WorldWideScience

Sample records for area telescope multiwavelength

  1. GLAST Large Area Telescope Multiwavelength Opportunities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High-energy gamma-ray sources are inherently nonthermal, multiwavelength objects. With the launch of the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) scheduled for later this year, the GLAST Large Area Telescope (LAT) Collaboration invites cooperative efforts from observers at all wavelengths. Among the many topics where multiwavelength studies will maximize the scientific understanding, two stand out for particular emphasis: (1) Active Galactic Nuclei. The study of AGN gamma-ray jets through time variability and spectral modeling can help link the accretion processes close to the black hole with the large-scale interaction of the AGN with its environment; (2) Unidentified Gamma-ray Sources. New gamma-ray sources need first to be identified with known objects seen at other wavelengths using position, spectrum, or time variability, and then multiwavelength studies can be used to explore the astrophysical implications of high-energy radiation from these sources. Observers interested in any type of coordinated observations should contact the LAT Multiwavelength Coordinating Group

  2. GLAST Large Area Telescope Multiwavelength Opportunities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, David J.; /NASA, Goddard

    2007-10-10

    High-energy gamma-ray sources are inherently nonthermal, multiwavelength objects. With the launch of the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) scheduled for later this year, the GLAST Large Area Telescope (LAT) Collaboration invites cooperative efforts from observers at all wavelengths. Among the many topics where multiwavelength studies will maximize the scientific understanding, two stand out for particular emphasis: (1) Active Galactic Nuclei. The study of AGN gamma-ray jets through time variability and spectral modeling can help link the accretion processes close to the black hole with the large-scale interaction of the AGN with its environment; (2) Unidentified Gamma-ray Sources. New gamma-ray sources need first to be identified with known objects seen at other wavelengths using position, spectrum, or time variability, and then multiwavelength studies can be used to explore the astrophysical implications of high-energy radiation from these sources. Observers interested in any type of coordinated observations should contact the LAT Multiwavelength Coordinating Group.

  3. Future Multiwavelength Studies with the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, David J.

    2011-01-01

    With two and a half years of experience, Fermi LAT contributions to multiwavelength studies have become an integral part of many astrophysical research projects. Future efforts will benefit from (1) Deeper LAT exposures} resulting in more sources; (2) More high-energy, high-angular resolution photons, giving better source locations and imaging; (3) Faster analysis of variability and announcements to the community; and (4) Longer time series for studies of variable source properties in comparison to other wavelengths.

  4. Fermi Large Area Telescope and multi-wavelength observations of the flaring activity of PKS 1510-089 between 2008 September and 2009 June

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2010-01-01

    We report on the multi-wavelength observations of PKS 1510-089 (a flat spectrum radio quasar at z=0.361) during its high activity period between 2008 September and 2009 June. During this 11 months period, the source was characterized by a complex variability at optical, UV and gamma-ray bands, on time scales down to 6-12 hours. The brightest gamma-ray isotropic luminosity, recorded on 2009 March 26, was ~ 2x10^48erg s^-1. The spectrum in the Fermi-LAT energy range shows a mild curvature well described by a log-parabolic law, and can be understood as due to the Klein-Nishina effect. The gamma-ray flux has a complex correlation with the other wavelengths. There is no correlation at all with the X-ray band, a weak correlation with the UV, and a significant correlation with the optical flux. The gamma-ray flux seems to lead the optical one by about 13 days. From the UV photometry we estimated a black hole mass of ~ 5.4x10^8 solar masses, and an accretion rate of ~ 0.5 solar masses/year. Although the power in the ...

  5. A New Multi-wavelength Solar Telescope: Optical and Near-infrared Solar Eruption Tracer (ONSET)

    OpenAIRE

    Fang, C.; Chen, P. F.; Li, Z.; Ding, M. D.; Dai, Y.; X. Y. Zhang; Mao, W. J.; J. P. Zhang; T. Li; Liang, Y J; Lu, H T

    2013-01-01

    A new multi-wavelength solar telescope, Optical and Near-infrared Solar Eruption Tracer (ONSET) of Nanjing University, was constructed, being fabricated by Nanjing Institute of Astronomical Optics & Technology and run in cooperation with Yunnan Astronomical Observatory. ONSET is able to observe the Sun in three wavelength windows: He {\\small I} 10830 \\AA, H$\\alpha$, and white-light at 3600 \\AA and 4250 \\AA, which are selected in order to obtain the dynamics in the corona, chromosphere, and th...

  6. A new multi-wavelength solar telescope: Optical and Near-infrared Solar Eruption Tracer (ONSET)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new multi-wavelength solar telescope, the Optical and Near-infrared Solar Eruption Tracer (ONSET) of Nanjing University, has been constructed. It was fabricated at the Nanjing Institute of Astronomical Optics and Technology, and the operation is jointly administered with Yunnan Astronomical Observatory. ONSET is able to observe the Sun in three wavelength windows: He I 10830 Å, Hα and white-light at 3600 Å and 4250 Å, which are selected in order to simultaneously record the dynamics of the corona, chromosphere and photosphere respectively. Full-disk or partial-disk solar images with a field of 10' at three wavelengths can be obtained nearly simultaneously. It is designed to trace solar eruptions with high spatial and temporal resolutions. This telescope was installed at a new solar observing site near Fuxian Lake in Yunnan Province, southwest China. The site is located at E102N24, with an altitude of 1722 m. The seeing is stable and has high quality. We give a brief description of the scientific objectives and the basic structure of ONSET. Some preliminary results are also presented

  7. The gamma-ray large area space telescope (GLAST)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope is planned as NASA's next major mission in high-energy gamma-ray astronomy. It is included in the Space Science Enterprise Strategic Plan as a 2002 'New Start', with a planned 2005 launch. NASA commissioned a Facility Science Team (FST) of both advocates and non-advocates to establish the framework of the mission. The FST developed a Science Requirements Document that outlines the specifications of an instrument needed to make the next advance in this field. The adopted specifications will lead to an investigation with an energy response extending to 300 GeV, ten times higher than the EGRET instrument on the Compton Observatory, and with a source sensitivity 50 times greater. In addition there would be gains in spectral and spatial resolution. A heavy emphasis will be placed on multi-wavelength observations to maximize the science from the mission

  8. Modeling Fermi Large Area Telescope and Multiwavelength Data from Blazars

    CERN Document Server

    Finke, Justin

    2016-01-01

    Blazars are active galactic nuclei with relativistic jets pointed at the Earth, making them extremely bright at essentially all wavelengths, from radio to gamma rays. I review the modeling of this broadband spectral energy distributions of these objects, and what we have learned, with a focus on gamma rays.

  9. Discovery of VHE gamma-rays from the blazar 1ES 1215+303 with the MAGIC Telescopes and simultaneous multi-wavelength observations

    CERN Document Server

    Aleksić, J; Antonelli, L A; Antoranz, P; Asensio, M; Backes, M; de Almeida, U Barres; Barrio, J A; Bastieri, D; González, J Becerra; Bednarek, W; Berger, K; Bernardini, E; Biland, A; Blanch, O; Bock, R K; Boller, A; Bonnoli, G; Tridon, D Borla; Bretz, T; Cañellas, A; Carmona, E; Carosi, A; Colin, P; Colombo, E; Contreras, J L; Cortina, J; Cossio, L; Covino, S; Da Vela, P; Dazzi, F; De Angelis, A; De Caneva, G; del Pozo, E De Cea; De Lotto, B; Mendez, C Delgado; Ortega, A Diago; Doert, M; Domínguez, A; Prester, D Dominis; Dorner, D; Doro, M; Eisenacher, D; Elsaesser, D; Ferenc, D; Fonseca, M V; Font, L; Fruck, C; López, R J García; Garczarczyk, M; Terrats, D Garrido; Giavitto, G; Godinović, N; Muñoz, A González; Gozzini, S R; Hadasch, D; Häfner, D; Herrero, A; Hildebrand, D; Hose, J; Hrupec, D; Huber, B; Jankowski, F; Jogler, T; Kadenius, V; Kellermann, H; Klepser, S; Krähenbühl, T; Krause, J; La Barbera, A; Lelas, D; Leonardo, E; Lewandowska, N; Lindfors, E; Lombardi, S; López, M; López-Coto, R; López-Oramas, A; Lorenz, E; Makariev, M; Maneva, G; Mankuzhiyil, N; Mannheim, K; Maraschi, L; Mariotti, M; Martínez, M; Mazin, D; Meucci, M; Miranda, J M; Mirzoyan, R; Moldón, J; Moralejo, A; Munar-Adrover, P; Niedzwiecki, A; Nieto, D; Nilsson, K; Nowak, N; Orito, R; Paiano, S; Paneque, D; Paoletti, R; Pardo, S; Paredes, J M; Partini, S; Perez-Torres, M A; Persic, M; Pilia, M; Pochon, J; Prada, F; Moroni, P G Prada; Prandini, E; Gimenez, I Puerto; Puljak, I; Reichardt, I; Reinthal, R; Rhode, W; Ribó, M; Rico, J; Rügamer, S; Saggion, A; Saito, K; Saito, T Y; Salvati, M; Satalecka, K; Scalzotto, V; Scapin, V; Schultz, C; Schweizer, T; Shore, S N; Sillanpää, A; Sitarek, J; Snidaric, I; Sobczynska, D; Spanier, F; Spiro, S; Stamatescu, V; Stamerra, A; Steinke, B; Storz, J; Strah, N; Sun, S; Surić, T; Takalo, L; Takami, H; Tavecchio, F; Temnikov, P; Terzić, T; Tescaro, D; Teshima, M; Tibolla, O; Torres, D F; Treves, A; Uellenbeck, M; Vogler, P; Wagner, R M; Weitzel, Q; Zabalza, V; Zandanel, F; Zanin, R; Berdyugin, A; Buson, S; Järvelä, E; Larsson, S; Lähteenmäki, A; Tammi, J; de Lausanne, now at: Ecole polytechnique fédérale; Lausanne,; Switzerland,; Padova, supported by INFN; Energéticas, now at: Centro de Investigaciones; Tecnológicas, Medioambientales y; Madrid,; Spain,; KIPAC, now at:; Laboratory, SLAC National Accelerator; USA,; ESO, now at: Finnish Centre for Astronomy with; Turku, University of; Finland,; Observatory, Aalto University Metsähovi Radio; Metsähovintie,; Finland,; Physics, Department of; University, Stockholm; Stockholm,; Sweden,; Physics, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmoparticle; Stockholm,; Sweden,; Astronomy, Department of; University, Stockholm; Stockholm,; Sweden),

    2012-01-01

    Context. We present the discovery of very high energy (VHE, E > 100GeV) gamma-ray emission from the BL Lac object 1ES 1215+303 by the MAGIC telescopes and simultaneous multi-wavelength data in a broad energy range from radio to gamma-rays. Aims. We study the VHE gamma-ray emission from 1ES 1215+303 and its relation to the emissions in other wavelengths. Methods. Triggered by an optical outburst, MAGIC observed the source in January-February 2011 for 20.3 hrs. The target was monitored in the optical R-band by the KVA telescope that also performed optical polarization measurements. We triggered target of opportunity observations with the Swift satellite and obtained simultaneous and quasi-simultaneous data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope and from the Mets\\"ahovi radio telescope. We also present the analysis of older MAGIC data taken in 2010. Results. The MAGIC observations of 1ES 1215+303 carried out in January-February 2011 resulted in the first detection of the source at VHE with a statistical significanc...

  10. Fermi Large Area Telescope first source catalog

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    We present a catalog of high-energy gamma-ray sources detected by the Large Area Telescope (LAT), the primary science instrument on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi), during the first 11 months of the science phase of the mission, which began on 2008 August 4. The First Fermi-LAT catalog (1FGL) contains 1451 sources detected and characterized in the 100 MeV to 100 GeV range. Source detection was based on the average flux over the 11-month period, and the threshold likelihood Test St...

  11. Fermi Large Area Telescope Third Source Catalog

    OpenAIRE

    The Fermi-LAT Collaboration

    2015-01-01

    We present the third Fermi Large Area Telescope source catalog (3FGL) of sources in the 100 MeV-300 GeV range. Based on the first four years of science data from the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope mission, it is the deepest yet in this energy range. Relative to the 2FGL catalog, the 3FGL catalog incorporates twice as much data as well as a number of analysis improvements, including improved calibrations at the event reconstruction level, an updated model for Galactic diffuse gamma-ray emissi...

  12. FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE SECOND SOURCE CATALOG

    OpenAIRE

    Nolan, P. L.; Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann et al., M.

    2012-01-01

    We present the second catalog of high-energy gamma-ray sources detected by the Large Area Telescope (LAT), the primary science instrument on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi), derived from data taken during the first 24 months of the science phase of the mission, which began on 2008 August 4. Source detection is based on the average flux over the 24-month period. The Second Fermi-LAT catalog (2FGL) includes source location regions, defined in terms of elliptical fits to the 95% conf...

  13. Multi-wavelength study of Mrk 421 TeV flare observed with \\emph{TACTIC} telescope in February 2010

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, K K; Chandra, P; Sahayanathan, S; Bhatt, N; Rannot, R C; Tickoo, A K; Koul, R

    2014-01-01

    We present results from multi-wavelength study of intense flaring activity from a high frequency peaked BL Lac object Mrk 421. The source was observed in its flaring state on February 16, 2010 with the $TACTIC$ at energies above 1.5 TeV. Near simultaneous multi-wavelength data were obtained from high energy (MeV-GeV) $\\gamma$--ray observations with \\emph{Fermi}--LAT, X--ray observations by the \\emph{Swift} and \\emph{MAXI} satellites, optical V-band observation by SPOL at \\emph{Steward Observatory} and radio 15 GHz observation at OVRO 40 meter-telescope. We have performed a detailed spectral and temporal analysis of $TACTIC$, \\emph{Fermi}--LAT and \\emph{Swift}--XRT observations of Mrk 421 during February 10--23, 2010 (MJD 55237-55250). The flaring activity of the source is studied by investigating the properties of daily light curves from radio to $TeV$ energy range and we present the correlation and variability analysis in each energy band. The $TeV$ flare detected by $TACTIC$ on February 16, 2010 is well cor...

  14. Discovery of VHE γ-rays from the blazar 1ES 1215+303 with the MAGIC telescopes and simultaneous multi-wavelength observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksić, J.; Alvarez, E. A.; Antonelli, L. A.; Antoranz, P.; Ansoldi, S.; Asensio, M.; Backes, M.; Barres de Almeida, U.; Barrio, J. A.; Bastieri, D.; Becerra González, J.; Bednarek, W.; Berger, K.; Bernardini, E.; Biland, A.; Blanch, O.; Bock, R. K.; Boller, A.; Bonnoli, G.; Borla Tridon, D.; Bretz, T.; Cañellas, A.; Carmona, E.; Carosi, A.; Colin, P.; Colombo, E.; Contreras, J. L.; Cortina, J.; Cossio, L.; Covino, S.; Da Vela, P.; Dazzi, F.; De Angelis, A.; De Caneva, G.; De Cea del Pozo, E.; De Lotto, B.; Delgado Mendez, C.; Diago Ortega, A.; Doert, M.; Domínguez, A.; Dominis Prester, D.; Dorner, D.; Doro, M.; Eisenacher, D.; Elsaesser, D.; Ferenc, D.; Fonseca, M. V.; Font, L.; Fruck, C.; García López, R. J.; Garczarczyk, M.; Garrido Terrats, D.; Gaug, M.; Giavitto, G.; Godinović, N.; González Muñoz, A.; Gozzini, S. R.; Hadasch, D.; Häfner, D.; Herrero, A.; Hildebrand, D.; Hose, J.; Hrupec, D.; Huber, B.; Jankowski, F.; Jogler, T.; Kadenius, V.; Kellermann, H.; Klepser, S.; Krähenbühl, T.; Krause, J.; La Barbera, A.; Lelas, D.; Leonardo, E.; Lewandowska, N.; Lindfors, E.; Lombardi, S.; López, M.; López-Coto, R.; López-Oramas, A.; Lorenz, E.; Makariev, M.; Maneva, G.; Mankuzhiyil, N.; Mannheim, K.; Maraschi, L.; Mariotti, M.; Martínez, M.; Mazin, D.; Meucci, M.; Miranda, J. M.; Mirzoyan, R.; Moldón, J.; Moralejo, A.; Munar-Adrover, P.; Niedzwiecki, A.; Nieto, D.; Nilsson, K.; Nowak, N.; Orito, R.; Paiano, S.; Paneque, D.; Paoletti, R.; Pardo, S.; Paredes, J. M.; Partini, S.; Perez-Torres, M. A.; Persic, M.; Pilia, M.; Pochon, J.; Prada, F.; Prada Moroni, P. G.; Prandini, E.; Puerto Gimenez, I.; Puljak, I.; Reichardt, I.; Reinthal, R.; Rhode, W.; Ribó, M.; Rico, J.; Rügamer, S.; Saggion, A.; Saito, K.; Saito, T. Y.; Salvati, M.; Satalecka, K.; Scalzotto, V.; Scapin, V.; Schultz, C.; Schweizer, T.; Shore, S. N.; Sillanpää, A.; Sitarek, J.; Snidaric, I.; Sobczynska, D.; Spanier, F.; Spiro, S.; Stamatescu, V.; Stamerra, A.; Steinke, B.; Storz, J.; Strah, N.; Sun, S.; Surić, T.; Takalo, L.; Takami, H.; Tavecchio, F.; Temnikov, P.; Terzić, T.; Tescaro, D.; Teshima, M.; Tibolla, O.; Torres, D. F.; Treves, A.; Uellenbeck, M.; Vogler, P.; Wagner, R. M.; Weitzel, Q.; Zabalza, V.; Zandanel, F.; Zanin, R.; Berdyugin, A.; Buson, S.; Järvelä, E.; Larsson, S.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Tammi, J.

    2012-08-01

    Context. We present the discovery of very high energy (VHE, E > 100 GeV) γ-ray emission from the BL Lac object 1ES 1215+303 by the MAGIC telescopes and simultaneous multi-wavelength data in a broad energy range from radio to γ-rays. Aims: We study the VHE γ-ray emission from 1ES 1215+303 and its relation to the emissions in other wavelengths. Methods: Triggered by an optical outburst, MAGIC observed the source in 2011 January - February for 20.3 h. The target was monitored in the optical R-band by the KVA telescope that also performed optical polarization measurements. We triggered target of opportunity observations with the Swift satellite and obtained simultaneous and quasi-simultaneous data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope and from the Metsähovi radio telescope. We also present the analysis of older MAGIC data taken in 2010. Results: The MAGIC observations of 1ES 1215+303 carried out in 2011 January - February resulted in the first detection of the source at VHE with a statistical significance of 9.4σ. Simultaneously, the source was observed in a high optical and X-ray state. In 2010 the source was observed in a lower state in optical, X-ray, and VHE, while the GeV γ-ray flux and the radio flux were comparable in 2010 and 2011. The spectral energy distribution obtained with the 2011 data can be modeled with a simple one zone SSC model, but it requires extreme values for the Doppler factor or the electron energy distribution.

  15. FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE DETECTION OF SUPERNOVA REMNANT RCW 86

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using 5.4 yr Fermi Large Area Telescope data, we report the detection of GeV γ-ray emission from the shell-type supernova remnant RCW 86 (G315.4-2.3) with a significance of ∼5.1σ. The data slightly favors an extended emission of this supernova remnant. The spectral index of RCW 86 is found to be very hard, Γ ∼ 1.4, in the 0.4-300 GeV range. A one-zone leptonic model can well fit the multi-wavelength data from radio to very high energy γ-rays. The very hard GeV γ-ray spectrum and the inferred low gas density seem to disfavor a hadronic origin for the γ-rays. The γ-ray behavior of RCW 86 is very similar to several other TeV shell-type supernova remnants, e.g., RX J1713.7-3946, RX J0852.0-4622, SN 1006, and HESS J1731-347

  16. Fermi Large Area Telescope Third Source Catalog

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2015-01-01

    We present the third Fermi Large Area Telescope source catalog (3FGL) of sources in the 100~MeV--300~GeV range. Based on the first four years of science data from the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope mission, it is the deepest yet in this energy range. Relative to the 2FGL catalog, the 3FGL catalog incorporates twice as much data as well as a number of analysis improvements, including improved calibrations at the event reconstruction level, an updated model for Galactic diffuse gamma-ray emission, a refined procedure for source detection, and improved methods for associating LAT sources with potential counterparts at other wavelengths. The 3FGL catalog includes 3033 sources above 4 sigma significance, with source location regions, spectral properties, and monthly light curves for each. Of these, 78 are flagged as potentially being due to imperfections in the model for Galactic diffuse emission. Twenty-five sources are modeled explicitly as spatially extended, and overall 232 sources are considered as identifie...

  17. Fermi Large Area Telescope Second Source Catalog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, P. L.; Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M; Allafort, A.; Antolini, E; Bonnell, J.; Cannon, A.; Celik O.; Corbet, R.; Davis, D. S.; DeCesar, M. E.; Ferrara, E. C.; Gehrels, N.; Harding, A. K.; Hays, E.; Johnson, T. E.; McConville, W.; McEnery, J. E; Perkins, J. S.; Racusin, J. L; Scargle, J. D.; Stephens, T. E.; Thompson, D. J.; Troja, E.

    2012-01-01

    We present the second catalog of high-energy gamma-ray sources detected by the Large Area Telescope (LAT), the primary science instrument on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi), derived from data taken during the first 24 months of the science phase of the mission, which began on 2008 August 4. Source detection is based on the average flux over the 24-month period. The Second Fermi-LAT catalog (2FGL) includes source location regions, defined in terms of elliptical fits to the 95% confidence regions and spectral fits in terms of power-law, exponentially cutoff power-law, or log-normal forms. Also included are flux measurements in 5 energy bands and light curves on monthly intervals for each source. Twelve sources in the catalog are modeled as spatially extended. We provide a detailed comparison of the results from this catalog with those from the first Fermi-LAT catalog (1FGL). Although the diffuse Galactic and isotropic models used in the 2FGL analysis are improved compared to the 1FGL catalog, we attach caution flags to 162 of the sources to indicate possible confusion with residual imperfections in the diffuse model. The 2FGL catalog contains 1873 sources detected and characterized in the 100 11eV to 100 GeV range of which we consider 127 as being firmly identified and 1171 as being reliably associated with counterparts of known or likely gamma-ray-producing source classes.

  18. FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE SECOND SOURCE CATALOG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nolan, P. L.; Ajello, M.; Allafort, A.; Bechtol, K.; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D. [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Abdo, A. A. [Center for Earth Observing and Space Research, College of Science, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States); Ackermann, M. [Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron DESY, D-15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Antolini, E.; Bonamente, E. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Perugia, I-06123 Perugia (Italy); Atwood, W. B.; Belfiore, A. [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics, Department of Physics and Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California at Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Axelsson, M. [Department of Astronomy, Stockholm University, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Baldini, L.; Bellazzini, R. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Ballet, J. [Laboratoire AIM, CEA-IRFU/CNRS/Universite Paris Diderot, Service d' Astrophysique, CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Barbiellini, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Trieste, I-34127 Trieste (Italy); Bastieri, D. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Padova, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Bignami, G. F., E-mail: digel@stanford.edu, E-mail: Gino.Tosti@pg.infn.it, E-mail: jean.ballet@cea.fr, E-mail: tburnett@u.washington.edu [Istituto Universitario di Studi Superiori (IUSS), I-27100 Pavia (Italy); and others

    2012-04-01

    We present the second catalog of high-energy {gamma}-ray sources detected by the Large Area Telescope (LAT), the primary science instrument on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi), derived from data taken during the first 24 months of the science phase of the mission, which began on 2008 August 4. Source detection is based on the average flux over the 24 month period. The second Fermi-LAT catalog (2FGL) includes source location regions, defined in terms of elliptical fits to the 95% confidence regions and spectral fits in terms of power-law, exponentially cutoff power-law, or log-normal forms. Also included are flux measurements in five energy bands and light curves on monthly intervals for each source. Twelve sources in the catalog are modeled as spatially extended. We provide a detailed comparison of the results from this catalog with those from the first Fermi-LAT catalog (1FGL). Although the diffuse Galactic and isotropic models used in the 2FGL analysis are improved compared to the 1FGL catalog, we attach caution flags to 162 of the sources to indicate possible confusion with residual imperfections in the diffuse model. The 2FGL catalog contains 1873 sources detected and characterized in the 100 MeV to 100 GeV range of which we consider 127 as being firmly identified and 1171 as being reliably associated with counterparts of known or likely {gamma}-ray-producing source classes.

  19. FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE SECOND SOURCE CATALOG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the second catalog of high-energy γ-ray sources detected by the Large Area Telescope (LAT), the primary science instrument on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi), derived from data taken during the first 24 months of the science phase of the mission, which began on 2008 August 4. Source detection is based on the average flux over the 24 month period. The second Fermi-LAT catalog (2FGL) includes source location regions, defined in terms of elliptical fits to the 95% confidence regions and spectral fits in terms of power-law, exponentially cutoff power-law, or log-normal forms. Also included are flux measurements in five energy bands and light curves on monthly intervals for each source. Twelve sources in the catalog are modeled as spatially extended. We provide a detailed comparison of the results from this catalog with those from the first Fermi-LAT catalog (1FGL). Although the diffuse Galactic and isotropic models used in the 2FGL analysis are improved compared to the 1FGL catalog, we attach caution flags to 162 of the sources to indicate possible confusion with residual imperfections in the diffuse model. The 2FGL catalog contains 1873 sources detected and characterized in the 100 MeV to 100 GeV range of which we consider 127 as being firmly identified and 1171 as being reliably associated with counterparts of known or likely γ-ray-producing source classes.

  20. Fermi Large Area Telescope Second Source Catalog

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2011-01-01

    We present the second catalog of high-energy gamma-ray sources detected by the Large Area Telescope (LAT), the primary science instrument on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi), derived from data taken during the first 24 months of the science phase of the mission, which began on 2008 August 4. Source detection is based on the average flux over the 24-month period. The Second Fermi-LAT catalog (2FGL) includes source location regions, defined in terms of elliptical fits to the 95% confidence regions and spectral fits in terms of power-law, exponentially cutoff power-law, or log-normal forms. Also included are flux measurements in 5 energy bands and light curves on monthly intervals for each source. Twelve sources in the catalog are modeled as spatially extended. We provide a detailed comparison of the results from this catalog with those from the first Fermi-LAT catalog (1FGL). Although the diffuse Galactic and isotropic models used in the 2FGL analysis are improved compared to the 1FGL catalog, we att...

  1. FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE FIRST SOURCE CATALOG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a catalog of high-energy gamma-ray sources detected by the Large Area Telescope (LAT), the primary science instrument on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi), during the first 11 months of the science phase of the mission, which began on 2008 August 4. The First Fermi-LAT catalog (1FGL) contains 1451 sources detected and characterized in the 100 MeV to 100 GeV range. Source detection was based on the average flux over the 11 month period, and the threshold likelihood Test Statistic is 25, corresponding to a significance of just over 4σ. The 1FGL catalog includes source location regions, defined in terms of elliptical fits to the 95% confidence regions and power-law spectral fits as well as flux measurements in five energy bands for each source. In addition, monthly light curves are provided. Using a protocol defined before launch we have tested for several populations of gamma-ray sources among the sources in the catalog. For individual LAT-detected sources we provide firm identifications or plausible associations with sources in other astronomical catalogs. Identifications are based on correlated variability with counterparts at other wavelengths, or on spin or orbital periodicity. For the catalogs and association criteria that we have selected, 630 of the sources are unassociated. Care was taken to characterize the sensitivity of the results to the model of interstellar diffuse gamma-ray emission used to model the bright foreground, with the result that 161 sources at low Galactic latitudes and toward bright local interstellar clouds are flagged as having properties that are strongly dependent on the model or as potentially being due to incorrectly modeled structure in the Galactic diffuse emission.

  2. MULTI-WAVELENGTH HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE PHOTOMETRY OF STELLAR POPULATIONS IN NGC 288

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piotto, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, ' ' Galileo Galilei' ' Universita di Padova, Vicolo dell' Osservatorio 3, Padova I-35122 (Italy); Milone, A. P.; Marino, A. F.; Jerjen, H. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, Cotter Road, Weston, ACT 2611 (Australia); Bedin, L. R. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova, Vicolo dell' Osservatorio 5, I-35122 Padua (Italy); Anderson, J.; Bellini, A. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3800 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Cassisi, S., E-mail: giampaolo.piotto@unipd.it, E-mail: luigi.bedin@oapd.inaf.it, E-mail: milone@mso.anu.edu.au, E-mail: amarino@mso.anu.edu.au, E-mail: jerjen@mso.anu.edu.au, E-mail: jayander@stsci.edu, E-mail: bellini@stsci.edu, E-mail: cassisi@oa-teramo.inaf.it [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Collurania, via Mentore Maggini, I-64100 Teramo (Italy)

    2013-09-20

    We present new UV observations for NGC 288, taken with the WFC3 detector on board the Hubble Space Telescope, and combine them with existing optical data from the archive to explore the multiple-population phenomenon in this globular cluster (GC). The WFC3's UV filters have demonstrated an uncanny ability to distinguish multiple populations along all photometric sequences in GCs thanks to their exquisite sensitivity to the atmospheric changes that are telltale signs of second-generation enrichment. Optical filters, on the other hand, are more sensitive to stellar-structure changes related to helium enhancement. By combining both UV and optical data, we can measure the helium variation. We quantify this enhancement for NGC 288 and find that the variation is typical of what we have come to expect in other clusters.

  3. MULTIWAVELENGTH PHOTOMETRY AND HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE SPECTROSCOPY OF THE OLD NOVA V842 CENTAURUS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present ground-based optical and near infrared photometric observations and Hubble Space Telescope (HST) COS spectroscopic observations of the old nova V842 Cen (Nova Cen 1986). Analysis of the optical light curves reveals a peak at 56.5 ± 0.3 s with an amplitude of 8.9 ± 4.2 mma, which is consistent with the rotation of a magnetic white dwarf primary in V842 Cen that was detected earlier by Woudt et al., and led to its classification as an intermediate polar. However, our UV lightcurve created from the COS time-tag spectra does not show this periodicity. Our synthetic spectral analysis of an HST COS spectrum rules out a hot white dwarf photosphere as the source of the FUV flux. The best-fitting model to the COS spectrum is a full optically thick accretion disk with no magnetic truncation, a low disk inclination angle, low accretion rate and a distance less than half the published distance that was determined on the basis of interstellar sodium D line strengths. Truncated accretion disks with truncation radii of 3 Rwd and 5 Rwd yielded unsatisfactory agreement with the COS data. The accretion rate is unexpectedly low for a classical nova only 24 yr after the explosion when the accretion rate is expected to be high and the white dwarf should still be very hot, especially if irradiation of the donor star took place. Our low accretion rate is consistent with those derived from X-ray and ground-based optical data

  4. Gamma Large Area Silicon Telescope (GLAST)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The recent discoveries and excitement generated by EGRET have prompted an investigation into modern technologies ultimately leading to the next generation space-based gamma ray telescope. The goal is to design a detector that will increase the data acquisition rate by almost two orders of magnitude beyond EGRET, while at the same time improving on the angular resolution, the energy measurement of reconstructed gamma rays, and the triggering capability of the instrument. The GLAST proposal is based on the assertion that silicon particle detectors are the technology of choice for space application: no consumables, no gas volume, robust (versus fragile), long lived, and self triggering. The GLAST detector is roughly modeled after EGRET in that a tracking module precedes a calorimeter. The GLAST Tracker has planes of thin radiatior interspersed with planes of crossed-strip (x,y) 300-μm-pitch silicon detectors to measure the coordinates of converted electron-positron pairs. The gap between the layers (∼5 cm) provides a lever arm in track fitting resulting in an angular resolution of 0.1 degree at high energy (the low energy angular resolution at 100 MeV would be about 2 degree, limited by multiple scattering). A possible GLAST calorimeter is made of a mosaic of Csl crystals of order 10 r.l. in depth, with silicon photodiodes readout. The increased depth of the GLAST calorimeter over EGRET's extends the energy range to about 300 GeV

  5. Gamma Large Area Silicon Telescope (GLAST)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godfrey, G.L.

    1993-11-01

    The recent discoveries and excitement generated by EGRET have prompted an investigation into modern technologies ultimately leading to the next generation space-based gamma ray telescope. The goal is to design a detector that will increase the data acquisition rate by almost two orders of magnitude beyond EGRET, while at the same time improving on the angular resolution, the energy measurement of reconstructed gamma rays, and the triggering capability of the instrument. The GLAST proposal is based on the assertion that silicon particle detectors are the technology of choice for space application: no consumables, no gas volume, robust (versus fragile), long lived, and self triggering. The GLAST detector is roughly modeled after EGRET in that a tracking module precedes a calorimeter. The GLAST Tracker has planes of thin radiatior interspersed with planes of crossed-strip (x,y) 300-{mu}m-pitch silicon detectors to measure the coordinates of converted electron-positron pairs. The gap between the layers ({approximately}5 cm) provides a lever arm in track fitting resulting in an angular resolution of 0.1{degree} at high energy (the low energy angular resolution at 100 MeV would be about 2{degree}, limited by multiple scattering). A possible GLAST calorimeter is made of a mosaic of Csl crystals of order 10 r.l. in depth, with silicon photodiodes readout. The increased depth of the GLAST calorimeter over EGRET`s extends the energy range to about 300 GeV.

  6. Fermi Large Area Telescope Bright Gamma-ray Source List

    OpenAIRE

    Abdo, A. A.

    2009-01-01

    Following its launch in June 2008, the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi) began a sky survey in August. The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on Fermi in 3 months produced a deeper and better-resolved map of the gamma-ray sky than any previous space mission. We present here initial results for energies above 100 MeV for the 205 most significant (statistical significance greater than ~10-sigma) gamma-ray sources in these data. These are the best-characterized and best-localized point-like (i.e.,...

  7. The Large Area Telescope on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope Mission

    CERN Document Server

    Atwood, W B

    2009-01-01

    (Abridged) The Large Area Telescope (Fermi/LAT, hereafter LAT), the primary instrument on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi) mission, is an imaging, wide field-of-view, high-energy gamma-ray telescope, covering the energy range from below 20 MeV to more than 300 GeV. This paper describes the LAT, its pre-flight expected performance, and summarizes the key science objectives that will be addressed. On-orbit performance will be presented in detail in a subsequent paper. The LAT is a pair-conversion telescope with a precision tracker and calorimeter, each consisting of a 4x4 array of 16 modules, a segmented anticoincidence detector that covers the tracker array, and a programmable trigger and data acquisition system. Each tracker module has a vertical stack of 18 x,y tracking planes, including two layers (x and y) of single-sided silicon strip detectors and high-Z converter material (tungsten) per tray. Every calorimeter module has 96 CsI(Tl) crystals, arranged in an 8 layer hodoscopic configuration wit...

  8. Building Large Area CZT Imaging Detectors for a Wide-Field Hard X-ray Telescope - ProtoEXIST1

    CERN Document Server

    Hong, J; Grindlay, J; Chammas, N; Barthelemy, S; Baker, R; Gehrels, N; Nelson, K E; Labov, S; Collins, J; Cook, W R; McLean, R; Harrison, F

    2009-01-01

    We have constructed a moderately large area (32 cm2), fine pixel (2.5 mm pixel, 5 mm thick) CZT imaging detector which constitutes the first section of a detector module (256 cm2) developed for a balloon-borne wide-field hard X-ray telescope, ProtoEXIST1. ProtoEXIST1 is a prototype for the High Energy Telescope (HET) in the Energetic X-ray imaging Survey Telescope (EXIST), a next generation space-borne multi-wavelength telescope. We have constructed a large (nearly gapless) detector plane through a modularization scheme by tiling of a large number of 2 cm x 2 cm CZT crystals. Our innovative packaging method is ideal for many applications such as coded-aperture imaging, where a large, continuous detector plane is desirable for the optimal performance. Currently we have been able to achieve an energy resolution of 3.2 keV (FWHM) at 59.6 keV on average, which is exceptional considering the moderate pixel size and the number of detectors in simultaneous operation. We expect to complete two modules (512 cm2) withi...

  9. High Energy Astrophysics with the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hays, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews some of the findings of the Large Area Telescope (LAT) aboard the Fermi Observatory. It includes information about the LAT, and the Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (GBM), detection of the quiet sun and the moon in gamma rays, Pulsars observed by the observatory, Globular Star Clusters, Active Galactic Nucleus, and Gamma-Ray Bursts, with specific information about GRB 080916C.

  10. Cosmic Ray Studies with the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope Large Area Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, David J.; Baldini, L.; Uchiyama, Y.

    2012-01-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope provides both direct and indirect measurements of galactic cosmic rays (CR). The LAT high-statistics observations of the 7 GeV - 1 TeV electron plus positron spectrum and limits on spatial anisotropy constrain models for this cosmic-ray component. On a galactic scale, the LAT observations indicate that cosmic-ray sources may be more plentiful in the outer Galaxy than expected or that the scale height of the cosmic-ray diffusive halo is larger than conventional models. Production of cosmic rays in supernova remnants (SNR) is supported by the LAT gamma-ray studies of several of these, both young SNR and those interacting with molecular clouds.

  11. Constraints on the Galactic Population of TEV Pulsar Wind Nebulae Using Fermi Large Area Telescope Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Acero, F; Ajello, M; Allafort, A; Baldini, L; Ballet, J; Barbiellini, G; Bastieri, D; Bechtol, K; Bellazzini, R; Blandford, R D; Bloom, E D; Bonamente, E; Bottacini, E; Brandt, T J; Bregeon, J; Brigida, M; Bruel, P; Buehler, R; Buson, S; Caliandro, G A; Cameron, R A; Caraveo, P A; Cecchi, C; Charles, E; Chaves, R C G; Chekhtman, A; Chiang, J; Chiaro, G; Ciprini, S; Claus, R; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Conrad, J; Cutini, S; Dalton, M; D'Ammando, F; de Palma, F; Dermer, C D; Di Venere, L; Silva, E do Couto e; Drell, P S; Drlica-Wagner, A; Falletti, L; Favuzzi, C; Fegan, S J; Ferrara, E C; Focke, W B; Franckowiak, A; Fukazawa, Y; Funk, S; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Gasparrini, D; Giglietto, N; Giordano, F; Giroletti, M; Glanzman, T; Godfrey, G; Grégoire, T; Grenier, I A; Grondin, M -H; Grove, J E; Guiriec, S; Hadasch, D; Hanabata, Y; Harding, A K; Hayashida, M; Hayashi, K; Hays, E; Hewitt, J; Hill, A B; Horan, D; Hou, X; Hughes, R E; Inoue, Y; Jackson, M S; Jogler, T; Jóhannesson, G; Johnson, A S; Kamae, T; Kawano, T; Kerr, M; Knödlseder, J; Kuss, M; Lande, J; Larsson, S; Latronico, L; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Longo, F; Loparco, F; Lovellette, M N; Lubrano, P; Marelli, M; Massaro, F; Mayer, M; Mazziotta, M N; McEnery, J E; Mehault, J; Michelson, P F; Mitthumsiri, W; Mizuno, T; Monte, C; Monzani, M E; Morselli, A; Moskalenko, I V; Murgia, S; Nakamori, T; Nemmen, R; Nuss, E; Ohsugi, T; Okumura, A; Orienti, M; Orlando, E; Ormes, J F; Paneque, D; Panetta, J H; Perkins, J S; Pesce-Rollins, M; Piron, F; Pivato, G; Porter, T A; Rainò, S; Rando, R; Razzano, M; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Reposeur, T; Ritz, S; Roth, M; Rousseau, R; Parkinson, P M Saz; Schulz, A; Sgrò, C; Siskind, E J; Smith, D A; Spandre, G; Spinelli, P; Suson, D J; Takahashi, H; Takeuchi, Y; Thayer, J G; Thayer, J B; Thompson, D J; Tibaldo, L; Tibolla, O; Tinivella, M; Torres, D F; Tosti, G; Troja, E; Uchiyama, Y; Vandenbroucke, J; Vasileiou, V; Vianello, G; Vitale, V; Werner, M; Winer, B L; Wood, K S; Yang, Z

    2013-01-01

    Pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe) have been established as the most populous class of TeV gamma-ray emitters. Since launch, the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT)identified five high-energy (100MeV multi-wavelength data available and the new results provided by Fermi-LAT give us an opportunity to find new PWNe and to explore the radiative processes taking place in known ones. The TeV gamma-ray unidentifiedsources (UNIDs) are the best candidates for finding new PWNe. Using 45 months of Fermi-LAT data for energies above 10 GeV, an analysis was performed near the position of 58TeV PWNe and UNIDs within 5deg of the Galactic Plane to establish new constraints on PWNe properties and find new clues on the nature of UNIDs. Of the 58 sources, 30 were detected, and this work provides their gamma-rayfluxes for energies above 10 GeV. The spectral energy distributions (SED) anduppe...

  12. Co-evolution of AGN and Star-forming Galaxies in the Australia Telescope Large Area Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Norris, Ray P

    2014-01-01

    ATLAS (Australia Telescope Large Area Survey) is a wide deep radio survey which is distinguished by its comprehensive multi-wavelength approach. ATLAS is creating a large dataset of radio-selected galaxies for studying the evolution and inter-relationship of star-forming and active galaxies. Although the project is far from complete, we are already starting to answer some of these questions, and have stumbled across three surprises along the way: * FRI/FRII radio-loud AGN embedded within spiral galaxies, * radio-bright AGN which are unexpectedly faint in the infrared, and which may be at high redshift * IR-luminous radio-quiet AGN which are partly responsible for the wide variations in reported values of the radio-infrared ratio These and other observations suggest that the AGN activity and star formation become increasingly inter-dependent at high redshifts.

  13. Photometric Redshifts for the Large-Area Stripe 82X Multiwavelength Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasnim Ananna, Tonima; Salvato, Mara; Urry, C. Megan; LaMassa, Stephanie M.; STRIPE 82X

    2016-06-01

    The Stripe 82X survey currently includes 6000 X-ray sources in 31.3 square degrees of XMM-Newton and Chandra X-ray coverage, most of which are AGN. Using a maximum-likelihood approach, we identified optical and infrared counterparts in the SDSS, VHS K-band and WISE W1-band catalogs. 1200 objects which had different best associations in different catalogs were checked by eye. Our most recent paper provided the multiwavelength catalogs for this sample. More than 1000 counterparts have spectroscopic redshifts, either from SDSS spectroscopy or our own follow-up program. Using the extensive multiwavelength data in this field, we provide photometric redshift estimates for most of the remaining sources, which are 80-90% accurate according to the training set. Our sample has a large number of candidates that are very faint in optical and bright in IR. We expect a large fraction of these objects to be the obscured AGN sample we need to complete the census on black hole growth at a range of redshifts.

  14. The Large Area Telescope on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope Mission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Large Area Telescope (Fermi/LAT, hereafter LAT), the primary instrument on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi) mission, is an imaging, wide field-of-view (FoV), high-energy γ-ray telescope, covering the energy range from below 20 MeV to more than 300 GeV. The LAT was built by an international collaboration with contributions from space agencies, high-energy particle physics institutes, and universities in France, Italy, Japan, Sweden, and the United States. This paper describes the LAT, its preflight expected performance, and summarizes the key science objectives that will be addressed. On-orbit performance will be presented in detail in a subsequent paper. The LAT is a pair-conversion telescope with a precision tracker and calorimeter, each consisting of a 4 x 4 array of 16 modules, a segmented anticoincidence detector that covers the tracker array, and a programmable trigger and data acquisition system. Each tracker module has a vertical stack of 18 (x, y) tracking planes, including two layers (x and y) of single-sided silicon strip detectors and high-Z converter material (tungsten) per tray. Every calorimeter module has 96 CsI(Tl) crystals, arranged in an eight-layer hodoscopic configuration with a total depth of 8.6 radiation lengths, giving both longitudinal and transverse information about the energy deposition pattern. The calorimeter's depth and segmentation enable the high-energy reach of the LAT and contribute significantly to background rejection. The aspect ratio of the tracker (height/width) is 0.4, allowing a large FoV (2.4 sr) and ensuring that most pair-conversion showers initiated in the tracker will pass into the calorimeter for energy measurement. Data obtained with the LAT are intended to (1) permit rapid notification of high-energy γ-ray bursts and transients and facilitate monitoring of variable sources, (2) yield an extensive catalog of several thousand high-energy sources obtained from an all-sky survey, (3) measure spectra

  15. The Large Area Telescope on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope Mission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atwood, W.B.; /UC, Santa Cruz; Abdo, Aous A.; /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C.; Ackermann, M.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Anderson, B. /UC, Santa Cruz; Axelsson, M.; /Stockholm U.; Baldini, L.; /INFN, Pisa; Ballet, J.; /DAPNIA, Saclay; Band, D.L.; /NASA, Goddard /NASA, Goddard; Barbiellini, Guido; /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U.; Bartelt, J.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bastieri, Denis; /INFN, Padua /Padua U.; Baughman, B.M.; /Ohio State U.; Bechtol, K.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bederede, D.; /DAPNIA, Saclay; Bellardi, F.; /INFN, Pisa; Bellazzini, R.; /INFN, Pisa; Berenji, B.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bignami, G.F.; /Pavia U.; Bisello, D.; /INFN, Padua /Padua U.; Bissaldi, E.; /Garching, Max Planck Inst., MPE; Blandford, R.D.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /NASA, Goddard /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /INFN, Pisa /INFN, Pisa /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Ecole Polytechnique /Washington U., Seattle /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /IASF, Milan /IASF, Milan /Kalmar U. /Royal Inst. Tech., Stockholm /DAPNIA, Saclay /ASI, Rome /INFN, Pisa /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /George Mason U. /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /NASA, Goddard /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /DAPNIA, Saclay /NASA, Goddard /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Montpellier U. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; /more authors..

    2009-05-15

    The Large Area Telescope (Fermi/LAT, hereafter LAT), the primary instrument on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi) mission, is an imaging, wide field-of-view (FoV), high-energy {gamma}-ray telescope, covering the energy range from below 20 MeV to more than 300 GeV. The LAT was built by an international collaboration with contributions from space agencies, high-energy particle physics institutes, and universities in France, Italy, Japan, Sweden, and the United States. This paper describes the LAT, its preflight expected performance, and summarizes the key science objectives that will be addressed. On-orbit performance will be presented in detail in a subsequent paper. The LAT is a pair-conversion telescope with a precision tracker and calorimeter, each consisting of a 4 x 4 array of 16 modules, a segmented anticoincidence detector that covers the tracker array, and a programmable trigger and data acquisition system. Each tracker module has a vertical stack of 18 (x, y) tracking planes, including two layers (x and y) of single-sided silicon strip detectors and high-Z converter material (tungsten) per tray. Every calorimeter module has 96 CsI(Tl) crystals, arranged in an eight-layer hodoscopic configuration with a total depth of 8.6 radiation lengths, giving both longitudinal and transverse information about the energy deposition pattern. The calorimeter's depth and segmentation enable the high-energy reach of the LAT and contribute significantly to background rejection. The aspect ratio of the tracker (height/width) is 0.4, allowing a large FoV (2.4 sr) and ensuring that most pair-conversion showers initiated in the tracker will pass into the calorimeter for energy measurement. Data obtained with the LAT are intended to (1) permit rapid notification of high-energy {gamma}-ray bursts and transients and facilitate monitoring of variable sources, (2) yield an extensive catalog of several thousand high-energy sources obtained from an all-sky survey, (3

  16. Detections of millisecond pulsars with the FERMI Large Area Telescope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Fermi observatory was launched on June 11, 2008. It hosts the Large Area Telescope (LAT), sensitive to gamma-ray photons from 20 MeV to over 300 GeV. When the LAT began its activity, nine young and energetic pulsars were known in gamma ray range. At least several tens of pulsar detections by the LAT were predicted before launch. The LAT also allowed the study of millisecond pulsars (MSPs), never firmly detected in gamma ray range before Fermi. This thesis first presents the pulsar timing campaign for the LAT, in collaboration with large radio telescopes and X-ray telescopes, allowing for high sensitivity pulsed searches. Furthermore, it lead to quasi-homogeneous coverage of the galactic MSPs, so that the search for pulsations in LAT data for this population of stars was not affected by an a-priori bias. We present a search for pulsations from these objects in LAT data. For the first time, eight galactic MSPs have been detected as sources of pulsed gamma-ray emission over 100 MeV. In addition, a couple of good candidates for future detection are seen. A similar search for globular cluster MSPs was not successful so far. Comparison of the phase-aligned gamma-ray and radio light curves, as well as the spectral shapes, leads to the conclusion that their gamma-ray emission is similar to that of normal pulsars, and is probably produced in the outer-magnetosphere. This discovery suggests that many unresolved gamma-ray sources are unknown MSPs. (author)

  17. Searches for Dark Matter with the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    The nature of dark matter is a longstanding enigma of physics; it may consist of particles beyond the Standard Model that are still elusive to experiments. Among indirect search techniques, which look for stable products from the annihilation or decay of dark matter particles, or from axions coupling to high-energy photons, observations of the gamma-ray sky have come to prominence over the last few years, because of the excellent sensitivity and full-sky coverage of the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope mission. The LAT energy range from 20 MeV to above 300 GeV is particularly well suited for searching for products of the interactions of dark matter particles. In this talk I will describe targets studied for evidence of dark matter with the LAT, and review the status of searches performed with up to six years of LAT data. I will also discuss the factors that determine the sensitivities of these searches, including the magnitudes of the signals and the relevant backgrounds, c...

  18. FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE OBSERVATION OF SUPERNOVA REMNANT S147

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katsuta, J.; Uchiyama, Y.; Tanaka, T.; Tajima, H.; Bechtol, K.; Funk, S.; Lande, J. [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Ballet, J. [Laboratoire AIM, CEA-IRFU/CNRS/Universite Paris Diderot, Service d' Astrophysique, CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Hanabata, Y. [Department of Physical Sciences, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Lemoine-Goumard, M. [Universite Bordeaux 1, CNRS/IN2p3, Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Bordeaux Gradignan, 33175 Gradignan (France); Takahashi, T., E-mail: katsuta@slac.stanford.edu, E-mail: uchiyama@slac.stanford.edu [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan)

    2012-06-20

    We present an analysis of gamma-ray data obtained with the Large Area Telescope on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope in the region around supernova remnant (SNR) S147 (G180.0-1.7). A spatially extended gamma-ray source detected in an energy range of 0.2-10 GeV is found to coincide with SNR S147. We confirm its spatial extension at >5{sigma} confidence level. The gamma-ray flux is (3.8 {+-} 0.6) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -8} photons cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}, corresponding to a luminosity of 1.3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 34} (d/1.3 kpc){sup 2} erg s{sup -1} in this energy range. The gamma-ray emission exhibits a possible spatial correlation with the prominent H{alpha} filaments of SNR S147. There is no indication that the gamma-ray emission comes from the associated pulsar PSR J0538+2817. The gamma-ray spectrum integrated over the remnant is likely dominated by the decay of neutral {pi} mesons produced through the proton-proton collisions in the filaments. The reacceleration of the pre-existing cosmic rays and subsequent adiabatic compression in the filaments is sufficient to provide the energy density required of high-energy protons.

  19. FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE OBSERVATION OF SUPERNOVA REMNANT S147

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present an analysis of gamma-ray data obtained with the Large Area Telescope on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope in the region around supernova remnant (SNR) S147 (G180.0–1.7). A spatially extended gamma-ray source detected in an energy range of 0.2-10 GeV is found to coincide with SNR S147. We confirm its spatial extension at >5σ confidence level. The gamma-ray flux is (3.8 ± 0.6) × 10–8 photons cm–2 s–1, corresponding to a luminosity of 1.3 × 1034 (d/1.3 kpc)2 erg s–1 in this energy range. The gamma-ray emission exhibits a possible spatial correlation with the prominent Hα filaments of SNR S147. There is no indication that the gamma-ray emission comes from the associated pulsar PSR J0538+2817. The gamma-ray spectrum integrated over the remnant is likely dominated by the decay of neutral π mesons produced through the proton-proton collisions in the filaments. The reacceleration of the pre-existing cosmic rays and subsequent adiabatic compression in the filaments is sufficient to provide the energy density required of high-energy protons.

  20. Fermi Large Area Telescope observations of GRB 110625A

    CERN Document Server

    Tam, P H Thomas; Fan, Yi-Zhong

    2012-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) that emit photons at GeV energies form a small but significant population of GRBs. However, the number of GRBs whose GeV-emitting period is simultaneously observed in X-rays remains small. We report gamma-ray observations of GRB 110625A using Fermi's Large Area Telescope (LAT) in the energy range 100 MeV to 20 GeV. Gamma-ray emission at these energies was clearly detected using data taken between 180s and 580s after the burst, an epoch after the prompt emission phase. The GeV light curve differs from a simple power-law decay, and probably consists of two emission periods. Simultaneous Swift/XRT observations did not show flaring behaviors as in the case of GRB 100728A. We discuss the possibility that the GeV emission is the synchrotron self-Compton radiation of underlying ultraviolet flares.

  1. Gamma-Ray Observations of the Supernova Remnant RX J0852.0-4622 with the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, T.; Allafort, A.; Ballet, J.; Funk, S.; Giordano, F.; Hewitt, J.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Tajima, H.; Tibolla, O.; Uchiyama, Y.

    2011-01-01

    We report on gamma-ray observations of the supernova remnant (SNR) RX J0852.04622 with the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. In the Fermi-LAT data, we find a spatially extended source at the location of the SNR. The extension is consistent with the SNR size seen in other wavelengths such as X-rays and TeV gamma rays, leading to the identification of the gamma-ray source with the SNR. The spectrum is well described as a power law with a photon index of = 1.85 0.06 (stat)+0.18 0.19 (sys), which smoothly connects to the H.E.S.S. spectrum in the TeV energy band. We discuss the gamma-ray emission mechanism based on multiwavelength data. The broadband data can be fit well by a model in which the gamma rays are of hadronic origin. We also consider a scenario with inverse Compton scattering of electrons as the emission mechanism of the gamma rays. Although the leptonic model predicts a harder spectrum in the Fermi-LAT energy range, the model can fit the data considering the statistical and systematic errors.

  2. GAMMA-RAY OBSERVATIONS OF THE SUPERNOVA REMNANT RX J0852.0-4622 WITH THE FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on gamma-ray observations of the supernova remnant (SNR) RX J0852.0-4622 with the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. In the Fermi-LAT data, we find a spatially extended source at the location of the SNR. The extension is consistent with the SNR size seen in other wavelengths such as X-rays and TeV gamma rays, leading to the identification of the gamma-ray source with the SNR. The spectrum is well described as a power law with a photon index of Γ = 1.85 ± 0.06 (stat)+0.18-0.19 (sys), which smoothly connects to the H.E.S.S. spectrum in the TeV energy band. We discuss the gamma-ray emission mechanism based on multiwavelength data. The broadband data can be fit well by a model in which the gamma rays are of hadronic origin. We also consider a scenario with inverse Compton scattering of electrons as the emission mechanism of the gamma rays. Although the leptonic model predicts a harder spectrum in the Fermi-LAT energy range, the model can fit the data considering the statistical and systematic errors.

  3. FERMI/LARGE AREA TELESCOPE DISCOVERY OF GAMMA-RAY EMISSION FROM THE FLAT-SPECTRUM RADIO QUASAR PKS 1454-354

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the discovery by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) onboard the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope of high-energy γ-ray (GeV) emission from the flat-spectrum radio quasar PKS 1454-354 (z = 1.424). On 2008 September 4, the source rose to a peak flux of (3.5 ± 0.7) x 10-6 ph cm-2 s-1 (E > 100 MeV) on a timescale of hours and then slowly dropped over the following 2 days. No significant spectral changes occurred during the flare. Fermi/LAT observations also showed that PKS 1454-354 is the most probable counterpart of the unidentified EGRET source 3EG J1500-3509. Multiwavelength measurements performed during the following days (7 September with Swift; 6-7 September with the ground-based optical telescope Automated Telescope for Optical Monitoring; 13 September with the Australia Telescope Compact Array) resulted in radio, optical, UV, and X-ray fluxes greater than archival data, confirming the activity of PKS 1454-354.

  4. Automated Science Processing for the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, James

    2012-03-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) onboard the Fermi γ-ray Space Telescope provides high sensitivity to emission from astronomical sources over a broad energy range (20MeV to >300 GeV) and has substantially improved spatial, energy, and timing resolution compared with previous observatories at these energies [4]. One of the LAT's most innovative features is that it performs continuous monitoring of the gamma-ray sky with all-sky coverage every 3 h. This survey strategy greatly enables the search for transient behavior from both previously known and unknown sources. In addition, the constant accumulation of data allows for increasingly improved measurements of persistent sources. These include the Milky Way Galaxy itself, which produces gamma-ray emission as a result from interactions of cosmic rays with gas in the Galaxy, and potential signals from candidate dark matter particles in the Milky Way and its neighboring galaxies. The automated science processing (ASP) functionality of the Fermi Instrument Science Operations Center (ISOC) is a part of the automated data pipeline that processes the raw data arriving from the spacecraft and puts it into a form amenable to scientific analysis. ASP operates at the end of the pipeline on the processed data and is intended to detect and characterize transient behavior (e.g., short time scale increases or “flares” in the gamma-ray flux) from astronomical sources. On detection of a flaring event, ASP will alert other observatories on a timely basis so that they may train their telescopes on the flaring source in order to detect possible correlated activity in other wavelength bands. Since the data from the LAT is archived and publicly available as soon as it is processed, ASP serves mainly to provide triggers for those follow-up observations; its estimates of the properties of the flaring sources (flux, spectral index, location) need not be the best possible, as subsequent off-line analysis can provide more refined

  5. CONSTRAINTS ON THE GALACTIC POPULATION OF TeV PULSAR WIND NEBULAE USING FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE OBSERVATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acero, F.; Brandt, T. J. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Ackermann, M. [Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron DESY, D-15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Ajello, M. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, 7 Gauss Way, Berkeley, CA 94720-7450 (United States); Allafort, A.; Bechtol, K.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bottacini, E.; Buehler, R. [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Baldini, L. [Universita di Pisa and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Ballet, J. [Laboratoire AIM, CEA-IRFU/CNRS/Universite Paris Diderot, Service d' Astrophysique, CEA Saclay, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Barbiellini, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Trieste, I-34127 Trieste (Italy); Bastieri, D.; Buson, S. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Padova, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Bellazzini, R.; Bregeon, J. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Bonamente, E. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Perugia, I-06123 Perugia (Italy); Brigida, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica ' ' M. Merlin' ' dell' Universita e del Politecnico di Bari, I-70126 Bari (Italy); Bruel, P., E-mail: funk@slac.stanford.edu, E-mail: joshualande@gmail.com, E-mail: lemoine@cenbg.in2p3.fr, E-mail: rousseau@cenbg.in2p3.fr [Laboratoire Leprince-Ringuet, Ecole polytechnique, CNRS/IN2P3, F-91128 Palaiseau (France); and others

    2013-08-10

    Pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe) have been established as the most populous class of TeV {gamma}-ray emitters. Since launch, the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) has identified five high-energy (100 MeV < E < 100 GeV) {gamma}-ray sources as PWNe and detected a large number of PWN candidates, all powered by young and energetic pulsars. The wealth of multi-wavelength data available and the new results provided by Fermi-LAT give us an opportunity to find new PWNe and to explore the radiative processes taking place in known ones. The TeV {gamma}-ray unidentified (UNID) sources are the best candidates for finding new PWNe. Using 45 months of Fermi-LAT data for energies above 10 GeV, an analysis was performed near the position of 58 TeV PWNe and UNIDs within 5 Degree-Sign of the Galactic plane to establish new constraints on PWN properties and find new clues on the nature of UNIDs. Of the 58 sources, 30 were detected, and this work provides their {gamma}-ray fluxes for energies above 10 GeV. The spectral energy distributions and upper limits, in the multi-wavelength context, also provide new information on the source nature and can help distinguish between emission scenarios, i.e., between classification as a pulsar candidate or as a PWN candidate. Six new GeV PWN candidates are described in detail and compared with existing models. A population study of GeV PWN candidates as a function of the pulsar/PWN system characteristics is presented.

  6. CONSTRAINTS ON THE GALACTIC POPULATION OF TeV PULSAR WIND NEBULAE USING FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE OBSERVATIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe) have been established as the most populous class of TeV γ-ray emitters. Since launch, the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) has identified five high-energy (100 MeV < E < 100 GeV) γ-ray sources as PWNe and detected a large number of PWN candidates, all powered by young and energetic pulsars. The wealth of multi-wavelength data available and the new results provided by Fermi-LAT give us an opportunity to find new PWNe and to explore the radiative processes taking place in known ones. The TeV γ-ray unidentified (UNID) sources are the best candidates for finding new PWNe. Using 45 months of Fermi-LAT data for energies above 10 GeV, an analysis was performed near the position of 58 TeV PWNe and UNIDs within 5° of the Galactic plane to establish new constraints on PWN properties and find new clues on the nature of UNIDs. Of the 58 sources, 30 were detected, and this work provides their γ-ray fluxes for energies above 10 GeV. The spectral energy distributions and upper limits, in the multi-wavelength context, also provide new information on the source nature and can help distinguish between emission scenarios, i.e., between classification as a pulsar candidate or as a PWN candidate. Six new GeV PWN candidates are described in detail and compared with existing models. A population study of GeV PWN candidates as a function of the pulsar/PWN system characteristics is presented

  7. The Fermi Large Area Telescope as a Galactic Supernovae Axionscope

    CERN Document Server

    Meyer, Manuel; Mirizzi, Alessandro; Conrad, Jan; Sanchez-Conde, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    In a Galactic core-collapse supernova (SN), axionlike particles (ALPs) could be emitted via the Primakoff process and eventually convert into $\\gamma$ rays in the magnetic field of the Milky Way. From a data-driven sensitivity estimate, we find that, for a SN exploding in our Galaxy, the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) would be able to explore the photon-ALP coupling down to $g_{a\\gamma} \\simeq 2 \\times 10^{-13}\\,$GeV$^{-1}$ for an ALP mass $m_a \\lesssim 10^{-9}\\,$eV. These values are out of reach of next generation laboratory experiments. In this event, the Fermi LAT would probe large regions of the ALP parameter space invoked to explain the anomalous transparency of the Universe to $\\gamma$ rays, stellar cooling anomalies, and cold dark matter. If no $\\gamma$-ray emission were to be detected, Fermi-LAT observations would improve current bounds derived from SN1987A by more than one order of magnitude.

  8. FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE OBSERVATIONS OF THE VELA PULSAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Vela pulsar is the brightest persistent source in the GeV sky and thus is the traditional first target for new γ-ray observatories. We report here on initial Fermi Large Area Telescope observations during verification phase pointed exposure and early sky survey scanning. We have used the Vela signal to verify Fermi timing and angular resolution. The high-quality pulse profile, with some 32,400 pulsed photons at E ≥ 0.03 GeV, shows new features, including pulse structure as fine as 0.3 ms and a distinct third peak, which shifts in phase with energy. We examine the high-energy behavior of the pulsed emission; initial spectra suggest a phase-averaged power-law index of Γ = 1.51+0.05-0.04 with an exponential cutoff at Ec = 2.9 ± 0.1 GeV. Spectral fits with generalized cutoffs of the form e-(E/Ec)b require b ≤ 1, which is inconsistent with magnetic pair attenuation, and thus favor outer-magnetosphere emission models. Finally, we report on upper limits to any unpulsed component, as might be associated with a surrounding pulsar wind nebula.

  9. GLAST large area telescope - daily survey of high energy sky

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GLAST Large Area Telescope was proposed to NASA in 1999 as a follow-up of EGRET on-board Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory by an international collaboration. The proposal has been approved as a part of the GLAST observatory mission in its capability to explore a wide range of astrophysics with 5-40 times higher sensitivity and extended energy coverage (20MeV to 300GeV) than EGRET. The instrument consists of 16 towers of e+e- pair tracker, 16 blocks of segmented electro-magnetic calorimeter, and a set of anti-coicidence plastic scintillator tiles covering the tracker towers. It will have 5-10 times larger on-axis effective area, 6 times wider field-of-view (FOV), and up to 5 times better angular resolution when compared with EGRET. The Large Area Telescope will cover about 40% of the sky above the Earth's horizon in its FOV at any given time and will scan nearly the entire Universe every orbit (∼ 90min): about 20% of Gamma-Ray Bursts will be observed from the onset of the bursts to the initial after-glow phase; all longer-lasting transients and variabilities will be detected daily at the improved sensitivity. The instrument has been prototyped twice between 1995 and 2001, designed almost to the Flight Model by the international collaboration of the US (NASA and DoE), France, Italy, Japan, and Sweden. The first prototype consisted of one tower of e+e- pair trackers, one block of segmented calorimeters and a smaller set of anti-coicidence plastic scintillator tiles (Beam Test Engineering Model, BTEM), which was put into e+, p, and γ beams at SLAC in the winter of 1999-2000. It was subsequently modified for a balloon experiment (Balloon Flight Engineering Model, BFEM) and flown at Palestine, Texas in August 2001. Data collected in the test experiments have been analyzed and compared with predictions of computer simulation codes such as Geant4. These studies have confirmed validity of the basic design, brought up a few issues for further improvement, and gathered data on

  10. GLAST large area telescope - daily survey of high energy sky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamae, Tuneyoshi

    2003-07-01

    GLAST Large Area Telescope was proposed to NASA in 1999 as a follow-up of EGRET on-board Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory by an international collaboration. The proposal has been approved as a part of the GLAST observatory mission in its capability to explore a wide range of astrophysics with 5-40 times higher sensitivity and extended energy coverage (20MeV to 300GeV) than EGRET. The instrument consists of 16 towers of e+e- pair tracker, 16 blocks of segmented electro-magnetic calorimeter, and a set of anti-coicidence plastic scintillator tiles covering the tracker towers. It will have 5-10 times larger on-axis effective area, 6 times wider field-of-view (FOV), and up to 5 times better angular resolution when compared with EGRET. The Large Area Telescope will cover about 40% of the sky above the Earth's horizon in its FOV at any given time and will scan nearly the entire Universe every orbit (~ 90min): about 20% of Gamma-Ray Bursts will be observed from the onset of the bursts to the initial after-glow phase; all longer-lasting transients and variabilities will be detected daily at the improved sensitivity. The instrument has been prototyped twice between 1995 and 2001, designed almost to the Flight Model by the international collaboration of the US (NASA and DoE), France, Italy, Japan, and Sweden. The first prototype consisted of one tower of e+e- pair trackers, one block of segmented calorimeters and a smaller set of anti-coicidence plastic scintillator tiles (Beam Test Engineering Model, BTEM), which was put into e+, p, and γ beams at SLAC in the winter of 1999-2000. It was subsequently modified for a balloon experiment (Balloon Flight Engineering Model, BFEM) and flown at Palestine, Texas in August 2001. Data collected in the test experiments have been analyzed and compared with predictions of computer simulation codes such as Geant4. These studies have confirmed validity of the basic design, brought up a few issues for further improvement, and gathered data on

  11. Fermi Large Area Telescope Detection of Supernova Remnant RCW 86

    CERN Document Server

    Yuan, Qiang; Liu, Siming; Zhang, Bing

    2014-01-01

    Using $5.4$ year Fermi-LAT data, we report the detection of GeV $\\gamma$-ray emission from the shell-type supernova remnant RCW 86 (G315.4-2.3) with a significance of $\\sim5.1\\sigma$. The data slightly favors an extended emission of this supernova remnant. The spectral index of RCW 86 is found to be very hard, $\\Gamma\\sim1.4$, in the $0.4$ to $300$ GeV range. A one zone leptonic model can well fit the multi-wavelength data from radio to very high energy $\\gamma$-rays. The very hard GeV $\\gamma$-ray spectrum and the inferred low gas density seem to disfavor the hadronic origin of the $\\gamma$-rays. The $\\gamma$-ray behavior of RCW 86 is very similar to several other TeV shell-type supernova remnants, e.g., RX J1713.7-3946, RX J0852.0-4622, SN 1006 and HESS J1731-347.

  12. Effect of large effective area fiber length on the performance of forward-backward scattering combination multiwavelength Brillouin-Raman fiber laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we experimentally demonstrate the effect of large effective area fiber length on the performance of a multiwavelength Brillouin–Raman fiber laser in which the forward and backward generated Stokes lines due to Brillouin scattering are combined together through a 3 dB coupler. Thus, the demonstrated laser is dubbed a forward–backward scattering combination multiwavelength Brillouin–Raman fiber laser (FBSC-MBRFL). This laser system utilizes a large effective area fiber and a dispersion compensating fiber that act as Brillouin and Raman gain media, respectively. It is demonstrated that by employing forward pumping schemes, the demonstrated laser system is capable of generating a good flat amplitude Brillouin Stokes line with an average optical to noise ratio of 17 dB along the spectral spans. However, the backward pumping scheme is able to produced high bandwidth spans. At the optimal large effective area fiber length of 50 km, a Raman pump power of 1100 mW at Brillouin pump wavelengths of 1550 mm and 1560 nm is identified to produce the maximum bandwidth with values of approximately 28.45 nm and 24.08 nm, respectively. (paper)

  13. Fermi: The Gamma-Ray Large Area Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEnery, Julie

    2015-01-01

    Following its launch in June 2008, high-energy gamma-ray observations by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope have unveiled over 1000 new sources and opened an important and previously unexplored window on a wide variety of phenomena. These have included the discovery of an population of pulsars pulsing only in gamma rays; the detection of photons up to 10s of GeV from gamma-ray bursts, enhancing our understanding of the astrophysics of these powerful explosions; the detection of hundreds of active galaxies; a measurement of the high energy cosmic-ray electron spectrum which may imply the presence of nearby astrophysical particle accelerators; the determination of the diffuse gamma-ray emission with unprecedented accuracy and the constraints on phenomena such as supersymmetric dark-matter annihilations and exotic relics from the Big Bang. Continuous monitoring of the high-energy gamma-ray sky has uncovered numerous outbursts from active galaxies and the discovery of transient sources in our galaxy. In this talk I will describe the current status of the Fermi observatory and review the science highlights from Fermi.

  14. Fermi: The Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEnery, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Following its launch in June 2008, high-energy gamma-ray observations by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope have unveiled over 1000 new sources and opened an important and previously unexplored window on a wide variety of phenomena. These have included the discovery of an population of pulsars pulsing only in gamma rays; the detection of photons up to 10s of GeV from gamma-ray bursts, enhancing our understanding of the astrophysics of these powerful explosions; the detection of hundreds of active galaxies; a measurement of the high energy cosmic-ray electron spectrum which may imply the presence of nearby astrophysical particle accelerators; the determination of the diffuse gamma-ray emission with unprecedented accuracy and the constraints on phenomena such as supersymmetric dark-matter annihilations and exotic relics from the Big Bang. Continuous monitoring of the high-energy gamma-ray sky has uncovered numerous outbursts from active galaxies and the discovery of transient sources in our galaxy. In this talk I will describe the current status of the Fermi observatory and review the science highlights from Fermi.

  15. Fermi: The Gamma-Ray Large Area Telescope Mission Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEnery, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Following its launch in June 2008, high-energy gamma-ray observations by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope have unveiled over 1000 new sources and opened an important and previously unexplored window on a wide variety of phenomena. These have included the discovery of an population of pulsars pulsing only in gamma rays; the detection of photons up to 10s of GeV from gamma-ray bursts, enhancing our understanding of the astrophysics of these powerful explosions; the detection of hundreds of active galaxies; a measurement of the high energy cosmic-ray electron spectrum which may imply the presence of nearby astrophysical particle accelerators; the determination of the diffuse gamma-ray emission with unprecedented accuracy and the constraints on phenomena such as supersymmetric dark-matter annihilations and exotic relics from the Big Bang. Continuous monitoring of the high-energy gamma-ray sky has uncovered numerous outbursts from active galaxies and the discovery of transient sources in our galaxy. In this talk I will describe the current status of the Fermi observatory and review the science highlights from Fermi.

  16. Homestake Large Area Scintillation Detector and cosmic ray telescope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cherry, M.L.; Corbato, S.; Kieda, D.; Lande, K.; Lee, C.K.; Steinberg, R.I.

    1985-01-25

    The Homestake Large Area Scintillation Detector consists of 140 tons of liquid scintillator in a hollow 8 m x 8 m x 16 m box surrounding the Brookhaven /sup 37/Cl solar neutrino detector. The experiment is located at a depth of 4850 ft. (4200 m.w.e.) in the Homestake Gold Mine. Half of the detector is currently running; the full detector will be taking data early in 1985. An extensive air shower array is also currently under construction on the earth's surface above the underground chamber, consisting of 100 scintillators, each 3 m/sup 2/, covering approximately 0.8 km/sup 2/; the first portion of the surface array will also be providing data in early 1985. Together, the new Homestake detectors (Fig. 1) will be used to search for slow, massive magnetic monopoles; study the zenith angle distribution of neutrino-induced muons; search for neutrino bursts from the gravitational collapse of massive stars; measure the multiplicity and transverse momentum distributions of cosmic ray muons; and study the composition of the primary cosmic rays. In this paper, we present a progress report on the new detectors. In Sec. I we describe the underground device and its capabilities as a monopole detector; in Sec. II we describe the surface array and the cosmic ray studies; the neutrino measurements have been discussed elsewhere.

  17. Homestake Large Area Scintillation Detector and cosmic ray telescope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Homestake Large Area Scintillation Detector consists of 140 tons of liquid scintillator in a hollow 8 m x 8 m x 16 m box surrounding the Brookhaven 37Cl solar neutrino detector. The experiment is located at a depth of 4850 ft. (4200 m.w.e.) in the Homestake Gold Mine. Half of the detector is currently running; the full detector will be taking data early in 1985. An extensive air shower array is also currently under construction on the earth's surface above the underground chamber, consisting of 100 scintillators, each 3 m2, covering approximately 0.8 km2; the first portion of the surface array will also be providing data in early 1985. Together, the new Homestake detectors (Fig. 1) will be used to search for slow, massive magnetic monopoles; study the zenith angle distribution of neutrino-induced muons; search for neutrino bursts from the gravitational collapse of massive stars; measure the multiplicity and transverse momentum distributions of cosmic ray muons; and study the composition of the primary cosmic rays. In this paper, we present a progress report on the new detectors. In Sec. I we describe the underground device and its capabilities as a monopole detector; in Sec. II we describe the surface array and the cosmic ray studies; the neutrino measurements have been discussed elsewhere

  18. Results from the beam test of the engineering model of the GLAST large area telescope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the results of a beam test using the Engineering Model of the GLAST Large Area Telescope, which was installed in a beam of positrons, hadrons and tagged photons at SLAC. The performance of the four subsystems, Anti Coincidence Detector, Silicon Tracker, Calorimeter and Data Acquisition will be described

  19. ΔE-E telescope with high energy resolution large sensitive area ionization chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The construction and the performances of ΔE-E telescope with active thick 11 cm and window area 1600 mm2 are described. ΔE detector is a Frisch ionization chamber. The performances of ΔE detector utilizing 239Pu-α source is tested. The optimum ΔE resolution obtained is 4.6%

  20. The Large Area Telescope in the context of the extended Fermi mission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Launched on June 11, 2008 with the goal of a 10-year lifetime, the Fermi observatory is nearing completion of the 5-year prime phase of the mission. In this paper we briefly review the prospects of the Large Area Telescope (the main instrument on board Fermi) in the context of the extended mission

  1. Status of GLAST, the Gamma-ray Large-area Space Telescope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rochester, L.; /SLAC

    2005-12-14

    GLAST is a satellite-based observatory consisting of the Large-Area Telescope (LAT), a modular 4 x 4-tower pair-conversion telescope with a field-of-view greater than 2 steradians, capable of measuring gamma-ray energies in the range 20 MeV to 300 GeV, and the GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM), a set of NaI and BGO detectors covering 8 steradians and sensitive to photons with energies between 10 keV and 25 MeV, allowing for correlative observations of transient events. The observatory is currently being constructed and is scheduled to be launched in August 2007.

  2. Status of GLAST, the Gamma-ray Large-area Space Telescope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GLAST is a satellite-based observatory consisting of the Large-Area Telescope (LAT), a modular 4 x 4-tower pair-conversion telescope with a field-of-view greater than 2 steradians, capable of measuring gamma-ray energies in the range 20 MeV to 300 GeV, and the GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM), a set of NaI and BGO detectors covering 8 steradians and sensitive to photons with energies between 10 keV and 25 MeV, allowing for correlative observations of transient events. The observatory is currently being constructed and is scheduled to be launched in August 2007

  3. FERMI/LARGE AREA TELESCOPE BRIGHT GAMMA-RAY SOURCE LIST

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Following its launch in 2008 June, the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi) began a sky survey in August. The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on Fermi in three months produced a deeper and better resolved map of the γ-ray sky than any previous space mission. We present here initial results for energies above 100 MeV for the 205 most significant (statistical significance greater than ∼10σ) γ-ray sources in these data. These are the best characterized and best localized point-like (i.e., spatially unresolved) γ-ray sources in the early mission data.

  4. 2 years of INTEGRAL monitoring of GRS 1915+105. I. Multiwavelength coverage with INTEGRAL, RXTE, and the Ryle radio telescope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodriguez, J.; Hannikainen, D.C.; Shaw, S.E.;

    2008-01-01

    We report the results of simultaneous monitoring observations of the Galactic microquasar GRS 1915+105 with INTEGRAL and RXTE from 3 up to similar to 300 keV, and the Ryle Telescope at 15 GHz. We first identify the classes of variability in which GRS 1915+105 is found, and report some direct....... We then turn to three particular observations during which we observe several types of soft X-ray dip and spike cycles, followed by radio flares, corresponding to classes nu, lambda, and beta types of variability. This is the first time ejections are reported during a class lambda observation. We...... possible correlation between the amplitude of the radio flare and the duration of the X-ray dip is found. The X-ray dips prior to ejections could thus represent the time during which the source accumulates energy and material that is ejected later. The fact that these results do not rely on any spectral...

  5. Spectral analysis of the Crab Pulsar and Nebula with the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Crab Pulsar is a relatively young neutron star. The Pulsar is the central star in the Crab Nebula, a remnant of the supernova SN 1054, which was observed on Earth in the year 1054. The Crab Pulsar has been extensively observed in the gamma-ray energy band by the Large Area Telescope (LAT), the main instrument onboard the Fermi gamma-ray space telescope, during its first months of data taking. The LAT data have been used to reconstruct the fluxes and the energy spectra of the pulsed gamma-ray component and of the gamma-rays from the Nebula. The results on the pulsed component are in good agreement with the previous measurement from EGRET, while the results on the Nebula are consistent with the observations from Earth based telescopes.

  6. The Anti-Coincidence Detector for the GLAST Large Area Telescope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moiseev, A.A.; Hartman, R.C.; Ormes, J.F.; Thompson, D.J.; Amato, M.J.; Johnson, T.E.; Segal, K.N.; Sheppard, D.A.

    2007-03-23

    This paper describes the design, fabrication and testing of the Anti-Coincidence Detector (ACD) for the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) Large Area Telescope (LAT). The ACD is LAT's first-level defense against the charged cosmic ray background that outnumbers the gamma rays by 3-5 orders of magnitude. The ACD covers the top and 4 sides of the LAT tracking detector, requiring a total active area of {approx}8.3 square meters. The ACD detector utilizes plastic scintillator tiles with wave-length shifting fiber readout. In order to suppress self-veto by shower particles at high gamma-ray energies, the ACD is segmented into 89 tiles of different sizes. The overall ACD efficiency for detection of singly charged relativistic particles entering the tracking detector from the top or sides of the LAT exceeds the required 0.9997.

  7. A tool to estimate the Fermi Large Area Telescope background for short-duration observations

    OpenAIRE

    Vasileiou, V.

    2013-01-01

    The proper estimation of the background is a crucial component of data analyses in astrophysics, such as source detection, temporal studies, spectroscopy, and localization. For the case of the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi spacecraft, approaches to estimate the background for short (less than ~one thousand seconds duration) observations fail if they ignore the strong dependence of the LAT background on the continuously changing observational conditions. We present a (to be) pu...

  8. Multiwavelength Evidence for Quasi-periodic Modulation in the Gamma-Ray Blazar PG 1553+113

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Albert, A.; Atwood, W. B.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Becerra Gonzalez, J.; Bellazzini, R.; Bissaldi, E.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonino, R.; Bottacini, E.; Bregeon, J.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caputo, R.; Caragiulo, M.; Caraveo, P. A.; Cavazzuti, E.; Cecchi, C.; Chekhtman, A.; Chiang, J.; Chiaro, G.; Ciprini, S.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Conrad, J.; Cutini, S.; D'Ammando, F.; de Angelis, A.; de Palma, F.; Desiante, R.; Di Venere, L.; D´nguez, A.; Drell, P. S.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Ferrara, E. C.; Focke, W. B.; Fuhrmann, L.; Fukazawa, Y.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Giglietto, N.; Giommi, P.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Godfrey, G.; Green, D.; Grenier, I. A.; Grove, J. E.; Guiriec, S.; Harding, A. K.; Hays, E.; Hewitt, J. W.; Hill, A. B.; Horan, D.; Jogler, T.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, A. S.; Kamae, T.; Kuss, M.; Larsson, S.; Latronico, L.; Li, J.; Li, L.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lott, B.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Magill, J.; Maldera, S.; Manfreda, A.; Max-Moerbeck, W.; Mayer, M.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McEnery, J. E.; Michelson, P. F.; Mizuno, T.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Nuss, E.; Ohno, M.; Ohsugi, T.; Ojha, R.; Omodei, N.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Paneque, D.; Pearson, T. J.; Perkins, J. S.; Perri, M.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Petrosian, V.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Porter, T. A.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Readhead, A.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Schulz, A.; Sgrò, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Spada, F.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Suson, D. J.; Takahashi, H.; Thayer, J. B.; Thompson, D. J.; Tibaldo, L.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Troja, E.; Uchiyama, Y.; Vianello, G.; Wood, K. S.; Wood, M.; Zimmer, S.; Berdyugin, A.; Corbet, R. H. D.; Hovatta, T.; Lindfors, E.; Nilsson, K.; Reinthal, R.; Sillanpää, A.; Stamerra, A.; Takalo, L. O.; Valtonen, M. J.

    2015-11-01

    We report for the first time a γ-ray and multiwavelength nearly periodic oscillation in an active galactic nucleus. Using the Fermi Large Area Telescope we have discovered an apparent quasi-periodicity in the γ-ray flux (E > 100 MeV) from the GeV/TeV BL Lac object PG 1553+113. The marginal significance of the 2.18 ± 0.08 year period γ-ray cycle is strengthened by correlated oscillations observed in radio and optical fluxes, through data collected in the Owens Valley Radio Observatory, Tuorla, Katzman Automatic Imaging Telescope, and Catalina Sky Survey monitoring programs and Swift-UVOT. The optical cycle appearing in ˜10 years of data has a similar period, while the 15 GHz oscillation is less regular than seen in the other bands. Further long-term multiwavelength monitoring of this blazar may discriminate among the possible explanations for this quasi-periodicity.

  9. The On-Orbit Calibrations for the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdo, Aous A.; /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C.; Ackermann, M.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Ajello, M.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Ampe, J.; /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C.; Anderson, B.; /UC, Santa Cruz; Atwood, W.B.; /UC, Santa Cruz; Axelsson, M.; /Stockholm U., OKC /Stockholm U.; Bagagli, R.; /INFN, Pisa; Baldini, L.; /INFN, Pisa; Ballet, J.; /DAPNIA, Saclay; Barbiellini, Guido; /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U.; Bartelt, J.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bastieri, Denis; /INFN, Padua /Padua U.; Baughman, B.M.; /Ohio State U.; Bechtol, K.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bederede, D.; /DAPNIA, Saclay; Bellardi, F.; /INFN, Pisa; Bellazzini, R.; /INFN, Pisa; Belli, F.; /Frascati /Rome U.,Tor Vergata; Berenji, B.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bisello, D.; /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Garching, Max Planck Inst., MPE /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Ecole Polytechnique /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /DAPNIA, Saclay /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /INFN, Pisa /INFN, Pisa /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Ecole Polytechnique /Washington U., Seattle /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /IASF, Milan /IASF, Milan /Kalmar U. /Stockholm U., OKC /Royal Inst. Tech., Stockholm /DAPNIA, Saclay /ASDC, Frascati /INFN, Pisa /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /George Mason U. /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /NASA, Goddard /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /DAPNIA, Saclay /NASA, Goddard /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U.; /more authors..

    2011-11-17

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on-board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope began its on-orbit operations on June 23, 2008. Calibrations, defined in a generic sense, correspond to synchronization of trigger signals, optimization of delays for latching data, determination of detector thresholds, gains and responses, evaluation of the perimeter of the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA), measurements of live time, of absolute time, and internal and spacecraft boresight alignments. Here we describe on-orbit calibration results obtained using known astrophysical sources, galactic cosmic rays, and charge injection into the front-end electronics of each detector. Instrument response functions will be described in a separate publication. This paper demonstrates the stability of calibrations and describes minor changes observed since launch. These results have been used to calibrate the LAT datasets to be publicly released in August 2009.

  10. A population of gamma-ray millisecond pulsars seen with the Fermi Large Area Telescope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdo, A A; Ackermann, M; Ajello, M; Atwood, W B; Axelsson, M; Baldini, L; Ballet, J; Barbiellini, G; Baring, M G; Bastieri, D; Baughman, B M; Bechtol, K; Bellazzini, R; Berenji, B; Bignami, G F; Blandford, R D; Bloom, E D; Bonamente, E; Borgland, A W; Bregeon, J; Brez, A; Brigida, M; Bruel, P; Burnett, T H; Caliandro, G A; Cameron, R A; Camilo, F; Caraveo, P A; Carlson, P; Casandjian, J M; Cecchi, C; Celik, O; Charles, E; Chekhtman, A; Cheung, C C; Chiang, J; Ciprini, S; Claus, R; Cognard, I; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Cominsky, L R; Conrad, J; Corbet, R; Cutini, S; Dermer, C D; Desvignes, G; de Angelis, A; de Luca, A; de Palma, F; Digel, S W; Dormody, M; do Couto e Silva, E; Drell, P S; Dubois, R; Dumora, D; Edmonds, Y; Farnier, C; Favuzzi, C; Fegan, S J; Focke, W B; Frailis, M; Freire, P C C; Fukazawa, Y; Funk, S; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Gasparrini, D; Gehrels, N; Germani, S; Giebels, B; Giglietto, N; Giordano, F; Glanzman, T; Godfrey, G; Grenier, I A; Grondin, M H; Grove, J E; Guillemot, L; Guiriec, S; Hanabata, Y; Harding, A K; Hayashida, M; Hays, E; Hobbs, G; Hughes, R E; Jóhannesson, G; Johnson, A S; Johnson, R P; Johnson, T J; Johnson, W N; Johnston, S; Kamae, T; Katagiri, H; Kataoka, J; Kawai, N; Kerr, M; Knödlseder, J; Kocian, M L; Kramer, M; Kuss, M; Lande, J; Latronico, L; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Longo, F; Loparco, F; Lott, B; Lovellette, M N; Lubrano, P; Madejski, G M; Makeev, A; Manchester, R N; Marelli, M; Mazziotta, M N; McConville, W; McEnery, J E; McLaughlin, M A; Meurer, C; Michelson, P F; Mitthumsiri, W; Mizuno, T; Moiseev, A A; Monte, C; Monzani, M E; Morselli, A; Moskalenko, I V; Murgia, S; Nolan, P L; Norris, J P; Nuss, E; Ohsugi, T; Omodei, N; Orlando, E; Ormes, J F; Paneque, D; Panetta, J H; Parent, D; Pelassa, V; Pepe, M; Pesce-Rollins, M; Piron, F; Porter, T A; Rainò, S; Rando, R; Ransom, S M; Ray, P S; Razzano, M; Rea, N; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Reposeur, T; Ritz, S; Rochester, L S; Rodriguez, A Y; Romani, R W; Roth, M; Ryde, F; Sadrozinski, H F W; Sanchez, D; Sander, A; Saz Parkinson, P M; Scargle, J D; Schalk, T L; Sgrò, C; Siskind, E J; Smith, D A; Smith, P D; Spandre, G; Spinelli, P; Stappers, B W; Starck, J L; Striani, E; Strickman, M S; Suson, D J; Tajima, H; Takahashi, H; Tanaka, T; Thayer, J B; Thayer, J G; Theureau, G; Thompson, D J; Thorsett, S E; Tibaldo, L; Torres, D F; Tosti, G; Tramacere, A; Uchiyama, Y; Usher, T L; Van Etten, A; Vasileiou, V; Venter, C; Vilchez, N; Vitale, V; Waite, A P; Wallace, E; Wang, P; Watters, K; Webb, N; Weltevrede, P; Winer, B L; Wood, K S; Ylinen, T; Ziegler, M

    2009-08-14

    Pulsars are born with subsecond spin periods and slow by electromagnetic braking for several tens of millions of years, when detectable radiation ceases. A second life can occur for neutron stars in binary systems. They can acquire mass and angular momentum from their companions, to be spun up to millisecond periods and begin radiating again. We searched Fermi Large Area Telescope data for pulsations from all known millisecond pulsars (MSPs) outside of globular clusters, using rotation parameters from radio telescopes. Strong gamma-ray pulsations were detected for eight MSPs. The gamma-ray pulse profiles and spectral properties resemble those of young gamma-ray pulsars. The basic emission mechanism seems to be the same for MSPs and young pulsars, with the emission originating in regions far from the neutron star surface. PMID:19574349

  11. Fermi Large Area Telescope Observations of the Cosmic-Ray Induced

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdo, A.

    2012-02-29

    We report on measurements of the cosmic-ray induced {gamma}-ray emission of Earth's atmosphere by the Large Area Telescope onboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. The LAT has observed the Earth during its commissioning phase and with a dedicated Earth-limb following observation in September 2008. These measurements yielded {approx} 6.4 x 10{sup 6} photons with energies > 100 MeV and {approx} 250 hours total livetime for the highest quality data selection. This allows the study of the spatial and spectral distributions of these photons with unprecedented detail. The spectrum of the emission - often referred to as Earth albedo gamma-ray emission - has a power-law shape up to 500 GeV with spectral index {Lambda} = 2.79 {+-} 0.06.

  12. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, on Behalf of the Fermi Large Area Telescope Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, David J.

    2010-01-01

    Because high-energy gamma rays can be produced by processes that also produce neutrinos, the gamma-ray survey of the sky by the Fermi (Gamma-ray Space Telescope offers a view of potential targets for neutrino observations. Gamma-ray bursts. Active Galactic Nuclei, and supernova remnants are all sites where hadronic, neutrino-producing interactions are plausible. Pulsars, pulsar wind nebulae, and binary sources are all phenomena that reveal leptonic particle acceleration through their gamma-ray emission. While important to gamma-ray astrophysics, such sources are of less interest to neutrino studies. This talk will present a broad overview of the constantly changing sky seen with the Large Area Telescope (LAT)on the Fermi spacecraft.

  13. A Population of Gamma-Ray Millisecond Pulsars Seen with the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulsars are born with sub-second spin periods and slow by electromagnetic braking for several tens of millions of years, when detectable radiation ceases. A second life can occur for neutron stars in binary systems. They can acquire mass and angular momentum from their companions, to be spun up to millisecond periods and begin radiating again. We searched Fermi Large Area Telescope data for pulsations from all known millisecond pulsars (MSPs) outside of globular clusters, using rotation parameters from radio telescopes. Strong gamma-ray pulsations were detected for eight MSPs. The gamma-ray pulse profiles and spectral properties resemble those of young gamma-ray pulsars. The basic emission mechanism seems to be the same for MSPs and young pulsars, with the emission originating in regions far from the neutron star surface. (authors)

  14. Large-area Reflective Infrared Filters for Millimeter/sub-mm Telescopes

    CERN Document Server

    Ahmed, Z; Thompson, K L; Kuo, C L; Brooks, G; Pothoven, T

    2014-01-01

    Ground-based millimeter and sub-millimeter telescopes are attempting to image the sky with ever-larger cryogenically-cooled bolometer arrays, but face challenges in mitigating the infrared loading accompanying large apertures. Absorptive infrared filters supported by mechanical coolers scale insufficiently with aperture size. Reflective metal-mesh filters placed behind the telescope window provide a scalable solution in principle, but have been limited by photolithography constraints to diameters under 300 mm. We present laser etching as an alternate technique to photolithography for fabrication of large-area reflective filters, and show results from lab tests of 500 mm-diameter filters. Filters with up to 700 mm diameter can be fabricated using laser etching with existing capability.

  15. The on-orbit calibration of the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on-board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope began its on-orbit operations on June 23, 2008. Calibrations, defined in a generic sense, correspond to synchronization of trigger signals, optimization of delays for latching data, determination of detector thresholds, gains and responses, evaluation of the perimeter of the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA), measurements of live time, of absolute time, and internal and spacecraft bore-sight alignments. Here we describe on-orbit calibration results obtained using known astrophysical sources, galactic cosmic rays, and charge injection into the front-end electronics of each detector. Instrument response functions will be described in a separate publication. This paper demonstrates the stability of calibrations and describes minor changes observed since launch. These results have been used to calibrate the LAT datasets to be publicly released in August 2009. (authors)

  16. The on-orbit calibration of the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Bartelt, J.; Bechtol, K.; Berenji, B.; Bloom, E.D.; Bogart, J.R.; Borgland, A.W.; Bouvier, A.; Cameron, R.A.; Campell, M.; Charles, E.; Chiang, J.; Claus, R.; Condamoor, S.; Digel, S.W.; Silva, E.D.E.; Drell, P.S.; Dubois, R.; Edmonds, Y.; Flath, D.L.; Focke, W.B.; Fouts, K.; Freytag, D.; Funk, S.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Goodman, J.; Hakimi, M.; Haller, G.; Hart, P.A.; Huffer, M.; Johannesson, G.; Johnson, A.S.; Kamae, T.; Kavelaars, A.; Kelly, H.; Kocian, M.L.; Lee, S.H.; Madejski, G.M.; Michelson, P.F.; Mitra, P.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Monzani, M.E.; Moskalenko, I.V.; Murgia, S.; Nelson, D.; Nolan, P.L.; Paneque, D.; Panetta, J.H.; Rochester, L.S.; Romani, R.W.; Sapozhnikov, L.; Saxton, O.H.; Sugizaki, M.; Tajima, H.; Tanaka, T.; Thayer, J.B.; Thayer, J.G.; Tramacere, A.; Turri, M.; Usher, T.L.; Wai, L.L.; Waite, A.P.; Wang, P. [Stanford Univ, WW Hansen Expt Phys Lab, Kavli Inst Particle Astrophys and Cosmol, Dept Phys, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Bartelt, J.; Bechtol, K.; Berenji, B.; Bloom, E.D.; Bogart, J.R.; Borgland, A.W.; Bouvier, A.; Cameron, R.A.; Campell, M.; Charles, E.; Chiang, J.; Claus, R.; Condamoor, S.; Digel, S.W.; Silva, E.D.E.; Drell, P.S.; Dubois, R.; Edmonds, Y.; Flath, D.L.; Focke, W.B.; Fouts, K.; Freytag, D.; Funk, S.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Goodman, J.; Hakimi, M.; Haller, G.; Hart, P.A.; Huffer, M.; Johannesson, G.; Johnson, A.S.; Kamae, T.; Kavelaars, A.; Kelly, H.; Kocian, M.L.; Lee, S.H.; Madejski, G.M.; Michelson, P.F.; Mitra, P.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Monzani, M.E.; Moskalenko, I.V.; Murgia, S.; Nelson, D.; Nolan, P.L.; Paneque, D.; Panetta, J.H.; Rochester, L.S.; Romani, R.W.; Sapozhnikov, L.; Saxton, O.H.; Sugizaki, M.; Tajima, H.; Tanaka, T.; Thayer, J.B; Thayer, J.G.; Tramacere, A.; Turri, M.; Usher, T.L.; Wai, L.L.; Waite, A.P.; Wang, P. [Stanford Univ, SLAC Natl Accelerator Lab, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)] [and others

    2009-07-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on-board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope began its on-orbit operations on June 23, 2008. Calibrations, defined in a generic sense, correspond to synchronization of trigger signals, optimization of delays for latching data, determination of detector thresholds, gains and responses, evaluation of the perimeter of the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA), measurements of live time, of absolute time, and internal and spacecraft bore-sight alignments. Here we describe on-orbit calibration results obtained using known astrophysical sources, galactic cosmic rays, and charge injection into the front-end electronics of each detector. Instrument response functions will be described in a separate publication. This paper demonstrates the stability of calibrations and describes minor changes observed since launch. These results have been used to calibrate the LAT datasets to be publicly released in August 2009. (authors)

  17. The Fermi Large Area Telescope On Orbit: Event Classification, Instrument Response Functions, and Calibration

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2012-01-01

    The Fermi Large Area Telescope (Fermi-LAT, hereafter LAT), the primary instrument on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi) mission, is an imaging, wide field-of-view, high-energy \\gamma-ray telescope, covering the energy range from 20 MeV to more than 300 GeV. During the first years of the mission the LAT team has gained considerable insight into the in-flight performance of the instrument. Accordingly, we have updated the analysis used to reduce LAT data for public release as well as the Instrument Response Functions (IRFs), the description of the instrument performance provided for data analysis. In this paper we describe the effects that motivated these updates. Furthermore, we discuss how we originally derived IRFs from Monte Carlo simulations and later corrected those IRFs for discrepancies observed between flight and simulated data. We also give details of the validations performed using flight data and quantify the residual uncertainties in the IRFs. Finally, we describe techniques the LAT team h...

  18. In-Flight Measurement of the Absolute Energy Scale of the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on-board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope is a pair-conversion telescope designed to survey the gamma-ray sky from 20 MeV to several hundreds of GeV. In this energy band there are no astronomical sources with sufficiently well known and sharp spectral features to allow an absolute calibration of the LAT energy scale. However, the geomagnetic cutoff in the cosmic ray electron-plus-positron (CRE) spectrum in low Earth orbit does provide such a spectral feature. The energy and spectral shape of this cutoff can be calculated with the aid of a numerical code tracing charged particles in the Earth's magnetic field. By comparing the cutoff value with that measured by the LAT in different geomagnetic positions, we have obtained several calibration points between ∼6 and ∼13 GeV with an estimated uncertainty of ∼2%. An energy calibration with such high accuracy reduces the systematic uncertainty in LAT measurements of, for example, the spectral cutoff in the emission from gamma ray pulsars.

  19. In-Flight Measurement of the Absolute Energy Scale of the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ackermann, M.; /Stanford U., HEPL /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Ajello, M.; /Stanford U., HEPL /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Allafort, A.; /Stanford U., HEPL /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Atwood, W.B.; /UC, Santa Cruz; Axelsson, M.; /Stockholm U. /Stockholm U., OKC /Royal Inst. Tech., Stockholm; Baldini, L.; /INFN, Pisa; Barbiellini, G.; /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U.; Bastieri, D.; /INFN, Padua /Padua U.; Bechtol, K.; /Stanford U., HEPL /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Bellazzini, R.; /INFN, Pisa; Berenji, B.; /Stanford U., HEPL /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Bloom, E.D.; /Stanford U., HEPL /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Bonamente, E.; /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U.; Borgland, A.W.; /Stanford U., HEPL /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Bouvier, A.; /UC, Santa Cruz; Bregeon, J.; /INFN, Pisa; Brez, A.; /INFN, Pisa; Brigida, M.; /Bari Polytechnic /INFN, Bari; Bruel, P.; /Ecole Polytechnique; Buehler, R.; /Stanford U., HEPL /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Buson, S.; /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /CSIC, Catalunya /Stanford U., HEPL /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park /IASF, Milan /DAPNIA, Saclay /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /Stanford U., HEPL /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Unlisted, US /Stanford U., HEPL /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park /ASDC, Frascati /Perugia U. /Stanford U., HEPL /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Montpellier U. /ASDC, Frascati /Bari Polytechnic /INFN, Bari /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /Stanford U., HEPL /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., HEPL /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., HEPL /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., HEPL /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., HEPL /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., HEPL /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Montpellier U. /Bari Polytechnic /INFN, Bari /Ecole Polytechnique /Stanford U., HEPL /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Ecole Polytechnique /Hiroshima U. /Stanford U., HEPL /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Bari Polytechnic /INFN, Bari /INFN, Bari /NASA, Goddard /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U.; /more authors..

    2012-09-20

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on-board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope is a pair-conversion telescope designed to survey the gamma-ray sky from 20 MeV to several hundreds of GeV. In this energy band there are no astronomical sources with sufficiently well known and sharp spectral features to allow an absolute calibration of the LAT energy scale. However, the geomagnetic cutoff in the cosmic ray electron-plus-positron (CRE) spectrum in low Earth orbit does provide such a spectral feature. The energy and spectral shape of this cutoff can be calculated with the aid of a numerical code tracing charged particles in the Earth's magnetic field. By comparing the cutoff value with that measured by the LAT in different geomagnetic positions, we have obtained several calibration points between {approx}6 and {approx}13 GeV with an estimated uncertainty of {approx}2%. An energy calibration with such high accuracy reduces the systematic uncertainty in LAT measurements of, for example, the spectral cutoff in the emission from gamma ray pulsars.

  20. In-Flight Measurement of the Absolute Energy Scale of the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Allafort, A.; Atwood, W. B.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Barbielini, G; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B,; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A. W.; Bouvier, A.; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Gehrels, N.; Hays, E.; McEnery, J. E.; Thompson, D. J.; Troja, E. J.

    2012-01-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on-board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope is a pair-conversion telescope designed to survey the gamma-ray sky from 20 MeV to several hundreds of GeV. In this energy band there are no astronomical sources with sufficiently well known and sharp spectral features to allow an absolute calibration of the LAT energy scale. However, the geomagnetic cutoff in the cosmic ray electron- plus-positron (CRE) spectrum in low Earth orbit does provide such a spectral feature. The energy and spectral shape of this cutoff can be calculated with the aid of a numerical code tracing charged particles in the Earth's magnetic field. By comparing the cutoff value with that measured by the LAT in different geomagnetic positions, we have obtained several calibration points between approx. 6 and approx. 13 GeV with an estimated uncertainty of approx. 2%. An energy calibration with such high accuracy reduces the systematic uncertainty in LAT measurements of, for example, the spectral cutoff in the emission from gamma ray pulsars.

  1. The Fermi Large Area Telescope on Orbit: Event Classification, Instrument Response Functions, and Calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Albert, A.; Allafort, A.; Atwood, W. B.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Bissaldi, E.; Blandford, R. D.; Celik, Q.; Cobet, R.; Davis, D. S.; Ferrara, E. C.; Gehrels, N.; Guiriec, S.; McConville, W.; McEnery, J. E.; Nemmen, R.; Perkins, J. S.; Thompson, D. J.

    2012-01-01

    The Fermi Large Area Telescope (Fermi-LAT, hereafter LAT), the primary instrument on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi) mission, is an imaging, wide field-of-view, high-energy -ray telescope, covering the energy range from 20 MeV to more than 300 GeV. During the first years of the mission the LAT team has gained considerable insight into the in-flight performance of the instrument. Accordingly, we have updated the analysis used to reduce LAT data for public release as well as the Instrument Response Functions (IRFs), the description of the instrument performance provided for data analysis. In this paper we describe the effects that motivated these updates. Furthermore, we discuss how we originally derived IRFs from Monte Carlo simulations and later corrected those IRFs for discrepancies observed between flight and simulated data. We also give details of the validations performed using flight data and quantify the residual uncertainties in the IRFs. Finally, we describe techniques the LAT team has developed to propagate those uncertainties into estimates of the systematic errors on common measurements such as fluxes and spectra of astrophysical sources.

  2. THE FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE ON ORBIT: EVENT CLASSIFICATION, INSTRUMENT RESPONSE FUNCTIONS, AND CALIBRATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ackermann, M. [Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron DESY, D-15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Ajello, M.; Allafort, A.; Bechtol, K.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bogart, J. R.; Borgland, A. W.; Bottacini, E. [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Albert, A. [Department of Physics, Center for Cosmology and Astro-Particle Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Atwood, W. B.; Bouvier, A. [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics, Department of Physics and Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California at Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Axelsson, M. [Department of Astronomy, Stockholm University, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Baldini, L. [Universita di Pisa and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Ballet, J. [Laboratoire AIM, CEA-IRFU/CNRS/Universite Paris Diderot, Service d' Astrophysique, CEA Saclay, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Barbiellini, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Trieste, I-34127 Trieste (Italy); Bastieri, D. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Padova, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Bellazzini, R. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Bissaldi, E. [Institut fuer Astro- und Teilchenphysik and Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Leopold-Franzens-Universitaet Innsbruck, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Bonamente, E., E-mail: echarles@slac.stanford.edu, E-mail: luca.baldini@pi.infn.it, E-mail: rando@pd.infn.it [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Perugia, I-06123 Perugia (Italy); and others

    2012-11-15

    The Fermi Large Area Telescope (Fermi-LAT, hereafter LAT), the primary instrument on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi) mission, is an imaging, wide field-of-view, high-energy {gamma}-ray telescope, covering the energy range from 20 MeV to more than 300 GeV. During the first years of the mission, the LAT team has gained considerable insight into the in-flight performance of the instrument. Accordingly, we have updated the analysis used to reduce LAT data for public release as well as the instrument response functions (IRFs), the description of the instrument performance provided for data analysis. In this paper, we describe the effects that motivated these updates. Furthermore, we discuss how we originally derived IRFs from Monte Carlo simulations and later corrected those IRFs for discrepancies observed between flight and simulated data. We also give details of the validations performed using flight data and quantify the residual uncertainties in the IRFs. Finally, we describe techniques the LAT team has developed to propagate those uncertainties into estimates of the systematic errors on common measurements such as fluxes and spectra of astrophysical sources.

  3. Fermi Large Area Telescope Measurements of the Diffuse Gamma-Ray Emission at Intermediate Galactic Latitudes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdo, A.A.; /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; /SLAC; Anderson, B.; Atwood, W.B.; /UC, Santa Cruz; Axelsson, M.; /Stockholm U. /Stockholm U., OKC; Baldini, L.; /INFN, Pisa; Ballet, J.; /DAPNIA, Saclay; Barbiellini, G.; /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U.; Bastieri, D.; /INFN, Padua /Padua U.; Baughman, B.M.; /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /Ohio State U.; Bechtol, K.; /SLAC; Bellazzini, R.; /INFN, Pisa; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R.D.; Bloom, E.D.; /SLAC; Bonamente, E.; /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U.; Borgland, A.W.; /SLAC; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; /INFN, Pisa; Brigida, M.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Ecole Polytechnique /Washington U., Seattle /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /IASF, Milan /DAPNIA, Saclay /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /George Mason U. /NASA, Goddard /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /Montpellier U. /Stockholm U. /Stockholm U., OKC /Royal Inst. Tech., Stockholm /Padua U. /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /Udine U. /INFN, Trieste /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /INFN, Pisa /UC, Santa Cruz /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /CENBG, Gradignan /CENBG, Gradignan /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /Montpellier U. /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Ecole Polytechnique /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /Udine U. /INFN, Trieste /Hiroshima U. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /INFN, Pisa /INFN, Bari /NASA, Goddard /Maryland U.; /more authors..

    2012-04-11

    The diffuse galactic {gamma}-ray emission is produced by cosmic rays (CRs) interacting with the interstellar gas and radiation field. Measurements by the Energetic Gamma-Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) instrument on the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory indicated excess {gamma}-ray emission {ge}1 GeV relative to diffuse galactic {gamma}-ray emission models consistent with directly measured CR spectra (the so-called 'EGRET GeV excess'). The Large Area Telescope (LAT) instrument on the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope has measured the diffuse {gamma}-ray emission with improved sensitivity and resolution compared to EGRET. We report on LAT measurements for energies 100 MeV to 10 GeV and galactic latitudes 10{sup o} {le} |b| {le} 20{sup o}. The LAT spectrum for this region of the sky is well reproduced by a diffuse galactic {gamma}-ray emission model that is consistent with local CR spectra and inconsistent with the EGRET GeV excess.

  4. THE FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE ON ORBIT: EVENT CLASSIFICATION, INSTRUMENT RESPONSE FUNCTIONS, AND CALIBRATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Fermi Large Area Telescope (Fermi-LAT, hereafter LAT), the primary instrument on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi) mission, is an imaging, wide field-of-view, high-energy γ-ray telescope, covering the energy range from 20 MeV to more than 300 GeV. During the first years of the mission, the LAT team has gained considerable insight into the in-flight performance of the instrument. Accordingly, we have updated the analysis used to reduce LAT data for public release as well as the instrument response functions (IRFs), the description of the instrument performance provided for data analysis. In this paper, we describe the effects that motivated these updates. Furthermore, we discuss how we originally derived IRFs from Monte Carlo simulations and later corrected those IRFs for discrepancies observed between flight and simulated data. We also give details of the validations performed using flight data and quantify the residual uncertainties in the IRFs. Finally, we describe techniques the LAT team has developed to propagate those uncertainties into estimates of the systematic errors on common measurements such as fluxes and spectra of astrophysical sources.

  5. Space telescope phase B definition study. Volume 2A: Science instruments, high speed point/area photometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-01-01

    The analysis and preliminary design of a high speed point/area photometer for the space telescope are summarized. The scientific objectives, photometer requirements, and design concepts are presented.

  6. The Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST, also called the Guo Shou Jing Telescope) is a special reflecting Schmidt telescope. LAMOST's special design allows both a large aperture (effective aperture of 3.6 m–4.9 m) and a wide field of view (FOV) (5°). It has an innovative active reflecting Schmidt configuration which continuously changes the mirror's surface that adjusts during the observation process and combines thin deformable mirror active optics with segmented active optics. Its primary mirror (6.67 m × 6.05 m) and active Schmidt mirror (5.74m × 4.40m) are both segmented, and composed of 37 and 24 hexagonal sub-mirrors respectively. By using a parallel controllable fiber positioning technique, the focal surface of 1.75 m in diameter can accommodate 4000 optical fibers. Also, LAMOST has 16 spectrographs with 32 CCD cameras. LAMOST will be the telescope with the highest rate of spectral acquisition. As a national large scientific project, the LAMOST project was formally proposed in 1996, and approved by the Chinese government in 1997. The construction started in 2001, was completed in 2008 and passed the official acceptance in June 2009. The LAMOST pilot survey was started in October 2011 and the spectroscopic survey will launch in September 2012. Up to now, LAMOST has released more than 480000 spectra of objects. LAMOST will make an important contribution to the study of the large-scale structure of the Universe, structure and evolution of the Galaxy, and cross-identification of multi-waveband properties in celestial objects. (invited reviews)

  7. Sensitivity Projections for Dark Matter Searches with the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    OpenAIRE

    Charles, Eric; Sanchez-Conde, Miguel; Anderson, Brandon; Caputo, Regina; Cuoco, Alessandro; Di Mauro, Mattia; Drlica-Wagner, Alex; Gomez-Vargas, German; Meyer, Manuel; Tibaldo, Luigi; Wood, Matthew; Zaharijas, Gabrijela; Zimmer, Stephan; Ajello, Marco; Albert, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    The nature of dark matter is a longstanding enigma of physics; it may consist of particles beyond the Standard Model that are still elusive to experiments. Among indirect search techniques, which look for stable products from the annihilation or decay of dark matter particles, or from axions coupling to high-energy photons, observations of the $\\gamma$-ray sky have come to prominence over the last few years, because of the excellent sensitivity of the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi G...

  8. The Second Fermi Large Area Telescope Catalog of Gamma-Ray Pulsars

    OpenAIRE

    Abdo, A A; et al, .; Hessels, J.

    2013-01-01

    This catalog summarizes 117 high-confidence ≥0.1 GeV gamma-ray pulsar detections using three years of data acquired by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi satellite. Half are neutron stars discovered using LAT data through periodicity searches in gamma-ray and radio data around LAT unassociated source positions. The 117 pulsars are evenly divided into three groups: millisecond pulsars, young radio-loud pulsars, and young radio-quiet pulsars. We characterize the pulse profiles and ener...

  9. A Large Area CCD Camera for the Schmidt Telescope at the Venezuelan National Astronomical Observatory

    OpenAIRE

    Baltay, C.; Snyder, J. A.; Andrews, P.; Emmet, W.; Schaefer, B.; Sinnott, J.; Bailyn, C.; de Coppi, P.; Oemler, A.; Sabbey, C. N.; Sofia, S.; van Altena, W.; Vivas, A. K.; Abad, C; Briceno, C.

    2002-01-01

    We have designed, constructed and put into operation a large area CCD camera that covers a large fraction of the image plane of the 1 meter Schmidt telescope at Llano del Hato in Venezuela. The camera consists of 16 CCD devices arranged in a 4 x 4 mosaic covering 2.3 degrees x 3.5 degrees of sky. The CCDs are 2048 x 2048 LORAL devices with 15 micron pixels. The camera is optimized for drift scan photometry and objective prism spectroscopy. The design considerations, construction features and ...

  10. A Large Area CCD Camera for the Schmidt Telescope at the Venezuelan National Astronomical Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Baltay, C; Andrews, P; Emmet, W; Schaefer, B; Sinnott, J; Bailyn, C D; Coppi, P S; Oemler, A E; Sabbey, C N; Sofia, S; Van Altena, W F; Vivas, A K; Abad, C; Briceño, C; Bruzual, G; Magris, G; Stock, J; Prugna, F D; Sánchez, G; Schenner, H; Adams, B; Gebhard, M; Honeycutt, R K; Musser, J; Harris, F; Geary, J; Sanchez, Ge.; Sanchez, Gu.

    2002-01-01

    We have designed, constructed and put into operation a large area CCD camera that covers a large fraction of the image plane of the 1 meter Schmidt telescope at Llano del Hato in Venezuela. The camera consists of 16 CCD devices arranged in a 4 x 4 mosaic covering 2.3 degrees x 3.5 degrees of sky. The CCDs are 2048 x 2048 LORAL devices with 15 micron pixels. The camera is optimized for drift scan photometry and objective prism spectroscopy. The design considerations, construction features and performance parameters are described in the following article.

  11. Deep Australia telescope large area survey radio observations of the European large area ISO survey S1/Spitzer wide-area infrared extragalactic field

    OpenAIRE

    Middelberg, Enno; Norris, Ray P.; Cornwell, Tim J.; Voronkov, Maxim A.; Siana, Brian D.; Boyle, Brian J.; Ciliegi, Paolo; Jackson, Carole A.; Huynh, Minh T.; Berta, Stefano; Rubele, Stefano; Lonsdale, Carol J.; Ivison, Rob J.; Smail, Ian

    2008-01-01

    We have conducted sensitive (1 σ < 30 μJy) 1.4 GHz radio observations with the Australia Telescope Compact Array of a field largely coincident with infrared observations of the Spitzer Wide-Area Extragalactic Survey. The field is centered on the European Large Area ISO Survey S1 region and has a total area of 3.9°. We describe the observations and calibration, source extraction, and cross-matching to infrared sources. Two catalogs are presented: one of the radio components found in the image ...

  12. The silicon tracker/converter for the gamma-ray large area space telescope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Silicon Tracker/Converter of the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) will have an active area of 80 m2, representing one of the largest planned applications of the silicon-strip detector technology. The large number of channels (1.3 million) to read out, together with the requirement that the tracker provide the trigger to the data acquisition, force the readout electronics to be of very low noise. Furthermore, to fit into the power constraints of the satellite environment, the electronics must have an ultra-low power consumption. To fulfill these requirements, plus others imposed by the space environment, such as redundancy, a mixed mode CMOS front-end readout chip and a digital readout controller chip have been designed and prototyped. In this article, we present the status of the readout electronics and the results from a test-beam study with a small GLAST tracker prototype. (author)

  13. Fermi Large Area Telescope Observations of the Monoceros Loop Supernova Remnant

    CERN Document Server

    Katagiri, H; Ackermann, M; Ballet, J; Casandjian, J M; Hanabata, Y; Hewitt, J W; Kerr, M; Kubo, H; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Ray, P S

    2016-01-01

    We present an analysis of the gamma-ray measurements by the Large Area Telescope onboard the \\textit{Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope} in the region of the supernova remnant~(SNR) Monoceros Loop~(G205.5$+$0.5). The brightest gamma-ray peak is spatially correlated with the Rosette Nebula, which is a molecular cloud complex adjacent to the southeast edge of the SNR. After subtraction of this emission by spatial modeling, the gamma-ray emission from the SNR emerges, which is extended and fit by a Gaussian spatial template. The gamma-ray spectra are significantly better reproduced by a curved shape than a simple power law. The luminosities between 0.2--300~GeV are $\\sim$~$4 \\times 10^{34}$~erg~s$^{-1}$ for the SNR and $\\sim$~$3 \\times 10^{34}$~erg~s$^{-1}$ for the Rosette Nebula, respectively. We argue that the gamma rays likely originate from the interactions of particles accelerated in the SNR. The decay of neutral pions produced in nucleon-nucleon interactions of accelerated hadrons with interstellar gas provid...

  14. Gamma-ray observations of the Orion Molecular Clouds with the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Ackermann, M; Allafort, A; Antolini, E; Baldini, L; Ballet, J; Barbiellini, G; Bastieri, D; Bechtol, K; Bellazzini, R; Berenji, B; Blandford, R D; Bloom, E D; Bonamente, E; Borgland, A W; Bottacini, E; Brandt, T J; Bregeon, J; Brigida, M; Bruel, P; Buehler, R; Buson, S; Caliandro, G A; Cameron, R A; Caraveo, P A; Cecchi, C; Chekhtman, A; Chiang, J; Ciprini, S; Claus, R; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Conrad, J; D'Ammando, F; de Angelis, A; de Palma, F; Dermer, C D; Silva, E do Couto e; Drell, P S; Drlica-Wagner, A; Enoto, T; Falletti, L; Favuzzi, C; Fegan, S J; Ferrara, E C; Focke, W B; Fukazawa, Y; Fukui, Y; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Gasparrini, D; Germani, S; Giglietto, N; Giordano, F; Giroletti, M; Glanzman, T; Godfrey, G; Guiriec, S; Hadasch, D; Hanabata, Y; Harding, A K; Hayashida, M; Hayashi, K; Horan, D; Hou, X; Hughes, R E; Jackson, M S; Jóhannesson, G; Johnson, A S; Kamae, T; Katagiri, H; Kataoka, J; Kerr, M; Knödlseder, J; Kuss, M; Lande, J; Larsson, S; Lee, S -H; Longo, F; Loparco, F; Lovellette, M N; Lubrano, P; Makishima, K; Mazziotta, M N; Mehault, J; Mitthumsiri, W; Moiseev, A A; Monte, C; Monzani, M E; Morselli, A; Moskalenko, I V; Murgia, S; Nakamori, T; Naumann-Godo, M; Nishino, S; Norris, J P; Nuss, E; Ohno, M; Ohsugi, T; Okumura, A; Orienti, M; Orlando, E; Ormes, J F; Ozaki, M; Paneque, D; Panetta, J H; Parent, D; Pelassa, V; Pesce-Rollins, M; Pierbattista, M; Piron, F; Pivato, G; Porter, T A; Rainò, S; Razzano, M; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Roth, M; Sadrozinski, H F -W; Sgrò, C; Siskind, E J; Spandre, G; Spinelli, P; Strong, A W; Takahashi, H; Takahashi, T; Tanaka, T; Thayer, J G; Thayer, J B; Tibolla, O; Tinivella, M; Torres, D F; Tramacere, A; Troja, E; Uchiyama, Y; Usher, T L; Vandenbroucke, J; Vasileiou, V; Vianello, G; Vitale, V; Waite, A P; Wang, P; Winer, B L; Wood, K S; Yang, Z; Zimmer, S

    2012-01-01

    We report on the gamma-ray observations of giant molecular clouds Orion A and B with the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on-board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. The gamma-ray emission in the energy band between \\sim100 MeV and \\sim100 GeV is predicted to trace the gas mass distribution in the clouds through nuclear interactions between the Galactic cosmic rays (CRs) and interstellar gas. The gamma-ray production cross-section for the nuclear interaction is known to \\sim10% precision which makes the LAT a powerful tool to measure the gas mass column density distribution of molecular clouds for a known CR intensity. We present here such distributions for Orion A and B, and correlate them with those of the velocity integrated CO intensity (WCO) at a 1{\\deg} \\times1{\\deg} pixel level. The correlation is found to be linear over a WCO range of ~10 fold when divided in 3 regions, suggesting penetration of nuclear CRs to most of the cloud volumes. The Wco-to-mass conversion factor, Xco, is found to be \\sim2.3\\times1...

  15. Gamma-ray and Radio Properties of Six Pulsars Detected by the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weltevrede, P.; Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Baughman, B. M.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A. W.; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Burnett, T. H.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Camilo, F.; Caraveo, P. A.; Casandjian, J. M.; Cecchi, C.; Çelik, Ö.; Charles, E.; Chekhtman, A.; Cheung, C. C.; Chiang, J.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cognard, I.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Cominsky, L. R.; Conrad, J.; Cutini, S.; Dermer, C. D.; Desvignes, G.; de Angelis, A.; de Luca, A.; de Palma, F.; Digel, S. W.; Dormody, M.; Silva, E. do Couto e.; Drell, P. S.; Dubois, R.; Dumora, D.; Farnier, C.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Focke, W. B.; Fortin, P.; Frailis, M.; Freire, P. C. C.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Gehrels, N.; Germani, S.; Giavitto, G.; Giebels, B.; Giglietto, N.; Giordano, F.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Grenier, I. A.; Grondin, M.-H.; Grove, J. E.; Guillemot, L.; Guiriec, S.; Hanabata, Y.; Harding, A. K.; Hays, E.; Hobbs, G.; Hughes, R. E.; Jackson, M. S.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, A. S.; Johnson, T. J.; Johnson, W. N.; Johnston, S.; Kamae, T.; Katagiri, H.; Kataoka, J.; Kawai, N.; Keith, M.; Kerr, M.; Knödlseder, J.; Kocian, M. L.; Kramer, M.; Kuss, M.; Lande, J.; Latronico, L.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lott, B.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Lyne, A. G.; Makeev, A.; Manchester, R. N.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McEnery, J. E.; McGlynn, S.; Meurer, C.; Michelson, P. F.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A. A.; Monte, C.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Nolan, P. L.; Norris, J. P.; Nuss, E.; Ohsugi, T.; Omodei, N.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Paneque, D.; Panetta, J. H.; Parent, D.; Pelassa, V.; Pepe, M.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Piron, F.; Porter, T. A.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Ransom, S. M.; Razzano, M.; Rea, N.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Reposeur, T.; Rochester, L. S.; Rodriguez, A. Y.; Romani, R. W.; Roth, M.; Ryde, F.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Sanchez, D.; Sander, A.; Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Sgrò, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Smith, D. A.; Smith, P. D.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Stappers, B. W.; Strickman, M. S.; Suson, D. J.; Tajima, H.; Takahashi, H.; Tanaka, T.; Thayer, J. B.; Thayer, J. G.; Theureau, G.; Thompson, D. J.; Thorsett, S. E.; Tibaldo, L.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Tramacere, A.; Uchiyama, Y.; Usher, T. L.; Van Etten, A.; Vasileiou, V.; Venter, C.; Vilchez, N.; Vitale, V.; Waite, A. P.; Wang, P.; Wang, N.; Watters, K.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, K. S.; Ylinen, T.; Ziegler, M.

    2010-01-01

    We report the detection of pulsed γ-rays for PSRs J0631+1036, J0659+1414, J0742-2822, J1420-6048, J1509-5850, and J1718-3825 using the Large Area Telescope on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (formerly known as GLAST). Although these six pulsars are diverse in terms of their spin parameters, they share an important feature: their γ-ray light curves are (at least given the current count statistics) single peaked. For two pulsars, there are hints for a double-peaked structure in the light curves. The shapes of the observed light curves of this group of pulsars are discussed in the light of models for which the emission originates from high up in the magnetosphere. The observed phases of the γ-ray light curves are, in general, consistent with those predicted by high-altitude models, although we speculate that the γ-ray emission of PSR J0659+1414, possibly featuring the softest spectrum of all Fermi pulsars coupled with a very low efficiency, arises from relatively low down in the magnetosphere. High-quality radio polarization data are available showing that all but one have a high degree of linear polarization. This allows us to place some constraints on the viewing geometry and aids the comparison of the γ-ray light curves with high-energy beam models.

  16. Discovery of GeV emission from the Circinus galaxy with the Fermi large area telescope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the discovery of γ-ray emission from the Circinus galaxy using the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. Circinus is a nearby (∼4 Mpc) starburst with a heavily obscured Seyfert-type active nucleus, bipolar radio lobes perpendicular to the spiral disk, and kpc-scale jet-like structures. Our analysis of 0.1-100 GeV events collected during 4 yr of LAT observations reveals a significant (≅ 7.3σ) excess above the background. We find no indications of variability or spatial extension beyond the LAT point-spread function. A power-law model used to describe the 0.1-100 GeV γ-ray spectrum yields a flux of (18.8 ± 5.8) × 10–9 photon cm–2 s–1 and photon index 2.19 ± 0.12, corresponding to an isotropic γ-ray luminosity of 3 × 1040 erg s–1. This observed γ-ray luminosity exceeds the luminosity expected from cosmic-ray interactions in the interstellar medium and inverse Compton radiation from the radio lobes. Thus, the origin of the GeV excess requires further investigation.

  17. Fermi Large Area Telescope Observations of the Cygnus Loop Supernova Remnant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present an analysis of the gamma-ray measurements by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) onboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope in the region of the supernova remnant (SNR) Cygnus Loop (G74.0-8.5). We detect significant gamma-ray emission associated with the SNR in the energy band 0.2-100 GeV. The gamma-ray spectrum shows a break in the range 2-3 GeV. The gamma-ray luminosity is ∼ 1 x 1033 erg s-1 between 1-100 GeV, much lower than those of other GeV-emitting SNRs. The morphology is best represented by a ring shape, with inner/outer radii 0o.7 ± 0o.1 and 1o.6 ± 0o.1. Given the association among X-ray rims, Hα filaments and gamma-ray emission, we argue that gamma rays originate in interactions between particles accelerated in the SNR and interstellar gas or radiation fields adjacent to the shock regions. The decay of neutral pions produced in nucleon-nucleon interactions between accelerated hadrons and interstellar gas provides a reasonable explanation for the gamma-ray spectrum.

  18. FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE OBSERVATIONS OF THE CYGNUS LOOP SUPERNOVA REMNANT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present an analysis of the gamma-ray measurements by the Large Area Telescope onboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope in the region of the supernova remnant (SNR) Cygnus Loop (G74.0–8.5). We detect significant gamma-ray emission associated with the SNR in the energy band 0.2-100 GeV. The gamma-ray spectrum shows a break in the range 2-3 GeV. The gamma-ray luminosity is ∼1 × 1033 erg s–1 between 1 and 100 GeV, much lower than those of other GeV-emitting SNRs. The morphology is best represented by a ring shape, with inner/outer radii 0.07 ± 0.01 and 1.06 ± 0.01. Given the association among X-ray rims, Hα filaments, and gamma-ray emission, we argue that gamma rays originate in interactions between particles accelerated in the SNR and interstellar gas or radiation fields adjacent to the shock regions. The decay of neutral pions produced in nucleon-nucleon interactions between accelerated hadrons and interstellar gas provides a reasonable explanation for the gamma-ray spectrum.

  19. Fermi Large Area Telescope Observations of the Cygnus Loop Supernova Remnant

    CERN Document Server

    Katagiri, H; Ballet, J; Giordano, F; Grenier, I A; Porter, T A; Roth, M; Tibolla, O; Uchiyama, Y; Yamazaki, R

    2011-01-01

    We present an analysis of the gamma-ray measurements by the Large Area Telescope(LAT) onboard the \\textit{Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope} in the region of the supernova remnant(SNR) Cygnus Loop(G74.0$-$8.5). We detect significant gamma-ray emission associated with the SNR in the energy band 0.2--100 GeV. The gamma-ray spectrum shows a break in the range 2--3 GeV. The gamma-ray luminosity is $\\sim$ $1 \\times 10^{33}$erg s$^{-1}$ between 1--100 GeV, much lower than those of other GeV-emitting SNRs. The morphology is best represented by a ring shape, with inner/outer radii 0$^\\circ$.7 $\\pm$ 0$^\\circ$.1 and 1$^\\circ$.6 $\\pm$ 0$^\\circ$.1. Given the association among X-ray rims, \\halpha filaments and gamma-ray emission, we argue that gamma rays originate in interactions between particles accelerated in the SNR and interstellar gas or radiation fields adjacent to the shock regions. The decay of neutral pions produced in nucleon-nucleon interactions between accelerated hadrons and interstellar gas provides a reasona...

  20. FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE OBSERVATIONS OF TWO GAMMA-RAY EMISSION COMPONENTS FROM THE QUIESCENT SUN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the detection of high-energy γ-rays from the quiescent Sun with the Large Area Telescope on board the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope (Fermi) during the first 18 months of the mission. These observations correspond to the recent period of low solar activity when the emission induced by cosmic rays (CRs) is brightest. For the first time, the high statistical significance of the observations allows clear separation of the two components: the point-like emission from the solar disk due to CR cascades in the solar atmosphere and extended emission from the inverse Compton (IC) scattering of CR electrons on solar photons in the heliosphere. The observed integral flux (≥100 MeV) from the solar disk is (4.6 ± 0.2[statistical error]+1.0-0.8[systematic error]) x 10-7 cm-2 s-1, which is ∼7 times higher than predicted by the 'nominal' model of Seckel et al. In contrast, the observed integral flux (≥100 MeV) of the extended emission from a region of 20 deg. radius centered on the Sun, but excluding the disk itself, (6.8 ± 0.7[stat.]+0.5-0.4[syst.]) x 10-7 cm-2 s-1, along with the observed spectrum and the angular profile, is in good agreement with the theoretical predictions for the IC emission.

  1. GAMMA-RAY AND RADIO PROPERTIES OF SIX PULSARS DETECTED BY THE FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the detection of pulsed γ-rays for PSRs J0631+1036, J0659+1414, J0742-2822, J1420-6048, J1509-5850, and J1718-3825 using the Large Area Telescope on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (formerly known as GLAST). Although these six pulsars are diverse in terms of their spin parameters, they share an important feature: their γ-ray light curves are (at least given the current count statistics) single peaked. For two pulsars, there are hints for a double-peaked structure in the light curves. The shapes of the observed light curves of this group of pulsars are discussed in the light of models for which the emission originates from high up in the magnetosphere. The observed phases of the γ-ray light curves are, in general, consistent with those predicted by high-altitude models, although we speculate that the γ-ray emission of PSR J0659+1414, possibly featuring the softest spectrum of all Fermi pulsars coupled with a very low efficiency, arises from relatively low down in the magnetosphere. High-quality radio polarization data are available showing that all but one have a high degree of linear polarization. This allows us to place some constraints on the viewing geometry and aids the comparison of the γ-ray light curves with high-energy beam models.

  2. Sensitivity Projections for Dark Matter Searches with the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Charles, Eric; Anderson, Brandon; Caputo, Regina; Cuoco, Alessandro; Di Mauro, Mattia; Drlica-Wagner, Alex; Gomez-Vargas, German; Meyer, Manuel; Tibaldo, Luigi; Wood, Matthew; Zaharijas, Gabrijela; Zimmer, Stephan; Ajello, Marco; Albert, Andrea; Baldini, Luca; Bechtol, Keith; Bloom, Elliott; Ceraudo, Francesco; Cohen-Tanugi, Johann; Digel, Seth; Gaskins, Jennifer; Gustafsson, Michael; Mirabal, Nestor; Razzano, Massimiliano

    2016-01-01

    The nature of dark matter is a longstanding enigma of physics; it may consist of particles beyond the Standard Model that are still elusive to experiments. Among indirect search techniques, which look for stable products from the annihilation or decay of dark matter particles, or from axions coupling to high-energy photons, observations of the $\\gamma$-ray sky have come to prominence over the last few years, because of the excellent sensitivity of the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope mission. The LAT energy range from 20 MeV to above 300 GeV is particularly well suited for searching for products of the interactions of dark matter particles. In this report we describe methods used to search for evidence of dark matter with the LAT, and review the status of searches performed with up to six years of LAT data. We also discuss the factors that determine the sensitivities of these searches, including the magnitudes of the signals and the relevant backgrounds, considering both stati...

  3. Searches for Cosmic-Ray Electron Anisotropies with the \\textit{Fermi} Large Area Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Ackermann, M

    2010-01-01

    The Large Area Telescope on board the \\textit{Fermi} satellite (\\textit{Fermi}-LAT) detected more than 1.6 million cosmic-ray electrons/positrons with energies above 60 GeV during its first year of operation. The arrival directions of these events were searched for anisotropies of angular scale extending from $\\sim$ 10 $^\\circ$ up to 90$^\\circ$, and of minimum energy extending from 60 GeV up to 480 GeV. Two independent techniques were used to search for anisotropies, both resulting in null results. Upper limits on the degree of the anisotropy were set that depended on the analyzed energy range and on the anisotropy's angular scale. The upper limits for a dipole anisotropy ranged from $\\sim0.5%$ to $\\sim5%$.

  4. The Fermi Large Area Telescope as a cosmic-ray detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Fermi Large Area Telescope is an international observatory conceived to study high energy gamma-rays from the universe. It is designed to identify and reconstruct electromagnetic showers and it can collect cosmic-ray electrons and positrons thanks to its triggering and filtering capabilities. The Fermi LAT collaboration has published several results on charged cosmic rays. We measured the inclusive spectrum of electrons and positrons from 7 GeV to 1 TeV and searched for anisotropies in the electron incoming direction. We have recently published a measurement of cosmic-ray positron-only and electron-only spectra for energies between 20 GeV and 200 GeV exploiting the Earth's magnetic field as a charge separator. In this work we describe the techniques and capabilities of the LAT as a cosmic-ray detector and review the recent results and their interpretations. Prospects for future studies and observations will also be discussed

  5. Large area double scattering telescope for balloon-borne studies of neutrons and gamma rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A large area (1 m x 1 m) double scattering telescope for balloon-borne research is described. It measures the flux, energy and direction of 2 to 100 MeV neutrons and 0.5 to 30 MeV gamma rays. These measurements are made using time-of-flight and pulse height analysis techniques with two large tanks of mineral oil liquid scintillator. Results from Monte Carlo calculations of the efficiency, energy resolution and angular resolution are presented and the electronics implementation for the processing of 80 photomultiplier tubes signals will be discussed. The detector weighs 800 kg with a large part of this weight being the liquid scintillator (320 kg). It will be flown at 3 mbars for flight durations up to 40 hours. The first flight is planned for Spring, 1975. (U.S.)

  6. Measurement of separate cosmic-ray electron and positron spectra with the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Ackermann, M; Allafort, A; Baldini, L; Barbiellini, G; Bastieri, D; Bechtol, K; Bellazzini, R; Berenji, B; Blandford, R D; Bloom, E D; Bonamente, E; Borgland, A W; Bouvier, A; Bregeon, J; Brigida, M; Bruel, P; Buehler, R; Buson, S; Caliandro, G A; Cameron, R A; Caraveo, P A; Casandjian, J M; Cecchi, C; Charles, E; Chekhtman, A; Cheung, C C; Chiang, J; Ciprini, S; Claus, R; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Conrad, J; Cutini, S; de Angelis, A; de Palma, F; Dermer, C D; Digel, S W; Silva, E do Couto e; Drell, P S; Drlica-Wagner, A; Favuzzi, C; Fegan, S J; Ferrara, E C; Focke, W B; Fortin, P; Fukazawa, Y; Funk, S; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Gasparrini, D; Germani, S; Giglietto, N; Giommi, P; Giordano, F; Giroletti, M; Glanzman, T; Godfrey, G; Grenier, I A; Grove, J E; Guiriec, S; Gustafsson, M; Hadasch, D; Harding, A K; Hayashida, M; Hughes, R E; Jóhannesson, G; Johnson, A S; Kamae, T; Katagiri, H; Kataoka, J; Knödlseder, J; Kuss, M; Lande, J; Latronico, L; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Garde, M Llena; Longo, F; Loparco, F; Lovellette, M N; Lubrano, P; Madejski, G M; Mazziotta, M N; McEnery, J E; Michelson, P F; Mitthumsiri, W; Mizuno, T; Moiseev, A A; Monte, C; Monzani, M E; Morselli, A; Moskalenko, I V; Murgia, S; Nakamori, T; Nolan, P L; Norris, J P; Nuss, E; Ohno, M; Ohsugi, T; Okumura, A; Omodei, N; Ormes, E Orlando J F; Ozaki, M; Paneque, D; Parent, D; Pesce-Rollins, M; Pierbattista, M; Piron, F; Pivato, G; Porter, T A; Rainò, S; Rando, R; Razzano, M; Razzaque, S; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Reposeur, T; Ritz, S; Romani, R W; Roth, M; Sadrozinski, H F -W; Sbarra, C; Schalk, T L; Sgrò, C; Siskind, E J; Spandre, G; Spinelli, P; Strong, A W; Takahashi, H; Takahashi, T; Tanaka, T; Thayer, J G; Thayer, J B; Tibaldo, L; Tinivella, M; Torres, D F; Tosti, G; Troja, E; Uchiyama, Y; Usher, T L; Vandenbroucke, J; Vasileiou, V; Vianello, G; Vitale, V; Waite, A P; Winer, B L; Wood, K S; Wood, M; Yang, Z; Zimmer, S

    2011-01-01

    We measured separate cosmic-ray electron and positron spectra with the Fermi Large Area Telescope. Because the instrument does not have an onboard magnet, we distinguish the two species by exploiting the Earth's shadow, which is offset in opposite directions for opposite charges due to the Earth's magnetic field. We estimate and subtract the cosmic-ray proton background using two different methods that produce consistent results. We report the electron-only spectrum, the positron-only spectrum, and the positron fraction between 20 GeV and 200 GeV. We confirm that the fraction rises with energy in the 20--100 GeV range and determine for the first time that it continues to rise between 100 and 200 GeV.

  7. FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE DETECTION OF THE YOUNG SUPERNOVA REMNANT TYCHO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giordano, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica, ' M. Merlin' dell' Universita e del Politecnico di Bari, I-70126 Bari (Italy); Naumann-Godo, M.; Ballet, J. [Laboratoire AIM, CEA-IRFU/CNRS/Universite Paris Diderot, Service d' Astrophysique, CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Bechtol, K.; Funk, S.; Lande, J.; Tanaka, T.; Uchiyama, Y. [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Mazziotta, M. N.; Raino, S. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Bari, 70126 Bari (Italy); Tibolla, O., E-mail: francesco.giordano@ba.infn.it, E-mail: Melitta.Naumann-Godo@cea.fr [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik and Astrophysik, Universitaet Wuerzburg, D-97074 Wuerzburg (Germany)

    2012-01-15

    After almost three years of data taking in sky-survey mode, the Fermi Large Area Telescope has detected {gamma}-ray emission toward Tycho's supernova remnant (SNR). The Tycho SNR is among the youngest remnants in the Galaxy, originating from a Type Ia Supernova in AD 1572. The {gamma}-ray integral flux from 400 MeV up to 100 GeV has been measured to be (3.5 {+-} 1.1{sub stat} {+-} 0.7{sub syst}) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -9} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} with a photon index of 2.3 {+-} 0.2{sub stat} {+-} 0.1{sub syst}. A simple model consistent with TeV, X-ray, and radio data is sufficient to explain the observed emission as originating from {pi}{sup 0} decays as a result of cosmic-ray acceleration and interaction with the ambient medium.

  8. Large area double scattering telescope for balloon-borne studies of neutrons and gamma rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zych, A. D.; Herzo, D.; Koga, R.; Millard, W. A.; Moon, S.; Ryan, J.; Wilson, R.; White, R. S.; Dayton, B.

    1975-01-01

    A large area double scattering telescope for balloon-borne research is described. It measures the flux, energy and direction of 2-100 MeV neutrons and 0.5-30 MeV gamma rays. These measurements are made using time-of-flight and pulse height analysis techniques with two large tanks of mineral oil liquid scintillator. Results from Monte Carlo calculations of the efficiency, energy resolution and angular resolution are presented and the electronics implementation for the processing of 80 photomultiplier tubes signals will be discussed. The detector weighs 800 kg with a large part of this weight being the liquid scintillator (320 kg). It will be flown at 3 mbars for flight durations up to 40 hours. The first flight is planned for Spring, 1975.

  9. Observations of Gamma-ray Bursts with the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Longo, Francesco, E-mail: francesco.longo@ts.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Trieste and INFN, sezione di Trieste, via Valerio 2, I-34127 Trieste (Italy); Vianello, Giacomo; Omodei, Nicola [Stanford University (HEPL), 452 Lomita Mall, Stanford, CA 94205 (United States); Piron, Frederic; Vasilieou, Vlasios [Laboratoire Univers et Particules de Montpellier, Universite de Montpellier II, CNRS/IN2P3, CC72, Place E. Bataillon, F-34095 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); Razzaque, Soebur [Department of Physics, University of Johannesburg, P.O. Box 524, Auckland Park 2006 (South Africa)

    2014-04-01

    The Fermi observatory, with its Gamma-ray Bursts Monitor (GBM) and Large Area Telescope (LAT), is observing Gamma-ray Bursts (GRBs) with a very large spectral coverage and unprecedented sensitivity, from ∼10keV to >300GeV. In the first 3 years of the mission it observed emission above 100 MeV from 35 GRBs. In this paper we review the main results obtained on such a sample, highlighting also the relationships with the low-energy spectral and temporal features (as measured by the GBM). Some recent results on high energy photons from GRBs obtained with the preliminary Pass 8 new event-level reconstruction will be discussed.

  10. Observations of Gamma-ray Bursts with the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Fermi observatory, with its Gamma-ray Bursts Monitor (GBM) and Large Area Telescope (LAT), is observing Gamma-ray Bursts (GRBs) with a very large spectral coverage and unprecedented sensitivity, from ∼10keV to >300GeV. In the first 3 years of the mission it observed emission above 100 MeV from 35 GRBs. In this paper we review the main results obtained on such a sample, highlighting also the relationships with the low-energy spectral and temporal features (as measured by the GBM). Some recent results on high energy photons from GRBs obtained with the preliminary Pass 8 new event-level reconstruction will be discussed

  11. Recent Results on SNRs and PWNe from the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hays, Elizabeth A.

    2010-01-01

    Topics include: Fermi LAT Collaboration groups; galactic results from LAT; a GeV, wide-field instrument; the 1FGL catalog, the Fermi LAT 1FGL source catalog, unidentified gamma-ray sources; variability in 1FGL sources; curvature in 1FGL sources; spectral-variability classification; gamma-ray pulsars and MSPs; GeV PWN - where to look; Crab pulsar and nebula; Vela X nebular of Vela pulsar; MSH 15-52; GeV PWNe spectra; GeV nebula limits; Nebula search of LAT pulsars; supernova remnants; SNR: GeV morphology; SNR: molecular connection; SNR: GeV breaks; SNR: young vs. old. The summary includes slides about the Large Area Telescope (LAT) and LAT sensitivity with time.

  12. Measurement of Separate Cosmic-Ray Electron and Positron Spectra with the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrara, E. C.; Harding, A. K.; McEnery, J. E.; Moiseev, A. A.; Ackemann, M.

    2012-01-01

    We measured separate cosmic-ray electron and positron spectra with the Fermi Large Area Telescope. Because the instrument does not have an onboard magnet, we distinguish the two species by exploiting Earth's shadow, which, is offset in opposite directions for opposite charges due to Earth's magnetic field. We estimate and subtract the cosmic-ray proton background using two different methods that produce consistent results. We report the electron-only spectrum, the positron-only spectrum, and the positron fraction between 20 and 200 Ge V. We confirm that the fraction rises with energy in the 20-100 Ge V range. The three new spectral points between 100 and 200 GeV are consistent with a fraction that is continuing to rise with energy.

  13. Highlights from the Fermi Large Area Telescope after 5 years of operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) has been exploring the high-energy γ-ray sky since its launch on June 11, 2008. After 5 years of essentially flawless operations, the LAT collected more than 800 million γ rays from 20 MeV to more than 300 GeV. With its uniform coverage of the sky, the LAT allowed the first high statistics observations of γ-ray sources of known classes as well as the discovery of new emitters. The LAT also allowed a detailed study of the diffuse γ-ray emission, which constitutes roughly 90% of the LAT photons, and constrains cosmic-ray production and propagation in our own Galaxy. In this talk I will review the status and the performance of the LAT and describe some of the most important scientific results

  14. FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE DETECTION OF THE YOUNG SUPERNOVA REMNANT TYCHO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After almost three years of data taking in sky-survey mode, the Fermi Large Area Telescope has detected γ-ray emission toward Tycho's supernova remnant (SNR). The Tycho SNR is among the youngest remnants in the Galaxy, originating from a Type Ia Supernova in AD 1572. The γ-ray integral flux from 400 MeV up to 100 GeV has been measured to be (3.5 ± 1.1stat ± 0.7syst)× 10–9 cm–2 s–1 with a photon index of 2.3 ± 0.2stat ± 0.1syst. A simple model consistent with TeV, X-ray, and radio data is sufficient to explain the observed emission as originating from π0 decays as a result of cosmic-ray acceleration and interaction with the ambient medium.

  15. Sensitivity projections for dark matter searches with the Fermi large area telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, E.; Sánchez-Conde, M.; Anderson, B.; Caputo, R.; Cuoco, A.; Di Mauro, M.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Gomez-Vargas, G. A.; Meyer, M.; Tibaldo, L.; Wood, M.; Zaharijas, G.; Zimmer, S.; Ajello, M.; Albert, A.; Baldini, L.; Bechtol, K.; Bloom, E. D.; Ceraudo, F.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Digel, S. W.; Gaskins, J.; Gustafsson, M.; Mirabal, N.; Razzano, M.

    2016-06-01

    The nature of dark matter is a longstanding enigma of physics; it may consist of particles beyond the Standard Model that are still elusive to experiments. Among indirect search techniques, which look for stable products from the annihilation or decay of dark matter particles, or from axions coupling to high-energy photons, observations of the γ-ray sky have come to prominence over the last few years, because of the excellent sensitivity of the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope mission. The LAT energy range from 20 meV to above 300 GeV is particularly well suited for searching for products of the interactions of dark matter particles. In this report we describe methods used to search for evidence of dark matter with the LAT, and review the status of searches performed with up to six years of LAT data. We also discuss the factors that determine the sensitivities of these searches, including the magnitudes of the signals and the relevant backgrounds, considering both statistical and systematic uncertainties. We project the expected sensitivities of each search method for 10 and 15 years of LAT data taking. In particular, we find that the sensitivity of searches targeting dwarf galaxies, which provide the best limits currently, will improve faster than the square root of observing time. Current LAT limits for dwarf galaxies using six years of data reach the thermal relic level for masses up to 120 GeV for the b b ¯ annihilation channel for reasonable dark matter density profiles. With projected discoveries of additional dwarfs, these limits could extend to about 250 GeV. With as much as 15 years of LAT data these searches would be sensitive to dark matter annihilations at the thermal relic cross section for masses to greater than 400 GeV (200 GeV) in the b b ¯ (τ+τ-) annihilation channels.

  16. Pulsed Gamma-Rays From PSR J2021 3651 with the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the detection of pulsed gamma-rays from the young, spin-powered radio pulsar PSR J2021+3651 using data acquired with the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (formerly GLAST). The light curve consists of two narrow peaks of similar amplitude separated by 0.468 ± 0.002 in phase. The first peak lags the maximum of the 2 GHz radio pulse by 0.162 ± 0.004 ± 0.01 in phase. The integral gamma-ray photon flux above 100 MeV is (56 ± 3 ± 11) x 10-8 cm-2 s-1. The photon spectrum is well-described by an exponentially cut-off power law of the form dF/dE = kE-#Gamma#e(-E/Ec) where the energy E is expressed in GeV. The photon index is Γ = 1.5 ± 0.1 ± 0.1 and the exponential cut-off is Ec = 2.4 ± 0.3 ± 0.5 GeV. The first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. The integral photon flux of the bridge is approximately 10% of the pulsed emission, and the upper limit on off-pulse gamma-ray emission from a putative pulsar wind nebula is -2 but a poorly constrained magnetic geometry. Re-analysis of Chandra data enhanced the significance of the weak X-ray pulsations, and the first peak is roughly phase-aligned with the first gamma-ray peak. We discuss the emission region and beaming geometry based on the shape and spectrum of the gamma-ray light curve combined with radio and X-ray measurements, and the implications for the pulsar distance. Gamma-ray emission from the polar cap region seems unlikely for this pulsar.

  17. First detections of nebula with the Fermi-Large Area Telescope and study of their pulsars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope was launched on 2008 June 11, carrying the Large Area Telescope (LAT), sensitive to gamma-rays in the 20 MeV - 300 GeV energy range. The Crab Nebula had been detected and studied in the 70 MeV - 30 GeV band using the CGRO-EGRET experiment, but no pulsar wind nebula (PWN) had ever been firmly identified in the high energy gamma-ray domain. PWNe are powered by the constant injection of a relativistic wind of electrons and positrons from their central pulsars. These charged particles are accelerated at the shock front forming the PWN and emit photons which can be observed along the entire electromagnetic spectrum, including the high energy gamma-ray domain. Data provided by the Fermi-LAT during the first two years of the mission have allowed the detection and the identification of three PWNe and their associated pulsars (Crab Nebula, Vela X and MSH 15-52) as well as the PWN HESS J1825-137 discovered by ground-based experiments sensitive to very high energy gamma-rays. Results of temporal, spectral and morphological analyses of the pulsar/PWN systems detected by Fermi- LAT, as well as results of systematic studies performed first around every gamma-ray pulsar detected by the LAT and secondly around every very high energy source identified as a PWN or a PWN candidate are presented in this dissertation. These studies bring new insights and constraints on the physical properties of the sources as well as on emitting processes in pulsar magnetospheres and in PWNe. (author)

  18. Gamma-Ray Observations of the Orion Molecular Clouds with the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Allafort, A.; Antolini, E.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A. W.; Bottacini, E.; Brandt, T. J.; Bregeon, J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Buson, S.; Ferrara, E. C.; Harding, A. K.; Troja, E.

    2012-01-01

    We report on the gamma-ray observations of giant molecular clouds Orion A and B with the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. The gamma-ray emission in the energy band between approx 100 MeV and approx 100 GeV is predicted to trace the gas mass distribution in the clouds through nuclear interactions between the Galactic cosmic rays (CRs) and interstellar gas. The gamma-ray production cross-section for the nuclear interaction is known to approx 10% precision which makes the LAT a powerful tool to measure the gas mass column density distribution of molecular clouds for a known CR intensity. We present here such distributions for Orion A and B, and correlate them with those of the velocity-integrated CO intensity (W(sub CO)) at a 1 deg 1 deg pixel level. The correlation is found to be linear over a W(sub CO) range of approx 10-fold when divided in three regions, suggesting penetration of nuclear CRs to most of the cloud volumes. The W(sub CO)-to-mass conversion factor, X(sub CO), is found to be approx 2.3 10(exp 20) / sq cm (K km/s)(exp -1) for the high-longitude part of Orion A (l > 212 deg), approx 1.7 times higher than approx 1.3 10(exp 20) found for the rest of Orion A and B. We interpret the apparent high X(sub CO) in the high-longitude region of Orion A in the light of recent works proposing a nonlinear relation between H2 and CO densities in the diffuse molecular gas.W(sub CO) decreases faster than the H2 column density in the region making the gas "darker" to W(sub CO).

  19. FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE OBSERVATIONS OF THE VELA-X PULSAR WIND NEBULA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on gamma-ray observations in the off-pulse window of the Vela pulsar PSR B0833-45 using 11 months of survey data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). This pulsar is located in the 8 deg. diameter Vela supernova remnant, which contains several regions of non-thermal emission detected in the radio, X-ray, and gamma-ray bands. The gamma-ray emission detected by the LAT lies within one of these regions, the 2 deg. x 3 deg. area south of the pulsar known as Vela-X. The LAT flux is significantly spatially extended with a best-fit radius of 0.088 ± 0.012 for an assumed radially symmetric uniform disk. The 200 MeV to 20 GeV LAT spectrum of this source is well described by a power law with a spectral index of 2.41 ± 0.09 ± 0.15 and integral flux above 100 MeV of (4.73 ± 0.63 ± 1.32) x 10-7 cm-2 s-1. The first errors represent the statistical error on the fit parameters, while the second ones are the systematic uncertainties. Detailed morphological and spectral analyses give strong constraints on the energetics and magnetic field of the pulsar wind nebula system and favor a scenario with two distinct electron populations.

  20. Fermi large area telescope observations of the cosmic-ray induced γ-ray emission of the Earth's atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on measurements of the cosmic-ray induced γ-ray emission of Earth's atmosphere by the Large Area Telescope on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. The Large Area Telescope has observed the Earth during its commissioning phase and with a dedicated Earth limb following observation in September 2008. These measurements yielded ∼6.4x106 photons with energies >100 MeV and ∼250 hours total live time for the highest quality data selection. This allows the study of the spatial and spectral distributions of these photons with unprecedented detail. The spectrum of the emission--often referred to as Earth albedo gamma-ray emission--has a power-law shape up to 500 GeV with spectral index Γ=2.79±0.06.

  1. Refining the associations of the Fermi Large Area Telescope Source Catalogs

    CERN Document Server

    Massaro, F; Landoni, M; Paggi, A; Masetti, N; Giroletti, M; Otí-Floranes, H; Chavushyan, V; Jiménez-Bailón, E; Patiño-Álvarez, V; Digel, S W; Smith, Howard A; Tosti, G

    2015-01-01

    The Fermi-Large Area Telescope (LAT) First Source Catalog (1FGL) was released in February 2010 and the Fermi-LAT 2-Year Source Catalog (2FGL) appeared in April 2012, based on data from 24 months of operation. Since their releases, many follow up observations of unidentified gamma-ray sources (UGSs) were performed and new procedures to associate gamma-ray sources with potential counterparts at other wavelengths were developed. Here we review and characterize all the associations as published in the 1FGL and 2FGL catalog on the basis of multifrequency archival observations. In particular we located 177 spectra for the low-energy counterparts that were not listed in the previous Fermi catalogs, and in addition we present new spectroscopic observations of 8 gamma-ray blazar candidates. Based on our investigations, we introduce a new counterpart category of "candidate associations" and propose a refined classification for the candidate low-energy counterparts of the Fermi sources. We compare the 1FGL-assigned coun...

  2. Probing millisecond pulsar emission geometry using light curves from the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Venter, C; Guillemot, L

    2009-01-01

    An interesting new high-energy pulsar sub-population is emerging following early discoveries of gamma-ray millisecond pulsars (MSPs) by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). We present results from 3D emission modeling, including the Special Relativistic effects of aberration and time-of-flight delays and also rotational sweepback of B-field lines, in the geometric context of polar cap (PC), outer gap (OG), and two-pole caustic (TPC) pulsar models. In contrast to the general belief that these very old, rapidly-rotating neutron stars (NSs) should have largely pair-starved magnetospheres due to the absence of significant pair production, we find that most of the light curves are best fit by TPC and OG models, which indicates the presence of narrow accelerating gaps limited by robust pair production -- even in these pulsars with very low spin-down luminosities. The gamma-ray pulse shapes and relative phase lags with respect to the radio pulses point to high-altitude emission being dominant for all geometries. We...

  3. Observing two dark accelerators around the Galactic Centre with Fermi Large Area Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Hui, C Y; Ng, C W; Lin, L C C; Tam, P H T; Cheng, K S; Kong, A K H; Chernyshov, D O; Dogiel, V A

    2016-01-01

    We report the results from a detailed $\\gamma-$ray investigation in the field of two "dark accelerators", HESS J1745-303 and HESS J1741-302, with $6.9$ years of data obtained by the Fermi Large Area Telescope. For HESS J1745-303, we found that its MeV-GeV emission is mainly originated from the "Region A" of the TeV feature. Its $\\gamma-$ray spectrum can be modeled with a single power-law with a photon index of $\\Gamma\\sim2.5$ from few hundreds MeV to TeV. Moreover, an elongated feature, which extends from "Region A" toward northwest for $\\sim1.3^{\\circ}$, is discovered for the first time. The orientation of this feature is similar to that of a large scale atomic/molecular gas distribution. For HESS J1741-302, our analysis does not yield any MeV-GeV counterpart for this unidentified TeV source. On the other hand, we have detected a new point source, Fermi J1740.1-3013, serendipitously. Its spectrum is apparently curved which resembles that of a $\\gamma-$ray pulsar. This makes it possibly associated with PSR B1...

  4. The Second Fermi Large Area Telescope Catalog of Gamma-ray Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2013-01-01

    This catalog summarizes 117 high-confidence > 0.1 GeV gamma-ray pulsar detections using three years of data acquired by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi satellite. Half are neutron stars discovered using LAT data, through periodicity searches in gamma-ray and radio data around LAT unassociated source positions. The 117 pulsars are evenly divided into three groups: millisecond pulsars, young radio-loud pulsars, and young radio-quiet pulsars. We characterize the pulse profiles and energy spectra and derive luminosities when distance information exists. Spectral analysis of the off-peak phase intervals indicates probable pulsar wind nebula emission for four pulsars, and off-peak magnetospheric emission for several young and millisecond pulsars. We compare the gamma-ray properties with those in the radio, optical, and X-ray bands. We provide flux limits for pulsars with no observed gamma-ray emission, highlighting a small number of gamma-faint, radio-loud pulsars. The large, varied gamma-ray pulsar sam...

  5. Observations of Energetic High Magnetic Field Pulsars with the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parent, D.; Kerr, M.; DenHartog, P. R.; Baring, M. G.; DeCesar, M. E.; Espinoza, C. M.; Harding, A. K.; Romani, R. W.; Stappers, B. W.; Watters, K.; Weltevrde, P.; Abdo, A. A.; Craig, H. A.; Kramer, M.; Lyne, A. G.

    2011-01-01

    We report the detection of gamma-ray pulsations from the high-magnetic-field rotation-powered pulsar PSR J1119.6127 using data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope. The gamma-ray light curve of PSR J1119.6127 shows a single, wide peak offset from the radio peak by 0.43 +/- 0.02 in phase. Spectral analysis suggests a power law of index 1.0 +/- 0.3(+0.4 -0.2) with an energy cut-off at 0.8 +/- 0.2(+2.0 -0.5) GeV. The first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. We discuss the emission models of PSR J1119.6127 and demonstrate that despite the object's high surface magnetic field--near that of magnetars -- the field strength and structure in the gamma-ray emitting zone are apparently similar to those of typical young pulsars. Additionally, we present upper limits on the gamma-ray pulsed emission for the magnetically active PSR J1846.0258 in the supernova remnant Kesteven 75 and two other energetic high-Beta pulsars, PSRs J1718.3718 and J1734.3333. We explore possible explanations for the non-detection of these three objects, including peculiarities in their emission geometry.

  6. A tentative gamma-ray line from Dark Matter annihilation at the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The observation of a gamma-ray line in the cosmic-ray fluxes would be a smoking-gun signature for dark matter annihilation or decay in the Universe. We present an improved search for such signatures in the data of the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT), concentrating on energies between 20 and 300 GeV. Besides updating to 43 months of data, we use a new data-driven technique to select optimized target regions depending on the profile of the Galactic dark matter halo. In regions close to the Galactic center, we find a 4.6σ indication for a gamma-ray line at Eγ ≈ 130 GeV. When taking into account the look-elsewhere effect the significance of the observed excess is 3.2σ. If interpreted in terms of dark matter particles annihilating into a photon pair, the observations imply a dark matter mass of mχ = 129.8±2.4 +7−13 GeV and a partial annihilation cross-section of (σv)χχ→γγ = (1.27±0.32 +0.18−0.28) × 10−27cm3s−1 when using the Einasto dark matter profile. The evidence for the signal is based on about 50 photons; it will take a few years of additional data to clarify its existence

  7. Constraints on Lorentz Invariance Violation from Fermi -Large Area Telescope Observations of Gamma-Ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasileiou, V.; Jacholkowska, A.; Piron, F.; Bolmont, J.; Courturier, C.; Granot, J.; Stecker, Floyd William; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Longo, F.

    2013-01-01

    We analyze the MeV/GeV emission from four bright Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) observed by the Fermi-Large Area Telescope to produce robust, stringent constraints on a dependence of the speed of light in vacuo on the photon energy (vacuum dispersion), a form of Lorentz invariance violation (LIV) allowed by some Quantum Gravity (QG) theories. First, we use three different and complementary techniques to constrain the total degree of dispersion observed in the data. Additionally, using a maximally conservative set of assumptions on possible source-intrinsic spectral-evolution effects, we constrain any vacuum dispersion solely attributed to LIV. We then derive limits on the "QG energy scale" (the energy scale that LIV-inducing QG effects become important, E(sub QG)) and the coefficients of the Standard Model Extension. For the subluminal case (where high energy photons propagate more slowly than lower energy photons) and without taking into account any source-intrinsic dispersion, our most stringent limits (at 95% CL) are obtained from GRB 090510 and are E(sub QG,1) > 7.6 times the Planck energy (E(sub Pl)) and E(sub QG,2) > 1.3×10(exp 11) GeV for linear and quadratic leading order LIV-induced vacuum dispersion, respectively. These limits improve the latest constraints by Fermi and H.E.S.S. by a factor of approx. 2. Our results disfavor any class of models requiring E(sub QG,1) sub Pl)

  8. THE SECOND FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE CATALOG OF GAMMA-RAY PULSARS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This catalog summarizes 117 high-confidence ≥0.1 GeV gamma-ray pulsar detections using three years of data acquired by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi satellite. Half are neutron stars discovered using LAT data through periodicity searches in gamma-ray and radio data around LAT unassociated source positions. The 117 pulsars are evenly divided into three groups: millisecond pulsars, young radio-loud pulsars, and young radio-quiet pulsars. We characterize the pulse profiles and energy spectra and derive luminosities when distance information exists. Spectral analysis of the off-peak phase intervals indicates probable pulsar wind nebula emission for four pulsars, and off-peak magnetospheric emission for several young and millisecond pulsars. We compare the gamma-ray properties with those in the radio, optical, and X-ray bands. We provide flux limits for pulsars with no observed gamma-ray emission, highlighting a small number of gamma-faint, radio-loud pulsars. The large, varied gamma-ray pulsar sample constrains emission models. Fermi's selection biases complement those of radio surveys, enhancing comparisons with predicted population distributions

  9. THE SECOND FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE CATALOG OF GAMMA-RAY PULSARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdo, A. A. [Center for Earth Observing and Space Research, College of Science, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States); Ajello, M. [Space Sciences Laboratory, 7 Gauss Way, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-7450 (United States); Allafort, A.; Bloom, E. D.; Bottacini, E. [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Baldini, L. [Università di Pisa and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Ballet, J. [Laboratoire AIM, CEA-IRFU/CNRS/Université Paris Diderot, Service d' Astrophysique, CEA Saclay, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Barbiellini, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Trieste, I-34127 Trieste (Italy); Baring, M. G. [Rice University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, MS-108, P.O. Box 1892, Houston, TX 77251 (United States); Bastieri, D. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Padova, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Belfiore, A. [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics, Department of Physics and Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California at Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Bellazzini, R.; Bregeon, J. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Bhattacharyya, B. [National Centre for Radio Astrophysics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Pune 411 007 (India); Bissaldi, E. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Trieste, and Università di Trieste, I-34127 Trieste (Italy); Bonamente, E. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Perugia, I-06123 Perugia (Italy); Brandt, T. J. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Brigida, M., E-mail: hartog@stanford.edu [Dipartimento di Fisica ' ' M. Merlin' ' dell' Università e del Politecnico di Bari, I-70126 Bari (Italy); and others

    2013-10-01

    This catalog summarizes 117 high-confidence ≥0.1 GeV gamma-ray pulsar detections using three years of data acquired by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi satellite. Half are neutron stars discovered using LAT data through periodicity searches in gamma-ray and radio data around LAT unassociated source positions. The 117 pulsars are evenly divided into three groups: millisecond pulsars, young radio-loud pulsars, and young radio-quiet pulsars. We characterize the pulse profiles and energy spectra and derive luminosities when distance information exists. Spectral analysis of the off-peak phase intervals indicates probable pulsar wind nebula emission for four pulsars, and off-peak magnetospheric emission for several young and millisecond pulsars. We compare the gamma-ray properties with those in the radio, optical, and X-ray bands. We provide flux limits for pulsars with no observed gamma-ray emission, highlighting a small number of gamma-faint, radio-loud pulsars. The large, varied gamma-ray pulsar sample constrains emission models. Fermi's selection biases complement those of radio surveys, enhancing comparisons with predicted population distributions.

  10. FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE CONSTRAINTS ON THE GAMMA-RAY OPACITY OF THE UNIVERSE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The extragalactic background light (EBL) includes photons with wavelengths from ultraviolet to infrared, which are effective at attenuating gamma rays with energy above ∼10 GeV during propagation from sources at cosmological distances. This results in a redshift- and energy-dependent attenuation of the γ-ray flux of extragalactic sources such as blazars and gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). The Large Area Telescope on board Fermi detects a sample of γ-ray blazars with redshift up to z ∼ 3, and GRBs with redshift up to z ∼ 4.3. Using photons above 10 GeV collected by Fermi over more than one year of observations for these sources, we investigate the effect of γ-ray flux attenuation by the EBL. We place upper limits on the γ-ray opacity of the universe at various energies and redshifts and compare this with predictions from well-known EBL models. We find that an EBL intensity in the optical-ultraviolet wavelengths as great as predicted by the 'baseline' model of Stecker et al. can be ruled out with high confidence.

  11. FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE OBSERVATIONS OF PSR J1836+5925

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The discovery of the γ-ray pulsar PSR J1836+5925, powering the formerly unidentified EGRET source 3EG J1835+5918, was one of the early accomplishments of the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). Sitting 250 off the Galactic plane, PSR J1836+5925 is a 173 ms pulsar with a characteristic age of 1.8 million years, a spindown luminosity of 1.1 x 1034 erg s-1, and a large off-peak (OP) emission component, making it quite unusual among the known γ-ray pulsar population. We present an analysis of one year of LAT data, including an updated timing solution, detailed spectral results, and a long-term light curve showing no indication of variability. No evidence for a surrounding pulsar wind nebula is seen and the spectral characteristics of the OP emission indicate it is likely magnetospheric. Analysis of recent XMM-Newton observations of the X-ray counterpart yields a detailed characterization of its spectrum, which, like Geminga, is consistent with that of a neutron star showing evidence for both magnetospheric and thermal emission.

  12. SEARCH FOR GAMMA-RAY EMISSION FROM MAGNETARS WITH THE FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on the search for 0.1-10 GeV emission from magnetars in 17 months of Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) observations. No significant evidence for gamma-ray emission from any of the currently known magnetars is found. The most stringent upper limits to date on their persistent emission in the Fermi energy range are estimated between ∼10-12and10-10 erg s-1 cm-2, depending on the source. We also searched for gamma-ray pulsations and possible outbursts, also with no significant detection. The upper limits derived support the presence of a cutoff at an energy below a few MeV in the persistent emission of magnetars. They also show the likely need for a revision of current models of outer-gap emission from strongly magnetized pulsars, which, in some realizations, predict detectable GeV emission from magnetars at flux levels exceeding the upper limits identified here using the Fermi-LAT observations.

  13. THE FIRST CATALOG OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI DETECTED BY THE FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the first catalog of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) detected by the Large Area Telescope (LAT), corresponding to 11 months of data collected in scientific operation mode. The First LAT AGN Catalog (1LAC) includes 671 γ-ray sources located at high Galactic latitudes (|b|>100) that are detected with a test statistic greater than 25 and associated statistically with AGNs. Some LAT sources are associated with multiple AGNs, and consequently, the catalog includes 709 AGNs, comprising 300 BL Lacertae objects, 296 flat-spectrum radio quasars, 41 AGNs of other types, and 72 AGNs of unknown type. We also classify the blazars based on their spectral energy distributions as archival radio, optical, and X-ray data permit. In addition to the formal 1LAC sample, we provide AGN associations for 51 low-latitude LAT sources and AGN 'affiliations' (unquantified counterpart candidates) for 104 high-latitude LAT sources without AGN associations. The overlap of the 1LAC with existing γ-ray AGN catalogs (LBAS, EGRET, AGILE, Swift, INTEGRAL, TeVCat) is briefly discussed. Various properties-such as γ-ray fluxes and photon power-law spectral indices, redshifts, γ-ray luminosities, variability, and archival radio luminosities-and their correlations are presented and discussed for the different blazar classes. We compare the 1LAC results with predictions regarding the γ-ray AGN populations, and we comment on the power of the sample to address the question of the blazar sequence.

  14. Development of an X-ray Telescope with a Large Effective Area for the Iron K Line Band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Hironori; Tachibana, Sasagu; Yoshikawa, Shun; Tamura, Keisuke; Mori, Hideyuki; Mitsuishi, Ikuyuki; Tawara, Yuzuru; Kunieda, Hideyo; Yamashita, Kojun

    2015-08-01

    X-ray micro-calorimeters such as the Soft X-ray Spectrometer (SXS) on board ASTRO-H will enable precise spectroscopy of iron K lines even for spatially extended objects. To exploit the full power of the high-energy resolution, X-ray telescopes with a large effective area around 6 keV are essentially important. Conventional Wolter-I X-ray telescopes aimed at X-rays below 10 keV have used the principle of total reflection to collect the X-rays. Enlarging the diameter of this type of telescopes is not effective to obtain the large effective area, since the incident angle of X-rays for the outer part of the telescope exceeds the critical angle, and the X-ray reflectivity of the outer part is significantly low. For example, the critical angle of Ir for an X-ray of 6 keV is 0.748 deg. Thus if we assume a focal length of 6 m for a Wolter-I optics using mirrors covered with Ir as a reflector, the mirrors the radial position of which are larger than 34 cm cannot reflect X-rays above 6 keV effectively. If multi-layer mirrors are applied to the outer part of the telescope, however, the X-ray reflectivity can be enhanced significantly by the principle of Bragg reflection. Our objective is to develop a Wolter-I X-ray telescope with an aperture of 110 cm and a focal length of 6 m, and make all mirrors in the telescope can reflect X-rays around 6 keV effectively by utilizing the multi-layer mirrors. The size of the telescope is determined by a boundary condition that can be launched by the epsilon rocket of ISAS/JAXA. The multi-layer is designed to enhance the reflectivity at 6.4 keV, 6.7 keV, or 6.9 keV. Our simulation suggests that the effective area averaged in the 5.7-7.7 keV band could be 2000 cm2, whichis comparable to the effective area of Athena launched in 2028 by ESA. Furthermore, we showed that the Ir/C multi-layers produced by our DC magnetron sputtering machine has a surface roughness of less than 4 angstrom. This value is smaller than the average surface roughness

  15. Fermi large area telescope detection of a break in the gamma-ray spectrum of the supernova remnant Cassiopeia A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on observations of the supernova remnant Cassiopeia A in the energy range from 100 MeV to 100 GeV using 44 months of observations from the Large Area Telescope on board the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope. We perform a detailed spectral analysis of this source and report on a low-energy break in the spectrum at 1.72−0.89+1.35 GeV. By comparing the results with models for the gamma-ray emission, we find that hadronic emission is preferred for the GeV energy range.

  16. FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE OBSERVATIONS OF THE SUPERNOVA REMNANT G8.7-0.1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ajello, M.; Allafort, A.; Bechtol, K.; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Borgland, A. W.; Buehler, R.; Cameron, R. A. [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Baldini, L.; Bellazzini, R.; Bregeon, J. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Ballet, J. [Laboratoire AIM, CEA-IRFU/CNRS/Universite Paris Diderot, Service d' Astrophysique, CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Barbiellini, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Trieste, I-34127 Trieste (Italy); Bastieri, D.; Buson, S. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Padova, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Bonamente, E. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Perugia, I-06123 Perugia (Italy); Brigida, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica ' M. Merlin' dell' Universita e del Politecnico di Bari, I-70126 Bari (Italy); Bruel, P. [Laboratoire Leprince-Ringuet, Ecole polytechnique, CNRS/IN2P3, Palaiseau (France); Caliandro, G. A., E-mail: hanabata@hep01.hepl.hiroshima-u.ac.jp, E-mail: katagiri@mx.ibaraki.ac.jp [Institut de Ciencies de l' Espai (IEEE-CSIC), Campus UAB, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); and others

    2012-01-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the GeV gamma-ray emission toward the supernova remnant (SNR) G8.7-0.1 with the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. An investigation of the relationship between G8.7-0.1 and the TeV unidentified source HESS J1804-216 provides us with an important clue on diffusion process of cosmic rays if particle acceleration operates in the SNR. The GeV gamma-ray emission is extended with most of the emission in positional coincidence with the SNR G8.7-0.1 and a lesser part located outside the western boundary of G8.7-0.1. The region of the gamma-ray emission overlaps spatially connected molecular clouds, implying a physical connection for the gamma-ray structure. The total gamma-ray spectrum measured with LAT from 200 MeV-100 GeV can be described by a broken power-law function with a break of 2.4 {+-} 0.6 (stat) {+-} 1.2 (sys) GeV, and photon indices of 2.10 {+-} 0.06 (stat) {+-} 0.10 (sys) below the break and 2.70 {+-} 0.12 (stat) {+-} 0.14 (sys) above the break. Given the spatial association among the gamma rays, the radio emission of G8.7-0.1, and the molecular clouds, the decay of {pi}{sup 0}s produced by particles accelerated in the SNR and hitting the molecular clouds naturally explains the GeV gamma-ray spectrum. We also find that the GeV morphology is not well represented by the TeV emission from HESS J1804-216 and that the spectrum in the GeV band is not consistent with the extrapolation of the TeV gamma-ray spectrum. The spectral index of the TeV emission is consistent with the particle spectral index predicted by a theory that assumes energy-dependent diffusion of particles accelerated in an SNR. We discuss the possibility that the TeV spectrum originates from the interaction of particles accelerated in G8.7-0.1 with molecular clouds, and we constrain the diffusion coefficient of the particles.

  17. Fermi Large Area Telescope Observations of the Supernova Remnant GS.7-0.1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrara, E. C.; Hays, E.; Troja, E.; Moiseev, A. A.

    2012-01-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the GeV gamma-ray emission toward the supernova remnant (SNR) G8.7-0.1 with the Large Area Telescope (LAT) onboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. An investigation of the relationship among G8.7-0.1 and the TeV unidentified source HESS J1804-216 provides us with an important clue on diffusion process of cosmic rays if particle acceleration operates in the SNR. The GeV gamma-ray emission is extended with most of the emission in positional coincidence with the SNR G8.7-0.1 and a lesser part located outside the western boundary of G8.7-0.1. The region of the gamma-ray emission overlaps spatially-connected molecular clouds, implying a physical connection for the gamma-ray structure. The total gamma-ray spectrum measured with LAT from 200 MeV-100 GeV can be described by a broken power-law function with a break of 2.4 +/- 0.6 (stat) +/- 1.2 (sys) GeV, and photon indices of2.10 +/- 0.06 (stat) +/- 0.10 (sys) below the break and 2.70 +/- 0.12 (stat) +/- 0.14 (sys) above the break. Given the spatial association among the gamma rays, the radio emission ofG8.7-0.1, and the molecular clouds, the decay of pions produced by particles accelerated in the SNR and hitting the molecular clouds naturally explains the GeV gamma-ray spectrum. We also find that the GeV morphology is not well represented by the TeV emission from HESS Jl804-2l6 and that the spectrum in the Ge V band is not consistent with the extrapolation of the TeV gamma-ray spectrum. The spectral index of the TeV emission is consistent with the particle spectral index predicted by a theory that assumes energy-dependent diffusion of particles accelerated in an SNR. We discuss the possibility that the TeV-spectrum originates from the interaction of particles accelerated in G8.7-0.l with molecular clouds, and we constrain the diffusion coefficient of the particles.

  18. Pulsed Gamma-Rays From PSR J2021 3651 with the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdo, Aous A.; /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C.; Ackermann, M.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Ajello, Marco; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Atwood, William B.; /UC, Santa Cruz; Baldini, L.; /INFN, Pisa; Ballet, J.; /DAPNIA, Saclay; Barbiellini, Guido; /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U.; Bastieri, Denis; /INFN, Padua /Padua U.; Battelino, Milan; /Royal Inst. Tech., Stockholm; Baughman, B.M.; /Ohio State U.; Bechtol, K.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bellazzini, Ronaldo; /INFN, Pisa; Berenji, Bijan; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bloom, Elliott D.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bogaert, G.; /Ecole Polytechnique; Borgland, Anders W.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bregeon, J.; /INFN, Pisa; Brez, A.; /INFN, Pisa; Brigida, M.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Bruel, P.; /Ecole Polytechnique; Burnett, Thompson H.; /Washington U., Seattle /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Columbia U. /IASF, Milan /IASF, Milan /DAPNIA, Saclay /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /George Mason U. /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /IASF, Milan /IASF, Milan /NASA, Goddard /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /LPCE, Orleans /Montpellier U. /Sonoma State U. /Royal Inst. Tech., Stockholm /Stockholm U. /ASI, Rome /NRAO, Charlottesville /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /INFN, Trieste /Pavia U. /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /UC, Santa Cruz /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /CENBG, Gradignan /CENBG, Gradignan /Manchester U. /Montpellier U. /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; /more authors..

    2011-11-30

    We report the detection of pulsed gamma-rays from the young, spin-powered radio pulsar PSR J2021+3651 using data acquired with the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (formerly GLAST). The light curve consists of two narrow peaks of similar amplitude separated by 0.468 {+-} 0.002 in phase. The first peak lags the maximum of the 2 GHz radio pulse by 0.162 {+-} 0.004 {+-} 0.01 in phase. The integral gamma-ray photon flux above 100 MeV is (56 {+-} 3 {+-} 11) x 10{sup -8} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}. The photon spectrum is well-described by an exponentially cut-off power law of the form dF/dE = kE{sup -{Gamma}}e{sup (-E/E{sub c})} where the energy E is expressed in GeV. The photon index is {Gamma} = 1.5 {+-} 0.1 {+-} 0.1 and the exponential cut-off is E{sub c} = 2.4 {+-} 0.3 {+-} 0.5 GeV. The first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. The integral photon flux of the bridge is approximately 10% of the pulsed emission, and the upper limit on off-pulse gamma-ray emission from a putative pulsar wind nebula is < 10% of the pulsed emission at the 95% confidence level. Radio polarization measurements yield a rotation measure of RM = 524 {+-} 4 rad m{sup -2} but a poorly constrained magnetic geometry. Re-analysis of Chandra data enhanced the significance of the weak X-ray pulsations, and the first peak is roughly phase-aligned with the first gamma-ray peak. We discuss the emission region and beaming geometry based on the shape and spectrum of the gamma-ray light curve combined with radio and X-ray measurements, and the implications for the pulsar distance. Gamma-ray emission from the polar cap region seems unlikely for this pulsar.

  19. Fermi Large Area Telescope Observations of the Supernova Remnant G8.7-0.1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ajello, M.; Allafort, A.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC; Baldini, L.; /INFN, Pisa; Ballet, J.; /AIM, Saclay; Barbiellini, G.; /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U.; Bastieri, D.; /INFN, Padua /Padua U.; Bechtol, K.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC; Bellazzini, R.; /INFN, Pisa; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R.D.; Bloom, E.D.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC; Bonamente, E.; /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U.; Borgland, A.W.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC; Bregeon, J.; /INFN, Pisa; Brigida, M.; /Bari Polytechnic /INFN, Bari; Bruel, P.; /Ecole Polytechnique; Buehler, R.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC; Buson, S.; /INFN, Padua /Padua U.; Caliandro, G.A.; /CSIC, Catalunya; Cameron, R.A.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC; Caraveo, P.A.; /IASF, Milan /AIM, Saclay /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /Unlisted, US /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /Perugia U. /ASDC, Frascati /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /Montpellier U. /ASDC, Frascati /Udine U. /INFN, Trieste /Bari Polytechnic /INFN, Bari /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /Bari Polytechnic /INFN, Bari /Ecole Polytechnique /NASA, Goddard /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /Udine U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste Observ. /Hiroshima U. /Nagoya U. /Bari Polytechnic /INFN, Bari /INFN, Bari /ASDC, Frascati /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /Bari Polytechnic /INFN, Bari /ASDC, Frascati /Bari Polytechnic /INFN, Bari /Bologna Observ. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /Alabama U., Huntsville /CSIC, Catalunya /Hiroshima U. /NASA, Goddard /Hiroshima U.; /more authors..

    2012-09-14

    We present a detailed analysis of the GeV gamma-ray emission toward the supernova remnant (SNR) G8.7-0.1 with the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. An investigation of the relationship between G8.7-0.1 and the TeV unidentified source HESS J1804-216 provides us with an important clue on diffusion process of cosmic rays if particle acceleration operates in the SNR. The GeV gamma-ray emission is extended with most of the emission in positional coincidence with the SNR G8.7-0.1 and a lesser part located outside the western boundary of G8.7-0.1. The region of the gamma-ray emission overlaps spatially connected molecular clouds, implying a physical connection for the gamma-ray structure. The total gamma-ray spectrum measured with LAT from 200 MeV-100 GeV can be described by a broken power-law function with a break of 2.4 {+-} 0.6 (stat) {+-} 1.2 (sys) GeV, and photon indices of 2.10 {+-} 0.06 (stat) {+-} 0.10 (sys) below the break and 2.70 {+-} 0.12 (stat) {+-} 0.14 (sys) above the break. Given the spatial association among the gamma rays, the radio emission of G8.7-0.1, and the molecular clouds, the decay of p0s produced by particles accelerated in the SNR and hitting the molecular clouds naturally explains the GeV gamma-ray spectrum. We also find that the GeV morphology is not well represented by the TeV emission from HESS J1804-216 and that the spectrum in the GeV band is not consistent with the extrapolation of the TeV gamma-ray spectrum. The spectral index of the TeV emission is consistent with the particle spectral index predicted by a theory that assumes energy-dependent diffusion of particles accelerated in an SNR. We discuss the possibility that the TeV spectrum originates from the interaction of particles accelerated in G8.7-0.1 with molecular clouds, and we constrain the diffusion coefficient of the particles.

  20. Modeling the early multiwavelength emission in GRB130427A

    CERN Document Server

    Fraija, Nissim; Veres, Péter

    2016-01-01

    One of the most powerful gamma-ray bursts, GRB 130427A was swiftly detected from GeV $\\gamma$-rays to optical wavelengths. In the GeV band, the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope observed the highest-energy photon ever recorded of 95 GeV, and a bright peak in the early phase followed by emission temporally extended for more than 20 hours. In the optical band, a bright flash with a magnitude of $7.03\\pm 0.03$ in the time interval from 9.31 s to 19.31 s after the trigger was reported by RAPTOR in r-band. We study the origin of the GeV $\\gamma$-ray emission, using the multiwavelength observation detected in X-ray and optical bands. The origin of the temporally extended LAT, X-ray and optical flux is naturally interpreted as synchrotron radiation and the 95-GeV photon and the integral flux upper limits placed by the HAWC observatory are consistent with synchrotron self-Compton from an adiabatic forward shock propagating into the stellar wind of its progenitor. The extreme LAT ...

  1. A multi-wavelength polarimetric study of the blazar CTA 102 during a Gamma-ray flare in 2012

    OpenAIRE

    Casadio, Carolina; Gómez, José L.; Jorstad, Svetlana G.; Marscher, Alan P.; Larionov, Valeri M.; Smith, Paul S.; Gurwell, Mark A.; Lähteenmäki, Anne; Agudo, Iván; Molina, Sol N.; Bala, Vishal; Joshi, Manasvita; Taylor, Brian; Williamson, Karen E.; Arkharov, Arkady A.

    2015-01-01

    We perform a multi-wavelength polarimetric study of the quasar CTA 102 during an extraordinarily bright $\\gamma$-ray outburst detected by the {\\it Fermi} Large Area Telescope in September-October 2012 when the source reached a flux of F$_{>100~\\mathrm{MeV}} =5.2\\pm0.4\\times10^{-6}$ photons cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$. At the same time the source displayed an unprecedented optical and NIR outburst. We study the evolution of the parsec scale jet with ultra-high angular resolution through a sequence of 8...

  2. Multiwavelength Evidence for Quasi-Periodic Modulation in the Gamma-Ray Blazar PG 1553+113

    OpenAIRE

    Ackermann, Markus; Ajello, M.; Bissaldi, E.; Perri, M.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Petrosian, V.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Porter, T. A.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M; Readhead, A.; Blandford, R. D.; Reimer, A

    2015-01-01

    We report for the first time a γ-ray and multiwavelength nearly periodic oscillation in an active galactic nucleus. Using the Fermi Large Area Telescope we have discovered an apparent quasi-periodicity in the γ-ray flux (E > 100 MeV) from the GeV/TeV BL Lac object PG 1553+113. The marginal significance of the 2.18 ± 0.08 year period γ-ray cycle is strengthened by correlated oscillations observed in radio and optical fluxes, through data collected in the Owens Valley Radio Observatory, Tuorla,...

  3. Hard x-ray telescope mission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorenstein, P.; Worrall, D.; Joensen, K.D.; Romaine, S.E.; Weisskopf, M.C.; Ramsey, B.D.; Bilbro, J.W.; Kroeger, R.A.; Gehrels, N.A.; Parsons, A.M.; Smither, R.K.; Christensen, Finn Erland; Citterio, O.; von Ballmoos, P.

    The Hard X-Ray Telescope was selected for study as a possible new intermediate size mission for the early 21st century. Its principal attributes are: (1) multiwavelength observing with a system of focussing telescopes that collectively observe from the UV to over 1 MeV, (2) much higher sensitivity...

  4. Probing Millisecond Pulsar Emission Geometry Using Light Curves From the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venter, Christo; Harding, Alice; Guillemot, L.

    2009-01-01

    An interesting new high-energy pulsar sub-population is emerging following early discoveries of gamma-ray millisecond pulsars (MSPs) by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). We present results from 3D emission modeling, including the Special Relativistic effects of aberration and time-of-flight delays and also rotational sweepback of 13-field lines, in the geometric context of polar cap (PC), slot gap (SG), outer gap (OG), and two-pole caustic (TPC) pulsar models. In contrast to the general belief that these very old, rapidly-rotating neutron stars (NSs) should have largely pair-starved magnetospheres due to the absence of significant pair production, we find that most of the light curves are best fit by SG and OG models, which indicates the presence of narrow accelerating gaps limited by robust pair production -- even in these pulsars with very low spin-down luminosities. The gamma-ray pulse shapes and relative phase lags with respect to the radio pulses point to high-altitude emission being dominant for all geometries. We also find exclusive differentiation of the current gamma-ray MSP population into two MSP sub-classes: light curve shapes and lags across wavebands impose either pair-starved PC (PSPC) or SG / OG-type geometries. In the first case, the radio pulse has a small lag with respect to the single gamma-ray pulse, while the (first) gamma-ray peak usually trails the radio by a large phase offset in the latter case. Finally, we find that the flux correction factor as a function of magnetic inclination and observer angles is typically of order unity for all models. Our calculation of light curves and flux correction factor f(_, _, P) for the case of MSPs is therefore complementary to the "ATLAS paper" of Watters et al. for younger pulsars.

  5. Jet Emission in Young Radio Sources: A Fermi Large Area Telescope Gamma-Ray View

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliori, G.; Siemiginowska, A.; Kelly, B. C.; Stawarz, Ł.; Celotti, A.; Begelman, M. C.

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the contribution of the beamed jet component to the high-energy emission in young and compact extragalactic radio sources, focusing for the first time on the γ-ray band. We derive predictions on the γ-ray luminosities associated with the relativistic jet assuming a leptonic radiative model. The high-energy emission is produced via Compton scattering by the relativistic electrons in a spherical region at the considered scales (lsim10 kpc). Simulations show a wide range of γ-ray luminosities, with intensities up to ~1046-1048 erg s-1 depending on the assumed jet parameters. We find a highly linear relation between the simulated X-ray and γ-ray luminosities that can be used to select candidates for γ-ray detection. We compare the simulated luminosity distributions in the radio, X-ray, and γ-ray regimes with observations for the largest sample of X-ray-detected young radio quasars. Our analysis of ~4-yr Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) data does not yield any statistically significant detections. However, the majority of the model-predicted γ-ray fluxes for the sample are near or below the current Fermi-LAT flux threshold and compatible with the derived upper limits. Our study gives constraints on the minimum jet power (L jet, kin/L disk > 0.01) of a potential jet contribution to the X-ray emission in the most compact sources (lsim 1 kpc) and on the particle-to-magnetic field energy density ratio that are in broad agreement with equipartition assumptions.

  6. Constraints on dark matter annihilation in clusters of galaxies with the Fermi large area telescope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nearby clusters and groups of galaxies are potentially bright sources of high-energy gamma-ray emission resulting from the pair-annihilation of dark matter particles. However, no significant gamma-ray emission has been detected so far from clusters in the first 11 months of observations with the Fermi Large Area Telescope. We interpret this non-detection in terms of constraints on dark matter particle properties. In particular for leptonic annihilation final states and particle masses greater than ∼ 200 GeV, gamma-ray emission from inverse Compton scattering of CMB photons is expected to dominate the dark matter annihilation signal from clusters, and our gamma-ray limits exclude large regions of the parameter space that would give a good fit to the recent anomalous Pamela and Fermi-LAT electron-positron measurements. We also present constraints on the annihilation of more standard dark matter candidates, such as the lightest neutralino of supersymmetric models. The constraints are particularly strong when including the fact that clusters are known to contain substructure at least on galaxy scales, increasing the expected gamma-ray flux by a factor of ∼ 5 over a smooth-halo assumption. We also explore the effect of uncertainties in cluster dark matter density profiles, finding a systematic uncertainty in the constraints of roughly a factor of two, but similar overall conclusions. In this work, we focus on deriving limits on dark matter models; a more general consideration of the Fermi-LAT data on clusters and clusters as gamma-ray sources is forthcoming

  7. Jet emission in young radio sources: A Fermi large area telescope gamma-ray view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigate the contribution of the beamed jet component to the high-energy emission in young and compact extragalactic radio sources, focusing for the first time on the γ-ray band. We derive predictions on the γ-ray luminosities associated with the relativistic jet assuming a leptonic radiative model. The high-energy emission is produced via Compton scattering by the relativistic electrons in a spherical region at the considered scales (≲10 kpc). Simulations show a wide range of γ-ray luminosities, with intensities up to ∼1046-1048 erg s–1 depending on the assumed jet parameters. We find a highly linear relation between the simulated X-ray and γ-ray luminosities that can be used to select candidates for γ-ray detection. We compare the simulated luminosity distributions in the radio, X-ray, and γ-ray regimes with observations for the largest sample of X-ray-detected young radio quasars. Our analysis of ∼4-yr Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) data does not yield any statistically significant detections. However, the majority of the model-predicted γ-ray fluxes for the sample are near or below the current Fermi-LAT flux threshold and compatible with the derived upper limits. Our study gives constraints on the minimum jet power (L jet, kin/L disk > 0.01) of a potential jet contribution to the X-ray emission in the most compact sources (≲ 1 kpc) and on the particle-to-magnetic field energy density ratio that are in broad agreement with equipartition assumptions.

  8. ON THE FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE SURPLUS OF DIFFUSE GALACTIC GAMMA-RAY EMISSION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent observations of diffuse Galactic γ-ray emission (DGE) by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (Fermi-LAT) have shown significant deviations, above a few GeV to about 100 GeV, from DGE models that use the GALPROP code for the propagation of cosmic ray (CR) particles outside their sources in the Galaxy and their interaction with the target distributions of the interstellar gas and radiation fields. The surplus of radiation observed is most pronounced in the inner Galaxy, where the concentration of CR sources is strongest. The present study investigates this 'Fermi-LAT Galactic Plane Surplus' by estimating the γ-ray emission from the sources themselves, which is disregarded in the above DGE models. It is shown that the expected hard spectrum of CRs, still confined in their sources (source cosmic rays, SCRs), can indeed explain this surplus. The method is based on earlier studies regarding the so-called EGRET GeV excess, which by now is generally interpreted as an instrumental effect. The contribution from SCRs is also predicted to increasingly exceed the DGE models above 100 GeV, up to γ-ray energies of about 10 TeV, where the corresponding surplus exceeds the hadronic part of the DGE by about one order of magnitude. Above such energies, the emission surplus should decrease again with energy due to the finite lifetime of the assumed supernova remnant sources. Observations of the DGE in the inner Galaxy at 15 TeV with the ground-based Milagro γ-ray detector and, at TeV energies, with the ARGO-YBJ detector are interpreted to provide confirmation of a significant SCR contribution to the DGE

  9. FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE GAMMA-RAY DETECTION OF THE RADIO GALAXY M87

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) discovery of high-energy (MeV/GeV) γ-ray emission positionally consistent with the center of the radio galaxy M87, at a source significance of over 10σ in 10 months of all-sky survey data. Following the detections of Cen A and Per A, this makes M87 the third radio galaxy seen with the LAT. The faint point-like γ-ray source has a >100 MeV flux of 2.45 (±0.63) x 10-8 photons cm-2 s-1 (photon index = 2.26 ± 0.13) with no significant variability detected within the LAT observation. This flux is comparable with the previous EGRET upper limit (-8 photons cm-2 s-1, 2σ), thus there is no evidence for a significant MeV/GeV flare on decade timescales. Contemporaneous Chandra and Very Long Baseline Array data indicate low activity in the unresolved X-ray and radio core relative to previous observations, suggesting M87 is in a quiescent overall level over the first year of Fermi-LAT observations. The LAT γ-ray spectrum is modeled as synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) emission from the electron population producing the radio-to-X-ray emission in the core. The resultant SSC spectrum extrapolates smoothly from the LAT band to the historical-minimum TeV emission. Alternative models for the core and possible contributions from the kiloparsec-scale jet in M87 are considered, and cannot be excluded.

  10. Discovery of Nine Gamma-Ray Pulsars in Fermi Large Area Telescope Data Using a New Blind Search Method

    OpenAIRE

    Pletsch, H. J.; Guillemot, L.; Allen, B.; Kramer, M.; Aulbert, C.; Fehrmann, H.; Ray, P.S.; Barr, E. D.; Belfiore, A.; Camilo, F.; Caraveo, P. A.; Çelik, O; Champion, D. J.; Dormody, M.; Eatough, R. P.

    2012-01-01

    We report the discovery of nine previously unknown gamma-ray pulsars in a blind search of data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). The pulsars were found with a novel hierarchical search method originally developed for detecting continuous gravitational waves from rapidly rotating neutron stars. Designed to find isolated pulsars spinning at up to kHz frequencies, the new method is computationally efficient and incorporates several advances, including a metric-based gridding of the sear...

  11. Fermi Large Area Telescope Observations of Markarian 421: The Missing Piece of its Spectral Energy Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A. W.; Bouvier, A.; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Cannon, A.; Caraveo, P. A.; Carrigan, S.; Casandjian, J. M.; Cavazzuti, E.; Cecchi, C.; Çelik, Ö.; Charles, E.; Chekhtman, A.; Chiang, J.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Conrad, J.; Cutini, S.; de Angelis, A.; de Palma, F.; Dermer, C. D.; Silva, E. do Couto e.; Drell, P. S.; Dubois, R.; Dumora, D.; Escande, L.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Finke, J.; Focke, W. B.; Fortin, P.; Frailis, M.; Fuhrmann, L.; Fukazawa, Y.; Fukuyama, T.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Gehrels, N.; Georganopoulos, M.; Germani, S.; Giebels, B.; Giglietto, N.; Giommi, P.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Grenier, I. A.; Guiriec, S.; Hadasch, D.; Hayashida, M.; Hays, E.; Horan, D.; Hughes, R. E.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, A. S.; Johnson, W. N.; Kadler, M.; Kamae, T.; Katagiri, H.; Kataoka, J.; Knödlseder, J.; Kuss, M.; Lande, J.; Latronico, L.; Lee, S.-H.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lott, B.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Madejski, G. M.; Makeev, A.; Max-Moerbeck, W.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McEnery, J. E.; Mehault, J.; Michelson, P. F.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Monte, C.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Nakamori, T.; Naumann-Godo, M.; Nishino, S.; Nolan, P. L.; Norris, J. P.; Nuss, E.; Ohsugi, T.; Okumura, A.; Omodei, N.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Ozaki, M.; Paneque, D.; Panetta, J. H.; Parent, D.; Pavlidou, V.; Pearson, T. J.; Pelassa, V.; Pepe, M.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Pierbattista, M.; Piron, F.; Porter, T. A.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Readhead, A.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Reyes, L. C.; Richards, J. L.; Ritz, S.; Roth, M.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Sanchez, D.; Sander, A.; Sgrò, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Smith, P. D.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Stawarz, Ł.; Stevenson, M.; Strickman, M. S.; Suson, D. J.; Takahashi, H.; Takahashi, T.; Tanaka, T.; Thayer, J. G.; Thayer, J. B.; Thompson, D. J.; Tibaldo, L.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Tramacere, A.; Troja, E.; Usher, T. L.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Vasileiou, V.; Vianello, G.; Vilchez, N.; Vitale, V.; Waite, A. P.; Wang, P.; Wehrle, A. E.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, K. S.; Yang, Z.; Yatsu, Y.; Ylinen, T.; Zensus, J. A.; Ziegler, M.; Fermi LAT Collaboration; Aleksić, J.; Antonelli, L. A.; Antoranz, P.; Backes, M.; Barrio, J. A.; Becerra González, J.; Bednarek, W.; Berdyugin, A.; Berger, K.; Bernardini, E.; Biland, A.; Blanch, O.; Bock, R. K.; Boller, A.; Bonnoli, G.; Bordas, P.; Borla Tridon, D.; Bosch-Ramon, V.; Bose, D.; Braun, I.; Bretz, T.; Camara, M.; Carmona, E.; Carosi, A.; Colin, P.; Colombo, E.; Contreras, J. L.; Cortina, J.; Covino, S.; Dazzi, F.; de Angelis, A.; De Cea del Pozo, E.; Delgado Mendez, C.; De Lotto, B.; De Maria, M.; De Sabata, F.; Diago Ortega, A.; Doert, M.; Domínguez, A.; Dominis Prester, D.; Dorner, D.; Doro, M.; Elsaesser, D.; Ferenc, D.; Fonseca, M. V.; Font, L.; García López, R. J.; Garczarczyk, M.; Gaug, M.; Giavitto, G.; Godinovi, N.; Hadasch, D.; Herrero, A.; Hildebrand, D.; Höhne-Mönch, D.; Hose, J.; Hrupec, D.; Jogler, T.; Klepser, S.; Krähenbühl, T.; Kranich, D.; Krause, J.; La Barbera, A.; Leonardo, E.; Lindfors, E.; Lombardi, S.; López, M.; Lorenz, E.; Majumdar, P.; Makariev, E.; Maneva, G.; Mankuzhiyil, N.; Mannheim, K.; Maraschi, L.; Mariotti, M.; Martínez, M.; Mazin, D.; Meucci, M.; Miranda, J. M.; Mirzoyan, R.; Miyamoto, H.; Moldón, J.; Moralejo, A.; Nieto, D.; Nilsson, K.; Orito, R.; Oya, I.; Paoletti, R.; Paredes, J. M.; Partini, S.; Pasanen, M.; Pauss, F.; Pegna, R. G.; Perez-Torres, M. A.; Persic, M.; Peruzzo, J.; Pochon, J.; Prada, F.; Prada Moroni, P. G.; Prandini, E.; Puchades, N.; Puljak, I.; Reichardt, T.; Rhode, W.; Ribó, M.; Rico, J.; Rissi, M.; Rügamer, S.; Saggion, A.; Saito, K.; Saito, T. Y.; Salvati, M.; Sánchez-Conde, M.; Satalecka, K.; Scalzotto, V.; Scapin, V.; Schultz, C.; Schweizer, T.; Shayduk, M.; Shore, S. N.; Sierpowska-Bartosik, A.; Sillanpää, A.; Sitarek, J.; Sobczynska, D.; Spanier, F.; Spiro, S.; Stamerra, A.; Steinke, B.; Storz, J.; Strah, N.; Struebig, J. C.; Suric, T.; Takalo, L. O.; Tavecchio, F.; Temnikov, P.; Terzić, T.; Tescaro, D.; Teshima, M.; Vankov, H.; Wagner, R. M.; Weitzel, Q.; Zabalza, V.; Zandanel, F.; Zanin, R.; MAGIC Collaboration; Villata, M.; Raiteri, C.; Aller, H. D.; Aller, M. F.; Chen, W. P.; Jordan, B.; Koptelova, E.; Kurtanidze, O. M.; Lähteenmäki, A.; McBreen, B.; Larionov, V. M.; Lin, C. S.; Nikolashvili, M. G.; Reinthal, R.; Angelakis, E.; Capalbi, M.; Carramiñana, A.; Carrasco, L.; Cassaro, P.; Cesarini, A.; Falcone, A.; Gurwell, M. A.; Hovatta, T.; Kovalev, Yu. A.; Kovalev, Y. Y.; Krichbaum, T. P.; Krimm, H. A.; Lister, M. L.; Moody, J. W.; Maccaferri, G.; Mori, Y.; Nestoras, I.; Orlati, A.; Pace, C.; Pagani, C.; Pearson, R.; Perri, M.; Piner, B. G.; Ros, E.; Sadun, A. C.; Sakamoto, T.; Tammi, J.; Zook, A.

    2011-08-01

    We report on the γ-ray activity of the high-synchrotron-peaked BL Lacertae object Markarian 421 (Mrk 421) during the first 1.5 years of Fermi operation, from 2008 August 5 to 2010 March 12. We find that the Large Area Telescope (LAT) γ-ray spectrum above 0.3 GeV can be well described by a power-law function with photon index Γ = 1.78 ± 0.02 and average photon flux F(> 0.3 GeV) = (7.23 ± 0.16) × 10-8 ph cm-2 s-1. Over this time period, the Fermi-LAT spectrum above 0.3 GeV was evaluated on seven-day-long time intervals, showing significant variations in the photon flux (up to a factor ~3 from the minimum to the maximum flux) but mild spectral variations. The variability amplitude at X-ray frequencies measured by RXTE/ASM and Swift/BAT is substantially larger than that in γ-rays measured by Fermi-LAT, and these two energy ranges are not significantly correlated. We also present the first results from the 4.5 month long multifrequency campaign on Mrk 421, which included the VLBA, Swift, RXTE, MAGIC, the F-GAMMA, GASP-WEBT, and other collaborations and instruments that provided excellent temporal and energy coverage of the source throughout the entire campaign (2009 January 19 to 2009 June 1). During this campaign, Mrk 421 showed a low activity at all wavebands. The extensive multi-instrument (radio to TeV) data set provides an unprecedented, complete look at the quiescent spectral energy distribution (SED) for this source. The broadband SED was reproduced with a leptonic (one-zone synchrotron self-Compton) and a hadronic model (synchrotron proton blazar). Both frameworks are able to describe the average SED reasonably well, implying comparable jet powers but very different characteristics for the blazar emission site.

  12. Likelihood Methods for the Detection and Characterization of Gamma-ray Pulsars with the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Kerr, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    The sensitivity of the Large Area Telescope (LAT) aboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope allows detection of thousands of new gamma-ray sources and detailed characterization of the spectra and variability of bright sources. Unsurprisingly, this increased capability leads to increased complexity in data analysis. Likelihood methods are ideal for connecting models with data, but the computational cost of folding the model input through the multi-scale instrument response function is appreciable. Both interactive analysis and large projects---such as analysis of the full gamma-ray sky---can be prohibitive or impossible, reducing the scope of the science possible with the LAT. To improve on this situation, we have developed pointlike, a software package for fast maximum likelihood analysis of LAT data. It is interactive by design and its rapid evaluation of the likelihood facilitates exploratory and large-scale, all-sky analysis. We detail its implementation and validate its performance on simulated data. We ...

  13. Development of the Model of Galactic Interstellar Emission for Standard Point-Source Analysis of Fermi Large Area Telescope Data

    CERN Document Server

    Acero, F; Ajello, M; Albert, A; Baldini, L; Ballet, J; Barbiellini, G; Bastieri, D; Bellazzini, R; Bissaldi, E; Bloom, E D; Bonino, R; Bottacini, E; Brandt, T J; Bregeon, J; Bruel, P; Buehler, R; Buson, S; Caliandro, G A; Cameron, R A; Caragiulo, M; Caraveo, P A; Casandjian, J M; Cavazzuti, E; Cecchi, C; Charles, E; Chekhtman, A; Chiang, J; Chiaro, G; Ciprini, S; Claus, R; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Conrad, J; Cuoco, A; Cutini, S; D'Ammando, F; de Angelis, A; de Palma, F; Desiante, R; Digel, S W; Di Venere, L; Drell, P S; Favuzzi, C; Fegan, S J; Ferrara, E C; Focke, W B; Franckowiak, A; Funk, S; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Gasparrini, D; Giglietto, N; Giordano, F; Giroletti, M; Glanzman, T; Godfrey, G; Grenier, I A; Guiriec, S; Hadasch, D; Harding, A K; Hayashi, K; Hays, E; Hewitt, J W; Hill, A B; Horan, D; Hou, X; Jogler, T; Jóhannesson, G; Kamae, T; Kuss, M; Landriu, D; Larsson, S; Latronico, L; Li, J; Li, L; Longo, F; Loparco, F; Lovellette, M N; Lubrano, P; Maldera, S; Malyshev, D; Manfreda, A; Martin, P; Mayer, M; Mazziotta, M N; McEnery, J E; Michelson, P F; Mirabal, N; Mizuno, T; Monzani, M E; Morselli, A; Nuss, E; Ohsugi, T; Omodei, N; Orienti, M; Orlando, E; Ormes, J F; Paneque, D; Pesce-Rollins, M; Piron, F; Pivato, G; Rainò, S; Rando, R; Razzano, M; Razzaque, S; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Remy, Q; Renault, N; Sánchez-Conde, M; Schaal, M; Schulz, A; Sgrò, C; Siskind, E J; Spada, F; Spandre, G; Spinelli, P; Strong, A W; Suson, D J; Tajima, H; Takahashi, H; Thayer, J B; Thompson, D J; Tibaldo, L; Tinivella, M; Torres, D F; Tosti, G; Troja, E; Vianello, G; Werner, M; Wood, K S; Wood, M; Zaharijas, G; Zimmer, S

    2016-01-01

    Most of the celestial gamma rays detected by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) aboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope originate from the interstellar medium when energetic cosmic rays interact with interstellar nucleons and photons. Conventional point and extended source studies rely on the modeling of this diffuse emission for accurate characterization. We describe here the development of the Galactic Interstellar Emission Model (GIEM) that is the standard adopted by the LAT Collaboration and is publicly available. The model is based on a linear combination of maps for interstellar gas column density in Galactocentric annuli and for the inverse Compton emission produced in the Galaxy. We also include in the GIEM large-scale structures like Loop I and the Fermi bubbles. The measured gas emissivity spectra confirm that the cosmic-ray proton density decreases with Galactocentric distance beyond 5 kpc from the Galactic Center. The measurements also suggest a softening of the proton spectrum with Galactocentric ...

  14. FERMI-LARGE AREA TELESCOPE OBSERVATIONS OF THE EXCEPTIONAL GAMMA-RAY OUTBURSTS OF 3C 273 IN 2009 SEPTEMBER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the light curves and spectral data of two exceptionally luminous gamma-ray outbursts observed by the Large Area Telescope experiment on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope from 3C 273 in 2009 September. During these flares, having a duration of a few days, the source reached its highest γ-ray flux ever measured. This allowed us to study, in some details, their spectral and temporal structures. The rise and the decay are asymmetric on timescales of 6 hr, and the spectral index was significantly harder during the flares than during the preceding 11 months. We also found that short, very intense flares put out the same time-integrated energy as long, less intense flares like that observed in 2009 August.

  15. Improvements in data analysis obtained by large-area silicon ΔE - E detector telescopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper describes a few practical methods for the analysis of data obtained by standard thin-thick silicon detector telescopes used in nuclear reaction measurements. The addressed issues are: (1) improvement in double-sided silicon strip detector (DSSSD) calibration based on the fact that each event is registered twice, both in horizontal and vertical strips, (2) improvements in particle identification and (3) simplified mapping of the non-uniformity of the thin detector, without a dedicated measurement of the thickness. The proposed procedures are applied on experimental data obtained for 30MeV 7Li beam induced reactions on LiF and C targets, studied with a detection setup consisting of four telescopes placed at different angles and distances. The proposed methods aim at quicker and more reliable calibration and particle identification. (orig.)

  16. Improvements in data analysis obtained by large-area silicon ΔE - E detector telescopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uroic, M.; Miljanic, D.; Prepolec, L.; Soic, N. [Ruder Boskovic Institute, Zagreb (Croatia); Milin, M. [University of Zagreb, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Zagreb (Croatia); Di Pietro, A.; Figuera, P.; Fisichella, M.; Pellegriti, M.G.; Scuderi, V. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, INFN, Catania (Italy); Lattuada, M. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, INFN, Catania (Italy); Universtita' di Catania, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Catania (Italy); Martel, I. [Universidad de Huelva, Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Huelva (Spain); Sanchez Benitez, A.M. [Universidad de Huelva, Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Huelva (Spain); Universidade de Lisboa, Centro de Fisica Nuclear da, Lisboa (Portugal); Strano, E.; Torresi, D. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, INFN, Catania (Italy); Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, INFN, Legnaro (Italy)

    2015-08-15

    The paper describes a few practical methods for the analysis of data obtained by standard thin-thick silicon detector telescopes used in nuclear reaction measurements. The addressed issues are: (1) improvement in double-sided silicon strip detector (DSSSD) calibration based on the fact that each event is registered twice, both in horizontal and vertical strips, (2) improvements in particle identification and (3) simplified mapping of the non-uniformity of the thin detector, without a dedicated measurement of the thickness. The proposed procedures are applied on experimental data obtained for 30MeV {sup 7}Li beam induced reactions on LiF and C targets, studied with a detection setup consisting of four telescopes placed at different angles and distances. The proposed methods aim at quicker and more reliable calibration and particle identification. (orig.)

  17. FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE STUDY OF COSMIC RAYS AND THE INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM IN NEARBY MOLECULAR CLOUDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ackermann, M. [Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron DESY, D-15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Ajello, M.; Allafort, A.; Bechtol, K.; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Borgland, A. W.; Bottacini, E.; Buehler, R. [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Baldini, L.; Bellazzini, R.; Bregeon, J. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Ballet, J. [Laboratoire AIM, CEA-IRFU/CNRS/Universite Paris Diderot, Service d' Astrophysique, CEA Saclay, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Barbiellini, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Trieste, I-34127 Trieste (Italy); Bastieri, D. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Padova, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Bonamente, E. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Perugia, I-06123 Perugia (Italy); Brandt, T. J. [CNRS, IRAP, F-31028 Toulouse cedex 4 (France); Brigida, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica ' M. Merlin' dell' Universita e del Politecnico di Bari, I-70126 Bari (Italy); Bruel, P., E-mail: hayashi@hep01.hepl.hiroshima-u.ac.jp, E-mail: mizuno@hep01.hepl.hiroshima-u.ac.jp [Laboratoire Leprince-Ringuet, Ecole polytechnique, CNRS/IN2P3, Palaiseau (France); and others

    2012-08-10

    We report an analysis of the interstellar {gamma}-ray emission from the Chamaeleon, R Coronae Australis (R CrA), and Cepheus and Polaris flare regions with the Fermi Large Area Telescope. They are among the nearest molecular cloud complexes, within {approx}300 pc from the solar system. The {gamma}-ray emission produced by interactions of cosmic rays (CRs) and interstellar gas in those molecular clouds is useful to study the CR densities and distributions of molecular gas close to the solar system. The obtained {gamma}-ray emissivities above 250 MeV are (5.9 {+-} 0.1{sub stat}{sup +0.9}{sub -1.0sys}) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -27} photons s{sup -1} sr{sup -1} H-atom{sup -1}, (10.2 {+-} 0.4{sub stat}{sup +1.2}{sub -1.7sys}) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -27} photons s{sup -1} sr{sup -1} H-atom{sup -1}, and (9.1 {+-} 0.3{sub stat}{sup +1.5}{sub -0.6sys}) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -27} photons s{sup -1} sr{sup -1} H-atom{sup -1} for the Chamaeleon, R CrA, and Cepheus and Polaris flare regions, respectively. Whereas the energy dependences of the emissivities agree well with that predicted from direct CR observations at the Earth, the measured emissivities from 250 MeV to 10 GeV indicate a variation of the CR density by {approx}20% in the neighborhood of the solar system, even if we consider systematic uncertainties. The molecular mass calibrating ratio, X{sub CO} = N(H{sub 2})/W{sub CO}, is found to be (0.96 {+-} 0.06{sub stat}{sup +0.15}{sub -0.12sys}) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 20} H{sub 2}-molecule cm{sup -2} (K km s{sup -1}){sup -1}, (0.99 {+-} 0.08{sub stat}{sup +0.18}{sub -0.10sys}) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 20} H{sub 2}-molecule cm{sup -2} (K km s{sup -1}){sup -1}, and (0.63 {+-} 0.02{sub stat}{sup +0.09}{sub -0.07sys}) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 20} H{sub 2}-molecule cm{sup -2} (K km s{sup -1}){sup -1} for the Chamaeleon, R CrA, and Cepheus and Polaris flare regions, respectively, suggesting a variation of X{sub CO} in the vicinity of the solar system. From the

  18. Diffuse γ-ray emission observed by the Fermi large area telescope: massive stars, cosmic rays and the census of the interstellar medium in the galaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galactic diffuse γ-ray emission is produced by interactions of cosmic rays (CRs) with interstellar gas and low-energy radiation fields. This is the brightest component of the high-energy γ-ray sky, surveyed since 2008 with unprecedented sensitivity and angular resolution by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. Galactic diffuse emission constitutes not only a bright and structured background which needs to be modeled in order to study individual sources and fainter diffuse components, but it can be used also as a probe of the interstellar environment of the Milky Way. We present in-depth studies of LAT γ-ray observations of selected regions in the local and outer Galaxy. LAT data are compared with multiwavelength tracers of the interstellar medium (ISM), including radio/mm-wave lines of gas and infrared emission/extinction from dust. The impact of the HI optical depth, often overlooked in the past, is carefully examined and recognized currently as the dominant source of uncertainty in the interpretation of observations. On one hand, we discuss the constraints provided by the γ-ray data on the census of the interstellar gas. We determine the XCO = N(H2)/WCO ratio for several clouds, finding no significant gradients in the Galactic disc over a range of ∼ 3.5 kpc in Galactocentric radius, and variations of a factor ≤ 2 in nearby local clouds. We also find evidence for an ubiquitous dark phase of interstellar gas which does not shine at radio/mm wavelengths and which provides a mass ∼ 50% of that traced by CO. For the first time we determine its γ-ray spectrum which is found to be well correlated with that of HI, thus further confirming that the emission originates from interstellar gas. On the other hand, we use the emissivity per hydrogen atom to infer the distribution of CRs in distant locations not accessible by direct measurements. While the local HI emissivity is consistent with the CR spectra measured near the

  19. The XMM-Large Scale Structure catalogue - II. X-ray sources and associated multiwavelength data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiappetti, L.; Clerc, N.; Pacaud, F.; Pierre, M.; Guéguen, A.; Paioro, L.; Polletta, M.; Melnyk, O.; Elyiv, A.; Surdej, J.; Faccioli, L.

    2013-02-01

    We present the final release of the multiwavelength XMM-Large Scale Structure (LSS) data set, covering the full survey area of 11.1 deg2, with X-ray data processed with the latest XMM-LSS pipeline version. The present publication supersedes the catalogue from the first paper in this series, pertaining to the initial 5 deg2. We provide X-ray source lists in the customary energy bands (0.5-2 and 2-10 keV) for a total of 6721 objects in the deep full-exposure catalogue and 5572 in the catalogue limited to 10 ks, above a detection likelihood of 15 in at least one band. We also provide a multiwavelength catalogue, cross-correlating our list with infrared, near-infrared, optical and ultraviolet catalogues. Customary data products, such as X-ray FITS images and thumbnail images from the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey and the Spitzer Wide-Area Infrared Extragalactic Survey, are made available, together with our data base in Milan, which can be queried interactively. Also, a static snapshot of the catalogues has been supplied to the Centre de Données astronomiques de Strasbourg (CDS).

  20. Gamma large area silicon telescope: Applying SI strip detector technology to the detection of gamma rays in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwood, W. B.; Bloom, E. D.; Godfrey, G. L.; Hertz, P. L.; Lin, Ying-Chi; Nolan, P. L.; Snyder, A. E.; Taylor, R. E.; Wood, K. S.; Michelson, P. F.

    1992-12-01

    The recent discoveries and excitement generated by EGRET (Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope) (presently operating on CGRO (Compton Gamma Ray Observatory)) has prompted an investigation into modern technologies ultimately leading to the next generation space based gamma ray telescope. The goal is to design a detector that would increase the data acquisition rate by almost two orders of magnitude beyond EGRET, while at the same time improving on the angular resolution, the energy measurement of reconstructed gamma rays and the triggering capability of the instrument. The proposed GLAST (Gamma Ray Large Area Silicon Telescope) instrument is based on silicon particle detectors that offer the advantages of no consumables, no gas volume, robust (versus fragile), long lived, and self triggering. The GLAST detector is roughly modeled after EGRET in that a tracking module precedes a calorimeter. The GLAST tracker has planes of cross strip (x, y) 300 micrometer match silicon detectors coupled to a thin radiator to measure the coordinates of converted electron-positron pairs. An angular resolution of 0.1 deg at high energy is possible (the low energy angular resolution 100 MeV would be about 2 deg, limited by multiple scattering). The increased depth of the GLAST calorimeter over EGRET's extends the energy range to about 300 GeV.

  1. Search for Spectral Irregularities due to Photon-Axionlike-Particle Oscillations with the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajello, M.; Albert, A.; Anderson, B.; Baldini, L.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bellazzini, R.; Bissaldi, E.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonino, R.; Bottacini, E.; Bregeon, J.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caragiulo, M.; Caraveo, P. A.; Cecchi, C.; Chekhtman, A.; Ciprini, S.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Conrad, J.; Costanza, F.; D'Ammando, F.; de Angelis, A.; de Palma, F.; Desiante, R.; Di Mauro, M.; Di Venere, L.; Domínguez, A.; Drell, P. S.; Favuzzi, C.; Focke, W. B.; Franckowiak, A.; Fukazawa, Y.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Giglietto, N.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Guiriec, S.; Horan, D.; Jóhannesson, G.; Katsuragawa, M.; Kensei, S.; Kuss, M.; Larsson, S.; Latronico, L.; Li, J.; Li, L.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lubrano, P.; Madejski, G. M.; Maldera, S.; Manfreda, A.; Mayer, M.; Mazziotta, M. N.; Meyer, M.; Michelson, P. F.; Mirabal, N.; Mizuno, T.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Negro, M.; Nuss, E.; Okada, C.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Paneque, D.; Perkins, J. S.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Porter, T. A.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Reimer, A.; Sánchez-Conde, M.; Sgrò, C.; Simone, D.; Siskind, E. J.; Spada, F.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Takahashi, H.; Thayer, J. B.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Troja, E.; Uchiyama, Y.; Wood, K. S.; Wood, M.; Zaharijas, G.; Zimmer, S.; Fermi-LAT Collaboration

    2016-04-01

    We report on the search for spectral irregularities induced by oscillations between photons and axionlike-particles (ALPs) in the γ -ray spectrum of NGC 1275, the central galaxy of the Perseus cluster. Using 6 years of Fermi Large Area Telescope data, we find no evidence for ALPs and exclude couplings above 5 ×10-12 GeV-1 for ALP masses 0.5 ≲ma≲5 neV at 95% confidence. The limits are competitive with the sensitivity of planned laboratory experiments, and, together with other bounds, strongly constrain the possibility that ALPs can reduce the γ -ray opacity of the Universe.

  2. Observations of the young supernova remnant RX J1713.7-3946 with the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    OpenAIRE

    Fermi-LAT Collaboration

    2011-01-01

    We present observations of the young Supernova remnant (SNR) RX J1713.7-3946 with the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). We clearly detect a source positionally coincident with the SNR. The source is extended with a best-fit extension of 0.55$^{\\circ} \\pm 0.04^{\\circ}$ matching the size of the non-thermal X-ray and TeV gamma-ray emission from the remnant. The positional coincidence and the matching extended emission allows us to identify the LAT source with the supernova remnant RX J1713.7-394...

  3. How many radio-loud quasars can be detected by the Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope?

    OpenAIRE

    Cao, Xinwu; Bai, J. M.

    2007-01-01

    In the unification scheme, radio quasars and FR II radio galaxies come from the same parent population, but viewed at different angles. Based on the Comptonization models for the gamma-ray emission from active galactic nuclei (AGNs), we estimate the number of radio quasars and FR II radio galaxies to be detected by the Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) using the luminosity function (LF) of their parent population derived from the flat-spectrum radio quasar (FSRQ) LF. We find that ~...

  4. Bent-Tailed Radio Sources in the Australia Telescope Large Area Survey of the Chandra Deep Field-South

    OpenAIRE

    Dehghan, Siamak; Johnston-Hollitt, Melanie; Franzen, Thomas M. O.; Norris, Ray P.; Miller, Neal A.

    2014-01-01

    Using the 1.4 GHz Australia Telescope Large Area Survey (ATLAS), supplemented with the 1.4 GHz Very Large Array images, we undertook a search for bent-tailed (BT) radio galaxies in the Chandra Deep Field-South (CDFS). Here we present a catalog of 56 detections, which include 45 bent-tailed sources, four diffuse low-surface-brightness objects (one relic, two halos, and one unclassified object), and a further seven complex, multi-component sources. We report BT sources with rest-frame powers in...

  5. Fermi large area telescope observations of blazar 3C 279 occultations by the sun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Observations of occultations of bright γ-ray sources by the Sun may reveal predicted pair halos around blazars and/or new physics, such as, e.g., hypothetical light dark matter particles—axions. We use Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope (Fermi) data to analyze four occultations of blazar 3C 279 by the Sun on October 8 each year from 2008 to 2011. A combined analysis of the observations of these occultations allows a point-like source at the position of 3C 279 to be detected with significance of ≈3σ, but does not reveal any significant excess over the flux expected from the quiescent Sun. The likelihood ratio test rules out complete transparency of the Sun to the blazar γ-ray emission at a 3σ confidence level.

  6. Thin fused silica optics for a high angular resolution and large collecting area X Ray telescope after Chandra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pareschi, Giovanni; Citterio, Oberto; Civitani, Marta M; Basso, Stefano; Campana, Sergio; Conconi, Paolo; Ghigo, Mauro; Mattaini, Enrico; Moretti, Alberto; Parodi, Giancarlo; Tagliaferri, Gianpiero

    2014-08-01

    The implementation of an X-ray mission with high imaging capabilities, similar to those achieved with Chandra (SMART-X project, led by CfA together with other US institutes. This project is based on adjustable segments of thin foil mirrors with piezo-electric actuators, aiming to achieve an effective area >2 m2 at 1 keV and an angular resolution better than 1 arcsec HEW. Another attractive technology to realize an X-ray telescope with similar characteristics is being developed at NASA/Goddard. In this case the mirrors are based on Si substrates that are super-polished and figured starting from a bulky Si ingot, from which they are properly cut. Here we propose an alternative method based on precise direct grinding, figuring and polishing of thin (a few mm) glass shells with innovative deterministic polishing methods. This is followed by a final correction via ion figuring to obtain the desired accuracy. For this purpose, a temporary stiffening structure is used to support the shell from the polishing operations up to its integration in the telescope supporting structure. This paper deals with the technological process under development, the results achieved so far and some mission scenarios based on this kind of optics, aiming to achieve an effective area more than 10 times larger than Chandra and an angular resolution of 1 arcsec HEW on axis and of a few arcsec off-axis across a large field of view (1o in diameter).

  7. Multi-wavelength Fibril Dynamics and Oscillations Above Sunspot - I. Morphological Signature

    CERN Document Server

    Mumpuni, Emanuel Sungging; Djamal, Mitra; Djamaluddin, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    In this work we selected one particular fibril from a high resolution solar chromosphere observation from the Dutch Open Telescope, and tried to obtain a broad picture of the intricate mechanism that might be incorporated in the multiple layer of the Solar atmosphere in high cadence multi-wavelength observation. We analyzed the changingvfibril patter using multi-wavelength tomography, which consists of both H$\\alpha$ line center \\& the blue wing, Doppler-signal, Ca II H, and the G-band. We have found that the intermittent ejected material through fibril from Doppler images has clearly shown oscillation mode, as seen in the H$\\alpha$ blue wing. The oscillations in the umbrae and penumbrae magnetic field lines that are above the sunspot cause a broadening and forms the area like a ring shape from 3 to 15-minute oscillations as function of height. These made a distinct boundary of umbrae and penumbrae which suggest the comb structure, and indicate that the oscillations could propagate along the inclined magn...

  8. FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE DETECTION OF BRIGHT γ-RAY OUTBURSTS FROM THE PECULIAR QUASAR 4C +21.35

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we report on the two-year-long Fermi-Large Area Telescope observation of the peculiar blazar 4C +21.35 (PKS 1222+216). This source was in a quiescent state from the start of the science operations of the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope in 2008 August until 2009 September, and then became more active, with gradually increasing flux and some moderately bright flares. In 2010 April and June, 4C +21.35 underwent a very strong GeV outburst composed of several major flares characterized by rise and decay timescales of the order of a day. During the outburst, the GeV spectra of 4C +21.35 displayed a broken power-law form with spectral breaks observed near 1-3 GeV photon energies. We demonstrate that, at least during the major flares, the jet in 4C +21.35 carried a total kinetic luminosity comparable to the total accretion power available to feed the outflow. We also discuss the origin of the break observed in the flaring spectra of 4C +21.35. We show that, in principle, a model involving annihilation of the GeV photons on the He II Lyman recombination continuum and line emission of 'broad-line region' clouds may account for such. However, we also discuss the additional constraint provided by the detection of 4C +21.35 at 0.07-0.4 TeV energies by the MAGIC telescope, which coincided with one of the GeV flares of the source. We argue that there are reasons to believe that the ∼17 cm from the nucleus), but instead originates further away from the active center, namely, around the characteristic scale of the hot dusty torus surrounding the 4C +21.35 nucleus (∼1019 cm).

  9. ATLASGAL - The APEX Telescope Large Area Survey of the Galaxy at 870 microns

    CERN Document Server

    Schuller, F; Contreras, Y; Wyrowski, F; Schilke, P; Bronfman, L; Henning, T; Walmsley, C M; Beuther, H; Bontemps, S; Cesaroni, R; Deharveng, L; Garay, G; Herpin, F; Le Floc'h, B; Linz, H; Mardones, D; Minier, V; Molinari, S; Motte, F; Nyman, L -A; Reveret, V; Risacher, C; Russeil, D; Schneider, N; Testi, L; Troost, T; Vasyunina, T; Wienen, M; Zavagno, A; Kovács, A; Kreysa, E; Siringo, G; Weiss, A

    2009-01-01

    (Abridged) Studying continuum emission from interstellar dust is essential to locate and characterize the highest density regions in the interstellar medium. In particular, the early stages of massive star formation are still mysterious. Our goal is to produce a large scale, systematic database of massive pre- and proto-stellar clumps in the Galaxy, in order to better understand how and under what conditions star formation takes place. A well characterized sample of star-forming sites will deliver an evolutionary sequence and a mass function of high-mass star-forming clumps. Such a systematic survey at submm wavelengths also represents a pioneering work in preparation for Herschel and ALMA. The APEX telescope is ideally located to observe the inner Milky Way. The recently commissioned Large APEX Bolometer Camera (LABOCA) is a 295-element bolometer array observing at 870 microns, with a beam of 19". Taking advantage of its large field of view (11.4') and excellent sensitivity, we have started an unbiased surve...

  10. Fermi: The Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope Mission Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEnery, Julie E

    2014-01-01

    Following its launch in June 2008, high-energy gamma-ray observations by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope have unveiled over 1000 new sources and opened an important and previously unexplored window on a wide variety of phenomena. These have included the discovery of a population of pulsars pulsing only in gamma rays; the detection of photons up to 10s of gigaelectronvolts from gamma-ray bursts, enhancing our understanding of the astrophysics of these powerful explosions; the detection of hundreds of active galaxies; a measurement of the high energy cosmic-ray electron spectrum which may imply the presence of nearby astrophysical particle accelerators; the determination of the diffuse gamma-ray emission with unprecedented accuracy and the constraints on phenomena such as super-symmetric dark-matter annihilations and exotic relics from the Big Bang. Continuous monitoring of the high-energy gamma-ray sky has uncovered numerous outbursts from active galaxies and the discovery of transient sources in our galaxy. In this talk I will describe the current status of the Fermi observatory and review the science highlights from Fermi.

  11. Constraints on the Emission Geometries of Gamma-ray Millisecond Pulsars Observed with the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, T J

    2012-01-01

    Millisecond pulsars (MSPs) have been established as a class of high-energy ($\\geq$0.1 GeV) emitters with the Large Area Telescope (LAT) aboard the \\emph{Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope}. Most MSP gamma-ray light curves display sharp peaks indicative of thin accelerating gaps, suggesting copious pair-creation in the open volume. MSP gamma-ray and radio light curves have been simulated using geometric outer-gap (OG), slot-gap/two-pole caustic (TPC), and pair-starved polar cap gamma-ray models and either a hollow-cone beam or altitude-limited, outer-magnetospheric gap radio model, all assuming a vacuum retarded dipolar magnetic field geometry. A Markov chain Monte Carlo maximum likelihood technique has been developed to find the best-fit model parameters for nineteen MSPs using data from the LAT and various radio observatories. The best-fit viewing angles follow a uniform, angular distribution. The distribution of magnetic inclination angles favors all angles equally, contrary to analyses of non-recycled pulsars...

  12. Development of the Model of Galactic Interstellar Emission for Standard Point-source Analysis of Fermi Large Area Telescope Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acero, F.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Albert, A.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bellazzini, R.; Bissaldi, E.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonino, R.; Bottacini, E.; Brandt, T. J.; Bregeon, J.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caragiulo, M.; Caraveo, P. A.; Casandjian, J. M.; Cavazzuti, E.; Cecchi, C.; Charles, E.; Chekhtman, A.; Chiang, J.; Chiaro, G.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Conrad, J.; Cuoco, A.; Cutini, S.; D’Ammando, F.; de Angelis, A.; de Palma, F.; Desiante, R.; Digel, S. W.; Di Venere, L.; Drell, P. S.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Ferrara, E. C.; Focke, W. B.; Franckowiak, A.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Giglietto, N.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Grenier, I. A.; Guiriec, S.; Hadasch, D.; Harding, A. K.; Hayashi, K.; Hays, E.; Hewitt, J. W.; Hill, A. B.; Horan, D.; Hou, X.; Jogler, T.; Jóhannesson, G.; Kamae, T.; Kuss, M.; Landriu, D.; Larsson, S.; Latronico, L.; Li, J.; Li, L.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Maldera, S.; Malyshev, D.; Manfreda, A.; Martin, P.; Mayer, M.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McEnery, J. E.; Michelson, P. F.; Mirabal, N.; Mizuno, T.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Nuss, E.; Ohsugi, T.; Omodei, N.; Orienti, M.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Paneque, D.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Razzaque, S.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Remy, Q.; Renault, N.; Sánchez-Conde, M.; Schaal, M.; Schulz, A.; Sgrò, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Spada, F.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Strong, A. W.; Suson, D. J.; Tajima, H.; Takahashi, H.; Thayer, J. B.; Thompson, D. J.; Tibaldo, L.; Tinivella, M.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Troja, E.; Vianello, G.; Werner, M.; Wood, K. S.; Wood, M.; Zaharijas, G.; Zimmer, S.

    2016-04-01

    Most of the celestial γ rays detected by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope originate from the interstellar medium when energetic cosmic rays interact with interstellar nucleons and photons. Conventional point-source and extended-source studies rely on the modeling of this diffuse emission for accurate characterization. Here, we describe the development of the Galactic Interstellar Emission Model (GIEM), which is the standard adopted by the LAT Collaboration and is publicly available. This model is based on a linear combination of maps for interstellar gas column density in Galactocentric annuli and for the inverse-Compton emission produced in the Galaxy. In the GIEM, we also include large-scale structures like Loop I and the Fermi bubbles. The measured gas emissivity spectra confirm that the cosmic-ray proton density decreases with Galactocentric distance beyond 5 kpc from the Galactic Center. The measurements also suggest a softening of the proton spectrum with Galactocentric distance. We observe that the Fermi bubbles have boundaries with a shape similar to a catenary at latitudes below 20° and we observe an enhanced emission toward their base extending in the north and south Galactic directions and located within ∼4° of the Galactic Center.

  13. Stellar Archaeology and Galaxy Genesis: The Need for Large Area Multi-Object Spectrograph on 8 m-Class Telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, Mike J.; Lewis, Geraint F.

    The origin and evolution of galaxies like the Milky Way and M31 remain among the key questions in astrophysics. The galaxies we see today in and around the Local Group are representatives of the general field population of the Universe and have been evolving for the majority of cosmic time. As our nearest neighbour systems they can be studied in far more detail than their distant counterparts and hence provide our best hope for understanding star formation and prototypical galaxy evolution over the lifetime of the Universe [K. Freeman, J. Bland-Hawthorn in Annu. Rev. Astron. Astrophys. 40, 487 (2002)]. Significant observational progress has been made, but we are still a long way from understanding galaxy genesis. To unravel this formative epoch, detailed large area multi-object spectroscopy of spatial, kinematic and chemical structures on 8 m-class telescopes are required, to provide the link between local near-field cosmology and predictions from the high-redshift Universe.

  14. Search for Spectral Irregularities due to Photon-Axionlike-Particle Oscillations with the Fermi Large Area Telescope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajello, M; Albert, A; Anderson, B; Baldini, L; Barbiellini, G; Bastieri, D; Bellazzini, R; Bissaldi, E; Blandford, R D; Bloom, E D; Bonino, R; Bottacini, E; Bregeon, J; Bruel, P; Buehler, R; Caliandro, G A; Cameron, R A; Caragiulo, M; Caraveo, P A; Cecchi, C; Chekhtman, A; Ciprini, S; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Conrad, J; Costanza, F; D'Ammando, F; de Angelis, A; de Palma, F; Desiante, R; Di Mauro, M; Di Venere, L; Domínguez, A; Drell, P S; Favuzzi, C; Focke, W B; Franckowiak, A; Fukazawa, Y; Funk, S; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Gasparrini, D; Giglietto, N; Glanzman, T; Godfrey, G; Guiriec, S; Horan, D; Jóhannesson, G; Katsuragawa, M; Kensei, S; Kuss, M; Larsson, S; Latronico, L; Li, J; Li, L; Longo, F; Loparco, F; Lubrano, P; Madejski, G M; Maldera, S; Manfreda, A; Mayer, M; Mazziotta, M N; Meyer, M; Michelson, P F; Mirabal, N; Mizuno, T; Monzani, M E; Morselli, A; Moskalenko, I V; Murgia, S; Negro, M; Nuss, E; Okada, C; Orlando, E; Ormes, J F; Paneque, D; Perkins, J S; Pesce-Rollins, M; Piron, F; Pivato, G; Porter, T A; Rainò, S; Rando, R; Razzano, M; Reimer, A; Sánchez-Conde, M; Sgrò, C; Simone, D; Siskind, E J; Spada, F; Spandre, G; Spinelli, P; Takahashi, H; Thayer, J B; Torres, D F; Tosti, G; Troja, E; Uchiyama, Y; Wood, K S; Wood, M; Zaharijas, G; Zimmer, S

    2016-04-22

    We report on the search for spectral irregularities induced by oscillations between photons and axionlike-particles (ALPs) in the γ-ray spectrum of NGC 1275, the central galaxy of the Perseus cluster. Using 6 years of Fermi Large Area Telescope data, we find no evidence for ALPs and exclude couplings above 5×10^{-12}  GeV^{-1} for ALP masses 0.5≲m_{a}≲5  neV at 95% confidence. The limits are competitive with the sensitivity of planned laboratory experiments, and, together with other bounds, strongly constrain the possibility that ALPs can reduce the γ-ray opacity of the Universe. PMID:27152783

  15. Measurement of the high-energy gamma-ray emission from the Moon with the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Albert, A.; Atwood, W. B.; Baldini, L.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bellazzini, R.; Bissaldi, E.; Blandford, R. D.; Bonino, R.; Bottacini, E.; Bregeon, J.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caragiulo, M.; Caraveo, P. A.; Cavazzuti, E.; Cecchi, C.; Chekhtman, A.; Chiang, J.; Chiaro, G.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Costanza, F.; Cuoco, A.; Cutini, S.; D'Ammando, F.; de Angelis, A.; de Palma, F.; Desiante, R.; Digel, S. W.; Di Venere, L.; Drell, P. S.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Focke, W. B.; Franckowiak, A.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Giglietto, N.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Grenier, I. A.; Grove, J. E.; Guiriec, S.; Harding, A. K.; Hewitt, J. W.; Horan, D.; Hou, X.; Iafrate, G.; Jóhannesson, G.; Kamae, T.; Kuss, M.; Larsson, S.; Latronico, L.; Li, J.; Li, L.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Magill, J.; Maldera, S.; Manfreda, A.; Mayer, M.; Mazziotta, M. N.; Michelson, P. F.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Murgia, S.; Nuss, E.; Omodei, N.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Paneque, D.; Perkins, J. S.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Petrosian, V.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Reposeur, T.; Sgrò, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Spada, F.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Takahashi, H.; Thayer, J. B.; Thompson, D. J.; Tibaldo, L.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Troja, E.; Vianello, G.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, K. S.; Yassine, M.; Cerutti, F.; Ferrari, A.; Sala, P. R.; Fermi LAT Collaboration

    2016-04-01

    We have measured the gamma-ray emission spectrum of the Moon using the data collected by the Large Area Telescope onboard the Fermi satellite during its first seven years of operation, in the energy range from 30 MeV up to a few GeV. We have also studied the time evolution of the flux, finding a correlation with the solar activity. We have developed a full Monte Carlo simulation describing the interactions of cosmic rays with the lunar surface. The results of the present analysis can be explained in the framework of this model, where the production of gamma rays is due to the interactions of cosmic-ray proton and helium nuclei with the surface of the Moon. Finally, we have used our simulation to derive the cosmic-ray proton and helium spectra near Earth from the Moon gamma-ray data.

  16. Search for spectral irregularities due to photon-axion-like particle oscillations with the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2016-01-01

    We report on the search for spectral irregularities induced by oscillations between photons and axion-like particles (ALPs) in the $\\gamma$-ray spectrum of NGC 1275, the central galaxy of the Perseus cluster. Using six years of Fermi Large Area Telescope data, we find no evidence for ALPs and exclude couplings above $5\\times10^{-12}\\,\\mathrm{GeV}^{-1}$ for ALP masses $0.5 \\lesssim m_a \\lesssim 5$ neV at 95% confidence. The limits are competitive with the sensitivity of planned laboratory experiments, and, together with other bounds, strongly constrain the possibility that ALPs can reduce the $\\gamma$-ray opacity of the Universe.

  17. Searching for Dark Matter Annihilation from Milky Way Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies with Six Years of Fermi Large Area Telescope Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackermann, M.; Albert, A.; Anderson, B.; Atwood, W. B.; Baldini, L.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Bissaldi, E.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonino, R.; Bottacini, E.; Brandt, T. J.; Bregeon, J.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caputo, R.; Caragiulo, M.; Caraveo, P. A.; Cecchi, C.; Charles, E.; Chekhtman, A.; Chiang, J.; Chiaro, G.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Conrad, J.; Cuoco, A.; Cutini, S.; D'Ammando, F.; de Angelis, A.; de Palma, F.; Desiante, R.; Digel, S. W.; Di Venere, L.; Drell, P. S.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Essig, R.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Ferrara, E. C.; Focke, W. B.; Franckowiak, A.; Fukazawa, Y.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Giglietto, N.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Gomez-Vargas, G. A.; Grenier, I. A.; Guiriec, S.; Gustafsson, M.; Hays, E.; Hewitt, J. W.; Horan, D.; Jogler, T.; Jóhannesson, G.; Kuss, M.; Larsson, S.; Latronico, L.; Li, J.; Li, L.; Llena Garde, M.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lubrano, P.; Malyshev, D.; Mayer, M.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McEnery, J. E.; Meyer, M.; Michelson, P. F.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A. A.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Murgia, S.; Nuss, E.; Ohsugi, T.; Orienti, M.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Paneque, D.; Perkins, J. S.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Porter, T. A.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Ritz, S.; Sánchez-Conde, M.; Schulz, A.; Sehgal, N.; Sgrò, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Spada, F.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Strigari, L.; Tajima, H.; Takahashi, H.; Thayer, J. B.; Tibaldo, L.; Torres, D. F.; Troja, E.; Vianello, G.; Werner, M.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, K. S.; Wood, M.; Zaharijas, G.; Zimmer, S.; Fermi-LAT Collaboration

    2015-12-01

    The dwarf spheroidal satellite galaxies (dSphs) of the Milky Way are some of the most dark matter (DM) dominated objects known. We report on γ -ray observations of Milky Way dSphs based on six years of Fermi Large Area Telescope data processed with the new Pass8 event-level analysis. None of the dSphs are significantly detected in γ rays, and we present upper limits on the DM annihilation cross section from a combined analysis of 15 dSphs. These constraints are among the strongest and most robust to date and lie below the canonical thermal relic cross section for DM of mass ≲100 GeV annihilating via quark and τ -lepton channels.

  18. Measurement of the high-energy gamma-ray emission from the Moon with the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Cerutti, F; Sala, P R

    2016-01-01

    We have measured the gamma-ray emission spectrum of the Moon using the data collected by the Large Area Telescope onboard the Fermi satellite during its first 7 years of operation, in the energy range from 30 MeV up to a few GeV. We have also studied the time evolution of the flux, finding a correlation with the solar activity. We have developed a full Monte Carlo simulation describing the interactions of cosmic rays with the lunar surface. The results of the present analysis can be explained in the framework of this model, where the production of gamma rays is due to the interactions of cosmic-ray proton and helium nuclei with the surface of the Moon. Finally, we have used our simulation to derive the cosmic-ray proton and helium spectra near Earth from the Moon gamma-ray data.

  19. Searching for Dark Matter Annihilation from Milky Way Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies with Six Years of Fermi Large Area Telescope Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackermann, M; Albert, A; Anderson, B; Atwood, W B; Baldini, L; Barbiellini, G; Bastieri, D; Bechtol, K; Bellazzini, R; Bissaldi, E; Blandford, R D; Bloom, E D; Bonino, R; Bottacini, E; Brandt, T J; Bregeon, J; Bruel, P; Buehler, R; Caliandro, G A; Cameron, R A; Caputo, R; Caragiulo, M; Caraveo, P A; Cecchi, C; Charles, E; Chekhtman, A; Chiang, J; Chiaro, G; Ciprini, S; Claus, R; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Conrad, J; Cuoco, A; Cutini, S; D'Ammando, F; de Angelis, A; de Palma, F; Desiante, R; Digel, S W; Di Venere, L; Drell, P S; Drlica-Wagner, A; Essig, R; Favuzzi, C; Fegan, S J; Ferrara, E C; Focke, W B; Franckowiak, A; Fukazawa, Y; Funk, S; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Gasparrini, D; Giglietto, N; Giordano, F; Giroletti, M; Glanzman, T; Godfrey, G; Gomez-Vargas, G A; Grenier, I A; Guiriec, S; Gustafsson, M; Hays, E; Hewitt, J W; Horan, D; Jogler, T; Jóhannesson, G; Kuss, M; Larsson, S; Latronico, L; Li, J; Li, L; Llena Garde, M; Longo, F; Loparco, F; Lubrano, P; Malyshev, D; Mayer, M; Mazziotta, M N; McEnery, J E; Meyer, M; Michelson, P F; Mizuno, T; Moiseev, A A; Monzani, M E; Morselli, A; Murgia, S; Nuss, E; Ohsugi, T; Orienti, M; Orlando, E; Ormes, J F; Paneque, D; Perkins, J S; Pesce-Rollins, M; Piron, F; Pivato, G; Porter, T A; Rainò, S; Rando, R; Razzano, M; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Ritz, S; Sánchez-Conde, M; Schulz, A; Sehgal, N; Sgrò, C; Siskind, E J; Spada, F; Spandre, G; Spinelli, P; Strigari, L; Tajima, H; Takahashi, H; Thayer, J B; Tibaldo, L; Torres, D F; Troja, E; Vianello, G; Werner, M; Winer, B L; Wood, K S; Wood, M; Zaharijas, G; Zimmer, S

    2015-12-01

    The dwarf spheroidal satellite galaxies (dSphs) of the Milky Way are some of the most dark matter (DM) dominated objects known. We report on γ-ray observations of Milky Way dSphs based on six years of Fermi Large Area Telescope data processed with the new Pass8 event-level analysis. None of the dSphs are significantly detected in γ rays, and we present upper limits on the DM annihilation cross section from a combined analysis of 15 dSphs. These constraints are among the strongest and most robust to date and lie below the canonical thermal relic cross section for DM of mass ≲100  GeV annihilating via quark and τ-lepton channels. PMID:26684107

  20. Simultaneous Multiwavelength Observations of Markarian 421 During Outburst

    CERN Document Server

    Perez, I de la Calle; Rodríguez, P

    2009-01-01

    We report on the results of two coordinated multiwavelength campaigns that focused on the blazar Markarian 421 during its 2006 and 2008 outbursts. These campaigns obtained UV and X-ray data using the XMM-Newton satellite, while the gamma-ray data were obtained utilizing three imaging atmospheric Cerenkov telescopes, the Whipple 10m telescope and VERITAS, both based in Arizona, as well as the MAGIC telescope, based on La Palma in the Canary Islands. The coordinated effort between the gamma-ray groups allowed for truly simultaneous data in UV/X-ray/gamma-ray wavelengths during a significant portion of the XMM-Newton observations. This simultaneous coverage allowed for a reliable search for correlations between UV, X-ray and gamma-ray variability over the course of the observations. Investigations of spectral hysteresis and modeling of the spectral energy distributions are also presented.

  1. SIMULTANEOUS MULTIWAVELENGTH OBSERVATIONS OF MARKARIAN 421 DURING OUTBURST

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on the results of two coordinated multiwavelength campaigns that focused on the blazar Markarian 421 during its 2006 and 2008 outbursts. These campaigns obtained UV and X-ray data using the XMM-Newton satellite, while the gamma-ray data were obtained utilizing three imaging atmospheric Cerenkov telescopes, the Whipple 10 m telescope and VERITAS, both based in Arizona, as well as the MAGIC telescope, based on La Palma in the Canary Islands. The coordinated effort between the gamma-ray groups allowed for truly simultaneous data in UV/X-ray/gamma-ray wavelengths during a significant portion of the XMM-Newton observations. This simultaneous coverage allowed for a reliable search for correlations between UV, X-ray, and gamma-ray variability over the course of the observations. Investigations of spectral hysteresis and modeling of the spectral energy distributions are also presented.

  2. Multiwavelength observations of TANAMI sources

    OpenAIRE

    Krauß, Felicia; Müller, Cornelia; Kadler, Matthias; Wilms, Jörn; Böck, Moritz; Ojha, Roopesh; Ros, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    The TANAMI VLBI program is monitoring a sample of 84 Active Galactic Nuclei of the Southern Sky at 8.4 and 22 GHz. The combination of VLBI and multiwavelength data allows us to study changes in the spectral energy distributions, as well as changes in the structure of the inner jets and to search correlations between both. We present initial results of the multiwavelength analysis of a sub-sample of the TANAMI sources, combining our radio data with simultaneous X-ray and optical/UV observation...

  3. Resolving the Extragalactic γ -Ray Background above 50 GeV with the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Albert, A.; Atwood, W. B.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Bissaldi, E.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonino, R.; Bregeon, J.; Britto, R. J.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caragiulo, M.; Caraveo, P. A.; Cavazzuti, E.; Cecchi, C.; Charles, E.; Chekhtman, A.; Chiang, J.; Chiaro, G.; Ciprini, S.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Cominsky, L. R.; Costanza, F.; Cutini, S.; D'Ammando, F.; de Angelis, A.; de Palma, F.; Desiante, R.; Digel, S. W.; Di Mauro, M.; Di Venere, L.; Domínguez, A.; Drell, P. S.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Ferrara, E. C.; Franckowiak, A.; Fukazawa, Y.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Giglietto, N.; Giommi, P.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Godfrey, G.; Green, D.; Grenier, I. A.; Guiriec, S.; Hays, E.; Horan, D.; Iafrate, G.; Jogler, T.; Jóhannesson, G.; Kuss, M.; La Mura, G.; Larsson, S.; Latronico, L.; Li, J.; Li, L.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lott, B.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Madejski, G. M.; Magill, J.; Maldera, S.; Manfreda, A.; Mayer, M.; Mazziotta, M. N.; Michelson, P. F.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A. A.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Negro, M.; Nuss, E.; Ohsugi, T.; Okada, C.; Omodei, N.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Paneque, D.; Perkins, J. S.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Petrosian, V.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Porter, T. A.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Razzaque, S.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Reposeur, T.; Romani, R. W.; Sánchez-Conde, M.; Schmid, J.; Schulz, A.; Sgrò, C.; Simone, D.; Siskind, E. J.; Spada, F.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Suson, D. J.; Takahashi, H.; Thayer, J. B.; Tibaldo, L.; Torres, D. F.; Troja, E.; Vianello, G.; Yassine, M.; Zimmer, S.

    2016-04-01

    The Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) Collaboration has recently released a catalog of 360 sources detected above 50 GeV (2FHL). This catalog was obtained using 80 months of data re-processed with Pass 8, the newest event-level analysis, which significantly improves the acceptance and angular resolution of the instrument. Most of the 2FHL sources at high Galactic latitude are blazars. Using detailed Monte Carlo simulations, we measure, for the first time, the source count distribution, d N /d S , of extragalactic γ -ray sources at E >50 GeV and find that it is compatible with a Euclidean distribution down to the lowest measured source flux in the 2FHL (˜8 ×10-12 ph cm-2 s-1 ). We employ a one-point photon fluctuation analysis to constrain the behavior of d N /d S below the source detection threshold. Overall, the source count distribution is constrained over three decades in flux and found compatible with a broken power law with a break flux, Sb, in the range [8 ×10-12,1.5 ×10-11] ph cm-2 s-1 and power-law indices below and above the break of α2∈[1.60 ,1.75 ] and α1=2.49 ±0.12 , respectively. Integration of d N /d S shows that point sources account for at least 8 6-14+16% of the total extragalactic γ -ray background. The simple form of the derived source count distribution is consistent with a single population (i.e., blazars) dominating the source counts to the minimum flux explored by this analysis. We estimate the density of sources detectable in blind surveys that will be performed in the coming years by the Cherenkov Telescope Array.

  4. Searching for dwarf spheroidal galaxies and other galactic dark matter substructures with the Fermi large area telescope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drlica-Wagner, Alex [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Physics

    2013-08-01

    Over the past century, it has become clear that about a quarter of the known universe is composed of an invisible, massive component termed ''dark matter''. Some of the most popular theories of physics beyond the Standard Model suggest that dark matter may be a new fundamental particle that could self-annihilate to produce γ rays. Nearby over-densities in the dark matter halo of our Milky Way present some of the most promising targets for detecting the annihilation of dark matter. We used the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on-board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope to search for γ rays produced by dark matter annihilation in Galactic dark matter substructures. We searched for γ-ray emission coincident with Milky Way dwarf spheroidal satellite galaxies, which trace the most massive Galactic dark matter substructures. We also sought to identify nearby dark matter substructures that lack all astrophysical tracers and would be detectable only through γ-ray emission from dark matter annihilation. We found no conclusive evidence for γ-ray emission from dark matter annihilation, and we set stringent and robust constraints on the dark matter annihilation cross section. While γ-ray searches for dark matter substructure are currently the most sensitive and robust probes of dark matter annihilation, they are just beginning to intersect the theoretically preferred region of dark matter parameter space. Thus, we consider future prospects for increasing the sensitivity of γ-ray searches through improvements to the LAT instrument performance and through upcoming wide- field optical surveys.

  5. Pulsed Gamma-Rays From the Millisecond Pulsar J0030+0451 with the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the discovery of gamma-ray pulsations from the nearby isolated millisecond pulsar PSR J0030+0451 with the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (formerly GLAST). This discovery makes PSR J0030+0451 the second millisecond pulsar to be detected in gamma-rays after PSR J0218+4232, observed by the EGRET instrument on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory. The spin-down power (dot E) = 3.5 x 1033 ergs s-1 is an order of magnitude lower than the empirical lower bound of previously known gamma-ray pulsars. The emission profile is characterized by two narrow peaks, respectively 0.07 ± 0.01 and 0.08 ± 0.02 wide, separated by 0.44 ± 0.02 in phase. The first gamma-ray peak falls 0.15 ± 0.01 after the main radio peak. The pulse shape is similar to that of the 'normal' gamma-ray pulsars. An exponentially cut-off power-law fit of the emission spectrum leads to an integral photon flux above 100 MeV of (6.76 ± 1.05 ± 1.35) x 10-8 cm-2 s-1 with cut-off energy (1.7 ± 0.4 ± 0.5) GeV. Based on its parallax distance of (300 ± 90) pc, we obtain a gamma-ray efficiency Lγ/(dot E) ≅ 15% for the conversion of spin-down energy rate into gamma-ray radiation, assuming isotropic emission.

  6. Resolving the Extragalactic γ-Ray Background above 50 GeV with the Fermi Large Area Telescope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackermann, M; Ajello, M; Albert, A; Atwood, W B; Baldini, L; Ballet, J; Barbiellini, G; Bastieri, D; Bechtol, K; Bellazzini, R; Bissaldi, E; Blandford, R D; Bloom, E D; Bonino, R; Bregeon, J; Britto, R J; Bruel, P; Buehler, R; Caliandro, G A; Cameron, R A; Caragiulo, M; Caraveo, P A; Cavazzuti, E; Cecchi, C; Charles, E; Chekhtman, A; Chiang, J; Chiaro, G; Ciprini, S; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Cominsky, L R; Costanza, F; Cutini, S; D'Ammando, F; de Angelis, A; de Palma, F; Desiante, R; Digel, S W; Di Mauro, M; Di Venere, L; Domínguez, A; Drell, P S; Favuzzi, C; Fegan, S J; Ferrara, E C; Franckowiak, A; Fukazawa, Y; Funk, S; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Gasparrini, D; Giglietto, N; Giommi, P; Giordano, F; Giroletti, M; Godfrey, G; Green, D; Grenier, I A; Guiriec, S; Hays, E; Horan, D; Iafrate, G; Jogler, T; Jóhannesson, G; Kuss, M; La Mura, G; Larsson, S; Latronico, L; Li, J; Li, L; Longo, F; Loparco, F; Lott, B; Lovellette, M N; Lubrano, P; Madejski, G M; Magill, J; Maldera, S; Manfreda, A; Mayer, M; Mazziotta, M N; Michelson, P F; Mitthumsiri, W; Mizuno, T; Moiseev, A A; Monzani, M E; Morselli, A; Moskalenko, I V; Murgia, S; Negro, M; Nuss, E; Ohsugi, T; Okada, C; Omodei, N; Orlando, E; Ormes, J F; Paneque, D; Perkins, J S; Pesce-Rollins, M; Petrosian, V; Piron, F; Pivato, G; Porter, T A; Rainò, S; Rando, R; Razzano, M; Razzaque, S; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Reposeur, T; Romani, R W; Sánchez-Conde, M; Schmid, J; Schulz, A; Sgrò, C; Simone, D; Siskind, E J; Spada, F; Spandre, G; Spinelli, P; Suson, D J; Takahashi, H; Thayer, J B; Tibaldo, L; Torres, D F; Troja, E; Vianello, G; Yassine, M; Zimmer, S

    2016-04-15

    The Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) Collaboration has recently released a catalog of 360 sources detected above 50 GeV (2FHL). This catalog was obtained using 80 months of data re-processed with Pass 8, the newest event-level analysis, which significantly improves the acceptance and angular resolution of the instrument. Most of the 2FHL sources at high Galactic latitude are blazars. Using detailed Monte Carlo simulations, we measure, for the first time, the source count distribution, dN/dS, of extragalactic γ-ray sources at E>50  GeV and find that it is compatible with a Euclidean distribution down to the lowest measured source flux in the 2FHL (∼8×10^{-12}  ph cm^{-2} s^{-1}). We employ a one-point photon fluctuation analysis to constrain the behavior of dN/dS below the source detection threshold. Overall, the source count distribution is constrained over three decades in flux and found compatible with a broken power law with a break flux, S_{b}, in the range [8×10^{-12},1.5×10^{-11}]  ph cm^{-2} s^{-1} and power-law indices below and above the break of α_{2}∈[1.60,1.75] and α_{1}=2.49±0.12, respectively. Integration of dN/dS shows that point sources account for at least 86_{-14}^{+16}% of the total extragalactic γ-ray background. The simple form of the derived source count distribution is consistent with a single population (i.e., blazars) dominating the source counts to the minimum flux explored by this analysis. We estimate the density of sources detectable in blind surveys that will be performed in the coming years by the Cherenkov Telescope Array. PMID:27127954

  7. PULSED GAMMA RAYS FROM THE MILLISECOND PULSAR J0030+0451 WITH THE FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the discovery of gamma-ray pulsations from the nearby isolated millisecond pulsar (MSP) PSR J0030+0451 with the Large Area Telescope on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (formerly GLAST). This discovery makes PSR J0030+0451 the second MSP to be detected in gamma rays after PSR J0218+4232, observed by the EGRET instrument on the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory. The spin-down power E-dot=3.5x1033 erg s-1 is an order of magnitude lower than the empirical lower bound of previously known gamma-ray pulsars. The emission profile is characterized by two narrow peaks, 0.07 ± 0.01 and 0.08 ± 0.02 wide, respectively, separated by 0.44 ± 0.02 in phase. The first gamma-ray peak falls 0.15 ± 0.01 after the main radio peak. The pulse shape is similar to that of the 'normal' gamma-ray pulsars. An exponentially cutoff power-law fit of the emission spectrum leads to an integral photon flux above 100 MeV of (6.76 ± 1.05 ± 1.35) x 10-8 cm-2 s-1 with cutoff energy (1.7 ± 0.4 ± 0.5) GeV. Based on its parallax distance of (300 ± 90) pc, we obtain a gamma-ray efficiency Lγ/E-dot≅15 percent for the conversion of spin-down energy rate into gamma-ray radiation, assuming isotropic emission.

  8. Bent-Tailed Radio Sources in the Australia Telescope Large Area Survey of the Chandra Deep Field-South

    CERN Document Server

    Dehghan, Siamak; Franzen, Thomas M O; Norris, Ray P; Miller, Neal A

    2015-01-01

    Using the 1.4 GHz Australia Telescope Large Area Survey (ATLAS), supplemented with the 1.4 GHz Very Large Array images, we undertook a search for bent-tailed (BT) radio galaxies in the Chandra Deep Field-South (CDFS). Here we present a catalog of 56 detections, which include 45 bent-tailed sources, four diffuse low-surface-brightness objects (one relic, two halos, and one unclassified object), and a further seven complex, multi-component sources. We report BT sources with rest-frame powers in the range $10^{22} \\leq$ $\\textrm{P}_{1.4 \\textrm{ GHz}} \\leq 10^{26}$ W Hz$^{-1}$, redshifts up to 2 and linear extents from tens of kpc up to about one Mpc. This is the first systematic study of such sources down to such low powers and high redshifts and demonstrates the complementary nature of searches in deep, limited area surveys as compared to shallower, large surveys. Of the sources presented here one is the most distant bent-tailed source yet detected at a redshift of 2.1688. Two of the sources are found to be as...

  9. Thin fused silica optics for a few arcsec angular resolution and large collecting area x-ray telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citterio, O.; Civitani, M. M.; Pareschi, G.; Basso, S.; Campana, S.; Conconi, P.; Ghigo, M.; Mattaini, E.; Moretti, A.; Parodi, G.; Tagliaferri, G.

    2013-09-01

    The implementation of a X-ray mission with high imaging capabilities, similar to those achieved with Chandra (SMART-X project, led by CfA and involving several other US Institutes. This project is based on adjustable segments of thin foil mirrors with piezo-electric actuators, aiming to achieve an effective area mirrors are based on Si substrates that are super-polished and figured starting from a bulky Si ingot, from which they are properly cut. Here we propose an alternative method based on precise direct grinding, figuring and polishing of thin (a few mm) glass shells with innovative deterministic polishing methods. This is followed by a final correction via ion figuring to obtain the desired accuracy in order to achieve the 1 arc sec HEW requirement. For this purpose, a temporary stiffening structure is used to support the shell from the polishing operations up to its integration in the telescope supporting structure. We will present the technological process under development, the results achieved so far and some mission scenarios based on this kind of optics, aiming to achieve an effective area more than 10 times larger than Chandra and an angular resolution of 1 arcsec HEW on axis and of a few arcsec off-axis across a large field of view (1 deg in diameter).

  10. The Swift X-ray Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, J. E.; Burrows, D. N.; Nousek, J. A.; Wells, A.; Turner, M.; Willingale, R.; Holland, A.; Citterio, O.; Chincarini, G.; Campana, S.; Tagliaferri, G.; Swift XRT Team

    1999-12-01

    The Swift Gamma Ray Burst Explorer will be launched in 2003 to observe hundreds of gamma ray bursts per year and study their X-ray and optical afterglows, using a multiwavelength complement of three instruments: a wide-field Burst Alert Telescope (BAT), an X-Ray Telescope (XRT), and a UV/Optical Telescope (UVOT). The XRT is designed to study X-ray counterparts of the gamma ray bursts and their afterglows, beginning 20--70 s from the time of the burst, and continuing for days or weeks. The XRT utilizes a superb mirror set built for JET-X (Citterio et al. 1996) and a state-of-the-art XMM/EPIC CCD detector to provide a sensitive broad-band (0.2-10 keV) X-ray imager with effective area of 110 cm2 at 1.5 keV, field of view of 23.6 x 23.6 arcminutes, and angular resolution of 15 arcsec HPD. The sensitivity is 2 x 10-14 erg cm-2 s-1 in 104 seconds. The telescope electronics will be designed to provide automated source detection and position reporting, with a position good to 2.5 arcseconds transmitted to the ground within two minutes of the burst detection. The XRT will operate in an auto-exposure mode, adjusting the CCD readout mode automatically to optimize the science return for each frame as the source fades. The XRT will measure spectra and lightcurves of the GRB afterglow beginning within about a minute after the burst and will follow each burst until it fades from view, typically monitoring 2-3 ``old'' bursts at a time while waiting for a new burst to be detected. This work is supported at Penn State by NASA grant NAG5-8401 and at Leicester University by funding from PPARC.

  11. Multiwavelength Observations of a Flare from Markarian 501

    OpenAIRE

    Catanese, M.; Bradbury, S. M.; Breslin, A. C.; J. H. Buckley(Department of Physics, Washington University, St. Louis, USA); Carter-Lewis, D. A.; Cawley, M. F.; Dermer, C. D.; Fegan, D. J.; Finley, J. P.; Gaidos, J. A.; Hillas, A.M.; Johnson, W. N.; Krennrich, F.; Lamb, R. C.; Lessard, R. W.

    1997-01-01

    We present multiwavelength observations of the BL Lacertae object Markarian 501 (Mrk 501) in 1997 between April 8 and April 19. Evidence of correlated variability is seen in very high energy (VHE, E > 350 GeV) gamma-ray observations taken with the Whipple Observatory gamma-ray telescope, data from the Oriented Scintillation Spectrometer Experiment of the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory, and quicklook results from the All-Sky Monitor of the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer while the Energetic Gamma-R...

  12. Search for gamma-ray emission from dark matter annihilation in the large magellanic cloud with the fermi large area telescope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.R. Buckley; E. Charles; J.M. Gaskins; A.M. Brooks; A. Drlica-Wagner; P. Martin; G. Zhao

    2015-01-01

    At a distance of 50 kpc and with a dark matter mass of similar to 10(10) M-circle dot, the large magellanic cloud (LMC) is a natural target for indirect dark matter searches. We use five years of data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) and updated models of the gamma-ray emission from standar

  13. Fermi Large Area Telescope Detection of Extended Gamma-Ray Emission from the Radio Galaxy Fornax A

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2016-01-01

    We report the Fermi Large Area Telescope detection of extended gamma-ray emission from the lobes of the radio galaxy Fornax A using 6.1 years of Pass 8 data. After Centaurus A, this is now the second example of an extended gamma-ray source attributed to a radio galaxy. Both an extended flat disk morphology and a morphology following the extended radio lobes were preferred over a point-source description, and the core contribution was constrained to be 100 MeV gamma-ray emission established, we model the source broadband emission considering currently available total lobe radio and millimeter flux measurements, as well as X-ray detections attributed to inverse Compton (IC) emission off the cosmic microwave background (CMB). Unlike the Centaurus A case, we find that a leptonic model involving IC scattering of CMB and extragalactic background light (EBL) photons underpredicts the gamma-ray fluxes by factors of about ~ 2 - 3, depending on the EBL model adopted. An additional gamma-ray spectral component is thus ...

  14. THE VELA-X PULSAR WIND NEBULA REVISITED WITH FOUR YEARS OF FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE OBSERVATIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Vela supernova remnant (SNR) is the closest SNR to Earth containing an active pulsar, the Vela pulsar (PSR B0833–45). This pulsar is an archetype of the middle-aged pulsar class and powers a bright pulsar wind nebula (PWN), Vela-X, spanning a region of 2° × 3° south of the pulsar and observed in the radio, X-ray, and very high energy γ-ray domains. The detection of the Vela-X PWN by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) was reported in the first year of the mission. Subsequently, we have reinvestigated this complex region and performed a detailed morphological and spectral analysis of this source using 4 yr of Fermi-LAT observations. This study lowers the threshold for morphological analysis of the nebula from 0.8 GeV to 0.3 GeV, allowing for the inspection of distinct energy bands by the LAT for the first time. We describe the recent results obtained on this PWN and discuss the origin of the newly detected spatial features

  15. The Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope Quasar Survey: Quasar Properties from First Data Release

    CERN Document Server

    Ai, Y L; Yang, Jinyi; Yang, Qian; Wang, Feige; Guo, Rui; Zuo, Wenwen; Dong, Xiaoyi; Zhang, Y -X; Yuan, H -L; Song, Y -H; Wang, Jianguo; Dong, Xiaobo; Yang, M; Wu, H; Shen, S -Y; Shi, J -R; He, B -L; Lei, Y -J; Li, Y -B; Luo, A -L; Zhao, Y -H; Zhang, Hao-Tong

    2015-01-01

    We present preliminary results of the quasar survey in Large Sky Area Multi- Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST) first data release (DR1), which includes pilot survey and the first year regular survey. There are 3921 quasars identified with reliability, among which 1180 are new quasars discovered in the survey. These quasars are at low to median redshifts, with highest z of 4.83. We compile emission line measurements around the H{\\alpha}, H{\\beta}, Mg II, and C IV regions for the new quasars. The continuum luminosities are inferred from SDSS photo- metric data with model fitting as the spectra in DR1 are non-flux-calibrated. We also compile the virial black hole mass estimates, and flags indicating the selec- tion methods, broad absorption line quasars. The catalog and spectra for these quasars are available online. 28% of the 3921 quasars are selected with optical- infrared colours independently, indicating that the method is quite promising in completeness of quasar survey. LAMOST DR1 and the on-g...

  16. Updated search for spectral lines from Galactic dark matter interactions with pass 8 data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Albert, A.; Anderson, B.; Atwood, W. B.; Baldini, L.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bellazzini, R.; Bissaldi, E.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonino, R.; Bottacini, E.; Brandt, T. J.; Bregeon, J.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caputo, R.; Caragiulo, M.; Caraveo, P. A.; Cecchi, C.; Charles, E.; Chekhtman, A.; Chiang, J.; Chiaro, G.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Conrad, J.; Cuoco, A.; Cutini, S.; D'Ammando, F.; de Angelis, A.; de Palma, F.; Desiante, R.; Digel, S. W.; Di Venere, L.; Drell, P. S.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Franckowiak, A.; Fukazawa, Y.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Giglietto, N.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Godfrey, G.; Gomez-Vargas, G. A.; Grenier, I. A.; Grove, J. E.; Guiriec, S.; Gustafsson, M.; Hewitt, J. W.; Hill, A. B.; Horan, D.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, R. P.; Kuss, M.; Larsson, S.; Latronico, L.; Li, J.; Li, L.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Malyshev, D.; Mayer, M.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McEnery, J. E.; Michelson, P. F.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A. A.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Murgia, S.; Nuss, E.; Ohsugi, T.; Orienti, M.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Paneque, D.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Reimer, A.; Reposeur, T.; Ritz, S.; Sánchez-Conde, M.; Schulz, A.; Sgrò, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Spada, F.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Tajima, H.; Takahashi, H.; Thayer, J. B.; Tibaldo, L.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Troja, E.; Vianello, G.; Werner, M.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, K. S.; Wood, M.; Zaharijas, G.; Zimmer, S.

    2015-06-01

    Dark matter in the Milky Way may annihilate directly into γ rays, producing a monoenergetic spectral line. Therefore, detecting such a signature would be strong evidence for dark matter annihilation or decay. We search for spectral lines in the Fermi Large Area Telescope observations of the Milky Way halo in the energy range 200 MeV-500 GeV using analysis methods from our most recent line searches. The main improvements relative to previous works are our use of 5.8 years of data reprocessed with the Pass 8 event-level analysis and the additional data resulting from the modified observing strategy designed to increase exposure of the Galactic center region. We search in five sky regions selected to optimize sensitivity to different theoretically motivated dark matter scenarios and find no significant detections. In addition to presenting the results from our search for lines, we also investigate the previously reported tentative detection of a line at 133 GeV using the new Pass 8 data.

  17. FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE DETECTION OF GRAVITATIONAL LENS DELAYED γ-RAY FLARES FROM BLAZAR B0218+357

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheung, C. C.; Grove, J. E. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375-5352 (United States); Larsson, S. [Department of Physics, Stockholm University, AlbaNova, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Scargle, J. D. [Space Sciences Division, NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035-1000 (United States); Amin, M. A. [Kavli Institute for Cosmology and Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Blandford, R. D.; Chiang, J.; Marshall, P. J. [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Bulmash, D. [Department of Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Ciprini, S. [Agenzia Spaziale Italiana (ASI) Science Data Center, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Corbet, R. H. D. [Center for Research and Exploration in Space Science and Technology (CRESST) and NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Falco, E. E. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Wood, D. L. [Praxis Inc., Alexandria, VA 22303 (United States); Ajello, M. [Space Sciences Laboratory, 7 Gauss Way, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-7450 (United States); Bastieri, D. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Padova, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Chekhtman, A. [Center for Earth Observing and Space Research, College of Science, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States); D' Ammando, F.; Giroletti, M. [INAF Istituto di Radioastronomia, I-40129 Bologna (Italy); Lott, B. [Centre d' Études Nucléaires de Bordeaux Gradignan, IN2P3/CNRS, Université Bordeaux 1, BP120, F-33175 Gradignan Cedex (France); Ojha, R., E-mail: Teddy.Cheung@nrl.navy.mil, E-mail: stefan@astro.su.se [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); and others

    2014-02-20

    Using data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT), we report the first clear γ-ray measurement of a delay between flares from the gravitationally lensed images of a blazar. The delay was detected in B0218+357, a known double-image lensed system, during a period of enhanced γ-ray activity with peak fluxes consistently observed to reach >20-50 × its previous average flux. An auto-correlation function analysis identified a delay in the γ-ray data of 11.46 ± 0.16 days (1σ) that is ∼1 day greater than previous radio measurements. Considering that it is beyond the capabilities of the LAT to spatially resolve the two images, we nevertheless decomposed individual sequences of superposing γ-ray flares/delayed emissions. In three such ∼8-10 day-long sequences within a ∼4 month span, considering confusion due to overlapping flaring emission and flux measurement uncertainties, we found flux ratios consistent with ∼1, thus systematically smaller than those from radio observations. During the first, best-defined flare, the delayed emission was detailed with a Fermi pointing, and we observed flux doubling timescales of ∼3-6 hr implying as well extremely compact γ-ray emitting regions.

  18. First detection of GeV emission from an ultraluminous infrared galaxy Arp 220 with the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Peng, Fang-Kun; Liu, Ruo-Yu; Tang, Qing-Wen; Wang, Jun-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Cosmic rays (CRs) in starburst galaxies produce high energy gamma-rays by colliding with the dense interstellar medium. Arp 220 is the nearest ultra luminous infrared galaxy (ULIRG) that has star-formation at extreme levels, so it has long been predicted to emit high-energy gamma-rays. However, no evidence of gamma-ray emission was found despite intense efforts of search. Here we report the discovery of high-energy gamma-ray emission above 200 MeV from Arp 220 at a confidence level of $\\sim 6.3 \\sigma $ using 7.5 years of \\textsl {Fermi} Large Area Telescope observation. The gamma-ray emission shows no significant variability over the observation period and it obeys the quasi-linear scaling relation between the gamma-ray luminosity and total infrared luminosity for star-forming galaxies, suggesting that these gamma-rays arise from CR interactions. As the high density gas makes Arp 220 an ideal CR calorimeter, the gamma-ray luminosity can be used to measure the efficiency of powering CRs by supernova remnants ...

  19. Studying the SGR 1806-20/Cl* 1806-20 region using the \\emph{Fermi} Large Area Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Yeung, Paul K H; Tam, P H Thomas; Lin, Lupin C C; Hui, C Y; Hu, Chin-Ping; Cheng, K S

    2016-01-01

    The region around SGR 1806-20 and its host stellar cluster Cl* 1806-20 is a potentially important site of particle acceleration. The soft $\\gamma-$ray repeater and Cl* 1806-20, which also contains several very massive stars including a luminous blue variable hypergiant LBV 1806-20, are capable of depositing a large amount of energy to the surroundings. Using the data taken with the \\emph{Fermi} Large Area Telescope (LAT), we identified an extended LAT source to the south-west of Cl* 1806-20. The centroid of the 1-50~GeV emission is consistent with that of HESS J1808-204 (until now unidentified). The LAT spectrum is best-fit by a broken power-law with the break energy $E_\\mathrm{b}=297\\pm15$ MeV. The index above $E_\\mathrm{b}$ is $2.60\\pm0.04$, and is consistent with the flux and spectral index above 100 GeV for HESS J1808-204, suggesting an association between the two sources. Meanwhile, the interacting supernova remnant SNR G9.7-0.0 is also a potential contributor to the LAT flux. A tentative flux enhancemen...

  20. Optical archival spectra of blazar candidates of uncertain type in the 3rd Fermi Large Area Telescope Catalog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez Crespo, N.; Massaro, F.; D'Abrusco, R.; Landoni, M.; Masetti, N.; Chavushyan, V.; Jiménez-Bailón, E.; La Franca, F.; Milisavljevic, D.; Paggi, A.; Patiño-Álvarez, V.; Ricci, F.; Smith, Howard A.

    2016-09-01

    Despite the fact that blazars constitute the rarest class among active galactic nuclei (AGNs) they are the largest known population of associated γ-ray sources. Many of the γ-ray objects listed in the Fermi-Large Area Telescope Third Source catalog (3FGL) are classified as blazar candidates of uncertain type (BCUs), either because they show multifrequency behavior similar to blazars but lacking optical spectra in the literature, or because the quality of such spectra is too low to confirm their nature. Here we select, out of 585 BCUs in the 3FGL, 42 BCUs which we identify as probable blazars by their WISE infrared colors and which also have optical spectra that are available in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and/or Six-Degree Field Galaxy Survey Database (6dFGS). We confirm the blazar nature of all of the sources. We furthermore conclude that 28 of them are BL Lacs, 8 are radio-loud quasars with flat radio spectrum and 6 are BL Lac whose emission is dominated by their host galaxy.

  1. Dark Matter Constraints from Observations of 25 Milky Way Satellite Galaxies with the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackermann, M.; Albert, A.; Anderson, B.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Bissaldi, E.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Bouvier, A.; Brandt, T. J.; Hays, E.; Perkins, J. S.

    2013-01-01

    The dwarf spheroidal satellite galaxies of the Milky Way are some of the most dark-matter-dominated objects known. Due to their proximity, high dark matter content, and lack of astrophysical backgrounds, dwarf spheroidal galaxies are widely considered to be among the most promising targets for the indirect detection of dark matter via gamma rays. Here we report on gamma ray observations of 25 Milky Way dwarf spheroidal satellite galaxies based on 4 years of Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) data. None of the dwarf galaxies are significantly detected in gamma rays, and we present gamma ray flux upper limits between 500MeV and 500 GeV. We determine the dark matter content of 18 dwarf spheroidal galaxies from stellar kinematic data and combine LAT observations of 15 dwarf galaxies to constrain the dark matter annihilation cross section. We set some of the tightest constraints to date on the annihilation of dark matter particles with masses between 2 GeV and 10TeV into prototypical standard model channels. We find these results to be robust against systematic uncertainties in the LAT instrument performance, diffuse gamma ray background modeling, and assumed dark matter density profile.

  2. Constraining Dark Matter Models from a Combined Analysis of Milky Way Satellites with the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Albert, A.; Atwood, W. B.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Bladford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A. W.; Bregeon, J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Ferrara, E. C.; Gehrels, N.; Hays, E.; Scargle, J. D.; Thompson, D. J.; Troja, E.

    2011-01-01

    Satellite galaxies of the Milky Way are among the most promising targets for dark matter searches in gamma rays. We present a search for dark matter consisting of weakly interacting massive particles, applying a joint likelihood analysis to 10 satellite galaxies with 24 months of data of the Fermi Large Area Telescope. No dark matter signal is detected. Including the uncertainty in the dark matter distribution, robust upper limits are placed on dark matter annihilation cross sections. The 95% confidence level upper limits range from about 10(exp -26) cm(exp 3) / s at 5 GeV to about 5 X 10(exp -23) cm(exp 3)/ s at 1 TeV, depending on the dark matter annihilation final state. For the first time, using gamma rays, we are able to rule out models with the most generic cross section (approx 3 X 10(exp -26) cm(exp 3)/s for a purely s-wave cross section), without assuming additional boost factors.

  3. Dark Matter Constraints from Observations of 25 Milky Way Satellite Galaxies with the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    :,; Albert, A; Anderson, B; Baldini, L; Ballet, J; Barbiellini, G; Bastieri, D; Bechtol, K; Bellazzini, R; Bissaldi, E; Bloom, E D; Bonamente, E; Bouvier, A; Brandt, T J; Bregeon, J; Brigida, M; Bruel, P; Buehler, R; Buson, S; Caliandro, G A; Cameron, R A; Caragiulo, M; Caraveo, P A; Cecchi, C; Charles, E; Chekhtman, A; Chiang, J; Ciprini, S; Claus, R; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Conrad, J; D'Ammando, F; de Angelis, A; Dermer, C D; Digel, S W; Silva, E do Couto e; Drell, P S; Drlica-Wagner, A; Essig, R; Favuzzi, C; Ferrara, E C; Franckowiak, A; Fukazawa, Y; Funk, S; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Gasparrini, D; Giglietto, N; Giroletti, M; Godfrey, G; Gomez-Vargas, G A; Grenier, I A; Guiriec,; Gustafsson, M; Hayashida, M; Hays, E; Hewitt, J; Hughes, R E; Jogler, T; Kamae, T; Knödlseder, J; Kocevski, D; Kuss, M; Larsson,; Latronico, L; Garde, M Llena; Longo, F; Loparco, F; Lovellette, M N; Lubrano, P; Martinez, G; Mayer, M; Mazziotta, M N; Michelson, P F; Mitthumsiri, W; Mizuno, T; Moiseev, A A; Monzani, M E; Morselli, A; Moskalenko, I V; Murgia, S; Nemmen, R; Nuss, E; Ohsugi, T; Orlando, E; Ormes, J F; Perkins, J S; Piron, F; Pivato, G; Porter, T A; Rainò, S; Rando, R; Razzano, M; Razzaque, S; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Ritz, S; Sànchez-Conde, M; Sehgal, N; Sgrò, C; Siskind, E J; Spinelli, P; Strigari, L; Suson, D J; Tajima, H; Takahashi, H; Thayer, J B; Tibaldo, L; Tinivella, M; Torres, D F; Uchiyama, Y; Usher, T L; Vandenbroucke, J; Vianello, G; Vitale, V; Werner, M; Winer, B L; Wood, K S; Wood, M; Zaharijas, G; Zimmer, S

    2013-01-01

    The dwarf spheroidal satellite galaxies of the Milky Way are some of the most dark-matter-dominated objects known. Due to their proximity, high dark matter content, and lack of astrophysical backgrounds, dwarf spheroidal galaxies are widely considered to be among the most promising targets for the indirect detection of dark matter via gamma rays. Here we report on gamma-ray observations of 25 Milky Way dwarf spheroidal satellite galaxies based on 4 years of Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) data. None of the dwarf galaxies are significantly detected in gamma rays, and we present gamma-ray flux upper limits between 500 MeV and 500 GeV. We determine the dark matter content of 18 dwarf spheroidal galaxies from stellar kinematic data and combine LAT observations of 15 dwarf galaxies to constrain the dark matter annihilation cross section. We set some of the tightest constraints to date on the the annihilation of dark matter particles with masses between 2 GeV and 10 TeV into prototypical Standard Model channels. W...

  4. Bent-tailed Radio Sources in the Australia Telescope Large Area Survey of the Chandra Deep Field South

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehghan, S.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Franzen, T. M. O.; Norris, R. P.; Miller, N. A.

    2014-11-01

    Using the 1.4 GHz Australia Telescope Large Area Survey, supplemented by the 1.4 GHz Very Large Array images, we undertook a search for bent-tailed (BT) radio galaxies in the Chandra Deep Field South. Here we present a catalog of 56 detections, which include 45 BT sources, 4 diffuse low-surface-brightness objects (1 relic, 2 halos, and 1 unclassified object), and a further 7 complex, multi-component sources. We report BT sources with rest-frame powers in the range 1022 wide-angle tail source in A3141 and a putative radio relic which appears at the infall region between the galaxy group MZ 00108 and the galaxy cluster AMPCC 40. Further observations are required to confirm the relic detection, which, if successful, would demonstrate this to be the least powerful relic yet seen with P 1.4 GHz = 9 × 1022 W Hz-1. Using these data, we predict future 1.4 GHz all-sky surveys with a resolution of ~10 arcsec and a sensitivity of 10 μJy will detect of the order of 560,000 extended low-surface-brightness radio sources of which 440,000 will have a BT morphology.

  5. FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE DETECTION OF GRAVITATIONAL LENS DELAYED γ-RAY FLARES FROM BLAZAR B0218+357

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT), we report the first clear γ-ray measurement of a delay between flares from the gravitationally lensed images of a blazar. The delay was detected in B0218+357, a known double-image lensed system, during a period of enhanced γ-ray activity with peak fluxes consistently observed to reach >20-50 × its previous average flux. An auto-correlation function analysis identified a delay in the γ-ray data of 11.46 ± 0.16 days (1σ) that is ∼1 day greater than previous radio measurements. Considering that it is beyond the capabilities of the LAT to spatially resolve the two images, we nevertheless decomposed individual sequences of superposing γ-ray flares/delayed emissions. In three such ∼8-10 day-long sequences within a ∼4 month span, considering confusion due to overlapping flaring emission and flux measurement uncertainties, we found flux ratios consistent with ∼1, thus systematically smaller than those from radio observations. During the first, best-defined flare, the delayed emission was detailed with a Fermi pointing, and we observed flux doubling timescales of ∼3-6 hr implying as well extremely compact γ-ray emitting regions

  6. The VELA-X-Pulsar Wind Nebula Revisited with Four Years of Fermi Large Area Telescope Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grondin, M. -H.; Romani, R. W.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Guillemot, L.; Harding, Alice K.; Reposeur, T.

    2013-01-01

    The Vela supernova remnant (SNR) is the closest SNR to Earth containing an active pulsar, the Vela pulsar (PSR B0833-45). This pulsar is an archetype of the middle-aged pulsar class and powers a bright pulsar wind nebula (PWN), Vela-X, spanning a region of 2deg × 3deg south of the pulsar and observed in the radio, X-ray, and very high energy ?-ray domains. The detection of the Vela-X PWN by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) was reported in the first year of the mission. Subsequently, we have reinvestigated this complex region and performed a detailed morphological and spectral analysis of this source using 4 yr of Fermi-LAT observations. This study lowers the threshold for morphological analysis of the nebula from 0.8 GeV to 0.3 GeV, allowing for the inspection of distinct energy bands by the LAT for the first time. We describe the recent results obtained on this PWN and discuss the origin of the newly detected spatial features.

  7. Inferred cosmic-ray spectrum from Fermi large area telescope γ-ray observations of Earth's limb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackermann, M; Ajello, M; Albert, A; Allafort, A; Baldini, L; Barbiellini, G; Bastieri, D; Bechtol, K; Bellazzini, R; Blandford, R D; Bloom, E D; Bonamente, E; Bottacini, E; Bouvier, A; Brandt, T J; Brigida, M; Bruel, P; Buehler, R; Buson, S; Caliandro, G A; Cameron, R A; Caraveo, P A; Cecchi, C; Charles, E; Chaves, R C G; Chekhtman, A; Chiang, J; Chiaro, G; Ciprini, S; Claus, R; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Conrad, J; Cutini, S; Dalton, M; D'Ammando, F; de Angelis, A; de Palma, F; Dermer, C D; Digel, S W; Di Venere, L; do Couto e Silva, E; Drell, P S; Drlica-Wagner, A; Favuzzi, C; Fegan, S J; Ferrara, E C; Focke, W B; Franckowiak, A; Fukazawa, Y; Funk, S; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Gasparrini, D; Germani, S; Giglietto, N; Giordano, F; Giroletti, M; Glanzman, T; Godfrey, G; Gomez-Vargas, G A; Grenier, I A; Grove, J E; Guiriec, S; Gustafsson, M; Hadasch, D; Hanabata, Y; Harding, A K; Hayashida, M; Hayashi, K; Hewitt, J W; Horan, D; Hou, X; Hughes, R E; Inoue, Y; Jackson, M S; Jogler, T; Jóhannesson, G; Johnson, A S; Kamae, T; Kawano, T; Knödlseder, J; Kuss, M; Lande, J; Larsson, S; Latronico, L; Longo, F; Loparco, F; Lovellette, M N; Lubrano, P; Mayer, M; Mazziotta, M N; McEnery, J E; Mehault, J; Michelson, P F; Mitthumsiri, W; Mizuno, T; Moiseev, A A; Monte, C; Monzani, M E; Morselli, A; Moskalenko, I V; Murgia, S; Nemmen, R; Nuss, E; Ohsugi, T; Okumura, A; Orienti, M; Orlando, E; Ormes, J F; Paneque, D; Panetta, J H; Perkins, J S; Pesce-Rollins, M; Piron, F; Pivato, G; Porter, T A; Rainò, S; Rando, R; Razzano, M; Razzaque, S; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Ritz, S; Roth, M; Schaal, M; Schulz, A; Sgrò, C; Siskind, E J; Spandre, G; Spinelli, P; Strong, A W; Takahashi, H; Takeuchi, Y; Thayer, J G; Thayer, J B; Thompson, D J; Tibaldo, L; Tinivella, M; Torres, D F; Tosti, G; Troja, E; Tronconi, V; Usher, T L; Vandenbroucke, J; Vasileiou, V; Vianello, G; Vitale, V; Werner, M; Winer, B L; Wood, K S; Wood, M; Yang, Z

    2014-04-18

    Recent accurate measurements of cosmic-ray (CR) species by ATIC-2, CREAM, and PAMELA reveal an unexpected hardening in the proton and He spectra above a few hundred GeV, a gradual softening of the spectra just below a few hundred GeV, and a harder spectrum of He compared to that of protons. These newly discovered features may offer a clue to the origin of high-energy CRs. We use the Fermi Large Area Telescope observations of the γ-ray emission from Earth's limb for an indirect measurement of the local spectrum of CR protons in the energy range ∼90  GeV-6  TeV (derived from a photon energy range 15 GeV-1 TeV). Our analysis shows that single power law and broken power law spectra fit the data equally well and yield a proton spectrum with index 2.68±0.04 and 2.61±0.08 above ∼200  GeV, respectively. PMID:24785023

  8. Search for high energy gamma-ray emission from tidal disruption events with the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Peng, Feng-Kun; Wang, Xiang-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Massive black holes at galaxy center may tear apart a star when the star passes occasionally within the disruption radius, which is the so-called tidal disruption event(TDE). Most TDEs radiate with thermal emission resulted from the acceleration disk, but three TDEs have been detected in bright non-thermal X-ray emission, which is interpreted as arising from the relativistic jets. Search for high-energy gamma-ray emission from one relativistic TDE (Swift J164449.3+573451) with the \\textsl{Fermi} Large Area Telescope (LAT) has yielded non-detection. In this paper, we report the search for high energy emission from the other two relativistic TDEs (Swift J2058.4+0516 Swift J1112.2-8238) during the flare period. No significant GeV emission is found, with an upper limit fluence in LAT energy range being less than $1\\%$ of that in X-rays. Compared with gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and blazars, these TDEs have the lowest flux ratio between GeV emission and X-ray emission. The non-detection of high-energy emission from re...

  9. Constraining Dark Matter Models from a Combined Analysis of Milky Way Satellites with the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; /Stanford U., HEPL /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /SLAC; Albert, A.; /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /Ohio State U.; Atwood, W.B.; /UC, Santa Cruz; Baldini, L.; /INFN, Pisa; Ballet, J.; /DAPNIA, Saclay; Barbiellini, G.; /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U.; Bastieri, D.; /INFN, Padua /Padua U.; Bechtol, K.; /Stanford U., HEPL /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /SLAC; Bellazzini, R.; /INFN, Pisa; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R.D.; Bloom, E.D.; /Stanford U., HEPL /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /SLAC; Bonamente, E.; /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U.; Borgland, A.W.; /Stanford U., HEPL /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /SLAC; Bregeon, J.; /INFN, Pisa; Brigida, M.; /Bari Polytechnic /INFN, Bari; Bruel, P.; /Ecole Polytechnique; Buehler, R.; /Stanford U., HEPL /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /SLAC; Burnett, T.H.; /Washington U., Seattle; Buson, S.; /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /ICE, Bellaterra /Stanford U., HEPL /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /SLAC /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /IASF, Milan /IASF, Milan /DAPNIA, Saclay /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /Stanford U., HEPL /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /SLAC /Artep Inc. /Stanford U., HEPL /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /SLAC /ASDC, Frascati /Perugia U. /Stanford U., HEPL /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /SLAC /Montpellier U. /Stockholm U. /Stockholm U., OKC /ASDC, Frascati /ASDC, Frascati /Udine U. /INFN, Trieste /Bari Polytechnic /INFN, Bari /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /Stanford U., HEPL /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /SLAC /Montpellier U. /Bari Polytechnic /INFN, Bari /Ecole Polytechnique /NASA, Goddard /Hiroshima U. /Stanford U., HEPL /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /SLAC /Bari Polytechnic /INFN, Bari /INFN, Bari /ASDC, Frascati /NASA, Goddard /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /Bari Polytechnic /INFN, Bari /Bologna Observ. /Stanford U., HEPL /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /SLAC /DAPNIA, Saclay /Alabama U., Huntsville; /more authors..

    2012-09-14

    Satellite galaxies of the Milky Way are among the most promising targets for dark matter searches in gamma rays. We present a search for dark matter consisting of weakly interacting massive particles, applying a joint likelihood analysis to 10 satellite galaxies with 24 months of data of the Fermi Large Area Telescope. No dark matter signal is detected. Including the uncertainty in the dark matter distribution, robust upper limits are placed on dark matter annihilation cross sections. The 95% confidence level upper limits range from about 10{sup -26} cm{sup 3} s{sup -1} at 5 GeV to about 5 x 10{sup -23} cm{sup 3} s{sup -1} at 1 TeV, depending on the dark matter annihilation final state. For the first time, using gamma rays, we are able to rule out models with the most generic cross section ({approx}3 x 10{sup -26} cm{sup 3} s{sup -1} for a purely s-wave cross section), without assuming additional boost factors.

  10. OBSERVATIONS OF THE YOUNG SUPERNOVA REMNANT RX J1713.7-3946 WITH THE FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present observations of the young supernova remnant (SNR) RX J1713.7-3946 with the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). We clearly detect a source positionally coincident with the SNR. The source is extended with a best-fit extension of 0.055 ± 0.004 matching the size of the non-thermal X-ray and TeV gamma-ray emission from the remnant. The positional coincidence and the matching extended emission allow us to identify the LAT source with SNR RX J1713.7-3946. The spectrum of the source can be described by a very hard power law with a photon index of Γ = 1.5 ± 0.1 that coincides in normalization with the steeper H.E.S.S.-detected gamma-ray spectrum at higher energies. The broadband gamma-ray emission is consistent with a leptonic origin as the dominant mechanism for the gamma-ray emission.

  11. Gamma-ray emission from PSR J0007+7303 using 7 years of Fermi Large Area Telescope observations

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Jian; Wilhelmi, Emma de Ona; Rea, Nanda; Martin, Jonatan

    2016-01-01

    Based on more than seven years of Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) Pass 8 data, we report on a detailed analysis of the bright gamma-ray pulsar (PSR) J0007+7303. We confirm that PSR J0007+7303 is significantly detected as a point source also during the off-peak phases with a TS value of 262 ($\\sim$ 16 $\\sigma$). In the description of PSR J0007+7303 off-peak spectrum, a power law with an exponential cutoff at 2.7$\\pm$1.2$\\pm$1.3 GeV (the first/second uncertainties correspond to statistical/systematic errors) is preferred over a single power law at a level of 3.5 $\\sigma$. The possible existence of a cutoff hints at a magnetospheric origin of the emission. In addition, no extended gamma-ray emission is detected compatible with either the supernova remnant (CTA 1) or the very high energy (> 100 GeV) pulsar wind nebula. A flux upper limit of 6.5$\\times$10$^{-12}$ erg cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$ in the 10-300 GeV energy range is reported, for an extended source assuming the morphology of the VERITAS detection. During on-pe...

  12. Discovery of Pulsed Gamma Rays from the Young Radio Pulsar PSR J1028-5819 with the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    OpenAIRE

    Collaboration, The Fermi-LAT

    2009-01-01

    Radio pulsar PSR J1028-5819 was recently discovered in a high-frequency search (at 3.1 GHz)in the error circle of the EGRET source 3EG J1027-5817. The spin-down power of this young pulsar is great enough to make it very likely the counterpart for the EGRET source. We report here the discovery of gamma-ray pulsations from PSR J1028-5819 in early observations by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope. The gamma-ray light curve shows two sharp peaks having phase se...

  13. Multiwavelength Observations of GRB 110731A: GeV Emission from Onset to Afterglow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Asano, K.; Baldini, L.; Barbiellini, G.; Baring, M. G.; Bastieri, D.; Bellazzini, R.; Blandford, R. D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A. W.; Bottacini, E.; Bregeon, J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caraveo, P. A.; Cecchi, C.; Charles, E.; Chaves, R. C. G.; Chekhtman, A.; Chiang, J.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Conrad, J.; Cutini, S.; D'Ammando, F.; de Angelis, A.; de Palma, F.; Dermer, C. D.; Silva, E. do Couto e.; Drell, P. S.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Focke, W. B.; Franckowiak, A.; Fukazawa, Y.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Gehrels, N.; Giglietto, N.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Granot, J.; Greiner, J.; Grenier, I. A.; Grove, J. E.; Guiriec, S.; Hadasch, D.; Hanabata, Y.; Hayashida, M.; Hays, E.; Hughes, R. E.; Jackson, M. S.; Jogler, T.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, A. S.; Knödlseder, J.; Kocevski, D.; Kuss, M.; Lande, J.; Larsson, S.; Latronico, L.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McEnery, J. E.; Mehault, J.; Mészáros, P.; Michelson, P. F.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Monte, C.; Monzani, M. E.; Moretti, E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Naumann-Godo, M.; Norris, J. P.; Nuss, E.; Nymark, T.; Ohno, M.; Ohsugi, T.; Omodei, N.; Orienti, M.; Orlando, E.; Paneque, D.; Perkins, J. S.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Racusin, J. L.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Razzaque, S.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Romoli, C.; Roth, M.; Ryde, F.; Sanchez, D. A.; Sgrò, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Sonbas, E.; Spinelli, P.; Stamatikos, M.; Takahashi, H.; Tanaka, T.; Thayer, J. G.; Thayer, J. B.; Tibaldo, L.; Tinivella, M.; Tosti, G.; Troja, E.; Usher, T. L.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Vasileiou, V.; Vianello, G.; Vitale, V.; Waite, A. P.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, K. S.; Yang, Z.; Gruber, D.; Bhat, P. N.; Bissaldi, E.; Briggs, M. S.; Burgess, J. M.; Connaughton, V.; Foley, S.; Kippen, R. M.; Kouveliotou, C.; McBreen, S.; McGlynn, S.; Paciesas, W. S.; Pelassa, V.; Preece, R.; Rau, A.; van der Horst, A. J.; von Kienlin, A.; Kann, D. A.; Filgas, R.; Klose, S.; Krühler, T.; Fukui, A.; Sako, T.; Tristram, P. J.; Oates, S. R.; Ukwatta, T. N.; Littlejohns, O.

    2013-02-01

    We report on the multiwavelength observations of the bright, long gamma-ray burst GRB 110731A, by the Fermi and Swift observatories, and by the MOA and GROND optical telescopes. The analysis of the prompt phase reveals that GRB 110731A shares many features with bright Large Area Telescope bursts observed by Fermi during the first three years on-orbit: a light curve with short time variability across the whole energy range during the prompt phase, delayed onset of the emission above 100 MeV, extra power-law component and temporally extended high-energy emission. In addition, this is the first GRB for which simultaneous GeV, X-ray, and optical data are available over multiple epochs beginning just after the trigger time and extending for more than 800 s, allowing temporal and spectral analysis in different epochs that favor emission from the forward shock in a wind-type medium. The observed temporally extended GeV emission is most likely part of the high-energy end of the afterglow emission. Both the single-zone pair transparency constraint for the prompt signal and the spectral and temporal analysis of the forward-shock afterglow emission independently lead to an estimate of the bulk Lorentz factor of the jet Γ ~ 500-550.

  14. Argentinian multi-wavelength scanning Raman lidar to observe night sky atmospheric transmission

    CERN Document Server

    Pallotta, Juan; Otero, Lidia; Chouza, Fernando; Raul, Delia; Gonzalez, Francisco; Etchegoyen, Alberto; Quel, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    This paper discusses the multi-wavelength scanning Raman lidar being built at Lidar Division, CEILAP (CITEDEF-CONICET) in the frame of the Argentinean Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) collaboration to measure the spectral characteristics of the atmospheric aerosol extinction profiles to provide better transmission calculations at the future CTA site. This lidar emits short laser pulses of 7-9 ns at 355, 532 and 1064 nm at 50 Hz with nominal energy of 125 mJ at 1064 nm. This wavelengths are also used to retrieve the atmospheric (air, aerosol and clouds) backscattered radiation in the UV, VIS and IR ranges. Raman capabilities were added in the UV and VIS wavelengths to retrieve the spectral characteristics of the aerosol extinction and the water vapor profile. Due to the expected low aerosol optical depth of the future site, the short observation period as well as the extension of the observation, an enhanced collection area is required. This system uses six 40 cm f/2.5 newtonian telescopes to avoid dealing with...

  15. Multiwavelength polarization observations of the γ-ray bright quasar PKS 0420-014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Troitskiy I.S.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We analyze total and polarized intensity images of the quasar PKS 0420-014 obtained monthly with the VLBA at 43 GHz during 2008–2012 along with γ-ray data provided by the Fermi Large Area Telescope and multi-color photometric and polarimetric measurements collected by different optical telescopes. During this period the quasar underwent a number of optical flares, which were accompanied by rapid rotation of polarization angle, an increase of activity in γ-rays, and the appearance of new superluminal knots in the parsec-scale jet. We investigate the fine structure of the flares at different wavelengths and in polarized light, and determine kinematic parameters of the knots. We compare the rapid evolution of the optical polarization with the polarization of the VLBI core and knots. We interpret the multi-wavelength behavior within a model that places the blazar “dissipation zone” at the millimeter-wave core of the parsec-scale jet.

  16. Bent-tailed radio sources in the australia telescope large area survey of the Chandra deep field south

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dehghan, S.; Johnston-Hollitt, M. [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Victoria University of Wellington, P.O. Box 600, Wellington 6140 (New Zealand); Franzen, T. M. O.; Norris, R. P. [Australia Telescope National Facility, CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, P.O. Box 76, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia); Miller, N. A., E-mail: siamak.dehghan@vuw.ac.nz [Department of Mathematics and Physical Sciences, Stevenson University, Stevenson, MD 21153 (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Using the 1.4 GHz Australia Telescope Large Area Survey, supplemented by the 1.4 GHz Very Large Array images, we undertook a search for bent-tailed (BT) radio galaxies in the Chandra Deep Field South. Here we present a catalog of 56 detections, which include 45 BT sources, 4 diffuse low-surface-brightness objects (1 relic, 2 halos, and 1 unclassified object), and a further 7 complex, multi-component sources. We report BT sources with rest-frame powers in the range 10{sup 22} ≤ P {sub 1.4} {sub GHz} ≤ 10{sup 26} W Hz{sup –1}, with redshifts up to 2 and linear extents from tens of kiloparsecs up to about 1 Mpc. This is the first systematic study of such sources down to such low powers and high redshifts and demonstrates the complementary nature of searches in deep, limited area surveys as compared to shallower, large surveys. Of the sources presented here, one is the most distant BT source yet detected at a redshift of 2.1688. Two of the sources are found to be associated with known clusters: a wide-angle tail source in A3141 and a putative radio relic which appears at the infall region between the galaxy group MZ 00108 and the galaxy cluster AMPCC 40. Further observations are required to confirm the relic detection, which, if successful, would demonstrate this to be the least powerful relic yet seen with P {sub 1.4} {sub GHz} = 9 × 10{sup 22} W Hz{sup –1}. Using these data, we predict future 1.4 GHz all-sky surveys with a resolution of ∼10 arcsec and a sensitivity of 10 μJy will detect of the order of 560,000 extended low-surface-brightness radio sources of which 440,000 will have a BT morphology.

  17. Bent-tailed radio sources in the australia telescope large area survey of the Chandra deep field south

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using the 1.4 GHz Australia Telescope Large Area Survey, supplemented by the 1.4 GHz Very Large Array images, we undertook a search for bent-tailed (BT) radio galaxies in the Chandra Deep Field South. Here we present a catalog of 56 detections, which include 45 BT sources, 4 diffuse low-surface-brightness objects (1 relic, 2 halos, and 1 unclassified object), and a further 7 complex, multi-component sources. We report BT sources with rest-frame powers in the range 1022 ≤ P 1.4 GHz ≤ 1026 W Hz–1, with redshifts up to 2 and linear extents from tens of kiloparsecs up to about 1 Mpc. This is the first systematic study of such sources down to such low powers and high redshifts and demonstrates the complementary nature of searches in deep, limited area surveys as compared to shallower, large surveys. Of the sources presented here, one is the most distant BT source yet detected at a redshift of 2.1688. Two of the sources are found to be associated with known clusters: a wide-angle tail source in A3141 and a putative radio relic which appears at the infall region between the galaxy group MZ 00108 and the galaxy cluster AMPCC 40. Further observations are required to confirm the relic detection, which, if successful, would demonstrate this to be the least powerful relic yet seen with P 1.4 GHz = 9 × 1022 W Hz–1. Using these data, we predict future 1.4 GHz all-sky surveys with a resolution of ∼10 arcsec and a sensitivity of 10 μJy will detect of the order of 560,000 extended low-surface-brightness radio sources of which 440,000 will have a BT morphology.

  18. Hunting for treasures among the Fermi unassociated sources: A multiwavelength approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope has been detecting a wealth of sources where the multiwavelength counterpart is either inconclusive or missing altogether. We present a combination of factors that can be used to identify multiwavelength counterparts to these Fermi unassociated sources. This approach was used to select and investigate seven bright, high-latitude unassociated sources with radio, UV, X-ray, and γ-ray observations. As a result, four of these sources are candidates to be active galactic nuclei, and one to be a pulsar, while two do not fit easily into these known categories of sources. The latter pair of extraordinary sources might reveal a new category subclass or a new type of γ-ray emitter. These results altogether demonstrate the power of a multiwavelength approach to illuminate the nature of unassociated Fermi sources.

  19. Multiwavelength observations of Mrk 501 in 2008

    CERN Document Server

    Aleksić, J; Antonelli, L A; Antoranz, P; Babic, A; Bangale, P; de Almeida, U Barres; Barrio, J A; González, J Becerra; Bednarek, W; Berger, K; Bernardini, E; Biland, A; Blanch, O; Bock, R K; Bonnefoy, S; Bonnoli, G; Borracci, F; Bretz, T; Carmona, E; Carosi, A; Fidalgo, D Carreto; Colin, P; Colombo, E; Contreras, J L; Cortina, J; Covino, S; Da Vela, P; Dazzi, F; De Angelis, A; De Caneva, G; De Lotto, B; Mendez, C Delgado; Doert, M; Domínguez, A; Prester, D Dominis; Dorner, D; Doro, M; Einecke, S; Eisenacher, D; Elsaesser, D; Farina, E; Ferenc, D; Fonseca, M V; Font, L; Frantzen, K; Fruck, C; López, R J García; Garczarczyk, M; Terrats, D Garrido; Gaug, M; Giavitto, G; Godinović, N; Muñoz, A González; Gozzini, S R; Hadamek, A; Hadasch, D; Herrero, A; Hildebrand, D; Hose, J; Hrupec, D; Idec, W; Kadenius, V; Kellermann, H; Knoetig, M L; Krause, J; Kushida, J; La Barbera, A; Lelas, D; Lewandowska, N; Lindfors, E; Lombardi, S; López, M; López-Coto, R; López-Oramas, A; Lorenz, E; Lozano, I; Makariev, M; Mallot, K; Maneva, G; Mankuzhiyil, N; Mannheim, K; Maraschi, L; Marcote, B; Mariotti, M; Martínez, M; Mazin, D; Menzel, U; Meucci, M; Miranda, J M; Mirzoyan, R; Moralejo, A; Munar-Adrover, P; Nakajima, D; Niedzwiecki, A; Nilsson, K; Nowak, N; Orito, R; Overkemping, A; Paiano, S; Palatiello, M; Paneque, D; Paoletti, R; Paredes, J M; Paredes-Fortuny, X; Partini, S; Persic, M; Prada, F; Moroni, P G Prada; Prandini, E; Preziuso, S; Puljak, I; Reinthal, R; Rhode, W; Ribó, M; Rico, J; Garcia, J Rodriguez; Rügamer, S; Saggion, A; Saito, T; Saito, K; Salvati, M; Satalecka, K; Scalzotto, V; Scapin, V; Schultz, C; Schweizer, T; Shore, S N; Sillanpää, A; Sitarek, J; Snidaric, I; Sobczynska, D; Spanier, F; Stamatescu, V; Stamerra, A; Steinbring, T; Storz, J; Sun, S; Surić, T; Takalo, L; Tavecchio, F; Temnikov, P; Terzić, T; Tescaro, D; Teshima, M; Thaele, J; Tibolla, O; Torres, D F; Toyama, T; Treves, A; Uellenbeck, M; Vogler, P; Wagner, R M; Zandanel, F; Zanin, R; :,; Behera, B; Beilicke, M; Benbow, W; Bird, R; Bouvier, A; Bugaev, V; Cerruti, M; Chen, X; Ciupik, L; Collins-Hughes, E; Cui, W; Duke, C; Dumm, J; Falcone, A; Federici, S; Feng, Q; Finley, J P; Fortson, L; Furniss, A; Galante, N; Gillanders, G H; Griffin, S; Griffiths, S T; Grube, J; Gyuk, G; Hanna, D; Holder, J; Johnson, C A; Kaaret, P; Kertzman, M; Kieda, D; Krawczynski, H; Lang, M J; Madhavan, A S; Maier, G; Majumdar, P; Meagher, K; Moriarty, P; Mukherjee, R; Nieto, D; de Bhróithe, A O'Faoláin; Ong, R A; Otte, A N; Pichel, A; Pohl, M; Popkow, A; Prokoph, H; Quinn, J; Rajotte, J; Ratliff, G; Reyes, L C; Reynolds, P T; Richards, G T; Roache, E; Sembroski, G H; Shahinyan, K; Sheidaei, F; Smith, A W; Staszak, D; Telezhinsky, I; Theiling, M; Tyler, J; Varlotta, A; Vincent, S; Wakely, S P; Weekes, T C; Welsing, R; Williams, D A; Zajczyk, A; Zitzer, B; :,; Villata, M; Raiteri, C M; Ajello, M; Perri, M; Aller, H D; Aller, M F; Larionov, V M; Efimova, N V; Konstantinova, T S; Kopatskaya, E N; Chen, W P; Koptelova, E; Hsiao, H Y; Kurtanidze, O M; Nikolashvili, M G; Kimeridze, G N; Jordan, B; Leto, P; Buemi, C S; Trigilio, C; Umana, G; Lahtenmaki, A; Nieppola, E; Tornikoski, M; Sainio, J; Giroletti, M; Cesarini, A; Fuhrmann, L; Kovalev, Yu A; Kovalev, Y Y

    2014-01-01

    Mrk 501 is one of the brightest blazars at TeV energies and has been extensively studied since its first VHE detection in 1996. Our goal is to characterize in detail the source gamma-ray emission, together with the radio-to-X-ray emission, during the non-flaring (low) activity, which is less often studied than the occasional flaring (high) activity. We organized a multiwavelength (MW) campaign on Mrk 501 between March and May 2008. This multi-instrument effort included the most sensitive VHE gamma-ray instruments in the northern hemisphere, namely the imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes MAGIC and VERITAS, as well as Swift, RXTE, the F-GAMMA, GASP-WEBT, and other collaborations and instruments. Mrk 501 was found to be in a low state of activity during the campaign, with a VHE flux in the range of 10%-20% of the Crab nebula flux. Nevertheless, significant flux variations were detected with various instruments, with a trend of increasing variability with energy. The broadband spectral energy distribution du...

  20. A Multi-Wavelength Study of the Gamma-Ray Binary 1FGL J1018.6-5856

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coley, Joel Barry; Corbet, Robin; Cheung, Chi C.; Dubus, Guillaume; Edwards, Philip; McBride, Vanessa; Stevens, Jamie

    2016-04-01

    1FGL J1018.6-5856, the first gamma-ray binary discovered by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT), consists of an O6 V((f)) star and suspected rapidly spinning pulsar. While 1FGL J1018.6-5856 has been postulated to be powered by the interaction between a relativistic pulsar wind and the stellar wind of the companion, a microquasar scenario where the compact object is a black hole cannot be ruled out. We present the first extensive multi-wavelength analysis of 1FGL J1018.6-5856 with the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA), Fermi LAT and the Swift X-ray Telescope (XRT) to better determine the properties of the 16.531$\\pm$0.006 day orbital modulation. The radio amplitude modulation is found to decline with increasing frequency, which is a possible indication of the presence of free-free absorption. This is further supported by the absence of clear modulation in the 33.0 and 35.0\\,GHz bands, which were not previously reported. The best-fit spectral model of the Swift XRT data consists of a featureless power law with index $\\Gamma\\sim$1.3--1.7 modified by an absorber that fully covers the source. This is possible evidence that 1FGL J1018.6-5856 is a non-accreting system.

  1. Space Telescope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Huntsville, AL. George C. Marshall Space Flight Center.

    This pamphlet describes the Space Telescope, an unmanned multi-purpose telescope observatory planned for launch into orbit by the Space Shuttle in the 1980s. The unique capabilities of this telescope are detailed, the major elements of the telescope are described, and its proposed mission operations are outlined. (CS)

  2. Strong Gravitational Lenses and Multi-Wavelength Galaxy Surveys with AKARI, Herschel, SPICA and Euclid

    CERN Document Server

    Serjeant, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Submillimetre and millimetre-wave surveys with Herschel and the South Pole Telescope have revolutionised the discovery of strong gravitational lenses. Their follow-ups have been greatly facilitated by the multi-wavelength supplementary data in the survey fields. The forthcoming Euclid optical/near-infrared space telescope will also detect strong gravitational lenses in large numbers, and orbital constraints are likely to require placing its deep survey at the North Ecliptic Pole (the natural deep field for a wide class of ground-based and space-based observatories including AKARI, JWST and SPICA). In this paper I review the current status of the multi-wavelength survey coverage in the NEP, and discuss the prospects for the detection of strong gravitational lenses in forthcoming or proposed facilities such as Euclid, FIRSPEX and SPICA.

  3. Neutrino telescopes

    CERN Document Server

    Carr, J

    2002-01-01

    This review presents the scientific objectives and status of Neutrino Telescope Projects. The science program of these projects covers: neutrino astronomy, dark matter searches and measurements of neutrino oscillations. The two neutrino telescopes in operation: AMANDA and BAIKAL will be described together with the ANTARES neutrino telescope being built in the Mediterranean. (18 refs).

  4. DETECTION OF GAMMA-RAY EMISSION FROM THE STARBURST GALAXIES M82 AND NGC 253 WITH THE LARGE AREA TELESCOPE ON FERMI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the detection of high-energy γ-ray emission from two starburst galaxies using data obtained with the Large Area Telescope on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. Steady point-like emission above 200 MeV has been detected at significance levels of 6.8σ and 4.8σ, respectively, from sources positionally coincident with locations of the starburst galaxies M82 and NGC 253. The total fluxes of the sources are consistent with γ-ray emission originating from the interaction of cosmic rays with local interstellar gas and radiation fields and constitute evidence for a link between massive star formation and γ-ray emission in star-forming galaxies.

  5. DISCOVERY OF PULSED γ-RAYS FROM THE YOUNG RADIO PULSAR PSR J1028-5819 WITH THE FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radio pulsar PSR J1028-5819 was recently discovered in a high-frequency search (at 3.1 GHz) in the error circle of the Energetic Gamma-Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) source 3EG J1027-5817. The spin-down power of this young pulsar is great enough to make it very likely the counterpart for the EGRET source. We report here the discovery of γ-ray pulsations from PSR J1028-5819 in early observations by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope. The γ-ray light curve shows two sharp peaks having phase separation of 0.460 ± 0.004, trailing the very narrow radio pulse by 0.200 ± 0.003 in phase, very similar to that of other known γ-ray pulsars. The measured γ-ray flux gives an efficiency for the pulsar of ∼10-20% (for outer magnetosphere beam models). No evidence of a surrounding pulsar wind nebula is seen in the current Fermi data but limits on associated emission are weak because the source lies in a crowded region with high background emission. However, the improved angular resolution afforded by the LAT enables the disentanglement of the previous COS-B and EGRET source detections into at least two distinct sources, one of which is now identified as PSR J1028-5819.

  6. DETERMINATION OF THE POINT-SPREAD FUNCTION FOR THE FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE FROM ON-ORBIT DATA AND LIMITS ON PAIR HALOS OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ackermann, M. [Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron DESY, D-15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Ajello, M.; Allafort, A.; Bechtol, K.; Bloom, E. D.; Borgland, A. W.; Bottacini, E.; Buehler, R. [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Asano, K. [Interactive Research Center of Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro City, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Atwood, W. B. [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics, Department of Physics and Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California at Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Baldini, L.; Bellazzini, R.; Bregeon, J. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Ballet, J. [Laboratoire AIM, CEA-IRFU/CNRS/Universite Paris Diderot, Service d' Astrophysique, CEA Saclay, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Barbiellini, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Trieste, I-34127 Trieste (Italy); Bastieri, D. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Padova, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Bonamente, E. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Perugia, I-06123 Perugia (Italy); Brandt, T. J. [CNRS, IRAP, F-31028 Toulouse cedex 4 (France); Brigida, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica ' M. Merlin' dell' Universita e del Politecnico di Bari, I-70126 Bari (Italy); Bruel, P., E-mail: mdwood@slac.stanford.edu, E-mail: mar0@uw.edu [Laboratoire Leprince-Ringuet, Ecole polytechnique, CNRS/IN2P3, F-91128 Palaiseau (France); and others

    2013-03-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope is a pair-conversion telescope designed to detect photons with energies from Almost-Equal-To 20 MeV to >300 GeV. The pre-launch response functions of the LAT were determined through extensive Monte Carlo simulations and beam tests. The point-spread function (PSF) characterizing the angular distribution of reconstructed photons as a function of energy and geometry in the detector is determined here from two years of on-orbit data by examining the distributions of {gamma} rays from pulsars and active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Above 3 GeV, the PSF is found to be broader than the pre-launch PSF. We checked for dependence of the PSF on the class of {gamma}-ray source and observation epoch and found none. We also investigated several possible spatial models for pair-halo emission around BL Lac AGNs. We found no evidence for a component with spatial extension larger than the PSF and set upper limits on the amplitude of halo emission in stacked images of low- and high-redshift BL Lac AGNs and the TeV blazars 1ES0229+200 and 1ES0347-121.

  7. DETERMINATION OF THE POINT-SPREAD FUNCTION FOR THE FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE FROM ON-ORBIT DATA AND LIMITS ON PAIR HALOS OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope is a pair-conversion telescope designed to detect photons with energies from ≈20 MeV to >300 GeV. The pre-launch response functions of the LAT were determined through extensive Monte Carlo simulations and beam tests. The point-spread function (PSF) characterizing the angular distribution of reconstructed photons as a function of energy and geometry in the detector is determined here from two years of on-orbit data by examining the distributions of γ rays from pulsars and active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Above 3 GeV, the PSF is found to be broader than the pre-launch PSF. We checked for dependence of the PSF on the class of γ-ray source and observation epoch and found none. We also investigated several possible spatial models for pair-halo emission around BL Lac AGNs. We found no evidence for a component with spatial extension larger than the PSF and set upper limits on the amplitude of halo emission in stacked images of low- and high-redshift BL Lac AGNs and the TeV blazars 1ES0229+200 and 1ES0347–121.

  8. Calibration of Multi-wavelength Raman Polarization Lidar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Xuan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The current high energy cosmic ray detection technology, including Cherenkov telescopes and fluorescence detector, is mainly limited by uncertainties in the determination of atmospheric parameters. LIDARs are currently the best suited technology to get atmospheric parameters for the atmosphere correction of high energy cosmic ray observatory data with one single instrument. A new Multi-wavelength Raman Polarization Lidar (AMPLE has been developed and introduced in this paper. In order to provide precise and accurate results, lidar system should be calibrated before using for atmosphere correction in cosmic rays observatory. The calibration methods and results of AMPLE have been presented, including overlap function calibration, multi-wavelength channel calibration, depolarization calibration. In order to verify the accuracy of parameter measured by AMPLE lidar system, the comparison with radio sounder and sun-photometer has been done. The results show AMPLE lidar system has the ability to precisely measure the vertical profile of the atmosphere properties without any assumption and is a good choice for cosmic rays observatory to get atmosphere correction information.

  9. Multi-wavelength follow-up of ANTARES neutrino alerts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathieu, Aurore

    2015-10-01

    Transient sources are often associated with the most violent phenomena in the Universe, where the acceleration of hadrons may occur. Such sources include gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), active galactic nuclei (AGN) or core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe), and are promising candidates for the production of high energy cosmic rays and neutrinos. The ANTARES telescope, located in the Mediterranean sea, aims at detecting these high energy neutrinos, which could reveal the presence of a cosmic ray accelerator. However, to enhance the sensitivity to transient sources, a method based on multi-wavelength follow-up of neutrino alerts has been developed within the ANTARES collaboration. This program, denoted as TAToO, triggers a network of robotic optical telescopes and the Swift-XRT with a delay of only a few seconds after a neutrino detection. The telescopes start an observation program of the corresponding region of the sky in order to detect a possible electromagnetic counterpart to the neutrino event. The work presented in this thesis covers the development and implementation of an optical image analysis pipeline, as well as the analysis of optical and X-ray data to search for fast transient sources, such as GRB afterglows, and slowly varying transient sources, such as CCSNe.

  10. Multiwavelength Observations of a Flare from Markarian 501

    CERN Document Server

    Catanese, M; Breslin, A C; Buckley, J H; Carter-Lewis, D A; Cawley, M F; Dermer, C D; Fegan, D J; Finley, J P; Gaidos, J A; Hillas, A M; Johnson, W N; Krennrich, F; Lamb, R C; Lessard, R W; Macomb, D J; McEnery, J E; Moriarty, P; Quinn, J; Rodgers, A J; Rose, H J; Samuelson, F W; Sembroski, G H; Srinivasan, R; Weekes, T C; Zweerink, J A

    1997-01-01

    We present multiwavelength observations of the BL Lacertae object Markarian 501 (Mrk 501) in 1997 between April 8 and April 19. Evidence of correlated variability is seen in very high energy (VHE, E > 350 GeV) gamma-ray observations taken with the Whipple Observatory gamma-ray telescope, data from the Oriented Scintillation Spectrometer Experiment of the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory, and quicklook results from the All-Sky Monitor of the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer while the Energetic Gamma-Ray Experiment Telescope did not detect Mrk 501. Short term optical correlations are not conclusive but the U-band flux observed with the 1.2m telescope of the Whipple Observatory was 10% higher than in March. The average energy output of Mrk 501 appears to peak in the 2 keV to 100 keV range suggesting an extension of the synchrotron emission to at least 100 keV, the highest observed in a blazar and ~100 times higher than that seen in the other TeV-emitting BL Lac object, Mrk 421. The VHE gamma-ray flux observed during thi...

  11. Multiwavelength Observations of the Redback Millisecond Pulsar J1048+2339

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deneva, J. S.; Ray, P. S.; Camilo, F.; Halpern, J. P.; Wood, K.; Cromartie, H. T.; Ferrara, E.; Kerr, M.; Ransom, S. M.; Wolff, M. T.; Chambers, K. C.; Magnier, E. A.

    2016-06-01

    We report on radio timing and multiwavelength observations of the 4.66 ms redback pulsar J1048+2339, which was discovered in an Arecibo search targeting the Fermi-Large Area Telescope source 3FGL J1048.6+2338. Two years of timing allowed us to derive precise astrometric and orbital parameters for the pulsar. PSR J1048+2339 is in a 6 hr binary and exhibits radio eclipses over half the orbital period and rapid orbital period variations. The companion has a minimum mass of 0.3 M ⊙, and we have identified a V ∼ 20 variable optical counterpart in data from several surveys. The phasing of its ∼1 mag modulation at the orbital period suggests highly efficient and asymmetric heating by the pulsar wind, which may be due to an intrabinary shock that is distorted near the companion, or to the companion’s magnetic field channeling the pulsar wind to specific locations on its surface. We also present gamma-ray spectral analysis of the source and preliminary results from searches for gamma-ray pulsations using the radio ephemeris.

  12. Cosmic rays from multiwavelength observations of the Galactic diffuse emission

    CERN Document Server

    Orlando, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Cosmic rays (CRs) generate diffuse emission while interacting with the Galactic magnetic field (B-field), the interstellar gas and the radiation field. This diffuse emission extends from radio, microwaves, through X-rays, to high-energy gamma rays. Diffuse emission has considerably increased the interest of the astrophysical community due to recent detailed observations by Planck, Fermi-LAT, and by very-high-energy Cherenkov telescopes. Observations of this emission and comparison with detailed predictions are used to gain information on the properties of CRs, such as their density, spectra, distribution and propagation in the Galaxy. Unfortunately disentangling and characterizing this diffuse emission strongly depends on uncertainties in the knowledge of unresolved sources, gas, radiation fields, and B-fields, other than CRs throughout the Galaxy. We report here on recent multiwavelength observations of the Galactic diffuse emission, and discuss the diffuse emission produced by CRs and its model uncertaintie...

  13. Multiwavelength behaviour of the blazar OJ 248 from radio to γ-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnerero, M. I.; Raiteri, C. M.; Villata, M.; Acosta-Pulido, J. A.; D'Ammando, F.; Smith, P. S.; Larionov, V. M.; Agudo, I.; Arévalo, M. J.; Arkharov, A. A.; Bach, U.; Bachev, R.; Benítez, E.; Blinov, D. A.; Bozhilov, V.; Buemi, C. S.; Bueno Bueno, A.; Carosati, D.; Casadio, C.; Chen, W. P.; Damljanovic, G.; Paola, A. Di; Efimova, N. V.; Ehgamberdiev, Sh. A.; Giroletti, M.; Gómez, J. L.; González-Morales, P. A.; Grinon-Marin, A. B.; Grishina, T. S.; Gurwell, M. A.; Hiriart, D.; Hsiao, H. Y.; Ibryamov, S.; Jorstad, S. G.; Joshi, M.; Kopatskaya, E. N.; Kurtanidze, O. M.; Kurtanidze, S. O.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Larionova, E. G.; Larionova, L. V.; Lázaro, C.; Leto, P.; Lin, C. S.; Lin, H. C.; Manilla-Robles, A. I.; Marscher, A. P.; McHardy, I. M.; Metodieva, Y.; Mirzaqulov, D. O.; Mokrushina, A. A.; Molina, S. N.; Morozova, D. A.; Nikolashvili, M. G.; Orienti, M.; Ovcharov, E.; Panwar, N.; Pastor Yabar, A.; Puerto Giménez, I.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Richter, G. M.; Rossini, M.; Sigua, L. A.; Strigachev, A.; Taylor, B.; Tornikoski, M.; Trigilio, C.; Troitskaya, Yu. V.; Troitsky, I. S.; Umana, G.; Valcheva, A.; Velasco, S.; Vince, O.; Wehrle, A. E.; Wiesemeyer, H.

    2015-07-01

    We present an analysis of the multiwavelength behaviour of the blazar OJ 248 at z = 0.939 in the period 2006-2013. We use low-energy data (optical, near-infrared, and radio) obtained by 21 observatories participating in the Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST)-AGILE Support Program of the Whole Earth Blazar Telescope, as well as data from the Swift (optical-UV and X-rays) and Fermi (γ-rays) satellites, to study flux and spectral variability and correlations among emissions in different bands. We take into account the effect of absorption by the Damped Lyman α intervening system at z = 0.525. Two major outbursts were observed in 2006-2007 and in 2012-2013 at optical and near-IR wavelengths, while in the high-frequency radio light curves prominent radio outbursts are visible peaking at the end of 2010 and beginning of 2013, revealing a complex radio-optical correlation. Cross-correlation analysis suggests a delay of the optical variations after the γ-ray ones of about a month, which is a peculiar behaviour in blazars. We also analyse optical polarimetric and spectroscopic data. The average polarization percentage P is less than 3 per cent, but it reaches ˜19 per cent during the early stage of the 2012-2013 outburst. A vague correlation of P with brightness is observed. There is no preferred electric vector polarization angle and during the outburst the linear polarization vector shows wide rotations in both directions, suggesting a complex behaviour/structure of the jet and possible turbulence. The analysis of 140 optical spectra acquired at the Steward Observatory reveals a strong Mg II broad emission line with an essentially stable flux of 6.2 × 10- 15 erg cm- 2 s- 1 and a full width at half-maximum of 2053 km s- 1.

  14. Back to the future: science and technology directions for radio telescopes of the twenty-first century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordes, James M.

    2009-08-01

    The early days of radio astronomy showed incredibly diverse experimentation in ways to sample the electromagnetic spectrum at radio wavelengths. In addition to obtaining adequate sensitivity by building large collection areas, a primary goal also was to achieve sufficient angular resolution to localize radio sources for multi-wavelength identification. This led to many creative designs and the invention of aperture synthesis and VLBI. Some of the basic telescope types remain to the present day, now implemented across the entire radio spectrum from wavelengths of tens of meters to submillimeter wavelengths. In recent years, as always, there is still the drive for greater sensitivity but a primary goal is now to achieve very large fields of view to complement high resolution and frequency coverage, leading to a new phase of experimentation. This is the “back to the future” aspect of current research and development for next-generation radio telescopes. In this paper I summarize the scientific motivations for development of new technology and telescopes since about 1990 and going forward for the next decade and longer. Relevant elements include highly optimized telescope optics and feed antenna designs, innovative fabrication methods for large reflectors and dipole arrays, digital implementations, and hardware vs. software processing. The emphasis will be on meter and centimeter wavelength telescopes but I include a brief discussion of millimeter wavelengths to put the longer wavelength enterprises into perspective. I do not discuss submillimeter wavelengths because they are covered in other papers.

  15. BRIGHT ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI SOURCE LIST FROM THE FIRST THREE MONTHS OF THE FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE ALL-SKY SURVEY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first three months of sky-survey operation with the Large Area Telescope (LAT) onboard the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope reveal 132 bright sources at |b|>10 deg. with test statistic greater than 100 (corresponding to about 10σ). Two methods, based on the CGRaBS, CRATES, and BZCat catalogs, indicate high-confidence associations of 106 of these sources with known active galactic nuclei (AGNs). This sample is referred to as the LAT Bright AGN Sample (LBAS). It contains two radio galaxies, namely, Centaurus A and NGC 1275, and 104 blazars consisting of 58 flat spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs), 42 BL Lac objects, and 4 blazars with unknown classification. Four new blazars were discovered on the basis of the LAT detections. Remarkably, the LBAS includes 10 high-energy-peaked BL Lacs (HBLs), sources which were previously difficult to detect in the GeV range. Another 10 lower-confidence associations are found. Only 33 of the sources, plus two at |b| < 10 deg., were previously detected with Energetic Gamma-Ray Experiment Telescope(EGRET), probably due to variability. The analysis of the γ-ray properties of the LBAS sources reveals that the average GeV spectra of BL Lac objects are significantly harder than the spectra of FSRQs. No significant correlation between radio and peak γ-ray fluxes is observed. Blazar log N-log S distributions and luminosity functions are constructed to investigate the evolution of the different blazar classes, with positive evolution indicated for FSRQs but none for BL Lacs. The contribution of LAT blazars to the total extragalactic γ-ray intensity is estimated.

  16. Blazar Demographics Using Multiwavelength Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Peiyuan; Massaro, F.; Urry, C. Megan

    2016-01-01

    Blazars are ideal laboratories to study relativistic jets in AGN, which are thought to be an important channel for feeding energy into galaxies and clusters. We present multi-wavelength SEDs of 2214 blazars with known redshifts, based on the Roma-BZCAT data across 12 frequency bands ranging from radio to gamma-ray. We confirm the anti-correlation between radio luminosity and synchrotron peak frequency, (part of what defines the "blazar sequence"), although with greater scatter than seen previously in studies of far fewer blazars. We describe an empirical estimator of luminosities in those 12 frequency bands using only the radio luminosity at 1.4 GHz and the redshift as inputs. Using this estimator, we study the demographics of blazars by comparing Monte-Carlo simulations to blazar surveys at several different frequencies and flux limits. We recover the observed evolutionary parameter for both low-frequency peaked (V/Vmax≈0.6) and high-frequency peaked (V/Vmax≈0.4) blazars, proving that selection effects cause the high-frequency-peaked sources to appear to anti-evolve even though the same underlying evolution was assumed in the simulation. We also show that the if instead we randomly assign fluxes independent of radio luminosity, the simulated blazar samples disagree strongly with the observed ones. These simulations confirm that luminosity and SED shape must indeed be linked in a physical blazar sequence.

  17. Multiwavelength pyrometry for nongray bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Daniel

    1992-01-01

    A multiwavelength technique was developed and applied to measure the temperatures of nongray surfaces. The instruments required are a spectral radiometer, a dedicated auxiliary radiation source, and a computer. In general, three radiation spectra are recorded: (1) spectrum S sub 0 of the auxiliary radiation source; (2) spectrum S sub 1 of the surface-emitted radiation; and (3) spectrum S sub 2, the sum of the radiation of S sub 1 plus the reflected radiation due to the incidence of the auxiliary radiation source on the surface. Subtracting spectrum S sub 1 from spectrum Sub 2 yields the reflection spectrum resulting from the incidence radiation. From these spectra, a quantity z(lambda) is derived and is related to the reflectivity r(lambda) by r(lambda) = z(lambda)/f, where f is a constant. Spectrum S sub 1 is represented mathematically as the product of a wavelength-dependent emissivity obtained from Kirchhoff's law and a Planck function of temperature T. Application of two-variable (lambda and z), nonlinear, least-squares curve-fitting computer software to fit spectrum S sub 1 to this mathematical expression yielded the surface temperature. This technique also measured the spectral reflectivity and emissivity of the surface. Instrumentation necessary to extend measurement to elevated temperatures and in the presence of reflective interference is discussed.

  18. Multiwavelength observations of Mrk 501 in 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aleksic, J.; Ansoldi, S.; Antonelli, L. A.; Antoranz, P.; Babic, A.; Bangale, P.; Barres de Almeida, U.; Barrio, J. A.; Gonzalez, Becerra; Bednarek, W.; Zitzer, B.

    2015-01-01

    Context. Blazars are variable sources on various timescales over a broad energy range spanning from radio to very high energy (>100 GeV, hereafter VHE). Mrk 501 is one of the brightest blazars at TeV energies and has been extensively studied since its first VHE detection in 1996. However, most of the γ-ray studies performed on Mrk 501 during the past years relate to flaring activity, when the source detection and characterization with the available γ-ray instrumentation was easier toperform. Aims. Our goal is to characterize the source γ-ray emission in detail, together with the radio-to-X-ray emission, during the non-flaring (low) activity, which is less often studied than the occasional flaring (high) activity. Methods. We organized a multiwavelength (MW) campaign on Mrk 501 between March and May 2008. This multi-instrument effort included the most sensitive VHE γ-ray instruments in the northern hemisphere, namely the imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes MAGIC and VERITAS, as well as Swift, RXTE, the F-GAMMA, GASP-WEBT, and other collaborations and instruments. This provided extensive energy and temporal coverage of Mrk 501 throughout the entire campaign. Results. Mrk 501 was found to be in a low state of activity during the campaign, with a VHE flux in the range of 10%–20% of the Crab nebula flux. Nevertheless, significant flux variations were detected with various instruments, with a trend of increasing variability with energy and a tentative correlation between the X-ray and VHE fluxes. The broadband spectral energy distribution during the two different emission states of the campaign can be adequately described within the homogeneous one-zone synchrotron self-Compton model, with the (slightly) higher state described by an increase in the electron number density. Conclusions. The one-zone SSC model can adequately describe the broadband spectral energy distribution of the source during the two months covered by the MW campaign. This agrees with

  19. Diffusion of cosmic-rays and the Gamma-ray Large Area Telescope: Phenomenology at the 1-100 GeV regime

    CERN Document Server

    Marrero, Ana Y Rodriguez; del Pozo, Elsa de Cea; Reimer, Olaf; Cillis, Analia N

    2008-01-01

    This paper analyzes astrophysical scenarios that may be detected at the upper end of the energy range of the Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST), as a result of cosmic-ray (CR) diffusion in the interstellar medium (ISM). Hadronic processes are considered as the source of $\\gamma$-ray photons from localized molecular enhancements nearby accelerators. Two particular cases are presented: a) the possibility of detecting spectral energy distributions (SEDs) with maxima above 1 GeV, which may be constrained by detection or non-detection at very-high energies (VHE) with observations by ground-based Cerenkov telescopes, and b) the possibility of detecting V-shaped, inverted spectra, due to confusion of a nearby (to the line of sight) arrangement of accelerator/target scenarios with different characteristic properties. We show that the finding of these signatures (in particular, a peak at the 1--100 GeV energy region) is indicative for an identification of the underlying mechanism producing the $\\gamma$-rays ...

  20. Space Telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigby, Jane R.

    2011-01-01

    The science of astronomy depends on modern-day temples called telescopes. Astronomers make pilgrimages to remote mountaintops where these large, intricate, precise machines gather light that rains down from the Universe. Bit, since Earth is a bright, turbulent planet, our finest telescopes are those that have been launched into the dark stillness of space. These space telescopes, named after heroes of astronomy (Hubble, Chandra, Spitzer, Herschel), are some of the best ideas our species has ever had. They show us, over 13 billion years of cosmic history, how galaxies and quasars evolve. They study planets orbiting other stars. They've helped us determine that 95% of the Universe is of unknown composition. In short, they tell us about our place in the Universe. The next step in this journey is the James Webb Space Telescope, being built by NASA, Europe, and Canada for a 2018 launch; Webb will reveal the first galaxies that ever formed.

  1. SNAP telescope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lampton, Michael L.; Akerlof, C.W.; Aldering, G.; Amanullah, R.; Astier, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bebek, C.; Bergstrom, L.; Bercovitz, J.; Bernstein, G.; Bester, M.; Bonissent, A.; Bower, C.; Carithers Jr., W.C.; Commins, E.D.; Day, C.; Deustua, S.E.; DiGennaro, R.; Ealet, A.; Ellis,R.S.; Eriksson, M.; Fruchter, A.; Genat, J.-F.; Goldhaber, G.; Goobar,A.; Groom, D.; Harris, S.E.; Harvey, P.R.; Heetderks, H.D.; Holland,S.E.; Huterer, D.; Karcher, A.; Kim, A.G.; Kolbe, W.; Krieger, B.; Lafever, R.; Lamoureux, J.; Levi, M.E.; Levin, D.S.; Linder, E.V.; Loken,S.C.; Malina, R.; Massey, R.; McKay, T.; McKee, S.P.; Miquel, R.; Mortsell, E.; Mostek, N.; Mufson, S.; Musser, J.; Nugent, P.; Oluseyi,H.; Pain, R.; Palaio, N.; Pankow, D.; Perlmutter, S.; Pratt, R.; Prieto,E.; Refregier, A.; Rhodes, J.; Robinson, K.; Roe, N.; Sholl, M.; Schubnell, M.; Smadja, G.; Smoot, G.; Spadafora, A.; Tarle, G.; Tomasch,A.; von der Lippe, H.; Vincent, R.; Walder, J.-P.; Wang, G.; Wang, G.

    2002-07-29

    The SuperNova/Acceleration Probe (SNAP) mission will require a two-meter class telescope delivering diffraction limited images spanning a one degree field in the visible and near infrared wavelength regime. This requirement, equivalent to nearly one billion pixel resolution, places stringent demands on its optical system in terms of field flatness, image quality, and freedom from chromatic aberration. We discuss the advantages of annular-field three-mirror anastigmat (TMA) telescopes for applications such as SNAP, and describe the features of the specific optical configuration that we have baselined for the SNAP mission. We discuss the mechanical design and choice of materials for the telescope. Then we present detailed ray traces and diffraction calculations for our baseline optical design. We briefly discuss stray light and tolerance issues, and present a preliminary wavefront error budget for the SNAP Telescope. We conclude by describing some of tasks to be carried out during the upcoming SNAP research and development phase.

  2. Quantum telescopes

    CERN Document Server

    Kellerer, Aglae

    2014-01-01

    In the 20th century, quantum mechanics connected the particle and wave concepts of light and thereby made mechanisms accessible that had never been imagined before. Processes such as stimulated emission and quantum entanglement have revolutionized modern technology. But even though astronomical observations rely on novel technologies, the optical layout of telescopes has fundamentally remained unchanged. While there is no doubt that Huyghens and Newton would be astounded by the size of our modern telescopes, they would nevertheless understand their optical design. The time may now have come to consider quantum telescopes, that make use of the fundamental scientific changes brought along by quantum mechanics. While one aim is to entertain our reader, our main purpose is to explore the possible future evolution of telescopes.

  3. Multiwavelength Gamma-Ray Bursts Observations with ECLAIRs

    CERN Document Server

    Gotz, Diego

    2007-01-01

    ECLAIRs is the next space borne instrument that will be fully dedicated to multi-wavelength studies of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs). It consists of a coded mask telescope with a wide (~2 sr) field of view, made of 6400 CdTe pixels (~1000 cm^2), which will work in the 4-300 keV energy band. It is expected to localise ~80 GRBs/yr, thanks to the on-board real time event processing. The GRBs (and other transients) coordinates will be distributed within a few seconds from the onset of the burst with a typical uncertainty of ~5-10 arcmin. The detection system will also include a soft X-ray camera (1-10 keV) allowing to study in detail the prompt soft X-ray emission and to reduce the error box for about half of the GRBs seen by ECLAIRs to ~30 arcsec. ECLAIRs is expected to be flown in late 2011 and to be the only instrument capable of providing GRB triggers with sufficient localisation accuracy for GRB follow-up observations with the powerful ground based spectroscopic telescopes available by then. We will present the cu...

  4. Measurement of the Cosmic Ray e+ plus e- Spectrum from 20 GeV to 1 TeV with the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdo, Aous A.; /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C.; Ackermann, M.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Ajello, M.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Atwood, W.B.; /UC, Santa Cruz; Axelsson, M.; /Stockholm U., OKC /Stockholm U.; Baldini, L.; /INFN, Pisa; Ballet, J.; /DAPNIA, Saclay; Barbiellini, Guido; /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U.; Bastieri, Denis; /INFN, Padua /Padua U.; Battelino, M.; /Stockholm U., OKC /Royal Inst. Tech., Stockholm; Baughman, B.M.; /Ohio State U.; Bechtol, K.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bellazzini, R.; /INFN, Pisa; Berenji, B.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Blandford, R.D.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bloom, Elliott D.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bogaert, G.; /Ecole Polytechnique; Bonamente, E.; /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U.; Borgland, A.W.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bregeon, J.; /INFN, Pisa; Brez, A.; /INFN, Pisa /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Ecole Polytechnique /Washington U., Seattle /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /IASF, Milan /IASF, Milan /Stockholm U., OKC /Royal Inst. Tech., Stockholm /DAPNIA, Saclay /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /George Mason U. /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /NASA, Goddard /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Montpellier U. /Sonoma State U. /Stockholm U., OKC /Royal Inst. Tech., Stockholm /Stockholm U. /ASDC, Frascati /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /INFN, Trieste /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /INFN, Pisa /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /CENBG, Gradignan /CENBG, Gradignan /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Montpellier U. /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; /more authors..

    2012-05-14

    Designed as a high-sensitivity gamma-ray observatory, the Fermi Large Area Telescope is also an electron detector with a large acceptance exceeding 2 m{sup 2}sr at 300 GeV. Building on the gamma-ray analysis, we have developed an efficient electron detection strategy which provides sufficient background rejection for measurement of the steeply-falling electron spectrum up to 1 TeV. Our high precision data show that the electron spectrum falls with energy as E{sup -3.0} and does not exhibit prominent spectral features. Interpretations in terms of a conventional diffusive model as well as a potential local extra component are briefly discussed.

  5. Cosmic-Ray Background Flux Model based on a Gamma-Ray Large-Area Space Telescope Balloon Flight Engineering Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizuno, T

    2004-09-03

    Cosmic-ray background fluxes were modeled based on existing measurements and theories and are presented here. The model, originally developed for the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) Balloon Experiment, covers the entire solid angle (4{pi} sr), the sensitive energy range of the instrument ({approx} 10 MeV to 100 GeV) and abundant components (proton, alpha, e{sup -}, e{sup +}, {mu}{sup -}, {mu}{sup +} and gamma). It is expressed in analytic functions in which modulations due to the solar activity and the Earth geomagnetism are parameterized. Although the model is intended to be used primarily for the GLAST Balloon Experiment, model functions in low-Earth orbit are also presented and can be used for other high energy astrophysical missions. The model has been validated via comparison with the data of the GLAST Balloon Experiment.

  6. FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE OBSERVATIONS OF GAMMA-RAY PULSARS PSR J1057-5226, J1709-4429, AND J1952+3252

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) data have confirmed the pulsed emission from all six high-confidence gamma-ray pulsars previously known from the EGRET observations. We report results obtained from the analysis of 13 months of LAT data for three of these pulsars (PSR J1057-5226, PSR J1709-4429, and PSR J1952+3252) each of which had some unique feature among the EGRET pulsars. The excellent sensitivity of LAT allows more detailed analysis of the evolution of the pulse profile with energy and also of the variation of the spectral shape with phase. We measure the cutoff energy of the pulsed emission from these pulsars for the first time and provide a more complete picture of the emission mechanism. The results confirm some, but not all, of the features seen in the EGRET data.

  7. Scientific impact of large telescopes

    CERN Document Server

    Sánchez, S F

    2000-01-01

    The scientific impacts of telescopes worldwide have been compared on the basis of their contributions to (a) the 1000 most-cited astronomy papers published 1991-8 (125 from each year), and (b) the 452 astronomy papers published in Nature 1989-98. 1-m and 2-m ground-based telescopes account for \\~5% of the citations to the top-cited papers, 4-m telescopes 10%, Keck I/II 4%, sub-mm and radio telescopes 4%, HST 8%, other space telescopes 23%. The remaining citations are mainly to theoretical and review papers. The strong showing by 1-m and 2-m telescopes in the 1990s augurs well for the continued scientific impact of 4-m telescopes in the era of 8-m telescopes. The impact of individual ground-based optical telescopes is proportional to collecting area (and approximately proportional to capital cost). The impacts of the various 4-m telescopes are similar, with CFHT leading in citation counts, and WHT in Nature papers. HST has about 15 times the citation impact of a 4-m ground-based telescope, but cost >100 times ...

  8. GAMMA-RAY LOUDNESS, SYNCHROTRON PEAK FREQUENCY, AND PARSEC-SCALE PROPERTIES OF BLAZARS DETECTED BY THE FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The parsec-scale radio properties of 232 active galactic nuclei, most of which are blazars, detected by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope have been observed contemporaneously by the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) at 5 GHz. Data from both the first 11 months (1FGL) and the first 2 years (2FGL) of the Fermi mission were used to investigate these sources' γ-ray properties. We use the ratio of the γ-ray-to-radio luminosity as a measure of γ-ray loudness. We investigate the relationship of several radio properties to γ-ray loudness and to the synchrotron peak frequency. There is a tentative correlation between γ-ray loudness and synchrotron peak frequency for BL Lac objects in both 1FGL and 2FGL, and for flat-spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs) in 2FGL. We find that the apparent opening angle tentatively correlates with γ-ray loudness for FSRQs, but only when we use the 2FGL data. We also find that the total VLBA flux density correlates with the synchrotron peak frequency for BL Lac objects and FSRQs. The core brightness temperature also correlates with synchrotron peak frequency, but only for the BL Lac objects. The low-synchrotron-peaked (LSP) BL Lac object sample shows indications of contamination by FSRQs which happen to have undetectable emission lines. There is evidence that the LSP BL Lac objects are more strongly beamed than the rest of the BL Lac object population.

  9. GAMMA-RAY LOUDNESS, SYNCHROTRON PEAK FREQUENCY, AND PARSEC-SCALE PROPERTIES OF BLAZARS DETECTED BY THE FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linford, J. D.; Taylor, G. B.; Schinzel, F. K., E-mail: jlinford@unm.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of New Mexico, MSC07 4220, Albuquerque, NM 87131-0001 (United States)

    2012-09-20

    The parsec-scale radio properties of 232 active galactic nuclei, most of which are blazars, detected by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope have been observed contemporaneously by the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) at 5 GHz. Data from both the first 11 months (1FGL) and the first 2 years (2FGL) of the Fermi mission were used to investigate these sources' {gamma}-ray properties. We use the ratio of the {gamma}-ray-to-radio luminosity as a measure of {gamma}-ray loudness. We investigate the relationship of several radio properties to {gamma}-ray loudness and to the synchrotron peak frequency. There is a tentative correlation between {gamma}-ray loudness and synchrotron peak frequency for BL Lac objects in both 1FGL and 2FGL, and for flat-spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs) in 2FGL. We find that the apparent opening angle tentatively correlates with {gamma}-ray loudness for FSRQs, but only when we use the 2FGL data. We also find that the total VLBA flux density correlates with the synchrotron peak frequency for BL Lac objects and FSRQs. The core brightness temperature also correlates with synchrotron peak frequency, but only for the BL Lac objects. The low-synchrotron-peaked (LSP) BL Lac object sample shows indications of contamination by FSRQs which happen to have undetectable emission lines. There is evidence that the LSP BL Lac objects are more strongly beamed than the rest of the BL Lac object population.

  10. PSR J0007+7303 in the CTA1I Supenova Remnant: New Gamma-Ray Results from Two Years of Fermi Large Area Telescope Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdo, A.; Wood, K.; DeCesar, M.; Gargano, F.; Giordano, F.; Ray, P. S.; Parent, D.; Harding, A.; Coleman, M.; Wood, D. L.; Wolff, M.

    2012-01-01

    One of the main results of the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope is the discovery of -ray selected pulsars. The high magnetic field pulsar, PSR J0007+7303 in CTA1, was the first ever to be discovered through its -ray pulsations. Based on analysis of two years of Large Area Telescope (LAT) survey data, we report on the discovery of -ray emission in the off-pulse phase interval at the 6 level. The emission appears to be extended at the 2 level with a disk of extension 0.6. level. The flux from this emission in the energy range E 100 MeV is F 100 = (1.73 0.40stat 0.18sys) 108photonscm2 s1 and is best fitted by a power law with a photon index of = 2.54 0.14stat 0.05sys. The pulsed -ray flux in the same energy range is F 100 = (3.95 0.07stat 0.30sys) 107photonscm2 s1 and is best fitted by an exponentially cutoff power-law spectrum with a photon index of = 1.41 0.23stat 0.03sys and a cutoff energy Ec = 4.04 0.20stat 0.67sysGeV. We find no flux variability either at the 2009 May glitch or in the long-term behavior. We model the -ray light curve with two high-altitude emission models, the outer gap and slot gap, and find that the preferred model depends strongly on the assumed origin of the off-pulse emission. Both models favor a large angle between the magnetic axis and observer line of sight, consistent with the nondetection of radio emission being a geometrical effect. Finally, we discuss how the LAT results bear on the understanding of the cooling of this neutron star.

  11. ERRATUM: FERMI Large Area Telescope Study of Cosmic-Rays and the Interstellar Medium in Nearby Molecular Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Allafort, A.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A.W.; Bottacini, E.; Brandt, T. J.; Bregeon, J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Busetto, G.; S.Buson; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caraveo, P. A.; Ferrara, E. C.; Harding, A. K.; Nemmen, R.; Thompson, D. J.; Troja, E.

    2013-01-01

    systematic uncertainty into account." 3. Table 1 and Figure 13, which show gas emissivities and spectra for the Chamaeleon region in the original paper, should be changed to the Table 1 and Figure 1 as shown below. 4. Figure 16, which compares Hi gas emissivities among several regions in the original paper, should be changed to Figure 2 as shown below. 5. The text from the line 13 to the last one in the first paragraph of Section 4.1, "The spectral shapes for the three regions..., indicating a difference of the CR density between the Chamaeleon and the others as shown in Figure 16." should be changed to the paragraph that follows. "The shaded area of each spectrum indicates the systematic uncertainty as described in Section 3. We note that the systematic uncertainty of the LAT effective area (5% at 100 MeV and 20% at 10 GeV; Rando et al. 2009) does not affect the relative value of emissivities. The effect of unresolved point sources is small; we have verified that the obtained emissivities are almost unaffected by decreasing the threshold for point sources from TS = 100 to TS = 50. We also confirmed that the residual excess of photons around (l = 280deg to 288deg, b = -20deg to -12deg; see the bottom panel of Figure 8) in the Chamaeleon region does not affect the local Hi emissivity very much. Thus the total systematic uncertainty is reasonably expressed by the shaded area shown in Fig. 1.

  12. The MAGIC Telescope Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Up to now the 20-300 GeV energy range has been inaccessible to gamma-ray astronomy. Here we report on a design for a 17-m φ air Cerenkov telescope, dubbed MAGIC telescope, which will have a threshold of 20 GeV, a large collection area of > 105 m2 and a high gamma/hadron separation power. It is estimated that the hardware investments would be about 3.5 M$ and 2.5-3.5 years would be needed for the construction. (author)

  13. Multiwavelength observations of Mrk 501 in 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksić, J.; Ansoldi, S.; Antonelli, L. A.; Antoranz, P.; Babic, A.; Bangale, P.; Barres de Almeida, U.; Barrio, J. A.; Becerra González, J.; Bednarek, W.; Berger, K.; Bernardini, E.; Biland, A.; Blanch, O.; Bock, R. K.; Bonnefoy, S.; Bonnoli, G.; Borracci, F.; Bretz, T.; Carmona, E.; Carosi, A.; Carreto Fidalgo, D.; Colin, P.; Colombo, E.; Contreras, J. L.; Cortina, J.; Covino, S.; da Vela, P.; Dazzi, F.; de Angelis, A.; de Caneva, G.; de Lotto, B.; Delgado Mendez, C.; Doert, M.; Domínguez, A.; Dominis Prester, D.; Dorner, D.; Doro, M.; Einecke, S.; Eisenacher, D.; Elsaesser, D.; Farina, E.; Ferenc, D.; Fonseca, M. V.; Font, L.; Frantzen, K.; Fruck, C.; García López, R. J.; Garczarczyk, M.; Garrido Terrats, D.; Gaug, M.; Giavitto, G.; Godinović, N.; González Muñoz, A.; Gozzini, S. R.; Hadamek, A.; Hadasch, D.; Herrero, A.; Hildebrand, D.; Hose, J.; Hrupec, D.; Idec, W.; Kadenius, V.; Kellermann, H.; Knoetig, M. L.; Krause, J.; Kushida, J.; La Barbera, A.; Lelas, D.; Lewandowska, N.; Lindfors, E.; Lombardi, S.; López, M.; López-Coto, R.; López-Oramas, A.; Lorenz, E.; Lozano, I.; Makariev, M.; Mallot, K.; Maneva, G.; Mankuzhiyil, N.; Mannheim, K.; Maraschi, L.; Marcote, B.; Mariotti, M.; Martínez, M.; Mazin, D.; Menzel, U.; Meucci, M.; Miranda, J. M.; Mirzoyan, R.; Moralejo, A.; Munar-Adrover, P.; Nakajima, D.; Niedzwiecki, A.; Nilsson, K.; Nowak, N.; Orito, R.; Overkemping, A.; Paiano, S.; Palatiello, M.; Paneque, D.; Paoletti, R.; Paredes, J. M.; Paredes-Fortuny, X.; Partini, S.; Persic, M.; Prada, F.; Prada Moroni, P. G.; Prandini, E.; Preziuso, S.; Puljak, I.; Reinthal, R.; Rhode, W.; Ribó, M.; Rico, J.; Rodriguez Garcia, J.; Rügamer, S.; Saggion, A.; Saito, T.; Saito, K.; Salvati, M.; Satalecka, K.; Scalzotto, V.; Scapin, V.; Schultz, C.; Schweizer, T.; Shore, S. N.; Sillanpää, A.; Sitarek, J.; Snidaric, I.; Sobczynska, D.; Spanier, F.; Stamatescu, V.; Stamerra, A.; Steinbring, T.; Storz, J.; Sun, S.; Surić, T.; Takalo, L.; Tavecchio, F.; Temnikov, P.; Terzić, T.; Tescaro, D.; Teshima, M.; Thaele, J.; Tibolla, O.; Torres, D. F.; Toyama, T.; Treves, A.; Uellenbeck, M.; Vogler, P.; Wagner, R. M.; Zandanel, F.; Zanin, R.; MAGIC Collaboration; Behera, B.; Beilicke, M.; Benbow, W.; Berger, K.; Bird, R.; Bouvier, A.; Bugaev, B.; Cerruti, M.; Chen, X.; Ciupik, L.; Collins-Hughes, E.; Cui, W.; Duke, C.; Dumm, J.; Falcone, A.; Federici, S.; Feng, Q.; Finley, J. P.; Fortson, L.; Furniss, A.; Galante, N.; Gillanders, G. H.; Griffin, S.; Griffiths, S. T.; Grube, J.; Gyuk, G.; Hanna, D.; Holder, J.; Johnson, C. A.; Kaaret, P.; Kertzman, M.; Kieda, D.; Krawczynski, H.; Lang, M. J.; Madhavan, A. S.; Maier, G.; Majumdar, P.; Meagher, K.; Moriarty, P.; Mukherjee, R.; Nieto, D.; O'Faoláin de Bhróithe, A.; Ong, R. A.; Otte, A. N.; Pichel, A.; Pohl, M.; Popkow, A.; Prokoph, H.; Quinn, J.; Rajotte, J.; Ratliff, G.; Reyes, L. C.; Reynolds, P. T.; Richards, G. T.; Roache, E.; Sembroski, G. H.; Shahinyan, K.; Sheidaei, F.; Smith, A. W.; Staszak, D.; Telezhinsky, I.; Theiling, M.; Tyler, J.; Varlotta, A.; Vincent, S.; Wakely, S. P.; Weekes, T. C.; Welsing, R.; Williams, D. A.; Zajczyk, A.; Zitzer, B.; VERITAS Collaboration; Villata, M.; Raiteri, C. M.; Ajello, M.; Perri, M.; Aller, H. D.; Aller, M. F.; Larionov, V. M.; Efimova, N. V.; Konstantinova, T. S.; Kopatskaya, E. N.; Chen, W. P.; Koptelova, E.; Hsiao, H. Y.; Kurtanidze, O. M.; Nikolashvili, M. G.; Kimeridze, G. N.; Jordan, B.; Leto, P.; Buemi, C. S.; Trigilio, C.; Umana, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Nieppola, E.; Tornikoski, M.; Sainio, J.; Kadenius, V.; Giroletti, M.; Cesarini, A.; Fuhrmann, L.; Kovalev, Yu. A.; Kovalev, Y. Y.

    2015-01-01

    Context. Blazars are variable sources on various timescales over a broad energy range spanning from radio to very high energy (>100 GeV, hereafter VHE). Mrk 501 is one of the brightest blazars at TeV energies and has been extensively studied since its first VHE detection in 1996. However, most of the γ-ray studies performed on Mrk 501 during the past years relate to flaring activity, when the source detection and characterization with the available γ-ray instrumentation was easier toperform. Aims: Our goal is to characterize the source γ-ray emission in detail, together with the radio-to-X-ray emission, during the non-flaring (low) activity, which is less often studied than the occasional flaring (high) activity. Methods: We organized a multiwavelength (MW) campaign on Mrk 501 between March and May 2008. This multi-instrument effort included the most sensitive VHE γ-ray instruments in the northern hemisphere, namely the imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes MAGIC and VERITAS, as well as Swift, RXTE, the F-GAMMA, GASP-WEBT, and other collaborations and instruments. This provided extensive energy and temporal coverage of Mrk 501 throughout the entire campaign. Results: Mrk 501 was found to be in a low state of activity during the campaign, with a VHE flux in the range of 10%-20% of the Crab nebula flux. Nevertheless, significant flux variations were detected with various instruments, with a trend of increasing variability with energy and a tentative correlation between the X-ray and VHE fluxes. The broadband spectral energy distribution during the two different emission states of the campaign can be adequately described within the homogeneous one-zone synchrotron self-Compton model, with the (slightly) higher state described by an increase in the electron number density. Conclusions: The one-zone SSC model can adequately describe the broadband spectral energy distribution of the source during the two months covered by the MW campaign. This agrees with previous

  14. The South Pole Telescope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruhl, J.E.; Ade, P.A.R.; Carlstrom, J.E.; Cho, H.M.; Crawford,T.; Dobbs, M.; Greer, C.H.; Halverson, N.W.; Holzapfel, W.L.; Lanting,T.M.; Lee, A.T.; Leitch, E.M.; Leong, J.; Lu, W.; Lueker, M.; Mehl, J.; Meyer, S.S.; Mohr, J.J.; Padin, S.; Plagge, T.; Pryke, C.; Runyan, M.C.; Schwan, D.; Sharp, M.K.; Spieler, H.; Staniszewski, Z.; Stark, A.A.

    2004-11-04

    A new 10 meter diameter telescope is being constructed for deployment at the NSF South Pole research station. The telescope is designed for conducting large-area millimeter and sub-millimeter wave surveys of faint, low contrast emission, as required to map primary and secondary anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background. To achieve the required sensitivity and resolution, the telescope design employs an off-axis primary with a 10 m diameter clear aperture. The full aperture and the associated optics will have a combined surface accuracy of better than 20 microns rms to allow precision operation in the submillimeter atmospheric windows. The telescope will be surrounded with a large reflecting ground screen to reduce sensitivity to thermal emission from the ground and local interference. The optics of the telescope will support a square degree field of view at 2mm wavelength and will feed a new 1000-element micro-lithographed planar bolometric array with superconducting transition-edge sensors and frequency-multiplexed readouts. The first key project will be to conduct a survey over 4000 degrees for galaxy clusters using the Sunyaev-Zeldovich Effect. This survey should find many thousands of clusters with a mass selection criteria that is remarkably uniform with redshift. Armed with redshifts obtained from optical and infrared follow-up observations, it is expected that the survey will enable significant constraints to be placed on the equation of state of the dark energy.

  15. RADIOMETRIC CALIBRATION OF MULTI-WAVELENGTH AIRBORNE LASER SCANNING DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Briese

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Airborne laser scanning (ALS is a widely used technique for the sampling of the earth's surface. Nowadays a wide range of ALS sensor systems with different technical specifications can be found. One parameter is the laser wavelength which leads to a sensitivity for the wavelength dependent backscatter characteristic of sensed surfaces. Current ALS sensors usually record next to the geometric information additional information on the recorded signal strength of each echo. In order to utilize this information for the study of the backscatter characteristic of the sensed surface, radiometric calibration is essential. This paper focuses on the radiometric calibration of multi-wavelength ALS data and is based on previous work on the topic of radiometric calibration of monochromatic (single-wavelength ALS data. After a short introduction the theory and whole workflow for calibrating ALS data radiometrically based on in-situ reference surfaces is presented. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that this approach for the monochromatic calibration can be used for each channel of multi-wavelength ALS data. The resulting active multi-channel radiometric image does not have any shadows and from a geometric viewpoint the position of the objects on top of the terrain surface is not altered (the result is a multi-channel true orthophoto. Within this paper the approach is demonstrated by three different single-wavelength ALS data acquisition campaigns (532nm, 1064nm and 1550nm covering the area of the city Horn (Austria. The results and practical issues are discussed.

  16. Multi-wavelength Observations of 3FGL J2039.6-5618: A Candidate Redback Millisecond Pulsar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvetti, D.; Mignani, R. P.; De Luca, A.; Delvaux, C.; Pallanca, C.; Belfiore, A.; Marelli, M.; Breeveld, A. A.; Greiner, J.; Becker, W.; Pizzocaro, D.

    2015-12-01

    We present multi-wavelength observations of the unassociated γ-ray source 3FGL J2039.6-5618 detected by the Fermi Large Area Telescope. The source γ-ray properties suggest that it is a pulsar, most likely a millisecond pulsar, for which neither radio nor γ-ray pulsations have been detected. We observed 3FGL J2039.6-5618 with XMM-Newton and discovered several candidate X-ray counterparts within/close to the γ-ray error box. The brightest of these X-ray sources is variable with a period of 0.2245 ± 0.0081 days. Its X-ray spectrum can be described by a power law with photon index ΓX = 1.36 ± 0.09, and hydrogen column density NH star. The light curve profile of the companion star, which has two asymmetric peaks, suggests that the optical emission comes from two regions with different temperatures on its tidally distorted surface. Based upon its X-ray and optical properties, we consider this source as the most likely X-ray counterpart to 3FGL J2039.6-5618, which we propose to be a new redback system.

  17. Multi-wavelength observations of 3FGL J2039.6-5618: a candidate redback millisecond pulsar

    CERN Document Server

    Salvetti, D; De Luca, A; Delvaux, C; Pallanca, C; Belfiore, A; Marelli, M; Breeveld, A A; Greiner, J; Becker, W; Pizzoccaro, D

    2015-01-01

    We present multi-wavelength observations of the unassociated gamma-ray source 3FGL J2039.6-5618 detected by the Fermi Large Area Telescope. The source gamma-ray properties suggest that it is a pulsar, most likely a millisecond pulsar, for which neither radio nor $\\gamma$-ray pulsations have been detected yet. We observed 3FGL J2039.6-5618 with XMM-Newton and discovered several candidate X-ray counterparts within/close to the gamma-ray error box. The brightest of these X-ray sources is variable with a period of 0.2245$\\pm$0.0081 d. Its X-ray spectrum can be described by a power law with photon index $\\Gamma_X =1.36\\pm0.09$, and hydrogen column density $N_{\\rm H} < 4 \\times 10^{20}$ cm$^{-2}$, which gives an unabsorbed 0.3--10 keV X-ray flux of $1.02 \\times 10^{-13}$ erg cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$. Observations with the Gamma-Ray Burst Optical/Near-Infrared Detector (GROND) discovered an optical counterpart to this X-ray source, with a time-average magnitude $g'\\sim 19.5$. The counterpart features a flux modulation ...

  18. Multi-wavelength observations of blazar AO 0235+164 in the 2008-2009 flaring state

    CERN Document Server

    Ackermann, M; Ballet, J; Barbiellini, G; Bastieri, D; Bellazzini, R; Blandford, R D; Bloom, E D; Bonamente, E; Borgland, A W; Bottacini, E; Bregeon, J; Brigida, M; Bruel, P; Buehler, R; Buson, S; Caliandro, G A; Cameron, R A; Caraveo, P A; Casandjian, J M; Cavazzuti, E; Cecchi, C; Charles, E; Chekhtman, A; Chiang, J; Ciprini, S; Claus, R; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Cutini, S; D'Ammando, F; de Palma, F; Dermer, C D; Silva, E do Couto e; Drell, P S; Drlica-Wagner, A; Dubois, R; Favuzzi, C; Fegan, S J; Ferrara, E C; Focke, W B; Fortin, P; Fuhrmann, L; Fukazawa, Y; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Gasparrini, D; Gehrels, N; Germani, S; Giglietto, N; Giommi, P; Giordano, F; Giroletti, M; Glanzman, T; Godfrey, G; Grenier, I A; Guiriec, S; Hadasch, D; Hayashida, M; Hughes, R E; Itoh, R; Johannesson, G; Johnson, A S; Katagiri, H; Kataoka, J; Knodlseder, J; Kuss, M; Lande, J; Larsson, S; Lee, S -H; Longo, F; Loparco, F; Lott, B; Lovellette, M N; Lubrano, P; Madejski, G M; Mazziotta, M N; McEnery, J E; Mehault, J; Michelson, P F; Mitthumsiri, W; Mizuno, T; Monte, C; Monzani, M E; Morselli, A; Moskalenko, I V; Murgia, S; Naumann-Godo, M; Nishino, S; Norris, J P; Nuss, E; Ohsugi, T; Okumura, A; Omodei, N; Orlando, E; Ozaki, M; Paneque, D; Panetta, J H; Pelassa, V; Pesce-Rollins, M; Pierbattista, M; Piron, F; Pivato, G; Porter, T A; Raino, S; Rando, R; Rastawicki, D; Razzano, M; Readhead, A; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Reyes, L C; Richards, J L; Sbarra, C; Sgro, C; Siskind, E J; Spandre, G; Spinelli, P; Szostek, A; Takahashi, H; Tanaka, T; Thayer, J G; Thayer, J B; Thompson, D J; Tinivella, M; Torres, D F; Tosti, G; Troja, E; Usher, T L; Vandenbroucke, J; Vasileiou, V; Vianello, G; Vitale, V; Waite, A P; Winer, B L; Wood, K S; Yang, Z; Zimmer, S; Moderski, R; Nalewajko, K; Sikora, M; Villata, M; Raiteri, C M; Aller, H D; Aller, M F; Arkharov, A A; Benitez, E; Berdyugin, A; Blinov, D A; Boettcher, M; Calle, O J A Bravo; Buemi, C S; Carosati, D; Chen, W P; Diltz, C; Di Paola, A; Dolci, M; Efimova, N V; Forn\\', E; Gurwell, M A; Heidt, J; Hiriart, D; Jordan, B; Kimeridze, G; Konstantinova, T S; Kopatskaya, E N; Koptelova, E; Kurtanidze, O M; Lahteenmaki, A; Larionova, E G; Larionova, L V; Larionov, V M; Leto, P; Lindfors, E; Lin, H C; Morozova, D A; Nikolashvili, M G; Nilsson, K; Oksman, M; Roustazadeh, P; Sievers, A; Sigua, L A; Sillanpaa, A; Takahashi, T; Takalo, L O; Tornikoski, M; Trigilio, C; Troitsky, I S; Umana, G; Angelakis, E; Krichbaum, T P; Nestoras, I; Riquelme, D; Krips, M; Trippe, S; Arai, A; Kawabata, K S; Sakimoto, K; Sasada, M; Sato, S; Uemura, M; Yamanaka, M; Yoshida, M; Belloni, T; Tagliaferri, G; Bonning, E W; Isler, J; Urry, C M; Hoversten, E; Falcone, A; Pagani, C; Stroh, M

    2012-01-01

    The blazar AO 0235+164 (z = 0.94) has been one of the most active objects observed by Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) since its launch in Summer 2008. In addition to the continuous coverage by Fermi, contemporaneous observations were carried out from the radio to {\\gamma} -ray bands between 2008 September and 2009 February. In this paper, we summarize the rich multi-wavelength data collected during the campaign (including F-GAMMA, GASP- WEBT, Kanata, OVRO, RXTE, SMARTS, Swift, and other instruments), examine the cross-correlation between the light curves measured in the different energy bands, and interpret the resulting spectral energy distributions in the context of well-known blazar emission models. We find that the {\\gamma} -ray activity is well correlated with a series of near-IR/optical flares, accompanied by an increase in the optical polarization degree. On the other hand, the X-ray light curve shows a distinct 20 day high state of unusually soft spectrum, which does not match the extrapolation of th...

  19. MULTI-WAVELENGTH OBSERVATIONS OF BLAZAR AO 0235+164 IN THE 2008-2009 FLARING STATE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ackermann, M. [Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron DESY, D-15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Ajello, M.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Borgland, A. W.; Bottacini, E.; Buehler, R.; Cameron, R. A. [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Ballet, J.; Casandjian, J. M. [Laboratoire AIM, CEA-IRFU/CNRS/Universite Paris Diderot, Service d' Astrophysique, CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Barbiellini, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Trieste, I-34127 Trieste (Italy); Bastieri, D.; Buson, S. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Padova, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Bellazzini, R.; Bregeon, J. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Bonamente, E. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Perugia, I-06123 Perugia (Italy); Brigida, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica ' M. Merlin' dell' Universita e del Politecnico di Bari, I-70126 Bari (Italy); Bruel, P. [Laboratoire Leprince-Ringuet, Ecole polytechnique, CNRS/IN2P3, Palaiseau (France); Caliandro, G. A. [Institut de Ciencies de l' Espai (IEEE-CSIC), Campus UAB, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Caraveo, P. A., E-mail: eduardo@slac.stanford.edu, E-mail: madejski@slac.stanford.edu, E-mail: fabio.gargano@ba.infn.it, E-mail: silvia.raino@ba.infn.it, E-mail: lreyes04@calpoly.edu, E-mail: knalew@colorado.edu, E-mail: sikora@camk.edu.pl [INAF-Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica Cosmica, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Collaboration: Fermi-LAT Collaboration; GASP-WEBT consortium; F-GAMMA; Iram-PdBI; Kanata; RXTE; SMARTS; Swift-XRT; and others

    2012-06-01

    The blazar AO 0235+164 (z = 0.94) has been one of the most active objects observed by Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) since its launch in Summer 2008. In addition to the continuous coverage by Fermi, contemporaneous observations were carried out from the radio to {gamma}-ray bands between 2008 September and 2009 February. In this paper, we summarize the rich multi-wavelength data collected during the campaign (including F-GAMMA, GASP-WEBT, Kanata, OVRO, RXTE, SMARTS, Swift, and other instruments), examine the cross-correlation between the light curves measured in the different energy bands, and interpret the resulting spectral energy distributions in the context of well-known blazar emission models. We find that the {gamma}-ray activity is well correlated with a series of near-IR/optical flares, accompanied by an increase in the optical polarization degree. On the other hand, the X-ray light curve shows a distinct 20 day high state of unusually soft spectrum, which does not match the extrapolation of the optical/UV synchrotron spectrum. We tentatively interpret this feature as the bulk Compton emission by cold electrons contained in the jet, which requires an accretion disk corona with an effective covering factor of 19% at a distance of 100 R{sub g}. We model the broadband spectra with a leptonic model with external radiation dominated by the infrared emission from the dusty torus.

  20. MULTI-WAVELENGTH OBSERVATIONS OF BLAZAR AO 0235+164 IN THE 2008-2009 FLARING STATE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The blazar AO 0235+164 (z = 0.94) has been one of the most active objects observed by Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) since its launch in Summer 2008. In addition to the continuous coverage by Fermi, contemporaneous observations were carried out from the radio to γ-ray bands between 2008 September and 2009 February. In this paper, we summarize the rich multi-wavelength data collected during the campaign (including F-GAMMA, GASP-WEBT, Kanata, OVRO, RXTE, SMARTS, Swift, and other instruments), examine the cross-correlation between the light curves measured in the different energy bands, and interpret the resulting spectral energy distributions in the context of well-known blazar emission models. We find that the γ-ray activity is well correlated with a series of near-IR/optical flares, accompanied by an increase in the optical polarization degree. On the other hand, the X-ray light curve shows a distinct 20 day high state of unusually soft spectrum, which does not match the extrapolation of the optical/UV synchrotron spectrum. We tentatively interpret this feature as the bulk Compton emission by cold electrons contained in the jet, which requires an accretion disk corona with an effective covering factor of 19% at a distance of 100 Rg. We model the broadband spectra with a leptonic model with external radiation dominated by the infrared emission from the dusty torus.

  1. A multi-wavelength polarimetric study of the blazar CTA 102 during a Gamma-ray flare in 2012

    CERN Document Server

    Casadio, Carolina; Jorstad, Svetlana G; Marscher, Alan P; Larionov, Valeri M; Smith, Paul S; Gurwell, Mark A; Lähteenmäki, Anne; Agudo, Iván; Molina, Sol N; Bala, Vishal; Joshi, Manasvita; Taylor, Brian; Williamson, Karen E; Arkharov, Arkady A; Blinov, Dmitry A; Borman, George A; Di Paola, Andrea; Grishina, Tatiana S; Hagen-Thorn, Vladimir A; Itoh, Ryosuke; Kopatskaya, Evgenia N; Larionova, Elena G; Larionova, Liudmila V; Morozova, Daria A; Rastorgueva-Foi, Elizaveta; Sergeev, Sergey G; Tornikoski, Merja; Troitsky, Ivan S; Thum, Clemens; Wiesemeyer, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    We perform a multi-wavelength polarimetric study of the quasar CTA 102 during an extraordinarily bright $\\gamma$-ray outburst detected by the {\\it Fermi} Large Area Telescope in September-October 2012 when the source reached a flux of F$_{>100~\\mathrm{MeV}} =5.2\\pm0.4\\times10^{-6}$ photons cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$. At the same time the source displayed an unprecedented optical and NIR outburst. We study the evolution of the parsec scale jet with ultra-high angular resolution through a sequence of 80 total and polarized intensity Very Long Baseline Array images at 43 GHz, covering the observing period from June 2007 to June 2014. We find that the $\\gamma$-ray outburst is coincident with flares at all the other frequencies and is related to the passage of a new superluminal knot through the radio core. The powerful $\\gamma$-ray emission is associated with a change in direction of the jet, which became oriented more closely to our line of sight ($\\theta\\sim$1.2$^{\\circ}$) during the ejection of the knot and the $\\gamm...

  2. First Detection of GeV Emission from an Ultraluminous Infrared Galaxy: Arp 220 as Seen with the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Fang-Kun; Wang, Xiang-Yu; Liu, Ruo-Yu; Tang, Qing-Wen; Wang, Jun-Feng

    2016-04-01

    Cosmic rays (CRs) in starburst galaxies produce high-energy gamma-rays by colliding with the dense interstellar medium. Arp 220 is the nearest ultraluminous infrared galaxy that has star formation at extreme levels, so it has long been predicted to emit high-energy gamma-rays. However, no evidence of gamma-ray emission was found despite intense search efforts. Here we report the discovery of high-energy gamma-ray emission above 200 MeV from Arp 220 at a confidence level of ∼6.3σ using 7.5 years of Fermi Large Area Telescope observations. The gamma-ray emission shows no significant variability over the observation period and it is consistent with the quasi-linear scaling relation between the gamma-ray luminosity and total infrared luminosity for star-forming galaxies, suggesting that these gamma-rays arise from CR interactions. As the high-density medium of Arp 220 makes it an ideal CR calorimeter, the gamma-ray luminosity can be used to measure the efficiency of powering CRs by supernova (SN) remnants given a known supernova rate in Arp 220. We find that this efficiency is about 4.2 ± 2.6% for CRs above 1 GeV.

  3. The angular power spectrum of the diffuse gamma-ray emission as measured by the Fermi Large Area Telescope and constraints on its Dark Matter interpretation

    CERN Document Server

    Fornasa, Mattia; Zavala, Jesus; Gaskins, Jennifer M; Sanchez-Conde, Miguel A; Gomez-Vargas, German; Komatsu, Eiichiro; Linden, Tim; Prada, Francisco; Zandanel, Fabio; Morselli, Aldo

    2016-01-01

    The isotropic gamma-ray background arises from the contribution of unresolved sources, including members of confirmed source classes and proposed gamma-ray emitters such as the radiation induced by dark matter annihilation and decay. Clues about the properties of the contributing sources are imprinted in the anisotropy characteristics of the gamma-ray background. We use 81 months of Pass 7 Reprocessed data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope to perform a measurement of the anisotropy angular power spectrum of the gamma-ray background. We analyze energies between 0.5 and 500 GeV, extending the range considered in the previous measurement based on 22 months of data. We also compute, for the first time, the cross-correlation angular power spectrum between different energy bins. We find that the derived angular spectra are compatible with being Poissonian, i.e. constant in multipole. Moreover, the energy dependence of the anisotropy suggests that the signal is due to two populations of sources, contributing, resp...

  4. DETECTION OF THE ENERGETIC PULSAR PSR B1509-58 AND ITS PULSAR WIND NEBULA IN MSH 15-52 USING THE FERMI-LARGE AREA TELESCOPE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the detection of high-energy γ-ray emission from the young and energetic pulsar PSR B1509 - 58 and its pulsar wind nebula (PWN) in the composite supernova remnant G320.4 - 1.2 (aka MSH 15 - 52). Using 1 yr of survey data with the Fermi-Large Area Telescope (LAT), we detected pulsations from PSR B1509 - 58 up to 1 GeV and extended γ-ray emission above 1 GeV spatially coincident with the PWN. The pulsar light curve presents two peaks offset from the radio peak by phases 0.96 ± 0.01 and 0.33 ± 0.02. New constraining upper limits on the pulsar emission are derived below 1 GeV and confirm a severe spectral break at a few tens of MeV. The nebular spectrum in the 1-100 GeV energy range is well described by a power law with a spectral index of (1.57 ± 0.17 ± 0.13) and a flux above 1 GeV of (2.91 ± 0.79 ± 1.35) x 10-9 cm-2 s-1. The first errors represent the statistical errors on the fit parameters, while the second ones are the systematic uncertainties. The LAT spectrum of the nebula connects nicely with Cherenkov observations, and indicates a spectral break between GeV and TeV energies.

  5. Search for Gamma-ray Emission from Dark Matter Annihilation in the Small Magellanic Cloud with the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Caputo, Regina; Martin, Pierrick; Charles, Eric; Brooks, Alyson M; Drlica-Wagner, Alex; Gaskins, Jennifer M; Wood, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    The Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) is the second-largest satellite galaxy of the Milky Way and is only 60 kpc away. As a nearby, massive, and dense object with relatively low astrophysical backgrounds, it is a natural target for dark matter indirect detection searches. In this work, we use six years of Pass 8 data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope to search for gamma-ray signals of dark matter annihilation in the SMC. Using data-driven fits to the gamma-ray backgrounds, and a combination of N-body simulations and direct measurements of rotation curves to estimate the SMC DM density profile, we found that the SMC was well described by standard astrophysical sources, and no signal from dark matter annihilation was detected. We set conservative upper limits on the dark matter annihilation cross section. These constraints are in agreement with stronger constraints set by searches in the Large Magellanic Cloud and approach the canonical thermal relic cross section at dark matter masses lower than 10 GeV in the $b\\...

  6. The Baikal Neutrino Telescope: Status and plans

    OpenAIRE

    Wischnewski, R; Baikal Collaboration

    2007-01-01

    The high energy neutrino telescope NT200+ is currently in operation in Lake Baikal. We review the status of the Baikal the Baikal Neutrino Telescope, and describe recent progress on key components of the next generation kilometer-cube (km3) Lake Baikal detector, like investigation of new large area phototubes, integrated into the telescope.

  7. Multi-Wavelength Observations of Supernova Remnants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, B.

    2012-01-01

    Supernova remnants (SNRs) provide a laboratory for studying various astrophysical processes, including particle acceleration, thermal and non thermal emission processes across the spectrum, distribution of heavy elements, the physics of strong shock waves, and the progenitor systems and environments of supernovae. Long studied in radio and X-rays, the past decade has seen a dramatic increase in the detection and subsequent study of SNRs in the infrared and gamma-ray regimes. Understanding the evolution of SNRs and their interaction with the interstellar medium requires a multi-wavelength approach. I will review the various physical processes observed in SNRs and how these processes are intertwined. In particular, I will focus on X-ray and infrared observations, which probe two very different but intrinsically connected phases of the ISM: gas and dust. I will discuss results from multi-wavelength studies of several SNRs at various stages of evolution, including Kepler, RCW 86, and the Cygnus Loop.

  8. Status of MUSIC, the MUltiwavelength Sub/millimeter Inductance Camera

    CERN Document Server

    Golwala, Sunil R; Brugger, Spencer; Czakon, Nicole G; Day, Peter K; Downes, Thomas P; Duan, Ran; Gao, Jiansong; Gill, Amandeep K; Glenn, Jason; Hollister, Matthew I; LeDuc, Henry G; Maloney, Philip R; Mazin, Benjamin A; McHugh, Sean G; Miller, David; Noroozian, Omid; Nguyen, Hien T; Sayers, Jack; Schlaerth, James A; Siegel, Seth; Vayonakis, Anastasios K; Wilson, Philip R; Zmuidzinas, Jonas

    2012-01-01

    We present the status of MUSIC, the MUltiwavelength Sub/millimeter Inductance Camera, a new instrument for the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory. MUSIC is designed to have a 14', diffraction-limited field-of-view instrumented with 2304 detectors in 576 spatial pixels and four spectral bands at 0.87, 1.04, 1.33, and 1.98 mm. MUSIC will be used to study dusty star-forming galaxies, galaxy clusters via the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect, and star formation in our own and nearby galaxies. MUSIC uses broadband superconducting phased-array slot-dipole antennas to form beams, lumped-element on-chip bandpass filters to define spectral bands, and microwave kinetic inductance detectors to senseincoming light. The focal plane is fabricated in 8 tiles consisting of 72 spatial pixels each. It is coupled to the telescope via an ambient temperature ellipsoidal mirror and a cold reimaging lens. A cold Lyot stop sits at the image of the primary mirror formed by the ellipsoidal mirror. Dielectric and metal mesh filters are used to b...

  9. A Multiwavelength Study of the Orion-Eridanus Superbubble.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhiyu

    1995-01-01

    A multiwavelength study of the Orion-Eridanus superbubble has been carried out based on the ROSAT PSPC pointed observation data, IRAS 100 μm data, the 21 cm data obtained with NRAO 140-foot telescope at Green Bank and the inter-stellar Na D data obtained with NOAO Coude Feed telescope. The temperature and the N_{rm H} distribution across the superbubble have been obtained from the X-ray data analysis. It is found that the temperature and N _{rm H} distribution obtained from the best fit are consistent with the morphology difference between the 1over 4 keV and the 3over 4 keV X-ray emission results from the absorption by the intervening gas. Distance limits to the boundary of the Local Bubble and to the near and far sides of the shell associated with the Orion-Eridanus bubble have been estimated based on our 21 cm mapping of the X-ray absorbing clouds and our interstellar Na D absorption line observations toward stars in the 21 cm fields. It is found that the distance to the near side of the Orion -Eridanus bubble is 155 +/- 22 pc in the direction (1,b) ~ (203 ^circ, -40^circ ) and the upper distance limit to the far side of the bubble is 586 pc in the same direction. The observed geometry and kinematics of the Orion-Eridanus feature have been compared with the standard wind-blown bubble theory. It is found that the Orion-Eridanus feature can be explained as a stellar wind superbubble associated with the Orion OB1 association. The evolution and dynamics of the Orion -Eridanus superbubble have also been discussed and it is found that the interstellar pressures from cosmic rays and interstellar magnetic fields play important roles in determining whether the Orion-Eridanus superbubble will blow out the entire galactic H scI disk.

  10. Multiwavelength Astronomy Modules for High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Christie; Brazas, J.; Lane, S.; York, D. G.

    2014-01-01

    The University of Chicago Multiwavelength Astronomy modules are web-based lessons covering the history, science, tools, and impact of astronomy across the wavebands, from gamma ray to infrared. Each waveband includes four lessons addressing one aspect of its development. The lessons are narrated by a historical docent or practicing scientist who contributed to a scientific discovery or instrument design significant to astronomical progress. The process of building each lesson began with an interview conducted with the scientist, or the consultation of a memoir or oral history transcript for historical docents. The source was then excerpted to develop a lesson and supplemented by archival material from the University of Chicago Library and other archives; NASA media; and participant contributed photographs, light curves, and spectra. Practicing educators also participated in the lesson development and evaluation. In July 2013, the University of Chicago sponsored 9 teachers and 15 students to participate in a STEM education program designed to engage participants as co-learners as they used the Multiwavelength Astronomy lessons in conjunction with talks given by the participating scientists. Teachers also practiced implementation of the resources with students and designed authentic research activities that make use of NASA mission data, which were undertaken as mini-research projects by student teams during the course of the program. This poster will introduce the Multiwavelength Astronomy web modules; highlight educator experiences in their use with high school audiences; and analyze the module development process, framing the benefits to and contributions of each of the stakeholders including practicing astronomers in research and space centers, high school science educators, high school students, University libraries and archives, and the NASA Science Mission Directorate. The development of these resources, and the summer professional development workshops were

  11. Multi-Wavelength Study of Segue 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Joanne D.; Schiefelbein, Spencer; Le, Donna; Corrin, Olivia; Joudi, Hanah; Lacy, Brianna I.

    2016-06-01

    Segue 3 is a very faint and distant star cluster, first identfied as being [Fe/H]=-1.7 dex, but later reclassified as [Fe/H]=-0.8. We study the stellar population in Washington and SDSS filters, adding to VI-photometry in the literature. We show the importance of multi-wavelength coverage, careful filter-selection, and use of the sub-giant and lower red-giant branch populations, to break the age-metallicity degeneracy.

  12. High-energy gamma-ray emission from solar flares: Summary of Fermi large area telescope detections and analysis of two M-class flares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ackermann, M. [Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron DESY, D-15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Ajello, M. [Space Sciences Laboratory, 7 Gauss Way, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-7450 (United States); Albert, A. [Department of Physics, Center for Cosmology and Astro-Particle Physics, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Allafort, A.; Bechtol, K.; Bottacini, E.; Buehler, R. [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Baldini, L. [Università di Pisa and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Barbiellini, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Trieste, I-34127 Trieste (Italy); Bastieri, D.; Buson, S. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Padova, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Bellazzini, R.; Bregeon, J. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Bissaldi, E. [Institut für Astro- und Teilchenphysik and Institut für Theoretische Physik, Leopold-Franzens-Universität Innsbruck, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Bonamente, E. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Perugia, I-06123 Perugia (Italy); Bouvier, A. [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics, Department of Physics and Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California at Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Brandt, T. J. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Brigida, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica " M. Merlin" dell' Università e del Politecnico di Bari, I-70126 Bari (Italy); Bruel, P. [Laboratoire Leprince-Ringuet, École polytechnique, CNRS/IN2P3, F-91128 Palaiseau (France); Caliandro, G. A., E-mail: allafort@stanford.edu, E-mail: nicola.omodei@stanford.edu [Institut de Ciències de l' Espai (IEEE-CSIC), Campus UAB, E-08193 Barcelona (Spain); and others

    2014-05-20

    We present the detections of 18 solar flares detected in high-energy γ-rays (above 100 MeV) with the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) during its first 4 yr of operation. This work suggests that particle acceleration up to very high energies in solar flares is more common than previously thought, occurring even in modest flares, and for longer durations. Interestingly, all these flares are associated with fairly fast coronal mass ejections (CMEs). We then describe the detailed temporal, spatial, and spectral characteristics of the first two long-lasting events: the 2011 March 7 flare, a moderate (M3.7) impulsive flare followed by slowly varying γ-ray emission over 13 hr, and the 2011 June 7 M2.5 flare, which was followed by γ-ray emission lasting for 2 hr. We compare the Fermi LAT data with X-ray and proton data measurements from GOES and RHESSI. We argue that the γ-rays are more likely produced through pion decay than electron bremsstrahlung, and we find that the energy spectrum of the proton distribution softens during the extended emission of the 2011 March 7 flare. This would disfavor a trapping scenario for particles accelerated during the impulsive phase of the flare and point to a continuous acceleration process at play for the duration of the flares. CME shocks are known for accelerating the solar energetic particles (SEPs) observed in situ on similar timescales, but it might be challenging to explain the production of γ-rays at the surface of the Sun while the CME is halfway to the Earth. A stochastic turbulence acceleration process occurring in the solar corona is another likely scenario. Detailed comparison of characteristics of SEPs and γ-ray-emitting particles for several flares will be helpful to distinguish between these two possibilities.

  13. High-energy gamma-ray emission from solar flares: Summary of Fermi large area telescope detections and analysis of two M-class flares

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the detections of 18 solar flares detected in high-energy γ-rays (above 100 MeV) with the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) during its first 4 yr of operation. This work suggests that particle acceleration up to very high energies in solar flares is more common than previously thought, occurring even in modest flares, and for longer durations. Interestingly, all these flares are associated with fairly fast coronal mass ejections (CMEs). We then describe the detailed temporal, spatial, and spectral characteristics of the first two long-lasting events: the 2011 March 7 flare, a moderate (M3.7) impulsive flare followed by slowly varying γ-ray emission over 13 hr, and the 2011 June 7 M2.5 flare, which was followed by γ-ray emission lasting for 2 hr. We compare the Fermi LAT data with X-ray and proton data measurements from GOES and RHESSI. We argue that the γ-rays are more likely produced through pion decay than electron bremsstrahlung, and we find that the energy spectrum of the proton distribution softens during the extended emission of the 2011 March 7 flare. This would disfavor a trapping scenario for particles accelerated during the impulsive phase of the flare and point to a continuous acceleration process at play for the duration of the flares. CME shocks are known for accelerating the solar energetic particles (SEPs) observed in situ on similar timescales, but it might be challenging to explain the production of γ-rays at the surface of the Sun while the CME is halfway to the Earth. A stochastic turbulence acceleration process occurring in the solar corona is another likely scenario. Detailed comparison of characteristics of SEPs and γ-ray-emitting particles for several flares will be helpful to distinguish between these two possibilities.

  14. Spacing-adjustable and wavelength-tunable multiwavelength fibre laser with nonlinear Brillouin gain and birefringence fibre loop mirror

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper demonstrates a room-temperature multiwavelength fibre laser with spacing-adjustability and wavelength-tunability. The nonlinear gain of self-excited stimulated Brillouin scattering can suppress mode competition induced by homogeneous broadening of Erbium-doped fibre. With the use of a birefringence fibre loop filter, the wavelength spacing can be adjusted by changing the length of the used birefringence fibre, and the lasing wavelengths can be finely tuned through modifying the filtering profile of the birefringence filter. Multiwavelength output with spectral spacing as small as 0.076 nm and a wavelength number of more than 80 has been successfully produced. (classical areas of phenomenology)

  15. Multi-zone temperature sensor using a multi-wavelength Brillouin fiber ring laser

    OpenAIRE

    Galíndez Jamioy, Carlos Augusto; Madruga Saavedra, Francisco Javier; Ullán Nieto, Ángel; López Amo, Manuel; López Higuera, José Miguel

    2009-01-01

    A simple system for sensing temperature in multiple zones based on a multi-wavelength Brillouin fiber laser ring is presented. Optical fiber reels are serially concatenated and divided in zones (one per sensing area). Setting the Brillouin lasing in each spool of fiber generates a characteristic wavelength that depends on the fiber properties and the temperature in the zone. Thus, it is possible to measure temperature independently and accurately through heterodyne detection between two narro...

  16. Advanced Fabrication of Single-Mode and Multi-Wavelength MIR-QCLs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin J. Süess

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In this article we present our latest work on the optimization of mid-infrared quantum cascade laser fabrication techniques. Our efforts are focused on low dissipation devices, broad-area high-power photonic crystal lasers, as well as multi-wavelength devices realized either as arrays or multi-section distributed feedback (DFB devices. We summarize our latest achievements and update them with our most recent results.

  17. The Cosmic-Ray and Gas Content of the Cygnus Region as Measured in Gamma Rays by the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Allafort, A.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Belfiore, A.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A. W.; Bottacini, E.; Bregeon, J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Harding, A. K.; Hays, E.; Thompson, D. J.; Troja, E.

    2011-01-01

    Context. The Cygnus region hosts a giant molecular-cloud complex which actively forms massive stars. Interactions of cosmic rays with interstellar gas and radiation fields make it shine at y-ray energies. Several gamma-ray pulsars and other energetic sources are seen in this direction. Aims. In this paper we analyse the gamma-ray emission measured by the Fermi Large Area Telescope in the energy range from 100 Me V to 100 Ge V in order to probe the gas and cosmic-ray content over the scale of the whole Cygnus complex. The gamma-ray emission on the scale of the central massive stellar clusters and from individual sources is addressed elsewhere. Methods. The signal from bright pulsars is largely reduced by selecting photons in their off-pulse phase intervals. We compare the diffuse gamma-ray emission with interstellar gas maps derived from radio/mm-wave lines and visual extinction data. and a global model of the region, including other pulsars and gamma-ray sources, is sought. Results. The integral H I emissivity above 100 MeV averaged over the whole Cygnus complex amounts to 12.06 +/- 0.11 (stat.) (+0.15 -0.84) (syst.J] x 10(exp -26) photons /s / sr / H-atom, where the systematic error is dominated by the uncertainty on the H I opacity to calculate its column densities. The integral emissivity and its spectral energy distribution are both consistent within the systematics with LAT measurements in the interstellar space near the solar system. The average X(sub co) N(H2)/W(sub co) ratio is found to be [1.68 +/- 0.05 (stat.) (H I opacity)] x 1020 molecules cm-2 (K km/s /r, consistent with other LAT measurements in the Local Arm. We detect significant gamma-ray emission from dark neutral gas for a mass corresponding to approx 40% of that traced by CO. The total interstellar mass in the Cygnus complex inferred from its gamma-ray emission amounts to 8(+5 -1) x 10(exp 6) Solar M at a distance of 1.4 kpc. Conclusions. Despite the conspicuous star formation activity and large

  18. The upgraded MAGIC Cherenkov telescopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tescaro, D., E-mail: dtescaro@iac.es [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC), E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Universidad de La Laguna (ULL), Dept. Astrofísica, E-38206 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain)

    2014-12-01

    The MAGIC Cherenkov telescopes underwent a major upgrade in 2011 and 2012. A new 1039-pixel camera and a larger area digital trigger system were installed in MAGIC-I, making it essentially identical to the newer MAGIC-II telescope. The readout systems of both telescopes were also upgraded, with fully programmable receiver boards and DRS4-chip-based digitization systems. The upgrade eased the operation and maintenance of the telescopes and also improved significantly their performance. The system has now an integral sensitivity as good as 0.6% of the Crab Nebula flux (for E>400GeV), with an effective analysis threshold at 70 GeV. This allows MAGIC to secure one of the leading roles among the current major ground-based Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes for the next 5–10 years. - Highlights: • In 2011 and 2012 the MAGIC telescopes underwent a two-stage major upgrade. • The new camera of MAGIC-I allows us to exploit a 1.4 larger trigger area. • The novel DRS4-based readout systems allow a cost-effective ultra-fast digitization. • The upgrade greatly improved the maintainability of the system. • MAGIC has now an optimal integral sensitivity of 0.6% of the Crab Nebula flux.

  19. The upgraded MAGIC Cherenkov telescopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The MAGIC Cherenkov telescopes underwent a major upgrade in 2011 and 2012. A new 1039-pixel camera and a larger area digital trigger system were installed in MAGIC-I, making it essentially identical to the newer MAGIC-II telescope. The readout systems of both telescopes were also upgraded, with fully programmable receiver boards and DRS4-chip-based digitization systems. The upgrade eased the operation and maintenance of the telescopes and also improved significantly their performance. The system has now an integral sensitivity as good as 0.6% of the Crab Nebula flux (for E>400GeV), with an effective analysis threshold at 70 GeV. This allows MAGIC to secure one of the leading roles among the current major ground-based Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes for the next 5–10 years. - Highlights: • In 2011 and 2012 the MAGIC telescopes underwent a two-stage major upgrade. • The new camera of MAGIC-I allows us to exploit a 1.4 larger trigger area. • The novel DRS4-based readout systems allow a cost-effective ultra-fast digitization. • The upgrade greatly improved the maintainability of the system. • MAGIC has now an optimal integral sensitivity of 0.6% of the Crab Nebula flux

  20. Using a multiwavelength LiDAR for improved remote sensing of natural waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Deric J; Anderson, John; Nelson, Jean; Edwards, Jarrod

    2015-11-01

    This paper describes research to characterize the benefits of a multiwavelength oceanographic LiDAR for various water types. Field measurements were conducted to establish endmembers representative of both typical and extremely challenging natural conditions. Laboratory tests were performed using a prototype multiwavelength LiDAR in water tanks with optical conditions simulating both sediment-laden and biologically rich water types. LiDAR models were used to simulate the LiDAR signal from both field and laboratory experiments. Our measurements and models show that using a laser wavelength of 470-490 nm in the open ocean leads to an improvement factor of 1.50-1.75 compared to a 532 nm system. In more turbid areas using a laser wavelength of 560-580 nm leads to an improvement factor of 1.25. We conclude by demonstrating how using multiple LiDAR wavelengths can help detect and characterize constituents in the water column. PMID:26560612

  1. Status of MUSIC, the MUltiwavelength Sub/millimeter Inductance Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golwala, Sunil R.; Bockstiegel, Clint; Brugger, Spencer; Czakon, Nicole G.; Day, Peter K.; Downes, Thomas P.; Duan, Ran; Gao, Jiansong; Gill, Amandeep K.; Glenn, Jason; Hollister, Matthew I.; LeDuc, Henry G.; Maloney, Philip R.; Mazin, Benjamin A.; McHugh, Sean G.; Miller, David; Noroozian, Omid; Nguyen, Hien T.; Sayers, Jack; Schlaerth, James A.; Siegel, Seth; Vayonakis, Anastasios K.; Wilson, Philip R.; Zmuidzinas, Jonas

    2012-09-01

    We present the status of MUSIC, the MUltiwavelength Sub/millimeter Inductance Camera, a new instrument for the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory. MUSIC is designed to have a 14', diffraction-limited field-of-view instrumented with 2304 detectors in 576 spatial pixels and four spectral bands at 0.87, 1.04, 1.33, and 1.98 mm. MUSIC will be used to study dusty star-forming galaxies, galaxy clusters via the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect, and star formation in our own and nearby galaxies. MUSIC uses broadband superconducting phased-array slot-dipole antennas to form beams, lumpedelement on-chip bandpass filters to define spectral bands, and microwave kinetic inductance detectors to sense incoming light. The focal plane is fabricated in 8 tiles consisting of 72 spatial pixels each. It is coupled to the telescope via an ambient-temperature ellipsoidal mirror and a cold reimaging lens. A cold Lyot stop sits at the image of the primary mirror formed by the ellipsoidal mirror. Dielectric and metal-mesh filters are used to block thermal infrared and out-ofband radiation. The instrument uses a pulse tube cooler and 3He/ 3He/4He closed-cycle cooler to cool the focal plane to below 250 mK. A multilayer shield attenuates Earth's magnetic field. Each focal plane tile is read out by a single pair of coaxes and a HEMT amplifier. The readout system consists of 16 copies of custom-designed ADC/DAC and IF boards coupled to the CASPER ROACH platform. We focus on recent updates on the instrument design and results from the commissioning of the full camera in 2012.

  2. The small size telescope projects for the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2015-01-01

    The small size telescopes (SSTs), spread over an area of several square km, dominate the CTA sensitivity in the photon energy range from a few TeV to over 100 TeV, enabling for the detailed exploration of the very high energy gamma-ray sky. The proposed telescopes are innovative designs providing a wide field of view. Two of them, the ASTRI (Astrophysics con Specchi a Tecnologia Replicante Italiana) and the GCT (Gamma-ray Cherenkov Telescope) telescopes, are based on dual mirror Schwarzschild-Couder optics, with primary mirror diameters of 4 m. The third, SST-1M, is a Davies-Cotton design with a 4 m diameter mirror. Progress with the construction and testing of prototypes of these telescopes is presented. The SST cameras use silicon photomultipliers, with preamplifier and readout/trigger electronics designed to optimize the performance of these sensors for (atmospheric) Cherenkov light. The status of the camera developments is discussed. The SST sub-array will consist of about 70 telescopes at the CTA souther...

  3. Magnetic reconnection signatures in the solar atmosphere: results from multi-wavelength observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuccarello, F.; Guglielmino, S. L.; Romano, P.

    In the solar atmosphere magnetic reconnection is invoked as the main mechanism causing very energetic events (1028 - 1032 erg), like flares and coronal mass ejections, as well as other less energetic phenomena, like microflares, X-ray jets and chromospheric surges. In the last decade, thanks to high spatial resolution, multi-wavelength observations carried out by both ground-based telescopes (THEMIS, SST, VTT, DST) and space-born satellites (SOHO, TRACE, RHESSI, HINODE), it has been possible to study these phenomena and several signatures of the occurrence of magnetic reconnection have been singled out. In this paper, we describe some results obtained from the analysis of multi-wavelength observations carried out in the last years, with special emphasis on those events that were characterized by plasma outflows from the reconnection site. The events here discussed are relevant to some active regions observed on the Sun, characterized by the interaction of different bundles of magnetic flux tubes, as a consequence of phenomena of emergence of new magnetic flux from the subphotospheric layers and/or of cancellation of magnetic fragments. We report on these phenomena in order to give a contribution to the possibility to find a similarity with jets observed in AGNs.

  4. Multiwavelength Observations of 1ES 1959+650, One Year After the Strong Outburst of 2002

    CERN Document Server

    Gutíerrez, K; Bradbury, S M; Buckley, J H; Celik, O; Chow, Y C; Cogan, P; Cui, W; Daniel, M; Falcone, A; Fegan, S J; Finley, J P; Gillanders, G H; Grube, J; Holder, J; Horan, D; Hughes, S B; Jung, I; Kieda, D; Kosack, K; Krawczynski, H; Krennrich, F; Lang, M J; Le Bohec, S; Maier, G; Moriarty, P; Perkins, J; Pohl, M; Quinn, J; Rebillot, P F; Rose, H J; Schroedter, M; Sembroski, G H; Wakely, S P; Weekes, T C; White, R J

    2006-01-01

    In April-May 2003, the blazar 1ES 1959+650 showed an increased level of X-ray activity. This prompted a multiwavelength observation campaign with the Whipple 10 m gamma-ray telescope, the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer, the Bordeaux Optical Observatory, and the University of Michigan Radio Astrophysical Observatory. We present the multiwavelength data taken from May 2, 2003 to June 7, 2003 and compare the source characteristics with those measured during observations taken during the years 2000 and 2002. The X-ray observations gave a data set with high signal-to-noise light curves and energy spectra; however, the gamma-ray observations did not reveal a major TeV gamma-ray flare. Furthermore, we find that the radio and optical fluxes do not show statistically significant deviations from those measured during the 2002 flaring periods. While the X-ray flux and X-ray photon index appear correlated during subsequent observations, the apparent correlation evolved significantly between the years 2000, 2002, and 2003. W...

  5. VERITAS and Multiwavelength Observations of the BL Lacertae Object 1ES 1741+196

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abeysekara, A. U.; Archambault, S.; Archer, A.; Benbow, W.; Bird, R.; Biteau, J.; Buchovecky, M.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Byrum, K.; Cardenzana, J. V.; Cerruti, M.; Chen, X.; Christiansen, J. L.; Ciupik, L.; Connolly, M. P.; Cui, W.; Dickinson, H. J.; Dumm, J.; Eisch, J. D.; Errando, M.; Falcone, A.; Feng, Q.; Finley, J. P.; Fleischhack, H.; Flinders, A.; Fortin, P.; Fortson, L.; Furniss, A.; Gillanders, G. H.; Griffin, S.; Grube, J.; Gyuk, G.; Huetten, M.; Hanna, D.; Holder, J.; Humensky, T. B.; Johnson, C. A.; Kaaret, P.; Kar, P.; Kelley-Hoskins, N.; Kertzman, M.; Kieda, D.; Krause, M.; Krennrich, F.; Lang, M. J.; Maier, G.; McArthur, S.; McCann, A.; Meagher, K.; Moriarty, P.; Mukherjee, R.; Nieto, D.; O'Brien, S.; de Bhróithe, A. O'Faoláin; Ong, R. A.; Otte, A. N.; Park, N.; Pelassa, V.; Petrashyk, A.; Petry, D.; Pohl, M.; Popkow, A.; Pueschel, E.; Quinn, J.; Ragan, K.; Ratliff, G.; Reyes, L. C.; Reynolds, P. T.; Reynolds, K.; Richards, G. T.; Roache, E.; Rulten, C.; Santander, M.; Sembroski, G. H.; Shahinyan, K.; Smith, A. W.; Staszak, D.; Telezhinsky, I.; Tucci, J. V.; Tyler, J.; Vincent, S.; Wakely, S. P.; Weiner, O. M.; Weinstein, A.; Wilhelm, A.; Williams, D. A.; Zitzer, B.

    2016-04-01

    We present results from multiwavelength observations of the BL Lacertae object 1ES 1741+196, including results in the very-high-energy γ-ray regime using the Very Energetic Radiation Imaging Telescope Array System (VERITAS). The VERITAS time-averaged spectrum, measured above 180 GeV, is well-modelled by a power law with a spectral index of 2.7 ± 0.7stat ± 0.2syst. The integral flux above 180 GeV is (3.9 ± 0.8stat ± 1.0syst) × 10-8 m-2 s-1, corresponding to 1.6% of the Crab Nebula flux on average. The multiwavelength spectral energy distribution of the source suggests that 1ES 1741+196 is an extreme-high-frequency-peaked BL Lacertae object. The observations analysed in this paper extend over a period of six years, during which time no strong flares were observed in any band. This analysis is therefore one of the few characterizations of a blazar in a non-flaring state.

  6. VERITAS and Multiwavelength Observations of the BL Lacertae Object 1ES 1741+196

    CERN Document Server

    Abeysekara, A U; Archer, A; Benbow, W; Bird, R; Biteau, J; Buchovecky, M; Buckley, J H; Bugaev, V; Byrum, K; Cardenzana, J V; Cerruti, M; Chen, X; Christiansen, J L; Ciupik, L; Connolly, M P; Cui, W; Dickinson, H J; Dumm, J; Eisch, J D; Errando, M; Falcone, A; Feng, Q; Finley, J P; Fleischhack, H; Flinders, A; Fortin, P; Fortson, L; Furniss, A; Gillanders, G H; Griffin, S; Grube, J; Gyuk, G; Hütten, M; Hanna, D; Holder, J; Humensky, T B; Johnson, C A; Kaaret, P; Kar, P; Kelley-Hoskins, N; Kertzman, M; Kieda, D; Krause, M; Krennrich, F; Kumar, S; Lang, M J; Maier, G; McArthur, S; McCann, A; Meagher, K; Moriarty, P; Mukherjee, R; Nieto, D; O'Brien, S; de Bhróithe, A O'Faoláin; Ong, R A; Otte, A N; Park, N; Pelassa, V; Petrashyk, A; Pohl, M; Popkow, A; Pueschel, E; Quinn, J; Ragan, K; Ratliff, G; Reyes, L C; Reynolds, P T; Richards, G T; Roache, E; Rulten, C; Santander, M; Sembroski, G H; Shahinyan, K; Smith, A W; Staszak, D; Telezhinsky, I; Tucci, J V; Tyler, J; Vincent, S; Wakely, S P; Weiner, O M; Weinstein, A; Wilhelm, A; Williams, D A; Zitzer, B

    2016-01-01

    We present results from multiwavelength observations of the BL Lacertae object 1ES 1741+196, including results in the very-high-energy $\\gamma$-ray regime using the Very Energetic Radiation Imaging Telescope Array System (VERITAS). The VERITAS time-averaged spectrum, measured above 180 GeV, is well-modelled by a power law with a spectral index of $2.7\\pm0.7_{\\mathrm{stat}}\\pm0.2_{\\mathrm{syst}}$. The integral flux above 180 GeV is $(3.9\\pm0.8_{\\mathrm{stat}}\\pm1.0_{\\mathrm{syst}})\\times 10^{-8}$ m$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$, corresponding to 1.6% of the Crab Nebula flux on average. The multiwavelength spectral energy distribution of the source suggests that 1ES 1741+196 is an extreme-high-frequency-peaked BL Lacertae object. The observations analysed in this paper extend over a period of six years, during which time no strong flares were observed in any band. This analysis is therefore one of the few characterizations of a blazar in a non-flaring state.

  7. Blazar Observations with the MAGIC Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneiske, T. M.; Mannheim, K.

    The MAGIC Telescope will be able to detect gamma gay sources down to energies of 30GeV. Therefore a large number of sources will be seen, especially blazars. 30 GeV is also the upper energy limit of EGRET. Therefore it is possible to extrapolate a spectrum of an EGRET source without a complicated model. We make first predictions about the detectability of EGRET blazars calculating the minimum observation time for the MAGIC Telescope. Blazars are often located at high redshifts and their spectra should show some cut-offs at high energies due to pair production processes with low energy background photons. We developed a background radiation model using recent results of optical to infrared data and included this absorption effect in our calculation about the observability. We found that the shape of the spectrum and the intergalactic absorption does not make a big difference for a simple detection of the source. The observation time is only dependent on the flux near the energy threshold of the telescope (30 GeV) and the zenith angle of the blazar. The results are showing that MAGIC will be able to detect more than 50% of the EGRET sources even at high redshift and therefore it will be a good tool for multi-wavelength campaigns.

  8. The Swift X-Ray telescope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Explorer is designed to make prompt multiwavelength observations of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) and their afterglows. The X-ray Telescope (XRT) provides key capabilities that permit Swift to determine GRB positions with several arcsecond accuracy within 100 seconds of the burst onset. We present an overview of the XRT and its capabilities. The XRT is designed to observe GRB afterglows covering 7 orders of magnitude in flux in the 0.2-10 keV band, with completely autonomous operation. Accurate GRB positions are determined within seconds of target acquisition and are sent to the ground for distribution over the GCN. The XRT can also measure redshifts of GRBs if they have Fe line emission or other spectral features

  9. Multiwavelength Emission from Blazars – Conference Summary

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Meg Urry

    2011-03-01

    Presentations at the Guangzhou Conference on Multiwave-length Emission from Blazars confirmed our understanding of blazars as relativistic jets closely aligned with the line of sight. Powerful new studies have been enabled by the Fermi gamma-ray satellite and new ground-based TeV facilities, which are an order of magnitude more sensitive than their predecessors. Combining gamma-ray data with VLBA radio and with optical/IR photometry has shed new light on the emission mechanisms and the jet geometry. This conference summary sets the context for the 4th blazar conference and presents some of the highlights from the meeting, as well as the questions that remain outstanding.

  10. Multiwavelength Observations of Mrk 501 in 2008

    CERN Document Server

    Kranich, D; Cesarini, A; Falcone, A; Giroletti, M; Hoversten, E; Hovatta, T; Kovalev, Y Y; Lahteenmaki, A; Nieppola, E; Pagani, C; Pichel, A; Satalecka, K; Scargle, J; Steele, D; Tavecchio, F; Tescaro, D; Tornikoski, M; Villata, M

    2009-01-01

    The well-studied VHE (E >100 GeV) blazar Mrk 501 was observed between March and May 2008 as part of an extensive multiwavelength observation campaign including radio, optical, X-ray and VHE gamma-ray instruments. Mrk 501 was in a low state of activity during the campaign, with a low VHE flux of about 20% the Crab Nebula flux. Nevertheless, significant flux variations could be observed in X-rays as well as $\\gamma$-rays. Overall Mrk 501 showed increased variability when going from radio to gamma-ray energies. The broadband spectral energy distribution during the two different emission states of the campaign was well described by a homogeneous one-zone synchrotron self-Compton model. The high emission state was satisfactorily modeled by increasing the amount of high energy electrons with respect to the low emission state. This parameterization is consistent with the energy-dependent variability trend observed during the campaign.

  11. Taiwan Automated Telescope Network

    OpenAIRE

    Shuhrat Ehgamberdiev; Alexander Serebryanskiy; Antonio Jimenez; Li-Han Wang; Ming-Tsung Sun; Javier Fernandez Fernandez; Dean-Yi Chou

    2010-01-01

    A global network of small automated telescopes, the Taiwan Automated Telescope (TAT) network, dedicated to photometric measurements of stellar pulsations, is under construction. Two telescopes have been installed in Teide Observatory, Tenerife, Spain and Maidanak Observatory, Uzbekistan. The third telescope will be installed at Mauna Loa Observatory, Hawaii, USA. Each system uses a 9-cm Maksutov-type telescope. The effective focal length is 225 cm, corresponding to an f-ratio of 25. The field...

  12. Mid- and far-infrared luminosity functions and galaxy evolution from multiwavelength Spitzer observations up to z ~ 2.5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodighiero, G.; Vaccari, M.; Franceschini, A.; Tresse, L.; Le Fevre, O.; Le Brun, V.; Mancini, C.; Matute, I.; Cimatti, A.; Marchetti, L.; Ilbert, O.; Arnouts, S.; Bolzonella, M.; Zucca, E.; Bardelli, S.; Lonsdale, C. J.; Shupe, D.; Surace, J.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Garilli, B.; Zamorani, G.; Pozzetti, L.; Bondi, M.; de la Torre, S.; Vergani, D.; Santini, P.; Grazian, A.; Fontana, A.

    2010-06-01

    Context. Studies of the infrared (IR) emission of cosmic sources have proven essential to constraining the evolutionary history of cosmic star formation and the gravitational accretion of nuclear black holes, because many of these events occur inside heavily dust-extinguished environments. Aims: The Spitzer Space Telescope has provided a large amount of data to constrain the nature and cosmological evolution of infrared source populations. In the present paper we exploit a large homogeneous dataset to derive a self-consistent picture of IR emission based on the time-dependent λ_eff = 24, 15, 12, and 8 μm monochromatic and bolometric IR luminosity functions (LF) over the full 0 1.5. Based on the multiwavelength information available in these areas, we constrain the LFs at 8, 12, 15, and 24 μm. We also infer the total IR luminosities from our best-fit model of the observed SEDs of each source, and use this to derive the bolometric (8-1000 μm) LF and comoving volume emissivity to z ~ 2.5. Results: In the redshift interval 0 1. The mean redshift of the peak in the source number density shifts with luminosity: the brightest IR galaxies appear to form stars at earlier cosmic times (z > 1.5), while star formation in the less luminous galaxies continues until more recent epochs (z ~ 1 for LIR 1. We also appear to measure a difference in the evolutionary rate of the source number densities as a function of luminosity, which is consistent with the downsizing evolutionary patterns reported for other samples of cosmic sources.

  13. A Multi-wavelength Polarimetric Study of the Blazar CTA 102 during a Gamma-Ray Flare in 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casadio, Carolina; Gómez, José L.; Jorstad, Svetlana G.; Marscher, Alan P.; Larionov, Valeri M.; Smith, Paul S.; Gurwell, Mark A.; Lähteenmäki, Anne; Agudo, Iván; Molina, Sol N.; Bala, Vishal; Joshi, Manasvita; Taylor, Brian; Williamson, Karen E.; Arkharov, Arkady A.; Blinov, Dmitry A.; Borman, George A.; Di Paola, Andrea; Grishina, Tatiana S.; Hagen-Thorn, Vladimir A.; Itoh, Ryosuke; Kopatskaya, Evgenia N.; Larionova, Elena G.; Larionova, Liudmila V.; Morozova, Daria A.; Rastorgueva-Foi, Elizaveta; Sergeev, Sergey G.; Tornikoski, Merja; Troitsky, Ivan S.; Thum, Clemens; Wiesemeyer, Helmut

    2015-11-01

    We perform a multi-wavelength polarimetric study of the quasar CTA 102 during an extraordinarily bright γ-ray outburst detected by the Fermi Large Area Telescope in 2012 September-October when the source reached a flux of F>100 MeV = 5.2 ± 0.4 × 10-6 photons cm-2 s-1. At the same time, the source displayed an unprecedented optical and near-infrared (near-IR) outburst. We study the evolution of the parsec-scale jet with ultra-high angular resolution through a sequence of 80 total and polarized intensity Very Long Baseline Array images at 43 GHz, covering the observing period from 2007 June to 2014 June. We find that the γ-ray outburst is coincident with flares at all the other frequencies and is related to the passage of a new superluminal knot through the radio core. The powerful γ-ray emission is associated with a change in direction of the jet, which became oriented more closely to our line of sight (θ ˜ 1.°2) during the ejection of the knot and the γ-ray outburst. During the flare, the optical polarized emission displays intra-day variability and a clear clockwise rotation of electric vector position angles (EVPAs), which we associate with the path followed by the knot as it moves along helical magnetic field lines, although a random walk of the EVPA caused by a turbulent magnetic field cannot be ruled out. We locate the γ-ray outburst a short distance downstream of the radio core, parsecs from the black hole. This suggests that synchrotron self-Compton scattering of NIR to ultraviolet photons is the probable mechanism for the γ-ray production.

  14. The ECLAIRs micro-satellite mission for gamma-ray burst multi-wavelength observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schanne, S.; Atteia, J.-L.; Barret, D.; Basa, S.; Boer, M.; Casse, F.; Cordier, B.; Daigne, F.; Klotz, A.; Limousin, O.; Manchanda, R.; Mandrou, P.; Mereghetti, S.; Mochkovitch, R.; Paltani, S.; Paul, J.; Petitjean, P.; Pons, R.; Ricker, G.; Skinner, G.

    2006-11-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRB)—at least those with a duration longer than a few seconds—are the most energetic events in the Universe and occur at cosmological distances. The ECLAIRs micro-satellite, to be launched in 2009, will provide multi-wavelength observations of GRB, to study their astrophysics and to use them as cosmological probes. Furthermore, in 2009 ECLAIRs is expected to be the only space-borne instrument capable of providing a GRB trigger in near real-time with sufficient localization accuracy for GRB follow-up observations with the powerful ground-based spectroscopic telescopes available by then. A “Phase A study” of the ECLAIRs project has recently been launched by the French Space Agency CNES, aiming at a detailed mission design and selection for flight in 2006. The ECLAIRs mission is based on a CNES micro-satellite of the “Myriade” family and dedicated ground-based optical telescopes. The satellite payload combines a 2 sr field-of-view coded aperture mask gamma-camera using 6400 CdTe pixels for GRB detection and localization with 10 arcmin precision in the 4 50 keV energy band, together with a soft X-ray camera for onboard position refinement to 1 arcmin. The ground-based optical robotic telescopes will detect the GRB prompt/early afterglow emission and localize the event to arcsec accuracy, for spectroscopic follow-up observations.

  15. The ECLAIRs micro-satellite mission for gamma-ray burst multi-wavelength observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRB)-at least those with a duration longer than a few seconds-are the most energetic events in the Universe and occur at cosmological distances. The ECLAIRs micro-satellite, to be launched in 2009, will provide multi-wavelength observations of GRB, to study their astrophysics and to use them as cosmological probes. Furthermore, in 2009 ECLAIRs is expected to be the only space-borne instrument capable of providing a GRB trigger in near real-time with sufficient localization accuracy for GRB follow-up observations with the powerful ground-based spectroscopic telescopes available by then. A 'Phase A study' of the ECLAIRs project has recently been launched by the French Space Agency CNES, aiming at a detailed mission design and selection for flight in 2006. The ECLAIRs mission is based on a CNES micro-satellite of the 'Myriade' family and dedicated ground-based optical telescopes. The satellite payload combines a 2 sr field-of-view coded aperture mask gamma-camera using 6400 CdTe pixels for GRB detection and localization with 10 arcmin precision in the 4-50 keV energy band, together with a soft X-ray camera for onboard position refinement to 1 arcmin. The ground-based optical robotic telescopes will detect the GRB prompt/early afterglow emission and localize the event to arcsec accuracy, for spectroscopic follow-up observations

  16. The astrocosmic databases for multi-wavelength and cosmological properties of extragalactic sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vavilova, I. B.; Ivashchenko, G. Yu.; Babyk, Yu. V.; Sergijenko, O.; Dobrycheva, D. V.; Torbaniuk, O. O.; Vasylenko, A. A.; Pulatova, N. G.

    2015-12-01

    The article briefly describes the new specially-oriented Astro Space databases obtained with ground-based telescopes and space observatories. As a result, multi-wavelength spectral and physical properties of galaxies and galaxy clusters were analyzed in more details, particularly 1) to study the spectral properties of quasars and the distribution of matter in intergalactic scales using Lyman-alpha forest; 2) to study galaxies (including with active nuclei), especially for the formation of large-scale structures in the Universe and influence of the environment on the internal parameters of galaxies; 3) to estimate a visible and dark matter content in galaxy clusters and to test cosmological parameters and the evolution of matter in a wide range of age of the Universe.

  17. Solid State Multiwavelength LIDAR for Volcanic Ash Monitoring Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Physical Sciences Inc. proposes to develop a compact, multiwavelength LIDAR with polarization analysis capability that will be able to identify volcanic ash clouds...

  18. Exploring Multiwavelength AGN Variability with Swift Archival Data

    OpenAIRE

    Gelbord, Jonathan; Gronwall, Caryl; Grupe, Dirk; Berk, Dan Vanden; Wu, Jian

    2015-01-01

    We are conducting an archival Swift program to measure multiwavelength variability in active galactic nuclei (AGN). This variability information will provide constraints on the geometry, physical conditions and processes of the structures around the central black holes that emit and reprocess the observed flux. Among our goals are: (1) to produce a catalog of type 1 AGN with time-resolved multi-wavelength data; (2) to characterize variability in the optical, UV and X-ay bands as well as chang...

  19. AstroSat - a multi-wavelength astronomy satellite

    CERN Document Server

    Rao, A R; Bhattacharya, D

    2016-01-01

    AstroSat is a multi-wavelength astronomy satellite, launched on 2015 September 28. It carries a suite of scientific instruments for multi-wavelength observations of astronomical sources. It is a major Indian effort in space astronomy and the context of AstroSat is examined in a historical perspective. The Performance Verification phase of AstroSat has been completed and all instruments are working flawlessly and as planned. Some brief highlights of the scientific results are also given here.

  20. Quantitative Phase Imaging Using Multi-Wavelength Optical Phase Unwrapping

    OpenAIRE

    Warnasooriya, Nilanthi; Kim, Myung K.

    2010-01-01

    In summary, this chpater demonstrates the effectiveness of the multi-wavelength optical unwrapping method. To our knowledge this is the first time that three wavelengths have been used in interferometry for phase unwrapping without increasing phase noise. Unlike conventional software phase unwrapping methods that fail when there is high phase noise and when there are irregularities in the object, the multi-wavelength optical phase unwrapping method can be used with any type of object. Softwar...

  1. WorldWide Telescope in Research and Education

    OpenAIRE

    Goodman, Alyssa A.; Fay, Jonathan; Muench, August A.; Pepe, Alberto; Udompraseret, Patricia; Wong, Curtis

    2012-01-01

    The WorldWide Telescope computer program, released to researchers and the public as a free resource in 2008 by Microsoft Research, has changed the way the ever-growing Universe of online astronomical data is viewed and understood. The WWT program can be thought of as a scriptable, interactive, richly visual browser of the multi-wavelength Sky as we see it from Earth, and of the Universe as we would travel within it. In its web API format, WWT is being used as a service to display professional...

  2. European Extremely Large Telescope: progress report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamai, R.; Spyromilio, J.

    2014-07-01

    The European Extremely Large Telescope is a project of the European Southern Observatory to build and operate a 40-m class optical near-infrared telescope. The telescope design effort is largely concluded and construction contracts are being placed with industry and academic/research institutes for the various components. The siting of the telescope in Northern Chile close to the Paranal site allows for an integrated operation of the facility providing significant economies. The progress of the project in various areas is presented in this paper and references to other papers at this SPIE meeting are made.

  3. The new MQ/AAO/Strasbourg multi-wavelength and spectroscopic PNe database: MASPN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Quentin Andrew; Bojicic, Ivan; Frew, David; Acker, Agnes; Ochsenbein, Francois; MASPN Database Team

    2015-01-01

    We are in a new golden age of PN discovery. This is thanks in particular to high sensitivity, wide-field, narrow-band surveys of the Galactic plane undertaken on the UKST in Australia and the Isaac Newton telescope on La Palma. Together these telescopes and their H-alpha surveys have provided very significant Planetary Nebulae (PNe) discoveries that have more than doubled the totals accrued by all telescopes over the previous 250 years. However, these PNe are not simply more of the same found in previous catalogues. Most new PNe are more obscured, evolved and of lower surface brightness than previous compilations while others are faint but compact and more distant. This has required an extensive and time-consuming programme of spectroscopic confirmation on a variety of 2m and 4m telescopes that is now largely complete. The scope of any future large-scale PNe studies, particularly those of a statistical nature or undertaken to understand true PNe diversity and evolution should now reflect this fresh PN population landscape of the combined sample of ~3500 Galactic PNe now available. Such studies should be coloured and nuanced by these recent major discoveries and the massive, high sensitivity, high resolution, multi-wavelength imaging surveys now available across much of the electromagnetic spectrum.Following this motivation we provide, for the first time, an accessible, reliable, on-line "one-stop" SQL database for essential, up-to date information for all known Galactic PN. We have attempted to: i) Reliably remove the many PN mimics/false ID's that have biased previous compilations and subsequent studies; ii) Provide accurate, updated positions, sizes, morphologies, radial velocities, fluxes, multi-wavelength imagery and spectroscopy; iii) Link to CDS/Vizier and hence provide archival history for each object; iv) Provide an interface to sift, select, browse, collate, investigate, download and visualise the complete currently known Galactic PNe diaspora and v

  4. Monte Carlo Studies of medium-size telescope designs for the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    CERN Document Server

    Wood, M; Dumm, J; Funk, S

    2015-01-01

    We present studies for optimizing the next generation of ground-based imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (IACTs). Results focus on mid-sized telescopes (MSTs) for CTA, detecting very high energy gamma rays in the energy range from a few hundred GeV to a few tens of TeV. We describe a novel, flexible detector Monte Carlo package, FAST (FAst Simulation for imaging air cherenkov Telescopes), that we use to simulate different array and telescope designs. The simulation is somewhat simplified to allow for efficient exploration over a large telescope design parameter space. We investigate a wide range of telescope performance parameters including optical resolution, camera pixel size, and light collection area. In order to ensure a comparison of the arrays at their maximum sensitivity, we analyze the simulations with the most sensitive techniques used in the field, such as maximum likelihood template reconstruction and boosted decision trees for background rejection. Choosing telescope design parameters repre...

  5. Antares Reference Telescope System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viswanathan, V.K.; Kaprelian, E.; Swann, T.; Parker, J.; Wolfe, P.; Woodfin, G.; Knight, D.

    1983-01-01

    Antares is a 24-beam, 40-TW carbon-dioxide laser-fusion system currently nearing completion at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The 24 beams will be focused onto a tiny target (typically 300 to 1000 ..mu..m in diameter) located approximately at the center of a 7.3-m-diameter by 9.3-m-long vacuum (10/sup -6/ torr) chamber. The design goal is to position the targets to within 10 ..mu..m of a selected nominal position, which may be anywhere within a fixed spherical region 1 cm in diameter. The Antares Reference Telescope System is intended to help achieve this goal for alignment and viewing of the various targets used in the laser system. The Antares Reference Telescope System consists of two similar electro-optical systems positioned in a near orthogonal manner in the target chamber area of the laser. Each of these consists of four subsystems: (1) a fixed 9X optical imaging subsystem which produces an image of the target at the vidicon; (2) a reticle projection subsystem which superimposes an image of the reticle pattern at the vidicon; (3) an adjustable front-lighting subsystem which illuminates the target; and (4) an adjustable back-lighting subsystem which also can be used to illuminate the target. The various optical, mechanical, and vidicon design considerations and trade-offs are discussed. The final system chosen (which is being built) and its current status are described in detail.

  6. Antares Reference Telescope System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antares is a 24-beam, 40-TW carbon-dioxide laser-fusion system currently nearing completion at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The 24 beams will be focused onto a tiny target (typically 300 to 1000 μm in diameter) located approximately at the center of a 7.3-m-diameter by 9.3-m-long vacuum (10-6 torr) chamber. The design goal is to position the targets to within 10 μm of a selected nominal position, which may be anywhere within a fixed spherical region 1 cm in diameter. The Antares Reference Telescope System is intended to help achieve this goal for alignment and viewing of the various targets used in the laser system. The Antares Reference Telescope System consists of two similar electro-optical systems positioned in a near orthogonal manner in the target chamber area of the laser. Each of these consists of four subsystems: (1) a fixed 9X optical imaging subsystem which produces an image of the target at the vidicon; (2) a reticle projection subsystem which superimposes an image of the reticle pattern at the vidicon; (3) an adjustable front-lighting subsystem which illuminates the target; and (4) an adjustable back-lighting subsystem which also can be used to illuminate the target. The various optical, mechanical, and vidicon design considerations and trade-offs are discussed. The final system chosen (which is being built) and its current status are described in detail

  7. The Dutch Open Telescope

    OpenAIRE

    Rutten, R. J.; Hammerschlag, R.H.; Bettonvil, F.C.M.

    2001-01-01

    The Dutch Open Telescope is a new and novel optical solar telescope on La Palma. It aims at high resolution by combining an excel- lent site on La Palma with an open tower and an open telescope and leads the way to large-aperture high resolution telescopes. We brie y review the DOT principle, structure and goals. More information is found at the DOT website.

  8. The SOFIA Telescope

    OpenAIRE

    Krabbe, Alfred

    2000-01-01

    The SOFIA telescope as the heart of the observatory is a major technological challenge. I present an overview on the astro-nomical and scientific requirements for such a big airborne observatory and demonstrate the impact of these requirements on the layout of SOFIA, in particular on the telescope design as it is now. Selected components of the telescope will be de-scribed in their context and functionality. The current status of the telescope is presented.

  9. The Green Bank Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prestage, R. M.; Constantikes, K. T.; Hunter, T. R.; King, L. J.; Lacasse, R. J.; Lockman, F. J.; Norrod, R. D.

    2009-08-01

    The Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory is the world's premiere single-dish radio telescope operating at centimeter to long millimeter wavelengths. This paper describes the history, construction, and main technical features of the telescope.

  10. Auto Adjusting Astronomical Telescope

    OpenAIRE

    Rohit R. Ghalsasi; Prof. N. D. Dhoot

    2014-01-01

    Astronomical telescope is powerful and basic tool for star or celestial observation. Here we proposed integrated system using Raspberry Pi for auto adjusting astronomical telescope. This integrated circuit helps to control stellar monitoring, stellar targeting, and tracking functions of telescope. Astro compass gives the direction of the celestial objects.

  11. The MAGIC Telescope

    OpenAIRE

    Bigongiari, Ciro

    2005-01-01

    MAGIC (Major Atmospheric Gamma Imaging Cherenkov telescope) is presently the largest ground-based gamma ray telescope. MAGIC has been taking data regularly since October 2004 at the Roque de los Muchachos Observatory on the island of La Palma. In this paper the MAGIC telescope status, its performances and some preliminary results on observed gamma ray sources are presented.

  12. Auto Adjusting Astronomical Telescope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohit R. Ghalsasi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Astronomical telescope is powerful and basic tool for star or celestial observation. Here we proposed integrated system using Raspberry Pi for auto adjusting astronomical telescope. This integrated circuit helps to control stellar monitoring, stellar targeting, and tracking functions of telescope. Astro compass gives the direction of the celestial objects.

  13. Novel Multiwavelength Microscopic Scanner for Mouse Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herlen Alencar

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Real-time in vivo imaging of molecular targets at (subcellular resolution is essential in better understanding complex biology. Confocal microscopy and multiphoton microscopy have been used in the past to achieve this goal, but their true capabilities have often been limited by bulky optics and difficult experimental set-ups requiring exteriorized organs. We describe here the development and validation of a unique nearinfrared laser scanning microscope system that uses novel optics with a millimeter footprint. Optimized for use in the far red and near-infrared ranges, the system allows an imaging depth that extends up to 500 Mm from a 1.3-mm-diameter stick objective, which is up to 2 cm in length. We show exceptionally high spatial, temporal, and multiwavelength resolutions of the system and show that it can be applied to virtually any internal organ through a keyhole surgical access. We demonstrate that, when combined with novel far red imaging probes, it is possible to image the cellular details of many organs and disease processes. The new optics, coupled with the use of near-infrared probes, should prove immensely valuable for in vivo cancer imaging.

  14. Multiwavelength EDM measurements in southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, L.E.; McGarr, A.; Langbein, J.O.; Linker, M.F.

    1983-01-01

    We installed a precise geodetic network along the San Andreas fault near Pearblossom, California in November, 1980. The network is within the region frequently referred to as the "Palmdale Uplift" and consists of 13 lines radiating from a central benchmark. The lines range in length from 3.2 to 8.1 km are generally measured several times each week. The multiwavelength distance measuring (MWDM) instrument is located at the central benchmark and is housed in a small protective shelter. The MWDM instrument has demonstrated a capability to make measurements to a precision of 1 part in 10 million. Using a coordinate system whose x-axis is parallel to the local trace of the San Andreas fault the following strain rates were observed during the first 10 months of this effort: {greater-than with dot}exx = -0.180 ?? 0.025 ??str/yr{greater-than with dot}eyy = -0.031 ?? 0.029 ??str/yr{greater-than with dot}exy = +0.077 ?? 0.024 ??str/yr?? = -0.213 ?? 0.039 ??str/yr. The observed strain rates do not appear to be constant in time, much of the deformation occurs in fairly well defined episodes. These changes in strain rate are particularly obvious in the \\ ??.geyy component. ?? 1983.

  15. ATST telescope mount: telescope of machine tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffers, Paul; Stolz, Günter; Bonomi, Giovanni; Dreyer, Oliver; Kärcher, Hans

    2012-09-01

    The Advanced Technology Solar Telescope (ATST) will be the largest solar telescope in the world, and will be able to provide the sharpest views ever taken of the solar surface. The telescope has a 4m aperture primary mirror, however due to the off axis nature of the optical layout, the telescope mount has proportions similar to an 8 meter class telescope. The technology normally used in this class of telescope is well understood in the telescope community and has been successfully implemented in numerous projects. The world of large machine tools has developed in a separate realm with similar levels of performance requirement but different boundary conditions. In addition the competitive nature of private industry has encouraged development and usage of more cost effective solutions both in initial capital cost and thru-life operating cost. Telescope mounts move relatively slowly with requirements for high stability under external environmental influences such as wind buffeting. Large machine tools operate under high speed requirements coupled with high application of force through the machine but with little or no external environmental influences. The benefits of these parallel development paths and the ATST system requirements are being combined in the ATST Telescope Mount Assembly (TMA). The process of balancing the system requirements with new technologies is based on the experience of the ATST project team, Ingersoll Machine Tools who are the main contractor for the TMA and MT Mechatronics who are their design subcontractors. This paper highlights a number of these proven technologies from the commercially driven machine tool world that are being introduced to the TMA design. Also the challenges of integrating and ensuring that the differences in application requirements are accounted for in the design are discussed.

  16. Dynamic analysis of holographic gratings in a multi-wavelength visible light sensitive photopolymer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A dynamic theoretical model of photochemistry and hologram formation in holographic photopolymer is established, and the dynamic development process of holographic gratings in the photopolymer is discussed with the model. A novel multi-wavelength visible light sensitive photopolymer for holographic storage is prepared. The influence of exposure wavelength on holographic storage characteristics is analysed. By fitting the experimental data of transmittance and diffraction efficiency to a function of time with different exposure intensities and wavelengths, the variations of dynamic parameters of photochemistry and photopolymerization diffusion are presented. (classical areas of phenomenology)

  17. Influence of color coatings on aircraft surface ice detection based on multi-wavelength imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuge, Jing-chang; Yu, Zhi-jing; Gao, Jian-shu; Zheng, Da-chuan

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, a simple aircraft surface ice detection system is proposed based on multi-wavelength imaging. Its feasibility is proved by the experimental results. The influence of color coatings of aircraft surface is investigated. The results show that the ice area can be clearly distinguished from the red, white, gray and blue coatings painted aluminum plates. Due to the strong absorption, not enough signals can be detected for the black coatings. Thus, a deep research is needed. Even though, the results of this paper are helpful to the development of aircraft surface ice detection.

  18. The Travelling Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Daniel

    2015-08-01

    The telescope has been around for over 400 years, yet most people have never looked though one. We invite people outside under the stars to learn about those curious lights in the sky, and have a close encounter with the cosmos.Our main aim is to promote science, technology, engineering, and mathematics to the young minds by inspiring, empowering and engaging them using astronomy and astrophysics tools and concepts. We would like to see Africa compete with the rest of the world and we believe this can happen through having a scientifically literate society. We also work closely wit teachers, parents and the general public to further our objectives. We will present on our recently awarded project to work with schools in rural coastal Kenya, a very poor area of the country. We will also present on other work we continue to do with schools to make our project sustainable even after the OAD funding.

  19. Multiwavelength observations of the candidate disintegrating sub-Mercury KIC 12557548B , ,

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present multiwavelength photometry, high angular resolution imaging, and radial velocities of the unique and confounding disintegrating low-mass planet candidate KIC 12557548b. Our high angular resolution imaging, which includes space-based Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 (HST/WFC3) observations in the optical (∼0.53 μm and ∼0.77 μm), and ground-based Keck/NIRC2 observations in K' band (∼2.12 μm), allow us to rule out background and foreground candidates at angular separations greater than 0.''2 that are bright enough to be responsible for the transits we associate with KIC 12557548. Our radial velocity limit from Keck/HIRES allows us to rule out bound, low-mass stellar companions (∼0.2 M ☉) to KIC 12557548 on orbits less than 10 yr, as well as placing an upper limit on the mass of the candidate planet of 1.2 Jupiter masses; therefore, the combination of our radial velocities, high angular resolution imaging, and photometry are able to rule out most false positive interpretations of the transits. Our precise multiwavelength photometry includes two simultaneous detections of the transit of KIC 12557548b using Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope/Wide-field InfraRed Camera (CFHT/WIRCam) at 2.15 μm and the Kepler space telescope at 0.6 μm, as well as simultaneous null-detections of the transit by Kepler and HST/WFC3 at 1.4 μm. Our simultaneous HST/WFC3 and Kepler null-detections provide no evidence for radically different transit depths at these wavelengths. Our simultaneous CFHT/WIRCam detections in the near-infrared and with Kepler in the optical reveal very similar transit depths (the average ratio of the transit depths at ∼2.15 μm compared with ∼0.6 μm is: 1.02 ± 0.20). This suggests that if the transits we observe are due to scattering from single-size particles streaming from the planet in a comet-like tail, then the particles must be ∼0.5 μm in radius or larger, which would favor that KIC 12557548b is a sub

  20. Multiwavelength observations of the candidate disintegrating sub-Mercury KIC 12557548B , ,

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Croll, Bryce; Rappaport, Saul; Levine, Alan M. [Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); DeVore, John [Visidyne, Inc., Santa Barbara, CA 93105 (United States); Gilliland, Ronald L.; Star, Kimberly M. [Center for Exoplanets and Habitable Worlds, The Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Lab, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Crepp, Justin R. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, 225 Nieuwland Science Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Howard, Andrew W. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii at Manoa, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Chiang, Eugene [Departments of Astronomy and of Earth and Planetary Science, University of California at Berkeley, Hearst Field Annex B-20, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Jenkins, Jon M. [SETI Institute/NASA Ames Research Center, M/S 244-30, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Albert, Loic [Département de physique, Université de Montréal, C.P. 6128 Succ. Centre-Ville, Montréal, QC H3C 3J7 (Canada); Bonomo, Aldo S. [INAF-Osservatorio Astrofisico di Torino, via Osservatorio 20, I-10025 Pino Torinese (Italy); Fortney, Jonathan J. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Isaacson, Howard, E-mail: croll@space.mit.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2014-05-10

    We present multiwavelength photometry, high angular resolution imaging, and radial velocities of the unique and confounding disintegrating low-mass planet candidate KIC 12557548b. Our high angular resolution imaging, which includes space-based Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 (HST/WFC3) observations in the optical (∼0.53 μm and ∼0.77 μm), and ground-based Keck/NIRC2 observations in K' band (∼2.12 μm), allow us to rule out background and foreground candidates at angular separations greater than 0.''2 that are bright enough to be responsible for the transits we associate with KIC 12557548. Our radial velocity limit from Keck/HIRES allows us to rule out bound, low-mass stellar companions (∼0.2 M {sub ☉}) to KIC 12557548 on orbits less than 10 yr, as well as placing an upper limit on the mass of the candidate planet of 1.2 Jupiter masses; therefore, the combination of our radial velocities, high angular resolution imaging, and photometry are able to rule out most false positive interpretations of the transits. Our precise multiwavelength photometry includes two simultaneous detections of the transit of KIC 12557548b using Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope/Wide-field InfraRed Camera (CFHT/WIRCam) at 2.15 μm and the Kepler space telescope at 0.6 μm, as well as simultaneous null-detections of the transit by Kepler and HST/WFC3 at 1.4 μm. Our simultaneous HST/WFC3 and Kepler null-detections provide no evidence for radically different transit depths at these wavelengths. Our simultaneous CFHT/WIRCam detections in the near-infrared and with Kepler in the optical reveal very similar transit depths (the average ratio of the transit depths at ∼2.15 μm compared with ∼0.6 μm is: 1.02 ± 0.20). This suggests that if the transits we observe are due to scattering from single-size particles streaming from the planet in a comet-like tail, then the particles must be ∼0.5 μm in radius or larger, which would favor that KIC 12557548b is a sub

  1. MULTI-WAVELENGTH OBSERVATIONS OF COMET C/2011 L4 (PAN-STARRS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dynamically new comet C/2011 L4 (Pan-STARRS) is one of the brightest comets observed since the great comet C/1995 O1 (Hale-Bopp). Here, we present our multi-wavelength observations of C/2011 L4 during its in-bound passage to the inner solar system. A strong absorption band of water ice at 2.0 μm was detected in the near-infrared spectra, obtained with the 8 m Gemini-North and 3 m Infrared Telescope Facility Telescopes. The companion 1.5 μm band of water ice, however, was not observed. Spectral modeling shows that the absence of the 1.5 μm feature can be explained by the presence of sub-micron-sized fine ice grains. No gas lines (i.e., CN, HCN, or CO) were observed pre-perihelion in either the optical or the submillimeter. We derived 3σ upper limits for the CN and CO production rates. The comet exhibited a very strong continuum in the optical and its slope seemed to become redder as the comet approached the Sun. Our observations suggest that C/2011 L4 is an unusually dust-rich comet with a dust-to-gas mass ratio >4

  2. MULTI-WAVELENGTH OBSERVATIONS OF COMET C/2011 L4 (PAN-STARRS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Bin; Keane, Jacqueline; Meech, Karen [NASA Astrobiology Institute, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Owen, Tobias; Wainscoat, Richard, E-mail: yangbin@ifa.hawaii.edu [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States)

    2014-04-01

    The dynamically new comet C/2011 L4 (Pan-STARRS) is one of the brightest comets observed since the great comet C/1995 O1 (Hale-Bopp). Here, we present our multi-wavelength observations of C/2011 L4 during its in-bound passage to the inner solar system. A strong absorption band of water ice at 2.0 μm was detected in the near-infrared spectra, obtained with the 8 m Gemini-North and 3 m Infrared Telescope Facility Telescopes. The companion 1.5 μm band of water ice, however, was not observed. Spectral modeling shows that the absence of the 1.5 μm feature can be explained by the presence of sub-micron-sized fine ice grains. No gas lines (i.e., CN, HCN, or CO) were observed pre-perihelion in either the optical or the submillimeter. We derived 3σ upper limits for the CN and CO production rates. The comet exhibited a very strong continuum in the optical and its slope seemed to become redder as the comet approached the Sun. Our observations suggest that C/2011 L4 is an unusually dust-rich comet with a dust-to-gas mass ratio >4.

  3. Multiwavelength Observations of the Blazar Mrk 421 in December 2002 and January 2003

    CERN Document Server

    Rebillot, P; Aller, M; Badran, H M; Blaylock, G; Boltwood, P; Bradbury, S M; Buckley, J H; Carter-Lewis, D A; Celik, O; Chow, Y C; Cogan, P; Cui, W; Daniel, M; Duke, C; Falcone, A; Fegan, S J; Finley, J P; Fortson, L F; Gillanders, G H; Gutíerrez, K; Gyuk, G; Hanna, D; Holder, J; Horan, D; Hughes, S B; Jung, I; Kenny, G E; Kertzman, M; Kieda, D; Kildea, J; Kosack, K; Kranich, D; Krawczynski, H; Krennrich, F; Lang, M J; Le Bohec, S; Linton, E; Maier, G; Moriarty, P; Perkins, J; Pohl, M; Quinn, J; Ragan, K; Reynolds, P T; Rose, H J; Sadun, A; Schroedter, M; Sembroski, G H; Sillanpää, A; Steele, G; Swordy, S P; Valcarcel, L; Vasilev, V V; Wakely, S P; Weekes, T C

    2006-01-01

    We report on a multiwavelength campaign on the TeV gamma-ray blazar Markarian (Mrk) 421 performed during December 2002 and January 2003. These target of opportunity observations were initiated by the detection of X-ray and TeV gamma-ray flares with the All Sky Monitor (ASM) on board the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) and the 10~m Whipple gamma-ray telescope.The campaign included observational coverage in the radio (University of Michigan Radio Astronomy Observatory), optical (Boltwood, La Palma KVA 0.6m, WIYN 0.9m), X-ray (RXTE pointed telescopes), and TeV gamma-ray (Whipple and HEGRA) bands. At TeV energies, the observations revealed several flares at intermediate flux levels, peaking between 1 and 1.5 times the flux from the Crab Nebula. While the time averaged spectrum can be fitted with a single power law of photon index Gamma =2.8, we find some evidence for spectral variability. Confirming earlier results, the campaign reveals a rather loose correlation between the X-ray and TeV gamma-ray fluxes. In ...

  4. The ECLAIRs micro-satellite mission for gamma-ray burst multi-wavelength observations

    CERN Document Server

    Schanne, S; Barret, D; Basa, S; Boër, M; Casse, F; Cordier, B; Daigne, F; Klotz, A; Limousin, O; Manchanda, R; Mandrou, P; Mereghetti, S; Mochkovitch, R; Paltani, S; Paul, J; Petitjean, P; Pons, R; Ricker, G; Skinner, G K

    2006-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRB), at least those with a duration longer than a few seconds are the most energetic events in the Universe and occur at cosmological distances. The ECLAIRs micro-satellite, to be launched in 2009, will provide multi-wavelength observations of GRB, to study their astrophysics and to use them as cosmological probes. Furthermore in 2009 ECLAIRs is expected to be the only space borne instrument capable of providing a GRB trigger in near real-time with sufficient localization accuracy for GRB follow-up observations with the powerful ground based spectroscopic telescopes available by then. A "Phase A study" of the ECLAIRs project has recently been launched by the French Space Agency CNES, aiming at a detailed mission design and selection for flight in 2006. The ECLAIRs mission is based on a CNES micro-satellite of the "Myriade" family and dedicated ground-based optical telescopes. The satellite payload combines a 2 sr field-of-view coded aperture mask gamma-camera using 6400 CdTe pixels for GRB ...

  5. A Multiwavelength Study of the Intracluster Medium and the Characterization of the Multiwavelength Sub/millimeter Inductance Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Seth Robert

    The first part of this thesis combines Bolocam observations of the thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect at 140 GHz with X-ray observations from Chandra, strong lensing data from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), and weak lensing data from HST and Subaru to constrain parametric models for the distribution of dark and baryonic matter in a sample of six massive, dynamically relaxed galaxy clusters. For five of the six clusters, the full multiwavelength dataset is well described by a relatively simple model that assumes spherical symmetry, hydrostatic equilibrium, and entirely thermal pressure support. The multiwavelength analysis yields considerably better constraints on the total mass and concentration compared to analysis of any one dataset individually. The subsample of five galaxy clusters is used to place an upper limit on the fraction of pressure support in the intracluster medium (ICM) due to nonthermal processes, such as turbulent and bulk flow of the gas. We constrain the nonthermal pressure fraction at r500c to be less than 0.11 at 95% confidence, where r500c refers to radius at which the average enclosed density is 500 times the critical density of the Universe. This is in tension with state-of-the-art hydrodynamical simulations, which predict a nonthermal pressure fraction of approximately 0.25 at r500c for the clusters in this sample. The second part of this thesis focuses on the characterization of the Multiwavelength Sub/millimeter Inductance Camera (MUSIC), a photometric imaging camera that was commissioned at the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO) in 2012. MUSIC is designed to have a 14 arcminute, diffraction-limited field of view populated with 576 spatial pixels that are simultaneously sensitive to four bands at 150, 220, 290, and 350 GHz. It is well-suited for studies of dusty star forming galaxies, galaxy clusters via the SZ Effect, and galactic star formation. MUSIC employs a number of novel detector technologies: broadband phased

  6. Aerosol optical and microphysical retrievals from a hybrid multiwavelength lidar data set – DISCOVER-AQ 2011

    OpenAIRE

    Sawamura, P.; Müller, D; R. M. Hoff; C. A. Hostetler; R. A. Ferrare; J. W. Hair; R. R. Rogers; Anderson, B E; L. D. Ziemba; A. J. Beyersdorf; K. L. Thornhill; E. L. Winstead; Holben, B. N.

    2014-01-01

    Retrievals of aerosol microphysical properties (effective radius, volume and surface-area concentrations) and aerosol optical properties (complex index of refraction and single-scattering albedo) were obtained from a hybrid multiwavelength lidar data set for the first time. In July 2011, in the Baltimore–Washington DC region, synergistic profiling of optical and microphysical properties of aerosols with both airborne (in situ and remote sensing) and ground-based remote sensi...

  7. A Multiwavelength Study of Three Hybrid Blazars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, E. C.; Kharb, P.; Lister, M. L.; Marshall, H. L.; O'Dea, C.; Baum, S.

    2015-07-01

    We present multiwavelength imaging observations of PKS 1045-188, 8C 1849+670, and PKS 2216-038, three radio-loud active galactic nuclei from the MOJAVE-Chandra Sample that straddle the Fanaroff-Riley (FR) boundary between low- and high-power jets. These hybrid sources provide an excellent opportunity to study jet emission mechanisms and the influence of the external environment. We used archival VLA observations, and new Hubble and Chandra observations to identify and study the spectral properties of five knots in PKS 1045-188, two knots in 8C 1849+670, and three knots in PKS 2216-038. For the seven X-ray visible knots, we constructed and fit the broadband spectra using synchrotron and inverse Compton/cosmic microwave background (IC/CMB) emission models. In all cases, we found that the lack of detected optical emission ruled out the X-ray emission from the same electron population that produces radio emission. All three sources have high total extended radio power, similar to that of FR II sources. We find this is in good agreement with previously studied hybrid sources, where high-power hybrid sources emit X-rays via IC/CMB and the low-power hybrid sources emit X-rays via synchrotron emission. This supports the idea that it is total radio power rather than FR morphology that determines the X-ray emission mechanism. We found no significant asymmetries in the diffuse X-ray emission surrounding the host galaxies. Sources PKS 1045-188 and 8C 1849+670 show significant differences in their radio and X-ray termination points, which may result from the deceleration of highly relativistic bulk motion.

  8. Exploring Multiwavelength AGN Variability with Swift Archival Data

    CERN Document Server

    Gelbord, Jonathan; Grupe, Dirk; Berk, Dan Vanden; Wu, Jian

    2015-01-01

    We are conducting an archival Swift program to measure multiwavelength variability in active galactic nuclei (AGN). This variability information will provide constraints on the geometry, physical conditions and processes of the structures around the central black holes that emit and reprocess the observed flux. Among our goals are: (1) to produce a catalog of type 1 AGN with time-resolved multi-wavelength data; (2) to characterize variability in the optical, UV and X-ay bands as well as changes in spectral slope; (3) to quantify the impact of variability on multi-wavelength properties; and (4) to measure correlated variability between bands. Our initial efforts have revealed a UVOT calibration issue that can cause a few percent of measured UV fluxes to be anomalously low, by up to 30%.

  9. Atmospheric aerosol characterization combining multi-wavelength Raman lidar and MAX-DOAS measurements in Gwanjgu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Jihyo; Shin, Dong Ho; Kim, Kwang Chul; Lee, Kwon-Ho; Shin, Sungkyun; Noh, Young M.; Müller, Detlef; Kim, Young J.

    2011-11-01

    Integrated approach has been adopted at the ADvanced Environmental Research Center (ADEMRC), Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology (GIST), Korea for effective monitoring of atmospheric aerosol. Various active and passive optical remote sensing techniques such as multi-wavelength (3β+2α+1δ) Raman LIDAR, sun-photometry, MAX-DOAS, and satellite retrieval have been utilized. This integrated monitoring system approach combined with in-situ surface measurement is to allow better characterization of physical and optical properties of atmospheric aerosol. Information on the vertical distribution and microphysical properties of atmospheric aerosol is important for understanding its transport characteristics as well as radiative effect. The GIST multi-wavelength (3β + 2α+1δ) Raman lidar system can measure vertical profiles of optical properties of atmospheric aerosols such as extinction coefficients at 355 and 532nm, particle backscatter coefficients at 355, 532 and 1064 nm, and depolarization ratio at 532nm. The incomplete overlap between the telescope field-of-view and beam divergence of the transmitting laser significantly affects lidar measurement, resulting in higher uncertainty near the surface where atmospheric aerosols of interest are concentrated. Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) technique is applied as a complementary tool for the detection of atmospheric aerosols near the surface. The passive Multi-Axis DOAS (MAX-DOAS) technique uses scattered sunlight as a light source from several viewing directions. Recently developed aerosol retrieval algorithm based on O4 slant column densities (SCDs) measured at UV and visible wavelengths has been utilized to derive aerosol information (e.g., aerosol optical depth (AOD) and aerosol extinction coefficients (AECs)) in the lower troposphere. The aerosol extinction coefficient at 356 nm was retrieved for the 0-1 and 1-2 km layers based on the MAX-DOAS measurements using the retrieval algorithm

  10. JWST Pathfinder Telescope Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Gary W.; Kennard, Scott H.; Broccolo, Ronald T.; Ellis, James M.; Daly, Elizabeth A.; Hahn, Walter G.; Amon, John N.; Mt. Pleasant, Stephen M.; Texter, Scott; Atkinson, Charles B.; McKay, Andrew; Levi, Joshua; Keski-Kuha, Ritva; Feinberg, Lee

    2015-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is a 6.5m, segmented, IR telescope that will explore the first light of the universe after the big bang. In 2014, a major risk reduction effort related to the Alignment, Integration, and Test (AI&T) of the segmented telescope was completed. The Pathfinder telescope includes two Primary Mirror Segment Assemblies (PMSA's) and the Secondary Mirror Assembly (SMA) onto a flight-like composite telescope backplane. This pathfinder allowed the JWST team to assess the alignment process and to better understand the various error sources that need to be accommodated in the flight build. The successful completion of the Pathfinder Telescope provides a final integration roadmap for the flight operations that will start in August 2015.

  11. Automated telescope scheduling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Mark D.

    1988-08-01

    With the ever increasing level of automation of astronomical telescopes the benefits and feasibility of automated planning and scheduling are becoming more apparent. Improved efficiency and increased overall telescope utilization are the most obvious goals. Automated scheduling at some level has been done for several satellite observatories, but the requirements on these systems were much less stringent than on modern ground or satellite observatories. The scheduling problem is particularly acute for Hubble Space Telescope: virtually all observations must be planned in excruciating detail weeks to months in advance. Space Telescope Science Institute has recently made significant progress on the scheduling problem by exploiting state-of-the-art artificial intelligence software technology. What is especially interesting is that this effort has already yielded software that is well suited to scheduling groundbased telescopes, including the problem of optimizing the coordinated scheduling of more than one telescope.

  12. JWST pathfinder telescope integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Gary W.; Kennard, Scott H.; Broccolo, Ronald T.; Ellis, James M.; Daly, Elizabeth A.; Hahn, Walter G.; Amon, John N.; Mt. Pleasant, Stephen M.; Texter, Scott; Atkinson, Charles B.; McKay, Andrew; Levi, Joshua; Keski-Kuha, Ritva; Feinberg, Lee

    2015-08-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is a 6.5m, segmented, IR telescope that will explore the first light of the universe after the big bang. In 2014, a major risk reduction effort related to the Alignment, Integration, and Test (AI and T) of the segmented telescope was completed. The Pathfinder telescope includes two Primary Mirror Segment Assemblies (PMSA's) and the Secondary Mirror Assembly (SMA) onto a flight-like composite telescope backplane. This pathfinder allowed the JWST team to assess the alignment process and to better understand the various error sources that need to be accommodated in the flight build. The successful completion of the Pathfinder Telescope provides a final integration roadmap for the flight operations that will start in August 2015.

  13. The great Melbourne telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Gillespie, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Erected at Melbourne Observatory in 1869, the telescope was the second largest in the world, designed to explore the nature of the nebulae in the southern skies. Richard Gillespie, head of the History and Technology department at the Melbourne museum has written an entertaining account of the telescope's extraordinary history and tells the story through an amazing cast of characters whose lives intersected with the telescope.

  14. Linear Estimation of Particle Bulk Parameters from Multi-Wavelength Lidar Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veselovskii, Igor; Dubovik, Oleg; Kolgotin, A.; Korenskiy, M.; Whiteman, D. N.; Allakhverdiev, K.; Huseyinoglu, F.

    2012-01-01

    An algorithm for linear estimation of aerosol bulk properties such as particle volume, effective radius and complex refractive index from multiwavelength lidar measurements is presented. The approach uses the fact that the total aerosol concentration can well be approximated as a linear combination of aerosol characteristics measured by multiwavelength lidar. Therefore, the aerosol concentration can be estimated from lidar measurements without the need to derive the size distribution, which entails more sophisticated procedures. The definition of the coefficients required for the linear estimates is based on an expansion of the particle size distribution in terms of the measurement kernels. Once the coefficients are established, the approach permits fast retrieval of aerosol bulk properties when compared with the full regularization technique. In addition, the straightforward estimation of bulk properties stabilizes the inversion making it more resistant to noise in the optical data. Numerical tests demonstrate that for data sets containing three aerosol backscattering and two extinction coefficients (so called 3 + 2 ) the uncertainties in the retrieval of particle volume and surface area are below 45% when input data random uncertainties are below 20 %. Moreover, using linear estimates allows reliable retrievals even when the number of input data is reduced. To evaluate the approach, the results obtained using this technique are compared with those based on the previously developed full inversion scheme that relies on the regularization procedure. Both techniques were applied to the data measured by multiwavelength lidar at NASA/GSFC. The results obtained with both methods using the same observations are in good agreement. At the same time, the high speed of the retrieval using linear estimates makes the method preferable for generating aerosol information from extended lidar observations. To demonstrate the efficiency of the method, an extended time series of

  15. Multiwavelength Observations of Volatiles in Comets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milam, Stefanie N.; Charnley, Steven B.; Kuan, Yi-Jehng; Chuang, Yo-Ling; DiSanti, Michael A.; Bonev, Boncho P.; Remijan, Anthony J.

    2011-01-01

    Recently, there have been complimentary observations from multiple facilities to try to unravel the chemical complexity of comets. Incorporating results from various techniques, including: single-dish millimeter wavelength observations, interferometers, and/or IR spectroscopy, one can gain further insight into the abundances, production rates, distributions, and formation mechanisms of molecules in these objects [I]. Such studies have provided great detail towards molecules with a-typical chemistries, such as H2CO [2]. We report spectral observations of C/2006 M4 (SWAN), C/2007 N3 (Lulin), and C/2009 RI (McNaught) with the Arizona Radio Observatory's SMT and 12-m telescopes, as well as the NRAO Greenbank telescope and IRTFCSHELL. Multiple parent volatiles (HCN, CH3OH, CO, CH4, C2H6, and H2O) plus two photodissociation products (CS and OH) have been detected in these objects. We will present a comparison of molecular abundances in these comets to those observed in others, supporting a long-term effort of building a comet taxonomy based on composition. Previous work has revealed a range of abundances of parent species (from "organics-poor" to "organics-rich") with respect to water among comets [3,4,5], however the statistics are stiII poorly constrained and interpretations of the observed compositional diversity are uncertain.

  16. Multiwavelength erbium-doped fiber laser exploiting intracavity polarization inhomogeneity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙军强; 丘军林; 黄德修

    2000-01-01

    Simultaneous multiwavelength lasing is demonstrated exploiting intracavity polarization in-homogeneity in an erbium-doped fiber laser. Experiments indicate that polarization hole burning can be enhanced by the changes of optical MQW waveguide bias current and the polarization states in the laser cavity. Ten wavelengths with 0.9 nm spacing are generated at room temperature.

  17. Strictly Transparent Wavelength Conversion Using Multi-Wavelength Signal Generation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Eiichi; Yamada; Hiroaki; Sanjoh; Yuzo; Yoshikuni

    2003-01-01

    We succeeded in strictly transparent wavelength conversion by means of channel selection from multi-wavelength signals generated by sinusoidal modulation of input signal. Modulation-format-independent and bit-rate-independent wavelength conversion is achieved with small power penalty.

  18. Multiwavelength erbium-doped fiber laser exploiting intracavity polarization inhomogeneity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Simultaneous multiwavelength lasing is demonstrated exploiting intracavity polarization inhomogeneity in an erbium-doped fiber laser. Experiments indicate that polarization hole burning can be enhanced by the changes of optical MQW waveguide bias current and the polarization states in the laser cavity. Ten wavelengths with 0.9 nm spacing are generated at room temperature.

  19. Coordinated multi-wavelength observations of Sgr A*

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Eckart; R. Schödel; F.K. Baganoff; M. Morris; T. Bertram; M. Dovciak; D. Downes; W.J. Duschl; V. Karas; S. König; T. Krichbaum; M. Krips; D. Kunneriath; R.S. Lu; S. Markoff; J. Mauerhan; L. Meyer; J. Moultaka; K. Muzic; F. Najarro; K. Schuster; L. Sjouwerman; C. Straubmeier; C. Thum; S. Vogel; H. Wiesemeyer; G. Witzel; M. Zamaninasab; A. Zensus

    2008-01-01

    We report on recent near-infrared (NIR) and X-ray observations of Sagittarius A* (Sgr A*), the electromagnetic manifestation of the ~4x10^6 M-circle-dot solar masses super-massive black hole (SMBH) at the Galactic Center. The goal of these coordinated multi-wavelength observations is to investigate

  20. High resolution telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massie, Norbert A.; Oster, Yale

    1992-01-01

    A large effective-aperture, low-cost optical telescope with diffraction-limited resolution enables ground-based observation of near-earth space objects. The telescope has a non-redundant, thinned-aperture array in a center-mount, single-structure space frame. It employs speckle interferometric imaging to achieve diffraction-limited resolution. The signal-to-noise ratio problem is mitigated by moving the wavelength of operation to the near-IR, and the image is sensed by a Silicon CCD. The steerable, single-structure array presents a constant pupil. The center-mount, radar-like mount enables low-earth orbit space objects to be tracked as well as increases stiffness of the space frame. In the preferred embodiment, the array has elemental telescopes with subaperture of 2.1 m in a circle-of-nine configuration. The telescope array has an effective aperture of 12 m which provides a diffraction-limited resolution of 0.02 arc seconds. Pathlength matching of the telescope array is maintained by an electro-optical system employing laser metrology. Speckle imaging relaxes pathlength matching tolerance by one order of magnitude as compared to phased arrays. Many features of the telescope contribute to substantial reduction in costs. These include eliminating the conventional protective dome and reducing on-site construction activites. The cost of the telescope scales with the first power of the aperture rather than its third power as in conventional telescopes.

  1. Athermal laser launch telescopes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamphues, F.G.; Henselmans, R.; Rijnveld, N.; Lemmen, M.H.J.; Doelman, N.J.; Nijkerk, M.D.

    2011-01-01

    ESO has developed a concept for a compact laser guide star unit for use in future Adaptive Optics (AO) systems. A small powerful laser is combined with a telescope that launches the beam, creating a single modular unit that can be mounted directly on a large telescope. This approach solves several o

  2. A Fire Detector for Monitoring Inaccessible Areas in Aircrafts Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — En'Urga Inc. will evaluate the feasibility of utilizing reflected, multi-wavelength, near infrared radiation for detecting fires in inaccessible areas within...

  3. The XMM-LSS catalogue: X-ray sources and associated multiwavelength data. Version II

    CERN Document Server

    Chiappetti, L; Pacaud, F; Pierre, M; Gueguen, A; Paioro, L; Polletta, M; Melnyk, O; Elyiv, A; Surdej, J; Faccioli, L

    2012-01-01

    We present the final release of the multi-wavelength XMM-LSS data set,covering the full survey area of 11.1 square degrees, with X-ray data processed with the latest XMM-LSS pipeline version. The present publication supersedes the Pierre et al.(2007) catalogue pertaining to the initial 5 square degrees. We provide X-ray source lists in the customary energy bands (0.5-2 and 2-10 keV) for a total of 6721 objects in the deep full-exposure catalogue and 5572 in the 10ks-limited one, above a detection likelihood of 15 in at least one band. We also provide a multiwavelength catalogue, cross-correlating our list with IR, NIR, optical and UV catalogues. Customary data products (X-ray FITS images, CFHTLS and SWIRE thumbnail images) are made available together with our interactively queriable database in Milan, while a static snapshot of the catalogues will be supplied to CDS, as soon as final acceptance is completed.

  4. Thermal investigation of a large lunar telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Sherry T.

    1992-01-01

    Recent interest in construction of a large telescope on the lunar surface (Nein and Davis, 1991; Bely, Burrows, and Illingworth, 1989) has prompted this feasibility study of a thermal control system for a 16 meter diameter telescope located near the lunar equator. In addition to detailed analyses for a telescope located in a flat area near the equator, the thermal effect of locating the telescope in a crater, on a hill, and at higher latitude sites is discussed. Because an unprotected telescope experiences a wide range of temperature swings, several thermal protection schemes have been examined, including domes, sunshades, and ground shields to limit the temperature excursions of the primary mirror. Results of these analyses indicate that mirror temperature excursions can be limited to less than 100 Kelvin (K) per lunar cycle with an appropriate passive thermal protection system (dome), and that the telescope primary mirror can be maintained at less than 100 K for at least 7 days of each lunar cycle. However, such a dome precludes observations during the lunar day. Mirror temperature excursions can be reduced by incorporating thermal enclosures or shades in the design or by placing the telescope at a higher latitude.

  5. Remote monitoring of atmospheric aerosol properties by using a multi-wavelength lidar system at Kwangju, Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A multi-wavelength lidar system that can measure simultaneously spectral aerosol extinction coefficient and depolarization ratio has been developed and tested. Some results from lidar measurements aerosol extinction coefficient, lidar ratio, and depolarization ratio of aerosols are presented. Lidar transmit system generates 20 Hz laser pulses at 355 nm, 532 nm, and 1064 nm with an Nd;YAG laser. Backscattered light from atmospheric aerosol particles is collected with three Cassegrain type telescopes. Signal detection unit has 7-channels consisting of two 532 nm channels and one 1064 nm channel for measuring the stratospheric aerosols, two 532 nm channels for tropospheric aerosols, 387 nm channel for Raman scattering measurements. Aerosol observation has been conducted since December 2002 at Kwangju (35 .deg. 10'N, 126 .deg. 53'), Korea. Raman channel permitted better determination of optical properties of continental aerosols. The profile of the depolarization ratio is determined at 532 nm and used to investigate particle shape.

  6. Blazar Monitoring with the Whipple 10 m Gamma-ray Telescope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since September 2005, the Whipple 10 m Gamma-ray Telescope has been used primarily to monitor known TeV AGN. The five Northern Hemisphere blazars that have been previously detected at Whipple, Markarian 421, H1426+428, Markarian 501, 1ES 1959+650 and 1ES 2344+514, are monitored each night that they are visible. To encourage and coordinate observations of these AGN at other wavelengths, the observing timetable and preliminary light curves for the TeV observations are provided on a publicly accessible website: veritas.sao.arizona.edu/content/blogsection/6/40. A number of multiwavelength observing campaigns have been undertaken by numerous collaborators in conjunction with the Whipple program and a significant amount of data has been accumulated. We report here on the status of these multiwavelength observations and present light curves of radio, optical, X-ray and gamma-ray data

  7. Hubble Space Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-02-01

    An overview of the mission of the Hubble Space Telescope, a joint project between NASA and the European Space Agency which will be used to study deep space, as well as our solar system is presented. The video contains animations depicting the Hubble Space Telescope in orbit, as well as footage of scientists at the Space Telescope Science Institute making real time observations. The images Hubble acquires will be downloaded into a database that contains images of over 19,000,0000 celestial objects called the Star Catalog.

  8. The Dutch Open Telescope

    OpenAIRE

    Rutten, R. J.; Hammerschlag, R.H.; Bettonvil, F.C.M.

    2001-01-01

    The Utrecht Open Tower Telescope, recently renamed into \\Dutch Open Telescope", is now being installed at the Roque de los Muchachos Observatory on La Palma (Fig. 1). Like THEMIS, the DOT is a solar telescope of novel design, is located at a superior site, aims at high spatial resolution, is suited to polarimetry, has been long in the making, and should start its scientic career in 1997. Unlike THEMIS, the DOT has no dome, no vacuum enclosure, no post-focus equipment, and no long-term funding.

  9. The Dutch Open Telescope

    OpenAIRE

    Rutten, R. J.; Hammerschlag, R.H.; Bettonvil, F.C.M.

    2001-01-01

    The Utrecht Open Tower Telescope, recently renamed into "Dutch Open Telescope", is now being installed at the Roque de los Muchachos Observatory on La Palma (Fig. 1). Like THEMIS, the DOT is a solar telescope of novel design, is located at a superior site, aims at high spatial resolution, is suited to polarimetry, has been long in the making, and should start its scientific career in 1997. Unlike THEMIS, the DOT has no dome, no vacuum enclosure, no post-focus equipment, and no long-term funding.

  10. Long-term, Multiwavelength Light Curves of Ultra-cool Dwarfs: I. An Interplay of Starspots & Clouds Likely Drive the Variability of the L3.5 dwarf 2MASS 0036+18

    CERN Document Server

    Croll, Bryce; Han, Eunkyu; Dalba, Paul A; Radigan, Jacqueline; Morley, Caroline V; Lazarevic, Marko; Taylor, Brian

    2016-01-01

    We present multi-telescope, ground-based, multiwavelength optical and near-infrared photometry of the variable L3.5 ultra-cool dwarf 2MASSW J0036159+182110. We present 22 nights of photometry of 2MASSW J0036159+182110, including 7 nights of simultaneous, multiwavelength photometry, spread over ~120 days allowing us to determine the rotation period of this ultra-cool dwarf to be 3.080 +/- 0.001 hr. Our many nights of multiwavelength photometry allow us to observe the evolution, or more specifically the lack thereof, of the light curve over a great many rotation periods. The lack of discernible phase shifts in our multiwavelength photometry, and that the amplitude of variability generally decreases as one moves to longer wavelengths for 2MASSW J0036159+182110, is generally consistent with starspots driving the variability on this ultra-cool dwarf, with starspots that are ~100 degrees K hotter or cooler than the ~1700 K photosphere. Also, reasonably thick clouds are required to fit the spectra of 2MASSW J0036159...

  11. Data Reduction of Multi-wavelength Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Pilia, M; Pellizzoni, A P; Bachetti, M; Piano, G; Poddighe, A; Egron, E; Iacolina, M N; Melis, A; Concu, R; Possenti, A; Perrodin, D

    2015-01-01

    Multi-messenger astronomy is becoming the key to understanding the Universe from a comprehensive perspective. In most cases, the data and the technology are already in place, therefore it is important to provide an easily-accessible package that combines datasets from multiple telescopes at different wavelengths. In order to achieve this, we are working to produce a data analysis pipeline that allows the data reduction from different instruments without needing detailed knowledge of each observation. Ideally, the specifics of each observation are automatically dealt with, while the necessary information on how to handle the data in each case is provided by a tutorial that is included in the program. We first focus our project on the study of pulsars and their wind nebulae (PWNe) at radio and gamma-ray frequencies. In this way, we aim to combine time-domain and imaging datasets at two extremes of the electromagnetic spectrum. In addition, the emission has the same non-thermal origin in pulsars at radio and gam...

  12. An enhanced multiwavelength ultraviolet biological trigger lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achey, Alexander; Bufton, Jack; Dawson, Jeffrey; Huang, Wen; Lee, Sangmin; Mehta, Nikhil; Prasad, Coorg R.

    2004-12-01

    A compact Ultraviolet Biological Trigger Lidar (UBTL) instrument for detection and discrimination of bio-warfare-agent (BWA) simulant aerosol clouds was developed by us [Prasad, et al, 2004] using a 5mW, 375nm semiconductor UV optical source (SUVOS) laser diode. It underwent successful field tests at Dugway Proving Ground and demonstrated measurement ranges of over 300m for elastic scattering and >100m for fluorescence. The UBTL was modified during mid-2004 to enhance its detection and discrimination performance with increased range of operation and sensitivity. The major optical modifications were: 1. increase in telescope collection aperture to 200 mm diameter: 2. addition of 266nm and 977nm laser transmitters: 3. addition of three detection channels for 266nm and 977nm elastic backscatter and fluorescence centered at 330nm. Also the commercial electronics of the original UBTL were replaced with a multi-channel field programmable gate array (FPGA) chip for laser diode modulation and data acquisition that allowed simultaneous and continuous operation of the UBTL sensor on all of its transmitter and receiver wavelengths. A notebook computer was added for data display and storage. Field tests were performed during July 2004 at the Edgewood Chemical and Biological Center in Maryland to establish the enhanced performance of UBTL subsystems. Results of these tests are presented and discussed.

  13. Monte Carlo studies of medium-size telescope designs for the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, M.; Jogler, T.; Dumm, J.; Funk, S.

    2016-01-01

    We present studies for optimizing the next generation of ground-based imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (IACTs). Results focus on mid-sized telescopes (MSTs) for CTA, detecting very high energy gamma rays in the energy range from a few hundred GeV to a few tens of TeV. We describe a novel, flexible detector Monte Carlo package, FAST (FAst Simulation for imaging air cherenkov Telescopes), that we use to simulate different array and telescope designs. The simulation is somewhat simplified to allow for efficient exploration over a large telescope design parameter space. We investigate a wide range of telescope performance parameters including optical resolution, camera pixel size, and light collection area. In order to ensure a comparison of the arrays at their maximum sensitivity, we analyze the simulations with the most sensitive techniques used in the field, such as maximum likelihood template reconstruction and boosted decision trees for background rejection. Choosing telescope design parameters representative of the proposed Davies-Cotton (DC) and Schwarzchild-Couder (SC) MST designs, we compare the performance of the arrays by examining the gamma-ray angular resolution and differential point-source sensitivity. We further investigate the array performance under a wide range of conditions, determining the impact of the number of telescopes, telescope separation, night sky background, and geomagnetic field. We find a 30-40% improvement in the gamma-ray angular resolution at all energies when comparing arrays with an equal number of SC and DC telescopes, significantly enhancing point-source sensitivity in the MST energy range. We attribute the increase in point-source sensitivity to the improved optical point-spread function and smaller pixel size of the SC telescope design.

  14. A Proposal to Localize Fermi GBM GRBs Through Coordinated Scanning of the GBM Error Circle via Optical Telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ukwatta, T. N.; Linnemann, J. T.; Tollefson, K.; Abeysekara, A. U.; Bhat, P. N.; Sonbas, E.; Gehrels, N.

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the feasibility of implementing a system that will coordinate ground-based optical telescopes to cover the Fermi GBM Error Circle (EC). The aim of the system is to localize GBM detected GRBs and facilitate multi-wavelength follow-up from space and ground. This system will optimize the observing locations in the GBM EC based on individual telescope location, Field of View (FoV) and sensitivity. The proposed system will coordinate GBM EC scanning by professional as well as amateur astronomers around the world. The results of a Monte Carlo simulation to investigate the feasibility of the project are presented.

  15. A Proposal to Localize Fermi GBM GRBs Through Coordinated Scanning of the GBM Error Circle via Optical Telescopes

    OpenAIRE

    Ukwatta, T. N.; Linnemann, J. T.; Tollefson, K.; Abeysekara, A. U.; Bhat, P. N.; Sonbas, E.; Gehrels, N.

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the feasibility of implementing a system that will coordinate ground-based optical telescopes to cover the Fermi GBM Error Circle (EC). The aim of the system is to localize GBM detected GRBs and facilitate multi-wavelength follow-up from space and ground. This system will optimize the observing locations in the GBM EC based on individual telescope location, Field of View (FoV) and sensitivity. The proposed system will coordinate GBM EC scanning by professional as well as amateu...

  16. The ASTRODEEP Frontier Fields catalogues. I. Multiwavelength photometry of Abell-2744 and MACS-J0416

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlin, E.; Amorín, R.; Castellano, M.; Fontana, A.; Buitrago, F.; Dunlop, J. S.; Elbaz, D.; Boucaud, A.; Bourne, N.; Boutsia, K.; Brammer, G.; Bruce, V. A.; Capak, P.; Cappelluti, N.; Ciesla, L.; Comastri, A.; Cullen, F.; Derriere, S.; Faber, S. M.; Ferguson, H. C.; Giallongo, E.; Grazian, A.; Lotz, J.; Michałowski, M. J.; Paris, D.; Pentericci, L.; Pilo, S.; Santini, P.; Schreiber, C.; Shu, X.; Wang, T.

    2016-05-01

    Context. The Frontier Fields survey is a pioneering observational program aimed at collecting photometric data, both from space (Hubble Space Telescope and Spitzer Space Telescope) and from ground-based facilities (VLT Hawk-I), for six deep fields pointing at clusters of galaxies and six nearby deep parallel fields, in a wide range of passbands. The analysis of these data is a natural outcome of the Astrodeep project, an EU collaboration aimed at developing methods and tools for extragalactic photometry and creating valuable public photometric catalogues. Aims: We produce multiwavelength photometric catalogues (from B to 4.5 μm) for the first two of the Frontier Fields, Abell-2744 and MACS-J0416 (plus their parallel fields). Methods: To detect faint sources even in the central regions of the clusters, we develop a robust and repeatable procedure that uses the public codes Galapagos and Galfit to model and remove most of the light contribution from both the brightest cluster members, and the intra-cluster light. We perform the detection on the processed HST H160 image to obtain a pure H-selected sample, which is the primary catalogue that we publish. We also add a sample of sources which are undetected in the H160 image but appear on a stacked infrared image. Photometry on the other HST bands is obtained using SExtractor, again on processed images after the procedure for foreground light removal. Photometry on the Hawk-I and IRAC bands is obtained using our PSF-matching deconfusion code t-phot. A similar procedure, but without the need for the foreground light removal, is adopted for the Parallel fields. Results: The procedure of foreground light subtraction allows for the detection and the photometric measurements of ~2500 sources per field. We deliver and release complete photometric H-detected catalogues, with the addition of the complementary sample of infrared-detected sources. All objects have multiwavelength coverage including B to H HST bands, plus K

  17. Goddard Robotic Telescope (GRT)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Since it is not possible to predict when a Gamma-Ray Burst (GRB) occurs, the follow-up ground telescopes must be distributed as uniform as possible all over the...

  18. The Dark Matter Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Tyson, J A; Angel, J R P; Wittman, David

    2001-01-01

    Weak gravitational lensing enables direct reconstruction of dark matter maps over cosmologically significant volumes. This research is currently telescope-limited. The Dark Matter Telescope (DMT) is a proposed 8.4 m telescope with a 3 degree field of view, with an etendue of 260 $(m. degree)^2$, ten times greater than any other current or planned telescope. With its large etendue and dedicated observational mode, the DMT fills a nearly unexplored region of parameter space and enables projects that would take decades on current facilities. The DMT will be able to reach 10-sigma limiting magnitudes of 27-28 magnitude in the wavelength range .3 - 1 um over a 7 square degree field in 3 nights of dark time. Here we review its unique weak lensing cosmology capabilities and the design that enables those capabilities.

  19. The Nordic Optical Telescope

    OpenAIRE

    Djupvik, Anlaug Amanda; Andersen, Johannes

    2009-01-01

    An overview of the Nordic Optical Telescope (NOT) is presented. Emphasis is on current capabilities of direct interest to the scientific user community, including instruments. Educational services and prospects and strategies for the future are discussed briefly as well.

  20. Hubble Space Telescope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The characteristics and capabilities of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) are described. The telescope can provide an angular resolution of about 0.1 arcsec, a faint stellar limiting magnitude of about 28 mag, and UV observations greater than or equal to 1150 A. The scientific instruments on the HST include: a wide-field and planetary camera, a faint object spectrograph, a faint object camera, a high speed photometer, a high resolution spectrograph, and three fine guidance sensors. The role of the Space Telescope Science Institute in managing and distributing the HST data is examined. The application of the telescope to the study of cosmology, evolution, QSOs and AGNs, galaxies and cluster, stars and the interstellar medium, and planetary astronomy is proposed

  1. Multiwavelength Observations of the Candidate Disintegrating Sub-Mercury KIC 12557548b

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croll, Bryce; Rappaport, Saul; DeVore, John; Gilliland, Ronald L.; Crepp, Justin R.; Howard, Andrew W.; Star, Kimberly M.; Chiang, Eugene; Levine, Alan M.; Jenkins, Jon M.; Albert, Loic; Bonomo, Aldo S.; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Isaacson, Howard

    2014-05-01

    We present multiwavelength photometry, high angular resolution imaging, and radial velocities of the unique and confounding disintegrating low-mass planet candidate KIC 12557548b. Our high angular resolution imaging, which includes space-based Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 (HST/WFC3) observations in the optical (~0.53 μm and ~0.77 μm), and ground-based Keck/NIRC2 observations in K' band (~2.12 μm), allow us to rule out background and foreground candidates at angular separations greater than 0.''2 that are bright enough to be responsible for the transits we associate with KIC 12557548. Our radial velocity limit from Keck/HIRES allows us to rule out bound, low-mass stellar companions (~0.2 M ⊙) to KIC 12557548 on orbits less than 10 yr, as well as placing an upper limit on the mass of the candidate planet of 1.2 Jupiter masses; therefore, the combination of our radial velocities, high angular resolution imaging, and photometry are able to rule out most false positive interpretations of the transits. Our precise multiwavelength photometry includes two simultaneous detections of the transit of KIC 12557548b using Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope/Wide-field InfraRed Camera (CFHT/WIRCam) at 2.15 μm and the Kepler space telescope at 0.6 μm, as well as simultaneous null-detections of the transit by Kepler and HST/WFC3 at 1.4 μm. Our simultaneous HST/WFC3 and Kepler null-detections provide no evidence for radically different transit depths at these wavelengths. Our simultaneous CFHT/WIRCam detections in the near-infrared and with Kepler in the optical reveal very similar transit depths (the average ratio of the transit depths at ~2.15 μm compared with ~0.6 μm is: 1.02 ± 0.20). This suggests that if the transits we observe are due to scattering from single-size particles streaming from the planet in a comet-like tail, then the particles must be ~0.5 μm in radius or larger, which would favor that KIC 12557548b is a sub-Mercury rather than super

  2. Servicing Mission 4 and the Extraordinary Science of the Hubble Space Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiseman, Jennifer J.

    2012-01-01

    Just two years ago, NASA astronauts performed a challenging and flawless final Space Shuttle servicing mission to the orbiting Hubble Space Telescope. With science instruments repaired on board and two new ones installed, the observatory. is more powerful now than ever before. I will show the dramatic highlights of the servicing mission and present some of the early scientific results from the refurbished telescope. Its high sensitivity and multi-wavelength capabilities are revealing the highest redshift galaxies ever seen, as well as details of the cosmic web of intergalactic medium, large scale structure formation, solar system bodies, and stellar evolution. Enlightening studies of dark matter, dark energy, and exoplanet atmospheres add to the profound contributions to astrophysics that are being made with Hubble, setting a critical stage for future observatories such as the James Webb Space Telescope.

  3. The Cherenkov Telescope Array

    OpenAIRE

    Bigongiari, Ciro

    2016-01-01

    The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) is planned to be the next generation ground based observatory for very high energy (VHE) gamma-ray astronomy. Gamma-rays provide a powerful insight into the non-thermal universe and hopefully a unique probe for new physics. Imaging Cherenkov telescopes have already discovered more than 170 VHE gamma-ray emitters providing plentiful of valuable data and clearly demonstrating the power of this technique. In spite of the impressive results there are indication...

  4. The Atacama Cosmology Telescope

    OpenAIRE

    Kosowsky, Arthur

    2004-01-01

    The Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT) project is described. This multi-institution collaboration aims to produce arcminute-resolution and micro-Kelvin sensitivity maps of the microwave background temperature over 200 square degrees of the sky in three frequency bands. We give a brief overview of the scientific motivations for such a map, followed by a design outline of our six-meter custom telescope, an overview of our proposed bolometer array detector technology, and site considerations and ...

  5. Hubble Space Telescope Configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    This image illustrates the overall Hubble Space Telescope (HST) configuration. The HST is the product of a partnership between NASA, European Space Agency Contractors, and the international community of astronomers. It is named after Edwin P. Hubble, an American Astronomer who discovered the expanding nature of the universe and was the first to realize the true nature of galaxies. The purpose of the HST, the most complex and sensitive optical telescope ever made, is to study the cosmos from a low-Earth orbit. By placing the telescope in space, astronomers are able to collect data that is free of the Earth's atmosphere. The HST detects objects 25 times fainter than the dimmest objects seen from Earth and provides astronomers with an observable universe 250 times larger than visible from ground-based telescopes, perhaps as far away as 14 billion light-years. The HST views galaxies, stars, planets, comets, possibly other solar systems, and even unusual phenomena such as quasars, with 10 times the clarity of ground-based telescopes. The major elements of the HST are the Optical Telescope Assembly (OTA), the Support System Module (SSM), and the Scientific Instruments (SI). The HST is approximately the size of a railroad car, with two cylinders joined together and wrapped in a silvery reflective heat shield blanket. Wing-like solar arrays extend horizontally from each side of these cylinders, and dish-shaped anternas extend above and below the body of the telescope. The HST was deployed from the Space Shuttle Discovery (STS-31 mission) into Earth orbit in April 1990. The Marshall Space Flight Center had responsibility for design, development, and construction of the HST. The Perkin-Elmer Corporation, in Danbury, Connecticut, developed the optical system and guidance sensors. The Lockheed Missile and Space Company of Sunnyvale, California produced the protective outer shroud and spacecraft systems, and assembled and tested the finished telescope.

  6. Monte Carlo comparison of mid-size telescope designs for the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    CERN Document Server

    Jogler, T; Dumm, J

    2012-01-01

    The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) is a future very high energy gamma-ray observatory. CTA will be comprised of small-, medium- and large-size telescopes covering an energy range from tens of GeV to hundreds of TeV and will surpass existing telescopes in sensitivity by an order of magnitude. The aim of our study is to find the optimal design for the medium-size telescopes (MSTs), which will determine the sensitivity in the key energy range between a few hundred GeV to about ten TeV. To study the effect of the telescope design parameters on the array performance, we simulated arrays of 61 MSTs with 120 m spacing and a variety of telescope configurations. We investigated the influence of the primary telescope characteristics including optical resolution, pixel size, and light collection area on the total array performance with a particular emphasis on telescope configurations with imaging performance similar to the proposed Davis-Cotton (DC) and Schwarzschild-Couder (SC) MST designs. We compare the performance...

  7. Monte Carlo comparison of medium-size telescope designs for the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    CERN Document Server

    Jogler, T; Dumm, J

    2013-01-01

    The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) is a future very high energy gamma-ray observatory. CTA will be comprised of small-,medium- and large-size telescopes covering an energy range from tens of GeV to hundreds of TeV and will surpass existing telescopes in sensitivity by an order of magnitude. The aim of our study is to find the optimal design for the medium-size telescopes (MSTs), which will determine the sensitivity in the key energy range between a few hundred GeV to about ten TeV. To study the effect of the telescope design parameters on the array performance, we simulated arrays of 61 MSTs with 120 m spacing and a variety of telescope configurations. We investigated the influence of the primary telescope characteristics including optical resolution, pixel size, and light collection area on the total array performance with a particular emphasis on telescope configurations with imaging performance similar to the proposed Davies-Cotton (DC) and Schwarzschild-Couder (SC) MST designs. We compare the performance...

  8. MAGIC long-term study of the distant TeV blazar PKS 1424+240 in a multiwavelength context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksić, J.; Ansoldi, S.; Antonelli, L. A.; Antoranz, P.; Babic, A.; Bangale, P.; Barres de Almeida, U.; Barrio, J. A.; Becerra González, J.; Bednarek, W.; Berger, K.; Bernardini, E.; Biland, A.; Blanch, O.; Bock, R. K.; Bonnefoy, S.; Bonnoli, G.; Borracci, F.; Bretz, T.; Carmona, E.; Carosi, A.; Carreto Fidalgo, D.; Colin, P.; Colombo, E.; Contreras, J. L.; Cortina, J.; Covino, S.; Da Vela, P.; Dazzi, F.; De Angelis, A.; De Caneva, G.; De Lotto, B.; Delgado Mendez, C.; Doert, M.; Domínguez, A.; Dominis Prester, D.; Dorner, D.; Doro, M.; Einecke, S.; Eisenacher, D.; Elsaesser, D.; Farina, E.; Ferenc, D.; Fonseca, M. V.; Font, L.; Frantzen, K.; Fruck, C.; García López, R. J.; Garczarczyk, M.; Garrido Terrats, D.; Gaug, M.; Giavitto, G.; Godinović, N.; González Muñoz, A.; Gozzini, S. R.; Hadasch, D.; Hayashida, M.; Herrero, A.; Hildebrand, D.; Hose, J.; Hrupec, D.; Idec, W.; Kadenius, V.; Kellermann, H.; Kodani, K.; Konno, Y.; Krause, J.; Kubo, H.; Kushida, J.; La Barbera, A.; Lelas, D.; Lewandowska, N.; Lindfors, E.; Lombardi, S.; López, M.; López-Coto, R.; López-Oramas, A.; Lorenz, E.; Lozano, I.; Makariev, M.; Mallot, K.; Maneva, G.; Mankuzhiyil, N.; Mannheim, K.; Maraschi, L.; Marcote, B.; Mariotti, M.; Martínez, M.; Mazin, D.; Menzel, U.; Meucci, M.; Miranda, J. M.; Mirzoyan, R.; Moralejo, A.; Munar-Adrover, P.; Nakajima, D.; Niedzwiecki, A.; Nilsson, K.; Nishijima, K.; Nowak, N.; Orito, R.; Overkemping, A.; Paiano, S.; Palatiello, M.; Paneque, D.; Paoletti, R.; Paredes, J. M.; Paredes-Fortuny, X.; Partini, S.; Persic, M.; Prada, F.; Prada Moroni, P. G.; Prandini, E.; Preziuso, S.; Puljak, I.; Reinthal, R.; Rhode, W.; Ribó, M.; Rico, J.; Rodriguez Garcia, J.; Rügamer, S.; Saggion, A.; Saito, T.; Saito, K.; Salvati, M.; Satalecka, K.; Scalzotto, V.; Scapin, V.; Schultz, C.; Schweizer, T.; Shore, S. N.; Sillanpää, A.; Sitarek, J.; Snidaric, I.; Sobczynska, D.; Spanier, F.; Stamatescu, V.; Stamerra, A.; Steinbring, T.; Storz, J.; Sun, S.; Surić, T.; Takalo, L.; Takami, H.; Tavecchio, F.; Temnikov, P.; Terzić, T.; Tescaro, D.; Teshima, M.; Thaele, J.; Tibolla, O.; Torres, D. F.; Toyama, T.; Treves, A.; Uellenbeck, M.; Vogler, P.; Wagner, R. M.; Zandanel, F.; Zanin, R.; MAGIC Collaboration; Cutini, S.; Gasparrini, D.; Furniss, A.; Hovatta, T.; Kangas, T.; Kankare, E.; Kotilainen, J.; Lister, M.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Max-Moerbeck, W.; Pavlidou, V.; Readhead, A.; Richards, J.

    2014-07-01

    Aims: We present a study of the very high-energy (VHE; E> 100 GeV) γ-ray emission of the blazar PKS 1424+240 observed with the MAGIC telescopes. The primary aim of this paper is the multiwavelength spectral characterization and modeling of this blazar, which is made particularly interesting by the recent discovery of a lower limit of its redshift of z ≥ 0.6 and makes it a promising candidate to be the most distant VHE source. Methods: The source has been observed with the MAGIC telescopes in VHE γ rays for a total observation time of ~33.6 h from 2009 to 2011. A detailed analysis of its γ-ray spectrum and time evolution has been carried out. Moreover, we have collected and analyzed simultaneous and quasi-simultaneous multiwavelength data. Results: The source was marginally detected in VHE γ rays during 2009 and 2010, and later, the detection was confirmed during an optical outburst in 2011. The combined significance of the stacked sample is ~7.2σ. The differential spectra measured during the different campaigns can be described by steep power laws with the indices ranging from 3.5 ± 1.2 to 5.0 ± 1.7. The MAGIC spectra corrected for the absorption due to the extragalactic background light connect smoothly, within systematic errors, with the mean spectrum in 2009-2011 observed at lower energies by the Fermi-LAT. The absorption-corrected MAGIC spectrum is flat with no apparent turn down up to 400 GeV. The multiwavelength light curve shows increasing flux in radio and optical bands that could point to a common origin from the same region of the jet. The large separation between the two peaks of the constructed non-simultaneous spectral energy distribution also requires an extremely high Doppler factor if an one zone synchrotron self-Compton model is applied. We find that a two-component synchrotron self-Compton model describes the spectral energy distribution of the source well, if the source is located at z ~ 0.6. Appendix is available in electronic form at

  9. Multiwavelength and parsec-scale properties of extragalactic jets

    CERN Document Server

    Cornelia, Müller

    2016-01-01

    Extragalactic jets originating from the central supermassive black holes of active galaxies are powerful, highly relativistic plasma outflows, emitting light from the radio up to the gamma-ray regime. The details of their formation, composition and emission mechanisms are still not completely clear. The combination of high-resolution observations using very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) and multiwavelength monitoring provides the best insight into these objects. Here, such a combined study of sources of the TANAMI sample is presented, investigating the parsec-scale and high-energy properties. The TANAMI program is a multiwavelength monitoring program of a sample of the radio and gamma-ray brightest extragalactic jets in the southern sky, below -30deg declination. We obtain the first-ever VLBI images for most of the sources, providing crucial information on the jet kinematics and brightness distribution at milliarcsecond resolution. Two particular sources are discussed in detail: PMN J1603-4904, which ca...

  10. Alignment telescope for Antares

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Antares Automatic Alignment System employs a specially designed telescope for alignment of its laser beamlines. There are two telescopes in the system, and since each telescope is a primary alignment reference, stringent boresight accuracy and stability over the focus range were required. Optical and mechanical designs, which meet this requirement as well as that of image quality over a wide wavelength band, are described. Special test techniques for initial assembly and alignment of the telescope are also presented. The telescope, which has a 180-mm aperture FK51-KZF2 type glass doublet objective, requires a boresight accuracy of 2.8 μrad at two focal lengths, and object distances between 11 meters and infinity. Travel of a smaller secondary doublet provides focus from 11 m to infinity with approximately 7.8 m effective focal length. By flipping in a third doublet, the effective focal length is reduced to 2.5 m. Telescope alignment was accomplished by using a rotary air bearing to establish an axis in front of the system and placing the focus of a Laser Unequal Path Interferometer (LUPI) at the image plane

  11. Multi-wavelength Study of Transition Region Penumbral Subarcsecond Bright Dots Using IRIS and NST

    CERN Document Server

    Deng, Na; Tian, Hui; Kleint, Lucia; Liu, Chang; Xu, Yan; Wang, Haimin

    2016-01-01

    Using high-resolution transition region (TR) observations taken by the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) mission, Tian et al. (2014b) revealed numerous short-lived subarcsecond bright dots (BDs) above sunspots (mostly located in the penumbrae), which indicate yet unexplained small-scale energy releases. Moreover, whether these subarcsecond TR brightenings have any signature in the lower atmosphere and how they are formed are still not fully resolved. This paper presents a multi-wavelength study of the TR penumbral BDs using a coordinated observation of a near disk-center sunspot with IRIS and the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope (NST) at the Big Bear Solar Observatory. NST provides high-resolution chromospheric and photospheric observations with narrow-band H-alpha imaging spectroscopy and broad-band TiO images, respectively, complementary to IRIS TR observations. A total of 2692 TR penumbral BDs are identified from a 37-minute time series of IRIS 1400 A slitjaw images. Their locations tend to be associat...

  12. Multiwavelength behaviour of the blazar OJ 248 from radio to {\\gamma}-rays

    CERN Document Server

    Carnerero, M I; Villata, M; Acosta-Pulido, J A; D'Ammando, F; Smith, P S; Larionov, V M

    2015-01-01

    We present an analysis of the multiwavelength behaviour of the blazar OJ 248 at z = 0.939 in the period 2006-2013. We use low-energy data (optical, near-infrared, and radio) obtained by 21 observatories participating in the GLAST-AGILE Support Program (GASP) of the Whole Earth Blazar Telescope (WEBT), as well as data from the Swift (optical-UV and X-rays) and Fermi (gamma-rays) satellites, to study flux and spectral variability and correlations among emissions in different bands. We take into account the effect of absorption by the Damped Lyman Alpha intervening system at z = 0.525. Two major outbursts were observed in 2006-2007 and in 2012-2013 at optical and near-IR wavelengths, while in the high-frequency radio light curves prominent radio outbursts are visible peaking at the end of 2010 and beginning of 2013, revealing a complex radio-optical correlation. Cross-correlation analysis suggests a delay of the optical variations after the gamma-ray ones of about a month, which is a peculiar behaviour in blazar...

  13. A real-time fast radio burst: polarization detection and multiwavelength follow-up

    CERN Document Server

    Petroff, E; Barr, E D; Barsdell, B R; Bhat, N D R; Bian, F; Burke-Spolaor, S; Caleb, M; Champion, D; Chandra, P; Da Costa, G; Delvaux, C; Flynn, C; Gehrels, N; Greiner, J; Jameson, A; Johnston, S; Kasliwal, M M; Keane, E F; Keller, S; Kocz, J; Kramer, M; Leloudas, G; Malesani, D; Mulchaey, J S; Ng, C; Ofek, E O; Perley, D A; Possenti, A; Schmidt, B P; Shen, Yue; Stappers, B; Tisserand, P; van Straten, W; Wolf, C

    2014-01-01

    Fast radio bursts (FRBs) are one of the most tantalizing mysteries of the radio sky; their progenitors and origins remain unknown and until now no rapid multiwavelength follow-up of an FRB has been possible. New instrumentation has decreased the time between observation and discovery from years to seconds, and enables polarimetry to be performed on FRBs for the first time. We have discovered an FRB (FRB 140514) in real-time on 14 May, 2014 at 17:14:11.06 UTC at the Parkes radio telescope and triggered follow-up at other wavelengths within hours of the event. FRB 140514 was found with a dispersion measure (DM) of 562.7(6) cm$^{-3}$ pc, giving an upper limit on source redshift of $z \\lesssim 0.5$. FRB 140514 was found to be 21$\\pm$7% (3-$\\sigma$) circularly polarized on the leading edge with a 1-$\\sigma$ upper limit on linear polarization $<10%$. We conclude that this polarization is intrinsic to the FRB. If there was any intrinsic linear polarization, as might be expected from coherent emission, then it may...

  14. Novel Analysis of the Multiwavelength Structure of Relativistic Jet in Quasar 3C 273

    CERN Document Server

    Marchenko, Volodymyr; Ostrowski, Michal; Stawarz, Lukasz; Bohdan, Artem; Jamrozy, Marek; Hnatyk, Bohdan

    2016-01-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the best-quality multi-wavelength data gathered for the large-scale jet in the core-dominated quasar 3C 273. We analyze all the archival observations of the target with the Chandra X-ray Observatory, the far-ultraviolet observations with the Hubble Space Telescope, and a 8.4 GHz maps obtained with the Very Large Array. In our study we focus on investigating the morphology of the outflow at different frequencies, and therefore we apply various techniques for the image deconvolution, paying particular attention to a precise modeling of the Chandra and Hubble point spread functions. We find that the prominent brightness enhancements in the X-ray and far-ultraviolet jet of 3C 273 - the "knots" - are not point-like, and can be resolved transversely as extended features with sizes of about $\\simeq 0.5$ kpc. Also, the radio outflow is wider than the deconvolved X-ray/ultraviolet jet. Finally, the intensity peaks of the X-ray knots are located systematically upstream of the correspon...

  15. MULTIWAVELENGTH OBSERVATIONS AND MODELING OF 1ES 1959+650 IN A LOW FLUX STATE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aliu, E.; Errando, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Barnard College, Columbia University, NY 10027 (United States); Archambault, S. [Physics Department, McGill University, Montreal, QC H3A 2T8 (Canada); Arlen, T.; Aune, T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Beilicke, M.; Bugaev, V.; Dickherber, R. [Department of Physics, Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States); Benbow, W. [Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Amado, AZ 85645 (United States); Bird, R.; Collins-Hughes, E. [School of Physics, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Boettcher, M. [Astrophysical Institute, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ohio University, Athens, OH 45701 (United States); Bouvier, A. [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics and Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Byrum, K. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Cesarini, A.; Connolly, M. P. [School of Physics, National University of Ireland Galway, University Road, Galway (Ireland); Ciupik, L. [Astronomy Department, Adler Planetarium and Astronomy Museum, Chicago, IL 60605 (United States); Cui, W. [Department of Physics, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Duke, C. [Department of Physics, Grinnell College, Grinnell, IA 50112-1690 (United States); Dumm, J. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); and others

    2013-09-20

    We report on the VERITAS observations of the high-frequency peaked BL Lac object 1ES 1959+650 in the period 2007-2011. This source is detected at TeV energies by VERITAS at 16.4 standard deviation ({sigma}) significance in 7.6 hr of observation in a low flux state. A multiwavelength spectral energy distribution (SED) is constructed from contemporaneous data from VERITAS, Fermi-LAT, RXTE PCA, and Swift UVOT. Swift XRT data is not included in the SED due to a lack of simultaneous observations with VERITAS. In contrast to the orphan {gamma}-ray flare exhibited by this source in 2002, the X-ray flux of the source is found to vary by an order of magnitude, while other energy regimes exhibit less variable emission. A quasi-equilibrium synchrotron self-Compton model with an additional external radiation field is used to describe three SEDs corresponding to the lowest, highest, and average X-ray states. The variation in the X-ray spectrum is modeled by changing the electron injection spectral index, with minor adjustments of the kinetic luminosity in electrons. This scenario produces small-scale flux variability of the order of {approx}< 2 in the high energy (E > 1 MeV) and very high energy (E > 100 GeV) {gamma}-ray regimes, which is corroborated by the Fermi-LAT, VERITAS, and Whipple 10 m telescope light curves.

  16. MULTIWAVELENGTH OBSERVATIONS AND MODELING OF 1ES 1959+650 IN A LOW FLUX STATE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on the VERITAS observations of the high-frequency peaked BL Lac object 1ES 1959+650 in the period 2007-2011. This source is detected at TeV energies by VERITAS at 16.4 standard deviation (σ) significance in 7.6 hr of observation in a low flux state. A multiwavelength spectral energy distribution (SED) is constructed from contemporaneous data from VERITAS, Fermi-LAT, RXTE PCA, and Swift UVOT. Swift XRT data is not included in the SED due to a lack of simultaneous observations with VERITAS. In contrast to the orphan γ-ray flare exhibited by this source in 2002, the X-ray flux of the source is found to vary by an order of magnitude, while other energy regimes exhibit less variable emission. A quasi-equilibrium synchrotron self-Compton model with an additional external radiation field is used to describe three SEDs corresponding to the lowest, highest, and average X-ray states. The variation in the X-ray spectrum is modeled by changing the electron injection spectral index, with minor adjustments of the kinetic luminosity in electrons. This scenario produces small-scale flux variability of the order of ∼ 1 MeV) and very high energy (E > 100 GeV) γ-ray regimes, which is corroborated by the Fermi-LAT, VERITAS, and Whipple 10 m telescope light curves

  17. Multiwavelength Observations and Modeling of 1ES 1959+650 in a Low Flux State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliu, E.; Archambault, S.; Arlen, T.; Aune, T.; Beilicke, M.; Benbow, W.; Bird, R.; Böttcher, M.; Bouvier, A.; Bugaev, V.; Byrum, K.; Cesarini, A.; Ciupik, L.; Collins-Hughes, E.; Connolly, M. P.; Cui, W.; Dickherber, R.; Duke, C.; Dumm, J.; Errando, M.; Falcone, A.; Federici, S.; Feng, Q.; Finley, J. P.; Finnegan, G.; Fortson, L.; Furniss, A.; Galante, N.; Gall, D.; Gillanders, G. H.; Griffin, S.; Grube, J.; Gyuk, G.; Hanna, D.; Holder, J.; Hughes, G.; Humensky, T. B.; Kaaret, P.; Kertzman, M.; Khassen, Y.; Kieda, D.; Krawczynski, H.; Krennrich, F.; Lang, M. J.; Madhavan, A. S.; Maier, G.; Majumdar, P.; McArthur, S.; McCann, A.; Moriarty, P.; Mukherjee, R.; Nelson, T.; O'Faoláin de Bhróithe, A.; Ong, R. A.; Orr, M.; Otte, A. N.; Park, N.; Perkins, J. S.; Pichel, A.; Pohl, M.; Popkow, A.; Prokoph, H.; Quinn, J.; Ragan, K.; Reyes, L. C.; Reynolds, P. T.; Roache, E.; Saxon, D. B.; Schroedter, M.; Sembroski, G. H.; Skole, C.; Smith, A. W.; Staszak, D.; Telezhinsky, I.; Theiling, M.; Tyler, J.; Varlotta, A.; Vassiliev, V. V.; Wakely, S. P.; Weekes, T. C.; Weinstein, A.; Welsing, R.; Williams, D. A.; Zitzer, B.

    2013-09-01

    We report on the VERITAS observations of the high-frequency peaked BL Lac object 1ES 1959+650 in the period 2007-2011. This source is detected at TeV energies by VERITAS at 16.4 standard deviation (σ) significance in 7.6 hr of observation in a low flux state. A multiwavelength spectral energy distribution (SED) is constructed from contemporaneous data from VERITAS, Fermi-LAT, RXTE PCA, and Swift UVOT. Swift XRT data is not included in the SED due to a lack of simultaneous observations with VERITAS. In contrast to the orphan γ-ray flare exhibited by this source in 2002, the X-ray flux of the source is found to vary by an order of magnitude, while other energy regimes exhibit less variable emission. A quasi-equilibrium synchrotron self-Compton model with an additional external radiation field is used to describe three SEDs corresponding to the lowest, highest, and average X-ray states. The variation in the X-ray spectrum is modeled by changing the electron injection spectral index, with minor adjustments of the kinetic luminosity in electrons. This scenario produces small-scale flux variability of the order of 1 MeV) and very high energy (E > 100 GeV) γ-ray regimes, which is corroborated by the Fermi-LAT, VERITAS, and Whipple 10 m telescope light curves.

  18. Multi-Wavelength Observations of the Blazar 1ES 1011+496 in Spring 2008

    CERN Document Server

    Ahnen, M L; Antonelli, L A; Antoranz, P; Babic, A; Banerjee, B; Bangale, P; de Almeida, U Barres; Barrio, J A; Gonzalez, J Becerra; Bednarek, W; Bernardini, E; Biasuzzi, B; Biland, A; Blanch, O; Bonnefoy, S; Bonnoli, G; Borracci, F; Bretz, T; Carmona, E; Carosi, A; Chatterjee, A; Clavero, R; Colin, P; Colombo, E; Contreras, J L; Cortina, J; Covino, S; Da Vela, P; Dazzi, F; De Angelis, A; De Caneva, G; De Lotto, B; Wilhelmi, E de Ona; Mendez, C Delgado; Di Pierro, F; Prester, D Dominis; Dorner, D; Doro, M; Einecke, S; Elsaesser, D; Fernandez-Barral, A; Fidalgo, D; Fonseca, M V; Font, L; Frantzen, K; Fruck, C; Galindo, D; Lopez, R J Garcia; Garczarczyk, M; Terrats, D Garrido; Gaug, M; Giammaria, P; Glawion, D; Godinovic, N; Munoz, A Gonzalez; Guberman, D; Hanabata, Y; Hayashida, M; Herrera, J; Hose, J; Hrupec, D; Hughes, G; Idec, W; Kodani, K; Konno, Y; Kubo, H; Kushida, J; La Barbera, A; Lelas, D; Lindfors, E; Lombardi, S; Longo, F; Lopez, M; Lopez-Coto, R; Lopez-Oramas, A; Lorenz, E; Majumdar, P; Makariev, M; Mallot, K; Maneva, G; Manganaro, M; Mannheim, K; Maraschi, L; Marcote, B; Mariotti, M; Martinez, M; Mazin, D; Menzel, U; Miranda, J M; Mirzoyan, R; Moralejo, A; Nakajima, D; Neustroev, V; Niedzwiecki, A; Rosillo, M Nievas; Nilsson, K; Nishijima, K; Noda, K; Orito, R; Overkemping, A; Paiano, S; Palacio, J; Palatiello, M; Paneque, D; Paoletti, R; Paredes, J M; Paredes-Fortuny, X; Persic, M; Poutanen, J; Moroni, P G Prada; Prandini, E; Puljak, I; Reinthal, R; Rhode, W; Ribo, M; Rico, J; Garcia, J Rodriguez; Rugamer, S; Saito, T; Satalecka, K; Scapin, V; Schultz, C; Schweizer, T; Shore, S N; Sillanpaa, A; Sitarek, J; Snidaric, I; Sobczynska, D; Stamerra, A; Steinbring, T; Strzys, M; Takalo, L; Takami, H; Tavecchio, F; Temnikov, P; Terzic, T; Tescaro, D; Teshima, M; Thaele, J; Torres, D F; Toyama, T; Treves, A; Verguilov, V; Vovk, I; Ward, J E; Will, M; Wu, M H; Zanin, R; Lucarelli, F; Pittori, C; Berdyugin, A; Carini, M T; Lahteenmaki, A; Pasanen, M; Pease, A; Sainio, J; Tornikoski, M; Walters, R

    2016-01-01

    The BL Lac object 1ES 1011+496 was discovered at Very High Energy gamma-rays by MAGIC in spring 2007. Before that the source was little studied in different wavelengths. Therefore a multi-wavelength (MWL) campaign was organized in spring 2008. Along MAGIC, the MWL campaign included the Metsahovi radio observatory, Bell and KVA optical telescopes and the Swift and AGILE satellites. MAGIC observations span from March to May, 2008 for a total of 27.9 hours, of which 19.4 hours remained after quality cuts. The light curve showed no significant variability. The differential VHE spectrum could be described with a power-law function. Both results were similar to those obtained during the discovery. Swift XRT observations revealed an X-ray flare, characterized by a harder when brighter trend, as is typical for high synchrotron peak BL Lac objects (HBL). Strong optical variability was found during the campaign, but no conclusion on the connection between the optical and VHE gamma-ray bands could be drawn. The contempo...

  19. Multi-Wavelength Study of Sgr A*: The Short Time Scale Variability

    CERN Document Server

    Yusef-Zadeh, F; Roberts, D; Wardle, M; Reid, M; Dodds-Eden, K; Porquet, D; Grosso, N

    2010-01-01

    To understand the correlation and the radiation mechanism of flare emission in different wavelength bands, we have coordinated a number of telescopes to observe SgrA* simultaneously. We focus only on one aspect of the preliminary results of our multi-wavelength observing campaigns, namely, the short time scale variability of emission from SgrA* in near-IR, X-ray and radio wavelengths. The structure function analysis indicate most of the power spectral density is detected on hourly time scales in all wavelength bands. We also report minute time scale variability at 7 and 13mm placing a strong constraint on the nature of the variable emission. The hourly time scale variability can be explained in the context of a model in which the peak frequency of emission shifts toward lower frequencies as a self-absorbed synchrotron source expands adiabatically near the acceleration site. The short time scale variability, on the other hand, places a strong constraint on the size of the emitting region. Assuming that rapid m...

  20. Galaxy evolution in a complex environment: a multi-wavelength study of HCG 7

    CERN Document Server

    Konstantopoulos, I S; Fedotov, K; Durrell, P R; Heiderman, A; Elmegreen, D M; Charlton, J C; Hibbard, J E; Tzanavaris, P; Chandar, R; Johnson, K E; Maybhate, A; Zabludoff, A E; Gronwall, C; Szathmary, D; Hornschemeier, A E; English, J; Whitmore, B; de Oliveira, C Mendes; Mulchaey, J S

    2010-01-01

    [Abridged] The environment where galaxies are found heavily influences their evolution. Close groupings, like the cores of galaxy clusters or compact groups, evolve in ways far more dramatic than their isolated counterparts. We have conducted a multiwavelength study of HCG7, consisting of four giant galaxies: 3 spirals and 1 lenticular. We use Hubble Space Telescope (HST) imaging to identify and characterize the young and old star cluster populations. We find young massive clusters (YMC) mostly in the three spirals, while the lenticular features a large, unimodal population of globular clusters (GC) but no detectable clusters with ages less than ~Gyr. The spatial and approximate age distributions of the ~300 YMCs and ~150 GCs thus hint at a regular star formation history in the group over a Hubble time. While at first glance the HST data show the galaxies as undisturbed, our deep ground-based, wide-field imaging that extends the HST coverage reveals faint signatures of stellar material in the intra-group medi...

  1. MAGIC search for VHE $\\gamma$-ray emission from AE Aquarii in a multiwavelength context

    CERN Document Server

    Aleksić, J; Antonelli, L A; Antoranz, P; Babic, A; Bangale, P; Barrio, J A; González, J Becerra; Bednarek, W; Bernardini, E; Biasuzzi, B; Biland, A; Blanch, O; Bonnefoy, S; Bonnoli, G; Borracci, F; Bretz, T; Carmona, E; Carosi, A; Colin, P; Colombo, E; Contreras, J L; Cortina, J; Covino, S; Da Vela, P; Dazzi, F; De Angelis, A; De Caneva, G; De Lotto, B; Wilhelmi, E de Oña; Mendez, C Delgado; Doert, M; Prester, D Dominis; Dorner, D; Doro, M; Einecke, S; Eisenacher, D; Elsaesser, D; Fonseca, M V; Font, L; Frantzen, K; Fruck, C; Galindo, D; López, R J García; Garczarczyk, M; Terrats, D Garrido; Gaug, M; Godinović, N; Muñoz, A González; Gozzini, S R; Hadasch, D; Hanabata, Y; Hayashida, M; Herrera, J; Hildebrand, D; Hose, J; Hrupec, D; Idec, W; Kadenius, V; Kellermann, H; Kodani, K; Konno, Y; Krause, J; Kubo, H; Kushida, J; La Barbera, A; Lelas, D; Lewandowska, N; Lindfors, E; Lombardi, S; López, M; López-Coto, R; López-Oramas, A; Lorenz, E; Lozano, I; Makariev, M; Mallot, K; Maneva, G; Mankuzhiyil, N; Mannheim, K; Maraschi, L; Marcote, B; Mariotti, M; Martínez, M; Mazin, D; Menzel, U; Miranda, J M; Mirzoyan, R; Moralejo, A; Munar-Adrover, P; Nakajima, D; Niedzwiecki, A; Nilsson, K; Nishijima, K; Noda, K; Nowak, N; Orito, R; Overkemping, A; Paiano, S; Palatiello, M; Paneque, D; Paoletti, R; Paredes, J M; Paredes-Fortuny, X; Persic, M; Moroni, P G Prada; Prandini, E; Preziuso, S; Puljak, I; Reinthal, R; Rhode, W; Ribó, M; Rico, J; Garcia, J Rodriguez; Rügamer, S; Saggion, A; Saito, T; Saito, K; Satalecka, K; Scalzotto, V; Scapin, V; Schultz, C; Schweizer, T; Sillanpää, A; Sitarek, J; Snidaric, I; Sobczynska, D; Spanier, F; Stamatescu, V; Stamerra, A; Steinbring, T; Storz, J; Strzys, M; Takalo, L; Takami, H; Tavecchio, F; Temnikov, P; Terzić, T; Tescaro, D; Teshima, M; Thaele, J; Tibolla, O; Torres, D F; Toyama, T; Treves, A; Uellenbeck, M; Vogler, P; Wagner, R M; Zanin, R; Bogosavljevic, M; Ioannou, Z; Mauche, C W; Palaiologou, E V; Pérez-Torres, M A; Tuominen, T

    2014-01-01

    It has been claimed that the nova-like cataclysmic variable (CV) AE Aquarii (AE Aqr) is a very-high-energy (VHE, $E>$100 GeV) source both on observational and theoretical grounds. We aim to search for VHE gamma-ray emission from AE Aqr during different states of the source at several wavelengths to confirm or rule out previous claims of detection of gamma-ray emission from this object. We report on observations of AE Aqr performed by MAGIC. The source was observed during 12 hours as part of a multiwavelength campaign carried out between May and June 2012 covering the optical, X-ray, and gamma-ray ranges. Besides MAGIC, the other facilities involved were the KVA, Skinakas, and Vidojevica telescopes in the optical and Swift in X-rays. We calculated integral upper limits coincident with different states of the source in the optical. We computed upper limits to the pulsed emission limiting the signal region to 30% of the phaseogram and we also searched for pulsed emission at different frequencies applying the Ray...

  2. Multi-Wavelength Observations of Comet C/2011 L4 (Pan-Starrs)

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, B; Meech, K; Owen, T; Wainscoat, R

    2014-01-01

    Dynamically new comet C/2011 L4 (PanSTARRS) is one of the brightest comets since the great comet C/1995 O1 (Hale-Bopp). Here, we present our multi-wavelength observations of C/2011 L4 during its in-bound passage to the inner Solar system. A strong absorption band of water ice at 2.0 $\\mu$m was detected in the near infrared spectra, taken with the 8-m Gemini-North and 3-m IRTF telescopes. The companion 1.5 $\\mu$m band of water ice, however, was not observed. Spectral modeling show that the absence of the 1.5 $\\mu$m feature can be explained by the presence of sub-micron-sized fine ice grains. No gas lines (i.e. CN, HCN or CO) were observed pre-perihelion either in the optical or in the sub-millimeter. 3-$\\sigma$ upper limits to the CN and CO production rates were derived. The comet exhibited a very strong continuum in the optical and its slope seemed to become redder as the comet approached the Sun. Our observations suggest that C/2011 L4 is an unusually dust-rich comet with a dust-to-gas mass ratio $>$ 4.

  3. MAGIC TeV Gamma-Ray Observations of Markarian 421 during Multiwavelength Campaigns in 2006

    CERN Document Server

    Aleksić, J; Antoranz, P; Backes, M; Baixeras, C; Balestra, S; Barrio, J A; Bastieri, D; González, J Becerra; Bednarek, W; Berdyugin, A; Berger, K; Bernardini, E; Biland, A; Bock, R K; Bonnoli, G; Bordas, P; Tridon, D Borla; Bosch-Ramon, V; Bose, D; Braun, I; Bretz, T; Britzger, D; Camara, M; Carmona, E; Carosi, A; Colin, P; Commichau, S; Contreras, J L; Cortina, J; Costado, M T; Covino, S; Dazzi, F; De Angelis, A; del Pozo, E De Cea; Mendez, C Delgado; Reyes, R De los; De Lotto, B; De Maria, M; De Sabata, F; Doert, M; Domínguez, A; Prester, D Dominis; Dorner, D; Doro, M; Elsaesser, D; Errando, M; Ferenc, D; Fonseca, M V; Font, L; López, R J García; Garczarczyk, M; Gaug, M; Godinovic, N; Hadasch, D; Herrero, A; Hildebrand, D; Höhne-Mönch, D; Hose, J; Hrupec, D; Hsu, C C; Jogler, T; Klepser, S; Krähenbühl, T; Kranich, D; La Barbera, A; Laille, A; Leonardo, E; Lindfors, E; Lombardi, S; Longo, F; López, M; Lorenz, E; Majumdar, P; Maneva, G; Mankuzhiyil, N; Mannheim, K; Maraschi, L; Mariotti, M; Martínez, M; Mazin, D; Meucci, M; Miranda, J M; Mirzoyan, R; Miyamoto, H; Moldón, J; Moles, M; Moralejo, A; Nieto, D; Nilsson, K; Ninkovic, J; Orito, R; Oya, I; Paiano, S; Paoletti, R; Paredes, J M; Partini, S; Pasanen, M; Pascoli, D; Pauss, F; Pegna, R G; Perez-Torres, M A; Persic, M; Peruzzo, L; Prada, F; Prandini, E; Puchades, N; Puljak, I; Reichardt, I; Rhode, W; Ribó, M; Rico, J; Rissi, M; Rügamer, S; Saggion, A; Saito, T Y; Salvati, M; Sánchez-Conde, M; Satalecka, K; Scalzotto, V; Scapin, V; Schultz, C; Schweizer, T; Shayduk, M; Shore, S N; Sierpowska-Bartosik, A; Sillanpää, A; Sitarek, J; Sobczynska, D; Spanier, F; Spiro, S; Stamerra, A; Steinke, B; Struebig, J C; Suric, T; Takalo, L; Tavecchio, F; Temnikov, P; Terzic, T; Tescaro, D; Teshima, M; Torres, D F; Vankov, H; Wagner, R M; Zabalza, V; Zandanel, F; Zanin, R

    2014-01-01

    The Major Atmospheric Gamma Imaging Cerenkov (MAGIC) telescope participated in three multiwavelength (MWL) campaigns, observing the blazar Markarian (Mkn) 421 during the nights of 2006 April 28, 29, and 2006 June 14. We analyzed the corresponding MAGIC very-high energy observations during 9 nights from 2006 April 22 to 30 and on 2006 June 14. We inferred light curves with sub-day resolution and night-by-night energy spectra. A strong gamma-ray signal was detected from Mkn 421 on all observation nights. The flux (E > 250 GeV) varied on night-by-night basis between (0.92+-0.11)10^-10 cm^-2 s^-1 (0.57 Crab units) and (3.21+-0.15)10^-10 cm^-2 s^-1 (2.0 Crab units) in 2006 April. There is a clear indication for intra-night variability with a doubling time of 36+-10(stat) minutes on the night of 2006 April 29, establishing once more rapid flux variability for this object. For all individual nights gamma-ray spectra could be inferred, with power-law indices ranging from 1.66 to 2.47. We did not find statistically si...

  4. Multiwavelength Transit Observations of the Candidate Disintegrating Planetesimals Orbiting WD 1145+017

    CERN Document Server

    Croll, Bryce; Vanderburg, Andrew; Eastman, Jason; Rappaport, Saul; DeVore, John; Bieryla, Allyson; Muirhead, Philip S; Han, Eunkyu; Latham, David W; Beatty, Thomas G; Wittenmyer, Robert A; Wright, Jason T; Johnson, John Asher; McCrady, Nate

    2015-01-01

    We present multiwavelength, multi-telescope, ground-based follow-up photometry of the white dwarf WD 1145+017, that has recently been suggested to be orbited by up to six or more, short-period, low-mass, disintegrating planetesimals. We detect 9 significant dips in flux of between 10% and 30% of the stellar flux from our ground-based photometry. We observe transits deeper than 10% on average every ~3.6 hr in our photometry. This suggests that WD 1145+017 is indeed being orbited by multiple, short-period objects. Through fits to the multiple asymmetric transits that we observe, we confirm that the transit egress timescale is usually longer than the ingress timescale, and that the transit duration is longer than expected for a solid body at these short periods, all suggesting that these objects have cometary tails streaming behind them. The precise orbital periods of the planetesimals in this system are unclear from the transit-times, but at least one object, and likely more, have orbital periods of ~4.5 hours....

  5. MAGIC Observations and multiwavelength properties of the quasar 3C 279 in 2007 and 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksić, J.; Antonelli, L. A.; Antoranz, P.; Backes, M.; Barrio, J. A.; Bastieri, D.; Becerra González, J.; Bednarek, W.; Berdyugin, A.; Berger, K.; Bernardini, E.; Biland, A.; Blanch, O.; Bock, R. K.; Boller, A.; Bonnoli, G.; Borla Tridon, D.; Braun, I.; Bretz, T.; Cañellas, A.; Carmona, E.; Carosi, A.; Colin, P.; Colombo, E.; Contreras, J. L.; Cortina, J.; Cossio, L.; Covino, S.; Dazzi, F.; de Angelis, A.; de Cea Del Pozo, E.; de Lotto, B.; Delgado Mendez, C.; Diago Ortega, A.; Doert, M.; Domínguez, A.; Dominis Prester, D.; Dorner, D.; Doro, M.; Elsaesser, D.; Ferenc, D.; Fonseca, M. V.; Font, L.; Fruck, C.; García López, R. J.; Garczarczyk, M.; Garrido, D.; Giavitto, G.; Godinović, N.; Hadasch, D.; Häfner, D.; Herrero, A.; Hildebrand, D.; Hose, J.; Hrupec, D.; Huber, B.; Jogler, T.; Klepser, S.; Krähenbühl, T.; Krause, J.; La Barbera, A.; Lelas, D.; Leonardo, E.; Lindfors, E.; Lombardi, S.; López, M.; Lorenz, E.; Majumdar, P.; Makariev, M.; Maneva, G.; Mankuzhiyil, N.; Mannheim, K.; Maraschi, L.; Mariotti, M.; Martínez, M.; Mazin, D.; Meucci, M.; Miranda, J. M.; Mirzoyan, R.; Miyamoto, H.; Moldón, J.; Moralejo, A.; Nieto, D.; Nilsson, K.; Orito, R.; Oya, I.; Paoletti, R.; Pardo, S.; Paredes, J. M.; Partini, S.; Pasanen, M.; Pauss, F.; Perez-Torres, M. A.; Persic, M.; Peruzzo, L.; Pilia, M.; Pochon, J.; Prada, F.; Prada Moroni, P. G.; Prandini, E.; Puljak, I.; Reichardt, I.; Reinthal, R.; Rhode, W.; Ribó, M.; Rico, J.; Rügamer, S.; Rüger, M.; Saggion, A.; Saito, K.; Saito, T. Y.; Salvati, M.; Satalecka, K.; Scalzotto, V.; Scapin, V.; Schultz, C.; Schweizer, T.; Shayduk, M.; Shore, S. N.; Sillanpää, A.; Sitarek, J.; Sobczynska, D.; Spanier, F.; Spiro, S.; Stamerra, A.; Steinke, B.; Storz, J.; Strah, N.; Surić, T.; Takalo, L.; Tavecchio, F.; Temnikov, P.; Terzić, T.; Tescaro, D.; Teshima, M.; Thom, M.; Tibolla, O.; Torres, D. F.; Treves, A.; Vankov, H.; Vogler, P.; Wagner, R. M.; Weitzel, Q.; Zabalza, V.; Zandanel, F.; Zanin, R.

    2011-06-01

    Context. 3C 279, the first quasar discovered to emit VHE γ-rays by the MAGIC telescope in 2006, was reobserved by MAGIC in January 2007 during a major optical flare and from December 2008 to April 2009 following an alert from the Fermi space telescope on an exceptionally high γ-ray state. Aims: The January 2007 observations resulted in a detection on January 16 with significance 5.4σ, corresponding to a F (>150 GeV) (3.8 ± 0.8) × 10-11 ph cm-2 s-1 while the overall data sample does not show significant signal. The December 2008-April 2009 observations did not detect the source. We study the multiwavelength behaviour of the source at the epochs of MAGIC observations, collecting quasi-simultaneous data at optical and X-ray frequencies and for 2009 also γ-ray data from Fermi. Methods: We study the light curves and spectral energy distribution of the source. The spectral energy distributions of three observing epochs (including the February 2006, which has been previously published) are modelled with one-zone inverse Compton models and the emission on January 16, 2007 also with two zone model and with a lepto-hadronic model. Results: We find that the VHE γ-ray emission detected in 2006 and 2007 challenges standard one-zone model, based on relativistic electrons in a jet scattering broad line region photons, while the other studied models fit the observed spectral energy distribution more satisfactorily.

  6. Multiwavelength observations of the blazar 1ES 1011+496 in Spring 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahnen, M. L.; Ansoldi, S.; Antonelli, L. A.; Antoranz, P.; Babic, A.; Banerjee, B.; Bangale, P.; de Almeida, U. Barres; Barrio, J. A.; González, J. Becerra; Bednarek, W.; Bernardini, E.; Biasuzzi, B.; Biland, A.; Blanch, O.; Bonnefoy, S.; Bonnoli, G.; Borracci, F.; Bretz, T.; Carmona, E.; Carosi, A.; Chatterjee, A.; Clavero, R.; Colin, P.; Colombo, E.; Contreras, J. L.; Cortina, J.; Covino, S.; Da Vela, P.; Dazzi, F.; De Angelis, A.; De Caneva, G.; De Lotto, B.; de Oña Wilhelmi, E.; Mendez, C. Delgado; Pierro, F. Di; Prester, D. Dominis; Dorner, D.; Doro, M.; Einecke, S.; Elsaesser, D.; Fernández-Barral, A.; Fidalgo, D.; Fonseca, M. V.; Font, L.; Frantzen, K.; Fruck, C.; Galindo, D.; López, R. J. García; Garczarczyk, M.; Terrats, D. Garrido; Gaug, M.; Giammaria, P.; (Eisenacher), D. Glawion; Godinović, N.; Muñoz, A. González; Guberman, D.; Hanabata, Y.; Hayashida, M.; Herrera, J.; Hose, J.; Hrupec, D.; Hughes, G.; Idec, W.; Kodani, K.; Konno, Y.; Kubo, H.; Kushida, J.; Barbera, A. La; Lelas, D.; Lindfors, E.; Lombardi, S.; Longo, F.; López, M.; López-Coto, R.; López-Oramas, A.; Lorenz, E.; Majumdar, P.; Makariev, M.; Mallot, K.; Maneva, G.; Manganaro, M.; Mannheim, K.; Maraschi, L.; Marcote, B.; Mariotti, M.; Martínez, M.; Mazin, D.; Menzel, U.; Miranda, J. M.; Mirzoyan, R.; Moralejo, A.; Nakajima, D.; Neustroev, V.; Niedzwiecki, A.; Rosillo, M. Nievas; Nilsson, K.; Nishijima, K.; Noda, K.; Orito, R.; Overkemping, A.; Paiano, S.; Palacio, J.; Palatiello, M.; Paneque, D.; Paoletti, R.; Paredes, J. M.; Paredes-Fortuny, X.; Persic, M.; Poutanen, J.; Moroni, P. G. Prada; Prandini, E.; Puljak, I.; Reinthal, R.; Rhode, W.; Ribó, M.; Rico, J.; Garcia, J. Rodriguez; Rügamer, S.; Saito, T.; Satalecka, K.; Scapin, V.; Schultz, C.; Schweizer, T.; Shore, S. N.; Sillanpää, A.; Sitarek, J.; Snidaric, I.; Sobczynska, D.; Stamerra, A.; Steinbring, T.; Strzys, M.; Takalo, L.; Takami, H.; Tavecchio, F.; Temnikov, P.; Terzić, T.; Tescaro, D.; Teshima, M.; Thaele, J.; Torres, D. F.; Toyama, T.; Treves, A.; Verguilov, V.; Vovk, I.; Ward, J. E.; Will, M.; Wu, M. H.; Zanin, R.; Lucarelli, F.; Pittori, C.; Vercellone, S.; Berdyugin, A.; Carini, M. T.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Pasanen, M.; Pease, A.; Sainio, J.; Tornikoski, M.; Walters, R.

    2016-07-01

    The BL Lac object 1ES 1011+496 was discovered at very high energy (VHE, E > 100GeV) γ-rays by Major Atmospheric Gamma-ray Imaging Cherenkov (MAGIC) in Spring 2007. Before that the source was little studied in different wavelengths. Therefore, a multiwavelength (MWL) campaign was organized in Spring 2008. Along MAGIC, the MWL campaign included the Metsähovi Radio Observatory, Bell and Kungliga Vetenskapsakademien (KVA) optical telescopes and the Swift and AGILE satellites. MAGIC observations span from 2008 March to May for a total of 27.9 h, of which 19.4 h remained after quality cuts. The light curve showed no significant variability yielding an integral flux above 200 GeV of (1.3 ± 0.3) × 10-11 photons cm-2 s-1. The differential VHE spectrum could be described with a power-law function with a spectral index of 3.3 ± 0.4. Both results were similar to those obtained during the discovery. Swift X-ray Telescope observations revealed an X-ray flare, characterized by a harder-when-brighter trend, as is typical for high synchrotron peak BL Lac objects (HBL). Strong optical variability was found during the campaign, but no conclusion on the connection between the optical and VHE γ-ray bands could be drawn. The contemporaneous spectral energy distribution shows a synchrotron-dominated source, unlike concluded in previous work based on non-simultaneous data, and is well described by a standard one-zone synchrotron self-Compton model. We also performed a study on the source classification. While the optical and X-ray data taken during our campaign show typical characteristics of an HBL, we suggest, based on archival data, that 1ES 1011+496 is actually a borderline case between intermediate and high synchrotron peak frequency BL Lac objects.

  7. DISCOVERY OF PULSED γ-RAYS FROM PSR J0034-0534 WITH THE FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE: A CASE FOR CO-LOCATED RADIO AND γ-RAY EMISSION REGIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Millisecond pulsars (MSPs) have been firmly established as a class of γ-ray emitters via the detection of pulsations above 0.1 GeV from eight MSPs by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). Using 13 months of LAT data, significant γ-ray pulsations at the radio period have been detected from the MSP PSR J0034-0534, making it the ninth clear MSP detection by the LAT. The γ-ray light curve shows two peaks separated by 0.274 ± 0.015 in phase which are very nearly aligned with the radio peaks, a phenomenon seen only in the Crab pulsar until now. The ≥0.1 GeV spectrum of this pulsar is well fit by an exponentially cutoff power law with a cutoff energy of 1.8 ± 0.6 ± 0.1 GeV and a photon index of 1.5 ± 0.2 ± 0.1, first errors are statistical and second are systematic. The near-alignment of the radio and γ-ray peaks strongly suggests that the radio and γ-ray emission regions are co-located and both are the result of caustic formation.

  8. The international AGN watch: A multiwavelength monitoring consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alloin, D.; Clavel, J.; Peterson, B. M.; Reichert, G. A.; Stirpe, G. M.

    1994-01-01

    The International AGN Watch, an informal consortium of over 100 astronomers, was established to coordinate multiwavelength monitoring of a limited number of active galactic nuclei and thus obtain comprehensive continuum and emission-line variability data with unprecedented temporal and wavelength coverage. We summarize the principal scientific results from two completed space-based and ground-based campaigns on the Seyfert galaxies NGC 5548 and NGC 3783. We describe a project in progress and outline our future plans.

  9. Monte Carlo studies of multiwavelength pyrometry using linearized equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gathers, G. R.

    1992-03-01

    Multiwavelength pyrometry has been advertised as giving significant improvement in precision by overdetermining the solution with extra wavelengths and using least squares methods. Hiernaut et al. [1] have described a six-wavelength pyrometer for measurements in the range 2000 to 5000 K. They use the Wien approximation and model the logarithm of the emissivity as a linear function of wavelength in order to produce linear equations. The present work examines the measurement errors associated with their technique.

  10. A Synoptic, Multiwavelength Analysis of a Large Quasar Sample

    OpenAIRE

    Rengstorf, Adam W.; Brunner, Robert J.; Wilhite, Brian C.

    2005-01-01

    We present variability and multi-wavelength photometric information for the 933 known quasars in the QUEST Variability Survey. These quasars are grouped into variable and non-variable populations based on measured variability confidence levels. In a time-limited synoptic survey, we detect an anti-correlation between redshift and the likelihood of variability. Our comparison of variability likelihood to radio, IR, and X-ray data is consistent with earlier quasar studies. Using already-known qu...

  11. Future Plans of Telescope Array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Telescope Array (TA) experiment is the only ultra high energy cosmic ray observatory in the northern hemisphere. In addition, it will be the world's first air shower detector to be directly calibrated by an on-site accelerator beam. For wider and deeper understanding of cosmic rays by via high precision measurements, we have undertaken the study of extension plans for TA. One extension plan will extend the sensitive energy range of TA down to 1017 eV. A second plan would extend of the aperture area of the SD array. These plans are described in this note.

  12. Affordable Digital Planetariums with WorldWide Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Rosenfield, Philip; Fay, Jonathan; Carey, Larry; Sayres, Conor; Tofflemire, Benjamin

    2010-01-01

    Digital planetariums can provide a broader range of educational experiences than the more classical planetariums that use star-balls. This is because of their ability to project images, content from current research and the 3D distribution of the stars and galaxies. While there are hundreds of planetariums in the country the reason that few of these are full digital is the cost. In collaboration with Microsoft Research (MSR) we have developed a way to digitize existing planetariums for approximately \\$40,000 using software freely available. We describe here how off the shelf equipment, together with MSR's WorldWide Telescope client can provide a rich and truly interactive experience. This will enable students and the public to pan though multi-wavelength full-sky scientific data sets, explore 3d visualizations of our Solar System (including trajectories of millions of minor planets), near-by stars, and the SDSS galaxy catalog.

  13. Affordable Digital Planetariums with WorldWide Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenfield, P.; Connolly, A.; Fay, J.; Sayres, C.; Tofflemire, B.

    2011-09-01

    Digital planetariums can provide a broader range of educational experiences than the more classical planetariums that use star-balls. This is because of their ability to project images, content from current research, and the 3-D distribution of the stars and galaxies. While there are hundreds of planetariums in the country, the reason that few of these are fully digital is the cost. In collaboration with Microsoft Research (MSR), we have developed a way to digitize existing planetariums for approximately $40,000 using freely available software. We describe here how off the shelf equipment, together with a WorldWide Telescope client, can provide a rich and truly interactive experience. This will enable students and the public to pan though multi-wavelength full-sky scientific data sets, explore 3-D visualizations of our Solar System (including trajectories of millions of minor planets), near-by stars, and the SDSS galaxy catalog.

  14. Towers for Antarctic Telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammerschlag, R. H.; Bettonvil, F. C. M.; Jägers, A. P. L.; Nielsen, G.

    To take advantage of the exceptional seeing above the boundary layer on Antarctic sites, a high-resolution telescope must be mounted on a support tower. An open transparent tower of framework minimizes the upward temperature-disturbed airflow. A typical minimum height is 30m. The tower platform has to be extremely stable against wind-induced rotational motions, which have to be less than fractions of an arc second, unusually small from a mechanical engineering viewpoint. In a traditional structure, structural deflections result in angular deflections of the telescope platform, which introduce tip and tilt motions in the telescope. However, a structure that is designed to deflect with parallel motion relative to the horizontal plane will undergo solely translation deflections in the telescope platform and thus will not degrade the image. The use of a parallel motion structure has been effectively demonstrated in the design of the 15-m tower for the Dutch Open Telescope (DOT) on La Palma. Special framework geometries are developed, which make it possible to construct high towers in stories having platforms with extreme stability against wind-induced tilt. These geometric solutions lead to constructions, being no more massive than a normal steel framework carrying the same load. Consequently, these lightweight towers are well suited to difficult sites as on Antarctica. A geometry with 4 stories has been worked out.

  15. The Travelling Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murabona Oduori, Susan

    2015-08-01

    The telescope has been around for more than 400 years, and through good use of it scientists have made many astonishing discoveries and begun to understand our place in the universe. Most people, however, have never looked through one. Yet it is a great tool for cool science and observation especially in a continent and country with beautifully dark skies. The Travelling Telescope project aims to invite people outside under the stars to learn about those curious lights in the sky.The Travelling Telescope aims to promote science learning to a wide range of Kenyan schools in various locations exchanging knowledge about the sky through direct observations of celestial bodies using state of the art telescopes. In addition to direct observing we also teach science using various hands-on activities and astronomy software, ideal for explaining concepts which are hard to understand, and for a better grasp of the sights visible through the telescope. We are dedicated to promoting science using astronomy especially in schools, targeting children from as young as 3 years to the youth, teachers, their parents and members of the public. Our presentation focuses on the OAD funded project in rural coastal Kenya.

  16. Robotic and Survey Telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woźniak, Przemysław

    Robotic telescopes are revolutionizing the way astronomers collect their dataand conduct sky surveys. This chapter begins with a discussion of principles thatguide the process of designing, constructing, and operating telescopes andobservatories that offer a varying degree of automation, from instruments remotelycontrolled by observers to fully autonomous systems requiring no humansupervision during their normal operations. Emphasis is placed on designtrade-offs involved in building end-to-end systems intended for a wide range ofscience applications. The second part of the chapter contains descriptions ofseveral projects and instruments, both existing and currently under development.It is an attempt to provide a representative selection of actual systems thatillustrates state of the art in technology, as well as important ideas and milestonesin the development of the field. The list of presented instruments spans the fullrange in size starting from small all-sky monitors, through midrange robotic andsurvey telescopes, and finishing with large robotic instruments and surveys.Explosive growth of telescope networking is enabling entirely new modesof interaction between the survey and follow-up observing. Increasingimportance of standardized communication protocols and software is stressed.These developments are driven by the fusion of robotic telescope hardware,massive storage and databases, real-time knowledge extraction, and datacross-correlation on a global scale. The chapter concludes with examplesof major science results enabled by these new technologies and futureprospects.

  17. Detection of foliage-obscured vehicle using a multiwavelength polarimetric lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, S.; Stoker, J.; Greenlee, S.

    2008-01-01

    Foliage obscured man-made targets detection and identification is of great interest to many applications. In this paper, the backscattered laser signals from a multiwavelength polarimetric lidar were used to detect a vehicle hidden inside a vegetated area. The Polarimetric reflectance data from the lidar at two separate laser wavelengths at 1064 nm and 532 nm revealed distinct target characteristics from both the vehicle and the vegetation. The results from this case study demonstrated the validity of the proposed lidar detection technique. Furthermore, the results could potentially lead to a lidar detection and identification technique for a wide variety of foliage-obscured man-made targets under various application scenarios. ?? 2007 IEEE.

  18. Solar Rejection Filter for Large Telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmati, Hamid; Lesh, James

    2009-01-01

    To reject solar radiation photons at the front aperture for large telescopes, a mosaic of large transmission mode filters is placed in front of the telescope or at the aperture of the dome. Filtering options for effective rejection of sunlight include a smaller filter down-path near the focus of the telescope, and a large-diameter filter located in the front of the main aperture. Two types of large filters are viable: reflectance mode and transmittance mode. In the case of reflectance mode, a dielectric coating on a suitable substrate (e.g. a low-thermal-expansion glass) is arranged to reflect only a single, narrow wavelength and to efficiently transmit all other wavelengths. These coatings are commonly referred to as notch filter. In this case, the large mirror located in front of the telescope aperture reflects the received (signal and background) light into the telescope. In the case of transmittance mode, a dielectric coating on a suitable substrate (glass, sapphire, clear plastic, membrane, and the like) is arranged to transmit only a single wavelength and to reject all other wavelengths (visible and near IR) of light. The substrate of the large filter will determine its mass. At first glance, a large optical filter with a diameter of up to 10 m, located in front of the main aperture, would require a significant thickness to avoid sagging. However, a segmented filter supported by a structurally rugged grid can support smaller filters. The obscuration introduced by the grid is minimal because the total area can be made insignificant. This configuration can be detrimental to a diffraction- limited telescope due to diffraction effects at the edges of each sub-panel. However, no discernable degradation would result for a 20 diffraction-limit telescope (a photon bucket). Even the small amount of sagging in each subpanel should have minimal effect in the performance of a non-diffraction limited telescope because the part has no appreciable optical power. If the

  19. Telescopes and Techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Kitchin, C R

    2013-01-01

    Telescopes and Techniques has proved itself in its first two editions, having become probably one of the most widely used astronomy texts, both for amateur astronomers and astronomy and astrophysics undergraduates. Both earlier editions of the book were widely used for introductory practical astronomy courses in many universities. In this Third Edition the author guides the reader through the mathematics, physics and practical techniques needed to use today's telescopes (from the smaller models to the larger instruments installed in many colleges) and how to find objects in the sky. Most of the physics and engineering involved is described fully and requires little prior knowledge or experience. Both visual and electronic imaging techniques are covered, together with an introduction to how data (measurements) should be processed and analyzed. A simple introduction to radio telescopes is also included. Brief coverage of the more advanced topics of photometry and spectroscopy are included, but mainly to enable ...

  20. Integrated Modeling of Telescopes

    CERN Document Server

    Andersen, Torben

    2011-01-01

    With increasingly complex and costly opto-mechanical systems, there is a growing need for reliable computer modeling and simulation. The field of integrated modeling, combining optics, mechanics, control engineering, and other disciplines, is the subject of this book. Although the book primarily focuses on ground-based optical telescopes, the techniques introduced are applicable also to other wavelengths and to other opto-mechanical applications on the ground or in space. Basic tools of integrated modeling are introduced together with concepts of ground-based telescopes. Modeling of optical systems, structures, wavefront control systems with emphasis on segmented mirror control, and active and adaptive optics are described together with a variety of noise sources; many examples are included in this book. Integrated Modeling of Telescopes is a text for physicists and engineers working in the field of opto-mechanical design and wavefront control, but it will also be valuable as a textbook for PhD students.

  1. The Sardinia Radio Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Amico, Nichi

    2011-08-01

    We present the status of the Sardinia Radio Telescope (SRT) project, a new general purpose, fully steerable 64 m diameter parabolic radio telescope under construction in Sardinia. The instrument is funded by Italian Ministry of University and Research (MIUR), by the Sardinia Regional Government (RAS), and by the Italian Space Agency (ASI), and it is charge to three research structures of the National Institute for Astrophysics (INAF): the Institute of Radio Astronomy of Bologna, the Cagliari Astronomical Observatory (in Sardinia), and the Arcetri Astrophysical Observatory in Florence. The radio telescope has a shaped Gregorian optical configuration with a 8 m diameter secondary mirror and additional Beam-Wave Guide (BWG) mirrors. One of the most challenging feature of SRT is the active surface of the primary reflector which provides good efficiency up to about 100 GHz. This paper reports on the most recent advances of the construction.

  2. Configurable Aperture Space Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ennico, Kimberly; Bendek, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    In December 2014, we were awarded Center Innovation Fund to evaluate an optical and mechanical concept for a novel implementation of a segmented telescope based on modular, interconnected small sats (satlets). The concept is called CAST, a Configurable Aperture Space Telescope. With a current TRL is 2 we will aim to reach TLR 3 in Sept 2015 by demonstrating a 2x2 mirror system to validate our optical model and error budget, provide straw man mechanical architecture and structural damping analyses, and derive future satlet-based observatory performance requirements. CAST provides an alternative access to visible and/or UV wavelength space telescope with 1-meter or larger aperture for NASA SMD Astrophysics and Planetary Science community after the retirement of HST

  3. MAGIC search for VHE γ-ray emission from AE Aquarii in a multiwavelength context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksić, J.; Ansoldi, S.; Antonelli, L. A.; Antoranz, P.; Babic, A.; Bangale, P.; Barrio, J. A.; Becerra González, J.; Bednarek, W.; Bernardini, E.; Biasuzzi, B.; Biland, A.; Blanch, O.; Bonnefoy, S.; Bonnoli, G.; Borracci, F.; Bretz, T.; Carmona, E.; Carosi, A.; Colin, P.; Colombo, E.; Contreras, J. L.; Cortina, J.; Covino, S.; Da Vela, P.; Dazzi, F.; De Angelis, A.; De Caneva, G.; De Lotto, B.; de Oña Wilhelmi, E.; Delgado Mendez, C.; Doert, M.; Dominis Prester, D.; Dorner, D.; Doro, M.; Einecke, S.; Eisenacher, D.; Elsaesser, D.; Fonseca, M. V.; Font, L.; Frantzen, K.; Fruck, C.; Galindo, D.; García López, R. J.; Garczarczyk, M.; Garrido Terrats, D.; Gaug, M.; Godinović, N.; González Muñoz, A.; Gozzini, S. R.; Hadasch, D.; Hanabata, Y.; Hayashida, M.; Herrera, J.; Hildebrand, D.; Hose, J.; Hrupec, D.; Idec, W.; Kadenius, V.; Kellermann, H.; Kodani, K.; Konno, Y.; Krause, J.; Kubo, H.; Kushida, J.; La Barbera, A.; Lelas, D.; Lewandowska, N.; Lindfors, E.; Lombardi, S.; López, M.; López-Coto, R.; López-Oramas, A.; Lorenz, E.; Lozano, I.; Makariev, M.; Mallot, K.; Maneva, G.; Mankuzhiyil, N.; Mannheim, K.; Maraschi, L.; Marcote, B.; Mariotti, M.; Martínez, M.; Mazin, D.; Menzel, U.; Miranda, J. M.; Mirzoyan, R.; Moralejo, A.; Munar-Adrover, P.; Nakajima, D.; Niedzwiecki, A.; Nilsson, K.; Nishijima, K.; Noda, K.; Nowak, N.; Orito, R.; Overkemping, A.; Paiano, S.; Palatiello, M.; Paneque, D.; Paoletti, R.; Paredes, J. M.; Paredes-Fortuny, X.; Persic, M.; Prada Moroni, P. G.; Prandini, E.; Preziuso, S.; Puljak, I.; Reinthal, R.; Rhode, W.; Ribó, M.; Rico, J.; Rodriguez Garcia, J.; Rügamer, S.; Saggion, A.; Saito, T.; Saito, K.; Satalecka, K.; Scalzotto, V.; Scapin, V.; Schultz, C.; Schweizer, T.; Sillanpää, A.; Sitarek, J.; Snidaric, I.; Sobczynska, D.; Spanier, F.; Stamatescu, V.; Stamerra, A.; Steinbring, T.; Storz, J.; Strzys, M.; Takalo, L.; Takami, H.; Tavecchio, F.; Temnikov, P.; Terzić, T.; Tescaro, D.; Teshima, M.; Thaele, J.; Tibolla, O.; Torres, D. F.; Toyama, T.; Treves, A.; Uellenbeck, M.; Vogler, P.; Wagner, R. M.; Zanin, R.

    2014-08-01

    Context. It has been claimed that the nova-like cataclysmic variable AE Aquarii (AE Aqr) is a very-high-energy (VHE, E> 100 GeV) source both on observational and theoretical grounds. Aims: We search for VHE γ-ray emission from AE Aqr during different states of the source at several wavelengths to confirm or rule out previous claims of detection of γ-ray emission from this object. Methods: We report on observations of AE Aqr performed by MAGIC. The source was observed during 12 h as part of a multiwavelength campaign carried out between May and June 2012 covering the optical, X-ray, and γ-ray ranges. Besides MAGIC, the other facilities involved were the KVA, Skinakas, and Vidojevica telescopes in the optical and Swift in X-rays. We calculated integral upper limits coincident with different states of the source in the optical. We computed upper limits to the pulsed emission limiting the signal region to 30% of the phaseogram and we also searched for pulsed emission at different frequencies applying the Rayleigh test. Results: AE Aqr was not detected at VHEs during the multiwavelength campaign. We establish integral upper limits at the 95% confidence level for the steady emission assuming the differential flux proportional to a power-law function dφ/ dE ∝ E- Γ, with a Crab-like photon spectral index of Γ = 2.6. The upper limit above 200 GeV is 6.4 × 10-12 cm-2 s-1 and above 1 TeV is 7.4 × 10-13 cm-2 s-1. We obtained an upper limit for the pulsed emission of 2.6 × 10-12 cm-2 s-1 for energies above 200 GeV. Applying the Rayleigh test for pulsed emission at different frequencies we did not find any significant signal. Conclusions: Our results indicate that AE Aqr is not a VHE γ-ray emitter at the level of emission previously claimed. We have established the most constraining upper limits for the VHE γ-ray emission of AE Aqr.

  4. Multiwavelength Observations of AGN Jets: Untangling the Coupled Problems of Emission Mechanism and Jet Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlman, Eric S.; Avachat, Sayali S.; Clautice, Devon; Georganopoulos, Markos; Meyer, Eileen; Cara, Mihai

    2016-04-01

    The discovery of X-ray and optical emission from large numbers of AGN jets is one of the key legacies of the Chandra X-ray Observatory and Hubble Space Telescope. Several dozen optical and X-ray emitting jets are now known, most of which are seen in both bands as well as in the radio, where they were first discovered. Jets carry prodigious amounts of energy and mass out from the nuclear regions out to tens to hundreds of kiloparsecs distant from the central black hole, depositing it into the host galaxy and cluster. Interpreting their multiwavelength emissions has not been easy: while in most jets, the optical and radio emission in many objects is believed to emerge via the synchrotron process, due to its characteristic spectral shape and high radio polarization, the X-ray emission has been a tougher nut to crack. In less powerful, FR I jets, such as M87, the X-ray emission is believed to be synchrotron emission from the highest energy electrons, requiring in situ particle acceleration due to the short radiative lifetimes of the particles. However, in FR II and quasar jets, a variety of emission mechanisms are possible. Until the last few years, the leading interpretation had been inverse-Comptonization of Cosmic Microwave Background photons (the IC/CMB mechanism). This requires the jet to be relativistic out to hundreds of kiloparsecs from the nucleus, and requires an electron spectrum that extends to very low Lorentz factors. However, that now appears less likely, due to observed high optical polarizations in jets where the optical and X-ray emission appears to lie on the same spectral component, as well as limits derived from Fermi observations in the GeV gamma-rays. It now appears more likely that the X-rays must arise as synchrotron emission from a second, high energy electron population. With this revelation, we must tackle anew the coupling between jet structure and emission mechanisms. Multiwavelength imaging and polarimetry can give us clues to the

  5. New Vacuum Solar Telescope

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    With its pure aperture up to 985mm, the New Vacuum Solar Telescope of China (NVST) has become the world's biggest vacuum solar telescope. The main science task of NVST is the high-resolution observation of photosphere and chromosphere including their fine structure of magnetic field on the sun. The NVST was equipped with many new technologies and powerful instruments, such as an adaptive optical system, a polarization analyzer, two vertical spectrographs, a high-resolution image system and a very narrow Ha filter (0.125A).

  6. Athermal laser launch telescopes

    OpenAIRE

    Kamphues, F.G.; Henselmans, R.; Rijnveld, N.; Lemmen, M.H.J.; Doelman, N.J.; Nijkerk, M.D.

    2011-01-01

    ESO has developed a concept for a compact laser guide star unit for use in future Adaptive Optics (AO) systems. A small powerful laser is combined with a telescope that launches the beam, creating a single modular unit that can be mounted directly on a large telescope. This approach solves several of the stability problems experienced with a number of first generation laser guide star systems around the world. Four of these compact laser guide stars will be used for the new VLT 4LGSF Adaptive...

  7. Overview of the results from extra-galactic observations with the MAGIC telescopes

    OpenAIRE

    Berger, Karsten; Collaboration, for the MAGIC

    2011-01-01

    The non-thermal jet emission in active galactic nuclei covers several orders of magnitude in the frequency range. Hence the observational approach needs multi-wavelength (MWL) campaigns collecting data in the radio, optical, UV, X-rays, high energy until the Very High Energy (VHE) gamma-ray band. MAGIC, a system of two 17 m diameter telescopes at the Roque de los Muchachos observatory on the canary island La Palma, actively participates and organizes MWL observations on known and newly discov...

  8. Scientific Highlights from Observations of Active Galactic Nuclei with the MAGIC Telescope

    OpenAIRE

    Wagner, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Since 2004, the MAGIC gamma-ray telescope has newly discovered 6 TeV blazars. The total set of 13 MAGIC-detected active galactic nuclei includes well-studied objects at other wavelengths like Markarian 501 and the giant radio galaxy M 87, but also the distant the flat-spectrum radio quasar 3C 279, and the newly discovered TeV gamma-ray emitter S5 0716+71. In addition, also long-term and multi-wavelength studies on well-known TeV blazars and systematic searches for new TeV blazars have been...

  9. Scientific Highlights from Observations of Active Galactic Nuclei with the MAGIC Telescope

    OpenAIRE

    Wagner, Robert; Collaboration, for the MAGIC

    2008-01-01

    Since 2004, the MAGIC gamma-ray telescope has newly discovered 6 TeV blazars. The total set of 13 MAGIC-detected active galactic nuclei includes well-studied objects at other wavelengths like Markarian 501 and the giant radio galaxy M87, but also the distant the flat-spectrum radio quasar 3C 279, and the newly discovered TeV gamma-ray emitter S5 0716+71. In addition, also long-term and multi-wavelength studies on well-known TeV blazars and systematic searches for new TeV blazars have been car...

  10. Results from the Blazar Monitoring Campaign at the Whipple 10m Gamma-ray Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Steele, David; Charlot, P; Kurtanidze, O; Lahteenmaki, A; Montaruli, T; Sadun, A C; Villata, M

    2007-01-01

    In September 2005, the observing program of the Whipple 10 m gamma-ray telescope was redefined to be dedicated almost exclusively to AGN monitoring. Since then the five Northern Hemisphere blazars that had already been detected at Whipple are monitored routinely each night that they are visible. Thanks to the efforts of a large number of multiwavelength collaborators, the first year of this program has been very successful. We report here on the analysis of Markarian 421 observations taken from November, 2005 to May, 2006 in the gamma-ray, X-ray, optical and radio bands.

  11. Review of the solar array telescopes

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, D. A.

    2005-01-01

    For several years the only experiments sensitive to astrophysical gamma rays with energies beyond the reach of EGRET but below that the Cherenkov imaging telescopes have been the "solar towar" detectors. They use > 2000 m$^{2}$ mirror areas to sample the Cherenkov wavefront generated by

  12. Imaging capabilities of the SODART telescopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Finn Erland; Hornstrup, Allan; Pedersen, Kristian; Frederiksen, Peter; Westergaard, Niels Jørgen Stenfeldt

    The on- and off-axis imaging properties and effective area of the two SODART flight telescopes have been measured using the expanded beam X-ray facility at the Daresbury synchrotron. Following measurements have been done for both Flight Model 1 & 2, at three energies: 6.627 keV, 8.837 keV and 11...

  13. XSPECT telescopes on the SRG: optical performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westergaard, Niels Jørgen Stenfeldt; Polny, Josef; Christensen, Finn Erland; Nørgaard-Nielsen, Hans Ulrik; Schnopper, Herbert W.

    1994-01-01

    The XSPECT, thin foil, multiply nested telescope on SRG has been designed to achieve a large effective area at energies between 6 and 15 keV. The design goal for the angular resolution is 2 arcmin (HPD). Results of foil figure error measurements are presented. A ray tracing analysis was performed...

  14. The ECLAIRs micro-satellite for multi-wavelength studies of gamma-ray burst prompt emission

    CERN Document Server

    Schanne, S; Barret, D; Basa, S; Boër, M; Cordier, B; Daigne, F; Ealet, A; Goldoni, P; Klotz, A; Limousin, O; Mandrou, P; Mochkovitch, R; Paltani, S; Paul, J; Petitjean, P; Pons, R; Skinner, G K

    2004-01-01

    The cosmological revolution of 1997 has established that (at least long duration) gamma-ray bursts (GRB) are among the most energetic events in the Universe and occur at cosmological distances. The ECLAIRs micro-satellite, to be launched in 2009, will provide multi-wavelength observations for astrophysical studies of GRB and for their possible use as cosmological probes. It is expected to be the only space borne GRB trigger available for ground based robotic telescopes operational at that time. This paper presents the ECLAIRs project and its status. An X/gamma-ray camera onboard ECLAIRs with a wide field of view of 2 sr, will detect ~100 GRB/yr in the 4-50 keV energy range, localize the GRB with a precision of ~10 arcmin on the sky, and transmit this information to the ground in near real-time, as a GRB trigger for ground based optical telescopes. Inspired by the INTEGRAL imager IBIS, it is based on a CdTe detection plane covering 1000 cm^2, placed 35 cm below a coded mask. An optical camera, sensitive to mag...

  15. MAGIC long-term study of the distant TeV blazar PKS 1424+240 in a multiwavelength context

    CERN Document Server

    Aleksić, J; Antonelli, L A; Antoranz, P; Babic, A; Bangale, P; de Almeida, U Barres; Barrio, J A; González, J Becerra; Bednarek, W; Bernardini, E; Biland, A; Blanch, O; Bonnefoy, S; Bonnoli, G; Borracci, F; Bretz, T; Carmona, E; Carosi, A; Fidalgo, D Carreto; Colin, P; Colombo, E; Contreras, J L; Cortina, J; Covino, S; Da Vela, P; Dazzi, F; De Angelis, A; De Caneva, G; De Lotto, B; Mendez, C Delgado; Doert, M; Domínguez, A; Prester, D Dominis; Dorner, D; Doro, M; Einecke, S; Eisenacher, D; Elsaesser, D; Farina, E; Ferenc, D; Fonseca, M V; Font, L; Frantzen, K; Fruck, C; López, R J García; Garczarczyk, M; Terrats, D Garrido; Gaug, M; Godinović, N; Muñoz, A González; Gozzini, S R; Hadasch, D; Hayashida, M; Herrera, J; Herrero, A; Hildebrand, D; Hose, J; Hrupec, D; Idec, W; Kadenius, V; Kellermann, H; Kodani, K; Konno, Y; Krause, J; Kubo, H; Kushida, J; La Barbera, A; Lelas, D; Lewandowska, N; Lindfors, E; Lombardi, S; López, M; López-Coto, R; López-Oramas, A; Lorenz, E; Lozano, I; Makariev, M; Mallot, K; Maneva, G; Mankuzhiyil, N; Mannheim, K; Maraschi, L; Marcote, B; Mariotti, M; Martínez, M; Mazin, D; Menzel, U; Meucci, M; Miranda, J M; Mirzoyan, R; Moralejo, A; Munar-Adrover, P; Nakajima, D; Niedzwiecki, A; Nilsson, K; Nishijima, K; Noda, K; Nowak, N; Orito, R; Overkemping, A; Paiano, S; Palatiello, M; Paneque, D; Paoletti, R; Paredes, J M; Paredes-Fortuny, X; Partini, S; Persic, M; Prada, F; Moroni, P G Prada; Prandini, E; Preziuso, S; Puljak, I; Reinthal, R; Rhode, W; Ribó, M; Rico, J; Garcia, J Rodriguez; Rügamer, S; Saggion, A; Saito, T; Saito, K; Satalecka, K; Scalzotto, V; Scapin, V; Schultz, C; Schweizer, T; Shore, S N; Sillanpää, A; Sitarek, J; Snidaric, I; Sobczynska, D; Spanier, F; Stamatescu, V; Stamerra, A; Steinbring, T; Storz, J; Sun, S; Surić, T; Takalo, L; Takami, H; Tavecchio, F; Temnikov, P; Terzić, T; Tescaro, D; Teshima, M; Thaele, J; Tibolla, O; Torres, D F; Toyama, T; Treves, A; Uellenbeck, M; Vogler, P; Wagner, R M; Zandanel, F; Zanin, R; Cutini, S; Gasparrini, D; Furniss, A; Hovatta, T; Kangas, T; Kankare, E; Kotilainen, J; Lister, M; Lähteenmäki, A; Max-Moerbeck, W; Pavlidou, V; Readhead, A; Richards, J

    2014-01-01

    Aims. We present a study of the very high energy (VHE; E>100 GeV) gamma-ray emission of the blazar PKS 1424+240 observed with the MAGIC telescopes. The primary aim of this paper is the multiwavelength spectral characterization and modeling of this blazar, made particularly interesting by the recent discovery of a lower limit of its redshift of z>0.6, which makes it a promising candidate to be the most distant VHE source. Methods. The source has been observed with the MAGIC telescopes in VHE gamma rays for a total observation time of 33.6 h from 2009 to 2011. Results. The source was marginally detected in VHE gamma rays during 2009 and 2010 and later the detection was confirmed during an optical outburst in 2011. The combined significance of the stacked sample is 7.2 sigma. The differential spectra measured during the different campaigns can be described by steep power laws, with the indices ranging from 3.5+/-1.2 to 5.0+/-1.7. The MAGIC spectra corrected for the absorption due to the extragalactic background ...

  16. Microwave photonic filter using multiwavelength Brillouin-erbium fiber laser with double-Brillouin-frequency shift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loh, K. K.; Yeo, K. S.; Shee, Y. G.

    2015-04-01

    A microwave photonic filter based on double-Brillouin-frequency spaced multiwavelength Brillouin-erbium fiber laser (BEFL) is experimentally demonstrated. The filter selectivity can be easily adjusted by tuning and apodizing the optical taps generated from the multiwavelength BEFL. Reconfiguration of different frequency responses are demonstrated.

  17. Microwave photonic filter using multiwavelength Brillouin-erbium fiber laser with double-Brillouin-frequency shift

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loh, K. K.; Yeo, K. S.; Shee, Y. G. [Integrated Lightwave Research Group, Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2015-04-24

    A microwave photonic filter based on double-Brillouin-frequency spaced multiwavelength Brillouin-erbium fiber laser (BEFL) is experimentally demonstrated. The filter selectivity can be easily adjusted by tuning and apodizing the optical taps generated from the multiwavelength BEFL. Reconfiguration of different frequency responses are demonstrated.

  18. Microwave photonic filter using multiwavelength Brillouin-erbium fiber laser with double-Brillouin-frequency shift

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A microwave photonic filter based on double-Brillouin-frequency spaced multiwavelength Brillouin-erbium fiber laser (BEFL) is experimentally demonstrated. The filter selectivity can be easily adjusted by tuning and apodizing the optical taps generated from the multiwavelength BEFL. Reconfiguration of different frequency responses are demonstrated

  19. Taiwan Automated Telescope Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dean-Yi Chou

    2010-01-01

    can be operated either interactively or fully automatically. In the interactive mode, it can be controlled through the Internet. In the fully automatic mode, the telescope operates with preset parameters without any human care, including taking dark frames and flat frames. The network can also be used for studies that require continuous observations for selected objects.

  20. A Simple "Tubeless" Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straulino, S.; Bonechi, L.

    2010-01-01

    Two lenses make it possible to create a simple telescope with quite large magnification. The set-up is very simple and can be reproduced in schools, provided the laboratory has a range of lenses with different focal lengths. In this article, the authors adopt the Keplerian configuration, which is composed of two converging lenses. This instrument,…

  1. The Telescope (to 1950)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrell, R.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    The TELESCOPE was the single greatest technical innovation in the history of astronomy, transforming it from a naked-eye study of celestial motions into a physical science. It revealed to humans a far richer and more complex universe than ever imagined. Its history proceeded in stages: a technological discovery led to a series of improvements until an impasse was reached. Another discovery would ...

  2. Exploring Galileo's Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straulino, Samuele; Terzuoli, Alessandra

    2010-01-01

    In the first months of 2009, the International Year of Astronomy, the authors developed an educational project for middle-level students connected with the first astronomical discoveries that Galileo Galilei (1564-1642) made 400 years ago. The project included the construction of a basic telescope and the observation of the Moon. The project, if…

  3. The Liverpool Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Robert J.; Bates, S. D.; Clay, Neil R.; Fraser, Stephen N.; Marchant, J. M.; Mottram, C. J.; Steele, I. A.; Tomlinson, M. D.

    2011-03-01

    The Liverpool Telescope (LT) is a fully robotic 2m optical telescope at a world-class observatory site. It runs autonomously without direct human control either on site or remotely. It is not operated primarily for a single science project, but rather is a common-user facility, time allocated by an open, peer-review process and conducting a variety of optical and IR imaging, spectroscopic and polarimetric programs. This paper describes some of aspects of the site infrastructure and instrument suite designed specifically to support robust and reliable unsupervised operations. Aside from the telescope hardware, the other aspect of robotic operations is the mechanisms whereby users interact with the telescope and its automated scheduler. We describe how these have been implemented for the LT. Observing routinely since 2004, the LT has demonstrated it is possible to operate a large, common-user robotic observatory. Making the most of the flexibility afforded by fully robotic operations, development continues in collaboration with both observers and other observatories to develop observing modes to enable new science across the broad discipline of time-domain astrophysics.

  4. THE LARGE MILLIMETER TELESCOPE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. H. Hughes

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper, presented on behalf of the Large Millimeter Telescope (LMT project team, describes the status and near-term plans for the telescope and its initial instrumentation. The LMT is a bi-national collaboration between M xico and the USA, led by the Instituto Nacional de Astrof sica, ptica y Electr nica (INAOE and the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, to construct, commission and operate a 50 m diameter millimeterwave radio telescope. Construction activities are nearly complete at the LMT site, at an altitude of 4600 m on the summit of Sierra Negra, an extinct volcano in the Mexican state of Puebla. Full movement of the telescope, under computer control in both azimuth and elevation, has been achieved. First-light at centimeter wavelengths on astronomical sources was obtained in November 2006. Installation of precision surface segments for millimeter-wave operation is underway, with the inner 32 m diameter of the surface now complete and ready to be used to obtain rst-light at millimeter wavelengths in 2008. Installation of the remainder of the re ector will continue during the next year and be completed in 2009 for nal commissioning of the antenna. The full LMT antenna, out ted with its initial complement of scienti c instruments, will be a world-leading scienti c research facility for millimeter-wave astronomy.

  5. STAGES: the Space Telescope A901/2 Galaxy Evolution Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Gray, M E; Barden, Marco; Peng, Chien Y; Haeussler, Boris; Bell, Eric F; McIntosh, Daniel H; Guo, Yicheng; Caldwell, John A R; Bacon, David; Balogh, Michael; Barazza, Fabio D; Boehm, Asmus; Heymans, Catherine; Jahnke, Knud; Jogee, Shardha; van Kampen, Eelco; Lane, Kyle; Meisenheimer, Klaus; Sánchez, Sebastian F; Taylor, Andy; Wisotzki, Lutz; Zheng, Xianzhong; Green, David A; Beswick, R J; Saikia, D J; Gilmour, Rachel; Johnson, Benjamin D; Papovich, Casey

    2008-01-01

    We present an overview of the Space Telescope A901/2 Galaxy Evolution Survey (STAGES). STAGES is a multiwavelength project designed to probe physical drivers of galaxy evolution across a wide range of environments and luminosity. A complex multi-cluster system at z~0.165 has been the subject of an 80-orbit F606W HST/ACS mosaic covering the full 0.5x0.5 (~5x5 Mpc^2) span of the supercluster. Extensive multiwavelength observations with XMM-Newton, GALEX, Spitzer, 2dF, GMRT, and the 17-band COMBO-17 photometric redshift survey complement the HST imaging. Our survey goals include simultaneously linking galaxy morphology with other observables such as age, star-formation rate, nuclear activity, and stellar mass. In addition, with the multiwavelength dataset and new high resolution mass maps from gravitational lensing, we are able to disentangle the large-scale structure of the system. By examining all aspects of environment we will be able to evaluate the relative importance of the dark matter halos, the local gal...

  6. The Greenland Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimes, Paul; Blundell, Raymond

    2012-09-01

    In the spring of 2010, the Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, and the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, acquired the ALMA North America prototype antenna - a state-of-the-art 12-m diameter dish designed for submillimeter astronomy. Together with the MIT-Haystack Observatory and the National Radio Astronomy Observatory, the plan is to retrofit this antenna for cold-weather operation and equip it with a suite of instruments designed for a variety of scientific experiments and observations. The primary scientific goal is to image the shadow of the Super-Massive Black Hole in M87 in order to test Einstein’s theory of relativity under extreme gravity. This requires the highest angular resolution, which can only be achieved by linking this antenna with others already in place to form a telescope almost the size of the Earth. We are therefore developing plans to install this antenna at the peak of the Greenland ice-sheet. This location will produce an equivalent North-South separation of almost 9,000 km when linked to the ALMA telescope in Northern Chile, and an East-West separation of about 6,000 km when linked to SAO and ASIAA’s Submillimeter Array on Mauna Kea, Hawaii, and will provide an angular resolution almost 1000 times higher than that of the most powerful optical telescopes. Given the quality of the atmosphere at the proposed telescope location, we also plan to make observations in the atmospheric windows at 1.3 and 1.5 THz. We will present plans to retrofit the telescope for cold-weather operation, and discuss potential instrumentation and projected time-line.

  7. VERITAS Telescope 1 Relocation: Details and Improvements

    CERN Document Server

    Perkins, Jeremy S

    2009-01-01

    The first VERITAS telescope was installed in 2002-2003 at the Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory and was originally operated as a prototype instrument. Subsequently the decision was made to locate the full array at the same site, resulting in an asymmetric array layout. As anticipated, this resulted in less than optimal sensitivity due to the loss in effective area and the increase in background due to local muon initiated triggers. In the summer of 2009, the VERITAS collaboration relocated Telescope 1 to improve the overall array layout. This has provided a 30% improvement in sensitivity corresponding to a 60% change in the time needed to detect a source.

  8. All-normal-dispersion multi-wavelength dissipative soliton Yb-doped fiber laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We propose and demonstrate an all-normal-dispersion multi-wavelength dissipative soliton Yb-doped fiber laser with a periodic birefringence fiber filter, for the first time to our best knowledge. Numerical simulations show that single-, dual-, and multi-wavelength dissipative solitons can be generated under appropriate filter bandwidth and saturation power. Under a certain filter bandwidth, the generated wavelength number of multi-wavelength mode-locked dissipative solitons is related to the saturation power, decreasing with increasing saturation power. The maximal and minimal attainable wavelength spacing of multi-wavelength dissipative solitons are also investigated, which are 21 nm and 4.6 nm, respectively, according to our simulations. Furthermore, the generation of multi-wavelength dissipative solitons has been verified by experiments. Dual- and three-wavelength dissipative solitons with a wavelength spacing of 16.4 nm have been achieved. (letter)

  9. Multi-Wavelength Observations of Nearby Starburst Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Janice

    2015-08-01

    Do cycles of violent, intense, but short-lived bursts constitute a significant mode of global star formation in present-day galaxies? Such events can have a profound effect on galaxies, particularly those with shallow potential wells, and observational measures of their prevalence inform our understanding of a wide range of issues in galaxy evolution. I will highlight what we have learned about starbursts from multi-wavelength observations of galaxies in the local volume on both galactic and smaller scales, and explore how connections with the study of the deaths of massive stars may further our understanding of open issues in galaxy evolution.

  10. Methods of data processing in multi-wavelength thermometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Xiao-gang; ZHAO Wei; YUAN Gui-bin; DAI Jing-min

    2006-01-01

    Three kinds of methods for processing the data of the multi-wavelength pyrometer are presented in this paper and are named curve auto-search method, curve auto-regression method and neural network method.The experimental results indicate that the calculated temperature and the spectral emissivity compared with the true target temperature and spectral emissivity have significant deviation using the curve auto-search and the curve auto-regression methods. However, the calculated temperature and the spectral emissivity with higher accuracy can be obtained using the neural network method.

  11. Multiwavelength Constraints on the Dynamical History of Omega Centauri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haggard, Daryl; Cool, A. M.; Arias, T.; Brochmann, M. B.; Dorfman, J.; Gafford, A.; White, V.; Anderson, J.; Davies, M. B.

    2012-09-01

    Omega Centauri, the Milky Way's most massive and enigmatic old stellar cluster, offers a treasure trove of astronomical discovery and controversy. Is the cluster a globular or a dwarf galaxy remnant? Does it host a massive central black hole? What are the origins and dynamical histories of the cluster's multiple stellar populations? I will discuss our multiwavelength imaging and spectroscopic campaigns, and in particular a new Chandra X-ray flux limit on the cluster's purported IMBH. These observations also probe Omega Cen's binary populations and shed light on the cluster's dynamical history.

  12. Multi-wavelength Šolc birefringent filter

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Melich, Radek; Melich, Zbyněk; Šolc, Ivan

    Vol. 7018. Bellingham, Washington : Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers, 2008 - (Atad-Ettedgui, E.; Lemke, D.), s. 1-7 ISBN 9780819472281. - (SPIE. 7018). [The Physics of Chromospheric Plasma. Marseille (FR), 23.06.2008-27.06.2008] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR 1QS100820502 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : Šolc birefringent filter * multiwavelength Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/12.788814

  13. Nonlinear optical signal processing on multiwavelength sensitive materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azimipour, Mehdi; Pashaie, Ramin

    2013-11-01

    Exploiting salient features in the photodynamics of specific types of light sensitive materials, a new approach is presented for realization of parallel nonlinear operations with optics. We briefly review the quantum structure and mathematical models offered for the photodynamics of two multiwavelength sensitive materials, doped crystals of lithium niobate and thick layers of bacteriorhodopsin. Next, a special mode of these dynamics in each material is investigated and a graphical design procedure is offered to produce highly nonlinear optical responses that can be dynamically reshaped via applying minimum changes in the optical setup. PMID:24177084

  14. Molecular transport network security using multi-wavelength optical spins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunsiri, Surachai; Thammawongsa, Nopparat; Mitatha, Somsak; Yupapin, Preecha P

    2016-01-01

    Multi-wavelength generation system using an optical spin within the modified add-drop optical filter known as a PANDA ring resonator for molecular transport network security is proposed. By using the dark-bright soliton pair control, the optical capsules can be constructed and applied to securely transport the trapped molecules within the network. The advantage is that the dark and bright soliton pair (components) can securely propagate for long distance without electromagnetic interference. In operation, the optical intensity from PANDA ring resonator is fed into gold nano-antenna, where the surface plasmon oscillation between soliton pair and metallic waveguide is established. PMID:25058032

  15. Status of MUSIC, the MUltiwavelength Sub/millimeter Inductance Camera

    OpenAIRE

    Golwala, Sunil R.; Bockstiegel, Clint; Brugger, Spencer; Czakon, Nicole G.; Day, Peter K.; Downes, Thomas P.; Duan, Ran; Gao, Jiansong; Gill, Amandeep K.; Glenn, Jason; Hollister, Matthew I.; LeDuc, Henry G.; Maloney, Philip R.; Mazin, Benjamin A.; McHugh, Sean G.

    2012-01-01

    We present the status of MUSIC, the MUltiwavelength Sub/millimeter Inductance Camera, a new instrument for the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory. MUSIC is designed to have a 14', diffraction-limited field-of-view instrumented with 2304 detectors in 576 spatial pixels and four spectral bands at 0.87, 1.04, 1.33, and 1.98 mm. MUSIC will be used to study dusty star-forming galaxies, galaxy clusters via the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect, and star formation in our own and nearby galaxies. MUSIC uses br...

  16. Multiwavelength Study of the May 13, 2005 Flare Event

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rovira, M.G.; Šimberová, Stanislava; Karlický, Marian; Luoni, M.L.; Fárník, František

    San Francisco : Astronomical Society of the Pacific, 2007 - (Heinzel, P.; Dorotovič, I.; Rutten, R.), s. 461-465 ISBN 978-1-583812-36-5. - (ASP Conference Series. 368). [Solar Physics Meeting. Coimbra (PT), 09.10.2006-13.10.2006] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA102/04/0155; GA AV ČR 1QS300120506 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10030501 Keywords : solar activity * multiwavelength image processing Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics

  17. NRAO Green Bank Telescope (GBT)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The largest fully steerable telescope in the world - the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope, began observations in Green Bank, West Virginia in 2000and is a wonder...

  18. Optical Space Telescope Assembly Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Optical Space Telescope Assembly (OSTA) task is to demonstrate the technology readiness of assembling large space telescopes on orbit in 2015. This task is an...

  19. The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Fiona A.; Boggs, Steven; Christensen, Finn; Craig, William; Hailey, Charles; Stern, Daniel; Zhang, William; Angelini, Lorella; An, Hong Jun; Bhalereo, Varun; Brejnholt, Nicolai; Cominsky, Lynn; Cook, Rick; Doll, Melania; Giommi, Paolo; Grefenstette, Brian; Hornstrup, Allan; Kaspi, Victoria M.; Kim, Yunjin; Kitaguchi, Takao; Koglin, Jason; Liebe, Carl Christian; Madejski, Greg; Madsen, Kristen Kruse; Mao, Peter

    2010-01-01

    The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) is a NASA Small Explorer mission that will carry the first focusing hard X-ray (5 - 80 keV) telescope to orbit. NuSTAR will offer a factor 50 - 100 sensitivity improvement compared to previous collimated or coded mask imagers that have operated in this energy band. In addition, NuSTAR provides sub-arcminute imaging with good spectral resolution over a 12-arcminute field of view. After launch, NuSTAR will carry out a two-year primary science mission that focuses on four key programs: studying the evolution of massive black holes through surveys carried out in fields with excellent multiwavelength coverage, understanding the population of compact objects and the nature of the massive black hole in the center of the Milky Way, constraining explosion dynamics and nucleosynthesis in supernovae, and probing the nature of particle acceleration in relativistic jets in active galactic nuclei. A number of additional observations will be included in the primary mission, and a. guest observer program will be proposed for an extended mission to expand the range of scientific targets. The payload consists of two co-aligned depth-graded multilayer coated grazing incidence optics focused onto solid state CdZnTe pixel detectors. To be launched in early 2012 on a Pegasus rocket into a low-inclination Earth orbit. NuSTAR largely avoids SAA passages, and will therefore have low and stable detector backgrounds. The telescope achieves a 10.15-meter focal length through on-orbit deployment of all mast. An aspect and alignment metrology system enable reconstruction of the absolute aspect and variations in the telescope alignment resulting from mast flexure during ground data processing. Data will be publicly available at GSFC's High Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center (HEASARC) following validation at the science operations center located at Caltech.

  20. Mirror Development for the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    CERN Document Server

    Förster, A; Baba, H; Bähr, J; Bonardi, A; Bonnoli, G; Brun, P; Canestrari, R; Chadwick, P; Chikawa, M; Carton, P -H; De Souza, V; Dipold, J; Doro, M; Durand, D; Dyrda, M; Giro, E; Glicenstein, J -F; Hanabata, Y; Hayashida, M; Hrabovski, M; Jeanney, C; Kagaya, M; Katagiri, H; Lessio, L; MANDAT, D; Mariotti, M; Medina, C; Michałowski, J; Micolon, P; Nakajima, D; Niemiec, J; Nozato, A; Palatka, M; Pareschi, G; Pech, M; Peyaud, B; Pühlhofer, G; Rataj, M; Rodeghiero, G; Rojas, G; Rousselle, J; Sakonaka, R; Schovanek, P; Seweryn, K; Schultz, C; Shu, S; Stinzing, F; Stodulski, M; Teshima, M; Travniczek, P; Van Eldik, C; Vassiliev, V; Wiśniewski, Ł; Wörnlein, A; Yoshida, T

    2013-01-01

    The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) is a planned observatory for very-high energy gamma-ray astronomy. It will consist of several tens of telescopes of different sizes, with a total mirror area of up to 10,000 square meters. Most mirrors of current installations are either polished glass mirrors or diamond-turned aluminium mirrors, both labour intensive technologies. For CTA, several new technologies for a fast and cost-efficient production of light-weight and reliable mirror substrates have been developed and industrial pre-production has started for most of them. In addition, new or improved aluminium-based and dielectric surface coatings have been developed to increase the reflectance over the lifetime of the mirrors compared to those of current Cherenkov telescope instruments.

  1. Tracking subsystem of the SOFIA telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittner, Hermann; Braeuninger, Christoph; Dierks, Andreas; Erdmann, Matthias; Erhard, Markus; Lattner, Klaus; Schmolke, Juergen

    2000-06-01

    The Tracking Subsystem of the SOFIA telescope consists of three high performance imagers and a dedicated tracking control unit. There are two boresighted imagers for target acquisition and tracking, one with a wide (6 degrees) and one with a fine (70 arcmin) field-of-view, and one main- telescope-optics sharing imager with a narrow field-of-view (8 arcmin) for high performance tracking. From the recorded stellar images, tracking error signals are generated by the tracker controller. The tracker controller has several features to support various tracking schemes such as tracking the telescope as an inertial platform, on- axis/offset tracking, and limb tracking. The tracker has three modes, i.e. positioning, tracking and `override'. Special features are the handling of so-called areas-of- interest in the inertial reference frame and the external imager synchronization. The paper presents the design and functional/operational performance of the imagers and the tracking control unit.

  2. AGLITE: multiwavelength lidar for characterizing atmospheric emissions from animal feeding operations using simultaneous optical and point measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkerson, Thomas D.; Bingham, Gail E.; Zavyalov, Vladimir V.; Marchant, Christian C.; Anderson, Jan M.; Andrew, Luke P.

    2007-10-01

    AGLITE is a multiwavelength lidar developed for Agricultural Research Service of the United States Department of Agriculture and its program on particle emissions from animal production facilities. The lidar transmission system is a pulsed Nd:YAG laser (355, 532, 1064 nm) operating at a pulse rate of 10 kHz. We analyze and model lidar backscatter and extinction coefficients to extract aerosol physical properties. All wavelength channels operate simultaneously, day or night, using photon counting and high speed data acquisition. The lidar housing is a transportable trailer suitable for all-weather operation at any accessible site. We direct the laser and telescope field of views to targets of interest in both azimuth and elevation. Arrays of particle samplers and turbulence detectors were also used by colleagues specializing in those fields and are compared with the lidar data. The value of multiwavelength, eyesafe lidars for agricultural aerosol measurements has been confirmed by the successful operation of AGLITE. In this paper, we demonstrate the ability of the lidar system to quantitatively characterize particulate emissions as mass concentration fields applicable for USEPA regulations. The combination of lidar with point characterization information allows the development of 3-D distributions of standard USEPA mass concentration fractions (PM10, PM2.5, and other interesting groupings such as PM10-PM2.5 and PM1). Lidar measurements are also focused on air motion as seen by long duration scans of the farm region. We demonstrate the ability to use "standoff" lidar methods to determine the movement and concentrations of emissions over an entire agricultural facility.

  3. Progress in Space Solar Telescope

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we will summarize the progress in the development of the Chinese Space Solar Telescope (SST) during the past few years. The main scientific objective of SST is to observe the fundamental structure of solar magnetic field with its 1-m optical telescope. The success of 1-m Swedish Solar Telescope and Hinode underscores the importance of this 1-m space telescope. In addition, some key technical problems have been solved.

  4. Lunar transit telescope lander design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, Husam A.

    The Program Development group at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center has been involved in studying the feasibility of placing a 16 meter telescope on the lunar surface to scan the skies using visible/ Ultraviolet/ Infrared light frequencies. The precursor telescope is now called the TRANSIT LUNAR TELESCOPE (LTT). The Program Development Group at Marshall Space Flight Center has been given the task of developing the basic concepts and providing a feasibility study on building such a telescope. The telescope should be simple with minimum weight and volume to fit into one of the available launch vehicles. The preliminary launch date is set for 2005. A study was done to determine the launch vehicle to be used to deliver the telescope to the lunar surface. The TITAN IV/Centaur system was chosen. The engineering challenge was to design the largest possible telescope to fit into the TITAN IV/Centaur launch system. The telescope will be comprised of the primary, secondary and tertiary mirrors and their supporting system in addition to the lander that will land the telescope on the lunar surface and will also serve as the telescope's base. The lunar lander should be designed integrally with the telescope in order to minimize its weight, thus allowing more weight for the telescope and its support components. The objective of this study were to design a lander that meets all the constraints of the launching system. The basic constraints of the TITAN IV/Centaur system are given.

  5. The Herschel-ATLAS Data Release 1 Paper II: Multi-wavelength counterparts to submillimetre sources

    CERN Document Server

    Bourne, N; Maddox, S J; Dye, S; Furlanetto, C; Hoyos, C; Smith, D J B; Eales, S; Smith, M W L; Valiante, E; Alpaslan, M; Andrae, E; Baldry, I K; Cluver, M E; Cooray, A; Driver, S P; Dunlop, J S; Grootes, M W; Ivison, R J; Jarrett, T H; Liske, J; Madore, B F; Popescu, C C; Robotham, A G; Rowlands, K; Seibert, M; Thompson, M A; Tuffs, R J; Viaene, S; Wright, A H

    2016-01-01

    This paper is the second in a pair of articles presenting data release 1 (DR1) of the Herschel Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey (H-ATLAS), the largest single open-time key project carried out with the Herschel Space Observatory. The H-ATLAS is a wide-area imaging survey carried out in five photometric bands at 100, 160, 250, 350 and 500$\\mu$m covering a total area of 600deg$^2$. In this paper we describe the identification of optical counterparts to submillimetre sources in DR1, comprising an area of 161 deg$^2$ over three equatorial fields of roughly 12$^\\circ$x4.5$^\\circ$ centred at 9$^h$, 12$^h$ and 14.5$^h$ respectively. Of all the H-ATLAS fields, the equatorial regions benefit from the greatest overlap with current multi-wavelength surveys spanning ultraviolet (UV) to mid-infrared regimes, as well as extensive spectroscopic coverage. We use a likelihood-ratio technique to identify SDSS counterparts at r<22.4 for 250-$\\mu$m-selected sources detected at $\\geq$ 4$\\sigma$ ($\\approx$28mJy). We fin...

  6. Jet evolution in Steep Spectrum Radio Quasars: a multiwavelength study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torresi Eleonora

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Thanks to the Fermi γ-ray satellite, it is now confirmed that Misaligned Active Galactic Nuclei (MAGN, i.e. radio galaxies and steep spectrum radio quasars, are a new class of GeV emitters. In this work we present the first γ-ray and multiwavelength study of the two steep spectrum radio quasars, i.e. 3C 207 and 3C 380, belonging to the MAGN sample. From the γ -ray variability study we estimate the physical size of the zone where high-energy photons are dissipated: for both sources this region should be very compact, not larger than 0.05 pc. As a successive step, we build multiwavelength light curves of 3C 207 and 3C 380 to search for possible simultaneous outbursts in different wavebands with the aim of localizing the compact emitting region. This is an important issue with strong impact on theoretical models: indeed, knowing where highenergy photons are dissipated (at sub-pc or pc-scale provides information on the nature of the seed photons involved in the production of the GeV radiation.

  7. DMMW: A tool for multi-wavelength dark matter searches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The level of emission expected from Dark Matter annihilation at radio frequencies, UV and at X-ray frequencies is comparable, and thus complementary, to searches in gamma rays with Fermi-LAT. However, unlike the prompt gamma-ray emission, the secondary inverse Compton, bremsstrahlung and synchrotron emission from leptons depends on the transport setup and the astrophysical properties of the object under consideration. At the same time Cosmic Ray electrons and positrons, as well as protons form a background which is subject to the same transport model uncertainties. Here we present first results from DMMW (Dark Matter Multi-Wavelength), a tool which is capable of simultaneously fitting the multi-wavelength emission spectrum of a given object for generic Dark Matter models, density distributions and Cosmic Ray transport setups. DMMW allows the user to make reliable predictions about the radio, UV, X-ray and soft gamma-ray emission associated with the relativistic electrons and positrons produced in Dark Matter annihilation, as well as the relativistic electrons, positrons and protons produced in Cosmic Ray sources and Cosmic Ray interactions with the gas. The stable charged annihilation products are propagated in the same framework as the Cosmic Rays, thus allowing the user to probe different transport setups and self-consistently constrain a possible signal from Dark Matter Annihilation from radio to soft gamma-rays.

  8. Everyday Radio Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Mandal, Pranshu; Kumar, Pratik; Yelikar, Anjali; Soni, Kanchan; T, Vineeth Krishna

    2016-01-01

    We have developed an affordable, portable college level radio telescope for amateur radio astronomy which can be used to provide hands-on experience with the fundamentals of a radio telescope and an insight into the realm of radio astronomy. With our set-up one can measure brightness temperature and flux of the Sun at 11.2 GHz and calculate the beam width of the antenna. The set-up uses commercially available satellite television receiving system and parabolic dish antenna. We report the detection of point sources like Saturn and extended sources like the galactic arm of the Milky way. We have also developed python pipeline, which are available for free download, for data acquisition and visualization.

  9. Telescopic horizon scanning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenderink, Jan

    2014-12-20

    The problem of "distortionless" viewing with terrestrial telescopic systems (mainly "binoculars") remains problematic. The so called "globe effect" is only partially counteracted in modern designs. Theories addressing the phenomenon have never reached definitive closure. In this paper, we show that exact distortionless viewing with terrestrial telescopic systems is not possible in general, but that it is in principle possible in-very frequent in battle field and marine applications-the case of horizon scanning. However, this involves cylindrical optical elements. For opto-electronic systems, a full solution is more readily feasible. The solution involves a novel interpretation of the relevant constraints and objectives. For final design decisions, it is not necessary to rely on a corpus of psychophysical (or ergonomic) data, although one has to decide whether the instrument is intended as an extension of the eye or as a "pictorial" device. PMID:25608206

  10. Telescope enclosure flow visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Fred F.; Wong, Woon-Yin; Baldwin, Jack; Siegmund, Walter A.; Limmongkol, Siriluk; Comfort, Charles H.

    1991-12-01

    Dome-induced thermal disturbances that degrade seeing can originate when temperature differences exist between the interior and exterior of a telescope enclosure. It is important to design enclosures which minimize the effect. One design aid is to model the enclosure and study the flow patterns in and around the model at various angles to the flow direction. We have used a water tunnel and models of spherical, octagonal, and rectangular enclosures to investigate the flow characteristics as a function of angle and venting configuration. In addition to a large video data-base, numerical results yield flushing times for all models and all venting arrangements. We have also investigated the comparative merits of passive venting as opposed to active forced flow circulation for the 4m telescope enclosure at the NOAO Cerro Tololo Interamerican Observatory at La Serena, Chile. Finally, the flow characteristics of a tracking half-shroud were studied as a possible shield for the enclosureless case.

  11. Comparing NEO Search Telescopes

    CERN Document Server

    Myhrvold, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    Multiple terrestrial and space-based telescopes have been proposed for detecting and tracking near-Earth objects (NEOs). Detailed simulations of the search performance of these systems have used complex computer codes that are not widely available, which hinders accurate cross- comparison of the proposals and obscures whether they have consistent assumptions. Moreover, some proposed instruments would survey infrared (IR) bands, whereas others would operate in the visible band, and differences among asteroid thermal and visible light models used in the simulations further complicate like-to-like comparisons. I use simple physical principles to estimate basic performance metrics for the ground-based Large Synoptic Survey Telescope and three space-based instruments - Sentinel, NEOCam, and a Cubesat constellation. The performance is measured against two different NEO distributions, the Bottke et al. distribution of general NEOs, and the Veres et al. distribution of earth impacting NEO. The results of the comparis...

  12. The Bionic Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolf, Neville

    2009-05-01

    Four hundred years after children in a spectacle makers workshop accidentally discovered the telescope, the development of this device has been a continuous replacement of the ``natural'' by the deliberate. The human eye is gone. The lens is gone. The tube is gone. The dome is on the verge of going. The size of the optics are ceasing to be set by transportation limits. Adaptive optics are preferred to stable optics. We deliberately break the Lagrange invariant. We focus on lasers instead of stars, and natural observing environments are being replaced by adaptive environments. The goals for the new ground based telescope encompass the oldest and newest ideas, to find signs of life elsewhere, and to find how all the universe developed.

  13. The VATLY radio telescope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A small radio telescope (SRT) has been installed on the roof of the Hanoi astrophysics laboratory VATLY. It is equipped with a 2.6 m diameter mobile parabolic dish remotely controlled in elevation and azimuth and with super-heterodyne detection around the 21 cm hydrogen line. First results of observations of the Sun and of the centre of the Milky Way are presented. They demonstrate the high quality of the telescope performance and are used to evaluate lobe size, signal to noise ratios, anthropogenic interferences and measurement accuracies. Particular attention is given to the measurement of the pointing accuracy. The rich measurement programme that is now at hand is briefly sketched. (author)

  14. The ANTARES Neutrino Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Perrina, Chiara

    2015-01-01

    At about 40 km off the coast of Toulon (France), anchored at 2475 m deep in the Mediterranean Sea, there is ANTARES: the first undersea neutrino telescope and the only one currently operating. The detector consists of 885 photomultiplier tubes arranged into 12 strings of 450-metres high, with the aim to detect the Cherenkov light induced by the charged superluminal interaction products of neutrinos. Its main scientific target is the search for high-energy (TeV and beyond) neutrinos from cosmic accelerators, as predicted by hadronic interaction models, and the measurement of the cosmic neutrino diffuse flux, focusing in particular on events coming from below the horizon (up-going events) in order to significantly reduce the atmospheric muons background. Thanks to the development of a strategy for the identification of neutrinos coming from above the horizon (down-going events) the field of view of the telescope will be extended.

  15. New Radio Telescope Makes First Scientific Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-05-01

    The world's two largest radio telescopes have combined to make detailed radar images of the cloud-shrouded surface of Venus and of a tiny asteroid that passed near the Earth. The images mark the first scientific contributions from the National Science Foundation's (NSF) new Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope in West Virginia, which worked with the NSF's recently-upgraded Arecibo telescope in Puerto Rico. The project used the radar transmitter on the Arecibo telescope and the huge collecting areas of both telescopes to receive the echoes. GBT-Arecibo Radar Image of Maxwell Montes on Venus "These images are the first of many scientific contributions to come from the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope, and a great way for it to begin its scientific career," said Paul Vanden Bout, director of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO). "Our congratulations go to the scientists involved in this project as well as to the hard-working staffs at Green Bank and Arecibo who made this accomplishment possible," Vanden Bout added. To the eye, Venus hides behind a veil of brilliant white clouds, but these clouds can be penetrated by radar waves, revealing the planet's surface. The combination of the Green Bank Telescope (GBT), the world's largest fully-steerable radio telescope, and the Arecibo telescope, the world's most powerful radar, makes an unmatched tool for studying Venus and other solar-system bodies. "Having a really big telescope like the new Green Bank Telescope to receive the radar echoes from small asteroids that are really close to the Earth and from very distant objects like Titan, the large moon of Saturn, will be a real boon to radar studies of the solar system." said Cornell University professor Donald Campbell, leader of the research team. Ten years ago, the radar system on NASA's Magellan spacecraft probed though the clouds of Venus to reveal in amazing detail the surface of the Earth's twin planet. These new studies using the GBT and Arecibo, the

  16. [Galileo and his telescope].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strebel, Christoph

    2006-01-01

    Galileo's publication of observations made with his newly reinvented telescope provoked a fierce debate. In April 1610 Martinus Horky, a young Bohemian astronomer, had an opportunity to make his own observations with Galileo's telescope in the presence of Antonio Magini and other astronomers. Horky and the other witnesses denied the adequacy of Galileo's telescope and therefore the bona fides of his discoveries. Kepler conjectured Horky as well as all his witnesses to be myopic. But Kepler's objection could not stop the publication of Horky's Peregrinatio contra nuncium sidereum (Modena, 1610), the first printed refutation of Galileo's Sidereus nuncius. In his treatise, Horky adresses four questions: 1) Do the four newly observed heavenly bodies actually exist? Horky denies their existence on various grounds: a) God, as every astronomer teaches, has created only seven moveable heavenly bodies and astronomical knowledge originates in God, too. b) Heavenly bodies are either stars or planets. Galileo's moveable heavenly bodies fit into neither category. c) If they do exist, why have they not already been observed by other scholars? Horky concludes that there are no such heavenly bodies. 2) What are these phenomena? They are purely artefactual, and produced by Galileo's telescope. 3) How are they like? Galileo's "stars" are so small as to be almost invisible. Galileo claims that he has measured their distances from each other. This however is impossible due to their diminutive size and other observational problems. Hence, Galileo's claim is a further proof that he is a fraud. 4) Why are they? For Galileo they are a chance to earn money but for astronomers like Horky they are a reason to offer thanks and honour to God. Horky's treatise was favourably received by the enemies of Galileo. But Kepler's critique was devastating. After calling on Kepler in Prague, Horky had to revoke the contents of his book. PMID:16929794

  17. TELESCOPE sipping in PWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to the experience accumulated at ABB Atom in the early seventies, the company could use the know-how and available data for further development work and in the nineties introduced an advanced burst can detection method, the TELESCOPE sipping. The device and the method were successfully tested in November 1996 in pilot tests performed at the Grohnde nuclear power plant using a number of suitable fuel assemblies. (orig./CB)

  18. Workshop: Neutrino telescopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despite being the most elusive of the known particles, neutrinos provide vital new physics insights. Most neutrino knowledge so far has come from studies using beams from reactors and accelerators, but in recent years important new contributions have resulted from investigation of natural neutrinos from cosmic rays, nearby stars (the sun), or distant sources, such as the 1987 supernova. The supernova observations marked the start of a new era in neutrino astronomy, but neutrino telescopes were anyway assured of an important ongoing role

  19. Light Weight, Scalable Manufacturing of Telescope Optics Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA's future X-ray astronomy missions will require X-ray optics that have large effective areas, are lightweight, and cost effective. Recent X-ray telescopes, such...

  20. Hubble Space Telescope: The Telescope, the Observations & the Servicing Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-11-01

    Today the HST Archives contain more than 260 000 astronomical observations. More than 13 000 astronomical objects have been observed by hundreds of different groups of scientists. Direct proof of the scientific significance of this project is the record-breaking number of papers published : over 2400 to date. Some of HST's most memorable achievements are: * the discovery of myriads of very faint galaxies in the early Universe, * unprecedented, accurate measurements of distances to the farthest galaxies, * significant improvement in the determination of the Hubble constant and thus the age of the Universe, * confirmation of the existence of blacks holes, * a far better understanding of the birth, life and death of stars, * a very detailed look at the secrets of the process by which planets are created. Europe and HST ESA's contribution to HST represents a nominal investment of 15%. ESA provided one of the two imaging instruments - the Faint Object Camera (FOC) - and the solar panels. It also has 15 scientists and computer staff working at the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore (Maryland). In Europe the astronomical community receives observational assistance from the Space Telescope European Coordinating Facility (ST-ECF) located in Garching, Munich. In return for ESA's investment, European astronomers have access to approximately 15% of the observing time. In reality the actual observing time competitively allocated to European astronomers is closer to 20%. Looking back at almost ten years of operation, the head of ST-ECF, European HST Project Scientist Piero Benvenuti states: "Hubble has been of paramount importance to European astronomy, much more than the mere 20% of observing time. It has given the opportunity for European scientists to use a top class instrument that Europe alone would not be able to build and operate. In specific areas of research they have now, mainly due to HST, achieved international leadership." One of the major reasons for

  1. Results from the 2013 Multi-wavelength Campaign on Mkn 421

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balokovic, Mislav; Ajello, M.; Blandford, R. D.; Boggs, S. E.; Borracci, F.; Chiang, J.; Christensen, F.; Craig, W. W.; Forster, K.; Furniss, A.; Fuerst, F.; Ghisellini, G.; Giebels, B.; Giommi, P.; Grefenstette, B.; Hailey, C. J.; Harrison, F.; Hayashida, M.; Humensky, B.; Inoue, Y.; Koglin, J.; Krawczynski, H.; Madejski, G. M.; Madsen, K.; Meier, D. L.; Nelson, T.; Ogle, P. M.; Paneque, D.; Perri, M.; Puccetti, S.; Reynolds, C. S.; Sbarrato, T.; Stern, D.; Tagliaferri, G.; Urry, C. M.; Wehrle, A. E.; Zhang, W.; NuSTAR; Swift; MAGIC; VERITAS

    2014-01-01

    Mkn 421 is a nearby BL Lacertae object of the high-synchrotron peaked type (HSP). Its very broad spectral energy distribution (SED) peaks in the X-ray and gamma-ray bands and can be explained as a non-thermal continuum arising from the relativistic jet seen at a small angle to the line of sight. Emission near the two peaks of the SED is dominated by cooling of high-energy electrons in the jet. To study the electron distribution and its evolution, we carried out a large coordinated multi-wavelength campaign between December 2012 and May 2013. The observations were made using space observatories (NuSTAR, Swift and Fermi), ground-based Cherenkov-array telescopes (MAGIC and VERITAS), as well as several optical and radio observatories. The range of X-ray flux observed spans nearly two orders of magnitude and includes the faintest states ever observed in Mkn 421 with sufficient spectral and temporal resolution to resolve short-timescale spectral variability. We find that at low flux the hard X-ray spectrum assumes a very soft/steep power-law shape and gradually becomes harder as the flux increases. The flux variations in the X-ray and the very high energy (VHE) gamma-ray domains are positively correlated and consistent with the expectations of the one-zone synchrotron self-Compton scenario with the up-scattering occurring in the suppressed Klein-Nishina regime. For the first time, it was observed that, for very low X-ray and VHE activity, both the low- and high-energy SED bumps shifted to substantially lower energies with respect to the typical SED of Mkn 421. The unprecedented data quality and the extension of high sensitivity above 10 keV enabled by NuSTAR have proven to be instrumental for deepening our understanding of the energy distribution of particles in relativistic jets.

  2. Opportunities for Fundamental and New Physics with Very High Energy Gamma-ray Telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechtol, Keith

    2016-04-01

    Astronomical observations with the highest energy gamma rays enable a wide range of fundamental physics measurements as well as searches for new physics beyond the Standard Model. In this presentation, I will discuss indirect dark matter searches, intergalactic magnetic field constraints, and tests of Lorentz invariance with an emphasis on sensitivity gains that could be achieved with two new ground-based gamma-ray telescopes operating at the TeV energy scale: the High-Altitude Water Cherenkov observatory (HAWC) and the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA). Multiwavelength and multimessenger observations are an essential component of these studies needed to characterize the environments in which the highest energy gamma rays are produced, the conditions encountered while traversing interstellar and intergalactic distances, and "conventional" astrophysical backgrounds.

  3. The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR)

    CERN Document Server

    Harrison, Fiona A; Christensen, Finn; Craig, William; Hailey, Charles; Stern, Daniel; Zhang, William; Angelini, Lorella; An, HongJun; Bhalereo, Varun; Brejnholt, Nicolai; Cominsky, Lynn; Cook, W Rick; Doll, Melania; Giommi, Paolo; Grefenstette, Brian; Hornstrup, Allan; Kaspi, Victoria M; Kim, Yunjin; Kitaguchi, Takao; Koglin, Jason; Liebe, Carl Christian; Madejski, Greg; Madsen, Kristin Kruse; Mao, Peter; Meier, David; Miyasaka, Hiromasa; Mori, Kaya; Perri, Matteo; Pivovaroff, Michael; Puccetti, Simonetta; Rana, Vikram; Zoglauer, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) is a NASA Small Explorer mission that will carry the first focusing hard X-ray (5 -- 80 keV) telescope to orbit. NuSTAR will offer a factor 50 -- 100 sensitivity improvement compared to previous collimated or coded mask imagers that have operated in this energy band. In addition, NuSTAR provides sub-arcminute imaging with good spectral resolution over a 12-arcminute field of view. After launch, NuSTAR will carry out a two-year primary science mission that focuses on four key programs: studying the evolution of massive black holes through surveys carried out in fields with excellent multiwavelength coverage, understanding the population of compact objects and the nature of the massive black hole in the center of the Milky Way, constraining explosion dynamics and nucleosynthesis in supernovae, and probing the nature of particle acceleration in relativistic jets in active galactic nuclei. A number of additional observations will be included in the primary missio...

  4. Alignment Test Results of the JWST Pathfinder Telescope Mirrors in the Cryogenic Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitman, Tony L.; Wells, Conrad; Hadaway, James; Knight, J. Scott; Lunt, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    After integration of the Optical Telescope Element (OTE) to the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) to become the OTIS, the James Webb Space Telescope OTIS is tested at NASAs Johnson Space Center (JSC) in the cryogenic vacuum Chamber A for alignment and optical performance. The alignment of the mirrors comprises a sequence of steps as follows: The mirrors are coarsely aligned using photogrammetry cameras with reflective targets attached to the sides of the mirrors. Then a multi-wavelength interferometer is aligned to the 18-segment primary mirror using cameras at the center of curvature to align reflected light from the segments and using fiducials at the edge of the primary mirror. Once the interferometer is aligned, the 18 primary mirror segments are then adjusted to optimize wavefront error of the aggregate mirror. This process phases the piston and tilt positions of all the mirror segments. An optical fiber placed at the Cassegrain focus of the telescope then emits light towards the secondary mirror to create a collimated beam emitting from the primary mirror. Portions of the collimated beam are retro-reflected from flat mirrors at the top of the chamber to pass through the telescope to the SI detector. The image on the detector is used for fine alignment of the secondary mirror and a check of the primary mirror alignment using many of the same analysis techniques used in the on-orbit alignment. The entire process was practiced and evaluated in 2015 at cryogenic temperature with the Pathfinder telescope.

  5. Retrieval of aerosol parameters from multiwavelength lidar: investigation of the underlying inverse mathematical problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemyakin, Eduard; Burton, Sharon; Kolgotin, Alexei; Müller, Detlef; Hostetler, Chris; Ferrare, Richard

    2016-03-20

    We present an investigation of some important mathematical and numerical features related to the retrieval of microphysical parameters [complex refractive index, single-scattering albedo, effective radius, total number, surface area, and volume concentrations] of ambient aerosol particles using multiwavelength Raman or high-spectral-resolution lidar. Using simple examples, we prove the non-uniqueness of an inverse solution to be the major source of the retrieval difficulties. Some theoretically possible ways of partially compensating for these difficulties are offered. For instance, an increase in the variety of input data via combination of lidar and certain passive remote sensing instruments will be helpful to reduce the error of estimation of the complex refractive index. We also demonstrate a significant interference between Aitken and accumulation aerosol modes in our inversion algorithm, and confirm that the solutions can be better constrained by limiting the particle radii. Applying a combination of an analytical approach and numerical simulations, we explain the statistical behavior of the microphysical size parameters. We reveal and clarify why the total surface area concentration is consistent even in the presence of non-unique solution sets and is on average the most stable parameter to be estimated, as long as at least one extinction optical coefficient is employed. We find that for selected particle size distributions, the total surface area and volume concentrations can be quickly retrieved with fair precision using only single extinction coefficients in a simple arithmetical relationship. PMID:27140552

  6. A tunable multiwavelength Brillouin fiber laser with a semiconductor optical amplifier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A multiwavelength Brillouin fiber laser with wavelength tunability using a semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) and a birefringence fiber loop mirror has been demonstrated. The inhomogeneous broadening, and flat and broad gain in the SOA make the proposed multiwavelength laser comparatively stable and have the potential to generate a large number of Brillouin lasing wavelengths. A stable multiwavelength output with a spectral spacing of the Brillouin frequency shift of 0.08 nm and a wavelength number of more than 91 has been successfully produced. Moreover, wavelength tuning over a 21 nm wavelength range has been achieved. (paper)

  7. The Planck Telescope reflectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stute, Thomas

    2004-09-01

    The mechanical division of EADS-Astrium GmbH, Friedrichshafen is currently engaged with the development, manufacturing and testing of the advanced dimensionally stable composite reflectors for the ESA satellite borne telescope Planck. The objective of the ESA mission Planck is to analyse the first light that filled the universe, the cosmic microwave background radiation. Under contract of the Danish Space Research Institute and ESA EADS-Astrium GmbH is developing the all CFRP primary and secondary reflectors for the 1.5-metre telescope which is the main instrument of the Planck satellite. The operational frequency ranges from to 25 GHz to 1000 GHz. The demanding high contour accuracy and surface roughness requirements are met. The design provides the extreme dimensional stability required by the cryogenic operational environment at around 40 K. The elliptical off-axis reflectors display a classical lightweight sandwich design with CFRP core and facesheets. Isostatic mounts provide the interfaces to the telescope structure. Protected VDA provides the reflecting surface. The manufacturing is performed at the Friedrichshafen premises of EADS-Space Transportation GmbH, the former Dornier composite workshops. Advanced manufacturing technologies like true angle lay-up by CNC fibre placement and filament winding are utilized. The protected coating is applied at the CAHA facilities at the Calar Alto Observatory, Spain. The exhaustive environmental testing is performed at the facilities of IABG, Munich (mechanical testing) and for the cryo-optical tests at CSL Liege. The project is in advanced state with both Qualification Models being under environmental testing. The flight models will be delivered in 2004. The paper gives an overview over the requirements and the main structural features how these requirements are met. Special production aspects and available test results are reported.

  8. Comparing NEO Search Telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myhrvold, Nathan

    2016-04-01

    Multiple terrestrial and space-based telescopes have been proposed for detecting and tracking near-Earth objects (NEOs). Detailed simulations of the search performance of these systems have used complex computer codes that are not widely available, which hinders accurate cross-comparison of the proposals and obscures whether they have consistent assumptions. Moreover, some proposed instruments would survey infrared (IR) bands, whereas others would operate in the visible band, and differences among asteroid thermal and visible-light models used in the simulations further complicate like-to-like comparisons. I use simple physical principles to estimate basic performance metrics for the ground-based Large Synoptic Survey Telescope and three space-based instruments—Sentinel, NEOCam, and a Cubesat constellation. The performance is measured against two different NEO distributions, the Bottke et al. distribution of general NEOs, and the Veres et al. distribution of Earth-impacting NEO. The results of the comparison show simplified relative performance metrics, including the expected number of NEOs visible in the search volumes and the initial detection rates expected for each system. Although these simplified comparisons do not capture all of the details, they give considerable insight into the physical factors limiting performance. Multiple asteroid thermal models are considered, including FRM, NEATM, and a new generalized form of FRM. I describe issues with how IR albedo and emissivity have been estimated in previous studies, which may render them inaccurate. A thermal model for tumbling asteroids is also developed and suggests that tumbling asteroids may be surprisingly difficult for IR telescopes to observe.

  9. Telescope Time Allocation Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, J.

    2005-03-01

    TaToo is ESO's new Time Allocation Tool. This software scheduler is a combination of a user-friendly graphical user interface and an intelligent constraint-programming engine fine-tuned to ESO's scheduling problem. TaToo is able to produce a high quality and reliable schedule taking into consideration all constraints of the recommended programs for all telescopes in about 15 minutes. This performance allows schedulers at ESO-VISAS to simulate and evaluate different scenarios, optimize the scheduling of engineering activities at the observatories, and in the end construct the most science efficient schedule possible.

  10. Emissivity range constraints algorithm for multi-wavelength pyrometer (MWP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Jian; Rana, R S; Gu, Weihong

    2016-08-22

    In order to realize rapid and real temperature measurement for high temperature targets by multi-wavelength pyrometer (MWP), emissivity range constraints to optimize data processing algorithm without effect from emissivity has been developed. Through exploring the relation between emissivity deviation and true temperature by fitting of large number of data from different emissivity distribution target models, the effective search range of emissivity for every time iteration is obtained, so data processing time is greatly reduced. Simulation and experimental results indicate that calculation time is less by 0.2 seconds with 25K absolute error at 1800K true temperature, and the efficiency is improved by more than 90% compared with the previous algorithm. The method has advantages of simplicity, rapidity, and suitability for in-line high temperature measurement. PMID:27557198

  11. High power and compact switchable bismuth based multiwavelength fiber laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A compact switchable multiwavelength fibre laser (SWFL) is proposed and demonstrated using a bismuth based erbium doped fibre amplifier (Bi-EDFA) and a Sagnac loop mirror (SLM) in a ring cavity. The proposed compact SWFL can generate up to 6 switchable wavelengths with an average peak power of 11 dBm and also shows good stability over time with a high side mode signal ratio (SMSR) of 40 dB that negates minor fluctuations in the laser output. The Bi-EDF based gain medium gives the SWFL a large usable bandwidth of up to 80 nm, and it is expected that this will allow the SWFL to be used as a tunable laser source for high power applications to meet increasing demand

  12. A multiwavelength study of young stars in the Elephant Trunk

    Science.gov (United States)

    López Martí, B.; Bayo, A.; Morales Calderón, M.; Barrado, D.

    2013-05-01

    We present the results of a multiwavelength study of young stars in IC 1396A, ``the Elephant Trunk Nebula''. Our targets are selected combining optical, near-infrared and mid-infrared photometry. Near-infrared and optical spectroscopy are used to confirm their youth and to derive spectral types for these objects, showing that they are early to mid-M stars, and that our sample includes some of the lowest-mass objects reported so far in the region. The photometric and spectroscopic information is used to construct the spectral energy distributions and to study the properties of the stars (mass, age, accretion, disks, spatial location). The implications for the triggered star formation picture are discussed.

  13. Multi-Wavelength Variability in PKS 2155-304

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Y. G. Zheng; L. Zhang; X. Zhang; H. J. Ma

    2011-03-01

    We study multi-wavelength variability in BL Lacertae object PKS 2155-304 in the frame of the time dependent one-zone synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) model, where stochastic particle acceleration is taken into account. In this model, a homogeneously and isotropically spherical structure is assumed, the Fokker–Planck type equation which describes the evolution of the particles energy is numerically solved, and the synchrotron and self-Compton components from the spherical blob are calculated. Our results can reproduce observed spectra energy distribution (SED) and give definite predictions for the flux and spectral variability of PKS 2155-304.We find that particle injection rate, magnetic field and Doppler factor in the acceleration zone are important parameters for explaining its flaring behaviour.

  14. A new configuration of multi-wavelength Brillouin fiber laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A multi-wavelength laser is demonstrated using stimulated Brillouin scattering in a single-mode fiber with a feedback loop using two couplers and an optical circulator. This Brillouin fiber laser can operate at any wavelength depending on the Brillouin pump (BP) wavelength used. With a BP of 14 dBm, approximately 8 to 10 BFL lines are obtained in both forward and backward directions respectively with a line spacing of 0.16 nm. The use of the 99/1 coupler and 50/50 coupler gives the highest power and number of lines for the forward and backward outputs respectively. The maximum Stokes power obtained is approximately 8.0 dBm. The anti-Stokes lines are also obtained due to four wave mixing and bidirectional operation. The combination of forward and backward output can generate a larger number of lines with channel spacing of 0.08 nm

  15. A Synoptic, Multiwavelength Analysis of a Large Quasar Sample

    CERN Document Server

    Rengstorf, A W; Wilhite, B C; Brunner, Robert J.; Rengstorf, Adam W.; Wilhite, Brian C.

    2005-01-01

    We present variability and multi-wavelength photometric information for the 933 known quasars in the QUEST Variability Survey. These quasars are grouped into variable and non-variable populations based on measured variability confidence levels. In a time-limited synoptic survey, we detect an anti-correlation between redshift and the likelihood of variability. Our comparison of variability likelihood to radio, IR, and X-ray data is consistent with earlier quasar studies. Using already-known quasars as a template, we introduce a light curve morphology algorithm that provides an efficient method for discriminating variable quasars from periodic variable objects in the absence of spectroscopic information. The establishment of statistically robust trends and efficient, non-spectroscopic selection algorithms will aid in quasar identification and categorization in upcoming massive synoptic surveys. Finally, we report on three interesting variable quasars, including variability confirmation of the BL Lac candidate P...

  16. Connecting the Baryons: Multiwavelength Data for SKA HI Surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Meyer, Martin; Obreschkow, Danail; Driver, Simon; Staveley-Smith, Lister; Zwaan, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The science achievable with SKA HI surveys will be greatly increased through the combination of HI data with that at other wavelengths. These multiwavelength datasets will enable studies to move beyond an understanding of HI gas in isolation to instead understand HI as an integral part of the highly complex baryonic processes that drive galaxy evolution. As they evolve, galaxies experience a host of environmental and feedback influences, many of which can radically impact their gas content. Important processes include: accretion (hot and cold mode, mergers), depletion (star formation, galactic winds, AGN), phase changes (ionised/atomic/molecular), and environmental effects (ram pressure stripping, tidal effects, strangulation). Governing all of these to various extents is the underlying dark matter distribution. In turn, the result of these processes can significantly alter the baryonic states in which material is finally observed (stellar populations, dust, chemistry) and its morphology (galaxy type, bulge/d...

  17. Multi-wavelength probes of distant lensed galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Serjeant, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    I summarise recent results on multi-wavelength properties of distant lensed galaxies, with a particular focus on Herschel. Submm surveys have already resulted in a breakthrough discovery of an extremely efficient selection technique for strong gravitational lenses. Benefitting from the gravitational magnification boost, blind mm-wave redshifts have been demonstrated on IRAM, SMA and GBT, and follow-up emission line detections have been made of water, [OIII], [CII] and other species, revealing the PDR/XDR/CRDR conditions. I also discuss HST imaging of submm lenses, lensed galaxy reconstruction, the prospects for ALMA and e-Merlin and the effects of differential magnification. Many emission line diagnostics are relatively unaffected by differential magnification, but SED-based estimates of bolometric fractions in lensed infrared galaxies are so unreliable as to be useless, unless a lens mass model is available to correct for differential amplification.

  18. SIX YEARS OF FERMI-LAT AND MULTI-WAVELENGTH MONITORING OF THE BROAD-LINE RADIO GALAXY 3C 120: JET DISSIPATION AT SUB-PARSEC SCALES FROM THE CENTRAL ENGINE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Y. T. [Hiroshima Astrophysical Science Center, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Doi, A.; Inoue, Y.; Stawarz, L. [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, JAXA, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Cheung, C. C. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375-5352 (United States); Fukazawa, Y.; Itoh, R. [Department of Physical Sciences, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Gurwell, M. A. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Tahara, M.; Kataoka, J., E-mail: ytanaka@hep01.hepl.hiroshima-u.ac.jp [Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan)

    2015-01-30

    We present multi-wavelength monitoring results for the broad-line radio galaxy 3C 120 in the MeV/GeV, sub-millimeter, and 43 GHz bands over 6 yr. Over the past 2 yr, the Fermi-Large Area Telescope sporadically detected 3C 120 with high significance and the 230 GHz data also suggest an enhanced activity of the source. After the MeV/GeV detection from 3C 120 in MJD 56240–56300, 43 GHz Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) monitoring revealed a brightening of the radio core, followed by the ejection of a superluminal knot. Since we observed the γ-ray and VLBA phenomena in temporal proximity to each other, it is naturally assumed that they are physically connected. This assumption was further supported by the subsequent observation that the 43 GHz core brightened again after a γ-ray flare occurred around MJD 56560. We can then infer that the MeV/GeV emission took place inside an unresolved 43 GHz core of 3C 120 and that the jet dissipation occurred at sub-parsec distances from the central black hole (BH), if we take the distance of the 43 GHz core from the central BH as ∼0.5 pc, as previously estimated from the time lag between X-ray dips and knot ejections. Based on our constraints on the relative locations of the emission regions and energetic arguments, we conclude that the γ rays are more favorably produced via the synchrotron self-Compton process, rather than inverse Compton scattering of external photons coming from the broad line region or hot dusty torus. We also derived the electron distribution and magnetic field by modeling the simultaneous broadband spectrum.

  19. Characterisation of a phantom for multiwavelength quantitative photoacoustic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, M.; Zeqiri, B.; Beard, P. C.; Cox, B. T.

    2016-07-01

    Quantitative photoacoustic imaging (qPAI) has the potential to provide high- resolution in vivo images of chromophore concentration, which may be indicative of tissue function and pathology. Many strategies have been proposed recently for extracting quantitative information, but many have not been experimentally verified. Experimental phantom-based validation studies can be used to test the robustness and accuracy of such algorithms in order to ensure reliable in vivo application is possible. The phantoms used in such studies must have well-characterised optical and acoustic properties similar to tissue, and be versatile and stable. Polyvinyl chloride plastisol (PVCP) has been suggested as a phantom for quality control and system evaluation. By characterising its multiwavelength optical properties, broadband acoustic properties and thermoelastic behaviour, this paper examines its potential as a phantom for qPAI studies too. PVCP’s acoustic properties were assessed for various formulations, as well as its intrinsic optical absorption, and scattering with added TiO2, over a range of wavelengths from 400-2000 nm. To change the absorption coefficient, pigment-based chromophores that are stable during the phantom fabrication process, were used. These yielded unique spectra analogous to tissue chromophores and linear with concentration. At the high peak powers typically used in photoacoustic imaging, nonlinear optical absorption was observed. The Grüneisen parameter was measured to be Γ   =  1.01  ±  0.05, larger than typically found in tissue, though useful for increased PA signal. Single and multiwavelength 3D PA imaging of various fabricated PVCP phantoms were demonstrated.

  20. Characterisation of a phantom for multiwavelength quantitative photoacoustic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, M; Zeqiri, B; Beard, P C; Cox, B T

    2016-07-01

    Quantitative photoacoustic imaging (qPAI) has the potential to provide high- resolution in vivo images of chromophore concentration, which may be indicative of tissue function and pathology. Many strategies have been proposed recently for extracting quantitative information, but many have not been experimentally verified. Experimental phantom-based validation studies can be used to test the robustness and accuracy of such algorithms in order to ensure reliable in vivo application is possible. The phantoms used in such studies must have well-characterised optical and acoustic properties similar to tissue, and be versatile and stable. Polyvinyl chloride plastisol (PVCP) has been suggested as a phantom for quality control and system evaluation. By characterising its multiwavelength optical properties, broadband acoustic properties and thermoelastic behaviour, this paper examines its potential as a phantom for qPAI studies too. PVCP's acoustic properties were assessed for various formulations, as well as its intrinsic optical absorption, and scattering with added TiO2, over a range of wavelengths from 400-2000 nm. To change the absorption coefficient, pigment-based chromophores that are stable during the phantom fabrication process, were used. These yielded unique spectra analogous to tissue chromophores and linear with concentration. At the high peak powers typically used in photoacoustic imaging, nonlinear optical absorption was observed. The Grüneisen parameter was measured to be [Formula: see text]  =  1.01  ±  0.05, larger than typically found in tissue, though useful for increased PA signal. Single and multiwavelength 3D PA imaging of various fabricated PVCP phantoms were demonstrated. PMID:27286411

  1. The Cherenkov Telescope Array

    CERN Document Server

    Bigongiari, Ciro

    2016-01-01

    The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) is planned to be the next generation ground based observatory for very high energy (VHE) gamma-ray astronomy. Gamma-rays provide a powerful insight into the non-thermal universe and hopefully a unique probe for new physics. Imaging Cherenkov telescopes have already discovered more than 170 VHE gamma-ray emitters providing plentiful of valuable data and clearly demonstrating the power of this technique. In spite of the impressive results there are indications that the known sources represent only the tip of the iceberg. A major step in sensitivity is needed to increase the number of detected sources, observe short time-scale variability and improve morphological studies of extended sources. An extended energy coverage is advisable to observe far-away extragalactic objects and improve spectral analysis. CTA aims to increase the sensitivity by an order of magnitude compared to current facilities, to extend the accessible gamma-ray energies from a few tens of GeV to a hundred o...

  2. Upgrade of the MAGIC telescopes

    CERN Document Server

    Mazin, Daniel; Garczarczyk, Markus; Giavitto, Gianluca; Sitarek, Julian

    2014-01-01

    The MAGIC telescopes are two Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes (IACTs) located on the Canary island of La Palma. With 17m diameter mirror dishes and ultra-fast electronics, they provide an energy threshold as low as 50 GeV for observations at low zenith angles. The first MAGIC telescope was taken in operation in 2004 whereas the second one joined in 2009. In 2011 we started a major upgrade program to improve and to unify the stereoscopic system of the two similar but at that time different telescopes. Here we report on the upgrade of the readout electronics and digital trigger of the two telescopes, the upgrade of the camera of the MAGIC I telescope as well as the commissioning of the system after this major upgrade.

  3. Compact, Wavelength Stabilized Seed Source for Multi-Wavelength Lidar Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA LaRC is developing a compact, multi-wavelength High Spectral resolution Lidar (HSRL) system designed to measure various optical and microphysical properties of...

  4. Flexible Optical-Comb-Based Multi-Wavelength Conversion for Optical Switching and Multicast

    OpenAIRE

    Vilar Mateo, Ruth; Ramos Pascual, Francisco; Marques, C.; Nogueira, Regina Isabel; Teixeira, A; Llorente Sáez, Roberto; RAMOS, FRAN JOSE

    2011-01-01

    Experimental results on multi-wavelength conversion based on optical comb generation for optical switching and multicast applications are presented. All the newly generated channels showed good performance with clear and open eye diagrams. FP7-ICT- 2009-4-249142 FP7-ICT-2007-1- 216863 Vilar Mateo, R.; Ramos Pascual, F.; Marques, C.; Nogueira, RI.; Teixeira, A.; Llorente Sáez, R.; Ramos, FJ. (2011). Flexible Optical-Comb-Based Multi-Wavelength Conversion for Optical Switch...

  5. Multi-wavelength Observations of PKS 2142-758 during an Active Gamma-Ray State

    CERN Document Server

    Dutka, Michael; Pottschmidt, Katja; Finke, Justin; Stevens, Jamie; Blanchard, Jay; Nesci, Roberto; Edwards, Philip; Lovell, Jim; Kadler, Matthias; Wilms, Joern; Tosti, Gino; Pursimo, Tapio

    2012-01-01

    PKS 2142-758 is a flat spectrum radio quasar which emits few, weak but significant gamma-ray flares in the MeV through GeV energy range. The first flare occured on April 4th, 2010, when the source reached a daily flux of (1.1 \\pm 0.3) * 10^-6 ph cm^-2 s^-1 (ATEL #2539) in the 100 MeV to 300 GeV range. This flux represented more than an order of magnitude increase over its quiescent flux. Since the initial flare, this source has been detected in an elevated state within the same energy range from October to November of 2010 and another period ranging from July to August of 2011. During the latest flaring period in 2011 a multi wavelength observing campaign was carried out using the Ceduna radio telescope, the Australian Telescope Compact Array (ATCA), the TANAMI VLBI Array, Swift, the Rapid Eye Mount Telescope (REM), and the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board Fermi. These quasi-simultaneous data were used to construct a broadband SED of this object in its rare active state. We present these observations and t...

  6. A medium sized telescope prototype for the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CTA (Cherenkov Telescope Array) is a proposed next generation instrument to observe very high energy (VHE) gamma-rays at ground level. The array will consist of 3 sizes of telescope covering a wide photon energy range: small (4m diameter) telescopes sensitive to the highest energy photons, medium sized telescopes (12 m) operating in the mid energy range, and a small number of large telescopes (24 m) with high sensitivity to low energy photons. Current Cherenkov Telescope experiments consist of up to 5 telescopes; CTA will be made up of an order of magnitude more, which will greatly enhance the number of photons that can be detected as well as increasing the number of views of each cascade, bringing significantly improved angular resolution and background suppression. The observatory is currently in the planning and development phase. A prototype CTA medium sized telescope (MST) is being built in Adlershof (Berlin). This talk focuses on plans for CTA and the design and construction of the MST prototype, as well as its operation, instrumentation and early measurement results.

  7. Development of a mid-sized Schwarzschild-Couder Telescope for the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cameron, Robert A.

    2012-06-28

    The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) is a ground-based observatory for very high-energy (10 GeV to 100 TeV) gamma rays, planned for operation starting in 2018. It will be an array of dozens of optical telescopes, known as Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes (ACTs), of 8 m to 24 m diameter, deployed over an area of more than 1 square km, to detect flashes of Cherenkov light from showers initiated in the Earth's atmosphere by gamma rays. CTA will have improved angular resolution, a wider energy range, larger fields of view and an order of magnitude improvement in sensitivity over current ACT arrays such as H.E.S.S., MAGIC and VERITAS. Several institutions have proposed a research and development program to eventually contribute 36 medium-sized telescopes (9 m to 12 m diameter) to CTA to enhance and optimize its science performance. The program aims to construct a prototype of an innovative, Schwarzschild-Couder telescope (SCT) design that will allow much smaller and less expensive cameras and much larger fields of view than conventional Davies-Cotton designs, and will also include design and testing of camera electronics for the necessary advances in performance, reliability and cost. We report on the progress of the mid-sized SCT development program.

  8. The neutrino telescope ANTARES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gleixner Andreas

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The ANTARES neutrino telescope is currently the largest neutrino detector in the Northern Hemisphere. The detector consists of a three-dimensional array of 885 photomultiplier tubes, distributed along 12 lines, located at a depth of 2500 m in the Mediterranean Sea. The purpose of the experiment is the detection of high-energy cosmic neutrinos. The detection principle is based on the observation of Cherenkov-Light emitted by muons resulting from charged-current interactions of muon neutrinos in the vicinity of the detection volume. The main scientific targets of ANTARES include the search for astrophysical neutrino point sources, the measurement of the diffuse neutrino flux and the indirect search for dark matter.

  9. Spectroradiometry with Space Telescopes

    CERN Document Server

    Pauluhn, Anuschka; Smith, Peter L; Colina, Luis

    2015-01-01

    Radiometry has been of fundamental importance in astronomy from the early beginnings. Initially, astronomers had their own radiometric system, based on extraterrestrial standards, namely the irradiance of stars expressed in visual magnitudes. Observing and comparing magnitudes in specific spectral bands then led to the astronomical spectrophotometry. The advent of astronomical high-resolution spectroscopy offered the possibility to interpret observations through physical models of stellar atmospheres. Such models had to be constructed based on physics-related units, and such units, rather than magnitudes, were then used for observational tests of the models. In this review, we provide an overview of how to achieve a valid laboratory calibration, and discuss ways to reliably extend this calibration to the spectroscopic telescope's performance in space. Recently, the quest for independent calibrations traceable to laboratory standards has become a well-supported aim, and has led to plans for now also launching ...

  10. The ANTARES neutrino telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Zornoza, Juan de Dios

    2012-01-01

    The ANTARES collaboration completed the installation of the first neutrino detector in the sea in 2008. It consists of a three dimensional array of 885 photomultipliers to gather the Cherenkov photons induced by relativistic muons produced in charged-current interactions of high energy neutrinos close to/in the detector. The scientific scope of neutrino telescopes is very broad: the origin of cosmic rays, the origin of the TeV photons observed in many astrophysical sources or the nature of dark matter. The data collected up to now have allowed us to produce a rich output of physics results, including the map of the neutrino sky of the Southern hemisphere, search for correlations with GRBs, flaring sources, gravitational waves, limits on the flux produced by dark matter self-annihilations, etc. In this paper a review of these results is presented.

  11. Composite telescope technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Peter C.; Rabin, Douglas

    2014-07-01

    We report the development of optical mirrors based on polymer matrix composite materials. Advantages of this technology are low cost and versatility. By using appropriate combinations of polymers and various metallic and nonmetallic particles and fibers, the properties of the materials can be tailored to suit a wide variety of applications. We report the fabrication and testing of flat and curved mirrors made with metal powders, multiple mirrors replicated with high degree of uniformity from the same mandrels, cryogenic testing, mirrors made of ferromagnetic materials that can be actively or adaptively controlled by non-contact actuation, optics with very smooth surfaces made by replication, and by spincasting. We discuss development of a new generation of ultra-compact, low power active optics and 3D printing of athermal telescopes.

  12. Microoptical telescope compound eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duparré, Jacques; Schreiber, Peter; Matthes, André; Pshenay-Severin, Ekaterina; Bräuer, Andreas; Tünnermann, Andreas; Völkel, Reinhard; Eisner, Martin; Scharf, Toralf

    2005-02-01

    A new optical concept for compact digital image acquisition devices with large field of view is developed and proofed experimentally. Archetypes for the imaging system are compound eyes of small insects and the Gabor-Superlens. A paraxial 3x3 matrix formalism is used to describe the telescope arrangement of three microlens arrays with different pitch to find first order parameters of the imaging system. A 2mm thin imaging system with 21x3 channels, 70 masculinex10 masculine field of view and 4.5mm x 0.5mm image size is optimized and analyzed using sequential and non-sequential raytracing and fabricated by microoptics technology. Anamorphic lenses, where the parameters are a function of the considered optical channel, are used to achieve a homogeneous optical performance over the whole field of view. Captured images are presented and compared to simulation results. PMID:19494951

  13. Multiwavelength observations of 3C 454.3. I. The AGILE 2007 November campaign on the "Crazy Diamond"

    CERN Document Server

    Vercellone, S; Vittorini, V; Giuliani, A; D'Ammando, F; Tavani, M; Donnarumma, I; Pucella, G; Raiteri, C M; Villata, M; Chen, W P; Tosti, G; Impiombato, D; Romano, P; Belfiore, A; De Luca, A; Novara, G; Senziani, F; Bazzano, A; Fiocchi, M T; Ubertini, P; Ferrari, A; Argan, A; Barbiellini, G; Boffelli, F; Bulgarelli, A; Caraveo, P; Cattaneo, P W; Cocco, V; Costa, E; Del Monte, E; De Paris, G; Di Cocco, G; Evangelista, Y; Feroci, M; Fiorini, M; Fornari, F; Froysland, T; Fuschino, F; Galli, M; Gianotti, F; Labanti, C; Lapshov, I; Lazzarotto, F; Lipari, P; Longo, F; Marisaldi, M; Mereghetti, S; Morselli, A; Pellizzoni, A; Pacciani, L; Perotti, F; Picozza, P; Prest, M; Rapisarda, M; Rappoldi, A; Soffitta, P; Trifoglio, M; Trois, A; Vallazza, E; Zambra, A; Zanello, D; Pittori, C; Verrecchia, F; Santolamazza, P; Preger, B; Gasparrini, D; Cutini, S; Giommi, P; Colafrancesco, S; Salotti, L

    2008-01-01

    [Abridged] We report on a multiwavelength observation of the blazar 3C 454.3 (which we dubbed "crazy diamond") carried out on November 2007 by means of the astrophysical satellites AGILE, INTEGRAL, Swift, the WEBT Consortium, and the optical-NIR telescope REM. 3C 454.3 is detected at a $\\sim 19-\\sigma$ level during the 3-week observing period, with an average flux above 100 MeV of $F_{\\rm E>100MeV} = (170 \\pm 13) \\times 10^{-8}$ \\phcmsec. The gamma-ray spectrum can be fit with a single power-law with photon index $\\Gamma_{\\rm GRID} = 1.73 \\pm 0.16$ between 100 MeV and 1 GeV. We detect significant day-by-day variability of the gamma-ray emission during our observations, and we can exclude that the fluxes are constant at the 99.6% ($\\sim 2.9 \\sigma$) level. The source was detected typically around 40 degrees off-axis, and it was substantially off--axis in the field of view of the AGILE hard X-ray imager. However, a 5-day long ToO observation by INTEGRAL detected 3C 454.3 at an average flux of about $F_{\\rm 20-2...

  14. The Multiwavelength Survey by Yale-Chile (MUSYC): Deep Near-Infrared Imaging and the Selection of Distant Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Quadri, R; van Dokkum, P; Gawiser, E; Franx, M; Lira, P; Rudnick, G; Urry, C M; Maza, J; Kriek, M; Barrientos, L F; Blanc, G; Castander, F J; Christlein, D; Coppi, P S; Hall, P B; Herrera, D; Infante, L; Taylor, E N; Treister, E; Willis, J P; Quadri, Ryan; Marchesini, Danilo; Dokkum, Pieter van; Gawiser, Eric; Franx, Marijn; Lira, Paulina; Rudnick, Gregory; Maza, Jose; Kriek, Mariska; Blanc, Guillermo; Castander, Francisco J.; Christlein, Daniel; Coppi, Paolo S.; Hall, Patrick B.; Herrera, David; Infante, Leopoldo; Taylor, Edward N.; Treister, Ezequiel; Willis, Jon P.

    2006-01-01

    We present deep near-infrared JHK imaging of four 10'x10' fields. The observations were carried out as part of the Multiwavelength Survey by Yale-Chile (MUSYC) with ISPI on the CTIO 4m telescope. The typical point source limiting depths are J~22.5, H~21.5, and K~21 (5sigma; Vega). The effective seeing in the final images is ~1.0". We combine these data with MUSYC UBVRIz imaging to create K-selected catalogs that are unique for their uniform size, depth, filter coverage, and image quality. We investigate the rest-frame optical colors and photometric redshifts of galaxies that are selected using common color selection techniques, including distant red galaxies (DRGs), star-forming and passive BzKs, and the rest-frame UV-selected BM, BX, and Lyman break galaxies (LBGs). These techniques are effective at isolating large samples of high redshift galaxies, but none provide complete or uniform samples across the targeted redshift ranges. The DRG and BM/BX/LBG criteria identify populations of red and blue galaxies, r...

  15. A Multi-Wavelength Simultaneous Study of the Composition of the Halley Family Comet 8P/Tuttle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jehin, E.; Bockelée-Morvan, D.; Dello Russo, N.; Manfroid, J.; Hutsemékers, D.; Kawakita, H.; Kobayashi, H.; Schulz, R.; Smette, A.; Stüwe, J.; Weiler, M.; Arpigny, C.; Biver, N.; Cochran, A.; Crovisier, J.; Magain, P.; Rauer, H.; Sana, H.; Vervack, R. J.; Weaver, H.; Zucconi, J.-M.

    2009-09-01

    We report on simultaneous optical and infrared observations of the Halley Family comet 8P/Tuttle performed with the ESO Very Large Telescope. Such multi-wavelength and coordinated observations are a good example of what can be done to support space missions. From high resolution optical spectroscopy of the CN (0,0) 388 nm and NH2 (0,9,0) 610 nm bands using UVES at UT2 we determined 12C/13C = 90 ± 10 and 14N/15N = 150 ± 20 in CN and we derived a nuclear spin temperature of NH3 of 29 ± 1 K. These values are similar to those found in Oort-Cloud and Jupiter Family comets. From low resolution long slit spectroscopy with FORS1 at UT2 we determined the CN, C3 and C2 production rates and the parent and daughter scale lengths up to 5.2 105 km tailward. From high resolution IR spectroscopy with CRIRES at UT1 we measured simultaneously the production rates and mixing ratios of H2O, HCN, C2H2, CH4, C2H6, and CH3OH.

  16. The environment and star formation of HII region Sh2-163: a multi-wavelength study

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Naiping; Li, Nan

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the environment of HII region Sh2-163 and search for evidence of triggered star formation in this region, we performed a multi-wavelength study of this HII region. Most of our data were taken from large-scale surveys: 2MASS, CGPS, MSX and SCUBA. We also made CO molecular line observations, using the 13.7-m telescope. The ionized region of Sh2-163 is detected by both the optical and radio continuum observations. Sh2-163 is partially bordered by an arc-like photodissociation region (PDR), which is coincident with the strongest optical and radio emissions, indicating interactions between the HII region and the surrounding interstellar medium. Two molecular clouds were discovered on the border of the PDR. The morphology of these two clouds suggests they are compressed by the expansion of Sh2-163. In cloud A, we found two molecular clumps. And it seems star formation in clump A2 is much more active than in clump A1. In cloud B, we found new outflow activities and massive star(s) are forming inside. ...

  17. Future perspectives for ground-based telescopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Technological developments now make it possible to observe planets orbiting other stars, peer deeper than ever into the universe, use particles and gravitational waves to study celestial sources, and to carry out in situ exploration of solar system objects. This promises tremendous progress towards answering key astronomical questions such as the nature of dark matter and dark energy; physics under extreme conditions including black holes, supernovae and gamma-ray bursts; the formation and evolution of galaxies from first light to the present, and the formation of stars and planets including the origin of our own solar system and the beginning of life. These are amongst the most fundamental scientific questions and are of enormous interest to the general public. A wide range of general purpose and dedicated observatories, on the ground and in space, is presently in operation or under development. Plans are being drawn up for a next generation of facilities, including extremely large telescopes for the optical and infrared, a radio telescope with very large collecting area, survey telescopes which would provide deep imaging of the sky every few nights, an advanced technology solar telescope, wide-field imagers in space, advanced planetary and solar missions, experiments to detect particles and gravitational waves, large x-ray telescopes, and space missions devoted to characterizing extra-solar planets. Construction of these facilities will require substantial investment by national funding agencies over the next decades. At their request, an integrated science vision was developed which identifies the most promising techniques and facilities needed to make substantial progress, followed by a road map for the development of the required infrastructure. The talk will discuss future ground-based facilities and highlight the role of ESO. (author)

  18. Hubble Space Telescope, Wide Field Planetary Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    This illustration is a diagram of the Hubble Space Telescope's (HST's), Wide Field Planetary Camera (WF/PC), one of the five Scientific Instruments. The WF/PC uses a four-sided pyramid mirror to split a light image into quarters. It then focuses each quadrant onto one of two sets of four sensors. The sensors are charge-coupled detectors and function as the electronic equivalent of extremely sensitive photographic plates. The WF/PC operates in two modes. The Wide-Field mode that will view 7.2-arcmin sections of the sky, and the Planetary mode that will look at narrower fields of view, such as planets or areas within other galaxies. The purpose of the HST, the most complex and sensitive optical telescope ever made, is to study the cosmos from a low-Earth orbit. By placing the telescope in space, astronomers are able to collect data that is free of the Earth's atmosphere. The HST detects objects 25 times fainter than the dimmest objects seen from Earth and provides astronomers with an observable universe 250 times larger than visible from ground-based telescopes, perhaps as far away as 14 billion light-years. The HST views galaxies, stars, planets, comets, possibly other solar systems, and even unusual phenomena such as quasars, with 10 times the clarity of ground-based telescopes. The HST was deployed from the Space Shuttle Discovery (STS-31 mission) into Earth orbit in April 1990. The Marshall Space Flight Center had responsibility for design, development, and construction of the HST. The Perkin-Elmer Corporation, in Danbury, Cornecticut, developed the optical system and guidance sensors.

  19. Recent results from the FERMI gamma-ray telescope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Can we learn about New Physics with astronomical and astroparticle data? Since its launch in 2008, the Large Area Telescope, onboard of the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, has detected the largest amount of gamma rays in the 20 MeV–300 GeV energy range and electrons and positrons in the 7GeV–1TeV range. These impressive statistics allow one to perform a very sensitive indirect experimental search for dark matter.

  20. Building the Hubble Space Telescope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of the design for the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) is discussed. The HST optical system is described and illustrated. The financial and policy issues related to the development of the HST are considered. The actual construction of the HST optical telescope is examined. Also, consideration is given to the plans for the HST launch