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Sample records for area process ponds

  1. Sampling and Hydrogeology of the Vadose Zone Beneath the 300 Area Process Ponds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Four open pits were dug with a backhoe into the vadose zone beneath the former 300 Area Process Ponds in April 2003. Samples were collected about every 2 feet for physical, chemical, and/or microbiological characterization. This reports presents a stratigraphic and geohydrologic summary of the four excavations

  2. Sediment and process water characterization in support of 300 Area North Process Pond physical soil washing test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The sediments in the 300 Area North Process Pond are being considered for clean-up using soil washing processes. Prior to site clean-up several preliminary pilot-scale physical washing campaigns were performed by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) staff in the summer of 1993. WHC used equipment that was obtained from the US Environmental Protection Agency. Specific details are found in the 300-FF-1 Physical Separations CERCLA Treatability Test Plan. Physical soil washing includes separation and proper containment of the contaminant-rich fines and residual liquid effluent and release of the coarse ''clean'' fraction, should it meet minimum performance levels for residual contaminant concentration to the site being cleaned. A goal of the demonstration is to concentrate the contaminants into ≤10% of the soil volume excavated and, therefore, to release ≥90% of the soil back to the site as clean soil. To support interpretation of the WHC soil washing treatability study, PNL performed some sediment and process water characterization on samples taken during three major and one small campaign. This report documents particle-size distributions in various field washed piles, and chemical and gama emitting radionuclide contents as a function of particle-size distribution for the field washed sediments and contents in the spent process water. All of the particle fractions were separated by wet sieving, but two field samples were also subjected to dry sieving and attrition scrubbing followed by wet sieving

  3. 78 FR 23949 - Sunkhaze Meadows National Wildlife Refuge and Carlton Pond Waterfowl Production Area, Penobscot...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-23

    ... and Carlton Pond WPA. We started this process through a notice in the Federal Register (76 FR 14984... Fish and Wildlife Service Sunkhaze Meadows National Wildlife Refuge and Carlton Pond Waterfowl... Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) and Carlton Pond Waterfowl Production Area (WPA), located...

  4. Cladocera of the pond area between Studenka and Polanka in Poodri Landscape Protected Area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poodri Protected Landscape Area was established in 1991, to preserve the Odra River flood plain with many ponds and pools. 32 Cladoceran taxa were identified in samples from the pond area between Studenka and Polanka. (author)

  5. 淮南采煤沉陷区积水过程地下水作用机制%Groundwater influencing mechanism in water-ponding process of Huainan coal mining subsidence area

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陆垂裕; 陆春辉; 李慧; 柳炳俊; 孙青言; 李翠

    2015-01-01

    Groundsubsidence caused by coal mining activity commonly exists in the coal belt of China eastern plain area. Subsidence area is on average 0.18-0.33 hm2 per ten thousand tons of coal mining. The subsidence coefficient there is about 0.8-0.9, which means coal mining of one cubic meters result in ground subsidence of 0.8-0.9 m3. In the environment with high groundwater level, the situation is worse, for once the ground sinks due to coal mining, large area of water-ponding occurs. Due to limited source of backfill material, high cost, the long time needed to wait for the stable state of subsidence and other factors, traditional land remediation pattern for coal mining subsidence in China faces difficulties, and land reclamation rate by now is only 12%. From other point of view, coal mining subsidence area is potentially useful water storage structure, and recently some researchers start to study a new remediation pattern of using them for water resource development. However, a prerequisite for the new pattern is to learn where the water comes from. Related to the environment background with high groundwater level, it seems that water stored in coal mining subsidence areas may mainly come from groundwater, but by now this viewpoint has not been proved in detail yet. The article researched the law of water-ponding process in coal mining subsidence area by means of hydrological reasoning and water cycle simulation. In this paper, Huainan coal mining area is taken as study area, which is the largest coal production base of East China area with its coal reserves accounting for 74% of Anhui Province, and 50% of East China area. According to statistical data in 2010, after long-term coal mining activity of dozens of years, the maximum subsidence depth of Huainan coal mining area has reached 7.6m, and the ground subsidence area has reached 108.3 km2, along with the total subsidence volume of 0.314×109 m3. Some meaningful conclusions are drawn through our study. Firstly, the

  6. South Bay Salt Pond initial stewardship plan & related Bay Area restoration projects

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Initial Stewardship Plan for the South Bay Salt Pond Restoration Project outlines a process to reduce the salinity of the existing salt ponds and to manage the...

  7. Farmed areas predict the distribution of amphibian ponds in a traditional rural landscape.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tibor Hartel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Traditional rural landscapes of Eastern Europe are undergoing major changes due to agricultural intensification, land abandonment, change in agricultural practices and infrastructural development. Small man-made ponds are important yet vulnerable components of rural landscapes. Despite their important role for biodiversity, these ponds tend to be excluded from conservation strategies. METHODOLOGY/FINDINGS: Our study was conducted in a traditional rural landscape in Eastern Europe. The aim of this study is twofold: (i to model the distribution of four major man-made pond types and (ii to present the importance of man-made ponds for the endangered Yellow Bellied Toad (Bombina variegata and the Common Toad (Bufo bufo. Six environmental variables were used to model pond distribution: Corine landcover, the heterogeneity of the landcover, slope, road distance, distance to closest village and the human population density. Land cover heterogeneity was the most important driver for the distribution of fishponds. Areas used for agriculture with significant areas of natural vegetation were the most important predictors for the distribution of temporary ponds. In addition, areas covered by transitional woodland and scrub were important for the open cattle ponds. Bombina variegata was found predominantly in the temporary ponds (e.g. ponds created by cattle and buffalo, dirt road ponds and concrete ponds created for livestock drinking and Bufo bufo in fishponds. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our Maxent models revealed that the highest probability of occurrence for amphibian ponds was in areas used as farmland. The traditional farming practices combined with a low level of infrastructure development produces a large number of amphibian ponds. The challenge is to harmonize economic development and the maintenance of high densities of ponds in these traditional rural landscapes.

  8. The effect of sunny area ratios on the thermal performance of solar ponds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The effect of sunny area ratio on model solar ponds in different geometries. • The sunny area ratio was calculated for 8 different cases. • The efficiency of the model solar pond was determined for 8 different cases. • The energy efficiencies of the solar pond are affected by the sizes of the solar pond, strongly. • The results help to select the sizes of the solar pond before construction. - Abstract: In this study, we investigated the effect of the sunny area ratios on thermal efficiency of model solar pond for different cases in Adiyaman, Turkey. For this purpose, we modeled the solar ponds to compute theoretical sunny area ratios of the zones and temperature distributions in order to find the performance of the model solar ponds. Incorporating the finite difference approach, one and two dimensional heat balances were written for inner zones and insulation side walls. Through, careful determination of the dimensions, insulation parameter and incoming solar radiation reaching the storage zone increased the efficiency of the solar pond. The efficiencies of the model solar pond were determined for case1a–2a–3a–4a to be maximum 14.93%, 20.42%, 23.51% and 27.84%, and for case1b–2b–3b–4b to be maximum 12.65%, 16.76%, 21.37% and 23.30% in August, respectively. With the increase of the sunny area ratio, the performance of the solar pond significantly increased. However, with the increasing rate of the surface area, performance increase rate decreased gradually. The results provide a strong perspective to determine the dimensions of the solar pond before starting the project of a solar pond

  9. Pond Creek Coal Zone Resource Areas (Outcrop) in Kentucky, West Virginia, and Virginia

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset is a polygon coverage of counties limited to the extent of the Pond Creek coal bed resource areas. Resource areas are only a subset of the entire areal...

  10. 78 FR 66056 - Sunkhaze Meadows National Wildlife Refuge and Carlton Pond Waterfowl Production Area, Penobscot...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-04

    ... and Carlton Pond WPA. We started this process through a notice in the Federal Register (76 FR 14984... Sunkhaze Meadows NWR and Carlton Pond WPA from April 23 to May 31, 2013 (78 FR 23949). During the comment... requesting comments in a notice of availability in the Federal Register (78 FR 23949). Currently,...

  11. Heavy Metal Concentration from Shrimp Culture Ponds at Point Calimer Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Umamaheswari

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Palk strait estuarine water was highly polluted by Cu, Fe, Pb, Zn and Hg. The study was carryout the interactions between heavy metals and microorganisms. The study area paying attention on the role of probiotic bacteria such as Bacillus cereus, Aeromonas hydrophila, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Azotobacter vinelandii, and Lactobacillus sp. to remove the metals from polluted nine aquaculture ponds through the way of bioremediation, bioaccumulation and mineralization process. The highest inhibition zone was absorbed in Pseudomonas aeruginosa against Hg (3.796 mm and Cu (0.060 mm, Aeromonas hydrophila against Pb (5.526 mm and Bacillus cereus against Zn (4.504 mm and Fe (1.635 mm. No inhibition zone was produced by Azotobacter beijerinckii and control also maintained.

  12. Performance Evaluation of a Waste Stabilization Pond in a Rural Area in Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahassen M.E.D. Ghazy

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The performance evaluation of the waste stabilization pond (WSP as a model of domestic wastewater treatment unit in rural area was carried out. The unit comprised of anaerobic, facultative and maturation ponds in two series. The effluents of WSP which are discharged in the drain had the BOD reduced to 109-245 mg L-1 (Mean = 145.3 mg L-1, 50.65% removal, while the COD was reduced to 221-400 mg L-1 (Mean = 289 mg L-1, 48.95% removal and the total suspended solids (TSS were reduced to 118-190 mg L-1 (Mean = 157.8 mg L-1, 44.3% removal. The reduction percentages of total coliform (TC, faecal coliform (FC, E.coli, faecal streptococci (FS, salmonellae and Listeria were 98.8, 95.6, 79.4, 96.8, 97.9 and 89.5% respectively. Also, the removal percentages of coliphage and infectious rotaviruses were 49.03 and 99.66% respectively. Identical sequences of rotaviruses VP-6 detected in the final effluent of the pond and the drain were observed. Euglena variables and Chlamydomonas reinhardt were predominant in anaerobic, facultative and maturation effluents. It has been noticed that pollution affected species diversity of zooplankton; the number of species in facultative pond was 8 species because of high pollution level, whereas in maturation pond increased to 21 species. Also, pollution in anaerobic pond increased density of ciliates (Protozoa which are known to be bio-indicators of organic pollution. The percent removal of ciliates in the maturation pond was 70%. It is recommended to make some modifications in the design to increase the efficiency of WSP.

  13. Effects of season on ecological processes in extensive earthen tilapia ponds in Southeastern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favaro, E G P; Sipaúba-Tavares, L H; Milstein, A

    2015-11-01

    In Southeastern Brazil tilapia culture is conducted in extensive and semi-intensive flow-through earthen ponds, being water availability and flow management different in the rainy and dry seasons. In this region lettuce wastes are a potential cheap input for tilapia culture. This study examined the ecological processes developing during the rainy and dry seasons in three extensive flow-through earthen tilapia ponds fertilized with lettuce wastes. Water quality, plankton and sediment parameters were sampled monthly during a year. Factor analysis was used to identify the ecological processes occurring within the ponds and to construct a conceptual graphic model of the pond ecosystem functioning during the rainy and dry seasons. Processes related to nitrogen cycling presented differences between both seasons while processes related to phosphorus cycling did not. Ecological differences among ponds were due to effects of wind protection by surrounding vegetation, organic loading entering, tilapia density and its grazing pressure on zooplankton. Differences in tilapia growth among ponds were related to stocking density and ecological process affecting tilapia food availability and intraspecific competition. Lettuce wastes addition into the ponds did not produce negative effects, thus this practice may be considered a disposal option and a low-cost input source for tilapia, at least at the amounts applied in this study. PMID:26602348

  14. Glacier melting and precipitation trends detected by surface area changes in Himalayan ponds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salerno, Franco; Thakuri, Sudeep; Guyennon, Nicolas; Viviano, Gaetano; Tartari, Gianni

    2016-07-01

    Climatic time series for high-elevation Himalayan regions are decidedly scarce. Although glacier shrinkage is now sufficiently well described, the changes in precipitation and temperature at these elevations are less clear. This contribution shows that the surface area variations of unconnected glacial ponds, i.e. ponds not directly connected to glacier ice, but that may have a glacier located in their hydrological basin, can be considered as suitable proxies for detecting past changes in the main hydrological components of the water balance. On the south side of Mt Everest, glacier melt and precipitation have been found to be the main drivers of unconnected pond surface area changes (detected mainly with Landsat imagery). In general, unconnected ponds have decreased significantly by approximately 10 ± 5 % in terms of surface area over the last 50 years (1963-2013 period) in the study region. Here, an increase in precipitation occurred until the mid-1990s followed by a decrease until recent years. Until the 1990s, glacier melt was constant. An increase occurred in the early 2000s, while a declining trend in maximum temperature has caused a reduction in the glacier melt during recent years.

  15. ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF CYANOBACTERIA IN SEWAGE POND OF H.E.C INDUSTRIAL AREA, RANCHI INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The ecological study of the sewage stabilization pond of HEC area, Hatia, Ranchi has been taken for the first time in this area. Studies were conducted to determine the occurrence and abundance of cyanobacteria in relation to physico-chemical characteristics of sewage pond. It assumes significance of algae mostly cyanobacteria can be used as bioindicators of water pollution in different water habitat of the area. Increased eutrophication from domestic effluent, sewage promotes the development of algal bloom. This study indicates the maximum occurrence and abundance of Microcystis, Oscillatoria, and phormidium spp. in all sites of the sewage pond. The physico-chemical analysis shows maximum nitrogen up to 35.4 mg l-1, 4.8 mg l-1 phosphate, 147.131 mg l-1 chloride and alkaline nature of water throughout the year favour the growth of cyanophycean members and promote algal bloom formation of Microcystis aeruginosa, O.princeps and O.tenuis in this pond.

  16. Site-specific health and safety plan 100-D Pond remediation project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 100-D Ponds are located north of the northern perimeter fence of the 100-D Area. The ponds were excavated in a preexisting basin that had been used for disposal of coal ash. There are two ponds, one used as a settling pond and the other a percolation pond. Liquid effluent from the 100-D process sewers was discharged to the ponds from 1977 through 1987; after 1987 the ponds received backwash and rinsate from the 100-D water treatment facilities. All discharges to the ponds ceased in June 1994, and the ponds were allowed to dry up

  17. Assessment of natural radioactivity in water and sediment from amang (tin tailing) processing ponds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamma spectroscopy was performed to determine the concentrations of uranium-238 and thorium-232 concentrations in the environment as a consequence of amang processing. In this study 33 water samples and 26 sediment samples were collected from 7 amang processing areas. The concentrations of uranium-238 and thorium-232 were determined by direct counting using a hyper pure germanium (HPGe) detector inter phased with a multi channel analyzer (MCA) . Results showed that the maximum mass and activity concentrations of uranium in water samples were 6.64 ppm and 78.53 Bql-1 respectively, while in sediment samples were 69.75 mgkg-1 and 860.57 Bqkg-1 respectively. The maximum mass and activity concentrations of thorium in water samples were 1.71 ppm and 6.90 Bql-1, while in sediment samples were 157.73 mgkg-1 and 637.61 Bqkg-1 respectively. Concentrations of uranium-238 and thorium-232 in sediment samples were higher than concentrations of uranium-238 and thorium-232 in water samples, and this may be attributed to insolubility of these radionuclides in water. The concentrations of both radionuclides were higher in sediments collected from ponds involved in the close water recycle system compared to those ponds involved in the open water system. Results also showed that the concentrations of these radionuclides were higher than background indicating that amang processing activity has enhanced the natural radionuclides contents in water and sediment.(author)

  18. K-Area and Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Sites Groundwater Monitoring Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samples from the three wells at the K-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (KSS wells) and the three wells at the Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Site (PSS wells) are analyzed quarterly for constituents required by South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control Construction Permit 13,173 and, as requested, for other constituents as part of the Savannah River Site (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program. Annual analyses for other constituents, primarily metals, also are required by the permit. Dichloromethane (methylene chloride) exceeded the final Primary Drinking Water Standard in a single well of the K-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site during fourth quarter 1993. Aluminum, iron, and lead, reported in excess of the SRS Flag 2 criteria at both the K-Area and Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Sites during third quarter 1993, were not analyzed fourth quarter

  19. Purification and utilization of garlic processing wastewater in lotus pond wetlands

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun PANG; Xue-ling FENG; Xiu-feng WANG

    2014-01-01

    Based on the experiments of utilization of garlic processing wastewater in a lotus pond, this study demonstrates that lotus pond wetlands have a remarkable ability to remove organic pollutants and decrease chemical oxygen demand (CODCr), biochemical oxygen demand (BOD5), and suspended substances (SS) in garlic processing wastewater. Results also show evident effects of lotus roots on absorption of NH3-N. The pH value in a lotus pond with wastewater discharged was relatively stable. The water quality in the lotus pond reached the classⅡ emission standard, according to the Integrated Wastewater Discharge Standard (GB8978-1996), seven days after pretreated garlic processing wastewater had been discharged into the lotus pond. Garlic processing wastewater irrigation does not produce pollution in the pond sediment and has no negative effect on the growth of lotus roots. Due to utilization of garlic processing wastewater, the output of lotus roots increased by 3.0% to 8.3%, and the quality of lotus roots was improved. Therefore, better purification and utilization results can be achieved.

  20. Purification and utilization of garlic processing wastewater in lotus pond wetlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun PANG

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Based on the experiments of utilization of garlic processing wastewater in a lotus pond, this study demonstrates that lotus pond wetlands have a remarkable ability to remove organic pollutants and decrease chemical oxygen demand (CODCr, biochemical oxygen demand (BOD5, and suspended substances (SS in garlic processing wastewater. Results also show evident effects of lotus roots on absorption of NH3-N. The pH value in a lotus pond with wastewater discharged was relatively stable. The water quality in the lotus pond reached the class Ⅱ emission standard, according to the Integrated Wastewater Discharge Standard (GB8978-1996, seven days after pretreated garlic processing wastewater had been discharged into the lotus pond. Garlic processing wastewater irrigation does not produce pollution in the pond sediment and has no negative effect on the growth of lotus roots. Due to utilization of garlic processing wastewater, the output of lotus roots increased by 3.0% to 8.3%, and the quality of lotus roots was improved. Therefore, better purification and utilization results can be achieved.

  1. K-Area and Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Sites Groundwater Monitoring Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During fourth quarter 1992, samples from the three monitoring wells at the K-Area site (KSS series) and the three monitoring wells at the Par Pond site (PSS series) were analyzed for constituents required by South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control Construction Permit 13, 173 and for other constituents as part of the Savannah River Site (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program. This report describes monitoring results that exceeded the final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) or the SRS flagging criteria. During fourth quarter 1992, no constituents analyzed exceeded the PDWS or the SRS Flag 2 criteria at the K-Area and Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Sites. In the KSS well series, the field measurement for alkalinity ranged as high as 26 mg/L in well KSS 1D. Alkalinity measurements were zero in the PSS wells. Historical and current water-level elevations at the K-Area and Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Site indicate that the groundwater flow directions are south to southwest (SRS grid coordinates)

  2. Identifying biogeochemical processes beneath stormwater infiltration ponds in support of a new best management practice for groundwater protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Reilly, Andrew M.; Chang, Ni-Bin; Wanielista, Martin P.; Xuan, Zhemin

    2011-01-01

     When applying a stormwater infiltration pond best management practice (BMP) for protecting the quality of underlying groundwater, a common constituent of concern is nitrate. Two stormwater infiltration ponds, the SO and HT ponds, in central Florida, USA, were monitored. A temporal succession of biogeochemical processes was identified beneath the SO pond, including oxygen reduction, denitrification, manganese and iron reduction, and methanogenesis. In contrast, aerobic conditions persisted beneath the HT pond, resulting in nitrate leaching into groundwater. Biogeochemical differences likely are related to soil textural and hydraulic properties that control surface/subsurface oxygen exchange. A new infiltration BMP was developed and a full-scale application was implemented for the HT pond. Preliminary results indicate reductions in nitrate concentration exceeding 50% in soil water and shallow groundwater beneath the HT pond.

  3. Addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 92: Area 6 Decon Pond Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The following is an addendum to the 'Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 92: Area 6 Decontamination Pond, Nevada Test Site, Nevada', DOE/NV/11718--306, dated April 1999. This addendum includes Use Restriction Information forms and survey maps for CAS 06-04-01, Decon Pad Oil/Water Separator, and CAS 06-05-02, Decontamination Pond (RCRA), that were inadvertently left out of the Closure Report when it was published as a final document

  4. Closure report for CAU 93: Area 6 steam cleaning effluent ponds, Nevada Test Site. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Steam Cleaning Effluent Ponds (SCEP) waste unit is located in Area 6 at the Nevada Test Site. The SCEPs are evaporation basins formerly used for the disposal of untreated liquid effluent discharged from steam cleaning activities associated with Buildings 6-623 and 6-800. This closure report documents the strategy and analytical results that support the clean closure or closure in place of each of the components within CAU 93. In addition, the report documents all deviations from the approved closure plan and provides rationale for all deviations

  5. Closure report for CAU 93: Area 6 steam cleaning effluent ponds, Nevada Test Site. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-01

    The Steam Cleaning Effluent Ponds (SCEP) waste unit is located in Area 6 at the Nevada Test Site. The SCEPs are evaporation basins formerly used for the disposal of untreated liquid effluent discharged from steam cleaning activities associated with Buildings 6-623 and 6-800. This closure report documents the strategy and analytical results that support the clean closure or closure in place of each of the components within CAU 93. In addition, the report documents all deviations from the approved closure plan and provides rationale for all deviations.

  6. Radionuclide concentrations in wild waterfowl using the test reactor area radioactive leaching pond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waterfowl use the Test Reactor Area (TRA) Radioactive Leaching Pond on the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Site (INEL Site) as a resting area. Daily observations of waterfowl were made to determine species composition and numbers. Eight ducks and one coot were collected from the TRA pond during 1976 and 1977. Seven background samples were also collected. Each bird was dissected and tissue samples were analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides. Duck tissues contained 25 radionuclides. Average and maximum radionuclide concentrations were highest in gut followed by feathers, liver, and muscle, Chromium-51 had the highest concentrations of all radionuclides identified 130,000 pCi/g (4800 Bq/g) in the gut and 37,500 pCi/g (1390 Bq/g) on the feathres). Neodymium-147 had the highest concentration on feathers of any radionuclide (104,000 pCi/g, 3850 Bq/g). Cesium-137 was the predominant radionuclide in muscle with a maximum concentration of 4,070 pCi/g (150 Bq/g). The ducks had lower radionuclide concentrations in the edible tissues than in the non-edible tissues. Potential whole-body and thyroid dose commitments to man consuming contaminated ducks were calculated using muscle concentrations of Cs-134, Cs-137, and I-131. Although assumptions used for dose calculations maximized the dose commitment to man, results indicated that consumption of contaminated duck tissue is not a radiation hazard to humans. Even the highest dose commitments were below the limits recommended for individuals of the general population by the Internatioal Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). The highest potential dose commitment to man would result from the consumption of an American coot known to have spent 20 days on the TRA pond. The average dose commitment to man would be 20 mrem

  7. Retention of activation and fission radionuclides by mallards from the Test Reactor Area radioactive leaching pond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twenty semi-wild mallard ducks were banded, fitted with dorsal and ventral thermoluminescent dosimeter packets, and released on the Test Reactor Area radioactive leaching ponds. Ducks were live captured after 75 days and 145 days on the pond, placed in metabolic cages and whole-body counted periodically for 52 days. Ducks from each group were sacrificed immediately after capture, dissected, and muscle, feather, gut, and liver samples submitted for analyses. The remaining ducks were also sacrificed and dissected after the 52 day counting period. Concentrations of the 17 gamma emitting radionuclides detected at capture and after 52 days of physical and biological decay were compared. Highest mean radionuclide concentrations were found in feathers followed by gut, liver, and muscle. Effective and biological halflives of Zn-65, Cr-51, Cs-134, Cs-137, and Se-75 were determined and compared with data from previous studies. Samples are currently being analyzed for Pu-238, Pu-239-240, Am-241, Cm-242, Cm-244 and Sr-90. Further data analyses will be completed after data collection has terminated

  8. Intermediate pond sizes contain the highest density, richness, and diversity of pond-breeding amphibians.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond D Semlitsch

    Full Text Available We present data on amphibian density, species richness, and diversity from a 7140-ha area consisting of 200 ponds in the Midwestern U.S. that represents most of the possible lentic aquatic breeding habitats common in this region. Our study includes all possible breeding sites with natural and anthropogenic disturbance processes that can be missing from studies where sampling intensity is low, sample area is small, or partial disturbance gradients are sampled. We tested whether pond area was a significant predictor of density, species richness, and diversity of amphibians and if values peaked at intermediate pond areas. We found that in all cases a quadratic model fit our data significantly better than a linear model. Because small ponds have a high probability of pond drying and large ponds have a high probability of fish colonization and accumulation of invertebrate predators, drying and predation may be two mechanisms driving the peak of density and diversity towards intermediate values of pond size. We also found that not all intermediate sized ponds produced many larvae; in fact, some had low amphibian density, richness, and diversity. Further analyses of the subset of ponds represented in the peak of the area distribution showed that fish, hydroperiod, invertebrate density, and canopy are additional factors that drive density, richness and diversity of ponds up or down, when extremely small or large ponds are eliminated. Our results indicate that fishless ponds at intermediate sizes are more diverse, produce more larvae, and have greater potential to recruit juveniles into adult populations of most species sampled. Further, hylid and chorus frogs are found predictably more often in ephemeral ponds whereas bullfrogs, green frogs, and cricket frogs are found most often in permanent ponds with fish. Our data increase understanding of what factors structure and maintain amphibian diversity across large landscapes.

  9. Intermediate pond sizes contain the highest density, richness, and diversity of pond-breeding amphibians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semlitsch, Raymond D; Peterman, William E; Anderson, Thomas L; Drake, Dana L; Ousterhout, Brittany H

    2015-01-01

    We present data on amphibian density, species richness, and diversity from a 7140-ha area consisting of 200 ponds in the Midwestern U.S. that represents most of the possible lentic aquatic breeding habitats common in this region. Our study includes all possible breeding sites with natural and anthropogenic disturbance processes that can be missing from studies where sampling intensity is low, sample area is small, or partial disturbance gradients are sampled. We tested whether pond area was a significant predictor of density, species richness, and diversity of amphibians and if values peaked at intermediate pond areas. We found that in all cases a quadratic model fit our data significantly better than a linear model. Because small ponds have a high probability of pond drying and large ponds have a high probability of fish colonization and accumulation of invertebrate predators, drying and predation may be two mechanisms driving the peak of density and diversity towards intermediate values of pond size. We also found that not all intermediate sized ponds produced many larvae; in fact, some had low amphibian density, richness, and diversity. Further analyses of the subset of ponds represented in the peak of the area distribution showed that fish, hydroperiod, invertebrate density, and canopy are additional factors that drive density, richness and diversity of ponds up or down, when extremely small or large ponds are eliminated. Our results indicate that fishless ponds at intermediate sizes are more diverse, produce more larvae, and have greater potential to recruit juveniles into adult populations of most species sampled. Further, hylid and chorus frogs are found predictably more often in ephemeral ponds whereas bullfrogs, green frogs, and cricket frogs are found most often in permanent ponds with fish. Our data increase understanding of what factors structure and maintain amphibian diversity across large landscapes. PMID:25906355

  10. Process of removing manganeses and radium for a uranium tailing pond and its application effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aimed at high manganese and radium concentrations in the effluent of a uranium tailing pond, a process of removing manganese and radium by using aeration and manganese sand filtering method was presented. The process flow and the application of the process in the waster water treatment of the tailing pond were introduced. The run results showed that the manganese and radium concentrations in the treated waster water were in the range of 0.7-1.3 mg/L and 0.36-0.70 Bq/L respectively, and the treated waster water has reached the discharge standard. The process was stable and easy to manage, but its running cost was high. (authors)

  11. K-Area and Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Sites Groundwater Monitoring Report. First quarter 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-07-01

    Samples from the three wells at the K-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (KSS wells) and the three wells at the Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Site (PSS wells) are analyzed quarterly for constituents required by South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control Construction Permit 13,173 and, as requested, for other constituents as part of the Savannah River Site Groundwater Monitoring Program. Annual analyses for other constituents, primarily metals, also are required by the permit. During first quarter 1993, no permit-required constituents exceeded standards at the two sites except iron, which was elevated in one KSS well and two PSS wells. Aluminum, not required by the permit, was the only other constituent that exceeded standards. Elevated levels of aluminum and iron at these two sites may be concurrent with a change in analytical methodology. As in previous quarters, chlordane concentrations did not exceed the detection limit in any of the wells.

  12. Environmental remediation of the Wismut legacy and utilization of the reclaimed areas, waste rock piles and tailings ponds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Between 1945 and reunification (1989) of Germany more than 232 000 t of U3O8 has been produced in Saxony and Thuringia, East Germany. This affected an area of approximately 100 km2 and left behind an extensive legacy of contaminated operations areas, underground and open pit mines, waste rock piles and tailings ponds. Following reunification, DM 13 billion (Euro 6.6 billion) were committed (and later revised to Euro 6.2 billion) to remediation of the liabilities and the government owned corporation, Wismut GmbH entrusted with the implementation of the Environmental Remediation (ER) of the liabilities. The prime goal of the ER Project follows from the legal requirements to abate health risks, mitigate existing and prevent future environmental damages. During the investigations and assessment of risks, development of remediation concepts, adoption of suitable technologies and work procedures as well as physical implementation of the remedial measures extensive use was made of international (mostly US and Canadian) ER experience. The extent of remedial measures was based on object-specific Environmental Assessments rather than on uniformly applied health/environmental standards. The ER workflow is more an iterative process than a linear succession of tasks, such as common for civil engineering projects. The internal (technical) parts of the problems were partly resolved by using Conceptual Site Models (CSM) for selection and prioritization of remedial measures. Reclamation of the waste rock piles is by covering in situ, relocation to a central pile or backfilling into an open pit. The backfilling of the open pit at Ronneburg with acid generating waste rock has been optimized from a geochemical point of view. For tailings ponds reclamation in form of dry landforms is being followed. To increase release (and reuse) of scrap metal from demolition, a fast and reliable method of discrimination of the non-contaminated metal has been developed. The flooding of underground

  13. The application of remote sensing in the environmental risk monitoring of tailings pond: a case study in Zhangjiakou area of China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Rulin; Shen, Wenming; Fu, Zhuo; Shi, Yuanli; Xiong, Wencheng; Cao, Fei

    2012-10-01

    As a kind of huge environmental risk source, tailings pond could cause a huge environmental disaster to the downstream area once an accident happened on it. Therefore it has become one key target of the environmental regulation in china. Especially, recently environmental emergencies caused by tailings pond are growing rapidly in China, the environmental emergency management of the tailings pond has been confronting with a severe situation. However, the regulatory agency is badly weak in the environmental regulation of tailings pond, due to the using of ground surveys and statistics which is costly, laborious and time consuming, and the lacking of strong technical and information support. Therefore, in this paper, according to the actual needs of the environmental emergency management of tailings pond, we firstly make a brief analysis of the characteristics of the tailings pond and the advantages and capability of remote sensing technology, and then proposed a comprehensive and systematic indexes system and the method of environmental risk monitoring of tailings pond based on remote sensing and GIS. The indexes system not only considers factors from the upstream area, the pond area and the downstream area in a perspective of the risk space theory, but also considers factors from risk source, risk receptor and risk control mechanism in a perspective of risk systems theory. Given that Zhangjiakou city has up to 580 tailings pond and is nearly located upstream of the water source of Beijing, so finally we apply the proposed indexes system and method in Zhangjiakou area in China to help collect environmental risk data of tailings pond in that area and find out it works well. Through the use case in Zhajiakou, the technique of using remote sensing to monitor environmental risk of tailings pond is feasible and effective, and would contribute to the establishment of `Space-Ground' monitoring network of tailings pond in future.

  14. Duckweed based wastewater stabilization ponds for wastewater treatment (a low cost technology for small urban areas in Zimbabwe)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalu, J. M.; Ndamba, J.

    A three-year investigation into the potential use of duckweed based wastewater stabilizations ponds for wastewater treatment was carried out at two small urban areas in Zimbabwe. The study hoped to contribute towards improved environmental management through improving the quality of effluent being discharged into natural waterways. This was to be achieved through the development and facilitation of the use of duckweed based wastewater stabilizations ponds. The study was carried out at Nemanwa and Gutu Growth Points both with a total population of 23 000. The two centers, like more than 70% of Zimbabwe’s small urban areas, relied on algae based ponds for domestic wastewater treatment. The final effluent is used to irrigate gum plantations before finding its way into the nearest streams. Baseline wastewater quality information was collected on a monthly basis for three months after which duckweed ( Lemna minor) was introduced into the maturation ponds to at least 50% pond surface cover. The influent and effluent was then monitored on a monthly basis for chemical, physical and bacteriological parameters as stipulated in the Zimbabwe Water (Waste and Effluent Disposal) regulations of 2000. After five months, the range of parameters tested for was narrowed to include only those that sometimes surpassed the limits. These included: phosphates, nitrates, pH, biological oxygen demand, iron, conductivity, chemical oxygen demand, turbidity, total dissolved solids and total suspended solids. Significant reductions to within permissible limits were obtained for most of the above-mentioned parameters except for phosphates, chemical and biological oxygen demand and turbidity. However, in these cases, more than 60% reductions were observed when the influent and effluent levels were compared. It is our belief that duckweed based waste stabilization ponds can now be used successfully for the treatment of domestic wastewater in small urban areas of Zimbabwe.

  15. Anaerobic reactor/high rate pond combined technology for sewage treatment in the Mediterranean area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Hafiane, F; El Hamouri, B

    2005-01-01

    Two high-rate, anaerobic/aerobic units were used to treat the sewage of the Institut Agronomique st Vétérinaire Hassan II (Morocco) campus in a 1,100 m2-plant designed for 1,500 e.p. and receiving 63 m3 per day. The anaerobic pre-treatment consisted of a two-step up-flow anaerobic reactor (TSUAR) comprising two reactors and one external settler all in series. The aerobic line, or post-treatment, consisted of a high-rate algal pond (HRAP) and one maturation pond in series. The system totalized a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 9 days. A gravel filter (GF) was constructed behind the TSUAR to trap low-density particles. The TSUAR removed 80% of COD and 90% of SS within 48 h. Solids retention time in the reactors averaged 32 d with a specific sludge production of 0.28 g SS g(-1) COD removed. Almost 93% of the sludge evacuated from the settler was stabilized. Specific biogas production from both reactors was 0.25m3 kg(-1) COD removed. Used in this configuration, the HRAP lost its BOD removal activity and increased its nutrients and pathogens removal capabilities (tertiary treatment). Results showed that 85% of total nitrogen and 48% of total phosphorus were removed by the HRAP. Land area requirement of this combination was less than 1 m2 per capita and filtered final effluent was of excellent quality (COD, 82 mg/l; TKN, 8.3 mg/l; total P, 2.7 mg/l, faecal coliforms, 2.4 10(3)/100 ml and zero helminths eggs). PMID:16114674

  16. Influence of competing and predatory invertebrate taxa on larval populations of mosquitoes in temporary ponds of wetland areas in Germany

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elono, Alvine Larissa Meyabeme; Liess, Matthias; Duquesne, Sabine

    2010-01-01

    Abundances of mosquito larvae and associated invertebrate communities were assessed in 27 temporary ponds during the spring season in wetland areas of Germany. Four genera of mosquitoes were identified: Aedes, Anopheles, Culex, and Culiseta. We focused our analyses on Aedes spp. because this genus w

  17. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 552: Area 12 Muckpile and Ponds, Nevada Test Site, Nevada: Revision 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office

    2004-04-06

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office's approach for collecting the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 552: Area 12 Muckpile and Ponds, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Located in Area 12 on the NTS, CAU 552 consists of two Corrective Action Sites (CASs): 12-06-04, Muckpile; 12-23-05, Ponds. Corrective Action Site 12-06-04 in Area 12 consists of the G-Tunnel muckpile, which is the result of tunneling activities. Corrective Action Site 12-23-05 consists of three dry ponds adjacent to the muckpile. The toe of the muckpile extends into one of the ponds creating an overlap of two CASs. The purpose of the investigation is to ensure that adequate data are collected to provide sufficient and reliable information to identify, evaluate, and select technic ally viable corrective actions. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document.

  18. H-Area, K-Area, and Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Sites groundwater monitoring report. Third quarter 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groundwater samples from the three wells at the H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (HSS wells) are analyzed quarterly for constituents as required by South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) Construction Permit 12,076. Samples from the three wells at the K-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (KSS wells) and the three wells at the quired by SCDHEC Construction Permit 13,173. All samples are also analyzed as requested for other constituents as part of the Savannah River Site (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program. Annual analyses for other constituents, primarily metals, also are required by the permits. No constituents exceeded the SCDHEC final Primary Drinking Water Standard in any well from the H-Area, K-Area, and Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Sites. Aluminum and iron were above Flag 2 criteria in one or more wells in the three sites during third quarter 1994. These constituents were not analyzed during the previous quarter. Third quarter results are similar to results for first quarter 1994

  19. Frozen ponds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langer, M; Westermann, S.; Anthony, K. Walter; Wischnewski, K.; Boike, J.

    2015-01-01

    Lakes and ponds play a key role in the carbon cycle of permafrost ecosystems, where they are considered to be hotspots of carbon dioxide CO2 and methane CH4 emission. The strength of these emissions is, however, controlled by a variety of physical and biogeochemical processes whose responses to a...... warming climate are complex and only poorly understood. Small waterbodies have been attracting an increasing amount of attention since recent studies demonstrated that ponds can make a significant contribution to the CO2 and CH4emissions of tundra ecosystems. Waterbodies also have a marked effect on the...... thermal state of the surrounding permafrost; during the freezing period they prolong the period of time during which thawed soil material is available for microbial decomposition.  This study presents net CH4 production rates during the freezing period from ponds within a typical lowland tundra landscape...

  20. Reproductive and health assessment of fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) inhabiting a pond containing oil sands process-affected water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kavanagh, Richard J., E-mail: rkavanag@uoguelph.ca [Department of Integrative Biology, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada N1G 2W1 (Canada); Frank, Richard A.; Solomon, Keith R. [Centre for Toxicology, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada N1G 2W1 (Canada); Van Der Kraak, Glen [Department of Integrative Biology, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada N1G 2W1 (Canada)

    2013-04-15

    Highlights: ► Fish were collected from a pond containing oil sands process-affected water (OSPW). ► They were compared to fish from two reference sites within the oil sands region. ► Differences in GSIs and tubercle numbers were observed in fish from the OSPW pond. ► Opercula, gills, and 11-KT concentrations also differed in fish from the OSPW pond. ► Black spot and tapeworms were not observed in any of the fish from the OSPW pond. -- Abstract: Previous laboratory based studies have shown that oil sands process-affected waters (OSPWs) containing high concentrations of naphthenic acids (>25 mg/l) have adverse effects on the reproductive physiology of fish. The purpose of this study was to assess the reproductive development and health of a wild population of fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) inhabiting an OSPW pond that has moderate concentrations of naphthenic acids (∼10 mg/l). Fathead minnows were collected at various times during the period of 2006 through 2008 from Demonstration Pond (OSPW) located at Syncrude Canada Ltd., and two reference sites, Beaver Creek reservoir and Poplar Creek reservoir, which are all north of Fort McMurray, AB, Canada. Condition factor, gill histopathology, gonadosomatic indices, liver somatic indices, male secondary sexual characteristics, and plasma sex steroids were examined. Depending on the time of year that fathead minnows were collected, there were differences in the condition factor, gonadosomatic indices, liver somatic indices, and secondary sexual characteristics of fathead minnows (in males) from Demonstration Pond when compared to the fathead minnows from the reference sites. In comparison to reference fish, lower concentrations of 11-ketotestosterone were measured in the plasma of male fathead minnows collected from Demonstration Pond in June 2006 and July 2007. Black spot disease and Ligula intestinalis were prevalent in fathead minnows from the reference sites but were not observed in fathead minnows

  1. Reproductive and health assessment of fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) inhabiting a pond containing oil sands process-affected water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Fish were collected from a pond containing oil sands process-affected water (OSPW). ► They were compared to fish from two reference sites within the oil sands region. ► Differences in GSIs and tubercle numbers were observed in fish from the OSPW pond. ► Opercula, gills, and 11-KT concentrations also differed in fish from the OSPW pond. ► Black spot and tapeworms were not observed in any of the fish from the OSPW pond. -- Abstract: Previous laboratory based studies have shown that oil sands process-affected waters (OSPWs) containing high concentrations of naphthenic acids (>25 mg/l) have adverse effects on the reproductive physiology of fish. The purpose of this study was to assess the reproductive development and health of a wild population of fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) inhabiting an OSPW pond that has moderate concentrations of naphthenic acids (∼10 mg/l). Fathead minnows were collected at various times during the period of 2006 through 2008 from Demonstration Pond (OSPW) located at Syncrude Canada Ltd., and two reference sites, Beaver Creek reservoir and Poplar Creek reservoir, which are all north of Fort McMurray, AB, Canada. Condition factor, gill histopathology, gonadosomatic indices, liver somatic indices, male secondary sexual characteristics, and plasma sex steroids were examined. Depending on the time of year that fathead minnows were collected, there were differences in the condition factor, gonadosomatic indices, liver somatic indices, and secondary sexual characteristics of fathead minnows (in males) from Demonstration Pond when compared to the fathead minnows from the reference sites. In comparison to reference fish, lower concentrations of 11-ketotestosterone were measured in the plasma of male fathead minnows collected from Demonstration Pond in June 2006 and July 2007. Black spot disease and Ligula intestinalis were prevalent in fathead minnows from the reference sites but were not observed in fathead minnows

  2. Impacts of Climatic Hazards on the Small Wetland Ecosystems (ponds: Evidence from Some Selected Areas of Coastal Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucy Faulkner

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Most climate related hazards in Bangladesh are linked to water. The climate vulnerable poor—the poorest and most marginalized communities living in remote villages along Bangladesh’s coastal zone that are vulnerable to climate change impacts and who possess low adaptive capacity are most affected by lack of access to safe water sources. Many climate vulnerable poor households depend on small isolated wetlands (ponds for daily drinking water needs and other domestic requirements, including cooking, bathing and washing. Similarly, the livelihoods of many of these households also depend on access to ponds due to activities of small-scale irrigation for rice farming, vegetable farming and home gardening. This is particularly true for those poorest and most marginalized communities living in Satkhira, one of the most vulnerable coastal districts in south-west Bangladesh. These households rely on pond water for vegetable farming and home gardening, especially during winter months. However, these pond water sources are highly vulnerable to climate change induced hazards, including flooding, drought, salinity intrusion, cyclone and storm surges, erratic rainfall patterns and variations in temperature. Cyclone Sidr and Cyclone Aila, which hit Bangladesh in 2007 and 2009 respectively, led to a significant number of such ponds being inundated with saline water. This impacted upon and resulted in wide scale implications for climate vulnerable poor households, including reduced availability of safe drinking water, and safe water for health and hygiene practices and livelihood activities. Those households living in remote areas and who are most affected by these climate impacts are dependent on water being supplied through aid, as well as travelling long distances to collect safe water for drinking purposes.

  3. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act industrial site environmental restoration site characterization plan. Area 6 Steam Cleaning Effluent Ponds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This plan presents the strategy for the characterization of the Area 6 South and North Steam Cleaning Effluent Ponds (SCEPs) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) to be conducted for the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV), Environmental Restoration Division (ERD). The purposes of the planned activities are to: obtain sufficient, sample analytical data from which further assessment, remediation, and/or closure strategies may be developed for the site; obtain sufficient, sample analytical data for management of investigation-derived waste (IDW). The scope of the characterization may include excavation, drilling, and sampling of soil in and around both ponds; sampling of the excavated material; in situ sampling of the soil at the bottom and on the sides of the excavations as well as within subsurface borings; and conducting sample analysis for both characterization and waste management purposes. Contaminants of concern include RCRA-regulated VOCs and metals

  4. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act industrial site environmental restoration site characterization plan. Area 6 Decontamination Pond Facility. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This plan presents the strategy for the characterization of the Area 6 Decontamination Pond Facility at the Nevada Test Site which will be conducted for the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office, Environmental Restoration Division. The objectives of the planned activities are to: obtain sufficient, sample analytical data from which further assessment, remediation, and/or closure strategies may be developed for the site; obtain sufficient, sample analytical data for management of investigation-derived waste. The scope of the characterization may include surface radiation survey(s), surface soil sampling, subsurface soil boring (i.e., drilling), and sampling of soil in and around the pond; in situ sampling of the soil within subsurface soil borings; and sample analysis for both site characterization and waste management purposes

  5. Intermediate Pond Sizes Contain the Highest Density, Richness, and Diversity of Pond-Breeding Amphibians

    OpenAIRE

    Semlitsch, Raymond D.; William E Peterman; Anderson, Thomas L.; Drake, Dana L.; Brittany H Ousterhout

    2015-01-01

    We present data on amphibian density, species richness, and diversity from a 7140-ha area consisting of 200 ponds in the Midwestern U.S. that represents most of the possible lentic aquatic breeding habitats common in this region. Our study includes all possible breeding sites with natural and anthropogenic disturbance processes that can be missing from studies where sampling intensity is low, sample area is small, or partial disturbance gradients are sampled. We tested whether pond area was a...

  6. Evaluation of the Preservation Value and Location of Farm Ponds in Yunlin County, Taiwan

    OpenAIRE

    Wen-Wen Chou; Soen-Han Lee; Chen-Fa Wu

    2013-01-01

    Farm ponds in Yunlin County first appeared in 1,622 and have played roles in habitation, production, the ecology, culture, and disaster reduction. Farm ponds largely disappeared with the development of urban areas and the industrial sector; thus, effective preservation of the remaining ponds is critical. The criteria to evaluate the preservation value of farm ponds is established by expert questionnaires which follow the Fuzzy Delphi Method (FDM) and Fuzzy Analytic Hierarchy Process (FAHP), a...

  7. Examining potential benefits of combining a chimney with a salinity gradient solar pond for production of power in salt affected areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akbarzadeh, Aliakbar; Johnson, Peter; Singh, Randeep [Energy Conservation and Renewable Energy Group, School of Aerospace Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, RMIT University, P.O. Box 71, Bundoora 3083, Vic. (Australia)

    2009-08-15

    The concept of combining a salinity gradient solar pond with a chimney to produce power in salt affected areas is examined. Firstly the causes of salinity in salt affected areas of northern Victoria, Australia are discussed. Existing salinity mitigation schemes are introduced and the integration of solar ponds with those schemes is discussed. Later it is shown how a solar pond can be combined with a chimney incorporating an air turbine for the production of power. Following the introduction of this concept the preliminary design is presented for a demonstration power plant incorporating a solar pond of area 6 hectares and depth 3 m with a 200 m tall chimney of 10 m diameter. The performance, including output power and efficiency of the proposed plant operating in northern Victoria is analysed and the results are discussed. The paper also discusses the overall advantages of using a solar pond with a chimney for production of power including the use of the large thermal mass of a solar pond as a practical and efficient method of storing collected solar energy. (author)

  8. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act corrective measures study: Area 6 decontamination pond facility, corrective action unit no. 92

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-10-01

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) No. 92, the Area 6 Decontamination Pond Facility (DPF), is an historic disposal unit located at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) in Nye County, Nevada (Figures 1 - 1, 1-2, and 1-3). The NTS is operated by the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV), which has been required by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) to characterize the DPF under the requirements of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Part A Permit (NDEP, 1995) for the NTS and Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 265 (1996c). The DPF is prioritized in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996) but is governed by the permit. The DPF was characterized through sampling events in 1994, 1996, and 1997. The results of these sampling events are contained in the Final Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Industrial Site Environmental Restoration Site Characterization Report, Area 6 Decontamination Pond Facility, Revision I (DOE/NV, 1997). This Corrective Measures Study (CMS) for the Area 6 DPF has been prepared for the DOE/NV`s Environmental Restoration Project. The CMS has been developed to support the preparation of a Closure Plan for the DPF. Because of the complexities of the contamination and regulatory issues associated with the DPF, DOE/NV determined a CMS would be beneficial to the evaluation and selection of a closure alternative.

  9. Gamma hazards and risk associated with NORM in sediment from amang processing recycling ponds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amang processing is an important downstream activity of tin mining noted for technologically enhancing naturally occurring radioactive materials. A study was carried out to determine the gamma radiation hazards associated with amang processing with special reference to the sediment accumulated in amang processing ponds. Twenty eight sediment samples from two amang processing plants employing the recycling close water management system were collected and analyzed. The activity concentrations of 226Ra, 232Th and 40K in sediments were measured using gamma spectrometry analysis, with a Hyper Pure Ge-Li detector coupled to a Multi Channel Analyzer detector system. The range of mean activity concentrations of 226Ra, 232Th and 40K were between 40.94 - 189.58 Bq kg-1, 104.90 - 516.17 Bq kg-1 and 74.8-848.0 Bq/ kg respectively. The maximum activity concentrations of 226Ra, 232Th and 40K recorded were higher than Malaysia average and the worlds natural highest. Gamma Radiation Representative Level Index, Iγr associated with these levels of activity concentrations of radionuclide in sediments, warrants an immediate attention from the regulatory authorities. The contribution of amang processing and the use of recycling close water management system in enhancing potential environmental radiological risk are discussed. (author)

  10. The comparison of OFS simulation and measurement results to verify the Wolsong spent fuels in pond area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An Optical Fiber Scintillator(OFS) system is being developed to verify the CANDU spent fuels in the pond area of Wolsong Nuclear Power Plants. The OFS has been known to be able to use for neutron, alpha, beta and gamma detection in extreme environments. The OFS consists of optic detectors with light guides and light guide, Photo Multiplier Tube(PMT) modules, electronic equipment, a scanning device and computer software. This system detects a gross gamma ray emitting from the spent fuels by measuring the current from OFS. The dominant signal is from a front and a back side bundles of the OFS detector. Due to the tiny and flexible structure, the detector can easily access to the spent fuels, which are located in the difficult to access area. Therefore, it is expected that the spent fuels in the pond can be verified without the tray movement using the OFS system. In this study, OFS system response using MCNP code and the result were compared with the measurement result from field test

  11. Polishing of treated palm oil mill effluent (POME) from ponding system by electrocoagulation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashir, Mohammed J K; Mau Han, Tham; Jun Wei, Lim; Choon Aun, Ng; Abu Amr, Salem S

    2016-01-01

    As the ponding system used to treat palm oil mill effluent (POME) frequently fails to satisfy the discharge standard in Malaysia, the present study aimed to resolve this problem using an optimized electrocoagulation process. Thus, a central composite design (CCD) module in response surface methodology was employed to optimize the interactions of process variables, namely current density, contact time and initial pH targeted on maximum removal of chemical oxygen demand (COD), colour and turbidity with satisfactory pH of discharge POME. The batch study was initially designed by CCD and statistical models of responses were subsequently derived to indicate the significant terms of interactive process variables. All models were verified by analysis of variance showing model significances with Prob > F removal of colour and turbidity with COD removal of 75.4%. The pH of post-treated POME of 7.6 was achieved, which is suitable for direct discharge. These predicted outputs were subsequently confirmed by insignificant standard deviation readings between predicted and actual values. This optimum condition also permitted the simultaneous removal of NH3-N, and various metal ions, signifying the superiority of the electrocoagulation process optimized by CCD. PMID:27232407

  12. Evaluation of the preservation value and location of farm ponds in Yunlin County, Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Wen-Wen; Lee, Soen-Han; Wu, Chen-Fa

    2014-01-01

    Farm ponds in Yunlin County first appeared in 1,622 and have played roles in habitation, production, the ecology, culture, and disaster reduction. Farm ponds largely disappeared with the development of urban areas and the industrial sector; thus, effective preservation of the remaining ponds is critical. The criteria to evaluate the preservation value of farm ponds is established by expert questionnaires which follow the Fuzzy Delphi Method (FDM) and Fuzzy Analytic Hierarchy Process (FAHP), and GIS, which are integrated into a spatial analysis of the remaining 481 farm ponds in Yunlin County. The results show that 28 ponds should be preserved to continue the cultural interaction between farm ponds and settlements; 36 ponds should preserved to connect coasts and streams, which are important habitats for birds; 30 ponds should be preserved to increase storage capacity, recharge groundwater, and reduce land subsidence; four ponds should be preserved as Feng-Shui ponds in front of temples in settlements or as recreation areas for local citizens; and four farms should be preserved (high priority) in agricultural production areas to support irrigation. In short, FAHP and GIS are integrated to evaluate the number and locations of farm ponds that provide water for habitation, production, the ecology, culture, and disaster reduction and maintain the overall preservation value in Yunlin County. The results could inform governmental departments when considering conservation policies. PMID:24384776

  13. Evaluation of the Preservation Value and Location of Farm Ponds in Yunlin County, Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Wen Chou

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Farm ponds in Yunlin County first appeared in 1,622 and have played roles in habitation, production, the ecology, culture, and disaster reduction. Farm ponds largely disappeared with the development of urban areas and the industrial sector; thus, effective preservation of the remaining ponds is critical. The criteria to evaluate the preservation value of farm ponds is established by expert questionnaires which follow the Fuzzy Delphi Method (FDM and Fuzzy Analytic Hierarchy Process (FAHP, and GIS, which are integrated into a spatial analysis of the remaining 481 farm ponds in Yunlin County. The results show that 28 ponds should be preserved to continue the cultural interaction between farm ponds and settlements; 36 ponds should preserved to connect coasts and streams, which are important habitats for birds; 30 ponds should be preserved to increase storage capacity, recharge groundwater, and reduce land subsidence; four ponds should be preserved as Feng-Shui ponds in front of temples in settlements or as recreation areas for local citizens; and four farms should be preserved (high priority in agricultural production areas to support irrigation. In short, FAHP and GIS are integrated to evaluate the number and locations of farm ponds that provide water for habitation, production, the ecology, culture, and disaster reduction and maintain the overall preservation value in Yunlin County. The results could inform governmental departments when considering conservation policies.

  14. Chinese semantic processing cerebral areas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHAN Baoci; ZHANG Wutian; MA Lin; LI Dejun; CAO Bingli; TANG Yiyuan; WU Yigen; TANG Xiaowei

    2003-01-01

    This study has identified the active cerebral areas of normal Chinese that are associated with Chinese semantic processing using functional brain imaging. According to the traditional cognitive theory, semantic processing is not particularly associated with or affected by input modality. The functional brain imaging experiments were conducted to identify the common active areas of two modalities when subjects perform Chinese semantic tasks through reading and listening respectively. The result has shown that the common active areas include left inferior frontal gyrus (BA 44/45), left posterior inferior temporal gyrus (BA37); the joint area of inferior parietal lobules (BA40) and superior temporal gyrus, the ventral occipital areas and cerebella of both hemispheres. It gives important clue to further discerning the roles of different cerebral areas in Chinese semantic processing.

  15. Selection of natural treatment processes for algae removal from stabilisation ponds effluents in Brasilia, using multicriterion methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neder, K D; Carneiro, G A; Queiroz, T R; de Souza, M A A

    2002-01-01

    A multicriterion methodology is used in the evaluation and selection of the most appropriate alternative(s) for removing algae from stabilisation ponds effluents in a case study in Brasilia. For this purpose, five different natural treatment processes are tested at pilot scale: rock filter, sand filter, floating aquatic plants, constructed wetlands, and overland flow. These pilot units were constructed in Brasilia and set in parallel, each one receiving a portion of the effluent that comes from an existing wastewater treatment plant composed of preliminary treatment, UASB reactors, and high-rate stabilisation ponds. Several evaluation criteria are used in order to relate the capabilities of the post-treatment processes to the multiple objectives in this case. Two multicriterion decision-aid methods--compromise programming and ELECTRE-III--are used to select the most satisfying processes. The top ranking alternatives are indicated for subsequent studies, considering the possible implementation of these technologies to existing plants. PMID:12361031

  16. Processing of Oak Ridge B ampersand C pond sludge surrogate in the transportable vitrification system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Transportable Vitrification System (TVS) developed at the Savannah River Site is designed to process low-level and mixed radioactive wastes into a stable glass product. The TVS consists of a feed preparation and delivery system, a joule-heated melter, and an offgas treatment system. Surrogate Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) B ampersand amp;C pond sludge was treated in a demonstration of the TVS system at Clemson University and at ORR. After initial tests with soda-lime-silica (SLS) feed, three melter volumes of glass were produced from the surrogate feed. A forthcoming report will describe glass characterization; and melter feeding, operation, and glass pouring. Melter operations described will include slurry characterization and feeding, factors affecting feed melt rates, glass pouring and pour rate constraints, and melter operating temperatures. Residence time modeling of the melter will also be discussed. Characterization of glass; including composition, predicted liquidity and viscosity, Toxic Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP), and devitrification will be covered. Devitrification was a concern in glass container tests and was found to be mostly dependent on the cooling rate. Crucible tests indicated that melter shutdown with glass containing Fe and Li was also a devitrification concern, so the melter was flushed with SLS glass before cooldown

  17. Transuranic concentrations in selected biotic and abiotic components of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Test Reactor Area ponds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The TRA leaching pond area was sampled from June through August 1976 and again in 1977 to determine the concentration of five transuranic radionuclides, Pu-238, Pu-239, Am-241, Cm-242, and Cm-244, in abiotic and biotic components of this freshwater ecosystem. Highest concentration ratios were obtained for periphytic, planktonic, and sediment components of the system. Concentrations of these radionuclides decreased with increasing trophic level organisms, i.e., aquatic insects and bird species. Plant species analyzed had concentration ratios of approximately one to two orders of magnitude. These data represent the first investigation of five transuranic radionuclides being concurrently studied within a single freshwater ecosystem. The complete transuranic inventory will be combined with limnological data to compare the distribution of these nuclides with data obtained from other freshwater systems. From these comparisons, models concerning the movement of the radionuclides within and away from a freshwater system will be developed

  18. Trace elements and petroleum hydrocarbons in the aquatic bird food chain of process water evaporation ponds at the Little America Refinery, Casper, Wyoming

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This study determined the nature and extent of trace elements, metals, and petroleum hydrocarbons in evaporation ponds used for the disposal of process water from...

  19. Plutonium, 137Cs and U in some pond and lake sediments FSurrounding areas of the semipalatinsk nuclear test site: with emphasis on anomalously high U accumulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Between 1949 and 1989, the former USSR conducted more than 450 nuclear explosions, including atmospheric, above ground and underground nuclear tests, at the proving ground (SNTS) near Semipalatinsk City in Eastern Kazakhstan. We have visited to these areas ten several times, and estimated current contamination levels and distribution of long-lived radionuclides 137Cs and Pu isotopes (238,239,240Pu) of the ground at various areas and radiation doses by TL using brick. Parallel to these soil and brick samplings, pond and lake sediment core samples were also taken from the water bodies (impoundments) scattered on the vicinity of the SNTS. They include from north to south, Pond Korosteli (maximum depth: 2-3 m), Lake Kanoneruka (deeper than 5 m), Pond Veramenka (ca.3 m), Lake Semanailka (deeper than 10 m) and Pond Alkat (ca. 1 m in summer season). In each pond and lake, sediment cores to 25440 cm depth were collected in September 1998 by inserting a polyvinyl chloride (PVC) pipe (5.0 cm i.d.) into the sediment by hand at the depths ranging approximately 1 to 3 m. The underlying final objective is to get information on total 137Cs and Pu deposition and their history of SNTS fallout within the regions of the study: After non-destructive gamma-ray measurements of 137Cs and natural radionuclides including 210Pb, Pu and U isotopes were determined by alpha-ray spectrometry after radiochelnical separation. We found some ponds and lakes which were accumulating an anomalously high U in the sediments. This 235U/238U activity ratios of U found are almost the same as that (0.046) of natural U. In this paper, depth profiles of 137Cs and Pu concentrations in the sediments from these impoundments are presented with emphasis on those of high U accumulation. (authors)

  20. Fate and transport of process-affected water in out-of-pit tailings ponds in the oil sands industry in Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holden, A.; Tompkins, T.; Haque, S.; Perez, L.; Sutherland, H.; Bowron, M.; Biggar, K.; Sego, D.

    2011-03-15

    Long term research is being conducted to better understand the flow of process-affected (PA) water in native sediments and find a strategy to avoid the contamination of groundwater with PA water. PA water is stored in above-grade tailings ponds but can move from the tailing ponds to native sediments and groundwater. Since we do not know the impacts it could have and the placement of out-of-pit tailings ponds atop sand channels is expected to be prevalent in the future, this project has been initiated by several universities and Suncor Energy Inc. This study is the first one looking at the lifecycle of PA water.

  1. Process studies of odour emissions from effluent ponds using machine-based odour measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, J. H.; Smith, R. J.; Yoong, E.

    Replicable experimental studies using a novel experimental facility and a machine-based odour quantification technique were conducted to demonstrate the relationship between odour emission rates and pond loading rates. The odour quantification technique consisted of an electronic nose, AromaScan A32S, and an artificial neural network. Odour concentrations determined by olfactometry were used along with the AromaScan responses to train the artificial neural network. The trained network was able to predict the odour emission rates for the test data with a correlation coefficient of 0.98. Time averaged odour emission rates predicted by the machine-based odour quantification technique, were strongly correlated with volatile solids loading rate, demonstrating the increased magnitude of emissions from a heavily loaded effluent pond. However, it was not possible to obtain the same relationship between volatile solids loading rates and odour emission rates from the individual data. It is concluded that taking a limited number of odour samples over a short period is unlikely to provide a representative rate of odour emissions from an effluent pond. A continuous odour monitoring instrument will be required for that more demanding task.

  2. Some experiments on commercial pond fish culture in the tidal mangrove area of Niger delta of Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Uyeh, W.W.

    1987-01-01

    A pilot fish culture project was initiated by Shell Petroleum Development Company of Nigeria Limited in 1981 with specific aims and objectives. Site selection, survey, pond construction method and fish production with regards to experiences gathered and gained, problems and solutions so far obtained are discussed. Trials of freshwater fish species to check their adaptability to brackishwater ponds were carried out and the promising results of the growth rate of these species when compared wit...

  3. Fuel element storage pond for nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a fuel element storage pond for nuclear installations, with different water levels, radioactive particles are deposited at the points of contact of the water surface with the pond wall. So that this deposition will not occur, a metal apron is provided in the area of the points of contact of the water surface with the bond wall. The metal apron consists of individual sheets of metal which are suspended by claws in wall hooks. To clean the sheets, these are moved to a position below the water level. The sheets are suspended from the wall hooks during this process. (orig.)

  4. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 478: Area 12 T-Tunnel Ponds, Nevada Test Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2010-03-15

    This Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD)/Closure Report (CR) was prepared by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 478, Area 12 T-Tunnel Ponds. This CADD/CR is consistent with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the U.S. Department of Defense. Corrective Action Unit 478 is comprised of one corrective action site (CAS): • 12-23-01, Ponds (5) RAD Area The purpose of this CADD/CR is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation for closure in place with use restrictions for CAU 478.

  5. Process Design and Economics for the Production of Algal Biomass: Algal Biomass Production in Open Pond Systems and Processing Through Dewatering for Downstream Conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, Ryan [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Markham, Jennifer [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Kinchin, Christopher [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Grundl, Nicholas [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Tan, Eric C.D. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Humbird, David [DWH Process Consulting, Denver, CO (United States)

    2016-02-17

    This report describes in detail a set of aspirational design and process targets to better understand the realistic economic potential for the production of algal biomass for subsequent conversion to biofuels and/or coproducts, based on the use of open pond cultivation systems and a series of dewatering operations to concentrate the biomass up to 20 wt% solids (ash-free dry weight basis).

  6. Interim Control Strategy for the Test Area North/Technical Support Facility Sewage Treatment Facility Disposal Pond - Two-year Update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Idaho Cleanup Project has prepared this interim control strategy for the U.S. Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office pursuant to DOE Order 5400.5, Chapter 11.3e (1) to support continued discharges to the Test Area North/Technical Support Facility Sewage Treatment Facility Disposal Pond. In compliance with DOE Order 5400.5, a 2-year review of the Interim Control Strategy document has been completed. This submittal documents the required review of the April 2005 Interim Control Strategy. The Idaho Cleanup Project's recommendation is unchanged from the original recommendation. The Interim Control Strategy evaluates three alternatives: (1) re-route the discharge outlet to an uncontaminated area of the TSF-07; (2) construct a new discharge pond; or (3) no action based on justification for continued use. Evaluation of Alternatives 1 and 2 are based on the estimated cost and implementation timeframe weighed against either alternative's minimal increase in protection of workers, the public, and the environment. Evaluation of Alternative 3, continued use of the TSF-07 Disposal Pond under current effluent controls, is based on an analysis of four points: - Record of Decision controls will protect workers and the public - Risk of increased contamination is low - Discharge water will be eliminated in the foreseeable future - Risk of contamination spread is acceptable. The Idaho Cleanup Project recommends Alternative 3, no action other than continued implementation of existing controls and continued deactivation, decontamination, and dismantlement efforts at the Test Area North/Technical Support Facility

  7. A synthesis of dominant ecological processes in intensive shrimp ponds and adjacent coastal environments in NE Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the key environmental concerns about shrimp farming is the discharge of waters with high levels of nutrients and suspended solids into adjacent waterways. In this paper we synthesize the results of our multidisciplinary research linking ecological processes in intensive shrimp ponds with their downstream impacts in tidal, mangrove-lined creeks. The incorporation of process measurements and bioindicators, in addition to water quality measurements, improved our understanding of the effect of shrimp farm discharges on the ecological health of the receiving water bodies. Changes in water quality parameters were an oversimplification of the ecological effects of water discharges, and use of key measures including primary production rates, phytoplankton responses to nutrients, community shifts in zooplankton and δ15N ratios in marine plants have the potential to provide more integrated and robust measures. Ultimately, reduction in nutrient discharges is most likely to ensure the future sustainability of the industry

  8. 216-B-3 expansion ponds closure plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document describes the activities for clean closure under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) of the 216-B-3 Expansion Ponds. The 216-B-3 Expansion Ponds are operated by the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) and co-operated by Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford). The 216-B-3 Expansion Ponds consists of a series of three earthen, unlined, interconnected ponds that receive waste water from various 200 East Area operating facilities. The 3A, 3B, and 3C ponds are referred to as Expansion Ponds because they expanded the capability of the B Pond System. Waste water (primarily cooling water, steam condensate, and sanitary water) from various 200 East Area facilities is discharged to the Bypass pipe (Project X-009). Water discharged to the Bypass pipe flows directly into the 216-B-3C Pond. The ponds were operated in a cascade mode, where the Main Pond overflowed into the 3A Pond and the 3A Pond overflowed into the 3C Pond. The 3B Pond has not received waste water since May 1985; however, when in operation, the 3B Pond received overflow from the 3A Pond. In the past, waste water discharges to the Expansion Ponds had the potential to have contained mixed waste (radioactive waste and dangerous waste). The radioactive portion of mixed waste has been interpreted by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to be regulated under the Atomic Energy Act of 1954; the dangerous waste portion of mixed waste is regulated under RCRA

  9. 216-B-3 expansion ponds closure plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-10-01

    This document describes the activities for clean closure under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) of the 216-B-3 Expansion Ponds. The 216-B-3 Expansion Ponds are operated by the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) and co-operated by Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford). The 216-B-3 Expansion Ponds consists of a series of three earthen, unlined, interconnected ponds that receive waste water from various 200 East Area operating facilities. The 3A, 3B, and 3C ponds are referred to as Expansion Ponds because they expanded the capability of the B Pond System. Waste water (primarily cooling water, steam condensate, and sanitary water) from various 200 East Area facilities is discharged to the Bypass pipe (Project X-009). Water discharged to the Bypass pipe flows directly into the 216-B-3C Pond. The ponds were operated in a cascade mode, where the Main Pond overflowed into the 3A Pond and the 3A Pond overflowed into the 3C Pond. The 3B Pond has not received waste water since May 1985; however, when in operation, the 3B Pond received overflow from the 3A Pond. In the past, waste water discharges to the Expansion Ponds had the potential to have contained mixed waste (radioactive waste and dangerous waste). The radioactive portion of mixed waste has been interpreted by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to be regulated under the Atomic Energy Act of 1954; the dangerous waste portion of mixed waste is regulated under RCRA.

  10. Pond fractals in a tidal flat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cael, B B; Lambert, Bennett; Bisson, Kelsey

    2015-11-01

    Studies over the past decade have reported power-law distributions for the areas of terrestrial lakes and Arctic melt ponds, as well as fractal relationships between their areas and coastlines. Here we report similar fractal structure of ponds in a tidal flat, thereby extending the spatial and temporal scales on which such phenomena have been observed in geophysical systems. Images taken during low tide of a tidal flat in Damariscotta, Maine, reveal a well-resolved power-law distribution of pond sizes over three orders of magnitude with a consistent fractal area-perimeter relationship. The data are consistent with the predictions of percolation theory for unscreened perimeters and scale-free cluster size distributions and are robust to alterations of the image processing procedure. The small spatial and temporal scales of these data suggest this easily observable system may serve as a useful model for investigating the evolution of pond geometries, while emphasizing the generality of fractal behavior in geophysical surfaces. PMID:26651668

  11. Greenhouse Gas Exchange in Small Arctic Thaw Ponds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurion, I.; Bégin, P. N.; Bouchard, F.; Preskienis, V.

    2014-12-01

    Arctic lakes and ponds can represent up to one quarter of the land surface in permafrost landscapes, particularly in lowland tundra landscapes characterized by ice wedge organic polygons. Thaw ponds can be defined as the aquatic ecosystems associated to thawing of organic soils, either resulting from active layer processes and located above low-center peat polygons (hereafter low-center polygonal or LCP ponds), or resulting from thermokarst slumping above melting ice wedges linked to the accelerated degradation of permafrost (hereafter ice-wedge trough or IWT ponds). These ponds can merge together forming larger water bodies, but with relatively stable shores (hereafter merged polygonal or MPG ponds), and with limnological characteristics similar to LCP ponds. These aquatic systems are very small and shallow, and present a different physical structure than the larger thermokarst lakes, generated after years of development and land subsidence. In a glacier valley on Bylot Island, Nunavut, Canada, thermokarst and kettle lakes together represent 29% of the aquatic area, with a thermal profile resembling those of more standard arctic lakes (mixed epilimnion). The IWT ponds (44% of the area) are stratified for a large fraction of the summer despite their shallowness, while LCP and MPG ponds (27% of the area) show a more homogeneous water column. This will affect gas exchange in these diverse aquatic systems, in addition to their unique microbiota and organic carbon lability that control the production and consumption rates of greenhouse gases. The stratification in IWT ponds generates hypoxic conditions at the bottom, and together with the larger availability of organic carbon, stimulates methanogenesis and limits the mitigating action of methanotrophs. Overall, thaw ponds are largely supersaturated in methane, with IWT ponds dominating the emissions in this landscape (92% of total aquatic emissions estimated for the same valley), and they present large variations in

  12. Impacts of Climatic Hazards on the Small Wetland Ecosystems (ponds): Evidence from Some Selected Areas of Coastal Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Lucy Faulkner; Syed Hafizur Rahman; Golam Rabbani

    2013-01-01

    Most climate related hazards in Bangladesh are linked to water. The climate vulnerable poor—the poorest and most marginalized communities living in remote villages along Bangladesh’s coastal zone that are vulnerable to climate change impacts and who possess low adaptive capacity are most affected by lack of access to safe water sources. Many climate vulnerable poor households depend on small isolated wetlands (ponds) for daily drinking water needs and other domestic requirements, includin...

  13. Seasonal Variation of Lead in Fish Pond Waters of High Hunting Activity Area and Relation to Metals and Ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binkowski, Lukasz J; Rzonca, Bartłomiej

    2014-01-01

    Anthropogenic activities such as industry, agriculture, and daily life are related to metal pollution of the environment. Places known of the highest impact are fishponds where intensive fish farming is believed to input a significant amount of various elements to water. Additionally, many studies suspect wetland hunting activity of water lead pollution. The present paper aims to check if hunting is a significant source of lead (Pb) in water as well as to study the temporal trends of numerous parameters (pH, SEC, Cd, Cu, Zn, Ca, Mg, Na, K, NH4+, HCO3 (-), SO4 (2-), Cl(-), NO3 (-), F(-)) in ponds (n = 48) and inflow (n = 24) waters near Zator in southern Poland, Europe. Most concentrations were measured with ion chromatography and electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. Lead concentrations in pond waters were low and found not to be linked with hunting activity, as well as they did not differ from the ones found in the inflow water. Moreover, it could be stated that activities led on ponds did not enrich rivers in the studied ions and elements. PMID:25419011

  14. Large contribution to inland water CO2 and CH4 emissions from very small ponds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holgerson, Meredith A.; Raymond, Peter A.

    2016-03-01

    Inland waters are an important component of the global carbon cycle. Although they contribute to greenhouse gas emissions, estimates of carbon processing in these waters are uncertain. The global extent of very small ponds, with surface areas of less than 0.001 km2, is particularly difficult to map, resulting in their exclusion from greenhouse gas budget estimates. Here we combine estimates of the lake and pond global size distribution, gas exchange rates, and measurements of carbon dioxide and methane concentrations from 427 lakes and ponds ranging in surface area from 2.5 m2 to 674 km2. We estimate that non-running inland waters release 0.583 Pg C yr-1. Very small ponds comprise 8.6% of lakes and ponds by area globally, but account for 15.1% of CO2 emissions and 40.6% of diffusive CH4 emissions. In terms of CO2 equivalence, the ratio of CO2 to CH4 flux increases with surface area, from about 1.5 in very small ponds to about 19 in large lakes. The high fluxes from very small ponds probably result from shallow waters, high sediment and edge to water volume ratios, and frequent mixing. These attributes increase CO2 and CH4 supersaturation in the water and limit efficient methane oxidation. We conclude that very small ponds represent an important inland water carbon flux.

  15. Strategy of Quality Improvement of Pond Shrimp Post Harvest Management (Penaeus monodon Fabricius in Mahakam Delta (Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andi Noor Asikin

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Mahakam Delta area, which is situated in Kutai Kartanegara Regency, has become a pond center that gives a significant contribution to shrimp export of East Kalimantan Province. Pond-produced shrimps, however, do not always accord to the intention of cold storage companies at expected price. The companies even sometimes reject the request due to poor quality of the product. The decreasing shrimp quality may be due to maintenance process by the pond farmers as well as the improper collectors. In the other hand, importing countries have decided more and more restricted requirements for the imported fishing products. This study was held in Muara Jawa, Anggana, and Muara Badak Districts using techniques of data collection of in-depth interview with twelve respondents. In order to improve shrimp quality, farmers or the producers have to formulate a strategy towards the improvement of the post harvest shrimps from the pond using an Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP. Results of the AHP consist of as follows: (1 application of pond shrimp post harvest technology and improvement of facilities and accommodation that support the quality improvement of the pond shrimps, (2 human resource quality improvement of pond farmers, collectors, and field instructors, (3 development of pond culture by applying best practices principle and local policies in order to improve the quality of the pond shrimps, and (4 improvement of interagency coordination, monitoring, and evaluation to enhance the pond shrimp quality

  16. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 552: Area 12 Muckpile and Ponds, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 1 with ROTC 1 and 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David A. Strand

    2005-01-01

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains project-specific information including facility descriptions, environmental sample collection objectives, and criteria for conducting site investigation activities at Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 552: Area 12 Muckpile and Ponds, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada. This CAIP has been developed in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) (1996) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the U.S. Department of Defense. The NTS is approximately 65 miles (mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1-1). Corrective Action Unit 552 is comprised of the one Corrective Action Site which is 12-23-05, Ponds. One additional CAS, 12-06-04, Muckpile (G-Tunnel Muckpile), was removed from this CAU when it was determined that the muckpile is an active site. A modification to the FFACO to remove CAS 12-06-04 was approved by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) on December 16, 2004. The G-Tunnel ponds were first identified in the 1991 Reynolds Electrical & Engineering Co., Inc. document entitled, ''Nevada Test Site Inventory of Inactive and Abandoned Facilities and Waste Sites'' (REECo, 1991). Corrective Action Unit 552 is being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Therefore, additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation (CAI) prior to evaluating and selecting the corrective action alternatives for the site. The CAI will include field inspections, radiological surveys, and sampling of appropriate media. Data will also be obtained to support investigation-derived waste (IDW) disposal and potential future waste management decisions.

  17. A Landsat analysis of variability of supraglacial ponds for the debris-covered glaciers of the Langtang Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Evan; Willis, Ian; Arnold, Neil; Pellicciotti, Francesca

    2016-04-01

    Debris-covered glaciers have received renewed interest in recent years in an attempt to improve understanding of climate-glacier interactions in High Mountain Asia. Understanding of key processes occurring in supraglacial ponds has advanced conceptually to include conduit-collapse formation, subaqueous and waterline melting, calving, and englacial filling and drainage. The behaviour of systems of ponds, however, has received little attention, as most process observations have been made on individual features. Several studies have used satellite data to determine pond distributions at a single point in time or their variability across several years or decades. However, no attempt has been made to document the seasonal and inter-annual variability of ponds, even though individual ponds have been observed to fill and drain periodically. We analyse 172 Landsat TM/ETM+ scenes for the period 1999-2013 to identify thawed supraglacial ponds for the debris-covered tongues of five glaciers in the Langtang Valley of Nepal. We apply an advanced atmospheric correction routine (LandCor/6S) and improve upon previous band-ratio and image morphological techniques to identify ponds, then apply this database of identified ponds to: 1) measure the density of supraglacial ponding for five glaciers with differing characteristics, and evaluate the dependency of pond density to those glaciers' characteristics; 2) evaluate the controls that surface gradient and glacier velocity in particular exert on pond occurrence; 3) document the seasonal cycle of pond thawing and formation followed by freezing and draining; 4) document pond persistence, recurrence, and evolution over the 15-year period; and 5) determine if surface ponding has increased over time for the study glaciers. We find high variability between glaciers (0.08-1.69% of debris-covered area during ablation season), related primarily to glacier size, velocity, and surface gradient. At the glacier scale, pond cover is also correlated

  18. Hydrogeochemical signatures and evolution of groundwater impacted by the Bayan Obo tailing pond in northwest China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiang; Deng, Hailin; Zheng, Chunmiao; Cao, Guoliang

    2016-02-01

    Uncontrolled leakage from mine tailing ponds can pose a serious environmental threat. Groundwater quality in a semi-arid region with extensive worries about the leakage from one of world's largest tailing ponds is studied herein through an integrated hydrogeochemical analysis and multivariate statistical analysis. Results show that elevated concentrations of NO2(-), B, Mn, NH4(+), F(-), and SO4(2-) in groundwater were probably caused by leakage from the tailing pond and transported with the regional groundwater flow towards downstream Yellow River. While NO2(-) contamination is only limited to areas close to the pond, high B concentrations persist within the contaminated plume originating from the tailing pond. Our current study shows that there is no geochemical evidence for U and Th contamination in groundwater due to leakage from the Bayan Obo tailing pond. Combining effects which includes regional variations, pond leaking and downstream mixing, mineral precipitation and dissolution, redox processes, ion exchange processes and agricultural activities, controlled groundwater hydrogeochemical signatures in the studied area. This study demonstrate that an increase in knowledge of evolution of groundwater quality by integrating field hydrochemical data and multivariate statistical analysis will help understand major water-rock interactions and provide a scientific basis for protection and rational utilization of groundwater resources in this and other tailing-impacted areas. PMID:26595403

  19. Par Pond vegetation status 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The water level of Par Pond was lowered approximately 20 feet in mid-1991 in order to protect downstream residents from possible dam failure suggested by subsidence on the downstream slope of the dam and to repair the dam. This lowering exposed both emergent and nonemergent macrophyte beds to drying conditions resulting in extensive losses. A survey of the newly emergent, shoreline aquatic plant communities of Par Pond began in June 1995, three months after the refilling of Par Pond to approximately 200 feet above mean sea level. These surveys continued in July, September, and late October, 1995, and into the early spring and late summer of 1996. Communities similar to the pre-drawdown, Par Pond aquatic plant communities continue to become re-established. Emergent beds of maidencane, lotus, waterlily, watershield, and Pontederia are extensive and well developed. Measures of percent cover, width of beds, and estimates of area of coverage with satellite data indicate regrowth within two years of from 40 to 60% of levels prior to the draw down. Cattail occurrence continued to increase during the summer of 1996, especially in the former warm arm of Par Pond, but large beds common to Par Pond prior to the draw down still have not formed. Lotus has invaded and occupies many of the areas formerly dominated by cattail beds. To track the continued development of macrophytes in Par Pond, future surveys through the summer and early fall of 1997, along with the evaluation of satellite data to map the extent of the macrophyte beds of Par Pond, are planned

  20. The evolution of plant for the processing and encapsulation of spent ion exchange resins and pond sludges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the inception of the nuclear power industry some 30 years ago, various types of radioactive waste have been accumulating at power station sites and in fuel reprocessing plants. A large part of these wastes is formed from fuel element cooling pond chemistry and reactor circuit chemistry. The fuel element cooling pond chemistry gives rise to spent ion exchange resins and sludges of various types and the principal reactor circuit chemistry is that associated with evaporator wastes, i.e. boric acid sludges. A history is given of the evolution of specific plant to deal with these wastes. (author)

  1. Radiotoxic element on soil sample from waste ponds around U processing Lemajung West Kalimantan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the measurement is to know the spread of U and Th from waste vat to environment. The soil sample were taken at waste vat environment Lemajung West Kalimantan with distance of 1, 2, and 3 meters from vat side, and depth of 30 cm from soil surface. Uranium and thorium test had been done with spectrometry method at Tono Geoscience Centre. Before analyze, uranium and thorium separated from impurities element by extraction process using Tri Butyl Phosphat (TBP) and ion exchange resins (Ion Exchange AG1X8). The result of analyze shown that the biggest U concentration at T1 Location is 233 ppm and 14.3 ppm of Th

  2. Culture modes and financial evaluation of two oleaginous microalgae for biodiesel production in desert area with open raceway pond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Qiaoning; Yang, Haijian; Hu, Chunxiang

    2016-10-01

    Cultivation modes of autotrophic microalgae for biodiesel production utilizing open raceway pond were analyzed in this study. Five before screened good microalgae were tested their lipid productivity and biodiesel quality again in outdoor 1000L ORP. Then, Chlorella sp. L1 and Monoraphidium dybowskii Y2 were selected due to their stronger environmental adaptability, higher lipid productivity and better biodiesel properties. Further scale up cultivation for two species with batch and semi-continuous culture was conducted. In 40,000L ORP, higher lipid productivity (5.15 versus 4.06gm(-2)d(-1) for Chlorella sp. L1, 5.35 versus 3.00gm(-2)d(-1) for M. dybowskii Y2) was achieved in semi-continuous mode. Moreover, the financial costs of 14.18$gal(-1) and 13.31$gal(-1) for crude biodiesel in two microalgae with semi-continuous mode were more economically feasible for commercial production on large scale outdoors. PMID:27403859

  3. Ownership of fishing areas and use of fishing resources by artisanal fishermen in a pond in southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jackes Mancke dos Santos

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The Mangueira Lagoon located in southern Brazil, has its northern portion included in the Taim Ecological Station, a federal conservation unit. The fishing practice is among the activities at this region. It has its own characteristics due to environmental conditions and specific physiography of the area. A field protocol based on geographic information was used to characterize the occupation process and the use of fishing resources. Socio-economic information was collected through interviews of the fishermen and also based on fishing data. After compiling the data a statistical descriptive analyses was completed. The average catch per fisherman in the region is 4,766.5 kg per year. The Loricariichthys anus showed the highest catch volume, ensuring the economic viability of the local activity. The constant increase of the activity may be compromising the reproductive cycle of the local ichthyological fauna, thus compromising the fishery sustainability.

  4. 2101-M pond closure plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document describes activities for the closure of a surface impoundment (2101-M Pond) at the Hanford Site. The 2101-H Pond was initially constructed in 1953 to serve as a drainage collection area for the 2101-H Building. (Until the Basalt Waste Isolation Project (BWIP) Laboratory was constructed in the 2101-M Building in 1979--1981, the only source contributing discharge to the pond was condensate water from the 2101-H Building heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) system. The drains for the BWIP Laboratory rooms were plumbed into a 4-in., cast-iron, low-pressure drain pipe that carries waste water from the HVAC system to the pond. During the active life of the BWIP Laboratory, solutions of dissolved barium in groundwater samples were discharged to the 2101-M Pond via the laboratory drains. As a result of the discharges, a Part A permit application was initially submitted to the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) in August 1986 which designates the 2101-M Pond as a surface impoundment

  5. HEAVY METAL ANALYSIS IN WASTE WATER SAMPLES FROM VALEA ŞESEI TAILING POND

    OpenAIRE

    I. L. MELENTI; E. MAGYAR; T. RUSU

    2011-01-01

    Heavy metal analysis in waste water samples from Valea Şesei tailing pond. The mining of ore deposits and the processing and smelting of copper at Roşia Poieni have resulted in an increase of the toxic elements concentration within all components of the environment in the area. Valea Şesei tailing pond is a waste deposit for the Roşia Poieni open-pit and is the biggest tailing pond in Romania. In October 2009, we determined 8 heavy metals (Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni and Zn) in 10 waste water ...

  6. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 482: Area 15 U15a/e Muckpiles and Ponds Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Corrective Action Decision Document /Closure Report (CADD/CR) was prepared by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 482 U15a/e Muckpiles and Ponds. This CADD/CR is consistent with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy, and the U.S. Department of Defense. Corrective Action Unit 482 is comprised of three Corrective Action Sites (CASs) and one adjacent area: CAS 15-06-01, U15e Muckpile; CAS 15-06-02, U15a Muckpile; CAS 15-38-01, Area 15 U15a/e Ponds; and Drainage below the U15a Muckpile. The purpose of this CADD/CR is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation for closure with no further corrective action, by placing use restrictions on the three CASs and the adjacent area of CAU 482. To support this recommendation, a corrective action investigation (CAI) was performed in September 2002. The purpose of the CAI was to fulfill the following data needs as defined during the Data Quality Objective (DQO) process: (1) Determine whether contaminants of concern (COCs) are present. (2) If COCs are present, determine their nature and extent. (3) Provide sufficient information and data to determine appropriate corrective actions. The CAU 482 dataset from the CAI was evaluated based on the data quality indicator parameters. This evaluation demonstrated the quality and acceptability of the dataset for use in fulfilling the DQO data needs. Analytes detected during the CAI were evaluated against final action levels (FALs) established in this document. Tier 2 FALS were determined for the hazardous constituents of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH)-diesel-range organics (DRO) and the radionuclides americium (Am)-241, cesium (Cs)-137, plutonium (Pu)-238, and Pu-239. The Tier 2 FALs were calculated for the radionuclides using site-specific information. The hazardous constituents of TPH-DRO were compared to the PALs

  7. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 482: Area 15 U15a/e Muckpiles and Ponds Nevada Test Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2009-09-30

    This Corrective Action Decision Document /Closure Report (CADD/CR) was prepared by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 482 U15a/e Muckpiles and Ponds. This CADD/CR is consistent with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy, and the U.S. Department of Defense. Corrective Action Unit 482 is comprised of three Corrective Action Sites (CASs) and one adjacent area: CAS 15-06-01, U15e Muckpile; CAS 15-06-02, U15a Muckpile; CAS 15-38-01, Area 15 U15a/e Ponds; and Drainage below the U15a Muckpile. The purpose of this CADD/CR is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation for closure with no further corrective action, by placing use restrictions on the three CASs and the adjacent area of CAU 482. To support this recommendation, a corrective action investigation (CAI) was performed in September 2002. The purpose of the CAI was to fulfill the following data needs as defined during the Data Quality Objective (DQO) process: (1) Determine whether contaminants of concern (COCs) are present. (2) If COCs are present, determine their nature and extent. (3) Provide sufficient information and data to determine appropriate corrective actions. The CAU 482 dataset from the CAI was evaluated based on the data quality indicator parameters. This evaluation demonstrated the quality and acceptability of the dataset for use in fulfilling the DQO data needs. Analytes detected during the CAI were evaluated against final action levels (FALs) established in this document. Tier 2 FALS were determined for the hazardous constituents of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH)-diesel-range organics (DRO) and the radionuclides americium (Am)-241, cesium (Cs)-137, plutonium (Pu)-238, and Pu-239. The Tier 2 FALs were calculated for the radionuclides using site-specific information. The hazardous constituents of TPH-DRO were compared to the PALs

  8. Tailings Pond Characterization And Designing Through Geophysical Surveys In Dipping Sedimentary Formations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muralidharan, D.; Andrade, R.; Anand, K.; Sathish, R.; Goud, K.

    2009-12-01

    Mining activities results into generation of disintegrated waste materials attaining increased mobilization status and requires a safe disposal mechanism through back filling process or secluded storage on surface with prevention of its interaction with environment cycle. The surface disposal of waste materials will become more critical in case of mined minerals having toxic or radioactive elements. In such cases, the surface disposal site is to be characterized for its sub-surface nature to understand its role in environmental impact due to the loading of waste materials. Near surface geophysics plays a major role in mapping the geophysical characters of the sub-surface formations in and around the disposal site and even to certain extent helps in designing of the storage structure. Integrated geophysical methods involving resistivity tomography, ground magnetic and shallow seismic studies were carried out over proposed tailings pond area of 0.3 sq. kms underlined by dipping sedimentary rocks consisting of ferruginous shales and dolomitic to siliceous limestone with varying thicknesses. The investigated site being located in tectonically disturbed area, geophysical investigations were carried out with number of profiles to visualize the sub-surface nature with clarity. The integration of results of twenty profiles of resistivity tomography with 2 m (shallow) and 10 m (moderate depth) electrode spacing’s enabled in preparing probable sub-surface geological section along the strike direction of the formation under the tailings pond with some geo-tectonic structure inferred to be a fault. Similarly, two resistivity tomography profiles perpendicular to the strike direction of the formations brought out the existence of buried basic intrusive body on the northern boundary of the proposed tailings pond. Two resistivity tomography profiles in criss-cross direction over the suspected fault zone confirmed fault existence on the north-eastern part of tailings pond. Thirty

  9. WRAP process area development control work plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leist, K.L., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-02-27

    This work plan defines the manner in which the Waste Receiving and Processing Facility, Module I Process Area will be maintained under development control status. This status permits resolution of identified design discrepancies, control system changes, as-building of equipment, and perform modifications to increase process operability and maintainability as parallel efforts. This work plan maintains configuration control as these efforts are undertaken. This task will end with system testing and reissue of field verified design drawings.

  10. Risk assessment and restoration possibilities of some abandoned mining ponds in Murcia Region, SE Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faz, Angel; Acosta, Jose A.; Martinez-Martinez, Silvia; Carmona, Dora M.; Zornoza, Raul; Kabas, Sebla; Bech, Jaume

    2010-05-01

    In Murcia Region, SE Spain, there are 85 tailing ponds due to intensive mining activities that occurred during last century, especially in Sierra Minera de Cartagena-La Union. Although mining activity was abandoned several decades ago, those tailing ponds with high amounts of heavy metals still remain in the area. The ponds, due to their composition and location, may create environmental risks of geochemical pollution, negatively affecting soil, water, and plant, animal, and human populations, as well as infrastructures. The main objective of this research is to evaluate the restoration possibilities of two representative mining ponds in order to minimize the risk for human and ecosystems. To achieve this objective, two tailing ponds generated by mining activities were selected, El Lirio and El Gorguel. These ponds are representative of the rest of existent ponds in Sierra Minera de Cartagena-La Unión, with similar problems and characteristics. Several techniques and studies were applied to the tailing ponds for their characterization, including: geophysics, geotechnics, geochemical, geological, hydrological, and vegetation studies. In addition, effects of particulate size in the distribution of heavy metals will be used to assess the risk of dispersion of these metals in finest particles. Once the ponds were characterized, they were divided in several sectors in order to apply different amendments (pig slurry and marble waste) to reduce the risk of metal mobility and improve soil quality for a future phytostabilization. It is known that organic amendments promote soil development processes, microbial diversity, and finally, soil ecosystem restoration to a state of self-sustainability. By comparing the results before and after applications we will be able to evaluate the effect of the different amendments on soil quality and their effectively on risk reduction. Finally, plant metal-tolerant species are used to restore vegetation in the ponds, thereby decreasing

  11. Review of SERI Solar Pond Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zangrando, F.; Johnson, D. H.

    1984-01-01

    Development of models of pond thermal performance; analysis of solar pond use for building space heat and hot water production; use of low-temperature pond-produced heat for industrial processes, desalination, and electricity production; development of direct-contact heat exchanger to reduce conversion equipment cost; determination of effects of extracted heat and mass from the storage layer on pond performance; and investigation of factors which determine gradient layer stability and the stability of this interface between this level and the upper and lower convecting layers were described.

  12. Big-Fish-Little-Pond Effects on Gymnastics Self-concept: Social Comparison Processes in a Physical Setting

    OpenAIRE

    Chanal, Julien; Marsh, Herbert,; Sarrazin, Philippe; Bois, Julien

    2005-01-01

    In sport/exercise contexts, individuals use the performances of others to evaluate their own competence. In big-fish-little-pond effect (BFLPE) in educational settings, academic self-concept is positively predicted by one's own academic achievement but negatively predicted by the average achievement of others in one's school or class. Participation in programs for academically gifted students leads to lower self-concepts. In apparently the first test of the BFLPE in the physical domain, multi...

  13. Is intensification a viable way for pond culture in Central and Eastern Europe?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gergő Gyalog

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Today’s Central and Eastern European aquaculture is based on low production intensity pondculture dominated by traditional extensive and semi-intensive carp-based polyculture technologies, useof complete feeds in pond culture is not prevalent. Meanwhile pond culture in other parts of the Worldhas gone through an intensification process, nowadays high-intensity monoculture technologies dominatein pond farming. Use of complete feeds and application of higher stocking rates have doubled-tripledyields compared to traditional extensive, semi-intensive farming methods. Economic analysis of Asianfarms shows that intensification leads to increased profits per unit area and decreased profitability. Thecalculation of financial results of fish farming technologies of different intensity level show the sameeffect of intensification on viability in Hungary as in Asia: high feeding and stocking rate result inoutstanding profit per unit area and decreased profit margin at the same time. Rising land prices (andrents, fees for usage of water, decrease in area-based subsidies can push the Central and EasternEuropean pond aquaculture toward intensification as high intensity fish rearing in ponds may offer goodalternative for those farmers who have limited access to land (pond area and water. However one musttake the increased risks of high intensity and must have good managing abilities and farming expertisewith special regard to water quality and biomass management.

  14. Event-based stormwater management pond runoff temperature model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabouri, F.; Gharabaghi, B.; Sattar, A. M. A.; Thompson, A. M.

    2016-09-01

    Stormwater management wet ponds are generally very shallow and hence can significantly increase (about 5.4 °C on average in this study) runoff temperatures in summer months, which adversely affects receiving urban stream ecosystems. This study uses gene expression programming (GEP) and artificial neural networks (ANN) modeling techniques to advance our knowledge of the key factors governing thermal enrichment effects of stormwater ponds. The models developed in this study build upon and compliment the ANN model developed by Sabouri et al. (2013) that predicts the catchment event mean runoff temperature entering the pond as a function of event climatic and catchment characteristic parameters. The key factors that control pond outlet runoff temperature, include: (1) Upland Catchment Parameters (catchment drainage area and event mean runoff temperature inflow to the pond); (2) Climatic Parameters (rainfall depth, event mean air temperature, and pond initial water temperature); and (3) Pond Design Parameters (pond length-to-width ratio, pond surface area, pond average depth, and pond outlet depth). We used monitoring data for three summers from 2009 to 2011 in four stormwater management ponds, located in the cities of Guelph and Kitchener, Ontario, Canada to develop the models. The prediction uncertainties of the developed ANN and GEP models for the case study sites are around 0.4% and 1.7% of the median value. Sensitivity analysis of the trained models indicates that the thermal enrichment of the pond outlet runoff is inversely proportional to pond length-to-width ratio, pond outlet depth, and directly proportional to event runoff volume, event mean pond inflow runoff temperature, and pond initial water temperature.

  15. Assessment of Ash Pond Project effectiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In April 1989 the US Department of Energy (DOE) completed the Ash Pond Isolation Project at the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project (WSSRAP). This Interim Response Action (IRA) was designed to reduce uranium concentrations in surface water released from the Ash Pond Outfall at the Weldon Spring Site (WSS). Uranium concentrations at this outfall have been measured as high as 5,500 pCi/l with an average concentration of 1,498 pCi/l. This project was one of several IRAs aimed at improving health and safety conditions at the WSS prior to the Record of Decision. The Ash Pond Isolation Project was constructed to intercept surface water runoff to the Ash Pond drainage and redirect flows around the Ash Pond and South Dump areas, thereby eliminating leaching and transport of uranium-contaminated materials from these source areas. The DOE has monitored the releases from the Ash Pond Outfall in fulfillment of the site's National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System Permit and initiated additional monitoring to further assess the effectiveness of the Ash Pond Isolation Project. Results of this monitoring effort indicate a reduction in uranium concentrations measured at the Ash Pond Outfall from a pre-completion average of 1,498 pCi/l to an average of 145 pCi/l following completion of the IRA. 6 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs

  16. Solar pond technology

    OpenAIRE

    J. Srinivasan

    1993-01-01

    Solar pond technology has made substantial progress in the last fifteen years. This paper reviews the basic principles of solar ponds and the problems encountered in their operation and maintenance. The factors which influence the technical and economic viability of solar ponds for thermal applications and power generation have been discussed.

  17. 300 Area Process Trenches Closure Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luke, S.N.

    1994-08-15

    Since 1987, Westinghouse Hanford Company has been a major contractor to the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office and has served as co-operator of the 300 Area Process Trenches, the waste management unit addressed in this closure plan. For the purposes of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, Westinghouse Hanford Company is identified as ``co-operator.`` The 300 Area Process Trenches Closure Plan (Revision 0) consists of a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Part A Dangerous Waste Permit Application, Form 3 and a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Closure Plan. An explanation of the Part A Permit Application, Form 3 submitted with this document is provided at the beginning of the Part A Section. The closure plan consists of nine chapters and six appendices. The 300 Area Process Trenches received dangerous waste discharges from research and development laboratories in the 300 Area and from fuels fabrication processes. This waste consisted of state-only toxic (WT02), corrosive (D002), chromium (D007), spent halogenated solvents (F001, F002, and F003), and spent nonhalogented solvent (F005). Accurate records are unavailable concerning the amount of dangerous waste discharged to the trenches. The estimated annual quantity of waste (item IV.B) reflects the total quantity of both regulated and nonregulated waste water that was discharged to the unit.

  18. Pond 1 : closure of the first oil sands tailings pond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, H.B.; Wells, P.S.; Cox, L [Suncor Energy, Fort McMurray, AB (Canada)

    2010-10-01

    This article discussed the closure and reclamation of the first oilsands tailings pond in the Athabasca Oil Sands region. Pond 1 began construction in 1966, received tailings until 1995, and was released for reclamation in 2007. Infilling was completed in 2009, and surface land forming and revegetation were finished in the fall of 2010. The challenges associated with closing a tailings pond were unknown. Environmental goals evolved over the life of the pond, from initial absence to grass cover to prevent wind erosion, tree plantings for wildlife habitat, and finally to reclamation to viable ecosystems compatible with pre-development. The final stage involved infilling and reclamation of the pond interior. The Mature Fine Tailings were removed to a different location for storage and treatment. Infilling with course tailings sand established a trafficable surface on which to perform reclamation activities. The landform design involved a sand pile that had become bird habitat; a small marsh wetland; swales to collect and control surface runoff water; and hummocks for topographical diversity and increased biodiversity. The reclamation soil cover was a peat/mineral mix. Micro-topographical enhancements created locally diverse conditions for wildlife habitat. An excavated area was lined with a geosynthetic material for water retention, amended with peat/mineral mix, and planted with wetland species to create the marsh. The revegetation involved 33 different species of trees, shrubs, grasses, and aquatic plants. The pond closure is taking place in a highly regulated environment with a substantial knowledge base of reclamation techniques and clearly defined reclamation goals. 8 figs.

  19. An update to the construction of the Suncor oil sands tailings pond 5 cover

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abusaid, Ayman; Pollock, Gord; Fear, Catherine; McRoberts, Ed [AMEC Earth and Environmental (Canada); Wells, Sean [Suncor Energy Inc. (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    Tailings, produced during the extraction process that separates bitumen from oil sand, are pumped into holding ponds. The heaviest material - mostly sand - settles to the bottom, while water rises to the top, creating a middle layer, the mature fine tailings (MFT), made up of fine clay particles suspended in water. Suncor is using consolidated tailings technology to speed up the consolidation of MFT. To facilitate reclamation of its pond 5 oil sands tailings pond and make a trafficable surface, Suncor began construction of a full-scale floating cover over the fluid tailings in the pond in January, 2010. A road and infill approach was taken which involved constructing a network of roads as the first stage, followed by constructing the area between the roads (or cells) in the following stage, using geosynthetics overlain by petroleum coke. The results from a series of field trials conducted during this year and from other novel aspects of construction are presented and discussed in this paper.

  20. Aquatic studies of Gable Mountain Pond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies of the biotic and abiotic components of the Gable Mountain Pond (HAPO cooling water disposal pond) ecosystem were undertaken to determine if there was a potential problem for off-site transfer of radioactivity to man originating with the aquatic food web. Most of the 137Cs in the pond is associated with the sediments which are probably the main source of 137Cs for uptake by the biota. Generally, highest concentrations of 137Cs and other radioisotopes were found in the upper two inches of sediments in the northwest end of the pond and in the deeper areas along the long-axis of the pond. Native goldfish had maximum and average 137Cs concentrations of about 340 and 170 pCi/g dry wt, respectively. Algae, macrophytes, and detritus comprised the main food items of the goldfish, and the 137Cs levels in the plants were usually higher than the 137Cs concentration in the fish. The 137Cs concentrations of wild experimental ducks restricted to Gable Mountain Pond were approximately the same as resident coots, but significantly higher than transient wild ducks. Neither the goldfish nor the waterfowl inhabiting the pond attained concentrations of 137Cs exceeding acceptable limits. Sediment, however, could be a source of high concentrations of radioactivity or radioactive contamination concern if the concentration of radiocontaminants increased and/or the pond dries up, and the contaminated sediments become windborne. (U.S.)

  1. An aerial radiological survey of Par Pond and associated drainage pathways of the Savannah River Site, Aiken, South Carolina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first of a three-phase effort to radiologically monitor the lowering of Par Pond and associated drainage pathways was conducted over three areas of the Savannah River Site (SRS). The areas surveyed during this first phase included Par Pond, the Savannah River swamp from Steel Creek to Little Hell Landing, and Lower Three Runs Creek from the mouth of Lower Three Runs to the Highway 301 Bridge. The first phase was conducted to coincide with the lowering of the water level of Par Pond to an elevation of 190 feet above sea level. Additional surveys were conducted when the water level was at an elevation of 180 feet and prior to refill. The first survey began August 19, 1991, and was completed September 11, 1991. The second survey was conducted in October/November, 1991, during the SRS site-wide survey, and the third survey was conducted in August/September, 1992. Only the Par Pond area itself was surveyed during the third and final phase. The radiation detected over the Creek Plantation portion of the Savannah River swamp and Lower Three Runs areas during the August 1991 survey was consistent with the spatial distribution, quantity, and kinds of radionuclides detected during the 1983 and 1986 surveys. No migration of man-made gamma emitting materials was detected when compared to the prior surveys. The major differences occurred along the Par Pond shoreline where lowered water levels exposed the contaminated pond bed. The activity in the pond bed was attenuated by the water cover prior to the start of the lowering of Par Pond in June 1991. The data collected during each survey were processed in the field and were presented to SRS. A comparison report is being generated after the completion of each survey. A final report will be generated for the three surveys and will include a quantitative comparison of the three surveys in the Par Pond area only

  2. 300 Area process trench sediment analysis report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmerman, M.G.; Kossik, C.D.

    1987-12-01

    This report describes the results of a sampling program for the sediments underlying the Process Trenches serving the 300 Area on the Hanford reservation. These Process Trenches were the subject of a Closure Plan submitted to the Washington State Department of Ecology and to the US Environmental Protection Agency in lieu of a Part B permit application on November 8, 1985. The closure plan described a proposed sampling plan for the underlying sediments and potential remedial actions to be determined by the sample analyses results. The results and proposed remedial action plan are presented and discussed in this report. 50 refs., 6 figs., 8 tabs.

  3. Air conditioning for data processing system areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernando Camacho García

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The appropiate selection of air conditioners for data processing system areas requires the knowledge of the environmental desing conditions, the air conditioning systems succssfully used computer and the cooling loads to handle. This work contains information about a wide variety of systems designed for computer room applications. a complete example of calculation to determine the amount of heat to be removed for satisfactory operation, is also included.

  4. Melt-rock interactions and fabric development of peridotites from North Pond in the Kane area, Mid-Atlantic Ridge: Implications of microstructural and petrological analyses of peridotite samples from IODP Hole U1382A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harigane, Yumiko; Abe, Natsue; Michibayashi, Katsuyoshi; Kimura, Jun-Ichi; Chang, Qing

    2016-06-01

    North Pond is an isolated sedimentary pond on the western flank of the Kane area along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. Drill-hole U1382A of IODP Expedition 336 recovered peridotite and gabbro samples from a sedimentary breccia layer in the pond, from which we collected six fresh peridotite samples. The peridotite samples came from the southern slope of the North Pond where an oceanic core complex is currently exposed. The samples were classified as spinel harzburgite, plagioclase-bearing harzburgite, and a vein-bearing peridotite that contains tiny gabbroic veins. No obvious macroscopic shear deformation related to the formation of a detachment fault was observed. The spinel harzburgite with a protogranular texture was classified as refractory peridotite. The degree of partial melting of the spinel harzburgite is estimated to be ˜17%, and melt depletion would have occurred at high temperatures in the uppermost mantle beneath the spreading axis. The progressive melt-rock interactions between the depleted spinel harzburgite and the percolating melts of Normal-Mid Ocean Ridge Basalt (N-MORB) produced the plagioclase-bearing harzburgite and the vein-bearing peridotite at relatively low temperatures. This implies that the subsequent refertilization occurred in an extinct spreading segment of the North Pond after spreading at the axis. Olivine fabrics in the spinel and plagioclase-bearing harzburgites are of types AG, A, and D, suggesting the remnants of a mantle flow regime beneath the spreading axis. The initial olivine fabrics appear to have been preserved despite the later melt-rock interactions. The peridotite samples noted above preserve evidence of mantle flow and melt-rock interactions beneath a spreading ridge that formed at ˜8 Ma.

  5. Monitoring, sizing and removal efficiency in stormwater ponds

    OpenAIRE

    Persson, Jesper; Pettersson, Thomas J.R

    2009-01-01

    Retention ponds and wetlands are frequently used in stormwater management to remove pollutants, reduce flow peaks and improve scenic views in parks and along roads. This study analyzes the correlation between long-term removal efficiency of pollutants (total suspended solids and heavy metals) and specific pond area (ratio between effective drainage area and surface area). For this purpose, all data on ponds in Sweden that have been monitored were collected and evaluated. The results show that...

  6. 100-D Ponds closure plan. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petersen, S.W.

    1997-09-01

    The 100-D Ponds is a Treatment, Storage, and Disposal (TSD) unit on the Hanford Facility that received both dangerous and nonregulated waste. This Closure Plan (Rev. 1) for the 100-D Ponds TSD unit consists of a RCRA Part A Dangerous Waste Permit Application (Rev. 3), a RCRA Closure Plan, and supporting information contained in the appendices to the plan. The closure plan consists of eight chapters containing facility description, process information, waste characteristics, and groundwater monitoring data. There are also chapters containing the closure strategy and performance standards. The strategy for the closure of the 100-D Ponds TSD unit is clean closure. Appendices A and B of the closure plan demonstrate that soil and groundwater beneath 100-D Ponds are below cleanup limits. All dangerous wastes or dangerous waste constituents or residues associated with the operation of the ponds have been removed, therefore, human health and the environment are protected. Discharges to the 100-D Ponds, which are located in the 100-DR-1 operable unit, were discontinued in June 1994. Contaminated sediment was removed from the ponds in August 1996. Subsequent sampling and analysis demonstrated that there is no contamination remaining in the ponds, therefore, this closure plan is a demonstration of clean closure.

  7. 100-D Ponds closure plan. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 100-D Ponds is a Treatment, Storage, and Disposal (TSD) unit on the Hanford Facility that received both dangerous and nonregulated waste. This Closure Plan (Rev. 1) for the 100-D Ponds TSD unit consists of a RCRA Part A Dangerous Waste Permit Application (Rev. 3), a RCRA Closure Plan, and supporting information contained in the appendices to the plan. The closure plan consists of eight chapters containing facility description, process information, waste characteristics, and groundwater monitoring data. There are also chapters containing the closure strategy and performance standards. The strategy for the closure of the 100-D Ponds TSD unit is clean closure. Appendices A and B of the closure plan demonstrate that soil and groundwater beneath 100-D Ponds are below cleanup limits. All dangerous wastes or dangerous waste constituents or residues associated with the operation of the ponds have been removed, therefore, human health and the environment are protected. Discharges to the 100-D Ponds, which are located in the 100-DR-1 operable unit, were discontinued in June 1994. Contaminated sediment was removed from the ponds in August 1996. Subsequent sampling and analysis demonstrated that there is no contamination remaining in the ponds, therefore, this closure plan is a demonstration of clean closure

  8. TIS process supervisory local area network (LAN)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    TIS - the process supervisory LAN was installed at both the NPP V-1 twin-units of WWER-440/230 type and the NPP V-2 twin-units of WWER-440/213 type at Jaslovske Bohunice, Slovak Republic, in 1992. It represents a superstructure to the existing reactor unit process computers RPP-16S and IV 500 MA at the NPP V-1 and IVS Komplex Uran 2M and KVRK at the NPP V-2. The principal goal of TIS is to supply both the main control room staff and the NPP operation personnel and operation mode engineers with process information in a larger extent and on a higher level than the existing process computers do. TIS provides following process supervision functions: Taking over Data, Data Processing, Operative and Historical Data Collection, Active Alarm Management, Mimic Diagrams, REAL-time and Historical Trending, Horizontal Bargraphs, Data Tables, Report Generation, Shift Supervisor Support in case of Failure/Accident at NPP, User Database Applications, Computerized Operating Procedures, Programmable Prompts to Operator, ''Desk-top'' Calculator, Communication with Professional Departments, Auto-diagnostics. TIS is a PC local area network of QNX NET type, its data transmission rate being 2.5 Mbits/second. TIS is run under QNX operating system. Application software modules are written in QNX C and C-86 languages. Some functions were completed in OnCmd v.4.2 database environment. (author). 2 figs

  9. The Relationship between the Area of Aquaculture Pond and Purification Pond in Water Circulation Aquaculture System%池塘循环水养殖模式下养殖面积与净化面积的配比关系研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋超; 陈家长; 戈贤平; 孟顺龙; 范立民; 胡庚东

    2013-01-01

    The establishment of water circulation aquaculture system realized the hierarchical use of nitrogen,phosphorus and other eutrophic substances in aquaculture wastewater and the recirculation use of water resource.However,no research has been reported on the detailed calculation of the relationship between the area of aquaculture pond and purification pond.In this study,referring to the absorption ability of aquatic plants to pollutants in aquaculture wastewater and pollutant generation and discharge coefficient in aquaculture pond,based on the general rules of water quality management in freshwater aquaculture system,a calculation mode was established to investigate the relationship between the area of aquaculture pond and purification pond in freshwater recirculation aquaculture system,which was feasible to explain related cases and would provide theoretical basis to reduce the economic costs in the construction of water circulation aquaculture system and realize the balance between the ecological benefits and the economic benefits.%池塘循环水养殖模式的构建实现了养殖废水中氮、磷等富营养化物质的分级利用和水资源的循环使用,但此前的研究并没有详细计算养殖面积和净化面积合理的配比关系.通过参照水生植物对养殖尾水中污染物的吸收能力和养殖鱼类的产排污系数,再结合淡水池塘养殖过程中的水质管理的一般规律,给出了淡水池塘循环水养殖模式中养殖池塘面积和净化池塘面积之间配比关系的计算方法.利用该计算方法来解释此前相关的研究实例,也证明是可行的.该计算模型的构建为今后在池塘循环水养殖模式构建中降低经济成本,为最终实现生态效益对经济效益的补偿提供了理论基础.

  10. CO₂ efflux from shrimp ponds in Indonesia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frida Sidik

    Full Text Available The conversion of mangrove forest to aquaculture ponds has been increasing in recent decades. One of major concerns of this habitat loss is the release of stored 'blue' carbon from mangrove soils to the atmosphere. In this study, we assessed carbon dioxide (CO₂ efflux from soil in intensive shrimp ponds in Bali, Indonesia. We measured CO₂ efflux from the floors and walls of shrimp ponds. Rates of CO₂ efflux within shrimp ponds were 4.37 kg CO₂ m⁻² y⁻¹ from the walls and 1.60 kg CO₂ m⁻² y⁻¹ from the floors. Combining our findings with published data of aquaculture land use in Indonesia, we estimated that shrimp ponds in this region result in CO₂ emissions to the atmosphere between 5.76 and 13.95 Tg y⁻¹. The results indicate that conversion of mangrove forests to aquaculture ponds contributes to greenhouse gas emissions that are comparable to peat forest conversion to other land uses in Indonesia. Higher magnitudes of CO₂ emission may be released to atmosphere where ponds are constructed in newly cleared mangrove forests. This study indicates the need for incentives that can meet the target of aquaculture industry without expanding the converted mangrove areas, which will lead to increased CO₂ released to atmosphere.

  11. Wintertime Emissions from Produced Water Ponds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, J.; Lyman, S.; Mansfield, M. L.

    2013-12-01

    Every year oil and gas drilling in the U.S. generates billions of barrels of produced water (water brought to the surface during oil or gas production). Efficiently disposing of produced water presents a constant financial challenge for producers. The most noticeable disposal method in eastern Utah's Uintah Basin is the use of evaporation ponds. There are 427 acres of produced water ponds in the Uintah Basin, and these were used to evaporate more than 5 million barrels of produced water in 2012, 6% of all produced water in the Basin. Ozone concentrations exceeding EPA standards have been observed in the Uintah Basin during winter inversion conditions, with daily maximum 8 hour average concentrations at some research sites exceeding 150 parts per billion. Produced water contains ozone-forming volatile organic compounds (VOC) which escape into the atmosphere as the water is evaporated, potentially contributing to air quality problems. No peer-reviewed study of VOC emissions from produced water ponds has been reported, and filling this gap is essential for the development of accurate emissions inventories for the Uintah Basin and other air sheds with oil and gas production. Methane, carbon dioxide, and VOC emissions were measured at three separate pond facilities in the Uintah Basin in February and March of 2013 using a dynamic flux chamber. Pond emissions vary with meteorological conditions, so measurements of VOC emissions were collected during winter to obtain data relevant to periods of high ozone production. Much of the pond area at evaporation facilities was frozen during the study period, but areas that actively received water from trucks remained unfrozen. These areas accounted for 99.2% of total emissions but only 9.5% of the total pond area on average. Ice and snow on frozen ponds served as a cap, prohibiting VOC from being emitted into the atmosphere. Emissions of benzene, toluene, and other aromatic VOCs averaged over 150 mg m-2 h-1 from unfrozen pond

  12. Effect of Variation of Temperature Field on the Process of Thermal Consolidation of Tailings Pond “Zelazny Most”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartlewska-Urban Monika

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The following study presents numerical calculations for establishing an impact of temperature changes on the process of distortion of bi–phase medium. The Biot consolidation equations with Kelvin–Voigt rheological skeleton were used for that purpose. The process was exemplified by thermal consolidation of post floatation dump “–elazny Most”. We analyzed the behavior of the landfill under the action of its own weight, forces of floating filtration and temperature gradient. Values of certain effective parameters of model were obtained during laboratory tests on material obtained from the landfill. The remaining data for mediums with similar characteristics were taken from literature. The results obtained from the stress state in the landfill allow the magnitude of plasticity potential to be specified based on known strength criteria. Change in the value sign of the plasticity potential clearly testifies to the emergence of an area of plasticity of material from landfill, however, this does not indicate the loss of stability of this hydrotechnical structure.

  13. Pond Fish Culture Practices in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.A. Akankali

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Pond fish culture practices in Nigeria was reviewed to refresh the minds of fish and other interested stake holders on some basic principles involved in pond fish culture. Fish pond system is the commonest agricultural techniques in the Niger Delta Region of Nigeria. Profit making, job creation, provision of raw materials for several industries and increase in foreign exchange earnings are some benefits. However, loss of land and introduction some water borne diseases are some disadvantages in pond fish culture. This articles reviews the fish pond management processes, stocking of ponds, feeding of fish, types of culture, fish farming combined with other branches of agriculture, rearing of fish for purposes other than food, other fish culture, types of fish used for fish culture in central east Africa, general biology of the species of value in fish culture and suitable combinations of fish for stocking to reawaken the minds of individuals, companies and government on the need to develop pond fish culture in Nigeria.

  14. Microbial activities and communities in oil sands tailings ponds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gieg, Lisa; Ramos, Esther; Clothier, Lindsay; Bordenave, Sylvain; Lin, Shiping; Voordouw, Gerrit; Dong, Xiaoli; Sensen, Christoph [University of Calgary (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    This paper discusses how the microbial communities and their activity play a vital role in tailings ponds. The ponds contain microorganisms along with metals, hydrocarbon diluent, naphthenic acid and others. The ponds play an important role in mining operations because they store bitumen extraction waste and also allow water to be re-used in the bitumen extraction process. Pond management presents a few challenges that include, among others, gas emissions and the presence of toxic and corrosive acids. Microbial activities and communities help in managing these ponds. Microbial activity measurement in active and inactive ponds is described and analyzed and the results are presented. The conditions for reducing sulfate, nitrate and iron are also presented. From the results it can be concluded that naphthenic acids can potentially serve as substrates for anaerobic populations in tailings ponds.

  15. Thermal Efficiency for Each Zone of a Solar Pond

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BEZ(I)R C(I)CEK Nalan; SAH(I)N SENCAN Arzu

    2011-01-01

    A salt gradient solar pond with a surface area of 3.5×3.5 m2 and a depth of 2m is built.Two collapsible covers are used to reduce thermal energy loss from the surface of the solar pond during the night and to increase the thermal efficiency of the pond solar energy harvesting during daytime.The covers can be rotated between 0 and 180° by a controlled electric motor and has insulation and reflection properties.The thermal efficiency for each solar pond zone is investigated theoretically and experimentally.A salt gradient solar pond (SGSP) can store a portion of solar radiation as thermal energy for longterm use.Long-term energy storage in a solar pond is important for many applications,i.e.greenhouse heating or heating in buildings.%A salt gradient solar pond with a surface area of 3.5×3.5 m2 and a depth of 2m is built. Two collapsible covers are used to reduce thermal energy loss from the surface of the solar pond during the night and to increase the thermal efficiency of the pond solar energy harvesting during daytime. The covers can be rotated between 0 and 180° by a controlled electric motor and has insulation and reflection properties. The thermal efficiency for each solar pond zone is investigated theoretically and experimentally.

  16. Par Pond water balance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A water budget for the Par Pond hydrologic system was established in order to estimate the rate of groundwater influx to Par Pond. This estimate will be used in modeling exercises to predict Par Pond reservoir elevation and spillway discharge in the scenario where Savannah River water is no longer pumped and discharged into Par Pond. The principal of conservation of mass was used to develop the water budget, where water inflow was set equal to water outflow. Components of the water budget were identified, and the flux associated with each was determined. The water budget was considered balanced when inflow and outflow summed to zero. The results of this study suggest that Par Pond gains water from the groundwater system in the upper reaches of the reservoir, but looses water to the groundwater system near the dam. The rate of flux of groundwater from the water table aquifer into Par Pond was determined to be 13 cfs. The rate of flux from Par Pond to the water table aquifer near the dam was determined to be 7 cfs

  17. Remediation of the Sillamae Radioactive Tailings Pond, Estonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper presents experiences gained and progress achieved during the ongoing Sillamaee Radioactive Tailings Pond Remediation Project. The Sillamaee tailings pond covering ca. 50 ha is located next to the shoreline of the Baltic Sea near Sillamaee town in Estonia. Tailings disposal included mill tailings from uranium ore processing (1953-1977), enriched uranium refining (1977- 1990), from rare earth elements processing (since 1970; tailings disposal ended 2003), black shale processing (1948-1953) and liquid oil-shale ashes from the local power plant. Initial environmental and geotechnical investigations identified insufficient safety of the tailings pond for radiological, environmental and geotechnical reasons. Contaminated seepage was entering the Baltic Sea. The 25 m high northern tailings dam was affected by marine erosion and the stability of the dam was found to be insufficient. Therefore the multi-national Sillamaee Radioactive Tailings Pond Remediation Programme was launched in 1998 jointly financed by North European Countries (NEFCO), EU and Estonia. The remediation project included the following crucial remediation steps: Drillings and samplings including geotechnical, (hydro-)geological and environmental investigations (2000-2001); relocation of mine wastes and contaminated soils from the surrounding area onto the tailings pond for interim covering (2000-2003); initial stabilization measures (2001-2003) including a 1080 m long shore protection embankment along the shoreline of the Baltic Sea, a 720 m long pile grillage for stabilizing the northern dam including two rows of 15 m or 18 m deep continuous flight auger piles, a 580 m long and 12-18 m deep cut-off wall, a deep gravel-filled drainage ditch (520 m, up to 12 m deep) and a deep drainage trench. Reshaping of the dams with respect to long term dam stability and contouring of the pond area with respect to long term settlement portions lasted from 2003 till 2004 building up a ridge-type surface

  18. Remote sensing monitoring and analysis of tailings ponds in the ore concentration area of Heilongjiang Province%黑龙江省矿集区尾矿库遥感监测与分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高永志; 初禹; 梁伟

    2015-01-01

    尾矿库是一个具有高势能的人造泥石流危险源,存在溃坝危险,一旦失事,容易造成重大或特大事故。尾矿库不仅占据了大量的土地资源、破坏土地植被,给环境安全带来隐患,同时尾矿中含有的各种重金属矿物和毒性物质经过淋滤和渗透,会严重污染尾矿库周边和下游的生态环境。为实现对尾矿库的遥感监测与分析,以黑龙江省重点矿集区尾矿库为研究对象,利用高分辨率遥感图像建立准确的遥感解译标志,对尾矿库进行遥感解译;利用GIS软件提取尾矿库的相关信息,摸清现有尾矿的基本类型、堆存数量、地理位置和有害因素等;同时了解和掌握尾矿堆放区的环境地质情况和生态状况,以期为尾矿库的监督和管理提供科学依据。%The tailings pond is a man -made debris flow hazard source with high potential energy in that there exists the risk of dam failure. Once the dam crashes,it is easy to cause serious accidents. Tailings ponds could produce a lot of hidden troubles to the environment due to occupying lots of land resources and destroying land vegetation;what is more,varieties of heavy metal materials and toxic substances contained in mineral tailings could cause serious pollution to the ecological environment around the tailings ponds and in the downstream area through leaching and permeating. For the realization of the remote sensing monitoring and analysis of the tailings ponds, the authors chose the tailings ponds in major ore concentration areas of Heilongjiang Province as the research objects, used high resolution remote sensing images to establish the accurate remote sensing interpretation keys,and finally accomplished the remote sensing interpretation of tailings ponds. And then the GIS software was utilized to extract relevant information so as to evaluate such basic data as the basic types, existing number of stockpiling tailings, geographic

  19. The western pond turtle: Habitat and history. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The western pond turtle is known from many areas of Oregon. The majority of sightings and other records occur in the major drainages of the Klamath, Rogue, Umpqua, Willamette and Columbia River systems. A brief overview is presented of the evolution of the Willamette-Puget Sound hydrographic basin. A synopsis is also presented of the natural history of the western pond turtle, as well as, the status of this turtle in the Willamette drainage basin. The reproductive ecology and molecular genetics of the western pond turtle are discussed. Aquatic movements and overwintering of the western pond turtle are evaluated. The effect of introduced turtle species on the status of the western pond turtle was investigated in a central California Pond. Experiments were performed to determine if this turtle could be translocated as a mitigation strategy

  20. Avifauna of waste ponds ERDA Hanford Reservation, Benton County, Washington

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The presence of small ponds on the Hanford 200 Area plateau provides attractive habitats for birds. During a 29-month period, 126 bird species were observed utilizing these ponds, their associated vegetation, and air space. Waterfowls are the important agents of dispersal of radionuclides from waste ponds based on food habits, abundance, migratory habits, and importance as food in the diet of people. Abundance, long residence time, and food habits identify the American coot as the single most important species to be considered in the biological dispersal of radionuclides from waste ponds. (U.S.)

  1. Eutrophic urban ponds suffer from cyanobacterial blooms: Dutch examples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waaijenberg, G.W.A.M.; Faassen, E.J.; Lurling, M.

    2014-01-01

    Ponds play an important role in urban areas. However, cyanobacterial blooms counteract the societal need for a good water quality and pose serious health risks for citizens and pets. To provide insight into the extent and possible causes of cyanobacterial problems in urban ponds, we conducted a surv

  2. Heat extraction from a salinity-gradient solar pond using in pond heat exchanger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaefarzadeh, M.R. [Civil Engineering Department, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, P.O. Box 91775-1111 Mashhad (Iran)

    2006-11-15

    Thermal energy extraction from a small salinity-gradient solar pond is studied in this article. The small pond has an area of 4.0m{sup 2} and a depth of 1.1m. Fresh water circulates through an internal heat exchanger, located in the lower convective zone, and transfers its thermal energy to an external heat exchanger. The study covers two periods of summer loading for a week and winter loading for two months. The hourly as well as daily variations of the temperatures of the storage zone, surface zone, ambient, inlet and outlet of the internal heat exchanger have been measured and analyzed. It is shown that the pond may deliver heat with a relatively high thermal efficiency in a transitional stage for a limited period of time. It can also be utilized continuously with a lower efficiency. The efficiency of the small pond in the latter case will be around 10%. (author)

  3. The importance of local and landscape-scale processes to the occupancy of wetlands by pond-breeding amphibians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherer, Rick D.; Muths, Erin; Noon, Barry R.

    2012-01-01

    Variation in the distribution and abundance of species across landscapes has traditionally been attributed to processes operating at fine spatial scales (i.e., environmental conditions at the scale of the sampling unit), but processes that operate across larger spatial scales such as seasonal migration or dispersal are also important. To determine the relative importance of these processes, we evaluated hypothesized relationships between the probability of occupancy in wetlands by two amphibians [wood frogs (Lithobates sylvaticus) and boreal chorus frogs (Pseudacris maculata)] and attributes of the landscape measured at three spatial scales in Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado. We used cost-based buffers and least-cost distances to derive estimates of landscape attributes that may affect occupancy patterns from the broader spatial scales. The most highly ranked models provide strong support for a positive relationship between occupancy by breeding wood frogs and the amount of streamside habitat adjacent to a wetland. The model selection results for boreal chorus frogs are highly uncertain, though several of the most highly ranked models indicate a positive association between occupancy and the number of neighboring, occupied wetlands. We found little evidence that occupancy of either species was correlated with local-scale attributes measured at the scale of individual wetlands, suggesting that processes operating at broader scales may be more important in influencing occupancy patterns in amphibian populations.

  4. Transition in the fractal geometry of Arctic melt ponds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Hohenegger

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available During the Arctic melt season, the sea ice surface undergoes a remarkable transformation from vast expanses of snow covered ice to complex mosaics of ice and melt ponds. Sea ice albedo, a key parameter in climate modeling, is determined by the complex evolution of melt pond configurations. In fact, ice–albedo feedback has played a major role in the recent declines of the summer Arctic sea ice pack. However, understanding melt pond evolution remains a significant challenge to improving climate projections. By analyzing area–perimeter data from hundreds of thousands of melt ponds, we find here an unexpected separation of scales, where pond fractal dimension D transitions from 1 to 2 around a critical length scale of 100 m2 in area. Pond complexity increases rapidly through the transition as smaller ponds coalesce to form large connected regions, and reaches a maximum for ponds larger than 1000 m2, whose boundaries resemble space-filling curves, with D ≈ 2. These universal features of Arctic melt pond evolution are similar to phase transitions in statistical physics. The results impact sea ice albedo, the transmitted radiation fields under melting sea ice, the heat balance of sea ice and the upper ocean, and biological productivity such as under ice phytoplankton blooms.

  5. Process optimization in the head end area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The measures to improve feed clarity and how they fit into the overall concept of the chemical head end are described as considerable changes in the head end. The effects which the conversion from the bundle shears to the individual rod shears has on the mechanical head end are also shown. The changes made, particularly in the chemical head end, are intended to increase the availability of the main process by improved feed clarity with a centrifuge, container and filter. (orig./DG)

  6. Groundwater impact assessment report for the 100-D Ponds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 183-D Water Treatment Facility (WTF) discharges effluent to the 120-0-1 Ponds (100-D Ponds) located north of the 100-D Area perimeter fence. This report satisfies one of the requirements of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) Milestone M-17-00B as agreed by the US Department of Energy, Washington State Department of Ecology, and the US Environmental Protection Agency. Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-17-00B includes a requirement to assess impacts to groundwater from disposal of the 183-D WTF effluent to the 100-D Ponds. In addition, the 100-D Ponds are a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 treatment, storage, and disposal facility covered by the 100-D Ponds Closure Plan (DOE-RL 1993a). There is evidence of groundwater contamination, primarily nitrate, tritium, and chromium, in the unconfined aquifer beneath the 100-D Area and 100 Areas in general. The contaminant plumes are area wide and are a result of past-practice reactor and disposal operations in the 100-D Area currently being investigated as part of the 100-DR-1 and 100-HR-3 Operable Units (DOE-RL 1992b, 1992a). Based on current effluent conditions, continued operation of the 100-D Ponds will not adversely affect the groundwater quality in the 100-D Area. Monitoring wells near the pond have slightly higher alkaline pH values than wells in the rest of the area. Concentrations of known contaminants in these wells are lower than ambient 100-D Area groundwater conditions and exhibit a localized dilution effect associated with discharges to the pond. Hydraulic impact to the local groundwater system from these discharges is minor. The groundwater monitoring well network for the 100-D Ponds is adequate

  7. Kealia Pond - Ungulate Exclusion Fence

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This project will contribute to the building of a fence around the Kealia Pond National Wildlife Refuge. Kealia Pond NWR is home to two endangered waterbird...

  8. Examining Water Quality Variations of Tidal Pond System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chui, T. F. M.; Cui, W.

    2014-12-01

    Brackish tidal shrimp ponds, traditionally referred to as gei wais, have been constructed along coastal areas in many parts of the world. The regular exchange of pond water with the surrounding coastal environment is important as it brings shrimp larvae and nutrients, etc. into and out of the pond. Such a water exchange can reduce the quality of the receiving waters; though there are opposing views recently because farming practices are becoming more sustainable while other sources of pollutions in the surroundings are increasing. This project monitors the water quality of a tidal shrimp pond and its receiving water at high temporal resolution. The pond is located within the wetland complex of Mai Po Nature Reserve in Hong Kong, China. Water quality parameters (i.e., dissolved oxygen, temperature, salinity, pH, water depth and chlorophyll) were recorded at 15-minute interval from December 2013 to March 2014 within the pond and also at its receiving water which is a water channel within a mangrove forest. Data reveals both daily and fortnightly fluctuations. Daily variations in mangrove correspond to both tidal flushing and insolation, whereas those within the pond correspond mainly to insolation. For example, dissolved oxygen in mangrove shows two peaks daily which correlate with tidal elevation, and that within the pond shows only one peak which correlates with sunlight. Dissolved oxygen within the pond also shows a fortnightly pattern that corresponds to the schedule of water exchange. Such high temporal resolution of monitoring reveals the two-way water quality influences between the pond and the mangrove. It sheds insights that can possibly lead to refinement of water exchange practice and water sampling schedule given the temporal variations of the water quality both inside and outside the pond. It thus enables us to take a step closer in adopting more sustainable farming practices despite increasing pollution in the surrounding areas.

  9. Computer simulation model of salt-gradient solar ponds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panahi, Z.

    1981-01-01

    The mass and energy transfer processes of salt-gradient solar pond were developed into a finite element of computer model. The system represented by the model can be: (1) a non-convective salt-gradient solar pond for which the energy transfer takes place by conduction through the brine and the round beneath the pond; (2) a stratified three-zone solar pond consisting of upper and lower convective zones and a non-convective gradient zone in between. The temperature of the upper and lower convective zones are predicted in terms of the net energy input to the zones. The energy fluxes at the pond surface include: reflected and absorbed solar radiation, evaporation energy loss, net long wave radiation loss to the atmosphere, advected energy of precipitation and inflow water, and convective heat loss at the surface. The model predicts the time dependent concentration, density, and temperature gradients in the pond. The program can operate with any time step of less than or equal to 24 hours, using either average daily or variables (with the time step) values of air temperature (calculated in the model using average, maximum and minimum values) and solar radiation data. The different cases that have been studied using the model are (1) the performance of a non-insulated salt-gradient solar pond with seepage of the brine and energy exchange through the ground below the pond; (2) the performance of an insulated salt-gradient solar pond with seepage of the brine and energy exchange through the ground below the pond; (2) the performance of an insulated salt-gradient and stratified three-zone solar pond. For stratified ponds comparisons on performance are made by changing the thickness of: (1) the upper convective zone, (2) the non-convective gradient zone, and (3) the lower convective (storage) zone.

  10. Agricultural ponds support amphibian populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knutson, M.G.; Richardson, W.B.; Reineke, D.M.; Gray, B.R.; Parmelee, J.R.; Weick, S.E.

    2004-01-01

    In some agricultural regions, natural wetlands are scarce, and constructed agricultural ponds may represent important alternative breeding habitats for amphibians. Properly managed, these agricultural ponds may effectively increase the total amount of breeding habitat and help to sustain populations. We studied small, constructed agricultural ponds in southeastern Minnesota to assess their value as amphibian breeding sites. Our study examined habitat factors associated with amphibian reproduction at two spatial scales: the pond and the landscape surrounding the pond. We found that small agricultural ponds in southeastern Minnesota provided breeding habitat for at least 10 species of amphibians. Species richness and multispecies reproductive success were more closely associated with characteristics of the pond (water quality, vegetation, and predators) compared with characteristics of the surrounding landscape, but individual species were associated with both pond and landscape variables. Ponds surrounded by row crops had similar species richness and reproductive success compared with natural wetlands and ponds surrounded by nongrazed pasture. Ponds used for watering livestock had elevated concentrations of phosphorus, higher turbidity, and a trend toward reduced amphibian reproductive success. Species richness was highest in small ponds, ponds with lower total nitrogen concentrations, tiger salamanders (Ambystoma tigrinum) present, and lacking fish. Multispecies reproductive success was best in ponds with lower total nitrogen concentrations, less emergent vegetation, and lacking fish. Habitat factors associated with higher reproductive success varied among individual species. We conclude that small, constructed farm ponds, properly managed, may help sustain amphibian populations in landscapes where natural wetland habitat is rare. We recommend management actions such as limiting livestock access to the pond to improve water quality, reducing nitrogen input, and

  11. The Big-Fish-Little-Pond Effect: Generalizability of Social Comparison Processes over Two Age Cohorts from Western, Asian, and Middle Eastern Islamic Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Herbert W.; Abduljabbar, Adel Salah; Morin, Alexandre J. S.; Parker, Philip; Abdelfattah, Faisal; Nagengast, Benjamin; Abu-Hilal, Maher M.

    2015-01-01

    Extensive support for the seemingly paradoxical negative effects of school- and class-average achievement on academic self-concept (ASC)-the big-fish-little-pond effect (BFLPE)--is based largely on secondary students in Western countries or on cross-cultural Program for International Student Assessment studies. There is little research testing the…

  12. Interconnected ponds operation for flood hazard distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putra, S. S.; Ridwan, B. W.

    2016-05-01

    The climatic anomaly, which comes with extreme rainfall, will increase the flood hazard in an area within a short period of time. The river capacity in discharging the flood is not continuous along the river stretch and sensitive to the flood peak. This paper contains the alternatives on how to locate the flood retention pond that are physically feasible to reduce the flood peak. The flood ponds were designed based on flood curve number criteria (TR-55, USDA) with the aim of rapid flood peak capturing and gradual flood retuning back to the river. As a case study, the hydrologic condition of upper Ciliwung river basin with several presumed flood pond locations was conceptually designed. A fundamental tank model that reproducing the operation of interconnected ponds was elaborated to achieve the designed flood discharge that will flows to the downstream area. The flood hazard distribution status, as the model performance criteria, will be computed within Ciliwung river reach in Manggarai Sluice Gate spot. The predicted hazard reduction with the operation of the interconnected retention area result had been bench marked with the normal flow condition.

  13. Maintenance strategy for a salt gradient solar pond coupled with an evaporation pond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agha, K.R.; Abughres, S.M.; Ramadan, A.M. [CSES, Tripoli (Libya). Center for Solar Energy Studies

    2004-07-01

    In a previous study, the authors presented a simple mathematical model for predicting the ratio of the evaporation pond area to that of a salt gradient solar pond area. The evaporation pond idea provides a very attractive method of salt recycling by evaporation, especially in areas of high evaporation and low rates of rain as it is the case for North Africa. In this paper, the model was elaborated upon and applied to two types of surface water flushing (fresh water and seawater) under the prevailing conditions of Tripoli, Libya (latitude = 32.86{sup o}N). All the results presented were predicted for the first three years of operation. The daily variations of brine concentration in the of Tajoura's Experimental Solar pond and those based on different designs were predicted and discussed under different scenarios. The quantities of brine provided by the evaporation pond and that required by were predicted for both cases of surface water flushing (fresh water and seawater) under the different design conditions. It was predicted that the can provide 20-40% during the first year and 45-95% during the third year depending on the design selected. (author)

  14. Appearance of Planktothrix rubescens Bloom with [D-Asp3, Mdha7]MC–RR in Gravel Pit Pond of a Shallow Lake-Dominated Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gábor Vasas

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Blooms of toxic cyanobacteria are well-known phenomena in many regions of the world. Microcystin (MC, the most frequent cyanobacterial toxin, is produced by entirely different cyanobacteria, including unicellular, multicellular filamentous, heterocytic, and non-heterocytic bloom-forming species. Planktothrix is one of the most important MC-producing genera in temperate lakes. The reddish color of cyanobacterial blooms viewed in a gravel pit pond with the appearance of a dense 3 cm thick layer (biovolume: 28.4 mm3 L−1 was an unexpected observation in the shallow lake-dominated alluvial region of the Carpathian Basin. [d-Asp3, Mdha7]MC–RR was identified from the blooms sample by MALDI-TOF and NMR. Concentrations of [d-Asp3, Mdha7]MC–RR were measured by capillary electrophoresis to compare the microcystin content of the field samples and the isolated, laboratory-maintained P. rubescens strain. In analyzing the MC gene cluster of the isolated P. rubescens strain, a deletion in the spacer region between mcyE and mcyG and an insertion were located in the spacer region between mcyT and mcyD. The insertion elements were sequenced and partly identified. Although some invasive tropical cyanobacterial species have been given a great deal of attention in many recent studies, our results draw attention to the spread of the alpine organism P. rubescens as a MC-producing, bloom-forming species.

  15. Simple intervention to reduce mosquito breeding in waste stabilisation ponds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ensink, Jeroen H J; Mukhtar, Muhammad; van der Hoek, Wim;

    2007-01-01

    Waste stabilisation ponds (WSP) are the preferred method for treatment of urban wastewater in low-income countries but, especially in arid regions, the pond systems can be important breeding sites for mosquitoes of medical importance. In a WSP system in Faisalabad, Pakistan, we assessed the impact...... of simple environmental interventions on mosquito occurrence and abundance. Reducing the amount of floating matter in the ponds, eliminating emergent vegetation and repairing cracks in the cement structure reduced the number of mosquito-positive samples in the intervention ponds to almost zero......, whereas the control ponds had a significant number of positive samples. This suggests that a combination of simple low-cost interventions is a feasible environmental management strategy for vector control in WSP systems that are located in areas where medically important mosquitoes may breed in the...

  16. Biological diversity of copepods and cladocerans in Mediterranean temporary ponds under periods of contrasting rainfall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria-José BOAVIDA

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The zooplankton communities of 5 temporary ponds in the Northern part of the Natural Park of the Southwest and Vicentina Coast (PNCSV, Southwestern Portugal, were studied during two consecutive years of contrasting rainfall. A total of ten cladoceran species and eleven copepod species (3 diaptomids, 5 cyclopoids and 3 harpacticoids were recorded. The community structure varied along the hydrological period of the ponds. Some species were restricted to the early period of the pond (Diaptomus kenitraensis, Hemidiaptomus roubaui, Daphnia hispanica while others started to build large populations in the middle of the hydroperiod and dominated the communities at the later stages of the hydroperiod: Dussartius baeticus and Ceriodaphnia reticulata dominated the larger ponds, while C. reticulata and Simocephalus exspinosus dominated the smaller ponds. Alpha and beta diversity of cladoceran and copepod species were calculated for the ponds of different hydroperiod length (i.e., water residence time and area. Alpha diversity was defined as the total diversity of species associated with each pond throughout the annual hydrological period. Copepod and cladoceran communities associated with larger ponds were more diverse than the communities of smaller ponds. As several pond species occur in succession during the length of hydrological period, a longer hydroperiod (2006/2007 allowed for the establishment of a larger number of species than a shorter hydroperiod (2007/2008. Beta diversity was considered as the turnover of species in the gradient of pond area and was higher in the longer hydrological period than in the shorter hydrological period. The degree of diversity change between pairs of ponds was larger between any of the two smaller ponds and any of the larger ponds. This is the first study on the richness of planktonic micro-crustaceans in Portuguese temporary ponds. It is our purpose to increase the knowledge on these taxa to highlight the importance

  17. IMAGE PROCESSING METHOD TO MEASURE SUGARCANE LEAF AREA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay B. Patil

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available In order to increase the average sugarcane yield per acres with minimum cost farmers are adapting precision farming technique. This paper includes the area measurement of sugarcane leaf based on image processing method which is useful for plants growth monitoring, to analyze fertilizer deficiency and environmental stress,to measure diseases severity. In image processing method leaf area is calculated through pixel number statistic. Unit pixel in the same digital images represent the same size hence from known reference area and pixel count, unit pixel size can calculate, so that it is easy to calculate leaf area by counting total pixel in leaf area region. The results are compared with the results of graphical area measurement method. The experimentally it is proved that image processing method for measuring sugarcane leaf area is accurate and strong practicabilitywith small relative error.

  18. Geohydrology and limnology of Walden Pond, Concord, Massachusetts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colman, John A.; Friesz, Paul J.

    2001-01-01

    The trophic ecology and ground-water contributing area of Walden Pond, in Concord and Lincoln, Mass., were investigated by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Management from April 1997 to July 2000. Bathymetric investigation indicated that Walden Pond (24.88 hectares), a glacial kettle-hole lake with no surface inlet or outlet, has three deep areas. The maximum depth (30.5 meters) essentially was unchanged from measurements made by Henry David Thoreau in 1846. The groundwater contributing area (621,000 square meters) to Walden Pond was determined from water-table contours in areas of stratified glacial deposits and from land-surface contours in areas of bedrock highs. Walden Pond is a flow-through lake: Walden Pond gains water from the aquifer along its eastern perimeter and loses water to the aquifer along its western perimeter. Walden Pond contributing area also includes Goose Pond and its contributing area. A water budget calculated for Walden Pond, expressed as depth of water over the lake surface, indicated that 45 percent of the inflow to the lake was from precipitation (1.215 meters per year) and 55 percent from ground water (1.47 meters per year). The groundwater inflow estimate was based on the average of two different approaches including an isotope mass-balance approach. Evaporation accounted for 26 percent of the outflow from the lake (0.71 meters per year) whereas lake-water seepage to the groundwater system contributed 74 percent of the outflow (1.97 meters per year). The water-residence time of Walden Pond is approximately 5 years. Potential point sources of nutrients to ground water, the Concord municipal landfill and a trailer park, were determined to be outside the Walden Pond groundwater contributing area. A third source, the septic leach field for the Walden Pond State Reservation facilities, was within the groundwater contributing area. Nutrient budgets for the lake indicated that

  19. HEAVY METAL ANALYSIS IN WASTE WATER SAMPLES FROM VALEA ŞESEI TAILING POND

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. L. MELENTI

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Heavy metal analysis in waste water samples from Valea Şesei tailing pond. The mining of ore deposits and the processing and smelting of copper at Roşia Poieni have resulted in an increase of the toxic elements concentration within all components of the environment in the area. Valea Şesei tailing pond is a waste deposit for the Roşia Poieni open-pit and is the biggest tailing pond in Romania. In October 2009, we determined 8 heavy metals (Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni and Zn in 10 waste water samples. This water flows under the tailing dam, through the Valea Şesei stream, into the Arieş River, the water’s pH varies between 3 and 4. The heavy metals concentration exceeds with orders of magnitude. In the stream the concentrations are much lower, but still exceed the admitted levels. The results show that the tailing pond is a pollution hot spot in the area affecting the environment.

  20. Modeling the summertime evolution of sea-ice melt ponds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lüthje, Mikael; Feltham, D.L.; Taylor, P.D.; Worster, M.G.

    2006-01-01

    We present a mathematical model describing the summer melting of sea ice. We simulate the evolution of melt ponds and determine area coverage and total surface ablation. The model predictions are tested for sensitivity to the melt rate of unponded ice, enhanced melt rate beneath the melt ponds......, vertical seepage, and horizontal permeability. The model is initialized with surface topographies derived from laser altimetry corresponding to first-year sea ice and multiyear sea ice. We predict that there are large differences in the depth of melt ponds and the area of coverage between the two types of...... ice. We also find that the vertical seepage rate and the melt rate of unponded ice are important in determining the total surface ablation and area covered by melt ponds....

  1. Management of uranium mining and processing wastes at Turamdih project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on environmental impact assessment, comprehensive plan for management of wastes has been drawn up. No solid waste from the mine is being disposed off outside the project area. The quantity of waste generated after processing of ore is large because of low content of uranium in the ore. A big tailings pond has been planned in specially selected suitable valley near the plant. No liquid effluents are to be discharged into general surrounding environment. Mine water is to be fed to the process plant. Effluents from tailings pond will be collected in a storage cum evaporation pond. All water from different zones of the project shall be collected in zonal ponds and then pumped to tailings effluent storage pond. All the ponds will be provided with requisite impervious liners. The effluents of the storage pond will be treated for removal of radium and manganese and discharged into monitoring pond. Large surface areas for various ponds are envisaged to take advantage of evaporation with aim for zero discharge. To reduce impact from gaseous emissions, high efficiency dust suppression and extraction systems shall be provided. High stacks have been incorporated for DG set, boiler plants, sulphuric acid plant and dust extraction systems for crushing and grinding section and the quality of discharges will be very much within the prescribed limits. The paper describes the management plan in detail. (author)

  2. Remediation of the low-level radioactive waste tailing pond in Kowary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The town of Kowary was the centre of uranium mining activities in Poland. The headquarters of the uranium mining company ZPR-1 (Zaklady Przemyslowe R-1) were located there, as it was the only uranium processing plant in Poland. Mining in Uranium in Poland ceased in 1963, but processing of low-grade dumps was continued in Kowary until 1972. As a result of these processing activities, a significant volume of wastes was produced and the tailings pond in Kowary was constructed to accommodate these wastes. The tailings pond covers an area of 1,3 ha. It is a hydrotechnical construction closed on three sides by a dam, which has been modified a number of times over the years. It is now 300 m long (the sum of the three sides)m with a maximum height of 12 m, and is at the limits of the geotechnical stability. As a result of the uranium processing activities, the tailings pond was filled with about 2,5 x 105 t of disposed fine-grained gneisses and schists containing about 4,5 t of uranium and about 440 GBq of radium (from processing of uranium ores). A prompt remedial action in this case is particularly necessary because the tailings pond is located in a steep mountainous valley where the local climate involves rapid summer rains with heavy erosion. The nearest buildings in the town of Kowary are located literally at the foot of the 12 m high dam and private gardens extend onto the dam slope. The urgency has recently been demonstrated during the flood of summer 1997 when the base of the dam eroded. In the early seventies, Wroclaw University of Technology (WUT) received, by a governmental decision, ownership of both the area and the facilities of the former uranium mining company ZPR-1. Subsequently, the company Hydromet, Ltd., owned by WUT, has continued to use the existing chemical plant for the various experimental processes of rare (radioactive) metals, chemical production and galvanic processes. As a result, 30 t of mixed heavy metals and 300 t of the remnants from the

  3. Design process of an area-efficient photobioreactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijffers, J.F.; Janssen, M.G.J.; Tramper, J.; Wijffels, R.H.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the design process of the Green Solar Collector (GSC), an area-efficient photobioreactor for the outdoor cultivation of microalgae. The overall goal has been to design a system in which all incident sunlight on the area covered by the reactor is delivered to the algae at such

  4. Microbiology of solar salt ponds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javor, B.

    1985-01-01

    Solar salt ponds are shallow ponds of brines that range in salinity from that of normal seawater (3.4 percent) through NaCl saturation. Some salterns evaporate brines to the potash stage of concentration (bitterns). All the brines (except the bitterns, which are devoid of life) harbor high concentrations of microorganisms. The high concentrations of microorganisms and their adaptation to life in the salt pond are discussed.

  5. Investigation of abandoned surface settling ponds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    preliminary measurements were done in a period when the water had been only partly removed from the pond, and further dry-up of sediments should lead to an increase in radon exhalation. Data from 2003 confirm this assumption. During this period the water content in the bottom sediments was significantly lower than previously, and results of measurements of radon exhalation were sometimes above 300 mBq·m-2s-1. Vegetation transgression into the pond occurred during 2003, mainly weeds. Samples of vegetation were collected from this area to measure the content of radium isotopes and to calculate the transfer factors for radium isotopes. Very high concentrations of radium isotopes were found at several sites. Another reason for the pollution might be the leaching of radium from sediments and contamination of groundwater. Therefore the above mentioned sources of radiation hazard must be taken into account for planning and designing of reclamation operations for surface settling ponds of underground mines. (author)

  6. Prevention of sewage pollution by stabilization ponds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshminarayana, J S

    1975-01-01

    Water is polluted when it constitutes a health hazard or when its usefulness is impaired. The major sources of water pollution are municipal, manufacturing, mining, steam, electric power, cooling and agricultural. Municipal or sewage pollution forms a greater part of the man's activity and it is the immediate need of even smaller communities of today to combat sewage pollution. It is needless to stress that if an economic balance of the many varied services which a stream or a body of water is called upon to render is balanced and taken into consideration one could think of ending up in a wise management programme. In order to eliminate the existing water pollutional levels of the natural water one has to think of preventive and treatment methods. Of the various conventional and non-conventional methods of sewage treatment known today, in India, where the economic problems are complex, the waste stabilization ponds have become popular over the last two decades to let Public Health Engineers use them with confidence as a simple and reliable means of treatment of sewage and certain industrial wastes, at a fraction of the cost of conventional waste treatment plants used hitherto. A waste stabilization pond makes use of natural purification processes involved in an ecosystem through the regulating of such processes. The term "waste stabilization pond" in its simplest form is applied to a body of water, artificial or natural, employed with the intention of retaining sewage or organic waste waters until the wastes are rendered stable and inoffensive for discharge into receiving waters or on land, through physical, chemical and biological processes commonly referred to as "self-purification" and involving the symbiotic action of algae and bacteria under the influence of sunlight and air. Organic matter contained in the waste is stabilized and converted in the pond into more stable matter in the form of algal cells which find their way into the effluent and hence the term

  7. Investigation of the environmental impacts of sedimentation in Anzali Pond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barmal, Milad; Neshaei, Seyed Ahmad; Farzan, Niloofar

    2016-04-01

    Anzali harbor is the most essential transportation pole between Iran and other countries of the Caspian Sea basin. Anzali pond is an important ecosystem in the region due to its unique plant and animal species. In order to determine the effects of interaction between pond and sea, a series of in-depth studies and analysis on the pattern of sedimentation in Anzali harbor and pond were performed. The study area is Anzali harbor and pond which is located in southwest of the Caspian Sea in Iran. In recent years the economical importance and improvement program of this region has devoted many scientists and authorities attention to itself. In this paper, researches on environmental impact by sediment and pollution in this zone are performed. Analysis indicates that by disposal of sediment and pollution in this area, the physical and chemical quality of water has declined. Some practical suggestions are made to improve the quality of the studied region in terms of environmental aspects.

  8. Effects of within-patch heterogeneity on connectivity in pond-breeding amphibians studied by means of an individual-based model

    OpenAIRE

    Pontoppidan, M.-B.; Nachman, G

    2013-01-01

    The metapopulation framework presumes the habitat of a local population to be continuous and homogenous, and patch area is often used as a proxy for population size. Many populations of pond-breeding amphibians are assumed to follow metapopulation dynamics, and connectivity is mostly measured between breeding ponds. However, the habitat of pond-breeding amphibians is not only defined by the pond but, typically, consists of a breeding pond surrounded by clusters of disjoint s...

  9. Inventory of vegetation and benthos in newly laid and natural ponds in Forsmark 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SKB plans to build a repository for the spent nuclear fuel. The repository is planned to be built in Forsmark and constitutes installations above and below ground. The building and operation of the construction will involve activities that might affect the nature in the area. The impact means, among other things, that a small water body, which today is a reproduction site for the red listed pool frog (Rana lessonae), will disappear. The lost locality for the pool frog has been compensated by creating four new ponds in the Forsmark area. This study is part of the follow-up of these new habitats. The aim is to describe the plant and animal communities in the ponds, and follow the succession, i.e. the development of the habitats. The study also includes two natural ponds that will serve as reference objects. The survey of vegetation and invertebrate fauna in the ponds was conducted in October 2012. The results show that the new ponds had low coverage of submersed vegetation and the species composition in the plant communities differed between the ponds. The reference ponds also had different plant communities, both in terms of species composition and coverage. This indicates that the species composition of the plant communities in the new ponds will likely depend on physical factors specific to the respective pond, but that higher vegetation coverage can be expected over time in all new ponds. The reference ponds had similar animal communities that differed from the animal communities in the new ponds. The similar species composition in the reference ponds, despite the variety of plant communities, suggests that similar animal communities are likely to develop in the new ponds, even if the plant communities continues to be different. Water chemical sampling has also been conducted in the ponds during 2012. A comparison of the inorganic environment (with regard to analysed ions) showed that the reference ponds had relatively similar ion compositions with little

  10. COLONIZATION OF MANGROVE FOREST AT ABANDONED SHRIMP-POND OF SEGARA ANAKAN-CILACAP

    OpenAIRE

    Tjut Sugandawaty Djohan

    2015-01-01

    During the 1996 to 1997, large areas of mangrove forest in the Segara Anakan were cleared and converted into intensive shrimp-ponds. After one to two years, these shrimp-ponds failed and were abandoned. These abandoned ponds created large gap areas and canopy gaps, which were colonized by mangrove shrub and liana. The Segara Anakan mangrove also experienced heavy siltation, and there were tree cuttings from the remnant of the mangrove trees. This research aimed to study the colonization of ma...

  11. Observational bias and the apparent distribution of ponds on Eros

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, James H.; Barnouin, Olivier S.; Kahn, Eliezer G.; Prockter, Louise M.

    2014-10-01

    Over 300 “ponds” have been identified on 433 Eros: smooth deposits that sharply embay the bounding depressions in which they lie. The known ponds are largely concentrated near the equator at the ends of the long axis of the asteroid. Here, we examine the pixel scale of images available at the pond locations, and compare the observed distribution of ponds on Eros to that of the image pixel scale. We find that the majority (60%) of ponds are found in the regions covered by images with pixel scales less than 2 m/px, a total of only 13% of the surface area. The correlation between pond density and image pixel scale suggests a significant observational bias in the identification of small ponds. These findings suggest that the distribution of ponds on Eros may not be as clear-cut as previously reported, and that it may be best not to use this distribution to assess existing models regarding their formation of these landforms.

  12. Modeling the summertime evolution of sea-ice melt ponds

    OpenAIRE

    Lüthje, M.; D. L. Feltham; Taylor, P D; Worster, M. G.

    2006-01-01

    1] We present a mathematical model describing the summer melting of sea ice. We simulate the evolution of melt ponds and determine area coverage and total surface ablation. The model predictions are tested for sensitivity to the melt rate of unponded ice, enhanced melt rate beneath the melt ponds, vertical seepage, and horizontal permeability. The model is initialized with surface topographies derived from laser altimetry corresponding to first-year sea ice and multiyear sea ice. We predict t...

  13. Nature of Flow and Gas Dynamics Below Spreading Ponds

    OpenAIRE

    Jordan F Clark; Avisar, Dror; Hudson, G. Bryant

    2005-01-01

    The El Rio Spreading Grounds, an area of artificial recharge, lies within a regional groundwater depression. It consists of ten small ponds surrounded by eight production wells. A deliberate tracer experiment using sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) and an isotope of helium (3He) was conducted to determine groundwater flow. The tracer was continuously injected into one pond for one week prior to a ~50 day period of no recharge. At the time of the experiment, the artificial recharge rate through the hi...

  14. Groundwater flow paths in the bedrock fracture zones revealed by using the stable isotopes of oxygen and hydrogen in the Talvivaara mine gypsum pond area, Northeastern Finland

    OpenAIRE

    KittilÀ, Anniina

    2015-01-01

    Bedrock fracturing is considerably extensive and distinct in Finland, and the fractures that are open, conductive and interconnected usually control the groundwater flow paths in fractured bedrock. This highlights the importance of knowing the locations and hydraulic connections of water conducting fracture zones particularly in mining areas, because they can transport adverse substances outside the mining area. In this study, it is focused on examining possible hydraulic connections of bedro...

  15. Ponds' water balance and runoff of endorheic watersheds in the Sahel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal, Laetitia; Grippa, Manuela; Kergoat, Laurent; Hiernaux, Pierre; Mougin, Eric; Peugeot, Christophe

    2015-04-01

    The Sahel has been characterized by a severe rainfall deficit since the mid-twentieth century, with extreme droughts in the early seventies and again in the early eighties. These droughts have strongly impacted ecosystems, water availability, fodder resources, and populations living in these areas. However, an increase of surface runoff has been observed during the same period, such as higher "summer discharge" of Sahelian's rivers generating local floods, and a general increase in pond's surface in pastoral areas of central and northern Sahel. This behavior, less rain but more surface runoff is generally referred to as the "Sahelian paradox". Various hypotheses have been put forward to explain this paradoxical situation. The leading role of increase in cropped areas, often cited for cultivated Sahel, does not hold for pastoral areas in central and northern Sahel. Processes such as degradation of vegetation subsequent to the most severe drought events, soils erosion and runoff concentration on shallow soils, which generate most of the water ending up in ponds, seem to play an important role. This still needs to be fully understood and quantified. Our study focuses on a model-based approach to better understand the hydrological changes that affected the Agoufou watershed (Gourma, Mali), typical of the central, non-cultivated Sahel. Like most of the Sahelian basins, the Agoufou watershed is ungauged. Therefore we used indirect data to provide the information required to validate a rainfall-runoff model approach. The pond volume was calculated by combining in-situ water level measurements with pond's surface estimations derived by remote sensing. Using the pond's water balance equation, the variations of pond volume combined to estimates of open water bodies' evaporation and infiltration determined an estimation for the runoff supplying the pond. This estimation highlights a spectacular runoff increase over the last sixty years on the Agoufou watershed. The runoff

  16. GROWING NIPA PALM FOR RESTORATION OF ABANDONED SHRIMP PONDS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Noparat Bamroongrugsa; Chorthip Purintavarakul

    2006-01-01

    Rapid increase in the production of marine shrimps in the coastal zone has resulted in large - scale conversion of mangrove forests to shrimp ponds. Productions of the shrimps in some regions have been unstable. Consequently, a number of ponds are left idle. Restoring environmental conditions within the pond site by planting a suitable mangrove species considered an option. The experiment herein was carried out to explore the effect of planting methods on growth of Nipa palm in abandoned shrimp ponds in the Southern Thailand. Economically, coastal villagers in this area earn their income from the palm in several ways, the most importantly in Nipa sugar production. Most seedlings were planted on top of furrows were constructed in the pond to avoid flooding, except for some seedlings which were planted in the pond base where additional pond sludge were slightly filled up to compare their growth rates. The results showed that planting seedlings with attached rhizomes had the best growth rate and without seedling death at 14 months after planting. At this stage, however, the height of seedlings grown from the fallen fruits was similar to those growth from bare rooted seedlings (70 cm tall). Also, seedling mortality was not observed when growth from fallen fruits whereas about6% mortality was experienced by the bare rooted ones. Among the bare rooted seedling treatments, however no significant differences in growth rates were found when applying the soil with chemical fertilizers or farm manure or liming with CaCO3. In addition, it was found that seedling growth measured at 40 months after planting for those growths in pond base was almost 100% greater than those grown on the furrows. Therefore, this finding may be applied for the restoration of abandoned shrimp ponds by growing Nipa palm.

  17. Seasonal evolution of melt ponds on Arctic sea ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Melinda A.; Rigor, Ignatius G.; Perovich, Donald K.; Richter-Menge, Jacqueline A.; Polashenski, Christopher M.; Light, Bonnie

    2015-09-01

    The seasonal evolution of melt ponds has been well documented on multiyear and landfast first-year sea ice, but is critically lacking on drifting, first-year sea ice, which is becoming increasingly prevalent in the Arctic. Using 1 m resolution panchromatic satellite imagery paired with airborne and in situ data, we evaluated melt pond evolution for an entire melt season on drifting first-year and multiyear sea ice near the 2011 Applied Physics Laboratory Ice Station (APLIS) site in the Beaufort and Chukchi seas. A new algorithm was developed to classify the imagery into sea ice, thin ice, melt pond, and open water classes on two contrasting ice types: first-year and multiyear sea ice. Surprisingly, melt ponds formed ˜3 weeks earlier on multiyear ice. Both ice types had comparable mean snow depths, but multiyear ice had 0-5 cm deep snow covering ˜37% of its surveyed area, which may have facilitated earlier melt due to its low surface albedo compared to thicker snow. Maximum pond fractions were 53 ± 3% and 38 ± 3% on first-year and multiyear ice, respectively. APLIS pond fractions were compared with those from the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean (SHEBA) field campaign. APLIS exhibited earlier melt and double the maximum pond fraction, which was in part due to the greater presence of thin snow and first-year ice at APLIS. These results reveal considerable differences in pond formation between ice types, and underscore the importance of snow depth distributions in the timing and progression of melt pond formation.

  18. Interim characterization report for the 300 Area process trenches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schalla, R.; Wallace, R.W.; Aaberg, R.L.; Airhart, S.P.; Bates, D.J.; Carlile, J.V.M.; Cline, C.S.; Dennison, D.I.; Freshley, M.D.; Heller, P.R.

    1988-09-01

    This document contains information on the results of the Hazardous Waste Ground-Water Monitoring Compliance Program characterization studies of wastes disposed of in the 300 Area process trenches. The characterization of the 300 Area process trenches has been conducted as part of an effort initiated in June 1985, when a facility-specific monitoring program was implemented. The characterization effort is part of a regulatory ground-water monitoring compliance program for hazardous chemicals on the Hanford Site. The characterization work described in this document represents an expanded ground-water monitoring compliance effort, and incorporates or refers to previous studies useful in characterizing the 300 Area. This document is primarily a compendium of technical information on the 300 Area; therefore, data interpretations are limited to the most obvious conclusions. Final conclusions will not be presented until the analysis of data is completed in September 1989. 48 refs., 25 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. The incomings and outgoings budget of dissolved oxygenin Penaeus monodon desalting culture ponds in estuarine area%河口区斑节对虾淡化养殖塘溶氧收支平衡状况

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王为东; 臧维玲; 戴习林; 江敏; 徐桂荣

    2000-01-01

    The paper reported incomings and outgoings budget of dissolved oxygen (DO) in the giant tiger prawn (Penaeus monodon) desalting culture ecosystem in estuarine area in 1997 and 1998. The gross oxygen production (GOP) of water column in the surface layer was more (even significantly) than the oxygen consumption of aquatic respiration (AR),but the GOP in the bottom was less evidently than the corresponding AR,which was the common "oxygen debt" phenomenon. Among the oxygen consuming factors, AR was the largest oxygen consumer, which made up more than 70% of the total oxygen consumption of water column; benthic respiration (BR) was the second and accounted for about 20% of the total oxygen consumption; the proportion of prawn respiration (PR) was lower and increased remarkably with culture period. The ratio (B/P) of mean compensation depth (B) to mean transparency (P) in Giant tiger prawn pond, 1.42±0.53, was lower than that in fishpond (1.5~2.5). Therefore, the oxygen production in the depths of pond was reduced. DO in the Giant tiger prawn desalting culture pond was in disequilibrium, the outgoings outweighed the incomings.%本文报道了1997年与1998年河口区斑节对虾淡化养殖塘生态系中溶氧收支平衡状况。表层水水柱毛产氧量均大于或显著大于水呼吸耗氧量,底层水毛产氧量却显著小于水呼吸耗氧量,呈现常有的"氧债"现象。在池塘氧耗因子中,水呼吸是最大的溶解氧消耗者,占水柱总耗氧量的70%以上;其次是底泥耗氧量,约占20%;虾呼吸耗氧量所占比例较小,但随养殖时间的延长明显上升。斑节对虾塘平均补偿深度(B)和平均透明度(P)之比(B/P)与通常鱼池所具有的比值(1.5~2.5)相比偏低,为1.42±0.53。说明池塘深层的产氧能力受到限制。斑节对虾淡化养殖塘溶氧处于支大于收的不平衡状态。

  20. Homestead fish pond and the environment in Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Okaeme, A.N.

    1999-01-01

    Homestead fish culture is a recent innovation for mass production of fish at backyard in Nigeria. The processes of pond construction often have resulted in soil disturbances, vegetation losses, and creation of new aquatic environment. The paper discusses homestead ponds in Nigeria, their potential impact on the environment which includes erosion, over flooding, pest and disease, accident risk, undesired fossil fuel production, vegetation destruction and fish genetic conservation, strategies f...

  1. Assessing the Performance of two Stormwater Management Ponds in Waterloo, Ontario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulroy, K.; Stone, M.

    2009-05-01

    Stormwater runoff in urban areas represents a major pathway for pollutant transfer to receiving waters. Stormwater management (SWM) ponds are used as a best management practice to help mitigate the negative effects of stormwater. This study examines the performance of two SWM pond designs (conventional and extended detention) in Waterloo, Ontario, Canada. A mass balance approach is used to quantify the concentration of total phosphorus (TP), soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) and total suspended solids (TSS) at the inlet(s) and outlet of each pond. These parameters were sampled and characterized for 30 baseflow observations and 10 stormflow events in order to calculate the trap efficiency for each pond. The results show that, baseflow reduction for all constituents was low for both ponds. Pond 33 (extended detention design) was a source of TP and SRP during baseflow periods with trap efficiencies of -34% and -61% respectively. Pond 45 (conventional design) retained 65% of influent TP and 36% SRP. Both ponds were sinks for TSS during baseflow periods with 61% and 48% of SS retained for Pond 33 and Pond 45 respectively. Retention during storm events was higher compared to baseflow periods. Pond 33 retained 11%, 40% and 66% of TP, SRP and TSS, whereas Pond 45 had a higher trap efficiency of 90%, 93% and 97% for TP, SRP and TSS. Trap efficiency of these constituents are governed by pH, temperature and dissolved oxygen, as well as sediment geochemistry, P speciation and cycling at the sediment-water interface. Additional research focusing on P cycling in SWM ponds is required to improve trap efficiencies through improved pond design.

  2. Conditions and process of deglaciation in the Antarctic coastal areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verkulich, Dr.

    2009-04-01

    The existing paleogeographic data from Antarctic ice-free land areas were analyzed with the purpose to reveal influence of global changes and local factors on deglaciation processes. The initial phase of deglaciation (end of Late Pleistocene—ca. 7000 yrs BP) was characterized by rapid retreat of glaciers in all areas due to both global climate warming (11000-8500 yrs BP) and relative sea-level rise. During ca. 8000-5500 yrs BP, the climate was colder, and the relative sea- level rise (maximum 7500-6000 yrs BP) was replaced by fall. Such climatic conditions were still suitable for slow deglaciation process in the coasts (on the whole), but led to positive balance of glaciers in "mountain" areas. Additionally, in some coasts, limited re-advance of the floating glacier edges happened in the places where they turned on the uplifting land. During ca. 4500-2000 yrs BP, an essential warming had different influence: in the areas inside continent deglaciation was continued; in the "maritime" lowland areas this warming led to increase in precipitation/snow accumulation and to the limited expansion of local glaciers. Within last 1000 years, the limited re-advance of glaciers occurred in most of areas, likely corresponding to the Little Ice Age.

  3. 300 Area Process Trenches Modified Closure/Postclosure Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This chapter provides a brief summary of the contents of each chapter of this plan for the closure of the 300 Area Process Trenches (300 APT) treatment, storage, and/or disposal unit. It also provides background information for this unit and discusses how its closure will be integrated with the remedial action for the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 300- FF-1 Operable Unit. The 300 APT is located within the 300 Area of the Hanford Site. This area contained reactor fuel fabrication facilities and research and development laboratories. The 300 APT was constructed and began operations in 1975 as the 316-5 Process Trenches. Effluent was discharged to the trenches by way of the 300 Area process sewer system, which has been the sole source of effluent for the 300 APT. The 316-5 Process Trenches gained Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) interim status as the 300 APT TSD unit on November 11, 1985. The unit has been administratively closed to discharges of dangerous waste since 1985

  4. Benthic Oxygen Demand in Three Former Salt Ponds Adjacent to South San Francisco Bay, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topping, Brent R.; Kuwabara, James S.; Athearn, Nicole D.; Takekawa, John Y.; Parcheso, Francis; Henderson, Kathleen D.; Piotter, Sara

    2009-01-01

    Sampling trips were coordinated in the second half of 2008 to examine the interstitial water in the sediment and the overlying bottom waters of three shallow (average depth 2 meters). The water column at all deployment sites was monitored with dataloggers for ancillary water-quality parameters (including dissolved oxygen, salinity, specific conductance, temperature, and pH) to facilitate the interpretation of benthic-flux results. Calculated diffusive benthic flux of dissolved (0.2-micron filtered) oxygen was consistently negative (that is, drawn from the water column into the sediment) and ranged between -0.5 x 10-6 and -37 x 10-6 micromoles per square centimeter per second (site averages depicted in table 2). Assuming pond areas of 1.0, 1.4, and 2.3 square kilometers for ponds A16, A14, and A3W, respectively, this converts to an oxygen mass flux into the ponds' sediment ranging from -1 to -72 kilograms per day. Diffusive oxygen flux into the benthos (listed as negative) was lowest in pond A14 (-0.5 x 10-6 to -1.8 x 10-6 micromoles per square centimeter per second) compared with diffusive flux estimates for ponds A16 and A3W (site averages -26 x 10-6 to -35 x 10-6 and -34 x 10-6 to -37 x 10-6 micromoles per square centimeter per second, respectively). These initial diffusive-flux estimates are of the order of magnitude of those measured in the South Bay using core-incubation experiments (Topping and others, 2004), which include bioturbation and bioirrigation effects. Estimates of benthic oxygen demand reported herein, based on molecular diffusion, serve as conservative estimates of benthic flux because solute transport across the sediment-water interface can be enhanced by multidisciplinary processes including bioturbation, bioirrigation, ground-water advection, and wind resuspension (Kuwabara and others, 2009).

  5. Metals in pond sediments as archives of anthropogenic activities: a study in response to health concerns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An environmental geochemistry approach was applied in response to health concerns about present day and past exposure to pollutants within Broome County, New York by determining historical records of anthropogenic activities as preserved in sediment cores. Sediment was collected from a stormwater retention pond adjacent to a warehouse complex in the urban community of Hillcrest as well as from 3 other ponds in rural locations in Broome County. Metal concentrations and decay products of 210Pb and 137Cs were measured to determine the timing of source specific differences in the distribution of metals in the sediment cores. Concentrations of Zn, Pb, Ni, Cu, Cr, Cd and As were elevated in the retention pond sediments when compared to sediment from other locations. Topography influenced atmospheric transport and deposition of pollutants within incised river valleys and enhanced runoff from impervious surfaces within an urban watershed contributed to the elevated metal concentrations at Hillcrest. Temporal changes in Pb deposition within retention pond sediment mimic the rise and fall in use of leaded gasoline. Arsenic concentrations decreased following placement of emission controls on nearby coal-fired power plant sources. Superimposed over the temporal trends of Pb and As are co-varying Zn, Ni, Cu, Cr and Cd concentrations; a suite of metals commonly used in metal plating processes by local industries. Analysis of sediment in stormwater retention ponds in other urban areas may provide opportunities for detailed records of pollution history to be obtained in many communities. Residents in urban communities located in incised river valley locations similar to Hillcrest may be particularly prone to enhanced exposure to metals from anthropogenic sources

  6. Deadline scramble : oilsands mining operators and outsiders investigate more rapid tailings pond cleanup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, M.

    2010-05-15

    Oil sand tailings ponds composed of a slurry of water, clay, sand, silt and residual bitumen have become one of the biggest environmental and public relations challenges facing the oil sand industry. The Alberta Energy Resources Conservation Board's Directive 74 requires that oilsands mining companies convert at least 20 per cent of the fine particles in their tailings ponds to solid waste by June 2011, rising to 50 per cent by 2013 and annually thereafter. Tailings ponds must be ready for surface reclamation within 5 years of the ponds becoming inactive. Directive 74 also stipulates that within 1 year of the creation of a dedicated disposal area, it must attain a minimum undrained shear strength of 5 kilopascals, rising to a minimum shear strength in 5 years of 10 kPa, trafficable and ready for reclamation. To date, only Suncor has committed to meeting the directive's deadlines. Syncrude Canada Ltd. has been testing centrifuge technology, and smaller companies, such as Solid Environmental Services Ltd, Foret Plasma Labs, LLC and Micro-TES, Inc. are also promoting their own solutions. The greatest challenge with the tailings ponds is to reach that 5 kPa rating. This article described some technologies that may attain the criteria, including the bentonite-based PitDry solidification process that is used to treat a variety of drilling, mining and industrial wastes; the Plasma Whirl, a plasma hydrocyclone that can be used for water treatment and heavy oil upgrading; and super bugs in which microbes break down hydrocarbons and other organic wastes into non-hazardous components such as fatty acids, carbon dioxide and water. 4 refs., 3 figs.

  7. Sound management of sediment yields at the catchment scale by small detention ponds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikorska, A. E.; Wasilewicz, M.; Banasik, K.

    2012-04-01

    thickness within the pond was measured twice (in 2009 and 2011) by the echo sounding technique. A resulting sediment deposit volume was computed by constructing a Digital Elevation Model (DEM) of the pond. An alternating reservoir volume was estimated for both measurements and confronted with the initial characteristics (2007). Our first results demonstrate that the pond will loose its sufficient capacity after about ten years if no regular sediment dredging is undertaken. Moreover, the useful time of the pond will decrease by two years when the catchment area increases by 10% due to expected urbanization. Furthermore, different scenarios of maintenance options were analyzed and recommendations for sound sediment management of similar small ponds in urban catchments were given.

  8. Conscious and unconscious processing of nonverbal predictability in Wernicke's area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischoff-Grethe, A; Proper, S M; Mao, H; Daniels, K A; Berns, G S

    2000-03-01

    The association of nonverbal predictability and brain activation was examined using functional magnetic resonance imaging in humans. Participants regarded four squares displayed horizontally across a screen and counted the incidence of a particular color. A repeating spatial sequence with varying levels of predictability was embedded within a random color presentation. Both Wernicke's area and its right homolog displayed a negative correlation with temporal predictability, and this effect was independent of individuals' conscious awareness of the sequence. When individuals were made aware of the underlying sequential predictability, a widespread network of cortical regions displayed activity that correlated with the predictability. Conscious processing of predictability resulted in a positive correlation to activity in right prefrontal cortex but a negative correlation in posterior parietal cortex. These results suggest that conscious processing of predictability invokes a large-scale cortical network, but independently of awareness, Wernicke's area processes predictive events in time and may not be exclusively associated with language. PMID:10684898

  9. Polishing ponds for post-treatment of digested sewage. Part 1: Flow-through ponds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalcanti, P F; van Haandel, A; Lettinga, G

    2001-01-01

    Polishing ponds are used to improve the quality of effluents from efficient anaerobic sewage treatment plants like UASB reactors, so that the final effluent quality becomes compatible with legal or desired standards. The residual organic material and suspended solids concentrations in the digested sewage are reduced, but often the main objective of polishing ponds is to improve the hygienic quality, measured by the concentration of two indicator organisms: helminth eggs and faecal coliforms (FC). The FC removal is normally the slowest process and for that reason becomes the main design criterion for a polishing pond. By contrast in conventional waste stabilisation pond (WSP) systems the organic material removal is the governing design parameter. The feasibility of operating a single polishing pond for the post-treatment of UASB effluent is shown in this paper and the final effluent quality as a function of the retention time is discussed. Even under the most adverse weather conditions (several weeks of rain) the population of algae remained stable and produced enough oxygen to maintain a predominantly aerobic environment. The final effluent TSS and BOD concentrations were not very low for retention times of less than 1 week, but this could be attributed to the presence of algae in the final effluent. Filtered effluent BOD and TSS concentrations were very low. For retention times of more than 1 week algae were efficiently removed from the liquid phase by the action of predators and algae flocculation and settling, so that a final effluent with a very low BOD and TSS concentrations was produced. To maximise the FC removal efficiency the polishing pond was constructed with the objective of approaching a plug flow regime. However, the observed efficiency was well below the expected value for all retention times, which was attributable to imperfections of the flow regime. From tracer studies it was established that the dispersion number was in the range of 0.14 to 0

  10. Description of work for 216-U-Pond cone penetrometer demonstration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This description of work details the Proposed field activities associated with Cone Penetrometer (CPT) work at the 216-U-10 Pond (U-10 Pond) in the 200 West Area and will serve as a field guide for those performing the work. The U-10 Pond was constructed in 1944 to receive low-level liquid effluent from the various chemical reprocessing facilities within the 200 West Area. The U-10 Pond covered 30 acres and received approximately 4.3 x 1010 gal of contaminated liquid. Sampling conducted in 1980 indicated that the most significant radionuclides were 90Sr, 137Cs, plutonium, and uranium (DOE-RL 1993). The pond was deactivated and stabilized in 1985 with clean fill dirt. The thickness of the stabilization cover is variable across the former pond and ranges between 2 ft near the pond margins and delta area to 8 feet in the deepest section of the pond. The purpose of this work is to establish the extent of contamination beneath the U-10 pond

  11. From tailings pond 1 to Wapisiw Lookout, Suncor celebrates reclamation milestone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaremko, D.

    2010-12-15

    Suncor Energy is the first company to achieve the restoration of a tailings pond to a natural setting. Its Tailings Pond 1 is now known as Wapisiw Lookout, a solid surface that accommodates 630,000 shrubs and trees planted earlier in 2010. Ultimately, the area will look very similar to the natural landscape of the boreal forest. Suncor created the 220 hectare Tailings Pond 1 in 1967 when it was the only way to produce bitumen. It was part of 8 tailings ponds that covered a combined 3,154 hectares. Pond 1 was decommissioned in December 2006 with the removal of mature fine tailings (MFT). The greatest challenge facing Suncor was to create a solid surface from the sludge. Suncor backfilled the site with 30 million tonnes of reclaimed tailings sand. The site undergoes regular soil, water and vegetation assessments. Much of the MFT from Pond 1 was moved to another tailings ponds that is better suited for long-term storage and treatment. This article also described Suncor's tailings reduction operations (TRO), in which MFTs are mixed with a polymer flocculant and then deposited in thin layers over sand banks with shallow slopes to produce a dry material that can be reclaimed instead of being moved to another location. Because of its TRO, Suncor will not be building any new tailings ponds. Pond 5 is the next tailings pond targeted for reclamation. 9 figs.

  12. Water requirement model for salt gradient solar ponds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batty, J.C.; Riley, J.P.; Panahi, Z.

    1987-01-01

    A model for predicting the salt gradient solar pond (SGSP) area that could be maintained with a given water supply is presented together with several specific applications. For example, based on 30-year average water flows, the model predicts that 1.93 x 10/sup 9/ m/sup 2/ (477,000 acres) of solar ponds, 1.02 x 10/sup 9/ m/sup 2/ (253,000 acres) of evaporation ponds to recycle salt, and 0.51 x 10/sup 9/ m/sup 2/ (125,000 acres) of freshwater storage reservoirs could be maintained at the Great Salt Lake of Utah. Water use requirements per unit of electrical energy from solar ponds are calculated as 600,000 m/sup 3//MW x yr. This is roughly 30 times the water evaporated per unit of electrical energy from coal-fired generating plants using wet cooling towers, but substantially less than water evaporation losses per unit of electrical energy produced from typical hydropower dams and reservoirs. It is concluded that water use requirements for solar ponds, although not necessarily prohibitive, are substantial; and in many locations may be the physical factor that limits solar pond development. 9 references, 4 figures, 5 tables.

  13. 2101-M pond closure plan. Volume 1, Revision 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izatt, R. D.; Lerch, R. E.

    1993-06-01

    This document describes activities for the closure of a surface impoundment (2101-M Pond) at the Hanford Site. The 2101-H Pond was initially constructed in 1953 to serve as a drainage collection area for the 2101-H Building. (Until the Basalt Waste Isolation Project (BWIP) Laboratory was constructed in the 2101-M Building in 1979--1981, the only source contributing discharge to the pond was condensate water from the 2101-H Building heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) system. The drains for the BWIP Laboratory rooms were plumbed into a 4-in., cast-iron, low-pressure drain pipe that carries waste water from the HVAC system to the pond. During the active life of the BWIP Laboratory, solutions of dissolved barium in groundwater samples were discharged to the 2101-M Pond via the laboratory drains. As a result of the discharges, a Part A permit application was initially submitted to the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) in August 1986 which designates the 2101-M Pond as a surface impoundment.

  14. Pond Ecology in the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneidl, Sally Stenhouse

    1993-01-01

    Describes activities with organisms from freshwater ponds and ditches. Several experiments involve predation, some involve habitat choices, and one addressees the role of sunlight in supporting plant-eating animals. (PR)

  15. Modelling faecal coliform mortality in water hyacinths ponds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo, A. W.; Kalibbala, M.

    Removal of faecal coliforms was investigated in pilot-scale water hyacinths ponds. The investigation was conducted to evaluate the role of solar intensity, pH, dissolved oxygen, temperature, sedimentation, and attachment of faecal coliforms on Eichhornia crassipes on disappearance of bacteria in water hyacinths ponds. A mathematical model that used the plug flow philosophy and incorporating the aforementioned factors was developed to predict faecal coliform mortality rate. The proposed multifactor model satisfactorily predicted mortality rate of faecal coliforms in a pilot-scale water hyacinths ponds. After optimization of the parameters, mortality rate constant for pH ( kpH) was 0.001, mortality rate constant for DO ( kDO) was 0.0037 and solar intensity mortality rate constant k s was 0.0102 cm 2/cal. The results also showed that the thickness of biofilm ( Lf) was 2.5 × 10 -4 m, and the effective surface area of water hyacinths roots per unit surface area of pond ( Rs) was 10.4 m 2/m 2. The results further showed that environmental factors such as solar intensity and pH were the key factors when water hyacinths ponds have a large exposed surface area. However, attachment of bacteria to water hyacinths played a major role in ponds fully covered with water hyacinths. The inclusion of sedimentation parameters in the model improved model efficiency by only 3.2%. It was concluded that sedimentation is not a major factor governing faecal coliform disappearance in water hyacinths pond systems receiving pretreated wastewaters.

  16. New approach to solar photo-Fenton operation. Raceway ponds as tertiary treatment technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Raceway ponds are used for the first time as photo-Fenton reactors. • Raceway ponds are effective and have high treatment capacity (48 mg/h m2 for 360 L). • The highest treatment capacity occurs with 5.5 mg Fe/L and 15 cm liquid depth. • Low iron concentrations are enough to oxidise the pesticide mixture. • Raceway ponds are a simple and low-cost alternative for micropollutant removal. - Abstract: The photo-Fenton process has proven its efficiency in the removal of micropollutants. However, the high costs usually associated with it prevent a spread of this technology. An important factor affecting costs is the kind of photoreactor used, usually tubular with a reflecting surface. Tubular reactors like compound parabolic collectors, CPCs, involve high capital costs. In comparison, the application of less costly reactors such as the extensive raceway ponds (RPRs) would help to spread the use of the photo-Fenton process as tertiary treatment at commercial scale. As far as the authors know, RPRs have never been used in advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) applications. This work is aimed at studying the applicability of RPRs to remove micropollutants with solar photo-Fenton. For this purpose, a pesticide mixture of commercial acetamiprid (ACTM) and thiabendazole (TBZ) (100 μg/L each) was used in simulated secondary effluent. Iron concentration (1, 5.5 and 10 mg/L) and liquid depth (5, 10 and 15 cm) were studied as process variables. TBZ was removed at the beginning of the treatment (less than 5 min), although ACTM removal times were longer (20–40 min for the highest iron concentrations). High treatment capacity per surface area was obtained (48 mg/h m2 with 5.5 mg Fe/L and 15 cm liquid depth), proving the feasibility of using RPRs for micropollutant removal

  17. New approach to solar photo-Fenton operation. Raceway ponds as tertiary treatment technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carra, Irene; Santos-Juanes, Lucas [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Almería, 04120, Almería (Spain); CIESOL, Joint Centre of the University of Almería-CIEMAT, 04120, Almería (Spain); Acién Fernández, Francisco Gabriel [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Almería, 04120, Almería (Spain); Malato, Sixto [CIESOL, Joint Centre of the University of Almería-CIEMAT, 04120, Almería (Spain); Plataforma Solar de Almería (CIEMAT), 04200, Tabernas, Almería (Spain); Sánchez Pérez, José Antonio, E-mail: jsanchez@ual.es [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Almería, 04120, Almería (Spain); CIESOL, Joint Centre of the University of Almería-CIEMAT, 04120, Almería (Spain)

    2014-08-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Raceway ponds are used for the first time as photo-Fenton reactors. • Raceway ponds are effective and have high treatment capacity (48 mg/h m{sup 2} for 360 L). • The highest treatment capacity occurs with 5.5 mg Fe/L and 15 cm liquid depth. • Low iron concentrations are enough to oxidise the pesticide mixture. • Raceway ponds are a simple and low-cost alternative for micropollutant removal. - Abstract: The photo-Fenton process has proven its efficiency in the removal of micropollutants. However, the high costs usually associated with it prevent a spread of this technology. An important factor affecting costs is the kind of photoreactor used, usually tubular with a reflecting surface. Tubular reactors like compound parabolic collectors, CPCs, involve high capital costs. In comparison, the application of less costly reactors such as the extensive raceway ponds (RPRs) would help to spread the use of the photo-Fenton process as tertiary treatment at commercial scale. As far as the authors know, RPRs have never been used in advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) applications. This work is aimed at studying the applicability of RPRs to remove micropollutants with solar photo-Fenton. For this purpose, a pesticide mixture of commercial acetamiprid (ACTM) and thiabendazole (TBZ) (100 μg/L each) was used in simulated secondary effluent. Iron concentration (1, 5.5 and 10 mg/L) and liquid depth (5, 10 and 15 cm) were studied as process variables. TBZ was removed at the beginning of the treatment (less than 5 min), although ACTM removal times were longer (20–40 min for the highest iron concentrations). High treatment capacity per surface area was obtained (48 mg/h m{sup 2} with 5.5 mg Fe/L and 15 cm liquid depth), proving the feasibility of using RPRs for micropollutant removal.

  18. Estimating survival and breeding probability for pond-breeding amphibians: a modified robust design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, L.L.; Kendall, W.L.; Church, D.R.; Wilbur, H.M.

    2004-01-01

    Many studies of pond-breeding amphibians involve sampling individuals during migration to and from breeding habitats. Interpreting population processes and dynamics from these studies is difficult because (1) only a proportion of the population is observable each season, while an unknown proportion remains unobservable (e.g., non-breeding adults) and (2) not all observable animals are captured. Imperfect capture probability can be easily accommodated in capture?recapture models, but temporary transitions between observable and unobservable states, often referred to as temporary emigration, is known to cause problems in both open- and closed-population models. We develop a multistate mark?recapture (MSMR) model, using an open-robust design that permits one entry and one exit from the study area per season. Our method extends previous temporary emigration models (MSMR with an unobservable state) in two ways. First, we relax the assumption of demographic closure (no mortality) between consecutive (secondary) samples, allowing estimation of within-pond survival. Also, we add the flexibility to express survival probability of unobservable individuals (e.g., ?non-breeders?) as a function of the survival probability of observable animals while in the same, terrestrial habitat. This allows for potentially different annual survival probabilities for observable and unobservable animals. We apply our model to a relictual population of eastern tiger salamanders (Ambystoma tigrinum tigrinum). Despite small sample sizes, demographic parameters were estimated with reasonable precision. We tested several a priori biological hypotheses and found evidence for seasonal differences in pond survival. Our methods could be applied to a variety of pond-breeding species and other taxa where individuals are captured entering or exiting a common area (e.g., spawning or roosting area, hibernacula).

  19. Vegetation succession process induced by reforestation in erosion areas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feixin WANG; Zhaoyin WANG; Zhengming YANG; Xining JI

    2008-01-01

    Reforestation is one of the most important and efficient measures of water and soil conservation. Based on field investigations in the Shangyang Soil Conservation and Reforestation Station in Huizhou, Guangdong Province, China, we studied the variation in vegetation development, vegetation succession processes and soil erosion. The regional vegetation consists mainly of monsoon evergreen broad-leaved forests (MEBF). The area was deforested and became a denuded hill area with extremely high soil erosion in the 1960s and 1970s. Then, the area was closed in order to allow recovery of the vegetation. Under natural condi-tions the vegetation development and succession processes were slow during which soil erosion and strong sunshine and evaporation slowed down the development of the vegetation. About 25 years later, the vegetation cover was still merely 35% or so. The dominant vegetation types were heliophilous herbage and shrubs which formed a poorly developed shrub-herbage community and erosion remained high. In contrast, reforestation with selected tree species dramatically speeded up the vegetation succession process. About 12 years after reforestation, vegetation cover of the Acacia auriculiformis plantations in the Shangyang Station was 90% and erosion was under control. After 23 years, understory vegetation, consisting of indigenous species, had developed in the plantations. The planted trees and naturally developing herbage, shrubs, bamboo, local trees and liana formed a complex vegetation community in three layers. It will take 60 years for the vegetation to succeed from bare land to a secondary growth forest under natural conditions. Reforestation may speed up the vegetation suc-cession process. The time may be reduced to 20 years. Reforestation is the most effective measure of vegetation restoration and erosion control in this area.

  20. Processes of deagrarization and urbanization of Slovene rural areas

    OpenAIRE

    Vladimir Klemenčič

    2015-01-01

    The treatise deals with elements of the processes of differentiation of Slovene rural areas which have been differentiated during the last four decades under the condition of industrialization and the concept of polycentric regional development into regions of urbanization, regions of transition and regions of depopulation. This differentiation was accompanied by the growth of the number of the population which was employed in industries and consequently quick decline in the percentage of agr...

  1. Design methodology for a salt gradient solar pond coupled with an evaporation pond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agha, K.R.; Ramadan, A.M. [Center for Solar Energy Studies, Tripoli (Libya); Abughres, S.M. [Center for Solar Energy Studies, Tripoli (Libya); Faculty of Engineering, Tripoli (Libya). Dept. of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering

    2002-05-01

    This paper presents the results of a simple mathematical model for predicting the ratio of the evaporation pond (EP) area to that of a Salt Gradient Solar Pond (SGSP) area. The EP idea provides a very attractive method of salt recycling by evaporation, especially in areas of high rates of evaporation and low rates of rain as it is the case for North Africa. The model is applied for two types of surface water flushing (fresh water and seawater) under the prevailing conditions of Tripoli-Libya (Lat.=32.68{sup o}N) and for measured evaporation rates. Under the summer conditions and for the case of surface flushing by fresh water, the area ratio was estimated at about 0.17. While for the case of using seawater this ratio increases enormously to about 14.4. The time required for the salt concentration to increase from seawater concentration to a high concentrated brine, which can be injected at the bottom of the solar pond, is also presented. It was estimated that the time required to increase the salt concentration from 3.5 to 35% is about 120 to 250 days during the summer months and about 200 to 220 days during the winter months. (author)

  2. Don Quixote Pond: A Small Scale Model of Weathering and Salt Accumulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englert, P.; Bishop, J. L.; Patel, S. N.; Gibson, E. K.; Koeberl, C.

    2015-01-01

    The formation of Don Quixote Pond in the North Fork of Wright Valley, Antarctica, is a model for unique terrestrial calcium, chlorine, and sulfate weathering, accumulation, and distribution processes. The formation of Don Quixote Pond by simple shallow and deep groundwater contrasts more complex models for Don Juan Pond in the South Fork of Wright Valley. Our study intends to understand the formation of Don Quixote Pond as unique terrestrial processes and as a model for Ca, C1, and S weathering and distribution on Mars.

  3. Performance of a Laboratory-scale Microalgae Pond for Secondary Treatment of Distillery Wastewaters

    OpenAIRE

    Travieso, L.; Benítez, F.; Sánchez, E.; Borja, R.; De León, M; Raposo, F.; Rincón, B.

    2008-01-01

    Distillery waste disposal is one of the major problems being faced by all nations across the globe. To diminish its organic loading, the distillery waste is treated before its final disposal by biological processes. Microalgae pond gives a way to solve this situation. An evaluation of the performance of a laboratory-scale microalgae pond treating distillery waste previously treated in an anaerobic filter was carried out. The microalgae pond operated with an effluent recycling (R) of 10:1 w...

  4. Design and Application of a Solar Mobile Pond Aquaculture Water Quality-Regulation Machine Based in Bream Pond Aquaculture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingguo Liu

    Full Text Available Bream pond aquaculture plays a very important role in China's aquaculture industry and is the main source of aquatic products. To regulate and control pond water quality and sediment, a movable solar pond aquaculture water quality regulation machine (SMWM was designed and used. This machine is solar-powered and moves on water, and its primary components are a solar power supply device, a sediment lifting device, a mechanism for walking on the water's surface and a control system. The solar power supply device provides power for the machine, and the water walking mechanism drives the machine's motion on the water. The sediment lifting device orbits the main section of the machine and affects a large area of the pond. Tests of the machine's mechanical properties revealed that the minimum illumination necessary for the SMWM to function is 13,000 Lx and that its stable speed on the water is 0.02-0.03 m/s. For an illumination of 13,000-52,500 Lx, the sediment lifting device runs at 0.13-0.35 m/s, and its water delivery capacity is 110-208 m(3/h. The sediment lifting device is able to fold away, and the angle of the suction chamber can be adjusted, making the machine work well in ponds at different water depths from 0.5 m to 2 m. The optimal distance from the sediment lifting device to the bottom of the pond is 10-15 cm. In addition, adjusting the length of the connecting rod and the direction of the traction rope allows the SMWM to work in a pond water area greater than 80%. The analysis of water quality in Wuchang bream (Parabramis pekinensis and silver carp (Hypophthalmichthys molitrix culture ponds using the SMWM resulted in decreased NH3(+-N and available phosphorus concentrations and increased TP concentrations. The TN content and the amount of available phosphorus in the sediment were reduced. In addition, the fish production showed that the SMWM enhanced the yields of Wuchang bream and silver carp by more than 30% and 24%, respectively. These

  5. Design and Application of a Solar Mobile Pond Aquaculture Water Quality-Regulation Machine Based in Bream Pond Aquaculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xingguo; Xu, Hao; Ma, Zhuojun; Zhang, Yongjun; Tian, Changfeng; Cheng, Guofeng; Zou, Haisheng; Lu, Shimin; Liu, Shijing; Tang, Rong

    2016-01-01

    Bream pond aquaculture plays a very important role in China's aquaculture industry and is the main source of aquatic products. To regulate and control pond water quality and sediment, a movable solar pond aquaculture water quality regulation machine (SMWM) was designed and used. This machine is solar-powered and moves on water, and its primary components are a solar power supply device, a sediment lifting device, a mechanism for walking on the water's surface and a control system. The solar power supply device provides power for the machine, and the water walking mechanism drives the machine's motion on the water. The sediment lifting device orbits the main section of the machine and affects a large area of the pond. Tests of the machine's mechanical properties revealed that the minimum illumination necessary for the SMWM to function is 13,000 Lx and that its stable speed on the water is 0.02-0.03 m/s. For an illumination of 13,000-52,500 Lx, the sediment lifting device runs at 0.13-0.35 m/s, and its water delivery capacity is 110-208 m(3)/h. The sediment lifting device is able to fold away, and the angle of the suction chamber can be adjusted, making the machine work well in ponds at different water depths from 0.5 m to 2 m. The optimal distance from the sediment lifting device to the bottom of the pond is 10-15 cm. In addition, adjusting the length of the connecting rod and the direction of the traction rope allows the SMWM to work in a pond water area greater than 80%. The analysis of water quality in Wuchang bream (Parabramis pekinensis) and silver carp (Hypophthalmichthys molitrix) culture ponds using the SMWM resulted in decreased NH3(+)-N and available phosphorus concentrations and increased TP concentrations. The TN content and the amount of available phosphorus in the sediment were reduced. In addition, the fish production showed that the SMWM enhanced the yields of Wuchang bream and silver carp by more than 30% and 24%, respectively. These results

  6. Distribution of trematodes in snails in ponds at integrated small-scale aquaculture farms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boerlage, A.S.; Graat, E.A.M.; Verreth, J.A.J.; Jong, de M.C.M.

    2013-01-01

    In integrated small-scale aquaculture farming, animal and human excreta maybe used as fish feed and pond fertilizer, thereby enhancing transmission of fish-borne zoonotic trematodes (FZTs) from final hosts, like humans, pigs and chickens, to snails. Areas within a pond could vary in trematode egg-lo

  7. Blogging from North Pond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marziali, C. G.; Edwards, K. J.

    2009-12-01

    Sea going research expeditions provide an ideal opportunity for outreach through blogs: the finite duration limits the author's commitment; scientists are usually in a remote location with fewer distractions; and fieldwork is visual and interesting to describe. Over four weeks this winter, Katrina Edwards of USC authored a blog about her deep-sea drilling expedition to North Pond, a depression in the ocean crust in the mid-Atlantic. She emailed daily dispatches and photos to USC Media Relations, which maintained a (still accessible) blog. Written for the general public, the blog quickly attracted interest from lay readers as well as from media organizations. Scientific American carried the blog on its web site, and the National Science Foundation linked to it in its "Science 360" electronic news digest. The blog also led to a Q&A with Edwards in the widely-read "Behind the Scenes" feature of LiveScience. Interest from science bloggers and National Geographic towards the end suggests that the blog could have expanded its reach given more time: expeditions lasting between six weeks and three months, such as occur during ocean drilling expeditions, would appear to be ideal candidates for a blog. Most importantly, the blog educated readers about the importance to planetary life of what Edwards calls the "intraterrestrials": the countless microbes that inhabit the oceanic crust and influence major chemical and biological cycles. Considering that the subjects of the expedition were invisible critters in a pitch-dark place, the blog shows what can be accomplished by scientists and institutions committed to public outreach.

  8. Solar Pond Fluid Dynamics and Heat Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, G. F.

    1984-01-01

    The primary objective of the solar pond research was to obtain an indepth understanding of solar pond fluid dynamics and heat transfer. The key product was the development of a validated one-dimensional computer model with the capability to accurately predict time-dependent solar pond temperature, salinities, and interface motions. Laboratory scale flow visualization experiments were conducted to better understand layer motion. Two laboratory small-scale ponds and a large-scale outdoor solar pond were designed and built to provide quantitative data. This data provided a basis for validating the model and enhancing the understanding of pond dynamic behavior.

  9. Flood, drought and the inter-annual variation to the number and size of ponds and small wetlands in an English lowland landscape over three years of weather extremes

    OpenAIRE

    Jeffries, Mike

    2016-01-01

    Ponds are biodiversity hotspots, but pond conservation is hampered by problems auditing these small, often temporary, habitats. Data on temporal changes to the number of ponds in response to weather variations are lacking. Annual and seasonal changes to the numbers and area of wetted ponds in a lowland farm in England were surveyed by field walks between November 2010 and November 2013. Plant communities were recorded to identify variations in pond type between land uses. The study period coi...

  10. High rates of methane emissions from south taiga wetland ponds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glagolev, M.; Kleptsova, I.; Maksyutov, S.

    2012-04-01

    (Casper et al., 2000). Annual CH4 emission from West Siberia south taiga ponds with area of 0.6·106 Mha was estimated to be 0.26 MtCH4·yr-1.

  11. Mycobiota in the processing areas of two different meat products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Louise Marie; Jacobsen, Tomas; Nielsen, Per Væggemose;

    2008-01-01

    /P. bialowiezense and P. palitans. A screening for secondary metabolites showed that isolates of these species consistently produced mycophenolic acid and cyclopiazonic acid, respectively. Presence of these toxinogenic species in the processing areas implies a risk of mycotoxin contamination of the products if they...... were identified as Aspergillus, Botrytis, Cladosporium, Epicoccum, Eurotium, Penicillium, Phaeoacremonium and Phoma. Of these, Penicillium and Eurotium were the most important for contamination of fermented sausage, whereas Penicillium and Cladosporium were most important for liver pâté. Cladosporium...... was isolated more frequently in the processing plants examined in the autumn than in the spring. The seasonal variation indicates that outdoor air is an important source for this contamination. Eurotium was isolated frequently at one of the fermented sausage plants. Penicillium was isolated frequently...

  12. Embankment over fly ash pond at Portsmouth Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fly ash and bottom ash sediments from the Portsmouth Power Station in Portsmouth, Virginia were being sluiced into a 39 acre diked ash pond near the plant. When the ash level within the pond was an average of 4 feet below the crest of the dike, it was decided to enlarge the capacity of the disposal area. The plant was about to convert to dry ash disposal, and thus, the plan was to construct a 30-foot high fly ash embarkment over the previously ponded ash. To meet regulatory guidelines, the conversion from wet to dry disposal of fly ash required that the existing ''wet'' pond area be ''closed'' with an impermeable cover and that the new ''dry'' area have an impervious liner (a cover-liner system). This posed potential drainage constraints necessitating an underdrain system below the cover-liner system. The design had to address the stability of the new 30-foot ash embankment constructed over confined, saturated ponded ash and not adversely affect the stability of the perimeter dike. The design also had to provide for interim storage of sluiced fly ash, which resulted in a new inner perimeter dike (inside the existing main dike) and for long term storage for sluiced bottom ash. The sluiced bottom ash would be collected in a small segmented diked pond within the existing main dike. This paper describes the subsurface exploration, stability evaluation, underdrains, design, instrumentation results, and problems encountered during construction of this converted disposal area which extended the life of the facility a minimum of five years

  13. 100-D Ponds closure plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 100-D Ponds is located within the Hanford Site and is a land surface impoundment for the disposal of liquid effluent. This unit has been classified as a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) treatment, storage, and/or disposal (TSD) unit because of a potential for having received nonradioactive, regulated dangerous waste. These ponds are no longer being used to receive waste with a potential to be dangerous and so will be closed as a RCRA-regulated TSD unit consists of a Part A Permit Application (Revision 3) and a closure plan. The Part A Permit Application revisions are explained at the beginning of the Part A section. The closure plan presents a description of the 100-D Ponds structures and boundaries, the history of the waste managed, and the approach that will be followed to close the 100-0 Ponds TSD unit. Radionuclides (source, special nuclear, and by-product material) are not within the scope of WAC 173-303 or of this closure plan. The dangerous waste directly leading to the classification of the site as a RCRA TSD unit did not contain radioactive constituents. Information provided on radionuclides is only for general knowledge where appropriate. Only dangerous constituents derived from the 100-D Ponds operations are addressed in this closure plan

  14. The influence of geomorphology on the composition of aquatic flora and fauna withim a temporary pond network

    OpenAIRE

    Florencio, Margarita; Serrano Martín, Laura; Siljestrom, Patricia; Fernández Zamundio, María del Rocio; García Murillo, Pablo; Díaz Paniagua, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Geomorphological and hydrological features can provide a sound basis for global wetland classification. Temporary ponds located on the sandy area of Doñana can be classified into five different geomorphological areas. We hypothesised that these ponds would differ in soil characteristics, which may also explain differences in the composition of their macroinvertebrate, amphibian, and aquatic plant species assemblages. The study ponds were significantly segregated into southern and nor...

  15. Improving risk estimates of runoff producing areas: formulating variable source areas as a bivariate process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xiaoya; Shaw, Stephen B; Marjerison, Rebecca D; Yearick, Christopher D; DeGloria, Stephen D; Walter, M Todd

    2014-05-01

    Predicting runoff producing areas and their corresponding risks of generating storm runoff is important for developing watershed management strategies to mitigate non-point source pollution. However, few methods for making these predictions have been proposed, especially operational approaches that would be useful in areas where variable source area (VSA) hydrology dominates storm runoff. The objective of this study is to develop a simple approach to estimate spatially-distributed risks of runoff production. By considering the development of overland flow as a bivariate process, we incorporated both rainfall and antecedent soil moisture conditions into a method for predicting VSAs based on the Natural Resource Conservation Service-Curve Number equation. We used base-flow immediately preceding storm events as an index of antecedent soil wetness status. Using nine sub-basins of the Upper Susquehanna River Basin, we demonstrated that our estimated runoff volumes and extent of VSAs agreed with observations. We further demonstrated a method for mapping these areas in a Geographic Information System using a Soil Topographic Index. The proposed methodology provides a new tool for watershed planners for quantifying runoff risks across watersheds, which can be used to target water quality protection strategies. PMID:24632403

  16. Northern Seasonal Woodland Ponds: Distribution, Biota, and Ecological Linkages with the Surrounding Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batzer, D.; Palik, B.

    2005-05-01

    Seasonal woodland ponds are important landscape features across much of eastern and central North America. Learning more about the ecology of these habitats is a pressing need in the US because federal protections are being reduced. Further, the fates of these habitats are not being monitored because most are too small for inclusion in the National Wetland Inventory. In our northern Minnesota study area, the distribution of seasonal woodland ponds is strongly influenced by glacial landform, with most ponds being associated with ground or end moraines. The habitats support an abundance of plants, invertebrates, and amphibians; these organisms are well adapted for the variable environments existing in ponds and they posses a durability that makes them resistant to most natural variation in conditions. Because of the small size of seasonal woodland ponds, input of plant litter and migration of invertebrates from the surrounding forest into ponds is an important ecological link. However, because ponds support an autochthonous growth of wetland trees, the relationship between ponds and the forest differs from that between streams and forests. Like eastern streams, logging of forests around ponds is a concern, but impacts of peripheral logging on theses wetlands appear less dramatic than for streams.

  17. Par Pond vegetation status Summer 1995 -- June survey descriptive summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The water level of Par Pond was lowered approximately 20 feet in mid-1991 in order to protect downstream residents from possible dam failure suggested by subsidence on the downstream slope of the dam and to repair the dam. This lowering exposed both emergent and nonemergent macrophyte beds to drying conditions resulting in extensive losses. A survey of the shoreline aquatic plant communities in June 1995, three months after the refilling of Par Pond to approximately 200 feet above mean sea level, indicated that much of the original plant communities and the intermediate shoreline communities present on the exposed sediments have been lost. The extensive old-field and emergent marsh communities that were present on the exposed shoreline during the drawdown have been flooded and much of the pre-drawdown Par Pond aquatic plant communities have not had sufficient time for re-establishment. The shoreline does, however, have extensive beds of maidencane which extend from the shoreline margin to areas as deep as 2 and perhaps 3 meters. Scattered individual plants of lotus and watershield are common and may indicate likely directions of future wetland development in Par Pond. In addition, within isolated coves, which apparently received ground water seepage and/or stream surface flows during the period of the Par Pond draw down, extensive beds of waterlilies and spike rush are common. Invasion of willow and red maple occurred along the lake shoreline as well. Although not absent from this survey, evidence of the extensive redevelopment of the large cattail and eel grass beds was not observed in this first survey of Par Pond. Future surveys during the growing seasons of 1995, 1996, and 1997 along with the evaluation of satellite date to map the areal extent of the macrophyte beds of Par Pond are planned

  18. Understanding the expected performance of large-scale solar ponds from laboratory-scale observations and numerical modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Experiments and numerical models were analyzed to understand solar pond efficiency. • Boundary effects typically reduce the efficiency of small-scale solar ponds. • Artificial lighting affects the energy that reaches the lower convective zone. • Turbidity is more important in large-scale solar ponds and decreases its efficiency. • Large-scale solar ponds collect more energy than small-scale solar ponds. - Abstract: Solar ponds are low-cost, large-scale solar collectors with integrated storage that can be used as an energy source in many thermal systems. Experimental solar pond investigations at smaller scales have proven to be useful when trying to understand how different factors affect the pond’s efficiency, but they do not necessarily represent the expected performance of large-scale solar ponds. Consequently, it is important to investigate how the results of small-scale solar pond experiments can be scaled up. In this work, we show how models based on laboratory-scale observations can be utilized to understand the expected performance of large-scale solar ponds. This paper presents an approach that combines high-resolution thermal observations with computational fluid dynamics to investigate how different physical processes affect solar pond performance at different scales. The main factors that result in differences between small- and large-scale solar pond performances are boundary effects, light radiation spectrum and intensity, and turbidity. Boundary effects (e.g., pond geometry, thermal insulation) reduce the energy that reaches the storage zone of small-scale solar ponds. Different types of lights result in different radiation spectrum and intensity, which affects the energy reaching the storage zone. Turbidity is typically not important in small-scale solar ponds subject to controlled environmental conditions. However, it is an important factor in outdoor solar ponds in which the pond is prone to particles that can deposit onto

  19. Direct Experimental Assessment of Microbial Activity in North Pond Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferdelman, T. G.; Picard, A.; Morando, M.; Ziebis, W.

    2009-12-01

    North Pond, an isolated sediment pond located at 22°45’N on the western flank of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, offered the opportunity to study microbial activities in deeply-buried low-activity sediments. About 8 x 15 km in size with sediment maximum thickness of about 300 m, North Pond is completely surrounded by exposed 7 Ma old basement. North Pond lies above the carbonate compensation depth at a water depth about 4500 m; hydrostatic pressure at the seafloor is about 45 MPa and the temperature is near 2°C. During the a R/V MS Merian cruise (MSM-11/1) in February -March 2009, 14 gravity cores of up to 9 m length were successfully obtained, from which samples were taken with 1-m resolution for experimental activity measurements. The goal of the experimental work was 1) to examine potential metabolic pathways in North Pond sediments and carbon assimilation pathways in this low-energy environment, and 2) explore the effects of pressure on microbial metabolic activities. As dissolved oxygen penetrated through all depths, sediments were aerobically sampled, processed and incubated at 4°C. Selected samples were immediately stored at in situ pressure until further use. The microbial uptake of both organic and inorganic carbon in selected North Pond sediment samples was investigated by following the fate of 14C in radio-labeled organic and organic compounds in North Pond sediment slurry incubations. Shipboard and on-shore experiments using 14C-leucine, 14C-glucose and 14C-bicarbonate were performed on selected cores. Day- to month- incubations were performed at 4°C. Parallel incubations were conducted at atmospheric pressure (0.1 MPa) and in situ pressure (~45 MPa). Either whole cell extraction (Kallmeyer et al., Limnol. Oceanogr.: Methods 6, 2008, 238-245) or protein-DNA extraction was carried on after various incubations to determine the fraction of 14C incorporated into cellular components. Formation of 14C-labeled CO2 was determined on samples incubated with 14C

  20. Low-temperature multi-effect evaporation desalination systems coupled with salinity-gradient solar ponds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leblanc, Jimmy; Andrews, John [School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mfg. Engineering, RMIT Univ., Bundoora, Vic. (Australia)

    2008-07-01

    As part of a project investigating the productive use of saline land and the development of sustainable desalination systems, the production of potable water from seawater or brackish water using desalination systems powered by low-temperature solar-thermal sources, including salinity-gradient solar ponds, has been studied. A Visual Basic computer model of solar-powered multi-effect evaporation (MEE) desalination processes was developed to determine the technical and economic feasibility of the system. A small-scale three-effect evaporation desalination system powered by a solar pond, capable of producing up to 2,300 litres of fresh water per day, has been designed using the model. The system has been manufactured and commissioned, and has operated effectively at a first-effect vapour temperature of about 68 C, which is ideal for heat delivery from a solar pond. The key design and operating parameters controlling the cost of fresh water - distillate production, recovery ratio, thermal energy and solar collection area-are determined from the computer simulation and compared with experimental results. (orig.)

  1. Studies on the microbial sulphur cycle in acid ponds in the Niederlausitz mining region in Brandenburg; Untersuchungen zum mikrobiellen Schwefelkreislauf in sauren Tagebau-Restseen der Niederlausitz (Brandenburg)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meier, J.

    2001-07-01

    The water quality of the acid ponds in the Niederlausitz brown coal mining region is characterised by pH values below 3 and high concentrations of dissolved iron (up to 10 mM) and sulphate (up to 30 mM). The development of these ponds is determined by the equilibrium that arises between acidifying and alkalinising processes. Acidity develops through weathering and oxidation of iron sulphides in the mining refuse, whereas alkalinity arises through the reduction of iron (III) and sulphate in the pond sediments, a process associated with the oxidation of organic matter. The purpose of the present study was to examine the influence of sulphate reduction and sulphur oxidation on the neutralising potential of the sediments in acid ponds and to characterise and identify the microorganisms involved in these processes. Comparative explorations were performed in two acid waters, namely ponds 111 and 107, and in a neutral water, namely pond B, in a semi-natural area of the Niederlausitz region. [German] Die Wasserqualitaet der sauren Bergbau-Restseen im Braunkohlerevier der Niederlausitz ist durch pH-Werte unter pH 3 und hohe Konzentrationen an geloestem Eisen (bis zu 10 mM) und Sulfat (bis zu 30 mM) gekennzeichnet. Die Entwicklung der Restseen wird durch das Gleichgewicht von aziditaets- und alkalinitaetsbildenden Prozessen bestimmt. Aziditaet entsteht bei der Verwitterung bzw. der Oxidation der Eisensulfide im Kippmassiv, waehrend Alkalinitaet bei der an die Oxidation organischer Substanz gekoppelte Reduktion von Eisen(III) und Sulfat in den Sedimenten der Seen gebildet wird. In der vorliegenden Arbeit wurde der Einfluss der Sulfratreduktion und der Schwefeloxidation auf das Neutralisierungspotenzial der Sedimente der sauren Restseen untersucht sowie die an diesen Prozessen beteiligten Mikroorganismen charakterisiert und identifiziert. Vergleichende Untersuchungen wurden in zwei sauren, Restsee 111 und 107, und in einem neutralen Gewaesser, Restsee B, im naturnahen Bereich

  2. A COMPARATIVE DESCRIPTION OF THE ECOLOGICAL STATE OF NURSERY PONDS OF THE LVIV FISH FARM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Dobrjanska

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Study of the ecological state of aquaculture ponds of the Lviv fish farms “Rudnyky” and “Derzhiv” for creation of optimum conditions for fish growing in ponds. Methodology. Growing of fish in the fish farm “Rudnyky” were conducted in the summer brood fish pond №12 of 4.2 ha area. The pond was stocked with yearlings of Lubin scaled and framed carps with an average weight of 83.3 g and stocking density of 1428 fish/ha. In the fish farm “Derzhiv”, growing of fish was conducted in the pond №1 of 4.2 ha area. The pond was stocked with fish larvae with stocking density of 18000 fish/ha. Determination of hydrochemical parameters was conducted using generally accepted analytical chemical methods. Quantitative determination of heavy metal content in water and bottom sediments was conducted by direct absorption in propane-butane flame with the aid of the absorption spectrophotometer C-115 M1. Findings. As a result of the conducted studies, we determined the pollution level of aquaculture ponds in the Lviv fish farms. Main hydrochemical indices, which characterize quality of water pond, meet norms for fish farming. All studied heavy metals in pond water of “Rudnyky” fish farm were at higher concentrations compared to those in the fish farm “Derzhiv”. Bottom sediments are characterized by a tendency of increasing nickel concentrations in both examined fish farms, values of which exceeded the maximum acceptable concentration. In the order of an increase of heavy metal content in bottom sediments, they can be ranged as Fe-Mn-Zn-Cd-Pb-Co-Cu-Ni. Originality. The ecological state of aquaculture ponds of the Lviv fish farms “Rudnyky” and “Derzhiv” has been investigated for the first time. Practical value. The obtained results of the ecological state of aquaculture ponds allow creating optimum conditions for growing of fish.

  3. Revegetation of flue gas desulfurization sludge pond disposal sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A comprehensive search of published literature was conducted to summarize research undertaken to date on revegetation of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) waste disposal ponds. A review of the physical and chemical properties of FGD sludges and wastes with similar characteristics is also included in order to determine the advantages and limitations of FGD sludge for plant growth. No specific guidelines have been developed for the revegetation of FGD sludge disposal sites. Survey studies showed that the wide-ranging composition of FGD wastes was determined primarily by the sulfur dioxide and other flue gas scrubbing processes used at powerplants. Sulfate rich (>90%CaSO4) FGD sludges are physically and chemically more stable, and thus more amenable to revegetation. Because of lack of macronutrients and extremely limited microbial activity, FBD sludge ponds presented a poor plant growth environment without amendment. Studies showed the natural process of inoculation of the FGD sludge with soil microbes that promote plant growth be can after disposal but proceeded slowly. Revegetation studies reviewed showed that FGD sludges amended with soils supported a wider variety of plant species better and longer than abandoned FGD ponds. Two major types of plants have been successful in revegetation of FGD waste ponds and similar wastes: salt-tolerant plants and aquatic plants. A comprehensive list of plant species with potential for regetation of FGD sludge disposal pond sites is presented along with successful revegetation techniques

  4. Groundwater monitoring plan for the 300 Area process trenches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document describes the groundwater monitoring program for the Hanford Site 300 Area Process Trenches (300 APT). The 300 APT are a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) regulated unit. The 300 APT are included in the Dangerous Waste Portion of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Permit for the Treatment, Storage, and Disposal of Dangerous Waste, Permit No. WA890008967, and are subject to final-status requirements for groundwater monitoring. This document describes a compliance monitoring program for groundwater in the uppermost aquifer system at the 300 APT. This plan describes the 300 APT monitoring network, constituent list, sampling schedule, statistical methods, and sampling and analysis protocols that will be employed for the 300 APT. This plan will be used to meet groundwater monitoring requirements from the time the 300 APT becomes part of the Permit and through the postclosure care period until certification of final closure

  5. Processes of deagrarization and urbanization of Slovene rural areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Klemenčič

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available The treatise deals with elements of the processes of differentiation of Slovene rural areas which have been differentiated during the last four decades under the condition of industrialization and the concept of polycentric regional development into regions of urbanization, regions of transition and regions of depopulation. This differentiation was accompanied by the growth of the number of the population which was employed in industries and consequently quick decline in the percentage of agrarian population. The numeric decline of agrarian population as well as decline in its percentage however opened numerous new problems (i.e. abandoning of the farm land, growing of the forests, growing of the greenlands which cause great problems with maintenance of cultural landscape especially at the regions of depopulation.

  6. Plasma diagnostics in large area plasma processing system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A series of plasma diagnostic have been carried out in our large area plasma processing system which is based on a modulated electron-beam produced plasma. These discharges were created in both electrically conducting and insulated vacuum chambers operated in 30-120 mTorr of pure gases (argon, oxygen, and nitrogen). Langmuir probes, microwave transmission, mass spectrometry, and external current sensors show robust discharges were made over fairly wide parameter ranges resulting in plasma densities of 1-4x1011 cm-3 and temperature ranging from 0.2 eV for the molecular gases and 1.4 eV for argon. The effects of various experimental techniques, parameters, and contamination issues are discussed in detail

  7. Aerial radiological surveys of Steed Pond, Savannah River Site: Dates of surveys, 1984--1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From June 1984 to August 1985, three aerial radiological surveys were conducted over Steed Pond at the Savannah River Site in South Carolina. In addition, Steed Pond was included in larger-area surveys of the Savannah River Site in subsequent years. The surveys were conducted by the Remote Sensing Laboratory of EG ampersand G Energy Measurements, Inc., Las Vegas, Nevada, for the US Department of Energy. Airborne measurements were obtained for both natural and man-made gamma radiation over Steed Pond and surrounding areas. The first survey was conducted when the pond was filled to normal capacity for the time of the year. On September 1, 1984, the Steed Pond dam spillway failed causing the pond to drain. The four subsequent surveys were conducted with the pond drained. The second survey and the third were conducted to study silt deposits exposed by the drop in water level after the spillway's opening. Steed Pond data from the February 1987 and April 1989 Savannah River Site surveys have been included to bring this study up to date

  8. Par Pond Fish, Water, and Sediment Chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objectives of this report are to describe the Par Pond fish community and the impact of the drawdown and refill on the community, describe contaminant levels in Par Pond fish, sediments, and water and indicate how contaminant concentrations and distributions were affected by the drawdown and refill, and predict possible effects of future water level fluctuations in Par Pond

  9. Heat extraction from salinity-gradient solar ponds using heat pipe heat exchangers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tundee, Sura; Terdtoon, Pradit; Sakulchangsatjatai, Phrut [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Singh, Randeep; Akbarzadeh, Aliakbar [Energy Conservation and Renewable Energy Group, School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, RMIT University, Bundoora East Campus, Bundoora, Victoria 3083 (Australia)

    2010-09-15

    This paper presents the results of experimental and theoretical analysis on the heat extraction process from solar pond by using the heat pipe heat exchanger. In order to conduct research work, a small scale experimental solar pond with an area of 7.0 m{sup 2} and a depth of 1.5 m was built at Khon Kaen in North-Eastern Thailand (16 27'N102 E). Heat was successfully extracted from the lower convective zone (LCZ) of the solar pond by using a heat pipe heat exchanger made from 60 copper tubes with 21 mm inside diameter and 22 mm outside diameter. The length of the evaporator and condenser section was 800 mm and 200 mm respectively. R134a was used as the heat transfer fluid in the experiment. The theoretical model was formulated for the solar pond heat extraction on the basis of the energy conservation equations and by using the solar radiation data for the above location. Numerical methods were used to solve the modeling equations. In the analysis, the performance of heat exchanger is investigated by varying the velocity of inlet air used to extract heat from the condenser end of the heat pipe heat exchanger (HPHE). Air velocity was found to have a significant influence on the effectiveness of heat pipe heat exchanger. In the present investigation, there was an increase in effectiveness by 43% as the air velocity was decreased from 5 m/s to 1 m/s. The results obtained from the theoretical model showed good agreement with the experimental data. (author)

  10. Adoption of Improved Processing Technologies by Fish Farmers in Akure North and South Local Government Areas, Ondo State, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FELIX OLAYINKA OLADIPO

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The study was conducted to determine the adoption of improved processing technologies by fish farmers in Akure North and South LGAs, Ondo state, Nigeria. A two stage sampling technique was employed to select 150 fish farmers interviewed for the study, data were analyzed by using descriptive statistics and Tobit regression model. Results showed that majority of the farmers (68.0% were males with mean age of 38.5 years old. Majority (80.7% of respondents were married while (90% had various degree of formal education, oil drum, smoking kiln and mud oven were the improved fish processing technologies available in the study area. Furthermore, cooperatives (92.7% was ranked 1st as the most preferred source of information by the farmers, majority of respondents (94.7% were aware of oil drum. The mean levels of adoption was 2.50, values below and above the mean were regarded as low and high respectively, the use of oil drum (2.58, smoking kiln (1.47 and mud oven (1.33 were the adoption scores of the respondents in the study area. Moreover, age (4.201, education level (2.105, household size (1.791, income (3.021, gender (1.781, pond size (2.511 and other income generating activities (2.256 were factors that were statistically significant thus affecting the rate of adoption of improved fish processing technologies. The study concludes that respondents were aware of some of the improved technologies but low adoption, the study therefore recommends the need for capacity building and advisory services by extension agents and other stakeholders for fish processors.

  11. How Healthy Is Our Pond?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterling, Donna R.; Hargrove, Dori L.

    2014-01-01

    With crosscutting concepts such as stability and change in the "Next Generation Science Standards," this article was written for those who have wondered how to teach these concepts in a way that is relevant to students. In this investigation, students ask the question, "Why is the pond dirty?" As students investigate the health…

  12. Biogeochemistry of dimethylsulfide in a seasonally stratified coastal salt pond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakeham, S. G.; Howes, B. L.; Dacey, J. W. H.; Schwarzenbach, R. P.; Zeyer, J.

    1987-01-01

    Dimethylsulfide (DMS) is the major volatile reduced organic sulfur compound in the water column of coastal Salt Pond, Cape Cod, MA. DMS concentration and vertical distributions vary seasonally in response to changing biogeochemical processes in the pond. When the pond is thermally stratified in summer, maximum DMS concentrations of up to 60 nmol/l were found in the oxygen-deficient metalimnion. DMS concentrations in the epilimnion (typically 5-10 nmol/l) were always an order of magnitude higher than in the hypolimnion (less than 0.2 nmol/l). The most likely precursor for DMS is algal dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP), which showed vertical profiles similar to those of DMS. Laboratory experiments show that microorganisms in the pond, especially in the metalimnion, are capable of decomposing DMSP to DMS, while photosynthetic sulfur bacteria in the hypolimnion can consume DMS. Estimates of DMS production and consumption in Salt Pond have been made, considering production of DMS in the epilimnion and metalimnion and removal of DMS via gas exchange to the atmosphere, tidal exchange, and microbial consumption in the hypolimnion.

  13. Wide-Area Thermal Processing of Light-Emitting Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duty, C.; Quick, N. (AppliCote Associates, LLC)

    2011-09-30

    Silicon carbide based materials and devices have been successfully exploited for diverse electronic applications. However, they have not achieved the same success as Si technologies due to higher material cost and higher processing temperatures required for device development. Traditionally, SiC is not considered for optoelectronic applications because it has an indirect bandgap. However, AppliCote Associates, LLC has developed a laser-based doping process which enables light emission in SiC through the creation of embedded p-n junctions. AppliCote laser irradiation of silicon carbide allows two different interaction mechanisms: (1) Laser conversion or induced phase transformation which creates carbon rich regions that have conductive properties. These conductive regions are required for interconnection to the light emitting semiconducting region. (2) Laser doping which injects external dopant atoms into the substrate that introduces deep level transition states that emit light when electrically excited. The current collaboration with AppliCote has focused on the evaluation of ORNL's unique Pulse Thermal Processing (PTP) technique as a replacement for laser processing. Compared to laser processing, Pulse Thermal Processing can deliver similar energy intensities (20-50 kW/cm2) over a much larger area (up to 1,000 cm2) at a lower cost and much higher throughput. The main findings of our investigation; which are significant for the realization of SiC based optoelectronic devices, are as follows: (1) The PTP technique is effective in low thermal budget activation of dopants in SiC similar to the laser technique. The surface electrical conductivity of the SiC samples improved by about three orders of magnitude as a result of PTP processing which is significant for charge injection in the devices; (2) The surface composition of the SiC film can be modified by the PTP technique to create a carbon-rich surface (increased local C:Si ratio from 1:1 to 2.9:1). This is

  14. A case study for biogas generation from covered anaerobic ponds treating abattoir wastewater: Investigation of pond performance and potential biogas production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • We report on the performance of a novel covered anaerobic pond system. • Potential biogas production was estimated using BioWin modelling software. • Ponds maintained stable operation; however, accumulation of crust was an issue. • Modelling indicated that biogas yield can be influenced by decomposition efficiency. • Configuration and operation of ponds can also impact potential biogas production. - Abstract: Covered anaerobic ponds offer significant advantages to the red meat processing industry by capturing methane rich gas as a fuel source for bioenergy while reducing greenhouse gas emissions (GHG). This paper presents the results of a novel-designed anaerobic pond system at an Australian abattoir in relation to pond performance and potential biogas production. Key findings in assessing the effectiveness of the system revealed that the covered ponds are capable of efficient wastewater decomposition and biogas production. The primary issue with the covered ponds at the abattoir was the build-up of fat/crust that prevented the accurate measurement of biogas and effective use of the cover. In the absence of field biogas data the novel application of the computer modelling software BioWin® was carried out to simulate chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal rates and subsequent biogas yield. The unique parameter used to fit field data was the fraction of the inlet COD due to a superficial crust which did not follow anaerobic digestion. Field data effluent COD removal rates were matched to simulated rates predicted by BioWin when measured influent COD was reduced to 30%. Biogas modelling results suggest significant variation in the economic benefit of biogas energy, with the quantity of biogas potentially varying tenfold (from 328 m3/d to 3284 m3/d) depending on site factors such as pond efficiency, pond configuration and operational practices

  15. Massive subsurface ice formed by refreezing of ice-shelf melt ponds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, Bryn; Luckman, Adrian; Ashmore, David W.; Bevan, Suzanne; Kulessa, Bernd; Kuipers Munneke, Peter; Philippe, Morgane; Jansen, Daniela; Booth, Adam; Sevestre, Heidi; Tison, Jean-Louis; O'Leary, Martin; Rutt, Ian

    2016-06-01

    Surface melt ponds form intermittently on several Antarctic ice shelves. Although implicated in ice-shelf break up, the consequences of such ponding for ice formation and ice-shelf structure have not been evaluated. Here we report the discovery of a massive subsurface ice layer, at least 16 km across, several kilometres long and tens of metres deep, located in an area of intense melting and intermittent ponding on Larsen C Ice Shelf, Antarctica. We combine borehole optical televiewer logging and radar measurements with remote sensing and firn modelling to investigate the layer, found to be ~10 °C warmer and ~170 kg m-3 denser than anticipated in the absence of ponding and hitherto used in models of ice-shelf fracture and flow. Surface ponding and ice layers such as the one we report are likely to form on a wider range of Antarctic ice shelves in response to climatic warming in forthcoming decades.

  16. Importance of waste stabilization ponds and wastewater irrigation in the generation of vector mosquitoes in Pakistan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mukhtar, Muhammad; Ensink, Jeroen; Van der Hoek, Wim;

    2006-01-01

    The objective of the current study was to investigate the role of waste stabilization ponds (WSP) and wastewater-irrigated sites for the production of mosquitoes of medical importance. Mosquito larvae were collected fortnightly from July 2001 to June 2002 in Faisalabad, Pakistan. In total, 3......,132 water samples from WSP and irrigated areas yielded 606,053 Culex larvae of five species. In addition, 107,113 anophelines, representing eight species were collected. Anopheles subpictus (Grassi) and Culex mosquitoes, especially Culex quinquefasciatus (Say) and Culex tritaeniorhynchus (Giles), showed an...... overwhelming preference for anaerobic ponds, which receive untreated wastewater. Facultative ponds generated lower numbers of both Anopheles and Culex mosquitoes, whereas the last ponds in the series, the maturation ponds, were the least productive for both mosquito genera. An. subpictus and Anopheles...

  17. Valuating Ecosystem Services of Urban Ponds - case study from Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carle, Nina

    2016-04-01

    A climate risk assessment for the city of Barisal was carried out by a consultancy firm, financed by KfW Development Bank of Germany. Due to high dependencies on natural capital of people in developing countries they are facing high vulnerability when it comes to changes of the asset category 'natural capital' (here: urban ponds), whether due to the exposition on climate (change) related impacts, implemented measures or land use change. With a closer view on the city's assets, the question remained open to the author 1) Under current conditions, what is the demand for ecosystem services (ES) 2) What is the value of the benefits and the how much is the contribution to the city's welfare? 3) What are the future changes in the demand for ES? And what are the future changes on the supply side (pressures and threats to the ecosystem)? Methodology: The City of Barisal in Bangladesh has a calculated number of around 10.000 urban rain-fed ponds,representing 6.5% of the city area, which represents a huge natural water supply and gives the city its characteristic face. In August 2015 a user survey was conducted in the city of Barisal, in every ward (administrative unit), to determine the demand for ecosystem services related to urban ponds, evaluating over 600 ponds. The findings will present the huge variation of provisioning ecosystem services and an important regulating service, related to economic and domestic use, in a spatial resolution. It will be shown, how the importance of ES changes, by changing the unit of analysis (families or ponds or the city) and the importance for the livelihood of pond owners and users. A relationship between pond area(m2) and number of users was detected, also the role of compensation payments for the pond owners by the users. It will be shown how natural capital, privately and publicly owned,contributes in an important way in buffering unequal distribution of societies resources in the short- and long-run. However society's demand for ES

  18. Pond Creek Coal Zone County Statistics (Geology) in Kentucky, West Virginia, and Virginia

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset is a polygon coverage of counties limited to the extent of the Pond Creek coal bed resource areas and attributed with statistics on the thickness of...

  19. Pond Creek Coal Zone Remaining Resources by County in Kentucky, West Virginia, and Virginia

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset is a polygon coverage of counties limited to the extent of the Pond Creek coal zone resource areas and attributed with remaining resources (millions of...

  20. Pond Creek Coal Zone Original Resources by County in Kentucky, West Virginia, and Virginia

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset is a polygon coverage of counties limited to the extent of the Pond Creek coal zone resource areas and attributed with original resources (millions of...

  1. EVALUATION OF CONSTRUCTED WETLAND AND RETENTION POND BMPS FOR ATTENUATING MICROBIAL CONTAMINANTS IN URBAN STORMWATER RUNOFF

    Science.gov (United States)

    This project investigated the use of constructed wetlands and retention ponds for decreasing microbial concentrations from urban stormwater runoff. Increased urbanization has resulted in a larger percentage of impervious areas which cause large quantities of stormwater runoff an...

  2. Pond Creek Coal Zone County Statistics (Chemistry) in Kentucky, West Virginia, and Virginia

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset is a polygon coverage of counties limited to the extent of the Pond Creek coal zone resource areas and attributed with statistics on these coal quality...

  3. Effects of the mosquito larvicides temephos and methoprene on insect populations in experimental ponds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinkney, A.E.; McGowan, P.C.; Murphy, D.R.; Lowe, T.P.; Sparling, D.W.; Ferrington, L.C.

    2000-01-01

    The nontarget effects of Abate 4E ? (44.6% temephos) at 0.054 kg of active ingredient (a.i.) per 1 ha and of Altosid Liquid Larvicide ? (5% methoprene) at 0.011 kg a.i./ha were investigated in 18 experimental ponds (average area, 202 m2; maximum depth, 0.7 m) at Patuxent Wildlife Research Center, Laurel, Maryland, USA. Ponds were sprayed three times at 3-week intervals. Six ponds were sprayed with Abate, six with Altosid, and six with distilled water. Two insect-emergence traps per pond collected for 7 d and were then harvested 1 d before each spray and 13 to 14 days afterward. A repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) revealed significant reductions in Shannon diversity, equatability, and numbers of individuals, species, and families in the Abate ponds relative to controls. Significant reductions also occurred in Ephemeroptera, Odonata, Diptera, Chironomidae, and Chaoborus sp. Hester-Dendy samplers were installed before spray one and harvested 16 d after spray three. Based on one-way ANOVA, Shannon diversity, equatability, and number of Ephemeroptera and Chironomidae were significantly reduced in the Abate ponds. Emergence data indicate only isolated cases with significant reductions in the Altosid ponds relative to controls, and the Hester-Dendy data indicate no significant differences between the Altosid and control ponds.

  4. Constructed wetlands for water pollution management of aquaculture farms conducting earthen pond culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ying-Feng; Jing, Shuh-Ren; Lee, Der-Yuan; Chang, Yih-Feng; Sui, Hsuan-Yu

    2010-08-01

    This study established farm-scale constructed wetlands integrated to shrimp ponds, using existing earthern pond areas, with a wetland-to-pond ratio of only 0.086 for shrimp culture. The constructed wetlands were used as practice for aquaculture water and wastewater treatment, to regulate the water quality of shrimp ponds and manage pollution from pond effluents. The results of water quality monitoring for influent and effluent showed that constructed wetlands significantly reduced total suspended solids (59 to 72%), turbidity (55 to 65%), chlorophyll a (58 to 72%), 5-day biochemical oxygen demand (29 to 40%), and chemical oxygen demand (13 to 24%) from pond water. The wetland treatment sufficiently regulated water quality of the recirculating shrimp pond, which was significantly (p shrimp pond, without the connection of constructed wetlands. Furthermore, the wetland-treated effluent satisfied the national effluent standards for aquaculture farms (R.O.C. Environmental Protection Administration, 2007). Accordingly, wetland treatment applications were proposed to implement the best management practices to reduce pollution from aquaculture farms in Taiwan. PMID:20853755

  5. 2101-M Pond hydrogeologic characterization report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chamness, M.A.; Luttrell, S.P.; Bates, D.J.; Martin, W.J.

    1990-09-01

    This report documents information collected by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory {sup (a)} at the request of Westinghouse Hanford Company. Presented in this report is the interpretation of the hydrogeologic environment at the 2101-M Pond, located in the 200-East Area of the Hanford Site. This information and its accompanying interpretation were derived from sampling and testing activities associated with the installation of four ground-water monitoring wells, in addition to data gathered from several previously existing wells. The new monitoring wells were installed as part of a groundwater monitoring program initiated in 1988. The four new monitoring wells were installed around the 2101-M Pond between May 23 and August 27, 1988. Geologic sampling, aquifer testing, and initial ground-water sampling were performed during the installation of these wells. Laboratory analyses of the sediment samples for particle size, calcium carbonate content, and selected natural and contaminant constituents were performed. A full year of quarterly ground-water sampling and the first statistical analysis of background and downgradient data have also been performed. 112 refs., 49 figs., 18 tabs.

  6. “Technical Properties of Pond Ash - Clay Fired Bricks – An Experimental Study”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashant G. Sonawane

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In the thermal power plants the coal is burnt to heat the water for making the steam, which in turn is used to run the turbines. The pond ash is a waste product from the boilers. It is mainly obtained from the wet disposal of the fly ash, which when get mixed with bottom ash is disposed off in large pond or dykes as slurry. The pond ash is being generated in an alarming rate. The generation of the pond ash is posing a lot of threat to environment and thus its sustainable management has become the thrust area in engineering research. As the pond ash is relatively coarse and the dissolvable alkalies present in it are washed with water, its pozzolanic reactivity becomes low and hence it is not preferred as part replacement of cement in concrete as in the case of fly ash. In this research work an attempt is made to find out the possibility of using pond ash in burnt clay bricks. The part of the clay is replaced by pond ash in different composition and the bricks are made in conventional method at a brick manufacturing plant. The bricks are fired in a traditional way as per usual practice in the area and the final products with different composition of pond ash are tested in laboratory; for tolerance in dimension, water absorption, compressive strength, initial rate of absorption and weathering. The results of all the tests on brick samples with different % of pond ash are compared with clay bricks and the effect on different characteristics of bricks due to addition of pond ash are studied.

  7. Visibility from Roads Predict the Distribution of Invasive Fishes in Agricultural Ponds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kizuka, Toshikazu; Akasaka, Munemitsu; Kadoya, Taku; Takamura, Noriko

    2014-01-01

    Propagule pressure and habitat characteristics are important factors used to predict the distribution of invasive alien species. For species exhibiting strong propagule pressure because of human-mediated introduction of species, indicators of introduction potential must represent the behavioral characteristics of humans. This study examined 64 agricultural ponds to assess the visibility of ponds from surrounding roads and its value as a surrogate of propagule pressure to explain the presence and absence of two invasive fish species. A three-dimensional viewshed analysis using a geographic information system quantified the visual exposure of respective ponds to humans. Binary classification trees were developed as a function of their visibility from roads, as well as five environmental factors: river density, connectivity with upstream dam reservoirs, pond area, chlorophyll a concentration, and pond drainage. Traditional indicators of human-mediated introduction (road density and proportion of urban land-use area) were alternatively included for comparison instead of visual exposure. The presence of Bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus) was predicted by the ponds' higher visibility from roads and pond connection with upstream dam reservoirs. Results suggest that fish stocking into ponds and their dispersal from upstream sources facilitated species establishment. Largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) distribution was constrained by chlorophyll a concentration, suggesting their lower adaptability to various environments than that of Bluegill. Based on misclassifications from classification trees for Bluegill, pond visual exposure to roads showed greater predictive capability than traditional indicators of human-mediated introduction. Pond visibility is an effective predictor of invasive species distribution. Its wider use might improve management and mitigate further invasion. The visual exposure of recipient ecosystems to humans is important for many invasive species that

  8. Process optimization in the main process area of the Wackersdorf reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main process area contains the first extraction cycle, the plutonium and uranium cleaning and the concentration of the medium and high activity waste. Optimisation was carried out by: integration of uranium in the main process building, electrolytic Pu reduction in the plutonium cleaning, omission of the second medium activity waste evaporation line, the omission of high activity waste denitrating and the omission of high activity waste denitrating and the omission of the high activity waste buffer store and by improving the U/Pu separation in the first cycle. (orig./DG)

  9. Microcosm investigations of stormwater pond sediment toxicity to embryonic and larval amphibians: Variation in sensitivity among species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snodgrass, Joel W. [Department of Biological Sciences, Towson University, 8000 York Road, Towson, MD 21252 (United States)], E-mail: jsnodgrass@towson.edu; Casey, Ryan E. [Department of Chemistry, Towson University, 8000 York Road, Towson, MD 21252 (United States); Joseph, Debra; Simon, Judith A. [Department of Biological Sciences, Towson University, 8000 York Road, Towson, MD 21252 (United States)

    2008-07-15

    Stormwater ponds have become common features of modern development and often represent significant amounts of open space in urbanized areas. Although stormwater ponds may provide habitat for wildlife, factors responsible for producing variation in wildlife use of ponds have received limited attention. To investigate the role of variation in species tolerances of pollutants in structuring pond-breeding amphibian assemblages, we exposed species tolerant (Bufo americanus) and not tolerant (Rana sylvatica) of urbanization to pond sediments in laboratory microcosms. Pond microcosms had elevated sediment metal levels and chloride water concentrations. Among R. sylvatica embryos, exposure to pond sediments resulted in 100% mortality. In contrast, B. americanus embryos and larvae experienced only sublethal effects (i.e., reduced size at metamorphosis) due to pond sediment exposure. Our results suggest variation in pollutant tolerance among early developmental stages of amphibians may act in concert with terrestrial habitat availability to structure amphibian assemblages associated with stormwater ponds. - Variation among species in sensitivity to pollutants can influence stormwater pond amphibian assemblages.

  10. Conceptual design of the Truscott brine lake solar-pond system, volume 1: Utility-independent scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-06-01

    A conceptual design was performed for a series of solar pond systems to provide pumping power for chloride control in the Red River Basin. In the chloride control project, briny waters are diverted so as not to pollute portable water. The diverted brine is stored in a dammed natural basin where, with the aid of natural evaporation, the brine is concentrated to the salinities required for the solar ponds. The brine is transferred to the ponds and injected at the proper levels to establish the gradients and storage layers. The solar ponds are to be located within the Truscott, Texas brine impoundment lake. Heat will be extracted from the ponds and used to drive organic Rankine-cycle turbine generators. The electricity produced will serve the pumping needs of the chloride control project, pump brine from the natural source to the evaporation ponds, pump concentrated brine from the evaporation ponds to the solar ponds, maintain the solar ponds, and supply all system parasitic loads. It was found that five solar ponds with eight organic Rankine-cycle turbine-generators would serve both the average and peaking power requirements of the pumping stations in the Truscott area as they come on-line.

  11. Microcosm investigations of stormwater pond sediment toxicity to embryonic and larval amphibians: Variation in sensitivity among species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stormwater ponds have become common features of modern development and often represent significant amounts of open space in urbanized areas. Although stormwater ponds may provide habitat for wildlife, factors responsible for producing variation in wildlife use of ponds have received limited attention. To investigate the role of variation in species tolerances of pollutants in structuring pond-breeding amphibian assemblages, we exposed species tolerant (Bufo americanus) and not tolerant (Rana sylvatica) of urbanization to pond sediments in laboratory microcosms. Pond microcosms had elevated sediment metal levels and chloride water concentrations. Among R. sylvatica embryos, exposure to pond sediments resulted in 100% mortality. In contrast, B. americanus embryos and larvae experienced only sublethal effects (i.e., reduced size at metamorphosis) due to pond sediment exposure. Our results suggest variation in pollutant tolerance among early developmental stages of amphibians may act in concert with terrestrial habitat availability to structure amphibian assemblages associated with stormwater ponds. - Variation among species in sensitivity to pollutants can influence stormwater pond amphibian assemblages

  12. An Object-Based Workflow Developed to Extract Aquaculture Ponds from Airborne LIDAR Data: a Test Case in Central Visayas, Philippines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loberternos, R. A.; Porpetcho, W. P.; Graciosa, J. C. A.; Violanda, R. R.; Diola, A. G.; Dy, D. T.; Otadoy, R. E. S.

    2016-06-01

    Traditional remote sensing approach for mapping aquaculture ponds typically involves the use of aerial photography and high resolution images. The current study demonstrates the use of object-based image processing and analyses of LiDAR-data-generated derivative images with 1-meter resolution, namely: CHM (canopy height model) layer, DSM (digital surface model) layer, DTM (digital terrain model) layer, Hillshade layer, Intensity layer, NumRet (number of returns) layer, and Slope layer. A Canny edge detection algorithm was also performed on the Hillshade layer in order to create a new image (Canny layer) with more defined edges. These derivative images were then used as input layers to perform a multi-resolution segmentation algorithm best fit to delineate the aquaculture ponds. In order to extract the aquaculture pond feature, three major classes were identified for classification, including land, vegetation and water. Classification was first performed by using assign class algorithm to classify Flat Surfaces to segments with mean Slope values of 10 or lower. Out of these Flat Surfaces, assign class algorithm was then performed to determine Water feature by using a threshold value of 63.5. The segments identified as Water were then merged together to form larger bodies of water which comprises the aquaculture ponds. The present study shows that LiDAR data coupled with object-based classification can be an effective approach for mapping coastal aquaculture ponds. The workflow currently presented can be used as a model to map other areas in the Philippines where aquaculture ponds exist.

  13. Automated Science Processing for the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, James

    2012-03-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) onboard the Fermi γ-ray Space Telescope provides high sensitivity to emission from astronomical sources over a broad energy range (20MeV to >300 GeV) and has substantially improved spatial, energy, and timing resolution compared with previous observatories at these energies [4]. One of the LAT's most innovative features is that it performs continuous monitoring of the gamma-ray sky with all-sky coverage every 3 h. This survey strategy greatly enables the search for transient behavior from both previously known and unknown sources. In addition, the constant accumulation of data allows for increasingly improved measurements of persistent sources. These include the Milky Way Galaxy itself, which produces gamma-ray emission as a result from interactions of cosmic rays with gas in the Galaxy, and potential signals from candidate dark matter particles in the Milky Way and its neighboring galaxies. The automated science processing (ASP) functionality of the Fermi Instrument Science Operations Center (ISOC) is a part of the automated data pipeline that processes the raw data arriving from the spacecraft and puts it into a form amenable to scientific analysis. ASP operates at the end of the pipeline on the processed data and is intended to detect and characterize transient behavior (e.g., short time scale increases or “flares” in the gamma-ray flux) from astronomical sources. On detection of a flaring event, ASP will alert other observatories on a timely basis so that they may train their telescopes on the flaring source in order to detect possible correlated activity in other wavelength bands. Since the data from the LAT is archived and publicly available as soon as it is processed, ASP serves mainly to provide triggers for those follow-up observations; its estimates of the properties of the flaring sources (flux, spectral index, location) need not be the best possible, as subsequent off-line analysis can provide more refined

  14. REMOVAL OF HELMINTH PARASITIC EGGS FROM WASTE STABILIZATION PONDS AT SHIMOGA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. SHANTHALA

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Helminth ova removal rates from waste stabilization pond effluents under tropical conditions ofShimoga using both laboratory and field modal ponds was undertaken. The helminthes were removedto the tune of 100% from laboratory model batch system ponds within 15 days of detention timeand it was only 65% in case of laboratory model continuos flow system ponds. The observation infield model ponds revealed an average 90% removal with 10 days retention time. A 100% removalcan not be expected both in continuous flow system laboratory model and field pond systems asthese receive daily fresh load of helminth eggs through influent sewage. The helminth ova are usallyremoved from waste stabilization ponds systems through sedimentation process. It is because thehelminth eggs attached to the suspended solids and when these solids settle to the bottom, the eggsare also removed from pelagic water. In the present study eggs of 4 helminth species viz. Ascarislumbricoides, Hymenolepis diminuta, Hymenolepis nana and Enterobius vermicularis wereencountered. Their rate of ova removal in batch system ponds was 99%, 97.4%, 94.9% and 98.8%for respective species. Presence of these ova in the sewage water indicates the prevalence of infectionin city population.

  15. Experiences during the decontamination process of areas surrounding to Fukushima

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work the experience gained during the decontamination of areas surrounding to Fukushima NPP, rugged during the earthquake and tsunami in 2011 and caused the contamination with fission products in these areas is described. Actions taken by the Japanese government are reported and some of the techniques used, the intervention levels and the progress made and disposal techniques considered are presented. (Author)

  16. The potential for remote sensing and hydrologic modelling to assess the spatio-temporal dynamics of ponds in the Ferlo Region (Senegal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Soti

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available In the Ferlo Region in Senegal, livestock depend on temporary ponds for water but are exposed to the Rift Valley Fever (RVF, a disease transmitted to herds by mosquitoes which develop in these ponds. Mosquito abundance is related to the emptying and filling phases of the ponds, and in order to study the epidemiology of RVF, pond modelling is required. In the context of a data scarce region, a simple hydrologic model which makes use of remote sensing data was developed to simulate pond water dynamics from daily rainfall. Two sets of ponds were considered: those located in the main stream of the Ferlo Valley whose hydrological dynamics are essentially due to runoff, and the ponds located outside, which are smaller and whose filling mechanisms are mainly due to direct rainfall. Separate calibrations and validations were made for each set of ponds. Calibration was performed from daily field data (rainfall, water level collected during the 2001 and 2002 rainy seasons and from three different sources of remote sensing data: 1 very high spatial resolution optical satellite images to access pond location and surface area at given dates, 2 Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER Digital Elevation Model (DEM data to estimate pond catchment area and 3 Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM data for rainfall estimates. The model was applied to all ponds of the study area, the results were validated and a sensitivity analysis was performed. Water height simulations using gauge rainfall as input were compared to water level measurements from four ponds and Nash coefficients >0.7 were obtained. Comparison with simulations using TRMM rainfall data gave mixed results, with poor water height simulations for the year 2001 and good estimations for the year 2002. A pond map derived from a Quickbird satellite image was used to assess model accuracy for simulating pond water areas for all the ponds of the study area. The validation

  17. Effects of pond draining on biodiversity and water quality of farm ponds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usio, Nisikawa; Imada, Miho; Nakagawa, Megumi; Akasaka, Munemitsu; Takamura, Noriko

    2013-12-01

    Farm ponds have high conservation value because they contribute significantly to regional biodiversity and ecosystem services. In Japan pond draining is a traditional management method that is widely believed to improve water quality and eradicate invasive fish. In addition, fishing by means of pond draining has significant cultural value for local people, serving as a social event. However, there is a widespread belief that pond draining reduces freshwater biodiversity through the extirpation of aquatic animals, but scientific evaluation of the effectiveness of pond draining is lacking. We conducted a large-scale field study to evaluate the effects of pond draining on invasive animal control, water quality, and aquatic biodiversity relative to different pond-management practices, pond physicochemistry, and surrounding land use. The results of boosted regression-tree models and analyses of similarity showed that pond draining had little effect on invasive fish control, water quality, or aquatic biodiversity. Draining even facilitated the colonization of farm ponds by invasive red swamp crayfish (Procambarus clarkii), which in turn may have detrimental effects on the biodiversity and water quality of farm ponds. Our results highlight the need for reconsidering current pond management and developing management plans with respect to multifunctionality of such ponds. Efectos del Drenado de Estanques sobre la Biodiversidad y la Calidad del Agua en Estanques de Cultivo. PMID:23869702

  18. Zinc Regime in the Sewage Sludge-Soil-Plant System of a City Waste Water Treatment Pond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lacatusu Radu

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The sewage sludge from wastewater treatment plant of Iasi, a city with 300,000 inhabitants, for domestic and industrial origin, was stored in a mud pond arranged on an area of 18,920 m2. Chemical analyzes of the sludge showed that, of all the chemical elements determined, only Zn is found at pollutant level (5739 mg∙kg-1, i.e. almost 30 times more than the maximum allowable limit for Zn in soil and 45 times more than the Zn content of the soil on which the mud pond has been set. Over time, the content of Zn in the mud pond, but also from soil to which it has been placed, has become upper the normal content of the surrounding soil up to a depth of 260 cm. On the other hand, the vegetation installed on sewage sludge in the process of mineralization, composed predominantly of Phragmites, Rumex, Chenopodium, and Aster species had accumulated in roots, stems and leaves Zn quantities equivalent to 1463 mg Kg-1, 3988 mg Kg-1, 1463 mg Kg-1, respectively, 1120 mg∙Kg-1. The plants in question represents the natural means of phytoremediation, and sewage sludge as such may constitute a fertilizer material for soils in the area, on which Zn deficiency in maize has been recorded. In addition, the ash resulted from the incineration of plants loaded with zinc may constitute, in its turn, a good material for fertilizing of the soils that are deficient in zinc.

  19. Thermal evolutions of two kinds of melt pond with different salinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joo-Hong; Wilkinson, Jeremy; Moon, Woosok; Hwang, Byongjun; Granskog, Mats

    2016-04-01

    Melt ponds are water pools on sea ice. Their formation reduces ice surface albedo and alter surface energy balance, by which the ice melting and freezing processes are regulated. Thus, better understanding of their radiative characteristics has been vital to improve the simulation of melting/freezing of sea ice in numerical models. A melt pond would preserve nearly fresh water if it formed on multi-year ice and no flooding of sea water occurred, whereas a melt pond would contain more salty water if it formed on thinner and porous first-year ice, if there were an inflow of sea water by streams or cracks. One would expect that the fluid dynamic/thermodynamic properties (e.g., turbulence, stability, etc.) of pond water are influenced by the salinity, so that the response of pond water to any heat input (e.g., shortwave radiation) would be different. Therefore, better understanding of the salinity-dependent thermal evolution also has significant potential to improve the numerical simulation of the sea ice melting/freezing response to radiative thermal forcing. To observe and understand the salinity-dependent thermal evolution, two ice mass balance buoys (IMBs) were deployed in two kinds (fresh and salty) of melt pond on a same ice floe on 13 August 2015 during Araon Arctic cruise. The thermistor chain, extending from the air through the pond and ice into the sea water, was deployed through a drilled borehole inside the pond. Besides, the IMBs were also accompanied with three broadband solar radiation sensors (two (up and down) in the air over melt pond and one upward-looking under sea ice) to measure the net shortwave radiation at the pond surface and the penetrating solar radiation through ice. Also, the web camera was installed to observe any updates in the conditions of equipment and surrounding environment (e.g., weather, surface state, etc.). On the date of deployment, the fresh pond had salinity of 2.3 psu, light blue color, lots of slush ice particles which

  20. Waste processing demonstrations within the Waste Pretreatment and Processing Program of the Tank Focus Area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management has created a new approach for the development of technology for DOE environmental remediation problems. Previously, technology development was conducted on a site-by-site basis and managed by multiple organizations. This new DOE strategy consolidates and focuses all technology development efforts on five priority problems. The remediation of the 1 x 108 gal of radioactive waste in the underground storage tanks (USTs) at five DOE sites is one of the priority problems. All tank remediation projects will be integrated into the Tank Focus Area (TFA). The TFA mission is to manage an integrated technology development program that results in the safe and efficient remediation of UST waste across the DOE complex. The TFA has divided its efforts into several areas such as safety, characterization, retrieval, pretreatment and processing, immobilization, and site closure. A key predecessor of the Waste Pretreatment and Processing Program (WPPP) of the TFA was the Waste Processing and Disposal Program (WPDP) of the Underground Storage Tank -- Integrated Demonstration. Nearly all of the FY 1995 WPDP projects have been transferred into the WPPP. These WPPP projects can be divided into four systems: cesium removal, comprehensive sludge and supernate, out-of-tank evaporation, and cross-flow filtration. The current status of these WPPP projects is presented. The goal of the projects is to minimize the volume of high-level waste and the radioactivity in low-level waste

  1. Geophysical Processes - 2013 Collapse Potential St. Louis Area (SHP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — Collapse potential correlates with locations of underground mines and sinkholes. The file includes areas in close proximity to mines and sinkholes. This project was...

  2. Wide Area Thermal Processing of Light Emitting Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duty, Chad E [ORNL; Joshi, Pooran C [ORNL; Jellison Jr, Gerald Earle [ORNL; Angelini, Joseph Attilio [ORNL; Sabau, Adrian S [ORNL

    2011-10-01

    Laboratory laser materials synthesis of wide bandgap materials has been successfully used to create white light emitting materials (LEMs). This technology development has progressed to the exploration on design and construction of apparatus for wide area doping and phase transformation of wide bandgap material substrates. The objective of this proposal is to develop concepts for wide area doping and phase transformation based on AppliCote Associates, LLC laser technology and ORNL high density pulsed plasma arc technology.

  3. PREPARATORY STUDY CONTROL OF LARVAE AND PUPA INSECTS IN STABILIZATION PONDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Asadi

    1987-12-01

    Full Text Available With increasing urbanization and industrialization, the volume of domestic sewage and industrial effluents are growing. So, now a days we need to consider the wastewaters as a secondary water resource, without impairing the health and well being of man. Waste stabilization ponds proved a useful method of wastewater treatment for many areas of Iran, the benefits from the use of waste stabilization ponds are measurable and significant. But there are some disadvantages, as mosquito breeding. The pond filled immediately the operational level by water, and used the nozzles. The results were satisfiable.

  4. Over-all investigation of the influence on environment from Koshkar-Ata tailing pond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The tailing pond KOSHKAR-ATA, representing the drain-free settling pool for industrial, toxic, chemical and radioactive wastes, as well as for ordinary domestic waste, is located 5 km northward to Aktau city in Mangystau oblast (Kazakhstan) in close vicinity of the Caspian Sea shore. The hollow of KOSHKAR-ATA was used since 1965 as storage for toxic and radioactive waste from chemical-hydrometallurgical and sulfur-acid plants that processed local uranium ore reach in phosphor. According to data of the Mangystau Regional Ecology department (Aktau), the amount of radioactive waste (RAW) disposed in the tailing pond is about 360 mln tons with total activity of 11000 Ci. Due to continuous shrinkage of the water phase level last decade, the area of the naked bottom sediments, that is a source of toxic dust, have increased. In local dry climate wind proliferation for considerable distances of fine-disperse toxic and radioactive dust is quite possible. Exhalation of 222Rn from the shore exposed bottom of the tailing pool with its further fall-out in form of 210Pb and proliferation of soluble toxic wastes into ground waters with outlet to the Caspian Sea is of primarily concern. There has been studied in details present radio-ecological state of the tailing pond and obtained quantitative data characterizing current ecological status of air, water and soil at KOSHKAR-ATA and adjacent territories. During field investigations in 2003 there has been performed for the first time mapping of water phase and shore exposed surface of the tailing pond KOSHKAR-ATA. Currently, area of the water phase is estimated to be 42.5 km2 with shore exposed surface of 34.5 km2. There has been studied spatial distribution of radionuclides at KOSHKAR-ATA and adjacent territories including 4 inhabited localities. There were performed field surveying and sampling at all the sites, determined concentrations of main dose-forming radionuclides. There were studied radionuclide distributions

  5. Par Pond vegetation status summer 1995 - July survey descriptive summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A survey of the emergent shoreline aquatic plant, communities began in June 1995, three months after the refilling of Par Pond to approximately 200 feet (61 meters) above mean sea level, and continued with this July survey. Aquatic plant communities, similar to the pre-drawdown Par Pond communities, are becoming reestablished. Beds of maidencane (Panicum hemitomon), lotus (Nelumbo lutea), water lily (Nymphaea odorata), and watershield (Brasenia schreberi) are now extensive and well established. In addition, within isolated coves, extensive beds of water lilies and spike-rush (Eleocharis sp.) are common. Cattail occurrence has increased since refill, but large beds common to Par Pond prior to the drawdown have not formed. Invasion of willow (Salix sp.) and red maple (Acer rubrum) occurred along the lake shoreline during drawdown. The red maples along the present shoreline are beginning to show evidence of stress and mortality from flooding over the past four months. Some of the willows appear to be stressed as well. The loblolly pines (Pinus taeda), which were flooded in all but the shallow shoreline areas, are now dead. Future surveys are planned for the growing seasons of 1995, 1996, and 1997, along with the evaluation of satellite data for mapping the areal extent of the macrophyte beds of Par Pond

  6. Pond Fish Culture Practices in Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    J.A. Akankali; J.F.N. Abowei; A. Eli

    2011-01-01

    Pond fish culture practices in Nigeria was reviewed to refresh the minds of fish and other interested stake holders on some basic principles involved in pond fish culture. Fish pond system is the commonest agricultural techniques in the Niger Delta Region of Nigeria. Profit making, job creation, provision of raw materials for several industries and increase in foreign exchange earnings are some benefits. However, loss of land and introduction some water borne diseases are some disadvantages i...

  7. Performance investigation of a salt gradient solar pond coupled with desalination facility near the Dead Sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solar ponds provide the most convenient and least expensive option for heat storage for daily and seasonal cycles. This is particularly important for a desalination facility, if steady and constant water production is required. If, in addition to high storage capacity, other favorable conditions exist, the salt gradient solar ponds (SGSPs) are expected to be able to carry the entire load of a large-scale flash desalination plants without dependence upon supplementary sources. This paper presents a performance investigation of a SGSP coupled with desalination plant under Jordanian climatic conditions. This is particularly convenient in the Dead Sea region characterized by high solar radiation intensities, high ambient temperature most of the year, and by the availability of high concentration brine. It was found that a 3000 m2 solar pond installed near the Dead Sea is able to provide an annual average production rate of 4.3 L min-1 distilled water compared with 3.3 L min-1 that would be produced by El Paso solar pond, which has the same surface area. Based on this study, solar ponds appear to be a feasible and an appropriate technology for water desalination near the Dead Sea in Jordan. -- Research highlights: → A performance investigation of a solar pond coupled with desalination plant. → Dead Sea area is characterized by availability of high solar radiation and brine. → The Dead Sea solar pond can provide production rate of 4.3 L min-1. → El Paso solar pond has production rate of 3.32 L min-1. The improvement is about 30%. → The solar pond with desalination investigated showed to be a feasible technology.

  8. Why does Amphibian Chytrid (Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis not occur everywhere? An exploratory study in Missouri ponds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Strauss

    Full Text Available The amphibian chytrid fungus, Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd, is a globally emerging pathogen that has caused widespread amphibian population declines, extirpations, and extinctions. However, Bd does not occur in all apparently suitable amphibian populations, even within regions where it is widespread, and it is often unclear why Bd occurs in some habitats but not others. In this study, we rigorously surveyed the amphibian and invertebrate biodiversity of 29 ponds in Missouri, screened resident amphibian larvae (Rana (Lithobates sp. for Bd infection, and characterized the aquatic physiochemical environment of each pond (temperature pH, conductivity, nitrogen, phosphorus, and chlorophyll-a. Our goal was to generate hypotheses toward answering the question, "Why does Bd not occur in all apparently suitable habitats?" Bd occurred in assayed amphibians in 11 of the 29 ponds in our study area (38% of ponds. We found no significant relationship between any single biotic or abiotic variable and presence of Bd. However, multivariate analyses (nonmetric multidimensional scaling and permutational tests of dispersion revealed that ponds in which Bd occurred were a restricted subset of all ponds in terms of amphibian community structure, macroinvertebrate community structure, and pond physiochemistry. In other words, Bd ponds from 6 different conservation areas were more similar to each other than would be expected based on chance. The results of a structural equation model suggest that patterns in the occurrence of Bd among ponds are primarily attributable to variation in macroinvertebrate community structure. When combined with recent results showing that Bd can infect invertebrates as well as amphibians, we suggest that additional research should focus on the role played by non-amphibian biota in determining the presence, prevalence, and pathogenicity of Bd in amphibian populations.

  9. Spatial effects on salinisation processes in a coastal wetland area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graeff, Thomas; Eberhard, Julius; Stefan, Krause; Martin, Maier; Anett, Schibalski; Schaik Loes, van

    2016-04-01

    In this study we present the influence of environmental changes on a coastal area which is at risk of salinisation through the subsurface. The study site is located at the estuary of the river Ems at the German North Sea coast. 30 % of the pasture-dominated landscape is below sea level and requires permanent water management. The low permeable soils prevent a significant interaction with the salty perched aquifer. But through geological faults of old paleo-channels, a connection to the surface water body exists which considerably decreases water quality. Observations in those areas show a high salinity with concentrations peaking during the summer period. We expect that under climate change the area will be more affected by dry summer periods and wetter winter periods. To analyse the effect of climate change on the study site, we choose a bottom up strategy. We simulate the hydrological dynamics of the catchment with a spatially explicit model approach. The estimated soil moistures and hydraulic heads are used as boundary conditions in a second step to calculate the local effect on salinisation on the plot scale. Because of the complex geology only predictions for areas with known layering are performed. The models are calibrated and validated based on observations. Finally, the validated model setups are used to investigate different climate scenarios covering a temperature rise between 1 and 3.5 K with different meteorological and sea level time series. To take changes in land management into account, we develop different scenarios of landuse strategies to avoid inundation during winter and salinisation during summer. Therefore, different types of polder systems are investigated. One of the scenarios of landuse strategies assumes the technological level of management will be adapted to rainfall and sea level. The scenario technological level of the land management is able to prevent low lying areas from inundation. But during summer salinisation and during winter

  10. Inventory of vegetation and benthos in newly laid and natural ponds in Forsmark 2012; Inventering av vegetation och bottenfauna i nyanlagda och naturliga goelar i Forsmark 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qvarfordt, Susanne; Wallin, Anders; Borgiel, Micke [Sveriges Vattenekologer AB, Vingaaker (Sweden)

    2013-01-15

    SKB plans to build a repository for the spent nuclear fuel. The repository is planned to be built in Forsmark and constitutes installations above and below ground. The building and operation of the construction will involve activities that might affect the nature in the area. The impact means, among other things, that a small water body, which today is a reproduction site for the red listed pool frog (Rana lessonae), will disappear. The lost locality for the pool frog has been compensated by creating four new ponds in the Forsmark area. This study is part of the follow-up of these new habitats. The aim is to describe the plant and animal communities in the ponds, and follow the succession, i.e. the development of the habitats. The study also includes two natural ponds that will serve as reference objects. The survey of vegetation and invertebrate fauna in the ponds was conducted in October 2012. The results show that the new ponds had low coverage of submersed vegetation and the species composition in the plant communities differed between the ponds. The reference ponds also had different plant communities, both in terms of species composition and coverage. This indicates that the species composition of the plant communities in the new ponds will likely depend on physical factors specific to the respective pond, but that higher vegetation coverage can be expected over time in all new ponds. The reference ponds had similar animal communities that differed from the animal communities in the new ponds. The similar species composition in the reference ponds, despite the variety of plant communities, suggests that similar animal communities are likely to develop in the new ponds, even if the plant communities continues to be different. Water chemical sampling has also been conducted in the ponds during 2012. A comparison of the inorganic environment (with regard to analysed ions) showed that the reference ponds had relatively similar ion compositions with little

  11. NASA Ames DEVELOP Interns Collaborate with the South Bay Salt Pond Restoration Project to Monitor and Study Restoration Efforts using NASA's Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newcomer, Michelle E.; Kuss, Amber Jean; Nguyen, Andrew; Schmidt, Cynthia L.

    2012-01-01

    In the past, natural tidal marshes in the south bay were segmented by levees and converted into ponds for use in salt production. In an effort to provide habitat for migratory birds and other native plants and animals, as well as to rebuild natural capital, the South Bay Salt Pond Restoration Project (SBSPRP) is focused on restoring a portion of the over 15,000 acres of wetlands in California's South San Francisco Bay. The process of restoration begins when a levee is breached; the bay water and sediment flow into the ponds and eventually restore natural tidal marshes. Since the spring of 2010 the NASA Ames Research Center (ARC) DEVELOP student internship program has collaborated with the South Bay Salt Pond Restoration Project (SBSPRP) to study the effects of these restoration efforts and to provide valuable information to assist in habitat management and ecological forecasting. All of the studies were based on remote sensing techniques -- NASA's area of expertise in the field of Earth Science, and used various analytical techniques such as predictive modeling, flora and fauna classification, and spectral detection, to name a few. Each study was conducted by a team of aspiring scientists as a part of the DEVELOP program at Ames.

  12. Assessment of U(nat) and 226Ra level in bore well water adjoining the newly constructed uranium mill tailings pond at Turamdih

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Processing of uranium ore leaves behind large quantity of low specific activity waste called tailings. In the absence of appropriate control measures such waste disposal may lead to contamination of adjoining ground water sources. Ten bore wells have been constructed across the earthen bund of the tailings pond to evaluate the migration characteristics of radionuclides and chemical toxicants. Present study is based on the monitoring results of significant radionuclides U(nat) and 226Ra of these bore well water during the last two years. The highest concentration of U(nat) and 226Ra was found 2.4 mg m-3 and 22.1 Bq m-3 respectively. These levels are comparable with the ground water sources situated in the vicinity of the tailings pond and adjacent areas within the same geological formation. The levels reflect the natural distribution of U(nat) and 226Ra in ground water sources of this region and impact of discharges at tailings pond has not been observed so far. The study reveal that the design features of tailings pond is able to restrict these radionuclides within the tailings pile. Moreover, the levels are well below the recommended standards of U(nat) and 226Ra for drinking water i.e. 60 mg m-3 and 300 Bq m-3. (author)

  13. Seasonal patterns of activity and community structure in an amphibian assemblage at a pond network with variable hydrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vignoli, Leonardo; Bologna, Marco A.; Luiselli, Luca

    2007-03-01

    We studied community structure and seasonal activity patterns in a system of four ponds with seasonally-variable hydrology at a Mediterranean area in central Italy. We used a set of field methods to assess species presence and relative frequency of observation. The network of ponds was inhabited by six species of amphibians, two salamanders and four frogs. The breeding phenology of the six species did not vary remarkably among ponds, but there were significant differences among species in use of ponds. Factorial analysis of pond similarity drawn from percentage composition of the amphibian fauna, revealed that each of the four ponds was treatable as independent units, with no influence of relative inter-pond distance. PCA analysis allowed us to spatially arrange the amphibian species into three main groups: two were monospecific groups (i.e., Triturus vulgaris and Bufo bufo) and the third consisted of those species that selected not only the largest-deepest ponds, but also the ephemeral ones (i.e., Triturus carnifex, Hyla intermedia, the green frogs and Rana dalmatina). Our results suggest that the inter-pond differences in riparian vegetation, water depth, aquatic vegetation structure/abundance, and soil composition may produce differences among pond ecological characteristics (i.e., water turbidity and temperature, shelter availability, abundance of oviposition micro-sites), which may in turn influence different patterns of use by amphibians. To our knowledge, this is the first study emphasizing the potential role of heterochrony in the maintenance of a high species richness in Mediterranean amphibian communities. Preservation of freshwater vertebrate biodiversity requires management and protection not only of the main ponds and water bodies but also the temporary and ephemeral shallow ponds.

  14. Bioclogging and Biocementation in Construction of Water Pond in Sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, J.; Ivanov, V.; Stabnikov, V.; Li, B.

    2012-12-01

    Conventionally, compacted bentonite, geosynthetic clay liner or plastic liners are used to seal ponds, channels, and reservoirs in sand. Recently, a new approach to form a low permeability layer of several centimetres thick through the microbially induced calcium carbonate precipitation (MICP) process has been developed (Chu et al., 2012). This method has been adopted to build a laboratory scale water pond model in sand. Calcium solution for bioclogging and biocementation was supplied initially by spaying to form a layer of the clogged sand by precipitation in the pores and then by slow percolation from solution above sand surface, which formed a crust of calcite. This combination of bioclogging and biocementation formed a sand layer of 1 - 3 cm depth with low permeability. The permeability of sand after this treatment was reduced from the order of 10^-4 m/s to 10^-7 m/s when an average 2.1 kg of Ca per m^2 of sand surface was precipitated. The bending strengths of the walls and the base of the model pond were in the range of 90 to 256 kPa. The unconfined compressive strengths obtained from samples from the walls and the base were in the range of 215 to 932 kPa. The graded sand and uniform supply of calcium solution were used for the model pond construction but it was significant spatial three-dimensional heterogeneity of sand bioclogging and biocementation.

  15. Nature of uranium contamination in the agricultural drainage water evaporation ponds of the San Joaquin Valley, California, USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evaporation ponds used for agricultural subsurface drainage water disposal in the Tulare Lake Bed (TLB) of the San Joaquin Valley, California, USA have elevated levels of U. Waterfowl which inhabit and forage the ponds and surrounding areas are threatened by exposure to U. The ponds, which receive irrigation drainage waters and seasonal rain, are subject to wetting and drying periods. The periods result in the accumulation of decaying algae and other organic material in surface sediments. Sediment and waters in the ponds were sampled to determine what factors control U solubility and sediment U concentrations. Data from a 1990 study conducted by Chilcott et al. in 1989 on the TLB ponds were used to help identify what factors may control U solubility. Pond sediment U concentrations decreased abruptly with depth and surface sediment U concentrations were related to dissolved Ca:HCO3 ratios. Pond algal U bioaccumulation was favored in waters with high Ca:HCO3 ratios, which had lower pH values and carbonate alkalinities than waters with low CA:HCO3 ratios. Ponds with high salinities and high carbonate alkalinities contained the highest aqueous U concentrations relative to other TLB ponds. Sediment total organic carbon (TOC) was correlated with sediment U concentrations, suggesting that U is bound to organic matter. The source of TOC is most likely from algae deposition. (author)

  16. Mercury assessment of Brandy Pond T39 MD, Maine

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Brandy Pond is a remote, shallow, pond in east‐central Maine. A bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) nest territory has existed on the pond since the mid-1960s....

  17. Impact of pond aquaculture effluents on seagrass performance in NE Hainan, tropical China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Seagrass performance in relation to large-scale pond aquaculture was assessed. • Effluent-affected seagrass meadows have a low biodiversity, shoot density and biomass. • Shading by epiphytes and sulphide poisoning are major decline mechanisms of seagrasses. • Distance to effluent source and pond agglomeration size are major determinants of seagrass degradation. - Abstract: The impact of pond aquaculture effluents on the distribution and performance of seagrasses was examined in NE Hainan, tropical China. Samples were taken along transects in three back-reef areas with different extent of aquaculture production in their hinterland. High δ15N in seagrass leaves and epiphytes (6–9‰) similar to values in pond effluents documented aquaculture as dominant nitrogen source in the back-reefs with decreasing impact with distance from shore. Seagrass species abundance, shoot density and biomass were lower and concentrations of nutrients, chlorophyll and suspended matter were higher at nearshore sites with high and moderate pond abundance than at the control site. High epiphyte loads and low δ34S in seagrass leaves suggest temporal shading and sulphide poisoning of the nearshore seagrasses. Observed gradients in environmental parameters and seagrass performance indicate that the distance from the pond outlets and size of the adjacent pond agglomeration are major determinants of seagrass degradation

  18. Elimination and accumulation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in urban stormwater wet detention ponds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Istenic, Darja; Arias, Carlos A; Matamoros, Víctor; Vollertsen, Jess; Brix, Hans

    2011-01-01

    The concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHS) in water and sediments of seven wet detention ponds receiving urban stormwater were investigated. The ponds comprised traditional wet detention ponds with a permanent wet volume and a storage volume as well as ponds that were expanded with sand filters and other means to improve the removal of micropollutants. The concentrations of sigmaPAH in the sediments varied between 6 +/- 5 and 2,222 +/- 603 ng g(-1) dry weight (mean +/- standard deviation), and were highest in the ponds with lower pond volume per catchment area and did not clearly reflect different activities in the catchments. In general, the concentrations of PAHS in the sediments decreased from inlet to outlet, especially in the systems with good conditions for sedimentation such as systems with flow perpendicular sand dikes and extensive submerged vegetation. High molecular weight PAHs were predominant in the sediments indicating the pyrogenic origin of the PAHS. There was no correlation between PAH species concentrations in water or sediments and their hydrophobicity (log K(ow)). PAH concentrations in water fluctuated in response to intensity and frequency of rain events, whereas concentrations in the sediments integrated the pollutant load over time. Pond systems expanded with sand filters and other technologies to enhance removal of micropollutants consistently had concentrations of PAHS in the effluents below the detection level. PMID:22097066

  19. Effect of Algal Biofilm and Operational Conditions on Nitrogen Removal in Wastewater Stabilization Ponds

    OpenAIRE

    Babu, M.

    2011-01-01

    Discharge of nutrient rich wastewater causes eutrophication of surface water; therefore wastewater treatment before discharge is required. Wastewater stabilization ponds are low cost technology used by developing countries but not effective in nitrogen removal due to low nitrifier biomass in the water column. Introduction of surface area for attachment of nitrifiers has therefore been proposed. This thesis reports the performance of pilot scale wastewater stabilization ponds fitted with baffl...

  20. Sunlight-Mediated Inactivation Mechanisms of Enteroccocus faecalis and Escherichia coli in Waste Stabilization Ponds

    OpenAIRE

    Kadir, Khalid

    2010-01-01

    Sewage treatment is a pressing global problem, with both environmental as well as human health impacts. In areas where piped sewerage systems are viable, waste stabilization pond systems are one possible method for the treatment of wastewater. Pond systems are often advantageous due to ease of construction and operation as well as their low cost and high effectiveness. With regards to human health, the most important aspect of sewage treatment is the removal and inactivation of pathogens. ...

  1. Anaerobic ponds for domestic wastewater treatment in temperate climates

    OpenAIRE

    Cruddas, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Energy demand, greenhouse gas emissions, and operational costs are continuing to rise year on year in the wastewater treatment sector, with traditional treatment options unable to provide sustainable solutions to increasing volumes and tightening quality standards. Current processes produce inherent fugitive greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, whilst also generating large quantities of sludge for disposal. Anaerobic ponds (APs) are natural wastewater treatment processes that have t...

  2. Technology strategy for subsea processing and transport; Technology Target Areas; TTA6 - Subsea processing and transportation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2008-07-01

    OG21 (www.OG21.org) Norway's official technology strategy for the petroleum sector issued a revised strategy document in November 2005 (new strategy planned in 2009). In this document 'Subsea processing and transport' was identified as one of the eight new technology target areas (TTAs). The overall OG21 strategy document is on an aggregated level, and therefore the Board of OG21 decided that a sub-strategy for each TTA was needed. This document proposes the sub-strategy for the technology target area 'Subsea processing and transport' which covers the technology and competence necessary to effectively transport well stream to a platform or to onshore facilities. This includes multiphase flow modelling, flow assurance challenges to avoid problems with hydrates, asphaltenes and wax, subsea or downhole fluid conditioning including bulk water removal, and optionally complete water removal, and sand handling. It also covers technologies to increase recovery by pressure boosting from subsea pumping and/or subsea compression. Finally it covers technologies to facilitate subsea processing such as control systems and power supply. The vision of the Subsea processing and transport TTA is: Norway is to be the leading international knowledge- and technology cluster in subsea processing and transport: Sustain increased recovery and accelerated production on the NCS by applying subsea processing and efficient transport solutions; Enable >500 km gas/condensate multiphase well stream transport; Enable >200 km oil-dominated multiphase well stream transport; Enable well stream transport of complex fluids; Enable subsea separation, boosting compression, and water injection; Enable deepwater developments; Enable environmentally friendly and energy efficient field development. Increase the export of subsea processing and transport technology: Optimize technology from the NCS for application worldwide; Develop new technology that can meet the challenges found in

  3. A breeding site model for regional, dynamical malaria simulations evaluated using in situ temporary ponds observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernest O. Asare

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Daily observations of potential mosquito developmental habitats in a suburb of Kumasi in central Ghana reveal a strong variability in their water persistence times, which ranged between 11 and 81 days. The persistence of the ponds was strongly tied with rainfall, location and size of the puddles. A simple power-law relationship is found to fit the relationship between the average pond depth and area well. A prognostic water balance model is derived that describes the temporal evolution of the pond area and depth, incorporating the power-law geometrical relation. Pond area increases in response to rainfall, while evaporation and infiltration act as sink terms. Based on a range of evaluation metrics, the prognostic model is judged to provide a good representation of the pond coverage evolution at most sites. Finally, we demonstrate that the prognostic equation can be generalised and equally applied to a grid-cell to derive a fractional pond coverage, and thus can be implemented in spatially distributed models for relevant vector- borne diseases such as malaria.

  4. A breeding site model for regional, dynamical malaria simulations evaluated using in situ temporary ponds observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asare, Ernest O; Tompkins, Adrian M; Amekudzi, Leonard K; Ermert, Volker

    2016-01-01

    Daily observations of potential mosquito developmental habitats in a suburb of Kumasi in central Ghana reveal a strong variability in their water persistence times, which ranged between 11 and 81 days. The persistence of the ponds was strongly tied with rainfall, location and size of the puddles. A simple power-law relationship is found to fit the relationship between the average pond depth and area well. A prognostic water balance model is derived that describes the temporal evolution of the pond area and depth, incorporating the power-law geometrical relation. Pond area increases in response to rainfall, while evaporation and infiltration act as sink terms. Based on a range of evaluation metrics, the prognostic model is judged to provide a good representation of the pond coverage evolution at most sites. Finally, we demonstrate that the prognostic equation can be generalised and equally applied to a grid-cell to derive a fractional pond coverage, and thus can be implemented in spatially distributed models for relevant vector- borne diseases such as malaria. PMID:27063734

  5. Distribution pattern of ambient cadmium in wetland ponds distributed along an industrial complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Shamik; Jana, B B

    2004-04-01

    Water and sediment samples collected from 18 wetland ponds within and outside industrial areas were examined for cadmium concentration and water quality parameters during the period of January to July 1996. The Cd contents in gill, liver, mantle and shell of freshwater mussel (Lamellidens marginalis) as well as leaves and roots of water hyacinth Eichhornia those occurred in these ponds were also estimated. Cd concentration ranged from 0.006 to 0.7025 mg/l in water and from 7 to 77 microg/gdw in sediments of all the ponds investigated. The amount of Cd occurring in water and sediment was much higher in concentrations in the ponds located in Captain Bheri and Mudiali farm close to industrial areas, compared to remaining ponds located outside the industrial belt. Lamellidens marginalis procured from Mudiali and Captain Bheri ponds showed regardless of size, tissue and season of collection significantly higher Cd concentration than did those from other ponds. Likewise, tissue Cd in Eichhornia collected from Mudiali pond was as high as 125-152 microg/gdw in root and 21-63 microg/gdw in leaves compared to 40-108 microg/gdw in root and 9-43 microg/gdw in leaves in the remaining ponds. Seasonal variability of Cd was clear-cut; the concentration was relatively higher in water and sediment in all ponds during summer than during monsoon season or winter. Size-wise, smaller groups showed the highest concentrations of Cd in all tissues of Lamellidens compared with medium and large size groups. Concentration factor for all tissues of Lamellidens regardless of size and season, was inversely proportional with the ambient Cd concentrations. Concentration factor estimated for all tissues in all ponds and all seasons was in the order: liver>gill>shell>mantle. As all ponds located outside the industrial belt showed Cd concentrations ranging from 0.006 to 0.049 mg/l, it is suggested that these wetlands do not pose serious risk to the environment. PMID:14761690

  6. Zooplankton succession in fingerling production ponds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many pond cultured species require a range of zooplankton species for consumption before they can be weaned onto manufactured feed. The widest variety of plankton species develops when empty ponds are filled and fertilized. Use of organic and inorganic fertilizers facilitates the development of ba...

  7. 33 CFR 117.600 - Lagoon Pond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Lagoon Pond. 117.600 Section 117.600 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Massachusetts § 117.600 Lagoon Pond. The draw of the Lagoon...

  8. WMOST v2 Case Study: Monponsett Ponds

    Science.gov (United States)

    This webinar presents an overview of the preliminary results of a case study application of EPA's Watershed Management Optimization Support Tool v2 (WMOST) for stakeholders in the Monponsett Ponds Watershed Workgroup. Monponsett Ponds is a large water system consisting of two ba...

  9. Par Pond vegetation status Summer 1995 -- Summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The water level of Par Pond was lowered approximately 20 feet in mid-1991 in order to protect downstream residents from possible dam failure suggested by subsidence on the downstream slope of the dam and to repair the dam. This lowering exposed both emergent and nonemergent macrophyte beds to drying conditions resulting in extensive losses. A survey of the newly emergent, shoreline aquatic plant communities of Par Pond began in June 1995, three months after the refilling of Par Pond to approximately 200 feet above mean sea level. These surveys continued in July, September, and late October, 1995. Communities similar to the pre-drawdown, Par Pond aquatic plant communities are becoming re-established. Emergent beds of maidencane, lotus, waterlily, and watershield are extensive and well developed. Cattail occurrence continued to increase during the summer, but large beds common to Par Pond prior to the drawdown have not formed. Estimates from SPOT HRV, remote sensing satellite data indicated that as much as 120 hectares of emergent wetlands vegetation may have been present along the Par Pond shoreline by early October, 1995. To track the continued development of macrophytes in Par Pond, future surveys throughout 1996 and 1997, along with the continued evaluation of satellite data to map the areal extent of the macrophyte beds of Par Pond, are planned

  10. Hydrology and chemistry of groundwater and seasonal ponds in the Atlantic Coastal Plain in Delaware, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Patrick J.; Shedlock, Robert J.

    1993-01-01

    The hydrochemistry of small seasonal ponds was investigated by studying relations between ground-water and surface water in a forested Coastal Plain drainage basin. Observation of changes in the water table in a series of wells equipped with automatic water-level recorders showed that the relation between water-table configuration and basin topography changes seasonally, and particularly in response to spring recharge. Furthermore, in this study area the water table is not a subdued expression of the land surface topography, as is commonly assumed. During the summer and fall months, a water-table trough underlies sandy ridges separating the seasonal ponds, and maximum water-table altitudes prevail in the sediments beneath the dry pond bottoms. As the ponds fill with water during the winter, maximum water-table altitudes shift to the upland-margin zone adjacent to the seasonal ponds. Increases in pond stage are associated with the development of transient water-table mounds at the upland-margin wells during the spring. The importance of small local-flow systems adjacent to the seasonal ponds also is shown by the similarities in the chemistry of the shallow groundwater in the upland margin and water in the seasonal ponds. The upland margin and surface water samples have low pH (generally less than 5.0), and contain large concentrations of dissolved aluminum (generally more than 100 μg 1 -1), and low bicarbonate concentrations (2 mg l 4 or less). In contrast, the parts of the surficial aquifer that do not experience transient mounding have higher pH and larger concentrations of bicarbonate. These results suggest that an understanding of the hydrochemistry of seasonally ponded wetlands requires intensive study of the adjacent shallow groundwater-flow system.

  11. Pond of Illusion: Interacting through Mixed Reality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nobel-Jørgensen, Morten; Nielsen, Jannik Boll; Larsen, Anders Boesen Lindbo;

    2013-01-01

    Pond of Illusion is a mixed reality installation where a virtual space (the pond) is injected between two real spaces. The users are in either of the real spaces, and they can see each other through windows in the virtual space as illustrated in Figure 1(left). The installation attracts people to a...... large display in either of the real spaces by allowing them to feed virtual fish swimming in the pond. Figure 1(middle) shows how a Microsoft Kinect mounted on top of the display is used for detecting throw motions, which triggers virtual breadcrumbs to be thrown into the pond for feeding the nearby...... fish. Of course, the fish may not be available because they are busy eating what people have thrown into the pond from the other side....

  12. Master plan for remediation of the Sillamaee tailings pond and technical design project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remediation of the Sillamaee radioactive tailings pond is a priority in the Estonian National Environmental Plan. The Sillamaee plant has processed metal ores by hydrometallurgical methods since 1946. Processing continued until 1990, but in the 1970s, production of rare earths and rare metals was introduced and continues today at a smaller scale. The tailings pond contains residues from these operations. The environmental problems associated with the tailings pond are the stability of the dam and the release of contaminants. In order to deal with these two issues effectively, a master plan was drawn up. The master plan covers the period from 1997 to 2008 and was compiled with the cooperation of the Silmet Group and the Sillamaee International Expert Reference Group (SIERG). The master plan sets up a systematic approach for the overall tailings pond remediation, including drying its interior, reshaping and covering the surface, minimizing water flow through the tailings, and ensuring long-term dam stability

  13. 40 CFR 265 interim-status ground-water monitoring plan for the 2101-M pond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report outlines a ground-water monitoring plan for the 2101-M pond, located in the southwestern part of the 200-East Area on the Hanford Site in south-central Washington State. It has been determined that hazardous materials may have been discharged to the pond. Installation of an interim-status ground-water monitoring system is required under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act to determine if hazardous chemicals are moving out of the pond. This plan describes the location of new wells for the monitoring system, how the wells are to be completed, the data to be collected, and how those data can be used to determine the source and extent of any ground-water contamination from the 2101-M pond. Four new wells are planned, one upgradient and three downgradient. 35 refs., 12 figs., 9 tabs

  14. 40 CFR 265 interim-status ground-water monitoring plan for the 2101-M pond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chamness, M.A.; Luttrell, S.P.; Dudziak, S.

    1989-03-01

    This report outlines a ground-water monitoring plan for the 2101-M pond, located in the southwestern part of the 200-East Area on the Hanford Site in south-central Washington State. It has been determined that hazardous materials may have been discharged to the pond. Installation of an interim-status ground-water monitoring system is required under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act to determine if hazardous chemicals are moving out of the pond. This plan describes the location of new wells for the monitoring system, how the wells are to be completed, the data to be collected, and how those data can be used to determine the source and extent of any ground-water contamination from the 2101-M pond. Four new wells are planned, one upgradient and three downgradient. 35 refs., 12 figs., 9 tabs.

  15. Image processing and analysis using neural networks for optometry area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netto, Antonio V.; Ferreira de Oliveira, Maria C.

    2002-11-01

    In this work we describe the framework of a functional system for processing and analyzing images of the human eye acquired by the Hartmann-Shack technique (HS), in order to extract information to formulate a diagnosis of eye refractive errors (astigmatism, hypermetropia and myopia). The analysis is to be carried out using an Artificial Intelligence system based on Neural Nets, Fuzzy Logic and Classifier Combination. The major goal is to establish the basis of a new technology to effectively measure ocular refractive errors that is based on methods alternative those adopted in current patented systems. Moreover, analysis of images acquired with the Hartmann-Shack technique may enable the extraction of additional information on the health of an eye under exam from the same image used to detect refraction errors.

  16. State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA) Environmental Checklist Form 216-B-3 Expansion Ponds Closure Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 216-B-3 Expansion Ponds Closure Plan (Revision 1) consists of a Part A Dangerous Waste Permit Application and a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Closure Plan. An explanation of the Part A submitted with this document is provided at the beginning of the Part A Section. The closure plan consists of nine chapters and five appendices. The 216-B-3 Pond System consists of a series of four earthen, unlined, interconnected ponds and the 216-B-3-3 Ditch that receive waste water from various 200 East Area operating facilities. These four ponds, collectively. Waste water (primarily cooling water, steam condensate, and sanitary water) from various 200 East Area facilities is discharged to the 216-B-3-3 Ditch. Water discharged to the 216-8-3-3 Ditch flows directly into the 216-B-3 Pond. In the past, waste water discharges to B Pond and the 216-B-3-3 Ditch contained mixed waste (radioactive waste and dangerous waste). The radioactive portion of mixed waste has been interpreted by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to be regulated under the Atomic Energy Act of 1954; the nonradioactive dangerous portion of mixed waste is regulated under RCRA. Mixed waste also may be considered a hazardous substance under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) when considering remediation of waste sites

  17. Support for characterization, grout formulations, and stabilization of K-1407-B and K-1407-C pond sludges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP) has generated large quantities of mixed hazardous and radioactive wastes over the years. Most of these wastes are contained as sludges in two large treatment and settling ponds, K-1407-B pond and K-1407-C pond. The federal mandate requiring that all surface impoundments be discontinued and closed by November 1988 makes the need for remedial action for these ponds very apparent. Both ponds were statistically sampled, and the sludge and clay layers in these ponds were completely characterized. Cement stabilization was chosen as the treatment method for processing these pond sludges. Laboratory-scale cement fixation studies were performed to develop a grout formulation that would allow the Sludge Treatment Facility (STF) at ORGDP to stabilize hazardous wastes so that they would meet or exceed applicable compressive strength and leachability requirements and thus qualify for delisting from hazardous to nonhazardous. A process flow sheet was developed that detailed operating procedures and equipment requirements for the handling of waste materials from the raw sludge to the final hardened concrete forms. Special problems associated with handling, pumping, processing, and moving of the raw sludge, wet concrete, and cast concrete have been investigated. The STF has been in operation since April 1987 stabilizing sludge from K-1407-C pond. Problems and operating experiences to date at the STF are discussed in this report. 18 refs., 5 figs., 32 tabs

  18. Asia-Pacific area shows big gains in processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on the Asia-Pacific region's buoyant refining and petrochemical industries that are reacting to lessons from the Persian gulf war. First-and least palatable-is the knowledge there is no alternative to oil from the Middle East to fuel headlong economic growth. Iraq's Aug. 2, 1990, invasion of Kuwait, resulting in the loss of crude oil from both countries and the flow of products from Kuwait's sophisticated refining complexes, hammered home another valuable lesson. In a crisis, the petroleum industry-oil exporting countries in particular-will in the short term find it easier to make substitute crude supplies available than to conjure up products from alternative processing capacity. The Japanese, as might be expected, are implementing new policies to take account of this lesson. Japan's tightly controlled refining sector has been told it can expand capacity for the first time in 18 years. And, with the blessing of the Japanese government, a group of companies led by Nippon Oil has agreed to a joint venture with Saudi Arabian Oil Co. that will lead to new refining capacity in Japan and a new export refinery in Saudi Arabia that is likely to be dedicated to the Japanese market

  19. Atmospheric radon and gamma levels in and around tailings pond at Jaduguda

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unlike other segment of nuclear industry, huge amount of solid waste is generated in the uranium-processing mill known as tailings. Special attention is to be given during disposal of this waste because they are chemically toxic in addition to the fact that they are radioactive. The composition of the waste or tailings depends on the type of leaching process adopted for the extraction of uranium, the reagent used and the mineralogy of ore. U.C.I.L is adopting acid leach process for processing of uranium ore. After recovery of uranium, bulk of the processed ore known as tailings is neutralized by addition of lime to pH 10 and then classified into coarse and fine fraction using hydrocyclone. The course fraction is used in mine as back fill material and the fine is impounded in an engineered earthen dam known as tailings pond. In Jaduguda, there are three Thilings Pond in which Ist and IInd stage is filled up to their optimum capacity and IIIrd stage is presently in use for tailings disposal. These tailings pond in Jaduguda are surrounded by hill on three sides and an engineered embankment on down stream side of natural drainage. As an approximation, about 75% of total activity contained in ore remains with tailings after recovery of uranium. Therefore these tailings may be a potential source of environmental problem because of (1) emanation of 222Rn, (2) disposal of tailings by wind, (3) their use in building material and ( 4) external exposure to b, g radiation, if effective control measures are not taken. Measurements of atmospheric radon and gamma level survey were carried out using low level radon detection system (LLRDS) developed at H.P. Unit, Jaduguda, environmental radiation dosimeter. This paper summarizes the environmental radon and gamma radiation survey carried out in the villages within 1.6 km area of tailings pond (area of influence). The atmospheric radon levels around the villages ( within 1.6 km distance from T.P.) were found to vary from 5 to 61

  20. Technical manual for calculating cooling pond performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This manual is produced in response to a growing number of requests for a technical aid to explain methods for simulating cooling pond performance. As such, it is a compilation of reports, charts and graphs developed through the years for use in analyzing situations. Section II contains a report summarizing the factors affecting cooling pond performance and lists statistical parameters used in developing performance simulations. Section III contains the graphs of simulated cooling pond performance on an hourly basis for various combinations of criteria (wind, solar, depth, air temperature and humidity) developed from the report in Section II. Section IV contains correspondence describing how to develop further data from the graphs in Section III, as well as mathematical models for the system of performance calculation. Section V contains the formulas used to simulate cooling pond performances in a cascade arrangement, such as the Fermilab Main Ring ponds. Section VI contains the calculations currently in use to evaluate the Main Ring pond performance based on current flows and Watts loadings. Section VII contains the overall site drawing of the Main Ring cooling ponds with thermal analysis and physical data

  1. Fate and Transport of 17β-estradiol Beneath Animal Waste Holding Ponds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, L. A.; Tyner, J. S.; Hawkins, S. A.; Lee, J.; Buchanan, J. R.

    2011-12-01

    Steroidal hormones, such as 17β-estradiol (E2), are prevalent in animal waste and are a common subject of study due to potential stream and groundwater contamination. These particular hormones are labeled as Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs) because of their developmental effects in reptiles and amphibians. Dairy waste at concentrated animal feeding operations is typically stored in a pond that is regulated by law to include an underlying soil liner with a minimal hydraulic conductivity to limit leaching beneath the pond, yet some studies have traced stream and groundwater contamination to these ponds. Previous studies have shown that the soil underlying earthen ponds are always unsaturated. This increases the pore water velocity relative to a given flux, which itself is dictated almost entirely by an organic seal that forms at the bottom of a waste pond. This increased velocity results in more rapid transport and less retention time within the vadose zone where E2 could biodegrade into its daughter product, estrone (E1). And since the soil is unsaturated and therefore has a negative pressure, preferential flow should not serve as a method of transport. On the contrary, E2 and E1 may sorb to mobile colloids increasing their mobility. This study will evaluate the use of biochar, an increasingly common activated carbon source, as a soil liner amendment. Biochar has a specific surface area that can exceed 1,500 m2/g and is high in organic matter, which E2 sorbs to strongly. The biochar amendment should be most effective and enduring as a layer located at the bottom of the soil liner so that the leachate has been treated by the soil prior to contact. Another proposed amendment technique is to uniformly mix the biochar within the soil liner to increase the leachate contact time with the biochar, but realistically could prove to be too costly and energy-intensive. Field and laboratory studies were conducted to analyze hormone persistence and transport processes and

  2. Development of Mobile Tracer Correlation Method for Quantification of Emissions from Landfills and Other Large Area Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    There is an emerging need to develop cost effective measurement methods for greenhouse gas and air pollutant emissions from large area sources such as landfills, waste water treatment ponds, open area processing units, agricultural operations, CO2 sequestration fields, and site r...

  3. Development of Mobile Tracer Correlation Approach for Quantification of Emissions from Landfills and Other Large Area Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    There is a recognized need to develop cost effective measurement methods for greenhouse gas and air pollutant emissions from large area sources such as landfills, waste water treatment ponds, open area processing units, agricultural operations, CO2 sequestration fields, and site ...

  4. Development of a Mobile Tracer Correlation Techniques for Assessment of Air Emissions from Landfills and Other Area Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Improved understanding of air emissions from large area sources such as landfills, waste water ponds, open-source processing, and agricultural operations is a topic of increasing environmental importance. In many cases, the size of the area source, coupled with spatial-heteroge...

  5. Photosynthesis and fish production in culture ponds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szyper, J.P.

    1995-12-31

    The widely-cultured Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus, has been the major species used in standardized experiments by the Pond Dynamics/Aquaculture Collaborative Research Support Program (PD/ACRSP). Yields of Nile Tilapia from fertilized, unfed ponds have served as a bioassay for effectiveness of pond management protocols developed during worldwide tropical experiments. Yield rates near 10 T/ha/y can be achieved without feed inputs in ponds which maintain high standing stocks of phytoplankton and exhibit high rates near 10 T/ha/y can be achieved without feed inputs in ponds which maintain high standing stocks of phytoplankton and exhibit high rates of primary production. Fish production is related to daytime net photosynthetic production, but it is not clear whether production of food materials or oxygen is the more direct influence. Excessively high standing stocks of phytoplankton are not the best net producers, and increase and risk of nighttime oxygen depletion. Fish readily grow to individual sizes of 200-300 g/fish in fertilized ponds, which is sufficient market size in many locations. Supplemental feeding of caged or free-ranging fish greatly accelerates growth beyond 300 g and potentiates high areal yields; the PD/A CRSP has also developed efficient feeding regimes and shown that supplemental feeding need not begin before fish reach 200 g weight. High standing stocks of phytoplankton and high photosynthetic rates in eutrophic ponds make study of photosynthesis possible without radioisotopes. Such ponds also exhibit complete extinction of incident solar radiation within shallow depths, and vertical temperature structure resembling that of deeper bodies of water. These characteristics make ponds useful as microcosms for study of some aspects of photosynthesis in natural waters.

  6. Process Performance Measurement as Part of Business Process Management in Manufacturing Area

    OpenAIRE

    Tupa, Jiri

    2010-01-01

    This chapter presents an example of process controlling application. Process controlling described in this paper, comprises the following components: Evaluation of the efficiency of business processes based on key performance indicators Transparent representation of procedures actually performed for cause analysis. Deduction of optimization measures. Continuous monitoring of success developments. Organizational analysis. The process controlling is very important tool for process improvement i...

  7. Removal of Fecal Indicators, Pathogenic Bacteria, Adenovirus, Cryptosporidium and Giardia (oo)cysts in Waste Stabilization Ponds in Northern and Eastern Australia

    OpenAIRE

    Maxim Sheludchenko; Anna Padovan; Mohammad Katouli; Helen Stratton

    2016-01-01

    Maturation ponds are used in rural and regional areas in Australia to remove the microbial loads of sewage wastewater, however, they have not been studied intensively until present. Using a combination of culture-based methods and quantitative real-time PCR, we assessed microbial removal rates in maturation ponds at four waste stabilization ponds (WSP) with (n = 1) and without (n = 3) baffles in rural and remote communities in Australia. Concentrations of total coliforms, E. coli, enterococci...

  8. WWER-type NPP spray ponds screen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this study is to develop a protection screen of WWER-type NPP spray ponds. The screen design is to ensure reduction of the water droplets blown by the wind and, if possible, their return back to the spray ponds. The cooling capacity of the ponds is not to be changed below the design level for safety reasons. Computational fluid dynamics analysis is used to assess the influence of each design variant on the behavior of the water droplets distribution. Two variants are presented here. The one with plants is found not feasible. The second variant, with steel screen and terrain profile modification is selected for implementation. (author)

  9. ANL-W 779 pond seepage test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ANL-W 779 sanitary wastewater treatment ponds are located on the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), north of the Argonne National Laboratory -- West (ANL-W) site A seepage test was performed for two Argonne National Laboratory -- West (ANL-W) sanitary wastewater treatment ponds, Facility 779. Seepage rates were measured to determine if the ponds are a wastewater land application facility. The common industry standard for wastewater land application facilities is a field-measured seepage rate of one quarter inch per day or greater

  10. Zooplankton assemblages in montane lakes and ponds of Mount Rainier National Park, Washington State, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, G.L.; Hoffman, R.; McIntire, C.D.; Lienkaemper, G.; Samora, B.

    2009-01-01

    Water quality and zooplankton samples were collected during the ice-free periods between 1988 and 2005 from 103 oligotrophic montane lakes and ponds located in low forest to alpine vegetation zones in Mount Rainier National Park, Washington State, USA. Collectively, 45 rotifer and 44 crustacean taxa were identified. Most of the numerically dominant taxa appeared to have wide niche breadths. The average number of taxa per lake decreased with elevation and generally increased as maximum lake depths increased (especially for rotifers). With one exception, fish presence/absence did not explain the taxonomic compositions of crustacean zooplankton assemblages. Many rotifer species were common members of zooplankton assemblages in montane lakes and ponds in western North America, whereas the crustacean taxa were common to some areas of the west, but not others. Constraints of the environmental variables did not appear to provide strong gradients to separate the distributions of most zooplankton species. This suggests that interspecific competitive interactions and stochastic processes regulate the taxonomic structures of the zooplankton assemblages at the landscape level. Crustacean species that had broad niche breadths were associated with different rotifer taxa across the environmental gradients. Studies of zooplankton assemblages need to address both crustacean and rotifer taxa, not one or the other.

  11. Thresholds for opportunistic disease in yellow perch (Perca flavescens) exposed to oil sand process-affected waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hogan, N.; Van Den Heuvel, M. [Prince Edward Island Univ., Charlottetown, PE (Canada); Van Meer, T.; Mackinnon, M. [Syncrude Canada Ltd., Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    Reclaimed oil sands wetlands will contain process-affected materials with elevated salt, naphthenic acids (NA) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). Mature fine tailings may also be placed at the bottom of reclaimed lakes. This study investigated the effects of oil sands-impacted aquatic systems on the health of perch stocked in 2 experimental lakes between 1995 and 1997. A demonstration pond was constructed in 1989 and contained 70,000 m{sup 3} of mature fine tailings capped with 70,000 m{sup 3} of surface water. The South Bison pond was formed in a natural depression in an area where unrecovered bitumen was deposited. The area surrounding the pond was reclaimed for pasture in 1996. Two disease pathologies were observed in perch stocked in both lakes, notably fin erosion caused by an unidentified pathogen, and lymphocystis. The pathologies were initially more prevalent in the South Bison pond. Later studies confirmed that the diseases were substantially more prevalent in the demonstration pond. The study showed that while NA decreased over time in the South Bison pond, NA was doubled in the demonstration pond as a result of tailings densification. The study suggested that temporal changes in NA correlate with the incidence of disease pathologies.

  12. Longitudinal study of urbanisation processes in peri-urban areas of Greater Copenhagen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Busck, Anne Gravsholt; Fertner, Christian; Kristensen, Lone Søderkvist;

    Urbanisation processes increasingly influence the use of land and properties in rural areas. In peri-urban areas population composition changes as the areas offer attractive possibilities of other gainful activities than agriculture (OGA), and residential and recreational alternatives to both urban...

  13. Anthropogenic climate change impacts on ponds: a thermal mass perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Matthews

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Small freshwater aquatic lentic systems (lakes and ponds are sensitive to anthropogenic climate change through shifts in ambient air temperatures and patterns of precipitation. Shifts in air temperatures will influence lentic water temperatures through convection and by changing evaporation rates. Shifts in the timing, amount, and intensity of precipitation will alter the thermal mass of lentic systems even in the absence of detectable ambient air temperature changes. These effects are likely to be strongest in ponds (standing water bodies primarily mixed by temperature changes than by wind, for whom precipitation makes up a large component of inflows. Although historical water temperature datasets are patchy for lentic systems, thermal mass effects are likely to outweigh impacts from ambient air temperatures in most locations and may show considerable independence from those trends. Thermal mass-induced changes in water temperature will thereby alter a variety of population- and community-level processes in aquatic macroinvertebrates.

  14. Groundwater fluxes in a shallow seasonal wetland pond: The effect of bathymetric uncertainty on predicted water and solute balances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trigg, Mark A.; Cook, Peter G.; Brunner, Philip

    2014-09-01

    The successful management of groundwater dependent shallow seasonal wetlands requires a sound understanding of groundwater fluxes. However, such fluxes are hard to quantify. Water volume and solute mass balance models can be used in order to derive an estimate of groundwater fluxes within such systems. This approach is particularly attractive, as it can be undertaken using measurable environmental variables, such as; rainfall, evaporation, pond level and salinity. Groundwater fluxes estimated from such an approach are subject to uncertainty in the measured variables as well as in the process representation and in parameters within the model. However, the shallow nature of seasonal wetland ponds means water volume and surface area can change rapidly and non-linearly with depth, requiring an accurate representation of the wetland pond bathymetry. Unfortunately, detailed bathymetry is rarely available and simplifying assumptions regarding the bathymetry have to be made. However, the implications of these assumptions are typically not quantified. We systematically quantify the uncertainty implications for eight different representations of wetland bathymetry for a shallow seasonal wetland pond in South Australia. The predictive uncertainty estimation methods provided in the Model-Independent Parameter Estimation and Uncertainty Analysis software (PEST) are used to quantify the effect of bathymetric uncertainty on the modelled fluxes. We demonstrate that bathymetry can be successfully represented within the model in a simple parametric form using a cubic Bézier curve, allowing an assessment of bathymetric uncertainty due to measurement error and survey detail on the derived groundwater fluxes compared with the fixed bathymetry models. Findings show that different bathymetry conceptualisations can result in very different mass balance components and hence process conceptualisations, despite equally good fits to observed data, potentially leading to poor management

  15. Geohydrology of the Flints Pond Aquifer, Hollis, New Hampshire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayotte, Joseph D.; Dorgan, Tracy H.

    1995-01-01

    Flints pond has been subjected to accelerated eutrophication as a result of watershed development (building of new homes and conversion of summer cottages into permanent homes) since the 1930's. Ground-water flow is the primary recharge and discharge mechanism for Flints Pond. The saturated thickness, transmissive properties, and altitude of the water table were determined by use of surface geophysics, test drilling, and aquifer-test data. Information on the geohydrology of the adjacent Flints Pond aquifer can be used in developing a water and nutrient budget for the pond-aquifer system. Ground-penetrating-radar surveys were done over more than 4 miles of the study area and on Flints Pond. Three distinct reflection signatures were commonly identifiable on the radar profiles: (1) thin, relatively flat-lying, continuous reflectors that represent fine-grained lacustrine sediment; (2) subparallel to hummocky and chaotic, coarse-grained reflectors that possibly represent coarse-grained ice-contact deposits or deltaic sediments in a lacustrine environment; and (3) sharply diffracted, fine-grained, chaotic reflectors that represent till and (or) till over bedrock. The saturated thickness of the aquifer exceeds 90 feet in the northern end of the study area and averages 30 to 50 feet in the southern and eastern parts. The saturated thickness of the western part is generally less than 10 feet. Test borings were completed at 19 sites and 13 wells (6 of which were nested pairs) were installed in various lithologic units. A water-table map, constructed from data collected in November 1994, represents average water-table conditions in the aquifer. Horizontal hydraulic conductivities calculated from single-well aquifer test data for stratified drift range from 2.8 to 226 feet per day. Hydraulic conductivities were quantitatively correlated with the reflector signatures produced with ground-penetrating radar so that transmissivities could be inferred for areas where well data were

  16. Can Environmental Education Actions Change Public Attitudes? An Example Using the Pond Habitat and Associated Biodiversity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eunice Sousa

    Full Text Available Ponds provide vital ecological services. They are biodiversity hotspots and important breading sites for rare and endangered species, including amphibians and dragonflies. Nevertheless, their number is decreasing due to habitat degradation caused by human activities. The "Ponds with Life" environmental education project was developed to raise public awareness and engagement in the study of ponds by promoting the direct contact between the public and nature, researchers and pedagogical hands-on exploration activities. A pre-post- project survey was set-up to assess the effects of the project on the environmental consciousness, knowledge and attitude changes towards ponds and the associated biodiversity of school students aged 15 to 18. The survey questions were based on Likert scales and their pre-post project comparisons used an innovative multivariate hypothesis testing approach. The results showed that the project improved the students' knowledge and attitudes towards ponds and associated biodiversity, especially the amphibians. Ponds can be found or constructed in urban areas and despite small sized, they proved to be interesting model habitats and living laboratories to foster environmental education, by encompassing a high number of species and a fast ecological succession.

  17. Can Environmental Education Actions Change Public Attitudes? An Example Using the Pond Habitat and Associated Biodiversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Eunice; Quintino, Victor; Palhas, Jael; Rodrigues, Ana Maria; Teixeira, José

    2016-01-01

    Ponds provide vital ecological services. They are biodiversity hotspots and important breading sites for rare and endangered species, including amphibians and dragonflies. Nevertheless, their number is decreasing due to habitat degradation caused by human activities. The "Ponds with Life" environmental education project was developed to raise public awareness and engagement in the study of ponds by promoting the direct contact between the public and nature, researchers and pedagogical hands-on exploration activities. A pre-post- project survey was set-up to assess the effects of the project on the environmental consciousness, knowledge and attitude changes towards ponds and the associated biodiversity of school students aged 15 to 18. The survey questions were based on Likert scales and their pre-post project comparisons used an innovative multivariate hypothesis testing approach. The results showed that the project improved the students' knowledge and attitudes towards ponds and associated biodiversity, especially the amphibians. Ponds can be found or constructed in urban areas and despite small sized, they proved to be interesting model habitats and living laboratories to foster environmental education, by encompassing a high number of species and a fast ecological succession. PMID:27148879

  18. Can Environmental Education Actions Change Public Attitudes? An Example Using the Pond Habitat and Associated Biodiversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Eunice; Quintino, Victor; Palhas, Jael; Rodrigues, Ana Maria; Teixeira, José

    2016-01-01

    Ponds provide vital ecological services. They are biodiversity hotspots and important breading sites for rare and endangered species, including amphibians and dragonflies. Nevertheless, their number is decreasing due to habitat degradation caused by human activities. The “Ponds with Life” environmental education project was developed to raise public awareness and engagement in the study of ponds by promoting the direct contact between the public and nature, researchers and pedagogical hands-on exploration activities. A pre-post- project survey was set-up to assess the effects of the project on the environmental consciousness, knowledge and attitude changes towards ponds and the associated biodiversity of school students aged 15 to 18. The survey questions were based on Likert scales and their pre-post project comparisons used an innovative multivariate hypothesis testing approach. The results showed that the project improved the students’ knowledge and attitudes towards ponds and associated biodiversity, especially the amphibians. Ponds can be found or constructed in urban areas and despite small sized, they proved to be interesting model habitats and living laboratories to foster environmental education, by encompassing a high number of species and a fast ecological succession. PMID:27148879

  19. Biomass and productivity of trematode parasites in pond ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, Daniel L; Orlofske, Sarah A; Lambden, Jason P; Johnson, Pieter T J

    2013-05-01

    1. Ecologists often measure the biomass and productivity of organisms to understand the importance of populations and communities in the flow of energy through ecosystems. Despite the central role of such studies in the advancement of freshwater ecology, there has been little effort to incorporate parasites into studies of freshwater energy flow. This omission is particularly important considering the roles that parasites sometimes play in shaping community structure and ecosystem processes. 2. Using quantitative surveys and dissections of over 1600 aquatic invertebrate and amphibian hosts, we calculated the ecosystem-level biomass and productivity of trematode parasites alongside the biomass of free-living aquatic organisms in three freshwater ponds in California, USA. 3. Snails and amphibian larvae, which are both important intermediate trematode hosts, dominated the dry biomass of free-living organisms across ponds (snails = 3.2 g m(-2); amphibians = 3.1 g m(-2)). An average of 33.5% of mature snails were infected with one of six trematode taxa, amounting to a density of 13 infected snails m(-2) of pond substrate. Between 18% and 33% of the combined host and parasite biomass within each infected snail consisted of larval trematode tissue, which collectively accounted for 87% of the total trematode biomass within the three ponds. Mid-summer trematode dry biomass averaged 0.10 g m(-2), which was equal to or greater than that of the most abundant insect orders (coleoptera = 0.10 g m(-2), odonata = 0.08 g m(-2), hemiptera = 0.07 g m(-2) and ephemeroptera = 0.03 g m(-2)). 4. On average, each trematode taxon produced between 14 and 1660 free-swimming larvae (cercariae) infected snail(-1) 24 h(-1) in mid-summer. Given that infected snails release cercariae for 3-4 months a year, the pond trematode communities produced an average of 153 mg m(-2) yr(-1) of dry cercarial biomass (range = 70-220 mg m(-2) yr(-1)). 5. Our results suggest that a significant amount of energy

  20. Solar pond design for Arabian Gulf conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassab, M.A.; Tag, I.A.; Jassim, I.A.; Al-Juburi, F.Y.

    1987-01-01

    Collection and storage of solar energy in salt gradient solar ponds under conditions of high ambient and ground temperatures and all year-round sunny weather are investigated theoretically. A transient model based on measured local environmental conditions is developed to predict solar transmission, temperature distribution and salt distribution inside the pond for any day of the year. In the model the effects of heat dissipation into the ground, bottom reflection, pond dimensions, load extraction and variation of the pond's physical properties with temperature and concentration are investigated. The generated non-linear coupled system of heat and salt concentration equations for the composite media, considered to have isothermal boundary conditions, is solved numerically using the implicit finite-difference scheme.

  1. Status report on Fish Springs pond snail

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report provides a life history of the pond snail (Lymnaea Hinkleyia pilsbryi) at Fish Springs National Wildlife Refuge. The following information is included;...

  2. South Bay Salt Ponds : Initial stewardship plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The California Department of Fish and Game and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will operate and maintain the South Bay Salt Ponds under this Initial Stewardship...

  3. Radioecological implications of the Par Pond drawdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The drawdown of the Par Pond reservoir created dramatic alterations in this formerly stable lentic ecosystem. In addition, the radiation environment at Par Pond has changed significantly because of the exposure of Cesium 137-contaminated sediments and the appearance of new transport pathways to the terrestrial environment. In response to this situation, SREL was asked to study the radioecological implications of the reservoir drawdown. This report contains the objectives, methods, and results of the SREL study

  4. Biological traits of European pond macroinvertebrates

    OpenAIRE

    Céréghino, Régis; Oertli, Beat; Marcello BAZZANTI; Coccia, Cristina; Compin, Arthur; Biggs, Jeremy; Bressi, Nicolas; Grillas, Patrick; Hull, Andrew P.; Kalettka, Thomas; Scher, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    Whilst biological traits of river macroinvertebrates show unimodal responses to geographic changes in habitat conditions in Europe, we still do not know whether spatial turnover of species result in distinct combinations of biological traits for pond macroinvertebrates. Here, we used data on the occurrence of 204 macroinvertebrate taxa in 120 ponds from four biogeographic regions of Europe, to compare their biological traits. The Mediterranean, Atlantic, Alpine, and Continental regions have s...

  5. History, origins and importance of temporary ponds

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Penny; Biggs, Jeremy; Fox, Gill; Nicolet, Pascale; Whitfield, Merica

    2001-01-01

    In Europe, temporary ponds are a naturally common and widespread habitat occurring, often in abundance, in all biogeographical regions from the boreal snow-melt pools of northern Scandinavia to the seasonally inundated coastal dune pools of southern Spain. Ecological studies in Europe and elsewhere also emphasise that temporary ponds are a biologically important habitat type, renowned both for their specialised assemblages and the considerable numbers of rare and endemic species they support....

  6. A Summary Description of a Computer Program Concept for the Design and Simulation of Solar Pond Electric Power Generation Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    A solar pond electric power generation subsystem, an electric power transformer and switch yard, a large solar pond, a water treatment plant, and numerous storage and evaporation ponds. Because a solar pond stores thermal energy over a long period of time, plant operation at any point in time is dependent upon past operation and future perceived generation plans. This time or past history factor introduces a new dimension in the design process. The design optimization of a plant must go beyond examination of operational state points and consider the seasonal variations in solar, solar pond energy storage, and desired plant annual duty-cycle profile. Models or design tools will be required to optimize a plant design. These models should be developed in order to include a proper but not excessive level of detail. The model should be targeted to a specific objective and not conceived as a do everything analysis tool, i.e., system design and not gradient-zone stability.

  7. Geomembrane selection criteria for uranium tailings ponds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The selection criteria, particularly those involving chemical compatibility, of geomembranes to be used in ponds at uranium mill operations are discussed. The principal functional criteria which a geomembrane must meet for this application are: (1) a specified service life and (2) low permeability. Chemical compatibility with the waste is essential in meeting these functional criteria. In two different types of aging tests using simulated acidic uranium mill waste, degradation of chemical and physical properties were examined in geomembranes of high-density polyethylene, polyvinyl chloride, and chlorosulfonated polyethylene. Compatibility tests according to the National Sanitation Foundation procedures are recommended to ascertain the stability of certain physical properties of the proposed geomembrane. Actual experience with a specific geomembrane in an identical application is probably the best method to assure compatibility; however, this experience is frequently not available. Experience with a geomembrane in similar applications is valuable in the selection process, however, small differences in either the geomembrane formulation or the waste composition may result in large differences in performance of the geomembrane. It is likely that many geomembranes have acceptable chemical stability for typical uranium mill applications, therefore, additional factors in the selection processes will include seaming characteristics, mechanical properties, site characteristics, and costs

  8. Melt ponds and marginal ice zone from new algorithm of sea ice concentration retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repina, Irina; Tikhonov, Vasiliy; Komarova, Nataliia; Raev, Mikhail; Sharkov, Evgeniy

    2016-04-01

    Studies of spatial and temporal properties of sea ice distribution in polar regions help to monitor global environmental changes and reveal their natural and anthropogenic factors, as well as make forecasts of weather, marine transportation and fishing conditions, assess perspectives of mineral mining on the continental shelf, etc. Contact methods of observation are often insufficient to meet the goals, very complicated technically and organizationally and not always safe for people involved. Remote sensing techniques are believed to be the best alternative. Its include monitoring of polar regions by means of passive microwave sensing with the aim to determine spatial distribution, types, thickness and snow cover of ice. However, the algorithms employed today to retrieve sea ice characteristics from passive microwave sensing data for different reasons give significant errors, especially in summer period and also near ice edges and in cases of open ice. A new algorithm of sea ice concentration retrieval in polar regions from satellite microwave radiometry data is discussed. Beside estimating sea ice concentration, the algorithm makes it possible to indicate ice areas with melting snow and melt ponds. Melt ponds are an important element of the Arctic climate system. Covering up to 50% of the surface of drifting ice in summer, they are characterized by low albedo values and absorb several times more incident shortwave radiation than the rest of the snow and ice cover. The change of melt ponds area in summer period 1987-2015 is investigated. The marginal ice zone (MIZ) is defined as the area where open ocean processes, including specifically ocean waves, alter significantly the dynamical properties of the sea ice cover. Ocean wave fields comprise short waves generated locally and swell propagating from the large ocean basins. Depending on factors like wind direction and ocean currents, it may consist of anything from isolated, small and large ice floes drifting over a

  9. The impact of under-ice melt ponds on Arctic sea ice volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Naomi; Flocco, Daniela; Feltham, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    A one-dimensional, thermodynamic model of Arctic sea ice [Flocco et al, 2015] has been adapted to study the evolution of under-ice melt ponds, pools of fresh water that are found below the Arctic sea ice, and false bottoms, sheets of ice that form at the boundary between the under-ice melt pond and the oceanic mixed layer. Over time, either the under-ice melt pond freezes or the false bottom is completely ablated. We have been investigating the impact that these features have on the growth or ablation of sea ice during the time that they are present. The sensitivity of our model to a range of parameters has been tested, revealing some interesting effects of the thermodynamic processes taking place during the life-cycle of these phenomena. For example, the under-ice melt pond and its associated false bottom can insulate the sea ice layer from ocean, increasing the thickness of sea ice present at the end of the time frame considered. A comparison of the results of the model of under-ice melt pond evolution with that of sea ice with a bare base has been used to estimate the impact of under-ice melt ponds on sea ice volume towards the end of the melt season. We find that the under-ice melt ponds could have a significant impact on the mass balance of the sea ice, suggesting that it could be desirable to include a parameterisation of the effects of under-ice melt pond in the sea ice components of climate models.

  10. Responses of epibenthic and nektonic macroinvertebrate communities to a gradient of fish size in ponds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Nieoczym

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Size relationships between fish and organisms from adjacent trophic levels are crucial for predicting the structure and dynamics of aquatic ecosystems. We compared macroinvertebrate communities along a fish-size gradient created by separate stocking of three age cohorts of common carp Cyprinus carpio in semi-natural ponds. The specific size range of fish (small, medium and large corresponding to fish age in ponds was the factor most strongly associated with macroinvertebrate composition. The other significant habitat variables were dissolved oxygen concentration in the water and submerged vegetation abundance in the open-water zone. Among the most numerous taxa in the ponds, relative abundances of Hirudinea, Gastropoda, Odonata and Coleoptera were larger in the presence of small-sized than of larger-sized carp. However, fish size effect was not linear, in that macroinvertebrate assemblages were less similar between ponds containing medium- vs large-sized fish than between ponds with small- vs large-sized fish. The dissimilarity patterns were mainly determined by disparities in abundance of Corixidae, which unlike other taxa common in the ponds occurred in the greatest numbers in the presence of large-sized carp. Macroinvertebrate diversity was greatest in ponds with small-sized fish and was positively related to emergent macrophyte cover. Enhancement of emergent vegetation is recommended as the most effective management strategy to buffer adverse impacts of fish on macroinvertebrates. If fish are present in the system, assessment of the size structure of fish populations can be advantageous in unravelling the essential processes driving the variation in pond communities.

  11. Multi-stage ponds-wetlands ecosystem for effective wastewater treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG Jian-feng; WANG Bao-zhen; WANG Lin

    2005-01-01

    The performance of the Dongying multi-stage ponds-wetlands ecosystem was investigated in this work. Study of the removal of different pollutants (BOD5, COD, SS, TP, TN, NH3-N, etc.) in different temperature seasons and different units in this system indicated that effluent BOD5 and SS were constant to less than 11 mg/L and 14 mg/L throughout the experimental processes; but that the removal efficiencies of pollutants such as TP, TN, NH3-N, COD varied greatly with season. The higher the temperature was, the higher was the observed removal in this system. Additionally, each unit of the system functioned differently in removing pollutants. BOD5 and SS were mainly removed in the first three units (hybrid facultative ponds, aeration ponds and aerated fish ponds), whereas nitrogen and phosphates were mainly removed in hydrophyte ponds and constructed reed wetlands.The multi-stage ponds-wetlands ecosystem exhibits good potential of removing different pollutants, and the effluent quality meet several standards for wastewater reuse.

  12. Detention Pond Sediment Accumulation Prediction using Monte Carlo Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supiah Shamsudin

    2012-01-01

    occurrence values for observed sediment loads and sediment depth at UTM showed no obvious differences with Ledang Heights; about 0.015 tons (16.8% and 0.00037 mm (15.5% respectively. The maximum occurrence of predicted sediment loads and sediment depth using MUSLE method for Ledang Height was 77.8 tons (16.8% and 7.5 mm (26.8% respectively. The maximum occurrence for UTM was slightly higher, about 264 tons (15.70% and 7.0 mm (21.10% respectively. The higher values for UTM were suspected due to its larger watershed. The sediment loads and depths were also predicted for the next 50-100 years considering no significant watershed land use changes. Conclusion: The sediment accumulation estimation and forecasting are very important to ensure the effectiveness and proper operation of the detention pond. The continuous effort through natural sediment control measures such as proper vegetation and grass inplants are always encourage around the detention pond and surrounding areas throughout its lifespan.

  13. Interpretation of ponded infiltration data using numerical experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dohnal Michal

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Ponded infiltration experiment is a simple test used for in-situ determination of soil hydraulic properties, particularly saturated hydraulic conductivity and sorptivity. It is known that infiltration process in natural soils is strongly affected by presence of macropores, soil layering, initial and experimental conditions etc. As a result, infiltration record encompasses a complex of mutually compensating effects that are difficult to separate from each other. Determination of sorptivity and saturated hydraulic conductivity from such infiltration data is complicated. In the present study we use numerical simulation to examine the impact of selected experimental conditions and soil profile properties on the ponded infiltration experiment results, specifically in terms of the hydraulic conductivity and sorptivity evaluation. The effect of following factors was considered: depth of ponding, ring insertion depth, initial soil water content, presence of preferential pathways, hydraulic conductivity anisotropy, soil layering, surface layer retention capacity and hydraulic conductivity, and presence of soil pipes or stones under the infiltration ring. Results were compared with a large database of infiltration curves measured at the experimental site Liz (Bohemian Forest, Czech Republic. Reasonably good agreement between simulated and observed infiltration curves was achieved by combining several of factors tested. Moreover, the ring insertion effect was recognized as one of the major causes of uncertainty in the determination of soil hydraulic parameters.

  14. Performance evaluation of a tailings pond seepage collection system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasuda, N.; Thomson, N.R. [Waterloo Univ., ON (Canada). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Barker, J.F. [Waterloo Univ., ON (Canada). Dept. of Earth and Environmental Sciences

    2010-12-15

    This paper presented a study evaluating the effectiveness of a seepage collection system at a large tailings pond at an oilsands mining operation. The 11-kilometre-long containment dyke that surrounds the tailings pond was constructed from permeable tailings sand. To collect process-affected water (PAW), the dyke was equipped with drains and seepage collection ditches. The field investigation focussed on the downgradient end of the tailings pond and dyke system, and groundwater flow and adjective transport modelling was used to support the analysis. Hydraulic measurements and water samples were taken via a network of piezometers and drive points to characterize the flow system of surface and ground water. Chemical tracers indicate that PAW had migrated to a shallow, permeable sand deposit on the other side of the inner seepage collection ditch and that further migration was prevented by elevated hydraulic heads on the other side of the outer ditch. A groundwater flow model was developed to simulate the hydraulic dyke conditions and estimate the amount of PAW discharging into the shallow aquifer. PAW has different chemical concentrations and stable isotope characteristics than groundwater; the parameters set forth in the study can be used to effectively track PAW migration in the future. It was concluded that the seepage collection system is adequate for effectively containing PAW under present hydraulic conditions. 25 refs., 3 tabs., 8 figs.

  15. Evaluation of seepage and acid generation potential from evaporation ponds, Iron Duke Pyrite Mine, Mazowe Valley, Zimbabwe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravengai, Seedwel; Owen, Richard; Love, David

    Iron Duke Pyrite Mine lies in the Mazowe Valley of northern Zimbabwe. Several urban areas and commercial farmers are major water users in the catchment. Accordingly, managing the impact of mining operations on water quality in the Mazowe Valley must be a major priority for sustainable development in this area. The mine disposes of its waste water via evaporation ponds. Some of the water in the ponds evaporates and some is lost through seepage to groundwater. Results of a water budget analysis of the ponds showed that 160.5 m 3 per day of acidic effluent with a pH of 2 and elevated levels of iron and sulphate was being lost through seepage. As the wastewater evaporates, the secondary minerals melanterite and hexahydrite precipitate. The solid material in the pond was found to contain 20% iron and 14% sulphate, which is far more than was found dissolved within the pond water. Despite this, the pond water is undersaturated with respect to both iron and sulphate. Acid generation tests on the solid material in the pond indicate a minimum of 540,000 mol and a maximum of 1,610,309 mol of acid are generated. The variation can be related to exposure to oxygen: material near the edges of the pond is more exposed to oxygen and has already reacted further than material from the centre of the pond; accordingly less acid can be generated. The acidity generated by the pond is due to the unreacted pyrite that is found in fine particles suspended in mine waters. Based on these results, between 20 and 60 metric tonnes of lime are required for complete neutralisation of the sediments in the pond. Although the ponds were decommissioned after the conclusion of this study, it is necessary to prevent formation of further acid mine drainage from existing sediments in the evaporation pond. This could be done by the use of reactive covers, whose compositions affect the chemistry of infiltrating water. A good reactive cover could be constructed from lime, overlain by topsoil rich in organic

  16. Disruption of Broca's Area Alters Higher-order Chunking Processing during Perceptual Sequence Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alamia, Andrea; Solopchuk, Oleg; D'Ausilio, Alessandro; Van Bever, Violette; Fadiga, Luciano; Olivier, Etienne; Zénon, Alexandre

    2016-03-01

    Because Broca's area is known to be involved in many cognitive functions, including language, music, and action processing, several attempts have been made to propose a unifying theory of its role that emphasizes a possible contribution to syntactic processing. Recently, we have postulated that Broca's area might be involved in higher-order chunk processing during implicit learning of a motor sequence. Chunking is an information-processing mechanism that consists of grouping consecutive items in a sequence and is likely to be involved in all of the aforementioned cognitive processes. Demonstrating a contribution of Broca's area to chunking during the learning of a nonmotor sequence that does not involve language could shed new light on its function. To address this issue, we used offline MRI-guided TMS in healthy volunteers to disrupt the activity of either the posterior part of Broca's area (left Brodmann's area [BA] 44) or a control site just before participants learned a perceptual sequence structured in distinct hierarchical levels. We found that disruption of the left BA 44 increased the processing time of stimuli representing the boundaries of higher-order chunks and modified the chunking strategy. The current results highlight the possible role of the left BA 44 in building up effector-independent representations of higher-order events in structured sequences. This might clarify the contribution of Broca's area in processing hierarchical structures, a key mechanism in many cognitive functions, such as language and composite actions. PMID:26765778

  17. ELECTROKINETIC DENSIFICATION OF COAL FINES IN WASTE PONDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E. James Davis

    1999-12-18

    The objective of this research was to demonstrate that electrokinetics can be used to remove colloidal coal and mineral particles from coal-washing ponds and lakes without the addition of chemical additives such as salts and polymeric flocculants. The specific objectives were: Design and develop a scaleable electrophoresis apparatus to clarify suspensions of colloidal coal and clay particles; Demonstrate the separation process using polluted waste water from the coal-washing facilities at the coal-fired power plants in Centralia, WA; Develop a mathematical model of the process to predict the rate of clarification and the suspension electrical properties needed for scale up.

  18. Disappearing Arctic tundra ponds: Fine-scale analysis of surface hydrology in drained thaw lake basins over a 65 year period (1948-2013)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andresen, Christian G.; Lougheed, Vanessa L.

    2015-03-01

    Long-term fine-scale dynamics of surface hydrology in Arctic tundra ponds (less than 1 ha) are largely unknown; however, these small water bodies may contribute substantially to carbon fluxes, energy balance, and biodiversity in the Arctic system. Change in pond area and abundance across the upper Barrow Peninsula, Alaska, was assessed by comparing historic aerial imagery (1948) and modern submeter resolution satellite imagery (2002, 2008, and 2010). This was complemented by photogrammetric analysis of low-altitude kite-borne imagery in combination with field observations (2010-2013) of pond water and thaw depth transects in seven ponds of the International Biological Program historic research site. Over 2800 ponds in 22 drained thaw lake basins (DTLB) with different geological ages were analyzed. We observed a net decrease of 30.3% in area and 17.1% in number of ponds over the 62 year period. The inclusion of field observations of pond areas in 1972 from a historic research site confirms the linear downward trend in area. Pond area and number were dependent on the age of DTLB; however, changes through time were independent of DTLB age, with potential long-term implications for the hypothesized geomorphologic landscape succession of the thaw lake cycle. These losses were coincident with increases in air temperature, active layer, and density and cover of aquatic emergent plants in ponds. Increased evaporation due to warmer and longer summers, permafrost degradation, and transpiration from encroaching aquatic emergent macrophytes are likely the factors contributing to the decline in surface area and number of ponds.

  19. Timing of the saprolitisation processes in the sediments of the Ardenne area (Belgium)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dating and the timing of the paleo-weathering processes are essential to predict the stability of the host-rocks for radioactive waste-disposal. This work deals with the mechanisms and the timing of the saprolitisation on the mature sedimentary potential host-rocks of the Haute-Lesse area (Ardenne, Belgium). In this area, the alternations of Lochkovian shales and sandstones experienced the Hercynian tectonic activity and were later affected by saprolitisation processes. (authors)

  20. Timing of the saprolitisation processes in the sediments of the Ardenne area (Belgium)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yans, J.; Dupuis, Ch. [Faculte Polytechnique de Mons, Geologie Fondamentale et Appliquee, Mons (Belgium); Perruchotz, A. [Paris-11 Univ., Lab. de Geochimie des roches sedimentaires, 91 - Orsay (France)

    2005-07-01

    The dating and the timing of the paleo-weathering processes are essential to predict the stability of the host-rocks for radioactive waste-disposal. This work deals with the mechanisms and the timing of the saprolitisation on the mature sedimentary potential host-rocks of the Haute-Lesse area (Ardenne, Belgium). In this area, the alternations of Lochkovian shales and sandstones experienced the Hercynian tectonic activity and were later affected by saprolitisation processes. (authors)

  1. Source or Sink: Investigating the role of storm water retention ponds in the urban landscape (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lev, S.; Casey, R.; Ownby, D.; Snodgrass, J.

    2009-12-01

    The impact of human activities on surface water, groundwater and soil is nowhere more apparent than in urban and suburban systems. Dramatic changes to watersheds in urbanizing areas have led to changes in hydrology and an associated increase in the flux of sediment and contaminants to surface and ground waters. In an effort to mediate these impacts, Best Management Practices (BMP) have been established in order to increase infiltration of runoff and trap sediment and particulates derived from impervious surfaces before they enter surface waters. Perhaps the most ubiquitous BMP are storm water retention ponds. While these structures are designed to reduce runoff and particulate loading to urban streams, their addition to the urban landscape has created a large number of new wetland habitats. In the Red Run watershed, just outside of Baltimore, Maryland, 186 discrete natural or man-made wetland areas have been identified. Of these 186 wetland areas, 165 were created to manage stormwater and most were specifically designed as stormwater management ponds (i.e., human-created basins or depressions that hold runoff for some period during the annual hydrological year). Despite their abundance in the landscape, very little is known about how these systems impact the flux of stormwater pollutants or affect the organisms using these ponds as habitat. Results from a series of related projects in the Red Run watershed are presented here in an effort to summarize the range of issues associated with stormwater management ponds. The Red Run watershed is situated inside the Urban-Rural Demarcation Line (URDL) around Baltimore City and has been identified as a smart growth corridor by Baltimore County. This region is one of two areas in Baltimore County where new development is focused. In a series of investigations of soils, surface and ground waters, and amphibian and earthworm use of 68 randomly selected stormwater retention ponds from the Red Run watershed, a range of

  2. A tale of two diversifications: reciprocal habitat shifts to fill ecological space along the pond permanence gradient

    OpenAIRE

    Stoks, Robby; McPeek, Mark A.

    2006-01-01

    The Enallagma and Lestes damselflies have both diversified and adapted over the past 10-15 million years to the various ecological milieus found along the pond permanence gradient among North American ponds and lakes. Previous articles have explored this diversification process for Enallagma. In this article, we present a phylogenetic hypothesis for the North American Lestes, use this hypothesis to reconstruct Lestes diversification, and compare the diversification processes inferred for Lest...

  3. A comparison between evaporation ponds and evaporation surfaces as a source of the concentrated salt brine for salt gradient maintenance at Tajoura solar pond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the main problems that negatively affect the operation of salt gradient solar ponds and influence its thermal stability is the maintenance of salt gradient profile. Evaporation pond (EP) is designed to generate the salt which lost upward salt diffusion from the lower convective zone (LCZ) of the solar pond. Another attractive method is the evaporation surface facility (ES). Regions with moderate to high precipitation favor Evaporation Surface over Evaporation Ponds. Dry climates will generally favor Evaporation Ponds for the brine re-concentration. In previous studies [1-3], the authors have shown that the (EP) of Tajoura's Experimental Solar Pond (TESP) is under sized and can provide only about 30% of the salt required by a Salt Gradient Solar Pond (SGSP). The anticipated size of (EP) was estimated and presented in those studies under different design conditions, including Summer, Autumn and Spring designs, while the winter design was excluded due to the low rates of net evaporation during the winter season. In addition, the results presented were predicted for the first three years of operation. The daily variations of brine concentration in the (EP) of (TESP) and those based on different designs were predicted and discussed under different scenarios. The quantities of brine provided by the evaporation pond and that required by SGSP were predicted for both cases of surface water flushing (fresh water and sea-water) under the different design conditions as shown in Table 1. This paper investigates the differences between (EP) and (ES) both as a source for salt brine generation by evaporation. The effect of (EP) depth on the area ratio and daily variations of salt concentrations for three years of operation is shown. Results show that evaporation can be a reasonable method for salt brine generation. Reducing the depth of (EP) improves the capability of (EP) for brine re-concentration. It also increases the (EP) surface area for the same quantity of

  4. POND4Kids: a web-based pediatric cancer database for hospital-based cancer registration and clinical collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintana, Yuri; Patel, Aman N; Naidu, Paula E; Howard, Scott C; Antillon, Federico A; Ribeiro, Raul C

    2011-01-01

    The Pediatric Oncology Network Database, POND4Kids (www.pond4kids.org, POND), is an online, multilingual clinical database created for use by pediatric oncology units in countries with limited resources to meet various clinical data management needs including cancer registration, data collection and changes in treatment outcome. Established as a part of the International Outreach Program at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital in Memphis, Tennessee, POND aims to provide oncology units a tool to store patient data for easy retrieval and analysis and to achieve uniform data collection to facilitate meaningful comparison of information among centers. Currently, POND is being used to store clinical data on thousands of patients and measure their treatment improvement over a period of time. In 2009 POND included more than 100 pediatric oncology units; each has its own virtual private area. A case study of the UNOP Guatemala Clinic's use of POND is presented. On-going challenges at partner sites include inconsistent data collection methods, missing records, training for data managers, and slow or unreliable internet connections. PMID:21335715

  5. THE CONTEXT OF THE GEOMORPHOLOGICAL PROCESSES IN URBAN AREA OF PIATRA-NEAMȚ CITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CĂTĂLINA-ELENA ROȘU

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The context of the geomorphological processes in urban area of Ppiatra-Neamț city. The paper approches the issue induced by the geomorphological processes in the development and planning of Piatra-Neamț city. The methodology used for this study has implied the identification of the slope`s geomorphological processes: rock fallings and landslides produced due to the clay bedrock, precipitation`s water infiltration, deforestation and other human interventions. The identification of these processes was followed by their clasification and inventory and was continued with the mapping process of the affected areas from the territory, such as: southern and western sides of Cozla Hill, the south-western side of Pietricica Hill, Bâtca Doamnei Hill, Humăriei Hill and Vulpea Hill. The geomorphological processes from the study area induce restriction in the development and planning of the city through their associated risks. Furthermore is necesary to search a new methodology to approach the risks induces by the geomorphological processes and this shall imply predictibility, control, risk studies and preservation of the affected areas. The given study is practicaly useful in identifying the development measures for the urban areas by being part of the territorial planning and urban studies.

  6. Distinct and Overlapping Brain Areas Engaged during Value-Based, Mathematical, and Emotional Decision Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Chun-Wei; Goh, Joshua O. S.

    2016-01-01

    When comparing between the values of different choices, human beings can rely on either more cognitive processes, such as using mathematical computation, or more affective processes, such as using emotion. However, the neural correlates of how these two types of processes operate during value-based decision-making remain unclear. In this study, we investigated the extent to which neural regions engaged during value-based decision-making overlap with those engaged during mathematical and emotional processing in a within-subject manner. In a functional magnetic resonance imaging experiment, participants viewed stimuli that always consisted of numbers and emotional faces that depicted two choices. Across tasks, participants decided between the two choices based on the expected value of the numbers, a mathematical result of the numbers, or the emotional face stimuli. We found that all three tasks commonly involved various cortical areas including frontal, parietal, motor, somatosensory, and visual regions. Critically, the mathematical task shared common areas with the value but not emotion task in bilateral striatum. Although the emotion task overlapped with the value task in parietal, motor, and sensory areas, the mathematical task also evoked responses in other areas within these same cortical structures. Minimal areas were uniquely engaged for the value task apart from the other two tasks. The emotion task elicited a more expansive area of neural activity whereas value and mathematical task responses were in more focal regions. Whole-brain spatial correlation analysis showed that valuative processing engaged functional brain responses more similarly to mathematical processing than emotional processing. While decisions on expected value entail both mathematical and emotional processing regions, mathematical processes have a more prominent contribution particularly in subcortical processes. PMID:27375466

  7. Distinct and Overlapping Brain Areas Engaged during Value-Based, Mathematical, and Emotional Decision Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Chun-Wei; Goh, Joshua O S

    2016-01-01

    When comparing between the values of different choices, human beings can rely on either more cognitive processes, such as using mathematical computation, or more affective processes, such as using emotion. However, the neural correlates of how these two types of processes operate during value-based decision-making remain unclear. In this study, we investigated the extent to which neural regions engaged during value-based decision-making overlap with those engaged during mathematical and emotional processing in a within-subject manner. In a functional magnetic resonance imaging experiment, participants viewed stimuli that always consisted of numbers and emotional faces that depicted two choices. Across tasks, participants decided between the two choices based on the expected value of the numbers, a mathematical result of the numbers, or the emotional face stimuli. We found that all three tasks commonly involved various cortical areas including frontal, parietal, motor, somatosensory, and visual regions. Critically, the mathematical task shared common areas with the value but not emotion task in bilateral striatum. Although the emotion task overlapped with the value task in parietal, motor, and sensory areas, the mathematical task also evoked responses in other areas within these same cortical structures. Minimal areas were uniquely engaged for the value task apart from the other two tasks. The emotion task elicited a more expansive area of neural activity whereas value and mathematical task responses were in more focal regions. Whole-brain spatial correlation analysis showed that valuative processing engaged functional brain responses more similarly to mathematical processing than emotional processing. While decisions on expected value entail both mathematical and emotional processing regions, mathematical processes have a more prominent contribution particularly in subcortical processes. PMID:27375466

  8. Accumulation of Pollutants in Highway Detention Ponds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentzen, Thomas Ruby

    This PhD study deals with issues related to water and pollutant transport from highway surfaces caused by rain. It is essential in the study to apply methods and models in which improvements in relation to removal of pollutants can be identified and to be able to predict the yearly discharges of...... single rain event. From the hindcast results it is possible to calculate mean water and pollutant loads. This method is commonly used in urban drainage systems for capacity analysis or for prediction of CSO's. The challenge is to develop a simplified and still accurate description of flow and transport....... Measurements of water and pollutant transport are carried out in different highway systems. A geometrically well-defined test pond is established, wherein the deposition of particulate matter can be measured. The result from the test pond is transferred to real detention ponds in which the three...

  9. Mapping cortical areas associated with Chinese word processing with functional magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To identify the cortical areas engaged during Chinese word processing with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and to examine the reliability and reproducibility of fMRI for localization of functional areas in the human brain. Methods: fMRI data were collected on 8 young, right-handed, native Chinese speakers during performance of Chinese synonym and homophone judgement tasks on 2 different clinical MRI systems (1.5 T GE Signa Horizon and 1.5 T Siemens Vision). A cross correlation analysis was used to statistically generate the activation map. Results: Broca's area, Wernicke's area, bilateral extrastriate, and ventral temporal cortex were significantly activated during both synonym and homophone tasks. There was essentially no difference between results acquired on 2 different MRI systems. Conclusion: fMRI is feasible for localizing cortical areas critical for Chinese language processing in the human brain. The results are reliable and well reproducible across different clinical MRI systems

  10. Process variations in surface nano geometries manufacture on large area substrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calaon, Matteo; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Tosello, Guido;

    2014-01-01

    The need of transporting, treating and measuring increasingly smaller biomedical samples has pushed the integration of a far reaching number of nanofeatures over large substrates size in respect to the conventional processes working area windows. Dimensional stability of nano fabrication processes...

  11. Cattle overwintering area: a model site for studies on soil nitrogen (and carbon) transformation processes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šimek, Miloslav; Hynšt, Jaroslav; Brůček, Petr; Čuhel, Jiří; Elhottová, Dana

    As: Norwegian University of Life Sciences (UMB), 2006. s. 10. [COST Action 856, Ecological Aspects of Denitrification, with Emphasis on Agriculture . Workshop 10, Denitrification - systems biology approaches. 05.10.2006-07.10.2006, As] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60660521 Keywords : cattle overwintering area * soil nitrogen transformation processes * soil carbon transformation processes Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour

  12. Stability of tailings ponds in the mining district of Mazarron (SE Spain): potential risks for the Moreras Rambla

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have used geochemical, geophysical and geotechnical techniques to identify and quantify the environmental risks of the San Cristobal and Las Moreras tailing ponds, which have been left since the closing down of Pb-Zn mining activities in a semi-arid Mediterranean area. The results show that the tailings ponds present a potential risk to nearby ecosystems because of their high acidity, high salinity and high concentrations of metals, especially Pb and Zn contain. If the pond dams were to fail or if erosion carried dry sludge to the surrounding areas, the result would be pollution, acidification, salinization, compaction and nutrient depletion of the soil, thus reducing the biodiversity of the area. Geoelectrical tomography has shown the depth of the deposits, their volume and the geomorphology of the basement. The profiles reveal that in none of the pseudo-sections are there any regions betraying cracks that might affect the stability of the structures. In fact, geotechnical studies indicate that on a large scale both ponds are stable. Nevertheless, if we contemplate circular rupture and seismic action in the San Cristobal pond, the safety factor values become critical. It is recommended, therefore, that periodic inspections should be carried out to assess moisture, upsurges and settlements in the dam. To reduce erosion of the surface sludge in the tailing ponds we suggest the application of alkaline and organic remediation so as to improve their geochemical characteristics and encourage the establishment of natural vegetation. (Author) 48 refs.

  13. Vadose Zone Clean Closure Report for the 300 Area Process Trenches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report documents the achievement of closure performance standards for the 300 Area Process Trenches (300 APT) located within the 300-FF-1 Operable Unit (OU). The report is intended to supplement the 300 Area Process Trenches Verification Package (BHI 1998C), which documents the achievement of the remedial action objectives specified in the 300-FF-1 Remedial Design Report/Remedial Action Work Plan (RDR/RAWP) (DOE-RL 1997). Upon acceptance of this document by the Washington State Department of Ecology, a 60-day period will begin to certify closure of the the process trenches

  14. Background ozone in the southern Europe and Mediterranean area: Influence of the transport processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The troposphere is subject to continuous inputs, production and removal processes of ozone and its precursors from natural processes and human activities acting together within a very complex system. In order to assess the behaviour of background ozone in the Mediterranean area, a description of trends, seasonal and diurnal behaviours of free tropospheric ozone is provided. In the Mediterranean area and southern Europe the background tropospheric ozone concentration appears significantly affected by three main air mass transport processes: (i) transport of polluted air masses on regional and long-range scales, (ii) downward transport of stratospheric air masses, and (iii) transport of mineral dust from the Sahara desert. In this review of the literature of the last two decades, we present an overview of these phenomena, mainly monitored at high baseline mountain stations representative of background atmospheric conditions. - How background ozone is influenced by vertical and horizontal transport processes in the southern Europe and the Mediterranean area.

  15. Bioaccumulation of heavy metals in two wet retention ponds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søberg, Laila C.; Vollertsen, Jes; Blecken, Godecke-Tobias; Nielsen, Asbjørn Haaning; Viklander, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Metal accumulation in stormwater ponds may contaminate the inhabiting fauna, thus jeopardizing their ecosystem servicing function. We evaluated bioaccumulation of metals in natural fauna and caged mussel indicator organisms in two wet retention ponds. Mussel cages were distributed throughout the ...

  16. Sea Ice Melt Pond Data from the Canadian Arctic

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains observations of albedo, depth, and physical characteristics of melt ponds on sea ice, taken during the summer of 1994. The melt ponds studied...

  17. THE CONTEXT OF THE GEOMORPHOLOGICAL PROCESSES IN URBAN AREA OF PIATRA-NEAMȚ CITY

    OpenAIRE

    CĂTĂLINA-ELENA ROȘU; I. A. IRIMUȘ

    2014-01-01

    The context of the geomorphological processes in urban area of Ppiatra-Neamț city. The paper approches the issue induced by the geomorphological processes in the development and planning of Piatra-Neamț city. The methodology used for this study has implied the identification of the slope`s geomorphological processes: rock fallings and landslides produced due to the clay bedrock, precipitation`s water infiltration, deforestation and other human interventions. The identification of these proces...

  18. PHYSICAL ASPECTS OF DESERTIFICATION PROCESSES OF THE SOIL COVER ON CARPATO-DANUBIANO-PONTIC AREA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gheorghe Jigau

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available The effects and consequences of desertification of a soil cover of Carpato-Danubiano-Pontic area become more and more appreciable. In this connection, this phenomenon became a subject of a number of the National and Regional programs directed on the item of information up to a minimum or complete prevention of these processes. At the same time, it is necessary to ascertain, that the efforts directed on it do not provide expected results, that is caused by a number of unsolved questions. To number last concern an estimation of the factors and identification of mechanisms of processes desertification. In the literature these processes are frequently reduced to increase of frequency of atmospheric droughts or to separate processes of degradation of efficiency of a soil cover On our sight is unreasonable the role separate of external processes (erosion, landslips etc. and is reduced a role of processes physical degradation of soils is exaggerated. In most cases role of physical degradation processes is reduced only to packing and destructurization. The processes of physical degradation result in appreciable reduction permeable and moisture capacity of soil, and at the end to reduction of stocks of productive moisture, is established. There of the essential changes undergo processes of humus formation and migration of water soluble substances. At the same time, intensity of a number of other chemical and biochemical processes and, on the contrary appreciably decreases, the intensity of physical processes is increased. All this gives to processes of pedogenesis some features characteristic for deserted areas.

  19. Overall investigation of the influence on environment from Koshkar-Ata tailing pond and rehabilitation measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The tailing pond KOSHKAR-ATA, representing the drain-free settling pool for industrial, toxic, chemical and radioactive wastes, as well as for ordinary domestic waste, is located 5 km northward to Aktau city in Mangystau oblast (Kazakhstan) in close vicinity of the Caspian Sea shore. The hollow of KOSHKAR-ATA was used since 1965 as storage for toxic and radioactive waste from chemical-hydrometallurgical and sulfur-acid plants that processed local uranium ore reach in phosphor. According to data of the Mangystau Regional Ecology department (Aktau), the amount of radioactive waste (RAW) disposed in the tailing pond is about 360 million tons with total activity of 11000 Ci. There has been studied in details present radio-ecological state of the tailing pond and obtained quantitative data characterizing current ecological status of air, water and soil at KOSHKAR-ATA and adjacent territories. During field investigations in 2003 there has been performed for the first time mapping of water phase and shore exposed surface of the tailing pond KOSHKAR-ATA. Currently, area of the water phase is estimated to be 42.5 km2 with shore exposed surface of 34.5 km2. Based on obtained data there was created a database with GIS elements 'KOSHKAR-ATA' enabling to obtain reliable information on concentrations of main dose-forming radionuclides in environmental objects. To polish rehabilitation technology for the shore exposed zone of the tailing pond KOSHKAR-ATA in its southern part was chosen a most characteristic control site 100 x 90 m. Reclaiming of the site was performed by backfilling of the site surface with 25 cm of radiation-clean sand-clay material. Preliminary assessment of the effectiveness for this reclaiming method (by backfilling with sand-clay material) demonstrates considerable improvement of radiation characteristics of the site. Comparative analysis of available materials showed advantages of sand-clay soils due to, first of all, availability and relative low price of

  20. Accidental Water Pollution Risk Analysis of Mine Tailings Ponds in Guanting Reservoir Watershed, Zhangjiakou City, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Renzhi; Liu, Jing; Zhang, Zhijiao; Borthwick, Alistair; Zhang, Ke

    2015-12-01

    Over the past half century, a surprising number of major pollution incidents occurred due to tailings dam failures. Most previous studies of such incidents comprised forensic analyses of environmental impacts after a tailings dam failure, with few considering the combined pollution risk before incidents occur at a watershed-scale. We therefore propose Watershed-scale Tailings-pond Pollution Risk Analysis (WTPRA), designed for multiple mine tailings ponds, stemming from previous watershed-scale accidental pollution risk assessments. Transferred and combined risk is embedded using risk rankings of multiple routes of the "source-pathway-target" in the WTPRA. The previous approach is modified using multi-criteria analysis, dam failure models, and instantaneous water quality models, which are modified for application to multiple tailings ponds. The study area covers the basin of Gutanting Reservoir (the largest backup drinking water source for Beijing) in Zhangjiakou City, where many mine tailings ponds are located. The resultant map shows that risk is higher downstream of Gutanting Reservoir and in its two tributary basins (i.e., Qingshui River and Longyang River). Conversely, risk is lower in the midstream and upstream reaches. The analysis also indicates that the most hazardous mine tailings ponds are located in Chongli and Xuanhua, and that Guanting Reservoir is the most vulnerable receptor. Sensitivity and uncertainty analyses are performed to validate the robustness of the WTPRA method. PMID:26633450

  1. Accidental Water Pollution Risk Analysis of Mine Tailings Ponds in Guanting Reservoir Watershed, Zhangjiakou City, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renzhi Liu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Over the past half century, a surprising number of major pollution incidents occurred due to tailings dam failures. Most previous studies of such incidents comprised forensic analyses of environmental impacts after a tailings dam failure, with few considering the combined pollution risk before incidents occur at a watershed-scale. We therefore propose Watershed-scale Tailings-pond Pollution Risk Analysis (WTPRA, designed for multiple mine tailings ponds, stemming from previous watershed-scale accidental pollution risk assessments. Transferred and combined risk is embedded using risk rankings of multiple routes of the “source-pathway-target” in the WTPRA. The previous approach is modified using multi-criteria analysis, dam failure models, and instantaneous water quality models, which are modified for application to multiple tailings ponds. The study area covers the basin of Gutanting Reservoir (the largest backup drinking water source for Beijing in Zhangjiakou City, where many mine tailings ponds are located. The resultant map shows that risk is higher downstream of Gutanting Reservoir and in its two tributary basins (i.e., Qingshui River and Longyang River. Conversely, risk is lower in the midstream and upstream reaches. The analysis also indicates that the most hazardous mine tailings ponds are located in Chongli and Xuanhua, and that Guanting Reservoir is the most vulnerable receptor. Sensitivity and uncertainty analyses are performed to validate the robustness of the WTPRA method.

  2. Accidental Water Pollution Risk Analysis of Mine Tailings Ponds in Guanting Reservoir Watershed, Zhangjiakou City, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Renzhi; Liu, Jing; Zhang, Zhijiao; Borthwick, Alistair; Zhang, Ke

    2015-01-01

    Over the past half century, a surprising number of major pollution incidents occurred due to tailings dam failures. Most previous studies of such incidents comprised forensic analyses of environmental impacts after a tailings dam failure, with few considering the combined pollution risk before incidents occur at a watershed-scale. We therefore propose Watershed-scale Tailings-pond Pollution Risk Analysis (WTPRA), designed for multiple mine tailings ponds, stemming from previous watershed-scale accidental pollution risk assessments. Transferred and combined risk is embedded using risk rankings of multiple routes of the “source-pathway-target” in the WTPRA. The previous approach is modified using multi-criteria analysis, dam failure models, and instantaneous water quality models, which are modified for application to multiple tailings ponds. The study area covers the basin of Gutanting Reservoir (the largest backup drinking water source for Beijing) in Zhangjiakou City, where many mine tailings ponds are located. The resultant map shows that risk is higher downstream of Gutanting Reservoir and in its two tributary basins (i.e., Qingshui River and Longyang River). Conversely, risk is lower in the midstream and upstream reaches. The analysis also indicates that the most hazardous mine tailings ponds are located in Chongli and Xuanhua, and that Guanting Reservoir is the most vulnerable receptor. Sensitivity and uncertainty analyses are performed to validate the robustness of the WTPRA method. PMID:26633450

  3. Massive subsurface ice formed by refreezing of ice-shelf melt ponds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, Bryn; Luckman, Adrian; Ashmore, David W; Bevan, Suzanne; Kulessa, Bernd; Kuipers Munneke, Peter; Philippe, Morgane; Jansen, Daniela; Booth, Adam; Sevestre, Heidi; Tison, Jean-Louis; O'Leary, Martin; Rutt, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Surface melt ponds form intermittently on several Antarctic ice shelves. Although implicated in ice-shelf break up, the consequences of such ponding for ice formation and ice-shelf structure have not been evaluated. Here we report the discovery of a massive subsurface ice layer, at least 16 km across, several kilometres long and tens of metres deep, located in an area of intense melting and intermittent ponding on Larsen C Ice Shelf, Antarctica. We combine borehole optical televiewer logging and radar measurements with remote sensing and firn modelling to investigate the layer, found to be ∼10 °C warmer and ∼170 kg m(-3) denser than anticipated in the absence of ponding and hitherto used in models of ice-shelf fracture and flow. Surface ponding and ice layers such as the one we report are likely to form on a wider range of Antarctic ice shelves in response to climatic warming in forthcoming decades. PMID:27283778

  4. Evaluation of historical and analytical data on the TAN TSF-07 Disposal Pond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Technical Support Facility (TSF)-07 Disposal Pond, located at Test Area North at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, has been identified as part of Operable Unit 1-06 under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act. The Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Department is conducting an evaluation of existing site characterization data for the TSF-07 Disposal Pond Track 1 investigation. The results from the site characterization data will be used to determine whether the operable unit will undergo a Track 2 investigation, an interim action, a remedial investigation/feasibility study, or result in a no-action decision. This report summarizes activities relevant to wastewaters discharged to the pond and characterization efforts conducted from 1982 through 1991. Plan view and vertical distribution maps of the significant contaminants contained in the pond are included. From this evaluation it was determined that cobalt-60, cesium-137, americium-241, mercury, chromium, and thallium are significant contaminants for soils. This report also evaluates the migration tendencies of the significant contaminants into the perched water zone under the pond and the surrounding terrain to support the investigation

  5. Evaluation of historical and analytical data on the TAN TSF-07 Disposal Pond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medina, S.M.

    1993-07-01

    The Technical Support Facility (TSF)-07 Disposal Pond, located at Test Area North at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, has been identified as part of Operable Unit 1-06 under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act. The Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Department is conducting an evaluation of existing site characterization data for the TSF-07 Disposal Pond Track 1 investigation. The results from the site characterization data will be used to determine whether the operable unit will undergo a Track 2 investigation, an interim action, a remedial investigation/feasibility study, or result in a no-action decision. This report summarizes activities relevant to wastewaters discharged to the pond and characterization efforts conducted from 1982 through 1991. Plan view and vertical distribution maps of the significant contaminants contained in the pond are included. From this evaluation it was determined that cobalt-60, cesium-137, americium-241, mercury, chromium, and thallium are significant contaminants for soils. This report also evaluates the migration tendencies of the significant contaminants into the perched water zone under the pond and the surrounding terrain to support the investigation.

  6. Characteristics of Nest Site of Ninespine Stickleback, Pungititus sp.2, in Preserved Pond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeshi, Takemura; Noriyuki, Koizumi; Hiroshi, Jinguji; Atsushi, Mori; Keiji, Watabe

    We set experimental circumstances controlled by aquatic plant mowing in the preserved pond, Komaba-Kita district. Aquatic plant mowing for a space of the pond had not been performed for over two years. For other space of the pond, eco-friendly type of aquatic plant mowing had been performed twice a year usually. There were many of small and medium scales of aquatic plant communities and only one large scale of aquatic plant community in the pond. Then we investigated characteristics of nest sites of the ninespine stickleback in the pond. We found total number of 20 nests. Almost all of those nests occurred at rim of these communities, whereas there were not any nests in central parts of medium and large scale of the communities. It was suggested that nest sites would concern deeply with aquatic plant mowing. To establish many of small and medium scales of aquatic plant communities owing to eco-friendly type of aquatic plant mowing appeared to increase a lot of rim of plant communities, indicating leading to increase in extent of rim areas of the suitable site for nesting.

  7. Detention Pond Sediment Accumulation Prediction using Monte Carlo Simulation

    OpenAIRE

    Supiah Shamsudin; Abd R.M. Darom; Irma N. Mohamad; Azmi A. Rahman

    2012-01-01

    Problem statement: A study in Malaysia had been carried out to predict the sediment accumulation in urban detention ponds. Suspended sediment is pollutant of primary concern to the river that results in adverse environmental effect. Detention pond becomes a practical approach to this problem. Suspended sediment that settled in stormwater detention pond, can bring effect to the detention pond functions. Questions were raised on how certain were the observed and predicted values of sediment dep...

  8. Retrieval of Melt Pond Coverage from MODIS using Optimal Estimation

    OpenAIRE

    Dodd, Emma

    2011-01-01

    Melt pond coverage on sea ice is an important influence on sea ice albedo reduction during the summer and can also affect the monitoring of sea ice extent, sea ice models and sea ice forecasting. Techniques to estimate melt pond coverage from global satellites have been developed in order to provide large scale information on melt ponds, but these techniques have limitations. In this study a new approach to estimating melt pond coverage from MODIS data was developed, based on Optimal Estimati...

  9. Cyanobacterial biodiversity from different freshwater ponds of Thanjavur, Tamilnadu (India)

    OpenAIRE

    Muthukumar, Chinnasamy; Muralitharan, Gangatharan; Vijayakumar, Ramasamy; Panneerselvam, Annamalai; Thajuddin, Nooruddin

    2007-01-01

    Cyanobacterial biodiversity from different freshwater ponds of Thanjavur, Tamilnadu (India). Studies on the cyanobacterial biodiversity of 5 different freshwater ponds in and around Thanjavur, Tamilnadu during summer month (June, 2004) has been made and compared their variations among five different ponds. In addition, certain physico-chemical parameters of pond waters such as dissolved oxygen, net productivity, pH, carbonate, bicarbonate, nitrate, nitrite, total phosphorus, inorganic phospho...

  10. Plankton biomass in secondary ponds treating piggery waste

    OpenAIRE

    Lígia Barthel; Paulo Armando Victória de Oliveira; Rejane Helena Ribeiro da Costa

    2008-01-01

    This study aimed at analyzing the plankton biomass found in a piggery waste treatment system, composed of a high rate algal pond (HRAP), two maturation ponds (MP1, MP2) (System A) and a water hyacinth pond (WHP) (System B). The ponds were disposed in series and the study was performed for 32 weeks. The physicochemical variables monitored were: pH, temperature, dissolved oxygen, soluble chemical oxygen demand, nitrogen compounds and total phosphorus. The plankton biomass was identified at genu...

  11. Differential School Contextual Effects for Math and English: Integrating the Big-Fish-Little-Pond Effect and the Internal/External Frame of Reference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Philip D.; Marsh, Herbert W.; Ludtke, Oliver; Trautwein, Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    The internal/external frame of reference and the big-fish-little-pond effect are two major models of academic self-concept formation which have considerable theoretical and empirical support. Integrating the domain specific and compensatory processes of the internal/external frame of reference model with the big-fish-little-pond effect suggests a…

  12. Analysis hydrogeochemical cituation in the territories adjacent to the storage ponds "Svidovok"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scherstyuk N.P.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Thehydrogeochemicalcomposition of surface and groundwater in the area adjacent to the pond-storage “Svidovok” (West Donbas was analyzed. The chemical types of surface and groundwater by the formula Kurlova were determined. The equilibriums with aluminosilicates and silicateswereconsidered.

  13. Pond and landscape determinants of Rana dalmatina population sizes in a Romanian rural landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartel, Tibor; Nemes, Szilárd; Cogălniceanu, Dan; Öllerer, Kinga; Moga, Cosmin Ioan; Lesbarrères, David; Demeter, László

    2009-01-01

    Amphibians are good indicators of human impact, declining steadily worldwide. We explored the relationships between the ponds and nearby landscape parameters and population size of the Agile Frog ( Rana dalmatina), estimated from the number of egg masses, in a cultural landscape within the central section of Târnava Mare Basin, Romania. Forty-three permanent ponds were surveyed in a 2600 km 2 area. The average number of egg masses per pond was 211.13 (SD = 426.41). The egg mass number was significantly and positively related to the emergent aquatic macrophyte cover (its effect peaks at around 50%) and the green connecting corridors between the ponds and forests, and negatively related to the extent of nearby urban areas. The proximity of the forest (positive effect) and the presence of high traffic roads (negative effect) were highly correlated with green corridors and further eliminated from the model due to multicollinearity. Both these variables had significant effects when incorporated in univariate models and multivariate models without green corridors. Since a large part of our study area was currently declared as Natura 2000 site, there is an increased need for management proposals and conservation applications for biodiversity, including amphibians. Rana dalmatina is an important species for monitoring because it is common in the studied area and is suited for short surveys.

  14. Vegetation establishment and evolution in four ponds that received sewage and wastewater in a portion of the Olezoa wetland complex, Yaounde, Cameroon, central Africa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atekwana, E.A. (Western Michigan Univ., Kalamazoo, MI (United States). Dept. of Geology); Agendia, P.L. (Univ. of Yaounde (Cameroon). Dept. of Plant Biology)

    1994-04-01

    A study of the spatial and temporal changes in the pattern and distribution of tropical wetland vegetation in four ponds that received sewage and wastewater discharge, was undertaken for a small wetland ecosystem in the Olezoa drainage basin in Yaounde, Cameroon. More than 25 years of nutrient loading has led to the eutrophication and subsequent establishment of wetland vegetation in these ponds. Estimated free water surface areas of the ponds in 1964, 1976, and 1986 and 1992 determined from digitized aerial photographs and field measurements suggests a decline of 70 to 100% in the pond surface areas due to invasion and colonization by plants. The rate of pond surface decline and vegetation development is correlated with the construction of sewage plants and the discharge of untreated sewage and wastewater into the ponds. The main wetland plants that are established in the ponds consist of aquatic species Nymphae lotus, Enhydra fluctuants, Pistia stratiotes, Commelina sp., Ipomea aquatica and terrestrial species Echinochloa sp., Thalia welwitschii, Polygonum senegalense, Leersia haxandra and Cyperus papyrus. The pattern of wetland plant succession that resulted within each pond is correlated to the timing, duration and magnitude of sewage and wastewater discharge into the wetland complex.

  15. Use of stabilization pond sludge in cultivation of roses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge L. da Paixão Filho

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available One option for the increasing production of sewage sludge (SS is its agricultural use in crops with high nutritional demand, such as the rose. Therefore, the aim of this work was to study the application of SS from primary stabilization pond in roses of the variety 'Carola'. For the experiment, the roses were planted in 20 L recipients using increasing doses of sludge (T2 - 12 Mg ha-1, T3 - 24 Mg ha-1 and T4 - 36 Mg ha-1, mineral fertilizer (T5 and control treatment (T1, without N in a randomized block design. The evaluated parameters were: roots dry mass, aerial dry mass, total biomass, leaflets area and nitrogen concentration in the leaf. The SS application resulted in better development of the rose, increasing the roots and the aerial biomasses, the leaflets area, and nitrogen content in the leaves compared to the control (T1. There was no statistical difference between the use of mineral fertilizer (T5, and the SS under the highest dose (T4. With these benefits, the use in agriculture of sewage sludge derived from stabilization ponds proved to be an adequate option for its disposal.

  16. Nat'l_Register, ContributingResources, The Ponds at Pipe Spring National Monument, Arizona (pisp_ponds)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This is an Arc/Info coverage consisting of 2 polygons representing the ponds at Pipe Spring National Monument, Arizona. The ponds were collected by a Trimble GeoXT...

  17. 33 CFR 117.598 - Eel Pond Channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Eel Pond Channel. 117.598 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Massachusetts § 117.598 Eel Pond Channel. The following requirements apply to the draw of Eel Pond (Water Street) drawbridge at mile 0.0 at...

  18. Mapping and monitoring geomorphological processes in mountainous areas using PSI data: Central Pyrenees case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Herrera

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the Stable Point Network technique, an established Persistent Scatterer InSAR (PSI technique, (SPN, has been applied for the first time to the analysis of several geomorphological processes present in the Gállego river basin (Central Pyrenees, Spain. The SPN coherence based approach has been used to process three different SAR images datasets covering two temporal periods: 1995 to 2001 and 2001 to 2007. This approach has permitted the detection of more than 40 000 natural ground targets or Persistent Scatterers (PSs in the study area, characterised by the presence of vegetation and a low urban density. Derived displacement maps have permitted the detection and monitoring of deformations in landslides, alluvial fans and erosive areas. In the first section, the study area is introduced. Then the specifics of the SPN processing are presented. The deformation results estimated with the SPN technique for the different processed datasets are compared and analysed with previous available geo-information. Then several detailed studies are presented to illustrate the processes detected by the satellite based analysis. In addition, a comparison between the performance of ERS and ENVISAT satellites with terrestrial SAR has demonstrates that these are complementary techniques, which can be integrated in order to monitor deformation processes, like landslides, that over the same monitoring area may show very different ranges of movement. The most relevant conclusions of this work are finally discussed.

  19. Suitability of constructed wetlands and waste stabilisation ponds in wastewater treatment: nitrogen transformation and removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senzia, M. A.; Mashauri, D. A.; Mayo, A. W.

    It is estimated that 90% of sewage in cities in developing countries are today discharged untreated into water bodies. In Tanzania, pollution of rivers such as Karanga, Njoro and Rao in Moshi; Mirongo in Mwanza and Themi in Arusha is the cause of frequent disease outbreaks in communities downstreams. Solutions to effluent crisis can be found by its proper treatment and disposal. The principal objective of wastewater treatment is to allow effluents to be disposed without danger to human health or unacceptable damage to the ecology of receiving water bodies. Field investigations were made on pilot scale horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetlands (CW) units located downstream of waste stabilisation ponds (WSP). Six units filled with gravel of 6-25 mm diameters in equal proportion, which gave an initial hydraulic conductivity of 86 m/d were used. While four units covering surface area of 40.7 m 2 each, were located downstream of primary facultative pond, the other two units with surface area 15.9 m 2 each were located downstream of maturation pond. An attempt was made to compare the output of mathematical models for Phragmites and Typha macrophytes located downstream of primary facultative pond. Based on total inflow nitrogen of 1.457 gN/m 2 d, while Phragmites has shown a removal of 54%, Typha had a removal of 44.2%. Furthermore, while the system downstream of primary facultative pond has accretion as a major pathway, accounting for 19.1% of inflow nitrogen, the system downstream of maturation pond has denitrification as its major removal mechanism accounting for 20.5%. In this paper, a comparison of land required by CW and WSP based on the amount of water to be treated is made.

  20. Barn swallows nesting near radioactive leaching ponds in southeastern Idaho

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seasonally occurring populations of barn swallows nest near the Test Reactor Area (TRA) radioactive leaching ponds on the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Site. These birds utilize leaching pond arthropods and are therefore capable of accumulating radioactive materials and exporting them from the INEL Site during migration. The breeding biology is discussed for these swallows and a control group located 100 km away. Total nestling mortality for the controls and a 1977 TRA population was found to be statistically identical. Over 20 fission and activation products have been detected in immature and adult TRA birds. Mean concentrations of detectable radionuclides were used to calculate internal dose rates, and results showed that Na-24 contributed about 72% of the total average of 21.9 mrad/d for adult birds. Concentration factors were also calculated for predominant radionuclides in swallows relative to filtered pond water. Data from LiF dosimeters in swallow nests constructed with contaminated mud indicated average dose rates were 84 mrad/d for eggs and 220 mrad/d for nestlings. Growth curves were constructed for the immature TRA birds and controls. The first clutch of TRA swallows was found to have a significantly lower mean growth rate constant than the first clutch of controls. The statistical difference in growth rate between the control and TRA first clutch populations may have resulted from differences in climate, nesting site habitat, or available food sources, and cannot be solely attributed to radiation exposure as a causative factor. Growth rate parameters for TRA birds were within the range of values reported in the literature

  1. Fate of Pyrethroids in Farmland Ponds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, B. B.; Sørensen, P. B.; Stuer-Lauridsen, F.;

    Pyrethroids constitute a group of widely used insecticides, which are toxic to aquatic organisms. This report presents the results from a 2-year study of the fate of pyrethroids in ponds, i.e. their distribution in the water column, the sediment and the surface microlayer respectively. The...

  2. Ecology of Great Salt Pond, Block Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Great Salt Pond is an island of estuarine water on Block Island, which sits in the middle of the Northwest Atlantic Continental Shelf. When the last continental glaciers retreated, they left a high spot on a terminal moraine. The rising sea from melting glaciers formed two island...

  3. Aquatic Habitats: Exploring Desktop Ponds. Teacher's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Katharine; Willard, Carolyn

    This book, for grades 2-6, is designed to provide students with a highly motivating and unique opportunity to investigate an aquatic habitat. Students set up, observe, study, and reflect upon their own "desktop ponds." Accessible plants and small animals used in these activities include Elodea, Tubifex worms, snails, mosquito larvae, and fish.…

  4. Photodemethylation of Methylmercury in Eastern Canadian Arctic Thaw Pond and Lake Ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girard, Catherine; Leclerc, Maxime; Amyot, Marc

    2016-04-01

    Permafrost thaw ponds of the warming Eastern Canadian Arctic are major landscape constituents and often display high levels of methylmercury (MeHg). We examined photodegradation potentials in high-dissolved organic matter (DOC) thaw ponds on Bylot Island (BYL) and a low-DOC oligotrophic lake on Cornwallis Island (Char Lake). In BYL, the ambient MeHg photodemethylation (PD) rate over 48 h of solar exposure was 6.1 × 10(-3) m(2) E(-1), and the rate in MeHg amended samples was 9.3 × 10(-3) m(2) E(-1). In contrast, in low-DOC Char Lake, PD was only observed in the first 12 h, which suggests that PD may not be an important loss process in polar desert lakes. Thioglycolic acid addition slowed PD, while glutathione and chlorides did not impact northern PD rates. During an ecosystem-wide experiment conducted in a covered BYL pond, there was neither net MeHg increase in the dark nor loss attributable to PD following re-exposure to sunlight. We propose that high-DOC Arctic thaw ponds are more prone to MeHg PD than nearby oligotrophic lakes, likely through photoproduction of reactive species rather than via thiol complexation. However, at the ecosystem level, these ponds, which are widespread through the Arctic, remain likely sources of MeHg for neighboring systems. PMID:26938195

  5. High quality coal extraction and environmental remediation of fine coal refuse ponds using advanced cleaning technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A vast number of coal refuse ponds represent a significant economical resource base that are also considered to be environmentally harmful. Significant amounts of cleanable fine coal generally exist in the refuse ponds due to the inability of conventional technologies to effectively separate the fine coal from the associated gangue particles. In addition, acid generation, generally a result of pyrite oxidation, has potential to adversely affect the surrounding environment. An integrated processing strategy of simultaneously recovering high quality coal and pyrite-rich products from the treatment of a coal refuse pond slurry has been successfully evaluated using an advanced physical cleaning circuit. A clean coal product having ash and pyritic sulfur contents of 10.1% and 0.41% was recovered with a mass yield of nearly 49%. In addition, a pyrite-rich product containing nearly 83% of the coal pyrite particles present in the refuse pond material was generated for neutralization purposes for the environmental remediation of the slurry pond. 4 refs

  6. Levels of participation and interactional issue framing in a water area planning process

    OpenAIRE

    Francois, G; A. Dewulf; Taillieu, T.

    2008-01-01

    Session 1-2 Levels of participation and their impact on interactional issue framing in a water area planning process Greet François 1, Art Dewulf 2, Tharsi Taillieu 1 1 K.U.Leuven - Research group for Work, Organisational and Personnel Psychology 2 Wageningen University - Public Administration and Policy Group This paper is an analysis of a participatory process to define a water management plan for the area between the Kromme Rijn and the Amsterdam-Rijn canal in The Netherlands. The waterboa...

  7. Heavy metals, PAHs and toxicity in stormwater wet detention ponds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wium-Andersen, Tove; Nielsen, Asbjørn Haaning; Hvitved-Jacobsen, Thorkild;

    2011-01-01

    Concentrations of 6 different heavy metals and total Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAH) were determined in stormwater runoff and in the pond water of two Danish wet detention ponds. The pond water samples were analyzed for toxic effects, using the algae Selenastrum capricornutum as a test...... organism. Stormwater and pond water from a catchment with light industry showed high levels of heavy metals, especially zinc and copper. The pond water showed high toxic effects and copper were found to be the main toxicant. Additionally, a large part of the copper was suspected to be complex bound...

  8. Assessment of the teaching-learning process in students of the health area: cardiopulmonary resuscitation maneuvers

    OpenAIRE

    Patrícia Moita Garcia Kawakame; Ana Maria Kazue Miyadahira

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVETo evaluate the skills and knowledge of undergraduate students in the health area on cardiopulmonary resuscitation maneuvers with the use of an automatic external defibrillator.METHODThe evaluation was performed in three different stages of the teaching-learning process. A theoretical and practical course was taught and the theoretical classes included demonstration. The evaluation was performed in three different stages of the teaching-learning process. Two instruments were applied ...

  9. A theoretical framework and classification of capability areas for business process maturity

    OpenAIRE

    A. VAN LOOY; M. DE BACKER; Poels, G.

    2011-01-01

    Organisations are increasingly striving to excel by improving their way of working, or in other words, to obtain mature business processes. However, no consensus exists on the capability areas (or skills) needed to excel. Therefore, this study presents a theoretical framework to overcome this gap. It particularly draws on theories regarding the traditional business process lifecycle, which are supplemented by recognised organisation management theories. The comprehensiveness of the framework ...

  10. Metabolic acceleration in the pond snail Lymnaea stagnalis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmer, Elke I.; Ducrot, V.; Jager, T.; Koene, J.; Lagadic, L.; Kooijman, S. A. L. M.

    2014-11-01

    Under constant environmental conditions, most animals tend to grow following the von Bertalanffy growth curve. Deviations from this curve can point to changes in the environment that the animals experience, such as food limitation when the available food is not sufficient or suitable. However, such deviations can also point to a phenomenon called metabolic acceleration, which is receiving increasing attention in the field of Dynamic Energy Budget (DEB) modeling. Reasons for such an acceleration are usually changes in shape during ontogeny, which cause changes in the surface area to volume ratio of the organism. Those changes, in turn, lead to changes in some of the model parameters that have length in their dimension. The life-history consequences of metabolic acceleration as implemented in the DEB theory are an s-shaped growth curve (when body size is expressed as a length measure) and a prolongation of the hatching time. The great pond snail Lymnaea stagnalis was earlier found to be food limited during the juvenile phase in laboratory experiments conducted under classical ecotoxicity test protocols. The pond snail has isomorphic shell growth but yet does not exhibit the expected von Bertalanffy growth curve under food limitation. When applying the standard DEB model to data from such life-cycle experiments, we also found that the hatching time is consistently underestimated, which could be a sign of metabolic acceleration. We here present an application of the DEB model including metabolic acceleration to the great pond snail. We account for the simultaneous hermaphroditism of the snail by including a model extension that describes the relative investment into the male and female function. This model allowed us to adequately predict the life history of the snail over the entire life cycle. However, the pond snail does not change in shape substantially after birth, so the original explanation for the metabolic acceleration does not hold. Since the change in shape

  11. Using UAVs and digital image processing to quantify areas of soil and vegetation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves, A. A.; La Scalea, R. A.; Colturato, A. B.; Kawabata, C. L. O.; Furtado, E. L.; Castelo Branco, K. R. L. J.

    2015-09-01

    Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) are becoming a very popular tool for remote sensing and crop monitoring. They are more easily deployed, cheaper and can obtain images with higher spatial-resolution than satellites. Some small, commercial UAVs can obtain images with spatial-resolution as low as 1.5cm per pixel. This opens up the range of possible remote sensing and monitoring applications. Moreover, they can cover large areas in very little time, such as 50 ha in about 20min, which makes UAVs the ideal tool for monitoring large farms and plantations. On the other hand, it is important to know precisely the area covered by farms in order to avoid invasion of other properties or preserved areas, and also to detect flaws in the plantation area. However, it is difficult to measure planted areas in some cases, such as Eucalyptus crops. Therefore, this paper aims to evaluate the use of UAV imagery for precise area measurement in Eucalyptus crops. We developed an image-processing algorithm to segment regions of soil, low biomass and high biomass and tested it on a Eucalyptus plantation in the city of Lenis Paulista -SP, Brazil. Results show that the area quantification is very accurate especially for bare soil regions and this method can be used to estimate areas in other scenarios.

  12. Dung beetle communities in coal mining areas in the process of recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana Zamprônio Bett

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Dung beetles that are sensitive to environmental alterations may be used as indicator species to mark the recovery of degraded areas. This work aimed at registering and comparing the communities of Scarabaeinae located in areas with different periods of environmental recovery after being used for coal mining. This study was developed in Lauro Müller, Santa Catarina, and consisted of two areas in the process of recovery, one for one year and one for five years. Fifteen pitfall traps baited with human feces were placed in each area in order to attract the dung beetles. The counting, identification and measurement of body size and biomass of the specimens captured were carried out in the laboratory. Sampling sufficiency was verified and variables from both areas were compared using a t test. The recorded species were Canthon aff. chalybaeus, Canthon angularis, Canthon rutilans cyanescens, Deltochilum multicolor, Dichotomius sericeus, Eurysternus parallelus and Ontherus sulcator. A total of 35 individuals were captured, three in the one-year recovery area and 32 in the area under recovery for five years, C. rutilans cyanescens being the most abundant species (40.6%. All species collected were found in the five-years recovery area, whereas only C. aff. chalybaeus and D. multicolor were found in the one-year recovery area. Individuals sampled in the area with one year of recovery had an average size of 11.03 mm and average biomass of 0.051 g, whereas in the five-years recovery area the average size and the biomass of the dung beetles sampled was 12.25 mm and 0.093 g, respectively.

  13. Distribution and Migration of Ordnance-Related Compounds and Oxygen and Hydrogen Stable Isotopes in Ground Water near Snake Pond, Sandwich, Massachusetts

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBlanc, Denis R.; Massey, Andrew J.; Cochrane, Jessica J.; King, Jonathan H.; Smith, Kirk P.

    2008-01-01

    Explosive compounds, such as RDX (hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine) and HMX (octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine), and the propellant compound perchlorate are present in ground water near Snake Pond, a ground-water flow-through glacial kettle pond in the glacial sand and gravel aquifer on western Cape Cod near Camp Edwards on the Massachusetts Military Reservation. The contaminants originate from the J-3 Range ordnance training and testing area. Ground-water samples were collected at 10 sites near the pond to determine the paths of the contaminants as they underflow or completely or partially discharge into the pond. Water-quality profiles were developed for sites on opposite ends of a 200-foot-long intermittent island near the northern, upgradient end of the pond by collecting water samples from two temporary drive-point borings. RDX was detected at both locations between 60 and 90 feet below the pond level. The highest RDX concentration was 0.99 micrograms per liter. Perchlorate was detected at only one location on the island, between 95 and 100 feet below the pond level at a concentration of 0.61 micrograms per liter. Profiles of oxygen and hydrogen stable isotopes were developed for seven sites spaced 300 to 600 feet apart along the southern, downgradient shore of the pond. A transition from heavier to lighter oxygen and hydrogen isotopes was observed at an altitude of about -50 feet. This transition most likely is the boundary between evaporation-affected pond water that is seeping into the aquifer and ground water that has passed beneath the pond. RDX was not detected in the ground-water samples collected south of the pond. Perchlorate was detected only in one sample from a shallow depth in one boring. The results of these analyses indicate that the J-3 Range plume contains low concentrations of RDX and perchlorate (less than 1 microgram per liter) as it passes beneath the northern end of Snake Pond. Results of ground-water-flow modeling

  14. Health physics experience during a uranium and thorium pond closure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aerojet Heavy Metals Company (AHMC) recently completed a pond decommissioning project which involved the movement and interment of approximately 600,000 cubic feet of uranium- and thorium-contaminated soil. This work was performed by a construction company using standard earth moving equipment and their general labor force. In addition to the construction company employees, geotechnical quality assurance was performed by a soils test engineer and overall construction management was performed by a resident project engineer. Certification of cleanup and inventory sampling were done by contract personnel also. In general, a large complicated project involving several different parties, a large amount of equipment and a large work area was completed with minimal exposure and no spread of contamination to uncontrolled areas. Detailed pre-planning with the project management staff and careful coordination with the actual construction contractor is required. Predictive methods of contamination and air activities can be valuable in assessing the program requirements

  15. Environmental Problems Associated with Decommissioning of Chernobyl Power Plant Cooling Pond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, T. Q.; Oskolkov, B. Y.; Bondarkov, M. D.; Gashchak, S. P.; Maksymenko, A. M.; Maksymenko, V. M.; Martynenko, V. I.; Jannik, G. T.; Farfan, E. B.; Marra, J. C.

    2009-12-01

    Decommissioning of nuclear power plants and other nuclear fuel cycle facilities associated with residual radioactive contamination is a fairly pressing issue. Significant problems may result from decommissioning of cooling ponds. The Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (ChNPP) Cooling Pond is one of the largest self-contained bodies of water in the Chernobyl Region and Ukrainian Polesye with a water surface area of 22.9 km2. The major hydrological feature of the ChNPP Cooling Pond is that its water level is 6-7 m higher than the water level in the Pripyat River and water losses due to seepage and evaporation are replenished by pumping water from the Pripyat River. In 1986, the accident at the ChNPP #4 Reactor Unit significantly contaminated the ChNPP Cooling Pond. According to the 2001 data, the total radionuclide inventory in the ChNPP Cooling Pond bottom deposits was as follows: 16.28 ± 2.59 TBq for 137Cs; 2.4 ± 0.48 TBq for 90Sr, and 0.00518 ± 0.00148 TBq for 239+240Pu. Since ChNPP is being decommissioned, the ChNPP Cooling Pond of such a large size will no longer be needed and cost effective to maintain. However, shutdown of the water feed to the Pond would expose the contaminated bottom deposits and change the hydrological features of the area, destabilizing the radiological and environmental situation in the entire region in 2007 - 2008, in order to assess potential consequences of draining the ChNPP Cooling Pond, the authors conducted preliminary radio-ecological studies of its shoreline ecosystems. The radioactive contamination of the ChNPP Cooling Pond shoreline is fairly variable and ranges from 75 to 7,500 kBq/m2. Three areas with different contamination levels were selected to sample soils, vegetation, small mammals, birds, amphibians, and reptilians in order to measure their 137Cs and 90Sr content. Using the ERICA software, their dose exposures were estimated. For the 2008 conditions, the estimated dose rates were found to be as follows: amphibians - 11

  16. 30 CFR 912.764 - Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations. 912.764 Section 912.764 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE IDAHO § 912.764...

  17. 30 CFR 933.764 - Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations. 933.764 Section 933.764 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE NORTH CAROLINA §...

  18. 30 CFR 939.764 - Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations. 939.764 Section 939.764 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE RHODE ISLAND §...

  19. 30 CFR 941.764 - Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations. 941.764 Section 941.764 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE SOUTH DAKOTA §...

  20. 30 CFR 910.764 - Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations. 910.764 Section 910.764 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE GEORGIA § 910.764...

  1. 30 CFR 937.764 - Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations. 937.764 Section 937.764 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE OREGON § 937.764...

  2. 30 CFR 903.764 - Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations. 903.764 Section 903.764 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE ARIZONA § 903.764...

  3. 30 CFR 905.764 - Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations. 905.764 Section 905.764 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE CALIFORNIA §...

  4. 30 CFR 922.764 - Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations. 922.764 Section 922.764 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE MICHIGAN §...

  5. 30 CFR 942.764 - Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations. 942.764 Section 942.764 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE TENNESSEE §...

  6. 30 CFR 921.764 - Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations. 921.764 Section 921.764 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE MASSACHUSETTS §...

  7. 30 CFR 947.764 - Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations. 947.764 Section 947.764 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE WASHINGTON §...

  8. Levels of participation and interactional issue framing in a water area planning process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Francois, G.; Dewulf, A.; Taillieu, T.

    2008-01-01

    Session 1-2 Levels of participation and their impact on interactional issue framing in a water area planning process Greet François 1, Art Dewulf 2, Tharsi Taillieu 1 1 K.U.Leuven - Research group for Work, Organisational and Personnel Psychology 2 Wageningen University - Public Administration and P

  9. 75 FR 12988 - National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Area Sources: Asphalt Processing and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-18

    ... the asphalt processing and asphalt roofing manufacturing area source category (74 FR 63236). Following... specified in Executive Order 13132, Federalism (64 FR 43255, August 10, 1999). This action does not..., Consultation and Coordination with Indian Tribal Governments (65 FR 67249, November 9, 2000). This...

  10. Cooling ponds and small rivers in north central United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An attempt is made to review those Commonwealth Edison (Ceco) programs related directly or indirectly to compensation and stock manipulation in fish populations. The direct stocking of sport fish fingerlings for mitigation is one method of stock manipulation. There are, however, two other, less common manipulative approaches to enhancing local fish stocks. First is the use of cooling ponds as off-stream nursery areas for forage and sport species. Second is the use of waste heat to modify habitat temperatures and permit or improve overwintering survival of select species such as gizzard or threadfin shad in north-temperate waters that are naturally too cold to sustain strong populations. This, in turn, will increase the abundance of these species as forage in subsequent years. There are four different Ceco projects which are discussed. These are: Fish releases in Pool 14 of the Mississippi River; Studies of endemic and stock fishes at the Collins and Dresden Cooling Ponds; Fish and water quality monitoring of the Des Plaines and Upper Illinois Rivers; and Proposed walleye, muskellunge and striped bass x white bass hybrid stocking in the Rock River. 7 references

  11. Effect of longwall face advance rate on spontaneous heating process in the gob area - CFD modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boleslav Taraba; Zdenek Michalec [University of Ostrava, Ostrava (Czech Republic). Dept. of Chemistry

    2011-08-15

    A commercial CFD software programme, FLUENT, was used to study the oxidation process of coal in the mined-out longwall (gob) area. A three-dimensional, single-phase model with a continuously advancing longwall face has been developed. For the model, the gob longwall area was designed on the basis of the actual longwall panel operating in the Ostrava-Karvina Coal Mines (OKD, Czech Republic). The behaviour of the coal to oxygen was modelled using the results arising mainly from the former laboratory-scale experiments with Czech bituminous coals. Basically, the technique of pulse flow calorimetry and measurements at a continuous airflow reactor were applied during the laboratory investigations. In the contribution, the main focus was to understand the effect of the longwall face advancing speed on the oxidation heat production as well as evolution of the gases in the gob area. Simultaneously, the effect of coal crushing in the mined-out area on the spontaneous heating process was examined. Numerical simulations confirmed the existence of a 'favourable' zone for the onset and development of the spontaneous heating process in the gob area. The location and the maximal temperature reached in the 'favourable' zone were found to be significantly affected by the advancing rate of the coalface. The slower the advancing rate is, the higher the maximal temperature and smaller the depth of the 'favourable' zone in the gob area are. When the rate drops to a certain 'critical' value, spontaneous heating turns to flammable combustion of the coal. The value of the 'critical' advancing rate was confirmed to increase if the grain size of the coal left in the gob decreases. Numerical examinations of carbon monoxide concentrations then proved that small incidents of spontaneous heating could occur in the gob area that need not be detected in the airflow of the longwall tail gate. 46 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Spread spectrum fiber-optic local area network using optical processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prucnal, P. R.; Santoro, M. A.; Fan, T. R.

    1986-01-01

    Spread spectrum code division multiple access (CDMA) allows asynchronous multiple access to a local area network (LAN) with no waiting. The additional bandwidth required by spread spectrum can be accommodated by using a fiber-optic channel and incoherent optical signal processing. New CDMA sequences are designed specifically for optical processing. It is shown that increasing the number of chips per bit, by using optical processing, allows an increase in capacity of a CDMA LAN. An experiment is performed demonstrating the performance of an optical CDMA LAN, operating at 100 Mbd with three users.

  13. Process and balance assessment in lignite mining areas by multi-isotope approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The multi-isotope approach using stable isotopes of various light elements offers possibilities to recognize chemical processes within the aquifers, interactions between ground and surface water, quantification of the balance of water or dissolved compounds in anthropogenic stressed landscapes. Especially in mining areas, the quality of ground- and surface water is one of the main problems during and after remediation measures. Caused by lowering of groundwater level, sulfide oxidation and consequently acidification of surface and groundwater systems are common processes. Successful remediation strategies require knowledge of the chemical and physical processes proceeding in dump sites, and of the groundwater flow dynamic

  14. Insect diversity and water quality parameters of two ponds of Chatla wetland, Barak valley, Assam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susmita Gupta

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available An investigation was carried out on two ponds of Chatla floodplain, Barak valley, Assam with special reference to aquatic insects. Pond 1 is purely a fish pond where as pond 2 is a community pond too. Present study revealed the status of water quality and in turn diversity, density, dominance and abundance of aquatic insects in both the ponds. Almost all the physico chemical parameters of both the ponds were found within permissible range for aquatic life .However in pond 2 level of phosphate was found little higher than pond 1 due to release of soaps and detergents by human influence. In both the ponds order Hemiptera showed maximum relative abundance ( 98% in pond 1 and 94% in pond 2. The study revealed lower diversity of aquatic insects in pond 2 than that in pond 1.

  15. 资兴市铅锌尾矿库区植物资源调查及耐性植物筛选%Survey on plants resource and selection of tolerant species at Pb -Zn tailings pond area of Zixing City

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈福春; 易心钰; 张路红

    2016-01-01

    通过对资兴铅锌尾矿区植物季节变化的调查,以及对该区植物重金属含量与分布特征的分析,初步筛选了适合于 Pb、Zn 尾矿库复合重金属污染土壤生态修复的植物种质资源。该区共记录高等植物81种,分属34科,其中自然定居62种,人工引种木本植物19种。重金属累积及转运特性分析表明,这些物种均对复合重金属污染具有较强的耐受性,其中,优势自然定居植物和人工栽种的木本植物对 Pb、Zn 富集能力均未达到超富集植物的临界阈值,一年蓬和青蒿对 Cd 的富集量分别达107 mg/kg 和136 mg/kg,具有 Cd 超富集植物的基本特征,野菊花、酸模、青蒿、女贞和桂花树均具备超富集植物特征。研究结果为铅锌矿区及其污染场地生态修复提供了先锋植物和生态经济树种资源。%A batch of plants resources,which can tolerate Pb,Zn,Cd,Cu heavy metal pollutants in soil,has been primarily selected through a survey of plant resources in terms of their seasonal changes,heavy metal contents and distri-butions in plants at Pb -Zn tailings pond area of Zixing City.There are total of 81 species of advanced plants belonging to 34 different families,which had demonstrated relatively strong tolerance to complex heavy metal pollution,and there are 62 native dominant species and 19 introducing species.Moreover,accumulation and transfer index analysis indicated that dominant species mentioned above could not be used as hyperaccumulator,but Cd accumulated in Erigeron annuus and Artemisia carvifolia was up to 107 mg/kg and 136mg/kg respectively,meanwhile,Hrysanthemum indicum,Rumex ace-tosa,Artemisia carvifolia,Ligustrum quihoui and Osmanthus fragrans have the potential of hyperaccumulator of heavy metals,and those can be used as pioneer and economic tress species for ecological restoration at Pb -Zn tailings pond ar-ea.

  16. New approach to solar photo-Fenton operation. Raceway ponds as tertiary treatment technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carra, Irene; Santos-Juanes, Lucas; Acién Fernández, Francisco Gabriel; Malato, Sixto; Sánchez Pérez, José Antonio

    2014-08-30

    The photo-Fenton process has proven its efficiency in the removal of micropollutants. However, the high costs usually associated with it prevent a spread of this technology. An important factor affecting costs is the kind of photoreactor used, usually tubular with a reflecting surface. Tubular reactors like compound parabolic collectors, CPCs, involve high capital costs. In comparison, the application of less costly reactors such as the extensive raceway ponds (RPRs) would help to spread the use of the photo-Fenton process as tertiary treatment at commercial scale. As far as the authors know, RPRs have never been used in advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) applications. This work is aimed at studying the applicability of RPRs to remove micropollutants with solar photo-Fenton. For this purpose, a pesticide mixture of commercial acetamiprid (ACTM) and thiabendazole (TBZ) (100μg/L each) was used in simulated secondary effluent. Iron concentration (1, 5.5 and 10mg/L) and liquid depth (5, 10 and 15cm) were studied as process variables. TBZ was removed at the beginning of the treatment (less than 5min), although ACTM removal times were longer (20-40min for the highest iron concentrations). High treatment capacity per surface area was obtained (48mg/hm(2) with 5.5mg Fe/L and 15cm liquid depth), proving the feasibility of using RPRs for micropollutant removal. PMID:25072137

  17. Denitrification and anammox in tropical aquaculture settlement ponds: an isotope tracer approach for evaluating N2 production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castine, Sarah A; Erler, Dirk V; Trott, Lindsay A; Paul, Nicholas A; de Nys, Rocky; Eyre, Bradley D

    2012-01-01

    Settlement ponds are used to treat aquaculture discharge water by removing nutrients through physical (settling) and biological (microbial transformation) processes. Nutrient removal through settling has been quantified, however, the occurrence of, and potential for microbial nitrogen (N) removal is largely unknown in these systems. Therefore, isotope tracer techniques were used to measure potential rates of denitrification and anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) in the sediment of settlement ponds in tropical aquaculture systems. Dinitrogen gas (N(2)) was produced in all ponds, although potential rates were low (0-7.07 nmol N cm(-3) h(-1)) relative to other aquatic systems. Denitrification was the main driver of N(2) production, with anammox only detected in two of the four ponds. No correlations were detected between the measured sediment variables (total organic carbon, total nitrogen, iron, manganese, sulphur and phosphorous) and denitrification or anammox. Furthermore, denitrification was not carbon limited as the addition of particulate organic matter (paired t-Test; P = 0.350, n = 3) or methanol (paired t-Test; P = 0.744, n = 3) did not stimulate production of N(2). A simple mass balance model showed that only 2.5% of added fixed N was removed in the studied settlement ponds through the denitrification and anammox processes. It is recommended that settlement ponds be used in conjunction with additional technologies (i.e. constructed wetlands or biological reactors) to enhance N(2) production and N removal from aquaculture wastewater. PMID:22962581

  18. Bioremediation process in impacted area of petroleum activities; Processos de biorremediacao em areas influenciadas por atividades petroliferas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Olivia Maria Cordeiro de; Trigueis, Jorge Alberto; Queiroz, Antonio Fernando de Souza; Celino, Joil Jose; Lima, Danusia Ferreira; Santana, Robson Carneiro [Universidade Federal da Bahia (UFBA), Salvador, BA (Brazil). Inst. de Geociencias

    2008-07-01

    The present work's objective is to test sampling methodologies applied on the bioremediation processes in situ, involving the establishment of sample replicates, specific laboratory procedures and its results, inedited on the referred technique. Agricultural fertilizers were used, NPK and OSMOCOTE, as biostimulants on mangroves substrates affected by petroleum activities. The tested methodology used on the experiment was based on the monitoring of this technology in aquarium with water from Sao Paulo's river and sediment contaminated by oil, realized in three steps (first pre-test, second pre-test and third pre-test) that happened between the months of August and November of 2007. The physical-chemical parameters were measured with portable devices carefully calibrated and the oil analyzed with gas chromatography. The saturated hydrocarbons (n-alkenes) had an increase on the concentrations for some aquariums and these found results do not permit to confirm if the inhibition of the degradation of the saturated hydrocarbons are somehow related to the usage of the nutrients NPK or OSMOCOTE. The time interval applied on the procedure, the sampling methodology used and even the intrinsic heterogeneity of the mangrove substrate are in the evaluation stage with new tests in order to make better the technique delineation, inedited, utilized in the area. (author)

  19. Evaluation of design factors for a cascade aerator to enhance the efficiency of an oxidation pond for ferruginous mine drainage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Chamteut; Ji, Sangwoo; Cheong, Youngwook; Yim, Giljae; Hong, Ji-Hye

    2016-10-01

    This research focused on the optimum design of a cascade aerator to enhance the efficiency of an oxidation pond in a passive treatment system for remediating ferruginous mine drainage. For this purpose, various aeration experiments with aerators of different drop heights (0-4 m) and formations (types A and B) were executed on mine drainage. Type A simply drops the mine drainage into the oxidation pond while type B sprays the mine drainage and retains it for 8 min in each step. The efficiency enhancement of the oxidation pond was strongly dependent on the increase in pH and DO of the mine drainage discharged into the pond. The water quality improved with the increase in drop height but especially showed better effect with type B. The reasons for this result were attributed to the increase of contact surface and retention time of the mine drainage. The cascade aerator, therefore, should be designed to be as high as possible with the assistance of spraying form and retention time of the mine drainage to maximize the efficiency of the oxidation pond. These effects could be evaluated by calculating required areas of the oxidation pond for 95% of Fe(2+) oxidation. PMID:26936197

  20. Electrokinetic densification of coal fines in waste ponds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this research is to demonstrate that electrokinetics can be used to remove colloidal coal and mineral particles from coal-washing ponds and lakes without the addition of chemical additives such as salts and polymeric flocculants. In this experimental and analytical study the authors elucidate the transport processes that control the rate of concentrated colloidal particle removal, demonstrate the process on a laboratory scale, and develop the scale-up laws needed to design commercial-scale processes. They then address the fundamental problems associated with particle-particle interactions (electrical and hydrodynamic), the effects of particle concentration on the applied electric field, the electrochemical reactions that occur at the electrodes, and the prediction of power requirements

  1. Bacteriophage Technique for Assessing Viral Removal in Constructed Wetland and Detention Pond Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Z Yousefi, CM Davies, HJ Bavor

    2004-01-01

    Constructed wetland and detention pond as a treatment system was applied for stormwater management in two adjacent areas in western Sydney. F-specific RNA and somatic coliphages were used as a model for assessing two systems for removal of viral pollution, fate, behavior and survival of viruses in the sediment. Water samples were collected weekly in sterile containers and sediment samples were collected three times using a box dredge sampler via a boat at the inlet, middle and outlet areas of...

  2. Implementation of reactive and predictive real-time control strategies to optimize dry stormwater detention ponds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaborit, Étienne; Anctil, François; Vanrolleghem, Peter A.; Pelletier, Geneviève

    2013-04-01

    here increased the pond's TSS (and associated pollution) removal efficiency from 46% (current state) to between 70 and 90%, depending on the pond's capacity considered. The RTC strategies allow simultaneously maximizing the detention time of water, while minimizing the hydraulic shocks induced to the receiving water bodies and preventing overflow. A constraint relative to a maximum time of 4 days with water accumulated in the pond was thus respected to avoid mosquito breeding issues. The predictive control schemes (taking rainfall forecasts into consideration) can further reinforce the safety of the management strategies, even if meteorological forecasts are, of course, not error-free. With RTC, the studied pond capacity could thus have been limited to 1250 m3 instead of the 4000 m3 capacity currently used under static control. References Marsalek, J. 2005. Evolution of urban drainage: from cloaca maxima to environmental sustainability. Paper presented at Acqua e Citta, I Convegno Nazionale di Idraulica Urbana, Cent. Stud. Idraul. Urbana, Sant'Agnello di Sorrento, Italy, 28- 30 Sept. Middleton, J.R. and Barrett, M.E. 2008. Water quality performance of a batch-type stormwater detention basin. Water Environment Research, 80 (2): 172-178. Doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.2175/106143007X220842 Muschalla, D., Pelletier, G., Berrouard, É., Carpenter, J.-F., Vallet, B., and Vanrolleghem, P.A. 2009. Ecohydraulic-driven real-time control of stormwater basins. In: Proceedings 8th International Conference on Urban Drainage Modelling (8UDM), Tokyo, Japan, September 7-11. National Research Council, 1993. Managing Wastewater in Coastal Urban Areas. Washington, DC: National Academy Press. Shammaa, Y., Zhu, D.Z., Gyürék, L.L., and Labatiuk C.W. 2002. Effectiveness of dry ponds for stormwater total suspended solids removal. Canadian Journal of Civil Engineering, 29 (2): 316-324 (9). Doi: 10.1139/l02-008

  3. Contact Area and Temperature of Same-Parameter Fractal Surfaces in Sliding Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bingbing Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the ability of fractal parameters for characterizing tribological properties of surfaces, some stable fractal surfaces, which possess the same fractal dimension, scale factor and root-mean-square deviation of surface topography, were synthesized, and then simulated using finite element analysis to calculate the maximum temperature and contact area during sliding process. It was found that for same-parameter fractal surfaces the maximum temperature and contact area fluctuated dramatically. Thus, the tribological properties of surfaces can not be characterized by some simple parameters.

  4. Process and device for imploding a micro-area by means of a fast liner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The invention describes a process and a device for controlling a fast liner with hot plasma, in order to start or drive a structured micro-area to implode, in turn. In this way a natural pulse formation causes high implosion speeds for generating energy in the form of radiation, neutrons and/or alpha particles. By optimizing the extraordinarily powerful flow instability to heat the very dense plasma, the invention produces effective giving up of radiation energy to heat the plasma and to initiate the fast liner to implode the micro-area. (orig.)

  5. Key Biodiversity Areas in the Indo-Burma Hotspot: Process, Progress and Future Directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.W. Tordoff

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Key Biodiversity Areas (KBAs provide geographic targets for the expansion of protected area coverage, and identify sites for urgent conservation action. Identification of KBAs in the Indo-Burma Hotspot was undertaken during 2003, for a region of analysis comprising Cambodia, Lao PDR, Myanmar (Burma, Thailand and Vietnam, plus parts of southern China. The starting point was information on 282 Important Bird Areas identified by BirdLife International and collaborators. These data were then overlaid with point locality data on globally threatened mammals, reptiles, amphibians, freshwater fish and plants, with additional KBAs identified as required. Through this process, a total of 438 KBAs were identified, covering 258,085km2 or 11.5 percent of the region of analysis. Only 58 percent of the KBAs are wholly or partly included within protected areas, suggesting that there may be a need for further expansion of protected area networks, particularly in Myanmar and Vietnam. The criteria for KBA identification are triggered by 812 species, of which 23 are believed only to occur at a single KBA globally. The KBAs have proven to be a useful conservation priority setting tool in Indo-Burma, helping to guide investments by various donors and application of environmental safeguard policies by international financial institutions. There are fewer examples of KBAs being used to guide expansion of protected area systems in Indo-Burma. In large part, this is because the period of rapid expansion of protected areas in most hotspot countries predated the KBA identification process, and political support for further significant expansion is currently limited.

  6. Diel changes in water chemistry in an arsenic-rich stream and treatment-pond system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gammons, C.H.; Grant, T.M.; Nimick, D.A.; Parker, S.R.; DeGrandpre, M.D.

    2007-01-01

    Arsenic concentrations are elevated in surface waters of the Warm Springs Ponds Operable Unit (WSPOU), located at the head of the upper Clark Fork River Superfund site, Montana, USA. Arsenic is derived from historical deposition of smelter emissions (Mill and Willow Creeks) and historical mining and milling wastes (Silver Bow Creek). Although long-term monitoring has characterized the general seasonal and flow-related trends in As concentrations in these streams and the pond system used to treat Silver Bow Creek water, little is known about solubility controls and sorption processes that influence diel cycles in As concentrations. Diel (24-h) sampling was conducted in July 2004 and August 2005 at the outlet of the treatment ponds, at two locations along a nearby reconstructed stream channel that diverts tributary water around the ponds, and at Silver Bow Creek 2??km below the ponds. Dissolved As concentration increased up to 51% during the day at most of the stream sites, whereas little or no diel change was displayed at the treatment-pond outlet. The strong cycle in streams is explained by pH- and temperature-dependent sorption of As onto hydrous metal oxides or biofilms on the streambed. Concentrations of dissolved Ca2+ and HCO3- at the stream sites showed a diel temporal pattern opposite to that of As, and geochemical modeling supports the hypothesis that the concentrations of Ca2+ and HCO3- were controlled by precipitation of calcite during the warm afternoon hours when pH rose above 9.0. Nightly increases in dissolved Mn and Fe(II) concentrations were out of phase with concentrations of other divalent cations and are more likely explained by redox phenomena. ?? 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Engineered design of SSC cooling ponds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cooling requirements of the SSC are significant and adequate cooling water systems to meet these requirements are critical to the project's successful operation. The use of adequately designed cooling ponds will provide reliable cooling for operation while also meeting environmental goals of the project to maintain streamflow and flood peaks to preconstruction levels as well as other streamflow and water quality requirements of the Texas Water Commission and the Environmental Protection Agency

  8. Par Pond refill water quality sampling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was designed to document anoxia and its cause in the event that the anoxia caused a fish kill. However, no fish kill was observed during this study, and dissolved oxygen and nutrient concentrations generally remained within the range expected for southeastern reservoirs. Par Pond water quality monitoring will continue during the second summer after refill as the aquatic macrophytes become reestablished and nutrients in the sediments are released to the water column

  9. Lessons learned from activities carried out under the Buhovo tailings pond reconstruction project in Bulgaria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1947, the 'Metallurgy' uranium processing plant began operation in Buhovo, near Sofia. Until 1990 the plant processed 10 million t of ore from various uranium deposits throughout the country. Tailings arising from the uranium recovery process were placed in two ponds, covering a 24 ha area close to Monastirsko river. Disposal took place in a basin enclosed by an earth dam. A great quantity of liquids remained above the sandy tailings, creating a severe risk in case of dam failures under seismic conditions because of the potential for liquid runoff and ensuing downstream contamination of the Monastirsko river. To strengthen the dam, a 30 m wide additional berm, extending to an elevation of 678 m, was planned and built. It required 700,000 m3 of clay soils and 60,000 m3 of gravel to be used as a filter for drainage purposes. Construction work was carried out by DEC (a Belgian contractor) between March 2000 and August 2001. INITEC, acting as the architect/engineer, supervised the work under FIDIC (Federation Internationale des Ingenieurs-Conseils) conditions and Bulgarian law. The purpose of the paper is to describe the lessons learned during this project, as well as the INITEC role as architect/engineer with active involvement in design modifications aimed at improving the performance of the project. (author)

  10. Tanks Focus Area retrieval process development and enhancements FY96 technology development summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rinker, M.W.; Bamberger, J.A.; Hatchell, B.K. [and others

    1996-09-01

    The Retrieval Process Development and Enhancements (RPD&E) activities are part of the Retrieval and Closure Program of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) EM-50 Tanks Focus Area. The purposes of RPD&E are to understand retrieval processes, including emerging and existing technologies, and to gather data on those processes, so that end users have the requisite technical basis to make retrieval decisions. Work has been initiated to support the need for multiple retrieval technologies across the DOE complex. Technologies addressed during FY96 focused on enhancements to sluicing, borehole mining, confined sluicing retrieval end effectors, the lightweight scarifier, and pulsed air mixing. Furthermore, a decision tool and database have been initiated to link retrieval processes with tank closure to assist end users in making retrieval decisions.

  11. Tanks Focus Area retrieval process development and enhancements FY96 technology development summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Retrieval Process Development and Enhancements (RPD ampersand E) activities are part of the Retrieval and Closure Program of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) EM-50 Tanks Focus Area. The purposes of RPD ampersand E are to understand retrieval processes, including emerging and existing technologies, and to gather data on those processes, so that end users have the requisite technical basis to make retrieval decisions. Work has been initiated to support the need for multiple retrieval technologies across the DOE complex. Technologies addressed during FY96 focused on enhancements to sluicing, borehole mining, confined sluicing retrieval end effectors, the lightweight scarifier, and pulsed air mixing. Furthermore, a decision tool and database have been initiated to link retrieval processes with tank closure to assist end users in making retrieval decisions

  12. Evaluation of the Eological Management and Enhancement Alernative for Remediation of the K1007-P1 Pond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, M.J.

    2005-10-31

    An evaluation of the human and ecological risks associated with the P1 Pond and surrounding environs was conducted as part of the ETTP Site-Wide Remedial Investigation. The RI provides the basis for the focus on PCBs as the most important unacceptable risk to human and ecological health in the pond. Other P1 contaminants, media, or pathways of risk to receptors are identified in the RI, but are not addressed as a major risk reduction goal for the ETTP Site-Wide Feasibility Study. Therefore, the goal of the Ecological Management alternative is to reduce unacceptable risks associated with PCBs in fish. Many of the actions proposed for this alternative, however, are likely to reduce risks associated with other contaminants and their pathways. The high PCB concentrations in fish from the P1 Pond are most certainly due in part to the current ecological condition of the pond that maximizes PCB biomagnification. This basic assumption and the factors contributing to it were evaluated by conducting an intensive field study of the P1 Pond in the summer of 2004 (for a thorough presentation of current P1 Pond biological conditions, see Peterson et al. 2005). Major hypotheses regarding the P1 Pond's current fish community, PCB fate and transport processes, pond vegetation, and limnological conditions that contribute to the high PCB levels in fish were validated by the study (Appendix A), The results of the 2004 ecological assessment, in concert with long-term datasets obtained as part of the ETTP Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) and recent abiotic sampling for the RI, provide the basis for the assessment of current conditions.

  13. Development of wide area reaction system for Reel-to-Reel TFA-MOD process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The previously developed numerical simulation method for the TFA-MOD process, which calculated the YBCO growth kinetics, gas element diffusion and gas flow, was applied to study the suitable gas flow mode for a multi-turning Reel-to-Reel tape conveyance system of a long YBCO coated conductors. The high YBCO production rate with uniform J c distribution among tape lines is desired in the system. It was found by the numerical simulation for the vertical gas flow onto the tape surface to realize the above demands even in a wider reaction area. We developed a new wide area reaction tube for the Reel-to-Reel TFA-MOD process according to the numerically designed gas flow configuration. The demand for the new tube was confirmed to be satisfied by experiments

  14. Remedial investigation of the High-Explosives (HE) Process Area, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Site 300

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crow, N.B.; Lamarre, A.L.

    1990-08-01

    This report presents the results of a Remedial Investigation (RI) to define the extent of high explosives (HE) compounds and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) found in the soil, rocks, and ground water of the HE Process Area of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL) Site 300 Facility. The report evaluates potential public health environmental risks associated with these compounds. Hydrogeologic information available before February 15, 1990, is included; however, chemical analyses and water-level data are reported through March 1990. This report is intended to assist the California Regional Water Quality Control Board (RWQCB)--Central Valley Region and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in evaluating the extent of environmental contamination of the LLNL HE Process Area and ultimately in designing remedial actions. 90 refs., 20 figs., 7 tabs.

  15. Use of radio frequency bias in the large area plasma processing system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the large-area plasma processing system (LAPPS) scheme, rf bias can be used for either of two purposes: to provide energetic ion bombardment of a substrate, or to controllably raise the electron temperature (which is intrinsically very cool) to a desired value. The physics of rf bias in the LAPPS differs from the situation in conventional processing reactors for several reasons: (1) The plasma density adjacent to the substrate can be so high that the ion plasma frequency exceeds the microwave frequency. (2) Plasma transport to the substrate is across a magnetic field. (3) Ionization occurs only in a thin, well-defined planar sheet, and thus the volume occupied by plasma is very broad in two dimensions but thin in the third dimension. (4) The surface area of the substrate is comparable to that of the containment vessel. We discuss the modifications to the theory of rf bias that are needed to account for these factors in a LAPPS plasma

  16. Multi Agent System Based Process Control in Wide Area Protection against Cascading Events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Zhou; Chen, Zhe; Sun, Haishun;

    2013-01-01

    In order to prevent long term voltage instability induced cascading events; a multi agent system (MAS) based wide area protection strategy is proposed in this paper. Due to some unexpected failures of control strategy execution or the consequent unexpected disturbance, the power system will face...... more complex emergent situation than planned. The process control strategy will be applied to improve the effectiveness and reliability of MAS based control strategy. The supervisory agent will help control center in the high level to manage not only the regular control process against the estimated...

  17. Higher sensory processing sensitivity, introversion and ectomorphism: New biomarkers for human creativity in developing rural areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos V Rizzo-Sierra

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The highly sensitive trait present in animals, has also been proposed as a human neurobiological trait. People having such trait can process larger amounts of sensory information than usual, making it an excellent attribute that allows to pick up subtle environmental details and cues. Furthermore, this trait correlates to some sort of giftedness such as higher perception, inventiveness, imagination and creativity. We present evidences that support the existance of key neural connectivity between the mentioned trait, higher sensory processing sensitivity, introversion, ectomorphism and creativity. The neurobiological and behavioral implications that these biomarkers have in people living in developing rural areas are discussed as well.

  18. APD arrays and large-area APDs via a new planar process

    CERN Document Server

    Farrell, R; Vanderpuye, K; Grazioso, R; Myers, R; Entine, G

    2000-01-01

    A fabrication process has been developed which allows the beveled-edge-type of avalanche photodiode (APD) to be made without the need for the artful bevel formation steps. This new process, applicable to both APD arrays and to discrete detectors, greatly simplifies manufacture and should lead to significant cost reduction for such photodetectors. This is achieved through a simple innovation that allows isolation around the device or array pixel to be brought into the plane of the surface of the silicon wafer, hence a planar process. A description of the new process is presented along with performance data for a variety of APD device and array configurations. APD array pixel gains in excess of 10 000 have been measured. Array pixel coincidence timing resolution of less than 5 ns has been demonstrated. An energy resolution of 6% for 662 keV gamma-rays using a CsI(T1) scintillator on a planar processed large-area APD has been recorded. Discrete APDs with active areas up to 13 cm sup 2 have been operated.

  19. Geology and History of Water-Containment Ponds at U12n, U12t, and U12e Tunnels, Rainier Mesa, Nevada National Security Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tunnels constructed in Rainier Mesa at the Nevada National Security Site (formerly Nevada Test Site) intersected water-producing areas (perched well above the regional groundwater system) during mining and drilling. There was enough overall sustained flow from three of the tunnel complexes (U12n, U12t, and U12e, also known as N-Tunnel, T-Tunnel, and E-Tunnel), that ponds were constructed in drainages below the portals to contain the discharged water. Water flow has now been blocked from N-Tunnel and T-Tunnel, and the ponds there are dry; however, E-Tunnel continues to produce water. The Underground Test Area Sub-Project of the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office is examining the possibility that contaminants from the tunnel complexes may be able to reach the regional groundwater flow system. Because some radiologically contaminated water was conveyed to these ponds, the ponds have been viewed as a potential source of groundwater contamination (in addition to the tunnel complexes themselves but part of the same hydrologic source term). Although the regional water table is very deep (greater than 305 meters [1,000 feet]) beneath the pond locations, some of the ponds were constructed on carbonate rocks, which some scientists think might provide a 'fast path' to the regional groundwater system. This report describes the geology and hydrologic conditions in the area of these three sets of tunnel ponds to aid in determining whether the ponds should be modeled as sources of contaminant migration. Data concerning the locations of the ponds, the volume of effluent discharged, and the concentration of tritium and other radionuclides in the water have been compiled from published and unpublished sources and included also.

  20. Fourteen Years of Pond Monitoring in Boreal Plain, northern Alberta, Canada: The effects of climate variability and harvesting practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abnizova, A.; Devito, K. J.; Petrone, R. M.

    2013-12-01

    Western Boreal forest of Canada is experiencing rapid increase in rates of cumulative impacts of disturbance for resource extraction, climate change and forest fires. To understand their sensitivity and response to multi-decadal natural and anthropogenic disturbances a long-term (1998-2013) and extensive pond ecosystem monitoring has been conducted on the Boreal Plains at the Utikuma Region Study Area (URSA) (56o N, 115o W). Hydrological, chemical and nutrient data were collected along a forest-peatland-pond transect in a paired catchment aspen harvest study in the area underlain by fine-grained till moraines glacial deposits. The aims of this study were (1) to identify the main characteristics in pond hydrologic regime, specifically water level dynamics, both seasonally and between years; (2) to identify factors controlling variation in measured hydro-chemistry and nutrients; and (3) to provide evidence on how water quality conditions in the ponds are changing on long (multi-year to decadal) time scales in response to harvesting practices and climatic trends during wet and dry cycles. No difference in pond or catchment hydrologic and hydro-chemical response was observed between harvested and reference sites pre- or post- harvesting. Wetland and pond waters were not affected by the harvesting practices due to lack of hydrologic connectivity between pond and forest systems. The hydrologic relationship between forestlands and open-water wetlands is a response in their water balance differences driven by their storage characteristics. Temporal trends in ponds' water levels, chemical and nutrient concentrations during the 14 year record were most closely related to relative connectivity to groundwater systems and flow direction in response to climatic cycles and vegetation water use and were the most useful parameters for characterizing duration and type of connectivity during wet and dry cycles. Using empirical relationships from such long-term monitoring, this study

  1. Remote sensing parameterization of the processes of energy and water cycle over desertification areas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA; Yaoming(马耀明); Tsukamoto; Osamu; Ishikawa; Hirohiko

    2002-01-01

    In order to understand the processes of land surface-atmosphere interaction over de-sertification area, it is indispensable to utilize of satellite remote sensing. Two scenes of LandsatTM were used to produce a set of maps of surface reflectance, MSAVI, vegetation coverage, sur-face temperature, net radiation, soil heat flux, sensible heat flux and latent heat flux. Statisticalanalysis based on these maps revealed some quantitative significant land surface characteristics.Future developments of the method are also discussed.

  2. Solution processed large area field effect transistors from dielectrophoreticly aligned arrays of carbon nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Stokes, Paul; Silbar, Eliot; Zayas, Yashira M.; Khondaker, Saiful I.

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate solution processable large area field effect transistors (FETs) from aligned arrays of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Commercially available, surfactant free CNTs suspended in aqueous solution were aligned between source and drain electrodes using ac dielectrophoresis technique. After removing the metallic nanotubes using electrical breakdown, the devices displayed p-type behavior with on-off ratios up to ~ 2X10^4. The measured field effect mobilities are as high as 123 cm2/Vs, which...

  3. MORPHODYNAMICS PROCESSES IN THE LAGOON OF VENICE: THE SCANELLO SALT MARSH AREA

    OpenAIRE

    Bonardi, Maurizio; Cucco, Andrea; Schiozzi, Laura; Tosi, Luigi; Sitran, Raffaella; Scroccaro, Isabella

    2002-01-01

    Geomorpholgical variations have been naturally occurring in the Lagoon of Venice since its formation. In recent times, however, complex morphodynamic changes, caused by natural processes and by the direct or indirect impact of man activities have been recognised. Moreover, there remains a lack of knowledge concerning sediment erosion, re-suspension, transport and sedimentation, sea-lagoon balance and the role played by the hydrodynamics. A detailed study of the Scanello salt marsh area,...

  4. A simple and highly effective process for the preparation of activated carbons with high surface area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → High surface area activated carbon can be prepared by rice husk H3PO4 without pretreatment. → The characteristics of the activated carbon were greatly influenced by post-processing method. → The lower SiO2 content of the activated carbons, the higher pore volume the carbons had. → Some silica in rice husk reacted with H3PO4 to form SiP2O7 which could be removed by post-process. - Abstract: Activated carbons with high surface area were prepared by phosphoric acid as activation agent and rice husks as precursors. It was found that the characteristics of the activated carbons were influenced not only by the preparation but also by the post-processing method. The high surface area of the activated carbons was prepared under the optimum condition (50% H3PO4 with impregnation ratio of 5:1, activation temperature of 500 deg. C, activation time of 0.5 h, wash water temperature of 100 deg. C). SiO2 content could affect the surface area of activated carbons, either. The lower SiO2 content of the activated carbons, the higher pore volume the carbons had. The SiO2 content was 11.2% when used the optimum condition. The explanation was that silicon element in rice husks reacted with H3PO4 to form silicon phosphate (SiP2O7), and it could be proved further by X-ray diffraction analysis, SiP2O7 could be removed by post-process.

  5. A simple and highly effective process for the preparation of activated carbons with high surface area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Ying, E-mail: liyingjlu@163.com [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Ding Xuefeng; Guo Yupeng; Wang Lili; Rong Chunguang; Qu Yuning; Ma Xiaoyu [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Wang Zichen, E-mail: wangzc@jlu.edu.cn [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China)

    2011-06-15

    Highlights: {yields} High surface area activated carbon can be prepared by rice husk H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} without pretreatment. {yields} The characteristics of the activated carbon were greatly influenced by post-processing method. {yields} The lower SiO{sub 2} content of the activated carbons, the higher pore volume the carbons had. {yields} Some silica in rice husk reacted with H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} to form SiP{sub 2}O{sub 7} which could be removed by post-process. - Abstract: Activated carbons with high surface area were prepared by phosphoric acid as activation agent and rice husks as precursors. It was found that the characteristics of the activated carbons were influenced not only by the preparation but also by the post-processing method. The high surface area of the activated carbons was prepared under the optimum condition (50% H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} with impregnation ratio of 5:1, activation temperature of 500 deg. C, activation time of 0.5 h, wash water temperature of 100 deg. C). SiO{sub 2} content could affect the surface area of activated carbons, either. The lower SiO{sub 2} content of the activated carbons, the higher pore volume the carbons had. The SiO{sub 2} content was 11.2% when used the optimum condition. The explanation was that silicon element in rice husks reacted with H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} to form silicon phosphate (SiP{sub 2}O{sub 7}), and it could be proved further by X-ray diffraction analysis, SiP{sub 2}O{sub 7} could be removed by post-process.

  6. Development of shrimp in small ponds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armando Adolfo Ortega Salas

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Development of white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei in small ponds ( 6 m3 in fresh water (2-3‰ and seawater; ponds 3.66 x 1.65 x 1.0 m; availability of fresh water, sea water, aeration and drainage. Two cycles of three months each were made. The postlarvae were acclimated to seawater fresh water in four days. Four hundred postlarvas/m3 were seeded in freshwater pond and 500 in the pool of seawater. First, a culture of Daphnia magna in the freshwater pond, also appeared chyronomid larvae; Artemia cysts were seeded in sea water as a dietary supplement. The shrimp were fed Camaronina (25% protein at libitum, daily; is offered on a tray of food; the temperature ranged between 27 and 30° C, oxygen 4.26 ± 1.43 mg / L , pH between 7 and 8 . Detritus siphoned every third day. Water changes between 10 and 20% are often performed. The feed conversion rate (FCR was 1:1.3 . The shrimp were measured in length and weight to calculate weekly growth by Bertalanffy model. Survival in the first cycle was 95.8 , and 97.9% for the second cycle. In seawater parameters of the population of the first cycle were k = 0.0301, L ∞ = 322.16 and t0 = -0.8852, the second cycle of k = 0.0203, L ∞ = 294.42 and t0 = -5.3771. The biomass of 27 kg was obtained for the first cycle and 16 kg for the second cycle. Freshwater population parameters of the first cycle were k = 0.0957, L ∞ = 146.98 and t0 = - 0.93; in the second cycle of k = 0.0172 , L ∞ = 367.82 and t0 = - 4.60. The biomass of 26 kg was obtained for the first cycle and 16 kg for the second cycle. The results indicate a rapid growth during the first 10 weeks. In small ponds can be handled well aseptic conditions without disease problems, good crop was obtained.

  7. The Ripple Pond: Enabling Spiking Networks to See

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed eAfshar

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We present the biologically inspired Ripple Pond Network (RPN, a simply connected spiking neural network which performs a transformation converting two dimensional images to one dimensional temporal patterns suitable for recognition by temporal coding learning and memory networks. The RPN has been developed as a hardware solution linking previously implemented neuromorphic vision and memory structures such as frameless vision sensors and neuromorphic temporal coding spiking neural networks. Working together such systems are potentially capable of delivering end-to-end high-speed, low-power and low-resolution recognition for mobile and autonomous applications where slow, highly sophisticated and power hungry signal processing solutions are ineffective. Key aspects in the proposed approach include utilising the spatial properties of physically embedded neural networks and propagating waves of activity therein for information processing, using dimensional collapse of imagery information into amenable temporal patterns and the use of asynchronous frames for information binding.

  8. Radiation Protection in the Magnox Ponds Programme, United Kingdom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Magnox ponds programme has a different approach to radiation protection. It is now seen as a key part of the delivery side in a project. It is embedded within the project, working permanently alongside the other members of the team. Typically, more resources have been provided to keep up with the changing conditions. The understanding of problems from a radiation protection standpoint is much greater, meaning solutions can be fully considered. Here are two examples of technologies implemented by radiation protection to help aid delivery: (a) Teledosimetry is used in high radiation environments for tasks such as pond floor cleanup. It uses wireless transmitters and receivers to transmit dose information to a remote computer, where it is monitored constantly. This means workers no longer need constant workface monitoring support. They can also focus on the task in hand and not worry about the dose they are accruing. It also reduces the potential for miscommunication between the work party and those monitoring dosages. A single clear instruction (a siren) is given to the workers when they are approaching their dose limit, indicating for them to leave the area. Using teledosimetry reduces total dosage by 33–50% and improves the efficiency of the workforce. (b) Historically, within Magnox, work in high radiation airborne environments would have been conducted in airline suits, owing to limited company tolerance for potential internal doses to the workforce. This method of working has a number of disadvantages such as increased time and cost and additional conventional safety issues. Work in such areas wearing respirators is much more effective, but has the potential to incur internal dosages. This is unlikely if managed properly. The ponds programme uses a method of derived air concentration hours (DACh) tracking to assess potential internal doses. This effectively assigns a potential dose to each worker based on air sample results from their location and

  9. Perspective of Using the Results of Monitoring and Modeling of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant's Cooling Pond as Analogue for the US DOE Contaminated Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faybishenko, B.; Voitsekhovich, O. V.; Bugay, D.; Skalskjj, A.; Shestopalov, V. M.; Zheleznyak, M.; Kashparov, V. A.; Antropov, A. S.; Kireev, S. I.; Bondarkov, M. D.; Ivanov, Y.; Oskolkov, B.; Marra, J.; Jannik, T.; Farfan, E.; Monken-Fernandes, H.; Hinton, T.; Smith, J.; Onishi, Y.; Konoplev, A.

    2010-12-01

    Although there are many contaminated sites that may be suitable candidates for providing analogue information for the development and testing of environmental modeling and risk assessment approaches, of particular scientific and practical interests is the feasibility study of planned decommissioning and remediation of the highly contaminated Chernobyl Cooling Pond (CP), located within the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone (ChEZ). The presence of the CP has caused an artificially high groundwater table within the ChEZ. After the planned cessation of water pumping from the Pripyat River to the CP, substantial areas of sediments, containing 137Cs, 90Sr, and hot particles with U, Pu, and Am. will be exposed to the atmosphere, and the groundwater level is expected to decline by as much as 7 m. The areal extent of the exposed zone, the dissolution rate, mobility and bioavailability of radionuclides will vary over time, depending on the dynamics of seepage losses from the pond and climatic conditions. The objective of the presentation is to discuss hydrological and geochemical processes, a conceptual model, and the results and perspectives of numerical modeling of coupled surface water-groundwater flow and transport, including the parameter estimation and uncertainty evaluation for various decommissioning and remediation options of the CP. In particular, the results of 1D, 2D, and 3D simulations of radionuclide transport in surface water and groundwater will be discussed, along with the evaluation of Kd parameters from the results of field monitoring and modeling of seasonal variations of 137Cs concentrations in pond water and sediments. It will be shown that the results of field monitoring and modeling of the Chernobyl CP can be used as analogue for several US DOE sites to improve scientific and practical understanding of subsurface hydrological and geochemical processes, as well as to obtain a better understanding of processes affecting natural attenuation of radionuclides in

  10. Mapping cortical areas associated with Chinese word processing using functiona l magnetic resonance imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马林; 唐一源; 王岩; 李德军; 翁旭初; 张武田; 庄建程; 胡小平

    2003-01-01

    Objectives To identify the cortical areas engaged during Chinese word processing using func tional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and to examine the reliability and repr oducibility of fMRI for localization of functional areas in the human brain.Methods FMRI data were collected on 8 young, right-handed, native Chinese speakers duri ng performance of Chinese synonym and homophone judgment tasks on two different clinical MRI systems (1.5 T GE Signa Horizon and 1.5 T Siemens Vision). A cro ss correlation analysis was used to statistically generate the activation map.Results Broca's area, Wernicke's area, bilateral extrastriate, and ventral tempo ral cortex were significantly activated during both the synonym and homophone activities. There was essentially no difference between results acquired on two different MRI systems.Conclusions FMRI can be used for localizing cortical areas critical to Chinese language proc essing in the human brain. The results are reliable and well reproducible acros s different clinical MRI systems.

  11. Soil washing results for mixed waste pond soils at Hanford

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soil washing technology was assessed as a means for remediating soil contaminated with mixed wastes primarily composed of heavy metals and radionuclides. The soils at the US Department of Energy's Hanford Site are considered suitable for soil washing because of their relatively low quantities of silt and clay. However, in a limited number of soil washing experiments using soils from different locations in the north pond of the 300 Area, the degree of decontamination achieved for the coarse fraction of the soil varied considerably. Part of this variation appears to be due to the presence of a discrete layer of contaminated sediment found in some of the samples. 7 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs

  12. Revised ground-water monitoring compliance plan for the 300 area process trenches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schalla, R.; Aaberg, R.L.; Bates, D.J.; Carlile, J.V.M.; Freshley, M.D.; Liikala, T.L.; Mitchell, P.J.; Olsen, K.B.; Rieger, J.T.

    1988-09-01

    This document contains ground-water monitoring plans for process-water disposal trenches located on the Hanford Site. These trenches, designated the 300 Area Process Trenches, have been used since 1973 for disposal of water that contains small quantities of both chemicals and radionuclides. The ground-water monitoring plans contained herein represent revision and expansion of an effort initiated in June 1985. At that time, a facility-specific monitoring program was implemented at the 300 Area Process Trenches as part of a regulatory compliance effort for hazardous chemicals being conducted on the Hanford Site. This monitoring program was based on the ground-water monitoring requirements for interim-status facilities, which are those facilities that do not yet have final permits, but are authorized to continue interim operations while engaged in the permitting process. The applicable monitoring requirements are described in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), 40 CFR 265.90 of the federal regulations, and in WAC 173-303-400 of Washington State's regulations (Washington State Department of Ecology 1986). The program implemented for the process trenches was designed to be an alternate program, which is required instead of the standard detection program when a facility is known or suspected to have contaminated the ground water in the uppermost aquifer. The plans for the program, contained in a document prepared by the US Department of Energy (USDOE) in 1985, called for monthly sampling of 14 of the 37 existing monitoring wells at the 300 Area plus the installation and sampling of 2 new wells. 27 refs., 25 figs., 15 tabs.

  13. Geochemistry of the Upper Parana River floodplain. Study of the Garcas Pond and Patos Pond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to investigate the temporal evolution of the supply of chemical elements to the Upper Parana River floodplain and identify trends in the geochemistry of its drainage basin. The primary factor that regulates the supply of chemical elements of the Upper Parana River floodplain is the flood pulse, which can be magnified by the El Nino-Southern Oscillation. Garcas Pond is affected by agriculture, urbanization, discharge of industrial effluents and hydroelectric power production activities. Patos Pond is affected by sugarcane burning, gold mining, agriculture and urbanization. (author)

  14. Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 100-F-33, 146-F Aquatic Biology Fish Ponds, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2006-021

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L. M. Dittmer

    2006-08-25

    The 100-F-33, 146-F Aquatice Biology Fish Ponds waste site was an area with six small rectangular ponds and one large circular pond used to conduct tests on fish using various mixtures of river and reactor effluent water. The current site conditions achieve the remedial action objectives specified in the Remaining Sites ROD. The results of verification and applicable confirmatory sampling show that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also demonstrate that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

  15. Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 100-F-33, 146-F Aquatic Biology Fish Ponds. Attachment to Waste Site Reclassification Form 2006-021

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 100-F-33, 146-F Aquatice Biology Fish Ponds waste site was an area with six small rectangular ponds and one large circular pond used to conduct tests on fish using various mixtures of river and reactor effluent water. The current site conditions achieve the remedial action objectives specified in the Remaining Sites ROD. The results of verification and applicable confirmatory sampling show that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also demonstrate that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River

  16. Study on Intercepting Method for Nitrogen and Phosphorus in Ecological Ditches and Pond

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAO; Jian-ting; DING; Hong-ming; XU; Jie

    2012-01-01

    [Objective] The research aimed to reduce emission load of the farmland runoff by using ecological ditches and pond. [Method] N and P intercepting project construction of the ecological ditches and pond in Zhaiji Village, Xiangcheng District, Suzhou City as research object, by repairing 1 834 m3 of original drainage ditches, newly excavating 6 800 m2 of ecological main ditches and 6 000 m2 of artificial purification ecological pond, etc., runoff emission load in real control area of the project was counted. [Result] Annual net loads of the runoff emission for TN and TP were respectively 2 552.22 and 95.00 kg in 33.3 hm2 of farmland. Annual runoff intercepting loads of TN and TP were respectively 1 225.07 and 50.35 kg in ditches. Annual runoff intercepting loads of TN and TP were respectively 1 327.15 and 44.65 kg in ecological pond. In effluent, TN concentration was 6.32 mg/L and was smaller than 15 mg/L. TP concentration was 0.25 mg/L and was smaller than 0.5 mg/L. They both reached level-one A discharge standard. [Conclusion] The research provided theoretical basis for effective control of the agricultural non-point source pollution in Taihu Lake basin.

  17. Evidence for ponding and catastrophic floods in central Valles Marineris, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, K.P.; Chapman, M.G.

    2008-01-01

    The Valles Marineris canyon system of Mars is closely related to large flood channels, some of which emerge full born from chaotic terrain in canyon floors. Coprates Chasma, one of the largest Valles Marineris canyons, is connected at its west end to Melas Chasma and on its east end to chaotic terrain-filled Capri and Eos Chasmata. The area from central Melas to Eos Chasmata contains a 1500 km long and about 1 km deep depression in its floor. Despite the large volumes of groundwater that likely discharged from chaotic terrain in this depression, no evidence of related fluvial activity has thus far been reported. We present an analysis of the regional topography which, together with photogeologic interpretation of available imagery, suggests that ponding due to late Hesperian discharge of water possibly produced a lake (mean depth 842 m) spanning parts of the Valles Marineris depression (VMD). Overflow of this lake at its eastern end resulted in delivery of water to downstream chaos regions and outflow channels. Our ponding hypothesis is motivated primarily by the identification of scarp and terrace features which, despite a lateral spread of about 1500 km, have similar elevations. Furthermore, these elevations correspond to the maximum ponding elevation of the region (-3560 m). Simulated ponding in the VMD yields an overflow point at its eastern extremity, in Eos Chasma. The neighborhood of this overflow point contains clear indicators of fluvial erosion in a consistent east-west orientation. ?? 2008 Elsevier Inc.

  18. Geochemistry and toxicity of sediment porewater in a salt-impacted urban stormwater detention pond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A comprehensive study was carried out to investigate the impacts of road salts on the benthic compartment of a small urban detention facility, Rouge River Pond. Although the pond is an engineered water body, it is representative of many small urban lakes, ponds and wetlands, which receive road runoff and are probable high impact areas. Specific objectives of the study were to document the porewater chemistry of an aquatic system affected by elevated salt concentrations and to carry out a toxicological assessment of sediment porewater to determine what factors may cause porewater toxicity. The results indicate that the sediment porewater may itself attain high salt concentrations. The computations show that increased chloride levels have important implications on the Cd complexation, augmenting its concentration in porewater. The toxicity tests suggest that the toxicity in porewater is caused by metals or other toxic chemicals, rather than high levels of chloride. - Effects of chlorides on metal chemistry and toxicity of sediment porewater in a stormwater detention pond impacted by road salts

  19. Association of amphibians with attenuation of ultraviolet-b radiation in montane ponds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, M.J.; Schindler, D.E.; Bury, B.R.

    2001-01-01

    Ambient ultraviolet-b (UV-B) radiation (280-320 nm) has increased at north-temperate latitudes in the last two decades. UV-B can be detrimental to amphibians, and amphibians have shown declines in some areas during this same period. We documented the distribution of amphibians and salmonids in 42 remote, subalpine and alpine ponds in Olympic National Park, Washington, United States. We inferred relative exposure of amphibian habitats to UV-B by estimating the transmission of 305- and 320-nm radiation in pond water. We found breeding Ambystoma gracile, A. macrodactylum and Rana cascadae at 33%, 31%, and 45% of the study sites, respectively. Most R. cascadae bred in fishless shallow ponds with relatively low transmission of UV-B. The relationship with UV-B exposure remained marginally significant even after the presence of fish was included in the model. At 50 cm water depth, there was a 55% reduction in incident 305-nm radiation at sites where breeding populations of R. cascadae were detected compared to other sites. We did not detect associations between UV-B transmission and A. gracile or A. macrodactylum. Our field surveys do not provide evidence for decline of R. cascadae in Olympic National Park as has been documented in Northern California, but are consistent with the hypothesis that the spatial distribution of R. cascadae breeding sites is influenced by exposure to UV-B. Substrate or pond depth could also be related to the distribution of R. cascadae in Olympic National Park.

  20. Food availability determines the response to pond desiccation in anuran tadpoles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enriquez-Urzelai, Urtzi; San Sebastián, Olatz; Garriga, Núria; Llorente, Gustavo A

    2013-09-01

    Food availability and pond desiccation are two of the most studied factors that condition amphibian metamorphosis. It is well known that, when food is abundant, organisms undergo metamorphosis early and when they are relatively large. The capability of anurans to accelerate their developmental rate in response to desiccation is also common knowledge. These two variables must act together in nature, since we know that, as a pond dries, the per capita resources decrease. We conduct an experiment to evaluate the effects of desiccation and food availability separately and in combination in tadpoles of the painted frog (Discoglossus pictus). We demonstrate that food deprivation leads to slow growth rates, which delay metamorphosis and produce smaller size and weight. The capability to accelerate metamorphosis when facing a drying pond is also confirmed, but, nevertheless, with factor interaction (when the pool is drying and resources are scarce) the capacity to respond to desiccation is lost. In addition, slow drying rates are shown to be stressful situations, but not enough to provoke a shortening of the larval period; in fact, the larval period becomes longer. We also demonstrate that the interaction of these factors changes the allometric relationship of different parts of the hind limb, which has implications for the biomechanics of jumping. Due to low mortality rates and an adequate response to both environmental factors, we expect D. pictus to have a great invasive potential in its new Mediterranean distribution area, where lots of temporary and ephemeral ponds are present. PMID:23344427

  1. Transition in the fractal geometry of Arctic melt ponds

    OpenAIRE

    C. Hohenegger; B. Alali; Steffen, K. R.; D. K. Perovich; Golden, K. M.

    2012-01-01

    During the Arctic melt season, the sea ice surface undergoes a remarkable transformation from vast expanses of snow covered ice to complex mosaics of ice and melt ponds. Sea ice albedo, a key parameter in climate modeling, is determined by the complex evolution of melt pond configurations. In fact, ice–albedo feedback has played a major role in the recent declines of the summer Arctic sea ice pack. However, understanding melt pond evolution remains a significant challenge to improving climate...

  2. Transition in the fractal geometry of Arctic melt ponds

    OpenAIRE

    C. Hohenegger; B. Alali; Steffen, K. R.; D. K. Perovich; Golden, K. M.

    2012-01-01

    During the Arctic melt season, the sea ice surface undergoes a remarkable transformation from vast expanses of snow covered ice to complex mosaics of ice and melt ponds. Sea ice albedo, a key parameter in climate modeling, is determined by the complex evolution of melt pond configurations. In fact, ice-albedo feedback has played a major role in the recent declines of the summer Arctic sea ice pack. However, understanding melt pond evolution remains a significant challenge to improving climate...

  3. Research Notes ~ Selecting Research Areas and Research Design Approaches in Distance Education: Process Issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudarshan Mishra

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to study the process used for selecting research areas and methodological approaches in distance education in India. Experts from the field of distance education in India were interviewed at length, with the aim of collecting qualitative data on opinions on process-issues for selecting areas for research, research design, and appropriate methodological approaches in distance education. Data collected from these interviews were subjected to content analysis; triangulation and peer consultation techniques were used for cross-checking and data verification. While the findings and recommendations of this study have limited application in that they can only be used in the specific context outlined in this paper, respondents in this study nonetheless revealed the pressing need for more process-oriented research in examining media and technology, learners and learning, and distance learning evaluation processes. Our research, which yielded interesting empirical findings, also determined that a mixed approach – one that involves both quantitative and qualitative methods – is more appropriate for conducting research in distance education in India. Qualitative evidence from our research also indicates that respondents interviewed felt that emphasis should be placed on interdisciplinary and systemic research, over that of traditional disciplinary research. Research methods such as student self-reporting, extensive and highly targeted interviews, conversation and discourse analysis, were determined to as useful for data collection for this study.

  4. Chemico-physical processes influencing acidic precipitation: the case study of Milan urban area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maffeis, G. [Environmental adviser, Verdello, Bergamo (Italy); Tamponi, M. [National Health Service IV U.O. PMIP, USL 7, Lecco (Italy); Tebaldi, G. [National Health Service IV U.O. PMIP, USL 38, Milan (Italy)

    1996-07-01

    The aim of the model presented in this work is to describe the acidic contents of cloud droplets` temporal evolution, both during their formation process and the following stage of precipitation. The attention is mainly focused on precipitation in which the contribution of local polluted air masses, typical of big urban areas, is predominant. Some phenomena are particularly taken into consideration: the exchange processes of those pollutants mostly influencing the pH, from the gas to the liquid phase; the process of sulphur oxidation in the liquid phase and finally the phenomenon of inclusion of the atmospheric particulate through interception processes. The model has been useful in the analysis of experimental data about the precipitations in Milan urban area from the January 1st 1991 to June 30th 1992. For instance, it has been possible to explain both a rapid decrease of pH, happening with strong convective instability, and the significant washout of basic particulate, taking place during the first minutes in most of the events. The sensitivity analysis has also shown that pH depends on ammonia concentration and on temperature in a significant way.

  5. Tanks Focus Area Alternative Salt Processing Research and Development Program Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harmon, Harry D.

    2000-05-15

    In March 2000, DOE-Headquarters (HQ) requested the Tanks Focus Area (TFA)to assume management responsibility for the Salt Processing Project technology development program at Savannah River Site. The TFA was requested to conduct several activities, including review and revision of the technology development roadmaps, development of down-selection criteria, and preparation of a comprehensive Research and Development (R&D) Program Plan for three candidate cesium removal technologies, as well as the Alpha and strontium removal processes that must also be carried out. The three cesium removal candidate technologies are Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST) Non-Elutable Ion Exchange, Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX), and Small Tank Tetraphenylborate Precipitation (STTP). This plan describes the technology development needs for each process that must be satisfied in order to reach a down-selection decision, as well as continuing technology development required to support conceptual design activities.

  6. Tanks Focus Area Alternative Salt Processing Research and Development Program Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harmon, Harry D.

    2000-11-30

    In March 2000, DOE-Headquarters (HQ) requested the Tanks Focus Area (TFA) to assume management responsibility for the Salt Processing Project technology development program at Savannah River Site. The TFA was requested to conduct several activities, including review and revision of the technology development roadmaps, development of down-selection criteria, and preparation of a comprehensive Research and Development (R&D) Program Plan for three candidate cesium removal technologies, as well as the Alpha and strontium removal processes that must also be carried out. The three cesium removal candidate technologies are Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST) Non-Elutable Ion Exchange, Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX), and Small Tank Tetraphenylborate Precipitation (STTP). This plan describes the technology development needs for each process that must be satisfied in order to reach a down-selection decision, as well as continuing technology development required to support conceptual design activities.

  7. Problems in the educational process during the pediatric surgery area teaching of fourth year medicine students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Luis González López

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Very typical situations of the Pediatric Surgery Services in the Pediatric Hospital of Cienfuegos may interfere with the appropriate development of the educational process. Consequently, students might not master the principles of medical practice in the most common surgical diseases in children, thus limiting its further application in their professional performances as basic general practitioners. To obtain more accurate information on the causes of this phenomenon is considered to be paramount in order to search for practical solutions to improve the educational process and to fulfil the goals of the teaching stage. The contents on the following information sources are analyzed in this paper: documents for higher education and for medicine career, publications and papers presented in scientific events (directly or indirectly related to the practice of Pediatric Surgery and hospital statistics. This review was aimed at analyzing the situations that negatively affect the educational process during the pediatric surgery area teaching of fourth year medicine students.

  8. Study on technique for integrated heating of a solar pond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao Jinlong [Ke Yuan New Energy Tech. Development Co. Ltd., Weifang, SD (China); Lu Xiaoyan [English Dept. of Weifang Medical Univ., SD (China)

    2008-07-01

    The first example in China of an integrated heating system using a solar pond was constructed on the banks of Laizhou Bay of Weifang city, in Shandong province. Adopting heating systems for seawater solar ponds, shallow-styled solar ponds and conservatory-model solar ponds, the system solves the problem of how to overwinter warm seawater fish. The method of heating in the course of nursing young aquatic products provides a new technique for protected aquaculture using solar energy. This essay introduces the technical parameters and development of the system and analyzes the validity of the technique and its prospects for application. Several shortcomings are also discussed. (orig.)

  9. Investigation of turbidity effect on exergetic performance of solar ponds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A comprehensive experimental work on a turbidity of the solar pond. • Percentage transmission evaluation of the turbid and clean salty water of the zones. • Exergy analysis of the inner zones for turbid and clean salty water. • Turbidity effect on exergy efficiencies of the solar pond. • The thermal performance assessment by comparing the exergetic efficiencies of the solar pond. - Abstract: The present paper undertakes a study on the exergetic performance assessment of a solar pond and experimental investigation of turbidity effect on the system performance. There are various types of solar energy applications including solar ponds. One of significant parameters to consider in the assessment of solar pond performance is turbidity which is caused by dirty over time (e.g., insects, leaf, dust and wind bringing parts fall down). Thus, the turbidity in the salty water decreases solar energy transmission through the zones. In this study, the samples are taken from the three zones of the solar pond and analyzed using a spectrometer for three months. The transmission aspects of the solar pond are investigated under calm and turbidity currents to help distinguish the efficiencies. Furthermore, the maximum exergy efficiencies are found to be 28.40% for the calm case and 22.27% with turbidity effects for the month of August, respectively. As a result, it is confirmed that the solar pond performance is greatly affected by the turbidity effect

  10. Capacidade da lagoa de estabilização, integrante de um sistema piloto, na remoção da carga orgânica da água residuária do processamento do café por via úmida Capability of a stabilization pond, part of a pilot system, of removing the organic load of wet coffee processing wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Júlia Ferreira da Silva

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available O processamento do café por via úmida, além de aumentar a eficiência para se obter cafés de melhor qualidade, diminui consideravelmente os custos de secagem e ainda, reduz o espaço ocupado no terreiro. Porém, esse tipo de processamento gera grandes quantidades de águas residuárias, que devem sofrer algum tipo de tratamento antes de serem lançadas em corpos hídricos. Nesta pesquisa, objetivou-se monitorar a Lagoa de Estabilização integrante desse sistema, avaliar a sua eficiência na remoção da carga orgânica afluente e desenvolver um modelo de ajuste para descrever a autodepuração ocorrida. Para esta pesquisa, foram considerados 300,200 litros de frutos do cafeeiro, da espécie Coffea arabica L., processados, por via úmida. A carga média diária foi de 136 kgDQO d-1, encaminhada para um sistema piloto de tratamento de água residuária do processamento do café. O monitoramento foi realizado por meio de análises químicas e físico-químicas e o modelo de ajuste foi desenvolvido a partir do cálculo do balanço hídrico, das equações de estimativa teórica de remoção de DQO e das análises de DQO realizadas. O efluente da lagoa de estabilização apresentou concentração inicial de DQO de 7,100 mg L-1 e final de 100 mg L-1. Ficou constatado que a lagoa foi a unidade de tratamento que reduziu em cerca de 80% a concentração de matéria orgânica afluente. O modelo de ajuste desenvolvido apresentou coeficiente de ajuste satisfatório (r² = 0,8015.Wet coffee processing, besides its efficiency in getting better coffee quality, also minimizes considerably drying costs, and moreover reduces the space due to the ground-flour spreading seeds. However, this type of processing produces large quantities of wastewater, which must be treated before being discharged into the sewage system. The main objective of this research was to monitor the stabilization pond, as part of a pilot system, and therefore, to evaluate its efficiency

  11. Sea ice melt pond fraction estimation from dual-polarisation C-band SAR – Part 2: Scaling in situ to Radarsat-2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. K. Scharien

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Observed changes in the Arctic have motivated efforts to understand and model its components as an integrated and adaptive system at increasingly finer scales. Sea ice melt pond fraction, an important summer sea ice component affecting surface albedo and light transmittance across the ocean-sea ice–atmosphere interface, is inadequately parameterized in models due to a lack of large scale observations. In this paper, results from a multi-scale remote sensing program dedicated to the retrieval of pond fraction from satellite C-band synthetic aperture radar (SAR are detailed. The study was conducted on first-year sea (FY ice in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago during the summer melt period in June 2012. Approaches to retrieve the subscale FY ice pond fraction from mixed pixels in RADARSAT-2 imagery, using in situ, surface scattering theory, and image data are assessed. Each algorithm exploits the dominant effect of high dielectric free-water ponds on the VV/HH polarisation ratio (PR at moderate to high incidence angles (about 40° and above. Algorithms are applied to four images corresponding to discrete stages of the seasonal pond evolutionary cycle, and model performance is assessed using coincident pond fraction measurements from partitioned aerial photos. A RMSE of 0.07, across a pond fraction range of 0.10 to 0.70, is achieved during intermediate and late seasonal stages. Weak model performance is attributed to wet snow (pond formation and synoptically driven pond freezing events (all stages, though PR has utility for identification of these events when considered in time series context. Results demonstrate the potential of wide-swath, dual-polarisation, SAR for large-scale observations of pond fraction with temporal frequency suitable for process-scale studies and improvements to model parameterizations.

  12. Magnetic properties of marine magnetotactic bacteria in a seasonally stratified coastal pond (Salt Pond, MA, USA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskowitz, Bruce M.; Bazylinski, Dennis A.; Egli, Ramon; Frankel, Richard B.; Edwards, Katrina J.

    2008-07-01

    Magnetic properties of suspended material in the water columns of freshwater and marine environments provide snapshots of magnetic biomineralization that have yet to be affected by the eventual time-integration and early diagenetic effects that occur after sediment deposition. Here, we report on the magnetism, geochemistry and geobiology of uncultured magnetite- and greigite-producing magnetotactic bacteria (MB) and magnetically responsive protists (MRP) in Salt Pond (Falmouth, MA, USA), a small coastal, marine basin (~5 m deep) that becomes chemically stratified during the summer months. At this time, strong inverse O2 and H2S concentration gradients form in the water column and a well-defined oxic-anoxic interface (OAI) is established at a water depth of about 3.5 m. At least four morphological types of MB, both magnetite and greigite producers, and several species of magnetically responsive protists are found associated with the OAI and the lower sulphidic hypolimnion. Magnetic properties of filtered water were determined through the water column across the OAI and were consistent with the occurrence of magnetite- and greigite-producing MB at different depths. Sharp peaks in anhysteretic remanent magnetization (ARM) and saturation isothermal remanent magnetization (SIRM) and single-domain (SD) values of ARM/SIRM occur within the OAI corresponding to high concentrations of MB and MRP with magnetically derived cell densities of 104-106 ml-1. Low-temperature (II) in the water column. However, below the OAI, magnetic minerals constitute a much larger fraction of the total dissolved Fe(II) ranging from 13.6 to 32.2 per cent depending on magnetic mineralogy. Most of this iron is possibly in the form of nanophase magnetic particles, possibly associated with biologically induced mineralization processes occurring below the OAI. Still, the OAI is a narrow but intense zone of SD particle production. Despite using just a small fraction of available dissolved Fe(II) in the

  13. A multistep process for the dispersal of a Y chromosomal lineage in the Mediterranean area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaspina, P; Tsopanomichalou, M; Duman, T; Stefan, M; Silvestri, A; Rinaldi, B; Garcia, O; Giparaki, M; Plata, E; Kozlov, A I; Barbujani, G; Vernesi, C; Papola, F; Ciavarella, G; Kovatchev, D; Kerimova, M G; Anagnou, N; Gavrila, L; Veneziano, L; Akar, N; Loutradis, A; Michalodimitrakis, E N; Terrenato, L; Novelletto, A

    2001-07-01

    In this work we focus on a microsatellite-defined Y-chromosomal lineage (network 1.2) identified by us and reported in previous studies, whose geographic distribution and antiquity appear to be compatible with the Neolithic spread of farmers. Here, we set network 1.2 in the Y-chromosomal phylogenetic tree, date it with respect to other lineages associated with the same movements by other authors, examine its diversity by means of tri- and tetranucleotide loci and discuss the implications in reconstructing the spread of this group of chromosomes in the Mediterranean area. Our results define a tripartite phylogeny within HG 9 (Rosser et al. 2000), with the deepest branching defined by alleles T (Haplogroup Eu10) or G (Haplogroup Eu9) at M172 (Semino et al. 2000), and a subsequent branching within Eu9 defined by network 1.2. Population distributions of HG 9 and network 1.2 show that their occurrence in the surveyed area is not due to the spread of people from a single parental population but, rather, to a process punctuated by at least two phases. Our data identify the wide area of the Balkans, Aegean and Anatolia as the possible homeland harbouring the largest variation within network 1.2. The use of recently proposed tests based on the stepwise mutation model suggests that its spread was associated to a population expansion, with a high rate of male gene flow in the Turkish-Greek area. PMID:11592923

  14. Fabrication of large area silicon solar cells by rapid thermal processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivoththaman, S.; Laureys, W.; Nijs, J.; Mertens, R.

    1995-10-01

    Large area n+pp+ solar cells have been fabricated on 10 cm×10 cm pseudo-quasi-square CZ silicon wafers (1 Ω cm, p-type) predominantly used by the photovoltaic (PV) industry. All the high-temperature steps have been performed by rapid thermal processing (RTP). Emitter formation, back surface field (BSF) formation, and surface oxidation have been performed in just two RTP steps each lasting 50 s. Solar cells of 15% efficiency have been fabricated this way, demonstrating the applicability of this low thermal budget technology to large area, modulable size, industrial quality Si wafers. Furthermore, the rapid thermal oxidation (RTO) is shown to result in good quality thin oxides with Si/SiO2 interface trap densities (Dit)<1011 cm-3 eV-1 near-midgap.

  15. Results of the NNWSI area-to-location phase of the repository siting process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A comprehensive system study has been completed to screen the Nevada Research and Development Area of the Nevada Test Site and nearby areas for relatively favorable locations for the permanent disposal of radioactive waste in a mined repository. The effort to develop a formal screening process was initiated in 1979 and brought to fruition in 1981 using a data base that had been developed in the interim. Fifteen locations were identified based on groupings of similarly rated grid cells. These locations were ranked according to the sum of weights associated with individual analyses. Of the 15 locations, northern Yucca Mountain ranks highest, primarily due to favorable ratings for long-term safety, containment, isolation, avoidance of disruptive events, tectonic attributes, human disturbance attributes, and the presence of Calico Hills Tuff and Topopah Spring Tuff. Two other locations, northeastern Jackass Flats and Calico Hills-Upper Topapah Wash, also rate generally high. 6 figures, 6 tables

  16. NASA Space Technology Draft Roadmap Area 13: Ground and Launch Systems Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clements, Greg

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the technology development roadmap for the area of ground and launch systems processing. The scope of this technology area includes: (1) Assembly, integration, and processing of the launch vehicle, spacecraft, and payload hardware (2) Supply chain management (3) Transportation of hardware to the launch site (4) Transportation to and operations at the launch pad (5) Launch processing infrastructure and its ability to support future operations (6) Range, personnel, and facility safety capabilities (7) Launch and landing weather (8) Environmental impact mitigations for ground and launch operations (9) Launch control center operations and infrastructure (10) Mission integration and planning (11) Mission training for both ground and flight crew personnel (12) Mission control center operations and infrastructure (13) Telemetry and command processing and archiving (14) Recovery operations for flight crews, flight hardware, and returned samples. This technology roadmap also identifies ground, launch and mission technologies that will: (1) Dramatically transform future space operations, with significant improvement in life-cycle costs (2) Improve the quality of life on earth, while exploring in co-existence with the environment (3) Increase reliability and mission availability using low/zero maintenance materials and systems, comprehensive capabilities to ascertain and forecast system health/configuration, data integration, and the use of advanced/expert software systems (4) Enhance methods to assess safety and mission risk posture, which would allow for timely and better decision making. Several key technologies are identified, with a couple of slides devoted to one of these technologies (i.e., corrosion detection and prevention). Development of these technologies can enhance life on earth and have a major impact on how we can access space, eventually making routine commercial space access and improve building and manufacturing, and weather

  17. Comparison between field data and ultimate heat-sink cooling-pond and spray-pond models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two previously published reports, NUREG-0693 and NUREG-0733, presented models and methods by which ultimate heat sink cooling ponds and spray ponds used for safety-related water supplies in nuclear power plants could be analyzed for design-basis conditions of heat load and meteorology. These models were only partially verified with field data. The present report compares the NRC models to data collected for NRC by Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratories on the performance of small geothermally heated ponds and spray ponds. These comparisons generally support the conclusion that the NRC models are useful tools in predicting ultimate heat sink performance

  18. Application of polymeric flocculant for enhancing settling of the pond ash particles and water drainage from hydraulically stowed pond ash

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mishra Devi Prasad; Das Samir Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Delayed settling of the ash particles and poor drainage of water from the pond ash are the major problems faced during the hydraulic stowing of pond ash.In this study the effect of polymeric flocculant on settling of the ash particles and drainage of water during pond ash stowing are investigated.In addition,the parameters,viz.drainage and absorption of water during pond ash stowing are quantified by stowing a mine goaf model with pond ash slurries of five different concentrations added with and without flocculant.The study revealed that addition of only 5 × 10-6 of Sodium Carboxymethyl Cellulose (Na-CMC)flocculant with the pond ash slurries during stowing offers best result in terms of quicker settling of the ash particles and enhanced water drainage from the hydraulically stowed pond ash.Besides,it resulted in drainage of more than 85% of the total water used in the initial 45 min of stowing.The improvement in drainage is caused due to coagulation and flocculation of the pond ash particles because of charge neutralization and particle-particle bridging.This study may provide a basis for estimating the drainage and absorption of water during the real pond ash stowing operation in underground mines.

  19. International experience in tailings pond remediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tailings pond remediation is required primarily on mine closure. While mining is an ancient industry, requirement for mine facility remediation is a comparatively new development. Requirement for remediation has come about partly as a result of mans awareness of the environmental impacts of mining and his desire to minimize this, partly, as a result of the ever-increasing scale and production rates of tailings generation and the resulting increased environmental impacts and safety risks. The paper starts with a review of the evolution of mans intolerance of environmental impacts from tailings production and the assignment of liability to remediate such impacts. Many of the tailings ponds currently undergoing remediation were designed and constructed using methods and technology that would be considered inappropriate for new impoundments being designed and developed today. The paper reviews the history of tailings impoundment design and construction practice and the resulting inherent deficiencies that must be remediated. Current practices and future trends in tailings pond remediation are reviewed. The evolution of regulatory requirements is not only in terms of technical and safety criteria, but also in terms of financial and political risk. Perhaps the most substantive driver of risk management is today the requirement for corporate governance at mining company board level and oversight of new project development in the underdeveloped countries by the large financial institutions responsible for funding projects. Embarrassment in the public eye and punishment in the stock markets for poor environmental and safety performance is driving the need for efficient and effective risk management of potential impacts and the remediation to avoid these. A basis for practical risk management is described. (orig.)

  20. Oxygen and nitrogen dynamics in split ponds vs. conventional catfish production ponds

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Split Pond aquaculture system (SP) has captured the attention of catfish producers across the southern U.S. The SP represents a lower cost adaptation of Clemson University’s Partitioned Aquaculture System (PAS). The original PAS design relied on slowly rotating paddlewheels to move water throu...

  1. Comparison of phytoplankton communities in catfish split-pond aquaculture systems with conventional ponds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    There has been a growing interest and use of variations of partitioned aquaculture systems (PAS) in recent years by the southeastern United States of America farmed catfish industry. Split-pond systems, one type of PAS, are designed to better manage fish waste byproducts (e.g., ammonia) and dissolv...

  2. Evaluation of remedial alternatives for the Solar Ponds Plume, Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the process used to select a remedial alternative for handling contaminated groundwater emanating from the Solar Evaporation Ponds (Solar Ponds) at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) and prevent it from reaching the nearest surface water body, North Walnut Creek. Preliminary results of field investigations conducted to provide additional information for the alternatives analysis are also presented. The contaminated groundwater is referred to as the Solar Ponds Plume (SPP). The primary contaminants in the SPP are nitrate and uranium; however, some metals exceed the site action levels at several locations and volatile organic compounds, originating from other sources, also have been detected. Currently the SPP, local surface water runoff, and infiltrated precipitation are collected by a trench system located downgradient of the Solar Ponds and pumped to three storage tanks. The water (two to three million gallons annually) is then pumped to an on-site treatment plant for evaporation at an approximate cost of $7.57 per liter

  3. Remediation of the low level radioactive waste tailings pond in Kowary (Poland)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper presents in a condensed form the characteristics of the tailings pond in Kowary (Poland), the plan for remediation, as well as the most essential elements of the remediation technology applied. Post-remediation investigations indicated that the remediation results are consistent with planned indicators. The pond was eliminated from the surface of the land, dams were stabilized, the radiation was reduced to background level, i.e. <300 nSv/h, the surface and groundwaters from the area of the settling tank were drained and taken outside for later treatment in the existing water treatment system. The entire area was cleaned up and - due to vegetation development - blended into the landscape. (author)

  4. Studies Regarding Tailings Pond Seepage Water from Mining Activities over Avena sativa L. Germination Influence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen BEINSAN

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Cultivation of oat in the limiting areas of tailings pond might be regarded as one of the possibilities that could lead to the general amelioration of these places. In order to characterize the waste products, to determine and evaluate the components that may be leached from waste products and that can affect the limiting areas of tailings pond, leaching tests were performed. In this paper, we have observed the influence of eluate, obtained from leaching tests, on seed germination, radicle and coleoptyle development as well as on the amount of accumulated dry matter for Avena sativa L., genotypes. According to our researches, we may conclude that the studied genotypes of Avena sativa L. showed tolerance to eluate while values registered for seed germination, radicle and coleoptyle development as well as dry matter content were comparatively higher than those registered for the control variant.

  5. 30 CFR 817.56 - Postmining rehabilitation of sedimentation ponds, diversions, impoundments, and treatment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... ponds, diversions, impoundments, and treatment facilities. 817.56 Section 817.56 Mineral Resources... Postmining rehabilitation of sedimentation ponds, diversions, impoundments, and treatment facilities. Before... removed and reclaimed, and that all permanent sedimentation ponds, diversions, impoundments, and...

  6. 30 CFR 816.56 - Postmining rehabilitation of sedimentation ponds, diversions, impoundments, and treatment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... ponds, diversions, impoundments, and treatment facilities. 816.56 Section 816.56 Mineral Resources... rehabilitation of sedimentation ponds, diversions, impoundments, and treatment facilities. Before abandoning a... and reclaimed, and that all permanent sedimentation ponds, diversions, impoundments, and...

  7. Screening-level ecological and human health risk assessment of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in stormwater detention pond sediments of Coastal South Carolina, USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Screening-level ecological and human health assessments were performed for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) contamination in the sediments of 19 stormwater detention ponds located in coastal South Carolina. For ecological screening benchmarks, we used threshold and probable effect concentrations (TEC and PEC) derived from consensus-based sediment quality guidelines for individual PAH analytes and equilibrium partitioning sediment benchmarks-toxic units (ΣESB-TU) derived for PAH mixtures. For human health benchmarks, we used preliminary remediation goals (PRGs). Sediments of five stormwater ponds (four commercial ponds and one residential pond with a large drainage area) exceeded PEC values for several PAH analytes and the ΣESB-TU safe value of 1 for PAH mixtures. These same five stormwater ponds also exceeded the PRG values for five carcinogenic PAH analytes. These results suggest that the PAH levels in sediments from certain commercial and residential ponds have the potential to pose moderate to high risks for adverse, chronic effects to benthic organisms in situ and an increased risk of cancer to humans ex situ following excavation and on-site disposal. We recommend that sediment from these stormwater ponds be tested prior to excavation to determine the appropriate method of disposal. We also recommend that regulatory agencies enforce guidelines for periodic sediment removal as this should reduce both in situ and ex situ risks resulting from sediment PAH exposure.

  8. Genetic processes and environmental significance of Lower Devonian brachiopod shell concentrations in Longmenshan area, Sichuan, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fengjie; Qu, Xuelin; Du, Lingchun; Dai, Tingyong; Yang, Yuchuan; Li, Junwu; Yang, Chengjin

    2016-01-01

    The distinctive features of the Lower Devonian rocks of the Longmenshan area in southwestern China are brachiopod shell concentrations, especially in the Bailiuping, Ganxi and Xiejiawan Formations, where brachiopod shell concentrations occur widely throughout. Depending on the dominant skeletal elements, six types of shell concentrations can be distinguished: Protochonete, Acrospirifer, Howellella, Orientospirifer, polyspecific shell and polyspecific fragments concentrations. According to the shell features, taphonomic signature, host sediments and their relationships, four genetic models of the various shell concentrations are described in this paper. The genetic processes and distributions along an onshore-offshore area were clarified on the base of taphonomic analysis. Pavements of opportunistic species of Protochonetes are autochthonous assemblages living in quieter, deeper, more offshore waters near the maximum storm wave base. The pavements are the result of reduced sedimentation; the substrate was silty and water-saturated with variable turbidity soupy-mud. Transport by high-energy processes is interpreted as the final formation process of polyspecific fragments concentrations with most extensive scope from intertidal zone to the maximum storm wave base. The Acrospirifer, Howellella, and Orientospirifer concentrations have been stirred by storm wave action and quickly buried after short transport tempestite model. They are most easily preserved around the average storm wave-base. The polyspecific shell concentrations, which include large bivalves are autochthonous assemblages living in shallow and relatively quieter water near shore environments. Autochthonous assemblages of the opportunist Protochonetes bailiupingensis occurring in the Bailiuping Formation of the Longmenshan area not only record of storm events, but are also important features to identify and correlate the Bailiuping Formation in the field.

  9. Phyllosphere mycobiota on garden ponds plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Kowalik

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Investigations were conducted on calamus, common cattail, soft rush, yellow iris and white water lily plants in twenty ponds in Malopolska and Podkarpacie Regions. Mycobiota existing in the phyllosphere caused discolouring and necroses of leaves and shoots. 88 species of mycobiota were identified and isolated from the diseased tissues. Dominant were Alternaria alternata, Epicoccum nigrum and Isaria farinosa. Fungi of genera: Aspergillus, Botrytis, Chaetomium, Cladosporium, Fusarium, Ilyonectria, Mortierella, Mucor, Penicillium, Phialophora, Phoma, Pleustomophora, Sordaria, Trichoderma and Umbelopsis were also numerous. The monophagous and the polyphagous were identified.

  10. Commercial pond fish culture using waste water

    OpenAIRE

    Okoye, F.C.; Ita, E.O.; Adeniji, H.A.

    1987-01-01

    Waste water from some National Electric Power Authority (NEPA) housing units in Nigeria was fed to a 0.4 ha pond which was stocked with 2,200 Sarotherodon galilaeus fingerlings with a mean weight of about 36.0gm and 1000 Cyprinus carpio fingerlings with a mean weight of 10gm. This yielded after 10 months, over 2300 kg of harvestable fish plus over 20,000 Sarotherodon galilaeus fingerlings. The growth rate of C. carpio was not very encouraging possibly because of the type of plankton that colo...

  11. Ecological risk assessment of urban stormwater ponds: Literature review and proposal of a new conceptual approach providing ecological quality goals and the associated bioassessment tools

    OpenAIRE

    Tixier, G.; Lafont, M.; Grapentine, L.; Rochfort, Q.; Marsalek, J.

    2011-01-01

    Stormwater ponds are a common feature of the urban landscape in many countries with advanced stormwater management. Built to control the impacts of urbanization in the form of increased runoff flows, volumes and pollution loads, stormwater ponds are exposed to strong anthropogenic pressures. Meanwhile, as open water systems, they represent new aquatic habitats potentially enhancing the biodiversity of urban areas and balancing the transformation of original ecosystems existing prior to urbani...

  12. Object-based Image Classification of Arctic Sea Ice and Melt Ponds through Aerial Photos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, X.; Xie, H.; Li, Z.; Lei, R.

    2013-12-01

    The last six years have marked the lowest Arctic summer sea ice extents in the modern era, with a new record summer minimum (3.4 million km2) set on 13 September 2012. It has been predicted that the Arctic could be free of summer ice within the next 25-30. The loss of Arctic summer ice could have serious consequences, such as higher water temperature due to the positive feedback of albedo, more powerful and frequent storms, rising sea levels, diminished habitats for polar animals, and more pollution due to fossil fuel exploitation and/ or increased traffic through the Northwest/ Northeast Passage. In these processes, melt ponds play an important role in Earth's radiation balance since they strongly absorb solar radiation rather than reflecting it as snow and ice do. Therefore, it is necessary to develop the ability of predicting the sea ice/ melt pond extents and space-time evolution, which is pivotal to prepare for the variation and uncertainty of the future environment, political, economic, and military needs. A lot of efforts have been put into Arctic sea ice modeling to simulate sea ice processes. However, these sea ice models were initiated and developed based on limited field surveys, aircraft or satellite image data. Therefore, it is necessary to collect high resolution sea ice aerial photo in a systematic way to tune up, validate, and improve models. Currently there are many sea ice aerial photos available, such as Chinese Arctic Exploration (CHINARE 2008, 2010, 2012), SHEBA 1998 and HOTRAX 2005. However, manually delineating of sea ice and melt pond from these images is time-consuming and labor-intensive. In this study, we use the object-based remote sensing classification scheme to extract sea ice and melt ponds efficiently from 1,727 aerial photos taken during the CHINARE 2010. The algorithm includes three major steps as follows. (1) Image segmentation groups the neighboring pixels into objects according to the similarity of spectral and texture

  13. Modern to millennium-old greenhouse gases emitted from ponds and lakes of the Eastern Canadian Arctic (Bylot Island, Nunavut)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchard, F.; Laurion, I.; Prėskienis, V.; Fortier, D.; Xu, X.; Whiticar, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    Ponds and lakes are widespread across the rapidly changing permafrost environments. Aquatic systems play an important role in global biogeochemical cycles, especially in greenhouse gas (GHG) exchanges between terrestrial systems and the atmosphere. The source, speciation and emission rate of carbon released from permafrost landscapes are strongly influenced by local conditions, hindering pan-Arctic generalizations. This study reports on GHG ages and emission rates from aquatic systems located on Bylot Island, in the continuous permafrost zone of the Eastern Canadian Arctic. Dissolved and ebullition gas samples were collected during the summer season from different types of water bodies located in a highly dynamic periglacial valley: polygonal ponds, collapsed ice-wedge trough ponds, and larger lakes. The results showed strikingly different ages and fluxes depending on aquatic system types. Polygonal ponds were net sinks of dissolved CO2, but variable sources of dissolved CH4. They presented the highest ebullition fluxes, 1 or 2 orders of magnitude higher than from other ponds and lakes. Trough ponds appeared as substantial GHG sources, especially when their edges were actively eroding. Both types of ponds produced modern to hundreds of years old ( 2000 yr BP) derived from freshly eroded peat. Lakes had small dissolved and ebullition fluxes, however they released much older GHG, including millennium-old CH4 (up to 3500 yr BP) from lake central areas. Acetoclastic methanogenesis dominated at all study sites and there was minimal, if any, methane oxidation in gas emitted through ebullition. These findings provide new insights on GHG emissions by permafrost aquatic systems and their potential positive feedback effect on climate.

  14. Analysis and evaluation of water coming from several uranium processing areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treatment of liquid effluent from uranium mines and mills in China during operation is described in this paper. Analysis and evaluation of water types coming from different sources of polluted areas are also presented in this paper. From this study, several methods for processing liquid effluents were chosen for study to improve current practice. In this work, three uranium mines and mills were carefully chosen for investigation. One is located in the north west of China. The other two are located in the southern part of China. (author)

  15. Large area low cost processing for CIS photovoltaics. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B. Basol; G. Norsworthy; C. Leidholm; A. Halani; R. Roe; V. Kapur

    1999-07-22

    An ink coating method was developed for CIS absorber deposition. The technique involves four processing steps: (1) preparation of a Cu-In alloy powder, (2) preparation of an ink using this powder, (3) deposition of the ink on a substrate in the form of a precursor layer, and (4) selenization to convert the Cu-In precursor into a fused CIS film. Absorbers grown by this low-cost, large-area method were used in the fabrication of 10.5% efficient solar cells.

  16. USING THE ANALYTICAL HIERARCHY PROCESS TO SUPPORT SUSTAINABLE USE OF GEO-RESOURCES IN METROPOLITAN AREAS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Oswald MARINONI; Andreas HOPPE

    2006-01-01

    Sand and gravel are important raw materials which are needed for many civil engineering projects.Due to economic reasons, sand and gravelpits are frequently located in the periphery of metropolitan areas which are often subject to competing land-use interests. As a contribution to land-use conflict solving, the Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) is applied within a Geographic Information System (GIS) environment. Two AHP preference matrix scenario constellations are evaluated and their results are used to create a land-use conflict map.

  17. Two designs for image digital processing applications in the nuclear area using ImaWin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work two designs of image processing systems of low cost for the nuclear area are presented. They have the advantage of the adaptability given by the ImaWin software and the connection with Internet, applied to digitalisation in research and development fields. The first design is the development of a digitalisation system for inspection and study of fuel plate radiographs for test reactors, while the second one describes the specification and design of an intelligent system of intrusion signals continuous inspection and administrative control of fissile material deposits. (author)

  18. Experimental canopy removal enhances diversity of vernal pond amphibians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skelly, David K; Bolden, Susan R; Freidenburg, L Kealoha

    2014-03-01

    Vernal ponds are often treated as protected environments receiving special regulation and management. Within the landscapes where they are found, forest vegetation frequently dominates surrounding uplands and can grow to overtop and shade pond basins. Two bodies of research offer differing views of the role of forest canopy for vernal pond systems. Studies of landscape conversion suggest that removing forest overstory within uplands can cause local extinctions of amphibians by altering terrestrial habitat or hindering movement. Studies of canopy above pond basins imply an opposite relationship; encroachment of overstory vegetation can be associated with local extinctions potentially via changes in light, thermal, and food resource environments. Unresolved uncertainties about the role of forest canopy reveal significant gaps in our understanding of wetland species distributions and dynamics. Any misunderstanding of canopy influences is simultaneously important to managers because current practices emphasize promoting or conserving vegetation growth particularly within buffers immediately adjacent to ponds. We evaluated this apparent contradiction by conducting a landscape-scale, long-term experiment using 14 natural vernal ponds. Tree felling at six manipulated ponds was limited in spatial scope but was nevertheless effective in increasing water temperature. Compared with eight control ponds, manipulated ponds maintained more amphibian species during five years post-manipulation. There was little evidence that any species was negatively influenced, and the reproductive effort of species for which we estimated egg inputs maintained pretreatment population densities in manipulated compared with control ponds. Overall, our experiment shows that a carefully circumscribed reduction of overhead forest canopy can enhance the capacity of vernal ponds to support wildlife diversity and suggests a scale dependence of canopy influences on amphibians. These findings have

  19. Remediation of the low-level radioactive waste tailing pond at Kowary, Poland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    tailing pond remediation area. The efforts of all involved partners have allowed the EC-part of the Kowary Remediation Project to be completed on time and within the planned financial budget. (author)

  20. Large area SiC coating technology of RBSC for semiconductor processing component

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Ji Yeon; Kim, Weon Ju

    2001-06-01

    As the semiconductor process is developed for the larger area wafer and the larger-scale integration, the processing fixtures are required to have excellent mechanical and high temperature properties. This highlights the importance of silicon carbide-based materials as a substitute for quartz-based susceptors. In this study, SiC coating technology on reaction sintered (RS) SiC with thickness variation of +/- 10% within a diameter of 8 inch by low pressure chemical vapor deposition has been developed for making a plate type SiC fixture such as heater, baffle, etc., with a diameter of 12 inch. Additionally, a state of art on fabrication technology and products of the current commercial SiC fixtures has been described.

  1. Large area SiC coating technology of RBSC for semiconductor processing component

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As the semiconductor process is developed for the larger area wafer and the larger-scale integration, the processing fixtures are required to have excellent mechanical and high temperature properties. This highlights the importance of silicon carbide-based materials as a substitute for quartz-based susceptors. In this study, SiC coating technology on reaction sintered (RS) SiC with thickness variation of +/- 10% within a diameter of 8 inch by low pressure chemical vapor deposition has been developed for making a plate type SiC fixture such as heater, baffle, etc., with a diameter of 12 inch. Additionally, a state of art on fabrication technology and products of the current commercial SiC fixtures has been described

  2. Large area ceramic thin films on plastics: A versatile route via solution processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new general route for large area, submicron thick ceramic thin films (crystalline metal oxide thin films) on plastic substrates is presented, where the crystallization of films is guaranteed by a firing process. Gel films are deposited on silicon substrates with a release layer and fired to be ceramic films, followed by transferring onto plastic substrates using adhesives. The ceramic films thus fabricated on plastics exhibit a certain degree of flexibility, implying the possibility of the technique to be applied to high-throughput roll-to-roll processes. Using this technique, we successfully realized transparent anatase thin films that provide high optical reflectance and transparent indium tin oxide thin films that exhibit electrical conductivity on polycarbonate and acrylic resin substrates, respectively. Crystallographically oriented zinc oxide films and patterned zinc oxide films are also demonstrated to be realized on acrylic resin substrates.

  3. Large area ceramic thin films on plastics: A versatile route via solution processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozuka, H.; Yamano, A.; Fukui, T.; Uchiyama, H.; Takahashi, M.; Yoki, M.; Akase, T.

    2012-01-01

    A new general route for large area, submicron thick ceramic thin films (crystalline metal oxide thin films) on plastic substrates is presented, where the crystallization of films is guaranteed by a firing process. Gel films are deposited on silicon substrates with a release layer and fired to be ceramic films, followed by transferring onto plastic substrates using adhesives. The ceramic films thus fabricated on plastics exhibit a certain degree of flexibility, implying the possibility of the technique to be applied to high-throughput roll-to-roll processes. Using this technique, we successfully realized transparent anatase thin films that provide high optical reflectance and transparent indium tin oxide thin films that exhibit electrical conductivity on polycarbonate and acrylic resin substrates, respectively. Crystallographically oriented zinc oxide films and patterned zinc oxide films are also demonstrated to be realized on acrylic resin substrates.

  4. Autonomous water-cleaning machine using solar energy in shrimp ponds

    OpenAIRE

    Dang, Thien Ngon

    2012-01-01

    Limited water exchange shrimp culture technology is commonly used today in many shrimp farms in Vietnam to reduce water usage, input of diseases and discharge of nutrient-rich effluents into environment as well as to increase the production per unit area. However, a remaining problem in this technology is that the water quality in shrimp ponds will be reduced due to limitation of water exchange for a long period. The accumulation of inorganic components such as waste feed, bacterial deposits ...

  5. The relationship between pond habitat depth and functional tadpole diversity in an agricultural landscape

    OpenAIRE

    de Souza Queiroz, Cássia; da Silva, Fernando Rodrigues; de Cerqueira Rossa-Feres, Denise

    2015-01-01

    One of the most important goals of biodiversity studies is to identify which characteristics of local habitats act as filters that determine the diversity of functional traits along environmental gradients. In this study, we investigated the relationship between the environmental variables of ponds and the functional trait diversity distribution of anuran tadpoles in an agricultural area in southeastern Brazil. Our results show that the functional trait diversity of frog tadpoles has a bell-c...

  6. Crustacean zooplankton species richness in Chilean lakes and ponds (23°-51°S)

    OpenAIRE

    Patricio De los Ríos-Escalante

    2013-01-01

    Chilean inland-water ecosystems are characterized by their low species-level biodiversity. This study analyses available data on surface area, maximum depth, conductivity, chlorophyll-α concentration, and zooplankton crustacean species number in lakes and ponds between 23° and 51°S. The study uses multiple regression analysis to identify the potential factors affecting the species number. The partial correlation analysis indicated a direct significant correlation between chlorophyll-α concent...

  7. Pond Fish Production Through People's Participation in Rural Bangladesh 【Article】

    OpenAIRE

    Chowdhury, Masudul Hoq; Maharjan, Keshav Lall

    2001-01-01

    Aquaculture is currently responsible for a significant proportion of total fish production in Bangladesh. Fish is the main animal sources of protein for the rural people of Bangladesh. However,given increasing demand for fish, the per capita production of fish is declining. The present studyhighlights the development of fresh water pond fish culture through grassroots level organization inBangladesh. The study was conducted in rural area of Bangladesh. The result of the study reveals that,man...

  8. EM-50 Tanks Focus Area retrieval process development and enhancements. FY97 technology development summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Retrieval Process Development and Enhancements (RPD and E) activities are part of the US Department of Energy (DOE) EM-50 Tanks Focus Area, Retrieval and Closure program. The purpose of RPD and E is to understand retrieval processes, including emerging and existing technologies, and to gather data on these processes, so that end users have requisite technical bases to make retrieval decisions. Technologies addressed during FY97 include enhancements to sluicing, the use of pulsed air to assist mixing, mixer pumps, innovative mixing techniques, confined sluicing retrieval end effectors, borehole mining, light weight scarification, and testing of Russian-developed retrieval equipment. Furthermore, the Retrieval Analysis Tool was initiated to link retrieval processes with tank waste farms and tank geometric to assist end users by providing a consolidation of data and technical information that can be easily assessed. The main technical accomplishments are summarized under the following headings: Oak Ridge site-gunite and associated tanks treatability study; pulsed air mixing; Oak Ridge site-Old Hydrofracture Facility; hydraulic testbed relocation; cooling coil cleaning end effector; light weight scarifier; innovative tank mixing; advanced design mixer pump; enhanced sluicing; Russian retrieval equipment testing; retrieval data analysis and correlation; simulant development; and retrieval analysis tool (RAT)

  9. Involvement of the TPJ area in processing of novel global forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rennig, Johannes; Himmelbach, Marc; Huberle, Elisabeth; Karnath, Hans-Otto

    2015-08-01

    The neuropsychological syndrome "simultanagnosia" is characterized by the inability to integrate local elements into a global entity. This deficit in Gestalt perception is mainly apparent for novel global structures administered in clinical tests or unfamiliar visual scenes. Recognition of familiar complex objects or well-known visual scenes is often unaffected. Recent neuroimaging studies and reports from simultanagnosia patients suggest a crucial involvement of temporoparietal brain areas in processing of hierarchically organized visual material. In this study, we investigated the specific role of the TPJ in Gestalt perception. On the basis of perceptual characteristics known from simultanagnosia, we hypothesized that TPJ is dominantly involved in processing of novel object arrangements. To answer this question, we performed a learning study with hierarchical stimuli and tested behavioral and neuronal characteristics of Gestalt perception pre- and posttraining. The study included 16 psychophysical training sessions and two neuroimaging sessions. Participants improved their behavioral performance for trained global stimuli and showed limited transfer to untrained global material. We found significant training dependent neuronal signal modulations in anterior right hemispheric TPJ regions. These activation changes were specific to trained global stimuli, whereas no systematic neuronal response changes were observed for recognition of untrained global stimuli, local elements and regular objects that served as control stimuli. In line with perceptual characteristics in simultanagnosia, the results argue for an involvement of TPJ in processing of novel global structures. We discuss the signal modulations in the context of a more efficient or different neuronal strategy to process familiar global stimuli. PMID:25811709

  10. EM-50 Tanks Focus Area retrieval process development and enhancements. FY97 technology development summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rinker, M.W.; Bamberger, J.A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Alberts, D.G. [Waterjet Technology, Inc., Kent, WA (United States)] [and others

    1997-09-01

    The Retrieval Process Development and Enhancements (RPD and E) activities are part of the US Department of Energy (DOE) EM-50 Tanks Focus Area, Retrieval and Closure program. The purpose of RPD and E is to understand retrieval processes, including emerging and existing technologies, and to gather data on these processes, so that end users have requisite technical bases to make retrieval decisions. Technologies addressed during FY97 include enhancements to sluicing, the use of pulsed air to assist mixing, mixer pumps, innovative mixing techniques, confined sluicing retrieval end effectors, borehole mining, light weight scarification, and testing of Russian-developed retrieval equipment. Furthermore, the Retrieval Analysis Tool was initiated to link retrieval processes with tank waste farms and tank geometric to assist end users by providing a consolidation of data and technical information that can be easily assessed. The main technical accomplishments are summarized under the following headings: Oak Ridge site-gunite and associated tanks treatability study; pulsed air mixing; Oak Ridge site-Old Hydrofracture Facility; hydraulic testbed relocation; cooling coil cleaning end effector; light weight scarifier; innovative tank mixing; advanced design mixer pump; enhanced sluicing; Russian retrieval equipment testing; retrieval data analysis and correlation; simulant development; and retrieval analysis tool (RAT).

  11. Box Model of a Series of Salt Ponds, as Applied to the Alviso Salt Pond Complex, South San Francisco Bay, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lionberger, Megan A.; Schoellhamer, David H.; Shellenbarger, Gregory; Orlando, James L.; Ganju, Neil K.

    2007-01-01

    This report documents the development and application of a box model to simulate water level, salinity, and temperature of the Alviso Salt Pond Complex in South San Francisco Bay. These ponds were purchased for restoration in 2003 and currently are managed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to maintain existing wildlife habitat and prevent a build up of salt during the development of a long-term restoration plan. The model was developed for the purpose of aiding pond managers during the current interim management period to achieve these goals. A previously developed box model of a salt pond, SPOOM, which calculates daily pond volume and salinity, was reconfigured to simulate multiple connected ponds and a temperature subroutine was added. The updated model simulates rainfall, evaporation, water flowing between the ponds and the adjacent tidal slough network, and water flowing from one pond to the next by gravity and pumps. Theoretical and measured relations between discharge and corresponding differences in water level are used to simulate most flows between ponds and between ponds and sloughs. The principle of conservation of mass is used to calculate daily pond volume and salinity. The model configuration includes management actions specified in the Interim Stewardship Plan for the ponds. The temperature subroutine calculates hourly net heat transfer to or from a pond resulting in a rise or drop in pond temperature and daily average, minimum, and maximum pond temperatures are recorded. Simulated temperature was compared with hourly measured data from pond 3 of the Napa?Sonoma Salt Pond Complex and monthly measured data from pond A14 of the Alviso Salt-Pond Complex. Comparison showed good agreement of measured and simulated pond temperature on the daily and monthly time scales.

  12. Reflection processing and interpretation of refraction seismic data, extension area 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Posiva Oy takes care of the final disposal of spent nuclear fuel in Finland. In year 2001 Olkiluoto was selected for the site of final disposal. Currently construction of the underground research facility, ONKALO, is going on at the Olkiluoto site. The aim of this work was to use two-dimensional reflection seismic processing methods to refraction seismic data collected from Olkiluoto in year 2005 and 2006, and to locate gently dipping reflectors from the stacked sections. This work is continuation to the similar work carried out in 2006. The method provides a cost-effective way to get 3D interpretation from existing data. Reflecting events are typically linked to fault or shear zones in bedrock, and sometimes to lithological contacts. Reflectors coincide with e.g. fracture intensity maxima and P-wave velocity minima locations met in drillholes. The goal was to link together previous reflector and model information at ONKALO area and later results from 3D reflection seismic measurements carried out in 2007. Processing was done using mainly open source software Seismic Unix. After the processing, the most distinct two-dimensional reflectors were picked from seismic sections using visualization environment OpendTect. The features from crossing lines were combined into three-dimensional surfaces. Special attention was given to the detection of possible faults and discontinuities. The geometry of the surfaces was defined based on procedure similar to 3D migration and available geological information. The applied processing method was successful in detecting the reflectors. Most significant steps were the refraction and residual statics, removal of short offset (less than 50 m shot-geophone interval) traces and deconvolution. Some distinct reflectors can be seen at times 20-200 ms (vertical depths 50-500 m). The signal gets noisier below 200 ms. Reflectors are best visible as coherent phase between the adjacent traces, but are not much above the surrounding noise level

  13. A single-stage biological process for municipal sewage treatment in tourist areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Iaconi, C; De Sanctis, M; Lopez, A

    2014-11-01

    This pilot scale study aims to test the effectiveness of an innovative compact biological system (SBBGR - Sequencing Batch Biofilter Granular Reactor) for treating municipal wastewater in tourist areas characterised by intense seasonal water demand and wastewater discharge. The results obtained after a long term operation of 463 days have shown that the proposed system is able to assure average removal efficiencies higher than 90% for COD (chemical oxygen demand), total suspended solids and TKN (total Kjeldahl nitrogen) independently of the influent concentration values and organic loading, which ranged from 0.2 to 5.1 kgCOD/m(3)biofilter.d Furthermore, the plant showed a high degree of operation flexibility and stability in response to the organic load variations occurring in tourist areas. In fact, no significant deterioration in the plant's effluent quality was observed even during a sudden several-fold increase in organic loading. High nitrogen removal efficiencies (80%, on average) were also achieved thanks to the establishment of simultaneous nitrification-denitrification process favoured by the plant's high biomass concentration and operating conditions. Finally, the system was characterized by an excess sludge production much lower (60-80% lower) than that of conventional biological systems operating without a primary clarifier. An acceptable level of stabilization of excess sludge was also obtained so that a further stabilization process was no longer required. PMID:24908613

  14. Safety assessment of waste rock dump built on existing tailings ponds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李全明; 袁会娜; 钟茂华

    2015-01-01

    The construction of waste rock dumps on existing tailing ponds has been put into practice in China to save precious land resources. This work focuses on the safety assessment of the Daheishan molybdenum mine waste rock dump under construction on two adjoining tailings ponds. The consolidation of the tailings foundation and the filling quality of the waste rock are investigated by the transient electromagnetic method through detecting water-rich areas and loose packing areas, from which, the depth of phreatic line is also estimated. With such information and the material parameters, the numerical method based on shear strength reduction is applied to analyzing the overall stability of the waste rock dump and the tailings ponds over a number of typical cross sections under both current and designed conditions, where the complex geological profiles exposed by site investigation are considered. Through numerical experiments, the influence of soft lenses in the tailings and possible loose packing areas in the waste rock is examined. Although large displacements may develop due to the soft tailings foundation, the results show that the waste rock dump satisfies the safety requirements under both present and designed conditions.

  15. Emerging contaminant degradation and removal in algal wastewater treatment ponds: Identifying the research gaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norvill, Zane N; Shilton, Andy; Guieysse, Benoit

    2016-08-01

    Whereas the fate of emerging contaminants (ECs) during 'conventional' and 'advanced' wastewater treatment (WWT) has been intensively studied, little research has been conducted on the algal WWT ponds commonly used in provincial areas. The long retention times and large surface areas exposed to light potentially allow more opportunities for EC removal to occur, but experimental evidence is lacking to enable definite predictions about EC fate across different algal WWT systems. This study reviews the mechanisms of EC hydrolysis, sorption, biodegradation, and photodegradation, applying available knowledge to the case of algal WWT. From this basis the review identifies three main areas that need more research due to the unique environmental and ecological conditions occurring in algal WWT ponds: i) the effect of diurnally fluctuating pH and dissolved oxygen upon removal mechanisms; ii) the influence of algae and algal biomass on biodegradation and sorption under relevant conditions; and iii) the significance of EC photodegradation in the presence of dissolved and suspended materials. Because of the high concentration of dissolved organics typically found in algal WWT ponds, most EC photodegradation likely occurs via indirect mechanisms rather than direct photolysis in these systems. PMID:27135171

  16. Surface Sediments in Precooler Ponds 2, 4, and 5: March 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunn, D.L.

    2001-01-29

    Pond 2, Pond 4, and Pond 5 are inactive reactor cooling impoundments built in 1961 on the R-Reactor Effluent System in the east-central portion of the Department of Energy's Savannah River Site in Aiken, South Carolina. These precooler ponds are part of the Par Pond cooling water system and are considered part of the Par Pond operable unit. The intent was not to characterize the ponds, but to identify the maximum levels of contamination that could be exposed if the ponds are drained to remove the danger of dam failure.

  17. Delayed feeding of channel catfish fry stocked in ponds

    Science.gov (United States)

    We compared production variables between channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus, nursery ponds fed according to industry standards, that is feeding immediately at stocking, to an alternative practice of delaying feeding for 6 wk after stocking in an effort to utilize natural pond productivity and redu...

  18. Wind Effects on Retention Time in Highway Ponds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentzen, Thomas Ruby; Larsen, Torben; Rasmussen, Michael R.

    2007-01-01

    The paper presents results from an experimental and numerical study of wind-induced flows and transportation patterns in highway wet detention ponds. The study presented here is part of a general investigation on road runoff and pollution in respect to wet detention ponds. The objective is to eva...

  19. STORMWATER TREATMENT: WET/DRY PONDS VS. CONSTRUCTED WETLANDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Extant data were used to assess the relative effectiveness of ponds vs. wetland-type BMPs. Compared to wet ponds, wetlands tended toward higher constituent concentrations in effluent, were inefficient at nitrogen removal, and appeared to preferentially retain phosphorous. These d...

  20. Origin and flatness of ponds on asteroid 433 Eros

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, James H.; Kahn, Eliezer G.; Barnouin, Olivier S.; Ernst, Carolyn M.; Prockter, Louise M.; Gaskell, Robert W.

    2014-10-01

    NEAR-Shoemaker Multi-Spectral Imager data reveal several hundred "ponds" on 433 Eros: smooth deposits that sharply embay the bounding depressions in which they lie, and whose spectra appear blue relative to that of the surrounding terrain. We investigate the topography of these ponds on Eros using a new shape model derived from stereophotoclinometric analysis, and validated against altimetry from the NEAR Laser Rangefinder, to constrain the mode of pond formation from three existing models. We update the locations of 55 pond candidates identified in images registered to the new shape model. We classify the flatness of these features according to the behavior of the first and second derivatives of the topography. We find that less than half of pond candidates have clearly flat floors. Based on the pond topography, we favor an external origin for the ponds' deposits. We suggest that fine dust may be transported into bounding depressions by electrostatic levitation, but may adhere to slopes, and that seismic shaking may not be sufficient to bring the deposits to an equipotential surface. Disaggregation of a central boulder should result in an obvious break in slope, such a variation is only observed in roughly half the pond candidates.