WorldWideScience

Sample records for area-wide integrated pest

  1. Collection of entomological baseline data for tsetse area-wide integrated pest management programmes

    OpenAIRE

    Leak, Stephen G. A.; Vreysen, M.J.B.; Ejigu, Dejene

    2015-01-01

    Area-wide integrated pest management (AW-IPM) entails the integration of different control tactics against an entire pest population within a circumscribed area, while given adequate attention to human health and the environment. For most insect pests including tsetse, AW-IPM results in more sustainable pest control and the concept has gained significantly in importance in the last decade. These guidelines provide, aside from some basic information on the biology of tsetse flies, guidance o...

  2. Area-wide integrated pest management and the sterile insect technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Area-wide integrated pest management (AW-IPM) focuses on the preventive management of pest populations throughout the ecosystem. It seeks to treat all habitats of the pest population so that none produces migrants to re-establish significant infestations in areas of concern. In contrast, the conventional strategy focuses narrowly on defending the valued entity (crop, livestock, people, buildings, etc.) from direct attack by pests. AW-IPM requires multiyear planning, and an organization dedicated exclusively to its implementation, whereas conventional pest management involves minimal forward planning, tends to be reactive, and is implemented independently by individual producers, businesses, or households. AW-IPM tends to utilize advanced technologies, whereas the conventional strategy tends to rely on traditional tactics and tools. The sterile insect technique (SIT) is a species-specific form of birth control imposed on the pest population. It is a powerful tool for 'mopping up' sparse pest populations, and is most efficient when applied as a tactic in a system deployed on an area-wide basis. On environmental, economic and biological grounds, the case for the SIT is compelling. (author)

  3. Area-wide integrated pest management of fruit flies in the Asia-Pacific region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fruit flies (Diptera: Tephritidae) are recognised as one of the most important pests of fruits and vegetables. The importance of an Integrated Pest Management approach to fruit fly suppression or eradication has been emphasized over the past 30 years. Integrated Pest Management has, in some instance, a narrow focus on the crop or the orchard or farm, but not adopting an area-wide approach, where much of the activity may be outside the crop or production unit. All of the techniques used to manage fruit flies at the on-farm level may be used on an area-wide basis, preferably in combination to maximise the impact of each technique. There are some techniques, which are better suited to the area-wide approach, but can be used on-farm as well. Techniques include physical control (e.g., bagging), cultural control (e.g., production when fly numbers are low, resistant varieties, crop hygiene, early harvesting, growing refuge crops), biological control, behavioral control (e.g., protein bait spray application technique and male annihilation technique), sterile insect technique, and chemical control. In adopting an area-wide approach, very effective collaboration between many stakeholders is essential. (author)

  4. Management of area-wide integrated pest management programmes that integrate the sterile insect technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effective management of area-wide integrated pest management (AW-IPM) programmes that integrate the sterile insect technique (SIT) is key to success. Programme planning includes collection of baseline data and a feasibility assessment. The optimal management structure is where the programme can be implemented effectively and flexibly, independent of government politics, bureaucracy, and even corruption that impede timely goal achievement. Ideally, programmes include both public and private management, and require strong and steady financial support. Governments and donors are the most common sources of funds, but a mixture of public, community, and private funds is now the trend. Interrupted cash flow severely restrains programme performance. Physical support of programme operations must be reliable, and led by a maintenance professional. It is essential to have full-time, well-paid, and motivated staff led by a programme manger with technical and management experience. Programme failure is usually due to poor management and inadequate public support, and not to poor technology. (author)

  5. Optimal sterile insect release for area-wide integrated pest management in a density regulated pest population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordillo, Luis F

    2014-06-01

    To determine optimal sterile insect release policies in area-wide integrated pest management is a challenge that users of this pest control method inevitably confront. In this note we provide approximations to best policies of release through the use of simulated annealing. The discrete time model for the population dynamics includes the effects of sterile insect release and density dependence in the pest population. Spatial movement is introduced through integrodifference equations, which allow the use of the stochastic search in cases where movement is described through arbitrary dispersal kernels. As a byproduct of the computations, an assessment of appropriate control zone sizes is possible. PMID:24506557

  6. Sterile insect technique. Principles and practice in area-wide integrated pest management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For several major insect pests, the environment-friendly sterile insect technique (SIT) is being applied as a component of area-wide integrated pest management (AW-IPM) programmes. This technology, using radiation to sterilize insects, was first developed in the USA, and is currently applied on six continents. For four decades it has been a major subject for research and development in the Joint FAO/IAEA Programme on Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture, involving both research and the transfer of this technology to Member States so that they can benefit from improved plant, animal and human health, cleaner environments, increased production of plants and animals in agricultural systems, and accelerated economic development. The socio-economic impacts of AW-IPM programmes that integrate the SIT have confirmed the usefulness of this technology. Numerous publications related to the integration of the SIT in pest management programmes, arising from research, coordinated research projects, field projects, symposia, meetings, and training activities have already provided much information to researchers, pest-control practitioners, programme managers, plant protection and animal health officers, and policy makers. However, by bringing together and presenting in a generic fashion the principles, practice, and global application of the SIT, this book will be a major reference source for all current and future users of the technology. The book will also serve as a textbook for academic courses on integrated pest management. Fifty subject experts from 19 countries contributed to the chapters, which were all peer reviewed before final editing

  7. Strategic options in using sterile insects for area-wide integrated pest management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The four strategic options, 'suppression', 'eradication', 'containment' and 'prevention', in which the sterile insect technique (SIT) can be deployed as part of area-wide integrated pest management (AW-IPM) interventions, are defined and described in relation to the contexts in which they are applied against exotic or naturally occurring major insect pests. Advantages and disadvantages of these strategic options are analysed, and examples of successful programmes provided. Considerations of pest status, biology and distribution affecting decision-making in relation to strategy selection are reviewed and discussed in terms of feasibility assessment, and programme planning and implementation. Unrealistic expectations are often associated with applying the SIT, resulting in high political costs to change a strategy during implementation. The choice of strategy needs to be assessed carefully, and considerable baseline data obtained to prepare for the selected strategy, before embarking on an AW-IPM programme with an SIT component. (author)

  8. Monitoring sterile and wild insects in area-wide integrated pest management programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Insect pest control programmes, which integrate the release of sterile insects, can be efficient only if the released insects have an optimal biological quality. Frequent monitoring of the quality of reared insects after being released in the field is an important but often neglected component of area-wide integrated pest management (AW-IPM) programmes that integrate the sterile insect technique (SIT). Parameters of sterile insects, which should be monitored regularly, are sexual competitiveness of the released insects, and related components, e.g. survival, mobility, dispersal characteristics, and spatial occupation of the habitat. A well-balanced monitoring programme will, at any given time, provide essential feedback on the progress being made. This information is prerequisite to efficient implementation of the release and cost-efficient use of sterile insects. The type of monitoring to be done will be determined largely by the particular biology of the target insect species. The most important parameter in relation to the release of sterile insects is the rate of sterility induced in the wild insect pest population; it will provide the best evidence that any observed changes, e.g. in the density of the target insect, are caused by the release of sterile insects. (author)

  9. Tsetse flies: their biology and control using area-wide integrated pest management approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vreysen, Marc J B; Seck, Momar Talla; Sall, Baba; Bouyer, Jérémy

    2013-03-01

    Tsetse flies are the cyclical vectors of trypanosomes, the causative agents of 'sleeping sickness' or human African trypanosomosis (HAT) in humans and 'nagana' or African animal trypanosomosis (AAT) in livestock in Sub-saharan Africa. Many consider HAT as one of the major neglected tropical diseases and AAT as the single greatest health constraint to increased livestock production. This review provides some background information on the taxonomy of tsetse flies, their unique way of reproduction (adenotrophic viviparity) making the adult stage the only one easily accessible for control, and how their ecological affinities, their distribution and population dynamics influence and dictate control efforts. The paper likewise reviews four control tactics (sequential aerosol technique, stationary attractive devices, live bait technique and the sterile insect technique) that are currently accepted as friendly to the environment, and describes their limitations and advantages and how they can best be put to practise in an IPM context. The paper discusses the different strategies for tsetse control i.e. localised versus area-wide and focusses thereafter on the principles of area-wide integrated pest management (AW-IPM) and the phased-conditional approach with the tsetse project in Senegal as a recent example. We argue that sustainable tsetse-free zones can be created on Africa mainland provided certain managerial and technical prerequisites are in place.

  10. Public relations and political support in area-wide integrated pest management programmes that integrate the sterile insect technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The public relations component of area-wide integrated pest management (AW-IPM) programmes that integrate the sterile insect technique (SIT) has a large impact on programme success. Full-time professionals should direct public relations activities and secure vital political support from governments and community organizations. Good communication among programme staff, and between programme staff and the public, is required to maintain participation and support, and to keep the work goal-oriented even when some programme activities are controversial. The media can be valuable and effective partners by informing the public about the real facts and activities of a programme, especially if this is done in a non-technical and straightforward way. Ongoing research support improves the programme technology, provides technical credibility on contentious issues, and solves operational problems. Programme failure can result from poor public relations and inadequate public support. (author)

  11. Conceptual Model for Assessing the Minimum Size Area for an Area-Wide Integrated Pest Management Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A conceptual model was developed based on the two basic spatial elements of area-wide integrated pest management (AW-IPM), a core area and a buffer zone, to determine the minimum size of the protected area for the program to be technically feasible and economically justifiable. The model consisted of a biological part (insect dispersal) and an economic part. The biological part used random walks and diffusion equations to describe insect dispersal and to determine the minimum width of the buffer zone required to protect the core area from immigration of pests from outside. In the economic part, the size of the core area was calculated to determine the point at which the revenues from the core area equal the control costs. This model will need to be calibrated and validated for each species and geographic location. Tsetse flies and the Mediterranean fruit fly are used as case studies to illustrate the model. (author)

  12. FAO/IAEA international conference on area-wide control of insect pests: Integrating the sterile insect and related nuclear and other techniques. Book of extended synopses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The successful implementation of area-wide pest control programmes integrating the use of sterile insects with other control technologies against a number of key veterinary, medical and plant insect pests, such as various fruit flies, moths, screwworms, and tsetse species, clearly demonstrates a peaceful application of nuclear technology. Over the last 40 years, FAO and IAEA have played, and they will continue to play, a critical role in supporting their Member States in the development and application of these environment-friendly pest control methods. The concept of area-wide integrated pest management, in which the total population of a pest in an area or region is targeted, is central to the effective application of the Sterile Insect Technique (SIT) and is increasingly being considered for related genetic, biological and other pest control technologies. Insect movement, occurring sometimes over long distances, is generally underestimated. As a consequence, most conventional pest control can be described as localized, un-coordinated action against segments of a pest population, resulting very often in an unsustainable spiral of insecticide application and eventual resistance. However, an area-wide integrated approach adopts a preventive rather than a reactive tactic, whereby all individuals of the pest population are targeted, requiring fewer inputs and resulting in more cost effective and sustainable control. In June 1998 FAO and IAEA sponsored the First International Conference on Area-Wide Control of Insect Pests Integrating the Sterile Insect and Related Nuclear and other Techniques in Penang, Malaysia with the participation of almost 300 participants from 63 Member States and 5 international organizations. This Conference greatly increased awareness concerning the area-wide approach for insect pest control programmes. Since then, many new technical innovations have been introduced and a better regulatory framework is being developed for integrating SIT

  13. Area-wide implementation of integrated pest management in some scented rice-growing tracts of India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scented rice, which is mostly cultivated in the north Indian states of Haryana, Punjab, Uttaranchal and Uttar Pradesh, fetches a high price in domestic and export markets. The yellow stem borer (Sciropophaga incertulas), leaf folder (Cnaphalocrocis medinalis), white back plant hopper (Sogatella furcifera), some occasional pests and a few diseases are the main constraints in achieving the potential yield levels of scented rice cultivars. Farmers use pesticides to get rid of pest problems with meagre knowledge of proper time of application, quantity etc. and as a result they do not get desired control levels. Moreover, excessive use of insecticides often results in reduction of biodiversity of natural enemies, outbreaks of secondary pests and pesticides induced resurgence. The environmental pollution and residues in grains are the other hazards experienced with the indiscriminate use of pesticides. The holistic integrated pest management (IPM) strategy was developed and validated by the National Centre for IPM on some small farms during 1996-1999. This paper reports on the area-wide IPM implemented in two villages of Uttar Pradesh and Haryana states in a farmers' participatory mode during the years 2000 to 2003. Initially, a village namely Shikohpur in Uttar Pradesh was selected, which had a history of excessive and indiscriminate use of pesticides in which the cultivar Pusa Basmati 1 is popularly grown. The area under IPM was 300 ha during 2000, and 400 ha during 2001 and 2002. Another village i.e. Chhajpur in the state of Haryana was selected for IPM implementation during the crop season of 2002 (28 ha) and 2003 (80 ha) in another scented rice cultivar Taraori Local which has more export potential. The main components of the holistic IPM approach were: - Seed treatment to suppress seed borne diseases (no seed treatment in Farmers' Practices (FP)). - Planting of Sesbania aculeate for green manuring after the harvest of wheat crop to reduce dosage of nitrogenous

  14. Economics of area-wide pest control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Area-wide pest management is commonly practised throughout the world, probably much more so than is generally recognised (Lindquist 2000, Klassen 2000). Apart from highly publicised area-wide schemes such as the sterile insect technique (SIT) for fruit flies, pheromone disruption for cotton bollworms and classical biological control, there are many examples of actions such as concerted host plant eradication, enforced closed crop seasons, organised pesticide rotation for resistance management, coordination of resistant crop genotypes, etc., some going back several centuries, which should also be considered as area-wide practices. Each of these is faced with many of the economic issues generally associated with area-wide management which will be discussed below. In general, there are to be four major questions to answer in devising an area-wide pest management programme: 1) Should a particular pest be controlled locally or area-wide? 2) What is an appropriate area over which management should be attempted? 3) Within that area what form of control is most efficient? 4) What level of organisation should be used to get the job done? It should be noted that apart from clearly objective measures such as technical effectiveness (say, mortality) or cost efficiency (mortality per dollar), there are many subjective measures that come into the evaluation of area-wide control due to the element of risk (for example, in quarantine and eradication), the boundaries of externalities (for example, variable probabilities of pesticide drift under different conditions or target organism sensitivities) and time preferences for returns on capital investments (such as insect rearing facilities or research to develop pheromone technologies). As a result of these subjective components, it may sometimes be difficult to reach clearly agreed decisions based on objective economic analyses, even with a consensus on the data used. There are three general classes of economic problems in comparing

  15. Use of geographic information systems and spatial analysis in area-wide integrated pest management programmes that integrate the sterile insect technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The advantages that geographic information systems (GIS) and associated technologies can offer, in terms of the design and implementation of area-wide programmes of insect and/or disease suppression, are becoming increasingly recognised, even if the realization of this potential has not been fully exploited and for some area-wide programmes adoption appears to be progressing slowly. This chapter provides a basic introduction to the science of GIS, Global Positioning System (GPS), and satellite remote sensing (RS), and reviews the principal ways in which these technologies can be used to assist various stages of development of the sterile insect technique (SIT) as part of area-wide integrated pest management (AW-IPM) programmes - from the selection of project sites, and feasibility assessments and planning of pre-intervention surveys, to the monitoring and analysis of insect suppression programmes, and the release of sterile insects. Potential barriers to the successful deployment of GIS tools are also discussed. (author)

  16. Preparing the way for coming area wide integrated pest management projects against the new world screwworm, Cochliomyia hominivorax, in MERCOSUR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mastrangelo, Thiago; Fernandes, Thiago; Walder, Julio, E-mail: piaui@cena.usp.br [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil); Bezerra, Fernando [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia do Sertao Pernambucano (IFSERTAO-PE), Petrolina, PE (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The New World Screwworm (NWS), Cochliomyia hominivorax, was eradicated from the USA, Central America to Panama, but in most tropical regions of Latin America, the NWS is still a serious threat to livestock, provoking estimated annual losses of US$ 1.8 billion in Brazil. Between January and May 2009, a pilot-project was performed at the Brazil-Uruguay border. As the results were positive, novel regional Area-Wide Integrated Pest Management projects are being planned. To set a mass-rearing center based in South America is strategic when considering long-term programs. In partnership with CENA/USP and the Biofactory MOSCAMED Brazil, a project to produce sterile NWS started on 2009. The project aimed to maintain a colony of a regional NWS strain, to develop a mass-rearing system and a sterilization protocol by X rays, and to study the sterility induction in regional strains. A colony was successfully established. The adults were kept in cages and fed on a diet (honey and spray dried egg). The larvae were reared in a medium made of spray dried blood, spray dried egg, milk, water, formalin and Ecogel. Egg hatch has been of 80 {+-} 10%. From F{sub 1} to F{sub 22}, the total amount of pupae produced was about 38 L ({approx} 315,400 pupae). The mean adult emergence and sex ratio were 86.7 {+-} 3% and 0.59 {+-} 0.08 respectively. The mean pupal weight was 47.1 {+-} 1.7 mg. The estimated X ray doses to induce 99% sterility in males and females were 43.7 Gy and 47.5 Gy, respectively. To produce 1.5 L of pupae, the current cost is about US$ 15.00. (author)

  17. Preparing the way for coming area wide integrated pest management projects against the new world screwworm, Cochliomyia hominivorax, in MERCOSUR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The New World Screwworm (NWS), Cochliomyia hominivorax, was eradicated from the USA, Central America to Panama, but in most tropical regions of Latin America, the NWS is still a serious threat to livestock, provoking estimated annual losses of US$ 1.8 billion in Brazil. Between January and May 2009, a pilot-project was performed at the Brazil-Uruguay border. As the results were positive, novel regional Area-Wide Integrated Pest Management projects are being planned. To set a mass-rearing center based in South America is strategic when considering long-term programs. In partnership with CENA/USP and the Biofactory MOSCAMED Brazil, a project to produce sterile NWS started on 2009. The project aimed to maintain a colony of a regional NWS strain, to develop a mass-rearing system and a sterilization protocol by X rays, and to study the sterility induction in regional strains. A colony was successfully established. The adults were kept in cages and fed on a diet (honey and spray dried egg). The larvae were reared in a medium made of spray dried blood, spray dried egg, milk, water, formalin and Ecogel. Egg hatch has been of 80 ± 10%. From F1 to F22, the total amount of pupae produced was about 38 L (∼ 315,400 pupae). The mean adult emergence and sex ratio were 86.7 ± 3% and 0.59 ± 0.08 respectively. The mean pupal weight was 47.1 ± 1.7 mg. The estimated X ray doses to induce 99% sterility in males and females were 43.7 Gy and 47.5 Gy, respectively. To produce 1.5 L of pupae, the current cost is about US$ 15.00. (author)

  18. Economic evaluation of an area-wide integrated pest management program to control the Asian tiger mosquito in New Jersey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepard, Donald S; Halasa, Yara A; Fonseca, Dina M; Farajollahi, Ary; Healy, Sean P; Gaugler, Randy; Bartlett-Healy, Kristen; Strickman, Daniel A; Clark, Gary G

    2014-01-01

    Aedes albopictus is the most invasive mosquito in the world, an important disease vector, and a biting nuisance that limits outdoor activities. Area-wide integrated pest management (AW-IPM) is the recommended control strategy. We conducted an economic evaluation of the AW-IPM project in Mercer and Monmouth Counties, New Jersey with a controlled design (AW-IPM vs. control) from 2009 through 2011. The study analyzed financial documents and staff time for AW-IPM and surveyed an average of 415 randomly chosen households in AW-IPM and control areas each fall from 2008 through 2011. Hours lost from yard and porch activities were calculated as differences between actual and potential hours of these activities in an average summer week if there had been no mosquito concerns. Net estimated benefits of AW-IPM were based on cross-over and difference-in-difference analyses. Reductions in hours lost were valued based on respondents' willingness to pay for a hypothetical extra hour free of mosquitoes spent on yard or porch activities and literature on valuation of a quality adjusted life year (QALY). The incremental cost of AW-IPM per adult was $41.18 per year. Number of hours lost due to mosquitoes in AW-IPM areas between the base year (2008) and the intervention years (2009-2011) declined by 3.30 hours per summer week in AW-IPM areas compared to control areas. Survey respondents valued this improvement at $27.37 per adult per summer week. Over the 13-week summer, an average adult resident gained 42.96 hours of yard and porch time, worth $355.82. The net benefit over the summer was $314.63. With an average of 0.0027 QALYs gained per adult per year, AW-IPM was cost effective at $15,300 per QALY gained. The benefit-cost ratio from hours gained was 8.64, indicating that each $1 spent on AW-IPM gave adults additional porch and yard time worth over $8.

  19. Economic evaluation of an area-wide integrated pest management program to control the Asian tiger mosquito in New Jersey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald S Shepard

    Full Text Available Aedes albopictus is the most invasive mosquito in the world, an important disease vector, and a biting nuisance that limits outdoor activities. Area-wide integrated pest management (AW-IPM is the recommended control strategy. We conducted an economic evaluation of the AW-IPM project in Mercer and Monmouth Counties, New Jersey with a controlled design (AW-IPM vs. control from 2009 through 2011. The study analyzed financial documents and staff time for AW-IPM and surveyed an average of 415 randomly chosen households in AW-IPM and control areas each fall from 2008 through 2011. Hours lost from yard and porch activities were calculated as differences between actual and potential hours of these activities in an average summer week if there had been no mosquito concerns. Net estimated benefits of AW-IPM were based on cross-over and difference-in-difference analyses. Reductions in hours lost were valued based on respondents' willingness to pay for a hypothetical extra hour free of mosquitoes spent on yard or porch activities and literature on valuation of a quality adjusted life year (QALY. The incremental cost of AW-IPM per adult was $41.18 per year. Number of hours lost due to mosquitoes in AW-IPM areas between the base year (2008 and the intervention years (2009-2011 declined by 3.30 hours per summer week in AW-IPM areas compared to control areas. Survey respondents valued this improvement at $27.37 per adult per summer week. Over the 13-week summer, an average adult resident gained 42.96 hours of yard and porch time, worth $355.82. The net benefit over the summer was $314.63. With an average of 0.0027 QALYs gained per adult per year, AW-IPM was cost effective at $15,300 per QALY gained. The benefit-cost ratio from hours gained was 8.64, indicating that each $1 spent on AW-IPM gave adults additional porch and yard time worth over $8.

  20. Population structure of Glossina palpalis gambiensis (Diptera: Glossinidae) between river basins in Burkina Faso : consequences for area-wide integrated pest management

    OpenAIRE

    Bouyer, J.; Ravel, Sophie; Guerrini, L; Dujardin, Jean-Pierre; Sidibé, I.; Vreysen, M.J.B.; Solano, Philippe; De Meeûs, Thierry

    2010-01-01

    African animal trypanosomosis is a major obstacle to the development of more efficient and sustainable livestock production systems in West Africa. Riverine tsetse species such as Glossina palpalis gambiensis Vanderplank are their major vectors. A wide variety of control tactics is available to manage these vectors, but their elimination will only be sustainable if control is exercised following area-wide integrated pest management (AW-IPM) principles, i.e. the control effort is targeting an ...

  1. Recent trends on sterile insect technique and area-wide integrated pest management. Economic feasibility, control projects, farmer organization and Bactrocera dorsalis complex control study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have invited professional papers from over the world, including Okinawa, for compilation of recent trends on Sterile Insect Techniques and Area-Wide Integrated Pest Management to further pursue environment friendly pest insects control measures in agricultural production in the Asia-Pacific region. Pest insects such as the tephritid fruit flies have long been and are still today causing serious damage to agricultural products in the Asia-Pacific region and farmers in the region apply such insecticides that are no longer allowed or being subjected to strict usage control in Japan. This, in return, may endanger the health of the very farmers, food safety and the ecosystem itself. The purpose of this report is, therefore, to clarify keys for technology transfer of so called SIT/AWIPM to potential recipients engaged in agricultural production in the region. This report focused on several topics, which make up important parts for the effective Sterile Insect Technique and Area-Wide Integrated Pest Management: economic feasibility; pest insects control projects; farmers' education; research progress in Bactrocera dorsalis complex issues specific to the Asia-Pacific region. The 12 of the papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  2. FAO/IAEA international conference on area-wide control of insect pests integrating the sterile insect and related nuclear and other techniques. Programme book of abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The organization of this International Conference on the Areawide Approach to the Control of Insect Pests is appropriate and timely. There is increasing interest in the holistic approach to dealing with major insect pest problems. This interest has been prompted by the steady progress scientists have made in the development of the sterile insect technique for eliminating the screwworm from North America, the melon fly from Okinawa, the elimination and containment of the medfly in various countries and the progress that scientists have made in eradicating tsetse fly populations from isolated areas. Increased interest has also been shown by agriculturalists because of the realization that the farm-to-farm reactive method of insect control is only a temporary solution to problems and that pests continue to be about as numerous as ever from year-to-year. In the meantime, there is increasing public concern over the environmental hazards created by the use of broad-spectrum insecticides to deal with insect pest problems. The sterile insect technique provides a feasible way to manage total insect pest populations. However, other techniques and strategies appropriately integrated into management programs can increase the effectiveness and efficiency of area-wide management programs. These include the augmentation of massproduced biological organisms and the use of semiochemicals such as the insect sex pheromones. This conference will give pest management scientists from many countries the opportunity to exchange information on the area-wide approach to insect pest management - an approach that if fully developed can be highly effective, low in cost and at the same time make a major contribution to alleviating the environmental concerns associated with primary reliance on broad-spectrum insecticides for controlling insect pests. This document contains 200 abstracts of papers presented at the conference

  3. Guidelines for the use of mathematics in operational area-wide integrated pest management programs using the sterile insect technique with a special focus on Tephritid Fruit Flies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pest control managers can benefit from using mathematical approaches, particularly models, when implementing area-wide pest control programs that include sterile insect technique (SIT), especially when these are used to calculate required rates of sterile releases to result in suppression or eradica...

  4. Area-wide pest management: Environmental and economic issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Employing area-wide pest management practices best controls several major insect pests of crops and livestock. The screwworm fly that attacks several types of livestock, especially cattle, has been effectively controlled by utilising nuclear energy to sterilise the males. This pest was causing about USD 750 million in damages per year to US livestock. The cotton boll weevil and corn rootworm pests have been effectively controlled using area-wide pest management practices in some regions employing either insecticides or crop rotations. Timed crop planting of wide areas has provided effective against some wheat and rice pests in the USA and Asia. The major challenges facing pest management specialists is the invasion of foreign insect pests into crops, forests, and natural ecosystems. Approximately 40% of the insect and mite pests of the US crops are introduced species and they are causing about USD10 billion in damage and control costs each year. The most recent introductions are the long-horned beetle and the emerald ash-borer, both accidentally introduced from Asia by mistake. The long-horned beetle has become a threat to maple trees in the USA and Canada, while the emerald ash-borer is killing ash trees also in the same region. Area-wide control of these destructive pests is in progress because they are a major threat to valuable tree species in the North American forest ecosystems. (author)

  5. Trade issues and area-wide pest management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Food security and economic security are unarguably desirable objectives for all nations - indeed for the world. Equally important is the sustainability of designs that achieve these objectives without disadvantaging others or damaging the environment. Considering area-wide pest management in the context of these interrelated global policy forces is essential to fully understand its role in both the protection of plant resources and in facilitation of trade. The case for food security begins with the realisation that there are currently about 800 million people in the world who are suffering from malnutrition due to lack of food. The World Food Summit, convened in November 1996, urgently called for coordinated world-wide action to ensure 'food for all'. A key strategy for realising this goal is reducing losses due to plant pests. In this light, area-wide pest management can be viewed as a valuable addition to the toolbox of pest management strategies. It can also be one of the most sustainable and cost-effective options to consider for pest management. However, just as the problem of world hunger is not solved by a single farmer, area-wide pest management cannot be successful at the individual level. It requires commitment and cooperation to make it feasible - the same type of commitment and cooperation that was expressed at the World Food Summit. Where economic security is concerned, one need not look far to see a world of growing economic integration and widening circles of development. As the World Trade Organisation celebrates the 50th anniversary of the rules-based trading system which began with the GATT after World War II, it is clear that globalisation and the liberalisation of trade have become permanent fixtures in international policy formulation and are integral to the economic security of all nations. Now, more than ever before, the world's prosperity rests on maintaining an open international economy based on commonly agreed rules. The significance of

  6. Stratified entomological sampling in preparation for an area-wide integrated pest management program: the example of Glossina palpalis gambiensis (Diptera: Glossinidae) in the Niayes of Senegal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouyer, Jérémy; Seck, Momar Talla; Sall, Baba; Ndiaye, Elhadji Youssou; Guerrini, Laure; Vreysen, Marc J B

    2010-07-01

    The riverine tsetse species Glossina palpalis gambiensis Vanderplank 1949 (Diptera: Glossinidae) inhabits riparian forests along river systems in West Africa. The government of Senegal has embarked on a project to eliminate this tsetse species, and African animal trypanosomoses, from the Niayes area using an area-wide integrated pest management approach. A stratified entomological sampling strategy was therefore developed using spatial analytical tools and mathematical modeling. A preliminary phytosociological census identified eight types of suitable habitat, which could be discriminated from LandSat 7 ETM+ satellite images and denominated wet areas. At the end of March 2009, 683 unbaited Vavoua traps had been deployed, and the observed infested area in the Niayes was 525 km2. In the remaining area, a mathematical model was used to assess the risk that flies were present despite a sequence of zero catches. The analysis showed that this risk was above 0.05 in 19% of this area that will be considered as infested during the control operations. The remote sensing analysis that identified the wet areas allowed a restriction of the area to be surveyed to 4% of the total surface area (7,150 km2), whereas the mathematical model provided an efficient method to improve the accuracy and the robustness of the sampling protocol. The final size of the control area will be decided based on the entomological collection data. This entomological sampling procedure might be used for other vector or pest control scenarios. PMID:20695269

  7. Willingness-to-pay for an area-wide integrated pest management program to control the Asian tiger mosquito in New Jersey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halasa, Yara A; Shepard, Donald S; Wittenberg, Eve; Fonseca, Dina M; Farajollahi, Ary; Healy, Sean; Gaugler, Randy; Strickman, Daniel; Clark, Gary G

    2012-09-01

    Using contingent valuation we estimated the perceived value of an area-wide integrated pest management program for the Asian tiger mosquito, Aedes albopictus, implemented in Monmouth and Mercer counties, NJ. We estimated residents' maximum willingness-to-pay and perceived monetary benefits (willingness-to-pay excluding residents who protested all types of payments) and payment modality through a telephone survey of 51 randomly selected households. The mean (+/- SE) perceived monetary benefits for an enhanced mosquito abatement program was $9.54 +/- 2.90 per capita per year. Most respondents would have been willing to pay through taxes (35%) or charitable donations (6%) starting then, or through one of these approaches in the future (43%), whereas 16% were completely unwilling to pay any additional costs whatsoever. We projected that the perceived monetary benefits to the counties' 1.01 million residents for an enhanced mosquito control program would be $9.61 million annually. Thus, collectively residents perceived monetary benefits of 3.67 times the combined 2008 annual operating costs of the counties' existing mosquito control programs of $2.61 million.

  8. Population structure of Glossina palpalis gambiensis (Diptera: Glossinidae) between river basins in Burkina Faso: consequences for area-wide integrated pest management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouyer, Jérémy; Ravel, Sophie; Guerrini, Laure; Dujardin, Jean-Pierre; Sidibé, Issa; Vreysen, Marc J B; Solano, Philippe; De Meeûs, Thierry

    2010-03-01

    African animal trypanosomosis is a major obstacle to the development of more efficient and sustainable livestock production systems in West Africa. Riverine tsetse species such as Glossina palpalis gambiensis Vanderplank are their major vectors. A wide variety of control tactics is available to manage these vectors, but their elimination will only be sustainable if control is exercised following area-wide integrated pest management (AW-IPM) principles, i.e. the control effort is targeting an entire tsetse population within a circumscribed area. In the present study, genetic variation at microsatellite DNA loci was used to examine the population structure of G. p. gambiensis inhabiting two adjacent river basins, i.e. the Comoé and the Mouhoun River basins in Burkina Faso. A remote sensing analysis revealed that the woodland savannah habitats between the river basins have remained unchanged during the last two decades. In addition, genetic variation was studied in two populations that were separated by a man-made lake originating from a dam built in 1991 on the Comoé. Low genetic differentiation was observed between the samples from the Mouhoun and the Comoé River basins and no differentiation was found between the samples separated by the dam. The data presented indicate that the overall genetic differentiation of G. p. gambiensis populations inhabiting two adjacent river basins in Burkina Faso is low (F(ST)=0.016). The results of this study suggest that either G. p. gambiensis populations from the Mouhoun are not isolated from those of the Comoé, or that the isolation is too recent to be detected. If elimination of the G. p. gambiensis population from the Mouhoun River basin is the selected control strategy, re-invasion from adjacent river basins may need to be prevented by establishing a buffer zone between the Mouhoun and the other river basin(s). PMID:20060501

  9. Pest management strategies: Area-wide and conventional

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conventional Insect Control The usual approach to insect control is to treat the commodity only after a damaging population of insects has developed. In other words, the producer, home owner or casual gardener fights a defensive battle. He reacts to an insect attack. When he sees the enemy or the damage caused by the enemy, he loads up his sprayer with an insecticide and mounts a counter attack. Most insect control procedures are applied by an individual producer on his own relatively small production area. This conventional insect control approach encourages the producer to make his own decisions about whether or not any insect control is to be used, which insect control method or product to use, when to use it, how to use it, who applies it, etc. Advice to producers on insect control is usually available from government extension personnel, private insect control consultants or representatives of companies that sell insecticides or other insect control materials or methods. The conventional procedure results in great variability in the efficacy of insect control because each producer makes his own decisions. The objective of conventional insect control is to protect the commodity. This is usually accomplished by treating the commodity, be it cows or corn or rice in a warehouse. Conventional insect control requires virtually no planning to achieve results. The 'programme' is short-term, frequently measured in days until the next insecticide application is needed. It is reactive (defensive). Area-wide Insect Control Area-wide insect control is applied against an important insect pest over a relatively large area involving many individual producers of the same or similar crops. The 'area' is a combination of geography and the range of hosts of the target insect pest. The term 'area' in 'area-wide' refers to the area where the target insect population survives. The area is not limited to production of the major crop(s) to be protected. It is very likely that a large

  10. Genetic methods for area-wide management of Lepidopterous pests with emphasis on F1 sterility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enormous losses in the production and marketing of food and fiber are caused by larvae of Lepidoptera. Currently, large quantities of insecticides are used to combat these pests. Insecticide resistance, increasing concern over pesticide pollution, and the desire to effectively manage lepidopteran pests on an area-wide basis have motivated scientists to identify and develop new pest management tactics that are compatible with current IPM. Genetic methods have emerged as a promising control strategy for lepidopteran pests. Genetic control as a practical means of pest management was first successfully implemented by Knipling and colleagues in the USA during the 1960's with the sterile insect technique (SIT) program for the screwworm fly. SIT is not a readily adapted for use against Lepidoptera as against Diptera. Radiation-induced inherited sterility (or F1 sterility) is generally considered the most promising genetic methods for large-scale suppression of lepidopteran populations. This papers discusses four genetic control methods that have been developed and the progress that has been made in integrating sterility with other IPM tactics. (author)

  11. Area-wide integration of lepidopteran F1 sterility and augmentative biological control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Area-wide pest management (APM) and integrated pest management (IPM) originated from two different efforts to combine two or more control techniques into programmes in which each method could synergise the effectiveness of others and thus create a level of pest control that was greater than that of a single technique (Perkins 1982). Since then, the concept of APM has evolved to include many aspects of IPM and often is now referred to as area-wide IPM. Still, the element of total population management is central to this approach of insect pest management. In support of APM, Knipling (1998) stated that of the insect pests that were of major concern to agriculture before the newer classes of insecticides were available, most are still pests today, the major exceptions being the screw-worm fly and the boll weevil in the southeastern US cotton growing region. Knipling also noted that both of these pest species were subjected to area-wide suppression programmes. In response to the USDA IPM Initiative (USDA 1993, 1994) which seeks to achieve the national goal of having 75% of the crop acres under IPM by the year 2000, the Agricultural Research Service developed an Area-wide IPM Programme. This programme combines environmentally-sound pest control techniques with the advantages of APM and develops partnerships with other federal, state, local and private sector entities. Technologies such as the integration of lepidopteran F1 sterility and augmentative biological control may be considered for future programmes

  12. Area-wide pest management programmes: Challenges and opportunities for regulatory plant protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The Agreement on the Application of Sanitary and Phytosanitary Measures (SPS Agreement) entered into force for all WTO Member countries in 2000. It states that measures to protect human, animal and plant health or life shall be based on international standards where possible. These measures shall be based on a scientific risk assessment and should be implemented only to the extent necessary to achieve an appropriate level of protection. The International Plant Protection Convention (IPPC) is the international standard setting body for protecting plant health identified in the SPS Agreement. Both international treaties make provision for control of pests at regional levels (regionalisation) and for identification of pest free areas. The IPPC provides guidance to countries, in the form of international standards, on the implementation of pest free areas and pest risk analysis (including Systems Approaches and other risk management measures). The implementation of area-wide pest management programmes should meet IPPC standards. Countries meeting IPPC requirements can take advantage of liberalised trade while maintaining their phytosanitary security. (author)

  13. Farmer education and organization in the Hawaii area-wide fruit fly pest management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A critical component of successful area wide pest management (AWPM) programs are organized, coordinated and comprehensive outreach educational programs. The Hawaii area wide fruit fly pest management (HAW-FLYPM) program's educational program, a part of a USDA AWPM program in Hawaii, utilized the 'logic model' approach to organize, plan, execute and evaluate farmer and community educational programs statewide. The logic model approach was an outcome-driven rather than activity based method that employed a linear sequence that developed relationships between program inputs, outputs and outcomes. This model was utilized extensively to transfer sustainable, science-based technologies to suppress tephritid fruit fly pests. HAW-FLYPM's educational program targeted growers and community door yard growers, three teaching curricula aimed at elementary through high school students, and a statewide awareness program for the pubic at large. Additional key components of the HAW-FLYPM education program was the development of implementation schedules used to track program progress, a comprehensive media matrix developed to ensure educational materials met the needs of target audience groups, and a sustainability calculator to assess the likelihood of program sustainability after the initial five year funding cycle. The model served as a 'blue print' for ensuring program elements were planned, delivered and executed on a timely basis. Utilization of the logic model to organize efforts and manage diverse, multi agency programs such as the HAW-FLYPM program has shown to be a successful method of program advancement and outcome achievement. (author)

  14. Developing critical partnerships in area-wide pest management programmes: The Hawaii experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Aside from the technical issues that form the basis of any successful area-wide programme, significant attention must be made to programme organisation and development of partnerships that facilitate the large numbers of non-technical issues that must be addressed in a successful area-wide programme. The recent experience with the Hawaii area-wide fruit fly integrated pest management programme (HAW-FLYPM) is a recent example of the trials and tribulations that occur when one attempts to set up such a programme. In our example, USDA-ARS researchers (and their predecessors) from the US Pacific Basin Agr. Res. Center had developed much of overarching strategies that are used today for the detection, control and eradication of many tephritid fruit fly species, especially Mediterranean fruit fly, oriental fruit fly and melon fly, all species that have become established in Hawaii over the last 100 years. Early researchers were responsible for such seminal technologies as the development of low cost diets for mass-rearing, attractants for several fruit fly species, early demonstrations of SIT against fruit flies and more recently development of augmentative biological control strategies against fruit flies. These early discoveries have been refined and improved by many USDA and non-USDA researchers over the subsequent decades but the basic technologies have remained the same. While credit must be given for those pioneers in Hawaii who set the stage for area-wide fruit fly control technologies, the presence of plantation agriculture in the form of sugarcane and pineapple overshadowed any strong movement to apply the Hawaii-based technologies in their backyard. Instead the application of these technologies was showcased outside the state of Hawaii. The decline of both sugar cane and pineapple in Hawaii has brought about a renewed interest in diversified ag in Hawaii and with it the resurgence of the fruit fly issue due to its impact on production, trade and

  15. Designing and implementing a geographical information system: A guide for managers of area-wide pest management programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the past two decades, the use of computer software and mapping methods known as geographical information systems (GIS) has been adopted by an ever growing variety of professionals. Every activity that deals with location dependent information can use GIS, and agriculture is no exception. The potential of GIS and remote sensing (RS) to facilitate the planning and implementation of areawide integrated pest management (AW-IPM) programmes is enormous but unfortunately, these methods are still much underused. AW-IPM programmes, especially those that integrate the sterile insect technique (SIT) with other surveillance and control methods, would benefit considerably by drawing on GIS/RS. These programmes are often implemented over large areas of even tens of thousands of square kilometres, where surveillance methods are deployed and large data sets are systematically generated on a daily basis. The acquisition of geo-referenced data sets on pest presence/absence, relative abundance, disease prevalence, crop damage, etc., that will allow accurate spatial and temporal analysis is important for proper and timely decision making to efficiently plan and implement any operational pest management programme. Animal health and plant protection officials and pest control programme managers might be intuitively aware of the importance of employing GIS as an analytical tool. However, they often lack a deeper understanding of its capabilities. Since GIS is a desk exercise using computers, data analysis is often left to the computer staff without proper directives from the programme managers on programmatic needs. This is unfortunate as it will usually NOT bring the desired GIS-processed information to the decision makers. This manual targets area-wide pest control programme administrators and managers of FAO and IAEA Member States in an attempt to demonstrate the type of data processing and spatial analysis that can be expected of GIS. The manual does not aim to provide

  16. Targeted Trapping, Bait-spray, Sanitation, Sterile-male and Parasitoid Releases in an Area Wide Integrated Melon Fly (Diptera: Tephritidae) Control Program in Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    An area wide integrated pest management approach to melon fly Bactrocera cucurbitae (Diptera:Tephritidae) suppression in Kamuela, Hawaii, was undertaken as part of a larger state-wide program by the United States Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Area Wide Initiative. After a...

  17. Area-wide control of fruit flies and other insect pests. Joint proceedings of the international conference on area-wide control of insect pests and the fifth international symposium on fruit flies of economic importance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the world population attaining the six billion mark, the urgency of increasing quality food production and reducing the spread of diseases transmitted by insects, without affecting our fragile environment, will be of paramount importance. Losses currently experienced in agricultural production, due to insect pests and through diseases transmitted by insect vectors, are very high especially in developing and poor countries. Many insect pests and vectors are of economic importance, and several such as fruit flies, mosquitoes and tsetse flies have attracted international concerns. Most pests are traditionally controlled through heavy reliance on pesticides which can cause environmental pollution, pesticide resistance, and pest resurgence. The control, management or eradication of insect pests and vectors with minimal adverse impact on our food quality, environment, health and well-being should be of great concern to many agriculturists, biological and physical scientists as well as to national and international agencies responsible for pest control. Steps taken by the various concerned agencies to improve and implement the area-wide control will hopefully lead us into the next millennium free from major insect pests and vectors while at the same time protect our precarious global environment. This volume is the culmination of proceedings conducted in two recent international meetings, FAO/IAEA International Conference on Area-Wide Control of Insect Pests, 28 May - 2 June 1998, and the Fifth International Symposium on Fruit Flies of Economic Importance, 1-5 June 1998, held in Penang, Malaysia. Over three hundred papers (both oral contributions and posters) were presented at the two meetings. The manuscripts submitted by authors are divided according to broad topics into eighteen sections originally defined by the organisers as corresponding to the sessions of the meetings. The organisers identified one to several individuals in each of the sessions to deliver an

  18. Lessons learned from area-wide insect pest management programmes with an SIT component: an FAO/IAEA perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The area-wide integrated pest management (AW-IPM) approach, which entails the integration of various control tactics addressing an entire insect pest population within a circumscribed geographical area, is undoubtedly the most rational control strategy available against major insect pests of agricultural and medical/veterinary importance. The concept of interfering with the reproductive capacity of major insect pests (i.e. the Sterile Insect Technique (SIT)) has considerably evolved since its original description by Knipling in the in the 1950's. To date, the SIT, which relies on the sequential release of sterile male insects in the target area, is increasingly being considered as one of many complementary methods to be integrated in an AW-IPM approach. Four major strategic options of area-wide IPM programmes with an SIT component can be distinguished and have been implemented successfully worldwide, leading to: (i) the eradication of the insect pest (e.g. the New World screwworm (NWS) in Libya; the Mediterranean fruit fly in Chile and in the Patagonia region of Argentina), (ii) its containment (e.g. the Mediterranean fruit fly containment programme in Guatemala and Mexico) and (iii) its prevention (e.g. the Mediterranean fruit fly preventative programme in California and Florida) or (iv) its suppression (e.g. the codling moth suppression programme in British Columbia, Canada or the suppression of the Mediterranean fruit fly in the Arava/Araba Valley of Israel/Jordan and in the Hex River Valley of the Western Cape, South Africa). These programmes have directly or indirectly benefited from support by the IAEA and the FAO through i.) Technical Cooperation projects with its Member States, ii.) the implementation of coordinated research and development (R and D) efforts, iii.) 'problem-solving' research and iv.) normative activities. This support often includes the development of local technical capacity for the economic assessment, the rearing of flies

  19. Integrated Pest Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Council on Environmental Quality, Washington, DC.

    After a brief discussion of the problems of pesticide use and the status of current pest control practices, a definition of integrated pest management is given along with some examples of its successful application, and a description of some of the reasons why the concept has not been applied more widely. The major techniques which can be used as…

  20. Use of attractant traps in area-wide control of vegetable insect pests in the Jiangxi province of China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Plutella xylostella (L.), Prodenia litura (Fabricius) and Laphyqma exiqua Huebner are main insect pests of vegetables in the Jiangxi province. The long-term use of pesticides to control these pests has caused serious problems such as resistance to pesticides and resurgence of pests as well as pollution to environment and vegetables. Sex attractants have been used for area-wide control of these pests to solve these problems and to produce pollution-free vegetables. Based on the principles of effective, economic and operational implementation, two types of traps made of used plastic cola bottles (1.25L) and oil bottles (2.5L), have been used in 2,250 ha of vegetables in 2001-2003. Traps have been baited with pest-specific attractants incorporated in a rubber wick and placed in vegetable fields at a density of 45 traps per ha. The area-wide use of sex attractants to control these pests has resulted in the decrease of densities of male adults, eggs and larva of these pests and the increase of vegetable yield. An average of 2.34, 2.1, 2.85 male P. xylostella (L.), P. litura (Fabricius) and L. exiqua Huebner was trapped per day respectively with the cola bottle trap, and 3.22, 0.63, 4.33 male P. xylostella (L.), P. litura (Fabricius) and L. exiqua Huebner was trapped per day respectively oil bottle trap. Comparing trap area with non-trap area, egg density of P. xylostella (L.) on radish plants and cabbage plants was decreased by 84.48% and 85.38%, respectively and larva density of P. xylostella (L.) on radish plants and cabbage plants was decreased by 89.62% and 89.93%, respectively. The egg and larva density of L. exiqua Huebner was reduced by 66.67% and 64.47%, respectively and the percent of damaged host plants and leaves was reduced by 83.48% and 75.85%, respectively. The larva density of P. litura (Fabricius) was reduced by 24.92% and the percent of damaged host plants was reduced by 35.52%. The vegetable yield per ha has been increased by 30% on average

  1. Area-wide approaches to insect pest management: history and lessons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    World agriculture is now entering a very trying era because currently our numbers are expanding by more than 90 million additional people per year. Demographers project that our growth will not drop below 90 million people per year until about 2020 (United Nations 1993, Nygaard 1998). The challenge is to increase food production every three or four years sufficiently to feed an additional population equivalent to that of Western Europe or North America. The land available for agriculture on a per capita basis is becoming progressively more limited so than in 2010, on average, 1 hectare in developing countries will have to feed 5 people, and in South Asia, 1 hectare will have to feed 8 people (Alexandratos 1995, Klassen 1995). On an average, 66 percent of the additional food must come from increased yields, and in South Asia, fully 80 percent must come from increased yields. The balance will come from expanding the area cultivated and use of intensified cropping systems. However, this is not a simple matter since pest populations tend to be favoured by yield-boosting measures. Since population growth rates recede as people overcome poverty, and since increasing food production is the principal means of overcoming poverty in many countries, it is imperative that in the decades immediately ahead major improvements be made in reducing losses to pests and in other yield enhancing measures

  2. Integrated Pest Management

    OpenAIRE

    Sagers, Larry A.

    2006-01-01

    Integrated pest management, in which the conventional pesticides are augmented by one or more nonchemical control practices, has been receiving renewed interest. What is new in this revitalization of an old technique is the careful and more knowledgeable application of a variety of control techniques.

  3. Integrated pest management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An effective Integrated Pest Management (IPM) programme requires a thorough knowledge of the biology of the target species, namely information on the dispersal, population densities and dynamics as well as the ecology of the natural enemies of the pest. Studies on these can be accomplished by radiolabelling techniques. In the event that conditions prevent the use of radioisotopes the insects can be labelled with either a rare earth or stable isotopes. All insects treated with the rare earths, once captured, are exposed to neutrons which produce radioactivity in the rare earths. There are two other approaches in the practical application of radiation to the problem of insect control: the exposure of insects to lethal doses of radiation and the release of sterile insects. The Insect and Pest Control Section contributes to all aspects of the sterile insect technique (SIT) and it is involved in the Agency's Coordinated Research Programme which permits scientists from the developing countries to meet to discuss agricultural problems and to devise means of solving crop-pest infestation problems by using isotopes and radiation. The success of radiation in insect pest control was underlined and reviewed at the international symposium on the sterile insect technique and the use of radiation in genetic insect control jointly organized by the FAO and the IAEA and held in the FRG in 1981. Another important action is the BICOT programme in Nigeria between the IAEA and the Government of Nigeria on the biological control of tsetse flies by SIT

  4. The Hawaii Fruit Fly Area-Wide Pest Management Programme: Influence of a good education and partnerships in a successful programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Introduction: In 1999, USDA-ARS launched the 'Hawaii Fruit Fly Area-Wide Pest Management (AWPM) Program' as a 5-yr programme to suppress fruit flies below economic thresholds while reducing the use of organophosphate insecticides. The programme involved developing and integrating biologically-based pest technologies into a comprehensive management package that will be economically viable, environmentally sensitive and sustainable. Technologies included: 1) field sanitation, 2) protein bait sprays and/or traps, 3) male annihilation with male lures and attractants, and if needed, 4) augmentative parasitoid releases and 5) sterile insect releases. Many of these technologies were developed by ARS in Hawaii; however, they had never been packaged and transferred to Hawaiian farmers. Education: A critical component of successful area-wide pest management (AWPM) programmes is an organised, coordinated and comprehensive outreach educational programme. The Hawaii area-wide fruit fly pest management (HAW-FLYPM) programme's educational programme, utilised the 'logic model' approach to organise, plan, execute and evaluate farmer and community educational programmes statewide. The logic model approach was an outcome-driven rather than activity-based method that employed a linear sequence that developed relationships between programme inputs, outputs and outcomes. This model was utilised extensively to transfer sustainable, science-based technologies to suppress tephritid fruit fly pests. HAW-FLYPM's educational programme targeted growers and community door yard growers, three teaching curricula aimed at elementary through high school students, and a statewide awareness programme for the public at large. Additional key components of the HAWFLYPM education programme was the development of implementation schedules used to track programme progress, a comprehensive media matrix developed to ensure educational materials met the needs of target audience groups, and a

  5. Environmentally-safe pest control using novel bioelectrostatic techniques: Initial results and prospects for area-wide usage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    active materials. Long-lasting charge retention is perhaps the most important factor. Pesticide Slow-acting approved insecticides in a dry powder formulation can be applied to an insect long enough for it to be killed. The knock-down time can be varied between one and three days for certain synthetic insecticides, or over four days for biological insecticides, during which time the insect behaves normally. Spores of the entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium can be used as biological insecticides, for example. Dry spores of the fungus can be formulated with suitable electrostatically chargeable particles. Particle Transfer There is a high rate of loss of particles during the first 48 hours, particularly from hairs and other projections of the insect (after which the loss is very low). This means that particles are readily transferred to females in mating attempts. A Selective Attractant Pheromones or parapheromone attractants for males are available for almost all of the major insect pest species. Control by trapping males alone, however, is generally not a viable method because over 90% must be trapped to ensure that sufficient eggs in the next generation are infertile. A Dissemination Station Bait stations have been developed which retain formulated powders, minimising their loss by wind and facilitating transfer to insects (Patent applied for). This method mimics a natural epidemic infective process (such as a sexually-transmitted disease), with the following advantages: insecticides do not come into contact with the crop or soil, extremely small amounts of insecticide are used, the method targets the pest species only, and others (beneficial insects etc.) are unaffected materials are all low-cost, unskilled labour is required only for placing devices around the crop, does not preclude the use of other methods that might be used in integrated pest management, the way is open to using a range of pesticides to which insects have not previously been exposed and to which

  6. The basic principles of the application of sterile insect technique for area-wide insect pest control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sterile Insect Technique (SIT) is a new insect pest control technique, potential, and compatible to other techniques. This technique includes irradiation of insect colony in the laboratory using gamma, n, or x-rays and then release them in the field periodically to obtain the increase of sterility probability level from the first generation to the dependence as the result the decrease of the fertility level in the field. The effect the release of sterile insects ( 9:1 ratio to the male indigenous and reproductive potential every single female of each generation reproduce 5 females ) to the insect reduction population model is conceptually discussed. From one million of the female parental decrease to be 26, 316; 1,907; 10; and 0 insects at the first, second, third, and the forth progeny respectively. Then if sterile insect technique integrated with chemical technique (insecticide) 90% kill, it will be much more effective compared to the application sterile insect technique only. From the number of one million population of insects will decrease to be 2,632; 189; and 0 insects at the first, second, and the third progeny respectively. In the Lepidoptera insects was found a phenomenon of inherited sterility. According to Knipling (1970) the inherited sterility in the first offspring caused by chromosome translocation in the gamete . In the individual of heterozygote will be die and in the homozygotes is still alive. Interspecific hybrid sterility first time was found by Laster (1972) from a cross between males Heliothis virescens (F) and females Heliothis subflexa Guenee. Male moths of the first offspring from the cross between H. virescens and H. subflexa is sterile and the females still remain fertile. If the female moths of the first offspring back crossed with male H. virescens the phenomenon of sterility always found will same situation as mention earlier the male offspring is sterile and the females is fertile ( the male F2 will be sterile and the females will

  7. Hanford site integrated pest management plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giddings, R.F.

    1996-04-09

    The Hanford Site Integrated Pest Management Plan (HSIPMP) defines the Integrated Pest Management (IPM) decision process and subsequent strategies by which pest problems are to be solved at all Hanford Site properties per DOE-RL Site Infrastructure Division memo (WHC 9505090). The HSIPMP defines the roles that contractor organizations play in supporting the IPM process. In short the IPM process anticipates and prevents pest activity and infestation by combining several strategies to achieve long-term pest control solutions.

  8. Adopting Integrated Pest Management in Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currie, William E.

    1991-01-01

    The development of an effective Integrated Pest Management program is discussed. Provided are the common goals and procedures involved in adopting an Integrated Pest Management program for schools. (CW)

  9. Area-wide pest management of locusts and grasshoppers: The striking similarities of problems and solutions in Africa and the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grasshoppers and locusts are among the most devastating pests of human agriculture. These insects cause serious damage to crops and forage on every arable continent, and their depredations have become the basis for legends, myths, and (in recent times) complex political and economic programmes. No pest problem spans such immense areas, with up to 8 million ha treated for rangeland grasshoppers during outbreaks in the US and 16 million km2 prone to outbreaks of the Desert locust, Schistocerca gregaria Forskal, alone. The traditional management approach has involved extensive, regionalised control programmes, but recent trends suggest a decentralised future for grasshopper and locust management. Hence, we have a dynamic situation that presents the opportunity for a comparative analysis of the costs and benefits of an area-wide approach to pest management at different scales. As political, cultural, and communication barriers between scientists dissolve, the possibility of learning from one another's experiences (both failures and successes) promises to dramatically accelerate the rate of innovation, progress and discovery in pest management. For example, the recent advances in Reduced Agent-Area Treatments (RAAT, in which insecticide is applied to swaths, separated by untreated swaths or buffers) for management of rangeland grasshoppers in the US (Lockwood and Schell 1997) are based on the adaptation of tactics developed by African, Australian, Asian, and European scientists (Rachadi and Foucart 1996, Musuna and Mugisha 1997, Scherer and Celestin 1997, Wilps and Diop 1997, Launois and Rachadi 1997). The key to successful adaptation of management methods must begin with intellectual modesty and nationalistic humility so that the insights of non-scientists and experts from outside one's country are given respect and serious consideration. It is subsequently necessary to recognise the essential similarities and differences between land use systems and understand the

  10. Integrated Management of Structural Pests in Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illinois State Dept. of Public Health, Springfield.

    The state of Illinois is encouraging schools to better inspect and evaluate the causes of their pest infestation problems through use of the Integrated Pest Management (IPM) guidelines developed by the Illinois Department of Public Health. This guide reviews the philosophy and organization of an IPM program for structural pests in schools,…

  11. Area-wide integrated control of oriental fruit fly (Bactrocera dorsalis) and Guava Fruit Fly (Bactrocera correcta) in Thailand using the sterile insect technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Two tephritid species, Bactrocera dorsalis and B. correcta are the major insect pests of fruit production in Thailand, causing yield loss and quality degradation. This leads to quarantine restrictions from importing countries. After one decade of effective cooperation between IAEA and Thailand, DOAE an area-wide integrated fruit fly management programme has been established with a Sterile Insect Technique (SIT) component. This is underway in two distinctive pilot areas in Ratchaburi (western) and Pichit (northern) provinces, approximately 70 km2. The ongoing programme is aimed at controlling, Bactrocera dorsalis and B. correcta, the key pests of mango. Both species are mass-reared and sterilised at the facility located in the Pathumthani province following standard operational procedures. Currently sterilised pupae, 20 million B. dorsalis and 10 million B. correcta, are transported to the pilot areas, held until adult emergence and ground released. Quality control of the release is monitored through use of a trapping network to monitor the distribution and abundance of wild and sterile flies whilst success of the control is monitored using periodic fruit sampling to assess the percentage of fruit infested. The integrated approach has been effective in controlling fruit flies by reducing damage from over 80% to an average of less than 5% in Ratchaburi province in the past three years. Meanwhile in Pichit province, which has been under a control programme for 2 years, the percentage of infestation has been reduced from 43% to 16%. We also address the use of public relations, grower cooperation and integration of multidisciplinary research for the field operations. (author)

  12. Insect Pathogenic Bacteria in Integrated Pest Management

    OpenAIRE

    Luca Ruiu

    2015-01-01

    The scientific community working in the field of insect pathology is experiencing an increasing academic and industrial interest in the discovery and development of new bioinsecticides as environmentally friendly pest control tools to be integrated, in combination or rotation, with chemicals in pest management programs. In this scientific context, market data report a significant growth of the biopesticide segment. Acquisition of new technologies by multinational Ag-tech companies is the cent...

  13. Integrated Pest Management. A Curriculum Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, Robert H., Ed.; And Others

    This book consists of materials prepared for a conference aimed at developing courses of study in Integrated Pest Management appropriate for use at several levels: secondary schools, MDTA programs, community colleges and technical institutions, baccalaureate programs, and master's and doctoral level programs. The first section (Background Papers)…

  14. Insect Pathogenic Bacteria in Integrated Pest Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiu, Luca

    2015-01-01

    The scientific community working in the field of insect pathology is experiencing an increasing academic and industrial interest in the discovery and development of new bioinsecticides as environmentally friendly pest control tools to be integrated, in combination or rotation, with chemicals in pest management programs. In this scientific context, market data report a significant growth of the biopesticide segment. Acquisition of new technologies by multinational Ag-tech companies is the center of the present industrial environment. This trend is in line with the requirements of new regulations on Integrated Pest Management. After a few decades of research on microbial pest management dominated by Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt), novel bacterial species with innovative modes of action are being discovered and developed into new products. Significant cases include the entomopathogenic nematode symbionts Photorhabdus spp. and Xenorhabdus spp., Serratia species, Yersinia entomophaga, Pseudomonas entomophila, and the recently discovered Betaproteobacteria species Burkholderia spp. and Chromobacterium spp. Lastly, Actinobacteria species like Streptomyces spp. and Saccharopolyspora spp. have gained high commercial interest for the production of a variety of metabolites acting as potent insecticides. With the aim to give a timely picture of the cutting-edge advancements in this renewed research field, different representative cases are reported and discussed. PMID:26463190

  15. Insect Pathogenic Bacteria in Integrated Pest Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Ruiu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The scientific community working in the field of insect pathology is experiencing an increasing academic and industrial interest in the discovery and development of new bioinsecticides as environmentally friendly pest control tools to be integrated, in combination or rotation, with chemicals in pest management programs. In this scientific context, market data report a significant growth of the biopesticide segment. Acquisition of new technologies by multinational Ag-tech companies is the center of the present industrial environment. This trend is in line with the requirements of new regulations on Integrated Pest Management. After a few decades of research on microbial pest management dominated by Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt, novel bacterial species with innovative modes of action are being discovered and developed into new products. Significant cases include the entomopathogenic nematode symbionts Photorhabdus spp. and Xenorhabdus spp., Serratia species, Yersinia entomophaga, Pseudomonas entomophila, and the recently discovered Betaproteobacteria species Burkholderia spp. and Chromobacterium spp. Lastly, Actinobacteria species like Streptomyces spp. and Saccharopolyspora spp. have gained high commercial interest for the production of a variety of metabolites acting as potent insecticides. With the aim to give a timely picture of the cutting-edge advancements in this renewed research field, different representative cases are reported and discussed.

  16. Biointensive Integrated Pest Management for Bt Cotton

    OpenAIRE

    N. Sathiah; Balagurunathan, R.; P.S. Shanmugam

    2006-01-01

    Biointensive Integrated Pest Management (BIPM) modules were compared with the Farmers` Package of Practices (FPP) for MECH 162 Bt and MECH 162 N Bt The incidence of leaf hopper, aphids, thrips and whiteflies in different modules was in the order of FPP-MECH 162 Bt > BIPM MECH 162 Bt > BIPM MECH 162 N Bt > FPP MECH 162 N Bt. Natural enemies population were more in BIPM modules than the FPP. Coccinellids such as Menochilus sexmaculatus, Coccinella transversalis and spiders Oxyopes spp., Argiope...

  17. Almond growers rely on pest control advisers for integrated pest management

    OpenAIRE

    Brodt, Sonja; Zalom, Frank; Krebill-Prather, Rose; Bentley, Walt; Pickel, Carolyn; Connell, Joseph; Wilhoit, Larry; Gibbs, Marcia

    2005-01-01

    A comprehensive survey of full-time almond growers in the three primary almond-producing regions of California showed that growers rely substantially on pest control advisers (PCAs) for pest management decision-making. Independent PCAs communicated more frequently with growers than PCAs who are employed by agricultural product suppliers. Growers who use independent PCAs tend to feel more knowledgeable about integrated pest management (IPM) and report the use of more complex pest-monitoring te...

  18. Integrated Pest Management Plan : Shiawassee National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The objectives of any Integrated Pest Management Plan must ensure the primary goals of Shiawassee NWR are met while using the best techniques to minimize pest...

  19. Integrated Pest Management Plan Medicine Lake National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of the Integrated Pest Management Plan is to provide a comprehensive, environmentally sensitive approach to managing pests on the Medicine Lake NWR. The...

  20. Inspect, Detect, Correct: Structural Integrated Pest Management Strategies at School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jochim, Jerry

    2003-01-01

    Describes a model integrated pest management (IPM) program for schools used in Monroe County, Indiana. Addresses how to implement an IPM program, specific school problem areas, specific pest problems and solutions, and common questions. (EV)

  1. Integrated Pest Management Plan for Sand Lake NWR Complex

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of the Integrated Pest Management Plan is to provide a comprehensive, environmentally sensitive approach to managing pests on the Sand Lake WMD. The...

  2. Arrowwood National Wildlife Refuge Complex Integrated Pest Management Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of the Integrated Pest Management Plan is to provide a comprehensive, environmentally sensitive approach to managing pests on the Arrowwood NWRC. The...

  3. Integrated Pest Management Plan : Kulm Wetland Management District 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of the Integrated Pest Management Plan is to provide a comprehensive, environmentally sensitive approach to managing pests on the Kulm WMD. The goals...

  4. Integrated Pest Management Plan Browns Park National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of the Integrated Pest Management Plan is to provide a comprehensive, environmentally sensitive approach to managing pests on the Browns Park National...

  5. Integrated Pest Management Plan - Fish Springs National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of the Integrated Pest Management Plan is to provide a comprehensive, environmentally sensitive approach to managing pests on the Fish Springs NWR. The...

  6. Integrated Pest Management Plan Kulm Wetland Management District 1999

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of the Integrated Pest Management Plan is to provide a comprehensive, environmentally sensitive approach to managing pests on the Kulm WMD. The goals...

  7. Integrated Pest Management Plan Ouray National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of the Integrated Pest Management Plan is to provide a comprehensive, environmentally sensitive approach to managing pests on the Ouray NWR. The goals...

  8. Integrated Pest Management in Rice: Integrating Economics, Extension and Policy

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, John

    1988-01-01

    Since 1980, a project on integrated pest management in rice has been operating in seven countries of the South/South East ASian Region through the Food and Agriculture Organisation. Austral1a has been an instigator and act1 va finanOial '\

  9. Biointensive Integrated Pest Management for Bt Cotton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Sathiah

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Biointensive Integrated Pest Management (BIPM modules were compared with the Farmers` Package of Practices (FPP for MECH 162 Bt and MECH 162 N Bt The incidence of leaf hopper, aphids, thrips and whiteflies in different modules was in the order of FPP-MECH 162 Bt > BIPM MECH 162 Bt > BIPM MECH 162 N Bt > FPP MECH 162 N Bt. Natural enemies population were more in BIPM modules than the FPP. Coccinellids such as Menochilus sexmaculatus, Coccinella transversalis and spiders Oxyopes spp., Argiope spp., Neoscona spp., Araenus spp. and Plexippus spp. were frequently observed in the field trials. Incidence of bollworm population was more in winter field trial than that in the summer field trials. Fruiting bodies damage, open boll, locule and inter locule damage in different modules was in the order of BIPM MECH 162 Bt > FPP MECH 162 Bt > BIPM MECH 162 N Bt > FPP MECH 162 N Bt. Seed cotton yield in BIPM MECH 162 Bt, BIPM MECH 162 N Bt, FPP MECH 162 Bt and FPP MECH 162 N Bt modules at Alandurai field trial were 1920, 1640, 1800 and 1440 kg ha-1. The results indicated the better performance of Bt cotton in both the modules. BIPM approach reduces the insecticide usage. The IPM approach is essential for gaining higher advantage from Bt cotton as it takes care of varying pest situation.

  10. A Practical Guide to Management of Common Pests in Schools. Integrated Pest Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illinois State Dept. of Public Health, Springfield.

    This 3-part manual is designed to assist school officials understand the principles of Integrated Pest Management and aid them in implementing those principles into a comprehensive pest control program in their facilities. Developed for Illinois, this guide can be applied in part or in total to other areas of the country. Part 1 explains what an…

  11. Integrated pest management: theoretical insights from a threshold policy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Michel I. da Silveira [Laboratorio Nacional de Computacao Cientifica (LNCC), Petropolis, RJ (Brazil)], e-mail: michel@lncc.br; Faria, Lucas del B. [Universidade Federal de Lavras, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Biologia. Setor de Ecologia], e-mail: lucasdbf@gmail.com

    2010-01-15

    An Integrated Pest Management is formulated as a threshold policy. It is shown that when this strategy is applied to a food web consisting of generalist, specialist predators and endemic and pest prey, the dynamics can be stable and useful from the pest control point of view, despite the dynamical complexities inherent to the application of biocontrol only. In addition, pesticide toxicity depends rather on the species intrinsic parameters than on the chemical agent concentration. (author)

  12. Integrated pest management: theoretical insights from a threshold policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An Integrated Pest Management is formulated as a threshold policy. It is shown that when this strategy is applied to a food web consisting of generalist, specialist predators and endemic and pest prey, the dynamics can be stable and useful from the pest control point of view, despite the dynamical complexities inherent to the application of biocontrol only. In addition, pesticide toxicity depends rather on the species intrinsic parameters than on the chemical agent concentration. (author)

  13. Bt maize and integrated pest management--a European perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meissle, Michael; Romeis, Jörg; Bigler, Franz

    2011-09-01

    The European corn borer (Ostrinia nubilalis), the Mediterranean corn borer (Sesamia nonagrioides) and the western corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera) are the main arthropod pests in European maize production. Practised pest control includes chemical control, biological control and cultural control such as ploughing and crop rotation. A pest control option that is available since 1996 is maize varieties that are genetically engineered (GE) to produce insecticidal compounds. GE maize varieties available today express one or several genes from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) that target corn borers or corn rootworms. Incentives to growing Bt maize are simplified farm operations, high pest control efficiency, improved grain quality and ecological benefits. Limitations include the risk of resistance evolution in target pest populations, risk of secondary pest outbreaks and increased administration to comply with licence agreements. Growers willing to plant Bt maize in the European Union (EU) often face the problem that authorisation is denied. Only one Bt maize transformation event (MON810) is currently authorised for commercial cultivation, and some national authorities have banned cultivation. Spain is the only EU member state where Bt maize adoption levels are currently delivering farm income gains near full potential levels. In an integrated pest management (IPM) context, Bt maize can be regarded as a preventive (host plant resistance) or a responsive pest control measure. In any case, Bt maize is a highly specific tool that efficiently controls the main pests and allows combination with other preventive or responsive measures to solve other agricultural problems including those with secondary pests.

  14. Challenges of Integrated Pest Management in Sub-Saharan Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huis, van A.

    2009-01-01

    a response to the negative side effects of chemical control in the developed world, Integrated Pest Management (IPM) developed with an emphasis on reducing the role of pesticides. Later the role of natural enemies was recognized as being the cornerstone for sustainable pest management strategies. Th

  15. Study on Integrated Pest Management for Libraries and Archives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Thomas A.

    This study addresses the problems caused by the major insect and rodent pests and molds and mildews in libraries and archives; the damage they do to collections; and techniques for their prevention and control. Guidelines are also provided for the development and initiation of an Integrated Pest Management program for facilities housing library…

  16. An Integrated Pest Management Tool for Evaluating Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Blake; Hurley, Janet; Merchant, Mike

    2016-01-01

    Having the ability to assess pest problems in schools is essential for a successful integrated pest management (IPM) program. However, such expertise can be costly and is not available to all school districts across the United States. The web-based IPM Calculator was developed to address this problem. By answering questions about the condition of…

  17. Pest Private Eye: Using an Interactive Role-Playing Video Game to Teach about Pests and Integrated Pest Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Erin; Ogg, Clyde

    2011-01-01

    The trend toward encouraging adoption of Integrated Pest Management (IPM) in schools has increased in the last decade. Because IPM helps reduce risk of human pesticide exposure, reduce allergens and asthma triggers, save energy, and protect the environment, it's essential that IPM awareness continue not only with current school administrators,…

  18. Integrated Pest Management as European standard – is it possible?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Nilsen

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available As part of the work within the European Committee for Standardization (CEN, standards for conservation of cultural property are being developed in CEN/TC (Technical Committee 346, Conservation of Cultural Property. In Working Group 4 Environment, a draft is being prepared to create a proposal for standardised Integrated Pest Management. The author of this paper welcomes delegates to the Meeting on Cultural Heritage Pests in Piacenza to contribute to the discussion regarding standardised methods for pest control in the cultural heritage sector.

  19. Targeted Cue-lure Trapping, Bait-spray, Sanitation, Sterile-male and Parasitoid Releases in an Area Wide Integrated Melon Fly (Diptera: Tephritidae) Control Program in Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Introduction: An area wide IPM approach to melon fly Bactrocera cucurbitae (Diptera:Tephritidae) suppression was undertaken as part of a Hawaii state-wide program funded by USDA-ARS Area Wide Initiative. Methods: A grid of 1 cuelure trap/ km2 over 40 km2 was established in Kamuela, HI to pinpoint ...

  20. Integration of inherited sterility and other pest management strategies for Helicoverpa zea: Status and potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The corn earworm, Helicoverpa zea (Boddie), is one of the most destructive pests of field crops in the United States of America. Currently, control of H. zea is achieved almost entirely through the use of synthetic insecticides. However, successful application of the inherited sterility principle to a wild population of H. zea during a pilot test has encouraged further development of this pest control strategy. Data from recent studies and population models suggest that the full potential of inherited sterility as an area wide control strategy for H. zea and other lepidopteran pests may be realized only when inherited sterility is integrated with other suppression methods. Applications of singular, non-insecticidal methods for area wide suppression of H. zea have had limited success and have been vulnerable to temporary programme failures (e.g. inclement weather, reduced insect rearing output, etc.). An integrated approach would be horizontally diversified through the use of several strategies which use different modes of action and, therefore, would be less vulnerable to temporary programme failures than would a single strategy. Combining two or more control strategies with additive effects may increase programme efficiency. However, the greatest benefit in combining inherited sterility with other control strategies is the dynamic synergistic effects. The demonstrated potential of inherited sterility to reduce the reproductive ability of H. zea and the demonstrated capacity of inherited sterility to perform compatibly and synergistically with other control strategies suggest that inherited sterility should be major component of future integrated approaches to managing H. zea. (author). 13 refs, 2 figs

  1. Insect Pests and Integrated Pest Management in Museums, Libraries and Historic Buildings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Querner, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    Insect pests are responsible for substantial damage to museum objects, historic books and in buildings like palaces or historic houses. Different wood boring beetles (Anobium punctatum, Hylotrupes bajulus, Lyctus sp. or introduced species), the biscuit beetle (Stegobium paniceum), the cigarette beetle (Lasioderma serricorne), different Dermestides (Attagenus sp., Anthrenus sp., Dermestes sp., Trogoderma sp.), moths like the webbing clothes moth (Tineola bisselliella), Silverfish (Lepisma saccharina) and booklice (Psocoptera) can damage materials, objects or building parts. They are the most common pests found in collections in central Europe, but most of them are distributed all over the world. In tropical countries, termites, cockroaches and other insect pests are also found and result in even higher damage of wood and paper or are a commune annoyance in buildings. In this short review, an introduction to Integrated Pest Management (IPM) in museums is given, the most valuable collections, preventive measures, monitoring in museums, staff responsible for the IPM and chemical free treatment methods are described. In the second part of the paper, the most important insect pests occurring in museums, archives, libraries and historic buildings in central Europe are discussed with a description of the materials and object types that are mostly infested and damaged. Some information on their phenology and biology are highlighted as they can be used in the IPM concept against them. PMID:26463205

  2. Insect Pests and Integrated Pest Management in Museums, Libraries and Historic Buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascal Querner

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Insect pests are responsible for substantial damage to museum objects, historic books and in buildings like palaces or historic houses. Different wood boring beetles (Anobium punctatum, Hylotrupes bajulus, Lyctus sp. or introduced species, the biscuit beetle (Stegobium paniceum, the cigarette beetle (Lasioderma serricorne, different Dermestides (Attagenus sp., Anthrenus sp., Dermestes sp., Trogoderma sp., moths like the webbing clothes moth (Tineola bisselliella, Silverfish (Lepisma saccharina and booklice (Psocoptera can damage materials, objects or building parts. They are the most common pests found in collections in central Europe, but most of them are distributed all over the world. In tropical countries, termites, cockroaches and other insect pests are also found and result in even higher damage of wood and paper or are a commune annoyance in buildings. In this short review, an introduction to Integrated Pest Management (IPM in museums is given, the most valuable collections, preventive measures, monitoring in museums, staff responsible for the IPM and chemical free treatment methods are described. In the second part of the paper, the most important insect pests occurring in museums, archives, libraries and historic buildings in central Europe are discussed with a description of the materials and object types that are mostly infested and damaged. Some information on their phenology and biology are highlighted as they can be used in the IPM concept against them.

  3. Insect Pests and Integrated Pest Management in Museums, Libraries and Historic Buildings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Querner, Pascal

    2015-06-16

    Insect pests are responsible for substantial damage to museum objects, historic books and in buildings like palaces or historic houses. Different wood boring beetles (Anobium punctatum, Hylotrupes bajulus, Lyctus sp. or introduced species), the biscuit beetle (Stegobium paniceum), the cigarette beetle (Lasioderma serricorne), different Dermestides (Attagenus sp., Anthrenus sp., Dermestes sp., Trogoderma sp.), moths like the webbing clothes moth (Tineola bisselliella), Silverfish (Lepisma saccharina) and booklice (Psocoptera) can damage materials, objects or building parts. They are the most common pests found in collections in central Europe, but most of them are distributed all over the world. In tropical countries, termites, cockroaches and other insect pests are also found and result in even higher damage of wood and paper or are a commune annoyance in buildings. In this short review, an introduction to Integrated Pest Management (IPM) in museums is given, the most valuable collections, preventive measures, monitoring in museums, staff responsible for the IPM and chemical free treatment methods are described. In the second part of the paper, the most important insect pests occurring in museums, archives, libraries and historic buildings in central Europe are discussed with a description of the materials and object types that are mostly infested and damaged. Some information on their phenology and biology are highlighted as they can be used in the IPM concept against them.

  4. Measuring integrated pest management programs for public buildings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Albert; Breisch, Nancy L

    2002-02-01

    Integrated pest management (IPM) tends to be perceived by different stakeholder groups either as a methodology for effective pest control or as an ideology of responsible environmental stewardship. The IPM process has never been subjected to a rigorous empirical test as a control methodology in buildings; published studies have either tested isolated program components or have presented uncontrolled, sequential descriptions of IPM replacing traditional pest control service procedures. Because ideological measurement is simpler, cheaper, and more relevant than methodological testing to evaluate structural IPM performance in the public sector, data on pesticide use/risk and customer satisfaction, rather than control efficacy, are used by the General Services Administration (GSA) IPM program to demonstrate success compatible with Government Performance and Results Act (GPRA) guidelines. Implementation of IPM in 1989 resulted in significant decreases both in quantities of insecticide applied indoors and requests for pest control service by building occupants throughout the first decade of the program. Although these results do not provide an empirical test of structural IPM methodological superiority as a means of reducing pest populations, they indicate that replacing sprayed insecticide formulations with baits and using client reporting as the primary pest surveillance method can successfully achieve the policy goals of a large-scale IPM program for public buildings. PMID:11942743

  5. Measuring integrated pest management programs for public buildings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Albert; Breisch, Nancy L

    2002-02-01

    Integrated pest management (IPM) tends to be perceived by different stakeholder groups either as a methodology for effective pest control or as an ideology of responsible environmental stewardship. The IPM process has never been subjected to a rigorous empirical test as a control methodology in buildings; published studies have either tested isolated program components or have presented uncontrolled, sequential descriptions of IPM replacing traditional pest control service procedures. Because ideological measurement is simpler, cheaper, and more relevant than methodological testing to evaluate structural IPM performance in the public sector, data on pesticide use/risk and customer satisfaction, rather than control efficacy, are used by the General Services Administration (GSA) IPM program to demonstrate success compatible with Government Performance and Results Act (GPRA) guidelines. Implementation of IPM in 1989 resulted in significant decreases both in quantities of insecticide applied indoors and requests for pest control service by building occupants throughout the first decade of the program. Although these results do not provide an empirical test of structural IPM methodological superiority as a means of reducing pest populations, they indicate that replacing sprayed insecticide formulations with baits and using client reporting as the primary pest surveillance method can successfully achieve the policy goals of a large-scale IPM program for public buildings.

  6. Integrated Pest Management: A Curriculum for Early Care and Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    California Childcare Health Program, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This "Integrated Pest Management Toolkit for Early Care and Education Programs" presents practical information about using integrated pest management (IPM) to prevent and manage pest problems in early care and education programs. This curriculum will help people in early care and education programs learn how to keep pests out of early care and…

  7. Obstacles to integrated pest management adoption in developing countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Parsa, S.; Mores, S.; Bonifacio, A.; Chancellor, T.; Condori, B.; Crespo-Perez, V.; Hobbs, S.; Kroshel, J.; Ba, M.; Rebaudo, F.; Sherwood, S.G.; Vanek, S.J.; Faye, E.; Herrera, M.; Dangles, O.

    2014-01-01

    Despite its theoretical prominence and sound principles, integrated pest management (IPM) continues to suffer from anemic adoption rates in developing countries. To shed light on the reasons, we surveyed the opinions of a large and diverse pool of IPM professionals and practitioners from 96 countrie

  8. A socioeconomic analysis of biocontrol in integrated pest management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benjamin, Emmanuel O.; Wesseler, Justus H.H.

    2016-01-01

    European regulations on the sustainable use of pesticides aim to promote integrated pest management (IPM) strategy and the use of biological control agents. However, uncertainty over benefits and costs, irreversibility effects as well as flexibility in adoption of this technology needs to be cons

  9. Transgenic plants as vital components of integrated pest management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kos, M.; Loon, van J.J.A.; Dicke, M.; Vet, L.E.M.

    2009-01-01

    Although integrated pest management (IPM) strategies have been developed worldwide, further improvement of IPM effectiveness is required. The use of transgenic technology to create insect-resistant plants can offer a solution to the limited availability of highly insect-resistant cultivars. Commerci

  10. Analytical models integrated with satellite images for optimized pest management

    Science.gov (United States)

    The global field protection (GFP) was developed to protect and optimize pest management resources integrating satellite images for precise field demarcation with physical models of controlled release devices of pesticides to protect large fields. The GFP was implemented using a graphical user interf...

  11. Introducing the term 'Biocontrol Plants' for integrated pest management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pia Parolin

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Studies of interactions between crops, additional plants, pests and beneficial organisms already exist as well as studies of natural enemy preference, dispersal, and abundance. However, these studies focus on tri-trophic interactions from an "arthropod" point of view. We think that in order to optimize crop protection methods we need to understand the effects that plant structures have on the various arthropods and on subsequent tri-trophic interactions. Although studies and reviews describing the role of secondary plants in Integrated Pest Management (IPM exist, to date a general term which encompasses all plants added to a cropping system with the aim of enhancing IPM strategies has yet to be formulated. Therefore, we suggest a new term, "biocontrol plants", which we define as plants that are intentionally added to a crop system with the aim of enhancing crop productivity through pest attraction and/or pest regulation; a term that will promote the use of biocontrol services, and can ultimately lead to an increase in the sustainability of cropping systems.

  12. Integrating ecology and technology to create innovative pest control devices

    OpenAIRE

    Blackie, H.; MacMorran, D.; L. Shapiro; Woodhead, I.; Diegel, O.; Murphy, E.; Eason, C. T.

    2011-01-01

    The development of innovative pest management and monitoring tools requires the integration of animal ecology, toxicology and design engineering. Resetting, multi-kill devices offer substantial advantages over current baiting or trapping techniques. This research outlines the development and testing of a longlife, resetting, toxin delivery systems for predator control, which has recently been laboratory and field trialed on stoats (Mustela erminea) and weasels (M. nivalis). Results of laborat...

  13. Consumers' preferences for Integrated Pest Management: Experimental insights

    OpenAIRE

    Biguzzi, Coralie; Ginon, Emilie; Gomez-y-Paloma, Sergio; Langrell, Sergio; Lefebvre, Marianne; Marette, Stephan; Mateu, Guillermo; Sutan, Angela

    2014-01-01

    This article aims to analyse consumers' preferences for Integrated Pest Management (IPM), in comparison to conventional and organic food products. It analyses the case of tomatoes, based on experimental data of 189 French consumers. We find that consumers are more interested in information on the production system than on the characteristics of the final product in terms of pesticide residue levels, and more in IPM than organic. While information on IPM production increases consumers' willing...

  14. Should Grain Elevator Managers Adopt Integrated Pest Management?

    OpenAIRE

    Adam, Brian D.; Siaplay, Mounir; Brorsen, B. Wade; Flinn, Paul W.

    2007-01-01

    Insect infestation during storage and processing causes millions of dollars of wheat damage annually in the United States. Insect infestation reduces wheat storing processing profit as well as consumer confidence in wheat food products. Meanwhile, increased concerns about insecticide use have increase interest in Integrated Pest Management (IPM) strategies. This research compares the costs of IPM and chemical-based approaches to insect control to determine why most elevator managers have not ...

  15. Development and Integration of Alternative Management Strategies Using Inherited Sterility and Natural Enemies to Control Lepidopteran Pests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lepidopteran pests such as corn earworm, Helicoverpa zea, fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda, beet armyworm, Spodoptera exigua, and diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella, are often the most destructive pests of field crops in the United States. Insecticide resistance, increasing concern over pesticide pollution, and the desire to effectively manage lepidopteran pests on an area-wide basis have motivated scientists to identify and develop new pest management tactics that are compatible with current IPM practices. IPM-based systems, including genetic methods and biological control, offer the best long-term solutions to pesticide reduction and the management of destructive agricultural pests. F1 sterility has emerged as a promising control strategy for lepidopteran pests.

  16. J. Clark Salyer National Wildlife Refuge Complex Integrated Pest Management Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of the Integrated Pest Management Plan is to provide a comprehensive, environmentally sensitive approach to managing pests on the J. Clark Salyer NWRC....

  17. Integrated Pest Management Plan 2006-2011 Sand Lake National Wildlife Refuge Complex

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of the Integrated Pest Management Plan is to provide a comprehensive, environmentally sensitive approach to managing pests on the Sand Lake NWRC. The...

  18. Integrated Pest Management Plan 2006-2011 Upper Souris National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of the Integrated Pest Management Plan is to provide a comprehensive, environmentally sensitive approach to managing pests on the Upper Souris NWR. The...

  19. Integrated Pest Management Plan 2003-2008 Devils Lake Wetland Management Complex

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of the Integrated Pest Management Plan is to provide a comprehensive, environmentally sensitive approach to managing pests on the Devils Lake WMC. The...

  20. Crescent Lake / North Platte National Wildlife Refuge Complex Integrated Pest Management Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of the Integrated Pest Management Plan is to provide a comprehensive, environmentally sensitive approach to managing pests on the Crescent Lake / North...

  1. Integrated Pest Management Plan Rainwater Basin Wetland Management District 2004-2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of the Integrated Pest Management Plan is to provide a comprehensive, environmentally sensitive approach to managing pests on the Rainwater Basin WMD....

  2. Integrated Pest Management Plan 2004-2009 Devils Lake Wetland Management Complex

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of the Integrated Pest Management Plan is to provide a comprehensive, environmentally sensitive approach to managing pests on the Devils Lake WMC. The...

  3. Integrated Pest Management Plan 2008-2013 Madison Wetland Management District

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of the Integrated Pest Management Plan is to provide a comprehensive, environmentally sensitive approach to managing pests on the Madison WMD. The goals...

  4. Integrated Pest Management Plan 2008-2013 Lostwood Wetland Management District Complex

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of the Integrated Pest Management Plan is to provide a comprehensive, environmentally sensitive approach to managing pests on the Lostwood Wetland...

  5. Integrated Pest Management Plan For Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of the Integrated Pest Management Plan is to provide a comprehensive, environmentally sensitive approach to managing pests on the Rocky Mountain Arsenal...

  6. Integrated Pest Management Plan 2005-2010 Des Lacs National Wildlife Refuge Complex

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of the Integrated Pest Management Plan is to provide a comprehensive, environmentally sensitive approach to managing pests on the Des Lacs NWRC. The...

  7. Integrated Pest Management Plan for Flint Hills National Wildlife Refuge 2004 through 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of the Integrated Pest Management Plan is to provide a comprehensive, environmentally sensitive approach to managing pests on the Flint Hills NWR. The...

  8. Transgenic plants as vital components of integrated pest management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kos, Martine; van Loon, Joop J A; Dicke, Marcel; Vet, Louise E M

    2009-11-01

    Although integrated pest management (IPM) strategies have been developed worldwide, further improvement of IPM effectiveness is required. The use of transgenic technology to create insect-resistant plants can offer a solution to the limited availability of highly insect-resistant cultivars. Commercially available insect-resistant transgenic crops show clear benefits for agriculture and there are many exciting new developments such as transgenic plants that enhance biological control. Effective evaluation tools are needed to ascertain that transgenic plants do not result in undesired non-target effects. If these conditions are met, there will be ample opportunities for transgenic plants to become key components of environmentally benign and durable pest management systems. Here we discuss the potential and challenges for incorporating transgenic plants in IPM.

  9. The Economic Feasibility of Tree Fruit Integrated Pest Management in the Northeast

    OpenAIRE

    G B White; Thompson, Peter

    1982-01-01

    A pilot tree fruit pest management program in Wayne County, New York was evaluated. Thirty-three blocks of fruit were matched for 26 participants in the pilot program and for 23 nonparticipants. Participants reduced pesticide costs and total pest management costs in comparison to nonparticipants. Factors which will affect the adoption of Integrated Pest Management in other locations include the attitudes of growers, farm size, and the density of fruit production. Integrated Pest Management pr...

  10. Bug Off: A Guide for Integrated Pest Management in Granville Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001

    This guide describes options for the Granville schools when dealing with pests. It is based on Integrated Pest Management (IPM), a philosophy that employs safe and practical pest control methods. The guide can be used to incorporate IPM philosophy into the school systems. The first section provides the environmental context for an interest in…

  11. Healthy Schools Act spurs integrated pest management in California public schools

    OpenAIRE

    Geiger, Chris A.; Tootelian, Dennis H.

    2005-01-01

    The Healthy Schools Act of 2000 established right-to-know procedures for pesticide use in California public schools, and mandated using least-toxic pest management methods as state policy. In a survey conducted 2 years after the law’s passage, school districts that had integrated pest management (IPM) programs generally used more ecologically sound pest management tactics than districts that did not, and most of those said that IPM had improved their pest management effectiveness. The Healthy...

  12. Enhancing Integrated Pest Management in GM Cotton Systems Using Host Plant Resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Trapero, Carlos; Wilson, Iain W; Stiller, Warwick N.; Lewis J Wilson

    2016-01-01

    Cotton has lost many ancestral defensive traits against key invertebrate pests. This is suggested by the levels of resistance to some pests found in wild cotton genotypes as well as in cultivated landraces and is a result of domestication and a long history of targeted breeding for yield and fiber quality, along with the capacity to control pests with pesticides. Genetic modification (GM) allowed integration of toxins from a bacteria into cotton to control key Lepidopteran pests. Since the mi...

  13. Enhancing integrated pest management in GM cotton systems using host plant resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Carlos eTrapero; Wilson, Iain W; Stiller, Warwick N.; Lewis J Wilson

    2016-01-01

    Cotton has lost many ancestral defensive traits against key invertebrate pests. This is suggested by the levels of resistance to some pests found in wild cotton genotypes as well as in cultivated landraces and is a result of domestication and a long history of targeted breeding for yield and fibre quality, along with the capacity to control pests with pesticides. Genetic modification (GM) allowed integration of toxins from a bacteria into cotton to control key Lepidopteran pests. Since the mi...

  14. Role of imidacloprid in integrated pest management of California citrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grafton-Cardwell, E E; Lee, J E; Robillard, S M; Gorden, J M

    2008-04-01

    Portions of three commercial citrus orchards were treated for 1 yr with foliar imidacloprid or for 2 yr with a systemic formulation in a replicated plot design to determine the impact of this neonicotinoid on the San Joaquin Valley California citrus integrated pest management (IPM) program. Foliar-applied imidacloprid had little effect on California red scale, Aonidiella aurantii (Maskell); cottony cushion scale, Icerya purchasi Maskell; or citrus red mite, Panonychus citri (McGregor), populations. Short-term suppression of the parasitoids Aphytis melinus DeBach and Comperiella bifasciata Howard; vedalia, Rodolia cardinalis (Mulsant); and the predacious mite Euseius tularensis (Congdon) were observed. Suppression of natural enemies allowed scales and mites to maintain higher populations in the treated areas compared with the nontreated areas. Thus, foliar imidacloprid did not exhibit control of these citrus pest species, and it disrupted biological control. Systemically applied imidacloprid suppressed California red scale and citricola scale populations 2-3 mo after treatment. Suppression of parasitoids of the California red scale also was observed. Thus, treatments of systemic imidacloprid applied in areawide management programs for invasive pests would provide a benefit of California red scale and citricola scale suppression. However, this treatment provided only single-season control of citricola scale, it was somewhat disruptive of biological control, and it did not suppress densities of either scale as low as a treatment of the organophosphate chlorpyrifos for citricola scale or the insect growth regulator pyriproxyfen for California red scale. Insecticides with longer periods of efficacy and greater IPM compatibility than imidacloprid should be used for a sustainable IPM approach in California citrus. PMID:18459411

  15. Models for integrated pest control and their biological implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Sanyi; Cheke, Robert A

    2008-09-01

    Successful integrated pest management (IPM) control programmes depend on many factors which include host-parasitoid ratios, starting densities, timings of parasitoid releases, dosages and timings of insecticide applications and levels of host-feeding and parasitism. Mathematical models can help us to clarify and predict the effects of such factors on the stability of host-parasitoid systems, which we illustrate here by extending the classical continuous and discrete host-parasitoid models to include an IPM control programme. The results indicate that one of three control methods can maintain the host level below the economic threshold (ET) in relation to different ET levels, initial densities of host and parasitoid populations and host-parasitoid ratios. The effects of host intrinsic growth rate and parasitoid searching efficiency on host mean outbreak period can be calculated numerically from the models presented. The instantaneous pest killing rate of an insecticide application is also estimated from the models. The results imply that the modelling methods described can help in the design of appropriate control strategies and assist management decision-making. The results also indicate that a high initial density of parasitoids (such as in inundative releases) and high parasitoid inter-generational survival rates will lead to more frequent host outbreaks and, therefore, greater economic damage. The biological implications of this counter intuitive result are discussed.

  16. The use of push-pull strategies in integrated pest management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Samantha M; Khan, Zeyaur R; Pickett, John A

    2007-01-01

    Push-pull strategies involve the behavioral manipulation of insect pests and their natural enemies via the integration of stimuli that act to make the protected resource unattractive or unsuitable to the pests (push) while luring them toward an attractive source (pull) from where the pests are subsequently removed. The push and pull components are generally nontoxic. Therefore, the strategies are usually integrated with methods for population reduction, preferably biological control. Push-pull strategies maximize efficacy of behavior-manipulating stimuli through the additive and synergistic effects of integrating their use. By orchestrating a predictable distribution of pests, efficiency of population-reducing components can also be increased. The strategy is a useful tool for integrated pest management programs reducing pesticide input. We describe the principles of the strategy, list the potential components, and present case studies reviewing work on the development and use of push-pull strategies in each of the major areas of pest control.

  17. Area-wide population suppression of codling moth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The area-wide pest population control concept began with E.F. Knipling (1979) in the 1970s. Control of a pest population on individual fields does little to control the overall pest population because only a portion of the population is being affected. Expanding control tactics beyond individual farms tends to suppress the population on a wider scale and frequently results in suppression of the population for more than one year. The Agriculture Research Service (ARS) believes that this concept has not been addressed with the focus and support that it deserves. The ARS Administration made a conscious decision in 1994 to create a series of area-wide programmes funded out of ARS-based funds that had previously been used for pilot tests. These programmes involve a coordinated effort among ARS and university scientists, growers, and fieldmen for agriculture supply centres and fruit packing houses. The first area-wide programme supported by ARS was the codling moth (CM), Cydia pomonella L. (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) suppression programme. The codling moth is the key pest of pome fruit throughout the western United States (Beers et al. 1993). About half of the insecticides applied on these crops are directed toward this pest. A non-insecticidal control technique, mating disruption (MD), is available to replace the organophosphates. Removal of the hard pesticides directed against this pest would do the most to allow natural enemies to survive and reproduce in the orchards, which in turn would have the effect of reducing secondary pests. Elimination of the pesticides would also remove much of the health risks to workers and would minimise buildup of pesticide resistance. The objectives of the Codling Moth Area-wide Program are to enhance the efficacy of the non-pesticide approach, to demonstrate that mating disruption will work if conducted properly, to develop biological technology to lower costs of control that complement mating disruption, to implement effective

  18. A new mechanised cultural practice to reduce Ceratitis capitata Wied. populations in area-wide IPM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Chueca

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The Mediterranean fruit fly (or medfly, Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann (Diptera: Tephritidae, affects most of the fruit species grown in temperate and tropical climate regions, causing significant economic damage. One of the classical cultural strategies against this pest is to gather and bury the remaining fruit after harvest, but this is economically unfeasible today. Wood shredders already available in current Spanish groves can be used to grind or crush fruits laying on the soil as an alternative to this practice and to the use of pesticides in area-wide integrated pest management (IPM. With the purpose of evaluating this alternative, the initial step of this study was to perform laboratory tests to assess the efficacy of crushing and grinding as a method for controlling medflies. The results showed that grinding was 78% effective against larval stages, while crushing resulted in a 17% efficacy, leading us to choose the first alternative. As a second step, the operational parameters (type of cutting tool, shaft rotation speed and tractor speed of the wood shredders were adjusted to efficiently carry out this practice under field conditions. Finally, the effect of the mechanised grinding of fallen fruit on C. capitata populations was evaluated for two consecutive years in commercial citrus orchards. The results showed a significant 27-46% reduction in C. capitata populations the following spring, thus demonstrating that the newly proposed mechanised alternative can be included in the current area-wide IPM of the pest in Spain.

  19. Integrated Pest Management (IPM of the drug store beetle, Stegobium paniceum (L., a serious pest of old books

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanislaw Ignatowicz

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Recently (January 2010, we have found that drugstore beetle, Stegobium paniceum (L., is a serious pest of old books in a religious library in Cracow, Poland. About 80% old books were found more or less damaged by this pest. As the result of larval activity, many holes and tunnels were formed in damaged books. Some of them were old, some of them were new tunnels with live larvae and pupae. Many characteristic emergence holes of the adults were found in the book bindings. Around books there was an enormous amount of dust as a result of larval feeding activity. Live and dead adults were found around old books and within the library room, especially near windows. The Integrated Pest Management program was suggested to the owners and curator of the library to control infestation and to avoid the continuation of the damage.

  20. Integrated pest management in citrus orchards in Antalya (1995-1999)

    OpenAIRE

    Özkan, A.; Akteke, Ş.A.; Kaplan, M.; Gürol, M.; Eray, N.; Dalka, Y.; UYSAL, H.; Aytekin, H.; Akyel, E.; Çelik, G.; ARSLAN, M.; Tuncel, H.

    2008-01-01

    This study relating to integrated pest management citrus orchards consisting Central, Kumluca, Finike and Alanya counties of Antalya has been carried out in 8 orchards in 2124 trees during 1995-1999. The citrus mealybug has been found as the main pest and controlled biologically by releasing Leptomastix dactylopii as parasitoid and Cryptolaemus montrouzieri as predator. Citrus whitefly, Citrus red mite and Carob moth have been found as the secondary pests. Mineral oils and specific aca...

  1. SPUR: Moving San Diego, California Schools toward Integrated Pest Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Sharon

    1991-01-01

    The preparation of a report, slide show, and brochure to promote awareness of the hazards of toxic pest control for school pest management personnel in the San Diego Unified School District is discussed. The future plans of the coalition are proposed. (CW)

  2. Insect Pests and Integrated Pest Management in Museums, Libraries and Historic Buildings

    OpenAIRE

    Pascal Querner

    2015-01-01

    Insect pests are responsible for substantial damage to museum objects, historic books and in buildings like palaces or historic houses. Different wood boring beetles (Anobium punctatum, Hylotrupes bajulus, Lyctus sp. or introduced species), the biscuit beetle (Stegobium paniceum), the cigarette beetle (Lasioderma serricorne), different Dermestides (Attagenus sp., Anthrenus sp., Dermestes sp., Trogoderma sp.), moths like the webbing clothes moth (Tineola bisselliella), Silverfish (Lepisma sacc...

  3. Development and Evaluation of an Integrated Pest Management Toolkit for Child Care Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkon, Abbey; Kalmar, Evie; Leonard, Victoria; Flint, Mary Louise; Kuo, Devina; Davidson, Nita; Bradman, Asa

    2012-01-01

    Young children and early care and education (ECE) staff are exposed to pesticides used to manage pests in ECE facilities in the United States and elsewhere. The objective of this pilot study was to encourage child care programs to reduce pesticide use and child exposures by developing and evaluating an Integrated Pest Management (IPM) Toolkit for…

  4. Gaby: a computer-based support system for integrated pest management in Dutch apple orchards

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ende, van den E.; Blommers, L.; Trapman, M.

    1996-01-01

    In The Netherlands, a computerized advisory system (called Gaby) for integrated pest management (IPM) in apple has been developed to support the decision making of individual fruit growers. Gaby provides clear monitoring recommendations when this is appropriate for a particular pest in (a defined ar

  5. Area-wide control of insects with screwworm as an example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Screwworms, Cochliomyia hominivorax (Coquerel), are devastating pests of warm blooded animals. They have been eradicated from continental North America using the sterile insect technique (SIT). Proper implementation of SIT is an example of the requirements of area-wide control of insect pests. Area-...

  6. Integrated Pest Management for sweetpotato in Eastern Africa.

    OpenAIRE

    Smit, N.E.J.M.

    1997-01-01

    Sweetpotato is an important crop in Eastern Africa. Sweetpotato weevils ( Cylas puncticollis Boheman and C. brunneus Fabricius; Coleoptera: Apionidae) cause damage to roots and vinesthroughout the crop's production area. Other insect pests of sweetpotato are of regional importance. The aim of the research project was to gain insight in the biology and ecology of sweetpotato weevils and, based on this insight, develop pest management programmes on sweetpotato in Eastern Africa.In Chapter 1, th...

  7. Integrated Pest Management Plan for Chesapeake Marshlands National Wildlife Refuge Complex 2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — With this Integrated Pest Management Plan, the Chesapeake Marshlands National Wildlife Refuge Complex aims to demonstrate land stewardship in controlling invasive...

  8. Enhancing integrated pest management in GM cotton systems using host plant resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos eTrapero

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Cotton has lost many ancestral defensive traits against key invertebrate pests. This is suggested by the levels of resistance to some pests found in wild cotton genotypes as well as in cultivated landraces and is a result of domestication and a long history of targeted breeding for yield and fibre quality, along with the capacity to control pests with pesticides. Genetic modification (GM allowed integration of toxins from a bacteria into cotton to control key Lepidopteran pests. Since the mid-1990’s, use of GM cotton cultivars has greatly reduced the amount of pesticides used in many cotton systems. However, pests not controlled by the GM traits have usually emerged as problems, especially the sucking bug complex. Control of this complex with pesticides often causes a reduction in beneficial invertebrate populations, allowing other secondary pests to increase rapidly and require control. Control of both sucking bug complex and secondary pests is problematic due to the cost of pesticides and/or high risk of selecting for pesticide resistance. Deployment of host plant resistance provides an opportunity to manage these issues in GM cotton systems. Cotton cultivars resistant to the sucking bug complex and/or secondary pests would require fewer pesticide applications, reducing costs and risks to beneficial invertebrate populations and pesticide resistance. Incorporation of host plant resistance traits into elite cotton cultivars with high yield and fibre quality offers the potential to further reduce pesticide use and increase the durability of pest management in GM cotton systems. We review the challenges that the identification and use of host plant resistance against invertebrate pests brings to cotton breeding. We explore sources of resistance to the sucking bug complex and secondary pests, the mechanisms that control them and the approaches to incorporate these defence traits to commercial cultivars.

  9. Enhancing Integrated Pest Management in GM Cotton Systems Using Host Plant Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trapero, Carlos; Wilson, Iain W; Stiller, Warwick N; Wilson, Lewis J

    2016-01-01

    Cotton has lost many ancestral defensive traits against key invertebrate pests. This is suggested by the levels of resistance to some pests found in wild cotton genotypes as well as in cultivated landraces and is a result of domestication and a long history of targeted breeding for yield and fiber quality, along with the capacity to control pests with pesticides. Genetic modification (GM) allowed integration of toxins from a bacteria into cotton to control key Lepidopteran pests. Since the mid-1990s, use of GM cotton cultivars has greatly reduced the amount of pesticides used in many cotton systems. However, pests not controlled by the GM traits have usually emerged as problems, especially the sucking bug complex. Control of this complex with pesticides often causes a reduction in beneficial invertebrate populations, allowing other secondary pests to increase rapidly and require control. Control of both sucking bug complex and secondary pests is problematic due to the cost of pesticides and/or high risk of selecting for pesticide resistance. Deployment of host plant resistance (HPR) provides an opportunity to manage these issues in GM cotton systems. Cotton cultivars resistant to the sucking bug complex and/or secondary pests would require fewer pesticide applications, reducing costs and risks to beneficial invertebrate populations and pesticide resistance. Incorporation of HPR traits into elite cotton cultivars with high yield and fiber quality offers the potential to further reduce pesticide use and increase the durability of pest management in GM cotton systems. We review the challenges that the identification and use of HPR against invertebrate pests brings to cotton breeding. We explore sources of resistance to the sucking bug complex and secondary pests, the mechanisms that control them and the approaches to incorporate these defense traits to commercial cultivars. PMID:27148323

  10. IPM: Integrated Pest Management Kit for Building Managers. How To Implement an Integrated Pest Management Program in Your Building(s).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Brad

    This management kit introduces building managers to the concept of Integrated Pest Management (IPM), and provides the knowledge and tools needed to implement an IPM program in their buildings. It discusses the barriers to implementing an IPM program, why such a program should be used, and the general guidelines for its implementation. Managerial…

  11. Integrated Pest Management for sweetpotato in Eastern Africa.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, N.E.J.M.

    1997-01-01

    Sweetpotato is an important crop in Eastern Africa. Sweetpotato weevils ( Cylas puncticollis Boheman and C. brunneus Fabricius; Coleoptera: Apionidae) cause damage to roots and vinesthroughout the crop's production area. Other insect pests of sweetpotato are of regional importance. The

  12. The adoption of integrated pest management (IPM) technologies by cotton growers in the Punjab

    OpenAIRE

    Maqsood Hussain*, Sarwat Zia and Abdul Saboor

    2011-01-01

    Pesticides applications generate negative externalities for health, environment and also add up to economiccost to cotton producers. Consequently, there is an urgent need of alternative methods of pest management forenvironment friendly cotton production systems. Integrated pest management (IPM) is a right method which canreduce or minimize the use of pesticides as well as can lessen the cost. The cross-sectional data was collected fromdistrict Jhang. A random sample of 99 farmers was selecte...

  13. Who Wants To Be an IPM Super Sleuth? Integrated Pest Management Educational Activities & Resources for Kids of All Ages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walejko, Gina K.; Colon, Joseph L.

    This guide presents games and activities on integrated pest management (IPM) for home targeting grades 1-7. The activities and games use a problem-solving approach based on pest knowledge to develop an understanding of pest management. Three cases are presented: (1) "Inspection is the Key to IPM Success" includes two activities--"Word Searches"…

  14. Area-wide management of fruit flies in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    in Western Australia. On the other hand Queensland fruit fly is just as destructive but is restricted to the east coast of Australia. Programmes such as advice on cover sprays, correct use of pesticides, public education, the Sterile Insect Technique (SIT), the male annihilation technique (MAT) and fruit fly baiting and trapping are under way to reduce the impact of pest fruit flies on commercial and backyard horticulture. Due to trade and travel, both commercial and private, from Western Australia to the central areas of Australia (the State of South Australia and the Northern Territory) and the east (Tasmania, Victoria, New South Wales and Queensland and the Australian Capital Territory) and from east to west, both Mediterranean fruit fly and Queensland fruit fly are serious threats to those other States. Mechanisms such as roadblocks, community awareness programmes, reduce the threat of these pests to horticultural production in areas free from these species. Codes of Practice for actions against both Queensland fruit fly and Mediterranean fruit fly, which describe these conditions and actions, have been compiled and agreed upon by most States and some overseas trading partners. Apart from protecting fruit fly free-areas and regions with native species from non-endemic pest fruit flies from other regions within Australia we also protect our shores from exotic pest fruit fly species from regions outside Australia. The Australian Government has issued signage, pamphlets and compulsory quarantine declaration forms alerting travellers about the risk of bringing in fresh fruit and vegetables and the penalties for doing so. All commercial produce is inspected on arrival and samples taken for analysis of possible infestation. Some produce is prohibited from some countries due to the presence of quarantine pests while others are allowed following certification of area-freedom status or of the correct application of post-harvest quarantine treatment or area-wide management

  15. Ten years of Integrated Pest Management (IPM at the Kunsthistorisches Museum in Wien

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascal Querner

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The Kunsthistorisches Museum Wien is one of the largest fine arts collections worldwide, comprising the Kunsthistorisches Museum, the Austrian Theater Museum, the Museum of Ethnology, all placed in Vienna, and Schloß Ambras in Tirol. We present results from up to 10 years of insect pest monitoring in different collections and the implementation of an Integrated Pest Management (IPM concept. The Kunsthistorisches Museum was the first museum in Vienna to introduce such a concept. We also present specific insect pest problems such as a biscuit beetle (Stegobium paniceum infestation of paintings lined with starch paste backings (linings or the webbing clothes moth (Tineola bisselliella infestation at the Museum of Carriages, both repeatedly occurring problems in the museum. With the help of the insect pest monitoring programs, these and other problems were found and the infested objects treated, usually with anoxia (nitrogen.

  16. An area wide control of fruit flies in Mauritius

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sookar, P.; Permalloo, S.; Gungah, B.; Alleck, M.; Seewooruthun, S.I.; Soonnoo, A.R., E-mail: ento@intnet.m, E-mail: moa-entomology@mail.gov.m [Ministry of Agro Industry and Fisheries Reduit, Republic of Mauritius (Mauritius)

    2006-07-01

    An area-wide National Fruit Fly Control Programme (NFFCP) was initiated in 1994, funded by the European Union until 1999 and now fully financed by the Government of Mauritius. The NFFCP targets some 75,000 backyard fruit trees owners mainly. The bait application and male annihilation techniques (BAT e MAT) are currently being applied against the fruit flies attacking fleshy fruits and are targeting selected major fruit growing areas in the north, north-east, central and western parts of the island. Successful control has been achieved using these two techniques as demonstrated by trap catches and fruit samplings. The level of fruit fly damage to fruits has been reduced. Presently, the bait-insecticide mixture is being supplied free of charge to the public. The current status of the area-wide suppression programme is such that continuous use of BAT/MAT is a never ending process and as such is not viable. In this context, a TC project on Feasibility studies for integrated use of sterile insect technique for area wide tephritid fruit fly control.Studies are also being carried out on mass rearing of the peach fruit fly for small scale trials on SIT so as to eventually integrate this control method in our area-wide control programme. (author)

  17. An area wide control of fruit flies in Mauritius

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An area-wide National Fruit Fly Control Programme (NFFCP) was initiated in 1994, funded by the European Union until 1999 and now fully financed by the Government of Mauritius. The NFFCP targets some 75,000 backyard fruit trees owners mainly. The bait application and male annihilation techniques (BAT e MAT) are currently being applied against the fruit flies attacking fleshy fruits and are targeting selected major fruit growing areas in the north, north-east, central and western parts of the island. Successful control has been achieved using these two techniques as demonstrated by trap catches and fruit samplings. The level of fruit fly damage to fruits has been reduced. Presently, the bait-insecticide mixture is being supplied free of charge to the public. The current status of the area-wide suppression programme is such that continuous use of BAT/MAT is a never ending process and as such is not viable. In this context, a TC project on Feasibility studies for integrated use of sterile insect technique for area wide tephritid fruit fly control.Studies are also being carried out on mass rearing of the peach fruit fly for small scale trials on SIT so as to eventually integrate this control method in our area-wide control programme. (author)

  18. Economic value of biological control in integrated pest management of managed plant systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naranjo, Steven E; Ellsworth, Peter C; Frisvold, George B

    2015-01-01

    Biological control is an underlying pillar of integrated pest management, yet little focus has been placed on assigning economic value to this key ecosystem service. Setting biological control on a firm economic foundation would help to broaden its utility and adoption for sustainable crop protection. Here we discuss approaches and methods available for valuation of biological control of arthropod pests by arthropod natural enemies and summarize economic evaluations in classical, augmentative, and conservation biological control. Emphasis is placed on valuation of conservation biological control, which has received little attention. We identify some of the challenges of and opportunities for applying economics to biological control to advance integrated pest management. Interaction among diverse scientists and stakeholders will be required to measure the direct and indirect costs and benefits of biological control that will allow farmers and others to internalize the benefits that incentivize and accelerate adoption for private and public good.

  19. Cost-benefit analysis model: A tool for area-wide fruit fly management. Procedures manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Generic Fruit Fly Cost-Benefit Analysis Model assists in economic decision making associated with area-wide fruit fly control options. The FRUIT FLY COST-BENEFIT ANALYSIS PROGRAM (available on 1 CD-ROM from the Joint FAO/IAEA Programme of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture) is an Excel 2000 Windows based program, for which all standard Windows and Excel conventions apply. The Model is user friendly and thus largely self-explanatory. Nevertheless, it includes a procedures manual that has been prepared to guide the user, and thus should be used together with the software. Please note that the table presenting the pest management options in the Introductory Page of the model is controlled by spin buttons and click boxes. These controls are linked to macros that hide non relevant tables and boxes. N.B. it is important that the medium level of security is selected from the Tools menu of Excel, to do this go to Tools|Macros|Security| and select Medium. When the file is opened a form will appear containing three buttons, click on the middle button, 'Enable Macros', so that the macros may be used. Ideally the model should be used as a support tool by working groups aiming at assessing the economic returns of different fruit fly control options (suppression, eradication, containment and prevention). The working group should include professionals in agriculture with experience in area-wide implementation of integrated pest management programmes, an economist or at least someone with basic knowledge in economics, and if relevant, an entomologist with some background in the application of the sterile insect technique (SIT)

  20. Insect pest control newsletter. No. 65

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concept of Area-wide Integrated Pest Management (AW-IPM) is defined as IPM applied against an entire pest population within a delimited geographic area. Area-wide intervention strategies require more planning and ecological understanding, longer-term commitment, a minimum infrastructure and a coordinated implementation by farmers and all other stakeholders. The spatial distribution of the pest population has to be considered not only in surrounding cultivated areas, but also in non-cultivated areas. It also involves considering the temporal distribution of the pest to determine the periods when the pest is most susceptible to preventive, rather than remedial, interventions. In 1998 FAO and the Agency sponsored the First International Conference on 'Area-Wide Control of Insect Pests, Integrating the Sterile Insect and Related Nuclear and other Techniques' in Penang, Malaysia. This Conference greatly increased the interest and awareness concerning the AW-IPM approach to insect pest control. Since then, many new technical innovations have been introduced; a better regulatory framework is being developed to encourage the involvement of the private sector, and more FAO and Agency Member States are integrating insect pest control methods on an areawide basis. Over the past months we have been heavily involved in preparing for the Second FAO/IAEA International Conference on 'Area-Wide Control of Insect Pests: Integrating the Sterile Insect and Related Nuclear and Other Techniques', which was held from 9-13 May in Vienna. The response and interest of scientists and governments, as well as the private sector and sponsors were once more very encouraging. The conference took place with the participation of over 300 delegates from 86 countries, nine international organization, and eight exhibitors. It covered the area-wide approach again in a very broad sense, including the development and integration of many non-SIT technologies, as well as genetic research on cytoplasmic

  1. Moving On: Farmer Education in Integrated Insect Pest and Disease Management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jiggins, J.L.S.; Mancini, F.

    2009-01-01

    This chapter explores intensive hands-on occupational education for farmers in selected European, African, Latin American countries and in south India. An Indian case study of Farmer Field Schools for Integrated Pest and Production Management (IPPM) to ensure food security and livelihood improvement

  2. Low Energy Technology. A Unit of Instruction in Florida Agriculture. Crop Protection with Integrated Pest Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florida Univ., Gainesville. Inst. of Food and Agricultural Sciences.

    This unit of instruction on integrated pest management was designed for use by agribusiness and natural resources teachers in Florida high schools and by agricultural extension agents as they work with adults and students. It is one of a series of 11 instructional units (see note) written to help teachers and agents to educate their students and…

  3. The Adoption of Integrated Pest Management Practices among Texas Cotton Growers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, John K.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Describes integrated pest management (IPM), a more advanced approach than chemical pesticide. Applies diffusion and farming-systems theories to create analytical model to explain IPM's adoption, use, and implications for agricultural change. Telephone surveys of Texas cotton growers on IPM practices found different sources of IPM information…

  4. Safer Schools: Achieving a Healthy Learning Environment through Integrated Pest Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003

    Integrated pest management (IPM) is a program of prevention, monitoring, and control that offers the opportunity to eliminate or drastically reduce hazardous pesticide use. IPM is intended to establish a program that uses cultural, mechanical, biological, and other non-toxic practices, and only introduces least-hazardous chemicals as a last…

  5. Social Capital and Geography of Learning: Roles in Accelerating the Spread of Integrated Pest Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palis, Florencia G.; Morin, Stephen; Hossain, Mahabub

    2005-01-01

    This paper aims to show the relevance of spatial proximity and social capital in accelerating the spread of agricultural technologies such as integrated pest management (IPM). The research was done in response to the problem of slow diffusion of agricultural technologies. Both quantitative and qualitative methods were used in investigating the…

  6. Challenges and opportunities for integrated pest management in Europe: A telling example of minor uses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lamichhane, Jay Ram; Arendse, Wilma; Dachbrodt-Saaydeh, Silke;

    2015-01-01

    years. This is mainly due to the lack of pesticides in certain crops, as a number of previously authorized pesticides has not been re-authorized due to a stricter regulation. Also the introduction of tropical or sub-tropical crops and their pests into Europe has contributed to the problem of minor crops...... state of the art of minor crops in Europe and elucidate ongoing efforts to address such problems through Integrated Pest Management (IPM). The information reported is expected to provide relevance of minor crops in Europe and encourage the development and implementation of effective IPM solutions....

  7. The sterile insect technique in the integrated pest management of whitefly species in greenhouses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Insect pests commonly known as whiteflies are Hemiptera belonging to the family of Aleyrodidae Trialeurodes vaporariorum Westwood (greenhouse whitefly) and the B-biotype of Bemisia tabaci Gennadius (=Bemisia argentifolii Bellows and Perring) are pests whose economic importance is constantly increasing within the European agriculture. The B-biotype of B. tabaci, in particular, has become more problematic by causing damage over a wide range, from the temperate climates of Californian squash fields to European greenhouses and field crops. In the absence of valid alternatives, many growers have resorted to intensive application of insecticides to control these pests, creating a severe environmental and health hazard. Several new environmentally safe technologies are currently available and have opened up new opportunities in the integrated pest management (IPM) of whiteflies under greenhouse conditions. In particular, biological or biologically-based control means, including a number of fungi, insects, and compounds have been recently developed. However, the limitation of whitefly population outbreaks in greenhouses is a problem that needs to be solved. The idea to extend the use of sterile insect technique (SIT) to a confined environment against whitefly species is novel, and especially when we consider that the target species undergo arrhenotoky (unfertilised females generate only male progenies). The possibility to join this approach to the Integrated Pest Management (IPM) of the whitefly species in the greenhouse may open new perspectives in the safe application of nuclear technology for pest control. The present work reviews recent advances in research and practice related to the development of SIT for the control of whiteflies in greenhouses. Explanations on whitefly radiation biology, with data on Bemisia spp. radio-sterilisation, methods for whitefly mass rearing and collection, and the definition of a complete SIT procedure tested against the greenhouse

  8. Duality in Phase Space and Complex Dynamics of an Integrated Pest Management Network Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Baoyin; Tang, Sanyi; Cheke, Robert A.

    Fragmented habitat patches between which plants and animals can disperse can be modeled as networks with varying degrees of connectivity. A predator-prey model with network structures is proposed for integrated pest management (IPM) with impulsive control actions. The model was analyzed using numerical methods to investigate how factors such as the impulsive period, the releasing constant of natural enemies and the mode of connections between the patches affect pest outbreak patterns and the success or failure of pest control. The concept of the cluster as defined by Holland and Hastings is used to describe variations in results ranging from global synchrony when all patches have identical fluctuations to n-cluster solutions with all patches having different dynamics. Heterogeneity in the initial densities of either pest or natural enemy generally resulted in a variety of cluster oscillations. Surprisingly, if n > 1, the clusters fall into two groups one with low amplitude fluctuations and the other with high amplitude fluctuations (i.e. duality in phase space), implying that control actions radically alter the system's characteristics by inducing duality and more complex dynamics. When the impulsive period is small enough, i.e. the control strategy is undertaken frequently, the pest can be eradicated. As the period increases, the pest's dynamics shift from a steady state to become chaotic with periodic windows and more multicluster oscillations arise for heterogenous initial density distributions. Period-doubling bifurcation and periodic halving cascades occur as the releasing constant of the natural enemy increases. For the same ecological system with five differently connected networks, as the randomness of the connectedness increases, the transient duration becomes smaller and the probability of multicluster oscillations appearing becomes higher.

  9. Social Networks Shaping Integrated Pest Management Knowledge and Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Keith M. Moore

    2005-01-01

    Conventional technology transfer is based on the assumption of autonomous individuals independently making behavioral decisions. In contrast, the idea of "social networks" is that people and technologies are interconnected in ways that reinforce and reproduce some types of knowledge and behavioral practices and not others. Research from West Africa demonstrates that farm level decisions are shaped off farm by type of network integration. Evidence from Farmer Field School experiences in South ...

  10. Modeling the integration of parasitoid, insecticide, and transgenic insecticidal crop for the long-term control of an insect pest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onstad, David W; Liu, Xiaoxia; Chen, Mao; Roush, Rick; Shelton, Anthony M

    2013-06-01

    The tools of insect pest management include host plant resistance, biological control, and insecticides and how they are integrated will influence the durability of each. We created a detailed model of the population dynamics and population genetics of the diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella L., and its parasitoid, Diadegma insulare (Cresson), to study long-term pest management in broccoli Brassica oleracea L. Given this pest's history of evolving resistance to various toxins, we also evaluated the evolution of resistance to transgenic insecticidal Bt broccoli (expressing Cry1Ac) and two types of insecticides. Simulations demonstrated that parasitism provided the most reliable, long-term control of P. xylostella populations. Use of Bt broccoli with a 10% insecticide-free refuge did not reduce the long-term contribution of parasitism to pest control. Small refuges within Bt broccoli fields can delay evolution of resistance > 30 generations if resistance alleles are rare in the pest population. However, the effectiveness of these refuges can be compromised by insecticide use. Rainfall mortality during the pest's egg and neonate stages significantly influences pest control but especially resistance management. Our model results support the idea that Bt crops and biological control can be integrated in integrated pest management and actually synergistically support each other. However, the planting and maintenance of toxin-free refuges are critical to this integration. PMID:23865173

  11. Safe Cockroach Control: A Guide to Setting Up an Integrated Pest Management Program within a School System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowles, Kathleen Letcher; And Others

    Integrated Pest Management (IPM) is a decision-making approach to pest control that has been used successfully on farms, city parks, offices, homes, and schools. IPM programs help individuals decide when treatments are necessary, where treatment would be most helpful, and what combinations of tactics would be most effective, safe, and inexpensive…

  12. History and contemporary perspectives of the integrated pest management of soybean in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panizzi, A R

    2013-04-01

    The integrated pest management (IPM) of soybean developed and implemented in Brazil was one of the most successful programs of pest management in the world. Established during the 1970s, it showed a tremendous level of adoption by growers, decreasing the amount of insecticide use by over 50%. It included outstanding approaches of field scouting and decision making, considering the economic injury levels (EILs) for the major pests. Two main biological control programs were highly important to support the soybean IPM program in Brazil, i.e., the use of a NPVAg to control the major defoliator, the velvet bean caterpillar, Anticarsia gemmatalis Hübner, and the use of egg parasitoids against the seed-sucking stink bugs, in particular, the southern green stink bug, Nezara viridula (L.). These two biological control programs plus pests scouting, and the use of more selective insecticides considering the EILs supported the IPM program through the 1980s and 1990s. With the change in the landscape, with the adoption of the no-tillage cultivation system and the introduction of more intense multiple cropping, and with the lower input to divulge and adapt the IPM program to this new reality, the program started to decline during the years 2000s. Nowadays, soybean IPM is almost a forgotten control technology. In this mini-review article, suggestions are made to possibly revive and adapt the soybean IPM to contemporary time.

  13. Returns to integrated pest management research and outreach for soybean aphid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Feng; Swinton, Scott M

    2009-12-01

    Soybean aphid, Aphis glycines Matsumura, is a major invasive pest that has caused substantial yield loss and increased insecticide use in the United States since its discovery in 2000. Using the economic surplus approach, we estimate the economic benefits of U.S. research and outreach for integrated pest management (IPM) of soybean aphid. We calculate ex ante net benefits from adoption of an IPM economic threshold (ET). The ET triggers insecticide application only if the value of predicted yield damage from pest scouting is expected to exceed the cost of pest control. Our research finds that gradual adoption of an ET for soybean aphid management will generate a projected economic net benefit of $1.3 billion, for an internal rate of return of 124%, over the 15 yr since soybean aphid IPM research began in 2003. Lower and upper bound sensitivity analysis brackets the estimated net benefit to U.S. consumers and soybean, Glycine max (L.) Merr., growers in the range of $0.6 to $2.6 billion in 2005 dollars. If a 10% rate of return is attributed to IPM applied research and outreach on soybean aphid, that would leave nearly $800 million to compensate prior activities that contribute to the development and adoption of IPM.

  14. Insecticides -a cure or curse and rational use of integrated pest management in Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemical based control in crops has increased the pest problem, disturbed the agro ecosystem and has killed the non-target and environmentally friendly organisms and misuse of insecticides has led to resistance to insecticides, resurgence of secondary pests, polluting soil, water and food with contaminates. In addition to this, irrigation and drinking water, cottonseed oil, lint and cattle feed and animal milk are also contaminated having deleterious effects on human life. To reduce chemical control, Integrated Pest Management (IPM) emerged. Its emphasis is on non-disturbance of ecosystem but to manage the insect pest populations with all the available means on economic basis. IPM approach is knowledge based with in-depth information. In spite of IPM studies and work unfortunately reliance on pesticides has not been reduced in Pakistan. Conservation/augmentation, releases of new biotic agents may disturb the ecosystem. The stress on IPM is made in the developed countries primarily due to human health factor. These societies even risk the reduction in yield in the IPM fields. Successful stories of IPM in Pakistan has not been cashed to due merits. The bottlenecks must be removed so that better results can be obtained. The main reason seems to be lack of in depth involvement of the growers in this activity. (author)

  15. Should I fight or should I flight? How studying insect aggression can help integrated pest management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benelli, Giovanni

    2015-07-01

    Aggression plays a key role all across the animal kingdom, as it allows the acquisition and/or defence of limited resources (food, mates and territories) in a huge number of species. A large part of our knowledge on aggressive behaviour has been developed on insects of economic importance. How can this knowledge be exploited to enhance integrated pest management? Here, I highlight how knowledge on intraspecific aggression can help IPM both in terms of insect pests (with a focus on the enhancement of the sterile insect technique) and in terms of biological control agents (with a focus on mass-rearing optimisation). Then, I examine what implications for IPM can be outlined from knowledge about interspecific aggressive behaviour. Besides predator-pest aggressive interactions predicted by classic biological control, I focus on what IPM can learn from (i) interspecific aggression among pest species (with special reference to competitive displacement), (ii) defensive behaviour exhibited by prey against predaceous insects and (iii) conflicts among predaceous arthropods sharing the same trophic niche (with special reference to learning/sensitisation practices and artificial manipulation of chemically mediated interactions). PMID:25582991

  16. A Three-Year Field Validation Study to Improve the Integrated Pest Management of Hot Pepper

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Ji-Hoon; Yun, Sung-Chul

    2013-01-01

    To improve the integrated pest management (IPM) of hot pepper, field study was conducted in Hwasung from 2010 to 2012 and an IPM system was developed to help growers decide when to apply pesticides to control anthracnose, tobacco budworm, Phytophthora blight, bacterial wilt, and bacterial leaf spot. The three field treatments consisted of IPM sprays following the forecast model advisory, a periodic spray at 7-to-10-day intervals, and no spray (control). The number of annual pesticide applicat...

  17. A new integrative assessment indicator for damage caused by major pests and diseases in the vineyard

    OpenAIRE

    Delbac, L; Constant, N.; Laveau, E.; Thiéry, D.; Smits, N; Roudet, J; Mérot, A.; Wéry, J.; Fermaud, M.

    2013-01-01

    An original and integrative evaluation indicator has been developed to quantify the cumulated damage from major pests and diseases affecting grape bunches: downy mildew, powdery mildew, gray mould and tortricid moths. It made it possible to estimate the associated crop losses and to relate them to the plant protection strategy in different modes of production (organic farming, in-transition, conventional). Thus, overall plant losses were higher in 2012 than in 2011. The in-transition growers’...

  18. The use of semiochemical slow-release devices in integrated pest management strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Heuskin, S.; Verheggen, FG.; Haubruge, E.; Wathelet, JP.; Lognay, G.

    2011-01-01

    The development of integrated pest management (IPM) strategies is increasing since many problems appeared with the use of synthetic pesticides. Semiochemicals – informative molecules used in insect-insect or plant-insect interaction – are more and more considered within IPM strategies as alternative or complementary approach to insecticide treatments. Indeed, these species-specific compounds do not present any related adversely affectation of beneficial organisms and do not generate any risk ...

  19. Contribution of the light filth method to the Integrated Pest Management of a flour mill

    OpenAIRE

    P. Trematerra; Catalano, S.

    2010-01-01

    An important contribution to Integrated Pest Management in stored-product protection can be provided by the light-filth method since it gives particular attention to the extraneous particles contaminating food (such as insects, insect fragments, mites, hairs, feather barbules, etc.), extending to the identification of the material from which they have originated or the animals and vegetables from which they derive or have been part of in the past. In this regard, semolina produced by an indus...

  20. Biological pest control in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Trevor; Arredondo-Bernal, Hugo C; Rodríguez-del-Bosque, Luis A

    2013-01-01

    Mexico is a megadiverse country that forms part of the Mesoamerican biological corridor that connects North and South America. Mexico's biogeographical situation places it at risk from invasive exotic insect pests that enter from the United States, Central America, or the Caribbean. In this review we analyze the factors that contributed to some highly successful past programs involving classical biological control and/or the sterile insect technique (SIT). The present situation is then examined with reference to biological control, including SIT programs, targeted at seven major pests, with varying degrees of success. Finally, we analyze the current threats facing Mexico's agriculture industry from invasive pests that have recently entered the country or are about to do so. We conclude that despite a number of shortcomings, Mexico is better set to develop biological control-based pest control programs, particularly on an area-wide basis, than many other Latin American countries are. Classical and augmentative biological control and SIT-based programs are likely to provide effective and sustainable options for control of native and exotic pests, particularly when integrated into technology packages that meet farmers' needs across the great diversity of production systems in Mexico.

  1. Policies Affecting Production Practices and Adoption of Integrated Pest Management for Jamaican Farmers in Ebony Park, Clarendon

    OpenAIRE

    Ogrodowczyk, Joseph Daniel

    1998-01-01

    Farmers' decisions to adopt Integrated Pest Management (IPM) technologies depend on the profitability of IPM systems relative to the traditional production methods. Government policies may affect the profitability of the IPM technologies. A linear programming model was developed and used to evaluate the economic incentives for adoption of Integrated Pest Mangement (IPM) practices by Jamaican farmers in Ebony Park, Clarendon. Further analysis was completed to determine the affect of policy ...

  2. Comparative Study of Integrated Pest Management and Farmers Practices on Sustainable Environment in the Rice Ecosystem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Zahangeer Alam

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Integrated pest management (IPM is an environmentally friendly technology. IPM is a multifaceted approach to pest management that seeks to minimize negative impacts on the environment. This technique is an important step towards providing healthy, viable food for a growing global population. The focus of this study was to examine the impact of integrated pest management in a rice agroecosystem. Currently, more than 80% of farmers rely on pesticides. IPM methods employed in our study had an impact on the number of healthy tillers and hills and grain weight. The lowest percentage of dead heart (1.03 and white head (2.00 was found in the IPM treated plots. These plots had an average yield of 7.4 tonne/ha. We found that there were significant differences between the treatment and the observed percentage of dead heart, grain weight, and yield. We conclude that IPM practices are an effective strategy for obtaining high rice yields while protecting the environment and creating a more sustainable agroecosystem. Furthermore, the need for ongoing research and training on IPM methods will be essential for creating a sustainable rice agroecosystem.

  3. Economic Benefits of Sustainable Agricultural Production: The Case of Integrated Pest Management in Cabbage Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mad Nasir Shamsudin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Environmental protection is a basic element of sustainable agricultural development. Agricultural production practices, however, can cause negative externalities. One main concern of the externality is the negative effects of pesticide use. This has motivated the application of Integrated Pest Management (IPM program. This study attempts to evaluate the economic benefits of IPM to address the widespread misuse of pesticides in cabbage production. IPM application in cabbage production includes initiatives on the optimal use of pesticides, complementary weed control strategies, and alternative cultural and biological controls. Results of this study showed that the programme would generate economic benefits which include improvements in water quality, food safety, pesticide application safety, and long term sustainability of pest management systems. Thus there is justification for public investment of resources in training and educational programs to increase awareness about IPM and promote IPM adoption.

  4. Effects of Integrated Pest Management on Pest Damage and Yield Components in a Rice Agro-Ecosystem in the Barisal Region of Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Zahangeer eAlam

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Recently, recognition of negative environmental impacts associated with overuse of pesticides in the agricultural regions of Bangladesh has made it clear that unsustainable pest-control strategies must change. Integrated Pest Management (IPM was developed for use as a tool in the production of healthy, sustainably grown food. A strategic approach to crop-pest control, IPM aims to minimize pest populations by combining environmentally friendly pest-control methods and economically viable farming practices. This study examined the impact of IPM on insect damage to crop-yield parameters in a rice agro-ecosystem. IPM methods tested were: 1 collection of egg masses; 2 sweeping (using a funnel shaped net to capture insects; 3 perching (installing a branch or pole which serves as a resting place for predatory birds; and 4 Economic Threshold Level (ETL based insecticide application (The ETL is the point at which the value of the crop destroyed exceeds the cost of controlling the pest. We also examined the effects of prophylactic insecticide application and current management practices on rice yield. Rice-yield indicators included number of healthy tillers, number of hills, central leaf drying (Dead Heart, and grain-less panicles (White Head. For two consecutive years, the lowest percentages of Dead Heart (1.23 and 1.55 and White Head (2.06 were found in the IPM-treated plots. Further, the IPM-treated plots had higher yields (7.3-7.5 ton/ha compared with the non-IPM treatments (6.28-7.02 ton/ha. The location of the plots appeared to be non-significant for all measured yield components. The effect of treatment on the percentage of Dead Heart, White Head, number of hills, and yield was statistically significant (p ≤ 0.05. We concluded that IPM is an effective strategy for obtaining high rice yields in sustainable rice agro-ecosystems.

  5. Corn rootworm area-wide management across the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research Service and cooperating north central United States universities developed a semiochemical insecticide-bait targeted at adult corn rootworms (Sutter and Hesler 1993). The bait, composed of cucurbitacins, a minute amount of carbaryl, and a non-toxic edible carrier, can be applied by conventional aerial or ground sprayers (Hoffmann et al. 1996, Chandler and Sutter 1997, Chandler 1998). The bait adheres to plant surfaces and stimulates rootworm adult feeding, resulting in high levels of mortality and little impact on secondary pests or beneficial arthropods. The bait is applied when females predominate in the field and before significant oviposition begins. By targeting females at this critical developmental stage, egg laying can be reduced and thus, economic larval infestations can be avoided in the following growing season. Unlike soil insecticides, where maize root protection is the primary goal, this control tactic manages rootworm populations. The development of this bait along with improved rootworm monitoring techniques and better understanding of rootworm biology/ecology, forms the basis for the corn rootworm area-wide management programme. Management of rootworm populations using the bait concept is best accomplished when conducted over a large area. Thus, a regional or area-wide approach may effectively reduce rootworm populations, resulting in significant economic savings to growers and improved environmental stewardship through the reduction of insecticide use throughout maize production areas. The information presented discusses the development of the corn rootworm area-wide programme, the initiation of the operational component of the programme, and the results of the first year of semiochemical-bait applications

  6. Geometric Analysis of an Integrated Pest Management Model Including Two State Impulses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wencai Zhao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available According to integrated pest management strategies, we construct and investigate the dynamics of a Holling-Tanner predator-prey system with state dependent impulsive effects by releasing natural enemies and spraying pesticide at different thresholds. Applying the Dulacs criterion, the global stability of the positive equilibrium in the system without impulsive effect is discussed. By using impulsive differential equation geometry theory and the method of successor functions, we prove the existence of periodic solution of the system with state dependent impulsive effects. Furthermore, the stability conditions of periodic solutions are obtained. Some simulations are exerted to illustrate the feasibility of our main results.

  7. Impact of integrated pest management on the population of leafminers, fruit borers, and natural enemies in tomato

    OpenAIRE

    Miranda Moacyr Mascarenhas Motta; Picanço Marcelo Coutinho; Zanuncio José Cola; Bacci Leandro; Silva Ézio Marques da

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this work was to evaluate the impact of integrated pest management (IPM) in the productivity of the tomato and in the populations of leafminers, fruit borers, and natural enemies in tomato crops. The treatments were calendar (spraying twice weekly with insecticides and fungicides), IPM (spraying when action thresholds were achieved), and control (no pesticide was applied). IPM was the most efficient system of pest control due to presenting similar productivity and 65.6% less ...

  8. The role of GIS and spatial analysis within area-wide insect control programmes for disease control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The success of area-wide interventions aimed at suppressing or eradicating insect populations rests largely on appropriate project planning and implementation - and this is as true in the context of vector-borne diseases as it is within the wider context of pest management. In either context, a successful intervention programme requires accurate knowledge of preexisting distributions of insects (disease vectors) in time and space, on the appropriate design of insect suppression/replacement strategies, and on the development of suitable frameworks for monitoring and evaluation. 'Standard' disease control interventions, such as indoor residual spraying of insecticides or insecticide-treated bed nets for malaria, and the aerial application of insecticides or use of baited traps against human and animal trypanosomes, often include elements of area-wide planning because they target particular disease strata. Genetic control strategies (including SIT) are more intrinsically area-wide because they target specific vectors over large geographical areas delineated by biological criteria associated with colonisation or dispersal potential. In either case a strong geographical basis to planning and implementation is likely to improve the chances of programme success, as well as making more efficient use of resources and increasing cost-effectiveness. Geographic information systems (GIS), global positioning systems (GPS), and remote sensing are allied technologies that together provide a means of gathering, integrating and analysing spatial data. To date, the application of these tools within traditional and area-wide programmes has been relatively limited, but this seems likely to change, particularly as GIS and GPS are already being used extensively in other areas of agroecological management and research. The tools themselves are becoming increasingly accessible to non-specialists, while increases in computing power now mean that even high-level GIS systems can be

  9. Area-Wide Ground Applications of Bacillus thuringiensis var. israelensis for the Control of Aedes albopictus in Residential Neighborhoods: From Optimization to Operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Gregory M.; Faraji, Ary; Unlu, Isik; Healy, Sean P.; Farooq, Muhammad; Gaugler, Randy; Hamilton, George; Fonseca, Dina M.

    2014-01-01

    The increasing range of Aedes albopictus, the Asian tiger mosquito, in the USA and the threat of chikungunya and dengue outbreaks vectored by this species have necessitated novel approaches to control this peridomestic mosquito. Conventional methods such as adulticiding provide temporary relief, but fail to manage this pest on a sustained basis. We explored the use of cold aerosol foggers and misting machines for area-wide applications of Bacillus thuringiensis var. israelensis (VectoBac WDG) as a larvicide targeting Aedes albopictus. During 2010–2013 we performed initially open field trials and then 19 operational area-wide applications in urban and suburban residential areas in northeastern USA to test three truck-mounted sprayers at two application rates. Area-wide applications of WDG in open field conditions at 400 and 800 g/ha killed on average 87% of tested larvae. Once techniques were optimized in residential areas, applications with a Buffalo Turbine Mist Sprayer at a rate of 800 g/ha, the best combination, consistently provided over 90% mortality. Importantly, there was no significant decrease in efficacy with distance from the spray line even in blocks of row homes with trees and bushes in the backyards. Under laboratory conditions Bti deposition in bioassay cups during the operational trials resulted in over 6 weeks of residual control. Our results demonstrate that area-wide truck mounted applications of WDG can effectively suppress Ae. albopictus larvae and should be used in integrated mosquito management approaches to control this nuisance pest and disease vector. PMID:25329314

  10. Area-wide ground applications of Bacillus thuringiensis var. israelensis for the control of Aedes albopictus in residential neighborhoods: from optimization to operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Gregory M; Faraji, Ary; Unlu, Isik; Healy, Sean P; Farooq, Muhammad; Gaugler, Randy; Hamilton, George; Fonseca, Dina M

    2014-01-01

    The increasing range of Aedes albopictus, the Asian tiger mosquito, in the USA and the threat of chikungunya and dengue outbreaks vectored by this species have necessitated novel approaches to control this peridomestic mosquito. Conventional methods such as adulticiding provide temporary relief, but fail to manage this pest on a sustained basis. We explored the use of cold aerosol foggers and misting machines for area-wide applications of Bacillus thuringiensis var. israelensis (VectoBac WDG) as a larvicide targeting Aedes albopictus. During 2010-2013 we performed initially open field trials and then 19 operational area-wide applications in urban and suburban residential areas in northeastern USA to test three truck-mounted sprayers at two application rates. Area-wide applications of WDG in open field conditions at 400 and 800 g/ha killed on average 87% of tested larvae. Once techniques were optimized in residential areas, applications with a Buffalo Turbine Mist Sprayer at a rate of 800 g/ha, the best combination, consistently provided over 90% mortality. Importantly, there was no significant decrease in efficacy with distance from the spray line even in blocks of row homes with trees and bushes in the backyards. Under laboratory conditions Bti deposition in bioassay cups during the operational trials resulted in over 6 weeks of residual control. Our results demonstrate that area-wide truck mounted applications of WDG can effectively suppress Ae. albopictus larvae and should be used in integrated mosquito management approaches to control this nuisance pest and disease vector. PMID:25329314

  11. Area-wide ground applications of Bacillus thuringiensis var. israelensis for the control of Aedes albopictus in residential neighborhoods: from optimization to operation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory M Williams

    Full Text Available The increasing range of Aedes albopictus, the Asian tiger mosquito, in the USA and the threat of chikungunya and dengue outbreaks vectored by this species have necessitated novel approaches to control this peridomestic mosquito. Conventional methods such as adulticiding provide temporary relief, but fail to manage this pest on a sustained basis. We explored the use of cold aerosol foggers and misting machines for area-wide applications of Bacillus thuringiensis var. israelensis (VectoBac WDG as a larvicide targeting Aedes albopictus. During 2010-2013 we performed initially open field trials and then 19 operational area-wide applications in urban and suburban residential areas in northeastern USA to test three truck-mounted sprayers at two application rates. Area-wide applications of WDG in open field conditions at 400 and 800 g/ha killed on average 87% of tested larvae. Once techniques were optimized in residential areas, applications with a Buffalo Turbine Mist Sprayer at a rate of 800 g/ha, the best combination, consistently provided over 90% mortality. Importantly, there was no significant decrease in efficacy with distance from the spray line even in blocks of row homes with trees and bushes in the backyards. Under laboratory conditions Bti deposition in bioassay cups during the operational trials resulted in over 6 weeks of residual control. Our results demonstrate that area-wide truck mounted applications of WDG can effectively suppress Ae. albopictus larvae and should be used in integrated mosquito management approaches to control this nuisance pest and disease vector.

  12. Integration of behavioral and biological control for the management of cotton insect pests: Significance and cost benefits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Earias pheromones. The pheromones were applied once in a season at the start of square formation stage of the cotton crop. The fourth block was treated with conventional insecticides. The farmer applied organophosphate (confidor) and Pyrethroid (Polytrin-C) insecticides in two sprays each. The infestation of pink bollworm and Earias spp. was recorded at weekly intervals. Establishment of the parasitoids was determined by placing Angoumois grain moth eggs in the field. These cards were brought into the laboratory after 24 hours exposure in the differently treated blocks and parasitoid emergence was recorded. For the control of sucking pests, insecticide (confidor) was sprayed uniformly in all the treatments in the third week of June during both years. The cost of the treatments was worked out and the cost benefit ratio for each treatment was calculated. Integration of parasitoids and pheromones, suppressed the bollworms infestation below the economic injury level (5-10%). Separate treatment of pheromones or parasitoids was less effective, and required supplemental measures. The population of the parasitoids in the field was low in the hot months of June and July and thereafter it gradually increased in the succeeding months. Maximum number of the parasitoids was observed in the month of October. The cost of integrated treatment with parasitoids and pheromones was also less than that of insecticide treatment alone. Potential of behavioural and biological control tactics for launching the integrated approach on an area-wide basis is discussed

  13. A three-year field validation study to improve the integrated pest management of hot pepper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji-Hoon; Yun, Sung-Chul

    2013-09-01

    To improve the integrated pest management (IPM) of hot pepper, field study was conducted in Hwasung from 2010 to 2012 and an IPM system was developed to help growers decide when to apply pesticides to control anthracnose, tobacco budworm, Phytophthora blight, bacterial wilt, and bacterial leaf spot. The three field treatments consisted of IPM sprays following the forecast model advisory, a periodic spray at 7-to-10-day intervals, and no spray (control). The number of annual pesticide applications for the IPM treatment ranged from six to eight, whereas the plots subjected to the periodic treatment received pesticide 11 or 12 times annually for three years. Compared to the former strategy, our improved IPM strategy features more intense pest management, with frequent spraying for anthracnose and mixed spraying for tobacco budworm or Phytophthora blight. The incidences for no pesticide control in 2010, 2011, and 2012 were 91, 97.6, and 41.4%, respectively. Conversely, the incidences for the IPM treatment for those years were 7.6, 62.6, and 2%, and the yields from IPM-treated plots were 48.6 kg, 12.1 kg, and 48.8 kg. The incidence and yield in the IPM-treated plots were almost the same as those of the periodic treatment except in 2011, in which no unnecessary sprays were given, meaning that the IPM control was quite successful. From reviewing eight years of field work, sophisticated forecasts that optimize pesticide spray timing reveal that reliance on pesticides can be reduced without compromising yield. Eco-friendly strategies can be implemented in the pest management of hot pepper. PMID:25288956

  14. A Three-Year Field Validation Study to Improve the Integrated Pest Management of Hot Pepper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Hoon Kim

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available To improve the integrated pest management (IPM of hot pepper, field study was conducted in Hwasung from 2010 to 2012 and an IPM system was developed to help growers decide when to apply pesticides to control anthracnose, tobacco budworm, Phytophthora blight, bacterial wilt, and bacterial leaf spot. The three field treatments consisted of IPM sprays following the forecast model advisory, a periodic spray at 7-to-10-day intervals, and no spray (control. The number of annual pesticide applications for the IPM treatment ranged from six to eight, whereas the plots subjected to the periodic treatment received pesticide 11 or 12 times annually for three years. Compared to the former strategy, our improved IPM strategy features more intense pest management, with frequent spraying for anthracnose and mixed spraying for tobacco budworm or Phytophthora blight. The incidences for no pesticide control in 2010, 2011, and 2012 were 91, 97.6, and 41.4%, respectively. Conversely, the incidences for the IPM treatment for those years were 7.6, 62.6, and 2%, and the yields from IPM-treated plots were 48.6 kg, 12.1 kg, and 48.8 kg. The incidence and yield in the IPM-treated plots were almost the same as those of the periodic treatment except in 2011, in which no unnecessary sprays were given, meaning that the IPM control was quite successful. From reviewing eight years of field work, sophisticated forecasts that optimize pesticide spray timing reveal that reliance on pesticides can be reduced without compromising yield. Eco-friendly strategies can be implemented in the pest management of hot pepper.

  15. Implementation of integrated pest management of Ceratitis malgassa in citrus groves in Madagascar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Three species of Ceratitinae have been recorded in Madagascar but most of the economic damage is done by the endemic species Ceratitis malgassa that is considered as the main pest of many fruits (cultivated and wild). During the 1960s, some research on different control methods of Ceratitis malgassa has been undertaken, such as the introduction of natural enemies (4 Opius species from Mauritius and Dirrhinus giffardi). The utilisation of the Sterile Insect Technique has also been considered, but the lack of financial means has prevented such studies. Since 1998 the Ministry of Agriculture through the Plant Protection Service in collaboration with fruit producers and NGO's is carrying out activities to implement the system of integrated pest management in different citrus groves: - Trapping system: test of different traps, monitoring using traps; - Developing the sanitation methods; - Determination of Ceratitis malgassa response to attractants such as trimedlure, torula yeast, tri- lure and protein hydrolysat in view of the application of bait spraying and the male annihilation technique; - Biological control using natural enemies is not yet applied because results of the latest research is not yet available. Many producers who want to export their fruits are interested in the SIT. (author)

  16. SIT in Uruguay: Screwworm Eradication and the Need for Integration for a Successful Pest Management Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nuclear Research Center at the School of Sciences is the unique nuclear facility constructed and devoted to work with radiation and isotopes in Uruguay. SIT technology experience was gained working with the Chagas' disease vector, Triatoma rubrovaria, as a model (Cristina et al., 1986; Salvatella et al., 1987; Cristina et al., 1985, 1984a,b,c). At the present time, working together with the Ministry for Cattle, Agriculture and Fisheries, it was possible to determine the importance of New World Screwworm control and/or eradication from Uruguay. This pest challenges the main export products of Uruguay. Regarding myiasis, four different species of Diptera have been found in Uruguay: Chlochliomyia hominivorax, Chlochliomyia macellaria, Chrysomya albiceps and Dermatobia hominis. C. hominivorax accounts for 87.2 % of all myiasis in Uruguay. The general prevalence of the disease is 4.5% of bovines and 6.2% of ovines are affected. The death rate of affected animals is calculated to be 6.5% for bovines and 18.5% for ovines. Considering a population of 10 million cattle and 26 million ovine in Uruguay, 450,000 bovines and 1,612,000 ovines are affected each year. Total loses are estimated to be US$24 million per year. Since no geographical barrier separates Uruguay from Brazil, integrated management is the only choice to successfully control this important pest. SIT against screwworm would be very beneficial for Uruguay.

  17. The use of semiochemical slow-release devices in integrated pest management strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heuskin, S.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of integrated pest management (IPM strategies is increasing since many problems appeared with the use of synthetic pesticides. Semiochemicals – informative molecules used in insect-insect or plant-insect interaction – are more and more considered within IPM strategies as alternative or complementary approach to insecticide treatments. Indeed, these species-specific compounds do not present any related adversely affectation of beneficial organisms and do not generate any risk of pest insect resistance as observed with insecticides. Because of their complex biological activity, their dispersion in the environment to be protected or monitored needs the elaboration of slow-release devices ensuring a controlled release of the biologically active volatile compounds. These sensitive molecules also need to be protected from degradation by UV light and oxygen. Many studies were conducted on estimation of release-rate from commercialized or experimental slow-release devices. The influence of climatic parameters and dispenser type were estimated by previous authors in order to provide indications about the on-field longevity of lures. The present review outlines a list of slow-release studies conducted by many authors followed by a critical analysis of these studies.

  18. Integrated Pest Management for Sustainable Intensification of Agriculture in Asia and Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pretty, Jules; Bharucha, Zareen Pervez

    2015-01-01

    Integrated Pest Management (IPM) is a leading complement and alternative to synthetic pesticides and a form of sustainable intensification with particular importance for tropical smallholders. Global pesticide use has grown over the past 20 years to 3.5 billion kg/year, amounting to a global market worth $45 billion. The external costs of pesticides are $4-$19 (€3-15) per kg of active ingredient applied, suggesting that IPM approaches that result in lower pesticide use will benefit, not only farmers, but also wider environments and human health. Evidence for IPM's impacts on pesticide use and yields remains patchy. We contribute an evaluation using data from 85 IPM projects from 24 countries of Asia and Africa implemented over the past twenty years. Analysing outcomes on productivity and reliance on pesticides, we find a mean yield increase across projects and crops of 40.9% (SD 72.3), combined with a decline in pesticide use to 30.7% (SD 34.9) compared with baseline. A total of 35 of 115 (30%) crop combinations resulted in a transition to zero pesticide use. We assess successes in four types of IPM projects, and find that at least 50% of pesticide use is not needed in most agroecosystems. Nonetheless, policy support for IPM is relatively rare, counter-interventions from pesticide industry common, and the IPM challenge never done as pests, diseases and weeds evolve and move.

  19. Integrated Pest Management for Sustainable Intensification of Agriculture in Asia and Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jules Pretty

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Integrated Pest Management (IPM is a leading complement and alternative to synthetic pesticides and a form of sustainable intensification with particular importance for tropical smallholders. Global pesticide use has grown over the past 20 years to 3.5 billion kg/year, amounting to a global market worth $45 billion. The external costs of pesticides are $4–$19 (€3–15 per kg of active ingredient applied, suggesting that IPM approaches that result in lower pesticide use will benefit, not only farmers, but also wider environments and human health. Evidence for IPM’s impacts on pesticide use and yields remains patchy. We contribute an evaluation using data from 85 IPM projects from 24 countries of Asia and Africa implemented over the past twenty years. Analysing outcomes on productivity and reliance on pesticides, we find a mean yield increase across projects and crops of 40.9% (SD 72.3, combined with a decline in pesticide use to 30.7% (SD 34.9 compared with baseline. A total of 35 of 115 (30% crop combinations resulted in a transition to zero pesticide use. We assess successes in four types of IPM projects, and find that at least 50% of pesticide use is not needed in most agroecosystems. Nonetheless, policy support for IPM is relatively rare, counter-interventions from pesticide industry common, and the IPM challenge never done as pests, diseases and weeds evolve and move.

  20. The most important sugar beet pests in Ukraine and integral measures for their control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fedorenko Vitaly P.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The report delivers the origins of the insect complex formation on sugar beet fields in Ukraine. Biological, ethological and ecological peculiarities of the most numerous pest species have been shown. Regularities of many-year dynamics of pests, the problems of phytosanitary state of agrocenosis of sugar beet fields and conceptual grounds of pest control in contemporary conditions have been substantiated.

  1. How functional genomics will impact fruit fly pest control: the example of the Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata

    OpenAIRE

    Scolari, Francesca; Ludvik M Gomulski; Gabrieli, Paolo; Manni, Mosè; Savini, Grazia; Gasperi, Giuliano; Anna R Malacrida

    2014-01-01

    The highly invasive agricultural insect pest Ceratitis capitata (Diptera: Tephritidae) is the most thoroughly studied tephritid fruit fly at the genetic and molecular levels. It has become a model for the analysis of fruit fly invasions and for the development of area-wide integrated pest management (AW-IPM) programmes based on the environmentally-friendly Sterile Insect Technique (SIT). Extensive transcriptome resources and the recently released genome sequence are making it possible to unra...

  2. Impact of Training Bolivian Farmers on Integrated Pest Management and Diffusion of Knowledge to Neighboring Farmers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørs, Erik; Konradsen, Flemming; Huici, Omar;

    2016-01-01

    Teaching farmers Integrated Pest Management (IPM) in Farmer Field Schools (FFS) has led to reduced pesticide use and safer handling. This article evaluates the long term impact of training farmers on IPM and the diffusion of knowledge from trained farmers to neighboring farmers, a subject...... the impact of the intervention, self-reported knowledge and practice on pesticide handling and IPM among trained farmers (N=23) and their neighboring farmers (N=47) were analyzed in a follow up study and compared in a cross-sectional analysis to a control group of farmers (N=138) introduced in 2009...... of 9.18 (95% CI 8.55-9.80). Controlling for age and living altitude did not change these results. Trained farmers and their neighboring farmers improved and maintained knowledge and practice on IPM and pesticide handling. Diffusion of knowledge from trained farmers might explain the better performance...

  3. Extension field workers' perception of cotton integrated pest management programme in sindh province

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study was conducted in the Sindh province of Pakistan to assess the performance of Extension Field Worker (EFWs) performed during FAO-EU-ADB funded National Integrated Pest Management Programme (Nat-IPM) for cotton. The basic principle of Nat-IPM programme was to enable farmers to be self sufficient, using practices that are agro-ecological friendly. This study was carried out in four districts of Sindh province (Hyderabad, Tando Allahyar, Matiari, and Mirpurkhas). The sample size comprised 48 EFWs who participated in Training of Facilitators (ToF) and erecuted FFSs during 2001 and 2004. The results revealed that the EFWs performed effectively to attain the objectives of IPM programme. It appears that EFWs improved farmers' knowledge, skills and behavioral change in attitude towards agro-ecological sound IPM practices through FFS training. (author)

  4. Reducing the Incidence of Acute Pesticide Poisoning by Educating Farmers on Integrated Pest Management in South India

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mancini, F.; Jiggins, J.L.S.; O'Malley, M.

    2009-01-01

    Sixty-five farmers reported on pesticide use and the signs and symptoms of acute pesticide poisoning when using two different plant protection strategies: in 2003 using chemical controls and in 2004 using an approach to Integrated Pest Management (IPM) based on an ecological analysis of the field co

  5. Principles and practices of integrated pest management on cotton in the lower Rio Grande Valley of Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sustainable agriculture is ecologically sound, economically viable, socially just, and humane. These four goals for sustainability can be applied to all aspects of any agricultural system, from production and marketing, to processing and consumption. Integrated Pest Management (IPM) may be conside...

  6. Integrated pest management and weed management in the United States and Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Micheal D K; Beckie, Hugh J; Leeson, Julia Y; Norsworthy, Jason K; Steckel, Larry E

    2015-03-01

    There is interest in more diverse weed management tactics because of evolved herbicide resistance in important weeds in many US and Canadian crop systems. While herbicide resistance in weeds is not new, the issue has become critical because of the adoption of simple, convenient and inexpensive crop systems based on genetically engineered glyphosate-tolerant crop cultivars. Importantly, genetic engineering has not been a factor in rice and wheat, two globally important food crops. There are many tactics that help to mitigate herbicide resistance in weeds and should be widely adopted. Evolved herbicide resistance in key weeds has influenced a limited number of growers to include a more diverse suite of tactics to supplement existing herbicidal tactics. Most growers still emphasize herbicides, often to the exclusion of alternative tactics. Application of integrated pest management for weeds is better characterized as integrated weed management, and more typically integrated herbicide management. However, adoption of diverse weed management tactics is limited. Modifying herbicide use will not solve herbicide resistance in weeds, and the relief provided by different herbicide use practices is generally short-lived at best. More diversity of tactics for weed management must be incorporated in crop systems.

  7. Integrated pest management and weed management in the United States and Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Micheal D K; Beckie, Hugh J; Leeson, Julia Y; Norsworthy, Jason K; Steckel, Larry E

    2015-03-01

    There is interest in more diverse weed management tactics because of evolved herbicide resistance in important weeds in many US and Canadian crop systems. While herbicide resistance in weeds is not new, the issue has become critical because of the adoption of simple, convenient and inexpensive crop systems based on genetically engineered glyphosate-tolerant crop cultivars. Importantly, genetic engineering has not been a factor in rice and wheat, two globally important food crops. There are many tactics that help to mitigate herbicide resistance in weeds and should be widely adopted. Evolved herbicide resistance in key weeds has influenced a limited number of growers to include a more diverse suite of tactics to supplement existing herbicidal tactics. Most growers still emphasize herbicides, often to the exclusion of alternative tactics. Application of integrated pest management for weeds is better characterized as integrated weed management, and more typically integrated herbicide management. However, adoption of diverse weed management tactics is limited. Modifying herbicide use will not solve herbicide resistance in weeds, and the relief provided by different herbicide use practices is generally short-lived at best. More diversity of tactics for weed management must be incorporated in crop systems. PMID:25346235

  8. Push-Pull: Chemical Ecology-Based Integrated Pest Management Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Zeyaur; Midega, Charles A O; Hooper, Antony; Pickett, John

    2016-07-01

    Lepidopterous stemborers, and parasitic striga weeds belonging to the family Orobanchaceae, attack cereal crops in sub-Saharan Africa causing severe yield losses. The smallholder farmers are resource constrained and unable to afford expensive chemicals for crop protection. The push-pull technology, a chemical ecology- based cropping system, is developed for integrated pest and weed management in cereal-livestock farming systems. Appropriate plants were selected that naturally emit signaling chemicals (semiochemicals). Plants highly attractive for stemborer egg laying were selected and employed as trap crops (pull), to draw pests away from the main crop. Plants that repelled stemborer females were selected as intercrops (push). The stemborers are attracted to the trap plant, and are repelled from the main cereal crop using a repellent intercrop (push). Root exudates of leguminous repellent intercrops also effectively control the parasitic striga weed through an allelopathic mechanism. Their root exudates contain flavonoid compounds some of which stimulate germination of Striga hermonthica seeds, such as Uncinanone B, and others that dramatically inhibit their attachment to host roots, such as Uncinanone C and a number of di-C-glycosylflavones (di-CGFs), resulting in suicidal germination. The intercrop also improves soil fertility through nitrogen fixation, natural mulching, improved biomass, and control of erosion. Both companion plants provide high value animal fodder, facilitating milk production and diversifying farmers' income sources. The technology is appropriate to smallholder mixed cropping systems in Africa. Adopted by about 125,000 farmers to date in eastern Africa, it effectively addresses major production constraints, significantly increases maize yields, and is economical as it is based on locally available plants, not expensive external inputs. PMID:27392788

  9. Population dynamics and on-farm fruit fly integrated pest management in mango orchards in the natural area of Niayes in Senegal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The trend of the populations of fruit flies in the Niayes area of Senegal follows the dynamics of the rains. This tendency is more visible in Bactrocera invadens than in Ceratitis cosyra. Based on trap captures, B. invadens was largely the dominant pest species, and this was confirmed by the incubation of host fruits, showing that mango, loquat, guava and grapefruit were the favoured commercial host fruits of B. invadens. This recently introduced pest species seemed to displace the presence of the indogenous C. cosyra and other related fruit fly species. Interspecific competition could explain the fact that C. cosyra dominated emergence (up to 87%) in incubated fruits from alternate or wild host plants such as Cactus sp., Capparis spp., Cordyla pinata, and Momordica balsamina. An integrated pest management (IPM) package was tested cooperatively at the village level, which included: (1) male annihilation using wood blocks soaked in insecticide (malathion 500 EC) and lure (methyl eugenol for B. invadens and terpinyl acetate for C. cosyra); (2) two protein hydrolysate bait applications (Success Appat (spinosad) at 1 litre per ha); and (3) sanitation trough weeding and destruction of collected fallen fruits by the following practices: using black plastic bags, burying holes, burning on the ground surface, and incinerating with a barrel transformed into incinerator. The aim of this work was to develop an improved management system for fruit flies in mango orchards. Fruit fly infestations were up to 83% lower in the treated orchard compared to the 6 km distant untreated orchard. The C. cosyra population was higher in the treated orchard where B. invadens was suppressed. Results obtained might be improved if the IPM package is implemented on an area-wide basis. From all above sanitation methods implemented to destroy collected fruits, a reinforced black plastic bag would be recommended as the most effective and practical for popular use. When comparing methyl eugenol to

  10. 具有天敌捕食的鼠害综合防治模型研究%Modeling on Integrated Mnagement Rodent Pest with Predators

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    成定平

    2001-01-01

    Combined rodent control with predator,two models of integratedmanagement and optimal control for rodent pest were proposed.The model of integrated management for rodent pest was based on the population dynamics of rodents and their predators.The model of optimal control was based on vector converge at equilibrium state with minimum the cost.

  11. Aggression in Tephritidae Flies: Where, When, Why? Future Directions for Research in Integrated Pest Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benelli, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    True fruit flies (Diptera: Tephritidae) include over 4000 species, many of which constitute enormous threats to fruit and vegetable production worldwide. A number of Tephritidae are lekking species, forming aggregations in which males fight to defend a small territory where they court females and mate. Male-male contests also occur in non-lekking species, characterized by resource defense polygyny. Tephritidae females display agonistic behavior to maintain single oviposition sites and reduce larval competition for food. Here, how, where, when and why aggressive interactions occur in Tephritidae flies is reviewed. A number of neglected issues deserving further research are highlighted, with a special focus on diel periodicity of aggression, cues evoking aggressive behavior, the role of previous experience on fighting success and the evolution of behavioral lateralization of aggressive displays. In the final section, future directions to exploit this knowledge in Integrated Pest Management, with particular emphasis on enhancement of Sterile Insect Technique and interspecific competitive displacement in the field are suggested. PMID:26463064

  12. Aggression in Tephritidae Flies: Where, When, Why? Future Directions for Research in Integrated Pest Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Benelli

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available True fruit flies (Diptera: Tephritidae include over 4000 species, many of which constitute enormous threats to fruit and vegetable production worldwide. A number of Tephritidae are lekking species, forming aggregations in which males fight to defend a small territory where they court females and mate. Male-male contests also occur in non-lekking species, characterized by resource defense polygyny. Tephritidae females display agonistic behavior to maintain single oviposition sites and reduce larval competition for food. Here, how, where, when and why aggressive interactions occur in Tephritidae flies is reviewed. A number of neglected issues deserving further research are highlighted, with a special focus on diel periodicity of aggression, cues evoking aggressive behavior, the role of previous experience on fighting success and the evolution of behavioral lateralization of aggressive displays. In the final section, future directions to exploit this knowledge in Integrated Pest Management, with particular emphasis on enhancement of Sterile Insect Technique and interspecific competitive displacement in the field are suggested.

  13. Methyl Bromide Alternatives Area-Wide Pest Management Project - South Atlantic Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protocols and Standard Operational Procedures (SOPs) were developed for collecting environmental and soil edaphic information during and after application of methyl bromide alternatives. Parameters measured included soil moisture, soil bulk density, percent moisture at field capacity (-0.3 bars wat...

  14. Development of an airborne remote sensing system for crop pest management: System integration and verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remote sensing along with Global Positioning Systems, Geographic Information Systems, and variable rate technology has been developed, which scientists can implement to help farmers maximize the economic and environmental benefits of crop pest management through precision agriculture. Airborne remo...

  15. Theoretical study and control optimization of an integrated pest management predator-prey model with power growth rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Kaibiao; Zhang, Tonghua; Tian, Yuan

    2016-09-01

    This work presents a pest control predator-prey model, where rate of change in prey density follows a scaling law with exponent less than one and the control is by an integrated management strategy. The aim is to investigate the change in system dynamics and determine a pest control level with minimum control price. First, the dynamics of the proposed model without control is investigated by taking the exponent as an index parameter. And then, to determine the frequency of spraying chemical pesticide and yield releases of the predator, the existence of the order-1 periodic orbit of the control system is discussed in cases. Furthermore, to ensure a certain robustness of the adopted control, i.e., for an inaccurately detected species density or a deviation, the control system could be stabilized at the order-1 periodic orbit, the stability of the order-1 periodic orbit is verified by an stability criterion for a general semi-continuous dynamical system. In addition, to minimize the total cost input in pest control, an optimization problem is formulated and the optimum pest control level is obtained. At last, the numerical simulations with a specific model are carried out to complement the theoretical results. PMID:27378223

  16. Using parasitoid wasps in Integrated Pest Management in museums against biscuit beetle (Stegobium paniceum and webbing clothes moth (Tineola bisselliella

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascal Querner

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Biscuit beetle (Stegobium paniceum and webbing clothes moth (Tineola bisselliella cause much damage to museum objects. Some objects and materials are very attractive to these two pest species and objects are often re-infested after treatment. For some years parasitoid wasps have been used in biological pest control to treat and reduce infestations of stored product pests in food processing facilities. Their application in museums is still new and in a research stage. Results from five different museums in Germany and Austria and their application are presented. Lariophagus distinguendus wasps were released against Stegobium paniceum in the municipal library Augsburger Stadtarchiv (Germany, the Ethnological Museum in Berlin (Germany and the Picture Gallery in the Kunsthistorisches Museum in Vienna (Austria. Trichogramma evanescens were released against Tineola bisselliella in the Technisches Museum in Vienna (Austria and in the Deutsches Museum Verkehrszentrum in Munich (Germany. Results show that for active biscuit beetle infestations good results can be expected using the Lariophagus distinguendus in museums. Active clothes moth infestations are harder to treat but with a very regular and long-term exposure to the wasps, the clothes moth population can be reduced over the years. We see the application of parasitoid wasps as part of an Integrated Pest Management concept that should be used besides regular insect monitoring and other preventive measures. Difficulties, limitations and research needs in the application of parasitoid wasps in museums are discussed.

  17. Potential Economic Benefits from Plantain Integrated Pest Management Adoption: The Case of Coastal Rural Households in Ecuador.

    OpenAIRE

    Baez, Carolina

    2004-01-01

    This thesis evaluates the potential of Integrated Pest Management (IPM) technologies for plantain to benefit the poor in Ecuador. First, a socioeconomic analysis of plantain producers in the Ecuadorian coast is presented. Second, adoption rates for different size farms are estimated for use of various improved management practices. Projected adoption rates are then used in an economic surplus analysis to estimate potential benefits of IPM technologies. Results indicate that most producer ...

  18. The development of area wide traffic management scenarios

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Zuylen, H.J.; Lu, S.; Li, J.; Yusen, C.

    2014-01-01

    Traffic management in cities with congestion is a big challenge with still unused opportunities. Intersection control is a corner stone but this should be done in an area-wide context. The dominant traffic process on urban roads is the traffic flow on the intersections. Spill back is a most importan

  19. Dynamic complexities for prey-dependent consumption integrated pest management models with impulsive effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we consider the prey-dependent consumption predator-prey (natural enemy-pest) models with age structure for the predator, immature and mature natural enemies are released and pesticide is applied impulsively. We prove that, when the impulsive period is no longer than some threshold, the pest-eradication solution is globally asymptotically stable, or say, the pest population can be eradicated totally. But from the point of ecological balance and saving resources, we only need to control the pest population under the economic threshold level instead of eradicating it totally, so we further prove that, when the impulsive period is longer than the threshold, pest population and natural enemy population can coexist, i.e., the system is uniformly permanent. Considering population communities always are imbedded in periodically varying environments, and the parameters in ecosystem models may oscillate simultaneously with the periodically varying environments, we add a forcing term into the prey population's intrinsic growth rate. From two aspects, i.e., when the period of forcing term is same as the impulsive period and when the two periods are different, we illustrate that, the dynamical behaviors of corresponding impulsive system are very complex

  20. Integrated Pest Management of Coffee Berry Borer: Strategies from Latin America that Could Be Useful for Coffee Farmers in Hawaii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis F. Aristizábal

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The coffee berry borer (CBB, Hypothenemus hampei Ferrari (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae is the primary arthropod pest of coffee plantations worldwide. Since its detection in Hawaii (September 2010, coffee growers are facing financial losses due to reduced quality of coffee yields. Several control strategies that include cultural practices, biological control agents (parasitoids, chemical and microbial insecticides (entomopathogenic fungi, and a range of post-harvest sanitation practices have been conducted to manage CBB around the world. In addition, sampling methods including the use of alcohol based traps for monitoring CBB populations have been implemented in some coffee producing countries in Latin America. It is currently unclear which combination of CBB control strategies is optimal under economical, environmental, and sociocultural conditions of Hawaii. This review discusses components of an integrated pest management program for CBB. We focus on practical approaches to provide guidance to coffee farmers in Hawaii. Experiences of integrated pest management (IPM of CBB learned from Latin America over the past 25 years may be relevant for establishing strategies of control that may fit under Hawaiian coffee farmers’ conditions.

  1. Integrated Pest Management of Coffee Berry Borer: Strategies from Latin America that Could Be Useful for Coffee Farmers in Hawaii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aristizábal, Luis F; Bustillo, Alex E; Arthurs, Steven P

    2016-01-01

    The coffee berry borer (CBB), Hypothenemus hampei Ferrari (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) is the primary arthropod pest of coffee plantations worldwide. Since its detection in Hawaii (September 2010), coffee growers are facing financial losses due to reduced quality of coffee yields. Several control strategies that include cultural practices, biological control agents (parasitoids), chemical and microbial insecticides (entomopathogenic fungi), and a range of post-harvest sanitation practices have been conducted to manage CBB around the world. In addition, sampling methods including the use of alcohol based traps for monitoring CBB populations have been implemented in some coffee producing countries in Latin America. It is currently unclear which combination of CBB control strategies is optimal under economical, environmental, and sociocultural conditions of Hawaii. This review discusses components of an integrated pest management program for CBB. We focus on practical approaches to provide guidance to coffee farmers in Hawaii. Experiences of integrated pest management (IPM) of CBB learned from Latin America over the past 25 years may be relevant for establishing strategies of control that may fit under Hawaiian coffee farmers' conditions. PMID:26848690

  2. Sterility method of pest control and its potential role in an integrated sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) control program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Lee H.; Manion, Patrick J.

    1980-01-01

    The sterility method of pest control could be an effective tool in the sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) control program in the Great Lakes. Some of the requirements for its successful application have been met. A field study demonstrated that the release of male sea lampreys, sterilized by the injection of 100 mg/kg of P,P-bis(1-aziridinyl)-N-methylphosphinothioic amide (bisazir), will reduce the number of viable larvae produced. The actual reduction in reproductive success that occurred was directly related to the ratio of sterile to normal males in the population. The technique can be used in many ways in an integrated control program and has considerable potential for the more effective control of the sea lamprey. Eradication is a distinct possibility.Key words: sea lamprey, Petromyzon marinus; pest control, fish control, sterile-male technique, sterilization, chemosterilants, bisazir, Great Lakes

  3. Urban Pest Management. Selected Readings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowles, Kathleen Letcher, Comp.; And Others

    These readings provide basic background information on urban integrated pest management and the development of Integrated Pest Management (IPM) programs for the control of rodents, cockroaches, and head lice. IPM is a decision-making process for deciding if pest supprssion treatments are needed, when they should be initiated, where they should be…

  4. Impact of Training Bolivian Farmers on Integrated Pest Management and Diffusion of Knowledge to Neighboring Farmers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørs, Erik; Konradsen, Flemming; Huici, Omar; Morant, Rafael C; Volk, Julie; Lander, Flemming

    2016-01-01

    Teaching farmers integrated pest management (IPM) in farmer field schools (FFS) has led to reduced pesticide use and safer handling. This article evaluates the long-term impact of training farmers on IPM and the diffusion of knowledge from trained farmers to neighboring farmers, a subject of importance to justify training costs and to promote a healthy and sustainable agriculture. Training on IPM of farmers took place from 2002 to 2004 in their villages in La Paz County, Bolivia, whereas dissemination of knowledge from trained farmer to neighboring farmer took place until 2009. To evaluate the impact of the intervention, self-reported knowledge and practice on pesticide handling and IPM among trained farmers (n = 23) and their neighboring farmers (n = 47) were analyzed in a follow-up study and compared in a cross-sectional analysis with a control group of farmers (n = 138) introduced in 2009. Variables were analyzed using χ(2) test and analysis of variance (ANOVA). Trained farmers improved and performed significantly better in all tested variables than their neighboring farmers, although the latter also improved their performance from 2002 to 2009. Including a control group showed an increasing trend in all variables, with the control farmers having the poorest performance and trained farmers the best. The same was seen in an aggregated variable where trained farmers had a mean score of 16.55 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 15.45-17.65), neighboring farmers a mean score of 11.97 (95% CI: 10.56-13.38), and control farmers a mean score of 9.18 (95% CI: 8.55-9.80). Controlling for age and living altitude did not change these results. Trained farmers and their neighboring farmers improved and maintained knowledge and practice on IPM and pesticide handling. Diffusion of knowledge from trained farmers might explain the better performance of the neighboring farmers compared with the control farmers. Dissemination of knowledge can contribute to justify the cost and

  5. Evaluating the Role of Seed Treatments in Canola/Oilseed Rape Production: Integrated Pest Management, Pollinator Health, and Biodiversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekulic, Gregory; Rempel, Curtis B.

    2016-01-01

    The use patterns and role of insecticide seed treatments, with focus on neonicotinoid insecticides, were examined for canola/oilseed rape production in Canada and the EU. Since nearly all planted canola acres in Western Canada and, historically, a majority of planted oilseed acres in the EU, use seed treatments, it is worth examining whether broad use of insecticidal seed treatments (IST) is compatible with principles of integrated pest management (IPM). The neonicotinoid insecticide (NNI) seed treatment (NNI ST) use pattern has risen due to effective control of several early season insect pests, the most destructive being flea beetles (Phyllotreta sp.). Negative environmental impact and poor efficacy of foliar applied insecticides on flea beetles led growers to look for better alternatives. Due to their biology, predictive models have been difficult to develop for flea beetles, and, therefore, targeted application of seed treatments, as part of an IPM program, has contributed to grower profitability and overall pollinator success for canola production in Western Canada. Early evidence suggests that the recent restriction on NNI may negatively impact grower profitability and does not appear to be having positive impact on pollinator health. Further investigation on impact of NNI on individual bee vs. hive health need to be conducted. Predictive models for flea beetle emergence/feeding activity in canola/oilseed rape need to be developed, as broad acre deployment of NNI seed treatments may not be sustainable due to concerns about resistance/tolerance in flea beetles and other pest species. PMID:27527233

  6. Evaluating the Role of Seed Treatments in Canola/Oilseed Rape Production: Integrated Pest Management, Pollinator Health, and Biodiversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekulic, Gregory; Rempel, Curtis B

    2016-01-01

    The use patterns and role of insecticide seed treatments, with focus on neonicotinoid insecticides, were examined for canola/oilseed rape production in Canada and the EU. Since nearly all planted canola acres in Western Canada and, historically, a majority of planted oilseed acres in the EU, use seed treatments, it is worth examining whether broad use of insecticidal seed treatments (IST) is compatible with principles of integrated pest management (IPM). The neonicotinoid insecticide (NNI) seed treatment (NNI ST) use pattern has risen due to effective control of several early season insect pests, the most destructive being flea beetles (Phyllotreta sp.). Negative environmental impact and poor efficacy of foliar applied insecticides on flea beetles led growers to look for better alternatives. Due to their biology, predictive models have been difficult to develop for flea beetles, and, therefore, targeted application of seed treatments, as part of an IPM program, has contributed to grower profitability and overall pollinator success for canola production in Western Canada. Early evidence suggests that the recent restriction on NNI may negatively impact grower profitability and does not appear to be having positive impact on pollinator health. Further investigation on impact of NNI on individual bee vs. hive health need to be conducted. Predictive models for flea beetle emergence/feeding activity in canola/oilseed rape need to be developed, as broad acre deployment of NNI seed treatments may not be sustainable due to concerns about resistance/tolerance in flea beetles and other pest species. PMID:27527233

  7. Evaluating the Role of Seed Treatments in Canola/Oilseed Rape Production: Integrated Pest Management, Pollinator Health, and Biodiversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory Sekulic

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The use patterns and role of insecticide seed treatments, with focus on neonicotinoid insecticides, were examined for canola/oilseed rape production in Canada and the EU. Since nearly all planted canola acres in Western Canada and, historically, a majority of planted oilseed acres in the EU, use seed treatments, it is worth examining whether broad use of insecticidal seed treatments (IST is compatible with principles of integrated pest management (IPM. The neonicotinoid insecticide (NNI seed treatment (NNI ST use pattern has risen due to effective control of several early season insect pests, the most destructive being flea beetles (Phyllotreta sp.. Negative environmental impact and poor efficacy of foliar applied insecticides on flea beetles led growers to look for better alternatives. Due to their biology, predictive models have been difficult to develop for flea beetles, and, therefore, targeted application of seed treatments, as part of an IPM program, has contributed to grower profitability and overall pollinator success for canola production in Western Canada. Early evidence suggests that the recent restriction on NNI may negatively impact grower profitability and does not appear to be having positive impact on pollinator health. Further investigation on impact of NNI on individual bee vs. hive health need to be conducted. Predictive models for flea beetle emergence/feeding activity in canola/oilseed rape need to be developed, as broad acre deployment of NNI seed treatments may not be sustainable due to concerns about resistance/tolerance in flea beetles and other pest species.

  8. The development of area wide traffic management scenarios

    OpenAIRE

    van Zuylen, H.J.; Lu, S.; Li, J.; Yusen, C.

    2014-01-01

    Traffic management in cities with congestion is a big challenge with still unused opportunities. Intersection control is a corner stone but this should be done in an area-wide context. The dominant traffic process on urban roads is the traffic flow on the intersections. Spill back is a most important cause of malfunctioning networks. The methodology described in this paper gives a structured approach to develop scenarios for dynamic traffic management. The detection of spillback can be done b...

  9. Integrated pest management and entomopathogenic fungal biotechnology in the Latin Americas: II key research and development prerequisites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the first part of this review article (Valencia and Khachatourians, 1998) we presented the special opportunity that entomopathogenic fungi (EPF) offer for integrated pest management (IPM) in the Latin Americas. As expected, along with the opportunities, there are challenges for the use of EPF. First that there are only two fungi, Beauveria bassiana and Metarhizium anisopliae, for which some prerequisite knowledge of basic and applied mycology for industrial research and development (R and D) are in place. Because of precedent setting leadership in the development of certain EPF, e.g., B. bassiana in IPM, Latin America stands to contribute to and gain from future

  10. Oviposition Deterrents in Herbivorous Insects and their potential use in Integrated Pest Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Archana; Kaushik, Nutan

    2016-03-01

    In the life cycle of insects, oviposition is an important phenomenon, and it is influenced by many intrinsic and extrinsic factors, especially in relation to suitable hosts for completion of their life-cycle. Oviposition deterrents which deter an insect from laying eggs are important in the management of insect pests. Proper understanding of these deterrents shall provide necessary insight into new vistas for Insect Pest Management. Chemicals from plants and insects play an important role in attracting phytophagous insects for selecting host for oviposition. Considerable research has been done on oviposition deterrents and their mode of actions. In the present review, we have consolidated the updated information on this important aspect of insect behavior.

  11. International assistance to intervention policies and implementation of area-wide tsetse and animal trypanosomiasis programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    agricultural development. The Programme Against African Trypanosomiasis (PAAT) and the Pan African Tsetse and Trypanosomiasis Eradication Campaign (PATTEC) of the African Union jointly developed a set of criteria and guiding principles to assist tsetse-affected countries in the selection of priority areas for intervention against the AAT problem. The concept of area-wide integrated pest management (AW-IPM) has been designed to address geographically and ecologically well demarcated tsetse fly populations impacting seriously on SARD and to ensure efficiency of the intervention and sustainability of results. AW-IPM exploits favourable trends (entomological, agro-ecological, climatic, anthropogenic and epidemiological), which may assist in redressing the impact of the disease. Thus, substantial benefits from interventions are believed to result, particularly for the development of mixed-crop-livestock systems in the 'cotton-belt', a transfrontier area of Burkina Faso and Mali, and in the southern part of the Rift Valley in Ethiopia. With regards to HAT, priority countries for intervention, as far as WHO is concerned, include Angola, Chad, Congo, Cote d'Ivoire, Democratic Republic of Congo, Guinea and Sudan. For HAT the next challenge is the development of tools, supporting the strategies for the elimination of the disease. Sets of measures against the HAT and the AAT problem, as part of overall efforts directed at improved public health and SARD, respectively, will necessitate an integration of technical, institutional, socio-economic, public health and agricultural development considerations. This integrated approach will, in turn, provide the supportive environment for emergency interventions in HAT foci, balanced investments in AAT programmes, amalgamated with the AW-IPM concept, as preliminary essential steps for technical success, anticipated SARD impact and sustainability. In the context of the described overall agricultural development and public health framework the

  12. Area-wide suppression of invasive fire ant populations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    increases the susceptibility of fire ants to bait insecticide treatments. Field host range studies conducted in Argentina indicated that both T. solenopsae and V. invictae were specific to Solenopsis ants. A combination of chemical and biologically-based control could form the basis of an integrated management system to suppress fire ant populations over large areas, while possibly requiring less chemical control. Project proposal was funded by USDA/ARS Headquarters to demonstrate control of fire ant populations over large areas using integrated management methods. The objectives of this project are to: (1) maintain low fire ant populations using a combination of self-sustaining fire ant biological control agents (the phorid fly, P. tricuspis, and the pathogen, T. solenopsae) and bait toxicants, (2) assess the economic impact associated with fire ants and the benefits of area-wide fire ant control, (3) assess the environmental impact of fire ants and the effects of their control on native ant fauna, (4) develop educational materials for the public on fire ants and their control, and (5) a research component that focuses on new methodologies that can enhance bait and/or biocontrol effectiveness. The Project team includes USDA/ARS and APHIS personnel and state cooperators from Texas A and M University, Oklahoma State University, Clemson University, South Carolina, and the University of Florida. Control and treatment demonstration sites (120 ha + periphery) were set up in each of five states (Florida, Oklahoma, Texas, South Carolina, and Mississippi). The control site had bait applications, but no biocontrol around the periphery. The treatment site had bait applications plus biocontrol agents (phorid flies and T. solenopsae) were applied to the periphery around the bait treated areas, to prevent, limit, or slow reinfestation of the chemically treated area. Insecticide applications consisted of a combination of hydramethylnon and methoprene baits, chosen because they were

  13. Relevance of traditional integrated pest management (IPM) strategies for commercial corn producers in a transgenic agroecosystem: a bygone era?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Michael E

    2011-06-01

    The use of transgenic Bt maize hybrids continues to increase significantly across the Corn Belt of the United States. In 2009, 59% of all maize planted in Illinois was characterized as a "stacked" gene variety. This is a 40% increase since 2006. Stacked hybrids typically express one Cry protein for corn rootworm control and one Cry protein for control of several lepidopteran pests; they also feature herbicide tolerance (to either glyphosate or glufosinate). Slightly more than 50 years has passed since Vernon Stern and his University of California entomology colleagues published (1959) their seminal paper on the integrated control concept, laying the foundation for modern pest management (IPM) programs. To assess the relevance of traditional IPM concepts within a transgenic agroecosystem, commercial maize producers were surveyed at a series of meetings in 2009 and 2010 regarding their perceptions on their use of Bt hybrids and resistance management. Special attention was devoted to two insect pests of corn, the European corn borer and the western corn rootworm. A high percentage of producers who participated in these meetings planted Bt hybrids in 2008 and 2009, 97 and 96.7%, respectively. Refuge compliance in 2008 and 2009, as mandated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), was 82 and 75.7%, respectively, for those producers surveyed. A large majority of producers (79 and 73.3% in 2009 and 2010, respectively) revealed that they would, or had, used a Bt hybrid for corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte) or European corn borer (Ostrinia nubilalis Hübner) control even when anticipated densities were low. Currently, the EPA is evaluating the long-term use of seed blends (Bt and non-Bt) as a resistance management strategy. In 2010, a large percentage of producers, 80.4%, indicated they would be willing to use this approach. The current lack of integration of management tactics for insect pests of maize in the U.S. Corn Belt, due primarily to

  14. Application of benefit/cost analysis to insect pest control using the sterile insect technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Before embarking on area-wide integrated pest management (AW-IPM) programmes involving eradication, exclusion, or suppression of insect pests using the sterile insect technique (SIT), and/or other area-wide control measures, not only their technical but also their economic feasibility needs to be assessed. They may require significant initial capital investments to achieve long-term returns in subsequent periods, and may raise questions about the distribution of benefits or the justification of public or private pest control efforts. A consistent and transparent system is needed to analyse the benefits and costs of such programmes and to demonstrate their value, or in some cases to assess appropriate contributions to the costs by the various stakeholders who gain the benefits. Benefit/cost analysis (BCA) provides such a framework, and has been applied to many AW-IPM programmes that integrate the SIT, in which it has been used to demonstrate the expected value of area-wide eradication, exclusion or suppression. This chapter outlines the process of BCA in which itemized future costs and benefits are compared in terms of present values. It also provides a review and examples of the application of BCA to the SIT. A checklist of BCA inputs, and some examples of benefit/cost outputs, are also presented. (author)

  15. Knowing your enemies: Integrating molecular and ecological methods to assess the impact of arthropod predators on crop pests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furlong, Michael J

    2015-02-01

    The importance of natural enemies as the foundation of integrated pest management (IPM) is widely accepted, but few studies conduct the manipulative field experiments necessary to directly quantify their impact on pest populations in this context. This is particularly true for predators. Studying arthropod predator-prey interactions is inherently difficult: prey items are often completely consumed, individual predator-prey interactions are ephemeral (rendering their detection difficult) and the typically fluid or soft-bodied meals cannot be easily identified visually within predator guts. Serological techniques have long been used in arthropod predator gut-contents analysis, and current enzyme linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) are highly specific and sensitive. Recently, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods for gut-contents analysis have developed rapidly and they now dominate the diagnostic methods used for gut-contents analysis in field-based research. This work has identified trophic linkages within food webs, determined predator diet breadth and preference, demonstrated the importance of cannibalism and intraguild predation within and between certain taxa, and confirmed the benefits (predator persistence) and potential disadvantages (reduced feeding on pest species) of the availability of alternative nonpest prey. Despite considerable efforts to calibrate gut-contents assays, these methods remain qualitative. Available techniques for predator gut-contents analysis can provide rapid, accurate, cost-effective identification of predation events. As such, they perfectly compliment the ecological methods developed to directly assess predator impacts on prey populations but which are imperfect at identifying the key predators. These diagnostic methods for gut-contents analysis are underexploited in agricultural research and they are almost never applied in unison with the critical field experiments to measure predator impact. This paper stresses the need for a

  16. Area-wide IPM for commercial wheat storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The USDA, Agricultural Research Service funded a demonstration project (1998-2003) for area-wide IPM for stored wheat in Kansas and Oklahoma. This project was a collaboration of researchers at the ARS Grain Marketing and Production Research Center in Manhattan, Kansas, Kansas State University, and Oklahoma State University. The project utilised two elevator networks, one in each state, for a total of 28 grain elevators. These elevators stored approximately 843,682 metric tonnes of wheat, which was harvested from approximately 324,000 ha. During this study, thousands of grain samples were taken in concrete elevator bins. A vacuum-probe sampler was used to take ten 3-kg grain samples in the top 12 meters of each bin at grain elevators. Decision support software, Stored Grain Advisor Pro (SGA Pro) was developed. This software interprets insect sampling data, and provides grain managers with a risk analysis report that describes which bins are at low, moderate or high risk for insect-caused economic losses. Recommended treatment strategies and economic analysis are presented to the manager. The area-wide IPM programme was superior to calendar-based management because it ensured that the grain in each bin was only treated when insect densities exceeded economic thresholds. This approach reduced the frequency of fumigation while maintaining high grain quality. Elevators that followed our recommendations reduced the number of bins they normally fumigated by at least 50%. A new grain-scouting company was started that is using SGA Pro and the sampling tools that were developed in this project. The company is in its second year and has over 30 commercial elevators on contract. (author)

  17. Impact of integrated pest management on the population of leafminers, fruit borers, and natural enemies in tomato

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miranda Moacyr Mascarenhas Motta

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to evaluate the impact of integrated pest management (IPM in the productivity of the tomato and in the populations of leafminers, fruit borers, and natural enemies in tomato crops. The treatments were calendar (spraying twice weekly with insecticides and fungicides, IPM (spraying when action thresholds were achieved, and control (no pesticide was applied. IPM was the most efficient system of pest control due to presenting similar productivity and 65.6% less pesticide applications than in the calendar. The attack of Tuta absoluta (Meyrick (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae and Liriomyza spp. (Diptera: Agromyzidae to the leaves only achieved the action threshold in the final phase of the cultivation. The main fruit borer was Neoleucinoides elegantalis (Guen. (Lepidoptera: Crambidae, followed by T. absoluta and Spodoptera eridania (Cr. (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae. The natural enemy populations were severely reduced by excessive pesticide applications. Predators were more abundant than parasitoids. The most abundant predators were Araneidae, Anthicus sp. (Coleoptera: Anthicidae, Cycloneda sanguinea larva (L. (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae, Staphylinidae adults (Coleoptera, Orius sp. and Xylocoris sp. (Hemiptera: Anthocoridae, Formicidae (Hymenoptera, and Phlaeothripidae (Thysanoptera. The most abundant parasitoids were Hymenoptera of the families Eulophidae, Braconidae (Bracon sp. and Chelonus sp., Trichogrammatidae [Trichogramma pretiosum (Riley] and Bethylidae (Goniozus nigrifemur Ashmead, besides Tachinidae (Diptera.

  18. Integrated pest management: the push-pull approach for controlling insect pests and weeds of cereals, and its potential for other agricultural systems including animal husbandry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanali, Ahmed; Herren, Hans; Khan, Zeyaur R; Pickett, John A; Woodcock, Christine M

    2008-02-12

    This paper describes the 'push-pull' or 'stimulo-deterrent diversionary' strategy in relation to current and potential examples from our own experiences. The push-pull effect is established by exploiting semiochemicals to repel insect pests from the crop ('push') and to attract them into trap crops ('pull'). The systems exemplified here have been developed for subsistence farming in Africa and delivery of the semiochemicals is entirely by companion cropping, i.e. intercropping for the push and trap cropping for the pull. The main target was a series of lepidopterous pests attacking maize and other cereals. Although the area given to the cereal crop itself is reduced under the push-pull system, higher yields are produced per unit area. An important spin-off from the project is that the companion crops are valuable forage for farm animals. Leguminous intercrops also provide advantages with regard to plant nutrition and some of the trap crops help with water retention and in reducing land erosion. A major benefit is that certain intercrop plants provide dramatic control of the African witchweed (striga). Animal husbandry forms an essential part of intensive subsistence agriculture in Africa and developments using analogous push-pull control strategies for insect pests of cattle are exemplified.

  19. Remote Sensing and GIS Applications for Precision Areawide Pest Management: Implications for Homeland Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    Areawide pest management represents coordinated adoption of integrated pest management to conduct preventive suppression of a pest species throughout its geographic distribution. Scientists in areawide pest management programs have been developing, integrating, and evaluating multiple strategies an...

  20. Two Generalized Predator-Prey Models for Integrated Pest Management with Stage Structure and Disease in the Prey Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruiqing Shi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Stage-structured predator-prey models with disease in the prey are constructed. For the purpose of integrated pest management, two types of impulsive control strategies (impulsive release of infective prey and impulsive release of predator are used. For Case  1, infective prey applications are more frequent than releases of predator (natural enemies. For Case  2, predator (natural enemies releases are more frequent than infective prey applications. In both cases, we get the sufficient conditions for the global attractivity of the susceptible prey-eradication periodic solution. In addition, the persistence of the systems is also discussed. At last, the results are discussed and some possible future work is put forward.

  1. Benefits of collaborative learning for environmental management: applying the integrated systems for knowledge management approach to support animal pest control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, W; Bosch, O; Kilvington, M; Oliver, J; Gilbert, M

    2001-02-01

    Resource management issues continually change over time in response to coevolving social, economic, and ecological systems. Under these conditions adaptive management, or "learning by doing," offers an opportunity for more proactive and collaborative approaches to resolving environmental problems. In turn, this will require the implementation of learning-based extension approaches alongside more traditional linear technology transfer approaches within the area of environmental extension. In this paper the Integrated Systems for Knowledge Management (ISKM) approach is presented to illustrate how such learning-based approaches can be used to help communities develop, apply, and refine technical information within a larger context of shared understanding. To outline how this works in practice, we use a case study involving pest management. Particular attention is paid to the issues that emerge as a result of multiple stakeholder involvement within environmental problem situations. Finally, the potential role of the Internet in supporting and disseminating the experience gained through ongoing adaptive management processes is examined.

  2. The Learning Facilitation Role of Agricultural Extension Workers in the Adoption of Integrated Pest Management by Tropical Fruit Growers in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsey, Barry; Sirichoti, Kittipong

    2002-01-01

    A sample of 120 Thai fruit growers reported that agricultural extension workers were influential in their adoption of integrated pest management, which balances cultural tradition and progressive practice. Extension workers used discussion and reflection on practical experience, a participatory and collaborative approach to the adoption of…

  3. Trapping guidelines for area-wide fruit fly programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Different traps and lures have been developed and used over decades to survey fruit fly populations. The first attractant for male fruit flies was methyl eugenol (ME) (for Bactrocera zonata, Howlett, 1912) followed by kerosene for Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata, (medfly), Severin and Severin, 1913. In 1956, Angelica seed oil was used to trap medfly (Steiner et al, 1957). Beroza et al. (1961) discovered trimedlure (TML) to be effective for the same purpose. Beroza and Green, 1963, demonstrated cuelure to be an effective attractant for Bactrocera cucurbitae. Food baits based on protein solutions, fermenting sugar solutions, fruit juices, and vinegar have been used since 1918 for the capture of females of several species. The McPhail trap was the first device to be used with protein baits (McPhail, 1929). Steiner traps were developed in 1957 (Steiner et al., 1957) and Jackson traps in 1971 for TML (Harris et al., 1971). These traps are currently used in various countries for fruit fly surveys in support of control activities and eradication campaigns. The combination of a McPhail trap with a protein attractant, Jackson trap with TML, and the Steiner trap with ME or cuelure (CUE), has remained unchanged for several decades. Global trends in increasing food quality, revenue sources, and fruit and vegetable trade, has resulted in an increased worldwide movement of fruit fly species and requires refinement of survey systems. After years of validating trapping technology through coordinated research programmes (CRP's) and extensive technical assistance to member countries, the Joint Division FAO/IAEA proposes the use of proven technologies in improving trap sensitivity in area-wide fruit fly control programmes (IAEA 1996 and IAEA 1998). These proven technologies include the use of synthetic food lures such as female attractants that can be used for several species of Anastrepha, Bactrocera and Ceratitis. Other citations of information on these developments are

  4. New dispenser types for integrated pest management of agriculturally significant insect pests: an algorithm with specialized searching capacity in electronic data bases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hummel, H E; Eisinger, M T; Hein, D F; Breuer, M; Schmid, S; Leithold, G

    2012-01-01

    Pheromone effects discovered some 130 years, but scientifically defined just half a century ago, are a great bonus for basic and applied biology. Specifically, pest management efforts have been advanced in many insect orders, either for purposes or monitoring, mass trapping, or for mating disruption. Finding and applying a new search algorithm, nearly 20,000 entries in the pheromone literature have been counted, a number much higher than originally anticipated. This compilation contains identified and thus synthesizable structures for all major orders of insects. Among them are hundreds of agriculturally significant insect pests whose aggregated damages and costly control measures range in the multibillions of dollars annually. Unfortunately, and despite a lot of effort within the international entomological scene, the number of efficient and cheap engineering solutions for dispensing pheromones under variable field conditions is uncomfortably lagging behind. Some innovative approaches are cited from the relevant literature in an attempt to rectify this situation. Recently, specifically designed electrospun organic nanofibers offer a lot of promise. With their use, the mating communication of vineyard insects like Lobesia botrana (Lep.: Tortricidae) can be disrupted for periods of seven weeks. PMID:23885431

  5. Development of an organic integrated pest management (ipm module against insect-pests of muskmelon in arid region of Rajasthan, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shravan M Haldhar

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Four different muskmelon production systems (two conventional, one conventional IPM, and one organic IPM were compared in field experiments at the Central Institute for Arid Horticulture, Bikaner for two years. The organic IPM system proved to be the most effective and economical approach (B: C ratio 8.80:1 against melon aphid (Aphis gossypii, leaf eating caterpillar (Diaphania indica, hadda beetle (Epilachna vigintiopunctata and cucurbit fruit fly (Bactrocera cucurbitae in which the lowest incidence was recorded as compared to other modules. The organic IPM module-III comprised of growing resistant genotype (RM-50, spray of neem oil at 20 DAS, installation of pheromone trap (10/ hectare at 42 DAS, spray of tumba fruit extract (TFE 5% at 50 DAS and spray of spinosad 46 SC at 60 DAS was the most effective. The conventional I (farmer’s practices was the second most effective system against major pests during both years. The benefit-cost ratio of the tested muskmelon production systems in the control of insect-pests decreased in the following order: module-III (B: C ratio 8.80:1> module-I (B: C ratio 7.74:1> module-IV (B: C ratio 6.60:1> module-II (B: C ratio 3.56:1.

  6. Main forest pests on pines in Anxi County and its integrated control measures%安溪县松树主要有害生物及其防治

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘长士

    2011-01-01

    总结了近10年安溪县松树6种主要有害生物(松突圆蚧、松墨天牛、马尾松毛虫、松大蚜、松针褐斑病、棕鼯鼠)的发生特点与分布情况,提出了各主要有害生物的综合防治措施。%The distribution,harm and main characteristics of the six main forest pests species on pines in Anxi County,including Hemiberlesia pitysophila,Monochamus alternatus,Dendrolimus punctatus,Cinara pinitabulaeformis,Lecanosticta acicola and Bursaphelenchus xylophilus were dealt with by nearly 10 years of field studies.Integrated control measures were introduced according to local climate and forest pests characteristics,and could decrease the suffering rate caused by forest pests to less than 1.5‰.

  7. New Miticides for Integrated Pest Management of Varroa destructor (Acari: Varroidae) in Honey Bee Colonies on the Canadian Prairies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandervalk, L P; Nasr, M E; Dosdall, L M

    2014-12-01

    Varroa destructor Anderson and Trueman 2000 (Acari: Varroidae) is an ectoparasitic mite of the honey bee, Apis mellifera L. (Hymenoptera: Apidae). Honey bee colonies require extensive management to prevent mortality caused by varroa mites and the viruses they vector. New miticides (Thymovar and HopGuard) to manage varroa mites were evaluated during the spring and fall treatment windows of the Canadian prairies to determine their effectiveness as part of an integrated management strategy. Thymovar and HopGuard were evaluated alongside the currently used industry standards: Apivar and formic acid. Results demonstrated that Apivar and formic acid remain effective V. destructor management options under spring and fall conditions. Applications of Thymovar during spring were associated with a reduction in brood area, and therefore should be limited to the fall season. The miticide HopGuard was not effective in managing V. destructor, and alteration of the current delivery system is necessary. This study demonstrates the potential for new effective treatment options to supplement currently used V. destructor integrated pest management systems. PMID:26470066

  8. New Miticides for Integrated Pest Management of Varroa destructor (Acari: Varroidae) in Honey Bee Colonies on the Canadian Prairies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandervalk, L P; Nasr, M E; Dosdall, L M

    2014-12-01

    Varroa destructor Anderson and Trueman 2000 (Acari: Varroidae) is an ectoparasitic mite of the honey bee, Apis mellifera L. (Hymenoptera: Apidae). Honey bee colonies require extensive management to prevent mortality caused by varroa mites and the viruses they vector. New miticides (Thymovar and HopGuard) to manage varroa mites were evaluated during the spring and fall treatment windows of the Canadian prairies to determine their effectiveness as part of an integrated management strategy. Thymovar and HopGuard were evaluated alongside the currently used industry standards: Apivar and formic acid. Results demonstrated that Apivar and formic acid remain effective V. destructor management options under spring and fall conditions. Applications of Thymovar during spring were associated with a reduction in brood area, and therefore should be limited to the fall season. The miticide HopGuard was not effective in managing V. destructor, and alteration of the current delivery system is necessary. This study demonstrates the potential for new effective treatment options to supplement currently used V. destructor integrated pest management systems.

  9. Area-Wide Ground Applications of Bacillus thuringiensis var. israelensis for the Control of Aedes albopictus in Residential Neighborhoods: From Optimization to Operation

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Gregory M.; Ary Faraji; Isik Unlu; Sean P Healy; Muhammad Farooq; Randy Gaugler; George Hamilton; Fonseca, Dina M.

    2014-01-01

    The increasing range of Aedes albopictus, the Asian tiger mosquito, in the USA and the threat of chikungunya and dengue outbreaks vectored by this species have necessitated novel approaches to control this peridomestic mosquito. Conventional methods such as adulticiding provide temporary relief, but fail to manage this pest on a sustained basis. We explored the use of cold aerosol foggers and misting machines for area-wide applications of Bacillus thuringiensis var. israelensis (VectoBac WDG)...

  10. Participatory Evaluation of Integrated Pest and Soil Fertility Management Options Using Ordered Categorical Data Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Rutto, Esther; De Groote, Hugo; Vanlauwe, Bernard; Kanampiu, Fred; Odhiambo, George D.; Khan, Zeyaur R.

    2006-01-01

    During participatory rural appraisals, farmers at the Lake Victoria basin of Kenya and Uganda identified Striga, stemborer and declining soil fertility as three major constraints to maize production To reduce food insecurity, several innovative integrated technologies to address these constraints have been developed, including push-pull (maize intercropped with Desmodium and surrounded by napier grass), maize-soybean and maize-crotalaria rotations, and Imazapyrresistant (IR) maize seed coated...

  11. Integrated pest management and allocation of control efforts for vector-borne diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginsberg, H.S.

    2001-01-01

    Applications of various control methods were evaluated to determine how to integrate methods so as to minimize the number of human cases of vector-borne diseases. These diseases can be controlled by lowering the number of vector-human contacts (e.g., by pesticide applications or use of repellents), or by lowering the proportion of vectors infected with pathogens (e.g., by lowering or vaccinating reservoir host populations). Control methods should be combined in such a way as to most efficiently lower the probability of human encounter with an infected vector. Simulations using a simple probabilistic model of pathogen transmission suggest that the most efficient way to integrate different control methods is to combine methods that have the same effect (e.g., combine treatments that lower the vector population; or combine treatments that lower pathogen prevalence in vectors). Combining techniques that have different effects (e.g., a technique that lowers vector populations with a technique that lowers pathogen prevalence in vectors) will be less efficient than combining two techniques that both lower vector populations or combining two techniques that both lower pathogen prevalence, costs being the same. Costs of alternative control methods generally differ, so the efficiency of various combinations at lowering human contact with infected vectors should be estimated at available funding levels. Data should be collected from initial trials to improve the effects of subsequent interventions on the number of human cases.

  12. Prospects for area-wide integrated control of tsetse flies (Diptera:Glossinidae and trypanosomosis in sub-Saharan Africa Perspectivas para el control integrado abarcativo del área de moscas tse-tsé (Diptera: Glossinidae y la tripanosomiasis en el África sub-Sahariana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc J.B. Vreysen

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Countries in sub-Saharan Africa are among the least developed in the world and hunger and poverty remains widespread in most of the rural communities. Reducing hunger and chronic under nourishment through the introduction of productive livestock as a source of traction and manure for crop production, transport, milk and meat is deemed to be a fundamental first step towards better rural development. The presence of the tsetse fly in one third of the African continent and the disease trypanosomosis it transmits is considered the major barrier to the development of productive livestock. Despite the yearly administration of 35 million doses of trypanocidal drugs (at US$ 1 per dose, African farmers lose 3 million cattle every year to the disease and annual direct economic losses are estimated at US$ 600 to 1200 million. Tsetse flies mainly affect the rural poor and are rightfully considered 'a root cause of poverty ' in Africa . The most desirable way of containing the disease trypanosomosis is undoubtedly the elimination of entire populations of the vector from delimited geographical areas using an integration of various control tactics, i.e. an areawide integrated pest management (AW-IPM approach. Efficient methods to suppress or even eliminate tsetse populations have been available for the last 50 years and are mostly based on the use of insecticides or entail devices that attract and kill. Nevertheless, despite gigantic efforts in the past century, there are only a few examples where the elimination of tsetse flies has proven to be sustainable, e.g. the elimination of Glossina pallidipes Austen from South Africa in the 1950 's using mainly aerial spraying of residual insecticides or the creation of a zone free of Glossina austeni Newstead on Unguja Island of Zanzibar (1994-1997 through the integration of various control tactics including the release of sterile insects. The decentralisation of the tsetse control offices resulting in a shift from

  13. Schaderreger im Wurzelraum von Reben (Vitis spp.) - Vorkommen, Wirkung, Interaktionen - und Möglichkeiten zu deren Kontrolle durch Maßnahmen des Integrated Pest Management (IPM)

    OpenAIRE

    Huber, Lars

    2007-01-01

    Ziel der Untersuchungen war es, das Vorkommen, die Wirkungen und die Interaktionen bodenbürtiger Vitis-Pathogene in Pfropfrebenbeständen zu untersuchen und die Möglichkeiten ihrer Kontrolle im Rahmen des Integrated Pest Managements zu eruieren. Ein Schwerpunkt lag dabei bei den in Zusammenhang mit einem Befall der Rebstöcke durch D. vitifoliae stehenden Wuchsdepressionen und Absterbeerscheinungen. Hintergrund dieser Untersuchungen war die Hypothese, dass sich die Böden von Rebanlagen mit und ...

  14. Defence mechanisms of Brassicaceae: implications for plant-insect interactions and potential for integrated pest management. A review

    OpenAIRE

    Ahuja, Ishita; Rohloff, Jens; Bones, Atle Magnar

    2010-01-01

    Brassica crops are grown worldwide for oil, food and feed purposes, and constitute a significant economic value due to their nutritional, medicinal, bioindustrial, biocontrol and crop rotation properties. Insect pests cause enormous yield and economic losses in Brassica crop production every year, and are a threat to global agriculture. In order to overcome these insect pests, Brassica species themselves use multiple defence mechanisms, which can be constitutive, inducible, induced, direct or...

  15. Assessment of Small Scale Farmers’ Skills Regarding Integrated Pest Management (IPM in District Sargodha-Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ejaz Ashraf

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Asurvey study was conducted to assess the knowledge/awareness level in IPM technology among farmers. Fourvillages were randomly selected from Sargodha district fordata collection. Thirteen farmers from each village wereselected randomly and sample size was 52 respondents. Morethan 92% of respondents have no advisory services eitherfrom public or private sector. The findings imply that respondentsneed knowledge for all levels of competence in IPM technology.They need to get high-level of competence for application ofthis technology in the field. In addition, they have littleexposure to long-term training opportunities due to loweducation level for applications of this technology. More than77% of respondents think that government agricultural policiesand no access to information sources regarding integrated pestmanagement at grass-root level are main constraints. Thefindings from correlation and regression analyses indicate thatage and knowledge/awareness level are negatively correlated.It may be concluded that elder respondents have less adaptabilityto new ideas and techniques as compared to young respondents.However, training and information, education, and experienceplay a significant role in enhancing the knowledge/awarenesslevel of respondents in IPM technology.

  16. An Overview of Pest Species of Bactrocera Fruit Flies (Diptera: Tephritidae) and the Integration of Biopesticides with Other Biological Approaches for Their Management with a Focus on the Pacific Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Roger I; Piñero, Jaime C; Leblanc, Luc

    2015-01-01

    Fruit flies (Diptera: Tephritidae) are among the most economically important pest species in the world, attacking a wide range of fruits and fleshy vegetables throughout tropical and sub-tropical areas. These species are such devastating crop pests that major control and eradication programs have been developed in various parts of the world to combat them. The array of control methods includes insecticide sprays to foliage and soil, bait-sprays, male annihilation techniques, releases of sterilized flies and parasitoids, and cultural controls. During the twenty first century there has been a trend to move away from control with organophosphate insecticides (e.g., malathion, diazinon, and naled) and towards reduced risk insecticide treatments. In this article we present an overview of 73 pest species in the genus Bactrocera, examine recent developments of reduced risk technologies for their control and explore Integrated Pest Management (IPM) Programs that integrate multiple components to manage these pests in tropical and sub-tropical areas. PMID:26463186

  17. 烟粉虱暴发成因及其治理技术研究%Outbreak Reason of Cotton Whitefly [Bemisia Tabaci(Gennadius)]and its Integrated Pest Measure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    慕卫; 刘峰; 刘海涛

    2003-01-01

    The reason of cotton whitefly [ Bemisia tabaci ( Gennadius) ] happened heavily in China in recent years was analyzed from its biology characteristic, host range, crop culture and environment situation, control measure. At last, integrated pest measure for control cotton whiteflywas clarified.

  18. The sterile insect technique in integrated pest management programmes for the control of stable flies and horn flies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two large integrated pest management programmes involving the control of horn flies, Haematobia irritans L., and stable flies, Stomoxys calcitrans L., have been carried out by U.S. Department of Agriculture scientists. The horn fly project was conducted on the island of Molokai, Hawaii. Its aims were to control the fly population by the insect growth regulator (IGR) methoprene (isopropyl (E,E)-11-methoxy-3,7,11-trimethyl-2,4-dodecadienoate), which was metered into the drinking water of the cattle, and the release of sterile insects. The flies were released daily after exposing the young adults to 2.5 kR. There was excellent survival of the released flies. The release of sterile flies was discontinued after week 21 and no flies were observed on the cattle after week 23. No horn fly larvae could be found in any manure pats in the field after week 16. Horn-fly-infested cattle were moved into the area on week 30 and the fly population increased so the methoprene treatment was terminated on week 39. By week 44 the fly population had returned to normal. The stable fly population was suppressed on the island of St. Croix using sterile insect releases plus conventional control techniques. These included toxic traps, larviciding breeding sites and the release of parasites. The sterile insects, about 1X105/day, were released at 2km intervals over the 218km2 island for an 18-month period. For the last six months of the study more than 99.9% of the wild flies were eliminated from the island. However, a few fertile flies were found throughout the study. These fertile flies either came from small isolated breeding sites in the urban areas were no sterile flies were released, or were carried in by boats or planes with domestic livestock from the other islands in the area. (author)

  19. Utah Home Orchard Pest Management Guide

    OpenAIRE

    Murray, Marion; Alston, Diane; Nischwitz, Claudia

    2012-01-01

    Integrated pest management (IPM) is the practice of combining knowledge of the pest and host plant with multiple tactics for long-term, safe pest control. The goal of IPM is pesticide reduction by using cultural, mechanical, and biological controls before the last option, pesticides.

  20. The Integrated Control Measures for Crop Diseases and Pests%农作物病虫害的综合防治措施

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑钧; 陈天毅

    2011-01-01

    农业在我国的经济发展中具有举足轻重的作用,对病虫害进行有效防治则是提高农作物品质和产量的关键。病虫害防治需建立一套综合的防治体系,即需将农业防治、生物防治、物理防治和化学防治有效地结合起来。综合防治对于病虫害的防治效果显著,能够显著提高农作物产量和品质,培育安全、无公害的农产品。%Agriculture has an important role in economic development in China.Effective control of pests and diseases is a key for improving crop quality and yield.It is necessary to establish an integrated prevention system for controlling pests and diseases,which is an combination with agriculture control,biological control,physical control and chemical control.Integrated control can control the pest significantly,improve the quality of crops and cultivate green and pollution-free crops.

  1. 吴茱萸病虫害防治研究进展%RecentAdvances in Integrated Control of Evodia rutaecarpa Diseases and Insect Pests

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高丹; 张寿文; 吴波

    2012-01-01

      The paper reviewed the species of Evodia rutaecarpa diseases and pests. Integrated control techniques were introduced in several aspects, such as forecasts, agricultural control techniques, physical control techniques, chemical control techniques and other control techniques. Biological control techniques and genetic engineering were put forward for controlling Evodia rutaecarpa diseases and pests.%  概述了吴茱萸主要病虫害种类,介绍其了预测预报、农业防治、物理防治、化学防治等防治方法,并提出了生物防治技术和基因工程技术在其病虫害研究中的应用前景。

  2. Integrated Fruit Production and Pest Management in Europe: The Apple Case Study and How Far We Are From the Original Concept?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petros Damos

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This review focuses on the process of adapting the original concept of Integrated Pest Management (IPM to the wider conception of the Integrated Fruit Production (IFP implemented in Europe. Even though most of the pest management strategies still rely on the use of synthetic pesticides, a wide array of innovative and environmentally friendly tools are now available as possible alternative to the pesticides within the modern apple production system. We also highlight how recent pest management strategies and tools have created an opening for research towards IPM improvement, including the use of biorational pesticides, semiochemicals and biological control. Forecasting models, new tree training systems and innovative spray equipment have also been developed to improve treatment coverage, to mitigate pesticide drift and to reduce chemical residues on fruits. The possible threats that jeopardize the effective implementation of IPM and particularly the risks related to the development of the pesticide resistance and the introduction of new invasive pests are also reviewed. With the directive 128/09, the European legislation recognizes IPM as a strategic approach for the sustainable use of pesticides. Within this context, IPM and related guidelines is called to meet different areas of concern in relation to the worker and bystander safety. Beside the traditional economic criteria of the market-oriented agriculture, sustainable agriculture includes the assessment of the environmental impact of the agronomic practices within the societal context where they take place. As a consequence of the raising consumer concerns about environmental impacts generated by the fruit production, IFP certification over product standards, including process aspects, are frequently required by consumers and supermarket chains.

  3. PREMISE Insect Model: Integrated Population Dynamics Model for the Ex-ante Evaluation of IPM against Insect Pest

    OpenAIRE

    Hennen, Wil; Alaphilippe, Aude

    2015-01-01

    Codling moth Cydia pomonella L. is the most serious pest of apple and pear worldwide and causes damage and decreasedyields. To minimize this risk, IPM tools can be applied to reduce the use of chemicals. A cost-effective application of IPM dependson the number of insects at the time of application. Several conditions and factors influence the lifecycle and numbers of generationswithin a year. In order to perform ex-ante evaluations of the cost-effectiveness of IPM measures against pest insect...

  4. Non-invasive, Cosmic Ray Neutrons Approach for Area Wide Soil Moisture Measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurement of area wide soil moisture content is needed for a variety of applications such as large scale irrigation scheduling, yield forecasting and climate change studies. In past decades, measurement of area wide soil moisture has been a challenge since most devices are for small plots within the range of 0.05 to 1 m in diameter. As a result, a large number of measurements, which can be costly and time consuming, are required. The recent development of a cosmic ray neutrons approach represents a breakthrough in addressing this challenge (Zreda et al. 2008, Shuttleworth et al. 2010). Cosmic-ray neutrons monitor the background radiation in the air above the soil, the intensity of which depends primarily on soil moisture that was found to correlate with soil hydrogen content. The cosmic ray soil moisture probe integrates soil moisture content over an area of approximately 700 m in diameter to a depth of 70 cm, covering the rooting zones of most crops. As a result it can enhance point measurement devices to yield a reliable measure of area average soil moisture. The probe is insensitive to temperature, salinity, soil mineral chemistry and is non-invasive (Desilets et al. 2010), thus allowing measurements to be carried out under undisturbed soil conditions. The cosmic ray neutron probe responds to all forms of moisture, including liquid and frozen soil water, snow, and water in or on vegetation, allowing for the assessment of the total surface moisture. The probe will enable us to provide soil moisture readings at a large number of sites with different physical characteristics, from simple and easy (flat grasslands) to complex and difficult terrain.

  5. RESEARCH REGARDING INTEGRATED DISEASES AND PESTS CONTROL IN APPLE TREE CULTIVATION IN THE CÂRCINOV-ARGES FRUIT GROWING BASIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şt. Popescu

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In tree culture technologies, regardless the species and varieties in culture, cessation and control of disease and pest attack represent important and necessary sequence, which influence the quantity and mainly the quality of fruit production, especially the biological potential transmitted for the next 2 -3 years.

  6. The introduction of integrated pest management in the Ethiopian horticultural sector : Bacillus thuringiensis strains and its toxicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belder, den E.; Elderson, J.

    2012-01-01

    1 Introduction As hazards of conventional broad acting pesticides are documented, researchers, poli cymakers and growers look for pesticides that are toxic only to the target pest, have no impact on other such as beneficial species, and have fewer environmental effects. Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) i

  7. Grape Integrated Pest Prevention and Control Technology%葡萄虫害综合防治技术

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汤喜良

    2012-01-01

      近几年随着湖南省宁乡县沙田乡葡萄产业的发展,虫害的发生率也有所增加,葡萄虫害属于自然灾害,一旦发生,对葡萄的产量和质量都有严重影响,所以进行葡萄虫害的防治工作尤为重要。从葡萄虫害的种类和其症状表现出发,探讨其防治的方法措施。%  With the development of the industry in recent years, the incidence of pest increase grape pests belonging to natural disasters, the yield and quality of grapes has seriously affected in the event, the grape pest prevention and control work is particularly important. In this paper, starting from the type of grape pests and their symptoms, and to explore its prevention measures.

  8. Outcomes-based planning and implementation led to the success of the Hawaii fruit fly suppression programme: Implications to adoption of area-wide programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: A critical component of successful area-wide pest management (AWPM) programmes are organised, coordinated and comprehensive outreach educational programmes. The Hawaii area-wide fruit fly pest management (HAW-FLYPM) programme's educational programme, a part of a USDA AWPM programme in Hawaii, utilised the 'logic model' approach to organise, plan, execute and evaluate farmer and community educational programmes statewide. The logic model approach was an outcome-driven rather than activity based method that employed a linear sequence that developed relationships between programme inputs, outputs and outcomes. This model was utilised extensively to transfer sustainable, science-based technologies to suppress tephritid fruit fly pests. HAW-FLYPM's educational programme targeted growers and community door yard growers, three teaching curricula aimed at elementary through high school students, and a statewide awareness programme for the public at large. Additional key components of the HAW-FLYPM education programme was the development of implementation schedules used to track programme progress, a comprehensive media matrix developed to ensure educational materials met the needs of target audience groups, and a sustainability calculator to assess the likelihood of programme sustainability after the initial five year funding cycle. The model served as a 'blue print' for ensuring programme elements were planned, delivered and executed on a timely basis. Utilisation of the logic model to organise efforts and manage diverse, multi agency programmes such as the HAW-FLYPM programme has shown to be a successful method of programme advancement and outcome achievement. (author)

  9. Short-term and area-wide evaluation of safety measures.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oppe, S. & Wegman, F.C.M.

    1982-01-01

    A background paper for the seminar on short-term and area-wide evaluation of safety measures is presented. The seminar is restricted to safety measures, thus only countermeasures that are intended to reduce accidents are regarded. The measures should be furthermore for the short-term and area-wide.

  10. 40 CFR 52.326 - Area-wide nitrogen oxides (NOX) exemptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Area-wide nitrogen oxides (NOX... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Colorado § 52.326 Area-wide nitrogen oxides (NOX) exemptions. The Denver Regional Council of Governments (DRCOG) submitted a NOX...

  11. Periodicity and Permanence of a Discrete Impulsive Lotka-Volterra Predator-Prey Model Concerning Integrated Pest Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Tan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available By piecewise Euler method, a discrete Lotka-Volterra predator-prey model with impulsive effect at fixed moment is proposed and investigated. By using Floquets theorem, we show that a globally asymptotically stable pest-eradication periodic solution exists when the impulsive period is less than some critical value. Further, we prove that the discrete system is permanence if the impulsive period is larger than some critical value. Finally, some numerical experiments are given.

  12. Periodicity and Permanence of a Discrete Impulsive Lotka-Volterra Predator-Prey Model Concerning Integrated Pest Management

    OpenAIRE

    Chang Tan; Jun Cao

    2013-01-01

    By piecewise Euler method, a discrete Lotka-Volterra predator-prey model with impulsive effect at fixed moment is proposed and investigated. By using Floquets theorem, we show that a globally asymptotically stable pest-eradication periodic solution exists when the impulsive period is less than some critical value. Further, we prove that the discrete system is permanence if the impulsive period is larger than some critical value. Finally, some numerical experiments are given.

  13. Integrated pest management model and optimization control%害虫综合治理模型与最优控制策略

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨光

    2011-01-01

    This paper considers optimization control of integrated pest management. Crops to passive absorbing due to spaying pesticides, the effects of the pesticides gradually decrease, this process of the absorption, distribution and elimination would be analogous to taking medicine of the human being. So in this paper we try to establish the models of the crops pesticide effect by pharmacokinetics theory. First of all, the impulsive models of the pest management consisting of the spaying pesticides and releasing natural enemies of pests along with crops pesticide effect are established and analyzed. Then, making use of the optimal control theory to solve the optimum dose of the pesticides and the time intervals of spaying pesticides. Thus, given an optimal pest management strategy of the integrated pest management, which make pesticide residuals in the crops and the total dose of the spraying pesticides least, also make the maximum value of the pest population is larger then the given Economic Threshold. Finally, the simulation result shows the strategy is viable and effectively.%针对农作物害虫综合治理问题,提出一个对农作物危害最小的最优方案.由于喷洒杀虫剂,农作物被迫吸收农药,药效随时间下降,其吸收、分布和消除过程与人类用药类似,作者大胆尝试利用药物动力学理论研究建立农作物药效模型.首先根据脉冲微分方程理论,将农作物药效模型与害虫-天敌动态模型结合起来,建立农作物药效模型和喷洒杀虫剂及释放天敌的脉冲控制模型;然后根据脉冲控制理论分析上述模型的稳定性,利用最优控制理论,求出最适杀虫剂药量和喷洒时间间隔,使得杀虫剂药量在农作物的残留和喷洒农药量最少,同时使害虫数量控制在经济危害阈值以下,给出综合治理农业害虫的最佳方案;最后,通过数值模拟解释这一方案的执行.结果表明,该策略行之有效.

  14. Implementing reduced-risk integrated pest management in fresh-market cabbage: improved net returns via scouting and timing of effective control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkness, Eric C; Hutchison, W D

    2008-04-01

    During 1998-2001, field studies were done to assess the efficacy of an integrated pest management (IPM) program using an action threshold and "reduced-risk" insecticides. The IPM program was compared with a conventional grower-based program. Program performance was evaluated based on management of Trichoplusia ni (Hiibner), Pieris (=Artogeia) rapae (L.), and Plutella xylostella (L.), as well as the economic impact of each program on net returns. The action threshold used in the IPM program consisted of 10% plants infested with T. ni larvae, based on previous small-plot experiment station trials. In all years of the study, the IPM program resulted in significantly lower percentages of plants infested than the conventional program or untreated check. The mean reduction in insecticide applications for the IPM program compared with the conventional program was 23.5%, whereas, on average, the costs of the IPM program were 46.0% higher than the conventional program. Pest reduction in the IPM program resulted in an average of 10.5% higher marketable yields than the conventional program. Percentages of marketable heads in the IPM program ranged from 82 to 99% and from 63 to 96% in the conventional program. Mean net returns for the IPM program exceeded the conventional program by $984.20/ha. These results indicated that the IPM program reduced insecticide use overall, even though costs of the IPM program, with either spinosad or indoxacarb, were sometimes higher. Overall, net returns of the IPM program were higher due to active pest scouting, improved application timing, and increases in marketable yield. Given the potential decrease in insecticide applications and increases in net profit resulting from this IPM program, additional analyses should be conducted to quantify the economic risk, or consistency of the results, to fully evaluate the benefits of the IPM program compared with a conventional program.

  15. 我国农业害虫综合防治研究现状与展望%Advance in integrated pest management of crops in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴孔明; 陆宴辉; 王振营

    2009-01-01

    害虫综合防治作为农业生产的一项重要策略, 在农业可持续发展中具有举足轻重的作用.近年来,针对我国害虫防治所存在的技术需求,科技部等部门先后通过973计划、863计划、科技支撑计划和农业行业专项等对重要害虫防治研究立项支持.通过这些项目的实施,我国建成了一支由国家和省级科研单位和大学组成的专业科研队伍和研究平台,对害虫监测预警技术、基于生物多样性保护利用的生态调控技术、害虫生物防治技术、化学防治技术、抗虫转基因作物利用技术等方面的研究取得了一系列的重要进展,研究建立了棉花、水稻、玉米、小麦和蔬菜等作物重要害虫的综合防治技术体系,并在农业生产中发挥了重要作用.以基因工程和信息技术为代表的第二次农业技术革命的到来, 推动了害虫综合防治的理论发展,为害虫综合防治技术的广泛应用提供了新的机遇.地理信息系统、全球定位系统等信息技术和计算机网络技术的应用,提高了对害虫种群监测和预警的能力和水平,转基因抗虫作物的商业化种植等技术的应用显著增强了对害虫种群的区域性调控效率.针对产业结构调整和全球气候变化所带来的害虫新问题,进一步发展IPM新理论与新技术将成为我国农业昆虫学研究的重要方向之一.%Integrated pest management (IPM) in crops is an important strategy for insect pest control, which plays an important role for sustainable agriculture. In order to meet the demand of crop production in China, Chinese government launches a series of scientific programs for insect pest researches during 2006-2010, including 973 Project, 863 Project, the State Key Project and others. Based on these projects, China has established a national and province network which consists of scientist teams and special facilities for insect pest researches in universities and

  16. Using GPS instruments and GIS techniques in data management for insect pest control programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This interactive tutorial CD entitled 'Using GPS Instruments and GIS Techniques in Data Management for Insect Pest Control Programs' was developed by Micha silver of the Arava Development Co., Sapir, Israel, and includes step-by-step hands on lessons on the use of GPS/GIS in support of area-wide pest control operations

  17. Pest Resistance Regulation and Pest Mobility

    OpenAIRE

    Ambec, Stefan; Desquilbet, Marion,

    2008-01-01

    We use a spatially-explicit analytical framework to compare mandatory refuges and a tax on the resistant variety as regulation instruments for pest resistance management. Because the extraction of the common-pool pest susceptibility resource depends on the spatial pattern of pest dispersal, we find that the usual preference for market-based environmental instruments does not necessarily apply to pest resistance management. Mandatory refuges are preferred to a tax on the resistant variety for ...

  18. 论森林害虫的资源化研究与综合管理(IPM)的关系%Relationship Between Utilization of Forest Pests and Integrated Pest Management (IPM)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    童清; 何剑中

    2011-01-01

    论述森林害虫资源化研究在有害生物综合管理中的作用以及松毛虫、白蚁等森林害虫的研究进展.认为森林害虫的资源化研究能将昆虫转化为对人类有益的生物资源,减轻其对森林资源及其生态系统的危害,同时又能减少农药的使用量.人工采集害虫进行利用的行为可被视为害虫综合管理的组成部分.%Contribution of utilization of forest pest to IPM and latest developments of utilization of two kinds of forest pests, the pine caterpillars and termites are reviewed. On the theory, IPM must pay more attention to ecological balance, social security and economical results, and use all means and techniques to control the forest pests; in practice, the purpose of IPM is to reduce the use of chemical pesticides.While utilization and development of forest pests not only can turn these pests into biological resources,but also can help to prevent their damages and destruction to the forest, and to reduce the use of chemical pesticides. Therefore, artificial collection and utilization of these pests can be seen as a technique in IPM.

  19. Before and after Silent Spring: from chemical pesticides to biological control and integrated pest management--Britain, 1945-1980.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gay, Hannah

    2012-07-01

    The use of chemical pesticides increased considerably after World War II, and ecological damage was noticeable by the late 1940s. This paper outlines some ecological problems experienced during the post-war period in the UK, and in parts of what is now Malaysia. Also discussed is the government's response. Although Rachel Carson's book, Silent Spring (1962), was important in bringing the problems to a wider public, she was not alone in sounding the alarm. Pressure from the public and from British scientists led, among other things, to the founding of the Natural Environment Research Council in 1965. By the 1970s, environmentalism was an important movement, and funding for ecological and environmental research was forthcoming even during the economic recession. Some of the recipients were ecologists working at Imperial College London. Moved by the political climate, and by the evidence of ecological damage, they carried out research on the biological control of insect pests.

  20. Do Bolivian small holder farmers improve and retain knowledge to reduce occupational pesticide poisonings after training on Integrated Pest Management?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørs, Erik; Lander, Flemming; Huici, Omar;

    2014-01-01

    handling. Similar though less pronounced improvements was seen among neighbor farmers having had less training and information on pesticide handling and alternatives than the FFS trained farmers. Training of farmers on IPM and good agricultural practices has positive effects, but is scarce in Bolivia......BACKGROUND: Pesticide consumption is increasing in Bolivia as well as pest resistance, pesticide poisonings and pollution of the environment. This survey evaluates the training of small holder farmers on pesticide handling and ecological alternatives to reduce the negative pesticide effects. METHOD...... in 'knowledge, attitude and practice' (KAP) on IPM and symptoms of poisoning when handling pesticides. Statistical analysis was performed with SPSS version 21.0 using χ2-test, Cochran's Q test and Student's T-test. RESULTS: Improvements were seen in both groups but most significant among the FFS farmers...

  1. A contribution towards simplifying area-wide tsetse surveys using medium resolution meteorological satellite data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrickx, G; Napala, A; Slingenbergh, J H; De Deken, R; Rogers, D J

    2001-10-01

    A raster or grid-based Geographic Information System with data on tsetse, trypanosomiasis, animal production, agriculture and land use has recently been developed in Togo. The area-wide sampling of tsetse fly, aided by satellite imagery, is the subject of two separate papers. This paper follows on a first paper, published in this journal, describing the generation of digital tsetse distribution and abundance maps and how these accord with the local climatic and agro-ecological setting. Such maps when combined with data on the disease, the hosts and their owners, should contribute to the knowledge of the spatial epidemiology of trypanosomiasis and assist planning of integrated control operations. Here we address the problem of generating tsetse distribution and abundance maps from remotely sensed data, using a restricted amount of field data. Different discriminant analysis models have been applied using contemporary tsetse data and remotely sensed, low resolution data acquired from the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and Meteosat platforms. The results confirm the potential of satellite data application and multivariate analysis for the prediction of the tsetse distribution and abundance. This opens up new avenues because satellite predictions and field data may be combined to strengthen and/or substitute one another. The analysis shows how the strategic incorporation of satellite imagery may minimize field collection of data. Field surveys may be modified and conducted in two stages, first concentrating on the expected fly distribution limits and thereafter on fly abundance. The study also shows that when applying satellite data, care should be taken in selecting the optimal number of predictor variables because this number varies with the amount of training data for predicting abundance and on the homogeneity of the distribution limits for predicting fly presence. Finally, it is suggested that in addition to the use of contemporary

  2. Control of codling moth (Cydia pomonella) using the area-wide approach in Chile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Management of codling moth (CM) is being conducted in southern Chile using an area-wide approach and integrating different tools such us Geographic Information System (GIS), classical biological control, inundative biological control and mating disruption. The total area covers 6,000 ha, and extends from the foothills of the Andes mountains and is bordered in the south and north by rivers. Vegetation cover is predominantly pastures, pine forests and berries, including six commercial apple orchards. Codling moth control in the commercial orchards is based on chemical insecticides, mating disruption or organic practices. Many alternative hosts for CM grow in this area, mainly as ornamentals, in abandoned orchards and in gardens for self-consumption. The most important species are noncommercial apple, pear, quince, walnut and apricot. Satellite images were obtained and every alternate host tree was georeferenced and drawn on these images. Pheromone traps are being used to identify main migrant sources and to quantify migration from sources to commercial orchards. Classical biological control includes importation and release of an egg/larval parasitoid (Ascogaster quadridentata) from USA to Chile. CM is reared on artificial diet and eggs are used to increase the A. quadridentata colony and allow field releases in the 2004-2005 growing season, especially in isolated and abandoned trees. Related to inundative biological control, several strains of entomopathogenic organisms have been collected and evaluated against CM, including the fungus (Beauveria bassiana) and nematodes. In addition, a Chilean species of trichogrammatid wasps, Trichogramma nerudai and Trichogramma caccociae, have been used under an inundative approach, especially in abandoned orchards. The Chilean species T. nerudai has shown similar or better preference and laboratory performance than introduced species such as T. bactrae, T. caccociae, T. dendrolimi and T. platneri. (author)

  3. Integrated pest management of two-spotted mite Tetranychus urticae on greenhouse roses using petroleum spray oil and the predatory mite Phytoseiulus persimilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicetic; Watson, D M; Beattie, G A; Meats, A; Zheng, J

    2001-01-01

    From 1995 to 1999, four experiments were conducted on greenhouse roses to assess the effectiveness of the nC24 petroleum spray oil (PSO), D-C-Tron Plus, against two-spotted mite, Tetranychus urticae Koch (Acarina: Tetranychidae), and to determine how the oil could be most efficiently and effectively used in combination with the predatory mite Phytoseiulus persimilis Athias-Henriot (Acarina: Phytoseiidae) in an integrated pest management program. The results showed that 0.5% PSO applied fortnightly to roses gave excellent protection from T urticae infestation when the mite population was not already established. However, PSO applied after roses were infested with T. urticae above the economic threshold only stabilised populations without reducing them below that threshold. Populations of P. persimilis in the upper and lower canopies were unchanged after two sprays of PSO at 7-day intervals, and application of PSO to the upper canopy was as effective in controlling T. urticae in the presence of P persimilis as spraying the entire plant. Combining PSO with P. persimilis gave better control of T. urticae than using P. persimilis alone. The most cost-effective use of PSO in the presence of P. persimilis is, therefore, to apply spray only to the upper canopy. This will not affect control of powdery mildew with PSO. Comparison of a control program for T urticae based on the monitored use of synthetic miticides with that based on calendar application of PSO revealed that both gave equally effective control. The benefits of combining PSO and P. persimilis in an integrated pest management program for T. urticae on roses over a program based on synthetic fungicides are discussed.

  4. An Overview of Pest Species of Bactrocera Fruit Flies (Diptera: Tephritidae and the Integration of Biopesticides with Other Biological Approaches for Their Management with a Focus on the Pacific Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger I. Vargas

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Fruit flies (Diptera: Tephritidae are among the most economically important pest species in the world, attacking a wide range of fruits and fleshy vegetables throughout tropical and sub-tropical areas. These species are such devastating crop pests that major control and eradication programs have been developed in various parts of the world to combat them. The array of control methods includes insecticide sprays to foliage and soil, bait-sprays, male annihilation techniques, releases of sterilized flies and parasitoids, and cultural controls. During the twenty first century there has been a trend to move away from control with organophosphate insecticides (e.g., malathion, diazinon, and naled and towards reduced risk insecticide treatments. In this article we present an overview of 73 pest species in the genus Bactrocera, examine recent developments of reduced risk technologies for their control and explore Integrated Pest Management (IPM Programs that integrate multiple components to manage these pests in tropical and sub-tropical areas.

  5. 40 CFR 52.2351 - Area-wide nitrogen oxides (NOX) exemption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Area-wide nitrogen oxides (NOX) exemption. 52.2351 Section 52.2351 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... nitrogen oxides (NOX) exemption. On May 2, 1997, Ursula Trueman, Director, Division of Air Quality,...

  6. 40 CFR 52.992 - Area-wide nitrogen oxides exemptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Area-wide nitrogen oxides exemptions. 52.992 Section 52.992 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... nitrogen oxides exemptions. (a) The Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality submitted to the EPA...

  7. The ABCs of Non-Toxic Pest Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Susan

    1990-01-01

    Although chemical-intensive pest control methods have proven reasonably effective, a growing awareness of health and environmental risks associated with pesticides has sharpened public interest in safer alternatives. An integrated pest management approach reduces risks from pests while minimizing human exposure and reducing the toxicity of applied…

  8. Converting pest insects into food

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Offenberg, Hans Joachim; Wiwatwittaya, Decha

    2010-01-01

    by pest insects, problematic pests are converted into food and additional earnings. To assess the profitability of providing additional food for the ants, O. smaragdina food conversion efficiency (ECI) was estimated in the laboratory. This estimate suggests the feeding of weaver ants in ant farms......Canopy dwelling weaver ants (Oecophylla spp.) are used to control a variety of pests in a number of tropical tree crops. What is less familiar is the existence of commercial markets where these ants and their brood are sold for (i) human consumption, (ii) pet food or (iii) traditional medicine...... on management, 32-115 kg ant brood (mainly new queens) was harvested per ha per year without detrimental effect on colony survival and worker ant densities. This suggest that ant biocontrol and ant harvest can be sustainable integrated in plantations and double benefits derived. As ant production is fuelled...

  9. Training Childcare Center Administrators about Integrated Pest Management through Greener Environmental Communication Venues and Collecting Pesticide Use Data in the Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Marcia

    2014-01-01

    Many people assume that schools and childcare centers are environmentally safe places for children to learn. However, adverse health effects from pest allergy related illnesses or pesticide exposure incidents can demonstrate the need for safer and more effective pest management strategies. The goal of this research is to measure the efficacy of…

  10. Food webs and phenology models: evaluating the efficacy of ecologically based insect pest management in different agroecosystems

    OpenAIRE

    Philips, Christopher Robin

    2013-01-01

    Integrated pest management (IPM) is defined as an effective and environmentally sensitive approach to pest management that relies on a combination of common-sense practices. Integrated pest management programs use current, comprehensive information on the life cycles of pests and their interactions with host plants and the environment. This information, in combination with available pest control methods, is used to manage pest populations by the most economical means, and with the least possi...

  11. Optimal Control Policies of Pests for Hybrid Dynamical Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baolin Kang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We improve the traditional integrated pest management (IPM control strategies and formulate three specific management strategies, which can be described by hybrid dynamical systems. These strategies can not only effectively control pests but also reduce the abuse of pesticides and protect the natural enemies. The aim of this work is to study how the factors, such as natural enemies optimum choice in the two kinds of different pests, timings of natural enemy releases, dosages and timings of insecticide applications, and instantaneous killing rates of pesticides on both pests and natural enemies, can affect the success of IPM control programmes. The results indicate that the pests outbreak period or frequency largely depends on the optimal selective feeding of the natural enemy between one of the pests and the control tactics. Ultimately, we obtain the only pest needs to be controlled below a certain threshold while not supervising pest .

  12. Standard mode of integrated control to diseases and insect pests for pollution-free vegetables%无公害蔬菜病虫害综合防治规范操作模式

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王青松

    2012-01-01

    By using "prevention first, comprehensive prevention and control" as the core idea, an operation practice for standard mode of integrated control to diseases and insect pests for pollution-free vegetables was explored. The mode showed its widespreaded applicability and good operability. This paper summarized the operation practice for standard mode of integrated control to diseases and insect pests for pollution-free vegetables.%探索“预防为主,综合防治”为核心的无公害蔬菜病虫害综合防治规范操作模式,该模式适用性及可操作性强。该文总结了无公害蔬菜病虫害综合防治规范操作模式的具体技术措施。

  13. Cockroach Clean-Up Tour . Urban Pest Management. Teaching Environmental Living Skills to Elementary Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowles, Kathleen Letcher

    Integrated Pest Management (IPM), a decision-making approach to pest control, is designed to help individuals decide if pest suppression treatments are necessary, when they should be initiated, where they should be applied, and what strategy/mix of tatics to use. IPM combines a variety of approaches with which to manage pests, including human…

  14. Insect pest control newsletter. No. 62

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The year 2003 has again been a very intense period for all of us working at the Insect Pest Control Sub-programme of the Joint FAO/IAEA Agriculture Programme. This issue reports normative activities, and the application of area-wide control and SIT. One that stands out during 2003 is the recent publication of 'Trapping Guidelines for Area-wide Fruit Fly Programmes', which responds to the request by Member States to harmonize internationally trapping procedures for Tephritid fruit flies of economic importance. These pest insects have a major impact on the international trade of fresh fruits and vegetables, and the guidelines provide strategic guidance and direction to NPPOs, RPPOs and industry on where and how to implement fruit fl y surveys. Using these guidelines in the implementation of surveys will support FAO and IAEA Member States in obtaining international recognition of their fruit fly control and quarantine activities. A new project is a world-directory of fruit fly workers. A tremendous amount of information is made available each year on Tephritid fruit flies: new technologies developed, new information on their biology and ecology; new control methods made available, new species identified, new outbreaks recorded and new operational control programmes launched. This site will attempt to collate this information and allow Tephritid fruit fly workers worldwide to keep up-to-date on the most recent developments. Another activity has been the development of more scientific methods for determining when an area achieves a pest-free status. A consultants meeting focused on this topic and a generic procedure has been developed for declaring an area to be 'pest-free' following an eradication campaign against an insect pest. This involves a probability model to deal with null trapping results and also a growth model to help verify that pest specimen were not present when control was stopped. Other normative and promotional activities under development include

  15. Insect Pest Control Newsletter, No. 81, July 2013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In response to requests from our readers, this introduction is mainly dedicated to the ongoing efforts to develop alternatives for insect reproductive sterilization and blood sterilization for their use in insect pest control programmes with a sterile insect technique (SIT) component. Radioisotope irradiators that are loaded with either cobalt-60 or caesium-137 producing gamma rays have been routinely used for many decades and have proven to be extremely reliable and safe for these purposes in successful area-wide insect eradication or suppression programmes. These include industrial panoramic-type irradiators in larger programmes, all the way to smaller self-contained irradiators. Nevertheless, the transboundary shipment of self-contained gamma irradiators or radioactive material has become logistically more complex due to security issues. This situation was exacerbated when the production of the Gamma Cell 220 (GC220), the source most commonly used for irradiating insects for sterilization purposes, was discontinued. These events may have created the impression that the use of gamma radiation has become a less viable option, unattainable for insect pest control programmes that want to integrate the SIT. Nevertheless, some of the biggest SIT operational programmes have in recent years been equipped with new self-contained cobalt-60 sources, including the SIT programme against the pink bollworm in Phoenix, Arizona; El Pino Mediterranean fruit fly facility in Guatemala; and the screwworm programme in Panama. Thus these larger and more expensive irradiators, together with panoramic units (that are also costlier than self-contained gamma irradiators) have remained over the years a valid option, especially for larger operational programmes. In addition, the reloading of smaller units with new cobalt or the purchase of refurbished used self-contained irradiators remain viable alternatives

  16. FAO/IAEA Guidelines for Implementing Systems Approaches for Pest Risk Management of Fruit Flies. Working Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    International trade in commodities provides food, consumer goods, and a livelihood to millions of people, but can also spread pests that cause serious damage to commercial crops and to the environment. Many Tephritidae fruit fly species are important plant pests, due to tendencies towards high fecundity, wide host range and potential to cause serious damage. These fruit fly species often are categorized as quarantine pests in the first phase of a Pest Risk Analysis, which is a harmonised framework for decisions regarding trade in plant products, developed under the International Plant Protection Convention. The National Plant Protection Organisation of each country is responsible for addressing the possible risks from trade to domestic plant resources. After assessing the risk, the need for pest risk management is determined. These guidelines focus on the final phase of the PRA, when a management plan is developed. Some of the stand-alone options for managing fruit fly risk are non-host status, Pest Free Areas, and commodity treatments. Pest risk management measures may be combined in a Systems Approach, however, as described in the International Standard on Phytosanitary Measures No. 14 (The use of integrated measures in a system approach for pest risk management). This concept, described in depth in section IV, has been applied successfully to various combinations of different species of pest/host/area for many years. Yet, NPPOs still encounter challenges to the application of Systems Approach. The examples and descriptions in these guidelines seek to support its use against fruit fly pests. Measures may be applied sequentially in the exporting country at the time of preharvest, harvest, post-harvest, export and transport, or at entry and distribution to the importing country. Area-wide integrated pest management programmes against fruit flies can play a significant role in suppressing pest populations to the low level required to reduce initial infestation in

  17. A Usages of Herb Extracts by Stream Integrated with Micro-organism to Control Insect Pests and Phytophagus Mites by Biological Control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A usages of herb extracts by stream integrated rith micro-organism to control insect pests and phytophagus mites by biological control was compared with insecticide to investigate the responses of chili tree and kieffer lime tree. Moreover, herb extracts were tested in controlling insect pests. Herb extracts were selected from many effective kinds such as: Azadirachta indica, Hyptis suaveolens, Citronella grass, Eucalyptus, Stemona, Galangal, Zingiber, cassumunar Roxb. Chronmolaena oderatum, Derris elyptica, Ginger, Annona seed, Malueraca sp., Andrographis paniculata, Veronia aquarrosa, Garlic, Thevetia peruviana, and Tobacco. The experiment was set at Herb Laboratory Ayutthaya Campus, Rajamangala University of Technology, Suvarnabhumi during August 2004 to June 2006. From testing herb extracts at 100 ppm. On Chili germination, the result was that the Chromolaena extracts made highest germination of 69.50%, Citronella grass at 500 ppm., made highest germination of chili seed at 86.00% within 12 days. Garlic extracts could kill 75.90% of aphids in 24 hrs., maximized in this experiments. Malueraca extracts at 500 ppm. Could kill 92.65% of chili aphids similar to the activity of insecticides action in 24 hrs. However at 5,000 ppm. It found that chemical treatment gave difference results from herbal treatments. Annona extracts could kill 64.58% of chili aphids better that others treatments. There are 18 treatment of time at 6 hrs. , 15 hrs., and 24 hrs., respectively. The results found that at 6 hrs., Kelthane could kill 93.75% of red spider mite. At 15 hrs. Stemona could kill 95.50% of red spider mite. At 24 hrs. Stemona or Chromolaena could kill 100% of red spider mite equally, Chrolaena could kill more than 83% of chili thrips at 24 hrs. Annona extracts could harvest the maximum of fruit fresh weight and numbers of fruits. After cutting leaves for producing new leaves, spraying herbal extracts was not different in statistic; however, Eucalyptus extracts, Neem plus

  18. Wheat Resistance to the Adult Insect of Sunn Pest, Eurigaster Integriceps Put

    OpenAIRE

    Nima Sanaey; Tohid N. Mirak

    2012-01-01

    Sunn pest is one of the most serious pests of wheat and barley in Asia, North Africa and Eastern Europe. Using of resistant cultivars is an effective strategy for Integrated Pest Management (IPM). In order to identify the resistant wheat to sunn pest, 79 Iranian bread and durum wheat cultivarslines were evaluated for resistance to natural infestations of sunn pest in field conditions using CRD with four replications in Karaj in two cropping seasons. Analysis of variance revealed significant d...

  19. Radiation induced F1 sterility in Lepidoptera for area-wide control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Very high doses of ionizing radiation are required to induce sterility in Lepidoptera, but fully sterilizing doses are detrimental to the reproductive competitiveness of the insects and so irradiated males are much less able to compete for mates. It appears, however, that inherited sterility can be induced in all Lepidoptera species by means of radiation doses that induce only low levels of sterility in irradiated individuals. In this way the detrimental effects of irradiation on reproductive performance can be largely avoided, and the irradiated males are able to compete for females with their wild counterparts. This is the basis of radiation induced F1 sterility for genetic pest control. These proceedings include thirteen papers on different aspects of F1 sterility, with emphasis on laboratory experiments to determine the dose of gamma radiation required for inherited sterility. The individual papers have been indexed separately. Refs, figs and tabs

  20. Structural Pest Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, M. S.; Hoffman, W. M.

    This manual is designed for those who seek certification as pesticide applicators for industrial, institutional, structural, and health-related pest control. It is divided into six sections covering general pest control, wood-destroying organisms, bird control, fumigation, rodent control, and industrial weed control. The manual gives information…

  1. A Pest of Importance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potato cyst nematodes (PCN), G. rostochiensis and G. pallida, are internationally-recognized quarantine pests and considered the most devastating pests of potatoes worldwide. PCNs continue to spread throughout North America and were recently detected in Idaho (G. pallida) and Quebec and Alberta, Can...

  2. Integrated Management of Major Citrus Pests and Diseases in Guangxi%广西柑橘主要病虫害及其防治措施

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    廖贤军; 冷付春; 陈国平; 牛英; 刘冰浩; 娄兵海

    2012-01-01

    介绍了广西柑橘主要病虫害种类,分析了危害状况,提出了防治措施。%In order to provide guidance forcitrus production, this paper introduced the serious situation and the control tactics for the major pests and diseases of citrus orchard in Guangxi.

  3. Synonymization of key pest species within the Bactrocera dorsalis species complex (Diptera: Tephritidae): taxonomic changes based on a review of 20 years of integrative morphological, molecular, cytogenetic, behavioural and chemoecological data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bactrocera papayae Drew & Hancock, Bactrocera philippinensis Drew & Hancock, Bactrocera carambolae Drew & Hancock, and Bactrocera invadens Drew, Tsuruta & White are four horticultural pest tephritid fruit fly species that are highly similar, morphologically and genetically, to the destructive pest, the Oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel) (Diptera: Tephritidae). This similarity has rendered the discovery of reliable diagnostic characters problematic, which, in view of the economic importance of these taxa and the international trade implications, has resulted in ongoing difficulties for many areas of plant protection and food security. Consequently, a major international collaborative and integrated multidisciplinary research effort was initiated in 2009 to build upon existing literature with the specific aim of resolving biological species limits among B. papayae, B. philippinensis, B. carambolae, B. invadens and B. dorsalis to overcome constraints to pest management and international trade. Bactrocera philippinensis has recently been synonymized with B. papayae as a result of this initiative and this review corroborates that finding; however, the other names remain in use. While consistent characters have been found to reliably distinguish B. carambolae from B. dorsalis, B. invadens and B. papayae, no such characters have been found to differentiate the latter three putative species. We conclude that B. carambolae is a valid species and that the remaining taxa, B. dorsalis, B. invadens and B. papayae, represent the same species. Thus, we consider B. dorsalis (Hendel) as the senior synonym of B. papayae Drew and Hancock syn.n. and B. invadens Drew, Tsuruta & White syn.n. A redescription of B. dorsalis is provided. Given the agricultural importance of B. dorsalis, this taxonomic decision will have significant global plant biosecurity implications, affecting pest management, quarantine, international trade, postharvest treatment and basic research

  4. Diseases and Insect Pests in Peanut and Its Integrated Control Techniques%花生主要病虫害及其综合防治

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王新云

    2011-01-01

    介绍了固镇县花生主要病虫害危害症状及发生规律,并提出了相应的防治技术,为固镇县花生的种植提供理论参考。%The harm symptoms of main diseases and insect pests in peanut and its? occurrence regularity were introduced,and control techniques were also put forward,which provided theory reference for planting peanut.

  5. Optimal Application Timing of Pest Control Tactics in Nonautonomous Pest Growth Model

    OpenAIRE

    Shujuan Zhang; Juhua Liang; Sanyi Tang

    2014-01-01

    Considering the effects of the living environment on growth of populations, it is unrealistic to assume that the growth rates of predator and prey are all constants in the models with integrated pest management (IPM) strategies. Therefore, a nonautonomous predator-prey system with impulsive effect is developed and investigated in the present work. In order to determine the optimal application timing of IPM tactics, the threshold value which guarantees the stability of pest-free periodic solut...

  6. Important Insect Pests of Fruit - Important Insect Pests of Nuts - Field Crop Insect Pests - Insect Pests of Vegetable Crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gesell, Stanley G.; And Others

    This document consists of four agriculture extension service publications from Pennsylvania State University. The titles are: (1) Important Insect Pests of Fruit; (2) Important Insect Pests of Nuts; (3) Field Crop Insect Pests; and (4) Insect Pests of Vegetable Crops. The first publication gives the hosts, injury, and description of 22 insect…

  7. Pest Management Specialist (AFSC 56650).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Air Univ., Gunter AFS, Ala. Extension Course Inst.

    This eight-volume student text is designed for use by Air Force personnel enrolled in a self-study extension course for pest management specialists. Covered in the individual volumes are civil engineering; pest management (entomology, pest management planning and coordination, and safety and protective equipment); pest management chemicals and…

  8. Pest Management for Water Quality

    OpenAIRE

    Relf, Diane

    2009-01-01

    Helps gardeners reduce their environmental impact while they manage pests by explaining pesticide labels, how to select plants to avoid pest problems, developments in biological control, how to attract bug-eaters, the effect of pesticides and how to choose the right one, beneficial insects, general gardening practices to consider, pest and plant life cycles, and proper identification of pest problems

  9. PEST Analysis of Serbia

    OpenAIRE

    Ivan Stosic; Drasko Nikolic; Aleksandar Zdravkovic

    2012-01-01

    The main purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of the current Serbian macro-environment on the businesses through the implementation of PEST analysis as a framework for assessing general or macro environment in which companies are operating. The authors argue the elements in presented PEST analysis indicate that the current macro-environment is characterized by the dominance of threats and weaknesses with few opportunities and strengths. Consequently, there is a strong need for faste...

  10. Avocado pests in Florida: Not what you expected

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avocado, Persea americana Mill., is Florida's second most important fruit crop after citrus. Until recently, the complex of spider mite and insect pests that affected avocado in south Florida was under a 20 year Integrated Pest Management (IPM) program. The recent invasion of avocado orchards by a...

  11. Pest Management Guide: Home Grounds and Animals, 2014

    OpenAIRE

    Latimer, Joyce G.; Close, David

    2014-01-01

    This 2014 Virginia Pest Management Guide provides the latest recommendations for controlling diseases, insects, and weeds for home grounds and animals. New for 2014 is information about prevention and nonchemical control as alternatives to chemical control or as part of an integrated pest management approach.

  12. The area-wide epidemiology of bovine trypanosomosis and its impact on mixed farming in subhumid West Africa; a case study in Togo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrickx, G; Napala, A; Dao, B; Batawui, K; Bastiaensen, P; De Deken, R; Vermeilen, A; Vercruysse, J; Slingenbergh, J H

    1999-07-01

    This paper reports on an area wide study of all major variables determining the expression of trypanosomosis in cattle in the subhumid eco-zone of West Africa, taking Togo as an example. To enable systematic area-wide sampling, the country was divided in 311 grid-squares of 0.125 x 0.125 sides. Cross-sectional surveys were then conducted to generate maps or digital layers on cattle density, herd structure, ownership and breed. These data layers, except for the breed data, were subjected to a cluster analysis in order to define spatial patterns in animal husbandry systems. This analysis revealed two main systems: one is oriented towards integration with crop-agriculture and a second towards investment in cattle. These two systems could be further characterised by incorporating breed data. Zebu cattle and their crossbreeds are more favoured in the second system. The breed distribution map shows the actual situation but also serves to predict the outcome of progressive crossbreeding. An area wide trypanosomosis survey allowed the production of prevalence maps for Trypanosoma congolense, T. vivax and the associated packed cell volume (PCV) values. A simple curvi-linear relationship was established between vector density and disease prevalence. The regression between disease prevalence and PCV for taurine and zebu plus crossbreeds separately, revealed that taurine cattle maintain a comparatively high PCV level particularly in high prevalence scenarios. The relationship between the average herd PCV and cattle density suggests that herd PCV value may provide a mirror for the number of animals not kept because of the prevailing risk. The regression between agricultural intensity and cattle density subsequently in areas with decreasing herd PCV values reveals that the level of integration of cattle in crop production decreases with a decreasing PCV. Thus, despite the presence of taurine animals in Togo, the omnipresence of tsetse in particular Glossina tachinoides, remains

  13. Demonstration and Research Pest Control. Manual 91.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Agricultural Experiment Station.

    This training manual provides information needed to meet the minimum EPA standards for certification as a commercial applicator of pesticides in the demonstration and research pest control category. The text discusses pesticide-organism interactions such as penetration, transport, accumulation, and biological magnification. Integrating pesticides…

  14. Integrated programme to eradicate the old world screwworm fly from the Middle East

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Old World Screwworm fly is one of the most destructive insect pests of livestock, humans and wildlife. It was recognized by World Organization for Animal Health as a notifiable disease. The outbreak of Old World Screwworm in Iraq in the late 1996 led to a joint regional/international meeting under the umbrella of the Arab Organization for Agricultural Development to demonstrate the feasibility of eradicating Old World Screwworm from the gulf region by using the sterile insect technique as an agent of the Area- Wide Integrated Pest Management campaign. The programme approved by Arab Organization for Agricultural Development , Food and Agriculture Organization and International Atomic Energy Agency included identification of different stages of Old World Screwworm, Chrysomya bezziana, increasing the awareness of the animal breeder against the danger of this pest, the possibility of rearing this pest in the laboratory for carrying different studies such as the effect of gamma rays on different insect stages, induced sterility, competitiveness,.. etc. Furthermore, the programme included genetic diversity studies on the Old World Screwworm, Chrysomya bezziana strain which was found in different Arab Gulf countries to demonstrate if this diversity has any effect on using sterile insect technique to eradicate this pest from the gulf region. Finally the programme demonstrated the economic feasibility of using sterile insect technique for eradicating this pest from the gulf countries. (author)

  15. Dynamic models of pest propagation and pest control

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yin Ming; Lin Zhen-Quan; Ke Jian-Hong

    2011-01-01

    This paper proposes a pest propagation model to investigate the evolution behaviours of pest aggregates.A pest aggregate grows by self-monomer birth,and it may fragment into two smaller ones.The kinetic evolution behaviours of pest aggregates are investigated by the rate equation approach based on the mean-field theory.For a system with a self-birth rate kernel I(k)= Ik and a fragmentation rate kernel L(i,j)= L,we find that the total number M0A(t)and the total mass of the pest aggregates M1A(t)both increase exponentially with time if L≠0.Furthermore,we introduce two catalysis-driven monomer death mechanisms for the former pest propagation model to study the evolution behaviours of pest aggregates under pesticide and natural enemy controlled pest propagation.In the pesticide controlled model with a catalyzed monomer death rate kernel J1(k)= J1k,it is found that only when I pests be killed off.Otherwise,the pest aggregates can survive.In the model of pest control with a natural enemy,a pest aggregate loses one of its individuals and the number of natural enemies increases by one.For this system,we find that no matter how many natural enemies there are at the beginning,pests will be eliminated by them eventually.

  16. Are Schools Making the Grade? School Districts Nationwide Adopt Safer Pest Management Policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piper, Cortney; Owens, Kagan

    2002-01-01

    This report documents school districts that have adopted safer pest management policies, such as integrated pest management (IPM), in response to state requirements or as a voluntary measure that exceeds state law. It also documents the state of local school pest management policies and illustrates the opportunities that exist for better…

  17. Managing for soil health can suppress pests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Hodson

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available A “healthy” soil can be thought of as one that functions well, both agronomically and ecologically, and one in which soil biodiversity and crop management work in synergy to suppress pests and diseases. UC researchers have pioneered many ways of managing soil biology for pest management, including strategies such as soil solarization, steam treatment and anaerobic soil disinfestation, as well as improvements on traditional methods, such as reducing tillage, amending soil with organic materials, and cover cropping. As managing for soil health becomes more of an explicit focus due to restrictions on the use of soil fumigants, integrated soil health tests will be needed that are validated for use in California. Other research needs include breeding crops for disease resistance and pest suppressive microbial communities as well as knowledge of how beneficial organisms influence plant health.

  18. Prospects for area-wide integrated control of tsetse flies (Diptera: Glossinidae and trypanosomosis in sub-Saharan Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc J.B. VREYSEN

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Los países del África sub-Sahariana están entre los menos desarrollados del mundo, y el hambre y la pobreza continúan siendo muy extendidos en la mayoría de las comunidades rurales. Se considera que disminuir el hambre y la sub-alimentación mediante la introducción de ganado productivo, como fuente de tracción y abono para la producción agrícola, el transporte, los lácteos y la carne, es un primer paso fundamental hacia un mejor desarrollo rural. La presencia de la mosca tse-tsé en un tercio del continente africano y la tripanosomiasis que transmite, se consideran la principal barrera para el desarrollo del ganado productivo. A pesar de la administración anual de 35 millones de dosis de drogas tripanocidas (a 1 (un dólar por dosis, los granjeros africanos pierden 3 millones de cabezas de ganado por año debido a esta enfermedad, y las pérdidas económicas directas se estiman entre 600 y 1200 millones de dólares...

  19. Companion Cropping as Integrated Pest Management (IPM) Component for Management of Flower Thrips (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) in French Beans (Phasealous Vulgaris L.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Six companion crops, (Tagetes spp L. (African marigold), Daucus carota L. (carrot), Coriandrum sativum L. (coriander), Brassica spp. L. kale), capsicum spp L. (chilli) and Zea mays (maize) were evaluated for their efficacy in suppressing field populations of the French bean flower thrips, (Frankliniella occidentals (Pergande), Frankliniella schultzei (Trybom) and Megalurothrips sjostedti (trybom). The companion crops were compared to two insecticides, Labda cyhalothrin (Karate 1.75% EC) and Methiocarb (Mesurol 500 SC) and untreated mono-crop of French beans. Three of the treatments, coriander, maize and African marigold were found to be effective in that order, by repelling the pest away from the crop. It is concluded that these crops could be recommended to farmers for use and therefore are able to minimise the high use of chemical insecticides

  20. Companion Cropping as an Integrated Pest Management (IPM) Component for management of Flower Thrips (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) in French Beans (Phaseaolus Vulgaris L)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Six companion crops,(Targets spp L. (African marigold), Daucus corona L. (carrot), Coriandrum sativum L. (coriandar),Brassica spp. L. (kale), Capsicum spp L. (Chilli) and Zea mays L. (maize) were evaluated for their efficacy in suppressing field populations of the French bean flower thrips,(Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande), Franklieniella schultzie (Trybom) and Megalurothrips sjostedti (trybom). The companion crops were compared to two insecticides, Labda cyhalothrin (Karate 1.75% EC) and Methiocarb (Mesurol 500 SC) and untreated mono-crop of French beans. Three of the treatments, coriander, maize and African marigold were found to be effective in that order, by repelling the pest away from the crop. It is concluded that these crops could be recommended to farmers fro use and therefore are able to minimise the high use of chemical insecticides

  1. Improving Pest Management with Farmscaping

    OpenAIRE

    Philips, Chris; Kuhar, Thomas Patrick, 1969-; Morse, Ronald

    2013-01-01

    Farmscaping is a holistic ecologically-based approach to pest management that emphasizes the arrangement or configuration of plants that promote biological pest management by attracting and sustaining beneficial organisms.

  2. Pests in Ornamental Grasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ornamental perennial grasses are becoming increasingly popular in the landscape due to their beauty and ease of care. Although few pest problems are encountered in ornamental grasses, they are not immune to insects and disease. Two lined spittlebugs (Prosapia bicincta) can cause damage to ornament...

  3. The War Against Pests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ray F.

    1973-01-01

    Insecticides should not be the only weapons of war used against pests; in addition to them, a strategy aimed at winning the millenial warfare should combine the tactical use of natural plant enemies, reinforced plant genetic qualities, and the application of adequate ecological techniques. (BL)

  4. Public Health Pest Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arizona Univ., Tucson. Cooperative Extension Service.

    This manual supplies information helpful to individuals wishing to become certified in public health pest control. It is designed as a technical reference for vector control workers and as preparatory material for structural applicators of restricted use pesticides to meet the General Standards of Competency required of commercial applicators. The…

  5. Seasonal Population Dynamics of Three Potato Pests in Washington State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Auria, Elizabeth M; Wohleb, Carrie H; Waters, Timothy D; Crowder, David W

    2016-08-01

    Pest phenology models allow producers to anticipate pest outbreaks and deploy integrated pest management (IPM) strategies. Phenology models are particularly useful for cropping systems with multiple economically damaging pests throughout a season. Potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) crops of Washington State, USA, are attacked by many insect pests including the potato tuberworm (Phthorimaea operculella Zeller), the beet leafhopper (Circulifer tenellus Baker), and the green peach aphid (Myzus persicae Sulzer). Each of these pests directly damages potato foliage or tubers; C. tenellus and M. persicae also transmit pathogens that can drastically reduce potato yields. We monitored the seasonal population dynamics of these pests by conducting weekly sampling on a network of commercial farms from 2007 to 2014. Using these data, we developed phenology models to characterize the seasonal population dynamics of each pest based on accumulated degree-days (DD). All three pests exhibited consistent population dynamics across seasons that were mediated by temperature. Of the three pests, C. tenellus was generally the first detected in potato crops, with 90% of adults captured by 936 DD. In contrast, populations of P. operculella and M. persicae built up more slowly over the course of the season, with 90% cumulative catch by 1,590 and 2,634 DD, respectively. Understanding these seasonal patterns could help potato producers plan their IPM strategies while allowing them to move away from calendar-based applications of insecticides. More broadly, our results show how long-term monitoring studies that explore dynamics of multiple pest species can aid in developing IPM strategies in crop systems.

  6. Investigations on the use of the sterile male technique for the control of codling moth in an integrated pest control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The diapause of the codling moth, Laspeyresia pomonella L., was studied in relation to various altitudes of origin. Altitudes of 350 m and 1300 m above sea level showed that low-altitude moths had a longer diapause. Altitude appears to affect the duration of larval diapause. Biological control by virus-induced granulosis was investigated, using 3 to 4 applications of the virus per tree per season, at the rate of 2x1011 to 9x1011 virus capsules per application. Codling moth infestation was reduced by 74.2% to 88.2%. Trichomma enecator and Ascogaster quadridentatus Wesm., both parasites of the codling moth, were both colonized in the laboratory, and population dynamics are being studied. Copulatory behaviour in the males of A. quadridentatus is elicited primarily by pheromones produced by the female. Males emit some sounds which appear primarily intended to convey territorial rights to other males. The frequencies produced by males and by females differ. Codling moth odours stimulate females to oviposit. The effect of pesticides on parasitation is being studied. Details of a planned mass-rearing facility for lepidopteran and other pests are given

  7. Use of Nuclear Techniques in Biological Control: Managing Pests, Facilitating Trade and Protecting the Environment. Report of a Consultants Group Meeting. Working Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High-priority opportunities are proposed for use of nuclear techniques to effect improved production and shipping of augmentative biological control agents. Proposed subprojects include use of ionizing radiation to improve the production of insect natural enemies on natural hosts/prey or on artificial diets. Other subprojects pertain to improving the ability to move beneficial organisms in international trade, and in using them in the field. Additional high priority activities were identified proposing use of nuclear techniques to produce sterile and/or substerile F-1 weed biological control agents to help evaluate potential impact on non-target species in the pre-release phase, integration of augmentative releases and F-1 sterility in IPM and area-wide pest management programmes, and utilization of by-products from SIT mass-rearing facilities in augmentative biological control programmes. (author)

  8. Pest and disease monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Straw, Nigel; Lonsdale, David [Forest Research, Farnham (United Kingdom)

    2000-07-01

    This paper summaries the findings of surveys of pests and diseases carried out at pure and mixed plots of willow and poplar varieties twice a year during each growing season. The main causes of damage recorded were leaf rust, defoliation by insects, and leaf disease, distortion and chlorosis as well as frost damage, aphid infestation, and shoot dieback. Leaf rust for willow and poplar clones are plotted, and details of leaf rust and defoliation in pure and mixed plots are tabulated.

  9. Area-wide control tactics for the false codling moth, Cryptophlebia leucotreta, in South Africa designed to suppress local populations and prevent and treat invasion/establishment in other countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The False Codling Moth (FCM), Cryptophlebia leucotreta (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), is a key pest of citrus, stone fruit, and other crops in many countries throughout continental Africa, including South Africa. There is a growing awareness that this damaging pest could soon be introduced into other countries including the USA as a direct result of increased international trade and daily direct flights from African countries (including South Africa). As such, the FCM features prominently on the 'Worst of the Worst' Exotic Pest Arthropod List prepared for the USDA-APHIS-PPQ by the Entomological Society of America's Pest List Team. South Africa currently employs augmentative biological control against FCM using the egg parasitoid Trichogrammatoidea cryptophlebiae, however, this programme is not adequate as a stand-alone tactic for effective FCM suppression. Currently, the Sterile Insect Technique (SIT) is under development as a strategy for FCM suppression in South Africa and as a tactic that could be rapidly deployed if FCM were to become established as an exotic invasive pest in other countries such as the United States. The SIT is regarded as a host-specific tactic that is environment-friendly and compatible with natural enemies. However, fully successful integration of the SIT and releases of natural enemies into an effective pest management approach can occur only if the natural enemy does not negatively impact irradiated insects and their progeny more severely than it affects the feral pest population, and if the release of irradiated insects does not negatively impact the efficacy of the natural enemy. Therefore, knowledge of the compatibility of T. cryptophlebiae and the release of irradiated FCM is crucial to the evaluation of the combined use of these tactics. The development and combination of these off-shore IPM strategies in South Africa will develop and/or enhance scientific expertise and infrastructure in South Africa, reduce populations of

  10. Climate change will exacerbate California’s insect pest problems

    OpenAIRE

    Trumble, John; Butler, Casey

    2009-01-01

    The elevated carbon dioxide concentrations and increasing temperatures associated with climate change will have substantial impacts on plant-insect interactions, integrated pest management programs and the movement of nonnative insect species into California. Natural ecosystems will also be affected by the expected changes in insect diversity. Many insects will alter how much they eat in response to changing plant nutrition. Also, we can expect increased problems with many pest insects as the...

  11. Vertebrate Pest Control. Sale Publication 4077.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stimmann, M. W.; Clark, Dell O.

    This guide gives descriptions of common vertebrate pests and guidelines for using some common pesticides. The pests discussed are rats, mice, bats, moles, muskrats, ground squirrels, and gophers. Information is given for each pest on the type of damage the pest can do, the habitat and biology of the pest, and the most effective control methods.…

  12. Pest management strategies in traditional agriculture: an African perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abate, T; van Huis, A; Ampofo, J K

    2000-01-01

    research activities carried out by national or international agricultural research programs in Africa focus on classical biological control and host plant resistance breeding. With the exception of classical biological control of the cassava mealybug, research results have not been widely adopted. This could be due to African farmers facing heterogeneous conditions, not needing fixed prescriptions or one ideal variety but a number of options and genotypes to choose from. Indigenous pest management knowledge is site-specific and should be the basis for developing integrated pest management (IPM) techniques. Farmers often lack the biological and ecological information necessary to develop better pest management through experimentation. Formal research should be instrumental in providing the input necessary to facilitate participatory technology development such as that done by Farmer Field Schools, an approach now emerging in different parts of Africa.

  13. Trading biodiversity for pest problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recent shifts in agricultural practices have resulted in increased pesticide use, land use intensification, and landscape simplification, all of which threaten biodiversity in and near farms. Pests are major challenges to food security, and responses to pests can represent unintended socioeconomic a...

  14. Pest control in postharvest nuts

    Science.gov (United States)

    This chapter discusses the impact of insect infestations on the quality of postharvest nuts. The chapter first reviews the biology of key field pests that may be found in harvested nuts, and pests found in nut storage and processing facilities. The chapter then reviews current and developing control...

  15. Biorational pesticides for pecan pests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Key pecan insect pests include pecan aphid complex (such as the black pecan aphid, Melanocallis caryaefoliae) and pecan weevil, Curculio caryae. Alternative control tactics are needed for management of these pests in organic and conventional systems. Our objective was to determine the potential ut...

  16. Pest Control Section Biochemical Group, Progress Report 1982-86

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reserch efforts in the Pest Control Section, BARC, a continuator of insect sterilization and pest control section of the erstwhile Biology and Agriculture Division, were continued to develop integrated management practices for the control of important insect pests of agricultural and medical importance. Insect pests chosen are, ubiquitous potato tuberworm, a serious pest of potatoes, cotton bollworms with particular reference to spotted bollworms and a mosquito (Culex fatigans), a vector of filariasis. Keeping these insects as targets, research activities have been concentrated in the fields of biological control with parasities, pathogens and sterile insects, sex pheromones and insect plant interaction with a view to integrate pest management programme. Besides, the research activity also encompasses investigations of basic nature in the fields of insect sex pheromones, insect pathology and insect plant interaction. Studies on insect pheromones relate to the modifying influence of abiotic and biotic factors of the environment on pheromone production and perception and the possibility of insect developing resistance to pheromones. Studies in the field of insect plant interaction are directed towards identifying weak links in the insect plant relationship with a view to exploit them for developing control. Basic studies in the field of insect pathology relate to isolation and identification of entomopathogens, source of their pathogenecity, improvement in their virulence and formulation of cheaper and potent microbial insecticides. This report pertains to the period 1982-86. (Orig.). 11 tables, 5 figures

  17. Review of nonchemical methods for controlling stored products pests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fumigation of stored products with methyl bromide has been an important means of limiting the loss of quality and quantity of these commodities that are subject to attack by cosmopolitan stored product pests. Methyl bromide was identified as a substance depleting ozone, and is expected to be withdrawn from production, importation, and use in Poland and other countries soon after 2000. Based on the current knowledge, most of alternatives to methyl bromide (controlled atmospheres, heat, cold, irradiation, biotechnical methods, inert dusts, biological methods, sanitation) have researchable gaps or other constraints. None of these alternatives used alone will replace methyl bromide. Successful pest control in the absence of methyl bromide will require the development of sophisticated pest monitoring and decision support systems to enable the use of integrated pest management strategies. (author)

  18. Simulating Human and Environmental Exposure from Hand-Held Knapsack Pesticide Application: Be-WetSpa-Pest, an Integrative, Spatially Explicit Modeling Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binder, Claudia R; García-Santos, Glenda; Andreoli, Romano; Diaz, Jaime; Feola, Giuseppe; Wittensoeldner, Moritz; Yang, Jing

    2016-05-25

    This paper presents an integrative and spatially explicit modeling approach for analyzing human and environmental exposure from pesticide application of smallholders in the potato-producing Andean region in Colombia. The modeling approach fulfills the following criteria: (i) it includes environmental and human compartments; (ii) it contains a behavioral decision-making model for estimating the effect of policies on pesticide flows to humans and the environment; (iii) it is spatially explicit; and (iv) it is modular and easily expandable to include additional modules, crops, or technologies. The model was calibrated and validated for the Vereda La Hoya and was used to explore the effect of different policy measures in the region. The model has moderate data requirements and can be adapted relatively easily to other regions in developing countries with similar conditions.

  19. Pest insect olfaction in an insecticide-contaminated environment: info-disruption or hormesis effect

    OpenAIRE

    Hélène eTricoire-Leignel; Steeve Hervé Thany; Christophe eGadenne; Sylvia eAnton

    2012-01-01

    Most animals, including pest insects, live in an “odor world” and depend strongly on chemical stimuli to get information on their biotic and abiotic environment. Although integrated pest management strategies including the use of insect growth regulators (IGRs) are increasingly developed, most insect pest treatments rely on neurotoxic chemicals. These molecules are known to disrupt synaptic transmission, affecting therefore sensory systems. The wide-spread use of neurotoxic insecticides and t...

  20. An Overview of Pest Species of Bactrocera Fruit Flies (Diptera: Tephritidae) and the Integration of Biopesticides with Other Biological Approaches for Their Management with a Focus on the Pacific Region

    OpenAIRE

    Roger I. Vargas; Piñero, Jaime C.; Luc Leblanc

    2015-01-01

    Fruit flies (Diptera: Tephritidae) are among the most economically important pest species in the world, attacking a wide range of fruits and fleshy vegetables throughout tropical and sub-tropical areas. These species are such devastating crop pests that major control and eradication programs have been developed in various parts of the world to combat them. The array of control methods includes insecticide sprays to foliage and soil, bait-sprays, male annihilation techniques, releases of steri...

  1. Integrating ecosystem services into crop protection and pest management: Case study with the soil fumigant 1,3-dichloropropene and its use in tomato production in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deacon, Samantha; Alix, Anne; Knowles, Steve; Wheeler, James; Tescari, Enzo; Alvarez, Lara; Nicolette, Joseph; Rockel, Mark; Burston, Peter; Quadri, Giorgia

    2016-10-01

    Ecosystems provide the conditions for producing food, regulating water, and providing wildlife habitats; these, among others, are known as ecosystem services (ESs). Food production is both economically and culturally important to southern European farmers, particularly in Italy where farmers grow flavorsome tomatoes with passion and pride. Growers rely on pesticides for crop protection, the potential environmental impact of which is often questioned by regulators and other stakeholders. The European regulatory system for the approval of pesticides includes a thorough evaluation of risks to the environment and is designed to be protective of ecosystems. The consideration of ESs in environmental decision making is a growing trend, and the present case study provides an example of how ESs evaluation could be used to enhance agricultural practices and regulatory policy for crop protection. By attacking plant roots, nematodes may affect the growth and yield of fruit and vegetable crops, and the income earned by farmers at harvest time. Available solutions include chemical treatments such as 1,3-dichloropropene (1,3-D), physical treatments (solarization), and biological treatments (biofumigation). In order to characterize the risks and benefits associated with the use of 1,3-D in crop protection, ESs and socioeconomic analyses were applied to its use in the control of nematodes in tomato cultivation in southern Italy. The present study confirmed the benefits of 1,3-D to tomato production in Italy, with significant positive effects on production yields and farm income when compared to limited and transient potential impacts on services such as soil function. It was confirmed that 1,3-D allows farm income to be maintained and secures tomato production in these regions for the future. Integr Environ Assess Manag 2016;12:801-810. © 2016 SETAC.

  2. Integrating ecosystem services into crop protection and pest management: Case study with the soil fumigant 1,3-dichloropropene and its use in tomato production in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deacon, Samantha; Alix, Anne; Knowles, Steve; Wheeler, James; Tescari, Enzo; Alvarez, Lara; Nicolette, Joseph; Rockel, Mark; Burston, Peter; Quadri, Giorgia

    2016-10-01

    Ecosystems provide the conditions for producing food, regulating water, and providing wildlife habitats; these, among others, are known as ecosystem services (ESs). Food production is both economically and culturally important to southern European farmers, particularly in Italy where farmers grow flavorsome tomatoes with passion and pride. Growers rely on pesticides for crop protection, the potential environmental impact of which is often questioned by regulators and other stakeholders. The European regulatory system for the approval of pesticides includes a thorough evaluation of risks to the environment and is designed to be protective of ecosystems. The consideration of ESs in environmental decision making is a growing trend, and the present case study provides an example of how ESs evaluation could be used to enhance agricultural practices and regulatory policy for crop protection. By attacking plant roots, nematodes may affect the growth and yield of fruit and vegetable crops, and the income earned by farmers at harvest time. Available solutions include chemical treatments such as 1,3-dichloropropene (1,3-D), physical treatments (solarization), and biological treatments (biofumigation). In order to characterize the risks and benefits associated with the use of 1,3-D in crop protection, ESs and socioeconomic analyses were applied to its use in the control of nematodes in tomato cultivation in southern Italy. The present study confirmed the benefits of 1,3-D to tomato production in Italy, with significant positive effects on production yields and farm income when compared to limited and transient potential impacts on services such as soil function. It was confirmed that 1,3-D allows farm income to be maintained and secures tomato production in these regions for the future. Integr Environ Assess Manag 2016;12:801-810. © 2016 SETAC. PMID:26822540

  3. Guidance for packing, shipping, holding and release of sterile flies in area-wide fruit fly control programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This guidance represents the recommendations, reached by consensus of an international group of experts, on the standard procedures for the packing, shipping, holding and release of mass reared and sterilized tephritid flies that are to be used in area-wide programmes that include the Sterile Insect Technique (SIT). The majority of the procedures were initially designed specifically for the Mediterranean fruit fly Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann) (or Medfly), but they are applicable, with minor modifications, for other tephritid species such as those in the genera Anastrepha, Bactrocera and Dacus. The guidance is designed to be a working document that can be subject to periodic updates due to technological developments and research contributions. Future editions will endeavour to include more specific recommendations for other species of fruit flies as the relevant data become available. The procedures described in this guidance will help ensure that released sterile fruit flies will be of optimal quality and that the resulting field density of these flies will be as closely aligned to the individual programme needs. It is hoped that this guidance will help to quickly identify and correct problems in programme effectiveness, resulting from less than optimal emergence and release conditions

  4. The importance of arthropod pests in Belgian pome fruit orchards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bangels, Eva; De Schaetzen, Charles; Hayen, Guy; Paternotte, Edouard; Gobin, Bruno

    2008-01-01

    Located in temperate, maritime climate with frequent rainfall, crop protection in Belgian orchards is dominated by fungicides. Though, the importance of arthropod pests should not be underestimated. Pcfruit, the former Research station of Gorsem, has been maintaining a warning system for fruit pests in Belgium since 1944. Therefore, various pests and beneficial's and their life cycle stages have been monitored in Gorsem and in different observation posts across Belgium, being part of a monitoring network. Although up to 3000 arthropod species are present in pome fruit orchards, about 25% can be considered as harmful and another 25% as beneficial. Out of those species, around 100 harmful and 50 beneficial organisms are omnipresent. The list of monitored species is extended yearly for upcoming or difficult to control organisms. Integrated pest management was introduced in the eighties, with the accent on using selective pesticides and saving beneficial organisms. A shift in pesticide use affected the importance of secondary pests, together with recent exceptional climatic conditions. Following many years of monitoring insects and mites and editing warning bulletins in our station, a ranking of the economical importance of different pest species is presented.

  5. Peste des petits ruminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parida, S; Muniraju, M; Mahapatra, M; Muthuchelvan, D; Buczkowski, H; Banyard, A C

    2015-12-14

    Peste des petits ruminants virus causes a highly infectious disease of small ruminants that is endemic across Africa, the Middle East and large regions of Asia. The virus is considered to be a major obstacle to the development of sustainable agriculture across the developing world and has recently been targeted by the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) and the Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO) for eradication with the aim of global elimination of the disease by 2030. Fundamentally, the vaccines required to successfully achieve this goal are currently available, but the availability of novel vaccine preparations to also fulfill the requisite for differentiation between infected and vaccinated animals (DIVA) may reduce the time taken and the financial costs of serological surveillance in the later stages of any eradication campaign. Here, we overview what is currently known about the virus, with reference to its origin, updated global circulation, molecular evolution, diagnostic tools and vaccines currently available to combat the disease. Further, we comment on recent developments in our knowledge of various recombinant vaccines and on the potential for the development of novel multivalent vaccines for small ruminants. PMID:26443889

  6. Plant domestication slows pest evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turcotte, Martin M; Lochab, Amaneet K; Turley, Nash E; Johnson, Marc T J

    2015-09-01

    Agricultural practices such as breeding resistant varieties and pesticide use can cause rapid evolution of pest species, but it remains unknown how plant domestication itself impacts pest contemporary evolution. Using experimental evolution on a comparative phylogenetic scale, we compared the evolutionary dynamics of a globally important economic pest - the green peach aphid (Myzus persicae) - growing on 34 plant taxa, represented by 17 crop species and their wild relatives. Domestication slowed aphid evolution by 13.5%, maintained 10.4% greater aphid genotypic diversity and 5.6% higher genotypic richness. The direction of evolution (i.e. which genotypes increased in frequency) differed among independent domestication events but was correlated with specific plant traits. Individual-based simulation models suggested that domestication affects aphid evolution directly by reducing the strength of selection and indirectly by increasing aphid density and thus weakening genetic drift. Our results suggest that phenotypic changes during domestication can alter pest evolutionary dynamics.

  7. Forest Pest Control. Manual 94.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Agricultural Experiment Station.

    This training manual provides information needed to meet the minimum EPA standards for certification as a commercial applicator of pesticides in forest pest control. The text discusses disease problems, insects, and herbicide use in both established forests and nurseries. (CS)

  8. Multiscale approach to pest insect monitoring: Random walks, pattern formation, synchronization, and networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrovskii, Sergei; Petrovskaya, Natalia; Bearup, Daniel

    2014-09-01

    Pest insects pose a significant threat to food production worldwide resulting in annual losses worth hundreds of billions of dollars. Pest control attempts to prevent pest outbreaks that could otherwise destroy a sward. It is good practice in integrated pest management to recommend control actions (usually pesticides application) only when the pest density exceeds a certain threshold. Accurate estimation of pest population density in ecosystems, especially in agro-ecosystems, is therefore very important, and this is the overall goal of the pest insect monitoring. However, this is a complex and challenging task; providing accurate information about pest abundance is hardly possible without taking into account the complexity of ecosystems' dynamics, in particular, the existence of multiple scales. In the case of pest insects, monitoring has three different spatial scales, each of them having their own scale-specific goal and their own approaches to data collection and interpretation. In this paper, we review recent progress in mathematical models and methods applied at each of these scales and show how it helps to improve the accuracy and robustness of pest population density estimation.

  9. Alternatives to neonicotinoid insecticides for pest control: case studies in agriculture and forestry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furlan, Lorenzo; Kreutzweiser, David

    2015-01-01

    Neonicotinoid insecticides are widely used for control of insect pests around the world and are especially pervasive in agricultural pest management. There is a growing body of evidence indicating that the broad-scale and prophylactic uses of neonicotinoids pose serious risks of harm to beneficial organisms and their ecological function. This provides the impetus for exploring alternatives to neonicotinoid insecticides for controlling insect pests. We draw from examples of alternative pest control options in Italian maize production and Canadian forestry to illustrate the principles of applying alternatives to neonicotinoids under an integrated pest management (IPM) strategy. An IPM approach considers all relevant and available information to make informed management decisions, providing pest control options based on actual need. We explore the benefits and challenges of several options for management of three insect pests in maize crops and an invasive insect pest in forests, including diversifying crop rotations, altering the timing of planting, tillage and irrigation, using less sensitive crops in infested areas, applying biological control agents, and turning to alternative reduced risk insecticides. Continued research into alternatives is warranted, but equally pressing is the need for information transfer and training for farmers and pest managers and the need for policies and regulations to encourage the adoption of IPM strategies and their alternative pest control options.

  10. Dynamic complexities in a pest control model with birth pulse and harvesting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, A.; Gakkhar, S.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, an impulsive model is discussed for an integrated pest management approach comprising of chemical and mechanical controls. The pesticides and harvesting are used to control the stage-structured pest population. The mature pest give birth to immature pest in pulses at regular intervals. The pest is controlled by spraying chemical pesticides affecting immature as well as mature pest. The harvesting of both immature and mature pest further reduce the pest population. The discrete dynamical system obtained from stroboscopic map is analyzed. The threshold conditions for stability of pest-free state as well as non-trivial period-1 solution is obtained. The effect of pesticide spray timing and harvesting on immature as well as mature pest are shown. Finally, by numerical simulation with MATLAB, the dynamical behaviors of the model is found to be complex. Above the threshold level there is a characteristic sequence of bifurcations leading to chaotic dynamics. Route to chaos is found to be period-doubling. Period halving bifurcations are also observed.

  11. A pest is a pest is a pest? The dilemma of neotropical leaf-cutting ants: Keystone taxa of natural ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Harold G.; Pagani, Maria Inez; da Silva, Osvaldo Aulino; Forti, Luis Carlos; da Silva, Virgilio Pereira; de Vasconcelos, Heraldo Luis

    1989-11-01

    Leaf-cutting ants of the genera Acromyrmex and Atta are considered the principal polyphagous pests of the Neotropics Although some members of these genera are of economic importance, have a broad geographic distribution, and are extremely good colonizers, others are endemic and closely interact with native ecosystems. Control is generally practiced against any colony, irrespective of its taxonomic status. Indiscriminate control coupled with habitat destruction threatens endemic species with extinction, and, through habitat simplification, favors other pest species. As nests of Atta are large, having several square meters of nest surface, the endemic taxa can be easily used as environmental indicators for natural ecosystems Likewise, the pest species can be used to detect environmental disturbance As these ants are keystone species and easily identified by nonspecialists, efforts should be made to integrate these into viable conservation programs

  12. 绿色生态苹果园主要害虫发生特点及综合控制技术研究%A research on the occurrence characteristics and integrated control methods for major insect pests in the green ecological apple orchard

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王淑贤; 李学军; 郑国

    2009-01-01

    作者于2003-2005年在辽宁省岫岩县绿色生态园区建设中,对苹果树几种主要害虫的发生特点与防治措施进行了试验研究.以整个果园为对象,采取农业防治、物理防治和生物控制等技术措施,进行苹果主要害虫综合控制.调查了苹果瘤蚜、苹果绣线菊蚜、苹果全爪螨和桃小食心虫等主要害虫的发生和天敌控害作用.%The occurrence characteristics and integrated control measures for major insect pests carried on to experiment in the green ecological apple orchard,during 2003-2005 in Xiuyan, Liaoning province. Taking the apple orchard as one whole, major insect pests were controlled by adopting integrated technical measures of agriculture controls, physical controls and biological controls etc. The occurrence of insect pests and control functions of natural enemies have been investigated to Myzus malisuctus, Aphis spiraecola, Panonychus ulmi, Carposina nipponensis etc.

  13. Population Dynamics of Lepidoptera Pests in Eucalyptus urophylla Plantations in the Brazilian Amazonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Cola Zanuncio

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Forestry companies study the population dynamics of insect pests in Integrated Pest Management for cost effectiveness. The objective of this study was to obtain qualitative and quantitative information on population fluctuation of the Lepidopteran defoliators of Eucalyptus urophylla plants in the Brazilian Amazon rainforest. In all, 402 species were collected, of which 10 were primary pests, nine were secondary pests, and the remaining bore no definite relevance to eucalyptus. Primary pests formed a low percentage of the total species, although they recorded a high percentage of the total number of individuals. The abundance of secondary pests, except in Caracuru, was less than 150 specimens annually. Primary pests showed higher population peaks during periods of low precipitation. The small number of species and the high abundance of primary and secondary pests could be due to the availability of food, or a deficiency in natural biological control. This suggests the possibilities of population outbreaks in the eucalyptus plantations. The period of highest occurrence for insect species in these crops must be identified so that suitable strategies can be developed for Integrated Pest Management.

  14. New approaches to the management of golden apple snail, Pomacea canaliculata (Lamarck): An invasive alien pest species of rice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Golden apple snail (GAS), Pomacea canaliculata (Lamarck) is native to South America. It was introduced to farmers in the Philippines in the 1980s from Argentina via Taiwan, and to other countries in Asia to increase their income and to enrich the protein intake in their diet, and also as an aquarium pet. The Global Invasive Species (IAS) FAO report that it causes 1.2 billion USD losses to aquatic crops particularly rice, taro and morning glory in Asian countries and the USA. Aside from being a serious agricultural pest, it is also an environmental pest. In an attempt to control GAS resource-poor-farmers resort to 'shot-gun approach' of using toxic and non specific agrochemicals thereby aggravating ecosystem pollution, risking their health and causing loss of aquatic biodiversity. GAS is expanding its distribution westwards in Asia and poses new threats of its invasion in Australia, India, Bangladesh and Pakistan. At the Philippine Rice Research Institute (PhilRice), my team focuses on two approaches. First we have to understand the field ecology of the GAS and identify weak-links in their life cycle. Then we use this basic information to manage GAS at the village level within the community in an ecologically sustainable socially acceptable and economically viable ways. I shall discuss how this LAS in transplanted lowland irrigated rice ecologies can be managed using locally available attractants during the vulnerable stage(s) of rice crop growth. New approaches will highlight the innovative and applied techniques on how to prevent the rampant abuse/misuse of agrochemicals, as well as GAS utilisation in weed management in rice fields and as aqua feed. In future, it is necessary to develop collaborative exploratory research with the IAEA and the Philippine Nuclear Research Institute (PNRI) to develop an effective area-wide management of GAS in direct-seeded rice systems that will capitalise on an integrated approach and environment-friendly technologies

  15. The Ohio Schools Pest Management Survey: A Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001

    In 2001, the Environmental Studies Senior Capstone Seminar class at Denison University helped the state of Ohio work to prevent harmful pesticide use in schools. In cooperation with Ohio State University's Integrated Pest Management (IPM) in Schools Program, Denison conducted a statewide survey of school districts to determine current pest…

  16. Multi-State Dependent Impulsive Control for Pest Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huidong Cheng

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available According to the integrated pest management strategies, we propose a model for pest control which adopts different control methods at different thresholds. By using differential equation geometry theory and the method of successor functions, we prove the existence of order one periodic solution of such system, and further, the attractiveness of the order one periodic solution by sequence convergence rules and qualitative analysis. Numerical simulations are carried out to illustrate the feasibility of our main results. Our results show that our method used in this paper is more efficient and easier than the existing ones for proving the existence of order one periodic solution.

  17. Report of the workshop on strategic planning of area-wide tsetse and trypanosomiasis control in West Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsetse-transmitted trypanosomiasis is a disease unique to Africa affecting both humans and animals. This disease occurs in about 10 million km2 in 37 sub-Saharan countries corresponding approximately to one-third of Africa's total land area, and threatens an estimated 50 million people, 48 million cattle and a countless population of other domestic animal species. Trypanosomiasis has a severe impact on African agriculture; estimated annual losses in cattle production alone are in the range of 1.0-1.2 billion dollars. To this, we have to add the indirect negative effects engendered by trypanosomiasis on total crop production. The disease influences where people decide to live, how they manage their livestock and the intensity of crop agriculture. The combined effects result in changes in land use, environment and affect human welfare and increase the vulnerability of agricultural activity. FAO has identified the reinforcement of agriculture as a key element in the fight against poverty and the improvement of food security in developing countries. The need to reduce poverty is particularly felt in tsetse infested areas of sub-Saharan Africa. In this region half of the population suffers from food insecurity. Approximately 85% of the poor are located in rural areas and more than 80% of the population depends on agricultural production for their livelihood. In order to respond to the need in the fight against tsetse and trypanosomiasis (T and T) in people as well as livestock, the Programme Against African Trypanosomiasis (PAAT) was endorsed in November 1997 by the FAO Conference. The Programme seeks to combine the forces of FAO, IAEA, OAU/IBAR and WHO in order to: promote and co-ordinate international alliances and efforts assisting in harmonised interventions against T and T; effectively combat the disease in Africa; and delineate the polity framework, strategies and guiding pest management principles. This workshop was primarily concerned with the development of

  18. Integrated Pest Management in the Era of Gene---a Review of“IPM-Omics”%基因组时代的病虫害综合治理--“病虫综合治理组学”简介

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    荣昌鹤; 李文迪; 王绍景; 沈栩竹

    2016-01-01

    随着DNA测序技术的不断更新和生物信息学的快速发展,昆虫基因组学的研究不断深入,基因组、宏基因组、转录组、蛋白组、代谢组等组学技术在昆虫学和植物病理学中的广泛应用,一门新兴的“病虫害综合治理组学”( IPM-Omics)应运而生。本研究对IPM-Omics的核心研究内容、研究进展以及推动该组学发展和应用的周边新型技术手段进行了综述,为了解基因组时代害虫治理的研究进展及前景提供参考。然而任何策略的有效实施都离不开良好的合作与宣传,因此只有综合各领域学科的先进成果,加强宣传示范工作,才能使害虫防治发生革命性的变化。%With the development of DNA sequencing and bioinformatics, and deeper research in insect genomics, technologies such as metagenomics, proteomics, transcriptomics and metabolomics were widely applied in entomol-ogy and plant pathology, and the IPM-Omics emerged as a new integrated subject.This papered mainly reviewed the core contents and the research progress of IPM-Omics, as well as the correlation tools which could derive the application of this subject .Further analysis and suggestions were made for future development of IPM-Omics, and forecast the revolutionary change in insect pest control .

  19. Developing the sterile insect technique for area-wide management of the invasive cactus moth, Cactoblastis cactorum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    : fertile) overflooding ratio inside large field-cages containing O. stricta host plants. Insects were allowed to mate and lay eggs and all egg sticks were collected daily. Percent egg hatch and reduction in F1 fertile larvae was used to ascertain the effectiveness of each release combination. In addition, we conducted limited field release-recapture experiments to examine the dispersal ability of untreated and treated cactus moth males. Results suggest that an overflooding ratio as low as 5:1 can effectively suppress C. cactorum in field-cages. Our data also suggests that releasing both genders together may be more effective than releasing males only. Finally, our results suggest that the dispersal ability of C. cactorum is not significantly affected by irradiating the adults with a dose of 200 Gy. An area-wide field trial currently is in progress to evaluate the ability of the SIT in combination with cultural controls to reduce C. cactorum populations near the leading edge of the expanding geographical range. (author)

  20. Insect and Pest Control Newsletter, No. 86, January 2016

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 2015 we concluded the six-year Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on “Resolution of Cryptic Species Complexes of Tephritid Pests to Overcome Constraints to SIT Application and International Trade”. The objective of the CRP was to undertake targeted research into the systematics and diagnostics of taxonomically challenging fruit fly groups of economic importance. Close to 50 researchers from over 20 countries participated in the CRP, conducting coordinated, multidisciplinary research to address, with an integrative taxonomic framework, cryptic species complexes of major tephritid pests. One of the scientific outputs of the CRP was the accurate alignment of some biological species with taxonomic names. The resolution of some of these controversial issues has important applied implications for FAO and IAEA Member States, both in overcoming technical constraints to the application of the Sterile Insect Technique (SIT) against pest fruit flies and in facilitating international agricultural trade

  1. Global pest management in the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In spite of the problems that have arisen with overproduction in parts of the northern hemisphere, agriculture has to meet the challenge of providing enough food within the next 50 years for as many people as have lived on the earth during the last 1987 years. With a constantly growing world population this can only be achieved by intensifying production on a given acreage, since there are only marginal possibilities for extending agricultural land. Therefore, the yield potential of crop plants has to be secured against detrimental effects. The input for pest and weed control amounts to an average of less than 5% of the running costs at farm level but stabilizes the yield and quality of the agricultural production significantly. Rational use of biological and cultural practices in addition to chemicals will grow in importance to keep losses below the economic threshold. These approaches to pest management have global dimensions; intensity and structure, however, vary from region to region. The highly intensive agriculture of developed countries is increasingly subject to aspects of agricultural and environmental policy, whereas political economy and food supply are the dominating influences in developing countries and have a direct impact on pest management methods. These more regional trends do not always run parallel with the international policy trends of the agrochemical industry. However, research for effective crop protection basically envisages common targets; some aim at low rates, selectivity and favourable toxicological and ecotoxicological properties. Regional conditions may therefore be covered by efforts to select suitable products, formulations and application techniques. This will only be possible through an integrated research strategy, including biochemistry and molecular biology, based upon future oriented market analysis. (author). 8 refs, 1 fig., 4 tabs

  2. Cotton in Benin: governance and pest management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Togbe, C.E.

    2013-01-01

    Key words: cotton, synthetic pesticides, neem oil (Azadirachta indica), Beauveria bassiana, Bacillus thuringiensis, field experiment, farmers’ participation   Pests are one of the main factors limiting cotton production worldwide. Most of the pest control strategies in cotton producti

  3. Aquatic Pest Control. Manual 99.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Agricultural Experiment Station.

    This training manual provides information needed to meet the minimum EPA standards for certification as a commercial applicator of pesticides in the aquatic pest control category. The text discusses various water use situations; aquatic weed identification; herbicide use and effects; and aquatic insects and their control. (CS)

  4. Forest Pest Control. Bulletin 759.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, V. Rodney

    This manual describes the major forest types, the major species, seed orchards, and tree nurseries. Methods of identifying forest insect pests and diseases are given. The most common types of insecticides, fungicides, and herbicides are described. Both sprayer and granular applicator methods are discussed. Environmental considerations are…

  5. EVALUATION OF VARIOUS PEST-MANAGEMENT CHARACTERISTICS

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, G. Scott; Wetzstein, Michael E.; Douce, G. Keith

    1987-01-01

    Considering pest management in terms of a set of technology characteristics allows an investigation of various pest-management characteristics and how they relate to a total pest-management package. Employing restricted and unrestricted least squares in this investigation indicates the unique impact individual pest-management characteristics exert on net returns. A Stein-rule estimator is also employed in assessing this impact.

  6. Sustainable Pest Management : Achievements and Challenges

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to: (a) review World Bank's pest management activities during 1999-2004; (b) assess those in view of the changes in the external and internal contexts; (c) identify appropriate opportunities of engagement on pest and pesticide issues; and (d) suggest means to further promote sound pest management in the World Bank operations. The importance of sound pest management for sustainable agricultural production is being recognized by many developing countries. Many cou...

  7. Coupled information diffusion--pest dynamics models predict delayed benefits of farmer cooperation in pest management programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebaudo, François; Dangles, Olivier

    2011-10-01

    Worldwide, the theory and practice of agricultural extension system have been dominated for almost half a century by Rogers' "diffusion of innovation theory". In particular, the success of integrated pest management (IPM) extension programs depends on the effectiveness of IPM information diffusion from trained farmers to other farmers, an important assumption which underpins funding from development organizations. Here we developed an innovative approach through an agent-based model (ABM) combining social (diffusion theory) and biological (pest population dynamics) models to study the role of cooperation among small-scale farmers to share IPM information for controlling an invasive pest. The model was implemented with field data, including learning processes and control efficiency, from large scale surveys in the Ecuadorian Andes. Our results predict that although cooperation had short-term costs for individual farmers, it paid in the long run as it decreased pest infestation at the community scale. However, the slow learning process placed restrictions on the knowledge that could be generated within farmer communities over time, giving rise to natural lags in IPM diffusion and applications. We further showed that if individuals learn from others about the benefits of early prevention of new pests, then educational effort may have a sustainable long-run impact. Consistent with models of information diffusion theory, our results demonstrate how an integrated approach combining ecological and social systems would help better predict the success of IPM programs. This approach has potential beyond pest management as it could be applied to any resource management program seeking to spread innovations across populations.

  8. Coupled information diffusion--pest dynamics models predict delayed benefits of farmer cooperation in pest management programs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    François Rebaudo

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Worldwide, the theory and practice of agricultural extension system have been dominated for almost half a century by Rogers' "diffusion of innovation theory". In particular, the success of integrated pest management (IPM extension programs depends on the effectiveness of IPM information diffusion from trained farmers to other farmers, an important assumption which underpins funding from development organizations. Here we developed an innovative approach through an agent-based model (ABM combining social (diffusion theory and biological (pest population dynamics models to study the role of cooperation among small-scale farmers to share IPM information for controlling an invasive pest. The model was implemented with field data, including learning processes and control efficiency, from large scale surveys in the Ecuadorian Andes. Our results predict that although cooperation had short-term costs for individual farmers, it paid in the long run as it decreased pest infestation at the community scale. However, the slow learning process placed restrictions on the knowledge that could be generated within farmer communities over time, giving rise to natural lags in IPM diffusion and applications. We further showed that if individuals learn from others about the benefits of early prevention of new pests, then educational effort may have a sustainable long-run impact. Consistent with models of information diffusion theory, our results demonstrate how an integrated approach combining ecological and social systems would help better predict the success of IPM programs. This approach has potential beyond pest management as it could be applied to any resource management program seeking to spread innovations across populations.

  9. A novel approach to evaluation of pest insect abundance in the presence of noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Embleton, Nina; Petrovskaya, Natalia

    2014-03-01

    Evaluation of pest abundance is an important task of integrated pest management. It has recently been shown that evaluation of pest population size from discrete sampling data can be done by using the ideas of numerical integration. Numerical integration of the pest population density function is a computational technique that readily gives us an estimate of the pest population size, where the accuracy of the estimate depends on the number of traps installed in the agricultural field to collect the data. However, in a standard mathematical problem of numerical integration, it is assumed that the data are precise, so that the random error is zero when the data are collected. This assumption does not hold in ecological applications. An inherent random error is often present in field measurements, and therefore it may strongly affect the accuracy of evaluation. In our paper, we offer a novel approach to evaluate the pest insect population size under the assumption that the data about the pest population include a random error. The evaluation is not based on statistical methods but is done using a spatially discrete method of numerical integration where the data obtained by trapping as in pest insect monitoring are converted to values of the population density. It will be discussed in the paper how the accuracy of evaluation differs from the case where the same evaluation method is employed to handle precise data. We also consider how the accuracy of the pest insect abundance evaluation can be affected by noise when the data available from trapping are sparse. In particular, we show that, contrary to intuitive expectations, noise does not have any considerable impact on the accuracy of evaluation when the number of traps is small as is conventional in ecological applications. PMID:24619808

  10. Advantages and trends in managing insect pests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although many different insect control methods are currently in use, there has been a heavy reliance on conventional insecticides for more than forty years. Because of the development of insecticide resistance, the public concern about environmental and health risks, and the high cost of development, approvals for specific insecticide uses are now being removed at a faster rate than they are being replaced. Alternative insect management technologies will be required, and a strategy for their use should be selected based on the characteristics of the technology to be used and the pest involved. Most insect problems can best be dealt with by a pest management programme that includes integration of two or more suppression methods with the aid of a strong population dynamics knowledge base, decision support systems, economic analyses and environmental assessments. Although trends cannot be predicted with certainty, the market for conventional insecticides probably will decline and the market for biologically based products probably will increase. Thus, an increased number of biological suppression methods will probably be available in the future. Additional emphasis should also be placed on the development of non-product oriented, biologically based control methods. 43 refs, 1 fig., 2 tabs

  11. Ornamental, Turf and Nursery Pests. MEP 308.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Omar D.; And Others

    As part of a cooperative extension service series by the University of Maryland, this publication introduces the identification and control of common turf and plant pests that can be found in the urban environment. The first of the five sections defines "pest" and "weed" and generally introduces different kinds of pests such as insects, weeds, and…

  12. General Pest Control - Industrial. Manual 95.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Agricultural Experiment Station.

    This training manual provides information needed to meet the minimum EPA standards for certification as a commercial applicator of pesticides in the general pest control category. The text discusses general, parasitic and miscellaneous pests such as ants, ticks, and spiders; fabric, wood-destroying, and grain pests such as beetles, termites, and…

  13. Forest Pest Control. Sale Publication 4072.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stimmann, M. W., Ed.

    The forest pests discussed in this guide are weeds, insects, diseases, and vertebrates. The guide gives information about types of forests, characteristics of common forest pests, pest control methods, pesticides and application equipment used in forestry, and environmental and human hazards. (Author/BB)

  14. 东源县水稻主要病虫害综合防治技术规程%Integrated Control Technical Specification for Rice Diseases and Insect Pests in Dongyuan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐红梅; 罗伟景

    2012-01-01

    Analyzed the occurrence regularity and characteristics of rice diseases and insect pests in Dongyuan County, and explored a set of agriculture, physical, biological, chemical control measures of rice diseases and insect pests which was recommended to peasants in Dongyuan, all the measures can promote high efficiency and low toxicity application technology extension.%通过近年来东源县水稻常见病虫害的发生规律及其特性.摸索出一套适宜在东源县推广的几种水稻主要病虫害的农业、物理、生物、化学防治措施,以推广高效、低毒应用技术。

  15. Unexpected Effects of Low Doses of a Neonicotinoid Insecticide on Behavioral Responses to Sex Pheromone in a Pest Insect

    OpenAIRE

    Kaouther K Rabhi; Kali Esancy; Anouk Voisin; Lucille Crespin; Julie Le Corre; Hélène Tricoire-Leignel; Sylvia Anton; Christophe Gadenne

    2014-01-01

    In moths, which include many agricultural pest species, males are attracted by female-emitted sex pheromones. Although integrated pest management strategies are increasingly developed, most insect pest treatments rely on widespread use of neurotoxic chemicals, including neonicotinoid insecticides. Residual accumulation of low concentrations of these insecticides in the environment is known to be harmful to beneficial insects such as honey bees. This environmental stress probably acts as an "i...

  16. Main pests and diseases and their integrated control measures in Quanzhou Forest Park%泉州森林公园主要病虫害及其防治

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈文玉

    2012-01-01

    通过近5年的调查发现,泉州森林公园主要病虫害有26种,其中虫害23种、病害3种,危害较大的有松突圆蚧、松墨天牛、黑翅土白蚁、红棕象甲、曲纹紫灰蝶、绿翅绢野螟以及蚜虫、蚧虫、粉虱、木虱等刺吸式害虫。根据滨海城市森林公园是市民重要休闲场所的特殊性,提出了主要病虫害的防治原则和措施;总结构建了符合闽南气候特征及滨海城市公园建设管护特点的病虫害防治作业措施年历。%According to the data from recent 5 years survey, there were 23 species of pests and 3 diseases in Quanzhou Forest Park. Major pests were Hemiberlesia pitysophila, Monochamus alternatus, Odontotermes formosanus, Rhynchophorus ferrttgineus, Chilades pandava, Diaphania angustalis, and piercing-sucking insects such as aphids, scale insects, whitefly and psylla. In view of the spe- cial location of the forest park in the seacoastal city, the principles and measures to control the pests and diseases have been pro- posed, meanwhile a calendar on pests and diseases control measures in accordance with the southern Fujian climate and for park building and maintenance in the'seaeoastal city has been worked out.

  17. Pest persistence and eradication conditions in a deterministic model for sterile insect release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordillo, Luis F

    2015-01-01

    The release of sterile insects is an environment friendly pest control method used in integrated pest management programmes. Difference or differential equations based on Knipling's model often provide satisfactory qualitative descriptions of pest populations subject to sterile release at relatively high densities with large mating encounter rates, but fail otherwise. In this paper, I derive and explore numerically deterministic population models that include sterile release together with scarce mating encounters in the particular case of species with long lifespan and multiple matings. The differential equations account separately the effects of mating failure due to sterile male release and the frequency of mating encounters. When insects spatial spread is incorporated through diffusion terms, computations reveal the possibility of steady pest persistence in finite size patches. In the presence of density dependence regulation, it is observed that sterile release might contribute to induce sudden suppression of the pest population. PMID:25105593

  18. Adaptive release of natural enemies in a pest-natural enemy system with pesticide resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Juhua; Tang, Sanyi; Cheke, Robert A; Wu, Jianhong

    2013-11-01

    Integrated pest management options such as combining chemical and biological control are optimal for combating pesticide resistance, but pose questions if a pest is to be controlled to extinction. These questions include (i) what is the relationship between the evolution of pesticide resistance and the number of natural enemies released? (ii) How does the cumulative number of natural enemies dying affect the number of natural enemies to be released? To address these questions, we developed two novel pest-natural enemy interaction models incorporating the evolution of pesticide resistance. We investigated the number of natural enemies to be released when threshold conditions for the extinction of the pest population in two different control tactics are reached. Our results show that the number of natural enemies to be released to ensure pest eradication in the presence of increasing pesticide resistance can be determined analytically and depends on the cumulative number of dead natural enemies before the next scheduled release time.

  19. Insect pest control newsletter. No. 61

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    this sexing system, which could be a model for other moth pest insects. Germ-line transformation is quite efficient in the codling moth and the appropriate Notch allele has already been shown by Lisa Neven at ARS/USDA in Wapato, Washington State to express correctly in transformed codling moth lines. If such a sexing system could be developed in codling moth then it would have several advantages, a) only the females would be transgenic, the sterile males to be released as part of SIT operations would carry a completely normal genome, b) as the Notch gene is dominant, any recombinant individuals would also be killed by the temperature treatment and not be accidentally released, c) the fluorescent marker would be very tightly linked to Notch, resulting in strain stability, d) stockpiles of diapausing mass reared males would require only half the storage space, and e) the system should probably be easily transferable to other economically important lepidopteran pests. I would also like to report developments related to medfly control in Europe. Currently, medfly control requires intensive insecticide applications during the whole fruit maturation period. This is also the case of southern Spain, where the largest citrus production areas in Europe are located. Nevertheless, as a result of the detection of medfly-infested cargo at US ports of entry over a year ago, the US phytosanitary authorities banned temporarily the large citrus exports from Valencia, Spain. As the US has expensive programmes in operation to remain medly-free, including various preventive SIT programmes, it cannot tolerate the import of infested fruit. In view of these developments, and in order to reduce insecticide use to protect the environment, the authorities of the Autonomous Province of Valencia decided in 2002 to gradually shift their medfly control strategy from conventional large scale aerial insecticide spraying to an integrated pest control approach including the SIT. In March 2002, FAO

  20. Application of radiation and radioisotopes for the management of insect pests of economic importance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article gives brief account of radiation and radioisotope applications in the field of insect pest management. Radiation has a direct application in controlling insect pests, through sterile insect techniques (SIT) and radiation disinfestations of food grains, whereas radioisotopes can be used in basic as well as applied studies in the field of insect physiology, ecology and metabolism. The successful implementation of SIT against New world screwworm fly and different fruit fly species has clearly demonstrated the usefulness of radiation in agriculture. Over the past 35 years, the joint FAO/IAEA committee has played a critical role in supporting member states in the development and application of SIT for the management of various economically important insect pests. BARC has developed SIT for the management of red palm weevil, Rhynchophorus ferrugineus Oliv, the most serious pest of coconut in India and date palms in Arabian countries. Now, through thematic BRNS project this technique is being evaluated under field conditions in collaboration with three Indian agricultural universities. Present status and future prospects of sterile insect technique for the area wide control of different insect species will be discussed in detail. (author)

  1. Farmers’ knowledge and perceptions of potato pests and their management in Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua Sikhu Okonya

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available As we initiate entomological research on potato (Solanum tuberosum L. in Uganda, there is need to understand farmers’ knowledge of existing insect pest problems and their management practices. Such information is important for designing a suitable intervention and successful integrated pest management (IPM strategy. A farm household survey using a structured questionnaire was conducted among 204 potato farmers in six districts of Uganda (i.e., Kabale, Kisoro, Mbale, Kapchorwa, Mubende, and Kyegegwa during August and September 2013. Diseases, insect pests, price fluctuations, and low market prices were the four highest ranked constraints in potato production, in order of decreasing importance. Cutworms (Agrotis spp., aphids (Myzus persicae (Sulzer, and potato tuber moth (Phthorimaea operculella (Zeller were the three most severe insect pests. Ants (Dorylis orantalis Westwood, whiteflies (Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius, and leafminer flies (Liriomyza huidobrensis (Blanchard were pests of moderate importance. Major yield losses are predominantly due to late blight (Phytophthora infestans (Mont. de Bary and reached 100% without chemical control in the districts of Kabale, Kisoro, Mbale, and Kapchorwa. On average, farmers had little to moderate knowledge about pest characteristics. The predominant control methods were use of fungicides (72% of respondents and insecticides (62% of respondents. On average, only 5% of the 204 farmers knew about insect pests and their natural enemies. This lack of knowledge calls for training of both farmers and extension workers in insect pest identification, their biology, and control. Empowering farmers with knowledge about insect pests is essential for the reduction of pesticide misuse and uptake of more environmentally friendly approaches like IPM. Field surveys would need follow-up in order to assess the actual field infestation rates and intensities of each insect pest and compare the results with the responses

  2. Dynamical Analysis of a Pest Management Model with Saturated Growth Rate and State Dependent Impulsive Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wencai Zhao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A new pest management mathematical model with saturated growth is proposed. The integrated pest management (IPM strategy by introducing two state dependent pulses into the model is considered. Firstly, we analyze singular points of the model qualitatively and get the condition for focus point. Secondly, by using geometry theory of impulsive differential equation, the existence and stability of periodic solution of the system are discussed. Lastly, some examples and numerical simulations are given to illustrate our results.

  3. Coupled Information Diffusion–Pest Dynamics Models Predict Delayed Benefits of Farmer Cooperation in Pest Management Programs

    OpenAIRE

    Rebaudo, François; Dangles, Olivier

    2011-01-01

    Worldwide, the theory and practice of agricultural extension system have been dominated for almost half a century by Rogers' "diffusion of innovation theory". In particular, the success of integrated pest management (IPM) extension programs depends on the effectiveness of IPM information diffusion from trained farmers to other farmers, an important assumption which underpins funding from development organizations. Here we developed an innovative approach through an agent-based model (ABM) com...

  4. Plant diseases and pests in Utah raspberries

    OpenAIRE

    Christensen, Sean

    2016-01-01

    Very little information exists on pathogens and pests that affect Utah raspberry production. In fact a survey of Utah raspberry growers at the 2015 USU Urban and Small Farms conference showed that 72% said the largest problem they had was with diseases and pests, and 71% of those did not know what the diseases actually were. Several viruses, bacteria, pests, and nutrient deficiencies can have a large influence on raspberry yield. This survey was designed to raise awareness among Utah raspb...

  5. 近10年来我国草原虫害生物防控综合配套技术的研究与推广进展%Integrated biocontrol of insect pests during the last 10 years in China:Research and practice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    洪军; 杜桂林; 旭疆; 何新天; 张焕强; 林峻

    2014-01-01

    草原虫害防治是农业部较早大规模组织开展的防灾减灾工作之一。在长期的实践工作中,草原虫害防治始终坚持“预防为主,综合防治”的植保方针,逐步建立了“以生物防治为主,化学防治为辅”的技术路线。2002年起,全国畜牧总站在全国牧区组织开展了《草原虫害生物防控综合配套技术推广应用》项目。该项目的实施带动了全国的草原害虫防治,为草原可持续发展提供了技术支撑。本文以该项目的进展为基础,简要总结介绍了草原害虫防治的实施背景、开展情况及建设成果,包括以生态系统平衡原理为指导,对虫害监测预警、生物防控和施药技术等进行集成创新与组装配套,使草原害虫密度长期控制在经济阈值以下,实现草原生态系统平衡等。%Control of Grassland insect pests is an example of important early disaster prevention and mitigation work by the Ministry of Agriculture,China.The grassland insect pest control policy was based on prevention first followed by integrated control.The long-term practice was to use biocontrol as the primary means of con-trol with chemical control used in a complimentary role.The establishment of biocontrol techniques for insect pests has been undertaken by the China Animal Industry Station since 2002 .Ecosystem balance was used as the main driver of policy in the program.Insect pest monitoring and early warning,biocontrol and pesticide appli-cation technology was utilized,and insect pest density maintained below the economic threshold level during this time.The achievements of the program have been recognized in the National Agricultural Harvest A-wards.The background,progress and major achievements of the program are introduced with the aim of infor-ming people about the current status of grassland insect pest control in China.

  6. Industrial and Institutional Pest Control. Sale Publication 4073.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wamsley, Mary Ann, Ed.; Vermeire, Donna M., Ed.

    This guide gives information needed to meet Environmental Protection Agency standards on industrial and institutional pest control, and to help prepare for certification. It gives descriptions and pictures of general insect pests, parasitic pests of man, occasional invaders, wood-destroying pests, stored product pests, vertebrates, and weeds. The…

  7. Thiamethoxam Seed Treatments Have No Impact on Pest Numbers or Yield in Cultivated Sunflowers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bredeson, Michael M; Lundgren, Jonathan G

    2015-12-01

    The use of neonicotinoid seed treatments is a nearly ubiquitous practice in sunflower (Helianthus annuus) pest management. Sunflowers have a speciose pest complex, but also harbor a diverse and abundant community of beneficial, nontarget organisms which may be negatively affected by pest management practices. Here, we investigate how the foliar and subterranean arthropod pest communities in sunflower fields were affected by a thiamethoxam seed treatment over three site years (two years on one farm, and another year at an additional field in the second year). Thiamethoxam and its metabolite clothianidin in leaf tissue were quantified throughout the growing season, and yield differences between treatments were measured. Across site years, foliar herbivores and key pests of sunflowers were unaffected by the seed treatment. Likewise, subterranean herbivores were unaffected. Thiamethoxam was measurable in leaf tissue through the R1 plant stage, while its metabolite clothianidin was detected throughout flowering (R6). No difference in sunflower yield was observed between treatments across site years. This research suggests that neonicotinoid seed treatments in sunflowers do not always provide economic benefits to farmers in the form of pest reductions or yield improvements. Future research should focus on sunflower integrated pest management strategies that limit nontarget effects of agrochemicals, while providing greater economic returns to farmers. PMID:26340223

  8. Biologically Based Methods for Pest Management in Agriculture under Changing Climates: Challenges and Future Directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casper Nyamukondiwa

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The current changes in global climatic regimes present a significant societal challenge, affecting in all likelihood insect physiology, biochemistry, biogeography and population dynamics. With the increasing resistance of many insect pest species to chemical insecticides and an increasing organic food market, pest control strategies are slowly shifting towards more sustainable, ecologically sound and economically viable options. Biologically based pest management strategies present such opportunities through predation or parasitism of pests and plant direct or indirect defense mechanisms that can all be important components of sustainable integrated pest management programs. Inevitably, the efficacy of biological control systems is highly dependent on natural enemy-prey interactions, which will likely be modified by changing climates. Therefore, knowledge of how insect pests and their natural enemies respond to climate variation is of fundamental importance in understanding biological insect pest management under global climate change. Here, we discuss biological control, its challenges under climate change scenarios and how increased global temperatures will require adaptive management strategies to cope with changing status of insects and their natural enemies.

  9. Radar, Insect Population Ecology, and Pest Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughn, C. R. (Editor); Wolf, W. (Editor); Klassen, W. (Editor)

    1979-01-01

    Discussions included: (1) the potential role of radar in insect ecology studies and pest management; (2) the potential role of radar in correlating atmospheric phenomena with insect movement; (3) the present and future radar systems; (4) program objectives required to adapt radar to insect ecology studies and pest management; and (5) the specific action items to achieve the objectives.

  10. Agricultural Plant Pest Control. Manual 93.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Agricultural Experiment Station.

    This training manual provides information needed to meet the minimum EPA standards for certification as a commercial applicator of pesticides for the agricultural plant pest control category. The text discusses the insect pests including caterpillars, beetles, and soil inhabiting insects; diseases and nematodes; and weeds. Consideration is given…

  11. Agricultural Plant Pest Control. Bulletin 763.

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, John C.; And Others

    This manual gives general information on plant pests and pesticides. First, the life-cycle and habits of some common insect pests are given. These include caterpillars, beetles and beetle larvae, and sucking insects. Next, plant diseases such as leaf diseases, wilts, root and crown rots, stem cankers, fruit rots, seed and seedling diseases, and…

  12. Training for Certification: Forest Pest Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Robert C., Comp.

    This Cooperative Extension Service publication from Mississippi State University is a training guide for commercial pesticide applicators. Focusing on forest pest control, this publication examines plant and animal pest control practices for southern tree species. Contents include: (1) identification of insects, diseases, and weed tree species;…

  13. Training for Certification: Ornamental & Turf Pest Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mississippi State Univ., State College. Cooperative Extension Service.

    This Cooperative Extension Service publication from Mississippi State University is a training guide for commercial pesticide applicators. Focusing on ornamental and turf plant pest control, this publication examines the control of plant diseases, insects, and weeds. The contents are divided into a section on ornamental pest control and one on…

  14. Termite Pest Control - Industrial. Manual 96.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Agricultural Experiment Station.

    This training manual provides information needed to meet the minimum EPA standards for certification as a commercial applicator of pesticides in the termite pest control category. The text discusses general pests, especially ants, and wood-destroying organisms such as termites, beetles, and fungi. (CS)

  15. Agricultural Animal Pest Control. Manual 90.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Agricultural Experiment Station.

    This training manual provides information needed to meet the minimum EPA standards for certification as a commercial applicator of pesticides in the agricultural animal pest control category. The text discusses pesticide hazards, application techniques, and pests of livestock such as mosquitoes, flies, grubs and lice. (CS)

  16. Training for Certification: Demonstration & Research Pest Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mississippi State Univ., State College. Cooperative Extension Service.

    This Cooperative Extension Service publication from Mississippi State University is a training guide for commercial pesticide applicators. Focusing on agricultural pest control, this publication includes a full range of topics from uses of pesticides for agricultural animal pest control to the toxicity of common pesticides to fish and bees.…

  17. Public Health Pest Control Category Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, James S.; Turmel, Jon P.

    This manual provides information needed to meet the standards for pesticide applicator certification. It presents pest control guidelines for those organisms of public health significance. Fact sheets with line drawings discuss pests such as cockroaches, bedbugs, lice, ants, beetles, bats, birds, and rodents. (CS)

  18. Potato cyst nematodes: pests of national importance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potato cyst nematodes (PCN; G. rostochiensis and G. pallida) are internationally-recognized quarantine pests and considered the most devastating pests of potatoes due to annual worldwide yield losses estimated at 12.2%. PCNs continue to spread throughout North America and were recently detected in I...

  19. Agricultural Animal Pest Control. Bulletin 767.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Maxcy P., Jr.

    Included in this training manual are descriptions and pictures of the following agricultural animal pests: mosquitoes, stable flies, horse flies and deer or yellow flies, house flies, horn flies, wound-infesting larvae, lice, mites, ticks, and bots and grubs. Information is given on the life-cycle and breeding habits of the pests. Methods of…

  20. Ornamental and Turf Pest Control. Bulletin 764.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowyer, Timothy H.; And Others

    This manual gives descriptions of and methods for control of diseases and insect pests of ornamental plants, weeds, and diseases and insect pests of turf plants. Included are diseases caused by fungi such as cankers, leaf galls, and rust; diseases caused by bacteria such as bacterial blight and crown gall; and diseases caused by nematodes and…

  1. Nitric oxide fumigation for postharvest pest control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitric oxide fumigation is effective against all arthropod pests at various life stages tested. Nine insect pests at various life stages and bulb mites were subjected to nitric oxide fumigation treatments under ultralow oxygen conditions of =50 ppm O2 in 1.9L glass jars as fumigation chambers. The ...

  2. Integrated Insect Control May Alter Pesticide Use Pattern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worthy, Ward

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the use of predators, parasites, bacteria, viruses, hormones, pheromones, and sterile-male release and insect-resistance imparting techniques in pest control. Concludes with comments from chemical pesticide companies as popular attitudes toward the integrated pest management. (CC)

  3. Arapaho National Wildlife Refuge Integrated Pesticide Management Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of the Integrated Pest Management Plan is to provide a comprehensive, environmentally sensitive approach to managing pests on the Arapaho National...

  4. Applying the sterile insect technique to the control of insect pests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The sterile insect technique (SIT) is basically a novel twentieth century approach to insect birth control. It is species specific and exploits the mate seeking behaviour of the insect. The basic principle is simple. Insects are mass reared in 'factories' and sexually sterilized by gamma rays from a 60Co source. The sterile insects are then released in a controlled fashion into nature. Matings between the sterile insects released and native insects produced no progeny. If enough of these matings take place, reproduction of the pest population decreases. With continued release, the pest population can be controlled and in some cases eradicated. In the light of the many important applications of the SIT worldwide and the great potential that SIT concepts hold for insect and pest control in developing countries, two special benefits should be stressed. Of greatest significance is the fact that the SIT permits suppression and eradication of insect pests in an environmentally harmless manner. It combines nuclear techniques with genetic approaches and, in effect, replaces intensive use of chemicals in pest control. Although chemicals are used sparingly at the outset in some SIT programmes to reduce the size of the pest population before releases of sterilized insects are started, the total amount of chemicals used in an SIT programme is a mere fraction of what would be used without the SIT. It is also of great importance that the SIT is not designed strictly for the eradication of pest species but can readily be used in the suppression of insect populations. In fact, the SIT is ideally suited for use in conjunction with other agricultural pest control practices such as the use of parasites and predators, attractants and cultural controls (e.g. ploughing under or destruction of crop residues) in integrated pest management programmes to achieve control at the lowest possible price and with a minimum of chemical contamination of the environment

  5. Chemical environment manipulation for pest insects control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenblatt, J. A.; Lewis, W. J.

    1983-01-01

    The chemical environment of pest species may be considered a habitat susceptible to management Management may be by means of manipulation of the environment of the pest for population suppression or for enhancement of natural enemies Examples of each are reviewed here Chemical stimuli influencing the behavior of phytophagous insects include host plant originated stimuli and pheromones The latter, especially sex pheromones, have proved most successful as tools for manipulation of pest population dynamics Factors influencing search behavior of natural enemies include habitat characteristics such as crop, associated plants and plant assemblages, host plant characteristics, influence of associated organisms, and characteristics of the searching entomophage Recent studies have shown potential for simultaneous management of a pest species and enhancement of natural enemies using pest pheromones

  6. Diseases and pests in biomass production systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The current status of disease and pest problems in willow and poplar biomass systems for energy within Canada, Sweden, the United Kingdom and the United States is described. The IEA Disease and Pest Activities within the recent Task XII (1995-1997), and previous Tasks since 1987, have provided outstanding opportunities for international co-operation which has served substantially to augment national research programmes. Work is described on recognizing different forms of an insect pest or pathogen and understanding the genetic basis of its variability, which is of fundamental importance in developing pest management strategies that exclude inputs of energy-rich materials such as pesticides. Options for more natural pest control are considered including breeding for resistance, plantation designs based on host genotype diversity and biological control 16 refs, 2 figs

  7. Toxins for Transgenic Resistance to Hemipteran Pests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryony C. Bonning

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The sap sucking insects (Hemiptera, which include aphids, whiteflies, plant bugs and stink bugs, have emerged as major agricultural pests. The Hemiptera cause direct damage by feeding on crops, and in some cases indirect damage by transmission of plant viruses. Current management relies almost exclusively on application of classical chemical insecticides. While the development of transgenic crops expressing toxins derived from the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt has provided effective plant protection against some insect pests, Bt toxins exhibit little toxicity against sap sucking insects. Indeed, the pest status of some Hemiptera on Bt-transgenic plants has increased in the absence of pesticide application. The increased pest status of numerous hemipteran species, combined with increased prevalence of resistance to chemical insecticides, provides impetus for the development of biologically based, alternative management strategies. Here, we provide an overview of approaches toward transgenic resistance to hemipteran pests.

  8. Plant breeding for resistance to insect pests: Considerations about the use of induced mutations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Panel was intended to stimulate proposals on specific plant breeding objectives, for immediate and long term solution. Nine papers considered the host plant resistance to particular insect pests in a variety of cases. The desirability of achieving some measure of pest control via the development of disease-resistant mutants was discussed. In its conclusions, the Panel stressed the need to consider host plant resistance as one of the primary lines of defense in all pest management programmes. Consequently, resistance to insects was recommended to become an integral part of plant breeding programmes. Preference might need to be given to developing insect resistance in those crop plants for which practical control is lacking or where current methods of pest control present critical environmental hazards. The roles of the IAEA and FAO in such projects is outlined. Guidelines and recommendations on mutation breeding for resistance to insects are given in an appendix

  9. Calibration of hydrological model with programme PEST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brilly, Mitja; Vidmar, Andrej; Kryžanowski, Andrej; Bezak, Nejc; Šraj, Mojca

    2016-04-01

    PEST is tool based on minimization of an objective function related to the root mean square error between the model output and the measurement. We use "singular value decomposition", section of the PEST control file, and Tikhonov regularization method for successfully estimation of model parameters. The PEST sometimes failed if inverse problems were ill-posed, but (SVD) ensures that PEST maintains numerical stability. The choice of the initial guess for the initial parameter values is an important issue in the PEST and need expert knowledge. The flexible nature of the PEST software and its ability to be applied to whole catchments at once give results of calibration performed extremely well across high number of sub catchments. Use of parallel computing version of PEST called BeoPEST was successfully useful to speed up calibration process. BeoPEST employs smart slaves and point-to-point communications to transfer data between the master and slaves computers. The HBV-light model is a simple multi-tank-type model for simulating precipitation-runoff. It is conceptual balance model of catchment hydrology which simulates discharge using rainfall, temperature and estimates of potential evaporation. Version of HBV-light-CLI allows the user to run HBV-light from the command line. Input and results files are in XML form. This allows to easily connecting it with other applications such as pre and post-processing utilities and PEST itself. The procedure was applied on hydrological model of Savinja catchment (1852 km2) and consists of twenty one sub-catchments. Data are temporary processed on hourly basis.

  10. Peste des Petits Ruminants Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, M D; Diallo, A; Lancelot, R; Libeau, G

    2016-01-01

    Peste des petits ruminants virus (PPRV) causes a severe contagious disease of sheep and goats and has spread extensively through the developing world. Because of its disproportionately large impact on the livelihoods of low-income livestock keepers, and the availability of effective vaccines and good diagnostics, the virus is being targeted for global control and eventual eradication. In this review we examine the origin of the virus and its current distribution, and the factors that have led international organizations to conclude that it is eradicable. We also review recent progress in the molecular and cellular biology of the virus and consider areas where further research is required to support the efforts being made by national, regional, and international bodies to tackle this growing threat. PMID:27112279

  11. Management of sugarcane insect pests through environment-friendly techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The environment ecofriendly techniques like cultural and biological control are effective to manage sugarcane insects like borers and sucking pests on an area-wide basis in the state of Tamil Nadu in India. Among the cultural practices for the management of shoot borer of sugarcane (Chilo infuscatellus Snell), a major pest of this region, planting in the early season of December-January proves to be more efficient, followed by a system of trash mulching on the ridges or raising intercrop pulses like green gram or black gram immediately after planting. The benefit-cost ratio in the trash mulching and intercropping systems was higher than in the sugarcane monocrop. The reduction of shoot borer in the intercropped system ranged from 45.8% to 51.4% while the reduction was 50.5% in the trash mulched system. Early season planted sugarcane was minimally infested by shoot borer and stray incidence was only recorded. Another cultural practice of increasing the sugarcane sett/seed rate, while planting at 20% over and above the normal recommended rate during the late season when the incidence of shoot borer is highest in this region, recorded reduction in infestation to the extent of 26.8% during the two seasons trials conducted from 2002-2004. Another effective cultural practice of removal of older and dried up leaves of sugarcane twice during 5th and 7th months after planting reduced sucking pests likes white fly (Aleurolobus barodensis Mask) nymphs by 42.1% and puparia by 63.9%; and leaf hopper (Pyrilla perpusilla Wlk.) to the extent of 66% respectively. Among the biocontrol techniques the release of the egg parasitoid Trichogramma chilonis Ishii (Trichogrammatidae: Hymenoptera) reared under artificial conditions, at fortnightly intervals at 2.5cc/ha six times commencing from 5th month stage of crop reduced internode borer (Chilo sacchariphagus indicus Kapur) only to the extent of 20%, which is the least among the other practices tested. The natural field parasitisation of

  12. Nonchemical management of soilborne pests in fresh market vegetable production systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chellemi, D O

    2002-12-01

    ABSTRACT Nonchemical methods including host resistance, organic amendments, crop rotation, soil solarization, and cultural practices have been used to control soilborne pests in fresh market vegetable production systems. Their suitability as alternatives to methyl bromide will depend on the approach to pest management used by the grower. Traditionally, methyl bromide is used in production systems that rely on the single application of a broad-spectrum biocide to disinfest soils prior to planting. Non-chemical methods are not suitable for a single tactic approach to pest management because they do not provide the same broad spectrum of activity or consistency as fumigation with methyl bromide. Nonchemical methods are compatible with an integrated pest management (IPM) approach, where multiple tactics are used to maintain damage from pests below an economic threshold while minimizing the impact to beneficial organisms. However, adoption of IPM is hindered by the paucity of economically feasible sampling programs and thresholds for soilborne pests and by a reluctance of growers to commit additional resources to the collection and management of biological information. A novel approach to the management of soilborne pests is to design the crop production system to avoid pest outbreaks. Using this "proactive" approach, a tomato production system was developed using strip-tillage into existing bahia-grass pasture. By minimizing inputs and disruption to the pasture, growers were able to reap the rotational benefits of bahiagrass without cultivating the rotational crop. While minimizing the need for interventive procedures, a proactive approach is difficult to integrate into existing crop production systems and will require several years of testing and validation.

  13. Evaluation of pest vulnerability of 'Benning' soybean value added and insect resistant near isogenic lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel-Foo, Michelle; All, John N; Boerma, H Roger

    2013-04-01

    Crop enhancement with value added traits may affect vulnerability to insects, and evaluating the susceptibility levels of the various value added traits in elite germplasm would aid in developing integrated pest management strategies. During 2007-2008, five 'Benning' soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr) lines with different value added nutritional traits and four insect resistant quantitative trait loci (QTL) lines were evaluated in an effort to determine their pest vulnerability under artificial and natural insect pest populations. The lines showed variable susceptibility to lepidopterous insect pests classified as defoliators and stem feeders in replicated greenhouse and field tests. The study was carried out in Athens and Midville, GA. The green cloverworm (Hypena scabra (F.)) was the most common lepidopteran defoliator occurring in the fields. Other caterpillar pests found included the soybean looper (Pseudoplusia includens (Walker)), the bollworm (Helicoverpa zea (Boddie)), and the velvetbean caterpillar (Anticarsia gemmatalis (Hübner)). Data indicated that there was no significantly increased pest susceptibility among the value added cultivars with improved nutritional qualities, with the insect resistant quantitative trait loci lines Benning M and Benning MGH consistently being less susceptible to lepidopterous (Noctuidae) leaf injury. PMID:23786071

  14. Use of biorational for the vegetable pest control in the north of Sinaloa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Berenice González Maldonado

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In Sinaloa the vegetable and cucurbits production are important agricultural activities, so each year a high volume of chemicalinsecticides are applied to pest control that attack these crops. This paper present the main pests insects in the region, as wellas an analysis about effects of biorational insecticides on these pests. Was found that for control of Bemisia argentifolii Bellows & Perring (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae is used Neem oil 0.2%., for kill nymphs of Bactericera cockerelli Sulc. (Homoptera: Psyllidae soursop Annona muricata L. (Annonales: Annonaceae at doses of 2500-5000 mg/L., for Liriomyza trifolii Burgess (Diptera: Agromyzidae neem seeds 2%., to Myzus persicae Sulzer (Hemiptera: Aphididae rapeseed oil at doses 920 g/L (2% v/v., to Frankliniella occidentalis Pergande (Thysanoptera: Thripidae spinosad (Conserve® 48-60 mg/L., and for Phthorimaea operculella Zeller (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae granular viruses (105 OBs/mL combined with neem (DalNeem TM emulsifiable oil and NeemAzal TM -T/S at doses of 8 mg/L, everyone. The use of these products and the dose depends on the type of pest and crop. In general these products cause insect mortality greater than 95%, besides having low toxicity on natural enemies, so that these can be used individually or in combination in integrated pest control schemes against vegetable pests, and also for disease vectors insects in the northern of Sinaloa.

  15. Pest Control in the Presence of Pest Suppression by Natural Enemies

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Wei; Swinton, Scott M.

    2006-01-01

    The control of pests by their natural enemies represents an important ecosystem service that maintains the stability of agroecosystems and has the potential to mitigate pest control costs both to private producers and to society. Extending the "economic threshold" concept, this paper proposes an "ecological economic threshold" for pesticide use that takes into account the implicit cost of injury to natural enemies. By explicitly accounting for natural pest suppression, the ecological economic...

  16. Nuclear technology in pest management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear energy has been greatly explored for its use in various disciplines of entomology related to agriculture, medicine and industry. Since the ravages of the insects especially in the tropical and subtropical zones of the world are particularly serious, insect control is essential in the production of crop, animal produce and protection from dreadful communicable diseases. Presently, biological and para-biological control programmes are receiving major prominence due to insecticidal ill effects on health and environment, and due to development of insecticidal resistance in pests. The exposure to ionizing radiation is now the principal method for inducing reproductive sterility in mass-reared insects. Irradiation of insects is a relatively straightforward process with reliable quality control procedures. Using radiation may offer other advantages, such as insignificant increase in temperature during the process, use of treated insects immediately after processing, no addition of any residues harmful to human health or environment, etc. Various pragmatic perspectives of utilization of radiation as a tool in entomological research studies, in relation to noxious insects as well as ecologically beneficial insects, are highlighted. (author)

  17. Global pest management program wins international award

    OpenAIRE

    Rich, Miriam Sommers

    2009-01-01

    An agricultural research program managed at Virginia Tech has won an international award for its work with pest-management practices that show economic benefits with minimal impact on health and the environment.

  18. Pest Management Guide: Field Crops, 2014

    OpenAIRE

    Herbert, D. Ames (David Ames), 1949-

    2014-01-01

    This 2014 Virginia Pest Management Guide provides the latest recommendations for regulations and basic information, livestock, disease and nematode management in field crops, insects, weeds control, and plant regulators.

  19. 19 CFR 12.31 - Plant pests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... SPECIAL CLASSES OF MERCHANDISE Wild Animals, Birds, and Insects § 12.31 Plant pests. The importation in a... fruits, and orchard, forest or shade trees, and of the eggs, pupae, or larvae of such insects, except...

  20. Pest repellent properties of ant pheromones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Offenberg, Joachim

    2012-01-01

    Many ant species are efficient control agents against a wide range of pest insects in many crops. They control pest insects via predation; however, ant communication is based on chemical cues which may be eavesdropped by potential prey and serve as chemical warning signals. Thus, the presence...... of ant pheromones may be sufficient to repel pest insects from ant territories. The study of ant semiochemicals is in its infancy, yet, evidence for their potential use in pest management is starting to build up. Pheromones from four of five tested ant species have been shown to deter herbivorous insect...... from the ants’ host plants. (i) Oecophylla smaragdina deposits disrupt chrysomelid (Rhyparida wallacei) feeding on a Thai mangrove, and (ii) deposits from O. longinoda repel ovipositing fruit flies (Bactrosera invadens and Ceratitis cosyra) from mango fruits in Benin. Also, deposits from two New World...

  1. Wheat Resistance to the Adult Insect of Sunn Pest, Eurigaster Integriceps Put

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nima Sanaey

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Sunn pest is one of the most serious pests of wheat and barley in Asia, North Africa and Eastern Europe. Using of resistant cultivars is an effective strategy for Integrated Pest Management (IPM. In order to identify the resistant wheat to sunn pest, 79 Iranian bread and durum wheat cultivarslines were evaluated for resistance to natural infestations of sunn pest in field conditions using CRD with four replications in Karaj in two cropping seasons. Analysis of variance revealed significant differences among the genotypes for overwintered density of the adult insect and spike damage. Based on density of overwintered adult insect, cultivar Darab 2 with an average of 12.6 insects per m2 had the highest density and was the most susceptible cultivar to pest damage and the cultivars Marvdasht, M-82-6 and Bezostaya with densities of one insect/m2 were the most resistant wheat genotypes. The density of overwintered adult insects in oat (resistant check was zero. Based on the results for spike damage, line S-83-13 with 80 damaged spikes per m2 and the two cultivars MV17 and Gaspard both with 10 damaged plants per m2 were identified as the most susceptible and the most resistant wheat genotypes, respectively. Oat showed no damage based on this index. Based on the results of this study, it can be deduced that adult insects decrease grain yield through a reduction to number of grains per spike and number of spikes/area. It was also determined that at this growth stage of the sunn pest, those cultivars, which produce late heading and early maturing, incur less damage, indicating that the sunn pest prefers those cultivars that produce plants with more height than the shorter varieties.

  2. Cotton in Benin: governance and pest management

    OpenAIRE

    Togbe, C.E.

    2013-01-01

    Key words: cotton, synthetic pesticides, neem oil (Azadirachta indica), Beauveria bassiana, Bacillus thuringiensis, field experiment, farmers’ participation   Pests are one of the main factors limiting cotton production worldwide. Most of the pest control strategies in cotton production rely heavily on the application of synthetic pesticides. The recurrent use of synthetic pesticides has large consequences for the environment (air, water, fauna, and flora) and human health. In cott...

  3. Insect and Pest Control Newsletter. No. 46

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This newsletter lists the FAO/IAEA meetings in the field of pest control held between September 1990 and February 1991 and provides very brief summaries of their contents. It also features a special report on the New World Screwworm in North Africa. An eradication programme, organized by the IAEA and the FAO and based on the sterile insect technique, was implemented, and as a result it is expected that the area will be declared free of the pest during autumn 1991

  4. Insect pests of stored grain products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The presence of insects in stored products is a worldwide recognized problem. In this report chemical and physical methods to control insect infestations in stored products are discussed. Special attention is given to the use of ionizing radiation to control insect pests in stored grains. The radiosensitivity of the most common insect pests at their different developmental stages is presented and discussed. The conclusions of this review are compiled in an executive summary. 62 refs

  5. Pest repelling properties of ant pheromones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Offenberg, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    Ants control pests via predation and physical deterrence; however, ant communication is based on chemical cues which may serve as warning signals to potential prey and other intruders. The presence of ant pheromones may, thus, be sufficient to repel pests from ant territories. This mini......-review shows that four out of five tested ant species deposit pheromones that repel herbivorous prey from their host plants....

  6. Pest repelling properties of ant pheromones

    OpenAIRE

    Offenberg, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    Ants control pests via predation and physical deterrence; however, ant communication is based on chemical cues which may serve as warning signals to potential prey and other intruders. The presence of ant pheromones may, thus, be sufficient to repel pests from ant territories. This mini-review shows that four out of five tested ant species deposit pheromones that repel herbivorous prey from their host plants.

  7. IPM Standards for Schools: A Program for Reducing Pest and Pesticide Risks in Schools and Other Sensitive Environments. Version 2.0.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Thomas A., Ed.

    This guide presents Integrated Pest Management (IPM) practice standards for educational facilities to help schools become certified in providing effective and safe pest control. The guide is divided into two parts with three modules each for both buildings and grounds. The first module addresses building the IPM foundation to meet all legal…

  8. Nonchemical pest control in China rice: a review

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Shiwen; Wang, Ling; Liu, Lianmeng; Fu, Qian; Zhu, Defeng

    2014-01-01

    Major pests such as blast, sheath blight, bacterial blight, plant hoppers, leaf folder, and stem borers occur in rice paddy fields. These pests cause high damage to the grain and straw yield. The application of high N fertilizer loads increases the predisposition of rice crops to be infected by pests. Many agrochemicals used to control pests lead to pest adaptation and resistance, loss of soil fertility and organic carbon, soil erosion, decreasing biodiversity, and desertification. Chemical f...

  9. Approaches in highly parameterized inversion - PEST++, a Parameter ESTimation code optimized for large environmental models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welter, David E.; Doherty, John E.; Hunt, Randall J.; Muffels, Christopher T.; Tonkin, Matthew J.; Schreuder, Willem A.

    2012-01-01

    An object-oriented parameter estimation code was developed to incorporate benefits of object-oriented programming techniques for solving large parameter estimation modeling problems. The code is written in C++ and is a formulation and expansion of the algorithms included in PEST, a widely used parameter estimation code written in Fortran. The new code is called PEST++ and is designed to lower the barriers of entry for users and developers while providing efficient algorithms that can accommodate large, highly parameterized problems. This effort has focused on (1) implementing the most popular features of PEST in a fashion that is easy for novice or experienced modelers to use and (2) creating a software design that is easy to extend; that is, this effort provides a documented object-oriented framework designed from the ground up to be modular and extensible. In addition, all PEST++ source code and its associated libraries, as well as the general run manager source code, have been integrated in the Microsoft Visual Studio® 2010 integrated development environment. The PEST++ code is designed to provide a foundation for an open-source development environment capable of producing robust and efficient parameter estimation tools for the environmental modeling community into the future.

  10. Dynamic Analysis of a Predator-Prey (Pest) Model with Disease in Prey and Involving an Impulsive Control Strategy

    OpenAIRE

    Min Zhao; Yanzhen Wang; Lansun Chen

    2012-01-01

    The dynamic behaviors of a predator-prey (pest) model with disease in prey and involving an impulsive control strategy to release infected prey at fixed times are investigated for the purpose of integrated pest management. Mathematical theoretical works have been pursuing the investigation of the local asymptotical stability and global attractivity for the semitrivial periodic solution and population persistent, which depicts the threshold expression of some critical parameters for carrying o...

  11. Late pest control in determinate tomato cultivars Controle de pragas tardias em cultivares de tomateiro de crescimento determinado

    OpenAIRE

    Arlindo Leal Boiça Júnior; Marcos Aurélio Anequini Macedo; Adalci Leite Torres; Marina Robles Angelini

    2007-01-01

    The usage of insecticidal plants and others insect resistant varieties can be strong allies to the Integrated Pest Management (IPM), being able to reduce the number of insecticides applications and to minimize its effect to the man and the environment.The following control techniques were compared in field conditions, investigating the late pest control of two determinate tomato cultivars: a) Conventional - sprayings of metamidophos, buprofezin, acephate, cipermetrin, abamectin, permetrin, te...

  12. Modelling approach for biological control of insect pest by releasing infected pest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan Yuanshun [Department of Mathematics and Physics, Chongqing Jiaotong University, Chongqing 400074 (China); Department of Applied Mathematics, Dalian University of Technology, Liaoning 116024 (China)], E-mail: ystan625@yahoo.com.cn; Chen Lansun [Department of Applied Mathematics, Dalian University of Technology, Liaoning 116024 (China); Minnan Science and Technology Institute, Fujian Normal University, 362332 Fujian (China)

    2009-01-15

    Models of biological control have a long history of theoretical development that have focused on the interactions between a predator and a prey. Here we have extended the classical epidemic model to include a continuous and impulsive pest control strategies by releasing the infected pests bred in laboratory. For the continuous model, the results imply that the susceptible pest goes to extinct if the threshold condition R{sub 0} < 1. While R{sub 0} > 1, the positive equilibrium of continuous model is globally asymptotically stable. Similarly, the threshold condition which guarantees the global stability of the susceptible pest-eradication periodic solution is obtained for the model with impulsive control strategy. Consequently, based on the results obtained in this paper, the control strategies which maintain the pests below an acceptably low level are discussed by controlling the release rate and impulsive period. Finally, the biological implications of the results and the efficiency of two control strategies are also discussed.

  13. Eradication of tephritid fruit fly pest populations: outcomes and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BACKGROUND: The number of insect eradication programmes is rising in response to globalisation. A database of arthropod and plant pathogen eradications covers 1050 incursion responses, with 928 eradication programmes on 299 pest and disease taxa in 104 countries (global eradication database b3.net.nz/gerda). METHODS: A subset of the database was assembled with 211 eradication or response programmes against 17 species of fruit flies (Tephritidae) in 31 countries, in order to investigate factors affecting the outcome. RESULTS: The failure rate for fruit fly eradication programmes was about 7%, with 0% for Ceratitis capitata (n=85 programmes) and 0% for two Anastrepha species (n=12 programmes), but 12% for 13 Bactrocera species (n=108 programmes). A number of intended eradication programmesagainst long-established populations were not initiated because of cost and other considerations, or evolved during the planning phase into suppression programmes. Cost was dependent on area, ranged from $US 0.1 million to $US 240 million and averaged about $US 12 million (normalised to $US in 2012). In addition to the routine use of surveillance networks, quarantine and fruit destruction, the key tactics used in eradication programmes were male annihilation, protein bait sprays (which can attract both sexes), fruit destruction and the sterile insect technique. CONCLUSIONS: Eradication success generally required the combination of several tactics applied on an area-wide basis. Because the likelihood of eradication declines with an increase in the area infested, it pays to invest in effective surveillance networks that allow early detection and delimitation while invading populations are small, thereby greatly favouring eradication success. (author)

  14. Pests, pesticide use and alternative options in European maize production: current status and future prospects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meissle, M.; Mouron, P.; Musa, T.; Weide, van der R.Y.; Groten, J.A.M.

    2010-01-01

    Political efforts are made in the European Union (EU) to reduce pesticide use and to increase the implementation of integrated pest management (IPM). Within the EU project ENDURE, research priorities on pesticide reduction are defined. Using maize, one of the most important crops in Europe, as a cas

  15. Predicting methyl iodide emission, soil concentration, and pest control in a two-dimensional chamber system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Due to ever increasing state and federal regulations, the future use of fumigants is predicted on negative environmental impacts while offering sufficient pest control efficacy. To foster the development of the best management practice (BMP), an integrated tool is needed to simultaneously predict fu...

  16. Building Blocks for School IPM: A Least-Toxic Pest Management Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crouse, Becky, Ed.; Owens, Kagan, Ed.

    This publication is a compilation of original and republished materials from numerous individuals and organizations working on pesticide reform and integrated pest management (IPM)--using alternatives to prevailing chemical-intensive practices. The manual provides comprehensive information on implementing school IPM, including a practical guide to…

  17. Integration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emerek, Ruth

    2004-01-01

    Bidraget diskuterer de forskellige intergrationsopfattelse i Danmark - og hvad der kan forstås ved vellykket integration......Bidraget diskuterer de forskellige intergrationsopfattelse i Danmark - og hvad der kan forstås ved vellykket integration...

  18. ECONOMIC ANALYSIS OF ALFALFA INTEGRATED MANAGEMENT PRACTICES

    OpenAIRE

    Ward, Clement E.; Dowdy, Alan K.; Berberet, Richard C.; Stritzke, Jimmie F.

    1990-01-01

    Integrated pest management (IMP) initially focused on insect pest control. More recently, IPM encompasses a broader concept of management, one which crosses several disciplinary boundaries. This article reports results of research dealing with four integrated management decisions for alfalfa (cultivar selection, inset control, weed control, and end-of-season harvest options.

  19. Insect and pest control newsletter. No. 57

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsetse and trypanosomosis are at the root of low agricultural productivity in Sub-Saharan Africa and the removal of this factor would be a major contributor for large- scale poverty reduction in this region. Whilst removal of the disease would allow other constraining issues to become priorities such as the presence of other disease, lack of feed, poor husbandry skills and lack of markets for dairy products, without the removal of the threat of trypanosomosis there can be no progress, and for many in this region, no way out of staying hungry. Significantly though, during the past five years there has been an increasing awareness that the final elimination of the tsetse fly from areas can be achieved through the integrated use of the sterile insect technique (SIT). Reduction of tsetse fly populations has always been achievable but not sustainable. The area-wide application of SIT offers a realistic, affordable and environmentally acceptable way to complete the task by eliminating the final remaining flies. Although the effective use of SIT for fly elimination requires a reduction of fly populations by around 95%, this has often been achieved but not sustained due to the recurrent cost and logistics of fly control. The fact that use of SIT can achieve final eradication of the fly and hence the disease has been dramatically demonstrated on the island of Zanzibar. Recognizing this fact and in response to the increasing problem of African trypanosomosis, the Heads of African States and Governments, at their 36th Summit Meeting in Lome, Togo, 10-12 July 2000, adopted a Decision on Proposal for Eradication of Tsetse Flies on the African Continent. In this decision, AHG/Dec.156 (XXXVI), the Assembly of countries that have initiated the application of the SIT for their pioneering effort, and invited the OAU to lead the establishment of a Pan- African Tsetse and Trypanosomosis Eradication Campaign (PATTEC). The Programme Against African Trypanosomosis (PAAT), which is a

  20. Make your trappings count: The mathematics of pest insect monitoring. Comment on “Multiscale approach to pest insect monitoring: Random walks, pattern formation, synchronization, and networks” by Petrovskii et al.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blasius, Bernd

    2014-09-01

    Since the beginnings of agriculture the production of crops is characterized by an ongoing battle between farmers and pests [1]. Already during biblical times swarms of the desert locust, Schistocerca gregaria, were known as major pest that can devour a field of corn within an hour. Even today, harmful organisms have the potential to threaten food production worldwide. It is estimated that about 37% of all potential crops are destroyed by pests. Harmful insects alone destroy 13%, causing financial losses in the agricultural industry of millions of dollars each year [2-4]. These numbers emphasize the importance of pest insect monitoring as a crucial step of integrated pest management [1]. The main approach to gain information about infestation levels is based on trapping, which leads to the question of how to extrapolate the sparse population counts at singularly disposed traps to a spatial representation of the pest species distribution. In their review Petrovskii et al. provide a mathematical framework to tackle this problem [5]. Their analysis reveals that this seemingly inconspicuous problem gives rise to surprisingly deep mathematical challenges that touch several modern contemporary concepts of statistical physics and complex systems theory. The review does not aim for a collection of numerical recipes to support crop growers in the analysis of their trapping data. Instead the review identifies the relevant biological and physical processes that are involved in pest insect monitoring and it presents the mathematical techniques that are required to capture these processes.

  1. Development of reference transcriptomes for the major field insect pests of cowpea: a toolbox for insect pest management approaches in west Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tolulope A Agunbiade

    Full Text Available Cowpea is a widely cultivated and major nutritional source of protein for many people that live in West Africa. Annual yields and longevity of grain storage is greatly reduced by feeding damage caused by a complex of insect pests that include the pod sucking bugs, Anoplocnemis curvipes Fabricius (Hemiptera: Coreidae and Clavigralla tomentosicollis Stål (Hemiptera: Coreidae; as well as phloem-feeding cowpea aphids, Aphis craccivora Koch (Hemiptera: Aphididae and flower thrips, Megalurothrips sjostedti Trybom (Thysanoptera: Thripidae. Efforts to control these pests remain a challenge and there is a need to understand the structure and movement of these pest populations in order to facilitate the development of integrated pest management strategies (IPM. Molecular tools have the potential to help facilitate a better understanding of pest populations. Towards this goal, we used 454 pyrosequencing technology to generate 319,126, 176,262, 320,722 and 227,882 raw reads from A. curvipes, A. craccivora, C. tomentosicollis and M. sjostedti, respectively. The reads were de novo assembled into 11,687, 7,647, 10,652 and 7,348 transcripts for A. curvipes, A. craccivora, C. tomentosicollis and M. sjostedti, respectively. Functional annotation of the resulting transcripts identified genes putatively involved in insecticide resistance, pathogen defense and immunity. Additionally, sequences that matched the primary aphid endosymbiont, Buchnera aphidicola, were identified among A. craccivora transcripts. Furthermore, 742, 97, 607 and 180 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs were respectively predicted among A. curvipes, A. craccivora, C. tomentosicollis and M. sjostedti transcripts, and will likely be valuable tools for future molecular genetic marker development. These results demonstrate that Roche 454-based transcriptome sequencing could be useful for the development of genomic resources for cowpea pest insects in West Africa.

  2. Development of reference transcriptomes for the major field insect pests of cowpea: a toolbox for insect pest management approaches in west Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agunbiade, Tolulope A; Sun, Weilin; Coates, Brad S; Djouaka, Rousseau; Tamò, Manuele; Ba, Malick N; Binso-Dabire, Clementine; Baoua, Ibrahim; Olds, Brett P; Pittendrigh, Barry R

    2013-01-01

    Cowpea is a widely cultivated and major nutritional source of protein for many people that live in West Africa. Annual yields and longevity of grain storage is greatly reduced by feeding damage caused by a complex of insect pests that include the pod sucking bugs, Anoplocnemis curvipes Fabricius (Hemiptera: Coreidae) and Clavigralla tomentosicollis Stål (Hemiptera: Coreidae); as well as phloem-feeding cowpea aphids, Aphis craccivora Koch (Hemiptera: Aphididae) and flower thrips, Megalurothrips sjostedti Trybom (Thysanoptera: Thripidae). Efforts to control these pests remain a challenge and there is a need to understand the structure and movement of these pest populations in order to facilitate the development of integrated pest management strategies (IPM). Molecular tools have the potential to help facilitate a better understanding of pest populations. Towards this goal, we used 454 pyrosequencing technology to generate 319,126, 176,262, 320,722 and 227,882 raw reads from A. curvipes, A. craccivora, C. tomentosicollis and M. sjostedti, respectively. The reads were de novo assembled into 11,687, 7,647, 10,652 and 7,348 transcripts for A. curvipes, A. craccivora, C. tomentosicollis and M. sjostedti, respectively. Functional annotation of the resulting transcripts identified genes putatively involved in insecticide resistance, pathogen defense and immunity. Additionally, sequences that matched the primary aphid endosymbiont, Buchnera aphidicola, were identified among A. craccivora transcripts. Furthermore, 742, 97, 607 and 180 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were respectively predicted among A. curvipes, A. craccivora, C. tomentosicollis and M. sjostedti transcripts, and will likely be valuable tools for future molecular genetic marker development. These results demonstrate that Roche 454-based transcriptome sequencing could be useful for the development of genomic resources for cowpea pest insects in West Africa. PMID:24278221

  3. IPM STRATEGIES AGAINST MAJOR INSECT PEST OF RICE ECOSYSTEM IN MEGHALAYA: A BIO-RATIONAL APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PRITIN P. SONTAKKE *

    2014-10-01

    chemical control methods are now gaining importance day by day.Integrated Pest  Management  (IPM  has  emerged  as  a  science-based  approach  to minimize the risk associated  with  the use of pesticides. Both  the developed and  developing  countries  have  taken  major  initiatives  to  promote  IPM  in principal agriculture crops. Present communication is mainly focused on IPM strategies for the management of insect pest in rice ecosystem.

  4. Insect pest control newsletter. No. 63

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Second International Conference on Areawide Insect Pest Control sponsored by FAO and IAEA will be held from 9 to 13 May, 2005 in Vienna, Austria. This conference will provide a forum for the presentation of scientific papers dealing with areawide insect management programmes, including those applying the Sterile Insect Technique (SIT) and will include significant time for plenary discussion. The framework of the conference is being developed and the announcement with details of the Conference can be found under http://www.pub.iaea.org/MTCD/Meetings/Meetings2005.asp. It is planned to hold several Research Coordination Meetings in conjunction with this meeting. The Interregional Training Course on The Use of the Sterile Insect and Related Techniques for the Integrated Areawide Management of Insect Pests, was held from 4 May to 1 June 2004 in Gainesville, Florida, USA. This is a unique course that provides participants with a complete overview of all aspects related to areawide and SIT operational programmes. Both USA and external lecturers participated with an adequate balance between theory and practical laboratory and field exercises. Third, the SIT programme in Madeira is in negotiations with a private company regarding some type of partnership to ensure sustainability of the programme when EC funding comes to an end. These developments have been followed very closely by the sub-programme and we have been involved in providing advice, developing collaborative links and interacting at the R and D and technology transfer levels. There will be ample scope for further collaboration when these initiatives become fully realized. The fifth meeting of the Working Group on Fruit Flies of the Western Hemisphere (WGFFWH) took place in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, from 16 to 21 May 2004 and more than 200 participants attended. The meeting has a very unique format where scientists, action programme managers and the industry interact, greatly encouraging discussions and

  5. Insect and pest control newsletter. No. 60

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SIT methodologies have not been developed for many of the major potential invasive pest species for which it could play an important role in eradicating incipient outbreaks. Among the USDA-APHIS Exotic Pest Arthropod List for the USA, which highlights 100 high-risk pests, ca. fifty percent of this worst of the worst list are from the order Lepidoptera. Many of these Lepidoptera are not only a threat to the US but also to many other regions of the world. Nevertheless, research to develop SIT for these high risk, exotic lepidopteran pests is lacking in most cases (Asian gypsy moth being an exception). Cooperative efforts are needed to develop appropriate response strategies that would include eradication technologies in advance of invasive lepidopteran pest introductions. In collaboration with USDA scientists James Carpenter, Ken Bloem and Stephanie Bloem, FAO/IAEA has been supporting research and facilitating co-operation among scientists of different countries to develop F1 Sterility as a proactive approach for dealing with two such potential invasive lepidopteran pests. Because F1 Sterility produces competitive insects and has been reported in all lepidopteran species investigated, these studies should serve as useful models for half of the species on the 'Worst of the Worst' list. One is the false codling moth, Cryptophlebia leucotreta, which features prominently on the 'Worst of the Worst' list. It is a polyphagous key pest in South Africa and many regional plant protection organizations have expressed concern of the spread of this damaging pest as a direct result of increased international trade. Under a multi-country and multi-agency effort mass rearing methods are being improved in South Africa, and radiation biology studies are being refined to determine the optimum dose of radiation to induce F1 Sterility for use in an SIT programme as an eradication tool should this pest be introduced into a foreign country. Another good example of our ill-preparedness to

  6. Urban pest management. A Madrid case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibon Tamayo Uria

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Citizens’ reports of sightings of undesirable animals are a common component of pest control programmes in a city. For this reason, local authorities tend to develop procedures for the capture and analysis of the resulting data sets based on these reported sightings. These procedures in turn contribute to the development of other initiatives aimed at improving public health conditions. The study presented here focuses on the methodology designed and implemented by the Madrid City Council for controlling and managing the presence of urban pests.The long experience (over 100 years of the City Council and its commitment to the incorporation of new technologies have allowed a number of important lessons to be learnt in pest control and management, which may be useful as a guide and model for cities where public health services have not yet incorporated these methods.

  7. INDIGENOUS KNOWLEDGE AND MANAGEMENT OF YAM (DIOSCOREA CAYENENSIS - DIOSCOREA ROTUNDATA COMPLEX PESTS AND DISEASES IN NORTHERN BENIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loko Y.L

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Yam (Dioscorea spp.production in Northern Benin is severely affected by pests and diseases resulting in poor yields and cultivars diversity loss in spite of the importanceof thiscommodity.In order to develop efficient integrated pestsand diseases management approaches, twenty seven (27 villages of the yam production zone of northern Benin were surveyed using participatory research appraisal to document farmers’indigenous knowledge, and traditional management practices of yam pests and diseases. Results indicated that farmers have good knowledge of the yam pests and diseases that were even reported as the third most important production constraints in the study area. Among the pests and diseases nematodes, termites, mealybugs and wilt diseases were the most signaled. Farmers surveyed have traditional methods for mealybugs but nothing for the other pests and diseases apart from the use of resistant/tolerant cultivars. An undetermined disease locally called Ban was reported as expanding at alarming rate throughout villages and yam fields seriously affecting the food quality of the tubers. Urgent intervention zones were identified with multivariate analysis and recommended to the national protection service. The sensitization of the yam producers of the necessity of treating both soil and tuber seeds before planting, the development and the use of pests and diseases tolerant cultivars were proposed as management strategies. Also, the extension of the study to other yam producing regions of the country for identifying more cultivars tolerant to pests and diseases was recommended.

  8. Monthly forecasting of agricultural pests in Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschi, M.; Dubrovsky, M.; Spirig, C.; Samietz, J.; Calanca, P.; Weigel, A. P.; Fischer, A. M.; Rotach, M. W.

    2012-04-01

    Given the repercussions of pests and diseases on agricultural production, detailed forecasting tools have been developed to simulate the degree of infestation depending on actual weather conditions. The life cycle of pests is most successfully predicted if the micro-climate of the immediate environment (habitat) of the causative organisms can be simulated. Sub-seasonal pest forecasts therefore require weather information for the relevant habitats and the appropriate time scale. The pest forecasting system SOPRA (www.sopra.info) currently in operation in Switzerland relies on such detailed weather information, using hourly weather observations up to the day the forecast is issued, but only a climatology for the forecasting period. Here, we aim at improving the skill of SOPRA forecasts by transforming the weekly information provided by ECMWF monthly forecasts (MOFCs) into hourly weather series as required for the prediction of upcoming life phases of the codling moth, the major insect pest in apple orchards worldwide. Due to the probabilistic nature of operational monthly forecasts and the limited spatial and temporal resolution, their information needs to be post-processed for use in a pest model. In this study, we developed a statistical downscaling approach for MOFCs that includes the following steps: (i) application of a stochastic weather generator to generate a large pool of daily weather series consistent with the climate at a specific location, (ii) a subsequent re-sampling of weather series from this pool to optimally represent the evolution of the weekly MOFC anomalies, and (iii) a final extension to hourly weather series suitable for the pest forecasting model. Results show a clear improvement in the forecast skill of occurrences of upcoming codling moth life phases when incorporating MOFCs as compared to the operational pest forecasting system. This is true both in terms of root mean squared errors and of the continuous rank probability scores of the

  9. Manipulating behaviour with substrate-borne vibrations--potential for insect pest control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polajnar, Jernej; Eriksson, Anna; Lucchi, Andrea; Anfora, Gianfranco; Virant-Doberlet, Meta; Mazzoni, Valerio

    2015-01-01

    This review presents an overview of the potential use of substrate-borne vibrations for the purpose of achieving insect pest control in the context of integrated pest management. Although the importance of mechanical vibrations in the life of insects has been fairly well established, the effect of substrate-borne vibrations has historically been understudied, in contrast to sound sensu stricto. Consequently, the idea of using substrate-borne vibrations for pest control is still in its infancy. This review therefore focuses on the theoretical background, using it to highlight potential applications in a field environment, and lists the few preliminary studies that have been or are being performed. Conceptual similarities to the use of sound, as well as limitations inherent in this approach, are also noted. PMID:24962656

  10. Potential for widespread application of biological control of stored-product pests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lise Stengaard

    2007-01-01

    Biological control of stored product pests has substantial potential in Europe". This is essentially the conclusion of the activities of a European working group funded by the COST system, an intergovernmental networking system. Working group 4 of COST action 842 (2000-2005) focussed on biological...... control of stored-product pests and has considered a number of existing and potential fields for application of biological control. Three situations were identified where biological control would be a valuable component of integrated pest management: (1) Empty room treatment against stored-product mites......, beetles and moths; (2) Preventative treatment of bulk commodities against weevils (Sitophilus spp.) and storage mites; (3) Preventative application of egg-parasitoids against moths in packaged products. Development of methods for biological control and of mass production of natural enemies...

  11. Pheromone-Based Pest Management in China: Past, Present, and Future Prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Gen Zhong; Zhu, Junwei Jerry

    2016-07-01

    Semiochemical-based pest management technology has been widely used to monitor and control insect pests in agricultural, forestry, and public health sectors in the western world. It became a popular tool in the early 1970s with tremendous efforts in developing environment-friendly control technologies for the integrated pest management. However, in China, similar research lagged 15 to 20 years and was not initiated until the late 1980s. In this review, we present the early history of pheromone research that has led to the current practical applications in China, particularly in the development of pheromone-based pest management products. We also provide information regarding the current status of pheromone-based product manufacturing, marketing, and regulatory issues related to local semiochemical industries, which may be useful to other international companies interested in pursuing business in China. In addition, we share some research topics that represent new directions of the present pheromone research to explore novel tools for advancing semiochemical-based pest management in China.

  12. Assessing the impact of arthropod natural enemies on crop pests at the field scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macfadyen, Sarina; Davies, Andrew P; Zalucki, Myron P

    2015-02-01

    There are many reasons why it is important that we find ways to conserve, and better utilize natural enemies of invertebrate crop pests. Currently, measures of natural enemy impact are rarely incorporated into studies that purport to examine pest control. Most studies examine pest and natural enemy presence and/or abundance and then qualitatively infer impact. While this provides useful data to address a range of ecological questions, a measure of impact is critical for guiding pest management decision-making. Often some very simple techniques can be used to obtain an estimate of natural enemy impact. We present examples of field-based studies that have used cages, barriers to restrict natural enemy or prey movement, direct observation of natural enemy attack, and sentinel prey items to estimate mortality. The measure of natural enemy impact used in each study needs to be tailored to the needs of farmers and the specific pest problems they face. For example, the magnitude of mortality attributed to natural enemies may be less important than the timing and consistency of that mortality between seasons. Tailoring impact assessments will lead to research outcomes that do not simply provide general information about how to conserve natural enemies, but how to use these natural enemies as an integral part of decision-making.

  13. Pheromone-Based Pest Management in China: Past, Present, and Future Prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Gen Zhong; Zhu, Junwei Jerry

    2016-07-01

    Semiochemical-based pest management technology has been widely used to monitor and control insect pests in agricultural, forestry, and public health sectors in the western world. It became a popular tool in the early 1970s with tremendous efforts in developing environment-friendly control technologies for the integrated pest management. However, in China, similar research lagged 15 to 20 years and was not initiated until the late 1980s. In this review, we present the early history of pheromone research that has led to the current practical applications in China, particularly in the development of pheromone-based pest management products. We also provide information regarding the current status of pheromone-based product manufacturing, marketing, and regulatory issues related to local semiochemical industries, which may be useful to other international companies interested in pursuing business in China. In addition, we share some research topics that represent new directions of the present pheromone research to explore novel tools for advancing semiochemical-based pest management in China. PMID:27481347

  14. Perceived damage and areas of needed research for wildlife pests of California agriculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Roger A; Salmon, Terrell P; Schmidt, Robert H; Timm, Robert M

    2014-06-01

    Many wildlife species cause extensive damage to a variety of agricultural commodities in California, with estimates of damage in the hundreds of millions annually. Given the limited availability of resources to solve all human-wildlife conflicts, we should focus management efforts on issues that provide the greatest benefit to agricultural commodities in California. This survey provides quantitative data on research needs to better guide future efforts in developing more effective, practical and appropriate methods for managing these species. We found that ground squirrels, pocket gophers, birds, wild pigs, coyotes and voles were the most common agricultural wildlife pest species in California. The damage caused by these species could be quite high, but varied by agricultural commodity. For most species, common forms of damage included loss of crop production and direct death of the plant, although livestock depredation was the greatest concern for coyotes. Control methods used most frequently and those deemed most effective varied by pest species, although greater advancements in control methods were listed as a top research priority for all species. Collectively, the use of toxicants, biocontrol and trapping were the most preferred methods for control, but this varied by species. In general, integrated pest management practices were used to control wildlife pests, with a special preference for those approaches that were efficacious and quick and inexpensive to apply. This information and survey design should be useful in establishing research and management priorities for wildlife pest species in California and other similar regions. PMID:24952967

  15. Demystifying farmers' entomological and pest management knowledge: A methodology for assessing the impacts on knowledge from IPM-FFS and NES interventions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Price, L.

    2001-01-01

    Enhancing the environmental soundness of agricultural practices, particularly in high input systems, is of increasing concern to those involved in agricultural research and development. The Integrated Pest Management Farmer Field School, which is based on farmer participatory environmental education

  16. Prioritizing the risk of plant pests by clustering methods; self-organising maps, k-means and hierarchical clustering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Worner

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available For greater preparedness, pest risk assessors are required to prioritise long lists of pest species with potential to establish and cause significant impact in an endangered area. Such prioritization is often qualitative, subjective, and sometimes biased, relying mostly on expert and stakeholder consultation. In recent years, cluster based analyses have been used to investigate regional pest species assemblages or pest profiles to indicate the risk of new organism establishment. Such an approach is based on the premise that the co-occurrence of well-known global invasive pest species in a region is not random, and that the pest species profile or assemblage integrates complex functional relationships that are difficult to tease apart. In other words, the assemblage can help identify and prioritise species that pose a threat in a target region. A computational intelligence method called a Kohonen self-organizing map (SOM, a type of artificial neural network, was the first clustering method applied to analyse assemblages of invasive pests. The SOM is a well known dimension reduction and visualization method especially useful for high dimensional data that more conventional clustering methods may not analyse suitably. Like all clustering algorithms, the SOM can give details of clusters that identify regions with similar pest assemblages, possible donor and recipient regions. More important, however SOM connection weights that result from the analysis can be used to rank the strength of association of each species within each regional assemblage. Species with high weights that are not already established in the target region are identified as high risk. However, the SOM analysis is only the first step in a process to assess risk to be used alongside or incorporated within other measures. Here we illustrate the application of SOM analyses in a range of contexts in invasive species risk assessment, and discuss other clustering methods such as k

  17. Impact of five insecticides used to control citrus pests on the parasitoid Ageniaspis citricola Longvinovskaya (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Morais, Matheus Rovere; Zanardi, Odimar Zanuzo; Rugno, Gabriel Rodrigo; Yamamoto, Pedro Takao

    2016-07-01

    The parasitoid Ageniaspis citricola Longvnovskaya is a main biological control agent of the citrus leafminer Phyllocnistis citrella Stainton, an insect pest that causes considerable damage to citrus worldwide. However, the use of pesticides to control arthropod pests can reduce the effectiveness of parasitoids and disrupt integrated pest management in citrus groves. This study evaluated the impact on A. citricola of five insecticides that are used to control arthropod pests in citrus. Our results indicated that imidacloprid, chlorpyrifos, bifenthrin and β-cyfluthrin were harmful (mortality >89 %) to A. citricola adults; whereas abamectin did not cause significant mortality and was considered harmless to the parasitoid. In addition to causing high mortality, imidacloprid and bifenthrin were considered moderately persistent, because they caused impacts of these insecticides on the A. citricola parasitoid. PMID:27146672

  18. Stage-Structured Impulsive SI Model for Pest Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruiqing Shi

    2007-01-01

    stability of the pest-eradication periodic solution (0,0,I˜(t, and a condition for the permanence of the system. At last, a brief discussion shows that our results will be helpful for pest management.

  19. A theoretical approach on controlling agricultural pest by biological controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Prasanta Kumar; Jana, Soovoojeet; Kar, T K

    2014-03-01

    In this paper we propose and analyze a prey-predator type dynamical system for pest control where prey population is treated as the pest. We consider two classes for the pest namely susceptible pest and infected pest and the predator population is the natural enemy of the pest. We also consider average delay for both the predation rate i.e. predation to the susceptible pest and infected pest. Considering a subsystem of original system in the absence of infection, we analyze the existence of all possible non-negative equilibria and their stability criteria for both the subsystem as well as the original system. We present the conditions for transcritical bifurcation and Hopf bifurcation in the disease free system. The theoretical evaluations are demonstrated through numerical simulations.

  20. Insect Pests of Field Crops. MP-28.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhardt, Chris C.

    This document addresses the principles of field crop insect control through biological, mechanical, and chemical processes. Identification, life history, damage, pesticides, pesticide use and environmental considerations are presented for the major pests of corn, alfalfa, beans, small grains, sugar beets, and potatoes. Each section is accompanied…

  1. Insect and pest control newsletter. No. 56

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Newsletter announces research coordination meetings, status of existing research coordinated research programmes on the use of nuclear applications such as the sterile insect technique (SIT) in insect and pest control. Training courses as well as new coordinated research programmes in the pipeline are also highlighted

  2. 1976 Commercial Vegetable Pest Control Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacNab, A. A.; And Others

    This guide contains pest control information for commercial vegetable production. It was prepared for agricultural supply dealers, extension agents, fieldmen, and growers. It gives general precautions, information on seed treatment, growing disease-free seedlings and transplants, general soil insect control, general weed control, and spraying…

  3. Right Of Way Pest Control. Manual 88.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Agricultural Experiment Station.

    This training manual provides information needed to meet the minimum EPA standards for certification as a commercial applicator of pesticides in the right-of-way pest control category. The text discusses types of vegetation, the nature of herbicides, application methods, use for specific situations, and safety precautions. (CS)

  4. Training for Certification: Aquatic Pest Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wamsley, Mary Ann, Ed.; Vermeire, Donna M., Ed.

    This Cooperative Extension Service publication from Mississippi State University is a training guide for commercial applicators. Weed control, vertebrate pest control, and environmental considerations and restrictions are the three major parts of the document. The weed control section discusses non-pesticide, mechanical, and biological control as…

  5. Insect and pest control newsletter. No. 55

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Newsletter announces research coordination meetings, status of existing research coordinated research programmes on the use of nuclear applications such as the sterile insect technique (SIT) in insect and pest control. Training courses as well as new coordinated research programmes in the pipeline are also highlighted

  6. Insect and pest control newsletter. No. 53

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Newsletter announces research coordination meetings, status of existing research coordinated research programmes on the use of nuclear applications such as the sterile insect technique (SIT) in insect and pest control. Training courses as well as new coordinated research programmes in the pipeline are also highlighted

  7. Insect and pest control newsletter. No. 50

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Newsletter announces research coordination meetings, status of existing research coordinated research programmes on the use of nuclear applications such as the sterile insect technique (SIT) in insect and pest control. Training courses as well as new coordinated research programmes in the pipeline are also highlighted

  8. Insect and pest control newsletter. No. 51

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Newsletter announces research coordination meetings, status of existing research coordinated research programmes on the use of nuclear applications such as the sterile insect technique (SIT) in insect and pest control. Training courses as well as new coordinated research programmes in the pipeline are also highlighted

  9. Pest management update on sunflower midge

    Science.gov (United States)

    The sunflower midge (Contarinia schulzi) is a serious insect pest of sunflower, causing bud and head deformation that lead to poor seed development, and in many cases no seed development. This presentation describes the life cycle of the sunflower midge and shows images of infested sunflower heads. ...

  10. Aquatic Pest Control. Sale Publication 4071.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wamsley, Mary Ann, Ed.; Vermeire, Donna M., Ed.

    The information in this manual applies to control of aquatic pests in recreational waters, agricultural reservoirs, ornamental ponds, coastal bays, estuaries and channels, and drinking water reservoirs. Mechanical, cultural, biological, and chemical control methods are discussed. The majority of the material is devoted to weed control in static…

  11. Insect and pest control newsletter. No. 52

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Newsletter announces research coordination meetings, status of existing research coordinated research programmes on the use of nuclear applications such as the sterile insect technique (SIT) in insect and pest control. Training courses as well as new coordinated research programmes in the pipeline are also highlighted

  12. Insect and pest control newsletter. No. 54

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Newsletter announces research coordination meetings, status of existing research coordinated research programmes on the use of nuclear applications such as the sterile insect technique (SIT) in insect and pest control. Training courses as well as new coordinated research programmes in the pipeline are also highlighted

  13. Modern Stored-Product Insect Pest Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hagstrum David William

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Stored-product entomologists have a variety of new monitoring, decision-making, biological, chemical, and physical pest management tools available to them. Two types of stored-product insect populations are of interest: insects of immediate economic importance infesting commodities, and insects that live in food residues in equipment and facilities. The sampling and control methods change as grain and grain products move from field to consumer. There are also some changes in the major insect pest species to take into consideration. In this review, we list the primary insect pests at each point of the marketing system, and indicate which sampling methods and control strategies are most appropriate. Economic thresholds for insect infestation levels developed for raw commodity storage, processing plants, and retail business allow sampling-based pest management to be done before insect infestations cause economic injury. Taking enough samples to have a representative sample (20-30 samples will generally provide enough information to classify a population as above or below an economic threshold.

  14. Biotechnology and Pest Resistance: An Economic Assessment of Refuges

    OpenAIRE

    Hurley, Terrance M.; Babcock, Bruce A.; Hellmich, Richard L.

    1997-01-01

    Biologists now engineer transgenic crop varieties that offer farmers a new tool for effectively managing pests. Concern over pest resistance, however, has prompted the Environmental Protection Agency to require resistance management plans. This paper develops an economic model of pest management with pest resistance to estimate the constant proportion of cropland planted in refuge that maximizes farm income over a fixed planning horizon. Results indicate a clear economic tradeoff between the ...

  15. 7 CFR 319.40-11 - Plant pest risk assessment standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... article is to be exported. A plant pest that meets one of the following criteria is a quarantine pest and... pest risk, based on the available biological information and demonstrated plant pest importance....

  16. Comparing conventional and biotechnology-based pest management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pest management has changed dramatically during the past 15 years by the introduction of transgenes into crops for the purpose of pest management. Transgenes for herbicide resistance or for production of one or more Bt toxins are the predominant pest management traits currently available. These two ...

  17. The Cuba-Florida plant-pest pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Penca, Cory; Adams, Damian C.; Huler, Jiri

    2016-01-01

    Recent shifts in US policies towards Cuba suggest a relaxation or lifting of the embargo may occur in the near future. With the prospects of open travel and trade with Cuba come concerns over the introduction of agricultural pests. In an effort to assess these concerns the distribution-based introduction risk of pests listed in the 2015 Cooperative Agricultural Pest Survey’s (CAPS) list of priority pests of economic and environmental importance is reviewed. Of the 59 pests on the CAPS priorit...

  18. Preference and Prey Switching in a Generalist Predator Attacking Local and Invasive Alien Pests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaworski, Coline C.; Bompard, Anaïs; Genies, Laure; Amiens-Desneux, Edwige; Desneux, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    Invasive pest species may strongly affect biotic interactions in agro-ecosystems. The ability of generalist predators to prey on new invasive pests may result in drastic changes in the population dynamics of local pest species owing to predator-mediated indirect interactions among prey. On a short time scale, the nature and strength of such indirect interactions depend largely on preferences between prey and on predator behavior patterns. Under laboratory conditions we evaluated the prey preference of the generalist predator Macrolophus pygmaeus Rambur (Heteroptera: Miridae) when it encounters simultaneously the local tomato pest Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) and the invasive alien pest Tuta absoluta (Meyrick) (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae). We tested various ratios of local vs. alien prey numbers, measuring switching by the predator from one prey to the other, and assessing what conditions (e.g. prey species abundance and prey development stage) may favor such prey switching. The total predation activity of M. pygmaeus was affected by the presence of T. absoluta in the prey complex with an opposite effect when comparing adult and juvenile predators. The predator showed similar preference toward T. absoluta eggs and B. tabaci nymphs, but T. absoluta larvae were clearly less attacked. However, prey preference strongly depended on prey relative abundance with a disproportionately high predation on the most abundant prey and disproportionately low predation on the rarest prey. Together with the findings of a recent companion study (Bompard et al. 2013, Population Ecology), the insight obtained on M. pygmaeus prey switching may be useful for Integrated Pest Management in tomato crops, notably for optimal simultaneous management of B. tabaci and T. absoluta, which very frequently co-occur on tomato. PMID:24312646

  19. Preference and prey switching in a generalist predator attacking local and invasive alien pests.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coline C Jaworski

    Full Text Available Invasive pest species may strongly affect biotic interactions in agro-ecosystems. The ability of generalist predators to prey on new invasive pests may result in drastic changes in the population dynamics of local pest species owing to predator-mediated indirect interactions among prey. On a short time scale, the nature and strength of such indirect interactions depend largely on preferences between prey and on predator behavior patterns. Under laboratory conditions we evaluated the prey preference of the generalist predator Macrolophus pygmaeus Rambur (Heteroptera: Miridae when it encounters simultaneously the local tomato pest Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae and the invasive alien pest Tuta absoluta (Meyrick (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae. We tested various ratios of local vs. alien prey numbers, measuring switching by the predator from one prey to the other, and assessing what conditions (e.g. prey species abundance and prey development stage may favor such prey switching. The total predation activity of M. pygmaeus was affected by the presence of T. absoluta in the prey complex with an opposite effect when comparing adult and juvenile predators. The predator showed similar preference toward T. absoluta eggs and B. tabaci nymphs, but T. absoluta larvae were clearly less attacked. However, prey preference strongly depended on prey relative abundance with a disproportionately high predation on the most abundant prey and disproportionately low predation on the rarest prey. Together with the findings of a recent companion study (Bompard et al. 2013, Population Ecology, the insight obtained on M. pygmaeus prey switching may be useful for Integrated Pest Management in tomato crops, notably for optimal simultaneous management of B. tabaci and T. absoluta, which very frequently co-occur on tomato.

  20. Preference and prey switching in a generalist predator attacking local and invasive alien pests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaworski, Coline C; Bompard, Anaïs; Genies, Laure; Amiens-Desneux, Edwige; Desneux, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    Invasive pest species may strongly affect biotic interactions in agro-ecosystems. The ability of generalist predators to prey on new invasive pests may result in drastic changes in the population dynamics of local pest species owing to predator-mediated indirect interactions among prey. On a short time scale, the nature and strength of such indirect interactions depend largely on preferences between prey and on predator behavior patterns. Under laboratory conditions we evaluated the prey preference of the generalist predator Macrolophus pygmaeus Rambur (Heteroptera: Miridae) when it encounters simultaneously the local tomato pest Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) and the invasive alien pest Tuta absoluta (Meyrick) (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae). We tested various ratios of local vs. alien prey numbers, measuring switching by the predator from one prey to the other, and assessing what conditions (e.g. prey species abundance and prey development stage) may favor such prey switching. The total predation activity of M. pygmaeus was affected by the presence of T. absoluta in the prey complex with an opposite effect when comparing adult and juvenile predators. The predator showed similar preference toward T. absoluta eggs and B. tabaci nymphs, but T. absoluta larvae were clearly less attacked. However, prey preference strongly depended on prey relative abundance with a disproportionately high predation on the most abundant prey and disproportionately low predation on the rarest prey. Together with the findings of a recent companion study (Bompard et al. 2013, Population Ecology), the insight obtained on M. pygmaeus prey switching may be useful for Integrated Pest Management in tomato crops, notably for optimal simultaneous management of B. tabaci and T. absoluta, which very frequently co-occur on tomato. PMID:24312646

  1. Global warming presents new challenges for maize pest management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been conjectured that global warming will increase the prevalence of insect pests in many agro-ecosystems. In this paper, we quantitatively assess four of the key pests of maize, one of the most important systems in North American grain production. Using empirically generated estimates of pest overwintering thresholds and degree-day requirements, along with climate change projections from a high-resolution climate model, we project potential future ranges for each of these pests in the United States. Our analysis suggests the possibility of increased winter survival and greater degree-day accumulations for each of the pests surveyed. We find that relaxed cold limitation could expand the range of all four pest taxa, including a substantial range expansion in the case of corn earworm (H. zea), a migratory, cold-intolerant pest. Because the corn earworm is a cosmopolitan pest that has shown resistance to insecticides, our results suggest that this expansion could also threaten other crops, including those in high-value areas of the western United States. Because managing significant additional pressure from this suite of established pests would require additional pest management inputs, the projected decreases in cold limitation and increases in heat accumulation have the potential to significantly alter the pest management landscape for North American maize production. Further, these range expansions could have substantial economic impacts through increased seed and insecticide costs, decreased yields, and the downstream effects of changes in crop yield variability.

  2. Global warming presents new challenges for maize pest management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diffenbaugh, Noah S.; Krupke, Christian H.; White, Michael A.; Alexander, Corinne E.

    2008-10-01

    It has been conjectured that global warming will increase the prevalence of insect pests in many agro-ecosystems. In this paper, we quantitatively assess four of the key pests of maize, one of the most important systems in North American grain production. Using empirically generated estimates of pest overwintering thresholds and degree-day requirements, along with climate change projections from a high-resolution climate model, we project potential future ranges for each of these pests in the United States. Our analysis suggests the possibility of increased winter survival and greater degree-day accumulations for each of the pests surveyed. We find that relaxed cold limitation could expand the range of all four pest taxa, including a substantial range expansion in the case of corn earworm (H. zea), a migratory, cold-intolerant pest. Because the corn earworm is a cosmopolitan pest that has shown resistance to insecticides, our results suggest that this expansion could also threaten other crops, including those in high-value areas of the western United States. Because managing significant additional pressure from this suite of established pests would require additional pest management inputs, the projected decreases in cold limitation and increases in heat accumulation have the potential to significantly alter the pest management landscape for North American maize production. Further, these range expansions could have substantial economic impacts through increased seed and insecticide costs, decreased yields, and the downstream effects of changes in crop yield variability.

  3. Global warming presents new challenges for maize pest management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diffenbaugh, Noah S [Purdue Climate Change Research Center and Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Purdue University, 550 Stadium Mall Drive, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2051 (United States); Krupke, Christian H [Department of Entomology, Purdue University, 901 West State Street, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); White, Michael A [Department of Watershed Sciences, Utah State University, 5210 Old Main Hall, Logan, UT 84322-5210 (United States); Alexander, Corinne E [Department of Agricultural Economics, Purdue University, 403 West State Street, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2056 (United States)], E-mail: diffenbaugh@purdue.edu

    2008-10-15

    It has been conjectured that global warming will increase the prevalence of insect pests in many agro-ecosystems. In this paper, we quantitatively assess four of the key pests of maize, one of the most important systems in North American grain production. Using empirically generated estimates of pest overwintering thresholds and degree-day requirements, along with climate change projections from a high-resolution climate model, we project potential future ranges for each of these pests in the United States. Our analysis suggests the possibility of increased winter survival and greater degree-day accumulations for each of the pests surveyed. We find that relaxed cold limitation could expand the range of all four pest taxa, including a substantial range expansion in the case of corn earworm (H. zea), a migratory, cold-intolerant pest. Because the corn earworm is a cosmopolitan pest that has shown resistance to insecticides, our results suggest that this expansion could also threaten other crops, including those in high-value areas of the western United States. Because managing significant additional pressure from this suite of established pests would require additional pest management inputs, the projected decreases in cold limitation and increases in heat accumulation have the potential to significantly alter the pest management landscape for North American maize production. Further, these range expansions could have substantial economic impacts through increased seed and insecticide costs, decreased yields, and the downstream effects of changes in crop yield variability.

  4. [Evaluation of plant protectants against pest insects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, X; Zhang, M; Hou, Y; Jiao, Y; Cen, Y

    2000-02-01

    An interference index of population control (IIPC) was constructed for investigating the complex effects of plant protectants, including the effects of repelling insect pests away from the plant, deterring the egg laying of adults and the continuation of feeding, and causing death by toxicity. At the same time, indicated by IIPC, the alcohol extracts of some common plants, such as Eucalytus rubusta, Wedelia chinensis etc. and the neem oil gave very good results to protect the plant against Plutella xylostella. The D-C-Tron NR Petroleum Spray Oil (CALTEX) also gave an excellent effect to protect citrus against red mite. All the experiments show the important role of the repellent effect on the pests. PMID:11766564

  5. SPODOBASE : an EST database for the lepidopteran crop pest Spodoptera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabourault Cécile

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Lepidoptera Spodoptera frugiperda is a pest which causes widespread economic damage on a variety of crop plants. It is also well known through its famous Sf9 cell line which is used for numerous heterologous protein productions. Species of the Spodoptera genus are used as model for pesticide resistance and to study virus host interactions. A genomic approach is now a critical step for further new developments in biology and pathology of these insects, and the results of ESTs sequencing efforts need to be structured into databases providing an integrated set of tools and informations. Description The ESTs from five independent cDNA libraries, prepared from three different S. frugiperda tissues (hemocytes, midgut and fat body and from the Sf9 cell line, are deposited in the database. These tissues were chosen because of their importance in biological processes such as immune response, development and plant/insect interaction. So far, the SPODOBASE contains 29,325 ESTs, which are cleaned and clustered into non-redundant sets (2294 clusters and 6103 singletons. The SPODOBASE is constructed in such a way that other ESTs from S. frugiperda or other species may be added. User can retrieve information using text searches, pre-formatted queries, query assistant or blast searches. Annotation is provided against NCBI, UNIPROT or Bombyx mori ESTs databases, and with GO-Slim vocabulary. Conclusion The SPODOBASE database provides integrated access to expressed sequence tags (EST from the lepidopteran insect Spodoptera frugiperda. It is a publicly available structured database with insect pest sequences which will allow identification of a number of genes and comprehensive cloning of gene families of interest for scientific community. SPODOBASE is available from URL: http://bioweb.ensam.inra.fr/spodobase

  6. Investigating population differentiation in a major African agricultural pest: evidence from geometric morphometrics and connectivity suggests high invasion potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karsten, M; Addison, P; Jansen van Vuuren, B; Terblanche, J S

    2016-07-01

    The distribution, spatial pattern and population dynamics of a species can be influenced by differences in the environment across its range. Spatial variation in climatic conditions can cause local populations to undergo disruptive selection and ultimately result in local adaptation. However, local adaptation can be constrained by gene flow and may favour resident individuals over migrants-both are factors critical to the assessment of invasion potential. The Natal fruit fly (Ceratitis rosa) is a major agricultural pest in Africa with a history of island invasions, although its range is largely restricted to south east Africa. Across Africa, C. rosa is genetically structured into two clusters (R1 and R2), with these clusters occurring sympatrically in the north of South Africa. The spatial distribution of these genotypic clusters remains unexamined despite their importance for understanding the pest's invasion potential. Here, C. rosa, sampled from 22 South African locations, were genotyped at 11 polymorphic microsatellite loci and assessed morphologically using geometric morphometric wing shape analyses to investigate patterns of population structure and determine connectedness of pest-occupied sites. Our results show little to no intraspecific (population) differentiation, high population connectivity, high effective population sizes and only one morphological type (R2) within South Africa. The absence of the R1 morphotype at sites where it was previously found may be a consequence of differences in thermal niches of the two morphotypes. Overall, our results suggest high invasion potential of this species, that area-wide pest management should be undertaken on a country-wide scale, and that border control is critical to preventing further invasions. PMID:27085997

  7. Biological pest control in beetle agriculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aanen, Duur K; Slippers, Bernard; Wingfield, Michael J

    2009-05-01

    Bark beetles are among the most destructive tree pests on the planet. Their symbiosis with fungi has consequently been studied extensively for more than a century. A recent study has identified actinomycete bacteria that are associated with the southern pine beetle and produce specific antibiotics against an antagonist of the beetles' mutualistic fungus. In addition to highlighting the ecological complexity of bark-beetle-microbial symbioses, this work reveals a potential source of novel antibiotics.

  8. ORGANIC PEST MANAGEMENT DECISIONS: A SYSTEMS APPROACH

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Timothy A.; Lohr, Luanne

    2003-01-01

    Organic farmers make system-level crop protection decisions that combine complementary insect, disease, nematode, and weed management strategies. Data from a national survey of U.S. organic farmers were used in a multivariate count data model to identify the farm and regional factors influencing the intensity of adoption across the linked pest management categories. The results showed that weed management is of greatest concern to organic farmers. More intensive information-seeking and on-far...

  9. The Mathematical Study of Pest Management Strategy

    OpenAIRE

    Jinbo Fu; Yanzhen Wang

    2012-01-01

    The theory of impulsive state feedback control is used to establish a mathematical model in the pest management strategy. Then, the qualitative analysis of the mathematical model was provided. Here, a successor function in the geometry theory of differential equations is used to prove the sufficient conditions for uniqueness of the 1-periodic solution. It proved the orbital asymptotic stability of the periodic solution. In addition, numerical analysis is used to discuss the application signif...

  10. Toxins for Transgenic Resistance to Hemipteran Pests

    OpenAIRE

    Bryony C. Bonning; Chougule, Nanasaheb P.

    2012-01-01

    The sap sucking insects (Hemiptera), which include aphids, whiteflies, plant bugs and stink bugs, have emerged as major agricultural pests. The Hemiptera cause direct damage by feeding on crops, and in some cases indirect damage by transmission of plant viruses. Current management relies almost exclusively on application of classical chemical insecticides. While the development of transgenic crops expressing toxins derived from the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) ha...

  11. Modern Stored-Product Insect Pest Management

    OpenAIRE

    Hagstrum David William; Flinn Paul Whitney

    2014-01-01

    Stored-product entomologists have a variety of new monitoring, decision-making, biological, chemical, and physical pest management tools available to them. Two types of stored-product insect populations are of interest: insects of immediate economic importance infesting commodities, and insects that live in food residues in equipment and facilities. The sampling and control methods change as grain and grain products move from field to consumer. There are also some changes in the major insect ...

  12. Radiations: tool for insect pest management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The discovery that X-rays or gamma radiation could cause sufficient genetic damage to insect reproductive systems to induce sterility resulted from work conducted by H.J. Muller starting in the 1920s. The sterilizing effect of radiation was noted by scientists of the US Department of Agriculture who had been seeking a method to sterilize insects for many years. These scientists had theorized that if large numbers of the target insect species were reared, sterilized, and released into the field, the sterile insects would mate with the wild insects. These mating would result in no offspring and thus a decline in the population would be obtained. They calculated that if sufficient numbers of sterile insects were released, reproductive rate for the wild population would rapidly decline and reach zero. In simple language, birth control of insects. Radiation sterilization was the answer. In a SIT operation, radiation is used to sexually sterilize insects. Since the SIT is species specific, the selection the insect pest or group of pests on which to work is of primary importance. The Joint Division of the IAEA Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) has been involved in the use of isotopes and radiation in insect control since 1964. Isotopes are used as tags or markers, for instance, of chemical molecules, insects, or plants. For example, with these tags one can follow the fate of insecticides within insects and the environment; the incorporation of nutrients into the insect; and the movements of insects under field conditions. They also can plants on which insects feed so that the quantity of consumed food can be measured and directly correlated with plant resistance. They can be used as well to follow parasites and predators of insects - for example, their movements, numbers, and ability to help control insect pests. Radiations therefore have come as a novel tool to combat insect pest problem and in future could be very helpful in various other ways, of be it be cost

  13. Halal Logistics PEST Analysis: The Malaysia Perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamed Syazwan Ab Talib; Abu Bakar Abdul Hamid; Mohd Hafiz Zulfakar; Ananda S. Jeeva

    2014-01-01

    Halal logistics is a global business, and the objective of this study is to analyse the general environment of Halal logistics in Malaysia by using the PEST Analysis. This study is exploratory in nature and applies literature survey and the External Factors Evaluation (EFE) Matrix methodology. The results generated 20 factors that externally influencing the Malaysia Halal logistics scene. Plus, from the analysis, the opportunities and threats are also showcased. This study is the first attemp...

  14. 'Integration'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olwig, Karen Fog

    2011-01-01

    , while the countries have adopted disparate policies and ideologies, differences in the actual treatment and attitudes towards immigrants and refugees in everyday life are less clear, due to parallel integration programmes based on strong similarities in the welfare systems and in cultural notions of...

  15. Insect pest management in forest ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlsten, Donald L.; Rowney, David L.

    1983-01-01

    Understanding the role of insects in forest ecosystems is vital to the development of environmentally and economically sound pest management strategies in forestry Most of the research on forest insects has been confined to phytophagous species associated with economically important tree species The roles of most other insects in forest environments have generally been ignored, including the natural enemies and associates of phytophagous species identified as being important In the past few years several investigations have begun to reevaluate the role of phytophagous species responsible for perturbation in forest ecosystems, and it appears that these species may be playing an important role in the primary productivity of those ecosystems Also, there is an increasing awareness that forest pest managers have been treating the symptoms and not the causes of the problems in the forest Many insect problems are associated with poor sites or sites where trees are growing poorly because of crowding As a result, there is considerable emphasis on the hazard rating of stands of trees for their susceptibility to various phytophagous insects The next step is to manipulate forest stands to make them less susceptible to forest pest complexes A thinning study in California is used as an example and shows that tree mortality in ponderosa pine ( Pinus ponderosa) attributable to the western pine beetle ( Dendroctonus brevicomis) can be reduced by commercial thinning to reduce stocking

  16. Controle integrado de espécies de Simulium (Diptera, Simuliidae por Bacillus thuringiensis e manejos mecânicos no riacho e nos vertedouros de tanques de piscicultura, Almirante Tamandaré, Paraná, Brasil Integrated pest control of Simulium (Diptera, Simuliidae with Bacillus thuringiensis and mechanical handling in creek and pisciculture spillway, Almirante Tamandaré, Paraná, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiane Petry

    2004-03-01

    , ubicated in Curitiba's Metropolitan Area, simuliid populations boast high proliferation rates, delivering serious impact to local people with their noxious bites, to such an extent as to impair the daily meetings of people. From January to August 2002, 24,021 pupae were collected from which the following species and respective frequencies were identified: Simulium inaequale (55.24%, Simulium perflavum (16.81%, Simulium pertinax (13.93%, Simulium orbitale (8.03%, Simulium subnigrum (4.92%, Simulium distinctum (1.03% and Simulium incrustatum (0.04%. Local pest control measures were carried out from the February 28 to August 8, 2002. Main integrated pest control measures taken consisted in the application of biopesticide Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis (Bti and mechanical handling, not only by removing the immatures (eggs, larvae and pupae by means of drain brushing, but also by removing natural and artificial substrates from the bed. Larval mean density, monitored at artificial polythene strips substrates (area 13,500 cm², averaged 6.7 and 11.5 larvae/cm² before the application of Bti at the creek bed extension 75 m and on the dam spillway, respectively. Larval mass reduction at creek bed and at the spillway with application of Bti from 1.77 to 2.09 mg/litre of active ingredient for one minute exposure time and means of mechanical handlings monitored at polythene strips substrates (area 20,250 cm² varied, respectively from 72.61% to 99.97% and from 74.91% to 99.45 with outflows from 0.39 to 0.45 and from 0.38 to 0.43 m³/minute. At the one of the dam spillways with area of 5,110 cm², average larval density in the first mechanic handling was 10.27 larvae/cm². However, at this spillway, larval reduction by means of mechanical handlings was from 53.81% to 99.59%. Integrated pest control did down sized the number of bytes to the level wished, thus obtaining the positive effect aimed.

  17. Dynamic Analysis of a Predator-Prey (Pest Model with Disease in Prey and Involving an Impulsive Control Strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Zhao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic behaviors of a predator-prey (pest model with disease in prey and involving an impulsive control strategy to release infected prey at fixed times are investigated for the purpose of integrated pest management. Mathematical theoretical works have been pursuing the investigation of the local asymptotical stability and global attractivity for the semitrivial periodic solution and population persistent, which depicts the threshold expression of some critical parameters for carrying out integrated pest management. Numerical analysis indicates that the impulsive control strategy has a strong effect on the dynamical complexity and population persistent using bifurcation diagrams and power spectra diagrams. These results show that if the release amount of infective prey can satisfy some critical conditions, then all biological populations will coexist. All these results are expected to be of use in the study of the dynamic complexity of ecosystems.

  18. Resolving cryptic species complexes of major tephritid pests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrichs, Jorge; Vera, M. Teresa; De Meyer, Marc; Clarke, Anthony R.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract An FAO/IAEA Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) on “Resolution of Cryptic Species Complexes of Tephritid Pests to Overcome Constraints to SIT Application and International Trade” was conducted from 2010 to 2015. As captured in the CRP title, the objective was to undertake targeted research into the systematics and diagnostics of taxonomically challenging fruit fly groups of economic importance. The scientific output was the accurate alignment of biological species with taxonomic names; which led to the applied outcome of assisting FAO and IAEA Member States in overcoming technical constraints to the application of the Sterile Insect Technique (SIT) against pest fruit flies and the facilitation of international agricultural trade. Close to 50 researchers from over 20 countries participated in the CRP, using coordinated, multidisciplinary research to address, within an integrative taxonomic framework, cryptic species complexes of major tephritid pests. The following progress was made for the four complexes selected and studied: Anastrepha fraterculus complex – Eight morphotypes and their geographic and ecological distributions in Latin America were defined. The morphotypes can be considered as distinct biological species on the basis of differences in karyotype, sexual incompatibility, post-mating isolation, cuticular hydrocarbon, pheromone, and molecular analyses. Discriminative taxonomic tools using linear and geometric morphometrics of both adult and larval morphology were developed for this complex. Bactrocera dorsalis complex – Based on genetic, cytogenetic, pheromonal, morphometric, and behavioural data, which showed no or only minor variation between the Asian/African pest fruit flies Bactrocera dorsalis, Bactrocera papayae, Bactrocera philippinensis and Bactrocera invadens, the latter three species were synonymized with Bactrocera dorsalis. Of the five target pest taxa studied, only Bactrocera dorsalis and Bactrocera carambolae remain as

  19. Resolving cryptic species complexes of major tephritid pests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrichs, Jorge; Vera, M Teresa; De Meyer, Marc; Clarke, Anthony R

    2015-01-01

    An FAO/IAEA Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) on "Resolution of Cryptic Species Complexes of Tephritid Pests to Overcome Constraints to SIT Application and International Trade" was conducted from 2010 to 2015. As captured in the CRP title, the objective was to undertake targeted research into the systematics and diagnostics of taxonomically challenging fruit fly groups of economic importance. The scientific output was the accurate alignment of biological species with taxonomic names; which led to the applied outcome of assisting FAO and IAEA Member States in overcoming technical constraints to the application of the Sterile Insect Technique (SIT) against pest fruit flies and the facilitation of international agricultural trade. Close to 50 researchers from over 20 countries participated in the CRP, using coordinated, multidisciplinary research to address, within an integrative taxonomic framework, cryptic species complexes of major tephritid pests. The following progress was made for the four complexes selected and studied: Anastrepha fraterculus complex - Eight morphotypes and their geographic and ecological distributions in Latin America were defined. The morphotypes can be considered as distinct biological species on the basis of differences in karyotype, sexual incompatibility, post-mating isolation, cuticular hydrocarbon, pheromone, and molecular analyses. Discriminative taxonomic tools using linear and geometric morphometrics of both adult and larval morphology were developed for this complex. Bactrocera dorsalis complex - Based on genetic, cytogenetic, pheromonal, morphometric, and behavioural data, which showed no or only minor variation between the Asian/African pest fruit flies Bactrocera dorsalis, Bactrocera papayae, Bactrocera philippinensis and Bactrocera invadens, the latter three species were synonymized with Bactrocera dorsalis. Of the five target pest taxa studied, only Bactrocera dorsalis and Bactrocera carambolae remain as scientifically valid

  20. Integrating insect-resistant GM Crops in pest management systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    In 2006, GM cotton and maize with insect resistance were grown on 12.1 and 20.1 million hectares in 9 and 13 countries, respectively. These insect resistant GM crops produce various Cry toxins from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) and provide highly selective and effective control of lepidopteran and col...

  1. ADVANCES IN INTEGRATING INSECT GROWTH REGULATORS INTO STORAGE PEST MANAGEMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insect growth regulators (IGRs) are insecticides that mimic insect-produced hormones that regulate the developmental process. They generally have little or no mammalian toxicity, and are considered reduced-risk insecticides that are often exempt from tolerance requirements of regulatory agencies. Al...

  2. Expanding Integrated Pest Management Capacity: Rwanda Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baributsa, Dieudonne; Flores, Luis; Rukazambuga, Daniel; Wise, John C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Rwanda is developing its agricultural capacity to meet the needs of national food security while addressing food demands and requirements of regional and international markets. The Rwanda Horticultural Export Standards Initiative was developed by the Ministry of Agriculture and Natural Resources in collaboration with Michigan State…

  3. Course on spraying techniques for integrated pest management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lumkes, L.M.

    1989-01-01

    Knapsack, controlled pressure, field spot, compressed air and motor sprayers and types of lances an booms are introduces. How to calibrate, the effect of weather, and size and quantity of the droplets and drift is spoken of.

  4. Future pest status of an insect pest in museums, Attagenus smirnovi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lise Stengård; Åkerlund, Monika; Grøntoft, Terje;

    2012-01-01

    The brown carpet beetle Attagenus smirnovi, Zhantiev 1973 (Coleoptera: Dermestidae) is an important pest of objects of organic origin in museums of cultural and natural history in Europe. Future climate changes are expected to lead to increasing temperatures, which will affect the pest status...... was consumed in the greatest amounts: 169 mg of wool was consumed in three months by 30 A. smirnovi larvae. The expected future climate changes in Scandinavia are assumed to lead to higher temperatures in museums and stores where climate is not regulated. Updated data on the present distribution of A. smirnovi...... in museums and collections in Scandinavia due to this pest will increase as climate changes come into effect....

  5. Pest insect olfaction in an insecticide-contaminated environment: info-disruption or hormesis effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tricoire-Leignel, Hélène; Thany, Steeve Hervé; Gadenne, Christophe; Anton, Sylvia

    2012-01-01

    Most animals, including pest insects, live in an "odor world" and depend strongly on chemical stimuli to get information on their biotic and abiotic environment. Although integrated pest management strategies including the use of insect growth regulators (IGRs) are increasingly developed, most insect pest treatments rely on neurotoxic chemicals. These molecules are known to disrupt synaptic transmission, affecting therefore sensory systems. The wide-spread use of neurotoxic insecticides and the growing use of IGRs result in residual accumulation of low concentrations in the environment. These insecticide residues could act as an "info-disruptor" by modifying the chemical communication system, and therefore decrease chances of reproduction in target insects. However, residues can also induce a non-expected hormesis effect by enhancing reproduction abilities. Low insecticide doses might thus induce adaptive processes in the olfactory pathway of target insects, favoring the development of resistance. The effect of sublethal doses of insecticides has mainly been studied in beneficial insects such as honeybees. We review here what is known on the effects of sublethal doses of insecticides on the olfactory system of insect pests. PMID:22457653

  6. Pest insect olfaction in an insecticide-contaminated environment : info-disruption or hormesis effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélène eTricoire-Leignel

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Most animals, including pest insects, live in an odour world and depend strongly on chemical stimuli to get information on their biotic and abiotic environment. Although integrated pest management strategies including the use of insect growth regulators (IGRs are increasingly developed, most insect pest treatments rely on neurotoxic chemicals. These molecules are known to disrupt synaptic transmission, affecting therefore sensory systems. The wide-spread use of neurotoxic insecticides and the growing use of IGRs result in residual accumulation of low concentrations in the environment. These insecticide residues could act as an info-disruptor by modifying the chemical communication system, and therefore decrease chances of reproduction in target insects. However, residues can also induce a non-expected hormesis effect by enhancing reproduction abilities. Low insecticide doses might thus induce adaptive processes in the olfactory pathway of target insects, favouring the development of resistance. The effect of sublethal doses of insecticides has mainly been studied in beneficial insects such as honeybees. We review here what is known on the effects of sublethal doses of insecticides on the olfactory system of insect pests.

  7. Using Pesticides: Commercial Applicator Manual, Texas. Agricultural Pest Control - Field Crop Pest Control, Fruit and Vegetable Pest Control, Weed and Brush Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texas A and M Univ., College Station. Texas Agricultural Extension Service.

    This document is designed to provide commercial pesticide applicators with practical information and regulations required by the Texas Department of Agriculture. The manual includes two major sections. The first section discusses labels and labeling, pesticides, aerial application, ground application, pesticide safety, pests and pest damage,…

  8. Management Strategies and Research Orientations of Forest Diseases and Pests in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Forest diseases and pests are perceived as a growing hazard to China economy. It is a common conclusion that the actualities of forest pests in china are no effective measures to the old important pests, some secondary pests are ascending to chief pests, increasing devastation from exotic pests, frequent ecological pest eruption induced by environmental detriment and host-leading diseases to threaten the "Western Development Project "in China, which is the most important economical strategy to China; th...

  9. Producing bulbs and perennials : sustainable control of diseases, pests and weeds

    OpenAIRE

    Boer

    2011-01-01

    In the Netherlands every year flower bulbs and perennials are produced representing a value of € 500 m (flower bulbs) and of € 65 m (perennials, 2004). The growers are faced with several threatening pests and diseases during the production. They usually deal with these problems by using pesticides. In 2004 the Ministry of Agriculture and the stakeholders in Agribusiness made an agreement on reducing the environmental impact of pesticides by developing and implementing knowledge on Integrated ...

  10. A Cognitive Vision Approach to Early Pest Detection in Greenhouse Crops

    OpenAIRE

    Boissard, Paul; Martin, Vincent; Moisan, Sabine

    2008-01-01

    Early disease detection is a major challenge in horticulture. Integrated Pest Management (IPM) combines prophylactic, biological and physical methods to fight bioagressors of crops while minimizing the use of pesticides. This approach is particularly promising in the context of ornamental crops in greenhouses because of the high level of control needed in such agrosystems. However, IPM requires frequent and precise observations of plants (mainly leaves), which are not compatible with producti...

  11. Current status and prospect of pests on Moringa oleifera%辣木害虫研究现状与展望

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李召波; 田洋; 马春花; 高熹; 李强

    2016-01-01

    The present study was conducted to summarize the domestic and foreign research findings of Moringa oleifera, including the main pests species, their damage, occurrence and control technologies. However, there were some limitations existed in present research on pests of M. oleifera, for example, species of insect pests were unknown, pest control technology was simple, and dynamics of pest population had not been studied. According to existing problems, some relevant suggestions are put forward, which include making a comprehensive investigation and identification of pests on M. oleifera, strengthening systematic study on biological characteristics of pests , investigating natural enemies of pests and actively carrying out research work of biological control, studying forecasting technology of main pests, establishing integrated pest management system of M. oleifera.%文章综述了国内外辣木主要害虫种类、危害和发生规律及防治技术等的研究成果,并针对辣木害虫种类不明、防治方法简单及害虫优势种种群动态研究不足等问题,提出对各辣木种植区的害虫进行全面调查和鉴定;加强辣木害虫生物学特性研究;调查害虫天敌,积极开展生物防治研究;对发生严重的害虫进行预测预报研究,建立辣木害虫综合防控技术体系等建议。

  12. Climate Change, Carbon Dioxide, and Pest Biology: Monitor, Mitigate, Manage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziska, Lewis H; McConnell, Laura L

    2016-01-13

    Rising concentrations of atmospheric carbon dioxide ([CO2]) and subsequent changes in climate, including temperature and precipitation extremes, are very likely to alter pest pressures in both managed and unmanaged plant communities. Such changes in pest pressures can be positive (migration from a region) or negative (new introductions), but are likely to be accompanied by significant economic and environmental consequences. Recent studies indicate the range of invasive weeds such as kudzu and insects such as mountain pine beetle have already expanded to more northern regions as temperatures have risen. To reduce these consequences, a better understanding of the link between CO2/climate and pest biology is needed in the context of existing and new strategies for pest management. This paper provides an overview of the probable biological links and the vulnerabilities of existing pest management (especially chemical control) and provides a preliminary synthesis of research needs that could potentially improve the ability to monitor, mitigate, and manage pest impacts.

  13. Obligate symbiont involved in pest status of host insect

    OpenAIRE

    Hosokawa, Takahiro; Kikuchi, Yoshitomo; Shimada, Masakazu; Fukatsu, Takema

    2007-01-01

    The origin of specific insect genotypes that enable efficient use of agricultural plants is an important subject not only in applied fields like pest control and management but also in basic disciplines like evolutionary biology. Conventionally, it has been presupposed that such pest-related ecological traits are attributed to genes encoded in the insect genomes. Here, however, we report that pest status of an insect is principally determined by symbiont genotype rather than by insect genotyp...

  14. Stage-Structured Impulsive SI Model for Pest Management

    OpenAIRE

    Lansun Chen; Ruiqing Shi

    2007-01-01

    An SI epidemic model with stage structure is investigated. In the model, impulsive biological control is taken, that is, we release infected pests to the field at a fixed time periodically. We get a sufficient condition for the global asymptotical stability of the pest-eradication periodic solution (0,0,I˜(t)), and a condition for the permanence of the system. At last, a brief discussion shows that our results will be helpful for pest management.

  15. Pest management and food production: Looking to the future

    OpenAIRE

    Yudelman, M.; Ratta, A.; Nygaard, D.

    1998-01-01

    In their comprehensive paper, Montague Yudelman, Annu Ratta, and David Nygaard examine the key issues with regard to pest management and food production over the coming decades. They draw attention to the lack of adequate information on the magnitude and impact of pest losses; with out such information, policy makers are handicapped when devising strategies for meeting food needs. The authors address both chemical and nonchemical approaches to pest management, high lighting the importance of ...

  16. Multiple Adoption of Pest Management Technologies in UK cereal Farming

    OpenAIRE

    Fraser, Iain; Sharma, Abhijit; Bailey, Alastair

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we consider the adoption of pest management technologies by farmers in UK cereal crop systems. While for the majority of UK farmers chemical control of pest outbreaks remains important, there are a range of non-chemical approaches and management practices that can be used to control pest populations. However, few of these alternatives produce levels of control that compare with chemical use in isolation. In this paper we consider the determinants of adoption of different combina...

  17. THE CONTROL OF PESTS IN ECOSYSTEMS BY UNCHEMICAL METHODS

    OpenAIRE

    H BUNESCU; I GHIZDAVU; G MIHAI; I OLTEAN; M PORCA; BODIŞ, I.

    2003-01-01

    The most important way to control the pests is to not use chemicals, preventing the environmental pollution in the different ecosystems. We proposed to study and apply the unchemical methods according to ecological pest management, to control some pesticide resistant pests. The research has been oriented to the physical methods: the use of the light radiation reflected by different materials (supports), directly applied on the hostplant leaves or on the ground, which remove the insects from t...

  18. Relationship between tree pests and emmissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berge, H.

    1973-01-01

    In a forest in the vicinity of a large sulfur dioxide emission source, lice were discovered on the species Abies concolor and Abies veitchi mainly on those needles where injuries from SO/sub 2/ and hydrogen fluoride exposure were macroscopically and microscopically visible. All Abies species whose new shoots were treated with a pesticide until the second half of May showed no injuries on the new 1-year old needles. Non-treated trees showed either injuries or dropped the needles. Contrary to this, mealy bugs on Pinus griffithi, Pinus silvestris Fastigiata and Pinus silvestris Pumily were mostly found on the non-injured needles and not on those showing macroscopic and microscopic SO/sub 2/ injuries. Species of Ilex aquifolium uninjured by SO/sub 2/ suddenly displayed acute injuries after they had been heavily attacked by the fly Phytomyza ilicis which coincided with HF concentrations of 6 to 8 micrograms/Cu M and half-hourly values of SO/sub 2/ of 1.5 to 2.0 mg/Cu M. Only those treated with an 0.4% wuxal-solution (six times in 14-day intervals) showed no injuries. Similar results were obtained with a spider mite (Oligonychus ununguis) on Picea omorika. Through treatment with pesticide, the pests and plant injuries could be averted. The Sacchiphantes viridis louse was found in greater concentrations on parts protected from exposure by walls or other plants. The Blastethia turionella on Pinus montana occurred most frequently on heavily injured parts. The extent of pest occurrence among other things was influenced by weather, season, climatic, orographic, and topographic factors. Through efficient pest control, some injuries can be avoided.

  19. Cultural and chemical pest control methods alter habitat suitability for biological control agents: An example from Wisconsin commercial cranberry

    Science.gov (United States)

    An integrated pest control program requires an in-depth understanding of the compatibility of all control strategies used. In Wisconsin commercial cranberry production, early-season control strategies may include either a broad-spectrum insecticide application or a corresponding spring flood, along ...

  20. Scientific Opinion on peste des petits ruminants

    OpenAIRE

    EFSA Panel on Animal Health and Welfare (AHAW)

    2015-01-01

    Peste des petits ruminants (PPR) is a severe viral disease of small ruminants caused by a Morbillivirus closely related to rinderpest virus. It is widespread in Africa and Asia and is currently also found in Turkey and Northern Africa. PPR is transmitted via direct contact, and the disease would mainly be transferred to infection-free areas by transport of infected animals. In the EU, it could only happen through illegal transport of animals. The risk of that depends on the prevalence in the ...