hui‐Jiang; He, Jian‐Ning; Liu, Nan; Zhao, Yong‐Ju; Zhang, Jia‐Hua; Huang, Yong‐Fu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The domestic sheep (Ovis aries) has been an economically and culturally important farm animal species since its domestication around the world. A wide array of sheep breeds with abundant phenotypic diversity exists including domestication and selection as well as the indigenous breeds may harbor specific features as a result of adaptation to their environment. The objective of this study was to investigate the population structure of indigenous sheep in a large geographic location of...

  11. Postmenarche growth: cohort study among indigenous and non-indigenous Chilean adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Amigo, Hugo; Lara, Macarena; Bustos, Patricia; Muñoz, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Background In Chile, indigenous and non-indigenous schoolchildren have the same stature when they begin school but indigenous adults are shorter, indicating the importance of analyzing growth during puberty. The aim of this study was to compare the growth of indigenous and non-indigenous girls during the 36 months after menarche in Chile’s Araucanía Region. Methods A concurrent cohort study was conducted to compare growth in the two ethnic groups, which were comprised of 114 indigenous and 12...

  12. Genocide, culture and indigenous peoples

    OpenAIRE

    Short, D.(Department of Physics, Oxford University, Oxford, United Kingdom); Expert Seminar on Indigenous Cultures and Languages in collaboration with the UN

    2012-01-01

    This presentation was given as part of the Expert Seminar on Indigenous Cultures and Languages in collaboration with the UN by Dr Damien Short from the Institute of Commonwealth Studies, University of London. The seminar, hosted at Brunel University, took place on the 8th and 9th March 2012 and was organised by Brunel Law School's Human Rights Research Centre. The initiative, fronted by Dr Alexandra Xanthaki of Brunel Law School, represents a positive example of how academia, the civil societ...

  13. Helminth parasites of indigenous chickens in Oodi, Kgatleng District, Botswana : short communication

    OpenAIRE

    E.Z. Mushi; M.G. Binta; R.G. Chabo; R. Ndebele; T. Thibanyane

    2000-01-01

    Thirteen adult indigenous chickens from Oodi, Kgatleng district, Botswana, were examined for helminth parasites. Two species of nematodes, Ascaridia galli and Heterakis gallinarum, and species of the cestode genus Raillietina, were recovered. A. galli and H. gallinarumwere the most commonly seen parasites. The nematode A. galli occurred concurrently with Raillietina spp.

  14. Helminth parasites of indigenous chickens in Oodi, Kgatleng District, Botswana : short communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.Z. Mushi

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available Thirteen adult indigenous chickens from Oodi, Kgatleng district, Botswana, were examined for helminth parasites. Two species of nematodes, Ascaridia galli and Heterakis gallinarum, and species of the cestode genus Raillietina, were recovered. A. galli and H. gallinarumwere the most commonly seen parasites. The nematode A. galli occurred concurrently with Raillietina spp.

  15. Circle of Courage Infusion into the Alberta Indigenous Games 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchand, Dawn Marie

    2011-01-01

    Thousands of indigenous people from across North America came to the Enoch Cree Nation for the Alberta Indigenous Games, six days of sport, education, and cultural awakening. The vision of the Alberta Indigenous Games is to recognize the value and potential of Indigenous culture and the young people. Activities include sports, indigenous arts,…

  16. Indigenous Development: Poverty, Democracy and Sustainability

    OpenAIRE

    Diego Iturralde; Esteban Krotz; Víctor Cárdenas; Rodolfo Stavenhagen; Waldemar Wirsig; Marcial Fabricano; Xavier Albó; Shelton Davis; William Partridge; Luis Felipe Duchicela; Demetrio Cojtí Cuxil; José Del Val; Héctor Velásquez Sagua; Ramiro Molina R.; Gladys Jimeno

    1996-01-01

    The contributions included in this volume reflect both the challenges and opportunities of an incipient process of reflection and dialogue between indigenous peoples, governments and development agencies on a subject of vital importance for the approximately 40 million indigenous people of the hemisphere. In addition to the critical issues of poverty reduction, self-development, indigenous rights and secured access to land and natural resources, a common thread throughout this volume is the c...

  17. Resilience and Indigenous Spirituality: A Literature Review

    OpenAIRE

    Fleming, John; Ledogar, Robert J

    2008-01-01

    Indigenous spirituality is a more complex phenomenon than the term spirituality alone, as generally understood, implies. Spirituality is closely bound up with culture and ways of living in Indigenous communities and requires a more holistic or comprehensive research approach. Two conceptual frameworks could help to orient Indigenous resilience research. One is the enculturation framework. Enculturation refers to the degree of integration within a culture, which can be protective in social beh...

  18. Guyana: Technical Note on Indigenous Peoples

    OpenAIRE

    Jonathan Renshaw

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this note is to provide an overview of the situation of the Indigenous Peoples of Guyana. The note covers a range of issues, including land regularisation, environment - especially mining, logging and the establishment of protected areas - economic development, education, health care and local infrastructure. In line with the Bank's Policy on Indigenous Peoples, it stresses the need to ensure Indigenous Peoples are given the opportunity to participate in the discussions and decisio...

  19. Curriculum and the production of indigenous subjects

    OpenAIRE

    Adir Casaro Nascimento; Antonio Hilario Aguilera Urquiza

    2015-01-01

    The policy on school education has always been explicit in its intentions to produce identities for indigenous peoples. The Federal Constitution of 1988 broke with the assimilationist/integrationist/colonizing proposal of curricula imposed on indigenous people and recognizes the ethnic identities of indigenous people inserted within the context of their cultural relations and the right to their customs, values, traditions, languages and knowledge. The use of the mother tongue and of learning ...

  20. The application of geomatic technologies in an indigenous context : Amazonian Indians and indigenous land rights

    OpenAIRE

    Menell, David

    2003-01-01

    Indigenous people have employed Western analogue techniques (maps, charts, etc) to support their land rights ever since their traditional territories came under threat. Although indigenous groups utilise such tools there is still a significant divide between the epistemological conception of these analogue techniques and the ontology of the indigenous people. This research looks at one of the latest technologies to be utilised by indigenous peoples, that of geomatics technologi...

  1. THE INDIGENOUS GROUPS AND THE BRAZILIAN SWEETS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mártin César Tempass

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available In the books of Gilberto Freyre and Câmara Cascudo, that influencied so much the literature about brazilian alimentation, the participation of indigenous groups in the national sweets formation process is negligencied. However, is possible to find in book´s “interlineations” of these two authors valuables informations about indigenous contributions to this process. Starting from these two authors and based in the culinary system notion, this paper quests to situate the role of indigenous groups in the brazilian sweets formation and numbers the possibles causes to invisibility of sweets by indigenous at the culinary formation process.

  2. Rapid recovery of Dungeness crab within spatial fishery closures declared under indigenous law in British Columbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Frid

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Canada’s constitution grants indigenous people priority access to marine resources, yet indigenous, commercial and recreational fishers target the same species. Avoiding conflict between different users, therefore, requires evidence-based policies that manage fisheries for conservation while respecting indigenous rights. From 2006 to 2015, Canada’s Conservative government demoted the role of science in resource management, stifling research by federal agencies like Fisheries and Oceans Canada. To address ensuing data gaps, during 2014–2015 the Heiltsuk, Kitasoo/Xai’Xais, Nuxalk, and Wuikinuxv First Nations conducted coordinated research on Dungeness crab (Cancer magister, a culturally-significant resource. These indigenous groups are experiencing declining catch rates of Dungeness crab and postulate that commercial and recreational fisheries are primary causes of local declines. Accordingly, they applied indigenous laws and declared spatial fishery closures for commercial and recreational fishers at 10 sites (closed while allowing exploitation by all users to continue at 10 other sites (open. Sampling occurred repeatedly over time and analyses compared temporal trends in population characteristics between closed and open sites. Results were consistent with the hypothesis that fisheries decrease the abundance and size of exploited species, but spatial protection can reverse these effects. The body size and catch-per-unit effort of legal-sized males increased over time at closed sites but declined at open sites. Importantly, fishery status did not affect temporal changes in the relative abundance of unfished classes of crab–sublegal males and females–which is logically consistent with the hypothesis. Our study demonstrates that indigenous governance can create spatial closures for conservation and research when Canada’s government fails to do so. Long-term solutions, however, require collaboration in research and management between

  3. The Invisible Hand of Pedagogy in Australian Indigenous Studies and Indigenous Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhea, Zane Ma; Russell, Lynette

    2012-01-01

    The Australian Learning and Teaching Council (ALTC)-funded project "Exploring Problem-Based Learning Pedagogy as Transformative Education in Indigenous Australian Studies" raised a number of issues that resonated with concerns we have had as professionals engaged in teaching and researching Australian Indigenous studies and Indigenous education.…

  4. Background levels of some major, trace, and rare earth elements in indigenous plant species growing in Norway and the influence of soil acidification, soil parent material, and seasonal variation on these levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gjengedal, Elin; Martinsen, Thomas; Steinnes, Eiliv

    2015-06-01

    Baseline levels of 43 elements, including major, trace, and rare earth elements (REEs) in several native plant species growing in boreal and alpine areas, are presented. Focus is placed on species metal levels at different soil conditions, temporal variations in plant tissue metal concentrations, and interspecies variation in metal concentrations. Vegetation samples were collected at Sogndal, a pristine site in western Norway, and at Risdalsheia, an acidified site in southernmost Norway. Metal concentrations in the different species sampled in western Norway are compared with relevant literature data from Norway, Finland, and northwest Russia, assumed to represent natural conditions. Except for aluminium (Al) and macronutrients, the levels of metals were generally lower in western Norway than in southern Norway and may be considered close to natural background levels. In southern Norway, the levels of cadmium (Cd) and lead (Pb) in particular appear to be affected by air pollution, either by direct atmospheric supply or through soil acidification. Levels of some elements show considerable variability between as well as within plant species. Calcium (Ca), magnesium (Mg), and potassium (K) are higher in most species at Sogndal compared to Risdalsheia, despite increased extractable concentrations in surface soil in the south, probably attributed to different buffer mechanisms in surface soil. Antagonism on plant uptake is suggested between Ca, Mg, and K on one hand and Al on the other. Tolerance among calcifuges to acid conditions and a particular ability to detoxify or avoid uptake of Al ions are noticeable for Vaccinium vitis-idaea. PMID:26022847

  5. Indigenous development of helium liquefier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helium Liquefiers/refrigerators have become an essential part of future accelerator developments in India. Apart from designing, systems operating at liquid helium temperature viz. 4.2 K or lower, require additional technical skills to make them work as designed. To get insight in these intricacies, development of helium liquefier was taken up at RRCAT. An indigenous helium liquefier has been developed. This system is based on reciprocating type expansion engine and uses cross counter flow type heat exchangers, based on high finned density copper tubes. The cyclic compressor is a four stage air cooled reciprocating type compressor. Its oil removal system is also designed and developed indigenously. Initially, a liquefaction rate of 6 lit/hr was achieved. More than 150 liters of liquid helium was collected during its maiden trial itself, while operating for more than 25 hours continuously. This liquefier has at present crossed a liquefaction rate of 10 lits/hr by further tuning and reducing thermal in-leaks. Based on the experience gained in the present system and validation of design parameters under actual working conditions, a second model is being designed, which will be able to produce about 35 lit/hr of liquid helium. Further work is also being initiated to develop aluminium plate fin heat exchangers for developing helium liquefiers of larger capacity in the range of 100-200 lits/hr. Design, development and performance details of indigenous development of helium liquefier will be presented and ongoing efforts to increase the liquefaction capacity will be discussed. (author)

  6. Indigene Psychologien am Beispiel Brasiliens

    OpenAIRE

    Stubbe, Hannes

    2010-01-01

    "Anhand einiger ausgewählter Phänomene (Krankheitsvorstellungen, Seelenvorstellungen, Ethnotherapie, Ethnoästhetik der Federkunst, Traum) werden verschiedene indigene Psychologien in dem multiethnischen Brasilien vorgestellt. Dabei wird ihre große Bedeutung für das Gesundheits-, Sozial- und Kultur-System hervorgehoben. Der Autor plädiert für eine zukünftige 'Weltpsychologie', in der die indigenen Psychologien, die 'westliche' Psychologie und die Psychologie in der sog. Dritten Welt in einen f...

  7. Bolivian Currents: Popular Participation and Indigenous Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudley, Mary Jo

    1997-01-01

    Describes the effects on indigenous communities of Bolivia's recent Popular Participation Laws, which relocated political and financial decision making to the municipal level; community efforts toward cultural maintenance and nonformal agricultural education; the activism of indigenous university students; and the dual discrimination suffered by…

  8. Indigenous Rights and Schooling in Highland Chiapas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Margaret Freedson; Perez, Elias Perez

    1998-01-01

    Educational reforms in Mexico to preserve indigenous linguistic and cultural rights often originate in Mexico City and lack grassroots support. Although native language instruction improves literacy development and preserves culture, Native parents may reject it because Spanish is the language of status. However, some indigenous communities in…

  9. Indigenous Youth and Gangs as Family

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Rob

    2009-01-01

    This paper explores the ways in which Indigenous young people experience gang activity as stemming from family membership and family obligations. Based on recent gang research in Australia, the paper provides firsthand accounts of what "life in the gang/life in the family" means for Indigenous young people.

  10. Including People with Disabilities: An Indigenous Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevan-Brown, Jill

    2013-01-01

    Being victims of racial prejudice, religious intolerance, poverty, disempowerment and language loss it could be expected that indigenous people would be supportive of the Inclusion Movement with its philosophy of valuing and acceptance of all people. This supposition is examined for Maori, the indigenous people of Aotearoa/New Zealand. In…

  11. Gambling: A Poison Chalice for Indigenous Peoples'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyall, Lorna

    2010-01-01

    Indigenous populations are now being encouraged to be involved in the business of gambling as an operator or if not given that status, are actively encouraged to participate in gambling activities. Research both published and unpublished show that different indigenous populations often have a higher prevalence of problem and pathological gambling…

  12. Toward an Integrative Framework of Indigenous Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Peter Ping

    2012-01-01

    It has long been recognized that indigenous research should be helpful, if not essential, for an adequate understanding of local phenomena. The indigenous approach is consistent with, but extends beyond, the repeated calls for contextualizing management and organization research. However, the...

  13. An Indigenous View of North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaDuke, Winona

    1998-01-01

    Uses stories of U.S. and Canadian indigenous individuals who defended their lands against uranium mining and hydroelectric development to contrast the thinking of indigenous people (natural law as pre-eminent, spiritual practice, intergenerational residency in the same place) with industrial thinking (man's dominion over nature, linear thinking,…

  14. Indigenous Students in the Tertiary Education Sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandias, Susan; Fuller, Don; Larkin, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Important recent objectives of indigenous education policy in Australia have been aimed at redressing indigenous economic and social disadvantage through increasing student retention, progression and completion rates in both compulsory and post-compulsory education. The two sectors of the tertiary education system, vocational education and…

  15. Bilingual Discourse Markers in Indigenous Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Lourdes

    2006-01-01

    This review of research considers the occurrence and function of Spanish discourse markers and other particles in indigenous speech. I discuss important research that has examined these phenomena and refer to studies of bilingual discourse markers in other non-indigenous language contact situations to address unresolved issues concerning the form…

  16. Environmental education and indigenous approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Environmental pollution control is the most important and highly discussed issue at the international level. Our and our's next generation survival highly depends on environment. Environmental security is not less important than territorial security. Living in the Competitive trade, Business and Commerce era. WTO threats of globalization to countries like Pakistan require sharp and immediate actions. SOS(Save our Sole) steps should be taken in Environmental Education in order to reorganizing values and clarifying Concepts to develop the necessary skills and attitude necessary to understand and appreciate the interrelatidness among masses, the Cultures and Ecosystem. Historical backgrounds along with different approaches were discussed particularly reference to Pakistan. In this presentation a new but indigenous idea is flashed to improve the environment education system in poor third world countries including Pakistan. Instead of imported ideas, previous implemented as such, indigenous approach highly Perfumed with Islamic, Ideological and cultural blends will do the right job in right direction if employed with true sense of commitment. (author)

  17. Re-vitalizing an indigenous language

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Annette Skovsted

    2014-01-01

    The re-vitalization of indigenous languages depend on political and legal support and the imple-mentation of language rights depend on knowledge of vocabulary and grammar structures of the individual languages. Throughout the nineteenth century world, compilers of dictionaries adapted indigenous...... languages to match standards defined in nation-building and, thereby, enabled latent possibilities for indigenous populations to re-vitalize their languages in connection with the United Nations Year for Indigenous Peoples in 1993, and the first United Nations Decade for Indigenous Peoples, 1995......–2004. This article focuses on dictionaries of the languages of the Ainu populations in the borderlands between the nation-states Japan and Russia. The main argument is that the Ainu Cultural Promotion Act promulgated in 1997 had a significant impact on the production and purpose of Ainu dictionaries...

  18. Southern African species of Mentha L. (Lamiaceae)

    OpenAIRE

    L. E. Codd

    1983-01-01

    The species of Mentha L. occurring in Southern Africa are reviewed and a key is provided to two indigenous and one naturalized species.  M. wissii Launert is reduced to M. longifolia (L.) Huds. subsp. wissii (Launert) Codd.

  19. Engaging indigenous and academic knowledge on bees in the Amazon: implications for environmental management and transdisciplinary research

    OpenAIRE

    Athayde, Simone; Stepp, John Richard; Ballester, Wemerson C.

    2016-01-01

    Background This paper contributes to the development of theoretical and methodological approaches that aim to engage indigenous, technical and academic knowledge for environmental management. We present an exploratory analysis of a transdisciplinary project carried out to identify and contrast indigenous and academic perspectives on the relationship between the Africanized honey bee and stingless bee species in the Brazilian Amazon. The project was developed by practitioners and researchers o...

  20. An Indigenously Developed Insecticidal Aerosol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. N. Varma

    1969-10-01

    Full Text Available A total of 6 "Test" insecticidal aerosols (TA-I to VI indigenously produced were tested during the years 1966-67 as suitable replacements for imported aerosols.TA-I produced deep yellow staining and a yellowish spray mist. Its capacity was only 120 ml fluid. TA-III types II and III containing modified aerosol formulation with "Esso solvent 3245" and mineral turpentine oil (Burmah Shelland Freon 12 11 (all indigenouswere comparable to he "SRA" in insecticidial efficacy. The container was also manufactured in the country and it compared well with the "SRA" in construction, resistance against rough usage and mechanical function. They were both finally approved for introduction in the services as replacement for imported aerosols. TA-IV performed well in inscticidial assessment, but the aerosols formulation. TA-V and VI were similar to TA-III types II and III respectively.

  1. Mapping Resilience Pathways of Indigenous Youth in Five Circumpolar Communities

    OpenAIRE

    Allen, James; Hopper, Kim; Wexler, Lisa; Kral, Michael; Rasmus, Stacy; Nystad, Kristine

    2013-01-01

    This introduction to the special issue Indigenous Youth Resilience in the Arctic reviews relevant resilience theory and research, with particular attention to Arctic Indigenous youth. The role of social determinants and community resilience processes in Indigenous circumpolar settings are overviewed, as are emergent Indigenous resilience frameworks. The distinctive role for qualitative inquiry in understanding these frameworks is emphasized, as is the uniquely informative le...

  2. Indigenous Student Participation in Higher Education: Emergent Themes and Linkages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aseron, Johnnie; Wilde, Simon; Miller, Adrian; Kelly, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Educational processes directed at Indigenous peoples have long propagated a disparity between the educational successes of Indigenous and non-Indigenous students (May 1999), a contrast which can be acutely observed in Australia. It is not surprising, then, that the educational needs of Indigenous students have been poorly served, with the extant…

  3. Exporting by Migrants and Indigenous Entrepreneurs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashourizadeh, Shayegheh; Schøtt, Thomas; Pişkinsüt Şengüler, Ece;

    2016-01-01

    , however, be contingent on attributes such as gender and education, especially among the first generation of migrants, in that being male and educated is more advantageous for migrants than for indigenous entrepreneurs. A representative sample of 50,371 entrepreneurs establishing or operating enterprises...... around the world was surveyed in the Global Entrepreneurship Monitor, which reports on migration and exporting. Hierarchical linear modeling shows that migrant entrepreneurs export more than indigenous entrepreneurs, especially in the first generation, and especially among educated and male migrants....... These findings can be generalized to migrant and indigenous entrepreneurs worldwide to enhance knowledge about the entrepreneurial benefits of migration, albeit contingent on gender and education....

  4. Planetary surface reactor shielding using indigenous materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The exploration and development of Mars will require abundant surface power. Nuclear reactors are a low-cost, low-mass means of providing that power. A significant fraction of the nuclear power system mass is radiation shielding necessary for protecting humans and/or equipment from radiation emitted by the reactor. For planetary surface missions, it may be desirable to provide some or all of the required shielding from indigenous materials. This paper examines shielding options that utilize either purely indigenous materials or a combination of indigenous and nonindigenous materials

  5. Defining 'Indigenous': Between Culture and Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Pritchard

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available This essay considers a range of discourses on identity and the definition of culture. I have little doubt that, generally speaking, Indigenous people are quite capable of defining the meaning of ‘Indigenous person’ or ‘culture’ in a way that satisfies their specific immediate needs and interests. My concern here is with the definition of ‘Aboriginal or Indigenous person’ in Australian law and legislation and with the critical response, by members of the scientific community as well as cultural theorists, to references to a biological basis of identity.

  6. Defining 'Indigenous': Between Culture and Biology

    OpenAIRE

    Stephen Pritchard

    2013-01-01

    This essay considers a range of discourses on identity and the definition of culture. I have little doubt that, generally speaking, Indigenous people are quite capable of defining the meaning of ‘Indigenous person’ or ‘culture’ in a way that satisfies their specific immediate needs and interests. My concern here is with the definition of ‘Aboriginal or Indigenous person’ in Australian law and legislation and with the critical response, by members of the scientific community as well as cultura...

  7. Moving toward culturally sensitive services for Indigenous people: a non-Indigenous mental health nursing perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Anthony Tony

    2006-01-01

    Indigenous psychiatric morbidity, whilst culturally different in presentation to white communities has been suggested to run at a mean prevalence rate of 13.5% of the major disorders found in non-Indigenous communities. This paper discusses the socio-political and cross cultural issues to do with mental health for Australian Indigenous from a non-Indigenous perspective. The paper is particularly concerned with the effects of racism on Indigenous mental health and how racism effectively limits Indigenous people from full participation in the pluralist mainstream. Racism has been seen to be a major contributor to mental illness. The scope of this paper addresses the issue of transforming mainstream culture as well as highlighting the need for protection, participation and collaborative involvement in mental health service delivery. PMID:16594878

  8. The politics of indigeneity: Indigenous strategies for inclusion in climate change negotiations

    OpenAIRE

    Doolittle Amity

    2010-01-01

    Indigenous environmental activists have clearly articulated their views on global climate change policy. The content of these views was explored during the 10-day 2008 World Conservation Congress (WCC) in Barcelona. Data were primarily collected through interviews and participant observation. In addition, policy statements and declarations made by indigenous environmental activists from 2000 to 2009 were analysed to place the perspectives of indigenous leaders and environmental activists in t...

  9. The rights to self-determination of the indigenous peoples : illustrated by Arctic indigenous peoples

    OpenAIRE

    Yichao Chen

    2010-01-01

    This thesis is a legal analysis of indigenous peoples’ right to self-determination in the international law. In the beginning, this thesis distinguished three important concepts in the international law: peoples, minorities and indigenous peoples. Then it reviewed the development, content, beneficiary and other aspects of self-determination. Through those reviews, the indigenous peoples’ right to self-determination it different from the right to self-determination in the international law. Th...

  10. Not all semantics: similarities and differences in reminiscing function and content between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nile, Emma; Van Bergen, Penny

    2015-01-01

    This study explored why and how Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians remember the past. Indigenous Australians traditionally share a strong oral tradition in which customs, personal and cultural histories, and other narratives are passed across groups and between generations by word of mouth. Drawing on this tradition, in which inherent value is placed on sharing knowledge and maintaining connectedness with others, we hypothesised that Indigenous Australians would be more likely than non-Indigenous Australians to report reminiscing to fulfil social functions (but not self or directive functions). Furthermore, we hypothesised that Indigenous Australians would recall personal past experiences more elaborately than would non-Indigenous Australians. In Study 1, 33 Indigenous Australians and 76 non-Indigenous Australians completed Webster's Reminiscence Functions Scale. As predicted, Indigenous participants reported higher scores on subscales related to social functions than did non-Indigenous Australians: particularly "Teach/Inform" and "Intimacy Maintenance". They also scored higher on the "Identity" subscale. In Study 2, 15 Indigenous and 14 non-Indigenous Australians shared three memories from the distant and recent past. While Indigenous and non-Indigenous narratives did not differ in either emotion or elaboration, Indigenous Australians provided more memory context and detail by including a greater proportion of semantic memory content. Taken together, these findings suggest differences in both why and how Australians remember. PMID:24999815

  11. Cervical cancer in Indigenous women: The case of Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannon, Geordan D; Franco, Oscar H; Powles, John; Leng, Yue; Pashayan, Nora

    2011-11-01

    Globally, health inequities between Indigenous and non-Indigenous populations exist. The disparity in health outcomes between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians is exemplified by cervical cancer. Current evidence suggests that Indigenous women have higher age standardised incidence and mortality than non-Indigenous women when adjusted for stage at diagnosis and co-morbidities; however, there is little information pertaining to national estimates of cervical cancer in Indigenous women. In this paper we review available evidence on the difference in occurrence and case fatality of cervical cancer among Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australian women. The Australian Bureau of Statistics, Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, and State- or Territory-based Cancer Registries were utilised to collect surveillance data. To corroborate existing data, further available journal literature was identified through Medline and Embase. All papers selected for review were cross-referenced to identify further relevant studies. The most recent national estimate of age-standardised cervical cancer incidence rate was 16.9 and 7.1 per 100,000 women-years in Indigenous and non-Indigenous women respectively (incidence ratio 2.4). The Indigenous age-standardised mortality rate was 9.9 per 100,000 women years (95% CI 7.1-13.3), over 5 times the non-Indigenous rate. Cervical cancer incidence, in both Indigenous and non-Indigenous women, has decreased since 1991. Despite the decline, age-standardised incidence among Indigenous women is still higher than non-Indigenous women. The pattern of cervical cancer incidence and survival corroborates the health inequities that exist in Australia. Indigenous women are more likely than non-Indigenous women to develop cervical cancer and are less likely to survive it. Similar patterns exist in Indigenous populations worldwide, such as New Zealander Maoris and Canadian Aboriginals, suggesting that high rates of cervical cancer incidence and

  12. The Portrayal of Indigenous Health in Selected Australian Media

    OpenAIRE

    Melissa J. Stoneham; Jodie Goodman; Mike Daube

    2014-01-01

    It is acknowledged that health outcomes for Australian Indigenous peoples are lower than those of non-Indigenous Australians. Research suggests negative media in relation to Indigenous Australians perpetuates racist stereotypes among the wider population and impacts on the health of Indigenous Australians. This study examined the media portrayal of Indigenous Australian public health issues in selected media over a twelve month period and found that, overwhelmingly, the articles were negative...

  13. Honouring indigenous treaty rights for climate justice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantyka-Pringle, C. S.; Westman, C. N.; Kythreotis, A. P.; Schindler, D. W.

    2015-09-01

    Expansion of the oil sands industry in Canada has caused land destruction and social friction. Canada could become a leader in climate governance by honouring treaty commitments made with indigenous peoples.

  14. Recruiting and retaining indigenous farmworker participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farquhar, Stephanie; de Jesus Gonzalez, Carmen; Hall, Jennifer; Samples, Julie; Ventura, Santiago; Sanchez, Valentin; Shadbeh, Nargess

    2014-10-01

    There is limited information on the specific practices used to successfully recruit and retain indigenous and Latino farmworkers in research studies. This article describes the strategies used in a community-based participatory research project with indigenous agricultural workers. Participants were recruited through consulting with indigenous relatives and friends, identifying and meeting with indigenous leaders from hometown associations in countries of origin, and asking current participants to recruit fellow farmworkers. Adjustments were initiated to the second year protocol to enhance recruitment and retention. The difference in attrition rates between years one and two was statistically significant, a difference partially attributed to modifications to recruitment and retention protocol. Findings confirmed that active recruitment techniques and word-of-mouth recruitment were more effective than passive methods. Trust among academic, organization, and community partners, and shared language and culture between those doing the recruitment and the participants, contributed to sustained farmworker participation. PMID:23733354

  15. Clave para el reconocimiento de la Flora Leñosa Nativa del sitio Rasmar Jaaukanigás (Provincia de Santa Fe, Argentina Key to the recognition of indigenous tree and shrub species from Sitio Ramsar Jaaukanigás (Province of Santa Fe, Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. D. Marino

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available El conocimiento de la vegetación nativa es esencial para la investigación biológica y el diseño de planes de manejo y conservación de la biodiversidad en áreas protegidas. Diversas especies leñosas del valle de inundación del Río Paraná Medio son cruciales para el funcionamiento del ecosistema fluvial, además de ser aprovechadas localmente para la elaboración de medicinas y alimentos o como recursos madereros, tanineros y melíferos. No obstante, no existe hasta el presente un trabajo que facilite su reconocimiento. El objetivo de este trabajo fue elaborar una herramienta sistemática versátil para el reconocimiento a campo, a través de caracteres vegetativos, de las especies leñosas del Sitio Ramsar Jaaukanigás (Santa Fe, Argentina, área protegida que concentra una elevada diversidad biológica. Se presenta una clave botánica elaborada sobre la base de 36 caracteres vegetativos de fácil observación, que incluye 50 especies distribuidas en 44 géneros y 23 familias.The recognition of native vegetation is the first step on biological conservation and management planning in protected areas. The ligneous species of Paraná River floodplain are essential to fluvial ecosystem functioning; and, several of them are used by local inhabitants to made foods and medicines, or like primary source of wood, tannin and wild honey productions. Despite the high tree and shrub fluvial ecosystem diversity, to the present there is not any work that involves it and that facilitates its botanical recognition. The goal of this paper was to perform a friendly systematic tool to botanical recognition at field and vegetative stage of indigenous tree and shrub species from Sitio Ramsar Jaaukanigás (Santa Fe, Argentina, an area that encompass a high ligneous floristic diversity. A total of 36 characters relative to the general aspect, trunk, top and leave were observed to each taxon. The botanic key presented here, which include 50 species distributed

  16. Fostering Indigenous Students’ Participation in Business Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Vitartas

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In the Australian higher education context Indigenous students have consistently been under-represented in business education compared to other disciplines, such as education and arts, and compared to non-Indigenous students. According to Asmar, Page and Radloff (2011. “Compared with non-Indigenous students, Indigenous students… were more likely to be studying in the humanities; slightly more likely to be studying education, in a field of health, or in the creative arts; and less likely to be studying science, engineering or business” (p. 4. Progress on participation rates in business education has been slow as evidenced by Schwab making similar observations of the pattern of Indigenous participation in higher education in 1996 (Schwab 1996. The literature has revealed various attempts to increase overall Indigenous commencement and completion rates at universities (see e.g., Asmar et al., 2011; Barney, 2013; Behrendt et al., 2012; Raciti et al., 2014; Rahman, 2013. Nevertheless, little research has been undertaken on the topic of improving the uptake of higher education in business courses in particular (see Behrendt et al., 2012 and Rkein & Norris 2012 for exceptions. Among various measures, fostering Indigenous students’ participation in business education is ‘crucial for [indirectly] fostering [economic] independence’ (Foley, 2013, p. 25 and required if more Indigenous businesses are to be created. Against this backdrop, this paper contributes to our understanding of the complex issue of Indigenous students’ participation in business education. It begins by providing a brief review of the literature exploring enrolment and completion rates in business disciplines at the tertiary level. The paper then presents a case study of an innovative intervention developed by an Australian higher educational institution designed to inspire young Indigenous students to consider tertiary business studies as a viable option which would result

  17. INDIGENOUS PEOPLES’ CUSTOMARY LAW AND LEGAL PLURALISM

    OpenAIRE

    Melissa Volpato Curi

    2012-01-01

    This paper aims to characterize the common or customary law of indigenous peoples in order to identify the legal pluralism existent in Brazil. Whereas each society presents its own social organization; positive law -- written, codified and founded on the state -- is not the only source of law, neither the safest or fairest manner to sort societies. The orality and the absence of the state in form of entity, which characterize customary law, give dynamism to indigenous societies and sort these...

  18. Porter's Industry Clusters in Irish Indigenous Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Chris van Egeraat; Eoin O'Malley

    1999-01-01

    Studies by Porter (1990) and others find that competitive and successful industries usually occur in the form of clusters of industries which are linked together through vertical or horizontal relationships. This paper assesses whether the sectors of Irish indigenous industry which look most competitive and successful form such clusters. It is concluded that there is only limited or qualified evidence of Porter-type clusters in Irish indigenous industry but, despite this, there has been a rel...

  19. The Autonomy of Indigenous Territorial Entities

    OpenAIRE

    Samuel Baena

    2015-01-01

    The dynamics that emerge between western civilization and indigenous groups are not exempt from historical and cultural imbalances that deserve different legal treatment. The starting point to achieve some level of equality is, in general terms, territorial law, and in specific terms, the principle of autonomy supported and lead by indigenous territorial entities. However, theoretical constructs of anthropology and systemic hermeneutics of the 1991 Constitution, allow for the existence of an ...

  20. Genetic improvement in indigenous chicken of Ethiopia

    OpenAIRE

    Woldegiorgiss, W.E.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Wondmeneh Esatu Woldegiorgiss (2015). Genetic improvement in indigenous chicken of Ethiopia. PhD thesis, Wageningen University, the Netherlands This thesis considered various approaches to study the potential for improvement of village poultry production system using improved indigenous chicken. The approaches were structured survey questionnaire, village poultry simulation model (VIPOSIM), Heckman two-step model (econometric model), and experiments involving laboratory and field. Fi...

  1. Value perception and consumption of indigenous vegetables

    OpenAIRE

    Chanita Panmanee; Aree Cheamuangphan; Kasem Kunasri

    2013-01-01

    Awareness of safety and healthy food is continuously increasing nowadays. Indigenous vegetables are the one of many choices influencing on consumption decision making of local people because they are readily available food source in rural areas. Moreover, they are nutritious and have medicinal properties being beneficial in the treatment of various diseases. In fact, the more understanding of indigenous vegetables value of the consumers, the more utilizing them for their health. Thus, the pur...

  2. Indigenous rights entwined with nature conservation

    OpenAIRE

    Desmet, Ellen

    2011-01-01

    Heightened public awareness of the ever increasing loss of biodiversity has led to louder calls for effective nature conservation efforts. Most remaining biodiversity-rich areas are inhabited or used by indigenous peoples and local communities. In recent years a new ‘paradigm’ of ‘nature conservation with respect for the rights of indigenous peoples and local communities’ has emerged. Two questions arise: What exactly does this policy shift mean in terms of international human rights law? And...

  3. Ensuring the rights of indigenous children

    OpenAIRE

    Michael Miller

    2004-01-01

    Around the world, in rural and urban areas alike, indigenous chilldren frequently constitute one of the most disadvantaged groups, and their rights - including those to survival and development, to the highest standards of health, to education that respects their cultural identity, and to protection from abuse, violence and exploitation - are often compromised. At the same time, however, indigenous children possess very special resources: they are the custodians of a multitude of cultures, la...

  4. Gestational age specific stillbirth risk among Indigenous and non-Indigenous women in Queensland, Australia: a population based study

    OpenAIRE

    Ibiebele, Ibinabo; Coory, Michael; Smith, Gordon C S; Boyle, Frances M; Vlack, Susan; Middleton, Philippa; Roe, Yvette; Flenady, Vicki

    2016-01-01

    Background In Australia, significant disparity persists in stillbirth rates between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander (Indigenous Australian) and non-Indigenous women. Diabetes, hypertension, antepartum haemorrhage and small-for-gestational age (SGA) have been identified as important contributors to higher rates among Indigenous women. The objective of this study was to examine gestational age specific risk of stillbirth associated with these conditions among Indigenous and non-Indigenous...

  5. Making medicine indigenous: homeopathy in South India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausman, Gary J

    2002-08-01

    Historical studies of homeopathy in Europe and the USA have focused on practitioners' attempts to emphasize 'modern' and 'scientific' approaches. Studies of homeopathy in India have focused on a process of Indianization. Arguing against such unilineal trajectories, this paper situates homeopathy in South India within the context of shifting relations between 'scientific' and 'indigenous' systems of medicine. Three time periods are considered. From 1924 through 1934, homeopathy was singled out by Government of Madras officials as 'scientific', as contrasted with the 'indigenous' Ayurvedic, Siddha, and Unani systems of medicine. From 1947 through 1960, both 'indigenous' and 'scientific' interpretations of homeopathy were put forward by different factions. An honorary director of homeopathy proposed the Indianization of homeopathy, and its reconciliation with Ayurveda; this view conflicted with the Madras government's policy of expanding the 'scientific' medical curriculum of the Government College of Indigenous Medicine. It was not until the early 1970s that homeopathy was officially recognized in Tamilnadu State. By then, both homeopathy and Ayurveda had become conceptualized as non-Tamil, in contrast with promotion of the Tamil Siddha system of 'indigenous' medicine. Thus, constructs of 'indigenous' and 'scientific' systems of medicine are quite malleable with respect to homeopathy in South India. PMID:12638553

  6. Gut indigenous microbiota and epigenetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris Arkadievich Shenderov

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This review introduces and discusses data regarding fundamental and applied investigations in mammalian epigenomics and gut microbiota received over the last 10 years. Analysis of these data enabled the author first to come to the conclusion that the multiple low molecular weight substances of indigenous gut microbiota origin should be considered one of the main endogenous factors actively participating in epigenomic mechanisms that responsible for the mammalian genome reprogramming and post-translated modifications. Gut microecological imbalance coursed by various biogenic and abiogenic agents and factors can produce the different epigenetic abnormalities and the onset and progression of metabolic diseases associated. The author substantiates the necessity to create an international project ‘Human Gut Microbiota and Epigenomics’ that facilitates interdisciplinary collaborations among scientists and clinicians engaged in host microbial ecology, nutrition, metagenomics, epigenomics and metabolomics investigations as well as in diseases prevention and treatment. Some priority scientific and applied directions in the current omic technologies coupled with gnotobiological approaches are suggested that can open a new era in characterizing the role of the symbiotic microbiota small metabolic and signal molecules in the host epigenomics. Although discussed subject is only at an early stage its validation can open novel approaches in drug discovery studies.

  7. Bioactivity of Indigenous Medicinal Plants against the Cotton Whitefly, Bemisia tabaci

    OpenAIRE

    Hammad, E. Abou-Fakhr; Zeaiter, A.; Saliba, N.; Talhouk, S.

    2014-01-01

    Forty-one methanol extracts of 28 indigenous medicinal plant species were tested for their insecticidal bioactivity against cotton whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae), adults and second nymphal instars under controlled conditions. This study is within a bioprospection context, in the form of utilizing local plant species as an alternative in sustainable agriculture development. Eighteen and nine plant extracts caused a significant decrease in number of live adult and...

  8. Peer Effects and the Indigenous/Non-Indigenous Early Test-Score Gap in Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakellariou, Chris

    2008-01-01

    This paper assesses the magnitude of the non-indigenous/indigenous test-score gap for third-year and fourth-year primary school pupils in Peru, in relation to the main family, school and peer inputs contributing to the test-score gap using the estimation method of feasible generalized least squares. The article then decomposes the gap into its…

  9. Indigenous Economies, Theories of Subsistence, and Women: Exploring the Social Economy Model for Indigenous Governance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuokkanen, Rauna

    2011-01-01

    The significance of traditional economies in indigenous communities goes beyond the economic realm--they are more than just livelihoods providing subsistence and sustenance to individuals or communities. The centrality of traditional economies to indigenous identity and culture has been noted by numerous scholars. However, today one can detect a…

  10. Is disaster “normal” for indigenous people? Indigenous knowledge and coping practices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilhorst, Dorothea; Baart, Judith; Haar, van der Gemma; Leeftink, Floor Maria

    2015-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to contribute to debates on the value of indigenous knowledge for disaster risk reduction. Recent international policy papers advocate the importance of indigenous knowledge and calls for its recognition. The paper aims to explore these issues in the everyda

  11. Discovering indigenous science: Implications for science education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snively, Gloria; Corsiglia, John

    2001-01-01

    Indigenous science relates to both the science knowledge of long-resident, usually oral culture peoples, as well as the science knowledge of all peoples who as participants in culture are affected by the worldview and relativist interests of their home communities. This article explores aspects of multicultural science and pedagogy and describes a rich and well-documented branch of indigenous science known to biologists and ecologists as traditional ecological knowledge (TEK). Although TEK has been generally inaccessible, educators can now use a burgeoning science-based TEK literature that documents numerous examples of time-proven, ecologically relevant, and cost effective indigenous science. Disputes regarding the universality of the standard scientific account are of critical importance for science educators because the definition of science is a de facto gatekeeping device for determining what can be included in a school science curriculum and what cannot. When Western modern science (WMS) is defined as universal it does displace revelation-based knowledge (i.e., creation science); however, it also displaces pragmatic local indigenous knowledge that does not conform with formal aspects of the standard account. Thus, in most science classrooms around the globe, Western modern science has been taught at the expense of indigenous knowledge. However, because WMS has been implicated in many of the world's ecological disasters, and because the traditional wisdom component of TEK is particularly rich in time-tested approaches that foster sustainability and environmental integrity, it is possible that the universalist gatekeeper can be seen as increasingly problematic and even counter productive. This paper describes many examples from Canada and around the world of indigenous people's contributions to science, environmental understanding, and sustainability. The authors argue the view that Western or modern science is just one of many sciences that need to be

  12. The politics of indigeneity: Indigenous strategies for inclusion in climate change negotiations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doolittle Amity

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Indigenous environmental activists have clearly articulated their views on global climate change policy. The content of these views was explored during the 10-day 2008 World Conservation Congress (WCC in Barcelona. Data were primarily collected through interviews and participant observation. In addition, policy statements and declarations made by indigenous environmental activists from 2000 to 2009 were analysed to place the perspectives of indigenous leaders and environmental activists in the context of their decade-long struggle to gain negotiating power at the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. This study examines the rhetorical strategies indigenous leaders from around the world use to gain political recognition and legitimacy in climate change negotiations. Two core principles, relating to a particular representation of indigenous environmental knowledge are identified as fundamental rhetorical tools. These are a belief that the earth is a living being with rights and the conviction that it is the responsibility of indigenous peoples to protect the earth from over-exploitation. However, reference to indigenous environmental knowledge is not the only rhetorical mechanism used by indigenous leaders in the climate debates. When faced with specific United Nations policies to combat climate change that could have a profound impact on their land rights, some indigenous leaders adopt a more confrontational response. Fearing that new polices would reinforce historical trends of marginalisation, indigenous leaders seeking recognition in climate change debates speak less about their ecological knowledge and responsibility to the earth and more about their shared histories of political and economic marginalisation and land dispossession, experienced first through colonialism and more recently through globalisation.

  13. Living with aphasia: three Indigenous Australian stories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Elizabeth; Hersh, Deborah; Hayward, Colleen; Fraser, Joan; Brown, Melita

    2012-06-01

    The incidence of cardiovascular disorders and stroke in Australian Aboriginal communities is more than twice as high as non-Indigenous Australians. Approximately 30% of people who survive stroke are left with some level of aphasia, and yet Indigenous Australians appear to be infrequent users of speech-language pathology services, and there is virtually no research literature about the experiences of aphasia for this group of people. This paper presents the stories of living with aphasia for three Indigenous Australian men living in Perth, Western Australia. Their narratives were collected by an Indigenous researcher through in-depth, supported interviews, and were explored using both within-case and cross-case analyses for common and recurring themes. It is argued that there is value for speech-language pathologists, and other health professionals, to be aware of the broad experiences of living with aphasia for Indigenous Australians because their stories are rarely heard and because, as with people with aphasia generally, they are at risk of social isolation and tend to lack visibility in the community. This study explores the key issues which emerge for these three men and highlights the need for further research in this area. PMID:22472033

  14. Annual changes in abundance of non-indigenous marine benthos on a very large spatial scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Mads S.; Wernberg, Thomas; Stæhr, Peter Anton;

    2008-01-01

    in abundance, NIMS of particular interest were found to be Mya arenaria and Bonemaissonia hamifera (abundant), Crepidula fornicata, Ensis americanus, Neanthes succinea (a cryptogenic species), Marenzelleria spp. (increasing), and Sargassum muticum (abundant and increasing). In addition, new and/or warm......Non-indigenous marine species (NIMS) have only recently caught general interest in Denmark, and baseline studies are needed to identify what species are of particular importance in order to prioritize management and research efforts. We used large data sets compiled in monitoring databases...... to quantify annual nation-wide changes in abundance of non-indigenous soft-bottom invertebrates (from grab samples) and hard-bottom macroalgae (from diver based percent cover values) in Denmark. Based on criteria of being either abundant (constituting >1% of the entire Danish assemblages) or increasing...

  15. Invasive mammals and habitat modification interact to generate unforeseen outcomes for indigenous fauna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norbury, Grant; Byrom, Andrea; Pech, Roger; Smith, James; Clarke, Dean; Anderson, Dean; Forrester, Guy

    2013-10-01

    Biotic invasions and habitat modification are two drivers of global change predicted to have detrimental impacts on the persistence of indigenous biota worldwide. Few studies have investigated how they operate synergistically to alter trophic interactions among indigenous and nonindigenous species in invaded ecosystems. We experimentally manipulated a suite of interacting invasive mammals, including top predators (cat Felis catus, ferret Mustela furo, stoat M. erminea), herbivores (rabbit Oryctolagus cuniculus, hare Lepus europaeus), and an insectivore (hedgehog Erinaceus europaeus occidentalis), and measured their effects on indigenous lizards and invertebrates and on an invasive mesopredator (house mouse Mus musculus). The work was carried out in a grassland/shrubland ecosystem that had been subjected to two types of habitat modification (widespread introduction of high-seed-producing pasture species, and areas of land use intensification by fertilization and livestock grazing). We also quantified food productivity for indigenous and invasive fauna by measuring pasture biomass, as well as seed and fruit production by grasses and shrubs. Indigenous fauna did not always increase following top-predator suppression: lizards increased on one of two sites; invertebrates did not increase on either site. Mesopredator release of mice was evident at the site where lizards did not increase, suggesting negative effects of mice on lizard populations. High mouse abundance occurred only on the predator-suppression site with regular production of pasture seed, indicating that this food resource was the main driver of mouse populations. Removal of herbivores increased pasture and seed production, which further enhanced ecological release of mice, particularly where pasture swards were overtopped by shrubs. An effect of landscape supplementation was also evident where nearby fertilized pastures boosted rabbit numbers and the associated top predators. Other studies have shown that

  16. Exporting by Migrants and Indigenous Entrepreneurs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashourizadeh, Shayegheh; Schøtt, Thomas; Pişkinsüt Şengüler, Ece; Wang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Migrants may become entrepreneurs in their host countries. They may utilize their dual embeddedness in both the home country and the host country, and also use transnational links to gain a competitive advantage in exporting compared to indigenous entrepreneurs. Migrant entrepreneurs’ advantage may......, however, be contingent on attributes such as gender and education, especially among the first generation of migrants, in that being male and educated is more advantageous for migrants than for indigenous entrepreneurs. A representative sample of 50,371 entrepreneurs establishing or operating enterprises...... around the world was surveyed in the Global Entrepreneurship Monitor, which reports on migration and exporting. Hierarchical linear modeling shows that migrant entrepreneurs export more than indigenous entrepreneurs, especially in the first generation, and especially among educated and male migrants...

  17. Integrating indigenous ecological and scientific hydro-geological knowledge using a Bayesian Network in the context of water resource development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liedloff, A. C.; Woodward, E. L.; Harrington, G. A.; Jackson, S.

    2013-08-01

    The contributions indigenous ecological knowledge can make to better inform water management decisions are currently undervalued leading to an underrepresentation of indigenous values in water planning and policy. This paper outlines a novel approach in which indigenous ecological knowledge informs cause and effect relationships between species and aquatic habitats to promote broader ecosystem understanding. A Bayesian Network was developed to synthesise the seasonal aquatic knowledge of a group of Gooniyandi Aboriginal language speakers, including fish species’ availability, condition and required habitat, and integrate it with hydrogeological understanding obtained from research undertaken in a stretch of the Fitzroy River, Western Australia. This river system, like most in northern Australia, is highly seasonal and entirely dependent upon groundwater for maintaining flow during prolonged dry seasons. We found that potential changes in river flow rates caused by future water resource development, such as groundwater extraction and surface water diversion, may have detrimental effects on the ability to catch the high value aquatic food species such as Barramundi and Sawfish, but also that species such as Black Bream may benefit. These findings result from changes in availability of habitats at times when Gooniyandi understanding shows they are important for providing aquatic resources in good condition. This study raises awareness of the potential outcomes of future water management and stimulates communication between indigenous people, the scientific community and water managers by developing a model of indigenous understanding from which to predict eco-hydrological change.

  18. Conservation and restoration of indigenous plants to improve community livelihoods: the Useful Plants Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulian, Tiziana; Sacandé, Moctar; Mattana, Efisio

    2014-05-01

    Kew's Millennium Seed Bank partnership (MSBP) is one of the largest ex situ plant conservation initiatives, which is focused on saving plants in and from regions most at risk, particularly in drylands. Seeds are collected and stored in seed banks in the country of origin and duplicated in the Millennium Seed Bank in the UK. The MSBP also strengthens the capacity of local communities to successfully conserve and sustainably use indigenous plants, which are important for their wellbeing. Since 2007, high quality seed collections and research information have been gathered on ca. 700 useful indigenous plant species that were selected by communities in Botswana, Kenya, Mali, Mexico and South Africa through Project MGU - The Useful Plants Project. These communities range from various farmer's groups and organisations to traditional healers, organic cotton/crop producers and primary schools. The information on seed conservation and plant propagation was used to train communities and to propagate ca. 200 species that were then planted in local gardens, and as species reintroduced for reforestation programmes and enriching village forests. Experimental plots have also been established to further investigate the field performance (plant survival and growth rate) of indigenous species, using low cost procedures. In addition, the activities support revenue generation for local communities directly through the sustainable use of plant products or indirectly through wider environmental and cultural services. This project has confirmed the potential of biodiversity conservation to improve food security and human health, enhance community livelihoods and strengthen the resilience of land and people to the changing climate. This approach of using indigenous species and having local communities play a central role from the selection of species to their planting and establishment, supported by complementary research, may represent a model for other regions of the world, where

  19. Analysis of alcohol dependence in indigenous peoples in Northern Siberia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michail Savchenko

    2015-06-01

    More severe course of alcoholism among indigenous population of North of Siberia leads to the destruction of traditional lifestyles and reduction of the indigenous population in the northern territories of the Russian Federation.

  20. The Futures of Indigenous Peoples: 9-11 and the Trajectory of Indigenous Survival and Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas D. Hall

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the past, present, and future resistance of indigenous peoples to capitalist expansion. The central argument is that the survival of indigenous peoples, their identities, and their cultures, constitutes strong antisystemic resistance against global capitalism and against the deepening and the broadening of modern world-systemic or globalization processes. Furthermore, we argue that recent events often touted as turning points in history—the collapse of the Soviet Union, the 9-11 attack on the twin towers, and even the war on Iraq—are at most “blips on the radar” in a larger trajectory of change and resistance. Rather, the important features of indigenous survival are: (1 Indigenous peoples, despite an immense variety of forms of cultural and social organization, represent non-capitalist forms of organization. Their continued survival challenges the fundamental premises of capitalism and its increasingly global culture. (2 Indigenous people’s challenges to global domination succeed less on economic, political, or military force, and more as fundamental challenges to the underpinnings of the logic of capitalism and the interstate system. (3 In order to learn from these resistance models, it is necessary to ground our understanding in two seemingly antithetical forms of knowledge: (a information arising from indigenous cultures and values and (b research about how the longue duree of the world-system shapes the form and timing of such movements. (4 Indigenous successes may serve as models and/ or inspirations for other forms of resistance. An important task is to discover what is unique to indigenous resistance and to specify what indigenous resistance has in common with other forms of resistance.

  1. Education for indigenous childhood at the Indigenous Reservation Napalpí (Chaco, Argentina. 1911-1936)

    OpenAIRE

    Teresa Laura Artieda; Yamila Liva; Victoria Soledad Almiron; Anabel Nazar

    2016-01-01

    On this article we approach the education for indigenous childhood at the Indigenous Reservation napalpí (Chaco, Argentina) between 1911 and 1936, where the first plan of the national state for the confinement and discipline of the subjected natives, members of the Qom, moqoit, shinpi’ peoples, was implemented in a highly conflicting scenario of military campaigns of the national state for controlling the territorial and political indigenous domains of the territory, the expansion of capitali...

  2. A Community Engaged Dental Curriculum: A Rural Indigenous Outplacement Programme

    OpenAIRE

    Abuzar, Menaka A.; Owen, Julie

    2016-01-01

    Background Indigenous people worldwide suffer from poor oral health as compared to non-Indigenous citizens. One of the approaches to bring about improvement in Indigenous oral health is to enhance the service provision by implementing oral health outplacement programmes. A case study of such a programme for dental students in Australia reports how an educational institution can successfully engage with an Indigenous oral health service to provide learning experiences to the students as well a...

  3. Indigenous territories and tropical forest management in Latin America

    OpenAIRE

    Davis, Shelton H.; Wali, Alaka

    1993-01-01

    Using data from Latin America, the authors argue that fundamental changes must take place in the legal recognition and demarcation of indigenous territories if indigenous peoples are to fulfill their potential as resource managers for threatened tropical forest ecosystems. The authors compare different national land tenure models for forest-dwelling indigenous peoples (contained in national Indian, agrarian, and protected-area laws in Latin America) and a model proposed by indigenous organiza...

  4. Sustainable tourism in indigenous communities in the Amazon

    OpenAIRE

    Brandão, Cristiane do Nascimento; Barbieri, José Carlos; Silva, Luis Claudio de Jesus

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to examine how tourism can become a tool to promote sustainable development in indigenous communities, as well as knowing the position of indigenous and non-indigenous institutions for the development and regulation of activity. The paper also analyzes the potential environmental, social and economic activity coming from, considering that the activity requires strong interaction with the environment and indigenous communities. This exploratory study is based on ...

  5. 6. Ecuador’s Indigenous Cultures: Astride Orality and Literacy

    OpenAIRE

    Rendón, Jorge Gómez

    2015-01-01

    Indigenous languages in Ecuador: survival and change Ecuador is the smallest of the Andean countries but is linguistically diverse. Indigenous languages have not successfully entered literacy through educational programmes and are now critically endangered. Eleven indigenous languages from six different language families, including two unclassified ones, are spoken in Ecuador (Gómez Rendón 2009: 7). Kichwa is the most popular indigenous language: it is spoken in the Andean highlands and the A...

  6. Misunderstanding the ``Nature'' of Co-Management: A Geography of Regulatory Science and Indigenous Knowledges (IK)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Annette

    2013-11-01

    Governments, NGOs, and natural scientists have increased research and policy-making collaborations with Indigenous peoples for governing natural resources, including official co-management regimes. However, there is continuing dissatisfaction with such collaborations, and calls for better communication and mutual learning to create more “adaptive” co-management regimes. This, however, requires that both Western and Indigenous knowledge systems be equal participants in the “co-production” of regulatory data. In this article, I examine the power dynamics of one co-management regulatory regime, conducting a multi-sited ethnography of the practices of researching and managing one transnational migratory species, greater white-fronted geese ( Anser albifrons frontalis), who nest where Koyukon Athabascans in Alaska, USA, practice subsistence. Analyzing the ethnographic data through the literatures of critical geography, science studies and Indigenous Studies, I describe how the practice of researching for co-management can produce conflict. “Scaling” the data for the co-management regime can marginalize Indigenous understandings of human-environment relations. While Enlightenment-based practices in wildlife biology avoid “anthropomorphism,” Indigenous Studies describes identities that operate through non-modern, deeply imbricated human-nonhuman identities that do not separate “nature” and “society” in making knowledge. Thus, misunderstanding the “nature” of their collaborations causes biologists and managers to measure and research the system in ways that erase how subsistence-based Indigenous groups already “manage” wildlife: by living through their ethical commitments to their fellow beings. At the end of the article, I discuss how managers might learn from these ontological and epistemological differences to better “co-produce” data for co-management.

  7. Adaptation of indigenous sheep, goats and camels in harsh grazing conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microbial breakdown of cellulose is a rather slow process. Therefore the retention time of digesta and the volume of the fermentation chamber are factors limiting the quantity of fibrous diets that can be digested. Indigenous ruminants can generally adapt to harsh grazing conditions better than conventional breeds. Unexpectedly high rumen volumes were reported in a number of indigenous ruminants. In studies reported in this paper, Heidschnucken, an indigenous breed of sheep in the heather region of Northern Germany, were able to increase their rumen volume from 14% to 22% of body weight during adaptation to a low quality fibrous diet. Heidschnucken did not lose significant body weight, whereas Blackface sheep lost 20% and failed to adapt the rumen volume. Rumen volume of indigenous sheep and goats in Northern Kenya was 20% of body weight while grazing in the thornbush savannah during the dry season, compared with 9-12% while kept indoors on a hay-concentrate diet. Mean retention time of particles in the total gastrointestinal tract of goats and sheep in Kenya was 38 h and 46 h respectively. In the experiment with Heidschnucken, these sheep increased the retention time of particles to 71 h on a straw diet, while Blackface sheep retained particles 58 h. Dietary preference and feed intake have been studied in indigenous sheep and goats in Kenya at seasonal pasture conditions in the thornbush savannah. Goats have a higher preference to dicotyledon species (92-97%) than sheep, who are less selective grazers. The feeding behaviour of indigenous sheep and goats was complementary rather than competitive. Feeding observations indicate that this is also the case when cattle (grazers) and camels (browsers) are included in such a comparison. (author)

  8. Indigenous Representation and Alternative Schooling: Prioritising an Epistemology of Relationality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keddie, Amanda

    2014-01-01

    This paper draws on a case study of a small alternative Indigenous school in Queensland, Australia. From the perspective of several of the school's Indigenous Elders, the paper foregrounds the significance of group differentiation at the school on the basis of Indigenous representation. However, it also considers how such…

  9. Indigenous Higher Education Student Equity: Focusing on What Works

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devlin, Marcia

    2009-01-01

    The rates of higher education access, participation and completion for Indigenous students are much lower than those for non-Indigenous students in Australia. This paper argues for a research-led focus on what works in terms of Indigenous student equity in higher education. Undertaking independent evaluation of existing initiatives and leveraging…

  10. Indigenous Rights and the 1991-2000 Australian Reconciliation Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Gunstone

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The formal reconciliation process in Australia was conducted between 1991 and 2000 and aimed to reconcile Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples by 2001. In this paper, I detail the failure of both this reconciliation process and governments, in particular the Howard Government, to recognise Indigenous rights, such as sovereignty, a treaty, self-determination and land rights.

  11. Career Decision-Making: What Matters to Indigenous Australians?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helme, Sue

    2010-01-01

    This article brings together and discusses three research projects that examined the vocational education and career-decision making of Indigenous Australians. These studies focused on the experiences of Indigenous people themselves, in order to provide an Indigenous perspective on vocational and career development. Four main barriers that limit…

  12. Indigeneity and Homeland: Land, History, Ceremony, and Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerma, Michael

    2012-01-01

    What is the relationship between Indigenous peoples and violent reactions to contemporary states? This research explores differing, culturally informed notions of attachment to land or place territory. Mechanistic ties and organic ties to land are linked to a key distinction between Indigenous peoples and non-Indigenous peoples. Utilizing the…

  13. Engagement with indigenous peoples and honoring traditional knowledge systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado, Julie; Bennett, Bull; Chief, Karletta; Cochran, Patricia; Cozetto, Karen; Gough, Bob; Hiza, Margaret M.; Lynn, Kathy; Maynard, Nancy; Voggesser, Garrit

    2015-01-01

    The organizers of the 2014 US National Climate Assessment (NCA) made a concerted effort to reach out to and collaborate with Indigenous peoples, resulting in the most comprehensive information to date on climate change impacts to Indigenous peoples in a US national assessment. Yet, there is still much room for improvement in assessment processes to ensure adequate recognition of Indigenous perspectives and Indigenous knowledge systems. This article discusses the process used in creating the Indigenous Peoples, Land, and Resources NCA chapter by a team comprised of tribal members, agencies, academics, and non-governmental organizations, who worked together to solicit, collect, and synthesize traditional knowledges and data from a diverse array of Indigenous communities across the US. It also discusses the synergy and discord between traditional knowledge systems and science and the emergence of cross-cutting issues and vulnerabilities for Indigenous peoples. The challenges of coalescing information about climate change and its impacts on Indigenous communities are outlined along with recommendations on the types of information to include in future assessment outputs. We recommend that future assessments – not only NCA, but other relevant local, regional, national, and international efforts aimed at the translation of climate information and assessments into meaningful actions – should support integration of Indigenous perspectives in a sustained way that builds respectful relationships and effectively engages Indigenous communities. Given the large number of tribes in the US and the current challenges and unique vulnerabilities of Indigenous communities, a special report focusing solely on climate change and Indigenous peoples is warranted.

  14. Contested Territories: Water Rights and the Struggles over Indigenous Livelihoods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boelens, R.A.; Duarte, B.; Manosalvas Nicolalde, R.; Mena Vásconez, P.A.; Roa Avendaño, T.; Vera-Delgado, J.

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the threats to Indigenous water rights and territories in the Andean countries. It analyzes how water and water rights are embedded in Indigenous territories, and how powerful actors and intervention projects tend to undermine local societies and indigenous livelihoods by develop

  15. Indigenous Knowledge and Library Work in Sierra Leone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kargbo, John Abdul

    2006-01-01

    Indigenous knowledge is vital information that is sadly diminishing at an alarming rate in Sierra Leone. There is, therefore, an urgent need to collect it before much of it is completely lost. This article explores the concept of indigenous knowledge and indigenous knowledge systems with a particular focus on Sierra Leone. Definitions and…

  16. The Impact of Immigration on Bilingualism among Indigenous American Peoples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahler, Janet Goldenstein

    2007-01-01

    Early federal government policies for American indigenous people alternated between extermination and assimilation. Imposing the colonists' and immigrants' language on indigenous people was important for achieving the latter. In the 1970-90's, federally funded grants for bilingual education for indigenous schools were offered to accommodate Native…

  17. Diversity patterns of indigenous arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi associated with rhizosphere of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp.) in Benin, West Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, J. M.; Houngnandan, P.; A. Kane; Sanon, K. B.; Neyra, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Assessment of diversity and understanding factors underlying species distribution are fundamental themes in ecology. However, the diversity of native arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) species in African tropical agro-ecosystems remains weakly known. This research was carried out to assess the morphological diversity of indigenous AMF species associated with rhizosphere of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata (L) Walp.) in different agro-ecological zones (AEZ) of Benin and to examine the effects of soil...

  18. Ethnobotanical inventory and folk uses of indigenous plants from Pir Nasoora National Park,Azad Jammu and Kashmir

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Muhammad; Shoaib; Amjad; Muhammad; Arshad; Rahmatullah; Qureshi

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To document the medicinal and other folk uses of native plants of the area with a view to preserve the ethnobotanical knowledge associated with this area.Methods:The fieldwork was conducted during a period of one year.Data were collected through a semi-structured questionnaire and interviews with indigenous tribal people and traditional health practitioners residing in the study area.Results:The present study documented ethnobotanical uses of 104 plant species belonged to93 genera and 51 families.Results revealed that most of the documented species were used medicinally(78 spp..44.07%).Leaves were found to be the most frequently used part(69 spp..42.86%) for the preparation of indigenous recipes and for fodder.Conclusions:The current research contributes significantly to the ethnobotanical knowledge.and depicts a strong human-plant interaction.There is an urgent need to further document indigenous uses of plants for future domestication.

  19. Adult Education and Indigenous Peoples in Brazil. International Survey on Adult Education for Indigenous Peoples. Country Study: Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes da Silva, Aracy

    Adult education for indigenous peoples in Brazil was examined. First, information on government institutions, indigenous organizations, international agencies, and nongovernmental organizations engaged in adult education for Brazil's indigenous peoples was compiled. Next, questionnaires and survey techniques were used to research the policy and…

  20. Applied Indigenous Studies at Northern Arizona University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trosper, Ronald L.

    2001-01-01

    The Applied Indigenous Studies program at Northern Arizona University aims to prepare American Indian students to assume tribal leadership roles. Its location in the College of Ecosystem Science and Management emphasizes its land-oriented and applied focus. The program's development, core courses, and academic requirements for bachelors degrees…

  1. Control of indigenous pathogenic bacteria in seafood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huss, Hans Henrik

    1997-01-01

    The pathogenic bacteria indigenous to the aquatic and general environment are listed. Their distribution in nature, prevalence in seafood and the possibilities for growth of these organisms in various types of products are outlined These data, combined with what is known regarding the epidemiology...

  2. Improving the productivity of indigenous African livestock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document summarizes the results of two Co-ordinated Research Programs to improve the productivity of indigenous African livestock. After an introduction and a summary the reports of the participating countries are presented. The individual contributions have been indexed separately. Refs, figs and tabs

  3. Indigenous Metissage: A Decolonizing Research Sensibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donald, Dwayne

    2012-01-01

    This paper is a report on the theoretical origins of a decolonizing research sensibility called Indigenous Metissage. This research praxis emerged parallel to personal and ongoing inquiries into historic and current relations connecting Aboriginal peoples and Canadians in the place now called Canada. I frame the colonial frontier origins of these…

  4. Indigenous People: Emancipatory Possibilities in Curriculum Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMurchy-Pilkington, Colleen

    2008-01-01

    In this article, I argue that emancipatory possibilities for Maori, the Indigenous people of New Zealand, rely on structural changes that enable them to have control over resources, decision making, and meaning, and that emancipation is a journey traveled by oppressed groups as they exercise their collective agency. The 1990s development of…

  5. Indigenous Youth Migration and Language Contact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyman, Leisy T.

    2013-01-01

    Few studies ethnographically detail how Indigenous young people's mobility intersects with sociolinguistic transformation in an interconnected world. Drawing on a decade-long study of youth and language contact, I analyze Yup'ik young people's migration in relation to emerging language ideologies and patterns of language use in "Piniq,"…

  6. Indigenous Knowledge, Ecology, and Evolutionary Biology

    OpenAIRE

    E. N. Anderson

    2011-01-01

    Review of Indigenous Knowledge, Ecology, and Evolutionary Biology. Raymond Pierotti. 2011. Routledge (Taylor & Francis Group), New York.  Pp. Xv + 264, Bibliography, index.  ISBN13: 978-0-415-87924-8 (hbk), 978-0-203-84711-4 (ebk).

  7. Desiderata: Towards Indigenous Models of Vocational Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, Frederick T. L.; Pearce, Marina

    2011-01-01

    As a result of a relative lack of cross-cultural validity in most current (Western) psychological models, indigenous models of psychology have recently become a popular approach for understanding behaviour in specific cultures. Such models would be valuable to vocational psychology research with culturally diverse populations. Problems facing…

  8. Iron status markers in 224 indigenous Greenlanders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milman, N; Byg, K E; Mulvad, G;

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate iron status in indigenous Greenlanders and its relationship to gender, age and intake of traditional Greenlandic foods. Methods: Serum ferritin, serum transferrin saturation and haemoglobin were evaluated in a population survey in 1993-1994 comprising 224 Greenlandic indivi...

  9. Decolonizing Indigenous Archaeology: Developments from Down Under

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Claire; Jackson, Gary

    2006-01-01

    In this article the authors discuss recent developments in the decolonization of Australian archaeology. From the viewpoint of Indigenous Australians, much archaeological and anthropological research has been nothing more than a tool of colonial exploitation. For the last twenty years, many have argued for greater control over research and for a…

  10. Policy and Indigenous Languages in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, Graham

    2011-01-01

    The use of Indigenous languages has been declining over the period of non-Aboriginal settlement in Australia as a result of repressive policies, both explicit and implicit. The National Policy on Languages (Lo Bianco, 1987) was the high point of language policy in Australia, given its national scope and status and its attempt to encompass all…

  11. Indigenous Ways--Fruits of Our Ancestors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohn, Itamar

    2011-01-01

    In this paper the human-nature relationship is recognized as a major field of interest and a platform of ideas linked with it is explored. A "new" source to inform an alternative paradigm for outdoor education is proposed; it is millennia old, has roots all over the globe and is a living, breathing, and evolving tradition--indigenous ways. While…

  12. The Futures of Indigenous Peoples: 9-11 and the Trajectory of Indigenous Survival and Resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas D. Hall; James V. Fenelon

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores the past, present, and future resistance of indigenous peoples to capitalist expansion. The central argument is that the survival of indigenous peoples, their identities, and their cultures, constitutes strong antisystemic resistance against global capitalism and against the deepening and the broadening of modern world-systemic or globalization processes. Furthermore, we argue that recent events often touted as turning points in historythe collapse of the Soviet Union, the...

  13. A Comparative Analysis of Indigenous Research Guidelines to Inform Genomic Research in Indigenous Communities

    OpenAIRE

    Jay Maddock; Nicole K. Taniguchi

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Genetic research has potential benefits for improving health, such as identifying molecular characteristics of a disease, understanding disease prevalence and treatment, and developing treatments tailored to patients based on individual genetic characteristics of their disease. Indigenous people are often targeted for genetic research because genes are easier to study in communities that practice endogamy. Therefore, populations perceived to be more homogenous, such as Indigenous ...

  14. Geographic distribution of isolated indigenous societies in Amazonia and the efficacy of indigenous territories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesler, Dylan C; Walker, Robert S

    2015-01-01

    The headwaters of the Amazon Basin harbor most of the world's last indigenous peoples who have limited contact with encroaching colonists. Knowledge of the geographic distribution of these isolated groups is essential to assist with the development of immediate protections for vulnerable indigenous settlements. We used remote sensing to document the locations of 28 isolated villages within the four Brazilian states of Acre, Amazonas, Roraima, and Rondônia. The sites were confirmed during previous over-flights and by image evidence of thatched-roof houses; they are estimated to host over 1,700 individuals. Locational data were used to train maximum entropy models that identified landscape and anthropogenic features associated with the occurrence of isolated indigenous villages, including elevation, proximity to streams of five different orders, proximity to roads and settlements, proximity to recent deforestation, and vegetation cover type. Isolated villages were identified at mid elevations, within 20 km of the tops of watersheds and at greater distances from existing roads and trails. We further used model results, combined with boundaries of the existing indigenous territory system that is designed to protect indigenous lands, to assess the efficacy of the existing protected area network for isolated peoples. Results indicate that existing indigenous territories encompass all of the villages we identified, and 50% of the areas with high predicted probabilities of isolated village occurrence. Our results are intended to help inform policies that can mitigate against future external threats to isolated peoples. PMID:25970612

  15. Geographic distribution of isolated indigenous societies in Amazonia and the efficacy of indigenous territories.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dylan C Kesler

    Full Text Available The headwaters of the Amazon Basin harbor most of the world's last indigenous peoples who have limited contact with encroaching colonists. Knowledge of the geographic distribution of these isolated groups is essential to assist with the development of immediate protections for vulnerable indigenous settlements. We used remote sensing to document the locations of 28 isolated villages within the four Brazilian states of Acre, Amazonas, Roraima, and Rondônia. The sites were confirmed during previous over-flights and by image evidence of thatched-roof houses; they are estimated to host over 1,700 individuals. Locational data were used to train maximum entropy models that identified landscape and anthropogenic features associated with the occurrence of isolated indigenous villages, including elevation, proximity to streams of five different orders, proximity to roads and settlements, proximity to recent deforestation, and vegetation cover type. Isolated villages were identified at mid elevations, within 20 km of the tops of watersheds and at greater distances from existing roads and trails. We further used model results, combined with boundaries of the existing indigenous territory system that is designed to protect indigenous lands, to assess the efficacy of the existing protected area network for isolated peoples. Results indicate that existing indigenous territories encompass all of the villages we identified, and 50% of the areas with high predicted probabilities of isolated village occurrence. Our results are intended to help inform policies that can mitigate against future external threats to isolated peoples.

  16. [The contribution of indigenous community health workers to special healthcare for Brazilian indigenous peoples].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diehl, Eliana Elisabeth; Langdon, Esther Jean; Dias-Scopel, Raquel Paiva

    2012-05-01

    Indigenous community health workers are part of a strategy developed by Brazil in the last two decades to promote a special healthcare model for indigenous peoples. Their role is designed to deal with various aspects of the special health policy, including the link between the heath team and the community and mediation between scientific and indigenous medical knowledge. Despite a significant increase in the number of indigenous community health workers in recent years, an evaluation of their responsibilities and contributions to the success of special care had not been conducted previously. This article, based on a literature review and original research by the authors, analyzes the role of the indigenous community health workers vis-à-vis their training and participation in health teams in different contexts in Brazil. Considering the importance assigned to the role of indigenous community health workers, this analysis reveals various ambiguities and contradictions that hinder both their performance and their potential contribution to the special health services. PMID:22641506

  17. Complex Indigenous Organic Matter Embedded in Apollo 17 Volcanic Black Glass Surface Deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas-Keprta, Kathie L.; Clemett, S. J.; Ross, D. K.; Le, L.; Rahman, Z.; Gonzalez, C.; McKay, D. S.; Gibson, E. K.

    2013-01-01

    Papers presented at the first Lunar Science Conference [1] and those published in the subsequent Science Moon Issue [2] reported the C content of Apollo II soils, breccias, and igneous rocks as rang-ing from approx.50 to 250 parts per million (ppm). Later Fegley & Swindle [3] summarized the C content of bulk soils from all the Apollo missions as ranging from 2.5 (Apollo 15) to 280 ppm (Apollo 16) with an overall average of 124+/- 45 ppm. These values are unexpectedly low given that multiple processes should have contributed (and in some cases continue to contribute) to the lunar C inventory. These include exogenous accretion of cometary and asteroidal dust, solar wind implantation, and synthesis of C-bearing species during early lunar volcanism. We estimate the contribution of C from exogenous sources alone is approx.500 ppm, which is approx.4x greater than the reported average. While the assessm ent of indigenous organic matter (OM) in returned lunar samples was one of the primary scientific goals of the Apollo program, extensive analysis of Apollo samples yielded no evidence of any significant indigenous organic species. Furthermore, with such low concentrations of OM reported, the importance of discriminating indigenous OM from terrestrial contamination (e.g., lunar module exhaust, sample processing and handling) became a formidable task. After more than 40 years, with the exception of CH4 [5-7], the presence of indigenous lunar organics still remains a subject of considerable debate. We report for the first time the identification of arguably indigenous OM present within surface deposits of black glass grains collected on the rim of Shorty crater during the Apollo 17 mission by astronauts Eugene Cernan and Harrison Schmitt.

  18. Chromosomal profile of indigenous pig (Sus scrofa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Guru Vishnu

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The objective of this study was to investigate the chromosomal profile of indigenous pigs by computing morphometric measurements. Materials and Methods: A cytogenetic study was carried out in 60 indigenous pigs to analyze the chromosomal profile by employing the short term peripheral blood lymphocyte culture technique. Results: The modal chromosome number (2n in indigenous pigs was found to be 38 and a fundamental number of 64 as in the exotic. First chromosome was the longest pair, and thirteenth pair was the second largest while Y-chromosome was the smallest in the karyotype of the pig. The mean relative length, arm ratio, centromeric indices and morphological indices of chromosomes varied from 1.99±0.01 to 11.23±0.09, 1.04±0.05 to 2.95±0.02, 0.51±0.14 to 0.75±0.09 and 2.08±0.07 to 8.08±0.15%, respectively in indigenous pigs. Sex had no significant effect (p>0.05 on all the morphometric measurements studied. Conclusion: The present study revealed that among autosomes first five pairs were sub metacentric, next two pairs were sub telocentric (6-7, subsequent five pairs were metacentric (8-12 and remaining six pairs were telocentric (13-18, while both allosomes were metacentric. The chromosomal number, morphology and various morphometric measurements of the chromosomes of the indigenous pigs were almost similar to those established breeds reported in the literature.

  19. Study on coccidiosis of scavenging indigenous chickens in Central Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashenafi, H; Tadesse, S; Medhin, G; Tibbo, M

    2004-10-01

    An investigation was made into coccidiosis of 190 scavenging indigenous chickens between September 2000 and April 2001 in three selected agroclimatic zones, in central Ethiopia. This was done through clinical, postmortem and microscopic examinations. Data were processed by chi-square and Mantel-Haenzel test. The study indicated that 25.8% (49/190) of the chickens were infected with coccidiosis and found to harbour one to four different species of Eimeria. Of these infected chickens, 30 (15.8%) and 19 (10.0%) were positive for clinical and sub-clinical coccidiosis, respectively. There was a significant altitude difference (chi2 = 14.7, p poultry products in developing countries, knowledge of production constraints in traditional management practices could help devise control strategies for constraints on backyard poultry production systems. PMID:15563030

  20. ISOLATION OF FUNGI FROM THE GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT OF INDIGENOUS CHICKEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Kusdiyantini

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal tract of chicken is a place in which many kinds of fungi can be found. The aim of the research was to isolate fungi from the gastrointestinal tract of the indigenous chicken (Ayam Kampung. The chicken samples were four days, one week and two months old and were sampled from chicken farm located in Yogyakarta. Potato dextrose agar (PDA medium was used to grow the fungi. Fifty pure isolates of fungi were found from three different ages, those were four days, one week and two months old chicken were 5, 10 and 35 isolates respectively. The largest number of isolate was found in ileum, then followed by caecum, jejenum and duodenum. The fifty isolate of fungi belonged to seven species, those were Aspergillus fumigatus, Aspergillus niger, Chrysonilia crassa, Mucor circinelloides, Mucor sp, Rhizopus oligosporus and Rhizopus oryzae.

  1. Interim Report on SNP analysis and forensic microarray probe design for South American hemorrhagic fever viruses, tick-borne encephalitis virus, henipaviruses, Old World Arenaviruses, filoviruses, Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever viruses, Rift Valley fever

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaing, C; Gardner, S

    2012-06-05

    The goal of this project is to develop forensic genotyping assays for select agent viruses, enhancing the current capabilities for the viral bioforensics and law enforcement community. We used a multipronged approach combining bioinformatics analysis, PCR-enriched samples, microarrays and TaqMan assays to develop high resolution and cost effective genotyping methods for strain level forensic discrimination of viruses. We have leveraged substantial experience and efficiency gained through year 1 on software development, SNP discovery, TaqMan signature design and phylogenetic signature mapping to scale up the development of forensics signatures in year 2. In this report, we have summarized the whole genome wide SNP analysis and microarray probe design for forensics characterization of South American hemorrhagic fever viruses, tick-borne encephalitis viruses and henipaviruses, Old World Arenaviruses, filoviruses, Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus, Rift Valley fever virus and Japanese encephalitis virus.

  2. The potential use of indigenous nickel hyperaccumulators for small-scale mining in The Philippines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.S. Fernando

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Uptake of nickel and three other heavy metals (copper, cobalt, and chromium was examined in 33 species of the common and rare native vascular plants growing in an ultramafic area currently subjected to mining in Zambales Province, Luzon, Philippines. Leaf tissue samples were initially screened in the field using filter paper impregnated with dimethylglyoxime (1% solution in 70% ethyl alcohol and later analyzed by atomic absorption spectroscopy. One species was found to be a hypernickelophore (>10,000 µg/g, eight species were nickel hyperaccumulators (>1,000 µg/g, nineteen species were hemi-accumulators (>100-1,000 µg/g, and five species were non-accumulators (<100 µg/g. This paper significantly adds to the list of hyperaccumulator species first reported for the Philippines in 1992. The findings will be discussed in context of using indigenous species for post mining ecological restoration and nickel phytoextraction in small-scale mining in the Philippines

  3. Contrasting colonist and indigenous impacts on amazonian forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Flora; Gray, Clark; Bilsborrow, Richard E; Mena, Carlos F; Erlien, Christine M; Bremner, Jason; Barbieri, Alisson; Walsh, Stephen J

    2010-06-01

    To examine differences in land use and environmental impacts between colonist and indigenous populations in the northern Ecuadorian Amazon, we combined data from household surveys and remotely sensed imagery that was collected from 778 colonist households in 64 colonization sectors, and 499 households from five indigenous groups in 36 communities. Overall, measures of deforestation and forest fragmentation were significantly greater for colonists than indigenous peoples. On average, colonist households had approximately double the area in agriculture and cash crops and 5.5 times the area in pasture as indigenous households. Nevertheless, substantial variation in land-use patterns existed among the five indigenous groups in measures such as cattle ownership and use of hired agricultural labor. These findings support the potential conservation value of indigenous lands while cautioning against uniform policies that homogenize indigenous ethnic groups. PMID:20337669

  4. Using Modern Technologies to Capture and Share Indigenous Astronomical Knowledge

    CERN Document Server

    Nakata, N M; Warren, J; Byrne, A; Pagnucco, M; Harley, R; Venugopal, S; Thorpe, K; Neville, R; Bolt, R

    2014-01-01

    Indigenous Knowledge is important for Indigenous communities across the globe and for the advancement of our general scientific knowledge. In particular, Indigenous astronomical knowledge integrates many aspects of Indigenous Knowledge, including seasonal calendars, navigation, food economics, law, ceremony, and social structure. We aim to develop innovative ways of capturing, managing, and disseminating Indigenous astronomical knowledge for Indigenous communities and the general public for the future. Capturing, managing, and disseminating this knowledge in the digital environment poses a number of challenges, which we aim to address using a collaborative project involving experts in the higher education, library, and industry sectors. Using Microsoft's WorldWide Telescope and Rich Interactive Narratives technologies, we propose to develop software, media design, and archival management solutions to allow Indigenous communities to share their astronomical knowledge with the world on their terms and in a cult...

  5. Editor in Chief Commentary: Water - Recognizing the Indigenous Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerry P. White

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Indigenous peoples have, since time immemorial, understood that water is central to the cycles of life. Yet, as many of the articles in this special issue on water in Indigenous communities point out, Indigenous peoples have real problems accessing safe water. Why?Indigenous peoples have always cared for the water and followed practices that, depending on their geography, varied by season to protect and conserve fresh safe water. They have celebrated it as witnessed by the ceremony and language used. Colonial practices have disrupted the care and knowledge passing in Indigenous communities.Cost-effective technology exists to deliver safe water to Indigenous communities. The issue is that utilization of technology and environmental sustainability rest on the social determinants of safe water. From a policy perspective, this means we have to look outside of Western technological solutions and come to listen to the other ‘story’ - the one that emanates from Indigenous Traditional Knowledge.

  6. REM: A Collaborative Framework for Building Indigenous Cultural Competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, Tamara; Virdun, Claudia; Sherwood, Juanita; Parker, Nicola; Van Balen, Jane; Gray, Joanne; Jackson, Debra

    2016-09-01

    The well-documented health disparities between the Australian Indigenous and non-Indigenous population mandates a comprehensive response from health professionals. This article outlines the approach taken by one faculty of health in a large urban Australian university to enhance cultural competence in students from a variety of fields. Here we outline a collaborative and deeply respectful process of Indigenous and non-Indigenous university staff collectively developing a model that has framed the embedding of a common faculty Indigenous graduate attribute across the curriculum. Through collaborative committee processes, the development of the principles of "Respect; Engagement and sharing; Moving forward" (REM) has provided both a framework and way of "being and doing" our work. By drawing together the recurring principles and qualities that characterize Indigenous cultural competence the result will be students and staff learning and bringing into their lives and practice, important Indigenous cultural understanding. PMID:26069032

  7. The Portrayal of Indigenous Health in Selected Australian Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa J. Stoneham

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available It is acknowledged that health outcomes for Australian Indigenous peoples are lower than those of non-Indigenous Australians. Research suggests negative media in relation to Indigenous Australians perpetuates racist stereotypes among the wider population and impacts on the health of Indigenous Australians. This study examined the media portrayal of Indigenous Australian public health issues in selected media over a twelve month period and found that, overwhelmingly, the articles were negative in their portrayal of Indigenous health. A total of 74 percent of the coverage of Australian Indigenous related articles were negative, 15 percent were positive, and 11 percent were neutral. The most common negative subject descriptors related to alcohol, child abuse, petrol sniffing, violence, suicide, deaths in custody, and crime.

  8. Southern African species of Mentha L. (Lamiaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. E. Codd

    1983-12-01

    Full Text Available The species of Mentha L. occurring in Southern Africa are reviewed and a key is provided to two indigenous and one naturalized species.  M. wissii Launert is reduced to M. longifolia (L. Huds. subsp. wissii (Launert Codd.

  9. CONTEMPORARY INDIGENOUS LITERATURE: FORMS AND CONTENTS IN THE POETRY AND PROSE OF THE II LITERARY PARTY OF INDIGENOUS POETICS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah Goldemberg

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available By analyzing the forms and contents of the presentations made by indigenous performers and writers at the I Literary Party of Indigenous Poetics, this article exposes the challenges faced by traditional genre theories in tackling indigenous narratives and analyses how this “crisis” contributes to widening hierarchical and Western biased conceptions. On a stage open to contemporary indigenous expression, as is the literary party, the concepts of performance and storytelling, with the social function of maintaining tradition, continuous learning and transformation, better define this indigenous expression.

  10. Assessment of genetic diversity in indigenous turmeric (Curcuma longa) germplasm from India using molecular markers

    OpenAIRE

    Verma, Sushma; Singh, Shweta; Sharma, Suresh,; Tewari, S. K.; Roy, R. K.; Goel, A. K.; Rana, T. S.

    2015-01-01

    Curcuma longa L., commonly known as turmeric, is one of the economically and medicinally important plant species. It is predominantly cultivated in the tropical and sub tropical countries. India is the largest producer, and exporter of turmeric in the world, followed by China, Indonesia, Bangladesh and Thailand. In the present study, Directed Amplification of Minisatellite DNA (DAMD) and Inter Simple Sequence Repeats (ISSR), methods were used to estimate the genetic variability in indigenous ...

  11. Eating from the wild: Turumbu indigenous knowledge on noncultivated edible plants, Tshopo district, DRCongo

    OpenAIRE

    Termote, Céline; Van Damme, Patrick; Dhed'a Djailo, Benoît

    2010-01-01

    Documenting and revalorizing the rapidly disappearing indigenous knowledge on wild edible plants is essential to promote health and preserve diversity. Focus group discussions were organized within three Turumbu villages to document wild foods known, availability, preparation methods, and uses. Preferences in taste and commercial, nutritional, and cultural value were discussed during participatory ranking exercises. Results show 85 species within 70 genera and 44 families. Fruits of Anonidium...

  12. A Community Engaged Dental Curriculum: A Rural Indigenous Outplacement Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuzar, Menaka A.; Owen, Julie

    2016-01-01

    Background Indigenous people worldwide suffer from poor oral health as compared to non-Indigenous citizens. One of the approaches to bring about improvement in Indigenous oral health is to enhance the service provision by implementing oral health outplacement programmes. A case study of such a programme for dental students in Australia reports how an educational institution can successfully engage with an Indigenous oral health service to provide learning experiences to the students as well as deliver much needed services to the community. Design and Methods The assessment of this ongoing outplacement programme over the period of 2008-14, based on students’ feedback, highlights some of the key beneficial outcomes. Students agreed that the Indigenous outplacement programme improved their understanding of Indigenous issues (mean ± SD: 4.10±0.8; 5 refers to strongly agree on 5-point scale) and increased the possibility that they will practise in Indigenous health (3.66±1.0). They were pleased with the assistance received by clinical supervisors and clinic staff at the Indigenous dental clinic (4.28±0.8). Conclusions This programme has demonstrated that structured student outplacements are valuable in building relations across cultures especially with Indigenous communities. It has also shown that university engagement with the public health sector can be beneficial to both institutions. Significance for public health An oral health outreach programme is one of the suggested approaches to effectively address the endemic issues of poor oral health among Indigenous people around the world. An Indigenous dental clinical outplacement in Australia provides an example of beneficial outcomes of such an approach. It provides dental students with an opportunity to experience the health issues related to Australian Indigenous communities and prepare future graduates to work comfortably in the public health care system. Indigenous people also develop trust and feel

  13. Meeting the challenges of recruitment and retention of Indigenous people into nursing: outcomes of the Indigenous Nurse Education Working Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usher, Kim; Miller, Maria; Turale, Sue; Goold, Sally

    2005-07-01

    It has been recognised internationally that increasing the number of Indigenous people working as health professionals is linked to the improved health status of Indigenous people. When comparing Australian Indigenous and non-Indigenous populations, Indigenous people continue to have poorer health standards and are much less likely to be involved in employment in health professions than other Australians. In 2000, the Indigenous Nurse Education Working Group (INEWG) was formed by government with the mandate to work collaboratively with universities and important professional nursing bodies across the nation in an attempt to increase the number of Indigenous registered nurses and to prepare nursing graduates with better understanding of, and skills to assist with, Indigenous health issues. This paper describes the work of the INEWG from 2000 to mid-2003; firstly in developing and implementing strategies aimed at increasing the recruitment and retention of Indigenous people into undergraduate nursing programs; and secondly by helping university schools of nursing increase faculty and student understanding of Indigenous culture, history and health issues through educational processes. Lastly, it summarises the INEWG's 2002 recommendations to achieve a higher rate of Indigenous participation in nursing. The results of research into the success of these recommendations will be the subject of a later paper. PMID:16619917

  14. A review of ecological interactions between crayfish and fish, indigenous and introduced

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reynolds J.D.

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Crayfish (decapods and fish are both long-lived large members of freshwater communities, often functioning as keystone species. This paper reviews interactions between these, with emphasis on the European context. Native crayfish and fish are in ecological balance, which may involve mutual predation, competition and sometimes habitat disturbance. This balance is disrupted by range extensions and translocations of native fish or crayfish into exotic situations. Some fish and crayfish have been translocated globally, chiefly from North America to other continents. Non-indigenous crayfish species (NICS may impact on native fish, just as introduced fish impact on indigenous crayfish species (ICS. Competition between ICS and NICS may result in making the former susceptible to various mechanisms of interaction with fish, indigenous or introduced. In Europe, long-established NICS – signals, spiny-cheek and red swamp crayfish – may occur in greater densities than ICS; they are more tolerant and aggressive and show more interactions with fish. More recent introductions, still restricted in distribution, have not yet received enough study for their impacts to be assessed. Interactions between fish and crayfish in North and South America, Madagascar and Australasia are also explored. Mechanisms of interaction between fish and crayfish include mutual predation, competition for food and spatial resources, food-web alteration and habitat modification. Resultant changes in communities and ecosystems may be physical or biotal, and affect both ecosystem services and exploitation potential.

  15. Phytochemicals and Medicinal Properties of Indigenous Tropical Fruits with Potential for Commercial Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Amin

    2016-01-01

    Hundreds of fruit-bearing trees are native to Southeast Asia, but many of them are considered as indigenous or underutilized. These species can be categorized as indigenous tropical fruits with potential for commercial development and those possible for commercial development. Many of these fruits are considered as underutilized unless the commercialization is being realized despite the fact that they have the developmental potential. This review discusses seven indigenous tropical fruits from 15 species that have been identified, in which their fruits are having potential for commercial development. As they are not as popular as the commercially available fruits, limited information is found. This paper is the first initiative to provide information on the phytochemicals and potential medicinal uses of these fruits. Phytochemicals detected in these fruits are mainly the phenolic compounds, carotenoids, and other terpenoids. Most of these phytochemicals are potent antioxidants and have corresponded to the free radical scavenging activities and other biological activities of the fruits. The scientific research that covered a broad range of in vitro to in vivo studies on the medicinal potentials of these fruits is also discussed in detail. The current review is an update for researchers to have a better understanding of the species, which simultaneously can provide awareness to enhance their commercial value and promote their utilization for better biodiversity conservation. PMID:27340420

  16. A Collaborative Research Process Studying Fruit Availability and Seed Dispersal within an Indigenous Community in the Middle Caqueta River Region, Colombian Amazon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Parrado-Rosselli

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to present a collaborative research process between the Nonuya indigenous community and western scientists whilst studying fruit production patterns and the role of animals in the spatial distribution patterns of terra firme rain forest tree species in the Colombian Amazon. The process is presented in four stages: initially with a distant relationship between western scientists and indigenous people, with little exchange of knowledge, which progressed into a collaborative research relationship involving a high exchange of knowledge. The first stage consisted of the indigenous people's participation an exclusively scientific research project on natural sciences, as passive fieldwork guides. The second stage occurred when the guide became a fieldwork assistant and received training and expertise in scientific methodologies for data collection. The relationship between western scientists and indigenous people developed into the ability to have frequent debates and discussions over observations, findings, and interpretations. In the third stage, the indigenous fieldwork assistant proposed his own research, wherein he combined both scientific methodologies, and dialogue with elders in order to obtain information. During the fourth stage of the process, high quality information, relevant to the needs of both the western scientists and indigenous people was generated. This collaborative research process allowed the exchange of experiences, methodologies, and learning, leading to a better understanding of tropical rainforests. In this paper, the implications of this experience for future studies with the indigenous communities are discussed.

  17. Tuberculosis control in a highly endemic indigenous community in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croda, Mariana Garcia; Trajber, Zelik; Lima, Rosangela da Costa; Croda, Julio

    2012-04-01

    In Latin America, indigenous populations have high rates of non-completion of TB treatment and case fatality and have been defined as a priority group for investments. To evaluate TB control, a retrospective cohort study was performed to identify factors predictive of non-completion of treatment and mortality in an indigenous and non-indigenous population between 2002 and 2008 in Dourados, Brazil. A 90% reduction in non-completion of TB treatment was observed in the indigenous population after DOTS (directly observed treatment, short course) implementation (20% vs 2%). In the non-indigenous population, the number of patients not completing TB treatment continued to increase. Non-indigenous TB patients had 4.5 times higher mortality than indigenous TB patients (9% vs 2%). In multivariate analysis, non-indigenous race [odds ratio (OR) 2.33, 95% CI 1.32-4.10] was associated with non-completion of TB treatment, and HIV-positive status (OR 5.58, 95% CI 2.38-13.07) was associated with mortality. Implementation of DOTS in the indigenous populations in Dourados showed a significant reduction in non-completion of TB treatment. Nevertheless, a high rate of TB in children and young adults indicates the continuous transmission and maintenance of the epidemic in this community. Among the non-indigenous population, the TB case fatality rate is closely linked to the HIV prevalence. PMID:22365154

  18. Tuberculosis in indigenous children in the Brazilian Amazon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Gava

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Assess the epidemiological aspects of tuberculosis in Brazilian indigenous children and actions to control it. METHODS: An epidemiological study was performed with 356 children from 0 to 14 years of age in Rondônia State, Amazon, Brazil, during the period 1997-2006. Cases of TB reported to the Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System were divided into indigenous and non-indigenous categories and analyzed according to sex, age group, place of residence, clinical form, diagnostic tests and treatment outcome. A descriptive analysis of cases and hypothesis test (χ² was carried out to verify if there were differences in the proportions of illness between the groups investigated. RESULTS: A total of 356 TB cases were identified (125 indigenous, 231 non-indigenous of which 51.4% of the cases were in males. In the indigenous group, 60.8% of the cases presented in children aged 0-4 years old. The incidence mean was much higher among indigenous; in 2001, 1,047.9 cases/100,000 inhabitants were reported in children aged < 5 years. Pulmonary TB was reported in more than 80% of the cases, and in both groups over 70% of the cases were cured. Cultures and histopathological exams were performed on only 10% of the patients. There were 3 cases of TB/HIV co-infection in the non-indigenous group and none in the indigenous group. The case detection rate was classified as insufficient or fair in more than 80% of the indigenous population notifications, revealing that most of the diagnoses were performed based on chest x-ray. CONCLUSIONS: The approach used in this study proved useful in demonstrating inequalities in health between indigenous and non-indigenous populations and was superior to the conventional analyses performed by the surveillance services, drawing attention to the need to improve childhood TB diagnosis among the indigenous population.

  19. Globalisation And Local Indigenous Education In Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinke, Leanne

    2004-11-01

    Globalisation is often viewed as a threat to cultural and linguistic diversity and therefore is a central concern of educational practices and policy. The present study challenges this common view by demonstrating that local communities can use global means to support and enhance their specific practices and policies. An historical exploration of education policy in Mexico reveals that there has been a continuing struggle by indigenous peoples to maintain locally relevant modes of teaching. Indigenous peoples have increasingly used technology to maintain their languages and local cultural practices. Such accentuation of the local in a global context is exemplified by the people of Chiapas: They live in subsistence-type communities, yet their recent education movements and appeals to international solidarity (such as in the Zapatista rebellion) have employed computer-aided technologies.

  20. Nuclear rocket using indigenous Martian fuel NIMF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the 1960's, Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR) engines were developed and ground tested capable of yielding ISP of up to 900 s at thrusts up to 250 klb. Numerous trade studies have shown that such traditional hydrogen fueled NTR engines can reduce the inertial mass low earth orbit (IMLEO) of lunar missions by 35 percent and Mars missions by 50 to 65 percent. The same personnel and facilities used to revive the hydrogen NTR can also be used to develop NTR engines capable of using indigenous Martian volatiles as propellant. By putting this capacity of the NTR to work in a Mars descent/acent vehicle, the Nuclear rocket using Indigenous Martian Fuel (NIMF) can greatly reduce the IMLEO of a manned Mars mission, while giving the mission unlimited planetwide mobility

  1. Are Supernovae Recorded in Indigenous Astronomical Traditions?

    CERN Document Server

    Hamacher, Duane W

    2014-01-01

    Novae and supernovae are rare astronomical events that would have had an influence on the sky-watching peoples who witnessed them. Although several bright novae/supernovae have been visible during recorded human history, there are many proposed but no confirmed accounts of supernovae in oral traditions or material culture. Criteria are established for confirming novae/supernovae in oral and material culture, and claims from around the world are discussed to determine if they meet these criteria. Australian Aboriginal traditions are explored for possible descriptions of novae/supernovae. Although representations of supernovae may exist in Indigenous traditions, and an account of a nova in Aboriginal traditions has been confirmed, there are currently no confirmed accounts of supernovae in Indigenous oral or material traditions.

  2. THE REPRESENTATION INDIGENOUS GUARANI MEMOIR IN BOOKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Hermínio Maldonado

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The works of authors memoir, researched this, depict the lifestyles Guarani and conflicts involving territorial disputes between the eighteenth and mid-twentieth century. They report experiences and seek their opinion about the relationship between indigenous people and migrants, as the authors themselves, who came to southern Ontario then on business and looking for productive land. From these works it is understood as the Indians managed to hide the regional history and justify their judgments about this population without considering the culture and without social organization. The research is to understand the phenomenon of invisibility to which they are subject, not only the Guarani, but the other indigenous peoples today the state of Mato Grosso do Sul.

  3. Are supernovae recorded in indigenous astronomical traditions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamacher, Duane W.

    2014-07-01

    Novae and supernovae are rare astronomical events that would have had an influence on the skywatching peoples who witnessed them. Although several bright novae/supernovae have been visible during recorded human history, there are many proposed but no confirmed accounts of supernovae in indigenous oral traditions or material culture. Criteria are established for confirming novae/supernovae in oral traditions and material culture, and claims from around the world are discussed to determine if they meet these criteria. Aboriginal Australian traditions are explored for possible descriptions of novae/supernovae. Although representations of supernovae may exist in Aboriginal traditions, there are currently no confirmed accounts of supernovae in Indigenous Australian oral or material traditions.

  4. Critical Indigenous Studies: From Difference to Density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Andersen

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Proponents of the discipline of Native Studies (in its various guises have attempted to produce a methodologically and theoretically distinctive body of scholarship to justify its existence in the field of academia. Critiquing Duane Champagne’s recent article published in a flagship journal for North American Native Studies, I argue that while establishing Native Studies as a discipline has little or nothing to do with securing Native Studies departments on university campuses, a place nonetheless exists for these departments. Marrying Native Studies literature on the importance of producing tribally specific knowledge with Australian-based Whiteness Studies literature focusing on the utility of indigeneity for denaturalising white privilege, I argue that the discipline of Native Studies should justify itself departmentally by teaching about the complex forms of local indigeneity upon which white privilege is reproduced.

  5. Education for indigenous childhood at the Indigenous Reservation Napalpí (Chaco, Argentina. 1911-1936

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Laura Artieda

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available On this article we approach the education for indigenous childhood at the Indigenous Reservation napalpí (Chaco, Argentina between 1911 and 1936, where the first plan of the national state for the confinement and discipline of the subjected natives, members of the Qom, moqoit, shinpi’ peoples, was implemented in a highly conflicting scenario of military campaigns of the national state for controlling the territorial and political indigenous domains of the territory, the expansion of capitalism and the progressive proletarian condition of those populations in the regional farms. We analyze the schooling project for the indigenous childhood in the Reservation, we present some notes on its development during the first three decades of the twentieth century and the conceptions on childhood and the educating forms attributed to the indigenous populations.this work is registered on the social history of education, it deepens previous inquiries of our authorship and it integrates anthropological and regional history researches. Our corpus of data is based in state’s legislations, civil servants reports and national organizations memoirs.

  6. Recognition, Reconciliation and Resentment in Indigenous Politics

    OpenAIRE

    Coulthard, Glen

    2011-01-01

    Dr. Glen Coulthard is an assistant professor in the First Nations Studies Program and the Department of Political Science. Glen has written and published numerous articles and chapters in the areas of contemporary political theory, indigenous thought and politics, and radical social and political thought (marxism, anarchism, post-colonialism). His most recent work on Frantz Fanon and the politics of recognition won Contemporary Political Theory’s Annual Award for Best Article of the Year in 2...

  7. Technology development for indigenous water lubricated bearings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Water Lubricated Bearings (WLB) are used in various mechanisms of fuel handling systems of PHWRs and AHWR. Availability and random failures of these bearings was a major factor in refuelling operations. Indigenous development of these bearings was taken up and 7 types of antifriction bearings in various sizes (totaling 37 variants) for PHWR, AHWR and Dhruva applications were successfully developed. This paper deals with various aspects of WLB development. (author)

  8. Locally Situated Digital Representation of Indigenous Knowledge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winschiers-Theophilus, Heike; Jensen, Kasper Løvborg; Rodil, Kasper

    2012-01-01

    Digital re-presentation of indigenous knowledge remains an absurdity as long as we fail to deconstruct the prevalent design paradigm and techniques continuously re-framing technology within a western epistemology. This paper discusses key challenges in attempts of co-constructing a digital......’s views are brought to light within the design interactions. A new digital reality is created at the periphery of the situated knowledge through continuous negotiations and joint meaning making....

  9. Sustainability and Entrepreneurship: Fostering Indigenous Entrepreneurship in the Brazilian Amazon Region

    OpenAIRE

    Raul Gouvea

    2014-01-01

    This article elaborates on the diverse entrepreneurial activities of indigenous communities in the Brazilian Amazon region. This article argues that further sustainability of the Brazilian Amazonian region is intrinsically linked to the entrepreneurial activities by indigenous communities in the Amazon region. Amazonian indigenous communities are under increasing economic and social pressure. Fostering sustainable indigenous entrepreneurship in these disadvantaged indigenous communities has t...

  10. Airborne remote sensing of spatiotemporal change (1955-2004) in indigenous and exotic forest cover in the Taita Hills, Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellikka, Petri K. E.; Lötjönen, Milla; Siljander, Mika; Lens, Luc

    2009-08-01

    We studied changes in area and species composition of six indigenous forest fragments in the Taita Hills, Kenya using 1955 and 1995 aerial photography with 2004 airborne digital camera mosaics. The study area is part of Eastern Arc Mountains, a global biodiversity hot spot that boasts an outstanding diversity of flora and fauna and a high level of endemism. While a total of 260 ha (50%) of indigenous tropical cloud forest was lost to agriculture and bushland between 1955 and 2004, large-scale planting of exotic pines, eucalyptus, grevillea, black wattle and cypress on barren land during the same period resulted in a balanced total forest area. In the Taita Hills, like in other Afrotropical forests, indigenous forest loss may adversely affect ecosystem services.

  11. Early Vocabulary Development of Australian Indigenous Children: Identifying Strengths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brad M. Farrant

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The current study sought to increase our understanding of the factors involved in the early vocabulary development of Australian Indigenous children. Data from the Longitudinal Study of Indigenous Children were available for 573 Indigenous children (291 boys who spoke English (M=37.0 months, SD=5.4 months, at wave 3. Data were also available for 86 children (51 boys who spoke an Indigenous language (M=37.1 months, SD=6.0 months, at wave 3. As hypothesised, higher levels of parent-child book reading and having more children’s books in the home were associated with better English vocabulary development. Oral storytelling in Indigenous language was a significant predictor of the size of children’s Indigenous vocabulary.

  12. Including indigenous knowledge and experience in IPCC assessment reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, James D.; Cameron, Laura; Rubis, Jennifer; Maillet, Michelle; Nakashima, Douglas; Willox, Ashlee Cunsolo; Pearce, Tristan

    2016-04-01

    The IPCC is the leading international body for the assessment of climate change, forming the interface between science, policy and global politics. Indigenous issues have been under-represented in previous IPCC assessments. In this Perspective, we analyse how indigenous content is covered and framed in the Working Group II (WGII) portion of the Fifth Assessment Report (AR5). We find that although there is reference to indigenous content in WGII, which increased from the Fourth Assessment Report, the coverage is general in scope and limited in length, there is little critical engagement with indigenous knowledge systems, and the historical and contextual complexities of indigenous experiences are largely overlooked. The development of culturally relevant and appropriate adaptation policies requires more robust, nuanced and appropriate inclusion and framing of indigenous issues in future assessment reports, and we outline how this can be achieved.

  13. A Comparison between Australian Football League (AFL Injuries in Australian Indigenous versus Non-indigenous Players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Orchard

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available It has previously been shown that being of aboriginal descent is a risk factor for hamstring injuries in Australian football. The aim of this study was to review the Australian Football League (AFL injury database to determine whether there were any injuries where indigenous players had different relative risks to non-indigenous players. Analysis was conducted using data from the AFL injury database, which included data from 4,492 players over 21 years (1992–2012, covering 162,683 player-matches at AFL level, 91,098 matches at lower levels and 328,181 weeks (possible matches of exposure. Compared to non-indigenous players, indigenous players had a significantly higher risk of hamstring injuries (RR 1.52, 95% CI 1.32–1.73 and calf strains (RR 1.30, 95% CI 1.00–1.69. Conversely, indigenous players had a significantly lower risk of lumbar/thoracic spine injuries (RR 0.61, 95% CI 0.41–0.91, groin strains/osteitis pubis (RR 0.75, 95% CI 0.58–0.96 and Achilles tendon injuries (RR 0.32, 95% CI 0.12–0.86. The results for the above injuries were also significant in terms of games missed. There was no difference between overall risk of injury (RR 1.03, 95% CI 0.96–1.10 or missed games (RR 1.00, 95% CI 0.97–1.04. This suggests that indigenous AFL players have the same overall number of injuries and missed games, but a slightly different injury profile.

  14. Poor food and nutrient intake among Indigenous and non-Indigenous rural Australian children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gwynn Josephine D

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this study was to describe the food and nutrient intake of a population of rural Australian children particularly Indigenous children. Participants were aged 10 to 12 years, and living in areas of relative socio-economic disadvantage on the north coast of New South Wales. Methods In this descriptive cross-sectional study 215 children with a mean age of 11.30 (SD 0.04 years (including 82 Indigenous children and 93 boys completed three 24-hour food recalls (including 1 weekend day, over an average of two weeks in the Australian summer of late 2005. Results A high proportion of children consumed less than the Australian Nutrient Reference Values for fibre (74-84% less than Adequate Intake (AI, calcium (54-86% less than Estimated Average Requirement (EAR, folate and magnesium (36% and 28% respectively less than EAR among girls, and the majority of children exceeded the upper limit for sodium (68-76% greater than Upper Limit (UL. Energy-dense nutrient-poor (EDNP food consumption contributed between 45% and 49% to energy. Hot chips, sugary drinks, high-fat processed meats, salty snacks and white bread were the highest contributors to key nutrients and sugary drinks were the greatest per capita contributor to daily food intake for all. Per capita intake differences were apparent by Indigenous status. Consumption of fruit and vegetables was low for all children. Indigenous boys had a higher intake of energy, macronutrients and sodium than non-Indigenous boys. Conclusions The nutrient intake and excessive EDNP food consumption levels of Australian rural children from disadvantaged areas are cause for concern regarding their future health and wellbeing, particularly for Indigenous boys. Targeted intervention strategies should address the high consumption of these foods.

  15. A Comparison between Australian Football League (AFL) Injuries in Australian Indigenous versus Non-indigenous Players

    OpenAIRE

    Jessica Orchard; John Orchard; Hugh Seward

    2013-01-01

    It has previously been shown that being of aboriginal descent is a risk factor for hamstring injuries in Australian football. The aim of this study was to review the Australian Football League (AFL) injury database to determine whether there were any injuries where indigenous players had different relative risks to non-indigenous players. Analysis was conducted using data from the AFL injury database, which included data from 4,492 players over 21 years (1992–2012), covering 162,683 player-ma...

  16. Indigenous AIDS Organizing and the Anthropology of Activist Knowledge

    OpenAIRE

    Scott L. Morgensen

    2009-01-01

    Indigenous AIDS activists join AIDS activists worldwide today in theorizing the AIDS pandemic as a construct of social relations of power. Their anti-colonial and transnational activism holds scholars accountable to studying how power structures the production of knowledge about AIDS. This essay first examines how Indigenous AIDS activists theorize the colonial and transnational conditions of AIDS, and challenge states and international agencies to respect the sovereignty of Indigenous commun...

  17. Contrasting Colonist and Indigenous Impacts on Amazonian Forests

    OpenAIRE

    LU, FLORA; Gray, Clark; Bilsborrow, Richard E.; Mena, Carlos F.; ERLIEN, CHRISTINE M.; BREMNER, JASON; BARBIERI, ALISSON; Walsh, Stephen J.

    2010-01-01

    To examine differences in land use and environmental impacts between colonist and indigenous populations in the northern Ecuadorian Amazon, we combined data from household surveys and remotely sensed imagery that was collected from 778 colonist households in 64 colonization sectors, and 499 households from five indigenous groups in 36 communities. Overall, measures of deforestation and forest fragmentation were significantly greater for colonists than indigenous peoples. On average, colonist ...

  18. Indigeneity, Immigrant Newcomers and Interculturalism in Winnipeg, Canada

    OpenAIRE

    John Gyepi-Garbrah; Ryan Walker; Joseph Garcea

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines how modern urban Indigeneity is influencing the integration of immigrant newcomers in Western settler cities. Using a case study of Ka Ni Kanichihk Inc. (KNK), an Indigenous organisation in the city of Winnipeg, Canada, this research contributes to the emerging framework of intercultural urbanism. Indigenous peoples and newcomers are living side-by-side in many neighbourhoods, with common histories of colonialism, racism and socioeconomic challenges. Interviews with staff ...

  19. The Protection of the Traditional Knowledge of Indigenous Peoples

    OpenAIRE

    Gosart, Julia

    2013-01-01

    I examined the social content of the United Nations (UN) policies that aim at the protection of "traditional knowledge" (TK) of populations classified by international law as indigenous peoples. The UN category "traditional knowledge" embraces a wide range of products of the indigenous cultural and intellectual activities. I conjectured that while the TK policies were ostensibly aimed at protecting indigenous peoples from the misappropriation of these products, the major factor leading to cre...

  20. Poverty, Indigenous Culture and Ecotourism in Remote Australia

    OpenAIRE

    Don Fuller; Julia Caldicott; Grant Cairncross; Simon Wilde

    2007-01-01

    Significant challenges exist for Indigenous people in identifying suitable economic and commercial development opportunities directed at enhancing economic and human development within their communities. Ecotourism is seen as one sector that could provide such opportunities. Don Fuller and his colleagues examine the importance and implications of Indigenous culture for ecotourism developments in remote Australian Indigenous communities, in order to evaluate the potential of ecotourism venture...

  1. Indigenous identity and environmental governance in Guyana, South America

    OpenAIRE

    Mistry, Jayalaxshmi; Berardi, Andrea; Tschirhart, Céline; Bignante, Elisa; Haynes, Lakeram; Benjamin, Ryan; Albert, Grace; Xavier, Rebecca; Jafferally, Deirdre; de Ville, Géraud

    2015-01-01

    In an era of increasing access to digital technologies, Indigenous communities are progressively more able to present sophisticated and differentiated narratives in order to maximise their long-term survival. In this article, we explore how Indigenous communities use participatory video and participatory photography as tools of Indigenous media to enhance, adapt and/or reinforce their collective social memory. This social memory is key for identity formation and self-representation, and the w...

  2. Economic behavior of indigenous peoples: The Mexican case

    OpenAIRE

    Velasco Pavón, Juan Carlos Pérez

    2014-01-01

    Indigenous peoples have three features in common: their historical heritage, their current culture and their extreme poverty. This paper presents a hypothesis about the development of a cultural factor: indigenous people prefer to work on a small scale. This cultural factor developed during the colonial period and remains a part of current indigenous culture. To test the hypothesis, I elaborated a trade model and an economic growth model that take into account the cultural factor. As predicte...

  3. Genetic Diversity of Indigenous Saccharomyces sensu stricto Yeasts Isolated from Southern Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Skelin

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Alcoholic fermentation is a polimicrobial process involving a large number of genera and species of yeast and bacteria. The major yeast genera involved in this process belongs to the Saccharomyces spp. The aim of this study was the isolation, identification and determination of genetic diversity of indigenous Saccharomyces cerevisiae natural population taken from cv. Plavac mali from secluded wine growing areas of Southern Croatia. Must samples were taken during the spontaneous alcoholic fermentation followed by yeast isolation. A total of 40 isolates that were physiologically confirmed to belong to the Saccharomyces sensu stricto group were furthermore differentiated by molecular methods. PCR-RFLP analyses of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS1 region of the 18S ribosomal DNA identified 37 of the isolates as S. cerevisiae and two of the isolates as S. bayanus/pastorianus. All isolates were further analyzed by RAPD fingerprinting. The results of this study showed that in some cases the RAPD assay may be useful to separate species within the Saccharomyces sensu stricto group. The molecular analysis confirmed genetic diversity of S. cerevisiae indigenous population and additionally the involvement of indigenous S. paradoxus and S. bayanus was determined.The population structure of Saccharomyces cerevisiae has indicated that each vineyard is characterized with particular S. cerevisiae microflora. It is an important step towards the preservation and exploitation of yeast biodiversity in Southern Croatia.

  4. Editors’ Commentary: The Challenges in Improving Indigenous Educational Attainment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerry P. White

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Education has been called the “new buffalo” for its potential to contribute to the economic, social, and political well-being of Indigenous peoples in Canada (Stonechild, 2006. Despite gains in education among Aboriginal peoples in Canada, there continues to be gaps in educational attainment. This editors' introduction explores some of the realities underlying educational trends among Indigenous peoples in order to set the stage for the articles in this special edition of the International Indigenous Policy Journal examining educational pathways among Indigenous learners.

  5. Sporting Chance: Indigenous Participation in Australian Sport History

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean Gorman

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available For many non-Indigenous Australians the only time they have any engagement with Indigenous peoples, history or issues is through watching sport on television or being at a football match at the MCG. This general myopia and indifference by settler Australians with Indigenous Australians manifests itself in many ways but perhaps most obscenely in the simple fact that Indigenous Australians die nearly 20 years younger than the rest of Australias citizens. Many non-Indigenous Australians do not know this. Sport in many ways has offered Indigenous Australians a platform from which to begin the slow, hard process for social justice and equity to be actualised. This paper will discuss the participation of Indigenous Australians in sport and show how sport has enabled Indigenous Australians to create a space so that they can speak out against the injustices they have experienced and to further improve on relations going into the future. The central contention is that through sport all Australians can begin a process of engaging with Indigenous history as a means to improve race relations between the two groups.

  6. The management of diabetes in indigenous Australians from primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Merlin C

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Indigenous Australians have high rates of diabetes and its complications. This study examines ethnic differences in the management of patients with type 2 diabetes in Australian primary care. Methods Diabetes management and outcomes in Indigenous patients enrolled in the NEFRON study (n = 144 was systematically compared with that in non-Indigenous patients presenting consecutively to the same practitioner (n = 449, and the NEFRON cohort as a whole (n = 3893. Results Indigenous Australians with diabetes had high rates of micro- and macrovascular disease. 60% of Indigenous patients had an abnormal albumin to creatinine ratio compared to 33% of non-Indigenous patients (p 1c ≥ 8.0%, observed in 55% of all Indigenous patients, despite the similar frequency use of oral antidiabetic agents and insulin. Smoking was also more common in Indigenous patients (38%vs 10%, p Conclusion Although seeing the same doctors and receiving the same medications, glycaemic and smoking cessation targets remain unfulfilled in Indigenous patients. This cross-sectional study confirms Aboriginal ethnicity as a powerful risk factor for microvascular and macrovascular disease, which practitioners should use to identify candidates for intensive multifactorial intervention.

  7. A community engaged dental curriculum: a rural Indigenous outplacement programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menaka A. Abuzar

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background. Indigenous people worldwide suffer from poor oral health as compared to non-Indigenous citizens. One of the approaches to bring about improvement in Indigenous oral health is to enhance the service provision by implementing oral health outplacement programmes. A case study of such a programme for dental students in Australia reports how an educational institution can successfully engage with an Indigenous oral health service to provide learning experiences to the students as well as deliver much needed services to the community. Design and Methods. The assessment of this ongoing outplacement programme over the period of 2008-14, based on students’ feedback, highlights some of the key beneficial outcomes. Students agreed that the Indigenous outplacement programme improved their understanding of Indigenous issues (mean ± SD: 4.10±0.8; 5 refers to strongly agree on 5-point scale and increased the possibility that they will practise in Indigenous health (3.66±1.0. They were pleased with the assistance received by clinical supervisors and clinic staff at the Indigenous dental clinic (4.28±0.8. Conclusions. This programme has demonstrated that structured student outplacements are valuable in building relations across cultures especially with Indigenous communities. It has also shown that university engagement with the public health sector can be beneficial to both institutions.

  8. Rural nutrition interventions with indigenous plant foods - a case study of vitamin A deficiency in Malawi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babu S.C.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Identification, propagation, and introduction of a nutritionally rich, indigenous plant species in the existing cropping system are presented in this paper as a method of rural nutrition intervention. A case study of Moringa (Moringa oleifera Lam., Moringaceae, which is a common tree in Malawi and one of the richest sources of vitamin A and vitamin C compared to the commonly consumed vegetables is presented to address the problem of vitamin A deficiency. After a brief review of the prevalence of vitamin A deficiency and the efforts to reduce its incidence in Malawi, Moringa is suggested as a potential solution to the problem. A framework for designing nutrition intervention with Moringa is described for actual implementation. It is argued that attempts to identify, document, and encourage the utilization of nutrient-rich indigenous plants could be cost-effective, and a sustainable method of improving the nutritional status of local populations.

  9. 75 FR 74007 - Federal Aquatic Nuisance Species Research Risk Analysis Protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-30

    ... analysis. Language used in the NANPCA differentiates between a non-indigenous species and a nuisance... published in the Federal Register on August 31, 2010 (75 FR 53273). The period of public comment expired on..., and implementing the Non-indigenous Aquatic Nuisance Prevention and Control Act. The National...

  10. The State versus Indigenous Peoples: The Impact of Hydraulic Projects on Indigenous Peoples of Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thi Dieu, Nguyen

    1996-01-01

    Asserts that many Asian nations, in their drive to industrialize, have chosen national identity and economic development over the survival of their indigenous peoples. Utilizes case studies in Malaysia, India, and China to examine the divergence between macro- and microinterests illustrated by the egregious examples of these hydraulic projects.…

  11. Soil indigenous knowledge in North Central Namibia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prudat, Brice; Bloemertz, Lena; Kuhn, Nikolaus J.

    2016-04-01

    Mapping and classifying soils is part of an important learning process to improve soil management practices, soil quality and increase productivity. In order to assess soil quality improvement related to an ongoing land reform in North-Central Namibia, the characteristics that determine soil quality in the local land use context were determined in this study. To do so, we collated the indigenous soil knowledge in North-Central Namibia where the Ovakwanyama cultivate pearl millet for centuries. Local soil groups are defined mostly based on their productivity potential, which varies depending on the rainfall pattern. The morphological criteria used by the farmers to differentiate the soil groups (colour, consistence) were supported by a conventional analysis of soil physical and chemical properties. Now, they can be used to develop a soil quality assessment toolbox adapted to the regional use. The characteristics of the tool box do not directly indicate soil quality, but refer to local soils groups. The quality of these groups is relatively homogenous at the local scale. Our results show that understanding of indigenous soil knowledge has great potential to improve soil quality assessment with regards to land use. The integration of this knowledge with the conventional soil analysis improves the local meaning of such a "scientific" assessment and thus facilitates dialog between farmers and agronomists, but also scientists working in different regions of the world, but in similar conditions. Overall, the integration of indigenous knowledge in international classification systems (e.g. WRB) as attempted in this study has thus a major potential to improve soil mapping in the local context.

  12. Create a new vision for indigenous development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chavez Alba, Rafael; Sanchez Arancibia, Oscar Armando [TRANSIERRA S.A., Santa Cruz (Bolivia)

    2009-07-01

    Transierra is a Bolivian company created in the year 2000 with the goal of transporting natural gas from the fields of San Alberto and San Antonio, in Tarija, to the Rio Grande Gas Compression Plant in Santa Cruz, for export to Brazil. Transierra has implemented a Social Action Plan, which allowed it to execute more than 800 community projects for the benefit of over 40 thousand families living in it's area of influence, with the presence of 146 indigenous communities, generally lagging behind in economic and productive life in the region and country. The Support Program to Guarani Development Plans (PA-PDG) is part of the Social Plan and is part of a long-term agreement signed between Transierra and indigenous organizations. The program has implemented more than one hundred projects for productive development, health, education, cultural revaluation, and strengthening organizational infrastructure, generating huge benefits in improving the living conditions of thousands of families of the Guarani people. This year a unique initiative was created with 4 Indigenous Captains and with the support of the International Finance Corporation (World Bank Group), including Business Plans to promote sustainable economic growth, created productive economic cycles involving improvements to the production and productivity to enter the commercial distribution of local and national markets. These four initiatives have meant a shift in the implementation and is helping to generate new dynamics in production, in addition to capturing significant resources from public and private investment, laying the groundwork for the improvement of the incomes and quality of life of its beneficiaries. (author)

  13. Indigenous development of scanning electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scanning electron microscope (SEM) is a precision instrument and plays very important role in scientific studies. Bhabha Atomic Research Centre has taken up the job of development of SEM indigenously. Standard and commercially available components like computer, high voltage power supply, detectors etc. shall be procured from market. Focusing and scanning coils, vacuum chamber, specimen stage, control hardware and software etc. shall be developed at BARC with the help of Indian industry. Procurement, design and fabrication of various parts of SEM are in progress. (author)

  14. Nutritional composition of minor indigenous fruits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shajib, Md. Tariqul Islam; Kawser, Mahbuba; Miah, Md. Nuruddin;

    2013-01-01

    In line of the development of a food composition database for Bangladesh, 10 minor indigenous fruits were analysed for their nutrient composition comprising ascorbic acid, carotenoids and mineral values. Nutrient data obtained have been compared with published data reported in different literatures......, book and United States Department of Agriculture-National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference. Ascorbic acid was highest in Wood apple and lowest in Roselle. Monkey jack contained the highest amount of carotenoids, zinc and copper. Content of calcium, magnesium and phosphorous were found highest...

  15. Uranium mining and indigenous social impact issues - Kakadu Region, Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on indigenous social impact issues in the Kakadu/Alligators Rivers region of Australia. It briefly outlines the social history of the region, reflects on local, national and international attention being given to the impact of regional development on local indigenous (bininj) people, notes how social impact issues are being addressed and suggests some lessons learnt. (author)

  16. Coyote Goes to School: The Paradox of Indigenous Higher Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Heather

    2002-01-01

    Teaching about Indigenous culture from an Indigenous perspective in a Western educational institution involves unresolvable contradictions. A Metis faculty member describes how she has changed traditional academic practices by normalizing relationships with her students, taking students out of the classroom and bringing the outside in, encouraging…

  17. The Science of Storytelling: Indigenous Perspective in Environmental Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, C. E.; Low, R.; Zepeda, O.; Valdez, S.

    2013-04-01

    The 2-hour workshop was devoted to sharing indigenous approaches to understanding and communicating the environment around us. Topics focused on weather and climate change. Two indigenous peoples from the Tohono O'odham and Pueblo of Laguna Nations immersed participants in their perspectives of knowing through storytelling.

  18. New Digital Technologies: Educational Opportunities for Australian Indigenous Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Shalini

    2013-01-01

    This article presents a number of possibilities that digital technologies can offer to increase access for Indigenous people to higher education in Australia. Such technologies can assist Indigenous high school students acquire the knowledge and skills they require to be accepted into higher education courses. They can also assist Indigenous…

  19. Across the Colonial Divide: Conversations about Evaluation in Indigenous Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavino, Hayley Marama

    2013-01-01

    This essay engages questions of evaluator role and indigenous peoples participation in evaluation within colonial and decolonization contexts. Specifically, I critique the Western emphasis on cultural competence and contrast the utility of "mainstream" evaluation approaches alongside three indigenous inquiry models (Te Kotahitanga,…

  20. Indigenous Wellbeing Frameworks in Australia and the Quest for Quantification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prout, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    There is an emerging global recognition of the inadequacies of conventional socio-economic and demographic data in being able to reflect the relative wellbeing of Indigenous peoples. This paper emerges out of a recent desktop study commissioned by an Australian Indigenous organization who identified a need to enhance local literacies in data…

  1. Adult Education and Indigenous Peoples in Latin America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmelkes, Sylvia

    2011-01-01

    This article describes the educational situation of indigenous peoples in Latin America, and in particular their scant participation in adult education activities. It analyses the historical, structural and institutional barriers to their greater involvement in adult education. The article proposes to look at indigenous demands on education as a…

  2. Alternative Education Engaging Indigenous Young People: Flexi Schooling in Queensland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shay, Marnee; Heck, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    This article will discuss some of the findings from a qualitative research project that explored the connections between alternative education and Indigenous learners. This study investigated how flexi school leaders reported they were supporting Indigenous young people to remain engaged in education. The results of the survey provide demographic…

  3. Conversations on Indigenous Education, Progress, and Social Justice in Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huaman, Elizabeth Alva Sumida

    2013-01-01

    This article attempts to contribute to our expanding definitions of Indigenous education within a globalized world. Additionally, the article critiques notions of progress modeled by powerful nation-states due to their histories based on the intended consequences of marginalizing Indigenous populations for the purposes of material gain. Last,…

  4. Closing the Gap: Using Graduate Attributes to Improve Indigenous Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Peter J.; Atkinson, Bernadette

    2013-01-01

    Peter J. Anderson and Bernadette Atkinson teach Indigenous and Traditionally Education in a Global World as a fourth year unit in the Faculty of Education at Monash University, Clayton. This paper is a self reflective piece of work where they discuss the use of graduate attributes relating to Indigenous Education, put forward by the Australian…

  5. Indigenous Thought, Appropriation, and Non-Aboriginal People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haig-Brown, Celia

    2010-01-01

    In this article, I explore the question, "What is the relationship between appropriation of Indigenous thought and what might be called "deep learning" based in years of education in Indigenous contexts." Beginning with an examination of meanings ascribed to cultural appropriation, I bring texts from Gee on secondary discourses, Foucault on the…

  6. Cultural Resiliency and the Rise of Indigenous Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek Moscato

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Valerie Alia’s book, The New Media Nation: Indigenous Peoples and Global Communication (New York: Berghahn Books, 2012, 270 pp., points the way to major communication breakthroughs for traditional communities around the world, in turn fostering a more democratic media discourse. From Canada to Japan, and Australia to Mexico, this ambitious and wide-reaching work examines a broad international movement that at once protects ancient languages and customs but also communicates to audiences across countries, oceans, and political boundaries. The publication is divided roughly into five sections: The emergence of a global vision for Indigenous communities scattered around the world; government policy obstacles and opportunities; lessons from Canada, where Indigenous media efforts have been particularly dynamic; the global surge in television, radio and other technological media advances; and finally the long-term prospects and aspirations for Indigenous media. By laying out such a comprehensive groundwork for the rise of global Indigenous media over a variety of formats, particularly over the past century, Alia shows how recent social media breakthroughs such as the highly successful #IdleNoMore movement—a sustained online protest by Canada’s First Nations peoples—have been in fact inevitable. The world’s Indigenous communities have leveraged media technologies to overcome geographic isolation, to foster new linkages with Indigenous populations globally, and ultimately to mitigate structural power imbalances exacerbated by non-Indigenous media and other institutions.

  7. The indigenous space and marginalized peoples in the United Nations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Jens

    For more than 20 years, Jens Dahl has observed and now analyzed how a relatively independent space, the Indigenous Space, has been constructed within the confines of the United Nations. In the UN, indigenous peoples have achieved more than any other group of people, minorities included. The book...

  8. Using the Afrocentric Method in Researching Indigenous African Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mkabela, Queeneth

    2005-01-01

    The article highlights the realities and dynamics facing researchers researching indigenous African culture. The cultural aspirations, understandings, and practices of African indigenous people should position researchers to implement and organize the research process. Suggestions are also made for implementing the "Afrocentric method," and how to…

  9. Independent Correlates of Reported Gambling Problems amongst Indigenous Australians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Matthew; Young, Martin

    2010-01-01

    To identify independent correlates of reported gambling problems amongst the Indigenous population of Australia. A cross-sectional design was applied to a nationally representative sample of the Indigenous population. Estimates of reported gambling problems are presented by remoteness and jurisdiction. Multivariable logistic regression was used to…

  10. Extractive Industries and Indigenous Peoples: A Changing Dynamic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Faircheallaigh, Ciaran

    2013-01-01

    Indigenous peoples and other rural or remote populations often bear the social and environmental cost of extractive industries while obtaining little of the wealth they generate. Recent developments including national and international recognition of Indigenous rights, and the growth of "corporate social responsibility" initiatives among mining…

  11. Maori University Graduates: Indigenous Participation in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodore, Reremoana; Tustin, Karen; Kiro, Cynthia; Gollop, Megan; Taumoepeau, Mele; Taylor, Nicola; Chee, Kaa-Sandra; Hunter, Jackie; Poulton, Richie

    2016-01-01

    Maori, the indigenous population of New Zealand, are gaining university qualifications in greater numbers. This article describes the history of Maori university graduates, their current situation and the implications for indigenous futures. Section one provides a brief overview of historical policies and practices that, similar to those used on…

  12. Indigenous Healing of War-Affected Children in Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Edward C. Green; Honwana, Alcinda

    1999-01-01

    The note identifies how an informal partnership between indigenous healers - with their ritualistic therapies - and donor-assisted programs - with emphasis on the family, and social adjustment - can provide a model of how indigenous, and Western scientific approaches can be pursued to provide war-torn children a maximum benefit. Symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) have been e...

  13. Mathematics Registers in Indigenous Languages: Experiences from South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schafer, Marc

    2010-01-01

    Through reporting on an initiative in South Africa that aimed to provide epistemological access to teachers and learners of mathematics (and science) through translating mathematical concepts into two indigenous languages, this paper argues for the urgent development of mathematical registers in indigenous languages for mathematics and …

  14. Stories from the Sky: Astronomy in Indigenous Knowledge

    CERN Document Server

    Hamacher, Duane W

    2014-01-01

    Indigenous Australian practices, developed and honed over thousands of years, weave science with storytelling. In this Indigenous science series, we'll look at different aspects of First Australians' traditional life and uncover the knowledge behind them - starting today with astronomy.

  15. A Search for Mosquitocidal Fish Species as Biocontrol Agents

    OpenAIRE

    Muhammad Rasool; Muhammad Suleman

    1999-01-01

    Experiment were conducted to investigate the feeding preferences of different indigenous fishes in natural habitat of NWFP. A total of 426 fish specimens were collected from two diverse localities of Peshawar and Swat. Identification of fish specimen revealed 9 and 6 different species from Peshawar and Swat respectively. Fishes were further categorized in carnivores, omnivores and herbivores by analyzing their gut contents. Main objective of our study; was to identify indigenous fishes which ...

  16. Nuclear fuel fabrication - developing indigenous capability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear Fuel Complex (NFC), established in early 70's for production of fuel for PHWRs and BWRs in India, has made several improvements in different areas of fuel manufacturing. Starting with wire-wrap type of fuel bundles, NFC had switched over to split spacer type fuel bundle production in mid 80's. On the upstream side slurry extraction was introduced to prepare the pure uranyl nitrate solution directly from the MDU cake. Applying a thin layer of graphite to the inside of the tube was another modification. The Complex has developed cost effective and innovative techniques for these processes, especially for resistance welding of appendages on the fuel elements which has been a unique feature of the Indian PHWR fuel assemblies. Initially, the fuel fabrication plants were set-up with imported process equipment for most of the pelletisation and assembly operations. Gradually with design and development of indigenous equipment both for production and quality control, NFC has demonstrated total self reliance in fuel production by getting these special purpose machines manufactured indigenously. With the expertise gained in different areas of process development and equipment manufacturing, today NFC is in a position to offer know-how and process equipment at very attractive prices. The paper discusses some of the new processes that are developed/introduced in this field and describes different features of a few PLC based automatic equipment developed. Salient features of innovative techniques being adopted in the area Of UO2 powder production are also briefly indicated. (author)

  17. Indigenous people (in (and the Paraguayan Independence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana María RIBEIRO GUTIÉRREZ

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The independence of Paraguay, which started as a revolution against the power of Buenos Aires, the capital city of the viceroyalty of la Plata, did not produce any thoughts against native exploitation, and neither did it have relevant indigenous leaders or demands, although demographically speaking the indo-mestizo presence was higher than in the Banda Oriental. Paraguayan revolutionaries’ stance in relation to the indigenous population was conditioned in the first place by the strategic position of Jesuit Missions, and soon after by the policies applied by Dr. Gaspar de Francia, who after an early egalitarian impulse which favoured the gradual creation of a new unity, implemented integration and expulsion measures similar to those used during colonial times. The suppression in 1848 of the communal systems of the Guaraní people by Carlos Antonio López culminated a strategic integration within a «Paraguayan» identity. This decisive step in the shaping of the Paraguayan nation-state was completed by constructing Paraguay’s past as a Guaraní nation, thus establishing the starting point for all future Creole accounts of the nation.

  18. Indigenous Astronomies and Progress in Modern Astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Ruggles, Clive

    2010-01-01

    From an anthropological point of view, the whole concept of a "path of progress" in astronomical discovery is anathema, since it implicitly downgrades other cultural perspectives, such as the many "indigenous cosmologies" that still exist in the modern world. By doing so, one risks provoking those who hold them and-as is most obvious in places such as Hawaii where the two "world-views" come into direct contact-reating avoidable resistance to that very progress. The problem is complicated by the existence of "fringe" and "new-age" views that are increasingly confused with, and even passed off as, indigenous perceptions. In a modern world where widespread public perceptions include many that are unscientific in the broadest sense of the term, I shall argue that there are actually a range of positive benefits for progress in scientific astronomy to be derived from the mutual awareness and comprehension of "genuine" cultural world-views whose goals-in common with those of modern science-are to make sense of the c...

  19. Using Modern Technologies to Capture and Share Indigenous Astronomical Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakata, Martin; Hamacher, Duane W.; Warren, John; Byrne, Alex; Pagnucco, Maurice; Harley, Ross; Venugopal, Srikumar; Thorpe, Kirsten; Neville, Richard; Bolt, Reuben

    2014-06-01

    Indigenous Knowledge is important for Indigenous communities across the globe and for the advancement of our general scientific knowledge. In particular, Indigenous astronomical knowledge integrates many aspects of Indigenous Knowledge, including seasonal calendars, navigation, food economics, law, ceremony, and social structure. Capturing, managing, and disseminating this knowledge in the digital environment poses a number of challenges, which we aim to address using a collaborative project emerging between experts in the higher education, library, archive and industry sectors. Using Microsoft's WorldWide Telescope and Rich Interactive Narratives technologies, we propose to develop software, media design, and archival management solutions to allow Indigenous communities to share their astronomical knowledge with the world on their terms and in a culturally sensitive manner.

  20. Wholistic and Ethical: Social Inclusion with Indigenous Peoples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen E. Absolon

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper begins with a poem and is inclusive of my voice as Anishinaabekwe (Ojibway woman and is authored from my spirit, heart, mind and body. The idea of social inclusion and Indigenous peoples leave more to the imagination and vision than what is the reality and actuality in Canada. This article begins with my location followed with skepticism and hope. Skepticism deals with the exclusion of Indigenous peoples since colonial contact and the subsequent challenges and impacts. Hope begins to affirm the possibilities, strengths and Indigenous knowledge that guides wholistic cultural frameworks and ethics of social inclusion. A wholistic cultural framework is presented; guided by seven sacred teachings and from each element thoughts for consideration are guided by Indigenous values and principles. From each element this paper presents a wholistic and ethical perspective in approaching social inclusion and Indigenous peoples.

  1. Gendering Aboriginalism: A Performative Gaze on Indigenous Australian Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katelyn Barney

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available One of the most common Aboriginalist representations of Indigenous Australian people is, as Indigenous female performer Lou Bennett points out, ‘basically a man, out in the desert, black skin, flat nose with a lap-lap on, standing on one leg, resting against a spear’. Her comment raises many issues. In what ways are discourses of Aboriginalism gendered? How does Aboriginalism affect performance and specifically Aboriginal women performers? In exploring these questions, I examine Aboriginalist representations of Aboriginal women performers by white male scholars and the role of women anthropologists in the production of Aboriginalist discourse about Aboriginal women. Drawing on interviews with Indigenous women performers and musical examples of their songs, I explore the impact of Aboriginalism on non-Indigenous expectations of Indigenous Australian women performing in contemporary music contexts, the strategies performers use to work within and against these constructions and my own relationship to Aboriginalism.

  2. Gendering Aboriginalism : a performative gaze on indigenous Australian women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barney, Katelyn

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most common Aboriginalist representations of Indigenous Australian people is, as Indigenous female performer Lou Bennett points out, ‘basically a man, out in the desert, black skin, flat nose with a lap-lap on, standing on one leg, resting against a spear’. Her comment raises many issues. In what ways are discourses of Aboriginalism gendered? How does Aboriginalism affect performance and specifically Aboriginal women performers? In exploring these questions, I examine Aboriginalist representations of Aboriginal women performers by white male scholars and the role of women anthropologists in the production of Aboriginalist discourse about Aboriginal women. Drawing on interviews with Indigenous women performers and musical examples of their songs, I explore the impact of Aboriginalism on non-Indigenous expectations of Indigenous Australian women performing in contemporary music contexts, the strategies performers use to work within and against these constructions and my own relationship to Aboriginalism.

  3. Indigenous Ways of Knowing: Implications for Participatory Research and Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochran, Patricia A. L.; Marshall, Catherine A.; Garcia-Downing, Carmen; Kendall, Elizabeth; Cook, Doris; McCubbin, Laurie; Gover, Reva Mariah S.

    2008-01-01

    Researchers have a responsibility to cause no harm, but research has been a source of distress for indigenous people because of inappropriate methods and practices. The way researchers acquire knowledge in indigenous communities may be as critical for eliminating health disparities as the actual knowledge that is gained about a particular health problem. Researchers working with indigenous communities must continue to resolve conflict between the values of the academic setting and those of the community. It is important to consider the ways of knowing that exist in indigenous communities when developing research methods. Challenges to research partnerships include how to distribute the benefits of the research findings when academic or external needs contrast with the need to protect indigenous knowledge. PMID:18048800

  4. Misunderstanding the ‘‘nature’’ of co-management: a geography of regulatory science and indigenous knowledges (IK).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Annette

    2013-11-01

    Governments, NGOs, and natural scientists have increased research and policy-making collaborations with Indigenous peoples for governing natural resources, including official co-management regimes. However, there is continuing dissatisfaction with such collaborations, and calls for better communication and mutual learning to create more ‘‘adaptive’’ co-management regimes. This, however, requires that both Western and Indigenous knowledge systems be equal participants in the ‘‘co-production’’ of regulatory data. In this article, I examine the power dynamics of one co-management regulatory regime, conducting a multi-sited ethnography of the practices of researching and managing one transnational migratory species, greater white-fronted geese (Anser albifrons frontalis), who nest where Koyukon Athabascans in Alaska, USA, practice subsistence. Analyzing the ethnographic data through the literatures of critical geography, science studies and Indigenous Studies, I describe how the practice of researching for co-management can produce conflict. ‘‘Scaling’’ the data for the co-management regime can marginalize Indigenous understandings of human– environment relations. While Enlightenment-based practices in wildlife biology avoid ‘‘anthropomorphism,’’ Indigenous Studies describes identities that operate through non-modern, deeply imbricated human–nonhuman identities that do not separate ‘‘nature’’ and ‘‘society’’ in making knowledge. Thus, misunderstanding the ‘‘nature’’ of their collaborations causes biologists and managers to measure and research the system in ways that erase how subsistence- based Indigenous groups already ‘‘manage’’ wildlife: by living through their ethical commitments to their fellow beings. At the end of the article, I discuss how managers might learn from these ontological and epistemologicaldifferences to better ‘‘co-produce’’ data for co-management. PMID:23797486

  5. Wild Edible Plants Used by Endangered & Indigenous Raji Tribe in Western Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lal B Thapa

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The Rajis are one of the endangered indigenous people distributed in western part of Nepal enriched in their own mother tongue, culture, beliefs and practices. Owing to lack of proper documentation, the traditional knowledge of uses and practices on wild edible plants by such an endangered community is about to extinct. This paper aims to present the traditional practices and use of wild edible plants by Raji people in Nepal. Our study found that a total of 67 wild edible plant species included in 56 genera and 38 families used by Raji people. Out of them 62 species were angiosperms, one species was Gymnosperm and 4 species were Pteridophytes. The results of study show that Rajis have their traditional way to use different parts of wild plants such as seeds, fruits, leaves, shoots, roots and tubers in the forms of vegetables, pickles, juice, and raw or as fruits.

  6. Effect of indigenous animals on chronic end points in freshwater sediment toxicity tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reynoldson, T.B.; Day, K.E.; Clarke, C.; Milani, D. (National Water Research Inst., Burlington, Ontario (Canada))

    1994-06-01

    Sediment toxicity tests were conducted using three species of benthic invertebrates, Chironomus riparius, Hyalella azteca, and Hexagenia limbata, with various densities of the oligochaete worm Tubifex tubifex. It was shown that indigenous animals, simulated by the presence of Tubifex tubifex, did not affect survival of the test species (P [>=] 0.05) but did reduce growth in all three test species and in two species at the lowest tested densities, equivalent to 1,460 worms per square meter. At densities of Tubifex tubifex equivalent to 20,000 m[sup [minus]2], the growth of Chironomus riparius was reduced by >90%, Hyalella azteca by >60%, and Hexagenia limbata by almost 50%. The densities of oligochaetes are equivalent to those found in many contaminated sites. Therefore, it is concluded that the presence of indigenous organisms can confound the interpretation of toxicity test results, based on chronic end points. It is recommended that removal of organisms by considered before toxicity tests are conducted with freshwater sediments from sites with large populations of benthic invertebrates, especially oligochaete worms.

  7. Heart failure among Indigenous Australians: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woods John A

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiovascular diseases contribute substantially to the poor health and reduced life expectancy of Indigenous Australians. Heart failure is a common, disabling, progressive and costly complication of these disorders. The epidemiology of heart failure and the adequacy of relevant health service provision in Indigenous Australians are not well delineated. Methods A systematic search of the electronic databases PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, Cinahl Plus, Informit and Google Scholar was undertaken in April 2012 for peer-reviewed journal articles relevant to the topic of heart failure in Indigenous Australians. Additionally, a website search was done to identify other pertinent publications, particularly government reports. Results There was a paucity of relevant peer-reviewed research, and government reports dominated the results. Ten journal articles, 1 published conference abstract and 10 reports were eligible for inclusion. Indigenous Australians reportedly have higher morbidity and mortality from heart failure than their non-Indigenous counterparts (age-standardised prevalence ratio 1.7; age-standardised hospital separation ratio ≥3; crude per capita hospital expenditure ratio 1.58; age-adjusted mortality ratio >2. Despite the evident disproportionate burden of heart failure in Indigenous Australians, the accuracy of estimation from administrative data is limited by poor indigenous identification, inadequate case ascertainment and exclusion of younger subjects from mortality statistics. A recent journal article specifically documented a high prevalence of heart failure in Central Australian Aboriginal adults (5.3%, noting frequent undiagnosed disease. One study examined barriers to health service provision for Indigenous Australians in the context of heart failure. Conclusions Despite the shortcomings of available published data, it is clear that Indigenous Australians have an excess burden of heart failure. Emerging data

  8. Principals as Literacy Leaders with Indigenous Communities (PALLIC) Building Relationships: One School's Quest to Raise Indigenous Learners' Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Tasha; Webster, Amanda

    2016-01-01

    In 2011 to 2012, 48 schools in the Northern Territory, South Australia and Queensland participated in the Principals as Literacy Leaders with Indigenous Communities (PALLIC) project. Central to this project was the establishment of positive working relationships between school principals and Indigenous community leaders in order to improve…

  9. CROP OF TRANSGENIC SOY-BEAN. PEASANT AND INDIGENOUS COMMUNITY EFFECTS OF EUSTERN PARAGUAY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo Florencio Centurión Mereles

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The Word offers us a critical glance about the economic and socio-cultural impacts of the transgenic crops in peasant and indigenous communities of the eastern region of Paraguay, it is given special attention to the use of Roundup, with the undoubted environment cost and the uncertain risks to human and animal health. The impacts and interactions that the techno-commoditization of the organisms genetically modified OGM have on the affected populations and the environment-species, soil, water, woods, flora, fauna is discussed in the Word.The extent of use of glyphosate on transgenic crops would involve not only the environment of the crop, but go to generate profound cultural changes, technological, of management, environmental, economical, social and legal, whose effects we already see them come with the decline of peasant and indigenous communities, that at not finding adequate strategies to face them, collapse as collectivity. The Word contains important elements to renew the debate and the critical thought in relation to the problematic of transgenic crop and its impact in indigenous and peasant populations.

  10. Indigenous use and bio-efficacy of medicinal plants in the Rasuwa District, Central Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boon Emmanuel K

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background By revealing historical and present plant use, ethnobotany contributes to drug discovery and socioeconomic development. Nepal is a natural storehouse of medicinal plants. Although several ethnobotanical studies were conducted in the country, many areas remain unexplored. Furthermore, few studies have compared indigenous plant use with reported phytochemical and pharmacological properties. Methods Ethnopharmacological data was collected in the Rasuwa district of Central Nepal by conducting interviews and focus group discussions with local people. The informant consensus factor (FIC was calculated in order to estimate use variability of medicinal plants. Bio-efficacy was assessed by comparing indigenous plant use with phytochemical and pharmacological properties determined from a review of the available literature. Criteria were used to identify high priority medicinal plant species. Results A total of 60 medicinal formulations from 56 plant species were documented. Medicinal plants were used to treat various diseases and disorders, with the highest number of species being used for gastro-intestinal problems, followed by fever and headache. Herbs were the primary source of medicinal plants (57% of the species, followed by trees (23%. The average FIC value for all ailment categories was 0.82, indicating a high level of informant agreement compared to similar studies conducted elsewhere. High FIC values were obtained for ophthalmological problems, tooth ache, kidney problems, and menstrual disorders, indicating that the species traditionally used to treat these ailments are worth searching for bioactive compounds: Astilbe rivularis, Berberis asiatica, Hippophae salicifolia, Juniperus recurva, and Swertia multicaulis. A 90% correspondence was found between local plant use and reported plant chemical composition and pharmacological properties for the 30 species for which information was available. Sixteen medicinal plants were

  11. Dadirri: Using a Philosophical Approach to Research to Build Trust between a Non-Indigenous Researcher and Indigenous Participants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan Marie Stronach

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: This article focuses on a philosophical approach employed in a PhD research project that set out to investigate sport career transition (SCT experiences of elite Indigenous Australian sportsmen. The research was necessary as little is known about the transition of this cohort to a life after sport, or their experiences of retirement. A key problem within the SCT paradigm is a presumption that an end to elite sport requires a process of adjustment that is common to all sportspeople—a rather narrow perspective that fails to acknowledge the situational complexity and socio-cultural diversity of elite athletes. With such a range of personal circumstances, it is reasonable to suppose that athletes from different cultural groups will have different individual SCT needs. The researcher is non-Indigenous and mature aged: she encountered a number of challenges in her efforts to understand Indigenous culture and its important sensitivities, and to build trust with the Indigenous male participants she interviewed. An Indigenous philosophy known as Dadirri, which emphasises deep and respectful listening, guided the development of the research design and methodology. Consistent with previous studies conducted by non-Indigenous researchers, an open-ended and conversational approach to interviewing Indigenous respondents was developed. The objective was for the voices of the athletes to be heard, allowing the collection of rich data based on the participants’ perspectives about SCT. An overview of the findings is presented, illustrating that Indigenous athletes experience SCT in complex and distinctive ways. The article provides a model for non-Indigenous researchers to conduct qualitative research with Indigenous people.

  12. Indigenous oil-degrading bacteria in crude oil-contaminated seawater of the Yellow sea, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wanpeng; Zhang, Rongqiu; Zhong, Rongqiu; Shan, Dapeng; Shao, Zongze

    2014-08-01

    Indigenous oil-degrading bacteria play an important role in efficient remediation of polluted marine environments. In this study, we investigated the diversity and abundance of indigenous oil-degrading bacteria and functional genes in crude oil-contaminated seawater of the Dalian coast. The gene copy number bacterial 16S rRNA in total were determined to be about 10(10) copies L(-1) in contaminated seawater and 10(9) copies L(-1) in uncontaminated seawater. Bacteria of Alcanivorax, Marinobacter, Novosphingobium, Rhodococcus, and Pseudoalteromonas were found to be predominant oil-degrading bacteria in the polluted seawater in situ. In addition, bacteria belonging to Algoriphagus, Aestuariibacter, Celeribacter, Fabibacter, Zobellia, Tenacibaculum, Citreicella, Roseivirga, Winogradskyella, Thioclava, Polaribacter, and Pelagibaca were confirmed to be the first time as an oil-degrading bacterium. The indigenous functional enzymes, including AlkB or polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons ring-hydroxylating dioxygenases α (PAH-RHDα) coding genes from Gram-positive (GP) and Gram-negative bacteria (GN), were revealed and quite diverse. About 10(10) to 10(11) copies L(-1) for the expression of alkB genes were recovered and showed that the two-thirds of all the AlkB sequences were closely related to widely distributed Alcanivorax and Marinobacter isolates. About 10(9) copies L(-1) seawater for the expression of RHDαGN genes in contaminated seawater and showed that almost all RHDαGN sequences were closely related to an uncultured bacterium; however, RHDαGP genes represented only about 10(5) copies L(-1) seawater for the expression of genes in contaminated seawater, and the naphthalene dioxygenase sequences from Rhodococcus and Mycobacterium species were most abundant. Together, their data provide evidence that there exists an active aerobic microbial community indigenous to the coastal area of the Yellow sea that is capable of degrading petroleum hydrocarbons. PMID:24866944

  13. A Review On Dump Slope Stabilization By Revegetation With Reference To Indigenous Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vibhash Ranjan

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The waste sub-grade ROM and Fines dumps are characterized by high rock fragment contents low moisture retention capacity higher bulk density low nutrients lower pH and elevated metal concentrations. Use of suitable revegetation programme that require the selection of right type of plants to be used vis--vis the site condition and characteristics can enhance the long term stability both mechanical and ecological of dumps waste sub-grade ROM and fines through providing vegetative cover to control soil erosion amp gully formation consolidation of dump top amp side surfaces binding the loose particles through intricate roof system etc. This paper overviews the roles of Revegetation programme that can be used where vegetation is considered to be the long term answer to slope protection and erosion control. Various revegetation processes like Coir matting Lemmon Grass Vetiver Grass and Indigenous plant etc. may find a wide range of usage in Iron ore mines for dump stabilization.Miyawaki method of plantation is more effective than the conventional method of plantation. This will lead to co-existence of plants and as a matter of fact each plant draws from the other vital nutrients and they grow to become strong and healthy. The Miyawaki Plantation technique aim at Survival at fittest the area undergone such plantation have an ecology of their own. The Indigenous Plant has good binding capacity and helps to control soil erosion as well as improve the dump stability. Indigenous plant species like as Shorea robusta Sal CROTON ROXBURGHII Dal-bergia Sisoo SHISHAM KARANJ Azadirachta NEEM etc. The growth of indigenous plants is depending upon the soil quality as well as the organic matter of the dump material. The leaf debris plays important role for improving the organic matter of dump material for successfully implementation of revegetation programme.

  14. Proximate Composition, Amino Acids and Vitamins Profile of Pleurotus citrinopileatus Singer: An Indigenous Mushroom in Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard K. Mibey

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available There are many species of indigenous mushrooms in Kenya which form part of the traditional food system but whose nutritional and cultivation studies have not been completely determined and hence under utilized. The indigenous P. citrinopileatus was collected from Kakamega forest in Western Kenya, characterized and grown at the Kenya Industrial Research and Development Institute laboratories. The objective of this study was to evaluate indigenous P. citrinopileatus mushroom with the aim of qualifying and quantifying chemical information that might serve as a guide to exploit its potentials and benefits for human nutrition. The proximate composition (moisture, energy, fibre, crude fat, ash, minerals and protein and amino acids contents (by high performance liquid chromatography and vitamins of the indigenous P. citrinopileatus mushroom were determined. Proximate analysis of P. citrinopileatus revealed that it contained 22.10% protein, 1.32% crude lipid and 20.78% fibre. The mushroom was also found to contain variable amounts of minerals. The most predominant mineral found in the mushroom was Potassium with value of 2.28%. Copper, zinc and iron minerals were generally low with values from 0.0002, 0.0015 and 0.01%, respectively. Eight essential amino acids were detected namely Leucine>Valine> Threonine>Lysine>Phenylalanine>Isoleucine>Methionine>Tryptophan in decreasing order of abundance. Glutamic acid though non-essential was present in high proportion (3.07%. Vitamin B3 (Nicotinic acid, vitamin B5 (Pantothenic acid and vitamin B2 (Riboflavin were the most abundant vitamins in all samples analyzed. While vitamin B12 (Cyanocobalamin and vitamin A (retinol were the least with values of 0.3 and Pleurotus citrinopileatus mushroom can be an excellent source of micronutrients and antioxidants components.

  15. Road development and the geography of hunting by an Amazonian indigenous group: consequences for wildlife conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa, Santiago; Branch, Lyn C; Cueva, Rubén

    2014-01-01

    Protected areas are essential for conservation of wildlife populations. However, in the tropics there are two important factors that may interact to threaten this objective: 1) road development associated with large-scale resource extraction near or within protected areas; and 2) historical occupancy by traditional or indigenous groups that depend on wildlife for their survival. To manage wildlife populations in the tropics, it is critical to understand the effects of roads on the spatial extent of hunting and how wildlife is used. A geographical analysis can help us answer questions such as: How do roads affect spatial extent of hunting? How does market vicinity relate to local consumption and trade of bushmeat? How does vicinity to markets influence choice of game? A geographical analysis also can help evaluate the consequences of increased accessibility in landscapes that function as source-sink systems. We applied spatial analyses to evaluate the effects of increased landscape and market accessibility by road development on spatial extent of harvested areas and wildlife use by indigenous hunters. Our study was conducted in Yasuní Biosphere Reserve, Ecuador, which is impacted by road development for oil extraction, and inhabited by the Waorani indigenous group. Hunting activities were self-reported for 12-14 months and each kill was georeferenced. Presence of roads was associated with a two-fold increase of the extraction area. Rates of bushmeat extraction and trade were higher closer to markets than further away. Hunters located closer to markets concentrated their effort on large-bodied species. Our results clearly demonstrate that placing roads within protected areas can seriously reduce their capacity to sustain wildlife populations and potentially threaten livelihoods of indigenous groups who depend on these resources for their survival. Our results critically inform current policy debates regarding resource extraction and road building near or within

  16. Indigenous bacteria may interfere with the biocontrol of plant diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Someya, Nobutaka; Akutsu, Katsumi

    2009-06-01

    Prodigiosin is a reddish antibiotic pigment that plays an important role in the biocontrol of plant diseases by the bacterium Serratia marcescens. However, its activity is unstable under agricultural conditions; further, it can be degraded by various environmental factors. To examine the effect of epiphytic microbes on the stability of prodigiosin used for biological control processes, we collected a total of 1,280 bacterial isolates from the phylloplane of cyclamen and tomato plants. Approximately 72% of the bacterial strains isolated from the cyclamen plants and 66% of those isolated from the tomato plants grew on minimal agar medium containing 100 μg ml-1 prodigiosin. Certain isolates obtained from both plant species exhibited prodigiosin-degrading activity. We compared the 16S rRNA gene sequences derived from the isolates with sequences in a database. The comparison revealed that the sequences determined for the prodigiosin-degrading isolates were homologous to those of the genera Pseudomonas, Caulobacter, Rhizobium, Sphingomonas, Janthinobacterium, Novosphingobium, and Rathayibacter. These results indicate that indigenous epiphytic microorganisms may interfere with the interaction between plant pathogens and biocontrol agents by degrading the antibiotics produced by the agents.

  17. Modifiable Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors among Indigenous Populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam A. Lucero

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To identify modifiable cardio-metabolic and lifestyle risk factors among indigenous populations from Australia (Aboriginal Australians/Torres Strait Islanders, New Zealand (Māori, and the United States (American Indians and Alaska Natives that contribute to cardiovascular disease (CVD. Methods. National health surveys were identified where available. Electronic databases identified sources for filling missing data. The most relevant data were identified, organized, and synthesized. Results. Compared to their non-indigenous counterparts, indigenous populations exhibit lower life expectancies and a greater prevalence of CVD. All indigenous populations have higher rates of obesity and diabetes, hypertension is greater for Māori and Aboriginal Australians, and high cholesterol is greater only among American Indians/Alaska Natives. In turn, all indigenous groups exhibit higher rates of smoking and dangerous alcohol behaviour as well as consuming less fruits and vegetables. Aboriginal Australians and American Indians/Alaska Natives also exhibit greater rates of sedentary behaviour. Conclusion. Indigenous groups from Australia, New Zealand, and the United States have a lower life expectancy then their respective non-indigenous counterparts. A higher prevalence of CVD is a major driving force behind this discrepancy. A cluster of modifiable cardio-metabolic risk factors precede CVD, which, in turn, is linked to modifiable lifestyle risk factors.

  18. Innovative MIOR Process Utilizing Indigenous Reservoir Constituents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. O. Hitzman; A. K. Stepp; D. M. Dennis; L. R. Graumann

    2003-03-31

    This research program is directed at improving the knowledge of reservoir ecology and developing practical microbial solutions for improving oil production. The goal is to identify indigenous microbial populations which can produce beneficial metabolic products and develop a methodology to stimulate those select microbes with nutrient amendments to increase oil recovery. This microbial technology has the capability of producing multiple oil-releasing agents. Experimental laboratory work is underway. Microbial cultures have been isolated from produced water samples. Comparative laboratory studies demonstrating in situ production of microbial products as oil recovery agents were conducted in sand packs with natural field waters with cultures and conditions representative of oil reservoirs. Field pilot studies are underway.

  19. Indigenous technology development of speciality glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CSIR-Central Glass and Ceramic Research Institute, Kolkata pioneered the Specialty Glass development in India and has the distinction of running facilities for limited scale production of a few varieties of glasses for catering to the needs of civil and strategic sectors. The two important varieties of glass on which the Institute had embarked upon in the recent past in view of critical requirement of the glasses by Department of Atomic Energy (DAE) are high density Radiation Shielding Window (RSW) glass and Neodymium doped phosphate laser glass. Dedicated facilities have been established for this purpose. While the Institute has successfully achieved the milestone of developing the indigenous technology of producing RSW glass to make the country self-reliant in this important strategic area, initial success has also been achieved in developing laser glass. The details of the activities pursued for making the above two varieties of glass are explained in this presentation. (author)

  20. Control of indigenous pathogenic bacteria in seafood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huss, Hans Henrik

    1997-01-01

    The pathogenic bacteria indigenous to the aquatic and general environment are listed. Their distribution in nature, prevalence in seafood and the possibilities for growth of these organisms in various types of products are outlined These data, combined with what is known regarding the epidemiology...... order to prevent growth and toxin production by Clostridium botulinum when products are stored at abuse temperature, it is recommended that additional barriers to growth are included in lightly preserved (e.g. cold smoked salmon) and low-heat treated (e.g REPFEDS) products. It is finally pointed out...... of disease, are used to place the various seafood products in risk categories and to identify areas of concern. It is concluded that the presence of pathogens in molluscs and the growth of Listeria monocytogenes in lightly preserved fish products are hazards which are presently not under control. In...

  1. Marine Species Survey of Johnston Atoll, Central Pacific Ocean, June 2000 (NODC Accession 0000679)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The marine biota of Johnston atoll was surveyed for non-indigenous species in June, 2000 with observations and collections made by investigators using Scuba. Eleven...

  2. Nuclear fuel fabrication - developing indigenous capability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, U.C.; Jayaraj, R.N.; Meena, R.; Sastry, V.S.; Radhakrishna, C.; Rao, S.M.; Sinha, K.K. [Nuclear Fuel Complex, Dept. of Atomic Energy (India)

    1997-07-01

    Nuclear Fuel Complex (NFC), established in early 70's for production of fuel for PHWRs and BWRs in India, has made several improvements in different areas of fuel manufacturing. Starting with wire-wrap type of fuel bundles, NFC had switched over to split spacer type fuel bundle production in mid 80's. On the upstream side slurry extraction was introduced to prepare the pure uranyl nitrate solution directly from the MDU cake. Applying a thin layer of graphite to the inside of the tube was another modification. The Complex has developed cost effective and innovative techniques for these processes, especially for resistance welding of appendages on the fuel elements which has been a unique feature of the Indian PHWR fuel assemblies. Initially, the fuel fabrication plants were set-up with imported process equipment for most of the pelletisation and assembly operations. Gradually with design and development of indigenous equipment both for production and quality control, NFC has demonstrated total self reliance in fuel production by getting these special purpose machines manufactured indigenously. With the expertise gained in different areas of process development and equipment manufacturing, today NFC is in a position to offer know-how and process equipment at very attractive prices. The paper discusses some of the new processes that are developed/introduced in this field and describes different features of a few PLC based automatic equipment developed. Salient features of innovative techniques being adopted in the area Of UO{sub 2} powder production are also briefly indicated. (author)

  3. Estimating the Social Rate of Return to Education for Indigenous Australians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junankar, P. N.; Liu, J.

    2003-01-01

    Compares estimates of the social rate of return to education of Indigenous Australians with those of non-Indigenous Australians. Finds that social rate of return is higher for Indigenous Australians than for non-Indigenous. Draws implications for public policy. (Contains 4 tables and 32 references.)(PKP)

  4. Academic Staff Perceptions of Factors Underlying Program Completion by Australian Indigenous Nursing Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Roianne; Usher, Kim; Foster, Kim; Stewart, Lee

    2014-01-01

    An increase in the number of Indigenous health professionals is one way to help reduce the poor health outcomes of Australia's Indigenous people. However, while Indigenous students are enrolling in Australian tertiary undergraduate nursing courses in increasing numbers, their completion rates remain lower than non-Indigenous students and many…

  5. Potential Effectiveness of Specific Anti-Smoking Mass Media Advertisements among Australian Indigenous Smokers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Harold S.; Bowden, Jacqueline A.; Bayly, Megan C.; Sharplin, Greg R.; Durkin, Sarah J.; Miller, Caroline L.; Givans, Sharon E.; Warne, Charles D.; Wakefield, Melanie A.

    2011-01-01

    Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians (Indigenous Australians) have more than twice the smoking prevalence of non-Indigenous Australians. Anti-smoking campaigns have demonstrated success in the general population but little is known about their impact among Indigenous people. A total of 143 Indigenous and a comparison group of 156…

  6. Counter-Colonial and Philosophical Claims: An Indigenous Observation of Western Philosophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mika, Carl

    2015-01-01

    Providing an indigenous opinion on anything is a difficult task. To be sure, there is a multitude of possible indigenous responses to dominant Western philosophy. My aim in this paper is to assess dominant analytic Western philosophy in light of the general insistence of most indigenous authors that indigenous metaphysics is holistic, and to make…

  7. Helminth parasites in the intestinal tract of indigenous poultry in parts of Kenya : short communication

    OpenAIRE

    L.W. Irungu; R.N. Kimani; S.M. Kisia

    2004-01-01

    A study was carried out on 456 indigenous poultry intestinal specimens from various towns in Kenya to determine the occurrence and distribution of helminth parasites in the intestinal tract of the birds. Of the specimens examined, 414 had parasites whereas the remaining 42 had none, which is an infection rate of 90.78 %. The main species of helminths found in the intestines were Raillietina sp. (47.53 %), Heterakis gallinarum (21.33 %), Ascaridia galli (10.03 %), Strongyloides avium (9.96 %),...

  8. Eating from the wild: Turumbu indigenous knowledge on noncultivated edible plants, Tshopo District, DRCongo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Termote, Céline; Van Damme, Patrick; Dhed'a Djailo, Benoît

    2010-01-01

    Documenting and revalorizing the rapidly disappearing indigenous knowledge on wild edible plants is essential to promote health and preserve diversity. Focus group discussions were organized within three Turumbu villages to document wild foods known, availability, preparation methods, and uses. Preferences in taste and commercial, nutritional, and cultural value were discussed during participatory ranking exercises. Results show 85 species within 70 genera and 44 families. Fruits of Anonidium manni and Landolphia owariensis, and (unfolded) leaves of Megaphrynium macrostachyum and Talinum triangulare are most appreciated. Inventories and preference rankings should be completed with nutritional analyses and market studies to set priorities for participatory domestication. PMID:21883079

  9. Identification of indigenous fruits with export potential from Mukono district, Uganda

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nieminen, Riikka; Sørensen, Marten; Theilade, Ida

    2016-01-01

    compared the applicability of the two methods to identify indigenous fruits with economic potential for export. The ethnobotanical study consisted of household and market surveys based on questionnaires, focus group discussions and key-informant interviews. The scorecard was based on pre-determined scoring.......e. V. apiculata, G. buchananii, Myrianthus arboreus, Pseudospondias microcarpa, Phoenix reclinata and Rhus vulgaris as having export potential. The ethnobotanical methods were effective in identifying species with local economic potential and hence high likelihood of adoption by local farmers while the...

  10. Mobile Technologies for Preservation of Indigenous Knowledge in Rural Communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winschiers-Theophilus, Heike; Zaman, Tariq; Jensen, Kasper Løvborg;

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we explore the opportunities of mobile technologies in three of our own development endeavors with rural communities, promoting the preservation of indigenous knowledge. We reflect upon and recognize the fact that the representation of indigenous knowledge will be transformed within...... the digitalization process under the limitations and capabilities of the tools. We believe that a continuation of local appropriation and co-design of tools will lead to an integrated, intuitive and non-intrusive indigenous knowledge preservation process within the local communities....

  11. Adaptation of indigenous larval parasitoids to Tuta absoluta (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae) in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferracini, Chiara; Ingegno, Barbara Letizia; Navone, Paolo; Ferrari, Ester; Mosti, Marco; Tavella, Luciana; Alma, Alberto

    2012-08-01

    Tuta absoluta (Meyrick) (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae) is a serious threat to tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) crops in South America. In Europe, after its first detection in Spain in 2006, it rapidly spread through the Mediterranean basin, reaching Italy 2 yr later. The aim of our work was to find indigenous effective biological control agents and to evaluate their potential role in the control of larval populations of T. absoluta in controlled conditions. Nine species of larval parasitoids emerged from field-collected tomato leaves infested by T. absoluta. The most abundant, Necremnus near artynes (Walker) and Necremnus near tidius (Walker) (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae), were tested in laboratory parasitism trials. Furthermore, because the species N. artynes and N. tidius are each reported in literature as an ectoparasitoid of Cosmopterix pulchrimella Chambers (Lepidoptera: Cosmopterigidae) on upright pellitory plants, olfactometer bioassays were performed to assess the response of our parasitoids to the odors of tomato and pellitory leaves infested by T absoluta and C. pulchrimella, respectively, compared with healthy ones. Both Necremnus species showed good adaptation to the invasive pest, and we observed a high larval mortality of T. absoluta because of host feeding and parasitism. Even olfactory responses highlighted a preference of both wasps for tomato plants infested by the exotic pest. These preliminary results demonstrated a high suitability of these indigenous natural enemies for controlling T. absoluta. Further investigations are needed to confirm their role as potential biological agents in commercial tomato plantations. PMID:22928311

  12. Alien trees, shrubs and creepers invading indigenous vegetation in the Hluhluwe-Umfolozi Game Reserve Complex in Natal

    OpenAIRE

    I.A.W Macdonald

    1983-01-01

    The results of a survey and monitoring programme conducted in the Hluhluwe-Umfolozi Game Reserve Complex in Natal are presented. The area consists of 900 km2  of savanna and forest vegetation. Twenty alien tree, shrub and creeper species currently invading indigenous vegetation within the Complex are listed. Herbaceous aliens were not surveyed. An analysis of the habitats being invaded by these alien plants is presented and it is concluded that riverine and forest-edge habitats are those most...

  13. Genetic diversity and differentiation of Mongolian indigenous cattle populations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Livestock production plays an important role in Mongolian economy. Over the last decade it has contributed to around 80-90% of the gross domestic agricultural products and to 30% of the revenues generated from exportations. Cattle is one of the five traditional and most important livestock species of Mongolia together with horse, sheep, goat and camel. Out of a total of 1.57 millions Mongolian cattle, 1.55 millions supposedly belong to three indigenous Bos taurus cattle breeds, namely Mongol, Selenge and Khalkhun Golun, all herded under extensive pastoral systems. Indigenous Mongolian cattle are generally small but look sturdy and strong. They have a well-off coat of hair, solid forward looking shoulders and short stubby snouts, and they are used for meat, milk and transport. Beef production contributes to 30% of the total meat supply in Mongolia. The Mongol breed is by the far the commonest with 1.53 million animals and it is found almost throughout the country. The Selenge breed, found in Selenge province and numbering 9000 heads, was developed in middle of the 20th century by crossing the Kazakh Whiteheaded with the local Mongol cattle. The Khalkhun Golun breed was developed from local Mongol cattle and it is distributed in Eastern and Suhbaatar provinces with about 10,000 heads. Until now, to the best of our knowledge, only a single population of Mongolian cattle has been studied with microsatellite DNA markers and no information is available on the genetic relationship between the Mongolian indigenous cattle breeds. In this study, we collected samples from two populations of the Mongol cattle (sampled at Ikhtamir soum in North Hangay province and Tsogt soum in Govi Altay province) and one population of the Khalkhun Golun cattle (sampled at Tumentsogt soum in Suhbaatar province). Samples were characterised with nine microsatellite markers MGTG4B, ILSTS005, ILSTS006, ILSTS008, ILSTS023, ILSTS028, ILSTS036, ILSTS050 and ILSTS103. To assess the genetic diversity

  14. Cohort Profile: Footprints in Time, the Australian Longitudinal Study of Indigenous Children

    OpenAIRE

    Thurber, Katherine A.; Banks, Emily; Banwell, Cathy

    2014-01-01

    Indigenous Australians experience profound levels of disadvantage in health, living standards, life expectancy, education and employment, particularly in comparison with non-Indigenous Australians. Very little information is available about the healthy development of Australian Indigenous children; the Longitudinal Study of Indigenous Children (LSIC) is designed to fill this knowledge gap. This dataset provides an opportunity to follow the development of up to 1759 Indigenous children. LSIC c...

  15. The Two-Way Appropriation of Indigenous Knowledge : Environmental Management Policies and the Laponia Process

    OpenAIRE

    Nilsson Dahlström, Åsa

    2009-01-01

    In the face of climatic changes and environmental problems, indigenous knowledge is increasingly being accepted as an alternative to Western science in conservation policies. While indigenous knowledge may help indigenous empowerment, it is also placed under the control of the authorities whose science and structures it is meant to challenge. Indigenous knowledge is therefore the subject of a two-way appropriation by indigenous peoples as well as environmental authorities. This process is ill...

  16. Risk Factors for Problem Gambling Among Indigenous Australians: An Empirical Study

    OpenAIRE

    Hing, Nerilee; Breen, Helen; Gordon, Ashley; Russell, Alex

    2013-01-01

    Despite a long history of gambling amongst many Indigenous peoples, knowledge about contemporary Indigenous gambling is sparse. In Australia, previous studies of Indigenous gambling have been severely limited in number, scope and rigour. The research reported in this paper is based on the first Indigenous-specific quantitative gambling research undertaken in Australia since 1996 and draws on the largest sample to date. This study examined numerous aspects of gambling among Indigenous Australi...

  17. The role of indigenous knowledge in disaster risk reduction: a critical analysis / Oageng Ivan Maferetlhane

    OpenAIRE

    Maferetlhane, Oageng Ivan

    2013-01-01

    Although the importance of Indigenous Knowledge systems has been recognised by international organisations, such as the United Nations and World Bank, the role of Indigenous Knowledge in Disaster Risk Reduction has to date not received the attention it deserves in South Africa. Little is known about how South Africa‘s indigenous communities use Indigenous Knowledge to avoid, prevent and deal with disasters. This study has sought to investigate the role of Indigenous Knowledge in Disaster Risk...

  18. New strategies by indigenous movements against extractivism in Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ximena Cuadra Montoya

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This article analyses the emergence of transnational activism in the context of collective action organised around socio-environmental conflicts in Chile’s indigenous areas. It details the main events in the process of indigenous mobilisation in the form of three emblematic cases carried out on an interna­tional scale, together with their implications for the national political arena. The author explains how, after the indigenous people’s demands were blocked at home, they then mobilised abroad, where they raised aware­ness over their situation and called for justice in the international courts. Finally, at the local level the paper identifies the inclusion of glo­bal frameworks related to the human rights to the indigenous peoples.

  19. Linking Indigenous Knowledge and Observed Climate Change Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Chief Clarence; Bynum, Nora; Johnson, Liz; King, Ursula; Mustonen, Tero; Neofotis, Peter; Oettle, Noel; Rosenzweig, Cynthia; Sakakibara, Chie; Shadrin, Chief Vyacheslav; Vicarelli, Marta; Waterhouse, Jon; Weeks, Brian

    2010-01-01

    We present indigenous knowledge narratives and explore their connections to documented temperature and other climate changes and observed climate change impact studies. We then propose a framework for enhancing integration of these indigenous narratives of observed climate change with global assessments. Our aim is to contribute to the thoughtful and respectful integration of indigenous knowledge with scientific data and analysis, so that this rich body of knowledge can inform science, and so that indigenous and traditional peoples can use the tools and methods of science for the benefit of their communities if they choose to do so. Enhancing ways of understanding such connections are critical as the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Fifth Assessment process gets underway.

  20. International approaches to Indigenous dental care: what can we learn?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, J; Hearn, L; Gibson, B; Slack-Smith, L M

    2014-12-01

    Indigenous populations around the world have significantly poorer oral health and inequalities in access to dental care largely attribute to the social determinants of health. Reviewing international literature offers an opportunity to better understand appropriate approaches for policy and practice in Australia. This article is a descriptive narrative review based on primary research literature discussing informative international approaches to Indigenous dental care. Approaches identified in the literature included integration of dentistry with primary health care and traditional practice, training and use of oral health professionals and approaches used at different stages of life, particularly in the management of early childhood caries. The international literature provides a range of approaches to Indigenous oral health. Tailored, culturally appropriate family and community based initiatives that address the multidisciplinary issues confronting Indigenous communities were most highly regarded. PMID:25159709

  1. Indigenous AIDS Organizing and the Anthropology of Activist Knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott L. Morgensen

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Indigenous AIDS activists join AIDS activists worldwide today in theorizing the AIDS pandemic as a construct of social relations of power. Their anti-colonial and transnational activism holds scholars accountable to studying how power structures the production of knowledge about AIDS. This essay first examines how Indigenous AIDS activists theorize the colonial and transnational conditions of AIDS, and challenge states and international agencies to respect the sovereignty of Indigenous communities and knowledges. The essay then cites Indigenous activist knowledge as inspiration for revisiting critiques of coloniality in anthropology, and their implications for the anthropology of AIDS. Anthropologists studying AIDS can respond to AIDS activists by addressing how colonial legacies shape the processes and products of research and writing. By working within intersubjective and reflexive relationships with people and communities affected by AIDS, anthropologists can enter accountable dialogue with AIDS activists and on that basis produce anti-colonial and transnational knowledge about AIDS.

  2. On indigeneity, change, and representation in the northeastern Ecuadorian Amazon

    OpenAIRE

    Gabriela Valdivia

    2005-01-01

    Neoliberal reforms throughout Latin America are intended to promote development by opening up economies and encouraging market-oriented practices. These reforms have deeply affected the lives of indigenous peoples and their relationship with extralocal actors. Today, in the Ecuadorian Amazon, some indigenous peoples participate in oil-extraction negotiations, tourism, and intensive cattle ranching and agriculture as part of increased market integration. In the midst of these changes, question...

  3. Determining insurrectionary inclinations among indigenous peoples of Ecuador

    OpenAIRE

    Iniguez, Miguel Cortez.

    2001-01-01

    I have argued that Ecuador has historically excluded the indigenous peoples economically to the point where they experience the highest levels of poverty in the country. The indigenous people have been tied to their land and current economic policies are endangering their communal property rights and their way of life. Also contributing to that inequality is the political exclusion they experience. Without effective representation, social programs have been cancelled at will and economic poli...

  4. Reanimating Storywork: Indigenous Elders’ Reflections on Leadership by Larry Grant

    OpenAIRE

    Grant, Larry

    2011-01-01

    xwmuthkwey’um Musqueam Elder Larry Grant looks at leadership by exploring how colonialism has altered Indigenous ways of leading and being. Grant examines how culture, language, and values create Indigenous leadership. Themes: Oral tradition is leadership/stories/language. Preparation for learning, training, develop diplomatic skills. Respect with land/the land teaches us. Colonialism; Reconciliation; Religion; Racism; Word bundle/baskets responsibilities; Equity...

  5. X-Integrationism for Chinese Indigenous Management Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Regarding philosophical foundation of Chinese indigenous management research, Prof. Kwang Kuo Hwang of Taiwan University and Prof. Peter P. Li of Copenhagen Business School have contradictory judgments. Their opinions represent two opposite poles. This paper tries to offer a middle route between ...... rooted in China and the West, such as, Chinese Yin Yang thinking, Daoism, Confucianism, Bohr’s complementarity principle, and Hegel’s dialectic logic, this paper tries to construct the daoliology, epistemology and methodology of Chinese indigenous management research....

  6. A scoping review of Indigenous suicide prevention in circumpolar regions

    OpenAIRE

    Redvers, Jennifer; Bjerregaard, Peter; Eriksen, Heidi; Fanian, Sahar; Healey, Gwen; Hiratsuka, Vanessa; de Jong, Michael; Viskum Lytken Larsen, Christina; Linton, Janice; Pollock, Nathaniel; Silviken, Anne; Stoor, Petter; Chatwood, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Background. Suicide is a serious public health challenge in circumpolar regions, especially among Indigenous youth. Indigenous communities, government agencies and health care providers are making concerted efforts to reduce the burden of suicide and strengthen protective factors for individuals, families and communities. The persistence of suicide has made it clear that more needs to be done.Objective. Our aim was to undertake a scoping review of the peer-reviewed literature on suicide preve...

  7. The Myth of Nothing in Classics and Asian Indigenous Films

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Sheng-mei

    2013-01-01

    In his article "The Myth of Nothing in Classics and Asian Indigenous Films" Sheng-mei Ma discusses how the desert and the permafrost region are terra incognita, except nomads and Indigenous peoples. Given the extreme conditions of these forbidding places, Western modernity sees its own shadow cast on such black holes on earth. Since the 1960s, classic Hollywood or art house films by David Lean, Akira Kurosawa, Hiroshi Teshigahara, Anthony Minghella, and Sergei Bodrov romanticize and/or mythol...

  8. Technologies of Existence: The indigenous environmental justice movement

    OpenAIRE

    Dana E Powell

    2006-01-01

    Dana E. Powell argues that the Indigenous Environmental Justice Movement in North America is resignifying ‘development’ through emerging discourses and practices of ‘environmental justice’. She focuses on the emergence of wind and solar energy technologies in the movement as technologies of existence, challenging a history of biopolitical regimes of natural resource development of indigenous lands and bodies while also proposing an alternative approach to cultivating healthy economies, ecolog...

  9. Heart failure among Indigenous Australians: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Woods John A; Katzenellenbogen Judith M; Davidson Patricia M; Thompson Sandra C

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Cardiovascular diseases contribute substantially to the poor health and reduced life expectancy of Indigenous Australians. Heart failure is a common, disabling, progressive and costly complication of these disorders. The epidemiology of heart failure and the adequacy of relevant health service provision in Indigenous Australians are not well delineated. Methods A systematic search of the electronic databases PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, Cinahl Plus, Informit and Google ...

  10. SPONSORSHIP, COMMUNITY, AND SOCIAL CAPITAL RESOURCES IN INDIGENOUS COMMUNITIES

    OpenAIRE

    JANE SWINNEY

    2008-01-01

    This exploratory study conducted in heavily indigenous communities was undertaken to investigate entrepreneurial perceptions of community (sense of place, image, and positioning) and social capital (reciprocity, shared vision, and density of networks) resources present in rural communities, and the sponsorship involvement of the entrepreneurs in community activities. The uniqueness of the study was its focus on indigenous communities with a higher than state average Native-American population...

  11. Indigenous cattle in Sri Lanka: production systems and genetic diversity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Production status, farming systems and genetic diversity of indigenous cattle in Sri Lanka were evaluated using six geographically distinct populations. The indigenous cattle population of the country is considered as a nondescript mixture of genotypes, and represents more than half of the total cattle population of 1.2 million heads. Five distinct indigenous populations were investigated for morphological analysis, and four were included in evaluating genetic differences. Farming systems were analysed using a pre-tested structured questionnaire. The genetic variation was assessed within and between populations using 15 autosomal and two Y-specific microsatellite markers, and compared with two indigenous populations from the African region. Farming system analysis revealed that indigenous cattle rearing was based on traditional mixed-crop integration practices and operates under limited or no input basis. The contribution of indigenous cattle to total tangible income ranged from zero to 90% reflecting the high variation in the purpose of keeping. Morphometric measurements explained specific phenotypic characteristics arising from geographical isolation and selective breeding. Though varying according to the region, the compact body, narrow face, small horns and humps with shades of brown and black coat colour described the indigenous cattle phenotype in general. Genetic analysis indicated that indigenous cattle in Sri Lanka have high diversity with average number of alleles per locus ranging from 7.9 to 8.5. Average heterozygosity of different regions varied within a narrow range (0.72 ± 0.04 to 0.76 ± 0.03). Genetic distances between regions were low (0.085 and 0.066) suggesting a similar mixture of genotypes across regions. Y-specific analysis indicated a possible introgression of Taurine cattle in one of the cattle populations. (author)

  12. Socioeconomic status and self-reported asthma in Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australian adults aged 18-64 years: analysis of national survey data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cunningham Joan

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Asthma is more common among Indigenous than non-Indigenous Australian adults, but little is known about socioeconomic patterning of asthma within the Indigenous population, or whether it is similar to the non-Indigenous population. Methods I analysed weighted data on self-reported current diagnosed asthma and a range of socio-economic and demographic measures for 5,417 Indigenous and 15,432 non-Indigenous adults aged 18-64 years from two nationally representative surveys conducted in parallel by the Australian Bureau of Statistics in 2004-05. Results Current asthma prevalence was higher for Indigenous than non-Indigenous people in every age group. After adjusting for age and sex, main language and place of residence were significantly associated with asthma prevalence in both populations. Traditional SES variables such as education, income and employment status were significantly associated with asthma in the non-Indigenous but not the Indigenous population. For example, age-and sex-adjusted relative odds of asthma among those who did not complete Year 10 (versus those who did was 1.2 (95% confidence interval (CI 1.0-1.5 in the non-Indigenous population versus 1.0 (95% CI 0.8-1.3 in the Indigenous population. Conclusions The socioeconomic patterning of asthma among Indigenous Australians is much less pronounced than for other chronic diseases such as diabetes and kidney disease, and contrasts with asthma patterns in the non-Indigenous population. This may be due in part to the episodic nature of asthma, and the well-known challenges in diagnosing it, especially among people with limited health literacy and/or limited access to health care, both of which are more likely in the Indigenous population. It may also reflect the importance of exposures occurring across the socioeconomic spectrum among Indigenous Australians, such as racism, and discrimination, marginalization and dispossession, chronic stress and exposure to

  13. Arctic indigenous peoples as representations and representatives of climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martello, Marybeth Long

    2008-06-01

    Recent scientific findings, as presented in the Arctic Climate Impact Assessment (ACIA), indicate that climate change in the Arctic is happening now, at a faster rate than elsewhere in the world, and with major implications for peoples of the Arctic (especially indigenous peoples) and the rest of the planet. This paper examines scientific and political representations of Arctic indigenous peoples that have been central to the production and articulation of these claims. ACIA employs novel forms and strategies of representation that reflect changing conceptual models and practices of global change science and depict indigenous peoples as expert, exotic, and at-risk. These portrayals emerge alongside the growing political activism of Arctic indigenous peoples who present themselves as representatives or embodiments of climate change itself as they advocate for climate change mitigation policies. These mutually constitutive forms of representation suggest that scientific ways of seeing the global environment shape and are shaped by the public image and voice of global citizens. Likewise, the authority, credibility, and visibility of Arctic indigenous activists derive, in part, from their status as at-risk experts, a status buttressed by new scientific frameworks and methods that recognize and rely on the local experiences and knowledges of indigenous peoples. Analyses of these relationships linking scientific and political representations of Arctic climate change build upon science and technology studies (STS) scholarship on visualization, challenge conventional notions of globalization, and raise questions about power and accountability in global climate change research. PMID:19069077

  14. Identifying Useful Approaches to the Governance of Indigenous Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jodi Bruhn

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Questions of data governance occur in all contexts. Arguably, they become especially pressing for data concerning Indigenous people. Long-standing colonial relationships, experiences of vulnerability to decision-makers, claims of jurisdiction, and concerns about collective privacy become significant in considering how and by whom data concerning Indigenous people should be governed. Also significant is the on going need on the part of governments to access and use such data to plan, monitor, and account for programs involving Indigenous people. This exploratory policy article seeks to inform efforts to improve the governance of data between governments and Indigenous organizations and communities – especially the federal government and First Nations in Canada. It describes a spectrum of models arising from the growing literature on data governance in the corporate and public sectors as well as overarching approaches articulated by Indigenous organizations. After outlining certain practical considerations in negotiating data sharing agreements, the article presents a selection of promising initiatives in indigenous data governance undertaken in Canada, the United States, and Australia.

  15. Effects of understory vegetation and litter on plant nitrogen (N, phosphorus (P, N:P ratio and their relationships with growth rate of indigenous seedlings in subtropical plantations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Wang

    Full Text Available Establishing seedlings in subtropical plantations is very important for forest health, succession and management. Information on seedling nutrient concentrations is essential for both the selection of suitable indigenous tree species to accelerate succession of the established plantation and sustainable forest management. In this study, we investigated the concentrations of nitrogen ([N], phosphorus ([P], and N:P ratio in leaves, stems and roots of seedlings of three indigenous tree species (Castanopsis chinensis, Michelia chapensis and Psychotria rubra transplanted with removing or retaining understory vegetation and litter at two typical subtropical forest plantations (Eucalyptus plantation and native species plantation. We also measured the relative growth rate (RGR of seedling height, and developed the relationships between RGR and leaf [N], [P] and N:P ratio. Results showed that treatments of understory vegetation and associated litter (i.e. removal or retained generally had no significant effects on leaf [N], [P], N:P ratio and RGR of the transplanted tree seedlings for the experimental period. But among different species, there were significant differences in nutrient concentrations. M. chapensis and P. rubra had higher [N] and [P] compared to C. chinensis. [N] and [P] also varied among different plant tissues with much higher values in leaves than in roots for all indigenous species. RGR of indigenous tree seedlings was mostly positively correlated with leaf [N] and [P], but negatively correlated with leaf N:P ratio. Considering the low [P] and high N:P ratio observed in the introduced indigenous tree seedlings, we propose that the current experimental plantations might be P limited for plant growth.

  16. [Health and indigenous peoples in Brazil: reflections based on the First National Survey of Indigenous People's Health and Nutrition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlos Jr, E A Coimbra

    2014-04-01

    The current configuration of indigenous peoples' health in Brazil results from a complex historical trajectory, responsible for major delays for this population segment in the countrywide social advances seen in recent decades, particularly in the fields of health, education, housing, and sanitation. The main focus of this contribution is to review synthetically a selection of the main results of the First National Survey of Indigenous People's Health and Nutrition, conducted in the period 2008-2009, which visited 113 villages across the Brazil and interviewed 6,692 women and 6,128 children. Among the results, emphasis is given to the observed poor sanitation conditions in villages, high prevalence of chronic malnutrition, anemia, diarrhea, and acute respiratory infections in children, and the emergence of non-communicable chronic diseases in women. The scenario depicted by this survey requires urgent critical review of indigenous health policy in order to better meet the health needs of Brazil's indigenous population. PMID:24896060

  17. Nuclear thermal rocketry using indigenous Martian propellants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubrin, Robert M.

    A preliminary examination of a concept for a Mars and outer solar system exploratory vehicle is presented. Propulsion is provided by utilizing a nuclear thermal reactor to heat a propellant volatile indigenous to the destination world to form a high thrust rocket exhaust. Candidate propellants, whose performance, materials compatibility, and ease of acquisition are examined and include carbon dioxide, water, methane, nitrogen, carbon monoxide, and argon. Ballistics and winged supersonic configurations are discussed. It is shown that the use of this method of propulsion potentially offers high payoff to a manned Mars mission. This is accomplished by sharply reducing the initial mission mass required in mobility in traveling about the planet through the use of a vehicle that utilized in combination with a hydrogen-fueled nuclear-thermal interplanetary launch. By utilizing such a system in the outer solar system, a low level aerial reconnaissance of Titan combined with a multiple sample return from nearly every satellite of Saturn can be accomplished in a single launch of a Titan 4 or the Space Transportation System (STS). Similarly a multiple sample return from Callisto, Ganymedes and Europa can also be accomplished in one launch of a Titan 4 or the STS.

  18. Nuclear thermal rockets using indigenous extraterrestrial propellants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A preliminary examination of a concept for a Mars and outer solar system exploratory vehicle is presented. Propulsion is provided by utilizing a nuclear thermal reactor to heat a propellant volatile indigenous to the destination world to form a high thrust rocket exhaust. Candidate propellants, whose performance, materials compatibility, and ease of acquisition are examined and include carbon dioxide, water, methane, nitrogen, carbon monoxide, and argon. Ballistics and winged supersonic configurations are discussed. It is shown that the use of this method of propulsion potentially offers high payoff to a manned Mars mission. This is accomplished by sharply reducing the initial mission mass required in low earth orbit, and by providing Mars explorers with greatly enhanced mobility in traveling about the planet through the use of a vehicle that can refuel itself each time it lands. Thus, the nuclear landing craft is utilized in combination with a hydrogen-fueled nuclear-thermal interplanetary launch. By utilizing such a system in the outer solar system, a low level aerial reconnaissance of Titan combined with a multiple sample return from nearly every satellite of Saturn can be accomplished in a single launch of a Titan 4 or the Space Transportation System (STS). Similarly a multiple sample return from Callisto, Ganymede, and Europa can also be accomplished in one launch of a Titan 4 or the STS

  19. Virtual Machine Monitor Indigenous Memory Reclamation Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Shams Ul Haq

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Sandboxing is a mechanism to monitor and control the execution of malicious or untrusted program. Memory overhead incurred by sandbox solutions is one of bottleneck for sandboxing most of applications in a system. Memory reclamation techniques proposed for traditional full virtualization do not suit sandbox environment due to lack of full scale guest operating system in sandbox. In this paper, we propose memory reclamation technique for sandboxed applications. The proposed technique indigenously works in virtual machine monitor layer without installing any driver in VMX non root mode and without new communication channel with host kernel. Proposed Page reclamation algorithm is a simple modified form of Least recently used page reclamation and Working set page reclamation algorithms. For efficiently collecting working set of application, we use a hardware virtualization extension, page Modification logging introduced by Intel. We implemented proposed technique with one of open source sandboxes to show effectiveness of proposed memory reclamation method. Experimental results show that proposed technique successfully reclaim up to 11% memory from sandboxed applications with negligible CPU overheads

  20. The challenges of maintaining indigenous ecological knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joe McCarter

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Increased interest in indigenous ecological knowledge (IEK has led to concern that it is vulnerable amidst social and ecological change. In response, multiple authors have recommended the establishment of programs for the maintenance and revitalization of IEK systems. However, few studies have analyzed the methods, opportunities, and challenges of these programs. This is a critical gap, as IEK maintenance is challenging and will require layered and evidence-based solutions. We seek to build a foundation for future approaches to IEK maintenance. First, we present a systematic literature review of IEK maintenance programs (n = 39 and discuss the opportunities and challenges inherent in five broad groups of published approaches. Second, we use two case studies from the Republic of Vanuatu to illustrate these challenges in more depth. The first case study takes a community-based approach, which has inherent strengths (e.g., localized organization. It has, however, faced practical (e.g., funding and epistemological (changing modes of knowledge transmission challenges. The second case study seeks to facilitate IEK transmission within the formal school system. Although this model has potential, it has faced significant challenges (e.g., lack of institutional linkages. We conclude that supporting and strengthening IEK is important but that serious attention is needed to account for the social, situated, and dynamic nature of IEK. In closing, we use the review and case studies to propose four principles that may guide adaptive and flexible approaches for the future maintenance of IEK systems.

  1. INNOVATIVE MIOR PROCESS UTILIZING INDIGENOUS RESERVOIR CONSTITUENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D.O. Hitzman; A.K. Stepp; D.M. Dennis; L.R. Graumann

    2003-09-01

    This research program was directed at improving the knowledge of reservoir ecology and developing practical microbial solutions and technologies for improving oil production. The goal was to identify and utilize indigenous microbial populations which can produce beneficial metabolic products and develop a methodology to stimulate those select microbes with nutrient amendments to increase oil recovery. This microbial technology has the capability of producing multiple oil-releasing agents. Experimental laboratory work in model sandpack cores was conducted using microbial cultures isolated from produced water samples. Comparative laboratory studies demonstrating in situ production of microbial products as oil recovery agents were conducted in sand packs with natural field waters using cultures and conditions representative of oil reservoirs. Increased oil recovery in multiple model sandpack systems was achieved and the technology and results were verified by successful field studies. Direct application of the research results has lead to the development of a feasible, practical, successful, and cost-effective technology which increases oil recovery. This technology is now being commercialized and applied in numerous field projects to increase oil recovery. Two field applications of the developed technology reported production increases of 21% and 24% in oil recovery.

  2. Thermoluminescence dating of Brazilian indigenous ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farias, T M B; Gennari, R F; Etchevarne, C; Watanabe, S

    2009-08-01

    Two indigenous ceramics fragments, one from Lagoa Queimada (LQ) and another from Barra dos Negros (BN), both sites located on Bahia state (Brazil), were dated by thermoluminescence (TL) method. Each fragment was physically prepared and divided into two fractions, one was used for TL measurement and the other for annual dose determination. The TL fraction was chemically treated, divided in sub samples and irradiated with several doses. The plot extrapolation from TL intensities as function of radiation dose enabled the determination of the accumulated dose (D(ac)), 3.99 Gy and 1.88 Gy for LQ and BN, respectively. The annual dose was obtained through the uranium, thorium and potassium determination by ICP-MS. The annual doses (D(an)) obtained were 2.86 and 2.26 mGy/year. The estimated ages were approximately 1375 and 709 y for BN and LQ ceramics, respectively. The ages agreed with the archaeologists' estimation for the Aratu and Tupi tradition periods, respectively. PMID:19617598

  3. Thermoluminescence dating of Brazilian indigenous ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two indigenous ceramics fragments, one from Lagoa Queimada (LQ) and another from Barra dos Negros (BN), both sites located on Bahia state (Brazil), were dated by thermoluminescence (TL) method. Each fragment was physically prepared and divided into two fractions, one was used for TL measurement and the other for annual dose determination. The TL fraction was chemically treated, divided in sub samples and irradiated with several doses. The plot extrapolation from TL intensities as function of radiation dose enabled the determination of the accumulated dose (Dac), 3.99 Gy and 1.88 Gy for LQ and BN, respectively. The annual dose was obtained through the uranium, thorium and potassium determination by ICP-MS. The annual doses (D an) obtained were 2.86 and 2.26 mGy/year. The estimated ages were ∼1375 and 709 y for BN and LQ ceramics, respectively. The ages agreed with the archaeologists' estimation for the Aratu and Tupi tradition periods, respectively. (authors)

  4. Indigenous populations health protection: A Canadian perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richardson Katya L

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The disproportionate effects of the 2009 H1N1 pandemic on many Canadian Aboriginal communities have drawn attention to the vulnerability of these communities in terms of health outcomes in the face of emerging and reemerging infectious diseases. Exploring the particular challenges facing these communities is essential to improving public health planning. In alignment with the objectives of the Pandemic Influenza Outbreak Research Modelling (Pan-InfORM team, a Canadian public health workshop was held at the Centre for Disease Modelling (CDM to: (i evaluate post-pandemic research findings; (ii identify existing gaps in knowledge that have yet to be addressed through ongoing research and collaborative activities; and (iii build upon existing partnerships within the research community to forge new collaborative links with Aboriginal health organizations. The workshop achieved its objectives in identifying main research findings and emerging information post pandemic, and highlighting key challenges that pose significant impediments to the health protection and promotion of Canadian Aboriginal populations. The health challenges faced by Canadian indigenous populations are unique and complex, and can only be addressed through active engagement with affected communities. The academic research community will need to develop a new interdisciplinary framework, building upon concepts from ‘Communities of Practice’, to ensure that the research priorities are identified and targeted, and the outcomes are translated into the context of community health to improve policy and practice.

  5. Beyond Earth: Weaving Science and Indigenous Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Timothy; Guy, M.; Baker-Big Back, C.; Froelich, K.; Munski, L.; Johnson, T.

    2010-01-01

    Beyond Earth is an NSF planning grant designed to engage urban and rural families in science learning while piloting curriculum development and implementation that incorporates both Native and Western epistemologies. Physical, earth, and space science content is juxtaposed with indigenous culture, stories, language and epistemology in after-school programs and teacher training. Project partners include the Dakota Science Center, Fort Berthold Community College, and Sitting Bull College. The Native American tribes represented in this initiative illustrate partnerships between the Dakota, Lakota, Nakota, Hidatsa, Mandan, and Arikara. The primary project deliverables include a culturally responsive curriculum Beyond Earth Moon Module, teacher training workshops, a project website. The curriculum module introduces students to the moon's appearance, phases, and positions in the sky using the Night Sky Planetarium Experience Station to explore core concepts underlying moon phases and eclipses using the interactive Nature Experience Station before engaging in the culminating Mission Challenge in which they apply their knowledge to problem solving situations and projects. The website and developed explorations are presented.

  6. The wild plants used as traditional medicines by indigenous people of Manokwari, West Papua

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    OBED LENSE

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Lense O. 2012. The wild plants used as traditional medicines by indigenous people of Manokwari, West Papua. Biodiversitas 13: 98-106. The aims of the research were to identify the main plant species which are used as traditional medicines by native people in Manokwari District, West Papua Province and also to describe the method of preparation and uses of some of the medicinal plants. This research was conducted in seven sub-regencies, ie. Manokwari, Ransiki, Kebar, Wasior, Mimyambouw, Merdey and Anggi-Sururey sub-District. Information recorded including methods of diagnosis and treatment of diseases, tribal name of a plant they used for treating disease (s, part of the plant used, preparation and mode of application, and whether the plant is used alone or in combination with other plants. Results indicate that the indigenous people in Manokwari District have been using at least 99 plant species (93 genera and 59 families as sources of medicines. Most of these traditional medicinal plants are commonly gathered from the local tropical rainforest communities. At least 40 kind of sickness and injuries such as malaria, fever, and wounds can be treated by using traditional medicinal plants from Manokwari District. Reserach also found that all parts of plants used, but leaf extracts are the most common part of the plant used for treating medical condition.

  7. Cultural and socio-economic factors in health, health services and prevention for indigenous people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SHEIKH MASHHOOD AHMED

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Indigenous people across the world experience more health related problems as compared to the population at large. So, this review article is broadly an attempt to highlight the important factors for indigenous peoples’ health problems, and to recommend some suggestions to improve their health status. Standard database for instance, Pubmed, Medline, Google scholar, and Google book searches have been used to get the sources. Different key words, for example, indigenous people and health, socio-economic and cultural factors of indigenous health, history of indigenous peoples’ health, Australian indigenous peoples’ health, Latin American indigenous peoples’ health, Canadian indigenous peoples’ health, South Asian indigenous peoples’ health, African indigenous peoples’ health, and so on, have been used to find the articles and books. This review paper shows that along with commonplace factors, indigenous peoples’ health is affected by some distinctive factors such as indigeneity, colonialand post-colonial experience, rurality, lack of governments’ recognition etc., which nonindigenous people face to a much lesser degree. In addition, indigenous peoples around the world experience various health problems due to their varied socio-economic and cultural contexts. Finally, this paper recommends that the spiritual, physical, mental, emotional, cultural, economic, socio-cultural and environmental factors should be incorporated into the indigenous health agenda to improve their health status.

  8. Compatibility and complementarity of indigenous and scientific knowl-edge of wild plants in the highlands of southwest Saudi Arabia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A.K.Hegazy; A.A.Alatar; J.Thomas; M.Faisal; A.H.Alfarhan; K.Krzywinski

    2014-01-01

    This study presents a survey of wild plants commonly used by local inhabitants in the highlands of southwest Saudi Arabia. Based upon literature review, direct observation of local inhabitants, and question-naire interviews, 36 plant species were assessed and given scores ac-cording to their use. The gaps between scientific and indigenous knowl-edge on the use of plants were estimated using a“compatibility ratio”. The score values were estimated based on seven different use categories of ecosystem services, including food, forage, medicine, wood, beekeeping, research, and education. Additional structural categories include source of materials, shade, hedges, ornamental plantings, and soil stabilization. There are discrepancies between indigenous knowledge (IK) and scien-tific knowledge (SK) but in most cases, SK of the species supports the IK and plant users preference. The results also provide information that challenges assumptions about the consistency of IK with SK. Our study highlights the importance of understanding the cultural context and uses of wild plants. Biodiversity-based knowledge holds promise for contrib-uting to sustainable use of wild plant resources and related traditions. The success of such endeavours depends on the compatibility and comple-mentarity of indigenous and scientific knowledge.

  9. Indigenous and Contaminant Microbes in Ultradeep Mines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onstott, T. C.; Moser, D. P.; Pfiffner, S. M.; Fredrickson, J. K.; Brockman, F. J.; Phelps, T. J.; White, D. C.; Peacock, A.; Balkwill, D.; Hoover, R. B.; Krumholz, L. R.; Borscik, M.; Kieft, T. L.; Wilson, R.

    2003-01-01

    Rock, air and service water samples were collected for microbial analyses from 3.2 kilometers depth in a working Au mine in the Witwatersrand basin, South Africa. The approx. 1 meter wide mined zone was comprised of a carbonaceous, quartz, sulfide, uraninite and Au bearing layer, called the Carbon Leader, sandwiched by quartzite and conglomerates. The microbial community in the service water was dominated by mesophilic aerobic and anaerobic, alpha, beta, and gamma-Proteobacteria with a total biomass concentration approx. 10(exp 4) cells/ml, whereas, that of the mine air was dominated by members of the Chlorobi and Bacteroidetes groups and a fungal component. The microorganisms in the Carbon Leader were predominantly mesophilic, aerobic heterotrophic, nitrate reducing and methylotrophic, beta and gamma-Proteobacteria that were more closely related to service water microorganisms rather than air microbes. Rhodamine WT dye and fluorescent microspheres employed as contaminant tracers, however, indicated that service water contamination of most of the rock samples was < 0.01% during acquisition. The microbial contaminants most likely originated from the service water, infiltrated the low permeability rock through and accumulated within mining-induced fractures where they survived for several days prior to being mined. Combined PLFA and terminal restriction fragment length profile (T-RFLP) analyses suggest that the maximum concentration of indigenous microorganisms in the Carbon Leader was < 10(exp 2) cells/g. PLFA, (35)S autoradiography and enrichments suggest that the adjacent quartzite was less contaminated and contained approx. 10(exp 3) cells/gram of a thermophilic, sulfate reducing bacteria, SRB, some of whom are delta Proteobacteria. Pore water and rock geochemical analyses suggest that these SRB's may have been sustained by sulfate diffusing from the adjacent U-rich, Carbon Leader where it was formed by radiolysis of sulfide.

  10. Indigenously developed large pumping speed cryoadsorption cryopump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Indigenous cryoadsorption cryopump with large pumping speeds for fusion reactor application has been developed at the Institute for Plasma Research (IPR). Towards its successful realization, technological bottlenecks were identified, studied and resolved. Hydroformed cryopanels were developed from concept leading to the design and product realization with successful technology transfer to the industry. This has led to the expertise for developing hydroformed panels for any desired shape, geometry and welding pattern. Activated sorbents were developed, characterized using an experimental set up which measures adsorption isotherms down to 4K for hydrogen and helium. Special techniques were evolved for coating sorbents on hydroformed cryopanels with suitable cryo-adhesives. Various arrangements of cryopanels at 4 K surrounded by 80 K shields and baffles (which are also hydroformed) were studied and optimized by transmission probability analysis using Monte Carlo techniques. CFD analysis was used to study the temperature distribution and flow analysis during the cryogen flow through the panels. Integration of the developed technologies to arrive at the final product was a challenging task and this was meticulously planned and executed. This resulted in a cryoadsorption cryopump offering pumping speeds as high as 50,000 to 70,000 1/s for helium and 1,50,000 1/s for hydrogen with a 3.2 m2 of sorbent panel area. The first laboratory scale pump integrating the developed technologies was a Small Scale CryoPump (SSCP-01) with a pumping speed of 2,000 1/s for helium. Subsequently, Single Panel CryoPump (SPCP-01) with pumping speed 10,000 1/s for helium and a Multiple Panel CryoPump (MPCP-08) with a pumping speed of 70,000 1/s for helium and 1,50,000 1/s for hydrogen respectively were developed. This paper describes the efforts in realizing these products from laboratory to industrial scales. (author)

  11. Reproductive performance of indigenous cattle in Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Postpartum ovarian activity in indigenous Kedah-Kelantan cattle was monitored by progesterone radioimmunoassay to study the fertility of suckled cows exposed to natural mating. In the university herd, postpartum reproductive performance was monitored over two breeding periods. In one period, 34 suckled cows were bled weekly just before mating, with 70.6% showing detectable ovarian activity by 60 days postpartum. Cows bred at a mean (±SD) interval of 20.1±6.2 days (n=8) postpartum conceived at 51.1±23.7 days, with 87.5% conception, while cows bred at 49.1±7.1 days (n=17) conceived at 78.5±14.7 days, with 100% conception. In another breeding period when 37 suckled cows were bled twice weekly after calving, 21, 81.1 and 91.9% had resumed ovarian activity by 30, 60 and 90 days postpartum, respectively. The mean intervals to first oestrus and ovulation were 37.7±18.3 and 43.0±17.2 days, respectively. For animals bred at 25.8±3.7 days (n=12), the time to conception was 56.1±20.8 days, with 83.3% conception. When mated at 40.6±8.0 days (n=35), the mean interval to conception was 64.3±15.2 days postpartum, with 88% conception. In spite of calf suckling, high fertility to natural mating was observed by 90 days postpartum. Comparative studies were also conducted in a commercial herd (n=90) and smallholder cattle (n=73). Fertility after oestrus synchronization and AI was also investigated (n=70). Plasma progesterone profiles revealed that low conception to AI was associated with fertilization failure, although early embryonic mortality, anovulation and asynchrony between AI and oestrus were also detected

  12. The paradox of Indigenous resurgence at the end of empire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    . Waziyatawin

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In the twenty-first century, we are facing the unprecedented convergence of human-created crises. Climate chaos, fossil-fuel resource depletion, overpopulation, and the ongoing destruction of ecosystems threaten the very foundation of colonial empire, both creating emancipatory potential for Indigenous societies struggling against colonial subjugation and wreaking devastating havoc on the lands, waters, and ecosystems upon which our people must survive.  While the vulnerability and unsustainability of empire is clearly exposed, Indigenous people must wrestle with the continued cooptation of our people into civilization’s fallacies and destructive habits as well as the increasing threats to our homelands that jeopardize our capacity for a land-based existence. Thus, just when liberation may be within our grasp, the ecological destruction may be so complete that Indigenous lifeways may be impossible to practice. In this context there is a simultaneous and urgent need for both the restoration of sustainable Indigenous practices and a serious defense of Indigenous homelands.

  13. Indigenous Participation in Intercultural Education: Learning from Mexico and Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santos H. Alvarado Dzul

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Intercultural education seeks to create a forum for integrating Western scientific knowledge and indigenous knowledge to address local and global challenges such as biocultural diversity conservation, natural resource management, and social justice for indigenous peoples. Intercultural education is based on learning together with, rather than learning about or from, indigenous communities. In the best examples, problem-based learning dissolves the dichotomy between indigenous and nonindigenous, resulting in full partnerships in which participants share expertise to meet mutual needs. With reference to literature and two illustrative examples of intercultural education initiatives in Mexico and Tanzania, we present an original conceptual framework for assessing indigenous participation in intercultural education. This incorporates a new ladder of participation depth (in relation to both curriculum content and decision making alongside separate considerations of breadth, i.e., stakeholder diversity, and scope, i.e., the number of key project stages in which certain stakeholder groups are participating. The framework can be used to compare intercultural education initiatives in differing contexts and might be adaptable to other intercultural work.

  14. AGROBUSINESS PERSPECTIVES IN THE INDIGENOUS DEVELOPMENT: CASE QUERETARO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerardo Gómez González, Elvia Xitlaly Gómez Calderón y Yuriena Gerenarda Gómez Calderón

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This document argueses about aspects of agribusiness in the indigenous development in the state of Queretaro, considers as an economic activity under taken in rural areas, principally related to the use of agricultural and forestry resources, with an efficient management of productive resources. The approaches outlined here are the result of a research, training and organization in which over half a year the representatives and indigenous leaders of the State Council of Indigenous People of the State of Querétaro, which has played an important role in management and represent more than 63 thousand indigenou’s ethnicities Ñäñhu (Otomi Xi'ui (Pame and Tenek (Huasteco, located mainly in the municipiums of Amealco, Toliman, Cadereyta, Eezequiel Montes, Columbus and Jalpan, with the support of the National Commission for the Development of Indigenous People, Regional Delegation Queretaro - Guanajuato. Under the coordination and advice from the authors of this work. The information was collected by self - manegement participation approaches and with the participation of the leaders, communit’y leaders and municipal authorities. The agribusiness in the indigenous communities of the State of Queretaro, are an important option to fortify the economy family’s base and community, especially in the processes of integrating companies with their own identity and social responsability.

  15. Indigenous knowledge for disaster risk reduction: An African perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nnamdi G. Iloka

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Indigenous knowledge is valuable knowledge that has helped local communities all over the world survive for generations. This knowledge originates from the interaction between members of the community and the environment in which they live. Although much has been written about indigenous knowledge, its documentation in the area of disaster risk reduction and climate change in Africa has been very limited. The wealth of this knowledge has not been well-recognised in the disaster risk reduction field, as policy-makers still rely on mitigation strategies based on scientific knowledge. Colonialism and lack of proper documentation of indigenous knowledge are some of the contributing factors to this. Ignoring the importance of understanding adaptive strategies of the local people has led to failed projects. Understanding how local people in Africa have managed to survive and adapt for generations, before the arrival of Western education, may be the key to developing sustainable policies to mitigate future challenges. Literature used in this article, obtained from the books, papers and publications of various experts in the fields of disaster risk reduction, climate change, indigenous knowledge and adaptation, highlight the need for more interest to be shown in indigenous knowledge, especially in the developing country context. This would lead to better strategies which originate from the community level but would aim for overall sustainable development in Africa.

  16. Isolation, identification and characterization of regional indigenous Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šuranská, Hana; Vránová, Dana; Omelková, Jiřina

    2016-01-01

    In the present work we isolated and identified various indigenous Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains and screened them for the selected oenological properties. These S. cerevisiae strains were isolated from berries and spontaneously fermented musts. The grape berries (Sauvignon blanc and Pinot noir) were grown under the integrated and organic mode of farming in the South Moravia (Czech Republic) wine region. Modern genotyping techniques such as PCR-fingerprinting and interdelta PCR typing were employed to differentiate among indigenous S. cerevisiae strains. This combination of the methods provides a rapid and relatively simple approach for identification of yeast of S. cerevisiae at strain level. In total, 120 isolates were identified and grouped by molecular approaches and 45 of the representative strains were tested for selected important oenological properties including ethanol, sulfur dioxide and osmotic stress tolerance, intensity of flocculation and desirable enzymatic activities. Their ability to produce and utilize acetic/malic acid was examined as well; in addition, H2S production as an undesirable property was screened. The oenological characteristics of indigenous isolates were compared to a commercially available S. cerevisiae BS6 strain, which is commonly used as the starter culture. Finally, some indigenous strains coming from organically treated grape berries were chosen for their promising oenological properties and these strains will be used as the starter culture, because application of a selected indigenous S. cerevisiae strain can enhance the regional character of the wines. PMID:26887243

  17. Isolation, identification and characterization of regional indigenous Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šuranská, Hana; Vránová, Dana; Omelková, Jiřina

    2016-01-01

    In the present work we isolated and identified various indigenous Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains and screened them for the selected oenological properties. These S. cerevisiae strains were isolated from berries and spontaneously fermented musts. The grape berries (Sauvignon blanc and Pinot noir) were grown under the integrated and organic mode of farming in the South Moravia (Czech Republic) wine region. Modern genotyping techniques such as PCR-fingerprinting and interdelta PCR typing were employed to differentiate among indigenous S. cerevisiae strains. This combination of the methods provides a rapid and relatively simple approach for identification of yeast of S. cerevisiae at strain level. In total, 120 isolates were identified and grouped by molecular approaches and 45 of the representative strains were tested for selected important oenological properties including ethanol, sulfur dioxide and osmotic stress tolerance, intensity of flocculation and desirable enzymatic activities. Their ability to produce and utilize acetic/malic acid was examined as well; in addition, H2S production as an undesirable property was screened. The oenological characteristics of indigenous isolates were compared to a commercially available S. cerevisiae BS6 strain, which is commonly used as the starter culture. Finally, some indigenous strains coming from organically treated grape berries were chosen for their promising oenological properties and these strains will be used as the starter culture, because application of a selected indigenous S. cerevisiae strain can enhance the regional character of the wines. PMID:26887243

  18. The impact of indigenous culture on female leadership in Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shafta Manzoor

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Digging into the experiences of thirty working women, this study examined the barriers imposed by indigenous culture of Pakistan impose on these women. The study followed a qualitative research approach with phenomenological theoretical framework. Fifteen females were interviewed from urban areas and fifteen from rural areas to draw a holistic picture of indigenous culture of Pakistan and its effect on career progress of females. From the data collected, seven categories were initially developed through open coding, followed by three clusters through axial coding and lastly the study created a theoretical framework through selective coding. Findings of the study indicated that indigenous culture strongly affects the career success of working women in Pakistan. The study concluded that indigenous culture of Pakistan puts taboos on females in the form of family behavior, expectations, and the structurally enforced inferior status of females which affects their leadership skills negatively and restricts their career growth. The study concluded that indigenous culture affects career progress of females in negative way and although efforts have been done to give women equal rights in Pakistan, these efforts will become more meaningful if general perception of society about women and their role starts to change which will require awareness programs and cooperation from academic institutions and policy makers.

  19. Isolation, identification and characterization of regional indigenous Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hana Šuranská

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In the present work we isolated and identified various indigenous Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains and screened them for the selected oenological properties. These S. cerevisiae strains were isolated from berries and spontaneously fermented musts. The grape berries (Sauvignon blanc and Pinot noir were grown under the integrated and organic mode of farming in the South Moravia (Czech Republic wine region. Modern genotyping techniques such as PCR-fingerprinting and interdelta PCR typing were employed to differentiate among indigenous S. cerevisiae strains. This combination of the methods provides a rapid and relatively simple approach for identification of yeast of S. cerevisiae at strain level. In total, 120 isolates were identified and grouped by molecular approaches and 45 of the representative strains were tested for selected important oenological properties including ethanol, sulfur dioxide and osmotic stress tolerance, intensity of flocculation and desirable enzymatic activities. Their ability to produce and utilize acetic/malic acid was examined as well; in addition, H2S production as an undesirable property was screened. The oenological characteristics of indigenous isolates were compared to a commercially available S. cerevisiae BS6 strain, which is commonly used as the starter culture. Finally, some indigenous strains coming from organically treated grape berries were chosen for their promising oenological properties and these strains will be used as the starter culture, because application of a selected indigenous S. cerevisiae strain can enhance the regional character of the wines.

  20. Cytochrome P450 genetic polymorphisms of Mexican indigenous populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosa-Macías, Martha; Llerena, Adrián

    2013-01-01

    This review focuses on the genetic polymorphisms of the cytochrome P450 (CYP) genes in Mexican indigenous populations, who are a part of the wide ethnic diversity of this country. These native groups have a particular historical trajectory that is different from the Mexican Mestizos. This variability may be reflected in the frequency distribution of polymorphisms in the CYP genes that encode enzymes involved in the metabolism of drugs and other xenobiotics. Therefore, these polymorphisms may affect drug efficacy and safety in indigenous populations in Mexico. The present study aimed to analyze the prevalence of CYP polymorphisms in indigenous Mexicans and to compare the results with studies in Mexican Mestizos. Because the extrapolation of pharmacogenetic data from Mestizos is not applicable to the majority of indigenous groups, pharmacogenetic studies directed at indigenous populations need to be developed. The Amerindians analyzed in this study showed a low phenotypic (CYP2D6) and genotypic (CYP2D6, CYP2C9) diversity, unlike Mexican Mestizos. The frequency of polymorphisms in the CYP1A1, CYP2C19, CYP2E1, and CYP3A4 genes was more similar among the Amerindians and Mexican Mestizos, with the exception of the CYP1A2 gene, whose *1F variant frequency in Mexican Amerindians was the highest described to date. PMID:24145057

  1. Predicting hunter behavior of indigenous communities in the Ecuadorian Amazon: insights from a household production model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique de la Montaña

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Many indigenous communities living in the Amazon rely on hunting and fishing to meet the majority of their protein needs. Despite the importance of these practices, few studies from the region have analyzed the socioeconomic drivers of hunting and fishing at the household level. We propose a household production model to assess the effect of key economic parameters on hunting and fishing in small indigenous communities located in the Ecuadorian Amazon, whose principal source of protein is derived from hunting and fishing. The model was validated using empirical data from two communities that reflect different levels of market integration and forest conservation. Demand and supply functions were generated from household data gathered over 19 months. Elasticities were derived to determine the sensitivity of the decision to engage in hunting to exogenous parameters such as off-farm wages, hunting costs, bushmeat price, penalties for the illegal sale of bushmeat, and biological characteristics of the game species. After calibrating the model, we simulated changes in the key economic parameters. The parameter that most directly affected hunting activity in both communities was off-farm wages. Simulating a 10% wage increase resulted in a 16-20% reduction in harvested biomass, while a 50% increase diminished harvested biomass by > 50%. Model simulations revealed that bushmeat price and penalties for illegal trade also had important effects on hunter behavior in terms of amount of bushmeat sold, but not in terms of total harvest. As a tool for understanding hunters' economic decision-making, the model provides a basis for developing strategies that promote sustainable hunting and wildlife conservation while protecting indigenous livelihoods.

  2. Photobacterium angustum and Photobacterium kishitanii, Psychrotrophic High-Level Histamine-Producing Bacteria Indigenous to Tuna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjornsdottir-Butler, K; McCarthy, S A; Dunlap, P V; Benner, R A

    2016-04-01

    Scombrotoxin fish poisoning (SFP) remains the main contributor of fish poisoning incidents in the United States, despite efforts to control its spread. Psychrotrophic histamine-producing bacteria (HPB) indigenous to scombrotoxin-forming fish may contribute to the incidence of SFP. We examined the gills, skin, and anal vents of yellowfin (n = 3), skipjack (n = 1), and albacore (n = 6) tuna for the presence of indigenous HPB. Thirteen HPB strains were isolated from the anal vent samples from albacore (n = 3) and yellowfin (n = 2) tuna. Four of these isolates were identified as Photobacterium kishitanii and nine isolates as Photobacterium angustum; these isolates produced 560 to 603 and 1,582 to 2,338 ppm histamine in marine broth containing 1% histidine (25°C for 48 h), respectively. The optimum growth temperatures and salt concentrations were 26 to 27°C and 1% salt for P. kishitanii and 30 to 32°C and 2% salt for P. angustum in Luria 70% seawater (LSW-70). The optimum activity of the HDC enzyme was at 15 to 30°C for both species. At 5°C, P. kishitanii and P. angustum had growth rates of 0.1 and 0.2 h(-1), respectively, and the activities of histidine decarboxylase (HDC) enzymes were 71% and 63%, respectively. These results show that indigenous HPB in tuna are capable of growing at elevated and refrigeration temperatures. These findings demonstrate the need to examine the relationships between the rate of histamine production at refrigeration temperatures, seafood shelf life, and regulatory limits. PMID:26826233

  3. Oil and gas projects in the Western Amazon: threats to wilderness, biodiversity, and indigenous peoples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matt Finer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The western Amazon is the most biologically rich part of the Amazon basin and is home to a great diversity of indigenous ethnic groups, including some of the world's last uncontacted peoples living in voluntary isolation. Unlike the eastern Brazilian Amazon, it is still a largely intact ecosystem. Underlying this landscape are large reserves of oil and gas, many yet untapped. The growing global demand is leading to unprecedented exploration and development in the region. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We synthesized information from government sources to quantify the status of oil development in the western Amazon. National governments delimit specific geographic areas or "blocks" that are zoned for hydrocarbon activities, which they may lease to state and multinational energy companies for exploration and production. About 180 oil and gas blocks now cover approximately 688,000 km(2 of the western Amazon. These blocks overlap the most species-rich part of the Amazon. We also found that many of the blocks overlap indigenous territories, both titled lands and areas utilized by peoples in voluntary isolation. In Ecuador and Peru, oil and gas blocks now cover more than two-thirds of the Amazon. In Bolivia and western Brazil, major exploration activities are set to increase rapidly. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Without improved policies, the increasing scope and magnitude of planned extraction means that environmental and social impacts are likely to intensify. We review the most pressing oil- and gas-related conservation policy issues confronting the region. These include the need for regional Strategic Environmental Impact Assessments and the adoption of roadless extraction techniques. We also consider the conflicts where the blocks overlap indigenous peoples' territories.

  4. Hospital Utilisation in Indigenous and Non-Indigenous Infants under 12 Months of Age in Western Australia, Prospective Population Based Data Linkage Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAullay, Daniel; Strobel, Natalie A.; Marriott, Rhonda; Atkinson, David N.; Marley, Julia V.; Stanley, Fiona J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Indigenous infants (infants aged under 12 months) have the highest hospital admission and emergency department presentation risks in Australia. However, there have been no recent reports comparing hospital utilisation between Indigenous and non-Indigenous infants. Methods Our primary objective was to use a large prospective population-based linked dataset to assess the risk of all-cause hospital admission and emergency department presentation in Indigenous compared to non-Indigenous infants in Western Australia (WA). Secondary objectives were to assess the effect of socio-economic status (Index of Relative Socio-Economic Disadvantage [IRSD]) on hospital utilisation and to understand the causes of hospital utilisation. Findings There were 3,382 (5.4%) Indigenous and 59,583 (94.6%) non-Indigenous live births in WA from 1 January 2010 to 31 December 2011. Indigenous infants had a greater risk of hospital admission (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 1.90, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 1.77–2.04, p = <0.001) and emergency department presentation (aOR 2.15, 95% CI 1.98–2.33, p = <0.001) compared to non-Indigenous infants. Fifty nine percent (59.0%) of admissions in Indigenous children were classified as preventable compared to 31.2% of admissions in non-Indigenous infants (aOR 2.12, 95% CI 1.88–2.39). The risk of hospital admission in the most disadvantaged (IRSD 1) infants in the total cohort (35.7%) was similar to the risk in the least disadvantaged (IRSD 5) infants (30.6%) (aOR 1.04, 95% CI 0.96–1.13, p = 0.356). Interpretation WA Indigenous infants have much higher hospital utilisation than non Indigenous infants. WA health services should prioritise Indigenous infants regardless of their socio economic status or where they live. PMID:27120331

  5. Traditional Indigenous Approaches to Healing and the modern welfare of Traditional Knowledge, Spirituality and Lands: A critical reflection on practices and policies taken from the Canadian Indigenous Example

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian A. Robbins

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available In order for traditional knowledge to be maintained and to develop, it has to be practiced. Traditional healing provides a vehicle for this to occur. In Canada, the spiritual revitalization of Indigenous communities and individuals often involves the use numerous components of traditional healing. These elements are reflectedmost clearly at the grassroots level, however, current Indigenous programs delivered by Indigenous and governmental agencies have made some accommodating efforts as well. Perhaps most importantly, traditional knowledge and Indigenous spirituality hinges on the maintenance and renewal of relationships to the land.Indigenous land bases and the environment as a whole remain vitally important to the practice of traditional healing.A focus on Indigenous healing, when discussing Indigenous knowledge systems and spirituality, is paramount today due to the large scale suppression of Indigenous cultural expressions during the process of colonization. With respect to policy, there appears to be a historical progression of perception or attitude towards Indigenous traditional healing in Canada from one of disfavour to one favour. There are nevertheless continuing challenges for traditional healing. Mainstream perceptions and subsequent policy implementations sometimes still reflect attitudes that were formulated during the decline of traditional healing practice during colonization processes. As a consequence the ability for particular communities to maintain and use their specific understandings ofIndigenous knowledge continues encounter obstacles. Indigenous Knowledge systems are living entities and not relics of the past. Today, these knowledge systems are still greatly being applied to help Indigenous communities and Indigenous people recover fromintergenerational pain and suffering endured during the colonization process. Future policy development and implementation should aim to support Indigenous peoples and communities when

  6. INDIGENOUS PHYTOTHERAPY FOR FILARIASIS FROM ORISSA

    OpenAIRE

    Girach, R.D.; Brahmam, M.; Misra, M. K.; Ahmed, M

    1998-01-01

    Filarias is one major health problem in the coastal areas of Orissa including district Bhadrak. Tis article deals with 8 plant species used in native phytotherapy for filariasis in this region with the view to provide clue for further research.

  7. Vestas and the Indigenous Communities in Oaxaca, Mexico

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramirez, Jacobo

    2014-01-01

    Vestas was to start delivering 132 V90-3.0 megawatt (MW) turbines in the second quarter of 2012. The turbines were to be installed in the Isthmus of Tehuantepec region of Oaxaca, a southern state in Mexico. However, on 17 October 2012, Vestas’s deliveries were put on hold when social organisations...... and 40 indigenous Zapotec and Huave people held rallies in front of the Danish Embassy in Mexico City. With banners and placards, the protestors demanded Vestas’s exit from the Isthmus of Tehuantepec. The indigenous people suggested that although European companies had traditionally been present...... in Mexico and were among the most experienced wind developers in the world, 'their capitalist model' failed to take into account, 'the spiritual and social ties between the indigenous rural communities and the land'. According to local residents, the basic problem was a clash of cultures. This case can...

  8. A scoping review of Indigenous suicide prevention in circumpolar regions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Redvers, Jennifer; Bjerregaard, Peter; Eriksen, Heidi;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Suicide is a serious public health challenge in circumpolar regions, especially among Indigenous youth. Indigenous communities, government agencies and health care providers are making concerted efforts to reduce the burden of suicide and strengthen protective factors for individuals......, families and communities. The persistence of suicide has made it clear that more needs to be done. OBJECTIVE: Our aim was to undertake a scoping review of the peer-reviewed literature on suicide prevention and interventions in Indigenous communities across the circumpolar north. Our objective was to...... determine the extent and types of interventions that have been reported during past decade. We want to use this knowledge to support community initiative and inform intervention development and evaluation. DESIGN: We conducted a scoping review of online databases to identify studies published between 2004...

  9. Entrepreneurial characteristics of indigenous housing developers: the case of Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mastura JAAFAR

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Since the colonisation era, the immigrants from mainland China (and now their descendents dominate the Malaysian housing industry. Their high entrepreneurial ethics stimulated early venture in all economic sectors to become dominant in business. To increase the participation of indigenous entrepreneurs in economic activities, Malaysia has practiced its own version of the affirmative policy since the 1970s which is known as National Economic Policy (NEP. Unlike other economic sectors such as construction, manufacturing and agricultural, the government has not provided special assistance (other than those that are generic in nature for the indigenous populace to penetrate and thrive in housing development. As a consequence, their participation in this sector is conspicuous by their absence. A study was conducted to look into the involvement of indigenous housing developers in housing industry. Data was collected through postal questionnaires followed by face-to-face interviews. The discussion on the data analysis is presented together with interview findings.

  10. The Mayan Indigenous Women of Chiapas: Lekil Kuxlejal and food autonomy1

    OpenAIRE

    Magali Barreto Ávila

    2011-01-01

    Magali Barreto Avila describes how since the seizure of lands carried out by the Zapatistas from 1994 to 1997, Mayan indigenous women from Ocosingo, Chiapas have worked to build food autonomy for indigenous communities.

  11. Reflections on world citizens and privilege - comparing indigenous and Muslim minorities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Hanne

    2010-01-01

    The article treats the significance of status, citizenship and world-citizenship for two 'minorities' - indigenous people and Muslim.......The article treats the significance of status, citizenship and world-citizenship for two 'minorities' - indigenous people and Muslim....

  12. Marginalised Relics or Dynamic Modern Languages? Emerging Issues When Australia's Indigenous Languages Modernise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amery, Rob

    2002-01-01

    Examines attitudes toward indigenous languages in Australia. Suggests that if indigenous languages were granted official status, they would develop and modernize in response, rather than die out.(Author/VWL)

  13. Multimedia Technology and Indigenous Language Revitalization: Practical Educational Tools and Applications Used within Native Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galla, Candace Kaleimamoowahinekapu

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation reports findings from a study documenting the use of multimedia technology among Indigenous language communities to assist language learners, speakers, instructors, and institutions learn about multimedia technologies that have contributed to Indigenous language revitalization, education, documentation, preservation, and…

  14. The Old World species of Boehmeria (Urticaceae, tribus Boehmerieae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilmot-Dear, Christine Melanie; Friis, Ib

    2013-01-01

    This is the second part of a world-wide revision of the genus Boehmeria, the previously-published part having dealt with the New World species. The Old World species are widely distributed in the tropics and subtropics from West Africa to islands in the Pacific Ocean and from Japan and China to...... Southern Africa, Madagascar and Australia, with the highest species richness in the Himalayas and their extension into China and Indochina. No indigenous species is common to both the Old and New World. The species represent taxonomic units of very different complexity: most species exhibit little...

  15. South African indigenous healing: how it works.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cumes, David

    2013-01-01

    Sangomas or inyangas are shamans, healers, priests, and prophets that have been the backbone of Bantu communities, especially in the rural areas of Southern Africa for eons. However, with rapid Westernization and the increasing allure of the commodity market, the old ways are rapidly eroding. Indigenous knowledge has always been transmitted orally, and there is little written down about the secret traditions of initiation. Hence, the bibliography listed at the end of this article is scant. This information is a result of personal experience gleaned during my own initiation into the world of sangoma and my subsequent experiences with these healing realms. The knowledge has been gained experientially and not by the scientific method. Some of it is secret and cannot be revealed. The information may differ somewhat from healer to healer but the general principles are the same. Most sub-Saharan African peoples believe in the importance of the ancestors being able to guide events, and they revere them because they have this power. I mostly will be describing the traditions that I encountered during my initiation and subsequent practice. There are others. Since sangoma wisdom is an oral tradition the individual's initiation will depend on the mentor and the spirit guides involved. That particular sangoma's healing repertoire will be somewhat different to another though the principles remain the same. The ancestors find the most efficient way to impart the information so that the healer can do the work. The way in which they transmit the knowledge will be unique to that person's receptivity and talents. Objective proof is not part of the experiential training. In fact, any attempt at systematic inquiry gets in the way of the process. One has to put cognitive, left-brained intellect aside. Obsession with data obliterates the intuitive. The sangoma or inyanga has a lot to teach the West about the spirit world and our ancestral roots. Science has put us in touch with a

  16. Relative performance of an indigenous personal air sampler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An indigenous personal air sampler (PAS) is developed for estimating inhaled air activity of personnel working in radiotoxic laboratories containing airborne concentrations of plutonium, uranium, thorium etc. Performance of this sampler was tested and compared with an imported equipment viz., Casella (London) personal air sampler. On several parameters such as the size, weight, cost and performance efficiency over large ranges etc. the indigenous PAS is comparable to the Casella air sampler. The paper summarises the results of thoron airborne activity evaluated by both the air samplers in specific areas at the Thorium Plant, Indian Rare Earths Ltd. (IRE), Bombay. (author). 2 tabs., 2 figs

  17. Contested Identities: Urbanisation and Indigenous Identity in the Ecuadorian Amazon

    OpenAIRE

    O'Driscoll, Emma

    2015-01-01

    This thesis is a study of indigenous urbanisation and ethnic identity in the Ecuadorian Amazon. Taking as its focus Shuar urban residents of the rainforest city Sucúa, it argues that urban indigenous residents feel simultaneously more and less ‘indigenous’ than their more ‘rural’ counterparts. On the one hand, the experience of living in a multiethnic city, on the ‘boundary’ of the Shuar ethnic group (Barth 1969), increases urban Shuar residents’ awareness of their ethnic identity, as Shua...

  18. Indigenous Women in Defence of Life and Land: An introduction

    OpenAIRE

    Marisa Belausteguigoitia Rius; Mariana Gómez Alvarez Icaza; Iván González Márquez

    2011-01-01

    Marisa Belausteguigoitia Rius, Mariana Gómez Alvarez Icaza and Iván González Márquez argue that indigenous and rural women play a leading role in the fight for the defence of their territories and its natural resources. They introduce the essays and testimonies of this section of the journal in order to show the complexity of the situation lived in Mexico, related to land, territory and the defence of natural resources, especially for indigenous women. In this context, they propose that indig...

  19. IDENTITY AS A RELATION OF CONFLICT IN INDIGENOUS EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia Roberta Busarello

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to analyze the relationship of identity, to understand how they can generate conflicts and prejudices and how education can interact as an agent to overcome these reactions that often undermine the dignity of life. This article was based on literature review and arguments in meetings for study and discussion of the Research Group EDUCOGITANS Philosophy and Education as well as meetings related to research funded by CAPES /FINEP, "Pedagogical-Didactic Planning and Intercultural Training of Teachers for the revitalization of the language and culture in Indigenous Schools Xokleng Laklãnõ and howler in Santa Catarina, "linked to the Centre for Indigenous Education.

  20. Representing Mayas : Indigenous Authorities and the Local Politics of Identity in Guatemala

    OpenAIRE

    Rasch, E.D.

    2008-01-01

    Against the backdrop of emerging indigenous movements in Latin America, the Maya Movement appeared as a political actor in the 1980s, bringing “the Indian Question” to the fore in Guatemalan politics. Rejecting racism and assimilationalist State policies, the Maya Movement seeks to recapture indigenous community organizing and indigenous law in her imagination of the multicultural nation-state. This has resulted in, among others, recognition of indigenous authorities in the Peace Accords as a...

  1. International Human Rights Law Relevant to Natural Resource Extraction in Indigenous Territories – An Overview

    OpenAIRE

    Åhrén, Mattias

    2014-01-01

    The article surveys the relevance of indigenous peoples’ human rights with regard to natural resource extraction in territories traditionally used by them, with a focus on the rights to self-determination, culture, and, in particular, property. The article articulates how indigenous peoples’ right to self-determination may be of relevance to resource extraction in indigenous territories, although uncertainty prevails as to the scope of the right when applied to indigenous peoples. The article...

  2. Library Support for Indigenous University Students: Moving from the Periphery to the Mainstream

    OpenAIRE

    Joanna Hare; Wendy Abbott

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective – This research project explored the models of Indigenous support programs in Australian academic libraries, and how they align with the needs of the students they support. The research objective was to gather feedback from Indigenous students and obtain evidence of good practice models from Australian academic libraries to inform the development and enhancement of Indigenous support programs. The research presents the viewpoints of both Indigenous students and librari...

  3. An explanatory analysis of economic and health inequality changes among Mexican indigenous people, 2000-2010

    OpenAIRE

    Servan-Mori, Edson; Torres-Pereda, Pilar; Orozco, Emanuel; Sosa-Rubí, Sandra G

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Mexico faces important problems concerning income and health inequity. Mexico’s national public agenda prioritizes remedying current inequities between its indigenous and non-indigenous population groups. This study explores the changes in social inequalities among Mexico’s indigenous and non-indigenous populations for the time period 2000 to 2010 using routinely collected poverty, welfare and health indicator data. Methods We described changes in socioeconomic indicators (housin...

  4. Maternal morbidity and mortality among indigenous people in Bangladesh : a study of the Mru community

    OpenAIRE

    Islam, Md Rakibul

    2010-01-01

    Maternal health of indigenous people is poorer than the non-indigenous people across the world which is also true in the Bangladesh context. However, little research has been done among indigenous people in Bangladesh. As a result, the present study was conducted among the Mru indigenous people to comprehend their maternal health status and the factors associated with it. The study was carried out in three upazilas (administrative sub-districts) namely Alikadam, Lama and Thanchi of the Bandar...

  5. Participation of Indigenous Peoples in Mass Media: A Case Study of FM Radios in Kavrepalanchowk, Nepal

    OpenAIRE

    Sapkota, Prakash

    2013-01-01

    This thesis entitled “Participation of Indigenous Peoples in Mass Media” is a case study of indigenous peoples’ participation in FM radios in Kavrepalanchowk district of Nepal. The study intends to highlight the participatory pattern and impact of indigenous peoples in FM radios, the most popular modern means of mass media. The research is based on the fieldwork carried out in Kavrepalanchowk district of Nepal attempting to assess the access of indigenous peoples in mass media and to com...

  6. Joint contributions of mathematics teacher educators and indigenous Terena teachers to revitalization of the native language

    OpenAIRE

    Domite, M. do Carmo Santos; Dobereiner Pohl, Robert; Carvalho, Valéria de

    2014-01-01

    This study may be understood as a set of ideas, experiences, and proposals about possible directions for indigenous teacher education when the purpose is revitalization of indigenous language in general and the use and valuation of indigenous language in mathematics education in particular. Taking as a point of departure the visions and needs of indigenous Terena teachers relative to native language fluency, we worked with them in one Terena village and produced effective materials for learni...

  7. Helminth parasites in the intestinal tract of indigenous poultry in parts of Kenya : short communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.W. Irungu

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available A study was carried out on 456 indigenous poultry intestinal specimens from various towns in Kenya to determine the occurrence and distribution of helminth parasites in the intestinal tract of the birds. Of the specimens examined, 414 had parasites whereas the remaining 42 had none, which is an infection rate of 90.78 %. The main species of helminths found in the intestines were Raillietina sp. (47.53 %, Heterakis gallinarum (21.33 %, Ascaridia galli (10.03 %, Strongyloides avium (9.96 %, Choanotaenia infundibulum (4.61 %, Cotugnia digonopora (3.6 %, Capillaria sp. (1.5 %, Trichostrongylus tenius (1.04 % and Syngamus trachea (0.40 %. Most helminths were present in both the mid- and hindguts. Syngamus trachea and C. digonopora were only found in the foregut and midgut, respectively. Although chickens from which the specimens were collected appeard healthy, the high prevalence of helminthiasis observed shows the poor level of helminth infection control practiced by the indigenous poultry keepers in the country, which might affect the health status of the birds and their growth rates. Poultry keepers should be encouraged to prevent, control and treat such cases.

  8. Traditional Knowledge on Genetic Resources: Safeguarding the Cultural Sustenance of Indigenous Communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan Izatul Asma Wan Talaat

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Traditional knowledge, generally defined as the long-standing traditions and practices of certain regional, indigenous, or local communities, constitutes a cumulative body of knowledge, know-how, practices, and representations maintained and developed by peoples with extended histories of interaction with the natural environment. Recognition, protection and enforcement of the rights of indigenous communities to have continued access to biological genetic resources is quite related to the principle of sustainable and use of biological diversity crucial not only for the continued sustenance of their culture but also to protect their knowledge, acquired over thousands of years of experimentation and experience, about the uses biological resources can be put to particularly in medicinal and pharmaceutical preparations. The signing of the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD in 1992 has brought international intention to intellectual property laws to preserve, protect and promote their traditional knowledge. CBD recognises the value of traditional knowledge in protecting species, ecosystems and landscapes, which are inextricably associated to the sustainable conservation and use of natural resources. On the other hand, the subsequent adoption of the World Trade Organization (WTO Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS in 1994 could be interpreted to contradict the agreements made under the CBD. This paper highlights the efforts to protect traditional knowledge in the midst of the dichotomy between CBD and TRIPS.

  9. Ethnobotanical study and nutrient content of indigenous vegetables consumed in Central Kalimantan, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SUSI KRESNATITA

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Chotimah HENC, Kresnatita S, Miranda Y. 2013. Ethnobotanical study and nutrient content of indigenous vegetables consumed in Central Kalimantan, Indonesia. Biodiversitas 14: 106-111. People in Central Kalimantan consume vegetables that collected from the wild or traditionally cultivated. Documentation effort of them is very important because of the diversity of local vegetable are threatened with extinction due to the conversion of peat land and forest fires. This study aims to determine the diversity of indigenous vegetables in Central Kalimantan, its use as a vegetable and nutrient content some vegetables. The method used was the exploration and interviews. Exploration carried out in three districts namely Palangkaraya, Pulang Pisau, and Seruyan. Sampling of plants was randomly and selectively. Data analysis was performed descriptively. The results showed that we recorded 42 plant species belonging to 30 families. There were many vegetables processing: stir-fry, clear soup, a light coconut milk soup, acidic soup, or just consumed as fresh vegetables. The result of nutritional value analyzed, Helminthostachys zeylanica (L. Hook had a potential to further develop whether as vegetables or medicinal plant. It had the highest protein, carbohydrate and mineral P, Fe, Na and K content among the vegetables analyzed.

  10. Geomorpho-edaphic mapping of Atécuaro catchment (Michoacan, Mexico) and indigenous soil classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alanís González, N.; Alcalá de Jesús, M.; Arellano Reyes, A.; Jordán, A.; Zavala, L. M.

    2012-04-01

    The needs of management and conservation of land involve the study of natural resources and their internal relationships. Over time, these resources, including soil, have been used in an uncontrolled manner, resulting in species extinction and environmental degradation processes. The main reason for this in developing areas is the lack of soil and geomorphological information for an adequate land use planning. Often, ethnopedological knowledge and the inclusion of indigenous communities as beneficiaries of the agricultural technology are indispensable premises to make a better use of soil. A geomorphology and soil survey was conducted in the Atécuaro catchment (4591 ha), in the municipality of Morelia (Michoacan, Mexico). The Atécuaro catchment is located in the Mil Cumbres area, and is characterized by an irregular relief and a diversity of landforms and substrates (andesite, rhyolite, basalt, tuff and Quaternary sediments). The main land uses are oak and pine forest, shrubland, grassland and dryland farming. Results of the soil survey and the analysis of geoforms were studied and incorporated in a geographycal information system. Preliminary geoform and soil units maps were overlapped in order to get a map of geomorpho-edaphic units. Up to 30 different geomorpho-edaphic units were classified. Finally, map units were correlated with local indigenous soil classification.

  11. Immigrant Pantoea agglomerans embedded within indigenous microbial aggregates: a novel spatial distribution of epiphytic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qing; Ma, Anzhou; Cui, Mengmeng; Zhuang, Xuliang; Zhuang, Guoqiang

    2014-02-01

    Immigrant bacteria located on leaf surfaces are important to the health of plants as well as to people who consume fresh fruits and vegetables. However, the spatial distribution and organization of these immigrant bacteria on leaf surfaces are still poorly understood. To examine the spatial organization of these strains, two bacterial strains on tobacco leaves: (1) an indigenous strain, Pseudomonas stutzeri Nov. Y2011 labeled with green fluorescent protein, and (2) an immigrant strain Pantoea agglomerans labeled with cyan fluorescent protein isolated from pear, were studied. Under moist conditions, P. agglomerans cells quickly disappeared from direct observation by laser-scanning confocal microscopy, although elution results indicated that large amounts of live cells were still present on the leaves. Following exposure to desiccation stress, particles of cyan fluorescent protein-labeled P. agglomerans were visible within cracked aggregates of P. stutzeri Nov. Y2011. Detailed observation of sectioned aggregates showed that colonies of immigrant P. agglomerans were embedded within aggregates of P. stutzeri Nov. Y2011. Furthermore, carbon-resource partitioning studies suggested that these two species could coexist without significant nutritional competition. This is the first observation of an immigrant bacterium embedding within aggregates of indigenous bacteria on leaves to evade harsh conditions in the phyllosphere. PMID:25076531

  12. Cheating the Locals: Invasive Mussels Steal and Benefit from the Cooling Effect of Indigenous Mussels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lathlean, Justin A.; Seuront, Laurent; McQuaid, Christopher D.; Ng, Terence P. T.; Zardi, Gerardo I.; Nicastro, Katy R.

    2016-01-01

    The indigenous South African mussel Perna perna gapes during periods of aerial exposure to maintain aerobic respiration. This behaviour has no effect on the body temperatures of isolated individuals, but when surrounded by conspecifics, beneficial cooling effects of gaping emerge. It is uncertain, however, whether the presence of the invasive mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis limits the ability of P. perna for collective thermoregulation. We investigated whether varying densities of P. perna and M. galloprovincialis influences the thermal properties of both natural and artificial mussel beds during periods of emersion. Using infrared thermography, body temperatures of P. perna within mixed artificial beds were shown to increase faster and reach higher temperatures than individuals in conspecific beds, indicating that the presence of M. galloprovincialis limits the group cooling effects of gaping. In contrast, body temperatures of M. galloprovincialis within mixed artificial mussel beds increased slower and exhibited lower temperatures than for individuals in beds comprised entirely of M. galloprovincialis. Interestingly, differences in bed temperatures and heating rates were largely dependent on the size of mussels, with beds comprised of larger individuals experiencing less thermal stress irrespective of species composition. The small-scale patterns of thermal stress detected within manipulated beds were not observed within naturally occurring mixed mussel beds. We propose that small-scale differences in topography, size-structure, mussel bed size and the presence of organisms encrusting the mussel shells mask the effects of gaping behaviour within natural mussel beds. Nevertheless, the results from our manipulative experiment indicate that the invasive species M. galloprovincialis steals thermal properties as well as resources from the indigenous mussel P. perna. This may have significant implications for predicting how the co-existence of these two species may

  13. Cheating the Locals: Invasive Mussels Steal and Benefit from the Cooling Effect of Indigenous Mussels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lathlean, Justin A; Seuront, Laurent; McQuaid, Christopher D; Ng, Terence P T; Zardi, Gerardo I; Nicastro, Katy R

    2016-01-01

    The indigenous South African mussel Perna perna gapes during periods of aerial exposure to maintain aerobic respiration. This behaviour has no effect on the body temperatures of isolated individuals, but when surrounded by conspecifics, beneficial cooling effects of gaping emerge. It is uncertain, however, whether the presence of the invasive mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis limits the ability of P. perna for collective thermoregulation. We investigated whether varying densities of P. perna and M. galloprovincialis influences the thermal properties of both natural and artificial mussel beds during periods of emersion. Using infrared thermography, body temperatures of P. perna within mixed artificial beds were shown to increase faster and reach higher temperatures than individuals in conspecific beds, indicating that the presence of M. galloprovincialis limits the group cooling effects of gaping. In contrast, body temperatures of M. galloprovincialis within mixed artificial mussel beds increased slower and exhibited lower temperatures than for individuals in beds comprised entirely of M. galloprovincialis. Interestingly, differences in bed temperatures and heating rates were largely dependent on the size of mussels, with beds comprised of larger individuals experiencing less thermal stress irrespective of species composition. The small-scale patterns of thermal stress detected within manipulated beds were not observed within naturally occurring mixed mussel beds. We propose that small-scale differences in topography, size-structure, mussel bed size and the presence of organisms encrusting the mussel shells mask the effects of gaping behaviour within natural mussel beds. Nevertheless, the results from our manipulative experiment indicate that the invasive species M. galloprovincialis steals thermal properties as well as resources from the indigenous mussel P. perna. This may have significant implications for predicting how the co-existence of these two species may

  14. On agricultural protection and exotic species introductions

    OpenAIRE

    Costello, Christopher; McAusland, Carol

    2001-01-01

    Unintentional introductions of non-indigenous plants, animals, and microbes cause significant ecological and agricultural crop damage worldwide. There is an emerging empirical link between international trade and the frequency and damage of such introductions. We explore the effects of domestic agricultural protection on exotic species introductions. In contrast to the commonly held belief that agricultural protection harms the environment, we show that increasing agricultural protection may ...

  15. Mental Disorders and Communication of Intent to Die in Indigenous Suicide Cases, Queensland, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Leo, Diego; Milner, Allison; Sveticic, Jerneja

    2012-01-01

    In comparing Indigenous to non-Indigenous suicide in Australia, this study focussed on the frequency of the association between some psychiatric conditions, such as depression and alcohol abuse, and some aspect of suicidality, in particular communication of suicide intent. Logistic regression was implemented to analyze cases of Indigenous (n =…

  16. Connecting Indigenous Stories with Geology: Inquiry-Based Learning in a Middle Years Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larkin, Damian; King, Donna; Kidman, Gillian

    2012-01-01

    One way to integrate indigenous perspectives in junior science is through links between indigenous stories of the local area and science concepts. Using local indigenous stories about landforms, a teacher of Year 8 students designed a unit on geology that catered for the diverse student population in his class. This paper reports on the…

  17. Indigenous Education and Empowerment: International Perspectives. Contemporary Native American Communities #17

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Saad, Ismael, Ed.; Champagne, Duane, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    Indigenous people have often been confronted with education systems that ignore their cultural and historical perspectives. Largely unsuccessful projects of assimilation have been the predominant outcome of indigenous communities' encounters with state schools, as many indigenous students fail to conform to mainstream cultural norms. This…

  18. Indigenous Students in Bolivian Primary Schools: Patterns and Determinants of Inequities. A World Bank Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEwan, Patrick J.; Jimenez, Wilson

    This paper examines the patterns and determinants of inequities between indigenous and non-indigenous students in Bolivian primary (elementary) schools, using a 1997 survey of third and sixth graders. Analysis shows that, on average, indigenous students are of lower socioeconomic status, and their schools appear to have fewer instructional…

  19. Indigeneity-Grounded Analysis (IGA as Policy(-Making Lens: New Zealand Models, Canadian Realities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Maaka

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Engaging politically with the principles of indigeneity is neither an option nor a cop out. The emergence of Indigenous peoples as prime-time players on the world’s political stage attests to the timeliness and relevance of indigeneity in advancing a new postcolonial contract for living together differently. Insofar as the principles of indigeneity are inextricably linked with challenge, resistance, and transformation, this paper argues that reference to indigeneity as policy(- making paradigm is both necessary and overdue. To put this argument to the test, the politics of Maori indigeneity in Aotearoa New Zealand are analyzed and assessed in constructing an indigeneity agenda model. The political implications of an indigeneity-policy nexus are then applied to the realities of Canada’s Indigenous/Aboriginal peoples. The paper contends that, just as the Government is committed to a gender based analysis (GBA for improving policy outcomes along gender lines, so too should the principles of indigeneity (or aboriginality secure an indigeneity grounded analysis (IGA framework for minimizing systemic policy bias while maximizing Indigenous peoples inputs. The paper concludes by theorizing those provisional first principles that inform an IGA framework as a policy (-making lens.

  20. Media Influences on Body Image and Disordered Eating among Indigenous Adolescent Australians

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, Marita P.; Ricciardelli, Lina; Mellor, David; Ball, Kylie

    2005-01-01

    There has been no previous investigation of body image concerns and body change strategies among indigenous Australians. This study was designed to investigate the level of body satisfaction, body change strategies, and perceived media messages about body change strategies among 50 indigenous (25 males, 25 females) and 50 non-indigenous (25 males,…

  1. Supervision Provided to Indigenous Australian Doctoral Students: A Black and White Issue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trudgett, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    The number of Indigenous Australians completing doctoral qualifications is disparately below their non-Indigenous contemporaries. Whilst there has been a steady increase in Indigenous completions in recent years, significant work remains to redress the imbalance. Supervision has been identified as a primary influencer of the likely success of…

  2. Indigenous Students' Wellbeing and the Mobilisation of Ethics of Care in the Contact Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacGill, Bindi Mary; Blanch, Faye

    2013-01-01

    Schools have historically been a location of oppression for Indigenous students in Australian schools. This paper explores the processes of democratising (Giroux, 1992, p. 24) the school space by Aboriginal Community Education Officers (henceforward ACEOs) through an Indigenous ethics of care framework. The enactment of Indigenous ethics of care…

  3. Beyond Recovery: Colonization, Health and Healing for Indigenous People in Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavallee, Lynn F.; Poole, Jennifer M.

    2010-01-01

    How do we limit our focus to mental health when Indigenous teaching demands a much wider lens? How do we respond to mental health recovery when Indigenous experience speaks to a very different approach to healing, and how can we take up the health of Indigenous people in Canada without a discussion of identity and colonization? We cannot, for the…

  4. "Stay with Your Words": Indigenous Youth, Local Policy, and the Work of Language Fortification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huaman, Elizabeth Sumida; Martin, Nathan D.; Chosa, Carnell T.

    2016-01-01

    This article focuses on the work of cultural and language maintenance and fortification with Indigenous youth populations. Here, the idea of work represents two strands of thought: first, research that is partnered with Indigenous youth-serving institutions and that prioritizes Indigenous youth perspectives; and second, the work of cultural and…

  5. 75 FR 30060 - China: Effects of Intellectual Property Infringement and Indigenous Innovation Policies on the U...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-28

    ... COMMISSION China: Effects of Intellectual Property Infringement and Indigenous Innovation Policies on the U.S... investigation No. 332-519, China: Effects of Intellectual Property Infringement and Indigenous Innovation...: Intellectual Property Infringement, Indigenous Innovation Policies, and Frameworks for Measuring the Effects...

  6. Clinical comparison of indigenous /sup 99/Tc-m radiopharmaceuticals kits with Amersham diagnostic kits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ultimate appropriateness of the indigenous (Pinscan) cold kits was judged by performing clinical studies with them and comparing results with Amersham's diagnostic kits (Amerscan). The scans obtained by indigenous kits was as good as those of Amershams's. This proves that the indigenous kits are of acceptable quality and be used for routine clinical studies. (author)

  7. Risk and Protective Factors Associated with Gambling Products and Services: Indigenous Gamblers in North Queensland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breen, Helen

    2012-01-01

    As part of a larger study, this paper reports on findings into risk and protective factors associated with gambling products and services by Indigenous Australians. Both Indigenous card gambling (traditional or unregulated) and commercial gambling (regulated) were investigated. Permission was granted by Indigenous Elders and by a university ethics…

  8. Risk and Protective Factors Associated with Gambling Consequences for Indigenous Australians in North Queensland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breen, Helen M.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to examine risk and protective factors associated with the consequences of card gambling and commercial gambling for Indigenous Australians in north Queensland. With Indigenous Elders' approval and using qualitative methodology, semi-structured interviews were conducted with 60 Indigenous and 48 non-Indigenous…

  9. From the Sidelines to the Centre: Indigenous Support Units in Vocational Education and Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helme, Sue

    2007-01-01

    Indigenous Australians are significantly disadvantaged in comparison with non-Indigenous Australians on all socioeconomic indicators. Education and training are seen as a means of reducing inequality, and high levels of Indigenous participation in vocational education and training (VET) indicate that this sector has a central role in this process.…

  10. Global Marketing of Indigenous Culture: Discovering Native America with Lee Tiger and the Florida Miccosukee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedman, Dennis

    2010-01-01

    Indigenous scholars such as Seminole/Shawnee historian, Donald Fixico, drew attention to the lack of academic literature about the proactive, planned, and strategic actions of indigenous peoples. Most histories portray indigenous peoples as responding, accommodating, and assimilating to non-Indians and the US government. This article highlights…

  11. What Is the Responsibility of Mathematics Education to the Indigenous Students That It Serves?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meaney, Tamsin; Evans, Deb

    2013-01-01

    Although refuted many times, the commonly accepted story about Indigenous communities in Australia is that they had few counting words and thus were lacking in ways to quantify amounts. In this paper, we use the case of quantifying to discuss how Indigenous mathematics can be used, not just to help Indigenous students transition into the classroom…

  12. Four Scholars Speak to Navigating the Complexities of Naming in Indigenous Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Bronwyn; Berglund, Jeff; Harris, Michelle; Poata-Smith, Evan Te Ahu

    2014-01-01

    Universities in Australia are expanding their Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies programs to include Indigenous populations from around the globe. This is also the case for the Indigenous Studies Unit at the University of Wollongong (UOW). Although systems of nomenclature in Indigenous Studies seek to be respectful of difference, the…

  13. On a Dream and a Prayer: The Promise of World Indigenous Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shreve, Bradley

    2015-01-01

    Today, Indigenous peoples worldwide are coming together to assert greater self-determination in higher education. The movement is built on shared experiences and underscores the importance of Indigenous ways of knowing. This article describes the ventures taken in pursuit of ensuring the future of higher education for Indigenous peoples. On behalf…

  14. Using Mobile Phones as Placed Resources for Literacy Learning in a Remote Indigenous Community in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auld, Glenn; Snyder, Ilana; Henderson, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Despite massive funding from the Australian government, the literacy achievement of Australian Indigenous children remains significantly lower than for non-Indigenous. With the aim of identifying innovative ways to improve Indigenous children's literacy achievement, this study explored the social practices surrounding everyday mobile phone use by…

  15. Effects of Non Indigene Discrimination on Contemporary Nigerian Society: Christian Religious Knowledge Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Njoku, Nkechi C.

    2015-01-01

    This paper was designed to look into the non-indigene discrimination that migrated into Nigerian society from European countries. Non-indigene saga is a new trend that has threatened the unity, peace and progress of Nigeria as a pluralistic nation. The paper further explores the causes, forms and effects of non-indigene discrimination. It also…

  16. Transcriptional responses of invasive and indigenous whiteflies to different host plants reveal their disparate capacity of adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hong-Xing; Hong, Yue; Zhang, Min-Zhu; Wang, Yong-Liang; Liu, Shu-Sheng; Wang, Xiao-Wei

    2015-01-01

    The whitefly Bemisia tabaci contains more than 35 cryptic species. The higher adaptability of Middle East-Asia Minor 1 (MEAM1) cryptic species has been recognized as one important factor for its invasion and displacement of other indigenous species worldwide. Here we compared the performance of the invasive MEAM1 and the indigenous Asia II 3 whitefly species following host plant transfer from a suitable host (cotton) to an unsuitable host (tobacco) and analyzed their transcriptional responses. After transfer to tobacco for 24 h, MEAM1 performed much better than Asia II 3. Transcriptional analysis showed that the patterns of gene regulation were very different with most of the genes up-regulated in MEAM1 but down-regulated in Asia II 3. Whereas carbohydrate and energy metabolisms were repressed in Asia II 3, the gene expression and protein metabolisms were activated in MEAM1. Compared to the constitutive high expression of detoxification genes in MEAM1, most of the detoxification genes were down-regulated in Asia II 3. Enzymatic activities of P450, GST and esterase further verified that the detoxification of MEAM1 was much higher than that of Asia II 3. These results reveal obvious differences in responses of MEAM1 and Asia II 3 to host transfer. PMID:26041313

  17. Genotypic characterization and safety assessment of lactic acid bacteria from indigenous African fermented food products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adimpong David B

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Indigenous fermented food products play an essential role in the diet of millions of Africans. Lactic acid bacteria (LAB are among the predominant microbial species in African indigenous fermented food products and are used for different applications in the food and biotechnology industries. Numerous studies have described antimicrobial susceptibility profiles of LAB from different parts of the world. However, there is limited information on antimicrobial resistance profiles of LAB from Africa. The aim of this study was to characterize 33 LAB previously isolated from three different African indigenous fermented food products using (GTG5-based rep-PCR, sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene and species-specific PCR techniques for differentiation of closely related species and further evaluate their antibiotic resistance profiles by the broth microdilution method and their haemolytic activity on sheep blood agar plates as indicators of safety traits among these bacteria. Results Using molecular biology based methods and selected phenotypic tests such as catalase reaction, CO2 production from glucose, colonies and cells morphology, the isolates were identified as Lactobacillus delbrueckii, Lactobacillus fermentum, Lactobacillus ghanensis, Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus salivarius, Leuconostoc pseudomesenteroides, Pediococcus acidilactici, Pediococcus pentosaceus and Weissella confusa. The bacteria were susceptible to ampicillin, chloramphenicol, clindamycin and erythromycin but resistant to vancomycin, kanamycin and streptomycin. Variable sensitivity profiles to tetracycline and gentamicin was observed among the isolates with Lb. plantarum, Lb. salivarius, W. confusa (except strain SK9-5 and Lb. fermentum strains being susceptible to tetracycline whereas Pediococcus strains and Lb. ghanensis strains were resistant. For gentamicin, Leuc. pseudomesenteroides, Lb. ghanensis and Ped. acidilactici strains were resistant to 64

  18. Indigenous peoples in Costa Rica and El Diquís hydroelectric project : indigenous identity, consultation and representation

    OpenAIRE

    Vaage, Kari

    2011-01-01

    This thesis investigates the Brunca and the Teribe, two indigenous groups in Costa Rica, and their response to a proposed hydropower development on their territories. The Costa Rican Institute of Electricity (ICE) started the first attempt in order to extract the hydropower resources on the indigenous territory in 1970 with the Boruca – Cajón Project. However, this project stagnated and today the Proyecto Hidroelélectrico El Diquís (PHED) is the current alternative of the same project, ...

  19. Indigenous Knowledge of the Edible Weaver Ant Oecophylla smaragdina Fabricius Hymenoptera: Formicidae from the Vientiane Plain, Lao PDR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joost Van Itterbeeck

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Of major importance in realizing the potential of edible insects as a core element in improving food security, sustainable food production, and biodiversity conservation, are developments in sustainable exploitation of wild edible insect populations and in (semi-cultivating and farming edible insects. Such developments can draw on both western science and indigenous knowledge. Oecophylla smaragdina Fabricius Hymenoptera: Formicidae, of which particularly the queen brood is commonly consumed in Thailand and the Lao PDR, is believed to have the potential to act as flagship/umbrella species in forest conservation and management, to be incorporated simultaneously as biological control agent and direct source of human food in agroforestry practices, and to be (semi-cultivated. We provide a detailed account of indigenous knowledge of O. smaragdina and ant brood collection practices from the Vientiane Plain, Lao PDR, through focus group discussions and participant observations, and then reflect on sustainability and conservation issues, and on semi-cultivating constraints and possibilities embedded in indigenous knowledge and ant brood collection practices. 

  20. Climatic change and indigenous and non-indigenous ravagers : a new reality?; Changements climatiques et les ravageurs indigenes et exotiques : une nouvelle realite?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Regniere, J.; Cooke, B.; Logan, J.A.; Carroll, A.; Safranyik, L. [Natural Resources Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). Canadian Forest Service

    2005-07-01

    The impact that climate change may have on ecological diversity was discussed with particular reference to the movement of indigenous and non-indigenous insects that are harmful to trees. Insects in particular, are more likely to evolve rapidly and adapt to ecological change. Those with a high rate of reproduction and which can move long distances will colonize new habitats and survive a wide range of bio-physical conditions. This PowerPoint presentation included a series of graphs, tables and charts to illustrate the increased presence of various harmful insects in northern forests, including the balsam twig aphid, balsam gall midge, gypsy moth, hemlock looper, western spruce budworm, and forest tent caterpillar. It was shown that large changes in ecosystems are expected to occur at northern latitudes and higher altitudes. tabs., figs.

  1. Reprocessing of thoria based fuel - indigenous experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper covers the indigenous experience on the reprocessing of thoria based fuel since its inception in late sixties of the last century. Basic studies were followed by establishing the THOREX flow-sheet conditions using laboratory scale mixer-settlers for the recovery of 233U alone or both 233U and Th depending upon the requirement. Since in the initial phase recovery of 233U alone was envisaged, 5% TBP-n-paraffin based solvent extraction process was established in the laboratory. The process was validated by setting up a pilot plant in the early 1970s. Thoria/thorium irradiated in the reflector region of research reactor CIRUS was dissolved in concentrated nitric acid containing fluoride and aluminium nitrate. Co-extracted thorium and fission products were scrubbed using nitric acid and the 233U was stripped with dilute nitric acid. Tail end purification of 233U was carried out by anion exchanger in 8.0M HCl medium. The recovered 233U was used in many physics experiments and also in the core of KAMINI, a unique reactor, running on 233U fuel, for neutron radiography of irradiated fuel. The recovered 233U from irradiated thoria was also used in process developments to overcome some of the shortcomings encountered in the pilot plant. Incorporating some of the developments, in the year 2002, an engineering facility viz. Uranium Thorium Separation Facility, was designed, commissioned and operated successfully at Trombay for the recovery of 233U from CIRUS irradiated thoria rods. The process for thorium recovery from THOREX raffinate was also demonstrated using 38% TBP in n-dodecane at engineering scale. Another facility viz. Power Reactor Thoria Reprocessing Facility is being constructed and is expected to be commissioned soon at Trombay for processing the irradiated zircaloy clad thoria bundles, from the initial flux flattening of PHWRs. This facility would provide rich experience as several new technologies are being adopted in the facility. A solvent extraction

  2. Site-specific distribution and competitive ability of indigenous bean-nodulating rhizobia isolated from organic fields in Minnesota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wongphatcharachai, Manoosak; Wang, Ping; Staley, Christopher; Chun, Chan Lan; Ferguson, John A; Moncada, Kristine M; Sheaffer, Craig C; Sadowsky, Michael J

    2015-11-20

    Organic dry bean production systems have received increasing interest in many regions of the US, including Minnesota. Thus, improving biological N2 fixation would be highly beneficial for organic crop production. To date, only limited work has been done to select efficient N2-fixing rhizobia for organic dry bean production. In this study, soil samples from 25 organic fields in Minnesota, with a previous cropping history of dry beans, soybeans or both, were collected during May to July 2012. Genetic diversity of indigenous dry bean-rhizobia (511 isolates) was determined by using horizontal, fluorophore-enhanced, repetitive, extragenic, and palindromic-PCR (HFERP) DNA fingerprinting and isolates were classified as belonging to 58 different genotypes. The more abundant rhizobia isolated from bean nodules comprised 35.6% of the population. None of the isolates were identical to commonly-used commercial strains used in the U.S., including Rhizobium tropici CIAT899. Seventeen predominant genotypes were shown to represent two main species, Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. phaseoli (67.1%) and Rhizobium etli (30.2%). One of the indigenous strains, orgK9, displayed efficient N2-fixation and competitive ability relative to the commercial strains tested. The lack of large numbers of indigenous dry bean-rhizobia at most study sites will be useful to avoid competition problems between inoculant strains and indigenous rhizobia. This will allow inoculation with highly effective N2-fixing rhizobia, thus resulting in improved crop productivity. Our results highlight the existence of site-specific rhizobial genotypes in different organic fields and identify strains that may prove useful as novel inoculants for organic dry bean production systems. PMID:26403588

  3. Indigenous Australian Cultural Perspectives in the Study of Geography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pring, Adele

    1999-01-01

    Explores Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander perspectives, related to geography skills (mapping, locational distribution, directional skills, locational change, decision making), on topics such as geographic place names, location of indigenous language speaking groups, traditional stories as navigational tools, shifts in population, and mining.…

  4. Dropout Prevention Initiatives for Malaysian Indigenous Orang Asli Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nor, Sharifah Md; Roslan, Samsilah; Mohamed, Aminuddin; Hassan, Kamaruddin Hj. Abu; Ali, Mohamad Azhar Mat; Manaf, Jaimah Abdul

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses dropout prevention initiatives by the Malaysian government for the disadvantaged indigenous Orang Asli people in the rural villages of Peninsular Malaysia. The roles of the Ministry of Education (MOE) as well as the Institutes of Teacher Education (ITEs) are highlighted pertaining to efforts at improving the quality of…

  5. Capacity building in indigenous men's groups and sheds across Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southcombe, Amie; Cavanagh, Jillian; Bartram, Timothy

    2015-09-01

    This article presents an investigation into capacity building, at the community level, in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Men's Groups and Sheds. As safe men's spaces, Men's Groups and Sheds represent an ever-growing social, and health and well-being community service across Australia. The study is qualitative and employs 'yarning circles' (focus groups), semi-structured interviews and observations to gather data from 15 Groups/Sheds involving 45 men from urban, regional and remote communities. We found that capacity building is primarily about securing relationships between Group Leaders/Shed Co-ordinators and Government services. Capacity building establishes links to services such as Centrelink, Medicare, Department of Housing, Probation and Control, and positive outcomes such as Indigenous men securing housing and Centrelink payments. Capacity building results in better health outcomes and, educates and empowers men to improve their social, cultural, emotional and economic well-being. It helps men to better connect with family and community. The current research paves the way for countries worldwide to explore the conceptual and empirical approach of capacity building applicable to other Indigenous [and non-Indigenous] Men's Groups/Sheds. We recommend feasibilities studies, on approaches to capacity building in Indigenous Groups/Sheds, be carried out within urban, regional and remote regions across the country. PMID:24399032

  6. Indigenous Education and Cultural Resistance: A Decolonizing Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wane, Njoki Nathani

    2009-01-01

    This article presents a review of three chapters in "Part II, Section E: Internationalizing Curriculum" of "The SAGE Handbook of Curriculum and Instruction" (F. M. Connelly, M. F. He, J. I. Phillion, Eds.; Sage Publications, 2008). These chapters ["Indigenous Resistance and Renewal: From Colonizing Practices to Self-Determination" (Donna Deyhle,…

  7. Adaptive Behaviour Assessment System: Indigenous Australian Adaptation Model (ABAS: IAAM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    du Plessis, Santie

    2015-01-01

    The study objectives were to develop, trial and evaluate a cross-cultural adaptation of the Adaptive Behavior Assessment System-Second Edition Teacher Form (ABAS-II TF) ages 5-21 for use with Indigenous Australian students ages 5-14. This study introduced a multiphase mixed-method design with semi-structured and informal interviews, school…

  8. The Legacy of Racism and Indigenous Australian Identity within Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodkin-Andrews, Gawaian; Carlson, Bronwyn

    2016-01-01

    It may be argued that the emerging discourses focusing on the social, emotional, educational, and economic disadvantages identified for Australia's First Peoples (when compared to their non-Indigenous counterparts) are becoming increasingly dissociated with an understanding of the interplay between historical and current trends in racism.…

  9. Biodiverse planting for carbon and biodiversity on indigenous land.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renwick, Anna R; Robinson, Catherine J; Martin, Tara G; May, Tracey; Polglase, Phil; Possingham, Hugh P; Carwardine, Josie

    2014-01-01

    Carbon offset mechanisms have been established to mitigate climate change through changes in land management. Regulatory frameworks enable landowners and managers to generate saleable carbon credits on domestic and international markets. Identifying and managing the associated co-benefits and dis-benefits involved in the adoption of carbon offset projects is important for the projects to contribute to the broader goal of sustainable development and the provision of benefits to the local communities. So far it has been unclear how Indigenous communities can benefit from such initiatives. We provide a spatial analysis of the carbon and biodiversity potential of one offset method, planting biodiverse native vegetation, on Indigenous land across Australia. We discover significant potential for opportunities for Indigenous communities to achieve carbon sequestration and biodiversity goals through biodiverse plantings, largely in southern and eastern Australia, but the economic feasibility of these projects depend on carbon market assumptions. Our national scale cost-effectiveness analysis is critical to enable Indigenous communities to maximise the benefits available to them through participation in carbon offset schemes. PMID:24637736

  10. Biodiverse planting for carbon and biodiversity on indigenous land.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna R Renwick

    Full Text Available Carbon offset mechanisms have been established to mitigate climate change through changes in land management. Regulatory frameworks enable landowners and managers to generate saleable carbon credits on domestic and international markets. Identifying and managing the associated co-benefits and dis-benefits involved in the adoption of carbon offset projects is important for the projects to contribute to the broader goal of sustainable development and the provision of benefits to the local communities. So far it has been unclear how Indigenous communities can benefit from such initiatives. We provide a spatial analysis of the carbon and biodiversity potential of one offset method, planting biodiverse native vegetation, on Indigenous land across Australia. We discover significant potential for opportunities for Indigenous communities to achieve carbon sequestration and biodiversity goals through biodiverse plantings, largely in southern and eastern Australia, but the economic feasibility of these projects depend on carbon market assumptions. Our national scale cost-effectiveness analysis is critical to enable Indigenous communities to maximise the benefits available to them through participation in carbon offset schemes.

  11. Oil frontiers and indigenous resistance in the Peruvian Amazon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orta-Martinez, Marti [ICTA, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Finer, Matt [Save America' s Forests, 4 Library Court. NW, Washington DC 20003 (United States)

    2010-12-15

    The Peruvian Amazon is culturally and biologically one of the most diverse regions on Earth. Since the 1920s oil exploration and extraction in the region have threatened both biodiversity and indigenous peoples, particularly those living in voluntary isolation. We argue that the phenomenon of peak oil, combined with rising demand and consumption, is now pushing oil extraction into the most remote corners of the world. Modern patterns of production and consumption and high oil prices are forcing a new oil exploratory boom in the Peruvian Amazon. While conflicts spread on indigenous territories, new forms of resistance appear and indigenous political organizations are born and become more powerful. The impacts of oil exploration and exploitation and indigenous resistance throughout the oil history of the Peruvian Amazon are reviewed here, focusing on the Achuar people in Rio Corrientes. The driving forces, impacts, and responses to the current oil exploration boom are analyzed from an environmental justice perspective. We conclude that, in a context of peak oil and growing global demand for oil, such devastating effects for minor quantities of oil are likely to increase and impact other remote parts of the world. (author)

  12. Indigenous knowledge as decision support tool in rainwater harvesting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbilinyi, B. P.; Tumbo, S. D.; Mahoo, H. F.; Senkondo, E. M.; Hatibu, N.

    Rainfall patterns in semi-arid areas are typically highly variable, both spatially and temporally. As a result, people who rely completely on rainwater for their survival have over the centuries developed indigenous knowledge/techniques to harvest rainwater. These traditional water-harvesting systems have been sustainable for centuries. The reason for this is that they are compatible with local lifestyles, local institutional patterns and local social systems. In order to develop sustainable strategies, it is therefore important to take into account of, and learn from, what local people already know and do, and to build on this. This paper explores how indigenous knowledge is used by farmers in the Makanya catchment, Kilimanjaro region, Tanzania to identify potential sites for rainwater harvesting (RWH). The paper draws on participatory research methods including focus group discussions, key informant interviews, field visits and participatory workshops. Initial findings indicate that farmers do hold a substantial amount of knowledge about the resources around them. As there are spatially typical aspects to indigenous knowledge, it could be extrapolated over a wider geographic extent. From the preliminary findings, it is being recommended that geographic information system (GIS) could be an important tool to collect and upscale the utility of diverse indigenous knowledge in the decision-making process.

  13. GENE POOL OF INDIGENOUS GRAPE VARIETIES AND INTRODUCENTS IN ABKHAZIA

    OpenAIRE

    Aiba V. S.; Troshin L. P.; Kravchenko R. V.

    2014-01-01

    This article provides an overview of results of the conducting surveys on screening and saving gene pool of indigenous grape varieties in the Republic of Abkhazia, which contributed to detection and identification of the 15 previously described in the literature of Abkhazian native grape varieties

  14. Historical and Contemporary Policies of Indigenous Education in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahmad, Salomon

    1998-01-01

    Historically, Mexican education for indigenous children has reinforced linguistic ethnocide and assimilation in inefficient schools of low educational quality. Assimilationist policies generated interethnic, political, and economic conflicts. Recent constitutional changes resulted in minimal changes nationally, but a recent Oaxacan law protects…

  15. Australian Indigenous Perspectives on Quality Assurance in Children's Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchins, Teresa; Frances, Katie; Saggers, Sherry

    2009-01-01

    The Australian Government has recently committed to the development of an integrated system of assuring national quality standards for Australian childcare and preschool services (Australian Government, 2008). This article addresses two fundamental issues relating to the development of an integrated system as it applies to Indigenous children's…

  16. Reflecting User-Created Persona in Indigenous Namibia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gonzalez-Cabrero, Daniel; Koch Kapuire, Gereon; Winschiers-Theophilus, Heike; Stanley, Colin; Rodil, Kasper; Abdelnour Nocera, José

    This paper presents the initial experiences and reflective accounts on the arrival of a European research colleague who recently joined our team of researchers working with Indigenous communities in Namibia. He aims to explore how communities across Namibia take on, understand and create persona...

  17. Indigenous Mexican Culture and Chicana/o Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godina, Heriberto

    The Xinachtli Project, implemented by Chicano activists in Phoenix (Arizona) and El Paso (Texas), addresses the loss of ancestral culture by public school students of Mexican ancestry. The project teaches indigenous Mexican culture to students and their teachers through a series of presentations and lectures on Aztec dance, mathematics, language,…

  18. The Development of Indigenous Counseling in Contemporary Confucian Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Kwang-Kuo

    2009-01-01

    In view of the limitations of mainstream Western psychology, the necessity of indigenous psychology for the development of global community psychology is discussed in the context of multiculturalism. In addition to this general introduction, four articles underlying a common theme were designed to discuss (a) various types of value conflicts…

  19. Citizens and indigenous peoples in the populist state

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilson, Fiona

    2005-01-01

    The paper analyzes how post-colonial elites in the Peruvian Andes were able to remove an indigenous presence from the towns. This was done through recourse to a discourse of hygiene and (Indian) disease and by transforming ideas of shared urban space (the commons) into a new excluding urban public...

  20. Using Mixed Media Tools for Eliciting Discourse in Indigenous Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldecott, Marion; Koch, Karsten

    2014-01-01

    Prosody plays a vital role in communication, but is one of the most widely neglected topics in language documentation. This omission is doubly detrimental since intonation is unrecoverable from transcribed texts, the most prevalent data sources for many indigenous languages. One of the underlying reasons for the dearth of prosodic data is…