WorldWideScience

Sample records for area next-generation infrastructure

  1. HIGHWAY INFRASTRUCTURE FOCUS AREA NEXT-GENERATION INFRASTRUCTURE MATERIALS VOLUME I - TECHNICAL PROPOSAL & MANAGEMENTENHANCEMENT OF TRANSPORTATION INFRASTRUCTURE WITH IRON-BASED AMORPHOUS-METAL AND CERAMIC COATINGS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmer, J C

    2007-12-04

    The infrastructure for transportation in the United States allows for a high level of mobility and freight activity for the current population of 300 million residents, and several million business establishments. According to a Department of Transportation study, more than 230 million motor vehicles, ships, airplanes, and railroads cars were used on 6.4 million kilometers (4 million miles) of highways, railroads, airports, and waterways in 1998. Pipelines and storage tanks were considered to be part of this deteriorating infrastructure. The annual direct cost of corrosion in the infrastructure category was estimated to be approximately $22.6 billion in 1998. There were 583,000 bridges in the United States in 1998. Of this total, 200,000 bridges were steel, 235,000 were conventional reinforced concrete, 108,000 bridges were constructed using pre-stressed concrete, and the balance was made using other materials of construction. Approximately 15 percent of the bridges accounted for at this point in time were structurally deficient, primarily due to corrosion of steel and steel reinforcement. Iron-based amorphous metals, including SAM2X5 (Fe{sub 49.7}Cr{sub 17.7}Mn{sub 1.9}Mo{sub 7.4}W{sub 1.6}B{sub 15.2}C{sub 3.8}Si{sub 2.4}) and SAM1651 (Fe{sub 48}Mo{sub 14}Cr{sub 15}Y{sub 2}C{sub 15}B{sub 6}) have been developed, and have very good corrosion resistance. These materials have been prepared as a melt-spun ribbons, as well as gas atomized powders and thermal-spray coatings. During electrochemical testing in several environments, including seawater at 90 C, the passive film stabilities of these materials were found to be comparable to that of more expensive high-performance alloys, based on electrochemical measurements of the passive film breakdown potential and general corrosion rates. These materials also performed very well in standard salt fog tests. Chromium (Cr), molybdenum (Mo) and tungsten (W) provided corrosion resistance, and boron (B) enabled glass formation

  2. Next-generation navigational infrastructure and the ATLAS event store

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ATLAS event store employs a persistence framework with extensive navigational capabilities. These include real-time back navigation to upstream processing stages, externalizable data object references, navigation from any data object to any other both within a single file and across files, and more. The 2013-2014 shutdown of the Large Hadron Collider provides an opportunity to enhance this infrastructure in several ways that both extend these capabilities and allow the collaboration to better exploit emerging computing platforms. Enhancements include redesign with efficient file merging in mind, content-based indices in optimized reference types, and support for forward references. The latter provide the potential to construct valid references to data before those data are written, a capability that is useful in a variety of multithreading, multiprocessing, distributed processing, and deferred processing scenarios. This paper describes the architecture and design of the next generation of ATLAS navigational infrastructure.

  3. Recommendations on e-infrastructures for next-generation sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spjuth, Ola; Bongcam-Rudloff, Erik; Dahlberg, Johan; Dahlö, Martin; Kallio, Aleksi; Pireddu, Luca; Vezzi, Francesco; Korpelainen, Eija

    2016-01-01

    With ever-increasing amounts of data being produced by next-generation sequencing (NGS) experiments, the requirements placed on supporting e-infrastructures have grown. In this work, we provide recommendations based on the collective experiences from participants in the EU COST Action SeqAhead for the tasks of data preprocessing, upstream processing, data delivery, and downstream analysis, as well as long-term storage and archiving. We cover demands on computational and storage resources, networks, software stacks, automation of analysis, education, and also discuss emerging trends in the field. E-infrastructures for NGS require substantial effort to set up and maintain over time, and with sequencing technologies and best practices for data analysis evolving rapidly it is important to prioritize both processing capacity and e-infrastructure flexibility when making strategic decisions to support the data analysis demands of tomorrow. Due to increasingly demanding technical requirements we recommend that e-infrastructure development and maintenance be handled by a professional service unit, be it internal or external to the organization, and emphasis should be placed on collaboration between researchers and IT professionals. PMID:27267963

  4. Next-Generation Navigational Infrastructure and the ATLAS Event Store

    CERN Document Server

    van Gemmeren, P; The ATLAS collaboration; Nowak, M

    2014-01-01

    The ATLAS event store employs a persistence framework with extensive navigational capabilities. These include real-time back navigation to upstream processing stages, externalizable data object references, navigation from any data object to any other both within a single file and across files, and more. The 2013-2014 shutdown of the Large Hadron Collider provides an opportunity to enhance this infrastructure in several ways that both extend these capabilities and allow the collaboration to better exploit emerging computing platforms. Enhancements include redesign with efficient file merging in mind, content-based indices in optimized reference types, and support for forward references. The latter provide the potential to construct valid references to data before those data are written, a capability that is useful in a variety of multithreading, multiprocessing, distributed processing, and deferred processing scenarios. This paper describes the architecture and design of the next generation of ATLAS navigation...

  5. Next-Generation Navigational Infrastructure and the ATLAS Event Store

    CERN Document Server

    van Gemmeren, P; The ATLAS collaboration; Nowak, M

    2013-01-01

    The ATLAS event store employs a persistence framework with extensive navigational capabilities. These include real-time back navigation to upstream processing stages, externalizable data object references, navigation from any data object to any other both within a single file and across files, and more. The 2013-2014 shutdown of the Large Hadron Collider provides an opportunity to enhance this infrastructure in several ways that both extend these capabilities and allow the collaboration to better exploit emerging computing platforms. Enhancements include redesign with efficient file merging in mind, content-based indices in optimized reference types, and support for forward references. The latter provide the potential to construct valid references to data before those data are written, a capability that is useful in a variety of multithreading, multiprocessing, distributed processing, and deferred processing scenarios. This paper describes the architecture and design of the next generation of ATLAS navigation...

  6. Strategies for the next generation green ICT infrastructure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riaz, M. Tahir; Gutierrez Lopez, Jose Manuel; Pedersen, Jens Myrup

    2009-01-01

    Today, the global society is facing serious challenges in improving environmental performance, particularly with global warming, and resource management. Where the information and communication technology (ICT) industry is contributing to the global economy coupling with innovation and development...... of almost all the aspect of human life, but it also responsible for global CO2 emissions. In this paper, we provide a short survey of the challenges faced today of global warming by C02 emission related to global ICT infrastructure. The paper provides a number of strategies for greening ICT lead by...

  7. The Next Generation Information Infrastructure for International Trade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henningsson, Stefan; Gal, Uri; Bjørn-Andersen, Niels;

    2011-01-01

    Regulators and actors in international trade are facing a difficult challenge of increasing control and security while at the same time lowering the administrative burden for traders. As a tentative response, the European Commission has introduced the concept of “trusted traders”: certified traders...... that are in control of their business. Trusted traders are entitled to trade facilitations, faster border crossing, and fewer physical inspections. To enable the use of trusted traders, changes are required to the information infrastructure (II) of international trade. This article complements existing works on e......-Government interoperability by a theoretically driven approach with theoretical development of the II concept and how II can be modified as additional focus. Following the principles of IS design research, this paper presents a design proposition for the II of international trade. Using theories of II development and change...

  8. Necessity of Next Generation Network Infrastructure and the Evaluation of Broadband Developments in Rural Regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szilvia Botos

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Impacts of next generation network for the condition and development of rural regions are already evident, but the different economic sectors be differently affected by the effects of ICT and they require it in different degrees. In the national and EU strategies, building next generation infrastructure in rural areas, by this decreasing the extent of digital gap and reducing the disparities, is one of the main goals. We have proved by regional analysis that the infrastructural and usage features, which link to broadband networks (e.g. households with broadband access, shopping through Internet or the rate of computer usage, these be in connected with the socio-economic features, like regional production of GDP or the employment rate. Based on results, we could determine that the differences which be showed in the ICT level between the countries, they present also between the regions, within one country. For analyzing the levels of development of the countries, several indicators are available and these help to determine the future development directions, and some of those we will show in this article. But first, we give some review about the significance of NGN and e-services in the less favoured regions, the barriers of improvements and the comparison possibilities of the countries relative to their ICT situation in different territorial levels.

  9. SQoS as the Base for Next Generation Global Infrastructure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Ole Brun; Knudsen, Thomas Phillip; Pedersen, Jens Myrup

    2003-01-01

    The convergence towards a unified global WAN platform, providing both best effort services and guaranteed high quality services, sets the agenda for the design and implementation of the next generation global information infrastructure. The absence of design principles, allowing for smooth and cost...... efficient scalability without loss of control over the structurally based properties may prevent or seriously delay the introduction of globally available new application and switching services. Reliability and scalability issues are addressed from a structural viewpoint. The concept of Structural Quality...

  10. Next-generation Algorithms for Assessing Infrastructure Vulnerability and Optimizing System Resilience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burchett, Deon L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Chen, Richard Li-Yang [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Phillips, Cynthia A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Richard, Jean-Philippe [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-05-01

    This report summarizes the work performed under the project project Next-Generation Algo- rithms for Assessing Infrastructure Vulnerability and Optimizing System Resilience. The goal of the project was to improve mathematical programming-based optimization technology for in- frastructure protection. In general, the owner of a network wishes to design a network a network that can perform well when certain transportation channels are inhibited (e.g. destroyed) by an adversary. These are typically bi-level problems where the owner designs a system, an adversary optimally attacks it, and then the owner can recover by optimally using the remaining network. This project funded three years of Deon Burchett's graduate research. Deon's graduate advisor, Professor Jean-Philippe Richard, and his Sandia advisors, Richard Chen and Cynthia Phillips, supported Deon on other funds or volunteer time. This report is, therefore. essentially a replication of the Ph.D. dissertation it funded [12] in a format required for project documentation. The thesis had some general polyhedral research. This is the study of the structure of the feasi- ble region of mathematical programs, such as integer programs. For example, an integer program optimizes a linear objective function subject to linear constraints, and (nonlinear) integrality con- straints on the variables. The feasible region without the integrality constraints is a convex polygon. Careful study of additional valid constraints can significantly improve computational performance. Here is the abstract from the dissertation: We perform a polyhedral study of a multi-commodity generalization of variable upper bound flow models. In particular, we establish some relations between facets of single- and multi- commodity models. We then introduce a new family of inequalities, which generalizes traditional flow cover inequalities to the multi-commodity context. We present encouraging numerical results. We also consider the directed

  11. A Common Communications, Navigation and Surveillance Infrastructure for Accommodating Space Vehicles in the Next Generation Air Transportation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanSuetendael, RIchard; Hayes, Alan; Birr, Richard

    2008-01-01

    Suborbital space flight and space tourism are new potential markets that could significantly impact the National Airspace System (NAS). Numerous private companies are developing space flight capabilities to capture a piece of an emerging commercial space transportation market. These entrepreneurs share a common vision that sees commercial space flight as a profitable venture. Additionally, U.S. space exploration policy and national defense will impose significant additional demands on the NAS. Air traffic service providers must allow all users fair access to limited airspace, while ensuring that the highest levels of safety, security, and efficiency are maintained. The FAA's Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen) will need to accommodate spacecraft transitioning to and from space through the NAS. To accomplish this, space and air traffic operations will need to be seamlessly integrated under some common communications, navigation and surveillance (CNS) infrastructure. As part of NextGen, the FAA has been developing the Automatic Dependent Surveillance Broadcast (ADS-B) which utilizes the Global Positioning System (GPS) to track and separate aircraft. Another key component of NextGen, System-Wide Information Management/ Network Enabled Operations (SWIM/NEO), is an open architecture network that will provide NAS data to various customers, system tools and applications. NASA and DoD are currently developing a space-based range (SBR) concept that also utilizes GPS, communications satellites and other CNS assets. The future SBR will have very similar utility for space operations as ADS-B and SWIM has for air traffic. Perhaps the FAA, NASA, and DoD should consider developing a common space-based CNS infrastructure to support both aviation and space transportation operations. This paper suggests specific areas of research for developing a CNS infrastructure that can accommodate spacecraft and other new types of vehicles as an integrated part of NextGen.

  12. Design of indoor communication infrastructure for ultra-high capacity next generation wireless services

    OpenAIRE

    Gordon, George S. D.

    2013-01-01

    The proliferation of data hungry wireless devices, such as smart phones and intelligent sensing networks, is pushing modern wireless networks to their limits. A significant shortfall in the ability of networks to meet demand for data is imminent. This thesis addresses this problem through examining the design of distributed antenna systems (DAS) to support next generation high speed wireless services that require high densities of access points and must support multiple-input multiple-output ...

  13. 3D television (3DTV) technology, systems, and deployment rolling out the infrastructure for next-generation entertainment

    CERN Document Server

    Minoli, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Going beyond the technological building blocks of 3DTV, 3D Television (3DTV) Technology, Systems, and Deployment: Rolling Out the Infrastructure for Next-Generation Entertainment offers an early view of the deployment and rollout strategies of this emerging technology. It covers cutting-edge advances, theories, and techniques in end-to-end 3DTV systems to provide a system-level view of the topic and what it takes to make this concept a commercial reality. The book reflects the full-range of questions being posed about post-production 3D mastering, delivery options, and home screens. It reviews

  14. SQoS as the Base for Next Generation Global Infrastructure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Ole Brun; Knudsen, Thomas Phillip; Pedersen, Jens Myrup

    efficient scalability without loss of control over the structurally based properties may prevent or seriously delay the introduction of globally available new application and switching services.Reliability and scalability issues are addressed from a structural viewpoint. The concept of Structural Quality of...... Service (SQoS) has been introduced as an attempt to establish a base for reliability management in complex large-scale communication infrastructures. Two approaches to provide SQoS are introduced, and results for the N2R(p;q;r) family of vertex symmetric graph structures are presented and discussed...

  15. Technology Advancements in the Next Generation of Domain Agnostic Spatial Data Infrastructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golodoniuc, Pavel; Rankine, Terry; Box, Paul; Atkinson, Rob; Kostanski, Laura

    2013-04-01

    Spatial Data Infrastructures (SDI) are typically composed of a suite of products focused on improving spatial information discovery and access. Proliferation of SDI initiatives has caused the "Yet Another Portal" (YAP) syndrome to emerge with each initiative providing a new mechanism for cataloguing and enabling users to search for spatial information resources. Often coarse-grained and incomplete metadata information available via these SDIs renders them to being analogous with an antiquated library catalogue. We posit that the successful use of SDI resources requires attention to be focused on various semantic aspects of the information contained within - particularly the information models and vocabularies. Currently it is common for understanding of these models and vocabularies to be built into portals. This does not enhance interoperability between SDIs, nor does this provide a means for referencing or searching for a specific feature (e.g., the City of Sydney) without first knowing the location of the information source for the feature and the form in which it is represented. SDI interfaces, such as OGC WFS, provide data from a spatial representation perspective, but do not provide identifiers that can easily be cited or used across system boundaries. The lack of mechanisms to provide stable identifiers of a feature renders it permanently scoped to a particular dataset. The other three important aspects that are commonly lacking in SDIs are the inadequate handling of feature level metadata that is commonly not sufficient enough for more than the most basic data discovery; features delivered through SDI are not well integrated with information systems that deliver statistical information about those features; and, importantly there are inadequate mechanisms to reconcile and associate multiple identities and representations of the same real world feature. In this paper we present an extended view of an SDI architecture with integrated support for information

  16. High-performance integrated virtual environment (HIVE): a robust infrastructure for next-generation sequence data analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonyan, Vahan; Chumakov, Konstantin; Dingerdissen, Hayley; Faison, William; Goldweber, Scott; Golikov, Anton; Gulzar, Naila; Karagiannis, Konstantinos; Vinh Nguyen Lam, Phuc; Maudru, Thomas; Muravitskaja, Olesja; Osipova, Ekaterina; Pan, Yang; Pschenichnov, Alexey; Rostovtsev, Alexandre; Santana-Quintero, Luis; Smith, Krista; Thompson, Elaine E.; Tkachenko, Valery; Torcivia-Rodriguez, John; Wan, Quan; Wang, Jing; Wu, Tsung-Jung; Wilson, Carolyn; Mazumder, Raja

    2016-01-01

    The High-performance Integrated Virtual Environment (HIVE) is a distributed storage and compute environment designed primarily to handle next-generation sequencing (NGS) data. This multicomponent cloud infrastructure provides secure web access for authorized users to deposit, retrieve, annotate and compute on NGS data, and to analyse the outcomes using web interface visual environments appropriately built in collaboration with research and regulatory scientists and other end users. Unlike many massively parallel computing environments, HIVE uses a cloud control server which virtualizes services, not processes. It is both very robust and flexible due to the abstraction layer introduced between computational requests and operating system processes. The novel paradigm of moving computations to the data, instead of moving data to computational nodes, has proven to be significantly less taxing for both hardware and network infrastructure. The honeycomb data model developed for HIVE integrates metadata into an object-oriented model. Its distinction from other object-oriented databases is in the additional implementation of a unified application program interface to search, view and manipulate data of all types. This model simplifies the introduction of new data types, thereby minimizing the need for database restructuring and streamlining the development of new integrated information systems. The honeycomb model employs a highly secure hierarchical access control and permission system, allowing determination of data access privileges in a finely granular manner without flooding the security subsystem with a multiplicity of rules. HIVE infrastructure will allow engineers and scientists to perform NGS analysis in a manner that is both efficient and secure. HIVE is actively supported in public and private domains, and project collaborations are welcomed. Database URL: https://hive.biochemistry.gwu.edu PMID:26989153

  17. High-performance integrated virtual environment (HIVE): a robust infrastructure for next-generation sequence data analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonyan, Vahan; Chumakov, Konstantin; Dingerdissen, Hayley; Faison, William; Goldweber, Scott; Golikov, Anton; Gulzar, Naila; Karagiannis, Konstantinos; Vinh Nguyen Lam, Phuc; Maudru, Thomas; Muravitskaja, Olesja; Osipova, Ekaterina; Pan, Yang; Pschenichnov, Alexey; Rostovtsev, Alexandre; Santana-Quintero, Luis; Smith, Krista; Thompson, Elaine E; Tkachenko, Valery; Torcivia-Rodriguez, John; Voskanian, Alin; Wan, Quan; Wang, Jing; Wu, Tsung-Jung; Wilson, Carolyn; Mazumder, Raja

    2016-01-01

    The High-performance Integrated Virtual Environment (HIVE) is a distributed storage and compute environment designed primarily to handle next-generation sequencing (NGS) data. This multicomponent cloud infrastructure provides secure web access for authorized users to deposit, retrieve, annotate and compute on NGS data, and to analyse the outcomes using web interface visual environments appropriately built in collaboration with research and regulatory scientists and other end users. Unlike many massively parallel computing environments, HIVE uses a cloud control server which virtualizes services, not processes. It is both very robust and flexible due to the abstraction layer introduced between computational requests and operating system processes. The novel paradigm of moving computations to the data, instead of moving data to computational nodes, has proven to be significantly less taxing for both hardware and network infrastructure.The honeycomb data model developed for HIVE integrates metadata into an object-oriented model. Its distinction from other object-oriented databases is in the additional implementation of a unified application program interface to search, view and manipulate data of all types. This model simplifies the introduction of new data types, thereby minimizing the need for database restructuring and streamlining the development of new integrated information systems. The honeycomb model employs a highly secure hierarchical access control and permission system, allowing determination of data access privileges in a finely granular manner without flooding the security subsystem with a multiplicity of rules. HIVE infrastructure will allow engineers and scientists to perform NGS analysis in a manner that is both efficient and secure. HIVE is actively supported in public and private domains, and project collaborations are welcomed. Database URL: https://hive.biochemistry.gwu.edu. PMID:26989153

  18. Development of Closed-Loop Simulation Methods for a Next-Generation Terminal Area Automation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, John E., III; Isaacson, Douglas R.

    2002-01-01

    A next-generation air traffic decision support tool, known as the Active Final Approach Spacing Tool (aFAST), will generate heading, speed and altitude commands to achieve more precise separation of aircraft in the terminal area. The techniques used to analyze the performance of earlier generation decision support tools are not adequate to analyze the performance of aFAST. This paper summarizes the development of a new and innovative fully closed-loop testing method for aFAST. This method, called trajectory feedback testing, closes each aircraft's control loop inside of the aFAST scheduling algorithm. Validation of trajectory feedback testing by examination of the variation of aircraft time-of-arrival predictions between schedule updates and the variation of aircraft excess separation distances between simulation runs is presented.

  19. A new design of large area MCP-PMT for the next generation neutrino experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This manuscript discusses a new design of large area MCP-PMT for the next generation neutrino experiments. The main motivation of the design is to improve the quantum efficiency (photo detection efficiency) of the PMT. Two sets of small MCP units, the transmission photocathode coated on the front hemisphere and the reflection photocathode coated on the rear hemisphere are assembled in the same glass envelope to form nearly 4π viewing angle to enhance the efficiency of the photoelectron detection. The photoelectrons from the 4π photocathode are collected and amplified by two sets of MCP units. Our goal is eventually to produce 20 in. diameter PMT following such an approach. We will report preliminary results of our ptoelectronic simulation and the results of a 5 in. diameter prototype PMT. Future plans and prospects are discussed at the end.

  20. Next Generation Emission Measurements for Fugitive, Area Source, and Fence Line Applications?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Next generation emissions measurements (NGEM) is an EPA term for the rapidly advancing field of air pollutant sensor technologies, data integration concepts, and associated geospatial modeling strategies for source emissions measurements. Ranging from low coat sensors to satelli...

  1. Better-Than-Visual Technologies for Next Generation Air Transportation System Terminal Maneuvering Area Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prinzel, Lawrence J., III; Bailey, Randall E.; Shelton, Kevin J.; Jones, Denise R.; Kramer, Lynda J.; Arthur, Jarvis J., III; Williams, Steve P.; Barmore, Bryan E.; Ellis, Kyle E.; Rehfeld, Sherri A.

    2011-01-01

    A consortium of industry, academia and government agencies are devising new concepts for future U.S. aviation operations under the Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen). Many key capabilities are being identified to enable NextGen, including the concept of Equivalent Visual Operations (EVO) replicating the capacity and safety of today's visual flight rules (VFR) in all-weather conditions. NASA is striving to develop the technologies and knowledge to enable EVO and to extend EVO towards a Better-Than-Visual (BTV) operational concept. The BTV operational concept uses an electronic means to provide sufficient visual references of the external world and other required flight references on flight deck displays that enable VFR-like operational tempos and maintain and improve the safety of VFR while using VFR-like procedures in all-weather conditions. NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) research on technologies to enable the concept of BTV is described.

  2. Power Challenges of Large Scale Research Infrastructures: the Square Kilometer Array and Solar Energy Integration; Towards a zero-carbon footprint next generation telescope

    OpenAIRE

    Barbosa, Domingos; Márquez, Gonzalo Lobo; Ruiz, Valeriano; Silva, Manuel; Verdes-Montenegro, Lourdes; Santander-Vela, Juande; Maia, Dalmiro; Antón, Sonia; van Ardenne, Arnold; Vetter, Matthias; Kramer, Michael; Keller, Reinhard; Pereira, Nuno; Silva, Vitor; Consortium, The BIOSTIRLING

    2012-01-01

    The Square Kilometer Array (SKA) will be the largest Global science project of the next two decades. It will encompass a sensor network dedicated to radioastronomy, covering two continents. It will be constructed in remote areas of South Africa and Australia, spreading over 3000Km, in high solar irradiance latitudes. Solar Power supply is therefore an option to power supply the SKA and contribute to a zero carbon footprint next generation telescope. Here we outline the major characteristics o...

  3. Hacking the next generation

    CERN Document Server

    Dhanjani, Nitesh; Hardin, Brett

    2009-01-01

    With the advent of rich Internet applications, the explosion of social media, and the increased use of powerful cloud computing infrastructures, a new generation of attackers has added cunning new techniques to its arsenal. For anyone involved in defending an application or a network of systems, Hacking: The Next Generation is one of the few books to identify a variety of emerging attack vectors. You'll not only find valuable information on new hacks that attempt to exploit technical flaws, you'll also learn how attackers take advantage of individuals via social networking sites, and abuse

  4. PLANNING AND MANAGING VIRTUALIZED NEXT GENERATION NETWORKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukant K. Mohapatra

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Service convergence, content digitization, rapid and flexible service delivery, reduction of capital and operating costs, economies of scale, changes in telecom policy and regulation, and ever increasing competition have been key factors in the evolution of virtualized Next Generation Networks (vNGN. IPcentric converged networks aim to provide a multitude of services over a single network infrastructure. Tremendous success and benefit of server virtualization in data centers is driving the adaption of network virtualization. Network virtualization is applicable to enterprise data center, and enterprise as well as wide area networks. The focus of this paper is network virtualization aspects of service providers’ next generation network. The key factors for moving to virtualized network is optimal use and sharing of network infrastructure even among competitive service providers, programmability of network and rapid introduction of new service and standard based on open platform rather than proprietary implementation. Evolving Software Defined Network (SDN and Network Function Virtualization (NFV shall enable common network infrastructure sharing, control, and management at a higher layer thus making network devices more generic and less intelligent, thus enabling cost competitiveness and quick service delivery. Network virtualization shall enable key benefits such as lower cost, flexibility, efficiency, and security, However, the deployment of virtualized next generation networks has brought its unique challenges for network managers and planners, as the network has to be planned in a comprehensive way with effective management of virtual network elements, its correlation with physical infrastructure and monitoring of control functions and server platforms. This paper discusses generic next generation network, its virtualization, and addresses the challenges related to the planning and managing of virtualized next generation networks. This

  5. Power Challenges of Large Scale Research Infrastructures: the Square Kilometer Array and Solar Energy Integration; Towards a zero-carbon footprint next generation telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Barbosa, Domingos; Ruiz, Valeriano; Silva, Manuel; Verdes-Montenegro, Lourdes; Santander-Vela, Juande; Maia, Dalmiro; Antón, Sonia; van Ardenne, Arnold; Vetter, Matthias; Kramer, Michael; Keller, Reinhard; Pereira, Nuno; Silva, Vitor

    2012-01-01

    The Square Kilometer Array (SKA) will be the largest Global science project of the next two decades. It will encompass a sensor network dedicated to radioastronomy, covering two continents. It will be constructed in remote areas of South Africa and Australia, spreading over 3000Km, in high solar irradiance latitudes. Solar Power supply is therefore an option to power supply the SKA and contribute to a zero carbon footprint next generation telescope. Here we outline the major characteristics of the SKA and some innovation approaches on thermal solar energy Integration with SKA prototypes.

  6. Engineering the next generation of large-area displays: prospects and pitfalls

    OpenAIRE

    Carey, JD

    2003-01-01

    Considerable effort is currently expounded on the development and improvement of the myriad display technologies that have come to the market place. In this paper, several key questions are addressed in the development of the future generation of large-area field-emission-based displays based on semiconducting amorphous carbon thin films and carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The development of carbon-based cathodes has to date proceeded along empirical lines, with attempts to correlate the variation o...

  7. A new vision of the post-NIST civil infrastructure program: the challenges of next-generation construction materials and processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, H. Felix; Wan, Yan

    2014-03-01

    , security, and safety of elements of critical infrastructure for the Nation's already deteriorating civil infrastructure. It is envisioned that the Nation should look far beyond: not only should we efficiently and effectively address current problems of the aging infrastructure, but we must also further develop next-generation construction materials and processes for new construction. To accomplish this ambitious goal, we must include process efficiency that will help select the most reliable and cost-effective materials in construction processes; performance and cost will be the prime consideration for selections construction materials based on life-cycle cost and materials performance; energy efficiency will drive reduced energy consumption from current levels by 50 % per unit of output; and environmental responsiveness will achieve net-zero waste from construction materials and its constituents. Should it be successfully implemented, we will transform the current 21st century infrastructure systems to enable the vital functioning of society and improve competitiveness of the economy to ensure that our quality of life remains high.

  8. Next Generation Intelligent Wireless Infrastructure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toftegaard, Thomas Skjødeberg

    2010-01-01

    Given the commercial success of wireless technologies that has already taken place over the last couple of decades, with a global mobile communication penetration beyond 3 billion subscribers as well as the enormous success of wireless data communication through IEEE 802.11x and Bluetooth, people...

  9. Next generation CANDU plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Future CANDU designs will continue to meet the emerging design and performance requirements expected by the operating utilities. The next generation CANDU products will integrate new technologies into both the product features as well as into the engineering and construction work processes associated with delivering the products. The timely incorporation of advanced design features is the approach adopted for the development of the next generation of CANDU. AECL's current products consist of 700MW Class CANDU 6 and 900 MW Class CANDU 9. Evolutionary improvements are continuing with our CANDU products to enhance their adaptability to meet customers ever increasing need for higher output. Our key product drivers are for improved safety, environmental protection and improved cost effectiveness. Towards these goals we have made excellent progress in Research and Development and our investments are continuing in areas such as fuel channels and passive safety. Our long term focus is utilizing the fuel cycle flexibility of CANDU reactors as part of the long term energy mix

  10. Next Generation Sequencing Demands Next Generation Phenotyping

    OpenAIRE

    Hennekam, Raoul CM; Biesecker, Leslie G

    2012-01-01

    Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS) is the most powerful diagnostic tool since the roentgenogram. NGS will facilitate diagnosis on a massive scale –allowing interrogation of all genes in a single assay. It has been suggested that NGS will decrease the need for phenotyping in general, and medical geneticists in particular. We argue that NGS will shift focus and approach of phenotyping. We predict that NGS performed for diagnostic purposes will yield variants in several genes, and consequences of ...

  11. Next Generation Virtual Observatories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, P.; McGuinness, D. L.

    2008-12-01

    Virtual Observatories (VO) are now being established in a variety of geoscience disciplines beyond their origins in Astronomy and Solar Physics. Implementations range from hydrology and environmental sciences to solid earth sciences. Among the goals of VOs are to provide search/ query, access and use of distributed, heterogeneous data resources. With many of these goals being met and usage increasing, new demands and requirements are arising. In particular there are two of immediate and pressing interest. The first is use of VOs by non-specialists, especially for information products that go beyond the usual data, or data products that are sought for scientific research. The second area is citation and attribution of artifacts that are being generated by VOs. In some sense VOs are re-publishing (re-packaging, or generating new synthetic) data and information products. At present only a few VOs address this need and it is clear that a comprehensive solution that includes publishers is required. Our work in VOs and related semantic data framework and integration areas has lead to a view of the next generation of virtual observatories which the two above-mentioned needs as well as others that are emerging. Both of the needs highlight a semantic gap, i.e. that the meaning and use for a user or users beyond the original design intention is very often difficult or impossible to bridge. For example, VOs created for experts with complex, arcane or jargon vocabularies are not accessible to the non-specialist and further, information products the non-specialist may use are not created or considered for creation. In the second case, use of a (possibly virtual) data or information product (e.g. an image or map) as an intellectual artifact that can be accessed as part of the scientific publication and review procedure also introduces terminology gaps, as well as services that VOs may need to provide. Our supposition is that formalized methods in semantics and semantic web

  12. Next-generation human genetics

    OpenAIRE

    Shendure, Jay

    2011-01-01

    The field of human genetics is being reshaped by exome and genome sequencing. Several lessons are evident from observing the rapid development of this area over the past 2 years, and these may be instructive with respect to what we should expect from 'next-generation human genetics' in the next few years.

  13. Next generation information systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Information Systems Analysis and Development (ISAD) Team of the Safeguards Systems Group at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has been developing web based information and knowledge management systems for sixteen years. Our vision is to rapidly and cost effectively provide knowledge management solutions in the form of interactive information systems that help customers organize, archive, post and retrieve nonproliferation and safeguards knowledge and information vital to their success. The team has developed several comprehensive information systems that assist users in the betterment and growth of their organizations and programs. Through our information systems, users are able to streamline operations, increase productivity, and share and access information from diverse geographic locations. The ISAD team is also producing interactive visual models. Interactive visual models provide many benefits to customers beyond the scope of traditional full-scale modeling. We have the ability to simulate a vision that a customer may propose, without the time constraints of traditional engineering modeling tools. Our interactive visual models can be used to access specialized training areas, controlled areas, and highly radioactive areas, as well as review site-specific training for complex facilities, and asset management. Like the information systems that the ISAD team develops, these models can be shared and accessed from any location with access to the internet. The purpose of this paper is to elaborate on the capabilities of information systems and interactive visual models as well as consider the possibility of combining the two capabilities to provide the next generation of infonnation systems. The collection, processing, and integration of data in new ways can contribute to the security of the nation by providing indicators and information for timely action to decrease the traditional and new nuclear threats. Modeling and simulation tied to comprehensive

  14. Next Generation Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladislav Schwartz

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Two network types had been existing in Slovakia by the end of the year 2004 – public switched telephone network – PSTN and packet switched data network – DCN. The other network, known as the next generation network – NGN, has been put into operation since the beginning of the year 2005. The role of the next generation network is to merge the both previous network types into one unified complex network with the full centralised control, based on routing and packet switching. The T-Com company (previous Slovak Telecom was the first who did it.

  15. Next generation mobile broadcasting

    CERN Document Server

    Gómez-Barquero, David

    2013-01-01

    Next Generation Mobile Broadcasting provides an overview of the past, present, and future of mobile multimedia broadcasting. The first part of the book-Mobile Broadcasting Worldwide-summarizes next-generation mobile broadcasting technologies currently available. This part covers the evolutions of the Japanese mobile broadcasting standard ISDB-T One-Seg, ISDB-Tmm and ISDB-TSB; the evolution of the South Korean T-DMB mobile broadcasting technology AT-DMB; the American mobile broadcasting standard ATSC-M/H; the Chinese broadcasting technologies DTMB and CMMB; second-generation digital terrestrial

  16. Next Generation Summer School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eugenia, Marcu

    2013-04-01

    On 21.06.2010 the "Next Generation" Summer School has opened the doors for its first students. They were introduced in the astronomy world by astronomical observations, astronomy and radio-astronomy lectures, laboratory projects meant to initiate them into modern radio astronomy and radio communications. The didactic programme was structure as fallowing: 1) Astronomical elements from the visible spectrum (lectures + practical projects) 2) Radio astronomy elements (lectures + practical projects) 3) Radio communication base (didactic- recreative games) The students and professors accommodation was at the Agroturistic Pension "Popasul Iancului" situated at 800m from the Marisel Observatory. First day (summer solstice day) began with a practical activity: determination of the meridian by measurements of the shadow (the direction of one vertical alignment, when it has the smallest length). The experiment is very instructive and interesting because combines notions of physics, spatial geometry and basic astronomy elements. Next day the activities took place in four stages: the students processed the experimental data obtained on first day (on sheets of millimetre paper they represented the length of the shadow alignments according the time), each team realised its own sun quadrant, point were given considering the design and functionality of these quadrant, the four teams had to mimic important constellations on carton boards with phosphorescent sticky stars and the students, accompanied by the professors took a hiking trip to the surroundings, marking the interest point coordinates, using a GPS to establish the geographical coronations and at the end of the day the students realised a small map of central Marisel area based on the GPS data. On the third day, the students were introduced to basic notions of radio astronomy, the principal categories of artificial Earth satellites: low orbit satellites (LEO), Medium orbit satellites (MEO) and geostationary satellites (GEO

  17. Next Generation Inverter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Zilai [General Motors LLC, Detroit, MI (United States); Gough, Charles [General Motors LLC, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2016-04-22

    The goal of this Cooperative Agreement was the development of a Next Generation Inverter for General Motors’ electrified vehicles, including battery electric vehicles, range extended electric vehicles, plug-in hybrid electric vehicles and hybrid electric vehicles. The inverter is a critical electronics component that converts battery power (DC) to and from the electric power for the motor (AC).

  18. Next-generation phylogenomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan Cheong Xin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Thanks to advances in next-generation technologies, genome sequences are now being generated at breadth (e.g. across environments and depth (thousands of closely related strains, individuals or samples unimaginable only a few years ago. Phylogenomics – the study of evolutionary relationships based on comparative analysis of genome-scale data – has so far been developed as industrial-scale molecular phylogenetics, proceeding in the two classical steps: multiple alignment of homologous sequences, followed by inference of a tree (or multiple trees. However, the algorithms typically employed for these steps scale poorly with number of sequences, such that for an increasing number of problems, high-quality phylogenomic analysis is (or soon will be computationally infeasible. Moreover, next-generation data are often incomplete and error-prone, and analysis may be further complicated by genome rearrangement, gene fusion and deletion, lateral genetic transfer, and transcript variation. Here we argue that next-generation data require next-generation phylogenomics, including so-called alignment-free approaches. Reviewers Reviewed by Mr Alexander Panchin (nominated by Dr Mikhail Gelfand, Dr Eugene Koonin and Prof Peter Gogarten. For the full reviews, please go to the Reviewers’ comments section.

  19. Next Generation Relativistic Models

    OpenAIRE

    Furnstahl, R. J.

    2003-01-01

    The current generation of covariant mean-field models has had many successes in calculations of bulk observables for medium to heavy nuclei, but there remain many open questions. New challenges are confronted when trying to systematically extend these models to reliably address nuclear structure physics away from the line of stability. In this lecture, we discuss a framework for the next generation of relativistic models that can address these questions and challenges. We interpret nuclear me...

  20. Next Generation Social Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lene Tolstrup; Skouby, Knud Erik

    2008-01-01

    When it comes to discussing the future of electronic communication, social networking is the buzzword. The Internet has become a platform where new social networks emerge and the Internet it itself support the more traditional computer supported communication. The way users build and verifies...... different online networks for communities of people who share interests or individuals who presents themselves through user produced content is what makes up the social networking of today. The purpose of this paper is to discuss perceived user requirements to the next generation social networks. The paper...

  1. The Next Generation Photoinjector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmer, Dennis Thomas; /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept.

    2005-09-12

    This dissertation will elucidate the design, construction, theory, and operation of the Next Generation Photoinjector (NGP). This photoinjector is comprised of the BNL/SLAC/UCLA 1.6 cell symmetrized S-band photocathode radio frequency (rf) electron gun and a single emittance-compensation solenoidal magnet. This photoinjector is a prototype for the Linear Coherent Light Source X-ray Free Electron Laser operating in the 1.5 {angstrom} range. Simulations indicate that this photoinjector is capable of producing a 1nC electron bunch with transverse normalized emittance less than 1 {pi} mm mrad were the cathode is illuminated with a 10 psec longitudinal flat top pulse. Using a Gaussian longitudinal laser profile with a full width half maximum (FWHM) of 10 psec, simulation indicates that the NGP is capable of producing a normalized rms emittance of 2.50 {pi} mm mrad at 1 nC. Using the removable cathode plate we have studied the quantum efficiency (QE) of both copper and magnesium photo-cathodes. The Cu QE was found to be 4.5 x 10{sup -5} with a 25% variation in the QE across the emitting surface of the cathode, while supporting a field gradient of 125 MV/m. At low charge, the transverse normalized rms emittance, {epsilon}{sub n,rms}, produced by the NGP is {epsilon}{sub n,rms} = 1.2 {pi} mm mrad for Q{sub T} = 0.3 nC. The 95% electron beam bunch length was measured to 10.9 psec. The emittance due to the finite magnetic field at the cathode has been studied. The scaling of this magnetic emittance term as a function of cathode magnetic field was found to be 0.01 {pi} mm mrad per Gauss. The 1.6 cell rf gun has been designed to reduce the dipole field asymmetry of the longitudinal accelerating field. Low level rf measurements show that this has in fact been accomplished, with an order of magnitude decrease in the dipole field. High power beam studies also show that the dipole field has been decreased. An upper limit of the intrinsic non-reducible thermal emittance of a

  2. Next generation toroidal devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A general survey of the possible approach for the next generation toroidal devices was made. Either surprisingly or obviously (depending on one's view), the technical constraints along with the scientific considerations lead to a fairly limited set of systems for the most favorable approach for the next generation devices. Specifically if the magnetic field strength of 5 T or above is to be created by superconducting coils, it imposes minimum in the aspect ratio for the tokamak which is slightly higher than contemplated now for ITER design. The similar technical constraints make the minimum linear size of a stellarator large. Scientifically, it is indicated that a tokamak of 1.5 times in the linear dimension should be able to produce economically, especially if a hybrid reactor is allowed. For the next stellarator, it is strongly suggested that some kind of helical axis is necessary both for the (almost) absolute confinement of high energy particles and high stability and equilibrium beta limits. The author still favors a heliac most. Although it may not have been clearly stated in the main text, the stability afforded by the shearless layer may be exploited fully in a stellarator. (author)

  3. Next generation sensors and systems

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    Written by experts in their area of research, this book has outlined the current status of the fundamentals and analytical concepts, modelling and design issues, technical details and practical applications of different types of sensors and discussed about the trends of next generation of sensors and systems happening in the area of Sensing technology. This book will be useful as a reference book for engineers and scientist especially the post-graduate students find will this book as reference book for their research on wearable sensors, devices and technologies.  .

  4. Designing Next Generation Telecom Regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henten, Anders; Samarajiva, Rohan

    – ICT convergence regulation and multisector utility regulation. Whatever structure of next generation telecom regulation is adopted, all countries will need to pay much greater attention to the need for increased coordination of policy directions and regulatory activities both across the industries......Continuously expanding applications of information and communication technologies (ICT) are transforming local, national, regional and international economies into network economies, the foundation for information societies. They are being built upon expanded and upgraded national telecom networks...... to creating an environment to foster a massive expansion in the coverage and capabilities of the information infrastructure networks, with national telecom regulators as the key implementers of the policies of reform. The first phase of reform has focused on industry specific telecom policy and regulation...

  5. Next Generation HVAC System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Yasuo; Murakami, Yoshiki; Hanada, Yuuichi; Nishimura, Nobutaka; Yamazaki, Kenichi; Itoh, Yasuyuki

    A new HVAC (Heating, Ventilating, and Air-Conditioning) system for buildings is proposed. The key technology for the system is a twin coil air handling unit (AHU) and its advanced control method. One coil is equipped to cool and dehumidify the fresh air intake, and the other coil is for cooling circulated air. The deeply chilled water is necessary only for removing the moisture from the fresh air. The latter coil requires moderately cool water according to the HVAC load. Then 2 kinds of chilled water in terms of temperature should be prepared. The structure helps saving the energy consumption for air-conditioning because the higher chilled water temperature implies the better chiller efficiency (COP: Coefficient of Performance). In addition, an advanced control method that is called an ‘Air-Water cooperation system’ is introduced. The control system mainly focuses on energy savings through changing the temperature of the chilled water and supply air according to the HVAC load and weather conditions. In this paper, we introduce a Next Generation HVAC system with its control system and present evaluation results of the system for the model-building simulator.

  6. The Next Generation EMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshavjee, Karim; Mirza, Kashif; Martin, Ken

    2015-01-01

    Electronic medical/health record (EMR) usage in North America has increased significantly in the last half decade. But there is widespread dissatisfaction with the technologies that are currently available in the market place. Our hypothesis is that EMR vendors and the market place alone cannot solve the issue of poor technology. We propose an architecture for the next generation of electronic records that solves current concerns of end users and addresses the needs of additional stakeholders, including health system funders, patients, researchers and guideline implementers. By including additional stakeholders, we believe that additional resources, competencies and functionality can be unleashed to solve the larger problems of the current generation of EMRs. The architecture also addresses future requirements that are likely to arise from technological developments such as mobile apps and PHRs and from innovations in medicine, including genomics, artificial intelligence and personalized medicine. The paper makes a call to action for informatics researchers to play a greater role in R&D on EMRs. PMID:25676975

  7. NEXT GENERATION TURBINE PROGRAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William H. Day

    2002-05-03

    The Next Generation Turbine (NGT) Program's technological development focused on a study of the feasibility of turbine systems greater than 30 MW that offer improvement over the 1999 state-of-the-art systems. This program targeted goals of 50 percent turndown ratios, 15 percent reduction in generation cost/kW hour, improved service life, reduced emissions, 400 starts/year with 10 minutes to full load, and multiple fuel usage. Improvement in reliability, availability, and maintainability (RAM), while reducing operations, maintenance, and capital costs by 15 percent, was pursued. This program builds on the extensive low emissions stationary gas turbine work being carried out by Pratt & Whitney (P&W) for P&W Power Systems (PWPS), which is a company under the auspices of the United Technologies Corporation (UTC). This study was part of the overall Department of Energy (DOE) NGT Program that extends out to the year 2008. A follow-on plan for further full-scale component hardware testing is conceptualized for years 2002 through 2008 to insure a smooth and efficient transition to the marketplace for advanced turbine design and cycle technology. This program teamed the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), P&W, United Technologies Research Center (UTRC), kraftWork Systems Inc., a subcontractor on-site at UTRC, and Multiphase Power and Processing Technologies (MPPT), an off-site subcontractor. Under the auspices of the NGT Program, a series of analyses were performed to identify the NGT engine system's ability to serve multiple uses. The majority were in conjunction with a coal-fired plant, or used coal as the system fuel. Identified also was the ability of the NGT system to serve as the basis of an advanced performance cycle: the humid air turbine (HAT) cycle. The HAT cycle is also used with coal gasification in an integrated cycle HAT (IGHAT). The NGT systems identified were: (1) Feedwater heating retrofit to an existing coal-fired steam plant, which

  8. Next Generation Distributed Computing for Cancer Research

    OpenAIRE

    Pankaj Agarwal; Kouros Owzar

    2015-01-01

    Advances in next generation sequencing (NGS) and mass spectrometry (MS) technologies have provided many new opportunities and angles for extending the scope of translational cancer research while creating tremendous challenges in data management and analysis. The resulting informatics challenge is invariably not amenable to the use of traditional computing models. Recent advances in scalable computing and associated infrastructure, particularly distributed computing for Big Data, can provide ...

  9. Next Generation Environment for Collaborative Research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    D.Collados; G.Denis; 等

    2001-01-01

    Collaborative environments supporting point to point and multipoint videoconferencing,document and application sharing across both local and wide area networks,video on demand (Broadcast and playback)and interactive text facilities will be a crucial element for the development of the next generation of HEP experiments by geographically dispersed collaborations.The "Virtual Room Videoconferencing System"(VRVS) has been developed since 1995,in order to provide a low cost,bandwidth-efficient,extensible means for videoconferencing and remote collaboration over networks within the high Energy and Nuclear Physics communities.The VRVS(Virtual Rooms Videoconferencing System) provides worldwide videoconferencing service and collaborative environment to the research and education communities,VRVS uses the Internet2 and ESnet high-performance networks infrastructure to deploy its Web-based system,which now includes more than 5790 registered hosts running VRVS software in more than 50 different countries,VRVS hosts an average of 100-multipoint videconference and collaborative sessions worldwide every month.There are around 35 reflectors that manage the traffic flow.at HENP labs and universities in the US and Europe,So far,there are 7 Virtual Rooms for World Wide Conferences(involving more than one contient),and 4 Virtual Rooms each for intra-continental conferences in the US,Europe and Asia,VRVS continues to expand and implement new digital video technologies,including H.323 ITU standard integration,MPEG-2 videoconferencing integration,shared environments,and Quality of Service.

  10. Next Generation Pneumococcal Vaccines

    OpenAIRE

    Kristin L Moffitt; Malley, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Currently licensed pneumococcal vaccines are based on the generation of antibodies to the pneumococcal polysaccharide, of which there are more than 90 different types. While these vaccines are highly effective against the serotypes included, their high cost and limited serotype coverage limits their usefulness worldwide, particularly in low resources areas. Thus alternative or adjunctive options are being actively pursued. This review will present these various approaches, including variation...

  11. Next Generation Microshutter Arrays Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to develop the next generation MicroShutter Array (MSA) as a multi-object field selector for missions anticipated in the next two decades. For many...

  12. Next Generation Digital Commerce Technologies

    OpenAIRE

    Muzhir Shaban Al-Ani

    2009-01-01

    This paper deals with the demonstration of commerce technologies and concentration on the next generation technologies. The development of high advance technologies in telecommunications such as internet and mobile telephony leads to massive support for digital commerce. The main feature of the third generation mobile internet protocol addressing introduced an access to the internet through mobile. The trends of next generation digital commerce try to overcome all the commercial problems and ...

  13. Next generation CANDU plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CANDU Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors systems featuring horizontal fuel channels and heavy water moderator will continue to evolve, supported by AECL's strong commitment to comprehensive R and D programs. There are three key CANDU development strategic thrusts: improved economics, fuel cycle flexibility, and enhanced safety operation based on design feedback. Therefore, CANDU reactor products will continue to evolve by incorporating further improvements and advanced features that will be arising from our CANDU Technology R and D programs in areas such as heavy water and tritium, control and instrumentation, fuel and fuel cycles, systems and equipment and safety and constructability. Progressive CANDU development will continue in AECL to enhance the medium size product - CANDU 6, and to evolve the larger size product - CANDU 9. The development of features for CANDU 6 and CANDU 9 is carried out in parallel. Developments completed for one reactor size can then be applied to the other design with minimum costs and risk. (author)

  14. Next-generation Astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Norris, Ray P

    2010-01-01

    Fundamental changes are taking place in the way we do astronomy. In twenty years time, it is likely that most astronomers will never go near a cutting-edge telescope, which will be much more efficiently operated in service mode. They will rarely analyse data, since all the leading-edge telescopes will have pipeline processors. And rather than competing to observe a particularly interesting object, astronomers will more commonly group together in large consortia to observe massive chunks of the sky in carefully designed surveys, generating petabytes of data daily. We can imagine that astronomical productivity will be higher than at any previous time. PhD students will mine enormous survey databases using sophisticated tools, cross-correlating different wavelength data over vast areas, and producing front-line astronomy results within months of starting their PhD. The expertise that now goes into planning an observation will instead be devoted to planning a foray into the databases. In effect, people will plan ...

  15. Next generation fire suppressants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jerry A.

    1995-01-01

    Spectrex, Inc., located in Cedar Grove, NJ is a manufacturer of fire detection and suppression equipment. Spectrex is one of the original pioneers in high speed fire detection and suppression systems for combat vehicles. Spectrex has installed fire suppressions systems in thousands of combat vehicles and ships throughout the world. Additionally, they manufacture flame explosion detectors, ship damage control systems, and optical gas and vapor detectors. The culmination of several years of research and development has recently produced an innovative electro-optical continuous monitoring systems called SharpEye 20/20I IR(sup 3) and SAFEYE that provide fast and reliable gas, vapor, aerosol, flame, and explosion detection. SharpEye 20/20I IR(sup 3) is a self-contained triple spectrum flame detector which scans for oscillating IR radiation (1 to 10 Hz) in the spectral bands ranging from 4.0 to 5.0 microns and uses programmed algorithms to check the ratio and correlation of data received by the three sensors to make the system highly immune to false alarms. It is extremely sensitive as it can detect a 1 x 1 square foot gasoline pan fire at 200 feet in less than 3 seconds. The sensitivity is user programmable, offering 4 ranges of detection. SAFEYE is comprised of a selected number of multispectral ban microprocessors controlled detectors which are in communication with one or more radiation sources that is projected along a 600 feet optical path. The signals from the selected narrow bands are processed and analyzed by highly sophisticated algorithms. It is ideal for high risk, remote, large areas such as petroleum and chemical manufacturing sites, waste dumps, aircraft cargo bays, and ship compartments. The SAFEYE will perform direct readings of the presence or rate of rise of concentrations of gases, vapors, or aerosols at the range of parts per million and provide alarms at various set points at different levels of concentrations.

  16. Next Generation Microbiology Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, C. M.; Oubre, C. M.; Elliott, T. F.; Castro, V. A.; Pierson, D. L.

    2012-01-01

    As humans continue to explore deep into space, microorganisms will travel with them. The primary means to mitigate the risk of infectious disease are a combination of prudent spacecraft design and rigorous operational controls. The effectiveness of these methods are evaluated by microbiological monitoring of spacecraft, food, water, and the crew that is performed preflight, in-flight, and post-flight. Current NASA requirements associated with microbiological monitoring are based on culture-based methodology where microorganisms are grown on a semi-solid growth medium and enumerated. Subsequent identification of the organisms requires specialized labor and large equipment, which historically has been performed on Earth. Requirements that rely strictly on culture-based units limit the use of non-culture based monitoring technology. Specifically, the culture-based "measurement criteria" are Colony Forming Units (CFU, representing the growth of one microorganism at a single location on the agar medium) per a given volume, area, or sample size. As the CFU unit by definition is culture-based, these requirements limit alternative technologies for spaceflight applications. As spaceflight missions such as those to Mars extend further into space, culture-based technology will become difficult to implement due to the (a) limited shelf life of the culture media, (b) mass/volume necessary to carry these consumables, and (c) problems associated with the production of biohazardous material in the habitable volume of the spacecraft. In addition, an extensive amount of new knowledge has been obtained during the Space Shuttle, NASA-Mir, and International Space Station Programs, which gave direction for new or modified microbial control requirements for vehicle design and mission operations. The goal of this task is to develop and recommend a new set of requirements for vehicle design and mission operations, including microbiological monitoring, based upon "lessons learned" and new

  17. Next Generation CANDU Performance Assurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AECL is developing a next generation CANDU design to meet market requirements for low cost, reliable energy supplies. The primary product development objective is to achieve a capital cost substantially lower than the current nuclear plant costs, such that the next generation plant will be competitive with alternative options for large-scale base-load electricity supply. However, other customer requirements, including safety, low-operating costs and reliable performance, are being addressed as equally important design requirements. The main focus of this paper is to address the development directions that will provide performance assurance. The next generation CANDU is an evolutionary extension of the proven CANDU 6 design. There are eight CANDU 6 units in operation in four countries around the world and further three units are under construction. These units provide a sound basis for projecting highly reliable performance for the next generation CANDU. In addition, the next generation CANDU program includes development and qualification activities that will address the new features and design extensions in the advanced plant. To limit product development risk and to enhance performance assurance, the next generation CANDU design features and performance parameters have been carefully reviewed during the concept development phase and have been deliberately selected so as to be well founded on the existing CANDU knowledge base. Planned research and development activities are required only to provide confirmation of the projected performance within a modest extension of the established database. Necessary qualification tests will be carried out within the time frame of the development program, to establish a proven design prior to the start of a construction project. This development support work coupled with ongoing AECL programs to support and enhance the performance and reliability of the existing CANDU plants will provide sound assurance that the next generation

  18. The next generation safeguards initiative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NGSI or the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative is designed to revitalize the U.S. safeguards technical base, as well as invest in human resources, and to mobilize our primary asset - the U.S. National Laboratories - as well as industry and academia to restore capabilities. While NGSI is a U.S. effort it is intended to serve as a catalyst for a much broader commitment to international safeguards in partnership with the IAEA and other countries. Initiatives over the last years include such as the Proliferation Security Initiative, UN Security Council Resolution 1540, the Global Initiative to Combat Nuclear Terrorism, and initiatives of the G-8 and NSG to discourage the spread of enrichment and reprocessing. NGSI augments this agenda by providing a means to strengthen the technical and political underpinnings of IAEA safeguards. Priorities and envisioned activities under NGSI are the following. (1) Cooperation with IAEA and others to promote universal adoption of safeguards agreements and the Additional Protocol including greater information sharing between member states and the IAEA, investigation of weaponization and procurement activities, and options to strengthen the state-level approach to safeguards. (2) NGSI anticipates the deployment of new types of reactors and fuel cycle facilities, as well as the need to use limited safeguards resources effectively and efficiently, especially in plants that pose the largest burden specifically complex, bulk-handling facilities. (3) NGSI will encourage a generational improvement in current safeguards technologies including improvement of precision and speed of nuclear measurements, performance of real-time process monitoring and surveillance in unattended mode, enabling in-field, pre-screening and analysis of nuclear and environmental samples, and collection, integration, analysis and archiving safeguards-relevant information from all available sources.(4) NGSI will address human capital management. Training and

  19. Next-Generation Telemetry Workstation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    A next-generation telemetry workstation has been developed to replace the one currently used to test and control Range Safety systems. Improving upon the performance of the original system, the new telemetry workstation uses dual-channel telemetry boards for better synchronization of the two uplink telemetry streams. The new workstation also includes an Interrange Instrumentation Group/Global Positioning System (IRIG/GPS) time code receiver board for independent, local time stamping of return-link data. The next-generation system will also record and play back return-link data for postlaunch analysis.

  20. Technical presentation: Next Generation Oscilloscopes

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2011-01-01

      Rohde & Schwarz "Next Generation Oscilloscopes" - Introduction and Presentation Agenda: Wednesday 23 March  -  09:30 to 11:30 (open end) Bldg. 13-2-005 Language: English 09.30 Presentation "Next Generation Oscilloscopes" from Rohde & Schwarz RTO / RTM in theory and practice Gerard Walker 10.15 Technical design details from R&D Dr. Markus Freidhof 10.45 Scope and Probe Roadmap (confidential) Guido Schulze 11.00 Open Discussion Feedback, first impression, wishes, needs and requirements from CERN All 11.30 Expert Talks, Hands on All Mr. Dr. Markus Freidhof, Head of R&D Oscilloscopes, Rohde & Schwarz, Germany; Mr. Guido Schulze, ...

  1. Towards Next Generation BI Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Varga, Jovan; Romero, Oscar; Pedersen, Torben Bach;

    2014-01-01

    Next generation Business Intelligence (BI) systems require integration of heterogeneous data sources and a strong user-centric orientation. Both needs entail machine-processable metadata to enable automation and allow end users to gain access to relevant data for their decision making processes. ...

  2. Resists for next generation lithography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brainard, Robert L.; Barclay, George G.; Anderson, Erik H.; Ocola, Leonidas E.

    2001-10-03

    Four Next Generation Lithographic options (EUV, x-ray, EPL, IPL) are compared against four current optical technologies (i-line, DUV, 193 nm, 157 nm) for resolution capabilities based on wavelength. As the wavelength of the incident radiation decreases, the nature of the interaction with the resist changes. At high energies, optical density is less sensitive to molecular structure then at 157 nm.

  3. Sequencing antibody repertoires: The next generation

    OpenAIRE

    Fischer, Nicolas

    2011-01-01

    Genomic studies have been revolutionized by the use of next generation sequencing (NGS), which delivers huge amounts of sequence information in a short span of time. The number of applications for NGS is rapidly expanding and significantly transforming many areas of life sciences. The field of antibody research and discovery is no exception. Several recent studies have harnessed the power of NGS for analyzing natural or synthetic immunoglobulin repertoires with unprecedented resolution and ex...

  4. Next Generation Microchannel Heat Exchangers

    CERN Document Server

    Ohadi, Michael; Dessiatoun, Serguei; Cetegen, Edvin

    2013-01-01

    In Next Generation Microchannel Heat Exchangers, the authors’ focus on the new generation highly efficient heat exchangers and presentation of novel data and technical expertise not available in the open literature.  Next generation micro channels offer record high heat transfer coefficients with pressure drops much less than conventional micro channel heat exchangers. These inherent features promise fast penetration into many mew markets, including high heat flux cooling of electronics, waste heat recovery and energy efficiency enhancement applications, alternative energy systems, as well as applications in mass exchangers and chemical reactor systems. The combination of up to the minute research findings and technical know-how make this book very timely as the search for high performance heat and mass exchangers that can cut costs in materials consumption intensifies.

  5. Next-Generation Field Guides

    OpenAIRE

    Ellison, Aaron M.; Farnsworth, Elizabeth Jean; Chu, Miyoko; Kress, W. John; Neill, Amanda K.; Best, Jason H.; Pickering, John; Stevenson, Robert D.; Courtney, Gregory W.; VanDyk, John K.

    2013-01-01

    To conserve species, we must first identify them. Field researchers, land managers, educators, and citizen scientists need up-to-date and accessible tools to identify organisms, organize data, and share observations. Emerging technologies complement traditional, book-form field guides by providing users with a wealth of multimedia data. We review technical innovations of next-generation field guides, including Web-based and stand-alone applications, interactive multiple-access keys, visual-re...

  6. What is next generation sequencing?

    OpenAIRE

    Behjati, Sam; Tarpey, Patrick S.

    2013-01-01

    Next generation sequencing (NGS), massively parallel or deep sequencing are related terms that describe a DNA sequencing technology which has revolutionised genomic research. Using NGS an entire human genome can be sequenced within a single day. In contrast, the previous Sanger sequencing technology, used to decipher the human genome, required over a decade to deliver the final draft. Although in genome research NGS has mostly superseded conventional Sanger sequencing, it has not yet translat...

  7. Algorithms for Next Generation Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Cormode, Graham

    2010-01-01

    Data networking now plays a major role in everyday life and new applications continue to appear at a blinding pace. Yet we still do not have a sound foundation for designing, evaluating and managing these networks. This book covers topics at the intersection of algorithms and networking. It builds a complete picture of the current state of research on Next Generation Networks and the challenges for the years ahead. Particular focus is given to evolving research initiatives and the architecture they propose and implications for networking. Topics: Network design and provisioning, hardware issue

  8. Next generation distributed computing for cancer research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Pankaj; Owzar, Kouros

    2014-01-01

    Advances in next generation sequencing (NGS) and mass spectrometry (MS) technologies have provided many new opportunities and angles for extending the scope of translational cancer research while creating tremendous challenges in data management and analysis. The resulting informatics challenge is invariably not amenable to the use of traditional computing models. Recent advances in scalable computing and associated infrastructure, particularly distributed computing for Big Data, can provide solutions for addressing these challenges. In this review, the next generation of distributed computing technologies that can address these informatics problems is described from the perspective of three key components of a computational platform, namely computing, data storage and management, and networking. A broad overview of scalable computing is provided to set the context for a detailed description of Hadoop, a technology that is being rapidly adopted for large-scale distributed computing. A proof-of-concept Hadoop cluster, set up for performance benchmarking of NGS read alignment, is described as an example of how to work with Hadoop. Finally, Hadoop is compared with a number of other current technologies for distributed computing. PMID:25983539

  9. Rhamnolipids--next generation surfactants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Markus Michael; Kügler, Johannes H; Henkel, Marius; Gerlitzki, Melanie; Hörmann, Barbara; Pöhnlein, Martin; Syldatk, Christoph; Hausmann, Rudolf

    2012-12-31

    The demand for bio-based processes and materials in the petrochemical industry has significantly increased during the last decade because of the expected running out of petroleum. This trend can be ascribed to three main causes: (1) the increased use of renewable resources for chemical synthesis of already established product classes, (2) the replacement of chemical synthesis of already established product classes by new biotechnological processes based on renewable resources, and (3) the biotechnological production of new molecules with new features or better performances than already established comparable chemically synthesized products. All three approaches are currently being pursued for surfactant production. Biosurfactants are a very promising and interesting substance class because they are based on renewable resources, sustainable, and biologically degradable. Alkyl polyglycosides are chemically synthesized biosurfactants established on the surfactant market. The first microbiological biosurfactants on the market were sophorolipids. Of all currently known biosurfactants, rhamnolipids have the highest potential for becoming the next generation of biosurfactants introduced on the market. Although the metabolic pathways and genetic regulation of biosynthesis are known qualitatively, the quantitative understanding relevant for bioreactor cultivation is still missing. Additionally, high product titers have been exclusively described with vegetable oil as sole carbon source in combination with Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains. Competitive productivity is still out of reach for heterologous hosts or non-pathogenic natural producer strains. Thus, on the one hand there is a need to gain a deeper understanding of the regulation of rhamnolipid production on process and cellular level during bioreactor cultivations. On the other hand, there is a need for metabolizable renewable substrates, which do not compete with food and feed. A sustainable bioeconomy approach should

  10. The next generation CANDU 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AECL's product line of CANDU 6 and CANDU 9 nuclear power plants are adapted to respond to changing market conditions, experience feedback and technological development by a continuous improvement process of design evolution. The CANDU 6 Nuclear Power Plant design is a successful family of nuclear units, with the first four units entering service in 1983, and the most recent entering service this year. A further four CANDU 6 units are under construction. Starting in 1996, a focused forward-looking development program is under way at AECL to incorporate a series of individual improvements and integrate them into the CANDU 6, leading to the evolutionary development of the next-generation enhanced CANDU 6. The CANDU 6 improvements program includes all aspects of an NPP project, including engineering tools improvements, design for improved constructability, scheduling for faster, more streamlined commissioning, and improved operating performance. This enhanced CANDU 6 product will combine the benefits of design provenness (drawing on the more than 70 reactor-years experience of the seven operating CANDU 6 units), with the advantages of an evolutionary next-generation design. Features of the enhanced CANDU 6 design include: Advanced Human Machine Interface - built around the Advanced CANDU Control Centre; Advanced fuel design - using the newly demonstrated CANFLEX fuel bundle; Improved Efficiency based on improved utilization of waste heat; Streamlined System Design - including simplifications to improve performance and safety system reliability; Advanced Engineering Tools, -- featuring linked electronic databases from 3D CADDS, equipment specification and material management; Advanced Construction Techniques - based on open top equipment installation and the use of small skid mounted modules; Options defined for Passive Heat Sink capability and low-enrichment core optimization. (author)

  11. Building next-generation converged networks theory and practice

    CERN Document Server

    Pathan, Al-Sakib Khan

    2013-01-01

    Supplying a comprehensive introduction to next-generation networks, Building Next-Generation Converged Networks: Theory and Practice strikes a balance between how and why things work and how to make them work. It compiles recent advancements along with basic issues from the wide range of fields related to next generation networks. Containing the contributions of 56 industry experts and researchers from 16 different countries, the book presents relevant theoretical frameworks and the latest research. It investigates new technologies such as IPv6 over Low Power Wireless Personal Area Network (6L

  12. Next Generation Geothermal Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brugman, John; Hattar, Mai; Nichols, Kenneth; Esaki, Yuri

    1995-09-01

    A number of current and prospective power plant concepts were investigated to evaluate their potential to serve as the basis of the next generation geothermal power plant (NGGPP). The NGGPP has been envisaged as a power plant that would be more cost competitive (than current geothermal power plants) with fossil fuel power plants, would efficiently use resources and mitigate the risk of reservoir under-performance, and minimize or eliminate emission of pollutants and consumption of surface and ground water. Power plant concepts were analyzed using resource characteristics at ten different geothermal sites located in the western United States. Concepts were developed into viable power plant processes, capital costs were estimated and levelized busbar costs determined. Thus, the study results should be considered as useful indicators of the commercial viability of the various power plants concepts that were investigated. Broadly, the different power plant concepts that were analyzed in this study fall into the following categories: commercial binary and flash plants, advanced binary plants, advanced flash plants, flash/binary hybrid plants, and fossil/geothed hybrid plants. Commercial binary plants were evaluated using commercial isobutane as a working fluid; both air-cooling and water-cooling were considered. Advanced binary concepts included cycles using synchronous turbine-generators, cycles with metastable expansion, and cycles utilizing mixtures as working fluids. Dual flash steam plants were used as the model for the commercial flash cycle. The following advanced flash concepts were examined: dual flash with rotary separator turbine, dual flash with steam reheater, dual flash with hot water turbine, and subatmospheric flash. Both dual flash and binary cycles were combined with other cycles to develop a number of hybrid cycles: dual flash binary bottoming cycle, dual flash backpressure turbine binary cycle, dual flash gas turbine cycle, and binary gas turbine

  13. The Next Generation BLAST Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Galitzki, Nicholas; Angilè, Francesco E; Ashton, Peter; Beall, James A; Becker, Dan; Bradford, Kristi J; Che, George; Cho, Hsiao-Mei; Devlin, Mark J; Dober, Bradley J; Fissel, Laura M; Fukui, Yasuo; Gao, Jiansong; Groppi, Christopher E; Hillbrand, Seth; Hilton, Gene C; Hubmayr, Johannes; Irwin, Kent D; Klein, Jeffrey; Van Lanen, Jeff; Li, Dale; Li, Zhi-Yun; Lourie, Nathan P; Mani, Hamdi; Martin, Peter G; Mauskopf, Philip; Nakamura, Fumitaka; Novak, Giles; Pappas, David P; Pascale, Enzo; Pisano, Giampaolo; Santos, Fabio P; Savini, Giorgio; Scott, Douglas; Stanchfield, Sara; Tucker, Carole; Ullom, Joel N; Underhill, Matthew; Vissers, Michael R; Ward-Thompson, Derek

    2014-01-01

    The Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope for Polarimetry (BLASTPol) was a suborbital experiment designed to map magnetic fields in order to study their role in star formation processes. BLASTPol made detailed polarization maps of a number of molecular clouds during its successful flights from Antarctica in 2010 and 2012. We present the next-generation BLASTPol instrument (BLAST-TNG) that will build off the success of the previous experiment and continue its role as a unique instrument and a test bed for new technologies. With a 16-fold increase in mapping speed, BLAST-TNG will make larger and deeper maps. Major improvements include a 2.5 m carbon fiber mirror that is 40% wider than the BLASTPol mirror and ~3000 polarization sensitive detectors. BLAST-TNG will observe in three bands at 250, 350, and 500 microns. The telescope will serve as a pathfinder project for microwave kinetic inductance detector (MKID) technology, as applied to feedhorn coupled submillimeter detector arrays. The liquid he...

  14. On the Design of Next Generation Network Architecture for a Developing Economy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathaniel S. Tarkaa

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The design of network architecture is an essential step in the design of Next Generation Networks, leading to the prediction of the actual equipment quantities and dimensioning of the network. The network architecture is commonly drawn out as a diagram for visual representation of the overall network. This paper focuses on the design of the architectural model for a softswitch IP based backbone network for Benue State, Nigeria, as a case study of developing economies. It has been found that, in developing countries, the migration from the Public Switched Telephone Network to Next Generation Network takes the form of a major telecommunications development scheme meant for the extension of telecommunications infrastructure and services to new deserved areas and/or the modernization of the predominantly obsolete and substandard existing telecommunications infrastructure. So, the basic network planning principles have been followed to design the architecture in the most efficient and cost-effective manner possible. The key design methodology is based on intuitive demand forecasting, a snapshot of the existing network infrastructure and systematic assessment of the Public Switched Telephone Network-to-Next Generation Network migration principles. It was furthermore guided by use of the ITU-T’s generic reference models enabling the proper combinations of the functional entities. The resulting Next Generation Network backbone architecture is made up of 2 Softswitches, 23 Universal Media Gateways and an MPLS/IP core. The further optimization of the architecture, which is normally achieved with dimensioning of the network, is beyond the scope of this work.

  15. Next Generation Safeguards Initiative: Human Capital Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since 2008, the Human Capital Development (HCD) subprogramme of the U.S. National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA) Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) has supported the recruitment, education, training, and retention of the next generation of international safeguards professionals to meet the needs of both the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the United States. Specifically, HCD's efforts respond to data indicating that 82% of safeguards experts at U.S. Laboratories will have left the workforce within 15 years. This paper provides an update on the status of the subprogramme since its last presentation at the IAEA Safeguards Symposium in 2010. It highlights strengthened, integrated efforts in the areas of graduate and post-doctoral fellowships, young and midcareer professional support, short safeguards courses, and university engagement. It also discusses lessons learned from the U.S. experience in safeguards education and training as well as the importance of long-range strategies to develop a cohesive, effective, and efficient human capital development approach. (author)

  16. NEXT GENERATION TURBINE SYSTEM STUDY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank Macri

    2002-02-28

    Rolls-Royce has completed a preliminary design and marketing study under a Department of Energy (DOE) cost shared contract (DE-AC26-00NT40852) to analyze the feasibility of developing a clean, high efficiency, and flexible Next Generation Turbine (NGT) system to meet the power generation market needs of the year 2007 and beyond. Rolls-Royce evaluated the full range of its most advanced commercial aerospace and aeroderivative engines alongside the special technologies necessary to achieve the aggressive efficiency, performance, emissions, economic, and flexibility targets desired by the DOE. Heavy emphasis was placed on evaluating the technical risks and the economic viability of various concept and technology options available. This was necessary to ensure the resulting advanced NGT system would provide extensive public benefits and significant customer benefits without introducing unacceptable levels of technical and operational risk that would impair the market acceptance of the resulting product. Two advanced cycle configurations were identified as offering significant advantages over current combined cycle products available in the market. In addition, balance of plant (BOP) technologies, as well as capabilities to improve the reliability, availability, and maintainability (RAM) of industrial gas turbine engines, have been identified. A customer focused survey and economic analysis of a proposed Rolls-Royce NGT product configuration was also accomplished as a part of this research study. The proposed Rolls-Royce NGT solution could offer customers clean, flexible power generation systems with very high efficiencies, similar to combined cycle plants, but at a much lower specific cost, similar to those of simple cycle plants.

  17. Digital Earth reloaded - Beyond the next generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlers, M.; Woodgate, P.; Annoni, A.; Schade, S.

    2014-02-01

    Digital replicas (or 'mirror worlds') of complex entities and systems are now routine in many fields such as aerospace engineering; archaeology; medicine; or even fashion design. The Digital Earth (DE) concept as a digital replica of the entire planet occurs in Al Gore's 1992 book Earth in the Balance and was popularized in his speech at the California Science Center in January 1998. It played a pivotal role in stimulating the development of a first generation of virtual globes, typified by Google Earth that achieved many elements of this vision. Almost 15 years after Al Gore's speech, the concept of DE needs to be re-evaluated in the light of the many scientific and technical developments in the fields of information technology, data infrastructures, citizen?s participation, and earth observation that have taken place since. This paper intends to look beyond the next generation predominantly based on the developments of fields outside the spatial sciences, where concepts, software, and hardware with strong relationships to DE are being developed without referring to this term. It also presents a number of guiding criteria for future DE developments.

  18. The Next Generation Transit Survey (NGTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goad Michael

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The Next Generation Transit Survey (NGTS is a new ground-based sky survey designed to find transiting Neptunes and super-Earths. By covering at least sixteen times the sky area of Kepler, we will find small planets around stars that are sufficiently bright for radial velocity confirmation, mass determination and atmospheric characterisation. The NGTS instrument will consist of an array of twelve independently pointed 20 cm telescopes fitted with red-sensitive CCD cameras. It will be constructed at the ESO Paranal Observatory, thereby benefiting from the very best photometric conditions as well as follow up synergy with the VLT and E-ELT. Our design has been verified through the operation of two prototype instruments, demonstrating white noise characteristics to sub-mmag photometric precision. Detailed simulations show that about thirty bright super-Earths and up to two hundred Neptunes could be discovered. Our science operations are due to begin in 2014.

  19. Statistical analysis of next generation sequencing data

    CERN Document Server

    Nettleton, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) is the latest high throughput technology to revolutionize genomic research. NGS generates massive genomic datasets that play a key role in the big data phenomenon that surrounds us today. To extract signals from high-dimensional NGS data and make valid statistical inferences and predictions, novel data analytic and statistical techniques are needed. This book contains 20 chapters written by prominent statisticians working with NGS data. The topics range from basic preprocessing and analysis with NGS data to more complex genomic applications such as copy number variation and isoform expression detection. Research statisticians who want to learn about this growing and exciting area will find this book useful. In addition, many chapters from this book could be included in graduate-level classes in statistical bioinformatics for training future biostatisticians who will be expected to deal with genomic data in basic biomedical research, genomic clinical trials and personalized med...

  20. Next generation plant operation support technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research and development of next generation plant operation support technologies has been carried out by plant industries including nuclear industry. Several research projects have been conducted for advancement of operation and maintenance of nuclear power plants (NPPs), such as development of an advanced human-machine interface system to enhance operating availability of NPPs. For three years starting from April 2003, the committee of Institute of Electrical Engineers of Japan (IEEJ) had investigated developing and advanced technologies in several areas and studied their applicability to solve organizational and management issues related with operation and maintenance of NPPs. This book compiled the concept of advanced technologies and components to contribute advancement of safety and reliability of NPPs, based on results of investigations and studies of the committee. (T. Tanaka)

  1. Next Generation Safeguards Initiative: 2010 and Beyond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strengthening the international safeguards system is a key element of the U.S. non-proliferation policy agenda as evidenced by President Obama's call for more 'resources and authority to strengthen international inspections' in his April 2009 Prague speech. Through programs such as the recently-launched Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) and the long standing U.S. Program of Technical Assistance to IAEA Safeguards, the United States is working to implement this vision. The U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration launched NGSI in 2008 to develop the policies, concepts, technologies, expertise, and international safeguards infrastructure necessary to strengthen and sustain the international safeguards system as it evolves to meet new challenges. Following a successful 2009, NGSI has made significant progress toward these goals in 2010. NGSI has recently completed a number of policy studies on advanced safeguards concepts and sponsored several workshops, including a second international meeting on Harmonization of International Safeguards Infrastructure Development in Vienna. The program is also continuing multi-year projects to investigate advanced non-destructive assay techniques, enhance recruitment and training efforts, and strengthen international cooperation on safeguards. In December 2010, NGSI will host the Third Annual International Meeting on International Safeguards in Washington, DC, which will draw together key stakeholders from government, the nuclear industry, and the IAEA to further develop and promote a common understanding of Safeguards by Design principles and goals, and to identify opportunities for practical application of the concept. This paper presents a review of NGSI program activities in 2010 and previews plans for upcoming activities. (author)

  2. Securing user internet access using the next generation firewall

    OpenAIRE

    Bertoncelj, Matej

    2016-01-01

    Good practice in information infrastructure security requires a multifaceted approach. In the majority of cases, the firewall represents the first line of defence. The thesis discusses diverse types of firewalls, as well as advantages and disadvantages of diverse technological approaches. Increasingly more sophisticated threats have promoted the development of advanced security systems together with their integration into present day firewalls. A detailed description of a next generation fire...

  3. SmartMIMO: An Energy-Aware Adaptive MIMO-OFDM Radio Link Control for Next-Generation Wireless Local Area Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wim Dehaene

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Multiantenna systems and more particularly those operating on multiple input and multiple output (MIMO channels are currently a must to improve wireless links spectrum efficiency and/or robustness. There exists a fundamental tradeoff between potential spectrum efficiency and robustness increase. However, multiantenna techniques also come with an overhead in silicon implementation area and power consumption due, at least, to the duplication of part of the transmitter and receiver radio front-ends. Although the area overhead may be acceptable in view of the performance improvement, low power consumption must be preserved for integration in nomadic devices. In this case, it is the tradeoff between performance (e.g., the net throughput on top of the medium access control layer and average power consumption that really matters. It has been shown that adaptive schemes were mandatory to avoid that multiantenna techniques hamper this system tradeoff. In this paper, we derive smartMIMO: an adaptive multiantenna approach which, next to simply adapting the modulation and code rate as traditionally considered, decides packet-per-packet, depending on the MIMO channel state, to use either space-division multiplexing (increasing spectrum efficiency, space-time coding (increasing robustness, or to stick to single-antenna transmission. Contrarily to many of such adaptive schemes, the focus is set on using multiantenna transmission to improve the link energy efficiency in real operation conditions. Based on a model calibrated on an existing reconfigurable multiantenna transceiver setup, the link energy efficiency with the proposed scheme is shown to be improved by up to 30% when compared to nonadaptive schemes. The average throughput is, on the other hand, improved by up to 50% when compared to single-antenna transmission.

  4. SmartMIMO: An Energy-Aware Adaptive MIMO-OFDM Radio Link Control for Next-Generation Wireless Local Area Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dehaene Wim

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiantenna systems and more particularly those operating on multiple input and multiple output (MIMO channels are currently a must to improve wireless links spectrum efficiency and/or robustness. There exists a fundamental tradeoff between potential spectrum efficiency and robustness increase. However, multiantenna techniques also come with an overhead in silicon implementation area and power consumption due, at least, to the duplication of part of the transmitter and receiver radio front-ends. Although the area overhead may be acceptable in view of the performance improvement, low power consumption must be preserved for integration in nomadic devices. In this case, it is the tradeoff between performance (e.g., the net throughput on top of the medium access control layer and average power consumption that really matters. It has been shown that adaptive schemes were mandatory to avoid that multiantenna techniques hamper this system tradeoff. In this paper, we derive smartMIMO: an adaptive multiantenna approach which, next to simply adapting the modulation and code rate as traditionally considered, decides packet-per-packet, depending on the MIMO channel state, to use either space-division multiplexing (increasing spectrum efficiency, space-time coding (increasing robustness, or to stick to single-antenna transmission. Contrarily to many of such adaptive schemes, the focus is set on using multiantenna transmission to improve the link energy efficiency in real operation conditions. Based on a model calibrated on an existing reconfigurable multiantenna transceiver setup, the link energy efficiency with the proposed scheme is shown to be improved by up to 30% when compared to nonadaptive schemes. The average throughput is, on the other hand, improved by up to 50% when compared to single-antenna transmission.

  5. Next generation non-vacuum, maskless, low temperature nanoparticle ink laser digital direct metal patterning for a large area flexible electronics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junyeob Yeo

    Full Text Available Flexible electronics opened a new class of future electronics. The foldable, light and durable nature of flexible electronics allows vast flexibility in applications such as display, energy devices and mobile electronics. Even though conventional electronics fabrication methods are well developed for rigid substrates, direct application or slight modification of conventional processes for flexible electronics fabrication cannot work. The future flexible electronics fabrication requires totally new low-temperature process development optimized for flexible substrate and it should be based on new material too. Here we present a simple approach to developing a flexible electronics fabrication without using conventional vacuum deposition and photolithography. We found that direct metal patterning based on laser-induced local melting of metal nanoparticle ink is a promising low-temperature alternative to vacuum deposition- and photolithography-based conventional metal patterning processes. The "digital" nature of the proposed direct metal patterning process removes the need for expensive photomask and allows easy design modification and short turnaround time. This new process can be extremely useful for current small-volume, large-variety manufacturing paradigms. Besides, simple, scalable, fast and low-temperature processes can lead to cost-effective fabrication methods on a large-area polymer substrate. The developed process was successfully applied to demonstrate high-quality Ag patterning (2.1 µΩ·cm and high-performance flexible organic field effect transistor arrays.

  6. Next-generation cost management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angert, Sean; Seabrook, Hazel

    2011-03-01

    To implement a comprehensive approach for nonlabor cost reduction, hospitals should: Set goals, Identify areas to include or exclude, Establish a project structure, Develop a communications plan, Collect and analyze data, Establish teams to review opportunities forchange > Monitor progress and report results. PMID:21449305

  7. Ag lending: the next generation

    OpenAIRE

    Gunderson, Michael A.; Detre, Joshua D.; Briggeman, Brian C.; Wilson, Christine A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to identify relevant financial concepts and skills that are being taught and/or should be taught, as part of the financial management curriculum in undergraduate agricultural economics and agribusiness programs. Design/methodology/approach – The skill gap analysis uses survey respondents' rankings of the importance and competence scores of recent graduates' skills. The scores help to identify opportunities for improvement in the most critical areas of im...

  8. Next generation estrategic airlift military transport

    OpenAIRE

    CARSÍ DE LA CONCEPCIÓN, PAULA

    2016-01-01

    The overall goal of this project is to design a next generation strategic airlift military transport for entry in 2030. The design must follow specific rules and specifications required by the AIAA Foundation Undergraduate Team Aircraft Design Competition.

  9. NOAA NEXt-Generation RADar (NEXRAD) Products

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset consists of Level III weather radar products collected from Next-Generation Radar (NEXRAD) stations located in the contiguous United States, Alaska,...

  10. Optical Subsystems for Next Generation Access Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lazaro, J.A; Polo, V.; Schrenk, B.;

    2011-01-01

    Recent optical technologies are providing higher flexibility to next generation access networks: on the one hand, providing progressive FTTx and specifically FTTH deployment, progressively shortening the copper access network; on the other hand, also opening fixed-mobile convergence solutions...... in next generation PON architectures. It is provided an overview of the optical subsystems developed for the implementation of the proposed NG-Access Networks....

  11. Next Generation Sequencing and Its Latest Application

    OpenAIRE

    Shang Shanshan; You Jianxin

    2013-01-01

    The next generation sequencing, as an efficient and effective method, has been widely used in researches and help researches to get novel research results, so it is quite useful to summarize its characteristics and application. This study has a detailed review and introduction on the next Generation Sequencing (NGS) and makes a comparison on the NGS platforms, which can be very helpful for readers to understand the NGS. After introducing the NGS application, ...

  12. A Next Generation BioPhotonics Workstation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glückstad, Jesper; Palima, Darwin; Tauro, Sandeep; Bañas, Andrew Rafael

    2011-01-01

    We are developing a Next Generation BioPhotonics Workstation to be applied in research on regulated microbial cell growth including their underlying physiological mechanisms, in vivo characterization of cell constituents and manufacturing of nanostructures and meta-materials.......We are developing a Next Generation BioPhotonics Workstation to be applied in research on regulated microbial cell growth including their underlying physiological mechanisms, in vivo characterization of cell constituents and manufacturing of nanostructures and meta-materials....

  13. Next Generation BioPhotonics Workstation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glückstad, Jesper

    2010-01-01

    We are developing a Next Generation BioPhotonics Workstation to be applied in research on regulated microbial cell growth including their underlying physiological mechanisms, in vivo characterization of cell constituents and manufacturing of nanostructures and meta-materials.......We are developing a Next Generation BioPhotonics Workstation to be applied in research on regulated microbial cell growth including their underlying physiological mechanisms, in vivo characterization of cell constituents and manufacturing of nanostructures and meta-materials....

  14. Next-generation sequencing: applications beyond genomes

    OpenAIRE

    Marguerat, Samuel; Wilhelm, Brian T.; Bähler, Jürg

    2008-01-01

    The development of DNA sequencing more than 30 years ago has profoundly impacted biological research. In the last couple of years, remarkable technological innovations have emerged that allow the direct and cost-effective sequencing of complex samples at unprecedented scale and speed. These next-generation technologies make it feasible to sequence not only static genomes, but also entire transcriptomes expressed under different conditions. These and other powerful applications of next-generat...

  15. Next-generation phenotypic screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warchal, Scott J; Unciti-Broceta, Asier; Carragher, Neil O

    2016-07-01

    Phenotypic drug discovery (PDD) strategies are defined by screening and selection of hit or lead compounds based on quantifiable phenotypic endpoints without prior knowledge of the drug target. We outline the challenges associated with traditional phenotypic screening strategies and propose solutions and new opportunities to be gained by adopting modern PDD technologies. We highlight both historical and recent examples of approved drugs and new drug candidates discovered by modern phenotypic screening. Finally, we offer a prospective view of a new era of PDD underpinned by a wealth of technology advances in the areas of in vitro model development, high-content imaging and image informatics, mechanism-of-action profiling and target deconvolution. PMID:27357617

  16. Convergence and Next Generation Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Sen, Jaydip; Hooli, Basavaraj

    2010-01-01

    The communications sector is undergoing significant changes, with the emergence of a number of platforms available to provide a different range of services. Some of these platforms are complementary to each other, while others are competitive, or can provide a valid substitute for some of the services provided. Up till now, the most important communications platform in most of the developing countries has been the public switched telecommunication network (PSTN) which provides access to all households and buildings. This universality in providing access has also meant that the network has generally been designated as one for universal service.This chapter focuses on the area where the most significant changes are taking place in the communication sector. The objective of this chapter is neither to give an overview of all communication platforms, nor is it aimed to assess the relative extent to which different platforms complement or compete with each other. The central theme of this chapter is to examine the ...

  17. THE NEXT GENERATION NUCLEAR PLANT GRAPHITE PROGRAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William E. Windes; Timothy D. Burchell; Robert L. Bratton

    2008-09-01

    Developing new nuclear grades of graphite used in the core of a High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) is one of the critical development activities being pursued within the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) program. Graphite’s thermal stability (in an inert gas environment), high compressive strength, fabricability, and cost effective price make it an ideal core structural material for the HTGR reactor design. While the general characteristics necessary for producing nuclear grade graphite are understood, historical “nuclear” grades no longer exist. New grades must be fabricated, characterized, and irradiated to demonstrate that current grades of graphite exhibit acceptable non-irradiated and irradiated properties upon which the thermo-mechanical design of the structural graphite in NGNP is based. The NGNP graphite R&D program has selected a handful of commercially available types for research and development activities necessary to qualify this nuclear grade graphite for use within the NGNP reactor. These activities fall within five primary areas; 1) material property characterization, 2) irradiated material property characterization, 3) modeling, and 4) ASTM test development, and 5) ASME code development efforts. Individual research and development activities within each area are being pursued with the ultimate goal of obtaining a commercial operating license for the nuclear graphite from the US NRC.

  18. Emerging Definition of Next-Generation of Aeronautical Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerczewski, Robert J.

    2006-01-01

    Aviation continues to experience rapid growth. In regions such as the United States and Europe air traffic congestion is constraining operations, leading to major new efforts to develop methodologies and infrastructures to enable continued aviation growth through transformational air traffic management systems. Such a transformation requires better communications linking airborne and ground-based elements. Technologies for next-generation communications, the required capacities, frequency spectrum of operation, network interconnectivity, and global interoperability are now receiving increased attention. A number of major planning and development efforts have taken place or are in process now to define the transformed airspace of the future. These activities include government and industry led efforts in the United States and Europe, and by international organizations. This paper will review the features, approaches, and activities of several representative planning and development efforts, and identify the emerging global consensus on requirements of next generation aeronautical communications systems for air traffic control.

  19. Next Generation Nuclear Plant GAP Analysis Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ball, Sydney J [ORNL; Burchell, Timothy D [ORNL; Corwin, William R [ORNL; Fisher, Stephen Eugene [ORNL; Forsberg, Charles W. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT); Morris, Robert Noel [ORNL; Moses, David Lewis [ORNL

    2008-12-01

    As a follow-up to the phenomena identification and ranking table (PIRT) studies conducted recently by NRC on next generation nuclear plant (NGNP) safety, a study was conducted to identify the significant 'gaps' between what is needed and what is already available to adequately assess NGNP safety characteristics. The PIRT studies focused on identifying important phenomena affecting NGNP plant behavior, while the gap study gives more attention to off-normal behavior, uncertainties, and event probabilities under both normal operation and postulated accident conditions. Hence, this process also involved incorporating more detailed evaluations of accident sequences and risk assessments. This study considers thermal-fluid and neutronic behavior under both normal and postulated accident conditions, fission product transport (FPT), high-temperature metals, and graphite behavior and their effects on safety. In addition, safety issues related to coupling process heat (hydrogen production) systems to the reactor are addressed, given the limited design information currently available. Recommendations for further study, including analytical methods development and experimental needs, are presented as appropriate in each of these areas.

  20. Next Generation Solar Collectors for CSP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molnar, Attila [3M Company, St. Paul, MN (United States); Charles, Ruth [3M Company, St. Paul, MN (United States)

    2014-07-31

    The intent of “Next Generation Solar Collectors for CSP” program was to develop key technology elements for collectors in Phase 1 (Budget Period 1), design these elements in Phase 2 (Budget Period 2) and to deploy and test the final collector in Phase 3 (Budget Period 3). 3M and DOE mutually agreed to terminate the program at the end of Budget Period 1, primarily due to timeline issues. However, significant advancements were achieved in developing a next generation reflective material and panel that has the potential to significantly improve the efficiency of CSP systems.

  1. Proceedings of the Next Generation Exploration Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schingler, Robbie (Editor); Lynch, Kennda

    2006-01-01

    The Next Generation Exploration Conference (NGEC) brought together the emerging next generation of space leaders over three intensive days of collaboration and planning. The participants extended the ongoing work of national space agencies to draft a common strategic framework for lunar exploration, to include other destinations in the solar system. NGEC is the first conference to bring together emerging leaders to comment on and contribute to these activities. The majority of the three-day conference looked beyond the moon and focused on the "next destination": Asteroids, Cis-Lunar, Earth 3.0, Mars Science and Exploration, Mars Settlement and Society, and Virtual Worlds and Virtual Exploration.

  2. Risk analysis of underground infrastructures in urban areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cagno, Enrico, E-mail: Enrico.Cagno@PoliMI.i [Department of Management, Economics and Industrial Engineering, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, Milan 20132 (Italy); De Ambroggi, Massimiliano; Grande, Ottavio; Trucco, Paolo [Department of Management, Economics and Industrial Engineering, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, Milan 20132 (Italy)

    2011-01-15

    The paper presents an integrated approach for vulnerability and resilience analysis for underground infrastructures, i.e. a societal risk analysis of the failures of underground services for an urban area. The approach is based on the detailed study of (1) domino-effects for the components of a single infrastructure and for a given set of infrastructures interoperated and/or belonging to the same area; (2) risk and vulnerability analysis of a given area; (3) identification of a set of intervention guidelines, in order to improve the overall system resilience. The use of an integrated (interoperability and area) approach, breaking down the analysis area extent into sub-areas and assessing the dependencies among sub-areas both in terms of interoperability and damage propagation of critical infrastructures, demonstrates a useful advantage in terms of resilience analysis, more consistent with the 'zoned' nature of failures of the underground infrastructures. An applied case, describing the interoperability and damage propagation analysis with the evaluation of time-dependency for the infrastructures and targets and of different kinds of interventions of the underground infrastructures of a town, is presented for this purpose.

  3. Risk analysis of underground infrastructures in urban areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper presents an integrated approach for vulnerability and resilience analysis for underground infrastructures, i.e. a societal risk analysis of the failures of underground services for an urban area. The approach is based on the detailed study of (1) domino-effects for the components of a single infrastructure and for a given set of infrastructures interoperated and/or belonging to the same area; (2) risk and vulnerability analysis of a given area; (3) identification of a set of intervention guidelines, in order to improve the overall system resilience. The use of an integrated (interoperability and area) approach, breaking down the analysis area extent into sub-areas and assessing the dependencies among sub-areas both in terms of interoperability and damage propagation of critical infrastructures, demonstrates a useful advantage in terms of resilience analysis, more consistent with the 'zoned' nature of failures of the underground infrastructures. An applied case, describing the interoperability and damage propagation analysis with the evaluation of time-dependency for the infrastructures and targets and of different kinds of interventions of the underground infrastructures of a town, is presented for this purpose.

  4. 78 FR 64404 - Next Generation 911; Text-to-911; Next Generation 911 Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 20 Next Generation 911; Text-to-911; Next Generation 911 Applications AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: In this document, the Federal Communications...

  5. VIMT: The Next-Generation Media transport Standard

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gerard Femando

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss the development of MPEG media transport (MMT), which is a next-generation media transport standard effort by ISQ/MPEG. The architecture and functional areas of MMT are described. The functionality of existing media transport is analyzed to determine whether there is a need for this new media standard. From this analysis, potential areas for standardization in MMT have been identified.

  6. The next-generation ARC middleware

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Appleton, O.; Cameron, D.; Cernak, J.;

    2010-01-01

    The Advanced Resource Connector (ARC) is a light-weight, non-intrusive, simple yet powerful Grid middleware capable of connecting highly heterogeneous computing and storage resources. ARC aims at providing general purpose, flexible, collaborative computing environments suitable for a range of uses...... the next-generation ARC middleware, implemented as Web Services with the aim of standard-compliant interoperability....

  7. Next Generation Drivetrain Development and Test Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, Jonathan; Erdman, Bill; Blodgett, Doug; Halse, Chris; Grider, Dave

    2015-11-03

    This presentation was given at the Wind Energy IQ conference in Bremen, Germany, November 30 through December 2, 2105. It focused on the next-generation drivetrain architecture and drivetrain technology development and testing (including gearbox and inverter software and medium-voltage inverter modules.

  8. Data Analysis and Next Generation Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pon, Kathy

    2013-01-01

    For the last decade, much of the work of California school administrators has been shaped by the accountability of the No Child Left Behind Act. Now as they stand at the precipice of Common Core Standards and next generation assessments, it is important to reflect on the proficiency educators have attained in using data to improve instruction and…

  9. Galaxy LIMS for next-generation sequencing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholtalbers, J.; Rossler, J.; Sorn, P.; Graaf, J. de; Boisguerin, V.; Castle, J.; Sahin, U.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY: We have developed a laboratory information management system (LIMS) for a next-generation sequencing (NGS) laboratory within the existing Galaxy platform. The system provides lab technicians standard and customizable sample information forms, barcoded submission forms, tracking of input sam

  10. Research on Next-Generation Internet Architecture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-Ping Wu; Ke Xu

    2006-01-01

    The primary problem during the evolvement of next-generation Internet is the contradiction between growing requirements for Internet and the insufficient development of network theory and technology. As the fundamental principles to guide the developing direction of Internet, the study of Internet architecture is always a focus in the research community. To address the core issue of network scalability, we propose multi-dimension scalable architecture of next-generation Internet, the main idea of which is to extend the single-dimension scalability of traditional Internet on interconnection to multi-dimension scalability of next-generation Internet. The multi-dimension scalability is composed of scale-scalability,performance-scalability, security-scalability, function-scalability, and service-scalability. We suggest five elements, namely,IPv6, authentic IPv6 addressing, scalable processing capacity of routers, end-to-end connectionless Quality-of-Service control,and 4over6 mechanism to realize the multi-dimension scalability. The current research results show that the multi-dimension scalable architecture composed of these five elements will bring great influence on next-generation Internet.

  11. NASA's Next Generation Space Geodesy Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkowitz, S. M.; Desai, S. D.; Gross, R. S.; Hillard, L. M.; Lemoine, F. G.; Long, J. L.; Ma, C.; McGarry, J. F.; Murphy, D.; Noll, C. E.; Pavlis, E. C.; Pearlman, M. R.; Stowers, D. A.; Webb, F. H.

    2012-01-01

    Requirements for the ITRF have increased dramatically since the 1980s. The most stringent requirement comes from critical sea level monitoring programs: a global accuracy of 1.0 mm, and 0.1mm/yr stability, a factor of 10 to 20 beyond current capability. Other requirements for the ITRF coming from ice mass change, ground motion, and mass transport studies are similar. Current and future satellite missions will have ever-increasing measurement capability and will lead to increasingly sophisticated models of these and other changes in the Earth system. Ground space geodesy networks with enhanced measurement capability will be essential to meeting the ITRF requirements and properly interpreting the satellite data. These networks must be globally distributed and built for longevity, to provide the robust data necessary to generate improved models for proper interpretation of the observed geophysical signals. NASA has embarked on a Space Geodesy Program with a long-range goal to build, deploy and operate a next generation NASA Space Geodetic Network (SGN). The plan is to build integrated, multi-technique next-generation space geodetic observing systems as the core contribution to a global network designed to produce the higher quality data required to maintain the Terrestrial Reference Frame and provide information essential for fully realizing the measurement potential of the current and coming generation of Earth Observing spacecraft. Phase 1 of this project has been funded to (1) Establish and demonstrate a next-generation prototype integrated Space Geodetic Station at Goddard's Geophysical and Astronomical Observatory (GGAO), including next-generation SLR and VLBI systems along with modern GNSS and DORIS; (2) Complete ongoing Network Design Studies that describe the appropriate number and distribution of next-generation Space Geodetic Stations for an improved global network; (3) Upgrade analysis capability to handle the next-generation data; (4) Implement a modern

  12. NNSA Program Develops the Next Generation of Nuclear Security Experts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brim, Cornelia P.; Disney, Maren V.

    2015-09-02

    NNSA is fostering the next generation of nuclear security experts is through its successful NNSA Graduate Fellowship Program (NGFP). NGFP offers its Fellows an exceptional career development opportunity through hands-on experience supporting NNSA mission areas across policy and technology disciplines. The one-year assignments give tomorrow’s leaders in global nuclear security and nonproliferation unparalleled exposure through assignments to Program Offices across NNSA.

  13. Production of the next-generation library virtual tour

    OpenAIRE

    Duncan, James M.; Roth, Linda K.

    2001-01-01

    While many libraries offer overviews of their services through their Websites, only a small number of health sciences libraries provide Web-based virtual tours. These tours typically feature photographs of major service areas along with textual descriptions. This article describes the process for planning, producing, and implementing a next-generation virtual tour in which a variety of media elements are integrated: photographic images, 360-degree “virtual reality” views, textual descriptions...

  14. Applications for next-generation sequencing in fish ecotoxicogenomics

    OpenAIRE

    Mehinto, Alvine C.; Martyniuk, Christopher J.; Spade, Daniel J.; Nancy D. Denslow

    2012-01-01

    The new technologies for next-generation sequencing (NGS) and global gene expression analyses that are widely used in molecular medicine are increasingly applied to the field of fish biology. This has facilitated new directions to address research areas that could not be previously considered due to the lack of molecular information for ecologically relevant species. Over the past decade, the cost of NGS has decreased significantly, making it possible to use non-model fish species to investig...

  15. Next Generation Sequencing and Its Latest Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shang Shanshan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The next generation sequencing, as an efficient and effective method, has been widely used in researches and help researches to get novel research results, so it is quite useful to summarize its characteristics and application. This study has a detailed review and introduction on the next Generation Sequencing (NGS and makes a comparison on the NGS platforms, which can be very helpful for readers to understand the NGS. After introducing the NGS application, the latest results by taking use of NGS according to the 2013 SCI database are also illustrated, which will provide the latest high level research results and give some guidelines to researchers who will make further studies by taking use of NGS.

  16. Special Issue: Next Generation DNA Sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Richardson

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Next Generation Sequencing (NGS refers to technologies that do not rely on traditional dideoxy-nucleotide (Sanger sequencing where labeled DNA fragments are physically resolved by electrophoresis. These new technologies rely on different strategies, but essentially all of them make use of real-time data collection of a base level incorporation event across a massive number of reactions (on the order of millions versus 96 for capillary electrophoresis for instance. The major commercial NGS platforms available to researchers are the 454 Genome Sequencer (Roche, Illumina (formerly Solexa Genome analyzer, the SOLiD system (Applied Biosystems/Life Technologies and the Heliscope (Helicos Corporation. The techniques and different strategies utilized by these platforms are reviewed in a number of the papers in this special issue. These technologies are enabling new applications that take advantage of the massive data produced by this next generation of sequencing instruments. [...

  17. Next Generation Multimedia Distributed Data Base Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendleton, Stuart E.

    1997-01-01

    The paradigm of client/server computing is changing. The model of a server running a monolithic application and supporting clients at the desktop is giving way to a different model that blurs the line between client and server. We are on the verge of plunging into the next generation of computing technology--distributed object-oriented computing. This is not only a change in requirements but a change in opportunities, and requires a new way of thinking for Information System (IS) developers. The information system demands caused by global competition are requiring even more access to decision making tools. Simply, object-oriented technology has been developed to supersede the current design process of information systems which is not capable of handling next generation multimedia.

  18. Next Generation of Photovoltaics New Concepts

    CERN Document Server

    Vega, Antonio; López, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    This book presents new concepts for a next generation of PV. Among these concepts are: Multijunction solar cells, multiple excitation solar cells (or how to take benefit of high energy photons for the creation of more than one electron hole-pair), intermediate band solar cells (or how to take advantage of below band-gap energy photons) and related technologies (for quantum dots, nitrides, thin films), advanced light management approaches (plasmonics). Written by world-class experts in next generation photovoltaics this book is an essential reference guide accessible to both beginners and experts working with solar cell technology. The book deeply analyzes the current state-of-the-art of the new photovoltaic approaches and outlines the implementation paths of these advanced devices. Topics addressed range from the fundamentals to the description of state-of-the-art of the new types of solar cells.

  19. Next Generation Sequence Assembly with AMOS

    OpenAIRE

    Treangen, Todd J; Sommer, Dan D; Angly, Florent E; Koren, Sergey; Pop, Mihai

    2011-01-01

    A Modular Open-Source Assembler (AMOS) was designed to offer a modular approach to genome assembly. AMOS includes a wide range of tools for assembly, including lightweight de novo assemblers Minimus and Minimo, and Bambus 2, a robust scaffolder able to handle metagenomic and polymorphic data. This protocol describes how to configure and use AMOS for the assembly of Next Generation sequence data. Additionally, we provide three tutorial examples that include bacterial, viral, and metagenomic da...

  20. NASA's Next Generation Space Geodesy Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, S. D.; Gross, R. S.; Hilliard, L.; Lemoine, F. G.; Long, J. L.; Ma, C.; McGarry, J. F.; Merkowitz, S. M.; Murphy, D.; Noll, C. E.; Pavlis, E. C.; Pearlman, M. R.; Stowers, D. A.; Webb, F. H.

    2012-01-01

    NASA's Space Geodesy Project (SGP) is developing a prototype core site for a next generation Space Geodetic Network (SGN). Each of the sites in this planned network co-locate current state-of-the-art stations from all four space geodetic observing systems, GNSS, SLR, VLBI, and DORIS, with the goal of achieving modern requirements for the International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF). In particular, the driving ITRF requirements for this network are 1.0 mm in accuracy and 0.1 mm/yr in stability, a factor of 10-20 beyond current capabilities. Development of the prototype core site, located at NASA's Geophysical and Astronomical Observatory at the Goddard Space Flight Center, started in 2011 and will be completed by the end of 2013. In January 2012, two operational GNSS stations, GODS and GOON, were established at the prototype site within 100 m of each other. Both stations are being proposed for inclusion into the IGS network. In addition, work is underway for the inclusion of next generation SLR and VLBI stations along with a modern DORIS station. An automated survey system is being developed to measure inter-technique vectorties, and network design studies are being performed to define the appropriate number and distribution of these next generation space geodetic core sites that are required to achieve the driving ITRF requirements. We present the status of this prototype next generation space geodetic core site, results from the analysis of data from the established geodetic stations, and results from the ongoing network design studies.

  1. Semantic Web : The Next Generation Web

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Pengfei

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this Bachelor’s thesis work was to introduce the next generation of Web technology, a semantic Web utilizing metadata, ontology, and logic to carry out Web tasks. It is still not possible to resolve all Web problems completely using only artificial intelligence. However, it is important to recognize certain attributes of machines that point to their potential to have intelligence. I built both small samples and complex examples using meta-languages that machines could understan...

  2. Next generation sequencing in cardiovascular diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Faita, Francesca; Vecoli, Cecilia; Foffa, Ilenia; Andreassi, Maria Grazia

    2012-01-01

    In the last few years, the advent of next generation sequencing (NGS) has revolutionized the approach to genetic studies, making whole-genome sequencing a possible way of obtaining global genomic information. NGS has very recently been shown to be successful in identifying novel causative mutations of rare or common Mendelian disorders. At the present time, it is expected that NGS will be increasingly important in the study of inherited and complex cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). However, the...

  3. Traffic Management for Next Generation Transport Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Hao(Institute of Theoretical Physics, Lanzhou University, 730000, Lanzhou, People’s Republic of China); Dittmann, Lars

    2011-01-01

    Video services are believed to be prevalent in the next generation transport networks. The popularity of these bandwidth-intensive services, such as Internet Protocol Television (IPTV), online gaming, and Videoon- Demand (VoD), are currently driving the network service providers to upgrade their network capacities. However, in order to provide more advanced video services than simply porting the traditional television services to the network, the service provider needs to do more than just au...

  4. JUNO: A Next Generation Reactor Antineutrino Experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Zhan, Liang

    2015-01-01

    The mass hierarchy and the CP phase are the main focus of the next generation neutrino oscillation experiments. Jiangmen Underground Neutrino Observatory (JUNO), as a medium baseline reactor antineutrino experiment, can determine the neutrino mass hierarchy independent of the CP phase. The physics potential on the mass hierarchy, and other measurements are reviewed. The preliminary design options for a 20~kton detector with an energy resolution of $3\\%/\\sqrt{E_{vis}}$ are illustrated. The mai...

  5. Comparison of Next-Generation Sequencing Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Lin Liu; Yinhu Li; Siliang Li; Ni Hu; Yimin He; Ray Pong; Danni Lin; Lihua Lu; Maggie Law

    2012-01-01

    With fast development and wide applications of next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies, genomic sequence information is within reach to aid the achievement of goals to decode life mysteries, make better crops, detect pathogens, and improve life qualities. NGS systems are typically represented by SOLiD/Ion Torrent PGM from Life Sciences, Genome Analyzer/HiSeq 2000/MiSeq from Illumina, and GS FLX Titanium/GS Junior from Roche. Beijing Genomics Institute (BGI), which possesses the world’s ...

  6. Pervasive Services for Next Generation Heterogeneous Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Aguiar, Rui; Bijwaard, Dennis; Farschian, Bakak A.; Jonas, Amardeo; Sarma, Amardeo

    2006-01-01

    The overall goal of the European collaborative project Daidalos is to design, develop and validate a framework for next generation mobility-enabled networks. Envisioned scenarios include heterogeneous access networks, while requiring ubiquitous, services of adequate quality, broadcast integration, as well as the ability to support privacy and anonymity while making life easier for the end-user. This paper introduces the five key concepts of the EU IST project Daidalos and how these address su...

  7. Thermonuclear ignition in the next generation tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The extrapolation of experimental rules describing energy confinement and magnetohydrodynamic - stability limits, in known tokamaks, allow to show that stable thermonuclear ignition equilibria should exist in this configuration, if the product aBtx of the dimensions by a magnetic-field power is large enough. Quantitative application of this result to several next-generation tokamak projects show that those kinds of equilibria could exist in such devices, which would also have enough additional heating power to promote an effective accessible ignition

  8. Cooperating sentient vehicles for next generation automobiles

    OpenAIRE

    Sivaharan, Thirunavukkarasu; Blair, Gordon S.; Friday, Adrian; Wu, Maomao; Duran-Limon, Hector; Okanda, Paul; Sørensen, Carl-Fredrik; , EU FET (Funder)

    2004-01-01

    It is becoming clear that location-aware intelligent transportation systems will be one of the most promising upcoming applications for next generation vehicles. The driving force behind this is the introduction of pervasive high performance wireless networks and location sensing technologies, such as GPS and roadside detection systems. Intelligent transportation systems utilise inter-vehicle cooperation without human assistance to provide autonomous vehicle navigation from a given source to ...

  9. Smart Grid Technologies: Next Generation Power Sy

    OpenAIRE

    Jyotsna P. Gabhane; Manisha N.Nimbalkar; Tejal Irkhede

    2013-01-01

    In the next-generation electric power systems that incorporate diversified renewable energy resources, automated and intelligent management is a critical component that determines the effectiveness and efficiency of these power systems. The management automation and intelligence are envisioned to offer a variety of advantages over the current systems in terms of digitalization, flexibility, intelligence, resilience, sustainability, and customization, which entitles the name Smart Grid to the ...

  10. Population genomics of marine fishes: next generation prospects and challenges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jakob Hemmer; Therkildsen, Nina Overgaard; Pujolar, J.M.

    2014-01-01

    natural populations, are likely to challenge future studies. However, the combination of high genome coverage and new statistical developments offers promising solutions. Thus, the next generation of studies is likely to truly facilitate the transition from population genetics to population genomics in...... are valuable organisms for advancing our understanding of evolution on historical and contemporary time scales, and here we highlight areas in which research on these species is likely to be particularly important in the near future. These include possibilities for gaining insights into processes on...... ecological time scales, identifying genomic signatures associated with population divergence under gene flow, and determining the genetic basis of phenotypic traits. We also consider future challenges pertaining to the implementation of genome-wide coverage through next-generation sequencing and genotyping...

  11. Next Generation NASA Initiative for Space Geodesy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkowitz, S. M.; Desai, S.; Gross, R. S.; Hilliard, L.; Lemoine, F. G.; Long, J. L.; Ma, C.; McGarry J. F.; Murphy, D.; Noll, C. E.; Pavlis, E. C.; Pearlman, M. R.; Stowers, D. A.; Webb, F. H.

    2012-01-01

    Space geodesy measurement requirements have become more and more stringent as our understanding of the physical processes and our modeling techniques have improved. In addition, current and future spacecraft will have ever-increasing measurement capability and will lead to increasingly sophisticated models of changes in the Earth system. Ground-based space geodesy networks with enhanced measurement capability will be essential to meeting these oncoming requirements and properly interpreting the sate1!ite data. These networks must be globally distributed and built for longevity, to provide the robust data necessary to generate improved models for proper interpretation ofthe observed geophysical signals. These requirements have been articulated by the Global Geodetic Observing System (GGOS). The NASA Space Geodesy Project (SGP) is developing a prototype core site as the basis for a next generation Space Geodetic Network (SGN) that would be NASA's contribution to a global network designed to produce the higher quality data required to maintain the Terrestrial Reference Frame and provide information essential for fully realizing the measurement potential of the current and coming generation of Earth Observing spacecraft. Each of the sites in the SGN would include co-located, state of-the-art systems from all four space geodetic observing techniques (GNSS, SLR, VLBI, and DORIS). The prototype core site is being developed at NASA's Geophysical and Astronomical Observatory at Goddard Space Flight Center. The project commenced in 2011 and is scheduled for completion in late 2013. In January 2012, two multiconstellation GNSS receivers, GODS and GODN, were established at the prototype site as part of the local geodetic network. Development and testing are also underway on the next generation SLR and VLBI systems along with a modern DORIS station. An automated survey system is being developed to measure inter-technique vector ties, and network design studies are being

  12. Synchronization System for Next Generation Light Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zavriyev, Anton

    2014-03-27

    An alternative synchronization technique – one that would allow explicit control of the pulse train including its repetition rate and delay is clearly desired. We propose such a scheme. Our method is based on optical interferometry and permits synchronization of the pulse trains generated by two independent mode-locked lasers. As the next generation x-ray sources will be driven by a clock signal derived from a mode-locked optical source, our technique will provide a way to synchronize x-ray probe with the optical pump pulses.

  13. Next Generation Train - Zug der Zukunft

    OpenAIRE

    Winter, Joachim

    2012-01-01

    Allgemein bekannt ist, dass das Deutsche Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V. auf den Gebieten Raumfahrt und Luftfahrt forscht und entwickelt. Weniger bekannt ist, dass das DLR seit etwa zehn Jahren auch auf den Gebieten Energie und Verkehr und neuerdings Sicherheit angewandt forscht. Die Verkehrsforscher kümmern sich neben dem Straßenverkehr verstärkt um einen modernen Schienenverkehr. Im Forschungsprojekt Next Generation Train nutzen Forscher aus neun DLR-Instituten einen interdisziplinären...

  14. JUNO: A Next Generation Reactor Antineutrino Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Zhan, Liang

    2015-01-01

    The mass hierarchy and the CP phase are the main focus of the next generation neutrino oscillation experiments. Jiangmen Underground Neutrino Observatory (JUNO), as a medium baseline reactor antineutrino experiment, can determine the neutrino mass hierarchy independent of the CP phase. The physics potential on the mass hierarchy, and other measurements are reviewed. The preliminary design options for a 20~kton detector with an energy resolution of $3\\%/\\sqrt{E_{vis}}$ are illustrated. The main technical challenges on the PMT and scintillator are discussed and the corresponding R\\&D efforts are presented.

  15. Beamstrahlung spectra in next generation linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the next generation of linear colliders, the energy loss due to beamstrahlung during the collision of the e+e- beams is expected to substantially influence the effective center-of-mass energy distribution of the colliding particles. In this paper, we first derive analytical formulae for the electron and photon energy spectra under multiple beamstrahlung processes, and for the e+e- and γγ differential luminosities. We then apply our formulation to various classes of 500 GeV e+e- linear collider designs currently under study

  16. Firepower, Next Generation firewall from Cisco

    OpenAIRE

    Isaksson, Rickard

    2015-01-01

    As there is more and more threats on the internet the need for security is more crucial than ever for the companies to look into their solutions to protect their information. To be able to see how an attack works, we discus and show how an attack is progressing in this thesis we compare the difference between traditional and Next Generation firewalls. We also compare three different vendors to compare different functions and security performance. By using Systemair AB as testing ground and ha...

  17. Next Generation X-ray Polarimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill-Kittle, Joe

    The emission regions of many types of X-ray sources are small and cannot be spatially resolved without interferometry techniques that haven't yet been developed. In order to understand the emission mechanisms and emission geometry, alternate measurement techniques are required. Most microphysical processes that affect X-rays, including scattering and magnetic emission processes are imprinted as polarization signatures. X-ray polarization also reveals exotic physical processes occurring in regions of very strong gravitational and magnetic fields. Observations of X-ray polarization will provide a measurement of the geometrical distribution of gas and magnetic fields without foreground depolarization that affects longer wavelengths (e.g. Faraday rotation in the radio). Emission from accretion disks has an inclination-dependent polarization. The polarization signature is modified by extreme gravitational forces, which bend light, essentially changing the contribution of each part of the disk to the integrated total intensity seen by distant observers. Because gravity has the largest effect on the innermost parts of the disk (which are the hottest, and thus contributes to more high energy photons), the energy dependent polarization is diagnostic of disk inclination, black hole mass and spin. Increasing the sensitive energy band will make these measurements possible. X-ray polarimetry will also enable the study of the origin of cosmic rays in the universe, the nature of black holes, the role of black holes in the evolution of galaxies, and the interaction of matter with the highest physically possible magnetic fields. These objectives address NASA's strategic interest in the origin, structure, and evolution of the universe. We propose a two-year effort to develop the Next Generation X-ray Polarimeter (NGXP) that will have more than ten times the sensitivity of the current state of the art. NGXP will make possible game changing measurements of classes of astrophysical

  18. The Next Generation Airborne Polarimetric Doppler Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivekanandan, J.; Lee, Wen-Chau; Loew, Eric; Salazar, Jorge; Chandrasekar, V.

    2013-04-01

    NCAR's Electra Doppler radar (ELDORA) with a dual-beam slotted waveguide array using dual-transmitter, dual-beam, rapid scan and step-chirped waveform significantly improved the spatial scale to 300m (Hildebrand et al. 1996). However, ELDORA X-band radar's penetration into precipitation is limited by attenuation and is not designed to collect polarimetric measurements to remotely estimate microphysics. ELDORA has been placed on dormancy because its airborne platform (P3 587) was retired in January 2013. The US research community has strongly voiced the need to continue measurement capability similar to the ELDORA. A critical weather research area is quantitative precipitation estimation/forecasting (QPE/QPF). In recent years, hurricane intensity change involving eye-eyewall interactions has drawn research attention (Montgomery et al., 2006; Bell and Montgomery, 2006). In the case of convective precipitation, two issues, namely, (1) when and where convection will be initiated, and (2) determining the organization and structure of ensuing convection, are key for QPF. Therefore collocated measurements of 3-D winds and precipitation microphysics are required for achieving significant skills in QPF and QPE. Multiple radars in dual-Doppler configuration with polarization capability estimate dynamical and microphysical characteristics of clouds and precipitation are mostly available over land. However, storms over complex terrain, the ocean and in forest regions are not observable by ground-based radars (Bluestein and Wakimoto, 2003). NCAR/EOL is investigating potential configurations for the next generation airborne radar that is capable of retrieving dynamic and microphysical characteristics of clouds and precipitation. ELDORA's slotted waveguide array radar is not compatible for dual-polarization measurements. Therefore, the new design has to address both dual-polarization capability and platform requirements to replace the ELDORA system. NCAR maintains a C-130

  19. NEXT GENERATION GAS TURBINE SYSTEMS STUDY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benjamin C. Wiant; Ihor S. Diakunchak; Dennis A. Horazak; Harry T. Morehead

    2003-03-01

    Under sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory, Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation has conducted a study of Next Generation Gas Turbine Systems that embraces the goals of the DOE's High Efficiency Engines and Turbines and Vision 21 programs. The Siemens Westinghouse Next Generation Gas Turbine (NGGT) Systems program was a 24-month study looking at the feasibility of a NGGT for the emerging deregulated distributed generation market. Initial efforts focused on a modular gas turbine using an innovative blend of proven technologies from the Siemens Westinghouse W501 series of gas turbines and new enabling technologies to serve a wide variety of applications. The flexibility to serve both 50-Hz and 60-Hz applications, use a wide range of fuels and be configured for peaking, intermediate and base load duty cycles was the ultimate goal. As the study progressed the emphasis shifted from a flexible gas turbine system of a specific size to a broader gas turbine technology focus. This shift in direction allowed for greater placement of technology among both the existing fleet and new engine designs, regardless of size, and will ultimately provide for greater public benefit. This report describes the study efforts and provides the resultant conclusions and recommendations for future technology development in collaboration with the DOE.

  20. Convergence of wireless, wireline, and photonics next generation networks

    CERN Document Server

    Iniewski, Krzysztof

    2010-01-01

    Filled with illustrations and practical examples from industry, this book provides a brief but comprehensive introduction to the next-generation wireless networks that will soon replace more traditional wired technologies. Written by a mixture of top industrial experts and key academic professors, it is the only book available that covers both wireless networks (such as wireless local area and personal area networks) and optical networks (such as long-haul and metropolitan networks) in one volume. It gives engineers and engineering students the necessary knowledge to meet challenges of next-ge

  1. Next Generation Large Capacity Long Distance Fiber To The Home

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. M. A. Ayad and M. Elazazy

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Optical device technologies for photonic networks, are focusing on integrated optical device technologies for digital coherent optical transmission technologies. With the rapid spread of fiber to the home (FTTH, broadband video services and mobile Internet devices now require a highly functional optical network infrastructure with a large capacity 100-Gbit/s/channel system based on digital coherent technology is considered to be a promising candidate for next-generation large-capacity long-distance optical communication systems. The optical components required for such systems, such as Polarization Division Multiplexed Quadrate Phase Shift Keying (PDM-QPSK optical modulator, integrated receiver, and local light source, are under development. Opto-electrical integration technologies, which enable us to construct small, low-cost, and highly functional optical components, will play an important role in providing cost-effective transmission equipment for future 100-Gbit/s/ch and post-100-Gbit/s/ch optical communications

  2. Building a next generation Internet with source address validation architecture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU JianPing; REN Gang; LI Xing

    2008-01-01

    The IP packet forwarding of current Internet is mainly destination based. In the forwarding process, the source IP address is not checked in most cases.This causes serious security, management and accounting problems. Based on the drastically increased IPv6 address space, a "source address validation architecture" (SAVA) is proposed in this paper, which can guarantee that every packet received and forwarded holds an authenticated source IP address. The design goals of the architecture are lightweight, loose coupling, "multi-fence support" and incremental deployment. This paper discusses the design and implementation for the architecture, including inter-AS, intra-AS and local subnet. The performance and scalability of SAVA are described. This architecture is deployed into the CNGI-CERNET2infrastructure--a large-scale native IPv6 backbone network of the China Next Generation Internet project. We believe that the SAVA will help the transition to a new, more secure and dependable Internet.

  3. Software Defined Radio Architecture Contributions to Next Generation Space Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kacpura, Thomas J.; Eddy, Wesley M.; Smith, Carl R.; Liebetreu, John

    2015-01-01

    systems, as well as those communications and navigation systems operated by international space agencies and civilian and government agencies. In this paper, we review the philosophies, technologies, architectural attributes, mission services, and communications capabilities that form the structure of candidate next-generation integrated communication architectures for space communications and navigation. A key area that this paper explores is from the development and operation of the software defined radio for the NASA Space Communications and Navigation (SCaN) Testbed currently on the International Space Station (ISS). Evaluating the lessons learned from development and operation feed back into the communications architecture. Leveraging the reconfigurability provides a change in the way that operations are done and must be considered. Quantifying the impact on the NASA Space Telecommunications Radio System (STRS) software defined radio architecture provides feedback to keep the standard useful and up to date. NASA is not the only customer of these radios. Software defined radios are developed for other applications, and taking advantage of these developments promotes an architecture that is cost effective and sustainable. Developments in the following areas such as an updated operating environment, higher data rates, networking and security can be leveraged. The ability to sustain an architecture that uses radios for multiple markets can lower costs and keep new technology infused.

  4. INFRASTRUCTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    A. Gaddi and P. Tropea

    2012-01-01

    The CMS Infrastructures teams are preparing for the LS1 activities. A long list of maintenance, consolidation and upgrade projects for CMS Infrastructures is on the table and is being discussed among Technical Coordination and sub-detector representatives. Apart from the activities concerning the cooling infrastructures (see below), two main projects have started: the refurbishment of the SX5 building, from storage area to RP storage and Muon stations laboratory; and the procurement of a new dry-gas (nitrogen and dry air) plant for inner detector flushing. We briefly present here the work done on the first item, leaving the second one for the next CMS Bulletin issue. The SX5 building is entering its third era, from main assembly building for CMS from 2000 to 2007, to storage building from 2008 to 2012, to RP storage and Muon laboratory during LS1 and beyond. A wall of concrete blocks has been erected to limit the RP zone, while the rest of the surface has been split between the ME1/1 and the CSC/DT laborat...

  5. INFRASTRUCTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    A.Gaddi

    2011-01-01

    Between the end of March to June 2011, there has been no detector downtime during proton fills due to CMS Infrastructures failures. This exceptional performance is a clear sign of the high quality work done by the CMS Infrastructures unit and its supporting teams. Powering infrastructure At the end of March, the EN/EL group observed a problem with the CMS 48 V system. The problem was a lack of isolation between the negative (return) terminal and earth. Although at that moment we were not seeing any loss of functionality, in the long term it would have led to severe disruption to the CMS power system. The 48 V system is critical to the operation of CMS: in addition to feeding the anti-panic lights, essential for the safety of the underground areas, it powers all the PLCs (Twidos) that control AC power to the racks and front-end electronics of CMS. A failure of the 48 V system would bring down the whole detector and lead to evacuation of the cavern. EN/EL technicians have made an accurate search of the fault, ...

  6. Integrated control of next generation power system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2010-02-28

    The multi-agent system (MAS) approach has been applied with promising results for enhancing an electric power distribution circuit, such as the Circuit of the Future as developed by Southern California Edison. These next generation power system results include better ability to reconfigure the circuit as well as the increased capability to improve the protection and enhance the reliability of the circuit. There were four main tasks in this project. The specific results for each of these four tasks and their related topics are presented in main sections of this report. Also, there were seven deliverables for this project. The main conclusions for these deliverables are summarized in the identified subtask section of this report. The specific details for each of these deliverables are included in the “Project Deliverables” section at the end of this Final Report.

  7. Terahertz planar antennas for next generation communication

    CERN Document Server

    Jha, Kumud Ranjan

    2014-01-01

    This book describes various methods to enhance the directivity of  planar antennas, enabling the next generation of high frequency, wireless communication.  The authors discuss various applications to the terahertz regime of the electromagnetic spectrum, with an emphasis on gain enhancement mechanisms.  The numerical models of these antennas are presented and the analytical results are supported, using commercial simulators. The multilayer substrate microstrip transmission line at terahertz frequency is also explored and a method to obtain the various parameters of this interconnect at high frequency is described.  This book will be a valuable resource for anyone needing to explore the terahertz band gap for future wireless communication, in an effort to solve the bandwidth (spectrum scarcity) problem. • Enables development of terahertz communication systems in a license-free band of the electromagnetic spectrum; • Describes methods to design a multi-layered substrate transmission line to reduce var...

  8. Next-generation test of cosmic inflation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The increasing precision of cosmological datasets is opening up new opportunities to test predictions from cosmic inflation. Here we study the impact of high precision constraints on the primordial power spectrum and show how a new generation of observations can provide impressive new tests of the slow-roll inflation paradigm, as well as produce significant discriminating power among different slow-roll models. In particular, we consider next-generation measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature anisotropies and (especially) polarization, as well as new Lyman-α measurements that could become practical in the near future. We emphasize relationships between the slope of the power spectrum and its first derivative that are nearly universal among existing slow-roll inflationary models, and show how these relationships can be tested on several scales with new observations. Among other things, our results give additional motivation for an all-out effort to measure CMB polarization

  9. Conceptual design of next generation MTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conceptual design of the high-performance and low-cost next generation materials testing reactor (MTR) which will be expected to construct in the nuclear power plant introduction countries, started from 2010 in JAEA and nuclear-related companies in Japan. The aims of this conceptual design are to achieve highly safe reactor, economical design, high availability factor and advanced irradiation utilization. One of the basic reactor concept was determined as swimming pool type, thermal power of 10MW and water cooled and moderated reactor with plate type fuel element same as the JMTR. It is expected that the research reactors are used for human resource development, progress of the science and technology, expansion of industry use, lifetime extension of LWRs and so on. (author)

  10. Design features of Korean Next Generation Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korea Electric Power Corporation initiated a Korean Next Generation Reactor(KNGR) Development Program which is managed by KEPCO under the direction of Korean government. Various organizations of Korean nuclear industry are participating in this project including national licensing organization, research institutes, reactor vendor, and A/E etc. The phase I was two year program from 1992 to 1994 and major activities were the development of top tier design requirements and design concept for the next generation nuclear power plants in Korea. The program was finished at the end of 1994 as planned. Externally type pressurized water reactor with a capacity of 4000MWth has been selected as a basic configuration and for the safety goal of the KNGR, the core damage and containment failure frequency were targeted to be less than 10-5/RY and 10-6/RY respectively as a minimum requirement. The economic goal of the KNGR was set to achieve 20% cost advantage compared to the coal. Other performance and design goals were also set so as to achieve the enhanced safety and economic goal. The advanced design features such as 4 train safety injection system, direct vessel injection, inside containment refueling water storage tank and advanced control room using advanced I and C technology, etc. will be incorporated into the KNGR and severe accident prevention and mitigation would be achieved by the design of enhanced safety system, provisions for the safety depressurization systems and mitigation facilities for low pressure core melt ejection, etc. Also introduced will be some passive design features to enhance the level of safety of the KNGR

  11. Next generation sequencing of disseminated tumor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ElenKristineMøller

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Disseminated tumor cells (DTCs detected in the bone marrow have been shown as an independent prognostic factor for women with breast cancer. However, the mechanisms behind the tumor cell dissemination are still unclear and more detailed knowledge is needed to fully understand why some cells remain dormant and others metastasize. Sequencing of single cells has opened for the possibility to dissect the genetic content of subclones of a primary tumor, as well as DTCs. Previous studies of genetic changes in DTCs have employed single-cell array comparative genomic hybridization which provides information about larger aberrations. To date, next generation sequencing provides the possibility to discover new, smaller and copy neutral genetic changes. In this study, we performed whole genome amplification and subsequently next generation sequencing to analyze DTCs from two breast cancer patients. We compared copy number profiles of the DTCs and the corresponding primary tumor generated from sequencing and SNP-CGH data, respectively. While one tumor revealed mostly whole arm gains and losses, the other had more complex alterations, as well as subclonal amplification and deletions. Whole arm gains or losses in the primary tumor were in general also observed in the corresponding DTC. Both primary tumors showed amplification of chromosome 1q and deletion of parts of chromosome 16q, which was recaptured in the corresponding DTCs. Interestingly, clear differences were also observed, indicating that the DTC underwent further evolution at the copy number level. This study provides a proof-of-principle for sequencing of DTCs and correlation with primary copy number profiles. The analyses allow insight into tumor cell dissemination and show ongoing copy number evolution in DTCs compared to the primary tumors.

  12. Next Generation Advanced Video Guidance Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jimmy; Spencer, Susan; Bryan, Tom; Johnson, Jimmie; Robertson, Bryan

    2008-01-01

    The first autonomous rendezvous and docking in the history of the U.S. Space Program was successfully accomplished by Orbital Express, using the Advanced Video Guidance Sensor (AVGS) as the primary docking sensor. The United States now has a mature and flight proven sensor technology for supporting Crew Exploration Vehicles (CEV) and Commercial Orbital Transport. Systems (COTS) Automated Rendezvous and Docking (AR&D). AVGS has a proven pedigree, based on extensive ground testing and flight demonstrations. The AVGS on the Demonstration of Autonomous Rendezvous Technology (DART)mission operated successfully in "spot mode" out to 2 km. The first generation rendezvous and docking sensor, the Video Guidance Sensor (VGS), was developed and successfully flown on Space Shuttle flights in 1997 and 1998. Parts obsolescence issues prevent the construction of more AVGS. units, and the next generation sensor must be updated to support the CEV and COTS programs. The flight proven AR&D sensor is being redesigned to update parts and add additional. capabilities for CEV and COTS with the development of the Next, Generation AVGS (NGAVGS) at the Marshall Space Flight Center. The obsolete imager and processor are being replaced with new radiation tolerant parts. In addition, new capabilities might include greater sensor range, auto ranging, and real-time video output. This paper presents an approach to sensor hardware trades, use of highly integrated laser components, and addresses the needs of future vehicles that may rendezvous and dock with the International Space Station (ISS) and other Constellation vehicles. It will also discuss approaches for upgrading AVGS to address parts obsolescence, and concepts for minimizing the sensor footprint, weight, and power requirements. In addition, parts selection and test plans for the NGAVGS will be addressed to provide a highly reliable flight qualified sensor. Expanded capabilities through innovative use of existing capabilities will also be

  13. Novel nanostructures for next generation dye-sensitized solar cells

    KAUST Repository

    Tétreault, Nicolas

    2012-01-01

    Herein, we review our latest advancements in nanostructured photoanodes for next generation photovoltaics in general and dye-sensitized solar cells in particular. Bottom-up self-assembly techniques are developed to fabricate large-area 3D nanostructures that enable enhanced charge extraction and light harvesting through optical scattering or photonic crystal effects to improve photocurrent, photovoltage and fill factor. Using generalized techniques to fabricate specialized nanostructures enables specific optoelectronic and physical characteristics like conduction, charge extraction, injection, recombination and light harvesting but also helps improve mechanical flexibility and long-term stability in low cost materials. © 2012 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  14. Interoperability and security in wireless body area network infrastructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Steve; Lebak, Jeffrey; Yao, Jianchu; Creekmore, Jonathan; Milenkovic, Aleksandar; Jovanov, Emil

    2005-01-01

    Wireless body area networks (WBANs) and their supporting information infrastructures offer unprecedented opportunities to monitor state of health without constraining the activities of a wearer. These mobile point-of-care systems are now realizable due to the convergence of technologies such as low-power wireless communication standards, plug-and-play device buses, off-the-shelf development kits for low-power microcontrollers, handheld computers, electronic medical records, and the Internet. To increase acceptance of personal monitoring technology while lowering equipment cost, advances must be made in interoperability (at both the system and device levels) and security. This paper presents an overview of WBAN infrastructure work in these areas currently underway in the Medical Component Design Laboratory at Kansas State University (KSU) and at the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH). KSU efforts include the development of wearable health status monitoring systems that utilize ISO/IEEE 11073, Bluetooth, Health Level 7, and OpenEMed. WBAN efforts at UAH include the development of wearable activity and health monitors that incorporate ZigBee-compliant wireless sensor platforms with hardware-level encryption and the TinyOS development environment. WBAN infrastructures are complex, requiring many functional support elements. To realize these infrastructures through collaborative efforts, organizations such as KSU and UAH must define and utilize standard interfaces, nomenclature, and security approaches. PMID:17281067

  15. Wireless and wireline service convergence in next generation optical access networks - the FP7 WISCON project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vegas Olmos, Juan José; Pang, Xiaodan; Lebedev, Alexander;

    2014-01-01

    The next generation of information technology demands both high capacity and mobility for applications such as high speed wireless access capable of supporting broadband services. The transport of wireless and wireline signals is converging into a common telecommunication infrastructure. In this...... paper, we will present the Marie Curie Framework Program 7 project “Wireless and wireline service convergence in next generation optical access networks” (WISCON), which focuses on the conception and study of novel architectures for wavelength-division-multiplexing (WDM) optical multi-modulation format...

  16. Nuclear Knowledge to the Next Generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The safe, reliable, and cost-effective operation of Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) requires that personnel possess and maintain the requisite knowledge, skills, and attitudes to do their jobs properly. Such knowledge includes not only the technical competencies required by the nature of the technology and particular engineering designs, but also the softer competencies associated with effective management, communication and teamwork. Recent studies have shown that there has been a loss of corporate knowledge and memory. Both explicit knowledge and tacit knowledge must be passed on to the next generation of workers in the industry to ensure a quality workforce. New and different techniques may be required to ensure timely and effective knowledge retention and transfer. The IAEA prepared a report on this subject. The main conclusions from the report regarding strategies for managing the aging workforce are included. Also included are main conclusions from the report regarding the capture an d preservation of mission critical knowledge, and the effective transfer of this knowledge to the next generation of NPP personnel. The nuclear industry due to its need for well-documented procedures, specifications, design basis, safety analyses, etc., has a greater fraction of its mission critical knowledge as explicit knowledge than do many other industries. This facilitates the task of knowledge transfer. For older plants in particular, there may be a need for additional efforts to transfer tacit knowledge to explicit knowledge to support major strategic initiatives such as plant license extensions/renewals, periodic safety reviews, major plant upgrades, and plant specific control room simulator development. The challenge in disseminating explicit knowledge is to make employees aware that it is available and provide easy access in formats and forms that are usable. Tacit knowledge is more difficult to identify and disseminate. The challenge is to identify what can be converted to

  17. Next Generation Germanium Systems for Safeguards Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We are developing the latest generation of highly portable, mechanically cooled germanium systems for safeguard applications. In collaboration with our industrial partner, Ph.D.s Co, we have developed the Germanium Gamma Ray Imager (GeGI), an imager with a 2π field of view. This instrument has been thoroughly field tested in a wide range of environments and have performed reliably even in the harshest conditions. The imaging capability of GeGI complements existing safeguards techniques by allowing for the spatial detection, identification, and characterization of nuclear material. Additionally, imaging can be used in design information verification activities to address potential material diversions. Measurements conducted at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant highlight the advantages this instrument offers in the identification and localization of LEU, HEU and Pu holdup. GeGI has also been deployed to the Savannah River Site for the measurement of radioactive waste canisters, providing information valuable for waste characterization and inventory accountancy. Measuring 30 x 15 x 23 cm and weighing approximately 15 kg, this instrument is the first portable germanium-based imager. GeGI offers high reliability with the convenience of mechanical cooling, making this instrument ideal for the next generation of safeguards instrumentation. (author)

  18. Next Generation of Neutrino Studies and Facilities

    CERN Document Server

    Stanco, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Neutrino physics is nowadays receiving more and more attention as a possible source of information for the long--standing investigation of new physics beyond the Standard Model. The rather recent measurement of the third mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$ in the standard mixing oscillation scenario encourages the pursuit of the still missing results on leptonic CP violation and absolute neutrino masses, as well as the characteristic neutrino nature. Several projects are ongoing in more or less advanced stages. Right this year is ending with impressive outcomes. In this review the neutrino oscillation history of the last two decades is debated, focusing further on the present scenario. Then a critical discussion on the current studies of the mass ordering and the expected new results is given. Our conclusion is that the guidelines for the next generation of experiments and investigations have to be tightly founded on the results of the present generation ones. In that sense it would be wise to wait a few years before ...

  19. Next Generation Life Support Project Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barta, Daniel J.; Chullen, Cinda; Vega, Leticia; Cox, Marlon R.; Aitchison, Lindsay T.; Lange, Kevin E.; Pensinger, Stuart J.; Meyer, Caitlin E.; Flynn, Michael; Jackson, W. Andrew; Abney, Morgan B.; Wheeler, Raymond M.

    2014-01-01

    Next Generation Life Support (NGLS) is one of over twenty technology development projects sponsored by NASA's Game Changing Development Program. The NGLS Project develops selected life support technologies needed for humans to live and work productively in space, with focus on technologies for future use in spacecraft cabin and space suit applications. Over the last three years, NGLS had five main project elements: Variable Oxygen Regulator (VOR), Rapid Cycle Amine (RCA) swing bed, High Performance (HP) Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Glove, Alternative Water Processor (AWP) and Series-Bosch Carbon Dioxide Reduction. The RCA swing bed, VOR and HP EVA Glove tasks are directed at key technology needs for the Portable Life Support System (PLSS) and pressure garment for an Advanced Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU). Focus is on prototyping and integrated testing in cooperation with the Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) Advanced EVA Project. The HP EVA Glove Element, new this fiscal year, includes the generation of requirements and standards to guide development and evaluation of new glove designs. The AWP and Bosch efforts focus on regenerative technologies to further close spacecraft cabin atmosphere revitalization and water recovery loops and to meet technology maturation milestones defined in NASA's Space Technology Roadmaps. These activities are aimed at increasing affordability, reliability, and vehicle self-sufficiency while decreasing mass and mission cost, supporting a capability-driven architecture for extending human presence beyond low-Earth orbit, along a human path toward Mars. This paper provides a status of current technology development activities with a brief overview of future plans.

  20. Towards Intelligent Control for Next Generation Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta, Diana Michelle; KrishnaKumar, Kalmanje Srinvas; Frost, Susan Alane

    2008-01-01

    NASA Aeronautics Subsonic Fixed Wing Project is focused on mitigating the environmental and operation impacts expected as aviation operations triple by 2025. The approach is to extend technological capabilities and explore novel civil transport configurations that reduce noise, emissions, fuel consumption and field length. Two Next Generation (NextGen) aircraft have been identified to meet the Subsonic Fixed Wing Project goals - these are the Hybrid Wing-Body (HWB) and Cruise Efficient Short Take-Off and Landing (CESTOL) aircraft. The technologies and concepts developed for these aircraft complicate the vehicle s design and operation. In this paper, flight control challenges for NextGen aircraft are described. The objective of this paper is to examine the potential of state-of-the-art control architectures and algorithms to meet the challenges and needed performance metrics for NextGen flight control. A broad range of conventional and intelligent control approaches are considered, including dynamic inversion control, integrated flight-propulsion control, control allocation, adaptive dynamic inversion control, data-based predictive control and reinforcement learning control.

  1. Comparison of Next-Generation Sequencing Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Liu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available With fast development and wide applications of next-generation sequencing (NGS technologies, genomic sequence information is within reach to aid the achievement of goals to decode life mysteries, make better crops, detect pathogens, and improve life qualities. NGS systems are typically represented by SOLiD/Ion Torrent PGM from Life Sciences, Genome Analyzer/HiSeq 2000/MiSeq from Illumina, and GS FLX Titanium/GS Junior from Roche. Beijing Genomics Institute (BGI, which possesses the world’s biggest sequencing capacity, has multiple NGS systems including 137 HiSeq 2000, 27 SOLiD, one Ion Torrent PGM, one MiSeq, and one 454 sequencer. We have accumulated extensive experience in sample handling, sequencing, and bioinformatics analysis. In this paper, technologies of these systems are reviewed, and first-hand data from extensive experience is summarized and analyzed to discuss the advantages and specifics associated with each sequencing system. At last, applications of NGS are summarized.

  2. The next generation of crystal detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ren-Yuan

    2015-09-01

    Crystal detectors have been used widely in high energy and nuclear physics experiments, medical instruments and homeland security applications. Novel crystal detectors are continuously being discovered and developed in academia and in industry. In high energy and nuclear physics experiments, total absorption electromagnetic calorimeters (ECAL) made of inorganic crystals are known for their superb energy resolution and detection efficiency for photon and electron measurements. A crystal ECAL is thus the choice for those experiments where precision measurements of photons and electrons are crucial for their physics missions. For future HEP experiments at the energy and intensity frontiers, however, the crystal detectors used in the above mentioned ECALs are either not bright and fast enough, or not radiation hard enough. Crystal detectors have also been proposed to build a Homogeneous Hadron Calorimeter (HHCAL) to achieve unprecedented jet mass resolution by duel readout of both Cherenkov and scintillation light, where development of cost-effective crystal detectors is a crucial issue because of the huge crystal volume required. This paper discusses several R&D directions for the next generation of crystal detectors for future HEP experiments.

  3. The next-generation BLASTPol experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dober, Bradley J.; Ade, Peter A. R.; Ashton, Peter; Angilè, Francesco E.; Beall, James A.; Becker, Dan; Bradford, Kristi J.; Che, George; Cho, Hsiao-Mei; Devlin, Mark J.; Fissel, Laura M.; Fukui, Yasuo; Galitzki, Nicholas; Gao, Jiansong; Groppi, Christopher E.; Hillbrand, Seth; Hilton, Gene C.; Hubmayr, Johannes; Irwin, Kent D.; Klein, Jeffrey; Van Lanen, Jeff; Li, Dale; Li, Zhi-Yun; Lourie, Nathan P.; Mani, Hamdi; Martin, Peter G.; Mauskopf, Philip; Nakamura, Fumitaka; Novak, Giles; Pappas, David P.; Pascale, Enzo; Santos, Fabio P.; Savini, Giorgio; Scott, Douglas; Stanchfield, Sara; Ullom, Joel N.; Underhill, Matthew; Vissers, Michael R.; Ward-Thompson, Derek

    2014-07-01

    The Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope for Polarimetry (BLASTPol) is a suborbital mapping experiment designed to study the role magnetic fields play in star formation. BLASTPol has had two science flights from McMurdo Station, Antarctica in 2010 and 2012. These flights have produced thousands of polarization vectors at 250, 350 and 500 microns in several molecular cloud targets. We present the design, specifications, and progress towards the next-generation BLASTPol experiment (BLAST-TNG). BLAST-TNG will fly a 40% larger diameter primary mirror, with almost 8 times the number of polarization-sensitive detectors resulting in a factor of 16 increase in mapping speed. With a spatial resolution of 2200 and four times the field of view (340 arcmin2) of BLASTPol, BLAST-TNG will bridge the angular scales between Planck's all-sky maps with 50 resolution and ALMA's ultra-high resolution narrow (~ 2000) fields. The new receiver has a larger cryogenics volume, allowing for a 28 day hold time. BLAST-TNG employs three arrays of Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors (MKIDs) with 30% fractional bandwidth at 250, 350 and 500 microns. In this paper, we will present the new BLAST-TNG instrument and science objectives.

  4. The next-generation BLASTPol experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Dober, Bradley; Ashton, Peter; Angilè, Francesco E; Beall, James A; Becker, Dan; Bradford, Kristi J; Che, George; Cho, Hsiao-Mei; Devlin, Mark J; Fissel, Laura M; Fukui, Yasuo; Galitzki, Nicholas; Gao, Jiansong; Groppi, Christopher E; Hillbrand, Seth; Hilton, Gene C; Hubmayr, Johannes; Irwin, Kent D; Klein, Jeffrey; Van Lanen, Jeff; Li, Dale; Li, Zhi-Yun; Lourie, Nathan P; Mani, Hamdi; Martin, Peter G; Mauskopf, Philip; Nakamura, Fumitaka; Novak, Giles; Pappas, David P; Pascale, Enzo; Santos, Fabio P; Savini, Giorgio; Scott, Douglas; Stanchfield, Sara; Ullom, Joel N; Underhill, Matthew; Vissers, Michael R; Ward-Thompson, Derek

    2014-01-01

    The Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope for Polarimetry (BLASTPol) is a suborbital mapping experiment designed to study the role magnetic fields play in star formation. BLASTPol has had two science flights from McMurdo Station, Antarctica in 2010 and 2012. These flights have produced thousands of polarization vectors at 250, 350 and 500 microns in several molecular cloud targets. We present the design, specifications, and progress towards the next-generation BLASTPol experiment (BLAST-TNG). BLAST-TNG will fly a 40% larger diameter primary mirror, with almost 8 times the number of polarization-sensitive detectors resulting in a factor of 16 increase in mapping speed. With a spatial resolution of 22 arcseconds and four times the field of view of BLASTPol, BLAST-TNG will bridge the angular scales between Planck's low resolution all-sky maps and ALMA's ultra-high resolution narrow fields. The new receiver has a larger cryogenics volume, allowing for a 28 day hold time. BLAST-TNG employs three arr...

  5. Next Generation Life Support Project Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barta, Daniel J.; Chullen, Cinda; Pickering, Karen D.; Cox, Marlon; Towsend, Neil; Campbell, Colin; Flynn, Michael; Wheeler, Raymond

    2012-01-01

    Next Generation Life Support (NGLS) is one of several technology development projects sponsored by NASA s Game Changing Development Program. The NGLS Project is developing life support technologies (including water recovery and space suit life support technologies) needed for humans to live and work productively in space. NGLS has three project tasks: Variable Oxygen Regulator (VOR), Rapid Cycle Amine (RCA) swing bed, and Alternative Water Processor (AWP). The RCA swing bed and VOR tasks are directed at key technology needs for the Portable Life Support System (PLSS) for an Advanced Extravehicular Mobility Unit, with focus on test article development and integrated testing in an Advanced PLSS in cooperation with the Advanced Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) Project. An RCA swing-bed provides integrated carbon dioxide removal and humidity control that can be regenerated in real time during an EVA. The VOR technology will significantly increase the number of pressure settings available to the space suit. Current space suit pressure regulators are limited to only two settings whereas the adjustability of the advanced regulator will be nearly continuous. The AWP effort, based on natural biological processes and membrane-based secondary treatment, will result in the development of a system capable of recycling wastewater from sources expected in future exploration missions, including hygiene and laundry water. This paper will provide a status of technology development activities and future plans.

  6. Next generation drying technologies for pharmaceutical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Robert H; Bhatnagar, Bakul; Tchessalov, Serguei; Izutsu, Ken-Ichi; Tsumoto, Kouhei; Ohtake, Satoshi

    2014-09-01

    Drying is a commonly used technique for improving the product stability of biotherapeutics. Typically, drying is accomplished through freeze-drying, as evidenced by the availability of several lyophilized products on the market. There are, however, a number of drawbacks to lyophilization, including the lengthy process time required for drying, low energy efficiency, high cost of purchasing and maintaining the equipment, and sensitivity of the product to freezing and various other processing-related stresses. These limitations have led to the search for next-generation drying methods that can be applied to biotherapeutics. Several alternative drying methods are reviewed herein, with particular emphasis on methods that are commonly employed outside of the biopharmaceutical industry including spray drying, convective drying, vacuum drying, microwave drying, and combinations thereof. Although some of the technologies have already been implemented for processing biotherapeutics, others are still at an early stage of feasibility assessment. An overview of each method is presented, detailing the comparison to lyophilization, examining the advantages and disadvantages of each technology, and evaluating the potential of each to be utilized for drying biotherapeutic products. PMID:24916125

  7. Next generation advanced nuclear reactor designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Growing energy demand by technological developments and the increase of the world population and gradually diminishing energy resources made nuclear power an indispensable option. The renewable energy sources like solar, wind and geothermal may be suited to meet some local needs. Environment friendly nuclear energy which is a suitable solution to large scale demands tends to develop highly economical, advanced next generation reactors by incorporating technological developments and years of operating experience. The enhancement of safety and reliability, facilitation of maintainability, impeccable compatibility with the environment are the goals of the new generation reactors. The protection of the investment and property is considered as well as the protection of the environment and mankind. They became economically attractive compared to fossil-fired units by the use of standard designs, replacing some active systems by passive, reducing construction time and increasing the operation lifetime. The evolutionary designs were introduced at first by ameliorating the conventional plants, than revolutionary systems which are denoted as generation IV were verged to meet future needs. The investigations on the advanced, proliferation resistant fuel cycle technologies were initiated to minimize the radioactive waste burden by using new generation fast reactors and ADS transmuters.

  8. Optimized spectral sampling for next generation spectrographs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giguere, Matthew J.; Fischer, D.

    2014-01-01

    Over the past twenty years, technological improvements have led to a steadily decreasing lower mass limit for detectable exoplanets. Throughout these past two decades detectable radial velocity semi-amplitudes have always been larger than the intrinsic stellar noise of the quietest of stars. However, this is no longer the case. To continue to lower the mass detection limit of the radial velocity method, we can no longer ignore the intrinsic stellar noise, or simply add this astrophysical jitter in quadrature to our errors. Instead we must explore methods of disentangling it from the signals induced by orbiting planets. One method that has long been used to gauge stellar activity is line bisector analysis, but to our knowledge the optimal spectral sampling for line bisectors has never been explored. We have created synthetic spectral lines, modeled the affects of magnetic activity, and calculated how variations in magnetic activity affect line bisectors. We then used these results to calculate the optimal spectral sampling size for line bisector analysis. In order to detect Earth-like planets, the next generation of radial velocity machines must be built with the measurement of stellar signals in mind, not the detection of planets. These results are therefore helpful for the design of future high resolution spectrographs that have the goal of measuring and disentangling astrophysical affects from the signals induced by orbiting Earth-like planets.

  9. THE NEXT GENERATION TRANSIT SURVEY PROTOTYPING PHASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. McCormac

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available El Next Generation Transit Survey (NGTS es un nuevo sondeo d e exoplanetas transitantes de campo amplio que tiene como objetivo descubrir exoplanetas del tama ̃no d e Neptuno y super-Tierras entorno a estrellas brillantes ( V < 13 cercanas. NGTS consiste de un arreglo de 12 telescopios o perados rob ́oticamente observando en la banda de 600 − 900 nm. NGTS sondear ́a m ́as de cinco veces el n ́umero de estre llas, con V < 13, que Kepler y por lo tanto proveer ́a los objetivos m ́as brillantes para s er caracterizados con instrumentaci ́on existente y futura (VLT, E-ELT y JWST. En 2009/10 un prototipo del NGTS f ue probado en La Palma, comprobando que un sistema as ́ı puede alcanzar nuestros objetivos de fot ometr ́ıa estelar esencialmente limitada s ́olo por el ruido blanco. Los resultados son resumidos aqu ́ı. NGTS se al imenta de la experiencia del proyecto SuperWASP, que, por muchos a ̃nos, ha liderado la detecci ́on terrestre d e exoplanetas transitantes.

  10. Tailoring next-generation biofuels and their combustion in next-generation engines.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gladden, John Michael; Wu, Weihua; Taatjes, Craig A.; Scheer, Adam Michael; Turner, Kevin M.; Yu, Eizadora T.; O' Bryan, Greg; Powell, Amy Jo; Gao, Connie W. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA

    2013-11-01

    Increasing energy costs, the dependence on foreign oil supplies, and environmental concerns have emphasized the need to produce sustainable renewable fuels and chemicals. The strategy for producing next-generation biofuels must include efficient processes for biomass conversion to liquid fuels and the fuels must be compatible with current and future engines. Unfortunately, biofuel development generally takes place without any consideration of combustion characteristics, and combustion scientists typically measure biofuels properties without any feedback to the production design. We seek to optimize the fuel/engine system by bringing combustion performance, specifically for advanced next-generation engines, into the development of novel biosynthetic fuel pathways. Here we report an innovative coupling of combustion chemistry, from fundamentals to engine measurements, to the optimization of fuel production using metabolic engineering. We have established the necessary connections among the fundamental chemistry, engine science, and synthetic biology for fuel production, building a powerful framework for co-development of engines and biofuels.

  11. Ecological Infrastructures on Road Networks in and around Forested Areas.

    OpenAIRE

    Gülci, Sercan; Akay, Abdullah E.

    2015-01-01

    The road networks are located in and around forested areas to ensure sustainable management of forest resources. However, it is crucial to improve roads due to their habitat fragmentation and the barrier effects on forest ecosystems. Especially the wild animals, as one of the important components of ecosystem, are detrimentally affected by road networks due to degradation, alteration, conversion, and loss of their habitats. In recent years, ecological infrastructures have been developed to pr...

  12. Applications for next-generation sequencing in fish ecotoxicogenomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvine C Mehinto

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The new technologies for next-generation sequencing and global gene expression analyses that are widely used in molecular medicine are increasingly applied to the field of fish biology. This has facilitated new directions to address research areas that could not be previously considered due to the lack of molecular information for ecologically relevant species. Over the past decade, the cost of next-generation sequencing (NGS has decreased significantly, making it possible to use non-model fish species to investigate emerging environmental issues. NGS technologies have permitted researchers to obtain large amounts of raw data in short periods of time. There have also been significant improvements in bioinformatics to assemble the sequences and annotate the genes, thus facilitating the management of these large datasets. The combination of DNA sequencing and bioinformatics has improved our abilities to design custom microarrays and study the genome and transcriptome of a wide variety of organisms. Despite the promising results obtained using these techniques in fish studies, NGS technologies are currently underused in ecotoxicogenomics and few studies have employed these methods. These issues should be addressed in order to exploit the full potential of NGS in ecotoxicological studies and expand our understanding of the biology of non-model organisms.

  13. Next-generation healthcare: a strategic appraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montague, Terrence

    2009-01-01

    Successful next-generation healthcare must deliver timely access and quality for an aging population, while simultaneously promoting disease prevention and managing costs. The key factors for sustained success are a culture with aligned goals and values; coordinated team care that especially engages with physicians and patients; practical information that is collected and communicated reliably; and education in the theory and methods of collaboration, measurement and leadership. Currently, optimal population health is challenged by a high prevalence of chronic disease, with large gaps between best and usual care, a scarcity of health human resources - particularly with the skills, attitudes and training for coordinated team care - and the absence of flexible, reliable clinical measurement systems. However, to make things better, institutional models and supporting technologies are available. In the short term, a first step is to enhance the awareness of the practical opportunities to improve, including the expansion of proven community-based disease management programs that communicate knowledge, competencies and clinical measurements among professional and patient partners, leading to reduced care gaps and improved clinical and economic outcomes. Longer-term success requires two additional steps. One is formal inter-professional training to provide, on an ongoing basis, the polyvalent human resource skills and foster the culture of working with others to improve the care of whole populations. The other is the adoption of reliable information systems, including electronic health records, to allow useful and timely measurement and effective communication of clinical information in real-world settings. A better health future can commence immediately, within existing resources, and be sustained with feasible innovations in provider and patient education and information systems. The future is now. PMID:19521152

  14. Next Generation Melter Optioneering Study - Interim Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The next generation melter (NOM) development program includes a down selection process to aid in determining the recommended vitrification technology to implement into the WTP at the first melter change-out which is scheduled for 2025. This optioneering study presents a structured value engineering process to establish and assess evaluation criteria that will be incorporated into the down selection process. This process establishes an evaluation framework that will be used progressively throughout the NGM program, and as such this interim report will be updated on a regular basis. The workshop objectives were achieved. In particular: (1) Consensus was reached with stakeholders and technology providers represented at the workshop regarding the need for a decision making process and the application of the D20 process to NGM option evaluation. (2) A framework was established for applying the decision making process to technology development and evaluation between 2010 and 2013. (3) The criteria for the initial evaluation in 2011 were refined and agreed with stakeholders and technology providers. (4) The technology providers have the guidance required to produce data/information to support the next phase of the evaluation process. In some cases it may be necessary to reflect the data/information requirements and overall approach to the evaluation of technology options against specific criteria within updated Statements of Work for 2010-2011. Access to the WTP engineering data has been identified as being very important for option development and evaluation due to the interface issues for the NGM and surrounding plant. WRPS efforts are ongoing to establish precisely data that is required and how to resolve this Issue. It is intended to apply a similarly structured decision making process to the development and evaluation of LAW NGM options.

  15. Candu technology: the next generation now

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe the development philosophy, direction and concepts that are being utilized by AECL to refine the CANDU reactor to meet the needs of current and future competitive energy markets. The technology development path for CANDU reactors is based on the optimization of the pressure tube concept. Because of the inherent modularity and flexibility of this basis for the core design, it is possible to provide a seamless and continuous evolution of the reactor design and performance. There is no need for a drastic shift in concept, in technology or in fuel. By continual refinement of the flow and materials conditions in the channels, the basic reactor can be thermally and operationally efficient, highly competitive and economic, and highly flexible in application. Thus, the design can build on the successful construction and operating experience of the existing plants, and no step changes in development direction are needed. This approach minimizes investor, operator and development risk but still provides technological, safety and performance advances. In today's world energy markets, major drivers for the technology development are: (a) reduced capital cost; (b) improved operation; (c) enhanced safety; and (d) fuel cycle flexibility. The drivers provide specific numerical targets. Meeting these drivers ensures that the concept meets and exceeds the customer economic, performance, safety and resource use goals and requirements, including the suitable national and international standards. This logical development of the CANDU concept leads naturally to the 'Next Generation' of CANDU reactors. The major features under development include an optimized lattice for SEU (slightly enriched uranium) fuel, light water cooling coupled with heavy water moderation, advanced fuel channels and CANFLEX fuel, optimization of plant performance, enhanced thermal and BOP (balance of plant) efficiency, and the adoption of layout and construction technology adapted from successful on

  16. Next generation networks - The technologies and enablers

    OpenAIRE

    Bidot García, Anna Sofía

    2015-01-01

    While consumers are currently yearning for 4G smartphones, laboratories and some of the biggest companies are already working to develop its successor: the 5th generation networks. 5G will alter current technologies as we know them today. Software Defined Networking (SDN) will be the architecture used to deploy 5G. This thesis introduces the reader to the world of SDN. SDN breaks away from the conventional model of network, decoupling the network infrastructure from the applications and servi...

  17. Amplified CWDM-based Next Generation Broadband Access Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peiris, Sasanthi Chamarika

    The explosive growth of both fixed and mobile data-centric traffic along with the inevitable trend towards all-IP/Ethernet transport protocols and packet switched networks will ultimately lead to an all-packet-based converged fixed-mobile optical transport network from the core all the way out to the access network. To address the increasing capacity and speed requirements in the access networks, Wavelength-Division Multiplexed (WDM) and/or Coarse WDM (CWDM)-based Passive Optical Networks (PONs) are expected to emerge as the next-generation optical access infrastructures. However, due to several techno-economic hurdles, CWDM-PONs are still considered an expensive solution and have not yet made any significant inroads into the current access area. One of the key technology hurdles is the scalability of the CWDM-based PONs. Passive component optical insertion losses limit the reach of the network or the number of served optical network units (ONUs). In the recent years, optical amplified CWDM approaches have emerged and new designs of optical amplifiers have been proposed and demonstrated. The critical design parameter for these amplifiers is the very wide optical amplification bandwidth (e.g., 340 nm combined for both directions). The objective of this PhD dissertation work is first to engineer ring and tree-ring based PON architectures that can achieve longer unamplified PON reach and/or provide service to a greater number of ONUs and customers. Secondly is to develop new novel optical amplifier schemes to further address the scalability limitation of the CWDM-based PONs. Specifically, this work proposes and develops novel ultra wide-band hybrid Raman-Optical parametric amplifier (HROPA) schemes that operate over nearly the entire specified CWDM band to provide 340 nm bidirectional optical gain bandwidth over the amplified PON's downstream and upstream CWDM wavelength bands (about 170 nm in each direction). The performance of the proposed HROPA schemes is assessed

  18. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Materials Research and Development Program Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The U.S Department of Energy (DOE) has selected the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production without greenhouse gas emissions. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic or pebble-bed, thermal neutron spectrum reactor that will produce electricity and hydrogen in a state-of-the-art thermodynamically efficient manner. The NGNP will use very high burn-up, low-enriched uranium, TRISO-coated fuel and have a projected plant design service life of 60 years. The VHTR concept is considered to be the nearest-term reactor design that has the capability to efficiently produce hydrogen. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The NGNP Project is envisioned to demonstrate the following: (1) A full-scale prototype VHTR by about 2021; (2) High-temperature Brayton Cycle electric power production at full scale with a focus on economic performance; (3) Nuclear-assisted production of hydrogen (with about 10% of the heat) with a focus on economic performance; and (4) By test, the exceptional safety capabilities of the advanced gas-cooled reactors. Further, the NGNP program will: (1) Obtain a Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) License to construct and operate the NGNP, this process will provide a basis for future performance based, risk-informed licensing; and (2) Support the development, testing, and prototyping of hydrogen infrastructures. The NGNP Materials Research and Development (R and D) Program is responsible for performing R and D on likely NGNP materials in support of the NGNP design, licensing, and construction activities. The NGNP Materials R and D Program includes the following elements: (1) Developing a specific approach, program plan and other project management

  19. Developments of next generation of seafloor observatories in MARsite project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Italiano, Francesco; Favali, Paolo; Zaffuto, Alfonso; Zora, Marco; D'Anca, Fabio

    2015-04-01

    The development of new generation of autonomous sea-floor observatories is among the aims of the EC supersite project MARsite (MARMARA Supersite; FP7 EC-funded project, grant n° 308417). An approach based on multiparameter seafloor observatories is considered of basic importance to better understand the role of the fluids in an active tectonic system and their behaviour during the development of the seismogenesis. To continuously collect geochemical and geophysical data from the immediate vicinity of the submerged North Anatolian Fault Zone (NAFZ) is one of the possibilities to contribute to the seismic hazard minimization of the Marmara area. The planning of next generation of seafloor observatories for geo-hazard monitoring is a task in one of the MARsite Work Packages (WP8). The activity is carried out combining together either the experience got after years of investigating fluids and their interactions with the seafloor and tectonic structures and the long-term experience on the development and management of permanent seafloor observatories in the main frame of the EMSO (European Multidisciplinary Seafloor and water-column Observatory, www.emso-eu.org) Research Infrastructure. The new generation of seafloor observatories have to support the observation of both slow and quick variations, thus allow collecting low and high-frequency signals besides the storage of long-term dataset and/or enable the near-real-time mode data transmission. Improvements of some the seafloor equipments have been done so far within MARsite project in terms of the amount of contemporary active instruments, their interlink with "smart sensor" capacities (threshold detection, triggering), quality of the collected data and power consumption reduction. In order to power the multiparameter sensors the digitizer and the microprocessor, an electronic board named PMS (Power Management System) with multi-master, multi-slave, single-ended, serial bus Inter-Integrated Circuit (I²C) interface

  20. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Materials Research and Development Program Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G.O. Hayner; R.L. Bratton; R.N. Wright

    2005-09-01

    The U.S Department of Energy (DOE) has selected the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production without greenhouse gas emissions. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic or pebble-bed, thermal neutron spectrum reactor that will produce electricity and hydrogen in a state-of-the-art thermodynamically efficient manner. The NGNP will use very high burn-up, low-enriched uranium, TRISO-coated fuel and have a projected plant design service life of 60 years. The VHTR concept is considered to be the nearest-term reactor design that has the capability to efficiently produce hydrogen. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The NGNP Project is envisioned to demonstrate the following: (1) A full-scale prototype VHTR by about 2021; (2) High-temperature Brayton Cycle electric power production at full scale with a focus on economic performance; (3) Nuclear-assisted production of hydrogen (with about 10% of the heat) with a focus on economic performance; and (4) By test, the exceptional safety capabilities of the advanced gas-cooled reactors. Further, the NGNP program will: (1) Obtain a Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) License to construct and operate the NGNP, this process will provide a basis for future performance based, risk-informed licensing; and (2) Support the development, testing, and prototyping of hydrogen infrastructures. The NGNP Materials Research and Development (R&D) Program is responsible for performing R&D on likely NGNP materials in support of the NGNP design, licensing, and construction activities. The NGNP Materials R&D Program includes the following elements: (1) Developing a specific approach, program plan and other project management tools for

  1. Economic factors for the next generation NPPs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper has summarized the major economic factors that will impact the economic viability of the next generation of nuclear power plants. To make these plants competitive with other sources of electric power, they must have a large plant output (1000 - 1400 M We), be constructed over a short time period (on the order of four years or less), be standardized designs which are pre-licensed, and achieve high availability through the use of long operating cycles and short refueling outages. Many features in the design of these plants can promote these attributes. This is the task of the designer in concert with the plant constructor and equipment supplier to work in a concurrent manner to obtain an integrated design that achieves these goals. It is important from the beginning that all interested parties recognize that there must be a balance between the desire for improved safety and the cost to achieve this safety. Similarly, there must be a recognition that the economics of nuclear power plants are based on power generation costs over a sixty year period, not on the initial capital cost of the plant. The initial capital cost of the plant is only about one-third of the total cost of running the plant for its life time. Thus, focusing on the initial capital costs may drive the designers to incorporate features that adversely affect its future operation. Features such as compact plant designs that have restricted access to components, and the use of highly interconnected systems that perform multiple functions, result in increased difficulty of operating and maintaining the plant. Exhaustive planning in all phases of the plant life cycle will reap dramatic dividends in the reduction of power generation costs. The planning done in the design phase by utilizing designers, constructors, and operators will result in a plant that has lower power generation costs. Planning during the construction phase can result in a shorter schedule, by eliminating essentially all rework

  2. Penetration tests in next generation networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezac, Filip; Voznak, Miroslav

    2012-06-01

    SIP proxy server is without any doubts centerpiece of any SIP IP telephony infrastructure. It also often provides other services than those related to VoIP traffic. These softswitches are, however, very often become victims of attacks and threats coming from public networks. The paper deals with a system that we developed as an analysis and testing tool to verify if the target SIP server is adequately secured and protected against any real threats. The system is designed as an open-source application, thus allowing independent access and is fully extensible to other test modules.

  3. Toward robust AV conferencing on next-generation networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Haining; Cheng, Liang; El Zarki, Magda

    2005-01-01

    In order to enable a truly pervasive computing environment, next generation networks (including B3G and 4G) will merge the broadband wireless and wireline networking infrastructure. However, due to the tremendous complexity in administration and the unreliability of the wireless channel, provision of hard-guarantees for services on such networks will not happen in the foreseeable future. This consequently makes it particularly challenging to offer viable AV conferencing services due to their stringent synchronization, delay and data fidelity requirements. We propose in this paper a robust application-level solution for wireless mobile AV conferencing on B3G/4G networks. Expecting no special treatment from the network, we apply a novel adaptive delay and synchronization control mechanism to maintain the synchronization and reduce the latency as much as possible. We also employ a robust video coding technique that has better error-resilience capability. We investigate the performance of the proposed solution through simulations using a three-state hidden Markov chain as the generic end-to-end transport channel model. The results show that our scheme yields tight synchronization performance, relatively low end-to-end latency and satisfactory presentation quality. The scheme successfully provides a fairly robust AV conferencing service.

  4. Digital Earth reloaded – Beyond the next generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Digital replicas (or 'mirror worlds') of complex entities and systems are now routine in many fields such as aerospace engineering; archaeology; medicine; or even fashion design. The Digital Earth (DE) concept as a digital replica of the entire planet occurs in Al Gore's 1992 book Earth in the Balance and was popularized in his speech at the California Science Center in January 1998. It played a pivotal role in stimulating the development of a first generation of virtual globes, typified by Google Earth that achieved many elements of this vision. Almost 15 years after Al Gore's speech, the concept of DE needs to be re-evaluated in the light of the many scientific and technical developments in the fields of information technology, data infrastructures, citizen?s participation, and earth observation that have taken place since. This paper intends to look beyond the next generation predominantly based on the developments of fields outside the spatial sciences, where concepts, software, and hardware with strong relationships to DE are being developed without referring to this term. It also presents a number of guiding criteria for future DE developments

  5. Layer 1 VPN services in distributed next-generation SONET/SDH networks with inverse multiplexing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghani, N.; Muthalaly, M. V.; Benhaddou, D.; Alanqar, W.

    2006-05-01

    Advances in next-generation SONET/SDH along with GMPLS control architectures have enabled many new service provisioning capabilities. In particular, a key services paradigm is the emergent Layer 1 virtual private network (L1 VPN) framework, which allows multiple clients to utilize a common physical infrastructure and provision their own 'virtualized' circuit-switched networks. This precludes expensive infrastructure builds and increases resource utilization for carriers. Along these lines, a novel L1 VPN services resource management scheme for next-generation SONET/SDH networks is proposed that fully leverages advanced virtual concatenation and inverse multiplexing features. Additionally, both centralized and distributed GMPLS-based implementations are also tabled to support the proposed L1 VPN services model. Detailed performance analysis results are presented along with avenues for future research.

  6. An advanced control system for a next generation transport aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rising, J. J.; Davis, W. J; Grantham, W. D.

    1983-01-01

    The use of modern control theory to develop a high-authority stability and control system for the next generation transport aircraft is described with examples taken from work performed on an advanced pitch active control system (PACS). The PACS was configured to have short-period and phugoid modes frequency and damping characteristics within the shaded S-plane areas, column force gradients with set bounds and with constant slope, and a blended normal-acceleration/pitch rate time history response to a step command. Details of the control law, feedback loop, and modal control syntheses are explored, as are compensation for the feedback gain, the deletion of the velocity signal, and the feed-forward compensation. Scheduling of the primary and secondary gains are discussed, together with control law mechanization, flying qualities analyses, and application on the L-1011 aircraft.

  7. Production of the next-generation library virtual tour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, J M; Roth, L K

    2001-10-01

    While many libraries offer overviews of their services through their Websites, only a small number of health sciences libraries provide Web-based virtual tours. These tours typically feature photographs of major service areas along with textual descriptions. This article describes the process for planning, producing, and implementing a next-generation virtual tour in which a variety of media elements are integrated: photographic images, 360-degree "virtual reality" views, textual descriptions, and contextual floor plans. Hardware and software tools used in the project are detailed, along with a production timeline and budget, tips for streamlining the process, and techniques for improving production. This paper is intended as a starting guide for other libraries considering an investment in such a project. PMID:11837254

  8. The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    F. H. Southworth; P. E. MacDonald

    2003-11-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Power (NGNP) Project will demonstrate emissions-free nuclearassisted electricity and hydrogen production by 2015. The NGNP reactor will be a helium-cooled, graphite moderated, thermal neutron spectrum reactor with a design goal outlet temperature of 1000 C or higher. The reactor thermal power and core configuration will be designed to assure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage during hypothetical accidents. The fuel cycle will be a once-through very high burnup low-enriched uranium fuel cycle. This paper provides a description of the project to build the NGNP at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The NGNP Project includes an overall reactor design activity and four major supporting activities: materials selection and qualification, NRC licensing and regulatory support, fuel development and qualification, and the hydrogen production plant. Each of these activities is discussed in the paper. All the reactor design and construction activities will be managed under the DOE’s project management system as outlined in DOE Order 413.3. The key elements of the overall project management system discussed in this paper include the client and project management organization relationship, critical decisions (CDs), acquisition strategy, and the project logic and timeline. The major activities associated with the materials program include development of a plan for managing the selection and qualification of all component materials required for the NGNP; identification of specific materials alternatives for each system component; evaluation of the needed testing, code work, and analysis required to qualify each identified material; preliminary selection of component materials; irradiation of needed sample materials; physical, mechanical, and chemical testing of unirradiated and irradiated materials; and documentation of final materials selections. The NGNP will be licensed by the NRC under 10 CFR 50 or 10

  9. Next Generation Flight Displays Using HTML5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood, Brian

    2016-01-01

    The Human Integrated Vehicles and Environments (HIVE) lab at Johnson Space Center (JSC) is focused on bringing together inter-disciplinary talent to design and integrate innovative human interface technologies for next generation manned spacecraft. As part of this objective, my summer internship project centered on an ongoing investigation in to building flight displays using the HTML5 standard. Specifically, the goals of my project were to build and demo "flight-like" crew and wearable displays as well as create a webserver for live systems being developed by the Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) program. In parallel to my project, a LabVIEW application, called a display server, was created by the HIVE that uses an XTCE (XML (Extensible Markup Language) Telemetry and Command Exchange) parser and CCSDS (Consultative Committee for Space Data System) space packet decoder to translate telemetry items sent by the CFS (Core Flight Software) over User Datagram Protocol (UDP). It was the webserver's job to receive these UDP messages and send them to the displays. To accomplish this functionality, I utilized Node.js and the accompanying Express framework. On the display side, I was responsible for creating the power system (AMPS) displays. I did this by using HTML5, CSS and JavaScript to create web pages that could update and change dynamically based on the data they received from the webserver. At this point, I have not started on the commanding, being able to send back to the CFS, portion of the displays but hope to have this functionality working by the completion of my internship. I also created a way to test the webserver's functionality without the display server by making a JavaScript application that read in a comma-separate values (CSV) file and converted it to XML which was then sent over UDP. One of the major requirements of my project was to build everything using as little preexisting code as possible, which I accomplished by only using a handful of Java

  10. INFRASTRUCTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    Andrea Gaddi

    With all the technical services running, the attention has moved toward the next shutdown that will be spent to perform those modifications needed to enhance the reliability of CMS Infrastructures. Just to give an example for the cooling circuit, a set of re-circulating bypasses will be installed into the TS/CV area to limit the pressure surge when a circuit is partially shut-off. This problem has affected especially the Endcap Muon cooling circuit in the past. Also the ventilation of the UXC55 has to be revisited, allowing the automatic switching to full extraction in case of magnet quench. (Normally 90% of the cavern air is re-circulated by the ventilation system.) Minor modifications will concern the gas distribution, while the DSS action-matrix has to be refined according to the experience gained with operating the detector for a while. On the powering side, some LV power lines have been doubled and the final schematics of the UPS coverage for the counting rooms have been released. The most relevant inte...

  11. A New Regulatory Policy for FTTx-Based Next-Generation Access Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarovič, Boštjan

    2013-07-01

    This article critically assesses the latest European Commission policies in relation to next-generation access investment that put focus on regulated prices and relaxing of wholesale access obligations. Pointing at the vital socio-legal and economic arguments, it further challenges the assumptions of the current EU regulatory framework and calls for a more contractual utility-based model of regulation instead of the current system that overly relies on market-driven infrastructure-based competition.

  12. Roadmap for Next-Generation State Accountability Systems. Second Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Council of Chief State School Officers, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This Roadmap, developed by the Council of Chief State School Officers (CCSSO) Next-Generation State Accountability Taskforce, presents a vision for next-generation accountability systems to support college and career readiness for all students. It is written by and for states, building on the leadership toward college and career readiness. This…

  13. Optimal localisation of next generation Biofuel production in Sweden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wetterlund, Elisabeth [Linkoeping Univ., Linkoeping (Sweden); Pettersson, Karin [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden); Mossberg, Johanna [SP Technical Research Inst. of Sweden, Boraas (Sweden)] [and others

    2013-09-01

    With a high availability of lignocellulosic biomass and various types of cellulosic by-products, as well as a large number of industries, Sweden is a country of great interest for future large scale production of sustainable, next generation biofuels. This is most likely also a necessity as Sweden has the ambition to be independent of fossil fuels in the transport sector by the year 2030 and completely fossil free by 2050. In order to reach competitive biofuel production costs, plants with large production capacities are likely to be required. Feedstock intake capacities in the range of about 1-2 million tonnes per year, corresponding to a biomass feed of 300-600 MW, can be expected, which may lead to major logistical challenges. To enable expansion of biofuel production in such large plants, as well as provide for associated distribution requirements, it is clear that substantial infrastructure planning will be needed. The geographical location of the production plant facilities is therefore of crucial importance and must be strategic to minimise the transports of raw material as well as of final product. Competition for the available feedstock, from for example forest industries and CHP plants (combined heat and power) further complicates the localisation problem. Since the potential for an increased biomass utilisation is limited, high overall resource efficiency is of great importance. Integration of biofuel production processes in existing industries or in district heating systems may be beneficial from several aspects, such as opportunities for efficient heat integration, feedstock and equipment integration, as well as access to existing experience and know-how. This report describes the development of Be Where Sweden, a geographically explicit optimisation model for localisation of next generation biofuel production plants in Sweden. The main objective of developing such a model is to be able to assess production plant locations that are robust to varying

  14. Graphene Transparent Conductive Electrodes for Next- Generation Microshutter Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mary; Sultana, Mahmooda; Hess, Larry

    2012-01-01

    Graphene is a single atomic layer of graphite. It is optically transparent and has high electron mobility, and thus has great potential to make transparent conductive electrodes. This invention contributes towards the development of graphene transparent conductive electrodes for next-generation microshutter arrays. The original design for the electrodes of the next generation of microshutters uses indium-tin-oxide (ITO) as the electrode material. ITO is widely used in NASA flight missions. The optical transparency of ITO is limited, and the material is brittle. Also, ITO has been getting more expensive in recent years. The objective of the invention is to develop a graphene transparent conductive electrode that will replace ITO. An exfoliation procedure was developed to make graphene out of graphite crystals. In addition, large areas of single-layer graphene were produced using low-pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) with high optical transparency. A special graphene transport procedure was developed for transferring graphene from copper substrates to arbitrary substrates. The concept is to grow large-size graphene sheets using the LPCVD system through chemical reaction, transfer the graphene film to a substrate, dope graphene to reduce the sheet resistance, and pattern the film to the dimension of the electrodes in the microshutter array. Graphene transparent conductive electrodes are expected to have a transparency of 97.7%. This covers the electromagnetic spectrum from UV to IR. In comparison, ITO electrodes currently used in microshutter arrays have 85% transparency in mid-IR, and suffer from dramatic transparency drop at a wavelength of near-IR or shorter. Thus, graphene also has potential application as transparent conductive electrodes for Schottky photodiodes in the UV region.

  15. Next generation transcriptomes for next generation genomes using est2assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ffrench-Constant Richard H

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The decreasing costs of capillary-based Sanger sequencing and next generation technologies, such as 454 pyrosequencing, have prompted an explosion of transcriptome projects in non-model species, where even shallow sequencing of transcriptomes can now be used to examine a range of research questions. This rapid growth in data has outstripped the ability of researchers working on non-model species to analyze and mine transcriptome data efficiently. Results Here we present a semi-automated platform 'est2assembly' that processes raw sequence data from Sanger or 454 sequencing into a hybrid de-novo assembly, annotates it and produces GMOD compatible output, including a SeqFeature database suitable for GBrowse. Users are able to parameterize assembler variables, judge assembly quality and determine the optimal assembly for their specific needs. We used est2assembly to process Drosophila and Bicyclus public Sanger EST data and then compared them to published 454 data as well as eight new insect transcriptome collections. Conclusions Analysis of such a wide variety of data allows us to understand how these new technologies can assist EST project design. We determine that assembler parameterization is as essential as standardized methods to judge the output of ESTs projects. Further, even shallow sequencing using 454 produces sufficient data to be of wide use to the community. est2assembly is an important tool to assist manual curation for gene models, an important resource in their own right but especially for species which are due to acquire a genome project using Next Generation Sequencing.

  16. ADS: The Next Generation Search Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accomazzi, A.; Kurtz, M. J.; Henneken, E. A.; Chyla, R.; Luker, J.; Grant, C. S.; Thompson, D. M.; Holachek, A.; Dave, R.; Murray, S. S.

    2015-04-01

    Four years after the last LISA meeting, the NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS) finds itself in the middle of major changes to the infrastructure and contents of its database. In this paper we highlight a number of features of great importance to librarians and discuss the additional functionality that we are currently developing. Our citation coverage has doubled since 2010 and now consists of over 10 million citations. We are normalizing the affiliation information in our records and we have started collecting and linking funding sources with papers in our system. At the same time, we are undergoing major technology changes in the ADS platform. We have rolled out and are now enhancing a new high-performance search engine capable of performing full-text as well as metadata searches using an intuitive query language. We are currently able to index acknowledgments, affiliations, citations, and funding sources. While this effort is still ongoing, some of its benefits are already available through the ADS Labs user interface and API at http://adslabs.org/adsabs/.

  17. ADS: The Next Generation Search Platform

    CERN Document Server

    Accomazzi, Alberto; Henneken, Edwin A; Chyla, Roman; Luker, James; Grant, Carolyn S; Thompson, Donna M; Holachek, Alexandra; Dave, Rahul; Murray, Stephen S

    2015-01-01

    Four years after the last LISA meeting, the NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS) finds itself in the middle of major changes to the infrastructure and contents of its database. In this paper we highlight a number of features of great importance to librarians and discuss the additional functionality that we are currently developing. Starting in 2011, the ADS started to systematically collect, parse and index full-text documents for all the major publications in Physics and Astronomy as well as many smaller Astronomy journals and arXiv e-prints, for a total of over 3.5 million papers. Our citation coverage has doubled since 2010 and now consists of over 70 million citations. We are normalizing the affiliation information in our records and, in collaboration with the CfA library and NASA, we have started collecting and linking funding sources with papers in our system. At the same time, we are undergoing major technology changes in the ADS platform which affect all aspects of the system and its operations. We hav...

  18. A Rural Next Generation Network (R-NGN and Its Testbed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armein Z. R. Langi

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Rural Next Generation Networks (R-NGN technology allows Internet protocol (IP based systems to be used in rural areas. This paper reports a testbed of R-NGN that uses low cost Ethernet radio links, combined with media gateways and a softswitch. The network consists of point-to-point IP Ethernet 2.4 GHz wireless link, IP switches and gateways in each community, standard copper wires and telephone sets for users. It uses low power consumption, and suitable for low density users. This combination allows low cost systems as well as multiservices (voice, data, and multimedia for rural communications. An infrastructure has been deployed in two communities in Cipicung Girang, a village 10 km outside Bandung city, Indonesia. Two towers link the communities with a network of Institut Teknologi Bandung (ITB campus. In addition, local wirelines connect community houses to the network. Currently there are four houses connected to each community node (for a total of eight house, upon which we can perform various tests and measurements.

  19. Disaster Management with a Next Generation Disaster Decision Support System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y.

    2015-12-01

    As populations become increasingly concentrated in large cities, the world is experiencing an inevitably growing trend towards the urbanisation of disasters. Scientists have contributed significant advances in understanding the geophysical causes of natural hazards and have developed sophisticated tools to predict their effects; while, much less attention has been devoted to tools that increase situational awareness, facilitate leadership, provide effective communication channels and data flow and enhance the cognitive abilities of decision makers and first responders. In this paper, we envisioned the capabilities of a next generation disaster decision support system and hence proposed a state-of-the-art system architecture design to facilitate the decision making process in natural catastrophes such as flood and bushfire by utilising a combination of technologies for multi-channel data aggregation, disaster modelling, visualisation and optimisation. Moreover, we put our thoughts into action by implementing an Intelligent Disaster Decision Support System (IDDSS). The developed system can easily plug in to external disaster models and aggregate large amount of heterogeneous data from government agencies, sensor networks, and crowd sourcing platforms in real-time to enhance the situational awareness of decision makers and offer them a comprehensive understanding of disaster impacts from diverse perspectives such as environment, infrastructure and economy, etc. Sponsored by the Australian Government and the Victorian Department of Justice (Australia), the system was built upon a series of open-source frameworks (see attached figure) with four key components: data management layer, model application layer, processing service layer and presentation layer. It has the potential to be adopted by a range of agencies across Australian jurisdictions to assist stakeholders in accessing, sharing and utilising available information in their management of disaster events.

  20. Analyzing the next-generation catalog a library technology report

    CERN Document Server

    Nagy, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    his issue of ""Library Technology Reports"" analyzes five different academic libraries to better understand their investments, detailing the outcome thus far and drawing conclusions about the next-generation catalog.

  1. Next Generation MK III Lightweight HUT/Hatch Assembly Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Next Generation MK III Lightweight HUT/Hatch Assembly will maximize the Hard Upper Torso - Hatch assembly weight reduction through the combination of innovative...

  2. Next-generation carrier screening: are we ready?

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas W Prior

    2014-01-01

    Editorial summary Next-generation sequencing (NGS) methodology allows for a major expansion in current carrier screening tests. NGS testing has been shown to be analytically accurate and cost-effective, but major challenges include educational and counseling issues.

  3. Genotype and SNP calling from next-generation sequencing data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Rasmus; Paul, Joshua S.; Albrechtsen, Anders;

    2011-01-01

    Meaningful analysis of next-generation sequencing (NGS) data, which are produced extensively by genetics and genomics studies, relies crucially on the accurate calling of SNPs and genotypes. Recently developed statistical methods both improve and quantify the considerable uncertainty associated...

  4. Sustainable gerbera production realised with the next generation greenhouse cultivation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gelder, de A.; Warmenhoven, M.G.; Dieleman, J.A.

    2014-01-01

    In spite of a considerable decrease during the last decade, energy consumption in greenhouse cultivation remains high. More sustainable greenhouse horticulture can be realised by developing new greenhouse and cultivation concepts. Recently, we developed the Next Generation Greenhouse Cultivation sys

  5. NOAA Next Generation Radar (NEXRAD) Level III Products

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset consists of Level III weather radar products collected from Next-Generation Radar (NEXRAD) stations located in the contiguous United States, Alaska,...

  6. Next Generation MK III Lightweight HUT/Hatch Assembly Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A prototype Next Generation MK III Lightweight HUT/Hatch Assembly will be fabricated and delivered during Phase II. Maximum weight reduction for the Hard Upper...

  7. NOAA Next Generation Radar (NEXRAD) Level II Base Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset consists of Level II weather radar data collected from Next-Generation Radar (NEXRAD) stations located in the contiguous United States, Alaska, Hawaii,...

  8. Nuclear material accounting: The next generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Westinghouse Hanford company (Westinghouse Hanford) and the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) have undertaken a joint effort to develop a new generation material accounting system. The system will incorporate the latest advances in microcomputer hardware, software, and network technology. This system, the Local Area Network Material Accounting System (LANMAS), offers greater performance and functionality at a reduced overall cost. It also offers the possibility of establishing a standard among DOE and NRC facilities for material accounting. This report provides a discussion of this system

  9. Next-Generation Shipboard DC Power System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jin, Zheming; Sulligoi, Giorgio; Cuzner, Rob;

    2016-01-01

    present, the research of dc microgrid has investigated and developed a series of advanced methods in control, management and objective-oriented optimization, which would found the technical interface enabling the future applications in multiple industrial areas, such as smart buildings, electric vehicles......In recent years, more and more evidence suggests that the global energy system is on the verge of a drastic revolution. The evolutionary development in power electronic technologies, the emerging high-performance energy storage devices, as well as the ever increasing penetration of renewable energy...

  10. Thermal Challenges in Next-Generation Electronic Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Garimella, S V; Fleisher, A.S.; Murthy, J. Y.; A. KESHAVARZI; Prasher, R.; Patel, C.; Bhavnani, S; Venkatasubramanian, R; Mahajan, R; Joshi, Y.; Sammakia, B; Myers, B. A.; Chorosinski, L; Baelmans, M; Sathyamurthy, P

    2008-01-01

    Thermal challenges in next-generation electronic systems, as identified through panel presentations and ensuing discussions at the workshop, Thermal Challenges in Next Generation Electronic Systems, held in Santa Fe, NM, January 7-10, 2007, are summarized in this paper. Diverse topics are covered, including electrothermal and multiphysics codesign of electronics, new and nanostructured materials, high heat flux thermal management, site-specific thermal management, thermal design of next-gener...

  11. Next-generation wireless technologies 4G and beyond

    CERN Document Server

    Chilamkurti, Naveen; Chaouchi, Hakima

    2013-01-01

    This comprehensive text/reference examines the various challenges to secure, efficient and cost-effective next-generation wireless networking. Topics and features: presents the latest advances, standards and technical challenges in a broad range of emerging wireless technologies; discusses cooperative and mesh networks, delay tolerant networks, and other next-generation networks such as LTE; examines real-world applications of vehicular communications, broadband wireless technologies, RFID technology, and energy-efficient wireless communications; introduces developments towards the 'Internet o

  12. IMPACT OF NEXT GENERATION WIRELESS LAN ON LEGACY DEVICES

    OpenAIRE

    Goyal,Vikas

    2012-01-01

    The next generation wireless LAN Technology which offers new challenges and opportunities called 802.11n is a set of IEEE standard specification. It promises for designing and delivering data on wireless networking that is four to six times faster than earlier 802.11a/g (legacy WLAN devices) networks and improve transmission range. It has been proven that the 802.11n technology having wide bandwidth channel that satisfy next generation application and maintaining backward compatibility with p...

  13. Examination of concept of next generation computer. Progress report 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Center for Promotion of Computational Science and Engineering has conducted R and D works on the technology of parallel processing and has started the examination of the next generation computer in 1999. This report describes the behavior analyses of quantum calculation codes. It also describes the consideration for the analyses and examination results for the method to reduce cash misses. Furthermore, it describes a performance simulator that is being developed to quantitatively examine the concept of the next generation computer. (author)

  14. Next-generation sequencing offers new insights into DNA degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overballe-Petersen, Søren; Orlando, Ludovic Antoine Alexandre; Willerslev, Eske

    2012-01-01

    rates that previously were obtained only from extrapolations of results from in vitro kinetic experiments performed over short timescales. For example, recent next-generation sequencing of ancient DNA reveals purine bases as one of the main targets of postmortem hydrolytic damage, through base......The processes underlying DNA degradation are central to various disciplines, including cancer research, forensics and archaeology. The sequencing of ancient DNA molecules on next-generation sequencing platforms provides direct measurements of cytosine deamination, depurination and fragmentation...

  15. Cross-Layer Resource Allocation Scheme Under Heterogeneous Constraints for Next Generation High Rate WPAN

    CERN Document Server

    Khalil, Ayman; Helard, Jean-Francois; 10.5121/ijcnc.2010.2312

    2010-01-01

    In the next generation wireless networks, the growing demand for new wireless applications is accompanied with high expectations for better quality of service (QoS) fulfillment especially for multimedia applications. Furthermore, the coexistence of future unlicensed users with existing licensed users is becoming a challenging task in the next generation communication systems to overcome the underutilization of the spectrum. A QoS and interference aware resource allocation is thus of special interest in order to respond to the heterogeneous constraints of the next generation networks. In this work, we address the issue of resource allocation under heterogeneous constraints for unlicensed multiband ultra-wideband (UWB) systems in the context of Future Home Networks, i.e. the wireless personal area network (WPAN). The problem is first studied analytically using a heterogeneous constrained optimization problem formulation. After studying the characteristics of the optimal solution, we propose a low-complexity sub...

  16. Oxide fuel fabrication facility - the next generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1989, British Nuclear Fuels, Fuel Division, made a significant strategic decision to replace old plant in the oxide fuels manufacturing area. The decision was made against the fundamental objective of a Fuel Division determined to remain in the nuclear fabrication business with a facility to ensure secure supply to its customers, and build on its 40+ years fuel fabrication experience to become a major player in the international arena of nuclear fuel fabrication. The New Oxide Fuel Complex is a facility that considers the 90s issues of technology, environment, general public acceptance worker protection and commercial viability and provides BNFL, and its workforce, with a show-piece plant to take them with confidence into the 21st century. (author)

  17. SecA inhibitors: next generation antimicrobials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weixuan Chen; Arpana Chaudhary; Jianmei Cui; Jinshan Jin; Yinghsin Hsieh; Hsiuchin Yang; Yingju Huang; Phang C. Tai; Binghe Wang

    2012-01-01

    Health problems caused by bacterial infection have become a major public health concern in recent years due to the widespread emergence of drug-resistant bacterial strains.Therefore,the need for the development of new types of antimicrobial agents,especially those with a novel mechanism of action,is urgent.SecA,one of the key components of the secretion (Sec) pathway,is a new promising target for antimicrobial agent design.In recent years,promising leads targeting SecA have been identified and the feasibility of developing antimicrobial agents through the inhibition of SecA has been demonstrated.We hope this review will help stimulate more research in this area so that new antimicrobials can be obtained by targeting SecA.

  18. Next Generation Semantic Web and Its Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soumyarashmi Panigrahi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Currently, computers are changing from single, isolated devices into entry points to a worldwide network of information exchange and business transactions called the World Wide Web (WWW. However, the success of the WWW has made it increasingly difficult to find, access, present and maintain the information required by a wide variety of users. In response to this problem, many new research initiatives and commercial enterprises have been set up to enrich the available information with machine-process able semantics. This Semantic Web will provide intelligent access to heterogeneous, distributed information, enabling software products (agents to mediate between user needs and the information sources available. In this paper we describe some areas for application of this new technology. We focus on on-going work in the fields of knowledge management and electronic commerce. We also take a perspective on the semantic web-enabled web services which will help to bring the semantic web to its full potential.

  19. INFRASTRUCTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    A. Gaddi and P. Tropea

    2011-01-01

    Most of the work relating to Infrastructure has been concentrated in the new CSC and RPC manufactory at building 904, on the Prevessin site. Brand new gas distribution, powering and HVAC infrastructures are being deployed and the production of the first CSC chambers has started. Other activities at the CMS site concern the installation of a new small crane bridge in the Cooling technical room in USC55, in order to facilitate the intervention of the maintenance team in case of major failures of the chilled water pumping units. The laser barrack in USC55 has been also the object of a study, requested by the ECAL community, for the new laser system that shall be delivered in few months. In addition, ordinary maintenance works have been performed during the short machine stops on all the main infrastructures at Point 5 and in preparation to the Year-End Technical Stop (YETS), when most of the systems will be carefully inspected in order to ensure a smooth running through the crucial year 2012. After the incide...

  20. Investment dimensions in a universal service perspective: Next generation networks, alternative funding mechanisms and public-private partnerships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falch, Morten; Henten, Anders

    2008-01-01

    This paper seeks to examine the investment dimensions of next generation networks from a universal service perspective in a European context. The question is how new network infrastructures for providing access for everyone to communication, information and entertainment services in the present and...

  1. Next-Generation Therapeutics for IBD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löwenberg, Mark; D'Haens, Geert

    2015-06-01

    Various novel drugs have recently been evaluated in clinical trials showing promising effects in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Here, we summarize the recent literature in the area of emerging therapies in the field of IBD, with specific focus on anti-integrin antibodies, such as vedolizumab (anti-α4β7) and etrolizumab (anti-rhuMAb β7), and the Janus kinase (JAK) inhibitor tofacitinib. Moreover, we will discuss efficacy and safety data of golimumab (a new subcutaneous anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) antibody), Avaxia (an orally delivered anti-TNF antibody), and Budesonide MMX; all have been developed for the treatment of ulcerative colitis. Other therapeuticals that might find their way to the market the coming years include the anti-mucosal vascular addressin cell adhesion molecule (MAdCAM) PF-00547659, small molecules (including laquinimod and the CCR9 antagonist Vercirnon), as well as an orally active SMAD7 antisense oligonucleotide that showed clinical benefit in Crohn's disease patients. PMID:26031830

  2. Next generation PET data acquisition architectures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New architectures for higher performance data acquisition in PET are proposed. Improvements are demanded primarily by three areas of advancing PET state of the art. First, larger detector arrays such as the Hammersmith ECAT reg-sign EXACT HR++ exceed the addressing capacity of 32 bit coincidence event words. Second, better scintillators (LSO) make depth-of-interaction (DOI) and time-of-flight (TOF) operation more practical. Third, fully optimized single photon attenuation correction requires higher rates of data collection. New technologies which enable the proposed third generation Real Time Sorter (RTS III) include: (1) 80 M byte/sec Fibre Channel RAID disk systems, (2) PowerPC on both VMEbus and PCI Local bus, and (3) quadruple interleaved DRAM controller designs. Data acquisition flexibility is enhanced through a wider 64 bit coincidence event word. PET methodology support includes DOI (6 bits), TOF (6 bits), multiple energy windows (6 bits), 512 x 512 sinogram indexes (18 bits), and 256 crystal rings (16 bits). Throughput of 10 M events/sec is expected for list-mode data collection as well as both on-line and replay histogramming. Fully efficient list-mode storage for each PET application is provided by real-time bit packing of only the active event word bits. Real-time circuits provide DOI rebinning

  3. A Framework for Next Generation Mobile and Wireless Networks Application Development using Hybrid Component Based Development Model

    OpenAIRE

    Barnawi, Ahmed; Qureshi, M. Rizwan Jameel; Khan, Asif Irshad

    2012-01-01

    The IP Multimedia Subsystems (IMS) that features in Next Generation Networks (NGN) offers the application developer (third party) abilities to map out applications over mobile telecommunication infrastructure. The IMS comes about with APIs useful for mobile application developers to create applications to meet end-users' demands and comply with the provider's infrastructure set up at the same time. Session Initiation Protocol (SIP) is a signaling protocol for this architecture. It is used for...

  4. Accelerators for Society - TIARA 2012 Test Infrastructure and Accelerator Research Area (in Polish)

    OpenAIRE

    Romaniuk, R S

    2013-01-01

    TIARA (Test Infrastructure and Accelerator Research Area - Preparatory Phae) is an European Collaboration of Accelerator Technology, which by running research projects, technical, networks and infrastructural has a duty to integrate the research and technical communities and infrastructures in the global scale of Europe. The Collaboration gathers all research centers with large accelerator infrastructures. Other ones, like universities, are affiliated as associate members. TIARA-PP (preparato...

  5. Proceedings of the international workshop on next-generation linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains papers on the next-generation of linear colliders. The particular areas of discussion are: parameters; beam dynamics and wakefields; damping rings and sources; rf power sources; accelerator structures; instrumentation; final focus; and review of beam-beam interaction

  6. Deciphering next-generation pharmacogenomics: an information technology perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potamias, George; Lakiotaki, Kleanthi; Katsila, Theodora; Lee, Ming Ta Michael; Topouzis, Stavros; Cooper, David N; Patrinos, George P

    2014-07-01

    In the post-genomic era, the rapid evolution of high-throughput genotyping technologies and the increased pace of production of genetic research data are continually prompting the development of appropriate informatics tools, systems and databases as we attempt to cope with the flood of incoming genetic information. Alongside new technologies that serve to enhance data connectivity, emerging information systems should contribute to the creation of a powerful knowledge environment for genotype-to-phenotype information in the context of translational medicine. In the area of pharmacogenomics and personalized medicine, it has become evident that database applications providing important information on the occurrence and consequences of gene variants involved in pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, drug efficacy and drug toxicity will become an integral tool for researchers and medical practitioners alike. At the same time, two fundamental issues are inextricably linked to current developments, namely data sharing and data protection. Here, we discuss high-throughput and next-generation sequencing technology and its impact on pharmacogenomics research. In addition, we present advances and challenges in the field of pharmacogenomics information systems which have in turn triggered the development of an integrated electronic 'pharmacogenomics assistant'. The system is designed to provide personalized drug recommendations based on linked genotype-to-phenotype pharmacogenomics data, as well as to support biomedical researchers in the identification of pharmacogenomics-related gene variants. The provisioned services are tuned in the framework of a single-access pharmacogenomics portal. PMID:25030607

  7. Solution processing of next-generation nanocrystal solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Embden, J.; Chesman, A. S. R.; Duffy, N. W.; Della Gaspera, E.; Jasieniak, J. J.

    2013-12-01

    Next-generation solar cells will be fabricated from low-cost and earth abundant elements, using processes that are amenable to printing on a variety of light-weight substrates. The utilization of compositionally and structurally controlled colloidal nanocrystals as building blocks for such devices fulfills these criteria. Our recent efforts in developing kesterite Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) nanocrystals, one of the most promising materials to emerge in this area, enable the deposition of CZTS thin-films directly from a variety of solution-processed methods. Nanocrystalline thin films possess poor electronic properties, which precludes their use in solar cell devices. In order to overcome this, thermal treatment steps under an atmosphere of vaporous selenium are applied to induce large scale crystallite growth and the production of selenized CZTSSe films. This process results in a highly photoactive p-type layer. The n-type cadmium sulfide layer is also deposited from solution using chemical bath deposition. We will discuss each of these accomplishments in detail, highlighting the significant challenges that need to be overcome in order to fabricate working CZTSSe thin film solar cells.

  8. Towards a next generation open-source video codec

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bankoski, Jim; Bultje, Ronald S.; Grange, Adrian; Gu, Qunshan; Han, Jingning; Koleszar, John; Mukherjee, Debargha; Wilkins, Paul; Xu, Yaowu

    2013-02-01

    Google has recently been developing a next generation opensource video codec called VP9, as part of the experimental branch of the libvpx repository included in the WebM project (http://www.webmproject.org/). Starting from the VP8 video codec released by Google in 2010 as the baseline, a number of enhancements and new tools have been added to improve the coding efficiency. This paper provides a technical overview of the current status of this project along with comparisons and other stateoftheart video codecs H. 264/AVC and HEVC. The new tools that have been added so far include: larger prediction block sizes up to 64x64, various forms of compound INTER prediction, more modes for INTRA prediction, ⅛pel motion vectors and 8tap switchable subpel interpolation filters, improved motion reference generation and motion vector coding, improved entropy coding and framelevel entropy adaptation for various symbols, improved loop filtering, incorporation of Asymmetric Discrete Sine Transforms and larger 16x16 and 32x32 DCTs, frame level segmentation to group similar areas together, etc. Other tools and various bitstream features are being actively worked on as well. The VP9 bitstream is expected to be finalized by earlyto mid2013. Results show VP9 to be quite competitive in performance with mainstream stateoftheart codecs.

  9. Nanoimprint Lithography -A Next Generation High Volume Lithography Technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    R.Pelzer; P.Lindner; T.Glinsner; B.Vratzov; C.Gourgon; S.Landis; P.Kettner; C.Schaefer

    2004-01-01

    Nanoimprint Lithography has been demonstrated to be one of the most promising next generation techniques for large-area structure replication in the nanometer scale.This fast and low cost method becomes an increasingly important instrument for fabrication of biochemistry,μ-fluidic,μ-TAS and telecommunication devices,as well as for a wide variety of fields in the nm range,like biomedical,nano-fluidics,nano-optical applications,data storage,etc.Due to the restrictions on wavelength and the enormous development works,linked to high process and equipment costs on standard lithography systems,nanoimprint lithography might become a real competitive method in mainstream IC industry.There are no physical limitations encountered with imprinting techniques for much smaller replicated structures,down to the sub-10nm range [1].Among several Nanoimprint lithography techniques results of two promising methods,hot embossing lithography(HEL)and UV-nanoimprinting(UV-NIL)will be presented.Both techniques allow rapid prototyping as well as high volume production of fully patterned substrates for a wide range of materials.This paper will present results on HE and UVNIL,among them full wafer imprints up to 200mm with high-resolution patterns down to nm range.

  10. Next generation of global land cover characterization, mapping, and monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giri, C.; Pengra, B.; Long, J.; Loveland, T. R.

    2013-12-01

    Land cover change is increasingly affecting the biophysics, biogeochemistry, and biogeography of the Earth's surface and the atmosphere, with far-reaching consequences to human well-being. However, our scientific understanding of the distribution and dynamics of land cover and land cover change (LCLCC) is limited. Previous global land cover assessments performed using coarse spatial resolution (300 m-1 km) satellite data did not provide enough thematic detail or change information for global change studies and for resource management. High resolution (˜30 m) land cover characterization and monitoring is needed that permits detection of land change at the scale of most human activity and offers the increased flexibility of environmental model parameterization needed for global change studies. However, there are a number of challenges to overcome before producing such data sets including unavailability of consistent global coverage of satellite data, sheer volume of data, unavailability of timely and accurate training and validation data, difficulties in preparing image mosaics, and high performance computing requirements. Integration of remote sensing and information technology is needed for process automation and high-performance computing needs. Recent developments in these areas have created an opportunity for operational high resolution land cover mapping, and monitoring of the world. Here, we report and discuss these advancements and opportunities in producing the next generations of global land cover characterization, mapping, and monitoring at 30-m spatial resolution primarily in the context of United States, Group on Earth Observations Global 30 m land cover initiative (UGLC).

  11. Next generation sequencing technologies: tool to study avian virus diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapgate, S S; Barbuddhe, S B; Kumanan, K

    2015-03-01

    Increased globalisation, climatic changes and wildlife-livestock interface led to emergence of novel viral pathogens or zoonoses that have become serious concern to avian, animal and human health. High biodiversity and bird migration facilitate spread of the pathogen and provide reservoirs for emerging infectious diseases. Current classical diagnostic methods designed to be virus-specific or aim to be limited to group of viral agents, hinder identifying of novel viruses or viral variants. Recently developed approaches of next-generation sequencing (NGS) provide culture-independent methods that are useful for understanding viral diversity and discovery of novel virus, thereby enabling a better diagnosis and disease control. This review discusses the different possible steps of a NGS study utilizing sequence-independent amplification, high-throughput sequencing and bioinformatics approaches to identify novel avian viruses and their diversity. NGS lead to the identification of a wide range of new viruses such as picobirnavirus, picornavirus, orthoreovirus and avian gamma coronavirus associated with fulminating disease in guinea fowl and is also used in describing viral diversity among avian species. The review also briefly discusses areas of viral-host interaction and disease associated causalities with newly identified avian viruses. PMID:25790045

  12. Prospects for Next-Generation Storage Ring Light Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borland, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Storage ring light sources are among the most productive large-scale scientific user facilities in existence, owing to a combination of broad tunability, mature technology, high capacity, remarkable reliability, and high performance. The most commonly-used performance measure is the photon beam brightness, which is proportional to the flux per unit volume in six-dimensional phase space. The brightness is generally maximized by minimizing the transverse phase space area, or emittance, of the electron beam that generates the photons. Since the 1990's, most storage ring light sources have used a variant of the Chasman-Green, or double-bend-achromat (DBA), lattice, which produces transverse emittances of several nanometers. Presently, several light sources are under construction based on more challenging multi-bend-achromat (MBA) concepts, which promise an order of magnitude reduction in the emittance. Somewhat larger reductions are contemplated for upgrades of the largest facilities. This talk briefly surveys the relevant concepts in light source design, then explains both the mechanism and challenge of achieving next-generation emittances. Other factors, such as improved radiation-emitting devices, are also described. Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  13. Genetic markers, genotyping methods & next generation sequencing in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinidhi Desikan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecular epidemiology (ME is one of the main areas in tuberculosis research which is widely used to study the transmission epidemics and outbreaks of tubercle bacilli. It exploits the presence of various polymorphisms in the genome of the bacteria that can be widely used as genetic markers. Many DNA typing methods apply these genetic markers to differentiate various strains and to study the evolutionary relationships between them. The three widely used genotyping tools to differentiate Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains are IS6110 restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP, spacer oligotyping (Spoligotyping, and mycobacterial interspersed repeat units - variable number of tandem repeats (MIRU-VNTR. A new prospect towards ME was introduced with the development of whole genome sequencing (WGS and the next generation sequencing (NGS methods, where the entire genome is sequenced that not only helps in pointing out minute differences between the various sequences but also saves time and the cost. NGS is also found to be useful in identifying single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, comparative genomics and also various aspects about transmission dynamics. These techniques enable the identification of mycobacterial strains and also facilitate the study of their phylogenetic and evolutionary traits.

  14. INFRASTRUCTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    A. Gaddi

    2012-01-01

    The CMS Infrastructures teams are constantly ensuring the smooth operation of the different services during this critical period when the detector is taking data at full speed. A single failure would spoil hours of high luminosity beam and everything is put in place to avoid such an eventuality. In the meantime however, the fast approaching LS1 requires that we take a look at the various activities to take place from the end of the year onwards. The list of infrastructures consolidation and upgrade tasks is already long and will touch all the services (cooling, gas, inertion, powering, etc.). The definitive list will be available just before the LS1 start. One activity performed by the CMS cooling team that is worth mentioning is the maintenance of the cooling circuits at the CMS Electronics Integration Centre (EIC) at building 904. The old chiller has been replaced by a three-units cooling plant that also serves the HVAC system for the new CSC and RPC factories. The commissioning of this new plant has tak...

  15. INFRASTRUCTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    Andrea Gaddi

    2010-01-01

    In addition to the intense campaign of replacement of the leaky bushing on the Endcap circuits, other important activities have also been completed, with the aim of enhancing the overall reliability of the cooling infrastructures at CMS. Remaining with the Endcap circuit, the regulating valve that supplies cold water to the primary side of the circuit heat-exchanger, is not well adapted in flow capability and a new part has been ordered, to be installed during a stop of LHC. The instrumentation monitoring of the refilling rate of the circuits has been enhanced and we can now detect leaks as small as 0.5 cc/sec, on circuits that have nominal flow rates of some 20 litres/sec. Another activity starting now that the technical stop is over is the collection of spare parts that are difficult to find on the market. These will be stored at P5 with the aim of reducing down-time in case of component failure. Concerning the ventilation infrastructures, it has been noticed that in winter time the relative humidity leve...

  16. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Next Generation Safeguards Initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirk, Bernadette Lugue [ORNL; Eipeldauer, Mary D [ORNL; Whitaker, J Michael [ORNL

    2011-12-01

    In 2007, the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) Office of Nonproliferation and International Security (NA-24) completed a comprehensive review of the current and potential future challenges facing the international safeguards system. The review examined trends and events impacting the mission of international safeguards and the implications of expanding and evolving mission requirements on the legal authorities and institutions that serve as the foundation of the international safeguards system, as well as the technological, financial, and human resources required for effective safeguards implementation. The review's findings and recommendations were summarized in the report, 'International Safeguards: Challenges and Opportunities for the 21st Century (October 2007)'. One of the report's key recommendations was for DOE/NNSA to launch a major new program to revitalize the international safeguards technology and human resource base. In 2007, at the International Atomic Energy Agency's General Conference, then Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman announced the newly created Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI). NGSI consists of five program elements: (1) Policy development and outreach; (2) Concepts and approaches; (3) Technology and analytical methodologies; (4) Human resource development; and (5) Infrastructure development. The ensuing report addresses the 'Human Resource Development (HRD)' component of NGSI. The goal of the HRD as defined in the NNSA Program Plan (November 2008) is 'to revitalize and expand the international safeguards human capital base by attracting and training a new generation of talent.' One of the major objectives listed in the HRD goal includes education and training, outreach to universities, professional societies, postdoctoral appointments, and summer internships at national laboratories. ORNL is a participant in the NGSI program, together

  17. Next-Generation GPS Station for Hazards Mitigation (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Our objective is to better forecast, assess, and mitigate natural hazards, including earthquakes, tsunamis, and extreme storms and flooding through development and implementation of a modular technology for the next-generation in-situ geodetic station to support the flow of information from multiple stations to scientists, mission planners, decision makers, and first responders. The same technology developed under NASA funding can be applied to enhance monitoring of large engineering structures such as bridges, hospitals and other critical infrastructure. Meaningful warnings save lives when issued within 1-2 minutes for destructive earthquakes, several tens of minutes for tsunamis, and up to several hours for extreme storms and flooding, and can be provided by on-site fusion of multiple data types and generation of higher-order data products: GPS/GNSS and accelerometer measurements to estimate point displacements, and GPS/GNSS and meteorological measurements to estimate moisture variability in the free atmosphere. By operating semi-autonomously, each station can then provide low-latency, high-fidelity and compact data products within the constraints of narrow communications bandwidth that often accompanies natural disasters. We have developed a power-efficient, low-cost, plug-in Geodetic Module for fusion of data from in situ sensors including GPS, a strong-motion accelerometer module, and a meteorological sensor package, for deployment at existing continuous GPS stations in southern California; fifteen stations have already been upgraded. The low-cost modular design is scalable to the many existing continuous GPS stations worldwide. New on-the-fly data products are estimated with 1 mm precision and accuracy, including three-dimensional seismogeodetic displacements for earthquake, tsunami and structural monitoring and precipitable water for forecasting extreme weather events such as summer monsoons and atmospheric rivers experienced in California. Unlike more

  18. Informed maintenance for next generation space transportation systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Jack J.

    2001-02-01

    system software. This paper will summarize NASA's long-term strategy, development, and implementation plans for Informed Maintenance for next generation RLVs. This will be done through a convergence into a single IM vision the work being performed throughout NASA, industry and academia. Additionally, a current status of IM development throughout NASA programs such as the Space Shuttle, X-33, X-34 and X-37 will be provided and will conclude with an overview of near-term work that is being initiated in FY00 to support NASA's 2nd Generation Reusable Launch Vehicle Program. .

  19. Informed maintenance for next generation reusable launch systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Jack J.; Gormley, Thomas J.

    2001-03-01

    system software. This paper will summarize NASA's long-term strategy, development, and implementation plans for Informed Maintenance for next generation RLVs. This will be done through a convergence into a single IM vision the work being performed throughout NASA, industry and academia. Additionally, a current status of IM development throughout NASA programs such as the Space Shuttle, X-33, X-34 and X-37 will be provided and will conclude with an overview of near-term work that is being initiated in FY00 to support NASA's 2 nd Generation Reusable Launch Vehicle Program.

  20. Key thrusts in next generation CANDU. Annex 10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Current electricity markets and the competitiveness of other generation options such as CCGT have influenced the directions of future nuclear generation. The next generation CANDU has used its key characteristics as the basis to leap frog into a new design featuring improved economics, enhanced passive safety, enhanced operability and demonstrated fuel cycle flexibility. Many enabling technologies spinning of current CANDU design features are used in the next generation design. Some of these technologies have been developed in support of existing plants and near term designs while others will need to be developed and tested. This paper will discuss the key principles driving the next generation CANDU design and the fuel cycle flexibility of the CANDU system which provide synergism with the PWR fuel cycle. (author)

  1. Requirements for Next Generation Comprehensive Analysis of Rotorcraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Wayne; Data, Anubhav

    2008-01-01

    The unique demands of rotorcraft aeromechanics analysis have led to the development of software tools that are described as comprehensive analyses. The next generation of rotorcraft comprehensive analyses will be driven and enabled by the tremendous capabilities of high performance computing, particularly modular and scaleable software executed on multiple cores. Development of a comprehensive analysis based on high performance computing both demands and permits a new analysis architecture. This paper describes a vision of the requirements for this next generation of comprehensive analyses of rotorcraft. The requirements are described and substantiated for what must be included and justification provided for what should be excluded. With this guide, a path to the next generation code can be found.

  2. Accelerators for Society - TIARA 2012 Test Infrastructure and Accelerator Research Area (in Polish)

    CERN Document Server

    Romaniuk, R S

    2013-01-01

    TIARA (Test Infrastructure and Accelerator Research Area - Preparatory Phae) is an European Collaboration of Accelerator Technology, which by running research projects, technical, networks and infrastructural has a duty to integrate the research and technical communities and infrastructures in the global scale of Europe. The Collaboration gathers all research centers with large accelerator infrastructures. Other ones, like universities, are affiliated as associate members. TIARA-PP (preparatory phase) is an European infrastructural project run by this Consortium and realized inside EU-FP7. The paper presents a general overview of TIARA activities, with an introduction containing a portrait of contemporary accelerator technology and a digest of its applications in modern society.

  3. Evolution and Next Generation of Large Cosmic-Ray Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olinto, Angela

    2016-03-01

    With collaborations involving as many as 32 countries, next generation astro-particle observatories are being built to understand the puzzling origin of the most energetic processes in the Universe. We will review some recent results and the effort behind next generation observatories, which include large arrays of detectors and space missions to study high to ultra-high energy cosmic-rays, neutrinos, and gamma-rays. The great opportunity of word-wide scientific productivity and funding motivates these large-scale efforts, which also face many challenges due to geopolitical events and differences in science funding cultures.

  4. Technology Needs for the Next Generation of NASA Science Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, David J.

    2013-01-01

    In-Space propulsion technologies relevant to Mars presentation is for the 14.03 Emerging Technologies for Mars Exploration panel. The talk will address propulsion technology needs for future Mars science missions, and will address electric propulsion, Earth entry vehicles, light weight propellant tanks, and the Mars ascent vehicle. The second panel presentation is Technology Needs for the Next Generation of NASA Science Missions. This talk is for 14.02 Technology Needs for the Next Generation of NASA Science Missions panel. The talk will summarize the technology needs identified in the NAC's Planetary Science Decadal Survey, and will set the stage for the talks for the 4 other panelist.

  5. Recent progress in the study of the next generation Internet in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying; Wu, Jianping; Wu, Qian; Xu, Ke

    2013-03-28

    The Internet has become a major part of the global communications infrastructure supporting modern-day socio-economic development, social progress and technological innovation. Invented 30 years ago, today the Internet is facing severe challenges. Many countries have funded research projects on the new-generation Internet, such as GENI, FIND, FIRE and CNGI, in an effort to solve these challenges. In addition, over the past few years, the networking research community has engaged in an ongoing conversation about how to move the Internet forward, and there are now two different approaches towards Internet research. The first approach is based on using the existing Internet architecture to solve the major technical challenges-this is called 'evolutionary' research. The other, which is called the 'clean slate', involves the design of an entirely new Internet architecture. In the first part of this paper, the basic features of the next generation Internet and its principal contradictions are analysed. Then a survey of recent progress in the study of the next generation Internet in China is discussed. Finally, the focus and direction for the next step in research are presented as based on fundamental research into the international next generation Internet architecture, and the many new innovative demands placed on Internet architecture in recent years. PMID:23419856

  6. Guide to e-science next generation scientific research and discovery

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Xiaoyu; Jie, Wei

    2011-01-01

    This guidebook on e-science presents real-world examples of practices and applications, demonstrating how a range of computational technologies and tools can be employed to build essential infrastructures supporting next-generation scientific research. Each chapter provides introductory material on core concepts and principles, as well as descriptions and discussions of relevant e-science methodologies, architectures, tools, systems, services and frameworks. Features: includes contributions from an international selection of preeminent e-science experts and practitioners; discusses use of main

  7. Tempest: Tools for Addressing the Needs of Next-Generation Climate Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullrich, P. A.; Guerra, J. E.; Pinheiro, M. C.; Fong, J.

    2015-12-01

    Tempest is a comprehensive simulation-to-science infrastructure that tackles the needs of next-generation, high-resolution, data intensive climate modeling activities. This project incorporates three key components: TempestDynamics, a global modeling framework for experimental numerical methods and high-performance computing; TempestRemap, a toolset for arbitrary-order conservative and consistent remapping between unstructured grids; and TempestExtremes, a suite of detection and characterization tools for identifying weather extremes in large climate datasets. In this presentation, the latest advances with the implementation of this framework will be discussed, and a number of projects now utilizing these tools will be featured.

  8. INFRASTRUCTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    Andrea Gaddi

    2010-01-01

    During the last six months, the main activity on the cooling circuit has essentially been preventive maintenance. At each short machine technical stop, a water sample is extracted out of every cooling circuit to measure the induced radioactivity. Soon after, a visual check of the whole detector cooling network is done, looking for water leaks in sensitive locations. Depending on sub-system availability, the main water filters are replaced; the old ones are inspected and sent to the CERN metallurgical lab in case of suspicious sediments. For the coming winter technical stop, a number of corrective maintenance activities and infrastructure consolidation work-packages are foreseen. A few faulty valves, found on the muon system cooling circuit, will be replaced; the cooling gauges for TOTEM and CASTOR, in the CMS Forward region, will be either changed or shielded against the magnetic stray field. The demineralizer cartridges will be replaced as well. New instrumentation will also be installed in the SCX5 PC farm ...

  9. INFRASTRUCTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    A. Gaddi and P. Tropea

    2013-01-01

      Most of the CMS infrastructures at P5 will go through a heavy consolidation-work period during LS1. All systems, from the cryogenic plant of the superconducting magnet to the rack powering in the USC55 counting rooms, from the cooling circuits to the gas distribution, will undergo consolidation work. As announced in the last issue of the CMS Bulletin, we present here one of the consolidation projects of LS1: the installation of a new dry-gas plant for inner detectors inertion. So far the oxygen and humidity suppression inside the CMS Tracker and Pixel volumes were assured by flushing dry nitrogen gas evaporated from a large liquid nitrogen tank. For technical reasons, the maximum flow is limited to less than 100 m3/h and the cost of refilling the tank every two weeks with liquid nitrogen is quite substantial. The new dry-gas plant will supply up to 400 m3/h of dry nitrogen (or the same flow of dry air, during shut-downs) with a comparatively minimal operation cost. It has been evaluated that the...

  10. INFRASTRUCTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    A. Gaddi

    The long winter shut-down allows for modifications that will improve the reliability of the detector infrastructures at P5. The annual maintenance of detector services is taking place as well. This means a full stop of water-cooling circuits from November 24th with a gradual restart from mid January 09. The annual maintenance service includes the cleaning of the two SF5 cooling towers, service of the chiller plants on the surface, and the cryogenic plant serving the CMS Magnet. In addition, the overall site power is reduced from 8MW to 2MW, compatible with the switchover to the Swiss power network in winter. Full power will be available again from end of January. Among the modification works planned, the Low Voltage cabinets are being refurbished; doubling the cable sections and replacing the 40A circuit breakers with 60A types. This will reduce the overheating that has been experienced. Moreover, two new LV transformers will be bought and pre-cabled in order to assure a quick swap in case of failure of any...

  11. INFRASTRUCTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    Andrea Gaddi.

    The various water-cooling circuits ran smoothly over the summer. The overall performance of the cooling system is satisfactory, even if some improvements are possible, concerning the endcap water-cooling and the C6F14 circuits. In particular for the endcap cooling circuit, we aim to lower the water temperature, to provide more margin for RPC detectors. An expert-on-call piquet has been established during the summer global run, assuring the continuous supervision of the installations. An effort has been made to collect and harmonize the existing documentation on the cooling infrastructures at P5. The last six months have seen minor modifications to the electrical power network at P5. Among these, the racks in USC55 for the Tracker and Sniffer systems, which are backed up by the diesel generator in case of power outage, have been equipped with new control boxes to allow a remote restart. Other interventions have concerned the supply of assured power to those installations that are essential for CMS to run eff...

  12. INFRASTRUCTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    A. Gaddi

    2011-01-01

    During the last winter technical stop, a number of corrective maintenance activities and infrastructure consolidation work-packages were completed. On the surface, the site cooling facility has passed the annual maintenance process that includes the cleaning of the two evaporative cooling towers, the maintenance of the chiller units and the safety checks on the software controls. In parallel, CMS teams, reinforced by PH-DT group personnel, have worked to shield the cooling gauges for TOTEM and CASTOR against the magnetic stray field in the CMS Forward region, to add labels to almost all the valves underground and to clean all the filters in UXC55, USC55 and SCX5. Following the insertion of TOTEM T1 detector, the cooling circuit has been branched off and commissioned. The demineraliser cartridges have been replaced as well, as they were shown to be almost saturated. New instrumentation has been installed in the SCX5 PC farm cooling and ventilation network, in order to monitor the performance of the HVAC system...

  13. A model of psychological ownership in next-generation members of family-owned firms: A qualitative study

    OpenAIRE

    Ceja, Lucia; Tapies, Josep

    2011-01-01

    The present research study is intended to provide further insights into the psychological ownership experienced by next-generation members in relation to their family firms. As this is still a very young area of research, explorative research is needed. Therefore, a mixed-methods qualitative investigation, using a sample of 20 next-generation members of family-owned firms of different sizes, generational stages and business sectors, was performed. Through interpretative phenomenological and e...

  14. Access regulation in the next generation access network environment: A comparative study of Hong Kong and Singapore from the transaction cost economics perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Ho, Au Man

    2012-01-01

    Hong Kong and Singapore have adopted two different models in the regulation of the next generation access (NGA) networks. In Hong Kong, the government has decided that access regulation will not be applied to fibre-based access networks and its strategy will be to rely on facilities-based competition to promote investment in the NGA networks. Singapore, on the other hand, has promoted access/services-based competition over a next generation broadband infrastructure subsidised by public fundin...

  15. The Next Generation of the Montage Image Mopsaic Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berriman, G. Bruce; Good, John; Rusholme, Ben; Robitaille, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    We have released a major upgrade of the Montage image mosaic engine (http://montage.ipac.caltech.edu) , as part of a program to develop the next generation of the engine in response to the rapid changes in the data processing landscape in Astronomy, which is generating ever larger data sets in ever more complex formats . The new release (version 4) contains modules dedicated to creating and managing mosaics of data stored as multi-dimensional arrays ("data cubes"). The new release inherits the architectural benefits of portability and scalability of the original design. The code is publicly available on Git Hub and the Montage web page. The release includes a command line tool that supports visualization of large images, and the beta-release of a Python interface to the visualization tool. We will provide examples on how to use these these features. We are generating a mosaic of the Galactic Arecibo L-band Feed Array HI (GALFA-HI) Survey maps of neutral hydrogen in and around our Milky Way Galaxy, to assess the performance at scale and to develop tools and methodologies that will enable scientists inexpert in cloud processing to exploit could platforms for data processing and product generation at scale. Future releases include support for an R-tree based mechanism for fast discovery of and access to large data sets and on-demand access to calibrated SDSS DR9 data that exploits it; support for the Hierarchical Equal Area isoLatitude Pixelization (HEALPix) scheme, now standard for projects investigating cosmic background radiation (Gorski et al 2005); support fort the Tessellated Octahedral Adaptive Subdivision Transform (TOAST), the sky partitioning sky used by the WorldWide Telescope (WWT); and a public applications programming interface (API) in C that can be called from other languages, especially Python.

  16. Experimental demonstration of next-generation FSO communication system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazaura, Kamugisha; Omae, Kazunori; Suzuki, Toshiji; Matsumoto, Mitsuji; Mutafungwa, Edward; Asatani, Koichi; Murakami, Tadaaki; Takahashi, Koichi; Matsumoto, Hideki; Wakamori, Kazuhiko; Arimoto, Yoshinori

    2006-10-01

    Free-space optical communication has emerged as a competitive and viable technology for offering high data rates, improved capacity, cost-effective and an easy to deploy solution for providing connectivity between two points which are up to a few kilometers apart. In this paper we present experimental work which demonstrates the practicality of next generation free-space optical (FSO) communication systems suitable for short-haul, high-speed and robust data links. This experimental system is placed between two buildings in the Waseda University campus area for a communication link spanning a distance of 1 km. We outline the design of the optical antenna which uses 1550 nm wavelength and directly coupling a freespace optical beam to a single-mode fiber without the need for OE/EO conversion, to offer a communication link with data rates from 2.5 Gbps to 10 Gbps. The antenna is capable of overcoming most common limitations inherent in FSO communication systems, such as atmospheric induced beam wander and scintillation effects. A high-speed tracking mechanism which utilizes a fine positioning mirror (FPM) capable of tracking and controlling the received beam and focusing/steering most of beam power into the fiber is presented. This FPM is capable of suppressing the frequent power fluctuations caused by beam angle-of-arrival (AOA) variations. This paper presents experimental results of the FSO communication system capable offering stable performance in terms of measured bit-error-rate (BER). Performance results showing increasing the systems data rate from 2.5 Gbps to 10 Gpbs are also presented.

  17. Mobile e-Learning for Next Generation Communication Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tin-Yu; Chao, Han-Chieh

    2008-01-01

    This article develops an environment for mobile e-learning that includes an interactive course, virtual online labs, an interactive online test, and lab-exercise training platform on the fourth generation mobile communication system. The Next Generation Learning Environment (NeGL) promotes the term "knowledge economy." Inter-networking…

  18. Using Digital Watermarking for Securing Next Generation Media Broadcasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birk, Dominik; Gaines, Seán

    The Internet presents a problem for the protection of intellectual property. Those who create content must be adequately compensated for the use of their works. Rights agencies who monitor the use of these works exist in many jurisdictions. In the traditional broadcast environment this monitoring is a difficult task. With Internet Protocol Television (IPTV) and Next Generation Networks (NGN) this situation is further complicated.

  19. Prospects for next-generation e+e- linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this paper is to review progress in the US towards a next generation linear collider. During 1988, there were three workshops held on linear colliders: ''Physics of Linear Colliders,'' in Capri, Italy, June 14--18, 1988; Snowmass 88 (Linear Collider subsection) June 27--July 15, 1988; and SLAC International Workshop on Next Generation Linear Colliders, November 28--December 9, 1988. In this paper, I focus on reviewing the issues and progress on a next generation linear collider. The energy range is dictated by physics with a mass reach well beyond LEP, although somewhat short of SSC. The luminosity is that required to obtain 103--104 units of R0 per year. The length is consistent with a site on Stanford land with collision occurring on the SLAC site; the power was determined by economic considerations. Finally, the technology as limited by the desire to have a next generation linear collider by the next century. 37 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs

  20. Advancing Next-Generation Energy in Indian Country (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2012-08-01

    This fact sheet provides information on the Alaska Native governments selected to receive assistance from the Strategic Technical Assistance Response Team (START) Program, a U.S. Department of Energy Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs (DOE-IE) initiative to provide technical expertise to support the development of next-generation energy projects in Indian Country.

  1. Next Generation Science Standards: For States, by States

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Academies Press, 2013

    2013-01-01

    "Next Generation Science Standards" identifies the science all K-12 students should know. These new standards are based on the National Research Council's "A Framework for K-12 Science Education." The National Research Council, the National Science Teachers Association, the American Association for the Advancement of…

  2. Impact of ectopic pregnancy for reproductive prognosis in next generation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kårhus, Line Lund; Egerup, Pia; Skovlund, Charlotte Wessel;

    2014-01-01

    The impact of an ectopic pregnancy in the next generation is unknown. Our aim was to compare reproductive outcomes in daughters of women with and without ectopic pregnancy. Designed as a historical prospective controlled cohort study with data collected in four Danish registries from 1977-2009, w...

  3. Development of the next generation of powerful electron accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuksanov, N.K.; Korabelnikov, B.M.; Kosilov, M.R.; Nemytov, P.I.; Prudnikov, V.V.; Salimov, R.A.; Veis, M.E. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    1995-10-01

    The construction and principal circuit of the powerful accelerators of the next generation is described. These are the accelerator ELV-6M with two extraction windows and accelerator ``Tourch`` where electron beam is extracted into the atmosphere through the little hole using the differential vacuum pumping. (author).

  4. Development of the next generation of powerful electron accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The construction and principal circuit of the powerful accelerators of the next generation is described. These are the accelerator ELV-6M with two extraction windows and accelerator ''Tourch'' where electron beam is extracted into the atmosphere through the little hole using the differential vacuum pumping. (author)

  5. The bioinformatics of next generation sequencing: a meeting report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ravi Shankar

    2011-01-01

    @@ The Studio of Computational Biology & Bioinformatics (SCBB), IHBT, CSIR,Palampur, India organized one of the very first national workshop funded by DBT,Govt.of India, on the Bioinformatics issues associated with next generation sequencing approaches.The course structure was designed by SCBB, IHBT.The workshop took place in the IHBT premise on 17 and 18 June 2010.

  6. Building Next Generation Video Game Collections in Academic Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laskowski, Mary; Ward, David

    2009-01-01

    Most academic libraries do not yet have gaming collections, let alone gaming services and facilities that support the unique and growing teaching and research needs of campus environments. Academic libraries in particular need to start thinking about developing the next generation of gaming collections and services. This article examines the…

  7. Multiple nuclear ortholog next generation sequencing phylogeny of Daucus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Next generation sequencing is helping to solve the data insufficiency problem hindering well-resolved dominant gene phylogenies. We used Roche 454 technology to obtain DNA sequences from 93 nuclear orthologs, dispersed throughout all linkage groups of Daucus. Of these 93 orthologs, ten were designed...

  8. Efficient Cryptography for the Next Generation Secure Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupcu, Alptekin

    2010-01-01

    Peer-to-peer (P2P) systems, and client-server type storage and computation outsourcing constitute some of the major applications that the next generation cloud schemes will address. Since these applications are just emerging, it is the perfect time to design them with security and privacy in mind. Furthermore, considering the high-churn…

  9. The "Next Generation Science Standards" and the Life Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bybee, Rodger W.

    2013-01-01

    Publication of the "Next Generation Science Standards" will be just short of two decades since publication of the "National Science Education Standards" (NRC 1996). In that time, biology and science education communities have advanced, and the new standards will reflect that progress (NRC 1999, 2007, 2009; Kress and Barrett…

  10. Next Generation Science Standards: For States, by States

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Academies Press, 2013

    2013-01-01

    "Next Generation Science Standards" identifies the science all K-12 students should know. These new standards are based on the National Research Council's "A Framework for K-12 Science Education." The National Research Council, the National Science Teachers Association, the American Association for the Advancement of Science,…

  11. Advancing Next-Generation Energy in Indian Country (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2012-08-01

    This fact sheet provides information on Tribes in the lower 48 states selected to receive assistance from the Strategic Technical Assistance Response Team (START) Program, a U.S. Department of Energy Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs (DOE-IE) initiative to provide technical expertise to support the development of next-generation energy projects in Indian Country.

  12. Applications of next-generation sequencing techniques in plant biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    The last several years have seen revolutionary advances in DNA sequencing technologies with the advent of next generation sequencing (NGS) techniques. NGS methods now allow millions of bases to be sequenced in one round, at a fraction of the cost relative to traditional Sanger sequencing, allowing u...

  13. Power Electronics for the Next Generation Wind Turbine System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Ke

    This book presents recent studies on the power electronics used for the next generation wind turbine system. Some criteria and tools for evaluating and improving the critical performances of the wind power converters have been proposed and established. The book addresses some emerging problems...

  14. Next-generation sequencing approaches to understanding the oral microbiome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Zaura

    2012-01-01

    Until recently, the focus in dental research has been on studying a small fraction of the oral microbiome—so-called opportunistic pathogens. With the advent of next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies, researchers now have the tools that allow for profiling of the microbiomes and metagenomes at

  15. The next-generation electronic health record: perspectives of key leaders from the US Department of Veterans Affairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleem, Jason J; Flanagan, Mindy E; Wilck, Nancy R; Demetriades, Jim; Doebbeling, Bradley N

    2013-06-01

    The rapid change in healthcare has focused attention on the necessary development of a next-generation electronic health record (EHR) to support system transformation and more effective patient-centered care. The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) is developing plans for the next-generation EHR to support improved care delivery for veterans. To understand the needs for a next-generation EHR, we interviewed 14 VA operational, clinical and informatics leaders for their vision about system needs. Leaders consistently identified priorities for development in the areas of cognitive support, information synthesis, teamwork and communication, interoperability, data availability, usability, customization, and information management. The need to reconcile different EHR initiatives currently underway in the VA, as well as opportunities for data sharing, will be critical for continued progress. These findings may support the VA's effort for evolutionary change to its information system and draw attention to necessary research and development for a next-generation information system and EHR nationally. PMID:23599227

  16. Methods in virus diagnostics: from ELISA to next generation sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonham, Neil; Kreuze, Jan; Winter, Stephan; van der Vlugt, René; Bergervoet, Jan; Tomlinson, Jenny; Mumford, Rick

    2014-06-24

    Despite the seemingly continuous development of newer and ever more elaborate methods for detecting and identifying viruses, very few of these new methods get adopted for routine use in testing laboratories, often despite the many and varied claimed advantages they possess. To understand why the rate of uptake of new technologies is so low, requires a strong understanding of what makes a good routine diagnostic tool to begin. This can be done by looking at the two most successfully established plant virus detection methods: enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA) and more recently introduced real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). By examining the characteristics of this pair of technologies, it becomes clear that they share many benefits, such as an industry standard format and high levels of repeatability and reproducibility. These combine to make methods that are accessible to testing labs, which are easy to establish and robust in their use, even with new and inexperienced users. Hence, to ensure the establishment of new techniques it is necessary to not only provide benefits not found with ELISA or real-time PCR, but also to provide a platform that is easy to establish and use. In plant virus diagnostics, recent developments can be clustered into three core areas: (1) techniques that can be performed in the field or resource poor locations (e.g., loop-mediated isothermal amplification LAMP); (2) multiplex methods that are able to detect many viruses in a single test (e.g., Luminex bead arrays); and (3) methods suited to virus discovery (e.g., next generation sequencing, NGS). Field based methods are not new, with Lateral Flow Devices (LFDs) for the detection being available for a number of years now. However, the widespread uptake of this technology remains poor. LAMP does offer significant advantages over LFDs, in terms of sensitivity and generic application, but still faces challenges in terms of establishment. It is likely that the main barrier to the

  17. EGI: anOpen e-Infrastructure Ecosystem for the Digital European Research Area

    OpenAIRE

    Andreozzi, Sergio; Holsinger, Sy; Marinovic, Damir; Newhouse, Steven

    2012-01-01

    Bringing the digital European Research Area (ERA) online means modernising Europe’s research infrastructure by promoting open science through the availability, accessibility and reuse of scientific data and results, the use of web- based tools that facilitate scientific collaboration and ensuring public access to research. As the European Grid Infrastructure (EGI) is the largest European distributed computing infrastructure providing 24/7 access to large scale computing, storage and data reso...

  18. Visions, Scenarios and Action Plans Towards Next Generation Tanzania Power System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Kyaruzi

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents strategic visions, scenarios and action plans for enhancing Tanzania Power Systems towards next generation Smart Power Grid. It first introduces the present Tanzanian power grid and the challenges ahead in terms of generation capacity, financial aspect, technical and non-technical losses, revenue loss, high tariff, aging infrastructure, environmental impact and the interconnection with the neighboring countries. Then, the current initiatives undertaken by the Tanzania government in response to the present challenges and the expected roles of smart grid in overcoming these challenges in the future with respect to the scenarios presented are discussed. The developed scenarios along with visions and recommended action plans towards the future Tanzanian power system can be exploited at all governmental levels to achieve public policy goals and help develop business opportunities by motivating domestic and international investments in modernizing the nation’s electric power infrastructure. In return, it should help build the green energy economy.

  19. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Research and Development Program Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P. E. MacDonald

    2005-01-01

    The U.S Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting research and development (R&D) on the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design concept for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, thermal neutron spectrum reactor that will produce electricity and hydrogen in a highly efficient manner. The NGNP reactor core could be either a prismatic graphite block type core or a pebble bed core. Use of a liquid salt coolant is also being evaluated. The NGNP will use very high-burnup, low-enriched uranium, TRISO-coated fuel, and have a projected plant design service life of 60 years. The VHTR concept is considered to be the nearest-term reactor design that has the capability to efficiently produce hydrogen. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The objectives of the NGNP Project are to: Demonstrate a full-scale prototype VHTR that is commercially licensed by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Demonstrate safe and economical nuclearassisted production of hydrogen and electricity. The DOE laboratories, led by the INL, will perform R&D that will be critical to the success of the NGNP, primarily in the areas of: High temperature gas reactor fuels behavior High temperature materials qualification Design methods development and validation Hydrogen production technologies Energy conversion. The current R&D work is addressing fundamental issues that are relevant to a variety of possible NGNP designs. This document describes the NGNP R&D planned and currently underway in the first three topic areas listed above. The NGNP Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program is presented in Section 2, the NGNP Materials R&D Program Plan is presented in Section 3, and the NGNP Design Methods Development and Validation R&D Program is presented in Section 4. The DOE-funded hydrogen

  20. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Research and Development Program Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2005-01-01

    The U.S Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting research and development (R&D) on the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design concept for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, thermal neutron spectrum reactor that will produce electricity and hydrogen in a highly efficient manner. The NGNP reactor core could be either a prismatic graphite block type core or a pebble bed core. Use of a liquid salt coolant is also being evaluated. The NGNP will use very high-burnup, low-enriched uranium, TRISO-coated fuel, and have a projected plant design service life of 60 years. The VHTR concept is considered to be the nearest-term reactor design that has the capability to efficiently produce hydrogen. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The objectives of the NGNP Project are to: (1) Demonstrate a full-scale prototype VHTR that is commercially licensed by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (2) Demonstrate safe and economical nuclear-assisted production of hydrogen and electricity. The DOE laboratories, led by the INL, will perform R&D that will be critical to the success of the NGNP, primarily in the areas of: (1) High temperature gas reactor fuels behavior; (2) High temperature materials qualification; (3) Design methods development and validation; (4) Hydrogen production technologies; and (5) Energy conversion. The current R&D work is addressing fundamental issues that are relevant to a variety of possible NGNP designs. This document describes the NGNP R&D planned and currently underway in the first three topic areas listed above. The NGNP Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program is presented in Section 2, the NGNP Materials R&D Program Plan is presented in Section 3, and the NGNP Design Methods Development and Validation R&D Program is presented

  1. Historical Perspective, Development and Applications of Next-Generation Sequencing in Plant Virology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Barba

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Next-generation high throughput sequencing technologies became available at the onset of the 21st century. They provide a highly efficient, rapid, and low cost DNA sequencing platform beyond the reach of the standard and traditional DNA sequencing technologies developed in the late 1970s. They are continually improved to become faster, more efficient and cheaper. They have been used in many fields of biology since 2004. In 2009, next-generation sequencing (NGS technologies began to be applied to several areas of plant virology including virus/viroid genome sequencing, discovery and detection, ecology and epidemiology, replication and transcription. Identification and characterization of known and unknown viruses and/or viroids in infected plants are currently among the most successful applications of these technologies. It is expected that NGS will play very significant roles in many research and non-research areas of plant virology.

  2. Historical perspective, development and applications of next-generation sequencing in plant virology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barba, Marina; Czosnek, Henryk; Hadidi, Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Next-generation high throughput sequencing technologies became available at the onset of the 21st century. They provide a highly efficient, rapid, and low cost DNA sequencing platform beyond the reach of the standard and traditional DNA sequencing technologies developed in the late 1970s. They are continually improved to become faster, more efficient and cheaper. They have been used in many fields of biology since 2004. In 2009, next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies began to be applied to several areas of plant virology including virus/viroid genome sequencing, discovery and detection, ecology and epidemiology, replication and transcription. Identification and characterization of known and unknown viruses and/or viroids in infected plants are currently among the most successful applications of these technologies. It is expected that NGS will play very significant roles in many research and non-research areas of plant virology. PMID:24399207

  3. A National Demonstration Project Building the Next Generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    energy situation, and in a way which supports U.S. environmental objectives. A key element of this effort will be the reestablishment and maintenance of an industrial base, which can be accessed in response to changing national energy needs. Right now, in a cooperative program through the U.S. Department of Energy, U.S. and Russian dollars are paying for over 700 Russian nuclear scientists and engineers to complete design work on the Gas Turbine - Modular Helium Reactor (GT-MHR), a next generation nuclear power plant that is melt-down proof, substantially more efficient that the existing generation of reactors, creates substantially less waste and is extremely proliferation resistant. To date, the Russians are providing world class engineering design work, resulting in the program being on track to begin construction of this first of a kind reactor by the end of 2005. Just as important in parallel with this effort, a number of key U.S. utilities are speaking with Congress and the Administration to 'piggy back' off this U.S./Russian effort to promote a joint private-public partnership to construct in parallel a similar first of a kind reactor in the U.S. (authors)

  4. A novel procedure on next generation sequencing data analysis using text mining algorithm

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Weizhong; Chen, James J.; Perkins, Roger; Wang, Yuping; Liu, Zhichao; Hong, Huixiao; Tong, Weida; ZOU, WEN

    2016-01-01

    Background Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies have provided researchers with vast possibilities in various biological and biomedical research areas. Efficient data mining strategies are in high demand for large scale comparative and evolutional studies to be performed on the large amounts of data derived from NGS projects. Topic modeling is an active research field in machine learning and has been mainly used as an analytical tool to structure large textual corpora for data mining....

  5. Preliminary thoughts on the data acquisition for the next generation of silicon tracking systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J F Genat; A Savoy-Navarro

    2007-12-01

    Preliminary thoughts about the data acquisition system to be developed for the next generation of large area silicon tracker are presented in this paper. This paper describes the set of data delivered by these tracking systems, and the various stages of processing and data flow transmission from the front-end chip sitting on the detector to the latest stage in the data processing. How to best profit from the status of the art technologies is a major goal.

  6. Minimization of Handoff Failure Probability for Next-Generation Wireless Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Debabrata Sarddar; Tapas Jana; Souvik Kumar Saha; Joydeep Banerjee; Utpal Biswas; M.K.Naskar

    2010-01-01

    During the past few years, advances in mobile communication theory have enabled the development and deployment of different wireless technologies, complementary to each other. Hence, their integration can realize a unified wireless system that has the best features of the individual networks. Next-Generation Wireless Systems (NGWS) integrate different wireless systems, each of which is optimized for some specific services and coverage area to provide ubiquitous communications to the mobile us...

  7. Power Electronics for the Next Generation Wind Turbine System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Ke

    better control performance under the unbalanced AC source. It is concluded that power electronics will play more important role and regulate all the generated power in the next generation wind turbine system. In this case, the stress in the converter components becomes more critical because the power......The wind power generation has been steadily growing both for the total installed capacity and for the individual turbine size. Due to much more significant impacts to the power grid, the power electronics, which can change the behavior of wind turbines from an unregulated power source to an active...... generation unit, are becoming crucial in the wind turbine system. The objective of this project is to study the power electronics technology used for the next generation wind turbines. Some emerging challenges as well as potentials like the cost of energy and reliability are going to be addressed. First...

  8. Providing content based billing architecture over Next Generation Network

    CERN Document Server

    Lakhtaria, Kamaljit I

    2010-01-01

    Mobile Communication marketplace has stressed that "content is king" ever since the initial footsteps for Next Generation Networks like 3G, 3GPP, IP Multimedia subsystem (IMS) services. However, many carriers and content providers have struggled to drive revenue for content services, primarily due to current limitations of certain types of desirable content offerings, simplistic billing models, and the inability to support flexible pricing, charging and settlement. Unlike wire line carriers, wireless carriers have a limit to the volume of traffic they can carry, bounded by the finite wireless spectrum. Event based services like calling, conferencing etc., only perceive charge per event, while the Content based charging system attracts Mobile Network Operators (MNOs) to maximize service delivery to customer and achieve best ARPU. With the Next Generation Networks, the number of data related services that can be offered, is increased significantly. The wireless carrier will be able to move from offering wireles...

  9. NEXT GENERATION MARKETING STRATEGIES AN INDIAN MARKETING PROSPECTIVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandrakanth B Jewargi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The changing profile of the Indian customer has made it imperative for the marketer to change the way he communicates with the customer. The next generation Indian customers are educated, smart, equipped with technology and well informed through various media channels available now. On one hand, while rural markets have shown a tremendous growth Internet advertising has become the fastest-growing segment of total ad spending; rising at a rate of 20%1 in the first half of 2008. This article provides an integrated marketing view on the efficient use of next generation tactics such as blue ocean strategy, green marketing, permission marketing, buzz marketing, social marketing, ambush marketing etc. for the marketer to optimally utilize these favorable trends and reap the maximum benefits in terms of revenue growth and value creation to the customers.

  10. Compact continuum source finding for next generation radio surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, P. J.; Murphy, T.; Gaensler, B. M.; Hopkins, A.; Curran, J. R.

    2012-05-01

    We present a detailed analysis of four of the most widely used radio source-finding packages in radio astronomy, and a program being developed for the Australian Square Kilometer Array Pathfinder telescope. The four packages: SEXTRACTOR, SFIND, IMSAD and SELAVY are shown to produce source catalogues with high completeness and reliability. In this paper we analyse the small fraction (˜1 per cent) of cases in which these packages do not perform well. This small fraction of sources will be of concern for the next generation of radio surveys which will produce many thousands of sources on a daily basis, in particular for blind radio transients surveys. From our analysis we identify the ways in which the underlying source-finding algorithms fail. We demonstrate a new source-finding algorithm AEGEAN, based on the application of a Laplacian kernel, which can avoid these problems and can produce complete and reliable source catalogues for the next generation of radio surveys.

  11. Next-Generation Sequencing: From Understanding Biology to Personalized Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Meder

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Within just a few years, the new methods for high-throughput next-generation sequencing have generated completely novel insights into the heritability and pathophysiology of human disease. In this review, we wish to highlight the benefits of the current state-of-the-art sequencing technologies for genetic and epigenetic research. We illustrate how these technologies help to constantly improve our understanding of genetic mechanisms in biological systems and summarize the progress made so far. This can be exemplified by the case of heritable heart muscle diseases, so-called cardiomyopathies. Here, next-generation sequencing is able to identify novel disease genes, and first clinical applications demonstrate the successful translation of this technology into personalized patient care.

  12. Development of internal CRD for next generation BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to develop a competitive and high performance Next Generation BWR with fossil power plant, an internal CRD using a heatproof ceramics insulated coil is under development. In case of a 1700MWe next generation BWR, the internal CRDs are installed in a RPV whose size is equivalent to the 1356 MWe ABWR, and there will be no space required for CRDs and CRD exchange under RPV. These advantages realize a compact PCV and reduced volume of a reactor building. Moreover, the internal CRDs eliminate penetration via a bottom flange of RPV, and lower installation level of RPV in a drywell. This brings further advantages of elimination of RIA (Reactivity Induced Accidents) caused by CR withdrawing under pressure boundary broken, and easy IVR (In Vessel Retention) by vessel bottom cooling in case of a severe accidents. (author)

  13. Development of internal CRD for next generation BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to develop a competitive and high performance Next Generation BWR with fossil power plant, an internal CRD using a heatproof ceramics insulated coil has been developed. In case of a 1700MWe next generation BWR, the internal CRDs are installed in a RPV whose size is equivalent to the 1356 MWe ABWR, and there will be no space required for CRDs and CRD exchange under RPV. These advantages realize a compact PCV and reduced volume of a reactor building. Moreover, the internal CRDs eliminate penetration via a bottom flange of RPV, and lower installation level of RPV in a drywell. This brings further advantages of elimination of RIA (Reactivity Induced Accidents) caused by CR withdrawing under pressure boundary broken, and easy IVR (In Vessel Retention) by vessel bottom cooling in case of severe accidents. (authors)

  14. Results of Analyses of the Next Generation Solvent for Parsons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) prepared a nominal 150 gallon batch of Next Generation Solvent (NGS) for Parsons. This material was then analyzed and tested for cesium mass transfer efficiency. The bulk of the results indicate that the solvent is qualified as acceptable for use in the upcoming pilot-scale testing at Parsons Technology Center. This report describes the analysis and testing of a batch of Next Generation Solvent (NGS) prepared in support of pilot-scale testing in the Parsons Technology Center. A total of ∼150 gallons of NGS solvent was prepared in late November of 2011. Details for the work are contained in a controlled laboratory notebook. Analysis of the Parsons NGS solvent indicates that the material is acceptable for use. SRNL is continuing to improve the analytical method for the guanidine.

  15. Advanced instrumentation for next-generation aerospace propulsion control systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkhoudarian, S.; Cross, G. S.; Lorenzo, Carl F.

    1993-01-01

    New control concepts for the next generation of advanced air-breathing and rocket engines and hypersonic combined-cycle propulsion systems are analyzed. The analysis provides a database on the instrumentation technologies for advanced control systems and cross matches the available technologies for each type of engine to the control needs and applications of the other two types of engines. Measurement technologies that are considered to be ready for implementation include optical surface temperature sensors, an isotope wear detector, a brushless torquemeter, a fiberoptic deflectometer, an optical absorption leak detector, the nonintrusive speed sensor, and an ultrasonic triducer. It is concluded that all 30 advanced instrumentation technologies considered can be recommended for further development to meet need of the next generation of jet-, rocket-, and hypersonic-engine control systems.

  16. Power Electronics for the Next Generation Wind Turbine System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Ke

    The wind power generation has been steadily growing both for the total installed capacity and for the individual turbine size. Due to much more significant impacts to the power grid, the power electronics, which can change the behavior of wind turbines from an unregulated power source to an active...... generation unit, are becoming crucial in the wind turbine system. The objective of this project is to study the power electronics technology used for the next generation wind turbines. Some emerging challenges as well as potentials like the cost of energy and reliability are going to be addressed. First...... better control performance under the unbalanced AC source. It is concluded that power electronics will play more important role and regulate all the generated power in the next generation wind turbine system. In this case, the stress in the converter components becomes more critical because the power...

  17. Next generation database relational solutions for ATLAS distributed computing

    CERN Document Server

    Dimitrov, G; The ATLAS collaboration; Garonne, V

    2014-01-01

    The ATLAS Distributed Computing (ADC) project delivers production tools and services for ATLAS offline activities such as data placement and data processing on the Grid. The system has been capable of sustaining with high efficiency the needed computing activities during the first run of LHC data taking, and has demonstrated flexibility in reacting promptly to new challenges. Databases are a vital part of the whole ADC system. The Oracle Relational Database Management System (RDBMS) has been addressing a majority of the ADC database requirements for many years. Much expertise was gained through the years and without a doubt will be used as a good foundation for the next generation PanDA (Production ANd Distributed Analysis) and DDM (Distributed Data Management) systems. In this paper we present the current production ADC database solutions and notably the planned changes on the PanDA system, and the next generation ATLAS DDM system called Rucio. Significant work was performed on studying different solutions t...

  18. Next generation database relational solutions for ATLAS distributed computing

    CERN Document Server

    Dimitrov, G; The ATLAS collaboration; Garonne, V

    2013-01-01

    The ATLAS Distributed Computing (ADC) project delivers production tools and services for ATLAS offline activities such as data placement and data processing on the Grid. The system has been capable of sustaining with high efficiency the needed computing activities during the first run of LHC data taking, and has demonstrated flexibility in reacting promptly to new challenges. Databases are a vital part of the whole ADC system. The Oracle Relational Database Management System (RDBMS) has been addressing a majority of the ADC database requirements for many years. Much expertise was gained through the years and without a doubt will be used as a good foundation for the next generation PanDA (Production ANd Distributed Analysis) and DDM (Distributed Data Management) systems. In this paper we present the current production ADC database solutions and notably the planned changes on the PanDA system, and the next generation ATLAS DDM system called Rucio. Significant work was performed on studying different solutions t...

  19. The Next Generation of the Montage Image Mosaic Toolkit

    CERN Document Server

    Berriman, G Bruce; Rusholme, B; Robitaille, T

    2016-01-01

    The scientific computing landscape has evolved dramatically in the past few years, with new schemes for organizing and storing data that reflect the growth in size and complexity of astronomical data sets. In response to this changing landscape, we are, over the next two years, deploying the next generation of the Montage toolkit ([ascl:1010.036]). The first release (October 2015) supports multi-dimensional data sets ("data cubes"), and insertion of XMP/AVM tags that allows images to "drop-in" to the WWT. The same release offers a beta-version of web-based interactive visualization of images; this includes wrappers for visualization in Python. Subsequent releases will support HEALPix (now standard in cosmic background experiments); incorporation of Montage into package managers (which enable automated management of software builds), and support for a library that will enable Montage to be called directly from Python. This next generation toolkit will inherit the architectural benefits of the current engine - ...

  20. Converged Wireless Networking and Optimization for Next Generation Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Rodriguez

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The Next Generation Network (NGN vision is tending towards the convergence of internet and mobile services providing the impetus for new market opportunities in combining the appealing services of internet with the roaming capability of mobile networks. However, this convergence does not go far enough, and with the emergence of new coexistence scenarios, there is a clear need to evolve the current architecture to provide cost-effective end-to-end communication. The LOOP project, a EUREKA-CELTIC driven initiative, is one piece in the jigsaw by helping European industry to sustain a leading role in telecommunications and manufacturing of high-value products and machinery by delivering pioneering converged wireless networking solutions that can be successfully demonstrated. This paper provides an overview of the LOOP project and the key achievements that have been tunneled into first prototypes for showcasing next generation services for operators and process manufacturers.

  1. On reactor type comparisons for the next generation of reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we present a broad comparison of studies for a selected set of parameters for different nuclear reactor types including the next generation. This serves as an overview of key parameters which provide a semi-quantitative decision basis for selecting nuclear strategies. Out of a number of advanced reactor designs of the LWR type, gas cooled type, and FBR type, currently on the drawing board, the Advanced Light Water Reactors (ALWR) seem to have some edge over other types of the next generation of reactors for the near-term application. This is based on a number of attributes related to the benefit of the vast operating experience with LWRs coupled with an estimated low risk profile, economics of scale, degree of utilization of passive systems, simplification in the plant design and layout, modular fabrication and manufacturing. 32 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs

  2. Next-Generation Sequencing for Binary Protein-Protein Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernhard eSuter

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The yeast two-hybrid (Y2H system exploits host cell genetics in order to display binary protein-protein interactions (PPIs via defined and selectable phenotypes. Numerous improvements have been made to this method, adapting the screening principle for diverse applications, including drug discovery and the scale-up for proteome wide interaction screens in human and other organisms. Here we discuss a systematic workflow and analysis scheme for screening data generated by Y2H and related assays that includes high-throughput selection procedures, readout of comprehensive results via next-generation sequencing (NGS, and the interpretation of interaction data via quantitative statistics. The novel assays and tools will serve the broader scientific community to harness the power of NGS technology to address PPI networks in health and disease. We discuss examples of how this next-generation platform can be applied to address specific questions in diverse fields of biology and medicine.

  3. Next Generation Sequencing Reveals the Hidden Diversity of Zooplankton Assemblages

    OpenAIRE

    Lindeque, Penelope K.; Helen E Parry; Harmer, Rachel A.; Somerfield, Paul J.; Angus Atkinson

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Zooplankton play an important role in our oceans, in biogeochemical cycling and providing a food source for commercially important fish larvae. However, difficulties in correctly identifying zooplankton hinder our understanding of their roles in marine ecosystem functioning, and can prevent detection of long term changes in their community structure. The advent of massively parallel next generation sequencing technology allows DNA sequence data to be recovered directly from whole ...

  4. NEXT GENERATION MARKETING STRATEGIES AN INDIAN MARKETING PROSPECTIVE

    OpenAIRE

    Chandrakanth B Jewargi

    2014-01-01

    The changing profile of the Indian customer has made it imperative for the marketer to change the way he communicates with the customer. The next generation Indian customers are educated, smart, equipped with technology and well informed through various media channels available now. On one hand, while rural markets have shown a tremendous growth Internet advertising has become the fastest-growing segment of total ad spending; rising at a rate of 20%1 in the first half ...

  5. Next-generation sequencing and large genome assemblies

    OpenAIRE

    Henson, Joseph; Tischler, German; Ning, Zemin

    2012-01-01

    The next-generation sequencing (NGS) revolution has drastically reduced time and cost requirements for sequencing of large genomes, and also qualitatively changed the problem of assembly. This article reviews the state of the art in de novo genome assembly, paying particular attention to mammalian-sized genomes. The strengths and weaknesses of the main sequencing platforms are highlighted, leading to a discussion of assembly and the new challenges associated with NGS data. Current approaches ...

  6. The Dynamic Pricing of Next Generation Consumer Durables

    OpenAIRE

    Barry L. Bayus

    1992-01-01

    Learning curve effects, aspects of consumer demand models (e.g., reservation price distributions, intertemporal utility maximizing behavior), and competitive activity are reasons which have been offered to explain why prices of new durables decline over time. This paper presents an alternative rationale based on the buying behavior for products with overlapping replacement cycles (i.e., next generation products). A model for consumer sales of a new durable is developed by incorporating the re...

  7. Training the next generation of experts in hadron therapy

    CERN Multimedia

    Manuela Cirilli, Nathalie Vibert

    2012-01-01

    PARTNER is a 4-year Marie Curie Initial Training Network funded by the European Commission, aimed at the creation of the next generation of experts in hadron therapy. Ten academic institutes and research centres and two leading companies are participating in PARTNER, that is coordinated by CERN, forming a unique multidisciplinary and multinational European network. PARTNER just came to an end in September 2012, and the 25 young researchers recall here their experience

  8. Autonomous energy management system in next generation homes

    OpenAIRE

    Charro Laiño, Raúl

    2012-01-01

    [ANGLÈS] The energy management system in next generation home has been developed in web semantic technology. This technology is used in smart homes. And for the monitoring of the power level and consumption of appliances, groups and rooms. Inside the autonomous energy system. The semantic web will give us the necessary interrelated to use autonomous. For good management of energy consumption, we must create communication methods to interact with the user. We can refer to the possibilities off...

  9. Developing the next generation of nuclear workers at OPG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This presentation is about developing the next generation of nuclear workers at Ontario Power Generation (OPG). Industry developments are creating urgent need to hire, train and retain new staff. OPG has an aggressive hiring campaign. Training organization is challenged to accommodate influx of new staff. Collaborating with colleges and universities is increasing the supply of qualified recruits with an interest in nuclear. Program for functional and leadership training have been developed. Knowledge retention is urgently required

  10. Electron Beam Collimation for the Next Generation Light Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steier, C.; Emma, P.; Nishimura, H.; Papadopoulos, C.; Sannibale, F.

    2013-05-20

    The Next Generation Light Source will deliver high (MHz) repetition rate electron beams to an array of free electron lasers. Because of the significant average current in such a facility, effective beam collimation is extremely important to minimize radiation damage to undulators, prevent quenches of superconducting cavities, limit dose rates outside of the accelerator tunnel and prevent equipment damage. This paper describes the early conceptual design of a collimation system, as well as initial results of simulations to test its effectiveness.

  11. Impact of Next Generation Sequencing Techniques in Food Microbiology

    OpenAIRE

    Mayo, Baltasar; Rachid, Caio T. C. C.; Alegría, Ángel; Leite, Analy M. O.; Raquel S Peixoto; Delgado, Susana

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the Maxam-Gilbert and Sanger sequencing as the first generation, in recent years there has been an explosion of newly-developed sequencing strategies, which are usually referred to as next generation sequencing (NGS) techniques. NGS techniques have high-throughputs and produce thousands or even millions of sequences at the same time. These sequences allow for the accurate identification of microbial taxa, including uncultivable organisms and those present in small numbers. In sp...

  12. The road from next-generation sequencing to personalized medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Gonzalez-Garay, Manuel L

    2014-01-01

    Moving from a traditional medical model of treating pathologies to an individualized predictive and preventive model of personalized medicine promises to reduce the healthcare cost on an overburdened and overwhelmed system. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) has the potential to accelerate the early detection of disorders and the identification of pharmacogenetics markers to customize treatments. This review explains the historical facts that led to the development of NGS along with the strengt...

  13. Next-generation sequencing still needs our generation's clinicians

    OpenAIRE

    Foley, A. Reghan; Donkervoort, Sandra; Bönnemann, Carsten G.

    2015-01-01

    The full arrival and broader availability of next-generation sequencing (NGS) is transforming the practice of medicine, including neurology. Compared with the traditional one-gene-at-a-time Sanger sequencing, NGS, or massively parallel sequencing, is a radically different approach to genetic sequencing. NGS allows for a large number of genes to be captured and sequenced in parallel, creating an enormous amount of data in a relatively short period of time at much lower cost “per gene.”

  14. Application of Next-generation Sequencing Technology in Forensic Science

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Yaran; Xie, Bingbing; Yan, Jiangwei

    2014-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology, with its high-throughput capacity and low cost, has developed rapidly in recent years and become an important analytical tool for many genomics researchers. New opportunities in the research domain of the forensic studies emerge by harnessing the power of NGS technology, which can be applied to simultaneously analyzing multiple loci of forensic interest in different genetic contexts, such as autosomes, mitochondrial and sex chromosomes. Furthermore...

  15. Next generation sequencing in cancer research and clinical application

    OpenAIRE

    Shyr, Derek; Liu, Qi

    2013-01-01

    The wide application of next-generation sequencing (NGS), mainly through whole genome, exome and transcriptome sequencing, provides a high-resolution and global view of the cancer genome. Coupled with powerful bioinformatics tools, NGS promises to revolutionize cancer research, diagnosis and therapy. In this paper, we review the recent advances in NGS-based cancer genomic research as well as clinical application, summarize the current integrative oncogenomic projects, resources and computatio...

  16. Visual programming for next-generation sequencing data analytics

    OpenAIRE

    Milicchio, Franco; Rose, Rebecca; Bian, Jiang; Min, Jae; Prosperi, Mattia

    2016-01-01

    Background High-throughput or next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies have become an established and affordable experimental framework in biological and medical sciences for all basic and translational research. Processing and analyzing NGS data is challenging. NGS data are big, heterogeneous, sparse, and error prone. Although a plethora of tools for NGS data analysis has emerged in the past decade, (i) software development is still lagging behind data generation capabilities, and (ii) ...

  17. NGS-Trex : next generation sequencing transcriptome profile explorer

    OpenAIRE

    I. Boria; L. Boatti; Pesole, G; F. Mignone

    2013-01-01

    Background Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS) technology has exceptionally increased the ability to sequence DNA in a massively parallel and cost-effective manner. Nevertheless, NGS data analysis requires bioinformatics skills and computational resources well beyond the possibilities of many "wet biology" laboratories. Moreover, most of projects only require few sequencing cycles and standard tools or workflows to carry out suitable analyses for the identification and annotation of genes, trans...

  18. Clinical Next Generation Sequencing for Precision Medicine in Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Dong, Ling; Wang, Wanheng; Li, Alvin; Kansal, Rina; Chen, Yuhan; Chen, Hong; Li, Xinmin

    2015-01-01

    Rapid adoption of next generation sequencing (NGS) in genomic medicine has been driven by low cost, high throughput sequencing and rapid advances in our understanding of the genetic bases of human diseases. Today, the NGS method has dominated sequencing space in genomic research, and quickly entered clinical practice. Because unique features of NGS perfectly meet the clinical reality (need to do more with less), the NGS technology is becoming a driving force to realize the dream of precision ...

  19. The impact of next-generation sequencing on genomics

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Jun; Chiodini, Rod; Badr, Ahmed; Zhang, Genfa

    2011-01-01

    This article reviews basic concepts, general applications, and the potential impact of next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies on genomics, with particular reference to currently available and possible future platforms and bioinformatics. NGS technologies have demonstrated the capacity to sequence DNA at unprecedented speed, thereby enabling previously unimaginable scientific achievements and novel biological applications. But, the massive data produced by NGS also presents a significan...

  20. Next-generation digital information storage in DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Church, George M; Gao, Yuan; Kosuri, Sriram

    2012-09-28

    Digital information is accumulating at an astounding rate, straining our ability to store and archive it. DNA is among the most dense and stable information media known. The development of new technologies in both DNA synthesis and sequencing make DNA an increasingly feasible digital storage medium. We developed a strategy to encode arbitrary digital information in DNA, wrote a 5.27-megabit book using DNA microchips, and read the book by using next-generation DNA sequencing. PMID:22903519

  1. Overviews of “next-generation sequencing”

    OpenAIRE

    Aly, Sanaa; Mostafa,Enas; Sabri, Dalia

    2015-01-01

    Enas M Mostafa,1 Dalia M Sabri,2 Sanaa M Aly1,21Department of Forensic Medicine and Clinical Toxicology, Faculty of Medicine, 2Biotechnology Research Center, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt Abstract: DNA sequencing technology has a rich diverse history. Over the past several years, next-generation sequencing (NGS) has demonstrated its potential to accelerate research in the field of life sciences in general and forensic sciences in particular. Although the abilities of these new techn...

  2. Discovery services: next generation of searching scholarly information

    OpenAIRE

    Keene, Chris

    2011-01-01

    The new breed of resource discovery services is an evolutionary step forward in providing library users with a ‘one-stop shop’ where they can find information sources for their research. They provide a single search box that can search a library’s online and physical content including articles, books, journals, newspaper articles, e-books, specialist collections and more. These discovery services have built on the concepts of both federated searching and next-generation catalogues.

  3. The drivers of services on next generation networks

    OpenAIRE

    Iden, Jon; Methlie, Leif B.

    2010-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the drivers of service development on future telecommunication networks. As these networks are being transformed into next-generation networks, new and different services are being developed and mediated. However, little is known about the drivers of this development, and frameworks for strategic management of service innovation are scarce. This paper offers two contributions. First, it develops a conceptual framework for the identification and classifica...

  4. User interface description languages for next generation user interfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Shaer, Orit; Jacob, Robert; Green, Mark; LUYTEN, Kris

    2008-01-01

    In recent years HCI researchers have developed a broad range of new interfaces that diverge from the "window, icon, menu, pointing device" (WIMP) paradigm, employing a variety of novel interaction techniques and devices. Developers of these next generation user interfaces face challenges that are currently not addressed by state of the art user interface software tools. As part of the user interface software community’s effort to address these challenges, the concept of a User Interface Descr...

  5. Towards middleware security framework for next generation data centers connectivity

    OpenAIRE

    Talpur, Samar Raza; Abdalla, Sameh; Kechadi, Tahar

    2015-01-01

    Data Center as a Service (DCaaS) facilitates to clients as alternate outsourced physical data center, the expectations of business community to fully automate these data centers to run smoothly. Geographically distributed data centers and its connectivity has major role in next generation data centers. In order to deploy the reliable connections between distributed data centers the SDN based security and logical firewalls are attractiveand enviable. We present the middleware security framewor...

  6. The next generation of power reactors - safety characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The next generation of commercial nuclear power reactors is characterized by a new approach to achieving reliability of their safety systems. In contrast to current generation reactors, these designs apply passive safety features that rely on gravity-driven transfer processes or stored energy, such as gas-pressurized accumulators or electric batteries. This paper discusses the passive safety system of the AP600 and Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (SBWR) designs

  7. Configuring next generation food supply chains: a risk perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Deep, Aman; Dani, Samir

    2010-01-01

    An often overlooked aspect of today’s business environment in general and supply chains in particular is uncertainty. The scenarios of loss of supplier, transport strikes, IT services failing, stock outs etc are becoming all too common. Looking at the future of supply chains, uncertainty and risk appear to be increasing and will play a crucial part in the configuration of next generation supply chain. This paper presents an alternative approach to supply chain configuration using supply ch...

  8. Managing risks in next generation supply chains: a systems approach

    OpenAIRE

    Ghadge, Abhijeet; Dani, Samir; Kalawsky, Roy

    2010-01-01

    Supply chain risk management follows three basic processes to manage supply chain risks: Identify, Assess and Mitigate. This paper considers a systems perspective towards managing these risks. It presents variables that may affect Next Generation Supply Chains and applies a System dynamics modelling approach (Oehmen, et. al. 2009) towards depicting the causal linkages of these variables with future supply disruptions. To understand the interdependencies within these factors and the risk propa...

  9. Next Generation Sequencing Reveals the Hidden Diversity of Zooplankton Assemblages

    OpenAIRE

    Penelope K Lindeque; Parry, Helen E; Harmer, Rachel A.; Somerfield, Paul J; Atkinson, Angus

    2013-01-01

    Background Zooplankton play an important role in our oceans, in biogeochemical cycling and providing a food source for commercially important fish larvae. However, difficulties in correctly identifying zooplankton hinder our understanding of their roles in marine ecosystem functioning, and can prevent detection of long term changes in their community structure. The advent of massively parallel next generation sequencing technology allows DNA sequence data to be recovered directly from whole c...

  10. An Open Science Platform for the Next Generation of Data

    OpenAIRE

    Sweeney, Latanya; Crosas, Merce

    2015-01-01

    Imagine an online work environment where researchers have direct and immediate access to myriad data sources and tools and data management resources, useful throughout the research lifecycle. This is our vision for the next generation of the Dataverse Network: an Open Science Platform (OSP). For the first time, researchers would be able to seamlessly access and create primary and derived data from a variety of sources: prior research results, public data sets, harvested online data, physical ...

  11. NREL Next Generation Drivetrain: Mechanical Design and Test Plan (Poster)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, J.; Halse, C.

    2014-05-01

    The Department of Energy and industry partners are sponsoring a $3m project for design and testing of a 'Next Generation' wind turbine drivetrain at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). This poster focuses on innovative aspects of the gearbox design, completed as part of an end-to-end systems engineering approach incorporating innovations that increase drivetrain reliability, efficiency, torque density and minimize capital cost.

  12. Design of the next generation target at Lujan center, LANSCE.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferres, Laurent [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-07-27

    This is a presentation given at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) on the design of the next generation target at Lujan center, LANSCE. The motivation for this design is to enable new nuclear physics experiments (defense program applications (DANCE)) that are currently limited by neutron intensity or energy resolution available at LANSCE. The target is being redesigned so that the Flight Paths in the upper tier provide a higher intensity in the epithermal and medium energy ranges.

  13. Physics Opportunities at the Next Generation of Precision Flavor Physics

    OpenAIRE

    Marco CiuchiniINFN Sezione di Roma Tre, Rome, Italy; Achille Stocchi(LAL, Univ Paris-Sud, Orsay, France)

    2015-01-01

    Starting with next-generation experiments, flavor physics fully enters the era of precision measurements. The focus shifts from testing the Standard Model to finding and characterizing new physics contributions. We review the opportunities offered by future flavor experiments, discussing the expected sensitivities of the most important measurements. We also present some examples of measurable deviations from the Standard Model in the flavor sector generated in a selection of new physics model...

  14. A Practical Evaluation of Next Generation Sequencing & Molecular Cloning Software

    OpenAIRE

    Meintjes, Peter; Qaadri, Kashef; Olsen, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Laboratories using Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) technologies and/ or high-throughput molecular cloning experiments can spend a significant amount of their research budget on data analysis and data management. The decision to develop in-house software, to rely on combinations of free software packages, or to purchase commercial software can significantly affect productivity and ROI. In this talk, we will describe a practical software evaluation process that was developed to assist core fac...

  15. Optimal localisation of next generation biofuel production in Sweden

    OpenAIRE

    Wetterlund, Elisabeth; Pettersson, Karin; Mossberg, Johanna; Torén, Johan; Hoffstedt, Christian; von Schenck, Anna; Berglin, Niklas; Lundmark, Robert; Lundgren, Joakim; Leduc, Sylvain; Kindermann, Georg

    2013-01-01

    With a high availability of lignocellulosic biomass and various types of cellulosic by-products, as well as a large number of industries, Sweden is a country of great interest for future large scale production of sustainable, next generation biofuels. This is most likely also a necessity as Sweden has the ambition to be independent of fossil fuels in the transport sector by the year 2030 and completely fossil free by 2050. In order to reach competitive biofuel production costs, plants with la...

  16. Perspectives of Integrative Cancer Genomics in Next Generation Sequencing Era

    OpenAIRE

    Kwon, So Mee; Cho, Hyunwoo; Choi, Ji Hye; Jee, Byul A; Jo, Yuna; Woo, Hyun Goo

    2012-01-01

    The explosive development of genomics technologies including microarrays and next generation sequencing (NGS) has provided comprehensive maps of cancer genomes, including the expression of mRNAs and microRNAs, DNA copy numbers, sequence variations, and epigenetic changes. These genome-wide profiles of the genetic aberrations could reveal the candidates for diagnostic and/or prognostic biomarkers as well as mechanistic insights into tumor development and progression. Recent efforts to establis...

  17. Next-Generation Sequencing for Cancer Diagnostics: a Practical Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Meldrum, Cliff; Doyle, Maria A.; Tothill, Richard W.

    2011-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) is arguably one of the most significant technological advances in the biological sciences of the last 30 years. The second generation sequencing platforms have advanced rapidly to the point that several genomes can now be sequenced simultaneously in a single instrument run in under two weeks. Targeted DNA enrichment methods allow even higher genome throughput at a reduced cost per sample. Medical research has embraced the technology and the cancer field is at ...

  18. DARC: Next generation decentralized control framework for robot applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Morten; Andersen, Nils Axel; Ravn, Ole

    This paper presents DARC, a next generation control framework for robot applications. It is designed to be equally powerful in prototyping research projects and for building serious commercial robots running on low powered embedded hardware, thus closing the gab between research and industry. It ...... incorporates several new techniques such as a decentralized peer-to-peer architecture, transparent network distribution of the control system, and automatic run-time supervision to guarantee robustness....

  19. Signaling Over Protocols Gateways in Next-Generation Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Akinwande, Gbenga Segun

    2009-01-01

    In this thesis, I examined various signalling both in wired and mobile networks, with more emphasis on SIGTRAN. The SIGTRAN is the protocol suite applicable in the current new generation and next-generation networks, most especially as it enables service provider to be able to interpolate both wireline and wireless services within the same architecture. This concept is an important component in today’s Triple-play communication, and hence this thesis has provided a broad view on Signalling an...

  20. Providing content based billing architecture over Next Generation Network

    OpenAIRE

    Lakhtaria, Kamaljit I.

    2010-01-01

    Mobile Communication marketplace has stressed that "content is king" ever since the initial footsteps for Next Generation Networks like 3G, 3GPP, IP Multimedia subsystem (IMS) services. However, many carriers and content providers have struggled to drive revenue for content services, primarily due to current limitations of certain types of desirable content offerings, simplistic billing models, and the inability to support flexible pricing, charging and settlement. Unlike wire line carriers, ...

  1. Implementing Value Added Applications in Next Generation Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Yuan-Kuang Tu; Ren-Huang Liou; Yi-Bing Lin; Yeh-Chin Ho

    2010-01-01

    One of the major issues in the future Internet is the integration of telecom networks with the Internet. In many countries, large Internet Service Providers (ISPs) are also telecom operators that have been focusing on providing Internet services through their telecom networks with telecom-grade mechanisms. In this article, we show that IP Multimedia Subsystem (IMS) is a telecom-grade mechanism that addresses this important issue. In Next Generation Network (NGN), IMS supports IP-based multime...

  2. Next-generation pushbroom filter radiometers for remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarde, Richard W.; Dittman, Michael G.; Kvaran, Geir E.

    2012-09-01

    Individual focal plane size, yield, and quality continue to improve, as does the technology required to combine these into large tiled formats. As a result, next-generation pushbroom imagers are replacing traditional scanning technologies in remote sensing applications. Pushbroom architecture has inherently better radiometric sensitivity and significantly reduced payload mass, power, and volume than previous generation scanning technologies. However, the architecture creates challenges achieving the required radiometric accuracy performance. Achieving good radiometric accuracy, including image spectral and spatial uniformity, requires creative optical design, high quality focal planes and filters, careful consideration of on-board calibration sources, and state-of-the-art ground test facilities. Ball Aerospace built the Landsat Data Continuity Mission (LDCM) next-generation Operational Landsat Imager (OLI) payload. Scheduled to launch in 2013, OLI provides imagery consistent with the historical Landsat spectral, spatial, radiometric, and geometric data record and completes the generational technology upgrade from the Enhanced Thematic Mapper (ETM+) whiskbroom technology to modern pushbroom technology afforded by advanced focal planes. We explain how Ball's capabilities allowed producing the innovative next-generational OLI pushbroom filter radiometer that meets challenging radiometric accuracy or calibration requirements. OLI will improve the multi-decadal land surface observation dataset dating back to the 1972 launch of ERTS-1 or Landsat 1.

  3. Next generation nuclear arms control staff development initiative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The current demographics for staff with nuclear expertise within the United States National Laboratory complex are dominated by a well experienced, but departing late-career workforce, a cadre of mid-career staff that are relatively few in number, and entry-level staff that are well educated but inexperienced, particularly in nuclear arms control and international nuclear safeguards affairs. Although there are a few significant United States Department of Energy (DOE) Programs that have been established to deal with this issue across the Laboratory complex (Next Generation Safeguards Initiative and Nonproliferation Graduate Fellowship Program, as two examples), it remains the responsibility of the individual laboratories to provide internal education, training and development activities to move the next generation of nuclear arms control practitioners to higher levels of competency and responsibility. This presentation describes an internal Next Generation Nuclear Arms Control Staff Development Initiative for early- to mid-career technical and policy experts from a broad range of disciplines at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Elements of this internally funded PNNL initiative include, inter alia, student selection criteria, course focus and objectives, core curriculum topics, the distinguished guest speakers series, practical applications of new knowledge and other student responsibilities for action and engagement, training for technical publication, funding issues, and successes and achievements from the very first class of 2012. (author)

  4. The next generation of CANDU reactor: evolutionary economics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AECL has developed the design for a next generation of CANDUR plants by applying a set of enabling technologies to well-established successful CANDU features from the CANDU 6 Reactors in service and the design of the CANDU 9. Advances made in the construction of the Wolsong reactors have been built upon in the current project in China. The basis for the new design is to evolve from the current CANDU units by replicating or adapting existing components for a new core design. Using slightly enriched uranium fuel, a core with light water coolant, and heavy water moderator and reflector has been defined, based on the existing CANDU fuel channel module. This paper summarizes the main features and characteristics of the reference next-generation CANDU design. The progress of the next generation of CANDU design program in meeting challenging cost, schedule and performance targets is described. AECL's cost reduction methodology is summarized as an integral part of the design optimization process. Examples of cost reduction features are given, together with enhancement of design margins

  5. Safety Arguments for Next Generation, Location Aware Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, C. W.; Holloway, C. M.

    2010-01-01

    Concerns over accuracy, availability, integrity, and continuity have limited the integration of Global Positioning System (GPS) and Global Navigation Satellite System (GLONASS) for safety-critical applications. More recent augmentation systems, such as the European Geostationary Navigation Overlay Service (EGNOS) and the North American Wide Area Augmentation System (WAAS) have begun to address these concerns. Augmentation architectures build on the existing GPS/GLONASS infrastructures to support location based services in Safety of Life (SoL) applications. Much of the technical development has been directed by air traffic management requirements, in anticipation of the more extensive support to be offered by GPS III and Galileo. WAAS has already been approved to provide vertical guidance for aviation applications. During the next twelve months, the full certification of EGNOS for SoL applications is expected. This paper discusses similarities and differences between the safety assessment techniques used in Europe and North America.

  6. Computational Needs for the Next Generation Electric Grid Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birman, Kenneth; Ganesh, Lakshmi; Renessee, Robbert van; Ferris, Michael; Hofmann, Andreas; Williams, Brian; Sztipanovits, Janos; Hemingway, Graham; University, Vanderbilt; Bose, Anjan; Stivastava, Anurag; Grijalva, Santiago; Grijalva, Santiago; Ryan, Sarah M.; McCalley, James D.; Woodruff, David L.; Xiong, Jinjun; Acar, Emrah; Agrawal, Bhavna; Conn, Andrew R.; Ditlow, Gary; Feldmann, Peter; Finkler, Ulrich; Gaucher, Brian; Gupta, Anshul; Heng, Fook-Luen; Kalagnanam, Jayant R; Koc, Ali; Kung, David; Phan, Dung; Singhee, Amith; Smith, Basil

    2011-10-05

    The April 2011 DOE workshop, 'Computational Needs for the Next Generation Electric Grid', was the culmination of a year-long process to bring together some of the Nation's leading researchers and experts to identify computational challenges associated with the operation and planning of the electric power system. The attached papers provide a journey into these experts' insights, highlighting a class of mathematical and computational problems relevant for potential power systems research. While each paper defines a specific problem area, there were several recurrent themes. First, the breadth and depth of power system data has expanded tremendously over the past decade. This provides the potential for new control approaches and operator tools that can enhance system efficiencies and improve reliability. However, the large volume of data poses its own challenges, and could benefit from application of advances in computer networking and architecture, as well as data base structures. Second, the computational complexity of the underlying system problems is growing. Transmitting electricity from clean, domestic energy resources in remote regions to urban consumers, for example, requires broader, regional planning over multi-decade time horizons. Yet, it may also mean operational focus on local solutions and shorter timescales, as reactive power and system dynamics (including fast switching and controls) play an increasingly critical role in achieving stability and ultimately reliability. The expected growth in reliance on variable renewable sources of electricity generation places an exclamation point on both of these observations, and highlights the need for new focus in areas such as stochastic optimization to accommodate the increased uncertainty that is occurring in both planning and operations. Application of research advances in algorithms (especially related to optimization techniques and uncertainty quantification) could accelerate power

  7. Network Service Description and Discovery for the Next Generation Internet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enyue Lu

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The next generation Internet will face new challenges due to the coexisting heterogeneous networks and highly diverse networking applications. Therefore how to coordinate heterogeneous networking systems to support a wide spectrum of application requirements becomes a significant research problem. A key to solving this problem lies in effective and flexible collaborations among heterogeneous networking systems and interactions between applications and the underlying networks. Network virtualization plays a crucial role in enabling such collaborations and interactions, and the Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA provides a promising approach to supporting network virtualization. Network service description and discovery are key technologies for applying SOA in networking, and the current service description and discovery technologies must be evolved to meet the special requirements of future Internet. In this paper, we study the problem of network service description and discovery to support network virtualization in the next generation Internet. The main contributions of this paper include a general approach to describing service capabilities of various heterogeneous networking systems, a technology to discover and select the network services that guarantee the QoS requirements of different networking applications, a general profile for specifying networking demands of various applications, a scheme of network resource allocation for QoS provisioning, and a system structure for realizing the network description, discovery, and resource allocation technologies. We also propose information update mechanisms for improving performance of the network service description and discovery system. The approach and technology developed in this paper are general and independent of network architectures and implementations; thus are applicable to the heterogeneous networking systems in the next generation Internet.

  8. Natural Hematite for Next-Generation Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Yan; Xia, Chen; ZHANG Wei; Yang, Xiang; Bao, Zheng Yu; Li, Jiao Jun; Zhu, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Natural hematite ore is used as a novel electrolyte material for advanced solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). This hematite-based system exhibits a maximum power density of 225 mW cm(-2) at 600 degrees C and reaches 467 mW cm(-2) when the hematite is mixed with perovskite-structured La0.6Sr0.4Co0.2Fe0.8O3-. These results demonstrate that natural materials for next-generation SOFCs can influence the multiutilization of natural resources, thereby affecting the environment and energy sustainability.

  9. Implementation of Targeted Next Generation Sequencing in Clinical Diagnostics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Martin Jakob; Burton, Mark; Thomassen, Mads;

    Accurate mutation detection is essential in clinical genetic diagnostics of monogenic hereditary diseases. Targeted next generation sequencing (NGS) provides a promising and cost-effective alternative to Sanger sequencing and MLPA analysis currently used in most diagnostic laboratories. One......, respectively. For diagnostics, the sequencing coverage is essential, wherefore a minimum coverage of 30x per nucleotide in the coding regions was used as our primary quality criterion. For the majority of the included genes, we obtained adequate gene coverage, in which we were able to detect 100% of the known...

  10. Wireless next generation networks a virtue-based trust model

    CERN Document Server

    Harvey, Melissa

    2014-01-01

    This SpringerBrief proposes a trust model motivated by virtue epistemology, addressing the need for a more efficient and flexible trust model for wireless next generation networks. This theory of trust simplifies the computation and communication overhead of strictly cognitive-computational models of trust. Both the advantages and the challenges of virtue-based trust models are discussed. This brief offers new research and a general theory of rationality that enables users to interpret trust and reason as complementary mechanisms that guide our rational conduct at two different epistemic level

  11. ERP II: Next-generation Extended Enterprise Resource Planning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Charles

    2004-01-01

    results of the paper are threefold: First a conceptual framework for eERP is established. Secondly, the business and research issues of this new framework are evaluated in the perspective of ERP and in particular the SCM developments. Third, the conceptual framework is applied in a discussion of potential......ERP II (ERP/2) systems is a new concept introduced by Gartner Group in 2000 in order to label the latest extensions of the ERP-systems. The purpose of this paper is to explore the next-generation of ERP systems, the Extended Enterprise Resource Planning (EERP or as we prefer to use: eERP). The...

  12. ERP II - Next-generation Extended Enterprise Resource Planning

    OpenAIRE

    Møller, Charles

    2003-01-01

    ERP II (ERP/2) systems is a new concept introduced by Gartner Group in 2000 in order to label the latest extensions of the ERP-systems. The purpose of this paper is to explore the next-generation of ERP systems, the Extended Enterprise Resource Planning (EERP or as we prefer to use: eERP). The results of the paper are threefold: First a conceptual framework for eERP is established. Secondly, the business and research issues of this new framework are evaluated in the perspective of ERP and in ...

  13. ERP II - Next-generation Extended Enterprise Resource Planning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Charles

    2003-01-01

    results of the paper are threefold: First a conceptual framework for eERP is established. Secondly, the business and research issues of this new framework are evaluated in the perspective of ERP and in particular the SCM developments. Third, the conceptual framework is applied in a discussion of potential......ERP II (ERP/2) systems is a new concept introduced by Gartner Group in 2000 in order to label the latest extensions of the ERP-systems. The purpose of this paper is to explore the next-generation of ERP systems, the Extended Enterprise Resource Planning (EERP or as we prefer to use: eERP). The...

  14. Translating next generation sequencing to practice: opportunities and necessary steps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamalakaran, Sitharthan; Varadan, Vinay; Janevski, Angel; Banerjee, Nilanjana; Tuck, David; McCombie, W Richard; Dimitrova, Nevenka; Harris, Lyndsay N

    2013-08-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) approaches for measuring RNA and DNA benefit from greatly increased sensitivity, dynamic range and detection of novel transcripts. These technologies are rapidly becoming the standard for molecular assays and represent huge potential value to the practice of oncology. However, many challenges exist in the transition of these technologies from research application to clinical practice. This review discusses the value of NGS in detecting mutations, copy number changes and RNA quantification and their applications in oncology, the challenges for adoption and the relevant steps that are needed for translating this potential to routine practice. PMID:23769412

  15. Energy Efficient Glass Melting - The Next Generation Melter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Rue

    2008-03-01

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate a high intensity glass melter, based on the submerged combustion melting technology. This melter will serve as the melting and homogenization section of a segmented, lower-capital cost, energy-efficient Next Generation Glass Melting System (NGMS). After this project, the melter will be ready to move toward commercial trials for some glasses needing little refining (fiberglass, etc.). For other glasses, a second project Phase or glass industry research is anticipated to develop the fining stage of the NGMS process.

  16. Next Generation Luminaire (NGL) Downlight Demonstration Project, Hilton Columbus Downtown

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, R. G. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Perrin, T. E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2014-09-30

    At the Hilton Columbus Downtown hotel in Ohio, DOE's Better Buildings Alliance conducted a demonstration of Next Generation Luminaires-winning downlights installed in all guest rooms and suites prior to the hotel's 2012 opening. After a post-occupancy assessment, the LED downlights not only provided the aesthetic appearance and dimming functionality desired, but also provided 50% energy savings relative to a comparable CFL downlight and enabled the lighting power to be more than 20% below that allowed by code.

  17. Next Generation Train - Mit 400 km/h durch Europa

    OpenAIRE

    Schumann, Tilo

    2012-01-01

    Der Next Generation Train (NGT) ist ein Forschungsprojekt des Deutschen Zentrums für Luft- und Raumfahrt (DLR), in dem acht Institute verschiedener Disziplinen einen Hochgeschwindigkeitszug entwickeln, der bis zu 400 km/h fahren und dennoch weniger Energie verbrauchen soll als bisherige HGV-Züge. Zur Ermittlung der Einsatzpotenziale für den NGT wurde für Europa ein Verkehrsmodell aufgestellt. Neben den aktuellen und zukünftigen Fahrgastzahlen wurden diese auch für ein imaginäres Schnellfahrne...

  18. Next generation geothermal power plants. Draft final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brugman, John; Hattar, John; Nichols, Kenneth; Esaki, Yuri

    1994-12-01

    The goal of this project is to develop concepts for the next generation geothermal power plant(s) (NGGPP). This plant, compared to existing plants, will generate power for a lower levelized cost and will be more competitive with fossil fuel fired power plants. The NGGPP will utilize geothermal resources efficiently and will be equipped with contingencies to mitigate the risk of reservoir performance. The NGGPP design will attempt to minimize emission of pollutants and consumption of surface water and/or geothermal fluids for cooling service.

  19. Comparison of nuclear reactor types of the next generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper presents a comparison for a selected relevant set of parameters for different commercial nuclear reactor types at the next generation. This parameters overview could serve as the base for the semi-quantitative decision bases for the selection of the future nuclear strategy. The number of advanced reactor designs of the LWR, HWR, GCR and LMR type are presented. Even currently many of them are still on the drawing boards, the concepts and designs should be assessed in the sense of sensible approach for planning the possible future nuclear strategy. (author)

  20. Wavelet Neural Network Based Traffic Prediction for Next Generation Network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Qigang; Li Qunzhan; He Zhengyou

    2005-01-01

    By using netflow traffic collecting technology, some traffic data for analysis are collected from a next generation network (NGN) operator. To build a wavelet basis neural network (NN), the Sigmoid function is replaced with the wavelet in NN. Then the wavelet multiresolution analysis method is used to decompose the traffic signal, and the decomposed component sequences are employed to train the NN. By using the methods, an NGN traffic prediction model is built to predict one day's traffic. The experimental results show that the traffic prediction method of wavelet NN is more accurate than that without using wavelet in the NGN traffic forecasting.

  1. UMTS-WIMAX VERTICAL HANDOVER IN NEXT GENERATION WIRELESS NETWORKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nada Alamri

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The vision of next generation wireless network (NGWN is to integrate different wireless accesstechnologies, each with its own characteristics, into a common IP-based core network to provide mobileuser with service continuity and seamless roaming. One of the major issues for the convergedheterogeneous networks is providing a seamless vertical handover (VHO with QoS support. In this paperwe have reviewed the various interworking architectures and handover scenarios between UMTS andWiMAX. Also, we have compared the proposed solutions based on different criteria and revealed the prosand cons of each scheme. The comparison aids to adopt a better interworking and handover mechanismin NGWN.

  2. Concept of safety systems for next generation PWR (APWR+)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concept of the next generation PWR, which is expected to come after the APWR and is named the APWR+, is being studied, considering that the light water reactors are seemed to be dominant also in the 21st century. The APWR+ is designed to have the features of four-train safety systems, divergent emergency electrical sources, and passive core cooling system using steam generators at early stage of the Loss of Coolant Accident. The basic concept has been made, and more detailed investigation is scheduled in near future. (author)

  3. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Materials Research and Development Program Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. O. Hayner; E.L. Shaber

    2004-09-01

    The U.S Department of Energy (DOE) has selected the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production without greenhouse gas emissions. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic or pebble-bed, thermal neutron spectrum reactor that will produce electricity and hydrogen in a state-of-the-art thermodynamically efficient manner. The NGNP will use very high burn-up, low-enriched uranium, TRISO-coated fuel and have a projected plant design service life of 60 years.

  4. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Materials Selection and Qualification Program Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Doug Hamelin; G. O. Hayner

    2004-11-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has selected the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production without greenhouse gas emissions. The reactor design is a graphite-moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic or pebble bed thermal neutron spectrum reactor with an average reactor outlet temperature of at least 1000 C. The NGNP will use very high burn up, lowenriched uranium, TRISO-Coated fuel in a once-through fuel cycle. The design service life of the NGNP is 60 years.

  5. Radio resource management for next generation mobile communication systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Hua

    The key feature of next generation (4G) mobile communication system is the ability to deliver a variety of multimedia services with different Quality-of-Service (QoS) requirements. Compared to the third generation (3G) mobile communication systems, 4G mobile communication system introduces several...... technological novelties. Those technological breaks impose significant challenges on the design of advanced and completely new Radio Resource Management (RRM) algorithms, such as channel assignments and packet scheduling. Among the emerging technologies for broadband wireless access, special attention has been...

  6. Strategies Towords Next Generation IP Over Optical Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A consensus is emerging in industry on utilizing an IP-Centric control plane within optical networks to support dynamic provisioning and restoration of lightpaths. At the same time, there are divergent views of how IP routers interact with optical core networks to achieve end-to-end connectivity. This paper describes the strategies of optical communication's future development towards next generation IP over Optical Networks. The desirable extent of network transparency in advanced all-optical network architecture is studied. Architectural alternatives for interconnecting IP routers over optical networks, and the concerned routing and signaling issues are described.

  7. What we can learn from the next generation of experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Problems posed by the standard SU(3) x SU(2) x U(1) model (the (3,2,1)) model and crucial tests of the theory, are examined. Alternatives to the model are considered. The question of what can be learned from the next generation of experiments is extended beyond the (3,2,1) model and GUT's and the alternatives/modifications necessary to avoid the hierarchy problem are discussed. This leads to a discussion of supersymmetric models, technicolour models and constituent models. Finally, some of the exotica predicted in these models and the experimental searches for them are considered. (U.K.)

  8. EOS attitude determination and next generation star tracker enhancements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudva, P.; Throckmorton, A.

    1993-01-01

    The pointing knowledge required for the Earth Observing System (EOS) AM mission is at the limit of the current generation of star trackers, with little margin. Techniques for improving the performance of existing star trackers are explored, with performance sensitivities developed for each alternative. These are extended to define the most significant performance enhancements for a next generation star tracker. Since attitude determination studies tend to be computationally intensive, an approach for using a simpler one degree of freedom formulation is contrasted with a full three degree of freedom formulation. Additionally, covariance analysis results are compared with time domain simulation performance results.

  9. Qualification of the next generation of Star Tracker using COTS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guldager, Peter Buch; Aage, Helle Karina

    2005-01-01

    The Star Tracker from ØRSTED•DTU is built by using COTS components (Commercial-Off-The-Shelf) and due to no radiation data exists on COTS components, the EEE components are tested for Radiation effects. The components, which are tested is the one from the same lot, which is going to be used for the...... flight equipment, if they pass the radiation test. The next generation of Star Tracker are using 3-volt technology and this document describes how the COTS components are upscreened for space and how the instrument is qualified for space. The components are TID irradiated and are irradiated until...

  10. Next-Generation Sequencing-Based Molecular Diagnosis of Choroideremia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kayo Shimizu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We screened patients with choroideremia using next-generation sequencing (NGS and identified a novel mutation and a known mutation in the CHM gene. One patient presented an atypical fundus appearance for choroideremia. Another patient presented macular hole retinal detachment in the left eye. The present case series shows the utility of NGS-based screening in patients with choroideremia. In addition, the presence of macular hole in 1 of the 2 patients, together with a previous report, indicated the susceptibility of patients with choroideremia to macular hole.

  11. A Sociocognitive Perspective on Assessing EL Students in the Age of Common Core and Next Generation Science Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mislevy, Robert J.; Durán, Richard P.

    2014-01-01

    Subject-area standards such as Common Core State Standards for Language Arts and Mathematics and Next Generation Science Standards offer deeper, richer views of subject-area proficiency. In science, they underscore doing things with facts and concepts, such as explaining, planning, and investigating--activities that are intertwined with language,…

  12. Next generation fuel irradiation capability in the High Flux Reactor Petten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes selected equipment and expertise on fuel irradiation testing at the High Flux Reactor (HFR) in Petten, The Netherlands. The reactor went critical in 1961 and holds an operating license up to at least 2015. While HFR has initially focused on Light Water Reactor fuel and materials, it also played a decisive role since the 1970s in the German High Temperature Reactor (HTR) development program. A variety of tests related to fast reactor development in Europe were carried out for next generation fuel and materials, in particular for Very High Temperature Reactor (V/HTR) fuel, fuel for closed fuel cycles (U-Pu and Th-U fuel cycle) and transmutation, as well as for other innovative fuel types. The HFR constitutes a significant European infrastructure tool for the development of next generation reactors. Experimental facilities addressed include V/HTR fuel tests, a coated particle irradiation rig, and tests on fast reactor, transmutation and thorium fuel. The rationales for these tests are given, results are provided and further work is outlined.

  13. COMPARATIVE STUDY OF NEXT GENERATION HIGH SPEED WIRELESS NETWORK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RAHUL MALHOTRA

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Advances in mobile communication theory have enabled the development of different wireless access technologies. Alongside the revolutionary progress in wireless access technologies, advances in wireless access devices such as laptops, palmtops, and cell phones and mobile middleware have paved the way for the deliveryof beyond-voice-type services while on the move. This sets the platform for high-speed mobile communications that provide high-speed data and both real and non-real time multimedia to mobile users. Today's wireless world uses several communication infrastructures such as Bluetooth for personal area, IEEE 802.11 for local area,Universal Mobile Telecommunication System (UMTS for wide area, and Satellite networks for global networking other hand, since these wireless networks are complementary to each other, their integration and coordinated operation can provide ubiquitous “always best connection" quality mobile communications to the users. This paper discusses the different architectures of wireless networks and the different factors to be considered while designing a hybrid wireless network. The different factors to be considered for design of ahybrid wireless network and the different networks have been explored in this paper.

  14. Next generation informatics for big data in precision medicine era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuji; Zhu, Qian; Liu, Hongfang

    2015-01-01

    The rise of data-intensive biology, advances in informatics technology, and changes in the way health care is delivered has created an compelling opportunity to allow us investigate biomedical questions in the context of "big data" and develop knowledge systems to support precision medicine. To promote such data mining and informatics technology development in precision medicine, we hosted two international informatics workshops in 2014: 1) the first workshop on Data Mining in Biomedical informatics and Healthcare, in conjunction with the 18th Pacific-Asia Conference on Knowledge Discovery and Data Mining (PAKDD 2014), and 2) the first workshop on Translational biomedical and clinical informatics, in conjunction with the 8th International Conference on Systems Biology and the 4th Translational Bioinformatics Conference (ISB/TBC 2014). This thematic issue of BioData Mining presents a series of selected papers from these two international workshops, aiming to address the data mining needs in the informatics field due to the deluge of "big data" generated by next generation biotechnologies such as next generation sequencing, metabolomics, and proteomics, as well as the structured and unstructured biomedical and healthcare data from electronic health records. We are grateful for the BioData Mining's willingness to produce this forward-looking thematic issue. PMID:26539249

  15. Next generation database relational solutions for ATLAS distributed computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrov, G.; Maeno, T.; Garonne, V.; Atlas Collaboration

    2014-06-01

    The ATLAS Distributed Computing (ADC) project delivers production tools and services for ATLAS offline activities such as data placement and data processing on the Grid. The system has been capable of sustaining with high efficiency the needed computing activities during the first run of LHC data taking, and has demonstrated flexibility in reacting promptly to new challenges. Databases are a vital part of the whole ADC system. The Oracle Relational Database Management System (RDBMS) has been addressing a majority of the ADC database requirements for many years. Much expertise was gained through the years and without a doubt will be used as a good foundation for the next generation PanDA (Production ANd Distributed Analysis) and DDM (Distributed Data Management) systems. In this paper we present the current production ADC database solutions and notably the planned changes on the PanDA system, and the next generation ATLAS DDM system called Rucio. Significant work was performed on studying different solutions to arrive at the best relational and physical database model for performance and scalability in order to be ready for deployment and operation in 2014.

  16. The Need for Next Generation of Radiochemists in the USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 2009, the nuclear industry employed approximately 120,000 people. Nearly 38 percent of the nuclear industry force will be eligible to retire within the next five years. To maintain the current work force, the industry will need to hire approximately 25,000 more workers by 2015.1 The federal government will also need nuclear workers in the future in its laboratories, the military and government programs. There is a need not only for the entire nuclear community to work with the academia to recruit and train students in a standardized way for employment at nuclear facilities. Several strategies are taking place in the USA, as an example, an initiative developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is the Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology (INEST) with four Centers of Research and Education (COREs) selected to address some of the most challenging issues facing nuclear energy today: (1) Fuels and Materials, (2) Space Nuclear Research, (3) Fuel Cycle, and (4) Safety and Licensing. Another example is the development of a radiochemistry program at two universities: the University of Nevada Las Vegas (UNLV) and Washington State University (WSU) to attract the next generation work force. This paper will solely focus on the next generation of radiochemists needed in the US and will give examples illustrating the needs as well as the current activities in the academia and in the national laboratories to fulfill national needs.

  17. Next generation database relational solutions for ATLAS distributed computing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ATLAS Distributed Computing (ADC) project delivers production tools and services for ATLAS offline activities such as data placement and data processing on the Grid. The system has been capable of sustaining with high efficiency the needed computing activities during the first run of LHC data taking, and has demonstrated flexibility in reacting promptly to new challenges. Databases are a vital part of the whole ADC system. The Oracle Relational Database Management System (RDBMS) has been addressing a majority of the ADC database requirements for many years. Much expertise was gained through the years and without a doubt will be used as a good foundation for the next generation PanDA (Production ANd Distributed Analysis) and DDM (Distributed Data Management) systems. In this paper we present the current production ADC database solutions and notably the planned changes on the PanDA system, and the next generation ATLAS DDM system called Rucio. Significant work was performed on studying different solutions to arrive at the best relational and physical database model for performance and scalability in order to be ready for deployment and operation in 2014.

  18. Towards Next Generation Internet Management:CNGI-CERNET2EXPERIENCES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jia-Hai Yang; Hui Zhang; Jin-Xiang Zhang; Chang-Qing An

    2009-01-01

    Manageability is an important feature of next generation Internet; management and monitoring of IPv6-based networks are proving a big challenge. While leveraging current IPv4-based SNMP management scheme to IPv6 networks'management need is necessary, it is more urgent to coin a new network management architecture to accommodate the scalability and extensibility requirements of next generation Internet management. The paper proposes a novel network management architecture, IMN (Internet Management Network), which creates an overlay network of management nodes.While each management node can perform management tasks autonomously and independently, it can finish more sophis-ticated management tasks by collaboratively invoking management operations or sharing information provided by other management nodes. P2P-based communication services are introduced in IMN to enable such collaboration. The paper presents a prototyping implementation based on the Web service related technology, as well as some of the key technologies,especially solutions to those issues arising from the management practice of CERNET2. Experiences of deployment of CERNET2 operation and lessons learned from the management practice are discussed.

  19. Traffic Flow Analysis Based Flow Control Mechanism for next Generation Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Karunkuzhali

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Wireless communication is also one of the fastest growing technologies all over the world in the digital and multimedia communication. The cellular communication which is a part of wireless communication following infra-structure based networking. The cellular network has introduced the packet switching in addition to circuit switching in the Second Generation (2 G and it extends the features such as MMS in the 2.5 G, Video Conferencing in 3 G and IP networking in the 4 G. It is in progress to extend its capability through the 5G. Now, 5 G in cellular communication become more important and expected networking technologies. This fifth generation and above, is termed Next Generation Network (NGN. The NGN will offer heterogeneous connectivity on IP based broadband cellular communication. The NGN will leads to flexibility in the handling, mobility, reduced installation time, comparatively lower initial cost and nil maintenance cost on the user perception.

  20. Design & Deploy Web 2.0 enable services over Next Generation Network Platform

    CERN Document Server

    Lakhtaria, Kamaljit I; 10.5121/ijdms.2010.2305

    2010-01-01

    The Next Generation Networks (NGN) aims to integrate for IP-based telecom infrastructures and provide most advance & high speed emerging value added services. NGN capable to provide higher innovative services, these services will able to integrate communication and Web service into a single platform. IP Multimedia Subsystem, a NGN leading technology, enables a variety of NGN-compliant communications services to interoperate while being accessed through different kinds of access networks, preferably broadband. IMS–NGN services essential by both consumer and corporate users are by now used to access services, even communications services through the web and web-based communities and social networks, It is key for success of IMS-based services to be provided with efficient web access, so users can benefit from those new services by using web-based applications and user interfaces, not only NGN-IMS User Equipments and SIP protocol. Many Service are under planning which provided only under convergence of ...

  1. Analyzing Web 2.0 Integration with Next Generation Networks for Services Rendering

    CERN Document Server

    Lakhtaria, Kamaljit I

    2010-01-01

    The Next Generation Networks (NGN) aims to integrate for IP-based telecom infrastructures and provide most advance & high speed emerging value added services. NGN capable to provide higher innovative services, these services will able to integrate communication and Web service into a single platform. IP Multimedia Subsystem, a NGN leading technology, enables a variety of NGN-compliant communications services to interoperate while being accessed through different kinds of access networks, preferably broadband. IMS–NGN services essential by both consumer and corporate users are by now used to access services, even communications services through the web and web-based communities and social networks, It is key for success of IMS-based services to be provided with efficient web access, so users can benefit from those new services by using web-based applications and user interfaces, not only NGN-IMS User Equipments and SIP protocol. Many Service are under planning which provided only under convergence of ...

  2. Next generation hyper-scale software and hardware systems for big data analytics

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2013-01-01

    Building on foundational technologies such as many-core systems, non-volatile memories and photonic interconnects, we describe some current technologies and future research to create real-time, big data analytics, IT infrastructure. We will also briefly describe some of our biologically-inspired software and hardware architecture for creating radically new hyper-scale cognitive computing systems. About the speaker Rich Friedrich is the director of Strategic Innovation and Research Services (SIRS) at HP Labs. In this strategic role, he is responsible for research investments in nano-technology, exascale computing, cyber security, information management, cloud computing, immersive interaction, sustainability, social computing and commercial digital printing. Rich's philosophy is to fuse strategy and inspiration to create compelling capabilities for next generation information devices, systems and services. Using essential insights gained from the metaphysics of innnovation, he effectively leads ...

  3. Development of Multi-Disciplinary Simulation Codes and their Application to the Study of Next Generation Space Transport Systems

    OpenAIRE

    山本, 行光; Yamamoto, Yukimitsu

    2003-01-01

    The TSTO launching system has come to be considered a main candidate for next generation space transport systems. CFD has played a very important role in the aerothermodynamic design of atmospheric flight vehicles such as HOPE-X and HYFLEX. In order to develop our CFD technology in another practical and useful area, we have pursued the study of multi-disciplinary simulations based on NAL ITBL (Internet Based Laboratory) projects. Fig. 1 shows an image of a next generation TSTO system for spac...

  4. Cost and schedule reduction for next-generation Candu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AECL has developed a suite of technologies for CanduR reactors that enable the next step in the evolution of the Candu family of heavy-water-moderated fuel-channel reactors. These technologies have been combined in the design for the Advanced Candu Reactor TM1 (ACRTM), AECL's next generation Candu power plant. The ACR design builds extensively on the existing Candu experience base, but includes innovations, in design and in delivery technology, that provide very substantial reductions in capital cost and in project schedules. In this paper, main features of next generation design and delivery are summarized, to provide the background basis for the cost and schedule reductions that have been achieved. In particular the paper outlines the impact of the innovative design steps for ACR: - Selection of slightly enriched fuel bundle design; - Use of light water coolant in place of traditional Candu heavy water coolant; - Compact core design with unique reactor physics benefits; - Optimized coolant and turbine system conditions. In addition to the direct cost benefits arising from efficiency improvement, and from the reduction in heavy water, the next generation Candu configuration results in numerous additional indirect cost benefits, including: - Reduction in number and complexity of reactivity mechanisms; - Reduction in number of heavy water auxiliary systems; - Simplification in heat transport and its support systems; - Simplified human-machine interface. The paper also describes the ACR approach to design for constructability. The application of module assembly and open-top construction techniques, based on Candu and other worldwide experience, has been proven to generate savings in both schedule durations and overall project cost, by reducing premium on-site activities, and by improving efficiency of system and subsystem assembly. AECL's up-to-date experience in the use of 3-D CADDS and related engineering tools has also been proven to reduce both engineering and

  5. Next Generation Advanced Binder Chemistries for High Performance, Environmentally DurableThermal Control Material Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This innovative SBIR Phase II proposal will develop next generation products for Thermal Control Material Systems (TCMS) an adhesives based on the next generation...

  6. A Next Generation Light Source Facility at LBNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corlett, J.N.; Austin, B.; Baptiste, K.M.; Byrd, J.M.; Denes, P.; Donahue, R.; Doolittle, L.; Falcone, R.W.; Filippetto, D.; Fournier, S.; Li, D.; Padmore, H.A.; Papadopoulos, C.; Pappas, C.; Penn, G.; Placidi, M.; Prestemon, S.; Prosnitz, D.; Qiang, J.; Ratti, A.; Reinsch, M.; Sannibale, F.; Schlueter, R.; Schoenlein, R.W.; Staples, J.W.; Vecchione, T.; Venturini, M.; Wells, R.; Wilcox, R.; Wurtele, J.; Charman, A.; Kur, E.; Zholents, A.A.

    2011-03-23

    The Next Generation Light Source (NGLS) is a design concept, under development at LBNL, for a multibeamline soft x-ray FEL array powered by a ~;;2 GeV superconducting linear accelerator, operating with a 1 MHz bunch repetition rate. The CW superconducting linear accelerator is supplied by a high-brightness, highrepetition- rate photocathode electron gun. Electron bunches are distributed from the linac to the array of independently configurable FEL beamlines with nominal bunch rates up to 100 kHz in each FEL, and with even pulse spacing. Individual FELs may be configured for EEHG, HGHG, SASE, or oscillator mode of operation, and will produce high peak and average brightness x-rays with a flexible pulse format, with pulse durations ranging from sub-femtoseconds to hundreds of femtoseconds.

  7. Durability Challenges for Next Generation of Gas Turbine Engine Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Ajay K.

    2012-01-01

    Aggressive fuel burn and carbon dioxide emission reduction goals for future gas turbine engines will require higher overall pressure ratio, and a significant increase in turbine inlet temperature. These goals can be achieved by increasing temperature capability of turbine engine hot section materials and decreasing weight of fan section of the engine. NASA is currently developing several advanced hot section materials for increasing temperature capability of future gas turbine engines. The materials of interest include ceramic matrix composites with 1482 - 1648 C temperature capability, advanced disk alloys with 815 C capability, and low conductivity thermal barrier coatings with erosion resistance. The presentation will provide an overview of durability challenges with emphasis on the environmental factors affecting durability for the next generation of gas turbine engine materials. The environmental factors include gaseous atmosphere in gas turbine engines, molten salt and glass deposits from airborne contaminants, impact from foreign object damage, and erosion from ingestion of small particles.

  8. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Resilient Control System Functional Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Control Systems and their associated instrumentation must meet reliability, availability, maintainability, and resiliency criteria in order for high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) to be economically competitive. Research, perhaps requiring several years, may be needed to develop control systems to support plant availability and resiliency. This report functionally analyzes the gaps between traditional and resilient control systems as applicable to HTGRs, which includes the Next Generation Nuclear Plant; defines resilient controls; assesses the current state of both traditional and resilient control systems; and documents the functional gaps existing between these two controls approaches as applicable to HTGRs. This report supports the development of an overall strategy for applying resilient controls to HTGRs by showing that control systems with adequate levels of resilience perform at higher levels, respond more quickly to disturbances, increase operational efficiency, and increase public protection.

  9. Reducing Risk for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John M. Beck II; Harold J. Heydt; Emmanuel O. Opare; Kyle B. Oswald

    2010-07-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project, managed by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), is directed by the Energy Policy Act of 2005, to research, develop, design, construct, and operate a prototype forth generation nuclear reactor to meet the needs of the 21st Century. As with all large projects developing and deploying new technologies, the NGNP has numerous risks that need to be identified, tracked, mitigated, and reduced in order for successful project completion. A Risk Management Plan (RMP) was created to outline the process the INL is using to manage the risks and reduction strategies for the NGNP Project. Integral to the RMP is the development and use of a Risk Management System (RMS). The RMS is a tool that supports management and monitoring of the project risks. The RMS does not only contain a risk register, but other functionality that allows decision makers, engineering staff, and technology researchers to review and monitor the risks as the project matures.

  10. Perspectives of integrative cancer genomics in next generation sequencing era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, So Mee; Cho, Hyunwoo; Choi, Ji Hye; Jee, Byul A; Jo, Yuna; Woo, Hyun Goo

    2012-06-01

    The explosive development of genomics technologies including microarrays and next generation sequencing (NGS) has provided comprehensive maps of cancer genomes, including the expression of mRNAs and microRNAs, DNA copy numbers, sequence variations, and epigenetic changes. These genome-wide profiles of the genetic aberrations could reveal the candidates for diagnostic and/or prognostic biomarkers as well as mechanistic insights into tumor development and progression. Recent efforts to establish the huge cancer genome compendium and integrative omics analyses, so-called "integromics", have extended our understanding on the cancer genome, showing its daunting complexity and heterogeneity. However, the challenges of the structured integration, sharing, and interpretation of the big omics data still remain to be resolved. Here, we review several issues raised in cancer omics data analysis, including NGS, focusing particularly on the study design and analysis strategies. This might be helpful to understand the current trends and strategies of the rapidly evolving cancer genomics research. PMID:23105932

  11. Design and Modeling Billing solution to Next Generation Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Lakhtaria, Kamaljit I

    2010-01-01

    Next generation networks (NGN) services are assumed to be a new revenue stream for both network operators and service providers. New services especially focused on a mobile telecommunications that would be used not only as a communication de vice but also as a personal gateway to order or consume a variety of services and products [1]. This type of advanced services can be accomplished when the adaptability of the packet-networks (Internet) and the quality of service of the circuit switched networks are combined into one network [2]. New challenges appear in the billing of this heterogeneous multi services network. Some examples of such a services and possible solutions about charging and billing are examined in this paper. The first steps of mathematical model for billing are also considered.

  12. Next Generations Safeguards Initiative: The Life of a Cylinder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The U.S. Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration Office of Nonproliferation and International Security's Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) has begun a program based on a five-year plan to investigate the concept of a global monitoring scheme that uniquely identifies uranium hexafluoride (UF6) cylinders and their locations throughout the life cycle. A key initial activity in the NGSI program is to understand and document the 'life of a UF6 cylinder' from cradle to grave. This document describes the life of a UF6 cylinder and includes cylinder manufacture and procurement processes as well as cylinder-handling and operational practices at conversion, enrichment, fuel fabrication, and depleted UF6 conversion facilities. The NGSI multiple-laboratory team is using this document as a building block for subsequent tasks in the five-year plan, including development of the functional requirements for cylinder-tagging and tracking devices.

  13. Executing Medical Guidelines on the Web: Towards Next Generation Healthcare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argüello, M.; Des, J.; Fernandez-Prieto, M. J.; Perez, R.; Paniagua, H.

    There is still a lack of full integration between current Electronic Health Records (EHRs) and medical guidelines that encapsulate evidence-based medicine. Thus, general practitioners (GPs) and specialised physicians still have to read document-based medical guidelines and decide among various options for managing common non-life-threatening conditions where the selection of the most appropriate therapeutic option for each individual patient can be a difficult task. This paper presents a simulation framework and computational test-bed, called V.A.F. Framework, for supporting simulations of clinical situations that boosted the integration between Health Level Seven (HL7) and Semantic Web technologies (OWL, SWRL, and OWL-S) to achieve content layer interoperability between online clinical cases and medical guidelines, and therefore, it proves that higher integration between EHRs and evidence-based medicine can be accomplished which could lead to a next generation of healthcare systems that provide more support to physicians and increase patients' safety.

  14. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Resilient Control System Functional Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lynne M. Stevens

    2010-07-01

    Control Systems and their associated instrumentation must meet reliability, availability, maintainability, and resiliency criteria in order for high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) to be economically competitive. Research, perhaps requiring several years, may be needed to develop control systems to support plant availability and resiliency. This report functionally analyzes the gaps between traditional and resilient control systems as applicable to HTGRs, which includes the Next Generation Nuclear Plant; defines resilient controls; assesses the current state of both traditional and resilient control systems; and documents the functional gaps existing between these two controls approaches as applicable to HTGRs. This report supports the development of an overall strategy for applying resilient controls to HTGRs by showing that control systems with adequate levels of resilience perform at higher levels, respond more quickly to disturbances, increase operational efficiency, and increase public protection.

  15. Hydrogen Production from the Next Generation Nuclear Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) is a high temperature gas-cooled reactor that will be capable of producing hydrogen, electricity and/or high temperature process heat for industrial use. The project has initiated the conceptual design phase and when completed will demonstrate the viability of hydrogen generation using nuclear produced process heat. This paper explains how industry and the U.S. Government are cooperating to advance nuclear hydrogen technology. It also describes the issues being explored and the results of recent R and D including materials development and testing, thermal-fluids research, and systems analysis. The paper also describes the hydrogen production technologies being considered (including various thermochemical processes and high-temperature electrolysis)

  16. Structural materials for the next generation of technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Van de Voorde, Marcel Hubert

    1996-01-01

    1. Overview of advanced technologies; i.e. aerospace-aeronautics; automobile; energy technology; accelerator engineering etc. and the need for new structural materials. 2. Familiarisation with polymers, metals and alloys, structural ceramics, composites and surface engineering. The study of modern materials processing, generation of a materials data base, engineering properties includind NDE, radiation damage etc. 3. Development of new materials for the next generation of technologies; including the spin-off of materials developed for space and military purposes to industrial applications. 4. Materials selection for modern accelerator engineering. 5. Materials research in Europe, USA and Japan. Material R & D programmes sponsored by the European Union and the collaboration of CERN in EU sponsored programmes.

  17. Ultra-large scale cosmology with next-generation experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Alonso, David; Ferreira, Pedro G; Maartens, Roy; Santos, Mario G

    2015-01-01

    Future surveys of large-scale structure will be able to measure perturbations on the scale of the cosmological horizon, and so could potentially probe a number of novel relativistic effects that are negligibly small on sub-horizon scales. These effects leave distinctive signatures in the power spectra of clustering observables and, if measurable, would open a new window on relativistic cosmology. We quantify the size and detectability of the effects for a range of future large-scale structure surveys: spectroscopic and photometric galaxy redshift surveys, intensity mapping surveys of neutral hydrogen, and continuum surveys of radio galaxies. Our forecasts show that next-generation experiments, reaching out to redshifts z ~ 4, will not be able to detect previously-undetected general-relativistic effects from the single-tracer power spectra alone, although they may be able to measure the lensing magnification in the auto-correlation. We also perform a rigorous joint forecast for the detection of primordial non-...

  18. Grid: A next generation data parallel C++ QCD library

    CERN Document Server

    Boyle, Peter; Cossu, Guido; Portelli, Antonin

    2015-01-01

    In this proceedings we discuss the motivation, implementation details, and performance of a new physics code base called Grid. It is intended to be more performant, more general, but similar in spirit to QDP++\\cite{QDP}. Our approach is to engineer the basic type system to be consistently fast, rather than bolt on a few optimised routines, and we are attempt to write all our optimised routines directly in the Grid framework. It is hoped this will deliver best known practice performance across the next generation of supercomputers, which will provide programming challenges to traditional scalar codes. We illustrate the programming patterns used to implement our goals, and advances in productivity that have been enabled by using new features in C++11.

  19. Application of Next-generation Sequencing Technology in Forensic Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaran Yang

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Next-generation sequencing (NGS technology, with its high-throughput capacity and low cost, has developed rapidly in recent years and become an important analytical tool for many genomics researchers. New opportunities in the research domain of the forensic studies emerge by harnessing the power of NGS technology, which can be applied to simultaneously analyzing multiple loci of forensic interest in different genetic contexts, such as autosomes, mitochondrial and sex chromosomes. Furthermore, NGS technology can also have potential applications in many other aspects of research. These include DNA database construction, ancestry and phenotypic inference, monozygotic twin studies, body fluid and species identification, and forensic animal, plant and microbiological analyses. Here we review the application of NGS technology in the field of forensic science with the aim of providing a reference for future forensics studies and practice.

  20. Building Scientific Community Support for the Next Generation Science Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, S. M.; Awad, A. A.; Robeck, E.

    2015-12-01

    The Next Generation Science Standards offer an opportunity to teach Earth and space science in ways that are closer to how scientists practice, and more relevant to students and to societal issues. However, the level of scientific community involvement required to capitalize on this opportunity is high. Building on the results of the Summit Meeting on the Implementation of the NGSS at the State Level , this presentation proposes a set of mechanisms and practices by which the NGSS Earth and space science community can support NGSS implementation at the national, state and local levels. Based on work with summit attendees, classroom teachers, informal educators and undergraduate faculty, this presentation proposes ways to build a network of practitioners with shared communication, approaches and resources. A set of mechanisms whereby the community can build relationships and share practices will be described, along with an emerging set of strategies for supporting groups as they take the first steps into implementation.

  1. Requirements for the next generation of nuclear databases and services

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of relational database technology and general requirements for the next generation of nuclear databases and services are discussed. These requirements take into account an increased number of co-operating data centres working on diverse hardware and software platforms and users with different data-access capabilities. It is argued that the introduction of programming standards will allow the development of nuclear databases and data retrieval tools in a heterogeneous hardware and software environment. The functionality of this approach was tested with full-scale nuclear databases installed on different platforms having different operating and database management systems. User access through local network, internet, or CD-ROM has been investigated. (author)

  2. Methodology on the sparger development for Korean next generation reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hwan Yeol; Hwang, Y.D.; Kang, H.S.; Cho, B.H.; Park, J.K

    1999-06-01

    In case of an accident, the safety depressurization system of Korean Next Generation Reactor (KNGR) efficiently depressurize the reactor pressure by directly discharge steam of high pressure and temperature from the pressurizer into the in-containment refuelling water storage tank (IRWST) through spargers. This report was generated for the purpose of developing the sparger of KNGR. This report presents the methodology on application of ABB-Atom. Many thermal hydraulic parameters affecting the maximum bubble could pressure were obtained and the maximum bubble cloud pressure transient curve so called forcing function of KNGR was suggested and design inputs for IRWST (bubble cloud radius vs. time, bubble cloud velocity vs. time, bubble cloudacceleration vs. time, etc.) were generated by the analytic using Rayleigh-Plesset equation. (author). 17 refs., 6 tabs., 27 figs.

  3. Non-random DNA fragmentation in next-generation sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poptsova, Maria S.; Il'Icheva, Irina A.; Nechipurenko, Dmitry Yu.; Panchenko, Larisa A.; Khodikov, Mingian V.; Oparina, Nina Y.; Polozov, Robert V.; Nechipurenko, Yury D.; Grokhovsky, Sergei L.

    2014-03-01

    Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) technology is based on cutting DNA into small fragments, and their massive parallel sequencing. The multiple overlapping segments termed ``reads'' are assembled into a contiguous sequence. To reduce sequencing errors, every genome region should be sequenced several dozen times. This sequencing approach is based on the assumption that genomic DNA breaks are random and sequence-independent. However, previously we showed that for the sonicated restriction DNA fragments the rates of double-stranded breaks depend on the nucleotide sequence. In this work we analyzed genomic reads from NGS data and discovered that fragmentation methods based on the action of the hydrodynamic forces on DNA, produce similar bias. Consideration of this non-random DNA fragmentation may allow one to unravel what factors and to what extent influence the non-uniform coverage of various genomic regions.

  4. Control of Next Generation Aircraft and Wind Turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Susan

    2010-01-01

    The first part of this talk will describe some of the exciting new next generation aircraft that NASA is proposing for the future. These aircraft are being designed to reduce aircraft fuel consumption and environmental impact. Reducing the aircraft weight is one approach that will be used to achieve these goals. A new control framework will be presented that enables lighter, more flexible aircraft to maintain aircraft handling qualities, while preventing the aircraft from exceeding structural load limits. The second part of the talk will give an overview of utility-scale wind turbines and their control. Results of collaboration with Dr. Balas will be presented, including new theory to adaptively control the turbine in the presence of structural modes, with the focus on the application of this theory to a high-fidelity simulation of a wind turbine.

  5. Next Generation Prokaryotic Engineering: The CRISPR-Cas Toolkit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mougiakos, Ioannis; Bosma, Elleke F; de Vos, Willem M; van Kranenburg, Richard; van der Oost, John

    2016-07-01

    The increasing demand for environmentally friendly production processes of green chemicals and fuels has stimulated research in microbial metabolic engineering. CRISPR-Cas-based tools for genome editing and expression control have enabled fast, easy, and accurate strain development for established production platform organisms, such as Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, the growing interest in alternative production hosts, for which genome editing options are generally limited, requires further developing such engineering tools. In this review, we discuss established and emerging CRISPR-Cas-based tools for genome editing and transcription control of model and non-model prokaryotes, and we analyse the possibilities for further improvement and expansion of these tools for next generation prokaryotic engineering. PMID:26944793

  6. Prioritizing Signaling Information Transmission in Next Generation Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmina Baraković

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Next generation transport network is characterized by the use of in-band signaling, where Internet Protocol (IP packets carrying signaling or media information are mixed in transmission. Since transport resources are limited, when any segment of access or core network is congested, IP packets carrying signaling information may be discarded. As a consequence, it may be impossible to implement reachability and quality of service (QoS. Since present approaches are insufficient to completely address this problem, a novel approach is proposed, which is based on prioritizing signaling information transmission. To proof the concept, a simulation study was performed using Network Simulator version 2 (ns-2 and independently developed Session Initiation Protocol (SIP module. The obtained results were statistically processed using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS version 15.0. Summarizing our research results, several issues are identified for future work.

  7. Applications of Next-generation Sequencing in Systemic Autoimmune Diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yiyangzi Ma; Na Shi; Mengtao Li; Fei Chen; Haitao Niu

    2015-01-01

    Systemic autoimmune diseases are a group of heterogeneous disorders caused by both genetic and environmental factors. Although numerous causal genes have been identified by genome-wide association studies (GWAS), these susceptibility genes are correlated to a relatively low disease risk, indicating that environmental factors also play an important role in the pathogen-esis of disease. The intestinal microbiome, as the main symbiotic ecosystem between the host and host-associated microorganisms, has been demonstrated to regulate the development of the body’s immune system and is likely related to genetic mutations in systemic autoimmune diseases. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology, with high-throughput capacity and accuracy, provides a powerful tool to discover genomic mutations, abnormal transcription and intestinal microbiome identification for autoimmune diseases. In this review, we briefly outlined the applications of NGS in systemic autoimmune diseases. This review may provide a reference for future studies in the pathogenesis of systemic autoimmune diseases.

  8. Integrated Optical Wireless Network For Next Generation Wireless Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aditya Goel

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Next generation wireless networks need to support broadband wireless services at significantly reduced cost. The existing wireless systems can hardly provide transmission capacity of the order of few Mbps. However, millimeter waves and optical fiber can provide data capacity of the order of Gbps and Tbps respectively. Hence the requirements of broadband wireless system can be achieved through the integration of optical fiber and millimeter wireless systems. We suggest modified millimeter wireless system, with optical fiber as feeder network. Simulations have been carried out for AWGN and optical fiber channels using MATLAB code, so as to compare their individual performance. When compared it is observed that the performance of multimode optical fiber (MMOF link even for distance of 80 KM is better than that of the AWGN channel with SNR of 50 dB and above. Hence, an integrated fiber radio network is an excellent cost effective media for higher data rate (>100Mbps.

  9. From Hubble's Next Generation Spectral Library (NGSL) to Absolute Fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heap, S. R.; Lindler, D.

    2016-05-01

    Hubble's Next Generation Spectral Library (NGSL) consists of R˜1000 spectra of 374 stars of assorted temperature, gravity, and metallicity. Each spectrum covers the wavelength range, 0.18–1.03 μ. The library can be viewed and/or downloaded from the website, http://archive.stsci.edu/prepds/stisngsl/. Stars in the NGSL are now being used as absolute flux standards at ground-based observatories. However, the uncertainty in the absolute flux is about 2%, which does not meet the requirements of dark-energy surveys. We have therefore developed an observing procedure, data-reduction procedure, and correction algorithms that should yield fluxes with uncertainties less than 1%.

  10. NREL-Prime Next-Generation Drivetrain Dynamometer Test Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, Jonathan [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Erdman, Bill [Cinch, Inc., Moraga, CA (United States); Blodgett, Douglas [DNV KEMA Renewables, Burlington, VT (United States); Halse, Christopher [Romax Technology, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2016-08-01

    Advances in wind turbine drivetrain technologies are necessary to improve reliability and reduce the cost of energy for land-based and offshore wind turbines. The NREL-Prime Next-Generation Drivetrain team developed a geared, medium-speed drivetrain that is lighter, more reliable and more efficient than existing designs. One of the objectives of Phase II of the project was to complete the detailed design, fabrication, and dynamometer testing of a 750 kilowatt (kW) drivetrain that includes the key gearbox innovations designed by Romax Technology and power converter innovations designed by DNV Kema Renewables. The purpose of this document is to summarize these tests completed in NREL's National Wind Technology Center 2.5 megawatt (MW) dynamometer.

  11. Engineering microbes for tolerance to next-generation biofuels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dunlop Mary J

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A major challenge when using microorganisms to produce bulk chemicals such as biofuels is that the production targets are often toxic to cells. Many biofuels are known to reduce cell viability through damage to the cell membrane and interference with essential physiological processes. Therefore, cells must trade off biofuel production and survival, reducing potential yields. Recently, there have been several efforts towards engineering strains for biofuel tolerance. Promising methods include engineering biofuel export systems, heat shock proteins, membrane modifications, more general stress responses, and approaches that integrate multiple tolerance strategies. In addition, in situ recovery methods and media supplements can help to ease the burden of end-product toxicity and may be used in combination with genetic approaches. Recent advances in systems and synthetic biology provide a framework for tolerance engineering. This review highlights recent targeted approaches towards improving microbial tolerance to next-generation biofuels with a particular emphasis on strategies that will improve production.

  12. Metrology/viewing system for next generation fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Next generation fusion reactors require accurate measuring systems to verify sub-millimeter alignment of plasma-facing components in the reactor vessel. A metrology system capable of achieving such accuracy must be compatible with the vessel environment of high gamma radiation, high vacuum, elevated temperature, and magnetic field. This environment requires that the system must be remotely deployed. A coherent, frequency modulated laser radar system is being integrated with a remotely operated deployment system to meet these requirements. The metrology/viewing system consists of a compact laser transceiver optics module which is linked through fiber optics to the laser source and imaging units that are located outside of the harsh environment. The deployment mechanism is a telescopic-mast positioning system. This paper identifies the requirements for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor metrology and viewing system, and describes a remotely operated precision ranging and surface mapping system

  13. Next Generation GPS Ground Control Segment (OCX) Navigation Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertiger, Willy; Bar-Sever, Yoaz; Harvey, Nate; Miller, Kevin; Romans, Larry; Weiss, Jan; Doyle, Larry; Solorzano, Tara; Petzinger, John; Stell, Al

    2010-01-01

    In February 2010, a Raytheon-led team was selected by The Air Force to develop, implement, and operate the next generation GPS ground control segment (OCX). To meet and exceed the demanding OCX navigation performance requirements, the Raytheon team partnered with ITT (Navigation lead) and JPL to adapt major elements of JPL's navigation technology, proven in the operations of the Global Differential GPS (GDGPS) System. Key design goals for the navigation subsystem include accurate ephemeris and clock accuracy (user range error), ease of model upgrades, and a smooth and safe transition from the legacy system to OCX.We will describe key elements of the innovative architecture of the OCX navigation subsystem,and demonstrate the anticipated performance of the system through high fidelity simulations withactual GPS measurements.

  14. Methodology on the sparger development for Korean next generation reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In case of an accident, the safety depressurization system of Korean Next Generation Reactor (KNGR) efficiently depressurize the reactor pressure by directly discharge steam of high pressure and temperature from the pressurizer into the in-containment refuelling water storage tank (IRWST) through spargers. This report was generated for the purpose of developing the sparger of KNGR. This report presents the methodology on application of ABB-Atom. Many thermal hydraulic parameters affecting the maximum bubble could pressure were obtained and the maximum bubble cloud pressure transient curve so called forcing function of KNGR was suggested and design inputs for IRWST (bubble cloud radius vs. time, bubble cloud velocity vs. time, bubble cloud acceleration vs. time, etc.) were generated by the analytic using Rayleigh-Plesset equation. (author). 17 refs., 6 tabs., 27 figs

  15. Next generation sequencing: implications in personalized medicine and pharmacogenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabbani, Bahareh; Nakaoka, Hirofumi; Akhondzadeh, Shahin; Tekin, Mustafa; Mahdieh, Nejat

    2016-05-24

    A breakthrough in next generation sequencing (NGS) in the last decade provided an unprecedented opportunity to investigate genetic variations in humans and their roles in health and disease. NGS offers regional genomic sequencing such as whole exome sequencing of coding regions of all genes, as well as whole genome sequencing. RNA-seq offers sequencing of the entire transcriptome and ChIP-seq allows for sequencing the epigenetic architecture of the genome. Identifying genetic variations in individuals can be used to predict disease risk, with the potential to halt or retard disease progression. NGS can also be used to predict the response to or adverse effects of drugs or to calculate appropriate drug dosage. Such a personalized medicine also provides the possibility to treat diseases based on the genetic makeup of the patient. Here, we review the basics of NGS technologies and their application in human diseases to foster human healthcare and personalized medicine. PMID:27066891

  16. Reducing Risk for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project, managed by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), is directed by the Energy Policy Act of 2005, to research, develop, design, construct, and operate a prototype forth generation nuclear reactor to meet the needs of the 21st Century. As with all large projects developing and deploying new technologies, the NGNP has numerous risks that need to be identified, tracked, mitigated, and reduced in order for successful project completion. A Risk Management Plan (RMP) was created to outline the process the INL is using to manage the risks and reduction strategies for the NGNP Project. Integral to the RMP is the development and use of a Risk Management System (RMS). The RMS is a tool that supports management and monitoring of the project risks. The RMS does not only contain a risk register, but other functionality that allows decision makers, engineering staff, and technology researchers to review and monitor the risks as the project matures.

  17. Materials for next-generation desalination and water purification membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werber, Jay R.; Osuji, Chinedum O.; Elimelech, Menachem

    2016-05-01

    Membrane-based separations for water purification and desalination have been increasingly applied to address the global challenges of water scarcity and the pollution of aquatic environments. However, progress in water purification membranes has been constrained by the inherent limitations of conventional membrane materials. Recent advances in methods for controlling the structure and chemical functionality in polymer films can potentially lead to new classes of membranes for water purification. In this Review, we first discuss the state of the art of existing membrane technologies for water purification and desalination, highlight their inherent limitations and establish the urgent requirements for next-generation membranes. We then describe molecular-level design approaches towards fabricating highly selective membranes, focusing on novel materials such as aquaporin, synthetic nanochannels, graphene and self-assembled block copolymers and small molecules. Finally, we highlight promising membrane surface modification approaches that minimize interfacial interactions and enhance fouling resistance.

  18. Major NSSS design features of the Korean next generation reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to meet national needs for increasing electric power generation in the Republic of Korea in the 2000s, the Korean nuclear development group (KNDG) is developing a standardized evolutionary advanced light water reactor (ALWR), the Korean Next Generation Reactor (KNGR). It is an advanced version of the successful Korean Standard Nuclear Power Plant (KSNP) design, which meets utility needs for safety enhancement, performance improvement and ease of operation and maintenance. The KNGR design starts fro the proven design concept of the currently operating KSNPs with uprated power and advanced design features required by the utility. The KNGR design is currently in the final stage of the basic design, and the paper describes the major nuclear steam supply system (NSSS) design features of the KNGR together with introduction of the KNGR development program. (author)

  19. Advances in the development of next-generation anthrax vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedlander, Arthur M; Little, Stephen F

    2009-11-01

    Anthrax, a disease of herbivores, only rarely infects humans. However, the threat of using Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent, to intentionally produce disease has been the impetus for development of next-generation vaccines. Two licensed vaccines have been available for human use for several decades. These are composed of acellular culture supernatants containing the protective antigen (PA) component of the anthrax toxins. In this review we summarize the various approaches used to develop improved vaccines. These efforts have included the use of PA with newer adjuvants and delivery systems, including bacterial and viral vectors and DNA vaccines. Attempts to broaden the protection afforded by PA-based vaccines have focused on adding other B. anthracis components, including spore and capsule antigens. PMID:19837282

  20. Application of Erlang Formulae in Next Generation Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Chromy

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the possibility of the Erlang B and Erlang C formula utilization in Next Generation Networks (NGN. Based on the common properties of synchronous and asynchronous networks it is possible the utilization of Erlang formulas also for asynchronous networks. It is possible to describe traffic in NGN networks by calculation of following parameters – loss, link utilization and bandwidth. The second part of this paper deals with the possibility of application of Erlang B formula in contact center. Contact center is one of the many examples of the NGN networks. By application of Erlang B formula in contact center environment it is possible to monitor following important parameters - number of agents, probability of call blocking, utilization of agents and mean number of calls in the system.

  1. The next-generation liquid-scintillator neutrino observatory LENA

    CERN Document Server

    Wurm, Michael; Bezrukov, Leonid B; Bick, Daniel; Blümer, Johannes; Choubey, Sandhya; Ciemniak, Christian; D'Angelo, Davide; Dasgupta, Basudeb; Dighe, Amol; Domogatsky, Grigorij; Dye, Steve; Eliseev, Sergey; Enqvist, Timo; Erykalov, Alexey; von Feilitzsch, Franz; Fiorentini, Gianni; Fischer, Tobias; Göger-Neff, Marianne; Grabmayr, Peter; Hagner, Caren; Hellgartner, Dominikus; Hissa, Johannes; Horiuchi, Shunsaku; Janka, Hans-Thomas; Jaupart, Claude; Jochum, Josef; Kalliokoski, Tuomo; Kuusiniemi, Pasi; Lachenmaier, Tobias; Lazanu, Ionel; Learned, John G; Lewke, Timo; Lombardi, Paolo; Lorenz, Sebastian; Lubsandorzhiev, Bayarto; Ludhova, Livia; Loo, Kai; Maalampi, Jukka; Mantovani, Fabio; Marafini, Michela; Maricic, Jelena; Undagoitia, Teresa Marrodán; McDonough, William F; Miramonti, Lino; Mirizzi, Alessandro; Meindl, Quirin; Mena, Olga; Möllenberg, Randolph; Nahnhauer, Rolf; Nesterenko, Dmitry; Novikov, Yuri N; Nuijten, Guido; Oberauer, Lothar; Pakvasa, Sandip; Palomares-Ruiz, Sergio; Pallavicini, Marco; Pascoli, Silvia; Patzak, Thomas; Peltoniemi, Juha; Potzel, Walter; Räihä, Tomi; Raffelt, Georg G; Ranucci, Gioacchino; Razzaque, Soebur; Rummukainen, Kari; Sarkamo, Juho; Sinev, Valerij; Spiering, Christian; Stahl, Achim; Thorne, Felicitas; Tippmann, Marc; Tonazzo, Alessandra; Trzaska, Wladyslaw H; Vergados, John D; Wiebusch, Christopher; Winter, Jürgen

    2011-01-01

    We propose the liquid-scintillator detector LENA (Low Energy Neutrino Astronomy) as a next-generation neutrino observatory on the scale of 50 kt. The outstanding successes of the Borexino and KamLAND experiments demonstrate the large potential of liquid-scintillator detectors in low-energy neutrino physics. LENA's physics objectives comprise the observation of astrophysical and terrestrial neutrino sources as well as the investigation of neutrino oscillations. In the GeV energy range, the search for proton decay and long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiments complement the low-energy program. Based on the considerable expertise present in European and international research groups, the technical design is sufficiently mature to allow for an early start of detector realization.

  2. Testing gravity via next-generation lunar laser-ranging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, T.W. [University of California San Diego, 9500 Gilman Dr.-0424, La Jolla, CA 92093-0424 (United States); Adelberger, E.G. [Box 361560, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195-1560 (United States); Strasburg, J.D. [Box 361560, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195-1560 (United States); Stubbs, C.W. [Harvard University, 17 Oxford St., Cambridge, MA 02138 (United Kingdom); Nordtvedt, K. [Northwest Analysis, 118 Sourdough Ridge Road, Bozeman, MT 59715 (United States)

    2004-09-01

    Lunar laser ranging has a long history of performing the most precise tests of various gravitational phenomena, dating from the placement of retroreflector arrays on the lunar surface by the Apollo astronauts. Gravity is the least well understood of the fundamental forces of nature, our current model being incompatible with quantum mechanics. We must therefore push our tests of gravity further, with the expectation that general relativity will fail to reproduce exactly measurements of sufficient precision. We aim to improve lunar ranging performance by an order-of-magnitude, resulting in comparable sensitivity gains in various tests of the basic nature of gravity. Here we describe the scientific motivation and techniques behind this next-generation lunar ranging effort, APOLLO.

  3. Testing gravity via next-generation lunar laser-ranging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lunar laser ranging has a long history of performing the most precise tests of various gravitational phenomena, dating from the placement of retroreflector arrays on the lunar surface by the Apollo astronauts. Gravity is the least well understood of the fundamental forces of nature, our current model being incompatible with quantum mechanics. We must therefore push our tests of gravity further, with the expectation that general relativity will fail to reproduce exactly measurements of sufficient precision. We aim to improve lunar ranging performance by an order-of-magnitude, resulting in comparable sensitivity gains in various tests of the basic nature of gravity. Here we describe the scientific motivation and techniques behind this next-generation lunar ranging effort, APOLLO

  4. Metagenomic next-generation sequencing of viruses infecting grapevines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Johan T; Maree, Hans J

    2015-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies, for the first time, provide a truly "complete" representation of the viral (and other) pathogens present in a host organism. This is achieved in an unbiased way, and without any prior biological or molecular knowledge of these pathogen(s). During recent years a number of broad approaches, for most of the popular NGS platforms, have been developed. Here we describe such a protocol-one that accurately and reliably analyze viruses (and viroids) infecting grapevine. Our strategy relies on the synthesis of cDNA sequencing libraries from dsRNA, extracted from diseased grapevine tissues; the sequencing of these on an Illumina platform, and a streamlined bioinformatics pipeline to analyze the NGS data, yielding the virus composition (virome) of a specific grapevine tissue type, organ, entire plant, or even a vineyard. PMID:25981264

  5. Quantifying population genetic differentiation from next-generation sequencing data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fumagalli, Matteo; Vieira, Filipe G.; Korneliussen, Thorfinn Sand;

    2013-01-01

    method for quantifying population genetic differentiation from next-generation sequencing data. In addition, we present a strategy to investigate population structure via Principal Components Analysis. Through extensive simulations, we compare the new method herein proposed to approaches based......Over the last few years, new high-throughput DNA sequencing technologies have dramatically increased speed and reduced sequencing costs. However, the use of these sequencing technologies is often challenged by errors and biases associated with the bioinformatical methods used for analyzing the data....... In particular, the use of naïve methods to identify polymorphic sites and infer genotypes can inflate downstream analyses. Recently, explicit modeling of genotype probability distributions has been proposed as a method for taking genotype call uncertainty into account. Based on this idea, we propose a novel...

  6. A Next Generation Light Source Facility at LBNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Next Generation Light Source (NGLS) is a design concept, under development at LBNL, for a multibeamline soft x-ray FEL array powered by a ∼2 GeV superconducting linear accelerator, operating with a 1 MHz bunch repetition rate. The CW superconducting linear accelerator is supplied by a high-brightness, high-repetition-rate photocathode electron gun. Electron bunches are distributed from the linac to the array of independently configurable FEL beamlines with nominal bunch rates up to 100 kHz in each FEL, and with even pulse spacing. Individual FELs may be configured for EEHG, HGHG, SASE, or oscillator mode of operation, and will produce high peak and average brightness x-rays with a flexible pulse format, with pulse durations ranging from sub-femtoseconds to hundreds of femtoseconds.

  7. Final Report for "Analyzing and visualizing next generation climate data"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pletzer, Alexander

    2012-11-13

    The project "Analyzing and visualizing next generation climate data" adds block-structured (mosaic) grid support, parallel processing, and 2D/3D curvilinear interpolation to the open-source UV-CDAT climate data analysis tool. Block structured grid support complies to the Gridspec extension submitted to the Climate and Forecast metadata conventions. It contains two parts: aggregation of data spread over multiple mosaic tiles (M-SPEC) and aggregation of temporal data stored in different files (F-SPEC). Together, M-SPEC and F-SPEC allow users to interact with data stored in multiple files as if the data were in a single file. For computational expensive tasks, a flexible, multi-dimensional, multi-type distributed array class allows users to process data in parallel using remote memory access. Both nodal and cell based interpolation is supported; users can choose between different interpolation libraries including ESMF and LibCF depending on the their particular needs.

  8. Jefferson Lab injector development for next generation parity violation experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grames, J.; Hansknect, J.; Poelker, M.; Suleiman, R.

    2011-11-01

    To meet the challenging requirements of next generation parity violation experiments at Jefferson Lab, the Center for Injectors and Sources is working on improving the parity-quality of the electron beam. These improvements include new electron photogun design and fast helicity reversal of the Pockels Cell. We proposed and designed a new scheme for slow helicity reversal using a Wien Filter and two Solenoids. This slow reversal complements the insertable half-wave plate reversal of the laser-light polarization by reversing the electron beam polarization at the injector while maintaining a constant accelerator configuration. For position feedback, fast air-core magnets located in the injector were commissioned and a new scheme for charge feedback is planned.

  9. Application of Next-generation Sequencing Technology in Forensic Science

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yaran Yang; Bingbing Xie; Jiangwei Yan

    2014-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology, with its high-throughput capacity and low cost, has developed rapidly in recent years and become an important analytical tool for many genomics researchers. New opportunities in the research domain of the forensic studies emerge by harnessing the power of NGS technology, which can be applied to simultaneously analyzing multi-ple loci of forensic interest in different genetic contexts, such as autosomes, mitochondrial and sex chromosomes. Furthermore, NGS technology can also have potential applications in many other aspects of research. These include DNA database construction, ancestry and phenotypic inference, monozygotic twin studies, body fluid and species identification, and forensic animal, plant and microbiological analyses. Here we review the application of NGS technology in the field of forensic science with the aim of providing a reference for future forensics studies and practice.

  10. Next-Generation Sequencing: Role in Gynecologic Cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Tarra; Matulonis, Ursula

    2016-09-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) has risen to the forefront of tumor analysis and has enabled unprecedented advances in the molecular profiling of solid tumors. Through massively parallel sequencing, previously unrecognized genomic alterations have been unveiled in many malignancies, including gynecologic cancers, thus expanding the potential repertoire for the use of targeted therapies. NGS has expanded the understanding of the genomic foundation of gynecologic malignancies and has allowed identification of germline and somatic mutations associated with cancer development, enabled tumor reclassification, and helped determine mechanisms of treatment resistance. NGS has also facilitated rationale therapeutic strategies based on actionable molecular aberrations. However, issues remain regarding cost and clinical utility. This review covers NGS analysis of and its impact thus far on gynecologic cancers, specifically ovarian, endometrial, cervical, and vulvar cancers. PMID:27587626

  11. Next generation sequencing reveals the hidden diversity of zooplankton assemblages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penelope K Lindeque

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Zooplankton play an important role in our oceans, in biogeochemical cycling and providing a food source for commercially important fish larvae. However, difficulties in correctly identifying zooplankton hinder our understanding of their roles in marine ecosystem functioning, and can prevent detection of long term changes in their community structure. The advent of massively parallel next generation sequencing technology allows DNA sequence data to be recovered directly from whole community samples. Here we assess the ability of such sequencing to quantify richness and diversity of a mixed zooplankton assemblage from a productive time series site in the Western English Channel. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPLE FINDINGS: Plankton net hauls (200 µm were taken at the Western Channel Observatory station L4 in September 2010 and January 2011. These samples were analysed by microscopy and metagenetic analysis of the 18S nuclear small subunit ribosomal RNA gene using the 454 pyrosequencing platform. Following quality control a total of 419,041 sequences were obtained for all samples. The sequences clustered into 205 operational taxonomic units using a 97% similarity cut-off. Allocation of taxonomy by comparison with the National Centre for Biotechnology Information database identified 135 OTUs to species level, 11 to genus level and 1 to order, <2.5% of sequences were classified as unknowns. By comparison a skilled microscopic analyst was able to routinely enumerate only 58 taxonomic groups. CONCLUSIONS: Metagenetics reveals a previously hidden taxonomic richness, especially for Copepoda and hard-to-identify meroplankton such as Bivalvia, Gastropoda and Polychaeta. It also reveals rare species and parasites. We conclude that Next Generation Sequencing of 18S amplicons is a powerful tool for elucidating the true diversity and species richness of zooplankton communities. While this approach allows for broad diversity assessments of plankton it may

  12. Next generation: In-space transportation system(s)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffaker, Fredrick; Redus, Jerry; Kelley, David L.

    1991-01-01

    The development of the next generation In-Space Transportation System presents a unique challenge to the design of a propulsion system for the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI). Never before have the requirements for long-life, multiple mission use, space basing, high reliability, man-rating, and minimum maintenance come together with performance in one system that must protect the lives of space travelers, support the mission logistics needs, and do so at an acceptable cost. The challenge that is presented is to quantify the bounds of these requirements. The issue is one of degree. The length of acceptable life in space, the time it takes for reuse to pay off, and the degree to which space basing is practical (full, partial, or expended) are the issues that determine the reusable bounds of a design and include dependability, contingency capabilities, resilency, and minimum dependence on a maintenance node in preparation for and during a mission. Missions to planet earth, other non-NASA missions, and planetary missions will provide important but less demanding requirements for the transportation systems of the future. The mission proposed for the SEI require a family of transportation vehicles to meet the requirements for establishing a permanent human presence on the Moon and eventually on Mars. Specialized vehicles are needed to accomplish the different phases of each mission. These large scale missions require assembly in space and will provide the greatest usage of the planned integrated transportation system. The current approach to defining the In-Space Transportation System for the SEI Moon missions with later Mars mission applications is presented. Several system development options, propulsion concepts, current/proposed activities are reviewed, and key propulsion design criteria, issues, and technology challenges for the next generation In-Space Transportation System(s) are outlined.

  13. Extreme Precision Environmental Control for Next Generation Radial Velocity Spectrographs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefansson, Gudmundur K.; Hearty, Fred; Levi, Eric; Robertson, Paul; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Bender, Chad; Nelson, Matt; Halverson, Samuel

    2015-12-01

    Extreme radial velocity precisions of order 10cm/s will enable the discoveries of Earth-like planets around solar-type stars. Temperature and pressure variations inside a spectrograph can lead to thermomechanical instabilities in the optics and mounts, and refractive index variations in both the optical elements as well as the surrounding air. Together, these variations can easily induce instrumental drifts of several tens to hundreds of meters per second. Enclosing the full optical train in thermally stabilized high-vacuum environments minimizes such errors. In this talk, I will discuss the Environmental Control System (ECS) for the Habitable Zone Planet Finder (HPF) spectrograph: a near infrared (NIR) facility class instrument we will commission at the Hobby Eberly Telescope in 2016. The ECS will maintain the HPF optical bench stable at 180K at the sub milli-Kelvin level on the timescale of days, and at the few milli-Kelvin level over months to years. The entire spectrograph is kept under high-quality vacuum (environmental temperature fluctuations are compensated for with an actively controlled radiation shield outfitted with custom feedback electronics. High efficiency Multi-Layer Insulation (MLI) blankets, and a passive external thermal enclosure further isolate the optics from ambient perturbations. This environmental control scheme is versatile, suitable to stabilize both next generation NIR, and optical spectrographs. I will show how we are currently testing this control system for use with our design concept of the Extreme Precision Doppler Spectrograph (EPDS), the next generation optical spectrograph for the WIYN 3.5m telescope. Our most recent results from full-scale stability tests will be presented.

  14. U. S. Fuel Cycle Technologies R and D Program for Next Generation Nuclear Materials Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The U. S. Department of Energy's Fuel Cycle Technologies R and D program under the Office of Nuclear Energy is working to advance technologies to enhance both the existing and future fuel cycles. One thrust area is in developing enabling technologies for next generation nuclear materials management under the Materials Protection, Accounting and Control Technologies (MPACT) Campaign where advanced instrumentation, analysis and assessment methods, and security approaches are being developed under a framework of Safeguards and Security by Design. An overview of the MPACT campaign's activities and recent accomplishments is presented along with future plans

  15. Space Communications and Data Systems Technologies for Next Generation Earth Science Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Robert A.; Reinhart, Richard C.; Hilderman, Don R.; Paulsen, Phillip E.

    2003-01-01

    The next generation of Earth observing satellites and sensor networks will face challenges in supporting robust high rate communications links from the increasingly sophisticated onboard instruments. Emerging applications will need data rates forecast to be in the 100's to 1000's of Mbps. As mission designers seek smaller spacecraft, challenges exist in reducing the size and power requirements while increasing the capacity of the spacecraft's communications technologies. To meet these challenges, this work looks at three areas of selected space communications and data services technologies, specifically in the development of reflectarray antennas, demonstration of space Internet concepts, and measurement of atmospheric propagation effects on Ka-band signal transmitted from LEO.

  16. Development of digital plant protection system for Korean Next Generation Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Digital Plant Protection System (DPPS) for Korean Next Generation Reactor (KNGR) is being developed using the Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) technology. For the design verification, the development of the DPPS prototype is progressing at this time. The prototype hardware equipment is installed and software coding is started. DPPS software is being coded by strict software V and V activities and function block language that uses simple graphical symbols. By adopting the PLC technology, the design of DPPS is possible to take full advantages in areas such as automatic testing, simplified calibration, improved isolation between redundant channels, reduced internal and external wiring and increased plant availability. (author)

  17. 76 FR 49776 - The Development and Evaluation of Next-Generation Smallpox Vaccines; Public Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-11

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration The Development and Evaluation of Next-Generation Smallpox... workshop entitled ``The Development and Evaluation of Next-Generation Smallpox Vaccines.'' The purpose of... evaluation of next-generation smallpox vaccines. The public workshop will include presentations on the...

  18. Perspective: The Climate-Population-Infrastructure Modeling and Simulation Fertile Area for New Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, Melissa R [ORNL; Fernandez, Steven J [ORNL; Walker, Kimberly A [ORNL; Fu, Joshua S [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Managing the risks posed by climate change and extreme weather to energy production and delivery is a challenge to communities worldwide. As climate conditions change, populations will shift, and demand will re-locate; and networked infrastructures will evolve to accommodate new load centers, and, hopefully, minimize vulnerability to natural disaster. Climate effects such as sea level rise, increased frequency and intensity of natural disasters, force populations to move locations. Displaced population creates new demand for built infrastructure that in turn generates new economic activity that attracts new workers and associated households to the new locations. Infrastructures and their interdependencies will change in reaction to climate drivers as the networks expand into new population areas and as portions of the networks are abandoned as people leave. Thus, infrastructures will evolve to accommodate new load centers while some parts of the network are underused, and these changes will create emerging vulnerabilities. Forecasting the location of these vulnerabilities by combining climate predictions and agent based population movement models shows promise for defining these future population distributions and changes in coastal infrastructure configurations. By combining climate and weather data, engineering algorithms and social theory it has been only recently possible to examine electricity demand response to increased climactic temperatures, population relocation in response to extreme cyclonic events, consequent net population changes and new regional patterns in electricity demand. These emerging results suggest a research agenda of coupling these disparate modelling approaches to understand the implications of climate change for protecting the nation s critical infrastructure.

  19. Demographic and infrastructure problems of villages in the hilly - mountainous areas of Prilep

    OpenAIRE

    Koteski, Cane; Jakovlev, Zlatko; Kitanov, Vladimir

    2013-01-01

    In a paper being processed for chapters: the dynamics of the rural population in villages in the mountainous areas of the municipality of Prilep height distribution of the mountainous villages, the area size, absolute density and agrarian population in hilly - mountainous villages, the distance of the hill - mountain villages of the municipality center and institutional infrastructure hilly - mountainous areas in Prilep. Keywords: Dynamics of population height distribution of the set...

  20. On the use of IT investment assessment methods in the area of spatial data infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwirowicz-Rutkowska, Agnieszka

    2016-06-01

    One of the important issues concerning development of spatial data infrastructures (SDIs) is the carrying out of economic and financial analysis. It is essential to determine expenses and also assess effects resulting from the development and use of infrastructures. Costs and benefits assessment could be associated with assessment of the infrastructure effectiveness and efficiency as well as the infrastructure value, understood as the infrastructure impact on economic aspects of an organisational performance, both of an organisation which realises an SDI project and all users of the infrastructure. The aim of this paper is an overview of various assessment methods of investment as well as an analysis of different types of costs and benefits used for information technology (IT) projects. Based on the literature, the analysis of the examples of the use of these methods in the area of spatial data infrastructures is also presented. Furthermore, the issues of SDI projects and investments are outlined. The results of the analysis indicate usefulness of the financial methods from different fields of management in the area of SDI building, development and use. The author proposes, in addition to the financial methods, the adaptation of the various techniques used for IT investments and their development, taking into consideration the SDI specificity for the purpose of assessment of different types of costs and benefits and integration of financial aspects with non-financial ones. Among the challenges are identification and quantification of costs and benefits, as well as establishing measures which would fit the characteristics of the SDI project and artefacts resulting from the project realisation. Moreover, aspects of subjectivity and variability in time should be taken into account as the consequences of definite goals and policies as well as business context of organisation undertaking the project or using its artefacts and also investors.

  1. AgMIP: Next Generation Models and Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenzweig, C.

    2014-12-01

    Next steps in developing next-generation crop models fall into several categories: significant improvements in simulation of important crop processes and responses to stress; extension from simplified crop models to complex cropping systems models; and scaling up from site-based models to landscape, national, continental, and global scales. Crop processes that require major leaps in understanding and simulation in order to narrow uncertainties around how crops will respond to changing atmospheric conditions include genetics; carbon, temperature, water, and nitrogen; ozone; and nutrition. The field of crop modeling has been built on a single crop-by-crop approach. It is now time to create a new paradigm, moving from 'crop' to 'cropping system.' A first step is to set up the simulation technology so that modelers can rapidly incorporate multiple crops within fields, and multiple crops over time. Then the response of these more complex cropping systems can be tested under different sustainable intensification management strategies utilizing the updated simulation environments. Model improvements for diseases, pests, and weeds include developing process-based models for important diseases, frameworks for coupling air-borne diseases to crop models, gathering significantly more data on crop impacts, and enabling the evaluation of pest management strategies. Most smallholder farming in the world involves integrated crop-livestock systems that cannot be represented by crop modeling alone. Thus, next-generation cropping system models need to include key linkages to livestock. Livestock linkages to be incorporated include growth and productivity models for grasslands and rangelands as well as the usual annual crops. There are several approaches for scaling up, including use of gridded models and development of simpler quasi-empirical models for landscape-scale analysis. On the assessment side, AgMIP is leading a community process for coordinated contributions to IPCC AR6

  2. DNA qualification workflow for next generation sequencing of histopathological samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Simbolo

    Full Text Available Histopathological samples are a treasure-trove of DNA for clinical research. However, the quality of DNA can vary depending on the source or extraction method applied. Thus a standardized and cost-effective workflow for the qualification of DNA preparations is essential to guarantee interlaboratory reproducible results. The qualification process consists of the quantification of double strand DNA (dsDNA and the assessment of its suitability for downstream applications, such as high-throughput next-generation sequencing. We tested the two most frequently used instrumentations to define their role in this process: NanoDrop, based on UV spectroscopy, and Qubit 2.0, which uses fluorochromes specifically binding dsDNA. Quantitative PCR (qPCR was used as the reference technique as it simultaneously assesses DNA concentration and suitability for PCR amplification. We used 17 genomic DNAs from 6 fresh-frozen (FF tissues, 6 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE tissues, 3 cell lines, and 2 commercial preparations. Intra- and inter-operator variability was negligible, and intra-methodology variability was minimal, while consistent inter-methodology divergences were observed. In fact, NanoDrop measured DNA concentrations higher than Qubit and its consistency with dsDNA quantification by qPCR was limited to high molecular weight DNA from FF samples and cell lines, where total DNA and dsDNA quantity virtually coincide. In partially degraded DNA from FFPE samples, only Qubit proved highly reproducible and consistent with qPCR measurements. Multiplex PCR amplifying 191 regions of 46 cancer-related genes was designated the downstream application, using 40 ng dsDNA from FFPE samples calculated by Qubit. All but one sample produced amplicon libraries suitable for next-generation sequencing. NanoDrop UV-spectrum verified contamination of the unsuccessful sample. In conclusion, as qPCR has high costs and is labor intensive, an alternative effective standard

  3. Impact of the next generation solvent on DWPF CPC processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newell, J. D.

    2013-02-21

    As part of the Actinide Removal Process (ARP)/Modular Caustic-side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) Life Extension Project, a next generation solvent (NGS) and new strip acid will be deployed. Processing will begin with a blend of the current solvent and the NGS. Compositional changes in the NGS solvent and blending with the current solvent require review of previously performed work to determine if additional experimental work is required to address any impacts to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Chemical Process Cell (CPC). The composition change involved the substitution of the N,N’-dicyclohexyl-N”-isotridecylguanidine LIX® 79 guanidine suppressor with N,N’,N”-tris (3,7-dimethyloctyl) guanidine (TiDG) guanidine suppressor. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested by DWPF to evaluate any impacts to offgas generation, solvent buildup or carryover, chemical, thermal, and radiolytic stability of the blended and pure TiDG based NGS. Previous work has been performed by SRNL to evaluate impacts to CPC processing using the next generation solvent containing LIX® 79 suppressor with boric acid strip effluent. Based on previous experimental work and current literature, the following conclusions are made for processing in the CPC: No mechanism for a change in the catalytic hydrogen evolution in the CPC was identified for the NGS TiDG based solvent; The transition from the LIX® 79 based suppressor to the TiDG based suppressor is not expected to have any impact on solvent or Isopar® L accumulation; Transitioning from the current solvent to the TiDG based NGS is not expected to have an impact on solvent carryover or partitioning; No changes to the chemical stability of the solvent in the CPC process are expected; No changes to the thermal stability of the solvent in the CPC process are expected; A “worst case” scenario was examined in which all of the hydrogen atoms from the TiDG based NGS and blended solvent form hydrogen gas in the

  4. Evaluating multiplexed next-generation sequencing as a method in palynology for mixed pollen samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, A; Danner, N; Grimmer, G; Ankenbrand, M; von der Ohe, K; von der Ohe, W; Rost, S; Härtel, S; Steffan-Dewenter, I

    2015-03-01

    The identification of pollen plays an important role in ecology, palaeo-climatology, honey quality control and other areas. Currently, expert knowledge and reference collections are essential to identify pollen origin through light microscopy. Pollen identification through molecular sequencing and DNA barcoding has been proposed as an alternative approach, but the assessment of mixed pollen samples originating from multiple plant species is still a tedious and error-prone task. Next-generation sequencing has been proposed to avoid this hindrance. In this study we assessed mixed pollen probes through next-generation sequencing of amplicons from the highly variable, species-specific internal transcribed spacer 2 region of nuclear ribosomal DNA. Further, we developed a bioinformatic workflow to analyse these high-throughput data with a newly created reference database. To evaluate the feasibility, we compared results from classical identification based on light microscopy from the same samples with our sequencing results. We assessed in total 16 mixed pollen samples, 14 originated from honeybee colonies and two from solitary bee nests. The sequencing technique resulted in higher taxon richness (deeper assignments and more identified taxa) compared to light microscopy. Abundance estimations from sequencing data were significantly correlated with counted abundances through light microscopy. Simulation analyses of taxon specificity and sensitivity indicate that 96% of taxa present in the database are correctly identifiable at the genus level and 70% at the species level. Next-generation sequencing thus presents a useful and efficient workflow to identify pollen at the genus and species level without requiring specialised palynological expert knowledge. PMID:25270225

  5. Radiation Reduction Capabilities of a Next-Generation Pediatric Imaging Platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamers, Luke J; Moran, Martine; Torgeson, Jenna N; Hokanson, John S

    2016-01-01

    The aims of this study were to quantify patient radiation exposure for a single interventional procedure during transition from an adult catheterization laboratory to a next-generation imaging system with pediatric settings, and to compare this radiation data to published benchmarks. Radiation exposure occurs with any X-ray-directed pediatric catheterization. Technologies and imaging techniques that limit dose while preserving image quality benefit patient care. Patient radiation dose metrics, air kerma, and dose-area product (DAP) were retrospectively obtained for patients patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) closure on a standard imaging system (Group 1, n = 11) and a next-generation pediatric imaging system (Group 2, n = 10) with air-gap technique. Group 2 radiation dose metrics were then compared to published benchmarks. Patient demographics, procedural technique, PDA dimensions, closure devices, and fluoroscopy time were similar for the two groups. Air kerma and DAP decreased by 65-70% in Group 2 (p values value = 0.06); therefore, analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) was conducted that confirmed significantly lower dose measures in Group 2. This degree of dose reduction was similar when Group 2 data (Kerma 28 mGy, DAP 199 µGy m(2)) was compared to published benchmarks for PDA closure (Kerma 76 mGy, DAP 500 µGy m(2)). This is the first clinical study documenting the radiation reduction capabilities of a next-generation pediatric imaging platform. The true benefit of this dose reduction will be seen in patients requiring complex and often recurrent catheterizations. PMID:26215767

  6. ACO Algorithm Applied to Multi-Objectives Optimization of Capacity Expansion in Next Generation Wireless Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dac-Nhuong Le

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The optimal capacity expansion of base station subsystems in Next Generation Wireless Network (NGWN problem with respect to multi-demand type and system capacity constraints is known to be NP-complete. In this paper, we propose a novel ant colony optimization algorithm to solve a network topology has two levels in which mobile users are sources and both base stations and base station controllers are concentrators. There are two important aspects of upgrading to NGWN. The first importance of backward compatibility with pre-existing networks, and the second is the cost and operational benefit of gradually enhancing networks, by replacing, upgrading and installing new wireless network infrastructure elements that can accommodate both voice and data demand. Our objective function is the sources to concentrators connectivity costas well as the cost of the installation, connection, replacement, and capacity upgrade of infrastructure equipment. We evaluate the performance of our algorithm with a set of real world and data randomly generated. Numerical results show that our algorithms is a promising approach to solve this problem.

  7. The NASA Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) Next Generation Space Weather Data Warehouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddox, M. M.; Kuznetsova, M. M.; Pulkkinen, A. A.; Zheng, Y.; Rastaetter, L.; Chulaki, A.; Pembroke, A. D.; Wiegand, C.; Mullinix, R.; Boblitt, J.; Mendoza, A. M. M.; Swindell, M. J., IV; Bakshi, S. S.; Mays, M. L.; Shim, J. S.; Hesse, M.; Collado-Vega, Y. M.; Taktakishvili, A.; MacNeice, P. J.

    2014-12-01

    The Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables, supports, and performs research and development for next generation space science and space weather models. The CCMC currently hosts a large and expanding collection of state-or-the-art, physics-based space weather models that have been developed by the international research community. There are many tools and services provided by the CCMC that are currently available world-wide, along with the ongoing development of new innovative systems and software for research, discovery, validation, visualization, and forecasting. Over the history of the CCMC's existence, there has been one constant engineering challenge - describing, managing, and disseminating data. To address the challenges that accompany an ever-expanding number of models to support, along with a growing catalog of simulation output - the CCMC is currently developing a flexible and extensible space weather data warehouse to support both internal and external systems and applications. This paper intends to chronicle the evolution and future of the CCMC's data infrastructure, and the current infrastructure re-engineering activities that seek to leverage existing community data model standards like SPASE and the IMPEx Simulation Data Model.

  8. Recent results from DIII-D and their implications for next generation tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luxon, J.L.; Bramson, G.; Burrell, K.H.; Brooks, N.H.; Callis, R.W.; Carlstrom, T.N.; Chu, M.S.; Colleraine, A.P.; DeBoo, J.C.; Ferron, J.R.; Freeman, R.; Gohil, P.; Greenfield, C.M.; Groebner, R.J.; Hong, R.; Howl, W.; Hsieh, C.L.; Jackson, G.L.; Jensen, T.; Kellman, A.G.; Kim, J.; Lao, L.L.; La Haye, R.; Leikind, B.; Lippmann, S.I.; Lohr, J.; Luce, T.C.; Mahdavi, M.A.; Mayberry, M.; Moeller, C.P.; Osborne, T.H.; Overskei, D.O

    1990-07-01

    Recent results from the DIII-D tokamak have provided significant contributions to the understanding of many of the elements of tokamak physics and the application of this understanding to the design of next generation devices including ITER and CIT. The limitations of magnetohydrodynamics stability on the values of plasma beta (the ratio of kinetic pressure to the containing pressure of the magnetic field) that can be attained has been experimentally demonstrated and found to be described by existing theory. Values of beta (10.7%) well in excess of those required for proposed devices (ITER and CIT) have been demonstrated. Regimes of confinement (H-mode) have been established that scale favorably to proposed next generation devices, and experiments demonstrating the dependence of the energy confinement on plasma size have been completed. Understanding of confinement is rapidly developing especially in the areas of bulk transport and the role of turbulence in the plasma edge. Key experimental results in areas of plasma transport and edge plasma phenomena are found to be in agreement with theories based on short wavelength turbulence. Control of the divertor heat loads and impurity influx has been demonstrated, and new progress has been made in the understanding of plasma edge phenomena. Experiments with ion Bernstein wave heating have not found regimes in which these waves can produce effective central ion heating. Electron cyclotron current drive experiments have demonstrated 70 kA of driven current in 400 kA discharges.

  9. Persona: Network Layer Anonymity and Accountability for Next Generation Internet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallios, Yannis; Modi, Sudeep; Agarwala, Aditya; Johns, Christina

    Individual privacy has become a major concern, due to the intrusive nature of the services and websites that collect increasing amounts of private information. One of the notions that can lead towards privacy protection is that of anonymity. Unfortunately, anonymity can also be maliciously exploited by attackers to hide their actions and identity. Thus some sort of accountability is also required. The current Internet has failed to provide both properties, as anonymity techniques are difficult to fully deploy and thus are easily attacked, while the Internet provides limited level of accountability. The Next Generation Internet (NGI) provides us with the opportunity to examine how these conflicting properties could be efficiently applied and thus protect users’ privacy while holding malicious users accountable. In this paper we present the design of a scheme, called Persona that can provide anonymity and accountability in the network layer of NGI. More specifically, our design requirements are to combine these two conflicting desires in a stateless manner within routers. Persona allows users to choose different levels of anonymity, while it allows the discovery of malicious nodes.

  10. Cargo-Positioning System for Next-Generation Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holladay, Jon; Colton, Jonathan

    2006-01-01

    A report discusses a proposed system for mounting loaded pallets in the cargo bay of a next-generation space-shuttle-like spacecraft, such that the center of mass of the cargo would lie within a 1-in. (2.54-cm) cube that would also contain the center of mass of the spacecraft. The system would include (1) an algorithm for planning the locations of the pallets, given the geometric and weight properties of the pallets, and the geometric restrictions of the cargo bay; (2) quick-connect/quick-disconnect mounting mechanisms similar to those now used on air hoses; (3) other mounting mechanisms, comprising mostly spring-loaded pins, in a locking subsystem that would prevent shifting of the pallets under load; and (4) mechanisms for performing fine position adjustments to satisfy the center-of-mass requirement. The position- adjusting mechanisms would be motor-driven lead-screw mechanisms in groups of three - one for positioning each pin of the locking subsystem along each of three mutually perpendicular coordinate axes. The system also would include a triple-threaded screw that would provide compensation for thermal expansion or contraction of the spacecraft.

  11. The Next Generation ARC Middleware and ATLAS Computing Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The distributed NDGF Tier-1 and associated NorduGrid clusters are well integrated into the ATLAS computing environment but follow a slightly different paradigm than other ATLAS resources. The current paradigm does not divide the sites as in the commonly used hierarchical model, but rather treats them as a single storage endpoint and a pool of distributed computing nodes. The next generation ARC middleware with its several new technologies provides new possibilities in development of the ATLAS computing model, such as pilot jobs with pre-cached input files, automatic job migration between the sites, integration of remote sites without connected storage elements, and automatic brokering for jobs with non-standard resource requirements. ARC's data transfer model provides an automatic way for the computing sites to participate in ATLAS’ global task management system without requiring centralised brokering or data transfer services. The powerful API combined with Python and Java bindings can easily be used to build new services for job control and data transfer. Integration of the ARC core into the EMI middleware provides a natural way to implement the new services using the ARC components

  12. Construction Planning For The Next Generation Of Rural Coastal India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Selvamuthukumar

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Construction activities in the rural coast is a typical phenomenon which involves social, psychological, economical, environmental, geological, political, global, national as well as local issues of concern. Safe reconstruction for the rural coastal community after the 2004 devastating tsunami was the common will of all the twelve affected countries. In the subsequent tsunami of 2011, Japan experienced a multiple disasters and could not be able to manage things. It was proved by many factors like lack of land use planning, quality of construction, provision of basic amenities, health and total safety for Indian Tsunami reconstruction. Therefore, scientific and technological based approach only can give a better solution. For a developing country like India, having more rural based communities, the problem is serious and it becomes necessary to have the construction activities with a control system to achieve a permanently safer system. The problem is also aggravated for the next decade invited by the expected sea level rise and global warming issues, scarcity of water and other essential construction materials and shortage of conventional power production. This paper brings out the concept of providing an appropriate planning for the overall safe reconstruction in the rural east coast of India for the next generation.

  13. Modular EUV Source for the next generation lithography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present work, performed in the frame of the EXULITE project, was dedicated to the design and characterization of a laser-plasma-produced extreme ultraviolet (EUV) source prototype at 13.5 nm for the next generation lithography. It was conducted in cooperation with two laboratories from CEA, ALCATEL and THALES. One of our approach originalities was the laser scheme modularity. Six Nd:YAG laser beams were focused at the same time on a xenon filament jet to generate the EUV emitting plasma. Multiplexing has important industrial advantages and led to interesting source performances in terms of in-band power, stability and angular emission properties with the filament jet target. A maximum conversion efficiency (CE) value of 0.44% in 2π sr and 2% bandwidth was measured, which corresponds to a maximum in band EUV mean power of 7.7 W at a repetition rate of 6 kHz. The EUV emission was found to be stable and isotropic in these conditions. (authors)

  14. Next generation of human vaccines: what does the future hold?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awasthi, Sita

    2008-01-01

    The World Vaccine Congress was held in Arlington, VA April 21st-24th, 2008. Tevi Troy, the deputy secretary of the US Department of Health and Human Services, set the tone of the meeting during his keynote address. He discussed the government's plan to deliver a strategic outlook and follow a road map for vaccine development. He also emphasized the importance of ongoing cooperation between industry and the government's many departments. In an electrifying keynote address Gregory Poland, Professor of Medicine and Infectious Diseases at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, MN discussed the role of recent advancements in the fields of Immunology, Genetics, Molecular Biology, Bioinformatics and the completion of the Human Genome Project. Poland described the recent emergence of the field of Vaccinomics and laid out his vision for an era of personalized medicine. Next-generation vaccine approaches targeting cervical cancer, meningitis, childhood diarrhea and renal cell carcinoma were presented by leaders in the field. Preclinical and early-stage clinical successes of vaccines against Malaria, TB and Ebola were discussed along with a road map for HIV, TB and Malaria vaccine development. The importance of collaborations among government departments, academic institutions, industries and philanthropic foundations was a common theme stressed throughout the conference. PMID:18849649

  15. California Framework for the Next Generation Science Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Alessio, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    In September 2013, the California State Board of Education approved a revision to the state's science education standards, adopting the Next Generation Science Standards for the nation's most populous state. That action began a multi-year transition process that is ongoing. While the standards have been formally adopted, instructional materials and assessments that align with these standards have not yet been approved by the state. The approval process includes adopting a framework document that lays out the criteria for insructional materials and provides guidance to districts and teachers about how NGSS can be implemented effectively (not to be confused with the 2012 NRC Framework document). This document is currently available in draft form and has been approved by an appointed subcommittee, will undergo two periods of public comment, and is expected to be finalized by September 2016. We provide a summary of the process California is taking to implement NGSS, present highlights of the current document, and give a summary of the first public comment period.

  16. Status of advanced containment systems for next generation water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present IAEA status report is intended to provide information on the current status and development of containment systems of the next generation reactors for electricity production and, particularly, to highlight features which may be considered advanced, i.e. which present improved performance with evolutionary or innovative design solutions or new design approaches. The objectives of the present status report are: To present, on a concise and consistent basis, selected containment designs currently being developed in the world; to review and compare new approaches to the design bases for the containments, in order to identify common trends, that may eventually lead to greater worldwide consensus, to identify, list and compare existing design objectives for advanced containments, related to safety, availability, maintainability, plant life, decommissioning, economics, etc.; to describe the general approaches adopted in different advanced containments to cope with various identified challenges, both those included in the current design bases and those related to new events considered in the design; to briefly identify recent achievements and future needs for new or improved computer codes, standards, experimental research, prototype testing, etc. related to containment systems; to describe the outstanding features of some containments or specific solutions proposed by different parties and which are generally interesting to the international scientific community. 36 refs, 27 figs, 1 tab

  17. Next generation energy sources : the role of natural gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This presentation identified natural gas as the energy choice for the next generation. Natural gas is a safe, clean, flexible and reliable energy source that is part of an increasingly diversified fuel mix. With abundant, long term supplies of natural gas, new natural gas generation can be built quickly and cost effectively. Power generation is the fastest source of natural gas demand growth. In Canada, power generation accounts for 9 per cent of natural gas demand, while in the United States, it accounts for 23 per cent. Generating electricity with natural gas costs less, plus it is efficient and clean. The annual North American production is 27 trillion cubic feet (Tcf), which closely matches the current demand. The demand is expected to reach 32 Tcf by 2015. North American proven reserves are 254 Tcf and Canada's ultimate potential resource is 473 Tcf. This presentation also discussed the outlook for future gas prices. Price and volatility have both increased. The prospects in the medium term are for an easing of market tightness and restoring the balance of supply and demand. tabs., figs

  18. High-Throughput Microdissection for Next-Generation Sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Avi Z.; Armani, Michael D.; Fetsch, Patricia A.; Xi, Liqiang; Pham, Tina Thu; Raffeld, Mark; Chen, Yun; O’Flaherty, Neil; Stussman, Rebecca; Blackler, Adele R.; Du, Qiang; Hanson, Jeffrey C.; Roth, Mark J.; Filie, Armando C.; Roh, Michael H.; Emmert-Buck, Michael R.; Hipp, Jason D.; Tangrea, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Precision medicine promises to enhance patient treatment through the use of emerging molecular technologies, including genomics, transcriptomics, and proteomics. However, current tools in surgical pathology lack the capability to efficiently isolate specific cell populations in complex tissues/tumors, which can confound molecular results. Expression microdissection (xMD) is an immuno-based cell/subcellular isolation tool that procures targets of interest from a cytological or histological specimen. In this study, we demonstrate the accuracy and precision of xMD by rapidly isolating immunostained targets, including cytokeratin AE1/AE3, p53, and estrogen receptor (ER) positive cells and nuclei from tissue sections. Other targets procured included green fluorescent protein (GFP) expressing fibroblasts, in situ hybridization positive Epstein-Barr virus nuclei, and silver stained fungi. In order to assess the effect on molecular data, xMD was utilized to isolate specific targets from a mixed population of cells where the targets constituted only 5% of the sample. Target enrichment from this admixed cell population prior to next-generation sequencing (NGS) produced a minimum 13-fold increase in mutation allele frequency detection. These data suggest a role for xMD in a wide range of molecular pathology studies, as well as in the clinical workflow for samples where tumor cell enrichment is needed, or for those with a relative paucity of target cells. PMID:26999048

  19. Molecular Characterization of Transgenic Events Using Next Generation Sequencing Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mammadov, Jafar; Ye, Liang; Soe, Khaing; Richey, Kimberly; Cruse, James; Zhuang, Meibao; Gao, Zhifang; Evans, Clive; Rounsley, Steve; Kumpatla, Siva P.

    2016-01-01

    Demand for the commercial use of genetically modified (GM) crops has been increasing in light of the projected growth of world population to nine billion by 2050. A prerequisite of paramount importance for regulatory submissions is the rigorous safety assessment of GM crops. One of the components of safety assessment is molecular characterization at DNA level which helps to determine the copy number, integrity and stability of a transgene; characterize the integration site within a host genome; and confirm the absence of vector DNA. Historically, molecular characterization has been carried out using Southern blot analysis coupled with Sanger sequencing. While this is a robust approach to characterize the transgenic crops, it is both time- and resource-consuming. The emergence of next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies has provided highly sensitive and cost- and labor-effective alternative for molecular characterization compared to traditional Southern blot analysis. Herein, we have demonstrated the successful application of both whole genome sequencing and target capture sequencing approaches for the characterization of single and stacked transgenic events and compared the results and inferences with traditional method with respect to key criteria required for regulatory submissions. PMID:26908260

  20. Comprehensive Downtime Prediction in Next-Generation Internet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. F. Al-Khateeb, S. Al-Irhayim, and K. A. Al-Khateeb

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The benchmark for the reliability quality of networks depends mainly on the accuracy and comprehensiveness of the reliability parameters. Downtime prediction of a communication system is crucial for the quality of service (QoS offered to the end-user. Markov model enables analytical calculation of average single figure cumulative downtime over one year. The single average approach, generally, does not adequately describe the wide range of service performance that is likely to be experienced in communications systems due to the random nature of the failure. Therefore, it would be more appropriate to add downtime distribution obtained from network availability models to predict the expected cumulative downtime and other performance parameters among a large number of system populations. The distribution approach provides more comprehensive information about the behavior of the individual systems. Laplace-Stieltjes transform enables analytical solutions for simple network architectures, i.e. the simplex system and the parallel system. This paper uses simulations to determine reliability parameters for complex architecture such as the Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS backbone planned for next-generation Internet. In addition to the single figure downtime, simulations provide other reliability parameters such as probability of zero downtime. The paper also considers the downtime distribution among a population of equally designed systems.Key Words: Reliability, availability, downtime, Multiprotocol label switching

  1. Control technology for nuclear power system of next generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is the summary of the results obtained by the investigation activities for two years carried out by the expert committee on investigation of control technology for nuclear power system of next generation. The course of investigation is outlined, and as the results, as advanced control technologies, adaptive control. H sub (infinite) control, fuzzy control and the application of autonomous distributed system and genetic algorithm to control; as operation support technology, the operation and monitoring system for nuclear power plants and safety support system; as interface technology which is the basic technology of them, virtual reality, multimedia and so on; further, various problems due to human factors, computer technology, artificial intelligence and others were taken up, and the grasp of the present status and the future subjects was carried out, including the information in international conferences. The items of the investigation are roughly divided into measurement and control technologies, interface technology and operation support, human factors, computer technology and artificial intelligence, and the trend in foreign countries, and the results of investigation for respective items are reported. (K.I.)

  2. Introduction and comparison of next-generation mobile wireless technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidi, Syed R.; Hussain, Shahab; Ali, M. A.; Sana, Ajaz; Saddawi, Samir; Carranza, Aparicio

    2010-01-01

    Mobile networks and services have gone further than voice-only communication services and are rapidly developing towards data-centric services. Emerging mobile data services are expected to see the same explosive growth in demand that Internet and wireless voice services have seen in recent years. To support such a rapid increase in traffic, active users, and advanced multimedia services implied by this growth rate along with the diverse quality of service (QoS) and rate requirements set by these services, mobile operator need to rapidly transition to a simple and cost-effective, flat, all IP-network. This has accelerated the development and deployment of new wireless broadband access technologies including fourth-generation (4G) mobile WiMAX and cellular Long-Term Evolution (LTE). Mobile WiMAX and LTE are two different (but not necessarily competing) technologies that will eventually be used to achieve data speeds of up to 100 Mbps. Speeds that are fast enough to potentially replace wired broadband connections with wireless. This paper introduces both of these next generation technologies and then compares them in the end.

  3. Comparison of DNA Quantification Methods for Next Generation Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robin, Jérôme D; Ludlow, Andrew T; LaRanger, Ryan; Wright, Woodring E; Shay, Jerry W

    2016-01-01

    Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) is a powerful tool that depends on loading a precise amount of DNA onto a flowcell. NGS strategies have expanded our ability to investigate genomic phenomena by referencing mutations in cancer and diseases through large-scale genotyping, developing methods to map rare chromatin interactions (4C; 5C and Hi-C) and identifying chromatin features associated with regulatory elements (ChIP-seq, Bis-Seq, ChiA-PET). While many methods are available for DNA library quantification, there is no unambiguous gold standard. Most techniques use PCR to amplify DNA libraries to obtain sufficient quantities for optical density measurement. However, increased PCR cycles can distort the library's heterogeneity and prevent the detection of rare variants. In this analysis, we compared new digital PCR technologies (droplet digital PCR; ddPCR, ddPCR-Tail) with standard methods for the titration of NGS libraries. DdPCR-Tail is comparable to qPCR and fluorometry (QuBit) and allows sensitive quantification by analysis of barcode repartition after sequencing of multiplexed samples. This study provides a direct comparison between quantification methods throughout a complete sequencing experiment and provides the impetus to use ddPCR-based quantification for improvement of NGS quality. PMID:27048884

  4. QPLOT: A Quality Assessment Tool for Next Generation Sequencing Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bingshan Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Next generation sequencing (NGS is being widely used to identify genetic variants associated with human disease. Although the approach is cost effective, the underlying data is susceptible to many types of error. Importantly, since NGS technologies and protocols are rapidly evolving, with constantly changing steps ranging from sample preparation to data processing software updates, it is important to enable researchers to routinely assess the quality of sequencing and alignment data prior to downstream analyses. Results. Here we describe QPLOT, an automated tool that can facilitate the quality assessment of sequencing run performance. Taking standard sequence alignments as input, QPLOT generates a series of diagnostic metrics summarizing run quality and produces convenient graphical summaries for these metrics. QPLOT is computationally efficient, generates webpages for interactive exploration of detailed results, and can handle the joint output of many sequencing runs. Conclusion. QPLOT is an automated tool that facilitates assessment of sequence run quality. We routinely apply QPLOT to ensure quick detection of diagnostic of sequencing run problems. We hope that QPLOT will be useful to the community as well.

  5. Launching the Next Generation IODP Site Survey Data Bank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, S. P.; Helly, J.; Clark, D.; Eakins, B.; Sutton, D.; Weatherford, J.; Thatch, G.; Miville, B.; Zelt, B.

    2005-12-01

    The next generation all-digital Site Survey Data Bank (SSDB) became operational on August 15, 2005 as an online resource for Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) proponents, reviewers, panels and operations, worldwide. There are currently 123 active proposals for drilling at sites distributed across the globe, involving nearly 1000 proponents from more than 40 countries. The goal is to provide an authoritative, persistent, secure, password-controlled and easily-used home for contributed data objects, as proposals evolve through their life cycle from preliminary phases to planned drilling expeditions. Proposal status can be monitored graphically by proposal number, data type or date. A Java SSDBviewer allows discovery of all proposal data objects, displayed over a basemap of global topography, crustal age or other custom maps. Data can be viewed or downloaded under password control. Webform interfaces assist with the uploading of data and metadata. Thirty four different standard data types are currently supported. The system was designed as a fully functioning digital library, not just a database or a web archive, drawing upon the resources of the SIOExplorer Digital Library project. Blocks of metadata are organized to support discovery and use, as appropriate for each data type. The SSDB has been developed by a UCSD team of researchers and computer scientists at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography and the San Diego Supercomputer Center, under contract with IODP Management International Inc., supported by NSF OCE 0432224.

  6. DeCART benchmark calculation for LWR next generation fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeCART (Deterministic Core Analysis based on Ray Tracing) is a three-dimensional whole-core transport code capable of a direct core calculation at power generating conditions. Recently, a depletion capability has been implemented into the DeCART code to predict the depleted composition in the fuel. The representative depletion methods include the exponential matrix method and the linearization method. While most of the transport lattice codes adopt the linearization method for a better efficiency in the computing time, the Monte Carlo depletion codes adopt the exponential matrix method. The drawback of the linearization method is in its fixed formulation which causes difficulties in the modification of the depletion chains and the programming itself. The drawback of the exponential matrix method is the relatively expensive computing time. However, the computing time for a depletion calculation is quite small when compared with that for the main transport calculation. Therefore, the DeCART code adopts the exponential matrix method of ORIGEN-2 for the depletion calculation. In this paper, some features of the depletion method implemented in DeCART are described first, and next the depletion capability is examined by solving a LWR next generation fuel benchmark problem

  7. Implementing Value Added Applications in Next Generation Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-Kuang Tu

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available One of the major issues in the future Internet is the integration of telecom networks with the Internet. In many countries, large Internet Service Providers (ISPs are also telecom operators that have been focusing on providing Internet services through their telecom networks with telecom-grade mechanisms. In this article, we show that IP Multimedia Subsystem (IMS is a telecom-grade mechanism that addresses this important issue. In Next Generation Network (NGN, IMS supports IP-based multimedia services that can be accessed from various wireless and wired access technologies through fixed-mobile convergence. We show how to integrate Internet Protocol Television (IPTV with NGN/IMS to offer enhanced IPTV services for subscribers with set-top boxes or mobile phones. We specifically describe the implementations of three services: weather forecasts, short messages on TV screens and TV shopping/food ordering for mobile users. Although these services can be directly implemented in the Internet, our commercial operation experiences indicate that the NGN/IMS implementation has advantages in terms of telecom-grade security, Quality of Service (QoS, and flexible service creation.

  8. 2012 Next Generation Experiments to Measure the Neutron Lifetime Workshop

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    There is a great interest in improving the limits on neutron lifetime to the level of a precision of 0.1 s. The neutron lifetime is both an important fundamental quantity as well as a parameter influencing important processes such as nucleosynthesis (Helium production in the early universe) and the rate of energy production in the Sun. Aiming to create a roadmap of R&D for a next generation neutron lifetime experiment that can be endorsed by the North American neutron community, the focus of the workshop was on experiments using traps that utilize ultracold neutrons and confinement by a combination of magnetic and/or gravitational interaction in order to avoid systematic uncertainties introduced by neutron interactions with material walls. The papers in this volume summarize the limitations of present experiments, the discussion of new experiments in planning stage, and the discussion of systematic effects that must be addressed to achieve a lifetime measurement at an accuracy of 0.1 second.

  9. SpaceX's Dragon America's next generation spacecraft

    CERN Document Server

    Seedhouse, Erik

    2016-01-01

    This book describes Dragon V2, a futuristic vehicle that not only provides a means for NASA to transport its astronauts to the orbiting outpost but also advances SpaceX’s core objective of reusability. A direct descendant of Dragon, Dragon V2 can be retrieved, refurbished and re-launched. It is a spacecraft with the potential to completely revolutionize the economics of an industry where equipment costing hundreds of millions of dollars is routinely discarded after a single use. It was presented by SpaceX CEO Elon Musk in May 2014 as the spaceship that will carry NASA astronauts to the International Space Station as soon as 2016 SpaceX’s Dragon – America’s Next Generation Spacecraft describes the extraordinary feats of engineering and human achievement that have placed this revolutionary spacecraft at the forefront of the launch industry and positioned it as the precursor for ultimately transporting humans to Mars. It describes the design and development of Dragon, provides mission highlights of the f...

  10. Enhancing QOS and QOE in IMS enabled next generation networks

    CERN Document Server

    Lakhtaria, Kamaljit I

    2010-01-01

    Managing network complexity, accommodating greater numbers of subscribers, improving coverage to support data services (e.g. email, video, and music downloads), keeping up to speed with fast-changing technology, and driving maximum value from existing networks - all while reducing CapEX and OpEX and ensuring Quality of Service (QoS) for the network and Quality of Experience (QoE) for the user. These are just some of the pressing business issues faced by mobileservice providers, summarized by the demand to "achieve more, for less." The ultimate goal of optimization techniques at the network and application layer is to ensure End-user perceived QoS. The next generation networks (NGN), a composite environment of proven telecommunications and Internet-oriented mechanisms have become generally recognized as the telecommunications environment of the future. However, the nature of the NGN environment presents several complex issues regarding quality assurance that have not existed in the legacy environments (e.g., m...

  11. Molecular Characterization of Transgenic Events Using Next Generation Sequencing Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guttikonda, Satish K; Marri, Pradeep; Mammadov, Jafar; Ye, Liang; Soe, Khaing; Richey, Kimberly; Cruse, James; Zhuang, Meibao; Gao, Zhifang; Evans, Clive; Rounsley, Steve; Kumpatla, Siva P

    2016-01-01

    Demand for the commercial use of genetically modified (GM) crops has been increasing in light of the projected growth of world population to nine billion by 2050. A prerequisite of paramount importance for regulatory submissions is the rigorous safety assessment of GM crops. One of the components of safety assessment is molecular characterization at DNA level which helps to determine the copy number, integrity and stability of a transgene; characterize the integration site within a host genome; and confirm the absence of vector DNA. Historically, molecular characterization has been carried out using Southern blot analysis coupled with Sanger sequencing. While this is a robust approach to characterize the transgenic crops, it is both time- and resource-consuming. The emergence of next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies has provided highly sensitive and cost- and labor-effective alternative for molecular characterization compared to traditional Southern blot analysis. Herein, we have demonstrated the successful application of both whole genome sequencing and target capture sequencing approaches for the characterization of single and stacked transgenic events and compared the results and inferences with traditional method with respect to key criteria required for regulatory submissions. PMID:26908260

  12. Rucio, the next-generation Data Management system in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Serfon, C; The ATLAS collaboration; Beermann, T; Garonne, V; Goossens, L; Lassnig, M; Nairz, A; Vigne, R

    2014-01-01

    Rucio is the next-generation of Distributed Data Management (DDM) system benefiting from recent advances in cloud and "Big Data" computing to address HEP experiments scaling requirements. Rucio is an evolution of the ATLAS DDM system Don Quijote 2 (DQ2), which has demonstrated very large scale data management capabilities with more than 160 petabytes spread worldwide across 130 sites, and accesses from 1,000 active users. However, DQ2 is reaching its limits in terms of scalability, requiring a large number of support staff to operate and being hard to extend with new technologies. Rucio addresses these issues by relying on new technologies to ensure system scalability, cover new user requirements and employ new automation framework to reduce operational overheads. This paper shows the key concepts of Rucio, details the Rucio design, and the technology it employs, the tests that were conducted to validate it and finally describes the migration steps that were conducted to move from DQ2 to Rucio.

  13. Analysis Tools for Next-Generation Hadron Spectroscopy Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The series of workshops on New Partial-Wave Analysis Tools for Next-Generation Hadron Spectroscopy Experiments was initiated with the ATHOS 2012 meeting, which took place in Camogli, Italy, June 20-22, 2012. It was followed by ATHOS 2013 in Kloster Seeon near Munich, Germany, May 21-24, 2013. The third, ATHOS3, meeting is planned for April 13-17, 2015 at The George Washington University Virginia Science and Technology Campus, USA. The workshops focus on the development of amplitude analysis tools for meson and baryon spectroscopy, and complement other programs in hadron spectroscopy organized in the recent past including the INT-JLab Workshop on Hadron Spectroscopy in Seattle in 2009, the International Workshop on Amplitude Analysis in Hadron Spectroscopy at the ECT*-Trento in 2011, the School on Amplitude Analysis in Modern Physics in Bad Honnef in 2011, the Jefferson Lab Advanced Study Institute Summer School in 2012, and the School on Concepts of Modern Amplitude Analysis Techniques in Flecken-Zechlin near Berlin in September 2013. The aim of this document is to summarize the discussions that took place at the ATHOS 2012 and ATHOS 2013 meetings. We do not attempt a comprehensive review of the field of amplitude analysis, but offer a collection of thoughts that we hope may lay the ground for such a document

  14. A repetitive sequence assembler based on next-generation sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, S; Tu, Y; Wang, Y; Chen, X; Wang, L

    2016-01-01

    Repetitive sequences of variable length are common in almost all eukaryotic genomes, and most of them are presumed to have important biomedical functions and can cause genomic instability. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies provide the possibility of identifying capturing these repetitive sequences directly from the NGS data. In this study, we assessed the performances in identifying capturing repeats of leading assemblers, such as Velvet, SOAPdenovo, SGA, MSR-CA, Bambus2, ALLPATHS-LG, and AByss using three real NGS datasets. Our results indicated that most of them performed poorly in capturing the repeats. Consequently, we proposed a repetitive sequence assembler, named NGSReper, for capturing repeats from NGS data. Simulated datasets were used to validate the feasibility of NGSReper. The results indicate that the completeness of capturing repeat is up to 99%. Cross validation was performed in three real NGS datasets, and extensive comparisons indicate that NGSReper performed best in terms of completeness and accuracy in capturing repeats. In conclusion, NGSReper is an appropriate and suitable tool for capturing repeats directly from NGS data. PMID:27525861

  15. Next-generation phylogenomics using a Target Restricted Assembly Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kevin P; Walden, Kimberly K O; Robertson, Hugh M

    2013-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing technologies are revolutionizing the field of phylogenetics by making available genome scale data for a fraction of the cost of traditional targeted sequencing. One challenge will be to make use of these genomic level data without necessarily resorting to full-scale genome assembly and annotation, which is often time and labor intensive. Here we describe a technique, the Target Restricted Assembly Method (TRAM), in which the typical process of genome assembly and annotation is in essence reversed. Protein sequences of phylogenetically useful genes from a species within the group of interest are used as targets in tblastn searches of a data set from a lane of Illumina reads for a related species. Resulting blast hits are then assembled locally into contigs and these contigs are then aligned against the reference "cDNA" sequence to remove portions of the sequences that include introns. We illustrate the Target Restricted Assembly Method using genomic scale datasets for 20 species of lice (Insecta: Psocodea) to produce a test phylogenetic data set of 10 nuclear protein coding gene sequences. Given the advantages of using DNA instead of RNA, this technique is very cost effective and feasible given current technologies. PMID:23000819

  16. Pattern Recognition on Read Positioning in Next Generation Sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byeon, Boseon; Kovalchuk, Igor

    2016-01-01

    The usefulness and the utility of the next generation sequencing (NGS) technology are based on the assumption that the DNA or cDNA cleavage required to generate short sequence reads is random. Several previous reports suggest the existence of sequencing bias of NGS reads. To address this question in greater detail, we analyze NGS data from four organisms with different GC content, Plasmodium falciparum (19.39%), Arabidopsis thaliana (36.03%), Homo sapiens (40.91%) and Streptomyces coelicolor (72.00%). Using machine learning techniques, we recognize the pattern that the NGS read start is positioned in the local region where the nucleotide distribution is dissimilar from the global nucleotide distribution. We also demonstrate that the mono-nucleotide distribution underestimates sequencing bias, and the recognized pattern is explained largely by the distribution of multi-nucleotides (di-, tri-, and tetra- nucleotides) rather than mono-nucleotides. This implies that the correction of sequencing bias needs to be performed on the basis of the multi-nucleotide distribution. Providing companion software to quantify the effect of the recognized pattern on read positioning, we exemplify that the bias correction based on the mono-nucleotide distribution may not be sufficient to clean sequencing bias. PMID:27299343

  17. Report of research and development of next generation PET equipments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is a report of the meeting concerning the next generation PET, held January 26, 2004, National Institute of Radiological Sciences in Chiba (NIRS), and contains the list of investigators, the first part of current status of investigations on the research and development of the PET equipments in NIRS and co-working facilities, the second part of comments of investigators of nuclear medicine, and list of published works. The first part describes the summarized current state of the works, examinations of correction of sensitivity with application of PET simulator, scintillator for PET, development of depth of interaction (DOI) detector for jPET-D4, 4-layer DOI detector for PET of small animals, evaluation of 256 channel-flat pane (FP)-position sensitive photomultiplier tube (PMT), detector simulation, correction of detector elements, development of coincidence imaging detector during surgery, circuit for processing the detector signals, development of front-end encoder ASIC, coincidence circuit, evaluation of jPET-D4 images, statistical reconstruction of DOI-PET images, Monte Carlo simulation technology, measurement and correction of body movement, and pioneer/original works. The second part; trend of clinical PET, development of in vivo radiopharmaceuticals and PET, trend of new PET equipments, demands for the new PET equipment from clinical neurology, investigations of human brain functions by PET, PET and tumors, evaluation of PET equipment NEMA NU2-2001, and PET and MRI. (N.I.)

  18. Next-generation sequence analysis of cancer xenograft models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando J Rossello

    Full Text Available Next-generation sequencing (NGS studies in cancer are limited by the amount, quality and purity of tissue samples. In this situation, primary xenografts have proven useful preclinical models. However, the presence of mouse-derived stromal cells represents a technical challenge to their use in NGS studies. We examined this problem in an established primary xenograft model of small cell lung cancer (SCLC, a malignancy often diagnosed from small biopsy or needle aspirate samples. Using an in silico strategy that assign reads according to species-of-origin, we prospectively compared NGS data from primary xenograft models with matched cell lines and with published datasets. We show here that low-coverage whole-genome analysis demonstrated remarkable concordance between published genome data and internal controls, despite the presence of mouse genomic DNA. Exome capture sequencing revealed that this enrichment procedure was highly species-specific, with less than 4% of reads aligning to the mouse genome. Human-specific expression profiling with RNA-Seq replicated array-based gene expression experiments, whereas mouse-specific transcript profiles correlated with published datasets from human cancer stroma. We conclude that primary xenografts represent a useful platform for complex NGS analysis in cancer research for tumours with limited sample resources, or those with prominent stromal cell populations.

  19. Applicability of Next Generation Sequencing Technology in Microsatellite Instability Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun Gan

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Microsatellite instability (MSI is a useful marker for risk assessment, prediction of chemotherapy responsiveness and prognosis in patients with colorectal cancer. Here, we describe a next generation sequencing approach for MSI testing using the MiSeq platform. Different from other MSI capturing strategies that are based on targeted gene capture, we utilize “deep resequencing”, where we focus the sequencing on only the microsatellite regions of interest. We sequenced a series of 44 colorectal tumours with normal controls for five MSI loci (BAT25, BAT26, BAT34c4, D18S55, D5S346 and a second series of six colorectal tumours (no control with two mononucleotide loci (BAT25, BAT26. In the first series, we were able to determine 17 MSI-High, 1 MSI-Low and 26 microsatellite stable (MSS tumours. In the second series, there were three MSI-High and three MSS tumours. Although there was some variation within individual markers, this NGS method produced the same overall MSI status for each tumour, as obtained with the traditional multiplex PCR-based method.

  20. NG6: Integrated next generation sequencing storage and processing environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariette Jérôme

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Next generation sequencing platforms are now well implanted in sequencing centres and some laboratories. Upcoming smaller scale machines such as the 454 junior from Roche or the MiSeq from Illumina will increase the number of laboratories hosting a sequencer. In such a context, it is important to provide these teams with an easily manageable environment to store and process the produced reads. Results We describe a user-friendly information system able to manage large sets of sequencing data. It includes, on one hand, a workflow environment already containing pipelines adapted to different input formats (sff, fasta, fastq and qseq, different sequencers (Roche 454, Illumina HiSeq and various analyses (quality control, assembly, alignment, diversity studies,… and, on the other hand, a secured web site giving access to the results. The connected user will be able to download raw and processed data and browse through the analysis result statistics. The provided workflows can easily be modified or extended and new ones can be added. Ergatis is used as a workflow building, running and monitoring system. The analyses can be run locally or in a cluster environment using Sun Grid Engine. Conclusions NG6 is a complete information system designed to answer the needs of a sequencing platform. It provides a user-friendly interface to process, store and download high-throughput sequencing data.

  1. The Next Generation Photoinjector (thermal Emittance, Quantum Efficiency)

    CERN Document Server

    Palmer, D T

    1998-01-01

    This dissertation will elucidate the design, construction, theory, and operation of the Next Generation Photoinjector (NGP). This photoinjector is comprised of the BNL/SLAC/UCLA 1.6 cell symmetrized S-band photocathode radio frequency (rf) electron gun and a single emittance-compensation solenoidal magnet. This photoinjector is a prototype for the Linear Coherent Light Source X-ray Free Electron Laser operating in the 1.5 A range. Simulations indicate that this photoinjector is capable of producing a 1 nC electron bunch with transverse normalized emittance less than 1 $\\pi$ mm-mrad were the cathode is illuminated with a 10 psec longitudinal flat top pulse. Using a Gaussian longitudinal laser profile with a full width half maximum (FWHM) of 10 psec, simulation indicates that the NGP is capable of producing a normalized rms emittance of 2.50 $\\pi$ mm-mrad at 1 nC. Using the removable cathode plate we have studied the quantum efficiency (QE) of both copper and magnesium photo-cathodes...

  2. The impact of next-generation sequencing on genomics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun Zhang; Rod Chiodini; Ahmed Badr; Genfa Zhang

    2011-01-01

    This article reviews basic concepts,general applications,and the potential impact of next-generation sequencing(NGS)technologies on genomics,with particular reference to currently available and possible future platforms and bioinformatics.NGS technologies have demonstrated the capacity to sequence DNA at unprecedented speed,thereby enabling previously unimaginable scientific achievements and novel biological applications.But,the massive data produced by NGS also presents a significant challenge for data storage,analyses,and management solutions.Advanced bioinformatic tools are essential for the successful application of NGS technology.As evidenced throughout this review,NGS technologies will have a striking impact on genomic research and the entire biological field.With its ability to tackle the unsolved challenges unconquered by previous genomic technologies,NGS is likely to unravel the complexity of the human genome in terms of genetic variations,some of which may be confined to susceptible loci for some common human conditions.The impact of NGS technologies on genomics will be far reaching and likely change the field for years to come.

  3. Analysis Tools for Next-Generation Hadron Spectroscopy Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Battaglieri, M; Celentano, A; Chung, S -U; D'Angelo, A; De Vita, R; Döring, M; Dudek, J; Eidelman, S; Fegan, S; Ferretti, J; Fox, G; Galata, G; Garcia-Tecocoatzi, H; Glazier, D I; Grube, B; Hanhart, C; Hoferichter, M; Hughes, S M; Ireland, D G; Ketzer, B; Klein, F J; Kubis, B; Liu, B; Masjuan, P; Mathieu, V; McKinnon, B; Mitchell, R; Nerling, F; Paul, S; Pelaez, J R; Rademacker, J; Rizzo, A; Salgado, C; Santopinto, E; Sarantsev, A V; Sato, T; Schlüter, T; da Silva, M L L; Stankovic, I; Strakovsky, I; Szczepaniak, A; Vassallo, A; Walford, N K; Watts, D P; Zana, L

    2014-01-01

    The series of workshops on New Partial-Wave Analysis Tools for Next-Generation Hadron Spectroscopy Experiments was initiated with the ATHOS 2012 meeting, which took place in Camogli, Italy, June 20-22, 2012. It was followed by ATHOS 2013 in Kloster Seeon near Munich, Germany, May 21-24, 2013. The third, ATHOS3, meeting is planned for April 13-17, 2015 at The George Washington University Virginia Science and Technology Campus, USA. The workshops focus on the development of amplitude analysis tools for meson and baryon spectroscopy, and complement other programs in hadron spectroscopy organized in the recent past including the INT-JLab Workshop on Hadron Spectroscopy in Seattle in 2009, the International Workshop on Amplitude Analysis in Hadron Spectroscopy at the ECT*-Trento in 2011, the School on Amplitude Analysis in Modern Physics in Bad Honnef in 2011, the Jefferson Lab Advanced Study Institute Summer School in 2012, and the School on Concepts of Modern Amplitude Analysis Techniques in Flecken-Zechlin near...

  4. Looking toward to the next-generation space weather forecast system. Comments former a former space weather forecaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the 21st century, man's space-based activities will increase significantly and many kinds of space utilization technologies will assume a vital role in the infrastructure, creating new businesses, securing the global environment, contributing much to human welfare in the world. Communications Research Laboratory (CRL) has been contributing to the safety of human activity in space and to the further understanding of the solar terrestrial environment through the study of space weather, including the upper atmosphere, magnetosphere, interplanetary space, and the sun. The next-generation Space Weather Integrated Monitoring System (SWIMS) for future space activities based on the present international space weather forecasting system is introduced in this paper. (author)

  5. NNSA's next generation safeguards initiative to define an effective state system of accounting and control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The International Nuclear Safeguards and Engagement Program (INSEP), the international outreach component of the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI), is a collaborative program that endeavors to strengthen international safeguards at all stages of nuclear development. One of the critical ways the program achieves this objective is through working with partners to increase the effectiveness of the State System of Accountancy for and Control of Nuclear Materials (SSAC) - the essential elements of national, regulatory and facility safeguards competencies that work as a system to provide the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the world the full assurance of the state's adherence to its safeguards agreements. INSEP provides assistance in developing a state's SSAC in a number of areas, from developing national legislation governing the possession and use of nuclear material to working with nuclear facility operators to developing good practices in waste management. INSEP has collaborated with foreign partners in peaceful nuclear applications for over two decades, but recently, it has focused its efforts on strengthening SSACs due to the growth of nuclear power worldwide, particularly in countries with limited nuclear infrastructures. This new area of focus has prompted INSEP to develop a model of SSAC competencies that will serve not only as a structure for its engagement with partner states, but also as a means to facilitate coordination with other states that provide training and assistance, and as a mechanism for evaluating the effectiveness of its work in reaching its intended objectives. While this model uses as its starting point the requirements on a State that are presented in the Comprehensive Safeguards Agreement and the Additional Protocol, it is not, in itself, a requirements document or guidance for implementing requirements. It is rather an analysis of what capabilities will be needed in a State to be able to meet requirements and to

  6. Rural youth participation in infrastructural development in Isin local government area of Kwara state, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adesiji Gbolagade B.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The study investigated the level of youth participation in infrastructural development in Isin local government area of Kwara State, Nigeria. One hundred and five youths were randomly selected from seven rural communities, fifteen youths from each village. Data were collected with the aid of a questionnaire, which was analysed using frequency count and percentages. Chi-square analysis was used to test the hypothesis of significance between the socio-economic characteristics and the level of participation in infrastructural development. Findings revealed that 56.2% of respondents were within the age category of 21-30 years, 62.9% were male, and 60% were single, while 56.2% of the respondents had secondary school level education. The study revealed the various roles played by youths in participating in infrastructural development as well as the associated constraints which include finance, availability of materials, technical knowledge and time. Age, marital status, educational level and years of residence were found to be significantly related to the level of participation of youths in infrastructural development. The study recommended the adequate budget allocation to rural areas as well as intensive training and educative programmes for effective participative development.

  7. Advanced Combustion Systems for Next Generation Gas Turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joel Haynes; Jonathan Janssen; Craig Russell; Marcus Huffman

    2006-01-01

    Next generation turbine power plants will require high efficiency gas turbines with higher pressure ratios and turbine inlet temperatures than currently available. These increases in gas turbine cycle conditions will tend to increase NOx emissions. As the desire for higher efficiency drives pressure ratios and turbine inlet temperatures ever higher, gas turbines equipped with both lean premixed combustors and selective catalytic reduction after treatment eventually will be unable to meet the new emission goals of sub-3 ppm NOx. New gas turbine combustors are needed with lower emissions than the current state-of-the-art lean premixed combustors. In this program an advanced combustion system for the next generation of gas turbines is being developed with the goal of reducing combustor NOx emissions by 50% below the state-of-the-art. Dry Low NOx (DLN) technology is the current leader in NOx emission technology, guaranteeing 9 ppm NOx emissions for heavy duty F class gas turbines. This development program is directed at exploring advanced concepts which hold promise for meeting the low emissions targets. The trapped vortex combustor is an advanced concept in combustor design. It has been studied widely for aircraft engine applications because it has demonstrated the ability to maintain a stable flame over a wide range of fuel flow rates. Additionally, it has shown significantly lower NOx emission than a typical aircraft engine combustor and with low CO at the same time. The rapid CO burnout and low NOx production of this combustor made it a strong candidate for investigation. Incremental improvements to the DLN technology have not brought the dramatic improvements that are targeted in this program. A revolutionary combustor design is being explored because it captures many of the critical features needed to significantly reduce emissions. Experimental measurements of the combustor performance at atmospheric conditions were completed in the first phase of the program

  8. Nanostructured photovoltaic devices for next generation solar cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung Jin

    2008-10-01

    As the search for alternative sources of energy other than petroleum continues to expand, solar energy conversion has already been identified as one of the most promising technologies. In the past few years there has been extensive research focused on the next generation solar cells that can exceed the Shockley-Queisser limit (a model that predicts the maximum achievable efficiency for a given material with a given bandgap). Moreover, nanoengineering approaches to enhance solar power conversion efficiency have started to receive considerable interest. Even in the most efficient commercially available solar devices utilizing crystalline silicon, a major portion of the absorbed ultraviolet photon energy is wasted as heat. Furthermore, this heat is detrimental to device reliability. Colloidal nanocrystal quantum dots (NQDs) offer the exciting prospect of simultaneously manipulating device and material structures and processes to enable more efficient solar energy conversion. Most importantly, these colloidal nanocrystal quantum dots are amenable to inexpensive fabrication techniques such as dip coating or spray coating of the constituent nanoscale materials onto various substrates. This dissertation focuses on the development of nanostructured photovoltaic devices, that exhibit multiple exciton generation, and that exploit the wide absorption spectra enabled by the quantum dots for next generation highly efficient, low cost, solar cells. Firstly, multiple exciton generation and subsequent electrical extraction from a thin film photoconductive device constructed from PbSe NQDs is demonstrated. As an extension of this work, this PbSe NQD photoconductor was used in a tandem structure with a polymer solar cell to demonstrate multiple carrier extraction the application of an external electric field. This structure exhibited improved device durability from UV irradiation due to the self-passivating effect provided by the PbSe layer. In order to achieve better exciton

  9. Beyond Human Capital Development: Balanced Safeguards Workforce Metrics and the Next Generation Safeguards Workforce

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since its establishment in 2008, the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) has achieved a number of objectives under its five pillars: concepts and approaches, policy development and outreach, international nuclear safeguards engagement, technology development, and human capital development (HCD). As a result of these efforts, safeguards has become much more visible as a critical U.S. national security interest across the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex. However, limited budgets have since created challenges in a number of areas. Arguably, one of the more serious challenges involves NGSI's ability to integrate entry-level staff into safeguards projects. Laissez fair management of this issue across the complex can lead to wasteful project implementation and endanger NGSI's long-term sustainability. The authors provide a quantitative analysis of this problem, focusing on the demographics of the current safeguards workforce and compounding pressures to operate cost-effectively, transfer knowledge to the next generation of safeguards professionals, and sustain NGSI safeguards investments.

  10. Estabilishing requirements for the next generation of pressurized water reactors--reducing the uncertainty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Electric Power Research Institute is managing a major effort to establish requirements for the next generation of U.S. light water reactors. This effort is the vital first step in preserving the viability of the nuclear option to contribute to meet U.S. national electric power capacity needs in the next century. Combustion Engineering, Inc. and Duke Power Company formed a team to participate in the EPRI program which is guided by a Utility Steering committee consisting of experienced utility technical executives. A major thrust of the program is to reduce the uncertainties which would be faced by the utility executives in choosing the nuclear option. The uncertainties to be reduced include those related to safety, economic, operational, and regulatory aspects of advanced light water reactors. This paper overviews the Requirements Document program as it relates to the U.S. Advanced Light Water Reactor (ALWR) effort in reducing these uncertainties and reports the status of efforts to establish requirements for the next generation of pressurized water reactors. It concentrates on progress made in reducing the uncertainties which would deter selection of the nuclear option for contributing to U.S. national electric power capacity needs in the next century and updates previous reports in the same area. (author)

  11. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Methods Technical Program Plan -- PLN-2498

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard R. Schultz; Abderrafi M. Ougouag; David W. Nigg; Hans D. Gougar; Richard W. Johnson; William K. Terry; Chang H. Oh; Donald W. McEligot; Gary W. Johnsen; Glenn E. McCreery; Woo Y. Yoon; James W. Sterbentz; J. Steve Herring; Temitope A. Taiwo; Thomas Y. C. Wei; William D. Pointer; Won S. Yang; Michael T. Farmer; Hussein S. Khalil; Madeline A. Feltus

    2010-09-01

    One of the great challenges of designing and licensing the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is to confirm that the intended VHTR analysis tools can be used confidently to make decisions and to assure all that the reactor systems are safe and meet the performance objectives of the Generation IV Program. The research and development (R&D) projects defined in the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Design Methods Development and Validation Program will ensure that the tools used to perform the required calculations and analyses can be trusted. The Methods R&D tasks are designed to ensure that the calculational envelope of the tools used to analyze the VHTR reactor systems encompasses, or is larger than, the operational and transient envelope of the VHTR itself. The Methods R&D focuses on the development of tools to assess the neutronic and thermal fluid behavior of the plant. The fuel behavior and fission product transport models are discussed in the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) program plan. Various stress analysis and mechanical design tools will also need to be developed and validated and will ultimately also be included in the Methods R&D Program Plan. The calculational envelope of the neutronics and thermal-fluids software tools intended to be used on the NGNP is defined by the scenarios and phenomena that these tools can calculate with confidence. The software tools can only be used confidently when the results they produce have been shown to be in reasonable agreement with first-principle results, thought-problems, and data that describe the “highly ranked” phenomena inherent in all operational conditions and important accident scenarios for the VHTR.

  12. Next-Generation Sequencing and Genome Editing in Plant Virology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadidi, Ahmed; Flores, Ricardo; Candresse, Thierry; Barba, Marina

    2016-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) has been applied to plant virology since 2009. NGS provides highly efficient, rapid, low cost DNA, or RNA high-throughput sequencing of the genomes of plant viruses and viroids and of the specific small RNAs generated during the infection process. These small RNAs, which cover frequently the whole genome of the infectious agent, are 21–24 nt long and are known as vsRNAs for viruses and vd-sRNAs for viroids. NGS has been used in a number of studies in plant virology including, but not limited to, discovery of novel viruses and viroids as well as detection and identification of those pathogens already known, analysis of genome diversity and evolution, and study of pathogen epidemiology. The genome engineering editing method, clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-Cas9 system has been successfully used recently to engineer resistance to DNA geminiviruses (family, Geminiviridae) by targeting different viral genome sequences in infected Nicotiana benthamiana or Arabidopsis plants. The DNA viruses targeted include tomato yellow leaf curl virus and merremia mosaic virus (begomovirus); beet curly top virus and beet severe curly top virus (curtovirus); and bean yellow dwarf virus (mastrevirus). The technique has also been used against the RNA viruses zucchini yellow mosaic virus, papaya ringspot virus and turnip mosaic virus (potyvirus) and cucumber vein yellowing virus (ipomovirus, family, Potyviridae) by targeting the translation initiation genes eIF4E in cucumber or Arabidopsis plants. From these recent advances of major importance, it is expected that NGS and CRISPR-Cas technologies will play a significant role in the very near future in advancing the field of plant virology and connecting it with other related fields of biology.

  13. The next generation of transcription factor binding site prediction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Mathelier

    -protein interactions, while providing a single unified framework suitable for the next generation of TFBS prediction.

  14. Next Generation UV Coronagraph Instrumentation for Solar Cycle-24

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    John L. Kohl; Rajmal Jain; Steven R. Cranmer; Larry D. Gardner; Anil K. Pradhan; John C. Raymond; Leonard Strachan

    2008-03-01

    Ultraviolet coronagraph observations of the extended solar corona (defined here as 1.5 to 10 solar radii from Sun-center) have become a powerful tool for obtaining detailed empirical descriptions of coronal holes, streamers, and coronal mass ejections. The empirical models resulting from ultraviolet coronagraph observations provide the constraints needed to test and guide theoretical models aimed at determining the physical processes that control solar wind acceleration, CME heating and acceleration, and solar energetic particle (SEP) acceleration. Measurements to date from sounding rockets, the shuttle deployed Spartan 201 satellite and the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) have utilized high resolution spectroscopy over a very limited instantaneous field of view. New concepts for next generation instrumentation include imaging ultraviolet spectrocoronagraphs and large aperture ultraviolet coronagraph spectrometers. An imaging instrument would be the first to obtain absolute spectral line intensities of the extended corona over a wide field of view. Such images would provide the absolute intensities of spectral lines that can be used to determine densities and outflow velocities of specific coronal ions. Measurements from several charge states of a given element will allow electron temperatures to be determined. These measurements combined with observations of H I Ly provide absolute chemical abundances (relative to hydrogen) for observed elements. Ultraviolet imaging would be highly complementary to a large-aperture ultraviolet coronagraph spectrometer designed for high spectral resolution observations over a small instantaneous field of view. The images would be used to select targets for more detailed spectroscopic studies with the large aperture UV coronagraph spectrometer and to provide time dependent empirical descriptions of the regions surrounding the narrow instantaneous field of view of the large aperture instrument. Descriptions of both the

  15. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Methods Technical Program Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the great challenges of designing and licensing the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is to confirm that the intended VHTR analysis tools can be used confidently to make decisions and to assure all that the reactor systems are safe and meet the performance objectives of the Generation IV Program. The research and development (R and D) projects defined in the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Design Methods Development and Validation Program will ensure that the tools used to perform the required calculations and analyses can be trusted. The Methods R and D tasks are designed to ensure that the calculational envelope of the tools used to analyze the VHTR reactor systems encompasses, or is larger than, the operational and transient envelope of the VHTR itself. The Methods R and D focuses on the development of tools to assess the neutronic and thermal fluid behavior of the plant. The fuel behavior and fission product transport models are discussed in the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) program plan. Various stress analysis and mechanical design tools will also need to be developed and validated and will ultimately also be included in the Methods R and D Program Plan. The calculational envelope of the neutronics and thermal-fluids software tools intended to be used on the NGNP is defined by the scenarios and phenomena that these tools can calculate with confidence. The software tools can only be used confidently when the results they produce have been shown to be in reasonable agreement with first-principle results, thought-problems, and data that describe the ''highly ranked'' phenomena inherent in all operational conditions and important accident scenarios for the VHTR

  16. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Methods Technical Program Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard R. Schultz; Abderrafi M. Ougouag; David W. Nigg; Hans D. Gougar; Richard W. Johnson; William K. Terry; Chang H. Oh; Donald W. McEligot; Gary W. Johnsen; Glenn E. McCreery; Woo Y. Yoon; James W. Sterbentz; J. Steve Herring; Temitope A. Taiwo; Thomas Y. C. Wei; William D. Pointer; Won S. Yang; Michael T. Farmer; Hussein S. Khalil; Madeline A. Feltus

    2010-12-01

    One of the great challenges of designing and licensing the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is to confirm that the intended VHTR analysis tools can be used confidently to make decisions and to assure all that the reactor systems are safe and meet the performance objectives of the Generation IV Program. The research and development (R&D) projects defined in the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Design Methods Development and Validation Program will ensure that the tools used to perform the required calculations and analyses can be trusted. The Methods R&D tasks are designed to ensure that the calculational envelope of the tools used to analyze the VHTR reactor systems encompasses, or is larger than, the operational and transient envelope of the VHTR itself. The Methods R&D focuses on the development of tools to assess the neutronic and thermal fluid behavior of the plant. The fuel behavior and fission product transport models are discussed in the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) program plan. Various stress analysis and mechanical design tools will also need to be developed and validated and will ultimately also be included in the Methods R&D Program Plan. The calculational envelope of the neutronics and thermal-fluids software tools intended to be used on the NGNP is defined by the scenarios and phenomena that these tools can calculate with confidence. The software tools can only be used confidently when the results they produce have been shown to be in reasonable agreement with first-principle results, thought-problems, and data that describe the “highly ranked” phenomena inherent in all operational conditions and important accident scenarios for the VHTR.

  17. Genotyping 1000 yeast strains by next-generation sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilkening Stefan

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The throughput of next-generation sequencing machines has increased dramatically over the last few years; yet the cost and time for library preparation have not changed proportionally, thus representing the main bottleneck for sequencing large numbers of samples. Here we present an economical, high-throughput library preparation method for the Illumina platform, comprising a 96-well based method for DNA isolation for yeast cells, a low-cost DNA shearing alternative, and adapter ligation using heat inactivation of enzymes instead of bead cleanups. Results Up to 384 whole-genome libraries can be prepared from yeast cells in one week using this method, for less than 15 euros per sample. We demonstrate the robustness of this protocol by sequencing over 1000 yeast genomes at ~30x coverage. The sequence information from 768 yeast segregants derived from two divergent S. cerevisiae strains was used to generate a meiotic recombination map at unprecedented resolution. Comparisons to other datasets indicate a high conservation of recombination at a chromosome-wide scale, but differences at the local scale. Additionally, we detected a high degree of aneuploidy (3.6% by examining the sequencing coverage in these segregants. Differences in allele frequency allowed us to attribute instances of aneuploidy to gains of chromosomes during meiosis or mitosis, both of which showed a strong tendency to missegregate specific chromosomes. Conclusions Here we present a high throughput workflow to sequence genomes of large number of yeast strains at a low price. We have used this workflow to obtain recombination and aneuploidy data from hundreds of segregants, which can serve as a foundation for future studies of linkage, recombination, and chromosomal aberrations in yeast and higher eukaryotes.

  18. Next Generation Space Surveillance System-of-Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    McShane, B.

    2014-09-01

    International economic and military dependence on space assets is pervasive and ever-growing in an environment that is now congested, contested, and competitive. There are a number of natural and man-made risks that need to be monitored and characterized to protect and preserve the space environment and the assets within it. Unfortunately, today's space surveillance network (SSN) has gaps in coverage, is not resilient, and has a growing number of objects that get lost. Risks can be efficiently and effectively mitigated, gaps closed, resiliency improved, and performance increased within a next generation space surveillance network implemented as a system-of-systems with modern information architectures and analytic techniques. This also includes consideration for the newest SSN sensors (e.g. Space Fence) which are born Net-Centric out-of-the-box and able to seamlessly interface with the JSpOC Mission System, global information grid, and future unanticipated users. Significant opportunity exists to integrate legacy, traditional, and non-traditional sensors into a larger space system-of-systems (including command and control centers) for multiple clients through low cost sustainment, modification, and modernization efforts. Clients include operations centers (e.g. JSpOC, USSTRATCOM, CANSPOC), Intelligence centers (e.g. NASIC), space surveillance sensor sites (e.g. AMOS, GEODSS), international governments (e.g. Germany, UK), space agencies (e.g. NASA), and academic institutions. Each has differing priorities, networks, data needs, timeliness, security, accuracy requirements and formats. Enabling processes and technologies include: Standardized and type accredited methods for secure connections to multiple networks, machine-to-machine interfaces for near real-time data sharing and tip-and-queue activities, common data models for analytical processing across multiple radar and optical sensor types, an efficient way to automatically translate between differing client and

  19. Development of the next generation reactor analysis code system, MARBLE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A next generation reactor analysis code system, MARBLE, has been developed. MARBLE is a successor of the fast reactor neutronics analysis code systems, JOINT-FR and SAGEP-FR (conventional systems), which were developed for so-called JUPITER standard analysis methods. MARBLE has the equivalent analysis capability to the conventional system because MARBLE can utilize sub-codes included in the conventional system without any change. On the other hand, burnup analysis functionality for power reactors is improved compared with the conventional system by introducing models on fuel exchange treatment and control rod operation and so on. In addition, MARBLE has newly developed solvers and some new features of burnup calculation by the Krylov sub-space method and nuclear design accuracy evaluation by the extended bias factor method. In the development of MARBLE, the object oriented technology was adopted from the view-point of improvement of the software quality such as flexibility, expansibility, facilitation of the verification by the modularization and assistance of co-development. And, software structure called the two-layer system consisting of scripting language and system development language was applied. As a result, MARBLE is not an independent analysis code system which simply receives input and returns output, but an assembly of components for building an analysis code system (i.e. framework). Furthermore, MARBLE provides some pre-built analysis code systems such as the fast reactor neutronics analysis code system. SCHEME, which corresponds to the conventional code and the fast reactor burnup analysis code system, ORPHEUS. (author)

  20. Next Generation Integrated Environment for Collaborative Work Across Internets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harvey B. Newman

    2009-02-24

    We are now well-advanced in our development, prototyping and deployment of a high performance next generation Integrated Environment for Collaborative Work. The system, aimed at using the capability of ESnet and Internet2 for rapid data exchange, is based on the Virtual Room Videoconferencing System (VRVS) developed by Caltech. The VRVS system has been chosen by the Internet2 Digital Video (I2-DV) Initiative as a preferred foundation for the development of advanced video, audio and multimedia collaborative applications by the Internet2 community. Today, the system supports high-end, broadcast-quality interactivity, while enabling a wide variety of clients (Mbone, H.323) to participate in the same conference by running different standard protocols in different contexts with different bandwidth connection limitations, has a fully Web-integrated user interface, developers and administrative APIs, a widely scalable video network topology based on both multicast domains and unicast tunnels, and demonstrated multiplatform support. This has led to its rapidly expanding production use for national and international scientific collaborations in more than 60 countries. We are also in the process of creating a 'testbed video network' and developing the necessary middleware to support a set of new and essential requirements for rapid data exchange, and a high level of interactivity in large-scale scientific collaborations. These include a set of tunable, scalable differentiated network services adapted to each of the data streams associated with a large number of collaborative sessions, policy-based and network state-based resource scheduling, authentication, and optional encryption to maintain confidentiality of inter-personal communications. High performance testbed video networks will be established in ESnet and Internet2 to test and tune the implementation, using a few target application-sets.