WorldWideScience

Sample records for area silicon tracking

  1. The CDF-II silicon tracking system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    F. Palmonari et al.

    2002-01-18

    The CDFII silicon tracking system, SVX, for Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron has up to 8 cylindrical layers with average radii spanning from {approx} (1.5 to 28.7) cm, and lengths ranging from {approx} (90 to 200) cm for a total active-area of {approx} 6 m{sup 2} and {approx} 7.2 x 10{sup 5} readout channels. SVX will improve the CDFII acceptance and efficiency for both B and high-Pt physics dependent upon b-tagging. Along with the description of the SVX we report some alignment survey data from the SVX assembly phase and the actual status of the alignment as it results from the offline data analysis. The problems encountered are also reviewed.

  2. The D/Ø Silicon Track Trigger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbrück, Georg

    2003-09-01

    We describe a trigger preprocessor to be used by the D Ø experiment for selecting events with tracks from the decay of long-lived particles. This Level 2 impact parameter trigger utilizes information from the Silicon Microstrip Tracker to reconstruct tracks with improved spatial and momentum resolutions compared to those obtained by the Level 1 tracking trigger. It is constructed of VME boards with much of the logic existing in programmable processors. A common motherboard provides the I/O infrastructure and three different daughter boards perform the tasks of identifying the roads from the tracking trigger data, finding the clusters in the roads in the silicon detector, and fitting tracks to the clusters. This approach provides flexibility for the design, testing and maintenance phases of the project. The track parameters are provided to the trigger framework in 25 μs. The effective impact parameter resolution for high-momentum tracks is 35 μm, dominated by the size of the Tevatron beam.

  3. Muon tracking system with Silicon Photomultipliers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arneodo, F.; Benabderrahmane, M.L.; Dahal, S. [New York University Abu Dhabi, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Di Giovanni, A., E-mail: adriano.digiovanni@nyu.edu [New York University Abu Dhabi, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Pazos Clemens, L. [New York University Abu Dhabi, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Candela, A.; D' Incecco, M.; Sablone, D. [Gran Sasso National Laboratory of INFN, Assergi (Italy); Franchi, G. [AGE Scientific Srl, Capezzano Pianore (Italy)

    2015-11-01

    We report the characterisation and performance of a low cost muon tracking system consisting of plastic scintillator bars and Silicon Photomultipliers equipped with a customised front-end electronics based on a fast preamplifier network. This system can be used as a detector test bench for astroparticle physics and for educational and outreach purposes. We investigated the device behaviour in self-trigger and coincidence mode, without using LED and pulse generators, showing that with a relatively simple set up a complete characterisation work can be carried out. A high definition oscilloscope, which can easily be found in many university physics or engineering departments, has been used for triggering and data acquisition. Its capabilities have been exploited to discriminate real particles from the background.

  4. ATLAS' inner silicon tracker on track for completion

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    Last week, the team working at the SR1 facility on the inner detector of the ATLAS experiment reached a project milestone after the delivery of the last Semi-conductor Tracker (SCT) barrel to CERN. The third barrel before its insertion into the support structure.The insertion of a completed barrel to its support structure is one of the highlights of the assembly and test sequence of the SCT in SR1. The inner detector will eventually sit in the 2 teslas magnetic field of the ATLAS solenoid, tracking charged particles from proton-proton collisions at the centre of ATLAS. The particles will be measured by a pixel detector (consisting of 3 pixel layers), an SCT (4 silicon strip layers) and a transition radiation tracker (TRT) (consisting of more than 52,000 straw tubes - see Bulletin 14/2005). The SCT has a silicon surface area of 61m2 with about 6 million operational channels so that all tracks can be identified and precisely measured. During 2004 a team of physicists, engineers, and technicians from several...

  5. Overview of the Silicon Tracking System for the CBM experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larionov, Pavel; CBM Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    The Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment will explore the QCD phase diagram in the region of high net baryonic densities and moderate temperatures. CBM will start it's physics program at the SIS-100 and later at the SIS-300 synchrothrons which will deliver beams for heavy ion collisions at energies up to 45 AGeV with hit rates up to 10 MHz.The Silicon Tracking System (STS) is the core tracking detector of the experiment. It will be used for the reconstruction of the tracks of charged particles and determination of their momenta. For this task eight tracking stations constructed with double-sided sililconmicro-strip sensors will be accomodated downstream the target inside the superconducting magnet. The required momentum resolution for particles with momenta above 1 GeV/c is of the order of Δp/p = 1%. To aim this, the material budget should be reduced to the level of 1% X0. The STS will provide track reconstruction efficiency for fast primary tracks on the level of 95%and higher. In this paper, the detector concept is summarized along with the detector components and simulation of the system's performance. Also, the quality assurance tests of the silicon sensors in which the author is involved in, are presented.

  6. Automated quality assurance for silicon microstrip sensors of the CBM Silicon Tracking System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Silicon Tracking System (STS) is the main tracking detector of the upcoming fixed-target Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment which aims to explore the phase diagram of the strongly interacting matter in a region of high net baryonic densities and moderate temperatures. The STS will be used for the reconstruction of tracks of charged particles and determination of their momenta. The system comprises 8 tracking stations located 30 cm downstream the target and will be mounted with 300 μm thick double-sided silicon microstrip sensors in three different sizes. In this paper, the Quality Assurance (QA) procedures for the STS sensors are overviewed highlighting the automated QA testing procedure for a single strip defect identification

  7. Quality assurance database for the CBM silicon tracking system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lymanets, Anton [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Tuebingen (Germany); Collaboration: CBM-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    The Silicon Tracking System is a main tracking device of the CBM Experiment at FAIR. Its construction includes production, quality assurance and assembly of large number of components, e.g., 106 carbon fiber support structures, 1300 silicon microstrip sensors, 16.6k readout chips, analog microcables, etc. Detector construction is distributed over several production and assembly sites and calls for a database that would be extensible and allow tracing the components, integrating the test data, monitoring the component statuses and data flow. A possible implementation of the above-mentioned requirements is being developed at GSI (Darmstadt) based on the FAIR DB Virtual Database Library that provides connectivity to common SQL-Database engines (PostgreSQL, Oracle, etc.). Data structure, database architecture as well as status of implementation are discussed.

  8. Forward physics at PHENIX with precision silicon tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durham, J. Matthew

    2014-03-01

    The PHENIX experiment at RHIC has developed and installed a new silicon detector, the Forward Silicon Vertex Tracker (FVTX), to provide precise tracking at forward and backward rapidity (1 . 2 strip sensors with a 75 micron pitch in the radial direction, and is located in front of the existing PHENIX muon arms. By determining muon tracks with high precision before any interactions occur in the hadron absorber, the FVTX will enhance the mass resolution of dimuon resonance measurements as well as allow separation of decay muons from charm and bottom hadrons produced in heavy ion collisions. In this talk, the design and capabilities of the FVTX will be discussed, along with the analysis status of FVTX data.

  9. Experimental Investigation on Electrical Tracking of Epoxy Resin Compound with Silicon Rubber%Experimental Investigation on Electrical Tracking of Epoxy Resin Compound with Silicon Rubber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Abdul Syakur; Hamzah Berahim; Tumiran; Rochmadi

    2011-01-01

    The use of polymer materials as electrical insulators on transmission and distribution lines has been increas- ing such,as epoxy resin. Several advantages of using epoxy resin as an insulating material are its low density, better dielectric properties, and epoxy resin has higher volume resistivity than that of the glass and porcelain. However, ep- oxy resin has some disadvantages when it is used in tropical areas concerning with the humidity, high ultraviolet radia- tion, acid rain and effects of contaminants. Consequently, insulator surface will be easily damaged due to electrical tracking, which is indicated by the surface tracking. In this paper, the surface tracking on epoxy resin compound with silicon rubber has been investigated. The test was done based on the method of Inclined--Planed Tracking (IPT) IEC 587.. 1984 with NH4 C1 as contaminant. The test materials used were epoxy resins based on Diglycidyl Ether of Bisphenol A (DGEBA) and Methaphenylene Diamine (MPDA) compound with silicon rubber ( SiR ) with the dimensions of 50 mm×120 mm and the thickness of 6 mm. The flow rate of contaminant was 0.3 mL/min. The 3.5 kV AC high voltage 50 Hz was applied to the top electrodes. The experimental results show that the contact angle of hydrophobic was affected by compound of silicon rubber. The surface tracking, time to tracking and discharge current were affected by applied voltage, contamination and contact angle. By using micro--cameras, the surface damage was detected. The severest damaged sample surface on a sample had small contact angle. On the other hand, samples with the greatest contact angle needed longer time to have surface damage in the surface discharge. This shows that it is more difficult for large contact angle samples or more hydrophobic to have surface discharge. Epoxy resin compound with silicon rubber has contact angle of hydrophobic greater than epoxy resin without silicon rubber.

  10. Preliminary thoughts on the data acquisition for the next generation of silicon tracking systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J F Genat; A Savoy-Navarro

    2007-12-01

    Preliminary thoughts about the data acquisition system to be developed for the next generation of large area silicon tracker are presented in this paper. This paper describes the set of data delivered by these tracking systems, and the various stages of processing and data flow transmission from the front-end chip sitting on the detector to the latest stage in the data processing. How to best profit from the status of the art technologies is a major goal.

  11. Enabling technologies for silicon microstrip tracking detectors at the HL-LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feld, L.; Karpinski, W.; Klein, K. [RWTH Aachen Univ. (Germany). 1. Physikalisches Institut B; Collaboration: The PETTL Collaboration; and others

    2016-04-15

    While the tracking detectors of the ATLAS and CMS experiments have shown excellent performance in Run 1 of LHC data taking, and are expected to continue to do so during LHC operation at design luminosity, both experiments will have to exchange their tracking systems when the LHC is upgraded to the high-luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) around the year 2024. The new tracking systems need to operate in an environment in which both the hit densities and the radiation damage will be about an order of magnitude higher than today. In addition, the new trackers need to contribute to the first level trigger in order to maintain a high data-taking efficiency for the interesting processes. Novel detector technologies have to be developed to meet these very challenging goals. The German groups active in the upgrades of the ATLAS and CMS tracking systems have formed a collaborative ''Project on Enabling Technologies for Silicon Microstrip Tracking Detectors at the HL-LHC'' (PETTL), which was supported by the Helmholtz Alliance ''Physics at the Terascale'' during the years 2013 and 2014. The aim of the project was to share experience and to work together on key areas of mutual interest during the R and D phase of these upgrades. The project concentrated on five areas, namely exchange of experience, radiation hardness of silicon sensors, low mass system design, automated precision assembly procedures, and irradiations. This report summarizes the main achievements.

  12. Superconducting Super Collider silicon tracking subsystem research and development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, W.O.; Thompson, T.C.; Ziock, H.J. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)); Gamble, M.T. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (USA). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1990-12-01

    The Alamos National Laboratory Mechanical Engineering and Electronics Division has been investigating silicon-based elementary particle tracking device technology as part of the Superconducting Super Collider-sponsored silicon subsystem collaboration. Structural, materials, and thermal issues have been addressed. This paper explores detector structural integrity and stability, including detailed finite element models of the silicon wafer support and predictive methods used in designing with advanced composite materials. The current design comprises a magnesium metal matrix composite (MMC) truss space frame to provide a sparse support structure for the complex array of silicon detectors. This design satisfies the 25-{mu}m structural stability requirement in a 10-Mrad radiation environment. This stability is achieved without exceeding the stringent particle interaction constraints set at 2.5% of a radiation length. Materials studies have considered thermal expansion, elastic modulus, resistance to radiation and chemicals, and manufacturability of numerous candidate materials. Based on optimization of these parameters, the MMC space frame will possess a coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) near zero to avoid thermally induced distortions, whereas the cooling rings, which support the silicon detectors and heat pipe network, will probably be constructed of a graphite/epoxy composite whose CTE is engineered to match that of silicon. Results from radiation, chemical, and static loading tests are compared with analytical predictions and discussed. Electronic thermal loading and its efficient dissipation using heat pipe cooling technology are discussed. Calculations and preliminary designs for a sprayed-on graphite wick structure are presented. A hydrocarbon such as butane appears to be a superior choice of heat pipe working fluid based on cooling, handling, and safety criteria.

  13. Calibration and alignment of the CMS silicon tracking detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoye, M.

    2007-07-15

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will dominate the high energy physics program in the coming decade. The discovery of the standard model Higgs boson and the discovery of super-symmetric particles are within the reach at the energy scale explored by the LHC. However, the high luminosity and the high energy of the colliding protons lead to challenging demands on the detectors. The hostile radiation environment requires irradiation hard detectors, where the innermost subdetectors, consisting of silicon modules, are most affected. This thesis is devoted to the calibration and alignment of the silicon tracking detector. Electron test beam data, taken at DESY, have been used to investigate the performance of detector modules which previously were irradiated with protons up to a dose expected after 10 years of operation. The irradiated sensors turned out to be still better than required. The performance of the inner tracking systems will be dominated by the degree to which the positions of the sensors can be determined. Only a track based alignment procedure can reach the required precision. Such an alignment procedure is a major challenge given that about 50000 geometry constants need to be measured. Making use of the novel {chi}{sup 2} minimization program Millepede II an alignment strategy has been developed in which all detector components are aligned simultaneously, as many sources of information as possible are used, and all correlations between the position parameters of the detectors are taken into account. Utilizing simulated data, a proof of concept of the alignment strategy is shown. (orig.)

  14. Detector module development for the CBM silicon tracking system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertini, Olga [GSI Helmholtzzentrum, Darmstadt (Germany); Collaboration: CBM-Collaboration

    2014-07-01

    The central detector of the CBM experiment at FAIR, the Silicon Tracking System (STS), is designed to reconstruct hundreds of charged particle tracks produced at rates up to 10 MHz in interactions of ion beams of up to 45 AGeV projectile energies with nuclear targets. The building block of the tracking system is a module suitable for a low-mass detector construction. In a module, the basic functional unit of the STS, radiation tolerant microstrip sensors are read out through low-mass multi-line cables with self-triggering front-end electronics located at the periphery of the system. Light-weight carbon fibre support structures will carry 10 of such modules and build up the STS stations. The performance of module prototypes has been evaluated, resembling the structure of the intended STS module. The shown prototypes comprise a full-size CBM05 sensor and two 128-channel read-out cables attached to the read-out pads on either side of the sensor. The cables end in connector boards interfacing to two front-end boards each hosting one n-XYTER chip.

  15. The silicon tracking system of the CBM experiment at fair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment [1] will study the properties of nuclear matter by exploration of the QCD phase diagram in the region of high baryonic densities and moderate temperatures. The collision system will be created with beams of ultra-relativistic heavy-ions of up to 45A GeV energy. After reaching a certain critical combination of density and temperature, the hadronic matter is predicted to undergo a phase transition to a deconfined state - the quark-gluon plasma. A precise study of the phase boundary, properties of the deconfined matter and in-medium modification of hadron properties will be studied with a number of hadronic, leptonic and photonic observables including rare probes like low-mass vector mesons and open charm. Double-sided silicon microstrip detectors of 300 μm thickness and 50 μm strip pitch have been characterized in the laboratory and used for the construction of a prototype beam tracking telescope. Three tracking stations have been operated at GSI in a 2 GeV proton beam. The readout chain comprised the self-triggering n-XYTER front-end chip, CBM prototype readout controllers and the DABC data acquisition system. The performance of the sensors, the front-end electronics and test system are presented in the following paragraphs.

  16. The Silicon Tracking System of the CBM Experiment at FAIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuser, Johann M.

    The Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment at FAIR will conduct a systematic research program to explore the phase diagram of strongly interacting matter at highest net baryon densities and moderate temperatures. These conditions are to be created in collisions of heavy-ion beams with nuclear targets in the projectile beam energy range of 2 to 45 GeV/nucleon, initially coming from the SIS 100 synchrotron (up to 14 GeV/nucleon) and in a next step from SIS 300 enabling studies at the highest net baryon densities. Collision rates up to 107 per second are required to produce very rare probes with unprecedented statistics in this energy range. Their signatures are complex. These conditions call for detector systems designed to meet the extreme requirements in terms of rate capability, momentum and spatial resolution, and a novel data acquisition and trigger concept which is not limited by latency but by throughput. In the paper we describe the concept and development status of CBM's central detector, the Silicon Tracking System (STS). The detector realizes a large, highly granular and redundant detector system with fast read-out, and lays specific emphasis on low material budget in its physics aperture to achieve for charged particle tracks a momentum resolution of δp/p ≈ 1% at p > 1 GeV/c, at >95% track reconstruction efficiency. The detector employs 1220 highly segmented double-sided silicon micro-strip sensors of 300 µm thickness, mounted into 896 modular structures of various types that are aggregated on 106 low-mass carbon fiber ladders of different sizes that build up the tracking stations. The read-out electronics with its supply and cooling infrastructure is arranged at the periphery of the ladders, and provides a total channel count of 1.8 million. The signal transmission from the silicon sensors to the electronics is realized through ultra-thin multi-line aluminum-polyimide cables of up to half a meter length. The electronics generates a free

  17. Development of a Test System for the Quality Assurance of Silicon Microstrip Detectors for the Inner Tracking System of the CMS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Axer, Markus

    2003-01-01

    The inner tracking system of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) which is being built at the European Laboratory for Particle Physics CERN (Geneva, Switzerland) will be equipped with two different technologies of silicon detectors. While the innermost tracker will be composed of silicon pixel detectors, silicon microstrip detectors are envisaged for the outer tracker architecture. The silicon microstrip tracker will house about 15,000 single detector modules each composed of a set of silicon sensors, the readout electronics (front end hybrid), and a support frame. It will provide a total active area of 198 m2 and ten million analogue channels read out at the collider frequency of 40 MHz. This large number of modules to be produced and integrated into the tracking system is an unprecedented challenge involving industrial companies and various research institutes from many different countries. This thesis deals with the physics of silicon sensors and the preparation of ...

  18. Silicon Avalanche Pixel Sensor for High Precision Tracking

    CERN Document Server

    D'Ascenzo, N; Moon, C S; Morsani, F; Ratti, L; Saveliev, V; Navarro, A Savoy; Xie, Q

    2013-01-01

    The development of an innovative position sensitive pixelated sensor to detect and measure with high precision the coordinates of the ionizing particles is proposed. The silicon avalanche pixel sensors (APiX) is based on the vertical integration of avalanche pixels connected in pairs and operated in coincidence in fully digital mode and with the processing electronics embedded on the chip. The APiX sensor addresses the need to minimize the material budget and related multiple scattering effects in tracking systems requiring a high spatial resolution in the presence of a large occupancy. The expected operation of the new sensor features: low noise, low power consumption and suitable radiation tolerance. The APiX device provides on-chip digital information on the position of the coordinate of the impinging charged particle and can be seen as the building block of a modular system of pixelated arrays, implementing a sparsified readout. The technological challenges are the 3D integration of the device under CMOS ...

  19. New developments of the R & D silicon tracking for linear collider on silicon trackers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Savoy-Navarro; on behalf of the SiLC R&D Collaboration

    2007-12-01

    The status of the R & D activity achieved so far within the SiLC (silicon tracking for the linear collider) collaboration is reported here. It includes the following items: present status of the collaboration, new developments on sensors, on mechanics (new directions for module construction, large support structure, cooling, and alignment and integration issues), new lab test bench results on electronics and sensors. The perspectives over a period of four years are presented with a detailed test beam schedule and the roadmap including the construction of new mechanical prototypes equipped with front end and readout chips in deep sub-micron CMOS technology are discussed. Combined tests with other sub-detectors are finally addressed. This test beam program is inserted in the framework of the EUDET European project.

  20. Systematic characterization and quality assurance of silicon micro-strip sensors for the Silicon Tracking System of the CBM experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Silicon Tracking System (STS) is the central detector of the Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment at future Facility for Anti-proton and Ion Research (FAIR) at Darmstadt. The task of the STS is to reconstruct trajectories of charged particles originating at relatively high multiplicities from the high rate beam-target interactions. The tracker comprises of 300 μm thick silicon double-sided micro-strip sensors. These sensors should be radiation hard in order to reconstruct charged particles up to a maximum radiation dose of 1 × 1014neqcm−2. Systematic characterization allows us to investigate the sensor response and perform quality assurance (QA) tests. In this paper, systematic characterization of prototype double-sided silicon micro-strip sensors will be discussed. This procedure includes visual, passive electrical, and radiation hardness test. Presented results include tests on three different prototypes of silicon micro-strip sensors

  1. Performance of silicon pixel detectors at small track incidence angles for the ATLAS Inner Tracker upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viel, Simon; Banerjee, Swagato; Brandt, Gerhard; Carney, Rebecca; Garcia-Sciveres, Maurice; Hard, Andrew Straiton; Kaplan, Laser Seymour; Kashif, Lashkar; Pranko, Aliaksandr; Rieger, Julia; Wolf, Julian; Wu, Sau Lan; Yang, Hongtao

    2016-09-01

    In order to enable the ATLAS experiment to successfully track charged particles produced in high-energy collisions at the High-Luminosity Large Hadron Collider, the current ATLAS Inner Detector will be replaced by the Inner Tracker (ITk), entirely composed of silicon pixel and strip detectors. An extension of the tracking coverage of the ITk to very forward pseudorapidity values is proposed, using pixel modules placed in a long cylindrical layer around the beam pipe. The measurement of long pixel clusters, detected when charged particles cross the silicon sensor at small incidence angles, has potential to significantly improve the tracking efficiency, fake track rejection, and resolution of the ITk in the very forward region. The performance of state-of-the-art pixel modules at small track incidence angles is studied using test beam data collected at SLAC and CERN.

  2. Momentum Resolution Improvement Technique for Silicon Tracking Detectors using dE/dx

    CERN Document Server

    Paganis, S D; Tang, Jaw-Luen

    2001-01-01

    A technique for improving the momentum resolution for low momentum charged particles in few layer silicon based trackers is presented. The particle momenta are determined from the measured Landau dE/dx distribution and the Bethe-Bloch formula in the 1/beta^2 region. It is shown that a factor of two improvement of the momentum determination is achieved as compared to standard track fitting methods. This improvement is important in large scale heavy ion experiments which cover the low transverse momentum spectra using stand-alone silicon tracking devices with a few planes like the ones used in STAR at RHIC and ALICE at LHC.

  3. Silicon strip tracking detector development and prototyping for the Phase-2 Upgrade of the ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Kuehn, Susanne; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    In about ten years from now, the Phase-2 upgrade of the LHC is planned. This will result in a severe radiation dose and high particle rates for the multipurpose experiments because of a foreseen luminosity of ten times higher than the LHC design luminosity. Several detector components will have to be upgraded in the experiments. In the ATLAS experiment, the current inner detector will be replaced by an all silicon tracking detector aiming for high performance. The paper presents the development and the latest prototyping of the upgrade silicon strip tracking detector.

  4. Momentum resolution improvement technique for silicon tracking detectors using d E/d x

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paganis, Stathes D.; Tang, Jaw-Luen

    2001-08-01

    A technique for improving the momentum resolution for low momentum charged particles in few layer silicon based trackers is presented. The particle momenta are determined from the measured Landau d E/d x distribution and the Bethe-Bloch formula in the 1/ β2 region. It is shown that a factor of two improvement of the momentum determination is achieved as compared to standard track fitting methods. This improvement is important in large scale heavy ion experiments which cover the low transverse momentum spectra using stand-alone silicon tracking devices with a few planes like the ones used in STAR at RHIC and ALICE at LHC.

  5. Characterization of ion track morphology formed by swift heavy ion irradiation in silicon oxynitride films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mota–Santiago P.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Amorphous silicon oxynitride (SiOxNy possess interesting optical and mechanical properties. Here, we present direct evidence for the formation of ion tracks in 1 µm thick silicon oxynitride of different stoichiometries. The tracks were created by irradiation with 185 MeV Au13+ ions. The samples were studied using spectral reflectometry and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS, with the track morphology characterised by means of small angle X–ray scattering (SAXS. The radial density of the ion tracks resembles a core–shell structure with a typical radius of ~ 1.8 + 2.4 nm in the case of Si3N4 and 2.3 + 3.2 nm for SiO2.

  6. Investigations of Tracking Phenomena in Silicone Rubber Using Moving Average Current Technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    R. Sarathi; S. Chandrasekar

    2004-01-01

    In the present work, tracking phenomenon in Silicone rubber material has been studied under AC and DC voltage, with ammonium chloride as a contaminant. It is observed that the tracking is more severe under the DC voltages. The tracking time is less under negative DC compared to the positive DC voltage. The tracking mechanism is explained in detail. The leakage current during the tracking studies was as measured and the moving average technique was adopted to understand the trend in current flow. The leakage current magnitude is high with thermally aged specimens compared to the virgin specimen, irrespective of the type of applied voltage. It is realized that the tracking time and the leakage current magnitude shows an inverse relationship.

  7. Development of prototype components for the silicon tracking system of the CBM experiment at FAIR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lymanets, Anton

    2013-06-26

    . A detector module is a basic functional unit that includes a sensor, an analogue microcable and frontend electronics mounted on a support structure. The objective of the thesis is to perform quality assurance tests of the prototype module components in order to validate the concept of the detector module and to demonstrate its operation using radioactive sources and particle beams. Double-sided silicon microstrip detectors have been chosen as sensor technology for the STS because of the combination of a good spatial resolution, two-dimensional coordinate measurement achieved within low material budget (0.3%X{sub 0}), high readout speed and sufficient radiation tolerance. Several generations of double-sided silicon microstrip sensors have been manufactured in order to explore the radiation hard design features and the concept of a large-area sensor compatible with ladder-type structure of the detector module. In particular, sensors with double metal layer on both sides and active area of 62 x 62 mm{sup 2} have been produced. Electrical characterization of the sensors has been performed in order to establish the overall operability as well as to extract the device parameters. Current-voltage, capacitance-voltage characteristics and interstrip parameters have been measured. Readout of the sensors has been done using self-triggering front-end electronics. A front-end board has been developed based on the n-XYTER readout chip with data driven architecture and capable of operating at 32 MHz readout rate. The front-end board included an external analog-to-digital converter (ADC). Calibration of the ADC has been performed using both {sup 241}Am X-ray source and external pulse generator. Threshold calibration and investigation of temperature dependence of chip parameters has been carried out. Low-mass support structures have been developed using carbon fibre that has the rigidity to hold the detector modules and introduce minimal Coulomb scattering of the particle tracks

  8. Test of scintillating bars coupled to Silicon Photomultipliers for a charged particle tracking device

    CERN Document Server

    Cecchini, S; Esposti, L Degli; Lax, I; Mandrioli, G; Mauri, N; Pasqualini, L; Patrizii, L; Pozzato, M; Sirri, G; Tenti, M

    2016-01-01

    The results obtained in laboratory tests, using scintillator bars read by silicon photomultipliers are reported. The present approach is the first step for designing a precision tracking system to be placed inside a free magnetized volume for the charge identification of low energy crossing particles. The devised system is demonstrated able to provide a spatial resolution better than 2 mm.

  9. First prototype of a silicon tracker using an artificial retina for fast track finding

    CERN Document Server

    Neri, N; Caponio, F.; Citterio, M.; Coelli, S.; Fu, J.; Geraci, A.; Monti, M.; Petruzzo, M.; Bedeschi, F.; Marino, P.; Morello, M.J.; Piucci, A.; Punzi, G.; Spinella, F.; Stracka, S.; Walsh, J.; Ristori, L.; Tonelli, D.

    2014-01-01

    We report on the R\\&D for a first prototype of a silicon tracker based on an alternative approach for fast track finding. The working principle is inspired from neurobiology, in particular by the processing of visual images by the brain as it happens in nature. It is based on extensive parallelisation of data distribution and pattern recognition. In this work we present the design of a practical device that consists of a telescope based on single-sided silicon detectors; we describe the data acquisition system and the implementation of the track finding algorithms using available digital logic of commercial FPGA devices. Tracking performance and trigger capabilities of the device are discussed along with perspectives for future applications.

  10. Study of the Efficiency of Charge Matching Methods to Solve Ambiguous Tracks in 2-Sided Silicon Track Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    1994-01-01

    A GEANT-based simulation has been performed of the response of a layer of silicon micro-strips, located at 50 cm of radial distance from the LHC beam axis, in presence of a solenoidal magnetic field of 0.2 Tesla. Double-sided detectors have been considered, in which a charge signal is collected on the two sides of a silicon wafer, segmented in strips, the strips on one side being oriented at a small stereo angle relative to the strips of the other side. Then, a study was performed of the occurrence of ambiguous tracks in Pb-Pb events at the LHC energies, and of the efficiency of a method to resolve ambiguities based on the matching of the signals recorded on the two sides of the silicon detector. Results have shown that 84% of the tracks are not ambiguous, 7% are ambiguous (73% of them occurring in pairs, 16% in triples), 9% are joined together into a single cluster. Ambiguous pairs are resolved successfully by our algorithm with an average efficiency of 93%, and also the resolution for ambiguous triples apea...

  11. Development of prototype components for the silicon tracking system of the CBM experiment at FAIR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lymanets, Anton

    2013-06-26

    . A detector module is a basic functional unit that includes a sensor, an analogue microcable and frontend electronics mounted on a support structure. The objective of the thesis is to perform quality assurance tests of the prototype module components in order to validate the concept of the detector module and to demonstrate its operation using radioactive sources and particle beams. Double-sided silicon microstrip detectors have been chosen as sensor technology for the STS because of the combination of a good spatial resolution, two-dimensional coordinate measurement achieved within low material budget (0.3%X{sub 0}), high readout speed and sufficient radiation tolerance. Several generations of double-sided silicon microstrip sensors have been manufactured in order to explore the radiation hard design features and the concept of a large-area sensor compatible with ladder-type structure of the detector module. In particular, sensors with double metal layer on both sides and active area of 62 x 62 mm{sup 2} have been produced. Electrical characterization of the sensors has been performed in order to establish the overall operability as well as to extract the device parameters. Current-voltage, capacitance-voltage characteristics and interstrip parameters have been measured. Readout of the sensors has been done using self-triggering front-end electronics. A front-end board has been developed based on the n-XYTER readout chip with data driven architecture and capable of operating at 32 MHz readout rate. The front-end board included an external analog-to-digital converter (ADC). Calibration of the ADC has been performed using both {sup 241}Am X-ray source and external pulse generator. Threshold calibration and investigation of temperature dependence of chip parameters has been carried out. Low-mass support structures have been developed using carbon fibre that has the rigidity to hold the detector modules and introduce minimal Coulomb scattering of the particle tracks

  12. A New Efficient-Silicon Area MDAC Synapse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zied Gafsi

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Using the binary representation in the Multiplier digital to analog converter (MDAC synapse designs have crucial drawbacks. Silicon area of transistors, constituting the MDAC circuit, increases exponentially according to the number of bits. This latter is generated by geometric progression of common ratio equal to 2. To reduce this exponential increase to a linear growth, a new synapse named Arithmetic MDAC (AMDAC is designed. It functions with a new representation based on arithmetic progressions. Using the AMS CMOS 0.35µm technology the silicon area is reduced by a factor of 40%.

  13. High-resolution tracking with silicon strip detectors for relativistic ions

    CERN Document Server

    Hou, S R; Ambrosi, G; Balboni, C; Battiston, R; Burger, W J; Chang, Y H; Geissel, H; Ionica, M; Lustermann, W; Maehlum, G; Menichelli, M; Pauluzzi, M; Postolache, V; Produit, N; Rapin, D; Ren, D; Ribordy, M; Sann, H; Schardt, D; Sümmerer, K; Viertel, Gert M

    1999-01-01

    Tracking with silicon strip detectors for relativistic ions has been investigated using a sup 1 sup 2 C beam of 1.5 GeV/u at GSI. The ionization charge spectrum and the charge sharing between strips are presented. The strip cluster of carbon ion can be selected based on the cluster charge with high efficiency and little contamination. The spatial resolution of the silicon strip detectors is evaluated. The angular distribution of multiple Coulomb scattering was investigated with lead absorbers. The results are compared to the Moliere theory and the Gaussian approximation of GEANT calculations. (author)

  14. High-resolution tracking with silicon strip detectors for relativistic ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tracking with silicon strip detectors for relativistic ions has been investigated using a 12C beam of 1.5 GeV/u at GSI. The ionization charge spectrum and the charge sharing between strips are presented. The strip cluster of carbon ion can be selected based on the cluster charge with high efficiency and little contamination. The spatial resolution of the silicon strip detectors is evaluated. The angular distribution of multiple Coulomb scattering was investigated with lead absorbers. The results are compared to the Moliere theory and the Gaussian approximation of GEANT calculations. (author)

  15. 3D silicon sensors with variable electrode depth for radiation hard high resolution particle tracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    3D sensors, with electrodes micro-processed inside the silicon bulk using Micro-Electro-Mechanical System (MEMS) technology, were industrialized in 2012 and were installed in the first detector upgrade at the LHC, the ATLAS IBL in 2014. They are the radiation hardest sensors ever made. A new idea is now being explored to enhance the three-dimensional nature of 3D sensors by processing collecting electrodes at different depths inside the silicon bulk. This technique uses the electric field strength to suppress the charge collection effectiveness of the regions outside the p-n electrodes' overlap. Evidence of this property is supported by test beam data of irradiated and non-irradiated devices bump-bonded with pixel readout electronics and simulations. Applications include High-Luminosity Tracking in the high multiplicity LHC forward regions. This paper will describe the technical advantages of this idea and the tracking application rationale

  16. Momentum Resolution Improvement Technique for Silicon Tracking Detectors using dE/dx

    OpenAIRE

    Paganis, S. D.; Tang, Jaw-Luen

    2001-01-01

    A technique for improving the momentum resolution for low momentum charged particles in few layer silicon based trackers is presented. The particle momenta are determined from the measured Landau dE/dx distribution and the Bethe-Bloch formula in the 1/beta^2 region. It is shown that a factor of two improvement of the momentum determination is achieved as compared to standard track fitting methods. This improvement is important in large scale heavy ion experiments which cover the low transvers...

  17. Small area silicon diffused junction x-ray detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The low temperature performance of silicon diffused junction detectors in the measurement of low energy x-rays is reported. The detectors have an area of 0.04 cm2 and a thickness of 100 μm. The spectral resolutions of these detectors were found to be in close agreement with expected values indicating that the defects introduced by the high temperature processing required in the device fabrication were not deleteriously affecting the detection of low energy x-rays. Device performance over a temperature range of 77 to 1500K is given. These detectors were designed to detect low energy x-rays in the presence of minimum ionizing electrons. The successful application of silicon diffused junction technology to x-ray detector fabrication may facilitate the development of other novel silicon x-ray detector designs

  18. Kalman filter tracking and vertexing in a silicon detector for neutrino physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article describes the application of Kalman filter techniques for the tracking and vertexing of particles inside the NOMAD-STAR detector, a silicon vertex detector installed in NOMAD, one of the neutrino oscillation experiments at the CERN-SPS. The use of the Kalman filter simplifies computationally the tracking and vertex procedure for NOMAD-STAR. The alignment of NOMAD-STAR is shown as an example of the application of the Kalman filter for tracking purposes. The accuracy of the method is such that one obtains alignment residuals between 9 and 12 μm. Furthermore, a preliminary measure of the impact parameter (with an RMS ∼36 μm) illustrates the vertexing capabilities of this technique

  19. A 130 nm CMOS mixed mode front end readout chip for silicon strip tracking at the future linear collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pham, T.H., E-mail: pham@lpnhe.in2p3.f [LPNHE-Universite Pierre et Marie Curie/IN2P3-CNRS-4, Place Jussieu, 75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Charpy, A.; Ciobanu, C. [LPNHE-Universite Pierre et Marie Curie/IN2P3-CNRS-4, Place Jussieu, 75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Comerma, A. [Universitat de Barcelona, Dept E.C.M/Dept. Electronica/ICC-Diagonal 647, planta 6, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); David, J.; Dhellot, M. [LPNHE-Universite Pierre et Marie Curie/IN2P3-CNRS-4, Place Jussieu, 75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Dieguez, A.; Gascon, D. [Universitat de Barcelona, Dept E.C.M/Dept. Electronica/ICC-Diagonal 647, planta 6, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Genat, J.F.; Savoy Navarro, A.; Sefri, R. [LPNHE-Universite Pierre et Marie Curie/IN2P3-CNRS-4, Place Jussieu, 75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France)

    2010-11-01

    A 130 nm mixed (analog and digital) CMOS chip intended to read silicon strip detectors for future linear collider experiments was developed. Currently under testing, this chip has been optimized for a silicon micro-strip tracking device. It includes 88 channels of a full analog signal processing chain with the corresponding digital control and readout. Every analog channel includes (i) a low noise charge amplifier and integration with long pulse shaping, (ii) an eight by eight positions analog sampler for both storing successive events and reconstructing the full pulse shape, and (iii) a sparsifier performing analog sum of three adjacent inputs to decide whether there is signal or not. The whole system is controlled by the digital part, which allows configuring all the reference currents and voltages, drives the control signals to the analog memories, records the timing and channel information and subsequently performs the conversion to digital values of samples. The total surface of the circuit is 10x5 mm{sup 2}, with each analog channel occupying an area of 105x3500 {mu}m{sup 2}, and the remaining space of about 9000x700 {mu}m{sup 2} being filled by the analog channels on the silicon.

  20. A New Efficient-Silicon Area MDAC Synapse

    OpenAIRE

    Zied Gafsi; Nejib Hassen; Mongia Mhiri; Kamel Besbes

    2007-01-01

    Using the binary representation in the Multiplier digital to analog converter (MDAC) synapse designs have crucial drawbacks. Silicon area of transistors, constituting the MDAC circuit, increases exponentially according to the number of bits. This latter is generated by geometric progression of common ratio equal to 2. To reduce this exponential increase to a linear growth, a new synapse named Arithmetic MDAC (AMDAC) is designed. It functions with a new representation based on arithmetic progr...

  1. Silicon strip tracking detector development and prototyping for the Phase-2 Upgrade of the ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Kuehn, Susanne; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    In about ten years from now, the Phase-2 upgrade of the LHC is planned. This will result in a severe radiation dose and high particle rates for the multipurpose exeperiments because of a foreseen luminosity of ten times higher the LHC design luminosity. Several detector components will have to be upgraded in the experiments. In the ATLAS experiment the current inner detector will be replaced by an all silicon tracking detector aiming for high performance. The poster will present the development and the latest prototyping of the upgrade silicon strip tracking detector. Its layout foresees low mass and modular double-sided structures for the barrel and forward region. Silicon sensors and readout electronics, so-called modules, are planned to be assembled double-sided on larger carbon-core structures. The modularity allows assembly and testing at multiple sites. Many components need to be developed and their prototyping towards full-size components is ongoing. New developments and test results will be presented....

  2. Investigations of surface characterization of silicone rubber due to tracking phenomena under a.c. and d.c. voltages

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Uma Maheswar Rao; S S M S Abdul Majeed; C Venkataseshaiah; R Sarathi

    2002-11-01

    In the present work, tracking phenomena has been studied with silicone rubber material under the a.c. and d.c. voltages following IEC-587 standards. The surface condition of the tracked zone was analysed using wide angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD) and thermogravimetric differential thermal analysis (TG–DTA) studies. The tracking time was different for a.c. and d.c. voltages.

  3. Enabling Technologies for Silicon Microstrip Tracking Detectors at the HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Barth, C; Bloch, I.; Bögelspacher, F.; de Boer, W.; Daniels, M.; Dierlamm, A.; Eber, R.; Eckerlin, G.; Eckstein, D.; Eichhorn, T.; Erfle, J.; Feld, L.; Garutti, E.; Gregor, I. -M.; Guthoff, M.; Hartmann, F.; Hauser, M.; Husemann, U.; Jakobs, K.; Junkes, A.; Karpinski, W.; Klein, K.; Kuehn, S.; Lacker, H.; Mahboubi, K.; Müller, Th.; Mussgiller, A.; Nürnberg, A.; Parzefall, U.; Poehlsen, T.; Poley, L.; Preuten, M.; Rehnisch, L.; Sammet, J.; Schleper, P.; Schuwalow, S.; Sperlich, D.; Stanitzki, M.; Steinbrück, G.; Wlochal, M.

    2016-01-01

    While the tracking detectors of the ATLAS and CMS experiments have shown excellent performance in Run 1 of LHC data taking, and are expected to continue to do so during LHC operation at design luminosity, both experiments will have to exchange their tracking systems when the LHC is upgraded to the high-luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) around the year 2024. The new tracking systems need to operate in an environment in which both the hit densities and the radiation damage will be about an order of magnitude higher than today. In addition, the new trackers need to contribute to the first level trigger in order to maintain a high data-taking efficiency for the interesting processes. Novel detector technologies have to be developed to meet these very challenging goals. The German groups active in the upgrades of the ATLAS and CMS tracking systems have formed a collaborative "Project on Enabling Technologies for Silicon Microstrip Tracking Detectors at the HL-LHC" (PETTL), which was supported by the Helmholtz Alliance "Phys...

  4. Real-Time MRI-Guided Catheter Tracking Using Hyperpolarized Silicon Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiting, Nicholas; Hu, Jingzhe; Shah, Jay V.; Cassidy, Maja C.; Cressman, Erik; Zacharias Millward, Niki; Menter, David G.; Marcus, Charles M.; Bhattacharya, Pratip K.

    2015-08-01

    Visualizing the movement of angiocatheters during endovascular interventions is typically accomplished using x-ray fluoroscopy. There are many potential advantages to developing magnetic resonance imaging-based approaches that will allow three-dimensional imaging of the tissue/vasculature interface while monitoring other physiologically-relevant criteria, without exposing the patient or clinician team to ionizing radiation. Here we introduce a proof-of-concept development of a magnetic resonance imaging-guided catheter tracking method that utilizes hyperpolarized silicon particles. The increased signal of the silicon particles is generated via low-temperature, solid-state dynamic nuclear polarization, and the particles retain their enhanced signal for ≥40 minutes—allowing imaging experiments over extended time durations. The particles are affixed to the tip of standard medical-grade catheters and are used to track passage under set distal and temporal points in phantoms and live mouse models. With continued development, this method has the potential to supplement x-ray fluoroscopy and other MRI-guided catheter tracking methods as a zero-background, positive contrast agent that does not require ionizing radiation.

  5. High-precision tracking and charge selection with silicon strip detectors for relativistic ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alpat, B.; Ambrosi, G.; Balboni, C.; Battiston, R.; Biland, A.; Bourquin, M.; Burger, W.J.; Chang, Y.H.; Chen, A.E.; Dinu, N.; Extermann, P.; Fiandrini, E.; Hou, S.R. E-mail: suen.hou@cern.ch; Ionica, M.; Ionica, R.; Lin, W.T.; Lustermann, W.; Maehlum, G.; Menichelli, M.; Pauluzzi, M.; Produit, N.; Rapin, D.; Ren, D.; Ribordy, M.; Sann, H.; Schardt, D.; Suemmerer, K.; Viertel, G.; Vite, D.; Wallraff, W.; Wu, S.X

    2000-05-21

    High-precision tracking and charge selection with silicon strip detectors for relativistic ions has been investigated using a {sup 12}C beam of 1.5 GeV/u at GSI with prototype modules developed for the AMS tracker. The ionization energy loss is measured and compared to the Landau-Vavilov theory for ions of charge number up to Z=6. The linearity in Z{sup 2} is examined. The capability to distinguish different Z values based on the ionization energy loss is evaluated. The spatial resolution of the silicon strip detectors is investigated for carbon ions. The angular distribution of multiple Coulomb scattering is studied with lead absorbers. The results are compared to the Moliere theory and the Gaussian approximation of GEANT calculations.

  6. High-precision tracking and charge selection with silicon strip detectors for relativistic ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High-precision tracking and charge selection with silicon strip detectors for relativistic ions has been investigated using a 12C beam of 1.5 GeV/u at GSI with prototype modules developed for the AMS tracker. The ionization energy loss is measured and compared to the Landau-Vavilov theory for ions of charge number up to Z=6. The linearity in Z2 is examined. The capability to distinguish different Z values based on the ionization energy loss is evaluated. The spatial resolution of the silicon strip detectors is investigated for carbon ions. The angular distribution of multiple Coulomb scattering is studied with lead absorbers. The results are compared to the Moliere theory and the Gaussian approximation of GEANT calculations

  7. Development of a silicon micro-strip detector for tracking high intensity secondary beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A single-sided silicon micro-strip detector (SSD) has been developed as a tracking detector for hadron experiments at J-PARC where secondary meson beams with intensities of up to 108 Hz are available. The performance of the detector has been investigated and verified in a series of test beam experiments in the years 2009–2011. The hole mobility was deduced from the analysis of cluster events. The beam rate dependence was measured in terms of timing resolution, signal-to-noise ratio, and hit efficiency. This paper describes the detector with its read-out system, details of the test experiments, and discusses the performance achieved

  8. Operation and first results of the NEXT-DEMO prototype using a silicon photomultiplier tracking array

    CERN Document Server

    Álvarez, V; Cárcel, S; Castel, J; Cebrián, S; Cervera, A; Conde, C A N; Dafni, T; Dias, T H V T; Díaz, J; Egorov, M; Esteve, R; Evtoukhovitch, P; Fernandes, L M P; Ferrario, P; Ferreira, A L; Freitas, E D C; Gehman, V M; Gil, A; Goldschmidt, A; Gómez, H; Gómez-Cadenas, J J; González-Díaz, D; Gutiérrez, R M; Hauptman, J; Morata, J A Hernando; Herrera, D C; Iguaz, F J; Irastorza, I G; Jinete, M A; Labarga, L; Laing, A; Liubarsky, I; Lopes, J A M; Lorca, D; Losada, M; Luzón, G; Marí, A; Martín-Albo, J; Martínez, A; Martínez, G; Miller, T; Moiseenko, A; Monrabal, F; Monteiro, C M B; Mora, F J; Moutinho, L M; Vidal, J Muñoz; da Luz, H Natal; Navarro, G; Nebot-Guinot, M; Nygren, D; Oliveira, C A B; Palma, R; Pérez, J; Aparicio, J L Pérez; Renner, J; Ripoll, L; Rodríguez, A; Rodríguez, J; Santos, F P; Santos, J M F dos; Seguí, L; Serra, L; Shuman, D; Simón, A; Sofka, C; Sorel, M; Toledo, J F; Tomás, A; Torrent, J; Tsamalaidze, Z; Veloso, J F C A; Villar, J A; Webb, R; White, J T; Yahlali, N

    2013-01-01

    NEXT-DEMO is a high-pressure xenon gas TPC which acts as a technological test-bed and demonstrator for the NEXT-100 neutrinoless double beta decay experiment. In its current configuration the apparatus fully implements the NEXT-100 design concept. This is an asymmetric TPC, with an energy plane made of photomultipliers and a tracking plane made of silicon photomultipliers (SiPM) coated with TPB. The detector in this new configuration has been used to reconstruct the characteristic signature of electrons in dense gas. Demonstrating the ability to identify the MIP and ``blob'' regions. Moreover, the SiPM tracking plane allows for the definition of a large fiducial region in which an excellent energy resolution of 1.82% FWHM at 511 keV has been measured (a value which extrapolates to 0.83% at the xenon Qbetabeta).

  9. Study of the Tracking Method and Expected Performance of the Silicon Pixel Inner Tracker Applied in BESIII

    CERN Document Server

    Xiu, Qinglei; Li, Weidong; Liu, Huaimin; Ma, Qiumei; Ouyang, Qun; Qin, Zhonghua; Wang, Liangliang; Wu, Linghui; Yuan, Ye; Zhang, Yao

    2015-01-01

    The inner drift chamber of the BESIII is encountering serious aging problem after five year's running. For the first layer, the decrease in gas gain is about 26% from 2009 to 2013. The upgrade of the inner tracking detector has become an urgent problem for the BESIII experiment. An inner tracker using CMOS pixel sensors is an important candidate because of its great advantages on spatial resolution and radiation hardness. In order to carry out a Monte Carlo study on the expected performance, a Geant4-based full simulation for the silicon pixel detector has been implemented. The tracking method combining the silicon pixel inner tracker and outer drift chamber has been studied and a preliminary reconstruction software was developed. The Monte Carlo study shows that the performances including momentum resolution, vertex resolution and the tracking efficiency are significantly improved due to the good spatial resolution and moderate material budget of the silicon pixel detector.

  10. Low cost, large area silicon detectors for calorimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trapezoidal detectors with 28 cm2 active area have been fabricated on >2500 Ωcm, 4 in. diameter n-type silicon wafers. Instead of the commonly used ion implantation method, low-cost, high volume solid state diffusion technology along with phosphosilicate-glass and TCA gettering was adopted for boron and phosphorus doping. Typically the diode dark current was 15 μA at sign 100 volts. Efforts are being made to obtain a finished device yield of 80% to meet the $2/cm2 price goal of SSC semiconductor detector group. 20 refs., 4 figs

  11. Innovative carbon nanotube-silicon large area photodetector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on a new photodetector fabricated using carbon nanostructures grown on a silicon substrate. This device exhibits low noise, a good conversion efficiency of photons into electrical current and a good signal linearity in a wide range of radiation wavelengths ranging from ultraviolet to infrared at room temperature. The maximum quantum efficiency of 37% at 880 nm has been measured without signal amplification. Such innovative devices can be easily produced on large scales by Chemical Vapour Deposition (CVD) through a relatively inexpensive chemical process, which allows large sensitive areas from a few mm2 up to hundreds of cm2 to be covered.

  12. Development of radiation-hard sensors for the CBM silicon tracking system using simulation approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    TCAD simulations have been done to understand the radiation damage in Double Sided silicon Strip Detectors for the Silicon Tracking System of the upcoming CBM experiment. We are using Sentaurus Device, a subpackage of SYNOPSYS. We have found a good agreement between simulations and measurements in terms of leakage current, full depletion voltage (VFD) and capacitances. To simulate radiation damage, we have changed the effective doping concentration and minority carrier lifetime with fluence (φ). We applied the University of Perugia trap model for the defect levels introduced with φ for both n-type and p-type silicon. The extracted damage constant matches with the experimental values. It has been found that the breakdown occurs in the coupling oxide at around 165 V and is independent of fluence while the VFD increases with φ due to reverse annealing. Hence we have to operate our detectors under-depleted. It is important to understand whether these DSSDs will be operational upto a φ of 1 x 1015 neqcm-2. From interstrip parameters namely interstrip capacitance (Cint) and interstrip resistance (Rint) one can understand strip isolation. Cint and Rint have been studied in detail with φ and it has been found that these DSSDs will be efficient even after maximum fluence.

  13. Development of radiation hard microstrip detectors for the CBM silicon tracking system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatterji, Sudeep [GSI, Darmstadt (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    Radiation damage in Silicon microstrip detectors is of the one main concerns for the development of the Silicon Tracking System (STS) in the planned Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment at FAIR. The STS will consist of Double Sided Silicon Strip Detectors (DSSD) having pitch around 60 {mu}m, width 20 {mu}m, stereo angle of {+-}7.5{sup 0} on n and p sides with double metallization on either side making it challenging to fabricate.We are using 3-dimensional TCAD simulation tools from SYNOPSYS to carry out process (using Sentaurus Process) and device (using Sentaurus Device) simulations.We have simulated the impact of radiation damage in DSSDs by changing the effective carrier concentration (N{sub eff}) with fluence using the Hamburg model. The change in minority carrier life time has been taken into account using the Kraners model and the Perugia trap model has been used to simulate the traps. We have also extracted macroscopic parameters like Coupling Capacitance, Interstrip Capacitance (both DC and AC), Interstrip Resistance of DSSDs using Mixed Mode simulation (using SPICE with Sentaurus Device) and studied the variation of these parameters with fluence. The simulation results have been compared to the experimental results. We also simulated transients by passing a Heavy Ion through a DSSD and studied the charge collection performance.

  14. Silicon strip tracking detector development and prototyping for the Phase-II upgrade of the ATLAS experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuehn, S.

    2016-07-01

    In about ten years from now, the Phase-II upgrade of the LHC will be carried out. Due to increased luminosity, a severe radiation dose and high particle rates will occur for the experiments. In consequence, several detector components will have to be upgraded. In the ATLAS experiment, the current inner detector will be replaced by an all-silicon tracking detector with the goal of at least delivering the present detector performance also in the harsh Phase-II LHC conditions. This report presents the current planning and results from first prototype measurements of the upgrade silicon strip tracking detector.

  15. Development of radiation-hard double-sided silicon microstrip sensors for the CBM silicon tracking system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatterji, Sudeep [GSI, Darmstadt (Germany); Collaboration: CBM-Collaboration

    2013-07-01

    We give an overview of the prototypes microstrip sensors fabricated for the CBM Silicon Tracking System at CiS, Erfurt and Hamamatsu, Japan. The full-size sensors are double-sided with double metal and have strips oriented under a stereo angle of ±7.5{sup 0}. Also test structures were produced with orthogonal strips. The strip pitch is 58 μm. The radiation load in the detector is expected to not exceed 1 x 10{sup 14} n{sub eq}cm{sup -2} in several years of operation, after which they would be replaced. The charge collection behaviour of the sensors has been studied in simulations using the TCAD Synopsys package. A design optimization has been worked out to reduce the Equivalent Noise Charge (ENC) and to maximize the breakdown voltage and Charge Collection Efficiency. Various isolation techniques have been explored and a detailed comparison has been studied to optimize the detector performance. An operating scenario for the CBM experimental run has been developed taking into account periods of shutdown, warm maintenance and cold maintenance. Transient simulations have been performed to estimate the charge collection performance of the irradiated detectors and simulations have been verified with experimental data.

  16. The Silicon Tracking System of the CBM experiment at FAIR : development of microstrip sensors and signal transmission lines for a low-mass, low-noise system

    OpenAIRE

    Singla, Minni (Dr.)

    2014-01-01

    In this thesis, different physical and electrical aspects of silicon microstrip sensors and low-mass multi-line readout cables have been investigated. These silicon microstrip sensors and readout cables will be used in the Silicon Tracking System (STS) of the fixed-target heavy-ion Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment which is under development at the upcoming Facility for Antiproton and ion Research (FAIR) in Darmstadt, Germany. The highly segmented low-mass tracking system is a centr...

  17. Track reconstruction in heavy ion collisions with the CMS silicon tracker

    CERN Document Server

    Roland, C

    2006-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider at CERN will collide protons at \\sqrtS = 14TeV and lead ions at \\sqrt$\\S_{NN}$. The study of heavy ion collisions is an integral part of the physics program of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS). Central heavy ion events at LHC energies are expected to produce a multiplicity of up to 3500 charged particles per unit of rapidity. The CMS detector features a large acceptance and high resolution silicon tracker consisting of pixel and strip detector layers. We describe the algorithms used for pattern recognition in the very high track density environment of heavy ion collisions. Detailed studies using the full detector simulation and reconstruction are presented and achieved reconstruction efficiencies, fake rates and resolutions are discussed.

  18. The STAR silicon vertex tracker: a large area silicon drift detector

    CERN Document Server

    Lynn, D; Beuttenmüller, Rolf H; Caines, H; Chen, W; Dimassimo, D; Dyke, H; Elliot, D; Eremin, V; Grau, M; Hoffmann, G W; Humanic, T; Ilyashenko, Yu S; Kotov, I; Kraner, H W; Kuczewski, P; Leonhardt, B; Li, Z; Liaw, C J; Lo Curto, G; Middelkamp, P; Minor, R; Munhoz, M; Ott, G; Pandey, S U; Pruneau, C A; Rykov, V L; Schambach, J; Sedlmeir, J; Soja, B; Sugarbaker, E R; Takahashi, J; Wilson, K; Wilson, R

    2000-01-01

    The Solenoidal Tracker At RHIC-Silicon Vertex Tracker (STAR-SVT) is a three barrel microvertex detector based upon silicon drift detector technology. As designed for the STAR-SVT, silicon drift detectors (SDDs) are capable of providing unambiguous two-dimensional hit position measurements with resolutions on the order of 20 mu m in each coordinate. Achievement of such resolutions, particularly in the drift direction coordinate, depends upon certain characteristics of silicon and drift detector geometry that are uniquely critical for silicon drift detectors hit measurements. Here we describe features of the design of the STAR-SVT SDDs and the front-end electronics that are motivated by such characteristics.

  19. tkLayout: a design tool for innovative silicon tracking detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, G.

    2014-03-01

    and simulation experts to focus their efforts on other important or specific issues. Even if tkLayout was designed for the CMS tracker upgrade project, its flexibility makes it experiment-agnostic, so that it could be easily adapted to model other tracking detectors. The technology behind tkLayout is presented, as well as some of the results obtained in the context of the CMS silicon tracker design studies.

  20. tkLayout: a design tool for innovative silicon tracking detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    engineers and simulation experts to focus their efforts on other important or specific issues. Even if tkLayout was designed for the CMS tracker upgrade project, its flexibility makes it experiment-agnostic, so that it could be easily adapted to model other tracking detectors. The technology behind tkLayout is presented, as well as some of the results obtained in the context of the CMS silicon tracker design studies

  1. First measurements of segmented silicon tracking detectors with built-in multiplication layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavallaro, Emanuele; Lange, Jörn; Lopez Paz, Ivan; Grinstein, Sebastian [Institut de Física d' Altes Energies, IFAE, Barcelona (Spain); Baselga, Marta; Greco, Virginia; Quirion, David; Pellegrini, Giulio [Centro Nacional de Microelectrónica, CNM-IMB (CSIC), Barcelona (Spain)

    2015-10-01

    Silicon sensors with a built-in multiplication layer, also known as Low Gain Avalanche Detectors (LGAD), are a new technology of potentially radiation hard silicon sensors developed at CNM (Centro Nacional de Microelectrónica) in the framework of the CERN-RD50 collaboration. The concept of the LGAD technology is to produce a tracking sensor with an intrinsic low gain due to charge multiplication in order to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio. This makes LGAD detectors appealing for the high energy physics community which foresees a possible application in harsh radiation environments such as the inner detectors of the experiments at the High Luminosity LHC, where a fluence of 2×10{sup 16} n{sub eq}/cm{sup 2} is expected in the innermost pixel layer of the tracker. LGAD pad diodes with a multiplication factor of 10 at 200 V before irradiation have been produced and studied but it still has to be proven that this technology can be applied to segmented devices. The electric field profile at the p–n junction plays a crucial role for the multiplication mechanism that could be affected by implantation edge effects in highly segmented devices. In this paper the results of the first measurements of segmented LGAD devices from 285 μm thick float zone wafers will be discussed. Time resolved Transient-Current-Technique analysis has been performed on strip devices and charge collection measurements have been carried out on pixel detectors to test the LGAD technology on highly segmented devices.

  2. A Level-1 Tracking Trigger for the CMS upgrade using stacked silicon strip detectors and advanced pattern technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudoul, G.

    2013-01-01

    Experience at high luminosity hadrons collider experiments shows that tracking information enhances the trigger rejection capabilities while retaining high efficiency for interesting physics events. The design of a tracking based trigger for the High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) is an extremely challenging task, and requires the identification of high-momentum particle tracks as a part of the Level 1 Trigger. Simulation studies show that this can be achieved by correlating hits on two closely spaced silicon strip sensors, and reconstructing tracks at L1 by employing an Associative Memory approach. The progresses on the design and development of this micro-strip stacked prototype modules and the performance of few prototype detectors will be presented. Preliminary results of a simulated tracker layout equipped with stacked modules are discussed in terms of pT resolution and triggering capabilities. Finally, a discussion on the L1 architecture will be given.

  3. Robust track based alignment of the ATLAS silicon detectors and assessing patron distribution uncertainties in drell-yan processes

    OpenAIRE

    Heinemann, Florian.; Weidberg, Tony; Dr. Tony Weidberg

    2007-01-01

    The ATLAS Experiment is one of the four large detectors located at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN in Geneva, Switzerland. In summer 2008, ATLAS is expected to start collecting data from proton-proton collisions at 14 TeV centre-of-mass energy. In the centre of the detector, the reconstruction of charged particle tracks is performed by silicon and drift tube based sub-detectors. In order to achieve the ATLAS physics goals the resolutions of the measured track parameters...

  4. Finite element simulations of low-mass readout cables for the CBM Silicon Tracking System using RAPHAEL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singla, M.; Chatterji, S.; Müller, W. F. J.; Kleipa, V.; Heuser, J. M.

    2014-01-01

    The first three-dimensional simulation study of thin multi-line readout cables using finite element simulation tool RAPHAEL is being reported. The application is the Silicon Tracking System (STS) of the fixed-target heavy-ion experiment Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM), under design at the forthcoming accelerator center FAIR in Germany. RAPHAEL has been used to design low-mass analog readout cables with minimum possible Equivalent Noise Charge (ENC). Various trace geometries and trace materials have been explored in detail for this optimization study. These cables will bridge the distance between the microstrip detectors and the signal processing electronics placed at the periphery of the silicon tracking stations. SPICE modeling has been implemented in Sentaurus Device to study the transmission loss (dB loss) in cables and simulation has been validated with measurements. An optimized design having minimum possible ENC, material budget and transmission loss for the readout cables has been proposed.

  5. Recent Developments on the Silicon Drift Detector readout scheme for the ALICE Inner Tracking System

    CERN Document Server

    Mazza, G; Bonazzola, G C; Bonvicini, V; Cavagnino, D; Cerello, P G; De Remigis, P; Falchieri, D; Gabrielli, A; Gandolfi, E; Giubellino, P; Hernández, R; Masetti, M; Montaño-Zetina, L M; Nouais, D; Rashevsky, A; Rivetti, A; Tosello, F

    1999-01-01

    Proposal of abstract for LEB99, Snowmass, Colorado, 20-24 September 1999Recent developments of the Silicon Drift Detector (SDD) readout system for the ALICE Experiment are presented. The foreseen readout system is based on 2 main units. The first unit consists of a low noise preamplifier, an analog memory which continuously samples the amplifier output, an A/D converter and a digital memory. When the trigger signal validates the analog data, the ADCs convert the samples into a digital form and store them into the digital memory. The second unit performs the zero suppression/data compression operations. In this paper the status of the design is presented, together with the test results of the A/D converter, the multi-event buffer and the compression unit prototype.Summary:In the Inner Tracker System (ITS) of the ALICE experiment the third and the fourth layer of the detectors are SDDs. These detectors provide the measurement of both the energy deposition and the bi-dimensional position of the track. In terms o...

  6. Evaluation of molten area in micro-welding of monocrystalline silicon and glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordin, I. H. W.; Okamoto, Y.; Miyamoto, I.; Okada, A.

    2016-02-01

    Characteristics of the molten area in micro-welding of monocrystalline silicon and glass are described. In this study, 4 types of laser beam, which are nanosecond pulsed laser and picosecond pulsed laser of 532 nm and 1064 nm in wavelength were used for joining monocrystalline silicon and glass. Influence of wavelength and pulse duration on microwelding of monocrystalline silicon and glass was experimentally investigated under the same spot diameter, and the molten area of monocrystalline silicon and glass was characterized. A splash area of molten silicon with 532 nm wavelength was wider than that with 1064 nm in a nanosecond pulse laser. However, its splash area of molten silicon with 1064 nm changed drastically at certain pulse energy of 11 μJ in a nanosecond pulse laser. On the other hand, 12.5 ps pulsed laser still kept a stable molten area appearance even at pulse energy of 11 μJ. A splash area of molten silicon around the weld bead line was obvious in the nanosecond pulsed laser. On the other hand, there was no remarkable molten splash around the weld bead line in the picosecond pulsed laser. It is concluded that the combination of picosecond pulse duration and infrared wavelength leads to a stable molten area appearance of the weld bead.

  7. Selective-area laser deposition (SALD) Joining of silicon carbide with silicon carbide filler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Shay Llewellyn

    Selective Area Laser Deposition (SALD) is a gas-phase, solid freeform fabrication (SFF) process that utilizes a laser-driven, pyrolytic gas reaction to form a desired solid product. This solid product only forms in the heated zone of the laser beam and thus can be selectively deposited by control of the laser position. SALD Joining employs the SALD method to accomplish 'welding' of ceramic structures together. The solid reaction product serves as a filler material to bond the two parts. The challenges involved with ceramic joining center around the lack of a liquid phase, little plastic deformation and diffusivity and poor surface wetting for many ceramic materials. Due to these properties, traditional metal welding procedures cannot be applied to ceramics. Most alternative ceramic welding techniques use some form of a metal addition to overcome these material limitations. However, the metal possesses a lower ultimate use temperature than the ceramic substrate and therefore it decreases the temperature range over which the joined part can be safely used. SALD Joining enjoys several advantages over these ceramic welding procedures. The solid filler material chemistry can be tailored to match the type of ceramic substrate and therefore fabricate monolithic joints. The SALD filler material bonds directly to the substrate and the joined structure is made in a one step process, without any post-processing. The research documented in this dissertation focused on SALD Joining of silicon carbide structures with silicon carbide filler material. A historical progression of gas-phase SFF research and a literature review of the most prominent ceramic joining techniques are provided. A variety of SiC substrates were examined, as were various conditions of gas precursor pressures and mixtures, laser beam scan speed and joint configuration. The SALD material was characterized for composition and structure by x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and nuclear magnetic

  8. Calibration, alignment and long-term performance of the CMS silicon tracking detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butz, E.

    2009-03-15

    With an active area of more than 200 m{sup 2}, the CMS silicon strip detector is the largest silicon tracker ever built. It consists of more than 15,000 individual silicon modules which have to meet very high standards in terms of noise behavior and electronic crosstalk, as well as their exact positioning within the tracker. Furthermore, the modules will be exposed to a harsh radiation environment over the lifetime of the tracker. This thesis deals with several of the above-mentioned aspects. In the first part, individual modules are investigated using a testbeam. Some of the modules were irradiated up to an integrated dose which corresponds to the expected one over the life time of the tracker. These modules are investigated with respect to their signal-to-noise behavior, and their cross-talk. Several operational parameters are varied, such as the temperature and the bias voltage. It is shown that the modules behave as expected. The signal-to-noise ratio is well above the specifications and the cross-talk increases only very moderately with irradiation. Furthermore, the spatial resolution of the modules is investigated. Different cluster algorithms are utilized and compared. It is shown that the spatial resolution is not much affected by irradiation and that the spatial resolution can be improved with respect to the current standard reconstruction. In the second part, larger structures of the silicon tracker are studied during the socalled 'tracker slice-test'. Two sectors from one of the tracker end caps are investigated. Special emphasis is given to the commissioning of the system and the monitoring of the various commissioning parameters. Furthermore, the noise of the system is investigated as a function of the ambient temperature and different powering schemes. It is shown that the noise of the system behaves as expected. The noise is stable within 2% for different powering schemes. Also possible failures of components are investigated and persistent

  9. CATS: a cellular automaton for tracking in silicon for the HERA-B vertex detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The new track reconstruction program CATS developed for the Vertex Detector System of the HERA-B experiment at DESY is presented. It employs a cellular automaton for track searching and the Kalman filter for track fitting. This results in a very fast algorithm that combines highly efficient track recognition with accurate and reliable track parameter estimation. To reduce the computational cost of the fit an optimized numerical implementation of the Kalman filter is used. Alternative approaches to the track reconstruction in the VDS are also discussed. Since 1999, after extensive tests on simulated data, CATS has been employed to reconstruct experimental data collected in HERA-B. Results regarding tracking performance, the accuracy of track parameter estimates and CPU time consumption are presented

  10. CATS a cellular automaton for tracking in silicon for the HERA-B vertex detector

    CERN Document Server

    Abt, I; Kisel, I; Masciocchi, S

    2002-01-01

    The new track reconstruction program CATS developed for the Vertex Detector System of the HERA-B experiment at DESY is presented. It employs a cellular automaton for track searching and the Kalman filter for track fitting. This results in a very fast algorithm that combines highly efficient track recognition with accurate and reliable track parameter estimation. To reduce the computational cost of the fit an optimized numerical implementation of the Kalman filter is used. Alternative approaches to the track reconstruction in the VDS are also discussed. Since 1999, after extensive tests on simulated data, CATS has been employed to reconstruct experimental data collected in HERA-B. Results regarding tracking performance, the accuracy of track parameter estimates and CPU time consumption are presented.

  11. Gamma large area silicon telescope: Applying SI strip detector technology to the detection of gamma rays in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwood, W. B.; Bloom, E. D.; Godfrey, G. L.; Hertz, P. L.; Lin, Ying-Chi; Nolan, P. L.; Snyder, A. E.; Taylor, R. E.; Wood, K. S.; Michelson, P. F.

    1992-12-01

    The recent discoveries and excitement generated by EGRET (Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope) (presently operating on CGRO (Compton Gamma Ray Observatory)) has prompted an investigation into modern technologies ultimately leading to the next generation space based gamma ray telescope. The goal is to design a detector that would increase the data acquisition rate by almost two orders of magnitude beyond EGRET, while at the same time improving on the angular resolution, the energy measurement of reconstructed gamma rays and the triggering capability of the instrument. The proposed GLAST (Gamma Ray Large Area Silicon Telescope) instrument is based on silicon particle detectors that offer the advantages of no consumables, no gas volume, robust (versus fragile), long lived, and self triggering. The GLAST detector is roughly modeled after EGRET in that a tracking module precedes a calorimeter. The GLAST tracker has planes of cross strip (x, y) 300 micrometer match silicon detectors coupled to a thin radiator to measure the coordinates of converted electron-positron pairs. An angular resolution of 0.1 deg at high energy is possible (the low energy angular resolution 100 MeV would be about 2 deg, limited by multiple scattering). The increased depth of the GLAST calorimeter over EGRET's extends the energy range to about 300 GeV.

  12. Silicon-on-ceramic coating process. Silicon sheet growth development for the Large-Area Silicon Sheet and Cell Development Tasks of the Low-Cost Silicon Solar Array Project. Quarterly report No. 8, December 28, 1977--March 28, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapman, P.W. Zook, J.D.; Heaps, J D; Maclolek, R B; Koepke, B; Butter, C D; Schult, S B

    1978-04-20

    A research program to investigate the technical and economic feasibility of producing solar-cell-quality sheet silicon by coating inexpensive ceramic substrates with a thin layer of polycrystalline silicon is described. The coating methods to be developed are directed toward a minimum-cost process for producing solar cells with a terrestrial conversion efficiency of 12 percent or greater. By applying a graphite coating to one face of a ceramic substrate, molten silicon can be caused to wet only that graphite-coated face and produce uniform thin layers of large-grain polycrystalline silicon; thus, only a minimal quantity of silicon is consumed. A dip-coating method for putting silicon on ceramic (SOC) has been shown to produce solar-cell-quality sheet silicon. This method and a continuous coating process also being investigated have excellent scale-up potential which offers an outstanding cost-effective way to manufacture large-area solar cells. A variety of ceramic materials have been dip-coated with silicon. The investigation has shown that mullite substrates containing an excess of SiO/sub 2/ best match the thermal expansion coefficient of silicon and hence produce the best SOC layers. With such substrates, smooth and uniform silicon layers 25 cm/sup 2/ in area have been achieved with single-crystal grains as large as 4 mm in width and several cm in length. Solar cells with areas from 1 to 10 cm/sup 2/ have been fabricated from material withas-grown surface. Recently, an antireflection (AR) coating has been applied to SOC cells. Conversion efficiencies greater than 9% have been achieved without optimizing series resistance characteristics. Such cells typically have open-circuit voltages and short-circuit current densities of 0.51 V and 20 mA/cm/sup 2/, respectively.

  13. A Silicon UCN Detector With Large Area and With Analysis of UCN Polarization

    OpenAIRE

    Lasakov, M.; Serebrov, A.; Khusainov, A.; Pustovoit, A.; Borisov, Yu.; Fomin, A.; Geltenbort, P; Kon’kov, O.; Kotina, I.; Shablii, A.; Solovei, V.; Vasiliev, A.

    2005-01-01

    A silicon ultracold neutron (UCN) detector with an area of 45 cm2 and with a 6LiF converter is developed at St. Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute (PNPI). The spectral efficiency of the silicon UCN detector was measured by means of a gravitational spectrometer at Institut Max von Laue – Paul Langevin (ILL). The sandwich-type detector from two silicon plates with a 6LiF converter placed between them was also studied. Using this type of technology the UCN detector with analysis of polarizatio...

  14. A large area silicon UCN detector with the analysis of UCN polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasakov, M. S.; Serebrov, A. P.; Khusainov, A. Kh.; Pustovoit, A.; Borisov, Yu. V.; Fomin, A. K.; Geltenbort, P.; Kon'kov, O. I.; Kotina, I. M.; Shablii, A. I.; Solovei, V. A.; Vasiliev, A. V.

    2005-06-01

    A silicon UCN detector with an area of 45 cm2 and with a 6LiF converter was developed at PNPI. The spectral efficiency of the silicon UCN detector was measured by means of a gravitational spectrometer at ILL. The sandwich-type detector from two silicon plates with a 6LiF converter placed between them was also studied. Using this type of technology the UCN detector with analysis of polarization was developed and tested. The analyzing power of this detector assembly reaches up to 75% for the main part of UCN spectrum. This UCN detector with analysis of UCN polarization can be used in the new EDM spectrometer.

  15. Sol-gel preparation of low oxygen content, high surface area silicon nitride and imidonitride materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardar, Kripasindhu; Bounds, Richard; Carravetta, Marina; Cutts, Geoffrey; Hargreaves, Justin S J; Hector, Andrew L; Hriljac, Joseph A; Levason, William; Wilson, Felix

    2016-04-01

    Reactions of Si(NHMe)4 with ammonia are effectively catalysed by small ammonium triflate concentrations, and can be used to produce free-standing silicon imide gels. Firing at various temperatures produces amorphous or partially crystallised silicon imidonitride/nitride samples with high surface areas and low oxygen contents. The crystalline phase is entirely α-Si3N4 and structural similarities are observed between the amorphous and crystallised materials. PMID:26931152

  16. The use of large area silicon sensors for thermal neutron detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of large area planar silicon detectors coupled with gadolinium foils has been investigated to develop a thermal neutron detector having a large area-efficiency (Aε) product. Noise levels due to high detector capacitance limit the size of silicon detectors that can be utilized. Calculations using the Monte Carlo code, MCNP, have been made to determine the variation of intrinsic detection efficiency as a function of the discriminator threshold level required to eliminate the detector noise. Measurements of the noise levels for planar silicon detectors of various resistivities (400, 3000 and 5000 Ω cm) have been made and the optimal detector area-efficiency products have been determined. The response of a Si-Gd-Si sandwich detector with areas between 1 cm2 and 10.5 cm2 is presented and the effects of the detector capacitance and reverse current are discussed. ((orig.))

  17. A large area Micromegas TPC for tracking at the ILC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study of the fundamental building blocks of matter necessitates always more powerful accelerators. New particles are produced in high energy collisions of protons or electrons. The by-Products of these collisions are detected in large apparatus surrounding the interaction point. The 125 GeV Higgs particle discovered at LHC will be studied in detail in the next e+e- collider. The leading project for this is called ILC. The team that I joined is working on the R and D for a Time Projection Chamber (TPC) to detect the charged tracks by the ionization they leave in a gas volume, optimised for use at ILC. This primary ionization is amplified by the so-Called Micromegas device, with a charge-Sharing anode made of a resistive-Capacitive coating. After a presentation of the physics motivation for the ILC and ILD detector, I will review the principle of operation of a TPC (Chapter 2) and underline the advantages of the Micromegas readout with charge sharing. The main part of this PhD work concerns the detailed study of up to 12 prototypes of various kinds. The modules and their readout electronics are described in Chapter 3. A test-Bench setup has been assembled at CERN (Chapter 4) to study the response to a 55Fe source, allowing an energy calibration and a uniformity study. In Chapter 5, the ion back-flow is studied using a bulk Micromegas and the gas gain is measured using a calibrated electronics chain. With the same setup, the electron transparency is measured as a function of the field ratio (drift/amplification). Also, several beam tests have been carried out at DESY with a 5 GeV electron beam in a 1 T superconducting magnet. These beam tests allowed the detailed study of the spatial resolution. In the final test, the endplate was equipped with seven modules, bringing sensitivity to misalignment and distortions. Such a study required software developments (Chapter 6) to make optimal use of the charge sharing and to reconstruct multiple tracks through several

  18. Development of large area and thin silicon dE/dX detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this report is to demonstrate the feasibility of thin dE/dX detectors of large areas with today available ultrathin silicon membranes. With a fast and easy manufacturing procedure, very performant surface barriers with areas up to 1010 mm2 and about 50 μm thick have been realized

  19. High surface area silicon carbide-coated carbon aerogel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worsley, Marcus A; Kuntz, Joshua D; Baumann, Theodore F; Satcher, Jr, Joe H

    2014-01-14

    A metal oxide-carbon composite includes a carbon aerogel with an oxide overcoat. The metal oxide-carbon composite is made by providing a carbon aerogel, immersing the carbon aerogel in a metal oxide sol under a vacuum, raising the carbon aerogel with the metal oxide sol to atmospheric pressure, curing the carbon aerogel with the metal oxide sol at room temperature, and drying the carbon aerogel with the metal oxide sol to produce the metal oxide-carbon composite. The step of providing a carbon aerogel can provide an activated carbon aerogel or provide a carbon aerogel with carbon nanotubes that make the carbon aerogel mechanically robust. Carbon aerogels can be coated with sol-gel silica and the silica can be converted to silicone carbide, improved the thermal stability of the carbon aerogel.

  20. Formation of ion tracks in amorphous silicon nitride films with MeV C{sub 60} ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitayama, T.; Morita, Y.; Nakajima, K. [Department of Micro Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Narumi, K.; Saitoh, Y. [Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1233 Watanuki-machi, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Matsuda, M.; Sataka, M. [Nuclear Science Research Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Tsujimoto, M.; Isoda, S. [Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Sciences, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Toulemonde, M. [CIMAP-GANIL (CEA-CNRS-ENSICAEN-Université de Caen Basse Normandie), Bd. H. Becquerel, 14070 Caen (France); Kimura, K., E-mail: kimura@kues.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Micro Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan)

    2015-08-01

    Amorphous silicon nitride (a-SiN) films (thickness 5–100 nm) were irradiated with 0.12–5 MeV C{sub 60}, 100 MeV Xe, 200 MeV Kr, and 200 and 420 MeV Au ions. Ion tracks were clearly observed using high-angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM) except for 100 MeV Xe and 200 MeV Kr. The observed HAADF-STEM images showed that the ion tracks consist of a low density core (0.5–2 nm in radius) and a high density shell (several nm in radius). The observed core and shell radii are not simply correlated with the electronic energy loss indicating that the nuclear energy loss plays an important role in the both core and shell formations. The observed track radii were well reproduced by the unified thermal spike model with two thresholds for shell and core formations.

  1. Follow the track: The effects of silicon dioxide on GTA welding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schrauwers, A.

    2001-01-01

    Silicon dioxide, in other words sand, turns out to be a highly useful helper for arc welding processes. It can be used as a tracer for a welding robot to follow the weld line and it can also make welding go faster and "deeper". At the Materials Science department of the Delft University of Technolog

  2. A large area, silicon photomultiplier-based PET detector module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raylman, R. R.; Stolin, A.; Majewski, S.; Proffitt, J.

    2014-01-01

    The introduction of silicon photomultipliers (SiPM) has facilitated construction of compact, efficient and magnetic field-hardened positron emission tomography (PET) scanners. To take full advantage of these devices, methods for using them to produce large field-of-view PET scanners are needed. In this investigation, we explored techniques to combine two SiPM arrays to form the building block for a small animal PET scanner. The module consists of a 26×58 array of 1.5×1.5 mm2 LYSO elements (spanning 41×91 mm2) coupled to two SensL SiPM arrays. The SiPMs were read out with new multiplexing electronics developed for this project. To facilitate calculation of event position with multiple SiPM arrays it was necessary to spread scintillation light amongst a number of elements with a small light guide. This method was successful in permitting identification of all detector elements, even at the seam between two SiPM arrays. Since the performance of SiPMs is enhanced by cooling, the detector module was fitted with a cooling jacket, which allowed the temperature of the device and electronics to be controlled. Testing demonstrated that the peak-to-valley contrast ratio of the light detected from the scintillation array was increased by ~45% when the temperature was reduced from 28 °C to 16 °C. Energy resolution for 511 keV photons improved slightly from 18.8% at 28 °C to 17.8% at 16 °C. Finally, the coincidence timing resolution of the module was found to be insufficient for time-of-flight applications (~2100 ps at 14 °C). The first use of these new modules will be in the construction of a small animal PET scanner to be integrated with a 3 T clinical magnetic resonance imaging scanner.

  3. The silicon tracking system of the CBM experiment at FAIR. Development of microstrip sensors and signal transmission lines for a low-mass, low-noise system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this thesis, different physical and electrical aspects of silicon microstrip sensors and low-mass multi-line readout cables have been investigated. These silicon microstrip sensors and readout cables will be used in the Silicon Tracking System (STS) of the fixed-target heavy-ion Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment which is under development at the upcoming Facility for Antiproton and ion Research (FAIR) in Darmstadt, Germany. The highly segmented low-mass tracking system is a central CBM detector system to resolve the high tracking densities of charged particles originating from beam-target interactions. Considering the low material budget requirement the double-sided silicon microstrip detectors have been used in several planar tracking stations. The readout electronics is planned to be installed at the periphery of the tracking stations along with the cooling system. Low-mass multi-line readout cables shall bridge the distance between the microstrip sensors and the readout electronics. The CBM running operational scenario suggests that some parts of the tracking stations are expected to be exposed to a total integrated particle fluence of the order of 1 x 1014 neq/cm2. After 1 x 1014 neq/cm2 the damaged modules in the tracking stations will be replaced. Thus radiation hard sensor is an important requirement for the sensors. Moreover, to cope with the high reaction rates, free-streaming (triggerless) readout electronics with online event reconstruction must be used which require high signal-to-noise (SNR) ratio (i.e., high signal efficiency, low noise contributions). Therefore, reduction in noise is a major goal of the sensor and cable development. For better insight into the different aspects of the silicon microstrip sensors and multi-line readout cables, the simulation study has been performed using SYNOPSYS TCAD tools. 3D models of the silicon microstrip sensors and the readout cables were implemented which is motivated by the stereoscopic

  4. Electrochemical preparation of metal microstructures on large areas of etched ion track membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrev, D.; Vetter, J.; Angert, N.

    1999-01-01

    A microgalvanic method for metal filling of etched ion tracks in organic foils on large areas is described. The method and the used galvanic cell permit the deposition of stable standing individual metal whiskers with high aspect ratio and a density of 10 5-10 8 per cm 2 on an area of 12.5 cm 2. The method was verified with copper and it is suitable also for various other metals. It can be applied for the replication of etched ion tracks and for the fabrication of microstructures containing large numbers of individual metal whiskers.

  5. Optimization of the Clustering and Tracking Algorithms of the Silicon Microstrip Detectors for the COMPASS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Leeb, Michael

    The COMPASS experiment at CERN uses silicon microstrip detectors for beam defini- tion and during hadron program also for the reconstruction of the primary interaction point. In the year 2009 these detectors were operated continuously at cryogenic temper- atures of 200 K for the first time. The objec- tive of this thesis is the optimization of the data reconstruction algorithms used for the silicon microstrip detectors. The clustering algorithm is extended to increase the capa- bility of resolving several particles in close proximity with respect to each other. Fur- thermore improvements on the simulation of the detector response are presented. In addition, the requirements on the detector alignment in order to make full use of the detector capability are studied. Based on a precise alignment, results on the perfor- mance during cryogenic operation are given and compared to the non-cryogenic detector characteristics.

  6. Chemical vapor deposition of silicon carbide for large area mirrors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentilman, R. L.; Maguire, E. A.

    1982-05-01

    CVD-SiC has been identified as the leading mirror material for high energy synchrotron radiation because of its high K/alpha ratio and its ability to be super-polished to less than or equal to 10 A rms roughness. Technology already exists for depositing SiC over large areas (approximately 70 cm x 20 cm). The CVD process, substrate selection, and mirror design considerations are discussed.

  7. 19.4%-efficient large-area fully screen-printed silicon solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gatz, Sebastian; Hannebauer, Helge; Hesse, Rene; Werner, Florian; Schmidt, Arne; Dullweber, Thorsten; Bothe, Karsten [Institute for Solar Energy Hamelin (ISFH), Am Ohrberg 1, 31860 Emmerthal (Germany); Schmidt, Jan; Brendel, Rolf [Institute for Solar Energy Hamelin (ISFH), Am Ohrberg 1, 31860 Emmerthal (Germany); Institute of Solid-State Physics, University of Hannover, Appelstrasse 2, 30167 Hannover (Germany)

    2011-04-15

    We demonstrate industrially feasible large-area solar cells with passivated homogeneous emitter and rear achieving energy conversion efficiencies of up to 19.4% on 125 x 125 mm{sup 2} p-type 2-3 {omega} cm boron-doped Czochralski silicon wafers. Front and rear metal contacts are fabricated by screen-printing of silver and aluminum paste and firing in a conventional belt furnace. We implement two different dielectric rear surface passivation stacks: (i) a thermally grown silicon dioxide/silicon nitride stack and (ii) an atomic-layer-deposited aluminum oxide/silicon nitride stack. The dielectrics at the rear result in a decreased surface recombination velocity of S{sub rear} = 70 cm/s and 80 cm/s, and an increased internal IR reflectance of up to 91% corresponding to an improved J{sub sc} of up to 38.9 mA/cm{sup 2} and V{sub oc} of up to 664 mV. We observe an increase in cell efficiency of 0.8% absolute for the cells compared to 18.6% efficient reference solar cells featuring a full-area aluminum back surface field. To our knowledge, the energy conversion efficiency of 19.4% is the best value reported so far for large area screen-printed solar cells. (copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  8. A Silicon UCN Detector With Large Area and With Analysis of UCN Polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasakov, M; Serebrov, A; Khusainov, A; Pustovoit, A; Borisov, Yu; Fomin, A; Geltenbort, P; Kon'kov, O; Kotina, I; Shablii, A; Solovei, V; Vasiliev, A

    2005-01-01

    A silicon ultracold neutron (UCN) detector with an area of 45 cm(2) and with a (6)LiF converter is developed at St. Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute (PNPI). The spectral efficiency of the silicon UCN detector was measured by means of a gravitational spectrometer at Institut Max von Laue - Paul Langevin (ILL). The sandwich-type detector from two silicon plates with a (6)LiF converter placed between them was also studied. Using this type of technology the UCN detector with analysis of polarization was developed and tested. The analyzing power of this detector assembly reaches up 75 % for the main part of UCN spectrum. This UCN detector with analysis of UCN polarization can be used in the new electric dipole moment (EDM) spectrometer. PMID:27308138

  9. Ultra long-range interactions between large area graphene and silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Seung Ryul; Suk, Ji Won; Ruoff, Rodney S; Huang, Rui; Liechti, Kenneth M

    2014-11-25

    The wet-transfer of graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) has been the standard procedure for transferring graphene to any substrate. However, the nature of the interactions between large area graphene and target substrates is unknown. Here, we report on measurements of the traction-separation relations, which represent the strength and range of adhesive interactions, and the adhesion energy between wet-transferred, CVD grown graphene and the native oxide surface of silicon substrates. These were determined by coupling interferometry measurements of the separation between the graphene and silicon with fracture mechanics concepts and analyses. The measured adhesion energy was 357 ± 16 mJ/m(2), which is commensurate with van der Waals interactions. However, the deduced traction-separation relation for graphene-silicon interactions exhibited a much longer range interaction than those normally associated with van der Waals forces, suggesting that other mechanisms are present. PMID:25317979

  10. Suppression Effect and Mechanism of Platinum and Nitrogen-Containing Silane on the Tracking and Erosion of Silicone Rubber for High-Voltage Insulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wan Juan; Zeng, Xingrong; Lai, Xuejun; Li, Hongqiang; Fang, Wei Zhen; Hou, Fei

    2016-08-17

    How to effectively improve the tracking and erosion resistance of silicone rubber (SR) was an urgent topic in the field of high-voltage insulation. In this work, the tracking and erosion resistance of SR was significantly improved by incorporating platinum (Pt) catalyst and nitrogen-containing silane (NS). The suppression effect and mechanism of Pt/NS on tracking and erosion were studied by inclined plane (IP) test, thermogravimetry (TG), thermogravimetry-Fourier transform infrared spectrometry, laser Raman spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. It revealed that when 1.4 phr of NS and 6.7 ppm of Pt were added, the tracking resistance of SR was improved from 2.5 to 4.5 kV level in the IP test, and the eroded mass was significantly reduced. This might be attributed to the synergistic effect of Pt/NS on silicone chains. At a high temperature produced by arc discharge, Pt/NS would catalyze radical cross-linking, meanwhile suppressing oxidation and depolymerization of silicone chains. Hence, a tightly cross-linked network was formed and protected inner materials from arc ablation. Moreover, carbon deposit during pyrolysis was suppressed by Pt/NS, which served as the secondary mechanism of tracking suppression. PMID:27462876

  11. Track based alignment of the CMS silicon tracker and its implication on physics performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Draeger, Jula

    2011-08-15

    In order to fully exploit the discovery potential of the CMS detector for new physics beyond the Standard Model at the high luminosity and centre-of-mass energy provided by the Large Hadron Collider, a careful calibration of the detector and profound understanding of its impact on physics performance are necessary to provide realistic uncertainties for the measurements of physics processes. This thesis describes the track-based alignment of the inner tracking system of CMS with the Millepede II algorithm. Using the combined information of tracks from cosmic rays and collisions taken in 2010, a remarkable local alignment precision has been reached that meets the design specification for most regions of the detector and takes into account instabilities of the detector geometry over time. In addition, the impact of the alignment of b tagging or the Z boson resonance are investigated. The latter is studied to investigate the impact of correlated detector distortions which hardly influence the overall solution of the minimisation problem but introduce biases in the track parameters and thus the derived physics quantities. The determination and constraint of these weak modes present the future challenge of the alignment task at CMS. (orig.)

  12. KOLAM: a cross-platform architecture for scalable visualization and tracking in wide-area imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Joshua; Haridas, Anoop; Seetharaman, Guna; Rao, Raghuveer M.; Palaniappan, Kannappan

    2013-05-01

    KOLAM is an open, cross-platform, interoperable, scalable and extensible framework supporting a novel multi- scale spatiotemporal dual-cache data structure for big data visualization and visual analytics. This paper focuses on the use of KOLAM for target tracking in high-resolution, high throughput wide format video also known as wide-area motion imagery (WAMI). It was originally developed for the interactive visualization of extremely large geospatial imagery of high spatial and spectral resolution. KOLAM is platform, operating system and (graphics) hardware independent, and supports embedded datasets scalable from hundreds of gigabytes to feasibly petabytes in size on clusters, workstations, desktops and mobile computers. In addition to rapid roam, zoom and hyper- jump spatial operations, a large number of simultaneously viewable embedded pyramid layers (also referred to as multiscale or sparse imagery), interactive colormap and histogram enhancement, spherical projection and terrain maps are supported. The KOLAM software architecture was extended to support airborne wide-area motion imagery by organizing spatiotemporal tiles in very large format video frames using a temporal cache of tiled pyramid cached data structures. The current version supports WAMI animation, fast intelligent inspection, trajectory visualization and target tracking (digital tagging); the latter by interfacing with external automatic tracking software. One of the critical needs for working with WAMI is a supervised tracking and visualization tool that allows analysts to digitally tag multiple targets, quickly review and correct tracking results and apply geospatial visual analytic tools on the generated trajectories. One-click manual tracking combined with multiple automated tracking algorithms are available to assist the analyst and increase human effectiveness.

  13. Electronics and readout of a large area silicon detector for LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borer, K.; Munday, D.J.; Parker, M.A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Aspell, P.; Campbell, M.; Chilingarov, A.; Jarron, P.; Heijne, E.H.M.; Santiard, J.C.; Scampoli, P.; Verweij, H.; Goessling, C.; Lisowski, B.; Reichold, A.; Spiwoks, R.; Tsesmelis, E.; Benslama, K.; Bonino, R.; Clark, A.G.; Couyoumtzelis, C.; Kambara, H.; Wu, X.; Fretwurst, E.; Lindstroem, G.; Schultz, T.; Bardos, R.A.; Gorfine, G.W.; Moorhead, G.F.; Taylor, G.N.; Tovey, S.N.; Bibby, J.H.; Hawkings, R.J.; Kundu, N.; Weidberg, A.; Campbell, D.; Murray, P.; Seller, P.; Teiger, J. (Univ. of Bern (Switzerland) Cavendish Lab., Univ. of Cambridge (United Kingdom) CERN, Geneva (Switzerland) Inst. fuer Physik, Univ. Dortmund (Germany) DPNC, Geneva Univ. (Switzerland) 1. Inst. fur Experimentalphysik, Hamburg (Germany) School of Physics, Univ. of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC (Australia) Dept. of Nuclear Physics, Oxford Univ. (United Kingdom) Rutherford Appleton Lab., Chilton, Didcot (United Kingdom) Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, 91 Gif

    1994-04-21

    The purpose of the RD2 project is to evaluate the feasibility of a silicon tracker and/or preshower detector for LHC. Irradiation studies with doses equivalent to those expected at LHC have been performed to determine the behavior of operational parameters such as leakage current, depletion voltage and charge collection during the life of the detector. The development of fast, dense, low power and low cost signal processing electronics is one of the major activities of the collaboration. We describe the first fully functional integrated analog memory chip with asynchronous read and write operations and level 1 trigger capture capabilities. A complete test beam system using this analog memory chip at 66 MHz has been successfully operated with RD2 prototype silicon detectors during various test runs. The flexibility of the electronics and readout have allowed us to easily interface our set-up to other data acquisition systems. Mechanical studies are in progress to design a silicon tracking detector with several million channels that may be operated at low (0-10 C) temperature, while maintaining the required geometrical precision. Prototype readout boards for such a detector are being developed and simulation studies are being performed to optimize the readout architecture. (orig.)

  14. The upgrade of the ALICE Inner Tracking System - Status of the R&D; on monolithic silicon pixel sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Van Hoorne, Jacobus Willem

    2014-01-01

    s a major part of its upgrade plans, the ALICE experiment schedules the installation of a novel Inner Tracking System (ITS) during the Long Shutdown 2 (LS2) of the LHC in 2018/19. It will replace the present silicon tracker with seven layers of Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) and significantly improve the detector performance in terms of tracking and rate capabilities. The choice of technology has been guided by the tight requirements on the material budget of 0 : 3 % X = X 0 /layer for the three innermost layers and backed by the significant progress in the field of MAPS in recent years. The pixel chips are manufactured in the TowerJazz 180 nm CMOS imaging sensor process on wafers with a high resistivity epitaxial layer. Within the ongoing R&D; phase, several sensor chip prototypes have been developed and produced on different epitaxial layer thicknesses and resistivities. These chips are being characterized for their performance before and after irradiation using source tests, test beam and measu...

  15. Silicon on ceramic process. Silicon sheet growth development for the Large-Area Silicon Sheet Task of the Low-Cost Silicon Solar Array Project. Annual report No. 2, September 17, 1976--September 19, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zook, J.D.; Heaps, J.D.; Maciolek, R.B.; Koepke, B.; Butter, C.D.; Schuldt, S.B.

    1977-09-30

    The objective of this research program is to investigate the technical and economic feasibility of producing solar-cell-quality sheet silicon by coating one surface of carbonized ceramic substrates with a thin layer of large-grain polycrystalline silicon from the melt. In the past year significant progress was made in all areas of the program. The physical and chemical properties of the standard mullite refractory used for the majority of the coating runs (McDanel MV20 and Coors S1SI) have been characterized. A number of experimental compositions have been identified and procured from Coors. Characterization of the standard compositions revealed that the thermal expansion of mullite depends on both relative amounts of glass phase and on the impurity level in the glass. Since the thermal expansion in mullite exceeds that of silicon, the silicon coating should be in a state of compression. This was confirmed by x-ray measurements. After modifying and cleaning the dip-coating facility, silicon on ceramic (SOC) solar cells were fabricated which demonstrate that the SOC process can produce silicon of solar cell quality. SOC cells having 1 cm/sup 2/ active areas demonstrated measured conversion efficiencies as high as 7.2 percent. Typical open-ciruit voltages (V/sub oc/) and short-circuit current densities (J/sub sc/) were 0.51 volt and 20 mA/cm/sup 2/, respectively. Since the active surface of these solar cells is a highly reflective ''as-grown'' surface, one can expect improvement in J/sub sc/ after an anti-reflection (AR) coating is applied. Results of an economic analysis of the SOC process are presented.

  16. Development and operation of tracking detectors in silicon technology for the LHCb upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Rodriguez Perez, Pablo; Adeva, Bernardo

    The LHCb experiment is one of the four main experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. It uses the energy density provided by the LHC to attempt to probe asymmetries between particles and antiparticles that can not be explained by the Standard Model, and thus provide evidence that would allow us to build a new model of fundamental physics. This thesis covers the author's work in the Silicon Tracker $(\\textit{ST})$ and VErtex LOcator $(\\textit{VELO})$ detectors of the LHCb experiment. The thesis explains the installation and commissioning of the $ST$, as well as the development of the slow control for the detector. The $ST$ is a silicon micro-strip detector which provides precise momentum measurements of ionizing particles coming from the collisions. The $ST$consists of two sub-detectors: the Tracker Turicensis $ (TT)$, located upstream of the 4 Tm dipole magnet covering the full acceptance of the experiment, and the Inner Tracker $(IT)$, which covers the region of highest particle density closest...

  17. Sensor-Aware Recognition and Tracking for Wide-Area Augmented Reality on Mobile Phones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jing; Cao, Ruochen; Wang, Yongtian

    2015-01-01

    Wide-area registration in outdoor environments on mobile phones is a challenging task in mobile augmented reality fields. We present a sensor-aware large-scale outdoor augmented reality system for recognition and tracking on mobile phones. GPS and gravity information is used to improve the VLAD performance for recognition. A kind of sensor-aware VLAD algorithm, which is self-adaptive to different scale scenes, is utilized to recognize complex scenes. Considering vision-based registration algorithms are too fragile and tend to drift, data coming from inertial sensors and vision are fused together by an extended Kalman filter (EKF) to achieve considerable improvements in tracking stability and robustness. Experimental results show that our method greatly enhances the recognition rate and eliminates the tracking jitters. PMID:26690439

  18. Sensor-Aware Recognition and Tracking for Wide-Area Augmented Reality on Mobile Phones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jing; Cao, Ruochen; Wang, Yongtian

    2015-12-10

    Wide-area registration in outdoor environments on mobile phones is a challenging task in mobile augmented reality fields. We present a sensor-aware large-scale outdoor augmented reality system for recognition and tracking on mobile phones. GPS and gravity information is used to improve the VLAD performance for recognition. A kind of sensor-aware VLAD algorithm, which is self-adaptive to different scale scenes, is utilized to recognize complex scenes. Considering vision-based registration algorithms are too fragile and tend to drift, data coming from inertial sensors and vision are fused together by an extended Kalman filter (EKF) to achieve considerable improvements in tracking stability and robustness. Experimental results show that our method greatly enhances the recognition rate and eliminates the tracking jitters.

  19. A liquid-helium cooled large-area silicon PIN photodiode X-ray detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An X-ray detector using a liquid-helium cooled large-area silicon PIN photodiode has been developed along with a tailor-made charge sensitive preamplifier whose first-stage JFET has been cooled. The operating temperature of the JFET has been varied separately and optimized. The X- and γ-ray energy spectra for an 241Am source have been measured with the photodiode operated at 13 K. An energy resolution of 1.60 keV (FWHM) has been obtained for 60-keV γ rays and 1.30 keV (FWHM) for the pulser. The energy threshold could be set as low as 3 keV. It has been shown that a silicon PIN photodiode serves as a low-cost excellent X-ray detector which covers a large area at 13 K. (orig.)

  20. Large area silicon drift detectors for x-rays -- New results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Large area silicon drift detectors, consisting of 8 mm and 12 mm diameter hexagons, were fabricated on 0.35 mm thick high resistivity n-type silicon. An external FET and a low-noise charge sensitive preamplifier were used for testing the prototype detectors. The detector performance was measured in the range 75 to 25 C using Peltier cooling, and from 0.125 to 6 micros amplifier shaping time. Measured energy resolutions were 159 eV FWHM and 263 eV FWHM for the 0.5 cm2 and 1 cm2 detectors, respectively (at 5.9 keV, -75 C, 6 micros shaping time). The uniformity of the detector response over the entire active area (measured using 560 nm light) was < 0.5%

  1. SALT, a dedicated readout chip for high precision tracking silicon strip detectors at the LHCb Upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugiel, Sz.; Dasgupta, R.; Firlej, M.; Fiutowski, T.; Idzik, M.; Kuczynska, M.; Moron, J.; Swientek, K.; Szumlak, T.

    2016-02-01

    The Upstream Tracker (UT) silicon strip detector, one of the central parts of the tracker system of the modernised LHCb experiment, will use a new 128-channel readout ASIC called SALT. It will extract and digitise analogue signals from the UT sensors, perform digital signal processing and transmit a serial output data. The SALT is being designed in CMOS 130 nm process and uses a novel architecture comprising of analog front-end and fast (40 MSps) ultra-low power (<0.5 mW) 6-bit ADC in each channel. The prototype ASICs of important functional blocks, like analogue front-end, 6-bit SAR ADC, PLL, and DLL, were designed, fabricated and tested. A prototype of an 8-channel version of the SALT chip, comprising all important functionalities was also designed and fabricated. The architecture and design of the SALT, together with the selected preliminary tests results, are presented.

  2. tkLayout: a Design Tool for Innovative Silicon Tracking Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Bianchi, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    A new CMS tracker is scheduled to become operational for the LHC Phase 2 upgrade in the early 2020's. tkLayout is a software package developed to create 3d models for the design of the CMS tracker and to evaluate its fundamental performance figures. The new tracker will have to cope with much higher luminosity conditions, resulting in increased track density, harsher radiation exposure and, especially, much higher data acquisition bandwidth, such that equipping the tracker with triggering capabilities is envisaged. The design of an innovative detector involves deciding on an architecture offering the best trade-off among many figures of merit, such as tracking resolution, power dissipation, bandwidth, cost and so on. Quantitatively evaluating these figures of merit as early as possible in the design phase is of capital importance and it is best done with the aid of software models. tkLayout is a flexible modeling tool: new performance estimates and support for different detector geometries can be quickly ad...

  3. Rippled area formed by surface plasmon polaritons upon femtosecond laser double-pulse irradiation of silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derrien, Thibault J-Y; Krüger, Jörg; Itina, Tatiana E; Höhm, Sandra; Rosenfeld, Arkadi; Bonse, Jörn

    2013-12-01

    The formation of near-wavelength laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) on silicon upon irradiation with sequences of Ti:sapphire femtosecond laser pulse pairs (pulse duration 150 fs, central wavelength 800 nm) is studied theoretically. For this purpose, the nonlinear generation of conduction band electrons in silicon and their relaxation is numerically calculated using a two-temperature model approach including intrapulse changes of optical properties, transport, diffusion and recombination effects. Following the idea that surface plasmon polaritons (SPP) can be excited when the material turns from semiconducting to metallic state, the "SPP active area" is calculated as function of fluence and double-pulse delay up to several picoseconds and compared to the experimentally observed rippled surface areas. Evidence is presented that multi-photon absorption explains the large increase of the rippled area for temporally overlapping pulses. For longer double-pulse delays, relevant relaxation processes are identified. The results demonstrate that femtosecond LIPSS on silicon are caused by the excitation of SPP and can be controlled by temporal pulse shaping. PMID:24514516

  4. Demonstration of lasercom and spatial tracking with a silicon Geiger-mode APD array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarnall, Timothy M.; Horkley, Benjamin W.; Garg, Ajay S.; Hamilton, Scott A.

    2016-03-01

    We present a demonstration of a high-rate photon counting receiver with the potential to act as a spatial tracker based on a silicon Geiger-mode avalanche photodiode array (GM-APD). This array enables sensitive high-rate optical communication in the visible and near infrared regions of the spectrum. The array contains 1024 elements arranged in a 32x32 pixel square. This large number of elements supports high data rates through the mitigation of blocking losses and associated data rate limitations created by the reset time of an individual Geiger-mode detector. Measurement of bit error rates demonstrate that receiver sensitivities of 2.55 dB (detected) photons-per-bit for 78.8 Mb/s on-off-keying and -0.46 dB (detected) photons-per-bit for 19.4 Mb/s 16-ary pulse-position modulation are accessible with strong forward error correction. Additionally, the array can record the spatial coordinates of each detection event. By computing the centroid of the distribution of spatial detections it is possible to determine the angle-of-arrival of the detected photons. These levels of performance imply that Si GM-APD arrays are excellent candidates for a variety of free space lasercom applications ranging from atmospheric communication in the 1 micron or 780 nm spectral windows to underwater communication in the 480 nm to 520 nm spectral window

  5. Tracks FAQs: How Can I Tell If Asthma Hospitalization Rates In My Area Are Changing Over Time?

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-06-07

    In this podcast, CDC Tracking experts discuss asthma hospitalization rates and how you can tell if they've changed in your area over time. Do you have a question for our Tracking experts? Please e-mail questions to trackingsupport@cdc.gov.  Created: 6/7/2011 by National Center for Environmental Health, Division of Environmental Hazards and Health Effects, Environmental Health Tracking Branch.   Date Released: 6/7/2011.

  6. Increase in the area of etched alpha-particle tracks in CR-39 plastic with increasing storage time under nitrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Bhakta, J R; Miles, J C H

    1999-01-01

    The area of etched tracks in CR-39 (polyallyl diglycol carbonate, PADC) exposed to alpha-particles from an americium-241 source has been investigated as a function of post-exposure storage time in a dry nitrogen atmosphere. Data were collected over 2.5 years and the results show that the nominal maximum area of the track area distribution increases with increasing storage time.

  7. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 486: Double Tracks RADSAFE Area Nellis Air Force Range, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Double Tracks Radiological Safety Area (DTRSA), Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 486, was clean-closed following the approved Corrective Action Decision Document closure alternative and in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. The CAU consists of a single Corrective Action Site, 71-23-001-71DT. The DTRSA was used during May 1963 to decontaminate vehicles, equipment, personnel and animals from the Double Tracks Test. Double Tracks was one of four storage-transportation tests. The Double Tracks test was conducted in Stonewall Flat, approximately 32 kilometers (20 miles) east of Goldfield, Nevada, on the Nellis Air Force Range. The Double Tracks Test used a single device containing plutonium and depleted uranium and was designed to investigate the characteristics of plutonium-bearing particulate material formed by the non-nuclear detonation of a nuclear weapon. All facilities associated with the DTRSA operation were removed. Based on available information, the areas of concern at the DTRSA consisted of a decon facility (vehicle decon pad and decon sump) in the southern half of the DTRSA, and a burial pit and former loading/unloading area located in the northern half of the DTRSA. Based on the results of the Corrective Action Investigation, radiological field screening detected elevated gamma and alpha readings on excavated plastic debris. Swipe surveys taken on the plastic debris detected removable alpha. No contaminants were detected above preliminary action levels in soil samples. The debris excavated during the corrective action investigation was not characterized. The clean-closure corrective action consisted of excavation, disposal, verification sampling, backfilling, and regrading. Field activities began on May 1, 2000, and ended on May 10, 2000. Soil that was associated with the radiologically contaminated man-made debris was placed into B-25 bins, moved to the designated waste management area where it was scanned, and hauled off

  8. Polyimide microfluidic devices with integrated nanoporous filtration areas manufactured by micromachining and ion track technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metz, S.; Trautmann, C.; Bertsch, A.; Renaud, Ph

    2004-03-01

    This paper reports on polyimide microfluidic devices fabricated by photolithography and a layer transfer lamination technology. The microchannels are sealed by laminating an uncured polyimide film on a partially cured layer and subsequent imidization. Selected areas of the microchannels were irradiated with heavy ions of several hundred MeV and the generated ion tracks are chemically etched to submicron pores of high aspect ratio. The ion beam parameters and the track etching conditions define density, length, diameter and shape of the pores. Membrane permeability and separation performance is demonstrated in cross-flow filtration experiments. The devices can be used for selective delivery or probing of fluids to biological tissue, e.g. drug delivery or microdialysis. For chip-based devices the filters can be used as a sample pre-treatment unit for filtration or concentration of particles or molecules.

  9. Silicon-on ceramic process. Silicon sheet growth and device developmentt for the Large-Area Silicon Sheet Task of the Low-Cost Solar Array Project. Quarterly report No. 13, October 1-December 31, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapman, P W; Zook, J D; Grung, B L; McHenry, K; Schuldt, S B

    1980-02-15

    Research on the technical and economic feasibility of producing solar-cell-quality sheet silicon by coating inexpensive ceramic substrates with a thin layer of polycrystalline silicon is reported. The coating methods to be developed are directed toward a minimum-cost process for producing solar cells with a terrestrial conversion efficiency of 11 percent or greater. By applying a graphite coating to one face of a ceramic substrate, molten silicon can be caused to wet only that graphite-coated face and produce uniform thin layers of large-grain polycrystalline silicon; thus, only a minimal quantity of silicon is consumed. A variety of ceramic materials have been dip coated with silicon. The investigation has shown that mullite substrates containing an excess of SiO/sub 2/ best match the thermal expansion coefficient of silicon and hence produce the best SOC layers. With such substrates, smooth and uniform silicon layers 25 cm/sup 2/ in area have been achieved with single-crystal grains as large as 4 mm in width and several cm in length. Crystal length is limited by the length of the substrate. The thickness of the coating and the size of the crystalline grains are controlled by the temperature of the melt and the rate at which the substrate is withdrawn from the melt. The solar-cell potential of this SOC sheet silicon is promising. To date, solar cells with areas from 1 to 10 cm/sup 2/ have been fabricated from material with an as-grown surface. Conversion efficiencies of about 10 percent with antireflection (AR) coating have been achieved. Such cells typically have open-circuit voltage and short-circuit current densities of 0.55V and 23 mA/cm/sup 2/, respectively.

  10. Silicon on ceramic process. Silicon sheet growth for Large-Area Silicon Sheet Task of the Low-Cost Solar Array Project. Annual report No. 4, September 29, 1978-September 30, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapman, P W; Zook, J D; Heaps, J D; Koepke, B; Grung, B L; Schuldt, S B

    1979-10-31

    The objective of this research program is to investigate the technical and economic feasibility of producing solar-cell-quality sheet silicon by coating one surface of carbonized ceramic substrates with a thin layer of large-grain polycrystalline silicon from the melt. The effort is divided into several areas of investigation in order to most efficiently meet the goals of the program. These areas include: (1) dip-coating; (2) continuous coating; (3) material characterization; (4) cell fabrication; and (5) theoretical analysis. Progress in all areas of the program is reported in detail. (WHK)

  11. Large-Area Synthesis and Microstructural Investigations of Silicon Nano wires and Core-Shell Structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Large-area randomly-oriented silicon nano wires (SiNWs) were synthesized using Au-coated p-type Si(100) substrate via the solid-liquid-solid (SLS) process [1] under different growth conditions. Microstructural studies on the NWs produced show that straight crystalline nano wires of large aspect ratios were generally obtained at a growth temperature of 1000 degree Celsius along with some worm-like amorphous structures. Figure shows the SEM image of a NW sample. Typical high angle X-ray diffractogram in Figure reveals that the NWs are, in general, crystalline. (author)

  12. Silicon-on-ceramic process: silicon sheet growth and device development for the Large-Area Silicon Sheet and Cell Development Tasks of the Low-Cost Solar Array Project. Quarterly report No. 11, January 1-March 30, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapman, P.W.; Zook, J.D.; Heaps, J.D.; Grung, B.L.; Koepke, B.; Schuldt, S.B.

    1979-04-30

    The purpose of the research program is to investigate the technical and economic feasibility of producing solar-cell-quality sheet silicon by coating inexpensive ceramic substrates with a thin layer of polycrystalline silicon. The coating methods to be developed are directed toward a minimum-cost process for producing solar cells with a terrestrial conversion efficiency of 12 percent or greater. By applying a graphite coating to one face of a ceramic substrate, molten silicon can be caused to wet only that graphite-coated face and produce uniform thin layers of large-grain polycrystalline silicon; thus, only a minimal quantity of silicon is consumed. A dip-coating method for putting silicon on ceramic (SOC) has been shown to produce solar-cell-quality sheet silicon. This method and a continuous coating process also being investigated have excellent scale-up potential which offers an outstanding, cost-effective way to manufacture large-area solar cells. Results and accomplishments are described.

  13. The Aalborg case - GPS tracking of 169 young adults in a Danish central city area

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harder, Henrik; Bro, Peter; Knudsen, Anne-Marie

    detailed information on the interplay between users’ individual behaviours and the mentioned urban elements require complex, yet accessible ways of representation. Further questions must address other, value-based choices concerning urban design and planning. We demonstrate a number of ways in which...... was based on a unique sample of movement data gleaned from 169 young adults aged 16 to 20 years. Each person was GPS-tracked over a period of seven days in 2008-2009 to record their movements in and uses of spaces in the central city area of Aalborg, which is Denmark’s fourth-largest city, with 122 461...

  14. Collaborative 3D Target Tracking in Distributed Smart Camera Networks for Wide-Area Surveillance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xenofon Koutsoukos

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available With the evolution and fusion of wireless sensor network and embedded camera technologies, distributed smart camera networks have emerged as a new class of systems for wide-area surveillance applications. Wireless networks, however, introduce a number of constraints to the system that need to be considered, notably the communication bandwidth constraints. Existing approaches for target tracking using a camera network typically utilize target handover mechanisms between cameras, or combine results from 2D trackers in each camera into 3D target estimation. Such approaches suffer from scale selection, target rotation, and occlusion, drawbacks typically associated with 2D tracking. In this paper, we present an approach for tracking multiple targets directly in 3D space using a network of smart cameras. The approach employs multi-view histograms to characterize targets in 3D space using color and texture as the visual features. The visual features from each camera along with the target models are used in a probabilistic tracker to estimate the target state. We introduce four variations of our base tracker that incur different computational and communication costs on each node and result in different tracking accuracy. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our proposed trackers by comparing their performance to a 3D tracker that fuses the results of independent 2D trackers. We also present performance analysis of the base tracker along Quality-of-Service (QoS and Quality-of-Information (QoI metrics, and study QoS vs. QoI trade-offs between the proposed tracker variations. Finally, we demonstrate our tracker in a real-life scenario using a camera network deployed in a building.

  15. Fission track dating of the Cenozoic uplift in Mabian area, southern Sichuan Province, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AN YanFen; HAN ZhuJun; WAN JingLin

    2008-01-01

    The apparent ages of samples are obtained from fission track dating of apatite samples collected from the fault zones in Mabian area, southern Sichuan Province.In addition, thermal history is simulated from the obtained data by applying AFTSolve Program, to acquire the thermal evolution history of the samples.The result shows that tectonically the Mabian area was relatively stable between 25 and 3 Ma, compared to the inner parts and other marginal areas of the Tibetan Plateau.The studied area had little response to the rapid uplift events that occurred for several times in the Tibetan Plateau during 25-3 Ma.The latest thermal event related to the activity of the Lidian fault zone (about 8 Ma) is later than that of the Ebian fault zone (18-15 Ma ) to the west, indicating to some extent that the evolution of fault activity in the Mabian area has migrated from west to east.The latest extensive tectonic uplift occurred since about 3 Ma.As compared with the Xianshuihe fault zone, the Mabian area is closer to the eastern margin of the plateau, while the time of fast cooling event in this area is later than that in the southeast segment of the Xianshuihe fault zone (3.6-3.46 Ma).It appears to support the assumption of episodic uplift and stepwise outward extension of the eastern boundary of the Tibetan Plateau in late Cenozoic.

  16. Characterization of silicon microstrip sensors, front-end electronics, and prototype tracking detectors for the CBM experiment at FAIR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorokin, Iurii

    2013-07-01

    The Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment will explore the phase diagram of strongly interacting matter in the region of high net baryonic densities. The matter at the extreme conditions will be studied in collisions of a heavy ion beam with a fixed heavy element target. The present work is devoted to the development of the main component of the CBM experiment - the Silicon Tracking System (STS). The STS has to enable reconstruction of up to 1000 charged particle tracks per nucleus-nucleus interaction at the rate of up to 10 MHz, provide a momentum resolution Δp/p of 1 %, and withstand the radiation load of up to 10{sup 14} n{sub eq}/cm{sup 2} (n{sub eq}-neutron equivalent). The STS will be based on double-sided silicon microstrip sensors, that will be arranged in 8 planes in the aperture of the dipole magnet. Selftriggering readout electronics will be located on the periphery of the detecting planes, and connected to the sensors with low mass microcables. In the stage of R and D, as well as in the stages of pre-series and series production, characterization of the sensors, of the front-end electronics, and of the complete detector modules has to be performed. In the present work the required techniques were developed, and the performance of the latest detector prototypes was evaluated. A particular attention is paid to evaluation of the signal amplitude, as it is one of the most important detector characteristics. Techniques for measuring the passive electrical characteristics of the sensors were developed. These include: the coupling and the interstrip capacitances, the interstrip resistance, the bias resistance, the strip leakage current, the bulk capacitance, and the bulk leakage current. The techniques will be applied for the quality assurance of the sensors during the pre-series and the series production. Extensive characterization of the prototype readout chip, n-XYTER, was performed. The register settings were optimized, and the dependence of the

  17. Photon counting pixel and array in amorphous silicon technology for large area digital medical imaging applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdandoost, Mohammad Y.; Shin, Kyung W.; Safavian, Nader; Taghibakhsh, Farhad; Karim, Karim S.

    2010-04-01

    A single photon counting Voltage Controlled Oscillator (VCO) based pixel architecture in amorphous silicon (a-Si) technology is reported for large area digital medical imaging. The VCO converts X-ray generated input charge into an output oscillating frequency signal. Experimental results for an in-house fabricated VCO circuit in a-Si technology are presented and external readout circuits to extract the image information from the VCO's frequency output are discussed. These readout circuits can be optimized to reduce the fixed pattern noise and fringing effects in an imaging array containing many such VCO pixels. Noise estimations, stability simulations and measurements for the fabricated VCO are presented. The reported architecture is particularly promising for large area photon counting applications (e.g. low dose fluoroscopy, dental computed tomography (CT)) due to its very low input referred electronic noise, high sensitivity and ease of fabrication in low cost a-Si technology.

  18. Development of large-area silicon photomultiplier detectors for PET applications at FBK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorzi, Nicola; Melchiorri, Mirko; Piazza, Alessandro; Piemonte, Claudio; Tarolli, Alessandro

    2011-04-01

    This paper reports on the development of large-area silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) detectors specifically designed for positron emission tomography (PET) instruments. The sensors under study are monolithic arrays of two different types: a 2×2 array of ˜4×4 mm2 elements and an 8×8 array of 1.5×1.5 mm2 pixels. These devices are characterized at wafer level by means of an automatic test procedure, consisting of current-voltage curves in forward and reverse bias. The tests allowed selection of functioning devices and evaluation of the uniformity of basic parameters. Results of the electrical characterization are reported showing that acceptable values of yield together with rather uniform distribution of parameters have been obtained. Reliability of produced SiPMs has been proved by long-term accelerated stress tests.

  19. Development of large area silicon semiconductor detectors for use in the current mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Large area silicon semiconductor detectors for use in the current mode, with their dimensions of φ40, φ50 and φ60 mm, their depletion thickness of 200-300 μm, have been developed. Their performance measurements have been made, which indicate that the developed detectors can satisfactorily meet the needs in expectation. Compared with the detectors commercially available on the market, authors' large PIN detectors can serve both as reliable and efficient high-resolution devices for nuclear counting experiments, as well as monitors of high-intensity radiation fields in the current mode under a bias of 100-1000 V, while the detectors commercially available are only for the counting use

  20. Controllable chemical vapor deposition of large area uniform nanocrystalline graphene directly on silicon dioxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Jie; Lindvall, Niclas; Cole, Matthew T.;

    2012-01-01

    Metal-catalyst-free chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of large area uniform nanocrystalline graphene on oxidized silicon substrates is demonstrated. The material grows slowly, allowing for thickness control down to monolayer graphene. The as-grown thin films are continuous with no observable pinholes...... size similar to 10 nm. The absence of transfer to another substrate allows avoidance of wrinkles, holes, and etching residues which are usually detrimental to device performance. This work provides a broader perspective of graphene CVD and shows a viable route toward applications involving transparent......, and are smooth and uniform across whole wafers, as inspected by optical-, scanning electron-, and atomic force microscopy. The sp(2) hybridized carbon structure is confirmed by Raman spectroscopy. Room temperature electrical measurements show ohmic behavior (sheet resistance similar to exfoliated graphene...

  1. Coherent Bremsstrahlung effect observed during STEM analysis of dopant distribution in silicon devices using large area silicon drift EDX detectors and high brightness electron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, during dopant analysis of silicon devices, we have observed a phenomenon generally neglected in EDX analysis: the coherent Bremsstrahlung (CB). We discussed the reason why and came to the conclusion that the analytical TEM used for these experiments presents a configuration and performances, which makes this equipment very sensitive to the CB effect. This is due to large collection solid angle and high counting rate of the four silicon drift EDX detectors (SDD), a high brightness electron source providing large probe current and moreover a geometry favorable to on axis crystal observations. We analyzed silicon devices containing Si [110] and Si [100] crystal areas at different energies (80–120–200 keV). We also observed relaxed SiGe (27 and 40 at% of Ge). The CB effect, whose intensity is maximum near zone axis beam alignment, manifests as characteristic broad peaks present in the X-ray spectrum background. The peak energies are predicted by a simple formula deduced for the CB models found in the literature and that we present simply. We evaluate also the CB peak intensities and discuss the importance of this effect on the detection and quantification traces of impurities. The CB peaks also give information on the analyzed crystal structure (measurement of the periodicity along the zone axis) and allow, in every particular experiment or system, to determine the median take off angle of the EDX detectors. -- Highlights: ► STEM EDX dopant distribution analysis (As and P) in Si devices is carried out. ► High brightness electron source and four EDX Silicon Drift detectors are used. ► The obtained signal dynamics (four decades) allows detection down to 0.01 at%. ► During silicon axis analysis coherent Bremmsstrahlung is observed. ► This effect is studied at different energies and Si crystal orientations.

  2. Simulation-Based Optimization of Cure Cycle of Large Area Compression Molding for LED Silicone Lens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-Jae Song

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional heat transfer-curing simulation was performed for the curing process by introducing a large area compression molding for simultaneous forming and mass production for the lens and encapsulants in the LED molding process. A dynamic cure kinetics model for the silicone resin was adopted and cure model and analysis result were validated and compared through a temperature measurement experiment for cylinder geometry with cure model. The temperature deviation between each lens cavity could be reduced by implementing a simulation model on the large area compression mold and by optimizing the location of heat source. A two-step cure cycle was constructed to reduce excessive reaction peak at the initial stage and cycle time. An optimum cure cycle that could reduce cycle time by more than 29% compared to a one-step cure cycle by adjusting dwell temperature, heating rate, and dwell time was proposed. It was thus confirmed that an optimization of large area LED lens molding process was possible by using the present experiment and the finite element method.

  3. The LHCb Silicon Tracker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobin, Mark

    2016-09-01

    The LHCb experiment is dedicated to the study of heavy flavour physics at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The primary goal of the experiment is to search for indirect evidence of new physics via measurements of CP violation and rare decays of beauty and charm hadrons. The LHCb detector has a large-area silicon micro-strip detector located upstream of a dipole magnet, and three tracking stations with silicon micro-strip detectors in the innermost region downstream of the magnet. These two sub-detectors form the LHCb Silicon Tracker (ST). This paper gives an overview of the performance and operation of the ST during LHC Run 1. Measurements of the observed radiation damage are shown and compared to the expectation from simulation.

  4. Silicon-on ceramic process. Silicon sheet growth and device development for the large-area silicon sheet and cell development tasks of the low-cost solar array project. Quarterly report No. 12, April 2, 1979-June 29, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapman, P.W.; Zook, J.D.; Heaps, J.D.; Grung, B.L.; Koepke, B.; Schuldt, S.B.

    1979-07-31

    The objective of this research program is to investigate the technical and economic feasibility of producing solar-cell-quality sheet silicon. We plan to do this by coating one surface of carbonized ceramic substrates with a thin layer of large-grain polycrystalline silicon from the melt. During the quarter, significant progress was demonstrated in several areas: (1) a 10-cm/sup 2/ cell having 9.9 percent conversion efficiency (AM1, AR) was fabricated; (2) the Honeywall-sponsored SCIM coating development succeeded in producing a 225-cm/sup 2/ layer of sheet silicon (18 inches x 2 inches); and (3) 100 ..mu..m-thick coatings at pull speed of 0.15 cm/sec wer$obta9ned, although apoproximately 50 percent of the layer exhibited dendritic growth. Other results and accomplishments during the quarter are reported in detail. (WHK)

  5. A Novel System for Non-Invasive Method of Animal Tracking and Classification in Designated Area Using Intelligent Camera System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Matuska

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposed a novel system for non-invasive method of animal tracking and classification in designated area. The system is based on intelligent devices with cameras, which are situated in a designated area and a main computing unit (MCU acting as a system master. Intelligent devices track animals and then send data to MCU to evaluation. The main purpose of this system is detection and classification of moving animals in a designated area and then creation of migration corridors of wild animals. In the intelligent devices, background subtraction method and CAMShift algorithm are used to detect and track animals in the scene. Then, visual descriptors are used to create representation of unknown objects. In order to achieve the best accuracy in classification, key frame extraction method is used to filtrate an object from detection module. Afterwards, Support Vector Machine is used to classify unknown moving animals.

  6. The STAR Tracking Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Simon, Frank

    2007-01-01

    The STAR experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider RHIC studies the new state of matter produced in relativistic heavy ion collisions and the spin structure of the nucleon in collisions of polarized protons. In order to improve the capabilities for heavy flavor measurements and the reconstruction of charged vector bosons an upgrade of the tracking system both in the central and the forward region is pursued. The challenging environments of high track multiplicity in heavy ion collisions and of high luminosity in polarized proton collisions require the use of new technologies. The proposed inner tracking system, optimized for heavy flavor identification, is using active pixel sensors close to the collision point and silicon strip technology further outward. Charge sign determination for electrons and positrons from the decay of W bosons will be provide by 6 large-area triple GEM disks currently under development. A prototype of the active pixel detectors has been tested in the STAR experiment, and an e...

  7. Nanopillars: Large Area Fabrication of Leaning Silicon Nanopillars for Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (Adv. Mater. 10/2012)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Michael Stenbæk; Hübner, Jörg; Boisen, Anja

    2012-01-01

    M. S. Schmidt et al. describe on page OP11 a simple, two-step fabrication process to as-semble flexible, freestanding nanopillars into large-area substrates. These substrates can be made using readily available silicon-processing equipment and are suitable for SERS, having a large, uniform Raman ...

  8. Large-Area, UV-Optimized, Back-Illuminated Silicon Photomultiplier Arrays Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Existing photocathode-based technologies for visible and UV instruments lack sensitivity, are bulky, and have limited reliability. Solid-state silicon...

  9. Strain dyssynchrony index determined by three-dimensional speckle area tracking can predict response to cardiac resynchronization therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onishi Tetsuari

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have previously reported strain dyssynchrony index assessed by two-dimensional speckle tracking strain, and a marker of both dyssynchrony and residual myocardial contractility, can predict response to cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT. A newly developed three-dimensional (3-D speckle tracking system can quantify endocardial area change ratio (area strain, which coupled with the factors of both longitudinal and circumferential strain, from all 16 standard left ventricular (LV segments using complete 3-D pyramidal datasets. Our objective was to test the hypothesis that strain dyssynchrony index using area tracking (ASDI can quantify dyssynchrony and predict response to CRT. Methods We studied 14 heart failure patients with ejection fraction of 27 ± 7% (all≤35% and QRS duration of 172 ± 30 ms (all≥120 ms who underwent CRT. Echocardiography was performed before and 6-month after CRT. ASDI was calculated as the average difference between peak and end-systolic area strain of LV endocardium obtained from 3-D speckle tracking imaging using 16 segments. Conventional dyssynchrony measures were assessed by interventricular mechanical delay, Yu Index, and two-dimensional radial dyssynchrony by speckle-tracking strain. Response was defined as a ≥15% decrease in LV end-systolic volume 6-month after CRT. Results ASDI ≥ 3.8% was the best predictor of response to CRT with a sensitivity of 78%, specificity of 100% and area under the curve (AUC of 0.93 (p Conclusions ASDI can predict responders and LV reverse remodeling following CRT. This novel index using the 3-D speckle tracking system, which shows circumferential and longitudinal LV dyssynchrony and residual endocardial contractility, may thus have clinical significance for CRT patients.

  10. Dip coating process. Silicon sheet growth development for the large-area silicon sheet task of the Low Cost Silicon Solar Array Project. Quarterly report No. 5, December 18, 1976--March 21, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zook, J.D.; Heaps, J.D.; Maciolek, R.B.; Koepke, B.; Butter, C.D.; Schuldt, S.B.

    1977-03-31

    Ceramic substrates can be coated with a thin layer of large-grain polycrystalline silicon by a dip-coating process. The silicon-on-ceramic (SOC) material appears to be quite promising as a low-cost cell material but requires somewhat special fabrication procedure since the contacts to both the n- and p-layers are now made on the front surface. Solar cells have been made on SOC material and on single-crystal control samples. Photodiodes 0.01 to 0.1 cm/sup 2/ made on substrates coated with vitreous carbon prior to dip coating with silicon showed the best efficiency of SOC material to date, namely over 6 percent uncorrected and about 12 percent inherent efficiency. Etching procedures have indicated that the dislocation density varies from almost 10/sup 7/ cm/sup -2/ to almost dislocation-free material, assuming that all etch pits are due to dislocations. EBIC measurements procedures were also improved, and it was found that diodes appear to be fairly uniform in EBIC response. A new SOC coating facility is being designed which will coat larger substrates in a continuous manner. The purpose is to minimize the contamination problem by reducing the contact area of the substrate with molten silicon. By having much larger throughput, it will also demonstrate the scale-up potential of the silicon-on-ceramic process. Portions of the new facility are under construction. An attempt has been made to model the economics of a large-scale facility for coating ceramic panels with silicon. A first iteration based on available parameters estimates showed that major cost items were poly Si ($2.90 per square meter), labor and burden ($2.50 per square meter), and the ceramic substrate ($2.50 per square meter), for a total price of about $11 per square meter.

  11. Coherent Bremsstrahlung effect observed during STEM analysis of dopant distribution in silicon devices using large area silicon drift EDX detectors and high brightness electron source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantel, R

    2011-11-01

    In this paper, during dopant analysis of silicon devices, we have observed a phenomenon generally neglected in EDX analysis: the coherent Bremsstrahlung (CB). We discussed the reason why and came to the conclusion that the analytical TEM used for these experiments presents a configuration and performances, which makes this equipment very sensitive to the CB effect. This is due to large collection solid angle and high counting rate of the four silicon drift EDX detectors (SDD), a high brightness electron source providing large probe current and moreover a geometry favorable to on axis crystal observations. We analyzed silicon devices containing Si [110] and Si [100] crystal areas at different energies (80-120-200keV). We also observed relaxed SiGe (27 and 40at% of Ge). The CB effect, whose intensity is maximum near zone axis beam alignment, manifests as characteristic broad peaks present in the X-ray spectrum background. The peak energies are predicted by a simple formula deduced for the CB models found in the literature and that we present simply. We evaluate also the CB peak intensities and discuss the importance of this effect on the detection and quantification traces of impurities. The CB peaks also give information on the analyzed crystal structure (measurement of the periodicity along the zone axis) and allow, in every particular experiment or system, to determine the median take off angle of the EDX detectors. PMID:21946001

  12. Development of a Thick-film Silicon Ribbon Growth Technique for Application to Large-area Solar Cells and Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, P. A.

    1973-01-01

    A new technique is described for growth of large-area silicon ribbons. This technique is an edge-defined, film-fed growth process by which single crystals can be grown having a shape controlled by the outside dimensions of a shaping die, growth taking place from an extremely thin film of liquid fed by capillary action from a crucible below. The material from which the die is fabricated is very critical to the process. The die must be wet by the silicon, but adverse impurities must not be introduced into the silicon, and the die must not become degraded by the molten silicon. A breakthrough in die fabrication that has allowed the growth of silicon ribbons having dimensions of 1 cm by 30 cm with a thickness of 0.7 mm is described. The implications of this significant advancement with respect to development of photovoltaic solar arrays for wide-scale terrestrial solar-to-electric energy conversion systems are discussed.

  13. Development of an area monitor for neutrons using solid state nuclear track detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An area monitor for neutrons composed of the solid state nuclear track detector (SSNTD) Makrofol DE, together with a (n,α) converter, in the center of a 25 cm diameter polyethylene sphere, is developed. The optimal electrochemical etching conditions for the detection of thermal neutrons by the Makrofol DE using the BN converter are studied, leading to the choice of 55 min, at 300 C, under a 44,2 kV.cm-1 electric field with oscillation frequency of 2,0 khz. The response of this system to thermal neutrons, in the optimal conditions, is of 2,76(10)x 10-3 tr/n. Changing from the BN converter to a 2,73(3)g compressed boric acid tablet this value lowers to 3,88(17)x 10-4 tr/n. The performance of the whole monitor in the detection of fast neutrons is examined using the BN converter and neutrons from a 241 Am Be source, with a response of 4,4(2)x 103 tr.mSv-1.cm-2 and operational limits between 7(3)μSv and 5,6(2)mSv. The result of the monitoring of the control room of the IPEN Cyclotron accelerator are also presented as a final test for the viability of the practical use of the monitor. (author). 34 refs, 15 figs, 6 tabs, 1 app

  14. Dip-coating process. Silicon sheet growth development for the large-area silicon sheet task of the low-cost silicon solar array project. Quarterly report No. 7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zook, J.D.; Heaps, J.D.; Maciolek, R.B.; Koepke, B.; Butter, C.D.; Schuldt, S.B.

    1977-12-30

    The objective of this research program is to investigate the technical and economic feasibility of producing solar-cell-quality sheet silicon by coating one surface of carbonized ceramic substrates with a thin layer of large-grain polycrystalline silicon from the melt. During the past quarter, significant progress was demonstrated in several areas. Seeded growth of silicon-on-ceramic (SOC) with an EFG ribbon seed was demonstrated. Different types of mullite received from Coors were successfully coated with silicon. A new method of deriving minority carrier diffusion length, L/sub n/, from spectral response measurements was evaluated. ECOMOD cost projections were found to be in good agreement with the interim SAMIS method proposed by JPL. On the less positive side, there was a decrease in cell performance which is believed to be due to an unidentified source of impurities. Also, operation of the new coating system fell behind schedule but is expected to improve in the coming quarter, since construction has now been completed.

  15. ALICE silicon strip module

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2006-01-01

    This small silicon detector strip will be inserted into the inner tracking system (ITS) on the ALICE detector at CERN. This detector relies on state-of-the-art particle tracking techniques. These double-sided silicon strip modules have been designed to be as lightweight and delicate as possible as the ITS will eventually contain five square metres of these devices.

  16. Dip coating process. Silicon sheet growth development for the large-area silicon sheet task of the low-cost silicon solar array project. Quarterly report No. 6, March 22, 1977--June 24, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zook, J.D.; Heaps, J.D.; Maciolek, R.B.; Koepke, B.; Butter, C.D.; Schuldt, S.B.

    1977-06-30

    The objective of this research program is to investigate the technical and economic feasibility of producing solar-cell-quality sheet silicon by coating one surface of carbonized ceramic substrates with a thin layer of large-grain polycrystalline silicon from the melt. Significant progress was made in silicon on ceramic (SOC) solar cell performance. SOC cells having 1 cm/sup 2/ active areas demonstrated measured conversion efficiencies as high as 7.2 percent. Typical open circuit voltages (V/sub oc/) and short circuit current densities (J/sub sc/) were 0.51 volt and 20 mA/cm/sup 2/ respectively. Since the active surface of these solar cells is a highly reflective ''as-grown'' surface, one can expect improvement in J/sub sc/ after an anti-reflection (AR) coating is applied. It is significant that single-crystal comparison cells, also measured without benefit of an AR coating, had efficiencies in the 8.5 percent range with typical V/sub oc/'s and J/sub sc/'s of 0.54 volt and 23 mA/cm/sup 2/, respectively. Therefore, improvement in cell design and junction diffusion techniques should increase the efficiency of both the SOC and single-crystal cells. During this quarter the dip coating facility was inadvertently contaminated, but has since been restored to a purity level exceeding its original state. With this facility, silicon coatings were grown with a single-crystal seed attached to the substrate. Single-crystal silicon was not forthcoming, but the results were nonetheless encouraging. Several of the carbon coating types tried appear promising, including one which has high purity and can be applied uniformly by swab or airbrush.

  17. Tracking efficiency and charge sharing of 3D silicon sensors at different angles in a 1.4T magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Gjersdal, H; Slaviec, T; Sandaker, H; Tsung, J; Bolle, E; Da Via, C; Wermes, N; Borri, M; Grinstein, S; Nordahl, P; Hugging, F; Dorholt, O; Rohne, O; La Rosa, A; Sjobaek, K; Tsybychev, D; Mastroberardino, A; Fazio, S; Su, D; Young, C; Hasi, J; Grenier, P; Hansson, P; Jackson, P; Kenney, C; Kocian, M

    2011-01-01

    A 3D silicon sensor fabricated at Stanford with electrodes penetrating throughout the entire silicon wafer and with active edges was tested in a 1.4 T magnetic field with a 180 GeV/c pion beam at the CERN SPS in May 2009. The device under test was bump-bonded to the ATLAS pixel FE-I3 readout electronics chip. Three readout electrodes were used to cover the 400 pm long pixel side, this resulting in a p-n inter-electrode distance of similar to 71 mu m. Its behavior was confronted with a planar sensor of the type presently installed in the ATLAS inner tracker. Time over threshold, charge sharing and tracking efficiency data were collected at zero and 15 angles with and without magnetic field. The latest is the angular configuration expected for the modules of the Insertable B-Layer (IBL) currently under study for the LHC phase 1 upgrade expected in 2014. (C) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Initial steps toward the realization of large area arrays of single photon counting pixels based on polycrystalline silicon TFTs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Albert K.; Koniczek, Martin; Antonuk, Larry E.; El-Mohri, Youcef; Zhao, Qihua; Jiang, Hao; Street, Robert A.; Lu, Jeng Ping

    2014-03-01

    The thin-film semiconductor processing methods that enabled creation of inexpensive liquid crystal displays based on amorphous silicon transistors for cell phones and televisions, as well as desktop, laptop and mobile computers, also facilitated the development of devices that have become ubiquitous in medical x-ray imaging environments. These devices, called active matrix flat-panel imagers (AMFPIs), measure the integrated signal generated by incident X rays and offer detection areas as large as ~43×43 cm2. In recent years, there has been growing interest in medical x-ray imagers that record information from X ray photons on an individual basis. However, such photon counting devices have generally been based on crystalline silicon, a material not inherently suited to the cost-effective manufacture of monolithic devices of a size comparable to that of AMFPIs. Motivated by these considerations, we have developed an initial set of small area prototype arrays using thin-film processing methods and polycrystalline silicon transistors. These prototypes were developed in the spirit of exploring the possibility of creating large area arrays offering single photon counting capabilities and, to our knowledge, are the first photon counting arrays fabricated using thin film techniques. In this paper, the architecture of the prototype pixels is presented and considerations that influenced the design of the pixel circuits, including amplifier noise, TFT performance variations, and minimum feature size, are discussed.

  19. Irradiation of large area Mylar membrane and characterization of nuclear track filter

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    N K Acharya; P K Yadav; S Wate; Y K Vijay; F Singh; D K Avasthi

    2004-10-01

    Ion irradiation of Si8+ ion beam of 100 MeV was scattered by a gold foil on a Mylar membrane of 25 m thickness in the form of film roll (width, 12.5 cm and length, 400 cm) at the Nuclear Science Centre, New Delhi. The characterization of etched nuclear tracks was carried out by gas permeation measurements. The samples cut from the film roll of required size for permeability measurements were etched in a controlled manner in a constant temperature bath of 6N NaOH solution. The opening of the conical etched tracks was characterized by hydrogen gas permeation.

  20. Foreshowing of the Western Pacific tropical cyclone track to PM10 air pollution episode in the Beijing area

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG XiQuan; WANG ZiFa; YU Tong; GONG YanBang

    2009-01-01

    By utilizing the air quality monitoring data and the NCEP reanalysis data, the relationship between the PM10 air pollution episode and synoptic situation is analyzed in the Beijing area. It is interesting to find that PM10 air pollution episode in and around the Beijing area is correlated with the Western Pacific tropical cyclone track to some extent, namely when a tropical cyclone lands southward to the Chang-jiang River, PM10 air pollution episode is not easy to take place generally in the Beijing area; but when a tropical cyclone moves northward and finally lands at the Korea Peninsula or the Japanese mainland, and under this condition the Beijing area is generally controlled by weak high or weak low for several days, PM10 air pollution episode often takes place in one day or several days. Above findings indicate that predicting the Western Pacific tropical cyclone track can foretell whether or not PM10 air pollution episode takes place in the Beijing area, which can offer a technique for urban air quality prediction and air pollution source management in the Beijing area.

  1. Selected area laser-crystallized polycrystalline silicon thin films by a pulsed Nd:YAG laser with 355 nm wavelength

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Duan Chunyan; Liu Chao; Ai Bin; Lai Jianjun; Deng Youjun; Shen Hui

    2011-01-01

    Selected area laser-crystallized polycrystalline silicon(p-Si)thin films were prepared by the third harmonics(355 nm wavelength)generated by a solid-state pulsed Nd:YAG laser.Surface morphologies of 400 nm thick films after laser irradiation were analyzed.Raman spectra show that film crystallinity is improved with increase of laser energy.The optimum laser energy density is sensitive to the film thickness.The laser energy density for efficiently crystallizing amorphous silicon films is between 440-634 mJ/cm2 for 300 nm thick films and between 777-993 mJ/cm2 for 400 nm thick films.The optimized laser energy density is 634,975 and 1571 mJ/cm2 for 300,400 and 500 nm thick films,respectively.

  2. Process Simulation and Characterization of Substrate Engineered Silicon Thin Film Transistor for Display Sensors and Large Area Electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Design, simulation, fabrication and post-process qualification of substrate-engineered Thin Film Transistors (TFTs) are carried out to suggest an alternate manufacturing process step focused on display sensors and large area electronics applications. Damage created by ion implantation of Helium and Silicon ions into single-crystalline n-type silicon substrate provides an alternate route to create an amorphized region responsible for the fabrication of TFT structures with controllable and application-specific output parameters. The post-process qualification of starting material and full-cycle devices using Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS) and Proton or Particle induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) techniques also provide an insight to optimize the process protocols as well as their applicability in the manufacturing cycle

  3. Lithographically patterned silicon nanostructures on silicon substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Megouda, Nacera [Institut de Recherche Interdisciplinaire (IRI, USR 3078), Universite Lille1, Parc de la Haute Borne, 50 Avenue de Halley-BP 70478, 59658 Villeneuve d' Ascq and Institut d' Electronique, de Microelectronique et de Nanotechnologie (IEMN, CNRS-8520), Cite Scientifique, Avenue Poincare-B.P. 60069, 59652 Villeneuve d' Ascq (France); Faculte des Sciences, Universite Mouloud Mammeri, Tizi-Ouzou (Algeria); Unite de Developpement de la Technologie du Silicium (UDTS), 2 Bd. Frantz Fanon, B.P. 140 Alger-7 merveilles, Alger (Algeria); Piret, Gaeelle; Galopin, Elisabeth; Coffinier, Yannick [Institut de Recherche Interdisciplinaire (IRI, USR 3078), Universite Lille1, Parc de la Haute Borne, 50 Avenue de Halley-BP 70478, 59658 Villeneuve d' Ascq and Institut d' Electronique, de Microelectronique et de Nanotechnologie (IEMN, CNRS-8520), Cite Scientifique, Avenue Poincare-B.P. 60069, 59652 Villeneuve d' Ascq (France); Hadjersi, Toufik, E-mail: hadjersi@yahoo.com [Unite de Developpement de la Technologie du Silicium (UDTS), 2 Bd. Frantz Fanon, B.P. 140 Alger-7 merveilles, Alger (Algeria); Elkechai, Omar [Faculte des Sciences, Universite Mouloud Mammeri, Tizi-Ouzou (Algeria); and others

    2012-06-01

    The paper reports on controlled formation of silicon nanostructures patterns by the combination of optical lithography and metal-assisted chemical dissolution of crystalline silicon. First, a 20 nm-thick gold film was deposited onto hydrogen-terminated silicon substrate by thermal evaporation. Gold patterns (50 {mu}m Multiplication-Sign 50 {mu}m spaced by 20 {mu}m) were transferred onto the silicon wafer by means of photolithography. The etching process of crystalline silicon in HF/AgNO{sub 3} aqueous solution was studied as a function of the silicon resistivity, etching time and temperature. Controlled formation of silicon nanowire arrays in the unprotected areas was demonstrated for highly resistive silicon substrate, while silicon etching was observed on both gold protected and unprotected areas for moderately doped silicon. The resulting layers were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

  4. ALICE Silicon Strip Detector

    CERN Multimedia

    Nooren, G

    2013-01-01

    The Silicon Strip Detector (SSD) constitutes the two outermost layers of the Inner Tracking System (ITS) of the ALICE Experiment. The SSD plays a crucial role in the tracking of the particles produced in the collisions connecting the tracks from the external detectors (Time Projection Chamber) to the ITS. The SSD also contributes to the particle identification through the measurement of their energy loss.

  5. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION: Enhanced dc conductivity of low volume-fraction nano-particulate suspensions in silicone and perfluorinated oils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, S. A.; Libor, Z.; Skordos, A. A.; Zhang, Q.

    2009-03-01

    The dc conductivities of several different types of nanoparticles (nickel, barium titanate and magnetite) suspended in both silicone and perfluorinated oils have been measured and contrasted. Enhanced dc conductivity through interaction between the particles and the fluid has been demonstrated, even at quite moderate fields, and different types of nanoparticles have been shown to exhibit different behavioural trends. Whilst the dc enhancement is partly related to the concentration (or spatial arrangement) of the particles as expected, there is clear evidence that energy-activated (electric field activated) processes also play a major role. It can be said that effective-medium theories based solely on the electrical properties and volume fractions of the component materials have limited applicability when assessing the dc conductivities of these nanoparticle-fluid combinations at low volume fractions.

  6. Large Area Thin Film Silicon: Synergy between Displays and Solar Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schropp, R.E.I.

    2012-01-01

    Thin-film silicon technology has changed our society, owing to the rapid advance of its two major application fields in communication (thin-film displays) and sustainable energy (thin-film solar cells). Throughout its development, advances in these application fields have always benefitted each othe

  7. Seasonal variations, origin, and fate of settling diatoms in the Southern Ocean tracked by silicon isotope records in deep sediment traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Closset, Ivia; Cardinal, Damien; Bray, Stephen G.; Thil, François; Djouraev, Irina; Rigual-Hernández, Andrés. S.; Trull, Thomas W.

    2015-09-01

    The Southern Ocean plays a pivotal role in the control of atmospheric CO2 levels, via both physical and biological sequestration processes. The biological carbon transfer to the ocean interior is tightly coupled to the availability of other elements, especially iron as a trace-limiting nutrient and dissolved silicon as the mineral substrate that allows diatoms to dominate primary production. Importantly, variations in the silicon cycling are large but not well understood. Here we use δ30Si measurements to track seasonal flows of silica to the deep sea, as captured by sediment trap time series, for the three major zones (Antarctic, AZ; Polar Frontal, PFZ; and Sub-Antarctic, SAZ) of the open Southern Ocean. Variations in the exported flux of biogenic silica (BSi) and its δ30Si composition reveal a range of insights, including that (i) the sinking rate of BSi exceeds 200 m d-1 in summer in the AZ yet decreases to very low values in winter that allow particles to remain in the water column through to the following spring, (ii) occasional vertical mixing events affect the δ30Si composition of exported BSi in both the SAZ and AZ, and (iii) the δ30Si signature of diatoms is well conserved through the water column despite strong BSi and particulate organic carbon (POC) attenuation at depth and is closely linked to the Si consumption in surface waters. With the strong coupling observed between BSi and POC fluxes in PFZ and AZ, these data provide new constraints for application to biogeochemical models of seasonal controls on production and export.

  8. Silicon-on ceramic process: silicon sheet growth and device development for the large-area silicon sheet task of the Low-Cost Solar Array Project. Quarterly report NO. 15, April 1, 1980-June 30, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitehead, A B; Zook, J D; Grung, B L; McHenry, K; Schuldt, S B; Chapman, P W

    1980-07-31

    The objective of this research is to investigate the technical feasibility of producing solar-cell-quality sheet silicon which could meet the DOE cost goals. The Honeywell approach is to coat one surface of carbonized ceramic substrates with a thin layer of large-grain polycrystalline silicon from the melt. Results and accomplishments which occurred during the quarter can be summarized as follows: (1) two major problems associated with SCIM-coating wide (10-cm) substrates were identified and solved; (2) the longitudinal temperature profile in SCIM-II has been improved to prevent substrate warping, buckling, and cracking; (3) the transverse temperature profile in SCIM II has been improved to produce more uniform coatings; (4) a strategy to eliminate effects of thermal stress has been developed; (5) the best SOC cell has a total-area conversion efficiency of 10.5% (AM1, AR), for a cell area of 5 cm/sup 2/; (6) a number of experiments are being investigated for improving cell efficiency; (7) for the slow-cooldown experiment, the average efficiency of 29 AR-coated cells was 9.9%, with a standard deviation of 0.3%; (8) encouraging results were obtained on SOC material that had been treated in a hydrogen plasma at Sandia; and (9) thermal modeling has proven to be beneficial in designing modifications of SCIM II.

  9. Influence of stain etching on low minority carrier lifetime areas of multicrystalline silicon for solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montesdeoca-Santana, A. [Departamento de Fisica Basica, Universidad de La Laguna, Avda. Astrofisico Francisco Sanchez, 38206 La Laguna (Spain); Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems, Laboratory and Servicecenter Gelsenkirchen, Auf der Reihe 2, 45884 Gelsenkirchen (Germany); Gonzalez-Diaz, B. [Departamento de Fisica Basica, Universidad de La Laguna, Avda. Astrofisico Francisco Sanchez, 38206 La Laguna (Spain); Departamento de Energia Fotovoltaica, Instituto Tecnologico y de Energias Renovables. Poligono Industrial de Granadilla s/n, 38600 San Isidro-Granadilla de Abona (Spain); Jimenez-Rodriguez, E. [Departamento de Fisica Basica, Universidad de La Laguna, Avda. Astrofisico Francisco Sanchez, 38206 La Laguna (Spain); Ziegler, J. [Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems, Laboratory- and Servicecenter Gelsenkirchen. Auf der Reihe 2, 45884 Gelsenkirchen (Germany); Velazquez, J.J. [Departamento de Fisica Fundamental y Experimental, Electronica y Sistemas, Universidad de La Laguna. Avda. Astrofisico Francisco Sanchez, 38206 La Laguna (Spain); Hohage, S.; Borchert, D. [Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems, Laboratory and Servicecenter Gelsenkirchen. Auf der Reihe 2, 45884 Gelsenkirchen (Germany); Guerrero-Lemus, R., E-mail: rglemus@ull.es [Departamento de Fisica Basica, Universidad de La Laguna, Avda. Astrofisico Francisco Sanchez, 38206 La Laguna (Spain)

    2011-11-15

    Highlights: > An enhanced minority carrier lifetime at extended defects in multicrystalline silicon is observed with the use of HF/HNO{sub 3} stain etching to texture the surface. > FTIR analysis shows no influence of oxide passivation in this effect. > SEM images show a preferential etching at extended defects suggesting smoothing at defects as one of the causes for the reduced recombination activity. > LBIC images show a reduction in IQE at extended defects in HF/HNO{sub 3} textured multicrystalline solar cells. - Abstract: In this work the use of HF/HNO{sub 3} solutions for texturing silicon-based solar cell substrates by stain etching and the influence of texturing on minority carrier lifetimes are studied. Stain etching is currently used to decrease the reflectance and, subsequently improve the photogenerated current of the cells, but also produces nanostructures on the silicon surface. In the textured samples it has been observed that an improvement on the minority carrier lifetime with respect to the samples treated with a conventional saw damage etching process is produced on grain boundaries and defects, and the origin of this effect has been discussed.

  10. High-rate deposition of microcrystalline silicon in a large-area PECVD reactor and integration in tandem solar cells

    OpenAIRE

    Parascandolo, G; Bugnon, G.; Feltrin, A.; Ballif, C.

    2010-01-01

    We study the high-rate deposition of microcrystalline silicon in a large-area plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor-deposition (PECVD) reactor operated at 40.68 MHz, in the little-explored process conditions of high-pressure and high-silane concentration and depletion. Due to the long gas residence time in this process, the silane gas is efficiently depleted using moderate feed-in power density, thus facilitating up-scaling of the process to large surfaces. As observed in more traditional deposition...

  11. Temperature-Dependent Photoluminescence Imaging and Characterization of a Multi-Crystalline Silicon Solar Cell Defect Area: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnston, S.; Yan, F.; Li, J.; Romero, M. J.; Al-Jassim, M.; Zaunbrecher, K.; Sidelkheir, O.; Blosse, A.

    2011-07-01

    Photoluminescence (PL) imaging is used to detect areas in multi-crystalline silicon that appear dark in band-to-band imaging due to high recombination. Steady-state PL intensity can be correlated to effective minority-carrier lifetime, and its temperature dependence can provide additional lifetime-limiting defect information. An area of high defect density has been laser cut from a multi-crystalline silicon solar cell. Both band-to-band and defect-band PL imaging have been collected as a function of temperature from ~85 to 350 K. Band-to-band luminescence is collected by an InGaAs camera using a 1200-nm short-pass filter, while defect band luminescence is collected using a 1350-nm long pass filter. The defect band luminescence is characterized by cathodo-luminescence. Small pieces from adjacent areas within the same wafer are measured by deep-level transient spectroscopy (DLTS). DLTS detects a minority-carrier electron trap level with an activation energy of 0.45 eV on the sample that contained defects as seen by imaging.

  12. Assessment of fast and thermal neutron ambient dose equivalents around the KFUPM neutron source storage area using nuclear track detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fazal-ur-Rehman [Physics Department, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia)]. E-mail: fazalr@kfupm.edu.sa; Al-Jarallah, M.I. [Physics Department, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Abu-Jarad, F. [Radiation Protection Unit, Environmental Protection Department, Saudi Aramco, P. O. Box 13027, Dhahran 31311 (Saudi Arabia); Qureshi, M.A. [Center for Applied Physical Sciences, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia)

    2005-11-15

    A set of five {sup 241}Am-Be neutron sources are utilized in research and teaching at King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals (KFUPM). Three of these sources have an activity of 16Ci each and the other two are of 5Ci each. A well-shielded storage area was designed for these sources. The aim of the study is to check the effectiveness of shielding of the KFUPM neutron source storage area. Poly allyl diglycol carbonate (PADC) Nuclear track detectors (NTDs) based fast and thermal neutron area passive dosimeters have been utilized side by side for 33 days to assess accumulated low ambient dose equivalents of fast and thermal neutrons at 30 different locations around the source storage area and adjacent rooms. Fast neutron measurements have been carried out using bare NTDs, which register fast neutrons through recoils of protons, in the detector material. NTDs were mounted with lithium tetra borate (Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7}) converters on their surfaces for thermal neutron detection via B10(n,{alpha})Li6 and Li6(n,{alpha})H3 nuclear reactions. The calibration factors of NTD both for fast and thermal neutron area passive dosimeters were determined using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) with and without a polyethylene moderator. The calibration factors for fast and thermal neutron area passive dosimeters were found to be 1.33 proton tracks cm{sup -2}{mu}Sv{sup -1} and 31.5 alpha tracks cm{sup -2}{mu}Sv{sup -1}, respectively. The results show variations of accumulated dose with the locations around the storage area. The fast neutron dose equivalents rates varied from as low as 182nSvh{sup -1} up to 10.4{mu}Svh{sup -1} whereas those for thermal neutron ranged from as low as 7nSvh{sup -1} up to 9.3{mu}Svh{sup -1}. The study indicates that the area passive neutron dosimeter was able to detect dose rates as low as 7 and 182nSvh{sup -1} from accumulated dose for thermal and fast neutrons, respectively, which were not possible to detect with the available active neutron

  13. Study and Development of a novel Silicon Pixel Detector for the Upgrade of the ALICE Inner Tracking System

    CERN Document Server

    van Hoorn, Jacobus Willem; Riedler, Petra

    ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) is the heavy-ion experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). As an important part of its upgrade plans, the ALICE experiment schedules the installation of a new Inner Tracking System (ITS) during the Long Shutdown 2 (LS2) of the LHC in 2019/20. The new ITS will consist of seven concentric layers, covering about 10m2 with Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS). This choice of technology has been guided by the tight requirements on the material budget of 0.3 % x/X0 per layer for the three innermost layers and backed by the significant progress in the field of MAPS in recent years. The pixel chips are manufactured in the TowerJazz 180 nm CMOS process on wafers with a high-resistivity epitaxial layer on top of the substrate. During the R&D phase several chip architectures have been investigated, which take full advantage of a particular process feature, the deep p-well, that allows for full CMOS circuitry within the pixel matrix while retaining full charge colle...

  14. Investigating the Potential of Activity Tracking App Data to Estimate Cycle Flows in Urban Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haworth, J.

    2016-06-01

    Traffic congestion and its associated environmental effects pose a significant problem for large cities. Consequently, promoting and investing in green travel modes such as cycling is high on the agenda for many transport authorities. In order to target investment in cycling infrastructure and improve the experience of cyclists on the road, it is important to know where they are. Unfortunately, investment in intelligent transportation systems over the years has mainly focussed on monitoring vehicular traffic, and comparatively little is known about where cyclists are on a day to day basis. In London, for example, there are a limited number of automatic cycle counters installed on the network, which provide only part of the picture. These are supplemented by surveys that are carried out infrequently. Activity tracking apps on smart phones and GPS devices such as Strava have become very popular over recent years. Their intended use is to track physical activity and monitor training. However, many people routinely use such apps to record their daily commutes by bicycle. At the aggregate level, these data provide a potentially rich source of information about the movement and behaviour of cyclists. Before such data can be relied upon, however, it is necessary to examine their representativeness and understand their potential biases. In this study, the flows obtained from Strava Metro (SM) are compared with those obtained during the 2013 London Cycle Census (LCC). A set of linear regression models are constructed to predict LCC flows using SM flows along with a number of dummy variables including road type, hour of day, day of week and presence/absence of cycle lane. Cross-validation is used to test the fitted models on unseen LCC sites. SM flows are found to be a statistically significant (p<0.0001) predictor of total flows as measured by the LCC and the models yield R squared statistics of ~0.7 before considering spatio-temporal variation. The initial results indicate

  15. INVESTIGATING THE POTENTIAL OF ACTIVITY TRACKING APP DATA TO ESTIMATE CYCLE FLOWS IN URBAN AREAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Haworth

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Traffic congestion and its associated environmental effects pose a significant problem for large cities. Consequently, promoting and investing in green travel modes such as cycling is high on the agenda for many transport authorities. In order to target investment in cycling infrastructure and improve the experience of cyclists on the road, it is important to know where they are. Unfortunately, investment in intelligent transportation systems over the years has mainly focussed on monitoring vehicular traffic, and comparatively little is known about where cyclists are on a day to day basis. In London, for example, there are a limited number of automatic cycle counters installed on the network, which provide only part of the picture. These are supplemented by surveys that are carried out infrequently. Activity tracking apps on smart phones and GPS devices such as Strava have become very popular over recent years. Their intended use is to track physical activity and monitor training. However, many people routinely use such apps to record their daily commutes by bicycle. At the aggregate level, these data provide a potentially rich source of information about the movement and behaviour of cyclists. Before such data can be relied upon, however, it is necessary to examine their representativeness and understand their potential biases. In this study, the flows obtained from Strava Metro (SM are compared with those obtained during the 2013 London Cycle Census (LCC. A set of linear regression models are constructed to predict LCC flows using SM flows along with a number of dummy variables including road type, hour of day, day of week and presence/absence of cycle lane. Cross-validation is used to test the fitted models on unseen LCC sites. SM flows are found to be a statistically significant (p<0.0001 predictor of total flows as measured by the LCC and the models yield R squared statistics of ~0.7 before considering spatio-temporal variation. The initial

  16. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 539: Area 25 and Area 26 Railroad Tracks, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark Krauss

    2010-06-01

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan addresses the actions needed to achieve closure for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 539, Areas 25 and 26 Railroad Tracks, as identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). A modification to the FFACOwas approved in May 2010 to transfer the two Railroad Tracks corrective action sites (CASs) from CAU 114 into CAU539. The two CASs are located in Areas 25 and 26 of the Nevada Test Site: • 25-99-21, Area 25 Railroad Tracks • 26-99-05, Area 26 Railroad Tracks This plan provides the methodology for field activities needed to gather the necessary information for closing the two CASs. There is sufficient information and process knowledge from historical documentation and investigations of similar sites regarding the expected nature and extent of potential contaminants to recommend closure of the CAU 539 Railroad Tracks CASs using the SAFER process. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a field investigation before selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation should support a defensible recommendation that no further corrective action is necessary. If it is determined that complete clean closure cannot be accomplished during the SAFER, then a hold point will have been reached and the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) will be consulted to determine whether the remaining contamination will be closed under the alternative corrective action of closure in place with use restrictions. This will be presented in a closure report that will be prepared and submitted to the NDEP for review and approval. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on December 14, 2009, by representatives of U.S.Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Navarro Nevada Environmental Services, LLC (NNES); and National Security Technologies

  17. Plasma texturing on large-area industrial grade CZ silicon solar cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidsen, Rasmus Schmidt; Nordseth, Ørnulf; Boisen, Anja;

    2013-01-01

    , and thus holds a significant potential for improvement of the cell performance compared to current industrial standards. The reflectance is shown to remain below that of conventional textured cells also at high angle of incidence. The process is shown to be equally applicable to mono-, multi- and...... quasi-mono-crystalline Si. The process was successfully integrated in fabrication of solar cells using only industry standard processes on a Czochralski (CZ) silicon starting material. The resulting cell performance was compared to cells with conventional texturing. For cells, where the nanostructuring...

  18. Groundwater Monitoring and Tritium-Tracking Plan for the 200 Area State-Approved Land Disposal Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DB Barnett

    2000-08-31

    The 200 Area State-Approved Land Disposal Site (SALDS) is a drainfield which receives treated wastewater, occasionally containing tritium from treatment of Hanford Site liquid wastes at the 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF). Since operation of the SALDS began in December 1995, discharges of tritium have totaled {approx}304 Ci, only half of what was originally predicted for tritium quantity through 1999. Total discharge volumes ({approx}2.7E+8 L) have been commensurate with predicted volumes to date. This document reports the results of all tritium analyses in groundwater as determined from the SALDS tritium-tracking network since the first SALDS wells were installed in 1992 through July 1999, and provides interpretation of these results as they relate to SALDS operation and its effect on groundwater. Hydrologic and geochemical information are synthesized to derive a conceptual model, which is in turn used to arrive at an appropriate approach to continued groundwater monitoring at the facility.

  19. Large-area silica nanotubes with controllable geometry on silicon substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Mingzhe; Yu, Rong; MacManus-Driscoll, Judith L.; Robinson, Adam P.

    2009-01-01

    The synthesis of a highly uniform, large-scale nanoarrays consisting of silica nanotubes above embedded nanohole arrays in silicon substrates is demonstrated. In situ anodized aluminium oxide (AAO) thin film masks on Si substrates were employed, and the nanotubes were fabricated by Ar ion milling through the masks. The geometries of the nanoarrays, including pore diameter, interpore distance and the length of both nanopores and nanotubes could be controlled by the process parameters, which included that the outer pore diameter of silica tube was tuned from ˜80 nm to ˜135 nm while the inner tube diameter from ˜40 nm to ˜65 nm, the interpore distance of the nanotube arrays was from 100 nm to 180 nm and the length of silica tube changed from ˜90 nm to ˜250 nm. The presented nanostructure fabrication method has strong potential for application in intensity and frequency adjustable high luminescence efficiency optoelectronic devices.

  20. Seabird satellite tracking validates the use of latitudinal isoscapes to depict predators' foraging areas in the Southern Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeger, Audrey; Lecomte, Vincent J; Weimerskirch, Henri; Richard, Pierre; Cherel, Yves

    2010-12-15

    Stable isotopes are increasingly being used to trace wildlife movements. A fundamental prerequisite of animal isotopic tracking is a good knowledge of spatial isotopic variations in the environment. Few accessible reference maps of the isotopic landscape ("isoscapes") are available for marine predators. Here, we validate for the first time an isotopic gradient for higher trophic levels by using a unique combination of a large number of satellite-tracks and subsequent blood plasma isotopic signatures from a wide-ranging oceanic predator. The plasma δ(13)C and δ(15)N values of wandering albatrosses (n = 45) were highly and positively correlated to the Southern Ocean latitudes at which the satellite-tracked individuals foraged. The well-defined latitudinal baseline carbon isoscapes in the Southern Ocean is thus reflected in the tissue of consumers, but with a positive shift due to the cumulative effect of a slight (13)C-enrichment at each trophic level. The data allowed us to estimate the carbon isotopic position of the main oceanic fronts in the area, and thus to delineate robust isoscapes of the main foraging zones for top predators. The plasma δ(13)C and δ(15)N values were positively and linearly correlated, thus suggesting that latitudinal isoscapes also occur for δ(15)N at the base of the food web in oceanic waters of the Southern Ocean. The combination of device deployments with sampling of relevant tissues for isotopic analysis appears to be a powerful tool for investigating consumers' isoscapes at various spatio-temporal scales. PMID:21072802

  1. Tracking Forest and Open Area Effects on Snow Accumulation by Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Photogrammetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lendzioch, T.; Langhammer, J.; Jenicek, M.

    2016-06-01

    Airborne digital photogrammetry is undergoing a renaissance. The availability of low-cost Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) platforms well adopted for digital photography and progress in software development now gives rise to apply this technique to different areas of research. Especially in determining snow depth spatial distributions, where repetitive mapping of cryosphere dynamics is crucial. Here, we introduce UAV-based digital photogrammetry as a rapid and robust approach for evaluating snow accumulation over small local areas (e.g., dead forest, open areas) and to reveal impacts related to changes in forest and snowpack. Due to the advancement of the technique, snow depth of selected study areas such as of healthy forest, disturbed forest, succession, dead forest, and of open areas can be estimated at a 1 cm spatial resolution. The approach is performed in two steps: 1) developing a high resolution Digital Elevation Model during snow-free and 2) during snow-covered conditions. By substracting these two models the snow depth can be accurately retrieved and volumetric changes of snow depth distribution can be achieved. This is a first proof-of-concept study combining snow depth determination and Leaf Area Index (LAI) retrieval to monitor the impact of forest canopy metrics on snow accumulation in coniferous forest within the Šumava National Park, Czech Republic. Both, downward-looking UAV images and upward-looking LAI-2200 canopy analyser measurements were applied to reveal the LAI, controlling interception and transmitting radiation. For the performance of downward-looking images the snow background instead of the sky fraction was used. In contrast to the classical determination of LAI by hemispherical photography or by LAI plant canopy analyser, our approach will also test the accuracy of LAI measurements by UAV that are taken simultaneously during the snow cover mapping campaigns. Since the LAI parameter is important for snowpack modelling, this method presents

  2. Tracking influential haze source areas in North China using an adjoint model, GRAPES-CUACE

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, X. Q.; Zhai, S. X.; Jin, M.; Gong, S. L.; Wang, Y.

    2015-08-01

    Based upon the adjoint theory, the adjoint of the aerosol module in the atmospheric chemical modeling system GRAPES-CUACE (Global/Regional Assimilation and PrEdiction System coupled with the CMA Unified Atmospheric Chemistry Environment) was developed and tested for its correctness. Through statistic comparison, BC (black carbon aerosol) concentrations simulated by GRAPES-CUACE were generally consistent with observations from Nanjiao (one urban observation station) and Shangdianzi (one rural observation station) stations. To track the most influential emission-sources regions and the most influential time intervals for the high BC concentration during the simulation period, the adjoint model was adopted to simulate the sensitivity of average BC concentration over Beijing at the highest concentration time point (referred to as the Objective Function) with respect to BC emission amount over Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei region. Four types of regions were selected based on administrative division and sensitivity coefficient distribution. The adjoint model was used to quantify the effects of emission-sources reduction in different time intervals over different regions by one independent simulation. Effects of different emission reduction strategies based on adjoint sensitivity information show that the more influential regions (regions with relatively larger sensitivity coefficients) do not necessarily correspond to the administrative regions, and the influence effectiveness of sensitivity-oriented regions was greater than the administrative divisions. The influence of emissions on the objective function decreases sharply approximately for the pollutants emitted 17-18 h ago in this episode. Therefore, controlling critical emission regions during critical time intervals on the basis of adjoint sensitivity analysis is much more efficient than controlling administrative specified regions during an experiential time period.

  3. Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 486: Double Tracks RADSAFE Area, Nellis Air Force Range, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ITLV

    1999-07-12

    This Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 486, Double Tracks Radiological Safety (RADSAFE) Area (DTRSA) in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) of 1996 that was agreed to by the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV); the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP); and the U.S Department of Defense (FFACO, 1996). The CADD provides or references the specific information necessary to recommend a preferred corrective action for the single Corrective Action Site (CAS), 71-23-001-71DT, within CAU 486. Corrective Action Unit 486 is located on the Nellis Air Force Range 71 North, west of the Tonopah Test Range (TTR), Nevada. The TTR, located in the Nellis Air Force Range, is approximately 140 miles (mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1-1). The DTRSA is located on the west side of the Cactus Range approximately 5 mi southwest of the Cactus Spring gate at the intersection of the Cactus Spring Road and the Double Tracks Control Point Road (Figure 1-2).

  4. Distinction between the Youngest Toba Tuff and Oldest Toba Tuff from northern Sumatra based on the area density of spontaneous fission tracks in their glass shards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westgate, John A.; Pearce, Nicholas J. G.; Gatti, Emma; Achyuthan, Hema

    2014-09-01

    Determination of the area density of spontaneous fission tracks (ρs) in glass shards of Toba tephra is a reliable way to distinguish between the Youngest Toba Tuff (YTT) and the Oldest Toba Tuff (OTT). The ρs values for YTT, uncorrected for partial track fading, range from 70 to 181 tracks/cm2 with a weighted mean of 108 ± 5 tracks/cm2, based on 15 samples. Corrected ρs values for YTT are in the range of 77-140 tracks/cm2 with a weighted mean of 113 ± 8 tracks/cm2, within the range of uncorrected ρs values. No significant difference in ρs exists between YTT samples collected from marine and continental depositional settings. The uncorrected ρs for OTT is 1567 tracks/cm2 so that confusion with YTT is unlikely. The ρs values of the Toba tephra at Bori, Morgaon, and Gandhigram in northwestern India indicate a YTT identity, in agreement with geochemical data on their glass shards, the presence of multiple glass populations, and a glass fission-track age determination. Therefore, the view of others that OTT is present at these sites - and thereby indicates a Lower Pleistocene age for the associated Acheulean artifacts - is incorrect.

  5. Clean graphene interfaces by selective dry transfer for large area silicon integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, S. R.; Rahimi, S.; Tao, L.; Chou, H.; Ameri, S. K.; Akinwande, D.; Liechti, K. M.

    2016-03-01

    Here we present a very fast, selective mechanical approach for transferring graphene with low levels of copper contamination from seed wafers on which it was grown to target wafers for very large scale integration (VLSI) electronics. We found that graphene/copper or copper/silicon oxide delamination paths could be selected by slow and faster separation rates, respectively. Thus graphene can be transferred to a target wafer, either exposed or protected by the seed copper layer, which can later be removed by etching. Delamination paths were identified by SEM and Raman spectroscopy. The sheet resistance of the graphene produced by the two approaches was slightly higher than graphene transferred by a PMMA wet-transfer process, indicating reduced impurity doping, and the variation in the sheet resistance values was much lower. Copper contamination levels, quantitatively established by TOF-SIMS, were several orders of magnitude lower than the values for PMMA assisted transfer. In addition, we demonstrated that top-gated transistor devices from our mechanical, delamination transferred graphene exhibited superior transistor behavior to PMMA-assisted wet transfer graphene. The adhesion energy, strength and range of the interactions were quantitatively determined by nonlinear fracture analyses, and suggest that the roughness of the interface between graphene and copper plays an important role with implications for improvements in manufacturing processes.Here we present a very fast, selective mechanical approach for transferring graphene with low levels of copper contamination from seed wafers on which it was grown to target wafers for very large scale integration (VLSI) electronics. We found that graphene/copper or copper/silicon oxide delamination paths could be selected by slow and faster separation rates, respectively. Thus graphene can be transferred to a target wafer, either exposed or protected by the seed copper layer, which can later be removed by etching

  6. Isotopic Tracking of Hanford 300 Area Derived Uranium in the Columbia River

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christensen, John N.; Dresel, P. Evan; Conrad, Mark E.; Patton, Gregory W.; DePaolo, Donald J.

    2010-10-31

    Our objectives in this study are to quantify the discharge rate of uranium (U) to the Columbia River from the Hanford Site's 300 Area, and to follow that U down river to constrain its fate. Uranium from the Hanford Site has variable isotopic composition due to nuclear industrial processes carried out at the site. This characteristic makes it possible to use high-precision isotopic measurements of U in environmental samples to identify even trace levels of contaminant U, determine its sources, and estimate discharge rates. Our data on river water samples indicate that as much as 3.2 kg/day can enter the Columbia River from the 300 Area, which is only a small fraction of the total load of dissolved natural background U carried by the Columbia River. This very low-level of Hanford derived U can be discerned, despite dilution to < 1 percent of natural background U, 350 km downstream from the Hanford Site. These results indicate that isotopic methods can allow the amounts of U from the 300 Area of the Hanford Site entering the Columbia River to be measured accurately to ascertain whether they are an environmental concern, or are insignificant relative to natural uranium background in the Columbia River.

  7. Isotopic Tracking of Hanford 300 Area Derived Uranium in the Columbia River

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our objectives in this study are to quantify the discharge rate of uranium (U) to the Columbia River from the Hanford Site's 300 Area, and to follow that U down river to constrain its fate. Uranium from the Hanford Site has variable isotopic composition due to nuclear industrial processes carried out at the site. This characteristic makes it possible to use high-precision isotopic measurements of U in environmental samples to identify even trace levels of contaminant U, determine its sources, and estimate discharge rates. Our data on river water samples indicate that as much as 3.2 kg/day can enter the Columbia River from the 300 Area, which is only a small fraction of the total load of dissolved natural background U carried by the Columbia River. This very low-level of Hanford derived U can be discerned, despite dilution to < 1 percent of natural background U, 350 km downstream from the Hanford Site. These results indicate that isotopic methods can allow the amounts of U from the 300 Area of the Hanford Site entering the Columbia River to be measured accurately to ascertain whether they are an environmental concern, or are insignificant relative to natural uranium background in the Columbia River.

  8. Large Area Silicon Tracking Detectors with Fast Signal Readout for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Köstner, S

    2005-01-01

    The Standard Model of elementary particles, which is summarized briefly in the second chapter, incorporates a number of successful theories to explain the nature and consistency of matter. However not all building blocks of this model could yet be tested by experiment. To confirm existing theories and to improve nowadays understanding of matter a new machine is currently being built at CERN, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), described in the third chapter. LHC is a proton-proton collider which will reach unprecedented luminosities and center of mass energies. Five experiments are attached to it to give answers to questions like the existence of the Higgs meson, which allows to explain the mass content of matter, and the origin of CP-violation, which plays an important role in the baryogenesis of the universe. Supersymmetric theories, proposing a bosonic superpartner for each fermion and vice versa, will be tested. By colliding heavy ions, high energy and particle densities can be achieved and probed. This stat...

  9. Clean graphene interfaces by selective dry transfer for large area silicon integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, S R; Rahimi, S; Tao, L; Chou, H; Ameri, S K; Akinwande, D; Liechti, K M

    2016-04-14

    Here we present a very fast, selective mechanical approach for transferring graphene with low levels of copper contamination from seed wafers on which it was grown to target wafers for very large scale integration (VLSI) electronics. We found that graphene/copper or copper/silicon oxide delamination paths could be selected by slow and faster separation rates, respectively. Thus graphene can be transferred to a target wafer, either exposed or protected by the seed copper layer, which can later be removed by etching. Delamination paths were identified by SEM and Raman spectroscopy. The sheet resistance of the graphene produced by the two approaches was slightly higher than graphene transferred by a PMMA wet-transfer process, indicating reduced impurity doping, and the variation in the sheet resistance values was much lower. Copper contamination levels, quantitatively established by TOF-SIMS, were several orders of magnitude lower than the values for PMMA assisted transfer. In addition, we demonstrated that top-gated transistor devices from our mechanical, delamination transferred graphene exhibited superior transistor behavior to PMMA-assisted wet transfer graphene. The adhesion energy, strength and range of the interactions were quantitatively determined by nonlinear fracture analyses, and suggest that the roughness of the interface between graphene and copper plays an important role with implications for improvements in manufacturing processes.

  10. The impact of a fast track area on quality and effectiveness outcomes: a Middle Eastern emergency department perspective.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Devkaran, Subashnie

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Emergency department (ED) overcrowding is a ubiquitous problem with serious public health implications. The fast track area is a novel method which aims to reduce waiting time, patient dissatisfaction and morbidity. |The study objective was to determine the impact of a fast track area (FTA) on both effectiveness measures (i.e. waiting times [WT] and length of stay [LOS]) and quality measures (i.e. LWBS rates and mortality rates) in non-urgent patients. The secondary objective was to assess if a FTA negatively impacted on urgent patients entering the ED. METHODS: The study took place in a 500 bed, urban, tertiary care hospital in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates. This was a quasi-experimental, which examined the impact of a FTA on a pre-intervention control group (January 2005) (n = 4,779) versus a post-intervention study group (January 2006) (n = 5,706). RESULTS: Mean WTs of Canadian Triage Acuity Scale (CTAS) 4 patients decreased by 22 min (95% CI 21 min to 24 min, P < 0.001). Similarly, mean WTs of CTAS 5 patients decreased by 28 min (95% CI 19 min to 37 min, P < 0.001) post FTA. The mean WTs of urgent patients (CTAS 2\\/3) were also significantly reduced after the FTA was opened (P < 0.001). The LWBS rate was reduced from 4.7% to 0.7% (95% CI 3.37 to 4.64; P < 0.001). Opening a FTA had no significant impact on mortality rates (P = 0.88). CONCLUSION: The FTA improved ED effectiveness (WTs and LOS) and quality measures (LWBS rates) whereas mortality rate remained unchanged.

  11. A CSF-SPH method for simulating drainage and imbibition at pore-scale resolution while tracking interfacial areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivanesapillai, Rakulan; Falkner, Nadine; Hartmaier, Alexander; Steeb, Holger

    2016-09-01

    We present a conservative smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) model to study the flow of multiple, immiscible fluid phases in porous media using direct pore-scale simulations. Particular focus is put on continuously tracking the evolution of interfacial areas, which are considered to be important morphological quantities affecting multiphase transport in porous media. In addition to solving the Navier-Stokes equations, the model accounts for the effects of capillarity at interfaces and contact lines. This is done by means of incorporating the governing interfacial mass and momentum balances using the continuum surface force (CSF) method, thus rendering model calibration routines unnecessary and minimizing the set of constitutive and kinematic assumptions. We address the application of boundary conditions at rigid solid surfaces and study the predictive capability of the model as well as optimal choices for numerical parameters using an extensive model validation procedure. We demonstrate the applicability of the model to simulate multiphase flows involving partial wettability, dynamic effects, large density ratios (up to 1000), large viscosity ratios (up to 100), as well as fragmentation and coalescence of fluid phases. The model is used to study the evolution of fluid-fluid interfacial areas during saturation-controlled primary drainage and main imbibition of heterogeneous pore spaces at low capillary numbers. A variety of pore-scale effects, such as wetting phase entrapment and fragmentation due to snap-off, are observed. Specific fluid-fluid interfacial area is observed to monotonically increase during primary drainage and hysteretic effects are apparent during main imbibition.

  12. Large-Area, UV-Optimized, Back-Illuminated Silicon Photomultiplier Arrays Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Large-area (3m2), UV-sensitive focal plane arrays are needed for observation of air showers from ultra-high energy cosmic rays (JEM-EUSO) as well as for...

  13. Area tracking in topographical in-vivo measurement series of human skin by displacement vector fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopermann, Hermann; Lunderstaedt, Reinhart A.

    2000-12-01

    In the first part of the presented paper a new measurement system for fast three-dimensional in vivo measurement of the microtopography of human skin is proposed. It is based on the principle of active image triangulation. A Digital Micromirror Device (DMDTM) is used for projecting sinusoidal intensity distributions on the surface of human skin. By using temporal phase shift algorithms the three-dimensional topography is reconstructed from two-dimensional images. Displacement vector fields represent a promising approach for detecting deformation and other lateral changes in the surface of human skin. In the second part of the presented paper a method based on local template matching and smooth interpolation algorithms for determining a displacement vector field is proposed. Aiming at a minimal expenditure of numerical calculation, a stepwise algorithm was developed for this purpose. The deformatory component of the calculated vector field is separated by minimizing a suitable functional, which is also presented in the paper. In investigations of measurement series the proposed method proves to be very efficient. The calculated displacement vector fields connect corresponding areas in two subsequent measurements. Distortions caused by mechanical deformation or other influences can be detected and visualized by the separated deformatory components of the vector fields.

  14. RESULTS OF TRITIUM TRACKING AND GROUNDWATER MONITORING AT THE HANFORD SITE 200 AREA STATE APPROVED LAND DISPOSAL SITE FY2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ERB DB

    2008-11-19

    The Hanford Site's 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) processes contaminated aqueous wastes derived from Hanford Site facilities. The treated wastewater occasionally contains tritium, which cannot be removed by the ETF prior to the wastewater being discharged to the 200 Area State-Approved Land Disposal Site (SALDS). During the first 11 months of fiscal year 2008 (FY08) (September 1, 2007, to July 31, 2008), approximately 75.15 million L (19.85 million gal) of water were discharged to the SALDS. Groundwater monitoring for tritium and other constituents, as well as water-level measurements, is required for the SALDS by State Waste Discharge Permit Number ST-4500 (Ecology 2000). The current monitoring network consists of three proximal (compliance) monitoring wells and nine tritium-tracking wells. Quarterly sampling of the proximal wells occurred in October 2007 and in January/February 2008, April 2008, and August 2008. The nine tritium-tracking wells, including groundwater monitoring wells located upgradient and downgradient of the SALDS, were sampled in January through April 2008. Water-level measurements taken in the three proximal SALDS wells indicate that a small groundwater mound is present beneath the facility, which is a result of operational discharges. The mound increased in FY08 due to increased ETF discharges from treating groundwater from extraction wells at the 200-UP-l Operable Unit and the 241-T Tank Farm. Maximum tritium activities increased by an order of magnitude at well 699-48-77A (to 820,000 pCi/L in April 2008) but remained unchanged in the other two proximal wells. The increase was due to higher quantities of tritium in wastewaters that were treated and discharged in FY07 beginning to appear at the proximal wells. The FY08 tritium activities for the other two proximal wells were 68,000 pCi/L at well 699-48-77C (October 2007) and 120,000 pCi/L at well 699-48-77D (October 2007). To date, no indications of a tritium incursion from

  15. Implementing telemetry on new species in remote areas: Recommendations from a large-scale satellite tracking study of African waterfowl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappelle, J.; Iverson, S.A.; Takekawa, J.Y.; Newman, S.H.; Dodman, T.; Gaidet, N.

    2011-01-01

    We provide recommendations for implementing telemetry studies on waterfowl on the basis of our experience in a tracking study conducted in three countries of sub-Saharan Africa. The aim of the study was to document movements by duck species identified as priority candidates for the potential spread of avian influenza. Our study design included both captive and field test components on four wild duck species (Garganey, Comb Duck, White-faced Duck and Fulvous Duck). We used our location data to evaluate marking success and determine when signal loss occurred. The captive study of eight ducks marked with non-working transmitters in a zoo in Montpellier, France, prior to fieldwork showed no evidence of adverse effects, and the harness design appeared to work well. The field study in Malawi, Nigeria and Mali started in 2007 on 2 February, 6 February and 14 February, and ended on 22 November 2007 (288 d), 20 January 2010 (1 079 d), and 3 November 2008 (628 d), respectively. The field study indicated that 38 of 47 (81%) of the platform transmitter terminals (PTTs) kept transmitting after initial deployment, and the transmitters provided 15 576 locations. Signal loss during the field study was attributed to three main causes: PTT loss, PTT failure and mortality (natural, human-caused and PTT-related). The PTT signal quality varied by geographic region, and interference caused signal loss in the Mediterranean Sea region. We recommend careful attention at the beginning of the study to determine the optimum timing of transmitter deployment and the number of transmitters to be deployed per species. These sample sizes should be calculated by taking into account region-specific causes of signal loss to ensure research objectives are met. These recommendations should be useful for researchers undertaking a satellite tracking program, especially when working in remote areas of Africa where logistics are difficult or with poorly-known species. ?? NISC (Pty) Ltd.

  16. Single-grain Silicon Technology for Large Area X-ray Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Arslan, A

    2015-01-01

    Digital flat panel X-ray imagers are currently using a-Si and poly-Si thin-film-transistors (TFTs). a-Si TFT permits the use of large area substrates, however, due to the amorphous nature, the carrier mobility is very low (

  17. Single-grain Silicon Technology for Large Area X-ray Imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arslan, A.

    2015-01-01

    Digital flat panel X-ray imagers are currently using a-Si and poly-Si thin-film-transistors (TFTs). a-Si TFT permits the use of large area substrates, however, due to the amorphous nature, the carrier mobility is very low (<1 cm2/Vs). Poly-Si TFT improves the mobility (~150 cm2/Vs) but due to random

  18. Microfabrication of large-area circular high-stress silicon nitride membranes for optomechanical applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Serra

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In view of the integration of membrane resonators with more complex MEMS structures, we developed a general fabrication procedure for circular shape SiNx membranes using Deep Reactive Ion Etching (DRIE. Large area and high-stress SiNx membranes were fabricated and used as optomechanical resonators in a Michelson interferometer, where Q values up to 1.3 × 106 were measured at cryogenic temperatures, and in a Fabry-Pérot cavity, where an optical finesse up to 50000 has been observed.

  19. Printed Large-Area Single-Mode Photonic Crystal Bandedge Surface-Emitting Lasers on Silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Deyin; Liu, Shihchia; Yang, Hongjun; Ma, Zhenqiang; Reuterskiöld-Hedlund, Carl; Hammar, Mattias; Zhou, Weidong

    2016-01-04

    We report here an optically pumped hybrid III-V/Si photoic crystal surface emitting laser (PCSEL), consisting of a heterogeneously integrated III-V InGaAsP quantum well heterostructure gain medium, printed on a patterned defect-free Si photonic crystal (PC) bandedge cavity. Single mode lasing was achieved for a large area laser, with a side-mode suppression ratio of 28 dB, for lasing operation temperature ~ 200 K. Two types of lasers were demonstrated operating at different temperatures. Detailed modal analysis reveals the lasing mode matches with the estimated lasing gain threshold conditions. Our demonstration promises a hybrid laser sources on Si towards three-dimensional (3D) integrated Si photonics for on-chip wavelength-division multiplex (3D WDM) systems for a wide range of volume photonic/electronic applications in computing, communication, sensing, imaging, etc.

  20. Tunnel oxide passivated rear contact for large area n-type front junction silicon solar cells providing excellent carrier selectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuguo Tao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Carrier-selective contact with low minority carrier recombination and efficient majority carrier transport is mandatory to eliminate metal-induced recombination for higher energy conversion efficiency for silicon (Si solar cells. In the present study, the carrier-selective contact consists of an ultra-thin tunnel oxide and a phosphorus-doped polycrystalline Si (poly-Si thin film formed by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD and subsequent thermal crystallization. It is shown that the poly-Si film properties (doping level, crystallization and dopant activation anneal temperature are crucial for achieving excellent contact passivation quality. It is also demonstrated quantitatively that the tunnel oxide plays a critical role in this tunnel oxide passivated contact (TOPCON scheme to realize desired carrier selectivity. Presence of tunnel oxide increases the implied Voc (iVoc by ~ 125 mV. The iVoc value as high as 728 mV is achieved on symmetric structure with TOPCON on both sides. Large area (239 cm2 n-type Czochralski (Cz Si solar cells are fabricated with homogeneous implanted boron emitter and screen-printed contact on the front and TOPCON on the back, achieving 21.2% cell efficiency. Detailed analysis shows that the performance of these cells is mainly limited by boron emitter recombination on the front side.

  1. Stanols as a tool to track the origin of microbial contamination of oysters, Crassostrea gigas, in shellfish areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrault, Loïc; Jardé, Emilie; Jeanneau, Laurent; Petitjean, Patrice

    2013-04-01

    Runoff of cattle manures (cows, pigs, sheeps) or discharge of effluent from wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) into aquatic ecosystems can lead to microbiological contamination of waters and living organisms. In coastal ecosystems and particularly in shellfish harvesting areas, the presence of pathogen microorganisms in waters induces fecal contamination of filter feeding bivalves (oysters, mussels, scallops…), therefore leading to human health risks associated to the consumption of these contaminated organisms. Watershed management plans that aim at limiting these risks require the development of tools able to identify fecal contamination sources. The fecal indicator bacteria used in the regulations to determine fecal contamination are not source specific since they are found in the feces of most warm-blooded animals. Thus, microbiological biomarkers have been developed in association with chemical biomarkers as Microbial Source Tracking (MST) methods. Fecal stanols, by-products of sterols obtained by human and animal microbial gut flora, are found in considerable amounts in feces with different relative proportions depending on their animal or human source. Recently, in association with microbiological biomarkers, the stanol fingerprint of contaminated waters has been successfully used to determine the main source of fecal contamination (cow, pig or human sources) in rural watersheds (Brittany, France). Up to now, the use of the stanol fingerprint to track the fecal contamination in shellfish tissues, especially bivalves, has been limited to the analysis of coprostanol, a stanol commonly associated to human contamination. Therefore, whether the stanol fingerprint can be used as a MST method in bivalves or not is still unknown. The first aim of this study was to compare several organic extraction procedures of stanols in the oyster Crassostrea gigas to determine a reliable method for stanol fingerprint analysis in bivalves. Solvent extraction and purification

  2. Large Area Silicon Carbide Vertical JFETs for 1200 V Cascode Switch Operation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Veliadis

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available SiC VJFETs are excellent candidates for reliable high-power/temperature switching as they only use pn junctions in the active device area where the high-electric fields occur. VJFETs do not suffer from forward voltage degradation, exhibit excellent short-circuit performance, and operate at 300°C. 0.19 cm2 1200 V normally-on and 0.15 cm2 low-voltage normally-off VJFETs were fabricated. The 1200-V VJFET outputs 53 A with a forward drain voltage drop of 2 V and a specific onstate resistance of 5.4 mΩ cm2. The low-voltage VJFET outputs 28 A with a forward drain voltage drop of 3.3 V and a specific onstate resistance of 15 mΩ cm2. The 1200-V SiC VJFET was connected in the cascode configuration with two Si MOSFETs and with a low-voltage SiC VJFET to form normally-off power switches. At a forward drain voltage drop of 2.2 V, the SiC/MOSFETs cascode switch outputs 33 A. The all-SiC cascode switch outputs 24 A at a voltage drop of 4.7 V.

  3. High Numerates Count Icons and Low Numerates Process Large Areas in Pictographs: Results of an Eye-Tracking Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreuzmair, Christina; Siegrist, Michael; Keller, Carmen

    2016-08-01

    In two experiments, we investigated the influence of numeracy on individuals' information processing of pictographs depending on numeracy via an eye-tracker. In two conditions, participants from the general population were presented with a scenario depicting the risk of having cancer and were asked to indicate their perceived risk. The risk level was high (63%) in experiment 1 (N = 70) and low (6%) in experiment 2 (N = 69). In the default condition, participants were free to use their default strategy for information processing. In the guiding-toward-the-number condition, they were prompted to count icons in the pictograph by answering with an explicit number. We used eye-tracking parameters related to the distance between sequential fixations to analyze participants' strategies for processing numerical information. In the default condition, the higher the numeracy was, the shorter the distances traversed in the pictograph were, indicating that participants counted the icons. People lower in numeracy performed increased large-area processing by comparing highlighted and nonhighlighted parts of the pictograph. In the guiding-toward-the-number condition, participants used short distances regardless of their numeracy, supporting the notion that short distances represent counting. Despite the different default processing strategies, participants processed the pictograph with a similar depth and derived similar risk perceptions. The results show that pictographs are beneficial for communicating medical risk. Pictographs make the gist salient by making the part-to-whole relationship visually available, and they facilitate low numerates' non-numeric processing of numerical information. Contemporaneously, pictographs allow high numerates to numerically process and rely on the number depicted in the pictograph.

  4. A Novel Methodology for Thermal Aware Silicon Area Estimation for 2D & 3D MPSoCs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinod Pangracious

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In a multiprocessor system on chip (MPSoC IC the processor is one of the highest heat dissipating devices. The temperature generated in an IC may vary with floor plan of the chip. This paper proposes an integration and thermal analysis methodology to extract the peak temperature and temperature distribution of 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional multiprocessor system-on-chip. As we know the peak temperature of chip increases in 3-dimensional structures compared to 2-dimensional ones due to the reduced space in intra-layer and inter-layer components. In sub-nanometre scale technologies, it is inevitable to analysis the heat developed in individual chip to extract the temperature distribution of the entire chip. With thetechnology scaling in new generation ICs more and more components are integrated to a smaller area. Along with the other parameters threshold voltage is also scaled down which results in exponential increase in leakage current. This has resulted in rise in hotspot temperature value due to increase inleakage power. In this paper, we have analysed the temperature developed in an IC with four identical processors at 2.4 GHz in different floorplans. The analysis has been done for both 2D and 3D arrangements. In the 3D arrangement, a three layered structure has been considered with two Silicon layers and a thermal interface material (TIM in between them. Based on experimental results the paperproposes a methodology to reduce the peak temperature developed in 2D and 3D integrated circuits .

  5. The Solenoidal Detector Collaboration silicon detector system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silicon tracking systems will be fundamental components of the tracking systems for both planned major SSC experiments. Despite its seemingly small size, it occupies a volume of more than 5 meters in length and 1 meter in diameter and is an order of magnitude larger than any silicon detector system previously built. This report discusses its design and operation

  6. Exploration of maximum count rate capabilities for large-area photon counting arrays based on polycrystalline silicon thin-film transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Albert K.; Koniczek, Martin; Antonuk, Larry E.; El-Mohri, Youcef; Zhao, Qihua

    2016-03-01

    Pixelated photon counting detectors with energy discrimination capabilities are of increasing clinical interest for x-ray imaging. Such detectors, presently in clinical use for mammography and under development for breast tomosynthesis and spectral CT, usually employ in-pixel circuits based on crystalline silicon - a semiconductor material that is generally not well-suited for economic manufacture of large-area devices. One interesting alternative semiconductor is polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si), a thin-film technology capable of creating very large-area, monolithic devices. Similar to crystalline silicon, poly-Si allows implementation of the type of fast, complex, in-pixel circuitry required for photon counting - operating at processing speeds that are not possible with amorphous silicon (the material currently used for large-area, active matrix, flat-panel imagers). The pixel circuits of two-dimensional photon counting arrays are generally comprised of four stages: amplifier, comparator, clock generator and counter. The analog front-end (in particular, the amplifier) strongly influences performance and is therefore of interest to study. In this paper, the relationship between incident and output count rate of the analog front-end is explored under diagnostic imaging conditions for a promising poly-Si based design. The input to the amplifier is modeled in the time domain assuming a realistic input x-ray spectrum. Simulations of circuits based on poly-Si thin-film transistors are used to determine the resulting output count rate as a function of input count rate, energy discrimination threshold and operating conditions.

  7. Tracking objects, Tracking agents

    OpenAIRE

    Bullot, Nicolas J.; Rysiew, Patrick

    2005-01-01

    Animals and humans have to keep track of individuals in their environment, both in perception (sensorimotor tracking) and in cognition (e.g., spatio-temporal localization and linguistic reference via memory, communication and reasoning). Items that are typical targets for tracking are things such as stationary physical objects (e.g., rocks, plants, trees, buildings, or attached artifacts), moving physical objects (e.g., animals, certain artifacts) and human beings. All such items are located ...

  8. INNER TRACKING

    CERN Document Server

    P. Sharp

    The CMS Inner Tracking Detector continues to make good progress. The Objective for 2006 was to complete all of the CMS Tracker sub-detectors and to start the integration of the sub-detectors into the Tracker Support Tube (TST). The Objective for 2007 is to deliver to CMS a completed, installed, commissioned and calibrated Tracking System (Silicon Strip and Pixels) aligned to < 100µ in April 2008 ready for the first physics collisions at LHC. In November 2006 all of the sub-detectors had been delivered to the Tracker Integration facility (TIF) at CERN and the tests and QA procedures to be carried out on each sub-detector before integration had been established. In December 2006, TIB/TID+ was integrated into TOB+, TIB/TID- was being prepared for integration, and TEC+ was undergoing tests at the final tracker operating temperature (-100 C) in the Lyon cold room. In February 2007, TIB/TID- has been integrated into TOB-, and the installation of the pixel support tube and the services for TI...

  9. Application of human and animal viral microbial source tracking tools in fresh and marine waters from five different geographical areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusiñol, Marta; Fernandez-Cassi, Xavier; Hundesa, Ayalkibet; Vieira, Carmen; Kern, Anita; Eriksson, Irene; Ziros, Panos; Kay, David; Miagostovich, Marize; Vargha, Marta; Allard, Annika; Vantarakis, Apostolos; Wyn-Jones, Peter; Bofill-Mas, Sílvia; Girones, Rosina

    2014-08-01

    Integrated river basin management planning to mitigate the impacts of economic, demographic and climate change is an important issue for the future protection of water resources. Identifying sources of microbial contamination via the emerging science of Microbial Source Tracking (MST) plays a key role in risk assessment and the design of remediation strategies. Following an 18-month surveillance program within the EU-FP7-funded VIROCLIME project, specific MST tools were used to assess human markers such as adenoviruses (HAdV) and JC polyomaviruses (JCPyV) and porcine and bovine markers such as porcine adenoviruses (PAdV) and bovine polyomaviruses (BPyV) via quantification with real-time PCR to analyze surface water collected from five sites within different climatic zones: the Negro River (Brazil), Glafkos River (Greece), Tisza River (Hungary), Llobregat River (Spain) and Umeälven River (Sweden). The utility of the viral MST tools and the prevalence and abundance of specific human and animal viruses in the five river catchments and adjacent seawater, which is impacted by riverine contributions from the upstream catchments, were examined. In areas where no sanitation systems have been implemented, sewage can directly enter surface waters, and river water exhibited high viral loads; HAdV and JCPyV could be detected at mean concentrations of 10(5) and 10(4) Genome Copies/Liter (GC/L), respectively. In general, river water samples upstream of urban discharges presented lower human viral loads than downstream sampling sites, and those differences appeared to increase with urban populations but decrease in response to high river flow, as the elevated river water volume dilutes microbial loads. During dry seasons, river water flow decreases dramatically, and secondary effluents can represent the bulk of the riverine discharge. We also observed that ice cover that formed over the river during the winter in the studied areas in North Europe could preserve viral stability

  10. Apatite fission track analysis for revealing tectonic events of the Bayinguole area in the west section of Eastern Kunlun Mountains, northern Qinghai-Tibet Plateau

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Qimantage is an important tectonic metallogenic belt in western part of East Kunlun Mountain. It has experienced complex geological evolution, and significant mineralization. However, because of the plateau climate and inaccessibility, fewer research works have been done on this area, especially after Indo-sinian epoch. Purpose: Our work is to research tectonic activity, thermal history and uplifting around Bayinguole river in Qimantage belt. Methods: The apatite fission-track method was applied to research the tectonic setting, simulate the thermal history and calculate the uplift size and uplift speed. Results: A series of apatite fission track ages from granitoid samples in Bayinguole area of Eastern Kunlun Mountain were obtained, ranging from 120 Ma to 47 Ma that might be divided into three groups': 120-100 Ma, 67 Ma and 54-47 Ma. These ages reflected tectonic events in this area very well. Conclusions: The 120-100 Ma and 67 Ma ages present collision-convergences of Gangdese terrane and Himalayan terrane with their north-side terranes in Early Cretaceous and Late Cretaceous respectively. The ages of 54-47 Ma reflect post-orogenic stretching events in Eocene. Three stages of thermal evolution history are revealed by apatite fission track modeling in this area. Stage one 180-140 Ma is in the bottom temperature of apatite fission track anneal zone. Stage two 140-13 Ma records slow cooling. The last stage after 13 Ma records rapid cooling with temperature dropped 50℃. The uplifting ranges for these three stages are 1.0 km, 0.6 km and 1.4 km, respectively. The cumulative amount of uplift is about 3.0 km. The formula calculations for the 3 samples have their rock uplifts of 3623 m, 3317 m and 3769 m, respectively, averaging 3570 m, in accordance with the results based on the 3 stage thermal history. (authors)

  11. Hydrological and Physical Characterization of Cinque Terre Marine Protected Area (Ligurian Sea) and Evaluation of Current Velocity and Direction by AUV Navigation Tracks

    OpenAIRE

    Locritani, M.; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione Pisa, Pisa, Italia; Chiappini, O.; NATO Undersea Research Centre, La Spezia, Italy; Chiarabini, R.; NATO Undersea Research Centre, La Spezia, Italy; Bruni, F.; Tecnomare S.p.A.; Ciccarelli, V.; Tecnomare S.p.A.; Natale, L.; Parco Nazionale delle Cinque Terre, La Spezia, Italy; De Paulis, R.; ENI exploration and production division, GEOLAB Dept., Milano, Italy

    2010-01-01

    The integrated study, concerning the experimental observations, was performed during the oceanographic cruises on-board the two NURC research vessels, in the period between 2008 and 2010 in the Marine Protected Area of Cinque Terre (North-West Mediterranean Sea, Italy). The aim of the research is to describe the environmental features using both hydrological parameters and AUV navigation tracks, acquired respectively by a multi-parametric platform (MEDUSA) and AUV MUSCLE. The innovat...

  12. Mr. Lorenzo Dellai, presidente della provincia Autonoma di Trento and Professor Andrea Zanotti, president dell'Instituto Trentino di Cultura, visit ALICE experiment underground area and Pixel Silicon Laboratory

    CERN Multimedia

    Claudia Marcelloni

    2006-01-01

    Mr. Lorenzo Dellai, presidente della provincia Autonoma di Trento and Professor Andrea Zanotti, president dell'Instituto Trentino di Cultura, visit ALICE experiment underground area and Pixel Silicon Laboratory

  13. Porous silicon gettering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuo, Y.S.; Menna, P.; Al-Jassim, M. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)] [and others

    1995-08-01

    We have studied a novel extrinsic gettering method that utilizes the very large surface areas, produced by porous silicon etch on both front and back surfaces of the silicon wafer, as gettering sites. In this method, a simple and low-cost chemical etching is used to generate the porous silicon layers. Then, a high-flux solar furnace (HFSF) is used to provide high-temperature annealing and the required injection of silicon interstitials. The gettering sites, along with the gettered impurities, can be easily removed at the end the process. The porous silicon removal process consists of oxidizing the porous silicon near the end the gettering process followed by sample immersion in HF acid. Each porous silicon gettering process removes up to about 10 {mu}m of wafer thickness. This gettering process can be repeated so that the desired purity level is obtained.

  14. Hyperon production in proton-nucleus collisions at a center-of-mass energy of √(sNN) = 41.6 GeV at HERA-B and design of silicon microstrip detectors for tracking at LHCb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The topics of this thesis are the measurements of hyperon production in protonnucleus collisions at √(s)=41.6 GeV with the Hera-B detector located at DESY, Hamburg (Germany), and the design of silicon microstrip sensors for the LHCb experiment at CERN, Geneva (Switzerland). Λ, Ξ and Ω hyperons and their antiparticles were reconstructed from 113.5 . 106 inelastic collisions of protons with fixed carbon, titanium and tungsten targets. With these samples, antiparticle-to-particle ratios, cross sections integrated for the accessible kinematic region of Hera-B and single differential cross sections as function of transverse momentum, dσ/dpT2 (for Λ and Ξ) and rapidity, dσ/dy (for Λ only), have been been measured as well as the dependence of these quantities on the atomic number of the target nucleus, as parameterized using the Glauber model. The obtained ratios follow the same trend as found for the energy dependence of measurements from nucleus-nucleus collisions. Silicon microstrip sensors have been designed for the tracking system of the LHCb detector. Evaluating the performance in beam tests at CERN, the strip geometry and sensor thickness were varied optimizing for a large signal-to-noise ratio, a small number of read-out channels and a low occupancy. The detector is currently being built to be operational for first proton-proton collisions in autumn 2007. (orig.)

  15. Hyperon production in proton-nucleus collisions at a center-of-mass energy of {radical}(s{sub NN}) = 41.6 GeV at HERA-B and design of silicon microstrip detectors for tracking at LHCb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agari, Michaela

    2006-07-01

    The topics of this thesis are the measurements of hyperon production in protonnucleus collisions at {radical}(s)=41.6 GeV with the Hera-B detector located at DESY, Hamburg (Germany), and the design of silicon microstrip sensors for the LHCb experiment at CERN, Geneva (Switzerland). {lambda}, {xi} and {omega} hyperons and their antiparticles were reconstructed from 113.5 . 10{sup 6} inelastic collisions of protons with fixed carbon, titanium and tungsten targets. With these samples, antiparticle-to-particle ratios, cross sections integrated for the accessible kinematic region of Hera-B and single differential cross sections as function of transverse momentum, d{sigma}/dp{sub T}{sup 2} (for {lambda} and {xi}) and rapidity, d{sigma}/dy (for {lambda} only), have been been measured as well as the dependence of these quantities on the atomic number of the target nucleus, as parameterized using the Glauber model. The obtained ratios follow the same trend as found for the energy dependence of measurements from nucleus-nucleus collisions. Silicon microstrip sensors have been designed for the tracking system of the LHCb detector. Evaluating the performance in beam tests at CERN, the strip geometry and sensor thickness were varied optimizing for a large signal-to-noise ratio, a small number of read-out channels and a low occupancy. The detector is currently being built to be operational for first proton-proton collisions in autumn 2007. (orig.)

  16. Silicon microphones - a Danish perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouwstra, Siebe; Storgaard-Larsen, Torben; Scheeper, Patrick;

    1998-01-01

    Two application areas of microphones are discussed, those for precision measurement and those for hearing instruments. Silicon microphones are under investigation for both areas, and Danish industry plays a key role in both. The opportunities of silicon, as well as the challenges and expectations......, are discussed. For precision measurement the challenge for silicon is large, while for hearing instruments silicon seems to be very promising....

  17. ALICE Silicon Pixel Detector

    CERN Multimedia

    Manzari, V

    2013-01-01

    The Silicon Pixel Detector (SPD) forms the innermost two layers of the 6-layer barrel Inner Tracking System (ITS). The SPD plays a key role in the determination of the position of the primary collision and in the reconstruction of the secondary vertices from particle decays.

  18. A silicon detector for neutrino physics

    CERN Document Server

    Kokkonen, J

    2002-01-01

    In order to demonstrate the feasibility of conducting future muon neutrino - tau neutrino oscillation searches using a high-resolution, large-area silicon microstrip detector, the Silicon TARget (STAR) detector was built. STAR was installed in the NOMAD short baseline neutrino oscillation experiment at the CERN SPS neutrino beam, where it recorded approximately 10000 neutrino interactions during the operation of the detector in the period 1997-98. It consists of five layers of silicon detectors interleaved with four layers of passive boron carbide as the target. The target mass is 45 kg, while the total silicon surface area is 1.14 square-meters and contains 32000 readout channels. The individual modules have a length of 72 cm, the longest built to date. The detection of tau particles, produced in tau neutrino charged-current interactions, would require a tracking detector with a precision of a few tens of microns in order to measure the position of the neutrino interaction vertex as well as the impact parame...

  19. Record of Technical Change No.1 for Corrective Action Investigation Plan for CAU 486: Double Tracks RADSAFE Area, Nellis Air Force Range, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-11-16

    Health Physics recommends that daily field screening levels be determined for gross gamma monitoring at the Double Tracks RADSAFE Area. This recommendation is predicated on the fact that there is significant daily variation in gross gamma detector response, even in the absence of a radiation source. Calculating daily field screening levels will help ensure the detection of radiation contamination in soil. The following sections of this memorandum discuss the radiation survey instruments that will be used during the characterization of the Double Tracks site, the anticipated radionuclides in the radiological source term, the survey instrument response to these radionuclides, the definition of the field screening levels, and recommendations on how to select the daily gross gamma field screening level.

  20. Quantitative analysis of defects in silicon: silicon sheet growth development for the Large Area Silicon Sheet Task of the Low-Cost Solar Array Project. Quarterly progress report No. 5, April 1-June 30, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natesh, R.; Smith, J.M.; Qidwai, H.A.; Bruce, T.

    1979-07-12

    During this reporting period a computer program was written for the PDP 11/03 computer that controls the Quantimet 720 Image Analyzing System (QTM 720). This program will facilitate the analysis of silicon samples on the upgraded Quantimet 720 System. Also during this period thirty-two (32) Motorola samples were analyzed for twin boundaries, dislocation pits, and grain boundaries. A discussion of the computer program and the data obtained from the thirty-two (32) Motorola samples are given. The use of the Image Editor on the QTM 720 detected image is also described.

  1. Silicone metalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maghribi, Mariam N.; Krulevitch, Peter; Hamilton, Julie

    2006-12-05

    A system for providing metal features on silicone comprising providing a silicone layer on a matrix and providing a metal layer on the silicone layer. An electronic apparatus can be produced by the system. The electronic apparatus comprises a silicone body and metal features on the silicone body that provide an electronic device.

  2. Development and operation of a novel PC-based high speed beam telescope for particle tracking using double sided silicon microstrip detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A PC based high speed silicon microstrip beam telescope consisting of several independent modules is presented. Every module contains an AC-coupled double sided silicon microstrip sensor and a complete set of analog and digital signal processing electronics. A digital bus connects the modules with the DAQ PC. A trigger logic unit coordinates the operation of all modules of the telescope. The system architecture allows easy integration of any kind of device under test into the data acquisition chain. Signal digitization, pedestal correction, hit detection and zero suppression are done by hardware inside the modules, so that the amount of data per event is reduced by a factor of 80 compared to conventional readout systems. In combination with a two level data acquisition scheme, this allows event rates up to 7.6 kHz. This is a factor of 40 faster than conventional VME based beam telescopes while comparable analog performance is maintained achieving signal to noise ratios of up to 70:1. The telescope has been tested in the SPS testbeam at CERN. It has been adopted as the reference instrument for testbeam studies for the ATLAS pixel detector development. (orig.)

  3. Automated mapping of burned areas in Landsat imagery; tracking spatial and temporal patterns of burned areas and greenhouse gas emissions in the Southern Rocky Mountains, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawbaker, Todd; Vanderhoof, Melanie; French, Nancy; Billmire, Michael; Beal, Yen-Ju Grace; Takacs, Josh; Bosshart, Robbert; Caldwell, Megan

    2016-04-01

    Accurate estimates of greenhouse gas emissions depend on precise mapping of burned area extent and timing. Consequently, fire disturbance has been identified by the Global Climate Observing System (GCOS) program as one of the 14 Terrestrial Essential Climate Variables (ECVs). Landsat's temporal resolution and sensor characteristics make it more suitable for mapping burned area than existing burned area products from coarse resolution sensors. We have developed an automated algorithm to identify burned areas in temporally rich stacks of Landsat surface reflectance data using boosted regression trees and spatial filters. For this analysis, we quantified trends in burned area and fire emissions using the USGS Burned Area ECV data and the Monitoring Trends in Burn Severity data, the latter of which is known to be incomplete. Both datasets were combined with the LANDFIRE Fuel Characteristic Classification System to assign pre-fire biomass loads, and the CONSUME model was used to estimate biomass consumption and greenhouse gas emissions. Both data sets show a dramatic increase in burned area between 1984-1999 and 2000-2015, but the Burned Area ECV included more small fires and fires in non-forest ecosystems. Emission estimates were similar between the two burned area datasets, but were generally greater for the Burned Area ECV. Our results suggest that national and regional scale emission estimates could be improved by incorporating the more complete Burned Area ECV dataset.

  4. A simple method to control nanotribology behaviors of monocrystalline silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X. D.; Guo, J.; Chen, C.; Chen, L.; Qian, L. M.

    2016-01-01

    A simple method was proposed to control the nanotribology behaviors of monocrystalline silicon against SiO2 microsphere by adjusting relative humidity (RH). Experimental results indicated that adhesion work, friction coefficient, and nanowear of silicon against SiO2 microsphere significantly varied between 60% and 90% RH. Under 60% RH, adhesion work was 119 mN/m, and friction coefficient was about 0.53. However, adhesion work and friction coefficient decreased to ˜70 mN/m and ˜0.3 under 90% RH, respectively. An apparent wear track ˜13 nm deep formed on the silicon surface under 60% RH, whereas no obvious wear scar was observed on the silicon surface under 90% RH. Analysis indicated that such tribological behaviors were due to different water condensations on the silicon surface under 60% and 90% RH. Under 60% RH, the water that condensed on the surfaces of the silicon sample and SiO2 tip mainly consisted of ice-like water. As a result, adhesion work was enlarged by the breaking force of the ice-like water bridge in the contact area. Given that a ≡Si-O-Si≡ bonding bridge easily formed between the silicon surface and the SiO2 tip with the help of water condensation under 60% RH instead of 90% RH, the friction coefficient was large and the nanowear of the silicon sample was severe under 60% RH. These results may help elucidate the nanotribology behaviors of silicon and facilitate the tribological design of dynamic microelectromechanical systems working under humid conditions.

  5. INNER TRACKING

    CERN Multimedia

    P. Sharp

    The CMS Inner Tracking Detector continues to make good progress. The successful commissioning of ~ 25% of the Silicon Strip Tracker was completed in the Tracker Integration Facility (TIF) at CERN on 18 July 2007 and the Tracker has since been prepared for moving and installation into CMS at P5. The Tracker will be ready to move on schedule in September 2007. The Installation of the Tracker cooling pipes and LV cables between Patch Panel 1 (PP1) on the inside the CMS magnet cryostat, and the cooling plants and power system racks on the balconies has been completed. The optical fibres from PP1 to the readout FEDs in the USC will be installed in parallel with the installation of the EB/HB services, and will be completed in October. It is planned to install the Tracker into CMS at the end of October, after the completion of the installation of the EB/HB services. The Tracker will then be connected to the pre-installed services on YB0 and commissioned with CMS in December. The FPix and BPix continue to make ...

  6. INNER TRACKING

    CERN Multimedia

    P. Sharp

    The CMS Inner Tracking Detector continues to make good progress. The successful commissioning of ~ 25% of the Silicon Strip Tracker was completed in the Tracker Integration Facility (TIF) at CERN in July 2007 and the Tracker has since been prepared for moving and installation into CMS at P5. The Tracker was ready to move on schedule in September 2007. The Installation of the Tracker cooling pipes and LV cables between Patch Panel 1 (PP1) on the inside the CMS magnet cryostat, and the cooling plants and power system racks on the balconies has been completed. The optical fibres from PP1 to the readout FEDs in the USC have been installed, together with the Tracker cable channels, in parallel with the installation of the EB/HB services. All of the Tracker Safety, Power, DCS and the VME Readout Systems have been installed at P5 and are being tested and commissioned with CMS. It is planned to install the Tracker into CMS before Christmas. The Tracker will then be connected to the pre-installed services on Y...

  7. LHCb Silicon Tracker infrastructure

    CERN Document Server

    Ermoline, Yuri

    2004-01-01

    The LHCb Silicon Tracker is a vital part of the experiment. It consists of four planar stations: one trigger and three inner tracking stations. The operation of the Silicon Tracker detectors and electronics is provided by its infrastructure: cooling system, high- and low-voltage power supply systems, temperature and radiation monitoring systems. Several components of these systems are located in the experimental hall and subjected to radiation. This paper mainly concentrates on the recent development: requirements definition, evaluation of possible implementation scenarios, component choice and component radiation tests.

  8. Continuous bottom temperature measurements in strategic areas of the Florida Reef Track at Tennessee Reef, 1990 - 2004 (NODC Accession 0002749)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The purpose of this project is to document bottom seawater temperature in strategic areas of the Florida Reef Tract on a continuing basis and make that information...

  9. Large area multicrystalline silicon solar cells with high efficiency. Final report; Grossflaechige multikristalline Silizium-Solarzellen mit hohen Wirkungsraden. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebest, G.; Erler, K.; Mrwa, A.; Ball, M.

    2001-09-01

    Solar cells were produced of wafers of die-cast and strip-drawn multicrystalline silicon and characterized. Production methods like SOD (spin-on doping), RTP (rapid thermal processing), PECVD (plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition), RIE (reactive ion etching) and screen printing were investigated. The results are summarized as follows: 1. Layer resistance can be adjusted by variation of the RTP temperature cycle and by selecting appropriate doping materials (P507 by Filmtronics); 2. The low resistance required for screen printing metallization are obtained only with a different doping material (P8545SF-Filmtronics); 3. Metallized aluminium and copper require a 30 nm TiN layer as diffusion barrier; 4. Reflectivity will be reduced most effectively by RIE with chlorine gas on monocrystalline and multicrystalline silicon wafers. [German] Im Rahmen des Projektes wurden auf Wafern aus blockgegossenem und bandgezogenem multikristallinen Silizium Solarzellen hergestellt und charakterisiert. Fuer die Herstellung wurden Verfahren wie SOD (spin-on doping), RTP (rapid thermal processing), PECVD (plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition), RIE (reactive ion etching) und Siebdruck untersucht. Die Ergebnisse lassen sich wie folgt zusammenfassen: 1. eine Einstellung des Schichtwiderstandes wird durch Variation des RTP-Temperaturzyklus sowie Auswahl verschiedener Dotierstoffe (P507 von Filmtronics) erreicht; 2. die fuer die Siebdruckmetallisierung erforderlichen geringen Schichtwiderstaende werden nur durch die Wahl eines anderen Dotierstoffes (P8545SF-Filmtronics) erreicht; 3. Aluminium- und Kupfermetallisierungen benoetigen eine 30 nm dicke TiN-Schicht als Diffusionsbarriere; und 4. die wirksamste Verminderung des Reflexionsgrades ist mittels RIE-Verfahren unter Verwendung von Chlorgas auf ein- und multikristalline Siliziumwafer erreichbar.

  10. Detection of Vehicle Tracks and Vegetation Damages Caused by use of Snowmobiles in the Longyearbyen Area on Svalbard using Unmanned Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storvold, R.; Karlsen, S. R.; Solbø, S. A.; Johansen, B.; Johansen, K.; Høgda, K. A.; Tømmervik, H.; Zmarz, A.; Joly, D.

    2013-12-01

    The study area in the surroundings of Longyearbyen on Svalbard, Arctic Norway, located at 71.2°N and 16°E is characterized by dry Arctic climate with a snow season of more than eight months, annual precipitation of less than 200mm, and a mean July temperature of about 6°C. Longyearbyen is the main settlement on Svalbard, with about 2000 inhabitants. During the last two decades the number of snowmobiles have increased from a few hundred to a number almost equals the number of inhabitants, and snowmobile trips are today the one of the main leisure activities. In addition, thousands of tourist visits every spring, and many of these go on organized snowmobile trips. Due to the often thin snow cover, and use of snowmobile even during the spring snow melt in May and early June, the rapid growth in use of snowmobile has made some damage to the vegetation. Damage on the fragile vegetation caused by the skids and belts of the snowmobile can be observed in most parts of the Adventdalen valley, close to Longyearbyen. The main aim of this study is to explore the feasibility and accuracy of using data from Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) to identify vehicle tracks and damages on vegetation caused by the use of snowmobiles. Use of UAS give the opportunity to carry out research in a manner that minimizes the environmental footprint of the research activities. Small unmanned aircraft, combining both fixed wing multi rotor types allow us to collect image data for vegetation mapping without having any personnel walking into the field disturbing the sensitive High Arctic ecosystems. UAS used here are inexpensive and simple to operate. They are being developed with the goal of providing airborne capabilities for scientists at an affordable cost. The aircraft were instrumented with a normal Canon Powershot S100 RGB compact camera and a modified Canon Powershot SX230 NDVI camera. The fixed wing aircraft was taking pictures from 100 meters altitude with ground resolution of 2.5 cm

  11. Performance of ultra-small silicon photomultiplier array with active area of 0.12 mm×0.12 mm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yue, Wang; Zongde, Chen; Chenhui, Li; Ran, He; Shenyuan, Wang; Baicheng, Li; Ruiheng, Wang; Kun, Liang, E-mail: lk@bnu.edu.cn; Ru, Yang; Dejun, Han

    2015-07-01

    We report the performance of an ultra-small silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) line array with 7 elements of 0.12×0.12 mm{sup 2} in active area, 0.2 mm in pitch and 120 micro cells in one element. The device features an epitaxial bulk quenching resistor concept, demonstrated high geometrical fill factor of 41% and photon detection efficiency (PDE) of 25.4% in the wavelength region between 430 nm and 480 nm while retaining high micro cell density around 10 000 mm{sup −2} and ~3 ns FWHM of dark pulses width; it also demonstrated dark count rate of less than 28.7 kHz, optical crosstalk of the order of 2% to 4%, and excellent photon number discrimination. A 0.15 mm×1.6 mm×1.6 mm lutetium yttrium oxyorthosilicate (LYSO) crystal, corresponding to the width, length and height respectively, was successfully coupled to the 1×7 SiPM array for possible ultra-highly resolved positron emission tomography (PET) applications. This novel type of device has advantages particularly for small active area since the performances, such as PDE and response speed is one of the best among SiPMs with similarly high density of micro cells. It may pave a way for this type of SiPM as a promising pixel position sensitive device in imaging sensor applications. - Highlights: • The ultra-small SiPM line array with active area of 0.12 mm×0.12 mm was presented. • The ultra-small SiPM employs the bulk silicon structure as quenching resistor. • A considerable dynamic range and PDE over 25.4% @ 430 nm to 480 nm were characterized.

  12. Performance of ultra-small silicon photomultiplier array with active area of 0.12 mm×0.12 mm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the performance of an ultra-small silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) line array with 7 elements of 0.12×0.12 mm2 in active area, 0.2 mm in pitch and 120 micro cells in one element. The device features an epitaxial bulk quenching resistor concept, demonstrated high geometrical fill factor of 41% and photon detection efficiency (PDE) of 25.4% in the wavelength region between 430 nm and 480 nm while retaining high micro cell density around 10 000 mm−2 and ~3 ns FWHM of dark pulses width; it also demonstrated dark count rate of less than 28.7 kHz, optical crosstalk of the order of 2% to 4%, and excellent photon number discrimination. A 0.15 mm×1.6 mm×1.6 mm lutetium yttrium oxyorthosilicate (LYSO) crystal, corresponding to the width, length and height respectively, was successfully coupled to the 1×7 SiPM array for possible ultra-highly resolved positron emission tomography (PET) applications. This novel type of device has advantages particularly for small active area since the performances, such as PDE and response speed is one of the best among SiPMs with similarly high density of micro cells. It may pave a way for this type of SiPM as a promising pixel position sensitive device in imaging sensor applications. - Highlights: • The ultra-small SiPM line array with active area of 0.12 mm×0.12 mm was presented. • The ultra-small SiPM employs the bulk silicon structure as quenching resistor. • A considerable dynamic range and PDE over 25.4% @ 430 nm to 480 nm were characterized

  13. Fabrication, characterization and testing of silicon photomultipliers for the Muon Portal Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    La Rocca, P., E-mail: paola.larocca@ct.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia - Catania (Italy); INFN - Sezione di Catania (Italy); Billotta, S. [INAF - Osservatorio Astrofisico di Catania (Italy); Blancato, A.A.; Bonanno, D. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia - Catania (Italy); Bonanno, G. [INAF - Osservatorio Astrofisico di Catania (Italy); Fallica, G. [STMicroelectronics - Catania (Italy); Garozzo, S. [INAF - Osservatorio Astrofisico di Catania (Italy); Lo Presti, D. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia - Catania (Italy); INFN - Sezione di Catania (Italy); Marano, D. [INAF - Osservatorio Astrofisico di Catania (Italy); Pugliatti, C.; Riggi, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia - Catania (Italy); INFN - Sezione di Catania (Italy); Romeo, G. [INAF - Osservatorio Astrofisico di Catania (Italy); Santagati, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia - Catania (Italy); INFN - Sezione di Catania (Italy); Valvo, G. [STMicroelectronics - Catania (Italy)

    2015-07-01

    The Muon Portal is a recently started Project aiming at the construction of a large area tracking detector that exploits the muon tomography technique to inspect the contents of traveling cargo containers. The detection planes will be made of plastic scintillator strips with embedded wavelength-shifting fibres. Special designed silicon photomultipliers will read the scintillation light transported by the fibres along the strips and a dedicated electronics will combine signals from different strips to reduce the overall number of channels, without loss of information. Different silicon photomultiplier prototypes, both with the p-on-n and n-on-p technologies, have been produced by STMicroelectronics during the last years. In this paper we present the main characteristics of the silicon photomultipliers designed for the Muon Portal Project and describe the setup and the procedure implemented for the characterization of these devices, giving some statistical results obtained from the test of a first batch of silicon photomultipliers.

  14. The SAR train concept: An along-track formation of sar satellites for diluting the antenna area over N smaller satellites, while increasing performance by N

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul Aguttes, Jean

    2005-07-01

    This concept implements the coherent combination of N separate SAR flying along the same orbital arc as seen from ground. A particular case is when the N SAR are in visibility with a single one that transmits. A "signal cleaning" class of trains keeps the antenna area requirement of each individual SAR unchanged and brings a factor N advantage that applies on SNR and ambiguity protection. The main formation flying constraint is the width of the tube containing the satellite trajectories. The multiplication by N of the total antenna area is the other counterpart to these advantages. An "antenna dilution" class of train enables the distribution of an unchanged total antenna area into N smaller elementary antennas, together with multiplication by N of the SAR merit factor (swath over resolution ratio). With respect to the first class, the tube width constraint is increased and the space-time separation along the track has to be very accurate. Use of appropriate spread spectrum waveforms instead of conventional pulse waveforms removes the major part of the extra orbit constraints introduced by the "antenna dilution" class. A train of N SAR in visibility makes the concept more robust against loss of coherence and eases the metrology of the formation (DGPS). Moreover, the global energy efficiency is increased by N since with only a single transmit SAR the same performance is achieved. However, the along-track separation constraints for antenna dilution are made more stringent because of being restrained to the space domain, which reinforces the spread spectrum interest. As part of its applications, the concept can circumvent the matter of huge antenna size for SAR mission in very low frequency (P band) or at high altitude (surveillance).

  15. Roadmap on silicon photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, David; Zilkie, Aaron; Bowers, John E.; Komljenovic, Tin; Reed, Graham T.; Vivien, Laurent; Marris-Morini, Delphine; Cassan, Eric; Virot, Léopold; Fédéli, Jean-Marc; Hartmann, Jean-Michel; Schmid, Jens H.; Xu, Dan-Xia; Boeuf, Frédéric; O'Brien, Peter; Mashanovich, Goran Z.; Nedeljkovic, M.

    2016-07-01

    Silicon photonics research can be dated back to the 1980s. However, the previous decade has witnessed an explosive growth in the field. Silicon photonics is a disruptive technology that is poised to revolutionize a number of application areas, for example, data centers, high-performance computing and sensing. The key driving force behind silicon photonics is the ability to use CMOS-like fabrication resulting in high-volume production at low cost. This is a key enabling factor for bringing photonics to a range of technology areas where the costs of implementation using traditional photonic elements such as those used for the telecommunications industry would be prohibitive. Silicon does however have a number of shortcomings as a photonic material. In its basic form it is not an ideal material in which to produce light sources, optical modulators or photodetectors for example. A wealth of research effort from both academia and industry in recent years has fueled the demonstration of multiple solutions to these and other problems, and as time progresses new approaches are increasingly being conceived. It is clear that silicon photonics has a bright future. However, with a growing number of approaches available, what will the silicon photonic integrated circuit of the future look like? This roadmap on silicon photonics delves into the different technology and application areas of the field giving an insight into the state-of-the-art as well as current and future challenges faced by researchers worldwide. Contributions authored by experts from both industry and academia provide an overview and outlook for the silicon waveguide platform, optical sources, optical modulators, photodetectors, integration approaches, packaging, applications of silicon photonics and approaches required to satisfy applications at mid-infrared wavelengths. Advances in science and technology required to meet challenges faced by the field in each of these areas are also addressed together with

  16. Study of radon exhalation rates using solid state nuclear track detectors in stone mining area of Aravali range in Pali region, district Faridabad

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is well established that indoor radon-thoron and daughters are the largest contributor to total radiation dose received by populations. They account for more than 50% of the total dose and the radiation exposure beyond permissible levels can lead to deleterious effects on health. This fact necessitates extensive studies of natural radioactivity levels in the stone mining area of Aravali range in Faridabad. The stone mining area of Aravali Range in Pali, District Faridabad bears significant geological features. Radon exhalation from ground plays an important role in enhanced indoor radon levels and can pose grave health hazards to the workers and the residents. Exhalation rates (mass and surface) from stone samples of the area have been studied using LR-115, Type II nuclear track detectors. The mass and surface exhalation rates from crushed stone samples, also called stone dust varied in the range 3.41-9.11 mBq kg-1 h-1 and 75.9-202.7 mBq m-2 h-1, respectively. The study has revealed substantial presence of radionuclides in the samples collected from the mining area. (author)

  17. Identification of storm surge vulnerable areas in the Philippines through the simulation of Typhoon Haiyan-induced storm surge levels over historical storm tracks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. P. Lapidez

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Super Typhoon Haiyan entered the Philippine Area of Responsibility (PAR 7 November 2013, causing tremendous damage to infrastructure and loss of lives mainly due to the storm surge and strong winds. Storm surges up to a height of 7 m were reported in the hardest hit areas. The threat imposed by this kind of natural calamity compelled researchers of the Nationwide Operational Assessment of Hazards (Project NOAH, the flagship disaster mitigation program of the Department of Science and Technology (DOST, Government of the Philippines, to undertake a study to determine the vulnerability of all Philippine coastal communities to storm surges of the same magnitude as those generated by Haiyan. This study calculates the maximum probable storm surge height for every coastal locality by running simulations of Haiyan-type conditions but with tracks of tropical cyclones that entered PAR from 1948–2013. One product of this study is a list of the 30 most vulnerable coastal areas that can be used as basis for choosing priority sites for further studies to implement appropriate site-specific solutions for flood risk management. Another product is the storm tide inundation maps that the local government units can use to develop a risk-sensitive land use plan for identifying appropriate areas to build residential buildings, evacuation sites, and other critical facilities and lifelines. The maps can also be used to develop a disaster response plan and evacuation scheme.

  18. Identification of storm surge vulnerable areas in the Philippines through the simulation of Typhoon Haiyan-induced storm surge levels over historical storm tracks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. P. Lapidez

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Super Typhoon Haiyan entered the Philippine Area of Responsibility (PAR on 7 November 2013, causing tremendous damage to infrastructure and loss of lives mainly due to the storm surge and strong winds. Storm surges up to a height of 7 m were reported in the hardest hit areas. The threat imposed by this kind of natural calamity compelled researchers of the Nationwide Operational Assessment of Hazards (Project NOAH which is the flagship disaster mitigation program of the Department of Science and Technology (DOST of the Philippine government to undertake a study to determine the vulnerability of all Philippine coastal communities to storm surges of the same magnitude as those generated by Haiyan. This study calculates the maximum probable storm surge height for every coastal locality by running simulations of Haiyan-type conditions but with tracks of tropical cyclones that entered PAR from 1948–2013. One product of this study is a list of the 30 most vulnerable coastal areas that can be used as a basis for choosing priority sites for further studies to implement appropriate site-specific solutions for flood risk management. Another product is the storm tide inundation maps that the local government units can use to develop a risk-sensitive land use plan for identifying appropriate areas to build residential buildings, evacuation sites, and other critical facilities and lifelines. The maps can also be used to develop a disaster response plan and evacuation scheme.

  19. Satellite tracking of harbour seals on Horns Reef - Use of the Horns Reef wind farm area and the North Sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ten harbour seals (Phoca vitulina) caught on the Danish Wadden Sea island Roemoe were equipped with satellite linked time depth recorders. The animals were caught on three separate occasions (Jan. 4th, Feb. 18th and May 6th, 2002). The transmitters worked between 49 and 100 days, relaying positional and dive information back via the ARGOS satellite service until beginning of July. Background for the studies is the construction of the Worlds largest off shore wind farm on Horns Reef. Based on previous studies using VHF-transmitters, it was expected that the seals would spend considerable time on Horns Reef. The VHF-telemetry studies showed that the preferred direction for seals leaving the Danish Wadden Sea is NW from Graedyb tidal area outside Esbjerg, the direction directly towards the wind farm area. The previously used VHF-transmitters had a limited detection range and it was decided to equip a number of seals from the same area as before with satellite transmitters. This allows for positioning of the seals in the entire North Sea as well as providing dive summary information, as a transmitter with a depth transducer was chosen for the study. Positional information revealed that animals move about more extensively than previously believed. Substantial variation between animals was observed and each seal seemed to have adopted its own foraging strategy. Some animals travelled to the centre of the North Sea on foraging trips and spent considerable time close to the bottom at 30-70 meters depth. Other seals remained in the German Bight and yet others spent considerable time on and around Horns Reef. The area of Horns reef wind farm constitutes a negligible fraction of the total area visited by the tagged seals. The reef as a whole however, appears to be important to the seals both for foraging and as transit area to other feeding grounds further off shore. The resolution in positional information is not sufficiently high to allow for a detailed study of the effects

  20. Satellite tracking of harbour seals on Horns Reef - Use of the Horns Reef wind farm area and the North Sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tougaard, J.; Tougaard, S.; Jensen, Thyge [Fisheries and Maritime Museum Esbjerg (Denmark); Ebbesen, I. [Univ. of Sourthern Denmark, Inst. of Biology, Odense (Denmark); Teilmann, J. [NationL Environmental Res. Inst., Roskidle (Denmark)

    2003-03-15

    Ten harbour seals (Phoca vitulina) caught on the Danish Wadden Sea island Roemoe were equipped with satellite linked time depth recorders. The animals were caught on three separate occasions (Jan. 4th, Feb. 18th and May 6th, 2002). The transmitters worked between 49 and 100 days, relaying positional and dive information back via the ARGOS satellite service until beginning of July. Background for the studies is the construction of the Worlds largest off shore wind farm on Horns Reef. Based on previous studies using VHF-transmitters, it was expected that the seals would spend considerable time on Horns Reef. The VHF-telemetry studies showed that the preferred direction for seals leaving the Danish Wadden Sea is NW from Graedyb tidal area outside Esbjerg, the direction directly towards the wind farm area. The previously used VHF-transmitters had a limited detection range and it was decided to equip a number of seals from the same area as before with satellite transmitters. This allows for positioning of the seals in the entire North Sea as well as providing dive summary information, as a transmitter with a depth transducer was chosen for the study. Positional information revealed that animals move about more extensively than previously believed. Substantial variation between animals was observed and each seal seemed to have adopted its own foraging strategy. Some animals travelled to the centre of the North Sea on foraging trips and spent considerable time close to the bottom at 30-70 meters depth. Other seals remained in the German Bight and yet others spent considerable time on and around Horns Reef. The area of Horns reef wind farm constitutes a negligible fraction of the total area visited by the tagged seals. The reef as a whole however, appears to be important to the seals both for foraging and as transit area to other feeding grounds further off shore. The resolution in positional information is not sufficiently high to allow for a detailed study of the effects

  1. Is the Region of Visegrad Countries on the Track to the Euro Area? Recent Evidence from the Real Convergence Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Stavárek

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available After enlargement of the European Union and subsequently joining of a new member states to the euro area, the question of economic convergence attracted considerable research interest. This paper adopts three alternative concepts to examine the level and trend of convergence in the Visegrad countries (Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland, Slovakia. We concurrently estimate the β-convergence, σ-convergence and business cycle synchronization to find out whether all countries are on the way towards higher convergence with the euro area. The results suggest that convergence of all countries has been increasing. However, the recent acceleration of the convergence process is caused mainly by external shocks in the form of the financial crisis and following economic slowdowns. Hence, the current level of convergence in the Visegrad countries cannot be considered as fully adequate.

  2. Radon measurements by nuclear track detectors in dwellings in Oke-Ogun area, South-Western, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obed, R I; Ademola, A K; Ogundare, F O

    2012-03-01

    An indoor radon survey of a total of 77 dwellings randomly selected in 10 districts in Oke-Ogun area of Oyo state, South-western Nigeria was carried out using CR-39 detectors. The CR-39 detectors were placed in the bedrooms and living rooms and exposed for 6 months and then etched in NaOH 6.25 N solution at 90 °C for 3 h. Mean concentrations amount to 255 ± 47 and 259 ± 67 Bq m(-3) in the living rooms and bedrooms, respectively. The lowest radon concentration (77 ± 29 Bq m(-3)) was found in Igbeti, whereas the highest was found in Okeho (627 ± 125 Bq m(-3)). The annual exposure of dwellers was estimated to fall radon level in this part of the country may be attributed to its geographic location. The data presented here will serve as a baseline survey for radon concentration in dwellings in the area.

  3. Silicon drift-chamber prototype for the upgrade of the UA6 experiment at the CERN p /bar char/p collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A large-area (≅ 4 x 4 cm2) silicon drift chamber has been designed and constructed in order to investigate its possible use in the UA6 experiment. The drift chamber will supply unambiguously (x,y) space points on each track; each arm of the UA6 spectrometer will be provided with two layers of drift detectors. 12 refs., 4 figs

  4. Neonate turtle tracking data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The objectives of this project are to use novel satellite tracking methods to provide improved estimation of threats at foraging areas and along migration routes...

  5. The silicon sensor for the compact muon solenoid tracker. Control of the fabrication process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) is one of the experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) under construction at CERN. The inner tracking system of this experiment consists of the world largest Silicon Strip Tracker (SST). In total, 24,244 silicon sensors are implemented covering an area of 206 m2. To construct this large system and to ensure its functionality for the full lifetime of ten years under the hard LHC condition, a detailed quality assurance program has been developed. This paper describes the strategy of the Process Qualification Control to monitor the stability of the fabrication process throughout the production phase and the results obtained are shown. (authors)

  6. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 539: Areas 25 and 26 Railroad Tracks Nevada National Security Site, Nevada with ROTC-1, Revision 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark Kauss

    2011-06-01

    This Closure Report (CR) presents information supporting the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 539: Areas 25 and 26 Railroad Tracks, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada. This CR complies with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Management; U.S. Department of Defense; and DOE, Legacy Management. The corrective action sites (CASs) within CAU 539 are located within Areas 25 and 26 of the Nevada National Security Site. Corrective Action Unit 539 comprises the following CASs: • 25-99-21, Area 25 Railroad Tracks • 26-99-05, Area 26 Railroad Tracks The purpose of this CR is to provide documentation supporting the completed corrective actions and provide data confirming that the closure objectives for CASs within CAU 539 were met. To achieve this, the following actions were performed: • Reviewed documentation on historical and current site conditions, including the concentration and extent of contamination. • Conducted radiological walkover surveys of railroad tracks in both Areas 25 and 26. • Collected ballast and soil samples and calculated internal dose estimates for radiological releases. • Collected in situ thermoluminescent dosimeter measurements and calculated external dose estimates for radiological releases. • Removed lead bricks as potential source material (PSM) and collected verification samples. • Implemented corrective actions as necessary to protect human health and the environment. • Properly disposed of corrective action and investigation wastes. • Implemented an FFACO use restriction (UR) for radiological contamination at CAS 25-99-21. The approved UR form and map are provided in Appendix F and will be filed in the DOE, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), Facility Information Management System; the FFACO database; and the NNSA/NSO CAU/CAS files. From November 29

  7. Track reconstruction in CMS high luminosity environment

    CERN Document Server

    Goetzmann, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    The CMS tracker is the largest silicon detector ever built, covering 200 square meters and providing an average of 14 high-precision measurements per track. Tracking is essential for the reconstruction of objects like jets, muons, electrons and tau leptons starting from the raw data from the silicon pixel and strip detectors. Track reconstruction is widely used also at trigger level as it improves objects tagging and resolution.The CMS tracking code is organized in several levels, known as iterative steps, each optimized to reconstruct a class of particle trajectories, as the ones of particles originating from the primary vertex or displaced tracks from particles resulting from secondary vertices. Each iterative step consists of seeding, pattern recognition and fitting by a kalman filter, and a final filtering and cleaning. Each subsequent step works on hits not yet associated to a reconstructed particle trajectory.The CMS tracking code is continuously evolving to make the reconstruction computing load compat...

  8. Porous silicon gettering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuo, Y.S.; Menna, P.; Pitts, J.R. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)] [and others

    1996-05-01

    The authors have studied a novel extrinsic gettering method that uses the large surface areas produced by a porous-silicon etch as gettering sites. The annealing step of the gettering used a high-flux solar furnace. They found that a high density of photons during annealing enhanced the impurity diffusion to the gettering sites. The authors used metallurgical-grade Si (MG-Si) prepared by directional solidification casing as the starting material. They propose to use porous-silicon-gettered MG-Si as a low-cost epitaxial substrate for polycrystalline silicon thin-film growth.

  9. Silicon detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The status and recent progress of silicon detectors for high energy physics is reviewed. Emphasis is put on detectors with high spatial resolution and the use of silicon detectors in calorimeters. (orig.)

  10. Integration of kerma-area product and cumulative air kerma determination into a skin dose tracking system for fluoroscopic imaging procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayan, Sarath; Shankar, Alok; Rudin, Stephen; Bednarek, Daniel R.

    2016-03-01

    The skin dose tracking system (DTS) that we developed provides a color-coded mapping of the cumulative skin dose distribution on a 3D graphic of the patient during fluoroscopic procedures in real time. The DTS has now been modified to also calculate the kerma area product (KAP) and cumulative air kerma (CAK) for fluoroscopic interventions using data obtained in real-time from the digital bus on a Toshiba Infinix system. KAP is the integral of air kerma over the beam area and is typically measured with a large-area transmission ionization chamber incorporated into the collimator assembly. In this software, KAP is automatically determined for each x-ray pulse as the product of the air kerma/ mAs from a calibration file for the given kVp and beam filtration times the mAs per pulse times the length and width of the beam times a field nonuniformity correction factor. Field nonuniformity is primarily the result of the heel effect and the correction factor was determined from the beam profile measured using radio-chromic film. Dividing the KAP by the beam area at the interventional reference point provides the area averaged CAK. The KAP and CAK per x-ray pulse are summed after each pulse to obtain the total procedure values in real-time. The calculated KAP and CAK were compared to the values displayed by the fluoroscopy machine with excellent agreement. The DTS now is able to automatically calculate both KAP and CAK without the need for measurement by an add-on transmission ionization chamber.

  11. Particle tracking with scintillating fibres

    CERN Document Server

    D'Ambrosio, C; Leutz, H; Puertolas, D

    1996-01-01

    This article presents our R&D-work on particle tracking with scintillating fibres. We have developed new fibre dyes, more efficient fibre cladding, coherent fibre bundles with improved packing fraction and a new fibre readout technique (ISPA-tube). Altogether, these new developments increased the hit density of fine grain (60 µm) fibres by about 7 times. This results in mini-tracks per 2.5 mm fibre layer rather than in single hits only and enhances the track reconstruction efficiency to nearly 100 %. Compared with competing tracking methods (silicon strips, MSGCs), our scintillating fibres are superior in hit numbers per radiation length and in the 2-track resolution. They require much less readout channels and consequently no cooling provisions to remove their electronic heat.

  12. Evaluating Crop Area Mapping from MODIS Time-Series as an Assessment Tool for Zimbabwe's "Fast Track Land Reform Programme".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hentze, Konrad; Thonfeld, Frank; Menz, Gunter

    2016-01-01

    Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data forms the basis for numerous land use and land cover (LULC) mapping and analysis frameworks at regional scale. Compared to other satellite sensors, the spatial, temporal and spectral specifications of MODIS are considered as highly suitable for LULC classifications which support many different aspects of social, environmental and developmental research. The LULC mapping of this study was carried out in the context of the development of an evaluation approach for Zimbabwe's land reform program. Within the discourse about the success of this program, a lack of spatially explicit methods to produce objective data, such as on the extent of agricultural area, is apparent. We therefore assessed the suitability of moderate spatial and high temporal resolution imagery and phenological parameters to retrieve regional figures about the extent of cropland area in former freehold tenure in a series of 13 years from 2001-2013. Time-series data was processed with TIMESAT and was stratified according to agro-ecological potential zoning of Zimbabwe. Random Forest (RF) classifications were used to produce annual binary crop/non crop maps which were evaluated with high spatial resolution data from other satellite sensors. We assessed the cropland products in former freehold tenure in terms of classification accuracy, inter-annual comparability and heterogeneity. Although general LULC patterns were depicted in classification results and an overall accuracy of over 80% was achieved, user accuracies for rainfed agriculture were limited to below 65%. We conclude that phenological analysis has to be treated with caution when rainfed agriculture and grassland in semi-humid tropical regions have to be separated based on MODIS spectral data and phenological parameters. Because classification results significantly underestimate redistributed commercial farmland in Zimbabwe, we argue that the method cannot be used to produce spatial

  13. Tracking potential source areas of Central European loess: examples from Tokaj (HU), Nussloch (D) and Grub (AT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schatz, Ann-Kathrin; Qi, Yue; Siebel, Wolfgang; Wu, Jiade; Zöller, Ludwig

    2015-11-01

    There are several competing hypotheses for the origin of loess in Europe but quantitative evidence is still rare. Here, Sr-Nd isotopic and bulk elemental composition of loess from Marine Isotope Stages 2 and 3 from three study regions in Central Europe - Nussloch (Germany), Grub (Austria) and Tokaj (Hungary) - are analyzed. This study aims at examining differences and similarities of loess deposits throughout Europe, correlating loess with potential source rocks from major mountain ranges and comparing loess with floodplain sediments from main rivers as integrated samples of the drainage areas. The results show that European loess deposits are largely uniform and that sediment sources have been rather stable in the Southern and Eastern parts of Central Europe and more variable in West Central Europe. However, the methods used are not sufficient to unequivocally confirm and reject potential sediment sources but, in combination, help to identify the most likely sediment origins. While a direct correlation of loess and potential source rocks is dif- ficult, the comparison with floodplain sediments is most promising and confirms previous hypotheses. Loess from Tokaj and Grub is most likely a mix of material transported by the Danube River and sediments from the surrounding mountains. Rhine River sediments are probably the main source of loess at Nussloch.

  14. Groundwater Monitoring and Tritium-Tracking Plan for the 200 Area State-Approved Land Disposal Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnett, D. Brent

    2000-08-31

    The 200 Area State-Approved Land Disposal Site (SALDS) is a drainfield which receives treated wastewater, occasionally containing high levels of tritium from treatment of Hanford Site liquid wastes. Only the SALDS proximal wells (699-48-77A, 699-48-77C, and 699-48-77D) have been affected by tritium from the facility thus far; the highest activity observed (2.1E+6 pCi/L) occurred in well 699-48-77D in February 1998. Analytical results of groundwater geochemistry since groundwater monitoring began at the SALDS indicate that all constituents with permit enforcement limits have been below those limits with the exception of one measurement of total dissolved solids (TDS) in 1996. The revised groundwater monitoring sampling and analysis plan eliminates chloroform, acetone, tetrahydrofuran, benzene, and ammonia as constituents. Replicate field measurements will replace laboratory measurements of pH for compliance purposes. A deep companion well to well 699-51-75 will be monitored for tritium deeper in the uppermost aquifer.

  15. Musculoskeletal disorders in construction: A review and a novel system for activity tracking with body area network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valero, Enrique; Sivanathan, Aparajithan; Bosché, Frédéric; Abdel-Wahab, Mohamed

    2016-05-01

    Human body motions have been analysed for decades with a view on enhancing occupational well-being and performance of workers. On-going progresses in miniaturised wearable sensors are set to revolutionise biomechanical analysis by providing accurate and real-time quantitative motion data. The construction industry has a poor record of occupational health, in particular with regard to work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs). In this article, we therefore focus on the study of human body motions that could cause WMSDs in construction-related activities. We first present an in-depth review of existing assessment frameworks used in practice for the evaluation of human body motion. Subsequently different methods for measuring working postures and motions are reviewed and compared, pointing out the technological developments, limitations and gaps; Inertial Measurement Units (IMUs) are particularly investigated. Finally, we introduce a new system to detect and characterise unsafe postures of construction workers based on the measurement of motion data from wearable wireless IMUs integrated in a body area network. The potential of this system is demonstrated through experiments conducts in a laboratory as well as in a college with actual construction trade trainees. PMID:26851471

  16. Musculoskeletal disorders in construction: A review and a novel system for activity tracking with body area network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valero, Enrique; Sivanathan, Aparajithan; Bosché, Frédéric; Abdel-Wahab, Mohamed

    2016-05-01

    Human body motions have been analysed for decades with a view on enhancing occupational well-being and performance of workers. On-going progresses in miniaturised wearable sensors are set to revolutionise biomechanical analysis by providing accurate and real-time quantitative motion data. The construction industry has a poor record of occupational health, in particular with regard to work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs). In this article, we therefore focus on the study of human body motions that could cause WMSDs in construction-related activities. We first present an in-depth review of existing assessment frameworks used in practice for the evaluation of human body motion. Subsequently different methods for measuring working postures and motions are reviewed and compared, pointing out the technological developments, limitations and gaps; Inertial Measurement Units (IMUs) are particularly investigated. Finally, we introduce a new system to detect and characterise unsafe postures of construction workers based on the measurement of motion data from wearable wireless IMUs integrated in a body area network. The potential of this system is demonstrated through experiments conducts in a laboratory as well as in a college with actual construction trade trainees.

  17. Fish with chips: tracking reef fish movements to evaluate size and connectivity of Caribbean marine protected areas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon J Pittman

    Full Text Available Coral reefs and associated fish populations have experienced rapid decline in the Caribbean region and marine protected areas (MPAs have been widely implemented to address this decline. The performance of no-take MPAs (i.e., marine reserves for protecting and rebuilding fish populations is influenced by the movement of animals within and across their boundaries. Very little is known about Caribbean reef fish movements creating a critical knowledge gap that can impede effective MPA design, performance and evaluation. Using miniature implanted acoustic transmitters and a fixed acoustic receiver array, we address three key questions: How far can reef fish move? Does connectivity exist between adjacent MPAs? Does existing MPA size match the spatial scale of reef fish movements? We show that many reef fishes are capable of traveling far greater distances and in shorter duration than was previously known. Across the Puerto Rican Shelf, more than half of our 163 tagged fish (18 species of 10 families moved distances greater than 1 km with three fish moving more than 10 km in a single day and a quarter spending time outside of MPAs. We provide direct evidence of ecological connectivity across a network of MPAs, including estimated movements of more than 40 km connecting a nearshore MPA with a shelf-edge spawning aggregation. Most tagged fish showed high fidelity to MPAs, but also spent time outside MPAs, potentially contributing to spillover. Three-quarters of our fish were capable of traveling distances that would take them beyond the protection offered by at least 40-64% of the existing eastern Caribbean MPAs. We recommend that key species movement patterns be used to inform and evaluate MPA functionality and design, particularly size and shape. A re-scaling of our perception of Caribbean reef fish mobility and habitat use is imperative, with important implications for ecology and management effectiveness.

  18. The effect of minimum impact education on visitor spatial behavior in parks and protected areas: An experimental investigation using GPS-based tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidd, Abigail M; Monz, Christopher; D'Antonio, Ashley; Manning, Robert E; Reigner, Nathan; Goonan, Kelly A; Jacobi, Charles

    2015-10-01

    The unmanaged impacts of recreation and tourism can often result in unacceptable changes in resource conditions and quality of the visitor experience. Minimum impact visitor education programs aim to reduce the impacts of recreation by altering visitor behaviors. Specifically, education seeks to reduce impacts resulting from lack of knowledge both about the consequences of one's actions and impact-minimizing best practices. In this study, three different on-site minimum impact education strategies ("treatments") and a control condition were applied on the trails and summit area of Sargent Mountain in Acadia National Park, Maine. Treatment conditions were designed to encourage visitors to stay on marked trails and minimize off-trail travel. Treatments included a message delivered via personal contact, and both an ecological-based message and an amenity-based message posted on signs located alongside the trail. A control condition of current trail markings and directional signs was also assessed. The efficacy of the messaging was evaluated through the use of Global Positioning System (GPS) tracking of visitor spatial behavior on/off trails. Spatial analysis of GPS tracks revealed statistically significant differences among treatments, with the personal contact treatment yielding significantly less dispersion of visitors on the mountain summit. Results also indicate that the signs deployed in the study were ineffective at limiting off-trail use beyond what can be accomplished with trail markers and directional signs. These findings suggest that personal contact by a uniformed ranger or volunteer may be the most effective means of message delivery for on-site minimum impact education. PMID:26225933

  19. Development of n{sup +}-in-p large-area silicon microstrip sensors for very high radiation environments – ATLAS12 design and initial results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unno, Y., E-mail: yoshinobu.unno@kek.jp [Institute of Particle and Nuclear Study, KEK, Oho 1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Edwards, S.O.; Pyatt, S.; Thomas, J.P.; Wilson, J.A. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Kierstead, J.; Lynn, D. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Physics Department and Instrumentation Division, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Carter, J.R.; Hommels, L.B.A.; Robinson, D. [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, JJ Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Bloch, I.; Gregor, I.M.; Tackmann, K. [Josef Stefan Institute and Department of Physics, University of Ljubljana, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Betancourt, C.; Jakobs, K.; Kuehn, S.; Mori, R.; Parzefall, U.; Wiik-Fucks, L. [Physikalisches Institut, Universitt Freiburg, Hermann-Herder-Str. 3, D-79104 Freiburg (Germany); Clark, A. [DPNC, University of Geneva, 24, Quai Ernest-Ansermet, CH-1211 Genve 4 (Switzerland); and others

    2014-11-21

    We have been developing a novel radiation-tolerant n{sup +}-in-p silicon microstrip sensor for very high radiation environments, aiming for application in the high luminosity large hadron collider. The sensors are fabricated in 6 in., p-type, float-zone wafers, where large-area strip sensor designs are laid out together with a number of miniature sensors. Radiation tolerance has been studied with ATLAS07 sensors and with independent structures. The ATLAS07 design was developed into new ATLAS12 designs. The ATLAS12A large-area sensor is made towards an axial strip sensor and the ATLAS12M towards a stereo strip sensor. New features to the ATLAS12 sensors are two dicing lines: standard edge space of 910 μm and slim edge space of 450 μm, a gated punch-through protection structure, and connection of orphan strips in a triangular corner of stereo strips. We report the design of the ATLAS12 layouts and initial measurements of the leakage current after dicing and the resistivity of the wafers.

  20. Development of large area nanostructured silicon-hydrogen alloy material with improved stability for solar cell application by argon dilution method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Arka; Das, Mrinmay; Datta, Joydeep; Jana, Rajkumar; Dhar, Joydeep; Sil, Sayantan; Biswas, Debasish; Banerjee, Chandan; Ray, Partha Pratim

    2016-07-01

    Here we have presented the results of large area (30 × 30 cm2) silicon-hydrogen alloy material and solar cell by argon dilution method. As an alternative to hydrogen dilution, argon dilution method has been applied to develop single junction solar cell with appreciable stability. Optimization of deposition conditions revealed that 95% argon dilution gives a nanostructured material with improved transport property and less light induced degradation. The minority carrier diffusion length (L d ) and mobility-lifetime (μτ) product of the material with 95% argon dilution degrades least after light soaking. Also the density of states (DOS) below conduction level reveals that this material is less defective. Solar cell with this argon diluted material has been fabricated with all the layers deposited by argon dilution method. Finally we have compared the argon diluted solar cell results with the optimized hydrogen diluted solar cell. Light soaking study proves that it is possible to develop stable solar cell on large area by argon dilution method and that the degradation of argon diluted solar cell is less than that of hydrogen diluted one. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  1. Characterization of groundwater flow and transport in the General Separations Areas, Savannah River Plant: Flow model refinement and particle-tracking analysis report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duffield, G.M.; Buss, D.R.; Root, R.W. Jr.; Hughes, S.S.; Mercer, J.W. [GeoTrans, Inc., Sterling, VA (United States)

    1986-03-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is preparing the necessary NEPA documentation for an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) to address the waste disposal activities for groundwater protection at the Savannah River Plant (SRP). For purposes of this EIA, the areas within the plant have been separated into 26 functional groups based primarily on hydrogeologic setting and types of disposed waste materials. The overall objective is to provide an appropriate quantitative assessment of the environmental impacts from past and future operations within each functional group. The analysis from each functional group will be integrated to assess the impacts of plant-wide operations. A flexible approach to quantifying the impacts using several methods of quantitative analysis is being employed. Numerical flow and transport modeling is one method being applied to several functional groups. The scope of work can be divided into four broad categories: (1) Data Review and Conceptual Model Development, (2) Groundwater Flow Model Construction and Refinement, (3) Solute Transport Model Construction, and (4) Remedial Alternative Simulations. The major topics covered in this report are: (1) summary of the hydrogeologic conditions of the area, (2) observed flow velocities at the study site, (3) a summary of results from the preliminary flow modeling effort, (4) flow model refinement and results, and (5) particle tracking analyses based on the refined flow model.

  2. Soil gas radon–thoron monitoring in Dharamsala area of north-west Himalayas, India using solid state nuclear track detectors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Gulshan Kumar; Arvind Kumar; Vivek Walia; Jitender Kumar; Vikash Gupta; Tsanyao Frank Yang; Surinder Singh; Bikramjit Singh Bajwa

    2013-10-01

    The study described here is based on the measurements of soil gas radon–thoron concentrations performed at Dharamsala region of north-west (NW) Himalayas, India. The study area is tectonically and environmentally significant and shows the features of ductile shear zone due to the presence of distinct thrust planes. Solid state nuclear track detectors (LR-115 films) have been used for the soil gas radon–thoron monitoring. Twenty five radon–thoron discriminators with LR-115 films were installed in the borehole of about 50 cm in the study areas. The recorded radon concentration varies from 1593 to 13570 Bq/m3 with an average value of 5292 Bq/m3. The recorded thoron concentration varies from 223 to 2920 Bq/m3 with an average value of 901 Bq/m3. The anomalous value of radon–thoron has been observed near to the faults like main boundary thrust (MBT and MBT2) as well as neotectonic lineaments in the region.

  3. Soil gas radon-thoron monitoring in Dharamsala area of north-west Himalayas, India using solid state nuclear track detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Gulshan; Kumar, Arvind; Walia, Vivek; Kumar, Jitender; Gupta, Vikash; Yang, Tsanyao Frank; Singh, Surinder; Bajwa, Bikramjit Singh

    2013-10-01

    The study described here is based on the measurements of soil gas radon-thoron concentrations performed at Dharamsala region of north-west (NW) Himalayas, India. The study area is tectonically and environmentally significant and shows the features of ductile shear zone due to the presence of distinct thrust planes. Solid state nuclear track detectors (LR-115 films) have been used for the soil gas radon-thoron monitoring. Twenty five radon-thoron discriminators with LR-115 films were installed in the borehole of about 50 cm in the study areas. The recorded radon concentration varies from 1593 to 13570 Bq/m3 with an average value of 5292 Bq/m3. The recorded thoron concentration varies from 223 to 2920 Bq/m3 with an average value of 901 Bq/m3. The anomalous value of radon-thoron has been observed near to the faults like main boundary thrust (MBT and MBT2) as well as neotectonic lineaments in the region.

  4. Five-year tracking of Plasmodium falciparum allele frequencies in a holoendemic area with indistinct seasonal transitions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akala HM

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Hoseah M Akala, Angela O Achieng, Fredrick L Eyase, Dennis W Juma, Luiser Ingasia, Agnes C Cheruiyot, Charles Okello, Duke Omariba, Eunice A Owiti, Catherine Muriuki, Redemptah Yeda, Ben Andagalu, Jacob D Johnson, Edwin Kamau Global Emerging Infections Surveillance Program, United States Army Medical Research Unit-Kenya, Kenya Medical Research Institute, Walter Reed Project, Kisumu and Nairobi, Kenya Background: The renewed malaria eradication efforts require an understanding of the seasonal patterns of frequency of polymorphic variants in order to focus limited funds productively. Although cross-sectional studies in holoendemic areas spanning a single year could be useful in describing parasite genotype status at a given point, such information is inadequate in describing temporal trends in genotype polymorphisms. For Plasmodium falciparum isolates from Kisumu District Hospital, Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine-resistance transporter gene (Pfcrt-K76T and P. falciparum multidrug resistance gene 1 (PfMDR1-N86Y, were analyzed for polymorphisms and parasitemia changes in the 53 months from March 2008 to August 2012. Observations were compared with prevailing climatic factors, including humidity, rainfall, and temperature. Methods: Parasitemia (the percentage of infected red blood cells per total red blood cells was established by microscopy for P. falciparum malaria-positive samples. P. falciparum DNA was extracted from whole blood using a Qiagen DNA Blood Mini Kit. Single nucleotide polymorphism identification at positions Pfcrt-K76T and PfMDR1-N86Y was performed using real-time polymerase chain reaction and/or sequencing. Data on climatic variables were obtained from http://www.tutiempo.net/en/. Results: A total of 895 field isolates from 2008 (n=169, 2009 (n=161, 2010 (n=216, 2011 (n=223, and 2012 (n=126 showed large variations in monthly frequency of PfMDR1-N86Y and Pfcrt-K76T as the mutant genotypes decreased from 68.4%±15% and 38.1%±13% to

  5. A semiconductor silicon PIN diode matrix detector for measurement of 133Xe washout in small regional skin areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, J H; Sørensen, J L; Hauge, E N; Sejrsen, P; Bojsen, J

    1993-05-01

    Local variations in microvascularization are expected in lesions and lesion-free skin of patients with pressure sores. To investigate these variations, methods for studies of the regional blood flow rate within small skin areas are needed. Regional blood flow can be estimated by measuring the washout of 133Xe from the tissue. This study describes a 2 x 12 Si PIN diode matrix detector capable of 133Xe detection, and equipped with a collimator to improve the spatial resolution. Thus the regional blood flow in subcutaneous skin areas down to about 2 cm2 can be investigated when the atraumatic epicutaneous labelling technique is used. The capability of the matrix detector and its collimator is described by laboratory investigations. In pilot investigations three normal subjects and three paraplegics with pressure sores were studied. In each individual study the detector matrix was divided into six square areas containing four diode detectors each. Thus six 133Xe disappearance rate constants from adjacent subcutaneous tissue could be determined simultaneously. PMID:8334415

  6. Transformational silicon electronics

    KAUST Repository

    Rojas, Jhonathan Prieto

    2014-02-25

    In today\\'s traditional electronics such as in computers or in mobile phones, billions of high-performance, ultra-low-power devices are neatly integrated in extremely compact areas on rigid and brittle but low-cost bulk monocrystalline silicon (100) wafers. Ninety percent of global electronics are made up of silicon. Therefore, we have developed a generic low-cost regenerative batch fabrication process to transform such wafers full of devices into thin (5 μm), mechanically flexible, optically semitransparent silicon fabric with devices, then recycling the remaining wafer to generate multiple silicon fabric with chips and devices, ensuring low-cost and optimal utilization of the whole substrate. We show monocrystalline, amorphous, and polycrystalline silicon and silicon dioxide fabric, all from low-cost bulk silicon (100) wafers with the semiconductor industry\\'s most advanced high-κ/metal gate stack based high-performance, ultra-low-power capacitors, field effect transistors, energy harvesters, and storage to emphasize the effectiveness and versatility of this process to transform traditional electronics into flexible and semitransparent ones for multipurpose applications. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  7. Crescimento de diamante CVD em substratos de silício de grande área CVD Diamond growth in the silicon substrates of large area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Roberto Moro

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Realizaram-se crescimentos de filmes de diamante por deposição química de vapor (CVD, do inglês Chemical Vapor Deposition em substratos de silício (100, de grande área (80 cm², em um reator de filamento quente (HFCVD, com taxas de crescimento superiores a 1,5 µm/h. Foi realizado o crescimento das amostras com diferentes fluxos gasosos e diferentes porcentagens de metano (CH4 em hidrogênio (H2. As amostras foram caracterizadas por microscopia óptica, eletrônica de varredura e por espectroscopia de espalhamento Raman. Tais análises acusaram a presença de diamante de alta pureza em todas as amostras.Diamond films were grown through Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD in silicon substrates (100 of large area (80 cm², in a hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD, with growth rates over 1,5 µm/h. The growth of samples was made with different gaseous fluxes and different methane percentages (CH4 in hydrogen (H2. The samples were analyzed through optical microscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy and Raman spectroscopy scattering. Such analyzes showed the presence of a high purity diamond in all samples.

  8. High Area Capacity Lithium-Sulfur Full-cell Battery with Prelitiathed Silicon Nanowire-Carbon Anodes for Long Cycling Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Andreas; Dörfler, Susanne; Piwko, Markus; Wisser, Florian M.; Jaumann, Tony; Ahrens, Eike; Giebeler, Lars; Althues, Holger; Schädlich, Stefan; Grothe, Julia; Jeffery, Andrea; Grube, Matthias; Brückner, Jan; Martin, Jan; Eckert, Jürgen; Kaskel, Stefan; Mikolajick, Thomas; Weber, Walter M.

    2016-01-01

    We show full Li/S cells with the use of balanced and high capacity electrodes to address high power electro-mobile applications. The anode is made of an assembly comprising of silicon nanowires as active material densely and conformally grown on a 3D carbon mesh as a light-weight current collector, offering extremely high areal capacity for reversible Li storage of up to 9 mAh/cm2. The dense growth is guaranteed by a versatile Au precursor developed for homogenous Au layer deposition on 3D substrates. In contrast to metallic Li, the presented system exhibits superior characteristics as an anode in Li/S batteries such as safe operation, long cycle life and easy handling. These anodes are combined with high area density S/C composite cathodes into a Li/S full-cell with an ether- and lithium triflate-based electrolyte for high ionic conductivity. The result is a highly cyclable full-cell with an areal capacity of 2.3 mAh/cm2, a cyclability surpassing 450 cycles and capacity retention of 80% after 150 cycles (capacity loss <0.4% per cycle). A detailed physical and electrochemical investigation of the SiNW Li/S full-cell including in-operando synchrotron X-ray diffraction measurements reveals that the lower degradation is due to a lower self-reduction of polysulfides after continuous charging/discharging. PMID:27319783

  9. High Area Capacity Lithium-Sulfur Full-cell Battery with Prelitiathed Silicon Nanowire-Carbon Anodes for Long Cycling Stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Andreas; Dörfler, Susanne; Piwko, Markus; Wisser, Florian M; Jaumann, Tony; Ahrens, Eike; Giebeler, Lars; Althues, Holger; Schädlich, Stefan; Grothe, Julia; Jeffery, Andrea; Grube, Matthias; Brückner, Jan; Martin, Jan; Eckert, Jürgen; Kaskel, Stefan; Mikolajick, Thomas; Weber, Walter M

    2016-01-01

    We show full Li/S cells with the use of balanced and high capacity electrodes to address high power electro-mobile applications. The anode is made of an assembly comprising of silicon nanowires as active material densely and conformally grown on a 3D carbon mesh as a light-weight current collector, offering extremely high areal capacity for reversible Li storage of up to 9 mAh/cm(2). The dense growth is guaranteed by a versatile Au precursor developed for homogenous Au layer deposition on 3D substrates. In contrast to metallic Li, the presented system exhibits superior characteristics as an anode in Li/S batteries such as safe operation, long cycle life and easy handling. These anodes are combined with high area density S/C composite cathodes into a Li/S full-cell with an ether- and lithium triflate-based electrolyte for high ionic conductivity. The result is a highly cyclable full-cell with an areal capacity of 2.3 mAh/cm(2), a cyclability surpassing 450 cycles and capacity retention of 80% after 150 cycles (capacity loss <0.4% per cycle). A detailed physical and electrochemical investigation of the SiNW Li/S full-cell including in-operando synchrotron X-ray diffraction measurements reveals that the lower degradation is due to a lower self-reduction of polysulfides after continuous charging/discharging. PMID:27319783

  10. High Area Capacity Lithium-Sulfur Full-cell Battery with Prelitiathed Silicon Nanowire-Carbon Anodes for Long Cycling Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Andreas; Dörfler, Susanne; Piwko, Markus; Wisser, Florian M.; Jaumann, Tony; Ahrens, Eike; Giebeler, Lars; Althues, Holger; Schädlich, Stefan; Grothe, Julia; Jeffery, Andrea; Grube, Matthias; Brückner, Jan; Martin, Jan; Eckert, Jürgen; Kaskel, Stefan; Mikolajick, Thomas; Weber, Walter M.

    2016-06-01

    We show full Li/S cells with the use of balanced and high capacity electrodes to address high power electro-mobile applications. The anode is made of an assembly comprising of silicon nanowires as active material densely and conformally grown on a 3D carbon mesh as a light-weight current collector, offering extremely high areal capacity for reversible Li storage of up to 9 mAh/cm2. The dense growth is guaranteed by a versatile Au precursor developed for homogenous Au layer deposition on 3D substrates. In contrast to metallic Li, the presented system exhibits superior characteristics as an anode in Li/S batteries such as safe operation, long cycle life and easy handling. These anodes are combined with high area density S/C composite cathodes into a Li/S full-cell with an ether- and lithium triflate-based electrolyte for high ionic conductivity. The result is a highly cyclable full-cell with an areal capacity of 2.3 mAh/cm2, a cyclability surpassing 450 cycles and capacity retention of 80% after 150 cycles (capacity loss cycle). A detailed physical and electrochemical investigation of the SiNW Li/S full-cell including in-operando synchrotron X-ray diffraction measurements reveals that the lower degradation is due to a lower self-reduction of polysulfides after continuous charging/discharging.

  11. Feasibility studies for a wireless 60 GHz tracking detector readout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittmeier, S.; Schöning, A.; Soltveit, H. K.; Wiedner, D.

    2016-09-01

    The amount of data produced by highly granular silicon tracking detectors in high energy physics experiments poses a major challenge to readout systems. At high collision rates, e.g. at LHC experiments, only a small fraction of data can be read out with currently used technologies. To cope with the requirements of future or upgraded experiments new data transfer techniques are required which offer high data rates at low power and low material budget. Wireless technologies operating in the 60 GHz band or at higher frequencies offer high data rates and are thus a promising upcoming alternative to conventional data transmission via electrical cables or optical fibers. Using wireless technology, the amount of cables and connectors in detectors can be significantly reduced. Tracking detectors profit most from a reduced material budget as fewer secondary particle interactions (multiple Coulomb scattering, energy loss, etc.) improve the tracking performance in general. We present feasibility studies regarding the integration of the wireless technology at 60 GHz into a silicon tracking detector. We use spare silicon strip modules of the ATLAS experiment as test samples which are measured to be opaque in the 60 GHz range. The reduction of cross talk between links and the attenuation of reflections is studied. An estimate of the maximum achievable link density is given. It is shown that wireless links can be placed as close as 2 cm next to each other for a layer distance of 10 cm by exploiting one or several of the following measures: highly directive antennas, absorbers like graphite foam, linear polarization and frequency channeling. Combining these measures, a data rate area density of up to 11 Tb/(s·m2) seems feasible. In addition, two types of silicon sensors are tested under mm-wave irradiation in order to determine the influence of 60 GHz data transmission on the detector performance: an ATLAS silicon strip sensor module and an HV-MAPS prototype for the Mu3e

  12. Development Of Protocols For Simultaneous Measurements Of Rn, Tn Using Nuclear Track Detectors And Trial Application In Mining Areas Of Vietnam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioactive gases Radon (Rn) and Thoron (Tn) contribute of more than 50% of natural radiation dose. However, separate measurements of Rn and Tn have not been paid enough attention. An Intergovernmental Cooperation Project was conducted at the Institute for Nuclear Science and Technology with the help from Hungarian experts. The main tasks of the project were to finalize 02 protocols for simultaneous measurements of Rn and Tn using nuclear track detectors and to test these protocols in investigating the concentrations of Rn and Tn, calculating the natural dose due to Rn and Tn, and evaluating the increased radiation dose and radiation safety due to mining activities. Main results of the project include 02 protocols for simultaneous measurements of Rn and Tn and the test results in the mining areas. Rn and Tn concentrations inside the coal mining tunnels are in the average level of Vietnam and the world. Tn concentration inside the factory for separating Zircon at the Ha Tinh Zircon Processing Plant was found to be very high, up to 2931 Bq/m3. Based on annual effective dose calculation, workers inside the factory for separating Zircon at the Ha Tinh Zircon Processing Plant could receive an annual effective dose due to Rn and Tn of 4.890 mSv/year, and the increasing dose of 4.710 mSv/year is for higher than 1 mSv/year recommended by the IAEA. (author)

  13. Development of an adjoint model of GRAPES-CUACE and its application in tracking influential haze source areas in north China

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Xing Qin; Xian Zhai, Shi; Jin, Min; Gong, Sunling; Wang, Yu

    2016-06-01

    The aerosol adjoint module of the atmospheric chemical modeling system GRAPES-CUACE (Global-Regional Assimilation and Prediction System coupled with the CMA Unified Atmospheric Chemistry Environment) is constructed based on the adjoint theory. This includes the development and validation of the tangent linear and the adjoint models of the three parts involved in the GRAPES-CUACE aerosol module: CAM (Canadian Aerosol Module), interface programs that connect GRAPES and CUACE, and the aerosol transport processes that are embedded in GRAPES. Meanwhile, strict mathematical validation schemes for the tangent linear and the adjoint models are implemented for all input variables. After each part of the module and the assembled tangent linear and adjoint models is verified, the adjoint model of the GRAPES-CUACE aerosol is developed and used in a black carbon (BC) receptor-source sensitivity analysis to track influential haze source areas in north China. The sensitivity of the average BC concentration over Beijing at the highest concentration time point (referred to as the Objective Function) is calculated with respect to the BC amount emitted over the Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei region. Four types of regions are selected based on the administrative division or the sensitivity coefficient distribution. The adjoint sensitivity results are then used to quantify the effect of reducing the emission sources at different time intervals over different regions. It is indicated that the more influential regions (with relatively larger sensitivity coefficients) do not necessarily correspond to the administrative regions. Instead, the influence per unit area of the sensitivity selected regions is greater. Therefore, controlling the most influential regions during critical time intervals based on the results of the adjoint sensitivity analysis is much more efficient than controlling administrative regions during an experimental time period.

  14. Silicon strip detector qualification for the CMS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Kaußen, Gordon

    2008-01-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) is one of the four experiments being installed at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) which is located at the european organization for nuclear research CERN in Geneva. This proton-proton collider will explore a new energy regime of up to 14TeV center-of-mass energy. To provide the best spatial resolution for the particle trajectory reconstruction and a very fast readout, the inner tracking system of CMS is build up of silicon detectors with a pixel tracker in the center surrounded by a strip tracker. The silicon strip tracker consists of so-called modules representing the smallest detection unit of the tracking device. These modules are mounted on higher-level structures called shells in the tracker inner barrel (TIB), rods in the tracker outer barrel (TOB), disks in the tracker inner disks (TID) and petals in the tracker end caps (TEC). The entire strip tracker spans an active area of about 198m2 and consists of approximately 16000 modules. Before the silicon sensors were assembl...

  15. Performance of the CLAS12 Silicon Vertex Tracker modules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antonioli, Mary Ann [JLAB; Boiarinov, Serguie; Bonneau, Peter R. [JLAB; Elouadrhiri, Latifa [JLAB; Eng, Brian J. [JLAB; Gotra, Yuri N. [JLAB; Kurbatov, Evgeny O. [Moscow State U.; Leffel, Mindy A. [JLAB; Mandal, Saptarshi [JLAB; McMullen, Marc E. [JLAB; Merkin, Mikhail M. [Moscow State U.; Raydo, Benjamin J. [JLAB; Teachey, Robert W, [JLAB; Tucker, Ross J. [Arizona State U.; Ungaro, Maurizio [JLAB; Yegneswaran, Amrit S. [JLAB; Ziegler, Veronique [JLAB

    2013-12-01

    For the 12 GeV upgrade, the CLAS12 experiment has designed a Silicon Vertex Tracker (SVT) using single sided microstrip sensors fabricated by Hamamatsu. The sensors have graded angle design to minimize dead areas and a readout pitch of 156{micro}m, with intermediate strip. Double sided SVT module hosts three daisy-chained sensors on each side with a full strip length of 33 cm. There are 512 channels per module read out by four Fermilab Silicon Strip Readout (FSSR2) chips featuring data driven architecture, mounted on a rigid-flex hybrid. Modules are assembled on the barrel using unique cantilevered geometry to minimize the amount of material in the tracking volume. Design and performance of the SVT modules are presented, focusing on results of electrical measurements.

  16. Silicon Sensors for Trackers at High-Luminosity Environment

    CERN Document Server

    Peltola, Timo

    2015-01-01

    The planned upgrade of the LHC accelerator at CERN, namely the high luminosity (HL) phase of the LHC (HL-LHC foreseen for 2023), will result in a more intense radiation environment than the present tracking system was designed for. The required upgrade of the all-silicon central trackers at the ALICE, ATLAS, CMS and LHCb experiments will include higher granularity and radiation hard sensors. The radiation hardness of the new sensors must be roughly an order of magnitude higher than the one of LHC detectors. To address this, a massive R&D program is underway within the CERN RD50 collaboration "Development of Radiation Hard Semiconductor Devices for Very High Luminosity Colliders" to develop silicon sensors with sufficient radiation tolerance. Research topics include the improvement of the intrinsic radiation tolerance of the sensor material and novel detector designs with benefits like reduced trapping probability (thinned and 3D sensors), maximized sensitive area (active edge sensors) and enhanced charge ...

  17. Persistent Aerial Tracking

    KAUST Repository

    Mueller, Matthias

    2016-04-13

    In this thesis, we propose a new aerial video dataset and benchmark for low altitude UAV target tracking, as well as, a photo-realistic UAV simulator that can be coupled with tracking methods. Our benchmark provides the rst evaluation of many state of-the-art and popular trackers on 123 new and fully annotated HD video sequences captured from a low-altitude aerial perspective. Among the compared trackers, we determine which ones are the most suitable for UAV tracking both in terms of tracking accuracy and run-time. We also present a simulator that can be used to evaluate tracking algorithms in real-time scenarios before they are deployed on a UAV "in the field", as well as, generate synthetic but photo-realistic tracking datasets with free ground truth annotations to easily extend existing real-world datasets. Both the benchmark and simulator will be made publicly available to the vision community to further research in the area of object tracking from UAVs. Additionally, we propose a persistent, robust and autonomous object tracking system for unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) called Persistent Aerial Tracking (PAT). A computer vision and control strategy is applied to a diverse set of moving objects (e.g. humans, animals, cars, boats, etc.) integrating multiple UAVs with a stabilized RGB camera. A novel strategy is employed to successfully track objects over a long period, by \\'handing over the camera\\' from one UAV to another. We integrate the complete system into an off-the-shelf UAV, and obtain promising results showing the robustness of our solution in real-world aerial scenarios.

  18. Design and testing of an innovative slim-edge termination for silicon radiation detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Povoli, M.; Bagolini, A.; Boscardin, M.; Dalla Betta, G.-F.; Giacomini, G.; Mattedi, F.; Mendicino, R.; Zorzi, N.

    2013-11-01

    Silicon detectors with reduced or no dead volume along the edges have been attracting a lot of interest in the past few years in many different fields. High Energy Physics (HEP) experiments are demanding this feature to ease the assembly of the innermost tracking layers, where space and material budget are usually a concern. At the same time, other applications like X-Ray imaging, are starting to use matrixes of silicon detectors to cover increasingly larger areas and, in order to do so in a seamless way, minimum edge extension is required. In this paper we report on the design and testing of a new edge termination for silicon 3D detectors able to reduce the edge extension to about 50 μm without increasing the fabrication complexity. In addition, the same edge termination can also be applied to planar detectors with little additional process complexity.

  19. Segmented scintillation detectors with silicon photomultiplier readout for measuring antiproton annihilations

    CERN Document Server

    Sótér, A; Kobayashi, T; Barna, D; Horvath, D; Hori, M

    2014-01-01

    The Atomic Spectroscopy and Collisions Using Slow Antiprotons (ASACUSA) experiment at the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) facility of CERN constructed segmented scintillators to detect and track the charged pions which emerge from antiproton annihilations in a future superconducting radiofrequency Paul trap for antiprotons. A system of 541 cast and extruded scintillator bars were arranged in 11 detector modules which provided a spatial resolution of 17 mm. Green wavelength-shifting fibers were embedded in the scintillators, and read out by silicon photomultipliers which had a sensitive area of 1 x 1 mm^2. The photoelectron yields of various scintillator configurations were measured using a negative pion beam of momentum p ~ 1 GeV/c. Various fibers and silicon photomultipliers, fiber end terminations, and couplings between the fibers and scintillators were compared. The detectors were also tested using the antiproton beam of the AD. Nonlinear effects due to the saturation of the silicon photomultiplier were seen a...

  20. Development of Tandem Amorphous/Microcrystalline Silicon Thin-Film Large-Area See-Through Color Solar Panels with Reflective Layer and 4-Step Laser Scribing for Building-Integrated Photovoltaic Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Chin-Yi Tsai; Chin-Yao Tsai

    2014-01-01

    In this work, tandem amorphous/microcrystalline silicon thin-film large-area see-through color solar modules were successfully designed and developed for building-integrated photovoltaic applications. Novel and key technologies of reflective layers and 4-step laser scribing were researched, developed, and introduced into the production line to produce solar panels with various colors, such as purple, dark blue, light blue, silver, golden, orange, red wine, and coffee. The highest module power...

  1. Characterization of sources and loadings of fecal pollutants using microbial source tracking assays in urban and rural areas of the Grand River Watershed, Southwestern Ontario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dae-Young; Lee, Hung; Trevors, Jack T; Weir, Susan C; Thomas, Janis L; Habash, Marc

    2014-04-15

    Sources of fecal water pollution were assessed in the Grand River and two of its tributaries (Ontario, Canada) using total and host-specific (human and bovine) Bacteroidales genetic markers in conjunction with reference information, such as land use and weather. In-stream levels of the markers and culturable Escherichia coli were also monitored during multiple rain events to gain information on fecal loadings to catchment from diffuse sources. Elevated human-specific marker levels were accurately identified in river water impacted by a municipal wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluent and at a downstream site in the Grand River. In contrast, the bovine-specific marker showed high levels of cattle fecal pollution in two tributaries, both of which are characterized as intensely farmed areas. The bovine-specific Bacteroidales marker increased with rainfall in the agricultural tributaries, indicating enhanced loading of cattle-derived fecal pollutants to river from non-point sources following rain events. However, rain-triggered fecal loading was not substantiated in urban settings, indicating continuous inputs of human-originated fecal pollutants from point sources, such as WWTP effluent. This study demonstrated that the Bacteroidales source tracking assays, in combination with land use information and hydrological data, may provide additional insight into the spatial and temporal distribution of source-specific fecal contamination in streams impacted by varying land uses. Using the approach described in this study may help to characterize impacted water sources and to design targeted land use management plans in other watersheds in the future. PMID:24509346

  2. Tracking Land Use/Land Cover Dynamics in Cloud Prone Areas Using Moderate Resolution Satellite Data: A Case Study in Central Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bikash Basnet

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Tracking land surface dynamics over cloud prone areas with complex mountainous terrain is an important challenge facing the Earth Science community. One such region is the Lake Kivu region in Central Africa. We developed a processing chain to systematically monitor the spatio-temporal land use/land cover dynamics of this region over the years 1988, 2001, and 2011 using Landsat data, complemented by ancillary data. Topographic compensation was performed on Landsat reflectances to avoid the strong illumination angle impacts and image compositing was used to compensate for frequent cloud cover and thus incomplete annual data availability in the archive. A systematic supervised classification was applied to the composite Landsat imagery to obtain land cover thematic maps with overall accuracies of 90% and higher. Subsequent change analysis between these years found extensive conversions of the natural environment as a result of human related activities. The gross forest cover loss for 1988–2001 and 2001–2011 period was 216.4 and 130.5 thousand hectares, respectively, signifying significant deforestation in the period of civil war and a relatively stable and lower deforestation rate later, possibly due to conservation and reforestation efforts in the region. The other dominant land cover changes in the region were aggressive subsistence farming and urban expansion displacing natural vegetation and arable lands. Despite limited data availability, this study fills the gap of much needed detailed and updated land cover change information for this biologically important region of Central Africa. These multi-temporal datasets will be a valuable baseline for land use managers in the region interested in developing ecologically sustainable land management strategies and measuring the impacts of biodiversity conservation efforts.

  3. Thermal management and mechanical structures for silicon detector systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to the size of current silicon tracking systems system aspects have become a major design driver. This article discusses requirements for the engineering of the mechanical structures and thermal management of such systems and reviews solutions developed to satisfy them. Modern materials and fabrication techniques have been instrumental in constructing these devices and will be discussed here. Finally, this paper will describe current and potential future developments in the engineering of silicon tracking systems which will shape the silicon tracking systems of the future

  4. VEGA: A low-power front-end ASIC for large area multi-linear X-ray silicon drift detectors: Design and experimental characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahangarianabhari, Mahdi; Macera, Daniele [Politecnico di Milano, Department of Electronics Engineering, Information Science and Bioengineering, P.za L. da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); National Institute of Nuclear Physics, INFN sez. Milano (Italy); Bertuccio, Giuseppe, E-mail: Giuseppe.Bertuccio@polimi.it [Politecnico di Milano, Department of Electronics Engineering, Information Science and Bioengineering, P.za L. da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); National Institute of Nuclear Physics, INFN sez. Milano (Italy); Malcovati, Piero; Grassi, Marco [University of Pavia, Department of Electrical Engineering, and National Institute of Nuclear Physics, INFN sez. Pavia, Pavia (Italy)

    2015-01-11

    We present the design and the first experimental characterization of VEGA, an Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) designed to read out large area monolithic linear Silicon Drift Detectors (SDD’s). VEGA consists of an analog and a digital/mixed-signal section to accomplish all the functionalities and specifications required for high resolution X-ray spectroscopy in the energy range between 500 eV and 50 keV. The analog section includes a charge sensitive preamplifier, a shaper with 3-bit digitally selectable shaping times from 1.6 µs to 6.6 µs and a peak stretcher/sample-and-hold stage. The digital/mixed-signal section includes an amplitude discriminator with coarse and fine threshold level setting, a peak discriminator and a logic circuit to fulfill pile-up rejection, signal sampling, trigger generation, channel reset and the preamplifier and discriminators disabling functionalities. A Serial Peripherical Interface (SPI) is integrated in VEGA for loading and storing all configuration parameters in an internal register within few microseconds. The VEGA ASIC has been designed and manufactured in 0.35 µm CMOS mixed-signal technology in single and 32 channel versions with dimensions of 200 µm×500 µm per channel. A minimum intrinsic Equivalent Noise Charge (ENC) of 12 electrons r.m.s. at 3.6 µs peaking time and room temperature is measured and the linearity error is between −0.9% and +0.6% in the whole input energy range. The total power consumption is 481 µW and 420 µW per channel for the single and 32 channels version, respectively. A comparison with other ASICs for X-ray SDD’s shows that VEGA has a suitable low noise and offers high functionality as ADC-ready signal processing but at a power consumption that is a factor of four lower than other similar existing ASICs.

  5. Tracking subsystem of the SOFIA telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittner, Hermann; Braeuninger, Christoph; Dierks, Andreas; Erdmann, Matthias; Erhard, Markus; Lattner, Klaus; Schmolke, Juergen

    2000-06-01

    The Tracking Subsystem of the SOFIA telescope consists of three high performance imagers and a dedicated tracking control unit. There are two boresighted imagers for target acquisition and tracking, one with a wide (6 degrees) and one with a fine (70 arcmin) field-of-view, and one main- telescope-optics sharing imager with a narrow field-of-view (8 arcmin) for high performance tracking. From the recorded stellar images, tracking error signals are generated by the tracker controller. The tracker controller has several features to support various tracking schemes such as tracking the telescope as an inertial platform, on- axis/offset tracking, and limb tracking. The tracker has three modes, i.e. positioning, tracking and `override'. Special features are the handling of so-called areas-of- interest in the inertial reference frame and the external imager synchronization. The paper presents the design and functional/operational performance of the imagers and the tracking control unit.

  6. Silicon Ingot Casting - Heat Exchanger Method (HEM). Multi-Wire Slicing - Fixed Abrasive Slicing Technique (Fast). Phase 4 Silicon Sheet Growth Development for the Large Area Sheet Task of the Low-Cost Solar Array Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, F.

    1981-01-01

    The crystallinity of large HEM silicon ingots as a function of heat flow conditions is investigated. A balanced heat flow at the bottom of the ingot restricts spurious nucleation to the edge of the melted-back seed in contact with the crucible. Homogeneous resistivity distribution over all the ingot has been achieved. The positioning of diamonds electroplated on wirepacks used to slice silicon crystals is considered. The electroplating of diamonds on only the cutting edge is described and the improved slicing performance of these wires evaluated. An economic analysis of value added costs of HEM ingot casting and band saw sectioning indicates the projected add on cost of HEM is well below the 1986 allocation.

  7. Floating Silicon Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kellerman, Peter

    2013-12-21

    The Floating Silicon Method (FSM) project at Applied Materials (formerly Varian Semiconductor Equipment Associates), has been funded, in part, by the DOE under a “Photovoltaic Supply Chain and Cross Cutting Technologies” grant (number DE-EE0000595) for the past four years. The original intent of the project was to develop the FSM process from concept to a commercially viable tool. This new manufacturing equipment would support the photovoltaic industry in following ways: eliminate kerf losses and the consumable costs associated with wafer sawing, allow optimal photovoltaic efficiency by producing high-quality silicon sheets, reduce the cost of assembling photovoltaic modules by creating large-area silicon cells which are free of micro-cracks, and would be a drop-in replacement in existing high efficiency cell production process thereby allowing rapid fan-out into the industry.

  8. First test of cold edgeless silicon microstrip detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avati, V.; Boccone, V.; Borer, K.; Bozzo, M. E-mail: marco.bozzo@cern.ch; Capra, R.; Casagrande, L.; Eggert, K.; Heijne, E.; Klauke, S.; Li, Z.; Maeki, T.; Morelli, A.; Oljemark, F.; Palmieri, V.G.; Perea-Solano, B.; Tapprogge, S

    2004-02-01

    Silicon microstrip detectors will provide the forward tracking in the TOTEM experiment at the LHC. To allow efficient tracking closest to the beam ({approx}1 mm) these detectors should be sensitive up to their physical edge (i.e. edgeless). Edgeless (without guard rings) microstrip planar detectors can be operated at cryogenic temperatures (about 130 deg. K) where leakage currents due to the active edge are drastically reduced. A silicon microstrip prototype, cut perpendicular to the strips, has been tested with a pion beam at CERN to study its efficiency close to the edge by using reference tracks from a simple silicon telescope. Results indicate that the detector measures tracks with good efficiency up to the physical edge of the silicon.

  9. First test of cold edgeless silicon microstrip detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Avati, V; Borer, K; Bozzo, M; Capra, R; Casagrande, L; Eggert, Karsten; Heijne, Erik H M; Klauke, S; Li, Z; Mäki, T; Morelli, A; Oljemark, F; Palmieri, V G; Perea-Solano, B; Tapprogge, Stefan

    2004-01-01

    Silicon microstrip detectors will provide the forward tracking in the TOTEM experiment at the LHC. To allow efficient tracking closest to the beam ( approximately equals 1 mm) these detectors should be sensitive up to their physical edge (i.e. edgeless). Edgeless (without guard rings) microstrip planar detectors can be operated at cryogenic temperatures (about 130 degree K) where leakage currents due to the active edge are drastically reduced. A silicon microstrip prototype, cut perpendicular to the strips, has been tested with a pion beam at CERN to study its efficiency close to the edge by using reference tracks from a simple silicon telescope. Results indicate that the detector measures tracks with good efficiency up to the physical edge of the silicon.

  10. First test of cold edgeless silicon microstrip detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avati, V.; Boccone, V.; Borer, K.; Bozzo, M.; Capra, R.; Casagrande, L.; Eggert, K.; Heijne, E.; Klauke, S.; Li, Z.; Mäki, T.; Morelli, A.; Oljemark, F.; Palmieri, V. G.; Perea-Solano, B.; Tapprogge, S.

    2004-02-01

    Silicon microstrip detectors will provide the forward tracking in the TOTEM experiment at the LHC. To allow efficient tracking closest to the beam (≈1 mm) these detectors should be sensitive up to their physical edge (i.e. edgeless). Edgeless (without guard rings) microstrip planar detectors can be operated at cryogenic temperatures (about 130° K) where leakage currents due to the active edge are drastically reduced. A silicon microstrip prototype, cut perpendicular to the strips, has been tested with a pion beam at CERN to study its efficiency close to the edge by using reference tracks from a simple silicon telescope. Results indicate that the detector measures tracks with good efficiency up to the physical edge of the silicon.

  11. FUNDAMENTAL AREAS OF PHENOMENOLOGY (INCLUDING APPLICATIONS): Silicon Dioxide Coating Deposited by PDPs on PET Films and Influence on Oxygen Transmission Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yun-Jin; Fu, Ya-Bo; Chen, Qiang; Zhang, Chun-Mei; Sang, Li-Jun; Zhang, Yue-Fei

    2008-05-01

    A silicon dioxide film is deposited on the polyethyleneterephtalate (PET) by a penning discharge plasma source at ambient temperature in a high vacuum chamber. Hexamethyldisiloxane and oxygen are adopted as precursor and reactive reagent to grow a nano-scale silicon dioxide layer on polymer surfaces. For the chemical structure analysis x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy is performed to demonstrate the content of Si, O and C elements. It is noticed that a higher silicon concentration is contained if Ar plasma is used for pretreatment. X-ray diffraction analysis shows that a micro-crystal silicon dioxide is formed by peak patterns at 25.84° and 21.8°. The barrier properties examined by oxygen transmission rate show that the permeation parameter of the 12-μm-thick PET film drastically decreases from 135cc/m2 per day for the control one to 0.713cc/m2 per day for the as-deposited one after Ar plasma treatment. The surface morphology related to the barrier properties of SiOx-coated polymers os also investigated by scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy.

  12. Influence of tracks densities in solid state nuclear track detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors (SSNTD) is employed to measure nuclear tracks produced mainly by fission fragments and alpha particles, it is considered that the tracks observation work is performed under an efficiency, ε0, which is independent of the track density (number of tracks/area unit). There are not published results or experimental data supporting such an assumption. In this work the dependence of ε0 with track density is studied basing on experimental data. To perform this, pieces of CR-39 cut from a sole 'mother sheet' were coupled to thin uranium films for different exposition times and the resulting ratios between track density and exposition time were compared. Our results indicate that ε0 is constant for track densities between 103 and 105 cm-2. At our etching conditions track overlapping makes impossible the counting for densities around 1.7 x 105 cm-2. For track densities less than 103 cm-2, ε0 , was not observed to be constant. (authors). 4 refs., 2 figs

  13. Silicon Ingot Casting - Heat Exchanger Method Multi-wire Slicing - Fixed Abrasive Slicing Technique. Phase 3 Silicon Sheet Growth Development for the Large Area Sheet Task of the Low-cost Solar Array Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, F.; Khattak, C. P.

    1979-01-01

    Several 20 cm diameter silicon ingots, up to 6.3 kg. were cast with good crystallinity. The graphite heat zone can be purified by heating it to high temperatures in vacuum. This is important in reducing costs and purification of large parts. Electroplated wires with 45 um synthetic diamonds and 30 um natural diamonds showed good cutting efficiency and lifetime. During slicing of a 10 cm x 10 cm workpiece, jerky motion occurred in the feed and rocking mechanisms. This problem is corrected and modifications were made to reduce the weight of the bladeheat by 50%.

  14. Belle II silicon vertex detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, K.; Aihara, H.; Angelini, C.; Aziz, T.; Babu, V.; Bacher, S.; Bahinipati, S.; Barberio, E.; Baroncelli, Ti.; Baroncelli, To.; Basith, A. K.; Batignani, G.; Bauer, A.; Behera, P. K.; Bergauer, T.; Bettarini, S.; Bhuyan, B.; Bilka, T.; Bosi, F.; Bosisio, L.; Bozek, A.; Buchsteiner, F.; Casarosa, G.; Ceccanti, M.; Červenkov, D.; Chendvankar, S. R.; Dash, N.; Divekar, S. T.; Doležal, Z.; Dutta, D.; Enami, K.; Forti, F.; Friedl, M.; Hara, K.; Higuchi, T.; Horiguchi, T.; Irmler, C.; Ishikawa, A.; Jeon, H. B.; Joo, C. W.; Kandra, J.; Kang, K. H.; Kato, E.; Kawasaki, T.; Kodyš, P.; Kohriki, T.; Koike, S.; Kolwalkar, M. M.; Kvasnička, P.; Lanceri, L.; Lettenbicher, J.; Maki, M.; Mammini, P.; Mayekar, S. N.; Mohanty, G. B.; Mohanty, S.; Morii, T.; Nakamura, K. R.; Natkaniec, Z.; Negishi, K.; Nisar, N. K.; Onuki, Y.; Ostrowicz, W.; Paladino, A.; Paoloni, E.; Park, H.; Pilo, F.; Profeti, A.; Rashevskaya, I.; Rao, K. K.; Rizzo, G.; Rozanska, M.; Sandilya, S.; Sasaki, J.; Sato, N.; Schultschik, S.; Schwanda, C.; Seino, Y.; Shimizu, N.; Stypula, J.; Suzuki, J.; Tanaka, S.; Tanida, K.; Taylor, G. N.; Thalmeier, R.; Thomas, R.; Tsuboyama, T.; Uozumi, S.; Urquijo, P.; Vitale, L.; Volpi, M.; Watanuki, S.; Watson, I. J.; Webb, J.; Wiechczynski, J.; Williams, S.; Würkner, B.; Yamamoto, H.; Yin, H.; Yoshinobu, T.

    2016-09-01

    The Belle II experiment at the SuperKEKB collider in Japan is designed to indirectly probe new physics using approximately 50 times the data recorded by its predecessor. An accurate determination of the decay-point position of subatomic particles such as beauty and charm hadrons as well as a precise measurement of low-momentum charged particles will play a key role in this pursuit. These will be accomplished by an inner tracking device comprising two layers of pixelated silicon detector and four layers of silicon vertex detector based on double-sided microstrip sensors. We describe herein the design, prototyping and construction efforts of the Belle-II silicon vertex detector.

  15. Material Properties of Laser-Welded Thin Silicon Foils

    OpenAIRE

    Brabec, C.J.; Auer, R.; A. Bochmann; Christiansen, S.; Schmidt, M.; K. Cvecek; Voigt, M.; Hessmann, M. T.; Kunz, T.

    2013-01-01

    An extended monocrystalline silicon base foil offers a great opportunity to combine low-cost production with high efficiency silicon solar cells on a large scale. By overcoming the area restriction of ingot-based monocrystalline silicon wafer production, costs could be decreased to thin film solar cell range. The extended monocrystalline silicon base foil consists of several individual thin silicon wafers which are welded together. A comparison of three different approaches to weld 50 μm thin...

  16. Performance of the all-silicon CMS tracker

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caner, Alessandra E-mail: alessandra.caner@cern.ch

    2001-04-11

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) Tracker Collaboration has recently revised the tracking-detector layout. While the previous design relied on Micro Strip Gas Chamber (MSGC) and silicon detectors, the new layout implements solid state sensors as the sole technological choice. The new all-silicon layout is presented and the projected performance is discussed in terms of several benchmark topologies.

  17. Analysis and correction of track overlapping on nuclear track detectors (SSNTD)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palacios, D.; Sajo B, L.; Barros, H.; Avila, Y. [Universidad Simon Bolivar, P. O. 89000 Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Fusella, E. [Instituto de Estudios Avanzados, Apartado 17606, Caracas 1015-A (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of)

    2011-02-15

    The problem of nuclear track overlapping is addressed assuming the stochastic character of charged particle registry and the fact that even monoenergetic beam perpendicularly impacting on detector surface will show a distribution for track radius values. Asymmetric distributions of overlapping tracks were obtained for very low or very high simulated track quantities, while for intermediate values the distributions were well described by Gaussian s. A model for the track overlapping process was developed, considering the dependence of the quantity of non overlapping tracks on the number of simulated tracks by a second order homogeneous differential lineal equation. Its solution contains only one free parameter that is related to track geometry and field view area. By successive approximation, the number of total induced tracks (which is proportional to particle fluence) is determined from the knowledge of the amount of non overlapping tracks, dimensions of the field view and average track radius. (Author)

  18. Tracks Revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarnati, James T.

    1993-01-01

    Describes a contemporary adaptation of the "Footprint Puzzle," whigh was first developed in the 1960s for the Earth Science Curriculum Project. Students sequentially look at three frames of track drawings. For each frame, students first list observations and then make inferences about the observations. (PR)

  19. Assembly and validation of the SSD silicon microstrip detector of ALICE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Haas, A.P.; Kuijer, P.G.; Nooren, G.J.L.; Oskamp, C.J.; Sokolov, A.N.; van den Brink, A.

    2006-01-01

    The Silicon Strip Detector (SSD) forms the two outermost layers of the Inner Tracking System (ITS) of ALICE. The SSD detector consists of 1698 double-sided silicon microstrip modules. The electrical connection between silicon sensor and front-end electronics is made via TAB-bonded aluminium–polyimid

  20. Radiation hard silicon detectors - developments by the RD48 (ROSE) collaboration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindstroem, G. E-mail: gunnar.lindstroem@desy.de; Ahmed, M.; Albergo, S.; Allport, P.; Anderson, D.; Andricek, L.; Angarano, M.M.; Augelli, V.; Bacchetta, N.; Bartalini, P.; Bates, R.; Biggeri, U.; Bilei, G.M.; Bisello, D.; Boemi, D.; Borchi, E.; Botila, T.; Brodbeck, T.J.; Bruzzi, M.; Budzynski, T.; Burger, P.; Campabadal, F.; Casse, G.; Catacchini, E.; Chilingarov, A.; Ciampolini, P.; Cindro, V.; Costa, M.J.; Creanza, D.; Clauws, P.; Da Via, C.; Davies, G.; De Boer, W.; Dell' Orso, R.; De Palma, M.; Dezillie, B.; Eremin, V.; Evrard, O.; Fallica, G.; Fanourakis, G.; Feick, H.; Focardi, E.; Fonseca, L.; Fretwurst, E.; Fuster, J.; Gabathuler, K.; Glaser, M.; Grabiec, P.; Grigoriev, E.; Hall, G.; Hanlon, M.; Hauler, F.; Heising, S.; Holmes-Siedle, A.; Horisberger, R.; Hughes, G.; Huhtinen, M.; Ilyashenko, I.; Ivanov, A.; Jones, B.K.; Jungermann, L.; Kaminsky, A.; Kohout, Z.; Kramberger, G.; Kuhnke, M.; Kwan, S.; Lemeilleur, F.; Leroy, C.; Letheren, M.; Li, Z.; Ligonzo, T.; Linhart, V.; Litovchenko, P.; Loukas, D.; Lozano, M.; Luczynski, Z.; Lutz, G.; MacEvoy, B.; Manolopoulos, S.; Markou, A.; Martinez, C.; Messineo, A.; Mikuz, M.; Moll, M.; Nossarzewska, E.; Ottaviani, G.; Oshea, V.; Parrini, G.; Passeri, D.; Petre, D.; Pickford, A.; Pintilie, I.; Pintilie, L.; Pospisil, S.; Potenza, R.; Raine, C.; Rafi, J.M.; Ratoff, P.N.; Richter, R.H.; Riedler, P.; Roe, S.; Roy, P.; Ruzin, A.; Ryazanov, A.I.; Santocchia, A.; Schiavulli, L.; Sicho, P.; Siotis, I.; Sloan, T.; Slysz, W.; Smith, K.; Solanky, M.; Sopko, B.; Stolze, K.; Sundby Avset, B.; Svensson, B.; Tivarus, C.; Tonelli, G.; Tricomi, A.; Tzamarias, S.; Valvo, G.; Vasilescu, A.; Vayaki, A.; Verbitskaya, E.; Verdini, P.; Vrba, V.; Watts, S.; Weber, E.R.; Wegrzecki, M.; Wegrzecka, I.; Weilhammer, P.; Wheadon, R.; Wilburn, C.; Wilhelm, I.; Wunstorf, R.; Wuestenfeld, J.; Wyss, J.; Zankel, K.; Zabierowski, P.; Zontar, D

    2001-07-01

    The RD48 (ROSE) collaboration has succeeded to develop radiation hard silicon detectors, capable to withstand the harsh hadron fluences in the tracking areas of LHC experiments. In order to reach this objective, a defect engineering technique was employed resulting in the development of Oxygen enriched FZ silicon (DOFZ), ensuring the necessary O-enrichment of about 2x10{sup 17} O/cm{sup 3} in the normal detector processing. Systematic investigations have been carried out on various standard and oxygenated silicon diodes with neutron, proton and pion irradiation up to a fluence of 5x10{sup 14} cm{sup -2} (1 MeV neutron equivalent). Major focus is on the changes of the effective doping concentration (depletion voltage). Other aspects (reverse current, charge collection) are covered too and the appreciable benefits obtained with DOFZ silicon in radiation tolerance for charged hadrons are outlined. The results are reliably described by the 'Hamburg model': its application to LHC experimental conditions is shown, demonstrating the superiority of the defect engineered silicon. Microscopic aspects of damage effects are also discussed, including differences due to charged and neutral hadron irradiation.

  1. Development of Tandem Amorphous/Microcrystalline Silicon Thin-Film Large-Area See-Through Color Solar Panels with Reflective Layer and 4-Step Laser Scribing for Building-Integrated Photovoltaic Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin-Yi Tsai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, tandem amorphous/microcrystalline silicon thin-film large-area see-through color solar modules were successfully designed and developed for building-integrated photovoltaic applications. Novel and key technologies of reflective layers and 4-step laser scribing were researched, developed, and introduced into the production line to produce solar panels with various colors, such as purple, dark blue, light blue, silver, golden, orange, red wine, and coffee. The highest module power is 105 W and the highest visible light transmittance is near 20%.

  2. Real time tracking in liver SBRT: comparison of CyberKnife and Vero by planning structure-based γ-evaluation and dose-area-histograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sothmann, T; Blanck, O; Poels, K; Werner, R; Gauer, T

    2016-02-21

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare two clinical tracking systems for radiosurgery with regard to their dosimetric and geometrical accuracy in liver SBRT: the robot-based CyberKnife and the gimbal-based Vero. Both systems perform real-time tumour tracking by correlating internal tumour and external surrogate motion. CyberKnife treatment plans were delivered to a high resolution 2D detector array mounted on a 4D motion platform, with the platform simulating (a) tumour motion trajectories extracted from the corresponding CyberKnife predictor log files and (b) the tumour motion trajectories with superimposed baseline-drift. Static reference and tracked dose measurements were compared and dosimetric as well as geometrical uncertainties analyzed by a planning structure-based evaluation. For (a), γ-passing rates inside the CTV (γ-criteria of 1% / 1 mm) ranged from 95% to 100% (CyberKnife) and 98% to 100% (Vero). However, dosimetric accuracy decreases in the presence of the baseline-drift. γ-passing rates for (b) ranged from 26% to 92% and 94% to 99%, respectively; i.e. the effect was more pronounced for CyberKnife. In contrast, the Vero system led to maximum dose deviations in the OAR between  +1.5 Gy to +6.0 Gy (CyberKnife: +0.5 Gy to +3.5 Gy). Potential dose shifts were interpreted as motion-induced geometrical tracking errors. Maximum observed shift ranges were  -1.0 mm to  +0.7 mm (lateral) /-0.6 mm to +0.1 mm (superior-inferior) for CyberKnife and  -0.8 mm to +0.2 mm /-0.8 mm to +0.4 mm for Vero. These values illustrate that CyberKnife and Vero provide high precision tracking of regular breathing patterns. Even for the modified motion trajectory, the obtained dose distributions appear to be clinical acceptable with regard to literature QA γ-criteria of 3% / 3 mm. PMID:26836488

  3. Real time tracking in liver SBRT: comparison of CyberKnife and Vero by planning structure-based γ-evaluation and dose-area-histograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sothmann, T.; Blanck, O.; Poels, K.; Werner, R.; Gauer, T.

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare two clinical tracking systems for radiosurgery with regard to their dosimetric and geometrical accuracy in liver SBRT: the robot-based CyberKnife and the gimbal-based Vero. Both systems perform real-time tumour tracking by correlating internal tumour and external surrogate motion. CyberKnife treatment plans were delivered to a high resolution 2D detector array mounted on a 4D motion platform, with the platform simulating (a) tumour motion trajectories extracted from the corresponding CyberKnife predictor log files and (b) the tumour motion trajectories with superimposed baseline-drift. Static reference and tracked dose measurements were compared and dosimetric as well as geometrical uncertainties analyzed by a planning structure-based evaluation. For (a), γ-passing rates inside the CTV (γ-criteria of 1% / 1 mm) ranged from 95% to 100% (CyberKnife) and 98% to 100% (Vero). However, dosimetric accuracy decreases in the presence of the baseline-drift. γ-passing rates for (b) ranged from 26% to 92% and 94% to 99%, respectively; i.e. the effect was more pronounced for CyberKnife. In contrast, the Vero system led to maximum dose deviations in the OAR between  +1.5 Gy to  +6.0 Gy (CyberKnife:  +0.5 Gy to  +3.5 Gy). Potential dose shifts were interpreted as motion-induced geometrical tracking errors. Maximum observed shift ranges were  -1.0 mm to  +0.7 mm (lateral) /-0.6 mm to  +0.1 mm (superior-inferior) for CyberKnife and  -0.8 mm to  +0.2 mm /-0.8 mm to  +0.4 mm for Vero. These values illustrate that CyberKnife and Vero provide high precision tracking of regular breathing patterns. Even for the modified motion trajectory, the obtained dose distributions appear to be clinical acceptable with regard to literature QA γ-criteria of 3% / 3 mm.

  4. Silicon Spintronics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, R.

    2008-01-01

    Integration of magnetism and mainstream semiconductor electronics could impact information technology in ways beyond imagination. A pivotal step is implementation of spin-based electronic functionality in silicon devices. Remarkable progress made during the last two years gives confidence that this

  5. Shuttling electrons on and off As donor atoms in silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyryshkin, A. M.; Lyon, S. A.; Lo, C. C.; Lo Nardo, R.; Morton, J. J. L.; Simmons, S.; Weis, C. D.; Schenkel, T.; Bokor, J.; Meijer, J.; Rogalla, D.

    2013-03-01

    Hybrid quantum devices where electron spins are used for state initialization, fast manipulation, long range entanglement and detection, while nuclear spins are used for long term storage promise revolutionary advantages. Here we report our first experiments using a silicon-based device that utilizes electron and nuclear spins of arsenic donors. The device is a large-area, parallel-plate capacitor fabricated on a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafer where the SOI layer is implanted with arsenic donors, and a back gate is formed in the silicon below the buried oxide by a high-energy boron implantation. The electrons can be controllably stripped from the donors and then reintroduced to the ionized donors by applying appropriate gate voltages. We use ensemble ESR experiments (X-band, magnetic field of 0.35 T) to track the occupancy of the donors during these operations. Pulsed ESR is used to characterize the spin state of the donor electrons and the effect of applied electric fields below the ionization threshold. The spin state of the arsenic nuclei, and the effect of electron removal and reintroduction on the nuclear state is expected to be observable in pulsed ENDOR experiments. The work is funded by LPS and NSF-MWN.

  6. Silicon sensors for trackers at high-luminosity environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltola, Timo

    2015-10-01

    The planned upgrade of the LHC accelerator at CERN, namely the high luminosity (HL) phase of the LHC (HL-LHC foreseen for 2023), will result in a more intense radiation environment than the present tracking system that was designed for. The required upgrade of the all-silicon central trackers at the ALICE, ATLAS, CMS and LHCb experiments will include higher granularity and radiation hard sensors. The radiation hardness of the new sensors must be roughly an order of magnitude higher than in the current LHC detectors. To address this, a massive R&D program is underway within the CERN RD50 Collaboration "Development of Radiation Hard Semiconductor Devices for Very High Luminosity Colliders" to develop silicon sensors with sufficient radiation tolerance. Research topics include the improvement of the intrinsic radiation tolerance of the sensor material and novel detector designs with benefits like reduced trapping probability (thinned and 3D sensors), maximized sensitive area (active edge sensors) and enhanced charge carrier generation (sensors with intrinsic gain). A review of the recent results from both measurements and TCAD simulations of several detector technologies and silicon materials at radiation levels expected for HL-LHC will be presented.

  7. Qualification of a new supplier for silicon particle detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dragicevic, M., E-mail: marko.dragicevic@cern.ch [Institute of High Energy Physics, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Vienna (Austria); Bartl, U. [Infineon Technologies Austria AG, Villach (Austria); Bergauer, T.; Frühwirth, E. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Vienna (Austria); Gamerith, S.; Hacker, J.; Kröner, F.; Kucher, E.; Moser, J.; Neidhart, T. [Infineon Technologies Austria AG, Villach (Austria); Schulze, H.-J. [Infineon Technologies AG, Munich (Germany); Schustereder, W. [Infineon Technologies Austria AG, Villach (Austria); Treberspurg, W. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Vienna (Austria); Wübben, T. [Infineon Technologies Austria AG, Villach (Austria)

    2013-12-21

    Most modern particle physics experiments use silicon based sensors for their tracking systems. These sensors are able to detect particles generated in high energy collisions with high spatial resolution and therefore allow the precise reconstruction of particle tracks. So far only a few vendors are capable of producing silicon strip sensors with the quality needed in particle physics experiments. Together with the European semiconductor manufacturer Infineon Technologies Austria AG the Institute of High Energy Physics of the Austrian Academy of Sciences developed planar silicon strip sensors in p-on-n technology. This paper presents the development, production and results from the electrical characterisation of the first sensors produced by Infineon.

  8. Fission Track Method to Date Fault Activity —As Exemplified by the Three Gorges Dam Area of the Yangtze River Valley,CHina

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张峰; 翟鹏济; 等

    2000-01-01

    The Xiannushan and Jiuwanxi are the two major fracture belts adjacent to the Three Gorges Dam Site,ALpatites are selected from fracture clay and fracutre-cliff rock in the fracture belts and examined with the fission track dating method.Our study shows that the Xiannushan and Jiuwanxi fracture belts wer tectonically active at 0.60±0.04 Ma and 0.29±0.04Ma ago,respectively,Their ages are close to those obtained by the U-series method.

  9. 快通道麻醉在小儿腹股沟区手术中的临床应用价值探讨%Clinical application value discussion of fast-track anesthesia in pediatric groin area surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何林

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the clinical value of fast-track anesthesia in pediatric surgery in the groin area.Methods This study for my children hospital in February 2012 120 routine surgery groin area in February 2015 - admitted, and randomly divided into control group (60 cases) and observation group (60 cases). The control group received conventional anesthesia, the observation group to take fast-track anesthesia.Results The group of children and mean arterial pressure after 30min 60min after extubation, heart rate, plasma glucagon, cortisol were significantly better than the control group (P<0.05).Conclusion The fast-track anesthesia in pediatric surgery in the groin area and promoting surgery, with a high clinical value.%目的:探讨快通道麻醉在小儿腹股沟区手术中的临床应用价值。方法本次研究对象为我院2012年2月至2015年2月收治的120例行腹股沟区手术的患儿,并随机分成对照组(60例)和观察组(60例)。对照组采取常规麻醉方法,观察组采取快通道麻醉方法。结果观察组患儿术后30min和拔管后60min的平均动脉压、心率、血浆胰高血糖素、血浆皮质醇均显著优于对照组(P <0.05)。结论快通道麻醉在小儿腹股沟区手术中有利于促进手术疗效,具有很高的临床应用价值。

  10. High Area Capacity Lithium-Sulfur Full-cell Battery with Prelitiathed Silicon Nanowire-Carbon Anodes for Long Cycling Stability

    OpenAIRE

    Andreas Krause; Susanne Dörfler; Markus Piwko; Florian M. Wisser; Tony Jaumann; Eike Ahrens; Lars Giebeler; Holger Althues; Stefan Schädlich; Julia Grothe; Andrea Jeffery; Matthias Grube; Jan Brückner; Jan Martin; Jürgen Eckert

    2016-01-01

    We show full Li/S cells with the use of balanced and high capacity electrodes to address high power electro-mobile applications. The anode is made of an assembly comprising of silicon nanowires as active material densely and conformally grown on a 3D carbon mesh as a light-weight current collector, offering extremely high areal capacity for reversible Li storage of up to 9 mAh/cm2. The dense growth is guaranteed by a versatile Au precursor developed for homogenous Au layer deposition on 3D su...

  11. The STAR Silicon Strip Detector (SSD)

    CERN Document Server

    Arnold, L; Bonnet, D; Boucham, A; Bouvier, S; Castillo, J; Coffin, J P; Drancourt, C; Erazmus, B; Gaudichet, L; Germain, M; Gojak, C; Grabski, J; Guilloux, G; Guedon, M; Hippolyte, B; Janik, M; Kisiel, A; Kuhn, C; Lakehal-Ayat, L; Lefèvre, F; Le Moal, C; Leszczynski, P; Lutz, Jean Robert; Maliszewski, A; Martin, L; Milletto, T; Pawlak, T; Peryt, W; Pluta, J; Przewlocki, M; Radomski, S; Ravel, O; Renard, C; Renault, G; Rigalleau, L M; Roy, C; Roy, D; Suire, C; Szarwas, P; Tarchini, A

    2003-01-01

    The STAR Silicon Strip Detector (SSD) completes the three layers of the Silicon Vertex Tracker (SVT) to make an inner tracking system located inside the Time Projection Chamber (TPC). This additional fourth layer provides two dimensional hit position and energy loss measurements for charged particles, improving the extrapolation of TPC tracks through SVT hits. To match the high multiplicity of central Au+Au collisions at RHIC the double sided silicon strip technology was chosen which makes the SSD a half million channels detector. Dedicated electronics have been designed for both readout and control. Also a novel technique of bonding, the Tape Automated Bonding (TAB), was used to fullfill the large number of bounds to be done. All aspects of the SSD are shortly described here and test performances of produced detection modules as well as simulated results on hit reconstruction are given.

  12. Dual Tracking Method for Real Time Object Tracking using Moving Camera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shyam Lal

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This study presents dual tracking method for real time object tracking using a moving camera. A real time object tracking using self aligning servo mechanism with webcam, dual tracking and effective localization of object is presented. The proposed dual tracking method works in two phases: In first phase tracking is done by joint color texture histogram with mean shift and in second phase tracking is done by servo setup. The proposed dual tracking method enjoys the benefit of double tracking feature, not only tracking but also to find out the coordinates of the tracking object which is of particular interest. The coordinates of a moving object enable us to estimates the real time location of the object which is helpful in surveillance and shooting purposes of suspected person in security area. The tracking of some specific objects in real life is of particular interest. Due to its enhanced automation the proposed dual tracking method can be applied in public security, surveillance, robotics and traffic control etc. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed dual tracking method improves greatly the tracking area with accuracy and efficiency and also successfully find the coordinates of moving object.

  13. Simulations of silicon vertex tracker for star experiment at RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Odyniec, G.; Cebra, D.; Christie, W.; Naudet, C.; Schroeder, L.; Wilson, W. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Liko, D. [Institut fur Hochenenergiephysik, Vienna, (Austria); Cramer, J.; Prindle, D.; Trainor, T. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle (United States); Braithwaite, W. [Univ. of Arkansas, Little Rock (United States)

    1991-12-31

    The first computer simulations to optimize the Silicon Vertex Tracker (SVT) designed for the STAR experiment at RHIC are presented. The physics goals and the expected complexity of the events at RHIC dictate the design of a tracking system for the STAR experiment. The proposed tracking system will consist of a silicon vertex tracker (SVT) to locate the primary interaction and secondary decay vertices and to improve the momentum resolution, and a time projection chamber (TPC), positioned inside a solenoidal magnet, for continuous tracking.

  14. Pamela tracking system: status report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taccetti, F. E-mail: taccetti@iroe.fi.cnr.it; Adriani, O.; Bonechi, L.; Bongi, M.; Boscherini, M.; Castellini, G.; D' Alessandro, R.; Gabbanini, A.; Grandi, M.; Papini, P.; Piccardi, S.; Ricciarini, S.; Spillantini, P.; Straulino, S.; Tesi, M.; Vannuccini, E

    2002-06-01

    The Pamela apparatus will be launched at the end of 2002 on board of the Resurs DK Russian satellite. The tracking system, composed of six planes of silicon sensors inserted inside a permanent magnetic field was intensively tested during these last years. Results of tests have shown a good signal-to-noise ratio and an excellent spatial resolution, which should allow to measure the antiproton flux in an energy range from 80 MeV up to 190 GeV. The production of the final detector modules is about to start and mechanical and thermal tests on the tracking tower are being performed according to the specifications of the Russian launcher and satellite.

  15. Pamela tracking system status report

    CERN Document Server

    Taccetti, F; Bonechi, L; Bongi, M; Boscherini, M; Castellini, G; D'Alessandro, R; Gabbanini, A; Grandi, M; Papini, P; Piccardi, S; Ricciarini, S; Spillantini, P; Straulino, S; Tesi, M; Vannuccini, E

    2002-01-01

    The Pamela apparatus will be launched at the end of 2002 on board of the Resurs DK Russian satellite. The tracking system, composed of six planes of silicon sensors inserted inside a permanent magnetic field was intensively tested during these last years. Results of tests have shown a good signal-to-noise ratio and an excellent spatial resolution, which should allow to measure the antiproton flux in an energy range from 80 MeV up to 190 GeV. The production of the final detector modules is about to start and mechanical and thermal tests on the tracking tower are being performed according to the specifications of the Russian launcher and satellite.

  16. CERBEROS: A tracking system for secondary pion beams at the HADES spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirth, J.; Fabbietti, L.; Lalik, R.; Maier, L.; Scordo, A.

    2016-07-01

    In 2014 the HADES collaboration performed two successful physics production runs with secondary pion beams. Since secondary pion beams are strongly defocussed in position and momentum, two fast tracking stations were installed along the pion beam chicane following the pion production target providing the momentum measurement of each individual pion. The momentum is reconstructed using the position information of every hit detected by the tracking stations and the beam optics transport calculation with a resolution below 0.5% playing an important role in terms of the exclusive analysis of investigated reactions. Both tracking stations consist of a double-sided silicon strip sensor with a large active area (10 × 10cm2). To guarantee fast tracking, the sensors are read out with the n-XYTER ASIC chip. Due to its self-triggering architecture and local storage capability, the chip enables on-line tracking at high rates (dN / dt >106 part / s). The TRB3 read out board on which the trigger logic is implemented integrates the system into the HADES DAQ. In this report we are showing the results obtained during the calibration experiment with a monochromatic proton beam set at seven different momenta centred around 2.68 GeV/c. Also the excellent performance achieved during the production campaign with a pion beam are presented.

  17. Review of amorphous silicon based particle detectors: the quest for single particle detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyrsch, N.; Ballif, C.

    2016-10-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) is attractive for radiation detectors because of its radiation resistance and processability over large areas with mature Si microfabrication techniques. While the use of a-Si:H for medical imaging has been very successful, the development of detectors for particle tracking and minimum-ionizing-particle detection has lagged, with almost no practical implementation. This paper reviews the development of various types of a-Si:H-based detectors and discusses their respective achievements and limitations. It also presents more recent developments of detectors that could potentially achieve single particle detection and be integrated in a monolithic fashion into a variety of applications.

  18. Hyperon production in proton-nucleus collisions at a center-of-mass energy of $\\sqrt(S_NN)=41.6 GeV$ at HERA-B and design of silicon microstrip detectors for tracking at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Agari, M

    2006-01-01

    The topics of this thesis are the measurements of hyperon production in protonnucleus collisions at ps = 41.6 GeV with the Hera-B detector located at DESY, Hamburg (Germany), and the design of silicon microstrip sensors for the LHCb experiment at CERN, Geneva (Switzerland), and hyperons and their antiparticles were reconstructed from 113.5A.106 inelastic collisions of protons with fixed carbon, titanium and tungsten targets. With these samples, antiparticle-to-particle ratios, cross sections integrated for the accessible kinematic region of Hera-B and single differential cross sections as function of transverse momentum, $d\\sigma /dp^{2}_{T}$ (for and) and rapidity, $d\\sigma /dy$ (for only), have been been measured as well as the dependence of these quantities on the atomic number of the target nucleus, as parameterized using the Glauber model. The obtained ratios follow the same trend as found for the energy dependence of measurements from nucleus-nucleus collisions. Silicon microstrip sensors have been desi...

  19. Silicon photonics for telecommunications and biomedicine

    CERN Document Server

    Fathpour, Sasan

    2011-01-01

    Given silicon's versatile material properties, use of low-cost silicon photonics continues to move beyond light-speed data transmission through fiber-optic cables and computer chips. Its application has also evolved from the device to the integrated-system level. A timely overview of this impressive growth, Silicon Photonics for Telecommunications and Biomedicine summarizes state-of-the-art developments in a wide range of areas, including optical communications, wireless technologies, and biomedical applications of silicon photonics. With contributions from world experts, this reference guides

  20. Silicon nanotube field effect transistor with core-shell gate stacks for enhanced high-performance operation and area scaling benefits

    KAUST Repository

    Fahad, Hossain M.

    2011-10-12

    We introduce the concept of a silicon nanotube field effect transistor whose unique core-shell gate stacks help achieve full volume inversion by giving a surge in minority carrier concentration in the near vicinity of the ultrathin channel and at the same time rapid roll-off at the source and drain junctions constituting velocity saturation-induced higher drive current-enhanced high performance per device with efficient real estate consumption. The core-shell gate stacks also provide superior short channel effects control than classical planar metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) and gate-all-around nanowire FET. The proposed device offers the true potential to be an ideal blend for quantum ballistic transport study of device property control by bottom-up approach and high-density integration compatibility using top-down state-of-the-art complementary metal oxide semiconductor flow. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  1. Tracking Porters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Maja Hojer; Krause-Jensen, Jakob; Nielsen, Margit Saltofte

    2015-01-01

    Anthropology attempts to gain insight into people's experiential life-worlds through long-term fieldwork. The quality of anthropological knowledge production, however, does not depend solely on the duration of the stay in the field, but also on a particular way of seeing social situations......’ that differs from the standardized procedures of normal science. To establish our points we use an example of problem-based project work conducted by a group of Techno-Anthropology students at Aalborg University, we focus on key aspects of this craft and how the students began to learn it: For two weeks...... the students followed the work of a group of porters. Drawing on anthropological concepts and research strategies the students gained crucial insights about the potential effects of using tracking technologies in the hospital....

  2. The ALICE silicon strip detector system

    CERN Document Server

    Kuijer, P

    2000-01-01

    ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) is an experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) optimized for the study of heavy-ion collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 5.5 TeV per nucleon. The detector consists essentially of two main components: the central part, composed of detectors mainly devoted to the study of hadronic signals and dielectrons, and the forward muon spectrometer devoted to the study of quarkonia behaviour in dense matter. The central part, which covers +-45 deg. (|eta|<0.9) over the full azimuth, is embedded in a large magnet with a weak solenoidal field. Outside of the Inner Tracking System (ITS), there are a cylindrical TPC and a large area PID array of time-of-flight (TOF) counters. In addition, there are two small-area single-arm detectors: an electromagnetic calorimeter (Photon Spectrometer, PHOS) and an array of RICH counters optimized for high-momentum inclusive particle identification (HMPID). This article describes the silicon strip detector system used in the outer layers o...

  3. INNER TRACKING

    CERN Multimedia

    Peter Sharp

    The Silicon Strip Tracker was successfully installed into CMS on December 15, and was subsequently aligned to the LHC beam line to +/- 1mm. Before the Tracker was installed all of the connections from the low voltage power supplies, the cooling plants and optical readout fibres from the ‘off detector’ electronics had been installed to Patch Panel 1 (PP1), on the CMS magnet cryostat, and thoroughly tested. The careful connection of the Tracker to PP1 started in early January and will be completed in early March, just before the central section of the LHC beam pipe is installed into CMS. After initial checks of all the safety interlocks and the cooling circuits, the quality of each of the connections will be verified by commissioning each section of the Tracker in turn and reading back the calibration pulses (tick marks) from the front-end electronics. This process verifies that all of the connections are correct and in particular, that the quality of the fibre connections is good. When ...

  4. Low cost silicon-on-ceramic photovoltaic solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koepke, B. G.; Heaps, J. D.; Grung, B. L.; Zook, J. D.; Sibold, J. D.; Leipold, M. H.

    1980-01-01

    A technique has been developed for coating low-cost mullite-based refractory substrates with thin layers of solar cell quality silicon. The technique involves first carbonizing one surface of the ceramic and then contacting it with molten silicon. The silicon wets the carbonized surface and, under the proper thermal conditions, solidifies as a large-grained sheet. Solar cells produced from this composite silicon-on-ceramic material have exhibited total area conversion efficiencies of ten percent.

  5. Sintered silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A sintered silicon carbide body having a predominantly equiaxed microstructure consists of 91 to 99.85% by weight of silicon carbide at least 95% of which is the alpha phase, up to 5.0% by weight carbonized organic material, 0.15 to 3.0% of boron, and up to 1.0% by weight additional carbon. A mixture of 91 to 99.85 parts by weight silicon carbide having a surface area of 1 to 100 m2/g, 0.67 to 20 parts of a carbonizable organic binder with a carbon content of at least 33% by weight, 0.15 to 5 parts of a boron source containing 0.15 to 3.0 parts by weight boron and up to 15 parts by weight of a temporary binder is mixed with a solvent, the mixture is then dried, shaped to give a body with a density of at least 1.60 g/cc and fired at 1900 to 22500C to obtain an equiaxed microstructure. (author)

  6. Track Construction Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banke, Ron; Di Gennaro, Guy; Ediger, Rick; Garner, Lanny; Hersom, Steve; Miller, Jack; Nemeth, Ron; Petrucelli, Jim; Sierks, Donna; Smith, Don; Swank, Kevin; West, Kevin

    This book establishes guidelines for the construction and maintenance of tracks by providing information for building new tracks or upgrading existing tracks. Subjects covered include running track planning and construction, physical layout, available surfaces, and maintenance. General track requirements and construction specifications are…

  7. A Laser Testing Facility for the Characterization of Silicon Strip Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Sarah

    2011-04-01

    Silicon strip detectors are used for high-precision tracking systems in particle physics experiments. During the 12 GeV upgrade to the accelerator at Jefferson Lab, a new spectrometer, CLAS12, will be built in Hall B. The University of New Hampshire is part of the collaboration designing and building CLAS12. Among the detector systems being developed for CLAS12 is a silicon vertex tracker that will be placed close to the target, providing excellent position resolution for vertex determination. It is vital to have the ability to perform quality assurance tests and to evaluate the performance of the individual silicon strip detectors before installation in CLAS12. UNH is designing and building a laser testing facility to perform this task. The design consists of an infrared laser system and a precision computer-controlled positioning system that scans the laser light on the detector. The detector signals are read out by a data acquisition system for analysis. The facility includes a cleanroom area and a dry storage containment system. The facility allows the characterization of the large number of detectors before the final assembly of the silicon vertex tracker.

  8. A Printable Silicon Nano-Field Effect Transistor with High Operating Frequency for Large-Area Deployable Active Phased-Array Antennas Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Flexible electronic circuits can be easily integrated with large area (>10m aperture), inflatable antennas to provide distributed control and processing...

  9. Nanocrystalline silicon based thin film solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Swati

    2012-06-01

    Amorphous silicon solar cells and panels on glass and flexible substrate are commercially available. Since last few years nanocrystalline silicon thin film has attracted remarkable attention due to its stability under light and ability to absorb longer wavelength portion of solar spectrum. For amorphous silicon/ nanocrystalline silicon double junction solar cell 14.7% efficiency has been achieved in small area and 13.5% for large area modules internationally. The device quality nanocrystalline silicon films have been fabricated by RF and VHF PECVD methods at IACS. Detailed characterizations of the materials have been done. Nanocrystalline films with low defect density and high stability have been developed and used as absorber layer of solar cells.

  10. The CMS Silicon Tracker Alignment

    CERN Document Server

    Castello, R

    2008-01-01

    The alignment of the Strip and Pixel Tracker of the Compact Muon Solenoid experiment, with its large number of independent silicon sensors and its excellent spatial resolution, is a complex and challenging task. Besides high precision mounting, survey measurements and the Laser Alignment System, track-based alignment is needed to reach the envisaged precision.\\\\ Three different algorithms for track-based alignment were successfully tested on a sample of cosmic-ray data collected at the Tracker Integration Facility, where 15\\% of the Tracker was tested. These results, together with those coming from the CMS global run, will provide the basis for the full-scale alignment of the Tracker, which will be carried out with the first \\emph{p-p} collisions.

  11. The D0 silicon microstrip tracker

    CERN Document Server

    Quinn, B

    2003-01-01

    The D0 collaboration has completed building a 793,000 channel silicon microstrip tracker for the D0 upgrade. The tracker consists of 768 ladder and wedge assemblies including both single- and double-sided detectors. Detector readout utilizes the SVX-IIE radiation hard chip with on-chip digitization and sparsification. A brief review of the detector design is presented along with results from the assembly and testing processes. The operation of the full readout chain and the performance of the silicon tracker are described. Finally, lessons for future production of large scale tracking systems are discussed.

  12. Silicone chain extender

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    The present invention relates to a silicone chain extender, more particularly a chain extender for silicone polymers and copolymers, to a chain extended silicone polymer or copolymer and to a functionalized chain extended silicone polymer or copolymer, to a method for the preparation thereof and...

  13. Selective etching of silicon carbide films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Di; Howe, Roger T.; Maboudian, Roya

    2006-12-19

    A method of etching silicon carbide using a nonmetallic mask layer. The method includes providing a silicon carbide substrate; forming a non-metallic mask layer by applying a layer of material on the substrate; patterning the mask layer to expose underlying areas of the substrate; and etching the underlying areas of the substrate with a plasma at a first rate, while etching the mask layer at a rate lower than the first rate.

  14. LHCb : Tracking system of the LHCb upgrade

    CERN Multimedia

    Szumlak, Tomasz

    2015-01-01

    The upgrade of the LHCb experiment will run at an instantaneous luminosity of 2x10^33 cm^-2 s^-1 with a fully software based trigger, allowing to read out the detector at a rate of 40MHz. For this purpose, the full tracking system will be newly developed: the vertex locator (VELO) will be replaced by a pixel-based detector, withstanding the high radiation dose and providing an excellent track reconstruction with an efficiency of above 99% for all charged particles of interest. Upstream of the magnet, a silicon mico-strip detector with a high granularity and an improved acceptance coverage, called the Upstream Tracker (UT), will replace the current silicon strip tracker, and provide a rough momentum estimate. The tracking system downstream of the magnet will be replaced by the Scintillating Fibre tracker (SciFi), which will consist of 12 layers using 2.5m long scintillating fibres read out by silicon photo-multipliers, providing a spatial resolution better than 100 micron and resulting in a total momentum reso...

  15. The availabilities of arsenic and cadmium in rice paddy fields from a mining area: The role of soil extractable and plant silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Huan-Yun; Ding, Xiaodong; Li, Fangbai; Wang, Xiangqin; Zhang, Shirong; Yi, Jicai; Liu, Chuanping; Xu, Xianghua; Wang, Qi

    2016-08-01

    Adequate silicon (Si) can greatly boost rice yield and improve grain quality through alleviating stresses associated with heavy metals and metalloids such as arsenic (As) and cadmium (Cd). The soil plant-available Si is relatively low in South China due to severe desilicification and allitization of the soils in this region. Conversely, pollution of heavy metals and metalloids in the soils of this region occurs widely, especially As and Cd pollution in paddy soil. Therefore, evaluating the plant availability of Si in paddy soil of South China and examining its correlation with the availability of heavy metals and metalloids are of great significance. Accordingly, in our study, 107 pairs of soil and rice plant samples were collected from paddy fields contaminated by As and Cd in South China. Significantly positive correlations between Si in rice plants and Si fractions in soils extracted with citric acid, NaOAc-HOAc buffer, and oxalate-ammonium oxalate buffer suggest that these extractants are more suitable for use in extracting plant-available Si in the soils of our present study. Significantly negative correlations between different Si fractions and As or Cd in rice plant tissues and negative exponential correlations between the molar ratios of Si to As/Cd in rice roots, straws, husks or grains and As/Cd in rice grains indicate that Si can significantly alleviate the accumulation of As/Cd from soils to the rice plants. Finally, a contribution assessment of soil properties to As/Cd accumulation in rice grains based on random forest showed that in addition to Si concentrations in soil or rice plants, other factors such as Fe fractions and total phosphorus also contributed largely to As/Cd accumulation in rice grains. Overall, Si exhibited its unique role in mitigating As or Cd stress in rice, and our study results provide strong field evidence for this role. PMID:27209244

  16. The availabilities of arsenic and cadmium in rice paddy fields from a mining area: The role of soil extractable and plant silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Huan-Yun; Ding, Xiaodong; Li, Fangbai; Wang, Xiangqin; Zhang, Shirong; Yi, Jicai; Liu, Chuanping; Xu, Xianghua; Wang, Qi

    2016-08-01

    Adequate silicon (Si) can greatly boost rice yield and improve grain quality through alleviating stresses associated with heavy metals and metalloids such as arsenic (As) and cadmium (Cd). The soil plant-available Si is relatively low in South China due to severe desilicification and allitization of the soils in this region. Conversely, pollution of heavy metals and metalloids in the soils of this region occurs widely, especially As and Cd pollution in paddy soil. Therefore, evaluating the plant availability of Si in paddy soil of South China and examining its correlation with the availability of heavy metals and metalloids are of great significance. Accordingly, in our study, 107 pairs of soil and rice plant samples were collected from paddy fields contaminated by As and Cd in South China. Significantly positive correlations between Si in rice plants and Si fractions in soils extracted with citric acid, NaOAc-HOAc buffer, and oxalate-ammonium oxalate buffer suggest that these extractants are more suitable for use in extracting plant-available Si in the soils of our present study. Significantly negative correlations between different Si fractions and As or Cd in rice plant tissues and negative exponential correlations between the molar ratios of Si to As/Cd in rice roots, straws, husks or grains and As/Cd in rice grains indicate that Si can significantly alleviate the accumulation of As/Cd from soils to the rice plants. Finally, a contribution assessment of soil properties to As/Cd accumulation in rice grains based on random forest showed that in addition to Si concentrations in soil or rice plants, other factors such as Fe fractions and total phosphorus also contributed largely to As/Cd accumulation in rice grains. Overall, Si exhibited its unique role in mitigating As or Cd stress in rice, and our study results provide strong field evidence for this role.

  17. Sampling strong tracking nonlinear unscented Kalman filter and its application in eye tracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The unscented Kalman filter is a developed well-known method for nonlinear motion estimation and tracking. However, the standard unscented Kalman filter has the inherent drawbacks, such as numerical instability and much more time spent on calculation in practical applications. In this paper, we present a novel sampling strong tracking nonlinear unscented Kalman filter, aiming to overcome the difficulty in nonlinear eye tracking. In the above proposed filter, the simplified unscented transform sampling strategy with n + 2 sigma points leads to the computational efficiency, and suboptimal fading factor of strong tracking filtering is introduced to improve robustness and accuracy of eye tracking. Compared with the related unscented Kalman filter for eye tracking, the proposed filter has potential advantages in robustness, convergence speed, and tracking accuracy. The final experimental results show the validity of our method for eye tracking under realistic conditions. (classical areas of phenomenology)

  18. NEW TRACK-TO-TRACK CORRELATION ALGORITHMS BASED ON BITHRESHOLD IN A DISTRIBUTED MULTISENSOR INFORMATION FUSION SYSTEM

    OpenAIRE

    Liu Yu; Wang Haipeng; He You; Dong Kai; Xiao Chuwan

    2013-01-01

    Track-to-Track correlation (or association) is an ongoing area of interest in the field of distributed multisensory information fusion. In order to perform accurately identifying tracks with common origin and get fast convergence, this study presents independent and dependent Bi-threshold Track Correlation Algorithms (called BTCAs), which are described in detail and the track correlation mass and multivalency processing methods are discussed as well. Then, Based on BTCAs, two modified Bi-thre...

  19. Variable-density groundwater flow simulations and particle tracking. Numerical modelling using DarcyTools. Preliminary site description of the Simpevarp area, version 1.1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Follin, Sven [SF GeoLogic AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Stigsson, Martin; Berglund, Sten [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden); Svensson, Urban [Computer-aided Fluid Engineering AB, Norrkoeping (Sweden)

    2004-12-01

    SKB is conducting site investigations for a high-level nuclear waste repository in fractured crystalline rocks at two coastal areas in Sweden, Forsmark and Simpevarp. The investigations started in 2002 and have been planned since the late 1990s. The work presented here investigates the possibility of using hydrogeochemical measurements in deep boreholes to reduce parameter uncertainty in a regional modelling of groundwater flow in fractured rock. The work was conducted with the aim of improving the palaeohydrogeological understanding of the Simpevarp area and to give recommendations to the preparations of the next version of the Preliminary Site Description (1.2). The study is based on a large number of numerical simulations of transient variable density groundwater flow through a strongly heterogeneous and anisotropic medium. The simulations were conducted with the computer code DarcyTools, the development of which has been funded by SKB. DarcyTools is a flexible porous media code specifically designed to treat groundwater flow and salt transport in sparsely fractured crystalline rock and it is noted that some of the features presented in this report are still under development or subjected to testing and verification. The simulations reveal the sensitivity of the results to different hydrogeological modelling assumptions, e.g. the sensitivity to the initial groundwater conditions at 10,000 BC, the size of the model domain and boundary conditions, and the hydraulic properties of deterministically and stochastically modelled deformation zones. The outcome of these simulations was compared with measured salinities and calculated relative proportions of different water types (mixing proportions) from measurements in two deep core drilled boreholes in the Laxemar subarea. In addition to the flow simulations, the statistics of flow related transport parameters were calculated for particle flowpaths from repository depth to ground surface for two subareas within the

  20. Eye-Tracking Investigations Exploring How Students Learn Geology from Photographs and The Structural Setting of Hydrothermal Gold Deposits in the San Antonio Area, B.C.S., MX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyan, Joshua

    Geoscience educators commonly teach geology by projecting a photograph in front of the class. Geologic photographs often contain animals, people, and inanimate objects that help convey the scale of features in the photograph. Although scale items seem innocuous to instructors and other experts, the presence of such items is distracting and has a profound effect on student learning behavior. To evaluate how students visually interact with distracting scale items in photographs and to determine if cueing or signaling is an effective means to direct students to pertinent information, students were eye tracked while looking at geologically-rich photographs. Eye-tracking data revealed that learners primarily looked at the center of an image, focused on faces of both humans and animals if they were present, and repeatedly returned to looking at the scale item (distractor) for the duration an image was displayed. The presence of a distractor caused learners to look at less of an image than when a distractor was not present. Learners who received signaling tended to look at the distractor less, look at the geology more, and surveyed more of the photograph than learners who did not receive signaling. The San Antonio area in the southern part of the Baja California Peninsula is host to hydrothermal gold deposits. A field study, including drill-core analysis and detailed geologic mapping, was conducted to determine the types of mineralization present, the types of structures present, and the relationship between the two. This investigation revealed that two phases of mineralization have occurred in the area; the first is hydrothermal deposition of gold associated with sulfide deposits and the second is oxidation of sulfides to hematite, goethite, and jarosite. Mineralization varies as a function of depth, whereas sulfides occurring at depth, while minerals indicative of oxidation are limited to shallow depths. A structural analysis revealed that the oldest structures in the

  1. SILICON REFINING BY VACUUM TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Alexandrino Lotto

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This work aims to investigate the phosphorus removal by vacuum from metallurgical grade silicon (MGSi (98.5% to 99% Si. Melting experiments were carried out in a vacuum induction furnace, varying parameters such as temperature, time and relation area exposed to the vacuum / volume of molten silicon. The results of chemical analysis were obtained by inductively coupled plasma (ICP, and evaluated based on thermodynamic and kinetic aspects of the reaction of vaporization of the phosphorus in the silicon. The phosphorus was decreased from 33 to approximately 1.5 ppm after three hours of vacuum treatment, concluding that the evaporation step is the controlling step of the process for parameters of temperature, pressure and agitation used and refining by this process is technically feasible.

  2. The ALICE Silicon Pixel Detector System

    CERN Document Server

    Fadmar Osmic, FO

    2006-01-01

    The European Organization for Particle Physics (CERN) in Geneva is currently constructing the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), which will allow the study of the subnuclear ranges of physics with an accuracy never achieved before. Within the LHC project, ALICE is to the study of strongly interacting matter at extreme densities and high temperatures. ALICE as many other modern High Energy Physics (HEP) experiments uses silicon pixel detectors for tracking close to the interaction point (IP). The ALICE Silicon Pixel Detector (SPD) will constitute the two innermost layers of ALICE, and will due to its high granularity provide precise tracking information. In heavy ion collisions, the track density could be as high as 80 tracks/cm2 in the first SPD layer. The SPD will provide tracking information at radii of 3.9 and 7.6 cm from the IP. It is a fundamental element for the study of the weak decays of the particles carrying heavy flavour, whose typical signature will be a secondary vertex separated from the primary verte...

  3. 3D, Flash, Induced Current Readout for Silicon Sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, Sherwood I. [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States)

    2014-06-07

    A new method for silicon microstrip and pixel detector readout using (1) 65 nm-technology current amplifers which can, for the first time with silicon microstrop and pixel detectors, have response times far shorter than the charge collection time (2) 3D trench electrodes large enough to subtend a reasonable solid angle at most track locations and so have adequate sensitivity over a substantial volume of pixel, (3) induced signals in addition to, or in place of, collected charge

  4. Online track reconstruction at hadron colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Real time event reconstruction plays a fundamental role in High Energy Physics experiments. Reducing the rate of data to be saved on tape from millions to hundreds per second is critical. In order to increase the purity of the collected samples, rate reduction has to be coupled with the capability to simultaneously perform a first selection of the most interesting events. A fast and efficient online track reconstruction is important to effectively trigger on leptons and/or displaced tracks from b-quark decays. This talk will be an overview of online tracking techniques in different HEP environments: we will show how H1 experiment at HERA faced the challenges of online track reconstruction implementing pattern matching and track linking algorithms on CAMs and FPGAs in the Fast Track Processor (FTT). The pattern recognition technique is also at the basis of the Silicon Vertex Trigger (SVT) at the CDF experiment at Tevatron: coupled to a very fast fitting phase, SVT allows to trigger on displaced tracks, thus greatly increasing the efficiency for the hadronic B decay modes. A recent upgrade of the SVT track fitter, the Giga-fitter, can perform more than 1 fit/ns and further improves the CDF online trigger capabilities at high luminosity. At SLHC, where luminosities will be 2 orders of magnitude greater than Tevatron, online tracking will be much more challenging: we will describe CMS future plans for a Level-1 track trigger and the Fast Tracker (FTK) processor at the ATLAS experiment, based on the Giga-fitter architecture and designed to provide high quality tracks reconstructed over the entire detector in time for a Level-2 trigger decision.luminosity. At SLHC, where luminosities will be 2 orders of magnitude greater than Tevatron, online tracking will be much more challenging: we will describe CMS future plans for a Level-1 track trigger and the Fast Tracker (FTK) processor at the Atlas experiment, based on the Giga-fitter architecture and designed to provide high

  5. Evaluating Crop Area Mapping from MODIS Time-Series as an Assessment Tool for Zimbabwe’s “Fast Track Land Reform Programme”

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data forms the basis for numerous land use and land cover (LULC) mapping and analysis frameworks at regional scale. Compared to other satellite sensors, the spatial, temporal and spectral specifications of MODIS are considered as highly suitable for LULC classifications which support many different aspects of social, environmental and developmental research. The LULC mapping of this study was carried out in the context of the development of an evaluation approach for Zimbabwe’s land reform program. Within the discourse about the success of this program, a lack of spatially explicit methods to produce objective data, such as on the extent of agricultural area, is apparent. We therefore assessed the suitability of moderate spatial and high temporal resolution imagery and phenological parameters to retrieve regional figures about the extent of cropland area in former freehold tenure in a series of 13 years from 2001–2013. Time-series data was processed with TIMESAT and was stratified according to agro-ecological potential zoning of Zimbabwe. Random Forest (RF) classifications were used to produce annual binary crop/non crop maps which were evaluated with high spatial resolution data from other satellite sensors. We assessed the cropland products in former freehold tenure in terms of classification accuracy, inter-annual comparability and heterogeneity. Although general LULC patterns were depicted in classification results and an overall accuracy of over 80% was achieved, user accuracies for rainfed agriculture were limited to below 65%. We conclude that phenological analysis has to be treated with caution when rainfed agriculture and grassland in semi-humid tropical regions have to be separated based on MODIS spectral data and phenological parameters. Because classification results significantly underestimate redistributed commercial farmland in Zimbabwe, we argue that the method cannot be used to produce

  6. Characterization of PM2.5/PM2.5-10 and source tracking in the juncture belt between urban and rural areas of Beijing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG HaiLin; ZHOU YuMin; ZHUANG YaHui; WANG XiaoKe; HAO ZhengPing

    2009-01-01

    Coarse (PM2.5-10) and fine (PM2.5) atmospheric particulate samples were collected in summer and winter during 2005-2007 in the juncture belt between urban and rural areas of Beijing. Elements, ions, organic/elemental carbon (OC/EC) and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were determined to obtain some latest information about the particulate pollution in the juncture belt of Beijing. Particulate matter levels at this site were high as compared with the levels at other sampling sites in Beijing. Pollution elements, secondary ions and PAHs were enriched in fine particles rather than in coarse particles. An obvious seasonal variation of the chemical composition of PM was observed. Source apportionment results showed that secondary components were the largest mass contributor of PM2.5, accounting for 28%; whereas soil-related sources were the largest contributor of PM2.5-10, explaining about 49% of the total mass. The abnormal levels of soil heavy metals at the electronic waste disassembly site in the upwind villages suggested the potential impact of such activities to the environment.

  7. Solar tracking system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okandan, Murat; Nielson, Gregory N.

    2016-07-12

    Solar tracking systems, as well as methods of using such solar tracking systems, are disclosed. More particularly, embodiments of the solar tracking systems include lateral supports horizontally positioned between uprights to support photovoltaic modules. The lateral supports may be raised and lowered along the uprights or translated to cause the photovoltaic modules to track the moving sun.

  8. FPGA helix tracking algorithm for PANDA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Yutie; Galuska, Martin; Gessler, Thomas; Hu, Jifeng; Kuehn, Wolfgang; Lange, Jens Soeren; Muenchow, David; Spruck, Bjoern [II. Physikalisches, Giessen University (Germany); Ye, Hua [II. Physikalisches, Giessen University (Germany); Institute of High Energy Physics, Beijing (China); Collaboration: PANDA-Collaboration

    2014-07-01

    The PANDA detector is a general-purpose detector for physics with high luminosity cooled antiproton beams, planed to operate at the FAIR facility in Darmstadt, Germany. The central detector includes a silicon Micro Vertex Detector (MVD) and a Straw Tube Tracker (STT). Without any hardware trigger, large amounts of raw data are streaming into the data acquisition system. The data reduction task is performed in the online system by reconstruction algorithms programmed in VHDL (Very High Speed Integrated Circuit Hardware Description Language) on FPGAs (Field Programmable Gate Arrays) as first level and on a farm of GPUs or PCs as a second level. One important part in the system is the online track reconstruction. In this presentation, an online tracking finding algorithm for helix track reconstruction in the solenoidal field is shown. A performance study using C++ and the status of the VHDL implementation are presented.

  9. Status of the CDF silicon detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grinstein, Sebastian; /Harvard U.

    2006-05-01

    The CDF Run II silicon micro-strip detector is an essential part of the heavy flavor tagging and forward tracking capabilities of the experiment. Since the commissioning period ended in 2002, about 85% of the 730 k readout channels have been consistently provided good data. A summary of the recent improvements in the DAQ system as well as experience of maintaining and operating such a large, complex detector are presented.

  10. Low Cost Solar Array Project cell and module formation research area. Process research of non-CZ silicon material. Final report, November 26, 1980-September 30, 1983

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, R.B.

    1983-01-01

    The primary objective of the work reported was to investigate high-risk, high-payoff research areas associated with the Westinghouse process for producing photovoltaic modules using non-Czochralski sheet material. These tasks were addressed: technical feasibility study of forming front and back junctions using liquid dopant techniques, liquid diffusion mask feasibility study, application studies of antireflective material using a meniscus coater, ion implantation compatibility/feasibility study, and cost analysis. (LEW)

  11. Black luminescent silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pezoldt, Joerg [FG Nanotechnologie, Institut fuer Mikro- und Nanotechnologie, TU Ilmenau, Postfach 100565, 98684 Ilmenau (Germany); Kups, Thomas [FG Werkstoffe der Elektrotechnik, Institut fuer Mikro- und Nanotechnologien, TU Ilmenau, Postfach 1005765, 98684 Ilmenau (Germany); Stubenrauch, Mike [FG Mikromechanische Systeme, Institut fuer Mikro- und Nanotechnologien, TU Ilmenau, Postfach 1005765, 98684 Ilmenau (Germany); Fischer, Michael [FG Elektroniktechnologie, Institut fuer Mikro- und Nanotechnologien, TU Ilmenau, Postfach 1005765, 98684 Ilmenau (Germany)

    2011-03-15

    Black silicon is a fascinating multipurpose modification of bulk silicon which can be fabricated in a selforganized structure formation process during dry etching of bare silicon wafer leading to the formation of a high density of silicon needles. The smallest dimension of the tips approaches values between 1 and 2 nm. The silicon nanostructure exhibits an extremely low diffuse reflectivity. The nanosized tips and their coating with fluorine doped nonstoichiometric silicon dioxide are responsible for cathodoluminescence in the blue-green and red regions of the visible spectra (copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  12. A new silicon tracker for proton imaging and dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, J. T.; Waltham, C.; Price, T.; Allinson, N. M.; Allport, P. P.; Casse, G. L.; Kacperek, A.; Manger, S.; Smith, N. A.; Tsurin, I.

    2016-09-01

    For many years, silicon micro-strip detectors have been successfully used as tracking detectors for particle and nuclear physics experiments. A new application of this technology is to the field of particle therapy where radiotherapy is carried out by use of charged particles such as protons or carbon ions. Such a treatment has been shown to have advantages over standard x-ray radiotherapy and as a result of this, many new centres offering particle therapy are currently under construction around the world today. The Proton Radiotherapy, Verification and Dosimetry Applications (PRaVDA) consortium are developing instrumentation for particle therapy based upon technology from high-energy physics. The characteristics of a new silicon micro-strip tracker for particle therapy will be presented. The array uses specifically designed, large area sensors with technology choices that follow closely those taken for the ATLAS experiment at the HL-LHC. These detectors will be arranged into four units each with three layers in an x-u-v configuration to be suitable for fast proton tracking with minimal ambiguities. The sensors will form a tracker capable of tracing the path of ~200 MeV protons entering and exiting a patient allowing a new mode of imaging known as proton computed tomography (pCT). This will aid the accurate delivery of treatment doses and in addition, the tracker will also be used to monitor the beam profile and total dose delivered during the high fluences used for treatment. We present here details of the design, construction and assembly of one of the four units that will make up the complete tracker along with its characterisation using radiation tests carried out using a 90Sr source in the laboratory and a 60 MeV proton beam at the Clatterbridge Cancer Centre.

  13. First performance results of the Phobos silicon detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pernegger, H.; Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Barton, D. S.; Betts, R. R.; Bindel, R.; Budzanowski, A.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Decowski, M. P.; Garcia, E.; George, N.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gushue, S.; Halliwell, C.; Hamblen, J.; Heintzelman, G. A.; Henderson, C.; Hołyński, R.; Hofman, D. J.; Holzman, B.; Johnson, E.; Kane, J. L.; Katzy, J.; Khan, N.; Kucewicz, W.; Kulinich, P.; Lin, W. T.; Manly, S.; McLeod, D.; Michalowski, J.; Mignerey, A.; Mülmenstädt, J.; Nouicer, R.; Olszewski, A.; Pak, R.; Park, I. C.; Reed, C.; Remsberg, L. P.; Reuter, M.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rosenberg, L.; Sarin, P.; Sawicki, P.; Skulski, W.; Steadman, S. G.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Steinberg, P.; Stodulski, M.; Sukhanov, A.; Tang, J.-L.; Teng, R.; Trzupek, A.; Vale, C.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G. J.; Verdier, R.; Wadsworth, B.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Wosiek, B.; Woźniak, K.; Wuosmaa, A. H.; Wysłouch, B.

    2001-11-01

    The Phobos experiment concluded its first year of operation at RHIC taking data in Au-Au nucleus collisions at s nn=65 GeV and 130 GeV/ nucleon pair. First preliminary results of the performances of our silicon detectors in the experiment are summarized. The Phobos experiment uses silicon pad detectors for both tracking and multiplicity measurements. The silicon sensors vary strongly in their pad geometry. In this paper, we compare the signal response, the signal uniformity and signal-to-noise performance as measured in the experiment for the different geometries. Additionally, we investigate effects of very high channel occupancy on the signal response.

  14. First performance results of the Phobos silicon detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Phobos experiment concluded its first year of operation at RHIC taking data in Au-Au nucleus collisions at s radical = 65 GeV and 130 GeV/nucleon pair. First preliminary results of the performances of our silicon detectors in the experiment are summarized. The Phobos experiment uses silicon pad detectors for both tracking and multiplicity measurements. The silicon sensors vary strongly in their pad geometry. In this paper, we compare the signal response, the signal uniformity and signal-to-noise performance as measured in the experiment for the different geometries. Additionally, we investigate effects of very high channel occupancy on the signal response

  15. Silicon sensors for trackers at high-luminosity environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peltola, Timo, E-mail: timo.peltola@helsinki.fi

    2015-10-01

    The planned upgrade of the LHC accelerator at CERN, namely the high luminosity (HL) phase of the LHC (HL-LHC foreseen for 2023), will result in a more intense radiation environment than the present tracking system that was designed for. The required upgrade of the all-silicon central trackers at the ALICE, ATLAS, CMS and LHCb experiments will include higher granularity and radiation hard sensors. The radiation hardness of the new sensors must be roughly an order of magnitude higher than in the current LHC detectors. To address this, a massive R&D program is underway within the CERN RD50 Collaboration “Development of Radiation Hard Semiconductor Devices for Very High Luminosity Colliders” to develop silicon sensors with sufficient radiation tolerance. Research topics include the improvement of the intrinsic radiation tolerance of the sensor material and novel detector designs with benefits like reduced trapping probability (thinned and 3D sensors), maximized sensitive area (active edge sensors) and enhanced charge carrier generation (sensors with intrinsic gain). A review of the recent results from both measurements and TCAD simulations of several detector technologies and silicon materials at radiation levels expected for HL-LHC will be presented. - Highlights: • An overview of the recent results from the RD50 collaboration. • Accuracy of TCAD simulations increased by including both bulk and surface damage. • Sensors with n-electrode readout and MCz material offer higher radiation hardness. • 3D detectors are a promising choice for the extremely high fluence environments. • Detectors with an enhanced charge carrier generation under systematic investigation.

  16. ESSenTIAL: EPIXfab services specifically targeting (SME) industrial takeup of advanced silicon photonics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pozo Torres, J.M.; Kumar, P.; Lo Cascio, D.M.R.; Khanna, A.; Dumon, P.; Delbeke, D.; Baets, R.; Fournier, M.; Fedeli, J.-M.; Fulbert, L.; Zimmermann, L.; Tillack, B.; Tian, H.; Aalto, T.; O'Brien, P.; Deptuck, D.; Xu, J.; Zhang, X.; Gale, D.

    2012-01-01

    ePIXfab brings silicon photonics within reach of European small and medium sized enterprises, thereby building on its track record and its integration into Europractice. To this end, ePIXfab offers affordable access to standardized active and passive silicon photonic IC and packaging technology, a p

  17. 4H silicon carbide particle detectors: study of the defects induced by high energy neutron irradiation

    OpenAIRE

    Fabbri, Filippo

    2008-01-01

    During the last decade advances in the field of sensor design and improved base materials have pushed the radiation hardness of the current silicon detector technology to impressive performance. It should allow operation of the tracking systems of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) experiments at nominal luminosity (1034 cm-2s-1) for about 10 years. The current silicon detectors are unable to cope with such an environment. Silicon carbide (SiC), which has recently been recognized ...

  18. Descent of the Silicon Pixel Detector (SPD) for ALICE Experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    The Silicon Pixel Detector (SPD) constitutes the two innermost layers of the ALICE Inner Tracking System (ITS) at radii of 3.9 cm and 7.6 cm, respectively. It is a fundamental element for the determination of the position of the primary vertex as well as for the measurement of the impact parameter of secondary tracks originating from the weak decays of strange, charm and beauty particles.

  19. First testbeam results of prototype modules for the upgrade of the ATLAS strip tracking detector

    CERN Document Server

    Kuehn, Susanne; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The planned HL-LHC (High Luminosity LHC) in 2025 is being designed to maximise the physics potential of the LHC through a sizeable increase in the luminosity, totalling 1x1035cm-2s-1 after 10 years of operation. A consequence of this increased luminosity is the expected radiation damage at a integrated luminosity of 3000fb-1, requiring the tracking detectors to withstand hadron equivalences to over 1x1016 1 MeV neutron equivalent per cm2. With the addition of increased readout rates, a complete re-design of the current ATLAS Inner Detector (ID) is being developed as the Inner Tracker (ITk), which will consist of both strip and pixellated silicon detectors. The silicon strip tracker exploits the concept of modularity. Fast readout electronics, deploying 130nm CMOS front-end electronics is glued on top of a silicon sensor. These so-called modules are glued on carbon structures and will span about 200m2 of active area. A broad R&D program is ongoing to develop and prototype many detector components. The modu...

  20. Wettability and silicone hydrogel lenses: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keir, Nancy; Jones, Lyndon

    2013-01-01

    One of the major breakthroughs in the development of silicone hydrogel contact lenses has related to the ability of manufacturers to overcome the surface hydrophobicity that occurred with silicone elastomer lenses. However, the wettability of silicone hydrogel lenses continues to be of interest as a potential link between in vivo lens performance and contact lens-related comfort. This article will review some of the knowledge we have gained in the area of contact lens wettability over the past decade and will discuss some of the challenges related to its measurement. PMID:23274760

  1. Transistors using crystalline silicon devices on glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Anthony M.

    1995-01-01

    A method for fabricating transistors using single-crystal silicon devices on glass. This method overcomes the potential damage that may be caused to the device during high voltage bonding and employs a metal layer which may be incorporated as part of the transistor. This is accomplished such that when the bonding of the silicon wafer or substrate to the glass substrate is performed, the voltage and current pass through areas where transistors will not be fabricated. After removal of the silicon substrate, further metal may be deposited to form electrical contact or add functionality to the devices. By this method both single and gate-all-around devices may be formed.

  2. From silicon to organic nanoparticle memory devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsoukalas, D

    2009-10-28

    After introducing the operational principle of nanoparticle memory devices, their current status in silicon technology is briefly presented in this work. The discussion then focuses on hybrid technologies, where silicon and organic materials have been combined together in a nanoparticle memory device, and finally concludes with the recent development of organic nanoparticle memories. The review is focused on the nanoparticle memory concept as an extension of the current flash memory device. Organic nanoparticle memories are at a very early stage of research and have not yet found applications. When this happens, it is expected that they will not directly compete with mature silicon technology but will find their own areas of application.

  3. International Ice Patrol Iceberg Drift Tracks

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The International Ice Patrol (IIP) tracks, plots and predicts iceberg positions in the North Atlantic Ocean. The IIP area of responsibility is 40 to 52 degrees...

  4. Tracking facial features with occlusions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MARKIN Evgeny; PRAKASH Edmond C.

    2006-01-01

    Facial expression recognition consists of determining what kind of emotional content is presented in a human face.The problem presents a complex area for exploration, since it encompasses face acquisition, facial feature tracking, facial expression classification. Facial feature tracking is of the most interest. Active Appearance Model (AAM) enables accurate tracking of facial features in real-time, but lacks occlusions and self-occlusions. In this paper we propose a solution to improve the accuracy of fitting technique. The idea is to include occluded images into AAM training data. We demonstrate the results by running ex periments using gradient descent algorithm for fitting the AAM. Our experiments show that using fitting algorithm with occluded training data improves the fitting quality of the algorithm.

  5. Aircraft recognition and tracking device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filis, Dimitrios P.; Renios, Christos I.

    2011-11-01

    The technology of aircraft recognition and tracking has various applications in all areas of air navigation, be they civil or military, spanning from air traffic control and regulation at civilian airports to anti-aircraft weapon handling and guidance for military purposes.1, 18 The system presented in this thesis is an alternative implementation of identifying and tracking flying objects, which benefits from the optical spectrum by using an optical camera built into a servo motor (pan-tilt unit). More specifically, through the purpose-developed software, when a target (aircraft) enters the field of view of the camera18, it is both detected and identified.5, 22 Then the servo motor, being provided with data on target position and velocity, tracks the aircraft while it is in constant communication with the camera (Fig. 1). All the features are so designed as to operate under real time conditions.

  6. Doping Silicon Wafers with Boron by Use of Silicon Paste

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Gao; Shu Zhou; Yunfan Zhang; Chen Dong; Xiaodong Pi; Deren Yang

    2013-01-01

    In this work we introduce recently developed silicon-paste-enabled p-type doping for silicon.Boron-doped silicon nanoparticles are synthesized by a plasma approach.They are then dispersed in solvents to form silicon paste.Silicon paste is screen-printed at the surface of silicon wafers.By annealing,boron atoms in silicon paste diffuse into silicon wafers.Chemical analysis is employed to obtain the concentrations of boron in silicon nanoparticles.The successful doping of silicon wafers with boron is evidenced by secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) and sheet resistance measurements.

  7. Silicon: electrochemistry and luminescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooij, Ernst Stefan

    2001-01-01

    The electrochemistry of crystalline and porous silicon and the luminescence from porous silicon has been studied. One chapter deals with a model for the anodic dissolution of silicon in HF solution. In following chapters both the electrochemistry and various ways of generating visible luminescenc

  8. Silicon photonics: some remaining challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, G. T.; Topley, R.; Khokhar, A. Z.; Thompson, D. J.; Stanković, S.; Reynolds, S.; Chen, X.; Soper, N.; Mitchell, C. J.; Hu, Y.; Shen, L.; Martinez-Jimenez, G.; Healy, N.; Mailis, S.; Peacock, A. C.; Nedeljkovic, M.; Gardes, F. Y.; Soler Penades, J.; Alonso-Ramos, C.; Ortega-Monux, A.; Wanguemert-Perez, G.; Molina-Fernandez, I.; Cheben, P.; Mashanovich, G. Z.

    2016-03-01

    This paper discusses some of the remaining challenges for silicon photonics, and how we at Southampton University have approached some of them. Despite phenomenal advances in the field of Silicon Photonics, there are a number of areas that still require development. For short to medium reach applications, there is a need to improve the power consumption of photonic circuits such that inter-chip, and perhaps intra-chip applications are viable. This means that yet smaller devices are required as well as thermally stable devices, and multiple wavelength channels. In turn this demands smaller, more efficient modulators, athermal circuits, and improved wavelength division multiplexers. The debate continues as to whether on-chip lasers are necessary for all applications, but an efficient low cost laser would benefit many applications. Multi-layer photonics offers the possibility of increasing the complexity and effectiveness of a given area of chip real estate, but it is a demanding challenge. Low cost packaging (in particular, passive alignment of fibre to waveguide), and effective wafer scale testing strategies, are also essential for mass market applications. Whilst solutions to these challenges would enhance most applications, a derivative technology is emerging, that of Mid Infra-Red (MIR) silicon photonics. This field will build on existing developments, but will require key enhancements to facilitate functionality at longer wavelengths. In common with mainstream silicon photonics, significant developments have been made, but there is still much left to do. Here we summarise some of our recent work towards wafer scale testing, passive alignment, multiplexing, and MIR silicon photonics technology.

  9. Radiation hard silicon microstrip detectors for use in ATLAS at CERN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN (Geneva, Switzerland) will accelerate protons in colliding beams to a center of mass energy of 14 TeV at very high luminosities. The ATLAS detector is being built to explore the physics in this unprecedented energy range. Tracking of charged particles in high-energy physics (HEP) experiments requires a high spatial resolution and fast signal readout, all with as little material as possible. Silicon microstrip detectors meet these requirements well and have been chosen for the Semiconductor Tracker (SCT) which is part of the inner tracking system of ATLAS and has a total area of 61 m2. During the 10 years of operation at LHC, the total fluence received by the detectors is sufficiently large that they will suffer a severe degradation from radiation induced damage. The damage affects both the physics performance of the detectors as well as their operability and a great challenge has been to develop radiation hard detectors for this environment. An extensive irradiation programme has been carried out where detectors of various designs, including defect engineering by oxygen enriched silicon, have been irradiated to the expected fluence. A subsequent thermal annealing period is included to account for a realistic annual maintenance schedule at room temperature, during which the radiation induced defects alter the detector properties significantly. This thesis presents work that has been carried out in the Bergen ATLAS group with results both from the irradiation programme and from detector testing during the module production. (Author)

  10. Radiation hard silicon microstrip detectors for use in ATLAS at CERN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johansen, Lars Gimmestad

    2005-07-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN (Geneva, Switzerland) will accelerate protons in colliding beams to a center of mass energy of 14 TeV at very high luminosities. The ATLAS detector is being built to explore the physics in this unprecedented energy range. Tracking of charged particles in high-energy physics (HEP) experiments requires a high spatial resolution and fast signal readout, all with as little material as possible. Silicon microstrip detectors meet these requirements well and have been chosen for the Semiconductor Tracker (SCT) which is part of the inner tracking system of ATLAS and has a total area of 61 m2. During the 10 years of operation at LHC, the total fluence received by the detectors is sufficiently large that they will suffer a severe degradation from radiation induced damage. The damage affects both the physics performance of the detectors as well as their operability and a great challenge has been to develop radiation hard detectors for this environment. An extensive irradiation programme has been carried out where detectors of various designs, including defect engineering by oxygen enriched silicon, have been irradiated to the expected fluence. A subsequent thermal annealing period is included to account for a realistic annual maintenance schedule at room temperature, during which the radiation induced defects alter the detector properties significantly. This thesis presents work that has been carried out in the Bergen ATLAS group with results both from the irradiation programme and from detector testing during the module production. (Author)

  11. Forward tracking detectors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Klaus Mönig

    2007-11-01

    Forward tracking is an essential part of a detector at the international linear collider (ILC). The requirements for forward tracking are explained and the proposed solutions in the detector concepts are shown.

  12. Coating of silicon pore optics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cooper-Jensen, Carsten P.; Ackermann, M.; Christensen, Finn Erland;

    2009-01-01

    For the International X-ray observatory (IXO), a mirror module with an effective area of 3 m2 at 1.25 keV and at least 0.65 m2 at 6 keV has to be realized. To achieve this goal, coated silicon pore optics has been developed over the last years. One of the challenges is to coat the Si plates...

  13. The chemistry of silicon

    CERN Document Server

    Rochow, E G; Emeléus, H J; Nyholm, Ronald

    1975-01-01

    Pergamon Texts in Organic Chemistry, Volume 9: The Chemistry of Silicon presents information essential in understanding the chemical properties of silicon. The book first covers the fundamental aspects of silicon, such as its nuclear, physical, and chemical properties. The text also details the history of silicon, its occurrence and distribution, and applications. Next, the selection enumerates the compounds and complexes of silicon, along with organosilicon compounds. The text will be of great interest to chemists and chemical engineers. Other researchers working on research study involving s

  14. Geo Issue Tracking System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khakpour, Mohammad; Paulik, Christoph; Hahn, Sebastian

    2016-04-01

    Communication about remote sensing data quality between data providers and users as well as between the users is often difficult. The users have a hard time figuring out if a product has known problems over their region of interest and data providers have to spend a lot of effort to make this information available, if it exists. Scientific publications are one tool for communicating with the users base but they are static and mostly one way. As a data provider it is also often difficult to make feedback, received from users, available to the complete user base. The Geo Issue Tracking System (GeoITS) is an Open Source Web Application which has been developed to mitigate these problems. GeoITS combines a mapping interface (Google Maps) with a simple wiki platform. It allows users to give region specific feedback on a remote sensing product by drawing a polygon on the map and describing the problems they had using the remote sensing product in this area. These geolocated wiki entries are then viewable by other users as well as the data providers which can modify and extend the entries. In this way the conversations between the users and the data provider are no longer hidden in e.g. emails but open for all users of the dataset. This new kind of communication platform can enable better cooperation between users and data providers. It will also provide data providers with the ability to track problems their dataset might have in certain areas and resolve them with new product releases. The source code is available via http://github.com/TUW-GEO/geoits_dev A running instance can be tried at https://geoits.herokuapp.com/

  15. 一种小天体软着陆中基于地表阴影区的跟踪算法%Method of tracking for soft landing on small body based on shadow areas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    阮晓钢; 魏若岩; 李建更

    2014-01-01

    Considering the shadow areas of the planet surface can be seen as the landmark in the process of guidance, navigation and control(GNC) and hazard avoidance when the spacecraft soft lands on the small body, a method of the shadow areas tracking is proposed. Firstly, with the attitude estimates that are supplied by the attitude-measuring instruments, the two consecutive frames of image are rectified to the same attitude, and the shadow areas are detected by using the proposed binary algorithm. Then, the high correlation points of the shadow areas are found by using the template matching algorithm, and the feature vectors of the high correlation points are extracted to find the most similar point. Finally, the false matches are removed by using of random sample consensus(RANSAC). Two groups of sequence images of 433 Eros are utilized to teste the performance of the proposed method, and the results show that the method can be used in the real sequence images of planet.%考虑到星体表面的阴影区在航天器软着陆小天体时可作为导航路标以及壁障参考区,提出一种基于地表阴影区的跟踪算法。首先利用状态参数将拍摄到的前后两帧图像矫正到相同的状态,根据提出的二值化算法对图像的阴影区进行检测;然后利用模板匹配找出阴影区的相关位置点,并通过特征向量法找到相似性最大的位置点;最后结合RANSAC算法去除错匹配对。以两组433 Eros的连续拍摄图像作为阴影区进行跟踪实验,结果表明该算法具有一定的可行性。

  16. Results from a beam test of silicon strip sensors manufactured by Infineon Technologies AG

    CERN Document Server

    Dragicevic, M; Bartl, U; Bergauer, T; Gamerith, S; Hacker, J; König, A; Kröner, F; Kucher, E; Moser, J; Neidhart, T; Schulze, H-J; Schustereder, W; Treberspurg, W; Wübben, T

    2014-01-01

    Most modern particle physics experiments use silicon based sensors for their tracking systems. These sensors are able to detect particles generated in high energy collisions with high spatial resolution and therefore allow the precise reconstruction of particle tracks. So far only a few vendors were capable of producing silicon strip sensors with the quality needed in particle physics experiments. Together with the European-based semiconductor manufacturer Infineon Technologies AG (Infineon) the Institute of High Energy Physics of the Austrian Academy of Sciences (HEPHY) developed planar silicon strip sensors in p-on-n technology. This work presents the first results from a beam test of strip sensors manufactured by Infineon.

  17. Results from a beam test of silicon strip sensors manufactured by Infineon Technologies AG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dragicevic, M., E-mail: marko.dragicevic@oeaw.ac.at [Institute of High Energy Physics, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Vienna (Austria); Auzinger, G. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Vienna (Austria); CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Bartl, U. [Infineon Technologies Austria AG, Villach (Austria); Bergauer, T. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Vienna (Austria); Gamerith, S.; Hacker, J. [Infineon Technologies Austria AG, Villach (Austria); König, A. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Vienna (Austria); Infineon Technologies Austria AG, Villach (Austria); Kröner, F.; Kucher, E.; Moser, J.; Neidhart, T. [Infineon Technologies Austria AG, Villach (Austria); Schulze, H.-J. [Infineon Technologies AG, Munich (Germany); Schustereder, W. [Infineon Technologies Austria AG, Villach (Austria); Treberspurg, W. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Vienna (Austria); Wübben, T. [Infineon Technologies Austria AG, Villach (Austria)

    2014-11-21

    Most modern particle physics experiments use silicon based sensors for their tracking systems. These sensors are able to detect particles generated in high energy collisions with high spatial resolution and therefore allow the precise reconstruction of particle tracks. So far only a few vendors were capable of producing silicon strip sensors with the quality needed in particle physics experiments. Together with the European-based semiconductor manufacturer Infineon Technologies AG (Infineon) the Institute of High Energy Physics of the Austrian Academy of Sciences (HEPHY) developed planar silicon strip sensors in p-on-n technology. This work presents the first results from a beam test of strip sensors manufactured by Infineon.

  18. High-Sensitivity X-ray Polarimetry with Amorphous Silicon Active-Matrix Pixel Proportional Counters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, J. K.; Deines-Jones, P.; Jahoda, K.; Ready, S. E.; Street, R. A.

    2003-01-01

    Photoelectric X-ray polarimeters based on pixel micropattern gas detectors (MPGDs) offer order-of-magnitude improvement in sensitivity over more traditional techniques based on X-ray scattering. This new technique places some of the most interesting astronomical observations within reach of even a small, dedicated mission. The most sensitive instrument would be a photoelectric polarimeter at the focus of 2 a very large mirror, such as the planned XEUS. Our efforts are focused on a smaller pathfinder mission, which would achieve its greatest sensitivity with large-area, low-background, collimated polarimeters. We have recently demonstrated a MPGD polarimeter using amorphous silicon thin-film transistor (TFT) readout suitable for the focal plane of an X-ray telescope. All the technologies used in the demonstration polarimeter are scalable to the areas required for a high-sensitivity collimated polarimeter. Leywords: X-ray polarimetry, particle tracking, proportional counter, GEM, pixel readout

  19. APPLICATION FOR AIRCRAFT TRACKING

    OpenAIRE

    Ostroumov, Ivan; Kuz’menko, Natalia

    2011-01-01

    Abstract. In the article the important problems of software development for aircraft tracking have beendiscussed. Position reports of ACARS have been used for aircraft tracking around the world.An algorithm of aircraft coordinates decoding and visualization of aircraft position on the map has beenrepresented.Keywords: ACARS, aircraft, internet, position, software, tracking.

  20. Advanced Tracking of Vehicles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Christian Søndergaard; Li, K.-J.; Pakalnis, Stardas;

    2005-01-01

    server-side updates. This is achieved by designing, prototyping, and testing novel tracking techniques that exploit knowledge of the road network and past movement. These resulting tracking techniques are to support mobile services that rely on the existence of a central server that continuously tracks...

  1. Track and Field Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Tony

    2001-01-01

    Discusses planning and design tips that help ensure track and field facilities are successful and well-suited to both school and community use. Examines approaches to determining the best track surface and ways to maximize track and field flexibility with limited space. (GR)

  2. Chemical Analysis Methods for Silicon Carbide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shen Keyin

    2006-01-01

    @@ 1 General and Scope This Standard specifies the determination method of silicon dioxide, free silicon, free carbon, total carbon, silicon carbide, ferric sesquioxide in silicon carbide abrasive material.

  3. Real Time Eye Tracking in Unconstrained Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Tajeri

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, an effective method for human eye tracking and also decreasing the current challenges and problems in its algorithms, possibly as real time and for unconstrained environments has been proposed. In this method, firstly face has been detected and segmented from the remaining parts to make the searching area in tracking stage, narrower and processing speed higher. Then eye area is determined and eye pupils are detected in the specified area. In the proposed method, to support tracking in eye occlusion state, corner detection has been additionally used. Experimental results show the potential of this method for real time eye tracking in unconstrained environments with existence of complex background, head and face rotation, beard, makeup, eye glasses and veil, even while the eyes are closed. The correct recognition rate of the proposed method is about 91.9%.

  4. Explore new eye tracking and gaze locating methods

    OpenAIRE

    Kadyrov, Alexander; Yu, Hui; Liu, Honghai

    2013-01-01

    Eye tracking has been used extensively in research, often for plotting the gaze location of research participants. Many of the existing methods on tracking gaze locations, however, require special equipment. This equipment can be very expensive and/or cumbersome to use, restricting the use of it to specialist labs. By producing a method of eye tracking which requires minimal equipment and set up time, eye tracking might be more widely used as a research tool, especially in exploratory areas w...

  5. Novel scintillators and silicon photomultipliers for nuclear physics and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, David

    2015-06-01

    Until comparatively recently, scintillator detectors were seen as an old-fashioned tool of nuclear physics with more attention being given to areas such as gamma-ray tracking using high-purity germanium detectors. Next-generation scintillator detectors, such as lanthanum bromide, which were developed for the demands of space science and gamma- ray telescopes, are found to have strong applicability to low energy nuclear physics. Their excellent timing resolution makes them very suitable for fast timing measurements and their much improved energy resolution compared to conventional scintillators promises to open up new avenues in nuclear physics research which were presently hard to access. Such "medium-resolution" spectroscopy has broad interest across several areas of contemporary interest such as the study of nuclear giant resonances. In addition to the connections to space science, it is striking that the demands of contemporary medical imaging have strong overlap with those of experimental nuclear physics. An example is the interest in PET-MRI combined imaging which requires putting scintillator detectors in a high magnetic field environment. This has led to strong advances in the area of silicon photomultipliers, a solid-state replacement for photomultiplier tubes, which are insensitive to magnetic fields. Broad application to nuclear physics of this technology may be foreseen.

  6. Alignment of the CMS tracking detector with cosmic-ray tracks using Millepede II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grados Luyando, Juan Manuel; Mankel, Rainer; Schroeder, Matthias; Kleinwort, Claus [DESY, Hamburg (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    The physics performance of the CMS experiment depends crucially on its tracking detector, which consists of 25000 silicon sensors, making it the world's largest detector of this kind. In order to operate at the design precision, it is necessary to align the positions and orientations of the sensors at micrometer level. This is not a trivial task, since it requires the adjustment of approximately 200000 parameters. They are determined simultaneously in a track-based alignment procedure, using the MillePede II program, which minimizes the residuals between the measured and expected hit positions of the particle trajectories. In this presentation, alignment strategies for the early LHC Run-2 phase are outlined, and results obtained with cosmic-ray tracks are discussed.

  7. Mechanically flexible optically transparent silicon fabric with high thermal budget devices from bulk silicon (100)

    KAUST Repository

    Hussain, Muhammad Mustafa

    2013-05-30

    Today’s information age is driven by silicon based electronics. For nearly four decades semiconductor industry has perfected the fabrication process of continuingly scaled transistor – heart of modern day electronics. In future, silicon industry will be more pervasive, whose application will range from ultra-mobile computation to bio-integrated medical electronics. Emergence of flexible electronics opens up interesting opportunities to expand the horizon of electronics industry. However, silicon – industry’s darling material is rigid and brittle. Therefore, we report a generic batch fabrication process to convert nearly any silicon electronics into a flexible one without compromising its (i) performance; (ii) ultra-large-scale-integration complexity to integrate billions of transistors within small areas; (iii) state-of-the-art process compatibility, (iv) advanced materials used in modern semiconductor technology; (v) the most widely used and well-studied low-cost substrate mono-crystalline bulk silicon (100). In our process, we make trenches using anisotropic reactive ion etching (RIE) in the inactive areas (in between the devices) of a silicon substrate (after the devices have been fabricated following the regular CMOS process), followed by a dielectric based spacer formation to protect the sidewall of the trench and then performing an isotropic etch to create caves in silicon. When these caves meet with each other the top portion of the silicon with the devices is ready to be peeled off from the bottom silicon substrate. Release process does not need to use any external support. Released silicon fabric (25 μm thick) is mechanically flexible (5 mm bending radius) and the trenches make it semi-transparent (transparency of 7%). © (2013) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.

  8. Bayesian multiple target tracking

    CERN Document Server

    Streit, Roy L

    2013-01-01

    This second edition has undergone substantial revision from the 1999 first edition, recognizing that a lot has changed in the multiple target tracking field. One of the most dramatic changes is in the widespread use of particle filters to implement nonlinear, non-Gaussian Bayesian trackers. This book views multiple target tracking as a Bayesian inference problem. Within this framework it develops the theory of single target tracking, multiple target tracking, and likelihood ratio detection and tracking. In addition to providing a detailed description of a basic particle filter that implements

  9. Microstructure Control of Columnar-Grained Silicon Substrate Solidified from Silicon Melts Using Gas Pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Kyu Lee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A silicon substrate with the dimensions of 100 × 140 × 0.3 mm was grown directly from liquid silicon with gas pressure. The silicon melt in the sealed melting part was injected into the growth part at applied pressure of 780–850 Torr. The solidified silicon substrate was then transferred by the pull of the cooled dummy bar. A desirable structure with a liquid-solid interface perpendicular to the pulling direction was formed when the mold temperature in the solidification zone of the growth part was much higher than that of the dummy bar, as this technique should be able to overcome thermal loss through the molds and the limited heat flux derived from the very narrow contact area between the silicon melt and the dummy bar. In addition, because the metallic impurities and expansion of volume during solidification are preferably moved to a liquid phase, a high-quality silicon substrate, without defects such as cracks and impurities in the substrate, could be manufactured in the interface structure. The present study reports the experimental findings on a new and direct growth system for obtaining silicon substrates characterized by high quality and productivity, as a candidate for alternate routes for the fabrication of silicon substrates.

  10. Study of Silicon Microstrip Detector Properties for the LHCb Silicon Tracker

    CERN Document Server

    Lois-Gómez, C; Vázquez-Regueiro, P

    2006-01-01

    The LHCb experiment, at present under construction at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, has been designed to perform high-precision measurements of CP violating phenomena and rare decays in the B meson systems. The need of a good tracking performance and the high density of particles close to the beam pipe lead to the use of silicon microstrip detectors in a significant part of the LHCb tracking system. The Silicon Tracker (ST) will be built using p-on-n silicon detectors with strip pitches of approximately 200 $\\mu$m and readout strips up to 38 cm in length. This thesis describes the tests carried out on silicon microstrip detectors for the ST, starting from the characterization of different prototypes up to the final tests on the detectors that are being installed at CERN. The results can be divided in three main blocks. The first part comprises an exhaustive characterization of several prototype sensors selected as suitable candidates for the detector and was performed in order to decide some design param...

  11. Sampling Artifacts from Conductive Silicone Tubing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timko, Michael T.; Yu, Zhenhong; Kroll, Jesse; Jayne, John T.; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Miake-Lye, Richard C.; Onasch, Timothy B.; Liscinsky, David; Kirchstetter, Thomas W.; Destaillats, Hugo; Holder, Amara L.; Smith, Jared D.; Wilson, Kevin R.

    2009-05-15

    We report evidence that carbon impregnated conductive silicone tubing used in aerosol sampling systems can introduce two types of experimental artifacts: 1) silicon tubing dynamically absorbs carbon dioxide gas, requiring greater than 5 minutes to reach equilibrium and 2) silicone tubing emits organic contaminants containing siloxane that adsorb onto particles traveling through it and onto downstream quartz fiber filters. The consequence can be substantial for engine exhaust measurements as both artifacts directly impact calculations of particulate mass-based emission indices. The emission of contaminants from the silicone tubing can result in overestimation of organic particle mass concentrations based on real-time aerosol mass spectrometry and the off-line thermal analysis of quartz filters. The adsorption of siloxane contaminants can affect the surface properties of aerosol particles; we observed a marked reduction in the water-affinity of soot particles passed through conductive silicone tubing. These combined observations suggest that the silicone tubing artifacts may have wide consequence for the aerosol community and should, therefore, be used with caution. Gentle heating, physical and chemical properties of the particle carriers, exposure to solvents, and tubing age may influence siloxane uptake. The amount of contamination is expected to increase as the tubing surface area increases and as the particle surface area increases. The effect is observed at ambient temperature and enhanced by mild heating (<100 oC). Further evaluation is warranted.

  12. Solution-processed polycrystalline silicon on paper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trifunovic, M.; Ishihara, R., E-mail: r.ishihara@tudelft.nl [Delft Institute for Microsystems and Nanoelectronics (DIMES), Delft University of Technology, Feldmannweg 17, 2628CT Delft (Netherlands); Shimoda, T. [Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Nomi, Ishikawa 923-1292 (Japan)

    2015-04-20

    Printing electronics has led to application areas which were formerly impossible with conventional electronic processes. Solutions are used as inks on top of large areas at room temperatures, allowing the production of fully flexible circuitry. Commonly, research in these inks have focused on organic and metal-oxide ink materials due to their printability, while these materials lack in the electronic performance when compared to silicon electronics. Silicon electronics, on the other hand, has only recently found their way in solution processes. Printing of cyclopentasilane as the silicon ink has been conducted and devices with far superior electric performance have been made when compared to other ink materials. A thermal annealing step of this material, however, was necessary, which prevented its usage on inexpensive substrates with a limited thermal budget. In this work, we introduce a method that allows polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si) production directly from the same liquid silicon ink using excimer laser irradiation. In this way, poly-Si could be formed directly on top of paper even with a single laser pulse. Using this method, poly-Si transistors were created at a maximum temperature of only 150 °C. This method allows silicon device formation on inexpensive, temperature sensitive substrates such as polyethylene terephthalate, polyethylene naphthalate or paper, which leads to applications that require low-cost but high-speed electronics.

  13. Solution-processed polycrystalline silicon on paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trifunovic, M.; Shimoda, T.; Ishihara, R.

    2015-04-01

    Printing electronics has led to application areas which were formerly impossible with conventional electronic processes. Solutions are used as inks on top of large areas at room temperatures, allowing the production of fully flexible circuitry. Commonly, research in these inks have focused on organic and metal-oxide ink materials due to their printability, while these materials lack in the electronic performance when compared to silicon electronics. Silicon electronics, on the other hand, has only recently found their way in solution processes. Printing of cyclopentasilane as the silicon ink has been conducted and devices with far superior electric performance have been made when compared to other ink materials. A thermal annealing step of this material, however, was necessary, which prevented its usage on inexpensive substrates with a limited thermal budget. In this work, we introduce a method that allows polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si) production directly from the same liquid silicon ink using excimer laser irradiation. In this way, poly-Si could be formed directly on top of paper even with a single laser pulse. Using this method, poly-Si transistors were created at a maximum temperature of only 150 °C. This method allows silicon device formation on inexpensive, temperature sensitive substrates such as polyethylene terephthalate, polyethylene naphthalate or paper, which leads to applications that require low-cost but high-speed electronics.

  14. Smart Vehicle Tracking System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.P.Kamble

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available It is amazing to know how simple ideas can give a whole new dimension to the tracking and navigation industry and smart vehicle tracking system is used for tracking the vehicles. You can optimize driver routes, save petrol or gas and time, reduce theft and control the vehicle functions. Many a times it is not required to track your vehicle or target globally. In majority of cases tracking is more restricted to local purposes only, such as tracking movement of vehicle within city, tracking the raw materials within industrial estate or to know the present position of your daughter or son within city. But unfortunately in the pursuit of making things complex this simple idea is forgotten. This simple yet powerful idea forms the basis of this revolutionary project. All this coupled with a very low cost, a robust design and tremendous market potential makes this model even more attractive.

  15. Tracking by Neural Nets

    CERN Document Server

    Jofrehei, Arash

    2015-01-01

    Current track reconstruction methods start with two points and then for each layer loop through all possible hits to find proper hits to add to that track. Another idea would be to use this large number of already reconstructed events and/or simulated data and train a machine on this data to find tracks given hit pixels. Training time could be long but real time tracking is really fast. Simulation might not be as realistic as real data but tracking efficiency is 100 percent for that while by using real data we would probably be limited to current efficiency. The fact that this approach can be a lot faster and even more efficient than current methods by using simulation data can make it a great alternative for current track reconstruction methods used in both triggering and tracking.

  16. Tunable silicon CROW delay lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morichetti, Francesco; Canciamilla, Antonio; Torregiani, Matteo; Ferrari, Carlo; Melloni, Andrea; Martinelli, Mario

    2010-05-01

    Tunable coupled resonator optical waveguides (CROWs) are powerful and versatile devices that can be used to dynamically control the delay of optical data streams on chip. In this contribution we show that CROW delay lines fabricated on a silicon on insulator (SOI) platform are suitable for applications in the emerging scenario of optical systems at 100 Gbit/s. Issues concerning technology, design, limits and applications of SOI CROWs are discussed. The performances of silicon CROW delay lines activated by thermal tuning are compared to those of glass CROW in terms of power consumption, thermal crosstalk and reconfiguration speed. The continuous delay of 10-ps long optical pulses by 8 bit length is demonstrated by using a silicon CROW with a bandwidth of 87 GHz and made of 12 RRs. At 100 Gbit/s this structure provides comparable figures of merit (fractional delay of 0.75 bit/RR and fractional loss of 0.7 dB per bit-delay) of state-of-the art glass CROW operating at 10 Gbit/s, yet the area of the latter being three order of magnitude larger. The compatibility of silicon CROW with the emerging 100 Gbit/s systems is demonstrated by showing error-free phase-preserving propagation of a 100 Gbit/s return-to-zero (RZ) polarization-division-multiplexing (PolDM) differential quaternary phase shit keying (DQPSK) signal dynamically delayed by the CROW. It is also demonstrated that a silicon CROW can be used in a PolDM system to introduce a polarization selective delay in order to optimize the time interleaving of the two orthogonally polarized data streams.

  17. Tracks: Nurses and the Tracking Network

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-06-06

    This podcast highlights the utility of the National Environmental Public Health Tracking Network for nurses in a variety of work settings. It features commentary from the American Nurses Association and includes stories from a public health nurse in Massachusetts.  Created: 6/6/2012 by National Center for Environmental Health (NCEH)/Division of Environmental Hazards and Health Effects (DEHHE)/Environmental Health Tracking Branch (EHTB).   Date Released: 6/6/2012.

  18. The AMS tracking detector for cosmic-ray physics in space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourquin, Maurice [University of Geneva, Geneva (Switzerland)]. E-mail: Maurice.Bourquin@physics.unige.ch

    2005-04-01

    AMS-02 is a general-purpose spectrometer designed to measure cosmic rays and gamma rays in near-Earth orbit. The main scientific motivations are the search for cosmic anti-matter, the search for dark matter, precision measurements on the relative abundance of different nuclei and isotopes, as well as the measurement of very high-energy gamma rays. Constructed by a large international collaboration of institutes from America, Asia and Europe, it will collect data on the International Space Station for a period of at least three years. In this contribution, I first identify the various detector requirements necessary to carry out this ambitious program. In particular, a large-area silicon microstrip detector inside a 0.8T superconducting magnet is well suited to measure rigidity p/Z and specific energy loss dE/dx of cosmic rays, as well as the direction and energy of converted gamma rays. I review the advantage of such a silicon-tracking detector, taking into account the constraints of the space environment. The collaboration has gained extensive operating experience with double-sided silicon sensors in beam tests, and above all with AMS-01, a precursor spectrometer flown in the cargo bay of the Shuttle Discovery. During the entire 10-day STS-91 mission, the Silicon Tracker functioned without fault and with good spatial resolution. From the lessons learned with AMS-01, improvements were made to the design and assembly procedure of the 2500 sensors of AMS-02. As a result, the charge identification has been extended from Oxygen (Z=8) to Iron (Z=26). The physics reach of the new spectrometer is presented.

  19. D0 Silicon Upgrad: D0 Silicon Cooling System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Squires, B.; /Fermilab

    1998-07-14

    The cooling system design is not complete. This paper lays out the general design and some of the design calculations that have been performed up to this date. Further refinement will be performed. This is especially true in the piping layout, piping insulation and detector manifold areas. The silicon detector is cooled by means of a coolant in the beryllium channels that also act as the primary supporting device for the silicon ladders and wedges. The coolant is water with ethylene glycol added as a freezing point depressant. The glycol concentration in the coolant is 30% by weight resulting in a freezing point of approximately -15 C. If the water/glycol is not sufficient for maintaining the desired detector temperature the concentration of the water/glycol may be changed or an alternative coolant may be used.

  20. Kalman Filter Based Railway Tracking from Mobile LIDAR Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jwa, Y.; Sonh, G.

    2015-08-01

    This study introduces a new method to reconstruct 3D model of railway tracks from a railway corridor scene captured by mobile LiDAR data. The proposed approach starts to approximate the orientation of railway track trajectory from LiDAR point clouds and extract a strip, which direction is orthogonal to the trajectory of railway track. Within the strip, a track region and its track points are detected based on the Bayesian decision process. Once the main track region is localized, rail head points are segmented based on the region growing approach from the detected track points and then initial track models are reconstructed using a third-degree polynomial function. Based on the initial modelling result, a potential track region with varying lengths is dynamically predicted and the model parameters are updated in the Kalman Filter framework. The key aspect is that the proposed approach is able to enhance the efficiency of the railway tracking process by reducing the complexity for detecting track points and reconstructing track models based on the use of the track model previously reconstructed. An evaluation of the proposed method is performed over an urban railway corridor area containing multiple railway track pairs.

  1. Silicon Schottky Diode Safe Operating Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Megan C.; Lauenstein, Jean-Marie; Ladbury, Raymond L.; Wilcox, Edward P.; Phan, Anthony M.; Label, Kenneth A.

    2016-01-01

    Vulnerability of a variety of candidate spacecraft electronics to total ionizing dose and displacementdamage is studied. Devices tested include optoelectronics, digital, analog, linear bipolar devices, and hybrid devices.

  2. Silicon micro-mold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Alfredo M.

    2006-10-24

    The present invention describes a method for rapidly fabricating a robust 3-dimensional silicon-mold for use in preparing complex metal micro-components. The process begins by depositing a conductive metal layer onto one surface of a silicon wafer. A thin photoresist and a standard lithographic mask are then used to transfer a trace image pattern onto the opposite surface of the wafer by exposing and developing the resist. The exposed portion of the silicon substrate is anisotropically etched through the wafer thickness down to conductive metal layer to provide an etched pattern consisting of a series of rectilinear channels and recesses in the silicon which serve as the silicon micro-mold. Microcomponents are prepared with this mold by first filling the mold channels and recesses with a metal deposit, typically by electroplating, and then removing the silicon micro-mold by chemical etching.

  3. Silicon containing copolymers

    CERN Document Server

    Amiri, Sahar; Amiri, Sanam

    2014-01-01

    Silicones have unique properties including thermal oxidative stability, low temperature flow, high compressibility, low surface tension, hydrophobicity and electric properties. These special properties have encouraged the exploration of alternative synthetic routes of well defined controlled microstructures of silicone copolymers, the subject of this Springer Brief. The authors explore the synthesis and characterization of notable block copolymers. Recent advances in controlled radical polymerization techniques leading to the facile synthesis of well-defined silicon based thermo reversible blo

  4. Highly porous silicon membranes fabricated from silicon nitride/silicon stacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Chengzhu; Striemer, Christopher C; Gaborski, Thomas R; McGrath, James L; Fauchet, Philippe M

    2014-07-23

    Nanopore formation in silicon films has previously been demonstrated using rapid thermal crystallization of ultrathin (15 nm) amorphous Si films sandwiched between nm-thick SiO2 layers. In this work, the silicon dioxide barrier layers are replaced with silicon nitride, resulting in nanoporous silicon films with unprecedented pore density and novel morphology. Four different thin film stack systems including silicon nitride/silicon/silicon nitride (NSN), silicon dioxide/silicon/silicon nitride (OSN), silicon nitride/silicon/silicon dioxide (NSO), and silicon dioxide/silicon/silicon dioxide (OSO) are tested under different annealing temperatures. Generally the pore size, pore density, and porosity positively correlate with the annealing temperature for all four systems. The NSN system yields substantially higher porosity and pore density than the OSO system, with the OSN and NSO stack characteristics fallings between these extremes. The higher porosity of the Si membrane in the NSN stack is primarily due to the pore formation enhancement in the Si film. It is hypothesized that this could result from the interfacial energy difference between the silicon/silicon nitride and silicon/silicon dioxide, which influences the Si crystallization process. PMID:24623562

  5. ATLAS silicon microstrip tracker operation and performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barone, Gaetano

    2013-12-01

    The Semi-Conductor Tracker (SCT) is a silicon strip detector and one of the key precision tracking devices of the Inner Detector of the ATLAS experiment at CERN LHC. The SCT is constructed of 4088 silicon detector modules for a total of 6.3 million channels. Each module is designed, constructed and tested to operate as a stand-alone unit, mechanically, electrically, optically and thermally. The modules are mounted into two types of structures: one barrel (4 cylinders) and two end-cap systems (9 disks on each). The current results from the successful operation of the SCT Detector at the LHC and its status after three years of operation will be presented. The operation of the detector including an overview of the main issues encountered is reported. The main emphasis is given to the tracking performance of the SCT and the data quality during the >2 years of data taking of proton-proton collision data at 7 TeV (and short periods of heavy ion collisions). The SCT has been fully operational throughout all data taking periods, delivering high quality tracking data.

  6. Laser process for extended silicon thin film solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hessmann, M.T., E-mail: hessmann@zae.uni-erlangen.de [Bavarian Center for Applied Energy Research, Am Weichselgarten 7, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Kunz, T.; Burkert, I.; Gawehns, N. [Bavarian Center for Applied Energy Research, Am Weichselgarten 7, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Schaefer, L.; Frick, T.; Schmidt, M. [Bayerisches Laserzentrum, Konrad-Zuse-Str 2-6, 91052 Erlangen (Germany); Meidel, B. [Schott Solar AG, Carl-Zeiss-Strasse 4, 63755 Alzenau (Germany); Auer, R. [Bavarian Center for Applied Energy Research, Am Weichselgarten 7, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Brabec, C.J. [Bavarian Center for Applied Energy Research, Am Weichselgarten 7, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Chair VI - Materials for Electronics and Energy Technology, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Martensstrasse 7, 91058 Erlangen (Germany)

    2011-10-31

    We present a large area thin film base substrate for the epitaxy of crystalline silicon. The concept of epitaxial growth of silicon on large area thin film substrates overcomes the area restrictions of an ingot based monocrystalline silicon process. Further it opens the possibility for a roll to roll process for crystalline silicon production. This concept suggests a technical pathway to overcome the limitations of silicon ingot production in terms of costs, throughput and completely prevents any sawing losses. The core idea behind these thin film substrates is a laser welding process of individual, thin silicon wafers. In this manuscript we investigate the properties of laser welded monocrystalline silicon foils (100) by micro-Raman mapping and spectroscopy. It is shown that the laser beam changes the crystalline structure of float zone grown silicon along the welding seam. This is illustrated by Raman mapping which visualizes compressive stress as well as tensile stress in a range of - 147.5 to 32.5 MPa along the welding area.

  7. Silicon nano-biotechnology

    CERN Document Server

    He, Yao

    2014-01-01

    This book reviews the latest advances in the development of silicon nano-biotechnology for biological and biomedical applications, which include biosensing, bioimaging, and cancer therapy. In this book, newly developed silicon nano-biotechnology and its biomedical applications are systematically introduced. For instance, fluorescent silicon nanoparticles, serving as novel high-performance biological nanoprobes, are superbly suited to real-time and long-term bioimaging. Silicon nanowire-based sensing platform is especially capable of sensitive, specific, and multiplexed detection of various bio

  8. Novel Silicon Nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Novel silicon nanotubes with inner-diameter of 60-80 nm was prepared using hydrogen-added dechlorination of SiCl4 followed by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on a NixMgyO catalyst. The TEM observation showed that the suitable reaction temperature is 973 K for the formation of silicon nanotubes. Most of silicon nanotubes have one open end and some have two closed ends. The shape ofnanoscale silicon, however, is a micro-crystal type at 873 K, a rod or needle type at 993 K and an onion-type at 1023 K, respectively.

  9. A high Tc superconductor bolometer on a silicon nitride membrane

    OpenAIRE

    Sanchez, Stefan; Elwenspoek, Miko; Gui, Chengqun; Nivelle, de, M.J.M.E.; De, Vries; Korte, de, N.; Bruijn, Marcel P.; Wijnbergen, Jan J.; Michalke, Wolfgang; Steinbeiss, Erwin; Heidenblut, Torsten; Schwierzi, Bernard

    1998-01-01

    In this paper, we describe the design, fabrication, and performance of a high-Tc GdBa2Cu3O7-¿ superconductor bolometer positioned on a 2× 2-mm2 1-¿m-thick silicon nitride membrane. The bolometer structure has an effective area of 0.64 mm2 and was grown on a specially developed silicon-on-nitride (SON) layer. This layer was made by direct bonding of silicon nitride to silicon after chemical mechanical polishing. The operation temperature of the bolometer is 85 K. A thermal conductance G=3.3·10...

  10. A high-Tc superconductor bolometer on a silicon nitridemembrane

    OpenAIRE

    Sanchez, S.; Elwenspoek, M.C.; Gui, C; Nivelle, de, M.J.M.E.; De, Vries; Korte, de, N.; Bruijn, M.P.; Schwierzi, B.

    1997-01-01

    In this paper we describe the design, fabrication and performance of a high-Tc GdBa2Cu3O7-δ superconductor bolometer positioned on a 2×2 mm2, 1 μm thick silicon nitride membrane. The bolometer structure has an effective area of 0.64 mm2 and was grown on a specially developed silicon-on-nitride layer. This layer was made by direct bonding of silicon nitride to silicon after chemical mechanical polishing. The operation temperature of the bolometer is 85 K. A thermal conductance G=3.3·10-5 W/K w...

  11. Track Etching of PET Studied by Spectrophotometer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZhuZhiyong; DuanJinlai; SunYoumei; Y.Maekawa; H.Koshikawa; M.Yoshida

    2003-01-01

    Energetic heavy ion passing through polymeiic materials can produce a cylindrical intensively damaged area along the ion path, which is referred to as latent ion track. Large amount of small molecule fragments are produced inside ion track through interactions between the ion and the target atoms, which made it easy to be chemically etched compared to the bulk material. Porous membranes with nanometer and micrometer sized pores can therefore be produced through proper etching of the ion irradiated polymer film. As the pores are well aligned with respect to each other and the pore geometric shape can be finely controlled, the so produced ion track membrane has found wide applications.

  12. Silicon-nanowire based attachment of silicon chips for mouse embryo labelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durán, S; Novo, S; Duch, M; Gómez-Martínez, R; Fernández-Regúlez, M; San Paulo, A; Nogués, C; Esteve, J; Ibañez, E; Plaza, J A

    2015-03-21

    The adhesion of small silicon chips to cells has many potential applications as direct interconnection of the cells to the external world can be accomplished. Hence, although some typical applications of silicon nanowires integrated into microsystems are focused on achieving a cell-on-a-chip strategy, we are interested in obtaining chip-on-a-cell systems. This paper reports the design, technological development and characterization of polysilicon barcodes featuring silicon nanowires as nanoscale attachment to identify and track living mouse embryos during their in vitro development. The chips are attached to the outer surface of the Zona Pellucida, the cover that surrounds oocytes and embryos, to avoid the direct contact between the chip and the embryo cell membrane. Two attachment methodologies, rolling and pushpin, which allow two entirely different levels of applied forces to attach the chips to living embryos, are evaluated. The former consists of rolling the mouse embryos over one barcode with the silicon nanowires facing upwards, while in the latter, the barcode is pushed against the embryo with a micropipette. The effect on in vitro embryo development and the retention rate related to the calculated applied forces are stated. Field emission scanning electron microscopy inspection, which allowed high-resolution imaging, also confirms the physical attachment of the nanowires with some of them piercing or wrapped by the Zona Pellucida and revealed extraordinary bent silicon nanowires. PMID:25609565

  13. Thermoelectrics from silicon nanoparticles: the influence of native oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petermann, Nils; Stötzel, Julia; Stein, Niklas; Kessler, Victor; Wiggers, Hartmut; Theissmann, Ralf; Schierning, Gabi; Schmechel, Roland

    2015-06-01

    Thermoelectric materials were synthesized by current-assisted sintering of doped silicon nanoparticles produced in a microwave-plasma reactor. Due to their affinity to oxygen, the nanoparticles start to oxidize when handled in air and even a thin surface layer of native silicon oxide leads to a significant increase in the oxide volume ratio. This results in a considerable incorporation of oxygen into the sintered pellets, thus affecting the thermoelectric performance. To investigate the necessity of inert handling of the raw materials, the thermoelectric transport properties of sintered nanocrystalline silicon samples were characterized with respect to their oxygen content. An innovative method allowing a quantitative silicon oxide analysis by means of electron microscopy was applied: the contrast between areas of high and low electrical conductivity was attributed to the silicon matrix and silicon oxide precipitates, respectively. Thermoelectric characterization revealed that both, electron mobility and thermal conductivity decrease with increasing silicon oxide content. A maximum figure of merit with zT = 0.45 at 950 °C was achieved for samples with a silicon oxide mass fraction of 9.5 and 21.4% while the sample with more than 25% of oxygen clearly indicates a negative impact of the oxygen on the electron mobility. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Silicon and Silicon-related Materials for Thermoelectricity", edited by Dario Narducci.

  14. The PHENIX Forward Silicon Vertex Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Aidala, C; Anderssen, LE; Bambaugh, A; Barron, A; Boissevain, J G; Bok, J; Boose, S; Brooks, M L; Butsyk, S; Cepeda, LM; Chacon, P; Chacon, S; Chavez, L; Cote, T; D'Agostino, C; Datta, A; DeBlasio, K; DelMonte, L; Desmond, E J; Durham, J M; Fields, D; Finger, M; Gingu, C; Gonzales, B; Haggerty, J S; Hawke, T; van Hecke, H W; Herron, M; Hoff, J; Huang, J; Jiang, X; Johnson, LT; Jonas, M; Kapustinsky, J; Key, A; Kunde, G J; LaBounty, J; Lee, D M; Lee, K B; Leitch, M J; Lenz, M; Lenz, W; Liu, M X; Lynch, D; Mannel, E; McGaughey, P L; Meles, A; Meredith, B; Nguyen, H; O'Brien, E; Pak, R; Papavassiliou, V; Pate, S; Pereira, H; Perera, G D N; Phillips, M; Pisani, R; Polizzo, S; Poncione, R J; Popule, J; Prokop, M; Purschke, M L; Purwar, A K; Ronzhina, N; Silva, C L; Slunecka, M; Smith, R; Sondheim, W E; Spendier, K; Stoffer, M; Tennant, E; Thomas, D; Tomasek, M; Veicht, A; Vrba, V; Wang, X R; Wei, F; Winter, D; Yarema, R; You, Z; Zimmerman, A; Zimmerman, T

    2013-01-01

    A new silicon detector has been developed to provide the PHENIX experiment with precise charged particle tracking at forward and backward rapidity. The Forward Silicon Vertex Tracker (FVTX) was installed in PHENIX prior to the 2012 run period of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The FVTX is composed of two annular endcaps, each with four stations of silicon mini-strip sensors, covering a rapidity range of $1.2<|\\eta|<2.2$ that closely matches the two existing PHENIX muon arms. Each station consists of 48 individual silicon sensors, each of which contains two columns of mini-strips with 75 $\\mu$m pitch in the radial direction and lengths in the $\\phi$ direction varying from 3.4 mm at the inner radius to 11.5 mm at the outer radius. The FVTX has approximately 0.54 million strips in each endcap. These are read out with FPHX chips, developed in collaboration with Fermilab, which are wire bonded directly to the mini-strips. The maximum strip occupancy reached in central Au-Au collisions is approxim...

  15. Gated Luminescence Imaging of Silicon Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Jinmyoung; Liu, Xiangyou; Kotamraju, Venkata Ramana; Ruoslahti, Erkki; Nam, Yoonkey; Sailor, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    The luminescence lifetime of nanocrystalline silicon is typically on the order of microseconds, significantly longer than the nanosecond lifetimes exhibited by fluorescent molecules naturally present in cells and tissues. Time-gated imaging, where the image is acquired at a time after termination of an excitation pulse, allows discrimination of a silicon nanoparticle probe from these endogenous signals. Because of the microsecond time scale for silicon emission, time-gated imaging is relatively simple to implement for this biocompatible and nontoxic probe. Here a time-gated system with ~10 ns resolution is described, using an intensified CCD camera and pulsed LED or laser excitation sources. The method is demonstrated by tracking the fate of mesoporous silicon nanoparticles containing the tumor-targeting peptide iRGD, administered by retro-orbital injection into live mice. Imaging of such systemically administered nanoparticles in vivo is particularly challenging because of the low concentration of probe in the targeted tissues and relatively high background signals from tissue autofluorescence. Contrast improvements of >100-fold (relative to steady-state imaging) is demonstrated in the targeted tissues. PMID:26034817

  16. Multi-Pose Face Detection and Tracking Using Condensation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Chieh Chiang

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Automatically locating face areas can advance applications either in images or videos. This paper proposes a video-based approach for face detection and tracking in an indoor environment to determine where face areas appear in video sequences. Our approach involves four main modules: an initialization module for setting all configurations, a Condensation module for face tracking, a template module for measuring the observation process in Condensation, and a correction module for correcting the tracking if the tracked face has been lost. We adapted the Condensation algorithm for dealing with the face tracking problem, and designed a checklist scheme for the template module that can record the most significant templates of the tracked face poses. We also performed experiments to demonstrate the performance and the robustness of our proposed approach for face detection and tracking.

  17. Preparation and Characterization of Amorphous Silicon Oxide Nanowires

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Large-scale amorphous silicon nanowires (SiNWs) with a diameter about 100 nm and a length of dozens of micrometers on silicon wafers were synthesized by thermal evaporation of silicon monoxide (SiO).Scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) observations show that the silicon nanowires are smooth.Selected area electron diffraction (SAED) shows that the silicon nanowires are amorphous and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) indicates that the nanowires have the composition of Si and O elements in an atomic ratio of 1:2, their composition approximates that of SiO2.SiO is considered to be used as a Si sources to produce SiNWs.We conclude that the growth mechanism is closely related to the defect structure and silicon monoxide followed by growth through an oxide-assisted vapor-solid reaction.

  18. Nonlinear optical imaging of defects in cubic silicon carbide epilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hristu, Radu; Stanciu, Stefan G; Tranca, Denis E; Matei, Alecs; Stanciu, George A

    2014-06-11

    Silicon carbide is one of the most promising materials for power electronic devices capable of operating at extreme conditions. The widespread application of silicon carbide power devices is however limited by the presence of structural defects in silicon carbide epilayers. Our experiment demonstrates that optical second harmonic generation imaging represents a viable solution for characterizing structural defects such as stacking faults, dislocations and double positioning boundaries in cubic silicon carbide layers. X-ray diffraction and optical second harmonic rotational anisotropy were used to confirm the growth of the cubic polytype, atomic force microscopy was used to support the identification of silicon carbide defects based on their distinct shape, while second harmonic generation microscopy revealed the detailed structure of the defects. Our results show that this fast and noninvasive investigation method can identify defects which appear during the crystal growth and can be used to certify areas within the silicon carbide epilayer that have optimal quality.

  19. Silicon Sheet Growth Development for the Large Area Sheet Task of the Low Cost Solar Array Project. Heat Exchanger Method - Ingot Casting Fixed Abrasive Method - Multi-Wire Slicing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, F.; Khattak, C. P.

    1978-01-01

    Solar cells fabricated from HEM cast silicon yielded up to 15% conversion efficiencies. This was achieved in spite of using unpurified graphite parts in the HEM furnace and without optimization of material or cell processing parameters. Molybdenum retainers prevented SiC formation and reduced carbon content by 50%. The oxygen content of vacuum cast HEM silicon is lower than typical Czochralski grown silicon. Impregnation of 45 micrometers diamonds into 7.5 micrometers copper sheath showed distortion of the copper layer. However, 12.5 micrometers and 15 micrometers copper sheath can be impregnated with 45 micrometers diamonds to a high concentration. Electroless nickel plating of wires impregnated only in the cutting edge showed nickel concentration around the diamonds. This has the possibility of reducing kerf. The high speed slicer fabricated can achieve higher speed and longer stroke with vibration isolation.

  20. Online Supervised Subspace Tracking

    OpenAIRE

    Xie, Yao; Song, Ruiyang; Dai, Hanjun; Li, Qingbin; Song, Le

    2015-01-01

    We present a framework for supervised subspace tracking, when there are two time series $x_t$ and $y_t$, one being the high-dimensional predictors and the other being the response variables and the subspace tracking needs to take into consideration of both sequences. It extends the classic online subspace tracking work which can be viewed as tracking of $x_t$ only. Our online sufficient dimensionality reduction (OSDR) is a meta-algorithm that can be applied to various cases including linear r...

  1. Photonic Crystal Sensors Based on Porous Silicon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Pacholski

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Porous silicon has been established as an excellent sensing platform for the optical detection of hazardous chemicals and biomolecular interactions such as DNA hybridization, antigen/antibody binding, and enzymatic reactions. Its porous nature provides a high surface area within a small volume, which can be easily controlled by changing the pore sizes. As the porosity and consequently the refractive index of an etched porous silicon layer depends on the electrochemial etching conditions photonic crystals composed of multilayered porous silicon films with well-resolved and narrow optical reflectivity features can easily be obtained. The prominent optical response of the photonic crystal decreases the detection limit and therefore increases the sensitivity of porous silicon sensors in comparison to sensors utilizing Fabry-Pérot based optical transduction. Development of porous silicon photonic crystal sensors which allow for the detection of analytes by the naked eye using a simple color change or the fabrication of stacked porous silicon photonic crystals showing two distinct optical features which can be utilized for the discrimination of analytes emphasize its high application potential.

  2. Testbeam Results from Pre and Post Irradiated Modules for the Upgrade of the ATLAS Strip Tracking Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Blue, Andrew; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The planned HL-LHC (High Luminosity LHC) in 2025 is being designed to maximise the physics potential of the LHC through a sizeable increase in the luminosity, reaching 1x1035cm-2s-1 after 10 years of operation. A consequence of this increased luminosity is the expected radiation damage at a integrated luminosity of 3000fb-1, requiring the tracking detectors to withstand hadron fluencies to over 1x1016 1 MeV neutron equivalent per cm2. With the addition of increased readout rates, a complete re-design of the current ATLAS Inner Detector (ID) is being developed as the Inner Tracker (ITk), which will consist of both strip and pixelated silicon detectors. The silicon strip tracker exploits the concept of modularity. Fast readout electronics, deploying 130nm CMOS front-end electronics is glued on top of a silicon sensor. These so-called modules are glued on carbon structures and will span about 200m^2 of active area. A broad R&D program is ongoing to develop and prototype many detector components. The modules ...

  3. L1Track: a fast Level 1 track trigger for the ATLAS High Luminosity Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Cerri, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    With the planned high-luminosity upgrade of the LHC (HL-LHC), the ATLAS detector will see its collision rate increase by approximately a factor of 5 with respect to the current LHC operation. The earliest hardware based ATLAS trigger stage ("Level 1") will have to provide an higher rejection factor in a more difficult environment: a new improved Level 1 trigger architecture is under study, which includes the possibility of extracting with low latency and hight accuracy tracking information on time for the decision taking process. The expected trigger rates at HL-LHC and the available latency are the key ingredients that will drive the new design. The Level 1 track trigger (L1Track) design requires substantial modification of the ATLAS silicon detector readout philosophy: a precursor of the potential merging of detector and trigger architectures in the future silicon detectors at particle colliders. We will discuss potential approaches that are being actively considered to fulfil the demanding HL-LHC constrain...

  4. CWI at TREC 2012, KBA track and Session Track

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Araújo, S.; Boscarino, C.; Gebremeskel, G.G.; He, J.; Vries, A.P. de; Voorhees, E.M.; Buckland, L. P.

    2013-01-01

    We participated in two tracks: Knowledge Base Acceleration (KBA) Track and Session Track. In the KBA track, we focused on experi- menting with different approaches as it is the first time the track is launched. We experimented with supervised and unsupervised re- trieval models. Our supervised appro

  5. Cervical silicone lymphadenopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Latoni Kaysha; Thiruchelvam, Janavikulam

    2016-07-01

    A patient presented to the department of oral and maxillofacial surgery with a rare case of cervical silicone lymphadenopathy. She had a painless ovoid mass in the left side of her neck and had had cosmetic breast augmentation 10 years before. Radiological imaging and core biopsy examination were consistent with silicone lymphadenopathy. PMID:26830068

  6. Silicon Valley Ecosystem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Joseph Leu

    2005-01-01

    @@ It is unlikely that any industrial region of the world has received as much scrutiny and study as Silicon Valley. Despite the recent crash of Internet and telecommunications stocks,Silicon Valley remains the world's engine of growth for numerous high-technology sectors.

  7. Tracking parameter simulation for the Turkish accelerator center particle factory tracker system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapan, I.; Pilicer, E.; Pilicer, F. B.

    2016-09-01

    The silicon tracker part of the Turkish Accelerator Center super charm particle factory detector was designed for effectively tracking charged particles with momentum values up to 2.0 GeV/c. In this work, the FLUKA simulation code has been used to estimate the track parameters and their resolutions in the designed tracker system. These results have been compared with those obtained by the tkLayout software package. The simulated track parameter resolutions are compatible with the physics goals of the tracking detector.

  8. An Ion Beam Tracking System based on a Parallel Plate Avalanche Counter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carter I. P.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A pair of twin position-sensitive parallel plate avalanche counters have been developed at the Australian National University as a tracking system to aid in the further rejection of unwanted beam particles from a 6.5 T super conducting solenoid separator named SOLEROO. Their function is to track and identify each beam particle passing through the detectors on an event-by-event basis. In-beam studies have been completed and the detectors are in successful operation, demonstrating the tracking capability. A high efficiency 512-pixelwide-angle silicon detector array will then be integrated with the tracking system for nuclear reactions studies of radioactive ions.

  9. Electron track reconstruction in the ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Tadel, Matevž; Clark, Allan

    2001-01-01

    Before entering the hardware production phase of a HEP experiment, the detector elements that have been chosen during the planning process need to be thoroughly tested. At the LHC, silicon detectors will operate in a high-rate environment which requires low-noise electronics with a shaping time of $25 s$. A prototype silicon-strip half-module equipped with the analogue read-out chip SCTA128-HC was put in a $200GeV$ pion beam. An analysis of the collected data is presented. The tested module was found to conform to the SCT-modules specification for the ATLAS experiment. Electron reconstruction in the ATLAS detector is compromised by the large amount of material in the tracking volume, which leads to frequent emissions of hard bremsstrahlung photons. This affects the measurement of the transverse projections of track parameters in the inner detector as well as the measurement of energy and azimuthal angle in the EM calorimeter for $p_T<20GeV$. Reconstruction and electron identification efficiencies are...

  10. The impact of cine EPID image acquisition frame rate on markerless soft-tissue tracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yip, Stephen, E-mail: syip@lroc.harvard.edu; Rottmann, Joerg; Berbeco, Ross [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Although reduction of the cine electronic portal imaging device (EPID) acquisition frame rate through multiple frame averaging may reduce hardware memory burden and decrease image noise, it can hinder the continuity of soft-tissue motion leading to poor autotracking results. The impact of motion blurring and image noise on the tracking performance was investigated. Methods: Phantom and patient images were acquired at a frame rate of 12.87 Hz with an amorphous silicon portal imager (AS1000, Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA). The maximum frame rate of 12.87 Hz is imposed by the EPID. Low frame rate images were obtained by continuous frame averaging. A previously validated tracking algorithm was employed for autotracking. The difference between the programmed and autotracked positions of a Las Vegas phantom moving in the superior-inferior direction defined the tracking error (δ). Motion blurring was assessed by measuring the area change of the circle with the greatest depth. Additionally, lung tumors on 1747 frames acquired at 11 field angles from four radiotherapy patients are manually and automatically tracked with varying frame averaging. δ was defined by the position difference of the two tracking methods. Image noise was defined as the standard deviation of the background intensity. Motion blurring and image noise are correlated with δ using Pearson correlation coefficient (R). Results: For both phantom and patient studies, the autotracking errors increased at frame rates lower than 4.29 Hz. Above 4.29 Hz, changes in errors were negligible withδ < 1.60 mm. Motion blurring and image noise were observed to increase and decrease with frame averaging, respectively. Motion blurring and tracking errors were significantly correlated for the phantom (R = 0.94) and patient studies (R = 0.72). Moderate to poor correlation was found between image noise and tracking error with R −0.58 and −0.19 for both studies, respectively. Conclusions: Cine EPID

  11. LHCb: The LHCb Silicon Tracker: Running experience

    CERN Multimedia

    Saornil Gamarra, S

    2012-01-01

    The LHCb Silicon Tracker is part of the main tracking system of the LHCb detector at the LHC. It measures very precisely the particle trajectories coming from the interaction point in the region of high occupancies around the beam axis. After presenting our production and comissioning issues in TWEPP 2008, we report on our running experience. Focusing on electronic and hardware issues as well as operation and maintenance adversities, we describe the lessons learned and the pitfalls encountered after three years of successful operation.

  12. Present status of silicon detectors in COMPASS

    CERN Document Server

    Angerer, H; Esposito, A; Friedrich, J M; Gerassimov, S G; Grube, B; Ketzer, B; Konorov, I; Kühn, R; Paul, S; Schmitt, L; Wagner, R M; Wiesmann, M

    2003-01-01

    In 2002 the COMPASS experiment at CERN has started to take first physics data. The fixed target experiment at the SPS uses muon and hadron beams of very high intensity to investigate the structure of the nucleon. For beam definition and small angle tracking silicon microstrip detectors are used. This article describes the requirements which are set by the physics program of COMPASS for these detectors and the ways they were met, amongst which the operation at a temperature around 130 K (Lazarus effect) is the most prominent. Measurements at low temperatures as well as first results from the operation at room temperature in the COMPASS physics run 2002 are presented.

  13. Silicone-containing composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Mustafa

    2012-01-24

    A silicone-containing composition comprises the reaction product of a first component and an excess of an isocyanate component relative to the first component to form an isocyanated intermediary. The first component is selected from one of a polysiloxane and a silicone resin. The first component includes a carbon-bonded functional group selected from one of a hydroxyl group and an amine group. The isocyanate component is reactive with the carbon-bonded functional group of the first component. The isocyanated intermediary includes a plurality of isocyanate functional groups. The silicone-containing composition comprises the further reaction product of a second component, which is selected from the other of the polysiloxane and the silicone resin. The second component includes a plurality of carbon-bonded functional groups reactive with the isocyanate functional groups of the isocyanated intermediary for preparing the silicone-containing composition.

  14. Steps towards silicon optoelectronics

    CERN Document Server

    Starovoytov, A

    1999-01-01

    nanostructure fabrication. Thus, this thesis makes a dual contribution to the chosen field: it summarises the present knowledge on the possibility of utilising optical properties of nanocrystalline silicon in silicon-based electronics, and it reports new results within the framework of the subject. The main conclusion is that due to its promising optoelectronic properties nanocrystalline silicon remains a prospective competitor for the cheapest and fastest microelectronics of the next century. This thesis addresses the issue of a potential future microelectronics technology, namely the possibility of utilising the optical properties of nanocrystalline silicon for optoelectronic circuits. The subject is subdivided into three chapters. Chapter 1 is an introduction. It formulates the oncoming problem for microelectronic development, explains the basics of Integrated Optoelectronics, introduces porous silicon as a new light-emitting material and gives a brief review of other competing light-emitting material syst...

  15. Development and Evaluation of Test Stations for the Quality Assurance of the Silicon Micro-Strip Detector Modules for the CMS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Pöttgens, Michael

    2007-01-01

    CMS (Compact Muon Solenoid) is one of four large-scale detectors which will be operated at the LHC (Large Hadron Collider) at the European Laboratory for Particle Physics (CERN). For the search for new physics the reconstruction of the collision products and their properties is essential. In the innermost part of the CMS detector the traces of ionizing particles are measured utilizing a silicon tracker. A large fraction of this detector is equipped with silicon micro-strip modules which provide a precise space resolution in 1-dimension. A module consists of a sensor for detection of particles, the corresponding read-out electronics (hybrid) and a mechanical support structure. Since the 15,148 modules, which will be installed in the silicon micro-strip detector, have a total sensitive surface area of about 198 m2, the inner tracker of CMS is the largest silicon tracking detector, which has ever been built. While the sensors and hybrids are produced in industry, the construction of the modules and the control o...

  16. The Motif Tracking Algorithm

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, William; Aickelin, Uwe; 10.1007/s11633.008.0032.0

    2010-01-01

    The search for patterns or motifs in data represents a problem area of key interest to finance and economic researchers. In this paper we introduce the Motif Tracking Algorithm, a novel immune inspired pattern identification tool that is able to identify unknown motifs of a non specified length which repeat within time series data. The power of the algorithm comes from the fact that it uses a small number of parameters with minimal assumptions regarding the data being examined or the underlying motifs. Our interest lies in applying the algorithm to financial time series data to identify unknown patterns that exist. The algorithm is tested using three separate data sets. Particular suitability to financial data is shown by applying it to oil price data. In all cases the algorithm identifies the presence of a motif population in a fast and efficient manner due to the utilisation of an intuitive symbolic representation. The resulting population of motifs is shown to have considerable potential value for other ap...

  17. The Motif Tracking Algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The search for patterns or motifs in data represents a problem area of key interest to finance and economic researchers. In this paper, we introduce the motif tracking algorithm (MTA), a novel immune inspired (IS) pattern identification tool that is able to identify unknown motifs of a non specified length which repeat within time series data. The power of the algorithm comes from the fact that it uses a small number of parameters with minimal assumptions regarding the data being examined or the underlying motifs. Our interest lies in applying the algorithm to financial time series data to identify unknown patterns that exist. The algorithm is tested using three separate data sets. Particular suitability to financial data is shown by applying it to oil price data. In all cases, the algorithm identifies the presence of a motif population in a fast and efficient manner due to the utilization of an intuitive symbolic representation.The resulting population of motifs is shown to have considerable potential value for other applications such as forecasting and algorithm seeding.

  18. Eye-Tracking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela GROSSECK

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Eye-tracking: one of the newest and most efficient methods of improving on-line marketing communication is called eye-tracking. Marketers have borrowed this technique, usually used in psychological and medical research, in order to study web users with the help of a video camera incorporated in the monitor.

  19. Large scale tracking algorithms.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, Ross L.; Love, Joshua Alan; Melgaard, David Kennett; Karelitz, David B.; Pitts, Todd Alan; Zollweg, Joshua David; Anderson, Dylan Z.; Nandy, Prabal; Whitlow, Gary L.; Bender, Daniel A.; Byrne, Raymond Harry

    2015-01-01

    Low signal-to-noise data processing algorithms for improved detection, tracking, discrimination and situational threat assessment are a key research challenge. As sensor technologies progress, the number of pixels will increase signi cantly. This will result in increased resolution, which could improve object discrimination, but unfortunately, will also result in a significant increase in the number of potential targets to track. Many tracking techniques, like multi-hypothesis trackers, suffer from a combinatorial explosion as the number of potential targets increase. As the resolution increases, the phenomenology applied towards detection algorithms also changes. For low resolution sensors, "blob" tracking is the norm. For higher resolution data, additional information may be employed in the detection and classfication steps. The most challenging scenarios are those where the targets cannot be fully resolved, yet must be tracked and distinguished for neighboring closely spaced objects. Tracking vehicles in an urban environment is an example of such a challenging scenario. This report evaluates several potential tracking algorithms for large-scale tracking in an urban environment.

  20. On the Wrong Track.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Susan

    1992-01-01

    By any measure--student achievement, social development, or democratic values--ability grouping and tracking practices are indefensible and unsupported by research. Tracking allows schools to practice in-school segregation and perpetuate unequal opportunities and unequal socialization within classrooms. Jonathan Kozol's investigation shows how…

  1. Why we are tracking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tække, Jesper

    2015-01-01

    In this short essay, concerning why we are tracking, I will try to frame tracking as an evolutionary developed skill that humans need to survive. From an evolutionary point zero life must reflect upon itself in regard to its surrounding world as a kind of societal self-synchronization in this...

  2. Can Tracking Improve Learning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duflo, Esther; Dupas, Pascaline; Kremer, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Tracking students into different classrooms according to their prior academic performance is controversial among both scholars and policymakers. If teachers find it easier to teach a homogeneous group of students, tracking could enhance school effectiveness and raise test scores of both low- and high-ability students. If students benefit from…

  3. On the Wrong Track?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gursky, Daniel

    1990-01-01

    Discusses problems with student tracking. Although supporters consider tracking the best way for teachers to handle classroom diversity, many minorities say that it condemns their children to an inferior education. Studies show that heterogeneous classes benefit all students if the teachers adopt flexible instructional methods to handle the…

  4. Charge collection efficiency recovery in heavily irradiated silicon detectors operated at cryogenic temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    Da Vià, C; Berglund, P; Borchi, E; Borer, K; Bruzzi, Mara; Buontempo, S; Casagrande, L; Chapuy, S; Cindro, V; Dimcovski, Zlatomir; D'Ambrosio, N; de Boer, Wim; Dezillie, B; Esposito, A P; Granat, V; Grigoriev, E; Heijne, Erik H M; Heising, S; Janos, S; Koivuniemi, J H; Konotov, I; Li, Z; Lourenço, C; Mikuz, M; Niinikoski, T O; Pagano, S; Palmieri, V G; Paul, S; Pirollo, S; Pretzl, Klaus P; Ropotar, I; Ruggiero, G; Salmi, J; Seppä, H; Suni, I; Smith, K; Sonderegger, P; Valtonen, M J; Zavrtanik, M

    1998-01-01

    The charge collection efficiency (CCE) of high resistivity silicon detectors, previously neutron irradiated up to 2*10/sup 15/ n/cm/sup 2/, was measured at different cryogenic temperatures and different bias voltages. In order to $9 study reverse annealing (RA) effects, a few samples were heated to 80 degrees C and kept at room temperature for several months after irradiation. For comparison other samples (NRA) where kept at -10 C after irradiation. The RA and $9 NRA samples, measured at 250 V forward and reverse bias voltage, present a common temperature threshold at 150 K. Below 120 K the CCE is constant and ranges between 55and 65 0.000000or the RA and NRA sample respectively. Similar CCE $9 was measured for a device processed with low resistivity contacts (OHMIC), opening the prospect for a consistent reduction of the cost of large area particle tracking. (7 refs).

  5. Silicon germanium mask for deep silicon etching

    KAUST Repository

    Serry, Mohamed

    2014-07-29

    Polycrystalline silicon germanium (SiGe) can offer excellent etch selectivity to silicon during cryogenic deep reactive ion etching in an SF.sub.6/O.sub.2 plasma. Etch selectivity of over 800:1 (Si:SiGe) may be achieved at etch temperatures from -80 degrees Celsius to -140 degrees Celsius. High aspect ratio structures with high resolution may be patterned into Si substrates using SiGe as a hard mask layer for construction of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) devices and semiconductor devices.

  6. Amorphous silicon crystalline silicon heterojunction solar cells

    CERN Document Server

    Fahrner, Wolfgang Rainer

    2013-01-01

    Amorphous Silicon/Crystalline Silicon Solar Cells deals with some typical properties of heterojunction solar cells, such as their history, the properties and the challenges of the cells, some important measurement tools, some simulation programs and a brief survey of the state of the art, aiming to provide an initial framework in this field and serve as a ready reference for all those interested in the subject. This book helps to ""fill in the blanks"" on heterojunction solar cells. Readers will receive a comprehensive overview of the principles, structures, processing techniques and the curre

  7. LHCb Run II tracking performance and prospects for the Upgrade

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    The LHCb tracking system consists of a Vertex Locator around the interaction point, a tracking station with four layers of silicon strip detectors in front of the magnet, and three tracking stations, using either straw-tubes or silicon strip detectors, behind the magnet. This system allows to reconstruct charged particles with a high efficiency (typically > 95% for particles with momentum > 5 GeV) and an excellent momentum resolution (0.5% for particles with momentum < 20 GeV). The high momentum resolution results in very narrow mass peaks, leading to a very good signal-to-background ratio in such key channels as $B_s\\to\\mu^+\\mu^-$. Furthermore an optimal decay time resolution is an essential element in the studies of time dependent CP violation. For Run II a novel reconstruction strategy was adopted, allowing to run the same track reconstruction in the software trigger as offline. This convergence was possible due to a staged approach in the track reconstruction and a large reduction in the processing tim...

  8. Influence of radiation induced defect clusters on silicon particle detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Junkes, Alexandra

    2011-10-15

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) addresses some of today's most fundamental questions of particle physics, like the existence of the Higgs boson and supersymmetry. Two large general-purpose experiments (ATLAS, CMS) are installed to detect the products of high energy protonproton and nucleon-nucleon collisions. Silicon detectors are largely employed in the innermost region, the tracking area of the experiments. The proven technology and large scale availability make them the favorite choice. Within the framework of the LHC upgrade to the high-luminosity LHC, the luminosity will be increased to L=10{sup 35} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. In particular the pixel sensors in the innermost layers of the silicon trackers will be exposed to an extremely intense radiation field of mainly hadronic particles with fluences of up to {phi}{sub eq}=10{sup 16} cm{sup -2}. The radiation induced bulk damage in silicon sensors will lead to a severe degradation of the performance during their operational time. This work focusses on the improvement of the radiation tolerance of silicon materials (Float Zone, Magnetic Czochralski, epitaxial silicon) based on the evaluation of radiation induced defects in the silicon lattice using the Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy and the Thermally Stimulated Current methods. It reveals the outstanding role of extended defects (clusters) on the degradation of sensor properties after hadron irradiation in contrast to previous works that treated effects as caused by point defects. It has been found that two cluster related defects are responsible for the main generation of leakage current, the E5 defects with a level in the band gap at E{sub C}-0.460 eV and E205a at E{sub C}-0.395 eV where E{sub C} is the energy of the edge of the conduction band. The E5 defect can be assigned to the tri-vacancy (V{sub 3}) defect. Furthermore, isochronal annealing experiments have shown that the V{sub 3} defect

  9. Influence of radiation induced defect clusters on silicon particle detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) addresses some of today's most fundamental questions of particle physics, like the existence of the Higgs boson and supersymmetry. Two large general-purpose experiments (ATLAS, CMS) are installed to detect the products of high energy protonproton and nucleon-nucleon collisions. Silicon detectors are largely employed in the innermost region, the tracking area of the experiments. The proven technology and large scale availability make them the favorite choice. Within the framework of the LHC upgrade to the high-luminosity LHC, the luminosity will be increased to L=1035 cm-2s-1. In particular the pixel sensors in the innermost layers of the silicon trackers will be exposed to an extremely intense radiation field of mainly hadronic particles with fluences of up to Φeq=1016 cm-2. The radiation induced bulk damage in silicon sensors will lead to a severe degradation of the performance during their operational time. This work focusses on the improvement of the radiation tolerance of silicon materials (Float Zone, Magnetic Czochralski, epitaxial silicon) based on the evaluation of radiation induced defects in the silicon lattice using the Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy and the Thermally Stimulated Current methods. It reveals the outstanding role of extended defects (clusters) on the degradation of sensor properties after hadron irradiation in contrast to previous works that treated effects as caused by point defects. It has been found that two cluster related defects are responsible for the main generation of leakage current, the E5 defects with a level in the band gap at EC-0.460 eV and E205a at EC-0.395 eV where EC is the energy of the edge of the conduction band. The E5 defect can be assigned to the tri-vacancy (V3) defect. Furthermore, isochronal annealing experiments have shown that the V3 defect exhibits a bistability, as does the leakage current. In oxygen rich material the

  10. Note: Anodic bonding with cooling of heat-sensitive areas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vesborg, Peter Christian Kjærgaard; Olsen, Jakob Lind; Henriksen, Toke Riishøj;

    2010-01-01

    Anodic bonding of silicon to glass always involves heating the glass and device to high temperatures so that cations become mobile in the electric field. We present a simple way of bonding thin silicon samples to borosilicate glass by means of heating from the glass side while locally cooling heat......-sensitive areas from the silicon side. Despite the high thermal conductivity of silicon, this method allows a strong anodic bond to form just millimeters away from areas essentially at room temperature....

  11. Sparse Hashing Tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lihe; Lu, Huchuan; Du, Dandan; Liu, Luning

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel tracking framework based on a sparse and discriminative hashing method. Different from the previous work, we treat object tracking as an approximate nearest neighbor searching process in a binary space. Using the hash functions, the target templates and the candidates can be projected into the Hamming space, facilitating the distance calculation and tracking efficiency. First, we integrate both the inter-class and intra-class information to train multiple hash functions for better classification, while most classifiers in previous tracking methods usually neglect the inter-class correlation, which may cause the inaccuracy. Then, we introduce sparsity into the hash coefficient vectors for dynamic feature selection, which is crucial to select the discriminative and stable features to adapt to visual variations during the tracking process. Extensive experiments on various challenging sequences show that the proposed algorithm performs favorably against the state-of-the-art methods.

  12. Track etching technique in membrane technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Track membrane (TM) technology is an example of industrial application of track etching technique. Track-etch membranes offer distinct advantages over conventional membranes due to their precisely determined structure. Their pore size, shape and density can be varied in a controllable manner so that a membrane with the required transport and retention characteristics can be produced. The use of heavy ion accelerators made it possible to vary LET of track-forming particles, angle distribution of pore channels and pore lengths. So far the track formation and etching process has been studied in much detail for several polymeric materials. Today we understand determining factors and have numerous empirical data enabling us to manufacture any particular product based on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) or polycarbonate (PC) films. Pore shape can be made cylindrical, conical, funnel-like, or cigar-like at will. A number of modification methods has been developed for creating TMs with special properties and functions. Applications of 'conventional' track membranes can be categorized into three groups: process filtration, cell culture, and laboratory filtration. The use in biology stands out among other areas. Nuclear track pores find diverse applications as model systems and as templates for the synthesis of micro- and nanostructures

  13. The "Silicon Wheel" prototype for the barrel of the silicon tracker deep inside the CMS detector at CERN'S future LHC proton collider

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    1997-01-01

    Elements on a specially designed structure will track the emerging particles close to the beam pipe. The supporting structure is made out of special carbon fibre discs holding 112 detector modules (448 individual silicon detectors). The modules are arranged to provide three detection points per track and are distributed in seven layers on a spiral geometry to leave enough room for cables, cooling tubes, etc. The inner radius of the wheel is 20.5 cm; the overall diameter is 80 The prototype is a combined CMS silicon community effort; the main participating institutions were: Aachen (Germany), Bari (Italy), CERN, Florence (Italy), Imperial College (UK), Oulu (Finland), Padova, Perugia, Pisa (Italy), Rutherford Laboratory

  14. Silicon Pore Optics development for ATHENA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Collon, Maximilien J.; Vacanti, Giuseppe; Guenther, Ramses;

    2015-01-01

    ) to meet the science requirements of large effective area (1-2 m(2) at a few keV) at a focal length of 12 m. To meet the high angular resolution (5 arc seconds) requirement the X-ray lens will also need to be very accurate. Silicon Pore Optics (SPO) technology has been invented to enable building...

  15. Beam test of CSES silicon strip detector module

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Da-Li; Wang, Huan-Yu; Li, Xin-Qiao; Xu, Yan-Bing; An, heng-Hua; Yu, Xiao-xia; Wang, Hui; Shi, Feng; Wang, Ping; Zhao, Xiao-Yun

    2016-01-01

    The silicon-strip tracker of China Seismo-Electromagnetic Satellite (CSES) consists of two double-sided silicon strip detectors (DSSD). It provides the tracking information of incident particles. The low-noise analog ASIC VA140 was used for signal readout of DSSD. A beam test of the DSSD module was performed in the Beijing test beam Facility of the Beijing Electron Positron Collider (BEPC) using proton beam of 400~800MeV/c. Results on pedestal analysis, RMSE noise, gain correction and reconstruction of incident position of DSSD module are presented.

  16. A new telescope for wide-band gamma-ray astronomy: The Silicon Compton Recoil Telescope (SCRT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuemer, O. Tuemay; Ait-Ouamer, Farid; Blair, Scott C.; Case, Gary L.; O'Neill, Brendan P.; O'Neill, Terrence J.; White, R. Stephen; Zych, Allen D.

    1994-06-01

    A new prototype gamma-ray telescope is described which is sensitive from 0.3 to 30 MeV as a Compton telescope and to 100 MeV as a pair detector. The Silicon Compton Recoil Telescope (SCRT) uses multilayers of silicon strip detectors as a Compton gamma-ray converter. Recoil electrons are tracked with the silicon strip detectors, and their energy losses and directions are measured. The direction and energy of the Compton-scattered gamma rays are measured with CsI(Tl)-photodiode detectors. Thus unique directions and energies are found for each incident gamma ray for the first time and without the background of overlapping rings. SCRT is the first Compton telescope to image the gamma-ray sky directly. It can also detect electron-positron pairs from gamma rays above 5 MeV, extending SCRT's sensitivity to above 100 MeV. Typical resolutions are 3% (FWHM) in energy at 2 MeV and 0.5 deg (1 sigma) in angle. The proposed prototype SCRT instrument has a sensitive area of 650 sq cm, a detection efficiency of 3%, a size reduction by about an order of magnitude, and a sensitivity of 15 millicrab for a typical Compton Observatory exposure. SCRT can also measure the polarization of the incident gamma rays, especially at low energies and large scattered angles. Simulation calculations and a discussion of results with a laboratory model are presented.

  17. Development and characterization of diamond and 3D-silicon pixel detectors with ATLAS-pixel readout electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathes, Markus

    2008-12-15

    Hybrid pixel detectors are used for particle tracking in the innermost layers of current high energy experiments like ATLAS. After the proposed luminosity upgrade of the LHC, they will have to survive very high radiation fluences of up to 10{sup 16} particles per cm{sup 2} per life time. New sensor concepts and materials are required, which promise to be more radiation tolerant than the currently used planar silicon sensors. Most prominent candidates are so-called 3D-silicon and single crystal or poly-crystalline diamond sensors. Using the ATLAS pixel electronics different detector prototypes with a pixel geometry of 400 x 50 {mu}m{sup 2} have been built. In particular three devices have been studied in detail: a 3D-silicon and a single crystal diamond detector with an active area of about 1 cm{sup 2} and a poly-crystalline diamond detector of the same size as a current ATLAS pixel detector module (2 x 6 cm{sup 2}). To characterize the devices regarding their particle detection efficiency and spatial resolution, the charge collection inside a pixel cell as well as the charge sharing between adjacent pixels was studied using a high energy particle beam. (orig.)

  18. Development and Characterization of Diamond and 3D-Silicon Pixel Detectors with ATLAS-Pixel Readout Electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Mathes, Markus

    2008-01-01

    Abstract: Hybrid pixel detectors are used for particle tracking in the innermost layers of current high energy experiments like ATLAS. After the proposed luminosity upgrade of the LHC, they will have to survive very high radiation fluences of up to 10^16 particles per cm^2 per life time. New sensor concepts and materials are required, which promise to be more radiation tolerant than the currently used planar silicon sensors. Most prominent candidates are so-called 3D-silicon and single crystal or poly-crystalline diamond sensors. Using the ATLAS pixel electronics different detector prototypes with a pixel geometry of 400 × 50 um^2 have been built. In particular three devices have been studied in detail: a 3D-silicon and a single crystal diamond detector with an active area of about 1 cm^2 and a poly-crystalline diamond detector of the same size as a current ATLAS pixel detector module (2 × 6 cm^2). To characterize the devices regarding their particle detection efficiency and spatial resolution, the charge c...

  19. Drift chamber tracking with neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the very high event rates projected for experiments at the SSC and LHC, it is important to investigate new approaches to on line pattern recognition. The use of neural networks for pattern recognition. The use of neural networks for pattern recognition in high energy physics detectors has been an area of very active research. The authors discuss drift chamber tracking with a commercial analog VLSI neural network chip. Voltages proportional to the drift times in a 4-layer drift chamber were presented to the Intel ETANN chip. The network was trained to provide the intercept and slope of straight tracks traversing the chamber. The outputs were recorded and later compared off line to conventional track fits. Two types of network architectures were studied. Applications of neural network tracking to high energy physics detector triggers is discussed

  20. The Radiation environment and damage in the CDF tracking volume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. J. Tesarek et al.

    2003-12-16

    The authors present direct measurements of the spatial distribution of ionizing radiation and low energy neutrons (E{sub n} < 200 keV) inside the tracking volume of the collider detector at Fermilab (CDF). Using data from multiple exposures, the radiation field can be separated into components from beam losses and collisions and can be checked for consistency between the measurements. They compare the radiation measurements with an increase in the leakage currents of the CDF silicon detectors and find reasonable agreement.

  1. A study of a second level track trigger for ATLAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borer, K.; Bates, S.; Munday, D.J.; Parker, M.A.; Poppleton, A.; Goessling, C.; Lisowski, B.; Reichold, A.; Spiwoks, R.; Tsesmelis, E.; Clark, A.G.; Bonino, R.; Wu, X.; Moorhead, G.F.; Taylor, G.N.; Tovey, S.N.; Stapnes, S.; Hawkings, R.J.; Weidberg, A.R.; Lubrano, P.; Scampoli, P.; Teiger, J.; Gheorghe, A.; Bock, R.; Krischer, W. (Lab. fuer Hochenergiephysik, Univ. Bern (Switzerland) Cavendish Lab., Univ. of Cambridge (United Kingdom) CERN, Geneva (Switzerland) Inst. fuer Physik, Univ. Dortmund (Germany) DPNC, Univ. de Geneve (Switzerland) School of Physics, Univ. of Melbourne (Australia) Univ. of Oslo (Norway) Dept. of Nuclear Physics, Oxford Univ. (United Kingdom) Dipt. di Fisica dell' Univ. di Perugia (Italy) INFN Sezione di Perugia (Italy) Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette (France) Inst. of Atomic Physics and Polytecnic Inst., Bucharest (Romania) CERN, Geneva (Switzerland)); RD2 Collaboration; RD11 Collaboration

    1993-11-15

    This paper discusses some of the problems of triggering at a high energy, high luminosity pp collider. A suggested second level track trigger for the ATLAS detector is described, based on hit information from a silicon tracker. Detailed Monte Carlo simulations have been performed to assess the performance of the trigger in accepting electrons and in rejecting the QCD jets that would fake electrons in the first level calorimeter trigger. Studies of the feasibility of implementing such a trigger are also presented. (orig.)

  2. Scale adaptive compressive tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Pengpeng; Cui, Shaohui; Gao, Min; Fang, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Recently, the compressive tracking (CT) method (Zhang et al. in Proceedings of European conference on computer vision, pp 864-877, 2012) has attracted much attention due to its high efficiency, but it cannot well deal with the scale changing objects due to its constant tracking box. To address this issue, in this paper we propose a scale adaptive CT approach, which adaptively adjusts the scale of tracking box with the size variation of the objects. Our method significantly improves CT in three aspects: Firstly, the scale of tracking box is adaptively adjusted according to the size of the objects. Secondly, in the CT method, all the compressive features are supposed independent and equal contribution to the classifier. Actually, different compressive features have different confidence coefficients. In our proposed method, the confidence coefficients of features are computed and used to achieve different contribution to the classifier. Finally, in the CT method, the learning parameter λ is constant, which will result in large tracking drift on the occasion of object occlusion or large scale appearance variation. In our proposed method, a variable learning parameter λ is adopted, which can be adjusted according to the object appearance variation rate. Extensive experiments on the CVPR2013 tracking benchmark demonstrate the superior performance of the proposed method compared to state-of-the-art tracking algorithms. PMID:27386298

  3. Superhydrophobic silicone fiber mats fabricated by electrospinning from solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, Bonnie; Clark, Aneta; Snow, Steven; Hill, Randal; Schmidt, Randall; Fogg, Brad; Lo, Peter

    2007-03-01

    Fine silicone fibers of 1 -- 20 μm diameter were fabricated from solution via electrospinning. These are the first examples of fine fibers prepared from silicone homopolymers. Fiber morphology (beaded, ribbon-like, smooth) and diameter were controlled. The nanoscale surface roughness of nonwoven fiber mats created with silicone fibers produced a superhydrophobic surface that had a water contact angle of ˜160^o. The superhydrophobic surface was made reversibly hydrophilic with exposure to oxygen plasma. The combination of high surface area and superhydrophobicity suggests potential applications in the areas of water-repellent textiles, filtration, adsorption and chemical separations, wound dressings, and fuel cells.

  4. The Mark II Silicon Strip Vertex Detector and performance of a silicon detector telescope in the Mark II detector at the SLC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Labarga, L.; Adolphsen, C.; Gratta, G.; Litke, A.; Turala, M.; Zaccardelli, C. (California Univ., Santa Cruz, CA (USA). Inst. for Particle Physics); Breakstone, A.; Parker, S. (Hawaii Univ., Honolulu, HI (USA)); Barnett, B.; Dauncey, P.; Drewer, D.; Matthews, J. (Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (USA)); Jacobsen, R.; Lueth, V. (Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (USA))

    1989-12-01

    A Silicon Strip Vertex Detector (SSVD) consisting of 36 independent silicon detector modules has been built for use in the Mark II detector at the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC). We discuss the performance of the individual modules and the stability and accuracy of their placement in the mechanical support. To gain operational experience at the SLC, we have assembled and placed inside the Mark II a telescope made of three Silicon Detector Modules. We present results from the first data run of the SLC on the overall performance of the Telescope, including backgrounds, charged particle tracking and spatial resolution. 7 refs., 10 figs.

  5. GPS-Aided Video Tracking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Udo Feuerhake

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Tracking moving objects is both challenging and important for a large variety of applications. Different technologies based on the global positioning system (GPS and video or radio data are used to obtain the trajectories of the observed objects. However, in some use cases, they fail to provide sufficiently accurate, complete and correct data at the same time. In this work we present an approach for fusing GPS- and video-based tracking in order to exploit their individual advantages. In this way we aim to combine the reliability of GPS tracking with the high geometric accuracy of camera detection. For the fusion of the movement data provided by the different devices we use a hidden Markov model (HMM formulation and the Viterbi algorithm to extract the most probable trajectories. In three experiments, we show that our approach is able to deal with challenging situations like occlusions or objects which are temporarily outside the monitored area. The results show the desired increase in terms of accuracy, completeness and correctness.

  6. Silicon nanowire hybrid photovoltaics

    KAUST Repository

    Garnett, Erik C.

    2010-06-01

    Silicon nanowire Schottky junction solar cells have been fabricated using n-type silicon nanowire arrays and a spin-coated conductive polymer (PEDOT). The polymer Schottky junction cells show superior surface passivation and open-circuit voltages compared to standard diffused junction cells with native oxide surfaces. External quantum efficiencies up to 88% were measured for these silicon nanowire/PEDOT solar cells further demonstrating excellent surface passivation. This process avoids high temperature processes which allows for low-cost substrates to be used. © 2010 IEEE.

  7. Emissivity of microstructured silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloney, Patrick G; Smith, Peter; King, Vernon; Billman, Curtis; Winkler, Mark; Mazur, Eric

    2010-03-01

    Infrared transmittance and hemispherical-directional reflectance data from 2.5 to 25 microm on microstructured silicon surfaces have been measured, and spectral emissivity has been calculated for this wavelength range. Hemispherical-total emissivity is calculated for the samples and found to be 0.84 before a measurement-induced annealing and 0.65 after the measurement for the sulfur-doped sample. Secondary samples lack a measurement-induced anneal, and reasons for this discrepancy are presented. Emissivity numbers are plotted and compared with a silicon substrate, and Aeroglaze Z306 black paint. Use of microstructured silicon as a blackbody or microbolometer surface is modeled and presented, respectively.

  8. Advances in silicon nanophotonics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvam, Jørn Märcher; Pu, Minhao

    Silicon has long been established as an ideal material for passive integrated optical circuitry due to its high refractive index, with corresponding strong optical confinement ability, and its low-cost CMOS-compatible manufacturability. However, the inversion symmetry of the silicon crystal lattice...... recent advances in this direction. The efficient coupling of light between optical fibers and the planar silicon devices and circuits is of crucial importance. Both end-coupling (Fig. 1) and grating-coupling solutions will be discussed along with polarization issues. A new scheme for a hybrid III...

  9. Recrystallization of polycrystalline silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lall, C.; Kulkarni, S. B.; Graham, C. D., Jr.; Pope, D. P.

    1981-01-01

    Optical metallography is used to investigate the recrystallization properties of polycrystalline semiconductor-grade silicon. It is found that polycrystalline silicon recrystallizes at 1380 C in relatively short times, provided that the prior deformation is greater than 30%. For a prior deformation of about 40%, the recrystallization process is essentially complete in about 30 minutes. Silicon recrystallizes at a substantially slower rate than metals at equivalent homologous temperatures. The recrystallized grain size is insensitive to the amount of prestrain for strains in the range of 10-50%.

  10. Track Reconstruction with Cosmic Ray Data at the Tracker Integration Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Adam, Wolfgang; Dragicevic, Marko; Friedl, Markus; Fruhwirth, R; Hansel, S; Hrubec, Josef; Krammer, Manfred; Oberegger, Margit; Pernicka, Manfred; Schmid, Siegfried; Stark, Roland; Steininger, Helmut; Uhl, Dieter; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Widl, Edmund; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Cardaci, Marco; Beaumont, Willem; de Langhe, Eric; de Wolf, Eddi A; Delmeire, Evelyne; Hashemi, Majid; Bouhali, Othmane; Charaf, Otman; Clerbaux, Barbara; Elgammal, J.-P. Dewulf. S; Hammad, Gregory Habib; de Lentdecker, Gilles; Marage, Pierre Edouard; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Wickens, John; Adler, Volker; Devroede, Olivier; De Weirdt, Stijn; D'Hondt, Jorgen; Goorens, Robert; Heyninck, Jan; Maes, Joris; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Tavernier, Stefaan; Van Lancker, Luc; Van Mulders, Petra; Villella, Ilaria; Wastiels, C; Bonnet, Jean-Luc; Bruno, Giacomo; De Callatay, Bernard; Florins, Benoit; Giammanco, Andrea; Gregoire, Ghislain; Keutgen, Thomas; Kcira, Dorian; Lemaitre, Vincent; Michotte, Daniel; Militaru, Otilia; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Quertermont, L; Roberfroid, Vincent; Rouby, Xavier; Teyssier, Daniel; Daubie, Evelyne; Anttila, Erkki; Czellar, Sandor; Engstrom, Pauli; Harkonen, J; Karimaki, V; Kostesmaa, J; Kuronen, Auli; Lampen, Tapio; Linden, Tomas; Luukka, Panja-Riina; Maenpaa, T; Michal, Sebastien; Tuominen, Eija; Tuominiemi, Jorma; Ageron, Michel; Baulieu, Guillaume; Bonnevaux, Alain; Boudoul, Gaelle; Chabanat, Eric; Chabert, Eric Christian; Chierici, Roberto; Contardo, Didier; Della Negra, Rodolphe; Dupasquier, Thierry; Gelin, Georges; Giraud, Noël; Guillot, Gérard; Estre, Nicolas; Haroutunian, Roger; Lumb, Nicholas; Perries, Stephane; Schirra, Florent; Trocme, Benjamin; Vanzetto, Sylvain; Agram, Jean-Laurent; Blaes, Reiner; Drouhin, Frédéric; Ernenwein, Jean-Pierre; Fontaine, Jean-Charles; Berst, Jean-Daniel; Brom, Jean-Marie; Didierjean, Francois; Goerlach, Ulrich; Graehling, Philippe; Gross, Laurent; Hosselet, J; Juillot, Pierre; Lounis, Abdenour; Maazouzi, Chaker; Olivetto, Christian; Strub, Roger; Van Hove, Pierre; Anagnostou, Georgios; Brauer, Richard; Esser, Hans; Feld, Lutz; Karpinski, Waclaw; Klein, Katja; Kukulies, Christoph; Olzem, Jan; Ostapchuk, Andrey; Pandoulas, Demetrios; Pierschel, Gerhard; Raupach, Frank; Schael, Stefan; Schwering, Georg; Sprenger, Daniel; Thomas, Maarten; Weber, Markus; Wittmer, Bruno; Wlochal, Michael; Beissel, Franz; Bock, E; Flugge, G; Gillissen, C; Hermanns, Thomas; Heydhausen, Dirk; Jahn, Dieter; Kaussen, Gordon; Linn, Alexander; Perchalla, Lars; Poettgens, Michael; Pooth, Oliver; Stahl, Achim; Zoeller, Marc Henning; Buhmann, Peter; Butz, Erik; Flucke, Gero; Hamdorf, Richard Helmut; Hauk, Johannes; Klanner, Robert; Pein, Uwe; Schleper, Peter; Steinbruck, G; Blum, P; De Boer, Wim; Dierlamm, Alexander; Dirkes, Guido; Fahrer, Manuel; Frey, Martin; Furgeri, Alexander; Hartmann, Frank; Heier, Stefan; Hoffmann, Karl-Heinz; Kaminski, Jochen; Ledermann, Bernhard; Liamsuwan, Thiansin; Muller, S; Muller, Th; Schilling, Frank-Peter; Simonis, Hans-Jürgen; Steck, Pia; Zhukov, Valery; Cariola, P; De Robertis, Giuseppe; Ferorelli, Raffaele; Fiore, Luigi; Preda, M; Sala, Giuliano; Silvestris, Lucia; Tempesta, Paolo; Zito, Giuseppe; Creanza, Donato; De Filippis, Nicola; De Palma, Mauro; Giordano, Domenico; Maggi, Giorgio; Manna, Norman; My, Salvatore; Selvaggi, Giovanna; Albergo, Sebastiano; Chiorboli, Massimiliano; Costa, Salvatore; Galanti, Mario; Giudice, Nunzio; Guardone, Nunzio; Noto, Francesco; Potenza, Renato; Saizu, Mirela Angela; Sparti, V; Sutera, Concetta; Tricomi, Alessia; Tuve, Cristina; Brianzi, Mirko; Civinini, Carlo; Maletta, Fernando; Manolescu, Florentina; Meschini, Marco; Paoletti, Simone; Sguazzoni, Giacomo; Broccolo, B; Ciulli, Vitaliano; Focardi, R. D'Alessandro. E; Frosali, Simone; Genta, Chiara; Landi, Gregorio; Lenzi, Piergiulio; Macchiolo, Anna; Magini, Nicolo; Parrini, Giuliano; Scarlini, Enrico; Cerati, Giuseppe Benedetto; Azzi, Patrizia; Bacchetta, Nicola; Candelori, Andrea; Dorigo, Tommaso; Kaminsky, A; Karaevski, S; Khomenkov, Volodymyr; Reznikov, Sergey; Tessaro, Mario; Bisello, Dario; De Mattia, Marco; Giubilato, Piero; Loreti, Maurizio; Mattiazzo, Serena; Nigro, Massimo; Paccagnella, Alessandro; Pantano, Devis; Pozzobon, Nicola; Tosi, Mia; Bilei, Gian Mario; Checcucci, Bruno; Fano, Livio; Servoli, Leonello; Ambroglini, Filippo; Babucci, Ezio; Benedetti, Daniele; Biasini, Maurizio; Caponeri, Benedetta; Covarelli, Roberto; Giorgi, Marco; Lariccia, Paolo; Mantovani, Giancarlo; Marcantonini, Marta; Postolache, Vasile; Santocchia, Attilio; Spiga, Daniele; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Balestri, Gabriele; Berretta, Luca; Bianucci, S; Boccali, Tommaso; Bosi, Filippo; Bracci, Fabrizio; Castaldi, Rino; Ceccanti, Marco; Cecchi, Roberto; Cerri, Claudio; Cucoanes, Andi Sebastian; Dell'Orso, Roberto; Dobur, Didar; Dutta, Suchandra; Giassi, Alessandro; Giusti, Simone; Kartashov, Dmitry; Kraan, Aafke; Lomtadze, Teimuraz; Lungu, George-Adrian; Magazzu, Guido; Mammini, Paolo; Mariani, Filippo; Martinelli, Giovanni; Moggi, Andrea; Palla, Fabrizio; Palmonari, Francesco; Petragnani, Giulio; Profeti, Alessandro; Raffaelli, Fabrizio; Rizzi, Domenico; Sanguinetti, Giulio; Sarkar, Subir; Sentenac, Daniel; Serban, Alin Titus; Slav, Adrian; Soldani, A; Spagnolo, Paolo; Tenchini, Roberto; Tolaini, Sergio; Venturi, Andrea; Verdini, Piero Giorgio; Vos, Marcel; Zaccarelli, Luciano; Avanzini, Carlo; Basti, Andrea; Benucci, Leonardo; Bocci, Andrea; Cazzola, Ugo; Fiori, Francesco; Linari, Stefano; Massa, Maurizio; Messineo, Alberto; Segneri, Gabriele; Tonelli, Guido; Azzurri, Paolo; Bernardini, Jacopo; Borrello, Laura; Calzolari, Federico; Foa, Lorenzo; Gennai, Simone; Ligabue, Franco; Petrucciani, Giovanni; Rizzi, Andrea; Yang, Zong-Chang; Benotto, Franco; Demaria, Natale; Dumitrache, Floarea; Farano, R; Borgia, Maria Assunta; Castello, Roberto; Costa, Marco; Migliore, Ernesto; Romero, Alessandra; Abbaneo, Duccio; Abbas, M; Ahmed, Ijaz; Akhtar, I; Albert, Eric; Bloch, Christoph; Breuker, Horst; Butt, Shahid Aleem; Buchmuller, Oliver; Cattai, Ariella; Delaere, Christophe; Delattre, Michel; Edera, Laura Maria; Engstrom, Pauli; Eppard, Michael; Gateau, Maryline; Gill, Karl; Giolo-Nicollerat, Anne-Sylvie; Grabit, Robert; Honma, Alan; Huhtinen, Mika; Kloukinas, Kostas; Kortesmaa, Jarmo; Kottelat, Luc-Joseph; Kuronen, Auli; Leonardo, Nuno; Ljuslin, Christer; Mannelli, Marcello; Masetti, Lorenzo; Marchioro, Alessandro; Mersi, Stefano; Michal, Sebastien; Mirabito, Laurent; Muffat-Joly, Jeannine; Onnela, Antti; Paillard, Christian; Pal, Imre; Pernot, Jean-Francois; Petagna, Paolo; Petit, Patrick; Piccut, C; Pioppi, Michele; Postema, Hans; Ranieri, Riccardo; Ricci, Daniel; Rolandi, Gigi; Ronga, Frederic Jean; Sigaud, Christophe; Syed, A; Siegrist, Patrice; Tropea, Paola; Troska, Jan; Tsirou, Andromachi; Vander Donckt, Muriel; Vasey, François; Alagoz, Enver; Amsler, Claude; Chiochia, Vincenzo; Regenfus, Christian; Robmann, Peter; Rochet, Jacky; Rommerskirchen, Tanja; Schmidt, Alexander; Steiner, Stefan; Wilke, Lotte; Church, Ivan; Cole, Joanne; Coughlan, John A; Gay, Arnaud; Taghavi, S; Tomalin, Ian R; Bainbridge, Robert; Cripps, Nicholas; Fulcher, Jonathan; Hall, Geoffrey; Noy, Matthew; Pesaresi, Mark; Radicci, Valeria; Raymond, David Mark; Sharp, Peter; Stoye, Markus; Wingham, Matthew; Zorba, Osman; Goitom, Israel; Hobson, Peter R; Reid, Ivan; Teodorescu, Liliana; Hanson, Gail; Jeng, Geng-Yuan; Liu, Haidong; Pasztor, Gabriella; Satpathy, Asish; Stringer, Robert; Mangano, Boris; Affolder, K; Affolder, T; Allen, Andrea; Barge, Derek; Burke, Samuel; Callahan, D; Campagnari, Claudio; Crook, A; D'Alfonso, Mariarosaria; Dietch, J; Garberson, Jeffrey; Hale, David; Incandela, H; Incandela, Joe; Jaditz, Stephen; Kalavase, Puneeth; Kreyer, Steven Lawrence; Kyre, Susanne; Lamb, James; Mc Guinness, C; Mills, C; Nguyen, Harold; Nikolic, Milan; Lowette, Steven; Rebassoo, Finn; Ribnik, Jacob; Richman, Jeffrey; Rubinstein, Noah; Sanhueza, S; Shah, Yousaf Syed; Simms, L; Staszak, D; Stoner, J; Stuart, David; Swain, Sanjay Kumar; Vlimant, Jean-Roch; White, Dean; Ulmer, Keith; Wagner, Stephen Robert; Bagby, Linda; Bhat, Pushpalatha C; Burkett, Kevin; Cihangir, Selcuk; Gutsche, Oliver; Jensen, Hans; Johnson, Mark; Luzhetskiy, Nikolay; Mason, David; Miao, Ting; Moccia, Stefano; Noeding, Carsten; Ronzhin, Anatoly; Skup, Ewa; Spalding, William J; Spiegel, Leonard; Tkaczyk, Slawek; Yumiceva, Francisco; Zatserklyaniy, Andriy; Zerev, E; Anghel, Ioana Maria; Bazterra, Victor Eduardo; Gerber, Cecilia Elena; Khalatian, S; Shabalina, Elizaveta; Baringer, Philip; Bean, Alice; Chen, Jie; Hinchey, Carl Louis; Martin, Christophe; Moulik, Tania; Robinson, Richard; Gritsan, Andrei; Lae, Chung Khim; Tran, Nhan Viet; Everaerts, Pieter; Hahn, Kristan Allan; Harris, Philip; Nahn, Steve; Rudolph, Matthew; Sung, Kevin; Betchart, Burton; Demina, Regina; Gotra, Yury; Korjenevski, Sergey; Miner, Daniel Carl; Orbaker, Douglas; Christofek, Leonard; Hooper, Ryan; Landsberg, Greg; Nguyen, Duong; Narain, Meenakshi; Speer, Thomas; Tsang, Ka Vang

    2008-01-01

    The subsystems of the CMS silicon strip tracker were integrated and commissioned at the Tracker Integration Facility (TIF) in the period from November 2006 to July 2007. As part of the commissioning, large samples of cosmic ray data were recorded under various running conditions in the absence of a magnetic field. Cosmic rays detected by scintillation counters were used to trigger the readout of up to 15\\,\\% of the final silicon strip detector, and over 4.7~million events were recorded. This document describes the cosmic track reconstruction and presents results on the performance of track and hit reconstruction as from dedicated analyses.

  11. TrackPunch

    OpenAIRE

    Weigert, Jonas

    2014-01-01

    TrackPunch is a music streaming service that turns music discovery into a social experience. Our platform provides users with an elegant way to find new music based on their friends' listening habits. We aggregate music data from top music sources to index who influences each user individually. Our users can search, listen to, and share high quality content from GrooveShark, and SoundCloud, and YouTube for free. On TrackPunch, your next favorite song awaits. TrackPunch is a music streaming...

  12. Effects of etching time on alpha tracks in Solid state Nuclear Track Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillmore, Gavin; Wertheim, David; Crust, Simon

    2013-04-01

    Inhalation of radon gas is thought to be the cause of about 1100 lung cancer related deaths each year in the UK (1). Radon concentrations can be monitored using Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors (SSNTDs) as the natural decay of radon results in alpha particles which form tracks in the detectors and these tracks can be etched in order to enable microscopic analysis. We have previously shown that confocal microscopy can be used for 3D visualisation of etched SSNTDs (2, 3). The aim of the study was to examine the effect of etching time on the appearance of alpha tracks in SSNTDs. Six SSNTDs were placed in a chamber with a luminous dial watch for a fixed period. The detectors were etched for between 30 minutes and 4.5 hours using 6M NaOH at a temperature of 90oC. A 'LEXT' OLS4000 confocal laser scanning microscope (Olympus Corporation, Japan) was used to acquire 2D and 3D image datasets of CR-39 plastic SSNTDs. Confocal microscope 3D images were acquired using a x50 or x100 objective lens. Data were saved as images and also spreadsheet files with height measurements. Software was written using MATLAB (The MathWorks Inc., USA) to analyse the height data. Comparing the 30 minute and 4 hour etching time detectors, we observed that there were marked differences in track area; the lower the etching time the smaller the track area. The degree to which etching may prevent visualising adjacent tracks also requires further study as it is possible that etching could result in some tracks being subsumed in other tracks. On the other hand if there is too little etching, track sizes would be reduced and hence could be more difficult to image; thus there is a balance required to obtain suitable measurement accuracy. (1) Gray A, Read S, McGale P and Darby S. Lung cancer deaths from indoor radon and the cost effectiveness and potential of policies to reduce them. BMJ 2009; 338: a3110. (2) Wertheim D, Gillmore G, Brown L, and Petford N. A new method of imaging particle tracks in

  13. Raman and FTIR Studies of Silicon Carbide Surface Damage from Palladium Implantation in Presence of Hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muntele, I.; Ila, D.; Muntele, C. J.; Poker, D. B.; Hensley, D. K.; Larkin, David (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The ion implantation in a crystal such as silicon carbide will cause both damage in the ion track and in the substrate at the end of the ion track. We used both keV, and MeV Pd ions in fabricating electronic chemical sensors in silicon carbide, which can operate at elevated temperatures. In order to study the feasibility of fabricating an optical chemical sensor (litmus sensor), we need to understand the optical behavior of the embedded damage in the presence of hydrogen, as well as the potential chemical interaction of silicon carbide broken lattice bonds with the hydrogen dissociated from gas by palladium. Implanted samples of silicon carbide were studied using both Raman spectroscopy and FTIR (Fourier Transform-Infrared). The results of this work will be presented during the meeting.

  14. Comparison study of the charge density distribution induced by heavy ions and pulsed lasers in silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Kai; Cao, Zhou; Xue, Yu-Xiong; Yang, Shi-Yu

    2010-01-01

    Heavy ions and pulsed lasers are important means to simulate the ionization damage effects on semiconductor materials. The analytic solution of high-energy heavy ion energy loss in silicon has been obtained using the Bethe-Bloch formula and the Kobetich-Katz theory, and some ionization damage parameters of Fe ions in silicon, such as the track structure and ionized charge density distribution, have been calculated and analyzed according to the theoretical calculation results. Using the Gaussian function and Beer's law, the parameters of the track structure and charge density distribution induced by a pulsed laser in silicon have also been calculated and compared with those of Fe ions in silicon, which provides a theoretical basis for ionization damage effect modeling.

  15. Amorphous silicon for thin-film transistors

    OpenAIRE

    Schropp, Rudolf Emmanuel Isidore

    1987-01-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) has considerable potential as a semiconducting material for large-area photoelectric and photovoltaic applications. Moreover, a-Si:H thin-film transistors (TFT’s) are very well suited as switching devices in addressable liquid crystal display panels and addressable image sensor arrays, due to a new technology of low-cost, Iow-temperature processing overlarge areas. ... Zie: Abstract

  16. Financial Disclosure Tracking System

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — USAID's FDTS identifies personal service contractors and local employees who should file disclosure reports. It tracks late filers and identifies those who must...

  17. Applied eye tracking research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jarodzka, Halszka

    2011-01-01

    Jarodzka, H. (2010, 12 November). Applied eye tracking research. Presentation and Labtour for Vereniging Gewone Leden in oprichting (VGL i.o.), Heerlen, The Netherlands: Open University of the Netherlands.

  18. LHCb on track

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    On 7 and 8 June 2006, the last large component of the LHCb experiment was lowered into the cavern. This 10-tonne, 18-metre long metal structure known as 'the bridge' will support the LHCb tracking system.

  19. Human Capital Tracking Tool

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — AVS is now required to collect, track, and report on data from the following Flight, Business and Workforce Plan. The Human Resource Management’s Performance Target...

  20. Energy Tracking Software Platform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryan Davis; Nathan Bird; Rebecca Birx; Hal Knowles

    2011-04-04

    Acceleration has created an interactive energy tracking and visualization platform that supports decreasing electric, water, and gas usage. Homeowners have access to tools that allow them to gauge their use and track progress toward a smaller energy footprint. Real estate agents have access to consumption data, allowing for sharing a comparison with potential home buyers. Home builders have the opportunity to compare their neighborhood's energy efficiency with competitors. Home energy raters have a tool for gauging the progress of their clients after efficiency changes. And, social groups are able to help encourage members to reduce their energy bills and help their environment. EnergyIT.com is the business umbrella for all energy tracking solutions and is designed to provide information about our energy tracking software and promote sales. CompareAndConserve.com (Gainesville-Green.com) helps homeowners conserve energy through education and competition. ToolsForTenants.com helps renters factor energy usage into their housing decisions.

  1. Track Loading Vehicle - TLV

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The TLV is designed to apply forces close to the strength limits of the rails and other track structure components, such as ties, rail fasteners, and ballast, while...

  2. 1996 : Track Count Protocol

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The goal of St. Vincent National Wildlife Refuge's Track Count Protocol is to provide an index to the population size of game animals inhabiting St. Vincent Island.

  3. LHCb VELO Tracking Resolutions

    CERN Multimedia

    Alexander, Michael

    2011-01-01

    The excellent tracking performance of the Vertex Locator (VELO) at LHCb is presented. The resolutions it achieves on single hits, impact parameters, and primary vertex positions are shown, with particular attention paid to measurement of impact parameters.

  4. Case Analysis Tracking System

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Archives and Records Administration — CATS tracks Public and Federal Agency Reference Requests for OPF (Official Personnel Folder) , EMF (Employee Medical Folder), and eOPF (electronic Official...

  5. Silicon calorimetry for the SSC[ Superconducting Supercollider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SSC experiments will rely heavily on their calorimeters. Silicon calorimetry, which has been introduced in recent years as a useful technology, has many attractive characteristics which may make it a viable option for consideration. The many attractive properties of silicon detectors are reviewed. The relevant present day applications of large areas of silicon detectors are summarize to illustrate the emerging use. The troublesome issue of radiation damage in a high luminosity environment like the SSC is considered with a summary of much of the recent new measurements which help clarify this situation. A discussion of the electronics and a possible mechanical configuration is presented, followed by a summary of the outstanding R and D issues. 31 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs

  6. Silicon microfabricated beam expander

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Othman, A., E-mail: aliman@ppinang.uitm.edu.my; Ibrahim, M. N.; Hamzah, I. H.; Sulaiman, A. A. [Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi MARA Malaysia, 40450, Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia); Ain, M. F. [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Engineering Campus, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Seri Ampangan, 14300,Nibong Tebal, Pulau Pinang (Malaysia)

    2015-03-30

    The feasibility design and development methods of silicon microfabricated beam expander are described. Silicon bulk micromachining fabrication technology is used in producing features of the structure. A high-precision complex 3-D shape of the expander can be formed by exploiting the predictable anisotropic wet etching characteristics of single-crystal silicon in aqueous Potassium-Hydroxide (KOH) solution. The beam-expander consist of two elements, a micromachined silicon reflector chamber and micro-Fresnel zone plate. The micro-Fresnel element is patterned using lithographic methods. The reflector chamber element has a depth of 40 µm, a diameter of 15 mm and gold-coated surfaces. The impact on the depth, diameter of the chamber and absorption for improved performance are discussed.

  7. Provenance Tracking in UNICORE

    OpenAIRE

    Giesler, André; Hagemeier, Björn; Czekala, Myriam

    2015-01-01

    The automated tracking and storage of provenance information allows users of scientific workflow systems to validate and reproduce results of their experiments. Until now, UNICORE has not been providing comprehensive provenance features. For this reason, we plan to equip UNICORE with a flexible provenance tracking mechanism. Our goal is to ensure a suitable traceability of job and workflow processes into a description format supporting query capabilities and interoperability. In a first step,...

  8. ATLAS Silicon Microstrip Tracker Operation and Performance

    CERN Document Server

    Barone, G; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    The Semi-Conductor Tracker (SCT) is a silicon strip detector and one of the key precision tracking devices of the Inner Detector of the ATLAS experiment at CERN LHC. The SCT is constructed of $4088$ silicon detector modules for a total of 6.3 million channels. Each module is designed, constructed and tested to operate as a stand-alone unit, mechanically, electrically, optically and thermally. The modules are mounted into two types of structures: one barrel ($4$ cylinders) and two end-cap systems (9 disks on each). The current results from the successful operation of the SCT Detector at the LHC and its status after three years of operation will be presented. The operation of the detector including an overview of the main issues encountered is reported. The main emphasis is be given to the tracking performance of the SCT and the data quality during the $>2$ years of data taking of proton-proton collision data at $7$ TeV (and short periods of heavy ion collisions). The SCT has been fully operational throughout a...

  9. ATLAS Silicon Microstrip Tracker Operation and Performance

    CERN Document Server

    Barone, G; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    The Semi-Conductor Tracker (SCT) is a silicon strip detector and one of the key precision tracking devices in the Inner Detector of the ATLAS experiment at CERN LHC. The SCT is constructed of 4088 silicon detector modules for a total of 6.3 million strips. Each module is designed, constructed and tested to operate as a stand-alone unit, mechanically, electrically, optically and thermally. The modules are mounted into two types of structures: one barrel (4 cylinders) and two end-cap systems (9 disks on each end of the barrel). In the talk the current results from the successful operation of the SCT Detector at the LHC and its status after three years of operation will be presented. We will report on the operation of the detector including an overview of the issues we encountered and the observation of significant increases in leakage currents (as expected) from bulk damage due to non-ionising radiation. The main emphasis will be given to the tracking performance of the SCT and the data quality during the >2 ye...

  10. Wildlife conservation and rail track monitoring using wireless sensor networks

    OpenAIRE

    Mathur, Prateek; Nielsen, Rasmus Hjorth; Prasad, Neeli R.; Prasad, Ramjee

    2014-01-01

    n this paper we put forward an approach, first of its kind, to collectively address conservation of elephants by preventing their death being overrun by trains and monitoring the integrity of the rail track. It utilizes a unique method for deterring the elephants using infrasonic sound from crossing the rail track. For obtaining this output the sensing devices are placed in proximity areas of the rail track using a novel passive node mobility mechanism. These devices act as an input to the ac...

  11. Nonlinear silicon photonics

    OpenAIRE

    Tsia, KK; Jalali, B.

    2010-01-01

    An intriguing optical property of silicon is that it exhibits a large third-order optical nonlinearity, with orders-ofmagnitude larger than that of silica glass in the telecommunication band. This allows efficient nonlinear optical interaction at relatively low power levels in a small footprint. Indeed, we have witnessed a stunning progress in harnessing the Raman and Kerr effects in silicon as the mechanisms for enabling chip-scale optical amplification, lasing, and wavelength conversion - f...

  12. Alignment of the ALICE Inner Tracking System with cosmic-ray tracks

    CERN Document Server

    Aamodt, K; Abeysekara, U; Abrahantes Quintana, A; Adamová, D; Aggarwal, M M; Aglieri Rinella, G; Agocs, A G; Aguilar Salazar, S; Ahammed, Z; Ahmad, A; Ahmad, N; Ahn, S U; Akimoto, R; Akindinov, A; Aleksandrov, D; Alessandro, B; Alfaro Molina, R; Alici, A; Almaráz Aviña, E; Alme, J; Altini, V; Altinpinar, S; Alt, T; Andrei, C; Andronic, A; Anelli, G; Angelov, V; Anson, C; Anticic, T; Antinori, F; Antinori, S; Antipin, K; Antonczyk, D; Antonioli, P; Anzo, A; Aphecetche, L; Appelshäuser, H; Arcelli, S; Arceo, R; Arend, A; Armesto, N; Arnaldi, R; Aronsson, T; Arsene, I C; Asryan, A; Augustinus, A; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Äystö, J; Azmi, M D; Bablok, S; Bach, M; Badalà, A; Baek, Y W; Bagnasco, S; Bailhache, R; Bala, R; Baldisseri, A; Baldit, A; Bán, J; Barbera, R; Barile, F; Barnaföldi, G G; Barnby, L; Barret, V; Bartke, J; Basile, M; Basmanov, V; Bastid, N; Bathen, B; Batigne, G; Batyunya, B; Baumann, C; Bearden, I G; Becker, B; Belikov, I; Bellwied, R; Belmont-Moreno, E; Belogianni, A; Benhabib, L; Beolé, S; Berceanu, I; Bercuci, A; Berdermann, E; Berdnikov, Y; Betev, L; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bianchi, L; Bianchin, C; Bianchi, N; Bielcík, J; Bielcíková, J; Bilandzic, A; Bimbot, L; Biolcati, E; Blanc, A; Blanco, F; Blanco, F; Blau, D; Blume, C; Boccioli, M; Bock, N; Bogdanov, A; Bøggild, H; Bogolyubsky, M; Bohm, J; Boldizsár, L; Bombara, M; Bombonati, C; Bondila, M; Borel, H; Borshchov, V; Bortolin, C; Bose, S; Bosisio, L; Bossú, F; Botje, M; Böttger, S; Bourdaud, G; Boyer, B; Braun, M; Braun-Munzinger, P; Bravina, L; Bregant, M; Breitner, T; Bruckner, G; Bruna, E; Bruno, G E; Brun, R; Budnikov, D; Buesching, H; Bugaev, K; Buncic, P; Busch, O; Buthelezi, Z; Caffarri, D; Caines, H; Cai, X; Camacho, E; Camerini, P; Campbell, M; Canoa Roman, V; Capitani, G P; Cara Romeo, G; Carena, F; Carena, W; Carminati, F; Casanova Díaz, A; Caselle, M; Castillo Castellanos, J; Castillo Hernandez, J F; Catanescu, V; Cattaruzza, E; Cavicchioli, C; Cerello, P; Chambert, V; Chang, B; Chapeland, S; Charpy, A; Charvet, J L; Chattopadhyay, S; Chattopadhyay, S; Cherney, M; Cheshkov, C; Cheynis, B; Chiavassa, E; Chibante Barroso, V; Chinellato, D D; Chochula, P; Choi, K; Chojnacki, M; Christakoglou, P; Christensen, C H; Christiansen, P; Chujo, T; Chuman, F; Cicalo, C; Cifarelli, L; Cindolo, F; Cleymans, J; Cobanoglu, O; Coffin, J P; Coli, S; Colla, A; Conesa Balbastre, G; Conesa del Valle, Z; Conner, E S; Constantin, P; Contin, G; Contreras, J G; Cormier, T M; Corrales Morales, Y; Cortese, P; Cortés Maldonado, I; Cosentino, M R; Costa, F; Cotallo, M E; Crescio, E; Crochet, P; Cuautle, E; Cunqueiro, L; Cussonneau, J; Dainese, A; Dalsgaard, H H; Danu, A; Dash, A; Dash, S; Das, I; Das, S; de Barros, G O V; De Caro, A; de Cataldo, G; de Cuveland, J; De Falco, A; De Gaspari, M; de Groot, J; De Gruttola, D; de Haas, A P; De Marco, N; De Pasquale, S; De Remigis, R; de Rooij, R; de Vaux, G; Delagrange, H; Dellacasa, G; Deloff, A; Demanov, V; Dénes, E; Deppman, A; D'Erasmo, G; Derkach, D; Devaux, A; Di Bari, D; Di Giglio, C; Di Liberto, S; Di Mauro, A; Di Nezza, P; Dialinas, M; Díaz, L; Díaz, R; Dietel, T; Ding, H; Divià, R; Djuvsland, Ø; do Amaral Valdiviesso, G; Dobretsov, V; Dobrin, A; Dobrowolski, T; Dönigus, B; Domínguez, I; Don, D M M; Dordic, O; Dubey, A K; Dubuisson, J; Ducroux, L; Dupieux, P; Dutta Majumdar, A K; Dutta Majumdar, M R; Elia, D; Emschermann, D; Enokizono, A; Espagnon, B; Estienne, M; Evans, D; Evrard, S; Eyyubova, G; Fabjan, C W; Fabris, D; Faivre, J; Falchieri, D; Fantoni, A; Fasel, M; Fearick, R; Fedunov, A; Fehlker, D; Fekete, V; Felea, D; Fenton-Olsen, B; Feofilov, G; Fernández Téllez, A; Ferreiro, E G; Ferretti, A; Ferretti, R; Figueredo, M A S; Filchagin, S; Fini, R; Fionda, F M; Fiore, E M; Floris, M; Fodor, Z; Foertsch, S; Foka, P; Fokin, S; Formenti, F; Fragiacomo, E; Fragkiadakis, M; Frankenfeld, U; Frolov, A; Fuchs, U; Furano, F; Furget, C; Fusco Girard, M; Gaardhøje, J J; Gadrat, S; Gagliardi, M; Gago, A; Gallio, M; Ganoti, P; Ganti, M S; Garabatos, C; García Trapaga, C; Gebelein, J; Gemme, R; Germain, M; Gheata, A; Gheata, M; Ghidini, B; Ghosh, P; Giraudo, G; Giubellino, P; Gladysz-Dziadus, E; Glasow, R; Glässel, P; Glenn, A; Gomez, R; González Santos, H; González-Trueba, L H; González-Zamora, P; Gorbunov, S; Gorbunov, Y; Gotovac, S; Gottschlag, H; Grabski, V; Grajcarek, R; Grelli, A; Grigoras, A; Grigoras, C; Grigoriev, V; Grigoryan, A; Grinyov, B; Grion, N; Gros, P; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J F; Grossiord, J Y; Grosso, R; Guarnaccia, C; Guber, F; Guernane, R; Guerzoni, B; Gulbrandsen, K; Gulkanyan, H; Gunji, T; Gupta, A; Gupta, R; Gustafsson, H A; Gutbrod, H; Haaland, Ø; Hadjidakis, C; Haiduc, M; Hamagaki, H; Hamar, G; Hamblen, J; Han, B H; Harris, J W; Hartig, M; Harutyunyan, A; Hasch, D; Hasegan, D; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hayrapetyan, A; Heide, M; Heinz, M; Helstrup, H; Herghelegiu, A; Hernández, C; Herrera Corral, G; Herrmann, N; Hetland, K F; Hicks, B; Hiei, A; Hille, P T; Hippolyte, B; Horaguchi, T; Hori, Y; Hristov, P; Hrivnácová, I; Huber, S; Humanic, T J; Hu, S; Hutter, D; Hwang, D S; Ichou, R; Ilkaev, R; Ilkiv, I; Innocenti, P G; Ippolitov, M; Irfan, M; Ivan, C; Ivanov, A; Ivanov, M; Ivanov, V; Iwasaki, T; Jachokowski, A; Jacobs, P; Jancurová, L; Jangal, S; Janik, R; Jayananda, K; Jena, C; Jena, S; Jirden, L; Jones, G T; Jones, P G; Jovanovic, P; Jung, H; Jung, W; Jusko, A; Kaidalov, A B; Kalcher, S; Kalinák, P; Kalliokoski, T; Kalweit, A; Kamal, A; Kamermans, R; Kanaki, K; Kang, E; Kang, J H; Kapitan, J; Kaplin, V; Kapusta, S; Karavicheva, T; Karpechev, E; Kazantsev, A; Kebschull, U; Keidel, R; Khan, M M; Khan, S A; Khanzadeev, A; Kharlov, Y; Kikola, D; Kileng, B; Kim, D J; Kim, D S; Kim, D W; Kim, H N; Kim, J H; Kim, J; Kim, J S; Kim, M; Kim, M; Kim, S H; Kim, S; Kim, Y; Kirsch, S; Kiselev, S; Kisel, I; Kisiel, A; Klay, J L; Klein-Bösing, C; Klein, J; Kliemant, M; Klovning, A; Kluge, A; Kniege, S; Koch, K; Kolevatov, R; Kolojvari, A; Kondratiev, V; Kondratyeva, N; Konevskih, A; Kornas, E; Kour, R; Kowalski, M; Kox, S; Kozlov, K; Králik, I; Kral, J; Kramer, F; Kraus, I; Kravcáková, A; Krawutschke, T; Krivda, M; Krumbhorn, D; Krus, M; Kryshen, E; Krzewicki, M; Kucheriaev, Y; Kuhn, C; Kuijer, P G; Kumar, L; Kumar, N; Kupczak, R; Kurashvili, P; Kurepin, A; Kurepin, A N; Kuryakin, A; Kushpil, S; Kushpil, V; Kutouski, M; Kvaerno, H; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Lackner, F; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Lafage, V; Lal, C; Lara, C; La Rocca, P; Larsen, D T; Laurenti, G; Lazzeroni, C; Le Bornec, Y; Le Bris, N; Lee, H; Lee, K S; Lee, S C; Lefèvre, F; Lehnert, J; Leistam, L; Lenhardt, M; Lenti, V; León, H; León Monzón, I; León Vargas, H; Lévai, P; Lietava, R; Lindal, S; Lindenstruth, V; Lippmann, C; Lisa, M A; Listratenko, O; Liu, L; Li, Y; Loginov, V; Lohn, S; López Noriega, M; López-Ramírez, R; López Torres, E; Lopez, X; Løvhøiden, G; Lozea Feijo Soares, A; Lunardon, M; Luparello, G; Luquin, L; Lu, S; Lutz, J R; Luvisetto, M; Madagodahettige-Don, D M; Maevskaya, A; Mager, M; Mahajan, A; Mahapatra, D P; Maire, A; Makhlyueva, I; Ma, K; Malaev, M; Maldonado Cervantes, I; Malek, M; Mal'Kevich, D; Malkiewicz, T; Malzacher, P; Mamonov, A; Manceau, L; Mangotra, L; Manko, V; Manso, F; Manzari, V; Mao, Y; Mares, J; Margagliotti, G V; Margotti, A; Marín, A; Martashvili, I; Martinengo, P; Martínez Davalos, A; Martínez García, G; Martínez, M I; Maruyama, Y; Ma, R; Marzari Chiesa, A; Masciocchi, S; Masera, M; Masetti, M; Masoni, A; Massacrier, L; Mastromarco, M; Mastroserio, A; Matthews, Z L; Mattos Tavares, B; Matyja, A; Mayani, D; Mazza, G; Mazzoni, M A; Meddi, F; Menchaca-Rocha, A; Mendez Lorenzo, P; Meoni, M; Mercado Pérez, J; Mereu, P; Miake, Y; Michalon, A; Miftakhov, N; Milosevic, J; Minafra, F; Mischke, A; Miskowiec, D; Mitu, C; Mizoguchi, K; Mlynarz, J; Mohanty, B; Molnar, L; Mondal, M M; Montaño Zetina, L; Monteno, M; Montes, E; Morando, M; Moretto, S; Morsch, A; Moukhanova, T; Muccifora, V; Mudnic, E; Muhuri, S; Müller, H; Munhoz, M G; Munoz, J; Musa, L; Musso, A; Nandi, B K; Nania, R; Nappi, E; Navach, F; Navin, S; Nayak, T K; Nazarenko, S; Nazarov, G; Nedosekin, A; Nendaz, F; Newby, J; Nianine, A; Nicassio, M; Nielsen, B S; Nikolaev, S; Nikolic, V; Nikulin, S; Nikulin, V; Nilsen, B S; Nilsson, M S; Noferini, F; Nomokonov, P; Nooren, G; Novitzky, N; Nyatha, A; Nygaard, C; Nyiri, A; Nystrand, J; Ochirov, A; Odyniec, G; Oeschler, H; Oinonen, M; Okada, K; Okada, Y; Oldenburg, M; Oleniacz, J; Oppedisano, C; Orsini, F; Ortíz Velázquez, A; Ortona, G; Oskamp, C; Oskarsson, A; Osmic, F; Österman, L; Ostrowski, P; Otterlund, I; Otwinowski, J; Øvrebekk, G; Oyama, K; Ozawa, K; Pachmayer, Y; Pachr, M; Padilla, F; Pagano, P; Paic, G; Painke, F; Pajares, C; Palaha, A; Palmeri, A; Pal, S K; Pal, S; Panse, R; Pappalardo, G S; Park, W J; Pastircák, B; Pastore, C; Paticchio, V; Pavlinov, A; Pawlak, T; Peitzmann, T; Pepato, A; Pereira, H; Peressounko, D; Pérez, C; Perini, D; Perrino, D; Peryt, W; Peschek, J; Pesci, A; Peskov, V; Pestov, Y; Peters, A J; Petrácek, V; Petridis, A; Petris, M; Petrovici, M; Petrov, P; Petta, C; Peyré, J; Piano, S; Piccotti, A; Pikna, M; Pillot, P; Pinsky, L; Pitz, N; Piuz, F; Platt, R; Pluta, J; Pocheptsov, T; Pochybova, S; Podesta Lerma, P L M; Poggio, F; Poghosyan, M G; Poghosyan, T; Polák, K; Polichtchouk, B; Polozov, P; Polyakov, V; Pommeresch, B; Pop, A; Posa, F; Poskon, M; Pospisil, V; Potukuchi, B; Pouthas, J; Prasad, S K; Preghenella, R; Prino, F; Pruneau, C A; Pshenichnov, I; Puddu, G; Pujahari, P; Pulvirenti, A; Punin, A; Punin, V; Putis, M; Putschke, J; Quercigh, E; Rachevski, A; Rademakers, A; Radomski, S; Räihä, T S; Rak, J; Rakotozafindrabe, A; Ramello, L; Ramírez Reyes, A; Rammler, M; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Räsänen, S; Rashevskaya, I; Rath, S; Read, K F; Real, J; Redlich, K; Renfordt, R; Reolon, A R; Reshetin, A; Rettig, F; Revol, J P; Reygers, K; Ricaud, H; Riccati, L; Ricci, R A; Richter, M; Riedler, P; Riegler, W; Riggi, F; Rivetti, A; Rodriguez Cahuantzi, M; Røed, K; Röhrich, D; Román López, S; Romita, R; Ronchetti, F; Rosinský, P; Rosnet, P; Rossegger, S; Rossi, A; Roukoutakis, F; Rousseau, S; Roy, C; Roy, P; Rubio-Montero, A J; Rui, R; Rusanov, I; Russo, G; Ryabinkin, E; Rybicki, A; Sadovsky, S; Safarík, K; Sahoo, R; Saini, J; Saiz, P; Sakata, D; Salgado, C A; Salgueiro Dominques da Silva, R; Salur, S; Samanta, T; Sambyal, S; Samsonov, V; Sándor, L; Sandoval, A; Sano, M; Sano, S; Santo, R; Santoro, R; Sarkamo, J; Saturnini, P; Scapparone, E; Scarlassara, F; Scharenberg, R P; Schiaua, C; Schicker, R; Schindler, H; Schmidt, C; Schmidt, H R; Schossmaier, K; Schreiner, S; Schuchmann, S; Schukraft, J; Schutz, Y; Schwarz, K; Schweda, K; Scioli, G; Scomparin, E; Segato, G; Semenov, D; Senyukov, S; Seo, J; Serci, S; Serkin, L; Serradilla, E; Sevcenco, A; Sgura, I; Shabratova, G; Shahoyan, R; Sharkov, G; Sharma, N; Sharma, S; Shigaki, K; Shimomura, M; Shtejer, K; Sibiriak, Y; Siciliano, M; Sicking, E; Siddi, E; Siemiarczuk, T; Silenzi, A; Silvermyr, D; Simili, E; Simonetti, G; Singaraju, R; Singhal, V; Singh, R; Sinha, B C; Sinha, T; Sitar, B; Sitta, M; Skaali, T B; Skjerdal, K; Smakal, R; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Snow, H; Søgaard, C; Sokolov, O; Soloviev, A; Soltveit, H K; Soltz, R; Sommer, W; Son, C W; Song, M; Son, H S; Soos, C; Soramel, F; Soyk, D; Spyropoulou-Stassinaki, M; Srivastava, B K; Stachel, J; Staley, F; Stan, I; Stefanek, G; Stefanini, G; Steinbeck, T; Stenlund, E; Steyn, G; Stocco, D; Stock, R; Stolpovsky, P; Strmen, P; Suaide, A A P; Subieta Vásquez, M A; Sugitate, T; Suire, C; Sumbera, M; Susa, T; Swoboda, D; Symons, J; Szanto de Toledo, A; Szarka, I; Szostak, A; Szuba, M; Tadel, M; Tagridis, C; Takahara, A; Takahashi, J; Tanabe, R; Tapia Takaki, J D; Taureg, H; Tauro, A; Tavlet, M; Tejeda Muñoz, G; Telesca, A; Terrevoli, C; Thäder, J; Tieulent, R; Tlusty, D; Toia, A; Tolyhy, T; Torcato de Matos, C; Torii, H; Torralba, G; Toscano, L; Tosello, F; Tournaire, A; Traczyk, T; Tribedy, P; Tröger, G; Truesdale, D; Trzaska, W H; Tsiledakis, G; Tsilis, E; Tsuji, T; Tumkin, A; Turrisi, R; Turvey, A; Tveter, T S; Tydesjö, H; Tywoniuk, K; Ulery, J; Ullaland, K; Uras, A; Urbán, J; Urciuoli, G M; Usai, G L; Vacchi, A; Vala, M; Valencia Palomo, L; Vallero, S; van den Brink, A; van der Kolk, N; Vande Vyvre, P; van Leeuwen, M; Vannucci, L; Vargas, A; Varma, R; Vasiliev, A; Vassiliev, I; Vassiliou, M; Vechernin, V; Venaruzzo, M; Vercellin, E; Vergara, S; Vernet, R; Verweij, M; Vetlitskiy, I; Vickovic, L; Viesti, G; Vikhlyantsev, O; Vilakazi, Z; Villalobos Baillie, O; Vinogradov, A; Vinogradov, L; Vinogradov, Y; Virgili, T; Viyogi, Y P; Vodopianov, A; Voloshin, K; Voloshin, S; Volpe, G; von Haller, B; Vranic, D; Vrláková, J; Vulpescu, B; Wagner, B; Wagner, V; Wallet, L; Wan, R; Wang, D; Wang, Y; Watanabe, K; Wen, Q; Wessels, J; Wiechula, J; Wikne, J; Wilk, A; Wilk, G; Williams, M C S; Willis, N; Windelband, B; Xu, C; Yang, C; Yang, H; Yasnopolsky, A; Yermia, F; Yi, J; Yin, Z; Yokoyama, H; Yoo, I-K; Yuan, X; Yushmanov, I; Zabrodin, E; Zagreev, B; Zalite, A; Zampolli, C; Zanevsky, Yu; Zaporozhets, Y; Zarochentsev, A; Závada, P; Zbroszczyk, H; Zelnicek, P; Zenin, A; Zepeda, A; Zgura, I; Zhalov, M; Zhang, X; Zhou, D; Zhou, S; Zhu, J; Zichichi, A; Zinchenko, A; Zinovjev, G; Zinovjev, M; Zoccarato, Y; Zychácek, V

    2010-01-01

    ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) is the LHC (Large Hadron Collider) experiment devoted to investigating the strongly interacting matter created in nucleus-nucleus collisions at the LHC energies. The ALICE ITS, Inner Tracking System, consists of six cylindrical layers of silicon detectors with three different technologies; in the outward direction: two layers of pixel detectors, two layers each of drift, and strip detectors. The number of parameters to be determined in the spatial alignment of the 2198 sensor modules of the ITS is about 13,000. The target alignment precision is well below 10 micron in some cases (pixels). The sources of alignment information include survey measurements, and the reconstructed tracks from cosmic rays and from proton-proton collisions. The main track-based alignment method uses the Millepede global approach. An iterative local method was developed and used as well. We present the results obtained for the ITS alignment using about 10^5 charged tracks from cosmic rays that h...

  13. Radiation tolerance studies of neutron irradiated double sided silicon microstrip detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singla, M.; Larionov, P.; Balog, T.; Heuser, J.; Malygina, H.; Momot, I.; Sorokin, I.; Sturm, C.

    2016-07-01

    Radiation tolerance studies were made on double-sided silicon microstrip detectors for the Silicon Tracking System of the Compressed Baryonic Matter experiment at FAIR. The prototype detectors from two different vendors were irradiated to twice the highest expected fluence (1 ×1014 1 MeVneqcm-2) in the CBM experimental runs of several years. Test results from these prototype detectors both before and after irradiations have been discussed.

  14. The barrel sector assembly system of the ALICE silicon pixel detector

    CERN Document Server

    Antinori, F; Cinausero, M; Dima, R; Fabris, D; Fioretto, E; Lunardon, M; Moretto, S; Pepato, Adriano; Prete, G; Scarlassara, F; Segato, G F; Soramel, F; Turrisi, R; Vannucci, L; Viesti, G

    2004-01-01

    The Silicon Pixel Detector is the inner part of the ITS tracking system of the ALICE experiment at LHC. The 240 silicon modules, hosting almost 10 million pixel cells with dimension 50 . 425 mu m /sup 2/, have to be assembled on a carbon fiber support with micrometric precision. To reach this result, a dedicated high- precision computer-controlled tooling system has been developed at the INFN Padova. The assembly system and the mounting procedures are presented. (10 refs).

  15. Modeling of the internal tracking system of the NICA/MPD detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinchenko, A. I.; Murin, Yu. A.; Kondrat'ev, V. P.; Prokof'ev, N. A.

    2016-07-01

    The internal tracking system of the NICA/MPD detector is aimed at efficiently detecting the short-lived products of nucleus-nucleus collisions. We consider various geometries of the internal tracking system based on microstrip silicon sensors and simulate its identification power in reconstructing the Λ0 hyperons formed in central Au + Au collisions at √ {{S_{NN}}} = 9GeV.

  16. Bald Eagle Tracking Project Report Rappahannock River Valley National Wildlife Refuge 2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this study was to learn, by use of tracking devices, the locations of bald eagle high use areas for foraging and roosting. Tracking will provide...

  17. Catastrophic Impact of Silicon on Silicon: Unraveling the Genesis Impact Using Sample 61881

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhlman, K. R.; Kim, H.; Jurewicz, A. J. G.; Gonzalez, C. P.; Allums, K. K.

    2016-01-01

    The Genesis mission collected solar wind and brought it back to Earth in order to provide precise knowledge of solar isotopic and elemental compositions. The ions in the solar wind were stopped in the collectors at depths on the order of 10 to a few hundred nanometers. This shallow implantation layer is critical for scientific analysis of the composition of the solar wind and must be preserved throughout sample handling, cleaning, processing, distribution, preparation and analysis. The current work is motivated by the need to understand the interaction of the Genesis payload with contamination during the crash in the Utah desert. Silicon contamination has been found to be notoriously difficult to remove from silicon samples despite multiple cleanings with multiple techniques. However, the question has been posed, "Does the silicon really need to be removed for large area analyses?." If the recalcitrant silicon contamination is all pure silicon from fractured collectors, only a very tiny fraction of that bulk material will contain solar wind, which could skew the analyses. This could be complicated if the silicon trapped other materials and/or gases as it impacted the surface.

  18. ATLAS Silicon Microstrip Tracker Operation and Performance

    CERN Document Server

    Chalupkova, I; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    The Semi-Conductor Tracker (SCT) is a silicon strip detector and one of the key precision tracking devices in the Inner Detector of the ATLAS experiment at CERN LHC. The SCT is constructed of 4088 silicon detector modules for a total of 6.3 million strips. Each module is designed, constructed and tested to operate as a stand-alone unit, mechanically, electrically, optically and thermally. The modules are mounted into two types of structures: one barrel (4 cylinders) and two end-cap systems (9 disks on each end of the barrel). The SCT silicon micro-strip sensors are processed in the planar p-in-n technology. The signals from the strips are processed in the front-end ASICS ABCD3TA, working in the binary readout mode. Data is transferred to the off-detector readout electronics via optical fibers. The completed SCT has been installed inside the ATLAS experimental cavern since 2007 and has been operational since then. Calibration data has been taken regularly and analyzed to determine the noise performance of the ...

  19. ATLAS Silicon Microstrip Tracker Operation and Performance

    CERN Document Server

    NAGAI, K; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    The Semi-Conductor Tracker (SCT) is a silicon strip detector and one of the key precision tracking devices in the Inner Detector of the ATLAS experiment at CERN LHC. The SCT is constructed of 4088 silicon detector modules for a total of 6.3 million strips. Each module is designed, constructed and tested to operate as a stand-alone unit, mechanically, electrically, optically and thermally. The modules are mounted into two types of structures: one barrel (4 cylinders) and two end-cap systems (9 disks on each end of the barrel). The SCT silicon micro-strip sensors are processed in the planar p-in-n technology. The signals from the strips are processed in the front-end ASICS ABCD3TA, working in the binary readout mode. Data is transferred to the off-detector readout electronics via optical fibres. The completed SCT has been installed inside the ATLAS experimental cavern since 2007 and has been operational since then. Calibration data has been taken regularly and analysed to determine the noise performance of the ...

  20. Proton irradiation of various resistivity silicon detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bates, S.J.; Dezillie, B.; Furetta, C.; Glaser, M.; Lemeilleur, F. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Leon-Florian, E. [Univ. de Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

    1996-06-01

    Future high energy physics experiments at CERN`s Large Hadron Collider will use high precision silicon detectors for tracking purposes. The hadronic component of the radiation received threatens the lifetime of these detectors and it is vital to choose the silicon starting material to maximize the performance and lifetime. Ion-implanted silicon detectors with various initial resistivities and germanium concentrations have been irradiated with high energy protons up to a fluence of 10{sup 14} cm{sup {minus}2}. The change in leakage current and full depletion voltage have been studied both as a function of fluence and of time after irradiation. Measurements were made up to 100 days post-irradiation at room temperature and then using heating techniques to accelerate processes up to the equivalent of over 10 years at room temperature. The leakage-current damage constant is shown to be independent of the starting material while the conduction type inversion point and the long-term annealing of the depletion voltage are sensitive to the initial resistivity and impurity concentrations.

  1. Silicon Photomultipliers in High Energy and Space Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Berra, Alessandro; Vallazza, Erik

    In recent years Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPMs) have been proposed as a new type of readout system for scintillating detectors in many experiments. SiPMs consist of a matrix of parallel-connected silicon micro-pixels, which are independent photon counters working in limited Geiger mode with very high gain. The goal of this thesis work is to describe the use of SiPMs as a readout system for plastic scintillators, both for tracking and calorimetry purposes. Different prototypes of scintillating bar tracker and shashlik calorimeters have been tested at CERN on the PS and SPS extracted beamlines. All the tests have been performed in the framework of the FACTOR (Fiber Apparatus for Calorimetry and Tracking with Optoelectronic Read-out) collaboration, a three year R&D project started in 2007 and funded by the Italian Institute of Nuclear Physics (INFN).

  2. Development of Microstrip Silicon Detectors for Star and ALICE

    CERN Document Server

    Arnold, L; Coffin, J P; Guillaume, G; Guthneck, L; Higueret, S; Hundt, F; Kühn, C E; Lutz, Jean Robert; Pozdniakov, S; Rami, F; Tarchini, A; Boucham, A; Bouvier, S; Erazmus, B; Germain, M; Giliberto, S; Martin, L; Le Moal, C; Roy, C; Colledani, C; Dulinski, W; Turchetta, R

    1998-01-01

    The physics program of STAR and ALICE at ultra-relativistic heavy ion colliders, RHIC and LHC respectively, requires very good tracking capabilities. Some specific quark gluon plasma signatures, based on strange matter measurements implies quite a good secondary vertex reconstruction.For this purpose, the inner trackers of both experiments are composed of high-granularity silicon detectors. The current status of the development of double-sided silicon microstrip detectors is presented in this work.The global performance for tracking purpose adn particle identification are first reviewed. Then tests of the detectors and of the associated readout electronics are described. In-beam measurements of noise, spatial resolution, efficiency and charge matching capability, as well as radiation hardness, are examined.

  3. Oxygen defect processes in silicon and silicon germanium

    KAUST Repository

    Chroneos, A.

    2015-06-18

    Silicon and silicon germanium are the archetypical elemental and alloy semiconductor materials for nanoelectronic, sensor, and photovoltaic applications. The investigation of radiation induced defects involving oxygen, carbon, and intrinsic defects is important for the improvement of devices as these defects can have a deleterious impact on the properties of silicon and silicon germanium. In the present review, we mainly focus on oxygen-related defects and the impact of isovalent doping on their properties in silicon and silicon germanium. The efficacy of the isovalent doping strategies to constrain the oxygen-related defects is discussed in view of recent infrared spectroscopy and density functional theory studies.

  4. Oxygen defect processes in silicon and silicon germanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silicon and silicon germanium are the archetypical elemental and alloy semiconductor materials for nanoelectronic, sensor, and photovoltaic applications. The investigation of radiation induced defects involving oxygen, carbon, and intrinsic defects is important for the improvement of devices as these defects can have a deleterious impact on the properties of silicon and silicon germanium. In the present review, we mainly focus on oxygen-related defects and the impact of isovalent doping on their properties in silicon and silicon germanium. The efficacy of the isovalent doping strategies to constrain the oxygen-related defects is discussed in view of recent infrared spectroscopy and density functional theory studies

  5. Oxygen defect processes in silicon and silicon germanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chroneos, A., E-mail: alexander.chroneos@imperial.ac.uk [Faculty of Engineering and Computing, Coventry University, Priory Street, Coventry CV1 5FB (United Kingdom); Department of Materials, Imperial College London, London SW7 2BP (United Kingdom); Sgourou, E. N.; Londos, C. A. [Solid State Section, Physics Department, University of Athens, Panepistimiopolis, Zografos, 157 84 Athens (Greece); Schwingenschlögl, U. [PSE Division, KAUST, Thuwal 23955-6900 (Saudi Arabia)

    2015-06-15

    Silicon and silicon germanium are the archetypical elemental and alloy semiconductor materials for nanoelectronic, sensor, and photovoltaic applications. The investigation of radiation induced defects involving oxygen, carbon, and intrinsic defects is important for the improvement of devices as these defects can have a deleterious impact on the properties of silicon and silicon germanium. In the present review, we mainly focus on oxygen-related defects and the impact of isovalent doping on their properties in silicon and silicon germanium. The efficacy of the isovalent doping strategies to constrain the oxygen-related defects is discussed in view of recent infrared spectroscopy and density functional theory studies.

  6. Material properties of silicon and silicon carbide foams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacoby, Marc T.; Goodman, William A.

    2005-08-01

    Silicon and silicon carbide foams provide the lightweighting element for Schafer Corporation's silicon and silicon carbide lightweight mirror systems (SLMSTM and SiC-SLMSTM). SLMSTM and SiC-SLMSTM provide the enabling technology for manufacturing lightweight, athermal optical sub-assemblies and instruments. Silicon and silicon carbide foam samples were manufactured and tested under a Schafer-funded Internal Research and Development program in various configurations to obtain mechanical and thermal property data. The results of the mechanical tests that are reported in this paper include Young's modulus, compression strength, tensile strength, Poisson's ratio and vibrational damping. The results of the thermal tests include thermal conductivity and coefficient of thermal expansion.

  7. Silicon-Based Light Sources for Silicon Integrated Circuits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Pavesi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Silicon the material per excellence for electronics is not used for sourcing light due to the lack of efficient light emitters and lasers. In this review, after having introduced the basics on lasing, I will discuss the physical reasons why silicon is not a laser material and the approaches to make it lasing. I will start with bulk silicon, then I will discuss silicon nanocrystals and Er3+ coupled silicon nanocrystals where significant advances have been done in the past and can be expected in the near future. I will conclude with an optimistic note on silicon lasing.

  8. Microwave synthesis of phase-pure, fine silicon carbide powder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fine, monophasic silicon carbide powder has been synthesized by direct solid-state reaction of its constituents namely silicon and carbon in a 2.45 GHz microwave field. Optimum parameters for the silicon carbide phase formation have been determined by varying reaction time and reaction temperature. The powders have been characterized for their particle size, surface area, phase composition (X-ray diffraction) and morphology (scanning electron microscope). Formation of phase-pure silicon carbide can be achieved at 1300 deg. C in less than 5 min of microwave exposure, resulting in sub-micron-sized particles. The free energy values for Si + C → SiC reaction were calculated for different temperatures and by comparing them with the experimental results, it was determined that phase-pure silicon carbide can be achieved at around 1135 deg. C

  9. Nanoscale semiconducting silicon as a nutritional food additive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canham, L. T.

    2007-05-01

    Very high surface area silicon powders can be realized by high energy milling or electrochemical etching techniques. Such nanoscale silicon structures, whilst biodegradable in the human gastrointestinal tract, are shown to be remarkably stable in most foodstuffs and beverages. The potential for using silicon to improve the shelf life and bioavailability of specific nutrients in functional foods is highlighted. Published drug delivery data implies that the nanoentrapment of hydrophobic nutrients will significantly improve their dissolution kinetics, through a combined effect of nanostructuring and solid state modification. Nutrients loaded to date include vitamins, fish oils, lycopene and coenzyme Q10. In addition, there is growing published evidence that optimized release of orthosilicic acid, the biodegradation product of semiconducting silicon in the gut, offers beneficial effects with regard bone health. The utility of nanoscale silicon in the nutritional field shows early promise and is worthy of much further study.

  10. Patton's tracks in the Mojave Desert, USA: An ecological legacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belnap, J.; Warren, S.D.

    2002-01-01

    Recovery of soil properties from World War II-era military training exercises in the Mojave Desert was measured approximately 55 years following disturbance. Tracks from military vehicles were still visible, particularly in areas of desert pavement. Soil penetrability was much lower in visible tracks than outside the tracks. Soils in tracks had fewer rocks in the top 10 cm of the soil profile than adjacent untracked soils. Larger particles (> 4.8 mm) formed a moderately well-developed pavement outside of the tracks, while smaller, loose particles (???4.8 mm) dominated the surface of the tracks. The time required to restore the desert pavement is likely to be measured in centuries. Based on biomass estimates, the cyanobacterial component of biological soil crusts had recovered 46-65% in tracks, compared to outside the tracks. Overall recovery of lichen cover has been much slower. Under plant canopies, cover of Collema tenax was not significantly different between areas inside and outside the tracks; however, recovery of Catapyrenium squamulosum was only 36%. In plant interspaces with less favorable moisture and temperature conditions, C. tenax showed a 6% recovery and C. squamulosum a 3% recovery. Assuming recovery of the biological soil crust is linear, and complete only when the most sensitive species (C. squamulosum) has fully recovered in the most limiting microhabitats (plant interspaces), it may require almost two millennia for full recovery of these areas.

  11. The advanced position compensation to improve the dynamic tracking ability for fast moving target in an optoelectronic tracking system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Nengwei; Zhao, Lirong; Zhou, Hui; Chen, Juan

    2005-12-01

    The servo control system of the optoelectronic tracking equipment usually is a kind of SISO. When the fast moving target is tracked, the over-tune of the servo system is the main representation for the dynamic tracking error. As the result, the tracking ability may be improved by limiting the over-tune. We put forward a method, the advanced position compensation (called as APC in short), which is to check the speed-overtune by applying the advanced position information. For the large accelerate target, small over-tune tracking is achieved, but it lowers the ability for tracking the sine signal at low frequency area. While the dynamic high-type can improve the tracking precision for the sine signal at low frequency area, we work out a brand-new method, which combines the advantages of the both. It increases the tracking precision in the whole frequency band at large scale for the optoelectronic tracking system. The simulation results show that when the target moves with the largest accelerate 120°/s2, 120°/s, the maximum static tracking error is about 0.6".

  12. Sensor Management for Tracking in Sensor Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Fuemmeler, Jason A; Veeravalli, Venugopal V

    2010-01-01

    We study the problem of tracking an object moving through a network of wireless sensors. In order to conserve energy, the sensors may be put into a sleep mode with a timer that determines their sleep duration. It is assumed that an asleep sensor cannot be communicated with or woken up, and hence the sleep duration needs to be determined at the time the sensor goes to sleep based on all the information available to the sensor. Having sleeping sensors in the network could result in degraded tracking performance, therefore, there is a tradeoff between energy usage and tracking performance. We design sleeping policies that attempt to optimize this tradeoff and characterize their performance. As an extension to our previous work in this area [1], we consider generalized models for object movement, object sensing, and tracking cost. For discrete state spaces and continuous Gaussian observations, we derive a lower bound on the optimal energy-tracking tradeoff. It is shown that in the low tracking error regime, the g...

  13. A novel craniotomy simulation system for evaluation of stereo-pair reconstruction fidelity and tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaochen; Clements, Logan W.; Conley, Rebekah H.; Thompson, Reid C.; Dawant, Benoit M.; Miga, Michael I.

    2016-03-01

    Brain shift compensation using computer modeling strategies is an important research area in the field of image-guided neurosurgery (IGNS). One important source of available sparse data during surgery to drive these frameworks is deformation tracking of the visible cortical surface. Possible methods to measure intra-operative cortical displacement include laser range scanners (LRS), which typically complicate the clinical workflow, and reconstruction of cortical surfaces from stereo pairs acquired with the operating microscopes. In this work, we propose and demonstrate a craniotomy simulation device that permits simulating realistic cortical displacements designed to measure and validate the proposed intra-operative cortical shift measurement systems. The device permits 3D deformations of a mock cortical surface which consists of a membrane made of a Dragon Skin® high performance silicone rubber on which vascular patterns are drawn. We then use this device to validate our stereo pair-based surface reconstruction system by comparing landmark positions and displacements measured with our systems to those positions and displacements as measured by a stylus tracked by a commercial optical system. Our results show a 1mm average difference in localization error and a 1.2mm average difference in displacement measurement. These results suggest that our stereo-pair technique is accurate enough for estimating intra-operative displacements in near real-time without affecting the surgical workflow.

  14. Stand-alone Cosmic Muon Reconstruction Before Installation of the CMS Silicon Strip Tracker

    CERN Document Server

    Adam, W; Dragicevic, M; Friedl, M; Fruhwirth, R; Hansel, S; Hrubec, J; Krammer, M; Oberegger, M; Pernicka, M; Schmid, S; Stark, RS; Steininger, H; Uhl, D; Waltenberger, W; Widl, E; Van Mechelen, P; Cardaci, M; Beaumont, W; de Langhe, E; de Wolf, E A; Delmeire, E; Hashemi, M; Bouhali, O; Charaf, O; Clerbaux, B; Dewulf, J P; Elgammal, S; Hammad, G; de Lentdecker, G; Marage, P; Vander Velde, C; Vanlaer, P; Wickens, J; Adler, V; Devroede, O; De Weirdt, S; D'Hondt, J; Goorens, R; Heyninck, J; Maes, J; Mozer, M; Tavernier, S; Van Lancker, L; Van Mulders, P; Villella, I; Wastiels, C; Bonnet, J L; Bruno, G; De Callatay, B; Florins, B; Giammanco, A; Gregoire, G; Keutgen, Th; Kcira, D; Lemaitre, V; Michotte, D; Militaru, O; Piotrzkowski, K; Quertermont, L; Roberfroid, V; Rouby, X; Teyssier, D; Daubie, E; Anttila, E; Czellar, S; Engstrom, P; Harkonen, J; Karimaki, V; Kostesmaa, J; Kuronen, A; Lampen, T; Linden, T; Luukka, P R; Maenpaa, T; Michal, S; Tuominen, E; Tuominiemi, J; Ageron, M; Baulieu, G; Bonnevaux, A; Boudoul, G; Chabanat, E; Chabert, E; Chierici, R; Contardo, D; Della Negra, R; Dupasquier, T; Gelin, G; Giraud, N; Guillot, G; Estre, N; Haroutunian, R; Lumb, N; Perries, S; Schirra, F; Trocme, B; Vanzetto, S; Agram, J L; Blaes, R; Drouhin, F; Ernenwein, J P; Fontaine, J C; Berst, J D; Brom, J M; Didierjean, F; Goerlach, U; Graehling, P; Gross, L; Hosselet, J; Juillot, P; Lounis, A; Maazouzi, C; Olivetto, C; Strub, R; Van Hove, P; Anagnostou, G; Brauer, R; Esser, H; Feld, L; Karpinski, W; Klein, K; Kukulies, C; Olzem, J; Ostapchuk, A; Pandoulas, D; Pierschel, G; Raupach, F; Schael, S; Schwering, G; Sprenger, D; Thomas, M; Weber, M; Wittmer, B; Wlochal, M; Beissel, F; Bock, E; Flugge, G; Gillissen, C; Hermanns, T; Heydhausen, D; Jahn, D; Kaussen, G; Linn, A; Perchalla, L; Poettgens, M; Pooth, O; Stahl, A; Zoeller, M H; Buhmann, P; Butz, E; Flucke, G; Hamdorf, R; Hauk, J; Klanner, R; Pein, U; Schleper, P; Steinbruck, G; Blum, P; De Boer, W; Dierlamm, A; Dirkes, G; Fahrer, M; Frey, M; Furgeri, A; Hartmann, F; Heier, S; Hoffmann, K H; Kaminski, J; Ledermann, B; Liamsuwan, T; Muller, S; Muller, Th; Schilling, F P; Simonis, H J; Steck, P; Zhukov, V; Cariola, P; De Robertis, G; Ferorelli, R; Fiore, L; Preda, M; Sala, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Zito, G; Creanza, D; De Filippis, N; De Palma, M; Giordano, D; Maggi, G; Manna, N; My, S; Selvaggi, G; Albergo, S; Chiorboli, M; Costa, S; Galanti, M; Giudice, N; Guardone, N; Noto, F; Potenza, R; Saizu, M A; Sparti, V; Sutera, C; Tricomi, A; Tuve, C; Brianzi, M; Civinini, C; Maletta, F; Manolescu, F; Meschini, M; Paoletti, S; Sguazzoni, G; Broccolo, B; Ciulli, V; D'Alessandro, R; Focardi, E; Frosali, S; Genta, C; Landi, G; Lenzi, P; Macchiolo, A; Magini, N; Parrini, G; Scarlini, E; Cerati, G; Azzi, P; Bacchetta, N; Candelori, A; Dorigo, T; Kaminsky, A; Karaevski, S; Khomenkov, V; Reznikov, S; Tessaro, M; Bisello, D; De Mattia, M; Giubilato, P; Loreti, M; Mattiazzo, S; Nigro, M; Paccagnella, A; Pantano, D; Pozzobon, N; Tosi, M; Bilei, G M; Checcucci, B; Fano, L; Servoli, L; Ambroglini, F; Babucci, E; Benedetti, D; Biasini, M; Caponeri, B; Covarelli, R; Giorgi, M; Lariccia, P; Mantovani, G; Marcantonini, M; Postolache, V; Santocchia, A; Spiga, D; Bagliesi, G; Balestri, G; Berretta, L; Bianucci, S; Boccali, T; Bosi, F; Bracci, F; Castaldi, R; Ceccanti, M; Cecchi, R; Cerri, C; Cucoanes, A S; Dell'Orso, R; Dobur, D; Dutta, S; Giassi, A; Giusti, S; Kartashov, D; Kraan, A; Lomtadze, T; Lungu, G A; Magazzu, G; Mammini, P; Mariani, F; Martinelli, G; Moggi, A; Palla, F; Palmonari, F; Petragnani, G; Profeti, A; Raffaelli, F; Rizzi, D; Sanguinetti, G; Sarkar, S; Sentenac, D; Serban, A T; Slav, A; Soldani, A; Spagnolo, P; Tenchini, R; Tolaini, S; Venturi, A; Verdini, P G; Vos, M; Zaccarelli, L; Avanzini, C; Basti, A; Benucci, L; Bocci, A; Cazzola, U; Fiori, F; Linari, S; Massa, M; Messineo, A; Segneri, G; Tonelli, G; Azzurri, P; Bernardini, J; Borrello, L; Calzolari, F; Foa, L; Gennai, S; Ligabue, F; Petrucciani, G; Rizzi, A; Yang, Z; Benotto, F; Demaria, N; Dumitrache, F; Farano, R; Borgia, M A; Castello, R; Costa, M; Migliore, E; Romero, A; Abbaneo, D; Abbas, M; Ahmed, I; Akhtar, I; Albert, E; Bloch, C; Breuker, H; Butt, S; Buchmuller, O; Cattai, A; Delaere, C; Delattre, M; Edera, L M; Engstrom, P; Eppard, M; Gateau, M; Gill, K; Giolo-Nicollerat, A S; Grabit, R; Honma, A; Huhtinen, M; Kloukinas, K; Kortesmaa, J; Kottelat, L J; Kuronen, A; Leonardo, N; Ljuslin, C; Mannelli, M; Masetti, L; Marchioro, A; Mersi, S; Michal, S; Mirabito, L; Muffat-Joly, J; Onnela, A; Paillard, C; Pal, I; Pernot, J F; Petagna, P; Petit, P; Piccut, C; Pioppi, M; Postema, H; Ranieri, R; Ricci, D; Rolandi, G; Ronga, F; Sigaud, C; Syed, A; Siegrist, P; Tropea, P; Troska, J; Tsirou, A; Vander Donckt, M; Vasey, F; Alagoz, E; Amsler, C; Chiochia, V; Regenfus, Christian; Robmann, P; Rochet, J; Rommerskirchen, T; Schmidt, A; Steiner, S; Wilke, L; Church, I; Cole, J; Coughlan, J; Gay, A; Taghavi, S; Tomalin, I; Bainbridge, R; Cripps, N; Fulcher, J; Hall, G; Noy, M; Pesaresi, M; Radicci, V; Raymond, D M; Sharp, P; Stoye, M; Wingham, M; Zorba, O; Goitom, I; Hobson, P R; Reid, I; Teodorescu, L; Hanson, G; Jeng, G Y; Liu, H; Pasztor, G; Satpathy, A; Stringer, R; Mangano, B; Affolder, K; Affolder, T; Allen, A; Barge, D; Burke, S; Callahan, D; Campagnari, C; Crook, A; D'Alfonso, M; Dietch, J; Garberson, Jeffrey Ford; Hale, D; Incandela, H; Incandela, J; Jaditz, S; Kalavase, P; Kreyer, S; Kyre, S; Lamb, J; Mc Guinness, C; Mills, C; Nguyen, H; Nikolic, M; Lowette, S; Rebassoo, F; Ribnik, J; Richman, J; Rubinstein, N; Sanhueza, S; Shah, Y; Simms, L; Staszak, D; Stoner, J; Stuart, D; Swain, S; Vlimant, J R; White, D; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Bagby, L; Bhat, P C; Burkett, K; Cihangir, S; Gutsche, O; Jensen, H; Johnson, M; Luzhetskiy, N; Mason, D; Miao, T; Moccia, S; Noeding, C; Ronzhin, A; Skup, E; Spalding, W J; Spiegel, L; Tkaczyk, S; Yumiceva, F; Zatserklyaniy, A; Zerev, E; Anghel, I; Bazterra, V E; Gerber, C E; Khalatian, S; Shabalina, E; Baringer, P; Bean, A; Chen, J; Hinchey, C; Martin, C; Moulik, T; Robinson, R; Gritsan, A V; Lae, C K; Tran, N V; Everaerts, P; Hahn, K A; Harris, P; Nahn, S; Rudolph, M; Sung, K; Betchart, B; Demina, R; Gotra, Y; Korjenevski, S; Miner, D; Orbaker, D; Christofek, L; Hooper, R; Landsberg, G; Nguyen, D; Narain, M; Speer, T; Tsang, K V

    2009-01-01

    The subsystems of the CMS silicon strip tracker were integrated and commissioned at the Tracker Integration Facility (TIF) in the period from November 2006 to July 2007. As part of the commissioning, large samples of cosmic ray data were recorded under various running conditions in the absence of a magnetic field. Cosmic rays detected by scintillation counters were used to trigger the readout of up to 15% of the final silicon strip detector, and over 4.7 million events were recorded. This document describes the cosmic track reconstruction and presents results on the performance of track and hit reconstruction as from dedicated analyses.

  15. Proton therapy beam dosimetry with silicon CMOS image sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 16 mm2 CMOS Image Sensor with more than 100 000 pixels and with a standard video output was irradiated with 48, 95 and 180 MeV protons. Proton-induced nuclear reactions in silicon were detected as bright spots or tracks in the images. The angular and energy-dependent response of the detector were studied. The application to proton dosimetry is discussed

  16. Experience on 3D Silicon Sensors for ATLAS IBL

    CERN Document Server

    Darbo, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    3D silicon sensors, where plasma micro-machining is used to etch deep narrow apertures in the silicon substrate to form electrodes of PIN junctions, represent possible solutions for inner pixel layers of the tracking detectors in high energy physics experiments. This type of sensors has been developed for the Insertable B-Layer (IBL), an additional pixel layer that has been installed in ATLAS during the present shutdown of the LHC collider at CERN. It is presented here the experience in designing, testing and qualifying sensors and detector modules that have been used to equip part of the IBL. Based on the gained experience with 3D silicon sensors for the ATLAS IBL, we discuss possible new developments for the upgrade of ATLAS and CMS at the high-luminosity LHC (HL-LHC).

  17. Charge Collection Efficiency Simulations of Irradiated Silicon Strip Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Peltola, T

    2014-01-01

    During the scheduled high luminosity upgrade of LHC, the world's largest particle physics accelerator at CERN, the position sensitive silicon detectors installed in the vertex and tracking part of the CMS experiment will face more intense radiation environment than the present system was designed for. Thus, to upgrade the tracker to required performance level, comprehensive measurements and simulations studies have already been carried out. Essential information of the performance of an irradiated silicon detector is obtained by monitoring its charge collection efficiency (CCE). From the evolution of CCE with fluence, it is possible to directly observe the effect of the radiation induced defects to the ability of the detector to collect charge carriers generated by traversing minimum ionizing particles (mip). In this paper the numerically simulated CCE and CCE loss between the strips of irradiated silicon strip detectors are presented. The simulations based on Synopsys Sentaurus TCAD framework were performed ...

  18. Experience on 3D silicon sensors for ATLAS IBL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    3D silicon sensors, where plasma micro-machining is used to etch deep narrow apertures in the silicon substrate to form electrodes of PIN junctions, represent possible solutions for inner pixel layers of the tracking detectors in high energy physics experiments. This type of sensors has been developed for the Insertable B-Layer (IBL), an additional pixel layer that has been installed in ATLAS during the present shutdown of the LHC collider at CERN. It is presented here the experience in designing, testing and qualifying sensors and detector modules that have been used to equip part of the IBL. Based on the gained experience with 3D silicon sensors for the ATLAS IBL, we discuss possible new developments for the upgrade of ATLAS and CMS at the high-luminosity LHC (HL-LHC)

  19. Coastal Currents with Along-Track Interferometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greidanus, H.S.F.; Bree, R.J.P. van; Huising, E.J.; Vogelzang, J.; Vaessen, E.M.J.

    1999-01-01

    Airborne radar along-track interferometric measurements of a coastal area with a complex tidal flow pattern are analyzed. The results are compared with a current field computed from a tidal model. Using wave-current interaction modeling, a radar backscatter image is simulated based on the measured c

  20. Feasibility studies for a wireless 60 GHz tracking detector readout

    CERN Document Server

    Dittmeier, Sebastian; Soltveit, Hans Kristian; Wiedner, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    The amount of data produced by highly granular silicon tracking detectors in high energy physics experiments poses a major challenge to readout systems. At high collision rates, e.g. at LHC experiments, only a small fraction of data can be read out with currently used technologies. To cope with the requirements of future or upgraded experiments new data transfer techniques are required which offer high data rates at low power and low material budget. Wireless technologies operating in the 60 GHz band or at higher frequencies offer high data rates and are thus a promising upcoming alternative to conventional data transmission via electrical cables or optical fibers. Using wireless technology, the amount of cables and connectors in detectors can be significantly reduced. Tracking detectors profit most from a reduced material budget as fewer secondary particle interactions (multiple Coulomb scattering, energy loss, etc.) improve the tracking performance in general. We present feasibility studies regarding the in...