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Sample records for arctic kara sea

  1. Severnaya Zemlya, Arctic Russia: a nucleation area for Kara Sea ice sheets during the Middle to Late Quaternary

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moller, P.; Lubinski, D.J.; Ingolfsson, O.; Forman, S.L.; Seidenkrantz, M.S.; Bolshiyanov, D.Y.; Lokrantz, H.; Antonov, O.; Pavlov, M.; Ljung, K.; Zeeberg, J.J.; Andreev, A.

    2006-01-01

    Quaternary glacial stratigraphy and relative sea-level changes reveal at least four expansions of the Kara Sea ice sheet over the Severnaya Zemlya Archipelago at 79°N in the Russian Arctic, as indicated from tills interbedded with marine sediments, exposed in stratigraphic superposition, and from ra

  2. NODC Standard Product: International ocean atlas Volume 2 - Biological atlas of the Arctic Seas 2000 - Plankton of the Barents and Kara Seas (1 disc set) (NODC Accession 0098568)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Presented in this CD-ROM are physical and biological data for the region extending from the Barents Sea to the Kara Sea during 158 scientific cruises for the period...

  3. NODC Standard Product: Climatic atlas of the Arctic Seas 2004 - Database of the Barents, Kara, Laptev, and White Seas - Oceanography and marine biology (NODC Accession 0098061)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This Atlas presents primary data on meteorology, oceanography, and hydrobiology from the Barents, Kara, Laptev, and White Seas, which were collected during the...

  4. Dissolved inorganic carbon, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the POLARSTERN in the Arctic Ocean, Kara Sea and Laptev (or Nordenskjold) Sea from 1993-08-06 to 1993-10-05 (NODC Accession 0113593)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0113593 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from POLARSTERN in the Arctic Ocean, Kara Sea and Laptev (or...

  5. pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the POLARSTERN in the Arctic Ocean, Kara Sea and Laptev (or Nordenskjold) Sea from 1995-07-07 to 1995-09-20 (NODC Accession 0116408)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0116408 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from POLARSTERN in the Arctic Ocean, Kara Sea and Laptev (or...

  6. Radioactivity in the Arctic Seas. Report for the International Arctic Seas Assessment Project (IASAP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report provides comprehensive information on environmental conditions in the Arctic Seas as required for the study of possible radiological consequences from dumped high level radioactive wastes in the Kara Sea. The report describes the oceanography of the regions, with emphasis on the Kara and Barents Seas, including the East Novaya Zemlya Fjords. The ecological description concentrates on biological production, marine food-weds and fisheries in the Arctic Seas. The report presents data on radionuclide concentrations in the Kara and Barents Seas and uses these data to estimate the inventories of radionuclides currently in the marine environment of the Kara and Barents Seas

  7. Belugas (Delphinapterus leucas of the Barents, Kara and Laptev seas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei N Boltunov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews published information on the white whale or beluga (Delphinapterus leucas inhabiting the Barents, Kara and Laptev seas. Some data obtained during multi-year aerial reconnaissance of sea ice in the Russian Arctic are also included. Ice conditions, considered one of the major factors affecting distribution of belugas, are described. The number of belugas inhabiting the Russian Arctic is unknown. Based on analysis of published and unpublished information we believe that the primary summer habitats of belugas in the Western Russian Arctic lie in the area of Frants-Josef Land, in the Kara Sea and in the western Laptev Sea. Apparently most belugas winter in the Barents Sea. Although it has been suggested that a considerable number of animals winter in the Kara Sea, there is no direct evidence for this. Apparent migrations of animals are regularly observed at several sites: the straits of the Novaya Zemlya Archipelago, the waters north of the archipelago, and Vilkitskiy Strait between the Kara and Laptev seas. Calving and mating take place in summer, and the beluga mother feeds a calf for at least a year. Females mature earlier than males, and about 30% of mature females in a population are barren. Sex ratio is apparently close to 1:1. The diet of the beluga in the region includes fish and crustaceans and shows considerable spatial and temporal variations. However, polar cod (Boreogadus saida is the main prey most of the year, and whitefish (Coregonidae contribute in coastal waters in summer. Usually belugas form groups of up to 10 related individuals of different ages, while large aggregations are common during seasonal migrations or in areas with abundant and easily available food. Beluga whaling in Russia has a history of several centuries. The highest catches were taken in the 1950s and 1960s, when about 1,500 animals were caught annually in the Western Russian Arctic. In the 1990s, few belugas were

  8. Severnaya Zemlya, arctic Russia: a nucleation area for Kara Sea ice sheets during the Middle to Late Quaternary

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Möller, Per; Lubinski, David J.; Ingólfsson, Ólafur;

    2006-01-01

    raised-beach sequences that occur at altitudes up to 140 m a.s.l. Chronologic control is provided by AMS 14C, electron-spin resonance, green-stimulated luminescence, and aspartic-acid geochronology. Major glaciations followed by deglaciation and marine inundation occurred during MIS 10-9, MIS 8-7, MIS 6......-5e and MIS 5d-3. The MIS 6-5e event, associated with the high marine limit, implies ice-sheet thickness of >2000 m only 200 km from the deep Arctic Ocean, consistent with published evidence of ice grounding at ~1000 m water depth in the central Arctic Ocean. Till fabrics and glacial tectonics record...

  9. A lithosphere-scale structural model of the Barents Sea and Kara Sea region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Klitzke

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The Barents Sea and Kara Sea region as part of the European Arctic shelf, is geologically situated between the Proterozoic East-European Craton in the south and early Cenozoic passive margins in the north and the west. Proven and inferred hydrocarbon resources encouraged numerous industrial and academic studies in the last decades which brought along a wide spectrum of geological and geophysical data. By evaluating all available interpreted seismic refraction and reflection data, geological maps and previously published 3-D-models, we were able to develop a new lithosphere-scale 3-D-structural model for the greater Barents Sea and Kara Sea region. The sedimentary part of the model resolves four major megasequence boundaries (earliest Eocene, mid-Cretaceous, mid-Jurassic and mid-Permian. Downwards, the 3-D-structural model is complemented by the top crystalline crust, the Moho and a newly calculated lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB. The thickness distribution of the main megasequences delineates five major subdomains differentiating the region (the northern Kara Sea, the southern Kara Sea, the eastern Barents Sea, the western Barents Sea and the oceanic domain comprising the Norwegian-Greenland Sea and the Eurasia Basin. The vertical resolution of five sedimentary megasequences allows comparing for the first time the subsidence history of these domains directly. Relating the sedimentary structures with the deeper crustal/lithospheric configuration sheds some light on possible causative basin forming mechanisms that we discuss. The newly calculated LAB deepens from the typically shallow oceanic domain in three major steps beneath the Barents and Kara shelves towards the West-Siberian Basin in the east. Thereby, we relate the shallow continental LAB and slow/hot mantle beneath the southwestern Barents Sea with the formation of deep Paleozoic/Mesozoic rift basins. Thinnest continental lithosphere is observed beneath Svalbard and the NW

  10. Branched glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers and crenarchaeol record post-glacial sea level rise and shift in source of terrigenous brGDGTs in the Kara Sea (Arctic Ocean)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jonge, C.; Stadnitskaia, Alina; Cherkashov, G.; Sinninghe Damste, J.S.

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluates the glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraether (GDGT) distribution and provenance in sediments(spanning a minimum of 13.3 ka) from the St. Anna Trough (Northern Kara Sea). The site has experiencedextensive fluctuation in the delivery of river-derived organic matter (OM), caused by a e

  11. Mechanism of seasonal Arctic sea ice evolution and Arctic amplification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kwang-Yul; Hamlington, Benjamin D.; Na, Hanna; Kim, Jinju

    2016-09-01

    Sea ice loss is proposed as a primary reason for the Arctic amplification, although the physical mechanism of the Arctic amplification and its connection with sea ice melting is still in debate. In the present study, monthly ERA-Interim reanalysis data are analyzed via cyclostationary empirical orthogonal function analysis to understand the seasonal mechanism of sea ice loss in the Arctic Ocean and the Arctic amplification. While sea ice loss is widespread over much of the perimeter of the Arctic Ocean in summer, sea ice remains thin in winter only in the Barents-Kara seas. Excessive turbulent heat flux through the sea surface exposed to air due to sea ice reduction warms the atmospheric column. Warmer air increases the downward longwave radiation and subsequently surface air temperature, which facilitates sea surface remains to be free of ice. This positive feedback mechanism is not clearly observed in the Laptev, East Siberian, Chukchi, and Beaufort seas, since sea ice refreezes in late fall (November) before excessive turbulent heat flux is available for warming the atmospheric column in winter. A detailed seasonal heat budget is presented in order to understand specific differences between the Barents-Kara seas and Laptev, East Siberian, Chukchi, and Beaufort seas.

  12. Pronounced anomalies of air, water, ice conditions in the Barents and Kara Seas, and the Sea of Azov

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gennady G. Matishov

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyses the anomalous hydrometeorological situation that occurred at the beginning of 2012 in the seas of the Russian Arctic and Russian South. Atmospheric blocking in the temperate zone and the extension of the Siberian High to the Iberian Peninsula (known as the Voeikov et al. axis led to a positive anomaly of air and water temperatures and a decrease in the ice extent in the Barents and Kara Seas. At the same time a prolonged negative air temperature anomaly was recorded in central and southern Europe and led to anomalously severe ice conditions in the Sea of Azov. Winter hydrographic conditions in the Barents and Kara Seas are illustrated by a unique set of observations made using expendable bathythermosalinographs (XCTD.

  13. A dynamical model of Kara Sea land-fast ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olason, Einar

    2016-05-01

    This paper introduces modifications to the traditional viscous-plastic sea-ice dynamical model, which are necessary to model land-fast ice in the Kara Sea in a realistic manner. The most important modifications are an increase in the maximum viscosity from the standard value of ζmax=>(2.5×108s>)P to ζmax=>(1013s>)P, and to use a solver for the momentum equation capable of correctly solving for small ice velocities (the limit here is set to 10-4 m/s). Given these modifications, a necessary condition for a realistic fast-ice simulation is that the yield curve give sufficient uniaxial compressive strength. This is consistent with the idea that land-fast ice in the Kara Sea forms primarily via static arching. The modified model is tested and tuned using forcing data and observations from 1997 and 1998. The results show that it is possible to model land-fast ice using this model with the modifications mentioned above. The model performs well in terms of modeled fast-ice extent, but suffers from unrealistic break-ups during the start and end of the fast-ice season. The main results are that fast ice in the Kara Sea is supported by arching of the ice, the arches footers resting on a chain of islands off shore.

  14. The fate of gas hydrates in the Barents Sea and Kara Sea region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klitzke, Peter; Scheck-Wenderoth, Magdalena; Schicks, Judith; Luzi-Helbing, Manja; Cacace, Mauro; Jacquey, Antoine; Sippel, Judith; Faleide, Jan Inge

    2016-04-01

    The Barents Sea and Kara Sea are located in the European Arctic. Recent seismic lines indicate the presence of gas hydrates in the Barents Sea and Kara Sea region. Natural gas hydrates contain huge amounts of methane. Their stability is mainly sensitive to pressure and temperature conditions which make them susceptible for climate change. When not stable, large volumes of methane will be released in the water column and - depending on the water depth - may also be released into the atmosphere. Therefore, studying the evolution in time and space of the gas hydrates stability zone in the Barents Sea region is of interest for both environmental impact and energy production. In this study, we assess the gas hydrate inventory of the Barents Sea and Kara Sea under the light of increasing ocean bottom temperatures in the next 200 years. Thereby, we make use of an existing 3D structural and thermal model which resolves five sedimentary units, the crystalline crust and the lithospheric mantle. The sedimentary units are characterised by the prevailing lithology and porosity including effects of post-depositional erosion which strongly affect the local geothermal gradient. Governing equations for the conductive 3D thermal field and momentum balance have been integrated in a massively parallel finite-element-method based framework (MOOSE). The MOOSE framework provides a powerful and flexible platform to solve multiphysics problems implicitly on unstructured meshes. First we calculate the present-day steady-state 3D thermal field. Subsequently, we use the latter as initial condition to calculate the transient 3D thermal field for the next 200 years considering an ocean temperature model as upper boundary. Temperature and load distributions are then used to calculate the thickness of the gas hydrate stability zone for each time step. The results show that the gas hydrate stability zone strongly varies in the region due to the local geothermal gradient changes. The latter

  15. Impact of continental runoff and melted sea ice on spatial distribution of carbonate parameters and nutrients in the Kara and Laptev Seas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polukhin, Alexander; Kostyleva, Anna; Protsenko, Elizaveta; Stepanova, Svetlana; Yakubov, Shamil; Makkaveev, Petr

    2016-04-01

    It is well-known that the Kara and Laptev seas are strongly affected by large amount of fresh water coming from the great Siberian rivers (the Ob' River, the Yenisei River and the Lena River). Expeditions of the Shirshov Institute of Oceanology were directed on investigation of freshening of these two Arctic seas. We have large collection of data (CTD, nutrients, carbonate system parameters) from the Kara Sea expeditions (1993, 2007, 2011, 2013, 2014 years) and the newest data from the last expedition to the Kara and Laptev Seas in 2015. Employment of these materials along with archival data on mentioned seas gives us an opportunity to trace variability of hydrochemical parameters in conditions of changing climate. From year to year in our expeditions we see reduction of sea-ice cover on the water area of the Kara Sea, changes in freshwater discharge and different seasonal variability of hydrochemical structure under influence of continental runoff. Moreover we notice some falling of carbonate system parameters such as pH and alkalinity. Hereby we can estimate processes of acidification in the Russian Arctic and reveal main stressors. This work is supported by Russian Science Foundation (project №14-50-00095).

  16. Potential ocean–atmosphere preconditioning of late autumn Barents-Kara sea ice concentration anomaly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin P. King

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Many recent studies have revealed the importance of the climatic state in November on the seasonal climate of the subsequent winter. In particular, it has been shown that interannual variability of sea ice concentration (SIC over the Barents-Kara (BK seas in November is linked to winter atmospheric circulation anomaly that projects on the North Atlantic Oscillation. Understanding the lead–lag processes involving the different components of the climate system from autumn to winter is therefore important. This note presents dynamical interpretation for the ice-ocean–atmosphere relationships that can affect the BK SIC anomaly in late autumn. It is found that cyclonic (anticyclonic wind anomaly over the Arctic in October, by Ekman drift, can be responsible for positive (negative SIC in the BK seas in November. The results also suggest that ocean heat transport via the Barents Sea Opening in September and October can contribute to BK SIC anomaly in November.

  17. A seasonal comparison of zooplankton communities in the Kara Sea - With special emphasis on overwintering traits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosobokova, Ksenia Nikolaevna; Hirche, Hans-Juergen

    2016-06-01

    Siberian marginal seas cover large parts of the marine Arctic and host unique zooplankton communities. Detailed knowledge of their community structure and life history traits is a prerequisite to predict their response to ongoing and future climate and anthropogenic changes although winter data is extremely rare. Here data are presented from winter samples (February and April) in four biogeographic regions of the Kara Sea. Comparison of community composition and zooplankton abundance/biomass with data collected during summer showed lower diversity in winter, mainly due to the absence of freshwater species. In contrast to many other northern regions, seasonal biomass differences were relatively small. Year-round high biomass is maintained through a large share of small copepod species and constantly high share of the chaetognath Parasagitta elegans. An advanced state of gonad maturation and reproduction was observed in winter in herbivorous, omnivorous, and carnivorous species, e.g. the copepods Calanus glacialis, Drepanopus bungei, Limnocalanus macrurus, Oithona similis, Pseudocalanus major, Pseudocalanus minutus/acuspes, Paraeuchaeta glacialis, Microcalanus pygmaeus, and euphausiids, hydromedusae, and pteropods. Meroplanktonic larvae of nudibranchia, polychaeta and bivalvia were also registered. Close to the Yenisei mouth, abundance of eggs and larvae of various taxa exceeded older stages. Our data show that the brackish-water zone of the Kara Sea hosts specific communities with omnivorous species efficiently exploiting local resources during the winter and utilizing them for winter reproduction.

  18. Productivity, chlorophyll a, Photosynthetically Active Radiation (PAR) and other phytoplankton data from the Arctic Ocean, Bering Sea, Chukchi Sea, Beaufort Sea, East Siberian Sea, Kara Sea, Barents Sea, and Arctic Archipelago measured between 17 April, 1954 and 30 May, 2006 compiled as part of the Arctic System Science Primary Production (ARCSS-PP) observational synthesis project (NODC Accession 0063065)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Arctic Ocean primary production data were assembled from original input data archived in various international databases, provided by individual investigators or in...

  19. Human impact on dynamics of Barents and Kara Seas Coasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogorodov, Stanislav

    2013-04-01

    The coasts of Barents and Kara Seas which are composed of unconsolidated deposits have poor erosion resistance qualities. In natural conditions such coasts may retreat with a rate of 1 to 2 m a year. Under the influence of human activities this rate can double and even triple. Over the last twenty years the human impact on the natural coastal geosystems has noticeably increased due to the latest oil and gas developments on the sea shelf and coasts of the Russian North. A range of facilities - oil custody terminals for drilling and production platforms, submerged pipelines, ports and other industrial features and residential infrastructure - are currently being operated in the coastal and shelf zones. In most of the cases no morphodynamic or lithodynamic features of the coastal zone had been taken into account during the construction or operation of these facilities. This results in a disturbance of the sediment transport in the coastal zone, which triggers active erosion of both the shore itself and the coastal slope beneath. The operated facilities themselves are then threatened as their destruction is possible and often no new facilities can be constructed in the disturbed area. The operating companies have to bear forced nonmanufacturing expenses to protect or move their facilities of oil and gas industry to new areas. We may cite here three instances for Barents and Kara Seas where human impact has already brought in negative effects. One of the examples is Varandey Coast of the Barents Sea. From 1979 to 2012 a deliberate destruction of the dune chain of the barrier beach by vehicle traffic and a removal of the beach material for construction needs led to a quick intensification of the coastal retreat here. And now, storm surges without hindrance penetrate inland for several kilometers. Let's move further east to the Kara Sea: on to Kharasavey Coast to the Yamal Peninsula. A large-scale extraction of sediments from the coastal slope has resulted in a depletion

  20. On the link between Barents-Kara sea ice variability and European blocking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggieri, P.; Buizza, R.; Visconti, G.

    2016-05-01

    This study examines the connection between the variability of sea ice concentration in the Barents and Kara (B-K) seas and winter European weather on an intraseasonal time scale. Low sea ice regimes in autumn and early winter over the B-K seas are shown to affect the strength and position of the polar vortex, and increase the frequency of blocking regimes over the Euro-Atlantic sector in late winter. A hypothesis is presented on the mechanism that links sea ice over the B-K seas and circulation regimes in the North Atlantic, and is investigated considering 34 years of European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts reanalysis data. Four key steps have been identified, starting from a local response of the near-surface fluxes and modification of the upper tropospheric wave pattern, to the stratospheric adjustment and the tropospheric response in the North Atlantic. The proposed mechanism explains the delayed, late winter response of the North Atlantic Oscillation to the late autumn sea ice reduction, which has been found both in observations and model experiments. It also provides valuable insights on how the reduction of Arctic sea ice can influence the position of the tropospheric jet in the Euro-Atlantic sector.

  1. Dumping of radioactive waste and investigation of contamination in the Kara Sea. Results from 3 years of investigations (1992-1994) in the Kara Sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strand, P. [Statens Straalevern, Oesteraas (Norway); Foeyn, L. [Norsk Inst. for Vannforskning, Oslo (Norway); Nikitin, A.I. [SPA ``Typhoon``, Roshydromet (Russian Federation)] [and others

    1996-03-01

    The report summarises the results obtained from the joint Russian-Norwegian investigation concerning the consequences of dumping of radioactive waste in the Kara Sea. Three expeditions were undertaken to the Kara Sea and the present dumping sites for radioactive waste. Samples of water, sediments and biota were collected and analysed. An impact and risk assessment was performed, based on the information provided through the joint cooperation. Enhanced levels and artificially produced radionuclides in the sediments collected in the very close vicinity of almost all localised dumped objects, demonstrate that leakage occur. No contribution from dumped radioactive waste was observed in the open Kara Sea. Due to the potential for leakage from the dumped waste in the future and the presence of other potential sources in the area, a regular monitoring programme is highly recommended. 65 refs., 42 figs., 16 tabs.

  2. Tectonic structure, seismic stratigraphy and hydrocarbon potential of the North Kara Basin (Russian Arctic)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verzhbitsky, V.; Kosenkova, N.; Murzin, R.; Vasilyev, V.; Malysheva, S.; Komissarov, D.; Ananyev, V.; Roslov, Yu.; Khudoley, A.

    2012-04-01

    North Kara shelf represents one of the remote and still poorly studied sedimentary megabasins of Russian West Arctic. North Kara area lacks any offshore wells so the understanding of its structure is based on the geology of adjacent East Barents Basin, as well as surrounding land areas (Taimyr, Severnaya and Novaya Zemlya fold belts) and stratigraphic columns of the scattered Arctic Islands. It is widely believed that North Kara shelf is mostly composed of Riphean-Paleozoic sedimentary units, underlain by Precambrian basement (North Kara massif), and represents one of the most promising areas of the Russian Arctic for hydrocarbon (mostly oil) discoveries. Our study is based on the reinterpretation of several regional seismic lines acquired by Sevmorgeo. We used the main Paleozoic and Mesozoic tectonic events known for Severnaya Zemlya Archipelago and Taimyr Peninsula for interpretation of the age of main seismic complexes/boundaries within the North Kara sedimentary cover (first of all within the Priseverozemelsky Trough). We correlated the sharp angular unconformity in the lower part of sedimentary succession with Cambrian/Ordovician unconformity described earlier on the nearby Severnaya Zemlya onshore domain. It is likely that the pre-Ordovician tectonic event corresponds to the Late Baikalian (Timanian) orogeny, which took place on Timan-Pechora and Novaya Zemlya areas. Above the unconformity we proposed the occurrence of Ordovician-Silurian shelfal sedimentary sequence of ~ 2 km thickness. This strata are overlain by thick (~3-4 km) progradational unit. It is likely that this sequence should correspond to molassic deposits of old red sandstones, related to the regional Caledonian orogeny. We believe that general structural pattern of the North Kara region was formed in Late Carboniferous-Early Permian time as a result of Kara massif/Siberian Craton collision-related Hercynian orogeny of Taimyr-Severnaya Zemlya domain. This event led to gentle folding of the

  3. Arctic autumn sea ice decline and Asian winter temperature anomaly

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Na; LIN Lina; WANG Yingjie; KONG Bin; ZHANG Zhanhai; CHEN Hongxia

    2016-01-01

    Associations between the autumn Arctic sea ice concentration (SIC) and Asian winter temperature are discussed using the singular value decomposition analysis. Results show that in recent 33 years reduced autumn Arctic sea ice is accompanied by Asian winter temperature decrease except in the Tibetan plateau and the Arctic Ocean and the North Pacific Ocean coast. The autumn SIC reduction excites two geopotential height centers in Eurasia and the north Arctic Ocean, which are persistent from autumn to winter. The negative center is in Barents Sea/Kara Sea. The positive center is located in Mongolia. The anomalous winds are associated with geopotential height centers, providing favorable clod air for the Asian winter temperature decreasing in recent 33 years. This relationship indicates a potential long-term outlook for the Asian winter temperature decrease as the decline of the autumn sea ice in the Arctic Ocean is expected to continue as climate warms.

  4. Fram Strait sea-ice sediment provinces based on silt and clay compositions identify Siberian Kara and Laptev seas as main source regions

    OpenAIRE

    Dethleff, Dirk; Kuhlmann, Gesa

    2010-01-01

    Fram Strait sea-ice sediments (SIS) contain on average more than 94% silt and clay. Both fractions were compared with bottom deposits of the Kara and Laptev seas to identify shelf sources of fine-grained Arctic SIS. Based on silt granulometry and clay mineral assemblages we determined Fram Strait SIS provinces. Western Fram Strait SIS has medium to fine silt compositions, whereas eastern Fram Strait SIS is enriched in fine silt.Western Fram Strait SIS clays (low smectite/high illite) were sta...

  5. Springtime microwave emissivity changes in the southern Kara Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, Robert G.; Anderson, Mark R.

    1994-01-01

    Springtime microwave brightness temperatures over first-year ice are examined for the southern Kara Sea. Snow emissivity changes are revealed by episodic drops in the 37- to 18-GHz brightness temperature gradient ratio measured by the Nimbus 7 scanning multichannel microwave radiometer. We suggest that the negative gradient ratios in spring 1982 result from increased scatter at 37 GHz due to the formation of a near-surface hoar layer. This interpretation is supported by the results of a surface radiation balance model that shows the melt signature occurring at below freezing temperatures but under clear-sky conditions with increased solar input to the surface. Published observations from the Greenland ice cap show a surface hoar layer forming under similar atmospheric conditions owing to the increased penetration and absorption of solar radiation just below the surface layer. In spring/early summer 1984 similar gradient ratio signatures occur. They appear to be due to several days of freeze-thaw cycling following the movement of a low-pressure system through the region. These changes in surface emissivity represent the transition from winter to summer conditions (as defined by the microwave response) and are shown to be regional in extent and to vary with the synoptic circulations.

  6. Arctic Sea Level Reconstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Peter Limkilde

    method.For oceanographic purposes, the altimetric record over the Arctic Ocean is inferiorin quality to that of moderate latitudes, but nonetheless an invaluable set of observations. During this project, newly processed Arctic altimetry from the ERS-1/-2 and Envisat missions has become available......Reconstruction of historical Arctic sea level is very difficult due to the limited coverage and quality of tide gauge and altimetry data in the area. This thesis addresses many of these issues, and discusses strategies to help achieve a stable and plausible reconstruction of Arctic sea level from...... 1950 to today.The primary record of historical sea level, on the order of several decades to a few centuries, is tide gauges. Tide gauge records from around the world are collected in the Permanent Service for Mean Sea Level (PSMSL) database, and includes data along the Arctic coasts. A reasonable...

  7. A 3D gravity and thermal model for the Barents Sea and Kara Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klitzke, Peter; Sippel, Judith; Faleide, Jan Inge; Scheck-Wenderoth, Magdalena

    2016-08-01

    In the frame of this study, we investigate the lithosphere-scale 3D physical state of the Barents Sea and Kara Sea region. Therefore, we test an existing 3D structural model against the gravitational field by considering the heterogeneous upper mantle to further assess the structural and density configuration of the continental crystalline crust. The resulting 3D density configuration of the crust is discussed in terms of its relationships with the spatial distribution of tectonically different domains. In addition, it provides the base for a lithology-controlled parameterisation of the crust with thermal properties to calculate the 3D conductive thermal field. The deeper thermal field is controlled by the depth configuration of the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary. Accordingly, deeper isotherms such as the 450 °C isotherm deepen from below the rifted SW Barents Sea towards the intracratonic basins of the eastern Barents Sea and Kara Sea, indicating an increase of the lithospheric strength in the same direction. Temperature measurements of the upper 800 m below the SW Barents Sea reveal an increased thermal gradient which cannot be reproduced by a steady-state 3D conductive model alone. Beside fault-induced fluid flow to be active there, an alternative scenario could involve a phase of subsidence long enough to increase the temperature of the upper 800 m, followed by an uplift and erosion phase that prevented the positive thermal anomaly to propagate towards larger depths. The final lithosphere-scale 3D model is the first to integrate the geological, density and thermal configuration of the entire Barents Sea and Kara Sea region and hence provides an ideal base for future thermomechanical studies addressing, for instance, questions on the present-day, past and future relationships between lithospheric strength and deformation.

  8. Skill improvement of dynamical seasonal Arctic sea ice forecasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krikken, Folmer; Schmeits, Maurice; Vlot, Willem; Guemas, Virginie; Hazeleger, Wilco

    2016-05-01

    We explore the error and improve the skill of the outcome from dynamical seasonal Arctic sea ice reforecasts using different bias correction and ensemble calibration methods. These reforecasts consist of a five-member ensemble from 1979 to 2012 using the general circulation model EC-Earth. The raw model reforecasts show large biases in Arctic sea ice area, mainly due to a differently simulated seasonal cycle and long term trend compared to observations. This translates very quickly (1-3 months) into large biases. We find that (heteroscedastic) extended logistic regressions are viable ensemble calibration methods, as the forecast skill is improved compared to standard bias correction methods. Analysis of regional skill of Arctic sea ice shows that the Northeast Passage and the Kara and Barents Sea are most predictable. These results show the importance of reducing model error and the potential for ensemble calibration in improving skill of seasonal forecasts of Arctic sea ice.

  9. Benchmarking of numerical models describing the dispersion of radionuclides in the Arctic Seas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scott, E.M.; Gurbutt, P.; Harms, I.;

    1997-01-01

    As part of the International Arctic Seas Assessment Project (IASAP) of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), a working group was created to model the dispersal and transfer of radionuclides released from radioactive waste disposed of in the Kara Sea. The objectives of this group are: (1...

  10. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in bottom sediments of the Kara Sea shelf, Gulf of Ob and Yenisei Bay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahle, Salve; Savinov, Vladimir M; Matishov, Gennadij G; Evenset, Anita; Naes, Kristoffer

    2003-05-01

    PAH concentration and distribution has been examined in surface sediments samples from the Kara Sea, Russia. The study includes 13 samples from the South-eastern Kara Sea shelf, one sample from the south-western part of the sea, 4 samples from the Baydaratskaya Bay, 5 samples from the Gulf of Ob and 4 samples from the Yenisei Bay, collected in August-September 1993-1994. Cluster analysis and principal component analysis (PCA) were used to identify common patterns and possible sources of PAHs. The total PAH concentration (sum of two- to six-ring aromatic hydrocarbons) in the Kara Sea sediments was generally lower than in the Barents Sea sediments and comparable to the levels in the Pechora and White seas. Two- and three-ring aromatic hydrocarbons predominated in Kara Sea sediments, which indicate a relatively stronger petrogenic origin than that in the adjacent seas. The highest total PAH concentrations within the Kara Sea were found in sediments from the Yenisei Bay and in the South-western part of the Kara Sea in the Eastern Novaya Zemlya Trough. The PAHs of the Yenisei Bay sediments were dominated by perylene and PAHs of petrogenic origin, but had also a strong indication of PAHs of pyrogenic origin. The dominating PAH group in the South-western part of the Kara Sea were four- to six-ring aromatic hydrocarbons, indicating pyrogenic origin. Perylene levels were high in all the Kara Sea samples, and highest levels were found in areas of strong terrigenous influence. The most probable source is decaying peat products being transported to the Kara Sea by both large and small rivers. PMID:12699918

  11. Summer Arctic sea fog

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Synchronous or quasi-synchronous sea-land-air observations were conducted using advanced sea ice, atmospheric and marine instruments during China' s First Arctic Expedition. Based on the Precious data from the expedition, it was found that in the Arctic Ocean, most part of which is covered with ice or is mixed with ice, various kinds of sea fog formed such as advection fog, radiation fog and vapor fog. Each kind has its own characteristic and mechanics of creation. In the southern part of the Arctic Ocean, due to the sufficient warm and wet flow there, it is favorable for advection fog to form,which is dense and lasts a long time. On ice cap or vast floating ice, due to the strong radiation cooling effect, stable radiating fog is likely to form. In floating ice area there forms vapor fog with the appearance of masses of vapor from a boiling pot, which is different from short-lasting land fog. The study indicates that the reason why there are many kinds of sea fog form in the Arctic Ocean is because of the complicated cushion and the consequent sea-air interaction caused by the sea ice distribution and its unique physical characteristics. Sea fog is the atmospheric phenomenon of sea-air heat exchange. Especially, due to the high albedo of ice and snow surface, it is diffcult to absorb great amount of solar radiation during the polar days. Besides, ice is a poor conductor of heat; it blocks the sea-air heat exchange.The sea-air exchange is active in floating ice area where the ice is broken. The sea sends heat to the atmosphere in form of latent heat; vapor fog is a way of sea-air heat exchange influencing the climate and an indicator of the extent of the exchange. The study also indicates that the sea also transports heat to the atmosphere in form of sensible heat when vapor fog occurs.

  12. Bacteriohopanepolyol distribution in Yenisei River and Kara Sea suspended particulate matter and sediments traces terrigenous organic matter input

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Jonge, Cindy; Talbot, Helen M.; Bischoff, Juliane; Stadnitskaia, Alina; Cherkashov, Georgy; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.

    2016-02-01

    Bacteriohopanepolyols (BHPs) are ubiquitous bacterial membrane lipids, encountered in soils, river and marine suspended particulate matter (SPM) and sediments. Their abundance and distribution provides a direct means to identify bacterial inputs and can be used to trace soil-derived bacterial organic matter (OM) and in some cases the presence of bacterial groups and their activities in aquatic systems. We have studied the BHP distribution in the SPM of a major Siberian River (Yenisei River) that crosses a large latitudinal gradient, draining a large part of Mongolia and Siberian Russia. The Yenisei River is the main river to flow into the Kara Sea, a shelf sea of the Arctic Ocean. We show that the BHP distribution and concentration of SPM and surface sediments of the Yenisei Outflow in the Kara Sea allow to trace soil-marker BHPs and evaluate the performance of the R‧soil index, a proxy developed to trace bacterial soil-derived OM. Soil-marker BHPs are present in the Yenisei River, and their concentration decreases from the Yenisei River Outflow into the offshore marine sediments. The R‧soil correlates well with an independent proxy for bacterial OM, the BIT-index (r2 = 0.82) and has a moderate correlation with the δ13Corg values, a bulk OM proxy for terrigenous input (r2 = 0.44). Consequently, the R‧soil index performs well in the Kara Sea, strengthening its application for tracing bacterial OM in the Arctic Ocean, both in modern and downcore sediments. Furthermore, a suite of BHPs that are characteristic for methanotrophic bacteria, i.e. 35-aminobacteriohopane-30,31,32,33,34-pentol (aminopentol) and 35-aminobacteriohopane-31,32,33,34-tetrol (aminotetrol), is encountered in the Yenisei Outflow sediments. These components are partly sourced from terrigenous sources, but are likely also produced in-situ in the marine sediments. The distribution of the pentafunctionalized cyclitol ether BHP in the marine systems is noteworthy, and indicates that it can

  13. Potential ocean–atmosphere preconditioning of late autumn Barents-Kara sea ice concentration anomaly

    OpenAIRE

    King, Martin P.; García-Serrano, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Many recent studies have revealed the importance of the climatic state in November on the seasonal climate of the subsequent winter. In particular, it has been shown that interannual variability of sea ice concentration (SIC) over the Barents-Kara (BK) seas in November is linked to winter atmospheric circulation anomaly that projects on the North Atlantic Oscillation. Understanding the lead lag processes involving the different components of the climate system from autumn to winter is therefo...

  14. The influence of climate change on the intensity of ice gouging at the Kara Sea bottom by hummocky formations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogorodov, Stanislav; Arkhipov, Vasily; Kokin, Osip; Natalia, Shabanova

    2016-04-01

    Sea ice as a zonal factor is an important passive and active relief-forming agent in the coastal-shelf zone of the Arctic and other freezing seas. The most dangerous process in relation to the hydrotechnical facilities is ice gouging - destructive mechanical impact of the ice of the ground, connected with the dynamics of the ice cover, formation of hummocks and stamukhas under the influence of hydrometeorologic factors and of the relief of the coastal-shelf zone. Underestimation of the ice gouging intensity can lead to damage of the engineering facilities, while excessive deepening increases the expenses of the construction. Finding the optimal variant and, by this, decreasing the risks of extreme situations is a relevant task of the science and practice. This task is complicated by the fact that the oil and gas infrastructure within the coastal and shelf areas of the freezing seas is currently being developed in the conditions of global climate change. In the present work, several results of the repeated sounding of bottom ice gouging microrelief within the area of the underwater pipeline crossing of the Baydaratskaya Bay, Kara Sea, are presented. Based on the results of the monitoring, as well as the analysis of literature sources and modeling it has been established that under the conditions of climate warming and sea ice reduction, the zone of the most intensive ice gouging is shifted landwards, on shallower water areas.

  15. Relating Regional Arctic Sea Ice and climate extremes over Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ionita-Scholz, Monica; Grosfeld, Klaus; Lohmann, Gerrit; Scholz, Patrick

    2016-04-01

    The potential increase of temperature extremes under climate change is a major threat to society, as temperature extremes have a deep impact on environment, hydrology, agriculture, society and economy. Hence, the analysis of the mechanisms underlying their occurrence, including their relationships with the large-scale atmospheric circulation and sea ice concentration, is of major importance. At the same time, the decline in Arctic sea ice cover during the last 30 years has been widely documented and it is clear that this change is having profound impacts at regional as well as planetary scale. As such, this study aims to investigate the relation between the autumn regional sea ice concentration variability and cold winters in Europe, as identified by the numbers of cold nights (TN10p), cold days (TX10p), ice days (ID) and consecutive frost days (CFD). We analyze the relationship between Arctic sea ice variation in autumn (September-October-November) averaged over eight different Arctic regions (Barents/Kara Seas, Beaufort Sea, Chukchi/Bering Seas, Central Arctic, Greenland Sea, Labrador Sea/Baffin Bay, Laptev/East Siberian Seas and Northern Hemisphere) and variations in atmospheric circulation and climate extreme indices in the following winter season over Europe using composite map analysis. Based on the composite map analysis it is shown that the response of the winter extreme temperatures over Europe is highly correlated/connected to changes in Arctic sea ice variability. However, this signal is not symmetrical for the case of high and low sea ice years. Moreover, the response of temperatures extreme over Europe to sea ice variability over the different Arctic regions differs substantially. The regions which have the strongest impact on the extreme winter temperature over Europe are: Barents/Kara Seas, Beaufort Sea, Central Arctic and the Northern Hemisphere. For the years of high sea ice concentration in the Barents/Kara Seas there is a reduction in the number

  16. Human impact on dynamics of western coast of Yamal, Kara sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, Dmitry; Noskov, Alexey; Belova, Nataliya; Kamalov, Anatoly; Arkhipov, Vasily; Ogorodov, Stanislav

    2010-05-01

    The western coast of Yamal around the site of Bovanenkovo-Ukhta gas pipeline landfall (Baydarata bay, Kara sea) consists of two types of shore, with specific kind of human impact for each of them. These are low and gentle accumulative shores, which in this case are most influenced since the landfall site is situated within this type, and high bluffy abrasion shores. The heaviness of impact depends on degree of anthropogenic activity influencing the topography (this degree relates to proximity to main construction sites and intensity of human activity), and natural relief features, mainly its resistance to anthropogenic destruction and ability to restore itself. Accumulative shores are more resistant to destruction; main morphogenetic processes are marine accumulation (mainly within tideland) and aeolian transport, especially in areas without vegetation (tideland, beach and often the onshore sand bar). In the meantime, most part of construction (dams, roads, buildings, infrastructural sites) is located within accumulative coast, since it's generally more stable and good for construction. Abrasion coast is more prone to destruction because of human activity, but is much less subject to human impact since no direct construction activity is held here, and main types of this impact are usually traffic of heavy motor transport and allocation of construction waste (often brought by the sea). There are the following types of direct human impact on topography at pipeline landfall construction sites: 1) construction of large artificial accumulative bodies (dams, banks, sand deposits), which leads to additional sediment inflow at the site; 2) creation of negative forms like pits and trenches while taking sand material for construction (leads to erosion and decrease in tideland and beach width, rebuilding of submerged bar system); 3) change of surface properties during construction and traffic, destruction or suppression of vegetation (leads to activation of erosion). The

  17. The economic development of the regional area of the Kara Sea: Features of icebreaker providing navigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koz'menko S. Yu.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a retrospective of historical and economic development of the waters and coast of the Kara Sea. The estimation of major minerals' reserves as well as the possibility of mining, especially oil and gas, in difficult Arctic conditions has been considered. The structure of sea lanes in the aspect of raw materials transportation using icebreakers has been substantiated. Some approaches to the diversification of routes and means of transportation of Arctic natural resources and ways of fleet modernization have been determined. Представлена историко-экономическая ретроспектива освоения акватории и побережья Карского моря в пределах регионального пространства Арктики. Выполнена оценка запасов основных полезных ископаемых, а также возможности разработки месторождений, особенно нефти и газа, в сложных арктических условиях. Обоснована структура морских коммуникаций в аспекте организации транспортировки сырья при ледокольном обеспечении. Определены подходы к диверсификации путей и средств транспортировки арктических природных ресурсов и направления модернизации флота

  18. The use of 59Ni, 99Tc, and 236U to monitor the release of radionuclides from objects containing spent nuclear fuel dumped in the Kara Sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Between 1965 and 1981, five objects and six naval reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) from four former Soviet Union submarines and a special container from the icebreaker Lenin, all containing damaged spent nuclear fuel (SNF) were dumped in a variety of containments, at four sites in the Kara Sea. The International Atomic Energy Agency initiated the International Arctic Seas Assessment Project (IASAP) to study the possible health and environmental effects from disposal of these objects. One outcome of the IASAP was an estimation of the radionuclide inventory and their release rates from these objects. A follow-on concern is the ability to detect the radionuclides released into the water column. The work reported here is the feasibility of using the long-lived radionuclides 59Ni, 99Tc, and 236U encased within these objects, to monitor the breakdown of the containments due to corrosion

  19. Temperature profile and other data collected using bottle casts in Barents, Kara and other Seas from 01 January 1963 to 26 December 1964 (NODC Accession 0002123)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and other data were collected using bottle casts from the AISBERG and other platforms in the Kara, Barents, White, Laptev, and Norwegian Sea....

  20. Characteristics of Arctic Ocean ice determined from SMMR data for 1979 - Case studies in the seasonal sea ice zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, M. R.; Crane, R. G.; Barry, R. G.

    1985-01-01

    Sea ice data derived from the Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer are examined for sections of the Arctic Ocean during early summer 1979. The temporary appearance of spuriously high multiyear ice fractions in the seasonal ice zones of the Kara and Barents Seas is a result of surface melt phenomena and the relative responses of the different channels to these effects. These spurious signatures can provide early identification of melt onset and additional information on surface characteristics.

  1. Numerical model of the ice cover evolution in Arctic Seas for the operational forecasting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Klyachkin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic-thermodynamic model of the ice cover evolution is used for operational 5‑day ice forecasts in the Russian Arctic seas and to obtain some statistical estimates of the ice cover state. The model is a numerical realization of the heat budget and the motion balance equations for sea and ice cover with appropriate boundary conditions. The statistical processing of the data resulted in revealing characteristics of seasonal and spatial variability of the ice compressionin the Barents and Kara Seas.

  2. [Metagenomic Analysis of Microbial Communities of the Sediments of the Kara Sea Shelf and the Yenisei Bay].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamaeva, E V; Galach'yants, Yu P; Khabudaev, K V; Petrova, D P; Pogodaeva, T V; Khodzher, T B; Zemskaya, T I

    2016-01-01

    Microbial diversity in the sediments of the Kara Sea shelf and the southern Yenisei Bay, differing in pore water mineralization, was studied using massive parallel pyrosequencing according to the 454 (Roche) technology. Members of the same phyla (Cyanobacteria, Verrucomicrobia, Actinobacteria, Proteobacteria, and Bacteroidetes) predominated in bacterial communities of the sediments, while their ratio and taxonomic composition varied within the phyla and depended on pore water mineralization. Increasing salinity gradient was found to coincide with increased share of the γ-Proteobacteria and decreased abundance of α- and β-Proteo- bacteria, as well as of the phyla Verrucomicrobia, Chloroflexi, Chlorobi, and Acidobacteria. Archaeal diversity was lower, with Thaumarchaeota predominant in the sediments with high and low mineralization, while Crenarchaeota predominated in moderately mineralized sediments. Microbial communities of the Kara Sea shelf and Yenisei Gulf sediments were found to contain the organisms capable of utilization of a broad spectrum of carbon sources, including gaseous and petroleum hydrocarbons. PMID:27476207

  3. History of sea ice in the Arctic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Polyak, Leonid; Alley, Richard B.; Andrews, John T.;

    2010-01-01

    Arctic sea-ice extent and volume are declining rapidly. Several studies project that the Arctic Ocean may become seasonally ice-free by the year 2040 or even earlier. Putting this into perspective requires information on the history of Arctic sea-ice conditions through the geologic past. This inf......Arctic sea-ice extent and volume are declining rapidly. Several studies project that the Arctic Ocean may become seasonally ice-free by the year 2040 or even earlier. Putting this into perspective requires information on the history of Arctic sea-ice conditions through the geologic past....... This information can be provided by proxy records fromthe Arctic Ocean floor and from the surrounding coasts. Although existing records are far from complete, they indicate that sea ice became a feature of the Arctic by 47 Ma, following a pronounced decline in atmospheric pCO2 after the Paleocene–Eocene Thermal...

  4. Collective doses to man from dumping of radioactive waste in the Arctic Seas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, S.P.; Iosjpe, M.; Strand, P.

    1997-01-01

    A box model for the dispersion of radionuclides in the marine environment covering the Arctic Ocean and the North Atlantic Ocean has been constructed. Collective doses from ingestion pathways have been calculated from unit releases of the radionuclides H-3, (CO)-C-60, Ni-63, Sr-90, I-129, (CS...... produce further away from the Arctic Ocean. Collective doses were calculated for two release scenarios, both of which are based on information of the dumping of radioactive waste in the Barents and Kara Seas by the former Soviet Union and on preliminary information from the International Arctic Sea...... of the fuel ignoring the barriers that prevent direct contact between the fuel and the seawater. The second scenario selected assumed that releases of radionuclides from spent nuclear fuel do not occur until after failure of the protective barriers. All other liquid and solid radioactive waste was assumed...

  5. Arctic whaling : proceedings of the International Symposium Arctic Whaling February 1983

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacob, H.K. s'; Snoeijing, K

    1984-01-01

    Contents: D.M. Hopkins and Louie Marincovich Jr. Whale Biogeography and the history of the Arctic Basin P.M. Kellt, J.H.W. Karas and L.D. Williams Arctic Climate: Past, Present and Future Torgny E. Vinje On the present state and the future fate of the Arctic sea ice cover P.J.H. van Bree On the biol

  6. Arctic tides from GPS on sea ice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kildegaard Rose, Stine; Skourup, Henriette; Forsberg, René

    The presence of sea-ice in the Arctic Ocean plays a significant role in the Arctic climate. Sea ice dampens the ocean tide amplitude with the result that global tidal models which use only astronomical data perform less accurately in the polar regions. This study presents a kinematic processing...... of Global Positioning System (GPS) buoys placed on sea-ice at five different sites north of Greenland for the study of sea level height and tidal analysis to improve tidal models in the Central Arctic. The GPS measurements are compared with the Arctic tidal model AOTIM-5, which assimilates tide...

  7. Ice retreat in the Russian Arctic seas and assessment of the availability of the Northern Sea Route from satellite passive microwave observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalina, E. V.

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents data on the sea ice area decline in the Northern Hemisphere and in the Russian Arctic seas, on the Northern Sea Route in particular, calculated from passive microwave satellite data. Observations show that the Arctic sea ice has reduced by an average of 5% per decade from November 1978 to the present day. It is noted that, since 2007, the highest sea ice area variability has been observed, which increases the uncertainty of the forecast of the ice coverage in the Arctic seas and thus increases risk for ships in ice-covered waters of northern seas. It is demonstrated that the decrease in summer sea ice area, observed at the end of the melt season, is much more intense than the total decrease in the Arctic sea ice area. On average it is 13% for September for the Arctic as a whole and from 24 to 40% per decade for the seas of the Russian Arctic. The study of changes in the ice conditions in the Northern Sea Route has been carried out for one of the optimal sailing routes. The results indicate a decrease in the ice concentration on the route in the summer months and almost complete route opening in September for the period from 2008 and 2012. It is shown that data from microwave radiometers can be used in the study of ice conditions in the Kara Gates and Vilkitsky Strait. The ice concentration reduction in both water channels is indicated. In the Kara Gates it is 15% and in the Vilkitsky Strait it is 9.5% per decade.

  8. Cesium-137 global fallout into the Ob river basin and its influence on the Kara sea contamination - Weapons fallout cesium-137 in the Ob' catchment landscapes and its influence on radioactive contamination of the Kara sea: Western Siberia, Russia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Semenkov, Ivan N.; Miroshnikov, Alexey Yu. [The Organization of Russian Academy of Sciences Institute of geology of ore deposits, petrography, mineralogy and geochemistry Russian Academy of Sciences (Russian Federation)

    2014-07-01

    There are several high level {sup 137}Cs anomaly zones detected in the deposits of the SW part of the Kara Sea. These anomaly zones were formed in the Ob' and the Enisey river estuaries due to the geochemical 'river-sea' boarder barrier. Level of radiocaesium specific activity reaches 120 Bq*kg{sup -1} in the deposits from these zones. Radiochemical enterprises occur in the both river basins. Their activity results in caesium-137 transfer into the river net. Vast area is contaminated by {sup 137}Cs after nuclear weapons in Semipalatinsk test-site and Kyshtym disaster in the Ob' river basin. Moreover, caesium comes to the Ob' and the Enisey river basins with global atmospheric fallout. The inflow of global fallout caesium-137 to the catchments is 660 kCi (320 kCi including radioactive decay) that is 4 times higher than {sup 137}Cs emission due to Fukushima disaster. Therefore, these river basins as any other huge catchment are an important sources of radioactive contamination of the Arctic Ocean. The aim of our research is to study behavior of global fallout caesium-137 in the landscapes of the Ob and the Enisey river basins. We studied caesium-137 behavior on the example of first order catchments in taiga, wetland, forest-steppe, steppe, and semi-arid landscapes. Geographic information system (GIS) was made. The tenth-order catchments (n=154, Horton coding system) shape 20-groups due to topsoil properties controlling cesium mobility. Eleven first-order basins, characterized 7 groups of tenth order catchments, were studied. And 700 bulk-core soil samples were collected in 2011-2013. Cesium runoff is calculated for 3 first-order river basins in taiga and forest-steppe landscapes. Storage of global fallout caesium-137 declines from undisturbing taiga first-order river basin (90% of cumulative fallout including radioactive decay)> arable steppe and fores-steppe (70 - 75%)> undisturbing wetland (60%). Caesium-137 transfer is high in arable lands

  9. Seasonality of Air-sea-ice-land Variables for Arctic Tundra in Northern Eurasia and North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, U. S.; Walker, D. A.; Raynolds, M. K.; Steele, M.; Epstein, H.; Jia, G.; Comiso, J. C.; Pinzon, J. E.; Tucker, C. J.

    2009-12-01

    The strength of tundra productivity trends as measured by the annual maximum Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (MaxNDVI) and time integrated NDVI (TI-NDVI) vary around the Arctic over the 1982-2008 period. Our analysis suggests that the timing of terrestrial vegetation growth is connected to seasonal patterns of sea-ice concentrations, ocean temperatures and land surface temperatures. This study used SSMI estimates of sea ice concentration, based on a bootstrap algorithm and AVHRR radiometric surface temperature. Summer Warmth Index (SWI) was calculated as the sum from May to August of the degree months above freezing of surface temperature at each pixel and is an accepted measure of plant growth potential. The Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) represents vegetation greenness and has been used extensively to monitor changes in the Arctic. The albedo of green plants varies with solar radiation wavelength, which is the basis for the NDVI index. The analysis was conducted within 50 km of the Arctic coastline to focus on the region of maximum maritime influence. Time series of regional sea-ice concentration, SWI and NDVI were constructed for the 50-km width domains for the Pan-Arctic, North America, Eurasia and Arctic subregions. Standard climate analysis techniques were applied to the regional time series to investigate the seasonality of sea ice, NDVI and SWI. MaxNDVI has increased in the 50-km land domain contiguous to the Beaufort Sea by 17% since 1982, whereas it has only increased by 3% in the coastal Kara Sea region. Analysis of semimonthly MaxNDVI indicates that the vegetation greens up more rapidly in the spring in the Beaufort than the W. Kara and the Kara has slightly higher NDVI in the fall. The climatological weekly sea ice concentrations in 50-km coastal domain displays an earlier breakup in the Beaufort and a later freeze-up in the Kara Sea area. Regional differences in the seasonal cycle can in part explain the spatially varied trends

  10. Severe winter weather as a response to the lowest Arctic sea-ice anomalies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Hongxia; LIU Na; ZHANG Zhanhai

    2013-01-01

    Possible impact of reduced Arctic sea-ice on winter severe weather in China is investigated regarding the snowstorm over southern China in January 2008. The sea-ice conditions in the summer (July-September) and fall (September-November) of 2007 show that the sea-ice is the lowest that year. During the summer and fall of 2007, sea ice displayed a significant decrease in the East Siberian, the northern Chukchi Sea, the western Beaufort Sea, the Barents Sea, and the Kara Sea. A ECHAM5.4 atmospheric general circula-tion model is forced with realistic sea-ice conditions and strong thermal responses with warmer surface air temperature and higher-than-normal heat flux associated with the sea-ice anomalies are found. The model shows remote atmospheric responses over East Asia in January 2008, which result in severe snowstorm over southern China. Strong water-vapor transported from the Bay of Bengal and from the Pacific Ocean related to Arctic sea-ice anomalies in the fall (instead of summer) of 2007 is considered as one of the main causes of the snowstorm formation.

  11. Change of sea ice content in the Arctic and the associated climatic effects: detection and simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. I. Mokhov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Modeling results of the impact of sea surface temperature and sea ice extent changes over the last decades on the formation of weather and climate anomalies are presented. It was found that the Arctic sea ice area reduction may lead to anti-cyclonic regimes’ formation causing anomalously cold winters in particular on the Russian territory. Using simulation with an atmospheric general circulation model, it is shown that the Early 20th Century Warming must have been accompanied by a large negative Arctic sea ice area anomaly in winter time. The results imply a considerable role of long-term natural climate variations in the modern sea ice area decrease. Estimates of the possible probability’s changes of the dangerous events of strong winds and high waves in the Arctic basin and favorable navigation conditions for the Northern Sea Route in the 21st century are made based on numerical model calculations. An increase of extreme wave height is found to the middle of the 21st century for Kara and Chukchi Seas as a consequence of prolonged run length and increased surface winds.

  12. Influence of global climatic processes on environment The Arctic seas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kholmyansky, Mikhael; Anokhin, Vladimir; Kartashov, Alexandr

    2016-04-01

    One of the most actual problems of the present is changes of environment of Arctic regions under the influence of global climatic processes. Authors as a result of the works executed by them in different areas of the Russian Arctic regions, have received the materials characterising intensity of these processes. Complex researches are carried out on water area and in a coastal zone the White, the Barents, the Kara and the East-Siberian seas, on lake water areas of subarctic region since 1972 on the present. Into structure of researches enter: hydrophysical, cryological observations, direct measurements of temperatures, the analysis of the drill data, electrometric definitions of the parametres of a frozen zone, lithodynamic and geochemical definitions, geophysical investigations of boreholes, studying of glaciers on the basis of visual observations and the analysis of photographs. The obtained data allows to estimate change of temperature of a water layer, deposits and benthonic horizon of atmosphere for last 25 years. On the average they make 0,38⁰C for sea waters, 0,23⁰C for friable deposits and 0,72⁰C for atmosphere. Under the influence of temperature changes in hydrosphere and lithosphere of a shelf cryolithic zone changes the characteristics. It is possible to note depth increase of roof position of the cryolithic zone on the most part of the studied water area. Modern fast rise in temperature high-ice rocks composing coast, has led to avalanche process thermo - denudation and to receipt in the sea of quantity of a material of 1978 three times exceeding level Rise in temperature involves appreciable deviation borders of the Arctic glacial covers. On our monitoring measurements change of the maintenance of oxygen in benthonic area towards increase that is connected with reduction of the general salinity of waters at the expense of fresh water arriving at ice thawing is noticed. It, in turn, leads to change of a biogene part of ecosystem. The executed

  13. Skill improvement of seasonal Arctic sea ice forecasts using bias-correction and ensemble calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krikken, Folmer; Hazeleger, Wilco; Vlot, Willem; Schmeits, Maurice; Guemas, Virginie

    2016-04-01

    We explore the standard error and skill of dynamical seasonal sea ice forecasts of the Arctic using different bias-correction and ensemble calibration methods. The latter is often used in weather forecasting, but so far has not been applied to Arctic sea ice forecasts. We use seasonal predictions of Arctic sea ice of a 5-member ensemble forecast using the fully coupled GCM EC-Earth, with model initial states obtained by nudging towards ORAS4 and ERA-Interim. The raw model forecasts contain large biases in total sea ice area, especially during the summer months. This is mainly caused by a difference in average seasonal cycle between EC-Earth and observations, which translates directly into the forecasts yielding large biases. Further errors are introduced by the differences in long term trend between the observed sea ice, and the uninitialised EC-earth simulation. We find that extended logistic regression (ELR) and heteroscedastic extended logistic regression (HELR) both prove viable ensemble calibration methods, and improve the forecasts substantially compared to standard bias correction techniques. No clear distinction between ELR and HELR is found. Forecasts starting in May have higher skill (CRPSS > 0 up to 5 months lead time) than forecasts starting in August (2-3 months) and November (2-3 months), with trend-corrected climatology as reference. Analysis of regional skill in the Arctic shows distinct differences, where mainly the Arctic ocean and the Kara and Barents sea prove to be one of the more predictable regions with skilful forecasts starting in May up to 5-6 months lead time. Again, forecasts starting in August and November show much lower regional skill. Overall, it is still difficult to beat relative simple statistical forecasts, but by using ELR and HELR we are getting reasonably close to skilful seasonal forecasts up to 12 months lead time. These results show there is large potential, and need, for using ensemble calibration in seasonal forecasts of

  14. Arctic Landfast Sea Ice 1953-1998

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The files in this data set contain landfast sea ice data (monthly means) gathered from both Russian Arctic and Antarctic Research Institute (AARI) and Canadian Ice...

  15. Arctic and Southern Ocean Sea Ice Concentrations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Monthly sea ice concentration for Arctic (1901 to 1995) and Southern oceans (1973 to 1990) were digitized on a standard 1-degree grid (cylindrical projection) to...

  16. SONARC: A Sea Ice Monitoring and Forecasting System to Support Safe Operations and Navigation in Arctic Seas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, S. R.; Babiker, M.; Sandven, S.; Muckenhuber, S.; Korosov, A.; Bobylev, L.; Vesman, A.; Mushta, A.; Demchev, D.; Volkov, V.; Smirnov, K.; Hamre, T.

    2015-12-01

    Sea ice monitoring and forecasting systems are important tools for minimizing accident risk and environmental impacts of Arctic maritime operations. Satellite data such as synthetic aperture radar (SAR), combined with atmosphere-ice-ocean forecasting models, navigation models and automatic identification system (AIS) transponder data from ships are essential components of such systems. Here we present first results from the SONARC project (project term: 2015-2017), an international multidisciplinary effort to develop novel and complementary ice monitoring and forecasting systems for vessels and offshore platforms in the Arctic. Automated classification methods (Zakhvatkina et al., 2012) are applied to Sentinel-1 dual-polarization SAR images from the Barents and Kara Sea region to identify ice types (e.g. multi-year ice, level first-year ice, deformed first-year ice, new/young ice, open water) and ridges. Short-term (1-3 days) ice drift forecasts are computed from SAR images using feature tracking and pattern tracking methods (Berg & Eriksson, 2014). Ice classification and drift forecast products are combined with ship positions based on AIS data from a selected period of 3-4 weeks to determine optimal vessel speed and routing in ice. Results illustrate the potential of high-resolution SAR data for near-real-time monitoring and forecasting of Arctic ice conditions. Over the next 3 years, SONARC findings will contribute new knowledge about sea ice in the Arctic while promoting safe and cost-effective shipping, domain awareness, resource management, and environmental protection.

  17. Arctic sea ice melt, the Polar vortex, and mid-latitude weather: Are they connected?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vihma, Timo; Overland, James; Francis, Jennifer; Hall, Richard; Hanna, Edward; Kim, Seong-Joong

    2015-04-01

    The potential of recent Arctic changes to influence broader hemispheric weather is a difficult and controversial topic with considerable skepticism, as time series of potential linkages are short (relative to chaotic weather events is small. A way forward is through further understanding of potential atmospheric dynamic mechanisms. Although not definitive of change in a statistical or in a causality sense, the exceptionally warm Arctic winters since 2007 do contain increased variability according to some climate indices, with six negative (and two positive) Arctic Oscillation atmospheric circulation index events that created meridional flow reaching unusually far north and south. High pressure anomalies developed east of the Ural Mountains in Russia in response to sea-ice loss in the Barents/Kara Seas, which initiated eastward-propagating wave trains of high and low pressure that advected cold air over central and eastern Asia. Increased Greenland blocking and greater geopotential thickness related to low-level temperatures increases led to northerly meridional flow into eastern North America, inducing persistent cold periods. Arctic connections in Europe and western North America are less clear. The quantitative impact of potential Arctic change on mid-latitude weather will not be resolved within the foreseeable future, yet new approaches to high-latitude atmospheric dynamics can contribute to improved extended range forecasts as outlined by the WMO/Polar Prediction Program and other international activities.

  18. Predictability of the Arctic sea ice edge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goessling, H. F.; Tietsche, S.; Day, J. J.; Hawkins, E.; Jung, T.

    2016-02-01

    Skillful sea ice forecasts from days to years ahead are becoming increasingly important for the operation and planning of human activities in the Arctic. Here we analyze the potential predictability of the Arctic sea ice edge in six climate models. We introduce the integrated ice-edge error (IIEE), a user-relevant verification metric defined as the area where the forecast and the "truth" disagree on the ice concentration being above or below 15%. The IIEE lends itself to decomposition into an absolute extent error, corresponding to the common sea ice extent error, and a misplacement error. We find that the often-neglected misplacement error makes up more than half of the climatological IIEE. In idealized forecast ensembles initialized on 1 July, the IIEE grows faster than the absolute extent error. This means that the Arctic sea ice edge is less predictable than sea ice extent, particularly in September, with implications for the potential skill of end-user relevant forecasts.

  19. Contrasting Arctic and Antarctic sea ice temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vancoppenolle, Martin; Raphael, Marilyn; Rousset, Clément; Vivier, Frédéric; Moreau, Sébastien; Delille, Bruno; Tison, Jean-Louis

    2016-04-01

    Sea ice temperature affects the sea ice growth rate, heat content, permeability and habitability for ice algae. Large-scale simulations with NEMO-LIM suggest large ice temperature contrasts between the Arctic and the Antarctic sea ice. First, Antarctic sea ice proves generally warmer than in the Arctic, in particular during winter, where differences reach up to ~10°C. Second, the seasonality of temperature is different among the two hemispheres: Antarctic ice temperatures are 2-3°C higher in spring than they are in fall, whereas the opposite is true in the Arctic. These two key differences are supported by the available ice core and mass balance buoys temperature observations, and can be attributed to differences in air temperature and snow depth. As a result, the ice is found to be habitable and permeable over much larger areas and much earlier in late spring in the Antarctic as compared with the Arctic, which consequences on biogeochemical exchanges in the sea ice zone remain to be evaluated.

  20. Recent Arctic Sea Level Variations from Satellites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ole Baltazar; Piccioni, Gaia

    2016-01-01

    Sea level monitoring in the Arctic region has always been an extreme challenge for remote sensing, and in particular for satellite altimetry. Despite more than two decades of observations, altimetry is still limited in the inner Arctic Ocean. We have developed an updated version of the Danish...... Technical University's (DTU) Arctic Ocean altimetric sea level timeseries starting in 1993 and now extended up to 2015 with CryoSat-2 data. The time-series covers a total of 23 years, which allows higher accuracy in sea level trend determination. The record shows a sea level trend of 2.2 ± 1.1 mm....../y for the region between 66°N and 82°N. In particular, a local increase of 15 mm/y is found in correspondence to the Beaufort Gyre. An early estimate of the mean sea level trend budget closure in the Arctic for the period 2005–2015 was derived by using the Equivalent Water Heights obtained from GRACE Tellus...

  1. Regional variability of acidification in the Arctic: a sea of contrasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. E. Popova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The Arctic Ocean is a region that is particularly vulnerable to the impact of ocean acidification driven by rising atmospheric CO2, with potentially negative consequences for calcifying organisms such as coccolithophorids and foraminiferans. In this study, we use an ocean-only general circulation model, with embedded biogeochemistry and a comprehensive description of the ocean carbon cycle, to study the response of pH and saturation states of calcite and aragonite to rising atmospheric pCO2 and changing climate in the Arctic Ocean. Particular attention is paid to the strong regional variability within the Arctic, and, for comparison, simulation results are contrasted with those for the global ocean. Simulations were run to year 2099 using the RCP8.5 (an Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC Fifth Assessment Report (AR5 scenario with the highest concentrations of atmospheric CO2. The separate impacts of the direct increase in atmospheric CO2 and indirect effects via impact of climate change (changing temperature, stratification, primary production and freshwater fluxes were examined by undertaking two simulations, one with the full system and the other in which atmospheric CO2 was prevented from increasing beyond its preindustrial level (year 1860. Results indicate that the impact of climate change, and spatial heterogeneity thereof, plays a strong role in the declines in pH and carbonate saturation (Ω seen in the Arctic. The central Arctic, Canadian Arctic Archipelago and Baffin Bay show greatest rates of acidification and Ω decline as a result of melting sea ice. In contrast, areas affected by Atlantic inflow including the Greenland Sea and outer shelves of the Barents, Kara and Laptev seas, had minimal decreases in pH and Ω because diminishing ice cover led to greater vertical mixing and primary production. As a consequence, the projected onset of undersaturation in respect to aragonite is highly variable regionally within the

  2. Estimated inventory of radionuclides in Former Soviet Union Naval Reactors dumped in the Kara Sea and their associated health risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radionuclide inventories have bin estimated for the reactor cores, reactor components, and primary system corrosion products in the former Soviet Union naval reactors dumped at the Abrosimov Inlet, Tsivolka Inlet, Stepovoy Inlet, Techeniye Inlet, and Novaya Zemlya Depression sites in the Kara Sea between 1965 and 1988. For the time of disposal, the inventories are estimated at 17 to 66 kCi of actinides plus daughters and 1695 to 4782 kCi of fission products in the reactor cores, 917 to 1127 kCi of activation products in the reactor components, and 1.4 to 1.6 kCi of activation products in the primary system corrosion products. At the present time, the inventories are estimated to have decreased to 6 to 24 kCi of actinides plus daughters and 492 to 540 kCi of fission products in the reactor cores, 124 to 126 kCi of activation products in the reactor components, and 0.16 to 0.17 kCi of activation products in the primary system corrosion products. All actinide activities are estimated to be within a factor of two

  3. Arctic sea ice bordering on the North Atlantic and intera- nnual climate variations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Variations of winter Arctic sea ice bordering on the North Atlantic are closely related to climate variations in the same region. When winter North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) index is positive (negative) anomaly phase, Icelandic Low is obviously deepened and shifts northwards (southwards). Simultaneously, the Subtropical High over the North Atlantic is also intensified, and moves northwards (south-wards). Those anomalies strengthen (weaken) westerly be-tween Icelandic Low and the Subtropical High, and further result in positive (negative) sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies in the mid-latitude of the North Atlantic, and increase (decrease) the warm water transportation from the mid-latitude to the Barents Sea, which causes positive (nega-tive) mixed-layer water temperature anomalies in the south part of the Barents Sea. Moreover, the distribution of anom-aly air temperature clearly demonstrates warming (cooling) in northern Europe and the subarctic regions (including the Barents Sea) and cooling (warming) in Baffin Bay/ Davis Strait. Both of distributions of SST and air temperature anomalies directly result in sea ice decrease (increase) in the Barents/Kara Seas, and sea ice increase (decrease) in Baffin Bay/Davis Strait.

  4. The effect of tides on dense water formation in Arctic shelf seas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. F. Postlethwaite

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Ocean tides are not explicitly included in many ocean general circulation models, which will therefore omit any interactions between tides and the cryosphere. We present model simulations of the wind and buoyancy driven circulation and tides of the Barents and Kara Seas, using a 25 km × 25 km 3-D ocean circulation model coupled to a dynamic and thermodynamic sea ice model. The modeled tidal amplitudes are compared with tide gauge data and sea ice extent is compared with satellite data. Including tides in the model is found to have little impact on overall sea ice extent but is found to delay freeze up and hasten the onset of melting in tidally active coastal regions. The impact that including tides in the model has on the salt budget is investigated and found to be regionally dependent. The vertically integrated salt budget is dominated by lateral advection. This increases significantly when tides are included in the model in the Pechora Sea and around Svalbard where tides are strong. Tides increase the salt flux from sea ice by 50% in the Pechora and White Seas but have little impact elsewhere. This study suggests that the interaction between ocean tides and sea ice should not be neglected when modeling the Arctic.

  5. The effect of tides on dense water formation in Arctic shelf seas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. F. Postlethwaite

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Ocean tides are not explicitly included in many ocean general circulation models, which will therefore omit any interactions between tides and the cryosphere. We present model simulations of the wind and buoyancy driven circulation and tides of the Barents and Kara Seas, using a 25 km × 25 km 3-D ocean circulation model coupled to a dynamic and thermodynamic sea ice model. The modeled tidal amplitudes are compared with tide gauge data and sea ice extent is compared with satellite data. Including tides in the model is found to have little impact on overall sea ice extent but is found to delay freeze up and hasten the onset of melting in tidally active coastal regions. The impact that including tides in the model has on the salt budget is investigated and found to be regionally dependent. The vertically integrated salt budget is dominated by lateral advection. This increases significantly when tides are included in the model in the Pechora Sea and around Svalbard where tides are strong. Tides increase the salt flux from sea ice by 50% in the Pechora and White Seas but have little impact elsewhere. This study suggests that the interaction between ocean tides and sea ice should not be neglected when modeling the Arctic.

  6. Radionuclides in the Arctic seas from the former Soviet Union: Potential health and ecological risks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Layton, D W; Edson, R; Varela, M; Napier, B

    1999-11-15

    The primary goal of the assessment reported here is to evaluate the health and environmental threat to coastal Alaska posed by radioactive-waste dumping in the Arctic and Northwest Pacific Oceans by the FSU. In particular, the FSU discarded 16 nuclear reactors from submarines and an icebreaker in the Kara Sea near the island of Novaya Zemlya, of which 6 contained spent nuclear fuel (SNF); disposed of liquid and solid wastes in the Sea of Japan; lost a {sup 90}Sr-powered radioisotope thermoelectric generator at sea in the Sea of Okhotsk; and disposed of liquid wastes at several sites in the Pacific Ocean, east of the Kamchatka Peninsula. In addition to these known sources in the oceans, the RAIG evaluated FSU waste-disposal practices at inland weapons-development sites that have contaminated major rivers flowing into the Arctic Ocean. The RAIG evaluated these sources for the potential for release to the environment, transport, and impact to Alaskan ecosystems and peoples through a variety of scenarios, including a worst-case total instantaneous and simultaneous release of the sources under investigation. The risk-assessment process described in this report is applicable to and can be used by other circumpolar countries, with the addition of information about specific ecosystems and human life-styles. They can use the ANWAP risk-assessment framework and approach used by ONR to establish potential doses for Alaska, but add their own specific data sets about human and ecological factors. The ANWAP risk assessment addresses the following Russian wastes, media, and receptors: dumped nuclear submarines and icebreaker in Kara Sea--marine pathways; solid reactor parts in Sea of Japan and Pacific Ocean--marine pathways; thermoelectric generator in Sea of Okhotsk--marine pathways; current known aqueous wastes in Mayak reservoirs and Asanov Marshes--riverine to marine pathways; and Alaska as receptor. For these waste and source terms addressed, other pathways, such as

  7. Sea Ice, Hydrocarbon Extraction, Rain-on-Snow and Tundra Reindeer Nomadism in Arctic Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, B. C.; Kumpula, T.; Meschtyb, N.; Laptander, R.; Macias-Fauria, M.; Zetterberg, P.; Verdonen, M.

    2015-12-01

    It is assumed that retreating sea ice in the Eurasian Arctic will accelerate hydrocarbon development and associated tanker traffic along Russia's Northern Sea Route. However, oil and gas extraction along the Kara and Barents Sea coasts will likely keep developing rapidly regardless of whether the Northwest Eurasian climate continues to warm. Less certain are the real and potential linkages to regional biota and social-ecological systems. Reindeer nomadism continues to be a vitally important livelihood for indigenous tundra Nenets and their large herds of semi-domestic reindeer. Warming summer air temperatures over the NW Russian Arctic have been linked to increases in tundra productivity, longer growing seasons, and accelerated growth of tall deciduous shrubs. These temperature increases have, in turn, been linked to more frequent and sustained summer high-pressure systems over West Siberia, but not to sea ice retreat. At the same time, winters have been warming and rain-on-snow (ROS) events have become more frequent and intense, leading to record-breaking winter and spring mortality of reindeer. What is driving this increase in ROS frequency and intensity is not clear. Recent modelling and simulation have found statistically significant near-surface atmospheric warming and precipitation increases during autumn and winter over Arctic coastal lands in proximity to regions of sea-ice loss. During the winter of 2013-14 an extensive and lasting ROS event led to the starvation of 61,000 reindeer out of a population of ca. 300,000 animals on Yamal Peninsula, West Siberia. Historically, this is the region's largest recorded mortality episode. More than a year later, participatory fieldwork with nomadic herders during spring-summer 2015 revealed that the ecological and socio-economic impacts from this extreme event will unfold for years to come. There is an urgent need to understand whether and how ongoing Barents and Kara Sea ice retreat may affect the region's ancient

  8. Radionuclides in the Arctic seas from the former Soviet Union: Potential health and ecological risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary goal of the assessment reported here is to evaluate the health and environmental threat to coastal Alaska posed by radioactive-waste dumping in the Arctic and Northwest Pacific Oceans by the FSU. In particular, the FSU discarded 16 nuclear reactors from submarines and an icebreaker in the Kara Sea near the island of Novaya Zemlya, of which 6 contained spent nuclear fuel (SNF); disposed of liquid and solid wastes in the Sea of Japan; lost a 90Sr-powered radioisotope thermoelectric generator at sea in the Sea of Okhotsk; and disposed of liquid wastes at several sites in the Pacific Ocean, east of the Kamchatka Peninsula. In addition to these known sources in the oceans, the RAIG evaluated FSU waste-disposal practices at inland weapons-development sites that have contaminated major rivers flowing into the Arctic Ocean. The RAIG evaluated these sources for the potential for release to the environment, transport, and impact to Alaskan ecosystems and peoples through a variety of scenarios, including a worst-case total instantaneous and simultaneous release of the sources under investigation. The risk-assessment process described in this report is applicable to and can be used by other circumpolar countries, with the addition of information about specific ecosystems and human life-styles. They can use the ANWAP risk-assessment framework and approach used by ONR to establish potential doses for Alaska, but add their own specific data sets about human and ecological factors. The ANWAP risk assessment addresses the following Russian wastes, media, and receptors: dumped nuclear submarines and icebreaker in Kara Sea--marine pathways; solid reactor parts in Sea of Japan and Pacific Ocean--marine pathways; thermoelectric generator in Sea of Okhotsk--marine pathways; current known aqueous wastes in Mayak reservoirs and Asanov Marshes--riverine to marine pathways; and Alaska as receptor. For these waste and source terms addressed, other pathways, such as atmospheric

  9. Linkages between Arctic sea ice cover, large-scale atmospheric circulation, and weather and ice conditions in the Gulf of Bothnia, Baltic Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Timo Vihma; Bin Cheng; Petteri Uotila; WEI Lixin; QIN Ting

    2014-01-01

    During years 1980/1981–2012/2013, inter-annual variations in sea ice and snow thickness in Kemi, in the northern coast of the Gulf of Bothnia, Baltic Sea, depended on the air temperature, snow fall, and rain. Inter-annual variations in the November—April mean air temperature, accumulated total precipitation, snow fall, and rain, as well as ice and snow thickness in Kemi and ice concentration in the Gulf of Bothnia correlated with inter-annual variations of the Paciifc Decadal Oscillation (PDO), Arctic Oscillation (AO), North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), Scandinavian Pattern (SCA), and Polar / Eurasian Pattern (PEU). The strong role of PDO is a new ifnding. In general, the relationships with PDO were approximately equally strong as those with AO, but rain and sea ice concentration were better correlated with PDO. The correlations with PDO were, however, not persistent; for a study period since 1950 the correlations were much lower. During 1980/1981—2012/2013, also the Paciifc / North American Pattern (PNA) and El Nino–Southern Oscillation (ENSO) had statistical connections with the conditions in the Gulf of Bothnia, revealed by analyzing their effects combined with those of PDO and AO. A reduced autumn sea ice area in the Arctic was related to increased rain and total precipitation in the following winter in Kemi. This correlation was signiifcant for the Pan-Arctic sea ice area in September, October, and November, and for the November sea ice area in the Barents / Kara seas.

  10. Improvement in simulation of Eurasian winter climate variability with a realistic Arctic sea ice condition in an atmospheric GCM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study investigates how much a realistic Arctic sea ice condition can contribute to improve simulation of the winter climate variation over the Eurasia region. Model experiments are set up using different sea ice boundary conditions over the past 24 years (i.e., 1988–2011). One is an atmospheric model inter-comparison (AMIP) type of run forced with observed sea-surface temperature (SST), sea ice, and greenhouse gases (referred to as Exp RSI), and the other is the same as Exp RSI except for the sea ice forcing, which is a repeating climatological annual cycle (referred to as Exp CSI). Results show that Exp RSI produces the observed dominant pattern of Eurasian winter temperatures and their interannual variation better than Exp CSI (correlation difference up to ∼0.3). Exp RSI captures the observed strong relationship between the sea ice concentration near the Barents and Kara seas and the temperature anomaly across Eurasia, including northeastern Asia, which is not well captured in Exp CSI. Lagged atmospheric responses to sea ice retreat are examined using observations to understand atmospheric processes for the Eurasian cooling response including the Arctic temperature increase, sea-level pressure increase, upper-level jet weakening and cold air outbreak toward the mid-latitude. The reproducibility of these lagged responses by Exp RSI is also evaluated. (letter)

  11. Improvement in Simulation of Eurasian Winter Climate Variability with a Realistic Arctic Sea Ice Condition in an Atmospheric GCM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Young-Kwon; Ham, Yoo-Geun; Jeong, Jee-Hoon; Kug, Jong-Seong

    2012-01-01

    The present study investigates how much a realistic Arctic sea ice condition can contribute to improve simulation of the winter climate variation over the Eurasia region. Model experiments are set up using different sea ice boundary conditions over the past 24 years (i.e., 1988-2011). One is an atmospheric model inter-comparison (AMIP) type of run forced with observed sea-surface temperature (SST), sea ice, and greenhouse gases (referred to as Exp RSI), and the other is the same as Exp RSI except for the sea ice forcing, which is a repeating climatological annual cycle (referred to as Exp CSI). Results show that Exp RSI produces the observed dominant pattern of Eurasian winter temperatures and their interannual variation better than Exp CSI (correlation difference up to approx. 0.3). Exp RSI captures the observed strong relationship between the sea ice concentration near the Barents and Kara seas and the temperature anomaly across Eurasia, including northeastern Asia, which is not well captured in Exp CSI. Lagged atmospheric responses to sea ice retreat are examined using observations to understand atmospheric processes for the Eurasian cooling response including the Arctic temperature increase, sea-level pressure increase, upper-level jet weakening and cold air outbreak toward the mid-latitude. The reproducibility of these lagged responses by Exp RSI is also evaluated.

  12. Anomalous Arctic surface wind patterns and their impacts on September sea ice minima and trend

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bingyi Wu

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available We used monthly mean surface wind data from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction/National Centers for Atmospheric Research (NCEP/NCAR reanalysis dataset during the period 1979–2010 to describe the first two patterns of Arctic surface wind variability by means of the complex vector empirical orthogonal function (CVEOF analysis. The first two patterns respectively account for 31 and 16% of its total anomalous kinetic energy. The leading pattern consists of the two subpatterns: the northern Laptev Sea (NLS pattern and the Arctic dipole (AD pattern. The second pattern contains the northern Kara Sea (NKS pattern and the central Arctic (CA pattern. Over the past two decades, the combined dynamical forcing of the first two patterns has contributed to Arctic September sea ice extent (SIE minima and its declining trend. September SIE minima are mainly associated with the negative phase of the AD pattern and the positive phase of the CA pattern during the summer (July to September season, and both phases coherently show an anomalous anticyclone over the Arctic Ocean. Wind patterns affect September SIE through their frequency and intensity. The negative trend in September SIE over the past two decades is associated with increased frequency and enhanced intensity of the CA pattern during the melting season from April to September. Thus, it cannot be simply attributed to the AD anomaly characterised by the second empirical orthogonal function mode of sea level pressure north of 70°N. The CA pattern exhibited interdecadal variability in the late 1990s, and an anomalous cyclone prevailed before 1997 and was then replaced by an anomalous anticyclone over the Arctic Ocean that is consistent with the rapid decline trend in September SIE. This paper provides an alternative way to identify the dominant patterns of climate variability and investigate their associated Arctic sea ice variability from a dynamical perspective. Indeed, this study

  13. The Last Arctic Sea Ice Refuge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfirman, S. L.; Tremblay, B.; Newton, R.; Fowler, C.

    2010-12-01

    Summer sea ice may persist along the northern flank of Canada and Greenland for decades longer than the rest of the Arctic, raising the possibility of a naturally formed refugium for ice-associated species. Observations and models indicate that some ice in this region forms locally, while some is transported to the area by winds and ocean currents. Depending on future changes in melt patterns and sea ice transport rates, both the central Arctic and Siberian shelf seas may be sources of ice to the region. An international system of monitoring and management of the sea ice refuge, along with the ice source regions, has the potential to maintain viable habitat for ice-associated species, including polar bears, for decades into the future. Issues to consider in developing a strategy include: + the likely duration and extent of summer sea ice in this region based on observations, models and paleoenvironmental information + the extent and characteristics of the “ice shed” contributing sea ice to the refuge, including its dynamics, physical and biological characteristics as well as potential for contamination from local or long-range sources + likely assemblages of ice-associated species and their habitats + potential stressors such as transportation, tourism, resource extraction, contamination + policy, governance, and development issues including management strategies that could maintain the viability of the refuge.

  14. Stratospheric Impacts on Arctic Sea Ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichler, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Long-term circulation change in the stratosphere can have substantial effects on the oceans and their circulation. In this study we investigate whether and how sea ice at the ocean surface responds to intraseasonal stratospheric variability. Our main question is whether the surface impact of stratospheric sudden warmings (SSWs) is strong and long enough to affect sea ice. A related question is whether the increased frequency of SSWs during the 2000s contributed to the rapid decrease in Arctic sea ice during this time. To this end we analyze observations of sea ice, NCEP/NCAR reanalysis, and a long control integration with a stratospherically-enhanced version of the GFDL CM2.1 climate model. From both observations and the model we find that stratospheric extreme events have a demonstrable impact on the distribution of Arctic sea ice. The areas most affected are near the edge of the climatological ice line over the North Atlantic, North Pacific, and the Arctic Ocean. The absolute changes in sea ice coverage amount to +/-10 %. Areas and magnitudes of increase and decrease are about the same. It is thus unlikely that the increased SSW frequency during the 2000s contributed to the decline of sea ice during that period. The sea ice changes are consistent with the impacts of a negative NAO at the surface and can be understood in terms of (1) dynamical change due to altered surface wind stress and (2) thermodynamical change due to altered temperature advection. Both dynamical and thermodynamical change positively reinforce each other in producing sea change. A simple advection model is used to demonstrate that most of the sea ice change can be explained from the sea ice drift due to the anomalous surface wind stress. Changes in the production or melt of sea ice by thermodynamical effects are less important. Overall, this study adds to an increasing body of evidence that the stratosphere not only impacts weather and climate of the atmosphere but also the surface and

  15. The early twentieth century warming and winter Arctic sea ice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Semenov

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The Arctic has featured the strongest surface warming over the globe during the recent decades, and the temperature increase has been accompanied by a rapid decline in sea ice extent. However, little is known about Arctic sea ice change during the early twentieth century warming (ETCW during 1920–1940, also a period of a strong surface warming, both globally and in the Arctic. Here, we investigate the sensitivity of Arctic winter surface air temperature (SAT to sea ice during 1875–2008 by means of simulations with an atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM forced by estimates of the observed sea surface temperature (SST and sea ice concentration. The Arctic warming trend since the 1960s is very well reproduced by the model. In contrast, ETCW in the Arctic is hardly captured. This is consistent with the fact that the sea ice extent in the forcing data does not strongly vary during ETCW. AGCM simulations with observed SST but fixed sea ice reveal a strong dependence of winter SAT on sea ice extent. In particular, the warming during the recent decades is strongly underestimated by the model, if the sea ice extent does not decline and varies only seasonally. This suggests that a significant reduction of winter Arctic sea ice extent may have also accompanied the early twentieth century warming, pointing toward an important link between anomalous sea ice extent and Arctic surface temperature variability.

  16. The early twentieth century warming and winter Arctic sea ice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Semenov

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The Arctic featured the strongest surface warming over the globe during the recent decades, and the temperature increase was accompanied by a rapid decline in sea ice extent. However, little is known about Arctic sea ice change during the Early Twentieth Century Warming (ETCW during 1920–1940, also a period of a strong surface warming, both globally and in the Arctic. Here, we investigate the sensitivity of Arctic winter surface air temperature (SAT to sea ice during 1875–2008 by means of simulations with an atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM forced by estimates of the observed sea surface temperature (SST and sea ice concentration. The Arctic warming trend since the 1960s is very well reproduced by the model. In contrast, ETCW in the Arctic is hardly captured. This is consistent with the fact that the sea ice extent in the forcing data does not strongly vary during ETCW. AGCM simulations with observed SST but fixed sea ice reveal a strong dependence of winter SAT on sea ice extent. In particular, the warming during the recent decades is strongly underestimated by the model, if the sea ice extent does not decline and varies only seasonally. This suggests that a significant reduction of Arctic sea ice extent may have also accompanied the Early Twentieth Century Warming, pointing toward an important link between anomalous sea ice extent and Arctic surface temperature variability.

  17. The Kara Bogaz Gol Bay, Lake Issyk Kul and Aral Sea sediments as archives of climate change in the Aral-Caspian catchment basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 5-m long core of bottom sediments from the Kara Bogaz Gol Bay of the Caspian Sea, 4- m and 2-m cores from the Issyk Kul Lake of the Thian Shan Mountains, and a 4-m core from the Aral Sea were examined for evidence of climatic and environmental changes in the catchment basin of the Central Asia Region. The distribution of 18O and 13C in the bulk carbonates, 2H in the pore water, radiocarbon age, oxygen and hydrogen isotopes in the lake water, abundance of CaCO3, MgCO3, and the basic salt ions of Na+, K+, Cl-, SO42- in the cores were measured. The isotope and hydrogeochemical data of the Kara Bogaz Gol Bay sediments prove a historical scenario for the basin which suggests that fresh water has been discharged to the Caspian Sea during the Bay's humid episode across the Central Asia Region (∼ 9 Ka BP). Isotope and geochemical evidence indicate that the sedimentation of the upper core segment has taken place during the last ∼2.2 Ka BP in the environment of sea water recharged from the Central Caspian Basin. The period of between 4.3 and 6 Ka BP, which relates to the core depth interval of between 170 cm and 260 cm, demonstrates the most dramatic change in the sedimentation rate in the Issyk Kul Lake. It means that active melting of the mountain glaciers and warming of climate has happened just in this period. The swamp plant peat layers at depths of 230 cm and 130 cm indicate that during 3.5-3.7 Ka BP and 1.6-1.8 Ka BP the Aral Sea dried and broke up into a number of lakes and swamps. Sediment cores taken from the bottom of the Kara Bogaz Gol Bay, Lake Issyk Kul and Aral Sea show periodic rise and fall in water levels during the last ∼10 000 years. Two peat layers within the sediment core of the Aral Sea and dated at 1.6-1.8 Ka BP and 3.5-3.7 Ka BP demonstrate that this reservoir also periodically dried. (author)

  18. Marine Transportation Implications of the Last Arctic Sea Ice Refuge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brigham, L. W.

    2010-12-01

    Marine access is increasing throughout the Arctic Ocean and the 'Last Arctic Sea Ice Refuge' may have implications for governance and marine use in the region. Arctic marine transportation is increasing due to natural resource developemnt, increasing Arctic marine tourism, expanded Arctic marine research, and a general linkage of the Arctic to the gloabl economy. The Arctic Council recognized these changes with the release of the Arctic Marine Shipping Assessment of 2009. This key study (AMSA)can be viewed as a baseline assessment (using the 2004 AMSA database), a strategic guide for a host of stakeholders and actors, and as a policy document of the Arctic Council. The outcomes of AMSA of direct relevance to the Ice Refuge are within AMSA's 17 recommendations provided under three themes: Enhancing Arctic Marine Safety, Protecting Arctic People and the Environment, and Building the Arctic Marine Infrastructure. Selected recommendations of importance to the Ice Refuge include: a mandatory polar navigation code; identifying areas of heightened ecological and cultural significance; potential designation of special Arctic marine areas; enhancing the tracking and monitoring of Arctic marine traffic; improving circumpolar environmental response capacity; developing an Arctic search and rescue agreement; and, assessing the effects of marine transportation on marine mammals. A review will be made of the AMSA outcomes and how they can influence the governance, marine use, and future protection of this unique Arctic marine environment.

  19. Arctic whaling: proceedings of the International Symposium Arctic Whaling February 1983

    OpenAIRE

    H.K. 's Jacob; Snoeijing, K

    1984-01-01

    Contents: D.M. Hopkins and Louie Marincovich Jr. Whale Biogeography and the history of the Arctic Basin P.M. Kellt, J.H.W. Karas and L.D. Williams Arctic Climate: Past, Present and Future Torgny E. Vinje On the present state and the future fate of the Arctic sea ice cover P.J.H. van Bree On the biology of whales Edward Mitchell Ecology of North Atlantic Boreal and Arctic Monodontid and Mysticete Whales Allen P. McCartney History of native whaling in the Arctic and Subarctic Albert A. Dekin Jr...

  20. SEDNA: Sea ice Experiment - Dynamic Nature of the Arctic

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Sea Ice Experiment - Dynamic Nature of the Arctic (SEDNA) is an international collaborative effort to improve the understanding of the interaction between sea...

  1. Arctic Sea Ice Predictability and the Sea Ice Prediction Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiggins, H. V.; Stroeve, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    Drastic reductions in Arctic sea ice cover have increased the demand for Arctic sea ice predictions by a range of stakeholders, including local communities, resource managers, industry and the public. The science of sea-ice prediction has been challenged to keep up with these developments. Efforts such as the SEARCH Sea Ice Outlook (SIO; http://www.arcus.org/sipn/sea-ice-outlook) and the Sea Ice for Walrus Outlook have provided a forum for the international sea-ice prediction and observing community to explore and compare different approaches. The SIO, originally organized by the Study of Environmental Change (SEARCH), is now managed by the new Sea Ice Prediction Network (SIPN), which is building a collaborative network of scientists and stakeholders to improve arctic sea ice prediction. The SIO synthesizes predictions from a variety of methods, including heuristic and from a statistical and/or dynamical model. In a recent study, SIO data from 2008 to 2013 were analyzed. The analysis revealed that in some years the predictions were very successful, in other years they were not. Years that were anomalous compared to the long-term trend have proven more difficult to predict, regardless of which method was employed. This year, in response to feedback from users and contributors to the SIO, several enhancements have been made to the SIO reports. One is to encourage contributors to provide spatial probability maps of sea ice cover in September and the first day each location becomes ice-free; these are an example of subseasonal to seasonal, local-scale predictions. Another enhancement is a separate analysis of the modeling contributions. In the June 2014 SIO report, 10 of 28 outlooks were produced from models that explicitly simulate sea ice from dynamic-thermodynamic sea ice models. Half of the models included fully-coupled (atmosphere, ice, and ocean) models that additionally employ data assimilation. Both of these subsets (models and coupled models with data

  2. A conceptual model of an Arctic sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    St-Laurent, P.; Straneo, F.; Barber, D. G.

    2012-06-01

    We propose a conceptual model for an Arctic sea that is driven by river runoff, atmospheric fluxes, sea ice melt/growth, and winds. The model domain is divided into two areas, the interior and boundary regions, that are coupled through Ekman and eddy fluxes of buoyancy. The model is applied to Hudson and James Bays (HJB, a large inland basin in northeastern Canada) for the period 1979-2007. Several yearlong records from instruments moored within HJB show that the model results are consistent with the real system. The model notably reproduces the seasonal migration of the halocline, the baroclinic boundary current, spatial variability of freshwater content, and the fall maximum in freshwater export. The simulations clarify the important differences in the freshwater balance of the western and eastern sides of HJB. The significant role played by the boundary current in the freshwater budget of the system, and its sensitivity to the wind-forcing, are also highlighted by the simulations and new data analyses. We conclude that the model proposed is useful for the interpretation of observed data from Arctic seas and model outputs from more complex coupled/climate models.

  3. Annual Cycles of Multiyear Sea Ice Coverage of the Arctic Ocean: 1999-2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwok, R.

    2004-01-01

    For the years 1999-2003, we estimate the time-varying perennial ice zone (PIZ) coverage and construct the annual cycles of multiyear (MY, including second year) ice coverage of the Arctic Ocean using QuikSCAT backscatter, MY fractions from RADARSAT, and the record of ice export from satellite passive microwave observations. An area balance approach extends the winter MY coverage from QuikSCAT to the remainder of the year. From these estimates, the coverage of MY ice at the beginning of each year is 3774 x 10(exp 3) sq km (2000), 3896 x 10(exp 3) sq km (2001), 4475 x 10(exp 3) sq km (2002), and 4122 x 10(exp 3) sq km (2003). Uncertainties in coverage are approx.150 x 10(exp 3) sq km. In the mean, on 1 January, MY ice covers approx.60% of the Arctic Ocean. Ice export reduces this coverage to approx.55% by 1 May. From the multiple annual cycles, the area of first-year (FY) ice that survives the intervening summers are 1192 x 10(exp 3) sq km (2000), 1509 x 10(exp 3) sq km (2001), and 582 x 10(exp 3) sq km (2002). In order for the MY coverage to remain constant from year to year, these replenishment areas must balance the overall area export and melt during the summer. The effect of the record minimum in Arctic sea ice area during the summer of 2002 is seen in the lowest area of surviving FY ice of the three summers. In addition to the spatial coverage, the location of the PIZ is important. One consequence of the unusual location of the PIZ at the end of the summer of 2002 is the preconditioning for enhanced export of MY ice into the Barents and Kara seas. Differences between the minimums in summer sea ice coverage from our estimates and passive microwave observations are discussed.

  4. Assessing trend and variation of Arctic sea-ice extent during 1979–2012 from a latitude perspective of ice edge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wentao Xia

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Arctic sea-ice extent (in summer has been shrinking since the 1970s. However, we have little knowledge of the detailed spatial variability of this shrinking. In this study, we examine the (latitudinal ice extent along each degree of longitude, using the monthly Arctic ice index data sets (1979–2012 from the National Snow and Ice Data Center. Statistical analysis suggests that: (1 for summer months (July–October, there was a 34-year declining trend in sea-ice extent at most regions, except for the Canadian Arctic Archipelago, Greenland and Svalbard, with retreat rates of 0.0562–0.0898 latitude degree/year (or 6.26–10.00 km/year, at a significance level of 0.05; (2 for sea ice not geographically muted by the continental coastline in winter months (January–April, there was a declining trend of 0.0216–0.0559 latitude degree/year (2.40–6.22 km/year, at a significance level of 0.05. Regionally, the most evident sea-ice decline occurred in the Chukchi Sea from August to October, Baffin Bay and Greenland Sea from January to May, Barents Sea in most months, Kara Sea from July to August and Laptev Sea and eastern Siberian Sea in August and September. Trend analysis also indicates that: (1 the decline in summer ice extent became significant (at a 0.05 significance level since 1999 and (2 winter ice extent showed a clear changing point (decline around 2000, becoming statistically significant around 2005. The Pacific–Siberian sector of the Arctic accounted for most of the summer sea-ice decline, while the winter recovery of sea ice in the Atlantic sector tended to decrease.

  5. Arctic Tides from GPS on sea-ice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kildegaard Rose, Stine; Skourup, Henriette; Forsberg, René

    2013-01-01

    The presence of sea-ice in the Arctic Ocean plays a significant role in the Arctic climate. Sea-ice dampens the ocean tide amplitude with the result that global tidal models perform less accurately in the polar regions. This paper presents, a kinematic processing of global positioning system (GPS......) placed on sea-ice, at six different sites north of Greenland for the preliminary study of sea surface height (SSH), and tidal analysis to improve tide models in the Central Arctic. The GPS measurements are compared with the Arctic tide model AOTIM-5, which assimilates tide-gauges and altimetry data....... The results show coherence between the GPS buoy measurements, and the tide model. Furthermore, we have proved that the reference ellipsoid of WGS84, can be interpolated to the tidal defined zero level by applying geophysical corrections to the GPS data....

  6. The influence of regional Arctic sea-ice decline on stratospheric and tropospheric circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Christine; Bracegirdle, Thomas; Shuckburgh, Emily; Haynes, Peter

    2016-04-01

    region (one perturbation experiment combines all regions). These regions correspond to sea-ice loss hotspots such as the Barents-Kara Seas and the Bering Sea. The differences between the control and perturbation runs yields the effects of the imposed sea-ice loss on the polar vortex. To detect and count SSWs for each run, we use the World Meteorological Organisation's definition of an SSW (a reversal in zonal mean zonal wind at 10 hPa and 60° N, and a reversal in zonal mean meridional temperature gradient at 10 hPa between 60° N and 90° N). The poster will present and discuss the initial results of this study. Implications of the results for future change in the lower latitude mid-troposphere will be discussed. References Sun, L., C. Deser, and R. A. Tomas, 2015: Mechanisms of Stratospheric and Tropospheric Circulation Response to Projected Arctic Sea Ice Loss. J. Climate, 28, 7824-7845, doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1175/JCLI-D-15-0169.1.

  7. Arctic Sea Ice Concentration and Extent from Danish Meteorological Institute Sea Ice Charts, 1901-1956

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set provides estimates of Arctic sea ice extent and concentration from 1901 to 1956 created from a collection of historic, hand-drawn sea ice charts from...

  8. The impact of the Arctic Sea Ice retreat on extratropical cyclones and anticyclones over Northern Eurasia: atmospheric model simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akperov, Mirseid; Semenov, Vladimir; Mokhov, Igor; Lupo, Antony

    2015-04-01

    The Arctic region has been warming more than twice as fast as the other parts of the world during the last few decades. The rapid Arctic warming is accompanied with the dramatic change of Arctic sea ice cover. Recently, it has been suggested that such climatic changes might have led to the increase of anomalous weather events in winter over Northern Eurasia. One example is anomalous cold winters over Northern Eurasia associated with atmospheric blocking events. However, a large uncertainty remains concerning robustness of the observed relationship and associated mechanisms of impact. The main goal of this research is to explore the connection between the declining Arctic sea ice (most strongly expressed in the Barents-Kara Seas region) in the cold season and the change of cyclonic and anti-cyclonic activity over Northern Eurasia using simulations with atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM). The simulations were performed with the ECHAM5 AGCM using identical sea surface temperature climatology but different sea ice concentrations (SIC) for the periods corresponding to the high (1966-1969), low (1990-1995) and very low (2005-2012) SIC regimes in the Arctic as well as for the mean climatological SIC for 1971-2000. The duration of each simulation was 50 years. For the regimes with high and very low SIC, a statistically significant increase in the number of long-living anticyclones (with lifetime of more than 5 days) over Northern Eurasia was found. Long-living cyclones exhibited different changes in their number depending on their intensity. The analysis of the spatial patterns of cyclonic and anti-cyclonic activity over Eurasia was performed. We found an increase of the frequency of cyclones over the central region of the European part of Russia (EPR) and anticyclones over the northern region of the EPR for the regimes with a high sea ice concentration in the Arctic. For the regime with very low SIC the shift of the frequency of cyclones and anticyclones towards

  9. Dipole anomaly in the Arctic atmosphere and winter Arctic sea ice motion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU; Bingyi; ZHANG; Renhe

    2005-01-01

    This paper investigates a previously-ignored atmospheric circulation anomaly-di- pole structure anomaly in the arctic atmosphere, and its relationship with the winter sea ice motion, based on analyses of the International Arctic Buoy Programme Data (1979-1998) and datasets from the National Center for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) and the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) for the period of 1960-2002. The dipole structure anomaly is the second-leading mode of EOF of monthly mean SLP north of 70(N during the winter season (Oct.-Mar.), which accounts for 13% of the variance. One of its two anomaly centers is over the Canadian Archipelago; the other is situated over northern Eurasia and the Siberian marginal seas. Due to the dipole structure anomaly's strong meridionality, it becomes an important mechanism to drive both anomalous sea ice export out of the Arctic Basin and cold air outbreaks into the Barents Sea, the Nordic Seas and northern Europe.

  10. Arctic Sea Ice and Its Changes during the Satellite Period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X.; Liu, Y.; Key, J. R.

    2009-12-01

    Sea ice is a very important indicator and an effective modulator of regional and global climate change. Changes in sea ice will significantly affect the complex exchanges of momentum, heat, and mass between sea and the atmosphere, along with profound socio-economic influences due to its role in transportation, fisheries, hunting, polar animal habitat. Over the last two decades of the 20th century, the Arctic underwent significant changes in sea ice as part of the accelerated global warming of that period. More accurate, consistent, and detailed ice thickness, extent, and volume data are critical for a wide range of applications including climate change detection, climate modeling, and operational applications such as shipping and hazard mitigation. Satellite data provide an unprecedented opportunity to estimate and monitor Arctic sea ice routinely with relatively high spatial and temporal resolutions. In this study, a One-dimensional Thermodynamic Ice Model (OTIM) has been developed to estimate sea ice thickness based on the surface energy balance at a thermo-equilibrium state, containing all components of the surface energy balance. The OTIM has been extensively validated against submarine Upward-Looking Sonar (ULS) measurements, meteorological station measurements, and comprehensive numerical model simulations. Overall, OTIM-estimated sea ice thickness is accurate to within about 20% error when compared to submarine ULS ice thickness measurements and Canadian meteorological station measurements for ice less than 3 m. Along with sea ice extent information from the SSM/I, the Arctic sea ice volume can be estimated for the satellite period from 1984 to 2004. The OTIM has been used with satellite data from the extended Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) Polar Pathfinder (APP-x) products for the Arctic sea ice thickness, and sequentially sea ice volume estimations, and following statistical analysis of spatial and temporal distribution and trends in sea

  11. Arctic and Antarctic Sea Ice Changes and Impacts (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nghiem, S. V.

    2013-12-01

    The extent of springtime Arctic perennial sea ice, important to preconditioning summer melt and to polar sunrise photochemistry, continues its precipitous reduction in the last decade marked by a record low in 2012, as the Bromine, Ozone, and Mercury Experiment (BROMEX) was conducted around Barrow, Alaska, to investigate impacts of sea ice reduction on photochemical processes, transport, and distribution in the polar environment. In spring 2013, there was further loss of perennial sea ice, as it was not observed in the ocean region adjacent to the Alaskan north coast, where there was a stretch of perennial sea ice in 2012 in the Beaufort Sea and Chukchi Sea. In contrast to the rapid and extensive loss of sea ice in the Arctic, Antarctic sea ice has a trend of a slight increase in the past three decades. Given the significant variability in time and in space together with uncertainties in satellite observations, the increasing trend of Antarctic sea ice may arguably be considered as having a low confidence level; however, there was no overall reduction of Antarctic sea ice extent anywhere close to the decreasing rate of Arctic sea ice. There exist publications presenting various factors driving changes in Arctic and Antarctic sea ice. After a short review of these published factors, new observations and atmospheric, oceanic, hydrological, and geological mechanisms contributed to different behaviors of sea ice changes in the Arctic and Antarctic are presented. The contribution from of hydrologic factors may provide a linkage to and enhance thermal impacts from lower latitudes. While geological factors may affect the sensitivity of sea ice response to climate change, these factors can serve as the long-term memory in the system that should be exploited to improve future projections or predictions of sea ice changes. Furthermore, similarities and differences in chemical impacts of Arctic and Antarctic sea ice changes are discussed. Understanding sea ice changes and

  12. Influence of surface temperatures on source rock maturity - An example from the Arctic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nelskamp, S.; Donders, T.; Wees, J.D. van; Abbink, O.

    2010-01-01

    Using paleontological and geochemical techniques the long-term temperature development of the central Arctic was documented from sedimentary records for the first time. With the help of the new paleo-climatic evolution a tectonic paleo heat flow prediction of the Kara Sea area was performed to show

  13. Definition of Arctic and Antarctic Sea Ice Variation Index

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Hongxia; Liu Na; Pan Zengdi; Zhang Qinghua

    2004-01-01

    It is well known that varying of the sea ice not only in the Antarctic but also in the Arctic has an active influence on the globe atmosphere and ocean. In order to understand the sea ice variation in detail, for the first time, an objective index of the Arctic and Antarctic sea ice variation is defined by projecting the monthly sea ice concentration anomalies poleward of 20°N or 20°S onto the EOF (empirical orthogonal function)-1 spatial pattern. Comparing with some work in former studies of polar sea ice, the index has the potential for clarifying the variability of sea ice in northern and southern high latitudes.

  14. Sea Ice Edge Location and Extent in the Russian Arctic, 1933-2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Sea Ice Edge Location and Extent in the Russian Arctic, 1933-2006 data are derived from sea ice charts from the Arctic and Antarctic Research Institute (AARI),...

  15. The changing Arctic Sea ice cover : regional and seasonal aspects

    OpenAIRE

    Steene, Rebekka Jastamin

    2015-01-01

    As global climate changes are becoming increasingly evident, increasing air temperatures, melting glaciers, rising sea levels, and decreasing biodiversity is observed at increasing rates worldwide. The Arctic sea ice cover has has become a key indicator of the ongoing global climate change through its substantial decline in both extent and thickness. In this study we show how the observed regression of the Northern Hemisphere sea ice is distributed over different regions of the...

  16. Sea ice in the Canadian Arctic in the 21. century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Climate warming will occur first and most intensely in Arctic regions, according to the numerical simulations of future climate performed with different Global Climate Models (GCMs). It includes the simulations performed by the Meteorological Service of Canada. The observations gathered in the Arctic indicate that the present warming has no precedent over the past four hundred years. Since the 1970s, data acquired mainly by satellite indicates that the extent of Arctic sea ice decreased at a rate of approximately three per cent per decade. Over the period 1969-2000, a similar rate of decrease has been observed within Canadian Arctic waters. Over the past forty years, estimates of the thickness of ice in the Arctic, based on submarine measurements, show a 40 per cent decrease. By 2050, if all the conditions remain as they are, the Arctic Ocean could be ice free. The most widely held scientific opinion seems to be that in the future there will be less ice in the Arctic than what was observed in the past, an opinion that is still being debated by scientists. The development of local natural resources and trans-shipment between Europe and Asia could increase dramatically in a future with less ice. Marine transportation in the Canadian Arctic would be expanded. Climatological analysis results of Canadian ice information is presented by the authors, and they have chosen to discuss various probable scenarios related to ice conditions during this century. 13 refs., 8 figs

  17. Evaluation of Arctic Sea Ice Thickness Simulated by Arctic Ocean Model Intercomparison Project Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Mark; Proshuntinsky, Andrew; Aksenov, Yevgeny; Nguyen, An T.; Lindsay, Ron; Haas, Christian; Zhang, Jinlun; Diansky, Nikolay; Kwok, Ron; Maslowski, Wieslaw; Hakkinen, Sirpa; Ashik, Igor; De Cuevas, Beverly

    2012-01-01

    Six Arctic Ocean Model Intercomparison Project model simulations are compared with estimates of sea ice thickness derived from pan-Arctic satellite freeboard measurements (2004-2008); airborne electromagnetic measurements (2001-2009); ice draft data from moored instruments in Fram Strait, the Greenland Sea, and the Beaufort Sea (1992-2008) and from submarines (1975-2000); and drill hole data from the Arctic basin, Laptev, and East Siberian marginal seas (1982-1986) and coastal stations (1998-2009). Despite an assessment of six models that differ in numerical methods, resolution, domain, forcing, and boundary conditions, the models generally overestimate the thickness of measured ice thinner than approximately 2 mand underestimate the thickness of ice measured thicker than about approximately 2m. In the regions of flat immobile landfast ice (shallow Siberian Seas with depths less than 25-30 m), the models generally overestimate both the total observed sea ice thickness and rates of September and October ice growth from observations by more than 4 times and more than one standard deviation, respectively. The models do not reproduce conditions of fast ice formation and growth. Instead, the modeled fast ice is replaced with pack ice which drifts, generating ridges of increasing ice thickness, in addition to thermodynamic ice growth. Considering all observational data sets, the better correlations and smaller differences from observations are from the Estimating the Circulation and Climate of the Ocean, Phase II and Pan-Arctic Ice Ocean Modeling and Assimilation System models.

  18. Light Absorption in Arctic Sea Ice - Black Carbon vs Chlorophyll

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogunro, O. O.; Wingenter, O. W.; Elliott, S.; Hunke, E. C.; Flanner, M.; Wang, H.; Dubey, M. K.; Jeffery, N.

    2015-12-01

    The fingerprint of climate change is more obvious in the Arctic than any other place on Earth. This is not only because the surface temperature there has increased at twice the rate of global mean temperature but also because Arctic sea ice extent has reached a record low of 49% reduction relative to the 1979-2000 climatology. Radiation absorption through black carbon (BC) deposited on Arctic snow and sea ice surface is one of the major hypothesized contributors to the decline. However, we note that chlorophyll-a absorption owing to increasing biology activity in this region could be a major competitor during boreal spring. Modeling of sea-ice physical and biological processes together with experiments and field observations promise rapid progress in the quality of Arctic ice predictions. Here we develop a dynamic ice system module to investigate discrete absorption of both BC and chlorophyll in the Arctic, using BC deposition fields from version 5 of Community Atmosphere Model (CAM5) and vertically distributed layers of chlorophyll concentrations from Sea Ice Model (CICE). To this point, our black carbon mixing ratios compare well with available in situ data. Both results are in the same order of magnitude. Estimates from our calculations show that sea ice and snow around the Canadian Arctic Archipelago and Baffin Bay has the least black carbon absorption while values at the ice-ocean perimeter in the region of the Barents Sea peak significantly. With regard to pigment concentrations, high amounts of chlorophyll are produced in Arctic sea ice by the bottom microbial community, and also within the columnar pack wherever substantial biological activity takes place in the presence of moderate light. We show that the percentage of photons absorbed by chlorophyll in the spring is comparable to the amount attributed to BC, especially in areas where the total deposition rates are decreasing with time on interannual timescale. We expect a continuous increase in

  19. Interannual variability of summer sea ice thickness in the Siberian and central Arctic under different atmospheric circulation regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Christian; Eicken, Hajo

    2001-03-01

    Extensive drill hole and electromagnetic induction measurements of sea ice thickness in the Siberian and central Arctic Seas in the summers of 1993, 1995, and 1996 reveal significant interannual variability. In the Laptev Sea, minimum and maximum modal first-year ice thicknesses amounted to 1.25 and 1.85 m in 1995 and 1996, respectively. Ice thickness correlates with ice extent, which reached a record minimum in August 1995 and was well above average in 1996. These differences are explained by the strength and location of a summer cyclonic atmospheric circulation pattern affecting both ice advection and surface melt. From drifting buoys deployed in 1995 and satellite radar backscatter data, first- and second-year ice regimes are delineated. Differences in first-year ice backscatter coefficients between 1993, 1995, and 1996 are explained by differences in level ice surface roughness. The Lagrangian evolution of ice thickness between 1995 and 1996 is studied. While the shape of the thickness distribution does not change significantly, the mean (modal) ice thickness of the ice field increases from 1.80 m (1.25 m) in 1995 to 2.86 m (2.25 m) in 1996. The thickness distribution of second-year ice in 1996 closely agrees with that of level multiyear ice downstream in the Transpolar Drift obtained in 1991. In 1996, mean level ice thickness increases at 0.23 and 0.16 m deg-1 with latitude in the Kara and Laptev Sea sectors of the Arctic Ocean, respectively.

  20. The Northern Bering Sea: An Arctic Ecosystem in Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grebmeier, J. M.; Cooper, L. W.

    2004-12-01

    Arctic systems can be rich and diverse habitats for marine life in spite of the extreme cold environment. Benthic faunal populations and associated biogeochemical cycling processes are influenced by sea-ice extent, seawater hydrography (nutrients, salinity, temperature, currents), and water column production. Benthic organisms on the Arctic shelves and margins are long-term integrators of overlying water column processes. Because these organisms have adapted to living at cold extremes, it is reasonable to expect that these communities will be among the most susceptible to climate warming. Recent observations show that Arctic sea ice in the North American Arctic is melting and retreating northward earlier in the season and the timing of these events can have dramatic impacts on the biological system. Changes in overlying primary production, pelagic-benthic coupling, and benthic production and community structure can have cascading effects to higher trophic levels, particularly benthic feeders such as walruses, gray whales, and diving seaducks. Recent indicators of contemporary Arctic change in the northern Bering Sea include seawater warming and reduction in ice extent that coincide with our time-series studies of benthic clam population declines in the shallow northern Bering shelf in the 1990's. In addition, declines in benthic amphipod populations have also likely influenced the movement of feeding gray whales to areas north of Bering Strait during this same time period. Finally a potential consequence of seawater warming and reduced ice extent in the northern Bering Sea could be the northward movement of bottom feeding fish currently in the southern Bering Sea that prey on benthic fauna. This would increase the feeding pressure on the benthic prey base and enhance competition for this food source for benthic-feeding marine mammals and seabirds. This presentation will outline recent biological changes observed in the northern Bering Sea ecosystem as documented in

  1. Arctic Sea Ice Changes, Interactions, and Feedbacks on the Arctic Climate during the Satellite Era

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X.; Key, J. R.; Liu, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Of all the components of the Earth climate system, the cryosphere is arguably the least understood even though it is a very important indicator and an effective modulator of regional and global climate change. Changes in sea ice will significantly affect exchanges of momentum, heat, and mass between the ocean and the atmosphere, and have profound socio-economic impacts on transportation, fisheries, hunting, polar animal habitat and more. In the last three decades, the Arctic underwent significant changes in sea ice as part of the accelerated global climate change. With the recently developed One-dimensional Thermodynamic Ice Model (OTIM), sea and lake ice thickness and trends can be reasonably estimated. The OTIM has been extensively validated against submarine and moored upward-looking sonar measurements, meteorological station measurements, and comprehensive numerical model simulations. The Extended AVHRR Polar Pathfinder (APP-x) dataset has 25 climate parameters covering surface, cloud, and sea ice properties as well as surface and top-of-atmosphere radiative fluxes for the period 1982 - 2004 over the Arctic and Antarctic at 25 km resolution. The OTIM has been used with APP-x dataset for Arctic sea ice thickness and volume estimation. Statistical analysis of spatial and temporal distributions and trends in sea ice extent, thickness, and volume over the satellite period has been performed, along with the temporal analysis of first year and multiple year sea ice extent changes. Preliminary results show clear evidence that Arctic sea ice has been experiencing significant changes over the last two decades of the 20th century. The Arctic sea ice has been shrinking unexpectedly fast with the declines in sea ice extent, thickness, and volume, most apparent in the fall season. Moreover, satellites provide an unprecedented opportunity to observe Arctic sea ice and its changes with high spatial and temporal coverage that is making it an ideal data source for mitigating

  2. Arctic sea ice reaches second lowest in satellite record

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Xinhua reports that the blanket of sea ice that floats on the Arctic Ocean appears to have reached its lowest extent for 2011, the second lowest recorded since satellites began measuring it in 1979, according to a report released on September 15 by the University of Colorado Boulder's National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC).

  3. Optical properties of melting first-year Arctic sea ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Light, Bonnie; Perovich, Donald K.; Webster, Melinda A.; Polashenski, Christopher; Dadic, Ruzica

    2015-11-01

    The albedo and transmittance of melting, first-year Arctic sea ice were measured during two cruises of the Impacts of Climate on the Eco-Systems and Chemistry of the Arctic Pacific Environment (ICESCAPE) project during the summers of 2010 and 2011. Spectral measurements were made for both bare and ponded ice types at a total of 19 ice stations in the Chukchi and Beaufort Seas. These data, along with irradiance profiles taken within boreholes, laboratory measurements of the optical properties of core samples, ice physical property observations, and radiative transfer model simulations are employed to describe representative optical properties for melting first-year Arctic sea ice. Ponded ice was found to transmit roughly 4.4 times more total energy into the ocean, relative to nearby bare ice. The ubiquitous surface-scattering layer and drained layer present on bare, melting sea ice are responsible for its relatively high albedo and relatively low transmittance. Light transmittance through ponded ice depends on the physical thickness of the ice and the magnitude of the scattering coefficient in the ice interior. Bare ice reflects nearly three-quarters of the incident sunlight, enhancing its resiliency to absorption by solar insolation. In contrast, ponded ice absorbs or transmits to the ocean more than three-quarters of the incident sunlight. Characterization of the heat balance of a summertime ice cover is largely dictated by its pond coverage, and light transmittance through ponded ice shows strong contrast between first-year and multiyear Arctic ice covers.

  4. Arctic Sea saaga ikka ilma lõputa / Heiki Suurkask

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Suurkask, Heiki, 1972-

    2011-01-01

    Arctic Sea väidetava kaaperdamise juhi Dmitri Savini väitel olevat temalt kaaperdamise tellinud Eesti luurekoordinaator Eerik-Niiles Kross. Eesti võimud ei ole seni Krossi ja laeva kaaperdamise vahel sidemeid tuvastanud, Krossi väitel on tegemist KGB-liku meetodiga tema maine rikkumiseks

  5. A recent bifurcation in Arctic sea-ice cover

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Livina

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available There is ongoing debate over whether Arctic sea-ice has already passed a "tipping point", or whether it will do so in future, with several recent studies arguing that the loss of summer sea ice does not involve a bifurcation because it is highly reversible in models. Recently developed methods can detect and sometimes forewarn of bifurcations in time-series data, hence we applied them to satellite data for Arctic sea-ice cover. Here we show that a new low ice cover state has appeared from 2007 onwards, which is distinct from the normal state of seasonal sea ice variation, suggesting a bifurcation has occurred from one attractor to two. There was no robust early warning signal of critical slowing down prior to this bifurcation, consistent with it representing the appearance of a new ice cover state rather than the loss of stability of the existing state. The new low ice cover state has been sampled predominantly in summer-autumn and seasonal forcing combined with internal climate variability are likely responsible for triggering recent transitions between the two ice cover states. However, all early warning indicators show destabilization of the summer-autumn sea-ice since 2007. This suggests the new low ice cover state may be a transient feature and further abrupt changes in summer-autumn Arctic sea-ice cover could lie ahead; either reversion to the normal state or a yet larger ice loss.

  6. Global warming releases microplastic legacy frozen in Arctic Sea ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obbard, Rachel W.; Sadri, Saeed; Wong, Ying Qi; Khitun, Alexandra A.; Baker, Ian; Thompson, Richard C.

    2014-06-01

    When sea ice forms it scavenges and concentrates particulates from the water column, which then become trapped until the ice melts. In recent years, melting has led to record lows in Arctic Sea ice extent, the most recent in September 2012. Global climate models, such as that of Gregory et al. (2002), suggest that the decline in Arctic Sea ice volume (3.4% per decade) will actually exceed the decline in sea ice extent, something that Laxon et al. (2013) have shown supported by satellite data. The extent to which melting ice could release anthropogenic particulates back to the open ocean has not yet been examined. Here we show that Arctic Sea ice from remote locations contains concentrations of microplastics at least two orders of magnitude greater than those that have been previously reported in highly contaminated surface waters, such as those of the Pacific Gyre. Our findings indicate that microplastics have accumulated far from population centers and that polar sea ice represents a major historic global sink of man-made particulates. The potential for substantial quantities of legacy microplastic contamination to be released to the ocean as the ice melts therefore needs to be evaluated, as do the physical and toxicological effects of plastics on marine life.

  7. High resolution modelling of the decreasing Arctic sea ice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, K. S.; Rasmussen, T. A. S.; Blüthgen, Jonas;

    2012-01-01

    , and secondly oceanic oil drift in ice affected conditions. Both investigations are made with the coupled ocean - sea ice model HYCOM-CICE at 10 km resolution, which is also used operationally at DMI and allows detailed studies of sea ice build-up, drift and melt. To investigate the sea ice decrease of the last......The Arctic sea ice cover has been rapidly decreasing and thinning over the last decade, with minimum ice extent in 2007 and almost as low extent in 2011. This study investigates two aspects of the decreasing ice cover; first the large scale thinning and changing dynamics of the polar sea ice...... decade, we have performed a reanalysis simulation of the years 1990-2011, forced with ERA Interim atmospheric data. Thus, the simulation includes both the period before the recent sea ice decrease and the full period of decrease up till today. We will present our model results of the thinning...

  8. Impacts of Declining Arctic Sea Ice: An International Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serreze, M.

    2008-12-01

    As reported by the National Snow and Ice Data Center in late August of 2008, Arctic sea ice extent had already fallen to its second lowest level since regular monitoring began by satellite. As of this writing, we were closing in on the record minimum set in September of 2007. Summers may be free of sea ice by the year 2030. Recognition is growing that ice loss will have environmental impacts that may extend well beyond the Arctic. The Arctic Ocean will in turn become more accessible, not just to tourism and commercial shipping, but to exploitation of oil wealth at the bottom of the ocean. In recognition of growing accessibility and oil operations, the United States Coast Guard set up temporary bases this summer at Barrow and Prudhoe Bay, AK, from which they conducted operations to test their readiness and capabilities, such as for search and rescue. The Canadians have been busy showing a strong Arctic presence. In August, a German crew traversed the Northwest Passage from east to west in one of their icebreakers, the Polarstern. What are the major national and international research efforts focusing on the multifaceted problem of declining sea ice? What are the areas of intersection, and what is the state of collaboration? How could national and international collaboration be improved? This talk will review some of these issues.

  9. Improvements of sea level anomaly maps in the Arctic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yongcun; Baltazar Andersen, Ole; Knudsen, Per

    2013-04-01

    Obtaining satellite data at high latitude regions is generally very problematic. In the Arctic Ocean (For this investigation defined as 65°N-82°N), the ERS and ENVISAT sun-synchronous satellite altimetry measurements are nearly always affected by the presence of sea ice. Consequently, it is difficult to get accurate altimetric data for oceanography and climatology and this affect i.e., determination of the linear sea level trend over the regions. The objective of our study is to develop a new 3 days sea level anomaly maps in the Arctic Ocean. Multi-satellite (i.e., ERS-1, ERS-2 and ENVISAT) along track sea level anomaly data is extracted by applying adjusted editing criteria. Initially, the removal of orbit errors in sun-synchronous satellite altimetry is performed. A joint crossover with simultaneous TOPEX/Jason satellite altimetry, are used to adjust the long wavelength bias and tilt of the ERS-1, ERS-2 and ENVISAT. Subsequently, the adjusted sea level anomalies are gridded to a normal 0.5°×0.5°grid using collocation with a second-order Markov covariance function using spatial temporal interpolation which takes into account data from nearby periods in case of missing data. The data is then combined with tide gauge data and model outputs, the new data is used to study the sea level variability in Arctic Ocean. The contributors (for example, thermosteric, ice sheets and water mass) to the sea level change in the region are investigated. Moreover, significant decadal signal in sea level variation is found from tide gauge data and its comparison with AO index. The presentation is a contribution to the EU 7th FW supported projects MONARCH-A.

  10. Biopolymers form a gelatinous microlayer at the air-sea interface when Arctic sea ice melts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galgani, Luisa; Piontek, Judith; Engel, Anja

    2016-07-20

    The interface layer between ocean and atmosphere is only a couple of micrometers thick but plays a critical role in climate relevant processes, including the air-sea exchange of gas and heat and the emission of primary organic aerosols (POA). Recent findings suggest that low-level cloud formation above the Arctic Ocean may be linked to organic polymers produced by marine microorganisms. Sea ice harbors high amounts of polymeric substances that are produced by cells growing within the sea-ice brine. Here, we report from a research cruise to the central Arctic Ocean in 2012. Our study shows that microbial polymers accumulate at the air-sea interface when the sea ice melts. Proteinaceous compounds represented the major fraction of polymers supporting the formation of a gelatinous interface microlayer and providing a hitherto unrecognized potential source of marine POA. Our study indicates a novel link between sea ice-ocean and atmosphere that may be sensitive to climate change.

  11. Biopolymers form a gelatinous microlayer at the air-sea interface when Arctic sea ice melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galgani, Luisa; Piontek, Judith; Engel, Anja

    2016-07-01

    The interface layer between ocean and atmosphere is only a couple of micrometers thick but plays a critical role in climate relevant processes, including the air-sea exchange of gas and heat and the emission of primary organic aerosols (POA). Recent findings suggest that low-level cloud formation above the Arctic Ocean may be linked to organic polymers produced by marine microorganisms. Sea ice harbors high amounts of polymeric substances that are produced by cells growing within the sea-ice brine. Here, we report from a research cruise to the central Arctic Ocean in 2012. Our study shows that microbial polymers accumulate at the air-sea interface when the sea ice melts. Proteinaceous compounds represented the major fraction of polymers supporting the formation of a gelatinous interface microlayer and providing a hitherto unrecognized potential source of marine POA. Our study indicates a novel link between sea ice-ocean and atmosphere that may be sensitive to climate change.

  12. Additional Arctic observations improve weather and sea-ice forecasts for the Northern Sea Route.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Jun; Yamazaki, Akira; Ono, Jun; Dethloff, Klaus; Maturilli, Marion; Neuber, Roland; Edwards, Patti; Yamaguchi, Hajime

    2015-01-01

    During ice-free periods, the Northern Sea Route (NSR) could be an attractive shipping route. The decline in Arctic sea-ice extent, however, could be associated with an increase in the frequency of the causes of severe weather phenomena, and high wind-driven waves and the advection of sea ice could make ship navigation along the NSR difficult. Accurate forecasts of weather and sea ice are desirable for safe navigation, but large uncertainties exist in current forecasts, partly owing to the sparse observational network over the Arctic Ocean. Here, we show that the incorporation of additional Arctic observations improves the initial analysis and enhances the skill of weather and sea-ice forecasts, the application of which has socioeconomic benefits. Comparison of 63-member ensemble atmospheric forecasts, using different initial data sets, revealed that additional Arctic radiosonde observations were useful for predicting a persistent strong wind event. The sea-ice forecast, initialised by the wind fields that included the effects of the observations, skilfully predicted rapid wind-driven sea-ice advection along the NSR.

  13. Additional Arctic observations improve weather and sea-ice forecasts for the Northern Sea Route

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Jun; Yamazaki, Akira; Ono, Jun; Dethloff, Klaus; Maturilli, Marion; Neuber, Roland; Edwards, Patti; Yamaguchi, Hajime

    2015-11-01

    During ice-free periods, the Northern Sea Route (NSR) could be an attractive shipping route. The decline in Arctic sea-ice extent, however, could be associated with an increase in the frequency of the causes of severe weather phenomena, and high wind-driven waves and the advection of sea ice could make ship navigation along the NSR difficult. Accurate forecasts of weather and sea ice are desirable for safe navigation, but large uncertainties exist in current forecasts, partly owing to the sparse observational network over the Arctic Ocean. Here, we show that the incorporation of additional Arctic observations improves the initial analysis and enhances the skill of weather and sea-ice forecasts, the application of which has socioeconomic benefits. Comparison of 63-member ensemble atmospheric forecasts, using different initial data sets, revealed that additional Arctic radiosonde observations were useful for predicting a persistent strong wind event. The sea-ice forecast, initialised by the wind fields that included the effects of the observations, skilfully predicted rapid wind-driven sea-ice advection along the NSR.

  14. Coincident multiscale estimates of Arctic sea ice thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Joan; Richter-Menge, Jackie; Farrell, Sinead; Brozena, John

    2012-02-01

    Recent dramatic changes in the characteristics of the Arctic sea ice cover have sparked interest and concern from a wide range of disciplines including socioeconomics, maritime safety and security, and resource management, as well as basic research science. Though driven by different priorities, common to all is the demand for an improved ability to monitor and forecast changes in the sea ice cover. Key to meeting this demand is further improvement in the quality of observations collected from remote platforms. Satellites provide an important platform for instruments designed to monitor basin-wide changes in the volume of the ice cover, a function of ice extent and thickness. Remote techniques to monitor sea ice extent in all seasons are well developed—these observations reveal a dramatic decline in summer sea ice extent since 1979, when satellite records became available. Further, they indicate that the decline has been facilitated by a dramatic decrease in the extent of perennial (i.e., multiyear) ice. Combined estimates of ice thickness derived from submarine records between 1958 and 2000, and Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat) laser altimetry from 2003 to 2008, provide the longest-term record of sea ice thickness observations. These data suggest a decrease in the mean overall thickness of the sea ice over a region covering about 38% of the Arctic Ocean.

  15. Features of seismicity of the Euro-Arctic region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogozhin, E. A.; Antonovskaya, G. N.; Kapustian, N. K.; Fedorenko, I. V.

    2016-04-01

    New results from seismic monitoring in the Euro-Arctic region, including the seismicity of Gakkel Ridge and the Barents-Kara Sea shelf, are presented. The data used were obtained from the Arkhan-gelsk seismic network. The role of island-based seismic stations, in particular, those in Franz Josef Land, in the monitoring network is discussed. The possibility of specifying the nature of seismicity by waveform spectral-temporal analysis, even in the case of a single station, is considered.

  16. Deglacial-Holocene short-term variability in sea-ice distribution on the Eurasian shelf (Arctic Ocean) - An IP25 biomarker reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hörner, Tanja; Stein, Ruediger; Fahl, Kirsten

    2016-04-01

    Four well-dated sediment cores from the Eurasian continental shelf, i.e., the Kara Sea (Cores BP99/07 and BP00/07) and Laptev Sea (Cores PS51/154 and PS51/159), were selected for high-resolution reconstruction of past Arctic environmental conditions during the deglacial-Holocene time interval. These marginal seas are strongly affected by the post-glacial sea-level rise of about 120m. The major focus of our study was the reconstruction of the paleo-sea-ice distribution as sea-ice plays a key role within the modern and past climate system. For reconstruction of paleo-sea ice, the sea-ice proxy IP25 in combination with open-water phytoplankton biomarkers was used (for approach see Belt et al., 2007; Müller et al., 2009, 2011). In addition, specific sterols were determined to reconstruct changes in river run-off and biological production. The post-glacial sea-level rise is especially reflected in prominent decrease in terrigenous biomarkers. Deglacial variations in sea-ice cover sustained for thousand of years, mostly following climatic changes like the Bølling/Allerød (14.7-12.9 ka), Younger Dryas (12.9-11.6 ka) and Holocene warm phase (10-8 ka). Superimposed on a (Late) Holocene cooling trend, short-term fluctuations in sea-ice cover (on centennial scale) are distinctly documented in the distal/off-shore Core BP00/07 from the Kara Sea, less pronounced in the proximal/near-shore Core PS99/07 and in the Laptev Sea cores. Interestingly, this short-term variability in sea-ice cover correlates quite well to changes in Siberian river run-off (e.g., Stein et al. 2004), pointing to a direct linkage between precipitation (atmospheric circulation) and sea-ice formation. References Belt, S.T., Massé, G., Rowland, S.J., Poulin, M., Michel, C., LeBlanc, B., 2007. A novel chemical fossil of palaeo sea ice: IP25. Organic Geochemistry 38, 16-27. Müller, J., Masse, G., Stein, R., Belt, S.T., 2009. Variability of sea-ice conditions in the Fram Strait over the past 30,000 years

  17. Arctic energy budget in relation to sea ice variability on monthly-to-annual time scales

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krikken, F.; Hazeleger, W.

    2015-01-01

    The large decrease in Arctic sea ice in recent years has triggered a strong interest in Arctic sea ice predictions on seasonal-to-decadal time scales. Hence, it is important to understand physical processes that provide enhanced predictability beyond persistence of sea ice anomalies. This study anal

  18. Feasibility of a Sea Route through the Canadian Arctic

    OpenAIRE

    Saran Somanathan; Peter C Flynn; Jozef K Szymanski

    2007-01-01

    One predicted consequence of global warming is the thinning of Arctic sea ice. This raises the question whether the fabled Northwest Passage can be used for year round ship traffic, and whether the distance saved by using the polar route justifies the incremental investment in ice-breaking ships. A conceptual study using computer simulation was conducted to evaluate the Northwest Passage versus the Panama Canal routes between eastern North America and Japan. Recent historical ice conditions w...

  19. Decadal to seasonal variability of Arctic sea ice albedo

    OpenAIRE

    Agarwal, S; Moon, W.; Wettlaufer, J. S.

    2011-01-01

    A controlling factor in the seasonal and climatological evolution of the sea ice cover is its albedo $\\alpha$. Here we analyze Arctic data from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) Polar Pathfinder and assess the seasonality and variability of broadband albedo from a 23 year daily record. We produce a histogram of daily albedo over ice covered regions in which the principal albedo transitions are seen; high albedo in late winter and spring, the onset of snow melt and melt pond...

  20. Seasonal cycle of solar energy fluxes through Arctic sea ice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Arndt

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Arctic sea ice has not only decreased considerably during the last decades, but also changed its physical properties towards a thinner and more seasonal cover. These changes strongly impact the energy budget and might affect the ice-associated ecosystem of the Arctic. But until now, it is not possible to quantify shortwave energy fluxes through sea ice sufficiently well over large regions and during different seasons. Here, we present a new parameterization of light transmittance through sea ice for all seasons as a function of variable sea ice properties. The annual maximum solar heat flux of 30 × 105 J m−2 occurs in June, then also matching the under ice ocean heat flux. Furthermore, our results suggest that 96% of the total annual solar heat input occurs from May to August, during four months only. Applying the new parameterization on remote sensing and reanalysis data from 1979 to 2011, we find an increase in light transmission of 1.5% a−1 for all regions. Sensitivity studies reveal that the results strongly depend on the timing of melt onset and the correct classification of ice types. Hence, these parameters are of great importance for quantifying under-ice radiation fluxes and the uncertainty of this parameterization. Assuming a two weeks earlier melt onset, the annual budget increases by 20%. Continuing the observed transition from Arctic multi- to first year sea ice could increase light transmittance by another 18%. Furthermore, the increase in light transmission directly contributes to an increase in internal and bottom melt of sea ice, resulting in a positive transmittance-melt feedback process.

  1. Nonlinear threshold behavior during the loss of Arctic sea ice

    CERN Document Server

    Eisenman, I; 10.1073/pnas.0806887106

    2008-01-01

    In light of the rapid recent retreat of Arctic sea ice, a number of studies have discussed the possibility of a critical threshold (or "tipping point") beyond which the ice-albedo feedback causes the ice cover to melt away in an irreversible process. The focus has typically been centered on the annual minimum (September) ice cover, which is often seen as particularly susceptible to destabilization by the ice-albedo feedback. Here we examine the central physical processes associated with the transition from ice-covered to ice-free Arctic Ocean conditions. We show that while the ice-albedo feedback promotes the existence of multiple ice cover states, the stabilizing thermodynamic effects of sea ice mitigate this when the Arctic Ocean is ice-covered during a sufficiently large fraction of the year. These results suggest that critical threshold behavior is unlikely during the approach from current perennial sea ice conditions to seasonally ice-free conditions. In a further warmed climate, however, we find that a ...

  2. Near Real Time Arctic sea ice thickness and volume from CryoSat-2

    OpenAIRE

    Tilling, R. L.; Ridout, A; Shepherd, A.

    2016-01-01

    Timely observations of sea ice thickness help us to understand Arctic climate, and can support maritime activities in the Polar Regions. Although it is possible to calculate Arctic sea ice thickness using measurements acquired by CryoSat-2, the latency of the final release dataset is typically one month, due to the time required to determine precise satellite orbits. We use a new fast delivery CryoSat-2 dataset based on preliminary orbits to compute Arctic sea ice thickness ...

  3. Controls on Arctic sea ice from first-year and multi-year survival rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunke, Jes [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    The recent decrease in Arctic sea ice cover has transpired with a significant loss of multi year ice. The transition to an Arctic that is populated by thinner first year sea ice has important implications for future trends in area and volume. Here we develop a reduced model for Arctic sea ice with which we investigate how the survivability of first year and multi year ice control the mean state, variability, and trends in ice area and volume.

  4. Arctic Sea Ice Simulation in the PlioMIP Ensemble

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Fergus W.; Haywood, Alan M.; Otto-Bliesner, Bette L.; Bragg, Fran; Chan, Wing-Le; Chandler, Mark A.; Contoux, Camille; Kamae, Youichi; Abe-Ouchi, Ayako; Rosenbloom, Nan A.; Stepanek, Christian; Zhang, Zhongshi

    2016-01-01

    Eight general circulation models have simulated the mid-Pliocene warm period (mid-Pliocene, 3.264 to 3.025 Ma) as part of the Pliocene Modelling Intercomparison Project (PlioMIP). Here, we analyse and compare their simulation of Arctic sea ice for both the pre-industrial period and the mid-Pliocene. Mid-Pliocene sea ice thickness and extent is reduced, and the model spread of extent is more than twice the pre-industrial spread in some summer months. Half of the PlioMIP models simulate ice-free conditions in the mid-Pliocene. This spread amongst the ensemble is in line with the uncertainties amongst proxy reconstructions for mid-Pliocene sea ice extent. Correlations between mid-Pliocene Arctic temperatures and sea ice extents are almost twice as strong as the equivalent correlations for the pre-industrial simulations. The need for more comprehensive sea ice proxy data is highlighted, in order to better compare model performances.

  5. Mihhail Voitenko: Arctic Sea vedas salajast saadetist / Mihhail Voitenko ; intervjueerinud Jaanus Piirsalu

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Voitenko, Mihhail

    2009-01-01

    Kaubalaeva Arctic Sea kadumise avalikustanud Venemaa laevandusajakirjaniku hinnangul oli laeval salajane, mitte kriminaalne kaup. Ta ei usu, et kaheksa piraatideks nimetatud meest tungisid laevale ja kaaperdasid selle

  6. Links between Arctic sea ice and extreme summer precipi- tation in China:an alternative view

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Petteri Uotila; Alexey Karpechko; Timo Vihma

    2014-01-01

    Potential links between the Arctic sea-ice concentration anomalies and extreme precipitation in China are explored. Associations behind these links can be explained by physical interpretations aided by visualisations of temporarily lagged composites of variables such as atmospheric mean sea level pressure and sea surface temperature. This relatively simple approach is veriifed by collectively examining already known links between the Arctic sea ice and rainfall in China. For example, similarities in the extreme summer rainfall response to Arctic sea-ice concentration anomalies either in winter (DJF) or in spring (MAM) are highlighted. Furthermore, new links between the Arctic sea ice and the extreme weather in India and Eurasia are proposed. The methodology developed in this study can be further applied to identify other remote impacts of the Arctic sea ice variability.

  7. Arctic Sea Ice Thickness - Past, Present And Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadhams, P.

    2007-12-01

    In November 2005 the International Workshop on Arctic Sea Ice Thickness: Past, Present and Future was held at Rungstedgaard Conference Center, near Copenhagen, Denmark. The proceedings of the Workshop were subsequently published as a book by the European Commission. In this review we summarise the conclusions of the Workshop on the techniques which show the greatest promise for thickness monitoring on different spatial and temporal scales, and for different purposes. Sonic methods, EM techniques, buoys and satellite methods will be considered. Some copies of the book will be available at the lecture, and others can be ordered from the European Commission. The paper goes on to consider early results from some of the latest measurements on Arctic sea ice thickness done in 2007. These comprise a trans-Arctic voyage by a UK submarine, HMS "Tireless", equipped with a Kongsberg 3002 multibeam sonar which generates a 3-D digital terrain map of the ice underside; and experiments at the APLIS ice station in the Beaufort Sea carried out by the Gavia AUV equipped with a GeoSwath interferometric sonar. In both cases 3-D mapping of sea ice constitutes a new step forward in sea ice data collection, but in the case of the submarine the purpose is to map change in ice thickness (comparing results with a 2004 "Tireless" cruise and with US and UK data prior to 2000), while for the small AUV the purpose is intensive local mapping of a few ridges to improve our knowledge of their structure, as part of a multisensor programme

  8. The distribution of atmospheric black carbon in the marine boundary layer over the North Atlantic and the Russian Arctic Seas in July - October 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevchenko, Vladimir P.; Kopeikin, Vladimir M.; Evangeliou, Nikolaos; Novigatsky, Alexander N.; Pankratova, Natalia V.; Starodymova, Dina P.; Stohl, Andreas; Thompson, Rona

    2016-04-01

    Black carbon (BC) particles are highly efficient at absorbing visible light, which has a large potential impact on Arctic climate. However, measurement data on the distribution of BC in the atmosphere over the North Atlantic and the Russian Arctic Seas are scarce. We present measurement data on the distribution of atmospheric BC in the marine boundary layer of the North Atlantic and Baltic, North, Norwegian, Barents, White, Kara and Laptev Seas from research cruises during July 23 to October 6, 2015. During the 62nd and 63rd cruises of the RV "Akademik Mstislav Keldysh" air was filtered through Hahnemuhle fineart quarz-microfibre filters. The mass of BC on the filter was determined by measurement of the attenuation of a beam of light transmitted through the filter. Source areas were estimated by backwards trajectories of air masses calculated using NOAA's HYSPLIT model (http://www.arl.noaa.gov/ready.html) and FLEXPART model (http://www.flexpart.eu). During some parts of the cruises, air masses arrived from background areas of high latitudes, and the measured BC concentrations were low. During other parts of the cruise, air masses arrived from industrially developed areas with strong BC sources, and this led to substantially enhanced measured BC concentrations. Model-supported analyses are currently performed to use the measurement data for constraining the emission strength in these areas.

  9. A recent bifurcation in Arctic sea-ice cover

    CERN Document Server

    Livina, Valerie N

    2012-01-01

    There is ongoing debate over whether Arctic sea-ice has already passed a 'tipping point', or whether it will do so in future, with several recent studies arguing that the loss of summer sea ice does not involve a bifurcation because it is highly reversible in models. Recently developed methods can detect and sometimes forewarn of bifurcations in time-series data, hence we applied them to satellite data for Arctic sea-ice cover. Here we show that a new low ice cover state has appeared from 2007 onwards, which is distinct from the normal state of seasonal sea ice variation, suggesting a bifurcation has occurred from one attractor to two. There was no robust early warning signal of critical slowing down prior to this bifurcation, consistent with it representing the appearance of a new ice cover state rather than the loss of stability of the existing state. The new low ice cover state has been sampled predominantly in summer-autumn and seasonal forcing combined with internal climate variability are likely respons...

  10. The uniaxial compressive strength of the Arctic summer sea ice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Hongwei; LI Zhijun; HUANG Wenfeng; LU Peng; LEI Ruibo

    2015-01-01

    The results on the uniaxial compressive strength of Arctic summer sea ice are presented based on the sam-ples collected during the fifth Chinese National Arctic Research Expedition in 2012 (CHINARE-2012). Exper-imental studies were carried out at different testing temperatures (−3, −6 and −9°C), and vertical samples were loaded at stress rates ranging from 0.001 to 1 MPa/s. The temperature, density, and salinity of the ice were measured to calculate the total porosity of the ice. In order to study the effects of the total porosity and the density on the uniaxial compressive strength, the measured strengths for a narrow range of stress rates from 0.01 to 0.03 MPa/s were analyzed. The results show that the uniaxial compressive strength decreases linearly with increasing total porosity, and when the density was lower than 0.86 g/cm3, the uniaxial com-pressive strength increases in a power-law manner with density. The uniaxial compressive behavior of the Arctic summer sea ice is sensitive to the loading rate, and the peak uniaxial compressive strength is reached in the brittle-ductile transition range. The dependence of the strength on the temperature shows that the calculated average strength in the brittle-ductile transition range, which was considered as the peak uniaxial compressive strength, increases steadily in the temperature range from −3 to −9°C.

  11. Causes for different spatial distributions of minimum Arctic sea-ice extent in 2007 and 2012

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CUI Hongyan; QIAO Fangli; SHU Qi; SONG Yajuan; JIANG Chunfei

    2015-01-01

    Satellite records show the minimum Arctic sea ice extents (SIEs) were observed in the Septembers of 2007 and 2012, but the spatial distributions of sea ice concentration reduction in these two years were quite different. Atmospheric circulation pattern and the upper-ocean state in summer were investigated to explain the difference. By employing the ice-temperature and ice-specific humidity (SH) positive feedbacks in the Arctic Ocean, this paper shows that in 2007 and 2012 the higher surface air temperature (SAT) and sea level pressure (SLP) accompanied by more surface SH and higher sea surface temperature (SST), as a consequence, the strengthened poleward wind was favorable for melting summer Arctic sea ice in different regions in these two years. SAT was the dominant factor influencing the distribution of Arctic sea ice melting. The correlation coefficient is–0.84 between SAT anomalies in summer and the Arctic SIE anomalies in autumn. The increase SAT in different regions in the summers of 2007 and 2012 corresponded to a quicker melting of sea ice in the Arctic. The SLP and related wind were promoting factors connected with SAT. Strengthening poleward winds brought warm moist air to the Arctic and accelerated the melting of sea ice in different regions in the summers of 2007 and 2012. Associated with the rising air temperature, the higher surface SH and SST also played a positive role in reducing summer Arctic sea ice in different regions in these two years, which form two positive feedbacks mechanism.

  12. Arctic Sea jõudis lõpuks Soome tagasi, kuid saladused jäävad / Jaanus Piirsalu

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Piirsalu, Jaanus, 1973-

    2010-01-01

    Kaubalaeva Arctic Sea kaaperdamises süüdistatavad on endiselt Moskvas eeluurimisvanglas. Kaubalaeva kaaperdajate käest vabastama saadetud Vene sõjalaeva Ladnõi ohvitser esitatas uue versiooni Arctic Sea hõivamise kohta. Kaart

  13. A rapidly declining perennial sea ice cover in the Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comiso, Josefino C.

    2002-10-01

    The perennial sea ice cover in the Arctic is shown to be declining at -9% per decade using satellite data from 1978 to 2000. A sustained decline at this rate would mean the disappearance of the multiyear ice cover during this century and drastic changes in the Arctic climate system. An apparent increase in the fraction of second year ice in the 1990s is also inferred suggesting an overall thinning of the ice cover. Surface ice temperatures derived from satellite data are negatively correlated with perennial ice area and are shown to be increasing at the rate of 1.2 K per decade. The latter implies longer melt periods and therefore decreasing ice volume in the more recent years.

  14. Arctic sea-level reconstruction analysis using recent satellite altimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Peter Limkilde; Andersen, Ole Baltazar; Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg

    2014-01-01

    We present a sea-level reconstruction for the Arctic Ocean using recent satellite altimetry data. The model, forced by historical tide gauge data, is based on empirical orthogonal functions (EOFs) from a calibration period; for this purpose, newly retracked satellite altimetry from ERS-1 and -2...... and Envisat has been used. Despite the limited coverage of these datasets, we have made a reconstruction up to 82 degrees north for the period 1950–2010. We place particular emphasis on determining appropriate preprocessing for the tide gauge data, and on validation of the model, including the ability...... to reconstruct known data. The relationship between the reconstruction and climatic variables, such as atmospheric pressure, and climate oscillations, including the Arctic Oscillation (AO), is examined....

  15. Regional dependence in the rapid loss of Arctic sea ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Close, Sally; Houssais, Marie-Noëlle; Herbaut, Christophe

    2016-04-01

    The accelerating rate of sea ice decline in the Arctic, particularly in the summer months, has been well documented by previous studies. However, the methods of analysis used to date have tended to employ pre-defined regions over which to determine sea ice loss, potentially masking regional variability within these regions. Similarly, evidence of acceleration has frequently been based on decade-to-decade comparisons that do not precisely quantify the timing of the increase in rate of decline. In this study, we address this issue by quantifying the onset time of rapid loss in sea ice concentration on a point-by-point basis, using an objective method applied to satellite passive microwave data. Seasonal maps of onset time are produced, and reveal strong regional dependency, with differences of up to 20 years in onset time between the various subregions of the Arctic. In certain cases, such as the Laptev Sea, strong spatial variability is found even at the regional scale, suggesting that caution should be employed in the use of geographically-based region definitions that may be misaligned with the physical response. The earliest onset times are found in the Pacific sector, where certain areas undergo a transition ca. 1992. In contrast, onset times in the Atlantic sector are much more recent. Rates of decline prior to and following the onset of rapid decline are calculated, and suggest that the post-onset rate of loss is weakest in the Pacific sector and greatest in the Barents Sea region. Coherency is noted in the season-to-season response, both at interannual and longer time scales. Our results describe a series of spatially self-consistent regional responses, and may be useful in understanding the primary drivers of recent sea ice loss.

  16. Effect of retreating sea ice on Arctic cloud cover in simulated recent global warming

    OpenAIRE

    Abe, M.; Nozawa, T.; Ogura, T; K. Takata

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the effect of sea ice reduction on Arctic cloud cover in historical simulations with the coupled atmosphere–ocean general circulation model MIROC5. During simulated global warming since the 1970s, the Arctic sea ice extent has reduced substantially, particularly in September. This simulated reduction is consistent with satellite observation results. However, the Arctic cloud cover increases significantly during October at grids with s...

  17. The delivery of organic contaminants to the Arctic food web: Why sea ice matters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pucko, M.; Stern, Gary; Macdonald, Robie;

    2015-01-01

    For decades sea ice has been perceived as a physical barrier for the loading of contaminants to the Arctic Ocean. We show that sea ice, in fact, facilitates the delivery of organic contaminants to the Arctic marine food web through processes that: 1) are independent of contaminant physical–chemic...

  18. Contribution of sea-ice loss to Arctic amplification is regulated by Pacific Ocean decadal variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Screen, James A.; Francis, Jennifer A.

    2016-09-01

    The pace of Arctic warming is about double that at lower latitudes--a robust phenomenon known as Arctic amplification. Many diverse climate processes and feedbacks cause Arctic amplification, including positive feedbacks associated with diminished sea ice. However, the precise contribution of sea-ice loss to Arctic amplification remains uncertain. Through analyses of both observations and model simulations, we show that the contribution of sea-ice loss to wintertime Arctic amplification seems to be dependent on the phase of the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO). Our results suggest that, for the same pattern and amount of sea-ice loss, consequent Arctic warming is larger during the negative PDO phase relative to the positive phase, leading to larger reductions in the poleward gradient of tropospheric thickness and to more pronounced reductions in the upper-level westerlies. Given the oscillatory nature of the PDO, this relationship has the potential to increase skill in decadal-scale predictability of the Arctic and sub-Arctic climate. Our results indicate that Arctic warming in response to the ongoing long-term sea-ice decline is greater (reduced) during periods of the negative (positive) PDO phase. We speculate that the observed recent shift to the positive PDO phase, if maintained and all other factors being equal, could act to temporarily reduce the pace of wintertime Arctic warming in the near future.

  19. Warm Arctic—cold continents: climate impacts of the newly open Arctic Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James E. Overland

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent Arctic changes are likely due to coupled Arctic amplification mechanisms with increased linkage between Arctic climate and sub-Arctic weather. Historically, sea ice grew rapidly in autumn, a strong negative radiative feedback. But increased sea-ice mobility, loss of multi-year sea ice, enhanced heat storage in newly sea ice-free ocean areas, and modified wind fields form connected positive feedback processes. One-way shifts in the Arctic system are sensitive to the combination of episodic intrinsic atmospheric and ocean variability and persistent increasing greenhouse gases. Winter 2009/10 and December 2010 showed a unique connectivity between the Arctic and more southern weather patterns when the typical polar vortex was replaced by high geopotential heights over the central Arctic and low heights over mid-latitudes that resulted in record snow and low temperatures, a warm Arctic—cold continents pattern. The negative value of the winter (DJF 2009/10 North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO index associated with enhanced meridional winds was the lowest observed value since the beginning of the record in 1865. Wind patterns in December 2007 and 2008 also show an impact of warmer Arctic temperatures. A tendency for higher geopotential heights over the Arctic and enhanced meridional winds are physically consistent with continued loss of sea ice over the next 40 years. A major challenge is to understand the interaction of Arctic changes with climate patterns such as the NAO, Pacific North American and El Niño–Southern Oscillation.

  20. Transport and dispersion of artificial radioactivity in the Arctic Ocean - Model studies and observations -

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Arctic Ocean and the adjacent shelf regions are subject to growing concern because of increasing environmental problems. The most crucial problem arises probably from the dumping of nuclear waste in the Barents and the Kara Sea. But also the great Siberian rivers Ob and Yenisei which drain huge land areas and industrial zones may contribute to the input of pollutants into the Arctic environment. First results of a joint project are described which combines numerical model studies and experimental field work in order to investigate the potential pathways and dispersion of radioactive contaminants in the Arctic Ocean. (author)

  1. Nordic Seas and Arctic Ocean CFC data in CARINA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Jeansson

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Water column data of carbon and carbon relevant hydrographic and hydrochemical parameters have been retrieved from a large number of cruises and collected into a new database called CARINA (CARbon IN the Atlantic. These data have been merged into three sets of files, one for each of the three CARINA regions; the Arctic Mediterranean Seas (AMS, the Atlantic (ATL and the Southern Ocean (SO. The first part of the CARINA database consists of three files, one for each CARINA region, containing the original, non-adjusted cruise data sets, including data quality flags for each measurement. These data have then been subject to rigorous quality control (QC in order to ensure highest possible quality and consistency. The data for most of the parameters included were examined in order to quantify systematic biases in the reported values, i.e. secondary quality control. Significant biases have been corrected for in the second part of the CARINA data product. This consists of three files, one for each CARINA region, which contain adjustments to the original data values based on recommendations from the CARINA QC procedures, along with calculated and interpolated values for some missing parameters.

    Here we present an overview of the QC of the CFC data for the AMS region, including the chlorofluorocarbons CFC-11, CFC-12 and CFC-113, as well as carbon tetrachloride (CCl4. The Arctic Mediterranean Seas is comprised of the Arctic Ocean and the Nordic Seas, and the quality control was carried out separately in these two areas. For the secondary QC of the CFCs we used a combination of tools, including the evaluation of depth profiles and CFC ratios, surface saturations and a crossover analysis. This resulted in a multiplicative adjustment of data from some cruises, while other data were flagged to be of questionable quality, which excluded them from the final data product.

  2. Fine-resolution simulation of surface current and sea ice in the Arctic Mediterranean Seas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xiying; ZHANG Xuehong; YU Rucong; LIU Hailong; LI Wei

    2007-01-01

    A fine-resolution model is developed for ocean circulation simulation in the National Key Laboratory of Numerical Modeling for Atmospheric Sciences and Geophysical Fluid Dynamics (LASG),Chinese Academy of Sciences, and is applied to simulate surface current and sea ice variations in the Arctic Mediterranean Seas. A dynamic sea ice model in elastic-viscous-plastic rheology and a thermodynamic sea ice model are employed. A 200-year simulation is performed and a dimatological average of a 10-year period (141 st-150 th) is presented with focus on sea ice concentration and surface current variations in the Arctic Mediterranean Seas. The model is able to simulate well the East Greenland Current, Beaufort Gyre and the Transpolar Drift, but the simulated West Spitsbergen Current is small and weak. In the March climatology, the sea ice coverage can be simulated well except for a bit more ice in east of Spitsbergen Island. The result is also good for the September scenario except for less ice concentration east of Greenland and greater ice concentration near the ice margin. The extra ice east of Spitsbergen Island is caused by sea ice current convergence forced by atmospheric wind stress.

  3. Multiyear study of the dependence of sea salt aerosol on wind speed and sea ice conditions in the coastal Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, N. W.; Quinn, P. K.; McNamara, S. M.; Pratt, K. A.

    2016-08-01

    Thinning of Arctic sea ice gives rise to ice fracturing and leads (areas of open water surrounded by sea ice) that are a potential source of sea salt aerosol. Atmospheric particle inorganic ion concentrations, local sea ice conditions, and meteorology at Barrow, AK, from 2006 to 2009, were combined to investigate the dependence of submicron (aerodynamic diameter open water, consistent with transported sea salt influence. Sea salt aerosol produced from leads has the potential to alter cloud formation, as well as the chemical composition of the Arctic atmosphere and snowpack.

  4. Intercomparison of passive microwave sea ice concentration retrievals over the high-concentration Arctic sea ice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    andersen, susanne; Tonboe, R.; Kaleschke, L.;

    2007-01-01

    [1] Measurements of sea ice concentration from the Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I) using seven different algorithms are compared to ship observations, sea ice divergence estimates from the Radarsat Geophysical Processor System, and ice and water surface type classification of 59 wide......-swath synthetic aperture radar (SAR) scenes. The analysis is confined to the high-concentration Arctic sea ice, where the ice cover is near 100%. During winter the results indicate that the variability of the SSM/I concentration estimates is larger than the true variability of ice concentration. Results from...... a trusted subset of the SAR scenes across the central Arctic allow the separation of the ice concentration uncertainty due to emissivity variations and sensor noise from other error sources during the winter of 2003-2004. Depending on the algorithm, error standard deviations from 2.5 to 5.0% are found...

  5. A Possible Feedback Mechanism Involving the Arctic Freshwater,the Arctic Sea Ice, and the North Atlantic Drift

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Odd Helge OTTER(A); Helge DRANGE

    2004-01-01

    Model studies point to enhanced warming and to increased freshwater fluxes to high northern latitudes in response to global warming. In order to address possible feedbacks in the ice-ocean system in response to such changes, the combined effect of increased freshwater input to the Arctic Ocean and Arctic warming--the latter manifested as a gradual melting of the Arctic sea ice--is examined using a 3-D isopycnic coordinate ocean general circulation model. A suite of three idealized experiments is carried out: one control integration, one integration with a doubling of the modern Arctic river runoff, and a third more extreme case, where the river runoff is five times the modern value. In the two freshwater cases, the sea ice thickness is reduced by 1.5-2 m in the central Arctic Ocean over a 50-year period. The modelled ocean response is qualitatively the same for both perturbation experiments: freshwater propagates into the Atlantic Ocean and the Nordic Seas, leading to an initial weakening of the North Atlantic Drift.Furthermore, changes in the geostrophic currents in the central Arctic and melting of the Arctic sea ice lead to an intensified Beaufort Gyre, which in turn increases the southward volume transport through the Canadian Archipelago. To compensate for this southward transport of mass, more warm and saline Atlantic water is carried northward with the North Atlantic Drift. It is found that the increased transport of salt into the northern North Atlantic and the Nordic Seas tends to counteract the impact of the increased freshwater originating from the Arctic, leading to a stabilization of the North Atlantic Drift.

  6. Climate Change and China as a Global Emerging Regulatory Sea Power in the Arctic Ocean

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cassotta Pertoldi-Bianchi, Sandra; Hossain, Kamrul; Ren, Jingzheng;

    2015-01-01

    The impact of climate change in the Arctic Ocean such as ice melting and ice retreat facilitates natural resources extraction. Arctic fossil fuel becomes the drivers of geopolitical changes in the Arctic Ocean. Climate change facilitates natural resource extractions and increases competition...... between states and can result in tensions, even military ones. This article investigates through a political and legal analysis the role of China as an emerging regulatory sea power in the Arctic Ocean given its assertive “energy hungry country behaviour” in the Arctic Ocean. The United Nations Convention...... on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS) and the Arctic Council (AC) are taken into consideration under climate change effects, to assess how global legal frameworks and institutions can deal with China’s strategy in the Arctic Ocean. China’s is moving away from its role as “humble power” to one of “informal...

  7. Sea ice inertial oscillation magnitudes in the Arctic basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Gimbert

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available An original method to quantify the amplitude of inertial motion of oceanic and ice drifters, through the introduction of a non-dimensional parameter M defined from a spectral analysis, is presented. A strong seasonal dependence of the magnitude of sea ice inertial oscillations is revealed, in agreement with the corresponding annual cycles of sea ice extent, concentration, thickness, advection velocity, and deformation rates. The spatial pattern of the magnitude of the sea ice inertial oscillations over the Arctic basin is also in agreement with the sea ice thickness and concentration patterns. This argues for a strong link between the magnitude of inertial motion on one hand, the dissipation of energy through mechanical processes, and the cohesiveness of the cover on the other hand. Finally, a significant pluri-annual evolution towards greater magnitudes of inertial oscillations in recent years, in both summer and winter, is reported, thus concomitant with reduced sea ice thickness, concentration and spatial extent.

  8. Stochastic dynamics of Arctic sea ice Part I: Additive noise

    CERN Document Server

    Moon, Woosok

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the numerical solutions of a stochastic Arctic sea ice model with constant additive noise over a wide range of external heat-fluxes, $\\Delta F_0$, which correspond to greenhouse gas forcing. The variability that the stochasticity provides to the deterministic steady state solutions (perennial and seasonal ice states) is illustrated by examining both the stochastic paths and probability density functions (PDFs). The principal stochastic moments (standard deviation, mean and skewness) are calculated and compared with those determined from a stochastic perturbation theory described previously by Moon and Wettlaufer (2013). We examine in detail the competing roles of the destabilizing sea ice-albedo-feedback and the stabilizing long-wave radiative loss contributions to the variability of the ice cover under increased greenhouse-gas forcing. In particular, the variability of the stochastic paths at the end of summer shows a clear maximum, which is due to the combination of the increasing importance of t...

  9. Propaganda, News, or Education: Reporting Changing Arctic Sea Ice Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitzell, K.; Meier, W.

    2010-12-01

    The National Snow and Ice Data Center provides information on Arctic sea ice conditions via the Arctic Sea Ice News & Analysis (ASINA) website. As a result of this effort to explain climatic data to the general public, we have attracted a huge amount of attention from our readers. Sometimes, people write to thank us for the information and the explanation. But people also write to accuse us of bias, slant, or outright lies in our posts. The topic of climate change is a minefield full of political animosity, and even the most carefully written verbiage can appear incomplete or biased to some audiences. Our strategy has been to report the data and stick to the areas in which our scientists are experts. The ASINA team carefully edits our posts to make sure that all statements are based on the science and not on opinion. Often this means using some technical language that may be difficult for a layperson to understand. However, we provide concise definitions for technical terms where appropriate. The hope is that by communicating the data clearly, without an agenda, we can let the science speak for itself. Is this an effective strategy to communicate clearly about the changing climate? Or does it downplay the seriousness of climate change? By writing at a more advanced level and avoiding oversimplification, we require our readers to work harder. But we may also maintain the attention of skeptics, convincing them to read further and become more knowledgeable about the topic.

  10. Age characteristics in a multidecadal Arctic sea ice simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunke, Elizabeth C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bitz, Cecllia M [UNIV. OF WASHINGTON

    2008-01-01

    Results from adding a tracer for age of sea ice to a sophisticated sea ice model that is widely used for climate studies are presented. The consistent simulation of ice age, dynamics, and thermodynamics in the model shows explicitly that the loss of Arctic perennial ice has accelerated in the past three decades, as has been seen in satellite-derived observations. Our model shows that the September ice age average across the Northern Hemisphere varies from about 5 to 8 years, and the ice is much younger (about 2--3 years) in late winter because of the expansion of first-year ice. We find seasonal ice on average comprises about 5% of the total ice area in September, but as much as 1.34 x 10{sup 6} km{sup 2} survives in some years. Our simulated ice age in the late 1980s and early 1990s declined markedly in agreement with other studies. After this period of decline, the ice age began to recover, but in the final years of the simulation very little young ice remains after the melt season, a strong indication that the age of the pack will again decline in the future as older ice classes fail to be replenished. The Arctic ice pack has fluctuated between older and younger ice types over the past 30 years, while ice area, thickness, and volume all declined over the same period, with an apparent acceleration in the last decade.

  11. An Improved 20-Year Arctic Ocean Altimetric Sea Level Data Record

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheng, Yongcun; Andersen, Ole Baltazar; Knudsen, Per

    2015-01-01

    For ocean and climate research, it is essential to get long-term altimetric sea level data that is as accurate as possible. However, the accuracy of the altimetric data is frequently degraded in the interior of the Arctic Ocean due to the presence of seasonal or permanent sea ice. We have...... reprocessed ERS-1/2/Envisat satellite altimetry to develop an improved 20-year sea level dataset for the Arctic Ocean. We have developed both an along-track dataset and three-day gridded sea level anomaly (SLA) maps from September 1992 to April 2012. A major improvement in data coverage was gained...... estimation of sea level changes from satellite altimetry in the Arctic Ocean. The reprocessed dataset exhibit a mean sea level trend of 2.1 +/- 1.3mm/year (without Glacial Isostatic Adjustment correction) covering the Arctic Ocean between 66 degrees N and 82 degrees N with significant higher spatial...

  12. Regional variability of a projected sea ice-free Arctic during the summer months

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laliberté, F.; Howell, S. E. L.; Kushner, P. J.

    2016-01-01

    Climate projections of sea ice retreat under anthropogenic climate change at the regional scale and in summer months other than September have largely not been evaluated. Information at this level of detail is vital for future planning of safe Arctic marine activities. Here the timing of when Arctic waters will be reliably ice free across Arctic regions from June to October is presented. It is shown that during this century regions along the Northern Sea Route and Arctic Bridge will be more reliably ice free than regions along the Northwest Passage and the Transpolar Sea Route, which will retain substantial sea ice cover past midcentury. Moreover, ice-free conditions in the Arctic will likely be confined to September for several decades to come in many regions. Projections using a selection of models that accounts for agreement of models in each region and calendar month with observations yield similar conclusions.

  13. Investigating changes in the climate- and ecosystemof Arctic sea ice using remotely operated vehicles

    OpenAIRE

    Katlein, Christian; Arndt, Stefanie; Fernandez Mendez, Mar; Lange, Benjamin; Nicolaus, Marcel; Wenzhöfer, Frank; Jakuba, Mike; German, Chris

    2014-01-01

    The Arctic Ocean is currently undergoing a dramatic change. Decreasing sea-ice extent, thickness and age are changing important processes in the climate system. An increasing coverage of the sea ice by melt ponds and an increased amount of light transmitted to the upper ocean are also affecting the ice associated ecosystem. To document these changes, we operated different remotely operated vehicles (ROV) underneath the drifting sea ice of the Central Arctic Ocean. The newest under...

  14. Isolation of novel psychrophilic bacteria from Arctic sea ice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The phylogenetic diversity of culturable psychrophilic bacteria associated with sea ice from the high latitude regions of Canadian Basin and Chukchi Sea, Arctic, was investigated. A total of 34 psychropilic strains were isolated using three methods of (Ⅰ) dilution plating (at 4 ℃), (Ⅱ) bath culturing (at -1 ℃) and dilution plating, and (Ⅲ) cold shock (-20 ℃ for 24 h), bath culturing and dilution plating under aerobic conditions. Sea-ice samples were exposed to -20 ℃ for 24 h that might reduce the number of common microorganisms and encourage outgrowth of psychrophilic strains. This process might be able to be introduced to isolation psychrophilic bacteria from other environmental samples in future study. 16S rDNA nearly full-length sequence analysis revealed that psychrophilic strains felled in two phylogenetic divisions, γ-proteobacteria (in the genera Colwellia、Marinobacter、Shewanella、Glaciecola、Marinomonas and Pseudoalteromonas) and Cytophaga-Flexibacter-Bacteroides (Flavobacterium and Psychroflexus). Fifteen of bacterial isolates quite likely represented novel species (16S rDNA sequence similarity below 98%). One of strains (BSi20002) from Canadian Basin showed 100% sequence similarity to that of Marinobacter sp. ANT8277 isolated from the Antarctic Weddell sea ice, suggesting bacteria may have a bipolar distribution at the species level.

  15. Peopling of the high Arctic - induced by sea ice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funder, Svend

    2010-05-01

    'We travelled in the winter after the return of daylight and did not go into fixed camp until spring, when the ice broke up. There was good hunting on the way, seals, beluga, walrus, bear.' (From Old Merkrusârk's account of his childhood's trek from Baffin Island to Northwest Greenland, told to Knud Rasmussen on Saunders Island in 1904) Five thousand years ago people moving eastwards from Beringia spread over the barrens of the Canadian high Arctic. This was the first of three waves of prehistoric Arctic 'cultures', which eventually reached Greenland. The passage into Greenland has to go through the northernmost and most hostile part of the country with a 5 month Polar night, and to understand this extraordinary example of human behaviour and endurance, it has been customary to invoke a more favourable (warmer) climate. This presentation suggests that land-fast sea ice, i.e. stationary sea ice anchored to the coast, is among the most important environmental factors behind the spread of prehistoric polar cultures. The ice provides the road for travelling and social communion - and access to the most important source of food, the ocean. In the LongTerm Project (2006 and 2007) we attempted to establish a Holocene record for sea ice variations along oceanic coasts in northernmost Greenland. Presently the coasts north of 80° N are beleaguered by year-round sea ice - for ten months this is land-fast ice, and only for a period in the stormy autumn months are the coasts exposed to pack-ice. This presentation Land-fast ice - as opposed to pack-ice - is a product of local temperatures, but its duration over the year, and especially into the daylight season, is also conditioned by other factors, notably wind strength. In the geological record we recognize long lasting land-fast ice by two absences: absence of traces of wave action (no beach formation), which, however, can also be a result of pack-ice along the coast; - and absence of driftwood on the shore (land-fast ice

  16. Methane excess in Arctic surface water- triggered by sea ice formation and melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damm, E.; Rudels, B.; Schauer, U.; Mau, S.; Dieckmann, G.

    2015-11-01

    Arctic amplification of global warming has led to increased summer sea ice retreat, which influences gas exchange between the Arctic Ocean and the atmosphere where sea ice previously acted as a physical barrier. Indeed, recently observed enhanced atmospheric methane concentrations in Arctic regions with fractional sea-ice cover point to unexpected feedbacks in cycling of methane. We report on methane excess in sea ice-influenced water masses in the interior Arctic Ocean and provide evidence that sea ice is a potential source. We show that methane release from sea ice into the ocean occurs via brine drainage during freezing and melting i.e. in winter and spring. In summer under a fractional sea ice cover, reduced turbulence restricts gas transfer, then seawater acts as buffer in which methane remains entrained. However, in autumn and winter surface convection initiates pronounced efflux of methane from the ice covered ocean to the atmosphere. Our results demonstrate that sea ice-sourced methane cycles seasonally between sea ice, sea-ice-influenced seawater and the atmosphere, while the deeper ocean remains decoupled. Freshening due to summer sea ice retreat will enhance this decoupling, which restricts the capacity of the deeper Arctic Ocean to act as a sink for this greenhouse gas.

  17. Summer concentrations of NMHCs in ambient air of the Arctic and Antarctic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hellen, H.; Paatero, J.; Hakola, H.; Virkkula, A. [Finnish Meteorological Inst., Helsinki (Finland); Leck, C. [Stockholm Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Meteorology

    2012-11-01

    Summer concentrations of C{sub 2}-C{sub 6} non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) were measured in Antarctica and in the Arctic in 2008. The results show that NMHC concentrations are on average five times higher in the Arctic than in Antarctica. In Antarctica, there were few concentration peaks, but during most of the remaining time concentrations were below or close to the detection limits. Over the Arctic pack ice area north of 80 deg, concentrations of most of the measured NMHCs were always above the detection limits. No differences based on air-mass origin were detected in Antarctica, but samples collected over the central Arctic Ocean showed higher concentrations in air masses being advected from the Kara Sea and the western-central Arctic Ocean. The relatively higher NMHC-to-ethyne molar ratios calculated for samples collected over the central Arctic Ocean suggest additional alkane sources in the region. (orig.)

  18. SMOS sea surface salinity maps of the Arctic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabarro, Carolina; Olmedo, Estrella; Turiel, Antonio; Ballabrera-Poy, Joaquim; Martinez, Justino; Portabella, Marcos

    2016-04-01

    years of SMOS data acquisitions. The second is the modification of the filtering criterion to account for the statistical distributions of SSS at each ocean grid point. This allows retrieving a value of SSS which is less affected by outliers originated from RFI and other effects. We will provide an assessment of the quality of these new SSS products in the Arctic, as well as illustrate the potential of these maps to monitor the main river discharges to the Arctic Ocean. [1] Font, J.; Camps, A.; Borges, A.; Martín-Neira, M.; Boutin, J.; Reul, N.; Kerr, Y.; Hahne, A. & Mecklenburg, S. SMOS: The Challenging Sea Surface Salinity Measurement From Space Proceedings of the IEEE, 2010, 98, 649 -665

  19. Polar bear and walrus response to the rapid decline in Arctic sea ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oakley, K.; Whalen, M.; Douglas, D.; Udevitz, M.; Atwood, T.; Jay, C.

    2012-01-01

    The Arctic is warming faster than other regions of the world due to positive climate feedbacks associated with loss of snow and ice. One highly visible consequence has been a rapid decline in Arctic sea ice over the past 3 decades - a decline projected to continue and result in ice-free summers likely as soon as 2030. The polar bear (Ursus maritimus) and the Pacific walrus (Odobenus rosmarus divergens) are dependent on sea ice over the continental shelves of the Arctic Ocean's marginal seas. The continental shelves are shallow regions with high biological productivity, supporting abundant marine life within the water column and on the sea floor. Polar bears use sea ice as a platform for hunting ice seals; walruses use sea ice as a resting platform between dives to forage for clams and other bottom-dwelling invertebrates. How have sea ice changes affected polar bears and walruses? How will anticipated changes affect them in the future?

  20. Response of Arctic sea level and hydrography to hydrological regime change over boreal catchments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tourian, Mohammad J.; Sneeuw, Nico; Losch, Martin; Rabe, Benjamin

    2016-04-01

    Changes in freshwater influx into the Arctic Ocean are a key driver of regional dynamics and sea level change in the Arctic waters. Low-salinity surface waters maintain a strong stratification in the Arctic. This halocline largely shields the cool polar surface water and sea ice from the warmer waters of Atlantic origin below and, hence, inhibits vertical heat fluxes of heat, salt and nutrients. Recently observed changes in the freshwater content of the upper Arctic Ocean raise the question of the effect of these changes on the region. Changes in the freshwater budget affect regional steric sea level, but also the modified ocean dynamics may change sea level through mass transports within the Arctic. One component of the freshwater budget is continental runoff. The hydrological regime of river runoff appears to be non-stationary. There is both interannual variability and a significantly positive trend since the 1970s. The decreasing Arctic sea-ice cover may be a possible reason for the non-stationary behavior of runoff, especially in coastal and marginal seas. The decrease of sea ice due to global warming would lead to cloud formation and, indeed, increased precipitation. During the warmer season, increased precipitation would lead to more discharge of freshwater to the Arctic shelves and basins. The observational record of discharge into the Arctic Ocean, however, is still too sparse to address important science questions about the long-term behavior and development of Arctic sea level and climate. Given the insufficient monitoring from in situ gauge networks, and without any outlook of improvement, spaceborne approaches are currently being investigated. In this contribution we assess the long-term behavior of monthly runoff time series obtained from hydro-geodetic approaches and explore the effects of interannual runoff variability and long term trends on ocean model simulations.

  1. Arctic sea ice distribution in summer based on aerial photos

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Peng; LI Zhijun; ZHANG Zhanhai; DONG Xilu

    2005-01-01

    On the basis of aerial photos of sea ice in the Second Chinese National Arctic Research Expdition during July and September 2003 in the area of74.11°~79.56°N and 144.17°~169.95°W, image processing techniques are used to acquire some geometric parameters of floes, such as fractal dimension, roundness and mean caliper diameter. Latitudinal variation of morphology of arctic ice floes is then obtained, after comparing fractal dimension and roundness which represent geometry of floe edge, the latter is found to show a more obvious tendency with latitude but still not enough to describe floe abrasion. Then mean caliper diameter of ice floe is used as charac-teristic size to analyze floe size distribution, the result reveals that cumulative probabilities of floe sizes agree well with a power-law function, and distribution dimension is generally in the range of 1.05~1.25 and slightly increases as the latitude increases. However slight curvatures are still observed in the plots of cumulative probabilities as in former researches, which can be attributed to both the limitation of sampling area and effect of thermodynamic process.

  2. Sensitivity of Arctic warming to sea ice concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yim, Bo Young; Min, Hong Sik; Kim, Baek-Min; Jeong, Jee-Hoon; Kug, Jong-Seong

    2016-06-01

    We examine the sensitivity of Arctic amplification (AA) to background sea ice concentration (SIC) under greenhouse warming by analyzing the data sets of the historical and Representative Concentration Pathway 8.5 runs of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5. To determine whether the sensitivity of AA for a given radiative forcing depends on background SIC state, we examine the relationship between the AA trend and mean SIC on moving 30 year windows from 1960 to 2100. It is found that the annual mean AA trend varies depending on the mean SIC condition. In particular, some models show a highly variable AA trend in relation to the mean SIC clearly. In these models, the AA trend tends to increase until the mean SIC reaches a critical level (i.e., 20-30%), and the maximum AA trend is almost 3 to 5 times larger than the trend in the early stage of global warming (i.e., 50-60%, 60-70%). However, the AA trend tends to decrease after that. Further analysis shows that the sensitivity of AA trend to mean SIC condition is closely related to the feedback processes associated with summer surface albedo and winter turbulent heat flux in the Arctic Ocean.

  3. Apparent Arctic sea ice modeling improvement caused by volcanoes

    CERN Document Server

    Rosenblum, Erica

    2016-01-01

    The downward trend in Arctic sea ice extent is one of the most dramatic signals of climate change during recent decades. Comprehensive climate models have struggled to reproduce this, typically simulating a slower rate of sea ice retreat than has been observed. However, this bias has been substantially reduced in models participating in the most recent phase of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) compared with the previous generation of models (CMIP3). This improvement has been attributed to improved physics in the models. Here we examine simulations from CMIP3 and CMIP5 and find that simulated sea ice trends are strongly influenced by historical volcanic forcing, which was included in all of the CMIP5 models but in only about half of the CMIP3 models. The volcanic forcing causes temporary simulated cooling in the 1980s and 1990s, which contributes to raising the simulated 1979-2013 global-mean surface temperature trends to values substantially larger than observed. This warming bias is accompan...

  4. Satellite and ground-based observations of patterns and seasonality of sea-ice, summer warmth, snow, and NDVI along the North America and Eurasia Arctic transects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, D. A.; Epstein, H. E.; Raynolds, M. K.; Bhatt, U. S.; Bieniek, P. A.

    2011-12-01

    We analyzed vegetation, climate, and spectral data from zonal sites along two >1500 km long transects that span all five Arctic bioclimate subzones in North America and Eurasia to help interpret the long-term changes in satellite-derived trends of pattern and seasonality of vegetation greenness. Despite large differences in environment and vegetation along the two transects, there is nearly an identical logarithmic relationship between biomass and the summer maximum normalized difference vegetation index derived from AVHRR sensors (MaxNDVI) along the two transects. Summer open water in the Northern Alaska/Beaufort Sea region has increased by 39%, the summer warmth index (SWI) of the tundra increased by 14%, MaxNDVI by 28% and time-integrated NDVI (TI-NDVI) by 21%. The increased open water in the Beaufort is associated with a warming of the land and a large positive increase in the NDVI. In the eastern Kara Sea/Yamal Peninsula region, summer-fall open water has increased by 115%, the SWI decreased by -3%, MaxNDVI increased by only 6%, and TI-NDVI by 2%. The greatly reduced sea ice has affected the summer total warmth and NDVI of the Eurasia transect minimally possibly due to increased winter snow and delayed snowmelt in much of northwest Russian Arctic. In northern Alaska, there is distinctive trend of earlier snow melt at most stations; whereas the northern Yamal has seen an increase in the snow water equivalent and delayed melt on much of the Yagorsky, Yamal, Gydan, and Taimyr peninsulas. This appears to be associated with the reduction in the total summer warmth and relatively small increase in NDVI.

  5. Influence of Sea Ice on Arctic Marine Sulfur Biogeochemistry in the Community Climate System Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deal, Clara [Univ. of Alaska, Fairbanks, AL (United States); Jin, Meibing [Univ. of Alaska, Fairbanks, AL (United States)

    2013-06-30

    Global climate models (GCMs) have not effectively considered how responses of arctic marine ecosystems to a warming climate will influence the global climate system. A key response of arctic marine ecosystems that may substantially influence energy exchange in the Arctic is a change in dimethylsulfide (DMS) emissions, because DMS emissions influence cloud albedo. This response is closely tied to sea ice through its impacts on marine ecosystem carbon and sulfur cycling, and the ice-albedo feedback implicated in accelerated arctic warming. To reduce the uncertainty in predictions from coupled climate simulations, important model components of the climate system, such as feedbacks between arctic marine biogeochemistry and climate, need to be reasonably and realistically modeled. This research first involved model development to improve the representation of marine sulfur biogeochemistry simulations to understand/diagnose the control of sea-ice-related processes on the variability of DMS dynamics. This study will help build GCM predictions that quantify the relative current and possible future influences of arctic marine ecosystems on the global climate system. Our overall research objective was to improve arctic marine biogeochemistry in the Community Climate System Model (CCSM, now CESM). Working closely with the Climate Ocean Sea Ice Model (COSIM) team at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), we added 1 sea-ice algae and arctic DMS production and related biogeochemistry to the global Parallel Ocean Program model (POP) coupled to the LANL sea ice model (CICE). Both CICE and POP are core components of CESM. Our specific research objectives were: 1) Develop a state-of-the-art ice-ocean DMS model for application in climate models, using observations to constrain the most crucial parameters; 2) Improve the global marine sulfur model used in CESM by including DMS biogeochemistry in the Arctic; and 3) Assess how sea ice influences DMS dynamics in the arctic marine

  6. A study of Arctic sea ice freeboard heights, gravity anomalies and dynamic topography from ICESat measurementes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skourup, Henriette

    The Arctic sea ice cover has a great influence on the climate and is believed to respond rapidly to climate changes. Since 2003 the Ice, Cloud and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat) laser altimetry mission has provided satellite altimetry over the ice covered Arctic Ocean up to 86 N. In this thesis...

  7. Recent Trends in the Arctic Navigable Ice Season and Links to Atmospheric Circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslanik, J.; Drobot, S.

    2002-12-01

    One of the potential effects of Arctic climate warming is an increase in the navigable ice season, perhaps resulting in development of the Arctic as a major shipping route. The distance from western North American ports to Europe through the Northwest Passage (NWP) or the Northern Sea Route (NSR) is typically 20 to 60 percent shorter than travel through the Panama Canal, while travel between Europe and the Far East may be reduced by as much as three weeks compared to transport through the Suez Canal. An increase in the navigable ice season would also improve commercial opportunities within the Arctic region, such as mineral and oil exploration and tourism, which could potentially expand the economic base of Arctic residents and companies, but which would also have negative environmental impacts. Utilizing daily passive-microwave derived sea ice concentrations, trends and variability in the Arctic navigable ice season are examined from 1979 through 2001. Trend analyses suggest large increases in the length of the navigable ice season in the Kara and Barents seas, the Sea of Okhotsk, and the Beaufort Sea, with decreases in the length of the navigable ice season in the Bering Sea. Interannual variations in the navigable ice season largely are governed by fluctuations in low-frequency atmospheric circulation, although the specific annular modes affecting the length of the navigable ice season vary by region. In the Beaufort and East Siberian seas, variations in the North Atlantic Oscillation/Arctic Oscillation control the navigable ice season, while variations in the East Pacific anomaly play an important role in controlling the navigable ice season in the Kara and Barents seas. In Hudson Bay, the Canadian Arctic Archipelago, and Baffin Bay, interannual variations in the navigable ice season are strongly related to the Pacific Decadal Oscillation.

  8. Quaternary Sea-ice history in the Arctic Ocean based on a new Ostracode sea-ice proxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronin, T. M.; Gemery, L.; Briggs, W.M.; Jakobsson, M.; Polyak, L.; Brouwers, E.M.

    2010-01-01

    Paleo-sea-ice history in the Arctic Ocean was reconstructed using the sea-ice dwelling ostracode Acetabulastoma arcticum from late Quaternary sediments from the Mendeleyev, Lomonosov, and Gakkel Ridges, the Morris Jesup Rise and the Yermak Plateau. Results suggest intermittently high levels of perennial sea ice in the central Arctic Ocean during Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 3 (25-45 ka), minimal sea ice during the last deglacial (16-11 ka) and early Holocene thermal maximum (11-5 ka) and increasing sea ice during the mid-to-late Holocene (5-0 ka). Sediment core records from the Iceland and Rockall Plateaus show that perennial sea ice existed in these regions only during glacial intervals MIS 2, 4, and 6. These results show that sea ice exhibits complex temporal and spatial variability during different climatic regimes and that the development of modern perennial sea ice may be a relatively recent phenomenon. ?? 2010.

  9. NODC Standard Product: International ocean atlas Volume 6 - Zooplankton of the Arctic Seas 2002 (NODC Accession 0098570)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical and biological data for the Arctic and sub-Arctic regions extending from the Barents Sea to the Northwest Pacific, sampled during 25 scientific cruises for...

  10. Sea Ice Charts of the Russian Arctic in Gridded Format, 1933-2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Arctic and Antarctic Research Institute (AARI) in St. Petersburg, Russia, produces sea ice charts for safety of navigation in the polar regions and for other...

  11. Moderate-resolution sea surface temperature data for the Arctic Ocean Ecoregions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sea surface temperature (SST) is an important environmental characteristic in determining the suitability and sustainability of habitats for marine organisms. Of particular interest is the fate of the Arctic Ocean, which provides critical habitat to commercially important fish (M...

  12. The Role of Sea Ice for Vascular Plant Dispersal in the Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geirsdottir, A.; Alsos, I. G.; Seidenkrantz, M. S.; Bennike, O.; Kirchhefer, A.; Ehrich, D.

    2015-12-01

    Plant species adapted to arctic environments are expected to go extinct at their southern margins due to climate warming whereas they may find suitable habitats on arctic islands if they are able to disperse there. Analyses of species distribution and phylogenetic data indicate both that the frequency of dispersal events is higher in the arctic than in other regions, and that the dispersal routes often follow the routes of sea surface currents. Thus, it has been hypothesised that sea ice has played a central role in Holocene colonisation of arctic islands. Here we compile data on the first Holocene occurrence of species in East Greenland, Iceland, the Faroe Islands, and Svalbard. We then combine these records with interpretations of dispersal routes inferred from genetic data and data on geographical distributions, reconstructions of Holocene sea ice extent, and records of driftwood to evaluate the potential role sea ice has played in past colonisation events.

  13. Radiological impact assessment within the IAEA Arctic Assessment Project (IASAP)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scott, E.M.; Gurbutt, P.; Harmes, I.;

    1998-01-01

    As part of the International Arctic Seas Assessment Project (IASAP) of IAEA, a working group was created to model the dispersal and transfer of radionuclides released from radioactive waste disposed of in the Kara Sea and bays of Novaya Zemlya and to assess the radiological impact. Existing models...... were extended, and new models developed to incorporate several features of the area (including ice formation and transport) which present modelling challenges. An extensive inter-model comparison involving both compartmental and 3-D hydrodynamic models was then carried out. Finally, the radiological...

  14. Species richness and distribution of chondrichthyan fishes in the Arctic Ocean and adjacent seas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynghammar, A.; Christiansen, J. S.; Mecklenburg, C. W.;

    2013-01-01

    The sea ice cover decreases and human activity increases in Arctic waters. Fisheries and bycatch issues, shipping and petroleum exploitation (pollution issues) make it imperative to establish biological baselines for the marine fishes inhabiting the Arctic Ocean and adjacent seas (AOAS). Species ...... to be developed in the AOAS, but the precautionary principle should be implemented as abundances, basic taxonomy and biology are still largely unknown. © 2013 Copyright Taylor and Francis Group, LLC....

  15. Are Recent Arctic Sea Ice Changes a Fingerprint of Greenhouse Warming?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vavrus, S. J.

    2002-12-01

    Arctic sea ice has undergone significant reductions in thickness and extent in recent decades, leading to speculation that the ice pack is already showing signs of greenhouse warming. The decline in ice cover is not uniform across the Arctic Ocean, but instead shows a distinct spatial pattern of maximum reductions in the eastern (European) sector and minimum decreases in the western (North American) sector. This dipole spatial pattern has been dubbed the "East-West Arctic Anomaly Pattern" (EWAAP) and is consistent with recent trends in high-latitude atmospheric circulation, which in turn are driven by the well-known decrease in Arctic sea level pressure. Climate simulations using an AGCM coupled to a mixed-layer ocean (GENESIS) are presented to show that enhanced greenhouse forcing causes the model to produce the EWAAP and its associated anomalous cyclonic circulation pattern. Paleoclimate simulations of orbitally forced warm periods in the Arctic (mid-Holocene and last interglacial) show similar changes of sea ice cover and surface winds, suggesting that the recent anomalies may be a signature of warmer Arctic climates. The consistent EWAAP response to warm external forcings is caused by two dynamical mechanisms. First, the flow of Arctic sea ice in the modern climate produces ice divergence (convergence) and more (less) open water in the eastern (western) Arctic Ocean, thus favoring (hindering) melting in the eastern (western) sector under warmer conditions. Second, because warmer climates promote a decrease in Arctic sea level pressure, anomalous surface winds blow across the Arctic Ocean from Eurasia toward North America and thus enhance the spatial dipole pattern of ice coverage.

  16. The impact of varying atmospheric forcing on the thickness of arctic multi-year sea ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumas, J. A.; Flato, G. M.; Weaver, A. J.

    2003-09-01

    A 1-D thermodynamic sea ice model, forced with North Pole Drift Station observations from 1954-91, is used to study the effect of changing atmospheric forcing on multi-year Arctic sea ice. From 1954-70, most seasons show positive trends in calculated sea ice thickness over much of the Arctic. A dip in calculated ice thickness takes place between 1971-77 over most of the Arctic. Following the North Pacific regime shift in 1976-1977, the period 1978-91 reveals large negative trends in calculated sea ice thickness in all seasons. The results indicate that an important part of the variability and trends in Arctic sea ice thickness is thermodynamically-driven. Of the total variance in multi-year sea ice thickness, 10 to 20% is explained by variations in the Arctic Oscillation and Pacific North American patterns. The multi-year ice thickness response to a positive wintertime Arctic Oscillation anomaly occurs the following summer and persists for more than a year.

  17. Observations of atmospheric methane and its stable isotope ratio (δ13C) over the Arctic seas from ship cruises in the summer and autumn of 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skorokhod, Andrey; Belikov, Igor; Pankratova, Natalia; Novigatsky, Alexander; Thompson, Rona

    2016-04-01

    Atmospheric methane (CH4) is the second most important long-lived greenhouse gas. The Arctic has significant sources of CH4, such as from wetlands and possibly also from methane hydrates, which may act as a positive feedback on the climate system. Despite significant efforts in establishing a network of ground-based CH4 observations in the Arctic zone, there is still a lack of measurements over the Arctic Ocean and sub-polar seas. From 21 July to 9 October 2015, concentrations of CH4 and CO2, as well as of the 13C:12C isotopic ratio in CH4, i.e., δ13C, were measured in the marine boundary layer from aboard the Research Vessel "Akademik Mstislav Keldysh" by the Shirshov Institute of Oceanology. Measurements were made using a Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy instrument from Picarro™ (model G2132-i). The cruises covered a vast area including the North Atlantic up to 70°N, the Baltic, North, Norwegian, Greenland, Barents, White, Kara and Laptev Seas. To the best of our knowledge, these are the first measurements of their type made in these regions. Concentrations of CH4 typically had low variations (in the range of a few ppb) in the open sea but relatively large variations (of the order of 100 ppb) were recorded near and during stops in ports. High variability of atmospheric CH4 was also registered near the delta of the Lena River in the Laptev Sea, which has been suggested to be a large CH4 reservoir and where bubbles rising through the water column have been observed. The obtained set of δ13CCH4 is characterized by significant range of the measured values varying from open Atlantic to polluted regions near large sea ports. The Keeling plot analyses were implemented to study possible CH4 sources according to its isotopic signature. Footprint analyses are presented for the shipboard observations, as well as comparisons to simulated CH4 concentrations and δ13C using the Lagrangian transport model, FLEXPART. This work has been carried-out with the financial support of

  18. Observational determination of albedo decrease caused by vanishing Arctic sea ice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pistone, Kristina; Eisenman, Ian; Ramanathan, V

    2014-03-01

    The decline of Arctic sea ice has been documented in over 30 y of satellite passive microwave observations. The resulting darkening of the Arctic and its amplification of global warming was hypothesized almost 50 y ago but has yet to be verified with direct observations. This study uses satellite radiation budget measurements along with satellite microwave sea ice data to document the Arctic-wide decrease in planetary albedo and its amplifying effect on the warming. The analysis reveals a striking relationship between planetary albedo and sea ice cover, quantities inferred from two independent satellite instruments. We find that the Arctic planetary albedo has decreased from 0.52 to 0.48 between 1979 and 2011, corresponding to an additional 6.4 ± 0.9 W/m(2) of solar energy input into the Arctic Ocean region since 1979. Averaged over the globe, this albedo decrease corresponds to a forcing that is 25% as large as that due to the change in CO2 during this period, considerably larger than expectations from models and other less direct recent estimates. Changes in cloudiness appear to play a negligible role in observed Arctic darkening, thus reducing the possibility of Arctic cloud albedo feedbacks mitigating future Arctic warming. PMID:24550469

  19. HAUSGARTEN: Multidisciplinary investigations at a deep-sea, long-term observatory in the Arctic Ocean

    OpenAIRE

    Soltwedel, T.; Bauerfeind, E.; Bergmann, M.; Budaeva, N.; Hoste, E; Jaeckisch, N.; von Juterzenka, K.; Matthiessen, J.; Mokievsky, V.; Nöthig, E.-M.; Quéric, N.-V.; Sablotny, B.; Sauter, E.; Schewe, I.; Urban-Malinga, B.

    2005-01-01

    The marine Arctic has played an essential role in the history of our planet over the past 130 million years and contributes considerably to the present functioning of Earth and its life. The global cycles of a variety of materials fundamental to atmospheric conditions and thus to life depend to a signifi cant extent on Arctic marine processes (Aargaard et al., 1999). The past decades have seen remarkable changes in key Arctic variables. The decrease of sea-ice extent and sea-ice thickness in ...

  20. Canadian Arctic sea ice reconstructed from bromine in the Greenland NEEM ice core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spolaor, Andrea; Vallelonga, Paul; Turetta, Clara; Maffezzoli, Niccolò; Cozzi, Giulio; Gabrieli, Jacopo; Barbante, Carlo; Goto-Azuma, Kumiko; Saiz-Lopez, Alfonso; Cuevas, Carlos A; Dahl-Jensen, Dorthe

    2016-09-21

    Reconstructing the past variability of Arctic sea ice provides an essential context for recent multi-year sea ice decline, although few quantitative reconstructions cover the Holocene period prior to the earliest historical records 1,200 years ago. Photochemical recycling of bromine is observed over first-year, or seasonal, sea ice in so-called "bromine explosions" and we employ a 1-D chemistry transport model to quantify processes of bromine enrichment over first-year sea ice and depositional transport over multi-year sea ice and land ice. We report bromine enrichment in the Northwest Greenland Eemian NEEM ice core since the end of the Eemian interglacial 120,000 years ago, finding the maximum extension of first-year sea ice occurred approximately 9,000 years ago during the Holocene climate optimum, when Greenland temperatures were 2 to 3 °C above present values. First-year sea ice extent was lowest during the glacial stadials suggesting complete coverage of the Arctic Ocean by multi-year sea ice. These findings demonstrate a clear relationship between temperature and first-year sea ice extent in the Arctic and suggest multi-year sea ice will continue to decline as polar amplification drives Arctic temperatures beyond the 2 °C global average warming target of the recent COP21 Paris climate agreement.

  1. Canadian Arctic sea ice reconstructed from bromine in the Greenland NEEM ice core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spolaor, Andrea; Vallelonga, Paul; Turetta, Clara; Maffezzoli, Niccolò; Cozzi, Giulio; Gabrieli, Jacopo; Barbante, Carlo; Goto-Azuma, Kumiko; Saiz-Lopez, Alfonso; Cuevas, Carlos A.; Dahl-Jensen, Dorthe

    2016-01-01

    Reconstructing the past variability of Arctic sea ice provides an essential context for recent multi-year sea ice decline, although few quantitative reconstructions cover the Holocene period prior to the earliest historical records 1,200 years ago. Photochemical recycling of bromine is observed over first-year, or seasonal, sea ice in so-called “bromine explosions” and we employ a 1-D chemistry transport model to quantify processes of bromine enrichment over first-year sea ice and depositional transport over multi-year sea ice and land ice. We report bromine enrichment in the Northwest Greenland Eemian NEEM ice core since the end of the Eemian interglacial 120,000 years ago, finding the maximum extension of first-year sea ice occurred approximately 9,000 years ago during the Holocene climate optimum, when Greenland temperatures were 2 to 3 °C above present values. First-year sea ice extent was lowest during the glacial stadials suggesting complete coverage of the Arctic Ocean by multi-year sea ice. These findings demonstrate a clear relationship between temperature and first-year sea ice extent in the Arctic and suggest multi-year sea ice will continue to decline as polar amplification drives Arctic temperatures beyond the 2 °C global average warming target of the recent COP21 Paris climate agreement. PMID:27650478

  2. Projected changes in regional climate extremes arising from Arctic sea ice loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Screen, James A.; Deser, Clara; Sun, Lantao

    2015-08-01

    The decline in Arctic sea ice cover has been widely documented and it is clear that this change is having profound impacts locally. An emerging and highly uncertain area of scientific research, however, is whether such Arctic change has a tangible effect on weather and climate at lower latitudes. Of particular societal relevance is the open question: will continued Arctic sea ice loss make mid-latitude weather more extreme? Here we analyse idealized atmospheric general circulation model simulations, using two independent models, both forced by projected Arctic sea ice loss in the late twenty-first century. We identify robust projected changes in regional temperature and precipitation extremes arising solely due to Arctic sea ice loss. The likelihood and duration of cold extremes are projected to decrease over high latitudes and over central and eastern North America, but to increase over central Asia. Hot extremes are projected to increase in frequency and duration over high latitudes. The likelihood and severity of wet extremes are projected to increase over high latitudes, the Mediterranean and central Asia; and their intensity is projected to increase over high latitudes and central and eastern Asia. The number of dry days over mid-latitude Eurasia and dry spell duration over high latitudes are both projected to decrease. There is closer model agreement for projected changes in temperature extremes than for precipitation extremes. Overall, we find that extreme weather over central and eastern North America is more sensitive to Arctic sea ice loss than over other mid-latitude regions. Our results are useful for constraining the role of Arctic sea ice loss in shifting the odds of extreme weather, but must not be viewed as deterministic projections, as they do not account for drivers other than Arctic sea ice loss.

  3. On the Role of Arctic Sea Ice Deformations: An Evaluation of the Regional Arctic System Model Results with Observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osinski, Robert; Maslowski, Wieslaw; Roberts, Andrew

    2016-04-01

    The atmosphere - sea ice - ocean fluxes and their contribution to rapid changes in the Arctic system are not well understood and generally are not resolved by global climate models (GCMs). While many significant model refinements have been made in the recent past, including the representation of sea ice rheology, surface albedo and ice-albedo feedback, other processes such as sea ice deformations, still require further studies and model advancements. Of particular potential interest here are linear kinematic features (LKFs), which control winter air-sea heat exchange and affect buoyancy forces in the ocean. Their importance in Arctic climate change, especially under an increasing first-year ice cover, is yet to be determined and their simulation requires representation of processes currently at sub-grid scale of most GCMs. To address some of the GCM limitations and to better understand the role of LKFs in air-sea exchange we use the Regional Arctic System Model (RASM), which allows high spatio-temporal resolution and regional focus on the Arctic. RASM is a fully coupled regional climate model, developed to study dynamic and thermodynamic processes and their coupling across the atmosphere-sea ice-ocean interface. It consists of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) atmospheric model, the Parallel Ocean Program (POP), the Community Ice Model (CICE) and the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) land hydrology model. The sea ice component has been upgraded to the Los Alamos Community Ice Model version 5.1 (CICE5.1), which allows either Elastic-Viscous-Plastic (EVP) or a new anisotropic (EPA) rheology. RASM's domain is pan-Arctic, with the ocean and sea ice components configured at an eddy-permitting horizontal resolution of 1/12-degree as well as 1/48-degree, for limited simulations. The atmosphere and land model components are configured at 50-km grids. All the components are coupled at a 20-minute time step. Results from multiple RASM simulations are analyzed and

  4. Sensitivity of Pliocene Arctic climate to orbital forcing, atmospheric CO2 and sea ice albedo parameterisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Fergus W.; Haywood, Alan M.; Dowsett, Harry J.; Pickering, Steven J.

    2016-01-01

    General circulation model (GCM) simulations of the mid-Pliocene Warm Period (mPWP, 3.264 to 3.025 Myr ago) do not reproduce the magnitude of Northern Hemisphere high latitude surface air and sea surface temperature (SAT and SST) warming that proxy data indicate. There is also large uncertainty regarding the state of sea ice cover in the mPWP. Evidence for both perennial and seasonal mPWP Arctic sea ice is found through analyses of marine sediments, whilst in a multi-model ensemble of mPWP climate simulations, half of the ensemble simulated ice-free summer Arctic conditions. Given the strong influence that sea ice exerts on high latitude temperatures, an understanding of the nature of mPWP Arctic sea ice would be highly beneficial.

  5. The Arctic Sea ice in the CMIP3 climate model ensemble – variability and anthropogenic change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. K. Behrens

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The strongest manifestation of global warming is observed in the Arctic. The warming in the Arctic during the recent decades is about twice as strong as in the global average and has been accompanied by a summer sea ice decline that is very likely unprecedented during the last millennium. Here, Arctic sea ice variability is analyzed in the ensemble of CMIP3 models. Complementary to several previous studies, we focus on regional aspects, in particular on the Barents Sea. We also investigate the changes in the seasonal cycle and interannual variability. In all regions, the models predict a reduction in sea ice area and sea ice volume during 1900–2100. Toward the end of the 21st century, the models simulate higher sea ice area variability in September than in March, whereas the variability in the preindustrial control runs is higher in March. Furthermore, the amplitude and phase of the sea ice seasonal cycle change in response to enhanced greenhouse warming. The amplitude of the sea ice area seasonal cycle increases due to the very strong sea ice area decline in September. The seasonal cycle amplitude of the sea ice volume decreases due to the stronger reduction of sea ice volume in March.

    Multi-model mean estimates for the late 20th century are comparable with observational data only for the entire Arctic and the Central Arctic. In the Barents Sea, differences between the multi-model mean and the observational data are more pronounced. Regional sea ice sensitivity to Northern Hemisphere average surface warming has been investigated.

  6. Future Arctic marine access: analysis and evaluation of observations, models, and projections of sea ice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. S. Rogers

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available There is an emerging need for regional applications of sea ice projections to provide more accuracy and greater detail to scientists, national, state and local planners, and other stakeholders. The present study offers a prototype for a comprehensive, interdisciplinary study to bridge observational data, climate model simulations, and user needs. The study's first component is an observationally based evaluation of Arctic sea ice trends during 1980–2008, with an emphasis on seasonal and regional differences relative to the overall pan-Arctic trend. Regional sea ice loss has varied, with a significantly larger decline of winter maximum (January–March extent in the Atlantic region than in other sectors. A lead–lag regression analysis of Atlantic sea ice extent and ocean temperatures indicates that reduced sea ice extent is associated with increased Atlantic Ocean temperatures. Correlations between the two variables are greater when ocean temperatures lag rather than lead sea ice. The performance of 13 global climate models is evaluated using three metrics to compare sea ice simulations with the observed record. We rank models over the pan-Arctic domain and regional quadrants and synthesize model performance across several different studies. The best performing models project reduced ice cover across key access routes in the Arctic through 2100, with a lengthening of seasons for marine operations by 1–3 months. This assessment suggests that the Northwest and Northeast Passages hold potential for enhanced marine access to the Arctic in the future, including shipping and resource development opportunities.

  7. Future Arctic marine access: analysis and evaluation of observations, models, and projections of sea ice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. S. Rogers

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available There is an emerging need for regional applications of sea ice projections to provide more accuracy and greater detail to scientists, national, state and local planners, and other stakeholders. The present study offers a prototype for a comprehensive, interdisciplinary study to bridge observational data, climate model simulations, and user needs. The study's first component is an observationally-based evaluation of Arctic sea ice trends during 1980–2008, with an emphasis on seasonal and regional differences relative to the overall pan-Arctic trend. Regional sea ice los has varied, with a significantly larger decline of winter maximum (January–March extent in the Atlantic region than in other sectors. A lead-lag regression analysis of Atlantic sea ice extent and ocean temperatures indicates that reduced sea ice extent is associated with increased Atlantic Ocean temperatures. Correlations between the two variables are greater when ocean temperatures lag rather than lead sea ice. The performance of 13 global climate models is evaluated using three metrics to compare sea ice simulations with the observed record. We rank models over the pan-Arctic domain and regional quadrants, and synthesize model performance across several different studies. The best performing models project reduced ice cover across key access routes in the Arctic through 2100, with a lengthening of seasons for marine operations by 1–3 months. This assessment suggests that the Northwest and Northeast Passages hold potential for enhanced marine access to the Arctic in the future, including shipping and resource development opportunities.

  8. Quantifying the contribution of natural variability to September Arctic sea ice decline

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Mirong; WEI Lixin; WANG Zhenzhan

    2016-01-01

    Arctic sea ice extent has been declining in recent decades. There is ongoing debate on the contribution of natural internal variability to recent and future Arctic sea ice changes. In this study, we contrast the trends in the forced and unforced simulations of carefully selected global climate models with the extended observed Arctic sea ice records. The results suggest that the natural variability explains no more than 42.3% of the observed September sea ice extent trend during 35 a (1979–2013) satellite observations, which is comparable to the results of the observed sea ice record extended back to 1953 (61 a, less than 48.5% natural variability). This reinforces the evidence that anthropogenic forcing plays a substantial role in the observed decline of September Arctic sea ice in recent decades. The magnitude of both positive and negative trends induced by the natural variability in the unforced simulations is slightly enlarged in the context of increasing greenhouse gases in the 21st century. However, the ratio between the realizations of positive and negative trends change has remained steady, which enforces the standpoint that external forcing will remain the principal determiner of the decreasing Arctic sea ice extent trend in the future.

  9. Sea ice leads in the Arctic Ocean: Model assessment, interannual variability and trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Q.; Danilov, S.; Jung, T.; Kaleschke, L.; Wernecke, A.

    2016-07-01

    Sea ice leads in the Arctic are important features that give rise to strong localized atmospheric heating; they provide the opportunity for vigorous biological primary production, and predicting leads may be of relevance for Arctic shipping. It is commonly believed that traditional sea ice models that employ elastic-viscous-plastic (EVP) rheologies are not capable of properly simulating sea ice deformation, including lead formation, and thus, new formulations for sea ice rheologies have been suggested. Here we show that classical sea ice models have skill in simulating the spatial and temporal variation of lead area fraction in the Arctic when horizontal resolution is increased (here 4.5 km in the Arctic) and when numerical convergence in sea ice solvers is considered, which is frequently neglected. The model results are consistent with satellite remote sensing data and discussed in terms of variability and trends of Arctic sea ice leads. It is found, for example, that wintertime lead area fraction during the last three decades has not undergone significant trends.

  10. Arctic Ocean gravity, geoid and sea-ice freeboard heights from ICESat and GRACE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forsberg, René; Skourup, Henriette

    2005-01-01

    ICESat laser measurements provide a high-resolution mapping of the sea-ice surface of the Arctic Ocean, which can be inverted to determine gravity anomalies and sea-ice freeboard heights by a "lowest-level'' filtering scheme. In this paper we use updated terrestrial gravity data from the Arctic...... all major tectonic features of the Arctic Ocean, and has an accuracy of 6 mGal compared to recent airborne gravity data, illustrating the usefulness of ICESat data for gravity field determination....... Gravity Project in combination with GRACE gravity field models to derive an improved Arctic geoid model. This model is then used to convert ICESat measurements to sea-ice freeboard heights with a coarse lowest-level surface method. The derived freeboard heights show a good qualitative agreement...

  11. Changing Arctic ecosystems: sea ice decline, permafrost thaw, and benefits for geese

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flint, Paul; Whalen, Mary; Pearce, John M.

    2014-01-01

    Through the Changing Arctic Ecosystems (CAE) initiative, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) strives to inform resource management decisions for Arctic Alaska by providing scientific information on current and future ecosystem response to a warming climate. A key area for the USGS CAE initiative has been the Arctic Coastal Plain of northern Alaska. This region has experienced a warming trend over the past 30 years, leading to reductions in sea ice and thawing of permafrost. Loss of sea ice has increased ocean wave action, leading to erosion and salt water inundation of coastal habitats. Saltwater tolerant plants are now thriving in these areas and this appears to be a positive outcome for geese in the Arctic. This finding is contrary to the deleterious effects that declining sea ice is having on habitats of ice-dependent animals, such as polar bear and walrus.

  12. Chemical composition of sediments from White Sea, Russian Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamza, Olga; Shevchenko, Vladimir; Novigatsky, Aleksandr

    2010-05-01

    The White Sea, the only Russian inland sea, is located on the north of outlying districts of the European part of Russia, belongs to Arctic Ocean. Area of water of sea occupies about 90 tousend square kilometers. The sea can be divided into some general parts: neck, funnel, basin and 4 Bays: Dvina Bay, Kandalaksha Bay, Mezen Bay and Onega Bay. The purpose of this work was geochemical mapping of the surface sediments of this area. The main tasks were: compilation data base of element composition of the surface sediments, geochemical mapping of each element, research of the anormal concentration of elements on the surface. To detect the content of chemical elements several methods were used: atomic absorption spectrometry (P.P. Shirshov Institute of Oceanology); neutron activation analysis (Vernadsky Institute of Geochemistry and Analytical Chemistry), total and organic carbon analysis, photometric method to detection Si, Al, P (P.P. Shirshov Institute of Oceanology). Bulk composition is one of the fundamental characteristics of sediments and bottom deposites of modern basins. Coarse-grained sediments with portion of pelitic component 80%). Character of elements distribution correlates with facial distribution of sediments from White Sea. According to litologic description, bottom surface of Dvina Bay is practically everywhere covered by layer of fine-grained sand. In the border area between Dvina Bay and White Sea basin on terraced subwater slope aleurite politic silts are abundant. They tend to exhange down the slope to clay silts. In Onega Bay fractions of non-deposition are observed. They are characterized by wide spread of thin blanket poorgraded sediments, which are likely to be relic. Relief of Kandalakscha Bay bottom is presented as alternation of abyssal fosses (near 300 m) with silles and elevations (depressions and in central part of the sea, which is quite wide from both places of original sedimentation and run off sources [2]. Thus, the interrelation

  13. Dominant patterns of winter Arctic surface wind variability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Bingyi; John Walsh; LIU Jiping; ZHANG Xiangdong

    2014-01-01

    Dominant statistical patterns of winter Arctic surface wind (WASW) variability and their impacts on Arctic sea ice motion are investigated using the complex vector empirical orthogonal function (CVEOF) method. The results indicate that the leading CVEOF of Arctic surface wind variability, which accounts for 33% of the covariance, is characterized by two different and alternating spatial patterns (WASWP1 and WASWP2). Both WASWP1 and WASWP2 show strong interannual and decadal variations, superposed on their declining trends over past decades. Atmospheric circulation anomalies associated with WASWP1 and WASWP2 exhibit, respectively, equivalent barotropic and some baroclinic characteristics, differing from the Arctic dipole anomaly and the seesaw structure anomaly between the Barents Sea and the Beaufort Sea. On decadal time scales, the decline trend of WASWP2 can be attributed to persistent warming of sea surface temperature in the Greenland—Barents—Kara seas from autumn to winter, relfecting the effect of the Arctic warming. The second CVEOF, which accounts for 18% of the covariance, also contains two different spatial patterns (WASWP3 and WASWP4). Their time evolutions are signiifcantly correlated with the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) index and the central Arctic Pattern, respectively, measured by the leading EOF of winter sea level pressure (SLP) north of 70°N. Thus, winter anomalous surface wind pattern associated with the NAO is not the most important surface wind pattern. WASWP3 and WASWP4 primarily relfect natural variability of winter surface wind and neither exhibits an apparent trend that differs from WASWP1 or WASWP2. These dominant surface wind patterns strongly inlfuence Arctic sea ice motion and sea ice exchange between the western and eastern Arctic. Furthermore, the Fram Strait sea ice volume lfux is only signiifcantly correlated with WASWP3. The results demonstrate that surface and geostrophic winds are not interchangeable in terms of

  14. Anthropogenic radionuclides in the Arctic Ocean. Distribution and pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Josefsson, Dan

    1998-05-01

    Anthropogenic radionuclide concentrations have been determined in seawater and sediment samples collected in 1991, 1994 and 1996 in the Eurasian Arctic shelf and interior. Global fallout, releases from European reprocessing plants and the Chernobyl accident are identified as the three main sources. From measurements in the Eurasian shelf seas it is concluded that the total input of {sup 134}Cs, {sup 137}Cs and {sup 90}Sr from these sources has been decreasing during the 1990`s, while {sup 129}I has increased. The main fraction of the reprocessing and Chernobyl activity found in Arctic Ocean surface layer is transported from the Barents Sea east along the Eurasian Arctic shelf seas to the Laptev Sea before entering the Nansen Basin. This inflow results in highest {sup 137}Cs, {sup 129}I and {sup 90}Sr concentrations in the Arctic Ocean surface layers, and continuously decreasing concentrations with depth. Chernobyl-derived {sup 137}Cs appeared in the central parts of the Arctic Ocean around 1991, and in the mid 1990`s the fraction to total {sup 137}Cs was approximately 30% in the entire Eurasian Arctic region. The transfer times for releases from Sellafield are estimated to be 5-7 years to the SE Barents Sea, 7-9 years to the Kara Sea, 10-11 years to the Laptev Sea and 12-14 years to the central Arctic Ocean. Global fallout is the primary source of plutonium with highest concentrations found in the Atlantic layer of the Arctic Ocean. When transported over the shallow shelf seas, particle reactive transuranic elements experience an intense scavenging. A rough estimate shows that approximately 75% of the plutonium entering the Kara and Laptev Seas are removed to the sediment. High seasonal riverine input of {sup 239}, {sup 240}Pu is observed near the mouths of the large Russian rivers. Sediment inventories show much higher concentrations on the shelf compared to the deep Arctic Ocean. This is primarily due to the low particle flux in the open ocean

  15. Decadal to seasonal variability of Arctic sea ice albedo

    CERN Document Server

    Agarwal, S; Wettlaufer, J S

    2011-01-01

    A controlling factor in the seasonal and climatological evolution of the sea ice cover is its albedo $\\alpha$. Here we analyze Arctic data from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) Polar Pathfinder and assess the seasonality and variability of broadband albedo from a 23 year daily record. We produce a histogram of daily albedo over ice covered regions in which the principal albedo transitions are seen; high albedo in late winter and spring, the onset of snow melt and melt pond formation in the summer, and fall freeze up. The bimodal late summer distribution demonstrates the combination of the poleward progression of the onset of melt with the coexistence of perennial bare ice with melt ponds and open water, which then merge to a broad peak at $\\alpha \\gtrsim $ 0.5. We find the interannual variability to be dominated by the low end of the $\\alpha$ distribution, highlighting the controlling influence of the ice thickness distribution and large-scale ice edge dynamics. The statistics obtained pro...

  16. Stochastic dynamics of Arctic sea ice Part II: Multiplicative noise

    CERN Document Server

    Moon, Woosok

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the numerical solutions of a stochastic Arctic sea ice model with multiplicative noise over a wide range of external heat-fluxes, $\\Delta F_0$, which correspond to greenhouse gas forcing. When the noise is multiplicative, the noise-magnitude depends on the state-variable, and this will influence the statistical moments in a manner that differs from the additive case, which we analyzed in Part I of this study. The state variable describing the deterministic backbone of our model is the energy, $E(t)$, contained in the ice or the ocean and for a thorough comparison and contrast we choose the simplest form of multiplicative noise $\\sigma E(t) \\xi(t)$, where $\\sigma$ is the noise amplitude and $\\xi(t)$ is the noise process. The case of constant additive noise (CA) we write as $\\sigma\\overline{E_S}\\xi(t)$, in which $\\overline{E_S}$ is the seasonally averaged value of the periodic deterministic steady-state solution $E_S(t)$, or the deterministic seasonal cycle. We then treat the case of seasonally-varyi...

  17. Spectral albedo and transmittance of thin young Arctic sea ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taskjelle, Torbjørn; Hudson, Stephen R.; Granskog, Mats A.; Nicolaus, Marcel; Lei, Ruibo; Gerland, Sebastian; Stamnes, Jakob J.; Hamre, Børge

    2016-01-01

    Spectral albedo and transmittance in the range were measured on three separate dates on less than thick new Arctic sea ice growing on Kongsfjorden, Svalbard at , . Inherent optical properties, including absorption coefficients of particulate and dissolved material, were obtained from ice samples and fed into a radiative transfer model, which was used to analyze spectral albedo and transmittance and to study the influence of clouds and snow on these. Integrated albedo and transmittance for photosynthetically active radiation () were in the range 0.17-0.21 and 0.77-0.86, respectively. The average albedo and transmittance of the total solar radiation energy were 0.16 and 0.51, respectively. Values inferred from the model indicate that the ice contained possibly up to 40% brine and only 0.6% bubbles. Angular redistribution of solar radiation by clouds and snow was found to influence both the wavelength-integrated value and the spectral shape of albedo and transmittance. In particular, local peaks and depressions in the spectral albedo and spectral transmittance were found for wavelengths within atmospheric absorption bands. Simulated and measured transmittance spectra were within 5% for most of the wavelength range, but deviated up to 25% in the vicinity of , indicating the need for more optical laboratory measurements of pure ice, or improved modeling of brine optical properties in this near-infrared wavelength region.

  18. Fabric and crystal characteristics of Bohai and Arctic sea ice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李志军; 康建成; 蒲毅彬

    2002-01-01

    The fabrics and crystals of Bohai one-year ice show that the noncontinuous ice growth rate enables the level ice layers with different amount of air bubbles to be formed in lower part of an ice sheet which was clearly seen from CT technology; typical grain ice and columnar ice occur in the grey ice which grows in stable water; thaw-refrozen ice and rafted ice have their specific crystal characters. On the Arctic sea ice, the ice core located at 72°24.037′N, 153°33.994′W and 2.2 m in length was a 3-year ice floe and a new sort of crystal was found, which is defined as refrozen clastic pieces. The crystal profile of the ice core 4.86 m in length located at 74°58.614′N, 160°31.830′W shows the evidence that ice ridge changed into hummock.

  19. Snow depth on Arctic and Antarctic sea ice derived from autonomous (Snow Buoy) measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolaus, Marcel; Arndt, Stefanie; Hendricks, Stefan; Heygster, Georg; Huntemann, Marcus; Katlein, Christian; Langevin, Danielle; Rossmann, Leonard; Schwegmann, Sandra

    2016-04-01

    The snow cover on sea ice received more and more attention in recent sea ice studies and model simulations, because its physical properties dominate many sea ice and upper ocean processes. In particular; the temporal and spatial distribution of snow depth is of crucial importance for the energy and mass budgets of sea ice, as well as for the interaction with the atmosphere and the oceanic freshwater budget. Snow depth is also a crucial parameter for sea ice thickness retrieval algorithms from satellite altimetry data. Recent time series of Arctic sea ice volume only use monthly snow depth climatology, which cannot take into account annual changes of the snow depth and its properties. For Antarctic sea ice, no such climatology is available. With a few exceptions, snow depth on sea ice is determined from manual in-situ measurements with very limited coverage of space and time. Hence the need for more consistent observational data sets of snow depth on sea ice is frequently highlighted. Here, we present time series measurements of snow depths on Antarctic and Arctic sea ice, recorded by an innovative and affordable platform. This Snow Buoy is optimized to autonomously monitor the evolution of snow depth on sea ice and will allow new insights into its seasonality. In addition, the instruments report air temperature and atmospheric pressure directly into different international networks, e.g. the Global Telecommunication System (GTS) and the International Arctic Buoy Programme (IABP). We introduce the Snow Buoy concept together with technical specifications and results on data quality, reliability, and performance of the units. We highlight the findings from four buoys, which simultaneously drifted through the Weddell Sea for more than 1.5 years, revealing unique information on characteristic regional and seasonal differences. Finally, results from seven snow buoys co-deployed on Arctic sea ice throughout the winter season 2015/16 suggest the great importance of local

  20. Linkages between the circulation and distribution of dissolved organic matter in the White Sea, Arctic Ocean

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pavlov, Alexey K.; Stedmon, Colin A.; Semushin, Andrey V.;

    2016-01-01

    The White Sea is a semi-enclosed Arctic marginal sea receiving a significant loading of freshwater (225-231 km3 yr-1 equaling an annual runoff yield of 2.5 m) and dissolved organic matter (DOM) from river run-off. We report discharge weighed values of stable oxygen isotope ratios (δ18O) of -14.0‰...

  1. Near-real-time Arctic sea ice thickness and volume from CryoSat-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilling, Rachel L.; Ridout, Andy; Shepherd, Andrew

    2016-09-01

    Timely observations of sea ice thickness help us to understand the Arctic climate, and have the potential to support seasonal forecasts and operational activities in the polar regions. Although it is possible to calculate Arctic sea ice thickness using measurements acquired by CryoSat-2, the latency of the final release data set is typically 1 month due to the time required to determine precise satellite orbits. We use a new fast-delivery CryoSat-2 data set based on preliminary orbits to compute Arctic sea ice thickness in near real time (NRT), and analyse this data for one sea ice growth season from October 2014 to April 2015. We show that this NRT sea-ice-thickness product is of comparable accuracy to that produced using the final release CryoSat-2 data, with a mean thickness difference of 0.9 cm, demonstrating that the satellite orbit is not a critical factor in determining sea ice freeboard. In addition, the CryoSat-2 fast-delivery product also provides measurements of Arctic sea ice thickness within 3 days of acquisition by the satellite, and a measurement is delivered, on average, within 14, 7 and 6 km of each location in the Arctic every 2, 14 and 28 days respectively. The CryoSat-2 NRT sea-ice-thickness data set provides an additional constraint for short-term and seasonal predictions of changes in the Arctic ice cover and could support industries such as tourism and transport through assimilation in operational models.

  2. Exploring Arctic Transpolar Drift During Dramatic Sea Ice Retreat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gascard, J.C.; Festy, J.; le Goff, H.;

    2008-01-01

    The Arctic is undergoing significant environmental changes due to climate warming. The most evident signal of this warming is the shrinking and thinning of the ice cover of the Arctic Ocean. If the warming continues, as global climate models predict, the Arctic Ocean will change from a perennially...... ice-covered to a seasonally ice-free ocean. Estimates as to when this will occur vary from the 2030s to the end of this century. One reason for this huge uncertainty is the lack of systematic observations describing the state, variability, and changes in the Arctic Ocean....

  3. Arctic geodynamics: Continental shelf and deep ocean geophysics. ERS-1 satellite altimetry: A first look

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Allen Joel; Sandwell, David T.; Marquart, Gabriele; Scherneck, Hans-Georg

    1993-01-01

    An overall review of the Arctic Geodynamics project is presented. A composite gravity field model of the region based upon altimetry data from ERS-1, Geosat, and Seasat is made. ERS-1 altimetry covers unique Arctic and Antarctic latitudes above 72 deg. Both areas contain large continental shelf areas, passive margins, as well as recently formed deep ocean areas. Until ERS-1 it was not possible to study these areas with satellite altimetry. Gravity field solutions for the Barents sea, portions of the Arctic ocean, and the Norwegian sea north of Iceland are shown. The gravity anomalies around Svalbard (Spitsbergen) and Bear island are particularly large, indicating large isostatic anomalies which remain from the recent breakup of Greenland from Scandinavian. Recently released gravity data from the Armed Forces Topographic Service of Russia cover a portion of the Barents and Kara seas. A comparison of this data with the ERS-1 produced gravity field is shown.

  4. Political risks of hydrocarbon deposit development in the Arctic seas of the Russian Federation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nowadays the process of Arctic development has a long-term international cooperation character. Economic and geopolitical interests of both arctic and non-arctic countries meet in the region. Apart from resource development issues, there are problems concerning security, sustainable development and some others issues conditioned by climate and geographical characteristics of the region. Strategic analysis of political risks for the Russian Federation is carried out. The analysis reveals that political risks of hydrocarbon deposits development in the RF arctic seas appear as lack of coordination with arctic countries in solving key regional problems, failure to follow international agreements. Such inconsistency may lead to political risks, which results in strained situation in the region

  5. Temperature, salinity, and other data from buoy casts in the Arctic Ocean, Barents Sea and Beaufort Sea from 1948 to 1993 (NODC Accession 9800040)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature, salinity, and other data were collected using buoy casts in the Arctic Ocean, Barents Sea and Beaufort Sea from 1948 to 1993. Data were collected by...

  6. A preliminary assessment of potential doses to man from radioactive waste dumped in the Arctic sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielsen, S.P. [Risoe National Lab., Roskilde (Denmark); Iosjpe, M.; Strand, P. [Statens Straalevern, Oesteraas (Norway)

    1995-11-01

    This report describes a preliminary radiological assessment of collective doses to the world population from radioactive material dumped in the Kara and Barents Seas in the period 1961-1991. Information on the dumped waste and the rates of release of radionuclides have been available from Russian sources and from the International Atomic Energy Agency. A box model has been used to simulate the dispersion of radionuclides in the marine environment and to calculate the contamination of seafood and the subsequent radiation doses to man. Two release scenarios have been adopted. The worst-case release scenario, which ignores the presence of barriers between spent nuclear fuel and seawater, is estimated to give rise to about 10 mansievert calculated to 1000 years from the time of release. A more realistic release scenario is estimated to cause about 3 mansieverts. In both cases exposure from the radionuclide {sup 137}Cs is found to dominate the doses. 19 refs., 56 figs., 8 tabs.

  7. A preliminary assessment of potential doses to man from radioactive waste dumped in the Arctic Sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielsen, S.P. [Forskningscente Risoe, Roskilde (Denmark); Iosjpe, M.; Strand, P. [Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority, Oesteraas (Norway)

    1995-09-01

    This report describes a preliminary radiological assessment of collective doses to the world population from radioactive material dumped in the Barents and Kara Seas in the period 1961-1991. Information on the dumped waste and the rates of release of radionuclides have been available from Russian sources and from the International Atomic Energy Agency. A box model has been used to simulate the dispersion of radionuclides in the marine environment and to calculate the contamination of seafood and the subsequent radiation doses to man. Two release scenarios have been adopted. The worst-case release scenario which ignores the presence of barriers between spent nuclear fuel and seawater is estimated to give rise to about 10 mansieverts calculated to 1000 years from the time of release. A more realistic release scenario is estimated to cause about 3 mansieverts. In both cases exposure from the radionuclide {sup 137}Cs is found to dominate the doses. (au) 8 tabs., 56 ills., 19 refs.

  8. Waveform classification of airborne synthetic aperture radar altimeter over Arctic sea ice

    OpenAIRE

    Zygmuntowska, M.; Khvorostovsky, K.; V. Helm; S. Sandven

    2013-01-01

    Sea ice thickness is one of the most sensitive variables in the Arctic climate system. In order to quantify changes in sea ice thickness, CryoSat-2 was launched in 2010 carrying a Ku-band radar altimeter (SIRAL) designed to measure sea ice freeboard with a few centimeters accuracy. The instrument uses the synthetic aperture radar technique providing signals with a resolution of about 300m along track. In this study, airborne Ku-band radar altimeter data over different ...

  9. Impact of North Atlantic Current changes on the Nordic Seas and the Arctic Ocean

    OpenAIRE

    Kauker, Frank; Gerdes, Rüdiger; Karcher, Michael; Köberle, Cornelia

    2005-01-01

    The impact of North Atlantic Current (NAC) volume, heat, and salt transport variability onto the NordicSeas and the Arctic Ocean is investigated using numerical hindcast and sensitivity experiments. Theocean-sea ice model reproduces observed propagation pathways and speeds of SST anomalies.Part of the signal reaching the entrance to the Nordic Seas between Iceland and Scotland originatesin the lower latitude North Atlantic. Response experiments with different prescribed conditionsat 50N show ...

  10. Greenland freshwater pathways in the sub-Arctic Seas from model experiments with passive tracers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dukhovskoy, Dmitry S.; Myers, Paul G.; Platov, Gennady; Timmermans, Mary-Louise; Curry, Beth; Proshutinsky, Andrey; Bamber, Jonathan L.; Chassignet, Eric; Hu, Xianmin; Lee, Craig M.; Somavilla, Raquel

    2016-01-01

    Accelerating since the early 1990s, the Greenland Ice Sheet mass loss exerts a significant impact on thermohaline processes in the sub-Arctic seas. Surplus freshwater discharge from Greenland since the 1990s, comparable in volume to the amount of freshwater present during the Great Salinity Anomaly events, could spread and accumulate in the sub-Arctic seas, influencing convective processes there. However, hydrographic observations in the Labrador Sea and the Nordic Seas, where the Greenland freshening signal might be expected to propagate, do not show a persistent freshening in the upper ocean during last two decades. This raises the question of where the surplus Greenland freshwater has propagated. In order to investigate the fate, pathways, and propagation rate of Greenland meltwater in the sub-Arctic seas, several numerical experiments using a passive tracer to track the spreading of Greenland freshwater have been conducted as a part of the Forum for Arctic Ocean Modeling and Observational Synthesis effort. The models show that Greenland freshwater propagates and accumulates in the sub-Arctic seas, although the models disagree on the amount of tracer propagation into the convective regions. Results highlight the differences in simulated physical mechanisms at play in different models and underscore the continued importance of intercomparison studies. It is estimated that surplus Greenland freshwater flux should have caused a salinity decrease by 0.06-0.08 in the sub-Arctic seas in contradiction with the recently observed salinification (by 0.15-0.2) in the region. It is surmised that the increasing salinity of Atlantic Water has obscured the freshening signal.

  11. Circumpolar Arctic greening: Relationships to summer sea-ice concentrations, land temperatures and disturbance regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, D. A.; Bhatt, U. S.; Epstein, H. E.; Raynolds, M. K.; Frost, G. V.; Leibman, M. O.; Khomutov, A.; Jia, G.; Comiso, J. C.; Pinzon, J. E.; Tucker, C. J.; Webber, P. J.; Tweedie, C. E.

    2009-12-01

    The global distribution of Arctic tundra vegetation is closely tied to the presence of summer sea ice. Models predict that the reduction of sea ice will cause large changes to summer land-surface temperatures. Warming combined with increased natural and anthropogenic disturbance are expected to greatly increase arctic tundra productivity. To examine where tundra productivity is changing most rapidly, we studied 1982-2008 trends of sea-ice concentrations, summer warmth index (SWI) and the annual Maximum Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (MaxNDVI). We summarize the results according to the tundra adjacent to 14 Arctic seas. Sea-ice concentrations have declined and summer land temperatures have increased in all parts of the Arctic coast. The overall percentage increase in Arctic MaxNDVI was +7%. The trend was much greater in North America (+11%) than in Eurasia (+4%). Large percentage increases of MaxNDVI occurred inland from Davis Straight (+20%), Baffin Bay (+18%), Canadian Archipelago (+14%), Beaufort Sea (+12%), and Laptev Sea (+8%). Declines occurred in the W. Chukchi (-6%) and E. Bering (-5%) seas. The changes in NDVI are strongly correlated to changes in summer ground temperatures. Two examples from a 900-km north-south Arctic transect in Russia and long-term observations at a High Arctic site in Canada provide insights to where the changes in productivity are occurring most rapidly. At tree line near Kharp in northwest Siberia, alder shrubs are expanding vigorously in fire-disturbed areas; seedling establishment is occurring primarily in areas with disturbed mineral soils, particularly nonsorted circles. In the Low Arctic tundra areas of the central Yamal Peninsula greening is concentrated in riparian areas and upland landslides associated with degrading massive ground ice, where low-willow shrublands replace the zonal sedge, dwarf-shrub tundra growing on nutrient-poor sands. In polar desert landscapes near the Barnes Ice Cap, Baffin Island, Canada

  12. Sea ice decline and 21st century trans-Arctic shipping routes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melia, N.; Haines, K.; Hawkins, E.

    2016-09-01

    The observed decline in Arctic sea ice is projected to continue, opening shorter trade routes across the Arctic Ocean, with potentially global economic implications. Here we quantify, using Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 global climate model simulations calibrated to remove spatial biases, how projected sea ice loss might increase opportunities for Arctic transit shipping. By midcentury for standard open water vessels, the frequency of navigable periods doubles, with routes across the central Arctic becoming available. A sea ice-ship speed relationship is used to show that European routes to Asia typically become 10 days faster via the Arctic than alternatives by midcentury, and 13 days faster by late century, while North American routes become 4 days faster. Future greenhouse gas emissions have a larger impact by late century; the shipping season reaching 4-8 months in Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP)8.5 double that of RCP2.6, both with substantial interannual variability. Moderately, ice-strengthened vessels likely enable Arctic transits for 10-12 months by late century.

  13. Late winter biogeochemical conditions under sea ice in the Canadian High Arctic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen S. Findlay

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available With the Arctic summer sea-ice extent in decline, questions are arising as to how changes in sea-ice dynamics might affect biogeochemical cycling and phenomena such as carbon dioxide (CO2 uptake and ocean acidification. Recent field research in these areas has concentrated on biogeochemical and CO2 measurements during spring, summer or autumn, but there are few data for the winter or winter–spring transition, particularly in the High Arctic. Here, we present carbon and nutrient data within and under sea ice measured during the Catlin Arctic Survey, over 40 days in March and April 2010, off Ellef Ringnes Island (78° 43.11′ N, 104° 47.44′ W in the Canadian High Arctic. Results show relatively low surface water (1–10 m nitrate (<1.3 µM and total inorganic carbon concentrations (mean±SD=2015±5.83 µmol kg−1, total alkalinity (mean±SD=2134±11.09 µmol kg−1 and under-ice pCO2sw (mean±SD=286±17 µatm. These surprisingly low wintertime carbon and nutrient conditions suggest that the outer Canadian Arctic Archipelago region is nitrate-limited on account of sluggish mixing among the multi-year ice regions of the High Arctic, which could temper the potential of widespread under-ice and open-water phytoplankton blooms later in the season.

  14. 60-year Nordic and arctic sea level reconstruction based on a reprocessed two decade altimetric sea level record and tide gauges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Peter Limkilde; Andersen, Ole Baltazar; Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg

    Due to the sparsity and often poor quality of data, reconstructing Arctic sea level is highly challenging. We present a reconstruction of Arctic sea level covering 1950 to 2010, using the approaches from Church et al. (2004) and Ray and Douglas (2011). This involves decomposition of an altimetry ...... calibration record into EOFs, and fitting these patterns to a historical tide gauge record....

  15. Interannual variations of the dominant modes of East Asian winter monsoon and possible links to Arctic sea ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chenghu; Yang, Song; Li, Weijing; Zhang, Ruonan; Wu, Renguang

    2016-07-01

    Two dominant modes of the winter temperature over East Asia, a northern mode and a southern mode, and their links with Arctic climate conditions are analyzed. The relationships of the two modes with Arctic sea ice are different. The northern mode is closely linked to variations in sea ice of the Arctic Barents-Laptev Sea in previous autumn and most of the Arctic in concurrent winter. The southern mode seems independent from the Arctic sea ice variations, but is associated with sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies in the equatorial central-eastern Pacific. Results suggest an effect of Arctic sea ice variation on the northern mode and an influence of tropical SST anomalies on the southern mode. Reduced sea ice over the Arctic increases 1000-500-hPa thickness over the high-latitudes of Eurasian continent, which reduces the meridional thickness gradient between the middle and high latitudes and thus weakens the extratropical upper-level zonal wind. The weakened zonal wind provides a favorable dynamic condition for the development of a high-latitude ridge around the Ural Mountain. Reduced Arctic sea ice also tends to enhance the Siberian high through both thermodynamic and dynamic processes. The above atmospheric circulation patterns provide a favorable condition for the intrusion of cold air to northern East Asia.

  16. Insights on Arctic Sea Ice Processes from New Seafloor and Coastline Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nghiem, S. V.; Hall, D. K.; Rigor, I. G.; Clemente-Colon, P.; Li, P.; Neumann, G.

    2014-12-01

    The seafloor can exert a significant control on Arctic sea ice patterns by guiding the distribution of ocean water masses and river discharge in the Arctic Ocean. Satellite observations of sea ice and surface temperature are used together with bathymetry data to understand dynamic and thermodynamic processes of sea ice. In particular, data from satellite radars, including scatterometer and synthetic aperture radar (SAR) instruments, are used to identify and map sea ice with different spatial and temporal resolutions across the Arctic. Data from a satellite spectroradiometer, such as MODIS, are used to accurately measure surface temperature under clear sky conditions. For seafloor measurements, advances have been made with new observations surveyed to modern standards in different regions of the Arctic, enabling the production of an improved bathymetry dataset, such as the International Bathymetric Chart of the Arctic Ocean Version 3.0 (IBCAO 3.0) released in 2012. The joint analyses of these datasets reveal that the seafloor can govern warm- and cold-water distribution and thereby dictate sea ice patterns on the sea surface from small local scales to a large regional scale extending over thousands of km. Satellite results show that warm river waters can intrude into the Arctic Ocean and affect sea ice melt hundreds of km away from the river mouths. The Arctic rivers bring significant heat as their waters come from sources across vast watersheds influenced by warm continental climate effects in summertime. In the case of the Mackenzie River, results from the analysis with the new IBCAO 3.0 indicated that the formation and break-up of landfast sea ice is related to the depth and not the slope of the seafloor. In turn, such ice processes can impact the discharge and distribution of warm river waters and influence the melting of sea ice. Animations of satellite observations of sea ice overlaid on both the old and new versions of IBCAO will be presented to illustrate

  17. Studies on culture condition and extracellular hydrolase of psychrophilic bacteria from Arctic sea ice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Xiaohui; Yu Yong; Li Huirong; Zhang Lin; Jiang Xinyin; Ren Daming

    2008-01-01

    Arctic sea ice in the polar region provides a cold habitat for microbial community.Arctic sea ice microorganisms are revealed to be of considerable importance in basic research and potential in biotechnological application.This paper investigated the culture condition and extracellular hydrolase of 14 strains of different Arctic sea ice bacteria.The results showed that optimal growth temperature of strains is 15 ℃ or 20 ℃.The optimal pH is about 8.0.They hardly grow at acid condition.3% NaCl is necessary for better growth.These strains have different abilities in producing amylase,protease,cellulase and lipase.Pseudoalteronomas sp.Bsi429 and Pseudoalteronomas sp.Bsi539 produced both cellulose,protease and lipase.These results provide a basis for further developing and exploiting the cold adapted marine enzyme resources.

  18. Arctic sea ice decline contributes to thinning lake ice trend in northern Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexeev, Vladimir A.; Arp, Christopher D.; Jones, Benjamin M.; Cai, Lei

    2016-07-01

    Field measurements, satellite observations, and models document a thinning trend in seasonal Arctic lake ice growth, causing a shift from bedfast to floating ice conditions. September sea ice concentrations in the Arctic Ocean since 1991 correlate well (r = +0.69, p characterizing lake ice conditions. A lake ice growth model forced with Weather Research and Forecasting model output produced a 7% decrease in lake ice growth when 2007/08 sea ice was imposed on 1991/92 climatology and a 9% increase in lake ice growth for the opposing experiment. Here, we clearly link early winter ‘ocean-effect’ snowfall and warming to reduced lake ice growth. Future reductions in sea ice extent will alter hydrological, biogeochemical, and habitat functioning of Arctic lakes and cause sub-lake permafrost thaw.

  19. Less winter cloud aids summer 2013 Arctic sea ice return from 2012 minimum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In September 2012, Arctic sea ice cover reached a record minimum for the satellite era. The following winter the sea ice quickly returned, carrying through to the summer when ice extent was 48% greater than the same time in 2012. Most of this rebound in the ice cover was in the Chukchi and Beaufort Seas, areas experiencing the greatest decline in sea ice over the last three decades. A variety of factors, including ice dynamics, oceanic and atmospheric heat transport, wind, and solar insolation anomalies, may have contributed to the rebound. Here we show that another factor, below-average Arctic cloud cover in January–February 2013, resulted in a more strongly negative surface radiation budget, cooling the surface and allowing for greater ice growth. More thick ice was observed in March 2013 relative to March 2012 in the western Arctic Ocean, and the areas of ice growth estimated from the negative cloud cover anomaly and advected from winter to summer with ice drift data, correspond well with the September ice concentration anomaly pattern. Therefore, decreased wintertime cloud cover appears to have played an important role in the return of the sea ice cover the following summer, providing a partial explanation for large year-to-year variations in an otherwise decreasing Arctic sea ice cover. (paper)

  20. The contribution of Alaskan, Siberian, and Canadian coastal polynas to the cold halocline layer of the Arctic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalieri, Donald J.; Martin, Seelye

    1994-01-01

    Numerous Arctic Ocean circulation and geochemical studies suggest that ice growth in polynyas over the Alaskan, Siberian, and Canadian continental shelves is a source of cold, saline water which contributes to the maintenance of the Arctic Ocean halocline. The purpose of this study is to estimate for the 1978-1987 winters the contributions of Arctic coastal polynyas to the cold halocline layer of the Arctic Ocean. The study uses a combination of satellite, oceanographic, and weather data to calculate the brine fluxes from the polynyas; then an oceanic box model is used to calculate their contributions to the cold halocline layer of the Arctic Ocean. This study complements and corrects a previous study of dense water production by coastal polynyas in the Barents, Kara, and Laptev Seas.

  1. Arctic sea ice melt onset from passive microwave satellite data: 1979–2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. C. Bliss

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available An updated version of the Snow Melt Onset Over Arctic Sea Ice from SMMR and SSM/I-SSMIS Brightness Temperatures is now available. The data record has been re-processed and extended to cover the years 1979–2012. From this data set, a statistical summary of melt onset (MO dates on Arctic sea ice is presented. The mean MO date for the Arctic Region is 13 May (132.5 DOY with a standard deviation of ±7.3 days. Regionally, mean MO dates vary from 15 March (73.2 DOY in the St. Lawrence Gulf to 10 June (160.9 DOY in the Central Arctic. Statistically significant decadal trends indicate that MO is occurring 6.6 days decade−1 earlier in the year for the Arctic Region. Regionally, MO trends are as great as −11.8 days decade−1 in the East Siberian Sea. The Bering Sea is an outlier and MO is occurring 3.1 days decade−1 later in the year.

  2. Distribution of 226Ra in the Arctic Ocean and the Bering Sea and its hydrologic implications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邢娜; 陈敏; 黄奕普; 蔡平河; 邱雨生

    2003-01-01

    Radium-226 (226Ra) activities were measured in the surface water samples collected from the Arctic Ocean and the Bering Sea during the First Chinese National Arctic Research Expedition. The results showed that 226Ra concentrations in the surface water ranged from 0.28 to 1.56 Bq/m3 with an average of 0.76 Bq/m3 in the Arctic Ocean, and from 0.25 to 1.26 Bq/m3 with an average of 0.71 Bq/m3 in the Bering Sea. The values were obviously lower than those from open oceans in middle and low latitudes, indicating that the study area may be partly influenced by sea ice meltwater. In the Bering Sea, 226Ra in the surface water decreased northward, probably as a result of the exchange between the 226Ra-deficientsea ice meltwater and the 226Ra-rich Pacific water. In the Arctic Ocean, 226Ra in the surface water increased northward and eastward. This spatial distributionof 226Ra reflected the variation of the 226Ra-enriched river component in the water mass of the Arctic Ocean. The vertical profiles of 226Ra in the Canadian Basin showed a concentration maximum at 200 m, which could be attributed to the inputs of the Pacific water or/and the bottom shelf water with high 226Ra concentration. This conclusion was consistent with the results from 2H, 18O tracers.

  3. The role of mechanics and kinematics on the Arctic sea ice decline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, J.

    2011-12-01

    IPCC AR4 climate models unforeseen the recent Arctic sea ice decline, either in terms of extent or thinning rate. Owing to the complexity of the Arctic basin as a physical system involving many interacting processes and feedbacks (negative or positive), several tracks are currently followed to try to improve the representation of these processes. Here we focus on the representation of sea ice mechanics and kinematics (drift, deformation). Indeed, the spectacular evolution of the Arctic sea ice cover is not restricted to the shrinking of ice extent or to thinning. Kinematics is affected as well, and its evolution plays a central role in the changes underwent nowadays in the Arctic ocean. As observed from buoy drift data, the sea ice mean speed increased at a rate of 9% per decade from 1979 to 2007, whereas the mean deformation rate increased by more than 50% per decade over the same period. These two aspects of recent sea ice evolution, i.e. strong decline and accelerated kinematics, are likely intimately coupled. Increasing deformation means stronger fracturing, hence more lead opening and a decreasing albedo. As a result, ocean warming, in turn, favors sea ice thinning in summer and delays refreezing in early winter, i.e. strengthens sea ice decline. This thinning decreases the mechanical strength, therefore allowing even more fracturing, hence larger speed and deformation. A consequence is the acceleration of sea ice export through Fram or Nares Strait with a significant impact on sea ice mass balance. The coupling between the ice state (thickness and concentration) and ice velocity is unexpectedly weak in most IPCC AR4 models. In particular, sea ice drifts faster during the months when it is thick and packed than when it is thin, contrary to what is observed; also models with larger long-term thinning trends do not show higher drift acceleration. This weak coupling behavior (i) suggests that the positive feedbacks mentioned above are underestimated, and (ii) can

  4. Recent changes in the dynamic properties of declining Arctic sea ice: A model study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jinlun; Lindsay, Ron; Schweiger, Axel; Rigor, Ignatius

    2012-10-01

    Results from a numerical model simulation show significant changes in the dynamic properties of Arctic sea ice during 2007-2011 compared to the 1979-2006 mean. These changes are linked to a 33% reduction in sea ice volume, with decreasing ice concentration, mostly in the marginal seas, and decreasing ice thickness over the entire Arctic, particularly in the western Arctic. The decline in ice volume results in a 37% decrease in ice mechanical strength and 31% in internal ice interaction force, which in turn leads to an increase in ice speed (13%) and deformation rates (17%). The increasing ice speed has the tendency to drive more ice out of the Arctic. However, ice volume export is reduced because the rate of decrease in ice thickness is greater than the rate of increase in ice speed, thus retarding the decline of Arctic sea ice volume. Ice deformation increases the most in fall and least in summer. Thus the effect of changes in ice deformation on the ice cover is likely strong in fall and weak in summer. The increase in ice deformation boosts ridged ice production in parts of the central Arctic near the Canadian Archipelago and Greenland in winter and early spring, but the average ridged ice production is reduced because less ice is available for ridging in most of the marginal seas in fall. The overall decrease in ridged ice production contributes to the demise of thicker, older ice. As the ice cover becomes thinner and weaker, ice motion approaches a state of free drift in summer and beyond and is therefore more susceptible to changes in wind forcing. This is likely to make seasonal or shorter-term forecasts of sea ice edge locations more challenging.

  5. Distribution of Arctic and Pacific copepods and their habitat in the northern Bering Sea and Chukchi Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, H.; Matsuno, K.; Fujiwara, A.; Onuka, M.; Yamaguchi, A.; Ueno, H.; Watanuki, Y.; Kikuchi, T.

    2015-11-01

    The advection of warm Pacific water and the reduction of sea-ice extent in the western Arctic Ocean may influence the abundance and distribution of copepods, i.e., a key component in food webs. To understand the factors affecting abundance of copepods in the northern Bering Sea and Chukchi Sea, we constructed habitat models explaining the spatial patterns of the large and small Arctic copepods and the Pacific copepods, separately, using generalized additive models. Copepods were sampled by NORPAC net. Vertical profiles of density, temperature and salinity in the seawater were measured using CTD, and concentration of chlorophyll a in seawater was measured with a fluorometer. The timing of sea-ice retreat was determined using the satellite image. To quantify the structure of water masses, the magnitude of pycnocline and averaged density, temperature and salinity in upper and bottom layers were scored along three axes using principal component analysis (PCA). The structures of water masses indexed by the scores of PCAs were selected as explanatory variables in the best models. Large Arctic copepods were abundant in the water mass with high salinity water in bottom layer or with cold/low salinity water in upper layer and cold/high salinity water in bottom layer, and small Arctic copepods were abundant in the water mass with warm/saline water in upper layer and cold/high salinity water in bottom layers, while Pacific copepods were abundant in the water mass with warm/saline in upper layer and cold/high salinity water in bottom layer. All copepod groups were abundant in areas with deeper depth. Although chlorophyll a in upper and bottom layers were selected as explanatory variables in the best models, apparent trends were not observed. All copepod groups were abundant where the sea-ice retreated at earlier timing. Our study might indicate potential positive effects of the reduction of sea-ice extent on the distribution of all groups of copepods in the Arctic Ocean.

  6. Joint Russian-Norwegian expedition to the dumping sites for radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel in the Stepovogo fjord of the Kara sea, August - September 2012: investigations performed and main results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikitin, Aleksandr; Shershakov, Viacheslav; Valetova, Nailja; Petrenko, Galina; Katrich, Ivan; Fedorova, Anastasia [Research and Production Association ' Typhoon' , 249038, Obninsk, Kaluga Region (Russian Federation); Kazennov, Alexey [National Research Centre ' Kurchatov Institute' , Moscow (Russian Federation); Lind, Bjorn; Gwynn, Justin; Rudjord, Anne Liv [Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority, Oesteraas (Norway); Heldal, Hilde Elise [Institute of Marine Research, Bergen (Norway); Blinova, Oxana; Osvath, Iolanda; Levy, Isabelle; Bartocci, Jean; Khanh Pham, Mai; Sam, Adam; Nies, Hartmut [IAEA-MEL (Monaco); Grishin, Denis [Krylov State Research Centre, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Salbu, Brit; Ole- Christian, Lind; Teien, Hans-Cristian [Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Aas (Norway); Sidhu, Rajdeep Singh; Straalberg, Elisabeth [Institute for Energy Technology, Kjeller (Norway); Logoyda, Igor [State Scientific Centre ' Yuzhmorgeologiya' , Gelendzhik (Russian Federation)

    2014-07-01

    Stepovogo fjord, located on the Eastern coast of Novaya Zemlya, is one of the most important former Soviet Union dumping sites for radioactive waste in the Kara Sea. In addition to some 2000 dumped containers with conventional radioactive wastes, the nuclear submarine K-27 was dumped in Stepovogo fjord with two reactors loaded with spent nuclear fuel (SNF).Joint Russian and Norwegian surveys of the marine environment in Stepovogo fjord were first conducted in 1993 and 1994. In accordance with the working plan of the Joint Russian-Norwegian Expert Group on the Investigation of Radioactive Contamination in the Northern Areas, a follow up expedition into the radioecological status of Stepovogo fjord was carried out in August and September of 2012 onboard the R.V. 'Ivan Petrov' of the Roshydromet Northern Department. Investigations carried out in Stepovogo fjord during the expedition included: Sonar surveys, ROV inspections and in situ gamma measurements of the dumped nuclear submarine K-27 and dumped containers with radioactive waste Sampling of seawater, bottom sediments and marine biota. Results of the analysis of marine environmental samples performed by Russia, Norway and the IAEA, are presented and discussed in the paper. Preliminary measurements on surface sediments and water samples showed that the level of {sup 137}Cs contamination was generally low. However, slightly enhanced levels of {sup 137}Cs were detected in bottom seawater and sediment collected in the area with dumped containers. Measurements taken around the dumped nuclear submarine K-27 did not indicate any leakage of radioactive substances from the submarine. A similar picture for the level of radioactive contamination in Stepovogo fjord was observed in the first joint Russian-Norwegian expedition in 1993-94. (authors)

  7. Sensitivity of the Arctic sea ice concentration forecasts to different atmospheric forcing:a case study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Qinghua; LIU Jiping; ZHANG Zhanhai; SUI Cuijuan; XING Jianyong; LI Ming; LI Chunhua; ZHAO Jiechen; ZHANG Lin

    2014-01-01

    A regional Arctic configuration of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology general circulation model (MIT-gcm) is used as the coupled ice-ocean model for forecasting sea ice conditions in the Arctic Ocean at the Na-tional Marine Environmental Forecasting Center of China (NMEFC), and the numerical weather prediction from the National Center for Environmental Prediction Global Forecast System (NCEP GFS) is used as the atmospheric forcing. To improve the sea ice forecasting, a recently developed Polar Weather Research and Forecasting model (Polar WRF) model prediction is also tested as the atmospheric forcing. Their forecasting performances are evaluated with two different satellite-derived sea ice concentration products as initializa-tions: (1) the Special Sensor Microwave Imager/Sounder (SSMIS) and (2) the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for EOS (AMSR-E). Three synoptic cases, which represent the typical atmospheric circulations over the Arctic Ocean in summer 2010, are selected to carry out the Arctic sea ice numerical forecasting experiments. The evaluations suggest that the forecasts of sea ice concentrations using the Polar WRF atmo-spheric forcing show some improvements as compared with that of the NCEP GFS.

  8. The ASIBIA sea-ice facility: First results from the Atmosphere-Sea-Ice-Biogeochemistry in the Arctic chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    France, James L.; Thomas, Max

    2016-04-01

    Working in the natural ocean-ice-atmosphere system is very difficult, as conducting fieldwork on sea-ice presents many challenges ice including costs, safety, experimental controls and access. The new ASIBIA (Atmosphere-Sea-Ice-Biogeochemistry in the Arctic) coupled Ocean-Sea-Ice-(Snow)-Atmosphere chamber facility at the University of East Anglia, UK, we are aiming to perform controlled first-year sea-ice investigations in areas such as sea-ice physics, physicochemical and biogeochemical processes in sea-ice and quantification of the bi-directional flux of gases in various states of first-year sea-ice conditions. The facility is a medium sized chamber with programmable temperatures from -55°C to +30°C, allowing a full range of first year sea-ice growing conditions in both the Arctic and Antarctic to be simulated. The water depth can be up to 1 m (including up to 25 cm of sea-ice) and an optional 1 m tall Teflon film atmosphere on top of the sea-ice, thus creating a closed and coupled ocean-sea-ice-atmosphere mesocosm. Ice growth in the tank is well suited for studying first-year sea-ice physical properties, with in-situ ice-profile measurements of temperature, salinity, conductivity, pressure and spectral light transmission. Underwater and above ice cameras are installed to record the physical development of the sea-ice. Here, we present the data from the first suites of experiments in the ASIBIA chamber focussing on sea-ice physics and give a brief description of the capabilities of the facility going forward. The ASIBIA chamber was funded as part of an ERC consolidator grant to the late Prof. Roland von Glasow and we hope this work and further development of the facility will act as a lasting legacy.

  9. Object-based Image Classification of Arctic Sea Ice and Melt Ponds through Aerial Photos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, X.; Xie, H.; Li, Z.; Lei, R.

    2013-12-01

    The last six years have marked the lowest Arctic summer sea ice extents in the modern era, with a new record summer minimum (3.4 million km2) set on 13 September 2012. It has been predicted that the Arctic could be free of summer ice within the next 25-30. The loss of Arctic summer ice could have serious consequences, such as higher water temperature due to the positive feedback of albedo, more powerful and frequent storms, rising sea levels, diminished habitats for polar animals, and more pollution due to fossil fuel exploitation and/ or increased traffic through the Northwest/ Northeast Passage. In these processes, melt ponds play an important role in Earth's radiation balance since they strongly absorb solar radiation rather than reflecting it as snow and ice do. Therefore, it is necessary to develop the ability of predicting the sea ice/ melt pond extents and space-time evolution, which is pivotal to prepare for the variation and uncertainty of the future environment, political, economic, and military needs. A lot of efforts have been put into Arctic sea ice modeling to simulate sea ice processes. However, these sea ice models were initiated and developed based on limited field surveys, aircraft or satellite image data. Therefore, it is necessary to collect high resolution sea ice aerial photo in a systematic way to tune up, validate, and improve models. Currently there are many sea ice aerial photos available, such as Chinese Arctic Exploration (CHINARE 2008, 2010, 2012), SHEBA 1998 and HOTRAX 2005. However, manually delineating of sea ice and melt pond from these images is time-consuming and labor-intensive. In this study, we use the object-based remote sensing classification scheme to extract sea ice and melt ponds efficiently from 1,727 aerial photos taken during the CHINARE 2010. The algorithm includes three major steps as follows. (1) Image segmentation groups the neighboring pixels into objects according to the similarity of spectral and texture

  10. Ice–ocean coupled computations for sea-ice prediction to support ice navigation in Arctic sea routes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liyanarachchi Waruna Arampath De Silva

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available With the recent rapid decrease in summer sea ice in the Arctic Ocean extending the navigation period in the Arctic sea routes (ASR, the precise prediction of ice distribution is crucial for safe and efficient navigation in the Arctic Ocean. In general, however, most of the available numerical models have exhibited significant uncertainties in short-term and narrow-area predictions, especially in marginal ice zones such as the ASR. In this study, we predict short-term sea-ice conditions in the ASR by using a mesoscale eddy-resolving ice–ocean coupled model that explicitly treats ice floe collisions in marginal ice zones. First, numerical issues associated with collision rheology in the ice–ocean coupled model (ice–Princeton Ocean Model [POM] are discussed and resolved. A model for the whole of the Arctic Ocean with a coarser resolution (about 25 km was developed to investigate the performance of the ice–POM model by examining the reproducibility of seasonal and interannual sea-ice variability. It was found that this coarser resolution model can reproduce seasonal and interannual sea-ice variations compared to observations, but it cannot be used to predict variations over the short-term, such as one to two weeks. Therefore, second, high-resolution (about 2.5 km regional models were set up along the ASR to investigate the accuracy of short-term sea-ice predictions. High-resolution computations were able to reasonably reproduce the sea-ice extent compared to Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer–Earth Observing System satellite observations because of the improved expression of the ice–albedo feedback process and the ice–eddy interaction process.

  11. Covariance Between Arctic Sea Ice and Clouds Within Atmospheric State Regimes at the Satellite Footprint Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Patrick C.; Kato, Seiji; Xu, Kuan-Man; Cai, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the cloud response to sea ice change is necessary for modeling Arctic climate. Previous work has primarily addressed this problem from the interannual variability perspective. This paper provides a refined perspective of sea ice-cloud relationship in the Arctic using a satellite footprint-level quantification of the covariance between sea ice and Arctic low cloud properties from NASA A-Train active remote sensing data. The covariances between Arctic low cloud properties and sea ice concentration are quantified by first partitioning each footprint into four atmospheric regimes defined using thresholds of lower tropospheric stability and mid-tropospheric vertical velocity. Significant regional variability in the cloud properties is found within the atmospheric regimes indicating that the regimes do not completely account for the influence of meteorology. Regional anomalies are used to account for the remaining meteorological influence on clouds. After accounting for meteorological regime and regional influences, a statistically significant but weak covariance between cloud properties and sea ice is found in each season for at least one atmospheric regime. Smaller average cloud fraction and liquid water are found within footprints with more sea ice. The largest-magnitude cloud-sea ice covariance occurs between 500m and 1.2 km when the lower tropospheric stability is between 16 and 24 K. The covariance between low cloud properties and sea ice is found to be largest in fall and is accompanied by significant changes in boundary layer temperature structure where larger average near-surface static stability is found at larger sea ice concentrations.

  12. Winter spring dynamics in sea-ice carbon cycling in the coastal Arctic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedel, Andrea; Michel, Christine; Gosselin, Michel; LeBlanc, Bernard

    2008-12-01

    An understanding of microbial interactions in first-year sea ice on Arctic shelves is essential for identifying potential responses of the Arctic Ocean carbon cycle to changing sea-ice conditions. This study assessed dissolved and particulate organic carbon (DOC, POC), exopolymeric substances (EPS), chlorophyll a, bacteria and protists, in a seasonal (24 February to 20 June 2004) investigation of first-year sea ice and associated surface waters on the Mackenzie Shelf. The dynamics of and relationships between different sea-ice carbon pools were investigated for the periods prior to, during and following the sea-ice-algal bloom, under high and low snow cover. A predominantly heterotrophic sea-ice community was observed prior to the ice-algal bloom under high snow cover only. However, the heterotrophic community persisted throughout the study with bacteria accounting for, on average, 44% of the non-diatom particulate carbon biomass overall the study period. There was an extensive accumulation of sea-ice organic carbon following the onset of the ice-algal bloom, with diatoms driving seasonal and spatial trends in particulate sea-ice biomass. DOC and EPS were also significant sea-ice carbon contributors such that sea-ice DOC concentrations were higher than, or equivalent to, sea-ice-algal carbon concentrations prior to and following the algal bloom, respectively. Sea-ice-algal carbon, DOC and EPS-carbon concentrations were significantly interrelated under high and low snow cover during the algal bloom ( r values ≥ 0.74, p algae are primarily responsible for the large pools of DOC and EPS-carbon and that similar stressors and/or processes could be involved in regulating their release. This study demonstrates that DOC can play a major role in organic carbon cycling on Arctic shelves.

  13. Arctic Sea Level Change over the altimetry era and reconstructed over the last 60 years

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ole Baltazar; Svendsen, Peter Limkilde; Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg;

    The Arctic Ocean process severe limitations on the use of altimetry and tide gauge data for sea level studies and prediction due to the presence of seasonal or permanent sea ice. In order to overcome this issue we reprocessed all altimetry data with editing tailored to Arctic conditions, hereby....... Good altimetric data is seen to crucial for sea level studies and profoundly for sea level reconstruction where we present a 60 years sea level reconstruction based on this new data set. We here present a new multi-decade altimetric dataset and a 60 year reconstruction of sea level based on this...... together with tide gauge information. From our reconstruction, we found that the Arctic mean sea level trend is around 1.5 mm +/- 0.3 mm/y for the period 1950 to 2010, between 68ºN and 82ºN. This value is in good agreement with the global mean trend of 1.8 +/- 0.3 mm/y over the same period as found by...

  14. The future of Arctic benthos: Expansion, invasion, and biodiversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renaud, Paul E.; Sejr, Mikael K.; Bluhm, Bodil A.; Sirenko, Boris; Ellingsen, Ingrid H.

    2015-12-01

    One of the logical predictions for a future Arctic characterized by warmer waters and reduced sea-ice is that new taxa will expand or invade Arctic seafloor habitats. Specific predictions regarding where this will occur and which taxa are most likely to become established or excluded are lacking, however. We synthesize recent studies and conduct new analyses in the context of climate forecasts and a paleontological perspective to make concrete predictions as to relevant mechanisms, regions, and functional traits contributing to future biodiversity changes. Historically, a warmer Arctic is more readily invaded or transited by boreal taxa than it is during cold periods. Oceanography of an ice-free Arctic Ocean, combined with life-history traits of invading taxa and availability of suitable habitat, determine expansion success. It is difficult to generalize as to which taxonomic groups or locations are likely to experience expansion, however, since species-specific, and perhaps population-specific autecologies, will determine success or failure. Several examples of expansion into the Arctic have been noted, and along with the results from the relatively few Arctic biological time-series suggest inflow shelves (Barents and Chukchi Seas), as well as West Greenland and the western Kara Sea, are most likely locations for expansion. Apparent temperature thresholds were identified for characteristic Arctic and boreal benthic fauna suggesting strong potential for range constrictions of Arctic, and expansions of boreal, fauna in the near future. Increasing human activities in the region could speed introductions of boreal fauna and reduce the value of a planktonic dispersal stage. Finally, shelf regions are likely to experience a greater impact, and also one with greater potential consequences, than the deep Arctic basin. Future research strategies should focus on monitoring as well as compiling basic physiological and life-history information of Arctic and boreal taxa, and

  15. Multimodel simulations of Arctic Ocean sea surface height variability in the period 1970-2009

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koldunov, Nikolay V.; Serra, Nuno; Koehl, Armin;

    2014-01-01

    The performance of several numerical ocean models is assessed with respect to their simulation of sea surface height (SSH) in the Arctic Ocean, and the main patterns of SSH variability and their causes over the past 40 years (1970-2009) are analyzed. In comparison to observations, all tested models...... is in reasonable agreement with available measurements. Focusing on results from one of the models for a detailed analysis, it is shown that the decadal-scale SSH variability over shelf areas and deep parts of the Arctic Ocean have pronounced differences that are determined mostly by salinity variations. A further...... broadly reproduce the mean SSH in the Arctic and reveal a good correlation with both tide gauge data and SSH anomalies derived from satellite observations. Although the models do not represent the positive Arctic SSH trend observed over the last two decades, their interannual-to-decadal SSH variability...

  16. Modelling the mass balance and salinity of Arctic and Antarctic sea ice

    OpenAIRE

    Vancoppenolle, Martin

    2008-01-01

    Ice formed from seawater, called sea ice, is both an important actor in and a sensitive indicator of climate change. Covering 7% of the World Ocean, sea ice damps the atmosphere-ocean exchanges of heat, radiation and momentum in polar regions. It also affects the oceanic circulation at a global scale. Recent satellite and submarine observations systems indicate a sharp decrease in the extent and volume of Arctic sea ice over the last 30 years. In addition, climate models project drastic sea i...

  17. Impact of a Reduced Arctic Sea Ice Cover on Ocean and Atmospheric Properties

    OpenAIRE

    Sedláček, Jan; Knutti, Reto; Martius, Olivia; Beyerle, Urs

    2012-01-01

    The Arctic sea ice cover declined over the last few decades and reached a record minimum in 2007, with a slight recovery thereafter. Inspired by this the authors investigate the response of atmospheric and oceanic properties to a 1-yr period of reduced sea ice cover. Two ensembles of equilibrium and transient simulations are produced with the Community Climate System Model. A sea ice change is induced through an albedo change of 1 yr. The sea ice area and thickness recover in both ensembles a...

  18. Recent wind driven high sea ice export in the Fram Strait contributes to Arctic sea ice decline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. H. Smedsrud

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Arctic sea ice area decrease has been visible for two decades, and continues at a steady rate. Apart from melting, the southward drift through Fram Strait is the main loss. We present high resolution sea ice drift across 79° N from 2004 to 2010. The ice drift is based on radar satellite data and correspond well with variability in local geostrophic wind. The underlying current contributes with a constant southward speed close to 5 cm s−1, and drives about 33 % of the ice export. We use geostrophic winds derived from reanalysis data to calculate the Fram Strait ice area export back to 1957, finding that the sea ice area export recently is about 25 % larger than during the 1960's. The increase in ice export occurred mostly during winter and is directly connected to higher southward ice drift velocities, due to stronger geostrophic winds. The increase in ice drift is large enough to counteract a decrease in ice concentration of the exported sea ice. Using storm tracking we link changes in geostrophic winds to more intense Nordic Sea low pressure systems. Annual sea ice export likely has a significant influence on the summer sea ice variability and we find low values in the 60's, the late 80's and 90's, and particularly high values during 2005–2008. The study highlight the possible role of variability in ice export as an explanatory factor for understanding the dramatic loss of Arctic sea ice the last decades.

  19. Moderate-resolution sea surface temperature data and seasonal pattern analysis for the Arctic Ocean ecoregions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Meredith C.; Reusser, Deborah A.; Lee, Henry

    2012-01-01

    Sea surface temperature (SST) is an important environmental characteristic in determining the suitability and sustainability of habitats for marine organisms. In particular, the fate of the Arctic Ocean, which provides critical habitat to commercially important fish, is in question. This poses an intriguing problem for future research of Arctic environments - one that will require examination of long-term SST records. This publication describes and provides access to an easy-to-use Arctic SST dataset for ecologists, biogeographers, oceanographers, and other scientists conducting research on habitats and/or processes in the Arctic Ocean. The data cover the Arctic ecoregions as defined by the "Marine Ecoregions of the World" (MEOW) biogeographic schema developed by The Nature Conservancy as well as the region to the north from approximately 46°N to about 88°N (constrained by the season and data coverage). The data span a 29-year period from September 1981 to December 2009. These SST data were derived from Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) instrument measurements that had been compiled into monthly means at 4-kilometer grid cell spatial resolution. The processed data files are available in ArcGIS geospatial datasets (raster and point shapefiles) and also are provided in text (.csv) format. All data except the raster files include attributes identifying latitude/longitude coordinates, and realm, province, and ecoregion as defined by the MEOW classification schema. A seasonal analysis of these Arctic ecoregions reveals a wide range of SSTs experienced throughout the Arctic, both over the course of an annual cycle and within each month of that cycle. Sea ice distribution plays a major role in SST regulation in all Arctic ecoregions.

  20. Arctic sea ice area in CMIP3 and CMIP5 climate model ensembles – variability and change

    OpenAIRE

    V. A. Semenov; Martin, T.; Behrens, L. K.; M Latif

    2015-01-01

    The shrinking Arctic sea ice cover observed during the last decades is probably the clearest manifestation of ongoing climate change. While climate models in general reproduce the sea ice retreat in the Arctic during the 20th century and simulate further sea ice area loss during the 21st century in response to anthropogenic forcing, the models suffer from large biases and the model results exhibit considerable spread. The last generation of climate models from World Climate Research ...

  1. Anthropogenic iodine-129 in the Arctic Ocean and Nordic Seas: Numerical modeling and prognoses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A numerical model simulation has been used to predict extent and variability in the anthropogenic 129I pollution in the Arctic Ocean and Nordic Seas region over a period of 100 years. The source function of 129I used in the model is represented by a well-known history of discharges from the Sellafield and La Hague nuclear reprocessing facilities. The simulations suggest a fast transport and large inventory of the anthropogenic 129I in the Arctic and North Atlantic Oceans. In a fictitious case of abrupt stop of the discharges, a rapid decline of inventories is observed in all compartments except the North Atlantic Ocean, the deep Nordic Seas and the deep Arctic Ocean. Within 15 years after the stop of releases, the model prediction indicates that near-equilibrium conditions are reached in all compartments

  2. Distribution of Arctic and Pacific copepods and their habitat in the northern Bering and Chukchi seas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Hiroko; Matsuno, Kohei; Fujiwara, Amane; Onuka, Misaki; Yamaguchi, Atsushi; Ueno, Hiromichi; Watanuki, Yutaka; Kikuchi, Takashi

    2016-08-01

    The advection of warm Pacific water and the reduction in sea ice in the western Arctic Ocean may influence the abundance and distribution of copepods, a key component of food webs. To quantify the factors affecting the abundance of copepods in the northern Bering and Chukchi seas, we constructed habitat models explaining the spatial patterns of large and small Arctic and Pacific copepods separately. Copepods were sampled using NORPAC (North Pacific Standard) nets. The structures of water masses indexed by principle component analysis scores, satellite-derived timing of sea ice retreat, bottom depth and chlorophyll a concentration were integrated into generalized additive models as explanatory variables. The adequate models for all copepods exhibited clear continuous relationships between the abundance of copepods and the indexed water masses. Large Arctic copepods were abundant at stations where the bottom layer was saline; however they were scarce at stations where warm fresh water formed the upper layer. Small Arctic copepods were abundant at stations where the upper layer was warm and saline and the bottom layer was cold and highly saline. In contrast, Pacific copepods were abundant at stations where the Pacific-origin water mass was predominant (i.e. a warm, saline upper layer and saline and a highly saline bottom layer). All copepod groups showed a positive relationship with early sea ice retreat. Early sea ice retreat has been reported to initiate spring blooms in open water, allowing copepods to utilize more food while maintaining their high activity in warm water without sea ice and cold water. This finding indicates that early sea ice retreat has positive effects on the abundance of all copepod groups in the northern Bering and Chukchi seas, suggesting a change from a pelagic-benthic-type ecosystem to a pelagic-pelagic type.

  3. Temporal and spatial variability in sea-ice carbon:nitrogen ratios on Canadian Arctic shelves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Niemi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract To enhance the accuracy of carbon cycling models as applied to sea ice in the changing Arctic, we analyzed a large data set of particulate organic carbon (POC and nitrogen (PON measurements in first-year bottom sea ice (n = 257 from two Arctic shelves, the Canadian Arctic Archipelago and Beaufort Sea shelf, including dark winter and spring seasonal measurements. Wide ranges of sea-ice POC:PON ratios were observed during both the dark winter (12–46 mol:mol and spring (3–24 mol:mol periods. Sea-ice POC:PON ratios and chlorophyll a concentrations were significantly higher in the Archipelago versus the Beaufort Sea shelf (p < 0.01, yet there was a highly significant relationship between sea-ice POC and PON during spring for both shelves (r2 = 0.94. POC:PON ratios were not consistent over the range of measured POC and PON concentrations, justifying the use of a power function model to best describe the relationship between POC and PON. Distinct relationships between POC:PON ratios and chlorophyll-based biomass were observed for the dark winter and the spring: dark winter sea-ice POC:PON ratios decreased with increasing sea-ice biomass whereas spring POC:PON ratios increased with increasing sea-ice biomass. The transition from the dark period to the spring growth period in first-year sea ice represented a distinct stoichiometric shift in POC:PON ratios. Our results demonstrate that the Redfield ratio has limited applicability over the four-order of magnitude range of biomass concentrations observed in first-year sea ice on Arctic shelves. This study emphasizes the need for variable POC:PON stoichiometry in sea-ice biogeochemical models and budget estimates, in particular at high biomass concentrations and when considering seasonality outside of the spring period in first year ice. The use of a power function model for POC:PON relationships in sea ice is also recommended to better constrain carbon estimates in biogeochemical sea-ice models.

  4. Coeval Eocene blooms of the freshwater fern Azolla in and around Arctic and Nordic seas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barke, J.; Burgh, A.H.P. van der; Konijnenburg-van Cittert, J.H.A. van; Collinson, M.E.; Pearce, M.A.; Bujak, J.; Heilman-Clausen, C.; Lotter, A.F.; Speelman, E.N.; Kempen, M.M.L. van; Reichart, G.-J.; Brinkhuis, H.

    2012-01-01

    For a short time interval (c. 1.2 Myr) during the early middle Eocene (~ 49 Myr), the central Arctic Ocean was episodically densely covered by the freshwater fern Azolla, implying sustained freshening of surface waters. Coeval Azolla fossils in neighboring Nordic seas were thought to have been sourc

  5. The interaction of seasonality and low-frequencies in a stochastic Arctic sea ice model

    CERN Document Server

    Moon, Woosok

    2016-01-01

    The stochastic Arctic sea ice model described as a single periodic non-autonomous stochastic ordinary differential equation (ODE) is useful in explaining the seasonal variability of Arctic sea ice. However, to be nearer to realistic approximations we consider the inclusion of long-term forcing implying the effect of slowly-varying ocean or atmospheric low-frequencies. In this research, we rely on the equivalent Fokker-Planck equation instead of the stochastic ODE owing to the advantages of the Fokker-Planck equation in dealing with higher moments calculations. We include simple long-term forcing into the Fokker-Planck equation and then seek approximate stochastic solutions. The formalism based on the Fokker-Planck equation with a singular perturbation method is flexible with regard to accommodating further complexity that arises due to the inclusion of long-term forcing. These solutions are then applied to the stochastic Arctic sea ice model with long-term forcing. Strong seasonality in the Arctic sea ice mod...

  6. The complex response of Arctic cloud condensation nuclei to sea-ice retreat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Browse

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Loss of summertime Arctic sea ice will lead to a large increase in the emission of aerosols and precursor gases from the ocean surface. It has been suggested that these enhanced emissions will exert substantial aerosol radiative forcings, dominated by the indirect effect of aerosol on clouds. Here, we investigate the potential for these indirect forcings using a global aerosol microphysics model evaluated against aerosol observations from the ASCOS campaign to examine the response of Arctic cloud condensation nuclei (CCN to sea-ice retreat. In response to a complete loss of summer ice, we find that north of 70° N emission fluxes of sea-salt, marine primary organic aerosol (OA and dimethyl sulphide increase by a factor of ~10, ~4 and ~15, respectively. However, the CCN response is weak, with negative changes over the central Arctic ocean. The weak response is due to the efficient scavenging of aerosol by extensive drizzling stratocumulus clouds. In the scavenging-dominated Arctic environment, the production of condensable vapour from oxidation of dimethyl sulphide grows particles to sizes where they can be scavenged. This loss is not sufficiently compensated by new particle formation, due to the suppression of nucleation by the large condensation sink resulting from sea-salt and primary OA emissions. Thus, our results suggest that increased aerosol emissions will not cause a climate feedback through changes in cloud microphysical and radiative properties.

  7. The Role of the Mean State of Arctic Sea Ice on Near-Surface Temperature Trends

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linden, van der E.C.; Bintanja, R.; Hazeleger, W.; Katsman, C.A.

    2014-01-01

    Century-scale global near-surface temperature trends in response to rising greenhouse gas concentrations in climate models vary by almost a factor of 2, with greatest intermodel spread in the Arctic region where sea ice is a key climate component. Three factors contribute to the intermodel spread: 1

  8. Influence of projected Arctic sea ice loss on polar stratospheric ozone and circulation in spring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The impact of projected Arctic sea ice loss on the stratosphere is investigated using the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM), a state-of-the-art coupled chemistry climate model. Two 91-year simulations are conducted: one with a repeating seasonal cycle of Arctic sea ice for the late twentieth-century, taken from the fully coupled WACCM historical run; the other with Arctic sea ice for the late twenty-first century, obtained from the fully coupled WACCM RCP8.5 run. In response to Arctic sea ice loss, polar cap stratospheric ozone decreases by 13 DU (34 DU at the North Pole) in spring, confirming the results of Scinocca et al (2009 Geophys. Res. Lett. 36 L24701). The ozone loss is dynamically initiated in March by a suppression of upward-propagating planetary waves, possibly related to the destructive interference between the forced wave number 1 and its climatology. The diminished upward wave propagation, in turn, weakens the Brewer–Dobson circulation at high latitudes, strengthens the polar vortex, and cools the polar stratosphere. The ozone reduction persists until the polar vortex breaks down in late spring. (letter)

  9. Arctic Sea kaaperdaja: tellija oli Eerik-Niiles Kross / Andres Reimer

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Reimer, Andres

    2010-01-01

    Seitsmeaastase vanglakaristuse saanud kaubalaeva Arctic Sea kaaperdaja Dmitri Savins süüdistas Moskva kohtus endist luurekoordinaatorit Eerik-Niiles Krossi kuritöö tellimises, Kross eitab süüdistust ning Eesti prokuratuuril ja kaitsepolitseil pole andmeid Krossi asjaga seotuse kohta

  10. Development of oil and gas fields in the Arctic seas and other Russian offshore areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogoyavlensky V. I.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The results of development of the Arctic and other Russian seas oil and gas fields have been presented. The state of the offshore seismic exploration and drilling fleets has been analysed. Seismic monitoring has been recommended for efficiency and safety of the offshore fields development increasing. Main directions of Russian oil and gas industry development have been determined

  11. Environmental Working Group Joint U.S.-Russian Arctic Sea Ice Atlas

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Note: The Russian chart component of this product has been replaced and updated by Sea Ice Charts of the Russian Arctic in Gridded Format, 1933-2006 and the U.S...

  12. Advancing the understanding of variations of Arctic sea ice optical and thermal behaviors through an international research and mobility project

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marcel Nicolaus; LEI Ruibo; LI Qun; LU Peng; Caixin Wang; Sebastian Gerland; LI Na; LI Zhijun; Bin Cheng; Don K Perovich; Mats A Granskog; SHI Liqiong

    2015-01-01

    In recent decades, significant changes of Arctic sea ice have taken place. These changes are expected to influence the surface energy balance of the ice-covered Arctic Ocean. To quantify this energy balance and to increase our understanding of mechanisms leading to observed changes in the Arctic sea ice, the project“Advancing Modelling and Observing solar Radiation of Arctic sea ice—understanding changes and processes (AMORA)”was initiated and conducted from 2009 to 2013. AMORA was funded and organized under a frame of Norway-China bilateral collaboration program with partners from Finland, Germany, and the USA. The primary goal of the project was achieved by developing an autonomous spectral radiation buoy, deploying it on drifting sea ice close to the North Pole, and receiving a high-resolution time series of spectral radiation over and under sea ice from spring (before melt onset) to autumn (after freeze-up) 2012. Beyond this, in-situ sea ice data were collected during several ifeld campaigns and simulations of snow and sea ice thermodynamics were performed. More autonomous measurements are available through deployments of sea ice mass balance buoys. These new observational data along with numerical model studies are helping us to better understand the key thermodynamic processes of Arctic sea ice and changes in polar climate. A strong scientiifc, but also cultural exchange between Norway, China, and the partners from the USA and Europe initiated new collaborations in Arctic reseach.

  13. Sea ice concentration and sea ice drift for the Arctic summer using C- and L-band SAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Malin; Berg, Anders; Eriksson, Leif

    2014-05-01

    The decreasing amount of sea ice and changes from multi-year ice to first year ice within the Arctic Ocean opens up for increased maritime activities. These activities include transportation, fishing and tourism. One of the major threats for the shipping is the presence of sea ice. Should an oil spill occur, the search and rescue is heavily dependent on constant updates of sea ice movements, both to enable a safer working environment and to potentially prevent the oil from reaching the sea ice. It is therefore necessary to have accurate and updated sea ice charts for the Arctic Ocean during the entire year. During the melt season that ice is subject to melting conditions making satellite observations of sea ice more difficult. This period coincides with the peak in marine shipping activities and therefore requires highly accurate sea ice concentration estimates. Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) are not hindered by clouds and do not require daylight. The continuous record and high temporal resolution makes C-band data preferable as input data for operational sea ice mapping. However, with C-band SAR it is sometimes difficult to distinguish between a wet sea ice surface and surrounding open water. L-band SAR has a larger penetration depth and has been shown to be less sensitive to less sensitive than C-band to the melt season. Inclusion of L-band data into sea chart estimates during the melt season in particular could therefore improve sea ice monitoring. We compare sea ice concentration melt season observations using Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS) L-band images with Envisat ASAR C-band images. We evaluate if L-band images can be used to improve separation of wet surface ice from open water and compare with results for C-band.

  14. Controls on Arctic sea ice from first-year and multi-year ice survival rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, K.; Bitz, C. M.; Hunke, E. C.; Thompson, L.

    2009-12-01

    The recent decrease in Arctic sea ice cover has transpired with a significant loss of multi-year (MY) ice. The transition to an Arctic that is populated by thinner first-year (FY) sea ice has important implications for future trends in area and volume. We develop a reduced model for Arctic sea ice with which we investigate how the survivability of FY and MY ice control various aspects of the sea-ice system. We demonstrate that Arctic sea-ice area and volume behave approximately as first-order autoregressive processes, which allows for a simple interpretation of September sea-ice in which its mean state, variability, and sensitivity to climate forcing can be described naturally in terms of the average survival rates of FY and MY ice. This model, used in concert with a sea-ice simulation that traces FY and MY ice areas to estimate the survival rates, reveals that small trends in the ice survival rates explain the decline in total Arctic ice area, and the relatively larger loss of MY ice area, over the period 1979-2006. Additionally, our model allows for a calculation of the persistence time scales of September area and volume anomalies. A relatively short memory time scale for ice area (~ 1 year) implies that Arctic ice area is nearly in equilibrium with long-term climate forcing at all times, and therefore observed trends in area are a clear indication of a changing climate. A longer memory time scale for ice volume (~ 5 years) suggests that volume can be out of equilibrium with climate forcing for long periods of time, and therefore trends in ice volume are difficult to distinguish from its natural variability. With our reduced model, we demonstrate the connection between memory time scale and sensitivity to climate forcing, and discuss the implications that a changing memory time scale has on the trajectory of ice area and volume in a warming climate. Our findings indicate that it is unlikely that a “tipping point” in September ice area and volume will be

  15. Radar and laser altimeter measurements over Arctic sea ice.

    OpenAIRE

    Giles, K. A.

    2005-01-01

    To validate sea ice models, basin wide sea ice thickness measurements with an accuracy of 0.5 m are required to analyse trends in sea ice thickness, it is necessary to detect changes in sea ice thickness of 4 cm per year on a basin wide scale. The estimated error on satellite radar altimeter estimates of sea ice thickness is 0.45 m and the estimated error on satellite laser altimetry estimates of sea ice thickness is 0.78 m. The Laser Radar Altimetry (LaRA) field campaign took place in the Ar...

  16. Hotspots in cold seas: The composition, distribution, and abundance of marine birds in the North American Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Sarah N. P.; Gjerdrum, Carina; Morgan, Ken H.; Mallory, Mark L.

    2014-03-01

    The distribution and thickness of sea ice in the Arctic is changing rapidly, resulting in changes to Arctic marine ecosystems. Seabirds are widely regarded as indicators of marine environmental change, and understanding their distribution patterns can serve as a tool to monitor and elucidate biological changes in the Arctic seas. We examined the at-sea distribution of seabirds in the North American Arctic in July and August, 2007-2012, and marine areas of high density were identified based on bird densities for four foraging guilds. Short-tailed shearwaters (Puffinus tenuirostris) were the most abundant species observed. Northern fulmars (Fulmarus glacialis), thick-billed murres (Uria lomvia), and dovekies (Alle alle) were also sighted in large numbers. Few birds were sighted between Dolphin and Union Strait and King William Island. Areas of high density over multiple years were found throughout the entire western portion of the study area (Bering Sea, Bering Strait, and Chukchi Sea), Lancaster Sound, Baffin Bay, Davis Strait, and the low Arctic waters off Newfoundland. These waters are characterized by high primary productivity. This study is the first to document the marine distribution of seabirds across the entire North American Arctic within the same time period, providing a critical baseline for monitoring the distribution and abundance of Arctic seabirds in a changing Arctic seascape.

  17. Transnational Sea-Ice Transport in a Warmer, More Mobile Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, R.; Tremblay, B.; Pfirman, S. L.; DeRepentigny, P.

    2015-12-01

    As the Arctic sea ice thins, summer ice continues to shrink in its area, and multi-year ice becomes rarer, winter ice is not disappearing from the Arctic Basin. Rather, it is ever more dominated by first year ice. And each summer, as the total coverage withdraws, the first year ice is able travel faster and farther, carrying any ice-rafted material with it. Micro-organisms, sediments, pollutants and river runoff all move across the Arctic each summer and are deposited hundreds of kilometers from their origins. Analyzing Arctic sea ice drift patterns in the context of the exclusive economic zones (EEZs) of the Arctic nations raises concerns about the changing fate of "alien" ice which forms within one country's EEZ, then drifts and melts in another country's EEZ. We have developed a new data set from satellite-based ice-drift data that allows us to track groups of ice "pixels" forward from their origin to their destination, or backwards from their melting location to their point of formation. The software has been integrated with model output to extend the tracking of sea ice to include climate projections. Results indicate, for example, that Russian sea ice dominates "imports" to the EEZ of Norway, as expected, but with increasing ice mobility it is also is exported into the EEZs of other countries, including Canada and the United States. Regions of potential conflict are identified, including several national borders with extensive and/or changing transboundary sea ice transport. These data are a starting point for discussion of transborder questions raised by "alien" ice and the material it may import from one nation's EEZ to another's.

  18. Impacts of Organic Macromolecules, Chlorophyll and Soot on Arctic Sea Ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogunro, O. O.; Wingenter, O. W.; Elliott, S.; Flanner, M.; Dubey, M. K.

    2014-12-01

    Recent intensification of Arctic amplification can be strongly connected to positive feedback relating black carbon deposition to sea ice surface albedo. In addition to soot deposition on the ice and snow pack, ice algal chlorophyll is likely to compete as an absorber and redistributor of energy. Hence, solar radiation absorption by chlorophyll and some components of organic macromolecules in/under the ice column is currently being examined to determine the level of influence on predicted rate of ice loss. High amounts of organic macromolecules and chlorophyll are produced in global sea ice by the bottom microbial community and also in vertically distributed layers where substantial biological activities take place. Brine channeling in columnar ice can allow for upward flow of nutrients which leads to greater primary production in the presence of moderate light. Modeling of the sea-ice processes in tandem with experiments and field observations promises rapid progress in enhancing Arctic ice predictions. We are designing and conducting global climate model experiments to determine the impact of organic macromolecules and chlorophyll on Arctic sea ice. Influences on brine network permeability and radiation/albedo will be considered in this exercise. Absorption by anthropogenic materials such as soot and black carbon will be compared with that of natural pigments. We will indicate areas of soot and biological absorption dominance in the sense of single scattering, then couple into a full radiation transfer scheme to attribute the various contributions to polar climate change amplification. The work prepares us to study more traditional issues such as chlorophyll warming of the pack periphery and chemical effects of the flow of organics from ice internal communities. The experiments started in the Arctic will broaden to include Antarctic sea ice and shelves. Results from the Arctic simulations will be presented.

  19. The composition and origination of particles from surface water in the Chukchi Sea, Arctic Ocean

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Xiaoguo; LEI Jijiang; YAO Xuying; ZHU Jihao; JIN Xiaobing

    2014-01-01

    Suspended particle samples were collected at 11 stations on the shelf and slope regions of the Chukchi Sea and the central Arctic Ocean during the fifth Chinese National Arctic Research Expedition (summer 2012). The particle concentration, total organic carbon (TOC), total nitrogen (TN) and the isotopic composition of the samples were analyzed. The suspended particle concentration varied between 0.56 and 4.01 mg.L-1;the samples collected from the sea ice margin have higher concentrations. The organic matter content is higher in the shelf area (TOC:9.78%-20.24%;TN:0.91%-2.31%), and exhibits heavier isotopic compositions (δ13C: -23.29‰ to -26.33‰ PDB;δ15N: 6.14‰-7.78‰), indicating that the organic matter is mostly marine in origin with some terrigenous input. In the slope and the central Arctic Ocean, the organic matter content is lower (TOC:8.06%-8.96%;TN:0.46%-0.72%), except for one sample (SR15), and has lighter isotopic compositions (δ13C:-26.93‰to-27.78‰PDB;δ15N:4.13‰-4.84‰). This indicates that the organic matter is mostly terrestrially-derived in these regions. The extremely high amount of terrigenous organic matter (TOC:27.94%;TN:1.16%;δ13C:-27.43‰PDB;δ15N:3.81‰) implies that it was carried by transpolar currents from the East Siberian Sea. Material, including sea ice algae, carried by sea ice are the primary source for particles in the sea ice margins. Sea ice melting released a substantial amount of biomass into the shelf, but a large amount of detrital and clay minerals in the slope and the central Arctic Ocean.

  20. Arctic layer salinity controls heat loss from deep Atlantic layer in seasonally ice-covered areas of the Barents Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lind, Sigrid; Ingvaldsen, Randi B.; Furevik, Tore

    2016-05-01

    In the seasonally ice-covered northern Barents Sea an intermediate layer of cold and relatively fresh Arctic Water at ~25-110 m depth isolates the sea surface and ice cover from a layer of warm and saline Atlantic Water below, a situation that resembles the cold halocline layer in the Eurasian Basin. The upward heat flux from the Atlantic layer is of major concern. What causes variations in the heat flux and how is the Arctic layer maintained? Using observations, we found that interannual variability in Arctic layer salinity determines the heat flux from the Atlantic layer through its control of stratification and vertical mixing. A relatively fresh Arctic layer effectively suppresses the upward heat flux, while a more saline Arctic layer enhances the heat flux. The corresponding upward salt flux causes a positive feedback. The Arctic layer salinity and the water column structures have been remarkably stable during 1970-2011.

  1. Export of algal biomass from the melting Arctic Sea ice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boetius, A.; Albrecht, S.; Bakker, K.; Bienhold, C.; Felden, J.; Fernández-Méndez, M.; Hendricks, S.; Katlein, C.; Lalande, C.; Krumpen, T.; Nicolaus, M.; Peeken, I.; Rabe, B.; Rogacheva, A.; Rybakova, E.; Somavilla, R.; Wenzhöfer, F.; Shipboard Science Party

    2013-01-01

    In the Arctic, under-ice primary production is limited to summer months and is restricted not only by ice thickness and snow cover but also by the stratification of the water column, which constrains nutrient supply for algal growth. Research Vessel Polarstern visited the ice-covered eastern-central

  2. Spatio-Temporal Variability of Arctic Sea Ice Extent and Its Numerical Analysis with Sea Surface Temperature and Air Temperature%北极海冰范围时空变化及其与海温气温间的数值分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孔爱婷; 刘健; 余旭; 左菲

    2016-01-01

    GIS software. Then, the freezing and thawing processes of the sea ice were discussed in detail. The re-sults show that the Arctic sea ice mainly freezes and thaws in various marginal seas, including the Bering sea, Okhotsk, Beaufort Sea, Chukchi Sea, East Siberian Sea, Laptev Sea, Kara Sea, Barents Sea, Hudson B. and Baffin Bay. Finally, according to the sea surface temperature and air temperature data, the relationships among Arctic sea ice extent, sea surface temperature and air tempera-ture were preliminarily discussed here. The results show that a change of the Arctic sea ice which affects the sea surface tempera-ture may cause a variation of the air temperature. However, the seasonal changes of sea ice extent occur later than the seasonal changes of sea surface temperature and air temperature. The relationships among Arctic sea ice extent, sea surface temperature and air temperature in Chukotskoye More were analyzed using the sea surface temperature data and air temperature data derived from the ship-based observations. The data show that when the sea ice extent gets closer to the North Pole, the sea surface temperature and air temperature will be lower. When the sea ice extent gets closer to the land, the sea surface temperature and air temperature will be higher.

  3. The mechanism of multidecadal variability in the Arctic and North Atlantic in climate model INMCM4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Data from a 500-year preindustrial control run of climate model INMCM4 show distinct climate variability in the Arctic and North Atlantic with a period of 35–50 years. The variability can be seen as anomalies of upper ocean density that appear in the Arctic and propagate to the North Atlantic. The density gradient in a northeast–southwest direction alternates with the density gradient in a northwest–southeast direction. A positive density anomaly in the Arctic is associated with a positive salinity anomaly, a positive surface temperature anomaly and a reduction of sea ice in the Barents and Kara Seas. The nature of the variability is a vertical advection of density by thermal currents similar to that proposed in Dijkstra et al (2008 Phil. Trans. R. Soc. A 366). The cycle of model variability shows that after a negative anomaly of density in the northwest Atlantic, one should expect warming in the Arctic in 5–10 years. The ensemble of decadal predictions with climate model INMCM4 starting from 1995 shows that warming in the western Arctic and especially in the Barents Sea observed in 1996–2010 can be reproduced by eight of ten ensemble members. Arctic climate predictability in this case is associated with a proposed mechanism of a 35–50 year North Atlantic–Arctic oscillation. (letter)

  4. Arctic sea ice response to atmospheric forcings with varying levels of anthropogenic warming and climate variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jinlun; Steele, Michael; Schweiger, Axel

    2010-10-01

    Numerical experiments are conducted to project arctic sea ice responses to varying levels of future anthropogenic warming and climate variability over 2010-2050. A summer ice-free Arctic Ocean is likely by the mid-2040s if arctic surface air temperature (SAT) increases 4°C by 2050 and climate variability is similar to the past relatively warm two decades. If such a SAT increase is reduced by one-half or if a future Arctic experiences a range of SAT fluctuation similar to the past five decades, a summer ice-free Arctic Ocean would be unlikely before 2050. If SAT increases 4°C by 2050, summer ice volume decreases to very low levels (10-37% of the 1978-2009 summer mean) as early as 2025 and remains low in the following years, while summer ice extent continues to fluctuate annually. Summer ice volume may be more sensitive to warming while summer ice extent more sensitive to climate variability. The rate of annual mean ice volume decrease relaxes approaching 2050. This is because, while increasing SAT increases summer ice melt, a thinner ice cover increases winter ice growth. A thinner ice cover also results in a reduced ice export, which helps to further slow ice volume loss. Because of enhanced winter ice growth, arctic winter ice extent remains nearly stable and therefore appears to be a less sensitive climate indicator.

  5. Monitoring Arctic sea ice phenology change using hypertemporal remotely sensed data: 1989-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Wenxia; LeDrew, Ellsworth

    2016-07-01

    Arctic sea ice has undergone a significant decline in recent years. Previous studies have demonstrated that the annual sea ice cycle has experienced earlier melt and later freeze up, leading to a significant reduction in minimum sea ice extents and the lengthening of the melting season. The Arctic is being transformed into a regime of widespread seasonal ice with a large loss of old and thick multiyear ice in recent years. However, the sea ice change exhibits considerable interannual and regional variability at different spatial and temporal scales. In this study, we present a new method for hypertemporal sea ice data change detection based on the annual sea ice concentration (SIC) profile for the melt months of each year. A decision tree-based classification is adopted to group pixels with similar annual SIC profiles, and a phenology map of each year is generated for visualization. The phenoregion map visualizes the spatial and temporal configurations of ice melt process for a year. The change detection objective is achieved by comparing the phenoregion number of the same pixel in different years. The algorithm further leads to interpretation of anomalies to obtain change maps at the pixel level. Compared to previous sea ice studies that mainly focused on a particular spatial region and commonly use time period averages, the proposed pixel-based approach has the potential to map sea ice data change both temporally and spatially.

  6. Atmospheric winter response to Arctic sea ice changes in reanalysis data and model simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaiser, Ralf; Nakamura, Tetsu; Handorf, Dörthe; Dethloff, Klaus; Ukita, Jinro; Yamazaki, Koji

    2016-07-01

    The changes of atmospheric flow patterns related to Arctic Amplification have impacts well beyond the Arctic regional weather and climate system. Here we examine modulations of vertically propagating planetary waves, a major feature of the climate response to Arctic sea ice reduction by comparing the corresponding results of an atmospheric general circulation model with reanalysis data for periods of high and low sea ice conditions. Under low sea ice condition we find enhanced coupling between troposphere and stratosphere starting in November with preferred polar stratospheric vortex breakdowns in February, which then feeds back to the troposphere. The model experiment and ERA-Interim reanalysis data agree well with respect to temporal and spatial characteristics associated with vertical planetary wave propagation including its precursors. The upward propagating planetary wave anomalies resemble a wave number 1 and 2 pattern depending on region and timing. Since our experimental design only allows influences from sea ice changes and there is a high degree of resemblance between model results and observations, we conclude that sea ice is a main driver of observed winter circulation changes.

  7. Taxonomic revision of deep-sea Ostracoda from the Arctic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuhara, Moriaki; Stepanova, Anna; Okahashi, Hisayo; Cronin, Thomas M.; Brouwers, Elisabeth M.

    2015-01-01

    Taxonomic revision of deep-sea Ostracoda from the Arctic Ocean was conducted to reduce taxonomic uncertainty that will improve our understanding of species ecology, biogeography and relationship to faunas from other deep-sea regions. Fifteen genera and 40 species were examined and (re-)illustrated with high-resolution scanning electron microscopy images, covering most of known deep-sea species in the central Arctic Ocean. Seven new species are described: Bythoceratina lomonosovensis n. sp., Cytheropteron parahamatum n. sp., Cytheropteron lanceae n. sp.,Cytheropteron irizukii n. sp., Pedicythere arctica n. sp., Cluthiawhatleyi n. sp., Krithe hunti n. sp. This study provides a robust taxonomic baseline for application to paleoceanographical reconstruction and biodiversity analyses in this climatically sensitive region.

  8. Deep-sea ostracode shell chemistry (Mg:Ca ratios) and late Quaternary Arctic Ocean history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronin, T. M.; Dwyer, G.S.; Baker, P.A.; Rodriguez-Lazaro, J.; Briggs, W.M., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    The magnesium:calcium (Mg:Ca) and strontium:calcium (Sr:Ca) ratios were investigated in shells of the benthic ostracode genus Krithe obtained from 64 core-tops from water depths of 73 to 4411 m in the Arctic Ocean and Nordic seas to determine the potential of ostracode shell chemistry for paleoceanographic study. Shells from the abyssal plain and ridges of the Nansen, Amundsen and Makarov basins and the Norwegian and Greenland seas had a wide scatter of Mg:Ca ratios ranging from 0.007 to 0.012 that may signify post-mortem chemical alteration of the shells from Arctic deep-sea environments below about 1000 m water depth. There is a positive correlation (r2=0.59) between Mg:Ca ratios and bottom-water temperature in Krithe shells from water depths <900 m.

  9. Stable reconstruction of Arctic sea level for the 1950-2010 period

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Peter Limkilde; Andersen, Ole Baltazar; Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg

    2016-01-01

    on the combination of tide gauge records and a new 20-year reprocessed satellite altimetry derived sea level pattern. Hence the study is limited to the area covered by satellite altimetry (68ºN and 82ºN). It is found that timestep cumulative reconstruction as suggested by Church and White (2000) may yield widely......, a datum-fit of each tide gauges is used and the method takes into account the entirety of each tide gauge record. This makes the Arctic sea level reconstruction much less prone to drifting.From our reconstruction, we found that the Arctic mean sea level trend is around 1.5 mm +/- 0.3 mm/y for the period...

  10. Spatial and temporal variations in the age structure of Arctic sea ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belchansky, G.I.; Douglas, D.C.; Platonov, N.G.

    2005-01-01

    Spatial and temporal variations in the age structure of Arctic sea ice are investigated using a new reverse chronology algorithm that tracks ice-covered pixels to their location and date of origin based on ice motion and concentration data. The Beaufort Gyre tends to harbor the oldest (>10 years old) sea ice in the western Arctic while direct ice advection pathways toward the Transpolar Drift Stream maintain relatively young (10 years old (10+ year age class) were observed during 1989-2003. Since the mid-1990s, losses to the 10+ year age class lacked compensation by recruitment due to a prior depletion of all mature (6-10 year) age classes. Survival of the 1994 and 1996-1998 sea ice generations reestablished most mature age classes, and thereby the potential to increase extent of the 10+ year age class during the mid-2000s.

  11. Distribution and air-sea exchange of organochlorine pesticides in the North Pacific and the Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Minghong; Ma, Yuxin; Xie, Zhiyong; Zhong, Guangcai; MöLler, Axel; Yang, Haizhen; Sturm, Renate; He, Jianfeng; Ebinghaus, Ralf; Meng, Xiang-Zhou

    2012-03-01

    Surface seawater and boundary layer air samples were collected on the icebreaker Xuelong (Snow Dragon) during the Fourth Chinese Arctic Research Expedition (CHINARE2010) cruise in the North Pacific and Arctic Oceans during 2010. Samples were analyzed for organochlorine pesticides (OCPs), including three isomers of hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH), hexachlorobenzene (HCB), and two isomers of heptachlor epoxide. The gaseous total HCH (ΣHCHs) concentrations were approximately four times lower (average 12.0 pg m-3) than those measured during CHINARE2008 (average 51.4 pg m-3), but were comparable to those measured during CHINARE2003 (average 13.4 pg m-3) in the same study area. These changes are consistent with the evident retreat of sea ice coverage from 2003 to 2008 and increase of sea ice coverage from 2008 to 2009 and 2010. Gaseous β-HCH concentrations in the atmosphere were typically below the method detection limit, consistent with the expectation that ocean currents provide the main transport pathway for β-HCH into the Arctic. The concentrations of all dissolved HCH isomers in seawater increase with increasing latitude, and levels of dissolved HCB also increase (from 5.7 to 7.1 pg L-1) at high latitudes (above 73°N). These results illustrate the role of cold condensation processes in the transport of OCPs. The observed air-sea gas exchange gradients in the Arctic Ocean mainly favored net deposition of OCPs, with the exception of those for β-HCH, which favored volatilization.

  12. Bacterial and archaeal community structures in the Arctic deep-sea sediment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yan; LIU Qun; LI Chaolun; DONG Yi; ZHANG Wenyan; ZHANG Wuchang; XIAO Tian

    2015-01-01

    Microbial community structures in the Arctic deep-sea sedimentary ecosystem are determined by organic matter input, energy availability, and other environmental factors. However, global warming and earlier ice-cover melting are affecting the microbial diversity. To characterize the Arctic deep-sea sediment microbial diversity and its rela-tionship with environmental factors, we applied Roche 454 sequencing of 16S rDNA amplicons from Arctic deep-sea sediment sample. Both bacterial and archaeal communities’ richness, compositions and structures as well as tax-onomic and phylogenetic affiliations of identified clades were characterized. Phylotypes relating to sulfur reduction and chemoorganotrophic lifestyle are major groups in the bacterial groups;while the archaeal community is domi-nated by phylotypes most closely related to the ammonia-oxidizing Thaumarchaeota (96.66%) and methanogenic Euryarchaeota (3.21%). This study describes the microbial diversity in the Arctic deep marine sediment (>3 500 m) near the North Pole and would lay foundation for future functional analysis on microbial metabolic processes and pathways predictions in similar environments.

  13. Intensified Arctic warming under greenhouse warming by vegetation–atmosphere–sea ice interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Observations and modeling studies indicate that enhanced vegetation activities over high latitudes under an elevated CO2 concentration accelerate surface warming by reducing the surface albedo. In this study, we suggest that vegetation-atmosphere-sea ice interactions over high latitudes can induce an additional amplification of Arctic warming. Our hypothesis is tested by a series of coupled vegetation-climate model simulations under 2xCO2 environments. The increased vegetation activities over high latitudes under a 2xCO2 condition induce additional surface warming and turbulent heat fluxes to the atmosphere, which are transported to the Arctic through the atmosphere. This causes additional sea-ice melting and upper-ocean warming during the warm season. As a consequence, the Arctic and high-latitude warming is greatly amplified in the following winter and spring, which further promotes vegetation activities the following year. We conclude that the vegetation-atmosphere-sea ice interaction gives rise to additional positive feedback of the Arctic amplification. (letter)

  14. Recent and future changes in Arctic sea ice simulated by the HadCM3 AOGCM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, J. M.; Stott, P. A.; Cresswell, D. J.; Rayner, N. A.; Gordon, C.; Sexton, D. M. H.

    2002-12-01

    The HadCM3 AOGCM has been used to undertake an ensemble of four integrations from 1860 to 1999 with forcings due to all major anthropogenic and natural climate factors. The simulated decreasing trend in average Arctic sea ice extent for 1970-1999 (-2.5% per decade) is very similar to observations. HadCM3 indicates that internal variability and natural forcings (solar and volcanic) of the climate system are very unlikely by themselves to have caused a trend of this size. The simulated decreasing trend in Arctic sea ice volume (-3.4% per decade for 1961-1998) is less than some recent observationally based estimates. Extending the integrations into the 21st century, Arctic sea ice area and volume continue to decline. Area decreases linearly as global-average temperature rises (by 13% per K), and volume diminishes more rapidly than area. By the end of the century, in some scenarios, the Arctic is ice-free in late summer.

  15. Improved Arctic Sea Ice Thickness Projections Using Bias Corrected CMIP5 Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melia, N.; Hawkins, E.; Haines, K.

    2015-12-01

    Projections of Arctic sea ice thickness (SIT) have the potential to inform stakeholders about accessibility to the region, but are currently rather uncertain. The latest suite of CMIP5 Global Climate Models (GCMs) produce a wide range of simulated SIT in the historical period (1979-2014) and exhibit various spatial and temporal biases when compared with the Pan-Arctic Ice Ocean Modelling and Assimilation System (PIOMAS) sea ice reanalysis. We present a new method to constrain such GCM simulations of SIT to narrow projection uncertainty via a statistical bias correction technique. The bias correction successfully constrains the spatial SIT distribution and temporal variability in the CMIP5 projections whilst retaining the climatic fluctuations from individual ensemble members. The bias correction acts to reduce the uncertainty in projections of SIT and reveals the significant contributions of sea ice internal variability in the first half of the century and of scenario uncertainty from mid-century onwards. The projected date of ice-free conditions in the Arctic under the RCP8.5 high emission scenario occurs in the 2050s, which is a decade earlier than without the bias correction, with potentially significant implications for stakeholders in the Arctic such as the shipping industry. The bias correction methodology developed could be similarly applied to other variables to narrow uncertainty in climate projections more generally.

  16. The DTU2010MSS Mean Sea Surface In The Arctic - For And With Cyrosat-2 Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ole Baltazar; Knudsen, Per

    2011-01-01

    The new Mean Sea Surface DTU10MSS and associated DTU10MDT is presented and evaluated in the Arctic Ocean for the use with Cryosat-2 data. The DTU10MSS is currently the only available MSS which has true global coverage and hence is suitable for referencing when Cryosat-2 data are used in the Arctic...... global coverage. On the other hand Croysat-2 is also important for the evaluation of the DTU10MSS as it observers at latitudes not previously measured by any satellite....

  17. Differences between the bacterial community structures of first- and multi-year Arctic sea ice in the Lincoln Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatam, I.; Beckers, J. F.; Haas, C.; Lanoil, B. D.

    2014-12-01

    The Arctic sea ice composition is shifting from predominantly thick perennial ice (multiyear ice -MYI) to thinner, seasonal ice (first year ice -FYI). The effects of the shift on the Arctic ecosystem and macro-organisms of the Arctic Ocean have been the focus of many studies and have also been extensively debated in the public domain. The effect of this shift on the microbial constituents of the Arctic sea ice has been grossly understudied, although it is a vast habitat for a microbial community that plays a key role in the biogeochemical cycles and energy flux of the Arctic Ocean. MYI and FYI differ in many chemical and physical attributes (e.g. bulk salinity, brine volume, thickness and age), therefore comparing and contrasting the structure and composition of microbial communities from both ice types will be crucial to our understanding of the challenges that the Arctic Ocean ecosystem faces as MYI cover continues to decline. Here, we contend that due to the differences in abiotic conditions, differences in bacterial community structure will be greater between samples from different ice types than within samples from the same ice type. We also argue that since FYI is younger, its community structure will be closer to that of the surface sea water (SW). To test this hypotheses, we extracted DNA and used high throughput sequencing to sequence V1-V3 regions of the bacterial 16s rRNA gene from 10 sea ice samples (5 for each ice type) and 4 surface sea water (SW) collected off the shore of Northern Ellesmere Island, NU, CAN, during the month of May from 2010-2012. Our results showed that observed richness was higher in FYI than MYI. FYI and MYI shared 26% and 36% of their observed richness respectively. While FYI shared 23% of its observed richness with SW, MYI only shared 17%. Both ice types showed similar levels of endemism (61% of the observed richness). This high level of endemism results in the grouping of microbial communities from MYI, FYI, and SW to three

  18. Melt ponds on Arctic sea ice determined from MODIS satellite data using an artificial neural network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Rösel

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Melt ponds on sea ice strongly reduce the surface albedo and accelerate the decay of Arctic sea ice. Due to different spectral properties of snow, ice, and water, the fractional coverage of these distinct surface types can be derived from multispectral sensors like the Moderate Resolution Image Spectroradiometer (MODIS using a spectral unmixing algorithm. The unmixing was implemented using a multilayer perceptron to reduce computational costs.

    Arctic-wide melt pond fractions and sea ice concentrations are derived from the level 3 MODIS surface reflectance product. The validation of the MODIS melt pond data set was conducted with aerial photos from the MELTEX campaign 2008 in the Beaufort Sea, data sets from the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC for 2000 and 2001 from four sites spread over the entire Arctic, and with ship observations from the trans-Arctic HOTRAX cruise in 2005. The root-mean-square errors range from 3.8 % for the comparison with HOTRAX data, over 10.7 % for the comparison with NSIDC data, to 10.3 % and 11.4 % for the comparison with MELTEX data, with coefficient of determination ranging from R2=0.28 to R2=0.45. The mean annual cycle of the melt pond fraction per grid cell for the entire Arctic shows a strong increase in June, reaching a maximum of 15 % by the end of June. The zonal mean of melt pond fractions indicates a dependence of the temporal development of melt ponds on the geographical latitude, and has its maximum in mid-July at latitudes between 80° and 88° N.

    Furthermore, the MODIS results are used to estimate the influence of melt ponds on retrievals of sea ice concentrations from passive microwave data. Results from a case study comparing sea ice concentrations from ARTIST Sea Ice-, NASA Team 2-, and Bootstrap-algorithms with MODIS sea ice concentrations indicate an underestimation of around 40 % for sea ice concentrations retrieved with microwave

  19. Source-specific diatom lipid biomarkers as proxies for Arctic and Antarctic sea ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belt, Simon

    2016-04-01

    Sea ice plays a key role in controlling global climate due its influence over heat and gas exchange between the oceans and the atmosphere. In addition, sea ice exerts a strong influence over the absorption of incoming radiation at the ocean surface as a result of its high reflectivity or albedo. Driven, in part, by the recent dramatic changes to sea ice cover in both the Arctic and the Antarctic, the development of proxies for sea ice has received growing attention over the last 10 years or so. Amongst these, some so-called highly branched isoprenoid (HBI) lipid biomarkers have attracted considerable interest, not least, because they are derived from certain diatoms that reside and bloom within the sea ice matrix itself, thus providing a more direct indication of sea ice presence compared with some other proxies. The signature HBI sea proxies are a mono-unsaturated HBI (IP25) for the Arctic and a di-unsaturated HBI (C25:2) for the Antarctic, with different source organisms for each. Although the variability in sedimentary abundances of IP25 and C25:2 in Arctic and Antarctic sediments generally reflect the corresponding changes in sea ice conditions, a more complete picture of reconstructing sea ice conditions likely requires a multi-proxy approach involving, for example, other lipid biomarkers that serve as proxy measures of nearby open water conditions or sea surface temperature. By adoption of such an approach, a research strategy aimed at improving estimates of sea ice concentrations or better definitions of sea ice conditions (e.g. marginal ice zone, polynyas, permanent ice cover) represents the next stage in lipid-based sea ice proxy development. This presentation will focus on recent developments and future plans that involve a multi-proxy approach to improving sea ice reconstruction. An understanding of sources, ecology and environmental fate of various HBIs and other diatom lipids will likely be key in shaping the future direction of lipid-based sea ice

  20. Sea-ice hazards, associated risks and implications for human activities in the Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eicken, Hajo; Mahoney, Andrew; Jones, Joshua

    2014-05-01

    Polar sea ice serves important functions in the Earth system, including as climate regulator, habitat for diverse biological communities, or substrate and platform for a range of human activities. Subsumed under the concept of sea-ice services, polar ice covers are associated with benefits and risks of harm to ecosystems and people. Recent changes in Arctic ice extent, thickness and mobility have transformed services derived from sea ice. We summarize how these changes have diminished some benefits derived from the ice cover, while increasing others. More important, growing maritime activities in the North and a changing ice cover drive a need for better understanding of sea-ice hazards and the risk they represent in the context of human activities in the Arctic. Three major aspects of this problem are: (1) Broader risks associated with a rapid reduction in summer ice extent, such as geographic shifts in marine ecosystems and warming of submarine permafrost and adjacent land; (2) hazards resulting from changes in sea ice extent and dynamics such as increased coastal erosion and threats to infrastructure; and (3) risks derived from the combination of sea-ice hazards and human activities such as shipping or offshore resource development. Problem (1) is typically seen as a slow-onset hazard that requires a response in the form of mitigation and adaptation. At the same time, the importance of linkages between summer sea-ice reduction to processes outside of the Arctic has only recently emerged (such as atmospheric circulation patterns and extreme weather events) and remains difficult to quantify. Hazards and risks subsumed under (2) and (3) are more localized but with potentially major ecological and socio-economic consequences beyond the Arctic. Drawing on examples from our research in Alaska, we review and illustrate key aspects of sea-ice hazards in terms of risks to ecosystems, people and infrastructure in the coastal zone and Arctic shelf seas. In the Pacific

  1. Atmospheric Measurements over Arctic Sea Ice from Winter to Summer: Preliminary Results from N-ICE 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, L.; Walden, V. P.; Hudson, S. R.

    2015-12-01

    With large changes the in Arctic sea ice regime observed in recent decades, the Arctic is becoming more dominated by thin, first-year ice as opposed to thick, multi-year ice. The recently-completed Norwegian young sea ICE cruise (N-ICE2015) made measurements north of Svalbard from a ship drifting within the Arctic sea ice pack from mid-winter into summer (January—June 2015). The purpose of the experiment was to provide better understanding of the drivers and effects within this new sea ice regime in the Arctic. This extensive measurement campaign made concurrent, in-situ measurements of all aspects of the Arctic sea ice system including atmosphere, ocean, sea ice, snowpack, and biology. The atmosphere plays a key role in the sea ice system, thus, observations were made of the meteorological conditions, radiative fluxes, boundary layer properties, turbulent fluxes, clouds, and atmospheric profiles. Interestingly, the atmospheric circulation in this region during this period was very different during January to March than in April to June. This led to very different meteorological and radiative balance regimes during these two periods, with much larger variability in winter. We will present preliminary data from the atmospheric observations made throughout the campaign, which offer clues to how large-scale atmospheric circulation affects energy balance and heat and moisture transport in the Arctic.

  2. The East Siberian Arctic Shelf is a significant source of atmospheric methane as referred from multi-year ship-based observations (2000-2015)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosmach, D.; Semiletov, I. P.; Shakhova, N. E.; Salyuk, A.

    2015-12-01

    According to NOAA/CMDL data, the highest concentration and greatest seasonal amplitudes of atmospheric methane (CH4) occur at 60-70N, outside the 30-60N band where the main sources of anthropogenic CH4 is located, indicating that the northern environment is a source of these gases. Analyses of ice core samples also suggest a strong pole-to-pole gradient existing during inter-glacial epochs back to preindustrial times, which is independent of anthropogenic activity. The global budget of CH4 established >40 years ago, when very little knowledge existed about Arctic terrestrial sources and nothing was known about Arctic marine sources, has never considered contribution of Arctic sources of CH4 adequately. Here we present results of the multiyear high-precision continuous measurements across the Barents Sea, the Kara Sea, the Laptev Sea, the East Siberian Sea, the Chukchi Sea, the Bering Sea, the Sea of Okhotsk and the Japan Sea performed during one expedition in each of two years (2011 and 2012). Results of our investigations demonstrate that concentrations of dissolved CH4 measured in the surface water in all 8 seas were supersaturated regards to the atmosphere. However, anomalously high concentrations of dissolved CH4 in the surface water (up to 5,000-12,000% of super-saturation) was found in the East Siberian Arctic Shelf, which is composed of the Laptev Sea, the East Siberian Sea and the Chukchi Sea.

  3. Extreme low sea ice years in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago: 1998 versus 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Stephen E. L.; Tivy, Adrienne; Agnew, Tom; Markus, Thorsten; Derksen, Chris

    2010-10-01

    Extreme sea ice minima were observed within the Canadian Arctic Archipelago (CAA) during 1998 and 2007. The September average sea ice area was 2.90 and 2.65 standardized anomalies below the historical 1968-1996 climatology for 1998 and 2007, respectively. October sea ice area for 1998 was a staggering 4.45 standardized anomalies below the historical 1968-1996 climatology and 2007 was lower by 3.36 standardized anomalies. We examine the role of thermodynamic and dynamic forcing on CAA sea ice that was responsible for its extreme loss in 1998 and 2007. Thermodynamic forcing on the sea ice was concentrated over 1 month in 2007 facilitating rapid melt, contrasted against a long melt season in 1998. This variation was attributed to anomalously warm air temperatures in June, September, and October for 1998 compared to anomalously warm temperatures in July for 2007. Sea ice dynamics contributed to the 1998 minimum by inhibiting replenishment from the Arctic Ocean but actually facilitated replenishment in 2007 thereby preventing record low conditions. Replenishment was driven by dissimilarities in sea level pressure patterns over the CAA during these extreme years. Evidence for preconditioned thinning was apparent leading up to 2007 but not strongly apparent for 1998. Remarkably, at the onset of 1998 melt season, multi-year ice area within the CAA was 11% more than the historical climatology and 48% more than at the start of the 2007 melt season yet an extreme minima was still reached.

  4. Arctic sea ice and atmospheric circulation under the abrupt4xCO2 scenario

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Xiaoyong; Annette Rinke; JI Duoying; CUI Xuefeng; John C Moore

    2014-01-01

    We analyze sea ice changes from eight different earth system models that have conducted experiment abrupt4xCO2 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5). In response to abrupt quadrupling of CO2 from preindustrial levels, Arctic temperatures dramatically rise by about 10°C—16°C in winter and the seasonal sea ice cycle and sea ice concentration are signiifcantly changed compared with the pre-industrial control simulations (piControl). Changes of Arctic sea ice concentration are spatially correlated with temperature patterns in all seasons and highest in autumn. Changes in sea ice are associated with changes in atmospheric circulation patterns at heights up to the jet stream. While the pattern of sea level pressure changes is generally similar to the surface air temperature change pattern, the wintertime 500 hPa circulation displays a positive Paciifc North America (PNA) anomaly under abrupt4xCO2-piControl. This large scale teleconnection may contribute to, or feedback on, the simulated sea ice cover change and is associated with an intensiifcation of the jet stream over East Asia and the north Paciifc in winter.

  5. Sensitivity of Pliocene Arctic climate to orbital forcing, atmospheric CO2 and sea ice albedo parameterisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Fergus W.; Haywood, Alan M.; Dowsett, Harry J.; Pickering, Steven J.

    2016-05-01

    General circulation model (GCM) simulations of the mid-Pliocene Warm Period (mPWP, 3.264 to 3.025 Myr ago) do not reproduce the magnitude of Northern Hemisphere high latitude surface air and sea surface temperature (SAT and SST) warming that proxy data indicate. There is also large uncertainty regarding the state of sea ice cover in the mPWP. Evidence for both perennial and seasonal mPWP Arctic sea ice is found through analyses of marine sediments, whilst in a multi-model ensemble of mPWP climate simulations, half of the ensemble simulated ice-free summer Arctic conditions. Given the strong influence that sea ice exerts on high latitude temperatures, an understanding of the nature of mPWP Arctic sea ice would be highly beneficial. Using the HadCM3 GCM, this paper explores the impact of various combinations of potential mPWP orbital forcing, atmospheric CO2 concentrations and minimum sea ice albedo on sea ice extent and high latitude warming. The focus is on the Northern Hemisphere, due to availability of proxy data, and the large data-model discrepancies in this region. Changes in orbital forcings are demonstrated to be sufficient to alter the Arctic sea ice simulated by HadCM3 from perennial to seasonal. However, this occurs only when atmospheric CO2 concentrations exceed 300 ppm. Reduction of the minimum sea ice albedo from 0.5 to 0.2 is also sufficient to simulate seasonal sea ice, with any of the combinations of atmospheric CO2 and orbital forcing. Compared to a mPWP control simulation, monthly mean increases north of 60°N of up to 4.2 °C (SST) and 9.8 °C (SAT) are simulated. With varying CO2, orbit and sea ice albedo values we are able to reproduce proxy temperature records that lean towards modest levels of high latitude warming, but other proxy data showing greater warming remain beyond the reach of our model. This highlights the importance of additional proxy records at high latitudes and ongoing efforts to compare proxy signals between sites.

  6. Plutonium in the Arctic Marine Environment — A Short Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindis Skipperud

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Anthropogenic plutonium has been introduced into the environment over the past 50 years as the result of the detonation of nuclear weapons and operational releases from the nuclear industry. In the Arctic environment, the main source of plutonium is from atmospheric weapons testing, which has resulted in a relatively uniform, underlying global distribution of plutonium. Previous studies of plutonium in the Kara Sea have shown that, at certain sites, other releases have given rise to enhanced local concentrations. Since different plutonium sources are characterised by distinctive plutonium-isotope ratios, evidence of a localised influence can be supported by clear perturbations in the plutonium-isotope ratio fingerprints as compared to the known ratio in global fallout. In Kara Sea sites, such perturbations have been observed as a result of underwater weapons tests at Chernaya Bay, dumped radioactive waste in Novaya Zemlya, and terrestrial runoff from the Ob and Yenisey Rivers. Measurement of the plutonium-isotope ratios offers both a means of identifying the origin of radionuclide contamination and the influence of the various nuclear installations on inputs to the Arctic, as well as a potential method for following the movement of water and sediment loads in the rivers.

  7. Seasonal Changes in the Marine Production Cycles in Response to Changes in Arctic Sea Ice and Upper Ocean Circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitz, Y. H.; Ashjian, C. J.; Campbell, R. G.; Steele, M.; Zhang, J.

    2011-12-01

    Significant seasonal changes in arctic sea ice have been observed in recent years, characterized by unprecedented summer melt-back. As summer sea ice extent shrinks to record low levels, the peripheral seas of the Arctic Ocean are exposed much earlier to atmospheric surface heat flux, resulting in longer and warmer summers with more oceanic heat absorption. The changing seasonality in the arctic ice/ocean system will alter the timing, magnitude, duration, and pattern of marine production cycles by disrupting key trophic linkages and feedbacks in planktonic food webs. We are using a coupled pan-arctic Biology/Ice/Ocean Modeling and Assimilation System (BIOMAS) to investigate the changes in the patterns of seasonality in the arctic physical and biological system. Focus on specific regions of the Arctic, such as the Chukchi Sea, the Beaufort Sea and the adjacent central Arctic, reveals that changes in the timing of the spring bloom, its duration and the response of the secondary producers vary regionally. The major changes are, however, characterized by an earlier phytoplankton bloom and a slight increase of the biomass. In addition, the largest response in the secondary producers is seen in the magnitude of the microzooplankton concentration as well as in the period (early summer to late fall) over which the microzooplankton is present.

  8. Observational uncertainty of Arctic sea-ice concentration significantly affects seasonal climate forecasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunzel, Felix; Notz, Dirk; Baehr, Johanna; Müller, Wolfgang; Fröhlich, Kristina

    2016-04-01

    We examine how the choice of a particular satellite-retrieved sea-ice concentration dataset used for initialising seasonal climate forecasts impacts the prediction skill of Arctic sea-ice area and Northern hemispheric 2-meter air temperatures. To do so, we performed two assimilation runs with the Max Planck Institute Earth System Model (MPI-ESM) from 1979 to 2012, where atmospheric and oceanic parameters as well as sea-ice concentration were assimilated using Newtonian relaxation. The two assimilation runs differ only in the sea-ice concentration dataset used for assimilating sea ice. In the first run, we use sea-ice concentrations as derived by the NASA-Team algorithm, while in the second run we use sea-ice concentrations as derived from the Bootstrap algorithm. A major difference between these two sea-ice concentration data products involves the treatment of melt ponds. While for both products melt ponds appear as open water in the raw satellite data, the Bootstrap algorithm more strongly attempts to offset this systematic bias by synthetically increasing the retrieved ice concentration during summer months. For each year of the two assimilation runs we performed a 10-member ensemble of hindcast experiments starting on 1 May and 1 November with a hindcast length of 6 months. For hindcasts started in November, initial differences in Arctic sea-ice area and surface temperature decrease rapidly throughout the freezing period. For hindcasts started in May, initial sea-ice area differences increase over time. By the end of the melting period, this causes significant differences in 2-meter air temperature of regionally more than 3°C. Hindcast skill for surface temperatures over Europe and North America is higher with Bootstrap initialization during summer and with NASA Team initialisation during winter. This implies that the choice of the sea-ice data product and, thus, the observational uncertainty also affects forecasts of teleconnections that depend on Northern

  9. Analysis of an Arctic sea ice loss model in the limit of a discontinuous albedo

    CERN Document Server

    Hill, Kaitlin; Silber, Mary

    2015-01-01

    As Arctic sea ice extent decreases with increasing greenhouse gases, there is a growing interest in whether there could be a bifurcation associated with its loss, and whether there is significant hysteresis associated with that bifurcation. A challenge in answering this question is that the bifurcation behavior of certain Arctic energy balance models have been shown to be sensitive to how ice-albedo feedback is parameterized. We analyze an Arctic energy balance model in the limit as a smoothing parameter associated with ice-albedo feedback tends to zero, which makes the system piecewise-smooth. Our analysis provides a case study where we use the piecewise-smooth system to explore bifurcation behavior of the smooth system. In this case study, we demonstrate that certain qualitative bifurcation behaviors of the smooth system can have nonsmooth counterparts. We use this perspective to systematically search parameter space. For example, we uncover parameter sets for which the largest transition, with increasing g...

  10. Arctic Sea Ice Export Through Fram Strait and Atmospheric Planetary Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalieri, Donald J.; Koblinsky, Chester (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A link is found between the variability of Arctic sea ice export through Ram Strait and the phase of the longest atmospheric planetary wave (zonal wave 1) in SLP for the period 1958-1997. Previous studies have identified a link between From Strait ice export and the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), but this link has been described as unstable because of a lack of consistency over time scales longer than the last two decades. Inconsistent and low correlations are also found between From Strait ice export and the Arctic Oscillation (AD) index. This paper shows that the phase of zonal wave 1 explains 60% - 70% of the simulated From Strait ice export variance over the Goodyear period 1958 - 1997. Unlike the NAB and AD links, these high variances are consistent for both the first and second halves of the Goodyear period. This consistency is attributed to the sensitivity of the wave I phase at high latitudes to the presence of secondary low pressure systems in the Barents Sea that serve to drive sea ice southward through From Strait. These results provide further evidence that the phase of zonal wave 1 in SLP at high latitudes drives regional as well as hemispheric low frequency Arctic Ocean and sea ice variability.

  11. Arctic sea ice decline contributes to thinning lake ice trend in northern Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexeev, Vladimir; Arp, Christopher D.; Jones, Benjamin M.; Cai, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Field measurements, satellite observations, and models document a thinning trend in seasonal Arctic lake ice growth, causing a shift from bedfast to floating ice conditions. September sea ice concentrations in the Arctic Ocean since 1991 correlate well (r = +0.69,p model experiments to simulate winters with years of high (1991/92) and low (2007/08) sea ice extent for which we also had field measurements and satellite imagery characterizing lake ice conditions. A lake ice growth model forced with Weather Research and Forecasting model output produced a 7% decrease in lake ice growth when 2007/08 sea ice was imposed on 1991/92 climatology and a 9% increase in lake ice growth for the opposing experiment. Here, we clearly link early winter 'ocean-effect' snowfall and warming to reduced lake ice growth. Future reductions in sea ice extent will alter hydrological, biogeochemical, and habitat functioning of Arctic lakes and cause sub-lake permafrost thaw.

  12. Trends in sea-ice variability on the way to an ice-free Arctic

    CERN Document Server

    Bathiany, Sebastian; Williamson, Mark S; Lenton, Timothy M; Scheffer, Marten; van Nes, Egbert; Notz, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    It has been widely debated whether Arctic sea-ice loss can reach a tipping point beyond which a large sea-ice area disappears abruptly. The theory of dynamical systems predicts a slowing down when a system destabilises towards a tipping point. In simple stochastic systems this can result in increasing variance and autocorrelation, potentially yielding an early warning of an abrupt change. Here we aim to establish whether the loss of Arctic sea ice would follow these conceptual predictions, and which trends in sea ice variability can be expected from pre-industrial conditions toward an Arctic that is ice-free during the whole year. To this end, we apply a model hierarchy consisting of two box models and one comprehensive Earth system model. We find a consistent and robust decrease of the ice volume's annual relaxation time before summer ice is lost because thinner ice can adjust more quickly to perturbations. Thereafter, the relaxation time increases, mainly because the system becomes dominated by the ocean wa...

  13. Changes in Arctic and Antarctic Sea Ice as a Microcosm of Global Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, Claire L.

    2014-01-01

    Polar sea ice is a key element of the climate system and has now been monitored through satellite observations for over three and a half decades. The satellite observations reveal considerable information about polar ice and its changes since the late 1970s, including a prominent downward trend in Arctic sea ice coverage and a much lesser upward trend in Antarctic sea ice coverage, illustrative of the important fact that climate change entails spatial contrasts. The decreasing ice coverage in the Arctic corresponds well with contemporaneous Arctic warming and exhibits particularly large decreases in the summers of 2007 and 2012, influenced by both preconditioning and atmospheric conditions. The increasing ice coverage in the Antarctic is not as readily explained, but spatial differences in the Antarctic trends suggest a possible connection with atmospheric circulation changes that have perhaps been influenced by the Antarctic ozone hole. The changes in the polar ice covers and the issues surrounding those changes have many commonalities with broader climate changes and their surrounding issues, allowing the sea ice changes to be viewed in some important ways as a microcosm of global climate change.

  14. TOPAZ4: an ocean-sea ice data assimilation system for the North Atlantic and Arctic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Sakov

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available We present a detailed description of TOPAZ4, the latest version of TOPAZ – a coupled ocean-sea ice data assimilation system for the North Atlantic Ocean and Arctic. It is the only operational, large-scale ocean data assimilation system that uses the ensemble Kalman filter. This means that TOPAZ features a time-evolving, state-dependent estimate of the state error covariance. Based on results from the pilot MyOcean reanalysis for 2003–2008, we demonstrate that TOPAZ4 produces a realistic estimate of the ocean circulation in the North Atlantic and the sea-ice variability in the Arctic. We find that the ensemble spread for temperature and sea-level remains fairly constant throughout the reanalysis demonstrating that the data assimilation system is robust to ensemble collapse. Moreover, the ensemble spread for ice concentration is well correlated with the actual errors. This indicates that the ensemble statistics provide reliable state-dependent error estimates – a feature that is unique to ensemble-based data assimilation systems. We demonstrate that the quality of the reanalysis changes when different sea surface temperature products are assimilated, or when in-situ profiles below the ice in the Arctic Ocean are assimilated. We find that data assimilation improves the match to independent observations compared to a free model. Improvements are particularly noticeable for ice thickness, salinity in the Arctic, and temperature in the Fram Strait, but not for transport estimates or underwater temperature. At the same time, the pilot reanalysis has revealed several flaws in the system that have degraded its performance. Finally, we show that a simple bias estimation scheme can effectively detect the seasonal or constant bias in temperature and sea-level.

  15. The Arctic Ocean marine carbon cycle: evaluation of air-sea CO2 exchanges, ocean acidification impacts and potential feedbacks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. T. Mathis

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available At present, although seasonal sea-ice cover mitigates atmosphere-ocean gas exchange, the Arctic Ocean takes up carbon dioxide (CO2 on the order of −65 to −175 Tg C year−1, contributing 5–14% to the global balance of CO2 sinks and sources. Because of this, the Arctic Ocean is an important influence on the global carbon cycle, with the marine carbon cycle and atmosphere-ocean CO2 exchanges sensitive to Arctic Ocean and global climate change feedbacks. In the near-term, further sea-ice loss and increases in phytoplankton growth rates are expected to increase the uptake of CO2 by Arctic surface waters, although mitigated somewhat by surface warming in the Arctic. Thus, the capacity of the Arctic Ocean to uptake CO2 is expected to alter in response to environmental changes driven largely by climate. These changes are likely to continue to modify the physics, biogeochemistry, and ecology of the Arctic Ocean in ways that are not yet fully understood. In surface waters, sea-ice melt, river runoff, cooling and uptake of CO2 through air-sea gas exchange combine to decrease the calcium carbonate (CaCO3 mineral saturation states (Ω of seawater that is counteracted by seasonal phytoplankton primary production (PP. Biological processes drive divergent trajectories for Ω in surface and subsurface waters of Arctic shelves with subsurface water experiencing undersaturation with respect to aragonite and calcite. Thus, in response to increased sea-ice loss, warming and enhanced phytoplankton PP, the benthic ecosystem of the Arctic shelves are expected to be negatively impacted by the biological amplification of ocean acidification. This in turn reduces the ability of many species to produce CaCO3 shells or tests with profound implications for Arctic marine ecosystems.

  16. Sea surface salinity of the Eocene Arctic Azolla event using innovative isotope modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speelman, E. N.; Sewall, J. O.; Noone, D.; Huber, M.; Sinninghe Damste, J. S.; Reichart, G. J.

    2009-04-01

    With the realization that the Eocene Arctic Ocean was covered with enormous quantities of the free floating freshwater fern Azolla, new questions regarding Eocene conditions facilitating these blooms arose. Our present research focuses on constraining the actual salinity of, and water sources for, the Eocene Arctic basin through the application of stable water isotope tracers. Precipitation pathways potentially strongly affect the final isotopic composition of water entering the Arctic Basin. Therefore we use the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM3), developed by NCAR, combined with a recently developed integrated isotope tracer code to reconstruct the isotopic composition of global Eocene precipitation and run-off patterns. We further addressed the sensitivity of the modeled hydrological cycle to changes in boundary conditions, such as pCO2, sea surface temperatures (SSTs) and sea ice formation. In this way it is possible to assess the effect of uncertainties in proxy estimates of these parameters. Overall, results of all runs with Eocene boundary conditions, including Eocene topography, bathymetry, vegetation patterns, TEX86 derived SSTs and pCO2 estimates, show the presence of an intensified hydrological cycle with precipitation exceeding evaporation in the Arctic region. Enriched, precipitation weighted, isotopic values of around -120‰ are reported for the Arctic region. Combining new results obtained from compound specific isotope analyses (δD) on terrestrially derived n-alkanes extracted from Eocene sediments, and model outcomes make it possible to verify climate reconstructions for the middle Eocene Arctic. Furthermore, recently, characteristic long-chain mid-chain ω20 hydroxy wax constituents of Azolla were found in ACEX sediments. δD values of these C32 - C36 diols provide insight into the isotopic composition of the Eocene Arctic surface water. As the isotopic signature of the runoff entering the Arctic is modelled, and the final isotopic composition of

  17. The influence of Arctic sea ice variability on the summer North Atlantic Oscillation (SNAO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linderholm, H. W.; Folland, C. K.; Ou, T.; Jeong, J. H.; Wilson, R.; Rydval, M.; Chen, D.; Kim, B. M.

    2015-12-01

    The summer North Atlantic Oscillation (SNAO), which is strongly related to changes in Atlantic and European summer storm tracks and the latitudinal position of the jet stream, exerts a strong influence on rainfall, temperature, and cloudiness and is related to summer extremes, such as droughts and floods, mainly in Europe. Reconstructions suggest that the SNAO was mainly negative during the last several centuries until the mid-twentieth century when it entered a positive phase, and climate model projections have suggested a predominantly positive SNAO under future global warming. However, during the recent decade, the SNAO has mainly been in a negative phase, along with a southerly shift in the jet stream, accompanied by wet and cool summers in northwest Europe. Sea surface temperatures in the North Atlantic (related to the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation, AMO) strongly influence the SNAO, and the current positive phase of the AMO has likely played some role in the recent downturn of the SNAO. Additionally, we found a consistent association between winter/spring Arctic sea ice concentration (SIC), particularly in the Labrador and Nordic seas, and the SNAO over the last decades based on observations. However, since the 1990s the strength of the correlations with the regional SIC has changed, weakening over the Labrador Sea and strengthening over Barents Sea. This is particularly evident during the last decade. Possibly this is a response to the rapid changes in Arctic sea ice. To test this, a new tree-ring based reconstruction of the SNAO as well as CMIP5 model runs are used to examine the influence of Arctic sea ice on the summer atmospheric circulation over northwestern Europe in a long-term context.

  18. Statistical indicators of Arctic sea-ice stability - prospects and limitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bathiany, Sebastian; van der Bolt, Bregje; Williamson, Mark S.; Lenton, Timothy M.; Scheffer, Marten; van Nes, Egbert H.; Notz, Dirk

    2016-07-01

    We examine the relationship between the mean and the variability of Arctic sea-ice coverage and volume in a large range of climates from globally ice-covered to globally ice-free conditions. Using a hierarchy of two column models and several comprehensive Earth system models, we consolidate the results of earlier studies and show that mechanisms found in simple models also dominate the interannual variability of Arctic sea ice in complex models. In contrast to predictions based on very idealised dynamical systems, we find a consistent and robust decrease of variance and autocorrelation of sea-ice volume before summer sea ice is lost. We attribute this to the fact that thinner ice can adjust more quickly to perturbations. Thereafter, the autocorrelation increases, mainly because it becomes dominated by the ocean water's large heat capacity when the ice-free season becomes longer. We show that these changes are robust to the nature and origin of climate variability in the models and do not depend on whether Arctic sea-ice loss occurs abruptly or irreversibly. We also show that our climate is changing too rapidly to detect reliable changes in autocorrelation of annual time series. Based on these results, the prospects of detecting statistical early warning signals before an abrupt sea-ice loss at a "tipping point" seem very limited. However, the robust relation between state and variability can be useful to build simple stochastic climate models and to make inferences about past and future sea-ice variability from only short observations or reconstructions.

  19. Arctic Sea Salt Aerosol from Blowing Snow and Sea Ice Surfaces - a Missing Natural Source in Winter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, M. M.; Norris, S. J.; Brooks, I. M.; Nishimura, K.; Jones, A. E.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric particles in the polar regions consist mostly of sea salt aerosol (SSA). SSA plays an important role in regional climate change through influencing the surface energy balance either directly or indirectly via cloud formation. SSA irradiated by sunlight also releases very reactive halogen radicals, which control concentrations of ozone, a pollutant and greenhouse gas. However, models under-predict SSA concentrations in the Arctic during winter pointing to a missing source. It has been recently suggested that salty blowing snow above sea ice, which is evaporating, to be that source as it may produce more SSA than equivalent areas of open ocean. Participation in the 'Norwegian Young Sea Ice Cruise (N-ICE 2015)' on board the research vessel `Lance' allowed to test this hypothesis in the Arctic sea ice zone during winter. Measurements were carried out from the ship frozen into the pack ice North of 80º N during February to March 2015. Observations at ground level (0.1-2 m) and from the ship's crows nest (30 m) included number concentrations and size spectra of SSA (diameter range 0.3-10 μm) as well as snow particles (diameter range 50-500 μm). During and after blowing snow events significant SSA production was observed. In the aerosol and snow phase sulfate is fractionated with respect to sea water, which confirms sea ice surfaces and salty snow, and not the open ocean, to be the dominant source of airborne SSA. Aerosol shows depletion in bromide with respect to sea water, especially after sunrise, indicating photochemically driven release of bromine. We discuss the SSA source strength from blowing snow in light of environmental conditions (wind speed, atmospheric turbulence, temperature and snow salinity) and recommend improved model parameterisations to estimate regional aerosol production. N-ICE 2015 results are then compared to a similar study carried out previously in the Weddell Sea during the Antarctic winter.

  20. Cyclone impact on sea ice in the central Arctic Ocean: a statistical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kriegsmann

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the impact of cyclones on the Arctic Ocean sea ice for the first time in a statistical manner. We apply the coupled ice–ocean model NAOSIM which is forced by the ECMWF analyses for the period 2006–2008. Cyclone position and radius detected in the ECMWF data are used to extract fields of wind, ice drift, and concentration from the ice–ocean model. Composite fields around the cyclone centre are calculated for different cyclone intensities, the four seasons, and different regions of the Arctic Ocean. In total about 3500 cyclone events are analyzed. In general, cyclones reduce the ice concentration on the order of a few percent increasing towards the cyclone centre. This is confirmed by independent AMSR-E satellite data. The reduction increases with cyclone intensity and is most pronounced in summer and on the Siberian side of the Arctic Ocean. For the Arctic ice cover the impact of cyclones has climatologic consequences. In winter, the cyclone-induced openings refreeze so that the ice mass is increased. In summer, the openings remain open and the ice melt is accelerated via the positive albedo feedback. Strong summer storms on the Siberian side of the Arctic Ocean may have been important reasons for the recent ice extent minima in 2007 and 2012.

  1. Improved Arctic sea ice thickness projections using bias-corrected CMIP5 simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melia, N.; Haines, K.; Hawkins, E.

    2015-12-01

    Projections of Arctic sea ice thickness (SIT) have the potential to inform stakeholders about accessibility to the region, but are currently rather uncertain. The latest suite of CMIP5 global climate models (GCMs) produce a wide range of simulated SIT in the historical period (1979-2014) and exhibit various biases when compared with the Pan-Arctic Ice-Ocean Modelling and Assimilation System (PIOMAS) sea ice reanalysis. We present a new method to constrain such GCM simulations of SIT via a statistical bias correction technique. The bias correction successfully constrains the spatial SIT distribution and temporal variability in the CMIP5 projections whilst retaining the climatic fluctuations from individual ensemble members. The bias correction acts to reduce the spread in projections of SIT and reveals the significant contributions of climate internal variability in the first half of the century and of scenario uncertainty from the mid-century onwards. The projected date of ice-free conditions in the Arctic under the RCP8.5 high emission scenario occurs in the 2050s, which is a decade earlier than without the bias correction, with potentially significant implications for stakeholders in the Arctic such as the shipping industry. The bias correction methodology developed could be similarly applied to other variables to reduce spread in climate projections more generally.

  2. Seasonal sea ice predictions for the Arctic based on assimilation of remotely sensed observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauker, F.; Kaminski, T.; Ricker, R.; Toudal-Pedersen, L.; Dybkjaer, G.; Melsheimer, C.; Eastwood, S.; Sumata, H.; Karcher, M.; Gerdes, R.

    2015-10-01

    The recent thinning and shrinking of the Arctic sea ice cover has increased the interest in seasonal sea ice forecasts. Typical tools for such forecasts are numerical models of the coupled ocean sea ice system such as the North Atlantic/Arctic Ocean Sea Ice Model (NAOSIM). The model uses as input the initial state of the system and the atmospheric boundary condition over the forecasting period. This study investigates the potential of remotely sensed ice thickness observations in constraining the initial model state. For this purpose it employs a variational assimilation system around NAOSIM and the Alfred Wegener Institute's CryoSat-2 ice thickness product in conjunction with the University of Bremen's snow depth product and the OSI SAF ice concentration and sea surface temperature products. We investigate the skill of predictions of the summer ice conditions starting in March for three different years. Straightforward assimilation of the above combination of data streams results in slight improvements over some regions (especially in the Beaufort Sea) but degrades the over-all fit to independent observations. A considerable enhancement of forecast skill is demonstrated for a bias correction scheme for the CryoSat-2 ice thickness product that uses a spatially varying scaling factor.

  3. Sea surface height determination in the arctic ocean from Cryosat2 SAR data, the impact of using different empirical retrackers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jain, Maulik; Andersen, Ole Baltazar; Stenseng, Lars;

    2012-01-01

    Cryosat2 Level 1B SAR data can be processed using different empirical retrackers to determine the sea surface height and its variations in the Arctic Ocean. Two improved retrackers based on the combination of OCOG (Offset Centre of Gravity), Threshold methods and Leading Edge Retrieval is used...... to estimate the sea surface height in the Arctic Region. This sea surface height determination is to be compared with the Level2 sea surface height components available in the Cryosat2 data. Further a comparison is done with the marine gravity field for retracker performance evaluation....

  4. Arctic sea ice freeboard from AltiKa and comparison with CryoSat-2 and Operation IceBridge

    OpenAIRE

    Armitage, T. W. K.; Ridout, A. L.

    2015-01-01

    Satellite radar altimeters have improved our knowledge of Arctic sea ice thickness over the past decade. The main sources of uncertainty in sea ice thickness retrievals are associated with inadequate knowledge of the snow layer depth and the radar interaction with the snow pack. Here we adapt a method of deriving sea ice freeboard from CryoSat-2 to data from the AltiKa Ka band radar altimeter over the 2013–14 Arctic sea ice growth season. AltiKa measures basin-averaged freeboards between 4.4 ...

  5. A sensitivity analysis of a radiological assessment model for Arctic waters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, S.P.

    1998-01-01

    A model based on compartment analysis has been developed to simulate the dispersion of radionuclides in Arctic waters for an assessment of doses to man. The model predicts concentrations of radionuclides in the marine environment and doses to man from a range of exposure pathways. A parameter sen...... scavenging, water-sediment interaction, biological uptake, ice transport and fish migration. Two independent evaluations of the release of radioactivity from dumped nuclear waste in the Kara Sea have been used as source terms for the dose calculations....

  6. Surface water mass composition changes captured by cores of Arctic land-fast sea ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, I. J.; Eicken, H.; Mahoney, A. R.; Van Hale, R.; Gough, A. J.; Fukamachi, Y.; Jones, J.

    2016-04-01

    In the Arctic, land-fast sea ice growth can be influenced by fresher water from rivers and residual summer melt. This paper examines a method to reconstruct changes in water masses using oxygen isotope measurements of sea ice cores. To determine changes in sea water isotope composition over the course of the ice growth period, the output of a sea ice thermodynamic model (driven with reanalysis data, observations of snow depth, and freeze-up dates) is used along with sea ice oxygen isotope measurements and an isotopic fractionation model. Direct measurements of sea ice growth rates are used to validate the output of the sea ice growth model. It is shown that for sea ice formed during the 2011/2012 ice growth season at Barrow, Alaska, large changes in isotopic composition of the ocean waters were captured by the sea ice isotopic composition. Salinity anomalies in the ocean were also tracked by moored instruments. These data indicate episodic advection of meteoric water, having both lower salinity and lower oxygen isotopic composition, during the winter sea ice growth season. Such advection of meteoric water during winter is surprising, as no surface meltwater and no local river discharge should be occurring at this time of year in that area. How accurately changes in water masses as indicated by oxygen isotope composition can be reconstructed using oxygen isotope analysis of sea ice cores is addressed, along with methods/strategies that could be used to further optimize the results. The method described will be useful for winter detection of meteoric water presence in Arctic fast ice regions, which is important for climate studies in a rapidly changing Arctic. Land-fast sea ice effective fractionation coefficients were derived, with a range of +1.82‰ to +2.52‰. Those derived effective fractionation coefficients will be useful for future water mass component proportion calculations. In particular, the equations given can be used to inform choices made when

  7. Arctic Sea Ice Charts from Danish Meteorological Institute, 1893 - 1956

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — From 1893 to 1956, the Danish Meteorological Institute (DMI) created charts of observed and inferred sea ice extent for each summer month. These charts are based on...

  8. Sea Ice Melt Pond Data from the Canadian Arctic

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains observations of albedo, depth, and physical characteristics of melt ponds on sea ice, taken during the summer of 1994. The melt ponds studied...

  9. Sea level variability in the Arctic Ocean observed by satellite altimetry

    OpenAIRE

    P. Prandi; Ablain, M.; A. Cazenave; Picot, N.

    2012-01-01

    We investigate sea level variability in the Arctic Ocean from observations. Variability estimates are derived both at the basin scale and on smaller local spatial scales. The periods of the signals studied vary from high frequency (intra-annual) to long term trends. We also investigate the mechanisms responsible for the observed variability. Different data types are used, the main one being a recent reprocessing of satellite altimetry data...

  10. Characterization of sea-ice kinematic in the Arctic outflow region using buoy data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruibo Lei

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Data from four ice-tethered buoys deployed in 2010 were used to investigate sea-ice motion and deformation from the Central Arctic to Fram Strait. Seasonal and long-term changes in ice kinematics of the Arctic outflow region were further quantified using 42 ice-tethered buoys deployed between 1979 and 2011. Our results confirmed that the dynamic setting of the transpolar drift stream (TDS and Fram Strait shaped the motion of the sea ice. Ice drift was closely aligned with surface winds, except during quiescent conditions, or during short-term reversal of the wind direction opposing the TDS. Meridional ice velocity south of 85°N showed a distinct seasonal cycle, peaking between late autumn and early spring in agreement with the seasonality of surface winds. Inertia-induced ice motion was strengthened as ice concentration decreased in summer. As ice drifted southward into the Fram Strait, the meridional ice speed increased dramatically, while associated zonal ice convergence dominated the ice-field deformation. The Arctic atmospheric Dipole Anomaly (DA influenced ice drift by accelerating the meridional ice velocity. Ice trajectories exhibited less meandering during the positive phase of DA and vice versa. From 2005 onwards, the buoy data exhibit high Arctic sea-ice outflow rates, closely related to persistent positive DA anomaly. However, the long-term data from 1979 to 2011 do not show any statistically significant trend for sea-ice outflow, but exhibit high year-to-year variability, associated with the change in the polarity of DA.

  11. The delivery of organic contaminants to the Arctic food web: why sea ice matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pućko, Monika; Stern, Gary A; Macdonald, Robie W; Jantunen, Liisa M; Bidleman, Terry F; Wong, Fiona; Barber, David G; Rysgaard, Søren

    2015-02-15

    For decades sea ice has been perceived as a physical barrier for the loading of contaminants to the Arctic Ocean. We show that sea ice, in fact, facilitates the delivery of organic contaminants to the Arctic marine food web through processes that: 1) are independent of contaminant physical-chemical properties (e.g. 2-3-fold increase in exposure to brine-associated biota), and 2) depend on physical-chemical properties and, therefore, differentiate between contaminants (e.g. atmospheric loading of contaminants to melt ponds over the summer, and their subsequent leakage to the ocean). We estimate the concentrations of legacy organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and current-use pesticides (CUPs) in melt pond water in the Beaufort Sea, Canadian High Arctic, in 2008, at near-gas exchange equilibrium based on Henry's law constants (HLCs), air concentrations and exchange dynamics. CUPs currently present the highest risk of increased exposures through melt pond loading and drainage due to the high ratio of melt pond water to seawater concentration (Melt pond Enrichment Factor, MEF), which ranges from 2 for dacthal to 10 for endosulfan I. Melt pond contaminant enrichment can be perceived as a hypothetical 'pump' delivering contaminants from the atmosphere to the ocean under ice-covered conditions, with 2-10% of CUPs annually entering the Beaufort Sea via this input route compared to the standing stock in the Polar Mixed Layer of the ocean. The abovementioned processes are strongly favored in first-year ice compared to multi-year ice and, therefore, the dynamic balance between contaminant inventories and contaminant deposition to the surface ocean is being widely affected by the large-scale icescape transition taking place in the Arctic. PMID:25437762

  12. The delivery of organic contaminants to the Arctic food web: why sea ice matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pućko, Monika; Stern, Gary A; Macdonald, Robie W; Jantunen, Liisa M; Bidleman, Terry F; Wong, Fiona; Barber, David G; Rysgaard, Søren

    2015-02-15

    For decades sea ice has been perceived as a physical barrier for the loading of contaminants to the Arctic Ocean. We show that sea ice, in fact, facilitates the delivery of organic contaminants to the Arctic marine food web through processes that: 1) are independent of contaminant physical-chemical properties (e.g. 2-3-fold increase in exposure to brine-associated biota), and 2) depend on physical-chemical properties and, therefore, differentiate between contaminants (e.g. atmospheric loading of contaminants to melt ponds over the summer, and their subsequent leakage to the ocean). We estimate the concentrations of legacy organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and current-use pesticides (CUPs) in melt pond water in the Beaufort Sea, Canadian High Arctic, in 2008, at near-gas exchange equilibrium based on Henry's law constants (HLCs), air concentrations and exchange dynamics. CUPs currently present the highest risk of increased exposures through melt pond loading and drainage due to the high ratio of melt pond water to seawater concentration (Melt pond Enrichment Factor, MEF), which ranges from 2 for dacthal to 10 for endosulfan I. Melt pond contaminant enrichment can be perceived as a hypothetical 'pump' delivering contaminants from the atmosphere to the ocean under ice-covered conditions, with 2-10% of CUPs annually entering the Beaufort Sea via this input route compared to the standing stock in the Polar Mixed Layer of the ocean. The abovementioned processes are strongly favored in first-year ice compared to multi-year ice and, therefore, the dynamic balance between contaminant inventories and contaminant deposition to the surface ocean is being widely affected by the large-scale icescape transition taking place in the Arctic.

  13. Atlantic and Arctic sea-air CO2 fluxes, 1990–2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Rödenbeck

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The Atlantic and Arctic oceans are critical components of the global carbon cycle. Here we quantify the net sea-air CO2 flux, for the first time, across different methodologies for consistent time and space scales, for the Atlantic and Arctic basins. We present the long-term mean, seasonal cycle, interannual variability and trends in sea-air CO2 flux for the period 1990 to 2009, and assign an uncertainty to each. We use regional cuts from global observations and modelling products, specifically a pCO2-based CO2 flux climatology, flux estimates from the inversion of oceanic and atmospheric data, and results from six ocean biogeochemical models. Additionally, we use basin-wide flux estimates from surface ocean pCO2 observations based on two distinct methodologies. Our best estimate of the contemporary sea-to-air flux of CO2 (sum of anthropogenic and natural components by the Atlantic between 40° S and 79° N is −0.49 ± 0.11 Pg C yr−1 and by the Arctic is −0.12 ± 0.06 Pg C yr−1, leading to a combined sea-to-air flux of −0.61 ± 0.12 Pg C yr−1 for the two decades (negative reflects ocean uptake. We do find broad agreement amongst methodologies with respect to the seasonal cycle in the subtropics of both hemispheres, but not elsewhere. Agreement with respect to detailed signals of interannual variability is poor; and correlations to the North Atlantic Oscillation are weaker in the North Atlantic and Arctic than in the equatorial region and South Subtropics. Linear trends for 1995 to 2009 indicate increased uptake and generally correspond between methodologies in the North Atlantic, but there is disagreement amongst methodologies in the equatorial region and South Subtropics.

  14. Atlantic and Arctic sea-air CO2 fluxes, 1990-2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, U.; McKinley, G. A.; Bates, N.; Chevallier, F.; Doney, S. C.; Fay, A. R.; González-Dávila, M.; Gruber, N.; Jones, S.; Krijnen, J.; Landschützer, P.; Lefèvre, N.; Manizza, M.; Mathis, J.; Metzl, N.; Olsen, A.; Rios, A. F.; Rödenbeck, C.; Santana-Casiano, J. M.; Takahashi, T.; Wanninkhof, R.; Watson, A. J.

    2012-08-01

    The Atlantic and Arctic oceans are critical components of the global carbon cycle. Here we quantify the net sea-air CO2 flux, for the first time, across different methodologies for consistent time and space scales, for the Atlantic and Arctic basins. We present the long-term mean, seasonal cycle, interannual variability and trends in sea-air CO2 flux for the period 1990 to 2009, and assign an uncertainty to each. We use regional cuts from global observations and modelling products, specifically a pCO2-based CO2 flux climatology, flux estimates from the inversion of oceanic and atmospheric data, and results from six ocean biogeochemical models. Additionally, we use basin-wide flux estimates from surface ocean pCO2 observations based on two distinct methodologies. Our best estimate of the contemporary sea-to-air flux of CO2 (sum of anthropogenic and natural components) by the Atlantic between 40° S and 79° N is -0.49 ± 0.11 Pg C yr-1 and by the Arctic is -0.12 ± 0.06 Pg C yr-1, leading to a combined sea-to-air flux of -0.61 ± 0.12 Pg C yr-1 for the two decades (negative reflects ocean uptake). We do find broad agreement amongst methodologies with respect to the seasonal cycle in the subtropics of both hemispheres, but not elsewhere. Agreement with respect to detailed signals of interannual variability is poor; and correlations to the North Atlantic Oscillation are weaker in the North Atlantic and Arctic than in the equatorial region and South Subtropics. Linear trends for 1995 to 2009 indicate increased uptake and generally correspond between methodologies in the North Atlantic, but there is disagreement amongst methodologies in the equatorial region and South Subtropics.

  15. An assessment of the Atlantic and Arctic sea-air CO2 fluxes, 1990-2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, U.; McKinley, G. A.; Bates, N.; Chevallier, F.; Doney, S. C.; Fay, A. R.; González-Dávila, M.; Gruber, N.; Jones, S.; Krijnen, J.; Landschützer, P.; Lefèvre, N.; Manizza, M.; Mathis, J.; Metzl, N.; Olsen, A.; Rios, A. F.; Rödenbeck, C.; Santana-Casiano, J. M.; Takahashi, T.; Wanninkhof, R.; Watson, A. J.

    2013-01-01

    The Atlantic and Arctic Oceans are critical components of the global carbon cycle. Here we quantify the net sea-air CO2 flux, for the first time, across different methodologies for consistent time and space scales for the Atlantic and Arctic basins. We present the long-term mean, seasonal cycle, interannual variability and trends in sea-air CO2 flux for the period 1990 to 2009, and assign an uncertainty to each. We use regional cuts from global observations and modeling products, specifically a pCO2-based CO2 flux climatology, flux estimates from the inversion of oceanic and atmospheric data, and results from six ocean biogeochemical models. Additionally, we use basin-wide flux estimates from surface ocean pCO2 observations based on two distinct methodologies. Our estimate of the contemporary sea-air flux of CO2 (sum of anthropogenic and natural components) by the Atlantic between 40° S and 79° N is -0.49 ± 0.05 Pg C yr-1, and by the Arctic it is -0.12 ± 0.06 Pg C yr-1, leading to a combined sea-air flux of -0.61 ± 0.06 Pg C yr-1 for the two decades (negative reflects ocean uptake). We do find broad agreement amongst methodologies with respect to the seasonal cycle in the subtropics of both hemispheres, but not elsewhere. Agreement with respect to detailed signals of interannual variability is poor, and correlations to the North Atlantic Oscillation are weaker in the North Atlantic and Arctic than in the equatorial region and southern subtropics. Linear trends for 1995 to 2009 indicate increased uptake and generally correspond between methodologies in the North Atlantic, but there is disagreement amongst methodologies in the equatorial region and southern subtropics.

  16. Distribution of dissolved and particulate trace metals in Arctic sea ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, M.; Hendy, I. L.; Aciego, S.; Meyer, K.

    2014-12-01

    Iron (Fe) is an essential biolimiting micronutrient, however, the bioavailablility of Fe is dependent on source and speciation. In a high nutrient/low chlorophyll region of the ocean such as the Arctic, sea ice is an important aggregator of dissolved and particulate Fe from aerosol, lithogenic, and biogenic sources. While particulate Fe is less bioavailable than dissolved Fe, it is far more abundant in sea ice. As a result, sea ice directly enhances productivity by ice entrapment of mineral dust particulates containing Fe, which can be released into the surface ocean waters during melting. In seawater underlying sea ice, Fe can be concentrated up to two orders of magnitude higher than in the ice-free open ocean (Lannuzel et al., 2011). A transect of sea ice cores were collected in the spring of 2014 offshore of Barrow, AK, and the Canadian Arctic Archipelago to capture a gradient of sediment contributions from shelf sediments to aeolian sediments. At Barrow, AK, land fast first year ice was sampled. In the Canadian Arctic, both multi-year (pack ice) and first year (land fast) ice cores were retrieved. First year ice cores were between 100-150 cm thick and the multi year core was 195 cm thick. Cores were subsampled by depth and filtered. The resulting ice core sediments were analyzed for elemental composition, and multistep Fe-leaching experiments were conducted to determine the fraction of soluble Fe. Thus we have ascertained the solubility of particulate Fe prior to onset of melt season. Dissolved trace metals were also analyzed to ascertain changes in concentration with ice core depth of lithogenic elements (Mn, Al) and biologically important elements (Si, Mo, Cu, Zn). Preliminary results show some enrichment of lithogenic inputs near surface, indicating dust deposition, and lower portions of the cores, suggesting resuspended sediments from the continental shelf. Concentrations of some biologically important elements decrease with depth, suggesting possible

  17. Arctic Clouds and Sea Ice Inhomogeneities and Plane-parallel Biases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozwadowska, A.; Cahalan, R. F.

    Monte Carlo simulations of the expected influence of non-uniformity in cloud struc- ture and surface albedo on shortwave radiative fluxes in the Arctic atmosphere are presented. In particular, plane-parallel biases in cloud albedo and transmittance are studied for non-absorbing low-level all-liquid stratus clouds over sea ice. The "abso- lute bias" is defined as the difference between the cloud albedo or transmittance for the uniform or plane-parallel case, and the albedo or transmittance for nonuniform conditions with the same mean cloud optical thickness and the same mean surface albedo, averaged over a given area (i.e. bias > 0 means plane-parallel overestimates). Ranges of means and standard deviations of input parameters typical of Arctic con- ditions are determined from the FIRE-ACE/SHEBA/ARM experiment. We determine the sensitivity of the bias with respect to the following: domain averaged means and spatial variances of cloud optical thickness and surface albedo, shape of the surface reflectance function, presence of a scattering layer under the clouds, and solar zenith angle. The simulations show that the biases in Arctic conditions are generally lower than in subtropical stratocumulus. The magnitudes of the absolute biases are unlikely to exceed 0.02 for albedo and 0.05 for transmittance. The "relative bias" expresses the absolute bias as a percentage of the actual cloud albedo or transmittance. The mag- nitude of the relative bias in albedo is typically below 2% over the reflective Arctic surface, while the magnitude of the relative bias in transmittance can exceed 10% . Over ice free ocean, it is well known that the albedo bias is strictly positive but in the Arctic it can change sign when the surface bias contribution dominates over the cloud contribution. On the other hand, the transmittance bias remains strictly negative in the Arctic, regardless of surface conditions. The influence of cloud variability on the bi- ases strongly decreases with an

  18. Arctic sea-ice ridges—Safe heavens for sea-ice fauna during periods of extreme ice melt?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gradinger, Rolf; Bluhm, Bodil; Iken, Katrin

    2010-01-01

    The abundances and distribution of metazoan within-ice meiofauna (13 stations) and under-ice fauna (12 stations) were investigated in level sea ice and sea-ice ridges in the Chukchi/Beaufort Seas and Canada Basin in June/July 2005 using a combination of ice coring and SCUBA diving. Ice meiofauna abundance was estimated based on live counts in the bottom 30 cm of level sea ice based on triplicate ice core sampling at each location, and in individual ice chunks from ridges at four locations. Under-ice amphipods were counted in situ in replicate ( N=24-65 per station) 0.25 m 2 quadrats using SCUBA to a maximum water depth of 12 m. In level sea ice, the most abundant ice meiofauna groups were Turbellaria (46%), Nematoda (35%), and Harpacticoida (19%), with overall low abundances per station that ranged from 0.0 to 10.9 ind l -1 (median 0.8 ind l -1). In level ice, low ice algal pigment concentrations (3 m where abundances were up to 42-fold higher compared with level ice. We propose that the summer ice melt impacted meiofauna and under-ice amphipod abundance and distribution through (a) flushing, and (b) enhanced salinity stress at thinner level sea ice (less than 3 m thickness). We further suggest that pressure ridges, which extend into deeper, high-salinity water, become accumulation regions for ice meiofauna and under-ice amphipods in summer. Pressure ridges thus might be crucial for faunal survival during periods of enhanced summer ice melt. Previous estimates of Arctic sea ice meiofauna and under-ice amphipods on regional and pan-Arctic scales likely underestimate abundances at least in summer because they typically do not include pressure ridges.

  19. The impact of under-ice melt ponds on Arctic sea ice volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Naomi; Flocco, Daniela; Feltham, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    A one-dimensional, thermodynamic model of Arctic sea ice [Flocco et al, 2015] has been adapted to study the evolution of under-ice melt ponds, pools of fresh water that are found below the Arctic sea ice, and false bottoms, sheets of ice that form at the boundary between the under-ice melt pond and the oceanic mixed layer. Over time, either the under-ice melt pond freezes or the false bottom is completely ablated. We have been investigating the impact that these features have on the growth or ablation of sea ice during the time that they are present. The sensitivity of our model to a range of parameters has been tested, revealing some interesting effects of the thermodynamic processes taking place during the life-cycle of these phenomena. For example, the under-ice melt pond and its associated false bottom can insulate the sea ice layer from ocean, increasing the thickness of sea ice present at the end of the time frame considered. A comparison of the results of the model of under-ice melt pond evolution with that of sea ice with a bare base has been used to estimate the impact of under-ice melt ponds on sea ice volume towards the end of the melt season. We find that the under-ice melt ponds could have a significant impact on the mass balance of the sea ice, suggesting that it could be desirable to include a parameterisation of the effects of under-ice melt pond in the sea ice components of climate models.

  20. Wintertime Arctic Ocean sea water properties and primary marine aerosol concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Zábori

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Sea spray aerosols are an important part of the climate system through their direct and indirect effects. Due to the diminishing sea ice, the Arctic Ocean is one of the most rapidly changing sea spray aerosol source areas. However, the influence of these changes on primary particle production is not known.

    In laboratory experiments we examined the influence of Arctic Ocean water temperature, salinity, and oxygen saturation on primary particle concentration characteristics. Sea water temperature was identified as the most important of these parameters. A strong decrease in sea spray aerosol production with increasing water temperature was observed for water temperatures between −1°C and 9°C. Aerosol number concentrations decreased from at least 1400 cm−3 to 350 cm−3. In general, the aerosol number size distribution exhibited a robust shape with one mode close to dry diameter Dp 0.2 μm with approximately 45% of particles at smaller sizes. Changes in sea water temperature did not result in pronounced change of the shape of the aerosol size distribution, only in the magnitude of the concentrations. Our experiments indicate that changes in aerosol emissions are most likely linked to changes of the physical properties of sea water at low temperatures. The observed strong dependence of sea spray aerosol concentrations on sea water temperature, with a large fraction of the emitted particles in the typical cloud condensation nuclei size range, provide strong arguments for a more careful consideration of this effect in climate models.

  1. Sea ice melt onset dynamics in the northern Canadian Arctic Archipelago from RADARSAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmud, M. S.; Howell, S.; Geldsetzer, T.; Yackel, J.

    2015-12-01

    Sea ice melt onset, the appearance of liquid water in its snow cover, decreases surface albedo which increases shortwave absorption and thereby accelerates snow and sea ice melting. Earlier melt onset leads to the earlier formation of open water which enhances the ice-albedo feedback. Sea ice melt onset timing and duration vary considerably, both spatially and temporally, owing to variability in atmospheric forcing; this in turn influences the September sea ice extent. Sea ice melt onset variability has been investigated using coarse resolution passive microwave observation in Canadian Arctic Archipelago (CAA); however, this does not provide sufficient information about sea ice melt dynamics. We developed a new melt onset algorithm using high resolution synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images from RADARSAT to better understand sea ice melt onset dynamics in northern Canadian Arctic Archipelago (fig 1) from 1997 to 2014. The algorithm is based on the temporal evolution of the SAR backscatter coefficient (σo), using separate thresholds for seasonal first-year ice and multi-year ice. Results indicated that the mean annual average melt onset date in the northern CAA was on year day 164 (mid-June) with a standard deviation of 4 days over the 18 year period. No significant trend for melt onset date was found over the 18 year period (fig: 2) but extreme early melt onset was detected in 1998 and 2012 associated with anomalous atmospheric forcing. Spatially, sea ice onset over the entire northern CAA varied from a 10-day minimum in 2007, to a 35-day maximum in 2011 and exhibited negative correlation (r=0.70) with the rate of increase in surface air temperature (fig 3) derived from Extended AVHRR Polar Pathfinder (APP-x) dataset. An earlier (later) melt onset also results in light (heavier) September sea ice area in the northern CAA (fig 4).

  2. The melting sea ice of Arctic polar cap in the summer solstice month and the role of ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S.; Yi, Y.

    2014-12-01

    The Arctic sea ice is becoming smaller and thinner than climatological standard normal and more fragmented in the early summer. We investigated the widely changing Arctic sea ice using the daily sea ice concentration data. Sea ice data is generated from brightness temperature data derived from the sensors: Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP)-F13 Special Sensor Microwave/Imagers (SSM/Is), the DMSP-F17 Special Sensor Microwave Imager/Sounder (SSMIS) and the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer - Earth Observing System (AMSR-E) instrument on the NASA Earth Observing System (EOS) Aqua satellite. We tried to figure out appearance of arctic sea ice melting region of polar cap from the data of passive microwave sensors. It is hard to explain polar sea ice melting only by atmosphere effects like surface air temperature or wind. Thus, our hypothesis explaining this phenomenon is that the heat from deep undersea in Arctic Ocean ridges and the hydrothermal vents might be contributing to the melting of Arctic sea ice.

  3. Distribution of molluscan remains in the sediment of the Chukchi Sea and its vicinity, the Arctic

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gao Aiguo; Xu Fengshan; Sun Haiqing; Li Lon

    2003-01-01

    The result of an analysis of mollusca remains collected from the Chukchi Sea, Beaufort Sea and Bering Sea in the First Chinese National Arctic Research Expedition, from July to September,1999 is presented. Seventeen species of mollusca have been identified, which belong to two classes: Bivalvia and Gastropoda. The compositions of the mollusca are very simple. According to the distribution pattern two groups may be distinguished among molluscan species. The Pan-Arctic and circumboreal group comprises Nuculana pernula, N. radiata, Nucula bellotii, Astarte montagui, Seripes groenlandicus, Macoma calcarea, M. moesta alaskana, Liocyma fluctuosa, Mya pseudoarenaria and Turritella polaris. Three species, Cyclocardia crebricos tata, Trichotrois coronata and Argobuccinum oregonense are components of the Pan-Arctic and Pacific boreal group. With regard to feeding habits, detritus feeders dominate. There are 7 species of detritus feeders, i.e. , Nuculana pernula, N. radiata,Nucula bellotii , Macoma calcarea , M. moesta alaskana , Macoma sp. and Trichotropis coronata . Detritus feeders are dominant with regard to the numbers of species as well as to the frequency of occurrence. Macoma calcarea is the most abundant species.

  4. Ecosystem dynamics of the Pacific-influenced Northern Bering and Chukchi Seas in the Amerasian Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grebmeier, Jacqueline M.; Cooper, Lee W.; Feder, Howard M.; Sirenko, Boris I.

    2006-10-01

    The shallow continental shelves and slope of the Amerasian Arctic are strongly influenced by nutrient-rich Pacific waters advected over the shelves from the northern Bering Sea into the Arctic Ocean. These high-latitude shelf systems are highly productive both as the ice melts and during the open-water period. The duration and extent of seasonal sea ice, seawater temperature and water mass structure are critical controls on water column production, organic carbon cycling and pelagic-benthic coupling. Short food chains and shallow depths are characteristic of high productivity areas in this region, so changes in lower trophic levels can impact higher trophic organisms rapidly, including pelagic- and benthic-feeding marine mammals and seabirds. Subsistence harvesting of many of these animals is locally important for human consumption. The vulnerability of the ecosystem to environmental change is thought to be high, particularly as sea ice extent declines and seawater warms. In this review, we focus on ecosystem dynamics in the northern Bering and Chukchi Seas, with a more limited discussion of the adjoining Pacific-influenced eastern section of the East Siberian Sea and the western section of the Beaufort Sea. Both primary and secondary production are enhanced in specific regions that we discuss here, with the northern Bering and Chukchi Seas sustaining some of the highest water column production and benthic faunal soft-bottom biomass in the world ocean. In addition, these organic carbon-rich Pacific waters are periodically advected into low productivity regions of the nearshore northern Bering, Chukchi and Beaufort Seas off Alaska and sometimes into the East Siberian Sea, all of which have lower productivity on an annual basis. Thus, these near shore areas are intimately tied to nutrients and advected particulate organic carbon from the Pacific influenced Bering Shelf-Anadyr water. Given the short food chains and dependence of many apex predators on sea ice, recent

  5. Phylogenetic analysis of bacteria in sea ice brine sampled from the Canada Basin, Arctic Ocean

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Bacterial diversity in sea ice brine samples which collected from four stations located at the Canada Basin, Arctic Ocean was analyzed by PCR-DGGE. Twenty-three 16S rDNA sequences of bacteria obtained from DGGE bands were cloned and sequenced. Phylogenetic analysis clustered these sequences within γ-proteobacteria, Cytophaga-Flexibacter-Bacteroides (CFB) group, Firmicutes and Actinobacteria. The phylotype of Pseudoalteromonas in the γ-proteobacteria was predominant and members of the CFB group and γ-proteobacteria were highly abundant in studied sea ice brine samples.

  6. Ship-borne electromagnetic induction sounding of sea ice thickness in the Arctic during summer 2003

    OpenAIRE

    Shirasawa,Kunio /Tateyama,Kazutaka /Takatsuka,Toru /Kawamura,Toshiyuki /Uto,Shotaro

    2006-01-01

    Measurements of ice thickness were carried out by a ship-borne electromagnetic induction instrument mounted on the R/V Xuelong during the Second Chinese National Arctic Research Expedition (CHINARE-2003) in summer 2003 in the Chukchi Sea. A 1-D multi-layer model, consisting of three layers of snow, ice and seawater, was used to calculate the total thickness of snow and sea ice. The time series of total thickness from 24 August to 7 September 2003 indicates that deformed and second-/multi-year...

  7. Ku-Band radar penetration into Snow over Arctic Sea Ice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendricks, Stefan; Stenseng, Lars; Helm, Veit;

    is the snow/air interface, whereas radar waves interact with the variable physical properties of the snow cover on the Arctic sea ice. In addition, radar elevation measurements may vary for different retracker algorithms, which determine the track point of the scattered echo power distribution. Since accurate...... knowledge of the reflection horizon is critical for sea ice thickness retrieval, validation data is necessary to investigate the penetration of radar waves into the snow for the upcoming CryoSat-2 mission. Furthermore, the combination of both optical and RF wavelengths might be used to derive snow thickness...

  8. Plutonium and americium in arctic waters, the North Sea and Scottish and Irish coastal zones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallstadius, L.; Aarkrog, Asker; Dahlgaard, Henning;

    1986-01-01

    Plutonium and americium have been measured in surface waters of the Greenland and Barents Seas and in the northern North Sea from 1980 through 1984. Measurements in water and biota, Fucus, Mytilus and Patella, were carried out in North-English and Scottish waters in 1982 and Fucus samples were...... plutonium from the latter to Spitsbergen waters. Fallout plutonium in Arctic waters has a residence time of the order of several years, while for Pu from Sellafield we estimate mean residence times of 11–15 months in Scottish waters and, tentatively, 1·5-3 y during transport from the North Channel (north...

  9. Autotrophic and heterotrophic activity in Arctic first-year sea ice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søgaard, Dorte Haubjerg; Kristensen, Morten; Rysgaard, Søren;

    2010-01-01

    We present a study of autotrophic and heterotrophic activities of Arctic sea ice (Malene Bight, SW Greenland) as measured by 2 different approaches: (1) standard incubation techniques (H14CO3– and [3H]thymidine incubation) on sea ice cores brought to the laboratory and (2) cores incubated in situ...... in plastic bags with subsequent melting and measurements of changes in total O2 concentrations. The standard incubations showed that the annual succession followed a distinctive pattern, with a low, almost balancing heterotrophic and autotrophic activity during February and March. This period was followed...... March and April, it resulted in a significant net oxygen accumulation in the bag incubations. Integrated over the entire season, the sea ice of Malene Bight was net autotrophic with an annual net carbon fixation of 220 mg C m– 2, reflecting the net result of a sea ice-related gross primary production...

  10. Sea ice thickness and concentration in Arctic obtaining from remote sensing images

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lu Peng; Li Zhijun; Dong Xilu; Zhang Zhanhai; Chen Zhi

    2004-01-01

    Based on the sea ice digital videos and photos along the investigation route in the Second Chinese National Arctic Research Expedition (CHINARE) during July and September, 2003, collections of sea ice thickness and concentration in the area of latitude range of 74.11°N-79.56°N and longitude range of 144.17°W-169.95°W are finished. This paper discusses the methods of obtaining ice/snow thicknesses from ship-side videos and ice concentrations from aerial photos, and illustrates the measures should be taken in analysis and in-situ investigation processes to improve the reliability of the parameters. The methods in this paper are somewhat universal and can be used in the research of Bohai Sea and Polar Regions sea ice.

  11. Technetium-99 in the Nordic Seas and the Arctic Ocean 1970 - 2002: observations and model results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Technetium-99 (99Tc) is a highly soluble, beta emitting anthropogenic radionuclide with a half-life of 213000 years. The primary source of 99Tc to the northern marine environment has been through controlled discharges from the nuclear reprocessing facilities at Sellafield (UK) and Cap la Hague (France) which have taken place over several decades and have seen two periods of peak discharge in the 1970's and the 1990's. In the Nordic Seas, 99Tc is detected along the Norwegian Coastal Current (NCC) and further north, in the Barents Sea and West Spitsbergen Current. The further pathways of 99Tc are a recirculation with the East Greenland Current in the Nordic Seas and an intrusion into the Arctic Ocean proper with advective timescales of up to several decades. In the Norwegian Research Council (NFR) funded research project RADNOR, two state-of-the-art numerical models are used to simulate the fate of 99Tc discharges into the marine environment: The hydrodynamic coupled ice-ocean model NAOSIM, forced with realistic atmospheric data and the NRPA assessment box model which is forced by a fixed circulation pattern, but resolves the movement of the radionuclides in several environmental compartments. An intercomparison of the NAOSIM and NRPA model simulations of the dispersal of 99Tc will be performed followed by a comparison of the model simulations with an observational database. The database encompasses as complete as possible the available measurements from the West-European shelf seas northward into the Arctic Ocean. Results from this work will help to provide a better understanding of the dispersion dynamics of 99Tc in the Nordic Seas and the Arctic Ocean. (author)

  12. Snow thickness retrieval over thick Arctic sea ice using SMOS satellite data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maaß, N.; Kaleschke, L.; Tian-Kunze, X.; Drusch, M.

    2013-12-01

    The microwave interferometric radiometer of the European Space Agency's Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission measures at a frequency of 1.4 GHz in the L-band. In contrast to other microwave satellites, low frequency measurements in L-band have a large penetration depth in sea ice and thus contain information on the ice thickness. Previous ice thickness retrievals have neglected a snow layer on top of the ice. Here, we implement a snow layer in our emission model and investigate how snow influences L-band brightness temperatures and whether it is possible to retrieve snow thickness over thick Arctic sea ice from SMOS data. We find that the brightness temperatures above snow-covered sea ice are higher than above bare sea ice and that horizontal polarisation is more affected by the snow layer than vertical polarisation. In accordance with our theoretical investigations, the root mean square deviation between simulated and observed horizontally polarised brightness temperatures decreases from 20.9 K to 4.7 K, when we include the snow layer in the simulations. Although dry snow is almost transparent in L-band, we find brightness temperatures to increase with increasing snow thickness under cold Arctic conditions. The brightness temperatures' dependence on snow thickness can be explained by the thermal insulation of snow and its dependence on the snow layer thickness. This temperature effect allows us to retrieve snow thickness over thick sea ice. For the best simulation scenario and snow thicknesses up to 35 cm, the average snow thickness retrieved from horizontally polarised SMOS brightness temperatures agrees within 0.1 cm with the average snow thickness measured during the IceBridge flight campaign in the Arctic in spring 2012. The corresponding root mean square deviation is 5.5 cm, and the coefficient of determination is r2 = 0.58.

  13. Snow thickness retrieval over thick Arctic sea ice using SMOS satellite data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Maaß

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The microwave interferometric radiometer of the European Space Agency's Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS mission measures at a frequency of 1.4 GHz in the L-band. In contrast to other microwave satellites, low frequency measurements in L-band have a large penetration depth in sea ice and thus contain information on the ice thickness. Previous ice thickness retrievals have neglected a snow layer on top of the ice. Here, we implement a snow layer in our emission model and investigate how snow influences L-band brightness temperatures and whether it is possible to retrieve snow thickness over thick Arctic sea ice from SMOS data. We find that the brightness temperatures above snow-covered sea ice are higher than above bare sea ice and that horizontal polarisation is more affected by the snow layer than vertical polarisation. In accordance with our theoretical investigations, the root mean square deviation between simulated and observed horizontally polarised brightness temperatures decreases from 20.9 K to 4.7 K, when we include the snow layer in the simulations. Although dry snow is almost transparent in L-band, we find brightness temperatures to increase with increasing snow thickness under cold Arctic conditions. The brightness temperatures' dependence on snow thickness can be explained by the thermal insulation of snow and its dependence on the snow layer thickness. This temperature effect allows us to retrieve snow thickness over thick sea ice. For the best simulation scenario and snow thicknesses up to 35 cm, the average snow thickness retrieved from horizontally polarised SMOS brightness temperatures agrees within 0.1 cm with the average snow thickness measured during the IceBridge flight campaign in the Arctic in spring 2012. The corresponding root mean square deviation is 5.5 cm, and the coefficient of determination is r2 = 0.58.

  14. Arctic sea ice in transformation: A review of recent observed changes and impacts on biology and human activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Walter N.; Hovelsrud, Greta K.; Oort, Bob E. H.; Key, Jeffrey R.; Kovacs, Kit M.; Michel, Christine; Haas, Christian; Granskog, Mats A.; Gerland, Sebastian; Perovich, Donald K.; Makshtas, Alexander; Reist, James D.

    2014-09-01

    Sea ice in the Arctic is one of the most rapidly changing components of the global climate system. Over the past few decades, summer areal extent has declined over 30%, and all months show statistically significant declining trends. New satellite missions and techniques have greatly expanded information on sea ice thickness, but many uncertainties remain in the satellite data and long-term records are sparse. However, thickness observations and other satellite-derived data indicate a 40% decline in thickness, due in large part to the loss of thicker, older ice cover. The changes in sea ice are happening faster than models have projected. With continued increasing temperatures, summer ice-free conditions are likely sometime in the coming decades, though there are substantial uncertainties in the exact timing and high interannual variability will remain as sea ice decreases. The changes in Arctic sea ice are already having an impact on flora and fauna in the Arctic. Some species will face increasing challenges in the future, while new habitat will open up for other species. The changes are also affecting people living and working in the Arctic. Native communities are facing challenges to their traditional ways of life, while new opportunities open for shipping, fishing, and natural resource extraction. Significant progress has been made in recent years in understanding of Arctic sea ice and its role in climate, the ecosystem, and human activities. However, significant challenges remain in furthering the knowledge of the processes, impacts, and future evolution of the system.

  15. On the possibility and predictability of rapid Arctic winter sea-ice loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bathiany, Sebastian; Notz, Dirk; Mauritsen, Thorsten; Raedel, Gaby; Brovkin, Victor; van der Bolt, Bregje; Scheffer, Marten; van Nes, Egbert; Williamson, Mark; Lenton, Tim

    2016-04-01

    We examine the transition from a seasonally ice-covered Arctic to an Arctic Ocean that is sea-ice free all year round under increasing atmospheric CO2 levels. Using two column models and nine Earth System Models, we investigate how rapid such Arctic winter sea-ice loss can be, and whether an abrupt ice loss can be predicted from observed trends in variance or autocorrelation. Such statistical indicators have been proposed as early warning signals of abrupt shifts that are caused by positive feedbacks. We show that in comprehensive climate models, the loss of winter sea-ice area is faster than the preceding loss of summer sea-ice area for the same rate of warming. In two of the models, several million km2 of winter sea ice are lost within only one decade. Their behaviour resembles the catastrophic winter ice loss in a column model where the stable ice-covered state suddenly disappears at a bifurcation point, implying an irreversible and abrupt shift to the ice-free solution. However, we argue that winter sea-ice loss in comprehensive models is reversible and not associated with the existence of multiple steady states. The large sensitivity of winter sea-ice area in complex models is caused by the asymmetry between melting and freezing: An ice-free summer requires the complete melt of even the thickest sea ice, which is why the perennial ice coverage decreases only gradually as more and more of the thinner ice melts away. In winter, however, sea-ice areal coverage remains high as long as sea ice still forms, and then drops to zero wherever the ocean warms sufficiently to no longer form ice during winter. As this mechanism occurs in every model we analyse and is independent of any specific parameterisation, it is likely to be relevant in the real world. We also find that expected trends in variance and autocorrelation of sea-ice area and thickness are not specific to the existence or the mechanism of abrupt ice loss. For example, natural fluctuations of ice volume

  16. A 10,000-Year Record of Arctic Ocean Sea Ice Variability – View from the Beach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Funder, Svend Visby; Goose, Hugues; Jepsen, Hans;

    2011-01-01

    increase in multiyear sea ice culminated during the past 2500 years and is linked to an increase in ice export from the western Arctic and higher variability of ice-drift routes. When the ice was at its minimum in northern Greenland, it greatly increased at Ellesmere Island to the west. The lack...... of uniformity in past sea-ice changes, which is probably related to large-scale atmospheric anomalies such as the Arctic Oscillation, is not well reproduced in models. This needs to be further explored, as it is likely to have an impact on predictions of future sea-ice distribution...

  17. Biogenic, anthropogenic and sea salt sulfate size-segregated aerosols in the Arctic summer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghahremaninezhad, Roghayeh; Norman, Ann-Lise; Abbatt, Jonathan P. D.; Levasseur, Maurice; Thomas, Jennie L.

    2016-04-01

    Size-segregated aerosol sulfate concentrations were measured on board the Canadian Coast Guard Ship (CCGS) Amundsen in the Arctic during July 2014. The objective of this study was to utilize the isotopic composition of sulfate to address the contribution of anthropogenic and biogenic sources of aerosols to the growth of the different aerosol size fractions in the Arctic atmosphere. Non-sea-salt sulfate is divided into biogenic and anthropogenic sulfate using stable isotope apportionment techniques. A considerable amount of the average sulfate concentration in the fine aerosols with a diameter 63 %), which is higher than in previous Arctic studies measuring above the ocean during fall ( 30 %) (Norman et al., 1999). The anthropogenic sulfate concentration was less than that of biogenic sulfate, with potential sources being long-range transport and, more locally, the Amundsen's emissions. Despite attempts to minimize the influence of ship stack emissions, evidence from larger-sized particles demonstrates a contribution from local pollution. A comparison of δ34S values for SO2 and fine aerosols was used to show that gas-to-particle conversion likely occurred during most sampling periods. δ34S values for SO2 and fine aerosols were similar, suggesting the same source for SO2 and aerosol sulfate, except for two samples with a relatively high anthropogenic fraction in particles Arctic Ocean during the productive summer months.

  18. Convective forcing of mercury and ozone in the Arctic boundary layer induced by leads in sea ice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Christopher W; Obrist, Daniel; Steffen, Alexandra; Staebler, Ralf M; Douglas, Thomas A; Richter, Andreas; Nghiem, Son V

    2014-02-01

    The ongoing regime shift of Arctic sea ice from perennial to seasonal ice is associated with more dynamic patterns of opening and closing sea-ice leads (large transient channels of open water in the ice), which may affect atmospheric and biogeochemical cycles in the Arctic. Mercury and ozone are rapidly removed from the atmospheric boundary layer during depletion events in the Arctic, caused by destruction of ozone along with oxidation of gaseous elemental mercury (Hg(0)) to oxidized mercury (Hg(II)) in the atmosphere and its subsequent deposition to snow and ice. Ozone depletion events can change the oxidative capacity of the air by affecting atmospheric hydroxyl radical chemistry, whereas atmospheric mercury depletion events can increase the deposition of mercury to the Arctic, some of which can enter ecosystems during snowmelt. Here we present near-surface measurements of atmospheric mercury and ozone from two Arctic field campaigns near Barrow, Alaska. We find that coastal depletion events are directly linked to sea-ice dynamics. A consolidated ice cover facilitates the depletion of Hg(0) and ozone, but these immediately recover to near-background concentrations in the upwind presence of open sea-ice leads. We attribute the rapid recoveries of Hg(0) and ozone to lead-initiated shallow convection in the stable Arctic boundary layer, which mixes Hg(0) and ozone from undepleted air masses aloft. This convective forcing provides additional Hg(0) to the surface layer at a time of active depletion chemistry, where it is subject to renewed oxidation. Future work will need to establish the degree to which large-scale changes in sea-ice dynamics across the Arctic alter ozone chemistry and mercury deposition in fragile Arctic ecosystems.

  19. Convective forcing of mercury and ozone in the Arctic boundary layer induced by leads in sea ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Christopher W.; Obrist, Daniel; Steffen, Alexandra; Staebler, Ralf M.; Douglas, Thomas A.; Richter, Andreas; Nghiem, Son V.

    2014-02-01

    The ongoing regime shift of Arctic sea ice from perennial to seasonal ice is associated with more dynamic patterns of opening and closing sea-ice leads (large transient channels of open water in the ice), which may affect atmospheric and biogeochemical cycles in the Arctic. Mercury and ozone are rapidly removed from the atmospheric boundary layer during depletion events in the Arctic, caused by destruction of ozone along with oxidation of gaseous elemental mercury (Hg(0)) to oxidized mercury (Hg(II)) in the atmosphere and its subsequent deposition to snow and ice. Ozone depletion events can change the oxidative capacity of the air by affecting atmospheric hydroxyl radical chemistry, whereas atmospheric mercury depletion events can increase the deposition of mercury to the Arctic, some of which can enter ecosystems during snowmelt. Here we present near-surface measurements of atmospheric mercury and ozone from two Arctic field campaigns near Barrow, Alaska. We find that coastal depletion events are directly linked to sea-ice dynamics. A consolidated ice cover facilitates the depletion of Hg(0) and ozone, but these immediately recover to near-background concentrations in the upwind presence of open sea-ice leads. We attribute the rapid recoveries of Hg(0) and ozone to lead-initiated shallow convection in the stable Arctic boundary layer, which mixes Hg(0) and ozone from undepleted air masses aloft. This convective forcing provides additional Hg(0) to the surface layer at a time of active depletion chemistry, where it is subject to renewed oxidation. Future work will need to establish the degree to which large-scale changes in sea-ice dynamics across the Arctic alter ozone chemistry and mercury deposition in fragile Arctic ecosystems.

  20. Influence of ice thickness and surface properties on light transmission through Arctic sea ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katlein, C.; Arndt, S.; Nicolaus, M.; Perovich, D. K.; Jakuba, M.; Suman, S.; Elliott, S.; Whitcomb, L. L.; McFarland, C.; Gerdes, R.; Boetius, A.

    2015-12-01

    The changes in physical properties of sea ice such as decreased thickness and increased melt pond cover observed over the last decades severely impact the energy budget of Arctic sea ice. Increased light transmission leads to increased deposition of solar energy in the upper ocean and thus plays a crucial role in the amount and timing of sea-ice-melt and under-ice primary production. Recent developments in underwater technology provide new opportunities to undertake challenging research at the largely inaccessible underside of sea ice. We measured spectral under-ice radiance and irradiance onboard the new Nereid Under-Ice (NUI) underwater robotic vehicle, during a cruise of the R/V Polarstern to 83°N 6°W in the Arctic Ocean in July 2014. NUI is a next generation hybrid remotely operated vehicle (H-ROV) designed for both remotely-piloted and autonomous surveys underneath land-fast and moving sea ice. Here we present results from one of the first comprehensive scientific dives of NUI employing its interdisciplinary sensor suite. We combine under-ice optical measurements with three-dimensional under-ice topography and aerial images of the surface conditions. We investigate the influence of spatially varying ice-thickness and surface properties during summer on the spatial variability of light transmittance. Results show that surface properties dominate the spatial distribution of the under-ice light field on small scales (<1000m²), while sea ice-thickness is the most important predictor for light transmission on larger scales. In addition, we suggest an algorithm to obtain histograms of light transmission from distributions of sea ice thickness and surface albedo.

  1. Snow and sea ice thermodynamics in the Arctic: Model validation and sensitivity study against SHEBA data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Bin; Timo Vihma; ZHANG Zhan-hai; LI Zhi-jun; WU Hui-ding

    2008-01-01

    Evolution of the Arctic sea ice and its snow cover during the SHEBA year were simulated by applying a high-resolution thermodynamic snow/ice model (HIGHTSI). Attention was paid to the impact of albedo on snow and sea ice mass balance, effect of snow on total ice mass balance, and the model vertical resolution.The SHEBA annual simulation was made applying the best possible external forcing data set created by the Sea Ice Model Intercomparison Project. The HIGHTSI control run reasonably reproduced the observed snow and ice thickness. A number of albedo schemes were incorporated into HIGHTSI to study the feedhack processes between the albedo and snow and ice thickness. The snow thickness turned out to be an essential variable in the albedo parametetization. Albedo schemes dependent on the surface temperature were liable to excessive positive feedback effects generated by errors in the modelled surface temperature. The superimposed ice formation should be taken into account for the annual Arctic sea ice mass balance.

  2. The sensitivity of Arctic sea ice production to shelf flooding during the early Holocene: a modelling study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaschek, M.; Renssen, H.

    2012-04-01

    During the last deglaciation, the global sea-level started rising, changing the coastlines from an early Holocene stand (40 m lower than today at approximately 10 kyr BP, Siddall et al., 2003) to modern day coastlines. Proxy evidence shows that this transgression occurred non-uniformly over the globe. For instance, Bauch et al. (2001) report for the Laptev Sea (Arctic Ocean), that the modern coastline was only established at 5 kyr BP after a fast transgression from the early Holocene, leading to a flooding of the extensive shelf area. This shelf area is presently regarded to be an important production zone of Arctic sea ice, playing an important role in the dynamics of sea ice in the Arctic, as well as its export to the Nordic Seas along the East Greenland Current (EGC). Through this sea ice export, changes in the Laptev Sea shelf area during the Holocene could potentially have had a substantial impact on the sea surface conditions of the EGC, and the Denmark Strait, which is known to be sensitive to sea ice. This is consistent with a rapid increase in sea ice export through the EGC around 5 kyr BP as reported by Jennings et al. (2002). In this study we investigate the impact of this Arctic shelf flooding on sea ice production in the Holocene, and on the climate of the Nordic Seas in the LOVECLIM1.2 global ocean-atmosphere-vegetation model. We present results of several experiments in which we study the sensitivity of Arctic sea ice production to various Arctic shelf areas under early Holocene conditions (9 kyr BP). We approach this by changing the land-sea mask to represent different lower-than-present sea-level coastlines. For example, we perform experiments with the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) land-sea mask, representing a lowering of the sea-level by 120 m, while keeping other forcings at 9 kyr BP. A further step is to modify selected areas in the Arctic, such as the Laptev Sea area, to examine the importance of different areas. Our results help to explain long

  3. Robust seasonal cycle of Arctic sea ice area through tipping point in amplitude

    CERN Document Server

    Ditlevsen, Peter D

    2012-01-01

    The variation in the Arctic sea ice is dominated by the seasonal cycle with little inter-annual correlation. Though the mean sea ice area has decreased steadily in the period of satellite observations, a dramatic transition in the dynamics was initiated with the record low September ice area in 2007. The change is much more pronounced in the amplitude of the seasonal cycle than in the annual mean ice area. The shape of the seasonal cycle is surprisingly constant for the whole observational record despite the general decline. A simple explanation, independent of the increased greenhouse warming, for the shape of the seasonal cycle is offered. Thus the dramatic climate change in arctic ice area is seen in the amplitude of the cycle and to a lesser extend the annual mean and the summer ice extend. The reason why the climate change is most pronounced in the amplitude is related to the rapid reduction in perennial ice and thus a thinning of the ice. The analysis shows that a tipping point for the arctic ice area w...

  4. Bottom melting of Arctic Sea Ice in the Nansen Basin due to Atlantic Water influence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muilwijk, Morven; Smedsrud, Lars H.; Meyer, Amelie

    2016-04-01

    Our global climate is warming, and a shrinking Arctic sea ice cover remains one of the most visible signs of this warming. Sea Ice loss is now visible for all months in all regions of the Arctic. Hydrographic and current observations from a region north of Svalbard collected during the Norwegian Young Sea Ice Cruise (N-ICE2015) are presented here. Comparison with historical data shows that the new observations from January through June fill major gaps in available observations, and help describing important processes linking changes in regional Atlantic Water (AW) heat transport and sea ice. Warm and salty AW originating in the North Atlantic enters the Arctic Ocean through the Fram Strait and is present below the Arctic Sea Ice cover throughout the Arctic. However, the depth of AW varies by region and over time. In the region north of Svalbard, we assume that depth could be governed primarily by local processes, by upstream conditions of the ice cover (Northwards), or by upstream conditions of the AW (Southwards). AW carries heat corresponding to the volume transport of approximately 9 SV through Fram Strait, varying seasonally from 28 TW in winter to 46 TW in summer. Some heat is recirculated, but the net annual heat flux into the Arctic Ocean from AW is estimated to be around 40 TW. The Atlantic Water layer temperature at intermediate depths (150-900m) has increased in recent years. Until recently, maximum temperatures have been found to be 2-3 C in the Nansen Basin. Studies have shown that for example, in the West Spitsbergen Current the upper 50-200m shows an overall AW warming of 1.1 C since 1979. In general we expect efficient melting when AW is close to the surface. Previously the AW entering through Fram Strait has been considered as less important because changes in the sea ice cover have been connected to greater inflow of Pacific Water through Bering Strait and atmospheric forcing. Conversely it is now suggested that AW has direct impact on melting of

  5. Global warming effects on the Arctic and Sub-Arctic Seas

    OpenAIRE

    Nihoul, J.C.J.

    2009-01-01

    After a rather hydrostatic approach to global warming (mean earth temperature increasing, ice melting, sea level raising) one came to realize that the effects of global wan-ning were more of a hydrodynamic nature and that the ocean dynamics and its modifications in response to global warming constituted an essential factor. Taking into account the effect of global warming on ocean temperature distribution and currents contributed to a large extent to clarify the problem. The next step was obv...

  6. Inorganic carbon dynamics of melt pond-covered first year sea ice in the Canadian Arctic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geilfus, Nicolas-Xavier; Galley, R.J.; Crabeck, O.;

    2014-01-01

    Melt pond formation is a common feature of the spring and summer Arctic sea ice. However, the role of the melt ponds formation and the impact of the sea ice melt on both the direction and size of CO2 flux between air and sea is still unknown. Here we describe the CO2-carbonate chemistry of melting...... sea ice, melt ponds and the underlying seawater associated with measurement of CO2 fluxes across first year landfast sea ice in the Resolute Passage, Nunavut, in June 2012. Early in the melt season, the increase of the ice temperature and the subsequent decrease of the bulk ice salinity promote...... a strong decrease of the total alkalinity (TA), total dissolved inorganic carbon (TCO2) and partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) within the bulk sea ice and the brine. Later on, melt pond formation affects both the bulk sea ice and the brine system. As melt ponds are formed from melted snow the in situ melt pond...

  7. New Visualizations Highlight New Information on the Contrasting Arctic and Antarctic Sea-Ice Trends Since the Late 1970s

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, Claire L.; DiGirolamo, Nicolo E.

    2016-01-01

    Month-by-month ranking of 37 years (1979-2015) of satellite-derived sea-ice extents in the Arctic and Antarctic reveals interesting new details in the overall trends toward decreasing sea-ice coverage in the Arctic and increasing sea-ice coverage in the Antarctic. The Arctic decreases are so definitive that there has not been a monthly record high in Arctic sea-ice extents in any month since 1986, a time period during which there have been 75 monthly record lows. The Antarctic, with the opposite but weaker trend toward increased ice extents, experienced monthly record lows in 5 months of 1986, then 6 later monthly record lows scattered through the dataset, with the last two occurring in 2006, versus 45 record highs since 1986. However, in the last three years of the 1979-2015 dataset, the downward trends in Arctic sea-ice extents eased up, with no new record lows in any month of 2013 or 2014 and only one record low in 2015,while the upward trends in Antarctic ice extents notably strengthened, with new record high ice extents in 4 months (August-November) of 2013, in 6 months (April- September) of 2014, and in 3 months (January, April, and May) of 2015. Globally, there have been only 3 monthly record highs since 1986 (only one since 1988), whereas there have been 43 record lows, although the last record lows (in the 1979-2015 dataset) occurred in 2012.

  8. A 10,000-year record of Arctic Ocean sea-ice variability--view from the beach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funder, Svend; Goosse, Hugues; Jepsen, Hans; Kaas, Eigil; Kjær, Kurt H; Korsgaard, Niels J; Larsen, Nicolaj K; Linderson, Hans; Lyså, Astrid; Möller, Per; Olsen, Jesper; Willerslev, Eske

    2011-08-01

    We present a sea-ice record from northern Greenland covering the past 10,000 years. Multiyear sea ice reached a minimum between ~8500 and 6000 years ago, when the limit of year-round sea ice at the coast of Greenland was located ~1000 kilometers to the north of its present position. The subsequent increase in multiyear sea ice culminated during the past 2500 years and is linked to an increase in ice export from the western Arctic and higher variability of ice-drift routes. When the ice was at its minimum in northern Greenland, it greatly increased at Ellesmere Island to the west. The lack of uniformity in past sea-ice changes, which is probably related to large-scale atmospheric anomalies such as the Arctic Oscillation, is not well reproduced in models. This needs to be further explored, as it is likely to have an impact on predictions of future sea-ice distribution.

  9. A 10,000-Year Record of Arctic Ocean Sea-Ice Variability—View from the Beach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funder, Svend; Goosse, Hugues; Jepsen, Hans; Kaas, Eigil; Kjær, Kurt H.; Korsgaard, Niels J.; Larsen, Nicolaj K.; Linderson, Hans; Lyså, Astrid; Möller, Per; Olsen, Jesper; Willerslev, Eske

    2011-08-01

    We present a sea-ice record from northern Greenland covering the past 10,000 years. Multiyear sea ice reached a minimum between ~8500 and 6000 years ago, when the limit of year-round sea ice at the coast of Greenland was located ~1000 kilometers to the north of its present position. The subsequent increase in multiyear sea ice culminated during the past 2500 years and is linked to an increase in ice export from the western Arctic and higher variability of ice-drift routes. When the ice was at its minimum in northern Greenland, it greatly increased at Ellesmere Island to the west. The lack of uniformity in past sea-ice changes, which is probably related to large-scale atmospheric anomalies such as the Arctic Oscillation, is not well reproduced in models. This needs to be further explored, as it is likely to have an impact on predictions of future sea-ice distribution.

  10. Observations of Recent Arctic Sea Ice Volume Loss and Its Impact on Ocean-Atmosphere Energy Exchange and Ice Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtz, N. T.; Markus, T.; Farrell, S. L.; Worthen, D. L.; Boisvert, L. N.

    2011-01-01

    Using recently developed techniques we estimate snow and sea ice thickness distributions for the Arctic basin through the combination of freeboard data from the Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat) and a snow depth model. These data are used with meteorological data and a thermodynamic sea ice model to calculate ocean-atmosphere heat exchange and ice volume production during the 2003-2008 fall and winter seasons. The calculated heat fluxes and ice growth rates are in agreement with previous observations over multiyear ice. In this study, we calculate heat fluxes and ice growth rates for the full distribution of ice thicknesses covering the Arctic basin and determine the impact of ice thickness change on the calculated values. Thinning of the sea ice is observed which greatly increases the 2005-2007 fall period ocean-atmosphere heat fluxes compared to those observed in 2003. Although there was also a decline in sea ice thickness for the winter periods, the winter time heat flux was found to be less impacted by the observed changes in ice thickness. A large increase in the net Arctic ocean-atmosphere heat output is also observed in the fall periods due to changes in the areal coverage of sea ice. The anomalously low sea ice coverage in 2007 led to a net ocean-atmosphere heat output approximately 3 times greater than was observed in previous years and suggests that sea ice losses are now playing a role in increasing surface air temperatures in the Arctic.

  11. Relationships linking primary production, sea ice melting, and biogenic aerosol in the Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becagli, S.; Lazzara, L.; Marchese, C.; Dayan, U.; Ascanius, S. E.; Cacciani, M.; Caiazzo, L.; Di Biagio, C.; Di Iorio, T.; di Sarra, A.; Eriksen, P.; Fani, F.; Giardi, F.; Meloni, D.; Muscari, G.; Pace, G.; Severi, M.; Traversi, R.; Udisti, R.

    2016-07-01

    This study examines the relationships linking methanesulfonic acid (MSA, arising from the atmospheric oxidation of the biogenic dimethylsulfide, DMS) in atmospheric aerosol, satellite-derived chlorophyll a (Chl-a), and oceanic primary production (PP), also as a function of sea ice melting (SIM) and extension of the ice free area in the marginal ice zone (IF-MIZ) in the Arctic. MSA was determined in PM10 samples collected over the period 2010-2012 at two Arctic sites, Ny Ålesund (78.9°N, 11.9°E), Svalbard islands, and Thule Air Base (76.5°N, 68.8°W), Greenland. PP is calculated by means of a bio-optical, physiologically based, semi-analytical model in the potential source areas located in the surrounding oceanic regions (Barents and Greenland Seas for Ny Ålesund, and Baffin Bay for Thule). Chl-a peaks in May in the Barents sea and in the Baffin Bay, and has maxima in June in the Greenland sea; PP follows the same seasonal pattern of Chl-a, although the differences in absolute values of PP in the three seas during the blooms are less marked than for Chl-a. MSA shows a better correlation with PP than with Chl-a, besides, the source intensity (expressed by PP) is able to explain more than 30% of the MSA variability at the two sites; the other factors explaining the MSA variability are taxonomic differences in the phytoplanktonic assemblages, and transport processes from the DMS source areas to the sampling sites. The taxonomic differences are also evident from the slopes of the correlation plots between MSA and PP: similar slopes (in the range 34.2-36.2 ng m-3of MSA/(gC m-2 d-1)) are found for the correlation between MSA at Ny Ålesund and PP in Barents Sea, and between MSA at Thule and PP in the Baffin Bay; conversely, the slope of the correlation between MSA at Ny Ålesund and PP in the Greenland Sea in summer is smaller (16.7 ng m-3of MSA/(gC m-2 d-1)). This is due to the fact that DMS emission from the Barents Sea and Baffin Bay is mainly related to the MIZ

  12. Fluctuations and seasonality in the Arctic sea ice area: A sudden regime shift in 2007?

    CERN Document Server

    Ditlevsen, Peter D

    2013-01-01

    Since the beginning of satellite observations, the Arctic sea ice extent has shown a downward trend. The decline has been weaker in the March maximum than in the September minimum and masked by inter-annual fluctuations. One of the less understood aspects of the sea ice response is the persistence times for fluctuations, which could indicate the dominant physical processes behind the sea ice decline. To determine the fluctuation persistence times, however, it is necessary to first filter out the dominant effect of the seasonal cycle. In the current study, we thus develop a statistical model, which accurately decomposes the ice area changes into: (1) a variable seasonal cycle component with a constant shape and (2) a residual (short term) fluctuation. We find the persistence time of fluctuations to be only about three weeks, independently from season, which is substantially shorter than previously reported. Such short time scale points to the dominance of atmospheric forcing. The shape of the seasonal cycle is...

  13. Late Quaternary sea-ice history of northern Fram Strait/Arctic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremer, Anne; Stein, Rüdiger; Fahl, Kirsten; Matthießen, Jens; Forwick, Matthias; O'Regan, Matt

    2016-04-01

    One of the main characteristics of the Arctic Ocean is its seasonal to perennial sea-ice cover. Variations of sea-ice conditions affect the Earth's albedo, primary production, rate of deep-water etc.. During the last decades, a drastic decrease in sea ice has been recorded, and the causes of which, i.e., natural vs. anthropogenic forcings, and their relevance within the global climate system, are subject of intense scientific and societal debate. In this context, records of past sea-ice conditions going beyond instrumental records are of major significance. These records may help to better understand the processes controlling natural sea-ice variability and to improve models for forecasts of future climatic conditions. During RV Polarstern Cruise PS92 in summer 2015, a 860 cm long sediment core (PS92/039-2) was recovered from the eastern flank of Yermak Plateau north of the Svalbard archipelago (Peeken, 2015). Based on a preliminary age model, this sediment core probably represents the time interval from MIS 6 to MIS 1. This core, located close to the modern summer ice edge, has been selected for reconstruction of past Arctic sea-ice variability based on specific biomarkers. In this context, we have determined the ice-algae-derived sea-ice proxy IP25 (Belt et al., 2007), in combination with other biomarkers indicative for open-water conditions (cf., Müller et al., 2009, 2011). Furthermore, organic carbon fluxes were differentiated using specific biomarkers indicative for marine primary production (brassicasterol, dinosterol) and terrigenous input (campesterol, β-sitosterol). In this poster, preliminary results of our organic-geochemical and sedimentological investigations are presented. Distinct fluctuations of these biomarkers indicate several major, partly abrupt changes in sea-ice cover in the Yermak Plateau area during the late Quaternary. These changes are probably linked to changes in the inflow of Atlantic Water along the western coastline of Svalbard into

  14. Radioactive contamination of the Arctic Region, Baltic Sea, and the Sea of Japan from activities in the former Soviet Union

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contamination of the Arctic regions of northern Europe and Russia, as well as the Sea of Japan, may become a potential major hazard to the ecosystem of these large areas. Widespread poor radioactive waste management practices from nuclear fuel cycle activities in the former Soviet Union have resulted in direct discharges to this area as well as multiple sources that may continue to release additional radioactivity. Information on the discharges of radioactive materials has become more commonplace in the last year, and a clearer picture is emerging of the scale of the contamination. Radioactivity in the Arctic oceans is now reported to be four times higher than would be derived from fallout from weapons tests. Although the characteristics and extent of the contamination are not well known, it has been stated that the contamination in the Arctic may range from 1 to 3.5 billion curies. As yet, no scientific sampling or measurement program has occurred that can verify the amount or extent of the contamination, or its potential impact on the ecosystem

  15. Wave climate in the Arctic 1992-2014: seasonality, trends, and wave-ice influence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girard-Ardhuin, Fanny; Stopa, Justin; Ardhuin, Fabrice

    2016-04-01

    The diminishing sea ice has direct implications on the wave field which is mainly dependent on the ice-free area and wind. Over the past decade, the Arctic sea ice has diminished which directly impacts the wave field. This study characterizes the wave climate in the Arctic using detailed sea state information from a wave hindcast and merged altimeter dataset spanning 1992-2014. The waves are driven by winds from the Climate Forecast System Reanalysis. Ice concentrations derived from satellites with a grid spacing of 12.5 km are sufficiently able to resolve important features in the marginal ice zone. Before implementation, suitable wind forcing is identified and the validity and consistency of the wave hindcast is verified with altimeters. The seasonal ice advance and retreat largely dictates the waves and creates distinct features in the wind-waves and swells. The Nordic-Greenland Sea is dominated by swells from the North Atlantic while the coastal regions and semi-enclosed seas of the Kara, Laptev, Chukchi, and Beaufort have a more equal proportion of wind-waves and swells. Trends in the altimeters and model are in agreement and show increasing wave activities in the Baffin Bay, Beaufort, Chukchi, Laptev, and Kara Seas due to the loss of sea ice. In the Nordic-Greenland Sea, there is a decreasing trend related to changes in the wind field by North Atlantic Oscillation. The waves also influence the sea ice. Two distinctly different wave-ice environments are identified and selected events demonstrate the importance of waves in the marginal ice zone. The crux of the research identifies the need for continued study and improvement of wave-ice interaction.

  16. A Low Order Theory of Arctic Sea Ice Stability

    CERN Document Server

    Moon, W

    2011-01-01

    We analyze the stability of a low-order coupled sea ice and climate model and extract the essential physics governing the time scales of response as a function of greenhouse gas forcing. Under present climate conditions the stability is controlled by longwave radiation driven heat conduction. However, as greenhouse gas forcing increases and the ice cover decays, the destabilizing influence of ice-albedo feedback acts on equal footing with longwave stabilization. Both are seasonally out of phase and as the system warms towards a seasonal ice state these effects, which underlie the bifurcations between climate states, combine to extend the intrinsic relaxation time scale from ~ 2 yr to 5 yr.

  17. First Results from the ASIBIA (Arctic Sea-Ice, snow, Biogeochemistry and Impacts on the Atmosphere) Sea-Ice Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, M. M.; France, J.; von Glasow, R.; Thomas, M.

    2015-12-01

    The ocean-ice-atmosphere system is very complex, and there are numerous challenges with conducting fieldwork on sea-ice including costs, safety, experimental controls and access. By creating a new coupled Ocean-Sea-Ice-(Snow)-Atmosphere facility at the University of East Anglia, UK, we are able to perform controlled investigations in areas such as sea-ice physics, physicochemical and biogeochemical processes in sea-ice, and to quantify the bi-directional flux of gases in established, freezing and melting sea-ice. The environmental chamber is capable of controlled programmable temperatures from -55°C to +30°C, allowing a full range of first year sea-ice growing conditions in both the Arctic and Antarctic to be simulated. The sea-ice tank within the chamber measures 2.4 m x 1.4 m x 1 m water depth, with an identically sized Teflon film atmosphere on top of the tank. The tank and atmosphere forms a coupled, isolated mesocosm. Above the atmosphere is a light bank with dimmable solar simulation LEDs, and UVA and UVB broadband fluorescent battens, providing light for a range of experiments such as under ice biogeochemistry and photochemistry. Ice growth in the tank will be ideally suited for studying first-year sea-ice physical properties, with in-situ ice-profile measurements of temperature, salinity, conductivity, pressure and spectral light transmission. Under water and above ice cameras are installed to observe the physical development of the sea-ice. The ASIBIA facility is also well equipped for gas exchange and diffusion studies through sea-ice with a suite of climate relevant gas measuring instruments (CH4, CO2, O3, NOx, NOy permanently installed, further instruments available) able to measure either directly in the atmospheric component, or via a membrane for water side dissolved gases. Here, we present the first results from the ASIBIA sea-ice chamber, focussing on the physical development of first-year sea-ice and show the future plans for the facility over

  18. The role of Pacific water in the dramatic retreat of arctic sea ice during summer 2007

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jinlun; MI ke Steele; Rebecca Woodgate

    2008-01-01

    A model study is conducted to examine the role of Pacific water in the dramatic retreat of arctic sea ice during summer 2007. The model generally agrees with the observations in showing considerable seasonal and intcrannual variability of the Pacific water inflow at Bering Strait in response to changes in atmospheric circulation.During summer 2007 anomalously strong southerly winds over the Pacific sector of the Arctic Ocean strengthen the ocean circulation and bring more Pacific water into the Arctic than the recent (2000-2006) average. The simulated summer (3 months )2007 mean Pacific water inflow at Bering Strait is 1.2 Sv, which is the highest in the past three decades of the simulation and is 20% higher than the recent average. Particularly, the Pacific water inflow in September 2007 is about 0.5 Sv or 50% above the 2000-2006 average. The strengthened warm Pacific water inflow carries an additional 1.0 × 1020 Joules of heat into the Arctic, enough to melt an additional 0. 5 m of ice over the whole Chukchi Sea. In the model the extra summer oceanic heat brought in by the Pacific water mainly stays in the Chukchi and Beaufort region, contributing to the wanning of surface waters in that region. The heat is in constant contact with the ice cover in the region in July through September. Thus the Pacific water plays a role in ice melting in the Chukchi and Beaufort region all summer long in 2007, likely contributing to up to 0.5 m per month additional ice melting in some area of that region.

  19. Snow Cover on the Arctic Sea Ice: Model Validation, Sensitivity, and 21st Century Projections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blazey, Benjamin Andrew

    The role of snow cover in controlling Arctic Ocean sea ice thickness and extent is assessed with a series of models. Investigations with the stand alone Community Ice CodE (CICE) show, first, a reduction in snow depth triggers a decrease in ice volume and area, and, second, that the impact of increased snow is heavily dependent on ice and atmospheric conditions. Hindcast snow depths on the Arctic ice, simulated by the fully coupled Community Climate System Model (CCSM) are validated with 20th century in situ snow depth measurements. The snow depths in CCSM are found to be deeper than observed, likely due to excessive precipitation produced by the component atmosphere model. The sensitivity of the ice to the thermal barrier imposed by the biased snow depth is assessed. The removal of the thermodynamic impact of the exaggerated snow depth increases ice area and volume. The initial increases in ice due to enhanced conductive flux triggers feedback mechanisms with the atmosphere and ocean, reinforcing the increase in ice. Finally, the 21st century projections of decreased Arctic Ocean snow depth in CCSM are reported and diagnosed. The changes in snow are dominated by reduced accumulation due to the lack of autumn ice cover. Without this platform, much of the early snowfall is lost directly to the ocean. While this decrease in snow results in enhanced conductive flux through the ice as in the validation sensitivity experiment, the decreased summer albedo is found to dominate, as in the CICE stand alone sensitivity experiment. As such, the decrease in snow projected by CCSM in the 21st century presents a mechanism to continued ice loss. These negative (ice growth due decreased insulation) and positive (ice melt due to decreased albedo) feedback mechanisms highlight the need for an accurate representation snow cover on the ice in order to accurately simulate the evolution of Arctic Ocean sea ice.

  20. A near-uniform fluctuation of ocean bottom pressure and sea level across the deep ocean basins of the Arctic Ocean and the Nordic Seas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukumori, Ichiro; Wang, Ou; Llovel, William; Fenty, Ian; Forget, Gael

    2015-05-01

    Across the Arctic Ocean and the Nordic Seas, a basin-wide mode of ocean bottom pressure and sea level fluctuation is identified using satellite and in situ observations in conjunction with a global ocean circulation model and its adjoint. The variation extends across the interconnected deep ocean basins of these semi-enclosed Arctic seas, collectively called the Arctic Mediterranean, with spatially near-uniform amplitude and phase. The basin-wide fluctuation is barotropic and dominates the region's large-scale variability from sub-monthly to interannual timescales. The fluctuation results from bifurcating coastally trapped waves generated by winds along the continental slopes of the Arctic Mediterranean and its neighboring seas, including the North Atlantic Ocean. The winds drive Ekman transport across the large bathymetric gradients, forcing mass divergence between the shallow coastal area and the deep ocean basins and creating ocean bottom pressure anomalies of opposite signs in the two regions. The anomalies rapidly propagate away as barotropic coastally trapped waves with the coast and continental slope as respective boundaries. The waves subsequently bifurcate at the shallow straits connecting the Arctic Mediterranean with the rest of the globe. The straits transmit the shallow anomalies but not the deep variations, thereby inhibiting the anomalies' mutual cancelation by geographically separating the two. Anomalies that enter the deep Arctic basins equilibrate uniformly across the domain characterized by a homogeneous depth-integrated planetary potential vorticity distribution. The potential vorticity's steep gradient that borders the basins shields the region from neighboring shallow variations, giving rise to the observed spatially confined fluctuation. Compensating anomalies outside the Arctic adjust similarly across the rest of the globe but are comparatively negligible in amplitude because of the global ocean's larger area relative to that of the deep

  1. Seasonal Changes of Arctic Sea Ice Physical Properties Observed During N-ICE2015: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerland, S.; Spreen, G.; Granskog, M. A.; Divine, D.; Ehn, J. K.; Eltoft, T.; Gallet, J. C.; Haapala, J. J.; Hudson, S. R.; Hughes, N. E.; Itkin, P.; King, J.; Krumpen, T.; Kustov, V. Y.; Liston, G. E.; Mundy, C. J.; Nicolaus, M.; Pavlov, A.; Polashenski, C.; Provost, C.; Richter-Menge, J.; Rösel, A.; Sennechael, N.; Shestov, A.; Taskjelle, T.; Wilkinson, J.; Steen, H.

    2015-12-01

    Arctic sea ice is changing, and for improving the understanding of the cryosphere, data is needed to describe the status and processes controlling current seasonal sea ice growth, change and decay. We present preliminary results from in-situ observations on sea ice in the Arctic Basin north of Svalbard from January to June 2015. Over that time, the Norwegian research vessel «Lance» was moored to in total four ice floes, drifting with the sea ice and allowing an international group of scientists to conduct detailed research. Each drift lasted until the ship reached the marginal ice zone and ice started to break up, before moving further north and starting the next drift. The ship stayed within the area approximately 80°-83° N and 5°-25° E. While the expedition covered measurements in the atmosphere, the snow and sea ice system, and in the ocean, as well as biological studies, in this presentation we focus on physics of snow and sea ice. Different ice types could be investigated: young ice in refrozen leads, first year ice, and old ice. Snow surveys included regular snow pits with standardized measurements of physical properties and sampling. Snow and ice thickness were measured at stake fields, along transects with electromagnetics, and in drillholes. For quantifying ice physical properties and texture, ice cores were obtained regularly and analyzed. Optical properties of snow and ice were measured both with fixed installed radiometers, and from mobile systems, a sledge and an ROV. For six weeks, the surface topography was scanned with a ground LIDAR system. Spatial scales of surveys ranged from spot measurements to regional surveys from helicopter (ice thickness, photography) during two months of the expedition, and by means of an array of autonomous buoys in the region. Other regional information was obtained from SAR satellite imagery and from satellite based radar altimetry. The analysis of the data collected has started, and first results will be

  2. Variation in nematode assemblages over multiple spatial scales and environmental conditions in Arctic deep seas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Gustavo; Soltwedel, Thomas; Vanreusel, Ann; Lindegarth, Mats

    2010-03-01

    Although the comparison of relevant scales of variation is a prerequisite for understanding processes structuring benthic communities, deep-sea studies have traditionally examined spatial patterns of distribution of assemblages along a single scale or environmental gradient. A multiple-scale approach identifying which spatial-scale and associated environmental gradient is the most important in structuring the deep-sea benthos has never been attempted. To answer this question this study merged three independent data sets of nematodes from the Arctic deep seas. The data set included 300 samples and covered both margins of the Arctic Seas (Greenland and Norway-Spitsbergen, ca. 10 3 km distant apart), seven degrees of latitude (72-79°N), 2700 m depth differences (656-3350 m), horizontal distances between cores (20 cm) and vertical distances within the uppermost sediment layers (1-5 cm). Results showed that for abundance (N) and generic composition, differences between margins (M) and between cores (C) were the most important sources of variability, followed by water depth (D), vertical distribution within the sediment (VD) and latitude ( L). For species and genera diversity, measured as ES(50) and EG(50), the order was slightly different. For species, C was the most important source of variability, followed by D, M and L, while for genera VD was the most important. Relationships between environmental variables and the fauna were highly dependent on scale indicating that, at least for the deep-sea environment, we cannot predict the structure of nematode assemblages by scaling up or down results obtained on one or another scale. The only consistent pattern across different spatial scales was that higher abundances were associated with higher number and lower turnover of species. This raises the hypothesis that the most abundant species are also the most widespread and that abundance is the best predictor of nematode diversity patterns in deep-sea ecosystems.

  3. Pathways of Atlantic Waters into the Arctic Ocean: Eddy-permitting ocean and sea ice simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wekerle, Claudia; von Appen, Wilken-Jon; Danilov, Sergey; Jung, Thomas; Kanzow, Torsten; Schauer, Ursula; Timmermann, Ralph; Wang, Qiang

    2015-04-01

    Fram Strait is the only deep gateway connecting the central Arctic with the North Atlantic. Boundary currents on each side are responsible for the exchange of water masses between the Arctic and North Atlantic. The East Greenland Current (EGC) carries fresh and cold Arctic waters and sea ice southward, whereas the West Spitsbergen Current (WSC) carries warm Atlantic Waters (AW) into the Arctic Ocean. The complex topography in Fram Strait leads to a branching of the northward flowing WSC, with one branch recirculating between 78°N and 81°N which then joins the EGC. To date, the dynamics as well as the precise location of this recirculation are unclear. The goal of this research project is to quantify the amount and variability of AW which recirculates immediately in Fram Strait, and to investigate the role of atmospheric forcing and oceanic meso-scale eddies for the recirculation. We use simulations carried out with a global configuration of the Finite Element Sea ice-Ocean Model (FESOM) at eddy-permitting scales. The advantage of this model is the finite element discretization of the governing equations, which allows us to locally refine the mesh in areas of interest and keep it coarse in other parts of the global oceans without the need for traditional nesting. Here we will show the first results of the model validation. The model has ~9 km resolution in the Nordic Seas and Fram Strait and 1 deg south of 50°N. We assess the model capabilities in simulating the ocean circulation in the Nordic Seas and Fram Strait by comparing with the available observational data, e.g. with data from the Fram Strait oceanographic mooring array. The ocean volume and heat transport from the Atlantic Ocean into the Nordic Seas and at the Fram Strait are analyzed. Our results show that the model can capture some of the observed key ocean properties in our region of interest, while some tuning is required to further improve the model. In the next phase of this project we will focus

  4. The Arctic Ocean marine carbon cycle: evaluation of air-sea CO2 exchanges, ocean acidification impacts and potential feedbacks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. R. Bates

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available At present, although seasonal sea-ice cover mitigates atmosphere-ocean gas exchange, the Arctic Ocean takes up carbon dioxide (CO2 on the order of −66 to −199 Tg C year−1 (1012 g C, contributing 5–14% to the global balance of CO2 sinks and sources. Because of this, the Arctic Ocean has an important influence on the global carbon cycle, with the marine carbon cycle and atmosphere-ocean CO2 exchanges sensitive to Arctic Ocean and global climate change feedbacks. In the near-term, further sea-ice loss and increases in phytoplankton growth rates are expected to increase the uptake of CO2 by Arctic Ocean surface waters, although mitigated somewhat by surface warming in the Arctic. Thus, the capacity of the Arctic Ocean to uptake CO2 is expected to alter in response to environmental changes driven largely by climate. These changes are likely to continue to modify the physics, biogeochemistry, and ecology of the Arctic Ocean in ways that are not yet fully understood. In surface waters, sea-ice melt, river runoff, cooling and uptake of CO2 through air-sea gas exchange combine to decrease the calcium carbonate (CaCO3 mineral saturation states (Ω of seawater while seasonal phytoplankton primary production (PP mitigates this effect. Biological amplification of ocean acidification effects in subsurface waters, due to the remineralization of organic matter, is likely to reduce the ability of many species to produce CaCO3 shells or tests with profound implications for Arctic marine ecosystems

  5. Diatom vertical migration within land-fast Arctic sea ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aumack, C. F.; Juhl, A. R.; Krembs, C.

    2014-11-01

    Light levels inside first-year, landfast sea ice were experimentally altered by manipulating overlying snow depths. Irradiance available for ice algae growing near the ice-bottom, and under the ice, was highly dependent on snow depths ranging from 0 to > 30 cm. Importantly, algal vertical distributions also changed under different irradiances. Under thick snow (low light), the majority of algae were found several cm above the ice-seawater interface, while progressively more were found nearer the interface at locations with thinner overlying snow (higher light). Short-term field experiments suggested that ice algae were able to reposition themselves within the ice column within 3 days after manipulating snow depths. Laboratory gliding rate measurements of a cultured ice diatom suggested that it is capable of daily cm-scale movement. Vertical migration may help ice diatoms balance opposing light and nutrient resource gradients, similar to strategies used by some benthic and pelagic algae. Moreover, when ice algae congregate near the ice-seawater interface, they may be especially susceptible to loss from the ice environment. Vertical repositioning in response to changing light dynamics may be a mechanism to optimize between vertically-opposing environmental factors and help explain the connection between melting snow cover and export of biomass from sea ice.

  6. Radar and infrared remote sensing of terrain, water resources, arctic sea ice, and agriculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biggs, A. W.

    1983-01-01

    Radar range measurements, basic waveforms of radar systems, and radar displays are initially described. These are followed by backscatter from several types of terrain and vegetation as a function of frequency and grazing angle. Analytical models for this backscatter include the facet models of radar return, with range-angle, velocity-range, velocity-angle, range, velocity, and angular only discriminations. Several side-looking airborne radar geometries are presented. Radar images of Arctic sea ice, fresh water lake ice, cloud-covered terrain, and related areas are presented to identify applications of radar imagery. Volume scatter models are applied to radar imagery from alpine snowfields. Short pulse ice thickness radar for subsurface probes is discussed in fresh-water ice and sea ice detection. Infrared scanners, including multispectral, are described. Diffusion of cold water into a river, Arctic sea ice, power plant discharges, volcanic heat, and related areas are presented in thermal imagery. Multispectral radar and infrared imagery are discussed, with comparisons of photographic, infrared, and radar imagery of the same terrain or subjects.

  7. Sea-ice freeboard heights in the Arctic Ocean from ICESat and airborne lidar - a comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skourup, H.; Forsberg, R.

    2005-12-01

    Two near-coincident tracks of ICESat/GLAS and airborne scanning airborne lidar data were acquired on May 25, 2004, in the Arctic Ocean north of Greenland, in an area of thick perennial sea-ice with few open leads and numerous large ridges. The airborne lidar data, having a relative accuracy of few cm and 1 m spatial resolution, provide an excellent quantification of the ability of ICESat to detect and model sea-ice features such as leads and ridges, as well as gaining insight into the expected ICESat waveforms over heavily deformed sea-ice. In the paper we outline the underflight experiment and hardware, as well as show examples of the good fit between ICESat and filtered airborne data, matching the ICESat footprint. We also compare the observed ICESat waveforms to the airborne data, as well as quantify the biases induced by "lowest-level" filtering techniques in this particular area. We conclude by showing examples of Arctic Ocean-wide freeboard heights derived from ICESat by an improved "lowest-level" technique, showing good overall correlation to Quikscat multi-year ice distribution and expected seasonal changes.

  8. Interplay between linear, dissipative and permanently critical mechanical processes in Arctic sea ice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Chmel

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical processes in the Arctic ice pack result in fragmented sea ice cover, the regular geometry of which could be described in main features in terms of the conventional mechanics. However, the size distribution of sea ice floes does not exhibit the random (poissonian-like statistics and follows the power law typical for self-similar (fractal structures. The analysis of ice floe oscillations in the frequency range specific for cracking, shearing and stick-slip motion evidences the self-organized dynamics of sea ice fracturing, which manifests itself in scaling distributions of both the discrete energy discharges in fracture events and the recurrence times between that one. So determined space-time-energy self-similarity characterises the ice pack as the non-equilibrium, nonlinear thermodynamic system where the synergic relations are established through conventional long propagating wave/oscillations. The presented experimental data were collected at the Russian ice-research camp "North Pole 35" drifting on the Arctic ice pack in 2008.

  9. The seasonal foot printing mechanism of spring Arctic sea ice in the Bergen climate models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Dong; GAO Yongqi; GONG Daoyi

    2014-01-01

    The inlfuence of spring Arctic sea ice variability on the Paciifc Decadal Oscillation (PDO) like sea surface temperature (SST) variability is established and investigated using an Atmosphere Ocean General Circulation Model (AOGCM) of the Bergen Climate Model version 2 (BCM2). The spring Arctic sea ice variability affects the mid-latitudes and tropics through the propagation of the anomalous Eliassen-Palm (E-P) lfux from the polar region to mid- and low-latitudes during boreal spring. The pathway includes anomalous upward wave activity, which propagates to the high troposphere from near the surface of the polar region, turns southward between 500 hPa and 200 hPa and extends downward between 50°N and 70°N, influencing the near surface atmospheric circulation. The alteration of the near surface atmospheric circulation then causes anomalous surface ocean circulation. These circulation changes consequently leads to the SST anomalies in the North Paciifc which may persist until the following summer, named seasonal “foot printing” mechanism (SFPM).

  10. Projected polar bear sea ice habitat in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen G Hamilton

    Full Text Available Sea ice across the Arctic is declining and altering physical characteristics of marine ecosystems. Polar bears (Ursus maritimus have been identified as vulnerable to changes in sea ice conditions. We use sea ice projections for the Canadian Arctic Archipelago from 2006 - 2100 to gain insight into the conservation challenges for polar bears with respect to habitat loss using metrics developed from polar bear energetics modeling.Shifts away from multiyear ice to annual ice cover throughout the region, as well as lengthening ice-free periods, may become critical for polar bears before the end of the 21st century with projected warming. Each polar bear population in the Archipelago may undergo 2-5 months of ice-free conditions, where no such conditions exist presently. We identify spatially and temporally explicit ice-free periods that extend beyond what polar bears require for nutritional and reproductive demands.Under business-as-usual climate projections, polar bears may face starvation and reproductive failure across the entire Archipelago by the year 2100.

  11. Kara Smigel Croker | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kara Smigel Croker is the Communications Manager for the National Cancer Institute Division of Cancer Prevention. She coordinates and supports all aspects of communication, including media contacts, writing and editing of reports and responses, divisional websites, and social media. |

  12. Waveform classification of airborne synthetic aperture radar altimeter over Arctic sea ice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Zygmuntowska

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Sea ice thickness is one of the most sensitive variables in the Arctic climate system. In order to quantify changes in sea ice thickness, CryoSat-2 was launched in 2010 carrying a Ku-band radar altimeter (SIRAL designed to measure sea ice freeboard with a few centimeters accuracy. The instrument uses the synthetic aperture radar technique providing signals with a resolution of about 300 m along track. In this study, airborne Ku-band radar altimeter data over different sea ice types have been analyzed. A set of parameters has been defined to characterize the differences in strength and width of the returned power waveforms. With a Bayesian-based method, it is possible to classify about 80% of the waveforms from three parameters: maximum of the returned power waveform, the trailing edge width and pulse peakiness. Furthermore, the maximum of the power waveform can be used to reduce the number of false detections of leads, compared to the widely used pulse peakiness parameter. For the pulse peakiness the false classification rate is 12.6% while for the power maximum it is reduced to 6.5%. The ability to distinguish between different ice types and leads allows us to improve the freeboard retrieval and the conversion from freeboard into sea ice thickness, where surface type dependent values for the sea ice density and snow load can be used.

  13. Waveform analysis of airborne synthetic aperture radar altimeter over Arctic sea ice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Zygmuntowska

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Sea ice thickness is one of the most sensitive variables in the Arctic climate system. In order to quantify changes in sea ice thickness, CryoSat was launched in 2010 carrying a Ku-band Radar Altimeter (SIRAL designed to measure sea ice freeboard with a few centimeters accuracy. The instrument uses the synthetic aperture radar technique providing signals with a resolution of about 300 m along track. In this study, airborne Ku-band radar altimeter data over different sea ice types has been analyzed. A set of parameters has been defined to characterize the difference in strength and width of the returned power waveforms. With a Bayesian based method it is possible to classify about 80% of the waveforms by three parameters: maximum of the returned power echo, the trailing edge width and pulse peakiness. Furthermore, the radar power echo maximum can be used to minimize the rate of false detection of leads compared to the widely used Pulse Peakiness parameter. The possibility to distinguish between different ice types and open water allows to improve the freeboard retrieval and the conversion into sea ice thickness where surface type dependent values for the sea ice density and snow load can be used.

  14. Arctic climate response to forcing from light-absorbing particles in snow and sea ice in CESM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Goldenson

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The presence of light-absorbing aerosol particles deposited on arctic snow and sea ice influences the surface albedo, causing greater shortwave absorption, warming, and loss of snow and sea ice, lowering the albedo further. The Community Earth System Model version 1 (CESM1 now includes the radiative effects of light-absorbing particles in snow on land and sea ice and in sea ice itself. We investigate the model response to the deposition of black carbon and dust to both snow and sea ice. For these purposes we employ a slab ocean version of CESM1, using the Community Atmosphere Model version 4 (CAM4, run to equilibrium for year 2000 levels of CO2 and fixed aerosol deposition. We construct experiments with and without aerosol deposition, with dust or black carbon deposition alone, and with varying quantities of black carbon and dust to approximate year 1850 and 2000 deposition fluxes. The year 2000 deposition fluxes of both dust and black carbon cause 1–2 °C of surface warming over large areas of the Arctic Ocean and sub-Arctic seas in autumn and winter and in patches of Northern land in every season. Atmospheric circulation changes are a key component of the surface-warming pattern. Arctic sea ice thins by on average about 30 cm. Simulations with year 1850 aerosol deposition are not substantially different from those with year 2000 deposition, given constant levels of CO2. The climatic impact of particulate impurities deposited over land exceeds that of particles deposited over sea ice. Even the surface warming over the sea ice and sea ice thinning depends more upon light-absorbing particles deposited over land. For CO2 doubled relative to year 2000 levels, the climate impact of particulate impurities in snow and sea ice is substantially lower than for the year 2000 equilibrium simulation.

  15. Comparison of air-sea fluxes of CO2 in the Southern Ocean and the western Arctic Ocean

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Liqi; GAO Zhongyong; YANG Xulin; WANG Weiqiang

    2004-01-01

    The data were collected during Chinese Arctic and Antarctic Expeditions in the western Arctic Ocean and the marginal sea ice zone (MSIZ) of the Southern Ocean, respectively in the boreal summer from July to September of 1999 and in the austral summer from December of 1999 to January of 2000. The concentrations of CO2 in surface water of the survey regions would mostly present lower than those in the atmosphere. A significant biological driving force could also been observed in summer waters in both of the above oceans. Air to sea CO2 fluxes were also calculated to compare oceanic uptake capacity of CO2 in both oceans with the world oceans using Liss, Wanninkhof,and Jacobs' s methods. The averaged CO2 fluxes of air to sea in the western Arctic Ocean or in the MSIZ of the Southern Ocean doubled that in the world oceans.

  16. Halogen-based reconstruction of Russian Arctic sea ice area from the Akademii Nauk ice core (Severnaya Zemlya)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spolaor, A.; Opel, T.; McConnell, J. R.; Maselli, O. J.; Spreen, G.; Varin, C.; Kirchgeorg, T.; Fritzsche, D.; Saiz-Lopez, A.; Vallelonga, P.

    2016-01-01

    The role of sea ice in the Earth climate system is still under debate, although it is known to influence albedo, ocean circulation, and atmosphere-ocean heat and gas exchange. Here we present a reconstruction of 1950 to 1998 AD sea ice in the Laptev Sea based on the Akademii Nauk ice core (Severnaya Zemlya, Russian Arctic). The chemistry of halogens bromine (Br) and iodine (I) is strongly active and influenced by sea ice dynamics, in terms of physical, chemical and biological process. Bromine reacts on the sea ice surface in autocatalyzing "bromine explosion" events, causing an enrichment of the Br / Na ratio and hence a bromine excess (Brexc) in snow compared to that in seawater. Iodine is suggested to be emitted from algal communities growing under sea ice. The results suggest a connection between Brexc and spring sea ice area, as well as a connection between iodine concentration and summer sea ice area. The correlation coefficients obtained between Brexc and spring sea ice (r = 0.44) as well as between iodine and summer sea ice (r = 0.50) for the Laptev Sea suggest that these two halogens could become good candidates for extended reconstructions of past sea ice changes in the Arctic.

  17. The Hydromedusae and its distribution in Chukchi Sea and adjacent southern edge waters of Canada Basin, Arctic Ocean

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张金标; 林茂

    2001-01-01

    The present paper is based on materials collected in Chukchi Sea and adjacent southern edge waters of Canada Basin, Arctic Ocean during the period from July to August 1999 on the icebreaker, the R/V “Xuelong”, by the Chinese First Arctic Scientific Expedition. Totally, 8 species of pelagic Hydromedusae were identified, of which 4 species belonged to Anthomedusae, 2 species to Leptomedusae, 1 species to Trachymedusae and 1 species to Narcomedusae, the Neoturris breviconis is recorded for the first time in Chukchi Sea. Their principal morphological characteristics are described and illustrated. The 8 species of Hydromedusae occurring in the Chukchi Sea were all cold water species, of which 6 species belong to neritic species and 2 species to ocean species. According to the geographic distribution of species, they may be divided into three groups: Arctic species, Arctic-boreal species and Boreal-temperate species. From the view-point of zoogeography, species from these waters belong to the Arctic fauna.The abundance of Hydromedusae in Chukchi Sea was generally low, with a mean value of 108 ind.*10-2*m-3. Rathkea octopunctata and Aglantha digitale were dominant species. From the view-point of vertical distribution Aglantha digitale is inhabiting in the depth of 0 300 m and with the maximum in the depth of 50 m to 100 m.

  18. Modeling ocean and sea ice dynamics of the Canadian Arctic Archipelago: Aspects of forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wekerle, Claudia; Wang, Qiang; Danilov, Sergey; Myers, Paul G.; Jung, Thomas; Schröter, Jens

    2013-04-01

    The Canadian Arctic Archipelago (CAA) is one of the main pathways for freshwater exiting the Arctic Ocean. Freshwater exported to the North Atlantic may influence the deep water formation in the Labrador Sea, and thus the meridional overturning circulation. Modeling ocean and sea ice conditions of the CAA is difficult because of narrow straits and complex coastlines. The Finite-Element Sea-ice Ocean circulation Model (FESOM) configured on a global mesh is applied to assess the volume, freshwater and sea ice transports through the CAA. With a mesh resolution of 5 km in the CAA we are able to accurately resolve complex coastlines. Outside the CAA the mesh is refined to 24 km north of 55°N with a global background resolution of 1.5°. In this study, first, it is shown that the transports modeled with FESOM correlate well with the available observational data. Second, the model is used to learn about the impact of different atmospheric forcing datasets differing in spatial and temporal resolution (CORE 2 and the Reforecast dataset from Environment Canada). The CORE 2 dataset is on the T62 grid, which is coarse compared to the Reforecast dataset with grid resolution of 0.45° longitude and 0.3° latitude. The temporal resolution of the Reforecast dataset is higher than the CORE 2 dataset (one hourly and 6-hourly data, respectively, for wind, surface temperature and specific humidity fields). The representation of sea ice in the CAA can be improved by using the high resolution atmospheric forcing.

  19. Increased Arctic Sea Ice Drift Alters Polar Bear Movements and Energetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, D. C.; Durner, G. M.; Albeke, S. E.; Whiteman, J. P.; Amstrup, S. C.; Richardson, E.; Wilson, R. R.; Ben-David, M.

    2015-12-01

    Recent thinning of Arctic sea ice has increased its drift from currents and winds. Increased ice drift could affect movements and energy balance of polar bears (Ursus maritimus) which rely, almost exclusively, on this substrate for hunting seals. Foraging by polar bears is a relatively sedentary behavior, as they typically capture their main prey by waiting at breathing holes, where seals haul-out along leads, or by short-distance stalking. We examined the response of polar bears to ice drift in the Beaufort (BS) and Chukchi (CS) seas, and between two periods with different sea ice characteristics: 1987-1998 and 1999-2013. We used satellite-tracked adult female polar bear locations, standardized by a continuous-time correlated random walk, coupled with modeled ice drift, to estimate displacement and drift-corrected bear movements along east-west and north-south axes. Sea ice drift in both regions increased with greater westward and more extreme northward and southward rates from 1987-1998 to 1999-2013. Polar bears responded with greater eastward movements and, in the CS greater movements north and south. We show that efforts by polar bears to compensate for greater westward ice drift in recent years translated into a model-derived estimate of 5.7-7.2% increase in energy expenditure. We also estimated that polar bears increased their travel time 18-20% between the two time periods, suggesting time allocated to foraging was reduced. Increased energetic costs and travel time resulting from greater ice drift, in conjunction with ongoing habitat loss, suggest that recent changes to Arctic sea ice may affect movements and energy balance of polar bears.

  20. Distribution and sources of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in surface sediments from the Bering Sea and western Arctic Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Mengwei; Wang, Weiguo; Liu, Yanguang; Dong, Linsen; Jiao, Liping; Hu, Limin; Fan, Dejiang

    2016-03-15

    To analyze the distribution and sources of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and evaluate their potential ecological risks, the concentrations of 16 PAHs were measured in 43 surface sediment samples from the Bering Sea and western Arctic Ocean. Total PAH (tPAH) concentrations ranged from 36.95 to 150.21 ng/g (dry weight). In descending order, the surface sediment tPAH concentrations were as follows: Canada Basin>northern Chukchi Sea>Chukchi Basin>southern Chukchi Sea>Aleutian Basin>Makarov Basin>Bering Sea shelf. The Bering Sea and western Arctic Ocean mainly received PAHs of pyrogenic origin due to pollution caused by the incomplete combustion of fossil fuels. The concentrations of PAHs in the sediments of the study areas did not exceed effects range low (ERL) values. PMID:26806662

  1. Arctic sea-ice melting: Effects on hydroclimatic variability and on UV-induced carbon cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulzberger, Barbara

    2016-04-01

    Since 1980 both the perennial and the multiyear central Arctic sea ice areas have declined by approximately 13 and 15% per decade, respectively (IPCC, 2013). Arctic sea-ice melting has led to an increase in the amplitude of the Northern Hemisphere jet stream and, as a consequence, in more slowly moving Rossby waves which results in blocking of weather patterns such as heat waves, droughts, cold spells, and heavy precipitation events (Francis and Vavrus, 2012). Changing Rossby waves account for more than 30% of the precipitation variability over several regions of the northern middle and high latitudes, including the US northern Great Plains and parts of Canada, Europe, and Russia (Schubert et al., 2011). From 2007 to 2013, northern Europe experienced heavy summer precipitation events that were unprecedented in over a century, concomitant with Arctic sea ice loss (Screen, 2013). Heavy precipitation events tend to increase the runoff intensity of terrigenous dissolved organic matter (tDOM) (Haaland et al., 2010). In surface waters tDOM is subject to UV-induced oxidation to produce atmospheric CO2. Mineralization of DOM also occurs via microbial respiration. However, not all chemical forms of DOM are available to bacterioplankton. UV-induced transformations generally increase the bioavailability of tDOM (Sulzberger and Durisch-Kaiser, 2009). Mineralization of tDOM is an important source of atmospheric CO2 and this process is likely to contribute to positive feedbacks on global warming (Erickson et al., 2015). However, the magnitudes of these potential feedbacks remain unexplored. This paper will discuss the following items: 1.) Links between Arctic sea-ice melting, heavy precipitation events, and enhanced tDOM runoff. 2.) UV-induced increase in the bioavailability of tDOM. 3.) UV-mediated feedbacks on global warming. References Erickson, D. J. III, B. Sulzberger, R. G. Zepp, A. T. Austin (2015), Effects of stratospheric ozone depletion, solar UV radiation, and climate

  2. U.S. Geological Survery Oil and Gas Resource Assessment of the Russian Arctic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donald Gautier; Timothy Klett

    2008-12-31

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) recently completed a study of undiscovered petroleum resources in the Russian Arctic as a part of its Circum-Arctic Resource Appraisal (CARA), which comprised three broad areas of work: geological mapping, basin analysis, and quantitative assessment. The CARA was a probabilistic, geologically based study that used existing USGS methodology, modified somewhat for the circumstances of the Arctic. New map compilation was used to identify assessment units. The CARA relied heavily on geological analysis and analog modeling, with numerical input consisting of lognormal distributions of sizes and numbers of undiscovered accumulations. Probabilistic results for individual assessment units were statistically aggregated, taking geological dependencies into account. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funds were used to support the purchase of crucial seismic data collected in the Barents Sea, East Siberian Sea, and Chukchi Sea for use by USGS in its assessment of the Russian Arctic. DOE funds were also used to purchase a commercial study, which interpreted seismic data from the northern Kara Sea, and for geographic information system (GIS) support of USGS mapping of geological features, province boundaries, total petroleum systems, and assessment units used in the USGS assessment.

  3. Horizontal distribution patterns in Arctic deep-sea macrobenthic communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budaeva, Nataliya E.; Mokievsky, Vadim O.; Soltwedel, Thomas; Gebruk, Andrey V.

    2008-09-01

    Horizontal distribution patterns of macrobenthos were studied based on the material collected at the deep-sea long-term observatory HAUSGARTEN in Fram Strait, west of Spitsbergen (79°N), during the R.V. Polarstern expedition ARK XIX/3c in July-August 2003. Macrofauna was obtained with a giant box corer at water depths of about 2500-2600 m. Samples were arranged using a hierarchical approach to analyze benthic fauna distribution at different scales. Three stations were distributed along the 26 km transect. Three cores (0.25 m 2) were taken at each station. Five subcores (156.25 cm 2) were taken from each core. Both qualitative and quantitative methods of statistical analysis showed that all samples belong to one benthic community dominated by three species, Tetractinomorpha gen.sp. A, Myriochele heeri, and Galathowenia fragilis. Total biomasses varied from 2.31 to 6.41 g ww m -2 and densities ranged from 1976 to 3254 ind. m -2. Multivariate analysis showed the division of all samples into two distinct groups (species assemblages) on the core and subcore levels. These assemblages occupied an area several kilometers across, and differed from each other. The second level of heterogeneity occurs between cores and subcores of assemblage B and reflects variations in the abundance of sponge species Tetractinomorpha gen. sp. A. The size of these small patches appears to be about 150 cm 2. The hierarchical organization of benthic macrofauna on the continental slope off Spitsbergen includes at least three levels: communities, which replace each other along the depth gradient, species assemblages, which make up the orthogonal inner mosaics in each vertical zone, and patches of certain species, which form the lowest level of the hierarchy.

  4. On the influence of model physics on simulations of Arctic and Antarctic sea ice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Massonnet

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Two hindcast (1983–2007 simulations are performed with the global, ocean-sea ice models NEMO-LIM2 and NEMO-LIM3 driven by atmospheric reanalyses and climatologies. The two simulations differ only in their sea ice component, while all other elements of experimental design (resolution, initial conditions, atmospheric forcing are kept identical. The main differences in the sea ice models lie in the formulation of the subgrid-scale ice thickness distribution, of the thermodynamic processes, of the sea ice salinity and of the sea ice rheology. To assess the differences in model skill over the period of investigation, we develop a set of metrics for both hemispheres, comparing the main sea ice variables (concentration, thickness and drift to available observations and focusing on both mean state and seasonal to interannual variability. Based upon these metrics, we discuss the physical processes potentially responsible for the differences in model skill. In particular, we suggest that (i a detailed representation of the ice thickness distribution increases the seasonal to interannual variability of ice extent, with spectacular improvement for the simulation of the recent observed summer Arctic sea ice retreats, (ii the elastic-viscous-plastic rheology enhances the response of ice to wind stress, compared to the classical viscous-plastic approach, (iii the grid formulation and the air-sea ice drag coefficient affect the simulated ice export through Fram Strait and the ice accumulation along the Canadian Archipelago, and (iv both models show less skill in the Southern Ocean, probably due to the low quality of the reanalyses in this region and to the absence of important small-scale oceanic processes at the models' resolution (~1°.

  5. Towards an Automatic Ice Navigation Support System in the Arctic Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xintao Liu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Conventional ice navigation in the sea is manually operated by well-trained navigators, whose experiences are heavily relied upon to guarantee the ship’s safety. Despite the increasingly available ice data and information, little has been done to develop an automatic ice navigation support system to better guide ships in the sea. In this study, using the vector-formatted ice data and navigation codes in northern regions, we calculate ice numeral and divide sea area into two parts: continuous navigable area and the counterpart numerous separate unnavigable area. We generate Voronoi Diagrams for the obstacle areas and build a road network-like graph for connections in the sea. Based on such a network, we design and develop a geographic information system (GIS package to automatically compute the safest-and-shortest routes for different types of ships between origin and destination (OD pairs. A visibility tool, Isovist, is also implemented to help automatically identify safe navigable areas in emergency situations. The developed GIS package is shared online as an open source project called NavSpace, available for validation and extension, e.g., indoor navigation service. This work would promote the development of ice navigation support system and potentially enhance the safety of ice navigation in the Arctic sea.

  6. Postglacial sea-level rise and its impact on the circum-arctic Holocene climate evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauch, Henning; Abramova, Ekaterina; Alenius, Teija; Saarnisto, Matti

    2016-04-01

    The global sea-level rise after the last glaciation not only affected the surface properties (circulation, T-S, sea ice seasonality) of the Arctic Ocean and nearby seas it also had a strong impact on the Holocene development of the shallow North Siberian shelf systems and the environmental evolution of the adjacent hinterland areas. In this region sea level reconstructions indicate the postglacial highstand occurred some time in the middle Holocene, between 6 to 5 ka (Klemann et al., 2015). After that time the sedimentary regime of the shelf seas stabilized as noted in a drastic decrease in sedimentation rates observed in all sediment cores taken from middle to outer shelf water depths of the Laptev Sea (Bauch et al. 2001). But, at water depths lower than 30 meters - i.e., in the inner shelf and nearer to the coasts - sedimentation continued at relatively higher rates, presumably due to input of terrigenous material from river runoff as well as coastal erosion. In relation to the latter process, the huge Lena Delta should comprise a region of sediment catchment where aggradation wins over erosion. However, little is known about the detailed history of this delta during the second half of the Holocene. We therefore have investigated three islands within the Lena Delta. All of these are comprised of massive peat of several meters in thickness. Picking discrete specimens of water mosses (Sphagnum) only, we have carefully dated these peat sections. The depth/age relation of the sampled profiles reflect the growth rate of peat, and thus, the islands. It shows that the islands' history above the present-day delta sea level is about 4000 yrs. old. Moreover, a significant change in peat growth is noted after 2500 yrs BP in both, accumulation and composition, and allows the conclusion of a major shift in Arctic environmental conditions since then. Thus, our results add further information also for other coastal studies, as the ongoing degradation of the rather vulnerable

  7. Upwelling of Arctic pycnocline associated with shear motion of sea ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPhee, M. G.; Kwok, R.; Robins, R.; Coon, M.

    2006-01-01

    High-resolution radar imagery shows that the dynamic response of winter sea ice to gradients in large-scale surface wind stress is often localized along quasi-linear fractures hundreds of kilometers long. Relative shearing motion across these narrow fractures can exceed 10 cm/s. In one event recorded during the drift of the SHEBA ice camp, we observed an intense zone of pycnocline upwelling (approx.14 m) associated with significant shear motion near the camp, while upward turbulent heat flux in the ocean boundary layer reached nearly 400 W/sq m, an order of magnitude greater than at any other time during the year-long drift. We attribute the upwelling to Ekman pumping associated with concentrated ice shear. Over the entire Arctic Ocean sea ice cover, this process could be responsible for significant heat exchange between the cold surface layer and warmer subsurface water at the ubiquitous fractures resulting from large-scale atmosphere-ice interactions.

  8. Improving the Arctic Mean Sea Surface with CryoSat-2 Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenseng, Lars; Andersen, Ole Baltazar

    Bridge). The new state of the art DTU13MSS is a global high-resolution MSS that includes retracked CryoSat-2 data and thereby extends the polar data coverage up to 88 degrees latitude. Furthermore, in the sea-ice covered areas, the SAR and SARin feature of the altimeter on-board CryoSat-2 increases the amount...... an improvement of more than 20 cm between 82 and 88 degrees latitude. For the first time the three years of retracked CryoSat-2 data will, in combination with DTU13MSS, allow reliable estimation of the trend and annual variations in the high Arctic Ocean sea surface height....

  9. Arctic Sea Ice in Transformation: A Review of Recent Observed Changes and Impacts on Biology and Human Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Walter N.; Hovelsrud, Greta K.; van Oort, Bob E. H.; Key, Jeffrey R.; Kovacs, Kit M.; Michel, Christine; Haas, Christian; Granskog, Mats A.; Gerland, Sebastian; Perovich, Donald K.; Makshtas, Alexander; Reist, James D.

    2014-01-01

    Sea ice in the Arctic is one of the most rapidly changing components of the global climate system. Over the past few decades, summer areal extent has declined over 30, and all months show statistically significant declining trends. New satellite missions and techniques have greatly expanded information on sea ice thickness, but many uncertainties remain in the satellite data and long-term records are sparse. However, thickness observations and other satellite-derived data indicate a 40 decline in thickness, due in large part to the loss of thicker, older ice cover. The changes in sea ice are happening faster than models have projected. With continued increasing temperatures, summer ice-free conditions are likely sometime in the coming decades, though there are substantial uncertainties in the exact timing and high interannual variability will remain as sea ice decreases. The changes in Arctic sea ice are already having an impact on flora and fauna in the Arctic. Some species will face increasing challenges in the future, while new habitat will open up for other species. The changes are also affecting peoples living and working in the Arctic. Native communities are facing challenges to their traditional ways of life, while new opportunities open for shipping, fishing, and natural resource extraction.

  10. Arctic sea ice thickness loss determined using subsurface, aircraft, and satellite observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Lindsay

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Sea ice thickness is a fundamental climate state variable that provides an integrated measure of changes in the high-latitude energy balance. However, observations of ice thickness have been sparse in time and space making the construction of observation-based time series difficult. Moreover, different groups use a variety of methods and processing procedures to measure ice thickness and each observational source likely has different and poorly characterized measurement and sampling biases. Observational sources include upward looking sonars mounted on submarines or moorings, electromagnetic sensors on helicopters or aircraft, and lidar or radar altimeters on airplanes or satellites. Here we use a curve-fitting approach to evaluate the systematic differences between eight different observation systems in the Arctic Basin. The approach determines the large-scale spatial and temporal variability of the ice thickness as well as the mean differences between the observation systems using over 3000 estimates of the ice thickness. The thickness estimates are measured over spatial scales of approximately 50 km or time scales of 1 month and the primary time period analyzed is 2000–2013 when the modern mix of observations is available. Good agreement is found between five of the systems, within 0.15 m, while systematic differences of up to 0.5 m are found for three others compared to the five. The trend in annual mean ice thickness over the Arctic Basin is −0.58 ± 0.07 m decade−1 over the period 2000–2013, while the annual mean ice thickness for the central Arctic Basin alone (the SCICEX Box has decreased from 3.45 m in 1975 to 1.11 m in 2013, a 68% reduction. This is nearly double the 36% decline reported by an earlier study. These results provide additional direct observational confirmation of substantial sea ice losses found in model analyses.

  11. Seasonal changes in sea ice conditions along the Northeast Passage in 2007 and 2012

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei Ruibo; Li Na; Li Chunhua; Jnsdttir Ingibjrg

    2014-01-01

    Remote sensing data from passive microwave and satellite-based altimeters, associated with the data measured underway, were used to characterize seasonal and spatial changes in sea ice conditions along the Arctic Northeast Passage (NEP) and the high-latitude sea route (HSR) north of the island groups in the eastern Arctic Ocean in 2007 and 2012. In both years, summer Arctic sea ice extent reached minima since satellite records began in 1979. However, there were large differences in spatial distribution of sea ice between the two years. Sea ice conditions in the eastern sections of the sea routes were relatively slight in the 2007 summer, because of the remarkable decline of sea ice in the Paciifc sector. A belt of sea ice that blocked sections from the western Laptev Sea to the eastern Kara Sea resulted in both sea routes not completely opening through the 2007 summer. The combination of a great storm in early August causing sea ice to be sheared from the Arctic pack ice and the thick ice surviving the winter delayed the summer opening of the eastern parts of the sea routes in 2012. However, the average open period, deifned by 50% ice concentration for the entire NEP and HSR, reached 82 d and 55 d, respectively. Thus, 2012 was the most accessible year since the satellite era began in 1979. The distinct decrease in sea ice in the western parts of the HSR in the 2012 summer can be attributed to the thinning preconditions of sea ice prior to the melt season. The HSR opening can beneift Arctic shipping of deeper-draft vessels.

  12. Sea ice thickness measurement and its underside morphol-ogy analysis using radar penetration in the Arctic Ocean

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙波; 温家洪; 何茂兵; 康建成; 罗宇忠; 李院生

    2003-01-01

    Based on radar penetrating measurements and analysis of sea ice in the Arctic Ocean, the potential of radar wave to measure sea ice thickness and map the morphology of the underside of sea ice is investigated. The results indicate that the radar wave can penetrate Arctic summer sea ice of over 6 m in thickness; and the propagation velocity of the radar wave in sea ice is in the range of 0.142 m·ns-1 to 0.154 m·ns-1. The radar images display the roughness and micro-relief variation of sea ice bottom surface. These features are closely related to sea ice types, which show that radar survey may be used to identify and classify ice types. Since radar images can simultaneously display the linear profile features of both the upper surface and the underside of sea ice, we use these images to quantify their actual linear length discrepancy. A new length factor is suggested in relation to the actual linear length discrepancy in linear profiles of sea ice, which may be useful in the further study of the area difference between the upper surface and bottom surface of sea ice.

  13. Measurements of sea ice thickness and its subice morphology analysis using ice-penetration radar in the Arctic Ocean

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙波; 邓新生; 康建成; 罗宇忠; 温家洪; 李院生

    2003-01-01

    Based on radar penetrating measurements and analysis of sea ice in the Arctic Ocean, The potential of radar wave to measure sea ice thickness and map the morphology of the underside of sea ice is investigated.The results indicate that the radar wave can penetrate Arctic summer sea ice of over 6 meters thick; and the propagation velocity of the radar wave in sea ice is in the range of 0.142 m*ns-1 to 0.154 m*ns-1.The radar images display the roughness and micro-relief variation of sea ice bottom surface.These features are closely related to sea ice types, which show that radar survey may be used to identify and classify ice types.Since radar images can simultaneously display the linear profile features of both the upper surface and the underside of sea ice, we use these images to quantify their actual linear length discrepancy.A new length factor is suggested in relation to the actual linear length discrepancy in linear profiles of sea ice, which may be useful in further study of the area difference between the upper surface and bottom surface of sea ice.

  14. Hydrographic changes in the Lincoln Sea in the Arctic Ocean with focus on an upper ocean freshwater anomaly between 2007 and 2010

    OpenAIRE

    de Steur, L.; Steele, M; E. Hansen; J. Morison; Polyakov, I.; Olsen, S. M.; Melling, H.; F. A. McLaughlin; Kwok, R; Smethie Jr., W.M.; Schlosser, P.

    2013-01-01

    Hydrographic data from the Arctic Ocean show that freshwater content in the Lincoln Sea, north of Greenland, increased significantly from 2007 to 2010, slightly lagging changes in the eastern and central Arctic. The anomaly was primarily caused by a decrease in the upper ocean salinity. In 2011 upper ocean salinities in the Lincoln Sea returned to values similar to those prior to 2007. Throughout 2008–2010, the freshest surface waters in the western Lincoln Sea show water mass properties simi...

  15. History of sea ice in the Arctic basin: Lessons from the past for future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. I. Borzenkova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The process of the sea ice formation in the Arctic Ocean is analyzed for the period of the last 65 million years, i.e. from the Paleocene to the present time. Appearance of sea ice in the high latitudes is demonstrated to be caused by the negative trend in global temperatures due to decreasing of the CO2 concentration in the ancient atmosphere. Formation of seasonal and perennial ice cover in the limited area near the Pole could take place during the mid-Neogene period, about 12–13 Ma ago. However, areas of the sea icing could be obviously changed for this time during periods of the climate warming and cooling. Permanent sea ice had been formed in the early Pleistocene, i.e. about 2.0–1.8 Ma ago only. Paleoclimatic reconstructions, based on the indirect data and modeling simulation for the Holocene optimum (10–6 ka ago and for the Last Interglacial period (the isotopic substage in the marine cross-section 5e, about 125–127 ka ago had shown that rising of global temperatures by 1.0–1.5 °C resulted in strong decreasing of the sea ice area, and the perennial ice cover became the seasonal one. Relatively small changes in the incoming solar radiation originating during the spring-summer time due to the orbital factors played the role of a trigger for onset of the melting process. Further on, the process could be enhanced owing to difference in the albedo between the ice cover and open water. Recently, the rapid shortening of the sea ice area is noted, and in some parts of the Arctic Ocean the area is twice cut down as compared with the normal. In 2015, the record low area of the winter sea ice was observed, and therewith the maximum of the ice area shifted to the earlier period (by 15 days as compared with the period of 1981–2010. The winter fluctuations of the sea ice areas are as much important as the summer ones, since they are the best indicators of the present-day global warming. Thus, it can be supposed that some

  16. Splitting of Atlantic water transport towards the Arctic Ocean into the Fram Strait and Barents Sea Branches - mechanisms and consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beszczynska-Möller, Agnieszka; Skagseth, Øystein; von Appen, Wilken-Jon; Walczowski, Waldemar; Lien, Vidar

    2016-04-01

    The heat content in the Arctic Ocean is to a large extent determined by oceanic advection from the south. During the last two decades the extraordinary warm Atlantic water (AW) inflow has been reported to progress through the Nordic Seas into the Arctic Ocean. Warm anomalies can result from higher air temperatures (smaller heat loss) in the Nordic Seas, and/or from an increased oceanic advection. But the ultimate fate of warm anomalies of Atlantic origin depends strongly on their two possible pathways towards the Arctic Ocean. The AW temperature changes from 7-10°C at the entrance to the Nordic Seas, to 6-6.5°C in the Barents Sea opening and 3-3.5°C as the AW leaving Fram Strait enters the Arctic Ocean. When AW passes through the shallow Barents Sea, nearly all its heat is lost due to atmospheric cooling and AW looses its signature. In the deep Fram Strait the upper part of Atlantic water becomes transformed into a less saline and colder surface layer and thus AW preserves its warm core. A significant warming and high variability of AW volume transport was observed in two recent decades in the West Spitsbergen Current, representing the Fram Strait Branch of Atlantic inflow. The AW inflow through Fram Strait carries between 26 and 50 TW of heat into the Arctic Ocean. While the oceanic heat influx to the Barents Sea is of a similar order, the heat leaving it through the northern exit into the Arctic Ocean is negligible. The relative strength of two Atlantic water branches through Fram Strait and the Barents Sea governs the oceanic heat transport into the Arctic Ocean. According to recently proposed mechanism, the Atlantic water flow in the Barents Sea Branch is controlled by the strength of atmospheric low over the northern Barents Sea, acting through a wind-induced Ekman divergence, which intensifies eastward AW flow. The Atlantic water transport in the Fram Strait Branch is mainly forced by the large-scale low-pressure system over the eastern Norwegian and

  17. An analytical model for wind-driven Arctic summer sea ice drift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, H.-S.; Stewart, A. L.

    2016-01-01

    The authors present an analytical model for wind-driven free drift of sea ice that allows for an arbitrary mixture of ice and open water. The model includes an ice-ocean boundary layer with an Ekman spiral, forced by transfers of wind-input momentum both through the sea ice and directly into the open water between the ice floes. The analytical tractability of this model allows efficient calculation of the ice velocity provided that the surface wind field is known and that the ocean geostrophic velocity is relatively weak. The model predicts that variations in the ice thickness or concentration should substantially modify the rotation of the velocity between the 10 m winds, the sea ice, and the ocean. Compared to recent observational data from the first ice-tethered profiler with a velocity sensor (ITP-V), the model is able to capture the dependencies of the ice speed and the wind/ice/ocean turning angles on the wind speed. The model is used to derive responses to intensified southerlies on Arctic summer sea ice concentration, and the results are shown to compare closely with satellite observations.

  18. Using records from submarine, aircraft and satellites to evaluate climate model simulations of Arctic sea ice thickness

    OpenAIRE

    J. Stroeve; Barrett, A; Serreze, M.; Schweiger, A

    2014-01-01

    Arctic sea ice thickness distributions from models participating in the World Climate Research Programme Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) are evaluated against observations from submarines, aircraft and satellites. While it is encouraging that the mean thickness distributions from the models are in general agreement with observations, the spatial patterns of sea ice thickness are poorly represented in most models. The poor spatial representation of thick...

  19. Where to Forage in the Absence of Sea Ice? Bathymetry As a Key Factor for an Arctic Seabird

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amélineau, Françoise; Grémillet, David; Bonnet, Delphine; Le Bot, Tangi; Fort, Jérôme

    2016-01-01

    The earth is warming at an alarming rate, especially in the Arctic, where a marked decline in sea ice cover may have far-ranging consequences for endemic species. Little auks, endemic Arctic seabirds, are key bioindicators as they forage in the marginal ice zone and feed preferentially on lipid-rich Arctic copepods and ice-associated amphipods sensitive to the consequences of global warming. We tested how little auks cope with an ice-free foraging environment during the breeding season. To this end, we took advantage of natural variation in sea ice concentration along the east coast of Greenland. We compared foraging and diving behaviour, chick diet and growth and adult body condition between two years, in the presence versus nearby absence of sea ice in the vicinity of their breeding site. Moreover, we sampled zooplankton at sea when sea ice was absent to evaluate prey location and little auk dietary preferences. Little auks foraged in the same areas both years, irrespective of sea ice presence/concentration, and targeted the shelf break and the continental shelf. We confirmed that breeding little auks showed a clear preference for larger copepod species to feed their chick, but caught smaller copepods and nearly no ice-associated amphipod when sea ice was absent. Nevertheless, these dietary changes had no impact on chick growth and adult body condition. Our findings demonstrate the importance of bathymetry for profitable little auk foraging, whatever the sea-ice conditions. Our investigations, along with recent studies, also confirm more flexibility than previously predicted for this key species in a warming Arctic. PMID:27438790

  20. A closer investigation of associations between Autumn Arctic sea ice and central and east Eurasian winter climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shaoyin; Liu, Jiping

    2016-04-01

    Whether recent Arctic sea ice loss is responsible for recent severe winters over mid-latitude continents has emerged as a major debate among climate scientists owing to short records of observations and large internal variability in mid- and high-latitudes. In this study, we divide the evolution of autumn Arctic sea ice extent during 1979-2014 into three epochs, 1979-1986 (high), 1987-2006 (moderate) and 2007-2014 (low), using a regime shift identification method. We then compare the associations between autumn Arctic sea ice and winter climate anomalies over central and eastern Eurasia for the three epochs with focus not only on the mean state, but also the extreme events. The results show robust and detectable signals of sea ice loss in weather and climate over western Siberia and East Asia. For the mean state, anomalous low sea ice extent is associated with a strengthening of the Siberian high pressure, a weakening of westerly winds over north Asia, leading to cold anomalies in central Asia and northern China. For the extreme events, the latitude (speed) of the jet stream shifts southward (reduces), the wave extent amplifies, blocking high events increase over Ural Mountains, leading to increased frequency of cold air outbreaks extending from central Asia to northeast China. These associations bear a high degree of similarity to the observed atmospheric anomalies during the low sea ice epoch. By contrast, the patterns of atmospheric anomalies for the high sea ice epoch are different from those congruent with sea ice variability, which is related to the persistent negative phase of the Arctic Oscillation. We also found that the ENSO plays a minor role in the determination of the observed atmospheric anomalies for the three epochs. Support for these observational analysis is largely corroborated by independent atmospheric model simulations.

  1. Where to Forage in the Absence of Sea Ice? Bathymetry As a Key Factor for an Arctic Seabird.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amélineau, Françoise; Grémillet, David; Bonnet, Delphine; Le Bot, Tangi; Fort, Jérôme

    2016-01-01

    The earth is warming at an alarming rate, especially in the Arctic, where a marked decline in sea ice cover may have far-ranging consequences for endemic species. Little auks, endemic Arctic seabirds, are key bioindicators as they forage in the marginal ice zone and feed preferentially on lipid-rich Arctic copepods and ice-associated amphipods sensitive to the consequences of global warming. We tested how little auks cope with an ice-free foraging environment during the breeding season. To this end, we took advantage of natural variation in sea ice concentration along the east coast of Greenland. We compared foraging and diving behaviour, chick diet and growth and adult body condition between two years, in the presence versus nearby absence of sea ice in the vicinity of their breeding site. Moreover, we sampled zooplankton at sea when sea ice was absent to evaluate prey location and little auk dietary preferences. Little auks foraged in the same areas both years, irrespective of sea ice presence/concentration, and targeted the shelf break and the continental shelf. We confirmed that breeding little auks showed a clear preference for larger copepod species to feed their chick, but caught smaller copepods and nearly no ice-associated amphipod when sea ice was absent. Nevertheless, these dietary changes had no impact on chick growth and adult body condition. Our findings demonstrate the importance of bathymetry for profitable little auk foraging, whatever the sea-ice conditions. Our investigations, along with recent studies, also confirm more flexibility than previously predicted for this key species in a warming Arctic.

  2. Where to Forage in the Absence of Sea Ice? Bathymetry As a Key Factor for an Arctic Seabird.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amélineau, Françoise; Grémillet, David; Bonnet, Delphine; Le Bot, Tangi; Fort, Jérôme

    2016-01-01

    The earth is warming at an alarming rate, especially in the Arctic, where a marked decline in sea ice cover may have far-ranging consequences for endemic species. Little auks, endemic Arctic seabirds, are key bioindicators as they forage in the marginal ice zone and feed preferentially on lipid-rich Arctic copepods and ice-associated amphipods sensitive to the consequences of global warming. We tested how little auks cope with an ice-free foraging environment during the breeding season. To this end, we took advantage of natural variation in sea ice concentration along the east coast of Greenland. We compared foraging and diving behaviour, chick diet and growth and adult body condition between two years, in the presence versus nearby absence of sea ice in the vicinity of their breeding site. Moreover, we sampled zooplankton at sea when sea ice was absent to evaluate prey location and little auk dietary preferences. Little auks foraged in the same areas both years, irrespective of sea ice presence/concentration, and targeted the shelf break and the continental shelf. We confirmed that breeding little auks showed a clear preference for larger copepod species to feed their chick, but caught smaller copepods and nearly no ice-associated amphipod when sea ice was absent. Nevertheless, these dietary changes had no impact on chick growth and adult body condition. Our findings demonstrate the importance of bathymetry for profitable little auk foraging, whatever the sea-ice conditions. Our investigations, along with recent studies, also confirm more flexibility than previously predicted for this key species in a warming Arctic. PMID:27438790

  3. Where to Forage in the Absence of Sea Ice? Bathymetry As a Key Factor for an Arctic Seabird.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Françoise Amélineau

    Full Text Available The earth is warming at an alarming rate, especially in the Arctic, where a marked decline in sea ice cover may have far-ranging consequences for endemic species. Little auks, endemic Arctic seabirds, are key bioindicators as they forage in the marginal ice zone and feed preferentially on lipid-rich Arctic copepods and ice-associated amphipods sensitive to the consequences of global warming. We tested how little auks cope with an ice-free foraging environment during the breeding season. To this end, we took advantage of natural variation in sea ice concentration along the east coast of Greenland. We compared foraging and diving behaviour, chick diet and growth and adult body condition between two years, in the presence versus nearby absence of sea ice in the vicinity of their breeding site. Moreover, we sampled zooplankton at sea when sea ice was absent to evaluate prey location and little auk dietary preferences. Little auks foraged in the same areas both years, irrespective of sea ice presence/concentration, and targeted the shelf break and the continental shelf. We confirmed that breeding little auks showed a clear preference for larger copepod species to feed their chick, but caught smaller copepods and nearly no ice-associated amphipod when sea ice was absent. Nevertheless, these dietary changes had no impact on chick growth and adult body condition. Our findings demonstrate the importance of bathymetry for profitable little auk foraging, whatever the sea-ice conditions. Our investigations, along with recent studies, also confirm more flexibility than previously predicted for this key species in a warming Arctic.

  4. The freshwater fern Azolla (Azollaceae) from Eocene Arctic and Nordic Sea sediments: New species and their stratigraphic distribution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Burgh, J.; Collinson, M.E.; van Konijnenburg-van Cittert, J.H.A.; Barke, J.; Brinkhuis, H.

    2013-01-01

    Three new species of the freshwater fern Azolla are described from Eocene marine deposits of the Arctic and Nordic seas, bringing the total number of species now documented from these areas to five. Azolla arctica Collinson et al., Azolla jutlandica Collinson et al., Azolla nova sp. nov. and Azolla

  5. Iodine speciation in aerosol particle samples collected over the sea between offshore China and the Arctic Ocean

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KANG Hui; XU Siqi; YU Xiawei; LI Bing; LIU Wei; YANG Hongxia; XIE Zhouqing

    2015-01-01

    Iodine species collected by an onboard PM10 particle sampling system during the Second Chinese National Arctic Research Expedition (July–September 2003) were measured using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and ion chromatography-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Iodine (I−) was detected in all samples over the Arctic Ocean, whereas additional iodine species including insoluble iodine, soluble organic iodine plus I− were detected over the northwestern Paciifc Ocean. The results suggest that the main form of iodine is different within the Arctic Ocean than it is outside. Enrichment factor values showed moderate enrichment of iodine in the northwestern Paciifc, whereas a high enrichment factor was found in polar regions, implying sources other than sea salt. A potential explanation was ascribed to the role of sea ice melt in the Arctic and rapid growth of algae in seawater, which enhances the production of iodocarbon and air-sea exchange. This was conifrmed by the larger values of total iodine in 2008 than in 2003, with greater sea ice melt in the former year. In comparison with earlier reports, ratios of iodate to iodide (IO3−/I−) were much smaller than 1.0. These ratios were also different from modeling results, implying more complicated cycles of atmospheric iodine than are presently understood.

  6. Synoptic-scale variability of satellite-derived sea-ice deformation rates in the Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, A.; Głowacki, O.

    2012-04-01

    Observational data show that deformation of the compact sea ice covering the central Arctic takes place within elongated, narrow zones separating semi-rigid floes. Localization of deformation, and a related intermittent character of internal stress in the ice, cannot be satisfactorily reproduced with present state-of-the-art numerical models, especially those based on various versions of viscous-plastic rheology. Similarly, sea-ice models do not reproduce properly the observed power-law tails of deformation-rate probability distributions (pdfs), with a slope depending on the scale of the observation. In order to be able to improve the models, one needs: (i) relevant quantitative measures of ice deformation rates that the models should aim to reproduce; (ii) a better understanding of the time variability of those measures (existing studies are usually limited to the analysis of single events) and their dependence on changes of the external forcing and of the properties of the ice itself. In this study, we use gridded sea-ice total deformation rates from the RGPS data provided by the RADARSAT-1 satellite, available for 11 winter seasons with a time resolution of 3 days and a spatial resolution of 12.55 km. The analysis is based on deformation-rate pdfs obtained by means of a rank-order analysis of the data for each snapshot in the dataset. We analyze the time variability of: (i) the slope of the power-law tails of the pdfs, estimated with a maximum-likelihood method; and (ii) the moments of the pdfs for a range of exponents q and spatial scales L from the original mesh size to approximately 1000 km. In all analyzed cases, the slope of the moments as a function of the length scale L increases (faster than linearly) with increasing power q. However, the tempo of this increase can be very different. Generally, there are two distinct, dominating patterns of variability, with the first pattern describing the overall level of deformation, and the second one being generally

  7. Integrating Research on Global Climate Change and Human Use of the Oceans: a Geospatial Method for Daily Monitoring of Sea Ice and Ship Traffic in the Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eucker, W.; McGillivary, P. A.

    2012-12-01

    One apparent consequence of global climate change has been a decrease in the extent and thickness of Arctic sea ice more rapidly than models have predicted, while Arctic ship traffic has likewise increased beyond economic predictions. To ensure representative observations of changing climate conditions and human use of the Arctic Ocean, we concluded a method of tracking daily changes in both sea ice and shipping in the Arctic Ocean was needed. Such a process improves the availability of sea ice data for navigational safety and allows future developments to be monitored for understanding of ice and shipping in relation to policy decisions appropriate to optimize sustainable use of a changing Arctic Ocean. The impetus for this work was the 2009 Arctic Marine Shipping Assessment (AMSA) which provided baseline data on Arctic ship traffic. AMSA was based on responses from circumpolar countries, was manpower intensive, and took years to compile. A more timely method of monitoring human use of the Arctic Ocean was needed. To address this, a method of monitoring sea ice on a scale relevant to ship-navigation (internationally required on ships over a certain size, which includes most commercial vessels in the Arctic Ocean. Daily AIS and sea ice observations were chosen for this study. Results of this method of geospatial analysis of the entire arctic are presented for a year long period from April 1, 2010 to March 31, 2011. This confirmed the dominance of European Arctic ship traffic. Arctic shipping is maximal during August and diminishes in September with a minimum in winter, although some shipping continues year-round in perennially ice-free areas. Data are analyzed for the four principal arctic quadrants around the North Pole by season for number and nationality of vessels. The goal of this study was not merely to monitor ship traffic and ice conditions concurrently, but also to demonstrate a new method of ocean monitoring based on daily assimilation, data fusion, and

  8. Could massive Arctic sea ice export to the North Atlantic be the real cause of abrupt climate change during the last deglaciation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coletti, A. J.; Condron, A.

    2015-12-01

    Using a coupled ocean-sea ice model (MITgcm), we investigate whether the break-up and mobilization of thick, multiyear, Arctic sea ice might have supplied enough freshwater to the Nordic Seas to reduce North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW) formation and weaken the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC). Numerical simulations of a Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) environment show the potential for sea ice to grow to ~30m thick, storing ~1.41x105 km3 of freshwater as sea ice in the Arctic (this is ~10 times the volume of freshwater stored in the modern-day Arctic). Releasing this volume of sea ice from the Arctic in 1-yr is equivalent to a high-latitude freshwater forcing of ~4.5 Sv, which is comparable (or larger) in magnitude to most meltwater floods emanating from land-based glacial lakes (e.g. Agassiz) during the last deglaciation. Opening of the Bering Strait and Barents Sea are two plausible mechanisms that may have initiated sea ice mobilization. Opening Bering Strait increases sea ice transport through the Fram Strait by 7% and results in a 22% weakening of AMOC for 2000 years and a >3°C warming in the Arctic basin at 800 m depth. Opening Barents Sea to simulate a collapse of the Fennoscandian ice sheet has little impact on Arctic sea ice and freshwater export to the North Atlantic, but weakens AMOC ~8%. In a simulation with both straits open there is a transition to near-modern sea ice circulation pattern and a 24% reduction in AMOC. Experiments with the Bering Strait open and sea ice artificially capped to 10 m show barely any difference to those when sea ice can grow to ~30m, suggesting that changes in topography have a much greater impact on AMOC than the freshwater forcing from sea ice melting in the Nordic Seas.

  9. Assessment of sea ice-atmosphere links in CMIP5 models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boland, Emma J. D.; Bracegirdle, Thomas J.; Shuckburgh, Emily F.

    2016-09-01

    The Arctic is currently undergoing drastic changes in climate, largely thought to be due to so-called `Arctic amplification', whereby local feedbacks enhance global warming. Recently, a number of observational and modelling studies have questioned what the implications of this change in Arctic sea ice extent might be for weather in Northern Hemisphere midlatitudes, and in particular whether recent extremely cold winters such as 2009/10 might be consistent with an influence from observed Arctic sea ice decline. However, the proposed mechanisms for these links have not been consistently demonstrated. In a uniquely comprehensive cross-season and cross-model study, we show that the CMIP5 models provide no support for a relationship between declining Arctic sea ice and a negative NAM, or between declining Barents-Kara sea ice and cold European temperatures. The lack of evidence for the proposed links is consistent with studies that report a low signal-to-noise ratio in these relationships. These results imply that, whilst links may exist between declining sea ice and extreme cold weather events in the Northern Hemisphere, the CMIP5 model experiments do not show this to be a leading order effect in the long-term. We argue that this is likely due to a combination of the limitations of the CMIP5 models and an indication of other important long-term influences on Northern Hemisphere climate.

  10. Trophic transfer of persistent organochlorine contaminants (OCs) within an Arctic marine food web from the southern Beaufort-Chukchi Seas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The trophic status and biomagnification of persistent OCs within the near-shore Beaufort-Chukchi Seas food web from Barrow, AK is discussed. - Stable isotope values (δ13C, δ15N) and concentrations of persistent organochlorine contaminants (OCs) were determined to evaluate the near-shore marine trophic status of biota and biomagnification of OCs from the southern Beaufort-Chukchi Seas (1999-2000) near Barrow, AK. The biota examined included zooplankton (Calanus spp.), fish species such as arctic cod (Boreogadus saida), arctic char (Salvelinus alpinus), pink salmon (Oncorhynchus gorbuscha), and fourhorn sculpin (Myoxocephalus quadricornis), along with marine mammals, including bowhead whales (Balaena mysticetus), beluga whales (Delphinapterus leucas), ringed seals (Phoca hispida) and bearded seals (Erignathus barbatus). The isotopically derived trophic position of biota from the Beaufort-Chukchi Seas marine food web, avian fauna excluded, is similar to other coastal food webs in the Arctic. Concentrations of OCs in marine mammals were significantly greater than in fish and corresponded with determined trophic level. In general, OCs with the greatest food web magnification factors (FWMFs) were those either formed due to biotransformation (e.g. p,p'-DDE, oxychlordane) or considered recalcitrant (e.g. β-HCH, 2,4,5-Cl substituted PCBs) in most biota, whereas concentrations of OCs that are considered to be readily eliminated (e.g. γ-HCH) did not correlate with trophic level. Differences in physical-chemical properties of OCs, feeding strategy and possible biotransformation were reflected in the variable biomagnification between fish and marine mammals. The FWMFs in the Beaufort-Chukchi Seas region were consistent with reported values in the Canadian Arctic and temperate food webs, but were statistically different than FWMFs from the Barents and White Seas, indicating that the spatial variability of OC contamination in top-level marine Arctic predators is attributed to

  11. Trophic transfer of persistent organochlorine contaminants (OCs) within an Arctic marine food web from the southern Beaufort-Chukchi Seas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoekstra, P.F.; O' Hara, T.M.; Fisk, A.T.; Borgaa, K.; Solomon, K.R.; Muir, D.C.G

    2003-08-01

    The trophic status and biomagnification of persistent OCs within the near-shore Beaufort-Chukchi Seas food web from Barrow, AK is discussed. - Stable isotope values ({delta}{sup 13}C, {delta}{sup 15}N) and concentrations of persistent organochlorine contaminants (OCs) were determined to evaluate the near-shore marine trophic status of biota and biomagnification of OCs from the southern Beaufort-Chukchi Seas (1999-2000) near Barrow, AK. The biota examined included zooplankton (Calanus spp.), fish species such as arctic cod (Boreogadus saida), arctic char (Salvelinus alpinus), pink salmon (Oncorhynchus gorbuscha), and fourhorn sculpin (Myoxocephalus quadricornis), along with marine mammals, including bowhead whales (Balaena mysticetus), beluga whales (Delphinapterus leucas), ringed seals (Phoca hispida) and bearded seals (Erignathus barbatus). The isotopically derived trophic position of biota from the Beaufort-Chukchi Seas marine food web, avian fauna excluded, is similar to other coastal food webs in the Arctic. Concentrations of OCs in marine mammals were significantly greater than in fish and corresponded with determined trophic level. In general, OCs with the greatest food web magnification factors (FWMFs) were those either formed due to biotransformation (e.g. p,p'-DDE, oxychlordane) or considered recalcitrant (e.g. {beta}-HCH, 2,4,5-Cl substituted PCBs) in most biota, whereas concentrations of OCs that are considered to be readily eliminated (e.g. {gamma}-HCH) did not correlate with trophic level. Differences in physical-chemical properties of OCs, feeding strategy and possible biotransformation were reflected in the variable biomagnification between fish and marine mammals. The FWMFs in the Beaufort-Chukchi Seas region were consistent with reported values in the Canadian Arctic and temperate food webs, but were statistically different than FWMFs from the Barents and White Seas, indicating that the spatial variability of OC contamination in top

  12. Combined effects of the North Atlantic Oscillation and the Arctic Oscillation on sea surface temperature in the Alboran Sea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José C Báez

    Full Text Available We explored the possible effects of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO and Arctic Oscillation (AO on interannual sea surface temperature (SST variations in the Alborán Sea, both separately and combined. The probability of observing mean annual SST values higher than average was related to NAO and AO values of the previous year. The effect of NAO on SST was negative, while that of AO was positive. The pure effects of NAO and AO on SST are obscuring each other, due to the positive correlation between them. When decomposing SST, NAO and AO in seasonal values, we found that variation in mean annual SST and mean winter SST was significantly related to the mean autumn NAO of the previous year, while mean summer SST was related to mean autumn AO of the previous year. The one year delay in the effect of the NAO and AO on the SST could be partially related to the amount of accumulated snow, as we found a significant correlation between the total snow in the North Alborán watershed for a year with the annual average SST of the subsequent year. A positive AO implies a colder atmosphere in the Polar Regions, which could favour occasional cold waves over the Iberian Peninsula which, when coupled with precipitations favoured by a negative NAO, may result in snow precipitation. This snow may be accumulated in the high peaks and melt down in spring-summer of the following year, which consequently increases the runoff of freshwater to the sea, which in turn causes a diminution of sea surface salinity and density, and blocks the local upwelling of colder water, resulting in a higher SST.

  13. Wind-driven interannual variability of sea ice algal production over the western Arctic Chukchi Borderland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Watanabe

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Seasonal and interannual variability in sinking flux of biogenic particles was reported by the multi-year bottom-tethered sediment trap measurements in the Northwind Abyssal Plain (Station NAP: 75° N, 162° W, 1975 m water depth of the western Arctic Chukchi Borderland. Whereas the trapped particle flux had an obvious peak with the dominance of sea ice-related diatom valve in August 2011, the observed particle flux was considerably suppressed throughout the summer season in 2012. In the present study, response of ice algal production and biomass to wind-driven changes in physical environments was addressed using a pan-Arctic sea ice–ocean modeling approach. Sea ice ecosystem with ice algae was newly incorporated into the lower-trophic marine ecosystem model, which was previously coupled with a high-resolution (i.e., horizontal grid size of 5 km ocean general circulation model. Seasonal experiments covering two year-long mooring periods indicated that primary productivity of ice algae around the Chukchi Borderland depended on basin-scale wind pattern through various processes. Easterly wind in the southern part of distinct Beaufort High supplied high abundance of nutrient for euphotic zones of the NAP region via both surface Ekman transport of Chukchi shelf water and vertical turbulent mixing with underlying nutricline water as in 2011. In contrast, northwesterly wind flowing in the northern part of extended Siberian High transported oligotrophic water within the Beaufort Gyre circulation toward the NAP region as in 2012. The modeled ice algal biomass during the summer season certainly reflected the differences in nutrient distribution. The sinking flux of Particulate Organic Nitrogen (PON was comparable with the time series obtained from the sediment trap data in summer 2011. On the other hand, lateral advection of shelf-origin ice algal patch during a great cyclone event might have caused a model bias on the PON flux in 2012. The extension

  14. Cloud and boundary layer interactions over the Arctic sea ice in late summer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. D. Shupe

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Observations from the Arctic Summer Cloud Ocean Study (ASCOS, in the central Arctic sea-ice pack in late summer 2008, provide a detailed view of cloud–atmosphere–surface interactions and vertical mixing processes over the sea-ice environment. Measurements from a suite of ground-based remote sensors, near-surface meteorological and aerosol instruments, and profiles from radiosondes and a helicopter are combined to characterize a week-long period dominated by low-level, mixed-phase, stratocumulus clouds. Detailed case studies and statistical analyses are used to develop a conceptual model for the cloud and atmosphere structure and their interactions in this environment. Clouds were persistent during the period of study, having qualities that suggest they were sustained through a combination of advective influences and in-cloud processes, with little contribution from the surface. Radiative cooling near cloud top produced buoyancy-driven, turbulent eddies that contributed to cloud formation and created a cloud-driven mixed layer. The depth of this mixed layer was related to the amount of turbulence and condensed cloud water. Coupling of this cloud-driven mixed layer to the surface boundary layer was primarily determined by proximity. For 75% of the period of study, the primary stratocumulus cloud-driven mixed layer was decoupled from the surface and typically at a warmer potential temperature. Since the near-surface temperature was constrained by the ocean–ice mixture, warm temperatures aloft suggest that these air masses had not significantly interacted with the sea-ice surface. Instead, back-trajectory analyses suggest that these warm air masses advected into the central Arctic Basin from lower latitudes. Moisture and aerosol particles likely accompanied these air masses, providing necessary support for cloud formation. On the occasions when cloud–surface coupling did occur, back trajectories indicated that these air masses advected at

  15. Mesoscale eddies over the Laptev Sea continental slope in the Arctic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pnyushkov, A.; Polyakov, I.; Nguyen, A. T.

    2015-12-01

    Mesoscale eddies are an important component in Arctic Ocean dynamics and can play a role in vertical redistribution of ocean heat from the intermediate layer of warm Atlantic Water (AW). We analyze mooring data collected along the continental slope of the Laptev Sea in 2007-11 to improve the characterization of Arctic mesoscale eddies in this region of the Eurasian Basin (EB).Wavelet analyses suggest that ~20% of the mooring record is occupied by mesoscale eddies, whose vertical scales can be large, often >600 m. Based on similarity between temperature/salinity profiles measured inside eddies and modern climatology for the 2000s, we found two distinct sources of eddy formation in the EB; one in the vicinity of Fram Strait and the other at the continental slope of the Severnaya Zemlya Archipelago. Both sources of eddies are on the route of AW propagation along the EB margins, so that the Arctic Circumpolar Boundary Current (ACBC) can carry these eddies along the continental slope.The lateral advection of waters isolated inside the eddy cores by ACBC affect the heat and salt balance of the eastern EB. The average temperature anomaly inside Fram Strait eddies in the layer above the AW temperature core (i.e., above 350 m depth level) was ~0.1º C with the strongest temperature anomaly in this layer exceeding 0.5ºC. In contrast to Fram Strait eddies, Severnaya Zemlya eddies carry anomalously cold and fresh water, and likely contribute to ventilation of the AW core. In addition, we found increased vertical shears of the horizontal velocities inside eddies that result in enhanced mixing. Our estimates made using the Pacanowski and Philander (1981) relationship suggest that, on average, vertical diffusivity coefficients inside eddies are four times larger than those in the surrounding waters. We will use the high resolution ECCO model to investigate the relative contributions of along and across slope transports induced by eddies along the ACBC path.

  16. The Multi-Sectorial Impact Of Arctic Sea Ice Loss by Jeremy Wilkinson (on behalf of the ICE-ARC Team)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, J.

    2015-12-01

    One of the most visible aspects of climate change is the dramatic loss of Arctic sea ice; both sea ice extent and thickness. The striking loss of sea-ice in recent summers reflects profound changes in the Arctic system. However these climate driven changes in sea ice are not the only pressures on the region as the increase in the demand for natural resources are providing opportunities for investment, with estimates of $100bn or more coming in to the Arctic region over the next decade. Sea ice loss is one of the drivers behind this investment. However the environmental, socio-economic, and geopolitical consequences associated with sea ice loss bring opportunities and possibilities, but also far-reaching change amidst the potential conflicts and risks for human activities right across the Arctic and the globe. To better understand the impact of sea ice loss a multi-sectorial approach is needed. This innovative multi-sector approach to sea ice loss has gained traction over recent years as it transcends disciplinary boundaries, advances knowledge of Arctic change within a regional and global context, has a sharp eye to policy-relevance, and builds strong partnerships with northern communities. Ice Climate and Economics: Arctic Research on Change (ICE-ARC) is one of these programmes. ICE-ARC involves 23 institutes from 11 European Union and Russia. We present initial results from this exciting, multi-sectorial research programme.

  17. A 50% increase in the amount of terrestrial particles delivered by the Mackenzie River into the Beaufort Sea (Canadian Arctic Ocean) over the last 10 years

    OpenAIRE

    Doxaran, D; Devred, E.; M. Babin

    2015-01-01

    Global warming has a significant impact at the regional scale on the Arctic Ocean and surrounding coastal zones (i.e., Alaska, Canada, Greenland, Norway and Russia). The recent increase in air temperature has resulted in increased precipitations along the drainage basins of Arctic Rivers. It has also directly impacted land and seawater temperatures with the consequence of melting the permafrost and sea-ice. An increase in freshwater discharge by main Arctic rivers has ...

  18. Fate of terrigenous organic matter across the Laptev Sea from the mouth of the Lena River to the deep sea of the Arctic interior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bröder, Lisa; Tesi, Tommaso; Salvadó, Joan A.; Semiletov, Igor P.; Dudarev, Oleg V.; Gustafsson, Örjan

    2016-09-01

    Ongoing global warming in high latitudes may cause an increasing supply of permafrost-derived organic carbon through both river discharge and coastal erosion to the Arctic shelves. Mobilized permafrost carbon can be either buried in sediments, transported to the deep sea or degraded to CO2 and outgassed, potentially constituting a positive feedback to climate change. This study aims to assess the fate of terrigenous organic carbon (TerrOC) in the Arctic marine environment by exploring how it changes in concentration, composition and degradation status across the wide Laptev Sea shelf. We analyzed a suite of terrestrial biomarkers as well as source-diagnostic bulk carbon isotopes (δ13C, Δ14C) in surface sediments from a Laptev Sea transect spanning more than 800 km from the Lena River mouth (climate feedbacks.

  19. Molecular genetic diversity of bacteria in the bottom section of arctic sea ice from the Canada Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Huirong; YU Yong; CHEN Bo; ZENG Yinxin; REN Daming

    2005-01-01

    PCR-DGGE approach was used to analyze bacterial diversity in the bottom section of seven arctic sea ice samples colleted from the Canada Basin. Thirty-two 16S rDNA sequences were obtained from prominent DGGE bands. The closest relatives of these sequences are found to be those of cultivated or uncultured bacteria from antarctic or arctic sea ice. Phylogenetic analysis clustered these sequences or phylotypes within α- proteobacteria, γ-proteobacteria and CFB (cytophaga-flexibacter-bacteroides) group. Sequences belonging to γ-proteobacteria were dominant and members of the CFB group were highly abundant. It was suggested that the CFB group was the representative of the bottom section of sea ice samples.

  20. Application of long-chain aikenones and U37k values for paleotemperature estimation in the Arctic Chukchi Sea- Bering Sea area

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    -Long-chain alkenones were detected in samples of sea surface sediments from the Chukchi Sea and the Bering Sea areas, the Arctic Pole. The analysis result indicates that C37:3 methylketone is pre dominate in the long-chain alkenones from the Chukchi and Bering Sea sediments. The abundance of C37to C39 unsaturated alkenones changes in an order of C37 >C38 >C39. Based on ∑37/∑38 ratio, the de tected organism precursors of the long-chain alkenones are mainly coccolithophrid (Emiliania huxleyi).By the calibration relationship between U3k7 and U37k indices, the sea surface paleotemperature in these seas is estimated. The estimated values of U37k vary from 4.147℃ to 5. 706℃, with a mean value of 5.092℃.

  1. Decadal predictability of extreme fresh water export events from the Arctic Ocean into the Nordic Seas and subpolar North Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmith, Torben; Olsen, Steffen M.; Ringgaard, Ida M.; May, Wilhelm

    2016-04-01

    Abrupt fresh water releases originating in the Arctic Ocean have been documented to affect ocean circulation and climate in the North Atlantic area. Therefore, in this study, we investigate prospects for predicting such events up to one decade ahead. This is done in a perfect model setup by a combination of analyzing a 500 year control experiment and dedicated ensemble experiment aimed at predicting selected 10 year long segments of the control experiment. The selected segments are characterized by a large positive or negative trend in the total fresh water content in the Arctic Ocean. The analysis of the components (liquid fresh water and sea ice) reveals that they develop in a near random walk manner. From this we conclude that the main mechanism is integration of fresh water in the Beaufort Gyre through Ekman pumping from the randomly varying atmosphere. Therefore, the predictions from the ensemble experiments are on average not better than a damped persistence predictions. By running two different families of ensemble predictions, one starting from the 'observed' ocean globally, and one starting from climatology in the Arctic Ocean and from the observed ocean elsewhere, we conclude that the former outperforms the latter for the first few years as regards liquid fresh water and for the first year as regards sea ice. Analysis of the model experiments in terms of the fresh water export from the Arctic Ocean into Nordic seas and the subpolar North Atlantic reveals a very modest potential for predictability.

  2. Melt onset over Arctic sea ice controlled by atmospheric moisture transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortin, Jonas; Svensson, Gunilla; Graversen, Rune G.; Kapsch, Marie-Luise; Stroeve, Julienne C.; Boisvert, Linette N.

    2016-06-01

    The timing of melt onset affects the surface energy uptake throughout the melt season. Yet the processes triggering melt and causing its large interannual variability are not well understood. Here we show that melt onset over Arctic sea ice is initiated by positive anomalies of water vapor, clouds, and air temperatures that increase the downwelling longwave radiation (LWD) to the surface. The earlier melt onset occurs; the stronger are these anomalies. Downwelling shortwave radiation (SWD) is smaller than usual at melt onset, indicating that melt is not triggered by SWD. When melt occurs early, an anomalously opaque atmosphere with positive LWD anomalies preconditions the surface for weeks preceding melt. In contrast, when melt begins late, clearer than usual conditions are evident prior to melt. Hence, atmospheric processes are imperative for melt onset. It is also found that spring LWD increased during recent decades, consistent with trends toward an earlier melt onset.

  3. Vertical characteristics of ozone variation over the Arctic Chukchi Sea region in 1999

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周立波; 刘宇; 邹捍

    2002-01-01

    In 1999 summer, Chinese Arctic Research Expedition operated the Chukchi Sea. On Chinese icebreaker Xuelong, we made many high-resolution ozonesonds measurements. During the period from August 18 to 24, a synoptic scale observation was taken at 75°N, 160°W. Using the above data, together with TOMS total ozone and NCEP circulation data, we showed that atmospheric ozone amount experienced a high-low-high variation, with low-high-low tropopause altitude. Correlation analysis showed a close relation between the total ozone and ozone below 13 km, while the variation of the maximum concentration at about 20 km didn't show any relation to the column ozone. In 500 hPa height maps, there was also the weak-strong-weak southwesterly pattern. Therefore we suggested that the synoptic system might be responsible to a low ozone advection during this ozone variation.

  4. Phylogenetic analysis of cultivable bacteria isolated from Arctic sea-ice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rDNA of 8 strains of cultivable bacteria isolated from Arctic sea-ice was studied. The results showed that strain BJ1 belonged to genus Planococcus, which was a genus of low mole percent G+C gram-positive bacteria; strain BJ6 belonged to genus Burkholderia of β- proteobacteria and the rest 6 strain all belonged to γ-proteobacteria, of which strain BJ8 was a species of Pseudoalteromonas, strain BJ2-BJ5 and BJ7 were members of genus Psychrobacter. Phylogenetic analysis also indicated that bacteria of genus Psychrobacter of the isolates formed a relatively independent phylogenetic cluster in comparison with other bacteria belonged to genus Psychrobacter.

  5. Strategies for the Simulation of Sea Ice Organic Chemistry: Arctic Tests and Development

    CERN Document Server

    Elliott, S; Hunke, E; Deal, C; Jin, M; Wang, S; Smith, E Elliott; Oestreicher, S

    2016-01-01

    A mechanism connecting ice algal ecodynamics with the buildup of organic macromolecules in brine channels is tested offline in a reduced model of pack geochemistry. Driver physical quantities are extracted from the global sea ice dynamics code CICE, including snow height, column thickness and internal temperature. The variables are averaged at the regional scale over ten Arctic biogeographic zones and treated as input matrices at four vertical habitat levels. Nutrient-light-salt limited ice algal growth is computed along with the associated grazing plus mortality. Vertical transport is diffusive but responds to pore structure. Simulated bottom layer chlorophyll maxima are reasonable, though delayed by about a month relative to observations. This highlights major uncertainties deriving from snow thickness variability. Upper level biota are generated intermittently through flooding. Macromolecular injections are represented by the compound classes humics, proteins, polysaccharides and lipids. The fresh biopolym...

  6. Sea Surface Height Determination In The Arctic Using Cryosat-2 SAR Data From Primary Peak Empirical Retrackers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jain, Maulik; Andersen, Ole Baltazar; Dall, Jørgen;

    2015-01-01

    SAR waveforms from Cryosat-2 are processed using primary peak empirical retrackers to determine the sea surface height in the Arctic. The empirical retrackers investigated are based on the combination of the traditional OCOG (Offset Center of Gravity) and threshold methods with primary peak...... extraction. The primary peak retrackers involve the application of retracking algorithms on just the primary peak of the waveform instead of the complete reflected waveform. These primary peak empirical retrackers are developed for Cryosat-2 SAR data. This is the first time SAR data in the Arctic...

  7. Frost flowers on young Arctic sea ice: The climatic, chemical, and microbial significance of an emerging ice type

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barber, D.; Ehn, J.; Pucko, M.;

    2014-01-01

    Ongoing changes in Arctic sea ice are increasing the spatial and temporal range of young sea ice types over which frost flowers can occur, yet the significance of frost flowers to ocean-sea ice-atmosphere exchange processes remains poorly understood. Frost flowers form when moisture from seawater...... formed. The new ice and frost flowers dramatically changed the radiative and thermal environment. The frost flowers were about 5°C colder than the brine surface, with an approximately linear temperature gradient from their base to their upper tips. Salinity and δ18O values indicated that frost flowers...

  8. Hematology of southern Beaufort Sea polar bears (2005-2007): Biomarker for an arctic ecosystem health sentinel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, Cassandra M.; Amstrup, S.; Swor, Rhonda; Holcomb, Darce; O'Hara, T. M.

    2010-01-01

    Declines in sea-ice habitats have resulted in declining stature, productivity, and survival of polar bears in some regions. With continuing sea-ice declines, negative population effects are projected to expand throughout the polar bear's range. Precise causes of diminished polar bear life history performance are unknown, however, climate and sea-ice condition change are expected to adversely impact polar bear (Ursus maritimus) health and population dynamics. As apex predators in the Arctic, polar bears integrate the status of lower trophic levels and are therefore sentinels of ecosystem health. Arctic residents feed at the apex of the ecosystem, thus polar bears can serve as indicators of human health in the Arctic. Despite their value as indicators of ecosystem welfare, population-level health data for U.S. polar bears are lacking. We present hematological reference ranges for southern Beaufort Sea polar bears. Hematological parameters in southern Beaufort Sea polar bears varied by age, geographic location, and reproductive status. Total leukocytes, lymphocytes, monocytes, eosinophils, and serum immunoglobulin G were significantly greater in males than females. These measures were greater in nonlactating females ages ???5, than lactating adult females ages ???5, suggesting that females encumbered by young may be less resilient to new immune system challenges that may accompany ongoing climate change. Hematological values established here provide a necessary baseline for anticipated changes in health as arctic temperatures warm and sea-ice declines accelerate. Data suggest that females with dependent young may be most vulnerable to these changes and should therefore be a targeted cohort for monitoring in this sentinel. ?? 2010 International Association for Ecology and Health.

  9. Observed microphysical changes in Arctic mixed-phase clouds when transitioning from sea-ice to open ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Gillian; Jones, Hazel M.; Crosier, Jonathan; Bower, Keith N.; Darbyshire, Eoghan; Taylor, Jonathan W.; Liu, Dantong; Allan, James D.; Williams, Paul I.; Gallagher, Martin W.; Choularton, Thomas W.

    2016-04-01

    The Arctic sea-ice is intricately coupled to the atmosphere[1]. The decreasing sea-ice extent with the changing climate raises questions about how Arctic cloud structure will respond. Any effort to answer these questions is hindered by the scarcity of atmospheric observations in this region. Comprehensive cloud and aerosol measurements could allow for an improved understanding of the relationship between surface conditions and cloud structure; knowledge which could be key in validating weather model forecasts. Previous studies[2] have shown via remote sensing that cloudiness increases over the marginal ice zone (MIZ) and ocean with comparison to the sea-ice; however, to our knowledge, detailed in-situ data of this transition have not been previously presented. In 2013, the Aerosol-Cloud Coupling and Climate Interactions in the Arctic (ACCACIA) campaign was carried out in the vicinity of Svalbard, Norway to collect in-situ observations of the Arctic atmosphere and investigate this issue. Fitted with a suite of remote sensing, cloud and aerosol instrumentation, the FAAM BAe-146 aircraft was used during the spring segment of the campaign (Mar-Apr 2013). One case study (23rd Mar 2013) produced excellent coverage of the atmospheric changes when transitioning from sea-ice, through the MIZ, to the open ocean. Clear microphysical changes were observed, with the cloud liquid-water content increasing by almost four times over the transition. Cloud base, depth and droplet number also increased, whilst ice number concentrations decreased slightly. The surface warmed by ~13 K from sea-ice to ocean, with minor differences in aerosol particle number (of sizes corresponding to Cloud Condensation Nuclei or Ice Nucleating Particles) observed, suggesting that the primary driver of these microphysical changes was the increased heat fluxes and induced turbulence from the warm ocean surface as expected. References: [1] Kapsch, M.L., Graversen, R.G. and Tjernström, M. Springtime

  10. Power Scaling and Seasonal Changes of Floe Areas in the Arctic East Siberian Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geise, Gregory R.; Barton, Christopher C.; Tebbens, Sarah F.

    2016-08-01

    The cumulative number versus floe area distribution of seasonal sea floes from six satellite images of the Arctic Ocean during the summer breakup and melting is fit by two scale-invariant power law scaling regimes for floe areas ranging from 30 to 28,400,000 m2. Scaling exponents, β, for larger floe areas range from -0.6 to -1.0 with an average of -0.8. Scaling exponents, β, for smaller floe areas range from -0.3 to -0.6 with an average of -0.5. The inflection point between the two scaling regimes ranges from 283 × 102 to 4850 × 102 m2 and generally moves from larger to smaller floe areas through the summer melting season. The stability of the power scaling results is demonstrated for two of the images by dividing each in half and analyzing each half separately, with the result that the scaling exponents and the size of the inflection points are nearly the same for each half as for the whole image. We propose that the two scaling regimes and the inflection between them are established during the initial breakup of sea ice solely by the process of fracture. The distributions of floe size regimes retain their scaling exponents as the floe pack evolves from larger to smaller floe areas from the initial breakup through the summer season, due to grinding, crushing, fracture, and melting. The scaling exponents for floe area distribution are in the same range as those reported in previous studies of Arctic floes and for the single scaling exponents found for crushed and ground geologic materials including streambed gravel, lunar debris, and artificially crushed quartz. The single scaling exponent found for fault gouge falls below the range for floes possibly because the fracturing and grinding process in fault gouge takes place under high confining pressure. A probabilistic model of fragmentation is proposed that generates a single power law scaling distribution of fragment size.

  11. Hydrographic changes in the Lincoln Sea in the Arctic Ocean with focus on an upper ocean freshwater anomaly between 2007 and 2010

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Steur, L.; Steele, M.; Hansen, E.; Morison, J.; Polyakov, I.; Olsen, S.M.; Melling, H.; McLaughlin, F.A.; Kwok, R.; Smethie Jr., W.M.; Schlosser, P.

    2013-01-01

    Hydrographic data from the Arctic Ocean show that freshwater content in the Lincoln Sea, north of Greenland, increased significantly from 2007 to 2010, slightly lagging changes in the eastern and central Arctic. The anomaly was primarily caused by a decrease in the upper ocean salinity. In 2011 uppe

  12. Effectively Communicating Information about Dynamically Changing Arctic Sea Ice to the Public through the Global Fiducials Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molnia, B. F.; Friesen, B.; Wilson, E.; Noble, S.

    2015-12-01

    On July 15, 2009, the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) released a report, Scientific Value of Arctic Sea Ice Imagery Derived Products, advocating public release of Arctic images derived from classified data. In the NAS press release that announced the release, report lead Stephanie Pfirman states "To prepare for a possibly ice-free Arctic and its subsequent effects on the environment, economy, and national security, it is critical to have accurate projections of changes over the next several decades." In the same release NAS President Ralph Cicerone states "We hope that these images are the first of many that could help scientists learn how the changing climate could impact the environment and our society." The same day, Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar announced that the requested images had been released and were available to the public on a US Geological Survey Global Fiducials Program (GFP) Library website (http://gfl.usgs.gov). The website was developed by the USGS to provide public access to the images and to support environmental analysis of global climate-related science. In the statement describing the release titled, Information Derived from Classified Materials Will Aid Understanding of Changing Climate, Secretary Salazar states "We need the best data from all places if we are to meet the challenges that rising carbon emissions are creating. This information will be invaluable to scientists, researchers, and the public as we tackle climate change." Initially about 700 Arctic sea ice images were released. Six years later, the number exceeds 1,500. The GFP continues to facilitate the acquisition of new Arctic sea ice imagery from US National Imagery Systems. This example demonstrates how information about dynamically changing Arctic sea ice continues to be effectively communicated to the public by the GFP. In addition to Arctic sea ice imagery, the GFP has publicly released imagery time series of more than 125 other environmentally important

  13. Modeling the seasonal evolution of the Arctic sea ice floe size distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinlun Zhang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract To better simulate the seasonal evolution of sea ice in the Arctic, with particular attention to the marginal ice zone, a sea ice model of the distribution of ice thickness, floe size, and enthalpy was implemented into the Pan-arctic Ice–Ocean Modeling and Assimilation System (PIOMAS. Theories on floe size distribution (FSD and ice thickness distribution (ITD were coupled in order to explicitly simulate multicategory FSD and ITD distributions simultaneously. The expanded PIOMAS was then used to estimate the seasonal evolution of the Arctic FSD in 2014 when FSD observations are available for model calibration and validation. Results indicate that the simulated FSD, commonly described equivalently as cumulative floe number distribution (CFND, generally follows a power law across space and time and agrees with the CFND observations derived from TerraSAR-X satellite images. The simulated power-law exponents also correlate with those derived using MODIS images, with a low mean bias of –2%. In the marginal ice zone, the modeled CFND shows a large number of small floes in winter because of stronger winds acting on thin, weak first-year ice in the ice edge region. In mid-spring and summer, the CFND resembles an upper truncated power law, with the largest floes mostly broken into smaller ones; however, the number of small floes is lower than in winter because floes of small sizes or first-year ice are easily melted away. In the ice pack interior there are fewer floes in late fall and winter than in summer because many of the floes are “welded” together into larger floes in freezing conditions, leading to a relatively flat CFND with low power-law exponents. The simulated mean floe size averaged over all ice-covered areas shows a clear annual cycle, large in winter and smaller in summer. However, there is no obvious annual cycle of mean floe size averaged over the marginal ice zone. The incorporation of FSD into PIOMAS results in reduced

  14. Arctic methane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dyupina, E.; Amstel, van A.R.

    2013-01-01

    What are the risks of a runaway greenhouse effect from methane release from hydrates in the Arctic? In January 2013, a dramatic increase of methane concentration up to 2000 ppb has been measured over the Arctic north of Norway in the Barents Sea. The global average being 1750 ppb. It has been sugges

  15. ANWR progress report number FY84-6: Movement of molting oldsquaws within the Beaufort Sea coastal lagoons of Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska, 1983

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report covers the movement of molting oldsquaw within the Beaufort Sea Coastal lagoons of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska. During August, 1983, 16...

  16. Derive Arctic Sea-ice Freeboard and Thickness from NASA's LVIS Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, D.; Hofton, M. A.; Harbeck, J.; Cornejo, H.; Kurtz, N. T.

    2015-12-01

    The sea-ice freeboard and thickness are derived from the six sea-ice flights of NASA's IceBridge Land, Vegetation, and Ice Sensor (LVIS) over the Arctic from 2009 to 2013. The LVIS is an airborne scanning laser altimeter. It can operate at an altitude up to 10 km above the ground and produce a data swath up to 2 km wide with 20-m wide footprints. The laser output wavelength is 1064 nm and pulse repetition rate is 1000 Hz. The LVIS L2 geolocated surface elevation product and Level-1b waveform product (http://nsidc.org/data/ilvis2.html and http://nsidc.org/data/ilvis1b.html) at National Snow and Ice Data Center, USA (NSIDC) are used in this study. The elevations are referenced to a geoid with tides and dynamic atmospheric corrections applied. The LVIS waveforms were fitted with Gaussian curves to calculate pulse width, peak location, pulse amplitude, and signal baseline. For each waveform, the centroid, skewness, kurtosis, and pulse area were also calculated. The waveform parameters were calibrated based on laser off pointing angle and laser channels. Calibrated LVIS waveform parameters show a coherent response to variations in surface features along their ground tracks. These parameters, combined with elevation, can be used to identify leads, enabling the derivation of sea-ice freeboard and thickness without relying upon visual images. Preliminary results show that the elevations in some of the LVIS campaigns may vary with laser incident angle; this can introduce an elevation bias if not corrected. Further analysis of the LVIS data shown that the laser incident angle related elevation bias can be removed empirically. The sea-ice freeboard and thickness results from LVIS are compared with NASA's Airborne Topographic Mapper (ATM) for an April 20, 2010 flight, when both LVIS and ATM sensors were on the same aircraft and made coincidental measurements along repeat ground tracks.

  17. Rapidly changing distribution of velocity and suspended materials under the drifting Arctic sea ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Ho Kyung; Im, Jungho; Kim, Yong Hoon; Yae Son, Eun; Lee, Sanggyun

    2015-04-01

    In two summer seasons of 2011 and 2014, the short-term (1-4 days) ice-camp study has been conducted on the drifting Arctic sea ice. In particular, in 2014, the international collaboration with the Marginal Ice Zone program (sponsored by Office of Naval Research) has been integrated. The mooring package comprises the acoustic Doppler velocity profiler, holographic imaging camera, and conductivity-temperature-depth profiler, which are used to understand the dynamic behavior of sea ice and spatial-temporal variation of mixing layer (ML) and suspended particulate matters under the sea ice. Mooring data clearly shows the mixing and entrainment pattern in the upper ML in the marginal ice zone. When ice floes drift toward the pack ice, the upward entrainment from the seasonal pycnocline to sea ice-water boundary was induced by shear across ML and seasonal pycnocline. The entrainment speed was in the range of 0.25-2 m/hr, which matches well with thickening and thinning rate of ML during the near-inertial period (~12 hr). When ice floes drift toward the open ocean, the turbulent wakes at the advancing edge of ice were combined with the entrainment caused by near-inertial motion, which results in a complex mixing pattern of both upward and downward fluxes in the ML. Also, the acoustic backscatter observed by the acoustic Doppler current profiler and beam attenuation from transmissometer revealed the increased concentration of suspended particulate materials in the ML, which can be direct evidence visualizing the mixing pattern. Results suggest that the mixing and entrainment found in our study sustain particulate matters in suspension within the upper ML for a few months.

  18. Trends and variability in summer sea ice cover in the Canadian Arctic based on the Canadian Ice Service Digital Archive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, S.; Tivy, A. C.; Alt, B.; McCourt, S.; Chagnon, R.; Crocker, G.; Carrieres, T. G.; Yackel, J.

    2010-12-01

    The Canadian Ice Service Digital Archive (CISDA) is a compilation of weekly ice charts that cover Canadian Waters; the data set is continually updated and it extends back to the early 1960s. The ice charts are represent and integration of remotely sensed sea ice data, surface observations, airborne and ship reports, operational model results and the expertise of experience ice forecasters. Although the accuracy, type and detail of information far exceeds what is attainable from a single satellite source, errors and uncertainties in the data are non-uniform in both space and time. In part one of this study the main sources of uncertainty in the database are reviewed and the data are validated for use in climate studies. In part two, trends and variability in summer sea ice in the Canadian Arctic are investigated using CISDA. These data revealed that between 1968 and 2008, summer sea ice cover has decreased by 8.9% ± 3.1% per decade in Hudson Bay, 2.9% ± 1.2% per decade in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago, 8.9% ± 3.1% per decade in Baffin Bay, and 5.2% ± 2.4% per decade in the Beaufort Sea. In general, these reductions in sea ice cover are linked to increases in early summer surface air temperature (SAT); significant increases in SAT were observed in every season and with the exception of the Hudson Bay region they are consistently greater than the pan-Arctic change by up to ~0.2oC per decade. Within the Canadian Arctic Archipelago and Baffin Bay, the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) index correlates well with multi-year ice coverage (positive correlation) and first-year ice coverage (negative correlation) suggesting that El Nino episodes precede summers with more multi-year ice and less first-year ice. Extending the trend calculations back to 1960 along the major shipping routes through the Canadian Arctic revealed significant decreases in summer sea ice coverage ranging between 11% and 15% per decade along the shipping route through Hudson Bay, the western

  19. Arctic Shipping Emissions in the Changing Climate

    OpenAIRE

    Vihanninjoki, Vesa

    2014-01-01

    Due to the Arctic climate change and the related diminishing of Arctic sea ice cover, the general conditions for Arctic shipping are changing. The retreat of Arctic sea ice opens up new routes for maritime transportation, both trans-Arctic passages and new alternatives within the Arctic region. Hence the amount of Arctic shipping is presumed to increase. Despite the observed development, the sailing conditions in the Arctic waters will remain challenging. Thus particular attention will be ...

  20. Relationships between declining summer sea ice, increasing temperatures and changing vegetation in the Siberian Arctic tundra from MODIS time series (2000–11)

    OpenAIRE

    Dutrieux, L.P.; Bartholomeus, H.; Herold, M.; Verbesselt, J.

    2012-01-01

    The concern about Arctic greening has grown recently as the phenomenon is thought to have significant influence on global climate via atmospheric carbon emissions. Earlier work on Arctic vegetation highlighted the role of summer sea ice decline in the enhanced warming and greening phenomena observed in the region, but did not contain enough details for spatially characterizing the interactions between sea ice, temperature and vegetation photosynthetic absorption. By using 1 km resolution data...

  1. Recent extreme light sea ice years in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago: 2011 and 2012 eclipse 1998 and 2007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. E. L. Howell

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Record low mean September sea ice area in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago (CAA was observed in 2011 (146 × 103 km2, a level that was nearly exceeded in 2012 (150 × 103 km2. These values eclipsed previous September records set in 1998 (200 × 103 km2 and 2007 (220 × 103 km2 and are ∼60% lower than the 1981–2010 mean September climatology. In this study, the driving processes contributing to the extreme light years of 2011 and 2012 were investigated, compared to previous extreme minima of 1998 and 2007, and contrasted against historic summer seasons with above average September ice area. The 2011 minimum was driven by positive July surface air temperature (SAT anomalies that facilitated rapid melt, coupled with atmospheric circulation in July and August that restricted multi-year ice (MYI inflow from the Arctic Ocean into the CAA. The 2012 minimum was also driven by positive July SAT anomalies (with coincident rapid melt but further ice decline was temporarily mitigated by atmospheric circulation in August and September which drove Arctic Ocean MYI inflow into the CAA. Atmospheric circulation was comparable between 2011 and 1998 (impeding Arctic Ocean MYI inflow and 2012 and 2007 (inducing Arctic Ocean MYI inflow. However, evidence of both preconditioned thinner Arctic Ocean MYI flowing into CAA and maximum landfast first-year ice (FYI thickness within the CAA was more apparent leading up to 2011 and 2012 than 1998 and 2007. The rapid melt process in 2011 and 2012 was more intense than observed in 1998 and 2007 because of the thinner ice cover being more susceptible to positive SAT forcing. The thinner sea ice cover within the CAA in recent years has also helped counteract the processes that facilitate extreme heavy ice years. The recent extreme light years within the CAA are associated with a longer navigation season within the Northwest Passage.

  2. In situ expression of eukaryotic ice-binding proteins in microbial communities of Arctic and Antarctic sea ice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhlig, Christiane; Kilpert, Fabian; Frickenhaus, Stephan; Kegel, Jessica U; Krell, Andreas; Mock, Thomas; Valentin, Klaus; Beszteri, Bánk

    2015-11-01

    Ice-binding proteins (IBPs) have been isolated from various sea-ice organisms. Their characterisation points to a crucial role in protecting the organisms in sub-zero environments. However, their in situ abundance and diversity in natural sea-ice microbial communities is largely unknown. In this study, we analysed the expression and phylogenetic diversity of eukaryotic IBP transcripts from microbial communities of Arctic and Antarctic sea ice. IBP transcripts were found in abundances similar to those of proteins involved in core cellular processes such as photosynthesis. Eighty-nine percent of the IBP transcripts grouped with known IBP sequences from diatoms, haptophytes and crustaceans, but the majority represented novel sequences not previously characterized in cultured organisms. The observed high eukaryotic IBP expression in natural eukaryotic sea ice communities underlines the essential role of IBPs for survival of many microorganisms in communities living under the extreme conditions of polar sea ice. PMID:25885562

  3. Concentration and distribution of 17 organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) in seawater from the Japan Sea northward to the Arctic Ocean

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Seventeen classic organochlorine pesticides in surface seawater were studied in terms of their composition pattern as well as their distribution pattern in the areas covering the Japan Sea,Okhotsk Sea,Bering Sea,Chukchi Sea and Arctic Ocean.Their concentrations varied,but roughly two levels were seen with one ranging between 0.1 and 1 ng L-1 for most HCH isomers and the other lower than 0.1 ng L-1 for other chemicals.Of the 17 target compounds,HCHs were dominant with a total concentration percentage generally more than 50%,and a relatively high concentration percentage of heptachlor and aldrine was also observed at scattered stations.The historical long-term trend of several target chemicals in the five sea zones considered was discussed in comparison with previous reports.Inter-sea zone comparison was carried out for individual chemicals by comparing the concentration variation in all five sea zones.A higher variation in concentration was generally found in the northern sea zones,namely the Bering Sea,Chukchi Sea and Arctic Ocean,for most target compounds.The sum concentration of the 17 target chemicals displayed a general trend of increasing northward from the Japan Sea to the Okhotsk Sea to the Bering Sea to the Arctic Ocean.Different latitudinal trends were found forγ-HCH andγ-HCH,and the reason of this difference was discussed by considering their divergence of thermodynamic properties,which could contribute to a slightly different fractionation effect during their northward transport driven by atmospheric long range transport.The source of the HCHs was identified by analyzing theγ-HCH/γ-HCH ratio,which was less than 4 without exception,indicating a component characteristic featuring a mixture of technical HCHs and lindane.In addition,the vertical distribution ofγ-HCH,γ-HCH and their ratio at station B80 was discussed.Different patterns were found in the upper 300 m while in layers from 300 m downward to 3500 m the patterns were fairly comparable

  4. The first aeromagnetic survey in the Arctic: results of the Graf Zeppelin airship flight of 1931

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raspopov, O. M.; Sokolov, S. N.; Demina, I. M.; Pellinen, R.; Petrova, A. A.

    2013-03-01

    In July of 1931, on the eve of International Polar Year II, an Arctic flight of the Graf Zeppelin rigid airship was organized. This flight was a realization of the idea of F. Nansen, who advocated the use of airships for the scientific exploration of the Arctic territories, which were poorly studied and hardly accessible at that time. The route of the airship flight was Berlin - Leningrad - Arkhangelsk - Franz Josef Land - Severnaya Zemlya - the Taimyr Peninsula - Novaya Zemlya - Arkhangelsk - Berlin. One of scientific goals of the expedition was to measure the H and D geomagnetic field components. Actually, the first aeromagnetic survey was carried out in the Arctic during the flight. After the expedition, only preliminary results of the geomagnetic measurements, in which an anomalous behavior of magnetic declination in the high-latitude part of the route was noted, were published. Our paper is concerned with the first aeromagnetic measurements in the Arctic and their analysis based on archival and modern data on the magnetic field in the Barents and Kara sea regions. It is shown that the magnetic field along the flight route had a complicated structure, which was not reflected in the magnetic charts of those times. The flight was very important for future development of aero- and ground-based magnetic surveys in the Arctic, showing new methods in such surveys.

  5. The first aeromagnetic survey in the Arctic: results of the Graf Zeppelin airship flight of 1931

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. M. Raspopov

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In July of 1931, on the eve of International Polar Year II, an Arctic flight of the Graf Zeppelin rigid airship was organized. This flight was a realization of the idea of F. Nansen, who advocated the use of airships for the scientific exploration of the Arctic territories, which were poorly studied and hardly accessible at that time. The route of the airship flight was Berlin – Leningrad – Arkhangelsk – Franz Josef Land – Severnaya Zemlya – the Taimyr Peninsula – Novaya Zemlya – Arkhangelsk – Berlin. One of scientific goals of the expedition was to measure the H and D geomagnetic field components. Actually, the first aeromagnetic survey was carried out in the Arctic during the flight. After the expedition, only preliminary results of the geomagnetic measurements, in which an anomalous behavior of magnetic declination in the high-latitude part of the route was noted, were published. Our paper is concerned with the first aeromagnetic measurements in the Arctic and their analysis based on archival and modern data on the magnetic field in the Barents and Kara sea regions. It is shown that the magnetic field along the flight route had a complicated structure, which was not reflected in the magnetic charts of those times. The flight was very important for future development of aero- and ground-based magnetic surveys in the Arctic, showing new methods in such surveys.

  6. Affects of Changes in Sea Ice Cover on Bowhead Whales and Subsistence Whaling in the Western Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, S.; Suydam, R.; Overland, J.; Laidre, K.; George, J.; Demaster, D.

    2004-12-01

    Global warming may disproportionately affect Arctic marine mammals and disrupt traditional subsistence hunting activities. Based upon analyses of a 24-year time series (1979-2002) of satellite-derived sea ice cover, we identified significant positive trends in the amount of open-water in three large and five small-scale regions in the western Arctic, including habitats where bowhead whales (Balaena mysticetus) feed or are suspected to feed. Bowheads are the only mysticete whale endemic to the Arctic and a cultural keystone species for Native peoples from northwestern Alaska and Chukotka, Russia. While copepods (Calanus spp.) are a mainstay of the bowhead diet, prey sampling conducted in the offshore region of northern Chukotka and stomach contents from whales harvested offshore of the northern Alaskan coast indicate that euphausiids (Thysanoessa spp.) advected from the Bering Sea are also common prey in autumn. Early departure of sea ice has been posited to control availability of zooplankton in the southeastern Bering Sea and in the Cape Bathurst polynya in the southeastern Canadian Beaufort Sea, with maximum secondary production associated with a late phytoplankton bloom in insolatoin-stratified open water. While it is unclear if declining sea-ice has directly affected production or advection of bowhead prey, an extension of the open-water season increases opportunities for Native subsistence whaling in autumn. Therefore, bowhead whales may provide a nexus for simultaneous exploration of the effects sea ice reduction on pagophillic marine mammals and on the social systems of the subsistence hunting community in the western Arctic. The NOAA/Alaska Fisheries Science Center and NSB/Department of Wildlife Management will investigate bowhead whale stock identity, seasonal distribution and subsistence use patterns during the International Polar Year, as an extension of research planned for 2005-06. This research is in response to recommendations from the Scientific

  7. Critical mechanisms for the formation of extreme arctic sea-ice extent in the summers of 2007 and 1996

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xiquan; Zib, Behnjamin J.; Xi, Baike; Stanfield, Ryan; Deng, Yi; Zhang, Xiangdong; Lin, Bing; Long, Charles N.

    2014-07-01

    Along with significant changes in the Arctic climate system, the largest year-to-year variation in sea-ice extent (SIE) has occurred in the Laptev, East Siberian, and Chukchi seas (defined here as the area of focus, AOF), among which the two highly contrasting extreme events were observed in the summers of 2007 and 1996 during the period 1979-2012. Although most efforts have been devoted to understanding the 2007 low, a contrasting high September SIE in 1996 might share some related but opposing forcing mechanisms. In this study, we investigate the mechanisms for the formation of these two extremes and quantitatively estimate the cloud-radiation-water vapor feedback to the sea-ice-concentration (SIC) variation utilizing satellite-observed sea-ice products and the NASA MERRA reanalysis. The low SIE in 2007 was associated with a persistent anticyclone over the Beaufort Sea coupled with low pressure over Eurasia, which induced anomalous southerly winds. Ample warm and moist air from the North Pacific was transported to the AOF and resulted in positive anomalies of cloud fraction (CF), precipitable water vapor (PWV), surface LWnet (down-up), total surface energy and temperature. In contrast, the high SIE event in 1996 was associated with a persistent low pressure over the central Arctic coupled with high pressure along the Eastern Arctic coasts, which generated anomalous northerly winds and resulted in negative anomalies of above mentioned atmospheric parameters. In addition to their immediate impacts on sea ice reduction, CF, PWV and radiation can interplay to lead to a positive feedback loop among them, which plays a critical role in reinforcing sea ice to a great low value in 2007. During the summer of 2007, the minimum SIC is 31 % below the climatic mean, while the maximum CF, LWnet and PWV can be up to 15 %, 20 Wm-2, and 4 kg m-3 above. The high anti-correlations (-0.79, -0.61, -0.61) between the SIC and CF, PWV, and LWnet indicate that CF, PWV and LW radiation

  8. Revisiting the Potential of Melt Pond Fraction as a Predictor for the Seasonal Arctic Sea Ice Extent Minimum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiping; Song, Mirong; Horton, Radley M.; Hu, Yongyun

    2015-01-01

    The rapid change in Arctic sea ice in recent decades has led to a rising demand for seasonal sea ice prediction. A recent modeling study that employed a prognostic melt pond model in a stand-alone sea ice model found that September Arctic sea ice extent can be accurately predicted from the melt pond fraction in May. Here we show that satellite observations show no evidence of predictive skill in May. However, we find that a significantly strong relationship (high predictability) first emerges as the melt pond fraction is integrated from early May to late June, with a persistent strong relationship only occurring after late July. Our results highlight that late spring to mid summer melt pond information is required to improve the prediction skill of the seasonal sea ice minimum. Furthermore, satellite observations indicate a much higher percentage of melt pond formation in May than does the aforementioned model simulation, which points to the need to reconcile model simulations and observations, in order to better understand key mechanisms of melt pond formation and evolution and their influence on sea ice state.

  9. Relating the Age of Arctic Sea Ice to its Thickness, as Measured during NASA’s ICESat and IceBridge Campaigns

    OpenAIRE

    Mark A. Tschudi; Stroeve, Julienne C.; J. Scott Stewart

    2016-01-01

    Recent satellite observations yield estimates of the distribution of sea ice thickness across the entire Arctic Ocean. While these sensors were only placed in operation within the last few years, information from other sensors may assist us with estimating the distribution of sea ice thickness in the Arctic beginning in the 1980s. A previous study found that the age of sea ice is correlated to sea ice thickness from 2003 to 2006, but an extension of the temporal analysis is needed to better q...

  10. Arctic Ocean freshwater composition, pathways and transformations from a passive tracer simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Per Pemberton

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Freshwater (FW induced transformations in the upper Arctic Ocean were studied using a coupled regional sea ice-ocean model driven by winds and thermodynamic forcing from a reanalysis of data during the period 1948–2011, focusing on the mean state during 1968–2011. Using passive tracers to mark a number of FW sources and sinks, their mean composition, pathways and export were examined. The distribution of the simulated FW height reproduced the known features of the Arctic Ocean and volume-integrated FW content matched climatological estimates reasonably well. Input from Eurasian rivers and extraction by sea-ice formation dominate the composition of the Arctic FW content whilst Pacific water increases in importance in the Canadian Basin. Though pathways generally agreed with previous studies the locus of the Eurasian runoff shelf-basin transport centred at the Alpha-Mendeleyev ridge, shifting the Pacific–Atlantic front eastwards. A strong coupling between tracers representing Eurasian runoff and sea-ice formation showed how water modified on the shelf spreads across the Arctic and mainly exits through the Fram Strait. Transformation to salinity dependent coordinates showed how Atlantic water is modified by both low-salinity shelf and Pacific waters in an estuary-like overturning producing water masses of intermediate salinity that are exported to the Nordic Seas. A total halocline renewal rate of 1.0 Sv, including both shelf-basin exchange and cross-isohaline flux, was estimated from the transports: both components were of equal magnitude. The model's halocline shelf-basin exchange is dominated by runoff and sea-ice processes at the western shelves (the Barents and Kara seas and Pacific water at the eastern shelves (the Laptev, East Siberian and Chukchi seas.

  11. A comparative study on three EOF analysis techniques using decades of Arctic sea-ice concentration data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈新保; 刘信陶; 李松年; Chow Annie

    2015-01-01

    Change in Arctic sea ice extent is one of the indicators of global climate changes. Spatio-temporal change and change patterns can be identified using various methods to facilitate human understanding global climate changes. Three empirical orthogonal function (EOF) techniques are discussed and applied to decades of sea-ice concentration (SIC) dataset in Arctic area for identifying independent patterns. It was found that: 1) discrepancies exist in magnitude and scope for each EOF pattern, however, the first two leading EOFs of variability possess high similarities in structure and shape; 2) Even though there are somewhat differences in amplitude of each PC mode, the first two leading PC modes maintain consistent in overall trend and periodicity; 3) There are significant discrepancies and inconsistencies in the third and fourth leading EOF and PC modes. The accuracies of three techniques are further validated in representing the physical phenomena of SIC anomaly patterns.

  12. Kara para aklamayla mücadele

    OpenAIRE

    Aydınşakir, Esen

    2008-01-01

    Kara para aklayıcılar devletin, toplum düzeni içinde koyduğu yasaları hiçe sayarak toplum düzenini bozmakta, devlete ve vatandaşlara zarar vermektedir. Kara paranın varlığı ekonomik göstergeleri çarpıtmakta, ülke içindeki rekabet ve devlet bütçesini olumsuz yönde etkilemekte, kayıt dışı ekonominin büyümesine neden olmakta, beklenmedik anlarda ülkeye giriş-çıkış yaptığı için döviz kurunda ve fiyatlarda istikrarın yakalanmasının zorlaşması gibi devlete ve topluma birçok zararı vardır. Bu nedenl...

  13. Monitoring Sea Ice Conditions and Use in Arctic Alaska to Enhance Community Adaptation to Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druckenmiller, M. L.; Eicken, H.

    2010-12-01

    Sea ice changes in the coastal zone, while less conspicuous in relation to the dramatic thinning and retreat of perennial Arctic sea ice, can be more readily linked to local impacts. Shorefast ice is a unique area for interdisciplinary research aimed at improving community adaptation to climate through local-scale environmental observations. Here, geophysical monitoring, local Iñupiat knowledge, and the documented use of ice by the Native hunting community of Barrow, Alaska are combined to relate coastal ice processes and morphologies in the Chukchi Sea to ice stability and community adaption strategies for travel, hunting, and risk assessment. A multi-year effort to map and survey the community’s seasonal ice trails, alongside a detailed record of shorefast ice conditions, provides insight into how hunters evaluate the evolution of ice throughout winter and spring. Various data sets are integrated to relate the annual accretion history of the local ice cover to both measurements of ice thickness and topography and hunter observations of ice types and hazards. By relating changes in the timing of shorefast ice stabilization, offshore ice conditions, and winter wind patterns to ice characteristics in locations where spring bowhead whaling occurs, we are working toward an integrated scientific product compatible with the perspective of local ice experts. A baseline for assessing future change and community climate-related vulnerabilities may not be characterized by single variables, such as ice thickness, but rather by how changes in observable variables manifest in impacts to human activities. This research matches geophysical data to ice-use to establish such a baseline. Documenting human-environment interactions will allow future monitoring to illustrate how strategies for continued community ice-use are indicative of or responsive to change, and potentially capable of incorporating science products as additional sources of useable information.

  14. Egg size and reproductive adaptations among Arctic deep-sea copepods (Calanoida, Paraeuchaeta)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auel, Holger

    2004-10-01

    Reproductive strategies of the four congeneric and sympatric calanoid copepods Paraeuchaeta glacialis, P. norvegica, P. barbata, and P. polaris were studied in the Arctic Greenland Sea. Females of all species produce egg sacs and carry their brood attached to the genital opening until the offspring hatch. However, egg size and lipid content as well as clutch size and the fraction of females carrying egg masses show characteristic differences among the four species. P. glacialis and P. norvegica produce large numbers (37 to more than 50) of relatively small eggs, whereas P. barbata and P. polaris rely on small numbers (10 to 19 and 4 to 6, respectively) of large eggs with a high energy content. There is no correlation between female body size and egg size or clutch size, respectively. Females of the smallest species, P. polaris, produce relatively large eggs and show the highest energetic investment per egg. In contrast, energetic investment per clutch is highest in P. glacialis. Reproductive adaptations appear to be strongly related to the depth range inhabited by the respective species. In the central Greenland Sea P. glacialis and P. norvegica occur in the epipelagial and upper mesopelagial, whereas the other two species inhabit lower mesopelagic to bathypelagic depths. Thus, egg size increases with depth of occurrence, whereas clutch size is inversely correlated with depth. This observation leads to the hypothesis that the evolution of large eggs in deep-sea copepods may enable hatchlings to rely on a lecithotrophic development and thus represents a successful adaptation to cope with the limited food supply at great depths, whereas high offspring numbers in epipelagic species compensate for higher predation risks in the euphotic zone.

  15. Cloud and boundary layer interactions over the Arctic sea-ice in late summer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. D. Shupe

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Observations from the Arctic Summer Cloud Ocean Study (ASCOS, in the central Arctic sea-ice pack in late summer 2008, provide a detailed view of cloud-atmosphere-surface interactions and vertical mixing processes over the sea–ice environment. Measurements from a suite of ground-based remote sensors, near surface meteorological and aerosol instruments, and profiles from radiosondes and a helicopter are combined to characterize a week-long period dominated by low-level, mixed-phase, stratocumulus clouds. Detailed case studies and statistical analyses are used to develop a conceptual model for the cloud and atmosphere structure and their interactions in this environment. Clouds were persistent during the period of study, having qualities that suggest they were sustained through a combination of advective influences and in-cloud processes, with little contribution from the surface. Radiative cooling near cloud top produced buoyancy-driven, turbulent eddies that contributed to cloud formation and created a cloud-driven mixed layer. The depth of this mixed layer was related to the amount of turbulence and condensed cloud water. Coupling of this cloud-driven mixed layer to the surface boundary layer was primarily determined by proximity. For 75% of the period of study, the primary stratocumulus cloud-driven mixed layer was decoupled from the surface and typically at a warmer potential temperature. Since the near-surface temperature was constrained by the ocean–ice mixture, warm temperatures aloft suggest that these air masses had not significantly interacted with the sea–ice surface. Instead, back trajectory analyses suggest that these warm airmasses advected into the central Arctic Basin from lower latitudes. Moisture and aerosol particles likely accompanied these airmasses, providing necessary support for cloud formation. On the occasions when cloud-surface coupling did occur, back trajectories indicated that these air masses advected at low

  16. Arctic Sea tallinlased - piraadid, ökoloogid, võlanõudjad või palgatud kinnikukkujad? / Janar Filippov

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Filippov, Janar, 1976-

    2009-01-01

    Autor avaldab arvamust, et täit tõde kaubalaeva Arctic Sea 2-nädalase kadumise kohta ei saa avalikkus ilmselt kunagi teada ning esialgu jäävad õhku küsimused, kas kaheksa "piraati" läksid laevale omal initsiatiivil, mõne kuritegeliku grupeeringu või Venemaa võimude tellimusel. Vt. samas: Tavalised kriminaalid

  17. Physical, profile and underway data collected aboard the Sikuliaq during cruise SKQ201512S in the Arctic Ocean, Beaufort Sea and Bering Sea from 2015-09-27 to 2015-11-10 (NCEI Accession 0156185)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0156185 includes physical, profile and underway data collected aboard the Sikuliaq during cruise SKQ201512S in the Arctic Ocean, Beaufort Sea and...

  18. Biological, chemical and other data collected aboard the HEALY during cruise HLY1201 in the Arctic Ocean, Beaufort Sea and Bering Sea from 2012-08-09 to 2012-08-25 (NODC Accession 0116859)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC accession 0116859 includes biological, chemical, optical and physical data collected aboard the HEALY during cruise HLY1201 in the Arctic Ocean, Beaufort Sea...

  19. Ikaite crystals in melting sea ice - implications for pCO(2) and pH levels in Arctic surface waters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rysgaard, Søren; Glud, Ronnie N.; Lennert, K.;

    2012-01-01

    A major issue of Arctic marine science is to understand whether the Arctic Ocean is, or will be, a source or sink for air-sea CO2 exchange. This has been complicated by the recent discoveries of ikaite (a polymorph of CaCO3 center dot 6H(2)O) in Arctic and Antarctic sea ice, which indicate...... primary production within the ice floe of 0.3-1.3 mmol m(-2) sea ice d(-1). Finally, the presence of ikaite in sea ice and the dissolution of the mineral during melting of the sea ice and mixing of the melt water into the surface oceanic mixed layer accounted for half of the estimated pCO(2) uptake...

  20. The Increase of the Ice-free Season as Further Indication of the Rapid Decline of the Arctic sea ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, J.

    2008-12-01

    The unprecedented depletion of sea ice in large sectors of the Arctic Ocean in the summer of 2007 has been the subject of many publications which highlight the spectacular disappearance of the sea ice at the time of minimum ice cover or emphasise the losses at very high latitudes. However, minimum values can be strongly affected by specific circumstances occurring in a comparatively short time interval. The unusually clear skies and the presence of a particular wind pattern over the Arctic Ocean may partly explain the record minimum attained in September 2007. In this contribution, instead of limiting ourselves to the September minimum or the March maximum, we consider the ice conditions throughout the year, opting for a less used, and hopefully more convenient approach. We chose as variables to describe the evolution of the sea ice situation in the Arctic Ocean and peripheral seas in the 1979-2007 period the length of the ice- free season (LIFS) and the inverse sea ice index (ISII). The latter is a quantity that measures the degree of absence of sea ice in a year and varies between zero (when there is a perennial ice cover) and one (when there is open water all year round). We used sea ice concentration data obtained from passive microwave satellite imagery and processed with the Bootstrap algorithm for the SMMR and SSM/I periods, and with the Enhanced NASA Team algorithm for the AMSR-E period. From a linear fit of the observed data, we found that the average LIFS in the Arctic went from 118 days in the late 1970s to 148 days in 2006, which represents an average rate of increase of 1.1 days/year. In the period 2001-2007 the LIFS increased monotonically at an average rate of 5.5 days/year, in good agreement with the general consensus that the Arctic sea ice is currently in an accelerated decline. We also found that 2007 was the longest ice- free season on record (168 days). The ISII also reached a maximum in 2007 . We also investigated what happened at the regional

  1. Combined Effects of the North Atlantic Oscillation and the Arctic Oscillation on Sea Surface Temperature in the Alborán Sea

    OpenAIRE

    Báez, José C.; Gimeno, L.; Gómez-Gesteira, M.; Ferri-Yáñez, F.; Real, R.

    2013-01-01

    We explored the possible effects of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) and Arctic Oscillation (AO) on interannual sea surface temperature (SST) variations in the Albora´n Sea, both separately and combined. The probability of observing mean annual SST values higher than average was related to NAO and AO values of the previous year. The effect of NAO on SST was negative, while that of AO was positive. The pure effects of NAO and AO on SST are obscuring each other, due to the posit...

  2. Estimating Arctic sea-ice freeze-up and break-up from the satellite record: A comparison of different approaches in the Chukchi and Beaufort Seas

    OpenAIRE

    Mark Johnson; Hajo Eicken

    2016-01-01

    1. Abstract The recognized importance of the annual cycle of sea ice in the Arctic to heat budgets, human behavior, and ecosystem functions, requires consistent definitions of such key events in the ice cycle as break-up and freeze-up. An internally consistent and reproducible approach to characterize the timing of these events in the annual sea-ice cycle is described. An algorithm was developed to calculate the start and end dates of freeze-up and break-up and applied to time series of satel...

  3. Sensitivity of CryoSat-2 Arctic sea-ice freeboard and thickness on radar-waveform interpretation

    OpenAIRE

    Ricker, R.; Hendricks, S.; V. Helm; H. Skourup; M. Davidson

    2014-01-01

    In the context of quantifying Arctic ice-volume decrease at global scale, the CryoSat-2 satellite was launched in 2010 and is equipped with the Ku band synthetic aperture radar altimeter SIRAL (Synthetic Aperture Interferometric Radar Altimeter), which we use to derive sea-ice freeboard defined as the height of the ice surface above the sea level. Accurate CryoSat-2 range measurements over open water and the ice surface of the order of centimetres are necessary to achieve...

  4. In-situ calibration and validation of Cryosat-2 observations over arctic sea ice north of Svalbard

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerland, Sebastian; Renner, Angelika H. H.; Spreen, Gunnar;

    CryoSat-2's radar altimeter allows to observe the panArctic sea ice thickness up to 88°N on a monthly basis. However, calibration and validation are crucial to assess limitations and accuracy of the altimeter, and to better quantify the uncertainties involved in converting sea ice freeboard...... to thickness. We conducted four ship-based campaigns 2010-2012 to the pack ice north of Svalbard. Detailed in situ measurements of snow and ice thickness, freeboard, and snow stratigraphy and density were performed. The data were integrated with satellite data, airborne ice thickness observations, and aerial...

  5. Biogeography and Photosynthetic Biomass of Arctic Marine Pico-Eukaroytes during Summer of the Record Sea Ice Minimum 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metfies, Katja; von Appen, Wilken-Jon; Kilias, Estelle; Nicolaus, Anja; Nöthig, Eva-Maria

    2016-01-01

    Information on recent photosynthetic biomass distribution and biogeography of Arctic marine pico-eukaryotes (0.2-3 μm) is needed to better understand consequences of environmental change for Arctic marine ecosystems. We analysed pico-eukaryote biomass and community composition in Fram Strait and large parts of the Central Arctic Ocean (Nansen Basin, Amundsen Basin) using chlorophyll a (Chl a) measurements, automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (ARISA) and 454-pyrosequencing. Samples were collected during summer 2012, the year with the most recent record sea ice minimum. Chl a concentrations were highest in eastern Fram Strait and pico-plankton accounted for 60-90% of Chl a biomass during the observation period. ARISA-patterns and 454-pyrosequencing revealed that pico-eukaryote distribution is closely related to water mass distribution in the euphotic zone of the Arctic Ocean. Phaeocystaceae, Micromonas sp., Dinophyceae and Syndiniales constitute a high proportion of sequence reads, while sequence abundance of autotrophic Phaeocystaceae and mixotrophic Micromonas sp. was inversely correlated. Highest sequence abundances of Phaeocystaceae were observed in the warm Atlantic Waters in Fram Strait, while Micromonas sp. dominated the abundant biosphere in the arctic halocline. Our results are of particular interest considering existing hypotheses that environmental conditions in Nansen Basin might become more similar to the current conditions in Fram Strait. We propose that in response, biodiversity and biomass of pico-eukaryotes in Nansen Basin could resemble those currently observed in Fram Strait in the future. This would significantly alter biogeochemical cycles in a large part of the Central Arctic Ocean. PMID:26895333

  6. Fluctuating Arctic Sea ice thickness changes estimated by an in situ learned and empirically forced neural network model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belchansky, G.I.; Douglas, D.C.; Platonov, N.G.

    2008-01-01

    Sea ice thickness (SIT) is a key parameter of scientific interest because understanding the natural spatiotemporal variability of ice thickness is critical for improving global climate models. In this paper, changes in Arctic SIT during 1982-2003 are examined using a neural network (NN) algorithm trained with in situ submarine ice draft and surface drilling data. For each month of the study period, the NN individually estimated SIT of each ice-covered pixel (25-km resolution) based on seven geophysical parameters (four shortwave and longwave radiative fluxes, surface air temperature, ice drift velocity, and ice divergence/convergence) that were cumulatively summed at each monthly position along the pixel's previous 3-yr drift track (or less if the ice was <3 yr old). Average January SIT increased during 1982-88 in most regions of the Arctic (+7.6 ?? 0.9 cm yr-1), decreased through 1996 Arctic-wide (-6.1 ?? 1.2 cm yr-1), then modestly increased through 2003 mostly in the central Arctic (+2.1 ?? 0.6 cm yr-1). Net ice volume change in the Arctic Ocean from 1982 to 2003 was negligible, indicating that cumulative ice growth had largely replaced the estimated 45 000 km3 of ice lost by cumulative export. Above 65??N, total annual ice volume and interannual volume changes were correlated with the Arctic Oscillation (AO) at decadal and annual time scales, respectively. Late-summer ice thickness and total volume varied proportionally until the mid-1990s, but volume did not increase commensurate with the thickening during 1996-2002. The authors speculate that decoupling of the ice thickness-volume relationship resulted from two opposing mechanisms with different latitudinal expressions: a recent quasi-decadal shift in atmospheric circulation patterns associated with the AO's neutral state facilitated ice thickening at high latitudes while anomalously warm thermal forcing thinned and melted the ice cap at its periphery. ?? 2008 American Meteorological Society.

  7. Biogeography and Photosynthetic Biomass of Arctic Marine Pico-Eukaroytes during Summer of the Record Sea Ice Minimum 2012.

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    Katja Metfies

    Full Text Available Information on recent photosynthetic biomass distribution and biogeography of Arctic marine pico-eukaryotes (0.2-3 μm is needed to better understand consequences of environmental change for Arctic marine ecosystems. We analysed pico-eukaryote biomass and community composition in Fram Strait and large parts of the Central Arctic Ocean (Nansen Basin, Amundsen Basin using chlorophyll a (Chl a measurements, automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (ARISA and 454-pyrosequencing. Samples were collected during summer 2012, the year with the most recent record sea ice minimum. Chl a concentrations were highest in eastern Fram Strait and pico-plankton accounted for 60-90% of Chl a biomass during the observation period. ARISA-patterns and 454-pyrosequencing revealed that pico-eukaryote distribution is closely related to water mass distribution in the euphotic zone of the Arctic Ocean. Phaeocystaceae, Micromonas sp., Dinophyceae and Syndiniales constitute a high proportion of sequence reads, while sequence abundance of autotrophic Phaeocystaceae and mixotrophic Micromonas sp. was inversely correlated. Highest sequence abundances of Phaeocystaceae were observed in the warm Atlantic Waters in Fram Strait, while Micromonas sp. dominated the abundant biosphere in the arctic halocline. Our results are of particular interest considering existing hypotheses that environmental conditions in Nansen Basin might become more similar to the current conditions in Fram Strait. We propose that in response, biodiversity and biomass of pico-eukaryotes in Nansen Basin could resemble those currently observed in Fram Strait in the future. This would significantly alter biogeochemical cycles in a large part of the Central Arctic Ocean.

  8. Using timing of ice retreat to predict timing of fall freeze-up in the Arctic

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    Stroeve, Julienne C.; Crawford, Alex D.; Stammerjohn, Sharon

    2016-06-01

    Reliable forecasts of the timing of sea ice advance are needed in order to reduce risks associated with operating in the Arctic as well as planning of human and environmental emergencies. This study investigates the use of a simple statistical model relating the timing of ice retreat to the timing of ice advance, taking advantage of the inherent predictive power supplied by the seasonal ice-albedo feedback and ocean heat uptake. Results show that using the last retreat date to predict the first advance date is applicable in some regions, such as Baffin Bay and the Laptev and East Siberian seas, where a predictive skill is found even after accounting for the long-term trend in both variables. Elsewhere, in the Arctic, there is some predictive skills depending on the year (e.g., Kara and Beaufort seas), but none in regions such as the Barents and Bering seas or the Sea of Okhotsk. While there is some suggestion that the relationship is strengthening over time, this may reflect that higher correlations are expected during periods when the underlying trend is strong.

  9. The effect of tides on sea ice, temperature and salinity fields in the Arctic Ocean on multi-decadal scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luneva, Maria; Harle, James; Holt, Jason; Aksenov, Yevgeny

    2014-05-01

    The effects of tides on the hydrographical fields and sea-ice on multi-decadal timescales (from 1978-2007) has been examined using a newly developed Arctic Ocean NEMO-shelf-ice coupled model of moderate (10-15km) resolution, which explicitly simulates tides and processes in the benthic boundary layer. The model realistically reproduces the tides, which can be extremely strong on the Arctic shelf, with amplitudes reaching 4.4m in the Hudson Strait, 2-3m in the White Sea and above 1m in the Canadian Archipelago. It also accurately predicts the sea ice volume trends over this period, when compared with PIOMAS results, and demonstrates a stronger reduction in ice volume (by ~15%) and extent (by ~5%) in comparison with simulations without tides. By including tides in the Arctic simulation we find: (i) a decrease in ice thickness from 0.1 to 1m in Central Arctic, and up to 2m in the Canadian Archipelago; (ii) ice melting and thinning is accompanied by an increase in average surface salinity by 2PSU and changes of river freshwater pathways; (iii) cooling of the upper 300m of the Arctic Ocean in comparison with non-tidal simulations. We hypothesize that tidal mixing and advection support the supply of heat from warm Atlantic waters through the strongly stratified halocline layer. It has been found that tidal effects on the water mass structure are regionally localised, but subsequent can be transported across the entire basin. We discuss the following physical mechanisms for tidal influence: (a) increased vertical mixing near the bottom layer and on the ice-ocean interface; (b) opening and closing of leads in the sea ice in summer time altering the solar radiation flux to water below, thus affecting the ocean heat content and amount of ice melt ; (c) opening and closing of leads in the sea ice during winter leading to an increase the heat loss from the ocean to atmosphere, with subsequent ice production and brine rejection; (d) increased mixing in the pycnocline and at the

  10. New IceTracker Tool Depicts Forward and Backward Arctic Sea Ice Trajectories

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    Pfirman, S. L.; Campbell, G.; Tremblay, B.; Newton, R.; Meier, W.

    2013-12-01

    The IceTracker allows researchers, educators and the public to depict the forward drift trajectories of sea ice, as well as back trajectories showing the path the ice took to the specified location. Users enter in the location and date of an ice parcel - or parcels -- of interest, then select a later or earlier date, depending on whether they want to see the forward or the backward trajectory. The database for the IceTracker contains ice motion vectors based upon a pattern recognition algorithm applied to images of sea ice derived from microwave satellite data. Ice motion vector plots are single day motion estimates. The available database starts November 1978 and runs to the present with ca. 1 month delay. IceTracker output includes both an image of the ice motion path as well as a data file that has quasi-daily date, latitude, longitude, estimated sea ice age, ice drift speed, mean air temperature, and water depth. One can overlay different days on the same plot in different colors for comparing different seasons. This presentation highlights research, education, and outreach applications of the tool. Research applications include estimating the origin and melt location of sediment and contaminants sampled on or in sea ice, assessing potential trajectories oil spilled in ice-infested waters, documenting seasonal and interannual variability in ice drift trajectories from specific locations, defining the typical origins of ice that tend to melt in an area of interest, such as a polynya, and assessing the deviation from drift of polar bear foraging. The IceTracker can also be used in the social sciences, for example recreating Nansen's historic 1893-1896 trans-Arctic drift with the Fram under modern conditions and considering the implications of alternative fates. Educational purposes include teaching students about ice dynamics and interannual variability by setting up team competitions to be the first to reach the North Pole or some other location. Applications

  11. Relative sea level and coastal environments in arctic Alaska during Marine Isotope Stage 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farquharson, L. M.; Mann, D. H.; Jones, B. M.; Rittenour, T. M.; Grosse, G.; Groves, P.

    2015-12-01

    Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 5 was characterized by marked fluctuations in climate, the warmest being MIS 5e (124-119 ka) when relative sea level (RSL) stood 2-10 m higher than today along many coastlines. In northern Alaska, marine deposits now 5-10 m above modern sea level are assigned to this time period and termed the Pelukian transgression (PT). Complicating this interpretation is the possibility that an intra-Stage 5 ice shelf extended along the Alaskan coast, causing isostatic depression along its grounded margins, which caused RSL highs even during periods of low, global RSL. Here we use optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) to date inferred PT deposits on the Beaufort Sea coastal plain. A transition from what we interpret to be lagoonal mud to sandy tidal flat deposits lying ~ 2.75 m asl dates to 113+/-18 ka. Above this, a 5-m thick gravelly barrier beach dates to 95 +/- 20 ka. This beach contains well-preserved marine molluscs, whale vertebrae, and walrus tusks. Pleistocene-aged ice-rich eolian silt (yedoma) blanket the marine deposits and date to 57.6 +/-10.9 ka. Our interpretation of this chronostratigraphy is that RSL was several meters higher than today during MIS 5e, and lagoons or brackish lakes were prevalent. Gravel barrier beaches moved onshore as local RSL rose further after MIS 5e. The error range of the OSL age of the barrier-beach unit spans the remaining four substages of MIS 5; however, the highstand of RSL on this arctic coastline appears to occurr after the warmest part of the last interglacial and appears not to be coeval with the eustatic maximum reached at lower latitudes during MIS 5. One possibility is that RSL along the Beaufort Sea coast was affected by isostatic depression caused by an ice shelf associated with widespread, intra-Stage 5 glaciation that was out of phase with lower latitude glaciation and whose extent and timing remains enigmatic.

  12. Regional Sea level change in the Arctic Ocean from a combination of radar and laser altimetry, tide gauges and ocean models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, O. B.; Bondo, T.; Cheng, Y.

    2010-12-01

    Lack of adequate spatial and temporal sea level observations in the Arctic Ocean is one of the most challenging problems in the study of changes in sea level and ocean circulation in the Arctic Ocean today. Especially as sea level variation in the Arctic Ocean plays an important role in the global climate system. Only a few tide gauges with long time series exists (1933-> present). Preliminarily investigations show that several of these are not indicative of sea level changes but rather of changes in river flows due to their position so a careful editing is required. The use of satellite altimetry (1992->present) is hampered due to a suite of problems. The error on sea level recovery increases, standard retracking removes most data in areas of sea ice and furthermore most of the Arctic is not covered due to the inclination of the satellites. Only the radar altimeters on board ERS and ENVISAT and the laser altimeter on board ICESAT have so far provided sparse information about Arctic sea level change. However, the combined relatively long operation period of the three satellites has now made it possible to investigate annual and decadal sea level variations. Together with similar results from ocean models like GECCO, MICOM and University of Washington Ocean model we aim to improve the recovery of sea level changes in the Arctic Ocean on annual to inter-decadal scale and the first result for this work will be presented. The presentation is a contribution to the EU supported projects MONARCH and MyOcean.

  13. The effects of additional black carbon on the albedo of Arctic sea ice: variation with sea ice type and snow cover

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    A. A. Marks

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The response of the albedo of bare sea ice and snow-covered sea ice to the addition of black carbon is calculated. Visible light absorption and light-scattering cross-sections are derived for a typical first-year and multi-year sea ice with both "dry" and "wet" snow types. The cross-sections are derived using data from a 1970s field study that recorded both reflectivity and light penetration in Arctic sea ice and snow overlying sea ice. The variation of absorption cross-section over the visible wavelengths suggests black carbon is the dominating light-absorbing impurity. The response of first-year and multi-year sea ice albedo to increasing black carbon, from 1 to 1024 ng g−1, in a top 5 cm layer of a 155 cm-thick sea ice was calculated using a radiative-transfer model. The albedo of the first-year sea ice is more sensitive to additional loadings of black carbon than the multi-year sea ice. An addition of 8 ng g−1 of black carbon causes a decrease to 98.7% of the original albedo for first-year sea ice compared to a decrease to 99.7% for the albedo of multi-year sea ice, at a wavelength of 500 nm. The albedo of sea ice is surprisingly unresponsive to additional black carbon up to 100 ng g−1 . Snow layers on sea ice may mitigate the effects of black carbon in sea ice. Wet and dry snow layers of 0.5, 1, 2, 5 and 10 cm depth were added onto the sea ice surface. The albedo of the snow surface was calculated whilst the black carbon in the underlying sea ice was increased. A layer of snow 0.5 cm thick greatly diminishes the effect of black carbon in sea ice on the surface albedo. The albedo of a 2–5 cm snow layer (less than the e-folding depth of snow is still influenced by the underlying sea ice, but the effect of additional black carbon in the sea ice is masked.

  14. Variability of scaling time series in the Arctic sea-ice drift dynamics

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    A. Chmel

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The motion of an individual ice floe in the Arctic Ocean was monitored at the Russian research station North Pole 35 established on the ice pack in 2008. The ice floe speed (V was found to be correlated with wind speed (v in main features, such as the positions of maxima and minima of V and v. However, the fine structure of the V-variation cannot be explained by the wind forcing alone. There were periods of time when the floe drift was affected by the interactions of ice floes between each other or by the periodical forcing due to either the Coriolis inertia effect or the tidal activity. These data were compared with the "waiting times" statistics that are the distributions of time intervals between subsequent, sufficiently strong changes in the kinetic energy of drifting ice floe. These distributions were measured in several time windows differing in the average wind speed and wind direction, and/or in the mechanical state of the ice pack. The distribution functions N (t>τ, where N is the number of successive events of energy change separated by the time interval t that exceeds τ, constructed in different time windows demonstrate fractal or a multifractal nature of the time series during motion in the consolidated ice pack but were truly random when the ice floe drifted in the highly fragmented sea ice. The latter result shows the existenc