WorldWideScience

Sample records for areas technical activities

  1. Technical standards in nuclear area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The technical standardization in nuclear area is discussed. Also, the competence of CNEN in standardization pursuit is analysed. Moreover, the process of working up of technical standards is explained; in addition, some kinds of technical standards are discussed. (author)

  2. Passive and active soil gas sampling at the Mixed Waste Landfill, Technical Area III, Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Environmental Restoration Project at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico is tasked with assessing and remediating the Mixed Waste Landfill in Technical Area III. The Mixed Waste Landfill is a 2.6 acre, inactive radioactive and mixed waste disposal site. In 1993 and 1994, an extensive passive and active soil gas sampling program was undertaken to identify and quantify volatile organic compounds in the subsurface at the landfill. Passive soil gas surveys identified levels of PCE, TCE, 1,1, 1-TCA, toluene, 1,1,2-trichlorotrifluoroethane, dichloroethyne, and acetone above background. Verification by active soil gas sampling confirmed concentrations of PCE, TCE, 1,1,1-TCA, and 1,1,2-trichloro-1,2,2-trifluoroethane at depths of 10 and 30 feet below ground surface. In addition, dichlorodifluoroethane and trichlorofluoromethane were detected during active soil gas sampling. All of the volatile organic compounds detected during the active soil gas survey were present in the low ppb range

  3. Integrating Science with Technical and Vocational Areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Larry; Shreckengast, Craig

    This guide presents learning activities and lesson plans that integrate science with technical and vocational areas. Activities and plans are organized under broad headings such as Environmental Science and Acid Rain Research; Criminal Justice, Chemistry, and Narcotics; Children's Education and Services; Cosmetology; and Health Professions.…

  4. Technical planning activity: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In April 1985, the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Fusion Energy commissioned the Technical Planning Activity (TPA). The purpose of this activity was to develop a technical planning methodology and prepare technical plans in support of the strategic and policy framework of the Magnetic Fusion Program Plan issued by DOE in February 1985. Although this report represents the views of only the US magnetic fusion community, it is international in scope in the sense that the technical plans contained herein describe the full scope of the tasks that are prerequisites for the commercialization of fusion energy. The TPA has developed a well-structured methodology that includes detailed definitions of technical issues, definitions of program areas and elements, statements of research and development objectives, identification of key decision points and milestones, and descriptions of facility requirements

  5. Technical planning activity: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-01-01

    In April 1985, the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Fusion Energy commissioned the Technical Planning Activity (TPA). The purpose of this activity was to develop a technical planning methodology and prepare technical plans in support of the strategic and policy framework of the Magnetic Fusion Program Plan issued by DOE in February 1985. Although this report represents the views of only the US magnetic fusion community, it is international in scope in the sense that the technical plans contained herein describe the full scope of the tasks that are prerequisites for the commercialization of fusion energy. The TPA has developed a well-structured methodology that includes detailed definitions of technical issues, definitions of program areas and elements, statements of research and development objectives, identification of key decision points and milestones, and descriptions of facility requirements.

  6. 200 Area Interim Storage Area Technical Safety Requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 200 Area Interim Storage Area Technical Safety Requirements define administrative controls and design features required to ensure safe operation during receipt and storage of canisters containing spent nuclear fuel. This document is based on the 200 Area Interim Storage Area, Annex D, Final Safety Analysis Report which contains information specific to the 200 Area Interim Storage Area

  7. ITER EDA technical activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Six years of technical work under the ITER EDA Agreement have resulted in a design which constitutes a complete description of the ITER device and of its auxiliary systems and facilities. The ITER Council commented that the Final Design Report provides the first comprehensive design of a fusion reactor based on well established physics and technology

  8. 100-D Area technical baseline report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carpenter, R.W.

    1993-08-20

    This document is prepared in support of the 100 Area Environmental Restoration activity at the US Department of Energy`s Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. It provides a technical baseline of waste sites located at the 100-D Area. The report is based on an environmental investigation undertaken by the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) History Office in support of the Environmental Restoration Engineering Function and on review and evaluation of numerous Hanford Site current and historical reports, drawings, and photographs, supplemented by site inspections and employee interviews. No intrusive field investigation or sampling was conducted. All Hanford coordinate locations are approximate locations taken from several different maps and drawings of the 100-D Area. Every effort was made to derive coordinate locations for the center of each facility or waste site, except where noted, using standard measuring devices. Units of measure are shown as they appear in reference documents. The 100-D Area is made up of three operable units: 100-DR-1, 100-DR-2, and 100-DR-3. All three are addressed in this report. These operable units include liquid and solid waste disposal sites in the vicinity of, and related to, the 100-D and 100-DR Reactors. A fourth operable unit, 100-HR-3, is concerned with groundwater and is not addressed here. This report describes waste sites which include cribs, trenches, pits, french drains, retention basins, solid waste burial grounds, septic tanks, and drain fields. Each waste site is described separately and photographs are provided where available. A complete list of photographs can be found in Appendix A. A comprehensive environmental summary is not provided here but may be found in Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act Characterization (Cushing 1988), which describes the geology and soils, meteorology, hydrology, land use, population, and air quality of the area.

  9. 100-D Area technical baseline report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document is prepared in support of the 100 Area Environmental Restoration activity at the US Department of Energy's Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. It provides a technical baseline of waste sites located at the 100-D Area. The report is based on an environmental investigation undertaken by the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) History Office in support of the Environmental Restoration Engineering Function and on review and evaluation of numerous Hanford Site current and historical reports, drawings, and photographs, supplemented by site inspections and employee interviews. No intrusive field investigation or sampling was conducted. All Hanford coordinate locations are approximate locations taken from several different maps and drawings of the 100-D Area. Every effort was made to derive coordinate locations for the center of each facility or waste site, except where noted, using standard measuring devices. Units of measure are shown as they appear in reference documents. The 100-D Area is made up of three operable units: 100-DR-1, 100-DR-2, and 100-DR-3. All three are addressed in this report. These operable units include liquid and solid waste disposal sites in the vicinity of, and related to, the 100-D and 100-DR Reactors. A fourth operable unit, 100-HR-3, is concerned with groundwater and is not addressed here. This report describes waste sites which include cribs, trenches, pits, french drains, retention basins, solid waste burial grounds, septic tanks, and drain fields. Each waste site is described separately and photographs are provided where available. A complete list of photographs can be found in Appendix A. A comprehensive environmental summary is not provided here but may be found in Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act Characterization (Cushing 1988), which describes the geology and soils, meteorology, hydrology, land use, population, and air quality of the area

  10. Areas and programmes of technical assistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cooperation between the Atomic Energy Commission of Costa Rica, and the International Atomic Energy Agency, has permitted to carry out programmes and projects which agree with the national objectives of development. In the areas of environmental hydrology; physical sciences and chemistry; industry and geological sciences; health and animal production; biological sciences, agriculture and alimentation; scientific and technical information. (author)

  11. Implementing waste minimization at an active plutonium processing facility: Successes and progress at technical area (TA) -55 of the Los Alamos National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory has ongoing national security missions that necessitate increased plutonium processing. The bulk of this activity occurs at Technical Area -55 (TA-55), the nations only operable plutonium facility. TA-55 has developed and demonstrated a number of technologies that significantly minimize waste generation in plutonium processing (supercritical CO2, Mg(OH)2 precipitation, supercritical H2O oxidation, WAND), disposition of excess fissile materials (hydride-dehydride, electrolytic decontamination), disposition of historical waste inventories (salt distillation), and Decontamination ampersand Decommissioning (D ampersand D) of closed nuclear facilities (electrolytic decontamination). Furthermore, TA-55 is in the process of developing additional waste minimization technologies (molten salt oxidation, nitric acid recycle, americium extraction) that will significantly reduce ongoing waste generation rates and allow volume reduction of existing waste streams. Cost savings from reduction in waste volumes to be managed and disposed far exceed development and deployment costs in every case. Waste minimization is also important because it reduces occupational exposure to ionizing radiation, risks of transportation accidents, and transfer of burdens from current nuclear operations to future generations

  12. The Agency's technical co-operation activities in 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document reviews the IAEA's Technical Cooperation activities for 1993. Apart from an overview, the report contains reviews by Agency programmes and technical divisions, by area, by component and by fund. Summaries of project implementation are also included, as well as indications of the achievements of projects completed in 1993

  13. Mixed waste focus area technical baseline report. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Department of Energy (DOE) established the Mixed Waste Characterization, Treatment, and Disposal Focus Area (MWFA) to develop and facilitate implementation of technologies required to meet the Department's commitments for treatment of mixed low-level and transuranic wastes. The mission of the MWFA is to provide acceptable technologies, developed in partnership with end-users, stakeholders, tribal governments, and regulators, that enable implementation of mixed waste treatment systems. To accomplish this mission, a technical baseline was established in 1996 that forms the basis for determining which technology development activities will be supported by the MWFA. This technical baseline is revised on an annual basis to reflect changes in the DOE Mixed Waste Management strategies, changes in the MWFA technical baseline development process, and MWFA accomplishments. This report presents the first revision to the technical baseline and the resulting prioritized list of deficiencies that the MWFA will address. This report also reflects a higher level of stakeholder involvement in the prioritization of the deficiencies. This document summarizes the data and the assumptions upon which this work was based, as well as information concerning the DOE Office of Environmental Management (EM) mixed waste technology development needs

  14. 100-B area technical baseline report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document supports the environmental remediation effort of the 100-B Area by providing remediation planners with key data that characterize the 100-B and 100-C Reactor sites. It provides operational histories of the 100-B and 100-C Reactors and each of their associated liquid and solid waste sites

  15. 100-B area technical baseline report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carpenter, R.W.

    1994-09-01

    This document supports the environmental remediation effort of the 100-B Area by providing remediation planners with key data that characterize the 100-B and 100-C Reactor sites. It provides operational histories of the 100-B and 100-C Reactors and each of their associated liquid and solid waste sites.

  16. Corrective measures evaluation work plan Technical Area V groundwater.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lebow, Patrick S.; Dettmers, Dana L.; Hall, Kevin A.

    2004-04-01

    This document, which is prepared as directed by the Compliance Order on Consent (COOC) issued by the New Mexico Environment Department, identifies and outlines a process to evaluate remedial alternatives to identify a corrective measure for the Sandia National Laboratories New Mexico Technical Area (TA)-V Groundwater. The COOC provides guidance for implementation of a Corrective Measures Evaluation (CME) for the TA-V Groundwater. This Work Plan documents an initial screening of remedial technologies and presents a list of possible remedial alternatives for those technologies that passed the screening. This Work Plan outlines the methods for evaluating these remedial alternatives and describes possible site-specific evaluation activities necessary to estimate remedy effectiveness and cost. These methods will be reported in the CME Report. This Work Plan outlines the CME Report, including key components and a description of the corrective measures process.

  17. Sources of transportation expertise by selected technical areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) has assigned components of its Waste Transportation Program to three of the DOE Operations offices. The DOE Oak Ridge Operations Office (ORO) is responsible for the transportation operations design, development, acquisition, testing, implementation, and program management, including the equipment, facilities, and services of the transportation system. Within ORO, the OCRWM transportation component is assigned to the Transportation Operations Project Office (TOPO). The specific activities involved in the ORO/TOPO include procurement, operational testing, inspection, logistics, interfaces, maintenance, management and improvements, and system operation. Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU) has developed (and will maintain and enhance) a data base of sources of transportation expertise in selected technical areas for ORO. The data base includes individuals and organizations who have indicated that they have capabilities and interest in assisting ORO in the design, development, implementation, and management of the OCRWM transportation system. This assistance might be in the form of consulting or subcontract work and/or participation in peer review panels, technical evaluation committees, workshops, advisory groups, etc. This initial project was completed in the four month period of January 30, 1987 through May 31, 1987

  18. Technical area status report for chemical/physical treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) was established by the Department of Energy (DOE) to direct and coordinate waste management and site remediation programs and activities throughout the DOE Complex. The Mixed Waste Integrated Program (MWIP) was created by the DOE Office of Technology Development (OTD) to develop, deploy, and complete appropriate technologies for the treatment of an DOE low-level mixed waste (LLMW). The MWIP mission includes development of strategies related to enhanced waste form production, improvements to and testing of the EM-30 baseline flowsheet for mixed waste treatment, programmatic oversight for ongoing technical projects, and specific technical tasks related to the site specific Federal Facilities Compliance Agreement (FFCA). The MWIP has established five Technical Support Groups (TSGs) based on primary functional areas of the Mixed Waste Treatment Plant) identified by EM-30. These TSGs are: (1) Front-End Waste Handling, (2) Chemical/Physical Treatment, (3) Waste Destruction and Stabilization, (4) Second-stage Destruction and Offgas Treatment, and (5) Final Waste Forms. The focus of this document is the Chemical/Physical Treatment System (CPTS). The CPTS performs the required pretreatment and/or separations on the waste streams passing through the system for discharge to the environment or efficient downstream processing. Downstream processing can include all system components except Front-End Waste Handling. The primary separations to be considered by the CPTS are: (1) removal of suspended and dissolved solids from aqueous and liquid organic streams, (2) separation of water from organic liquids, (3) treatment of wet and dry solids, including separation into constituents as required, for subsequent thermal treatment and final form processing, (4) mercury removal and control, and (5) decontamination of equipment and waste classified as debris

  19. Technical area status report for waste destruction and stabilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalton, J.D.; Harris, T.L.; DeWitt, L.M. [Science Applications International Corp., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1993-08-01

    The Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) was established by the Department of Energy (DOE) to direct and coordinate waste management and site remediation programs/activities throughout the DOE complex. In order to successfully achieve the goal of properly managing waste and the cleanup of the DOE sites, the EM was divided into five organizations: the Office of Planning and Resource Management (EM-10); the Office of Environmental Quality Assurance and Resource Management (EM-20); the Office of Waste Operations (EM-30); the Office of Environmental Restoration (EM-40); and the Office of Technology and Development (EM-50). The mission of the Office of Technology Development (OTD) is to develop treatment technologies for DOE`s operational and environmental restoration wastes where current treatment technologies are inadequate or not available. The Mixed Waste Integrated Program (MWIP) was created by OTD to assist in the development of treatment technologies for the DOE mixed low-level wastes (MLLW). The MWIP has established five Technical Support Groups (TSGs) whose purpose is to identify, evaluate, and develop treatment technologies within five general technical areas representing waste treatment functions from initial waste handling through generation of final waste forms. These TSGs are: (1) Front-End Waste Handling, (2) Physical/Chemical Treatment, (3) Waste Destruction and Stabilization, (4) Second-Stage Destruction and Offgas Treatment, and (5) Final Waste Forms. This report describes the functions of the Waste Destruction and Stabilization (WDS) group. Specifically, the following items are discussed: DOE waste stream identification; summary of previous efforts; summary of WDS treatment technologies; currently funded WDS activities; and recommendations for future activities.

  20. Technical area status report for waste destruction and stabilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) was established by the Department of Energy (DOE) to direct and coordinate waste management and site remediation programs/activities throughout the DOE complex. In order to successfully achieve the goal of properly managing waste and the cleanup of the DOE sites, the EM was divided into five organizations: the Office of Planning and Resource Management (EM-10); the Office of Environmental Quality Assurance and Resource Management (EM-20); the Office of Waste Operations (EM-30); the Office of Environmental Restoration (EM-40); and the Office of Technology and Development (EM-50). The mission of the Office of Technology Development (OTD) is to develop treatment technologies for DOE's operational and environmental restoration wastes where current treatment technologies are inadequate or not available. The Mixed Waste Integrated Program (MWIP) was created by OTD to assist in the development of treatment technologies for the DOE mixed low-level wastes (MLLW). The MWIP has established five Technical Support Groups (TSGs) whose purpose is to identify, evaluate, and develop treatment technologies within five general technical areas representing waste treatment functions from initial waste handling through generation of final waste forms. These TSGs are: (1) Front-End Waste Handling, (2) Physical/Chemical Treatment, (3) Waste Destruction and Stabilization, (4) Second-Stage Destruction and Offgas Treatment, and (5) Final Waste Forms. This report describes the functions of the Waste Destruction and Stabilization (WDS) group. Specifically, the following items are discussed: DOE waste stream identification; summary of previous efforts; summary of WDS treatment technologies; currently funded WDS activities; and recommendations for future activities

  1. Alternatives to incineration. Technical area status report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwinkendorf, W.E. [BDM Federal, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); McFee, J.; Devarakonda, M. [International Technology Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Nenninger, L.L.; Fadullon, F.S. [Science Applications International Corp., Gaithersburg, MD (United States); Donaldson, T.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Dickerson, K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)]|[Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, Golden, CO (United States)

    1995-04-01

    Recently, the DOE`s Mixed Waste Integrated Program (MWIP) (superseded by the Mixed Waste Focus Area) initiated an evaluation of alternatives to incineration to identify technologies capable of treating DOE organically contaminated mixed wastes and which may be more easily permitted. These technologies have the potential of alleviating stakeholder concerns by decreasing off-gas volurties and the associated emissions of particulates, volatilized metals and radionuclides, PICs, NO{sub x}, SO{sub x}, and recombination products (dioxins and furans). Ideally, the alternate technology would be easily permitted, relatively omnivorous and effective in treating a variety of wastes with varying constituents, require minimal pretreatment or characterization, and be easy to implement. In addition, it would produce secondary waste stream volumes significantly smaller than the original waste stream, and would minimize the environmental health and safety effects on workers and the public. The purpose of this report is to provide an up-to-date (as of early 1995) compendium of iternative technologies for designers of mixed waste treatment facilities, and to identify Iternate technologies that may merit funding for further development. Various categories of non-thermal and thermal technologies have been evaluated and are summarized in Table ES-1. Brief descriptions of these technologies are provided in Section 1.7 of the Introduction. This report provides a detailed description of approximately 30 alternative technologies in these categories. Included in the report are descriptions of each technology; applicable input waste streams and the characteristics of the secondary, or output, waste streams; the current status of each technology relative to its availability for implementation; performance data; and costs. This information was gleaned from the open literature, governments reports, and discussions with principal investigators and developers.

  2. Alternatives to incineration. Technical area status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, the DOE's Mixed Waste Integrated Program (MWIP) (superseded by the Mixed Waste Focus Area) initiated an evaluation of alternatives to incineration to identify technologies capable of treating DOE organically contaminated mixed wastes and which may be more easily permitted. These technologies have the potential of alleviating stakeholder concerns by decreasing off-gas volurties and the associated emissions of particulates, volatilized metals and radionuclides, PICs, NOx, SOx, and recombination products (dioxins and furans). Ideally, the alternate technology would be easily permitted, relatively omnivorous and effective in treating a variety of wastes with varying constituents, require minimal pretreatment or characterization, and be easy to implement. In addition, it would produce secondary waste stream volumes significantly smaller than the original waste stream, and would minimize the environmental health and safety effects on workers and the public. The purpose of this report is to provide an up-to-date (as of early 1995) compendium of iternative technologies for designers of mixed waste treatment facilities, and to identify Iternate technologies that may merit funding for further development. Various categories of non-thermal and thermal technologies have been evaluated and are summarized in Table ES-1. Brief descriptions of these technologies are provided in Section 1.7 of the Introduction. This report provides a detailed description of approximately 30 alternative technologies in these categories. Included in the report are descriptions of each technology; applicable input waste streams and the characteristics of the secondary, or output, waste streams; the current status of each technology relative to its availability for implementation; performance data; and costs. This information was gleaned from the open literature, governments reports, and discussions with principal investigators and developers

  3. Technical Basis Document for PFP Area Monitoring Dosimetry Program

    CERN Document Server

    Cooper, J R

    2000-01-01

    This document describes the phantom dosimetry used for the PFP Area Monitoring program and establishes the basis for the Plutonium Finishing Plant's (PFP) area monitoring dosimetry program in accordance with the following requirements: Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), part 835, ''Occupational Radiation Protection'' Part 835.403; Hanford Site Radiological Control Manual (HSRCM-1), Part 514; HNF-PRO-382, Area Dosimetry Program; and PNL-MA-842, Hanford External Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual.

  4. Tanks Focus Area FY98 midyear technical review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlahta, S.N.; Brouns, T.M.

    1998-06-01

    The Tanks Focus Area (TFA) serves as the DOE`s Office of Environmental Management`s national technology and solution development program for radioactive waste tank remediation. Its technical scope covers the major functions that comprise a complete tank remediation system: waste retrieval, waste pretreatment, waste immobilization, tank closure, and characterization of both the waste and tank with safety integrated into all the functions. In total, 17 technologies and technical solutions were selected for review. The purpose of each review was to understand the state of development of each technology selected for review and to identify issues to be resolved before the technology or technical solution progressed to the next level of maturity. The reviewers provided detailed technical and programmatic recommendations and comments. The disposition of these recommendations and comments and their impact on the program is documented in this report.

  5. Tanks Focus Area FY98 midyear technical review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Tanks Focus Area (TFA) serves as the DOE's Office of Environmental Management's national technology and solution development program for radioactive waste tank remediation. Its technical scope covers the major functions that comprise a complete tank remediation system: waste retrieval, waste pretreatment, waste immobilization, tank closure, and characterization of both the waste and tank with safety integrated into all the functions. In total, 17 technologies and technical solutions were selected for review. The purpose of each review was to understand the state of development of each technology selected for review and to identify issues to be resolved before the technology or technical solution progressed to the next level of maturity. The reviewers provided detailed technical and programmatic recommendations and comments. The disposition of these recommendations and comments and their impact on the program is documented in this report

  6. The Agency's technical co-operation activities in 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report on the International Atomic Energy Agency's Technical Co-operation Activities in 1992 contains an overview of the general issues involved, including both in-house and external developments, resources and delivery, and evaluation of programs; an overview by field of activity and by division within the Agency; an overview by geographic area, distinguishing (i) Africa, (ii) Asia and the Pacific, (iii) Latin America, (iv) and the Middle East and Europe; an overview by component (i.e., experts, equipment, fellowships, training courses, sub-contracts and miscellaneous); and an overview by fund technical assistance and co-operation fund, extrabudgetary resources, United Nations Development Program (UNDP), assistance in kind. It also contains a profile on technical co-operation activities in Latin America. Projects concluded during 1992 are listed together with a description of their achievements. It concludes with implementation summaries. 10 figs, 9 tabs

  7. The roots of gender inequity in technical areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, James Reed

    This article describes a study of the academic self-concepts, attributions and achievements of male and female Asian American and Caucasian students who won Westinghouse Awards in 1984 and 1985. The results of the study showed that fewer Caucasian female recipients anticipated college majors in the technical areas. Furthermore, this group of females scored lower on both parts of the SAT, scored lower on all of the self-concept scales, and also scored lower on both attribution scales. In contrast, the Asian females optimized courses for the gifted and specialized research courses to distance themselves from the American females in almost all areas. The author linked these ethnic, gender differences to underlying psychological and sociological forces that are responsible for the self-concept and attribution differences. It is these forces that must be altered for Caucasian females to rectify the gender inequalities that exist in the technical areas.

  8. Identification of Vital Areas at Nuclear Facilities. Technical Guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The possibility that nuclear or other radioactive material could be used for malicious purposes cannot be ruled out in the current global situation. States have responded to this risk by engaging in a collective commitment to strengthen the protection and control of such material and to effectively respond to nuclear security events. States have agreed to strengthen existing and established new international legal instruments to enhance nuclear security around the world. Nuclear security is fundamental in the management of nuclear technologies and in applications where nuclear or other radioactive material is used or transported. Through its nuclear security programme, the IAEA supports States to establish, maintain and sustain an effective nuclear security regime. The IAEA has adopted a comprehensive approach to nuclear security. This recognizes that an effective national nuclear security regime builds on: the implementation of relevant international legal instruments; information protection; physical protection; material accounting and control; detection of and response to trafficking in such material; national response plans; and contingency measures. With its nuclear security series, the IAEA aims to assist States to implement and sustain such a regime in a coherent and integrated manner. The IAEA Nuclear Security Series comprises: Nuclear Security Fundamentals, which include objectives and essential elements of a State?s nuclear security regime; Recommendations; Implementing Guides; and Technical Guidance publications. Each State carries the full responsibility for nuclear security, i.e. to provide for the security of nuclear and other radioactive material and associated facilities and activities; to ensure the security of such material in use, storage or in transport; and to combat illicit trafficking and the inadvertent movement of such material. It should also be prepared to respond to a nuclear security event. The IAEA recommendations for the protection of

  9. PUREX Plant aggregate area management study technical baseline report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The PUREX aggregate area is made up of six operable units; 200-PO-1 through 200-PO-6 and consists of liquid and solid waste disposal sites in the vicinity of, and related to, PUREX Plant operations. This report describes PUREX and its waste sites, including cribs, french drains, septic tanks and drain fields, trenches and ditches, ponds, catch tanks, settling tanks, diversion boxes, underground tank farms, and the lines and encasements that connect them. Each waste site in the aggregate area is described separately. Close relationships between waste units, such as overflow from one to another, are also discussed. This document provides a technical baseline of the aggregate area and results from an environmental investigation. This document is based upon review and evaluation of numerous Hanford Site current and historical reports, drawings and photographs, supplemented with site inspections and employee interviews. No intrusive field investigations or sampling were conducted

  10. Supplemental Technical Data Summary M-Area Groundwater Investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marine, I.W., Bledsoe, H.W. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States)

    1995-10-01

    This supplement to the Preliminary Technical Data Summary (TDS) (Gordon, 1982) presents the state of knowledge on the hydrogeology and contaminant plume characteristics in the vicinity of M Area as of October 1984. As discussed in the previous TDS, the contaminants consist of organic solvents used for metal degreasing, namely trichloroethylene, tetrachloroethylene, and 1,1,1-trichloroethane. Since the issuance of the previous TDS, the groundwater consulting firm of Geraghty & Miller, Inc. has been retained to assist with program strategy, planning, and investigative techniques

  11. Corrective measures evaluation report for technical area-v groundwater.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Witt, Johnathan L (North Wind, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID); Orr, Brennon R. (North Wind, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID); Dettmers, Dana L. (North Wind, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID); Hall, Kevin A. (North Wind, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID); Howard, Hope (North Wind, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID)

    2005-07-01

    This Corrective Measures Evaluation Report was prepared as directed by the Compliance Order on Consent issued by the New Mexico Environment Department to document the process of selecting the preferred remedial alternative for contaminated groundwater at Technical Area V. Supporting information includes background information about the site conditions and potential receptors and an overview of work performed during the Corrective Measures Evaluation. Evaluation of remedial alternatives included identification and description of four remedial alternatives, an overview of the evaluation criteria and approach, qualitative and quantitative evaluation of remedial alternatives, and selection of the preferred remedial alternative. As a result of the Corrective Measures Evaluation, it was determined that monitored natural attenuation of all contaminants of concern (trichloroethene, tetrachloroethene, and nitrate) was the preferred remedial alternative for implementation as the corrective measure to remediate contaminated groundwater at Technical Area V of Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico. Finally, design criteria to meet cleanup goals and objectives and the corrective measures implementation schedule for the preferred remedial alternative are presented.

  12. U Plant Aggregate Area Management study technical baseline report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document was prepared in support of an Aggregate Area Management Study of U Plant. It provides a technical baseline of the aggregate area and results from an environmental investigation that was undertaken by the Technical Baseline Section of the Environmental Engineering Group, Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC), which is currently the Waste Site and Facility Research Office, Natural Resources, Bechtel Hanford, Inc. (BHI). It is based upon review and evaluation of numerous Hanford Site current and historical reports, drawings and photographs, supplemented with site inspections and employee interviews. U Plant refers to the 221-U Process Canyon Building, a chemical separation facility constructed during World War II. It also includes the Uranium Oxide (UO3) Plant constructed at the same time as 221-U as an adjunct to the original plutonium separation process but which, like 221-U, was converted for other missions. Waste sites are associated primarily with U Plant's 1952 through 1958 Uranium Metal Recovery Program mission and the U03 Plant's ongoing U03 mission. Waste sites include cribs, reverse wells, french drains, septic tanks and drain fields, trenches, catch tanks, settling tanks, diversion boxes, a waste vault, and the lines and encasements that connect them. It also includes the U Pond and its feed ditches and an underground tank farm designed for high-level liquid wastes

  13. Update of technical coordinating committee activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarado, R.A.

    1995-12-31

    The Technical Coordinating Committee has its origins in the earliest days of implementing the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act. Between 1982 and 1985, individuals in several of the states felt that coordination among the states would be beneficial to all by affording states a cost-effective method for sharing ideas, discussing alternatives, and presenting solutions to common problems. At the current time, the committee comprises members from each of the sited states. Various compacts, federal agencies, and industry groups participate in committee activities. The Low-Level Management Program provides support for the committee through the provision of logistical support and limited manpower allocation. Activities of the committee have recently focused on waste treatment and minimization technologies. The committee also has worked diligently to see the review of the 3RSTAT computer code completed. The committee has taken a position on various regulatory proposals the past year. The committee expects to continue its work until new sites are brought online.

  14. Technical Support Activities of a Nuclear Materials Management Programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of a nuclear materials management programme in the United States of America has recognized from its inception the value and need of strong technical support. The success of that programme has depended to a large extent on the development of a closely allied technical support effort. This effort has drawn on the technical competency of top governmental, industrial and academic consultants, in addition to that within the USAEC. Under the planning, development and administration of the USAEC's Division of Nuclear Materials Management, a broad spectrum of technical activities has evolved. These include: (a) The establishment of an Advisory Committee for Standard Reference Materials and Methods of Measurement, (b) Preparation and USAEC co-ordination with the National Bureau of Standards in the development of a series of uranium and plutonium chemical and isotopic standards, (c) Research and development programmes designed to provide improved measurement techniques, (d) Compilation and publication of a book of selected measurement methods for uranium and plutonium. Each of these technical support activities is discussed in some detail, including the conditions that gave rise to their need and development, and their application to the USAEC's nuclear materials management programme. Included is a discussion of the USAEC's Advisory Committee for Standard Reference Materials and Methods of Measurement, which was established to provide guidance to the nuclear materials management programme and recommend research and development activities. Resulting from these recommendations was a USAEC co-operative effort with the National Bureau of Standards for the development of chemical and isotopic standard reference materials of uranium and plutonium; particular attention is devoted to the results of that joint effort. The need for research and development efforts in areas of mutual interest is examined, and the cooperation of other nations of the world is elicited in

  15. B Plant aggregate area management study technical baseline report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The B aggregate area is made up of 13 operable units; 200-BP 1 through 200-BP 1 1, 200-IU-6, and 200-SS-1 that consist of liquid and solid waste disposal sites in the vicinity of, and related to, B Plant operations. This report describes B Plant and its waste sites, including cribs, french drains, septic tanks and drain fields, trenches and ditches, ponds, catch tanks, settling tanks, diversion boxes, underground tank farms designed for high-level liquid wastes, and the lines and encasements that connect them. Each waste site in the aggregate area is described separately. Close relationships between waste units, such as overflow from one to another, are also discussed. This document provides a technical baseline of the aggregate area and results from an environmental investigation. This document is based upon review and evaluation of numerous Hanford Site current and historical reports, drawings and photographs, supplemented with site inspections and employee interviews. No intrusive field investigations or sampling were conducted

  16. Mixed Waste Focus Area integrated technical baseline report, Phase 1: Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Department of Energy (DOE) established the Mixed Waste Characterization, Treatment, and Disposal Focus Area (MWFA) to develop and facilitate implementation of technologies required to meet the Department's commitments for treatment of mixed low-level and transuranic wastes. The mission of the MWFA is to provide acceptable treatment systems, developed in partnership with users and with participation of stakeholders, tribal governments, and regulators, that are capable of treating DOE's mixed waste. These treatment systems include all necessary steps such as characterization, pretreatment, and disposal. To accomplish this mission, a technical baseline is being established that forms the basis for determining which technology development activities will be supported by the MWFA. The technical baseline is the prioritized list of deficiencies, and the resulting technology development activities needed to overcome these deficiencies. This document presents Phase I of the technical baseline development process, which resulted in the prioritized list of deficiencies that the MWFA will address. A summary of the data and the assumptions upon which this work was based is included, as well as information concerning the DOE Office of Environmental Management (EM) mixed waste technology development needs. The next phase in the technical baseline development process, Phase II, will result in the identification of technology development activities that will be conducted through the MWFA to resolve the identified deficiencies

  17. Subsurface Contamination Focus Area technical requirements. Volume 1: Requirements summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nickelson, D.; Nonte, J.; Richardson, J.

    1996-10-01

    This document summarizes functions and requirements for remediation of source term and plume sites identified by the Subsurface Contamination Focus Area. Included are detailed requirements and supporting information for source term and plume containment, stabilization, retrieval, and selective retrieval remedial activities. This information will be useful both to the decision-makers within the Subsurface Contamination Focus Area (SCFA) and to the technology providers who are developing and demonstrating technologies and systems. Requirements are often expressed as graphs or charts, which reflect the site-specific nature of the functions that must be performed. Many of the tradeoff studies associated with cost savings are identified in the text.

  18. Technical issues associated with in situ vitrification of the INEL Subsurface Disposal Area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In situ vitrification (ISV) has been identified as an alternative technology for remediation of the acid pit and transuranic pits and trenches (TRU-PTs) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA). However, a number of technical issues must be resolved before ISV can be considered applicable to these waste sites. To assist in the ISV technology evaluation, an ISV Steering Committee was formed to identify, prioritize, and develop closure roadmaps for technical issues lated with ISV application at the SDA. The activities of the ISV Steering Committee are summarized in a three-volume report. Volume I identifies the systematic approach used to identify and prioritize the ISV technical issues and briefly discusses the methodology that will be employed to resolve these issues. Volumes 2 and 3 discuss each technical issue in greater detail and suggest specific closure roadmaps to be used in resolving technical issues associated with ISV at the SDA Acid Pit and TRU-PTS, respectively. The three-volume report is a working document that will be updated as necessary to reflect current evaluation strategy for the ISV technology. This is Volume 3

  19. Technical issues associated with in situ vitrification of the INEL Subsurface Disposal Area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In situ vitrification (ISV) has been identified as an alternative technology for remediation of the Acid Pit and Transuranic Pits and Trenches (TRU-PTs) that are present at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA). However, a number of technical issues exist that must be resolved before ISV can be considered applicable to these waste sites. To assist in the ISV technology evaluation, an ISV Steering Committee was formed to identify, prioritize, and develop closure roadmaps for technical issues associated with ISV application at the INEL SDA. The activities of the ISV Steering Committee are summarized in three volumes of this report. Volume 1 identifies the systematic approach used to identify and prioritize the ISV technical issues, and briefly discusses the methodology that will be employed to resolve these issues. This document Volume 2 and Volume 3 discusses each technical issue in greater detail and suggest specific closure roadmaps to be used in resolving technical issues associated with ISV at the SDA Acid Pit and TRU-PTs, respectively

  20. Critical technical areas for future improvement in biodiesel technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article analyses critical technical areas that currently limit the success of biodiesel as a fuel. The production process is currently shifting from homogeneous to heterogeneous using solid catalysts for a cleaner process and ease of product separation. The free fatty acid and moisture contents in the raw materials must be sufficiently low to avoid soap formation. The production of biodiesel with full compliance with ASTM D6751-07 or EN 14214:2003 is an uphill task. Current technologies for biodiesel production still do not provide more significant energy surplus. Biodiesel has relatively lower energy content, causing higher fuel consumption. Biodiesel has a drawback in terms of its cold flow properties. A high iodine value can cause degradation and polymerization of biodiesel components. Unconverted monoglyceride, diglyceride and triglyceride impurities will affect the engine performance. The alcohol content in biodiesel can attack rubber seals and gaskets. Biodiesel also can undergo chemical and biological modification to affect its quality in long-term storage. Biodiesel is also associated with high-level NOx emission, a fact that needs special attention

  1. Technical evaluation: 300 Area steam line valve accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On June 7, 1993, a journeyman power operator (JPO) was severely burned and later died as a result of the failure of a 6-in. valve that occurred when he attempted to open main steam supply (MSS) valve MSS-25 in the U-3 valve pit. The pit is located northwest of Building 331 in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site. Figure 1-1 shows a layout of the 300 Area steam piping system including the U-3 steam valve pit. Figure 1-2 shows a cutaway view of the approximately 10- by 13- by 16-ft-high valve pit with its various steam valves and connecting piping. Valve MSS-25, an 8-in. valve, is located at the bottom of the pit. The failed 6-in. valve was located at the top of the pit where it branched from the upper portion of the 8-in. line at the 8- by 8- by 6-in. tee and was then ''blanked off'' with a blind flange. The purpose of this technical evaluation was to determine the cause of the accident that led to the failure of the 6-in. valve. The probable cause for the 6-in. valve failure was determined by visual, nondestructive, and destructive examination of the failed valve and by metallurgical analysis of the fractured region of the valve. The cause of the accident was ultimately identified by correlating the observed failure mode to the most probable physical phenomenon. Thermal-hydraulic analyses, component stress analyses, and tests were performed to verify that the probable physical phenomenon could be reasonably expected to produce the failure in the valve that was observed

  2. Special Analysis: Disposal Plan for Pit 38 at Technical Area 54, Area G

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    French, Sean B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Shuman, Rob [URS Coporation

    2012-06-26

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) generates radioactive waste as a result of various activities. Operational waste is generated from a wide variety of research and development activities including nuclear weapons development, energy production, and medical research; environmental restoration (ER), and decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) waste is generated as contaminated sites and facilities at LANL undergo cleanup or remediation. The majority of this waste is low-level radioactive waste (LLW) and is disposed of at the Technical Area 54 (TA-54), Area G disposal facility. U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 435.1 (DOE, 2001) requires that radioactive waste be managed in a manner that protects public health and safety, and the environment. To comply with this order, DOE field sites must prepare site-specific radiological performance assessments for LLW disposal facilities that accept waste after September 26, 1988. Furthermore, sites are required to conduct composite analyses that account for the cumulative impacts of all waste that has been (or will be) disposed of at the facilities and other sources of radioactive material that may interact with the facilities. Revision 4 of the Area G performance assessment and composite analysis was issued in 2008 (LANL, 2008). These analyses estimate rates of radionuclide release from the waste disposed of at the facility, simulate the movement of radionuclides through the environment, and project potential radiation doses to humans for several on- and off-site exposure scenarios. The assessments are based on existing site and disposal facility data, and on assumptions about future rates and methods of waste disposal. The Area G disposal facility consists of Material Disposal Area (MDA) G and the Zone 4 expansion area. To date, disposal operations have been confined to MDA G and are scheduled to continue in that region until MDA G undergoes final closure at the end of 2013. Given its impending closure, efforts have

  3. Final Technical Report Transport Task Force Activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Transport Task Force has functioned as the primary scientific organization in the area of magnetic-fusion confinement and transport since its inception in 1988. It has defined and set research directions, coordinated broad research efforts, advocated new funding initiatives, and created a highly successful and widely admired interactive culture between experiment, theory and modeling. The Transport Task Force carries out its activities under the direction of its chair and the Executive Committee. The Executive Committee is comprised of the leaders and deputy leaders of the scientific working groups. The working groups are structured and organized according to research needs and priorities and have been organized around the areas of Core Transport, H Mode and Pedestal, Fast Particle Transport, Transient Transport Phenomena, and Modeling and Simulation. A steering committee provides advise on TTF activities. Further information on the working groups and the structure and management of the TTF can be found at http://psfcwww2.psfc.mit.edu/ttf/index.html. The TTF holds an annual workshop. A summary of the workshops held during the period of this report is given in Appendix I. During the period of this report the Transport Task Force was involved in several significant activities. Foremost of these was a sweeping review of the status of transport science, the key research tasks for progress during the next 5-10 years, and a proposal for a funding initiative to ensure application of adequate resources to these problems. The conclusions of this study were incorporated into a white paper, which is copied below in Appendix II. Other significant activities have included the introduction of an extended, ongoing discussion on verification and validation as a requisite for defining and codifying the path toward predictive capability, the orchestration of a gradual shift of focus from ion thermal confinement to electron thermal confinement, and a joining of efforts on edge

  4. Measurement of surface emission flux rates for volatile organic compounds at Technical Area 54

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trujillo, V.; Morgenstern, M.; Krier, D. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Gilkeson, R. [Weirich and Associates, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1998-06-01

    The survey described in this report was conducted to estimate the mass of volatile organic compounds venting to the atmosphere from active and inactive waste disposal sites at Technical Area 54. A large number of nonintrusive passive sample collection devices were placed on the ground surface for 72 hours to characterize an area of approximately 150 acres. Results provided an indication of the boundary location of the known volatile organic plume, plume constituents, and isolated high concentration areas. The data from this survey enhanced existing data from a limited number of monitor wells currently used for plume surveillance. Results indicate that the estimated mass emission to the atmosphere is orders of magnitude lower than what is considered a small flux rate at a spill site or a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act landfill and is far below the threshold limit established by the State of New Mexico as an air quality concern.

  5. IAEA Technical Co-operation activities: Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1975 Tanzania became the newest African Member State of the International Atomic Energy Agency, bringing the total African membership of the Agency up to 25 countries. The other African Member States are: Algeria; United Republic of Cameroon; Egypt; Ethiopia; Gabon; Ghana; Ivory Coast; Kenya; Liberia; Libyan Arab Republic; Madagascar; Mali; Mauritius; Morocco; Niger; Nigeria; Senegal; Sierra Leone; South Africa; Sudan; Tunisia; Uganda; Zaire; Zambia. Membership of the Agency entitles these countries to receive assistance both from the Regular Programme of the Agency and from UNDP resources, while non-Member States in the region only receive Agency assistance financed from the latter source. Any attempt to look at the technical co-operation programme in Africa must start by stressing the wide differences between African countries in their level of scientific and technical development ranging from countries with advanced atomic energy programmes to countries just crossing the threshold towards the peaceful use of nuclear energy. Perhaps the most striking and marked difference is in the quality and number of nuclear energy scientists and technologists available. In view of this, the technical assistance programme in the African context has been a selective one, guided by considerations of pragmatism and responsiveness to particular requirements of the different individual countries and not by any doctrinaire or ready-made strategy for assistance. (author)

  6. Technical area status report for low-level mixed waste final waste forms. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayberry, J.L.; DeWitt, L.M. [Science Applications International Corp., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Darnell, R. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)] [and others

    1993-08-01

    The Final Waste Forms (FWF) Technical Area Status Report (TASR) Working Group, the Vitrification Working Group (WG), and the Performance Standards Working Group were established as subgroups to the FWF Technical Support Group (TSG). The FWF TASR WG is comprised of technical representatives from most of the major DOE sites, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), the EPA Office of Solid Waste, and the EPA`s Risk Reduction Engineering Laboratory (RREL). The primary activity of the FWF TASR Working Group was to investigate and report on the current status of FWFs for LLNM in this TASR. The FWF TASR Working Group determined the current status of the development of various waste forms described above by reviewing selected articles and technical reports, summarizing data, and establishing an initial set of FWF characteristics to be used in evaluating candidate FWFS; these characteristics are summarized in Section 2. After an initial review of available information, the FWF TASR Working Group chose to study the following groups of final waste forms: hydraulic cement, sulfur polymer cement, glass, ceramic, and organic binders. The organic binders included polyethylene, bitumen, vinyl ester styrene, epoxy, and urea formaldehyde. Section 3 provides a description of each final waste form. Based on the literature review, the gaps and deficiencies in information were summarized, and conclusions and recommendations were established. The information and data presented in this TASR are intended to assist the FWF Production and Assessment TSG in evaluating the Technical Task Plans (TTPs) submitted to DOE EM-50, and thus provide DOE with the necessary information for their FWF decision-making process. This FWF TASR will also assist the DOE and the MWIP in establishing the most acceptable final waste forms for the various LLMW streams stored at DOE facilities.

  7. Technical area status report for low-level mixed waste final waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Final Waste Forms (FWF) Technical Area Status Report (TASR) Working Group, the Vitrification Working Group (WG), and the Performance Standards Working Group were established as subgroups to the FWF Technical Support Group (TSG). The FWF TASR WG is comprised of technical representatives from most of the major DOE sites, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), the EPA Office of Solid Waste, and the EPA's Risk Reduction Engineering Laboratory (RREL). The primary activity of the FWF TASR Working Group was to investigate and report on the current status of FWFs for LLNM in this TASR. The FWF TASR Working Group determined the current status of the development of various waste forms described above by reviewing selected articles and technical reports, summarizing data, and establishing an initial set of FWF characteristics to be used in evaluating candidate FWFS; these characteristics are summarized in Section 2. After an initial review of available information, the FWF TASR Working Group chose to study the following groups of final waste forms: hydraulic cement, sulfur polymer cement, glass, ceramic, and organic binders. The organic binders included polyethylene, bitumen, vinyl ester styrene, epoxy, and urea formaldehyde. Section 3 provides a description of each final waste form. Based on the literature review, the gaps and deficiencies in information were summarized, and conclusions and recommendations were established. The information and data presented in this TASR are intended to assist the FWF Production and Assessment TSG in evaluating the Technical Task Plans (TTPs) submitted to DOE EM-50, and thus provide DOE with the necessary information for their FWF decision-making process. This FWF TASR will also assist the DOE and the MWIP in establishing the most acceptable final waste forms for the various LLMW streams stored at DOE facilities

  8. BWR feedwater nozzle and control rod drive return line nozzle cracking: resolution of generic technical activity A-10. Technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes work performed by the NRC staff in the resolution of Generic Technical Activity A-10, 'BWR Nozzle Cracking'. Generic Technical Activity A-10 is one of the generic technical subjects designated as 'unresolved safety issues' pursuant to Section 210 of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974. The report describes the technical issues, the technical studies and analyses performed by the General Electric Company and the NRC staff, the staff's technical positions based on these studies, and the staff's plans for continued implementation of its technical positions. It also provides information for further work to resolve the non-destructive examination issue

  9. Tank Focus Area pretreatment activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plans call for the high-level wastes to be retrieved from the tanks and immobilized in a stable waste form suitable for long-term isolation. Chemistry and chemical engineering operations are required to retrieve the wastes, to condition the wastes for subsequent steps, and to reduce the costs of the waste management enterprise. Pretreatment includes those processes between retrieval and immobilization, and includes preparation of suitable feed material for immobilization and separations to partition the waste into streams that yield lower life-cycle costs. Some of the technologies being developed by the Tank Focus Area (TFA) to process these wastes are described. These technologies fall roughly into three areas: (1) solid/liquid separation (SLS), (2) sludge pretreatment, and (3) supernate pretreatment

  10. Technical Targets - A Tool to Support Strategic Planning in the Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area (SCFA) is supported by a lead laboratory consisting of technical representatives from DOE laboratories across the country. This broadly representative scientific group has developed and implemented a process to define Technical Targets to assist the SCFA in strategic planning and in managing their environmental research and development portfolio. At an initial meeting in Golden Colorado, an initial set of Technical Targets was identified using a rapid consensus based technical triage process. Thirteen Technical Targets were identified and described. Vital scientific and technical objectives were generated for each target. The targets generally fall into one of the following five strategic investment categories: Enhancing Environmental Stewardship, Eliminating Contaminant Sources, Isolating Contaminants, Controlling Contaminant Plumes, Enabling DOEs CleanUp Efforts. The resulting targets and the detail they comprise on what is, and what is not, needed to meet Environmental Management needs provide a comprehensive technically-based framework to assist in prioritizing future work and in managing the SCFA program

  11. Measurement of emission fluxes from Technical Area 54, Area G and L. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The emission flux (mass/time-area) of tritiated water from TA-54 was measured to support the characterization of radioactive air emissions from waste sites for the Radioactive Air Emissions Management (RAEM) program and for the Area G Performance Assessment. Measurements were made at over 180 locations during the summers of 1993 and 1994, including randomly selected locations across Area G, three suspected areas of contamination at Area G, and the property surrounding TA-54. The emission fluxes of radon were measured at six locations and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) at 30 locations. Monitoring was performed at each location over a several-hour period using the U.S. EPA flux chamber approach. Separate samples for tritiated water, radon, and VOCs were collected and analyzed in off-site laboratories. The measured tritiated water emission fluxes varied over several orders of magnitude, from background levels of about 3 pCi/m2-min to 9.69 x 106 pCi/m2-min near a disposal shaft. Low levels of tritiated water were found to have migrated into Pajarito Canyon, directly south of Area G. The tritium flux data were used to generate an estimated annual emission rate of 14 Curies/yr for all of Area G, with the majority of this activity being emitted from relatively small areas adjacent to several disposal shafts. The estimated total annual release is less than 1% of the total tritium release from all LANL in 1992 and results in a negligible off-site dose. Based on the limited data available, the average emission flux of radon from Area G is estimated to be 8.1 pCi/m2-min. The measured emission fluxes of VOCs were 2-min, which is small compared with fluxes typically measured at hazardous waste landfills. The air quality impacts of these releases were evaluated in a separate report

  12. Technical area status report for chemical/physical treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    These Appendices describe various technologies that may be applicable to the Mixed Waste Treatment Plant (MWTP) Chemical/Physical Treatment System (CPTS). These technologies were identified by the CPTS Technical Support Group (TSG) as potentially applicable to a variety of separation, volume reduction, and decontamination requirements. The purpose was to identify all available and developing technologies, and their characteristics, for subsequent evaluation for specific requirements identified for the CPTS. However, the technologies described herein are not necessarily all inclusive, nor are they necessarily all applicable

  13. Plutonium Equivalent Inventory for Belowground Radioactive Waste at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Technical Area 54, Area G Disposal Facility - Fiscal Year 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    French, Sean B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Shuman, Rob [WPS: WASTE PROJECTS AND SERVICES

    2012-04-18

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) generates radioactive waste as a result of various activities. Many aspects of the management of this waste are conducted at Technical Area 54 (TA-54); Area G plays a key role in these management activities as the Laboratory's only disposal facility for low-level radioactive waste (LLW). Furthermore, Area G serves as a staging area for transuranic (TRU) waste that will be shipped to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant for disposal. A portion of this TRU waste is retrievably stored in pits, trenches, and shafts. The radioactive waste disposed of or stored at Area G poses potential short- and long-term risks to workers at the disposal facility and to members of the public. These risks are directly proportional to the radionuclide inventories in the waste. The Area G performance assessment and composite analysis (LANL, 2008a) project long-term risks to members of the public; short-term risks to workers and members of the public, such as those posed by accidents, are addressed by the Area G Documented Safety Analysis (LANL, 2011a). The Documented Safety Analysis uses an inventory expressed in terms of plutonium-equivalent curies, referred to as the PE-Ci inventory, to estimate these risks. The Technical Safety Requirements for Technical Area 54, Area G (LANL, 2011b) establishes a belowground radioactive material limit that ensures the cumulative projected inventory authorized for the Area G site is not exceeded. The total belowground radioactive waste inventory limit established for Area G is 110,000 PE-Ci. The PE-Ci inventory is updated annually; this report presents the inventory prepared for 2011. The approach used to estimate the inventory is described in Section 2. The results of the analysis are presented in Section 3.

  14. Activation analysis in science and technics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Physical bases of the method of neutron activation analysis are described. Reactions of element nuclei with neutrons, gamma quanta and charged particles, ways of radioactivity measurement, gamma spectrometry in particular, have been described. The method errors, as well as element determination sensitivity in samples of different composition are considered, perspectives of activation analysis development being reflected. The practical use of the method in the studies on solid-state physics, during the analysis of semiconductors and pure materials, in criminalistics, agriculture, the environmnental control in geology and biology, is shown

  15. Status review of CHEMVAL2 technical areas, June 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The second phase of the CHEMVAL project has the principal aim of advancing the state of validation of predictive geochemical models in defined areas. Target areas are those known to be of concern in radiological assessment, namely temperature effects, ionic strength effects, organic complexation, sorption processes, coprecipitation and solid solution formation, and coupled chemical transport modelling. The first stage of CHEMVAL2 involved production of status reviews, which are now complete and combined in this report. The two remaining stages comprise the execution of the main research programme on code verification and model validation, followed by a more detailed comparison with experimental data, model refinement and final reporting. (author)

  16. Fiscal Decentralization in Specific Areas of Government. A Technical Note

    OpenAIRE

    Leonardo Letelier S.; José Luis Sáez Lozano

    2013-01-01

    This study makes a contribution in two basic areas. First, it sets up a model which combines efficiency as well as political economy aspects in explaining the degree of fiscal decentralization. It innovates in making explicit the benefits from better informed politicians and policy makers (Von Hayek effect) and the potential cost push effect on public services and public goods (Scale Effect) resulting from decentralization. It takes advantage of previous literature in recognizing the extent o...

  17. Technical Progress in Transport and the Tourism Area Life Cycle

    OpenAIRE

    Andrew Kato; James Mak

    2010-01-01

    Richard ButlerÕs tourism area life cycle envisions tourism destinations to evolve in stages from exploration to rapid growth followed by slackening, stagnation, and even decline. The eventual slow-down in tourism growth is attributed to the destinations reaching their physical and social carrying capacities. This article examines the evolution of Hawaii as a tourism destination from 1922 to 2009. We demonstrate that tourism growth in Hawaii has declined but not because the destination has rea...

  18. Low Energy Accelerator Laboratory Technical Area 53, Los Alamos National Laboratory. Environmental assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Environmental Assessment (EA) analyzes the potential environmental impacts that would be expected to occur if the Department of Energy (DOE) were to construct and operate a small research and development laboratory building at Technical Area (TA) 53 at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, New Mexico. DOE proposes to construct a small building to be called the Low Energy Accelerator Laboratory (LEAL), at a previously cleared, bladed, and leveled quarter-acre site next to other facilities housing linear accelerator research activities at TA-53. Operations proposed for LEAL would consist of bench-scale research, development, and testing of the initial section of linear particle accelerators. This initial section consists of various components that are collectively called an injector system. The anticipated life span of the proposed development program would be about 15 years

  19. Interim Status Closure Plan Open Burning Treatment Unit Technical Area 16-399 Burn Tray

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vigil-Holterman, Luciana R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-05-07

    This closure plan describes the activities necessary to close one of the interim status hazardous waste open burning treatment units at Technical Area (TA) 16 at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL or the Facility), hereinafter referred to as the 'TA-16-399 Burn Tray' or 'the unit'. The information provided in this closure plan addresses the closure requirements specified in the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Title 40, Part 265, Subparts G and P for the thermal treatment units operated at the Facility under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the New Mexico Hazardous Waste Act. Closure of the open burning treatment unit will be completed in accordance with Section 4.1 of this closure plan.

  20. Radioecological research in areas of technical Issyk-Kul region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text : Geochemical conditions of the Issyk-Kul basin define it as natural uranium biogeochemical provinces. An additional human impact creates areas with technologically enhanced background radionuclides in areas previously existing mining and processing of uranium ore. Technogenic uranium plot Kaji-Sai is located on the southern shore of Lake Issyk-Kul, in Ton district, 270 km from Bishkek. Coal mined in the local underground mine; previously burned a passing generation of electricity, and then uranium oxide was removed by acid leaching of ash. Scrap and industrial equipment were buried to form the tailings, with a total uranium waste 400 thousand m3. Currently, tailings dyke and under the influence of natural and anthropogenic influences are gradually destroyed. Former mine Kaji-Sai exposed to erosion floods and mudflows, which lead to the removal of radioactive materials on the surface. Biological response of living organisms on the geochemical conditions of the environment is manifested in the high places of the radionuclide content in their environment. Morphological changes of wild plants in the form of a different number of petals, flowers or infertility and sterility of pollen grains. For the representatives of some plant species (Artemisia dracunculus, Peganum harmala), as well as small rodents inhabiting the tailings (Microtus arvalis, Mus musculus), a raised level of cytogenetic abnormalities, which indicates the accumulation of radionuclides by living organisms

  1. US Forest Service Recreation Area Activities

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Forest Service, Department of Agriculture — A map service on the www depicting the recreation area activity information that the Forest Service collects through the Recreation Portal and shares with the...

  2. 48 CFR 31.205-43 - Trade, business, technical, and professional activity costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Contracts With Commercial Organizations 31.205-43 Trade, business, technical, and professional activity costs. The following types of costs are allowable: (a) Memberships in trade, business, technical,...

  3. Environmental Measurements Laboratory fiscal year 1998: Accomplishments and technical activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erickson, M.D.

    1999-01-01

    The Environmental Measurements Laboratory (EML) is government-owned, government-operated, and programmatically under the DOE Office of Environmental Management. The Laboratory is administered by the Chicago Operations Office. EML provides program management, technical assistance and data quality assurance for measurements of radiation and radioactivity relating to environmental restoration, global nuclear nonproliferation, and other priority issues for the Department of Energy, as well as for other government, national, and international organizations. This report presents the technical activities and accomplishments of EML for Fiscal Year 1998.

  4. Annual Report for Los Alamos National Laboratory Technical Area 54, Area G Disposal Facility – Fiscal Year 2015

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a condition to the disposal authorization statement issued to Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL or the Laboratory) on March 17, 2010, a comprehensive performance assessment and composite analysis maintenance program must be implemented for the Technical Area 54, Area G disposal facility. Annual determinations of the adequacy of the performance assessment and composite analysis (PA/CA) are to be conducted under the maintenance program to ensure that the conclusions reached by those analyses continue to be valid. This report summarizes the results of the fiscal year (FY) 2015 annual review for Area G.

  5. Annual Report for Los Alamos National Laboratory Technical Area 54, Area G Disposal Facility – Fiscal Year 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    French, Sean B. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Stauffer, Philip H. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Birdsell, Kay H. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-02-29

    As a condition to the disposal authorization statement issued to Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL or the Laboratory) on March 17, 2010, a comprehensive performance assessment and composite analysis maintenance program must be implemented for the Technical Area 54, Area G disposal facility. Annual determinations of the adequacy of the performance assessment and composite analysis (PA/CA) are to be conducted under the maintenance program to ensure that the conclusions reached by those analyses continue to be valid. This report summarizes the results of the fiscal year (FY) 2015 annual review for Area G.

  6. ILO activities in the area of chemical safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obadia, Isaac

    2003-08-21

    The ILO has been active in the area of safety in the use of chemicals at work since the year of its creation in 1919, including the development of international treaties and other technical instruments, the provision of technical assistance to its member States, and the development of chemical safety information systems. The two key ILO standards in this area are the Conventions on safety in the use of chemicals at work (No. 170, 1990), and the Prevention of Major Industrial Accidents (No. 174, 1993). The ILO Programme on occupational safety, health and environment (Safe Work) is currently responsible for ILO chemical safety activities. In the past two decades, most of ILO work in this area has been carried out within the context of inter-agency collaboration frameworks linking the ILO, WHO, UNEP, FAO, UNIDO, UNITAR, and the OECD, including the International Programme on Chemical Safety (IPCS), the Inter-Organisation Programme for the Sound Management of Chemicals (IOMC), and the Intergovernmental Forum on Chemical Safety (IFCS). Apart from the regular development, updating and dissemination of chemical safety information data bases such as the IPCS International Chemical Cards, the elaboration of a Globally harmonized system for the classification and labelling of Chemicals (GHS) has been the most outstanding achievement of this international collaboration on chemical safety. PMID:12909402

  7. Technical Area V (TA-V) transformation project close-out report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2010-07-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Technical Area V (TA-V) has provided unique nuclear experimental environments for decades. The technologies tested in TA-V facilities have furthered the United States Nuclear Weapons program and has contributed to the national energy and homeland security mission. The importance of TA-V working efficiently to produce an attractive and effective platform for experiments should not be underestimated. Throughout its brief history, TA-V has evolved to address multiple and diverse sets of requirements. These requirements evolved over many years; however, the requirements had not been managed nor communicated comprehensively or effectively. A series of programmatic findings over several years of external audits was evidence of this downfall. Today, these same requirements flow down through a new TA-V management system that produces consistently applied and reproducible approaches to work practices. In 2008, the TA-V department managers assessed the state of TA-V services and work activities to understand how to improve customer interfaces, stakeholders perceptions, and workforce efficiencies. The TA-V management team initiated the TA-V Transformation Project after they deemed the pre-June 2008 operational model to be ineffective in managing work and in providing integrated, continuous improvement to TA-V processes. This report summarizes the TA-V Transformation Project goals, activities, and accomplishments.

  8. Rationale for the necessity of technical inspection lines for motor vehicles in residential areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maslennikov Valeriy Aleksandrovich

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the influence of many different factors, the arrival of vehicles to technical inspection lines is stochastic. The existing methods of designing the network of technical inspection do not take full account of this fact, the consequence of which is the lack of inspection lines load at some periods of the year and its excess in the other. In the first case, we evidence the deteriorating of economic performance of these facilities, in the second - the quality of evaluating the technical condition of vehicles suffers. The authors proposed a method of justifying the minimum requirements of residential areas in the lines of technical examination, taking into account the probabilistic nature of vehicles inspection revenue. The use of the proposed method was shown on the example of a large village. Using the mathematical apparatus for calculation of queuing theory allows not only identifying the areas in need of inspection lines, but also, if necessary, providing technical and economic evaluation of the results obtained by calculations.

  9. Technical program plan for the transitioning, decommissioning, and final disposition focus area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The end of the Cold War and the decision to reduce the size of the nuclear weapons production complex have created a need for DOE to deactivate, decontaminate, and decommission (D ampersand D) a large number of aging, surplus facilities. The nature and magnitude of the facility D ampersand D problems require EM to facilitate the development and application of technologies that will address these problems quickly and cost-effectively. The needed technologies can best be provided by integrating the strengths of DOE's national laboratories with those of industry, universities, and other government agencies. To help focus and direct these activities toward achieving DOE's goals, the EM Office of Technology Development (OTD) devised the strategic concept of an Integrated Demonstration (ID), which involves selecting, demonstrating, testing, and evaluating an integrated set of technologies tailored to provide a complete solution to specific EM problems, such as those posed by D ampersand D. The ID approach allows optimal use of DOE's resources by avoiding duplication of effort and ensuring rapid demonstration of applicable technologies. Many technologies, including both the commercially mature and the innovative, are combined and evaluated for a cradle-to-grave solution to specific EM problems in areas such as D ampersand D. The process will involve transforming an existing problem condition to a desired end state, recycling waste materials generated, wherever feasible, and minimizing requirements for waste disposal. The D ampersand D ID Strategic Plan has been prepared by a Technical Support Group (TSG) assembled from various sites within the DOE Complex and intended to identify cross-cutting problem areas amenable to applications of the D ampersand D ID concept and to develop specific ID proposals for these problem areas

  10. IAEA technical co-operation activities in the 1990s

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The desire to extend the many benefits of the peaceful uses of nuclear technology to all countries led as long ago as 1957 to the establishment of the IAEA and to immediate introduction of a technical co-operation programme. In the more than thirty years that have passed since that time, the potential applications of nuclear techniques have greatly expanded. Over the period, many of the applications have moved from research laboratories into hospitals, farms and industrial enterprises. The direct resources made available to the IAEA by its Member States to support technology transfer processes have grown rapidly since the late 1950s. The current trends in the technical co-operation activities of the IAEA and some examples of projects supported by the IAEA are briefly presented in this document

  11. Area of Interest 4.Technical Interest to Electric Infrastructure Planners on Other Subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eto, Joseph H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-07-01

    In 2010, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) provided $60M in funding to five regional entities to conduct interregional transmission planning activities: the Eastern Interconnection Planning Collaborative (EIPC); the Eastern Interconnection States Planning Council (EISPC); the Transmission Expansion Planning and Policy Committee (TEPPC); the State Provincial Steering Committee (SPSC);and the Electricity Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT). DOE also provided funding to the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) to support aspects of these interregional transmission planning activities. LBNL’s support involved both technical assistance to DOE in its oversight of the activities conducted by the five regional entities and the preparation of six, standalone technical studies that were conducted in direct support for specific entities. This is the final report on LBNL’s activities. It consists of summaries of each activity; references are provided to each of the stand-alone studies.

  12. Elk and Deer Study, Material Disposal Area G, Technical Area 54: Source document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As nuclear research has become more prevalent, environmental contamination from the disposal of radioactive waste has become a prominent issue. At Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in northern New Mexico, radioactive contamination from disposal operations has raised some very specific concerns. Material Disposal Area G (Area G) is the primary low-level radioactive waste disposal site at LANL and occupies an area adjacent to land belonging to the Native American community of the Pueblo of San Ildefonso. Analyses of soil and vegetation collected from the perimeter of Area G have shown concentrations of radionuclides greater than background concentrations established for northern New Mexico. As a result, Pueblo residents had become concerned that contaminants from Area G could enter tribal lands through various ecological pathways. The residents specifically questioned the safety of consuming meat from elk and deer that forage near Area G and then migrate onto tribal lands. Consequently, this study addresses the uptake of 3H, 90Sr, totU, 238Pu, 239Pu, 241Am, and 137Cs by elk (Cervus elaphus) and deer (Odocoileus hemionus) that forage around the perimeter of Area G and the associated doses to the animals and to humans who consume these animals. Radionuclide uptake by and internal dose to animals was estimated using equations modified from National Council on Radiological Protection Report 76. The Residual Radiation computer code was used to estimate the external dose to animals and the dose to humans consuming meat. Soil and water concentrations from the perimeter of Area G and from background regions in northern New Mexico were averaged over 4 years (1993--1996) and used as input data for the models. Concentration estimates generated by the model correspond to the concentration range measured in actual tissue samples from elk and deer collected at LANL. The highest dose estimates for both animals (0.028 mrad/d) and humans (0.072 mrem/y) were well below guidelines

  13. Localization of cortical areas activated by thinking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roland, P E; Friberg, L

    1985-01-01

    These experiments were undertaken to demonstrate that pure mental activity, thinking, increases the cerebral blood flow and that different types of thinking increase the regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in different cortical areas. As a first approach, thinking was defined as brain work in the...... they started at their front door and then walked alternatively to the left or the right each time they reached a corner. The rCBF increased only in homotypical cortical areas during thinking. The areas in the superior prefrontal cortex increased their rCBF equivalently during the three types of...... thinking. In the remaining parts of the prefrontal cortex there were multifocal increases of rCBF. The localizations and intensities of these rCBF increases depended on the type of internal operation occurring. The rCBF increased bilaterally in the angular cortex during 50-3 thinking. The rCBF increased in...

  14. Functional MR mapping of activated cortical areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has recently been demonstrated to be sensitive to changes in neuronal activity of cortical areas. We report our initial experiences with functional MR brain mapping at high spatial resolution using a conventional whole-body MR system. A total of 10 visual and motor cortex activation studies were carried out on 8 healthy volunteers. In each examination, a time course series of 15 strongly T2'-weighted FLASH images was measured from three adjacent slices. The image analysis revealed a subtle but highly significant signal increase in cortical layers of gray matter in primary and associative visual as well as sensorimotoric cortex regions during periods of excessive brain activity provoked by photic stimuli or motoric tasks, respectively. To correlate brain structure and brain function, the computed MR brain activation maps were directly superimposed on T1-weighted anatomic spin-echo images. With this advance into the area of functional neuroimaging, MRI is moving into an established domain of positron emission tomography (PET). We, therefore, discuss the advantages and limitations of the MR method in comparison to PET as fas as this can be done at present. (orig.)

  15. Comparison of Uncertainty of Two Precipitation Prediction Models at Los Alamos National Lab Technical Area 54

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shield, Stephen Allan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Dai, Zhenxue [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-08-18

    Meteorological inputs are an important part of subsurface flow and transport modeling. The choice of source for meteorological data used as inputs has significant impacts on the results of subsurface flow and transport studies. One method to obtain the meteorological data required for flow and transport studies is the use of weather generating models. This paper compares the difference in performance of two weather generating models at Technical Area 54 of Los Alamos National Lab. Technical Area 54 is contains several waste pits for low-level radioactive waste and is the site for subsurface flow and transport studies. This makes the comparison of the performance of the two weather generators at this site particularly valuable.

  16. Mixed waste focus area integrated technical baseline report. Phase I, Volume 2: Revision 0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document (Volume 2) contains the Appendices A through J for the Mixed Waste Focus Area Integrated Technical Baseline Report Phase I for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Included are: Waste Type Managers' Resumes, detailed information on wastewater, combustible organics, debris, unique waste, and inorganic homogeneous solids and soils, and waste data information. A detailed list of technology deficiencies and site needs identification is also provided

  17. Fuel consumption in the transport of technical broadleaf roundwood in lowland areas

    OpenAIRE

    Danilović Milorad; Ilić Milenko; Ćuprić Nenad; Antonić Slavica; Stojnić Dušan

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an analysis of fuel consumption in the transport of technical roundwood of soft broadleaves from the felling site to a roadside landing using forwarders and tractor assemblies. The research was performed in various operating conditions in the area of FE "Banat" Pančevo. On the basis of the results of the analysis of variance, the data recorded in a variety of conditions were grouped. In addition, the dependence of fuel con...

  18. Mixed waste focus area integrated technical baseline report. Phase I, Volume 2: Revision 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-01-16

    This document (Volume 2) contains the Appendices A through J for the Mixed Waste Focus Area Integrated Technical Baseline Report Phase I for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Included are: Waste Type Managers` Resumes, detailed information on wastewater, combustible organics, debris, unique waste, and inorganic homogeneous solids and soils, and waste data information. A detailed list of technology deficiencies and site needs identification is also provided.

  19. Summary of Tiger Team Assessment and Technical Safety Appraisal recurring concerns in the Operations Area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fourteen Tiger Team Assessment and eight Technical Safety Appraisal (TSA) final reports have been received and reviewed by the DOE Training Coordination Program during Fiscal Year 1992. These assessments and appraisals included both reactor and non-reactor nuclear facilities in their reports. The Tiger Team Assessments and TSA reports both used TSA performance objectives, and list ''concerns'' as a result of their findings. However, the TSA reports categorized concerns into the following functional areas: (1) Organization and Administration, (2) Radiation Protection, (3) Nuclear Criticality Safety, (4) Occupational Safety, (5) Engineering/Technical Support, (6) Emergency Preparedness, (7) Safety Assessments, (8) Quality Verification, (9) Fire Protection, (10) Environmental Protection, and (11) Energetic Materials Safety. Although these functional areas match most of the TSA performance objectives, not all of the TSA performance objectives are addressed. For example, the TSA reports did not include Training, Maintenance, and Operations as functional areas. Rather, they included concerns that related to these topics throughout the 11 functional areas identified above. For consistency, the Operations concerns that were identified in each of the TSA report functional areas have been included in this summary with the corresponding TSA performance objective

  20. Distributed, explicit modeling of technical snow production and ski area management with the hydroclimatological model AMUNDSEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanzer, Florian; Marke, Thomas; Strasser, Ulrich

    2016-04-01

    In this presentation, a module for simulating technical snow production in ski areas coupled to the spatially distributed physically based hydroclimatological model AMUNDSEN is presented. The module explicitly considers individual snow guns and distributes the produced snow along the slopes. The amount of snow produced by each device is a function of its type, of wet-bulb temperature at the location, of ski area infrastructure (in terms of water supply and pumping capacity), and of snow demand. An empirical rule in the modeling for snow production, derived from common snowmaking practices, splits the winter season into a period of maximum snowmaking and a successive period of selective on-demand snowmaking. The model is exemplarily set up for a ski area in the Schladming region (Austrian Alps) using actual snowmaking infrastructure data. Integration of these data as model variables, as well as stakeholder-defined indicators and thresholds, have been implemented as defined interfaces in a coupled component model architecture. Comparison of the model results with recordings of snowmaking operation and satellite-derived snow cover maps indicate that the model is capable of accurately simulating the real-world snowmaking practice, and the combined natural and technical snow conditions on the slopes. The explicit consideration of individual snow guns and ski area infrastructure makes the model a valuable tool for scenario applications, e.g. to assess the effects of different ski area management strategies and changes in snowmaking infrastructure for climate change impact studies.

  1. TECHNICAL EFFICIENCY OF SORGHUM PRODUCTION IN HONG LOCAL GOVERNMENT AREA OF ADAMAWA STATE, NIGERIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abba Mohammed Wakili

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the technical efficiency of sorghum production and its determinants, using the stochastic frontier production function which incorporates a model of inefficiency effects. Farm level data were collected from a sample of 100 sorghum farmers in Hong local government area of Adamawa state using structured questionnaires. The empirical result shows that land, seed, and fertilizer were the major factors that influence changes in sorghum output. Farm specific variables such as education, extension contact and household size were found to have significant effects on the technical inefficiency among the sorghum producers. The technical efficiency of farmers varied from 0.1562 to 0.9214 with a mean technical efficiency of 0.7262. The implication of the study is that efficiency in sorghum production among the farmers could be increased by 28% through better use of land, seed and fertilizer in the short term given the prevailing state of technology. This could be achieved through policy interventions by the government in terms of better access to land, improved seed and fertilizer .The inefficiency effect also shows that improved farmer's educational levels through better education and literacy campaigns would help tremendously to increase efficiency.

  2. Radionuclide contaminant analysis of small mammals at Area G, Technical Area 54, 1996 (with cumulative summary for 1994--1996)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biggs, J.R.; Bennett, K.D.; Fresquez, P.R.

    1997-07-01

    Small mammals were sampled at two waste burial sites at Area G, Technical Area (TA) 54 and a control site within the proposed Area G expansion area in 1996 to (1) identify radionuclides that are present within rodent tissues at waste burial sites, (2) to compare the amount of radionuclide uptake by small mammals at waste burial sites to a control site, and (3) to identify the primary mode of contamination to small mammals, either through surface contact or ingestion/inhalation. Three composite samples of approximately five animals per sample were collected at each site. Pelts and carcasses of each animal were separated and analyzed independently. Samples were analyzed for {sup 241}Am, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239}Pu, total U, {sup 137}Cs, and {sup 3}H. Higher levels of total U, {sup 241}Am, {sup 238}Pu, and {sup 239}Pu were detected in pelts as compared to the carcasses of small mammals at TA-54. Concentrations of other measured radionuclides in carcasses were nearly equal to or exceeded the mean concentrations in the pelts. Due to low sample sizes in total number of animals captured, statistical analysis to compare site to site could not be conducted. However, mean concentrations of total U, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239}Pu, and {sup 137}Cs in rodent carcasses were higher at Site 1 than site 2 or the Control Site and {sup 241}Am was higher at Site 2 than Site 1 or the Control Site.

  3. Radionuclide contaminant analysis of small mammals at Area G, Technical Area 54, 1996 (with cumulative summary for 1994--1996)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Small mammals were sampled at two waste burial sites at Area G, Technical Area (TA) 54 and a control site within the proposed Area G expansion area in 1996 to (1) identify radionuclides that are present within rodent tissues at waste burial sites, (2) to compare the amount of radionuclide uptake by small mammals at waste burial sites to a control site, and (3) to identify the primary mode of contamination to small mammals, either through surface contact or ingestion/inhalation. Three composite samples of approximately five animals per sample were collected at each site. Pelts and carcasses of each animal were separated and analyzed independently. Samples were analyzed for 241Am, 90Sr, 238Pu, 239Pu, total U, 137Cs, and 3H. Higher levels of total U, 241Am, 238Pu, and 239Pu were detected in pelts as compared to the carcasses of small mammals at TA-54. Concentrations of other measured radionuclides in carcasses were nearly equal to or exceeded the mean concentrations in the pelts. Due to low sample sizes in total number of animals captured, statistical analysis to compare site to site could not be conducted. However, mean concentrations of total U, 238Pu, 239Pu, and 137Cs in rodent carcasses were higher at Site 1 than site 2 or the Control Site and 241Am was higher at Site 2 than Site 1 or the Control Site

  4. Identification of Vital Areas at Nuclear Facilities. Technical Guidance (French Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The possibility that nuclear or other radioactive material could be used for malicious purposes cannot be ruled out in the current global situation. States have responded to this risk by engaging in a collective commitment to strengthen the protection and control of such material and to effectively respond to nuclear security events. States have agreed to strengthen existing and established new international legal instruments to enhance nuclear security around the world. Nuclear security is fundamental in the management of nuclear technologies and in applications where nuclear or other radioactive material is used or transported. Through its nuclear security programme, the IAEA supports States to establish, maintain and sustain an effective nuclear security regime. The IAEA has adopted a comprehensive approach to nuclear security. This recognizes that an effective national nuclear security regime builds on: the implementation of relevant international legal instruments; information protection; physical protection; material accounting and control; detection of and response to trafficking in such material; national response plans; and contingency measures. With its nuclear security series, the IAEA aims to assist States to implement and sustain such a regime in a coherent and integrated manner. The IAEA Nuclear Security Series comprises: Nuclear Security Fundamentals, which include objectives and essential elements of a State?s nuclear security regime; Recommendations; Implementing Guides; and Technical Guidance publications. Each State carries the full responsibility for nuclear security, i.e. to provide for the security of nuclear and other radioactive material and associated facilities and activities; to ensure the security of such material in use, storage or in transport; and to combat illicit trafficking and the inadvertent movement of such material. It should also be prepared to respond to a nuclear security event. The IAEA recommendations for the protection of

  5. Subsurface Contaminant Focus Area: Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA)--Programmatic, Technical, and Regulatory Issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krupka, Kenneth M.; Martin, Wayne J.

    2001-07-23

    Natural attenuation processes are commonly used for remediation of contaminated sites. A variety of natural processes occur without human intervention at all sites to varying rates and degrees of effectiveness to attenuate (decrease) the mass, toxicity, mobility, volume, or concentration of organic and inorganic contaminants in soil, groundwater, and surface water systems. The objective of this review is to identify potential technical investments to be incorporated in the Subsurface Contaminant Focus Area Strategic Plan for monitored natural attenuation. When implemented, the technical investments will help evaluate and implement monitored natural attenuation as a remediation option at DOE sites. The outcome of this review is a set of conclusions and general recommendations regarding research needs, programmatic guidance, and stakeholder issues pertaining to monitored natural attenuation for the DOE complex.

  6. Subsurface Contaminant Focus Area: Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA)--Programmatic, Technical, and Regulatory Issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natural attenuation processes are commonly used for remediation of contaminated sites. A variety of natural processes occur without human intervention at all sites to varying rates and degrees of effectiveness to attenuate (decrease) the mass, toxicity, mobility, volume, or concentration of organic and inorganic contaminants in soil, groundwater, and surface water systems. The objective of this review is to identify potential technical investments to be incorporated in the Subsurface Contaminant Focus Area Strategic Plan for monitored natural attenuation. When implemented, the technical investments will help evaluate and implement monitored natural attenuation as a remediation option at DOE sites. The outcome of this review is a set of conclusions and general recommendations regarding research needs, programmatic guidance, and stakeholder issues pertaining to monitored natural attenuation for the DOE complex

  7. The instrumental neutron activation determination of impurities in technical cobalt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Instrumental neutron activation techniques for determination of 13 impurities with detection limit 10-5 - 10-2% in technical cobalt have been developed by using thermal and epithermal neutrons of nuclear reactor. Self-shielding and disturbance of neutron flux(Co59 has high capture cross-section of neutrons) by sample were taken into account by using some references and from the results obtained in preliminary experiments. Samples and standards have been placed in such a way that neutron flux disturbance was less than 2-3%. The Al-Pb-Cd-Cu filter was used for absorption of low energy γ-rays of Co60m and Co61. (author)

  8. The Agency's Technical Co-operation activities in 1987. Report by the Director General

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    resources and 7.4% from In kind contributions. UNDP provided 6.2% of the total resources. Total new resources grew by 5.5% over the previous year, the total adjusted programme by 7.1%. Of this total adjusted programme, 61.3% was implement. The 67% implementation rate achieved in the TACF is higher than in any year prior to 1986. TACF pledges and miscellaneous income, reduced by losses on exchange, covered 88.6% of the target. The decline in percentage attainment of the target which began in 1983 continued unabated. The rate of annual increase in TACF resources declined further to 8.2%. The level of resources in 1987 was well below that assumed when the 1987 programme was designed. This shortfall in resources, combined with factors which favored project budget overruns, led to a level of over programming by year-end which was considerably above the acceptable limit. Measures taken in introducing the 1988 programme have in the meantime reduced this programme deficit to $5 million. Stringent control and conservative resource planning for the 1989-90 biennial programme will aim at ensuring that the approved programme will be contained within available resources. All future reports on technical co-operation activities covering the period starting from 1 January 1988 will present information concerning fields of activity in accordance with the Agency's Area of Activity/Project Codes (AAPC)

  9. Summary of Tiger Team Assessment and Technical Safety Appraisal recurring concerns in the Maintenance Area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiger Team Assessments and Technical Safety Appraisals (TSA) were reviewed and evaluated for concerns in the Maintenance Area (MA). Two hundred and thirty one (231) maintenance concerns were identified by the Tiger Team Assessments and TSA reports. These recurring concerns appear below. A summary of the Noteworthy Practices that were identified and a compilation of the maintenance concerns for each performance objective that were not considered as recurring are also included. Where the Tiger Team Assessment and TSA identified the operating contractor or facility by name, the concern has been modified to remove the name while retaining the intent of the comment

  10. Technical re-equipment organization in machine-building enterprises economic activity

    OpenAIRE

    Фартушняк, Ольга Вікторівна; Цибулько, Дмитро Іванович

    2014-01-01

    The article discusses the questions related to characteristics analysis of the complex system of technical re-equipment activities, as well as the organizational structure of the technical re-equipment, applying a matrix-type of an organization development. The specific tasks of the project technical re-equipment on middle and lower management levels were worked out. The ways of eliminating double subordination for the selected organizational structure managing technical re-equipment of a giv...

  11. Factors Influencing Trade Area Activity in the Great Basin Area

    OpenAIRE

    George Ebai; Thomas R. Harris

    1997-01-01

    Proper assessment of rural retail sector activity would yield effective and targeted retail extension/outreach programs. Pull factors assess a local retail sector's ability to meet local retail demands and to capture outside trade. If the local retail sector's pull factor vaiue is above the threshold value of one, the local retail sector is capturing local and non-local retail demands. Tobit estimation procedures were used for eight retail sectors to determine factors which influence the capt...

  12. Technical and economic impacts of active management on distribution network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the deregulation of energy market and the appeal for environment protection, more and more distributed generation (DG) is embedded in the distribution network. However the approach of connecting DG in most cases is based on a so-called ''fit and forget'' policy and the capacity of DG is limited rigidly by distribution network operator (DNO) to avoid the negative effects of high level penetration. Therefore active management (AM) is put forward as an effective method to network reinforcement for the connection and operation of DG. In this paper, the concept and principle of AM are introduced, and several indices are proposed to evaluate both technical and economic impacts of AM on distribution network with DG. To simplify the simulation fuzzy C-means clustering (FCM) algorithm is introduced. The test results on a sample system represent that AM will lead to decrease of power generation of DG, but it can reduce energy losses and improve voltage profile effectively. Furthermore, AM will take great economic incentives to DG developer as well as DNO with reasonable policy. (author)

  13. CEA technical-economic activity report - Year 2014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents an assessment of activities undertaken by the CEA in the field of energy technique and economy during 2014. Technical-economic studies aims at contributing to national orientations on energy, at R and D program orientations, at highlighting and strengthening synergies between nuclear technologies and new energy technologies, and at strengthening the credibility of these technologies. After a presentation of the organisation of technique and economy within the CEA, of the involved bodies and departments, of the addressed themes (photovoltaic, wind, biomass and biofuels, hydrogen-based systems, mobility, electric systems and grids), the report presents studies performed in relationship with the national energy strategy and with energy scenarios, studies performed in the nuclear field (on fourth-generation reactors, on the front-end and back-end of the fuel cycle), studies performed in the field of new energy technologies and climate (hydrogen and storage, biofuels, climate, mobility, solar, electric systems). The next part addresses academic aspects, methodological studies and modelling studies. Contributions and participations to conferences, and publications are indicated

  14. A Brief Technical History of the Large-Area Picosecond Photodetector (LAPPD) Collaboration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, B.W.; et al.

    2016-03-06

    The Large Area Picosecond PhotoDetector (LAPPD) Collaboration was formed in 2009 to develop large-area photodetectors capable of time resolutions measured in pico-seconds, with accompanying sub-millimeter spatial resolution. During the next three and one-half years the Collaboration developed the LAPPD design of 20 x 20 cm modules with gains greater than $10^7$ and non-uniformity less than $15\\%$, time resolution less than 50 psec for single photons and spatial resolution of 700~microns in both lateral dimensions. We describe the R\\&D performed to develop large-area micro-channel plate glass substrates, resistive and secondary-emitting coatings, large-area bialkali photocathodes, and RF-capable hermetic packaging. In addition, the Collaboration developed the necessary electronics for large systems capable of precise timing, built up from a custom low-power 15-GigaSample/sec waveform sampling 6-channel integrated circuit and supported by a two-level modular data acquisition system based on Field-Programmable Gate Arrays for local control, data-sparcification, and triggering. We discuss the formation, organization, and technical successes and short-comings of the Collaboration. The Collaboration ended in December 2012 with a transition from R\\&D to commercialization.

  15. Radionuclide Contaminant Analysis of Small Mammals at Area G, Technical Area 54, 1997 (with cumulative summary 1994-1997)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James R. Biggs; Kathryn D. Bennett; P. R. Fresquez

    1998-12-01

    In 1997, small mammals were sampled at four locations at Area G, Technical Area 54, a control site within the proposed Area G expansion area, and a background site on Frijoles Mesa. The purpose of the sampling was to (1) identify radionuclides that are present within rodent tissues at waste burial sites, (2) compare the amount of radionuclide uptake by small mammals at waste burial sites to a control site, and (3) identifi the primary mode of contamination to small mammals, either through surface contact or ingestion/inhalation. Three composite samples of approximately five animals per sample were collected at each site. Pelts and carcasses of each animal were separated and analyzed independently. Samples were analyzed for 241Am, 90Sr, 238Pu, 239Pu, total U, 137Cs, and 3H. Higher levels of total U and 137CS were detected in pelts as compared to the carcasses of small mammals, and 90Sr was found to be higher in carcasses. Concentrations of other measured radionuclides in carcasses were not found to be statistically different (p< 0.05) from that measured in pelts. However, pelts generally had higher concentrations than carcasses, indicating surface contamination may be the primary contamination mode. Low sample sizes in total number of animals captured during 1997 prevented statistical analysis to compare site to site to all but four sites. Mean concentrations of 241Am, 238Pu, 239Pu, and 3H in small mammal carcasses were found to be statistically greater at the transuranic (TRU) waste pad #2. In addition, mean concentrations of total U, ~lAm, and 3H in pelts of small mammals were also statistically greater. The Control Site and Background Site consistently had the lowest mean concentrations of radionuclides. Year to year comparison of mean radionuclide concentrations was conducted where suftlcient sample size existed. We found 241Am, 238Pu, 239Pu, and 3H mean concentrations in carcasses to be statistically greater in 1997 than previous years at TRU waste pad #2

  16. 4th July 2011 - Russian Deputy Director-General Director of Directorate for Scientific and Technical Complex ROSATOM V. Pershukov in the ATLAS underground experimental area with Adviser T. Kurtyka, ATLAS Technical Coordinator M. Nessi and ATLAS Russian users.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2011-01-01

    4th July 2011 - Russian Deputy Director-General Director of Directorate for Scientific and Technical Complex ROSATOM V. Pershukov in the ATLAS underground experimental area with Adviser T. Kurtyka, ATLAS Technical Coordinator M. Nessi and ATLAS Russian users.

  17. The Bigourdane technical ceramic nomad and sedentary between heritage and transactional areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurence BARNECHE-MIQUEU

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This chapter introduces the technical ceramic sector in the Hautes Pyrenees county. It aims at presenting the dynamics of recomposition of an industry historically linked to the presence of a local resource: electricity, hydroelectricity which was reconstructed around innovative small and average size industries.We first dwell on the process of decomposition, recomposition of the sector thanks to the perennial reconstitution of the sector we show, starting from the characteristics of the companies which appeared during the decomposition phase of the central actor CERAVER, the intensity of the transformation of the local productive system. The setting inherited from a century long presence of the technical ceramic in the Tarbes region – heritage area – is now linked to a transactional space built through the exchanges taking place within the framework of the pole of competitiveness of ceramic of Limoges, where new actors take part, the Ecole Superieure of the Art of Ceramics and Research Centre on the arts of Fire and Earth.

  18. Scientific-technical activities of small business (foreign experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stoyko, Igor Ivanovych

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of small firms in foreign countries, their contribution to scientific and technical development, sources of financing and carrying out a niche in research and development work.

  19. Environmental assessment for operations, upgrades, and modifications in SNL/NM Technical Area IV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proposed action for this EA for Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico Technical Area IV, includes continuing existing operations, modification of an existing accelerator (Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator II) to support defnese-related Z-pinch experiments, and construction of two transformer oil storage tanks to support the expansion of the Advanced Pulsed Power Research Module, a single pulse accelerator. Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE believes that the proposed action is not a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of NEPA and CEQ NEPA implementing regulations in 40 CFR 1508.18 and 1508.27. Therefore, an environmental impact statement is not required, and a Finding of No Significant Impact is issued

  20. Environmental assessment for operations, upgrades, and modifications in SNL/NM Technical Area IV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-04-01

    The proposed action for this EA for Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico Technical Area IV, includes continuing existing operations, modification of an existing accelerator (Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator II) to support defnese-related Z-pinch experiments, and construction of two transformer oil storage tanks to support the expansion of the Advanced Pulsed Power Research Module, a single pulse accelerator. Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE believes that the proposed action is not a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of NEPA and CEQ NEPA implementing regulations in 40 CFR 1508.18 and 1508.27. Therefore, an environmental impact statement is not required, and a Finding of No Significant Impact is issued.

  1. Direct Penetrating Radiation Monitoring Systems: Technical Evaluation for Use at Area G, Los Alamos National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent advances and commercialization of electret-ion-chamber (EIC) technology for photon measurements prompted us to consider EKs as a replacement for our TLD system. After laboratory tests indicated that both systems gave adequate results for controlled exposures, throughout 1998 we conducted field tests with paired TLDs and EICS, in LANL technical areas and in public areas. We had approximately 30 paired sampling sites at Area G. At each sampling site, we deployed three TLDs and three EICS. The EICS were contained in air-tight jars, each of which was placed in a Tyvek envelope and hung about 1 m above the ground. The dosimeters were read (and, if necessary, replaced) every three months. At the sites outside Area G, the TLD readings for the first two quarters were statistically significantly higher than those of the EICS: group average exposures were 38 and 36, compared with 33 mR (both quarters) for the EICS; during quarter 3, the EIC average (40 mR) was higher than the TLD average (34 mR); and during quarter 4, the two systems were statistically the same: EIC = 42, TLD = 41 with a p-value of 0.61. We are still evaluating these differences and performing additional laboratory studies to determine causes. At the Area G sites,we noticed that several of the TLDs gave much higher readings than their co-located EICS; we believe that the TLDs were over-responding by ∼50% to the low-energy (60-keV) gamma radiation associated with 241Am, whereas the EICS were responding accurately. We conclude that EICS are more accurate at a wide range of gamma energies and are preferable to TLDs in environments where a significant fraction of the photons are low energy

  2. Report of Activity, 1996 - 1997. Vol. 3. General activities - Technical Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is the third tome of the Report of Activity of IPN - Orsay on 1996-1997. It deals with general activities and technical research. Summary reports and short communications are grouped in the following sections: 1 - Accelerators with the sub-divisions 1.1 - R and D on superconducting RF cavities; 1.2 - SPIRAL Project; 1.3 - Contribution to the LHC Project; 1.4 - Tandem; 2 - Targets, Sources and Injectors; 3 - Detectors and related instrumentation; 4 - Electronics; 5 - Data processing; 6 - Radioprotection and medical applications

  3. [Review comments on the Draft DOE Area Recommendation Report for the Crystalline Repository Project]: Final technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research performed under the grant primarily involved review and comment on the Draft Area Recommendations Report (DARR). However, because data and ''recommendations'' included in the DARR are unquestionably tied to years of research and dozens of technical reports and documents, i.e., Screening Methodologies, Regional characterization Reports, etc., it is essential that consultants to the Menominee Tribe review all the relevant DOE documents, working papers, etc. Given the short period provided for technical comment and limited funds available to the Tribe, a well designed and thorough technical review was (and is) without question impossible. What review and comment that did occur on a geotechnical level is included in this report

  4. An audit questionnaire that examines specifically the management of technical activities clauses in ISO 15189

    OpenAIRE

    Hartley, T F

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to design an audit questionnaire that focuses on the management of the technical activities in a Diagnostic Pathology Laboratory. The ISO 15189 Standard is written in such a way that it continually moves back and forth from topics where the auditor needs to question bench level staff, to topics where the auditor needs to question Technical Management Staff. This makes for a disjointed audit process — both Bench Staff and Technical Managers are repeatedly interrupted....

  5. Trends analysis of technical support - Objectives and activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The annual Eurosafe forum has been created five years ago. Its aim was and is to give the opportunity to all those involved in the technical aspects of Nuclear Safety to meet, discuss, exchange and develop professional relations beyond the meeting. The history of this conference is, in a way, emblematic of the evolutions of the Technical Safety Organisations (TSO). Indeed, at the beginning was the so-called 'Fachgespraech' organised by GRS as an internal meeting. Then, at the end of the eighties, when GRS and IRSN decided to cooperate more closely on such topics as safety assessment, code developments, nuclear safety in Eastern European countries, it became a common meeting, renamed after some time to 'Eurosafe' with the objective to contribute to the convergence of safety technical practices in Europe. It appeared immediately necessary to share the objectives and the organisation of this meeting with other Technical Safety Organisations and expertise bodies, to broaden the topics to radioprotection, security and to extend the collaboration to the creation of a review called 'Tribune Eurosafe' and a web site. The factors motivating these evolutions, recent ones, since they happened in the last decade, are still existing. The purpose of this speech is to present them and to explain their influences on the Technical Safety Organisations and expertise bodies. The following questions are addressed: What are those Technical Safety Organisations and expertise bodies?; What are the main evolutions of the environment of the technical support organisations ? (The liberalization of the electricity market coupled with the reduction of international Internationalization and growing importance of the European Institutions; The need of the society for more transparency and understanding of the choices); and What strategy for the TSO regarding evolution of the environment? The paper shows that the technical safety organisations are facing many changes in their environment. These

  6. Technical assessment of compliance with workplace air sampling requirements in the 300 Area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this Technical Work Document is to satisfy HSRCM-1, the ''Hanford Site Radiological Control Manual.'' Article 551.4 of that manual states a requirement for a documented study of facility workplace air sampling programs (WPAS). This first revision of the original Supporting Document covers the period from January 1, 1995 to December 31, 1995. HSRCM-1 is the primary guidance for radiological control at Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). It was written to implement DOE/EH-0256T ''US Department of Energy Radiological Control Manual'' as it applies to programs at Hanford. As such, it complies with Title 10, Part 835 of the Code of Federal Regulations. There are also several Department of Energy (DOE) Orders, national consensus standards, and reports that provide criteria, standards, and requirements for workplace air sampling programs. This document provides a summary of these, as they apply to WHC facility workplace air sampling programs. This document also provides an evaluation of the compliance of 300 Areas' workplace air sampling program to the criteria, standards, and requirements and documents compliance with the requirements where appropriate. Where necessary, it also indicates changes needed to bring specific locations into compliance. The areas evaluated were the 340 Facility, the Advanced Reactor Operations Division Facilities, the N Reactor Fuels Supply Facility, and The Geotechnical Engineering Laboratory

  7. Final environmental assessment: TRU waste drum staging building, Technical Area 55, Los Alamos National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Much of the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) research on plutonium metallurgy and plutonium processing is performed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), in Los Alamos, New Mexico. LANL's main facility for plutonium research is the Plutonium Facility, also referred to as Technical Area 55 (TA-55). The main laboratory building for plutonium work within the Plutonium Facility (TA-55) is the Plutonium Facility Building 4, or PF-4. This Environmental Assessment (EA) analyzes the potential environmental effects that would be expected to occur if DOE were to stage sealed containers of transuranic (TRU) and TRU mixed waste in a support building at the Plutonium Facility (TA-55) that is adjacent to PF-4. At present, the waste containers are staged in the basement of PF-4. The proposed project is to convert an existing support structure (Building 185), a prefabricated metal building on a concrete foundation, and operate it as a temporary staging facility for sealed containers of solid TRU and TRU mixed waste. The TRU and TRU mixed wastes would be contained in sealed 55-gallon drums and standard waste boxes as they await approval to be transported to TA-54. The containers would then be transported to a longer term TRU waste storage area at TA-54. The TRU wastes are generated from plutonium operations carried out in PF-4. The drum staging building would also be used to store and prepare for use new, empty TRU waste containers

  8. Video Surveillance: Activities in a Cell Area

    OpenAIRE

    Thummanapalli, Shashidhar Rao; Kotla, Savarkar

    2015-01-01

    Considering todays growing society and developing technologies which are co-influential between each other, there is a larger scope of security concerns, traffic congestion due to improper planning and hence a greater need of more intelligent video surveillance. In this thesis, we have worked on developing such intelligent video surveillance system which mainly focusses on cell area such as parking spaces. The system operates on outdoor environment with a stationary camera; the main objective...

  9. Environmental Radiation Monitoring at the Areas of the Former Military Technical Bases at the Russian Far East - 12445

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After termination of operation at the serviced facilities of the nuclear fleet of the former Soviet Union, the Military Technical Base in Sysoeva Bay has been reorganized to the site for SNF and RW temporary storage (STS). The main activities of STS are receipt, storage and transmission to radioactive waste reprocessing. Establishment of the RW management regional centre in the Far-Eastern region at the STS in Sysoeva Bay implies intensification of SNF and RW management in this region that can result in increasing ecological load to the adjacent areas and settlements. Regulatory supervision of the radiation safety at the areas of the Former Military Technical Bases at the Russian Far East is one of the regulatory functions of the Federal Medical Biological Agency (FMBA of Russia). To regulate SNF an RW management and provide the effective response to changing radiation situation, the environmental radiation monitoring system is arranged. For this purpose, wide range of environmental media examinations at the Sysoeva Bay STS was performed by Burnasyan Federal Medical Biophysical Centre - a technical support organization of FMBA of Russia in collaboration with the Federal State Geological Enterprise 'Hydrospecgeology' (Federal Agency for Entrails). Regulation during the RW and SNF management is continuous process, which the FMBA of Russia implements in close cooperation with other Russian responsible authorities - the State Atomic Energy Corporation 'Rosatom' and Federal Agency for Entrails. The Environmental radiation monitoring findings served as a basis for the associated databank arrangement. The radio ecological monitoring system was arranged at the facilities under inspection for the purpose of the dynamic control of the radiation situation. It presupposes regular radiometry inspections in-situ, their analysis and assessment of the radiation situation forecast in the course of the STS remediation main stages. Some new data on the radiation situation at the

  10. Technical activity profile and influence of body anthropometry on playing performance in female elite team handball

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michalsik, Lars B; Aagaard, Per; Madsen, Klavs

    2015-01-01

    To determine the physical demands placed on female elite team handball (TH) players in relation to playing position and body anthropometry, female elite TH primarily field players were monitored during match-play using video recording and subsequent computerized technical match analysis during 5...... regular tournament match seasons. Technical match activities were distributed in 6 major types of playing actions (shots, breakthroughs, fast breaks, technical errors, defensive errors, and tackles) and further divided into various subcategories (e.g., type of shot, hard or light tackles, claspings...... female elite TH players during competitive games intermittently perform a high number of short-term, high-intense technical playing actions making modern female elite TH a physically demanding team sport. No sign of technical fatigue were observed, since the amount of intense technical playing actions...

  11. Remedial activities effectiveness verification in tailing areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The complex radiological study of the basin of sludge from the uranium ore mining and preprocessing was done. Air kerma rates (including its spectral analysis) at the reference height of 1 m above ground over the whole area were measured and radiation fields mapped during two measuring campaigns (years 2009 and 2014). K, U and Th concentrations in sludge and concentrations in depth profiles (including radon concentration and radon exhalation rates) in selected points were determined using gamma spectrometry for in situ as well as laboratory samples measurement. Results were used for the analysis, design evaluation and verification of the efficiency of the remediation measures. Efficiency of the sludge basin covering by the inert material was modelled using MicroShield code. (authors)

  12. The Agency's technical co-operation activities in 1985. Report by the Director General

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although total resources and disbursements were higher in 1985 than in previous years, the growth rates for both declined somewhat. New resources for the Technical Assistance and Co-operation Fund (TACF) increased by 13%, the TACF accounting for over 66% of all technical co-operation resources in 1985. Pledges made towards the 1985 target for voluntary contributions to the TACF came close to 90% of the target. Although a significant loss on exchange had to be absorbed by the Fund, 96.9% of the target was covered thanks to additional income. Although extrabudgetary resources declined in 1985, they still accounted for one fifth of all technical assistance resources. There was a significant increase in in-kind contributions; this was attributable to the support for non-destructive testing training in Latin America given by Canada, which was the second largest donor of in-kind assistance after the United States. UNDP resources rose very slightly. With UNDP's new five-year programming cycle beginning in 1987, there may be further increases if new projects are identified and timely action taken. New information on implementation expressed as net expenditure and net expenditure rates has been introduced in the form of Expenditure Summaries I, II and III, which provide a more precise picture of performance by fund, geographic area, programme component, field of activity and technical Division. Net expenditure against all funds stood at 57.9%. Net expenditure against the TACF was 66.3%. As UNDP resources and funds in trust account for relatively small shares of the programme, their utilization does not influence the overall net expenditure rate significantly. However, the slow utilization of extrabudgetary resources did have an adverse effect on programme performance as a whole. Net expenditures from the TACF continued to increase at a higher rate than resources, so that the unobligated balance declined for the second consecutive year. In the past, the growing unobligated

  13. Technical area status report for second-stage destruction and offgas treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report was sponsored by the Mixed Waste Integrated Program (MWIP), which was established by the Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM), Office of Technology Development (OTD). DOE/EM carries the charter to direct and coordinate waste management and site remediation throughout the DOE complex. Within EM, the OTD established the MWIP to identify and develop new technologies for treatment of DOE low-level mixed waste. This report represents the second TASR for the Second-Stage Destruction and Offgas Treatment technical area. This TASR updates technology information, a design methodology for air pollution control systems for mixed waste treatment, and technology development needs for DOE/EM. The TASRs form the basis of a technology development program that addresses the highest priority DOE environmental needs and is coordinated with other technology development efforts both inside and outside DOE. The main functions of the second-stage destruction and offgas treatment system are to treat the gaseous effluent from the primary treatment process to acceptable levels for release to the atmosphere. Specific functions include (1) destruction of volatile organics; (2) capture of particulate matter; (3) capture of volatile metals; (4) capture and control of volatile, condensed-phase, and solid-phase radionuclides; (5) control of acid gases; (6) NOx abatement; and (7) gas cooling and reheating as required to perform these functions

  14. Fuel consumption in the transport of technical broadleaf roundwood in lowland areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danilović Milorad

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of an analysis of fuel consumption in the transport of technical roundwood of soft broadleaves from the felling site to a roadside landing using forwarders and tractor assemblies. The research was performed in various operating conditions in the area of FE "Banat" Pančevo. On the basis of the results of the analysis of variance, the data recorded in a variety of conditions were grouped. In addition, the dependence of fuel consumption on the average volume of tour was estimated. The results of the conducted analysis indicate that operating conditions significantly affect fuel consumption of the investigated vehicles. The elements of statistical analysis of the dependence of fuel consumption on the volume of load indicate that an increase in load causes increased fuel consumption per unit of production. Having in mind the results of the analysis of variance, unique norms of fuel consumption were adopted for practical purposes. The highest average consumption (1.21 L/m3 was achieved by a tractor assembly (Same Laser 130 tractor and Imako TP12 trailer with a Loglift 61F hydraulic crane, while significantly lower consumption was achieved by a John Deere 1210E forwarder (1.06 L/m3. In favourable operating conditions, consumption of the forwarder was about 0.9 L/m3.

  15. WindPACT Turbine Design Scaling Studies Technical Area 2: Turbine, Rotor and Blade Logistics; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), the United States Department of Energy (DOE) implemented the Wind Partnership for Advanced Component Technologies (WindPACT) program. This program will explore advanced technologies that may reduce the cost of energy (COE) from wind turbines. The initial step in the WindPACT program is a series of preliminary scaling studies intended to determine the optimum sizes for future turbines, help define sizing limits for certain critical technologies, and explore the potential for advanced technologies to contribute to reduced COE as turbine scales increase. This report documents the results of Technical Area 2-Turbine Rotor and Blade Logistics. For this report, we investigated the transportation, assembly, and crane logistics and costs associated with installation of a range of multi-megawatt-scale wind turbines. We focused on using currently available equipment, assembly techniques, and transportation system capabilities and limitations to hypothetically transport and install 50 wind turbines at a facility in south-central South Dakota

  16. Technical area status report for second-stage destruction and offgas treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    French, N.B. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States); Dalton, J.D. [Science Applications International Corp., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Vavruska, J. [Equinox Ltd., Santa Fe, NM (United States)

    1994-08-01

    This report was sponsored by the Mixed Waste Integrated Program (MWIP), which was established by the Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM), Office of Technology Development (OTD). DOE/EM carries the charter to direct and coordinate waste management and site remediation throughout the DOE complex. Within EM, the OTD established the MWIP to identify and develop new technologies for treatment of DOE low-level mixed waste. This report represents the second TASR for the Second-Stage Destruction and Offgas Treatment technical area. This TASR updates technology information, a design methodology for air pollution control systems for mixed waste treatment, and technology development needs for DOE/EM. The TASRs form the basis of a technology development program that addresses the highest priority DOE environmental needs and is coordinated with other technology development efforts both inside and outside DOE. The main functions of the second-stage destruction and offgas treatment system are to treat the gaseous effluent from the primary treatment process to acceptable levels for release to the atmosphere. Specific functions include (1) destruction of volatile organics; (2) capture of particulate matter; (3) capture of volatile metals; (4) capture and control of volatile, condensed-phase, and solid-phase radionuclides; (5) control of acid gases; (6) NO{sub x} abatement; and (7) gas cooling and reheating as required to perform these functions.

  17. Annual activities report of Brazilian Aerospace Technical Center -CTA/IEAv - 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document reports the research activities on nuclear physics and reactors physics and engineering in the Brazilian Aerospace Technical Center/Advanced Studies Institute, Sao Paulo State, in the year of 1989

  18. Compilation of historical information of 300 Area facilities and activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerber, M.S.

    1992-12-01

    This document is a compilation of historical information of the 300 Area activities and facilities since the beginning. The 300 Area is shown as it looked in 1945, and also a more recent (1985) look at the 300 Area is provided.

  19. Compilation of historical information of 300 Area facilities and activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document is a compilation of historical information of the 300 Area activities and facilities since the beginning. The 300 Area is shown as it looked in 1945, and also a more recent (1985) look at the 300 Area is provided

  20. Of learning motivation of younger schoolboys to technical activities by means of educational robotics

    OpenAIRE

    Vera Sinebruhova; Aliya Mamedova

    2015-01-01

    This article deals with the problem of formation of educational motivation of younger students to the tech-nical activities of educational robotics means. The article covers the main provisions of learning motivation in children of primary school age, especially of the subject "Technology" for primary school results marked the initial diagnosis of the level of development in primary school children learning motivation to technical activities, as well as the potential of educational robotics i...

  1. Technical Note on the Construction of the Interregional Input-Output System for the Concession Areas of ANEEL

    OpenAIRE

    Haddad, Eduardo A.; Maria Carolina C. Marques

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this technical note is to document the methodology used to generate an interregional inputoutput system (IIOS) for the Concession Areas of ANEEL. The system consists of 58 regions closely associated with the territories of the concession areas under contract with the Federal Government. It also includes up to 110 products and 15 sectors in each region, identifying the spatial and sectoral linkages in the Brazilian interregional system. This is the first study ever that attemp...

  2. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report : Vancouver Lowlands Shillapoo Wildlife Area, 1994-1995 Technical Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calkins, Brian; Anderson, Eric; Ashley, Paul

    1995-01-01

    This project was conducted as part of a comprehensive planning effort for the Vancouver Lowlands project area. The study was funded by The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and carried out by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). The Vancouver Lowlands is considered an area of high priority by WDFW and is being considered as a potential site for wildlife mitigation activities by BPA. The objectives of this study were to collect baseline information and determine current habitat values for the study area. A brief discussion of potential future management and a proposed listing of priorities for habitat protection are found near the end of this report. This report is a companion to a programmatic management plan being drafted for the area which will outline specific, management programs to improve habitat conditions based, in part, on this study. The following narratives, describing limiting habitat variables, carry recurring themes for each indicator species and habitat type. These recurring variables that limited habitat value include: Waterbodies that lack emergent and submerged vegetation; forest areas that lack natural shrub layers; a predominance of non-hydrophytic and less desirable non-native plants where shrubs are present; a general lack of cover for ground nesting and secure waterfowl nest sites (island type). Human disturbance was the variable that varied more than any other from site to site in the study area. One issue that the models we used do not truly deal with is the quantity and connectivity of habitat. The mallard and heron models deal with spatial relationships but for other species this may be as critical. Observation of habitat maps easily show that forested habitats are in short supply. Their continuity along Lake river and the Columbia has been broken by past development. Wetland distribution has also been affected by past development.

  3. Technical and economical analysis of concepts for using the heat of biogas plants in rural areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the implementation of the EEG in Germany the biogas production becomes an independent branch of industry in the agriculture. At this time more than 90 percent of the biogas plants work with co-generation plant for heat and power with a thermal engine efficiencies of more than 50 percent. Because of the location in the rural area heat costumers with a continuous demand of heat over the whole year are rare. This research had a closer look how to use the heat of biogas production efficiently and also generating profit. The aim of the study was to use heat over the whole year, a profitable heat concept without counting the KWK-bonus and an added value on the farm. During the study the following concepts were analyzed: asparagus production using soil heating, drying equipment for different products, the production of fish in aquaculture, the poultry production and the heated production of tomatoes. The results showed different concepts using heat of biogas plants as efficient for farmers. However with only one concept the aims - to use the heat over the whole year, generating a profitable heat concept without counting the KWK-bonus, add an value on the farm - mostly can not be achieved. The combination of different heat concepts is necessary. In this analysis the poultry production in combination with the dryer can be considered as the most efficient concept. Bearing in mind the benefit which can be generated with a heat concept as well as the higher income and the higher technical efficiency of biogas plants operators should implement an individual concept for their heat.

  4. INSA scientific activities in the space astronomy area

    CERN Document Server

    Martinez, Ricardo Perez; 10.1007/978-3-642-11250-8

    2010-01-01

    Support to Astronomy operations is an important and long-lived activity within INSA. Probably the best known (and traditional) INSA activities are those related with real-time spacecraft operations: Ground station maintenance and operation (Ground station engineers and operators); spacecraft and payload real-time operation (spacecraft and instruments controllers); computing infrastructure maintenance (operators, analysts) and general site services.In this paper, we'll show a different perspective, probably not so well-known, presenting some INSA recent activities at the European Space Astronomy Centre (ESAC) and NASA Madrid Deep Space Communication Complex (MDSCC) directly related to scientific operations. Basic lines of activity involved include: Operations support for science operations; system and software support for real time systems; technical administration and IT support; R \\& D activities, radioastronomy (at MDSCC and ESAC) and scientific research projects. This paper is structured as follows: fi...

  5. Predoctoral training grant in the area of physical sciences. Final technical report, October 1989--October 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venkateswarlu, P.

    1993-11-01

    This final technical report represents the results of the research in nonlinear optics (optical phase conjugation) obtained by five (5) predoctoral students in the department of physics at Alabama Agricultural and Mechanical University (AAMU).

  6. Tritium in surface soils at the Mixed Waste Landfill, Technical Area 3, Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Environmental Restoration Project at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico is tasked with assessment and remediation of the Mixed Waste Landfill in Technical Area 3. The Mixed Waste Landfill is an inactive, low-level radioactive and mixed waste disposal site. The Mixed Waste Landfill was subject to an extensive surface soil sampling program for tritium in July 1993. Results indicate that surface soils at the landfill contain significant levels of tritium. The classified area of the landfill contains the highest levels of tritium. Results also indicate that tritium has migrated beyond the fenced boundary of the classified area of the landfill

  7. Activities of technical cooperation in the countries of Latin America: the case of Costa Rica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The activities of technical cooperation in the region of Latin America, have been promoted by the own countries, and by the International Atomic Energy Agency, since 1957. In Costa Rica from 1969, the Commission of Atomic Energy of Costa Rica, has developed an intense work in the promotion of the pacific uses of nuclear energy, as well as, the coordination and canalization of the international technical cooperation, toward the national executing institutions. (author)

  8. Modelling and algorithmization technics and tactic activity of sportsmen on the basis of situational decomposition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kozin V.V.

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In research is consider possibility of modelling and algorithmization technics and tactical activity of sportsmen on the basis of situational decomposition. The question is studied of integration biomechanical principles movements and idealizing representations of the purpose action, as realised image anticipated result, in one system. Positive influence on the improvement of general structure of technics and tactical action have methodics of education.

  9. General Electric ATS program technical review: Phase 2 activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chance, T. [GE Power Generation, Schenectady, NY (United States); Smith, D. [GE Corporate Research & Development Center, Schenectady, NY (United States)

    1995-10-01

    In response to the industrial and utility objectives specified for the ATS, the GE Power Generation ATS Phase 2 Program consisted of a dual approach. These were (1) development of an Industrial ATS (aircraft engine based) led by GE Aircraft Engines, and (2) development of a Utility ATS which was already underway at GEPG. Both programs required the identification and resolution of critical technical issues. Both systems were studied in Tasks 3-7, and both have resulted in designs that meet all ATS goals. The Industrial ATS as defined (130 MW) did not meet projected market power size requirements, and emphasis has remained on the Utility ATS development. The design and testing effort has been focused on the MS7001H combined cycle gas turbine, as the next product evolution in GE Power Generation`s product line. Common technology derived from the ATS Program is also being incorporated into the 50 Hz version of the ATS utility machine designated as the MS9001H.

  10. Global estimation of burned area using MODIS active fire observations

    OpenAIRE

    GIGLIO, L.; G. R. van der Werf; J. T. Randerson; Collatz, G. J.; Kasibhatla, P.

    2006-01-01

    We present a method for estimating monthly burned area globally at 1° spatial resolution using Terra MODIS data and ancillary vegetation cover information. Using regression trees constructed for 14 different global regions, MODIS active fire observations were calibrated to ''true'' burned area estimates derived from 500-m MODIS imagery based on the conventional assumption that burned area is proportional to counts of fire pixels. Unlike earlier methods, we...

  11. Evaluation of the technical instruction for monitoring and control of water reuse in the health areas managed by the environmental health service of the Region of Murcia

    OpenAIRE

    Dolores Gómez Castelló; Carmen Martínez López; Rosa López Casares; María Saquero Martínez; María José Herrera Díaz; Francisca Sintas Lozano

    2016-01-01

    One of the basic activities of the Water Reuse Monitoring and Control Program is the supervision of self-control programs–which should be put into practice by the concessionaires that reuse the water provided by the River Basin Organization, in the Health Areas managed by the Environmental Health Service–to check compliance with Annex I of Royal Decree 1620/2007. To facilitate these tasks, this Service issued a Water Reuse Monitoring and Control Technical Instruction in June 2012.In order to ...

  12. Technical support for geopressured-geothermal well activities in Louisiana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-07-01

    Continuous recording microearthquake monitoring networks have been established around US Department of Energy (DOE) geopressured-geothermal design wells in southwestern Louisiana and southeastern Texas since summer 1980 to assess the effects well development may have had on subsidence and growth-fault activation. This monitoring has shown several unusual characteristics of Gulf Coast seismic activity. The observed activity is classified into two dominant types, one with identifiable body phases (type 1) and the other with only surface-wave signatures (type 2). During this reporting period no type 1 or body-wave events were reported. A total of 230 type 2 or surface-wave events were recorded. Origins of the type 2 events are still not positively understood; however, little or no evidence is available to connect them with geopressured-geothermal well activity. We continue to suspect sonic booms from military aircraft or some other human-induced source. 37 refs., 16 figs., 6 tabs.

  13. REFLEXIVE ORGANIZATION OF LEARNING AND COGNITIVE ACTIVITY OF STUDENTS IN TECHNICAL INSTITUTIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Pikalova, Elena

    2015-01-01

    The paper deals with the learning cognitive activity of students based on the reflexive organization. The purpose is to determine the level of professional training in Magnitogorsk State Technical University with a help of method of reflective organization. The research has been carried out to prove the need for a reflective organization of learning activity in higher school.

  14. Stages of Concern Profiles for Active Learning Strategies of Agricultural Technical School Teachers in Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Brian E.; Barrick, R. Kirby; Samy, Mohamed M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the study was to assess Egyptian Agricultural Technical School (ATS) teachers' implementation of active learning strategies in their classrooms. Methods: The Stages of Concern Questionnaire was administered to 230 participants in active learning workshops. After eliminating headmasters, supervisors and people no longer…

  15. Final Scientific / Technical Report, Geothermal Resource Exploration Program, Truckhaven Area, Imperial County, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Layman Energy Associates, Inc.

    2006-08-15

    With financial support from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Layman Energy Associates, Inc. (LEA) has completed a program of geothermal exploration at the Truckhaven area in Imperial County, California. The exploratory work conducted by LEA included the following activities: compilation of public domain resource data (wells, seismic data, geologic maps); detailed field geologic mapping at the project site; acquisition and interpretation of remote sensing imagery such as aerial and satellite photographs; acquisition, quality control and interpretation of gravity data; and acquisition, quality control and interpretation of resistivity data using state of the art magnetotelluric (MT) methods. The results of this exploratory program have allowed LEA to develop a structural and hydrologic interpretation of the Truckhaven geothermal resource which can be used to guide subsequent exploratory drilling and resource development. Of primary significance, is the identification of an 8 kilometer-long, WNW-trending zone of low resistivity associated with geothermal activity in nearby wells. The long axis of this low resistivity zone is inferred to mark a zone of faulting which likely provides the primary control on the distribution of geothermal resources in the Truckhaven area. Abundant cross-faults cutting the main WNW-trending zone in its western half may indicate elevated fracture permeability in this region, possibly associated with thermal upwelling and higher resource temperatures. Regional groundwater flow is inferred to push thermal fluids from west to east along the trend of the main low resistivity zone, with resource temperatures likely declining from west to east away from the inferred upwelling zone. Resistivity mapping and well data have also shown that within the WNW-trending low resistivity zone, the thickness of the Plio-Pleistocene sedimentary section above granite basement ranges from 1,900–2,600 meters. Well data indicates the lower part of this

  16. Social responsibility activity of small enterprise – selected areas

    OpenAIRE

    Agnieszka Sokolowska

    2011-01-01

    Rules of social responsibility concept apply more to large enterprises activity than small ones. That is why there exists the need for indication of specificity of social responsibility in this enterprise group. The aim of the paper is to present social responsibility activities in selected areas of social responsibility in a small enterprise. The discussion is of theoretical and empirical nature.

  17. Technical activities report: Graphite Studies Group, February 1952

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bupp, L.P.

    1952-03-06

    Monthly activities for the following studies are given: (1) pile graphite monitoring; (2) graphite burnout and chemical studies; (3) graphite physical properties studies; (4) controlled temperature exposure; (5) thermal conductivity of gases; (6) damage mechanism study; (7) special exposures; and (8) experimental graphite program.

  18. Evaluation of Low-Level Waste Disposal Receipt Data for Los Alamos National Laboratory Technical Area 54, Area G Disposal Facility - Fiscal Year 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    French, Sean B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Shuman, Robert [WPS: WASTE PROJECTS AND SERVICES

    2012-04-17

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL or the Laboratory) generates radioactive waste as a result of various activities. Operational or institutional waste is generated from a wide variety of research and development activities including nuclear weapons development, energy production, and medical research. Environmental restoration (ER), and decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) waste is generated as contaminated sites and facilities at LANL undergo cleanup or remediation. The majority of this waste is low-level radioactive waste (LLW) and is disposed of at the Technical Area 54 (TA-54), Area G disposal facility. U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 435.1 (DOE, 2001) requires that radioactive waste be managed in a manner that protects public health and safety, and the environment. To comply with this order, DOE field sites must prepare and maintain site-specific radiological performance assessments for LLW disposal facilities that accept waste after September 26, 1988. Furthermore, sites are required to conduct composite analyses that account for the cumulative impacts of all waste that has been (or will be) disposed of at the facilities and other sources of radioactive material that may interact with the facilities. Revision 4 of the Area G performance assessment and composite analysis was issued in 2008 (LANL, 2008). These analyses estimate rates of radionuclide release from the waste disposed of at the facility, simulate the movement of radionuclides through the environment, and project potential radiation doses to humans for several on-site and off-site exposure scenarios. The assessments are based on existing site and disposal facility data and on assumptions about future rates and methods of waste disposal. The accuracy of the performance assessment and composite analysis depends upon the validity of the data used and assumptions made in conducting the analyses. If changes in these data and assumptions are significant, they may invalidate or call

  19. Legal and technical analysis of the activities involving radiation applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Activities related to radiation applications have been worldwide target of studies concerning biology, medicine, sociology, psychology and law, since prediction of the possible risks and harms associated with the use of radiation, depends on probabilities not easy to quantify, mainly in the most common low-dose situations. In Brazil, legislation generated in the last forty years did not match evolution of the scientific domains related above. This way, more recent rules not rarely conflict with older regulations, without revoking them. (author)

  20. Active sites in char gasification: Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wojtowicz, M.; Lilly, W.D.; Perkins, M.T.; Hradil, G.; Calo, J.M.; Suuberg, E.M.

    1987-09-01

    Among the key variables in the design of gasifiers and combustors is the reactivity of the chars which must be gasified or combusted. Significant loss of unburned char is unacceptable in virtually any process; the provision of sufficient residence time for complete conversion is essential. A very wide range of reactivities are observed, depending upon the nature of the char in a process. The current work focuses on furthering the understanding of gasification reactivities of chars. It has been well established that the reactivity of char to gasification generally depends upon three principal factors: (1) the concentration of ''active sites'' in the char; (2) mass transfer within the char; and (3) the type and concentration of catalytic impurities in the char. The present study primarily addresses the first factor. The subject of this research is the origin, nature, and fate of active sites in chars derived from parent hydrocarbons with coal-like structure. The nature and number of the active sites and their reactivity towards oxygen are examined in ''model'' chars derived from phenol-formaldehyde type resins. How the active sites are lost by the process of thermal annealing during heat treatment of chars are studied, and actual rate for the annealing process is derived. Since intrinsic char reactivities are of primary interest in the present study, a fair amount of attention was given to the model char synthesis and handling so that the effect of catalytic impurities and oxygen-containing functional groups in the chemical structure of the material were minimized, if not completely eliminated. The project would not be considered complete without comparing characteristic features of synthetic chars with kinetic behavior exhibited by natural chars, including coal chars.

  1. Technical study on cross section measurement with Al activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The method of Al activation relative measurement of cross section has been studied. The cross sections of 27Al(n,α)24Na have been measured in 13.4 MeV to 14.7 MeV. The PD-300 accelerator offered D-T neutron source. The distance from sample to Tritium target is 20 cm. It spent 5 h to radiate sample with neutron. The intensity of neutron source is monitored by the α-particles from the T(d, n) 4He reaction. The induced neutron energy is determined using ratio of Nb(n,2n) and Zr(n,2n) cross section. The activated gamma ray is measured using GEM60P HPGe detector. The results of 27Al(n, α)24Na cross sections are compared with the nuclear data standard, and the deviation is less than 1%. It showed that the method of Al activation relative measurement of cross section is credible. (authors)

  2. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report : Ladd Marsh Wildlife Area, 2004-2006 Technical Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashley, Paul; Wagoner, Sara

    2006-05-01

    The Regional HEP Team (RHT) and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) staff conducted a follow-up habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) analysis on the Ladd Marsh Wildlife Management Area (LMWA) in May 2005. The 2005 HEP assessment resulted in a total of 647.44 HUs, or 0.76 HUs/acre. This is an increase of 420.34 HUs (0.49 HUs/acre) over 2001 HEP survey results. The most significant increase in HUs occurred on the Wallender and Simonis parcels which increased by 214.30 HUs and 177.49 HUs respectively. Transects were established at or near 2001 HEP analysis transect locations whenever possible. ODFW staff biologists assisted the RHT re-establish transect locations and/or suggested areas for new surveys. Since 2001, significant changes in cover type acreage and/or structural conditions have occurred due to conversion of agriculture cover types to emergent wetland and grassland cover types. Agricultural lands were seeded to reestablish grasslands and wetlands were restored through active management and manipulation of extant water sources including natural stream hydrology/flood regimes and available irrigation. Grasslands increased on the Wallender parcel by 21% (65 acres), 23% (71 acres) at the Simonis site, and 39% (62 acres) at Conley Lake. The emergent wetland cover type also changed significantly increasing 60% (184 acres) at Wallender and 59% (184 acres) on the Simonis tract. Today, agriculture lands (crop and grazed pasture) have been nearly eliminated from Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) mitigation project lands located on the LMWA.

  3. Technical support for geopressured-geothermal well activities in Louisiana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US Department of Energy has operated continuous-recording, microearthquake monitoring networks at geopressured-geothermal test well sites since 1980. These microseismic networks were designed to detect microearthquakes indicative of fault activation and/or subsidence that can potentially result from the deep subsurface withdrawal and underground disposal of large volumes of brine during well testing. Seismic networks were established before the beginning of testing to obtain background levels of seismicity. Monitoring continued during testing and for some time after cessation of flow testing to assess any delayed microseismicity caused by the time dependence of stress migration within the earth. No flow testing has been done at the Hulin well since January 1990, and the Pleasant Bayou well has been shut down since September 1992. Microseismic monitoring continued at the Hulin and Pleasant Bayou sites until 31 December 1992, at which time both operations were shut down and field sites dismantled. During 1992, the networks recorded seismic signals from earthquakes, sonic booms, geophysical blasting, thunderstorms, etc. However, as in previous years, no local microseismic activity attributable to geopressured-geothermal well testing was recorded

  4. Class 1 Permit Modification Notification Addition of Structures within Technical Area 54, Area G, Pad 11, Dome 375 Los Alamos National Laboratory Hazardous Waste Facility Permit, July 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this letter is to notify the New Mexico Environment Department-Hazardous Waste Bureau (NMED-HWB) of a Class 1 Permit Modification to the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Hazardous Waste Facility Permit issued to the Department of Energy (DOE) and Los Alamos National Security, LLC (LANS) in November 2010. The modification adds structures to the container storage unit at Technical Area (TA) 54 Area G, Pad 11. Permit Section 3.1(3) requires that changes to the location of a structure that does not manage hazardous waste shall be changed within the Permit as a Class 1 modification without prior approval in accordance with Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40 (40 CFR), (section)270.42(a)(1). Structures have been added within Dome 375 located at TA-54, Area G, Pad 11 that will be used in support of waste management operations within Dome 375 and the modular panel containment structure located within Dome 375, but will not be used as waste management structures. The Class 1 Permit Modification revises Figure 36 in Attachment N, Figures; and Figure G.12-1 in Attachment G.12, Technical Area 54, Area G, Pad 11 Outdoor Container Storage Unit Closure Plan. Descriptions of the structures have also been added to Section A.4.2.9 in Attachment A, TA - Unit Descriptions; and Section 2.0 in Attachment G.12, Technical Area 54, Area G, Pad 11 Outdoor Container Storage Unit Closure Plan. Full description of the permit modification and the necessary changes are included in Enclosure 1. The modification has been prepared in accordance with 40 CFR (section)270.42(a)(l). This package includes this letter and an enclosure containing a description of the permit modification, text edits of the Permit sections, and the revised figures (collectively LA-UR--12-22808). Accordingly, a signed certification page is also enclosed. Three hard copies and one electronic copy of this submittal will be delivered to the NMED-HWB.

  5. Active Learning based on the use of Augmented Reality Outline of Possible Applications: Serious Games, Scientific Experiments, Confronting Studies with Creation, Training for Carrying out Technical Skills

    OpenAIRE

    Cieutat, Jean-Marc; Hugues, Olivier; Ghouaiel, Nehla

    2012-01-01

    This paper looks at augmented reality as a support for active learning. Fourth areas of application are studied: serious games, scientific experiments, confronting study results with creation and training for carrying out technical skills. After introducing a new proposed augmented reality definition, we illustrate each area with original examples like an augmented reality serious game to understand electromagnetic phenomena and their applications in electrical engineering or still an augment...

  6. Advanced Transportation System Studies. Technical Area 3: Alternate Propulsion Subsystems Concepts. Volume 3; Program Cost Estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levack, Daniel J. H.

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this contract was to provide definition of alternate propulsion systems for both earth-to-orbit (ETO) and in-space vehicles (upper stages and space transfer vehicles). For such propulsion systems, technical data to describe performance, weight, dimensions, etc. was provided along with programmatic information such as cost, schedule, needed facilities, etc. Advanced technology and advanced development needs were determined and provided. This volume separately presents the various program cost estimates that were generated under three tasks: the F- IA Restart Task, the J-2S Restart Task, and the SSME Upper Stage Use Task. The conclusions, technical results , and the program cost estimates are described in more detail in Volume I - Executive Summary and in individual Final Task Reports.

  7. Review of the geological and structural setting near the site of the proposed Transuranic Waste Facility (TRUWF) Technical Area 52 (TA-52), Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schultz-Fellenz, Emily S.; Gardner, Jamie N.

    2007-10-01

    Because of Los Alamos National Laboratory’s proximal location to active geologic structures, assessment of seismic hazards, including the potential for seismic surface rupture, must occur before construction of any facilities housing nuclear or other hazardous materials. A transuranic waste facility (TRUWF) planned for construction at Technical Area 52 (TA-52) provides the impetus for this report. Although no single seismic hazards field investigation has focused specifically on TA-52, numerous studies at technical areas surrounding TA-52 have shown no significant, laterally continuous faults exhibiting activity in the last 10 ka within 3,000 ft of the proposed facility. A site-specific field study at the footprint of the proposed TRUWF would not yield further high-precision data on possible Holocene faulting at the site because post-Bandelier Tuff sediments are lacking and the shallowest subunit contacts of the Bandelier Tuff are gradational. Given the distal location of the proposed TRUWF to any mapped structures with demonstrable Holocene displacement, surface rupture potential appears minimal at TA-52.

  8. The Bigourdane technical ceramic nomad and sedentary between heritage and transactional areas

    OpenAIRE

    Laurence BARNECHE-MIQUEU

    2008-01-01

    This chapter introduces the technical ceramic sector in the Hautes Pyrenees county. It aims at presenting the dynamics of recomposition of an industry historically linked to the presence of a local resource: electricity, hydroelectricity which was reconstructed around innovative small and average size industries.We first dwell on the process of decomposition, recomposition of the sector thanks to the perennial reconstitution of the sector we show, starting from the characteristics of the comp...

  9. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report : Rainwater Wildlife Area, 1998-2001 Technical Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Childs, Allen

    2004-01-01

    vegetation species, allowance of normative processes such as fire occurrence, and facilitating development of natural stable stream channels and associated floodplains. Implementation of habitat enhancement and restoration activities could generate an additional 1,850 habitat units in 10 years. Baseline and estimated future habitat units total 7,035.3 for the Rainwater Wildlife Area. Habitat protection, enhancement and restoration will require long-term commitments from managers to increase probabilities of success and meet the goals and objectives of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Program. Longer-term benefits of protection and enhancement activities include increases in native species diversity and plant community resiliency in all cover types. Watershed conditions, including floodplain/riparian, and instream habitat quality should improve as well providing multiple benefits for terrestrial and aquatic resources. While such benefits are not necessarily recognized by HEP models and reflected in the number of habitat units generated, they are consistent with the NPPC Fish and Wildlife Program.

  10. IAEA Activities in the Area of Fast Reactors and Related Fuels and Fuel Cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the actual context of growing energy needs on one side and concerns for the environment on the other, it is generally recognized that innovative fast reactors and fuel cycle concepts will be able to provide a relevant contribution to future energy needs, if the research and technology developments create the conditions to clearly satisfy the criteria of economic competitiveness, stringent safety requirements, sustainable development and public acceptability. For more than 45 years, the IAEA has been accompanying and supporting the development and deployment of the fast reactor technology, serving the interested Member States as a major forum for fast reactor information exchange and collaborative research and technology development. In particular, since 1967 the keystone of the IAEA’s efforts in this field is represented by the Technical Working Group on Fast Reactors (TWG-FR), which is a group of experts tasked to provide advice and support programme implementation, reflecting a global network of excellence and expertise in the area of advanced technologies and R&D for fast reactors. The TWG-FR coordinates its activities with other IAEA projects, especially those of the Technical Working Group on Nuclear Fuel Cycle Options (TWG-NFCO), the Department of Nuclear Sciences and Applications, the Department of Nuclear Safety and Security and, last but not least, the International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and the Fuel Cycle (INPRO). Among the broad spectrum of IAEA activities in this field, the coordinated research projects (CRPs) represent the major tool to enhance Member States’ knowledge and technical capabilities in the different fields of the fast reactor technology, as well as to promote international cooperation and sharing of knowledge. With regard to the last purpose, the IAEA regularly organizes technical meetings and conferences to discuss the main technology challenges facing the deployment of fast reactors and advanced fuel cycles, to

  11. Technical progress in INPRO activities on modelling and innovation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Among the 31 Members of the 'International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles' (INPRO) in April 2010, more than 20 are cooperating in the implementation of Collaborative Projects (CPs) related to the four substantive Programme Areas of the INPRO Action Plan. The purpose of the CPs is to contribute to the achievement of goals established in the programmatic areas. This paper presents progress status of several CPs dealing with Modelling and Innovation: - CP on Environmental Impact Benchmarking applicable to Nuclear Energy Systems under Normal Operation (ENV): A benchmark of codes and methods for determining radiation released during normal operation of nuclear facilities is performed by using established source term, release scenario, and target group (humans). - CP on Proliferation Resistance: Acquisition/Diversion Pathway Analysis (PRADA): 'PRADA' addresses the identification and analyses of high level pathways for the acquisition of weapons usable material, and makes recommendations for evaluating the multiplicity and robustness of barriers against proliferation. PRADA develops a case study based on DUPIC fuel cycle. The outcome from the project will support the assessment methodologies developed at GIF and INPRO. - CP on Global Architecture of Nuclear Energy Systems based on Thermal and Fast Reactors including Closed Fuel Cycle (GAINS): GAINS objective is to develop a methodological platform for assessing future nuclear energy systems taking into account the sustainable development, and to validate the results through sample analyses. High and moderate scenarios of nuclear energy demand and supply during the Century (5000 and 2500 GWe respectively in the year 2100) are being analysed using homogeneous and heterogeneous considerations. A non-geographic approach grouping the countries according to their planned use of nuclear energy has being established. - CP on Investigations of the 233U/Th Fuel Cycle (ThFC): ThFC objective is to explore FC

  12. Mark II containment program load evaluation and acceptance criteria; Generic Technical Activity A-8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report provides a discussion of LOCA-related suppression pool hydrodynamic loads in boiling water reactor (BWR) facilities with the Mark II pressure-suppression containment design. This report concludes NRC Generic Technical Activity A-8, 'Mark II Containment Pool Dynamic Loads,' which has been designated an 'Unresolved Safety Issue' pursuant to Section 210 of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974

  13. 76 FR 7870 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Cybersecurity and Communications Technical Assistance...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-11

    ... published this ICR in the Federal Register on March 3, 2010, at 75 FR 9608-9609, for a 60-day public comment... SECURITY Agency Information Collection Activities: Cybersecurity and Communications Technical Assistance... Homeland Security (DHS), National Protection and Programs Directorate (NPPD), Office of Cybersecurity...

  14. Protected Areas in Tropical Africa : Assessing Threats and Conservation Activities

    OpenAIRE

    Tranquilli, Sandra; Abedi-Lartey, Michael; Abernethy, Katharine; Amsini, Fidèlle; Asamoah, Augustus; Balangtaa, Cletus; Blake, Stephen; Bouanga, Estelle; Breuer, Thomas; Brncic, Terry; Campbell, Geneviève; Chancellor, Rebecca; Chapman, Colin; Davenport, Tim; Dunn, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Numerous protected areas (PAs) have been created in Africa to safeguard wildlife and other natural resources. However, significant threats from anthropogenic activities and decline of wildlife populations persist, while conservation efforts in most PAs are still minimal. We assessed the impact level of the most common threats to wildlife within PAs in tropical Africa and the relationship of conservation activities with threat impact level. We collated data on 98 PAs with tropical forest cover...

  15. Defence force activities in marine protected areas: environmental management of Shoalwater Bay Training Area, Queensland, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wen; Wang, Xiaohua; Paull, David; Kesby, Julie

    2010-05-01

    Environmental management of military activities is of growing global concern by defence forces. As one of the largest landholders in Australia, the Australian Defence Force (ADF) is increasingly concerned with sustainable environmental management. This paper focuses on how the ADF is maintaining effective environmental management, especially in environmentally sensitive marine protected areas. It uses Shoalwater Bay Training Area (SWBTA) as a research example to examine environmental management strategies conducted by the ADF. SWBTA is one of the most significant Defence training areas in Australia, with a large number of single, joint and combined military exercises conducted in the area. With its maritime component contained in the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park (GBRMP), the Great Barrier Reef World Heritage Area (GBRWHA), and abutting Queensland’s State Marine Parks, it has high protection values. It is therefore vital for the ADF to adopt environmentally responsible management while they are conducting military activities. As to various tools employed to manage environmental performance, the ISO 14001 Environmental Management System (EMS) is widely used by the ADF. This paper examines military activities and marine environmental management within SWBTA, using the Talisman Saber (TS) exercise series as an example. These are extensive joint exercises conducted by the ADF and the United States defence forces. The paper outlines relevant legislative framework and environmental policies, analyses how the EMS operates in environmental management of military activities, and how military activities comply with these regulations. It discusses the implementation of the ADF EMS, including risk reduction measures, environmental awareness training, consultation and communication with stakeholders. A number of environmental management actions used in the TS exercises are presented to demonstrate the EMS application. Our investigations to this point indicate that the ADF is

  16. Contaminant Area Aquaculture Program. Determination of the chemical suitability of a dredged material containment area for aquaculture. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tatem, H.E.

    1990-12-01

    This concerns use of dredged material containment areas (DMCA) for aquaculture, specifically for production of a crop intended for human consumption. New DMCA's used only periodically for dredged material disposal could be managed to produce valuable crops. Previous studies conducted by the Corps of Engineers, including one where shrimp was raised at a DMCA, and others relating to the effects of sediment contaminants on aquatic organisms, are reviewed. The literature indicated that most dredged material is uncontaminated and that many sediment constituents such as metal are relatively unavailable to aquatic animals; DMCAs containing parts-per-million levels of organic contaminants such as pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls, or petroleum hydrocarbons should not be used for aquaculture without extensive testing.

  17. Adsorption of naphthenic acids on high surface area activated carbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iranmanesh, Sobhan; Harding, Thomas; Abedi, Jalal; Seyedeyn-Azad, Fakhry; Layzell, David B

    2014-01-01

    In oil sands mining extraction, water is an essential component; however, the processed water becomes contaminated through contact with the bitumen at high temperature, and a portion of it cannot be recycled and ends up in tailing ponds. The removal of naphthenic acids (NAs) from tailing pond water is crucial, as they are corrosive and toxic and provide a substrate for microbial activity that can give rise to methane, which is a potent greenhouse gas. In this study, the conversion of sawdust into an activated carbon (AC) that could be used to remove NAs from tailings water was studied. After producing biochar from sawdust by a slow-pyrolysis process, the biochar was physically activated using carbon dioxide (CO2) over a range of temperatures or prior to producing biochar, and the sawdust was chemically activated using phosphoric acid (H3PO4). The physically activated carbon had a lower surface area per gram than the chemically activated carbon. The physically produced ACs had a lower surface area per gram than chemically produced AC. In the adsorption tests with NAs, up to 35 mg of NAs was removed from the water per gram of AC. The chemically treated ACs showed better uptake, which can be attributed to its higher surface area and increased mesopore size when compared with the physically treated AC. Both the chemically produced and physically produced AC provided better uptake than the commercially AC. PMID:24766592

  18. IPN - Orsay Report of activity 1998-1999. General activities. Technical Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    spectrometer and for HADES experiment. Also the progress in developing the equipment for G0 experiment, VAMOS spectrometer, the large surface annular telescope and EUROBALL 4 detector is described. Finally in the chapter four there are reported works on developing a peak sensing ADC, a VXI D size card for EXOGAM,and data acquisition systems. The first volume begins with short reports of activity from the technical and general servicing departments. The second volume of the IPNO Report presents the results of the Research Division

  19. Technical area status report for chemical/physical treatment. Volume 2, Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, C.H. Jr. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Schwinkendorf, W.E. [BDM Federal, Inc., Arlington, VA (United States)

    1993-08-01

    These Appendices describe various technologies that may be applicable to the Mixed Waste Treatment Plant (MWTP) Chemical/Physical Treatment System (CPTS). These technologies were identified by the CPTS Technical Support Group (TSG) as potentially applicable to a variety of separation, volume reduction, and decontamination requirements. The purpose was to identify all available and developing technologies, and their characteristics, for subsequent evaluation for specific requirements identified for the CPTS. However, the technologies described herein are not necessarily all inclusive, nor are they necessarily all applicable.

  20. Evaluation of the technical instruction for monitoring and control of water reuse in the health areas managed by the environmental health service of the Region of Murcia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolores Gómez Castelló

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available One of the basic activities of the Water Reuse Monitoring and Control Program is the supervision of self-control programs–which should be put into practice by the concessionaires that reuse the water provided by the River Basin Organization, in the Health Areas managed by the Environmental Health Service–to check compliance with Annex I of Royal Decree 1620/2007. To facilitate these tasks, this Service issued a Water Reuse Monitoring and Control Technical Instruction in June 2012.In order to test the e effectiveness of monitoring activities concerning water reuse after the issuance of the Technical Instruction, the results obtained from the inspection activities carried out in 2012 were compared with those obtained after the 2014 inspections.The results obtained show that the performance of inspections and the sending of reports to the Basin Organization have led to an increase in compliance with R.D. 1620/2007. All of the inspected plants have a self-control program in place. Furthermore, the number of inspected plants that perform analytical determinations with a frequency below that set by current regulations has decreased drastically.

  1. Cognitive Neurostimulation: Learning to Volitionally Sustain Ventral Tegmental Area Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacInnes, Jeff J; Dickerson, Kathryn C; Chen, Nan-kuei; Adcock, R Alison

    2016-03-16

    Activation of the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and mesolimbic networks is essential to motivation, performance, and learning. Humans routinely attempt to motivate themselves, with unclear efficacy or impact on VTA networks. Using fMRI, we found untrained participants' motivational strategies failed to consistently activate VTA. After real-time VTA neurofeedback training, however, participants volitionally induced VTA activation without external aids, relative to baseline, Pre-test, and control groups. VTA self-activation was accompanied by increased mesolimbic network connectivity. Among two comparison groups (no neurofeedback, false neurofeedback) and an alternate neurofeedback group (nucleus accumbens), none sustained activation in target regions of interest nor increased VTA functional connectivity. The results comprise two novel demonstrations: learning and generalization after VTA neurofeedback training and the ability to sustain VTA activation without external reward or reward cues. These findings suggest theoretical alignment of ideas about motivation and midbrain physiology and the potential for generalizable interventions to improve performance and learning. PMID:26948894

  2. Current conceptual model of groundwater flow and contaminant transport at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico Technical Area V.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orr, Brennon R.; Dettmers, Dana L.

    2004-04-01

    The New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) requires a Corrective Measures Evaluation to evaluate potential remedial alternatives for contaminants of concern (COCs) in groundwater at Sandia National Laboratories New Mexico (SNUNM) Technical Area (TA)-V. These COCs consist of trichloroethene, tetrachloroethene, and nitrate. This document presents the current conceptual model of groundwater flow and transport at TA-V that will provide the basis for a technically defensible evaluation. Characterization is defined by nine requirement areas that were identified in the NMED Compliance Order on Consent. These characterization requirement areas consist of geohydrologic characteristics that control the subsurface distribution and transport of contaminants. This conceptual model document summarizes the regional geohydrologic setting of SNUNM TA-V. The document also presents a summary of site-specific geohydrologic data and integrates these data into the current conceptual model of flow and contaminant transport. This summary includes characterization of the local geologic framework; characterization of hydrologic conditions at TA-V, including recharge, hydraulics of vadose-zone and aquifer flow, and the aquifer field of flow as it pertains to downgradient receptors. The summary also discusses characterization of contaminant transport in the subsurface, including discussion about source term inventory, release, and contaminant distribution and transport in the vadose zone and aquifer.

  3. Technical know-how of selection process for the Horonobe underground research laboratory area and site - 59088

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study demonstrates the selection process for the Horonobe URL based on surveys of existing information and geophysical surveys on a regional scale. In addition, preliminary requirements on the geological environment, safety (during construction of the underground facility) and social and environmental constraints were taken into consideration. The technical know-how utilised through the experiences for the site selection is described here. The proposed Horonobe URL site required the existence of argillaceous sedimentary formations and associated groundwater. Further fundamental requirements were appropriate rock mechanical properties and low gas content in the host rock to meet safe underground construction and operation regulations. This led to a stepwise narrowing down from several potential URL areas located completely within the Horonobe District to one candidate URL area and, finally, to a specific URL site. In the URL investigation area (ca. 3 km x 3 km) the main surface-based investigations were conducted as the first step to choosing the actual URL site. This was selected based on establishing fundamental factors related to the geological environment, safety and societal issues. This paper provides an outline of the process utilised in selecting the URL site by taking into consideration technical and social requirements. Thus stepwise approach and experience in selecting the URL site will be applicable when NUMO needs to select a site through literature surveys, and preliminary and detailed investigations in the future. (authors)

  4. FY 2000 Tanks Focus Area Corrosion Monitoring Technical Committee Meeting Summary Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary purpose of the annual meeting between the corrosion monitoring personnel at the various DOE sites is to facilitate communications and promote technology transfer between the two sites. The close communications and good spirit of teamwork being exhibited between the parties representing the Hanford and Savannah River Sites has helped the Savannah River Site effort avoid many of the problems encountered during the initial development effort at Hanford. Similar benefits can be expected over the next few years as the ORNL program is developed. Expected products of this meeting as defined in Milestone A.4-1 of TTP RL0-9-WT-41 are reports on the status of technical work at the sites, discussions of emerging technical issues, and results of laboratory experiments and field trials. The formal meeting, informal discussions throughout the week, and the presentation materials shown in the attachment to this document fulfill the expectations of this meeting. At the conclusion of the meeting it was agreed that close communications should continue between the concerned parties at ORNL, SRTC and Hanford. Tentative plans were made to hold a similar meeting in approximately one year

  5. Technical program plan for the transitioning, decommissioning, and final disposition focus area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hundreds of aging nuclear materials processing facilities within the Department of Energy's (DOE) Weapons Complex are now being shut down and deactivated. These facilities, situated throughout the United States, will require a monumental effort to clean up safely and with minimal environmental insult. Current cleanup technologies tend to be labor intensive and expensive, they produce an unacceptably large volume of waste, and they expose workers to radioactive and other hazardous substances. This document describes an emerging program designed to develop and demonstrate new technical approaches to the decontamination and decommissioning (D ampersand D) program for DOE's nuclear materials processing facilities. Sponsored by the DOE Office of Technology Development within the Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM), the program seeks to integrate the strengths of DOE's technical, managerial, and systems engineering capabilities with those of industry, universities, and other government agencies. Once developed, these technologies will help to provide US industry with a competitive edge in the worldwide market that exists for improved environmental restoration and D ampersand D services

  6. Technical program plan for the transitioning, decommissioning, and final disposition focus area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-01-01

    Hundreds of aging nuclear materials processing facilities within the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Weapons Complex are now being shut down and deactivated. These facilities, situated throughout the United States, will require a monumental effort to clean up safely and with minimal environmental insult. Current cleanup technologies tend to be labor intensive and expensive, they produce an unacceptably large volume of waste, and they expose workers to radioactive and other hazardous substances. This document describes an emerging program designed to develop and demonstrate new technical approaches to the decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) program for DOE`s nuclear materials processing facilities. Sponsored by the DOE Office of Technology Development within the Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM), the program seeks to integrate the strengths of DOE`s technical, managerial, and systems engineering capabilities with those of industry, universities, and other government agencies. Once developed, these technologies will help to provide US industry with a competitive edge in the worldwide market that exists for improved environmental restoration and D&D services.

  7. Extended characterization of M-Area settling basin and vicinity. Technical data summary. Revision

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pickett, J B

    1985-10-01

    The Savannah River Plant M-Area settling basin, an unlined surface impoundment, has received process effluents from the M-Area fuel and target fabrication facilities since 1958. The waste effluents have contained metal degreasing agents (chlorinated hydrocarbons), acids, caustics, and heavy metals. Data analyses are provided.

  8. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Precious Lands Wildlife Management Area, Technical Report 2000-2003.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozusko, Shana

    2003-12-01

    The Nez Perce Tribe (NPT) currently manages a 15,325 acre parcel of land known as the Precious Lands Wildlife Management Area that was purchased as mitigation for losses incurred by construction of the four lower Snake River dams. The Management Area is located in northern Wallowa County, Oregon and southern Asotin County, Washington (Figure 1). It is divided into three management parcels--the Buford parcel is located on Buford Creek and straddles the WA-OR state line, and the Tamarack and Basin parcels are contiguous to each other and located between the Joseph Creek and Cottonwood Creek drainages in Wallowa County, OR. The project was developed under the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 (P.L. 96-501), with funding from the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). The acreage protected under this contract will be credited to BPA as habitat permanently dedicated to wildlife and wildlife mitigation. A modeling strategy known as Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was developed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and adopted by BPA as a habitat equivalency accounting system. Nine wildlife species models were used to evaluate distinct cover type features and provide a measure of habitat quality. Models measure a wide range of life requisite variables for each species and monitor overall trends in vegetation community health and diversity. One product of HEP is an evaluation of habitat quality expressed in Habitat Units (HUs). This HU accounting system is used to determine the amount of credit BPA receives for mitigation lands. After construction of the four lower Snake River dams, a HEP loss assessment was conducted to determine how many Habitat Units were inundated behind the dams. Twelve target species were used in that evaluation: Canada goose, mallard, river otter, downy woodpecker, song sparrow, yellow warbler, marsh wren, western meadowlark, chukar, ring-necked pheasant, California quail, and mule deer. The U.S. Army Corp of

  9. Technical review of US Department of Energy draft area recommendation report for the crystalline repository project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foth and Van Dyke and Associates Inc. was retained by the Stockbridge-Munsee Community to evaluate the DOE's screening process for selection of candidate areas in crystalline rock terranes, and critically review the geologic and environmental factors utilized by the DOE in selecting the NC-3 area as a potentially acceptable site (PAS). We have reviewed the DOE's Draft Area Recommendation Report (ARR) issued in January 1986, and prepared our comments. In addition, geologic and environmental data pertaining to the Stockbridge-Munsee community and vicinity that was not included in the Draft ARR is presented. 24 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs

  10. Characteristics of late hercynian magmatic activity and its formation mechanism in Nanpanjiang depression and adjacent areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on the distribution and petrochemistry of magmatic rocks, the technic background of sedimentary basin and the mechanism of magmatic activity at the Late Hercynian in Nanpanjiang depression and its adjacent areas, southern China, have been studied. The results indicate: (1) The distribution of magmatic rocks shows the feature that in the middle and western part of the study area basic igneous rocks dominate, and in the middle-eastern part intermediate rocks are predominant, while in the southeastern part acid ones are developed. (2) In the area west to the Shiwandashan basin, intermediate magmatites were controlled by deep NE-striking and NW-striking faults, especially as the conjunction site of these two group faults, magmatic activity was strong; and its tectonic background can be attributed to extensional continental rift. On the contrary, in the area east to the Shiwandashan basin, intermediate-acid magmatites were developed and controlled by Qingfang orogenic belt resulting from the Dongwu movement and its tectonic background can be identified as the orogenic belt of continental margin or island arc. (3) The model of magmatic activity has been determined as follows: at the end of Early Permian, under the action of strong tension of the crust in the middle and western part of the study area, the Yangzhi plate was obducted southeastward onto the Yunkai terrane, leading to the closure of Qingfang oceanic trough and the occurrence of continent-continent collision along the NE-trending Bobai-Chengxi fault belt. The dynamics source might be associated with 'the basalt province of E-mei Mountain' adjacent to the study area, and the mechanism of magmatic activity reflected the sedimentary features of Late Hercynian basins. (authors)

  11. The research project on technical information basis for aging management in Fukui and Kinki area. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Research Project on Technical Information Basis for Aging Management was initiated in FY2006 by the Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency (NISA) of the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI) as a five-year program effectively, to promote aging management of domestic nuclear power plants. Its main objective was to improve the technical basis on which aging nuclear power plants are regulated. Upon taking part in the technical strategy map for Aging Management and Safe Long Term Operation, the experiences and achievements of the participating organizations were taken into account and the following four topics were chosen. The regional characteristics of the Fukui and Kinki area where 15 nuclear power plants, mainly PWRs, and many nuclear related research institutes and universities are located, were also considered. 1) The improvement of pipe thinning management in nuclear power plants, 2) The development of inspection techniques to monitor the initiation and propagation of defects, 3) The development of a guideline for evaluating weld repair methods, 4) The development of a guideline for evaluating the degradation of main structures. To promote this research project, INSS has established a regional consortium (called the 'Fukui Regional Cluster' in coordination with universities, research institutes, electric utilities and venders in the Fukui and Kinki area. INSS is acting as a coordinator to make contracts, facilitate execution, and compile annual reports. In FY2010, 11 continuing research subjects were proposed for this project and all were accepted. Of these, 5 subjects were related to the first topic (pipe thinning), 4 subjects to the second topic (inspection technique) and 1 subject to each of the other two topics (weld repair and main structures). All the subjects have been completed, fulfilling the requirements and expectations. (author)

  12. An audit questionnaire that examines specifically the management of technical activities clauses in ISO 15189.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartley, T F

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to design an audit questionnaire that focuses on the management of the technical activities in a Diagnostic Pathology Laboratory. The ISO 15189 Standard is written in such a way that it continually moves back and forth from topics where the auditor needs to question bench level staff, to topics where the auditor needs to question Technical Management Staff. This makes for a disjointed audit process - both Bench Staff and Technical Managers are repeatedly interrupted. The solution was to do a clause by clause analysis of the Standard and assign the major responsibility for the compliance to each clause to either Technical Managers or Bench Staff. The Clauses were then grouped under four topic headings regardless of whether they were a Section 4 or Section 5 Clause. Two questionnaires have emerged - the one described in this work and one directed primarily towards the activities of bench staff. There are 95 questions and it takes approximately two hours to complete. PMID:23105892

  13. ENHANCING MASTERY OF PRACTICAL SKILLS IN STUDENTS OF VOCATIONAL AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION THROUGH ACTIVITY BASED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.I. Odo

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The study seeks to understand the issues and challenges related to the implementations of activity-based instructions on vocational and technical education student in Nigeria. A survey was carried out involving vocational and technical education teachers in all six government owned technical colleges in Lagos State of Nigeria. A total of 150 teachers were selected randomly as respondents for the study. A four point scale items were designed to elicit information from the respondents. The findings of the study indicated that the techniques and the strategies adopted by the teachers of vocational education include: demonstration, field trips, projects, experiments and assignments. Various methods to evaluate students outcome include: process-product through systematic observation. It was evident from the study that constantly focusing on activity to make learning fun can actually hamper those students who make good progress without it. Based on the findings the researcher therefore concluded that good vocational and technical education teachers require the right attitude, have years of professional and practical skills and entrepreneurial experience at the workshop floor of industry and good background knowledge of engineering design.

  14. Summary of field operations Technical Area I well PGS-1. Site-Wide Hydrogeologic Characterization Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Environmental Restoration (ER) Project at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico is managing the project to assess and, when necessary, to remediate sites contaminated by the lab operations. Within the ER project, the site-wide hydrogeologic characterization task is responsible for the area-wide hydrogeologic investigation. The purpose of this task is to reduce the uncertainty about the rate and direction of groundwater flow beneath the area and across its boundaries. This specific report deals with the installation of PGS-1 monitoring well which provides information on the lithology and hydrology of the aquifer in the northern area of the Kirtland Air Force Base. The report provides information on the well design; surface geology; stratigraphy; structure; drilling, completion, and development techniques; and borehole geophysics information

  15. Improvement of technical characteristics on orbital argon-ark welding at the expense of arch activation

    OpenAIRE

    Савицкий, А. М.; Савицкий, М. М.; Ващенко, В. Н.; Шкрабалюк, Ю. Н.; Коровин, И. А.

    2012-01-01

    In work results of research of activation of an arch are resulted at orbital welding of pipelines. It is shown that activation allows to carry out not rotary joints of pipes with thickness of a wall to 6 mm without cutting of edges for one pass, and at welding of more thick-walled pipes provides a thickness of root pass to 5 mm. Arch activation sharply reduces dependence of a welding current on spatial position of a welding bath. It simplifies technics of welding and reduces the price of the ...

  16. Corporate finance and economic activity in the euro area

    OpenAIRE

    Task Force of the Monetary Policy Committee of the ESCB; Diego Rodriguez-Palenzuela; Matthieu Darracq-Pariès; Giacomo Carboni; Annalisa Ferrando; Petra Köhler Ulbrich; Marie-Denise Zachary; Felix Geiger; Manuel Rupprecht; Taavi Raudsaar; Fergal McCann; Vasileios Georgakopoulos; Carmen Martínez-Carrascal; Juan Carluccio; Guillaume Horny

    2013-01-01

    This report analyses and reviews the corporate finance structure of non-financial corporations (NFCs) in the euro area, including how they interact with the macroeconomic environment. Special emphasis is placed on the crisis that began in 2007-08, thus underlining the relevance of financing and credit conditions to investment and economic activity in turbulent times. When approaching such a broad topic, a number of key questions arise. How did the corporate sector’s capital structure, interna...

  17. A Brief Technical History of the Large-Area Picosecond Photodetector (LAPPD) Collaboration

    CERN Document Server

    Adams, Bernhard W; Bogdan, Mircea; Byrum, Karen; Elagin, Andrey; Elam, Jeffrey W; Frisch, Henry J; Genat, Jean-Francois; Grabas, Herve; Gregar, Joseph; Hahn, Elaine; Heintz, Mary; Insepov, Zinetula; Ivanov, Valentin; Jelinsky, Sharon; Jokely, Slade; Lee, Sun Wu; Mane, Anil U; McPhate, Jason; Minot, Michael J; Murat, Pavel; Nishimura, Kurtis; Northrop, Richard; Obaid, Razib; Oberla, Eric; Ramberg, Erik; Ronzhin, Anatoly; Siegmund, Oswald H; Sellberg, Gregory; Sullivan, Neal T; Tremsin, Anton; Varner, Gary; Veryovkin, Igor; Vostrikov, Alexei; Wagner, Robert G; Walters, Dean; Wang, Hsien-Hau; Wetstein, Matthew; Xi, Junqi; Yusov, Zikri; Zinovev, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    The Large Area Picosecond PhotoDetector (LAPPD) Collaboration was formed in 2009 to develop large-area photodetectors capable of time resolutions measured in pico-seconds, with accompanying sub-millimeter spatial resolution. During the next three and one-half years the Collaboration developed the LAPPD design of 20 x 20 cm modules with gains greater than $10^7$ and non-uniformity less than $15\\%$, time resolution less than 50 psec for single photons and spatial resolution of 700~microns in both lateral dimensions. We describe the R\\&D performed to develop large-area micro-channel plate glass substrates, resistive and secondary-emitting coatings, large-area bialkali photocathodes, and RF-capable hermetic packaging. In addition, the Collaboration developed the necessary electronics for large systems capable of precise timing, built up from a custom low-power 15-GigaSample/sec waveform sampling 6-channel integrated circuit and supported by a two-level modular data acquisition system based on Field-Programmab...

  18. Insular Area energy vulnerability, Puerto Rico, US Virgin Islands. Technical Appendix 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stern, M.; Willard, E.E.; Efferding, S. [Ensys Energy & Systems, Inc., Flemington, NJ (United States)

    1994-05-01

    This report was prepared in response to Section 1406 of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (P.L. 192-486). The Act directed the Department of Energy (DOE) to ``conduct a study of the implications of the unique vulnerabilities of the insular areas to an oil supply disruption,`` and to ``outline how the insular areas shall gain access to vital oil supplies during times of national emergency.`` The Act defines the insular areas to be the US Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico in the Caribbean, and Guam, American Samoa, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI), and Palau in the Pacific. This report is the analysis of Puerto Rico and the US Virgin Islands. In the study, ``unique vulnerabilities`` were defined as susceptibility to: (1) more frequent or more likely interruptions of oil supplies compared to the mainland, and/or (2) disproportionately larger or more likely economic losses in the event of an oil supply disruption. In order to asses unique vulnerabilities, the study examined in the insular areas` experience during past global disruptions of oil supplies and during local emergencies caused by natural disasters. The effects of several possible future global disruptions and local emergencies were also analyzed. Analyses were based on historical data, simulations using energy and economic models, and interviews with officials in the insular governments and the energy industry.

  19. Insular Area energy vulnerability, Puerto Rico, US Virgin Islands. Technical Appendix 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report was prepared in response to Section 1406 of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (P.L. 192-486). The Act directed the Department of Energy (DOE) to ''conduct a study of the implications of the unique vulnerabilities of the insular areas to an oil supply disruption,'' and to ''outline how the insular areas shall gain access to vital oil supplies during times of national emergency.'' The Act defines the insular areas to be the US Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico in the Caribbean, and Guam, American Samoa, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI), and Palau in the Pacific. This report is the analysis of Puerto Rico and the US Virgin Islands. In the study, ''unique vulnerabilities'' were defined as susceptibility to: (1) more frequent or more likely interruptions of oil supplies compared to the mainland, and/or (2) disproportionately larger or more likely economic losses in the event of an oil supply disruption. In order to asses unique vulnerabilities, the study examined in the insular areas' experience during past global disruptions of oil supplies and during local emergencies caused by natural disasters. The effects of several possible future global disruptions and local emergencies were also analyzed. Analyses were based on historical data, simulations using energy and economic models, and interviews with officials in the insular governments and the energy industry

  20. Draft area recommendation report for the Crystalline Repository Project: Comments: Final technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Mille Lacs Band conducted a review of the draft area recommendation report (ARR) and provided comments as outlined in the contract. It also had staff attending the necessary training and informational meeting established by the Department of Energy. This had met all the necessary objectives as outlined in the contract

  1. Effects of filtering methods on muscle and fat cross-sectional area measurement by pQCT: a technical note

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT) is most commonly used for bone density and morphology assessment of the limbs, but it can also be used for soft tissue area quantification by segmenting regions representing different tissues. Scanning and analyzing cross-sectional areas of larger thighs present a special challenge due to increased statistical noise created from fewer detected x-ray photons. The purpose of this technical note is to compare total, muscle and fat cross-sectional area (CSA) measurements of the midthigh with Stratec 3000 pQCT scans using no filter, a weak smoothing filter and a strong smoothing filter to CSA measurements of midthigh MRI scans analyzed by Image J, a public domain image processing program. Nine healthy men and women participated in this study. CSAs did not differ significantly between MRI and strongly filtered pQCT images with per cent differences ranging from −3.1% for muscle to +6.5% for fat. The per cent difference in muscle CSA values between MRI and pQCT with the weak filter (−24.0 ± 38.0%) or no filter (−44.9 ± 22.7%) was strongly related to total thigh CSA (r = 0.78–0.92, p < 0.05). We propose that the midthigh can be assessed for soft tissue area measurements with pQCT, provided that strong smoothing filter is utilized. (note)

  2. Active system area networks for data intensive computations. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2002-04-01

    The goal of the Active System Area Networks (ASAN) project is to develop hardware and software technologies for the implementation of active system area networks (ASANs). The use of the term ''active'' refers to the ability of the network interfaces to perform application-specific as well as system level computations in addition to their traditional role of data transfer. This project adopts the view that the network infrastructure should be an active computational entity capable of supporting certain classes of computations that would otherwise be performed on the host CPUs. The result is a unique network-wide programming model where computations are dynamically placed within the host CPUs or the NIs depending upon the quality of service demands and network/CPU resource availability. The projects seeks to demonstrate that such an approach is a better match for data intensive network-based applications and that the advent of low-cost powerful embedded processors and configurable hardware makes such an approach economically viable and desirable.

  3. Long term continuous radon monitoring in a seismically active area

    CERN Document Server

    Piersanti, A; Galli, G

    2015-01-01

    We present the results of a long term, continuous radon monitoring experiment started in April 2010 in a seismically active area, affected during the 2010-2013 data acquisition time window by an intense micro seismic activity and by several small seismic events. We employed both correlation and cross-correlation analyses in order to investigate possible relationship existing between the collected radon data, seismic events and meteorological parameters. Our results do not support the feasibility of a robust one-to-one association between the small magnitude earthquakes characterizing the local seismic activity and single radon measurement anomalies, but evidence significant correlation patterns between the spatio-temporal variations of seismic moment release and soil radon emanations, the latter being anyway dominantly modulated by meteorological parameters variations.

  4. Long term continuous radon monitoring in a seismically active area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Piersanti

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We present the results of a long term, continuous radon monitoring experiment started in April 2010 in a seismically active area, affected during the 2010-2013 data acquisition time window by an intense micro seismic activity and by several small seismic events. We employed both correlation and cross-correlation analyses in order to investigate possible relationship existing between the collected radon data, seismic events and meteorological parameters. Our results do not support the feasibility of a robust one-to-one association between the small magnitude earthquakes characterizing the local seismic activity and single radon measurement anomalies, but evidence significant correlation patterns between the spatio-temporal variations of seismic moment release and soil radon emanations, the latter being anyway dominantly modulated by meteorological parameters variations.

  5. Protected Areas in Tropical Africa: Assessing Threats and Conservation Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tranquilli, Sandra; Abedi-Lartey, Michael; Abernethy, Katharine; Amsini, Fidèle; Asamoah, Augustus; Balangtaa, Cletus; Blake, Stephen; Bouanga, Estelle; Breuer, Thomas; Brncic, Terry M.; Campbell, Geneviève; Chancellor, Rebecca; Chapman, Colin A.; Davenport, Tim R. B.; Dunn, Andrew; Dupain, Jef; Ekobo, Atanga; Eno-Nku, Manasseh; Etoga, Gilles; Furuichi, Takeshi; Gatti, Sylvain; Ghiurghi, Andrea; Hashimoto, Chie; Hart, John A.; Head, Josephine; Hega, Martin; Herbinger, Ilka; Hicks, Thurston C.; Holbech, Lars H.; Huijbregts, Bas; Kühl, Hjalmar S.; Imong, Inaoyom; Yeno, Stephane Le-Duc; Linder, Joshua; Marshall, Phil; Lero, Peter Minasoma; Morgan, David; Mubalama, Leonard; N'Goran, Paul K.; Nicholas, Aaron; Nixon, Stuart; Normand, Emmanuelle; Nziguyimpa, Leonidas; Nzooh-Dongmo, Zacharie; Ofori-Amanfo, Richard; Ogunjemite, Babafemi G.; Petre, Charles-Albert; Rainey, Hugo J.; Regnaut, Sebastien; Robinson, Orume; Rundus, Aaron; Sanz, Crickette M.; Okon, David Tiku; Todd, Angelique; Warren, Ymke; Sommer, Volker

    2014-01-01

    Numerous protected areas (PAs) have been created in Africa to safeguard wildlife and other natural resources. However, significant threats from anthropogenic activities and decline of wildlife populations persist, while conservation efforts in most PAs are still minimal. We assessed the impact level of the most common threats to wildlife within PAs in tropical Africa and the relationship of conservation activities with threat impact level. We collated data on 98 PAs with tropical forest cover from 15 countries across West, Central and East Africa. For this, we assembled information about local threats as well as conservation activities from published and unpublished literature, and questionnaires sent to long-term field workers. We constructed general linear models to test the significance of specific conservation activities in relation to the threat impact level. Subsistence and commercial hunting were identified as the most common direct threats to wildlife and found to be most prevalent in West and Central Africa. Agriculture and logging represented the most common indirect threats, and were most prevalent in West Africa. We found that the long-term presence of conservation activities (such as law enforcement, research and tourism) was associated with lower threat impact levels. Our results highlight deficiencies in the management effectiveness of several PAs across tropical Africa, and conclude that PA management should invest more into conservation activities with long-term duration. PMID:25469888

  6. Protected areas in tropical Africa: assessing threats and conservation activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tranquilli, Sandra; Abedi-Lartey, Michael; Abernethy, Katharine; Amsini, Fidèle; Asamoah, Augustus; Balangtaa, Cletus; Blake, Stephen; Bouanga, Estelle; Breuer, Thomas; Brncic, Terry M; Campbell, Geneviève; Chancellor, Rebecca; Chapman, Colin A; Davenport, Tim R B; Dunn, Andrew; Dupain, Jef; Ekobo, Atanga; Eno-Nku, Manasseh; Etoga, Gilles; Furuichi, Takeshi; Gatti, Sylvain; Ghiurghi, Andrea; Hashimoto, Chie; Hart, John A; Head, Josephine; Hega, Martin; Herbinger, Ilka; Hicks, Thurston C; Holbech, Lars H; Huijbregts, Bas; Kühl, Hjalmar S; Imong, Inaoyom; Yeno, Stephane Le-Duc; Linder, Joshua; Marshall, Phil; Lero, Peter Minasoma; Morgan, David; Mubalama, Leonard; N'Goran, Paul K; Nicholas, Aaron; Nixon, Stuart; Normand, Emmanuelle; Nziguyimpa, Leonidas; Nzooh-Dongmo, Zacharie; Ofori-Amanfo, Richard; Ogunjemite, Babafemi G; Petre, Charles-Albert; Rainey, Hugo J; Regnaut, Sebastien; Robinson, Orume; Rundus, Aaron; Sanz, Crickette M; Okon, David Tiku; Todd, Angelique; Warren, Ymke; Sommer, Volker

    2014-01-01

    Numerous protected areas (PAs) have been created in Africa to safeguard wildlife and other natural resources. However, significant threats from anthropogenic activities and decline of wildlife populations persist, while conservation efforts in most PAs are still minimal. We assessed the impact level of the most common threats to wildlife within PAs in tropical Africa and the relationship of conservation activities with threat impact level. We collated data on 98 PAs with tropical forest cover from 15 countries across West, Central and East Africa. For this, we assembled information about local threats as well as conservation activities from published and unpublished literature, and questionnaires sent to long-term field workers. We constructed general linear models to test the significance of specific conservation activities in relation to the threat impact level. Subsistence and commercial hunting were identified as the most common direct threats to wildlife and found to be most prevalent in West and Central Africa. Agriculture and logging represented the most common indirect threats, and were most prevalent in West Africa. We found that the long-term presence of conservation activities (such as law enforcement, research and tourism) was associated with lower threat impact levels. Our results highlight deficiencies in the management effectiveness of several PAs across tropical Africa, and conclude that PA management should invest more into conservation activities with long-term duration. PMID:25469888

  7. Protected areas in tropical Africa: assessing threats and conservation activities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Tranquilli

    Full Text Available Numerous protected areas (PAs have been created in Africa to safeguard wildlife and other natural resources. However, significant threats from anthropogenic activities and decline of wildlife populations persist, while conservation efforts in most PAs are still minimal. We assessed the impact level of the most common threats to wildlife within PAs in tropical Africa and the relationship of conservation activities with threat impact level. We collated data on 98 PAs with tropical forest cover from 15 countries across West, Central and East Africa. For this, we assembled information about local threats as well as conservation activities from published and unpublished literature, and questionnaires sent to long-term field workers. We constructed general linear models to test the significance of specific conservation activities in relation to the threat impact level. Subsistence and commercial hunting were identified as the most common direct threats to wildlife and found to be most prevalent in West and Central Africa. Agriculture and logging represented the most common indirect threats, and were most prevalent in West Africa. We found that the long-term presence of conservation activities (such as law enforcement, research and tourism was associated with lower threat impact levels. Our results highlight deficiencies in the management effectiveness of several PAs across tropical Africa, and conclude that PA management should invest more into conservation activities with long-term duration.

  8. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report : Oxbow Conservation Area, 2002-2005 Technical Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cochran, Brian

    2005-02-01

    This Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) study was performed to determine baseline habitat units on the Oxbow Conservation Area in Grant County, Oregon. The evaluation is a required part of the Memorandum of Agreement between the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs and Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) relating to the acquisition and management of the Oxbow Conservation Area. The HEP team was comprised of individuals from the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife and the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon. The survey was conducted using the following HEP evaluation models for key species: black-capped chickadee (Poecile atricapilla), mallard (Anas platyrhynchos), mink (Mustela vison), western meadowlark (Sturnella neglecta), white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginiana), and yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia). Cover types used in this survey were conifer forest, irrigated meadow, riparian meadow, upland meadow, riparian shrub, upland shrub, and mine tailings. The project generated 701.3 habitat units for mitigation crediting purposes. Results for each HEP species are: (1) Black-capped chickadee habitat was good, with only isolated areas lacking snags or having low tree canopy cover. (2) Mallard habitat was poor in upland meadows and marginal elsewhere due to a lack of herbaceous/shrub cover and low herbaceous height. (3) Mink habitat was good, limited only by the lack of the shrub component. (4) Western meadowlark habitat was marginal in upland meadow and mine tailing cover types and good in irrigated meadow. Percent cover of grass and height of herbaceous variables were limiting factors. (5) White-tailed deer habitat was marginal due to relatively low tree canopy cover, reduced shrub cover, and limited browse diversity. (6) Yellow Warbler habitat was marginal due to less than optimum shrub height and the lack of hydrophytic shrubs. General ratings (poor, marginal, etc.) are described in the introduction section.

  9. Large area low cost processing for CIS photovoltaics. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B. Basol; G. Norsworthy; C. Leidholm; A. Halani; R. Roe; V. Kapur

    1999-07-22

    An ink coating method was developed for CIS absorber deposition. The technique involves four processing steps: (1) preparation of a Cu-In alloy powder, (2) preparation of an ink using this powder, (3) deposition of the ink on a substrate in the form of a precursor layer, and (4) selenization to convert the Cu-In precursor into a fused CIS film. Absorbers grown by this low-cost, large-area method were used in the fabrication of 10.5% efficient solar cells.

  10. Botanical reconnaissance of Big Run Bog Candidate Research Natural Area. Forest Service general technical report (Final)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muzika, R.M.; Hunsucker, R.; DeMeo, T.

    1996-07-25

    To document the botanical diversity of the Big Run Bog candidate Research Natural Area on the Monongahela National Forest in West Virginia, a botanical survey was conducted in 1993-94. The survey identified 193 species of vascular plants in 118 genera and 52 families. Six species of rare vascular plants were found. Vascular plant families with the most species present were Cyperaceae (24), Asteraceae (23), Poaceae (16), and Ericaceae (14). For each taxon, family, species, habitat and estimated abundance are reported. Nonvascular plants totaled 87 species in 55 genera and 33 families.

  11. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Tacoma/Trimble Area Management Plan, Technical Report 2001-2003.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Entz, Ray; Lockwood, Jr., Neil; Holmes, Darren

    2003-10-01

    In 2000 and 2001, the Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD) continued to mitigate the wildlife habitat losses as part of the Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Project. Utilizing Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funds, the Kalispel Tribe of Indians (Tribe) purchased three projects totaling nearly 1,200 acres. The Tacoma/Trimble Wildlife Management Area is a conglomeration of properties now estimated at 1,700 acres. It is the Tribe's intent to manage these properties in cooperation and collaboration with the Pend Oreille County Public Utility District (PUD) No. 1 and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) to benefit wildlife habitats and associated species, populations, and guilds.

  12. Risk and geodynamically active areas of Carpathian lithosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper illustrates an application of multidisciplinary data analysis to the Carpathian-Pannonian region and presents a verification of a Complex model of the Carpathian - Pannonian lithosphere by recent data sets and geophysical data analyses and its utilization for the determination of risk and active geodynamic and tectonic zones of Ist order . This model can be used for the analysing any Carpathian area from the point of view of the seismic risk, hazards and geodynamic activity, which is important to know for the building of a repository for the radioactive wasted material. Besides the traditionally used geological (sedimentological and volcanological data) and geomorphological data (Remote Sensing), an emphasis was laid on geodetic, grav/mag data, seismic, seismological and other geophysical data (magnetotelluric, heat flow, paleomagnetic etc.). All available geonomic (geologic, geodetic, geophysical, geomorphological) data were verified and unified on the basis of the same scale and in the Western Carpathians on the Remote Sensing data. The paper concentrates on two problematic areas - the so call 'rebounding area' in the Eastern Carpathians and the Raba - Muran - Malcov tectonic systems. (authors)

  13. Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area (SCFA) Lead Laboratory Providing Technical Assistance to the DOE Weapons Complex in Subsurface Contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area (SCFA), a DOE-HQ EM-50 organization, is hosted and managed at the Savannah River Site in Aiken, South Carolina. SCFA is an integrated program chartered to find technology and scientific solutions to address DOE subsurface environmental restoration problems throughout the DOE Weapons Complex. Since its inception in 1989, the SCFA program has resulted in a total of 269 deployments of 83 innovative technologies. Until recently, the primary thrust of the program has been to develop, demonstrate, and deploy those remediation technology alternatives that are solutions to technology needs identified by the DOE Sites. Over the last several years, the DOE Sites began to express a need not only for innovative technologies, but also for technical assistance. In response to this need, DOE-HQ EM-50, in collaboration with and in support of a Strategic Lab Council recommendation directed each of its Focus Areas to implement a Lead Laboratory Concept to enhance their technical capabilities. Because each Focus Area is unique as defined by the contrast in either the type of contaminants involved or the environments in which they are found, the Focus Areas were given latitude in how they set up and implemented the Lead Lab Concept. The configuration of choice for the SCFA was a Lead-Partner Lab arrangement. Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) teamed with the SCFA as the Focus Area's Lead Laboratory. SRTC then partnered with the DOE National Laboratories to create a virtual consulting function within DOE. The National Laboratories were established to help solve the Nation's most difficult problems, drawing from a resource pool of the most talented and gifted scientists and engineers. Following that logic, SRTC, through the Lead-Partner Lab arrangement, has that same resource base to draw from to provide assistance to any SCFA DOE customer throughout the Complex. This paper briefly describes how this particular arrangement is organized and

  14. The technical analysis of the stock exchange and physics: Japanese candlesticks for solar activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dineva, C.; Atanasov, V.

    2013-09-01

    In this article, we use the Japanese candlesticks, a method popular in the technical analysis of the Stock/Forex markets and apply it to a variable in physics-the solar activity. This method is invented and used exclusively for economic analysis and its application to a physical problem produced unexpected results. We found that the Japanese candlesticks are convenient tool in the analysis of the variables in the physics of the Sun. Based on our observations, we differentiated a new cycle in the solar activity.

  15. Robust satellite techniques for remote sensing of seismically active areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Piscitelli

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Several satellite techniques have been recently proposed to remotely map seismically active zones and to monitor geophysical phenomena possibly associated with earthquakes. Even if questionable in terms of their effective applicability, all these techniques highlight as the major problem, still to be overcome, the high number of natural factors (independent of any seismic activity whose variable contributions to the investigated signal can be so high as to completely mask (or simulate the space-time anomaly possibly associated to the seismic event under study. A robust approach (RAT has recently been proposed (and successfully applied in the field of the monitoring of the major environmental risks which, better than other methods, seems suitable for recognising space-time anomalies in the satellite observational field also in the presence of highly variable contributions from atmospheric (transmittance, surface (emissivity and morphology and observational (time/season, but also solar and satellite zenithal angles conditions.This work presents the first preliminary results, based on several years of NOAA/AVHRR observations, regarding its extension to satellite monitoring of thermal anomalies possibly associated to seismically active areas of Southern Italy. The main merits of this approach are its robustness against the possibility of false events detection (specially important for this kind of applications as well as its intrinsic exportability not only to different geographic areas but also to different satellite instrumental packages.

  16. Final Scientific/Technical Report Development of Large-Area Photo-Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frisch, Henry J. [The University of Chicago

    2013-07-15

    This proposal requested ADR funds for two years to make measurements and detector proto-types in the context of planning a program in conjunction with Argonne National Laboratory to develop very large-area planar photodetectors. The proposed detectors have integrated transmission-line readout and sampling electronics able to achieve timing and position resolutions in the range of 1-50 psec and 1-10 mm, respectively. The capability for very precise time measurements is inherent in the design, and provides a �third� coordinate, orthogonal to the two in the plane, for the point of origin of photons or charged particles, allowing �tomographic� reconstruction in 3-dimensions inside a volume.

  17. Radioactive sealed sources: Reasonable accountability, exemption, and licensing activity thresholds -- A technical basis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perhaps owing to their small size and portability, some radiation accidents/incidents have involved radioactive sealed sources (RSSs). As a result, programs for the control and accountability of RSSs have come to be recommended and emplaced that essentially require RSSs to be controlled in a manner different from bulk, unsealed radioactive material. Crucially determining the total number of RSSs for which manpower-intensive radiation protection surveillance is provided is the individual RSS activity above which such surveillance is required and below which such effort is not considered cost effective. Individual RSS activity thresholds are typically determined through scenarios which impart a chosen internal or external limiting dose to Reference Man under specified exposure conditions. The resultant RSS threshold activity levels have meaning commensurate with the assumed scenario exposure parameters, i.e., if they are realistic and technically based. A review of how the Department of Energy (DOE), the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) have determined their respective accountability, exemption, and licensing threshold activity values is provided. Finally, a fully explained method using references readily available to practicing health physicists is developed using realistic, technically-based calculation parameters by which RSS threshold activities may be locally generated

  18. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Yakama Nation Wildlife Management Areas, Technical Report 1999-2000.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raedeke, Kenneth; Raedeke, Dorothy

    2000-06-01

    Construction of the Dalles, Bonneville, McNary, and John Day Dams on the Columbia River by the federal government resulted in a substantial loss of riparian bottomland along the Columbia River. Impacts associated with the Mid-Columbia Projects were assessed for several wildlife species using the Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) developed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USDI-FWS 1980). The studies documented the loss of riparian habitat and established a baseline against which mitigation measures could be developed (USDI-FWS 1990 and USDE-BPA 1990). The impact assessments established a mitigation goal, a portion of which would be satisfied by the creation, restoration, and enhancement of riparian lands on tributaries to the Columbia River, including the Yakima Valley. The Yakama Nation (YN), the Northwest Power Planning Council, and the Bonneville Power Administration have agreed that the Yakama Nation would be funded to implement habitat restoration on lands within and adjacent to their reservation. Some of the targeted lands are owned by the Yakama Nation, some are trust lands, and some lands have been in private ownership. Since the early 1990s, the Yakama Nation has been in the process of assembling riparian lands into Wildlife Management Areas, and restoring natural hydrology and natural cover-types on these lands. The Northwest Power Planning Council, through the Bonneville Power Administration, has supported the program. HEP studies were performed by the Yakama Nation in 1990 (Bich et al. 1991) to establish baseline conditions and inventory wildlife habitat at the initiation of the restoration project. The 1990 HEP used a simplified version of the HEP to quantify baseline conditions. The present assessment is designed to evaluate the progress of the mitigation plan in meeting its stated goals. The 1999 HEP assessment has two distinct tasks: (1) Evaluation of the mitigation plan as currently implemented using the simplified YN HEP methodologies for

  19. The Agency's Technical Co-operation activities in 1984. Report by the Director General

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The year 1984 can be described as one during which efforts were made to increase momentum in the development co-operation between the Agency and its Member States while continuing to improve the quality of the technical assistance rendered. For the first time, the adjusted programme exceeded $50 million. During the year, changes were introduced in the administration of the programme in line with recommendations endorsed by the Board in 1983 at the end of its first technical co-operation policy review. In 1984, when the new technical co-operation policies were applied, there were three principal aims. First, the flow of Technical Assistance and Co-operation Fund resources was to be improved; by decreasing accumulated unobligated balances, an optimum level of resource utilization was to be attained by 1986. Second, procedures for the procurement of goods and services were to be streamlined in order to permit substantial increases in programme delivery. Third, systematic project evaluation was to lead to a number of specific actions that would increase the effectiveness of the Agency's development assistance. With regard to the first aim, implementation increased by 44% over the 1983 level, passing the $30 million mark in October and reaching $36.6 million by the end of the year. Of this amount, $31.8 million related to the implementation of activities programmed for 1984. Therefore, an increase in total resources of only 4% was accompanied by an increase in current-year implementation of 34%. As a result, the upward trend in the unobligated balance was checked, and earmarkings against the TACF actually decreased. The implementation rate against the TACF rose from 58% in 1983 to 65% in 1984, reaching the level that had been set as a target. If this performance can be maintained in 1985, it will be possible to reach the optimum level of TACF resource utilization one year earlier than originally expected. As regards the second aim, streamlined procedures introduced in

  20. Legal and Technical Aspects of Modernization of Land and Buildings Cadastre in Selected Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siejka, Monika; Ślusarski, Marek; Mika, Monika

    2015-12-01

    Modernization of the land and buildings cadastre is a set of actions aimed at improving the quality of data collected there. Application in the process of modernization of the sources of information from the land surveying, gives fully satisfactory results. On the other hand the use of photogrammetric measurements is the solution more economical in terms of financial and time. However, there is a danger of obtaining the results which do not meet the standards of accuracy of the border points position. The paper presents an example of the results of the influence of the process of modernizing the land and buildings cadastre for the areas where the source material are cadastral maps in the scale 1: 2000, created on the basis of photomaps or cadastral maps in the scale 1: 2880. An assessment of the suitability of these materials in the process of modernization and their impact on the current form of the land and building cadastre as a public register was made.

  1. Technical support document for the regional sustainable development strategy for the Athabasca Oil Sands Area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Regional Sustainable Development Strategy (RSDS) builds on the current environmental and resource management system in Alberta, and it features a framework for: providing support for continued economic development in the region that addresses environmental needs and resource sustainability; creating an enhanced management framework that will adapt to the changing needs of the area which will guide government environmental and resource managers; developing a strong foundation of environmental information and science to assist in making decisions on sustainable resource and environmental management in the region; and creating a way to identify priority regional environmental issues and to organize the science and monitoring work needed to comprehend those issues. Blueprints for action were identified to attack issues within three group categories. The first category, which is based on information gaps and urgency, includes sustainable ecosystems, cumulative impacts on wildlife, soil and plant species diversity, effects of air emissions on human health, wildlife and vegetation, and bioaccumulation of heavy metals. The second category, which is based on information gaps and work underway, includes access management, cumulative impacts on fish habitat and populations, effects of tailings ponds emissions, effects of acid deposition on sensitive receptors, and impacts on surface water quality. The third category, which is based on information gaps, work underway and lower level of urgency, includes end pit lake water quality, impacts on surface water quantity, and impacts on groundwater quantity and quality

  2. Red River Wildlife Management Area HEP Report, Habitat Evaluation Procedures, Technical Report 2004.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashley, Paul

    2004-11-01

    A habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) analysis conducted on the 314-acre Red River Wildlife Management Area (RRWMA) managed by the Idaho Department of Fish and Game resulted in 401.38 habitat units (HUs). Habitat variables from six habitat suitability index (HSI) models, comprised of mink (Mustela vison), mallard (Anas platyrhynchos), common snipe (Capella gallinago), black-capped chickadee (Parus altricapillus), yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia), and white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus), were measured by Regional HEP Team (RHT) members in August 2004. Cover types included wet meadow, riverine, riparian shrub, conifer forest, conifer forest wetland, and urban. HSI model outputs indicate that the shrub component is lacking in riparian shrub and conifer forest cover types and that snag density should be increased in conifer stands. The quality of wet meadow habitat, comprised primarily of introduced grass species and sedges, could be improved through development of ephemeral open water ponds and increasing the amount of persistent wetland herbaceous vegetation e.g. cattails (Typha spp.) and bulrushes (Scirpus spp.).

  3. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Forrest Conservation Area, Technical Report 2003-2004.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Brent

    2005-01-01

    The Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) study was performed to determine baseline habitat units on the 4,232-acre Forrest Conservation Area managed by the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (Tribe) in Grant County, Oregon. The habitat evaluation is required as part of the Memorandum of Agreement between the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs and Bonneville Power Administration. Representatives from the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife and the Tribes conducted the field surveys for the HEP. The survey collected data for habitat variables contained in habitat suitability index (HIS) models for wildlife species; the key species were black-capped chickadee (Poecile atricapilla), mallard (Anas platyrhynchos), mink (Mustela vison), western meadowlark (Sturnella neglecta), mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus), California Quail (Callipepla californica), and yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia). Cover types surveyed were grassland, meadow grassland, conifer forest, riparian tree shrub, shrub steppe, juniper forest, and juniper steppe. Other cover types mapped, but not used in the models were open water, roads, gravel pits, corrals, and residential.

  4. Potential for low fracture toughness and lamellar tearing on PWR steam generator and reactor coolant pump supports. Resolution of generic technical activity A-12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes work performed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission staff and its contractor, Sandia Laboratories, in the resolution of Generic Technical Activity A-12, ''Potential for Low Fracture Toughness and Lamellar Tearing in PWR Steam Generator and Reactor Coolant Pump Supports.'' The report describes the technical issues, the technical studies performed by Sandia describes the technical issues, the technical studies performed by Sandia Laboratories, the NRC staff's technical positions based on these studies, and the staff's plan for implementing its technical positions. It also provides recommendations for further work. The complete technical input from Sandia Laboratories is appended to the report

  5. Modeling self-sustained activity cascades in socio-technical networks

    CERN Document Server

    Piedrahíta, Pablo; Moreno, Yamir; Arenas, Alex

    2013-01-01

    The ability to understand and eventually predict the emergence of information and activation cascades in social networks is core to complex socio-technical systems research. However, the complexity of social interactions makes this a challenging enterprise. Previous works on cascade models assume that the emergence of this collective phenomenon is related to the activity observed in the local neighborhood of individuals, but do not consider what determines the willingness to spread information in a time-varying process. Here we present a mechanistic model that accounts for the temporal evolution of the individual state in a simplified setup. We model the activity of the individuals as a complex network of interacting integrate-and-fire oscillators. The model reproduces the statistical characteristics of the cascades in real systems, and provides a framework to study time-evolution of cascades in a state-dependent activity scenario.

  6. Modeling self-sustained activity cascades in socio-technical networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piedrahita, P.; Borge-Holthoefer, J.; Moreno, Y.; Arenas, A.

    2013-11-01

    The ability to understand and eventually predict the emergence of information and activation cascades in social networks is core to complex socio-technical systems research. However, the complexity of social interactions makes this a challenging enterprise. Previous works on cascade models assume that the emergence of this collective phenomenon is related to the activity observed in the local neighborhood of individuals, but do not consider what determines the willingness to spread information in a time-varying process. Here we present a mechanistic model that accounts for the temporal evolution of the individual state in a simplified setup. We model the activity of the individuals as a complex network of interacting integrate-and-fire oscillators. The model reproduces the statistical characteristics of the cascades in real systems, and provides a framework to study the time evolution of cascades in a state-dependent activity scenario.

  7. Modeling Aeolian Transport of Contaminated Sediments at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Technical Area 54, Area G: Sensitivities to Succession, Disturbance, and Future Climate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Technical Area 54 (TA-54) Area G disposal facility is used for the disposal of radioactive waste at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 435.1 (DOE, 2001) requires that radioactive waste be managed in a manner that protects public health and safety and the environment. In compliance with that requirement, DOE field sites must prepare and maintain site-specific radiological performance assessments for facilities that receive waste after September 26, 1988. Sites are also required to conduct composite analyses for facilities that receive waste after this date; these analyses account for the cumulative impacts of all waste that has been (and will be) disposed of at the facilities and other sources of radioactive material that may interact with these facilities. LANL issued Revision 4 of the Area G performance assessment and composite analysis in 2008. In support of those analyses, vertical and horizontal sediment flux data were collected at two analog sites, each with different dominant vegetation characteristics, and used to estimate rates of vertical resuspension and wind erosion for Area G. The results of that investigation indicated that there was no net loss of soil at the disposal site due to wind erosion, and suggested minimal impacts of wind on the long-term performance of the facility. However, that study did not evaluate the potential for contaminant transport caused by the horizontal movement of soil particles over long time frames. Since that time, additional field data have been collected to estimate wind threshold velocities for initiating sediment transport due to saltation and rates of sediment transport once those thresholds are reached. Data such as these have been used in the development of the Vegetation Modified Transport (VMTran) model. This model is designed to estimate patterns and long-term rates of contaminant redistribution caused by winds at the site, taking into account the impacts of plant

  8. Potential areas for AIJ [Activities Implemented Jointly] projects in Kenya

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omulo, Monica A. [Climate Network Africa, Nairobi (Kenya)

    1998-09-01

    This paper identifies three sectors where AIJ could bring tangible benefits to Kenya as well as massive benefits to the environment in terms of greenhouse gas emissions reduction. The energy sector is one of the potential areas for AIJ activities. Kenya has few developed domestic energy sources, despite the potential, little attention has been paid in the past to the potential for domestic energy from existing renewable resources. There is potential for exploration of existing renewable energy resources using decentralized small scale renewable energy technologies based on wind and solar power. The other area is the transport sector which has a wide variety of proven options including increasing affordable public transport, by discouraging private car use, shifting freight from road to rail. The possible participants include local and international private industries and Government. For instance, the private industry could set up urban car clinics to fine-tune engines for more efficient operations, raise public awareness, save fuel and foreign exchange. The third potential sector for AIJ is the production industry. This requires modernization of the polluting industries using environmentally friendly technologies. There is great potential for the sectors to contribute to greenhouse gas emissions reduction. Kenya should therefore take advantage of the development potential offered in AIJ/JI by focusing attention primarily on sectors such as energy, transport, and industry and promote science and technology in these areas. (author)

  9. Annual activities report of Brazilian Aerospace Technical Center -CTA/IEAv - 1989; Relatorio anual de atividades - CTA/IEAv - 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1989-12-31

    This document reports the research activities on nuclear physics and reactors physics and engineering in the Brazilian Aerospace Technical Center/Advanced Studies Institute, Sao Paulo State, in the year of 1989.

  10. A STATE AS AN ACTIVATOR OF SCIENTIFIC, TECHNICAL AND INNOVATION ACTIVITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Zhylinska

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Modern mechanisms and instruments of state regulation of science, technology and innovation are systematized from the point of view of market failures overcoming in these areas of the economy.

  11. Risk assessment of the retrieval of transuranic waste: Pads 1, 2, and 4, Technical Area-54, Area G Los Alamos National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Risk Assessment for the Retrieval of Transuranic Waste is a comparative risk assessment of the potential adverse human health effects resulting from exposure to contaminants during retrieval and post-retrieval aboveground storage operations of post-1970 earthen-covered transuranic waste. Two alternatives are compared: (1) Immediate Retrieval and (2) Delayed Retrieval. Under the Immediate Retrieval Alternative, retrieval of the waste is assumed to begin immediately, Under the Delayed Retrieval Alternative, retrieval is delayed 10 years. The current risk assessment is on Pads 1, 2, and 4, at Technical Area-54, Area-G, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Risks are assessed independently for three scenarios: (1) incident-free retrieval operations, (2) incident-free storage operations, and (3) a drum failure analysis. The drum failure analysis evaluates container integrity under both alternatives and assesses the impacts of potential drum failures during retrieval operations. Risks associated with a series of drum failures are potentially severe for workers, off-site receptors, and general on-site employees if retrieval is delayed 10 years and administrative and engineering controls remain constant. Under the Delayed Retrieval Alternative, an average of 300 drums out of 16,647 are estimated to fail during retrieval operations due to general corrosion, while minimal drums are predicted to fail under the Immediate Retrieval Alternative. The results of the current study suggest that, based on risk, remediation of Pads 1, 2, and 4 at LANL should not be delayed. Although risks from incident-free operations in the Delayed Retrieval Alternative are low, risks due to corrosion and drum failures are potentially severe

  12. Technical Issues Map for the NHI System Interface and Support Systems Area: 3rd Quarter FY 07

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document provides a mapping of technical issues associated with development of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) intermediate heat transport loop and nuclear hydrogen plant support systems to the work that has been accomplished or is currently underway. The technical issues are ranked according to priority and by assumed resolution dates. Due to funding limitations, not all high-priority technical issues are under study at the present time, and more resources will need to be dedicated to tackling such issues in the future. This technical issues map is useful for understanding the relative importance of various technical challenges and will be used as a planning tool by the NHI technical leadership for future work package planning. The technical map in its present form will be discontinued in FY08 and will be folded into a larger NHI System Interface and Support Systems project management plan and scope baseline statement in FY08

  13. Goals and activities of the JICA technical cooperation project on reduction of seismic risk in Romania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) Technical Cooperation Project on Reduction of Seismic Risk for Buildings and Structures started in Romania on October 1, 2002. The aim of the Project is to strengthen the capacity of earthquake disaster related activities in Romania. The Project approval is the result of four years of intensive efforts made by professionals from Technical University of Civil Engineering Bucharest (UTCB), Ministry of Transport, Constructions and Tourism (MTCT), Romania, National Building Research Institute (INCERC) Bucharest, JICA, Building Research Institute (BRI), Tsukuba, and National Institute for Land, Infrastructure and Management (NILIM), Tsukuba, Japan. The duration of the Project is five years. The implementing agency is the National Center for Seismic Risk Reduction (NCSRR) as a public institution of national interest under MTCT. The activities are carried out by NCSRR in partnership with UTCB and INCERC. During the Project period, 29 young Romanian engineers were trained in Japan, 7 Japanese experts and 37 Japanese experts worked for long-term and short-term, respectively in Romania. Equipment for seismic instrumentation, dynamic characterization of soil and structural testing rising up approximately to 260 million yens (i.e. 2.17 million USD) were donated by JICA to Romania, through NCSRR. The total cost of the Project is roughly 7 million USD. The paper describes the main activities and results of the Project until the JICA Final Evaluation Mission (March 2007). (authors)

  14. Some proposals on technical system for regulation of industrial activities involving NORMs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In accordance with the relevant provisions of 'Law of People's Republic of China on Prevention and Control of Radioactive Pollution' and 'Basic standards for protection against ionizing radiation and for safety of radiant sources' (GB 18871-2002), based on domestic specific situations and the international regulatory practices on NORM facilities, some constructive suggestions of technical system for regulation industrial activities involving NORMs were put forward in the paper. Several aspects such as justification evaluation, dose system, radioactivity classification management system, monitoring, decommissioning, radiation protection system, and management of existing NORM facilities were addressed. (authors)

  15. Technical basis for classification of low-activity waste fraction from Hanford site tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petersen, C.A., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-07-17

    The overall objective of this report is to provide a technical basis to support a U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission determination to classify the low-activity waste from the Hanford Site single-shell and double-shell tanks as `incidental` wastes after removal of additional radionuclides and immobilization.The proposed processing method, in addition to the previous radionuclide removal efforts, will remove the largest practical amount of total site radioactivity, attributable to high-level wastes, for disposal in a deep geologic repository. The remainder of the waste would be considered `incidental` waste and could be disposed onsite.

  16. A framework for activity detection in wide-area motion imagery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porter, Reid B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ruggiero, Christy E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Morrison, Jack D [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Wide-area persistent imaging systems are becoming increasingly cost effective and now large areas of the earth can be imaged at relatively high frame rates (1-2 fps). The efficient exploitation of the large geo-spatial-temporal datasets produced by these systems poses significant technical challenges for image and video analysis and data mining. In recent years there has been significant progress made on stabilization, moving object detection and tracking and automated systems now generate hundreds to thousands of vehicle tracks from raw data, with little human intervention. However, the tracking performance at this scale, is unreliable and average track length is much smaller than the average vehicle route. This is a limiting factor for applications which depend heavily on track identity, i.e. tracking vehicles from their points of origin to their final destination. In this paper we propose and investigate a framework for wide-area motion imagery (W AMI) exploitation that minimizes the dependence on track identity. In its current form this framework takes noisy, incomplete moving object detection tracks as input, and produces a small set of activities (e.g. multi-vehicle meetings) as output. The framework can be used to focus and direct human users and additional computation, and suggests a path towards high-level content extraction by learning from the human-in-the-loop.

  17. The Effect of Mercury Mining Activities on Oak Forest in the Almaden Area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This scientific-technical report is the result of the research work carried out by Maite Villadoniga Garcia, to obtain the Master's Final Project, this has been developed at the Unit of Soil Degradation in the Department of Environment at CIEMAT. Two main reasons are important for the study of the vegetation in Almaden, firstly to ascertain the state in which they find the different landscapes surrounding the mine and secondly, it would be interesting to know the potential applications for recovery areas, degraded by this type of mining. This report presents the initial analysis of a natural area where there has not been activity related to mining of mercury, but their lithologic conditions and proximity to the mine of Almaden (within 3 km) make it a space in which they are both elevated mercury concentrations in soil (1.25 to 35.55 mg kg-1) and plant species (Quercus ilex: 0.10-2.29 mg kg-1; Pseudovernia sp. 1.10-21.06 mg kg-1). We can conclude after this study that the natural vegetation of the area if they had been affected by years of mining, although not find any obvious signs of damage to these ecosystems and that different factors affect the uptake of mercury by of different species. (Author) 37 refs.

  18. A framework for activity detection in wide-area motion imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Reid; Ruggiero, Christy; Morrison, John D.

    2009-05-01

    As wide-area persistent imaging systems become cost effective, increasingly large areas of the earth can be imaged at relatively high frame rates. Efficient exploitation of the large geo-spatial-temporal datasets produced by these systems poses significant technical challenges for image and video analysis and for data mining. Significant progress in image stabilization, moving object detection and tracking, are allowing automated systems to generate hundreds to thousands of vehicle tracks from raw data, with little human intervention. However, tracking performance at this scale is unreliable, and average track length is much smaller than the average vehicle route. These are limiting factors for applications that depend heavily on track identity, i.e. tracking vehicles from their points of origin to their final destination. In this paper, we propose and evaluate a framework for wide-area motion imagery (WAMI) exploitation that minimizes the dependence on track identity. In its current form, this framework takes noisy, incomplete moving object detection tracks as input, and produces a small set of activities (e.g. multi-vehicle meetings) as output. The framework can be used to focus and direct human users and additional computation, and suggests a path towards high-level content extraction by learning from the human-in-the-loop.

  19. The heightened activity of radon in water analysis from Lounovice area, Czech Republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Lounovice area is located approximately 20 km south-east of Prague. Radon activity in fresh water from drilled-wells, used for village water supply, ranges between 700 and 900 Bq/l, which exceeds the standard for drinkable water by a factor higher than 100. Therefore, water is treated by aeration before use. Some residents, however, use drinking water from their own wells. A comprehensive radon and natural radioactivity survey was therefore conducted in this area. Secondary school students were engaged in this survey within the 'Physics Week' scientific program for young physicists, run by the Czech Technical University in Prague every year. in year 2004. The program included the following items: Laboratory gamma spectrometric measurement of the bedrock; Radon activity measurement in water before and after the aeration process; Radon monitoring at workplaces of the water company (the values provided by ionization chamber instruments and semiconductor detector instruments were compared); Radon daughters measurement at workplaces of the water company; In situ gamma spectrometry; In situ effective dose rate measurement; and Determination of a 'radon index' in the neighborhood of a drilled well

  20. Active Fault Characterization in the Urban Area of Vienna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Kurt; Grupe, Sabine; Hintersberger, Esther

    2016-04-01

    The identification of active faults that lie beneath a city is of key importance for seismic hazard assessment. Fault mapping and characterization in built-up areas with strong anthropogenic overprint is, however, a challenging task. Our study of Quaternary faults in the city of Vienna starts from the re-assessment of a borehole database of the municipality containing several tens of thousands of shallow boreholes. Data provide tight constraints on the geometry of Quaternary deposits and highlight several locations with fault-delimited Middle to Late Pleistocene terrace sediments of the Danube River. Additional information is obtained from geological descriptions of historical outcrops which partly date back to about 1900. The latter were found to be particularly valuable by providing unprejudiced descriptions of Quaternary faults, sometimes with stunning detail. The along-strike continuations of some of the identified faults are further imaged by industrial 2D/3D seismic acquired outside the city limits. The interpretation and the assessment of faults identified within the city benefit from a very well constrained tectonic model of the active Vienna Basin fault system which derived from data obtained outside the city limits. This data suggests that the urban faults are part of a system of normal faults compensating fault-normal extension at a releasing bend of the sinistral Vienna Basin Transfer Fault. Slip rates estimated for the faults in the city are in the range of several hundredths of millimetres per year and match the slip rates of normal faults that were trenched outside the city. The lengths/areas of individual faults estimated from maps and seismic reach up to almost 700 km² suggesting that all of the identified faults are capable of producing earthquakes with magnitudes M>6, some with magnitudes up to M~6.7.

  1. The Agency's Technical Co-operation activities in 1986. Report by the Director General

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During 1986, a total of 854 projects were operational and 71 training courses were held. These activities involved 1930 expert assignments. In addition, 937 persons received training under the fellowship programme. Performance indicators (non-financial) are given in Part II of this report (Sections B and C) in order to provide some impression of the increase in implementation actions related to the delivery of a growing programme. Although total resources were higher in 1986 than in previous years, the overall growth rate declined further while new obligations and disbursements increased steeply. The near-stagnation in the net expenditure rate for Technical Assistance and Co-operation Fund (TACF) resources which occurred in 1985 prompted close monitoring and follow-up measures in 1986. These actions led to an all-time high TACF net expenditure rate, namely 75.7%, in 1986. As the TACF represented 71% of all technical co-operation resources, overall programme performance in terms of net expenditure reached 67.6%, which is also the highest rate ever recorded. TACF resources increased by 11%. Pledges and miscellaneous income covered 92.7% of the target. The percentage attainment of the target has been declining since 1983. As actual disbursements against the TACF increased at a much higher rate than new resources, the unobligated balance decreased to the extent that striving for even higher net expenditure rates would no longer be consistent with judicious resource management. The share of extrabudgetary funds in the programme declined: they accounted for 14.5% of the resources and 12.6% of the disbursements in 1986. The Federal Republic of Germany became the largest contributor of extrabudgetary funds. Special attention will be given to the utilization of these resources so that delivery rates can be improved. As anticipated, UNDP's share in resources and disbursements increased and several new large-scale projects were approved. In-kind assistance continued to play a

  2. Dose Modeling Evaluations and Technical Support Document For the Authorized Limits Request for the DOE-Owned Property Outside the Limited Area, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Paducah, Kentucky

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Environmental assessments and remediation activities are being conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), Paducah, Kentucky. The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE), a DOE prime contractor, was contracted by the DOE Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office (DOE-PPPO) to conduct radiation dose modeling analyses and derive single radionuclide soil guidelines (soil guidelines) in support of the derivation of Authorized Limits (ALs) for 'DOE-Owned Property Outside the Limited Area' ('Property') at the PGDP. The ORISE evaluation specifically included the area identified by DOE restricted area postings (public use access restrictions) and areas licensed by DOE to the West Kentucky Wildlife Management Area (WKWMA). The licensed areas are available without restriction to the general public for a variety of (primarily) recreational uses. Relevant receptors impacting current and reasonably anticipated future use activities were evaluated. In support of soil guideline derivation, a Conceptual Site Model (CSM) was developed. The CSM listed radiation and contamination sources, release mechanisms, transport media, representative exposure pathways from residual radioactivity, and a total of three receptors (under present and future use scenarios). Plausible receptors included a Resident Farmer, Recreational User, and Wildlife Worker. single radionuclide soil guidelines (outputs specified by the software modeling code) were generated for three receptors and thirteen targeted radionuclides. These soil guidelines were based on satisfying the project dose constraints. For comparison, soil guidelines applicable to the basic radiation public dose limit of 100 mrem/yr were generated. Single radionuclide soil guidelines from the most limiting (restrictive) receptor based on a target dose constraint of 25 mrem/yr were then rounded and identified as the derived soil guidelines. An additional evaluation using the derived soil

  3. Dose Modeling Evaluations and Technical Support Document For the Authorized Limits Request for the DOE-Owned Property Outside the Limited Area, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Paducah, Kentucky

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boerner, A. J. [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Independent Environmental Assessment and Verification Program; Maldonado, D. G. [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Independent Environmental Assessment and Verification Program; Hansen, Tom [Ameriphysics, LLC (United States)

    2012-09-01

    Environmental assessments and remediation activities are being conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), Paducah, Kentucky. The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE), a DOE prime contractor, was contracted by the DOE Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office (DOE-PPPO) to conduct radiation dose modeling analyses and derive single radionuclide soil guidelines (soil guidelines) in support of the derivation of Authorized Limits (ALs) for 'DOE-Owned Property Outside the Limited Area' ('Property') at the PGDP. The ORISE evaluation specifically included the area identified by DOE restricted area postings (public use access restrictions) and areas licensed by DOE to the West Kentucky Wildlife Management Area (WKWMA). The licensed areas are available without restriction to the general public for a variety of (primarily) recreational uses. Relevant receptors impacting current and reasonably anticipated future use activities were evaluated. In support of soil guideline derivation, a Conceptual Site Model (CSM) was developed. The CSM listed radiation and contamination sources, release mechanisms, transport media, representative exposure pathways from residual radioactivity, and a total of three receptors (under present and future use scenarios). Plausible receptors included a Resident Farmer, Recreational User, and Wildlife Worker. single radionuclide soil guidelines (outputs specified by the software modeling code) were generated for three receptors and thirteen targeted radionuclides. These soil guidelines were based on satisfying the project dose constraints. For comparison, soil guidelines applicable to the basic radiation public dose limit of 100 mrem/yr were generated. Single radionuclide soil guidelines from the most limiting (restrictive) receptor based on a target dose constraint of 25 mrem/yr were then rounded and identified as the derived soil guidelines. An additional evaluation using the derived soil

  4. IAEA activities in the area of partitioning and transmutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Four major challenges are facing the long-term development of nuclear energy: improvement of the economic competitiveness, meeting increasingly stringent safety requirements, adhering to the criteria of sustainable development, and public acceptance. Meeting the sustainability criteria is the driving force behind the topic of this paper. In this context, sustainability has two aspects: natural resources and waste management. IAEA's activities in the area of Partitioning and Transmutation (P and T) are mostly in response to the latter. While not involving the large quantities of gaseous products and toxic solid wastes associated with fossil fuels, radioactive waste disposal is today's dominant public acceptance issue. In fact, small waste quantities permit a rigorous confinement strategy, and mined geological disposal is the strategy followed by some countries. Nevertheless, political opposition arguing that this does not yet constitute a safe disposal technology has largely stalled these efforts. One of the primary reasons cited is the long life of many of the radioisotopes generated from fission. This concern has led to increased R and D efforts to develop a technology aimed at reducing the amount and radio-toxicity of long-lived radioactive waste through transmutation in fission reactors or sub-critical systems. In the frame of the Project on Technology Advances in Fast Reactors and Accelerator-Driven Systems (ADS), the IAEA initiated a number of activities on utilization of plutonium and transmutation of long-lived radioactive waste, ADS, and deuterium-tritium plasma-driven sub-critical systems. The paper presents past accomplishments, current status and planned activities of this IAEA project

  5. Technical Basis for Safe Operations with Pu-239 in NMS and S Facilities (F and H Areas)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plutonium-239 is now being processed in HB-Line and H-Canyon as well as FB-Line and F-Canyon. As part of the effort to upgrade the Authorization Basis for H Area facilities relative to nuclear criticality, a literature review of Pu polymer characteristics was conducted to establish a more quantitative vs. qualitative technical basis for safe operations. The results are also applicable to processing in F Area facilities.The chemistry of Pu polymer formation, precipitation, and depolymerization is complex. Establishing limits on acid concentrations of solutions or changing the valence to Pu(III) or Pu(VI) can prevent plutonium polymer formation in tanks in the B lines and canyons. For Pu(IV) solutions of 7 g/L or less, 0.22 M HNO3 prevents polymer formation at ambient temperature. This concentration should remain the minimum acid limit for the canyons and B lines when processing Pu-239 solutions. If the minimum acid concentration is compromised, the solution may need to be sampled and tested for the presence of polymer. If polymer is not detected, processing may proceed. If polymer is detected, adding HNO3 to a final concentration above 4 M is the safest method for handling the solution. The solution could also be heated to speed up the depolymerization process. Heating with > 4 M HNO3 will depolymerize the solution for further processing.Adsorption of Pu(IV) polymer onto the steel walls of canyon and B line tanks is likely to be 11 mg/cm2, a literature value for unpolished steel. This value will be confirmed by experimental work. Tank-to-tank transfers via steam jets are not expected to produce Pu(IV) polymer unless a larger than normal dilution occurs (e.g., >3 percent) at acidities below 0.4 M

  6. Natural monopoly in Eurasian economic union: concept, essence, types and areas of activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moskalevich Galina

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to one of the kinds of monopoly — a natural monopoly. The purpose of the article is to reveal the concept and essence of natural monopoly, its peculiarities and kinds, to identify areas of economic activity in the sphere of natural monopoly. Scientific and practical significance of the research is that the results clarify, supplement and develop conceptual provisions that reveal the content of natural monopoly, various forms of its existence and activity. The definition of the concept "natural monopoly" is given; its essence is revealed. The peculiarities and the specificity of natural monopolies are described. The characteristic of the main features of this kind of a monopoly is given. It is emphasized that one of the peculiarities of natural monopolies is the existence of very high barriers to entry into the industry. The reasons of the emergence and existence of a natural monopoly are revealed. Natural monopolies occur where the competition is impossible or economically inexpedient, that is, where the competition uses the resources of the society less efficiently. Two main types of natural monopolies are considered and analyzed: a a natural monopoly that has arisen as a result of the presence of unique natural phenomena (climate, natural resources, the rarity of certain raw materials, location; b the technical and economic monopoly, the occurrence of which is dictated either by technical or economic reasons related to the manifestation of scale. The positive and negative characteristics of a natural monopoly, its pros and cons are identified. The legal duties of subjects of natural monopolies are disclosed. It is concluded that natural monopolies are based either on the unique natural resources or unique complicated technology; that the advantages of natural monopoly can become disadvantages, and vice versa. This form of economic organization is deeply controversial. It is impossible to determine clearly what is

  7. Modeling Aeolian Transport of Contaminated Sediments at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Technical Area 54, Area G: Sensitivities to Succession, Disturbance, and Future Climate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whicker, Jeffrey J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kirchner, Thomas B. [New Mexico State University; Breshears, David D. [University of Arizona; Field, Jason P. [University of Arizona

    2012-03-27

    The Technical Area 54 (TA-54) Area G disposal facility is used for the disposal of radioactive waste at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 435.1 (DOE, 2001) requires that radioactive waste be managed in a manner that protects public health and safety and the environment. In compliance with that requirement, DOE field sites must prepare and maintain site-specific radiological performance assessments for facilities that receive waste after September 26, 1988. Sites are also required to conduct composite analyses for facilities that receive waste after this date; these analyses account for the cumulative impacts of all waste that has been (and will be) disposed of at the facilities and other sources of radioactive material that may interact with these facilities. LANL issued Revision 4 of the Area G performance assessment and composite analysis in 2008. In support of those analyses, vertical and horizontal sediment flux data were collected at two analog sites, each with different dominant vegetation characteristics, and used to estimate rates of vertical resuspension and wind erosion for Area G. The results of that investigation indicated that there was no net loss of soil at the disposal site due to wind erosion, and suggested minimal impacts of wind on the long-term performance of the facility. However, that study did not evaluate the potential for contaminant transport caused by the horizontal movement of soil particles over long time frames. Since that time, additional field data have been collected to estimate wind threshold velocities for initiating sediment transport due to saltation and rates of sediment transport once those thresholds are reached. Data such as these have been used in the development of the Vegetation Modified Transport (VMTran) model. This model is designed to estimate patterns and long-term rates of contaminant redistribution caused by winds at the site, taking into account the impacts of plant

  8. ECVAM's ongoing activities in the area of acute oral toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinsner-Ovaskainen, Agnieszka; Bulgheroni, Anna; Hartung, Thomas; Prieto, Pilar

    2009-12-01

    The 7th Amendment of the Cosmetics Directive (2003/15/EC) set up timelines for banning animal testing and marketing of cosmetic products and their ingredients tested on animals. For most of the human health effects, including acute toxicity, the deadline for these bans was in March 2009. Moreover, the new Regulation EC 1907/2006 on Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation and Restriction of Chemicals (REACH) provided a strong impetus towards the application of alternative approaches to reduce the number of animals used for toxicological testing. Therefore, the European Centre for the Validation of Alternative Methods (ECVAM) is currently putting considerable effort into developing and validating alternative methods in the field of acute toxicity. The main activities in this area include: (1) the Integrated Project ACuteTox, funded by the European Commission's 6th Framework Programme in 2005 with the aim to develop and pre-validate a testing strategy to fully replace acute oral toxicity testing in vivo; (2) a follow-up validation study to assess the predictive capacity of the validated BALB/3T3 Neutral Red Uptake cytotoxicity assay to discriminate between toxic/hazardous (LD(50)2,000 mg/kg); (3) an approach to identify compounds with LD(50)>2,000 mg/kg using information from 28-days repeated dose toxicity studies. PMID:19591916

  9. Arsenic pollution in the Yellowknife area from gold smelter activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gold mined at Yelloknife in the North West Territories of Canada is associated with arsenopyrite ores which necessitates the oxidation of the arsenic and sulphur by roasting at two Yellowknife smelters. As2O3 and SO2 are emitted into the atmosphere, and despite improvements in emission control, significant emissions still occur. In order to asses the arsenic contamination in the local environment and the potential exposures to man, soil samples and samples of the native vegetation were collected in and around Yellowknife and the two smelters. Arsenic and antimony analyses were done by instrumental neutron activation analysis using the SLOWPOKE facility at University of Toronto. Zinc, copper, lead and cadmium analyses were done by atomic adsorption spectrophotometry. Arsenic was found to be accumulated in the soils in the vicinity of the two smelters to levels of several thousand ppm. Antimony levels were about 10% of arsenic and were highly correlated with arsenic. Zinc occured to 500 ppm around the smelters. Soil arsenic levels are sufficiently high to inhibit root growth in soils over a very extensive area. (author)

  10. International Collaboration on Building Local Technical Capacities for Monitoring Volcanic Activity at Pacaya Volcano, Guatemala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar-Wolf, R. P.; Chigna, G.; Morales, H.; Waite, G. P.; Oommen, T.; Lechner, H. N.

    2015-12-01

    Pacaya volcano is a frequently active and potentially dangerous volcano situated in the Guatemalan volcanic arc. It is also a National Park and a major touristic attraction, constituting an important economic resource for local municipality and the nearby communities. Recent eruptions have caused fatalities and extensive damage to nearby communities, highlighting the need for risk management and loss reduction from the volcanic activity. Volcanic monitoring at Pacaya is done by the Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH), instrumentally through one short period seismic station, and visually by the Parque Nacional Volcan de Pacaya y Laguna de Calderas (PNVPLC) personnel. We carry out a project to increase the local technical capacities for monitoring volcanic activity at Pacaya. Funding for the project comes from the Society of Exploration Geophysicists through the Geoscientists Without Borders program. Three seismic and continuous GPS stations will be installed at locations within 5 km from the main vent at Pacaya, and one webcam will aid in the visual monitoring tasks. Local educational and outreach components of the project include technical workshops on data monitoring use, and short thesis projects with the San Carlos University in Guatemala. A small permanent exhibit at the PNVPLC museum or visitor center, focusing on the volcano's history, hazards and resources, will also be established as part of the project. The strategy to involve a diverse group of local collaborators in Guatemala aims to increase the chances for long term sustainability of the project, and relies not only on transferring technology but also the "know-how" to make that technology useful. Although not a primary research project, it builds on a relationship of years of joint research projects at Pacaya between the participants, and could be a model of how to increase the broader impacts of such long term collaboration partnerships.

  11. Overview on technical co-operation activities deployed between Romania and International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romania became a Member State of the IAEA in 1957. From the mid 1960s to the mid 1970s Romania received assistance in the frame of the IAEA Technical Co-operation Program mainly in the following areas: research in nuclear physics, medical issues and some application of radiation and isotopes. In 1976 Romania decided to use CANDU type reactors for its NPPs. The construction of five units (of 660 MWe each) started in 1978 at Cernavoda. The orientation of Romania's Technical Co-operation projects was shifted towards the requirements raised by the national Nuclear Power Program and as such 18 projects of the IAEA and 3 projects of the UN development program (for which IAEA was a executive Agency) have been directly concerned with it. To develop scientific and technological support for nuclear power program a TRIGA 14 MW Materials Testing Reactor was commissioned at Pitesti in 1979. After 1989 the TC program was tailored to assist manpower training in areas related to nuclear power. In the period 1991 - 1995 a total of 33 TC projects were deployed. The largest part of researches were allotted to projects in nuclear engineering and technology field including also safety aspects (41%), followed by nuclear physics research (25%). During 1991 - 1994 Romania received 12% of the total funds allotted for TC program in Europe. In 1995 - 1996 cycle there were 24 on-going TC projects in Romania, implying the total resource allocation of USD 1,27 million. Diverse areas were covered by the program: 6 projects were related to Cernavoda NPP, followed by applications of nuclear techniques in medicine, agriculture and environment. A special attention was given to the following two projects: Industrial Radiation Sterilization and Decommissioning Plan for WWR-S research reactor. In the present cycle the first model project in Romania was started by the Agency based on initially approved financing of USA 1,6 million. The main area covered is still nuclear safety. For 1999 - 2000 biennial

  12. Model parameters of technical and tactical actions in the competitive activities of volleyball players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doroshenko E.Iu.

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The application of modeling of technical and tactical actions as one of the leading components of the control system of competitive activities of highly skilled volleyball players. It is show that the proposed modeling techniques can generate the optimum orientation of the training process with the use of specialized tools at different stages of the annual cycle of training. In a study based on official statistics volleyball tournament World League in 2012 years. It is recommended to be oriented on the followings model indexes of actions of command and sportsmen: general amount of the collected glasses (170 - 190; amount of glasses, collected in an attack (139 - 157; amount of glasses, collected at blocking (12 - 24; amount of glasses, collected from a serve (9 - 17; the middle index of efficiency is protective actions (at the reception of ball from a serve -58,29%. It is shown that the performance of technical and tactical actions can be used as a model in the management of the process of training and competitive volleyball elite athletes.

  13. Advanced transportation system studies technical area 2 (TA-2): Heavy lift launch vehicle development. volume 3; Program Cost estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCurry, J. B.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of the TA-2 contract was to provide advanced launch vehicle concept definition and analysis to assist NASA in the identification of future launch vehicle requirements. Contracted analysis activities included vehicle sizing and performance analysis, subsystem concept definition, propulsion subsystem definition (foreign and domestic), ground operations and facilities analysis, and life cycle cost estimation. The basic period of performance of the TA-2 contract was from May 1992 through May 1993. No-cost extensions were exercised on the contract from June 1993 through July 1995. This document is part of the final report for the TA-2 contract. The final report consists of three volumes: Volume 1 is the Executive Summary, Volume 2 is Technical Results, and Volume 3 is Program Cost Estimates. The document-at-hand, Volume 3, provides a work breakdown structure dictionary, user's guide for the parametric life cycle cost estimation tool, and final report developed by ECON, Inc., under subcontract to Lockheed Martin on TA-2 for the analysis of heavy lift launch vehicle concepts.

  14. Energy requirements and physical activity level of active elderly people in rural areas of cuba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obesity and non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) are common in the Third Age and increasing in Cuba. Among the life-style changes associated with increased prevalence of obesity and its related disorders, diet and activity patterns are prime candidates. The transition to this life-style model may induce a decrease in the energy needs. There is an urgent need for tools which have been validated for measuring diet and physical activity in nutritional studies in the developing world, but also a more urgent need for reference values for the total energy requirements of healthy elderly people. Regular physical activity reduces the likelihood to develop diseases that characterise the metabolic cardiovascular syndrome. Previous studies done in Havana showed values of physical activity level (PAL) which are lower than the reported for elderly subjects. Elderly people living in rural areas use to have physical activity levels which differ from the observed in urban areas. With the purpose of estimating the energy requirements, a group of 40 apparently healthy people older than 60 years of age living in a rural mountain community will be submitted to a medical, epidemiological, dietary, anthropometric and insulin resistance study. Physical activity will be determined by questionnaire and by the calculation of the PAL from the basal metabolic rate (BMR) and total energy expenditure (TEE) measured with the doubly-labelled water method (DLW). Associations with the prevalence of insulin resistance and obesity will be assessed. (author)

  15. Activity theory and genre ecology: Conceptual tools for understanding technical communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Winberg

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on a year-long project in an architectural technology department, which studied students’ oral language development in plenary discussions in a first year History and Appreciation of Architecture course. Data was obtained by videotaping classroom activities, and by interviewing the lecturer and students who were participants in the course. The data was analysed, using categories suggested by Activity Theory. The category of ‘rules’ was selected from the activity system for further analysis, using a Genre Ecology approach. The findings of the study show how technical communication is managed within a classroom based activity system comprising lecturer and students, and graphic and verbal texts, in a context of learning.  Learning, teaching, and expert discourses of the architectural review genre interact and are negotiated by participants. Through participation in plenary discussion, students from diverse backgrounds contribute to one another’s experience of architectural design, and by valuing and responding to students’ contributions, the lecturer facilitates students’ understanding of the ‘rules’ of architectural communication, and enables students to access an expanded repertoire of the genre of architectural review.

  16. Mark III LOCA-related hydrodynamic load definition. Generic technical activity B-10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report, prepared by the staff of the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation and its consultants at the Brookhaven National Laboratory, provides a discussion of LOCA-related suppression pool hydrodynamic loads in boiling water reactor (BWR) facilities with the Mark III pressure-suppression containment design. Its issuance completes NRC Generic Technical Activity B-10, Behavior of BWR Mark III Containment. On the basis of certain large-scale tests conducted between 1973 and 1979, the General Electric Company developed LOCA-related hydrodynamic load definitions for use in the design of the standard Mark III containment. The staff and its consultants have reviewed these load definitions and their bases conclude that, with a few specified changes, the proposed load definitions provide conservative loading conditions. The staff-approved acceptance criteria for LOCA-related hydrodynamic loads are provided in Appendix C of this report

  17. Mark III LOCA-related hydrodynamic load definition. Generic technical activity B-10. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report, prepared by the staff of the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation and its consultants at the Brookhaven National Laboratory, provides a discussion of LOCA-related suppression pool hydrodynamic loads in boiling water reactor (BWR) facilities with the Mark III pressure-suppression containment design. Its issuance completes NRC Generic Technical Activity B-10, Behavior of BWR Mark III Containment. On the basis of certain large-scale tests conducted between 1973 and 1979, the General Electric Company developed LOCA-related hydrodynamic load definitions for use in the design of the standard Mark III containment. The staff and its consultants have reviewed these load definitions and their bases and conclude that, with a few specified changes, the proposed load definitions provide conservative loading conditions. The staff approved acceptance criteria for LOCA-related hydrodynamic loads are provided in an appendix

  18. Supervision and technical coordination of the German activities in the 2D/3D-project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The German Federal Minister for Research and Technology, the Japanese Atomic Energy Bureau, represented by the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) and the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) made a contract to cooperate in the field of nuclear safety research with the aim to improve and to guarantee the safety of water-cooled nuclear reactors on an international basis by joint research activities in the 2D/3D-project. The necessity for these research activities results from gaps in the status of knowledge for a best-estimate analysis in emergency core cooling, from the legally established duty to minimize the radioactive emission to the environment as consequence of an incident, and from the effort to optimize the safeguard systems of nuclear reactors continuously and steadily. The activities which were performed in the frame of this project concentrated on the coordination of the experimental and theoretical work, as well as on the technical supervision with respect to an efficient attainment of the internationally aspired research aim and to an optimal adjustment with respect to the emergency core cooling problems of pressurized water reactors. (orig.)

  19. 300 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (TEDF) Hazards Assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document establishes the technical basis in support of emergency planning activities for the 300 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility. The technical basis for project-specific Emergency Action Levels and Emergency Planning Zone is demonstrated

  20. Technical Guidelines for Sodium Storage and Handling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Y. B.; Kim, J. M.; Kim, T. J.; Nam, H. Y.; Lee, T. H.; Jeong, J. Y.; Choi, B. H.; Choi, J. H.

    2010-09-15

    This document presents as a technical guideline for education and training of beginners who engage in the sodium facility operation and R and D activities for the first time. This guideline covers the following technical areas. - General properties of sodium - Sodium handling technology - Sodium fire and fire fighting - Material safety data sheet(MSDS)

  1. Activities in the area of procurement, dedication and obsolete parts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plant Support Engineering (PSE) is a utility-driven organization within the EPRI which utilizes a consensus approach to identify, prioritize and solve emergent issues within the nuclear utility community. This paper addresses PSE efforts to assist utilities to develop products related to the procurement and dedication of commercial grade items and the identification of replacement parts for obsolete parts. These products include: technical guidelines to be used by engineering personnel specifying and procuring replacement parts and equipment; databases used to store information related to the procurement and dedication of commercial grade items; databases to assist utilities in meeting the challenge of identifying suitable replacement parts for equipment which has become obsolete. 3 figs

  2. SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY ACTIVITIES FOR CHROMIUM IN THE 100 AREAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PETERSEN SW

    2009-07-02

    {sm_bullet} Primary Objective: Protect the Columbia River - Focus is control and treatment of contamination at or near the shoreline, which is influenced by bank storage {sm_bullet} Secondary Objective: Reduce hexavalent chromium to <48 parts per billion (ppb) in aquifer (drinking water standard) - Large plumes with isolated areas of high chromium concentrations (> 40,000 ppb), - Unknown source location(s); probably originating in reactor operation areas

  3. High Surface Area of Nano Pores Activated Carbon Derived From Agriculture Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, the high surface area of nano pores activated carbon rice husk originated from local biomass was investigated. The comparison in terms of surface area, porosity and behavior in electrochemical analysis with commercial activated carbon was studied in details. The nano pores activated carbon rice husk was synthesis using consecutive of carbonization and activation under purified nitrogen and carbon dioxide purge. Interestingly, the surface area and capacity of the nano pores activated carbon rice indicated higher in comparison to commercial activated carbon. This indicated that the nano pores activated carbon has potential to be developed further as an alternative material in reducing suspension on commercial activated carbon. (author)

  4. DOE standard: Integration of environment, safety, and health into facility disposition activities. Volume 1: Technical standard

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-05-01

    This Department of Energy (DOE) technical standard (referred to as the Standard) provides guidance for integrating and enhancing worker, public, and environmental protection during facility disposition activities. It provides environment, safety, and health (ES and H) guidance to supplement the project management requirements and associated guidelines contained within DOE O 430.1A, Life-Cycle Asset Management (LCAM), and amplified within the corresponding implementation guides. In addition, the Standard is designed to support an Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS), consistent with the guiding principles and core functions contained in DOE P 450.4, Safety Management System Policy, and discussed in DOE G 450.4-1, Integrated Safety Management System Guide. The ISMS guiding principles represent the fundamental policies that guide the safe accomplishment of work and include: (1) line management responsibility for safety; (2) clear roles and responsibilities; (3) competence commensurate with responsibilities; (4) balanced priorities; (5) identification of safety standards and requirements; (6) hazard controls tailored to work being performed; and (7) operations authorization. This Standard specifically addresses the implementation of the above ISMS principles four through seven, as applied to facility disposition activities.

  5. Reactor radiation. Technical activities, 1991. NAS-NRC assessment panel, February 13-14, 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The responsibilities of the Reactor Radiation Division are threefold: to operate the research reactor (NBSR) as a NIST and national resource in a cost-effective manner while protecting the public safety; to conduct a program of materials research using neutron methods, while developing and maintaining state-of-the-art instrumentation to ensure the best utilization of the NBSR neutron scattering facilities; and to develop and operate the Cold Neutron Research Facility (CNRF) as a National center, providing unique measurement capabilities to U.S. researchers. The techniques include nuclear methods for chemical analysis, neutron diffraction and scattering for the characterization of microstructure and dynamics of materials (e.g., hydrogen in metals, polymers, layered materials, surfaces and interfaces, ceramics, alloys, amorphous materials, micelles, microporous materials, and buckminsterfullerene) neturon diffraction metods for determination of residual stress and texture, neutron radiography for the non-destructive examination of large components, neturon autorafiography for art history and restoration, and various techniques for neutron flux calibrations and personnel radiation monitoring. The sections that follow are a summary of the t echnical activities of the Reactor Radiation Division from October 1,1990 through September 30, 1991. A detailed report on work performed at the NIST reactor is available in a NIST Technical Note entitled 'NIST Reactor: Summary of Activities July 1990 through June 1991'

  6. ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION DURING TECHNICAL ACTIVITIES ON THE THIRD STAGE OF SCHOOL EDUCATION IN POLAND

    OpenAIRE

    Pytel, Krzysztof; Piaskowska, Małgorzata; Rowińska, Małgorzata

    2016-01-01

    Technical education, is mainly focused on exploring the world of technology, arising the technical conscious and discovering the world that surrounds us. But also is in touch with the development of knowledge and awareness of environmental education, and arising the environmental responsibility which is part of the world. This study describes the ecological issues in technical education and the need of creating them. These are the objectives of environmental education and all educational acti...

  7. Preliminary data from an instantaneous profile test conducted near the Mixed Waste Landfill, Technical Area 3, Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents data from an instantaneous profile test conducted near the Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico Mixed Waste Landfill in Technical Area 3. The test was performed from December 1993 through 1995 as part of the environmental Restoration Project's Phase 2 RCRA Facility Investigation of the Mixed Waste Landfill. The purpose of the test was to measure the unsaturated hydraulic properties of soils near the Mixed Waste Landfill. The instantaneous profile test and instrumentation are described, and the pressure and moisture content data from the test are presented. These data may be useful for understanding the unsaturated hydraulic properties of soils in Technical Area 3 and for model validation, verification, and calibration

  8. Remedial investigation report on Waste Area Grouping 5 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 1: Technical summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    A remedial investigation (RI) was performed to support environmental restoration activities for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 5 at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The WAG 5 RI made use of the observational approach, which concentrates on collecting only information needed to assess site risks and support future cleanup work. This information was interpreted and is presented using the framework of the site conceptual model, which relates contaminant sources and release mechanisms to migration pathways and exposure points that are keyed to current and future environmental risks for both human and ecological receptors. The site conceptual model forms the basis of the WAG 5 remedial action strategy and remedial action objectives. The RI provided the data necessary to verify this model and allows recommendations to be made to accomplish those objectives.

  9. Remedial investigation report on Waste Area Group 5 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 1: Technical summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-03-01

    A remedial investigation (RI) was performed to support environmental restoration activities for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 5 at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The WAG 5 RI made use of the observational approach, which concentrates on collecting only information needed to assess site risks and support future cleanup work. This information was interpreted and is presented using the framework of the site conceptual model, which relates contaminant sources and release mechanisms to migration pathways and exposure points that are keyed to current and future environmental risks for both human and ecological receptors. The site conceptual model forms the basis of the WAG 5 remedial action strategy and remedial action objectives. The RI provided the data necessary to verify this model and allows recommendations to be made to accomplish those objectives.

  10. Remedial investigation report on Waste Area Grouping 5 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 1: Technical summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A remedial investigation (RI) was performed to support environmental restoration activities for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 5 at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The WAG 5 RI made use of the observational approach, which concentrates on collecting only information needed to assess site risks and support future cleanup work. This information was interpreted and is presented using the framework of the site conceptual model, which relates contaminant sources and release mechanisms to migration pathways and exposure points that are keyed to current and future environmental risks for both human and ecological receptors. The site conceptual model forms the basis of the WAG 5 remedial action strategy and remedial action objectives. The RI provided the data necessary to verify this model and allows recommendations to be made to accomplish those objectives.

  11. Remedial investigation report on Waste Area Group 5 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 1: Technical summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A remedial investigation (RI) was performed to support environmental restoration activities for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 5 at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The WAG 5 RI made use of the observational approach, which concentrates on collecting only information needed to assess site risks and support future cleanup work. This information was interpreted and is presented using the framework of the site conceptual model, which relates contaminant sources and release mechanisms to migration pathways and exposure points that are keyed to current and future environmental risks for both human and ecological receptors. The site conceptual model forms the basis of the WAG 5 remedial action strategy and remedial action objectives. The RI provided the data necessary to verify this model and allows recommendations to be made to accomplish those objectives

  12. Procurement activities required by the nuclear program developed by nuclearelectrica national company- technical issues versus public acquisitions legal issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Public procurement is one of the areas of the single market where the results of the liberalization drive have not yet measured up to expectations. This communication presents some technical issues versus public acquisition legal issues and suggests ways and means of improving contract award procedures. Procurement area includes the acquisition of goods, services and works, thus assumption not only for purchasing equipment, components, spare-parts or materials, but also hiring of the contractors or consultants to carry out services and works. Procurement is related to the function of management of supply, which encompasses aside range of planning function, coding and classification, stockholding policies, store-keeping, stores accounting, etc. but it is also related to the hiring of contractors or consultants for work or services. As an answer to the challenge of the increasing market globalization it has been developed the ISO quality system, within 9000 family of standards. The very intensive competition for all market clients, either locally or globally, encouraged development of a new concept of quality management systems. Due to its specificity of activity and with respect to the rules and legislation requirements imposed either by the internal Romanian Laws and Regulations or/and by international market rules and constrains, the development, construction and operation of a Nuclear Power Plant shall be performed in a controlled condition and based on specific authorizations obtained by the Owner of the NPP from the Romanian Regulatory Authorities. The experience, accumulated by over 10 years of operation of Cernavoda NPP Unit 1 by our company, demonstrates the high importance of the Quality Management System that imposes the quality of the components installed on the plant, the services and the works developed to assure a safety operation of the nuclear unit, with a strongly dependence by the procurement system established for purchasing of goods, services and

  13. Economic and Technical Feasibility Study of Utility-Scale Wind Generation for the New York Buffalo River and South Buffalo Brownfield Opportunity Areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, J. O.; Mosey, G.

    2014-04-01

    Through the RE-Powering America's Land initiative, the economic and technical feasibility of utilizing contaminated lands in the Buffalo, New York, area for utility-scale wind development is explored. The study found that there is available land, electrical infrastructure, wind resource, and local interest to support a commercial wind project; however, economies of scale and local electrical markets may need further investigation before significant investment is made into developing a wind project at the Buffalo Reuse Authority site.

  14. Comprehensive Technical Support for High-Quality Anthracite Production: A Case Study in the Xinqiao Coal Mine, Yongxia Mining Area, China

    OpenAIRE

    , Wei Zhang; Dongsheng Zhang; Hongzhi Wang; Jixin Cheng

    2015-01-01

    The effective production of high-quality anthracite has attracted increasing global attention. Based on the coal occurrence in Yongxia Mining Area and mining conditions of a coalface in Xinqiao Coal Mine, we proposed a systematic study on the technical support for the production of high-quality anthracite. Six key steps were explored, including coal falling at the coalface, transport, underground bunker storage, main shaft hoisting, coal preparation on the ground, and railway wagon loading. T...

  15. SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY ACTIVITIES FOR CHROMIUM IN THE 100 AREAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    (smbullet) Primary Objective: Protect the Columbia River - Focus is control and treatment of contamination at or near the shoreline, which is influenced by bank storage (smbullet) Secondary Objective: Reduce hexavalent chromium to 40,000 ppb), - Unknown source location(s); probably originating in reactor operation areas

  16. Technical report for a fluidless directional drilling system demonstrated at Solid Waste Storage Area 6 shallow buried waste sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    The purpose of the research was to demonstrate a fluidless directional drilling and monitoring system (FDD) specifically tailored to address environmental drilling concerns for shallow buried wasted. The major concerns are related to worker exposure, minimizing waste generation, and confining the spread of contamination. The FDD is potentially applicable to Environmental Restoration (ER) activities for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Waste Area Grouping 6 (WAG 6) shallow buried waste disposed in unlined trenches. Major ER activities for directional drilling are to develop a drilling system for leachate collection directly beneath trenches, and to provide localized control over leachate release to the environment. Other ER FDD activities could include vadose zone and groundwater monitoring of contaminant transport. The operational constraints pointed the research in the direction of purchasing a steerable impact hammer, or mole, manufactured by Steer-Rite Ltd. of Racine, Wisconsin. This drill was selected due to the very low cost ($25,000) associated with procuring the drill, steering module, instrumentation and service lines. The impact hammer is a self propelled drill which penetrates the soil by compacting cut material along the sidewalls of the borehole. Essentially, it forces its way through the subsurface. Although the pneumatic hammer exhausts compressed air which must be handled at the borehole collar, it does not generate soil cuttings or liquids. This is the basis for the term fluidless. A stub casing muffler was attached to the entrance hole for controlling exhaust gas and any airborne releases. Other environmental compliance modifications made to the equipment included operating the tool without lubrication, and using water instead of hydraulic fluid to actuate the steering fins on the tool.

  17. Technical report for a fluidless directional drilling system demonstrated at Solid Waste Storage Area 6 shallow buried waste sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the research was to demonstrate a fluidless directional drilling and monitoring system (FDD) specifically tailored to address environmental drilling concerns for shallow buried wasted. The major concerns are related to worker exposure, minimizing waste generation, and confining the spread of contamination. The FDD is potentially applicable to Environmental Restoration (ER) activities for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Waste Area Grouping 6 (WAG 6) shallow buried waste disposed in unlined trenches. Major ER activities for directional drilling are to develop a drilling system for leachate collection directly beneath trenches, and to provide localized control over leachate release to the environment. Other ER FDD activities could include vadose zone and groundwater monitoring of contaminant transport. The operational constraints pointed the research in the direction of purchasing a steerable impact hammer, or mole, manufactured by Steer-Rite Ltd. of Racine, Wisconsin. This drill was selected due to the very low cost ($25,000) associated with procuring the drill, steering module, instrumentation and service lines. The impact hammer is a self propelled drill which penetrates the soil by compacting cut material along the sidewalls of the borehole. Essentially, it forces its way through the subsurface. Although the pneumatic hammer exhausts compressed air which must be handled at the borehole collar, it does not generate soil cuttings or liquids. This is the basis for the term fluidless. A stub casing muffler was attached to the entrance hole for controlling exhaust gas and any airborne releases. Other environmental compliance modifications made to the equipment included operating the tool without lubrication, and using water instead of hydraulic fluid to actuate the steering fins on the tool

  18. SUPPLEMENTAL COLUMBIA RIVER PROTECTION ACTIVITIES AT THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY HANFORD SITE 2008 TECHNICAL REVIEW

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Looney, B; Dawn S. Kaback, D; Eugene L. LeBoeuf, E; Joe Rossabi, J; Karen L. Skubal, K; David L. Cocke, D; Paul C. Deutsch, P

    2008-09-30

    Beginning in 2006, the US Department of Energy (DOE) supported nine applied research projects to improve the protection of the Columbia River and mitigate the impacts of Hanford Site groundwater. These projects were funded through a supplemental Congressional budget allocation, and are now in various stages of completion in accordance with the research plans. The DOE Office of Environmental Management Groundwater and Soil Cleanup Technologies (EM-22) sponsored a technical peer review meeting for these projects in Richland WA, July 28-31, 2008. The overall objective of the peer review is to provide information to support DOE decisions about the status and potential future application of the various technologies. The charge for the peer review panel was to develop recommendations for each of the nine 'technologies'. Team members for the July 2008 review were Brian Looney, Gene LeBoeuf, Dawn Kaback, Karen Skubal, Joe Rossabi, Paul Deutsch, and David Cocke. Previous project reviews were held in May 2007 and March-May of 2006. The team used the following four rating categories for projects: (a) Incorporate the technology/strategy in ongoing and future EM activities; (b) Finish existing scope of applied research and determine potential for EM activities when research program is finished; (c) Discontinue current development activities and do not incorporate technology/strategy into ongoing and future EM activities unless a significant and compelling change in potential viability is documented; and (d) Supplement original funded work to obtain the data needed to support a DOE decision to incorporate the technology into ongoing and future EM activities. The supplemental funding portfolio included two projects that addressed strontium, five projects that addressed chromium, one project that addressed uranium and one project that addressed carbon tetrachloride. The projects ranged from in situ treatment methods for immobilizing contaminants using chemical

  19. Potential for low fracture toughness and lamellar tearing on PWR steam generator and reactor coolant pump supports. Resolution of generic technical activity A-12

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snaider, R.P.; Hodge, J.M.; Levin, H.A.; Zudans, J.J.

    1979-10-01

    This report summarizes work performed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission staff and its contractor, Sandia Laboratories, in the resolution of Generic Technical Activity A-12, ''Potential for Low Fracture Toughness and Lamellar Tearing in PWR Steam Generator and Reactor Coolant Pump Supports.'' The report describes the technical issues, the technical studies performed by Sandia describes the technical issues, the technical studies performed by Sandia Laboratories, the NRC staff's technical positions based on these studies, and the staff's plan for implementing its technical positions. It also provides recommendations for further work. The complete technical input from Sandia Laboratories is appended to the report.

  20. Environment-friendly Pd free surface activation technics for ABS surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Zengnian; Wang, Xu

    2012-05-01

    An environment-friendly surface etching and activation technics for acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS) surface metallization were investigated as a replacement for conventional chromic acid etching bath and palladium catalyst. After etching by H2SO4-MnO2 colloid, the ABS surfaces became roughness; meanwhile the carboxyl and hydroxyl groups were formed on the surface. With absorption and a reduction by a dimethylamineborane solution, copper particles were deposited on the ABS surface, which serves as a catalyst replacement for SnCl2/PdCl2 colloid. The effects of CuSO4 concentration, (CH3)2NHBH3 concentration, reduction temperature and reduction time on the adhesion strength between the ABS surface and the electroless copper film were investigated. And the average adhesion strengths reached 1.31 kN m-1, which is near the values (1.19 kN m-1) obtained by SnCl2/PdCl2 colloid.

  1. Activation of frontal neocortical areas by vocal production in marmosets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiano S Simões

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Primates often rely on vocal communication to mediate social interactions. Although much is known about the acoustic structure of primate vocalizations and the social context in which they are usually uttered, our knowledge about the neocortical control of audio-vocal interactions in primates is still incipient, being mostly derived from lesion studies in squirrel monkeys and macaques. To map the neocortical areas related to vocal control in a New World primate species, the common marmoset, we employed a method previously used with success in other vertebrate species: Analysis of the expression of the immediate-early gene Egr-1 in freely behaving animals. The neocortical distribution of Egr-1 immunoreactive cells in three marmosets that were exposed to the playback of conspecific vocalizations and vocalized spontaneously (H/V group was compared to data from three other marmosets that also heard the playback but did not vocalize (H/n group. The anterior cingulate cortex, the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex and the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex presented a higher number of Egr-1 immunoreactive cells in the H/V group than in H/n animals. Our results provide direct evidence that the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex, the region that comprises Broca's area in humans and has been associated with auditory processing of species-specific vocalizations and orofacial control in macaques, is engaged during vocal output in marmosets. Altogether, our results support the notion that the network of neocortical areas related to vocal communication in marmosets is quite similar to that of Old world primates. The vocal production role played by these areas and their importance for the evolution of speech in primates are discussed.

  2. 33 CFR 334.761 - Naval Support Activity Panama City; St. Andrews Bay; restricted areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... City; St. Andrews Bay; restricted areas. 334.761 Section 334.761 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS... REGULATIONS § 334.761 Naval Support Activity Panama City; St. Andrews Bay; restricted areas. (a) The areas—(1... intercepting any waterbased activity occurring within the active military security zone/s and...

  3. Mobility & activity patterns of individuals and parenting couples in the metropolitan area of Grenoble (France)

    OpenAIRE

    André-Poyaud, Isabelle,; CHARDONNEL, Sonia; Charleux, Laure; Tabaka, Kamila

    2016-01-01

    The geographies of our daily lives are becoming increasingly complex through phenomena such as urban sprawl, scattering of life spaces and the involvement of individuals in multiple types of activities. Daily mobility behavior can be seen as the keystone holding together the spatial components and time dimensions of the daily lives of individuals, each of whom must mobilize resources (technical and economic) and competencies (cultural and social) to organize as best they can their activities ...

  4. Cometary activity, discrete outgassing areas, and dust-jet formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekanina, Z.

    1991-01-01

    Conceptual models for various types of features observed in cometary comae (jets, spirals, halos, fans, etc.), their computer simulation, and the hydrodynamic models for jet formation are critically reviewed, and evidence for anisotropic, strongly collimated flows of ejecta emanating from discrete active regions (vents) on the rotating cometary nuclei is presented. Techniques employed to generate synthetic comet images that simulate the features observed are described, and their relevance to the primary objects of coma-morphology studies is discussed. Modeling of temporal variations in the water emission from discrete active regions suggests that production curves asymmetric with respect to perihelion should be commonplace. Critical comparisons with the activity profiles of Enke's comet and with light curves of disappearing comets and comets that undergo outbursts are presented. Recent developments in the understanding of the processes that cause the nongravitational perturbations of cometary motions are reviewed, and the observed discontinuities are identified with the birth of new sources and/or deactivation of old vents.

  5. Somatotopical relationships between cortical activity and reflex areas in reflexology: A functional magnetic resonance imaging study

    OpenAIRE

    Nakamaru, Tomomi; MIURA, NAOKI; Fukushima, Ai; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2008-01-01

    We examined the somatotopical relationship between cortical activity and sensory stimulation of reflex areas in reflexology using functional magnetic resonance imaging. Three reflex areas on the left foot, relating to the eye, shoulder, and small intestine were stimulated during the experiment. A statistical analysis showed that reflexological stimulation of the foot reflex areas corresponding to the eye, shoulder, and small intestine activated not only the somatosensory areas corresponding t...

  6. ENTERTAINMENT SERVICES IN RURAL AREAS – PART OF TOURISM ACTIVITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dionisie Marian TURCU

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The work aims to highlight the niche forms of tourism (active tourism and ecotourism, showing similarities and differences between them. However it argues the need to introduce the occupation of rural tourism entertainer, showing the main tasks incumbent upon it to organize leisure tourists. The research was conducted by studying the latest articles in the field and by consulting specific websites.

  7. Energy requirements and physical activity level of active elderly people in rural areas of Cuba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obesity and NIDDM are common in the Third Age and increasing in Cuba. Among the life-style changes associated with increased prevalence of obesity and its related disorders, diet and activity patterns are prime candidates. The transition to this life-style model may induce a decrease in the energy needs. There is an urgent need for tools which have been validated for measuring diet and physical activity in nutritional studies in the developing world, but also a more urgent need for reference values for the total energy requirements of healthy elderly people. Regular physical activity reduces the likelihood to develop diseases that characterise the metabolic cardiovascular syndrome. With the purpose of estimating the energy requirements, a group of 48 elderly people aged 61-74 years living in a rural mountain community was submitted to a medical, epidemiological, dietary and biochemical study of the nutritional status. Glucose intolerance was diagnosed in 40% and arterial hypertension was present in 23 % of them. Ten subjects without signs or symptoms of the metabolic cardiovascular syndrome were submitted to a measurement of the total energy expenditure by the doubly labelled water method. PAL values of 2.13 and 1.77 were measured for men and women, values which were significantly higher that the recommended value of 1.51 for elderly subjects. The total energy expenditure: The estimation of energy requirements by the energy intake or by the factorial method using the physical activity questionnaires generated values, which were 11 % and 30% lower than the values obtained by the DLW-method. The value of 1.51 x BMR for the estimation of the energy requirements of elderly subjects living in rural areas and submitted to higher levels of physical activity seems to be sub estimated

  8. Energy requirements and physical activity level of active elderly people in rural areas of China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obesity and NIDDM are common in the Third Age and increasing in Cuba. Among the life-style changes associated with increased prevalence of obesity and its related disorders, diet and activity patterns are prime candidates. The transition to this life-style model may induce a decrease in the energy needs. There is an urgent need for tools which have been validated for measuring diet and physical activity in nutritional studies in the developing world, but also a more urgent need for reference values for the total energy requirements of healthy elderly people. Regular physical activity reduces the likelihood to develop diseases that characterise the metabolic cardiovascular syndrome. With the purpose of estimating the energy requirements, a group of 48 elderly people aged 61-74 years living in a rural mountain community was submitted to a medical, epidemiological, dietary and biochemical study of the nutritional status. Glucose intolerance was diagnosed in 40% and arterial hypertension was present in 23 of them. Ten subjects without signs or symptoms of the metabolic cardiovascular syndrome were submitted to a measurement of the total energy expenditure by the doubly labelled water method. PAL values of 2.13 and 1. 77 were measured for men and women, values which were significantly higher that the recommended value of 1.51 for elderly subjects. The estimation of energy requirements by the energy intake or by the factorial method using the physical activity questionnaires generated values, which were 11% and 30% lower than the values obtained by the DLW-method The value of 1.51 x BMR for the estimation of the energy requirements of elderly subjects living in rural areas and submitted to higher levels of physical activity seems to be sub estimated. (author)

  9. Energy requirements and physical activity level of active elderly people in rural areas of Cuba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Obesity and NIDDM are common in the Third Age and increasing in Cuba. Among the lifestyle changes associated with increased prevalence of obesity and its related disorders, diet and activity patterns are prime candidates. The transition to this lifestyle model may induce a decrease in the energy needs. There is an urgent need for tools which have been validated for measuring diet and physical activity in nutritional studies in the developing world, but also a more urgent need for reference values for the total energy requirements of healthy elderly people. Regular physical activity reduces the likelihood to develop diseases that characterize the metabolic cardiovascular syndrome. With the purpose of estimating the energy requirements, a group of 48 elderly people aged 61-74 years living in a rural mountain community was submitted to a medical, epidemiological, dietary and biochemical study of the nutritional status. Glucose intolerance was diagnosed in 40% and arterial hypertension was present in 23 % of them. Ten subjects without signs or symptoms of the metabolic cardiovascular syndrome were submitted to a measurement of the total energy expenditure by the doubly labelled water method. PAL values of 2.13 and 1.77 were measured for men and women, values which were significantly higher that the recommended value of 1.51 for elderly subjects. The total energy expenditure The estimation of energy requirements by the energy intake or by the factorial method using the physical activity questionnaires generated values, which were 11% and 30% lower than the values obtained by the DLW method. The value of 1.51xBMR for the estimation of the energy requirements of elderly subjects living in rural areas and submitted to higher levels of physical activity seems to be sub estimated. (author)

  10. Areas of Unsolved Problems in Caribbean Active Tectonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, P.

    2015-12-01

    I review some unsolved problems in Caribbean active tectonics. At the regional and plate scale: 1) confirm the existence of intraplate deformation zones of the central Caribbean plate that are within the margin of error of ongoing GPS measurements; 2) carry out field studies to evaluate block models versus models for distributed fault shear on the densely populated islands of Jamaica, Hispaniola, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands; 3) carry out paleoseismological research of key plate boundary faults that may have accumulated large strains but have not been previously studied in detail; 4) determine the age of onset and far-field effects of the Cocos ridge and the Central America forearc sliver; 4) investigate the origin and earthquake-potential of obliquely-sheared rift basins along the northern coast of Venezuela; 5) determine the age of onset and regional active, tectonic effects of the Panama-South America collision including the continued activation of the Maracaibo block; and 6) validate longterm rates on active subduction zones with improving, tomographic maps of subducted slabs. At the individual fault scale: 1) determine the mode of termination of large and active strike -slip faults and application of the STEP model (Septentrional, Polochic, El Pilar, Bocono, Santa Marta-Bucaramanaga); 2) improve the understanding of the earthquake potential on the Enriquillo-Plantain Garden fault zone given "off-fault" events such as the 2010 Haiti earthquake; how widespread is this behavior?; and 3) estimate size of future tsunamis from studies of historic or prehistoric slump scars and mass transport deposits; what potential runups can be predicted from this information?; and 4) devise ways to keep rapidly growing, circum-Caribbean urban populations better informed and safer in the face of inevitable and future, large earthquakes.

  11. Qualification and actuation of the independent technical supervision organisms in nuclear power plants and others facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This norm presents the following objectives: establishment of the Brazilian National Nuclear Energy Commission requirements for qualifying an institution as independent technical supervision organization, in a specific area of activity related to nuclear power plants and others nuclear or radioactive facilities as appropriated; regulation of the independent technical supervision and others complementary activities to be executed by an independent technical supervision organism

  12. Review of occupational safety and health activities in Southern Africa funded under the DANIDA/ILO framework agreement on technical cooperation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasle, Peter; Jørgensen, Claus

    2003-01-01

    A review of occupational safety and health activities in Southern Africa (SADC region) which have been funded under the DANIDA/ILO framework agreement on technical cooperation.......A review of occupational safety and health activities in Southern Africa (SADC region) which have been funded under the DANIDA/ILO framework agreement on technical cooperation....

  13. DOE Technical Standards List. Directory of DOE and contractor personnel involved in non-government standards activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-06-01

    This is a periodic report on the level of agency participation in non-Government standards activities. This technical standards list is intended to assist US Department of Energy (DOE) management and other personnel involved in the DOE technical Standards Program by identifying those participating individuals. The body of this document contains a listing of DOE employees and DOE contractors who have submitted a Record of Non-Government Standards Activity. Additional names were added from rosters supplied by non-Government standards bodies. Appendices to this document are provided to list the information by parent employment organization, by non-Government standards activity, and by the proper names of the non-Government standards organizations and committees.

  14. Achievements and Status of Research Activities in the Containment Area

    OpenAIRE

    Meyer, Leo; WILKENING HEINZ; KLJENAK Ivo; MAGALLON Daniel

    2007-01-01

    In the SARNET Containment topic three issues of severe accident phenomenology are treated which endanger the containment integrity in an early stage of the accident by pressure increase due to fast heat transfer: hydrogen combustion, explosive melt water reaction, and direct containment heating. Progress in activities dealing with the hydrogen issue was achieved by performing experiments addressing these subjects: - hydrogen combustion with defined concentration gradients, - hydro...

  15. Magnetic fusion energy plasma interactive and high heat flux components. Volume I. Technical assessment of the critical issues and problem areas in the plasma materials interaction field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A technical assessment of the critical issues and problem areas in the field of plasma materials interactions (PMI) in magnetic fusion devices shows these problems to be central for near-term experiments, for intermediate-range reactor devices including D-T burning physics experiments, and for long-term reactor machines. Critical technical issues are ones central to understanding and successful operation of existing and near-term experiments/reactors or devices of great importance for the long run, i.e., ones which will require an extensive, long-term development effort and thus should receive attention now. Four subgroups were formed to assess the critical PMI issues along four major lines: (1) PMI and plasma confinement physics experiments; (2) plasma-edge modelling and theory; (3) surface physics; and (4) materials technology for in-vessel components and the first wall. The report which follows is divided into four major sections, one for each of these topics

  16. Spent fuel storage facility at science and technical center 'Sosny': Experience of ten years activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spent fuel storage of the Academic Science and Technical Center in Minsk is in operation already more then 10 years. In the paper aspects of its design, operation practice, problems and decisions for future are discussed. (author)

  17. Remediation of Highland Drive Landfill: Technical Challenges of Segregating Co-Mingled LLRW and Municipal Solid Waste in an Urbanized Area - 13319

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highland Drive Landfill is an inactive Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) Landfill which received waste from the 1940's until its closure in 1991. During a portion of its active life, the Landfill received low-level radioactive waste (LLRW) which currently exists both in a defined layer and co-mingled with MSW. Remediation of this site to remove the LLRW to meet established cleanup criteria, forms part of the Port Hope Project being undertaken by Atomic Energy Canada Limited (AECL) and Public Works and Government Services Canada (PWGSC) as part of the Port Hope Area Initiative (PHAI). The total volume of LLRW and co-mingled LLRW/MSW estimated to require removal from the Highland Drive Landfill is approximately 51,900 cubic metres (m3). The segregation and removal of LLRW at the Highland Drive Landfill presents a number of unique technical challenges due to the co-mingled waste and location of the Landfill in an urbanized area. Key challenges addressed as part of the design process included: delineation of the extent of LLRW, development of cut lines, and estimation of the quantity of co-mingled LLRW in a heterogeneous matrix; protection of adjacent receptors in a manner which would not impact the use of adjacent facilities which include residences, a recreational facility, and a school; coordination and phasing of the work to allow management of six separate material streams including clean soil, MSW, co-mingled LLRW/MSW, LLRW, un-impacted water, and impacted water/leachate within a confined environment; and development of a multi-tiered and adaptive program of monitoring and control measures for odour, dust, and water including assessment of risk of exceedance of monitoring criteria. In addition to ensuring public safety and protection of the environment during remedy implementation, significant effort in the design process was paid to balancing the advantages of increased certainty, including higher production rates, against the costs of attaining increased certainty

  18. Vadose zone microbial community structure and activity in metal/radionuclide contaminated sediments. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balkwill, David L.

    2002-08-17

    This final technical report describes the research carried out during the final two months of the no-cost extension ending 11/14/01. The primary goals of the project were (1) to determine the potential for transformation of Cr(VI) (oxidized, mobile) to Cr(III) (reduced, immobile) under unsaturated conditions as a function of different levels and combinations of (a) chromium, (b) nitrate (co-disposed with Cr), and (c) molasses (inexpensive bioremediation substrate), and (2) to determine population structure and activity in experimental treatments by characterization of the microbial community by signature biomarker analysis and by RT-PCR and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and 16S ribosomal RNA genes. It was determined early in the one-year no-cost extension period that the T-RFLP approach was problematic in regard to providing information on the identities of microorganisms in the samples examined. As a result, it could not provide the detailed information on microbial community structure that was needed to assess the effects of treatments with chromium, nitrate, and/or molasses. Therefore, we decided to obtain the desired information by amplifying (using TR-PCR, with the same primers used for T-RFLP) and cloning 16S rRNA gene sequences from the same RNA extracts that were used for T-RFLP analysis. We also decided to use a restriction enzyme digest procedure (fingerprinting procedure) to place the clones into types. The primary focus of the research carried out during this report period was twofold: (a) to complete the sequencing of the clones, and (b) to analyze the clone sequences phylogenetically in order to determine the relatedness of the bacteria detected in the samples to each other and to previously described genera and species.

  19. Agriculture in an area impacted by past uranium mining activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The shallow aquifer near the old Cunha Baixa uranium mine (Viseu, Portugal) was contaminated by acid mine drainage. Concentration of radionuclides in water from irrigation wells and in the topsoil layer of the agriculture fields nearby display enhanced concentrations of uranium, radium and polonium. Two types of agriculture land in this area were selected, one with enhanced and another with low uranium concentrations, for controlled growth of lettuce and potatoes. Plants were grown in replicate portions of land (two plots) in each soil type and were periodically irrigated with water from wells. In each soil, one plot was irrigated with water containing low concentration of dissolved uranium and the other plot with water containing enhanced concentration of dissolved uranium. At the end of the growth season, plants were harvested and analysed, along with soil and irrigation water samples. Results show the accumulation of radionuclides in edible parts of plants, specially in the field plots with higher radionuclide concentrations in soil. Radionuclides in irrigation water contributed less to the radioactivity accumulated in plants than radionuclides from soils. (authors)

  20. On communicating earthquake risk in low-activity areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaspar-Escribano, J. M.; García Rodríguez, M. J.; Rivas-Medina, A.; Benito, B.; Wachowicz, M.; Bernabé, M. A.; Iturrioz, T.

    2009-04-01

    The assessment of natural risks for emergency response and preparedness planning is a transversal discipline that can be studied from many perspectives, including social, political and earth sciences. Accordingly, people with different profiles and backgrounds working on the topic should use of a common language in order to avoid misunderstandings, improve information dissemination, and at the end, facilitate preparedness and response measurements in the right direction. Some ideas aimed at identifying communication barriers between all parties and suppressing them are presented, using the example of regional seismic risk studies of low-hazard areas, where the rare occurrence of destructive events complicates the situation. First, factors related to the actual awareness, the degree of understanding and the interest for getting the information about a given a natural risk, are analyzed taking into account that they differ from user to user (civil protection official, scientist, general public). Subsequently, choices of parameters used to typify seismic risk and ways of representing them graphically are proposed. Finally, whether the incidence of the lack of a common language increases risk vulnerability is discussed.

  1. Interim Control Strategy for the Test Area North/Technical Support Facility Sewage Treatment Facility Disposal Pond - Two-year Update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Idaho Cleanup Project has prepared this interim control strategy for the U.S. Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office pursuant to DOE Order 5400.5, Chapter 11.3e (1) to support continued discharges to the Test Area North/Technical Support Facility Sewage Treatment Facility Disposal Pond. In compliance with DOE Order 5400.5, a 2-year review of the Interim Control Strategy document has been completed. This submittal documents the required review of the April 2005 Interim Control Strategy. The Idaho Cleanup Project's recommendation is unchanged from the original recommendation. The Interim Control Strategy evaluates three alternatives: (1) re-route the discharge outlet to an uncontaminated area of the TSF-07; (2) construct a new discharge pond; or (3) no action based on justification for continued use. Evaluation of Alternatives 1 and 2 are based on the estimated cost and implementation timeframe weighed against either alternative's minimal increase in protection of workers, the public, and the environment. Evaluation of Alternative 3, continued use of the TSF-07 Disposal Pond under current effluent controls, is based on an analysis of four points: - Record of Decision controls will protect workers and the public - Risk of increased contamination is low - Discharge water will be eliminated in the foreseeable future - Risk of contamination spread is acceptable. The Idaho Cleanup Project recommends Alternative 3, no action other than continued implementation of existing controls and continued deactivation, decontamination, and dismantlement efforts at the Test Area North/Technical Support Facility

  2. 33 CFR 334.763 - Naval Support Activity Panama City; Gulf of Mexico; restricted area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Naval Support Activity Panama City; Gulf of Mexico; restricted area. 334.763 Section 334.763 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.763 Naval Support Activity Panama...

  3. Communicating Astronomy in a Metropolis and Disaster Area - Activities of the Tenpla Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamegai, K.; Takanashi, N.; Hiramatsu, M.; Naito, S.

    2015-03-01

    We present recent activities delivering astronomy to the public by the Tenpla project in Japan. One is voluntary activities in the disaster area of the Great East Japan Earthquake. The other is holding tens of star parties and public lectures in the central area of Tokyo.

  4. Management of the Hydrologic System in Areas Subject to Coal Mining Activities

    OpenAIRE

    Hotchkiss, Rollin H.; Israelsen, Eugene K.; Riley, J. Paul

    1980-01-01

    Publicity given to the detrimental effects of mining activities on the environment has tended to overshadow somewhat the hydrologic opportunities and benfits that could be associated with these activities. For example, many areas disturbed by surface mining have proved to be excellent recharge areas for groundwater aquifers. The degree to which mine sites can be exploited to improve management of the hydrologic sy...

  5. Overview of current Russian activities in P and T area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The general policy of radioactive waste management is consistent with the long-term plans for nuclear power development adopted in each country. Russian activities aimed at setting up in the future a fuel cycle of nuclear power with reasonably minimized quantities of Radwaste subject disposal are being carried out by Minatom as part of the general Strategy for development of national nuclear power. Several key missions of this Strategy deserve special mention: in the next 20-40 years, construction of advanced thermal reactors which will run on enriched uranium until the economically acceptable reserves of natural uranium are exhausted; reprocessing of all spent fuel of thermal reactors to separate plutonium and long-lived nuclides; development of a new generation of fast reactors which will meet the requirements placed on innovative reactors for large-scale electricity production (economic efficiency, safety, minimized Radwaste, proliferation resistance); after 2030, deployment of a system of innovative fast reactors, using plutonium separated from spent fuel of thermal reactors, and solution with their help of the totality of problems associated with transmutation of long-lived nuclides. Task named ''Transmutation'' was set up in 2001, within the general Minatom programme, to develop a scenario for transition to the fuel cycle of future large-scale nuclear power as part of the above Strategy and to resolve the technological problems of minimising the quantities of long-lived nuclides generated in the closed fuel cycle and subject to final disposal. (author)

  6. Technical Basis for the Use of Alarming Personal Criticality Detectors to Augment Permanent Nuclear Incident Monitor (NIM) Systems in Areas Not Normally Occupied

    CERN Document Server

    Yates, K R

    2003-01-01

    The technical basis for the use of alarming personal criticality detectors (APCDs) to augment permanent Nuclear Incident Monitor (NIM) Systems in areas not normally occupied is evaluated. All applicable DOE O 420.1A and ANSI/ANS-8.3-1997 criticality alarm system requirements and recommendations are evaluated for applicability to APCDs. Based on this evaluation, design criteria and administrative requirements are presented for APCDs. Siemens EPD/Mk-2 and EPD-N devices are shown to meet the design criteria. A definition of not normally occupied is also presented.

  7. Integrated Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) Education through Active Experience of Designing Technical Toys in Vietnamese Schools

    OpenAIRE

    Quang, Le Xuan; Hoang, Le Huy; Chuan, Vu Dinh; Nam, Nguyen Hoai; Anh, Nguyen Thi Tu; Nhung, Vu Thi Hong

    2015-01-01

    STEM has attracted great consideration. The purpose of research is: (1) study STEM education, (2) explore STEM education with the creative and experiential activity, (3) suggest applying STEM education by designing technical toys for the middle school student. This study used a qualitative approach to carry out teaching integration for STEM education. The study applied to teaching the technological field in Vietnamese middle schools. The design performed at the Faculty of Technology Education...

  8. A novel method for the activity measurement of large-area beta reference sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanga, D; De Felice, P; Keightley, J; Capogni, M; Ioan, M R

    2016-03-01

    A novel method has been developed for the activity measurement of large-area beta reference sources. It makes use of two emission rate measurements and is based on the weak dependence between the source activity and the activity distribution for a given value of transmission coefficient. The method was checked experimentally by measuring the activity of two ((60)Co and (137)Cs) large-area reference sources constructed from anodized aluminum foils. Measurement results were compared with the activity values measured by gamma spectrometry. For each source, they agree within one standard uncertainty and also agree within the same limits with the certified values of the source activity. PMID:26701656

  9. TECHNICAL BASIS DOCUMENT OF MARSSIM FIELD CALIBRATION FOR QUANTIFICATION OF CS-137 VOLUMETRICALLY CONTAMINATED SOILS IN THE BC CONTROLLED AREA USING 2 BY 2 SODIUM IODIDE DETECTORS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PAPPIN JL

    2007-10-26

    The purpose of this paper is to provide the Technical Basis and Documentation for Field Calibrations of radiation measurement equipment for use in the MARSSIM Seeping Surveys of the BC Controlled Area (BCCA). The Be Controlled Area is bounded on tt1e north by (but does not include) the BCCribs & Trenches and is bounded on the south by Army Loop Road. Parts of the BC Controlled Area are posted as a Contamination Area and the remainder is posted as a Soil Contamination Area. The area is approximately 13 square miles and divided into three zones (Zone A , Zone B. and Zone C). A map from reference 1 which shows the 3 zones is attached. The MARSSIM Scoping Surveys are intended 10 better identify the boundaries of the three zones based on the volumetric (pCi/g) contamination levels in the soil. The MARSSIM Field Calibration. reference 2. of radiation survey instrumentation will determine the Minimum Detectable Concentration (MDC) and an algorithm for converting counts to pCi/g. The instrumentation and corresponding results are not intended for occupational radiation protection decisions or for the release of property per DOE Order 5400.5.

  10. 17 April 2008 - Head of Internal Audit Network meeting visiting the ATLAS experimental area with CERN ATLAS Team Leader P. Fassnacht, ATLAS Technical Coordinator M. Nessi and ATLAS Resources Manager M. Nordberg.

    CERN Multimedia

    Mona Schweizer

    2008-01-01

    17 April 2008 - Head of Internal Audit Network meeting visiting the ATLAS experimental area with CERN ATLAS Team Leader P. Fassnacht, ATLAS Technical Coordinator M. Nessi and ATLAS Resources Manager M. Nordberg.

  11. Technical specification for the vacuum chamber assemblies comprising flexible metal bellows, transition pieces, flanges and vacuum tubes for the magnets MCA/MCB in the experimental areas of the 450 GeV proton synchrotron

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    1988-01-01

    Technical specification for the vacuum chamber assemblies comprising flexible metal bellows, transition pieces, flanges and vacuum tubes for the magnets MCA/MCB in the experimental areas of the 450 GeV proton synchrotron

  12. Individual human brain areas can be identified from their characteristic spectral activation fingerprints

    OpenAIRE

    Keitel, Anne; Gross, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    The human brain can be parcellated into diverse anatomical areas. We investigated whether rhythmic brain activity in these areas is characteristic and can be used for automatic classification. To this end, resting-state MEG data of 22 healthy adults was analysed. Power spectra of 1-s long data segments for atlas-defined brain areas were clustered into spectral profiles (“fingerprints”), using k-means and Gaussian mixture (GM) modelling. We demonstrate that individual areas can be identified f...

  13. Baseline study of corals and associated biological resources near Kudankulam Nuclear Power Project (KKNP) area: final technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This project aims to study the corals and other associated biological resources near KKNPP area which will further help to monitor and protect the precious marine biodiversity and environment in the KKNPP region

  14. Tritium in air activity outside operating island areas in M.A.P.S

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Routine monitoring of areas outside the operating island for tritium in air activity is necessary to assess the effect of reactor operation on the environment. The method employed for sampling the air for tritium in air activity is Ice Sample. The principle of this method is to condense atmospheric water in the sampling area using ice and to measure the specific activity of tritium in the condensed water by liquid scintillation spectrometer. Large number of samples from varioous areas were collected and analysed. Tritium in air activity levels in Administration Building, CISF, STC, TLD Laboratory are generally in the range of BDL-322 Bq/m3. The tiffin counter area adjacent to RC shop shows activity higher than other places (672-2927 Bq/m3). This area is just behind D2O drum storage area of upgrading plant. The drum storage areas are known to have higher tritium in air activity (1653-12737 Bq/m3). Canteen is showing tritium in air activity above that in Admn. building and similar other places. The sources of this activity appears mainly from Upgrading Plant. However another source of tritium activity in air in canteen is observed. This is the workers from operating island. The tritium in the clothes/body of the workers coming from the operating island give rise to low level of air activity in canteen. Comparison of the present value of 3H in air concentration in canteen with those observed two years before, reveals a build up of activity. The radiation dose to persons in Administration building and STC areas because of tritium in air activity concentration is negligible (Maximum 0.6 Mrem/year). (author). 1 tab

  15. Information Activities in Selected Types of U.S. Scientific and Technical Libraries and Information Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cveljo, K.

    1985-01-01

    This overview of the development of scientific and technical libraries in the United States highlights changes since World War II and present-day characteristics, role of the information manager, planning process, fiscal management, collection management, services, impact of technology, networking, marketing library services, and implications for…

  16. Individual Human Brain Areas Can Be Identified from Their Characteristic Spectral Activation Fingerprints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keitel, Anne; Gross, Joachim

    2016-06-01

    The human brain can be parcellated into diverse anatomical areas. We investigated whether rhythmic brain activity in these areas is characteristic and can be used for automatic classification. To this end, resting-state MEG data of 22 healthy adults was analysed. Power spectra of 1-s long data segments for atlas-defined brain areas were clustered into spectral profiles ("fingerprints"), using k-means and Gaussian mixture (GM) modelling. We demonstrate that individual areas can be identified from these spectral profiles with high accuracy. Our results suggest that each brain area engages in different spectral modes that are characteristic for individual areas. Clustering of brain areas according to similarity of spectral profiles reveals well-known brain networks. Furthermore, we demonstrate task-specific modulations of auditory spectral profiles during auditory processing. These findings have important implications for the classification of regional spectral activity and allow for novel approaches in neuroimaging and neurostimulation in health and disease. PMID:27355236

  17. Improving global fire carbon emissions estimates by combining moderate resolution burned area and active fire observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randerson, J. T.; Chen, Y.; Giglio, L.; Rogers, B. M.; van der Werf, G.

    2011-12-01

    In several important biomes, including croplands and tropical forests, many small fires exist that have sizes that are well below the detection limit for the current generation of burned area products derived from moderate resolution spectroradiometers. These fires likely have important effects on greenhouse gas and aerosol emissions and regional air quality. Here we developed an approach for combining 1km thermal anomalies (active fires; MOD14A2) and 500m burned area observations (MCD64A1) to estimate the prevalence of these fires and their likely contribution to burned area and carbon emissions. We first estimated active fires within and outside of 500m burn scars in 0.5 degree grid cells during 2001-2010 for which MCD64A1 burned area observations were available. For these two sets of active fires we then examined mean fire radiative power (FRP) and changes in enhanced vegetation index (EVI) derived from 16-day intervals immediately before and after each active fire observation. To estimate the burned area associated with sub-500m fires, we first applied burned area to active fire ratios derived solely from within burned area perimeters to active fires outside of burn perimeters. In a second step, we further modified our sub-500m burned area estimates using EVI changes from active fires outside and within of burned areas (after subtracting EVI changes derived from control regions). We found that in northern and southern Africa savanna regions and in Central and South America dry forest regions, the number of active fires outside of MCD64A1 burned areas increased considerably towards the end of the fire season. EVI changes for active fires outside of burn perimeters were, on average, considerably smaller than EVI changes associated with active fires inside burn scars, providing evidence for burn scars that were substantially smaller than the 25 ha area of a single 500m pixel. FRP estimates also were lower for active fires outside of burn perimeters. In our

  18. Manpower development for safe operation of nuclear power plant. China. Seminar on the technical support functions. Activity: 6.1.1-Task-03. Technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The seminar discussed the objectives, organization and scope of work of the Central and Site Technical Service Department in support of operating NPP; transfer of capability to establish and maintain an efficient operation support; defined the responsibilities and interface between on site and Central Technical Staff

  19. Contamination of water resources in Takwa mining area of Ghana : Linking technical, social-economic and gender dimensions

    OpenAIRE

    Balfors, Berit; Jacks, Gunnar; Singh, Nandita; Bhattacharya, Prosun; Koku, John

    2007-01-01

    Ghana is Africa’s second largest producer of gold with gold deposits in western part of the country. There are seven large-scale mines and 168 small-scale mining concessions valid in the region. Wassa West District is an important mining area, with Tarkwa as administrative capital. In recent years, the area has been exposed to lead, cadmium, arsenic, mercury and cyanide. Both small and large-scale mining industries have reportedly contaminated rivers, streams, dug wells and boreholes with hea...

  20. Optimized preparation for large surface area activated carbon from date (Phoenix dactylifera L.) stone biomass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The preparation of activated carbon from date stone treated with phosphoric acid was optimized using rotatable central composite design of response surface methodology (RSM). The chemical activating agent concentration and temperature of activation plays a crucial role in preparation of large surface area activated carbons. The optimized activated carbon was characterized using thermogravimetric analysis, field emission scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The results showed that the larger surface area of activated carbon from date stone can be achieved under optimum activating agent (phosphoric acid) concentration, 50.0% (8.674 mol L−1) and activation temperature, 900 °C. The Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET) surface area of optimized activated carbon was found to be 1225 m2 g−1, and thermogravimetric analysis revealed that 55.2% mass of optimized activated carbon was found thermally stable till 900 °C. The leading chemical functional groups found in the date stone activated carbon were aliphatic carboxylic acid salt ν(C=O) 1561.22 cm−1 and 1384.52 cm−1, aliphatic hydrocarbons ν(C–H) 2922.99 cm−1 (C–H sym./asym. stretch frequency), aliphatic phosphates ν(P–O–C) 1054.09 cm−1, and secondary aliphatic alcohols ν(O–H) 3419.81 cm−1 and 1159.83 cm−1. - Highlights: • RSM optimization was done for the production of large surface area activated carbon. • Two independent variables with two responses were selected for optimization. • Characterization was done for surface area, morphology and chemical constituents. • Optimized date stone activated carbon achieved surface area 1225 m2 g−1

  1. Mammography with and without radiolucent positioning sheets : Comparison of projected breast area, pain experience, radiation dose and technical image quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmers, Janine; ten Voorde, Marloes; van Engen, Ruben E.; van Landsveld-Verhoeven, Cary; Pijnappel, Ruud; Droogh-de Greve, Kitty; den Heeten, Gerard J.; Broeders, Mireille J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To compare projected breast area, image quality, pain experience and radiation dose between mammography performed with and without radiolucent positioning sheets. Methods: 184 women screened in the Dutch breast screening programme (May-June 2012) provided written informed consent to have on

  2. Activities of RILEM Technical Committee: Internal Curing of Concrete and Anticipated Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kovler, Konstantin; Jensen, Ole Mejlhede

    Novel methods of shrinkage mitigation, based on special advanced methods of internal curing (IC), are currently being intensively studied in research groups in several countries. They have been the focus of the State-of-the-Art report prepared by the Technical Committee TC 196-ICC “Internal Curin...... brought by the committee work is being reported in another ACI convention (Puerto-Rico, October 2007)....

  3. Technical Meeting on the Implementation of Fast Reactor Data Retrieval and Knowledge Preservation Activities. Working Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The current Technical Meeting was convened to foster the development of the FRKP initiative, in general, and, more specifically, to advance the development of the FRKP Portal. Its objectives were therefore: 1. To review the implementation status of the FRKP Portal prototype; 2. To review the availability of FR-related document collections made accessible through the FRKP Portal; 3. To locate sources of FR-related digital items to be made accessible through the FRKP portal

  4. Activities of the Slovak Centre of Scientific and Technical Information in the field of Grey Literature

    OpenAIRE

    Duskova, Marta (CVTISR); GreyNet, Grey Literature Network Service

    2014-01-01

    In this year Slovak Centre of Scientific and Technical Information (CVTI SR) celebrates the 75th anniversary of its establishment. In course of its existence our institution went through various organizational changes and we can say that today it is not only a library but also an information centre supporting science in Slovakia, participating in many national and international projects. The main objective of paper is to inform the international grey literature community about the mission,...

  5. ONERA. 1997 scientific and technical activities; ONERA. Activites scientifiques et techniques 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vuillot, F.; Lupoglazoff, N.; Dupays, J.; Basset, Th.; Daniel, E. [Universite de Provence, 13 - Marseille (France); Devincre, B.; Veyssiere, P.; Kubin, L.; Saada, G. [ONERA, CNRS,LEM (France); Hertl, M.; Dorval, N.; Jolly, J. [ONERA-CNRS, Laboratoire Plasmas Reactifs en Interactions avec les Materiaux (France); Thierry, G.; Guillen, Ph.; Prieur, J.; Lewy, S.; Nastasi, V.; Lerat, A.; Sides, J.; Gely, D.; Chanetz, B.; Pot, T.; Jacquin, L.; Geffroy, P.; Merienne, M.C.; Mebarki, Y.; Reijasse, P.; Corbel, B.; Reijasse, P.; Murer, Y.; Millan, P.; Pauzin, S.; Reulet, P.; Coustols, E.; Sauvage, Ph.; Bissieres, D.; Estivalezes, J.L.; Lavergne, G.; Casalis, G.; Troff, B.; Thivet, F.; Moschetta, J.M.; Deniau, H.; Grondin, G.; Grenon, R.; Bettschart, N.; Gardarein, P.; Moens, F.; Costes, M.; Gaveriaux, R.; Flodrops, J.P.; Paquet, J.B.; Leplat, M.; Sgarzi, O.; Zamuner, B.; Moreau, P.; Collin, G.; Magre, P.; Duterque, J.; Hommel, J.; Masson, C.; Forconi, H.; Fradin, C.; Roehle, I.; Hervat, P.; Soucail, M.; Octor, H.; Marty, M.; Dorvaux, J.M.; Lavigne, O.; Mevrel, R.; Poulain, M.; Lapasset, G.; Morel, A.; Naka, S.; Sanchez, C.; Thomas, M.; Krapez, J.C.; Lepoutre, F.; Balageas, D.; Chaboche, J.L.; Jung, O.; Deletombe, E.; Malherbe, B.; Ousset, Y.; Sudre, O.; Parlier, M.; Guichet, B.; Bretheau, T.; Kruch, S.; Vassel, A.; Boust, F.; Flavin, E.; Petot, D.; Rapin, M.; Morvan, A.; Lebihan, D.; Petitjean, B.; Leconte, P.; Grisval, J.P.; Sauvignet, C.; Johan, Z.; Loiseau, A.; Lesturgie, M.; Martineau, P.; Titin-Schnaider, C.; Vieillard, G.; Dreuillet, P.; Castelli, J.C.; Lacour, D.; Ferriere, X.; Bonnet, P.; Gobin, V.; Alliot, J.C.; Grisch, F.; Labrune, L.; Larigaldie, S.; Ory, M.; Lalande, P.; Bondiou-Clegerie, A.; Kayser, P.; Deyrac, F.; Le Traon, O.; Besson, C.; Serrot, G.; Bodilis, M.; Duffaut, J.; Conan, J.M.; Mugnier, L.; Michau, V.; Fusco, T.; Madec, P.Y.; Rousset, G.; Simoneau, P.; Barillot, Ph.; Dolfi, A.; Robineau, J.; Mugnier, L.; Cassaing, F.; Rousset, G.; and others

    1997-12-31

    The ONERA is the first French research office in the aerospace domain. This annual report summarizes the main research studies carried out by the different ONERA departments in 1997 in the domains of fluid mechanics and energetics (numerical simulation, aero-acoustics, aerodynamics, propellants, propulsion systems), materials and structures (metals and processes, solid mechanics, material testing, composite materials and systems, structure dynamics, microstructures), physics (space environment, electromagnetism and radars, physical measurements, optics), data processing and systems, and technical means. (J.S.)

  6. Yucca Mountain program summary of research and technical review activities, July 1988--June 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Desert Research Institute (DRI), through its Water Resources Center (WRC), since 1984 has supported the State of Nevada Nuclear Waste Project Office's activities related to the proposed high-level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). This effort is directed at providing the State Office with an unbiased evaluation of the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) investigations performed by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The overall objective is to determine independently whether or not the site meets the performance criteria defined by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 and amendments for isolating and containing the wastes during emplacement and the proposed life of the repository. A particularly important area of concern with the proposed repository is the site's hydrology. The faculty of the DRI have long been involved with research throughout the State and have particular expertise in groundwater studies related to radionuclide migration and hydrologic safety of underground nuclear testing by DOE and predecessor agencies. In addition, we utilize laboratory personnel for chemical and isotopic analyses in both of the DRI-WMC water chemistry laboratories

  7. Recent activities of the Nuclear Smuggling International Technical Working Group to Thwart Illicit Trafficking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nuclear Smuggling International Technical Working Group (ITWG) is an informal association of nuclear forensic practitioners working in partnership with law enforcement, first responder and nuclear regulatory professionals that cooperate to deter the illicit trafficking of nuclear materials. The objective of the ITWG is to advance the science of nuclear forensics and to provide a common approach and effective technical solutions to governments who request assistance. The ITWG was created in 1996 and since that time over 30 nations and organizations have participated in 12 annual meetings and two analytical round robin trials involving plutonium and high enriched uranium. A third analytical round robin as well as several table-top exercises are planned for later in 2007 and 2008. International interest in the ITWG has grown over the past five years as measured by the number of participants at its annual meetings. This growth has spawned the ITWG Nuclear Forensics Laboratories as a companion technical affiliate focusing exclusively on the scientific aspects of nuclear forensics and nuclear smuggling incident response. (author)

  8. Floodplain statement of findings for corrective actions in Potrillo Canyon technical area-36, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, David Charles [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-05-18

    In 2014, baseline storm water monitoring samples for Potrillo Canyon Sample Management Area (Figure 1) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) exceeded the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System Individual Permit No. NM0030759 target action level (TAL) of 15 picocuries per liter (pCi/L) for gross-alpha radioactivity (393 pCi/L) and a TAL of 30 pCi/L for radium-226 and radium-228 (95.9 pCi/L). Consequently, erosion control measures within the management area are proposed to minimize sediment migration, a corrective action under the permit that is a requirement of the New Mexico Environment Department consent decree and a good management practice to limit off site sediment migration. The area proposed for erosion controls (Figure 1) consists of portions of Technical Area 36 that were used as firing sites primarily involved high explosives (HE) and metal (e.g., depleted uranium, lead, copper, aluminum, and steel), small-explosives experiments and burn pits (burn pits were used for burning and disposal of test debris). In addition, underground explosive tests were conducted at an approximate depth of 100 feet were also conducted. These watershed-based storm water controls will focus on addressing erosion occurring within the floodplain through mitigating and reducing both current and future channelization and head cutting.

  9. Floodplain statement of findings for corrective actions in Potrillo Canyon technical area-36, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, David Charles [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-05-18

    In 2014, baseline storm water monitoring samples for Potrillo Canyon Sample Management Area at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) exceeded the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System Individual Permit No. NM0030759 target action level (TAL) of 15 picocuries per liter (pCi/L) for gross-alpha radioactivity (393 pCi/L) and a TAL of 30 pCi/L for radium-226 and radium-228 (95.9 pCi/L). Consequently, erosion control measures within the management area are proposed to minimize sediment migration, a corrective action under the permit that is a requirement of the New Mexico Environment Department consent decree and a good management practice to limit off-site sediment migration. The area proposed for erosion controls consists of portions of Technical Area 36 that were used as firing sites primarily involving high explosives (HE) and metal (e.g., depleted uranium, lead, copper, aluminum, and steel), small-explosives experiments and burn pits (burn pits were used for burning and disposal of test debris). In addition, underground explosive tests at an approximate depth of 100 feet were also conducted. These watershed-based storm water controls will focus on addressing erosion occurring within the floodplain through mitigating and reducing both current and future channelization and head cutting.

  10. Age-specific activation of cerebral areas in motor imagery - a fMRI study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objectives of this study were to study the age-specific activation patterns of cerebral areas during motor execution (ME) and motor imaging (MI) of the upper extremities and to discuss the age-related neural mechanisms associated with ME or MI. The functional magnetic resonance imaging technique was used to monitor the pattern and intensity of brain activation during the ME and MI of the upper extremities in 20 elderly (>50 years) and 19 young healthy subjects (<25 years). No major differences were identified regarding the activated brain areas during ME or MI between the two groups; however, a minor difference was noted. The intensity of the activated brain area during ME was stronger in the older group than in the younger group, while the results with MI were the opposite. The posterior central gyrus and supplementary motor area during MI were more active in the younger group than in the older group. The putamen, lingual, and so on demonstrated stronger activation during dominant hand MI in the older group. The results of this study revealed that the brain structure was altered and that neuronal activity was attenuated with age, and the cerebral cortex and subcortical tissues were found to be over-activated to achieve the same level of ME and MI, indicating that the activating effects of the left hemisphere enhanced with age, whereas the inhibitory effects declined during ME, and activation of the right hemisphere became more difficult during MI. (orig.)

  11. Age-specific activation of cerebral areas in motor imagery - a fMRI study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Li [Chongqing University, Key Laboratory of Biorheological Science and Technology of Ministry of Education, Bioengineering College, Chongqing (China); Third Military Medical University, Department of Medical Image, College of Biomedical Engineering, Chongqing (China); Qiu, Mingguo; Zhang, Jingna; Zhang, Ye; Sang, Linqiong [Third Military Medical University, Department of Medical Image, College of Biomedical Engineering, Chongqing (China); Liu, Chen; Yang, Jun [Third Military Medical University, Department of Radiology, Southwest Hospital, Chongqing (China); Yan, Rubing [Third Military Medical University, Department of Rehabilitation, Southwest Hospital, Chongqing (China); Zheng, Xiaolin [Chongqing University, Key Laboratory of Biorheological Science and Technology of Ministry of Education, Bioengineering College, Chongqing (China)

    2014-04-15

    The objectives of this study were to study the age-specific activation patterns of cerebral areas during motor execution (ME) and motor imaging (MI) of the upper extremities and to discuss the age-related neural mechanisms associated with ME or MI. The functional magnetic resonance imaging technique was used to monitor the pattern and intensity of brain activation during the ME and MI of the upper extremities in 20 elderly (>50 years) and 19 young healthy subjects (<25 years). No major differences were identified regarding the activated brain areas during ME or MI between the two groups; however, a minor difference was noted. The intensity of the activated brain area during ME was stronger in the older group than in the younger group, while the results with MI were the opposite. The posterior central gyrus and supplementary motor area during MI were more active in the younger group than in the older group. The putamen, lingual, and so on demonstrated stronger activation during dominant hand MI in the older group. The results of this study revealed that the brain structure was altered and that neuronal activity was attenuated with age, and the cerebral cortex and subcortical tissues were found to be over-activated to achieve the same level of ME and MI, indicating that the activating effects of the left hemisphere enhanced with age, whereas the inhibitory effects declined during ME, and activation of the right hemisphere became more difficult during MI. (orig.)

  12. Strategic environmental impact assessment of hydrocarbon activities in the Disko West area[Greenland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosbech, A.; Boertmann, D.; Jespersen, Martin

    2007-05-15

    This publication is a strategic environmental impact assessment of activities related to exploration, development and exploitation of hydrocarbons in the sea of West Greenland between 67 deg. and 71 deg. N (= the Disko West Area). (au)

  13. Strategic environmental impact assessment of hydrocarbon activities in the Disko West area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This publication is a strategic environmental impact assessment of activities related to exploration, development and exploitation of hydrocarbons in the sea of West Greenland between 67 deg. and 71 deg. N (the Disko West Area). (au)

  14. Glomalin Production and Microbial Activity in Soils Impacted by Gypsum Mining in a Brazilian Semiarid Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adalia C.E.S. Mergulhao

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Mining activities involve the removal of the vegetal cover and the soil organic layer, causing a severe environmental impact. In Northeast Brazil, 40% of the worlds crude gypsum is found in a semiarid area, making this region responsible for 95% of the gypsum demand in the national market. Although economically important, this activity is harmful to the environment. Studies of soil microbiological and biochemical attributes can help in the identification of the limitations of impacted ecosystems, providing data to define strategies for sustainability of such environments. Approach: To evaluate and compare the biological state of preserved and mining degraded semiarid soils, a native preserved area and areas impacted by gypsum mining were selected at the Araripina Experimental Station, located in the semiarid region of Pernambuco State, Northeast Brazil. The four sampling areas included: (1 A native, preserved �caatinga� area with spine bearing trees and shrubs and some characteristic xerophytic plants (AN; (2 An area surrounding the mine, presenting the same type of vegetation although already degraded (AM; (3 A waste deposit area (AR; (4 Interface area between the waste deposit and a mining degraded area (AI. Samples were taken in each area (1000 m2 during two periods: wet (December/2003, Rainfall = 28.7 mm and dry (September/2004, Rainfall = 1.3 mm. Results: Fluorescein diacetate hydrolysis values, microbial biomass C and basal respiration were higher in the preserved caatinga than in the impacted areas. The gypsum mining activity reduced the concentration of easily extractable glomalin in relation to the native caatinga area in both sampling periods. Higher deposits of total glomalin also occurred in the native area, however, mainly during the wet period. Conclusion: The mining activity produced a negative impact on the soil microbiota, reducing the total enzymatic activity. The microbial

  15. Geoprocessing as a technical tool for radiological assessment in the urban area of Pocos de Caldas, MG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study will introduce a methodology for spatial evaluation of external gamma dose throughout an urbanized region. As a case study, geoprocessing techniques were used to gather data, perform statistical and spatial data treatment related to natural gamma radioactivity throughout the Pocos de Caldas urban area. This information, which was initially punctual, could be correlated with the number of people exposed to natural radiation using the database from the census made available by IBGE (Brazilian Geography and Statistics Institute). The census sector is the smallest piece of territory, with identifiable physical boundaries in the field, with adequate size for research operations. All 54,237 geoprocessed external dose values, within dosimetry ranges, presented a variation from 0.33 mSv year-1 to 3.51 mSv year-1, with an average equal to 0.95 mSv year-1. The results obtained, when compared to worldwide dose values (0.06 mSv year-1 to 1.23 mSv year-1 with an average of 0.48 mSv year-1) indicated that though the average value in Pocos de Caldas - 0.95 mSv year-1 - is almost twice the world average, it is within the dosimetry range found in other countries. Nevertheless, the region has some areas with values higher than those observed elsewhere in the world, though in areas with lower population density. (author)

  16. Large-area Silicon-Film{trademark} panels and solar cells. Phase 2 technical report, January 1996--December 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rand, J.A.; Barnett, A.M.; Checchi, J.C.; Culik, J.S.; Collins, S.R.; Ford, D.H.; Hall, R.B.; Jackson, E.L.; Kendall, C.L. [AstroPower Inc., Newark, DE (United States)

    1997-03-01

    The Silicon-Film{trademark} process is on an accelerated path to large-scale manufacturing. A key element in that development is optimizing the specific geometry of both the Silicon-Film{trademark} sheet and the resulting solar cell. That decision has been influenced by cost factors, engineering concerns, and marketing issues. The geometry investigation has focused first on sheet nominally 15 cm wide. This sheet generated solar cells with areas of 240 cm{sup 2} and 675 cm{sup 2}. Most recently, a new sheet fabrication machine was constructed that produces Silicon-Film{trademark} with a width in excess of 30 cm. Test results have indicated that there is no limit to the width of sheet generated by this process. The new wide material has led to prototype solar cells with areas of 300, 400, and 1,800 cm{sup 2}. Significant advances in solar-cell processing have been developed in support of fabricating large-area devices, including uniform emitter diffusion and anti-reflection coatings.

  17. Comparison of various sources of high surface area carbon prepared by different types of activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Activated carbon has been known as an excellent adsorbent and is widely used due to its large adsorption capacity. Activation condition and types of activation influence the surface area and porosity of the activated carbon produced. In this study, palm kernel shells and commercially activated carbon were used. To convert palm kernel shells into coal, two methods were employed, namely chemical activation and physical activation. For chemical activation, two activating agents, zinc chloride and potassium carbonate, were used. The activated carbons were analyzed using Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, single point BET and free emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). The commercial activated carbon was also characterized. FTIR results indicate that all the palm kernel shells were successfully converted to carbon. Single point BET surface area of all the carbons prepared were obtained. From FESEM micrograph, the chemically activated palm kernel shells shows well highly defined cavities and pores. This study also shows that palm kernel shells can be used to be a better source of high surface area carbon. (author)

  18. Manpower development for safe operation of nuclear power plant. China. Seminar on the technical support functions. Activity: 6.1.1-Task-03. Technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The workshop which was intended to present operating experiences from utilities with a wide range of numbers of operating nuclear units. The speaker, S.H. Groom, presented N.B. Power's experience with a single nuclear unit, and intended to: Present the objectives, organization, and scope of work of the central and site Technical Service groups within N.B. Power which support the operation of the Point Lepreau NGS; Define responsibilities of, and interfaces between the on-site and the central technical service staff; Recommend methods for the establishment and maintenance of an efficient technical support group for the operation of any nuclear power plant

  19. DÖNER KEBAB RETAILED ON THE LUCCA AREA: RESULTS OF SURVEILLANCE ACTIVITY

    OpenAIRE

    C D’Ascenzi; L. Cambi; B. Gerardo; F. Pedonese; R Nassi; R. Nuvoloni; F. Forzale

    2013-01-01

    In this study the results of surveillance activity on döner kebab retailed on the Lucca area are reported. Ten kebab shops were inspected by health officers and food samples, including raw kebab, cooked kebab and sandwiches with kebab, were submitted for microbiological examinations. During surveillance activity some hygiene problems and difficult application of control plan were found. The microbiological analyses showed that döner kebab retailed in Lucca area had acceptable hygien...

  20. Brain areas activated by uncertain reward-based decision-making in healthy volunteers

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Zongjun; Chen, Juan; Liu, Shien; Li, Yuhuan; Sun, Bo; Gao, Zhenbo

    2013-01-01

    Reward-based decision-making has been found to activate several brain areas, including the ventrolateral prefrontal lobe, orbitofrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, ventral striatum, and mesolimbic dopaminergic system. In this study, we observed brain areas activated under three degrees of uncertainty in a reward-based decision-making task (certain, risky, and ambiguous). The tasks were presented using a brain function audiovisual stimulation system. We conducted brain scans of 15 healt...

  1. Study of structure of technical and tactical activity of high class hockey players of different line by the method of main component

    OpenAIRE

    Oleksiy Mikhnov

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: to study the factor structure of technical and tactical actions of hockey players of high qualification of different playing line of business. Material and methods: for the leadthrough of analysis of competition activity information of technical and tactical actions of hockey players was used NHL. Competition activity was in general complication analysed more than 800 hockey players of different line of business. Methods were used: pedagogical supervisions and analysis of competition...

  2. Report of Activity, 1996 - 1997. Vol. 3. General activities - Technical Research; Rapport d`activite 1996 - 1997. Tome 3. Activites generales - Recherches techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pouthas, Joel; Hutin, Christiane; Niogret Mathias [eds.] [Inst. de Physique Nucleaire, Paris-11 Univ., 91 - Orsay (France)

    1999-11-01

    This is the third tome of the Report of Activity of IPN - Orsay on 1996-1997. It deals with general activities and technical research. Summary reports and short communications are grouped in the following sections: 1 - Accelerators with the sub-divisions 1.1 - R and D on superconducting RF cavities; 1.2 - SPIRAL Project; 1.3 - Contribution to the LHC Project; 1.4 - Tandem; 2 - Targets, Sources and Injectors; 3 - Detectors and related instrumentation; 4 - Electronics; 5 - Data processing; 6 - Radioprotection and medical applications

  3. Extraction of emission parameters for large-area field emitters, using a technically complete Fowler-Nordheim-type equation

    OpenAIRE

    Forbes, Richard G.

    2011-01-01

    In papers on cold field electron emission from large area field emitters (LAFEs), it has become widespread practice to publish a misleading Fowler-Nordheim-type (FN-type) equation. This equation over-predicts the LAFE-average current density by a large highly-variable factor thought to usually lie between 1000 and 1000 000 000. This equation, although often referenced to FN's 1928 paper, is a simplified equation used in undergraduate teaching, does not apply unmodified to LAFEs, and does not ...

  4. The utilization of mesh meteorological data maps for agricultural activity in hilly and mountainous area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilly and mountainous areas occupy approximately 70% of Japan, and the area of farmland in these regions is decreasing; these areas are defined as those from the outer plains to the mountains. The development of strategies for the revitalization of local agriculture in hilly and mountainous areas is therefore a significant problem in Japan. Systematic agriculture is efficient in hilly and mountainous areas, and distribution maps are effective planning tools for evaluating the meteorological conditions for individual farms in those areas where farms are small and interspersed. Public agricultural research centers in each prefecture of Japan have developed mesh meteorological data maps with some kilometers grid cell resolutions for local agriculture, and have been made many studies using mesh meteorological data maps. However, critical variations exist between estimated mesh data and actual meteorological condition within the area of each grid cell. To address this problem, methods of estimating air temperature and solar radiation on a 50 m mesh (latitude 1.5 sec x longitude 2.25 sec) were developed. While many studies with mesh meteorological data maps have been made, numbers of concrete examples of utility for agricultural activity in hilly and mountainous areas have been few. This paper presents therefore some studies for utilization facilitated of mesh meteorological data maps in hilly and mountainous areas. And furthermore, it is proposed some guides to utilize mesh meteorological data maps for the purpose of revitalizing an agricultural activity in hilly and mountainous area with concrete examples

  5. Aquatic invertebrate sampling at selected outfalls in Operable Unit 1082; Technical areas 9, 11, 16 and 22

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cross, S.

    1995-09-01

    The Ecological Studies Team (EST) of ESH-20 at Los Alamos National Laboratory conducted preliminary aquatic sampling at outfalls within Operable Unit 1082 and nearby natural waterways. Eleven outfalls were sampled a total of eighteen times. Three natural waterways (upper Pajarito Canyon, Starmer`s Gulch, and Bulldog Spring) in the vicinity were sampled a total of six times. At most sites, EST recorded hydrological condition, physico-chemical parameters, wildlife uses, and vegetation. At each outfall with water and each natural waterway, EST collected an aquatic invertebrate sample which was analyzed by taxa composition, Wilhm`s biodiversity index, the community tolerance quotient (CTQ), and density. The physico-chemical parameters at most outfalls and natural waterways fell within the normal range of natural waters in the area. However, the outfalls are characterized by low biodiversity and severely stressed communities composed of a restricted number of taxa. The habitat at the other outfalls could probably support well-developed aquatic communities if sufficient water was available. At present, the hydrology at these outfalls is too slight and/or sporadic to support such a community in the foreseeable future. In contrast to the outfalls, the natural waterways of the area had greater densities of aquatic invertebrates, higher biodiversities, and lower CTQs.

  6. OECD/NEA activities to enhance cooperation among technical organizations involved with nuclear safety assessment and research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first priority for the member countries of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD/NEA) is nuclear safety and regulation. This fact is clearly recognized in the OECD/NEA strategic plan for 2005-2009 and directs the activities of the OECD/NEA's programme of work, in particular, those carried out by the safety committees - the Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations (CSNI) and the Committee on Nuclear Regulatory Activities (CNRA). To accomplish these objectives, the CSNI is organized into six permanent working groups, each covering a different set of technical disciplines. The CSNI has produced numerous state of the art reports (SOARs) or international standard problems (ISPs), which have been key contributors to national safety assessment practices. The CSNI is also responsible for organizing and monitoring cooperative research projects, which are generally organized to share costs and information on research programmes of common interest to many member countries and/or to ensure that key facilities/programmes related to the nuclear safety infrastructure are maintained. Currently, there are 15 ongoing safety research projects. OECD projects like LOFT (Loss of Fluid Test) and Halden are recognized worldwide. The paper underlines the main findings from past OECD/NEA experience, focusing on specific safety activities and showing the added value provided to member countries. From the OECD/ NEA perspective, any concerted action among technical institutions addressing safety should build on the successful cooperation existing today. (author)

  7. The activities of the Technical Independent Supervision Organization (OSTI) on the licensing process of the nucleoelectric installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The basic responsibility for licensing nuclear facilities belongs to the government to urban is up to take care of the safety and public health as well as for the installations environment impact. In practicing such responsibility the government should be assured that the operational safety and nucleoelectric installation construction has to be subjected to checks and controls by an independent organism apart from the owners organization responsible for the construction and operation. This paper presents the main activities of the technical independent supervision organization in conformity with the regulations for the licensing process of nuclear facilities as one of the safety principles adopted for Angra 2 nuclear power plant. (B.C.A.)

  8. SUPPLEMENTAL COLUMBIA RIVER PROTECTION ACTIVITIES AT THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY HANFORD SITE: 2006 TECHNICAL PEER REVIEW

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Looney, B; Dawn Kaback; Gene Leboeuf; Jason Mulvihill-Kuntz; Lynn Lefkoff

    2006-12-20

    Prompted by a $10 million Congressional allocation to identify supplemental actions to protect the Columbia River from groundwater contamination beneath the Hanford Reservation, the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management (EM) Office of Clean-up Technology identified twenty-three potential technical projects and then down-selected ten of these for further evaluation. An independent expert peer review was conducted for the ten down-selected proposals. The review panel consisted of twenty-three recognized subject matter experts that broadly represented academia, industry, and federal laboratories. Of the initial ten proposals reviewed, one was given unconditional support, six were given conditional support, and three were not supported as proposed. Three additional proposals were then submitted by DOE for review--these proposals were structured, in part, to respond to the initial round of technical peer review comments. Peer reviews of these additional proposals provided conditional support. For those proposals that received conditional support, DOE requested specific implementation and work plans and assessed whether the plans adequately addressed the technical conditions identified by the review panel. The final list of technology proposals receiving support, or conditional support, primarily focused on understanding and reducing the potential impacts of uranium, chromium, and strontium from facilities adjacent to the Columbia River, with a secondary focus on understanding and limiting the future Columbia River impacts from the large carbon tetrachloride groundwater plume underlying and downgradient of the Hanford Central Plateau facilities. The results and recommendations of the peer reviews informed the final DOE project selections and supported implementation of the selected projects to protect the Columbia River and address groundwater contamination at Hanford.

  9. Activity measurements of technically enhanced naturally occurring radionuclides (TENORM) in phosphogypsum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luca, A. [Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering (IFIN-HH), 407 Atomistilor Street, P.O. Box MG-6, Postcode 077125, Magurele, Ilfov County (Romania)], E-mail: aluca@ifin.nipne.ro; Margineanu, R.; Sahagia, M.; Waetjen, A.C. [Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering (IFIN-HH), 407 Atomistilor Street, P.O. Box MG-6, Postcode 077125, Magurele, Ilfov County (Romania)

    2009-05-15

    Phosphogypsum is a by-product of the phosphoric acid based fertilizer industry; it can be used in agriculture and to make building materials. Phosphogypsum is radioactive due to the presence of technically enhanced naturally occurring radionuclides (TENORM) and its environmental impact is a major concern of the public authorities. The Radionuclide Metrology Laboratory from IFIN-HH participated at the IAEA-CU-2007-06-CCRI(II)-S5 Supplementary Comparison for the Determination of TENORM in phosphogypsum. The measurement procedures and the discussion of results and problems encountered are presented.

  10. Activity measurements of technically enhanced naturally occurring radionuclides (TENORM) in phosphogypsum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phosphogypsum is a by-product of the phosphoric acid based fertilizer industry; it can be used in agriculture and to make building materials. Phosphogypsum is radioactive due to the presence of technically enhanced naturally occurring radionuclides (TENORM) and its environmental impact is a major concern of the public authorities. The Radionuclide Metrology Laboratory from IFIN-HH participated at the IAEA-CU-2007-06-CCRI(II)-S5 Supplementary Comparison for the Determination of TENORM in phosphogypsum. The measurement procedures and the discussion of results and problems encountered are presented.

  11. Distribution of physical activity facilities in Scotland by small area measures of deprivation and urbanicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ogilvie David

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to examine the distribution of physical activity facilities by area-level deprivation in Scotland, adjusting for differences in urbanicity, and exploring differences between and within the four largest Scottish cities. Methods We obtained a list of all recreational physical activity facilities in Scotland. These were mapped and assigned to datazones. Poisson and negative binomial regression models were used to investigate associations between the number of physical activity facilities relative to population size and quintile of area-level deprivation. Results The results showed that prior to adjustment for urbanicity, the density of all facilities lessened with increasing deprivation from quintiles 2 to 5. After adjustment for urbanicity and local authority, the effect of deprivation remained significant but the pattern altered, with datazones in quintile 3 having the highest estimated mean density of facilities. Within-city associations were identified between the number of physical activity facilities and area-level deprivation in Aberdeen and Dundee, but not in Edinburgh or Glasgow. Conclusions In conclusion, area-level deprivation appears to have a significant association with the density of physical activity facilities and although overall no clear pattern was observed, affluent areas had fewer publicly owned facilities than more deprived areas but a greater number of privately owned facilities.

  12. Natural Environments, Obesity, and Physical Activity in Nonmetropolitan Areas of the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michimi, Akihiko; Wimberly, Michael C.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the associations of the natural environment with obesity and physical activity in nonmetropolitan areas of the United States among representative samples by using 2 indices of outdoor activity potential (OAP) at the county level. Methods: We used the data from 457,820 and 473,296 noninstitutionalized adults aged over 18 years…

  13. Technical and Institutional Innovation in Agroforestry for Protected Areas Management in the Brazilian Amazon: Opportunities and Limitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroth, Götz; da Mota, Maria do Socorro S.

    2013-08-01

    Tropical forest countries are struggling with the partially conflicting policy objectives of socioeconomic development, forest conservation, and safeguarding the livelihoods of local forest-dependent people. We worked with communities in the lower Tapajós region of the central Brazilian Amazon for over 10 years to understand their traditional and present land use practices, the constraints, and decision making processes imposed by their biophysical, socioeconomic, and political environment, and to facilitate development trajectories to improve the livelihoods of forest communities while conserving the forest on the farms and in the larger landscape. The work focused on riverine communities initially in the Tapajós National Forest and then in the Tapajós-Arapiuns Extractive Reserve. These communities have a century-old tradition of planting rubber agroforests which despite their abandonment during the 1990s still widely characterize the vegetation of the river banks, especially in the two protected areas where they are safe from the recent expansion of mechanized rice and soybean agriculture. The project evolved from the capacity-building of communities in techniques to increase the productivity of the rubber agroforests without breaking their low-input and low-risk logic, to the establishment of a community enterprise that allowed reserve inhabitants to reforest their own land with tree species of their choice and sell reforestation (not carbon) credits to local timber companies while retaining the ownership of the trees. By making land use practices economically more viable and ecologically more appropriate for protected areas, the project shows ways to strengthen the system of extractive and sustainable development reserves that protects millions of hectares of Amazon forest with the consent of the communities that inhabit them.

  14. Technical and institutional innovation in agroforestry for protected areas management in the Brazilian Amazon: opportunities and limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroth, Götz; da Mota, Maria do Socorro S

    2013-08-01

    Tropical forest countries are struggling with the partially conflicting policy objectives of socioeconomic development, forest conservation, and safeguarding the livelihoods of local forest-dependent people. We worked with communities in the lower Tapajós region of the central Brazilian Amazon for over 10 years to understand their traditional and present land use practices, the constraints, and decision making processes imposed by their biophysical, socioeconomic, and political environment, and to facilitate development trajectories to improve the livelihoods of forest communities while conserving the forest on the farms and in the larger landscape. The work focused on riverine communities initially in the Tapajós National Forest and then in the Tapajós-Arapiuns Extractive Reserve. These communities have a century-old tradition of planting rubber agroforests which despite their abandonment during the 1990s still widely characterize the vegetation of the river banks, especially in the two protected areas where they are safe from the recent expansion of mechanized rice and soybean agriculture. The project evolved from the capacity-building of communities in techniques to increase the productivity of the rubber agroforests without breaking their low-input and low-risk logic, to the establishment of a community enterprise that allowed reserve inhabitants to reforest their own land with tree species of their choice and sell reforestation (not carbon) credits to local timber companies while retaining the ownership of the trees. By making land use practices economically more viable and ecologically more appropriate for protected areas, the project shows ways to strengthen the system of extractive and sustainable development reserves that protects millions of hectares of Amazon forest with the consent of the communities that inhabit them. PMID:23636205

  15. Effect of Pump Area on Lasing Modes in Active Random Media

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Ying-Mao; LIU Zheng-Dong

    2005-01-01

    @@ We investigate the effect of pump area on lasing modes in an active random medium. Considering the structure characteristics in a real experimental system, the random medium is divided into two regions, i.e. pump and non-pump areas. The dependence of lasing modes on the pump area is qualitatively explained by means of the model in which the lasing is ascribed to the interaction of the complex localized modes in the active random medium with local aperiodic quasi-structure with appropriate pump light. There exist different pump sizes for lasing with different modes. As the pump size decreases in this random system, the pump threshold of the lasing modes increases. There are different lasing modes in different excitation regions in this random system. This gives us some information about the dependence of lasing modes on pump areas in active random media.

  16. Activities of RILEM Technical Committee: Internal Curing of Concrete and Anticipated Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kovler, Konstantin; Jensen, Ole Mejlhede

    Novel methods of shrinkage mitigation, based on special advanced methods of internal curing (IC), are currently being intensively studied in research groups in several countries. They have been the focus of the State-of-the-Art report prepared by the Technical Committee TC 196-ICC “Internal Curin...... brought by the committee work is being reported in another ACI convention (Puerto-Rico, October 2007).......Novel methods of shrinkage mitigation, based on special advanced methods of internal curing (IC), are currently being intensively studied in research groups in several countries. They have been the focus of the State-of-the-Art report prepared by the Technical Committee TC 196-ICC “Internal Curing......, which is much more developed than the internal sealing techniques. The State-of-the-Art report (STAR) published by the TC in 2007 covers the present knowledge about principles, technologies and effects of internal curing of concrete. As a part of the TC work an International RILEM Conference was...

  17. Activation of extrastriate and frontal cortical areas by visual words and word-like stimuli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Visual presentation of words activates extrastriate regions of the occipital lobes of the brain. When analyzed by positron emission tomography (PET), certain areas in the left, medial extrastriate visual cortex were activated by visually presented pseudowords that obey English spelling rules, as well as by actual words. These areas were not activated by nonsense strings of letters or letter-like forms. Thus visual word form computations are based on learned distinctions between words and nonwords. In addition, during passive presentation of words, but not pseudowords, activation occurred in a left frontal area that is related to semantic processing. These findings support distinctions made in cognitive psychology and computational modeling between high-level visual and semantic computations on single words and describe the anatomy that may underlie these distinctions

  18. The Technical and Economic Study of Solar-Wind Hybrid Energy System in Coastal Area of Chittagong, Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuvankar Podder

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The size optimization and economic evaluation of the solar-wind hybrid renewable energy system (RES to meet the electricity demand of 276 kWh/day with 40 kW peak load have been determined in this study. The load data has been collected from the motels situated in the coastal areas of Patenga, Chittagong. RES in standalone as well as grid connected mode have been considered. The optimal system configurations have been determined based on systems net present cost (NPC and cost of per unit energy (COE. A standalone solar-wind-battery hybrid system is feasible and economically comparable to the present cost of diesel based power plant if 8% annual capacity shortage is allowed. Grid tied solar-wind hybrid system, where more than 70% electricity contribution is from RES, is economically comparable to present grid electricity price. Moreover, grid tied RES results in more than 60% reduction in greenhouse gases emission compared to the conventional grid. Sensitivity analysis has been performed in this study to determine the effect of capital cost variation or renewable resources variation on the system economy. Simulation result of sensitivity analysis has showed that 20% reduction of installation cost results in nearly 9%–12% reductions in cost of per unit energy.

  19. Areas of activity in biofilms through the biospeckle and the spectral domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, J. K.; Braga, R. A.; Pereira, J.

    2010-09-01

    The dynamic laser speckle or biospeckle laser has been used to analyze the activity of biological and non-biological material by means of various statistical techniques and image processing. However, a challenge to adopt this technique is the ability to identify, in the same material, an area of low activity immersed in an environment of a higher activity. This work was carried out to evaluate the spectral approach associated to biospeckle laser technique as an alternative to identify distinct activities areas in the same material. Biofilm samples, which present well known protocols to be prepared, and a simpler structure than vegetal and animal tissues, were prepared with potato starch and corn starch with areas of different levels of moisture and were analyzed using the biospeckle laser associated with the wavelets transform in order to evaluate the data in the spectral domain. The effect of a black or white background below the samples was also tested. The image analysis was conducted using Generalized Difference and Fujii techniques before and after the implementation of the wavelets transform producing the filtration of the data. The results allowed the visualization of different activities areas in different frequency bands. The areas of activity were presented clearer than the traditional procedures without filtering. A new way to present the results of the biospeckle and the frequency domain information was proposed to enhance the visualization of a whole picture. It was also noted that the greatest contrast between areas of different activity were promoted by materials of different compositions. In some experimental configurations there were possible to tag the relationship between the frequency and depth of the active or inactive material. The influence of the color, black or white, of the background was also noticed in the results, but with white background better in some configurations and with the black better in others.

  20. TECHNICAL COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    A. Ball

    2010-01-01

    Operational Experience At the end of the first full-year running period of LHC, CMS is established as a reliable, robust and mature experiment. In particular common systems and infrastructure faults accounted for <0.6 % CMS downtime during LHC pp physics. Technical operation throughout the entire year was rather smooth, the main faults requiring UXC access being sub-detector power systems and rack-cooling turbines. All such problems were corrected during scheduled technical stops, in the shadow of tunnel access needed by the LHC, or in negotiated accesses or access extensions. Nevertheless, the number of necessary accesses to the UXC averaged more than one per week and the technical stops were inevitably packed with work packages, typically 30 being executed within a few days, placing a high load on the coordination and area management teams. It is an appropriate moment for CMS Technical Coordination to thank all those in many CERN departments and in the Collaboration, who were involved in CMS techni...

  1. Extraction of emission parameters for large-area field emitters, using a technically complete Fowler-Nordheim-type equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Richard G.

    2012-03-01

    In papers on cold field electron emission from large-area field emitters (LAFEs), it has become widespread practice to publish a misleading Fowler-Nordheim-type (FN-type) equation. This equation over-predicts the LAFE-average current density by a large highly variable factor thought to usually lie between 103 and 109. This equation, although often referenced to FN’s 1928 paper, is a simplified equation used in undergraduate teaching, does not apply unmodified to LAFEs and does not appear in the 1928 paper. Technological LAFE papers often do not cite any theoretical work more recent than 1928, and often do not comment on the discrepancy between theory and experiment. This usage has occurred widely, in several high-profile American and UK applied-science journals (including Nanotechnology), and in various other places. It does not inhibit practical LAFE development, but can give a misleading impression of potential LAFE performance to non-experts. This paper shows how the misleading equation can be replaced by a conceptually complete FN-type equation that uses three high-level correction factors. One of these, or a combination of two of them, may be useful as an additional measure of LAFE quality; this paper describes a method for estimating factor values using experimental data and discusses when it can be used. Suggestions are made for improved engineering practice in reporting LAFE results. Some of these should help to prevent situations arising whereby an equation appearing in high-profile applied-science journals is used to support statements that an engineering regulatory body might deem to involve professional negligence.

  2. A simple and highly effective process for the preparation of activated carbons with high surface area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → High surface area activated carbon can be prepared by rice husk H3PO4 without pretreatment. → The characteristics of the activated carbon were greatly influenced by post-processing method. → The lower SiO2 content of the activated carbons, the higher pore volume the carbons had. → Some silica in rice husk reacted with H3PO4 to form SiP2O7 which could be removed by post-process. - Abstract: Activated carbons with high surface area were prepared by phosphoric acid as activation agent and rice husks as precursors. It was found that the characteristics of the activated carbons were influenced not only by the preparation but also by the post-processing method. The high surface area of the activated carbons was prepared under the optimum condition (50% H3PO4 with impregnation ratio of 5:1, activation temperature of 500 deg. C, activation time of 0.5 h, wash water temperature of 100 deg. C). SiO2 content could affect the surface area of activated carbons, either. The lower SiO2 content of the activated carbons, the higher pore volume the carbons had. The SiO2 content was 11.2% when used the optimum condition. The explanation was that silicon element in rice husks reacted with H3PO4 to form silicon phosphate (SiP2O7), and it could be proved further by X-ray diffraction analysis, SiP2O7 could be removed by post-process.

  3. A simple and highly effective process for the preparation of activated carbons with high surface area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Ying, E-mail: liyingjlu@163.com [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Ding Xuefeng; Guo Yupeng; Wang Lili; Rong Chunguang; Qu Yuning; Ma Xiaoyu [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Wang Zichen, E-mail: wangzc@jlu.edu.cn [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China)

    2011-06-15

    Highlights: {yields} High surface area activated carbon can be prepared by rice husk H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} without pretreatment. {yields} The characteristics of the activated carbon were greatly influenced by post-processing method. {yields} The lower SiO{sub 2} content of the activated carbons, the higher pore volume the carbons had. {yields} Some silica in rice husk reacted with H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} to form SiP{sub 2}O{sub 7} which could be removed by post-process. - Abstract: Activated carbons with high surface area were prepared by phosphoric acid as activation agent and rice husks as precursors. It was found that the characteristics of the activated carbons were influenced not only by the preparation but also by the post-processing method. The high surface area of the activated carbons was prepared under the optimum condition (50% H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} with impregnation ratio of 5:1, activation temperature of 500 deg. C, activation time of 0.5 h, wash water temperature of 100 deg. C). SiO{sub 2} content could affect the surface area of activated carbons, either. The lower SiO{sub 2} content of the activated carbons, the higher pore volume the carbons had. The SiO{sub 2} content was 11.2% when used the optimum condition. The explanation was that silicon element in rice husks reacted with H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} to form silicon phosphate (SiP{sub 2}O{sub 7}), and it could be proved further by X-ray diffraction analysis, SiP{sub 2}O{sub 7} could be removed by post-process.

  4. DOE technical standards list: Directory of DOE and contractor personnel involved in non-government standards activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-05-01

    The body of this document contains a listing of DOE employees and DOE contractors who have submitted form DOE F 1300.2, Record of Non-Government Standards Activity, which is attached to the end of this document. Additional names were added from rosters supplied by non-Government standards bodies. The committees or governing bodies in which the person participates is listed after each name. An asterisk preceding the committee notation indicates that the person has identified himself or herself as the DOE representative on that committee. Appendices to this document are also provided to sort the information by the parent employment organization, by non-Government standards activity, and by the proper names of the non-Government standards organizations and committees. DOE employees and contractors listed in this technical standards list are those recorded as of May 1, 1999.

  5. Fluorinated alkyl substances and technical mixtures used in food paper-packaging exhibit endocrine-related activity in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenmai, Anna Kjerstine; Taxvig, Camilla; Svingen, Terje;

    2016-01-01

    Migration of chemicals from packaging materials to foods may lead to human exposure. Polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) can be used in technical mixtures (TMs) for use in food packaging of paper and board, and PFAS have been detected in human serum and umbilical cord blood. The specific structures...... of the PFAS in TMs are often unknown, but polyfluorinated alkyl phosphate esters (PAPs) have been characterized in TMs, food packaging, and in food. PAPs can be metabolized into fluorotelomer alcohols (FTOHs) and perfluoroalkyl carboxylic acids (PFCAs). Some PFAS have endocrine activities, highlighting...... the need to investigate these effects. Herein, we studied the endocrine activity of less characterized PFAS, including short-chain PFCAs and FTOHs, PAPs, and TMs of unknown chemical composition. Long-chain PFCAs were also included. We applied seven assays covering effects on estrogen, glucocorticoid...

  6. Active commuting of the inhabitants of Liberec city in low and high walkability areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukáš Rubín

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Active commuting in terms of everyday transport to school or work can have a significant effect on physical activity. Active commuting can be influenced by the environment, and examples from abroad show that current environmental changes tend mostly to promote passive forms of commuting. A similar situation of decreasing active commuting might be expected in the Czech Republic. However, little information has been published to date about the issue of active commuting among the inhabitants of our country. Objective: The main objective of the present study is to describe the active commuting patterns of the inhabitants of Liberec city in low and high walkability areas. Methods: A total of 23,621 economically active inhabitants or students of Liberec city aged 6-87 years (34.77 ± 14.39 participated in the study. The data about commuting were retrieved from the national Population and Housing Census of 2011. Geographic information systems were used to objectively analyze the built environment and to calculate the walkability index. Results: Active commuting to/from school or work is used by 17.41% of inhabitants. Active commuting is dominated by walking (16.60% as opposed to cycling (0.81%. Inhabitants who lived in high walkability areas were more likely to actively commute than those living in low walkability areas (OR = 1.54; 95% CI [1.41, 1.68]. Conclusions: This study confirmed the findings of international studies about the effect of the built environment on active commuting among Liberec inhabitants. Active commuters are often those living near or in the city center, which is characterized by high walkability. In Liberec city, walking as a means of active commuting significantly prevails over cycling. One of the reasons might be the diverse topography of the city and the insufficiently developed cycling network.

  7. Exploring the Mismatch between Skills and Jobs for Women in Saudi Arabia in Technical and Vocational Areas: The Views of Saudi Arabian Private Sector Business Managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvert, John R.; Al-Shetaiwi, A. S.

    2002-01-01

    Gives an overview of women in both general and technical-vocational education and employment in Saudi Arabia. Reports on a survey of 220 private business managers: 83% indicated that Saudi women had limited participation in technical jobs; 63% suggested that vocational-technical education did not promote women's participation. (Contains 51…

  8. Weapons Engineering Tritium Facility, Building 205, Technical Area 16: Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Weapons Engineering Tritium Facility (WETF) was planned by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to retain at Los Alamos National Laboratory the capability of repackaging small quantities of tritium to exacting specifications. Small quantities of tritium are required for energy research and development activities and for research on nuclear weapons test devices carried out as part of the laboratory mission. The WETF is an improved design proposed to replace an aging Los Alamos facility where tritium has been repackaged for many years. This Environmental Assessment evaluates the environmental consequences to be expected from operating the new facility, for which construction was completed in 1984, compared with those from continuing to operate the old facility. The document was prepared for compliance with NEPA. In operation, the WETF will incorporate state-of-the-art systems for containing tritium in glove boxes and capturing any tritium released into the glove box exhaust system and the laboratory atmosphere. Liquid discharges from the WETF would contain less than 1% of the tritium found in effluents from the present facility. Effluent streams would be surface discharges and would not enter the aquifer from which municipal water supplies are drawn. The quantity of solid radioactive waste generated at the WETF would be approximately the same as that generated at the present facility. The risk to the public from normal tritium-packaging operations would be significantly less from the WETF than from the present facility. The proposed action will reduce the adverse environmental impacts caused by tritium repackaging by substantially reducing the amount of tritium that escapes to the environment. 35 refs., 3 figs., 21 tabs

  9. Activity theory and genre ecology: Conceptual tools for understanding technical communication

    OpenAIRE

    Christine Winberg

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports on a year-long project in an architectural technology department, which studied students’ oral language development in plenary discussions in a first year History and Appreciation of Architecture course. Data was obtained by videotaping classroom activities, and by interviewing the lecturer and students who were participants in the course. The data was analysed, using categories suggested by Activity Theory. The category of ‘rules’ was selected from the activity system f...

  10. Studies relevant to the catalytic activation of carbon monoxide. Technical progress report, September 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ford, P.C.

    1992-06-04

    Research activity during the 1991--1992 funding period has been concerned with the following topics relevant to carbon monoxide activation. (1) Exploratory studies of water gas shift catalysts heterogenized on polystyrene based polymers. (2) Mechanistic investigation of the nucleophilic activation of CO in metal carbonyl clusters. (3) Application of fast reaction techniques to prepare and to investigate reactive organometallic intermediates relevant to the activation of hydrocarbons toward carbonylation and to the formation of carbon-carbon bonds via the migratory insertion of CO into metal alkyl bonds.

  11. Technical safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Technical risks are compared to the publically consciously or unconsciously accepted risks. This kind of risk analysis has the aim to achieve an optimum safety with a justifiable effort. The realization of this target requires the solving of technical, economic and sociopolitical problems. In order to minimize the risk, one can reduce the probability of occurence as well as the extent of damage. Risk situations for the population due to natural occurences such as earthquakes, strike of lightning, frost, high water etc. can be relatively well quantified. These are therefore suitable a a basis for comparison. This basis risk is increased by individual traffic and by human force effects such as terror and war. On the other hand, life in the neighbourhood of a nuclear power plant does not measurably contribute to increasing individual risk. In principle, by increased expenditure one can reduce technical risks. Due to the lack of means, one must then save correspondingly somewhere else. The safety risks there can then possibly increase overproportionally or at least the wide-spread desire for a higher standard of living cannot be fulfilled. Nevertheless, absolute safety can never be reached. The insurance business is responsible for covering the financial damage. Fault trees are used in technology to analyse the weak points. This is explained taking the example of a propylene low-temperature tank. If one keeps below the base risk it must be possible to build technical plants, even nuclear power plants, in densely populated areas. Technical safety analyses, however, only embrace one side of it, rigid building and material control and extensive elimination of human error ar just as important. (orig.)

  12. Training and Technical Assistance for Compliance With Beverage and Physical Activity Components of New York City’s Regulations for Early Child Care Centers

    OpenAIRE

    Kakietek, Jakub; Dunn, Lillian; O’Dell, Sarah Abood; Jernigan, Jan; Kettel Khan, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Introduction In 2006, the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (DOHMH) passed regulations for child care centers that established standards for beverages provided to children and set a minimum amount of time for daily physical activity. DOHMH offered several types of training and technical assistance to support compliance with the regulations. This article analyzes the association between training and technical assistance provided and compliance with the regulations in a samp...

  13. Signal intensity, clinical activity and cross-sectional areas on MRI scans in thyroid eye disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The signal intensity from inflamed extra-ocular muscles on short tau inversion recovery (STIR)-sequence magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is known to correlate with clinical scores of thyroid eye disease (TED) severity. Twenty-one patients who had undergone repeated MRI scanning for TED were studied retrospectively. Signal intensity of extra-ocular muscles (from STIR-sequence MRI) and cross-sectional area (from STIR and T1 MRI) were correlated with Mourits' clinical activity score (CAS). The area of highest signal intensity within the most inflamed extra-ocular muscle, and the average cross-sectional signal intensity of the most inflamed extra-ocular muscle reliably correlated with CAS, and this was maintained as disease activity changed over time. In contrast, isolated measures of muscle cross-sectional area did not correlate with CAS. The extra-ocular muscle cross-sectional area calculated from STIR-sequence MR images was greater than that measured on T1 images. This suggests that muscle area from STIR-sequence MRI may also detect peri-muscular inflammation. We conclude that the peak signal intensity from the most inflamed extra-ocular muscle remains the most reliable correlate of clinical disease activity obtained from these images. STIR-sequence MRI scans provide a number of useful measures of disease activity in TED

  14. SNOW AVALANCHE ACTIVITY IN PARÂNG SKI AREA REVEALED BY TREE-RINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. MESEȘAN

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Snow Avalanche Activity in Parâng Ski Area Revealed by Tree-Rings. Snow avalanches hold favorable conditions to manifest in Parâng Mountains but only one event is historically known, without destructive impact upon infrastructure or fatalities and this region wasn’t yet the object of avalanche research. The existing ski infrastructure of Parâng resort located in the west of Parâng Mountains is proposed to be extended in the steep slopes of subalpine area. Field evidence pinpoints that these steep slopes were affected by snow avalanches in the past. In this study we analyzed 11 stem discs and 31 increment cores extracted from 22 spruces (Picea abies (L. Karst impacted by avalanches, in order to obtain more information about past avalanches activity. Using the dendrogeomorphological approach we found 13 avalanche events that occurred along Scărița avalanche path, since 1935 until 2012, nine of them produced in the last 20 years. The tree-rings data inferred an intense snow avalanche activity along this avalanche path. This study not only calls for more research in the study area but also proves that snow avalanches could constitute an important restrictive factor for the tourism infrastructure and related activities in the area. It must be taken into consideration by the future extension of tourism infrastructure. Keywords: snow avalanche, Parâng Mountains, dendrogeomorphology, ski area.

  15. DÖNER KEBAB RETAILED ON THE LUCCA AREA: RESULTS OF SURVEILLANCE ACTIVITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C D’Ascenzi

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study the results of surveillance activity on döner kebab retailed on the Lucca area are reported. Ten kebab shops were inspected by health officers and food samples, including raw kebab, cooked kebab and sandwiches with kebab, were submitted for microbiological examinations. During surveillance activity some hygiene problems and difficult application of control plan were found. The microbiological analyses showed that döner kebab retailed in Lucca area had acceptable hygienic quality, but further inspections are necessary to improve the hygienic conditions of kebab shops.

  16. Natural resources economical activities in coastal area of Rio de la Plata: report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The integrated management of coastal zone covers multiple problems, often conflicts on the use of coastal resources that is different productive capacities, the presence of a variety of important actors a degree of relationship with the river and its surroundings, this is due to the pressures on coastal resources in a given area may be higher due to the activities that take place outside this area. Colonia, San Jose, Canelones and Maldonado are the departments of the Oriental Republic of Uruguay to which they have studied the impact on the national economy, economic characteristics of the population, business, mining, farming, tourism fores tal activities.

  17. Technical activities of the Project Surata River for the handling of mercury and cyanide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The technical works executed by the project have been framed in the philosophy of reducing the contamination for mercury and cyanide in the operations of auriferous benefit, without causing detriment in the economic revenues of the miners, on the contrary, trying to carry out a better use of the auriferous mineral. In this sense, the project has toasted from simple solutions that allow to reduce the use of the pollutants mentioned a little until solutions more complex than they require introduction of gravimetric teams in pro of reducing the quantity of minerals amalgamated y/o cyanidates. This way an action plan was developed that contemplates a diagnosis stage, followed by a stage of executions in which has been worked in the modification of the systems of gravimetric concentration, process of amalgamation and in the cyanidation process. Particular emphasis has noticed to the cyanidation process for percolation, given its importance in the benefit and its degree of environmental affectation. Through a revision of the method used by the miners, it was possible to modify the technique and to reduce in 40% the global consumption of cyanide in the companies of the District Mining Vetas - California. Metallurgic studies in the advised companies allowed to verify that strengthening the gravimetric concentration is possible to gather 80% of the gold (heavy minerals) in 15% of the processed global material. Under these conditions the introduction of the cyanidation is facilitated by agitation, allowing to reduce the contamination for cyanide and to make a bigger use of the auriferous mineral

  18. [Effects of Different Reclaimed Scenarios on Soil Microbe and Enzyme Activities in Mining Areas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun-jian; Liu, Feng; Zhou, Xiao-mei

    2015-05-01

    Abstract: Ecological degradation in the mining areas is greatly aggravated in recent several decades, and ecological restoration has become the primary measure for the sustainable development. Soil microbe and enzyme activity are sensitive indices to evaluate soil quality. Ecological reconstruction was initiated in Antaibao mining area, and we tested soil physicochemical properties, microbial populations of azotobacteria, nitrifying-bacteria and denitrifying-bacteria, and enzyme activities (including sucrose, polyphenol oxidase, dehydrogenase and urease) under different regeneration scenarios. Regeneration scenarios had significant effects on soil physicochemical properties, microbial population and enzyme activities. Total nitrogen was strongly correlated with azotobacteria and nitrifying-bacteria, however, total nitrogen was not correlated with denitrifying-bacteria. Phenol oxidase activity was negatively correlated with soil organic carbon and total nitrogen, but other enzyme activities were positively correlated with soil organic carbon and total nitrogen. Principal Component Analysis ( PCA) was applied to analyze the integrated fertility index (IFI). The highest and lowest IFIs were in Robinia pseudoacacia-Pinus tabuliformis mixed forests and un-reclaimed area, respectively. R. pseudoacacia-P. tabuliformis mixed forests were feasible for reclaimed mining areas in semi-arid region Northwest Shanxi. PMID:26314137

  19. Assessing deposition of airborne particulates and gases in the Selkirk area using lichens growing on tree trunks : non-technical summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An independent study was conducted to address the public concern regarding airborne emissions from Manitoba Hydro's coal-fired electricity generating station located in the Selkirk area. This document is a non-technical summary of the report issued by Ecostem Ltd. Since there are no air quality monitoring stations in the study area which covers more than 1,000 square km, Ecostem used lichens as biological indicators of historical deposition of airborne dust and gases. The sources of airborne dust and gases include urban centres, agriculture, pesticides, fertilizers, waste burning, vehicle use and manufacturing. Lichens have been commonly used as indicators since 1866. They provide useful information because they are long-lived, are not mobile, acquire most of their nutrients from the atmosphere, retain the airborne deposition they initially trap, and they can accumulate airborne particles year round. It is possible to obtain a record of the chemicals that have been present in the air by simply analyzing the lichen tissue. This study used the concentrations of various chemical elements in lichen tissue and the distribution and abundance of lichen species to see if airborne particulates were substantially elevated in the Selkirk area and if so, to determine if the coal-fired generating station was the apparent source of the pollution. A total of 62 stations and lichens on more than 400 trees were sampled. Sulphur, a fingerprint for gaseous emissions from the generating station, had tissue concentrations that were 1.32 times higher. Statistical analysis suggests that barium, boron and strontium were the clearest fingerprint elements for generating station emissions. Tissue concentrations of antimony, arsenic, cadmium, chromium, copper, iron, lead, manganese, mercury, molybdenum, nickel, selenium, silver, thallium, tin, vanadium and zinc were examined further because they are considered to be toxic. It was noted that a conclusion regarding human health cannot be made

  20. Observation of electro-activated localized structures in broad area VCSELs

    OpenAIRE

    Parravicini, J.; Brambilla, M; Columbo, L.; Prati, F.; C. Rizza; Tissoni, G.; Agranat, A. J.; DelRe, E.

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate experimentally the electro-activation of a localized optical structure in a coherently driven broad-area vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) operated below threshold. Control is achieved by electro-optically steering a writing beam through a pre-programmable switch based on a photorefractive funnel waveguide.

  1. On the Area Expansion of Magnetic Flux-Tubes in Solar Active Regions

    CERN Document Server

    Dudik, Jaroslav; Cirtain, Jonathan W

    2014-01-01

    We calculated the 3D distribution of the area expansion factors in a potential magnetic field extrapolated from the high-resolution \\textit{Hinode}/SOT magnetogram of a quiescent active region NOAA 11482. Retaining only closed loops within the computational box, we show that the distribution of area expansion factors show significant structure. Loop-like structures characterized by locally lower values of the expansion factor are embedded in a smooth background. These loop-like flux-tubes have squashed cross-sections and expand with height. The distribution of the expansion factors show overall increase with height, allowing an active region core characterized by low values of the expansion factor to be distinguished. The area expansion factors obtained from extrapolation of the SOT magnetogram are compared to those obtained from an approximation of the observed magnetogram by a series of 134 submerged charges. This approximation retains the general flux distribution in the observed magnetogram, but removes t...

  2. Chemical composition of soils in the areas of volcanic ashfalls around active volcanoes in Kamchatka

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharikhina, L. V.; Litvinenko, Yu. S.

    2016-03-01

    The geochemical features of volcanic soils (Andosols) in the northern soil province of Kamchatka are identified. The background regional concentrations ( Cb r ) of most of chemical elements in the studied soils are lower than their average concentrations in soils of the world and in the European volcanic soils. Only Na, Ca, and Mg are present in elevated concentrations in all the studied soils in the north of Kamchatka. Regional background concentrations of elements are exceeded by 1.6 times in the area of active ashfalls of the Tolbachik volcano and by 1.3 times in the area of active ashfalls of the Shiveluch volcano. The concentrations of mobile forms of elements in these areas exceed their regional background concentrations by 2.1 and 2.6 times, respectively.

  3. Bioremediation process in impacted area of petroleum activities; Processos de biorremediacao em areas influenciadas por atividades petroliferas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Olivia Maria Cordeiro de; Trigueis, Jorge Alberto; Queiroz, Antonio Fernando de Souza; Celino, Joil Jose; Lima, Danusia Ferreira; Santana, Robson Carneiro [Universidade Federal da Bahia (UFBA), Salvador, BA (Brazil). Inst. de Geociencias

    2008-07-01

    The present work's objective is to test sampling methodologies applied on the bioremediation processes in situ, involving the establishment of sample replicates, specific laboratory procedures and its results, inedited on the referred technique. Agricultural fertilizers were used, NPK and OSMOCOTE, as biostimulants on mangroves substrates affected by petroleum activities. The tested methodology used on the experiment was based on the monitoring of this technology in aquarium with water from Sao Paulo's river and sediment contaminated by oil, realized in three steps (first pre-test, second pre-test and third pre-test) that happened between the months of August and November of 2007. The physical-chemical parameters were measured with portable devices carefully calibrated and the oil analyzed with gas chromatography. The saturated hydrocarbons (n-alkenes) had an increase on the concentrations for some aquariums and these found results do not permit to confirm if the inhibition of the degradation of the saturated hydrocarbons are somehow related to the usage of the nutrients NPK or OSMOCOTE. The time interval applied on the procedure, the sampling methodology used and even the intrinsic heterogeneity of the mangrove substrate are in the evaluation stage with new tests in order to make better the technique delineation, inedited, utilized in the area. (author)

  4. Technical documentation for the 1990 Nationwide Truck Activity and Commodity Survey Public Use File

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-09-01

    The Nationwide Truck Activity and Commodity Survey (NTACS) provides detailed activity data for a sample of trucks covered in the 1987 Truck Inventory and Use Survey (TIUS) for days selected at random over a 12-month period ending in 1990. The NTACS was conducted by the US Bureau of the Census for the US Department of Transportation (DOT). A Public Use File for the NTACS was developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under a reimbursable agreement with the DOT. The content of the Public Use File and the design of the NTACS are described in this document.

  5. Brain areas activated by uncertain reward-based decision-making in healthy volunteers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zongjun Guo; Juan Chen; Shien Liu; Yuhuan Li; Bo Sun; Zhenbo Gao

    2013-01-01

    Reward-based decision-making has been found to activate several brain areas, including the ven-trolateral prefrontal lobe, orbitofrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, ventral striatum, and meso-limbic dopaminergic system. In this study, we observed brain areas activated under three degrees of uncertainty in a reward-based decision-making task (certain, risky, and ambiguous). The tasks were presented using a brain function audiovisual stimulation system. We conducted brain scans of 15 healthy volunteers using a 3.0T magnetic resonance scanner. We used SPM8 to analyze the location and intensity of activation during the reward-based decision-making task, with respect to the three conditions. We found that the orbitofrontal cortex was activated in the certain reward con-dition, while the prefrontal cortex, precentral gyrus, occipital visual cortex, inferior parietal lobe, ce-rebel ar posterior lobe, middle temporal gyrus, inferior temporal gyrus, limbic lobe, and midbrain were activated during the ‘risk’ condition. The prefrontal cortex, temporal pole, inferior temporal gyrus, occipital visual cortex, and cerebel ar posterior lobe were activated during ambiguous deci-sion-making. The ventrolateral prefrontal lobe, frontal pole of the prefrontal lobe, orbitofrontal cortex, precentral gyrus, inferior temporal gyrus, fusiform gyrus, supramarginal gyrus, inferior parietal lo-bule, and cerebel ar posterior lobe exhibited greater activation in the‘risk’ than in the‘certain’ con-dition (P<0.05). The frontal pole and dorsolateral region of the prefrontal lobe, as wel as the ce-rebel ar posterior lobe, showed significantly greater activation in the ‘ambiguous’ condition com-pared to the ‘risk’ condition (P < 0.05). The prefrontal lobe, occipital lobe, parietal lobe, temporal lobe, limbic lobe, midbrain, and posterior lobe of the cerebel um were activated during deci-sion-making about uncertain rewards. Thus, we observed different levels and regions of

  6. TECHNICAL COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    A. Ball

    Overview From a technical perspective, CMS has been in “beam operation” state since 6th November. The detector is fully closed with all components operational and the magnetic field is normally at the nominal 3.8T. The UXC cavern is normally closed with the radiation veto set. Access to UXC is now only possible during downtimes of LHC. Such accesses must be carefully planned, documented and carried out in agreement with CMS Technical Coordination, Experimental Area Management, LHC programme coordination and the CCC. Material flow in and out of UXC is now strictly controlled. Access to USC remains possible at any time, although, for safety reasons, it is necessary to register with the shift crew in the control room before going down.It is obligatory for all material leaving UXC to pass through the underground buffer zone for RP scanning, database entry and appropriate labeling for traceability. Technical coordination (notably Stephane Bally and Christoph Schaefer), the shift crew and run ...

  7. Assessment, Problems and Ways of Improvement of Technical Regulation of Foreign Economic Activity (FEA in the World

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steblyanko Maryna D.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The article analyses the state of technical regulation of FEA in the world and Ukraine and identifies main problems and ways of increase of efficiency of certification. It considers the system of technical regulation of EU and provides examples of application of technical barriers by some countries for ensuring security of goods in the domestic market. The article offers to develop a strategy of development of the national system of information provision of technical regulation and suspend transition from the system of mandatory certification to the system of assessment of correspondence with requirements of technical orders of business.

  8. Neutron activation analysis of neonate and maternal hair sampled in areas with different levels of pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Instrumental neutron activation analysis was performed on human head hair of newborns and mothers sampled in two areas with different levels of environmental exposure. The group of neonates from the exposed area (polluted by thermal power plants burning brown coal and by chemical industry) exhibited higher levels of several trace elements in hair, e.g. Se, Zn, Hg and Sb in comparison with the control group. Moreover, the mean concentrations of Se, Hg, Zn and Br in neonate hair were found to be higher than in mothers' hair. Although the study revealed statistically significant differences in the composition of neonate hair samples in areas with different levels of environmental exposure, the differences are relatively small. Only a thorough long-term study both with environmental and medical observations can prove a direct connection of the elevated levels of some trace elements in neonate hair with the higher incidence of mental diseaes of children living in the exposed area. (author)

  9. The Importance of Landscape Elements for Bat Activity and Species Richness in Agricultural Areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heim, Olga; Treitler, Julia T; Tschapka, Marco; Knörnschild, Mirjam; Jung, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    Landscape heterogeneity is regarded as a key factor for maintaining biodiversity and ecosystem function in production landscapes. We investigated whether grassland sites at close vicinity to forested areas are more frequently used by bats. Considering that bats are important consumers of herbivorous insects, including agricultural pest, this is important for sustainable land management. Bat activity and species richness were assessed using repeated monitoring from May to September in 2010 with acoustic monitoring surveys on 50 grassland sites in the Biosphere Reserve Schorfheide-Chorin (North-East Germany). Using spatial analysis (GIS), we measured the closest distance of each grassland site to potentially connecting landscape elements (e.g., trees, linear vegetation, groves, running and standing water). In addition, we assessed the distance to and the percent land cover of forest remnants and urban areas in a 200 m buffer around the recording sites to address differences in the local landscape setting. Species richness and bat activity increased significantly with higher forest land cover in the 200 m buffer and at smaller distance to forested areas. Moreover, species richness increased in proximity to tree groves. Larger amount of forest land cover and smaller distance to forest also resulted in a higher activity of bats on grassland sites in the beginning of the year during May, June and July. Landscape elements near grassland sites also influenced species composition of bats and species richness of functional groups (open, edge and narrow space foragers). Our results highlight the importance of forested areas, and suggest that agricultural grasslands that are closer to forest remnants might be better buffered against outbreaks of agricultural pest insects due to higher species richness and higher bat activity. Furthermore, our data reveals that even for highly mobile species such as bats, a very dense network of connecting elements within the landscape is

  10. The Importance of Landscape Elements for Bat Activity and Species Richness in Agricultural Areas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Heim

    Full Text Available Landscape heterogeneity is regarded as a key factor for maintaining biodiversity and ecosystem function in production landscapes. We investigated whether grassland sites at close vicinity to forested areas are more frequently used by bats. Considering that bats are important consumers of herbivorous insects, including agricultural pest, this is important for sustainable land management. Bat activity and species richness were assessed using repeated monitoring from May to September in 2010 with acoustic monitoring surveys on 50 grassland sites in the Biosphere Reserve Schorfheide-Chorin (North-East Germany. Using spatial analysis (GIS, we measured the closest distance of each grassland site to potentially connecting landscape elements (e.g., trees, linear vegetation, groves, running and standing water. In addition, we assessed the distance to and the percent land cover of forest remnants and urban areas in a 200 m buffer around the recording sites to address differences in the local landscape setting. Species richness and bat activity increased significantly with higher forest land cover in the 200 m buffer and at smaller distance to forested areas. Moreover, species richness increased in proximity to tree groves. Larger amount of forest land cover and smaller distance to forest also resulted in a higher activity of bats on grassland sites in the beginning of the year during May, June and July. Landscape elements near grassland sites also influenced species composition of bats and species richness of functional groups (open, edge and narrow space foragers. Our results highlight the importance of forested areas, and suggest that agricultural grasslands that are closer to forest remnants might be better buffered against outbreaks of agricultural pest insects due to higher species richness and higher bat activity. Furthermore, our data reveals that even for highly mobile species such as bats, a very dense network of connecting elements within the

  11. Acupoints combination correlates with activation of cerebral areas A functional MRI study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xinsheng Lai; Yong Huang; Chunzhi Tang; Junjun Yang; Yanqi Zou; Junxian Wu; Yangjia Lu; Renyong Lin

    2011-01-01

    Acupoint combination is a method used for acupoint treatment of patients. Traditionally, acupoints are matched along the meridian distribution, which is a common rule in clinical practice, but the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Cerebral scans with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) have been used in the study of acupuncture and acupoint specifically. In this study,fMRI was used to detect the activation of the brain areas under different acupoints, matched along different meridians, to elucidate the acupoint combination via a modern medical approach. Forty healthy volunteers were randomly divided into the following groups: Waiguan point (SJ5), Waiguan (SJ5) + Zhigou (SJ6) (2 acupoints come from the same meridian), Waiguan (SJ 5) + Neiguan (PC 6)(2 acupoints come from 2 meridians with the relationship of interior-exterior), Waiguan (SJ 5) +Yanglingquan (GB 34) (2 acupoints come from 2 meridians with the same name-Shaoyang Meridian), and sham point groups (needling in different points on the right hand). A real-time cerebral fMRI scan was simultaneously performed. The cerebral activation rate, and the number and strength of different regions of interest ware compared among the groups. The fMRI cerebral imaging confirmed that there were some differences in the activation of cerebral areas by the needlings in SJ 5, and in combination with other acupoints. Needling at SJ 5 alone greatly activated the right cerebellum, while needling at both SJ 5 and different co-needling points activated different cerebral functional areas.

  12. Surface area and pore size distribution of activated carbon produced from low cost precursors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fast growing wood (Paulownia tomentos-PT, Ailanthus altissima-AA. Salvadara oleoides-SO) and animal bones were utilized for the preparation of activated carbon. The carbon samples were activated by thermal means (400-1000 degree C). The samples were characterized by surface area (Langmuir and BJH) with micropore and meso pores volume (BJH). The surface area of other carbon samples activated at 800 degree C was found in the sequence: 654.9 for Salvadora oleoides > 615.8 for Ailanthus altissima > 346.3 for Paulownia tomentosa > 300.0 for animal bones. BJH surface area (m/sup 2/g/sup -l/) analysis of the carbon samples activated at 800 degree C was found in the sequence: 274.6 for Salvadora oleoides > 261.76 for animal bones> 224.8 for Paulownia tomentosa > 200.2 for Ailanthus altissima. The micropore volume (BJH method) of 800 degree C activated carbon samples were in the sequence: 0.15 for Ailanthus altissima > 0.13 for Salvadora oleoides > 0.08 for animal bones. (author)

  13. Determination of antioxidant enzymatic activity in several halophytes from Dobrogea area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Aurelia Ivan

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Halophytes have evolved various mechanisms of adaptations to stress tolerance including anincrease of antioxidant enzymes activities. The present study was conducted in order to investigate the activity of someantioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase – SOD, catalase – CAT and peroxidase – POD in several halophytes. Forthis, four halophytic species were collected during summer of 2012 from two distinct saline areas, located in South-Eastof Romania (Dobrogea. Species collected from Histria are Plantago maritima and Bassia sedoides; the first mentionedspecies was collected in various stages of development (vegetative and flowering phases. Species Plantago coronopus, Spergularia media, Limonium gmelini, and Bassia sedoides from Sulina were collected from two different habitats: littoral area and an habitat located at 1000 m from littoral.The results show that halophytes collected from 1000 m to littoral area were characterized by higher levels ofSOD activity than those collected from littoral. The peroxidase activity in halophytes collected from Sulina show variousresponses according to species and collecting points. Some of halophytes collected from Histria and Sulina have anundetectable level of catalase activity at the moment of determination; perhaps the role of this enzyme for removing H2O2 has been taken by peroxidase.

  14. SCFA lead lab technical assistance at Oak Ridge Y-12 nationalsecurity complex: Evaluation of treatment and characterizationalternatives of mixed waste soil and debris at disposal area remedialaction DARA solids storage facility (SSF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hazen, Terry

    2002-08-26

    On July 17-18, 2002, a technical assistance team from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area (SCFA) met with the Bechtel Jacobs Company Disposal Area Remedial Action (DARA) environmental project leader to review treatment and characterization options for the baseline for the DARA Solids Storage Facility (SSF). The technical assistance request sought suggestions from SCFA's team of technical experts with experience and expertise in soil treatment and characterization to identify and evaluate (1) alternative treatment technologies for DARA soils and debris, and (2) options for analysis of organic constituents in soil with matrix interference. Based on the recommendations, the site may also require assistance in identifying and evaluating appropriate commercial vendors.

  15. Magnetic fusion energy plasma interactive and high heat flux components. Volume II. Technical assessment of the critical issues and problem areas in high heat flux materials and component development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A technical assessment of the critical issues and problem areas for high heat flux materials and components (HHFMC) in magnetic fusion devices shows these problems to be of critical importance for the successful operation of near-term fusion experiments and for the feasibility and attractiveness of long-term fusion reactors. A number of subgroups were formed to assess the critical HHFMC issues along the following major lines: (1) source conditions, (2) systems integration, (3) materials and processes, (4) thermal hydraulics, (5) thermomechanical response, (6) electromagnetic response, (7) instrumentation and control, and (8) test facilities. The details of the technical assessment are presented in eight chapters. The primary technical issues and needs for each area are highlighted

  16. Innovations in uranium exploration, mining and processing techniques, and new exploration target areas. Proceedings of a technical committee meeting held in Vienna, 5-8 December 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1994 there were 432 nuclear power plants in operation with a combined electricity generating capacity of 340 347 MWe. To achieve this, 58,000 tonnes of uranium were required as nuclear fuel. In view of its economic importance, the International Atomic Energy Agency has had a long-standing interest in uranium exploration, resources, production and demand. This is reflected in numerous publications covering different aspects of this field. Particularly worth mentioning is the periodical ''Uranium Resources, Production and Demand'', published jointly with the Nuclear Energy Agency of the OECD. Its fourteenth edition was published in early 1994. It was the objective of this Technical Committee meeting, the proceedings of which are presented in this TECDOC, to bring together specialists in the field and to collect information on new developments in exploration, mining techniques and innovative methods of processing that are more environmentally friendly. The meeting was attended by a total of 22 participants from 14 countries. Eleven papers were presented describing new exploration areas, improvements in processing methods, new mining techniques for the extraction of high grade ore, and innovative approaches for site reclamation. Two working groups were organized and dealt with the analysis of world uranium resources and the new direction of research in mining and ore processing. Refs, figs, tabs

  17. Comprehensive Technical Support for High-Quality Anthracite Production: A Case Study in the Xinqiao Coal Mine, Yongxia Mining Area, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The effective production of high-quality anthracite has attracted increasing global attention. Based on the coal occurrence in Yongxia Mining Area and mining conditions of a coalface in Xinqiao Coal Mine, we proposed a systematic study on the technical support for the production of high-quality anthracite. Six key steps were explored, including coal falling at the coalface, transport, underground bunker storage, main shaft hoisting, coal preparation on the ground, and railway wagon loading. The study resulted in optimized running parameters for the shearers, and the rotating patterns of the shearer drums was altered (one-way cutting was employed. Mining height and roof supporting intensity were reduced. Besides, loose presplitting millisecond blasting and mechanized mining were applied to upgrade the coal quantity and the lump coal production rate. Additionally, the coalface end transloading, coalface crush, transport systems, underground storage, and main shaft skip unloading processes were improved, and fragmentation-prevention techniques were used in the washing and railway wagon loading processes. As a result, the lump coal production rate was maintained at a high level and fragmentation was significantly reduced. Because of using the parameters and techniques determined in this research, high-quality coal production and increased profits were achieved. The research results could provide theoretical guidance and methodology for other anthracite production bases.

  18. Unsaturated hydrologic flow parameters based on laboratory and field data for soils near the mixed waste landfill, technical area III, Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roepke, C.S. [INTERA, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Strong, W.R.; Nguyen, H.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [and others

    1996-08-01

    This report presents the results of laboratory tests conducted on soil core samples obtained prior to an instantaneous profile test conducted west of the Mixed Waste Landfill in Technical Area III. The instantaneous profile test was conducted to measure in situ hydrologic parameters controlling unsaturated flow and contaminant transport in the near - surface vadose zone. Soil core samples from the instantaneous profile test plot were tested in the Sandia National Laboratory`s Environmental Restoration Project Hydrology Laboratory to measure saturated hydraulic conductivity and the relationships between moisture content and soil water tension. Data from laboratory tests and the instantaneous profile field test were then modeled using the computer code RETC to quantify moisture content, soil water tension, and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity relationships. Results content, soil verified that a combination of laboratory and field data yielded a more complete definition of hydrologic properties than either laboratory or field data alone. Results also indicated that at native moisture contents, the potential for significant unsaturated aqueous flow is limited, while at saturated or near - saturated conditions, preferential flow may occur.

  19. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 536: Area 3 Release Site, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (Rev. 0 / June 2003), Including Record of Technical Change No. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office

    2003-06-27

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives (CAAs) appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 536: Area 3 Release Site, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 536 consists of a single Corrective Action Site (CAS): 03-44-02, Steam Jenny Discharge. The CAU 536 site is being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of possible contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives for CAS 03-44-02. The additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation (CAI) prior to evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for this CAS. The results of this field investigation are to be used to support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document. Record of Technical Change No. 1 is dated 3-2004.

  20. Small-molecule endothelin receptor antagonists: a review of patenting activity across therapeutic areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mucke, Hermann A M

    2009-06-01

    In the field of nonpeptide NCEs with endothelin receptor antagonist activity, a burst in corporate IP filings occurred in the 1990s once the human endothelin system had been characterized, but patent activity has declined in the past decade. Universities have not been active in this area of research to a degree that would have led to many patent applications. While three endothelin receptor antagonists (bosentan, sitaxentan and ambrisentan) are already available for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension, the use of such compounds for the larger therapy areas of heart failure, cancer and nephropathy is still being evaluated in late-stage clinical trials. Marketed and advanced-stage endothelin receptor blockers have remarkably little chemical diversity; thus, the substantially larger chemical space defined by patenting remains to be explored. PMID:19517317

  1. SIMPROVING THE ECONOMIC ACTIVITIES IN THE LESS FAVOURED AREAS OF ROMANIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tileaga Cosmin

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with finding solutions for improving the economic activities in Romania’s undeveloped areas, which still represent a major problem for this country’s economy. During 1999 and 2009, these areas were considered tax havens, due to some facilities accorded by the Government and the EU (headage compensatory allowances*, tax deductions, non-refundable funds. Many had the opportunity to invest in those regions, but no positive effect was to be seen. Tulcea County (Danube Delta area, coal mine regions, rural areas and the North-East area (Suceava and Botosani county are considered to be Romania’s less favoured areas. * The objective of these schemes is to provide a reasonable level of income for farmers where natural production conditions are least favourable so as to conserve the countryside by the prevention of further depopulation of rural areas. Compensatory allowances are payable to farmers for the keeping of cattle, sheep and goats. (www.europa.eu

  2. Yucca Mountain program summary of research, site monitoring and technical review activities (January 1987--June 1988)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although studies of orbital mechanics provide speculative notions of future climatic trends, they cannot predict how these trends will manifest themselves in the immediate area around Yucca Mountain. The generally accepted approach to this question is to consider the climatic variations that have occurred during the last 10,000 years, and use these as a guide to the likely range of future variation in climate. However, because climatic studies around the world indicate that we are potentially on the verge of another ice age, we should also consider the conditions that predominated during the Pleistocene. The specific aim of this project is to derive the climatic history of Yucca Mountain during the last 20,000 years from the vegetation history. By integrating data obtained from pollen records, woodrat dens (middens), and tree-ring sequences from the Nevada Test Site (NTS) area, a regional climatic record is being generated that can be correlated to data obtained at Yucca Mountain to formulate a local climatic sequence there. This will then be used to determine the magnitude and frequency of climatic variation that have occurred during that time at Yucca Mountain. These data can then be used by other researchers to provide estimates of rainfall, recharge and soil chemical changes for modeling the past hydrology of Yucca Mountain

  3. Final Technical Report summarizing Purdue research activities as part of the DOE JET Topical Collaboration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molnar, Denes [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy

    2015-09-01

    This report summarizes research activities at Purdue University done as part of the DOE JET Topical Collaboration. These mainly involve calculation of covariant radiative energy loss in the (Djordjevic-)Gyulassy-Levai-Vitev ((D)GLV) framework for relativistic A+A reactions at RHIC and LHC energies using realistic bulk medium evolution with both transverse and longitudinal expansion. The single PDF file provided also includes a report from the entire JET Collaboration.

  4. SINMAP Modeling of an active landslide area in the Swabian Alb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terhorst, Birgit; Jaeger, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    agreements. This was in particular true for the slopes of the "Landhaussiedlung", a small settlement area east of Mössingen-Öschingen. In the uphill areas, a large landslide was triggered on June 3rd, 2013, mainly caused by heavy rainfalls during the days before. The scarp/slip surface was situated in the Callovian clay layers and in an area which was shown as susceptible for slope movements by the SINMAP model earlier Terhorst and Kreja (2009). The movement processes reactivated an old slide mass, which reached the outermost parts of the settlement area and damaged the densely built-up underground of the Landhaussiedlung. Although no house was destroyed completely by the slide mass, the induced pressure caused severe damages, rendering the buildings uninhabitable and leading to the evacuation of the Landhaussiedlung. The results show, that the modeling provided a solid identification of the vulnerable slope areas. The recent landslide area is almost completely situated in a region modeled as vulnerable for slope movements. Therefore, the landslide event of 2013 practically validated the susceptibility map. On the base of solid data and under consideration of detailed and differentiated information, SINMAP is a powerful tool for the assessment of susceptibilities for translational slides. Hammond, C., Hall, D., Miller, S., Swetik, P., 1992. Level I Stability Analysis (LISA) documentation for version 2.0. General Technical Report, INT-285. U.S. Deptartment of Agriculture, Forest Service, Intermountain Research Station, Ogden. Montgomery, D.R., Dietrich, W.E., 1994. A Physically Based Model for the Topographic Control on Shallow Landsliding. Water Resources Research, 30(4), 1153-1171. Pack, R.T., Tarboton, D.G., Goodwin, C.N., 1998. The SINMAP approach to terrain stability mapping, 8th Congress of the International Association of Engineering Geology, Vancouver, Canada, pp. 8. Tarboton, D.G., 1997. A new method for the determination of flow directions and upslope areas in

  5. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 490: Station 44 Burn Area, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada (with Record of Technical Change No.1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office

    2000-06-09

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 490 under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Active Unit 490 consists of four Corrective Action Sites (CASs): 03-56-001-03BA, Fire Training Area (FTA); RG-56-001-RGBA, Station 44 Burn Area; 03-58-001-03FN, Sandia Service Yard; and 09-54-001-09L2, Gun Propellant Burn Area. These CASs are located at the Tonopah Test Range near Areas 3 and 9. Historically, the FTA was used for training exercises where tires and wood were ignited with diesel fuel. Records indicate that water and carbon dioxide were the only extinguishing agents used during these training exercises. The Station 44 Burn Area was used for fire training exercises and consisted of two wooden structures. The two burn areas (ignition of tires, wood, and wooden structures with diesel fuel and water) were limited to the building footprints (10 ft by 10 ft each). The Sandia Service Yard was used for storage (i.e., wood, tires, metal, electronic and office equipment, construction debris, and drums of oil/grease) from approximately 1979 to 1993. The Gun Propellant Burn Area was used from the 1960s to 1980s to burn excess artillery gun propellant, solid-fuel rocket motors, black powder, and deteriorated explosives; additionally, the area was used for the disposal of experimental explosive items. Based on site history, the focus of the field investigation activities will be to: (1) determine the presence of contaminants of potential concern (COPCs) at each CAS, (2) determine if any COPCs exceed field-screening levels and/or preliminary action levels, and (3) determine the nature and extent of contamination with enough certainty to support selection of corrective action alternatives for each CAS. The scope of this CAIP is to resolve

  6. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 490: Station 44 Burn Area, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada (with Record of Technical Change No.1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 490 under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Active Unit 490 consists of four Corrective Action Sites (CASs): 03-56-001-03BA, Fire Training Area (FTA); RG-56-001-RGBA, Station 44 Burn Area; 03-58-001-03FN, Sandia Service Yard; and 09-54-001-09L2, Gun Propellant Burn Area. These CASs are located at the Tonopah Test Range near Areas 3 and 9. Historically, the FTA was used for training exercises where tires and wood were ignited with diesel fuel. Records indicate that water and carbon dioxide were the only extinguishing agents used during these training exercises. The Station 44 Burn Area was used for fire training exercises and consisted of two wooden structures. The two burn areas (ignition of tires, wood, and wooden structures with diesel fuel and water) were limited to the building footprints (10 ft by 10 ft each). The Sandia Service Yard was used for storage (i.e., wood, tires, metal, electronic and office equipment, construction debris, and drums of oil/grease) from approximately 1979 to 1993. The Gun Propellant Burn Area was used from the 1960s to 1980s to burn excess artillery gun propellant, solid-fuel rocket motors, black powder, and deteriorated explosives; additionally, the area was used for the disposal of experimental explosive items. Based on site history, the focus of the field investigation activities will be to: (1) determine the presence of contaminants of potential concern (COPCs) at each CAS, (2) determine if any COPCs exceed field-screening levels and/or preliminary action levels, and (3) determine the nature and extent of contamination with enough certainty to support selection of corrective action alternatives for each CAS. The scope of this CAIP is to resolve the

  7. A Promotion Program of Academic-Industrial Collaboration with Active and Joint Participation by Technical College Students Utilizing the Support Program for Contemporary Educational Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furusaki, Tsuyoshi; Ueda, Shigeta; Kojima, Yoichiro; Ikeda, Shin-Ichi; Abe, Tsukasa; Yoshizawa, Kousuke; Tada, Mitsuhiro

    Since 2005, Tomakomai National College of Technology has been conducting “A Promotion Program of Academic-Industrial Collaboration with Active and Joint Participation by Technical College Students” , in which the students actively challenged to resolve technical problems of local companies through internships and graduation researches. This project was adopted as part of the Support Program for Contemporary Educational Needs by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology. It has been revealed that the program is practical and effective engineering education for the students, i.e. “Future Engineers” . In addition, it leads to the revitalization of local companies which carried out collaborative researches with the participating students.

  8. Silent play in a loud theatre - soil development in a geomorphically active proglacial area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harlaar, Piet; Temme, Arnaud; Heckmann, Tobias

    2015-04-01

    Proglacial areas are scientifically famous for two sets of processes: first, the tumultuous geomorphic response to glacial retreat including enhanced fluvial activity and mass movements such as debris flows, rock fall and landslides. Second, the slow and somewhat regular development of soil and vegetation. These two sets of processes have usually been studied in isolation: soil development is best observed in wide, flat proglacial areas where not much geomorphic work is done. This has left questions unanswered that relate to the effect of geomorphic disturbance on high mountain soil formation, and vice versa. We attempted to characterize these interactions in the geomorphically active proglacial area of the Gepatsch Ferner in the Kaunertal in Austria. Geomorphic activity in this area is intensively studied in the PROSA project. In our study, several dozen soils were sampled in order to describe soil properties. Sampling locations were selected with Latin Hypercube sampling to best cover the variation in soil-forming factors. Results clearly showed that soil properties were not only a function of age, but also of erosion-deposition amounts and geomorphic regime. In contrast to what is reported in literature, soil pH in very young soils rose before it dropped as soils became older. The early pH rise probably reflects the leaching of pyrite in the parent material.

  9. Doppler shift of hot coronal lines in a moss area of an active region

    CERN Document Server

    Dadashi, Neda; Tripathi, Durgesh; Solanki, Sami K; Wiegelmann, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    The moss is the area at the footpoint of the hot (3 to 5 MK) loops forming the core of the active region where emission is believed to result from the heat flux conducted down to the transition region from the hot loops. Studying the variation of Doppler shift as a function of line formation temperatures over the moss area can give clues on the heating mechanism in the hot loops in the core of the active regions. We investigate the absolute Doppler shift of lines formed at temperatures between 1 MK and 2 MK in a moss area within active region NOAA 11243 using a novel technique that allows determining the absolute Doppler shift of EUV lines by combining observations from the SUMER and EIS spectrometers. The inner (brighter and denser) part of the moss area shows roughly constant blue shift (upward motions) of 5 km/s in the temperature range of 1 MK to 1.6 MK. For hotter lines the blue shift decreases and reaches 1 km/s for Fe xv 284 {\\AA} (~2 MK). The measurements are discussed in relation to models of the hea...

  10. On the area expansion of magnetic flux tubes in solar active regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dudík, Jaroslav [DAMTP, CMS, University of Cambridge, Wilberforce Road, Cambridge CB3 0WA (United Kingdom); Dzifčáková, Elena [Astronomical Institute of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Fričova 298, 251 65 Ondřejov (Czech Republic); Cirtain, Jonathan W., E-mail: J.Dudik@damtp.cam.ac.uk, E-mail: elena@asu.cas.cz [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, VP 62, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States)

    2014-11-20

    We calculated the three-dimensional (3D) distribution of the area expansion factors in a potential magnetic field, extrapolated from the high-resolution Hinode/SOT magnetogram of the quiescent active region NOAA 11482. Retaining only closed loops within the computational box, we show that the distribution of area expansion factors show significant structure. Loop-like structures characterized by locally lower values of the expansion factor are embedded in a smooth background. These loop-like flux tubes have squashed cross-sections and expand with height. The distribution of the expansion factors show an overall increase with height, allowing an active region core characterized by low values of the expansion factor to be distinguished. The area expansion factors obtained from extrapolation of the Solar Optical Telescope magnetogram are compared to those obtained from an approximation of the observed magnetogram by a series of 134 submerged charges. This approximation retains the general flux distribution in the observed magnetogram, but removes the small-scale structure in both the approximated magnetogram and the 3D distribution of the area expansion factors. We argue that the structuring of the expansion factor can be a significant ingredient in producing the observed structuring of the solar corona. However, due to the potential approximation used, these results may not be applicable to loops exhibiting twist or to active regions producing significant flares.

  11. Surface deformation of active volcanic areas retrieved with the SBAS-DInSAR technique: an overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Zeni

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a comprehensive overview of the surface deformation retrieval capability of the Differential Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (DInSAR algorithm, referred to as Small BAseline Subset (SBAS technique, in the context of active volcanic areas. In particular, after a brief description of the algorithm some experiments relevant to three selected case-study areas are presented. First, we concentrate on the application of the SBAS algorithm to a single-orbit scenario, thus considering a set of SAR data composed by images acquired on descending orbits by the European Remote Sensing (ERS radar sensors and relevant to the Long Valley caldera (eastern California area. Subsequently, we address the capability of the SBAS technique in a multipleorbit context by referring to Mt. Etna volcano (southern Italy test site, with respect to which two different ERS data set, composed by images acquired both on ascending and descending orbits, are available. Finally, we take advantage of the capability of the algorithm to work in a multi-platform scenario by jointly exploiting two different sets of SAR images collected by the ERS and the Environment Satellite (ENVISAT radar sensors in the Campi Flegrei caldera (southern Italy area. The presented results demonstrate the effectiveness of the algorithm to investigate the deformation field in active volcanic areas and the potential of the DInSAR methodologies within routine surveillance scenario.

  12. Determination of coastal areas of recreational activities in the city of Trabzon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buket Özdemir Işık

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The size of the areal use in planning allows for increase in recreational diversity. When considered that recreational needs are the times that people spend to make use of their spare time, it is obvious that the decisions taken based on the user will lead the planner to more accurate planning targets. While determining the recreational planning decisions, decisions should be evaluated in an integrated approach and in accordance with the requests and demands of users. This study aimed at taking planning decisions required for the recreational connections which are on the coast and for the improvement of people's social life between the coastal city and coastal users. Within the study, the diversity of Trabzon coastal area in terms of recreational activity based on measurement and observation was revealed. In the study, subclasses determined for Trabzon coast were formed by sticking to CORINE classification system, and the coast was divided into 9 sections considering the size and clarity of the area. In CBS environment, each section was digitized according to separate layers and areas with ArcCIS program in terms of recreational area usages. As a result of the study, it was revealed that the diversity of activity was more intense in sections where areal use was more intense depending on the size of the area.

  13. Analysis of the potential contamination risk of groundwater resources circulating in areas with anthropogenic activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Spizzico

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The area investigated is located in the province of Brindisi (Italy. It is a generally flat area separated from the nearby carbonatic plateau of the Murgia by quite indistinct and high fault scarps. As regards the geological features, carbonatic basement rocks and post-cretaceous terrains made up of calabrian calcarenites and middle-upper Pleistocenic marine terraced deposits can be distinguished. In the examined area there are two different hydrogeological environments. The first is represented by deep groundwater, the main groundwater resource in Apulia. The second hydrogeological environment, now of lesser importance than the deep aquifer in terms of size and use, is made up of some small shallow groundwater systems situated in post-calabrian sands and located in the eastern area. During some sampling cycles carried out in the studied area, water was withdrawn from both the deep aquifer and from the shallow groundwater. For every sample, the necessary parameters were determined for the physical and chemical characterisation of two different hydrogeological environments. Moreover, some chemical parameters indicating anthropogenic activities were determined. Analysis of the aerial distribution of the measured parameters has shown some main areas subject to different conditions of contamination risk, in accordance with the hydrogeological and geological features of the investigated area. In the south-eastern part of the investigated area, the important action performed by the surface aquifer for protecting the deep groundwater from contamination of anthropogenic origin is clear. On the other hand, in the shallow groundwater, areas of nitrate and nitrite contamination have been identified, which result from the extensive use of fertilizers.

  14. Site-specific characterization of Castromil Brownfield area related to gold mining activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira da Silva, Eduardo; Serrano Pinto, Luís; Patinha, Carla; Cardoso Fonseca, Edmundo

    2004-03-01

    Castromil is one of the gold mining areas in Portugal that has been abandoned since 1940. This area, which was first mined in Roman times, is located within a Hercynian granite body near the contact with Silurian metasediments. Gold is essentially disseminated along veins in the silicified granite, running NW-SE, related with a shear zone and frequently associated with sulphides (arsenopyrite and basically pyrite). In paragenetic terms, three stages of mineralization are considered: ferro-arseniferous (quartz + arsenopyrite I + pyrite I + pyrrhotite + bismuth), zinciferous (sphalerite + chalcopyrite), and remobilization (arsenopyrite II + galena + gold). Due to the lack of laws and environmental education, Castromil is today a gold mining heritage site where we can detect the consequences of an incautious exploration (tailings, wells and adits located in the old explored zone) and where a residential area is located. In order to characterize the actual state of the old mining area the trace metal contamination of soils and waters by mining activities was investigated. In the studied area 106 soil samples, 15 waters and 20 plants were sampled and analysed. The soil samples were analysed for 32 elements by ICP-AES. Waters were analysed by ionic chromatography and ICP-MS for major and trace elements. Plants were analysed for As, Fe and Pb by AAS. The results are discussed taking into account the risk-based standards for soils and groundwater's (target and intervention values) proposed by Swartjes (1999). The results show elevated concentration of As and Pb which were found in soils collected from agricultural areas. Foodstuff plants species collected in the Castromil agricultural area show high concentrations of As in the leaves (cabbage and lettuce) and in the tubers (potatoes). Groundwaters in the mining area contain high concentrations of As that exceeds the intervention values. The area must to be subject to a remediation process, considering the actual risks to

  15. State of the art of Monte Carlo technics for reliable activated waste evaluations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the calculation scheme used for many studies to assess the activities inventory of French shutdown reactors (including Pressurized Water Reactor, Heavy Water Reactor, Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor and Natural Uranium Gas Cooled or UNGG). This calculation scheme is based on Monte Carlo calculations (MCNP) and involves advanced technique for source modeling, geometry modeling (with Computer-Aided Design integration), acceleration methods and depletion calculations coupling on 3D meshes. All these techniques offer efficient and reliable evaluations on large scale model with a high level of details reducing the risks of underestimation or conservatisms. (authors)

  16. Propolis induced antibacterial activity and other technical properties of cotton textiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharaf, S; Higazy, A; Hebeish, A

    2013-08-01

    Propolis is a gum gathered by honey bees from various plants; the honey bees use propolis to seal holes in their honey combs, smooth out the internal wall and protect the entrance against intruders. It is composed of 50% resin (flavonoids and related phenolic acid), 30% wax, 10% essential oils, 5% pollen and 5% various organic components. As a natural mixture, propolis is widely used in medicine, cosmetics and food. So far no attempts have been yet made to make use of propolis in the realm of textile finishing. Current work presents the first systemic study targeted to build up a scientific basis for production of cotton textiles having antibacterial activity and other useful properties by making use of propolis as eco-friendly finish within the scope of green strategy. Propolis extract solution (70/30 ethanol/water) of 10% concentration was prepared as the stock. Different amounts of the latter were used along with a crosslinking agent and catalyst for treatment of cotton fabrics as per pad-dry-cure technique. Antibacterial activity of the so treated fabrics was obtained through monitoring the efficiency of the interaction of propolis with cotton cellulose. This interaction was expressed as inhibition zone diameter after the treated fabrics were exposed to (G+ve) and (G-ve) bacteria. Other properties include crease recovery, tensile strength and elongation at break. Factors affecting these properties such as type, nature and concentration of the crosslinking agent, concentration of propolis, and conditions of curing were investigated. In addition characterization of the propolis containing modified cotton fabrics including demonstration of the antibacterial activity, SEM, FTIR, durability to washing, UV protection and water repellency were performed. Based on results obtained, it is concluded that application of propolis along with glyoxal and Al2(SO4)3catalyst using pad-dry (3min/80°C), cure (5/140°C) bring about cotton textile with superior antibacterial

  17. Effects of human activities on rivers located in protected areas of the Atlantic Forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mônica Luisa Kuhlmann

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available AIM: This study evaluated the impacts of anthropogenic activities upstream of conservation areas on the Paraibuna river and its implications for freshwater biodiversity. METHODS: The study was carried out in two units, Cunha and Santa Virginia, of the Serra do Mar State Park (SP, located in the Atlantic Rain Forest. Five sampling sites were defined, four along the Paraibuna river and one in the Ipiranga river, the latter fully inserted into the protected area. Physical, chemical, microbiological and ecotoxicological data were obtained from surface water as well as aquatic macroinvertebrates. RESULTS: The results showed that the waters of the Paraibuna river have low anthropogenic interference. However, conductivity, turbidity, coliforms, iron, total phosphorus and nitrate showed a gradient improving its water quality from upstream to downstream, indicating the existence of erosion and introduction of organic debris in the basin. The BMWP index, varying from 58 to 190, also showed the good condition of the river to aquatic biota, with predominant Excellent quality diagnosis. The values of this index and the richness index (S outlined a similar gradient but with the lowest values recorded in P3. CONCLUSIONS: The results showed that the upstream activities alter the natural condition of the Paraibuna river and its biota and that the protected areas provides environmental services reducing these impacts. The ideal situation in order to ensure the conservation of the freshwater biota of the Paraibuna river would be the incorporation of parts of the upstream area into the protected area and convert occupied areas into Sustainable Use Area, that guarantee the adoption of sustainable techniques to the existing land uses and the application of aquatic life protection indicators for monitoring the water quality of the river.

  18. TEACHERS’ TRAINING FOR SOCIAL AND EDUCATIONAL ACTIVITY IN CONDITIONS OF MOUNTAIN AREA PRIMARY SCHOOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonida Pesotskaya

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The article reveals the question of using of the method of coaching in preparation of the students to the managerial activity in the sphere of preschool education in mountain areas. The necessity of preparation under the modern conditions of social-economic development of mountain areas has been proved. The content of the article generalizes basic contradictions between the necessity and reality. The definition of the main points of the research has been given. The attention is accentuated on the basic principles of management and on the notion “coaching” in the process of management of preschool education in mountain area. Coaching includes partnership, potential revealing, effectiveness. Methodology of coaching is based on the principle that the person naturally is sufficiently talented and owns great potential, which isn’t realized fully. An important condition of this approach is valuable, respectful attitude of the participants of polylogue to one another. Basic theoretical regulations of the coaching approach have been determined. In the context of selection of teching technologies on the basis of coaching approach, the method “reflexive team” has been briefly revealed. It is determined that coaching is a style of management, transformed culture: if the authoritarian style is substituted into coaching, then the hierarchy changes from the support of blaming and ridiculing to the objective evaluation, all-hands activity changes to strategic planning. Coaching approach will allow optimizing the structure of economic activity of a separate preschool educational establishment. The attention is accentuated at the fact, that using coaching with the students at the lessons as a style of management of preschool education, will let future managers of preschool educational establishments to form the skills of behavior in critical situations of mountain area, to enrich their activity with the new means of performing, to develop professional

  19. Technical Evolution in LHC Computing

    CERN Document Server

    Wenaus, T J; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    After a very successful first two years of LHC physics operations, LHC computing has entered an assessment and planning cycle in advance of a long shutdown in 2013-2014. The shutdown offers an opportunity to prepare computing for the higher energies and luminosities that will follow the shutdown, taking account of experience thus far, future LHC computing requirements, and new and emerging technologies. In the WLCG, Technical Evolution Groups were established in fall 2011 and have recently produced reports in the areas of databases, data management and storage, operations, security, and workload management. Within ATLAS, R&D projects relating to most of these areas were established in spring 2011 and in some cases are already transitioning to initial production deployments of new tools and technologies, while in others substantial work programs remain. This talk will present an overview and selected highlights of activities and plans in the technical evolution of LHC computing, with an emphasis on example...

  20. Study of structure of technical and tactical activity of high class hockey players of different line by the method of main component

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleksiy Mikhnov

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to study the factor structure of technical and tactical actions of hockey players of high qualification of different playing line of business. Material and methods: for the leadthrough of analysis of competition activity information of technical and tactical actions of hockey players was used NHL. Competition activity was in general complication analysed more than 800 hockey players of different line of business. Methods were used: pedagogical supervisions and analysis of competition activity, analysis of data of the special scientific-methodical literature, an analysis of data is the Internet, methods of mathematical statistics. Results: information is presented in relation to the specific of competition activity of hockey players of high class of different line of business in a match. The factor structure of technical and tactical activity of hockey players, executing in the command of function of extreme forward, central forward, defender and goalkeeper is set. for the players of line of attack most meaningfulness was had factors, related to the attack of gate of competitor, for defenders are power single combats, defense of gate and selection of puck, for a goalkeeper the most meaningful factor is characterized by efficiency of reflection of throws on a gate. Conclusions: the exposed features are in realization of technical and tactical actions the hockey players of high class of different playing line of business, it is necessary certainly to take into account in the process of estimation and control.

  1. Reactor neutron activation analysis of geological samples in the Training Reactor of Budapest Technical University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A neutron activation analytical method has been elaborated for solving geochemical problems. The method is able to make serial tests. A flux of about 2.4x1011cm-2s-1 has been used. The spectrum has been detected by a Princeton Gamma-Tech type semi-conductor detector (25 cm3) and a NTA 512 B type analyser of 1024 channel. The spectrum has been evaluated by a computer. There has been a resolution of about 2 keV/channel at the 1332/4 keV peak of 60Co. 21 elements have been determined by non-destructive analysis in silicates (those which are in parenthesis only from given matrix materials). By short-time irradiation (about 10 minutes) and cooling time of 2-3 minutes Al, (V); 1-2 hours: Mn, (Ni), (Ga); of 24 hours: Na, K, (La), (Zr) have been determined. By long time irradiation (6-12

  2. Archaeological investigations at a toolstone source area and temporary camp: Sample Unit 19-25, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. Technical report No. 77

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, R.C.; DuBarton, A.; Edwards, S.; Pippin, L.C.; Beck, C.M.

    1993-12-31

    Archaeological investigations were initiated at Sample Unit 19--25 to retrieve information concerning settlement and subsistence data on the aboriginal hunter and gatherers in the area. Studies included collection and mapping of 35.4 acres at site 26NY1408 and excavation and mapping of 0.02 acres at site 26NY7847. Cultural resources include two rock and brush structures and associated caches and a large lithic toolstone source area and lithic artifact scatter. Temporally diagnostic artifacts indicate periodic use throughout the last 12,000 years; however dates associated with projectile points indicate most use was in the Middle and Late Archaic. Radiocarbon dates from the rock and brush structures at site 26NY7847 indicate a construction date of A.D. 1640 and repair between A.D. 1800 and 1950 for feature 1 and between A.D. 1330 and 1390 and repair at A.D. 1410 for feature 2. The dates associated with feature 2 place its construction significantly earlier than similar structures found elsewhere on Pahute Mesa. Activity areas appear to reflect temporary use of the area for procurement of available lithic and faunal resources and the manufacture of tools.

  3. Activities for data base construction by Technical Committee for Investigation of Dielectric and Insulating Material in Radioactive Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Technical Committee for Investigation of Dielectric and Insulating Material in Radioactive Environment in May 1990 started activities for the collection of information and surveys and studies for the construction of a data base. The studies cover the mechanism of deterioration in electric mediums, communications equipment, materials and devices in a special environment; simulation of material in a special environment; prediction of the service life of material in a special environment; and feasibility of the construction of a data base. These surveys and studies are intended to determine the resistance of dielectric and insulating materials and devices to special environments, to achieve an increase in their reliability and service life, to provide techniques for accurate life prediction, to establish a data base from collected information, and to study the feasibility of the construction of an expert system. In particular, the report describes the activities for the construction of the data base, focusing on the data format, problems to be solved to permit its construction, etc. (N.K.)

  4. DOE standard: Integration of environment, safety, and health into facility disposition activities. Volume 1 of 2: Technical standard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Department of Energy (DOE) technical standard (referred to as the Standard) provides guidance for integrating and enhancing worker, public, and environmental protection during facility disposition activities. It provides environment, safety, and health (ES and H) guidance to supplement the project management requirements and associated guidelines contained within DOE O 430.1A, Life-Cycle Asset Management (LCAM), and amplified within the corresponding implementation guides. In addition, the Standard is designed to support an Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS), consistent with the guiding principles and core functions contained in DOE P 450.4, Safety Management System Policy, and discussed in DOE G 450.4-1, Integrated Safety Management System Guide. The ISMS guiding principles represent the fundamental policies that guide the safe accomplishment of work and include: (1) line management responsibility for safety; (2) clear roles and responsibilities; (3) competence commensurate with responsibilities; (4) balanced priorities; (5) identification of safety standards and requirements; (6) hazard controls tailored to work being performed; and (7) operations authorization. This Standard specifically addresses the implementation of the above ISMS principles four through seven, as applied to facility disposition activities

  5. Functional MRI activation of primary and secondary motor areas in healthy subjects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Donghai Li; Honghan Gong; Xiangzuo Xiao; Jinhua Wan

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Functional MRI(fMRI)demonstrates the localization of hand representation in the motor cortex,thereby providing feasible noninvasive mapping of functional activities in the human brain.OBJECTIVE:To observe cortical activation within different cortical motor regions during repetitive hand movements in healthy subjects through the use of fMRI.DESIGN:An observational study,with each subject acting as his own control.SETTING:Department of Radiology,the First Affiliated Hospital of Nanchang University.PARTICIPANTS:Seven healthy volunteers,4 males and 3/females,aged 19 to 38 years,participated in the study.All subjects were right-handed,with no neurological or psychological disorders.Informed written consent was obtained from all subjects,and the study was approved by the Institutional Review Board of the First Affiliated Hospital of Nanchang University.METHODS:The study was performed at the Department of Radiology between June-August 2005.A 1.5 Tesla Siemens MRI scanner(Symphony,Germany)was used to acquire Tl-weighted structural images,which were oriented parallel to the line running through the anterior and the posterior commissures.Subjects were instructed on a task and were allowed to practice briefly prior to the imaging procedure.The motor activation task consisted of the right hand performing a clenching movement.The T1-W images were acquired from six alternating epochs of rest and activation from all seven healthy subjects.Data were collected with echoplanar imaging of brain oxygen level dependent(BOLD)sequence.Each series comprised six cycles of task pertormance(30 seconds),alternating with rest(30 seconds) periods,and 3-second time intervals.The differences between active and baseline fMRI imaging were calculated using the student t-test.Differential maps were overlaid on the high resolution T1-W structural image for neuroanatomical correlation of activation areas.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:The omega-shaped hand knobs were recognized on T1-W structural

  6. Improvement of auditory hallucinations and reduction of primary auditory area's activation following TMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: In the present case study, improvement of auditory hallucinations following transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) therapy was investigated with respect to activation changes of the auditory cortices. Methods: Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), activation of the auditory cortices was assessed prior to and after a 4-week TMS series of the left superior temporal gyrus in a schizophrenic patient with medication-resistant auditory hallucinations. Results: Hallucinations decreased slightly after the third and profoundly after the fourth week of TMS. Activation in the primary auditory area decreased, whereas activation in the operculum and insula remained stable. Conclusions: Combination of TMS and repetitive fMRI is promising to elucidate the physiological changes induced by TMS.

  7. Reduced activation in ventral striatum and ventral tegmental area during probabilistic decision-making in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rausch, Franziska; Mier, Daniela; Eifler, Sarah; Esslinger, Christine; Schilling, Claudia; Schirmbeck, Frederike; Englisch, Susanne; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Kirsch, Peter; Zink, Mathias

    2014-07-01

    Patients with schizophrenia suffer from deficits in monitoring and controlling their own thoughts. Within these so-called metacognitive impairments, alterations in probabilistic reasoning might be one cognitive phenomenon disposing to delusions. However, so far little is known about alterations in associated brain functionality. A previously established task for functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), which requires a probabilistic decision after a variable amount of stimuli, was applied to 23 schizophrenia patients and 28 healthy controls matched for age, gender and educational levels. We compared activation patterns during decision-making under conditions of certainty versus uncertainty and evaluated the process of final decision-making in ventral striatum (VS) and ventral tegmental area (VTA). We replicated a pre-described extended cortical activation pattern during probabilistic reasoning. During final decision-making, activations in several fronto- and parietocortical areas, as well as in VS and VTA became apparent. In both of these regions schizophrenia patients showed a significantly reduced activation. These results further define the network underlying probabilistic decision-making. The observed hypo-activation in regions commonly associated with dopaminergic neurotransmission fits into current concepts of disrupted prediction error signaling in schizophrenia and suggests functional links to reward anticipation. Forthcoming studies with patients at risk for psychosis and drug-naive first episode patients are necessary to elucidate the development of these findings over time and the interplay with associated clinical symptoms. PMID:24831391

  8. Built Environments and Active Living in Rural and Remote Areas: a Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Anush Yousefian; Umstattd Meyer, M Renée; Lenardson, Jennifer D; Hartley, David

    2015-12-01

    Rural children and adults are more likely to have obesity than their urban counterparts even after adjustment for individual-level behaviors, suggesting that rural environments may promote obesity. The rural built environment may be an important area of research that can help us understand rural-urban disparities in obesity. The purpose of this review is to summarize the rural built environment and active living literature, and to address key issues, gaps, and observations in the field. A literature review was conducted in spring 2015 to identify research published from 2000 to 2015. Our review suggests that limited active living built environments in rural communities and unique rural barriers to physical activity may contribute to a higher prevalence of obesity compared to urban populations. More empirical research is needed to build the evidence-base for the association between rural built environments, active living, and obesity. School- and community-based policies that expand active living opportunities in rural areas should also be closely examined. PMID:26364307

  9. An advanced method of activity determination of large area beta emitting sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The presented advanced method of activity determination of large area beta emitting sources is based on a version of efficiency tracing method using a test foil placed between the source and a conventional large area detector. It is shown that the total efficiency of the measuring system may depend on a dimensionless parameter derived from the difference in count rates caused by inserting the test foil while other disturbing effects are mostly reduced or compensated. - Highlights: • Efficiency tracing transmission method of beta activity determination. • Efficiency determined by means of a parameter independent of initial absorption conditions. • Parameter is derived from two counting results obtained with using a test foil. • Particularly useful for calibration and measurement of radionuclide standard sources

  10. Correlation Fractal and Multifractal Characteristics of Seismic Activity in the Taiwan Area, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Jiandong; HUANG Jianfa; WEI Fuquan; YAN Yunpeng; LI Yaping; LIN Chien-te

    2005-01-01

    Based on the analysis of newly collected data of plate tectonics, distribution of active faults and crustal deformation, the Taiwan area is divided into two seismic regions and six seismic belts. Then, correlation fractal dimensions of all the regions and belts are calculated, and the fractal characteristics of hypocenteral distribution can be quantitatively analyzed. Finally, multifractal dimensions Dq andf(α) are calculated by using the earthquake catalog of the past 11 years in the Taiwan area. This study indicates that (1) there exists a favorable corresponding relationship between spatial images of seismic activity described with correlation fractal dimension analysis and tectonic settings; (2) the temporal structure of earthquakes is not single but multifractal fractal, and the pattem of Dq variation with time is a good indicator for predicting strong earthquake events.

  11. Neutron activation analysis challenges. Problems and applications in biomedical and other areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Developments in neutron activation analysis in its various modes for trace element determination are described with reference to reactor and other neutron sources, competing methods, tomography and detection systems. A selected number of areas of application are highlighted which provide challenges into the next millennium and to which a useful and in some cases a unique contribution can be made. The role that neutron activation analysis can play in decommissioning, landmine detection, boron neutron capture therapy, Alzheimer's disease, diabetes mellitus, the complex mechanisms of initiation and termination of feeding and obesity as well as in scar formation and the requirements for artificial skin are presented. (author)

  12. Neutron activation analysis challenges: Problems and applications in biomedical and other areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Developments in neutron activation analysis in its various modes for trace element determination are described with reference to reactor and other neutron sources, competing methods, tomography and detection systems. A selected number of areas of applications are highlighted which provide challenges into the next millennium and to which a useful and in some cases a unique contribution can be made. The role that neutron activation analysis can play in decommissioning, land mine detection, born neutron capture therapy, Alzheimer disease, diabetes mellitus, the complex mechanisms of initiation and termination of feeding and obesity as well as in scar formation and the requirements for artificial skin are presented. (author)

  13. Impact of detector-element active-area shape and fill factor on super-resolution

    OpenAIRE

    Russell C. Hardie; Douglas R. Droege; Alexander J Dapore; Mark E Greiner

    2015-01-01

    In many undersampled imaging systems, spatial integration from the individual detector elements is the dominant component of the system point spread function (PSF). Conventional focal plane arrays (FPAs) utilize square detector elements with a nearly 100% fill factor, where fill factor is defined as the fraction of the detector element area that is active in light detection. A large fill factor is generally considered to be desirable because more photons are collected for a given pitch, and t...

  14. Potential threat to licensed nuclear activities from insiders (insider study). Technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Insider Study was undertaken by NRC staff at the request of the Commission. Its objectives were to: (1) determine the characteristics of potential insider adversaries to licensed nuclear activities; (2) examine security system vulnerabilities to insider adversaries; and (3) assess the effectiveness of techniques used to detect or prevent insider malevolence. The study analyzes insider characteristics as revealed in incidents of theft or sabotage that occurred in the nuclear industry, analogous industries, government agencies, and the military. Adversary characteristics are grouped into four categories: position-related, behavioral, resource and operational. It also analyzes (1) the five security vulnerabilities that most frequently accounted for the success of the insider crimes in the data base; (2) the 11 means by which insider crimes were most often detected; and (3) four major and six lesser methods aimed at preventing insider malevolence. In addition to case history information, the study contains data derived from non-NRC studies and from interviews with over 100 security experts in industry, government (federal and state), and law enforcement

  15. Software for Applicon graphics system support of the NNWSI area-to-location screening activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A comprehensive system study has been performed to screen the Nevada Research and Development Area (NRDA) of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and nearby areas for relatively favorable locations of about 10 square miles for the permanent disposal of radioactive waste in a mined repository. The purpose of this screening was to use information available during the summer of 1981 to identify such locations. The results of this screening will allow more informed decisions by the Department of Energy's Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations Project as to where future repository exploration could be concentrated to optimize the chances that the locations chosen for characterization would qualify as a licensed repository site. The methods used for, and the results of, this study are described by S. Sinnock and J. Fernandez in their report, Summary and Conclusions of the NNWSI Area-to-Location Screening Activity (NVO-247). This report is intended to describe the computer support developed for the screening activity and, as such, should not be treated as a stand-alone document, but as a supplement to the above summary report. This report complements two other supplemental reports dealing with 16 physical data bases for screening and the objectives of the screening methodology. Together, these four reports fully describe the screening activity of the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations Project

  16. Areas activated during naturalistic reading comprehension overlap topological visual, auditory, and somatotomotor maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sood, Mariam R; Sereno, Martin I

    2016-08-01

    Cortical mapping techniques using fMRI have been instrumental in identifying the boundaries of topological (neighbor-preserving) maps in early sensory areas. The presence of topological maps beyond early sensory areas raises the possibility that they might play a significant role in other cognitive systems, and that topological mapping might help to delineate areas involved in higher cognitive processes. In this study, we combine surface-based visual, auditory, and somatomotor mapping methods with a naturalistic reading comprehension task in the same group of subjects to provide a qualitative and quantitative assessment of the cortical overlap between sensory-motor maps in all major sensory modalities, and reading processing regions. Our results suggest that cortical activation during naturalistic reading comprehension overlaps more extensively with topological sensory-motor maps than has been heretofore appreciated. Reading activation in regions adjacent to occipital lobe and inferior parietal lobe almost completely overlaps visual maps, whereas a significant portion of frontal activation for reading in dorsolateral and ventral prefrontal cortex overlaps both visual and auditory maps. Even classical language regions in superior temporal cortex are partially overlapped by topological visual and auditory maps. By contrast, the main overlap with somatomotor maps is restricted to a small region on the anterior bank of the central sulcus near the border between the face and hand representations of M-I. Hum Brain Mapp 37:2784-2810, 2016. © 2016 The Authors Human Brain Mapping Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27061771

  17. Active Travel by Built Environment and Lifecycle Stage: Case Study of Osaka Metropolitan Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waygood, E. Owen D.; Sun, Yilin; Letarte, Laurence

    2015-01-01

    Active travel can contribute to physical activity achieved over a day. Previous studies have examined active travel associated with trips in various western countries, but few studies have examined this question for the Asian context. Japan has high levels of cycling, walking and public transport, similar to The Netherlands. Most studies have focused either on children or on adults separately, however, having children in a household will change the travel needs and wants of that household. Thus, here a household lifecycle stage approach is applied. Further, unlike many previous studies, the active travel related to public transport is included. Lastly, further to examining whether the built environment has an influence on the accumulation of active travel minutes, a binary logistic regression examines the built environment’s influence on the World Health Organization’s recommendations of physical activity. The findings suggest that there is a clear distinction between the urbanized centers and the surrounding towns and unurbanized areas. Further, active travel related to public transport trips is larger than pure walking trips. Females and children are more likely to achieve the WHO recommendations. Finally, car ownership is a strong negative influence. PMID:26694429

  18. Active Travel by Built Environment and Lifecycle Stage: Case Study of Osaka Metropolitan Area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waygood, E Owen D; Sun, Yilin; Letarte, Laurence

    2015-12-01

    Active travel can contribute to physical activity achieved over a day. Previous studies have examined active travel associated with trips in various western countries, but few studies have examined this question for the Asian context. Japan has high levels of cycling, walking and public transport, similar to The Netherlands. Most studies have focused either on children or on adults separately, however, having children in a household will change the travel needs and wants of that household. Thus, here a household lifecycle stage approach is applied. Further, unlike many previous studies, the active travel related to public transport is included. Lastly, further to examining whether the built environment has an influence on the accumulation of active travel minutes, a binary logistic regression examines the built environment's influence on the World Health Organization's recommendations of physical activity. The findings suggest that there is a clear distinction between the urbanized centers and the surrounding towns and unurbanized areas. Further, active travel related to public transport trips is larger than pure walking trips. Females and children are more likely to achieve the WHO recommendations. Finally, car ownership is a strong negative influence. PMID:26694429

  19. Active Travel by Built Environment and Lifecycle Stage: Case Study of Osaka Metropolitan Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Owen D. Waygood

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Active travel can contribute to physical activity achieved over a day. Previous studies have examined active travel associated with trips in various western countries, but few studies have examined this question for the Asian context. Japan has high levels of cycling, walking and public transport, similar to The Netherlands. Most studies have focused either on children or on adults separately, however, having children in a household will change the travel needs and wants of that household. Thus, here a household lifecycle stage approach is applied. Further, unlike many previous studies, the active travel related to public transport is included. Lastly, further to examining whether the built environment has an influence on the accumulation of active travel minutes, a binary logistic regression examines the built environment’s influence on the World Health Organization’s recommendations of physical activity. The findings suggest that there is a clear distinction between the urbanized centers and the surrounding towns and unurbanized areas. Further, active travel related to public transport trips is larger than pure walking trips. Females and children are more likely to achieve the WHO recommendations. Finally, car ownership is a strong negative influence.

  20. Bat mortality and activity at a Northern Iowa wind resource area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, A.A.; Koford, Rolf R.; Hancock, A.W.; Zenner, G.G.

    2011-01-01

    We examined bat collision mortality, activity and species composition at an 89-turbine wind resource area in farmland of north-central Iowa from mid-Apr. to mid-Dec., 2003 and mid-Mar. to mid-Dec., 2004. We found 30 bats beneath turbines on cleared ground and gravel access areas in 2003 and 45 bats in 2004. After adjusting for search probability, search efficiency and scavenging rate, we estimated total bat mortality at 396 ?? 72 (95 ci) in 2003 and 636 ?? 112 (95 ci) in 2004. Although carcasses were mostly migratory tree bats, we found a considerable proportion of little brown bats (Myotis lucifugus). We recorded 1465 bat echolocation call files at turbine sites ( 34.88 call files/detector-night) and 1536 bat call files at adjacent non-turbine sites ( 36.57 call files/detector-night). Bat activity did not differ significantly between turbine and non-turbine sites. A large proportion of recorded call files were made by Myotis sp. but this may be because we detected activity at ground level only. There was no relationship between types of turbine lights and either collision mortality or echolocation activity. The highest levels of bat echolocation activity and collision mortality were recorded during Jul. and Aug. during the autumn dispersal and migration period. The fatality rates for bats in general and little brown bats in particular were higher at the Top of Iowa Wind Resource Area than at other, comparable studies in the region. Future efforts to study behavior of bats in flight around turbines as well as cumulative impact studies should not ignore non-tree dwelling bats, generally regarded as minimally affected. ?? 2011, American Midland Naturalist.

  1. Oxytocin activation of neurons in ventral tegmental area and interfascicular nucleus of mouse midbrain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yamei; Chen, Zhiheng; Tao, Huai; Li, Cunyan; Zhang, Xianghui; Tang, Aiguo; Liu, Yong

    2014-02-01

    Oxytocin (OT) was reported to affect cognitive and emotional behavior by action in ventral tegmental area (VTA) and other brain areas. However, it is still unclear how OT activates VTA and related midline nucleus. Here, using patch-clamp recording, we studied the effects of OT on neuron activity in VTA and interfascicular nucleus (IF). OT dose-dependently and selectively excited small neurons located in medial VTA and the majority of IF neurons but not large neurons in lateral VTA. We found the hyperpolarization-activated current (I(h)) and the membrane capacitance of OT-sensitive neuron were significantly smaller than those of OT-insensitive neurons. The action potential width of OT-sensitive neurons was about half that of OT-insensitive neurons. The OT effect was blocked by the OT receptor antagonist atosiban and WAY-267464 but not by tetrodotoxin, suggesting a direct postsynaptic activation of OT receptors. In addition, the phospholipase C (PLC) inhibitor U73122 antagonized the depolarization by OT. Both the nonselective cation channel (NSCC) antagonist SKF96365 and the Na(+)-Ca(2+) exchanger (NCX) blocker SN-6 attenuated OT effects. These results suggested that the PLC signaling pathway coupling to NSCC and NCX contributes to the OT-mediated activation of neurons in medial VTA and IF. Taken together, our results indicate OT directly acted on medial VTA and especially IF neurons to activate NSCC and NCX via PLC. The direct activation by OT of midbrain neurons may be one mechanism underlying OT effects on social behavior. PMID:24148809

  2. Federal Assistance Program Quarterly Project Progress Report. Geothermal Energy Program: Information Dissemination, Public Outreach, and Technical Analysis Activities. Reporting Period: January 1 - March 31, 2001 [Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lund, John W.

    2002-03-22

    The final report of the accomplishments of the geothermal energy program: information dissemination, public outreach and technical analysis activities by the project team consisting of the Geo-Heat Center, Geothermal Resources Council, Geothermal Education Office, Geothermal Energy Association and the Washington State University Energy Program.

  3. Statement delivered in the Board of Governors on 27 November 2008 by the Governor for Japan concerning Japan's activities in technical cooperation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On 27 November 2008, the Governor of Japan delivered a statement in the Board of Governors concerning Japan's activities in technical cooperation. As requested in that statement, the full text of the statement is herewith circulated for the information of Member States

  4. Technical note: Evaluation of a system for monitoring individual feeding behavior and activity in beef cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfger, B; Mang, A V; Cook, N; Orsel, K; Timsit, E

    2015-08-01

    Behavioral observations are important to detect illness in beef cattle. However, traditional observation techniques are time and labor intensive and may be subjective. The objective was to validate a system for monitoring individual feeding behavior and activity in beef cattle (Fedometer [FEDO]; ENGS, Rosh Pina, Israel). Sixteen steers (initial BW ± SD = 326 ± 46 kg) were fitted with data loggers (FEDO) on their left front leg and housed in a pen with a feedbunk equipped with an antenna emitting an electromagnetic field that reached 30 ± 2 cm in front of the feedbunk. Feedbunk attendance (duration of visit and frequency of meals) measured by FEDO was compared with live observations (27 observational periods lasting between 72 and 240 min; mean 126 min). Lying time and frequency of lying bouts were compared with previously validated accelerometers fitted to the hind leg (10 steers equipped for 10 to 12 d; HOBO Pendant G Acceleration Data Logger [HOBO]; Onset Computer Corporation, Pocasset, MA). Step counts were compared with video recordings (15 observations for 6-min intervals in 6 steers). Concordance correlation coefficients (CCC), accounting for repeated measures, and limits of agreement were computed. Comparison between FEDO and observed time at the feedbunk yielded a CCC of 0.98 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.97-0.99). All 68 meal events observed were recorded by FEDO. However, FEDO recorded 4 meal events during the 27 observational periods that were not observed. Lying time measured by HOBO and FEDO were highly correlated (CCC = 0.98; 95% CI 0.97-0.99). However, frequency of lying bouts measured by FEDO was only moderately correlated to HOBO (CCC = 0.71; 95% CI 0.63-0.77); FEDO underestimating the number of lying bouts (on average, 0.4 fewer bouts per 6 h). Step count by FEDO was moderately correlated to video observations (CCC = 0.75; 95% CI 0.49-0.89); FEDO overestimating the number of steps (on average, 5 more steps per 6 min). In conclusion, the FEDO

  5. Remediation of areas contaminated by past activities and accidents. Safety requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A number of activities and events have caused significant radioactive contamination of areas in many States. These include: inadequate practices for the management and disposal of radioactive waste; the intentional or accidental discharge of radioactive material to the environment; nuclear accidents; testing of nuclear weapons; incidents involving radionuclides at nuclear installations or other establishments such as hospitals and industrial and research facilities; and past practices that were not adequately controlled. Such contamination may present a hazard to human populations and the environment. Some older facilities in which radioactive material was processed when criteria for radiation protection were not as stringent as they are now are sources of radioactive contamination. In most such facilities, operations have been terminated. Radioactive contamination can be caused inadvertently by human activities involving processes in which natural radionuclides can become concentrated, in areas not normally controlled by regulatory bodies, to levels beyond the concentration limits set for practices. The IAEA has issued numerous publications dealing with the establishment of intervention levels and criteria for application in the event of a nuclear or radiological emergency and with criteria and techniques for assessment in the event of contamination of the environment. The International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources (BSS) establish requirements for radiation protection that apply to practices and to interventions. Interventions are divided into emergency exposure situations and chronic exposure situations on the basis of the recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) issued in 1991. The IAEA Safety Fundamentals publication on The Principles of Radioactive Waste Management establishes the internationally agreed principles of radioactive waste management

  6. Impaired microbial activity caused by metal pollution: A field study in a deactivated uranium mining area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    European frameworks for the ecological risk assessment (ERA) of contaminated sites integrate information from three lines of evidence: chemical, ecotoxicological, and ecological. Regarding the last one, field observations at the contaminated sites are compared to reference site(s) and the differences recorded are analysed at the light of a cause-effect relationship, taking into account the site-specific contamination. Thus, included in the tier 2 of a site-specific risk assessment that is being carried out in an deactivated uranium mining area, a battery of soil enzyme activities (dehydrogenases, urease, arysulphatase, cellulase, acid phosphate) and potential nitrification were assessed in seven sampling sites (A–D–E–F–G–H–I) at different distances from the mine pit. These parameters have been considered good indicators of impacts on soil microbial communities and, subsequently, on soil functions. Soil enzyme activities were impaired in the most contaminated site (A, near the mine pit), for which a higher degree of risk was determined in the tier 1 of ERA. Three other sites within the mining area (F, G, and D) were discriminated on the basis of their low microbial activity, using uni- and multivariate approaches, and validating what had been previously found with chemical and ecotoxicological lines of evidence. We observed considerable among-site heterogeneity in terms of soil physical and chemical properties, combined with seasonal differences in enzyme activities. Still, the correlation between microbial parameters and soil general physical and chemical parameters was weak. In opposition, significant and negative correlations were found between soil enzyme activities and several metallic elements (Al, Be, Cu, U). These findings suggest a clear correlation between compromised soil function (nutrient recycling) and metal contamination. Such information reinforces the evidence of risks for some sites within the mining area and is an important

  7. Choice-related Activity in the Anterior Intraparietal Area during 3-D Structure Categorization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhoef, Bram-Ernst; Michelet, Pascal; Vogels, Rufin; Janssen, Peter

    2015-06-01

    The anterior intraparietal area (AIP) of macaques contains neurons that signal the depth structure of disparity-defined 3-D shapes. Previous studies have suggested that AIP's depth information is used for sensorimotor transformations related to the efficient grasping of 3-D objects. We trained monkeys to categorize disparity-defined 3-D shapes and examined whether neuronal activity in AIP may also underlie pure perceptual categorization behavior. We first show that neurons with a similar 3-D shape preference cluster in AIP. We then demonstrate that the monkeys' 3-D shape discrimination performance depends on the position in depth of the stimulus and that this performance difference is reflected in the activity of AIP neurons. We further reveal correlations between the neuronal activity in AIP and the subject's subsequent choices and RTs during 3-D shape categorization. Our findings propose AIP as an important processing stage for 3-D shape perception. PMID:25514653

  8. Rate of litter decomposition and microbial activity in an area of Caatinga

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Carneiro Souto

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to evaluate the decomposition of litter and microbial activity in an area of preserved Caatinga, an experiment was conducted in the Natural Heritage Private Reserve Tamanduá Farm in Santa Terezinha county, State of Paraiba. The decomposition rate was determined by using litter bags containing 30 g of litter, which were arranged on the soil surface in September 2003 and 20 bags were taken each month until September 2005. The collected material was oven dried and weighed to assess weight loss compared to initial weight. Microbial activity was estimated monthly by the quantification of carbon dioxide (CO2 released into the edaphic breathing process from the soil surface, and captured by KOH solution. Weight loss of litter after one year was 41.19% and, after two years, was 48.37%, indicating a faster decomposition in the first year. Data analysis showed the influence of season on litter decomposition and temperature on microbial activity.

  9. It's how you get there: Walking down a virtual alley activates premotor and parietal areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna eWagner

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Voluntary drive is crucial for motor learning, therefore we are interested in the role that motor planning plays in gait movements. In this study we examined the impact of an interactive Virtual Environment (VE feedback task on the EEG patterns during robot assisted walking. We compared walking in the VE modality to two control conditions: walking with a visual attention paradigm, in which visual stimuli were unrelated to the motor task; and walking with mirror feedback, in which participants observed their own movements. Eleven healthy participants were considered. Application of independent component analysis to the EEG revealed three independent component clusters in premotor and parietal areas showing increased activity during walking with the adaptive VE training paradigm compared to the control conditions. During the interactive VE walking task spectral power in frequency ranges 8-12Hz, 15-20Hz and 23-40Hz was significantly (p ≤ 0.05 decreased. This power decrease is interpreted as a correlate of an active cortical area. Furthermore activity in the premotor cortex revealed gait cycle related modulations significantly different (p ≤ 0.05 from baseline in the frequency range 23-40Hz during walking. These modulations were significantly (p ≤ 0.05 reduced depending on gait cycle phases in the interactive VE walking task compared to the control conditions.We demonstrate that premotor and parietal areas show increased activity during walking with the adaptive VE training paradigm, when compared to walking with mirror- and movement unrelated feedback. Previous research has related a premotor-parietal network to motor planning and motor intention. We argue that movement related interactive feedback enhances motor planning and motor intention. We hypothesize that this might improve gait recovery during rehabilitation.

  10. Technical design and principle test of active magnetic bearings for the turbine compressor of HTR-10GT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi Lei, E-mail: shlinet@tsinghua.edu.cn [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Yu Suyuan; Yang Guojun; Shi Zhengang; Xu Yang [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2012-10-15

    The 10 MW high temperature gas-cooled test reactor coupled with gas-turbine circle (HTR-10GT) has been carried out by the Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology (INET) of Tsinghua University in China since year 2002. In the power convention unit (PCU) of the HTR-10GT, the contact-free and no-lubricating active magnetic bearings (AMB) are adopted to support the vertical high-speed turbine machine shaft, because of their numerous advantages over the conventional oil mechanical bearings under the special reactor operating conditions. Based on the previous studies and small tests of the AMBs, the final engineering design of the AMBs for the HTR-10GT turbine compressor rotor has been finished recently. This paper firstly introduces the design principle and technical futures of the AMBs. Then the main structure, as well as the key dimensions and parameters of the different AMB components are illustrated in detail. Besides, the rotor dynamic analysis is conducted to provide the mathematic model for the unbalance attenuation with high performance control system design in order to smoothly pass across the first two bending critical speeds before reaching the rated speed of 15,000 rpm. Furthermore, a small AMB flexible test system in compliance with the dynamic similarity principle of the helium turbine compressor rotor of the HTR-10GT, has been set up to validate the advanced control algorithms and accumulate design and operation experiences for the next full scale experiment in the near future.

  11. Technical design and principle test of active magnetic bearings for the turbine compressor of HTR-10GT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 10 MW high temperature gas-cooled test reactor coupled with gas-turbine circle (HTR-10GT) has been carried out by the Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology (INET) of Tsinghua University in China since year 2002. In the power convention unit (PCU) of the HTR-10GT, the contact-free and no-lubricating active magnetic bearings (AMB) are adopted to support the vertical high-speed turbine machine shaft, because of their numerous advantages over the conventional oil mechanical bearings under the special reactor operating conditions. Based on the previous studies and small tests of the AMBs, the final engineering design of the AMBs for the HTR-10GT turbine compressor rotor has been finished recently. This paper firstly introduces the design principle and technical futures of the AMBs. Then the main structure, as well as the key dimensions and parameters of the different AMB components are illustrated in detail. Besides, the rotor dynamic analysis is conducted to provide the mathematic model for the unbalance attenuation with high performance control system design in order to smoothly pass across the first two bending critical speeds before reaching the rated speed of 15,000 rpm. Furthermore, a small AMB flexible test system in compliance with the dynamic similarity principle of the helium turbine compressor rotor of the HTR-10GT, has been set up to validate the advanced control algorithms and accumulate design and operation experiences for the next full scale experiment in the near future.

  12. TECHNICAL COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    A. Ball and W. Zeuner

    2010-01-01

    Overview Once again, the bulk of this article reviews the intense activity of a recently completed shutdown, which, although quite unforeseeable until a few weeks before it started, proved by its success that our often advertised capability to conduct major maintenance within a two month period is real. Although safely completed, on-time to remarkable precision, the activity was not without incident, and highlighted our dependence on many experienced, specialist teams and their precise choreography. Even after the yoke was safely closed, magnet re-commissioning and beampipe pumpdown showed new and thought-provoking behaviour. The struggle to maintain adequate technical resources will be a pre-occupation over the coming months, in parallel with the start of truly sustained operation, for which various procedures are still being put in place. Planning for future shutdowns must now become a high priority, with many working groups and task forces already in existence to prepare infrastructure improvements and to...

  13. El Salvador - Formal Technical Education

    Data.gov (United States)

    Millenium Challenge Corporation — With a budget of nearly $20 million, the Formal Technical Education Sub-Activity was designed to strengthen technical and vocational educational institutions in the...

  14. Dynamic characteristics of an active coastal spreading area using ambient noise measurements—Anchor Bay, Malta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galea, Pauline; D'Amico, Sebastiano; Farrugia, Daniela

    2014-11-01

    Anchor Bay and surrounding regions are located on the northwest coast of the island of Malta, Central Mediterranean. The area is characterized by a coastal cliff environment having an outcropping layer of hard coralline limestone (UCL) resting on a thick (up to 50 m) layer of clays and marls (Blue Clay, BC). This configuration gives rise to coastal instability effects, in particular lateral spreading phenomena and rock falls. Previous and ongoing studies have identified both lateral spreading rates and vertical motions of several millimetres per year. The area is an interesting natural laboratory as coastal detachment processes in a number of different stages can be identified and are easily accessible. We investigate the site dynamic characteristics of this study area by recording ambient noise time-series at more than 30 points, over an area of 0.07 km2, using a portable three-component seismograph. The time-series are processed to give both horizontal-to-vertical spectral ratio graphs (H/V) as well as frequency-dependent polarisation analysis. The H/V graphs illustrate and quantify aspects of site resonance effects due both to underlying geology as well as to mechanical resonance of partly or wholly detached blocks. The polarization diagrams indicate the degree of linearity and predominant directions of vibrational effects. H/V curves closer to the cliff edge show complex responses at higher frequencies, characteristic of the dynamic behaviour of individual detached blocks. Particle motion associated with the higher frequencies shows strongly directional polarization and a high degree of linearity at well-defined frequencies, indicative of normal-mode vibration. The stable plateau areas, on the other hand, show simple, single-peak H/V curves representative of the underlying stratification and no predominant polarization direction. These results, which will be compared with those from other experiments in the area, have important implications for the

  15. Activities of Nuclear Research Institute Rez in the area of hydrogen technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NRI is a research institution established in 1955. Nowadays, the Institute provides wide range of expertise and services for operators of the nuclear power plants in the Czech Republic and abroad, supports Czech central state institutions in the domains of strategic energy planning and development, management of radioactive waste (for the Ministry of Trade and Industry), provides independent expertise for the State Office of Nuclear Safety, performs activities in the area of exploitation of ionising radiation and irradiation services for basic and applied research, health service and industry, performs research and provides services for radioactive waste disposal, production of radiopharmaceuticals, education and training of experts and scientific specialists and performs many other activities. With the gradual changes in energy policy, hydrogen economy becomes one of the important topics related to nuclear energy. NRI is participating in the research and development in this area and as a member of the Czech Hydrogen Technology Platform is currently the leader in this area in the country. To promote hydrogen economy, NRI prepared and participated in several demonstration projects. Studies on production of hydrogen in current and future nuclear power plants are performed as well. (authors)

  16. Exploring Bikeability in a Suburban Metropolitan Area Using the Active Commuting Route Environment Scale (ACRES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina Wahlgren

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Commuting by bicycle could contribute to public health, and route environments may influence this behaviour. Therefore, the aim of this study is to assess the potential associations between appraisals of the overall route environment as hindering or stimulating for bicycle commuting, with both perceptions of commuting route environmental factors in a suburban area and background factors. Methods: The Active Commuting Route Environment Scale (ACRES was used for the assessment of bicycle commuters’ perceptions and appraisals of their route environments in the suburban parts of Greater Stockholm, Sweden. A simultaneous multiple regression analysis was used to assess the relationship between the outcome variable whether the overall route environment hinders or stimulates bicycle commuting and environmental factors (e.g., exhaust fumes, speeds of motor vehicles, greenery, as well as background factors (sex, age, education, income as predictor variables. Results and Conclusions: The results indicate that in suburban areas, the factors aesthetics, greenery and bicycle paths seem to be, independently of each other, stimulating factors for bicycle commuting. On the other hand, flows of motor vehicles, noise, and low “directness” of the route seem to be hindering factors. A comparison of these results with those obtained from an inner urban area points to the importance of studying different types of built-up areas separately.

  17. Neuronal Activity in the Subthalamic Cerebrovasodilator Area under Partial-Gravity Conditions in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeredo L Zeredo

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The reduced-gravity environment in space is known to cause an upward shift in body fluids and thus require cardiovascular adaptations in astronauts. In this study, we recorded in rats the neuronal activity in the subthalamic cerebrovasodilator area (SVA, a key area that controls cerebral blood flow (CBF, in response to partial gravity. “Partial gravity” is the term that defines the reduced-gravity levels between 1 g (the unit gravity acceleration on Earth and 0 g (complete weightlessness in space. Neuronal activity was recorded telemetrically through chronically implanted microelectrodes in freely moving rats. Graded levels of partial gravity from 0.4 g to 0.01 g were generated by customized parabolic-flight maneuvers. Electrophysiological signals in each partial-gravity phase were compared to those of the preceding 1 g level-flight. As a result, SVA neuronal activity was significantly inhibited by the partial-gravity levels of 0.15 g and lower, but not by 0.2 g and higher. Gravity levels between 0.2–0.15 g could represent a critical threshold for the inhibition of neurons in the rat SVA. The lunar gravity (0.16 g might thus trigger neurogenic mechanisms of CBF control. This is the first study to examine brain electrophysiology with partial gravity as an experimental parameter.

  18. SCHOOL AND OUT-OF-SCHOOL PHYSICAL ACTIVITY OF CHILDREN IN RURAL AREAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Podstawski Robert

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : The aim of the study was to assess the level of school and out-of-school physical activity of children living in rural area at the early stage of their education. Material : The research was conducted in 2009 at primary school in Świętajno (a village. The study group consisted of 42 girls and 44 boys from the 1 st, 2 nd and 3 rd grade of primary school, aged 7-10. The children were chosen by means of a purposeful selection and surveyed by a questionnaire consisting of five open-ended and five closed-ended questions. Results : The research showed that the children living in the rural area at the early stage of their education eagerly participated in the classes of physical education held at school. The most popular physical activities among the children included: games and plays with the ball and other equipment, running, gymnastics (among girls and matches and competitions (among boys. The outdoor physical activities in which the children were involved outside of school were spontaneous and unorganized including mainly cycling, roller-skating, skating or skiing. Conclusions : A marginal percentage of children participated in out-of-school sports trainings or other physical education-oriented classes (e.g. swimming lessons. A relatively high percentage of children devoted a great deal of their free time to watching television, DVDs or playing on the computer.

  19. A double wavelength DFB laser with an identical active area for CWDM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongyun Xie; Wei Wang; Fan Zhou; Jing Bian; Baojun Wang; Lufeng Wang

    2005-01-01

    A novel distribute feedback (DFB) laser which gave two different wavelengths under two distinct work conditions was fabricated. The laser consists of two Bragg gratings with different periods corresponding to wavelength spacing of 20 nm in an identical active area. When driving current was injected into one of the different sections separately, two different wavelengths at 1542.4 and 1562.5 nm were realized. The side mode suppression ratio (SMSR) of 45 dB or more both for the two Bragg wavelengths were achieved. The fabricating process of the laser was just the same as that of traditional DFB laser diode. This device can be potentially used in coarse wavelength division multiplexer (CWDM) as a promising light source and the technology idea can be used to enlarge the transmission capacity in metro area network (MAN).

  20. Reading a suspenseful literary text activates brain areas related to social cognition and predictive inference.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moritz Lehne

    Full Text Available Stories can elicit powerful emotions. A key emotional response to narrative plots (e.g., novels, movies, etc. is suspense. Suspense appears to build on basic aspects of human cognition such as processes of expectation, anticipation, and prediction. However, the neural processes underlying emotional experiences of suspense have not been previously investigated. We acquired functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI data while participants read a suspenseful literary text (E.T.A. Hoffmann's "The Sandman" subdivided into short text passages. Individual ratings of experienced suspense obtained after each text passage were found to be related to activation in the medial frontal cortex, bilateral frontal regions (along the inferior frontal sulcus, lateral premotor cortex, as well as posterior temporal and temporo-parietal areas. The results indicate that the emotional experience of suspense depends on brain areas associated with social cognition and predictive inference.

  1. Reading a suspenseful literary text activates brain areas related to social cognition and predictive inference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehne, Moritz; Engel, Philipp; Rohrmeier, Martin; Menninghaus, Winfried; Jacobs, Arthur M; Koelsch, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Stories can elicit powerful emotions. A key emotional response to narrative plots (e.g., novels, movies, etc.) is suspense. Suspense appears to build on basic aspects of human cognition such as processes of expectation, anticipation, and prediction. However, the neural processes underlying emotional experiences of suspense have not been previously investigated. We acquired functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data while participants read a suspenseful literary text (E.T.A. Hoffmann's "The Sandman") subdivided into short text passages. Individual ratings of experienced suspense obtained after each text passage were found to be related to activation in the medial frontal cortex, bilateral frontal regions (along the inferior frontal sulcus), lateral premotor cortex, as well as posterior temporal and temporo-parietal areas. The results indicate that the emotional experience of suspense depends on brain areas associated with social cognition and predictive inference. PMID:25946306

  2. Antileishmanial activity of medicinal plants used in endemic areas in northeastern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Queiroz, Aline Cavalcanti; Dias, Thays de Lima Matos Freire; Da Matta, Carolina Barbosa Brito; Cavalcante Silva, Luiz Henrique Agra; de Araújo-Júnior, João Xavier; de Araújo, Givanildo Bernardino; Moura, Flávia de Barros Prado; Alexandre-Moreira, Magna Suzana

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the leishmanicidal activity of five species of plants used in folk medicine in endemic areas of the state of Alagoas, Brazil. Data were collected in the cities of Colonia Leopoldina, Novo Lino, and União dos Palmares, Alagoas state, from patients with cutaneous leishmaniasis (Leishmania amazonensis) who use medicinal plants to treat this disease. Plants extracts were tested at a concentration of 1-100 μg/mL in all experiments, except in an assay to evaluate activity against amastigotes, when 10 μg/mL was used. All plants extracts did not show deleterious activity to the host cell evidenced by LDH assay at 100, 10, and 1 μg/mL after 48 h of incubation. The plants extracts Hyptis pectinata (L.) Poit, Aloe vera L., Ruta graveolens L., Pfaffia glomerata (Spreng.) Pedersen, and Chenopodium ambrosioides L. exhibited direct activity against extracellular forms at 100 μg/mL; these extracts inhibited growth by 81.9%, 82.9%, 74.4%, 88.7%, and 87.4%, respectively, when compared with promastigotes. The plants extracts H. pectinata, A. vera, and R. graveolens also significantly diminished the number of amastigotes at 10 μg/mL, inhibiting growth by 85.0%, 40.4%, 94.2%, and 97.4%, respectively, when compared with control. Based on these data, we conclude that the five plants exhibited considerable leishmanicidal activity. PMID:25126099

  3. Combining Functional Neuroimaging with Off-Line Brain Stimulation: Modulation of Task-Related Activity in Language Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andoh, Jamila; Paus, Tomas

    2011-01-01

    Repetitive TMS (rTMS) provides a noninvasive tool for modulating neural activity in the human brain. In healthy participants, rTMS applied over the language-related areas in the left hemisphere, including the left posterior temporal area of Wernicke (LTMP) and inferior frontal area of Broca, have been shown to affect performance on word…

  4. Controlling the Electrochemically Active Area of Carbon Fiber Microelectrodes by the Electrodeposition and Selective Removal of an Insulating Photoresist

    OpenAIRE

    Lambie, Bradley A.; Orwar, Owe; Weber, Stephen G

    2006-01-01

    A new and simple method permits control of the electrochemically active area of a carbon fiber microelectrode. An electrophoretic photoresist insulates the 10 μm diameter carbon fiber microelectrodes. Photolysis of the photoresist followed by immersion of the exposed area into a developing solution reveals electroactive carbon fiber surface. The electroactive surface area exposed can be controlled with a good degree of reproducibility.

  5. 33 CFR 334.762 - Naval Support Activity Panama City; North Bay and West Bay; restricted areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... City; North Bay and West Bay; restricted areas. 334.762 Section 334.762 Navigation and Navigable Waters... REGULATIONS § 334.762 Naval Support Activity Panama City; North Bay and West Bay; restricted areas. (a) The... occurring within the active military security zone/s and offering navigational advice to ensure the...

  6. Neuronal Heterotopias Affect the Activities of Distant Brain Areas and Lead to Behavioral Deficits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Kazuhiro; Kubo, Ken-ichiro; Endo, Toshihiro; Yoshida, Keitaro; Benner, Seico; Ito, Yukiko; Aizawa, Hidenori; Aramaki, Michihiko; Yamanaka, Akihiro; Tanaka, Kohichi; Takata, Norio; Tanaka, Kenji F; Mimura, Masaru; Tohyama, Chiharu; Kakeyama, Masaki; Nakajima, Kazunori

    2015-09-01

    Neuronal heterotopia refers to brain malformations resulting from deficits of neuronal migration. Individuals with heterotopias show a high incidence of neurological deficits, such as epilepsy. More recently, it has come to be recognized that focal heterotopias may also show a range of psychiatric problems, including cognitive and behavioral impairments. However, because focal heterotopias are not always located in the brain areas responsible for the symptoms, the causal relationship between the symptoms and heterotopias remains elusive. In this study, we showed that mice with focal heterotopias in the somatosensory cortex generated by in utero electroporation exhibited spatial working memory deficit and low competitive dominance behavior, which have been shown to be closely associated with the activity of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) in rodents. Analysis of the mPFC activity revealed that the immediate-early gene expression was decreased and the local field potentials of the mPFC were altered in the mice with heterotopias compared with the control mice. Moreover, activation of these ectopic and overlying sister neurons using the DREADD (designer receptor exclusively activated by designer drug) system improved the working memory deficits. These findings suggest that cortical regions containing focal heterotopias can affect distant brain regions and give rise to behavioral abnormalities. Significance statement: Recent studies reported that patients with heterotopias have a variety of clinical symptoms, such as cognitive disturbance, psychiatric symptoms, and autistic behavior. However, the causal relationship between the symptoms and heterotopias remains elusive. Here we showed that mice with focal heterotopias in the somatosensory cortex generated by in utero electroporation exhibited behavioral deficits that have been shown to be associated with the mPFC activity in rodents. The existence of heterotopias indeed altered the neural activities of the mPFC, and

  7. Asphalt-derived high surface area activated porous carbons for carbon dioxide capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalilov, Almaz S; Ruan, Gedeng; Hwang, Chih-Chau; Schipper, Desmond E; Tour, Josiah J; Li, Yilun; Fei, Huilong; Samuel, Errol L G; Tour, James M

    2015-01-21

    Research activity toward the development of new sorbents for carbon dioxide (CO2) capture have been increasing quickly. Despite the variety of existing materials with high surface areas and high CO2 uptake performances, the cost of the materials remains a dominant factor in slowing their industrial applications. Here we report preparation and CO2 uptake performance of microporous carbon materials synthesized from asphalt, a very inexpensive carbon source. Carbonization of asphalt with potassium hydroxide (KOH) at high temperatures (>600 °C) yields porous carbon materials (A-PC) with high surface areas of up to 2780 m(2) g(-1) and high CO2 uptake performance of 21 mmol g(-1) or 93 wt % at 30 bar and 25 °C. Furthermore, nitrogen doping and reduction with hydrogen yields active N-doped materials (A-NPC and A-rNPC) containing up to 9.3% nitrogen, making them nucleophilic porous carbons with further increase in the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface areas up to 2860 m(2) g(-1) for A-NPC and CO2 uptake to 26 mmol g(-1) or 114 wt % at 30 bar and 25 °C for A-rNPC. This is the highest reported CO2 uptake among the family of the activated porous carbonaceous materials. Thus, the porous carbon materials from asphalt have excellent properties for reversibly capturing CO2 at the well-head during the extraction of natural gas, a naturally occurring high pressure source of CO2. Through a pressure swing sorption process, when the asphalt-derived material is returned to 1 bar, the CO2 is released, thereby rendering a reversible capture medium that is highly efficient yet very inexpensive. PMID:25531980

  8. 3.1.SUIT. Draft EA procedure applicable to historical areas active conservation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Algreen-Ussing, Gregers; Wedebrunn, Ola

    2002-01-01

    intended as a way to propose and ensure an active conservation policy for urban historical areas. It is based on state-of-the-art methods and the knowledge of the experts involved in the SUIT project. It is also based on the guidelines presenting the grid of analysis to be used by stakeholders in a joint...... conflict analysis with examples and guidance, the decision-matrix of tools and methodologies as well as the preminiary EU cross-comparison of EIA application. The procedure suggested in this report is phrased according to the requirements expressed in the Directive 85/337/EEC asamended by Directive 97...

  9. Volume 1, 1st Edition, Multiscale Tailoring of Highly Active and Stable Nanocomposite Catalysts, Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veser, Goetz

    2009-08-31

    Nanomaterials have gained much attention as catalysts since the discovery of exceptional CO oxidation activity of nanoscale gold by Haruta. However, many studies avoid testing nanomaterials at the high-temperatures relevant to reactions of interest for the production of clean energy (T > 700°C). The generally poor thermal stability of catalytically active noble metals has thus far prevented significant progress in this area. We have recently overcome the poor thermal stability of nanoparticles by synthesizing a platinum barium-hexaaluminate (Pt-BHA) nanocomposite which combines the high activity of noble metal nanoparticles with the thermal stability of hexaaluminates. This Pt-BHA nanocomposite demonstrates excellent activity, selectivity, and long-term stability in CPOM. Pt-BHA is anchored onto a variety of support structures in order to improve the accessibility, safety, and reactivity of the nanocatalyst. Silica felts prove to be particularly amenable to this supporting procedure, with the resulting supported nanocatalyst proving to be as active and stable for CPOM as its unsupported counterpart. Various pre-treatment conditions are evaluated to determine their effectiveness in removing residual surfactant from the active nanoscale platinum particles. The size of these particles is measured across a wide temperature range, and the resulting “plateau” of stability from 600-900°C can be linked to a particle caging effect due to the structure of the supporting ceramic framework. The nanocomposites are used to catalyze the combustion of a dilute methane stream, and the results indicate enhanced activity for both Pt-BHA as well as ceria-doped BHA, as well as an absence of internal mass transfer limitations at the conditions tested. In water-gas shift reaction, nanocomposite Pt-BHA shows stability during prolonged WGS reaction and no signs of deactivation during start-up/shut-down of the reactor. The chemical and thermal stability, low molecular weight, and

  10. Remedial investigation report on Waste Area Grouping 5 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 3, Appendix B, Technical findings and conclusions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-03-01

    This Remedial Investigation Report on Waste Area Grouping, (NVAG) 5 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory was prepared in accordance with requirements under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) for reporting, the results of a site chacterization for public review. This work was performed under Work Breakdown Structure 1.4.12.6.1.05.40.02 (Activity Data Sheet 3305, ``WAG 5``). Publication of this document meets a Federal Facility Agreement milestone of March 31, 1995. This document provides the Environmental Restoration Program with information about the results of investigations performed at WAG 5. It includes information on risk assessments that have evaluated long-term impacts to human health and the environment. Information provided in this document forms the basis for decisions regarding, the need for subsequent remediation work at WAG 5.

  11. Remedial investigation report on Waste Area Grouping 5 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 3, Appendix B, Technical findings and conclusions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Remedial Investigation Report on Waste Area Grouping, (NVAG) 5 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory was prepared in accordance with requirements under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) for reporting, the results of a site chacterization for public review. This work was performed under Work Breakdown Structure 1.4.12.6.1.05.40.02 (Activity Data Sheet 3305, ''WAG 5''). Publication of this document meets a Federal Facility Agreement milestone of March 31, 1995. This document provides the Environmental Restoration Program with information about the results of investigations performed at WAG 5. It includes information on risk assessments that have evaluated long-term impacts to human health and the environment. Information provided in this document forms the basis for decisions regarding, the need for subsequent remediation work at WAG 5

  12. Investigation of environmental activity levels of bone-coal mining area in five provinces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During 1991-1993, the activity levels of the bone-coal mines were investigated in Zhejiang, Hubei, Hunan, Jiangxi and Anhui Province, respectively, where the reserve of bone-coal is about 90% of our country's total reserve. The average of γ radiation dose rate level measured for bone-coal, bone-coal cinder (BCC) and bone-coal cinder brick (BCCB) in these provinces is about 500 nGy/h, 400 nGy/h and 700 nGy/h respectively, while that for fields, roads and houses made of BCCB in corresponding regions of these provinces is about 200 nGy/h, 260 nGy/h and 300 nGy/h respectively. It is shown that the environmental activity level of bone-coal mining area is about 3 times higher than the reference spots. (authors)

  13. Reward expectation differentially modulates attentional behavior and activity in visual area V4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baruni, Jalal K; Lau, Brian; Salzman, C Daniel

    2015-11-01

    Neural activity in visual area V4 is enhanced when attention is directed into neuronal receptive fields. However, the source of this enhancement is unclear, as most physiological studies have manipulated attention by changing the absolute reward associated with a particular location as well as its value relative to other locations. We trained monkeys to discriminate the orientation of two stimuli presented simultaneously in different hemifields while we independently varied the reward magnitude associated with correct discrimination at each location. Behavioral measures of attention were controlled by the relative value of each location. By contrast, neurons in V4 were consistently modulated by absolute reward value, exhibiting increased activity, increased gamma-band power and decreased trial-to-trial variability whenever receptive field locations were associated with large rewards. These data challenge the notion that the perceptual benefits of spatial attention rely on increased signal-to-noise in V4. Instead, these benefits likely derive from downstream selection mechanisms. PMID:26479590

  14. Geomorphic evidence of active faults growth in the Norcia seismic area (central Apennines, Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Materazzi, Marco; Aringoli, Domenico; Farabollini, Piero; Giacopetti, Marco; Pambianchi, Gilberto; Tondi, Emanuele; Troiani, Francesco

    2016-04-01

    Fault-growth by segment linkage is one of the fundamental processes controlling the evolution, in both time and the space, of fault systems. In fact, step-like trajectories shown by length-displacement diagrams for individual fault arrays suggest that the development of evolved structures result by the linkage of single fault segments. The type of interaction between faults and the rate at which faults reactivate not only control the long term tectonic evolution of an area, but also influence the seismic hazard, as earthquake recurrence intervals tend to decrease as fault slip rate increase. The use of Geomorphological investigations represents an important tool to constrain the latest history of active faults. In this case, attention has to be given to recognize morphostructural, historical, environmental features at the surface, since they record the long-term seismic behavior due to the fault growth processes (Tondi and Cello, 2003). The aim of this work is to investigate the long term morphotectonic evolution of a well know seismic area in the central Apennines: the Norcia intramontane basin (Aringoli et al., 2005). The activity of the Norcia seismic area is characterized by moderate events and by strong earthquakes with maximum intensities of X-XI degrees MCS and equivalent magnitudes around 6.5±7.0 (CPTI, 2004). Based on the morphostructural features as well as on the historical seismicity of the area, we may divide the Norcia seismic area into three minor basins roughly NW-SE oriented: the Preci sub-basin in the north; the S. Scolastica and the Castel S. Maria sub-basins in the south. The wider basin (S. Scolastica) is separated from the other two by ridges transversally oriented with respect the basins themselves; they are the geomorphological response to the tectonic deformation which characterizes the whole area. Other geomorphological evidences of tectonic activity are represented by deformation of old summit erosional surfaces, hydrographic network

  15. TECHNICAL COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    A. Ball and W. Zeuner

    2013-01-01

    For the reporting period, the CMS common systems and infrastructure worked well, without failures that caused significant data losses. One more disconnection of the magnet cold box occurred in the shadow of interruptions in data taking, caused by a series of technical faults. The recognition during 2012 that re-connection can only safely be done at around 2 T implies a minimum magnet recovery time of 12 hours and raises serious concerns about the number of ramping cycles of the magnet these incidents cause. This has triggered studies of how to make the cryo-system of the magnet more robust against failures. The proton-proton run ended just before the end-of-year CERN closure, during which CASTOR was installed on the negative end of CMS and both ZDC calorimeters were installed in TAN absorbers the LHC tunnel, in preparation for the heavy-ion run. The installation of CASTOR was an excellent “engineering test” of procedures for working in an activated environment. Despite some technical pr...

  16. TECHNICAL COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    Austin Ball

    Summary of progress since last CMS week. Ten years of construction work have been completed. CMS is closed, in very close to the ideal low luminosity configuration, and performed well in the first tests with LHC beam. Behind this encouraging news is the story of a summer of intense commitment by many teams (from the collaboration and 3 CERN departments) working together, against the clock and despite many minor setbacks, to ensure that the experiment was ready to play a leading role in the excitement of September 10. Following beampipe bakeout and refill with pure neon, a magnificent effort by the ECAL group and the pt 5 technical crew made it possible to install and commission all 4 ECAL endcap Dees before the end of August. In the shadow of this activity, the barrel and forward pixel trackers and part of the beam monitoring were installed within the vac tank. The pt 5 technical teams then succeeded in safely removing the 20t installation tables and their support blocks from beneath the already installed ...

  17. Contrast structure and EDLC performances of activated spherical carbons with medium and large surface areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two spherical carbons of 500 and 3000 m2/g, respectively, activated with NaOH (M500) and KOH (M3000), were examined in relation to their carbon structure and electrochemical behavior to explain their contrast capacitances as EDLC electrode. M500 and M3000 showed capacitances per weight (F/g) and volume (F/ml) of 35 and 35 (M500), 40 and 25 (M3000), respectively. The charge profile of M500 by galvanostat charge indicated that the charge took place rapidly below 1.5 V and then very gradually increased up to the final voltage of 2.7 V in the first charge. Such electrochemical behavior suggests electric field activation of this particular activated carbon at the charge. The charge profile of M3000 was conventional. The structure of M500 suffered a certain marked expansion at the charge, however the 0 0 2 diffractions profile shifted very slightly to a lower angle at the change. Such charge appears reversible while the structure of expansion was more or less irreversible. No expansion was observed with M3000 at the charge to the same voltage. Such a structure allows high efficiency of EDLC due to small pores and electric field activation to induce small pores among the graphitic units. In contrast, M3000 with its larger surface areas of relatively large pores in the graphitic structure showed a larger capacitance per weight. However many useless pores cause lower the capacitance per volume. In addition, large pores lose the efficiency for the formation of an electric double layer per unit surface area of the pore, while the non-graphitic wall of M3000 fails to introduce small pores with a higher capacitance

  18. SOME METHODOLOGICAL TECHNIQUES OF ACTIVATION OF THE COGNITIVE INTEREST IN BIOLOGY CLASSES OF STUDENTS OF THE MEDICAL TECHNICAL PROFILE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Baranov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Research objective. Identification of possibility of the modern pedagogical receptions in development of cognitive interest in students of a medico-technical profile at biology lessons.Research techniques. The theoretical: the analysis of psychology and pedagogical and methodical literature on a research problem, the teoretiko-methodical analysis of a studied problem, development of methodical bases of its realization in biology training; approach to carrying out a lecture and practical training in biology with bionics elements. The empirical – supervision, conversation, questioning, manufacture of multimedia presentations for carrying out an interactive lecture and practical training and the analysis of results of work with them.Material and methods. Students of the 1st course being trained in the direction of preparation 201000.62 – “Biotechnical systems and technologies” (bachelor degree.Results. It is possible to carry the following to the positive moments: within interactive lecture there is a tendency to motivation change to educational activity with external on the internal; the pedagogical receptions based on interactivity, allow to keep attention of audience easier; using problem situations, it was possible to involve pupils in educational activity selectively; when using considered approach process of communication with audience gains more natural character, approaching developing relationship in teacher student system to cooperation.It is possible to carry the next moments to the negative: process of teaching becomes more intense, deman­ding from the teacher of larger concentration on a training material, and constant readiness and ability to conduct discussion; the interactive format of giving of a training material sometimes possesses smaller informational characteristics; students are not always ready to such format of educational activity that is often shown in inability to carry on the free dialogue, inability to

  19. Nano Structured Activated Carbon for Hydrogen Storge. Project Final Technical Report (May 2, 2005-Dec. 31, 2012)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabasso, Israel; Yuan, Youxin

    2013-02-27

    Development of a nanostructured synthetic carbons materials that have been synthesized by thermal-decomposition of aromatic rich polyether such as poly(ether ether ketone) (PEEK) is reported. These polymers based nanostructured carbons efficacious for gas adsorption and storage and have Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area of more than 3000 m2/g, and with average pore diameter of < 2nm. Surface-area, pore characteristics, and other critical variables for selecting porous materials of high gas adsorption capacities are presented. Analysis of the fragments evolved under various carbonization temperatures, and the correlation between the activation and carbonization temperatures provides a mechanistic perspective of the pore evolution during activation. Correlations between gas (N2 and H2) adsorption capacity and porous texture of the materials have been established. The materials possess excellent hydrogen storage properties, with hydrogen storage capacity up to 7.4 wt% (gravimetric) and ~ 45 g H2 L-1 (volumetric) at -196oC and 6.0 MPa.

  20. Technical Shibboleths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, John S.

    1998-01-01

    Focuses on technical sub-languages to reveal sociological functions of language that transcend mere transfer of substantive information. Finds one sociological feature, the shibboleth, acting widely throughout technical fields. (PA)

  1. Evaluation of antioxidant activity of Malus domestica fruit extract from Kashan area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Jelodarian

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Antioxidants are considered as the main factors in the inhibition of unwanted oxidation reactions. Materials and Methods: In this research the antioxidant potential of the fresh fruits of 4 cultivars (A to D of Malus domestica (M. domestica cultivated in the Kashan, Qamsar area was evaluated. The antioxidant activity of the samples were evaluated using two complementary antioxidant assays: 2, 2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH and β-carotene/linoleic acid tests and the results were compared with the synthetic standard antioxidant butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT. Results: Total phenolic contents of the samples are also estimated by Folin-Ciocalteu's phenol test. In both DPPH β-carotene/linoleic acid tests in the concentration of 2 mg/ml, only samples from cultivar A showed moderate antioxidant activity with 63.92±0.42 and 6.02±0.03 inhibition percentages, respectively and other samples were weakly active. Conclusion: The Folin-Ciocalteu's phenol test was also showed very little phenolic compounds for the fruits. In conclusion, weak antioxidant activity was estimated for the studied apple cultivars.

  2. Assessment of 137Cs Activity Concentration in Soil from Tea Plantation Areas in Cameron Highlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    137Cs is well known man-made radionuclide produced from nuclear industry. Nuclear weapon tests and nuclear accidents had contributed to presence of 137Cs into the worldwide environment including Malaysia. It has spread out to the entire world through the air and water current. Since Cameron Highlands is located at high altitude, there is a better chance of the 137Cs to settle down on the trees and later the soil underneath. In this study, the soil samples were taken at the slopes of two different tea plantation areas namely A and B. The soil samples were oven dried, ground, sieved and packed and sealed properly in plastic containers before measurement. Each plastic container contains around 450 g of sample. The measurement of 137Cs activity concentration was done using HPGe detector gamma spectrometer. The spectrum was analyzed using Gamma Vision software to calculate the activity concentration of 137Cs with energy peak of 661.66 keV. The activity concentration of 137Cs found in the samples ranged from 0.23 to 1.90 and 0.11 to 3.01 Bq/ kg for tea plantation A and tea plantation B, respectively. From the activity concentration of 137Cs result, it was comparable to the others research regarding to 137Cs in the soil around Asian. (Author)

  3. Pedestrian Areas in Los Angeles: Influence of design features and market area on pedestrian activity. A case study of three commercial strips

    OpenAIRE

    Soto, Manuel Antonio

    2012-01-01

    This thesis examines the spatial, social, and economic aspects of pedestrianism in three active pedestrian areas of Los Angeles to identify the causes of their activity, and to shed light on how these aspects work together to achieve pedestrian vibrancy. Three old commercial strips were selected to reflect a wide range of demographic, socioeconomic, and urban space characteristics; these three cases were analyzed to determine qualitative and quantitative factors that influence pedestrian flo...

  4. Economic Analysis for Commingling Effects of Insect Activity in the Elevator Boot Area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilley, Dennis R; Casada, Mark E; Langemeier, Michael R; Subramanyam, Bhadriraju; Arthur, Frank H

    2015-12-01

    Boot areas in commercial grain elevators and feed mills contribute to commingling of insects with grain that moves through the elevator leg. A partial budget and stochastic dominance model were developed to improve pest management decision-making and risk analysis assessment from commingling effects of insect activity in the boot area. Modified pilot-scale bucket elevator legs, containing residual wheat or corn, were infested with varying insect pest densities prior to clean grain transfers. Appropriate grain discounts were applied to grain samples obtained from clean grain transfers over either: 1) insect-free and untreated boots, 2) infested and untreated boots, or 3) infested and chemical-treated (β-cyfluthrin) boots. The insect-free boots simulated performing clean-out of the boot area. Partial budget analysis and stochastic dominance modeling indicated that boot sanitation (cleanout) about every 30 d, avoiding costly grain discounts from insect commingling, is the preferred choice. Although chemical spray treatments of the empty boot may reduce insect populations of some boot residual grains, boot cleanout always had lower and usually zero insect pest populations in the boot residual grain, providing higher facility operational net income without the use of chemicals. PMID:26470368

  5. Summary and conclusions of the NNWSI area-to-location screening activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A comprehensive system study has been performed to screen the Nevada Research and Development Area (NRDA) of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and nearby areas for relatively favorable locations of about ten square miles for the permanent disposal of radioactive waste in a mined repository. The purpose of this screening is to use available information to identify such locations. The results of this screening will allow more informed decisions as to where future repository exploration can be concentrated to optimize the chances that the locations chosen for characterization will actually qualify as a licensed repository site. The screening was conducted in a manner compatible with the general repository siting strategy of the DOE National Waste Terminal Storage Program (NWTS). This report has four chapters. Chapter 1 provides background information regarding the NNWSI screening activity and its relationship to the national program. Chapter 2 describes the systems method used for quantitative evaluation of various locations and rock types in the screening area. It includes definitions of specific screening parameters and descriptions of the mathematical equations for calculating ratings for various locations and host rocks. Chapter 3 presents selected results of the numerical analyses. It shows and describes maps of location ratings and lists of saturated and unsaturated host-rock ratings. Chapter 4 summarizes the results and presents conclusions about which locations and rock types are most favorable. Appendices A through C contain supporting information for the discussions in the text

  6. Activity of CERN and LNF groups on large area GEM detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Alfonsi, M; Brock, I; Cerioni, S; Croci, G; David, E; De Lucia, E; De Oliveira, R; De Robertis, G; Domenici, D; Duarte Pinto, S; Felici, G; Gatta, M; Jacewicz, M; Loddo, F; Morello, G; Pistilli, M; Ranieri, A; Ropelewski, L; Sauli, F; Schioppa, M; Van Stenis, M

    2010-01-01

    We report on the activity of CERN and INFN-LNF groups on the development of large area GEM detectors. The two groups work together within the RD51 Collaboration, to aim at the development of Micro-pattern Gas detectors technologies. The vast request for large area foils by the GEM community has driven a change in the manufacturing procedure by the TS-DEM-PMT laboratory, needed to overcome the previous size limitation of 450 x 450 mm2. Now a single-mask technology is used allowing foils to be made as large as 450 x 2000 mm2. The limitation in the short size, due to the definite width of the raw material, can be overcome by splicing more foils together. A 10 x 10 cm2 GEM detector with the new single-mask foil has been tested with X-rays and the results are shown. Possible future applications for large area GEM are the TOTEM experiment upgrade at CERN, and the KLOE-2 experiment at the Dafne Φ-factory in Frascati.

  7. Activity of CERN and LNF groups on large area GEM detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alfonsi, M. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Bencivenni, G. [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati dell' INFN, Frascati (Italy); Brock, I. [Physikalisches Institute der Universitat Bonn, Bonn (Germany); Cerioni, S. [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati dell' INFN, Frascati (Italy); Croci, G.; David, E. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); De Lucia, E. [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati dell' INFN, Frascati (Italy); De Oliveira, R. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); De Robertis, G. [Sezione INFN di Bari, Bari (Italy); Domenici, D., E-mail: Danilo.Domenici@lnf.infn.i [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati dell' INFN, Frascati (Italy); Duarte Pinto, S. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Felici, G.; Gatta, M.; Jacewicz, M. [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati dell' INFN, Frascati (Italy); Loddo, F. [Sezione INFN di Bari, Bari (Italy); Morello, G. [Dipeartimento di Fisica Universita della Calabria e INFN, Cosenza (Italy); Pistilli, M. [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati dell' INFN, Frascati (Italy); Ranieri, A. [Sezione INFN di Bari, Bari (Italy); Ropelewski, L. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Sauli, F. [TERA Foundation, Novara (Italy)

    2010-05-21

    We report on the activity of CERN and INFN-LNF groups on the development of large area GEM detectors. The two groups work together within the RD51 Collaboration, to aim at the development of Micro-pattern Gas detectors technologies. The vast request for large area foils by the GEM community has driven a change in the manufacturing procedure by the TS-DEM-PMT laboratory, needed to overcome the previous size limitation of 450x450mm{sup 2}. Now a single-mask technology is used allowing foils to be made as large as 450x2000mm{sup 2}. The limitation in the short size, due to the definite width of the raw material, can be overcome by splicing more foils together. A 10x10cm{sup 2} GEM detector with the new single-mask foil has been tested with X-rays and the results are shown. Possible future applications for large area GEM are the TOTEM experiment upgrade at CERN, and the KLOE-2 experiment at the Dafne {Phi}-factory in Frascati.

  8. Activity of CERN and LNF groups on large area GEM detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on the activity of CERN and INFN-LNF groups on the development of large area GEM detectors. The two groups work together within the RD51 Collaboration, to aim at the development of Micro-pattern Gas detectors technologies. The vast request for large area foils by the GEM community has driven a change in the manufacturing procedure by the TS-DEM-PMT laboratory, needed to overcome the previous size limitation of 450x450mm2. Now a single-mask technology is used allowing foils to be made as large as 450x2000mm2. The limitation in the short size, due to the definite width of the raw material, can be overcome by splicing more foils together. A 10x10cm2 GEM detector with the new single-mask foil has been tested with X-rays and the results are shown. Possible future applications for large area GEM are the TOTEM experiment upgrade at CERN, and the KLOE-2 experiment at the Dafne Φ-factory in Frascati.

  9. 300 Area fuel supply shutdown facility hazards assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document establishes the technical basis in support of Emergency Planning activities for the 300 Area Fuel Supply Shutdown Facilities on the Hanford Site. Through this document, the technical basis for the development of facility specific Emergency Action Levels and Emergency Planning Zone, is demonstrated

  10. Radionuclide activity and the immune system functioning in residents of radiation contaminated areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. L. Sokolenko

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research is to assess the relation of radioactive contamination degree to immune system functioning, in the absence or presence of additional potential immunosuppressants. To achieve the objective, during the period of 1995–2015 we examined 250 people, students of Cherkasy State University, who lived in the areas of enhanced radiation monitoring before. Also we evaluated the additional impact of the emotional stress caused by examinations on examined students. Indicators of cellular immunity were determined by immunophenotyping and dyeing using Romanowsky-Giemsa method. The level of immunoglobulins in blood serum was determined by radial immunodiffusion (Mancini method. The level of cortisol in blood serum was determined by immunoenzyme method. We have found that in absence of the emotional stress among residents of the areas contaminated with radionuclides, cortisol level remained at the upper limit of homeostatic norm. There is an average positive correlation between the activity of radionuclides in the territories of residence and the level of cortisol. There are marked average positive correlations between the activity of radionuclides and the level of neutrophils, and low positive correlations with the levels of IgG and IgM in blood serum. Average negative correlations between the activity of radionuclides and the following parameters are also observed: absolute and relative number of functionally mature T-lymphocytes with phenotype CD3+, absolute and relative number of their helper subpopulation CD4+, absolute and relative number of natural killer cells with phenotype CD16+; and strong negative correlations with immunoregulatory index CD4+/CD8+. Cortisol level shows the similar correlation with the same parameters, but correlation coefficient is lower. Under conditions of additional stress, caused by emotional load during the examinations, cortisol level significantly increases. This enhanced previously discovered

  11. Technical presentation

    CERN Multimedia

    GS Department

    2010-01-01

    10 March 2010 DYNEOS 10:00 – 12:00 - Main Building, Room B, 61-1-009 Dyneos AG is active in the fields of photonics, laser and high-precision positioning. Our highly qualified engineer team has more than 30 years of experience in electro-optical solutions sales. The engineers are supported by a technical and administrative team. We are focused on the Swiss market and represent six suppliers (Coherent, PI Physik Instrumente, SIOS, Nanonics Imaging, APE, Ekspla) in order to give a qualified sales and service support to our customers. Our products are dedicated to the research field as well as to industry. In addition to standard catalog products, we offer custom designs to fulfill the specific needs of OEM customers or specific applications.

  12. Technical Training: Technical Training Seminar

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    TECHNICAL TRAINING Monique Duval tel. 74924 technical.training@cern.ch Tuesday 3 February 2004 From 09:00 to 13:30 - Training Centre Auditorium - bldg. 593, room 11 USB (Universal Serial Bus) CYPRESS Seminar Claudia Colombini, Field Application Engineer CYPRESS ActiveComp Electronic GmbH D-85077 MANCHING, Germany As a pioneer in USB, CYPRESS sets the standard for cost-effective solutions without sacrificing functionality, performance or reliability. Having shipped over 200 million USB devices, Cypress is the undisputed market leader and demonstrates unmatched USB expertise. With the industry's broadest selection of USB solutions, Cypress has the right silicon, software and support for every USB application, from Low-speed to High-Speed and USB On-The-Go (OTG). 9:00 - 10:30 Overview of USB systems. USB CYPRESS product overview. Peripherals: Low Speed, Full Speed, High Speed (1.1 and 2.0). Hub Solutions, Embedded Host Solutions, On-The-Go (OTG) and wireless USB. USB Development Tools (first part) 10:30 -...

  13. Characterizing the wake vortex signature for an active line of sight remote sensor. M.S. Thesis Technical Report No. 19

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heil, Robert Milton

    1994-01-01

    A recurring phenomenon, described as a wake vortex, develops as an aircraft approaches the runway to land. As the aircraft moves along the runway, each of the wing tips generates a spiraling and expanding cone of air. During the lifetime of this turbulent event, conditions exist over the runway which can be hazardous to following aircraft, particularly when a small aircraft is following a large aircraft. Left to themselves, these twin vortex patterns will converge toward each other near the center of the runway, harmlessly dissipating through interaction with each other or by contact with the ground. Unfortunately, the time necessary to disperse the vortex is often not predictable, and at busy airports can severely impact terminal area productivity. Rudimentary methods of avoidance are in place. Generally, time delays between landing aircraft are based on what is required to protect a small aircraft. Existing ambient wind conditions can complicate the situation. Reliable detection and tracking of a wake vortex hazard is a major technical problem which can significantly impact runway productivity. Landing minimums could be determined on the basis of the actual hazard rather than imposed on the basis of a worst case scenario. This work focuses on using a windfield description of a wake vortex to generate line-of-sight Doppler velocity truth data appropriate to an arbitrarily located active sensor such as a high resolution radar or lidar. The goal is to isolate a range Doppler signature of the vortex phenomenon that can be used to improve detection. Results are presented based on use of a simplified model of a wake vortex pattern. However, it is important to note that the method of analysis can easily be applied to any vortex model used to generate a windfield snapshot. Results involving several scan strategies are shown for a point sensor with a range resolution of 1 to 4 meters. Vortex signatures presented appear to offer potential for detection and tracking.

  14. The influence of urban area opacity on biologically active UV-B irradiance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chubarova, Nataly; Rozental', Victor

    2013-04-01

    The study of UV irradiance changes in urban area is an essential problem due to the significant effect of UV irradiance on human health which can be positive (vitamin D synthesis) and negative (erythema, skin cancer, eye damage). According to the results of several experiments within the Moscow megacity we studied the effects of urban area opacity on the different types of biologically active UV-B irradiance on the base of a specially developed mobile photometric complex snd additional measurements of the urban opacity by Nikon Fisheye Converter FC-E8. We analyzed both the level of erythemally-active irradiance and the UV eye damaging radiation using the broadband UVB-1 YES pyranometer calibrated against ultraviolet spectroradiometer Bentham DTM-300 of the Medical University of Innsbruck (courtesy of Dr. M.Blumthaler). In order to estimate the effects of the urban opacity the measurements were normalized on similar measurements at the Meteorological Observatory of Moscow State University with zero opacity. This ratio is defined as an urban radiative transmittance (URT). Different atmospheric conditions were considered. In cloudy conditions the effect of opacity on URT is much less than that in conditions when the sun disk is open from clouds. We revealed some spectral features in transmittance of biologically active UV-B irradiance which is characterized by higher URT variations in overcast cloudy conditions due to more intensive scattering and smaller direct solar radiation component. In the absence of cloudiness the effect of opacity was studied for open and screening solar disk conditions. We obtained much higher URT in UVB spectral region compared with that for total solar irradiance for screening solar disk conditions with a significant URT dependence on the opacity only in UVB spectral region. No URT dependence was obtained for total solar irradiance in these conditions. Some model calculations were fulfilled to match the experimental results.

  15. Upgrade of deep bed filtration with activated carbon dosage for compact micropollutant removal from wastewater in technical scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löwenberg, Jonas; Zenker, Armin; Krahnstöver, Thérèse; Boehler, Marc; Baggenstos, Martin; Koch, Gerhard; Wintgens, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    The removal of micropollutants from drinking and wastewater by powdered activated carbon (PAC) adsorption has received considerable attention in research over the past decade with various separation options having been investigated. With Switzerland as the first country in the world having adopted a new legislation, which forces about 100 wastewater treatment plants to be upgraded for the removal of organic micropollutants from municipal wastewater, the topic has reached practical relevance. In this study, the process combination of powdered activated carbon (PAC) adsorption and deep bed filtration (DBF) for advanced municipal wastewater treatment was investigated over an extended period exceeding one year of operation in technical scale. The study aimed to determine optimum process conditions to achieve sufficient micropollutant removal in agreement with the new Swiss Water Ordinance under most economic process design. It was shown that the addition of PAC and Fe(3+) as combined coagulation and flocculation agent improved effluent water quality with respect to dissolved organic pollutants as well as total suspended solids (TSS), turbidity and PO4-P concentration in comparison to a DBF operated without the addition of PAC and Fe(3+). Sufficient micropollutant (MP) removal of around 80% was achieved at PAC dosages of 10 mg/L revealing that PAC retained in the filter bed maintained considerable adsorption capacity. In the investigated process combination the contact reactor serves for adsorption as well as for flocculation and allowed for small hydraulic retention times of minimum 10 min while maintaining sufficient MP removal. The flocculation of two different PAC types was shown to be fully concluded after 10-15 min, which determined the flocculation reactor size while both PAC types proved suitable for the application in combination with DBF and showed no significant differences in MP removal. Finally, the capping of PAC dosage during rain water periods, which

  16. Interim Closure Activities at Corrective Action Unit 114: Area 25 EMAD Facility, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehlecke, R. F.

    2011-10-24

    This letter report documents interim activities that have been completed at CAU 114 to support ongoing access and generate information necessary to plan future closure activities. General housekeeping and cleanup of debris was conducted in the EMAD yard, cold bays, support areas of Building 3900, and postmortem cell tunnel area of the hot bay. All non-asbestos ceiling tiles and loose and broken non-friable asbestos floor tiles were removed from support galleries and office areas. Non-radiologically contaminated piping and equipment in the cold areas of the building and in the two 120-ton locomotives in the yard were tapped, characterized, drained, and verified free of contents.

  17. Geomorphological and hydrological transformation of the landscape due to mining activity in the mining area Bana Dolina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After more than 150 year history of mining activity in the brown coal mining area Bana Dolina have been produced a range of anthropogenic forms of relief. For reasons of underground coal mining to make interventions in the hydrographic network. Significant changes due to surface mining of coal seams should result in subsidence basins of different sizes, damage to buildings and roads. Mining activity was influenced by agricultural and forestry fund, gardening settlements. All these factors have contributed to the change in relief of the surrounding area. This study aims to research the effects of the largest mining Bana Dolina mining area reflecting the structure of land area. (authors)

  18. Primordial radionuclides in drinking water from former tin-mining area elevated activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The activity concentrations of the primordial radionuclides in drinking water from two former mining areas (Bisichi and Bukuru) in Jos, Plateau State in Nigeria have been studied. The activities were determined by a non-destructive analysis using a computerized gamma ray spectrometry system with high purity germanium (HPGe). The result show the average activity concentration for 226Ra, 232Th and 40K for Bukuru and Bisichi to be respectively 1.20±0.02 Bq/l, 1.93±0.01 Bq/l, 4.75±0.14 Bq/l and 2.03±0.14 Bq/l, 2.20±0.13 Bq/l, 3.26±0.06 Bq/l. The annual effective doses due to the intake of drinking water from both locations approximately 2.80 mSv and 3.32 mSv respectively. These results are much higher then the reference level of a dose of 0.1 mSv/year from the intake of drinking water.

  19. Early Activity in Broca's Area During Reading Reflects Fast Access to Articulatory Codes From Print.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Michael; Grainger, Jonathan; Wheat, Katherine L; Millman, Rebecca E; Simpson, Michael I G; Hansen, Peter C; Cornelissen, Piers L

    2015-07-01

    Prior evidence for early activity in Broca's area during reading may reflect fast access to articulatory codes in left inferior frontal gyrus pars opercularis (LIFGpo). We put this hypothesis to test using a benchmark for articulatory involvement in reading known as the masked onset priming effect (MOPE). In masked onset priming, briefly presented pronounceable strings of letters that share an initial phoneme with subsequently presented target words (e.g., gilp-GAME) facilitate word naming responses compared with unrelated primes (dilp-GAME). Crucially, these priming effects only occur when the task requires articulation (naming), and not when it requires lexical decisions. A standard explanation of masked onset priming is that it reflects fast computation of articulatory output codes from letter representations. We therefore predicted 1) that activity in left IFG pars opercularis would be modulated by masked onset priming, 2) that priming-related modulation in LIFGpo would immediately follow activity in occipital cortex, and 3) that this modulation would be greater for naming than for lexical decision. These predictions were confirmed in a magnetoencephalography (MEG) priming study. MOPEs emerged in left IFG at ∼100 ms posttarget onset, and the priming effects were more sustained when the task involved articulation. PMID:24448559

  20. THE DIMENSIONS OF CREATIVITY IN TECHNICAL EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Franc

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: this paper engages with the change in the approach to technical education and to its research nature, quantity and quality ratio. The technical education is ordinary education and technical education at the same time. The technical education is a set of activities aimed at the skillful use of technology in deliberately organized process of interacting with an individual, causing permanent changes in their personality. Formation of a learner’s technological culture is made by providing knowledge about the products of technology, experiencing technical situations, raising respect for human technical creativity and products of creativity, developing an ability to use the products of technology. Technical education is aimed at the student’s cognitive realm, providing information and building a system of knowledge about the technical reality, developing cognitive skills needed to receive, understand, interpret and verify technical phenomena. Materials and Methods: the research was based on the analysis of students’ theses enrolled at Organization and Management Faculty of Lodz University of Technology. Results: objective quality indicators were defined for the purposes of analysis. The analysis results are not final, but they form the basis for an in-depth understanding of the academic reality. Generic requirements have been developed to polytechnic education. Discussion and Conclusions: polytechnic education is a specific link in the development of culture and civilization that provides value to the formation of personality. Different areas of the human civilization and the objective socio-cultural world are the basis for development. Polytechnic education forms the elite, providing the stable development of the society in accordance with the rules and principles.

  1. Benefits of international technical collaboration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the benefits associated with international technical collaboration in the area of high-level radioactive waste (HLW) management. The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) maintains a proactive role in and has achieved significant benefits from international collaboration focused on geologic repository development, spent fuel storage and transportation, licensing, and public relations issues. Any one nation's confidence in these categories of activities associated with HLW waste management programs will be significantly affected by the success or failure of similar programs in other nations

  2. Physical and dynamic structure of seismic-active areas from Moesian platform and Dobrogea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research project no 35/2001 proposes a complex study of seismic-active areas from main geological unit of Moesian Platform and northern Dobrogea. In the first half of 2002 the research work was carried out in the western part of platform, west of 26 angle meridian. In the North, the study extended up to 45 angle N parallel, in southern sector of Carpathian foredeep. Western part of the Moesian Platform is characterized by a moderate seismic activity, of crustal pattern. During 1893-2001, 88 earthquakes occurred, 8 of them having magnitudes greater than 4.0. Temporal analysis of seismic shocks produced in the XX century evidenced a small activity between 1900 and 1943, no activity between 1944 and 1973, and an intensified seismic activity in 1974-2000. A maximum appears in 1991 by a strong earthquake of 5.6 degrees magnitude. Spatial analysis of quakes showed a migration of seismic activity, from east to west, from a shock of 4.5 magnitude in 1912 (west Ramnicu Valcea) to earthquake of 5.2 magnitude in 1943 (North Tg. Jiu) and the seismic event in 1991 with 5.6 magnitude (North-West Turnu Severin). Local mechanism analysis has been possible for 22 earthquakes. This processing utilized the P-waves recorded by the Romanian stations (conventional and telemetered) and information of World Data Center for Seismology (Denver, USA). Fault plane azimuths indicated two distinct groups, characterized by the following average directions: I- N 10 angle W and II- N 70 angle E. These represent directions of the principal faulting systems from platform (I- N-S faults, perpendicular on Carpathian orogen direction; II- E-W faults, parallel with orogenic area). Fault plane dips have great angles, between values of 37 angle and 89 angle (with an average value of 63 angle). Compression (P) and tension (T) axes show different directions indicating two faulting systems. For the N-S faults (I system) the compression forces (P) are oriented N 70 angle W(WNW-ESE) and tension forces N 15

  3. Hazard analysis in active landslide areas in the State of Veracruz, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilde, Martina; Morales Barrera, Wendy V.; Rodriguez Elizarrarás, Sergio R.; Solleiro Rebolledo, Elizabeth; Sedov, Sergey; Terhorst, Birgit

    2016-04-01

    mass movements are analyzed in order to reconstruct complex interrelations of the causes and effects of landslide events. One of the major objectives of this research is to evaluate the potential hazard of active landslide areas. Detailed field analyzes were performed to investigate the situations and dynamics of the slope movements. Therefore, geomorphological mapping, sediment characterization as well as geophysical methods are applied. On the one hand, a detailed sediment characterization aims to identify the type of material (e.g. geotechnical attributes), on the other sediments can provide information on different activity phases, respectively movement processes in slide masses. Furthermore, the focus is placed on the determination of landslide relevant parameters and thresholds. Digital elevation models, which were generated before the onset of slope movements, are integrated in the geomorphological analysis. The poster presents the specific study sites in Veracruz and the situation of endangered slopes before and after the landslide events. It is planned to use this knowledge to model susceptibility maps for the region in the future. Moreover, field data will be used as basic information for further monitoring plans. Resulting susceptibility maps will be provided to the responsible authorities in order to support sustainable planning of settlements and infrastructure in hazardous regions.

  4. Classification of medieval ceramics in the Rhineland and neighbouring areas by neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) is known to be well suited for provenance determinations of ceramics, since more than 25 minor and trace elements can be measured with precisions high enough to discriminate between different pottery production workshops. INAA-data are presented for more than 1500 shards, mostly wasters, produced in different places such as Brueggen/Elmpt, Brunssum/Schinveld, Frechen/Cologne, Hoehr-Grenzhausen, Mayen, Paffrath, Pingsdorf/Bruehl, Raeren and Siegburg, to name only the most important earthen and stoneware production centres of the Rhine area in medieval and post medieval times. It turned out, that the wares of these different centres, although by archeological criteria often very similar, can be clearly recognized by INAA. This large reference databank can now be used to determine export pieces from these centres and to trace trade relations in the Middle Ages. An examples of a provenance determination of questionable finds of Pingsdorf and Paffrath Ware from Emden is given. (author)

  5. Ground fissures in the area of Mavropigi Village (N. Greece): Seismotectonics or mining activity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalogirou, Eleni; Tsapanos, Theodoros; Karakostas, Vassilios; Marinos, Vassilios; Chatzipetros, Alexandros

    2014-12-01

    In the beginning of July 2010, a ground fissure was observed in the field near the village of Mavropigi (Northern Greece) and specifically in its NW side. Later on (early September), a second ground fissure was perceived, close and almost parallel to the first one and very close to the limits of the lignite exploitation mine (by the Public Power Corporation, PPC). It was observed that the village of Mavropigi slides away slowly towards the PPC lignite mine. Geological, seismological, as well as geotechnical survey in the field indicated that the phenomenon is related to the coal mining exploitation in the near vicinity of the village rather than to any seismotectonic activity in the surrounding area.

  6. Proposals for future activities agreed upon at the seminar on wastewater treatment in urban areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The programme of the seminar was divided into three different sections: - Sewerage systems, - Discharge of industrial wastewater to municipal sewerage systems, - Reduction of nitrogen. For each subject the participants of the seminar agreed upon the following proposal for future activities: Sewerage systems: a) Combined sewer overflows (CSO). Brief state-of-the-art reports should be compiled by the Contracting Parties. The reports should provide information on: - extent of combined sewers (in % of sewered area), - design practices including flow equalization, - rates of inflow/infiltration, - pollution due to CSO, - current research, - trends. A compilation of these reports may hopefully lead to the derivation of suitable effluent standards, which may be expressed as frequencies, total volumes or total amount of pollution load. The effluent standards may be expressed as monthly to yearly values

  7. Area and Flux Distributions of Active Regions, Sunspot Groups, and Sunspots: A Multi-Database Study

    CERN Document Server

    Muñoz-Jaramillo, Andrés; Windmueller, John C; Amouzou, Ernest C; Longcope, Dana W; Tlatov, Andrey G; Nagovitsyn, Yury A; Pevtsov, Alexei A; Chapman, Gary A; Cookson, Angela M; Yeates, Anthony R; Watson, Fraser T; Balmaceda, Laura A; DeLuca, Edward E; Martens, Petrus C H

    2014-01-01

    In this work we take advantage of eleven different sunspot group, sunspot, and active region databases to characterize the area and flux distributions of photospheric magnetic structures. We find that, when taken separately, different databases are better fitted by different distributions (as has been reported previously in the literature). However, we find that all our databases can be reconciled by the simple application of a proportionality constant, and that, in reality, different databases are sampling different parts of a composite distribution. This composite distribution is made up by linear combination of Weibull and log-normal distributions -- where a pure Weibull (log-normal) characterizes the distribution of structures with fluxes below (above) $10^{21}$Mx ($10^{22}$Mx). Additionally, we demonstrate that the Weibull distribution shows the expected linear behaviour of a power-law distribution (when extended into smaller fluxes), making our results compatible with the results of Parnell et al.\\ (200...

  8. Large-Area, Highly Ordered Array of Graphitic Carbon Materials Using Surface Active Chitosan Prepatterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Youn-Kyoung; Kim, Dae Woo; Yang, Seung Bo; Lee, Jung-Goo; Kim, Young Kuk; Jung, Hee-Tae

    2015-02-01

    We demonstrate that chitosan prepatterns can generate not only highly periodic DNA pattern but also various types of graphitic carbon materials such as single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (RGO). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), fluorescence imaging and Raman spectroscopic results revealed that the graphitic carbon materials were selectively deposited on the surface of the periodic chitosan patterns by the electrostatic interaction between protonated amine groups of chitosan and the negative charged carbon materials. One proof-of-concept application of the system to the fabrication of electrical devices based on the micropatterns of SWNTs and RGO was also demonstrated. The strategy to use highly surface active chitosan pattern that can easily fabricate highly periodic pattern via a variety of lithographic tools may pave the way for the production of periodic arrays of graphitic carbon materials for large area device integration. PMID:26353637

  9. The state and prospects for vital activities in the radiocontaminated areas of Zhytomyr Polissya

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper deals with the after-effects of the radioactive contamination of Zhytomyr province. In 1986, Ukrainian government decided to divide the area into 4 zones: the restricted access zone, the zone of obligatory resettlement, the zone of the guaranteed voluntary resettlement and the zone of the strict radiological control. The paper also analyses the ecological and socio-economic situation in the region 20 years after the Tchernobyl disaster. Not all citizens agreed to be displaced and many of them come back. Nowadays, about 4.5 thousand people live in the province. The long-term trends in the development of the economy and improvement of vital activities conditions in Zhytomyr Polissya have been determined

  10. The radiological impact of agricultural activities in an area of high natural radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Pocos de Caldas Plateau, Brazil, with 70 radioactive anomalies is used for cattle, pigs and poultry production and for raising crops like potatoes, corn, brown beans and carrots. Data on the radioactivity concentration of natural radionuclides in air, soil, animal products, vegetables, water, sediment, external dose rates, and outdoor and indoor radon were used together with socio-economical information to estimate the radiological exposure from these agricultural activities in this high natural radioactivity area for the local rural and remote populations. For the local population agricultural products from the plateau contribute only relatively little (ca. 0.14-0.24 mSv.y-1) to the high radiation exposure (ca. 6-16 mSv.y-1) from external exposure and inhalation of radon and thoron daughters. However, the agricultural products carry a significant annual collective dose (ca. 14 man.Sv.y-1) to remote populations. (author)

  11. Broca's region and Visual Word Form Area activation differ during a predictive Stroop task

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wallentin, Mikkel; Gravholt, Claus Højbjerg; Skakkebæk, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Competing theories attempt to explain the function of Broca's area in single word processing. Studies have found the region to be more active during processing of pseudo words than real words and during infrequent words relative to frequent words and during Stroop (incongruent) color words compared...... to Non-Stroop (congruent) words. Two related theories explain these findings as reflecting either “cognitive control” processing in the face of conflicting input or a linguistic prediction error signal, based on a predictive coding approach. The latter implies that processing cost refers to...... violations of expectations based on the statistical distributions of input. In this fMRI experiment we attempted to disentangle single word processing cost originating from cognitive conflict and that stemming from predictive expectation violation. Participants (N = 49) responded to whether the words “GREEN...

  12. MERGING TECHNICAL COMPETENCES AND HUMAN RESOURCES WITH THE AIM AT CONTRIBUTING TO TRANSFORM THE ADRIATIC AREA IN A STABLE HUB FOR A SUSTAINABLE TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Savoia

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The Vision of Europe as knowledge-based society is funded on availability and application of knowledge in all segments of European life. Universities, as key provider of knowledge, and industry, as its largest consumer, are two pillows of this vision. Academic Institutions has a double role in provisioning of knowledge: "research" for creation of new knowledge and "education" as dissemination of current knowledge. In this investigation, a four-year cross-border collaboration is described, including strategy, mechanisms and tools adopted for supporting a wider cooperation between universities and industry. Background, challenges and concepts of long-term sustainability are also presented. Furthermore, a general overview of technical outcomes and advances, provided by a research and development joint action, thanks to this international cooperation, is illustrated. A deeper description regarding these technical investigations is proposed in the following articles of this Special Issue on "Wood: an Ancient Material for a Modern Quality".

  13. A robust satellite technique for monitoring seismically active areas: The case of Bhuj Gujarat earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genzano, N.; Aliano, C.; Filizzola, C.; Pergola, N.; Tramutoli, V.

    2007-02-01

    A robust satellite data analysis technique (RAT) has been recently proposed as a suitable tool for satellite TIR surveys in seismically active regions and already successfully tested in different cases of earthquakes (both high and medium-low magnitudes). In this paper, the efficiency and the potentialities of the RAT technique have been tested even when it is applied to a wide area with extremely variable topography, land coverage and climatic characteristics (the whole Indian subcontinent). Bhuj-Gujarat's earthquake (occurred on 26th January 2001, MS ˜ 7.9) has been considered as a test case in the validation phase, while a relatively unperturbed period (no earthquakes with MS ≥ 5, in the same region and in the same period) has been analyzed for confutation purposes. To this aim, 6 years of Meteosat-5 TIR observations have been processed for the characterization of the TIR signal behaviour at each specific observation time and location. The anomalous TIR values, detected by RAT, have been evaluated in terms of time-space persistence in order to establish the existence of actually significant anomalous transients. The results indicate that the studied area was affected by significant positive thermal anomalies which were identified, at different intensity levels, not far from the Gujarat coast (since 15th January, but with a clearer evidence on 22nd January) and near the epicentral area (mainly on 21st January). On 25th January (1 day before Gujarat's earthquake) significant TIR anomalies appear on the Northern Indian subcontinent, showing a remarkable coincidence with the principal tectonic lineaments of the region (thrust Himalayan boundary). On the other hand, the results of the confutation analysis indicate that no meaningful TIR anomalies appear in the absence of seismic events with MS ≥ 5.

  14. Demand generation activities and modern contraceptive use in urban areas of four countries: a longitudinal evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speizer, Ilene S; Corroon, Meghan; Calhoun, Lisa; Lance, Peter; Montana, Livia; Nanda, Priya; Guilkey, David

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Family planning is crucial for preventing unintended pregnancies and for improving maternal and child health and well-being. In urban areas where there are large inequities in family planning use, particularly among the urban poor, programs are needed to increase access to and use of contraception among those most in need. This paper presents the midterm evaluation findings of the Urban Reproductive Health Initiative (Urban RH Initiative) programs, funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, that are being implemented in 4 countries: India (Uttar Pradesh), Kenya, Nigeria, and Senegal. Between 2010 and 2013, the Measurement, Learning & Evaluation (MLE) project collected baseline and 2-year longitudinal follow-up data from women in target study cities to examine the role of demand generation activities undertaken as part of the Urban RH Initiative programs. Evaluation results demonstrate that, in each country where it was measured, outreach by community health or family planning workers as well as local radio programs were significantly associated with increased use of modern contraceptive methods. In addition, in India and Nigeria, television programs had a significant effect on modern contraceptive use, and in Kenya and Nigeria, the program slogans and materials that were blanketed across the cities (eg, leaflets/brochures distributed at health clinics and the program logo placed on all forms of materials, from market umbrellas to health facility signs and television programs) were also significantly associated with modern method use. Our results show that targeted, multilevel demand generation activities can make an important contribution to increasing modern contraceptive use in urban areas and could impact Millennium Development Goals for improved maternal and child health and access to reproductive health for all. PMID:25611476

  15. Impact of agricultural and industrial activities on ground water quality in Kasur area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper focuses on the impact of agricultural and industrial activities on groundwater quality. Kasur area was selected to study the influence of chemical fertilizers and tannery effluents on groundwater with the help of /sup 15/N of water nitrates. Bremner and keeney methods with certain modifications ware adopted for extraction of nitrate nitrogen in the form of ammonium ions. Ammonium concentrates were converted to nitrogen gas using potassium hypo bromide solution and analyzed on GD-150 mass spectrometer. /sup 15/N of nitrates from groundwater (n=14), pond water and Kisan urea were determined. There is a pronounced difference in the /sup 15/N values of nitrates from various sources. /sup 15/N of pond water (mixture of tannery effluents, sewerage and rainwater) was found to be +31.99% and +21.26% for the first and the second samplings respectively. /sup 15/N of Kisan urea sample was determined to be - 1.00%. The nitrate concentration of groundwater ranged from 1-171 ppm and / sup 15/N was found to be -0.40 to WHO permissible limits (45 ppm). Temporal variation was also observed but the values were still above the WHO limits. It is concluded that the major source of nitrates pollution in the Kasur area is due to chemical fertilizers and +37.10%. Out of 14 drinking water samples six have nitrate contents above biological wastes but not due to the tannery effluents. (author)

  16. Emergency response activities and the collection of damaged radiation devices in the war areas of Croatia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several kinds of devices containing sources of ionizing radiation had been in use in the areas of Croatia which were affected by the recent war, principally in industrial and medical applications. The greater share of these devices was constituted by 151 radioactive lightning conductors with a maximum individual activity of 19.5 GBq and some 8300 smoke detectors. In the destruction caused by the war, some of these devices were damaged, destroyed or lost. The actions undertaken to retrieve them and their sources are described, as well as the experience gained and lessons learned. The importance of a well organized national regulatory system is underscored as a precondition for the efficient identification and safe recovery of radiation sources lying amidst the ruins in the area affected by the war. The experience gained in these actions may be applicable to similar situations caused by natural disasters such as earthquakes, floods, hurricanes, etc. and of particular interest to regulatory authorities for the drawing up of emergency preparedness plans. (author)

  17. IPN - Orsay Report of activity 1998-1999. General activities. Technical Development; IPN - Orsay. Rapport d'activite 1998-1999. Activites generales. Recherches techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pouthas, Joel; Hutin, Christiane; Rivenez, Jean-Philippe [eds.] [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, 91406 Orsay cedex (France)

    2000-01-12

    ALICE dimuon spectrometer and for HADES experiment. Also the progress in developing the equipment for G0 experiment, VAMOS spectrometer, the large surface annular telescope and EUROBALL 4 detector is described. Finally in the chapter four there are reported works on developing a peak sensing ADC, a VXI D size card for EXOGAM,and data acquisition systems. The first volume begins with short reports of activity from the technical and general servicing departments. The second volume of the IPNO Report presents the results of the Research Division.

  18. Process monitoring using a Quality and Technical Surveillance Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rafferty, C.A.

    1995-02-01

    The purpose of process monitoring using a Quality and Technical Surveillance Program was to help ensure manufactured clad vents sets fully met technical and quality requirements established by the manufacturer and the customer, and that line and program management were immediately alerted if any aspect of the manufacturing activities drifted out of acceptable limits. The Quality and Technical Surveillance Program provided a planned, scheduled approach to monitor key processes and documentation illuminated potential problem areas early enough to permit timely corrective actions to reverse negative trends that, if left uncorrected, could have resulted in deficient hardware. Significant schedule and cost impacts were eliminated.

  19. Process monitoring using a Quality and Technical Surveillance Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of process monitoring using a Quality and Technical Surveillance Program was to help ensure manufactured clad vents sets fully met technical and quality requirements established by the manufacturer and the customer, and that line and program management were immediately alerted if any aspect of the manufacturing activities drifted out of acceptable limits. The Quality and Technical Surveillance Program provided a planned, scheduled approach to monitor key processes and documentation illuminated potential problem areas early enough to permit timely corrective actions to reverse negative trends that, if left uncorrected, could have resulted in deficient hardware. Significant schedule and cost impacts were eliminated

  20. Active and passive computed tomography mixed waste focus area final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberson, G P

    1998-08-19

    The Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA) Characterization Development Strategy delineates an approach to resolve technology deficiencies associated with the characterization of mixed wastes. The intent of this strategy is to ensure the availability of technologies to support the Department of Energy's (DOE) mixed waste low-level or transuranic (TRU) contaminated waste characterization management needs. To this end the MWFA has defined and coordinated characterization development programs to ensure that data and test results necessary to evaluate the utility of non-destructive assay technologies are available to meet site contact handled waste management schedules. Requirements used as technology development project benchmarks are based in the National TRU Program Quality Assurance Program Plan. These requirements include the ability to determine total bias and total measurement uncertainty. These parameters must be completely evaluated for waste types to be processed through a given nondestructive waste assay system constituting the foundation of activities undertaken in technology development projects. Once development and testing activities have been completed, Innovative Technology Summary Reports are generated to provide results and conclusions to support EM-30, -40, or -60 end user/customer technology selection. The Active and Passive Computed Tomography non-destructive assay system is one of the technologies selected for development by the MWFA. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL) is developing the Active and Passive Computed Tomography (A&PCT) nondestructive assay (NDA) technology to identify and accurately quantify all detectable radioisotopes in closed containers of waste. This technology will be applicable to all types of waste regardless of .their classification; low level, transuranic or provide results and conclusions to support EM-30, -40, or -60 end user/customer technology selection. The Active and Passive Computed Tomography non