WorldWideScience

Sample records for arctic haze

  1. Why models struggle to capture Arctic Haze: the underestimated role of gas flaring and domestic combustion emissions

    OpenAIRE

    Stohl, A.; Klimont, Z.; S. Eckhardt; K. Kupiainen

    2013-01-01

    Arctic Haze is a seasonal phenomenon with high concentrations of accumulation-mode aerosols occurring in the Arctic in winter and early spring. Chemistry transport models and climate chemistry models struggle to reproduce this phenomenon, and this has recently prompted changes in aerosol removal schemes to remedy the modeling problems. In this paper, we show that shortcomings in current emission data sets are at least as important. We perform a 3 yr model simulation of black carbon (BC...

  2. 1 Mixing state and absorbing properties of black carbon during Arctic haze

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanatta, Marco; Gysel, Martin; Eleftheriadis, Kosas; Laj, Paolo; Hans-Werner, Jacobi

    2016-04-01

    The Arctic atmosphere is periodically affected by the Arctic haze occurring in spring. One of its particulate components is the black carbon (BC), which is considered to be an important contributor to climate change in the Arctic region. Beside BC-cloud interaction and albedo reduction of snow, BC may influence Arctic climate interacting directly with the solar radiation, warming the corresponding aerosol layer (Flanner, 2013). Such warming depends on BC atmospheric burden and also on the efficiency of BC to absorb light, in fact the light absorption is enhanced by mixing of BC with other atmospheric non-absorbing materials (lensing effect) (Bond et al., 2013). The BC reaching the Arctic is evilly processed, due to long range transport. Aging promote internal mixing and thus absorption enhancement. Such modification of mixing and is quantification after long range transport have been observed in the Atlantic ocean (China et al., 2015) but never investigated in the Arctic. During field experiments conducted at the Zeppelin research site in Svalbard during the 2012 Arctic spring, we investigated the relative precision of different BC measuring techniques; a single particle soot photometer was then used to assess the coating of Arctic black carbon. This allowed quantifying the absorption enhancement induced by internal mixing via optical modelling; the optical assessment of aged black carbon in the arctic will be of major interest for future radiative forcing assessment.Optical characterization of the total aerosol indicated that in 2012 no extreme smoke events took place and that the aerosol population was dominated by fine and non-absorbing particles. Low mean concentration of rBC was found (30 ng m-3), with a mean mass equivalent diameter above 200 nm. rBC concentration detected with the continuous soot monitoring system and the single particle soot photometer was agreeing within 15%. Combining absorption coefficient observed with an aethalometer and rBC mass

  3. Why models struggle to capture Arctic Haze: the underestimated role of gas flaring and domestic combustion emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Stohl

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Arctic Haze is a seasonal phenomenon with high concentrations of accumulation-mode aerosols occurring in the Arctic in winter and early spring. Chemistry transport models and climate chemistry models struggle to reproduce this phenomenon, and this has recently prompted changes in aerosol removal schemes to remedy the modeling problems. In this paper, we show that shortcomings in current emission data sets are at least as important. We perform a 3 yr model simulation of black carbon (BC with the Lagrangian particle dispersion model FLEXPART. The model is driven with a new emission data set which includes emissions from gas flaring. While gas flaring is estimated to contribute less than 3% of global BC emissions in this data set, flaring dominates the estimated BC emissions in the Arctic (north of 66° N. Putting these emissions into our model, we find that flaring contributes 42% to the annual mean BC surface concentrations in the Arctic. In March, flaring even accounts for 52% of all Arctic BC near the surface. Most of the flaring BC remains close to the surface in the Arctic, so that the flaring contribution to BC in the middle and upper troposphere is small. Another important factor determining simulated BC concentrations is the seasonal variation of BC emissions from domestic combustion. We have calculated daily domestic combustion emissions using the heating degree day (HDD concept based on ambient air temperature and compare results from model simulations using emissions with daily, monthly and annual time resolution. In January, the Arctic-mean surface concentrations of BC due to domestic combustion emissions are 150% higher when using daily emissions than when using annually constant emissions. While there are concentration reductions in summer, they are smaller than the winter increases, leading to a systematic increase of annual mean Arctic BC surface concentrations due to domestic combustion by 68% when using daily emissions. A large

  4. The ASTAR 2007 April 14 haze layer: The radiative effect of an aged and internally mixed aerosol in the Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engvall, A.-C.; Ström, J.; Tunved, P.; Schlager, H.; Minikin, A.

    2009-04-01

    INTRODUCTION The ASTAR project (Arctic Study of Tropospheric Aerosol and Radiation) is aimed at investigating the physico-chemical properties of the Arctic tropospheric aerosol by means of aircraft measurements. The goal of the program is to provide an observational dataset for improving not only the assessment of the direct and indirect effects of aerosols on the Arctic radiative balance, but also the aerosol parameterisation in the regional climate model HIRHAM [Rinke, et al., 1999; Treffeisen, et al., 2005]. The ASTAR 2007 campaign was conducted from March 18 - April 18 in 2007, Svalbard. This timing was chosen to make the measurements span during the Arctic spring due to its frequent Arctic hazes. In the present study we focus on an aerosol layer observed north of Svalbard at an altitude of around 3 km during the campaign. Due to recent discussions about the Arctic temperature amplification and the importance of soot in the atmosphere and its radiative effects, the aim of the present study is to evaluate the potential magnitude of the radiative effects such a haze layer might have in the Arctic. METHODS In the present study we have analysed in-situ observations of aerosol number densities of particles larger than 10 nm and 260 nm in diameter (henceforth denoted N10 and N260, respectively), aerosol size distributions, aerosol light scattering and absorption, and concentrations of carbon monoxide (CO) and ozone (O3). The measurements were conducted from the German DLR Falcon 20 research aeroplane. N10 was measured using a condensation particle counter (CPC) model TSI 3010. The aerosol size distribution between 17 and 239 nm was measured with a Differential Mobility Particle Sizer (DMPS) in stepwise mode utilising 13 bins, each of which was measured during 10 s. The aerosol size distribution between 260 and 2200 nm was observed with an optical particle counter (OPC) GRIMM, model 3.709, which sized the particles in 12 bins at 1 Hz. We also used information about

  5. Titan Haze

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Carrie M.; West, Robert; Lavvas, Panayotis

    2011-01-01

    The Titan haze exerts a dominating influence on surface visibility and atmospheric radiative heating at optical and near-infrared wavelengths and our desire to understand surface composition and atmospheric dynamics provides a strong motivation to study the properties of the haze. Prior to the Cassini/Huygens missions the haze was known to be global in extent, with a hemispheric contrast asymmetry, with a complicated structure in the polar vortex region poleward of about 55 deg latitude, and with a distinct layer near 370 km altitude outside of the polar vortex at the time of the Voyager 2 flyby. The haze particles measured by the Pioneer and Voyager spacecraft were both highly polarizing and strongly forward scattering, a combination that seems to require an aggregation of small (several tens of nm radius) primary particles. These same properties were seen in the Cassini orbiter and Huygens Probe data. The most extensive set of optical measurements were made inside the atmosphere by the Descent Imager/Spectral Radiometer (DISR) instrument on the Huygens Probe. At the probe location as determined by the DISR measurements the average haze particle contained about 3000 primary particles whose radius is about 40 nm. Three distinct vertical regions were seen in the DISR data with differing particle properties. Refractive indices of the particles in the main haze layer resemble those reported by Khare et al. between O.3S and about 0.7 micron but are more absorbing than the Khare et al. results between 0.7 micron and the long-wavelength limit of the DISR spectra at 1.6 micron. These and other results are described by Tomasko et al., and a broader summary of results was given by Tomasko and West,. New data continue to stream in from the Cassini spacecraft. New data analyses and new laboratory and model results continue to move the field forward. Titan's 'detached' haze layer suffered a dramatic drop in altitude near equinox in 2009 with implications for the circulation

  6. Characterization of humic-like substances in Arctic aerosols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, Quynh T.; Kristensen, Thomas Bjerring; Hansen, Anne Maria K.;

    2014-01-01

    , WSOC, HULIS, selected HULIS functional groups (carboxylic acids, aromatic carboxylic acids, and organosulfates) and levoglucosan overlapped with the typical Arctic haze pattern with elevated concentrations during winter to early spring. The aromatic carboxylic acid portion accounted for a larger share...

  7. Broken Pledges: The Deadly Rite of Hazing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuwer, Hank

    The practice of hazing in college fraternities, sororities, high school clubs, professional societies, business, the military, and secret societies is investigated. Through the retelling of actual stories involving hazing, the book addresses the questions of why men and women haze and allow themselves to be hazed, how the problems of hazing can be…

  8. Haze over Beijing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Thick haze collected over the Beijing region in late March 2007. Earlier that month, the BBC News reported that an international team of scientists had documented how increasing pollution in China led to decreasing rainfall over the region. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) flying onboard the Aqua satellite captured these images of the Beijing region on March 22, 2007. The top image is a 'true-color' picture, similar to a digital photo. The bottom, 'false-color,' image uses a combination of visible and infrared light to more clearly show vegetation, water, and clouds. Even sparse vegetation appears bright green, while water appears deep blue (bright blue when tinged with sediment). Clouds dominated by water droplets appear white, while clouds made of ice crystals appear light blue. The false-color image highlights water bodies, perhaps aqua-culture ponds, that are all but invisible in the true-color image, especially along the shores of the Bo Hai. While vegetation and water show up more clearly in the false-color image, haze is much more transparent. Although dingy gray haze dominates the true-color picture, it is all but invisible in the false-color view. The haze 'disappears' in the infrared-enhanced image because tiny haze particles do not reflect longer-wavelength infrared light very well, making this type of image useful for distinguishing haze from clouds. The bank of clouds in the upper right corner shows up clearly in both pictures. As China industrializes, factories, power plants, and automobiles all contribute to pollution in the region. In examining pollutants and rainfall, the team of scientists examined records covering more than 50 years, concluding that pollution decreased precipitation at Mount Hua near Xi'an in central China. They concluded that when conditions are so hazy that visibility is reduced to less than 8 kilometers (5 miles), hilly precipitation can drop by 30 to 50 percent. When moist air passes over mountains

  9. Wintertime Haze Formation in Beijing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy Zamora, M. E.

    2015-12-01

    Recent severe haze events in China have attracted significant public attention due to the severely reduced visibility and unprecedentedly high pollutant concentrations. Particular attention has been given to the high concentrations of particulate matter with a diameter less than 2.5 microns (PM2.5), which can exceed several hundred micrograms per cubic meter over several days. During January and February of 2015, a suite of aerosol instruments was deployed in Beijing to directly measure a comprehensive set of aerosol properties, including the particle size distribution, effective density, and chemical composition. In this presentation, we will discuss the particulate matter formation mechanisms, the evolution of aerosol properties throughout the event, and how the winter formation mechanisms compare with the warmer seasons. We show that the periodic cycles of severe haze episodes in Beijing are largely driven by meteorological conditions. During haze events, stagnation typically develops as a result of a low planetary boundary layer and weak southerly wind from polluted industrial source regions. Stronger northerly winds were frequently observed during the clean period, which carry unpolluted air masses from the less populated northern mountainous areas. Nucleation consistently occurs on clean days, producing a high number concentration of nano particles. The particle mass concentration exceeding several hundred micrograms per cubic meter is attributed to the continuous size growth from the nucleation-mode particles (diameter less than 10 nm) over multiple days to produce a high concentration of larger particles (diameter greater than 100 nm). The particle chemical composition in Beijing is similar to those commonly measured in other urban centers, which is indicative of chemical constituents dominated by secondary aerosol formation. Our results reveal that the severe haze formation in Beijing during the wintertime is similar to the mechanism of haze formation

  10. Reticle haze: an industrial approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gough, Stuart; Gérard, Xavier; Bichebois, Pascal; Roche, Agnès; Sundermann, Frank; Guyader, Véronique; Bièron, Yann; Galvier, Jean; Nicoleau, Serge

    2007-02-01

    Crystal growth on advanced reticles is currently a world wide industrial problem in high end semiconductor production environment, crystals are mainly found on reticles that use high energy photons at 193nm wavelength. The most common crystals to be found on masks are ammonium sulphate, a combination of sulphate, from maskshop residues after clean, pellicle materials and storage conditions and amines from clean room, tool and storage environments. High energy photons act as a catalyst to form crystals on both the pattern side as well as the backglass surface. After a number of exposures crystals can grow in size and eventually become printable. In order to detect HAZE before critical dimensions have been reached suitable detection methods need to be implemented to ensure image integrity. These detection methods are different and complementary depending on the surface to be inspected. Once crystals have started growing, the only method to regain mask quality is to clean the mask at the manufacturers site. This brings with it several undesirable situations, not only is the mask unavailable for production but the cleaning of a mask leads to a potential risk of damaging the mask especially for sub resolution patterns such as scatter bars and phase and transmission changes for eaPSM (Embedded Attenuated Phase Shift Mask) masks. This paper will discuss the initial haze issues seen in a 300mm wafer fab and actions put in place to address the problem. An explanation of results gained from haze reduction actions implemented in a wafer fab will be given. Haze seen by reticle inspection and surface analysis tools can be characterised by typical contamination patterns. These signatures appear after a certain number of wafers exposed depending on several reticle variables such as transmission, Binary, eaPSM, Pellicle. Details will be given of how reticles are managed to ensure minimum impact to a production environment with an appropriate reticle control plan. AMC (Airborne

  11. Haze detection by using modified normalized difference haze index in Beijing, Tianjin, and Hebei province

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xinlei; Yao, Fengmei; Zhang, Jiahua; Waqar, Mirza Muhammad; Zha, Yong; He, Junliang

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents the development of index to detect haze from moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer remote sensing data. Detection of haze over a large area has always been a problem. This study focuses on Beijing, Tianjin, and Shijiazhuang cities in China. These cities have suffered the worst hazy weather in recent years. The spectral influence of haze on surface features was determined through analysis of the spectral variations of surface covers between hazy and haze-free days. A spectral index known as modified normalized difference haze index (m-NDHI) is developed that can be used to monitor haze distribution and intensity. Correlation analysis of the derived m-NDHI and previously developed NDHI with in situ PM2.5 (particulate matter with diameter haze in large scales from remotely sensing data and characterize the situation of urban atmospheric pollution.

  12. METEOROLOGICAL FACTORS IN THE FORMATION OF REGIONAL HAZE

    Science.gov (United States)

    The purpose of this research project was to determine the role of meteorological factors in the formation of widespread areas of haze in the eastern United States. Three case studies were made: A summer haze episode, an off-season haze episode and a non-haze episode.

  13. Haze insights and mitigation in China: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Xuliang; Wang, Yuesi; He, Hong; Liu, Jianguo; Wang, Xinming; Zhu, Tingyu; Ge, Maofa; Zhou, Ju; Tang, Guiqian; Ma, Jinzhu

    2014-01-01

    The present article provides an overview of the chemical and physical features of haze in China, focusing on the relationship between haze and atmospheric fine particles, and the formation mechanism of haze. It also summarizes several of control technologies and strategies to mitigate the occurrence of haze. The development of instruments and the analysis of measurements of ambient particles and precursor concentrations have provided important information about haze formation. Indeed, the use of new instruments has greatly facilitated current haze research in China. Examples of insightful results include the relationship between fine particles and haze, the chemical compositions and sources of particles, the impacts of the aging process on haze formation, and the application of technologies that control the formation of haze. Based on these results, two relevant issues need to be addressed: understanding the relationship between haze and fine particles and understanding how to control PM2.5.

  14. Organosulfates and organic acids in Arctic aerosols: Speciation, annual variation and concentration levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anne Maria Kaldal; Kristensen, Kasper; Nguyen, Quynh;

    2014-01-01

    (-3)) and total organic acids (7-10 ngm(-3)) were observed. Elevated organosulfate and organic acid concentrations coincided with the Arctic haze period at both stations, where northern Eurasia was identified as the main source region. Air mass transport from northern Eurasia to Zeppelin Mountain......-range transport, whereas indications of local sources were found for some compounds at Zeppelin Mountain. Furthermore, organosulfates contributed significantly to organic matter throughout the year at Zeppelin Mountain (annual mean of 13 +/- 8 %) and during Arctic haze at Station Nord (7 +/- 2 %), suggesting...

  15. Hazing: Collective Stupidity, Insensitivity and Irresponsibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, E. T. "Joe", III; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Provides a basis for colleges and universities to develop regulations sanctioning hazing. Describes the types of activities that have caused death. Presents state laws and discusses the legal context leading to civil or criminal liability. (RC)

  16. Application of DARLAM to Regional Haze Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koe, L. C. C.; Arellano, A. F., Jr.; McGregor, J. L.

    - The CSIRO Division of Atmospheric Research limited area model (DARLAM) is applied to atmospheric transport modeling of haze in southeast Asia. The 1998 haze episode is simulated using an emission inventory derived from hotspot information and adopting removal processes based on SO2.Results show that the model is able to simulate the transport of haze in the region. The model images closely resemble the plumes of NASA Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer and Meteorological Service Singapore haze maps. Despite the limitation of input data, particularly for haze emissions, the three-month average pattern correlation obtained for the whole episode is 0.61. The model has also been able to reproduce the general features of transboundary air pollution over a long period of time. Predicted total particulate matter concentration also agrees reasonably well with observation.The difference in the model results from the satellite images may be attributed to the large uncertainties of emission, simplification of haze deposition and transformation mechanisms and the relatively coarse horizontal and vertical resolution adopted for this particular simulation.

  17. Arctic methane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dyupina, E.; Amstel, van A.R.

    2013-01-01

    What are the risks of a runaway greenhouse effect from methane release from hydrates in the Arctic? In January 2013, a dramatic increase of methane concentration up to 2000 ppb has been measured over the Arctic north of Norway in the Barents Sea. The global average being 1750 ppb. It has been sugges

  18. Arctic Newcomers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tonami, Aki

    2013-01-01

    Interest in the Arctic region and its economic potential in Japan, South Korea and Singapore was slow to develop but is now rapidly growing. All three countries have in recent years accelerated their engagement with Arctic states, laying the institutional frameworks needed to better understand an...

  19. Haze detection by using modified normalized difference haze index in Beijing, Tianjin, and Hebei province

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xinlei; Yao, Fengmei; Zhang, Jiahua; Waqar, Mirza Muhammad; Zha, Yong; He, Junliang

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents the development of index to detect haze from moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer remote sensing data. Detection of haze over a large area has always been a problem. This study focuses on Beijing, Tianjin, and Shijiazhuang cities in China. These cities have suffered the worst hazy weather in recent years. The spectral influence of haze on surface features was determined through analysis of the spectral variations of surface covers between hazy and haze-free days. A spectral index known as modified normalized difference haze index (m-NDHI) is developed that can be used to monitor haze distribution and intensity. Correlation analysis of the derived m-NDHI and previously developed NDHI with in situ PM2.5 (particulate matter with diameter water bodies has a coefficient of 0.7096, 0.5864, and 0.4857 and NDHI has coefficient of 0.5625, 0.5321, and 0.4618 with PM2.5 for Beijing, Tianjin, and Shijiazhuang, respectively, in winter. Moreover, the correlation of m-NDHI with PM2.5 is 0.4097, 0.8092, and 0.5546 during the spring, summer, and autumn, respectively, in Beijing. This developed index can be a much easier and more effective method to detect haze in large scales from remotely sensing data and characterize the situation of urban atmospheric pollution.

  20. Arctic Watch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orcutt, John; Baggeroer, Arthur; Mikhalevsky, Peter; Munk, Walter; Sagen, Hanne; Vernon, Frank; Worcester, Peter

    2015-04-01

    The dramatic reduction of sea ice in the Arctic Ocean will increase human activities in the coming years. This will be driven by increased demand for energy and the marine resources of an Arctic Ocean more accessible to ships. Oil and gas exploration, fisheries, mineral extraction, marine transportation, research and development, tourism and search and rescue will increase the pressure on the vulnerable Arctic environment. Synoptic in-situ year-round observational technologies are needed to monitor and forecast changes in the Arctic atmosphere-ice-ocean system at daily, seasonal, annual and decadal scales to inform and enable sustainable development and enforcement of international Arctic agreements and treaties, while protecting this critical environment. This paper will discuss multipurpose acoustic networks, including subsea cable components, in the Arctic. These networks provide communication, power, underwater and under-ice navigation, passive monitoring of ambient sound (ice, seismic, biologic and anthropogenic), and acoustic remote sensing (tomography and thermometry), supporting and complementing data collection from platforms, moorings and autonomous vehicles. This paper supports the development and implementation of regional to basin-wide acoustic networks as an integral component of a multidisciplinary, in situ Arctic Ocean Observatory.

  1. Haze in China: current and future challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Meina; Zhang, Lulu

    2014-06-01

    Regional haze which triggered both public anxiety and official concerns has been one of the most disastrous weather events in China in recent years. Haze not only had negative impact on daily life, but also an indicator of high concentrations of PM2.5 with the potential to adversely impact public health by damaging people's respiratory, cardiovascular, blood vessel of brain and nervous system. The dust-haze is an accumulated result for a long time of both natural factors and unhealthy economic growth model. In order to tackle air pollution, a number of policies and measures which target at reducing pollution emission and promoting alternative energy production had been implemented. Although significant improvement has occurred in China, change the development mode of "high growth, high pollution" and balance environmental conservation with the well-being of the population remains a challenge for China.

  2. Lack of association of dengue activity with haze.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilder-Smith, A; Earnest, A; Tan, S B; Ooi, E E; Gubler, D J

    2010-07-01

    Dengue activity depends on fluctuations in Aedes populations which in turn are known to be influenced by climate factors including temperature, humidity and rainfall. It has been hypothesized that haze may reduce dengue transmission. Due to its geographical location Singapore suffers almost every year from hazes caused by wildfires from Indonesia. Such hazes have a significant impact on pollution indexes in Singapore. We set out to study the relationship of dengue activity and haze (measured as pollution standard index) in Singapore, using ARIMA models. We ran different univariate models, each encompassing a different lag period for the effects of haze and temperature (from lag 0 to lag 12 weeks). We analysed the data on a natural logarithmic scale to stabilize the variance and improve the estimation. No association between dengue activity and haze was found. Our findings do not lend support to the hypothesis that haze is associated with reduced dengue activity in Singapore.

  3. Edge-Preserving Decomposition-Based Single Image Haze Removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhengguo; Zheng, Jinghong

    2015-12-01

    Single image haze removal is under-constrained, because the number of freedoms is larger than the number of observations. In this paper, a novel edge-preserving decomposition-based method is introduced to estimate transmission map for a haze image so as to design a single image haze removal algorithm from the Koschmiedars law without using any prior. In particular, weighted guided image filter is adopted to decompose simplified dark channel of the haze image into a base layer and a detail layer. The transmission map is estimated from the base layer, and it is applied to restore the haze-free image. The experimental results on different types of images, including haze images, underwater images, and normal images without haze, show the performance of the proposed algorithm.

  4. Ecological processes in the cycling of radionuclides within arctic ecosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Worldwide fallout radionuclides in arctic ecosystems was investigated ecologically by circumpolar nations during 1959-80. Several of the radionuclides are isotopes of elements which currently contribute to arctic haze; they thus serve as effective tracers of biogeochemical processes. Investigations demonstrated the effective concentration of several radionuclides, particularly strontium-90 (an alkaline earth metal) and cesium-137 (a light alkali metal) which are chemical analogs of calcium and potassium, two very important stable elements in biotic systems. Transfer of 137Cs through the lichen-cariboureindeer-man food chain characteristic of circumpolar nations, resulted in body burdens in Inuit that were 20 to 200 times greater than those in human populations of temperature latitudes. Radiation exposures from 90Sr, 137Cs and other natural and worldwide fallout radionuclides, were two to three times greater than for most other world populations. These results demonstrate the concentration capabilities of arctic ecosystems for several groups of chemical elements that have counterparts in arctic haze. These elements, therefore, provide the basis for considering the ecological implications of current situations

  5. Arctic bioremediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cleanup of oil and diesel spills on gravel pads in the Arctic has typically been accomplished by utilizing a water flushing technique to remove the gross contamination or excavating the spill area and placing the material into a lined pit, or a combination of both. Enhancing the biological degradation of hydrocarbon (bioremediation) by adding nutrients to the spill area has been demonstrated to be an effective cleanup tool in more temperate locations. However, this technique has never been considered for restoration in the Arctic because the process of microbial degradation of hydrocarbon in this area is very slow. The short growing season and apparent lack of nutrients in the gravel pads were thought to be detrimental to using bioremediation to cleanup Arctic oil spills. This paper discusses the potential to utilize bioremediation as an effective method to clean up hydrocarbon spills in the northern latitudes

  6. Arctic bioremediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cleanup of oil and diesel spills on gravel pads in the Arctic has typically been accomplished by utilizing a water flushing technique to remove the gross contamination or excavating the spill area and placing the material into a lined pit, or a combination of both. This paper discusses the potential to utilize bioremediation as an effective method to clean up hydrocarbon spills in the northern latitudes. Discussed are the results of a laboratory bioremediation study which simulated microbial degradation of hydrocarbon under arctic conditions

  7. The effect of pollutional haze on pulmonary function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shao-Kun; Cai, Shan; Chen, Yan; Xiao, Bing; Chen, Ping; Xiang, Xu-Dong

    2016-01-01

    Detrimental health effects of atmospheric exposure to ambient particulate matter (PM) have been investigated in numerous studies. Exposure to pollutional haze, the carrier of air pollutants such as PM and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) has been linked to lung and cardiovascular disease, resulting increases in both hospital admissions and mortality. This review focuses on the constituents of pollutional haze and its effects on pulmonary function. The article presents the available information and seeks to correlate pollutional haze and pulmonary function.

  8. Arctic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, Claire L.; Zukor, Dorothy J. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Arctic Ocean is the smallest of the Earth's four major oceans, covering 14x10(exp 6) sq km located entirely within the Arctic Circle (66 deg 33 min N). It is a major player in the climate of the north polar region and has a variable sea ice cover that tends to increase its sensitivity to climate change. Its temperature, salinity, and ice cover have all undergone changes in the past several decades, although it is uncertain whether these predominantly reflect long-term trends, oscillations within the system, or natural variability. Major changes include a warming and expansion of the Atlantic layer, at depths of 200-900 m, a warming of the upper ocean in the Beaufort Sea, a considerable thinning (perhaps as high as 40%) of the sea ice cover, a lesser and uneven retreat of the ice cover (averaging approximately 3% per decade), and a mixed pattern of salinity increases and decreases.

  9. Arctic Shipping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Carsten Ørts; Grønsedt, Peter; Lindstrøm Graversen, Christian;

    maritime industries (including shipping, offshore energy, ports, and maritime service and equipment suppliers) as well as addresses topics that cut across maritime industries (regulation and competitiveness). The topics and narrower research questions addressed in the initiative were developed in close......, the latter aiming at developing key concepts and building up a basic industry knowledge base for further development of CBS Maritime research and teaching. This report attempts to map the opportunities and challenges for the maritime industry in an increasingly accessible Arctic Ocean...

  10. Temporal variations of black carbon during haze and non-haze days in Beijing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qingyang; Ma, Tangming; Olson, Michael R.; Liu, Yanju; Zhang, Tingting; Wu, Yu; Schauer, James J.

    2016-09-01

    Black carbon (BC) aerosol has been identified as one of key factors responsible for air quality in Beijing. BC emissions abatement could help slow regional climate change while providing benefits for public health. In order to quantify its variations and contribution to air pollution, we systematically studied real-time measurements of equivalent black carbon (eBC) in PM2.5 aerosols at an urban site in Beijing from 2010 to 2014. Equivalent black carbon (eBC) is used instead of black carbon (BC) for data derived from Aethalometer-31 measurement. Equivalent BC concentrations showed significant temporal variations with seasonal mean concentration varying between 2.13 and 5.97 μg m-3. The highest concentrations of eBC were found during autumn and winter, and the lowest concentrations occurred in spring. We assessed the temporal variations of eBC concentration during haze days versus non-haze days and found significantly lower eBC fractions in PM2.5 on haze days compared to those on non-haze days. Finally, we observed a clear inverse relationship between eBC and wind speed. Our results show that wind disperses PM2.5 more efficiently than eBC; so, secondary aerosols are not formed to the same degree as primary aerosols over the same transport distance during windy conditions.

  11. Temporal variations of black carbon during haze and non-haze days in Beijing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qingyang; Ma, Tangming; Olson, Michael R; Liu, Yanju; Zhang, Tingting; Wu, Yu; Schauer, James J

    2016-01-01

    Black carbon (BC) aerosol has been identified as one of key factors responsible for air quality in Beijing. BC emissions abatement could help slow regional climate change while providing benefits for public health. In order to quantify its variations and contribution to air pollution, we systematically studied real-time measurements of equivalent black carbon (eBC) in PM2.5 aerosols at an urban site in Beijing from 2010 to 2014. Equivalent black carbon (eBC) is used instead of black carbon (BC) for data derived from Aethalometer-31 measurement. Equivalent BC concentrations showed significant temporal variations with seasonal mean concentration varying between 2.13 and 5.97 μg m(-3). The highest concentrations of eBC were found during autumn and winter, and the lowest concentrations occurred in spring. We assessed the temporal variations of eBC concentration during haze days versus non-haze days and found significantly lower eBC fractions in PM2.5 on haze days compared to those on non-haze days. Finally, we observed a clear inverse relationship between eBC and wind speed. Our results show that wind disperses PM2.5 more efficiently than eBC; so, secondary aerosols are not formed to the same degree as primary aerosols over the same transport distance during windy conditions. PMID:27634102

  12. Temporal variations of black carbon during haze and non-haze days in Beijing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qingyang; Ma, Tangming; Olson, Michael R; Liu, Yanju; Zhang, Tingting; Wu, Yu; Schauer, James J

    2016-09-16

    Black carbon (BC) aerosol has been identified as one of key factors responsible for air quality in Beijing. BC emissions abatement could help slow regional climate change while providing benefits for public health. In order to quantify its variations and contribution to air pollution, we systematically studied real-time measurements of equivalent black carbon (eBC) in PM2.5 aerosols at an urban site in Beijing from 2010 to 2014. Equivalent black carbon (eBC) is used instead of black carbon (BC) for data derived from Aethalometer-31 measurement. Equivalent BC concentrations showed significant temporal variations with seasonal mean concentration varying between 2.13 and 5.97 μg m(-3). The highest concentrations of eBC were found during autumn and winter, and the lowest concentrations occurred in spring. We assessed the temporal variations of eBC concentration during haze days versus non-haze days and found significantly lower eBC fractions in PM2.5 on haze days compared to those on non-haze days. Finally, we observed a clear inverse relationship between eBC and wind speed. Our results show that wind disperses PM2.5 more efficiently than eBC; so, secondary aerosols are not formed to the same degree as primary aerosols over the same transport distance during windy conditions.

  13. Does Pluto Have a Haze Layer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliot, James L.

    1997-01-01

    The goal of this research was to determine whether Pluto has a haze layer through observations (with the Kuiper Airborne Observatory) of a stellar occultation by Pluto that was originally predicted to occur on 1993 October 3. As described in the attached material, our extensive astrometric measurements determined that this occultation would not be visible from Earth, and we canceled plans to observe it with the KAO. Efforts were then directed toward improving our astrometric techniques so that we could find future occultations with which we could satisfy the original goals of the research proposed for this grant.

  14. 77 FR 38509 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; South Carolina; Regional Haze State...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-28

    ... promulgated a rule to address regional haze on July 1, 1999 (64 FR 35714), the Regional Haze Rule (RHR). The... address the first implementation period for regional haze.\\1\\ See 77 FR 11894. EPA proposed a limited..., 2012, proposal action on the South Carolina regional haze SIP submittal (77 FR 11906), the states...

  15. 77 FR 38501 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; State of Georgia; Regional Haze State...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-28

    ... haze on July 1, 1999 ] (64 FR 35714), the Regional Haze Rule (RHR). The RHR revised the existing... period for regional haze.\\1\\ See 77 FR 11452. EPA proposed a limited approval of Georgia's SIP revisions... discussed in the proposed rulemaking (77 FR 11474-11475), Georgia's regional haze SIP satisfies the...

  16. 77 FR 38515 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; State of Alabama; Regional Haze State...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-28

    ... haze on July 1, 1999 (64 FR 35713), the Regional Haze Rule (RHR). The RHR revised the existing... also 70 FR 39121. Alabama's analysis in the regional haze SIP revision was consistent with EPA's... February 28, 2012, proposal action on the Alabama regional haze SIP submittal (77 FR 11949), the RHR...

  17. 78 FR 53250 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; State of Florida; Regional Haze...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-29

    ... regional haze issues. EPA promulgated a rule to address regional haze on July 1, 1999 (64 FR 35713... first implementation period for regional haze.\\1\\ See 77 FR 31240. EPA's May 25, 2012, proposed... Florida regional haze SIP, and on June 7, 2012 (77 FR 33642), EPA finalized a limited disapproval of...

  18. 77 FR 38185 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; State of North Carolina; Regional Haze State...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-27

    ... regional haze issues. EPA promulgated a rule to address regional haze on July 1, 1999 (64 FR 35713), the..., 2007, SIP revision to address the first implementation period for regional haze.\\1\\ See 77 FR 11858...' test.'' See also 70 FR 39121. North Carolina's analysis in the regional haze SIP revision...

  19. 77 FR 38191 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; State of Mississippi; Regional Haze State...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-27

    ... regional haze issues. EPA promulgated a rule to address regional haze on July 1, 1999 (64 FR 35713), the... address the first implementation period for regional haze.\\1\\ See 77 FR 11879. EPA proposed a limited... FR 33642), EPA finalized a limited disapproval of the Mississippi regional haze SIP because...

  20. Arctic Diatoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tammilehto, Anna

    shellfish poisoning (ASP). This thesis showed that three most abundant mesozooplankton species (Calanus finmarchicus, C. glacialis and C. hyperboreus and copepodite stages C3 and C4) in the study area (Disko Bay, western Greenland) feed upon toxic P. seriata and retain the toxin, and may therefore act...... as vectors for DA to higher levels in the arctic marine food web, posing a possible risk also to humans. DA production in P. seriata was, for the first time, found to be induced by chemical cues from C. finmarchicus, C. hyperboreus and copepodite stages C3 and C4, suggesting that DA may be related to defense...

  1. Upper limits of possible photochemical hazes on Pluto

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elliot et al. [1989] invoked a haze layer near the surface of Pluto to explain certain features of a stellar occultation by that planet in June, 1988. The primary requirements for this haze layer were that it achieve unity tangential optical depth at a radius of 1174 km and be essentially transparent above 1189 km. The authors explore here the possibility that aerosols generated through methane photolysis could be responsible for such a haze layer. A comprehensive model of aerosol production, particle growth, sedimentation and condensation is applied to the atmosphere of Pluto using pressures, temperatures and composition derived from the stellar occultation and other data. They test two atmosphere models proposed in the literature, one from Elliot et al. [1989], and one from Hubbard et al. [1989], as well as a range of optical properties for the particles. In order to produce a haze with unity tangential optical depth at 1174 km, they had to use an aerosol mass production rate equal to twice the total methane dissociation rate due to solar UV expected for Pluto and assume that the particles produced were 10 times more absorbing than those in other hazes in the outer solar system. The possibility of condensation in the atmosphere was considered but did not result in distinctly different haze optical depths. If a photochemical haze on Pluto was responsible for the occultation lightcurve measured by Elliot et al., operation of a photochemical system different from those on Titan, Uranus or Neptune is indicated

  2. Feasibility of Haze Governance Based on Carbon Sink Mode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jie; HE; Quanquan; WANG

    2015-01-01

    In recent years,there are research findings of haze formation in various fields of academic circle. It has proved that causes of haze take on diverse characteristics. Thus,from both the natural and human perspective,haze governance should be diverse. Research conclusions on causes of haze formation mainly focus on special geographical structure,and meteorological factors such as relatively stable atmosphere,high rate of calm wind,high relative humidity and temperature of air,and human factors such as industrial pollution,automotive exhaust emissions,aerosol pollution,eutrophication of soil water,and change of city underlying surface. Carbon sink mode is a new channel for haze governance.In carbon sink mode,it is feasible to regulate relative humidity and temperature in air,enhance global wind,and reduce fine particles and microorganisms of air pollution,so as to reduce haze pollution. Besides,China’s special potential of carbon sink market makes it possible to govern haze on the base of carbon sink.

  3. Compositions and pollutant sources of haze in Beijing urban sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junmei; Song, Yujun; Zuo, Jiangnan; Wu, Hongwen

    2016-05-01

    Haze from urban sites in Beijing was collected with a self-assembled electrostatic dust collector. The sizes and morphologies, thermal properties, and compositions of the particles in the haze were characterized by scanning electronic microscopy (SEM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), and X-ray photoelectric spectroscopy (XPS), respectively. Based on these results, the causes and pollutant sources of the chemicals in the haze were analyzed, and some countermeasures were further advanced to reduce the related pollutant sources. Graphical abstract ᅟ. PMID:26810665

  4. Compositions and pollutant sources of haze in Beijing urban sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junmei; Song, Yujun; Zuo, Jiangnan; Wu, Hongwen

    2016-05-01

    Haze from urban sites in Beijing was collected with a self-assembled electrostatic dust collector. The sizes and morphologies, thermal properties, and compositions of the particles in the haze were characterized by scanning electronic microscopy (SEM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), and X-ray photoelectric spectroscopy (XPS), respectively. Based on these results, the causes and pollutant sources of the chemicals in the haze were analyzed, and some countermeasures were further advanced to reduce the related pollutant sources. Graphical abstract ᅟ.

  5. Scattering and extinction: interpreting hazes in stellar occultation data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosh, Amanda S.; Levine, Stephen; Sickafoose, Amanda A.; Person, Michael J.

    2016-10-01

    There has been debate concerning interpretation of stellar occultation data and whether those data contain evidence for hazes within Pluto's atmosphere. Multiple layers of haze have been imaged in at Pluto with the New Horizons spacecraft; color-dependent differences in minimum flux from stellar occultations also suggests haze. We look at a purely geometric approach, to evaluate whether it is valid to sidestep details of atmospheric temperature structure and, in an approximate manner, conduct an analysis of the 2015 stellar occultation data that is consistent with the New Horizons imaging results. Support for this work was provided by NASA SSO grant NNX15AJ82G to Lowell Observatory.

  6. Regional Haze Evolved from Peat Fires - an Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yuqi; Rein, Guillermo

    2016-04-01

    This work provides an overview of haze episodes, their cause, emissions and health effects found in the scientific literature. Peatlands, the terrestrial ecosystems resulting from the accumulation of partially decayed vegetation, become susceptible to smouldering fires because of natural droughts or anthropogenic-induced drainages. Once ignited, smouldering peat fires persistently consume large amounts of soil carbon in a flameless form. It is estimated that the average annual carbon gas emissions (mainly CO2 and CO) from peat fires are equivalent to 15% of manmade emissions, representing influential perturbation of global carbon circle. In addition to carbon emissions, smouldering peat fires emit substantial quantities of heterogeneous smoke, which is responsible for haze phenomena, has not yet been fully studied. Peat-fire-derived smoke is characterized by high concentration of particulate matter (PM), ranging from nano-scale ultrafine fraction (PM1, particle diameter tourism and agriculture-based industries. For example, an unprecedented peatland mega-fire burst on the Indonesian islands Kalimantan and Sumatra during the 1997 El-Niño event, resulting in transboundary smoke-haze disaster. Severe haze events continue to appear in Southeast Asia every few years due to periodical peat fires in this region. In addition, smouldering peat fires have been frequently reported in tropical, temperate and boreal regions (Botswana in 2000, North America in 2004, Scotland in 2006 and Central Russia in 2010 et al.), peat-fire-induced haze has become a regional seasonal phenomenon. Exposure to smoky haze results in deleterious physiologic responses, predominantly to the respiratory and cardiovascular systems. In 1997, an estimation of 100 million people in 5 countries in Southeast Asia were affected by Indonesia haze episode while 20 million people suffered from respiratory problems in Indonesia alone. Fine PM fraction generated from peat fires could penetrate into lower

  7. Detection of haze and/or cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukai, Sonoyo; Sano, Itaru; Mukai, Makiko; Kokhanovsky, Alexander

    2015-04-01

    It is highly likely that large-scale air pollution will continue to occur because air pollution becomes severe due to both the increasing emissions of the anthropogenic aerosols and the complicated behavior of natural aerosols, especially in Asia. It is natural to consider that incident solar light multiply interacts with the atmospheric aerosols due to dense radiation field in such a heavy haze. Accordingly efficient and practical algorithms for radiation simulation are indispensable to retrieve aerosol characteristics in a hazy atmosphere. It has been shown that aerosol retrieval in the hazy atmosphere is achieved based on MSOS (method of successive order of scattering) [1]. The satellite polarimetric sensor POLDER-1, 2, 3 has shown that the spectro-photopolarimetry of the terrestrial atmosphere is very useful for the observation of the Earth, especially for atmospheric particles. JAXA has been developing the new Earth observing system, GCOM satellite. GCOM-C will board the polarimetric sensor SGLI (second-generation global imager) in 2017. The SGLI has two polarization channels at near-infrared wavelengths of 670 and 870 nm. Furthermore, EUMETSAT plans to collect polarization measurements with a POLDER follow on 3MI/EPS-SG in 2021. Then the efficient algorithms for radiation simulation in the optically thick atmosphere by using polarization information denoted by Stokes parameters are shown in this work. It is of interest to mention that multi-spectral data are available for detection and/or distinction of hazy aerosol and/or cloud. In this work our MSOS is expected to be available for atmospheric particle retrieval in a mixture case of cloud and haze. The MSOS is available for the radiation simulation reflected from the optically semi-infinite atmosphere.[1]. Here we intend to improve MSOS-scalar into more efficient and practical form, and further into MSOS-vector form. We show here that a dense aerosol episode can be well simulated by a semi-infinite radiation

  8. Clouds and Hazes in Exoplanet Atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Marley, Mark S; Cuzzi, Jeffrey N; Kitzmann, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Clouds and hazes are commonplace in the atmospheres of solar system planets and are likely ubiquitous in the atmospheres of extrasolar planets as well. Clouds affect every aspect of a planetary atmosphere, from the transport of radiation, to atmospheric chemistry, to dynamics and they influence - if not control - aspects such as surface temperature and habitability. In this review we aim to provide an introduction to the role and properties of clouds in exoplanetary atmospheres. We consider the role clouds play in influencing the spectra of planets as well as their habitability and detectability. We briefly summarize how clouds are treated in terrestrial climate models and consider the far simpler approaches that have been taken so far to model exoplanet clouds, the evidence for which we also review. Since clouds play a major role in the atmospheres of certain classes of brown dwarfs we briefly discuss brown dwarf cloud modeling as well. We also review how the scattering and extinction efficiencies of cloud p...

  9. Energetics study of West African dust haze

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The causes of the large and often persistent negative anomalies of equivalent potential temperature observed in the 900-700 hpa layer and which occurs in association with dust haze outbreaks over Kano in winter is investigated. Energetics results indicate that the primary mechanism for such anomalies is the horizontal transport of drier and, to a lesser extent, colder air at the upper levels by eddy motions, with consequent destabilization of the atmospheric boundary layer over the station. This is suggested as the mobilization mechanism responsible for raising dust from the surface over the Bilma/Faya-Largeau source region much further poleward. Temperature inversions were also found to be more pronounced during dust spells than in clear periods. (author). 18 refs, 6 figs, 2 tabs

  10. Exploring the severe winter haze in Beijing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. J. Zheng

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Extreme haze episodes repeatedly shrouded Beijing during the winter of 2012–2013, causing major environmental and health problems. To better understand these extreme events, we analyzed the hourly observation data of PM2.5 and its major chemical composition, with support of model simulations. Severe winter haze was shown to result from stable synoptic meteorological conditions over a large part of northeastern China, rather than from an abrupt increase in emissions. Build-up of secondary species, including organics, sulfate, nitrate, and ammonium, was the major driving force behind these polluted periods. The contribution of organic matter decreased with increasing pollution level while sulfate and nitrate contributions increased. Correspondingly, the ratio of secondary organic carbon to elemental carbon decreased and had a stable diurnal pattern during heavily polluted periods, indicating weakened photochemical activity due to the dimming effect of high loading of aerosol particles. Under such conditions, the strong increase in sulfate and nitrate contributions to PM2.5 was attributed to an elevated conversion ratio, reflecting more active heterogeneous reactions with gradually increasing relative humidity. Moreover, we found that high aerosol concentration was a regional phenomenon. The accumulation process of aerosol particles occurred successively from southeast cities to Beijing. The "apparent" sharp increase in PM2.5 concentration of up to several hundred μg m−3 per hour recorded in Beijing represented rapid "recovery" from an "interruption" to the continuous pollution accumulation over the region, rather than purely local chemical production. This suggests that regional transport of pollutants played an important role during these severe pollution events.

  11. Atmospheric Prebiotic Chemistry and Organic Hazes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trainer, Melissa G.

    2012-01-01

    Earth's atmospheric composition at the time of the origin of life is not known, but it has often been suggested that chemical transformation of reactive species in the atmosphere was a significant source of pre biotic organic molecules. Experimental and theoretical studies over the past half century have shown that atmospheric synthesis can yield molecules such as amino acids and nucleobases, but these processes are very sensitive to gas composition and energy source. Abiotic synthesis of organic molecules is more productive in reduced atmospheres, yet the primitive Earth may not have been as reducing as earlier workers assumed, and recent research has reflected this shift in thinking. This work provides a survey of the range of chemical products that can be produced given a set of atmospheric conditions, with a particular focus on recent reports. Intertwined with the discussion of atmospheric synthesis is the consideration of an organic haze layer, which has been suggested as a possible ultraviolet shield on the anoxic early Earth. Since such a haze layer - if formed - would serve as a reservoir for organic molecules, the chemical composition of the aerosol should be closely examined. The results highlighted here show that a variety of products can be formed in mildly reducing or even neutral atmospheres, demonstrating that contributions of atmospheric synthesis to the organic inventory on early Earth should not be discounted. This review intends to bridge current knowledge of the range of possible atmospheric conditions in the prebiotic environment and pathways for synthesis under such conditions by examining the possible products of organic chemistry in the early atmosphere.

  12. Urban heat islands in China enhanced by haze pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Chang; Lee, Xuhui; Liu, Shoudong; Schultz, Natalie; Xiao, Wei; Zhang, Mi; Zhao, Lei

    2016-08-01

    The urban heat island (UHI), the phenomenon of higher temperatures in urban land than the surrounding rural land, is commonly attributed to changes in biophysical properties of the land surface associated with urbanization. Here we provide evidence for a long-held hypothesis that the biogeochemical effect of urban aerosol or haze pollution is also a contributor to the UHI. Our results are based on satellite observations and urban climate model calculations. We find that a significant factor controlling the nighttime surface UHI across China is the urban-rural difference in the haze pollution level. The average haze contribution to the nighttime surface UHI is 0.7+/-0.3 K (mean+/-1 s.e.) for semi-arid cities, which is stronger than that in the humid climate due to a stronger longwave radiative forcing of coarser aerosols. Mitigation of haze pollution therefore provides a co-benefit of reducing heat stress on urban residents.

  13. Biomass-burning emissions and associated haze layers over Amazonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreae, M. O.; Browell, E. V.; Gregory, G. L.; Harriss, R. C.; Hill, G. F.; Sachse, G. W.; Talbot, R. W.; Garstang, M.; Jacob, D. J.; Torres, A. L.

    1988-01-01

    The characteristics of haze layers, which were visually observed over the central Amazon Basin during many of the Amazon Boundary Layer Experiment 2A flights in July/August 1985, were investigated by remote and in situ measurements, using the broad range of instrumentation and sampling equipment on board the Electra aircraft. It was found that these layers strongly influenced the chemical and optical characteristics of the atmosphere over the eastern Amazon Basin. Relative to the regional background, the concentrations of CO, CO2, O3, and NO were significantly elevated in the plumes and haze layers, with the NO/CO ratio in fresh plumes much higher than in the aged haze layers. The haze aerosol was composed predominantly of organic material, NH4, K(+), NO3(-), SO4(2-), and organic anions (formate, acetate, and oxalate).

  14. Photochemical hazes in planetary atmospheres: solar system bodies and beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imanaka, Hiroshi; Cruikshank, Dale P.; McKay, Christopher P.

    2015-11-01

    Recent transit observations of exoplanets have demonstrated the possibility of a wide prevalence of haze/cloud layers at high altitudes. Hydrocarbon photochemical haze could be the candidate for such haze particles on warm sub-Neptunes, but the lack of evidence for methane poses a puzzle for such hydrocarbon photochemical haze. The CH4/CO ratios in planetary atmospheres vary substantially from their temperature and dynamics. An understanding of haze formation rates and plausible optical properties in a wide diversity of planetary atmospheres is required to interpret the current and future observations.Here, we focus on how atmospheric compositions, specifically CH4/CO ratios, affect the haze production rates and their optical properties. We have conducted a series of cold plasma experiments to constrain the haze mass production rates from gas mixtures of various CH4/CO ratios diluted either in H2 or N2 atmosphere. The mass production rates in the N2-CH4-CO system are much greater than those in the H2-CH4-CO system. They are rather insensitive to the CH4/CO ratios larger than at 0.3. Significant formation of solid material is observed both in H2-CO and N2-CO systems without CH4 in the initial gas mixtures. The complex refractive indices were derived for haze samples from N2-CH4, H2-CH4, and H2-CO gas mixtures. These are the model atmospheres for Titan, Saturn, and exoplanets, respectively. The imaginary part of the complex refractive indices in the UV-Vis region are distinct among these samples, which can be utilized for modeling these planetary atmospheres.

  15. Analysis on the Change Characteristics of Haze in Dezhou City in Recent 40 Years

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    [Objective] The aim was to analyze the change characteristics of haze in Dezhou City. [Method] Based on the data of haze and sunshine duration from 11 counties or cities in Dezhou City from 1970 to 2009, the daily, monthly, seasonal and annual variation of haze and their variation reasons were studied, meanwhile, the effects of haze on sunshine duration were discussed. [Result] Haze occurred most frequently from 09:00 to 14:00 and daily variation was different in various seasons; haze days were the most in ...

  16. Condensation in Saturn's Stratospheric Haze Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, Erika L.; Moses, Julianne I.

    2016-10-01

    Haze particles in Saturn's stratosphere can be seen in the visible limb images of Cassini's Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS). These hazes are likely a mix of particles, including solid organics formed as a result of methane photolysis and electron deposition, as well as the condensation of water and hydrocarbon ices. We have examined data from both Cassini and Voyager to study the detailed vertical structure of absorbing/scattering particulates in Saturn's stratosphere and developed a Saturn version of the Community Aerosol and Radiation Model for Atmospheres (CARMA), adding a large database of hydrocarbons that are observed or expected to be present in Saturn's atmosphere.Our modeling indicates that water ice condenses independently of the hydrocarbons to form a thin layer above the 0.1 mbar pressure level. Between about 5 and 50 mbar, the hydrocarbons reach their condensation levels (in order of increasing pressure level): C6H6, C5H12, C4H2, C4H10, and C2H2. Because of the proximity of their condensation levels and due to the gravitational settling of the particles, the hydrocarbons are likely condensing on one another and forming a thicker layer of mixed composition. Interestingly, butane (C4H10) has a triple point around 135 K which is much lower than most of the other condensing species we've explored. Given an approximate condensation level of 10 mbar and the observed temperature changes at this pressure level following the December 2010 northern-hemisphere storm (stratospheric temperatures were elevated by as much as 50-70 K in a region near 40° N latitude.), melting and further nucleation of droplets could be occurring.A number of factors including temperature profile, vapor pressure equation, volatile abundance, nucleation critical saturation, and coagulation efficiency will affect the altitudes of the individual ice layers. We will present a summary of results following the nucleation and growth of compounds in order to quantify the likely size and

  17. Simulation of Arctic Black Carbon using Hemispheric CMAQ: Role of Russia's BC Emissions, Transport, and Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, K.; Fu, J. S.

    2015-12-01

    Black carbon plays a unique role in the Arctic climate system due to its multiple effects. It causes Arctic warming by directly absorbing sunlight from space and by darkening the surface albedo of snow and ice, which indirectly leads to further warming and melting, thus inducing an Arctic amplification effect. BC depositions over the Arctic are more sensitive to regions in close proximity. In this study, we reconstruct BC emissions for Russian Federation, which is the country that occupies the largest area in the Arctic Circle. Local Russia information such as activity data, emission factors and other emission source data are used. In 2010, total anthropogenic BC emission of Russia is estimated to be around 254 Gg. Gas flaring, a commonly ignored black carbon source, contributes a dominant 43.9% of Russia's total anthropogenic BC emissions. Other sectors, i.e., residential, transportation, industry, and power plants, contribute 22.0%, 17.8%, 11.5%, and 4.8%, respectively. BC simulations were conducted using the hemispheric version of CMAQ with polar projection. Emission inputs are from a global emissions database EDGAR (Emissions Database for Global Atmospheric Research)-HTAPv2 (Hemispheric Transport of Air Pollution) and EDGAR-HTAPv2 with its Russian part replaced by the newly developed Russian BC emissions, respectively. The simulations using the new Russian BC emission inventory could improve 46 - 61% of the Absorption Aerosol Optical Depth (AAOD) measured at the AERONET sites in Russia throughout the whole year as compared to that using the default HTAPv2 emissions. At the four air monitoring sites (Zeppelin, Barrow, Alert, and Tiksi) in the Arctic Circle, surface BC simulations are improved the most during the Arctic haze periods (October - March). Emission perturbation studies show that Russia's BC emissions contribute over 50% of the surface BC concentrations over the Arctic during the cold seasons. This study demonstrates the good capability of H-CMAQ in

  18. Size-resolved source apportionment of particulate matter in urban Beijing during haze and non-haze episodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, S. L.; Pan, Y. P.; Wang, Y. S.

    2016-01-01

    Additional size-resolved chemical information is needed before the physicochemical characteristics and sources of airborne particles can be understood; however, this information remains unavailable in most regions of China due to lacking measurement data. In this study, we report observations of various chemical species in size-segregated particle samples that were collected over 1 year in the urban area of Beijing, a megacity that experiences severe haze episodes. In addition to fine particles, high concentrations of coarse particles were measured during the periods of haze. The abundance and chemical compositions of the particles in this study were temporally and spatially variable, with major contributions from organic matter and secondary inorganic aerosols. The contributions of organic matter to the particle mass decreased from 37.9 to 31.2 %, and the total contribution of sulfate, nitrate and ammonium increased from 19.1 to 33.9 % between non-haze and haze days, respectively. Due to heterogeneous reactions and hygroscopic growth, the peak concentrations of the organic carbon, cadmium and sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, chloride and potassium shifted from 0.43 to 0.65 µm on non-haze days to 0.65-1.1 µm on haze days. Although the size distributions of lead and thallium were similar during the observation period, their concentrations increased by a factor of more than 1.5 on haze days compared with non-haze days. We observed that sulfate and ammonium, which have a size range of 0.43-0.65 µm, sulfate and nitrate, which have a size range of 0.65-1.1 µm, calcium, which has a size range of 5.8-9 µm, and the meteorological factors of relative humidity and wind speed were responsible for haze pollution when the visibility was less than 10 km. Source apportionment using Positive Matrix Factorization showed six PM2.1 sources and seven PM2.1-9 common sources: secondary inorganic aerosol (25.1 % for fine particles vs. 9.8 % for coarse particles), coal combustion (17

  19. Elucidating severe urban haze formation in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Song; Hu, Min; Zamora, Misti L.; Peng, Jianfei; Shang, Dongjie; Zheng, Jing; Du, Zhuofei; Wu, Zhijun; Shao, Min; Zeng, Limin; Molina, Mario J.; Zhang, Renyi

    2014-12-01

    As the world's second largest economy, China has experienced severe haze pollution, with fine particulate matter (PM) recently reaching unprecedentedly high levels across many cities, and an understanding of the PM formation mechanism is critical in the development of efficient mediation policies to minimize its regional to global impacts. We demonstrate a periodic cycle of PM episodes in Beijing that is governed by meteorological conditions and characterized by two distinct aerosol formation processes of nucleation and growth, but with a small contribution from primary emissions and regional transport of particles. Nucleation consistently precedes a polluted period, producing a high number concentration of nano-sized particles under clean conditions. Accumulation of the particle mass concentration exceeding several hundred micrograms per cubic meter is accompanied by a continuous size growth from the nucleation-mode particles over multiple days to yield numerous larger particles, distinctive from the aerosol formation typically observed in other regions worldwide. The particle compositions in Beijing, on the other hand, exhibit a similarity to those commonly measured in many global areas, consistent with the chemical constituents dominated by secondary aerosol formation. Our results highlight that regulatory controls of gaseous emissions for volatile organic compounds and nitrogen oxides from local transportation and sulfur dioxide from regional industrial sources represent the key steps to reduce the urban PM level in China.

  20. Near-Range Receiver Unit of Next Generation PollyXT Used with Koldeway Aerosol Raman Lidar in Arctic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stachlewska Iwona S.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Near-range Aerosol Raman lidar (NARLa receiver unit, that was designed to enhance the detection range of the NeXT generation PollyXT Aerosol-Depolarization-Raman (ADR lidar of the University of Warsaw, was employed next the Koldeway Aerosol Raman Lidar (KARL at the AWI-IPEV German-French station in Arctic during Spring 2015. Here we introduce shortly design of both lidars, the scheme of their installation next to each other, and preliminary results of observations aiming at arctic haze investigation by the lidars and the iCAP a set of particle counter and aethalometer installed under a tethered balloon.

  1. Near-Range Receiver Unit of Next Generation PollyXT Used with Koldeway Aerosol Raman Lidar in Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stachlewska, Iwona S.; Markowicz, Krzysztof M.; Ritter, Christoph; Neuber, Roland; Heese, Birgit; Engelmann, Ronny; Linne, Holger

    2016-06-01

    The Near-range Aerosol Raman lidar (NARLa) receiver unit, that was designed to enhance the detection range of the NeXT generation PollyXT Aerosol-Depolarization-Raman (ADR) lidar of the University of Warsaw, was employed next the Koldeway Aerosol Raman Lidar (KARL) at the AWI-IPEV German-French station in Arctic during Spring 2015. Here we introduce shortly design of both lidars, the scheme of their installation next to each other, and preliminary results of observations aiming at arctic haze investigation by the lidars and the iCAP a set of particle counter and aethalometer installed under a tethered balloon.

  2. The impact of haze on the adolescent's acute respiratory disease: A single institution study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan Fairos Wan Yaacob

    2016-05-01

    Conclusions: Student with haze effect documented much higher symptoms during haze especially female students. Symptoms such as headache, wheezing and mucus were noted among the normal secondary school children in Kota Bharu.

  3. 77 FR 24952 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Regional Haze...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-26

    ... ICR (August 26, 2009; 74 FR 43118). The last collection request anticipated the program progressing... AGENCY Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Regional Haze... organizations and facilities potentially regulated under the regional haze rule. Title: Regional...

  4. 77 FR 76173 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; State of Washington; Regional Haze State...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-26

    ... Implementation Plans; State of Washington; Regional Haze State Implementation Plan; Federal Implementation Plan for Best Available Retrofit Technology for Alcoa Intalco Operations and Tesoro Refining and Marketing... Plans; State of Washington; Regional Haze State Implementation Plan; Federal Implementation Plan...

  5. Haze Research in Brunei Darussalam During the 1998 Episode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radojevic, M.

    - Brunei Darussalam experienced a severe haze episode between the beginning of February and the end of April 1998 due mainly to local peat and forest fires in Brunei and in neighbouring Sabah and Sarawak. The extensive research studies of the haze carried out in Brunei are outlined together with selected results. Particulate matter (PM10) was the only significant criteria pollutant and it exceeded WHO guidelines and accepted air quality standards on most days during the haze episode. Gaseous criteria pollutants (CO, SO2, NO2, O3) were generally well below WHO guidelines and at these concentrations they are expected to have no significant health or environmental effects. Measurements of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) revealed the presence of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX), aldehydes, phenol, and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Personal exposure monitoring of PM10 revealed significant differences in exposure patterns between different individuals depending on the location, time and activity. Data on outpatient visits showed an increase for some illnesses (e.g., acute respiratory infection) during the months of haze. No significant impacts of haze on rainwater acidity or deposition were noted. Emission factors for some volatile compounds were determined in combustion experiments in which peat was burned at temperatures typical of smouldering.

  6. Variations of fine particle physiochemical properties during a heavy haze episode in the winter of Beijing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Hongya; Hu, Wei; Zhang, Daizhou; Wu, Zhijun; Guo, Song; Pian, Wei; Cheng, Wenjing; Hu, Min

    2016-11-15

    Chemical composition, morphology, size and mixture of fine particles were measured in a heavy haze and the post-haze air in Beijing in January 2012. With the occurrence of haze, the concentrations of gaseous and particulate pollutants including organics, sulfate, nitrate, and ammonium grew gradually. The hourly averaged PM2.5 concentration increased from 118μgm(-3) to 402μgm(-3) within 12h. In contrast, it was less than 10μgm(-3) in the post-haze air. Occupying approximately 46% in mass, organics were the major component of PM1 in both the haze and post-haze air. Analysis of individual particles in the size range of 0.2-1.1μm revealed that secondary-like particles and soot particles were always the majority, and most soot particles had a core-shell structure. The number ratio of secondary-like particles to soot particles in accumulation mode in the haze air was about 2:1, and that in the post-haze air was 8:1. These results indicate both secondary particle formation and primary emission contributed substantially to the haze. The mode size of the haze particles was about 0.7μm, and the mode size of the post-haze particles was 0.4μm, indicating the remarkable growth of particles in haze. However, the ratios of the core size to shell size of core-shell structure soot particles in the haze were similar to those in the post-haze air, suggesting a quick aging of soot particles in either the haze air or the post-haze air. PMID:27470669

  7. Variations of fine particle physiochemical properties during a heavy haze episode in the winter of Beijing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Hongya; Hu, Wei; Zhang, Daizhou; Wu, Zhijun; Guo, Song; Pian, Wei; Cheng, Wenjing; Hu, Min

    2016-11-15

    Chemical composition, morphology, size and mixture of fine particles were measured in a heavy haze and the post-haze air in Beijing in January 2012. With the occurrence of haze, the concentrations of gaseous and particulate pollutants including organics, sulfate, nitrate, and ammonium grew gradually. The hourly averaged PM2.5 concentration increased from 118μgm(-3) to 402μgm(-3) within 12h. In contrast, it was less than 10μgm(-3) in the post-haze air. Occupying approximately 46% in mass, organics were the major component of PM1 in both the haze and post-haze air. Analysis of individual particles in the size range of 0.2-1.1μm revealed that secondary-like particles and soot particles were always the majority, and most soot particles had a core-shell structure. The number ratio of secondary-like particles to soot particles in accumulation mode in the haze air was about 2:1, and that in the post-haze air was 8:1. These results indicate both secondary particle formation and primary emission contributed substantially to the haze. The mode size of the haze particles was about 0.7μm, and the mode size of the post-haze particles was 0.4μm, indicating the remarkable growth of particles in haze. However, the ratios of the core size to shell size of core-shell structure soot particles in the haze were similar to those in the post-haze air, suggesting a quick aging of soot particles in either the haze air or the post-haze air.

  8. 78 FR 8083 - Partial Disapproval of State Implementation Plan; Arizona; Regional Haze Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-05

    ... regional haze on July 1, 1999. 64 FR 35714 (July 1, 1999) codified at ] 40 CFR part 51, subpart P (Regional... of the required SIP submissions to address regional haze. See 74 FR 2392. Specifically, EPA found... Arizona's 309 Regional Haze SIP, if finalized, will not create a new FIP obligation.\\18\\ \\16\\ 74 FR...

  9. 76 FR 76646 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; South Dakota; Regional Haze State...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-08

    .... 64 FR 35714 (July 1, 1999), codified at 40 CFR part 51, subpart P. The Regional Haze Rule revised the... the regional ] haze requirements. 74 FR 2392. Once EPA has found that a state has failed to make a...\\ The preamble to the Regional Haze Rule provides additional details about the deciview. 64 FR...

  10. 77 FR 30454 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; State of Oregon; Regional Haze State...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-23

    ... approved certain provisions in Oregon's Regional Haze SIP submission. 76 FR 38997. This previous action... regional haze on July 1, 1999 (64 FR 35713) (the regional haze rule or RHR). The RHR revised the existing... (BART). 76 FR 38997. The action in this Federal Register notice addresses the remaining requirements...

  11. 78 FR 5158 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Connecticut; Regional Haze

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-24

    ... rule to address regional haze on July 1, 1999 (64 FR 35714) (``the Regional Haze Rule''). The... Connecticut Regional Haze SIP. See 77 FR 12367. \\1\\ Areas designated as mandatory Class I Federal areas..., promulgated a list of 156 areas where visibility is identified as an important value (44 FR 69122, November...

  12. 76 FR 33662 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; State of Tennessee; Regional Haze...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-09

    ... address regional haze issues. EPA promulgated a rule to address regional haze on July 1, 1999 (64 FR 35713... revising the regional haze program, EPA made just such a demonstration for CAIR. See 70 FR 39104 (July 6... FR 39104, 39142-4143 (July 6, 2005). CAIR, as originally promulgated, requires significant...

  13. 77 FR 30932 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Massachusetts; Regional Haze

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-24

    .... EPA promulgated a rule to address regional haze on July 1, 1999 (64 FR 35714), the Regional Haze Rule... the Regional Haze Rule, Part II, How to Identify BART-Eligible Sources. See 70 FR 39158. This guidance... the visual range that would exist under estimated natural conditions. See 64 FR 35715 (July 1,...

  14. 77 FR 33021 - Approval, Disapproval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; State of Wyoming; Regional Haze...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-04

    ... address regional haze issues. EPA promulgated a rule to address regional haze on July 1, 1999. 64 FR 35714... addressing the regional haze requirements. 74 FR 2392. Once EPA has found that a state has failed to make a... conditions. 64 FR 35715 (July 1, 1999). \\1\\ Visual range is the greatest distance, in kilometers or miles,...

  15. 77 FR 17367 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Connecticut; Regional Haze

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-26

    .... EPA promulgated a rule to address regional haze on July 1, 1999 (64 FR 35714), the Regional Haze Rule... significance to be assigned to each factor. See 70 FR 39170 (July 6, 2005). A regional haze SIP must include... the visual range that would exist under estimated natural conditions. See 64 FR 35715 (July 1,...

  16. 77 FR 11452 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; State of Georgia; Regional Haze...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-27

    ... submittal arising from the State's reliance on CAIR to meet certain regional haze requirements. See 76 FR... promulgated a rule to address regional haze on July 1, 1999 (64 FR 35713), the RHR. The RHR revised the... ] revising the regional haze program, EPA made just such a demonstration for CAIR. See 70 FR 39104 (July...

  17. 77 FR 11928 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Wisconsin; Regional Haze

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-28

    ... regional haze issues. EPA promulgated a rule to address regional haze, the RHR, on July 1, 1999 (64 FR... issued in 2005 revising the regional haze program. 70 FR 39104 ] (July 6, 2005). EPA's regulations... would exist under estimated natural conditions. See 64 FR 35715 (July 1, 1999). \\1\\ Areas designated...

  18. 77 FR 34801 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Minnesota; Regional Haze

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-12

    ... haze plan on January 25, 2012 (77 FR 3681). The proposed rule described the nature of the regional haze... July 1, 1999 RHR (64 FR 35714) required states to submit a regional haze plan by December 17, 2007... (RHR) as codified at 40 CFR 51.308. This rule was promulgated on July 1, 1999 (64 FR 35713),...

  19. Study on the Variation Characteristics of Haze Weather in Hubei Province during 1980-2012

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tianxing SU; Mingfang XU; Xiang ZHOU; Zaiqiang YANG; Jijian YUAN; Haiyan ZHANG

    2015-01-01

    This paper, using the method of "the combination of 14 o ’clock relative humidity, visibility and weather phenomena" , selected haze days during 1980-2012 from 13 stations of Hubei Province, and studied years of variation characteristics of haze weather in Hubei Province. The results showed that the average annual haze days showed a fluctuant rising trend in whole from 1980 to 2012, but there were many peak value and val ey value during the whole changing process; haze days of most stations showed an increasing trend, among which the stations with less than 50 d haze days had a more obvious increasing trend, and the spatial distribution of annual mean haze days had distinct inhomogeneity. Haze days of Hubei Province presented the distribution characteristics of more in autumn and winter, and less in spring and summer, in which haze days during December-January were the most, and haze days during July -August were the least. Terrain had a big impact on lo-cal haze days, piedmont leeward zones were prone to haze days, mountainous re-gions were just the opposite. The research suggested that we should combine dif-ferent situations with different stations instead of exclusively from the mean value of multiple stations when we analyze the mean change of haze days in a broader area, to investigate the overal changing trend and the reasons.

  20. 78 FR 40654 - Approval, Disapproval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; State of Wyoming; Regional Haze...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-08

    ... partially approving and partially disapproving Wyoming's 40 CFR 51.309(g) regional haze SIP. 78 FR 34738. In.... at both locations. The comment period for the proposed rule published June 10, 2013 at 78 FR 34738 is...; Regional Haze State Implementation Plan; Federal Implementation Plan for Regional Haze; Notice of...

  1. 77 FR 3975 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Indiana; Regional Haze

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-26

    ... regional haze issues. EPA promulgated a rule to address regional haze, the RHR, on July ] 1, 1999 (64 FR... regulations issued in 2005 revising the regional haze program. 70 FR 39104 (July 6, 2005). EPA's regulations...-fifth of the visual range that would exist under estimated natural conditions. See 64 FR 35715 (July...

  2. 77 FR 71111 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; State of Florida; Regional Haze...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-29

    ... regional haze on July 1, 1999 (64 FR 35713), the Regional Haze Rule (RHR). The RHR revised the existing... haze SIP, and on June 7, 2012 (77 FR 33642), the EPA finalized a limited disapproval of the regional... of sources, i.e., ``reasonably attributable visibility impairment.'' See 45 FR 80084....

  3. 77 FR 46911 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Michigan; Regional Haze State...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-06

    ... July 1, 1999 (64 FR 35713). The regional haze rule, which amended 40 CFR part 50, subpart P, integrated... haze rule provides additional details about the deciview. 64 FR 35714 (July 1, 1999). To track changes... which revised the regional haze program. 70 FR 39104 (July 6, 2005). EPA's regulations provided...

  4. Size-resolved source apportionment of particulate matter in urban Beijing during haze and non-haze episodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, S. L.; Pan, Y. P.; Wang, Y. S.

    2015-03-01

    More size-resolved chemical information is needed before the physicochemical characteristics and sources of airborne particles can be understood, but this information remains unavailable in most regions of China due to a paucity of measurement data. In this study, we report a one-year observation of various chemical species in size-segregated particle samples collected in urban Beijing, a mega city that experiences severe haze episodes. In addition to fine particles, the measured particle size distributions showed high concentrations of coarse particles during the haze periods. The abundance and chemical compositions of the particles in this study were temporally and spatially variable, with major contributions from organic matter and secondary inorganic aerosols. The contribution of the organic matter to the mass decreased from 37.9 to 33.1%, whereas the total contribution of SO42-, NO3- and NH4+ increased from 19.1 to 32.3% on non-haze and haze days, respectively. Due to heterogeneous reactions and hygroscopic growth, the peaks in the size distributions of organic carbon, SO42-, NO3-, NH4+, Cl-, K+ and Cu shifted from 0.43-0.65 μm on non-haze days to 0.65-1.1 μm on haze days. Although the size distributions are similar for the heavy metals Pb, Cd and Tl during the observation period, their concentrations increased by a factor of more than 1.5 on haze days compared with non-haze days. We found that NH4+ with a size range of 0.43-0.65 μm, SO42- and NO3- with a size range of 0.65-1.1 μm and Ca2+ with a size range of 5.8-9 μm as well as the meteorological factors of relative humidity and wind speed were responsible for the haze pollution when the visibility was less than 15 km. Source apportionment using positive matrix factorization identified six common sources: secondary inorganic aerosols (26.1% for fine particles vs. 9.5% for coarse particles), coal combustion (19 vs. 23.6%), primary emissions from vehicles (5.9 vs. 8.0%), biomass burning (8.5 vs. 2

  5. Concentrations and chemical compositions of fine particles (PM2.5) during haze and non-haze days in Beijing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yang; Huang, Wei; Cai, Tianqi; Fang, Dongqing; Wang, Yuqin; Song, Jian; Hu, Min; Zhang, Yuanxun

    2016-06-01

    To investigate the chemical properties of PM2.5 and put forward reasonable control measures, daily samples of PM2.5 were collected at an urban site in Beijing from August 4 to September 3 of 2012 using two 2-channel samplers. Chemical analysis was conducted for eight water soluble inorganic ions (WSII, including Na+, NH4+, K+, Mg2 +, Ca2 +, Cl-, NO3-, and SO42 -), organic carbon (OC) and elementary carbon (EC). PM2.5 concentrations ranged from 8.8 to 218.6 μg m- 3, with an average concentration of 80.6 ± 57.3 μg m- 3. WSII, the most dominant PM2.5 constituents contributing 60 ± 18% of its mass, ranged from 3.1 to 172.2 μg m- 3. SO42 -, NO3-, and NH4+ dominated WSII (90 ± 28%) and their concentrations were 1.3-105.7 μg m- 3, 0.5-52.7 μg m- 3 and 0.3-33.5 μg m- 3, respectively. The concentrations of OC and EC were 3.0-28.8 μgC m- 3 and 0.8-7.4 μgC m- 3, constituting 17.6% and 4.9% of PM2.5, respectively. Three serious pollution episodes (haze days) occurred during the campaign. PM2.5 and its chemical species showed substantial increases during haze episodes. The greater enhancement factors for SO42 - (4.5), NO3- (4.0), and NH4+ (4.2) during haze days compared to non-haze days were obtained, suggesting that these secondary inorganic ions play important roles in the formation of haze. The average ratio of NO3-/SO42 - was 0.52. Ion balance calculations showed that PM2.5 samples were acidic during haze periods and close to neutral during non-haze days. Correlation analysis between the major ions was conducted and the results suggested that the main forms of NH4+ might be (NH4)2SO4. In addition, the variations between haze days and non-haze days for OC, EC, and the ratio of OC/EC were discussed.

  6. Haze of surface random systems: An approximate analytic approach

    CERN Document Server

    Simonsen, Ingve; Andreassen, Erik; Ommundsen, Espen; Nord-Varhaug, Katrin

    2009-01-01

    Approximate analytic expressions for haze (and gloss) of Gaussian randomly rough surfaces for various types of correlation functions are derived within phase-perturbation theory. The approximations depend on the angle of incidence, polarization of the incident light, the surface roughness, $\\sigma$, and the average of the power spectrum taken over a small angular interval about the specular direction. In particular it is demonstrated that haze(gloss) increase(decrease) with $\\sigma/\\lambda$ as $\\exp(-A(\\sigma/\\lambda)^2)$ and decreases(increase) with $a/\\lambda$, where $a$ is the correlation length of the surface roughness, in a way that depends on the specific form of the correlation function being considered. These approximations are compared to what can be obtained from a rigorous Monte Carlo simulation approach, and good agreement is found over large regions of parameter space. Some experimental results for the angular distribution of the transmitted light through polymer films, and their haze, are presen...

  7. Aerosols optical propertites in Titan's Detached Haze Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seignovert, Benoît; Rannou, Pascal; Lavvas, Panayotis; Cours, Thibaud; West, Robert A.

    2016-06-01

    Titan's Detached Haze Layer (DHL) first observed in 1983 by Rages and Pollack during the Voyager 2 [1] is a consistent spherical haze feature surrounding Titan's upper atmosphere and detached from the main haze. Since 2005, the Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) instrument on board the Cassini mission performs a continuous survey of the Titan's atmosphere and confirmed its persistence at 500 km up to the equinox (2009) before its drop and disappearance in 2012 [2]. Previous analyses showed, that this layer corresponds to the transition area between small spherical aerosols and large fractal aggregates and play a key role in the aerosols formation in Titan's atmosphere [3-5]. In this study we perform UV photometric analyses on ISS observations taken from 2005 to 2007 based on radiative transfer inversion to retrieve aerosols particles properties in the DHL (bulk and monomer size, fractal dimension and local density).

  8. Estimation of the Arctic aerosols from local and long-range transport using relationships between 210Pb and 212Pb atmospheric activity concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, the aerosol activity concentrations of 210Pb at 28 Canadian radiological monitoring stations from 2009 to 2013 were analyzed. The results show that the ratio of 210Pb winter average concentration to summer average concentration increases with increasing latitude. This could be used to evaluate the transport of pollutants to the Arctic region such as the Arctic haze from Eurasia through long-range atmospheric transport during winter. Based on 12 years of monitoring results from the Yellowknife station that includes both 210Pb and 212Pb concentrations, the study confirms that the seasonal distribution of 210Pb to 212Pb activity concentration ratios has a significant peak in winter and a relatively low value in summer, which can be used as an indicator of the air mass flow to the Arctic. The period dominated by long-range aerosol transport and Arctic haze was estimated by fitting a Gaussian distribution function to the peak values of this ratio in winter. A peak width parameter of full width at half maximum (FWHM) allows a year by year estimate of the period of influence by long-range transport of aerosols, and this varied between 67 and 88 days in this study. The fitted Gaussian peak also shows that the season of the continental influenced air mass in Yellowknife usually starts in mid-to-late November and ends in mid-to-late April. Thus, the 210Pb to 212Pb ratio distributions may enable the determination of periods dominated by long-range aerosol transport and the scale of the Arctic haze at different latitudes. - Highlights: • Twelve years 210Pb/212Pb monitoring results from low to high altitude are presented. • The 210Pbwinter/210Pbsummer ratio increases clearly with latitude of monitoring site. • The pollutant transport to the Arctic is estimated by distribution 210Pb/212Pb ratio. • The time scale of long-range transport aerosol bearing 210Pb to Arctic is reported

  9. Arctic Climate Tipping Points

    OpenAIRE

    Lenton, Timothy M.

    2012-01-01

    There is widespread concern that anthropogenic global warming will trigger Arctic climate tipping points. The Arctic has a long history of natural, abrupt climate changes, which together with current observations and model projections, can help us to identify which parts of the Arctic climate system might pass future tipping points. Here the climate tipping points are defined, noting that not all of them involve bifurcations leading to irreversible change. Past abrupt climate changes in the A...

  10. Arctic wind energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peltola, E. [Kemijoki Oy (Finland); Holttinen, H.; Marjaniemi, M. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland); Tammelin, B. [Finnish Meteorological Institute, Helsinki (Finland)

    1998-12-31

    Arctic wind energy research was aimed at adapting existing wind technologies to suit the arctic climatic conditions in Lapland. Project research work included meteorological measurements, instrument development, development of a blade heating system for wind turbines, load measurements and modelling of ice induced loads on wind turbines, together with the development of operation and maintenance practices in arctic conditions. As a result the basis now exists for technically feasible and economically viable wind energy production in Lapland. New and marketable products, such as blade heating systems for wind turbines and meteorological sensors for arctic conditions, with substantial export potential, have also been developed. (orig.)

  11. A Characterization of Arctic Aerosols as Derived from Airborne Observations and their Influence on the Surface Radiation Budget

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herber, A.; Stone, R.; Liu, P. S.; Li, S.; Sharma, S.; Neuber, R.; Birnbaumn, G.; Vitale, V.

    2011-12-01

    Arctic climate is influenced by aerosols that affect the radiation balance at the surface and within the atmosphere. Impacts depend on the composition and concentration of aerosols that determine opacity, which is quantified by the measure of aerosol optical depth (AOD). During winter and spring, aerosols are transported into the Arctic from lower latitude industrial regions. Trans-Arctic flight missions PAMARCMiP (Polar Airborne Measurements and Arctic Regional Climate Model Simulation Project) of the German POLAR 5 during spring 2009 and spring 2011 provided opportunities to collect a comprehensive data set from which properties of the aerosol were derived, including AOD. Measurements were made from near the surface to over 4 km in altitude during flights between Svalbard, Norway and Pt. Barrow, Alaska. These, along with measurements of particle size and concentration, and black carbon content (BC) provide a three-dimensional characterization of the aerosols encountered along track. The horizontal and vertical distribution of Arctic haze, in particular, was evaluated. During April 2009, the Arctic atmosphere was variably turbid with total column AOD (at 500 nm) ranging from ~ 0.12 to > 0.35, where clean background values are typically Stone et al., 2010). The haze was concentrated within and just above the surface-based temperature inversion layer. Few, distinct elevated aerosol layers were observed, also with an aerosol airborne Lidar. The presence of these haze layers in the Arctic atmosphere during spring reduced the diurnally averaged net shortwave irradiance, which can cause cooling of the surface, depending on its Albedo (reflectivity). An overview of both campaigns will be given with results presented in the context of historical observations and current thinking about the impact aerosols have on the Arctic climate. Stone, R.S., A. Herber, V. Vitale, M. Mazzola, A. Lupi, R. Schnell, E.G. Dutton, P. Liu, S.M. Li, K. Dethloff, A. Lampert, C. Ritter, M. Stock

  12. A drought-based predictor of recent haze events in western Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Robert D.; Wang, Yonghe; Roswintiarti, Orbita; Guswanto

    Indonesia's fire and haze problem is reviewed, and a model quantifying the relationship between drought and haze from biomass burning in western Indonesia is presented. Visibility observations from weather stations in Sumatra and Kalimantan were used as a haze indicator. The Drought Code component of the Canadian Forest Fire Weather Index System was used as a drought indicator. Using meteorological data from 1994 to 1998, we obtained regional haze and drought signals for western Indonesia. Nonlinear regression analysis was performed between the two signals to obtain a model of haze potential based on the Drought Code. Using the curvature properties of the nonlinear model, we estimated that severe haze is likely above a threshold Drought Code of 388.2. Using this threshold value, we propose four levels of drought that can be used operationally as an early warning tool in managing Indonesia's serious haze problem.

  13. Constraints on the Microphysics of Pluto's Photochemical Haze from New Horizons Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, Peter; Wong, Michael L; Liang, Mao-Chang; Shia, Run-Lie; Kammer, Joshua A; Yung, Yuk L; Summers, Michael E; Gladstone, G Randall; Young, Leslie A; Olkin, Catherine B; Ennico, Kimberly; Weaver, Harold A; Stern, S Alan

    2016-01-01

    The New Horizons flyby of Pluto confirmed the existence of hazes in its atmosphere. Observations of a large high- to low- phase brightness ratio, combined with the blue color of the haze, suggest that the haze particles are fractal aggregates, analogous to the photochemical hazes on Titan. Therefore, studying the Pluto hazes can shed light on the similarities and differences between the Pluto and Titan atmospheres. We model the haze distribution using the Community Aerosol and Radiation Model for Atmospheres assuming that the distribution is shaped by sedimentation and coagulation of particles originating from photochemistry. Hazes composed of both purely spherical and purely fractal aggregate particles are considered. Agreement between model results and occultation observations is obtained with aggregate particles when the downward flux of photochemical products is equal to the column-integrated methane destruction rate ~1.2 $\\times$ 10$^{-14}$ g cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$, while for spherical particles the mass flu...

  14. Chemical changes in the Arctic troposphere at polar sunrise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At polar sunrise, the Arctic troposphere (0 to ∼8 km) is a unique chemical reactor influenced by human activity and the Arctic Ocean. It is surrounded by industrialized continents that in winter contribute gaseous and particulate pollution (Arctic haze). It is underlain by the flat Arctic Ocean from which it is separated by a crack-ridden ice membrane 3 to 4 m thick. Ocean to atmosphere exchange of heat, water vapor and marine biogenic gases influence the composition of the reactor. From 21 September to 21 December to 21 March, the region north of the Arctic circle goes from a completely sunlit situation to a completely dark one and then back to light. At the same time the lower troposphere is stably stratified. This hinders vertical mixing. In this environment, chemical reactions involving sunlight are much slower than further south. Thus, it would not be surprising to find a high abundance of photochemically reactive compounds in the atmosphere at polar sunrise. Between complete dark in February and complete light in April, a number of chemical changes in the lower troposphere are observed. Perhaps the most sensational is the destruction of lower tropospheric ozone accompanied by production of filterable bromine and iodine. The latter are likely of marine origin, although their production may involve anthropogenic compounds. Another change is the shift in the fraction of total sulfur in its end oxidation state (VI) from 50% to 90%. Several gaseous hydrocarbons disappear from the atmosphere at this time. Preliminary observations also indicate a maximum in total non-black carbon on particulate matter. This is consistent with the formation of non-volatile organics from photochemically induced reactions of gas phase organics. Results of the Canadian Polar Sunrise Experiment 1988 are presented

  15. White Arctic vs. Blue Arctic: Making Choices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfirman, S. L.; Newton, R.; Schlosser, P.; Pomerance, R.; Tremblay, B.; Murray, M. S.; Gerrard, M.

    2015-12-01

    As the Arctic warms and shifts from icy white to watery blue and resource-rich, tension is arising between the desire to restore and sustain an ice-covered Arctic and stakeholder communities that hope to benefit from an open Arctic Ocean. If emissions of greenhouse gases to the atmosphere continue on their present trend, most of the summer sea ice cover is projected to be gone by mid-century, i.e., by the time that few if any interventions could be in place to restore it. There are many local as well as global reasons for ice restoration, including for example, preserving the Arctic's reflectivity, sustaining critical habitat, and maintaining cultural traditions. However, due to challenges in implementing interventions, it may take decades before summer sea ice would begin to return. This means that future generations would be faced with bringing sea ice back into regions where they have not experienced it before. While there is likely to be interest in taking action to restore ice for the local, regional, and global services it provides, there is also interest in the economic advancement that open access brings. Dealing with these emerging issues and new combinations of stakeholders needs new approaches - yet environmental change in the Arctic is proceeding quickly and will force the issues sooner rather than later. In this contribution we examine challenges, opportunities, and responsibilities related to exploring options for restoring Arctic sea ice and potential pathways for their implementation. Negotiating responses involves international strategic considerations including security and governance, meaning that along with local communities, state decision-makers, and commercial interests, national governments will have to play central roles. While these issues are currently playing out in the Arctic, similar tensions are also emerging in other regions.

  16. Urban heat islands in China enhanced by haze pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Chang; Lee, Xuhui; Liu, Shoudong; Schultz, Natalie; Xiao, Wei; Zhang, Mi; Zhao, Lei

    2016-01-01

    The urban heat island (UHI), the phenomenon of higher temperatures in urban land than the surrounding rural land, is commonly attributed to changes in biophysical properties of the land surface associated with urbanization. Here we provide evidence for a long-held hypothesis that the biogeochemical effect of urban aerosol or haze pollution is also a contributor to the UHI. Our results are based on satellite observations and urban climate model calculations. We find that a significant factor controlling the nighttime surface UHI across China is the urban-rural difference in the haze pollution level. The average haze contribution to the nighttime surface UHI is 0.7±0.3 K (mean±1 s.e.) for semi-arid cities, which is stronger than that in the humid climate due to a stronger longwave radiative forcing of coarser aerosols. Mitigation of haze pollution therefore provides a co-benefit of reducing heat stress on urban residents. PMID:27551987

  17. Ice haze, snow, and the Mars water cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Ralph

    1990-01-01

    Light curves and extinction profiles derived from Martian limb observations are used to constrain the atmospheric temperature structure in regions of the atmosphere with thin haze and to analyze the haze particle properties and atmospheric eddy mixing. Temperature between 170 and 190 K are obtained for three cases at levels in the atmosphere ranging from 20 to 50 km. Eddy diffusion coefficients around 100,000 sq cm/s, typical of a nonconvecting atmosphere, are derived in the haze regions at times when the atmosphere is relatively clear of dust. This parameter apparently changes by more than three orders of magnitude with season and local conditions. The derived particle size parameter varies systematically by more than an order of magnitude with condensation level, in such a way that the characteristic fall time is always about one Martian day. Ice hazes provide a mechanism for scavenging water vapor in the thin Mars atmosphere and may play a key role in the seasonal cycle of water on Mars.

  18. Surface Haze and Surface Morphology of Blown Film Compositions

    OpenAIRE

    Patel, Rajen; Ratta, Varun; Saavedra, Pepe; Li, Jing

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Reduction in surface haze is a very attractive way to improve the optical properties of most polyolefin films. This route becomes very viable for coextruded multilayer films where the inner layers may be utilized to provide the desired mechanical properties, such as high modulus, controlled shrinkage, and good tear strength while the outer 'skin' layers are utilized to give low surface and ...

  19. Urban heat islands in China enhanced by haze pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Chang; Lee, Xuhui; Liu, Shoudong; Schultz, Natalie; Xiao, Wei; Zhang, Mi; Zhao, Lei

    2016-08-23

    The urban heat island (UHI), the phenomenon of higher temperatures in urban land than the surrounding rural land, is commonly attributed to changes in biophysical properties of the land surface associated with urbanization. Here we provide evidence for a long-held hypothesis that the biogeochemical effect of urban aerosol or haze pollution is also a contributor to the UHI. Our results are based on satellite observations and urban climate model calculations. We find that a significant factor controlling the nighttime surface UHI across China is the urban-rural difference in the haze pollution level. The average haze contribution to the nighttime surface UHI is 0.7±0.3 K (mean±1 s.e.) for semi-arid cities, which is stronger than that in the humid climate due to a stronger longwave radiative forcing of coarser aerosols. Mitigation of haze pollution therefore provides a co-benefit of reducing heat stress on urban residents.

  20. Identifying the Radio Bubble Nature of the Microwave Haze

    CERN Document Server

    Dobler, Gregory

    2012-01-01

    Using 7-year data from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe I identify a sharp "edge" in the microwave haze at high Galactic latitude (35 deg < |b| < 55 deg) that is spatially coincident with the edge of the "Fermi Haze/Bubbles". This finding proves conclusively that the edge in the gamma-rays is real (and not a processing artifact), demonstrates explicitly that the microwave haze and the gamma-ray bubbles are indeed the same structure observed at multiple wavelengths, and strongly supports the interpretation of the microwave haze as a separate component of Galactic synchrotron (likely generated by a transient event) as opposed to a simple variation of the spectral index of disk synchrotron. In addition, combining these data sets allows for the first determination of the magnetic field within a radio bubble using microwaves and gamma-rays by taking advantage of the fact that the inverse Compton gamma-rays are primarily generated by scattering of CMB photons at these latitudes, thus minimizing uncert...

  1. The disappearance and reappearance of Titan's detached haze layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Robert; Rannou, Pascal; Lavvas, Panayotis; Seignovert, Benoit; Turtle, Elizabeth P.; Perry, Jason; Ovanessian, Aida; Roy, Mou

    2016-10-01

    Titan's extended haze is a prominent and long-lived feature of the atmosphere that encompasses a rich variety of chemical, dynamical and microphysical processes operating over a wide range of temporal and spatial scales. The so-called 'detached' haze layer is easily seen in high-resolution short-wave (near-UV and blue wavelengths) images and is a consequence of a nearly global (outside of the winter polar hood region) layer depleted in aerosol content. It was first seen near 350 Km altitude in Voyager images (Rages and Pollack, 1983) and later observed by the Cassini ISS cameras (Porco et al., 2005; West et al., 2010) and UV stellar occultation profiles (Koskinen et al. 2011). A series of Cassini images from 2009 to 2010 revealed what appears to be a seasonally related altitude variation with remarkable regularity (comparing the Voyager and Cassini images). The drop in altitude is most rapid at equinox. Here we report on images of the upper haze layer over the period 2012 to early 2016. In the early part of this period the detached haze continued to drop in altitude and disappeared. There was no evidence for it beginning late in 2012 and extending to early 2016 when it was again detected with very low contrast at an altitude near 500 Km. We document this behavior and examine the evolution of the haze as functions of both latitude and time. These new details put additional constraints on models that attempt to account for the existence of the detached layer. Part of this work was done by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology. References: Rages, K., and J. B. Pollack (1983), Vertical distribution of scattering hazes in Titan's upper atmosphere, Icarus, 55, 50–62, doi:10.1016/0019-1035 (83)90049-0; Porco, C. C. et al., Imaging Titan from the Cassini Spacecraft, Nature 434, 159-168 (2005); West, R. A. et al., The evolution of Titans detached haze layer near equinox in 2009", Geophys. Res. Lett. 38, L06204, doi:10.1029/2011GL046843, 2011

  2. Constraints on Pluto's Hazes from 2-Color Occultation Lightcurves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartig, Kara; Barry, T.; Carriazo, C. Y.; Cole, A.; Gault, D.; Giles, B.; Giles, D.; Hill, K. M.; Howell, R. R.; Hudson, G.; Loader, B.; Mackie, J. A.; Olkin, C. B.; Rannou, P.; Regester, J.; Resnick, A.; Rodgers, T.; Sicardy, B.; Skrutskie, M. F.; Verbiscer, A. J.; Wasserman, L. H.; Watson, C. R.; Young, E. F.; Young, L. A.; Buie, M. W.; Nelson, M.

    2015-11-01

    The controversial question of aerosols in Pluto's atmosphere first arose in 1988, when features in a Pluto occultation lightcurve were alternately attributed to haze opacity (Elliot et al. 1989) or a thermal inversion (Eshleman 1989). A stellar occultation by Pluto in 2002 was observed from several telescopes on Mauna Kea in wavelengths ranging from R- to K-bands (Elliot et al. 2003). This event provided compelling evidence for haze on Pluto, since the mid-event baseline levels were systematically higher at longer wavelengths (as expected if there were an opacity source that scattered more effectively at shorter wavelengths). However, subsequent occultations in 2007 and 2011 showed no significant differences between visible and IR lightcurves (Young et al. 2011).The question of haze on Pluto was definitively answered by direct imaging of forward-scattering aerosols by the New Horizons spacecraft on 14-JUL-2015. We report on results of a bright stellar occultation which we observed on 29-JUN-2015 in B- and H-bands from both grazing and central sites. As in 2007 and 2011, we see no evidence for wavelength-dependent extinction. We will present an analysis of haze parameters (particle sizes, number density profiles, and fractal aggregations), constraining models of haze distribution to those consistent with and to those ruled out by the occultation lightcurves and the New Horizons imaging.References:Elliot, J.L., et al., "Pluto's Atmosphere." Icarus 77, 148-170 (1989)Eshleman, V.R., "Pluto's Atmosphere: Models based on refraction, inversion, and vapor pressure equilibrium." Icarus 80 439-443 (1989)Elliot, J.L., et al., "The recent expansion of Pluto's atmosphere." Nature 424 165-168 (2003)Young, E.F., et al., "Search for Pluto's aerosols: simultaneous IR and visible stellar occultation observations." EPSC-DPS Joint Meeting 2011, held 2-7 October 2011 in Nantes, France (2011)

  3. Arctic Sea Level Reconstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Peter Limkilde

    method.For oceanographic purposes, the altimetric record over the Arctic Ocean is inferiorin quality to that of moderate latitudes, but nonetheless an invaluable set of observations. During this project, newly processed Arctic altimetry from the ERS-1/-2 and Envisat missions has become available......Reconstruction of historical Arctic sea level is very difficult due to the limited coverage and quality of tide gauge and altimetry data in the area. This thesis addresses many of these issues, and discusses strategies to help achieve a stable and plausible reconstruction of Arctic sea level from...... 1950 to today.The primary record of historical sea level, on the order of several decades to a few centuries, is tide gauges. Tide gauge records from around the world are collected in the Permanent Service for Mean Sea Level (PSMSL) database, and includes data along the Arctic coasts. A reasonable...

  4. Ice-Free Arctic Ocean?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Science Teacher, 2005

    2005-01-01

    The current warming trends in the Arctic may shove the Arctic system into a seasonally ice-free state not seen for more than one million years, according to a new report. The melting is accelerating, and researchers were unable to identify any natural processes that might slow the deicing of the Arctic. "What really makes the Arctic different from…

  5. Spatial and temporal variation of haze in China from 1961 to 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Rui; Wang, Shuxiao; Shen, Wenhai; Wang, Jiandong; Wu, Kang; Ren, Zhihua; Feng, Mingnong

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to analyze the climatic characteristics and long-term spatial and temporal variations of haze occurrence in China. The impact factors of haze trends are also discussed. Meteorological data from 1961 to 2012 and daily PM10 concentrations from 2003 to 2012 were employed in this study. The results indicate that the annual-average hazy days at all stations have been increasing rapidly from 4 days in 1961 to 18 days in 2012. The maximum number of haze days occur in winter (41.1%) while the minimum occur in summer (10.4%). During 1961-2012, the high occurrence areas of haze shifted from central to south and east regions of China. The Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei (Jing-Jin-Ji) region, Shanxi, Shaanxi, and Henan Province are the high occurrence areas for haze, while the Yangtze River Delta (YRD) and the Pearl River Delta (PRD) have become regions with high haze occurrences in the last 25 years. Temperature and pressure are positively correlated with the number of haze days. However, wind, relative humidity, precipitation, and sunshine duration are negatively correlated with the number of haze days. The key meteorological factors affecting the formation and dissipation of haze vary for high and low altitudes, and are closely related to anthropogenic activities. In recent years, anthropogenic activities have played a more important role in haze occurrences compared with meteorological factors. PMID:27521945

  6. Spatial and temporal variation of haze in China from 1961 to 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Rui; Wang, Shuxiao; Shen, Wenhai; Wang, Jiandong; Wu, Kang; Ren, Zhihua; Feng, Mingnong

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to analyze the climatic characteristics and long-term spatial and temporal variations of haze occurrence in China. The impact factors of haze trends are also discussed. Meteorological data from 1961 to 2012 and daily PM10 concentrations from 2003 to 2012 were employed in this study. The results indicate that the annual-average hazy days at all stations have been increasing rapidly from 4 days in 1961 to 18 days in 2012. The maximum number of haze days occur in winter (41.1%) while the minimum occur in summer (10.4%). During 1961-2012, the high occurrence areas of haze shifted from central to south and east regions of China. The Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei (Jing-Jin-Ji) region, Shanxi, Shaanxi, and Henan Province are the high occurrence areas for haze, while the Yangtze River Delta (YRD) and the Pearl River Delta (PRD) have become regions with high haze occurrences in the last 25 years. Temperature and pressure are positively correlated with the number of haze days. However, wind, relative humidity, precipitation, and sunshine duration are negatively correlated with the number of haze days. The key meteorological factors affecting the formation and dissipation of haze vary for high and low altitudes, and are closely related to anthropogenic activities. In recent years, anthropogenic activities have played a more important role in haze occurrences compared with meteorological factors.

  7. Titan-like exoplanets: Variations in geometric albedo and effective transit height with haze production rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Checlair, Jade; McKay, Christopher P.; Imanaka, Hiroshi

    2016-09-01

    Extensive studies characterizing Titan present an opportunity to study the atmospheric properties of Titan-like exoplanets. Using an existing model of Titan's atmospheric haze, we computed geometric albedo spectra and effective transit height spectra for six values of the haze production rate (zero haze to twice present) over a wide range of wavelengths (0.2-2 μm). In the geometric albedo spectra, the slope in the UV-visible changes from blue to red when varying the haze production rate values from zero to twice the current Titan value. This spectral feature is the most effective way to characterize the haze production rates. Methane absorption bands in the visible-NIR compete with the absorbing haze, being more prominent for smaller haze production rates. The effective transit heights probe a region of the atmosphere where the haze and gas are optically thin and that is thus not effectively probed by the geometric albedo. The effective transit height decreases smoothly with increasing wavelength, from 376 km to 123 km at 0.2 and 2 μm, respectively. When decreasing the haze production rate, the methane absorption bands become more prominent, and the effective transit height decreases with a steeper slope with increasing wavelength. The slope of the geometric albedo in the UV-visible increases smoothly with increasing haze production rate, while the slope of the effective transit height spectra is not sensitive to the haze production rate other than showing a sharp rise when the haze production rate increases from zero. We conclude that geometric albedo spectra provide the most sensitive indicator of the haze production rate and the background Rayleigh gas. Our results suggest that important and complementary information can be obtained from the geometric albedo and motivates improvements in the technology for direct imaging of nearby exoplanets.

  8. Arctic Climate Systems Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivey, Mark D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Robinson, David G. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Boslough, Mark B. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Backus, George A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Peterson, Kara J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); van Bloemen Waanders, Bart G. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Swiler, Laura Painton [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Desilets, Darin Maurice [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Reinert, Rhonda Karen [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-03-01

    This study began with a challenge from program area managers at Sandia National Laboratories to technical staff in the energy, climate, and infrastructure security areas: apply a systems-level perspective to existing science and technology program areas in order to determine technology gaps, identify new technical capabilities at Sandia that could be applied to these areas, and identify opportunities for innovation. The Arctic was selected as one of these areas for systems level analyses, and this report documents the results. In this study, an emphasis was placed on the arctic atmosphere since Sandia has been active in atmospheric research in the Arctic since 1997. This study begins with a discussion of the challenges and benefits of analyzing the Arctic as a system. It goes on to discuss current and future needs of the defense, scientific, energy, and intelligence communities for more comprehensive data products related to the Arctic; assess the current state of atmospheric measurement resources available for the Arctic; and explain how the capabilities at Sandia National Laboratories can be used to address the identified technological, data, and modeling needs of the defense, scientific, energy, and intelligence communities for Arctic support.

  9. Seasonal size distribution of airborne culturable bacteria and fungi and preliminary estimation of their deposition in human lungs during non-haze and haze days

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Min; Jia, Ruizhi; Qiu, Tianlei; Han, Meilin; Song, Yuan; Wang, Xuming

    2015-10-01

    In recent years, haze events in Beijing have significantly increased in frequency. On haze days, airborne microorganisms are considered to be a potential risk factor for various health concerns. However, limited information on bioaerosols has prevented our proper understanding of the possible threat to human health due to these bioaerosols. In this study, we used a six-stage impactor for sampling culturable bioaerosols and the LUDEP 2.07 computer-based model for calculating their deposition on human lungs to investigate seasonal concentration, size distribution, and corresponding deposition efficiency and flux in the human respiratory tract during different haze-level events. The current results of the analysis of 398 samples over four seasons indicate that the concentration of culturable airborne bacteria decreased with increasing haze severity. The bioaerosol concentration ratio was skewed towards larger particle sizes on heavy haze days leading to larger bioaerosol aerodynamic diameters than on non-haze days. During nasal breathing by an adult male engaged in light exercise in an outdoor environment, the total deposition efficiency of culturable bioaerosols is 80-90% including approximately 70% in the upper respiratory tract, 5-7% in the alveoli, and about 3% in the bronchial couple with bronchiolar regions. Although the difference in culturable bioaerosol aerodynamic diameters at different haze levels was not large enough to cause obvious differences in lung deposition efficiency, the deposition fluxes clearly varied with the degree of haze owing to the varied concentration of culturable airborne bacteria and fungi. The results here could improve our understanding of the seasonal health threat due to culturable bioaerosols during non-haze and haze days.

  10. The effect of carbon monoxide on planetary haze formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Organic haze plays a key role in many planetary processes ranging from influencing the radiation budget of an atmosphere to serving as a source of prebiotic molecules on the surface. Numerous experiments have investigated the aerosols produced by exposing mixtures of N2/CH4 to a variety of energy sources. However, many N2/CH4 atmospheres in both our solar system and extrasolar planetary systems also contain carbon monoxide (CO). We have conducted a series of atmosphere simulation experiments to investigate the effect of CO on the formation and particle size of planetary haze analogues for a range of CO mixing ratios using two different energy sources, spark discharge and UV. We find that CO strongly affects both number density and particle size of the aerosols produced in our experiments and indicates that CO may play an important, previously unexplored, role in aerosol chemistry in planetary atmospheres.

  11. The effect of carbon monoxide on planetary haze formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hörst, S. M.; Tolbert, M. A, E-mail: sarah.horst@colorado.edu [Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2014-01-20

    Organic haze plays a key role in many planetary processes ranging from influencing the radiation budget of an atmosphere to serving as a source of prebiotic molecules on the surface. Numerous experiments have investigated the aerosols produced by exposing mixtures of N{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} to a variety of energy sources. However, many N{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} atmospheres in both our solar system and extrasolar planetary systems also contain carbon monoxide (CO). We have conducted a series of atmosphere simulation experiments to investigate the effect of CO on the formation and particle size of planetary haze analogues for a range of CO mixing ratios using two different energy sources, spark discharge and UV. We find that CO strongly affects both number density and particle size of the aerosols produced in our experiments and indicates that CO may play an important, previously unexplored, role in aerosol chemistry in planetary atmospheres.

  12. The Effect of CO on Planetary Haze Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Hörst, Sarah M

    2014-01-01

    Organic haze plays a key role in many planetary processes ranging from influencing the radiation budget of an atmosphere to serving as a source of prebiotic molecules on the surface. Numerous experiments have investigated the aerosols produced by exposing mixtures of N$_{2}$/CH$_{4}$ to a variety of energy sources. However, many N$_{2}$/CH$_{4}$ atmospheres in both our solar system and extrasolar planetary systems also contain CO. We have conducted a series of atmosphere simulation experiments to investigate the effect of CO on formation and particle size of planetary haze analogues for a range of CO mixing ratios using two different energy sources, spark discharge and UV. We find that CO strongly affects both number density and particle size of the aerosols produced in our experiments and indicates that CO may play an important, previously unexplored, role in aerosol chemistry in planetary atmospheres.

  13. Investigating the impact of haze on MODIS cloud detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Feiyue; Duan, Miaomiao; Min, Qilong; Gong, Wei; Pan, Zengxin; Liu, Guangyi

    2015-12-01

    The cloud detection algorithm for passive sensors is usually based on a fuzzy logic system with thresholds determined from previous observations. In recent years, haze and high aerosol concentrations with high aerosol optical depth (AOD) occur frequently in China and may critically impact the accuracy of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) cloud detection. Thus, we comprehensively explore this impact by comparing the results from MODIS/Aqua (passive sensor), Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization/CALIPSO (lidar sensor), and Cloud Profiling Radar/CloudSat (microwave sensor) of the A-Train suite of instruments using an averaged AOD as an index for an aerosol concentration value. Case studies concerning the comparison of the three sensors indicate that MODIS cloud detection is reduced during haze events. In addition, statistical studies show that an increase in AOD creates an increase in the percentage of uncertain flags and a decrease in hit rate, a consistency index between consecutive sets of cloud retrievals. On average, AOD values lower than 0.1 give hit rate values up to 80.0% and uncertainty values lower than 16.8%, while AOD values greater than 1.0 reduce the hit rate below to 66.6% and increase the percentage of uncertain flags up to 46.6%. Therefore, we can conclude that the ability of MODIS cloud detection is weakened by large concentrations of aerosols. This suggests that use of the MODIS cloud mask, and derived higher-level products, in situations with haze requires caution. Further improvement of this retrieval algorithm is desired as haze studies based on MODIS products are of great interest in a number of related fields.

  14. Arctic Shipping Emissions in the Changing Climate

    OpenAIRE

    Vihanninjoki, Vesa

    2014-01-01

    Due to the Arctic climate change and the related diminishing of Arctic sea ice cover, the general conditions for Arctic shipping are changing. The retreat of Arctic sea ice opens up new routes for maritime transportation, both trans-Arctic passages and new alternatives within the Arctic region. Hence the amount of Arctic shipping is presumed to increase. Despite the observed development, the sailing conditions in the Arctic waters will remain challenging. Thus particular attention will be ...

  15. Comparison of physical and chemical properties of ambient aerosols during the 2009 haze and non-haze periods in Southeast Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jingsha; Tai, Xuhong; Betha, Raghu; He, Jun; Balasubramanian, Rajasekhar

    2015-10-01

    Recurrent smoke-haze episodes that occur in Southeast Asia (SEA) are of much concern because of their environmental and health impacts. These haze episodes are mainly caused by uncontrolled biomass and peat burning in Indonesia. Airborne particulate matter (PM) samples were collected in the southwest coast of Singapore from 16 August to 9 November in 2009 to assess the impact of smoke-haze episodes on the air quality due to the long-range transport of biomass and peat burning emissions. The physical and chemical characteristics of PM were investigated during pre-haze, smoke-haze, and post-haze periods. Days with PM2.5 mass concentrations of ≥35 μg m(-3) were considered as smoke-haze events. Using this criterion, out of the total 82 sampling days, nine smoke-haze events were identified. The origin of air masses during smoke-haze episodes was studied on the basis of HYSPLIT backward air trajectory analysis for 4 days. In terms of the physical properties of PM, higher particle surface area concentrations and particle gravimetric mass concentrations were observed during the smoke-haze period, but there was no consistent pattern for particle number concentrations during the haze period as compared to the non-haze period except that there was a significant increase at about 08:00, which could be attributed to the entrainment of PM from aloft after the breakdown of the nocturnal inversion layer. As for the chemical characteristics of PM, among the six key inorganic water-soluble ions (Cl(-), NO3(-), nss-SO4(2-), Na(+), NH4(+), and nss-K(+)) measured in this study, NO3(-), nss-SO4(2-), and NH4(+) showed a significant increase in their concentrations during the smoke-haze period together with nss-K(+). These observations suggest that the increased atmospheric loading of PM with higher surface area and increased concentrations of optically active secondary inorganic aerosols [(NH4)2SO4 or NH4HSO4 and NH4NO3] resulted in the atmospheric visibility reduction in SEA due to

  16. Arctic Bathymetry (batharcst)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The digitally compiled map includes geology, oil and gas field centerpoints, and geologic provinces of the Arctic (North Pole area encircled by 640 N Latitude). The...

  17. Arctic_Bathymetry

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Models project the Arctic Ocean will become undersaturated with respect to carbonate minerals in the next decade. Recent field results indicate parts may already be...

  18. Arctic Geology (geoarcst)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The digitally compiled map includes geology, oil and gas field centerpoints, and geologic provinces of the Arctic (North Pole area encircled by 640 N Latitude). The...

  19. Arctic survey, 1957

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes a survey and game patrol conducted to twelve villages in the Arctic from April 24 to May 2 1957. The report covers animals take for income...

  20. Single Image Haze Removal Method for Inland River

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiu Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to environmental pollution, the climate is worsening. The fog days up to 60% of the year in inland certain segments, which it has seriously affected the marine electronic cruise normal operation and navigation safety. According to the inland video image becomes gray and lack of visibility in foggy weather conditions, and in order to remove the haze to get a clear image color and contour, this paper presents a method based on Jones Extension Matrix and the Dark Channel Prior. First, we obtain the light intensity in the atmosphere and the estimated concentration of the haze by using Dark Channel Prior, and via using the Jones Extension Matrix and the parameters of Stokes' Law to eliminate part of the scattered light. At last, we have completed the function of image dehazing by brightness adjustment factor based on N pixels in the field of step brightness and improve the brightness based on Retinex Principle for the recovered image. Experimental results show this algorithm improves scenery visual effect in condition of haze. It is provided a clear video image for the marine electronic cruise in the foggy day.

  1. Photolytic Hazes in the Atmosphere of 51 Eri b

    CERN Document Server

    Zahnle, Kevin J; Morley, Caroline V; Moses, Julianne I

    2016-01-01

    We use a 1D model to address photochemistry and possible haze formation in the irradiated warm Jupiter, 51 Eridani b. The intended focus was to be carbon, but sulfur photochemistry turns out to be important. The case for organic photochemical hazes is intriguing but falls short of being compelling. If organic hazes form, they are likeliest to do so if vertical mixing in 51 Eri b is weaker than in Jupiter, and they would be found below the altitudes where methane and water are photolyzed. The more novel result is that photochemistry turns H$_2$S into elemental sulfur, here treated as S$_8$. In the cooler models, S$_8$ is predicted to condense in optically thick clouds of solid sulfur particles, whilst in the warmer models S$_8$ remains a vapor along with several other sulfur allotropes that are both visually striking and potentially observable. For 51 Eri b, the division between models with and without condensed sulfur is at an effective temperature of 700 K, which is within error its actual effective temperat...

  2. The impact of haze on the adolescent's acute respiratory disease:A single institution study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wan Fairos Wan Yaacob; Nor Suhana Mohamad Noor; Nor Ili Che A Bakar; Nurulhuda Afisah Mat Zin; Fahisham Taib

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To examine the impact of haze in the reduction of peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) reading and identify the risk factors affecting respiratory function due to haze. Methods: This study was conducted during haze period among secondary school stu-dents in Kota Bharu. We analyzed data on a total of 126 secondary school children measuring the respiratory health and symptoms in October 2015 using standardized questionnaire and PEFR measurement. Clinical characteristics on the risk factor and prevalence of haze effect were explored. Chi-square test and independent sample t-test was used to investigate the relationship between risk factors and haze effect and logistic regression analysis for the odds of having haze effect. Results: The findings revealed a significant reduction in PEFR reading of more than 15%from the expected PEFR values. It was also noted that the children with headache, cough, mucus and sore throat respiratory symptoms had consistently higher rates of respiratory illness of having haze effect compared to those who did not. Conclusions: Student with haze effect documented much higher symptoms during haze especially female students. Symptoms such as headache, wheezing and mucus were noted among the normal secondary school children in Kota Bharu.

  3. [Aerosol Optical Properties in the Northern Suburb of Nanjing During Haze Days in January 2013].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li-peng; Ma, Yan; Zheng, Jun; Cui, Fen-ping; Zhou, Yao-yao

    2016-03-15

    In January 2013 large-scale, continuous and severe haze occurred in Nanjing. Three-wavelength photoacoustic soot spectrometer (PASS-3) was used for real-time, online and situ measurements of aerosol absorption and scattering coefficients in the northern suburb of Nanjing during January 2013. The results indicated that the average aerosol absorption and scattering coefficients were (83.20 ± 35.24) Mm⁻¹ and (670.16 ± 136.44) Mm⁻¹ during haze days, which were 3.85 and 3.45 times higher than those on clean days, respectively. The diurnal variation of absorption and scattering coefficients showed a bimodal distribution. The mean single scattering albedo and scattering Angstrom exponent were (0.89 ± 0.04) and (1.30 ± 0.27) respectively, indicating the predominance of scattering fine particles during haze days in Nanjing. Aerosols could be significantly removed by precipitation. The absorption and scattering coefficients showed negative correlations with surface wind speed, and the single scattering albedo and Angstrom exponent showed positive correlations with wind speed. Aerosol scattering coefficient was highest under southeasterly wind, whereas the absorption coefficient was highest under the southwesterly wind. In the three haze pollution events, Haze 1 and Haze 2 were mainly affected by long-range transportation of pollutants. Haze 1 was mainly affected by aging air mass from north Nanjing, Haze 2 was mainly affected by biomass burning air mass from southwest Nanjing, while Haze 3 was mainly caused by the high sulfate.

  4. Arctic freshwater synthesis: Introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prowse, T.; Bring, A.; Mârd, J.; Carmack, E.

    2015-11-01

    In response to a joint request from the World Climate Research Program's Climate and Cryosphere Project, the International Arctic Science Committee, and the Arctic Council's Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Program, an updated scientific assessment has been conducted of the Arctic Freshwater System (AFS), entitled the Arctic Freshwater Synthesis (AFSΣ). The major reason for joint request was an increasing concern that changes to the AFS have produced, and could produce even greater, changes to biogeophysical and socioeconomic systems of special importance to northern residents and also produce extra-Arctic climatic effects that will have global consequences. Hence, the key objective of the AFSΣ was to produce an updated, comprehensive, and integrated review of the structure and function of the entire AFS. The AFSΣ was organized around six key thematic areas: atmosphere, oceans, terrestrial hydrology, terrestrial ecology, resources and modeling, and the review of each coauthored by an international group of scientists and published as separate manuscripts in this special issue of Journal of Geophysical Research-Biogeosciences. This AFSΣ—Introduction reviews the motivations for, and foci of, previous studies of the AFS, discusses criteria used to define the domain of the AFS, and details key characteristics of the definition adopted for the AFSΣ.

  5. Diversity and Composition of Airborne Fungal Community Associated with Particulate Matters in Beijing during Haze and Non-haze Days.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Dong; Zhang, Tao; Su, Jing; Zhao, Li-Li; Wang, Hao; Fang, Xiao-Mei; Zhang, Yu-Qin; Liu, Hong-Yu; Yu, Li-Yan

    2016-01-01

    To assess the diversity and composition of airborne fungi associated with particulate matters (PMs) in Beijing, China, a total of 81 PM samples were collected, which were derived from PM2.5, PM10 fractions, and total suspended particles during haze and non-haze days. The airborne fungal community in these samples was analyzed using the Illumina Miseq platform with fungi-specific primers targeting the internal transcribed spacer 1 region of the large subunit rRNA gene. A total of 797,040 reads belonging to 1633 operational taxonomic units were observed. Of these, 1102 belonged to Ascomycota, 502 to Basidiomycota, 24 to Zygomycota, and 5 to Chytridiomycota. The dominant orders were Pleosporales (29.39%), Capnodiales (27.96%), Eurotiales (10.64%), and Hypocreales (9.01%). The dominant genera were Cladosporium, Alternaria, Fusarium, Penicillium, Sporisorium, and Aspergilus. Analysis of similarities revealed that both particulate matter sizes (R = 0.175, p = 0.001) and air quality levels (R = 0.076, p = 0.006) significantly affected the airborne fungal community composition. The relative abundance of many fungal genera was found to significantly differ among various PM types and air quality levels. Alternaria and Epicoccum were more abundant in total suspended particles samples, Aspergillus in heavy-haze days and PM2.5 samples, and Malassezia in PM2.5 samples and heavy-haze days. Canonical correspondence analysis and permutation tests showed that temperature (p < 0.01), NO2 (p < 0.01), PM10 (p < 0.01), SO2(p < 0.01), CO (p < 0.01), and relative humidity (p < 0.05) were significant factors that determine airborne fungal community composition. The results suggest that diverse airborne fungal communities are associated with particulate matters and may provide reliable data for studying the responses of human body to the increasing level of air pollution in Beijing.

  6. The Impact of Clouds and Hazes in Substellar Atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morley, Caroline; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Marley, Mark S.

    2016-01-01

    The formation of clouds significantly alters the spectra of cool substellar atmospheres from terrestrial planets to brown dwarfs. In cool planets like Earth and Jupiter, volatile species like water and ammonia condense to form ice clouds. In hot planets and brown dwarfs, iron and silicates instead condense, forming dusty clouds. Irradiated methane-rich planets may have substantial hydrocarbon hazes. During my thesis, I have studied the impact of clouds and hazes in a variety of substellar objects. First, I present results for cool brown dwarfs including clouds previously neglected in model atmospheres. Model spectra that include sulfide and salt clouds can match the spectra of T dwarf atmospheres; water ice clouds will alter the spectra of the newest and coldest brown dwarfs, the Y dwarfs. These sulfide/salt and ice clouds potentially drive spectroscopic variability in these cool objects, and this variability should be distinguishable from variability caused by hot spots.Next, I present results for small, cool exoplanets between the size of Earth and Neptune, so-called super Earths. They likely have sulfide and salt clouds and also have photochemical hazes caused by stellar irradiation. Vast resources have been dedicated to characterizing the handful of super Earths accessible to current telescopes, yet of the planets smaller than Neptune studied to date, all have radii in the near-infrared consistent with being constant in wavelength, likely showing that these small planets are consistently enshrouded in thick hazes and clouds. Very thick, lofted clouds of salts or sulfides in high metallicity (1000× solar) atmospheres create featureless transmission spectra in the near-infrared. Photochemical hazes with a range of particle sizes also create featureless transmission spectra at lower metallicities. I show that despite these challenges, there are promising avenues for understanding this class of small planets: by observing the thermal emission and reflectivity of

  7. Fog and Haze in California's San Joaquin Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    This illustration features images of southern California and southwestern Nevada acquired on January 3, 2001 (Terra orbit 5569), and includes data from three of MISR's nine cameras. The San Joaquin Valley, which comprises the southern extent of California's Central Valley, covers much of the viewed area. Also visible are several of the Channel Islands near the bottom, and Mono and Walker Lakes, which stand out as darker patches near the top center, especially in the vertical and backward oblique images. Near the lower right of each image is the Los Angeles Basin, with the distinctive chevron shape of the Mojave Desert to its north.The Central Valley is a well-irrigated and richly productive agricultural area situated between the Coast Range and the snow-capped Sierra Nevadas. During the winter, the region is noted for its hazy overcasts and a low, thick ground fog known as the Tule. Owing to the effects of the atmosphere on reflected sunlight, dramatic differences in the MISR images are apparent as the angle of view changes. An area of thick, white fog in the San Joaquin Valley is visible in all three of the images. However, the pervasive haze that fills most of the valley is only slightly visible in the vertical view. At the oblique angles, the haze is highly distinguishable against the land surface background, particularly in the forward-viewing direction. Just above image center, the forward view also reveals bluish-tinged plumes near Lava Butte in Sequoia National Forest, where the National Interagency Coordination Center reported an active forest fire.The changing surface visibility in the multi-angle data allows us to derive the amount of atmospheric haze. In the lower right quadrant is a map of haze amount determined from automated processing of the MISR imagery. Low amounts of haze are shown in blue, and a variation in hue through shades of green, yellow, and red indicates progressively larger amounts of airborne particulates. Due to the topographically

  8. Characteristics of bacterial and fungal aerosols during the autumn haze days in Xi'an, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanpeng; Fu, Honglei; Wang, Wei; Liu, Jun; Meng, Qinglong; Wang, Wenke

    2015-12-01

    In recent years, haze pollution has become one of the most critical environmental issues in Xi'an, China, with particular matter (PM) being one of the top pollutants. As an important fraction of PM, bioaerosols may have adverse effects on air quality and human health. In this study, to better understand the characteristics of such biological aerosols, airborne microbial samples were collected by using an Andersen six-stage sampler in Xi'an from October 8th to 22nd, 2014. The concentration, size distribution and genera of airborne viable bacteria and fungi were comparably investigated during the haze days and non-haze days. Correlations of bioaerosol levels with meteorological parameters and PM concentrations were also examined. The results showed that the daily average concentrations of airborne viable bacteria and fungi during the haze days, 1102.4-1736.5 and 1466.2-1703.9 CFU/m3, respectively, were not only much higher than those during the non-haze days, but also exceeded the recommended permissible limit values. Comparing to size distributions during the non-haze days, slightly different patterns for bacterial aerosols and similar single-peak distribution pattern for fungal aerosols were observed during the haze days. Moreover, more allergic and infectious genera (e.g. Neisseria, Aspergillus, and Paecilomyces) in bioaerosols were identified during the haze days than during non-haze days. The present results reveal that bioaerosols may have more significant effects on public health and urban air quality during the haze days than during non-haze days.

  9. Arctic Rabies – A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prestrud Pål

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Rabies seems to persist throughout most arctic regions, and the northern parts of Norway, Sweden and Finland, is the only part of the Arctic where rabies has not been diagnosed in recent time. The arctic fox is the main host, and the same arctic virus variant seems to infect the arctic fox throughout the range of this species. The epidemiology of rabies seems to have certain common characteristics in arctic regions, but main questions such as the maintenance and spread of the disease remains largely unknown. The virus has spread and initiated new epidemics also in other species such as the red fox and the racoon dog. Large land areas and cold climate complicate the control of the disease, but experimental oral vaccination of arctic foxes has been successful. This article summarises the current knowledge and the typical characteristics of arctic rabies including its distribution and epidemiology.

  10. More Arctic research needed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, Susan

    The desire to achieve a balance between Arctic and Antarctic study was the message of the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation, which heard testimony on the need for more Arctic research on April 24. Ted Stevens (R-Alaska) noted that since 1986, study in the area has not increased as the National Science Foundation has claimed, but rather, owing to inflation, has merely kept pace. Robert Correll, assistant director of geosciences at NSF and chair of the Interagency Arctic Oceans Working Group, gave several reasons why the Arctic is an important area for study by the scientific community. Its unique environment, he said, makes it a natural laboratory. And due to its environmental sensitivity, it may provide one of the earliest indicators of global climate change. Also, its geographic location makes it a “window on space,” some of the world's largest mineral and petroleum resources are in the Arctic, and the region has great strategic and military importance.

  11. 77 FR 66929 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; State of Idaho; Regional Haze State...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-08

    ... a previous action EPA approved certain provisions in Idaho's Regional Haze SIP submission, 76 FR...]. regional haze SIP elements as proposed in the May 22, 2012 notice. 77 FR 30248. 0 3. Section 52.672 is... toward improving visibility in mandatory Class I Federal areas \\1\\ (Class I areas). 64 FR 35714 (July...

  12. 76 FR 43963 - Regional Haze State Implementation Plan; State of Nevada; Extension of Comment Period

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-22

    ... plan. DATES: The comment period for the proposed rule published June 22, 2011 (76 FR 36450), is... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 51 Regional Haze State Implementation Plan; State of Nevada; Extension of Comment... (SIP) to implement the regional haze program for the first planning period through July 31, 2018....

  13. 77 FR 11022 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; State of Alaska; Regional Haze State...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-24

    ... address regional haze on July 1, 1999 (64 FR 35713), the regional haze rule or RHR. The RHR revised the... Federal areas \\1\\ (Class I areas). 64 FR 35714 (July 1, 1999); see also 70 FR 39104 (July 6, 2005) and 71 FR 60612 (October 13, 2006). \\1\\ Areas designated as mandatory Class I Federal areas consist...

  14. 77 FR 76871 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; State of Colorado; Regional Haze State...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-31

    ... haze in 1999 (64 FR 35714, July 1, 1999, codified at 40 CFR part 51, subpart P). The requirements for... the regional haze requirements (74 FR 2392). Once EPA has found that a state has failed to make a... Register on March 26, 2012 (77 FR 18052). In that notice, we provided a detailed description of the...

  15. 77 FR 50611 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; State of Oregon; Regional Haze State...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-22

    ... approved certain provisions in Oregon's Regional Haze SIP submission. 76 FR 38997. This previous action... developing a LTS. 76 FR 38997. A detailed explanation of the Regional Haze Rule including the requirements... retrofit technology (BART). 76 FR 38997. On May 23, 2012, EPA proposed approving the remaining portion...

  16. 77 FR 30248 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; State of Idaho; Regional Haze State...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-22

    ... regional haze on July 1, 1999 (64 FR 35713) (the regional haze rule or RHR). The RHR revised the existing... toward improving visibility in mandatory Class ] I Federal areas \\1\\ (Class I areas). 64 FR 35714 (July 1, 1999); see also 70 FR 39104 (July 6, 2005) and 71 FR 60612 (October 13, 2006). \\1\\ Areas designated...

  17. 77 FR 20893 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; North Dakota; Regional Haze State...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-06

    ... regional haze issues, and we promulgated regulations addressing regional haze in 1999. 64 FR 35714 (July 1... requirements. 74 FR 2392. Once EPA has found that a state has failed to make a required submission, EPA is.... 62 FR 38652. Section 110(a)(2) of the CAA lists the elements that such new SIPs must address,...

  18. 76 FR 44534 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Tennessee; Regional Haze State...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-26

    .... The Commenters requested the extension in order to determine any potential impacts of the CSAPR on the... potential impacts of the final CSAPR on EPA's proposed rulemaking to approve Tennessee's Regional Haze State... the Regional Haze requirements and, specifically, any potential impacts on the Tennessee Regional...

  19. 77 FR 19098 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Commonwealth of Kentucky; Regional Haze State...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-30

    ..., 1999 (64 FR 35713), the Regional Haze Rule (RHR). The RHR revised the existing visibility regulations... for regional haze. See 76 FR 78194. EPA proposed a limited approval of Kentucky's two SIP revisions to....e., ``reasonably attributable visibility impairment.'' See 45 FR 80084. These...

  20. 77 FR 30467 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; State of Washington; Regional Haze State...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-23

    ... regional haze on July 1, 1999 (64 FR 35713) (the Regional Haze Rule or RHR). The RHR revised the existing... toward improving visibility in mandatory Class I Federal areas \\1\\ (Class I areas). 64 FR 35714 (July 1, 1999); see also 70 FR 39104 (July 6, 2005) and 71 FR 60612 (October 13, 2006). \\1\\ Areas designated...

  1. 77 FR 17334 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; State of Nevada; Regional Haze...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-26

    ... promulgated a rule to address regional haze on July 1, 1999 known as the Regional Haze Rule (RHR). See 64 FR... program. EPA proposed to approve all parts of Nevada's SIP revisions on June 22, 2011 (76 FR 36450). This... conditions. 64 FR 35715 (July 1, 1999). \\1\\ Visual range is the greatest distance, in kilometers or miles,...

  2. 77 FR 11914 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Vermont; Regional Haze

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-28

    .... EPA promulgated a rule to address regional haze on July 1, 1999 (64 FR 35714), the Regional Haze Rule... the visual range that would exist under estimated natural conditions. See 64 FR 35715, (July 1, 1999....e., ``reasonably attributable visibility impairment'' (RAVI). See 45 FR 80084 (Dec. 2,1980)....

  3. 77 FR 11809 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; New Hampshire; Regional Haze

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-28

    .... EPA promulgated a rule to address regional haze on July 1, 1999 (64 FR 35714), the Regional Haze Rule... FR 35715, (July 1, 1999). B. Background Information In section 169A(a)(1) of the 1977 Amendments to... of sources, i.e., ``reasonably attributable visibility impairment'' (RAVI). See 45 FR 80084, (Dec....

  4. 77 FR 41279 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Pennsylvania; Regional Haze State...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-13

    ... CAA and EPA's Regional Haze Rule (64 FR 35714, July 1, 1999) and the rationale for EPA's proposed... under the Regional Haze Rule at Appendix Y to 40 CFR part 51 (hereafter the BART Rule). See 70 FR 39104... (NPR) for Pennsylvania (77 FR 3984). The NPR proposed limited approval of Pennsylvania's RH SIP....

  5. 77 FR 11894 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; South Carolina; Regional Haze...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-28

    ... haze requirements. See 76 FR 82219 (December 30, 2011). EPA is not proposing to take action in today's... haze on July 1, 1999 (64 FR 35713), the RHR. The RHR revised the existing visibility regulations to... approved into the South Carolina SIP. See 50 FR 28544 (July 12, 1985) and 52 FR 45132 (November 24,...

  6. 77 FR 22550 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; New Hampshire; Regional Haze...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-16

    ..., 2012 (77 FR 11809) is reopened. Comments must be received on or before April 27, 2012. ADDRESSES...; Regional Haze; Reopening of Comment Period AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Proposed... 26, 2011, that addresses regional haze for the first planning period from 2008 through 2018....

  7. 78 FR 49684 - Approval and Disapproval of Air Quality State Implementation Plans; Arizona; Regional Haze and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-15

    ... INFORMATION: In Federal Register document 2013-18022 published in the Federal Register on July 30, 2013 (78 FR...; Regional Haze and Interstate Transport Requirements AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION... of Arizona's State Implementation Plan (SIP) to implement the regional haze program for the...

  8. 77 FR 39938 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Maryland; Regional Haze State...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-06

    ... approving into the Maryland SIP. \\1\\ EPA promulgated the RHR to address regional haze on July 1, 1999 (64 FR... which the SIP relies,'' which is ``defined as 2002 for regional haze purposes.'' See 64 FR 35742, July 1..., 2012 (77 FR 11839), EPA published a notice of proposed rulemaking (NPR) for the State of Maryland....

  9. 77 FR 39177 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Regional Haze

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-02

    ..., 2012 (77 FR 3712). The proposal notice described the nature of the regional haze problem and the... December 30, 2011 (76 FR 82219), EPA did in fact propose a limited disapproval of the Ohio regional haze... codified at 40 CFR 51.308. This rule was promulgated on July 1, 1999 (64 FR 35713). Further...

  10. 77 FR 11798 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Rhode Island; Regional Haze

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-28

    ... (64 FR 35714), the Regional Haze Rule. The Regional Haze Rule revised the existing visibility... conditions. See 64 FR 35715, (July 1, 1999). B. Background Information In section 169A(a)(1) of the 1977... FR 80084 (Dec. 2, 1980). These regulations represented the first phase in addressing...

  11. 76 FR 27973 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; State of Delaware; Regional Haze...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-13

    .... EPA promulgated a rule to address regional haze on July 1, 1999 (64 FR 35714), the Regional Haze Rule... kilometers or about one-fifth of the visual range that would exist under estimated natural conditions (64 FR... of sources, i.e., ``reasonably attributable visibility impairment'' (45 FR 80084). These...

  12. Male Team Sport Hazing Initiations in a Culture of Decreasing Homohysteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Eric; McCormack, Mark; Lee, Harry

    2012-01-01

    In this longitudinal ethnographic research, we report on 7 years of hazing rituals on two separate men's sports teams at one university in the United Kingdom. Using 38 in-depth interviews alongside naturalistic observations of the initiation rituals, we demonstrate that hazing activities have changed from being centered around homophobic same-sex…

  13. Analysis of the formation of fog and haze in North China Plain (NCP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Quan

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available North China Plain (NCP is one of the most populated and polluted regions in China. During the recent years, haze and fog occur frequently and cause severely low visibility in this region. In order to better understand the impact of aerosol particles on the formation of haze and fog, a long-term record of haze and fog occurrences in the past 56 years (from 1954–2009 over NCP is analyzed. The results show that there are rapid changes in the occurrences of haze and fog over NCP. The occurrences of haze and fog were low during 1970–1980, and reached a maximum during 1981–1998. After 1999, the occurrences of haze and fog slightly decreased. There was a nonlinear relationship between the occurrences of haze and fog. When the occurrence of haze was lower than 40 days yr−1, the occurrence of fog was strongly proportional to the occurrence of haze. However, when the occurrence of haze was high (larger than 75 days yr−1, the occurrence of fog was not sensitive to the occurrence of haze. In order to better understand the relationship between the occurrences of haze and fog as well as the effect of aerosol particles on the formation of haze and fog, an in-situ field experiment was conducted during a period with a mixed occurrence of haze and fog. The analysis of the experiment suggests that there were considerably high aerosol concentrations during the measurement period, with an averaged aerosol number concentration of 24 000 cm−3. The measurement also shows that a large amount of aerosol particles can act as condensation nuclei to enhance the formation of fog droplets. As a result, a large amount of fog droplets (>1000 cm−3 with small size in radius (5–6 μm were observed during the fog period, resulting in extremely low visibility (less than 100 m.

  14. Photolytic Hazes in the Atmosphere of 51 Eri b

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahnle, K.; Marley, M. S.; Morley, C. V.; Moses, J. I.

    2016-06-01

    We use a 1D model to address photochemistry and possible haze formation in the irradiated warm Jupiter, 51 Eridani b. The intended focus was to be carbon, but sulfur photochemistry turns out to be important. The case for organic photochemical hazes is intriguing but falls short of being compelling. If organic hazes form, they are likeliest to do so if vertical mixing in 51 Eri b is weaker than in Jupiter, and they would be found below the altitudes where methane and water are photolyzed. The more novel result is that photochemistry turns H2S into elemental sulfur, here treated as S8. In the cooler models, S8 is predicted to condense in optically thick clouds of solid sulfur particles, while in the warmer models S8 remains a vapor along with several other sulfur allotropes that are both visually striking and potentially observable. For 51 Eri b, the division between models with and without condensed sulfur is at an effective temperature of 700 K, which is within error its actual effective temperature; the local temperature where sulfur condenses is between 280 and 320 K. The sulfur photochemistry we have discussed is quite general and ought to be found in a wide variety of worlds over a broad temperature range, both colder and hotter than the 650–750 K range studied here, and we show that products of sulfur photochemistry will be nearly as abundant on planets where the UV irradiation is orders of magnitude weaker than it is on 51 Eri b.

  15. Titan's Oxygen Chemistry and its Impact on Haze Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuitton, Veronique; Carrasco, Nathalie; Flandinet, Laurene; Horst, Sarah; Klippenstein, Stephen; Lavvas, Panayotis; Orthous-Daunay, Francois-Regis; Thissen, Roland; Yelle, Roger

    2016-06-01

    Though Titan's atmosphere is reducing with its 98% N2, 2% CH4 and 0.1% H2, CO is the fourth most abundant molecule with a uniform mixing ratio of ˜50 ppm. Two other oxygen bearing molecules have also been observed in Titan's atmosphere: CO2 and H2O, with a mixing ratio of ˜15 and ˜1 ppb, respectively. The physical and chemical processes that determine the abundances of these species on Titan have been at the centre of a long-standing debate as they place constraints on the origin and evolution of its atmosphere [1]. Moreover, laboratory experiments have shown that oxygen can be incorporated into complex molecules, some of which are building blocks of life [2]. Finally, the presence of CO modifies the production rate and size of tholins [3,4], which transposed to Titan's haze may have some strong repercussions on the temperature structure and dynamics of the atmosphere. We present here our current understanding of Titan's oxygen chemistry and of its impact on the chemical composition of the haze. We base our discussion on a photochemical model that describes the first steps of the chemistry and on state-of-the-art laboratory experiments for the synthesis and chemical analysis of aerosol analogues. We used a very-high resolution mass spectrometer (LTQ-Orbitrap XL instrument) to characterize the soluble part of tholin samples generated from N2/CH4/CO mixtures at different mixing ratios and with two different laboratory set-ups. These composition measurements provide some understanding of the chemical mechanisms by which CO affects particle formation and growth. Our final objective is to obtain a global picture of the fate and impact of oxygen on Titan, from its origin to prebiotic molecules to haze particles to material deposited on the surface.

  16. Titan's Oxygen Chemistry and its Impact on Haze Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuitton, Veronique; Carrasco, Nathalie; Flandinet, Laurene; Horst, Sarah; Klippenstein, Stephen; Lavvas, Panayotis; Orthous-Daunay, Francois-Regis; Quirico, Eric; Thissen, Roland; Yelle, Roger V.

    2016-10-01

    Though Titan's atmosphere is reducing with its 98% N2, 2% CH4 and 0.1% H2, CO is the fourth most abundant molecule with a uniform mixing ratio of ~50 ppm. Two other oxygen bearing molecules have also been observed in Titan's atmosphere: CO2 and H2O, with a mixing ratio of ~15 and ~1 ppb, respectively. The physical and chemical processes that determine the abundances of these species on Titan have been at the centre of a long-standing debate as they place constraints on the origin and evolution of its atmosphere [1]. Moreover, laboratory experiments have shown that oxygen can be incorporated into complex molecules, some of which are building blocks of life [2]. Finally, the presence of CO modifies the production rate and size of tholins [3, 4], which transposed to Titan's haze may have some strong repercussions on the temperature structure and dynamics of the atmosphere.We present here our current understanding of Titan's oxygen chemistry and of its impact on the chemical composition of the haze. We base our discussion on a photochemical model that describes the first steps of the chemistry and on state-of-the-art laboratory experiments for the synthesis and chemical analysis of aerosol analogues. We used a very-high resolution mass spectrometer (LTQ-Orbitrap XL instrument) to characterize the soluble part of tholin samples generated from N2/CH4/CO mixtures at different mixing ratios and with two different laboratory set-ups. These composition measurements provide some understanding of the chemical mechanisms by which CO affects particle formation and growth. Our final objective is to obtain a global picture of the fate and impact of oxygen on Titan, from its origin to prebiotic molecules to haze particles to material deposited on the surface.[1] S.M. Hörst et al., The origin of oxygen species in Titan's atmosphere, J. Geophys. Res., 113, E10006 (2008).[2] S.M. Hörst et al., Formation of amino acids and nucleotide bases in a Titan atmosphere simulation experiment

  17. Arctic species resilience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Lars O.; Forchhammer, Mads C.; Jeppesen, Erik

    The peak of biological activities in Arctic ecosystems is characterized by a relative short and intense period between the start of snowmelt until the onset of frost. Recent climate changes have induced larger seasonal variation in both timing of snowmelt as well as changes mean temperatures and ...... and resources. This poster will present the conceptual framework for this project focusing on species resilience......., an extensive monitoring program has been conducted in the North Eastern Greenland National Park, the Zackenberg Basic. The objective of the program is to provide long time series of data on the natural innate oscillations and plasticity of a High Arctic ecosystem. With offset in the data provided through...

  18. Arctic Terrestrial Biodiversity Monitoring Plan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Tom; Payne, J.; Doyle, M.;

    The Conservation of Arctic Flora and Fauna (CAFF), the biodiversity working group of the Arctic Council, established the Circumpolar Biodiversity Monitoring Program (CBMP) to address the need for coordinated and standardized monitoring of Arctic environments. The CBMP includes an international...... on developing and implementing long-term plans for monitoring the integrity of Arctic biomes: terrestrial, marine, freshwater, and coastal (under development) environments. The CBMP Terrestrial Expert Monitoring Group (CBMP-TEMG) has developed the Arctic Terrestrial Biodiversity Monitoring Plan (CBMP......-Terrestrial Plan/the Plan) as the framework for coordinated, long-term Arctic terrestrial biodiversity monitoring. The goal of the CBMP-Terrestrial Plan is to improve the collective ability of Arctic traditional knowledge (TK) holders, northern communities, and scientists to detect, understand and report on long...

  19. A comprehensive climatology of Arctic aerosol properties on the North Slope of Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creamean, Jessie; de Boer, Gijs; Shupe, Matthew; McComiskey, Allison

    2016-04-01

    Evaluating aerosol properties has implications for the formation of Arctic clouds, resulting in impacts on cloud lifetime, precipitation processes, and radiative forcing. There are many remaining uncertainties and large discrepancies regarding modeled and observed Arctic aerosol properties, illustrating the need for more detailed observations to improve simulations of Arctic aerosol and more generally, projections of the components of the aerosol-driven processes that impact sea ice loss/gain. In particular, the sources and climatic effects of Arctic aerosol particles are severely understudied. Here, we present a comprehensive, long-term record of aerosol observations from the North Slope of Alaska baseline site at Barrow. These measurements include sub- and supermicron (up to 10 μm) total mass and number concentrations, sub- and supermicron soluble inorganic and organic ion concentrations, submicron metal concentrations, submicron particle size distributions, and sub- and supermicron absorption and scattering properties. Aerosol extinction and number concentration measurements extend back to 1976, while the remaining measurements were implemented since. Corroboration between the chemical, physical, and optical property measurements is evident during periods of overlapping observations, demonstrating the reliability of the measurements. During the Arctic Haze in the winter/spring, high concentrations of long-range transported submicron sea salt, mineral dust, industrial metals, pollution (non-sea salt sulfate, nitrate, ammonium), and biomass burning species are observed concurrent with higher concentrations of particles with sizes that span the submicron range, enhanced absorption and scattering coefficients, and largest Ångström exponents. The summer is characterized by high concentrations of small biogenic aerosols (extinction coefficients. Fall is characterized by clean conditions, with supermicron sea salt representing the dominant aerosol type supporting

  20. Proteome-Based Analysis of Colloidal Instability Enables the Detection of Haze-Active Proteins in Beer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, Fabian; Flaschel, Erwin; Niehaus, Karsten

    2016-09-01

    Colloidal haze is a serious quality defect of bright beers that considerably reduces their shelf life and is thought to be triggered by hordeins, a class of proline-rich barley proteins. In this work, the proteomes of fresh and old beers were investigated in bottled pilsners and compared to the protein inventory of haze to identify specific haze-active proteins. Haze isolates dissolved in rehydration buffer contained high concentrations of proteins and sugars but provided protein gels with weak spot signals. Consequently, a treatment for the chemical deglycation with trifluoromethanesulfonic acid was applied, which resulted in the identification of protein Z4, LTP1, CMb, CMe, pUP13, 3a, and Bwiph as constituents of the haze proteome. Because only one hordein was detectable and the proline content in haze hydrolysates was lower than those of barley prolamins, our results suggest that this class of proteins is of minor importance for haze development. PMID:27515584

  1. Proteome-Based Analysis of Colloidal Instability Enables the Detection of Haze-Active Proteins in Beer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, Fabian; Flaschel, Erwin; Niehaus, Karsten

    2016-09-01

    Colloidal haze is a serious quality defect of bright beers that considerably reduces their shelf life and is thought to be triggered by hordeins, a class of proline-rich barley proteins. In this work, the proteomes of fresh and old beers were investigated in bottled pilsners and compared to the protein inventory of haze to identify specific haze-active proteins. Haze isolates dissolved in rehydration buffer contained high concentrations of proteins and sugars but provided protein gels with weak spot signals. Consequently, a treatment for the chemical deglycation with trifluoromethanesulfonic acid was applied, which resulted in the identification of protein Z4, LTP1, CMb, CMe, pUP13, 3a, and Bwiph as constituents of the haze proteome. Because only one hordein was detectable and the proline content in haze hydrolysates was lower than those of barley prolamins, our results suggest that this class of proteins is of minor importance for haze development.

  2. The Arctic Circle

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Siobhan

    2016-04-01

    My name is Siobhan McDonald. I am a visual artist living and working in Dublin. My studio is based in The School of Science at University College Dublin where I was Artist in Residence 2013-2015. A fascination with time and the changeable nature of landmass has led to ongoing conversations with scientists and research institutions across the interweaving disciplines of botany, biology and geology. I am developing a body of work following a recent research trip to the North Pole where I studied the disappearing landscape of the Arctic. Prompted by my experience of the Arctic shelf receding, this new work addresses issues of the instability of the earth's materiality. The work is grounded in an investigation of material processes, exploring the dynamic forces that transform matter and energy. This project combines art and science in a fascinating exploration of one of the Earth's last relatively untouched wilderness areas - the High Arctic to bring audiences on journeys to both real and artistically re-imagined Arctic spaces. CRYSTALLINE'S pivotal process is collaboration: with The European Space Agency; curator Helen Carey; palaeontologist Prof. Jenny McElwain, UCD; and with composer Irene Buckley. CRYSTALLINE explores our desire to make corporeal contact with geological phenomena in Polar Regions. From January 2016, in my collaboration with Jenny McElwain, I will focus on the study of plants and atmospheres from the Arctic regions as far back as 400 million years ago, to explore the essential 'nature' that, invisible to the eye, acts as imaginary portholes into other times. This work will be informed by my arctic tracings of sounds and images recorded in the glaciers of this disappearing frozen landscape. In doing so, the urgencies around the tipping of natural balances in this fragile region will be revealed. The final work will emerge from my forthcoming residency at the ESA in spring 2016. Here I will conduct a series of workshops in ESA Madrid to work with

  3. Characteristics of atmospheric particulate mercury in size-fractionated particles during haze days in Shanghai

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaojia; Balasubramanian, Rajasekhar; Zhu, Qiongyu; Behera, Sailesh N.; Bo, Dandan; Huang, Xian; Xie, Haiyun; Cheng, Jinping

    2016-04-01

    Atmospheric particulate mercury (PHg) is recognized as a global pollutant that requires regulation because of its significant impacts on both human health and wildlife. The haze episodes that occur frequently in China could influence the transport and fate of PHg. To examine the characteristics of PHg during haze and non-haze days, size-fractioned particles were collected using thirteen-stage Nano-MOUDI samplers (10 nm-18 μm) during a severe haze episode (from December 2013 to January 2014) in Shanghai. The PHg concentration on haze days (4.11 ± 0.53 ng m-3) was three times higher than on non-haze days (1.34 ± 0.15 ng m-3). The ratio of the PHg concentration to total gaseous mercury (TGM) ranged from 0.42 during haze days to 0.21 during non-haze days, which was possibly due to the elevated concentration of particles for gaseous elemental mercury (GEM) adsorption, elevated sulfate and nitrate contributing to GEM oxidation, and the catalytic effect of elevated water-soluble inorganic metal ions. PHg/PM10 during haze days (0.019 ± 0.004 ng/μg) was lower than during non-haze days (0.024 ± 0.002 ng/μg), and PHg/PM10 was significantly reduced with an increasing concentration of PM10, which implied a relatively lower growth velocity of mercury than other compositions on particles during haze days, especially in the diameter range of 0.018-0.032 μm. During haze days, each size-fractioned PHg concentration was higher than the corresponding fraction on non-haze days, and the dominant particle size was in the accumulation mode, with constant accumulation to a particle size of 0.56-1.0 μm. The mass size distribution of PHg was bimodal with peaks at 0.32-0.56 μm and 3.1-6.2 μm on non-haze days, and 0.56-1.0 μm and 3.1-6.2 μm on haze days. There was a clear trend that the dominant size for PHg in the fine modes shifted from 0.32-0.56 μm during non-haze days to 0.56-1.0 μm on haze days, which revealed the higher growth velocity of PHg on haze days due to the

  4. Some discussions on Arctic vortex

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Hai; Sun Lantao; Wu Huiding; Li Xiang

    2006-01-01

    The Arctic vortex is a persistent large-scale cyclonic circulation in the middle and upper troposphere and the stratosphere. Its activity and variation control the semi-permanent active centers of Pan-Arctic and the short-time cyclone activity in the subarctic areas. Its strength variation, which directly relates to the atmosphere, ocean, sea ice and ecosystem of the Arctic, can affect the lower atmospheric circulation, the weather of subarctic area and even the weather of middle latitude areas. The 2003 Chinese Second Arctic Research Expedition experienced the transition of the stratosphereic circulation from a warm anticyclone to a cold cyclone during the ending period of Arctic summertime, a typical establishing process of the polar vortex circulation. The impact of the polar vortex variation on the low-level circulation has been investigated by some scientists through studying the coupling mechanisms of the stratosphere and troposphere. The impact of the Stratospheric Sudden Warming (SFW) events on the polar vortex variation was drawing people's great attention in the fifties of the last century. The Arctic Oscillation (AO) , relating to the variation of the Arctic vortex, has been used to study the impact of the Arctic vortex on climate change. The recent Arctic vortex studies are simply reviewed and some discussions on the Arctic vertex are given in the paper. Some different views and questions are also discussed.

  5. Ambient bioaerosol particle dynamics observed during haze and sunny days in Beijing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Kai; Zou, Zhuanglei; Zheng, Yunhao; Li, Jing; Shen, Fangxia; Wu, Chang-Yu; Wu, Yusheng; Hu, Min; Yao, Maosheng

    2016-04-15

    The chemical characteristics of airborne particulate matter (PM) have been extensively studied; however, little information exists for its biological components (bioaerosol) especially during a haze event in mega cities. Herein, we studied the bioaerosol (fluorescent particle) dynamics on both haze and sunny days in Beijing from Dec. 2013 to March 2014 by employing a widely used real-time bioaerosol sensor-ultraviolet aerodynamic particle spectrometer (UV-APS). Firstly, we studied the fluorescent particle (BioPM) concentration and size distributions during three independent haze and three independent sunny days. Secondly, we investigated BioPM dynamics over a two-week long monitoring period which included consecutive haze days and alternated sunny days. In addition, we analyzed bacterial community structures and endotoxin levels in the air samples using pyrosequencing and Limulus amebocyte lysate (LAL) method, respectively. More than 6-fold higher fluorescent particle concentrations up to 5×10(5)/m(3) with peaks at night or early dawn were detected at the time of haze occurrences than those observed on sunny days. When the haze episode progressed for 3-5days, the BioPM concentrations were observed to decrease to the levels that were typically observed on sunny days. In general, ozone levels were found to be elevated at noon, while BioPM, NOx and relative humidity were reduced. Gene sequence analysis revealed no significant difference in abundances and community structures for top 13 bacterial genera between haze and sunny days, yet about twice higher endotoxin levels (12.4EU/m(3)) were detected on haze days than on sunny days. The results here facilitate a better understanding of atmospheric fluorescent particle dynamics including those under haze events. PMID:26849339

  6. Chemical characteristics of PM2.5 during a typical haze episode in Guangzhou

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAN Jihua; DUAN Jingchun; HE Kebin; MA Yuanliang; DUAN Fengkui; CHEN Yuan; FU Jiamo

    2009-01-01

    The chemical characteristics (water-soluble ions and carbonaceous species) of PM2.5 in Guangzhou were measured during a typical haze episode.Most of the chemical species in PM2.5 showed significant difference between normal and haze days.The highest contributors to PM2.5 were organic carbon (OC),nitrate,and sulfate in haze days and were OC,sulfate,and elemental carbon (EC) in normal days.The concentrations of secondary species such as,NO3-,SO42-,and NH4+ in haze days were 6.5,3.9 and 5.3 times higher than those in normal days,respectively,while primary species (EC,Ca2+,K+) show similar increase from normal to haze days by a factor about 2.2-2.4.OC/EC ratio ranged from 2.8 to 6.2 with an average of 4.7 and the estimation on a minimum OC/EC ratio showed that SOC (secondary organic carbon) accounted more than 36.6% for the total organic carbon in haze days.The significantly increase in the secondary species (SOC,NO3-,SO42-,and NH4+),especially in NO3-,caused the worst air quality in this region.Simultaneously,the result illustrated that the serious air pollution in haze episodes was strongly correlated with the meteorological conditions.During the sampling periods,air pollution and visibility have a good relationship with the air mass transport distance;the shorter air masses transport distance,the worse air quality and visibility in Guangzhou,indicating the strong domination of local sources contributing to haze formation.High concentration of the secondary aerosol in haze episodes was likely due to the higher oxidation rates of sulfur and nitrogen species.

  7. Ambient bioaerosol particle dynamics observed during haze and sunny days in Beijing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Kai; Zou, Zhuanglei; Zheng, Yunhao; Li, Jing; Shen, Fangxia; Wu, Chang-Yu; Wu, Yusheng; Hu, Min; Yao, Maosheng

    2016-04-15

    The chemical characteristics of airborne particulate matter (PM) have been extensively studied; however, little information exists for its biological components (bioaerosol) especially during a haze event in mega cities. Herein, we studied the bioaerosol (fluorescent particle) dynamics on both haze and sunny days in Beijing from Dec. 2013 to March 2014 by employing a widely used real-time bioaerosol sensor-ultraviolet aerodynamic particle spectrometer (UV-APS). Firstly, we studied the fluorescent particle (BioPM) concentration and size distributions during three independent haze and three independent sunny days. Secondly, we investigated BioPM dynamics over a two-week long monitoring period which included consecutive haze days and alternated sunny days. In addition, we analyzed bacterial community structures and endotoxin levels in the air samples using pyrosequencing and Limulus amebocyte lysate (LAL) method, respectively. More than 6-fold higher fluorescent particle concentrations up to 5×10(5)/m(3) with peaks at night or early dawn were detected at the time of haze occurrences than those observed on sunny days. When the haze episode progressed for 3-5days, the BioPM concentrations were observed to decrease to the levels that were typically observed on sunny days. In general, ozone levels were found to be elevated at noon, while BioPM, NOx and relative humidity were reduced. Gene sequence analysis revealed no significant difference in abundances and community structures for top 13 bacterial genera between haze and sunny days, yet about twice higher endotoxin levels (12.4EU/m(3)) were detected on haze days than on sunny days. The results here facilitate a better understanding of atmospheric fluorescent particle dynamics including those under haze events.

  8. [Aerosol Optical Properties in the Northern Suburb of Nanjing During Haze Days in January 2013].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li-peng; Ma, Yan; Zheng, Jun; Cui, Fen-ping; Zhou, Yao-yao

    2016-03-15

    In January 2013 large-scale, continuous and severe haze occurred in Nanjing. Three-wavelength photoacoustic soot spectrometer (PASS-3) was used for real-time, online and situ measurements of aerosol absorption and scattering coefficients in the northern suburb of Nanjing during January 2013. The results indicated that the average aerosol absorption and scattering coefficients were (83.20 ± 35.24) Mm⁻¹ and (670.16 ± 136.44) Mm⁻¹ during haze days, which were 3.85 and 3.45 times higher than those on clean days, respectively. The diurnal variation of absorption and scattering coefficients showed a bimodal distribution. The mean single scattering albedo and scattering Angstrom exponent were (0.89 ± 0.04) and (1.30 ± 0.27) respectively, indicating the predominance of scattering fine particles during haze days in Nanjing. Aerosols could be significantly removed by precipitation. The absorption and scattering coefficients showed negative correlations with surface wind speed, and the single scattering albedo and Angstrom exponent showed positive correlations with wind speed. Aerosol scattering coefficient was highest under southeasterly wind, whereas the absorption coefficient was highest under the southwesterly wind. In the three haze pollution events, Haze 1 and Haze 2 were mainly affected by long-range transportation of pollutants. Haze 1 was mainly affected by aging air mass from north Nanjing, Haze 2 was mainly affected by biomass burning air mass from southwest Nanjing, while Haze 3 was mainly caused by the high sulfate. PMID:27337871

  9. [Characteristics of water-soluble organic nitrogen of PM2.5 in Xi'an during wintertime non-haze and haze periods].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yu-Ting; Wang, Ge-Hui; Sun, Tao; Cheng, Chun-Lei; Meng, Jing-Jing; Ren, Yan-Qin; Li, Jian-Jun

    2014-07-01

    High-volume PM2.5 samples were collected hourly from 4 December to 13 December 2012 at an urban site in Xi'an and analyzed for organic carbon (OC), elemental carbon (EC), water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC), water-soluble total nitrogen (WSTN), water-soluble organic nitrogen (WSON) and inorganic ions to investigate the sources and formation mechanism of WSON. The results showed that during the sampling period the averaged hourly concentration of WSON was (12 +/- 9.4) microg x m(-3) and maximized at 31 microg x m(-3), accounting for 47% +/- 9.8% of WSTN with NH4(+) -N and NO3(-) -N being 29% +/- 8.5% and 23% +/- 8.1%, respectively. WSON: WSOC (N: C) mass ratios ranged from 0.04 to 0.65 with an average of 0.31 +/- 0.13 during the observation period. WSON was (1.6 +/- 0.9) microg x m(-3), (6.5 +/- 3.9) microg x m(-3) and (23 +/- 4.7) microg x m(-3) in non-haze days (visibility > 10 km), light haze days (5 km haze days (visibility haze days to 0.3 +/- 0.1 on light haze days and 0.4 +/- 0.1 on heavy haze days, in consistence with the enhanced acidity of the fine particles. In addition, during the whole sampling period, WSON was strongly correlated with NH4(+), SO4(2-) and NO3(-) (R2 > 0.80), and negatively correlated with cation-anion equivalent ratio (R2 = 0.53). These phenomena can be mainly ascribed to a gas-particle conversion of gaseous water-soluble nitrogen-containing organic compounds like amines via acid-base reactions, which was sharply increased under the favorable meteorological conditions (e.g., low temperature and high humidity) during the heavy haze days.

  10. Deteriorating haze situation and the severe haze episode during December 18-25 of 2013 in Xi'an, China, the worst event on record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaodong; Hui, Ying; Yin, Zhi-Yong; Wang, Zhaosheng; Xie, Xiaoning; Fang, Jiangang

    2016-07-01

    Frequent occurrence of haze weather has been considered an urgent environmental problem in China and has attracted much attention worldwide in recent years. In this study, we examined the trend in the occurrence of haze days based on horizontal visibility in Xi'an, a major city in central China, since 2000. There were 49 haze days per year on average in Xi'an during 2000-2013, and the number of haze days has increased significantly since 2008, reaching 102 days in 2013. December is the month of the highest frequency of occurrence. During December 18-25 of 2013, the longest-lasting and most severe haze event in the recent decades occurred. The 8-day mean visibility in Xi'an was only 2.5 km with 5 days below 2 km. The mean air quality index in Xi'an during this period was 486.5, and in four of those days, it reached or exceeded the index's upper limit of 500. The exceptionally high level of PM2.5 concentration was inferred as the main reason of this severe haze episode. The local weather conditions were characterized by weak winds, enhanced atmospheric stability, and high relative humidity. Strong mid-tropospheric zonal flows in combination with weakened East Asian winter monsoon limited the cold air invasion from the higher latitudes, creating a condition of low pressure gradients in the lower troposphere and near the surface for a large region in central and eastern China. With high background emission levels, the suppressed dispersion of air pollutants eventually caused this severe haze episode affecting a large region in China.

  11. Effect of onion extract on corneal haze suppression after air assisted lamellar keratectomy

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Soohyun; Park, Young Woo; LEE, Euiri; PARK, Sang Wan; Park, Sungwon; Noh, Hyunwoo; Kim, Jong Whi; Seong, Je Kyung; SEO, Kangmoon

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of onion extract on corneal haze suppression after applying the air assisted lamellar keratectomy. The air assisted lamellar keratectomy was performed on 24 canine eyes. They were treated with an artificial tear (group C), prednisolone acetate (group P), onion extract (group O) and TGF-β1 (group T) three times per day from 7 to 28 days after the surgery. Corneal haze occurred on the all eyes and was observed beginning 7 days after the surgery. The haze was sign...

  12. Unlinking absorption and haze in thin film silicon solar cells front electrodes

    OpenAIRE

    Boccard, Mathieu; Cuony, Peter; Battaglia, Corsin; Despeisse, Matthieu; Ballif, Christophe

    2010-01-01

    We study the respective influence of haze and free carrier absorption (FCA) of transparent front electrodes on the photogenerated current of micromorph thin film silicon solar cells. To decouple the haze and FCA we develop bi-layer front electrodes: a flat indium tin oxide layer assures conduction and allows us to tune FCA while the haze is adjusted by varying the thickness of a highly transparent rough ZnO layer. We show how a minimum amount of FCA leads only to a few percents absorption for...

  13. 浅谈雾和霾%Discussion on Fog and Haze

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苗万强

    2013-01-01

    The paper discusses the causes, hazards of fog and haze, describes the influence of fog and haze on people's lives and puts forward scientific methods control fog and haze.%从雾和霾的成因、危害等方面的不同,进行了详细的论述,阐述了雾和霾对人们生活的影响,提出了应对雾和霾,科学预防、减小危害的方法。

  14. Pollutional haze and COPD: etiology, epidemiology, pathogenesis, pathology, biological markers and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fei; Ni, Song-Shi; Liu, Hua

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, serious pollutional haze occurs in the mainland of China thanks to the development of urbanization and industrialization. There is a close relationship between air pollution and the occurrence and development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), but there are some new characteristics in some aspects of COPD associated with pollutional haze compared with COPD induced by traditional physical and chemical factors. This article attempts to summarize the new progress from these new features of COPD related to pollutional haze, focus on etiology, epidemiology, pathogenesis, pathology, biological markers and therapy.

  15. Latitudinal variations in Titan's methane and haze from Cassini VIMS observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penteado, P.F.; Griffith, C.A.; Tomasko, M.G.; Engel, S.; See, C.; Doose, L.; Baines, K.H.; Brown, R.H.; Buratti, B.J.; Clark, R.; Nicholson, P.; Sotin, C.

    2010-01-01

    We analyze observations taken with Cassini's Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS), to determine the current methane and haze latitudinal distribution between 60??S and 40??N. The methane variation was measured primarily from its absorption band at 0.61 ??m, which is optically thin enough to be sensitive to the methane abundance at 20-50 km altitude. Haze characteristics were determined from Titan's 0.4-1.6 ??m spectra, which sample Titan's atmosphere from the surface to 200 km altitude. Radiative transfer models based on the haze properties and methane absorption profiles at the Huygens site reproduced the observed VIMS spectra and allowed us to retrieve latitude variations in the methane abundance and haze. We find the haze variations can be reproduced by varying only the density and single scattering albedo above 80 km altitude. There is an ambiguity between methane abundance and haze optical depth, because higher haze optical depth causes shallower methane bands; thus a family of solutions is allowed by the data. We find that haze variations alone, with a constant methane abundance, can reproduce the spatial variation in the methane bands if the haze density increases by 60% between 20??S and 10??S (roughly the sub-solar latitude) and single scattering absorption increases by 20% between 60??S and 40??N. On the other hand, a higher abundance of methane between 20 and 50 km in the summer hemisphere, as much as two times that of the winter hemisphere, is also possible, if the haze variations are minimized. The range of possible methane variations between 27??S and 19??N is consistent with condensation as a result of temperature variations of 0-1.5 K at 20-30 km. Our analysis indicates that the latitudinal variations in Titan's visible to near-IR albedo, the north/south asymmetry (NSA), result primarily from variations in the thickness of the darker haze layer, detected by Huygens DISR, above 80 km altitude. If we assume little to no latitudinal methane

  16. Arctic River organic matter transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, Peter; Gustafsson, Orjan; Vonk, Jorien; Spencer, Robert; McClelland, Jim

    2016-04-01

    Arctic Rivers have unique hydrology and biogeochemistry. They also have a large impact on the Arctic Ocean due to the large amount of riverine inflow and small ocean volume. With respect to organic matter, their influence is magnified by the large stores of soil carbon and distinct soil hydrology. Here we present a recap of what is known of Arctic River organic matter transport. We will present a summary of what is known of the ages and sources of Arctic River dissolved and particulate organic matter. We will also discuss the current status of what is known about changes in riverine organic matter export due to global change.

  17. Enhanced Haze Ratio on Glass by Novel Vapor Texturing Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seunghwan; Balaji, Nagarajan; Ju, Minkyu; Park, Cheolmin; Kim, Jungmo; Chung, Sungyoun; Lee, Youn-Jung

    2016-05-01

    State-of-the-art optical trapping designs are required to enhance the light trapping capabilities of tandem thin film silicon solar cells. The wet etch process is used to texture the glass surface by dipping in diluted acidic solutions such as HNO3 (nitric acid) and HF (hydrofluoric acid). For vapor texturing, the vapor was generated by adding silicon to HF:HNO3 acidic solution. The anisotropic etching of vapor textured wafers resulted in an etching depth of about 2.78 μm with reduced reflectance of 5%. We achieved a high haze value of 74.6% at a 540 nm wavelength by increasing the etching time and HF concentration. PMID:27483862

  18. The Arctic Circle Revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Colomo, F

    2007-01-01

    The problem of limit shapes in the six-vertex model with domain wall boundary conditions is addressed by considering a specially tailored bulk correlation function, the emptiness formation probability. A closed expression of this correlation function is given, both in terms of certain determinant and multiple integral, which allows for a systematic treatment of the limit shapes of the model for full range of values of vertex weights. Specifically, we show that for vertex weights corresponding to the free-fermion line on the phase diagram, the emptiness formation probability is related to a one-matrix model with a triple logarithmic singularity, or Triple Penner model. The saddle-point analysis of this model leads to the Arctic Circle Theorem, and its generalization to the Arctic Ellipses, known previously from domino tilings.

  19. Measuring Corneal Haze by Using Scheimpflug Photography and Confocal Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaren, Jay W.; Wacker, Katrin; Kane, Katrina M.; Patel, Sanjay V.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We compared corneal backscatter estimated from a Scheimpflug camera with backscatter estimated from a clinical confocal microscope across a wide range of corneal haze. Methods A total of 59 corneas from 35 patients with a range of severity of Fuchs' endothelial corneal dystrophy and 15 corneas from 9 normal participants were examined using a Scheimpflug camera (Pentacam) and a confocal microscope (ConfoScan 4). The mean image brightness from the anterior 120 μm, midcornea, and posterior 60 μm of the cornea across the central 2 mm recorded by the Scheimpflug camera and analogous regions from the confocal microscope were measured and standardized. Differences between instruments and correlations between backscatter and disease severity were determined by using generalized estimating equation models. Results Backscatter measured by the two instruments in the anterior and midcornea were correlated (r = 0.67 and 0.43, respectively, P < 0.001), although in the posterior cornea they were not correlated (r = 0.13, P = 0.66). Measured with the Scheimpflug camera, mean backscatter from the anterior and midcornea were greater, whereas backscatter from the posterior cornea was lower (P < 0.001) than that measured by the confocal microscope. Backscatter from the anterior cornea was correlated with disease severity for both instruments (Scheimpflug, r = 0.55, P < 0.001; confocal, r = 0.49, P = 0.003). Conclusions The Scheimpflug camera and confocal microscope should not be used interchangeably to measure corneal haze. The ability to detect changes in backscatter with disease severity is superior with the Scheimpflug camera. However, the confocal microscope provides higher resolution of corneal structure. PMID:26803798

  20. Summer Arctic sea fog

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Synchronous or quasi-synchronous sea-land-air observations were conducted using advanced sea ice, atmospheric and marine instruments during China' s First Arctic Expedition. Based on the Precious data from the expedition, it was found that in the Arctic Ocean, most part of which is covered with ice or is mixed with ice, various kinds of sea fog formed such as advection fog, radiation fog and vapor fog. Each kind has its own characteristic and mechanics of creation. In the southern part of the Arctic Ocean, due to the sufficient warm and wet flow there, it is favorable for advection fog to form,which is dense and lasts a long time. On ice cap or vast floating ice, due to the strong radiation cooling effect, stable radiating fog is likely to form. In floating ice area there forms vapor fog with the appearance of masses of vapor from a boiling pot, which is different from short-lasting land fog. The study indicates that the reason why there are many kinds of sea fog form in the Arctic Ocean is because of the complicated cushion and the consequent sea-air interaction caused by the sea ice distribution and its unique physical characteristics. Sea fog is the atmospheric phenomenon of sea-air heat exchange. Especially, due to the high albedo of ice and snow surface, it is diffcult to absorb great amount of solar radiation during the polar days. Besides, ice is a poor conductor of heat; it blocks the sea-air heat exchange.The sea-air exchange is active in floating ice area where the ice is broken. The sea sends heat to the atmosphere in form of latent heat; vapor fog is a way of sea-air heat exchange influencing the climate and an indicator of the extent of the exchange. The study also indicates that the sea also transports heat to the atmosphere in form of sensible heat when vapor fog occurs.

  1. Disparities in Arctic Health

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2008-02-04

    Life at the top of the globe is drastically different. Harsh climate devoid of sunlight part of the year, pockets of extreme poverty, and lack of physical infrastructure interfere with healthcare and public health services. Learn about the challenges of people in the Arctic and how research and the International Polar Year address them.  Created: 2/4/2008 by Emerging Infectious Diseases.   Date Released: 2/20/2008.

  2. Haze defect control and containment in a high volume DRAM manufacturing environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jerry X.; Nguyen, Maihan; Arasaki, Osamu; Maraquin, Tammy; Sawyer, Daniel; Morrison, Pedro

    2005-11-01

    Haze and other progressive reticle defects have been known in the semiconductor industry for more than a decade [1]. Extensive research and experiments have been carried out to determine the sources and origins of the progressive haze growth, but the true mechanisms of its cause are still under speculation. To minimize the wafer yield loss at Samsung Austin Semiconductor (SAS), we introduced a practical method to control the haze defects in a DRAM manufacturing environment that integrates reticle and wafer inspections, reticle cleaning, and a dose-based and time-based control forecast software system. This development has been proven to be very effective in controlling the haze defects and reducing the related yield loss while still supporting high volume wafer production.

  3. A Fast Single Image Haze Removal Algorithm Using Color Attenuation Prior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Qingsong; Mai, Jiaming; Shao, Ling

    2015-11-01

    Single image haze removal has been a challenging problem due to its ill-posed nature. In this paper, we propose a simple but powerful color attenuation prior for haze removal from a single input hazy image. By creating a linear model for modeling the scene depth of the hazy image under this novel prior and learning the parameters of the model with a supervised learning method, the depth information can be well recovered. With the depth map of the hazy image, we can easily estimate the transmission and restore the scene radiance via the atmospheric scattering model, and thus effectively remove the haze from a single image. Experimental results show that the proposed approach outperforms state-of-the-art haze removal algorithms in terms of both efficiency and the dehazing effect.

  4. Structure of haze forming proteins in white wines: Vitis vinifera thaumatin-like proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Marangon

    Full Text Available Grape thaumatin-like proteins (TLPs play roles in plant-pathogen interactions and can cause protein haze in white wine unless removed prior to bottling. Different isoforms of TLPs have different hazing potential and aggregation behavior. Here we present the elucidation of the molecular structures of three grape TLPs that display different hazing potential. The three TLPs have very similar structures despite belonging to two different classes (F2/4JRU is a thaumatin-like protein while I/4L5H and H2/4MBT are VVTL1, and having different unfolding temperatures (56 vs. 62°C, with protein F2/4JRU being heat unstable and forming haze, while I/4L5H does not. These differences in properties are attributable to the conformation of a single loop and the amino acid composition of its flanking regions.

  5. Transboundary smoke haze pollution in Malaysia: inpatient health impacts and economic valuation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othman, Jamal; Sahani, Mazrura; Mahmud, Mastura; Ahmad, Md Khadzir Sheikh

    2014-06-01

    This study assessed the economic value of health impacts of transboundary smoke haze pollution in Kuala Lumpur and adjacent areas in the state of Selangor, Malaysia. Daily inpatient data from 2005, 2006, 2008, and 2009 for 14 haze-related illnesses were collected from four hospitals. On average, there were 19 hazy days each year during which the air pollution levels were within the Lower Moderate to Hazardous categories. No seasonal variation in inpatient cases was observed. A smoke haze occurrence was associated with an increase in inpatient cases by 2.4 per 10,000 populations each year, representing an increase of 31 percent from normal days. The average annual economic loss due to the inpatient health impact of haze was valued at MYR273,000 ($91,000 USD).

  6. The Occurrence of Haze in Malaysia: A Case Study in an Urban Industrial Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soleiman, A.; Othman, M.; Samah, A. A.; Sulaiman, N. M.; Radojevic, M.

    - Klang Valley, a heavily industrialized urban area in Malaysia, has experienced severe haze episodes since the early 1980s. Total Suspended Particulate matter (TSP) is used in studying this phenomenon. Three severe haze episodes during the early 1990s are reviewed; August 1990, October 1991, and August-October 1994. The nature of these episodes, their possible causes, and their major features are discussed. Meteorological conditions associated with these episodes were analyzed. Results of the study indicate that stability and trapping of particles are the main factors affecting the pollution during haze periods. Maximum total suspended matter (TSP) was recorded in October 1991. The August-October 1994 episode was the most persistent and least affected by meteorological variables. Analysis of wind direction data showed that southerly and southwesterly winds coincided with the worst haze periods.

  7. Characteristics and issues of haze management in a wafer fabrication environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Sung Ha; Hwang, Dae Ho; Jeong, Goo Min; Lee, Young Mo; Kim, Sang Pyo; Yim, Dong Gyu

    2014-10-01

    The haze nucleation and growth phenomenon on critical photomask surfaces has periodically gained attention as it has significantly impacted wafer printability for different technology nodes over the years. A number of process solutions have been promoted in the semiconductor industry which has been shown to suppress or minimize the propensity for haze formation, but none of these technologies can stop every instance of haze. Fortunately, a novel technology which uses a dry (no chemical effluents) removal system, laser-based, through pellicle process has been reported recently. The technology presented here avoids many of the shortcomings of the wet clean process mentioned previously. The dry clean process extends the life of the photomask; maintains more consistent CD's, phase, and transmission; avoids adjustment to the exposure dose to account for photomask changes, reduces the number of required inspections and otherwise improves the efficiency and predictability of the lithography cell. We report on the performance of photomask based on a design developed to study the impact of metrology variations on dry clean process. In a first step we focus on basic characteristics: CD variation, phase, Cr/MoSi transmission, pellicle transmission, registration variations. In a second step, we evaluate haze removal and prevention performance and wafer photo margin. Haze removal is studied on the masks for several haze types and various exposure conditions. The results of this study show that some of metrology variation are likely to be a problem at high technology node, and haze removal performance is determined whether the component of haze is remained or not after treatment.

  8. The Link between Knowledge, Attitudes and Practices in Relation to Atmospheric Haze Pollution in Peninsular Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Laura De Pretto; Stephen Acreman; Matthew J Ashfold; Mohankumar, Suresh K.; Ahimsa Campos-Arceiz

    2015-01-01

    Transboundary haze episodes caused by seasonal forest fires have become a recurrent phenomenon in Southeast Asia, with serious environmental, economic, and public health implications. Here we present a cross-sectional survey conducted among people in Kuala Lumpur and surrounds to assess the links between knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to the transboundary haze episodes. Of 305 respondents, 125 were amateur athletes participating in a duathlon event and the remainder were surv...

  9. Clearance capacity of the atmosphere: the reason that the number of haze days reaches a ceiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qian; Cao, Ziqi; Xu, Hua

    2016-04-01

    China has experienced rapid development in the past 30 years but, alongside and associated with this growth, increased levels of pollution too. However, despite the continued increase in emissions of haze-forming aerosols in the twenty-first century, the annual number of haze days in some megacities has not risen in tandem. Various mechanisms have been proposed for "city dimming", but the cause of the hiatus remains unclear. We found that the number of haze days in Taiyuan experienced a sharp increase during 1980-1998, with a growth rate 51.6 days/10a, and then exhibited fluctuating variation around a stable high level from 1998 to 2014, while at the same time the average visibility during haze days started to decrease. We present a novel method to explain the long-term variation in the number of haze days via a temporal-piecewise function of human activities and atmospheric cleaning processes: the number of haze days increases with the level of human activity before reaching the upper limit and then remains at a high level due to the restriction of a relatively stable number of strong cleaning days.

  10. Episode-Based Evolution Pattern Analysis of Haze Pollution: Method Development and Results from Beijing, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Guangjie; Duan, Fengkui; Ma, Yongliang; Zhang, Qiang; Huang, Tao; Kimoto, Takashi; Cheng, Yafang; Su, Hang; He, Kebin

    2016-05-01

    Haze episodes occurred in Beijing repeatedly in 2013, resulting in 189 polluted days. These episodes differed in terms of sources, formation processes, and chemical composition and thus required different control policies. Therefore, an overview of the similarities and differences among these episodes is needed. For this purpose, we conducted one-year online observations and developed a program that can simultaneously divide haze episodes and identify their shapes. A total of 73 episodes were identified, and their shapes were linked with synoptic conditions. Pure-haze events dominated in wintertime, whereas mixed haze-dust (PM2.5/PM10 haze-fog (Aerosol Water/PM2.5 ∼ 0.3) events dominated in spring and summer-autumn, respectively. For all types, increase of ratio of PM2.5 in PM10 was typically achieved before PM2.5 reached ∼150 μg/m(3). In all PM2.5 species observed, organic matter (OM) was always the most abundant component (18-60%), but it was rarely the driving factor: its relative contribution usually decreased as the pollution level increased. The only OM-driven episode observed was associated with intensive biomass-burning activities. In comparison, haze evolution generally coincided with increasing sulfur and nitrogen oxidation ratios (SOR and NOR), indicating the enhanced production of secondary inorganic species. Applicability of these conclusions required further tests with simultaneously multisite observations.

  11. Aerosol size distribution seasonal characteristics measured in Tiksi, Russian Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmi, E.; Kondratyev, V.; Brus, D.; Laurila, T.; Lihavainen, H.; Backman, J.; Vakkari, V.; Aurela, M.; Hatakka, J.; Viisanen, Y.; Uttal, T.; Ivakhov, V.; Makshtas, A.

    2016-02-01

    Four years of continuous aerosol number size distribution measurements from the Arctic Climate Observatory in Tiksi, Russia, are analyzed. Tiksi is located in a region where in situ information on aerosol particle properties has not been previously available. Particle size distributions were measured with a differential mobility particle sizer (in the diameter range of 7-500 nm) and with an aerodynamic particle sizer (in the diameter range of 0.5-10 μm). Source region effects on particle modal features and number, and mass concentrations are presented for different seasons. The monthly median total aerosol number concentration in Tiksi ranges from 184 cm-3 in November to 724 cm-3 in July, with a local maximum in March of 481 cm-3. The total mass concentration has a distinct maximum in February-March of 1.72-2.38 μg m-3 and two minimums in June (0.42 μg m-3) and in September-October (0.36-0.57 μg m-3). These seasonal cycles in number and mass concentrations are related to isolated processes and phenomena such as Arctic haze in early spring, which increases accumulation and coarse-mode numbers, and secondary particle formation in spring and summer, which affects the nucleation and Aitken mode particle concentrations. Secondary particle formation was frequently observed in Tiksi and was shown to be slightly more common in marine, in comparison to continental, air flows. Particle formation rates were the highest in spring, while the particle growth rates peaked in summer. These results suggest two different origins for secondary particles, anthropogenic pollution being the important source in spring and biogenic emissions being significant in summer. The impact of temperature-dependent natural emissions on aerosol and cloud condensation nuclei numbers was significant: the increase in both the particle mass and the CCN (cloud condensation nuclei) number with temperature was found to be higher than in any previous study done over the boreal forest region. In addition

  12. Mining in the European Arctic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dam, Kim; Scheepstra, Annette; Gille, Johan; Stępień, Adam; Koivurova, Timo

    2014-01-01

    The European Arctic is currently experiencing an upsurge in mining activities, but future developments will be highly sensitive to mineral price fluctuations. The EU is a major consumer and importer of Arctic raw materials. As the EU is concerned about the security of supply, it encourages domestic

  13. Impact of 2013 south Asian haze crisis: study of physical and psychological symptoms and perceived dangerousness of pollution level

    OpenAIRE

    Ho, Roger C; Zhang, Melvyn W; Ho, Cyrus S; Pan, Fang; Lu, Yanxia; Sharma, Vijay K.

    2014-01-01

    Background The widespread forest fires in Indonesia in June 2013 led to widespread haze to neighbouring countries. This is the first study in the medical literature reporting the acute physical and psychological symptoms of the general population during a haze crisis. We evaluated the factors that are associated with psychological stress of haze exposure. Methods This study was conducted between June 21 to June 26, 2013. Participants were recruited by an online recruitment post and snowball s...

  14. The distribution and trends of fog and haze in the North China Plain over the past 30 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Q. Fu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Frequent low visibility, haze and fog events were found in the North China Plain (NCP. Data throughout the NCP during the past 30 years were examined to determine the horizontal distribution and decadal trends of low visibility, haze and fog events. The impact of meteorological factors such as wind and RH on those events was investigated. Results reveal distinct distributions of haze and fog days, due to their different formation mechanisms. Low visibility, haze and fog days all display increasing trends of before 1995, a steady stage during 1995–2003 and a drastically drop thereafter. All three events occurred most frequently during the heating season. Benefiting from emission control measures, haze and fog both show decreasing trends in winter during the past 3 decades, while summertime haze displays continuous increasing trends. The distribution of wind speed and wind direction as well as the topography within the NCP has determinative impacts on the distribution of haze and fog. Weakened south-easterly winds in the southern part of the NCP has resulted in high pollutant concentrations and frequent haze events along the foot of the Taihang Mountains. The orographic wind convergence zone in the central band area of the southern NCP is responsible for the frequent fog events in this region. Wind speed has been decreasing throughout the entire southern NCP, resulting in more stable atmospheric conditions and weaker dispersion abilities, calling for harder efforts to control emissions to prevent haze events. Haze events are strongly influenced by the ambient RH. RH values associated with haze days are evidently increasing, suggesting that an increasing fraction of haze events are caused by the hygroscopic growth of aerosols, rather than simply by high aerosol loadings.

  15. AMAP Assessment 2013: Arctic Ocean acidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    This assessment report presents the results of the 2013 AMAP Assessment of Arctic Ocean Acidification (AOA). This is the first such assessment dealing with AOA from an Arctic-wide perspective, and complements several assessments that AMAP has delivered over the past ten years concerning the effects of climate change on Arctic ecosystems and people. The Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme (AMAP) is a group working under the Arctic Council. The Arctic Council Ministers have requested AMAP to: - produce integrated assessment reports on the status and trends of the conditions of the Arctic ecosystems;

  16. Black carbon in the Arctic: the underestimated role of gas flaring and residential combustion emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Stohl

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Arctic haze is a seasonal phenomenon with high concentrations of accumulation-mode aerosols occurring in the Arctic in winter and early spring. Chemistry transport models and climate chemistry models struggle to reproduce this phenomenon, and this has recently prompted changes in aerosol removal schemes to remedy the modeling problems. In this paper, we show that shortcomings in current emission data sets are at least as important. We perform a 3 yr model simulation of black carbon (BC with the Lagrangian particle dispersion model FLEXPART. The model is driven with a new emission data set ("ECLIPSE emissions" which includes emissions from gas flaring. While gas flaring is estimated to contribute less than 3% of global BC emissions in this data set, flaring dominates the estimated BC emissions in the Arctic (north of 66° N. Putting these emissions into our model, we find that flaring contributes 42% to the annual mean BC surface concentrations in the Arctic. In March, flaring even accounts for 52% of all Arctic BC near the surface. Most of the flaring BC remains close to the surface in the Arctic, so that the flaring contribution to BC in the middle and upper troposphere is small. Another important factor determining simulated BC concentrations is the seasonal variation of BC emissions from residential combustion (often also called domestic combustion, which is used synonymously in this paper. We have calculated daily residential combustion emissions using the heating degree day (HDD concept based on ambient air temperature and compare results from model simulations using emissions with daily, monthly and annual time resolution. In January, the Arctic-mean surface concentrations of BC due to residential combustion emissions are 150% higher when using daily emissions than when using annually constant emissions. While there are concentration reductions in summer, they are smaller than the winter increases, leading to a systematic increase of

  17. Black carbon in the Arctic: the underestimated role of gas flaring and residential combustion emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stohl, A.; Klimont, Z.; Eckhardt, S.; Kupiainen, K.; Shevchenko, V. P.; Kopeikin, V. M.; Novigatsky, A. N.

    2013-09-01

    Arctic haze is a seasonal phenomenon with high concentrations of accumulation-mode aerosols occurring in the Arctic in winter and early spring. Chemistry transport models and climate chemistry models struggle to reproduce this phenomenon, and this has recently prompted changes in aerosol removal schemes to remedy the modeling problems. In this paper, we show that shortcomings in current emission data sets are at least as important. We perform a 3 yr model simulation of black carbon (BC) with the Lagrangian particle dispersion model FLEXPART. The model is driven with a new emission data set ("ECLIPSE emissions") which includes emissions from gas flaring. While gas flaring is estimated to contribute less than 3% of global BC emissions in this data set, flaring dominates the estimated BC emissions in the Arctic (north of 66° N). Putting these emissions into our model, we find that flaring contributes 42% to the annual mean BC surface concentrations in the Arctic. In March, flaring even accounts for 52% of all Arctic BC near the surface. Most of the flaring BC remains close to the surface in the Arctic, so that the flaring contribution to BC in the middle and upper troposphere is small. Another important factor determining simulated BC concentrations is the seasonal variation of BC emissions from residential combustion (often also called domestic combustion, which is used synonymously in this paper). We have calculated daily residential combustion emissions using the heating degree day (HDD) concept based on ambient air temperature and compare results from model simulations using emissions with daily, monthly and annual time resolution. In January, the Arctic-mean surface concentrations of BC due to residential combustion emissions are 150% higher when using daily emissions than when using annually constant emissions. While there are concentration reductions in summer, they are smaller than the winter increases, leading to a systematic increase of annual mean Arctic

  18. Did the widespread haze pollution over China increase during the last decade? A satellite view from space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Minghui; Chen, Liangfu; Wang, Zifeng; Wang, Jun; Tao, Jinhua; Wang, Xinhui

    2016-05-01

    Widespread haze layers usually cover China like low clouds, exerting marked influence on air quality and regional climate. With recent Collection 6 MODIS Deep Blue aerosol data in 2000–2015, we analyzed the trends of regional haze pollution and the corresponding influence of atmospheric circulation in China. Satellite observations show that regional haze pollution is mainly concentrated in northern and central China. The annual frequency of regional haze in northern China nearly doubles between 2000 and 2006, increasing from 30–50 to 80–90 days. Though there is a marked decrease in annual frequency during 2007–2009 due to both reduction of anthropogenic emissions and changes of meteorological conditions, regional pollution increases slowly but steadily after 2009, and maintains at a high level of 70–90 days except for the sudden decrease in 2015. Generally, there is a large increase in the number of regional-scale haze events during the last decade. Seasonal frequency of regional haze exhibits distinct spatial and temporal variations. The increasing winter haze events reach a peak in 2014, but decrease strongly in 2015 due partly to synoptic conditions that are favorable for dispersion. Trends of summer regional haze pollution are more sensitive to changes of atmospheric circulation. Our results indicate that the frequency of regional haze events is associated not only with the strength of atmospheric circulation, but also with its direction and position, as well as variations in anthropogenic emissions.

  19. Arctic Submarine Slope Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkelmann, D.; Geissler, W.

    2010-12-01

    Submarine landsliding represents aside submarine earthquakes major natural hazard to coastal and sea-floor infrastructure as well as to coastal communities due to their ability to generate large-scale tsunamis with their socio-economic consequences. The investigation of submarine landslides, their conditions and trigger mechanisms, recurrence rates and potential impact remains an important task for the evaluation of risks in coastal management and offshore industrial activities. In the light of a changing globe with warming oceans and rising sea-level accompanied by increasing human population along coasts and enhanced near- and offshore activities, slope stability issues gain more importance than ever before. The Arctic exhibits the most rapid and drastic changes and is predicted to change even faster. Aside rising air temperatures, enhanced inflow of less cooled Atlantic water into the Arctic Ocean reduces sea-ice cover and warms the surroundings. Slope stability is challenged considering large areas of permafrost and hydrates. The Hinlopen/Yermak Megaslide (HYM) north of Svalbard is the first and so far only reported large-scale submarine landslide in the Arctic Ocean. The HYM exhibits the highest headwalls that have been found on siliciclastic margins. With more than 10.000 square kilometer areal extent and app. 2.400 cubic kilometer of involved sedimentary material, it is one of the largest exposed submarine slides worldwide. Geometry and age put this slide in a special position in discussing submarine slope stability on glaciated continental margins. The HYM occurred 30 ka ago, when the global sea-level dropped by app. 50 m within less than one millennium due to rapid onset of global glaciation. It probably caused a tsunami with circum-Arctic impact and wave heights exceeding 130 meters. The HYM affected the slope stability field in its neighbourhood by removal of support. Post-megaslide slope instability as expressed in creeping and smaller-scaled slides are

  20. a New Japanese Project for Arctic Climate Change Research - Grene Arctic - (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enomoto, H.

    2013-12-01

    A new Arctic Climate Change Research Project 'Rapid Change of the Arctic Climate System and its Global Influences' has started in 2011 for a five years project. GRENE-Arctic project is an initiative of Arctic study by more than 30 Japanese universities and institutes as the flame work of GRENE (Green Network of Excellence) of MEXT (Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, Japan). The GRENE-Arctic project set four strategic research targets: 1. Understanding the mechanism of warming amplification in the Arctic 2. Understanding the Arctic system for global climate and future change 3. Evaluation of the effects of Arctic change on weather in Japan, marine ecosystems and fisheries 4. Prediction of sea Ice distribution and Arctic sea routes This project aims to realize the strategic research targets by executing following studies: -Improvement of coupled general circulation models based on validations of the Arctic climate reproducibility and on mechanism analyses of the Arctic climate change and variability -The role of Arctic cryosphere in the global change -Change in terrestrial ecosystem of pan-Arctic and its effect on climate -Studies on greenhouse gas cycles in the Arctic and their responses to climate change -Atmospheric studies on Arctic change and its global impacts -Ecosystem studies of the Arctic ocean declining Sea ice -Projection of Arctic Sea ice responding to availability of Arctic sea route (* ** ***) *Changes in the Arctic ocean and mechanisms on catastrophic reduction of Arctic sea ice cover **Coordinated observational and modeling studies on the basic structure and variability of the Arctic sea ice-ocean system ***Sea ice prediction and construction of ice navigation support system for the Arctic sea route. Although GRENE Arctic project aims to product scientific contribution in a concentrated program during 2011-2016, Japanese Arctic research community established Japan Consortium for Arctic Environmental Research (JCAR) in May

  1. Arctic charr farming

    OpenAIRE

    Brännäs, Eva; Larsson, Stefan; Saether, Björn Steinar; Siikavuopio, Sten Ivar; Thorarensen, Helgi; Sigurgeirsson, Ólafur; Jeuthe, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    The Arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus L.) is a holarctic salmonid fish species with both landlocked and anadromous populations. In Scandinavia it is mainly found in the mountain area, but it also appears in deep and large lake further south, i.e. in the Alps. It is the northernmost freshwater fish and A. charr is generally regarded as the most cold-adapted freshwater fish. A. charr has been commercially farmed since the early 90ths and today, the total production is 3000, 2300 and 700 tonnes/y...

  2. Research with Arctic peoples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, H Sally; Bjerregaard, Peter; Chan, Hing Man;

    2006-01-01

    entitled "Research with Arctic Peoples: Unique Research Opportunities in Heart, Lung, Blood and Sleep Disorders". The meeting was international in scope with investigators from Greenland, Iceland and Russia, as well as Canada and the United States. Multiple health agencies from Canada and the United States...... sent representatives. Also attending were representatives from the International Union for Circumpolar Health (IUCH) and the National Indian Health Board. The working group developed a set of ten recommendations related to research opportunities in heart, lung, blood and sleep disorders; obstacles...

  3. Formation and evolution mechanism of regional haze: a case study in the megacity Beijing, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Liu

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this study is to investigate the formation and evolution mechanism of the regional haze in megacity Beijing by analyzing the process of a severe haze that occurred 20–27 September 2011. Mass concentration and size distribution of aerosol particles as well as aerosol optical properties were concurrently measured at the Beijing urban atmospheric environment monitoring station. Gaseous pollutants (SO2, NO-NO2-NOx, O3, CO and meteorological parameters (wind speed, wind direction, and relative humidity (RH were simultaneously monitored. Meanwhile, aerosol spatial distribution and the height of planetary boundary layer (PBL were retrieved from the signal of satellite and LIDAR (light detection and ranging. Results showed that high intensity of local pollutants from Beijing urban source is the fundamental cause that led to the regional haze. Meteorological factors such as higher RH, weak surface wind speed, and decreasing height of PBL played an important role on the deterioration of air quality. New particle formation was considered to be the most important factor contributing the formation of haze. In order to improve the atmospheric visibility and reduce the occurrence of the haze, the mass concentration of PM2.5 at dry condition should be less than 60 µg m−3 in Beijing according to the empirical relationship of visibility, PM2.5 mass concentration and RH. This case study may provide valuable information for the public to recognize the formation mechanism of the regional haze event over the megacity, which is also useful for the government to adopt scientific approach to forecast and eliminate the occurrence of regional haze in China.

  4. State of the Arctic Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Arctic environment, covering about 21 million km2, is in this connection regarded as the area north of the Arctic Circle. General biological and physical features of the terrestrial and freshwater environments of the Arctic are briefly described, but most effort is put into a description of the marine part which constitutes about two-thirds of the total Arctic environment. General oceanography and morphological characteristics are included; e.g. that the continental shelf surrounding the Arctic deep water basins covers approximately 36% of the surface areas of Arctic waters, but contains only 2% of the total water masses. Blowout accident may release thousands of tons of oil per day and last for months. They occur statistically very seldom, but the magnitude underlines the necessity of an efficient oil spill contingency as well as sound safety and quality assurance procedures. Contingency plans should be coordinated and regularly evaluated through simulated and practical tests of performance. Arctic conditions demand alternative measures compared to those otherwise used for oil spill prevention and clean-up. New concepts or optimization of existing mechanical equipment is necessary. Chemical and thermal methods should be evaluated for efficiency and possible environmental effects. Both due to regular discharges of oil contaminated drilled cuttings and the possibility of a blowout or other spills, drilling operations in biological sensitive areas may be regulated to take place only during the less sensitive parts of the year. 122 refs., 8 figs., 8 tabs

  5. A case-crossover analysis of forest fire haze events and mortality in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahani, Mazrura; Zainon, Nurul Ashikin; Wan Mahiyuddin, Wan Rozita; Latif, Mohd Talib; Hod, Rozita; Khan, Md Firoz; Tahir, Norhayati Mohd; Chan, Chang-Chuan

    2014-10-01

    The Southeast Asian (SEA) haze events due to forest fires are recurrent and affect Malaysia, particularly the Klang Valley region. The aim of this study is to examine the risk of haze days due to biomass burning in Southeast Asia on daily mortality in the Klang Valley region between 2000 and 2007. We used a case-crossover study design to model the effect of haze based on PM10 concentration to the daily mortality. The time-stratified control sampling approach was used, adjusted for particulate matter (PM10) concentrations, time trends and meteorological influences. Based on time series analysis of PM10 and backward trajectory analysis, haze days were defined when daily PM10 concentration exceeded 100 μg/m3. The results showed a total of 88 haze days were identified in the Klang Valley region during the study period. A total of 126,822 cases of death were recorded for natural mortality where respiratory mortality represented 8.56% (N = 10,854). Haze events were found to be significantly associated with natural and respiratory mortality at various lags. For natural mortality, haze events at lagged 2 showed significant association with children less than 14 years old (Odd Ratio (OR) = 1.41; 95% Confidence Interval (CI) = 1.01-1.99). Respiratory mortality was significantly associated with haze events for all ages at lagged 0 (OR = 1.19; 95% CI = 1.02-1.40). Age-and-gender-specific analysis showed an incremental risk of respiratory mortality among all males and elderly males above 60 years old at lagged 0 (OR = 1.34; 95% CI = 1.09-1.64 and OR = 1.41; 95% CI = 1.09-1.84 respectively). Adult females aged 15-59 years old were found to be at highest risk of respiratory mortality at lagged 5 (OR = 1.66; 95% CI = 1.03-1.99). This study clearly indicates that exposure to haze events showed immediate and delayed effects on mortality.

  6. Rapid formation and evolution of an extreme haze episode in Northern China during winter 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yele; Chen, Chen; Zhang, Yingjie; Xu, Weiqi; Zhou, Libo; Cheng, Xueling; Zheng, Haitao; Ji, Dongsheng; Li, Jie; Tang, Xiao; Fu, Pingqing; Wang, Zifa

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the rapid formation and evolutionary mechanisms of an extremely severe and persistent haze episode that occurred in northern China during winter 2015 using comprehensive ground and vertical measurements, along with receptor and dispersion model analysis. Our results indicate that the life cycle of a severe winter haze episode typically consists of four stages: (1) rapid formation initiated by sudden changes in meteorological parameters and synchronous increases in most aerosol species, (2) persistent evolution with relatively constant variations in secondary inorganic aerosols and secondary organic aerosols, (3) further evolution associated with fog processing and significantly enhanced sulfate levels, and (4) clearing due to dry, cold north-northwesterly winds. Aerosol composition showed substantial changes during the formation and evolution of the haze episode but was generally dominated by regional secondary aerosols (53–67%). Our results demonstrate the important role of regional transport, largely from the southwest but also from the east, and of coal combustion emissions for winter haze formation in Beijing. Also, we observed an important downward mixing pathway during the severe haze in 2015 that can lead to rapid increases in certain aerosol species.

  7. A Long-Term Prediction Model of Beijing Haze Episodes Using Time Series Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhongqiu; Sun, Liren; Xu, Cui

    2016-01-01

    The rapid industrial development has led to the intermittent outbreak of pm2.5 or haze in developing countries, which has brought about great environmental issues, especially in big cities such as Beijing and New Delhi. We investigated the factors and mechanisms of haze change and present a long-term prediction model of Beijing haze episodes using time series analysis. We construct a dynamic structural measurement model of daily haze increment and reduce the model to a vector autoregressive model. Typical case studies on 886 continuous days indicate that our model performs very well on next day's Air Quality Index (AQI) prediction, and in severely polluted cases (AQI ≥ 300) the accuracy rate of AQI prediction even reaches up to 87.8%. The experiment of one-week prediction shows that our model has excellent sensitivity when a sudden haze burst or dissipation happens, which results in good long-term stability on the accuracy of the next 3–7 days' AQI prediction. PMID:27597861

  8. Rapid formation and evolution of an extreme haze episode in Northern China during winter 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yele; Chen, Chen; Zhang, Yingjie; Xu, Weiqi; Zhou, Libo; Cheng, Xueling; Zheng, Haitao; Ji, Dongsheng; Li, Jie; Tang, Xiao; Fu, Pingqing; Wang, Zifa

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the rapid formation and evolutionary mechanisms of an extremely severe and persistent haze episode that occurred in northern China during winter 2015 using comprehensive ground and vertical measurements, along with receptor and dispersion model analysis. Our results indicate that the life cycle of a severe winter haze episode typically consists of four stages: (1) rapid formation initiated by sudden changes in meteorological parameters and synchronous increases in most aerosol species, (2) persistent evolution with relatively constant variations in secondary inorganic aerosols and secondary organic aerosols, (3) further evolution associated with fog processing and significantly enhanced sulfate levels, and (4) clearing due to dry, cold north-northwesterly winds. Aerosol composition showed substantial changes during the formation and evolution of the haze episode but was generally dominated by regional secondary aerosols (53-67%). Our results demonstrate the important role of regional transport, largely from the southwest but also from the east, and of coal combustion emissions for winter haze formation in Beijing. Also, we observed an important downward mixing pathway during the severe haze in 2015 that can lead to rapid increases in certain aerosol species. PMID:27243909

  9. Unlinking absorption and haze in thin film silicon solar cells front electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boccard, Mathieu; Cuony, Peter; Battaglia, Corsin; Despeisse, Matthieu; Ballif, Christophe [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), Institute of Microengineering (IMT), Photovoltaics and Thin Film Electronics Laboratory, Rue A.-L. Breguet 2, 2000 Neuchatel (Switzerland)

    2010-11-15

    We study the respective influence of haze and free carrier absorption (FCA) of transparent front electrodes on the photogenerated current of micromorph thin film silicon solar cells. To decouple the haze and FCA we develop bi-layer front electrodes: a flat indium tin oxide layer assures conduction and allows us to tune FCA while the haze is adjusted by varying the thickness of a highly transparent rough ZnO layer. We show how a minimum amount of FCA leads only to a few percents absorption for a single light path but to a strong reduction of the cell current in the infrared part of the spectrum. Conversely, a current enhancement is shown with increasing front electrode haze up to a saturation of the current gain. This saturation correlates remarkably well with the haze of the front electrode calculated in silicon. This allows us to clarify the requirements for the front electrodes of micromorph cells. (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  10. A Long-Term Prediction Model of Beijing Haze Episodes Using Time Series Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaoping; Zhang, Zhongxia; Zhang, Zhongqiu; Sun, Liren; Xu, Cui; Yu, Li

    2016-01-01

    The rapid industrial development has led to the intermittent outbreak of pm2.5 or haze in developing countries, which has brought about great environmental issues, especially in big cities such as Beijing and New Delhi. We investigated the factors and mechanisms of haze change and present a long-term prediction model of Beijing haze episodes using time series analysis. We construct a dynamic structural measurement model of daily haze increment and reduce the model to a vector autoregressive model. Typical case studies on 886 continuous days indicate that our model performs very well on next day's Air Quality Index (AQI) prediction, and in severely polluted cases (AQI ≥ 300) the accuracy rate of AQI prediction even reaches up to 87.8%. The experiment of one-week prediction shows that our model has excellent sensitivity when a sudden haze burst or dissipation happens, which results in good long-term stability on the accuracy of the next 3-7 days' AQI prediction. PMID:27597861

  11. Rapid formation and evolution of an extreme haze episode in Northern China during winter 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yele; Chen, Chen; Zhang, Yingjie; Xu, Weiqi; Zhou, Libo; Cheng, Xueling; Zheng, Haitao; Ji, Dongsheng; Li, Jie; Tang, Xiao; Fu, Pingqing; Wang, Zifa

    2016-05-31

    We investigate the rapid formation and evolutionary mechanisms of an extremely severe and persistent haze episode that occurred in northern China during winter 2015 using comprehensive ground and vertical measurements, along with receptor and dispersion model analysis. Our results indicate that the life cycle of a severe winter haze episode typically consists of four stages: (1) rapid formation initiated by sudden changes in meteorological parameters and synchronous increases in most aerosol species, (2) persistent evolution with relatively constant variations in secondary inorganic aerosols and secondary organic aerosols, (3) further evolution associated with fog processing and significantly enhanced sulfate levels, and (4) clearing due to dry, cold north-northwesterly winds. Aerosol composition showed substantial changes during the formation and evolution of the haze episode but was generally dominated by regional secondary aerosols (53-67%). Our results demonstrate the important role of regional transport, largely from the southwest but also from the east, and of coal combustion emissions for winter haze formation in Beijing. Also, we observed an important downward mixing pathway during the severe haze in 2015 that can lead to rapid increases in certain aerosol species.

  12. A Long-Term Prediction Model of Beijing Haze Episodes Using Time Series Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaoping; Zhang, Zhongxia; Zhang, Zhongqiu; Sun, Liren; Xu, Cui; Yu, Li

    2016-01-01

    The rapid industrial development has led to the intermittent outbreak of pm2.5 or haze in developing countries, which has brought about great environmental issues, especially in big cities such as Beijing and New Delhi. We investigated the factors and mechanisms of haze change and present a long-term prediction model of Beijing haze episodes using time series analysis. We construct a dynamic structural measurement model of daily haze increment and reduce the model to a vector autoregressive model. Typical case studies on 886 continuous days indicate that our model performs very well on next day's Air Quality Index (AQI) prediction, and in severely polluted cases (AQI ≥ 300) the accuracy rate of AQI prediction even reaches up to 87.8%. The experiment of one-week prediction shows that our model has excellent sensitivity when a sudden haze burst or dissipation happens, which results in good long-term stability on the accuracy of the next 3-7 days' AQI prediction.

  13. A Long-Term Prediction Model of Beijing Haze Episodes Using Time Series Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoping Yang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The rapid industrial development has led to the intermittent outbreak of pm2.5 or haze in developing countries, which has brought about great environmental issues, especially in big cities such as Beijing and New Delhi. We investigated the factors and mechanisms of haze change and present a long-term prediction model of Beijing haze episodes using time series analysis. We construct a dynamic structural measurement model of daily haze increment and reduce the model to a vector autoregressive model. Typical case studies on 886 continuous days indicate that our model performs very well on next day’s Air Quality Index (AQI prediction, and in severely polluted cases (AQI ≥ 300 the accuracy rate of AQI prediction even reaches up to 87.8%. The experiment of one-week prediction shows that our model has excellent sensitivity when a sudden haze burst or dissipation happens, which results in good long-term stability on the accuracy of the next 3–7 days’ AQI prediction.

  14. Vertical structure of foggy haze over the Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei area in January 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Feng; Xu, Jun; He, Youjiang; Dang, Hongyan; Yang, Xuezhen; Meng, Fan

    2016-08-01

    In January 2013, frequent episodes of intense air pollution occurred in the Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei area (BTH), China. Besides the occurrence of region-wide dry haze pollution, foggy haze conditions also developed across the region on numerous days, lasting into the afternoon. Synergistic analysis, using multisatellite datasets, air sounding and surface meteorological observations, indicated that there was a vertical overlap of fog and aerosol layers during the foggy haze episodes in the region. Fog appeared at a low level of the atmosphere. The altitude of the upper boundary of the fog differed across the region, but it was always below 1 km. The aerosol layer that closely contacted with the top of the underlying fog was rather dense, having a high concentration comparable to that during severe pollution on the ground. Above the dense aerosol layer, aerosol with a concentration equivalent to that of moderate pollution stretched up to an altitude of 2 km. Beyond that, a tenuous aerosol layer extended 5 km into the atmosphere. This overlapping of fog and haze layers frequently occurred across the region in January 2013. The occurrence of a foggy haze over BTH could worsen the regional air quality, and its appearance across this region would have notable effects on the radiation balance.

  15. SCICEX: Submarine Arctic Science Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Submarine Arctic Science Program, SCICEX, is a federal interagency collaboration among the operational Navy, research agencies, and the marine research...

  16. Development of arctic wind technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holttinen, H.; Marjaniemi, M.; Antikainen, P. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland)

    1998-10-01

    The climatic conditions of Lapland set special technical requirements for wind power production. The most difficult problem regarding wind power production in arctic regions is the build-up of hard and rime ice on structures of the machine

  17. Acquatorialities of the Arctic Region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harste, Gorm

    2013-01-01

    In order to describe the Arctic system I propose using a concept functionally equivalent to territoriality, namely aquatoriality. Whether communicating about territoriality or aquatoriality, concepts and delimitations are both contingent to forms of communication systems. I will distinguish betwe...

  18. Analytical solution for haze values of aluminium-induced texture (AIT) glass superstrates for a-Si:H solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahraei, Nasim; Forberich, Karen; Venkataraj, Selvaraj; Aberle, Armin G; Peters, Marius

    2014-01-13

    Light scattering at randomly textured interfaces is essential to improve the absorption of thin-film silicon solar cells. Aluminium-induced texture (AIT) glass provides suitable scattering for amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) solar cells. The scattering properties of textured surfaces are usually characterised by two properties: the angularly resolved intensity distribution and the haze. However, we find that the commonly used haze equations cannot accurately describe the experimentally observed spectral dependence of the haze of AIT glass. This is particularly the case for surface morphologies with a large rms roughness and small lateral feature sizes. In this paper we present an improved method for haze calculation, based on the power spectral density (PSD) function of the randomly textured surface. To better reproduce the measured haze characteristics, we suggest two improvements: i) inclusion of the average lateral feature size of the textured surface into the haze calculation, and ii) considering the opening angle of the haze measurement. We show that with these two improvements an accurate prediction of the haze of AIT glass is possible. Furthermore, we use the new equation to define optimum morphology parameters for AIT glass to be used for a-Si:H solar cell applications. The autocorrelation length is identified as the critical parameter. For the investigated a-Si:H solar cells, the optimum autocorrelation length is shown to be 320 nm. PMID:24922000

  19. The effects of dust–haze on mortality are modified by seasons and individual characteristics in Guangzhou, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of dust–haze on mortality and to estimate the seasonal and individual-specific modification effects in Guangzhou, China. Mortality, air pollution and meteorological data were collected for 2006–2011. A dust–haze day was defined as daily visibility 10. We concluded that dust–haze significantly increased mortality risk in Guangzhou, China, and this effect appears to be dominated by particulate mass and modified by season and individual-specific factors. - Highlights: • We assessed the health impact of dust–haze in a megacity of southern China. • A dust–haze was defined according to visibility and relative humidity. • Dust–haze increased mortality risk, which may be dominated by particulate mass. • The dust–haze effects were modified by season and individual-specific factors. - This study extends our understanding of the health impact of dust–haze in southern China, and provides local evidence for health to advocate for improved air emissions control and strategies to reduce population exposure

  20. Chemical characteristics and source apportionment of PM10 during a brown haze episode in Harbin,China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Likun Huang; Chung-Shin Yuan; Guangzhi Wang; Kun Wang

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates the correlation between PM10 and meteorological factors such as wind speed,atmospheric visibility,dew point,relative humidity,and ambient temperature during a brown haze episode. In order to identify the potential sources of PM10 during brown haze episode,respirable particulate matter (PM10) was collected during both non-haze days and haze days and further analyzed for metallic elements,ionic species,and carbonaceous contents. Among them,ionic species contributed 45-64% to PM10,while metallic elements contributed 7-21% to PM10 which was smaller than the other chemical constituents. The average OC/EC ratio (42) in haze days was about three times of the average OC/EC ratio (14) in non-haze days. By using chemical mass balance (CMB) receptor model,the major sources were apportioned,including traffics,incinerators,coal combustion,steel industry,petrochemical industry,and secondary aerosols,etc. The contribution to PM10 concentration of each source was calculated for all the samples collected. The results showed that coal combustion was the major source of PM10 in non-haze days and secondary aerosols were the major source in haze days,followed by petrochemical industry,incinerators,and traffics,while other sources had negligible effect.

  1. Suppression of local haze variations in MERIS images over turbid coastal waters for retrieval of suspended sediment concentration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shen, F.; Verhoef, W.

    2010-01-01

    Atmospheric correction over turbid waters can be problematic if atmospheric haze is spatially variable. In this case the retrieval of water quality is hampered by the fact that haze variations could be partly mistaken for variations in suspended sediment concentration (SSC). In this study we propose

  2. ANALYSIS OF WMAP 7 YEAR TEMPERATURE DATA: ASTROPHYSICS OF THE GALACTIC HAZE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pietrobon, Davide; Gorski, Krzysztof M.; Bartlett, James; Colombo, Loris P. L.; Jewell, Jeffrey B.; Pagano, Luca; Rocha, Graca; Lawrence, Charles R. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109-8099 (United States); Banday, A. J. [Universie de Toulouse, UPS-OMP, IRAP, Toulouse (France); Dobler, Gregory [Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara Kohn Hall, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Hildebrandt, Sergi R. [Division of Physics, Mathematics and Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Eriksen, Hans Kristian [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1029, Blindern, N-0315 Oslo (Norway); Saha, Rajib, E-mail: davide.pietrobon@jpl.nasa.gov [Physics Department, Indian Institute of Science Education and Research Bhopal, Bhopal, MP 462023 (India)

    2012-08-10

    We perform a joint analysis of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and Galactic emission from the WMAP 7 year temperature data. Using the Commander code, based on Gibbs sampling, we simultaneously derive the CMB and Galactic components on scales larger than 1 Degree-Sign with improved sensitivity over previous work. We conduct a detailed study of the low-frequency Galactic foreground, focusing on the 'microwave haze' emission around the Galactic center. We demonstrate improved performance in quantifying the diffuse Galactic emission when including Haslam 408 MHz data and when jointly modeling the spinning and thermal dust emission. We examine whether the hypothetical Galactic haze can be explained by a spatial variation of the synchrotron spectral index, and find that the excess of emission around the Galactic center is stable with respect to variations of the foreground model. Our results demonstrate that the new Galactic foreground component-the microwave haze-is indeed present.

  3. What Causes Haze Pollution? An Empirical Study of PM2.5 Concentrations in Chinese Cities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiannan Wu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, many areas of China have suffered from serious haze pollution, which greatly affects human health and daily life. It is of policy importance to understand the factors that influence the spatial concentration of PM2.5. Based on data from 74 cities with PM2.5 monitoring stations in 2013 and 2014, this study presents the overall haze situation in China and explores the determinants of PM2.5 using a random-effects model, as well as a set of OLS regressions. The results indicate that PM2.5 is significantly correlated with the industrial proportion, the number of motor vehicles, and household gas consumption, while public financial expenditure on energy saving and environmental protection does not show statistically significant effects. The analysis implies that China should adjust its economic structure and optimizes environmental governance to effectively respond to haze pollution.

  4. Predicting Intention to Take Protective Measures During Haze: The Roles of Efficacy, Threat, Media Trust, and Affective Attitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Trisha T C; Bautista, John Robert

    2016-07-01

    The annual Southeast Asian haze pollution raises public health concerns in this region. Based on a modified extended parallel process model, this study examines efficacy (self-efficacy and response efficacy) and perceived threat (susceptibility and severity) and incorporates new constructs of media trust and affective attitude. Results from a Web survey of 410 undergraduate students in Singapore show that response efficacy to seek haze-related information mediates the association between perceived self-efficacy and intention to take protective measures during haze. Moreover, self-efficacy is negatively associated with affective attitude (e.g., fear and worry) toward haze-related health problems. Next, perceived severity and perceived susceptibility are positively associated with response efficacy and affective attitude. Affective attitude toward haze is a stronger predictor than response efficacy for behavioral intention. Finally, trust in new media is positively associated with young Singaporeans' affective attitude, which positively affects their behavioral intention to take protective measures. PMID:27315440

  5. Wintertime haze deterioration in Beijing by industrial pollution deduced from trace metal fingerprints and enhanced health risk by heavy metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yu-Chi; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Chou, Charles C-K; Zhang, Renjian; Wu, Yunfei; Kao, Shuh-Ji; Luo, Li; Huang, Chao-Hao; Lin, Shuen-Hsin; Huang, Yi-Tang

    2016-01-01

    Airborne particulate matter (PM) was collected in Beijing between 24 February and 12 March 2014 to investigate chemical characteristics and potential industrial sources of aerosols along with health risk of haze events. Results showed secondary inorganic aerosol was the major contributor to PM2.5 during haze days. Utilizing specific elements, including Fe, La, Tl and As, as fingerprinting tracers, four emission sources, namely iron and steel manufacturing, petroleum refining, cement plant, and coal combustion were explicitly identified; their elevated contributions to PM during haze days were also estimated. The average cancer risk from exposure to inhalable PM toxic metals was 1.53 × 10(-4) on haze days, which is one order of magnitude higher than in other developed cities. These findings suggested heavy industries emit large amounts of not only primary PM but also precursor gas pollutants, leading to secondary aerosol formation and harm to human health during haze days.

  6. Predicting Intention to Take Protective Measures During Haze: The Roles of Efficacy, Threat, Media Trust, and Affective Attitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Trisha T C; Bautista, John Robert

    2016-07-01

    The annual Southeast Asian haze pollution raises public health concerns in this region. Based on a modified extended parallel process model, this study examines efficacy (self-efficacy and response efficacy) and perceived threat (susceptibility and severity) and incorporates new constructs of media trust and affective attitude. Results from a Web survey of 410 undergraduate students in Singapore show that response efficacy to seek haze-related information mediates the association between perceived self-efficacy and intention to take protective measures during haze. Moreover, self-efficacy is negatively associated with affective attitude (e.g., fear and worry) toward haze-related health problems. Next, perceived severity and perceived susceptibility are positively associated with response efficacy and affective attitude. Affective attitude toward haze is a stronger predictor than response efficacy for behavioral intention. Finally, trust in new media is positively associated with young Singaporeans' affective attitude, which positively affects their behavioral intention to take protective measures.

  7. The effects of dust-haze on mortality are modified by seasons and individual characteristics in Guangzhou, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tao; Zhang, Yong Hui; Xu, Yan Jun; Lin, Hua Liang; Xu, Xiao Jun; Luo, Yuan; Xiao, Jianpeng; Zeng, Wei Lin; Zhang, Wan Fang; Chu, Cordia; Keogh, Kandice; Rutherford, Shannon; Qian, Zhengmin; Du, Yao Dong; Hu, Mengjue; Ma, Wen Jun

    2014-04-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of dust-haze on mortality and to estimate the seasonal and individual-specific modification effects in Guangzhou, China. Mortality, air pollution and meteorological data were collected for 2006-2011. A dust-haze day was defined as daily visibility haze (haze days were associated with increased mortality of 3.4%, 6.8% and 10.4% respectively, at a lag of 0-6 days. This effect was more pronounced during the cold season, for cardiovascular mortality (CVD), respiratory mortality (RESP), in males and people ≥60years. These effects became insignificant after adjustment for PM10. We concluded that dust-haze significantly increased mortality risk in Guangzhou, China, and this effect appears to be dominated by particulate mass and modified by season and individual-specific factors.

  8. Assessing the Performance of the Photovoltaic Cells on the Effects of Yellow Dust Events and Haze in Seoul, Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jiyeon; Kim, Yong Pyo; Wee, DaeHyun

    2016-04-01

    We analyze the potential effects of the Asian yellow dust Events and haze on the performance of Korean photovoltaic systems. Particulate matters from the Asian yellow dust outbreaks in the deserts of Mongolia and northern China are typically transported to Korea. Haze is an atmospheric phenomenon where dust, smoke and other dry particles obscure the clarity of the sky. Hence, we conjecture that the effects of the Asian yellow dust and haze block the incident solar irradiance. The potential reduction of the solar spectral irradiance due to Asian yellow dust events and haze in Korea is investigated using a clear-sky spectral radiation model, and the performance of photovoltaic systems under reduced irradiance is estimated by using a simple analytic model representing typical photovoltaic cells. Comparison of photovoltaic performance under Asian dust events, haze and that under a clear condition is made to evaluate overall influence of the particulate air pollution, respectively.

  9. Slicing The 2010 Saturn's Storm: Upper Clouds And Hazes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Hoyos, Santiago; Sanz-Requena, J. F.; Sanchez-Lavega, A.; Hueso, R.

    2012-10-01

    At the end of 2010 a small storm erupted in Saturn's northern mid-latitudes. Starting from a localized perturbation, it grew up to be a global-scale disturbance and cover the whole latitude band by February, 2011 (Fletcher et al. 2011, Science 332; Sánchez-Lavega et al. 2011, Nature 475; Fischer et al. 2011, Nature 475). By June, 2011 the storm was facing its end and gradually disappeared (Sánchez-Lavega et al. 2012, Icarus 220). In this work we use the observations acquired by the Cassini ISS instrument during the whole process to investigate the vertical cloud and haze structure above the ammonia condensation level (roughly 1 bar). Cassini ISS observations cover visual wavelengths from the blue to the near-infrared including two methane absorption bands. Such observations have been modeled using a radiative transfer code which reproduces the atmospheric reflectivity as a function of observation/illumination geometry and wavelength together with a retrieval technique to find maximum likelihood atmospheric models. This allows to investigate some atmospheric parameters: cloud-top pressures, aerosol optical thickness and particle absorption, among others. We will focus on two aspects: (1) maximum likelihood models for the undisturbed reference atmosphere in the 15°N to 45°N band before and after the disturbance; (2) models for particular structures during the development of the global-scale phenomenon. Our results show a general increase of particle density and single-scattering albedo inside the storm. However, some discrete features showing anomalous structure and related to the storm peculiar dynamics will also be discussed. Acknowledgments: This work was supported by the Spanish MICIIN project AYA2009-10701 with FEDER funds, by Grupos Gobierno Vasco IT-464-07 and by Universidad País Vasco UPV/EHU through program UFI11/55.

  10. The Composition of Organic Aerosols in Southeast Asia During The 2006 Haze Episode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, H.; Zielinska, B.; Balasubramanian, R.

    2007-12-01

    The regional smoke haze in Southeast Asia is a recurring air pollution problem. Uncontrolled forest fires from land-clearing activities in Sumatra and Borneo, and to a lesser extent Malaysia, have occurred almost every dry season since the late 1990s. The smoke haze that took place in October 2006 shrouded an estimated 215,000 square miles of land on Indonesia's islands of Sumatra and Borneo, and persisted for several weeks. Satellite pictures showed numerous hotspots in both Sumatra and Kalimantan. The prevailing, South-Southwesterly, winds blew smoke from land and forest fires in central and south Sumatra to Singapore, affecting the regional air quality significantly and reducing atmospheric visibility. During this haze episode, we carried out an intensive field study in Singapore to characterize the composition of organic aerosols, which usually account for a large fraction of airborne particulate matter (PM). A total of 17 PM samples were collected while the hazy atmospheric conditions persisted in Singapore, and subjected to accelerated solvent extraction with dichloromethane and acetone. The extracted compounds were grouped into three major fractions (n-alkanes, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and polar organic compounds). More than 180 particulate-bound organic compounds were determined using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC-MS). In order to investigate the origin of organic species, the carbon preference indexes as well as diagnostic ratios were used. The compositional differences of organic aerosols between the haze- and non- haze periods will be presented. The atmospheric implications of the composition of organic aerosols of biomass burning origin will be discussed. Keywords: smoke haze, organic aerosols, n-alkanes, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, polar organic compounds

  11. Effect of heterogeneous aqueous reactions on the secondary formation of inorganic aerosols during haze events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Jiannong; Liu, Quan; Li, Xia; Gao, Yang; Jia, Xingcan; Sheng, Jiujiang; Liu, Yangang

    2015-12-01

    The effect of heterogeneous aqueous reactions on the secondary formation of inorganic aerosols during haze events was investigated by analysis of comprehensive measurements of aerosol composition and concentrations [e.g., particular matters (PM2.5), nitrate (NO3), sulfate (SO4), ammonium (NH4)], gas-phase precursors [e.g., nitrogen oxides (NOx), sulfur dioxide (SO2), and ozone (O3)], and relevant meteorological parameters [e.g., visibility and relative humidity (RH)]. The measurements were conducted in Beijing, China from Sep. 07, 2012 to Jan. 16, 2013. The results show that the conversion ratios of N from NOx to nitrate (Nratio) and S from SO2 to sulfate (Sratio) both significantly increased in haze events, suggesting enhanced conversions from NOx and SO2 to their corresponding particle phases in the late haze period. Further analysis shows that Nratio and Sratio increased with increasing RH, with Nratio and Sratio being only 0.04 and 0.03, respectively, when RH aqueous reactions, because solar radiation and thus the photochemical capacity are reduced by the increases in aerosols and RH. This point was further affirmed by the relationships of Nratio and Sratio to O3: the conversion ratios increase with decreasing O3 concentration when O3 concentration is lower than aqueous reactions likely changed aerosols and their precursors during the haze events: in the beginning of haze events, the precursor gases accumulated quickly due to high emission and low reaction rate; the occurrence of heterogeneous aqueous reactions in the late haze period, together with the accumulated high concentrations of precursor gases such as SO2 and NOx, accelerated the formation of secondary inorganic aerosols, and led to rapid increase of the PM2.5 concentration.

  12. Severe haze episodes and seriously polluted fog water in Ji'nan, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinfeng; Chen, Jianmin; Sun, Jianfeng; Li, Weijun; Yang, Lingxiao; Wen, Liang; Wang, Wenxing; Wang, Xinming; Collett, Jeffrey L; Shi, Yang; Zhang, Qingzhu; Hu, Jingtian; Yao, Lan; Zhu, Yanhong; Sui, Xiao; Sun, Xiaomin; Mellouki, Abdelwahid

    2014-09-15

    Haze episodes often hit urban cities in China recently. Here, we present several continuous haze episodes with extremely high PM2.5 levels that occurred over several weeks in early 2013 and extended across most parts of the northern and eastern China-far exceeding the Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei region. Particularly, the haze episode covered ~1 million km(2) on January 14, 2013 and the daily averaged PM2.5 concentration exceeded 360 μg m(-3) in Ji'nan. The observed maximum hourly PM2.5 concentration in urban Ji'nan reached 701 μg m(-3) at 7:00 am (local time) in January 30. During these haze episodes, several fog events happened and the concurrent fog water was found to be seriously polluted. For the fog water collected in Ji'nan from 10:00 pm in January 14 to 11:00 am in January 15, sulfate, nitrate, and ammonium were the major ions with concentrations of 1.54 × 10(6), 8.98 × 10(5), and 1.75 × 10(6) μeq L(-1), respectively, leading to a low in-situ pH of 3.30. The sulfate content in the fog sample was more than 544 times as high as those observed in other areas. With examination of the simultaneously observed data on PM2.5 and its chemical composition, the fog played a role in scavenging and removing fine particles from the atmosphere during haze episodes and thus was seriously contaminated. However, the effect was not sufficient to obviously cleanse air pollution and block haze episodes.

  13. Analysis of a winter regional haze event and its formation mechanism in the North China Plain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. J. Zhao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A regional haze episode occurred in the Beijing, Tianjin and Hebei province (BTH area in the North China Plain (NCP from 16 to 19 January 2010. The chemical and optical properties of aerosols and the meteorological condition were investigated in this study with intensive measurement of aerosol and trace gases from 14 to 23 January 2010 at five sites. The episode was caused by the combination of anthropogenic emissions and surface air stagnation under a high pressure system followed by a low pressure system. The concentrations of PM2.5 and trace gases increased significantly on a regional scale during this episode. The increased aerosol scattering coefficient (σsp, absorption coefficient (σap, and aerosol optical depth (AOD showed the importance of aerosol extinction during this haze episode. The increase of secondary inorganic pollutants (SO42−, NO3, NH4+ was observed simultaneously at four sites, especially in the plain area of BTH, which could be identified as a common characteristic of pollution haze in east China. The organic matter (OM was different from secondary inorganic pollutants, which increased more significantly at Chengde (CD site than the other three sites in plain area. The sulfate and nitrate in PM2.5 were mainly formed through the heterogeneous reaction process in the urban area. The secondary organic aerosols in PM2.5 only existed during haze days at CD but in both haze and normal days at the other three sites. The chemical characteristics of aerosols in PM2.5 indicated that the secondary formation of aerosol was one important mechanism in the formation of haze episode. The strong temperature inversion and descending air motions in the planetary boundary layer (PBL allowed pollutants to accumulate in a shallow layer. The weak surface wind speed produced high pollutants concentration within

  14. [Comparative analysis on meteorological condition for persistent haze cases in summer and winter in Beijing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Xiao-Nong; Zhang, Xiao-Ling; Wang, Ying-Chun; Liu, Wei-Dong; Du, Jia; Zhao, Ling-Hui

    2014-06-01

    Summer is another peak season for haze besides winter in Beijing area, which is different from that in South China. The data of microwave radiometer, profiler, sounding, AWS, NCEP (NCAR) and air pollution monitors were used in the analysis of two haze cases which occurred in winter and summer, respectively. Both cases lasted for 6 days. This research focused on the difference in the mechanism of the formation and persistence of haze cases in various seasons. In winter, north-westerly flow dominated Beijing at upper-levels and a few of shallow troughs passed by during persistent haze development. The main meteorological reasons for lower visibility in 6 days were: there was an inversion in the boundary layer all the time; wind was weak at surface and moisture went up gradually. The change of inversion height and humidity day and night led to the diurnal variation of PM2.5 concentration and visibility. The surface wind speed kept lower because the weak cold air could not often hit the surface during the haze case. In addition, three factors played key roles in the inversion formation in boundary layer. One was that the rapid decrease in the surface temperature after sunset due to the radiation. At the same time, there was some warm advection at upper boundary layer. The third one attributed to the temperature increase after the air flowing over the mountains and down. However, in summer, regional transportation of aerosol, sustained convective stability and high air saturation were very important factors for the haze formation. Under the sub-tropic high control, the wind direction at lower troposphere was south. The PM2.5 concentration went up when the speed of south wind increased. The south flow caused by both synoptic scale systems and mountain-valley breeze near Beijing transported the aerosol northward from higher polluted area. There was no inversion in the summer haze case. But, the convective inhibition was kept over 200 J x kG(-1). As the result, it was not

  15. Organosulfates and organic acids in Arctic aerosols: speciation, annual variation and concentration levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, A. M. K.; Kristensen, K.; Nguyen, Q. T.; Zare, A.; Cozzi, F.; Nøjgaard, J. K.; Skov, H.; Brandt, J.; Christensen, J. H.; Ström, J.; Tunved, P.; Krejci, R.; Glasius, M.

    2014-02-01

    , organosulfate and organic acid concentrations remained relatively constant during most of the year at amean concentration of 15 (±4) ng m-3 (accounting for 4 (±1)% of total organic matter) and 3.9 (±1) ng m-3 (accounting for 1.1 (±0.1)% of total organic matter) respectively. However during four weeks of spring remarkably higher concentrations of total organosulfates (23-36 ng m-3) and total organic acids (7-10 ng m-3) were observed. The periods of observed elevated organosulfate and organic acid concentration at Station Nord and at Zeppelin Mountain coincided with the Arctic Haze period. Furthermore, backwards air mass trajectories indicated northern Eurasia as the main source region of the Arctic haze aerosols at both sites. Periods with air mass transport from Russia to Zeppelin Mountain were associated with a doubled number of detected organosulfate species compared with periods of air mass transport from the Arctic Ocean, Scandinavia and Greenland. Our analysis showed the presence of organosulfates and organic acids of both biogenic and anthropogenic origin throughout the year at both Arctic sites. As the formation of organosulfates binds inorganic sulfate, their presence may possibly affect the formation and lifetime of clouds in the Arctic atmosphere.

  16. Organosulfates and organic acids in Arctic aerosols: speciation, annual variation and concentration levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. K. Hansen

    2014-02-01

    , organosulfate and organic acid concentrations remained relatively constant during most of the year at amean concentration of 15 (±4 ng m−3 (accounting for 4 (±1% of total organic matter and 3.9 (±1 ng m−3 (accounting for 1.1 (±0.1% of total organic matter respectively. However during four weeks of spring remarkably higher concentrations of total organosulfates (23–36 ng m−3 and total organic acids (7–10 ng m−3 were observed. The periods of observed elevated organosulfate and organic acid concentration at Station Nord and at Zeppelin Mountain coincided with the Arctic Haze period. Furthermore, backwards air mass trajectories indicated northern Eurasia as the main source region of the Arctic haze aerosols at both sites. Periods with air mass transport from Russia to Zeppelin Mountain were associated with a doubled number of detected organosulfate species compared with periods of air mass transport from the Arctic Ocean, Scandinavia and Greenland. Our analysis showed the presence of organosulfates and organic acids of both biogenic and anthropogenic origin throughout the year at both Arctic sites. As the formation of organosulfates binds inorganic sulfate, their presence may possibly affect the formation and lifetime of clouds in the Arctic atmosphere.

  17. Mechanism of seasonal Arctic sea ice evolution and Arctic amplification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kwang-Yul; Hamlington, Benjamin D.; Na, Hanna; Kim, Jinju

    2016-09-01

    Sea ice loss is proposed as a primary reason for the Arctic amplification, although the physical mechanism of the Arctic amplification and its connection with sea ice melting is still in debate. In the present study, monthly ERA-Interim reanalysis data are analyzed via cyclostationary empirical orthogonal function analysis to understand the seasonal mechanism of sea ice loss in the Arctic Ocean and the Arctic amplification. While sea ice loss is widespread over much of the perimeter of the Arctic Ocean in summer, sea ice remains thin in winter only in the Barents-Kara seas. Excessive turbulent heat flux through the sea surface exposed to air due to sea ice reduction warms the atmospheric column. Warmer air increases the downward longwave radiation and subsequently surface air temperature, which facilitates sea surface remains to be free of ice. This positive feedback mechanism is not clearly observed in the Laptev, East Siberian, Chukchi, and Beaufort seas, since sea ice refreezes in late fall (November) before excessive turbulent heat flux is available for warming the atmospheric column in winter. A detailed seasonal heat budget is presented in order to understand specific differences between the Barents-Kara seas and Laptev, East Siberian, Chukchi, and Beaufort seas.

  18. Identification of chemical compositions and sources of atmospheric aerosols in Xi'an, inland China during two types of haze events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianjun; Wang, Gehui; Ren, Yanqin; Wang, Jiayuan; Wu, Can; Han, Yanni; Zhang, Lu; Cheng, Chunlei; Meng, Jingjing

    2016-10-01

    High time resolution (1h) of TSP filter samples was collected in Xi'an in inland China from December 5 to 13, 2012, during which a 9-day long of haze episode occurred. The hazy days were classified as two types, i.e., Light-haze period with moderate degradation in visibility (5-10km) and relatively dry conditions (RH: 53±19%) and Severe-haze period with a daily visibility less than 5km and humid conditions (RH: 73±14%). TSP in the two periods (415±205 and 530±180μgm(-3) in Light-haze and Severe-haze periods, respectively) was comparable, but crustal Fe and Ca elements presented higher concentrations and strong correlation (R(2)=0.72) with TSP in Light-haze period. SO4(2-), NO3(-) and NH4(+) in Light-haze period were 16±5.9, 12±6.7 and 4.1±2.8μgm(-3), respectively, and increased dramatically to 51±15, 44±9.7 and 23±5.6μgm(-3) in Severe-haze period. Contributions of Fe and Ca to TSP decreased from 9.2% in Light-haze period to 5.3% in Severe-haze period, but those of SO4(2-), NO3(-) and NH4(+) increased from 3.8%, 2.9% and 1.0% in Light-haze period to 9.6%, 8.3% and 4.4% in Severe-haze period, respectively. These results suggest that dust-derived particles were more significant in Light-haze period while secondary aerosols were more important in Severe-haze period. Hopanes (33±24 and 38±29ngm(-3) in Light-haze and Severe-haze periods, respectively) during the two types of haze periods are comparable, indicating that differences in contribution of primary organic aerosols from fossil fuel combustions to TSP were insignificant. In contrast, the ratio of secondary organic aerosols (e.g., o-phthalic acid) to EC was much higher in Severe-haze period (5.8±2.7ngμg(-1)) than in Light-haze period (3.4±2.1ngμg(-1)), probably indicating that the humid conditions in Severe-haze period are favorable for secondary organic aerosol formation. PMID:27220100

  19. Identification of chemical compositions and sources of atmospheric aerosols in Xi'an, inland China during two types of haze events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianjun; Wang, Gehui; Ren, Yanqin; Wang, Jiayuan; Wu, Can; Han, Yanni; Zhang, Lu; Cheng, Chunlei; Meng, Jingjing

    2016-10-01

    High time resolution (1h) of TSP filter samples was collected in Xi'an in inland China from December 5 to 13, 2012, during which a 9-day long of haze episode occurred. The hazy days were classified as two types, i.e., Light-haze period with moderate degradation in visibility (5-10km) and relatively dry conditions (RH: 53±19%) and Severe-haze period with a daily visibility less than 5km and humid conditions (RH: 73±14%). TSP in the two periods (415±205 and 530±180μgm(-3) in Light-haze and Severe-haze periods, respectively) was comparable, but crustal Fe and Ca elements presented higher concentrations and strong correlation (R(2)=0.72) with TSP in Light-haze period. SO4(2-), NO3(-) and NH4(+) in Light-haze period were 16±5.9, 12±6.7 and 4.1±2.8μgm(-3), respectively, and increased dramatically to 51±15, 44±9.7 and 23±5.6μgm(-3) in Severe-haze period. Contributions of Fe and Ca to TSP decreased from 9.2% in Light-haze period to 5.3% in Severe-haze period, but those of SO4(2-), NO3(-) and NH4(+) increased from 3.8%, 2.9% and 1.0% in Light-haze period to 9.6%, 8.3% and 4.4% in Severe-haze period, respectively. These results suggest that dust-derived particles were more significant in Light-haze period while secondary aerosols were more important in Severe-haze period. Hopanes (33±24 and 38±29ngm(-3) in Light-haze and Severe-haze periods, respectively) during the two types of haze periods are comparable, indicating that differences in contribution of primary organic aerosols from fossil fuel combustions to TSP were insignificant. In contrast, the ratio of secondary organic aerosols (e.g., o-phthalic acid) to EC was much higher in Severe-haze period (5.8±2.7ngμg(-1)) than in Light-haze period (3.4±2.1ngμg(-1)), probably indicating that the humid conditions in Severe-haze period are favorable for secondary organic aerosol formation.

  20. Time varying arctic climate change amplification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chylek, Petr [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dubey, Manvendra K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lesins, Glen [DALLHOUSIE U; Wang, Muyin [NOAA/JISAO

    2009-01-01

    During the past 130 years the global mean surface air temperature has risen by about 0.75 K. Due to feedbacks -- including the snow/ice albedo feedback -- the warming in the Arctic is expected to proceed at a faster rate than the global average. Climate model simulations suggest that this Arctic amplification produces warming that is two to three times larger than the global mean. Understanding the Arctic amplification is essential for projections of future Arctic climate including sea ice extent and melting of the Greenland ice sheet. We use the temperature records from the Arctic stations to show that (a) the Arctic amplification is larger at latitudes above 700 N compared to those within 64-70oN belt, and that, surprisingly; (b) the ratio of the Arctic to global rate of temperature change is not constant but varies on the decadal timescale. This time dependence will affect future projections of climate changes in the Arctic.

  1. History of sea ice in the Arctic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Polyak, Leonid; Alley, Richard B.; Andrews, John T.;

    2010-01-01

    Arctic sea-ice extent and volume are declining rapidly. Several studies project that the Arctic Ocean may become seasonally ice-free by the year 2040 or even earlier. Putting this into perspective requires information on the history of Arctic sea-ice conditions through the geologic past. This inf......Arctic sea-ice extent and volume are declining rapidly. Several studies project that the Arctic Ocean may become seasonally ice-free by the year 2040 or even earlier. Putting this into perspective requires information on the history of Arctic sea-ice conditions through the geologic past....... This information can be provided by proxy records fromthe Arctic Ocean floor and from the surrounding coasts. Although existing records are far from complete, they indicate that sea ice became a feature of the Arctic by 47 Ma, following a pronounced decline in atmospheric pCO2 after the Paleocene–Eocene Thermal...

  2. The Arctic policy of China and Japan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tonami, Aki

    2014-01-01

    At the May 2013 Arctic Council Ministerial Meeting, five Asian states, namely China, Japan, India, Singapore and South Korea, were accepted to become new Permanent Observers at the Arctic Council. Nonetheless, little attention has been paid to the Asian states and their interest in the Arctic. Most...... discussions have focused on China and the assessment of China’s interest in the Arctic is divided. This paper attempts to fill this gap by presenting and comparing the various components of the Arctic policies of China and Japan. Referring to Putnam’s model of the “two-level game” and Young’s categorization...... of Arctic stakeholders’ interests, data from policy documents and interviews with relevant stakeholders were analysed. This analysis shows the Chinese and Japanese governments are in the gradual process of consolidating their Arctic policies, but both China and Japan see the Arctic less as a strategically...

  3. In Brief: Arctic Report Card

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showstack, Randy

    2009-11-01

    The 2009 annual update of the Arctic Report Card, issued on 22 October, indicates that “warming of the Arctic continues to be widespread, and in some cases dramatic. Linkages between air, land, sea, and biology are evident.” The report, a collaborative effort of 71 national and international scientists initiated in 2006 by the Climate Program Office of the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), highlights several concerns, including a change in large-scale wind patterns affected by the loss of summer sea ice; the replacement of multiyear sea ice by first-year sea ice; warmer and fresher water in the upper ocean linked to new ice-free areas; and the effects of the loss of sea ice on Arctic plant, animal, and fish species. “Climate change is happening faster in the Arctic than any other place on Earth-and with wide-ranging consequences,” said NOAA administrator Jane Lubchenco. “This year“s Arctic Report Card underscores the urgency of reducing greenhouse gas pollution and adapting to climate changes already under way.”

  4. Models for Polar Haze Formation in Jupiter's Stratosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedson, A. James; Wong, Ah-San; Yung, Yuk L.

    2002-08-01

    We present coupled chemical-microphysical models for the formation, growth, and physical properties of the jovian polar haze based on a gas-phase photochemical model for the auroral regions developed by A. S. Wong et al. (2000, Astrophys. J.534, L215-217). In this model, auroral particle precipitation provides an important energy source for enhanced decomposition of methane and production of benzene and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). We find that at high altitude, A 4 (pyrene, a hydrocarbon consisting of four fused aromatic rings) should homogeneously nucleate to form tiny primary particles. At lower altitudes, A 3 (phenanthrene) and A 2 (naphthalene) heterogeneously nucleate on the A 4 nuclei. These particles subsequently grow by additional condensation of A 2 on the nucleated particles and by coagulation and eventually sediment out to the troposphere. We run different cases of the aerosol microphysical model for different assumptions regarding the fractal dimension of aggregate particles formed by the coagulation process. If coagulation is assumed to produce spherical particles (of dimensionality 3), then their mean radius at altitudes below the 20-mbar pressure level is computed to be approximately 0.1 μm. If coagulation produces fractal aggregates of dimension 2.1, then their equivalent mean radius below the 20-mbar level is much larger, of order 0.7 μm. Aggregates with fractal dimensions between 2.1 and 3 form with equivalent mean radii between 0.1 and 0.7 μm. In every case, mean particle radius is found to decrease with increasing altitude, as expected for a system approximately in sedimentation-coagulation equilibrium. The predicted range of altitudes where aerosol formation occurs and the mean size to which particles grow are found to be generally consistent with observations. However, our calculations cannot presently account for the large amount of total aerosol loading inferred by M. G. Tomasko et al. (1986, Icarus65, 218-243). We suggest

  5. Arctic Landscape Within Reach

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This image, one of the first captured by NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander, shows flat ground strewn with tiny pebbles and marked by small-scale polygonal cracking, a pattern seen widely in Martian high latitudes and also observed in permafrost terrains on Earth. The polygonal cracking is believed to have resulted from seasonal contraction and expansion of surface ice. Phoenix touched down on the Red Planet at 4:53 p.m. Pacific Time (7:53 p.m. Eastern Time), May 25, 2008, in an arctic region called Vastitas Borealis, at 68 degrees north latitude, 234 degrees east longitude. This image was acquired at the Phoenix landing site by the Surface Stereo Imager on day 1 of the mission on the surface of Mars, or Sol 0, after the May 25, 2008, landing. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  6. Progress towards a post-Venus Express Clouds & Haze reference model for Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcq, Emmanuel; Belyaev, Denis; Wilson, Colin; Wilquet, Valérie; Luginin, Mikhail

    2016-07-01

    With the end of Venus Express in 2014, the focus of the scientific community has gradually moved from the study of Venus Express mono-instrumental data sets to cross-instrumental studies involving pure modelization as well. This is especially true for the clouds and hazes that surround most of the planet between 48 and 70 km. They play a major role at the crossroads of various atmospheric processes among which the radiative budget as well as the dynamical and chemical coupling between the lower and upper atmosphere. In order to support such efforts, ISSI has supported from 2013 to 2015 a "Clouds & Hazes of Venus" scientific team involving Venus Express and ground-based observers as well as microphysical modelers. Together, they compared their results in order to achieve a more unified and consistent view of Venus' clouds and hazes, taking into account its spatial and temporal variability more in detail than previously available VIRA-1 and 2 cloud models. We will review the individual data sets and models that have been used, and then present our strategy towards a unified cloud model. We will first make available some observable parameters to the wider community through a web-based repository. Our future steps will involve more advanced techniques (data assimilation) in order to achieve our objective of a unified Venus clouds & haze model that encompasses its various variabilities as well as possible.

  7. 78 FR 16452 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; North Dakota; Regional Haze State...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-15

    ... discussion of regional haze requirements, please see our proposal at 76 FR 58574, 58576. In our proposed action, we proposed to disapprove the State's NO X BART determinations for these units. See 76 FR 58570... BART determinations for these units. 77 FR 20894, 20897 (April 6, 2012). We based our change on...

  8. Modeling study of the 2010 regional haze event in the North China Plain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, M.; Carmichael, G. R.; Wang, Y.; Saide, P. E.; Yu, M.; Xin, J.; Liu, Z.; Wang, Z.

    2016-02-01

    The online coupled Weather Research and Forecasting-Chemistry (WRF-Chem) model was applied to simulate a haze event that happened in January 2010 in the North China Plain (NCP), and was validated against various types of measurements. The evaluations indicate that WRF-Chem provides reliable simulations for the 2010 haze event in the NCP. This haze event was mainly caused by high emissions of air pollutants in the NCP and stable weather conditions in winter. Secondary inorganic aerosols also played an important role and cloud chemistry had important contributions. Air pollutants outside Beijing contributed about 64.5 % to the PM2.5 levels in Beijing during this haze event, and most of them are from south Hebei, Tianjin city, Shandong and Henan provinces. In addition, aerosol feedback has important impacts on surface temperature, relative humidity (RH) and wind speeds, and these meteorological variables affect aerosol distribution and formation in turn. In Shijiazhuang, Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) decreased about 278.2 m and PM2.5 increased more than 20 µg m-3 due to aerosol feedback. It was also shown that black carbon (BC) absorption has significant impacts on meteorology and air quality changes, indicating more attention should be paid to BC from both air pollution control and climate change perspectives.

  9. The Link between Knowledge, Attitudes and Practices in Relation to Atmospheric Haze Pollution in Peninsular Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Pretto, Laura; Acreman, Stephen; Ashfold, Matthew J; Mohankumar, Suresh K; Campos-Arceiz, Ahimsa

    2015-01-01

    Transboundary haze episodes caused by seasonal forest fires have become a recurrent phenomenon in Southeast Asia, with serious environmental, economic, and public health implications. Here we present a cross-sectional survey conducted among people in Kuala Lumpur and surrounds to assess the links between knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to the transboundary haze episodes. Of 305 respondents, 125 were amateur athletes participating in a duathlon event and the remainder were surveyed in an inner-city shopping mall. Across the whole sample, people who possessed more factual information about the haze phenomenon showed significantly higher levels of concern. Duathletes were more knowledgeable than non-duathletes and also more concerned about the negative effects of haze, especially on health. For all people who regularly practice outdoor sports (including people interviewed at the shopping mall), higher levels of knowledge and concerned attitudes translated into a greater likelihood of engaging in protective practices, such as cancelling their outdoor training sessions, while those with greater knowledge were more likely to check the relevant air pollution index on a daily basis. Our results indicate that the provision of accurate and timely information about air quality to residents will translate into beneficial practices, at least among particularly exposed individuals, such as amateur athletes who regularly practice outdoor sports.

  10. The Link between Knowledge, Attitudes and Practices in Relation to Atmospheric Haze Pollution in Peninsular Malaysia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura De Pretto

    Full Text Available Transboundary haze episodes caused by seasonal forest fires have become a recurrent phenomenon in Southeast Asia, with serious environmental, economic, and public health implications. Here we present a cross-sectional survey conducted among people in Kuala Lumpur and surrounds to assess the links between knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to the transboundary haze episodes. Of 305 respondents, 125 were amateur athletes participating in a duathlon event and the remainder were surveyed in an inner-city shopping mall. Across the whole sample, people who possessed more factual information about the haze phenomenon showed significantly higher levels of concern. Duathletes were more knowledgeable than non-duathletes and also more concerned about the negative effects of haze, especially on health. For all people who regularly practice outdoor sports (including people interviewed at the shopping mall, higher levels of knowledge and concerned attitudes translated into a greater likelihood of engaging in protective practices, such as cancelling their outdoor training sessions, while those with greater knowledge were more likely to check the relevant air pollution index on a daily basis. Our results indicate that the provision of accurate and timely information about air quality to residents will translate into beneficial practices, at least among particularly exposed individuals, such as amateur athletes who regularly practice outdoor sports.

  11. Haze event monitoring and investigation in Penang Island, Malaysia using a ground-based backscatter Lidar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During 24th July 2013 to 1st August 2013, a haze event struck Penang Island, causing the visibility to decrease and increase in Air Pollution Index (API). A ground-based backscatter Lidar, operate at 355 nm which was setup at the roof top of the School of Physics, Universiti Sains Malaysia. It was used to monitor and investigate the haze event. For this work, we studied the daytime variation of the aerosol intensity, distribution, planetary boundary layer (PBL) height and the aerosol optical depth (AOD) values during these days. We found that the aerosol are very intense during the first two days of the haze event and slowly decline as time passed. Finally the haze event died off on 1st August 2013. As for daily aerosol distribution, aerosols are generally more intense during the afternoon. Its intensity is slightly lower in the morning and evening. Similar trends were observed for AOD values as they increase from morning to afternoon and slowly decrease in the evening. Most aerosols are found contained below the PBL which generally found at around 1000 – 2000 m in height

  12. 77 FR 61477 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; State of Hawaii; Regional Haze Federal...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-09

    ... worst polluters in Hawaii. The commenter noted that EPA has not proposed additional pollution controls... address regional haze in the State of Hawaii. This FIP addresses the requirements of the Clean Air Act... ``from manmade air pollution'' . According to the commenter, failing to include the volcano in...

  13. 77 FR 27671 - State of Hawaii; Regional Haze Federal Implementation Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-11

    ... air pollution.'' Hawaii has two Class I areas: Hawaii Volcanoes National Park on the Big Island and... available by May 16, 2012 on the following Web site: http://www.epa.gov/region9/air/actions/hawaii.html and... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 State of Hawaii; Regional Haze Federal Implementation Plan AGENCY:...

  14. Planck Intermediate Results. IX. Detection of the Galactic haze with Planck

    CERN Document Server

    Ade, P A R; Arnaud, M; Ashdown, M; Atrio-Barandela, F; Aumont, J; Baccigalupi, C; Balbi, A; Banday, A J; Barreiro, R B; Bartlett, J G; Battaner, E; Benabed, K; Benoît, A; Bernard, J -P; Bersanelli, M; Bonaldi, A; Bond, J R; Borrill, J; Bouchet, F R; Burigana, C; Cabella, P; Cardoso, J -F; Catalano, A; Cayón, L; Chary, R -R; Chiang, L -Y; Christensen, P R; Clements, D L; Colombo, L P L; Coulais, A; Crill, B P; Cuttaia, F; Danese, L; D'Arcangelo, O; Davis, R J; de Bernardis, P; de Gasperis, G; de Rosa, A; de Zotti, G; Delabrouille, J; Dickinson, C; Diego, J M; Dobler, G; Dole, H; Donzelli, S; Doré, O; Dörl, U; Douspis, M; Dupac, X; Efstathiou, G; Enßlin, T A; Eriksen, H K; Finelli, F; Forni, O; Frailis, M; Franceschi, E; Galeotta, S; Ganga, K; Giard, M; Giardino, G; González-Nuevo, J; Górski, K M; Gratton, S; Gregorio, A; Gruppuso, A; Hansen, F K; Harrison, D; Helou, G; Henrot-Versillé, S; Hernández-Monteagudo, C; Hildebrandt, S R; Hivon, E; Hobson, M; Holmes, W A; Hornstrup, A; Hovest, W; Huffenberger, K M; Jaffe, T R; Jagemann, T; Jones, W C; Juvela, M; Keihänen, E; Knoche, J; Knox, L; Kunz, M; Kurki-Suonio, H; Lagache, G; Lähteenmäki, A; Lamarre, J -M; Lasenby, A; Lawrence, C R; Leach, S; Leonardi, R; Lilje, P B; Linden-Vørnle, M; López-Caniego, M; Lubin, P M; Macías-Pérez, J F; Maffei, B; Maino, D; Mandolesi, N; Maris, M; Martin, P G; Martínez-González, E; Masi, S; Massardi, M; Matarrese, S; Matthai, F; Mazzotta, P; Meinhold, P R; Melchiorri, A; Mendes, L; Mennella, A; Mitra, S; Miville-Deschênes, M -A; Moneti, A; Montier, L; Morgante, G; Munshi, D; Murphy, J A; Naselsky, P; Natoli, P; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H U; Noviello, F; Osborne, S; Pajot, F; Paladini, R; Paoletti, D; Partridge, B; Pearson, T J; Perdereau, O; Perrotta, F; Piacentini, F; Piat, M; Pierpaoli, E; Pietrobon, D; Plaszczynski, S; Pointecouteau, E; Polenta, G; Ponthieu, N; Popa, L; Poutanen, T; Pratt, G W; Prunet, S; Puget, J -L; Rachen, J P; Rebolo, R; Reinecke, M; Renault, C; Ricciardi, S; Riller, T; Rocha, G; Rosset, C; Rubiño-Martín, J A; Rusholme, B; Sandri, M; Savini, G; Schaefer, B M; Scott, D; Smoot, G F; Stivoli, F; Sudiwala, R; Suur-Uski, A -S; Sygnet, J -F; Tauber, J A; Terenzi, L; Toffolatti, L; Tomasi, M; Tristram, M; Türler, M; Umana, G; Valenziano, L; Van Tent, B; Vielva, P; Villa, F; Vittorio, N; Wade, L A; Wandelt, B D; White, M; Yvon, D; Zacchei, A; Zonca, A

    2012-01-01

    Using precise full-sky observations from Planck, and applying several methods of component separation, we identify and characterize the emission from the Galactic "haze" at microwave wavelengths. The haze is a distinct component of diffuse Galactic emission, roughly centered on the Galactic centre, and extends to |b| ~35 deg in Galactic latitude and |l| ~15 deg in longitude. By combining the Planck data with observations from the WMAP we are able to determine the spectrum of this emission to high accuracy, unhindered by the large systematic biases present in previous analyses. The derived spectrum is consistent with power-law emission with a spectral index of -2.55 +/- 0.05, thus excluding free-free emission as the source and instead favouring hard-spectrum synchrotron radiation from an electron population with a spectrum (number density per energy) dN/dE ~ E^-2.1. At Galactic latitudes |b|<30 deg, the microwave haze morphology is consistent with that of the Fermi gamma-ray "haze" or "bubbles," indicating ...

  15. 77 FR 40149 - Approval, Disapproval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; State of Nebraska; Regional Haze...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-06

    ... rain, ozone formation, and nitrogen deposition. The commenter also stated that haze-causing pollutants... acid rain. We agree that the same emissions that cause visibility impairment can form fine PM and be... Implementation Plans to Reduce Interstate Transport of Fine Particulate Matter and Ozone, 76 FR 48208 (August...

  16. 77 FR 75703 - Partial Approval and Disapproval of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Arizona; Regional Haze and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-21

    ... reasonable progress toward the national goal of achieving natural visibility conditions in 156 national parks... refer to nitrogen oxides. (17) The initials NM mean or refer to National Monument. (18) The initials NP... Implementation Plans A. Regional Haze Rule B. Determination of Baseline, Natural and Current...

  17. Redefining the importance of nitrate during haze pollution to help optimize an emission control strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yuepeng; Wang, Yuesi; Zhang, Junke; Liu, Zirui; Wang, Lili; Tian, Shili; Tang, Guiqian; Gao, Wenkang; Ji, Dongsheng; Song, Tao; Wang, Yonghong

    2016-09-01

    Nitrate salts represent a major component of fine mode aerosols, which play an important role in air pollution worldwide. Based on on-line and off-line aerosol measurements in urban Beijing for both clean and haze conditions, we demonstrate that the absolute and relative concentrations of nitrate increased with visibility degradation (relative humidity), whereas the variations of organics tracked the patterns of mixing-layer height and temperature. We propose that the increase in the relative contribution of nitrate to PM1 observed during the early stages of haze pollution was due to new particle formation, whereas the nitrate formed in PM1-2.5 during the latter stages was due to heterogeneous formation and hygroscopic growth. The increasing trend of nitrate (and also sulfate and ammonium) but decreasing trends of organics during haze development, together with the increase of the NO2/SO2 molar ratio with increasing proximity to downtown Beijing and with visibility degradation, provide further evidence that controlling NOx emissions should be a priority for improving air quality in mega cities. Additional large-scale investigation is required to adequately characterize the regional features of NOx-induced haze pollution in China. Such studies may provide insight into the formation of critical nuclei or the subsequent growth of freshly nucleated particles and advance our understanding of the role of nitrate in new particle formation.

  18. 78 FR 51686 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Oklahoma; Regional Haze and Interstate...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-21

    ... dioxide (SO 2 ) and oxides of nitrogen (NO X ) for Units 3 and 4 of the American Electric Power/Public... Regional Haze Rule. We are also proposing to approve a related SIP revision submitted to address the impact... various portions of this SIP submittal (76 FR 81727, December 28, 2011). Even as significant portions...

  19. Archean Earth Atmosphere Fractal Haze Aggregates: Light Scattering Calculations and the Faint Young Sun Paradox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boness, D. A.; Terrell-Martinez, B.

    2010-12-01

    As part of an ongoing undergraduate research project of light scattering calculations involving fractal carbonaceous soot aggregates relevant to current anthropogenic and natural sources in Earth's atmosphere, we have read with interest a recent paper [E.T. Wolf and O.B Toon,Science 328, 1266 (2010)] claiming that the Faint Young Sun paradox discussed four decades ago by Carl Sagan and others can be resolved without invoking heavy CO2 concentrations as a greenhouse gas warming the early Earth enough to sustain liquid water and hence allow the origin of life. Wolf and Toon report that a Titan-like Archean Earth haze, with a fractal haze aggregate nature due to nitrogen-methane photochemistry at high altitudes, should block enough UV light to protect the warming greenhouse gas NH3 while allowing enough visible light to reach the surface of the Earth. To test this hypothesis, we have employed a rigorous T-Matrix arbitrary-particle light scattering technique, to avoid the simplifications inherent in Mie-sphere scattering, on haze fractal aggregates at UV and visible wavelenths of incident light. We generate these model aggregates using diffusion-limited cluster aggregation (DLCA) algorithms, which much more closely fit actual haze fractal aggregates than do diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) algorithms.

  20. 78 FR 18280 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Nevada; Regional Haze Federal...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-26

    ... project to reduce emissions of NO X at RGGS. This project, as documented in a Gantt chart created by S&L... have developed a compressed 42-month (three and one-half year) schedule set forth in the Gantt chart in.... See, for example, EPA's proposed approval of the Nevada Regional Haze SIP on June 22, 2011 (76...

  1. 76 FR 41158 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; West Virginia; Regional Haze State...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-13

    .... EPA promulgated a rule to address regional haze on July 1, 1999 (64 FR 35713), the RHR. The RHR... FR 39104, 39142-4143, July 6, 2005). CAIR, as originally promulgated, requires significant reductions.... (75 FR 45210, Aug. 2, 2010) (``the Transport Rule''). EPA explained in that proposal that...

  2. Highly transparent, low-haze, hybrid cellulose nanopaper as electrodes for flexible electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xuezhu; Zhou, Jian; Jiang, Long; Lubineau, Gilles; Ng, Tienkhee; Ooi, Boon S; Liao, Hsien-Yu; Shen, Chao; Chen, Long; Zhu, J Y

    2016-06-16

    Paper is an excellent candidate to replace plastics as a substrate for flexible electronics due to its low cost, renewability and flexibility. Cellulose nanopaper (CNP), a new type of paper made of nanosized cellulose fibers, is a promising substrate material for transparent and flexible electrodes due to its potentially high transparency and high mechanical strength. Although CNP substrates can achieve high transparency, they are still characterized by high diffuse transmittance and small direct transmittance, resulting in high optical haze of the substrates. In this study, we proposed a simple methodology for large-scale production of high-transparency, low-haze CNP comprising both long cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs) and short cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs). By varying the CNC/CNF ratio in the hybrid CNP, we could tailor its total transmittance, direct transmittance and diffuse transmittance. By increasing the CNC content, the optical haze of the hybrid CNP could be decreased and its transparency could be increased. The direct transmittance and optical haze of the CNP were 75.1% and 10.0%, respectively, greatly improved from the values of previously reported CNP (31.1% and 62.0%, respectively). Transparent, flexible electrodes were fabricated by coating the hybrid CNP with silver nanowires (AgNWs). The electrodes showed a low sheet resistance (minimum 1.2 Ω sq(-1)) and a high total transmittance (maximum of 82.5%). The electrodes were used to make a light emitting diode (LED) assembly to demonstrate their potential use in flexible displays.

  3. 77 FR 31240 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; State of Florida; Regional Haze...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-25

    ... haze on July 1, 1999 (64 FR 35713), the RHR. The RHR revised the existing visibility regulations to... 76 FR 82219 (December 30, 2011). EPA is not proposing to take action in today's rulemaking on issues... natural conditions. See 64 FR 35715 (July 1, 1999). \\5\\ Visual range is the greatest distance,...

  4. 77 FR 3681 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Minnesota; Regional Haze

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-25

    ... CAIR under regulations issued in 2005 revising the regional haze program. 70 FR 39104 (July 6, 2005... would exist under estimated natural conditions. See 64 FR 35715 (July 1, 1999). \\1\\ Areas designated as... important value. 44 FR 69122 (November 30, 1979). The extent of a mandatory Class I area includes...

  5. 78 FR 57487 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Massachusetts; Regional Haze

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-19

    ... relies''), 70 FR 39104, 39143 (``The baseline date for regional haze SIPs is 2002. . . .'') & id. n.84... published a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPR) for the State of Massachusetts. See 77 FR 30932. The NPR... upheld in Utility Air Regulatory Group v. EPA, 471 F.3d 1333 (D.C. Cir. 2006). See 77 FR 33642,...

  6. 77 FR 71533 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Michigan; Regional Haze State...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-03

    ... Regional Haze Rule was promulgated on July 1, 1999 (64 FR 35713), with further significant provisions promulgated on July 6, 2005 (70 FR 39104), that provided guidance related to BART. On August 6, 2012 (77 FR... Michigan and a number of other states in a separate rulemaking, published on June 7, 2012 (77 FR...

  7. 77 FR 38006 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; State of Iowa: Regional Haze

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-26

    ... Regional Haze SIP and imposed a FIP for Iowa. 77 FR 33642. V. Statutory and Executive Order Requirements... Executive Order Reviews I. Background On February 28, 2012 (77 FR 11974), EPA published a notice of proposed... Executive Order 12866 (58 FR 51735, October 4, 1993); Does not impose an information collection burden...

  8. 77 FR 73369 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; State of Florida; Regional Haze...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-10

    ... CAIR to meet certain regional haze requirements. See 76 FR 82219 (December 30, 2011). On May 25, 2012... first implementation period. See 77 FR 31240. EPA's May 25, 2012, proposed rulemaking covered Florida's... sources. On November 29, 2012 (77 FR 71111), EPA took final action fully approving the unit-specific...

  9. Effect of Homoharringtonine on Corneal Haze after Excimer Laser Photorefractive Keratectomy in Rabbits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Mingchang; WANG Li; WANG Yong; DING Zhengping; MAI Caikeng; NIE Shaosong; CHEN Fei

    2005-01-01

    To evaluate the inhibiting effect of Homoharringtonine HHT) on the corneal haze after excimer laser photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) in rabbits. 18 healthy rabbits which underwent PRK were randomly divided into three groups (A, B and C). The refractive degree of ablation was -10. 0DS in each group. Group A was locally treated with a piece of filter paper soaked with 1 mg/mi HHT for 5 min, and then the entire cornea was repeatedly irrigated with balance solution;Group B was dropped with 0.1 mg/mL HHT after PRK for 3 months; Group C was the control group. Corneal haze, histopathology, response, ect. were investigated. The corneal haze was sig nificantly less in group A, while the difference between group B and group C was insignificant.Keratocytes and fibrocytes in corneal stroma were more active up to 3 months in group B and group C. Intraoperative use of topical HHT can reduce corneal haze after PRK in rabbits.

  10. 77 FR 3712 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Regional Haze

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-25

    ... the regional haze program. 70 FR 39104 (July 6, 2005). EPA's regulations provided that states... natural conditions. See 64 FR 35715 (July 1, 1999). \\1\\ Areas designated as mandatory Class I Federal..., promulgated a list of 156 areas where visibility is identified as an important value. 44 FR 69122 (November...

  11. 77 FR 35287 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Virginia; Regional Haze State...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-13

    ... Haze Rule (RH rule) (64 FR 35732, July 1, 1999) and the rationale for EPA's proposed action are...,'' or ``our'' is used, we mean EPA. On January 25, 2012 (77 FR 3691), EPA published a notice of proposed... Virginia). (76 FR 82219, December 30, 2011). Given the significance of the emissions reductions from...

  12. 77 FR 34218 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Indiana; Regional Haze

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-11

    ... SIP.' The baseline date for regional haze SIPs is 2002 * * *'' 70 FR 39143. Comment #2: For the Alcoa... CFR 51.308. This rule was promulgated on July 1, 1999 (64 FR 35713). Further significant provisions... proposed a limited approval of Indiana's submittal on January 26, 2012 (77 FR 3975). That action...

  13. Aspartic Acid Protease from Botrytis cinerea Removes Haze-Forming Proteins during White Winemaking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sluyter, Van S.C.; Warnock, N.I.; Schmidt, S.; Anderson, P.; Kan, van J.A.L.; Bacic, A.; Waters, E.J.

    2013-01-01

    White wines suffer from heat-induced protein hazes during transport and storage unless the proteins are removed prior to bottling. Bentonite fining is by far the most commonly used method, but it is inefficient and creates several other process challenges. An alternative to bentonite is the enzymati

  14. 77 FR 11827 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; State of Maryland; Regional Haze...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-28

    ... promulgated a rule to address regional haze on July 1, 1999 (64 FR 35714), the RHR. The RHR revised the... under estimated natural conditions (64 FR 35714, July 1, 1999). \\1\\ Visual range is the greatest... visibility impairment'' (45 FR 80084). These regulations represented the first phase in addressing...

  15. 77 FR 11937 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; State of Alabama; Regional Haze...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-28

    ... submittal arising from the State's reliance on CAIR to meet certain regional haze requirements. See 76 FR... in 40 CFR 52.61 that were approved into the Alabama SIP. See 52 FR 45138 (November 24, 1987). EPA is... 64 FR 35715 (July 1, 1999). \\3\\ Visual range is the greatest distance, in kilometers or miles,...

  16. Cloud and Haze in the Atmospheres of Wide-Separation Exoplanets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Renyu

    2016-10-01

    Imaging and characterizing wide-separation exoplanets with spaceborne coronagraph will write a new chapter of exoplanet science. Most of the exoplanets to be observed by coronagraph will be located further away from their parent stars than is Earth from the Sun. These "cold" exoplanets have atmospheric environments conducive for the formation of water and/or ammonia clouds by condensation. Above the condensation clouds, photochemical processes driven by UV irradiation can lead to formation of haze particles. Understanding the cloud and haze in the atmosphere of wide-separation exoplanets is essential, because they determine the planets' spectral signal and how well we can measure the planets' atmospheric abundances. Using atmospheric chemistry and radiative transfer models, I find that the mixing ratio of methane and the pressure level of the uppermost cloud deck on these planets can be uniquely determined from their reflection spectra, if a strong band and a weak band of methane are measured at moderate spectral resolutions. This determination can however be biased by a haze layer above the cloud. To constrain the uncertainty, atmospheric photochemistry models are used to estimate the amount of haze particles.

  17. Modeling study of the 2010 regional haze event in the North China Plain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Gao

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The online coupled Weather Research and Forecasting-Chemistry (WRF-Chem model was applied to simulate a haze event that happened in January 2010 in the North China Plain (NCP, and was validated against various types of measurements. The evaluations indicate that WRF-Chem provides reliable simulations for the 2010 haze event in the NCP. This haze event is mainly caused by high emissions of air pollutants in the NCP and stable weather conditions in winter. Secondary inorganic aerosols also played an important role and cloud chemistry had important contributions. Air pollutants outside Beijing contributed about 47.8 % to the PM2.5 levels in Beijing during this haze event, and most of them are from south Hebei, Shandong and Henan provinces. In addition, aerosol feedback has important impacts on surface temperature, Relative Humidity (RH and wind speeds, and these meteorological variables affect aerosol distribution and formation in turn. In Shijiazhuang, Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL decreased about 300 m and PM2.5 increased more than 20 μg m-3 due to aerosol feedback. Feedbacks associated to Black Carbon (BC account for about 50 % of the PM2.5 increases and 50 % of the PBL decreases in Shijiazhuang, indicating more attention should be paid to BC from both air pollution control and climate change perspectives.

  18. Particulate Characteristics during a Haze Episode Based on Two Ceilometers with Different Wavelengths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the particulate characteristics of a haze episode, data from two ceilometers with wavelengths of 532 nm and 910 nm, respectively, were studied intensively. By combining the data from the ceilometers with data from a sounding balloon, an automatic meteorological station, and a Grimm 180 PM instrument, analyses of the haze process of a short haze event were performed. The results showed that the relatively calm weather conditions were favorable to the occurrence of the haze and that higher relative humidity had a great influence on visibility. The extinction profiles from the ceilometers reflected the existence of an inverted structure of the temperature profiles and demonstrated the extinction differences at two different wavelengths. Because extinction has a positive correlation with relative humidity, the effect of hygroscopic growth was analyzed at the two different wavelengths. As hygroscopic growth of the particles proceeded, the longer wavelength became more sensitive to the large particles, and vice versa. The hygroscopic growth factor and the Angstrom exponent showed a negative correlation, and the correlation coefficients at 532 nm and 910 nm were 0.54 and 0.86, respectively. The accumulation mode particles were more stable through time than the coarse mode particles, and the variation of the coarse mode particles coincided well with the variation of the Angstrom exponent from the two ceilometers.

  19. Haze event monitoring and investigation in Penang Island, Malaysia using a ground-based backscatter Lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hee, W. S.; Tan, F.; Lim, H. S.; Matjafri, M. Z.

    2014-06-01

    During 24th July 2013 to 1st August 2013, a haze event struck Penang Island, causing the visibility to decrease and increase in Air Pollution Index (API). A ground-based backscatter Lidar, operate at 355 nm which was setup at the roof top of the School of Physics, Universiti Sains Malaysia. It was used to monitor and investigate the haze event. For this work, we studied the daytime variation of the aerosol intensity, distribution, planetary boundary layer (PBL) height and the aerosol optical depth (AOD) values during these days. We found that the aerosol are very intense during the first two days of the haze event and slowly decline as time passed. Finally the haze event died off on 1st August 2013. As for daily aerosol distribution, aerosols are generally more intense during the afternoon. Its intensity is slightly lower in the morning and evening. Similar trends were observed for AOD values as they increase from morning to afternoon and slowly decrease in the evening. Most aerosols are found contained below the PBL which generally found at around 1000 - 2000 m in height.

  20. Laboratory Simulation of Haze/Aerosol formation in warm and hot Jupiters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharib-Nezhad, Ehsan; Lyons, James R.; Wright, David P.

    2016-10-01

    During the transit of an exoplanet across its host star, transmitted starlight through exoplanet atmosphere is absorbed and scattered, and the recorded transit spectra reveal important chemical information. There are many detected exoplanets in which hazes/aerosols obscure the incident photons, and consequently, fewer photons are transmitted through the atmosphere, contributing to a flat/nearly flat transit spectrum. Here, we have carried out two complementary approaches to address haze formation. First, laboratory simulations of haze condensation in exoplanet atmospheres are carried out using an electric discharge tube. A mixture of likely gas species (i.e. H2, He, H2O, CH4, N2 and H2S) is inserted into a glass manifold on a vacuum line, at a pressure ~100-10 mbar, and depending on the exoplanet category (e.g., warm or hot Jupiters), the temperature is set. Applying a few kilovolts produces plasma in the discharge tube, and as a result, particles are formed. We use spectroscopic ellipsometry to measure the optical constants (complex refractive index) of the collected laboratory hazes. Then, chemical characterization is made using RBS (Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy) and XPS (X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy). Second, we developed a transit modeling code by which the transit spectra are generated using observational and laboratory data as an input. The model accounts for Mie scattering from haze particles in the vis-NIR spectral region, and Rayleigh scattering which comes from gases and particles (effective in UV-vis). The measured refractive indexes (real and imaginary part) describe the absorption and scattering in the vis-NIR transmission region, and, by generating transit spectra close to the observed ones from exoplanets, constraints on atmospheric chemical characterization can be revealed. Our laboratory results show that haze particles formed in the presence of water and with the solar C/O ratio = 0.5. The other outcome of our experiment is that

  1. Characterization of major pollution events (dust, haze, and two festival events) at Agra, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pachauri, Tripti; Singla, Vyoma; Satsangi, Aparna; Lakhani, Anita; Kumari, K Maharaj

    2013-08-01

    Total suspended particulate (TSP) samples were collected during dust, haze, and two festival events (Holi and Diwali) from February 2009 to June 2010. Pollutant gases (NO2, SO2, and O3) along with the meteorological parameters were also measured during the four pollution events at Agra. The concentration of pollutant gases decreases during dust events (DEs), but the levels of the gases increase during other pollution events indicating the impact of anthropogenic emissions. The mass concentrations were about two times higher during pollution events than normal days (NDs). High TSP concentrations during Holi and Diwali events may be attributed to anthropogenic activities while increased combustion sources in addition to stagnant meteorological conditions contributed to high TSP mass during haze events. On the other hand, long-range transport of atmospheric particles plays a major role during DEs. In the dust samples, Ca(2+), Cl(-), NO3 (-), and SO4 (2-) were the most abundant ions and Ca(2+) alone accounted for 22 % of the total ionic mass, while during haze event, the concentrations of secondary aerosols species, viz., NO3 (-), SO4 (2-), and NH4 (+), were 3.6, 3.3, and 5.1 times higher than the normal days. During Diwali, SO4 (2-) concentration (17.8 μg m(-3)) was highest followed by NO3 (-), K(+), and Cl(-) while the Holi samples were strongly enriched with Cl(-) and K(+) which together made up 32.7 % of the total water-soluble ions. The ion balances indicate that the haze samples were acidic. On the other hand, Holi, Diwali, and DE samples were enriched with cations. The carbonaceous aerosol shows strong variation with the highest concentration during Holi followed by haze, Diwali, DEs, and NDs. However, the secondary organic carbon concentration follows the order haze > DEs > Diwali > Holi > NDs. The scanning electron microscope/EDX results indicate that KCl and carbon-rich particles were more dominant during Holi and haze events while DE samples were enriched

  2. Characterization of major pollution events (dust, haze, and two festival events) at Agra, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pachauri, Tripti; Singla, Vyoma; Satsangi, Aparna; Lakhani, Anita; Kumari, K Maharaj

    2013-08-01

    Total suspended particulate (TSP) samples were collected during dust, haze, and two festival events (Holi and Diwali) from February 2009 to June 2010. Pollutant gases (NO2, SO2, and O3) along with the meteorological parameters were also measured during the four pollution events at Agra. The concentration of pollutant gases decreases during dust events (DEs), but the levels of the gases increase during other pollution events indicating the impact of anthropogenic emissions. The mass concentrations were about two times higher during pollution events than normal days (NDs). High TSP concentrations during Holi and Diwali events may be attributed to anthropogenic activities while increased combustion sources in addition to stagnant meteorological conditions contributed to high TSP mass during haze events. On the other hand, long-range transport of atmospheric particles plays a major role during DEs. In the dust samples, Ca(2+), Cl(-), NO3 (-), and SO4 (2-) were the most abundant ions and Ca(2+) alone accounted for 22 % of the total ionic mass, while during haze event, the concentrations of secondary aerosols species, viz., NO3 (-), SO4 (2-), and NH4 (+), were 3.6, 3.3, and 5.1 times higher than the normal days. During Diwali, SO4 (2-) concentration (17.8 μg m(-3)) was highest followed by NO3 (-), K(+), and Cl(-) while the Holi samples were strongly enriched with Cl(-) and K(+) which together made up 32.7 % of the total water-soluble ions. The ion balances indicate that the haze samples were acidic. On the other hand, Holi, Diwali, and DE samples were enriched with cations. The carbonaceous aerosol shows strong variation with the highest concentration during Holi followed by haze, Diwali, DEs, and NDs. However, the secondary organic carbon concentration follows the order haze > DEs > Diwali > Holi > NDs. The scanning electron microscope/EDX results indicate that KCl and carbon-rich particles were more dominant during Holi and haze events while DE samples were enriched

  3. Research on Haze Value of Wafer Surface%晶片表面Haze值研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张伟才; 宋晶; 杨洪星; 赵权

    2011-01-01

    The Haze value of wafer surface is introduced from the definitions and theories based on the principle of SSIS. The Haze is explained as optical signals which can indirectly reflect the state of the wafer surface. The different materials and different surface were scanned by SSIS, and the effect of surface roughness and reflection coefficient on the Haze value and its distribution were studied. The results show that the Haze value of the same material increases with the increase of surface roughness, and the Haze value shows significant differences between different materials with similar roughness. Through the Analysis of the characteristics of scans, the relationship between Haze value distribution and the consistency of wafer surface state was studied. A new process feedback method for chemical mechanical polishing and wet cleaning process using Haze value was proposed.%介绍了晶片表面Haze值的定义和理论依据,通过对SSIS系统的原理分析,揭示了H aze是一种间接反映晶片表面状态的光学信号.通过对不同表面状态抛光片的光学扫描,研究了晶片表面粗糙度与Haze值的关系;通过对Si抛光片和砷化镓抛光片的扫描对比,研究了晶片本体反射系数对Haze值的影响.研究结果表明,同种材料的Haze值随着表面粗糙度的增大而增大,而不同的材料即使拥有相似的表面粗糙度,Haze值也会因本体反射系数的不同而呈现很大差异.通过对Haze扫描图的特征分析,研究了Haze值分布与晶片表面均匀性的关系,成功地利用Haze值分布将表面性状化,为化学机械抛光和湿法清洗工艺提供了一个新的反馈手段.

  4. Environmental radioactivity in the Arctic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The conference considered several broad themes: (1) assessment of releases from landbased sources and river transport, (2) assessment of dumping of nuclear waste, (3) arctic radioecology, (4) assessment of impacts of nuclear explosions and accidents, (5) nuclear safety and consequences of nuclear accidents in the arctic, and (6) waste management. The presentations demonstrated that current levels of radioactivity in the Arctic are generally low. The two most important sources are global fallout from the nuclear weapons tests of the 1950's and 1960's, and discharges to the sea from reprocessing plants in Western Europe which are transported northward by prevailing currents. The conference was attended by scientists from 17 countries and served as a forum for collection and dissemination of information on the range of themes and described above. It is hoped that this will serve to increase awareness of areas of uncertainty and act as a stimulus to further research

  5. Investigating the haze transport from 1997 biomass burning in Southeast Asia: its impact upon Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koe, Lawrence C. C.; Arellano, Avelino F.; McGregor, John L.

    The 1997 Indonesia forest fires was an environmental disaster of exceptional proportions. Such a disaster caused massive transboundary air pollution and indiscriminate destruction of biodiversity in the world. The immediate consequence of the fires was the production of large amounts of haze in the region, causing visibility and health problems within Southeast Asia. Furthermore, fires of these magnitudes are potential contributors to global warming and climate change due to the emission of large amounts of greenhouse gases and other pyrogenic products.The long-range transport of fire-related haze in the region is investigated using trajectories from the CSIRO Division of Atmospheric Research Limited Area Model (DARLAM). Emission scenarios were constructed for hotspot areas in Sumatra and Kalimantan for the months of September and October 1997 to determine the period and fire locations most critical to Singapore. This study also examines some transport issues raised from field observations. Results show that fires in the coastal areas of southeast Sumatra and southwest Kalimantan can be potential contributors to transboundary air pollution in Singapore. Singapore was directly affected by haze from these areas whereas Kuala Lumpur was heavily affected by the haze coming from Sumatra. In most cases, Singapore was more affected by fires from Kalimantan than was Kuala Lumpur. This was mainly a result of the shifting of monsoons. The transition of monsoons resulted in weaker low-level winds and shifted convergence zones near to the southeast of Peninsular Malaysia. In addition to severe drought and massive fire activity in 1997, the timing of the monsoon transition has a strong influence on haze transport in the region.

  6. Characteristics of aerosol pollution during heavy haze events in Suzhou, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Mi; Wang, Huanbo; Chen, Yang; Yang, Fumo; Zhang, Xiaohua; Zou, Qiang; Zhang, Renquan; Ma, Yongliang; He, Kebin

    2016-06-01

    Extremely severe haze weather events occurred in many cities in China, especially in the east part of the country, in January 2013. Comprehensive measurements including hourly concentrations of PM2.5 and its major chemical components (water-soluble inorganic ions, organic carbon (OC), and elemental carbon (EC)) and related gas-phase precursors were conducted via an online monitoring system in Suzhou, a medium-sized city in Jiangsu province, just east of Shanghai. PM2.5 (particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter of 2.5 µm or less) frequently exceeded 150 µg m-3 on hazy days, with the maximum reaching 324 µg m-3 on 14 January 2013. Unfavorable weather conditions (high relative humidity (RH), and low rainfall, wind speed, and atmospheric pressure) were conducive to haze formation. High concentrations of secondary aerosol species (including SO42-, NO3-, NH4+, and SOC) and gaseous precursors were observed during the first two haze events, while elevated primary carbonaceous species emissions were found during the third haze period, pointing to different haze formation mechanisms. Organic matter (OM), (NH4)2SO4, and NH4NO3 were found to be the major contributors to visibility impairment. High concentrations of sulfate and nitrate might be explained by homogeneous gas-phase reactions under low RH conditions and by heterogeneous processes under relatively high RH conditions. Analysis of air mass trajectory clustering and potential source contribution function showed that aerosol pollution in the studied areas was mainly caused by local activities and surrounding sources transported from nearby cities.

  7. Circum-Arctic Map Compilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saltus, Richard W.; Gaina, Carmen

    2007-05-01

    Second Workshop of the Circum-Arctic Geophysical Maps Project, Trondheim, Norway, 12-13 February 2007 The eyes of the world are increasingly focused on the polar regions. Exploration and assessment of energy and mineral resources for the growing world economy are moving to high-latitude frontier areas. The effects of climatic changes are particularly pronounced at these ends of the Earth and have already attracted worldwide attention and concern. Many recent articles related to the International Polar Year underscore the importance of even basic mapping of the Arctic and Antarctic.

  8. Arctic Glass: Innovative Consumer Technology in Support of Arctic Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruthkoski, T.

    2015-12-01

    The advancement of cyberinfrastructure on the North Slope of Alaska is drastically limited by location-specific conditions, including: unique geophysical features, remoteness of location, and harsh climate. The associated cost of maintaining this unique cyberinfrastructure also becomes a limiting factor. As a result, field experiments conducted in this region have historically been at a technological disadvantage. The Arctic Glass project explored a variety of scenarios where innovative consumer-grade technology was leveraged as a lightweight, rapidly deployable, sustainable, alternatives to traditional large-scale Arctic cyberinfrastructure installations. Google Glass, cloud computing services, Internet of Things (IoT) microcontrollers, miniature LIDAR, co2 sensors designed for HVAC systems, and portable network kits are several of the components field-tested at the Toolik Field Station as part of this project. Region-specific software was also developed, including a multi featured, voice controlled Google Glass application named "Arctic Glass". Additionally, real-time sensor monitoring and remote control capability was evaluated through the deployment of a small cluster of microcontroller devices. Network robustness was analyzed as the devices delivered streams of abiotic data to a web-based dashboard monitoring service in near real time. The same data was also uploaded synchronously by the devices to Amazon Web Services. A detailed overview of solutions deployed during the 2015 field season, results from experiments utilizing consumer sensors, and potential roles consumer technology could play in support of Arctic science will be discussed.

  9. Analysis of China’s Haze Days in the Winter Half-Year and the Climatic Background during 1961-2012

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Lian-Chun; GAO Rong; LI Ying; WANG Guo-Fu

    2014-01-01

    The characteristics of haze days and the climatic background are analyzed by using daily observations of haze, precipitation, mean and maximum wind speed of 664 meteorological stations for the period of 1961-2012. The results show that haze days occur significantly more often in eastern China than in western China. The annual number of haze days is 5-30 d in most parts of central-eastern China, with some areas experiencing more than 30 d, while less than 5 d are averagely occurring in western China. Haze days are mainly concentrated in the winter half-year, with most in winter, followed by autumn, spring, and then summer. Nearly 20% of annual haze days are experienced in December. The haze days in central-eastern China in the winter half-year have a significant increasing trend of 1.7 d per decade during 1961-2012. There were great increases in haze days in the 1960s, 1970s and the beginning of the 21st century. There was also significant abrupt changes of haze days in the early 1970s and 2000s. From 1961 to 2012, haze days in the winter half-year increased in South China, the middle-lower reaches of the Yangtze River, and North China, but decreased in Northeast China, eastern Northwest China and eastern Southwest China. The number of persistent haze is rising. The Longer the haze, the greater the proportion to the number persistent haze. Certain climatic conditions exacerbated the occurrence of haze. The correlation coefficient between haze days and precipitation days in the winter half-year is mainly negative in central-eastern China. The precipitation days show a decreasing trend in most parts of China, with a rate of around -4.0 d per decade in central-eastern China, which reduces the sedimentation capacity of atmospheric pollutants. During the period of 1961-2012, the correlation coefficients between haze days and mean wind speed and strong wind days are mainly negative in central-eastern China, while there exists positive correlation between haze days and

  10. Research Progress on Haze in China for the Past Ten Years%近10年来中国霾天气研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    万春燕

    2015-01-01

    文章从霾的判别研究、霾天气的成因、霾天气预报研究、霾天气监测技术研究、霾天气治理研究及霾天气尺度研究等6个方面进行梳理。未来需要加强对霾天气的持续动态监测,重视科学技术的更新应用,从动态、整体的视角进行霾天气的综合监测,为制定更为科学的霾天气应对措施提供依据。%The paper reviews the research on haze from the following six aspects:the criteria of haze,the cause of the haze weather,weather forecast of the haze,monitoring technology of the haze weather,the control and governance of the haze and the dimension research of haze weather. To provide a basis for making more scientific measures for haze weather,a continuous dynamic monitoring on haze weather should be strengthened,much more importance shall be attached to the updating and the application of science and technology,and a comprehensive monitoring on haze weather from both the dynamic and holistic perspective shall be conducted in the future research.

  11. Mining in the European Arctic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dam, Karin; Scheepstra, Adriana; Gille, Johan; Stepien, Adam; Koivurova, Timo; Stepien, Adam; Koivurova, Timo; Kankaanpää, Paula

    2016-01-01

    The European Arctic has been recently experiencing an upsurge in mining activities. This is reflected in an on-going interest from the industry, regulators and the public. However, current and future prospects are highly sensitive to mineral price fluctuations. The EU is a major consumer and importe

  12. Correlation of polishing-induced shallow subsurface damages with laser-induced gray haze damages in fused silica optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiang; Zhao, Heng; Wang, Gang; Zhou, Peifan; Ma, Ping

    2016-08-01

    Laser-induced damage in fused silica optics greatly restricts the performances of laser facilities. Gray haze damage, which is always initiated on ceria polished optics, is one of the most important damage morphologies in fused silica optics. In this paper, the laser-induced gray haze damages of four fused silica samples polished with CeO2, Al2O3, ZrO2, and colloidal silica slurries are investigated. Four samples all present gray haze damages with much different damage densities. Then, the polishing-induced contaminant and subsurface damages in four samples are analyzed. The results reveal that the gray haze damages could be initiated on the samples without Ce contaminant and are inclined to show a tight correlation with the shallow subsurface damages.

  13. Characterization of individual aerosol particles collected during a haze episode in Incheon, Korea using the quantitative ED-EPMA technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Geng

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Haze is an atmospheric phenomenon that leads to low visibility, and is mostly due to elevated levels of fine particulate matter. It can have effects on cloud formation, public health, agriculture, and even the global climate. Although urban haze has been increasing in occurrence over the past several years over the Seoul-Incheon metropolis, Korea, studies of the morphology and chemical composition of ambient aerosol particles by single-particle analysis during haze episodes have rarely been conducted. Herein, a quantitative energy-dispersive electron probe microanalysis (ED-EPMA, called low-Z particle EPMA, was used to analyze individual aerosol particles collected in Incheon, Korea on 13–18 October 2008 (a typical haze episode occurred from 15 to 18 October. Overall, 3600 particles in 12 aerosol samples collected on haze and non-haze days were measured by low-Z particle EPMA. Based on quantitative X-ray analysis, together with secondary electron images of individual particles, we successfully identified the aerosol particle types as follows: elemental carbon (EC, organic carbon (OC, (NH42SO4/NH4HSO4-containing, genuine (fresh and reacted (aged sea-salt, mineral dust (such as aluminosilicate, SiO2, CaCO3/CaMg(CO32, etc., and K-containing, Fe-rich, and fly ash particles. By analyzing the relative abundances of different particle types, it was concluded that (a on non-haze days, reacted sea-salts and reacted mineral dust particles were abundant in both the PM2.5–10 and PM1.0–2.5 fractions (with relative abundances of 65.0% and 57.7%, respectively; whereas on haze days, the relative abundances of OC and (NH42SO4/NH4HSO4-containing particles were significantly elevated, indicating that organic matter and secondary aerosols were abundant in the atmosphere

  14. 雾霾的产生与防治措施%Cause Amalysis amd Prevemtiom Measures of Fog - haze

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李亚新

    2014-01-01

    近年来,我国中东部地区先后出现大面积持续雾霾天气,给人们生产生活造成了严重的影响。本文对雾霾天气形成的条件和污染源进行了分析,阐述了防治雾霾污染、改善空气质量的对策措施。%The fog - haze weather appears frequently in the area of Middle East China in recent years. It seriously affects human production and living. In this article the cause of fog - haze weather formation was analyzed in aspects of fog - haze weather condition and pollution resource. The measures and suggestions to improve the air quality for the prevention and control of fog - haze weather especially were expounded.

  15. Local causes, regional co-operation and global financing for environemntal problems: the case of Southeast Asian Haze pollution

    OpenAIRE

    Luca Tacconi; Frank Jotzo; R. Quentin Grafton

    2006-01-01

    Lack of action on cross-border environmental problems in developing countries is often ascribed to gaps in local capacity and resources, failure of regional cooperation, and lack of financial support from rich countries. Using the case of the Southeast Asian Haze pollution from forest and peat fires in Indonesia, we explore the challenges posed by environmental problems whose causes are closely linked to local development and livelihood strategies, and whose impacts are local, regional (haze)...

  16. Seasonal variation of Titan's haze at low and high altitudes from HST-STIS spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karkoschka, Erich

    2016-05-01

    The Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph accumulated image cubes of Titan in five years between 1997 and 2004 that we calibrated and analyzed. The observations probe Titan's early northern fall to early winter. Methane bands between 543 and 990 nm wavelength are well resolved spectrally, and Titan's latitudinal and center-to-limb reflectivity variations are resolved spatially. A principal component analysis revealed two large components and two small components of less significance. The first principal component describes a variation of Titan's haze below 80 ± 20 km altitude. Haze particles change their size, opacity, and/or shape of the single scattering phase function. The largest and smallest opacities occurred both in 1997 at high southern latitudes and northern latitudes, respectively. The hemispherical asymmetry switched sign in 2002 at low latitudes, in 2003 at mid latitudes, and in early 2004 at high latitudes. The seasonal amplitude increased almost linearly with distance from the Equator. Tropical latitudes had slightly lower opacities than the annual and global average if the observed variation is seasonally symmetric and shaped like a sine curve. The cause for the variation may be condensation of gases onto aerosols seasonally driven by atmospheric dynamics. The second principal component describes a variation of haze opacity at altitudes above 150 ± 50 km. Largest and smallest opacities both occurred in 2004 at northern and high southern latitudes, respectively. The asymmetry switched in late 2001. Tropical latitudes had significantly higher haze opacity than the annual and global average, opposite to the case at low altitudes. The cause for the high-altitude variation may be aerosols transported at varying speeds driven by atmospheric dynamics. We present a seasonal model that completely describes the haze parameters at each altitude, latitude, and time. It compares fairly well with Cassini results obtained since 2004. The north-south asymmetry may

  17. Haze types in Beijing and the influence of agricultural biomass burning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. J. Li

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Emissions from agricultural biomass burning (ABB in northern China have a significant impact on the regional and global climate. The monthly average aerosol optical depth (AOD at 550 nm in northern China in 2007 had a maximum of 0.7 in June. The AOD measurements are consistent with regional brown hazes that occurred at that time, which was a period of severe aerosol pollution. Aerosol particles were collected in urban Beijing from 12 to 30 June 2007, during a period of high haze, and studied using transmission electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry. The dominant particle types collected in the fine fraction (diameter <1 μm were ammonium sulfate, soot, K2SO4, KNO3, and organic matter, except that the K salts were minor between 21 and 30 June. K-rich particles as tracers of biomass burning, together with wildfire maps, show that intense regional ABB in northern China contributed significantly to the regional haze between 12 and 20 June. We therefore grouped the episodes into type-1 and -2 haze, with the former occurring between 12 and 20 June and the latter between 21 and 30 June. After long-range transport, ABB particles in the type-1 haze exhibited marked changes in morphology, composition, and mixing state. KCl particles were absent, presumably having been converted by heterogeneous reactions to K2SO4 and KNO3. Soot particles were mixed with the other particle types. Abundant organic matter and soluble salts emitted by ABB increased their sizes during transport and resulted in more hygroscopic aerosol particles in downwind areas, becoming additional cloud condensation nuclei. The high AOD (average value 2.2 in Beijing during 12 to 20 June is partly explained by the hygroscopic growth of fine aerosol particles and by the strong absorption of internally mixed soot particles, both coming from regional ABB emissions. Therefore, it is important to consider the

  18. Effects of meteorology and secondary particle formation on visibility during heavy haze events in Beijing, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiang; Quan, Jiannong; Tie, Xuexi; Li, Xia; Liu, Quan; Gao, Yang; Zhao, Delong

    2015-01-01

    The causes of haze formation in Beijing, China were analyzed based on a comprehensive measurement, including PBL (planetary boundary layer), aerosol composition and concentrations, and several important meteorological parameters such as visibility, RH (relative humidity), and wind speed/direction. The measurement was conducted in an urban location from Nov. 16, 2012 to Jan. 15, 2013. During the period, the visibility varied from >20 km to less than a kilometer, with a minimum visibility of 667 m, causing 16 haze occurrences. During the haze occurrences, the wind speeds were less than 1m/s, and the concentrations of PM2.5 (particle matter with radius less than 2.5 μm) were often exceeded 200 μg/m(3). The correlation between PM2.5 concentration and visibility under different RH values shows that visibility was exponentially decreased with the increase of PM2.5 concentrations when RH was less than 80%. However, when RH was higher than 80%, the relationship was no longer to follow the exponentially decreasing trend, and the visibility maintained in very low values, even with low PM2.5 concentrations. Under this condition, the hygroscopic growth of particles played important roles, and a large amount of water vapor acted as particle matter (PM) for the reduction of visibility. The variations of meteorological parameters (RH, PBL heights, and WS (wind speed)), chemical species in gas-phase (CO, O3, SO2, and NOx), and gas-phase to particle-phase conversions under different visibility ranges were analyzed. The results show that from high visibility (>20 km) to low visibility (<2 km), the averaged PBL decreased from 1.24 km to 0.53 km; wind speeds reduced from 1m/s to 0.5m/s; and CO increased from 0.5 ppmv to 4.0 ppmv, suggesting that weaker transport/diffusion caused the haze occurrences. This study also found that the formation of SPM (secondary particle matter) was accelerated in the haze events. The conversions between SO2 and SO4 as well as NOx to NO3(-) increased

  19. Satellite based classification (haze, fog) and affected area estimation over Indo - Pak Sub-Continent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghauri, Badar; Zafar, Sumaira

    2016-07-01

    Northern Pakistan and bordering Indian Punjab experience intense smog and fog during fall and winters. Environmentalists have been raising their voices over the situation and demanded control over regional emissions to save the livelihood of millions of dwellers whose trade, commerce and agriculture is at stake because of long smog/ fog spells.. This paper estimates the area affected by haze, smog and fog during 2006- 2010. MODIS (geo-referenced MODIS subsets India1, 2 &3) of the area in Pakistan and India from 2006 to 2010 for the period October to February) were analyzed using state of the art software ENVI 4.2 and ArcGIS 10.2. This process resulted in area belonging to each class that is; haze, smog and fog. On the basis of density, haze and fog cover was determined. Variations in fog cover, its density and identification of location of fog initiation process were also determined using near real time (30 minutes) METEOSAT-7 IODC data where actually fog formation started and then extended to the area of favorable conditions. Haze has been noticed to intensify due to massive burning of agricultural waste (rice husk) in India and Pakistan towards the end of October each year. MODIS thermal anomalies/fire data (MYD 14) were also used to verify this activity on the ground, which results in hazy conditions at regional level during fall months. Haze-affected area during 2006 to 2010 in Pakistan ranged from 155,000 Km2 to 354,000 Km2 and in India it ranged from 333,000 Km2 to 846,000 Km2. Similarly winter fog cover during this period in Pakistan varied from 136,000 Km2 to 381,000 Km2 and in India it was estimated at 327,000 Km2 to 566,000 Km2. This phenomenon was more prominent in India than in Pakistan where and fog cover was at least twice than that was observed in Pakistan. It has been noted that area covered by fog, smog and haze doubled during the study period in the region. Atmospheric dimming during autumn/ fall also reduces the mixing height leading to greater

  20. Source appointment of fine particle number and volume concentration during severe haze pollution in Beijing in January 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zirui; Wang, Yuesi; Hu, Bo; Ji, Dongsheng; Zhang, Junke; Wu, Fangkun; Wan, Xin; Wang, Yonghong

    2016-04-01

    Extreme haze episodes repeatedly shrouded Beijing during the winter of 2012-2013, causing major environmental and health problems. To better understand these extreme events, particle number size distribution (PNSD) and particle chemical composition (PCC) data collected in an intensive winter campaign in an urban site of Beijing were used to investigate the sources of ambient fine particles. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) analysis resolved a total of eight factors: two traffic factors, combustion factors, secondary aerosol, two accumulation mode aerosol factors, road dust, and long-range transported (LRT) dust. Traffic emissions (54%) and combustion aerosol (27%) were found to be the most important sources for particle number concentration, whereas combustion aerosol (33%) and accumulation mode aerosol (37%) dominated particle volume concentrations. Chemical compositions and sources of fine particles changed dynamically in the haze episodes. An enhanced role of secondary inorganic species was observed in the formation of haze pollution. Regional transport played an important role for high particles, contribution of which was on average up to 24-49% during the haze episodes. Secondary aerosols from urban background presented the largest contributions (45%) for the rapid increase of fine particles in the severest haze episode. In addition, the invasion of LRT dust aerosols further elevated the fine particles during the extreme haze episode. Our results showed a clear impact of regional transport on the local air pollution, suggesting the importance of regional-scale emission control measures in the local air quality management of Beijing.

  1. Tourists’ Perception of Haze Pollution and the Potential Impacts on Travel: Reshaping the Features of Tourism Seasonality in Beijing, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aiping Zhang

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Haze pollution has worsened and has received close attention by news agencies in the past two years. This type of environmental pollution might have a great effect on tourism image and the entire tourism industry of a destination. This study aimed to reveal the potential impacts of haze pollution on the tourism industry. Based on a case study in Beijing using questionnaires for potential tourists, awareness of haze pollution, impacts of haze pollution on travel and attitudes toward the impacts were discussed. The results indicated that haze pollution has a considerable potential impact on travel, and there are distinct differences among travel elements and tourism market segments. Due to its impacts, haze pollution could be taken into account in tourists’ decision-making processes, causing a portion of potential tourists to cancel tourism plans. As a result, tourist arrivals to similar destinations could decrease by a small margin, but the most significant impact could be on the temporal distribution of tourist arrivals, namely tourism seasonality, due to tourists’ “avoiding” psychology.

  2. Geologic Provinces of the Circum-Arctic, 2008 (north of the Arctic Circle)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This shapefile includes arcs and polygons that describe U.S. Geological Survey defined 33 geologic provinces of the Circum-Arctic (north of the Arctic Circle). Each...

  3. Assimilation of POLDER aerosol optical thickness into the LMDz-INCA model: Implications for the Arctic aerosol burden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The large spatial and temporal variability of atmospheric aerosol load makes it a challenge to quantify aerosol effect on climate. This study is one of the first attempts to apply data assimilation for the analysis of global aerosol distribution. Aerosol optical thickness (AOT) observed from the Polarization and Directionality of the Earth Reflectances (POLDER) space-borne instrument are assimilated into a three-dimensional chemistry model. POLDER capabilities to distinguish between fine and coarse AOT are used to constrain them separately in the model. Observation and model errors are a key component of such a system and are carefully estimated on a regional basis using some of the high-quality surface observations from the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET). Other AERONET data provide an independent evaluation of the a posteriori fields. Results for the fine mode show improvements, in terms of reduction of root-mean-square errors, in most regions with the largest improvements found in the Mediterranean Sea and Eurasia. We emphasize the results for the Arctic, where there is growing evidence of a strong aerosol impact on climate, but a lack of regional and continuous aerosol monitoring. The a posteriori fields noticeably well reproduce the winter-spring 'Arctic Haze' peak measured in Longyearbyen (15 degrees E, 78 degrees N) and typical seasonal variations in the Arctic region, where AOT increase by up to a factor of three between a posteriori and a priori. Enhanced AOT are found over a longer period in spring 2003 than in 1997, suggesting that the large Russian fires in 2003 have influenced the Arctic aerosol load. (authors)

  4. Strategic metal deposits of the Arctic Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortnikov, N. S.; Lobanov, K. V.; Volkov, A. V.; Galyamov, A. L.; Vikent'ev, I. V.; Tarasov, N. N.; Distler, V. V.; Lalomov, A. V.; Aristov, V. V.; Murashov, K. Yu.; Chizhova, I. A.; Chefranov, R. M.

    2015-11-01

    Mineral commodities rank high in the economies of Arctic countries, and the status of mineral resources and the dynamics of their development are of great importance. The growing tendency to develop strategic metal resources in the Circumarctic Zone is outlined in a global perspective. The Russian Arctic Zone is the leading purveyor of these metals to domestic and foreign markets. The comparative analysis of tendencies in development of strategic metal resources of the Arctic Zone in Russia and other countries is crucial for the elaboration of trends of geological exploration and research engineering. This paper provides insight into the development of Arctic strategic metal resources in global perspective. It is shown that the mineral resource potential of the Arctic circumpolar metallogenic belt is primarily controlled by large and unique deposits of nonferrous, noble, and rare metals. The prospective types of economic strategic metal deposits in the Russian Arctic Zone are shown.

  5. Biomass burning as the main source of organic aerosol particulate matter in Malaysia during haze episodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radzi bin Abas, M; Oros, Daniel R; Simoneit, B R T

    2004-05-01

    The haze episodes that occurred in Malaysia in September-October 1991, August-October 1994 and September-October 1997 have been attributed to suspended smoke particulate matter from biomass burning in southern Sumatra and Kalimantan, Indonesia. In the present study, polar organic compounds in aerosol particulate matter from Malaysia are converted to their trimethylsilyl derivatives and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in order to better assess the contribution of the biomass burning component during the haze episodes. On the basis of this analysis, levoglucosan was found to be the most abundant organic compound detected in almost all samples. The monosaccharides, alpha- and beta-mannose, the lignin breakdown products, vanillic and syringic acids and the minor steroids, cholesterol and beta-sitosterol were also present in some samples. The presence of the tracers from smoke overwhelmed the typical signatures of emissions from traffic and other anthropogenic activities in the urban areas.

  6. Biomass burning as the main source of organic aerosol particulate matter in Malaysia during haze episodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abas, M. Radzi bin [Malaya Univ., Dept. of Chemistry, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Oros, Daniel R.; Simoneit, B.R.T. [Oregon State Univ., Environmental and Petroleum Geochemistry Group, Corvallis, OR (United States)

    2004-05-01

    The haze episodes that occurred in Malaysia in September-October 1991, August-October 1994 and September-October 1997 have been attributed to suspended smoke particulate matter from biomass burning in southern Sumatra and Kalimantan, Indonesia. In the present study, polar organic compounds in aerosol particulate matter from Malaysia are converted to their trimethylsilyl derivatives and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in order to better assess the contribution of the biomass burning component during the haze episodes. On the basis of this analysis, levoglucosan was found to be the most abundant organic compound detected in almost all samples. The monosaccharides, {alpha}- and {beta}-mannose, the lignin breakdown products, vanillic and syringic acids and the minor steroids, cholesterol and {beta}-sitosterol were also present in some samples. The presence of the tracers from smoke overwhelmed the typical signatures of emissions from traffic and other anthropogenic activities in the urban areas. (Author)

  7. Rationale for Haze Formation after Carboxymethyl Cellulose (CMC) Addition to Red Wine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, Stephan; Dickescheid, Christian; Harbertson, James F; Fischer, Ulrich; Cohen, Seth D

    2016-09-14

    The aim of this study was to identify the source of haze formation in red wine after the addition of carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) and to characterize the dynamics of precipitation. Ninety commercial wines representing eight grape varieties were collected, tested with two commercial CMC products, and analyzed for susceptibility to haze formation. Seventy-four of these wines showed a precipitation within 14 days independent of the CMC product used. The precipitates of four representative samples were further analyzed for elemental composition (CHNS analysis) and solubility under different conditions to determine the nature of the solids. All of the precipitates were composed of approximately 50% proteins and 50% CMC and polyphenols. It was determined that the interactions between CMC and bovine serum albumin are pH dependent in wine-like model solution. Furthermore, it was found that the color loss associated with CMC additions required the presence of proteins and cannot be observed with CMC and anthocyanins alone. PMID:27571332

  8. Rationale for Haze Formation after Carboxymethyl Cellulose (CMC) Addition to Red Wine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, Stephan; Dickescheid, Christian; Harbertson, James F; Fischer, Ulrich; Cohen, Seth D

    2016-09-14

    The aim of this study was to identify the source of haze formation in red wine after the addition of carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) and to characterize the dynamics of precipitation. Ninety commercial wines representing eight grape varieties were collected, tested with two commercial CMC products, and analyzed for susceptibility to haze formation. Seventy-four of these wines showed a precipitation within 14 days independent of the CMC product used. The precipitates of four representative samples were further analyzed for elemental composition (CHNS analysis) and solubility under different conditions to determine the nature of the solids. All of the precipitates were composed of approximately 50% proteins and 50% CMC and polyphenols. It was determined that the interactions between CMC and bovine serum albumin are pH dependent in wine-like model solution. Furthermore, it was found that the color loss associated with CMC additions required the presence of proteins and cannot be observed with CMC and anthocyanins alone.

  9. Highly transparent, low-haze, hybrid cellulose nanopaper as electrodes for flexible electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xuezhu; Zhou, Jian; Jiang, Long; Lubineau, Gilles; Ng, Tienkhee; Ooi, Boon S.; Liao, Hsien-Yu; Shen, Chao; Chen, Long; Zhu, J. Y.

    2016-06-01

    Paper is an excellent candidate to replace plastics as a substrate for flexible electronics due to its low cost, renewability and flexibility. Cellulose nanopaper (CNP), a new type of paper made of nanosized cellulose fibers, is a promising substrate material for transparent and flexible electrodes due to its potentially high transparency and high mechanical strength. Although CNP substrates can achieve high transparency, they are still characterized by high diffuse transmittance and small direct transmittance, resulting in high optical haze of the substrates. In this study, we proposed a simple methodology for large-scale production of high-transparency, low-haze CNP comprising both long cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs) and short cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs). By varying the CNC/CNF ratio in the hybrid CNP, we could tailor its total transmittance, direct transmittance and diffuse transmittance. By increasing the CNC content, the optical haze of the hybrid CNP could be decreased and its transparency could be increased. The direct transmittance and optical haze of the CNP were 75.1% and 10.0%, respectively, greatly improved from the values of previously reported CNP (31.1% and 62.0%, respectively). Transparent, flexible electrodes were fabricated by coating the hybrid CNP with silver nanowires (AgNWs). The electrodes showed a low sheet resistance (minimum 1.2 Ω sq-1) and a high total transmittance (maximum of 82.5%). The electrodes were used to make a light emitting diode (LED) assembly to demonstrate their potential use in flexible displays.Paper is an excellent candidate to replace plastics as a substrate for flexible electronics due to its low cost, renewability and flexibility. Cellulose nanopaper (CNP), a new type of paper made of nanosized cellulose fibers, is a promising substrate material for transparent and flexible electrodes due to its potentially high transparency and high mechanical strength. Although CNP substrates can achieve high transparency, they are

  10. Trans-Boundary Haze Pollution in Southeast Asia: Sustainability through Plural Environmental Governance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Saidul Islam

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Recurrent haze in Southeast Asian countries including Singapore is largely attributable to rampant forest fires in Indonesia due to, for example, extensive slash-and-burn (S & B culture. Drawing on the “treadmill of production” and environmental governance approach, we examine causes and consequences of this culture. We found that, despite some perceived benefits, its environmental consequences include deforestation, soil erosion and degradation, global warming, threats to biodiversity, and trans-boundary haze pollution, while the societal consequences comprise regional tension, health risks, economic and productivity losses, as well as food insecurity. We propose sustainability through a plural coexistence framework of governance for targeting S & B that incorporates strategies of incentives, education and community resource management.

  11. Evolution of the Arctic Calanus complex: an Arctic marine avocado?

    OpenAIRE

    Berge, Jørgen; Gabrielsen, Tove M.; Mark A Moline; Renaud, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Before man hunted the large baleen whales to near extinction by the end of the nineteenth century, Arctic ecosystems were strongly influenced by these large predators. Their main prey were zooplankton, among which the calanoid copepod species of the genus Calanus, long considered key elements of polar marine ecosystems, are particularly abundant. These herbivorous zooplankters display a range of adaptations to the highly seasonal environments of the polar oceans, most notably extensive energy...

  12. Direct observations of organic aerosols in common wintertime hazes in North China: insights into their size, shape, mixing state, and source

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, S. R.; Xu, L.; Zhang, Y X; Chen, B; Wang, X F; X. Y. Zhang; Zheng, M; Chen, J. M.; Wang, W. X.; Sun, Y L; P. Q. Fu; Z. F. Wang; Li, W. J.

    2016-01-01

    Many studies have focused on the physicochemical properties of aerosol particles in unusually severe haze episodes instead of the more freqent and less severe hazes. Consistent with this lack of attention, the morphology and mixing state of organic matter (OM) particles in the frequent light and moderate (L&M) hazes in winter in North China Plain (NCP) have not been examined, even though OM dominates these fine particles. In the present work, morphology, mixing state, and size of organic aero...

  13. After Indonesia’s Ratification: The ASEAN Agreement on Transboundary Haze Pollution and Its Effectiveness As a Regional Environmental Governance Tool

    OpenAIRE

    Daniel Heilmann

    2015-01-01

    On 20 January 2015 Indonesia deposited its instrument of ratification for the ASEAN Agreement on Transboundary Haze Pollution with the ASEAN Secretariat, becoming the last ASEAN member state to join the treaty. Haze pollution poses a serious health threat to the people of Indonesia, Singapore and Malaysia, and for decades haze pollution has been a highly contentious issue among ASEAN member states. This article argues that Indonesia's ratification will not be an immediate game changer. The me...

  14. Arctic whaling : proceedings of the International Symposium Arctic Whaling February 1983

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacob, H.K. s'; Snoeijing, K

    1984-01-01

    Contents: D.M. Hopkins and Louie Marincovich Jr. Whale Biogeography and the history of the Arctic Basin P.M. Kellt, J.H.W. Karas and L.D. Williams Arctic Climate: Past, Present and Future Torgny E. Vinje On the present state and the future fate of the Arctic sea ice cover P.J.H. van Bree On the biol

  15. 江苏霾灾害风险与地区差异研究%STUDY OF HAZE RISK AND THE DIFFERENCE OF HAZE AMONG ALL AREAS IN JIANGSU

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田心如; 陈广昌; 武艳; 王伟丽

    2014-01-01

    利用江苏省69个地面气象观测站1980~2012年的气象资料,采用适当的方法定义了霾时概念,讨论了重度、中度、轻度及轻微霾时数的时空分布特征.根据霾灾害特点,以区县为评估单元,综合考虑了致灾因子危险性、孕灾环境敏感性、承载体易损性和防灾减灾能力4个因素,选取中度霾时数、重度霾时数、水域面积、植被面积、人口密度、公路里程、公共财政支出、每万人拥有医生数等8个因子作为评估的主要指标,利用层次分析法建立霾灾害风险评估模型,并借助于GIS分析工具,进行了霾灾害风险区划.%Based on the data collected from 69 surface observation stations during 1961-2012 in Jiangsu province,using proper measures to define the concept of haze hours,the temporal and spatial distribution features of severe,moderate,mild and slight haze hours are discussed in the research.According to the characteristics of haze disasters,the administrative regions (districts and counties) are taken as the basic evaluation unit,considering four factors such as the hazard risk,disaster pregnant environment sensitivity,vulnerability and disaster prevention and reduction capacity.This study selects eight factors including the moderate haze hours,severe haze hours,water area,vegetation area,population density,road mileage,public finance expenditure,the number of doctors per million people possessing as the evaluation indexes,uses the analytic hierarchy process to establish a risk assessment model,and with the help of GIS analysis tool,the haze disaster risk regionalization is given.The research shows that the slight haze is the most haze weather in Jiangsu province,with proportion of 77% in all haze weather.The frequency of severe and moderate haze weather is lower,with proportion of 2% and 4% respectively.The trend of annual haze hours of every grade is identical,rising slightly during 1980-2010,and obviously during 2011-2012.The

  16. Aerosol characterization over the North China Plain: Haze life cycle and biomass burning impacts in summer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yele; Jiang, Qi; Xu, Yisheng; Ma, Yan; Zhang, Yingjie; Liu, Xingang; Li, Weijun; Wang, Fei; Li, Jie; Wang, Pucai; Li, Zhanqing

    2016-03-01

    The North China Plain experiences frequent severe haze pollution during all seasons. Here we present the results from a summer campaign that was conducted at Xianghe, a suburban site located between the megacities of Beijing and Tianjin. Aerosol particle composition was measured in situ by an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor along with a suite of collocated measurements during 1-30 June 2013. Our results showed that aerosol composition at the suburban site was overall similar to that observed in Beijing, which was mainly composed of organics (39%), nitrate (20%), and sulfate (18%). Positive matrix factorization of organic aerosol (OA) identified four OA factors with different sources and processes. While secondary organic aerosol dominated OA, on average accounting for 70%, biomass burning OA (BBOA) was also observed to have a considerable contribution (11%) for the entire study period. The contribution of BBOA was increased to 21% during the BB period in late June, indicating a large impact of agricultural burning on air pollution in summer. Biomass burning also exerted a significant impact on aerosol optical properties. It was estimated that ~60% enhancement of absorption at the ultraviolet spectral region was caused by the organic compounds from biomass burning. The formation mechanisms and sources of severe haze pollution episodes were investigated in a case study. The results highlighted two different mechanisms, i.e., regional transport and local sources, driving the haze life cycles differently in summer in the North China Plain. While secondary aerosol species dominated aerosol composition in the episode from regional transport, organics and black carbon comprised the major fraction in the locally formed haze episode.

  17. Trans-Boundary Haze Pollution in Southeast Asia: Sustainability through Plural Environmental Governance

    OpenAIRE

    Md. Saidul Islam; Yap Hui Pei; Shrutika Mangharam

    2016-01-01

    Recurrent haze in Southeast Asian countries including Singapore is largely attributable to rampant forest fires in Indonesia due to, for example, extensive slash-and-burn (S & B) culture. Drawing on the “treadmill of production” and environmental governance approach, we examine causes and consequences of this culture. We found that, despite some perceived benefits, its environmental consequences include deforestation, soil erosion and degradation, global warming, threats to biodiversity, ...

  18. Characteristics of aerosol pollution during heavy haze events in Suzhou, China

    OpenAIRE

    Tian, Mi; Wang, Huanbo; Chen, Yang; Yang, Fumo; Zhang, Xiaohua; Zou, Qiang; Zhang, Renquan; Ma, Yongliang; He, Kebin

    2016-01-01

    Extremely severe haze weather events occurred in many cities in China, especially in the east part of the country, in January 2013. Comprehensive measurements including hourly concentrations of PM2.5 and its major chemical components (water-soluble inorganic ions, organic carbon (OC), and elemental carbon (EC)) and related gas-phase precursors were conducted via an online monitoring system in Suzhou, a medium-sized city in Jiangsu province, just east of Shanghai. PM2.5 (part...

  19. Public concerns about transboundary haze: a comparison of Indonesia, Singapore, and Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Forsyth, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Public concerns about environmental problems create narrative structures that influence policy by allocating roles of blame, responsibility, and appropriate behavior. This paper presents an analysis of public concerns about transboundary haze resulting from forest fires in Indonesia, Singapore, and Malaysia for crises experienced in 1997, 2005 and 2013. The source of the information is content analysis of 2231 articles from representative newspapers in each country. The study shows that newsp...

  20. Arctic shipping emissions inventories and future scenarios

    OpenAIRE

    J. J. Corbett; D. A. Lack; J. J. Winebrake; Harder, S; J. A. Silberman; Gold, M.

    2010-01-01

    The Arctic is a sensitive region in terms of climate change and a rich natural resource for global economic activity. Arctic shipping is an important contributor to the region's anthropogenic air emissions, including black carbon – a short-lived climate forcing pollutant especially effective in accelerating the melting of ice and snow. These emissions are projected to increase as declining sea ice coverage due to climate change allows for increased shipping activity in the Arctic. To understa...

  1. Arctic cephalopod distributions and their associated predators

    OpenAIRE

    Gardiner, Kathleen; Terry A Dick

    2010-01-01

    Cephalopods are key species of the eastern Arctic marine food web, both as prey and predator. Their presence in the diets of Arctic fish, birds and mammals illustrates their trophic importance. There has been considerable research on cephalopods (primarily Gonatus fabricii) from the north Atlantic and the west side of Greenland, where they are considered a potential fishery and are taken as a by-catch. By contrast, data on the biogeography of Arctic cephalopods are still incomplete. This stud...

  2. Shaping a Sustainability Strategy for the Arctic

    OpenAIRE

    Azcarate, Juan; Balfors, Berit; Destouni, Georgia; Bring, Arvid

    2011-01-01

    The development of the Arctic is shaped by the opportunities and constraints brought by climate change and technological advances. In the Arctic, warmer climate is expected to affect ecosystems, local communities and infrastructure due to a combination of effects like reduced sea ice and glaciers, thawing permafrost and increased frequency of floods. Less ice and new technologies mean openings to exploit natural resources in the Arctic. Fishing, mining, hydrocarbon extraction and vessel trans...

  3. [Characteristics of mass size distributions of water-soluble, inorganic ions during summer and winter haze days of Beijing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yi-Min; Liu, Zi-Rui; Chen, Hong; Wang, Yue-Si

    2013-04-01

    To investigate the size distribution characteristics of water soluble inorganic ions in haze days, the particle samples were collected by two Andersen cascade impactors in Beijing during summer and winter time and each sampling period lasted two weeks. Online measurement of PM10 and PM2.5 using TEOM were also conducted at the same time. Sources and formation mechanism of water soluble inorganic ions were analyzed based on their size distributions. The results showed that average concentrations of PM10 and PM 2.5 were (245.5 +/- 8.4) microg x m(-3) and (120.2 +/- 2.0) microg x m(-3) during summer haze days (SHD), and were (384.2 +/- 30.2) microg x m(-3) and (252.7 +/- 47.1) microg x m(-3) during winter haze days (WHD), which suggested fine particles predominated haze pollution episode in both seasons. Total water-soluble inorganic ions concentrations were higher in haze days than those in non-haze days, especially in fine particles. Furthermore, concentrations of secondary inorganic ions (SO4(2-), NO3(-) and NH4(+)) increased quicker than other inorganic ions in fine particles during haze days, indicating secondary inorganic ions played an important role in the formation of haze pollution. Similar size distributions were found for all Sinorganic water soluble ions except for NO3(-), during SHD and WHD. SO4(2-) and NH4(+) dominated in the fine mode (PM1.0) while Mg2+ and Ca2+ accumulated in coarse fraction, Na+, Cl- and K+ showed a bimodal distribution. For NO3(-), however, it showed a bimodal distribution during SHD and a unimodal distribution dominated in the fine fraction was found during WHD. The average mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) of SO4(2-) was 0.64 microm in SHD, which suggested the formation of SO4(2-) was mainly attributed to in-cloud processes. Furthermore, a higher apparent conversion rate of sulfur dioxide (SOR) was found in SHD, indicating more fine particles were produced by photochemical reaction in haze days than that in non-haze days. The

  4. Long-term trend and spatiotemporal variations of haze over China by satellite observations from 1979 to 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xingying; Wang, Ling; Wang, Weihe; Cao, Dongjie; Wang, Xi; Ye, Dianxiu

    2015-10-01

    With the fast development of economy and industry in the past thirty years, many large cities in the eastern and southwestern areas of China are experiencing increased haze events and atmospheric pollution, which causes significant impacts on the regional environment, human health, and even climate. The long-term trend and spatiotemporal variations of haze over China during recent 30 years are investigated using TOMS AAI products. In addition, the heavy haze events that occurred in January 2013 over eastern China are explored using AAI products from TOU on board FY-3A. Validation results show that satellite AAI products can be used for haze monitoring since it is sensitive to the carbonaceous aerosol, which is one of the main components of haze. In China, the high AAI values (>1.0) mainly located in the main four areas with intense anthropogenic activities, except for the desert region in Northwestern China. In the eastern and northeastern region, AAI peaks dominate in spring before 2005 since those areas were always affected by dust in spring. However, after 2005, AAI peaks appear in winter over eastern China because of haze. Moreover, in the northeastern region, AAI peaks dominate in winter with a secondary peak in spring because this area is affected by both dust and haze. In the southern region, the AAI peaks always dominate in spring since the high-level air pollution often occur in spring, but a decreasing trend is acquired during recent ten years. Over eastern China and northeastern China, AAI shows an increasing trend during recent 30 years in winter, which reveals that the haze over these areas is strengthen. A case study result shows that the heavy haze events occurred in January 2013 in eastern China can be clearly identified from the AAI products of TOU/FY-3A. The daily coverage area with AAI > 3.0 peaks at five periods at this time, i.e. Jan. 7-8, Jan. 13, Jan. 18, Jan. 23, and, Jan. 28-29, which agrees well with the haze events recorded by in

  5. Titan's 2 micron Surface Albedo and Haze Optical Depth in 1996-2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibbard, S; de Pater, I; Macintosh, B; Roe, H; Max, C; Young, E; McKay, C

    2004-05-04

    We observed Titan in 1996-2004 with high-resolution 2 {micro}m speckle and adaptive optics imaging at the W.M. Keck Observatory. By observing in a 2 {micro}m broadband filter we obtain images that have contributions from both Titan's surface and atmosphere. We have modeled Titan's atmosphere using a plane-parallel radiative transfer code that has been corrected to agree with 3-D Monte Carlo predictions. We find that Titan's surface albedo ranges from {le} 0:02 in the darkest equatorial region of the trailing hemisphere to {approx_equal} 0:1 in the brightest areas of the leading hemisphere. Over the past quarter of a Saturnian year haze optical depth in Titan's Southern hemisphere has decreased substantially from a value of 0.48 in 1996 down to 0.18 in 2004, while the northern haze has been increasing over the past few years. As a result of these changes, in 2004 the North/South haze asymmetry at K' band has disappeared.

  6. Impact of the June 2013 Riau province Sumatera smoke haze event on regional air pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewi Ayu Kusumaningtyas, Sheila; Aldrian, Edvin

    2016-07-01

    Forest and land fires in Riau province of Sumatera increase along with the rapid deforestation, land clearing, and are induced by dry climate. Forest and land fires, which occur routinely every year, cause trans-boundary air pollution up to Singapore. Economic losses were felt by Indonesia and Singapore as the affected country thus creates tensions among neighboring countries. A high concentration of aerosols are emitted from fire which degrade the local air quality and reduce visibility. This study aimed to analyze the impact of the June 2013 smoke haze event on the environment and air quality both in Riau and Singapore as well as to characterize the aerosol properties in Singapore during the fire period. Air quality parameters combine with aerosols from Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) data and some environmental parameters, i.e. rainfall, visibility, and hotspot numbers are investigated. There are significant relationships between aerosol and environmental parameters both in Riau and Singapore. From Hysplit modeling and a day lag correlation, smoke haze in Singapore is traced back to fire locations in Riau province after propagated one day. Aerosol characterization through aerosol optical depth (AOD), Ångstrom parameter and particle size distribution indicate the presence of fine aerosols in a great number in Singapore, which is characteristic of biomass burning aerosols. Fire and smoke haze even impaired economic activity both in Riau and Singapore, thus leaving some accounted economic losses as reported by some agencies.

  7. Protein/polysaccharide interactions and their impact on haze formation in white wines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufrechou, Marie; Doco, Thierry; Poncet-Legrand, Céline; Sauvage, François-Xavier; Vernhet, Aude

    2015-11-18

    Proteins in white wines may aggregate and form hazes at room temperature. This was previously shown to be related to pH-induced conformational changes and to occur for pH wine polysaccharides on pH-induced haze formation by proteins but also the consequences of their interactions with these proteins on the colloidal stability of white wines. To this end, model systems and purified global pools of wine proteins and polysaccharides were used first. Kinetics of aggregation, proteins involved, and turbidities related to final hazes were monitored. To further identify the impact of each polysaccharide, fractions purified to homogeneity were used in a second phase. These included two neutral (mannoprotein and arabinogalactan) and two negatively charged (rhamnogalacturonan II dimer (RG-II) and arabinogalactan) polysaccharides. The impact of major wine polysaccharides on wine protein aggregation at room temperature was clearly less marked than those of the pH and the ionic strength. Polysaccharides modulated the aggregation kinetics and final haziness, indicating that they interfere with the aggregation process, but could not prevent it.

  8. Insights into a historic severe haze event in Shanghai: synoptic situation, boundary layer and pollutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Chunpeng; Duan, Junyan; Xu, Chen; Zhang, Hefeng; Wang, Yifan; Wang, Yanyu; Li, Xiang; Kong, Lingdong; Tao, Jun; Zhang, Renjian; Cheng, Tiantao; Zha, Shuping; Yu, Xingna

    2016-07-01

    A historic haze event, characterized by lengthy, large-scale and severe pollution, occurred in the Yangtze River Delta (YRD) of China from 1 to 10 December 2013. This haze event significantly influenced air quality throughout the region, especially in urban areas. Aerosol physical, chemical and optical properties were measured in Shanghai. Sometimes the 1 h average particle concentration (e.g., PM2.5) exceeded 600 µg m-3. Inorganic water-soluble ions in particles, trace gases and aerosol optical coefficients had a similar tendency to increase evidently from clear to hazy episodes. A combination of various factors contributed to the formation and evolution of the haze event, among which meteorological conditions, local anthropogenic emissions and pollutants are the major factors. High pressure system, calm surface wind and subsidence airflow were responsible for the decrease of planetary boundary layer (PBL) and the accumulation of pollutants. Atmospheric visibility correlated strongly with relative humidity (RH), particle number in size of 600-1400 nm other than particulate water-soluble species and particle mass (PM2.5). The particle hygroscopicity plays an important role in atmospheric visibility reduction. The results are somewhat helpful to forecast and eliminate regional atmospheric pollution in China.

  9. Wavelength-Scale Structures as Extremely High Haze Films for Efficient Polymer Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ham, Juyoung; Dong, Wan Jae; Jung, Gwan Ho; Lee, Jong-Lam

    2016-03-01

    Wavelength-scale inverted pyramid structures with low reflectance and excellent haze have been designed for application to polymer solar cells (PSCs). The wavelength-scale structured haze films are fabricated on the back surface of glass without damages to organic active layer by using a soft lithographic technique with etched GaN molds. With a rigorous coupled-wave analysis of optical modeling, we find the shift of resonance peaks with the increase of pattern's diameter. Wavelength-scale structures could provide the number of resonances at the long wavelength spectrum (λ = 650-800 nm), yielding enhancement of power conversion efficiency (PCE) in the PSCs. Compared with a flat device (PCE = 7.12%, Jsc = 15.6 mA/cm(2)), improved PCE of 8.41% is achieved in a haze film, which is mainly due to the increased short circuit current density (Jsc) of 17.5 mA/cm(2). Hence, it opens up exciting opportunities for a variety of PSCs with wavelength-scale structures to further improve performance, simplify complicated process, and reduce costs. PMID:26901630

  10. Scattering properties of the heterogeneous and non-spherical haze particles in the SWIR band

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To effectively estimate the influence of multiple scattering caused by haze particles on the misestimating of CO2 concentrations, it is necessary to understand the scattering properties of haze particles in the shortwave infrared (SWIR) wavelength range (∼1.6um) using satellite data. Due to the complexity of structures and components of haze particles, this paper investigates effects of particle size and chemical component on the scattering properties of both single non-spherical particles and aggregates for the 1.6um by using numerically effective medium theory and core-mantle theory. For the single non-spherical particles, the scattering parameters (e.g. scattering phase function, single scattering albedo, extinction coefficient and scattering coefficient) are calculated by combining the T-matrix method and the Maxwell-Garnett effective medium theory. For the aggregates, the particle-cluster aggregation algorithm is used to generate aggregates with different monomer numbers. And then, the Core-Mantle Generalized Multi-particle Mie (CMGMM) method is used to compute the scattering parameters. The results indicate that the scattering characteristics are significantly different for both single non-spherical particles and aggregates

  11. On the latitudinal distribution of Titan's haze at the Voyager epoch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negrao, A.; Roos-Serote, M.; Rannou, P.; Rages, K.; McKay, C.

    2002-09-01

    In this work, we re-analyse a total of 10 high phase angle images of Titan (2 from Voyager 1 and 8 from Voyager 2). The images were acquired in different filters of the Voyager Imaging Sub System in 1980 - 1981. We apply a model, developed and used by Rannou etal. (1997) and Cabane etal. (1992), that calculates the vertical (1-D) distribution of haze particles and the I/F radial profiles as a function of a series of parameters. Two of these parameters, the haze particle production rate (P) and imaginary refractive index (xk), are used to obtain fits to the observed I/F profiles at different latitudes. Differerent from previous studies is that we consider all filters simultaneously, in an attempt to better fix the parameter values. We also include the filter response functions, not considered previously. The results show that P does not change significantly as a function of latitude, eventhough somewhat lower values are found at high northern latitudes. xk seems to increase towards southern latitudes. We will compare our results with GCM runs, that can give the haze distribution at the epoch of the observations. Work financed by portuguese Foundation for Science and Tecnology (FCT), contract ESO/PRO/40157/2000

  12. Net effect of wort osmotic pressure on fermentation course, yeast vitality, beer flavor, and haze.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigler, K; Matoulková, D; Dienstbier, M; Gabriel, P

    2009-04-01

    The net effect of increased wort osmolarity on fermentation time, bottom yeast vitality and sedimentation, beer flavor compounds, and haze was determined in fermentations with 12 degrees all-malt wort supplemented with sorbitol to reach osmolarity equal to 16 degrees and 20 degrees. Three pitchings were performed in 12 degrees/12 degrees/12 degrees, 16 degrees/16 degrees/12 degrees, and 20 degrees/20 degrees/12 degrees worts. Fermentations in 16 degrees and 20 degrees worts decreased yeast vitality measured as acidification power (AP) by a maximum of 10%, lowered yeast proliferation, and increased fermentation time. Repitching aggravated these effects. The 3rd "back to normal" pitching into 12 degrees wort restored the yeast AP and reproductive abilities while the extended fermentation time remained. Yeast sedimentation in 16 degrees and 20 degrees worts was delayed but increased about two times at fermentation end relative to that in 12 degrees wort. Third "back-to-normal" pitching abolished the delay in sedimentation and reduced its extent, which became nearly equal in all variants. Beer brewed at increased osmolarity was characterized by increased levels of diacetyl and pentanedione and lower levels of dimethylsulfide and acetaldehyde. Esters and higher alcohols displayed small variations irrespective of wort osmolarity or repitching. Increased wort osmolarity had no appreciable effect on the haze of green beer and accelerated beer clarification during maturation. In all variants, chill haze increased with repitching. PMID:19122996

  13. Regional contribution to PM1 pollution during winter haze in Yangtze River Delta, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Lili; Yu, Hongxia; Ding, Aijun; Zhang, Yunjiang; Qin, Wei; Wang, Zhuang; Chen, Wentai; Hua, Yan; Yang, Xiaoxiao

    2016-01-15

    To quantify regional sources contributing to submicron particulate matter (PM1) pollution in haze episodes, on-line measurements combining two modeling methods, namely, positive matrix factorization (PMF) and backward Lagrangian particle dispersion modeling (LPDM), were conducted for the period of one month in urban Nanjing, a city located in the western part of Yangtze River Delta (YRD) region of China. Several multi-day haze episodes were observed in December 2013. Long-range transport of biomass burning from the southwestern YRD region largely contributed to PM1 pollution with more than 25% of total organics mass in a lasting heavy haze. The LPDM analysis indicates that regional transport is a main source contributing to secondary low-volatility production. The high-potential source regions of secondary low-volatility production are mainly located in areas to the northeast of the city. High aerosol pollution was mainly contributed by regional transport associated with northeastern air masses. Such regional transport on average accounts for 46% of total NR-PM1 with sulfate and aged low-volatility organics being the largest fractions (>65%).

  14. The rural carbonaceous aerosols in coarse, fine, and ultrafine particles during haze pollution in northwestern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chong-Shu; Cao, Jun-Ji; Tsai, Chuen-Jinn; Shen, Zhen-Xing; Liu, Sui-Xin; Huang, Ru-Jin; Zhang, Ning-ning; Wang, Ping

    2016-03-01

    The carbonaceous aerosol concentrations in coarse particle (PM10: Dp ≤ 10 μm, particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter less than 10 μm), fine particle (PM2.5: Dp ≤ 2.5 μm), and ultrafine particle (PM0.133: Dp ≤ 0.133 μm) carbon fractions in a rural area were investigated during haze events in northwestern China. The results indicated that PM2.5 contributed a large fraction in PM10. OC (organic carbon) accounted for 33, 41, and 62 % of PM10, PM2.5, and PM0.133, and those were 2, 2.4, and 0.4 % for EC (elemental carbon) in a rural area, respectively. OC3 was more abundant than other organic carbon fractions in three PMs, and char dominated EC in PM10 and PM2.5 while soot dominated EC in PM0.133. The present study inferred that K(+), OP, and OC3 are good biomass burning tracers for rural PM10 and PM2.5, but not for PM0.133 during haze pollution. Our results suggest that biomass burning is likely to be an important contributor to rural PMs in northwestern China. It is necessary to establish biomass burning control policies for the mitigation of severe haze pollution in a rural area.

  15. Wavelength-Scale Structures as Extremely High Haze Films for Efficient Polymer Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ham, Juyoung; Dong, Wan Jae; Jung, Gwan Ho; Lee, Jong-Lam

    2016-03-01

    Wavelength-scale inverted pyramid structures with low reflectance and excellent haze have been designed for application to polymer solar cells (PSCs). The wavelength-scale structured haze films are fabricated on the back surface of glass without damages to organic active layer by using a soft lithographic technique with etched GaN molds. With a rigorous coupled-wave analysis of optical modeling, we find the shift of resonance peaks with the increase of pattern's diameter. Wavelength-scale structures could provide the number of resonances at the long wavelength spectrum (λ = 650-800 nm), yielding enhancement of power conversion efficiency (PCE) in the PSCs. Compared with a flat device (PCE = 7.12%, Jsc = 15.6 mA/cm(2)), improved PCE of 8.41% is achieved in a haze film, which is mainly due to the increased short circuit current density (Jsc) of 17.5 mA/cm(2). Hence, it opens up exciting opportunities for a variety of PSCs with wavelength-scale structures to further improve performance, simplify complicated process, and reduce costs.

  16. Effect of onion extract on corneal haze suppression after air assisted lamellar keratectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soohyun; Park, Young Woo; Lee, Euiri; Park, Sang Wan; Park, Sungwon; Noh, Hyunwoo; Kim, Jong Whi; Seong, Je Kyung; Seo, Kangmoon

    2016-03-01

    This study evaluated the effect of onion extract on corneal haze suppression after applying the air assisted lamellar keratectomy. The air assisted lamellar keratectomy was performed on 24 canine eyes. They were treated with an artificial tear (group C), prednisolone acetate (group P), onion extract (group O) and TGF-β1 (group T) three times per day from 7 to 28 days after the surgery. Corneal haze occurred on the all eyes and was observed beginning 7 days after the surgery. The haze was significantly decreased in groups P and O from day 14 compared with the group C using the clinical (group P; P=0.021, group O; P=0.037) and objective evaluation method (group P; P=0.021, group O; P=0.039). In contrast, it was significantly increased in group T from day 14 compared with group C based on the clinical (P=0.002) and objective evaluation method (Phaze development by suppressing the differentiation of fibroblasts into myofibroblasts.

  17. SEASONAL DISAPPEARANCE OF FAR-INFRARED HAZE IN TITAN'S STRATOSPHERE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jennings, Donald E.; Anderson, C. M.; Flasar, F. M.; Cottini, V. [Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Samuelson, R. E.; Nixon, C. A.; Kunde, V. G.; Achterberg, R. K. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); De Kok, R. [SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research, Sorbonnelaan 2, 3584 CA Utrecht (Netherlands); Coustenis, A.; Vinatier, S. [LESIA, Observatoire de Paris-Meudon, 92195 Meudon Cedex (France); Calcutt, S. B., E-mail: donald.e.jennings@nasa.gov [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom)

    2012-07-20

    A far-infrared emission band attributed to volatile or refractory haze in Titan's stratosphere has been decreasing in intensity since Cassini's arrival in 2004. The 220 cm{sup -1} feature, first seen by the Voyager Infrared Interferometer Spectrometer, has only been found in Titan's winter polar region. The emission peaks at about 140 km altitude near the winter stratospheric temperature minimum. Observations recorded over the period 2004-2012 by the Composite Infrared Spectrometer on Cassini show a decrease in the intensity of this feature by about a factor of four. Possible seasonal causes of this decline are an increase in photolytic destruction of source chemicals at high altitude, a lessening of condensation as solar heating increased, or a weakening of downwelling of vapors. As of early 2012, the 220 cm{sup -1} haze has not yet been detected in the south. The haze composition is unknown, but its decrease is similar to that of HC{sub 3}N gas in Titan's polar stratosphere, pointing to a nitrile origin.

  18. The development of Haze Events observed by multi-satellite retrievals and Meteorological Analysis: A Case Study over Eastern China in December 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoyu; Jiang, Binbin; Du, Yong; Yao, Lingling; Huang, Dasong

    2015-04-01

    With the rapid development of national economy and urbanization, the haze has been one of the environment disasters in eastern China. It is necessary that building a model of monitoring the haze for preventing and solving it in the future. In this study, NPP/AOT(550nm) >1and GOCI/AOT(555nm) >1 are adopted to dynamically monitor severe haze events in December 2013 over eastern China. Meanwhile, wind field data from CDAS-NCEP/DOE Reanalysis data and air temperature data from CDAS-NCEP/FNL are adopted to study the mechanism of the occurrence, migration and decay of the haze events. The haze event is composed of two consecutive cases. The first case occurred during 4-9 December is an exogenous haze for Yangtze River Delta, whereas the second case appeared during 11-15 December is an endogenous haze. This result shows:1) With the improved two-stream approximation model, GOCI is successful used to retrieve AOT with compared AERONET AOT, which demonstrates to be feasible in monitoring severe haze events. 2)Because of the large-scale observation capacity of NPP/AOT(550nm) product (×6km) and the high temporal resolution of GOCI/AOT(555nm), this study establishes a framework that detect the large-scale haze events using both data sets. 3)Weak wind speed of less than 5 m*s-1 is important for the development of the haze but the inversion is not a necessary condition for the haze. The strong cold air mass from the northern Siberia area and from East China Sea is the main force for the immigration, diffusion and decay of this haze event. 4)The air quality around Yangtze River Delta in winter is apt to suffer widely divergent influences including exogenous hazes carried by winter northwestward monsoon flows from northern Asia, and endogenous hazes induced by the rapid development of urbanization. The hit of multiple hazes over Yangtze River Delta lead to one of the most severe polluted regions of haze in China. Key words: NPP/AOT;GOCI/AOT; Haze;dynamic monitoring

  19. Arctic tides from GPS on sea ice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kildegaard Rose, Stine; Skourup, Henriette; Forsberg, René

    The presence of sea-ice in the Arctic Ocean plays a significant role in the Arctic climate. Sea ice dampens the ocean tide amplitude with the result that global tidal models which use only astronomical data perform less accurately in the polar regions. This study presents a kinematic processing...... of Global Positioning System (GPS) buoys placed on sea-ice at five different sites north of Greenland for the study of sea level height and tidal analysis to improve tidal models in the Central Arctic. The GPS measurements are compared with the Arctic tidal model AOTIM-5, which assimilates tide...

  20. Rossby Waves in the Arctic Ocean

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Poul G.; Schmith, Torben

    The Arctic Ocean has a characteristic stable stratification with fresh and cold water occupying the upper few hundred meters and the warm and more saline Atlantic waters underneath. These water masses are separated by the cold halocline. The stability of the cold halocline regulates the upward...... directed turbulent heat flux from the Atlantic water to the Arctic water. This heat flux is a part of the arctic energy budget and is important for large scale sea ice formation and melting. Due to the strong vertical stratification combined with its almost circular boundary, the Arctic Ocean supports...

  1. Plate tectonic history of the Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, K.

    1984-01-01

    Tectonic development of the Arctic Ocean is outlined, and geological maps are provided for the Arctic during the mid-Cenozoic, later Cretaceous, late Jurassic, early Cretaceous, early Jurassic and late Devonian. It is concluded that Arctic basin history is moulded by the events of the following intervals: (1) continental collision and immediately subsequent rifting and ocean formation in the Devonian, and continental rifting ocean formation, rapid rotation of microcontinents, and another episode of collision in the latest Jurassic and Cretaceous. It is noted that Cenozoic Arctic basin formation is a smaller scale event superimposed on the late Mesozoic ocean basin.

  2. Arctic Basemaps In Google Maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muggah, J.; Mioc, Darka

    2010-01-01

    the advantages of the use of Google Maps, to display the OMG's Arctic data. The map should should load the large Artic dataset in a reasonable time. The bathymetric images were created using software in Linux written by the OMG, and a step-by-step process was used to create images from the multibeam data...... collected by the OMG in the Arctic. The website was also created using Linux operating system. The projection needed to be changed from Lambert Conformal Conic (useful at higher Latitudes) to Mercator (used by Google Maps) and the data needed to have a common colour scheme. After creating and testing...... a prototype website using Google Ground overlay and Tile overlay, it was determined that the high resolution images (10m) were loading very slowly and the ground overlay method would not be useful for displaying the entire dataset. Therefore the Tile overlays were selected to be used within Google Maps. Tile...

  3. Aerosols indirectly warm the Arctic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Mauritsen

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available On average, airborne aerosol particles cool the Earth's surface directly by absorbing and scattering sunlight and indirectly by influencing cloud reflectivity, life time, thickness or extent. Here we show that over the central Arctic Ocean, where there is frequently a lack of aerosol particles upon which clouds may form, a small increase in aerosol loading may enhance cloudiness thereby likely causing a climatologically significant warming at the ice-covered Arctic surface. Under these low concentration conditions cloud droplets grow to drizzle sizes and fall, even in the absence of collisions and coalescence, thereby diminishing cloud water. Evidence from a case study suggests that interactions between aerosol, clouds and precipitation could be responsible for attaining the observed low aerosol concentrations.

  4. Stories from the Arctic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, Michelle

    2016-04-01

    I will discuss my experience co-ordinating a range of communication activities for a multi-university research programme called Methane in the Arctic: Measurements and Modelling. The project included ground- and aircraft-based fieldwork in the European Arctic, as well as computer modelling. Our communication activities included: our own field blog (www.arcticmethane.wordpress.com), which was syndicated to the Scientific American Expeditions blog; writing articles for other blogs with a wider audience than our own; use of twitter; and podcasting our field work. The grand finale to our communications work was a live event at a science festival, in which we took the audience along with us on a recreated research flight, complete with a life-size mock up of a section of our research aircraft. I will discuss my experiences of these forms of communication, and give an evaluation of their successes and failures.

  5. The Arctic Research Consortium of the United States (ARCUS): Connecting Arctic Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, R. H.; Wiggins, H. V.; Creek, K. R.; Sheffield Guy, L.

    2015-12-01

    This presentation will highlight the recent activities of the Arctic Research Consortium of the United States (ARCUS) to connect Arctic research. ARCUS is a nonprofit membership organization of universities and institutions that have a substantial commitment to research in the Arctic. ARCUS was formed in 1988 to serve as a forum for planning, facilitating, coordinating, and implementing interdisciplinary studies of the Arctic; to act as a synthesizer and disseminator of scientific information on arctic research; and to educate scientists and the general public about the needs and opportunities for research in the Arctic. ARCUS, in collaboration with the broader science community, relevant agencies and organizations, and other stakeholders, coordinates science planning and educational activities across disciplinary and organizational boundaries. Examples of ARCUS projects include: Arctic Sea Ice Outlook - an international effort that provides monthly summer reports synthesizing community estimates of the expected sea ice minimum. Sea Ice for Walrus Outlook - a resource for Alaska Native subsistence hunters, coastal communities, and others that provides weekly reports with information on sea ice conditions relevant to walrus in Alaska waters. PolarTREC (Teachers and Researchers Exploring and Collaborating) - a program whereby K-12 educators and researchers work together in hands-on field experiences in the Arctic and Antarctic to advance polar science education. ArcticInfo mailing list, Witness the Arctic newsletter, and the Arctic Calendar - communication tools for the arctic science community to keep apprised of relevant news, meetings, and announcements. Coordination for the Study of Environmental Arctic Change (SEARCH) program, which aims to provide scientific understanding of arctic environmental change to help society understand and respond to a rapidly changing Arctic. More information about these and other ARCUS activities can be found at the ARCUS website at

  6. Building Materials in Arctic Climate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Mejlhede

    2005-01-01

    Building in the artic requires special attention on the appropriateness of building materials. The harsh climate makes execution difficult and sets unusual requirements for the pure material properties. In addition, there is a lack of choice of good, natural building materials in the arctic....... This results in high transport costs. The building materials situation in Greenland may potentially be improved by intensifying the reuse of building materials or by promoting the local production of building materials....

  7. Arctic whaling: proceedings of the International Symposium Arctic Whaling February 1983

    OpenAIRE

    H.K. 's Jacob; Snoeijing, K

    1984-01-01

    Contents: D.M. Hopkins and Louie Marincovich Jr. Whale Biogeography and the history of the Arctic Basin P.M. Kellt, J.H.W. Karas and L.D. Williams Arctic Climate: Past, Present and Future Torgny E. Vinje On the present state and the future fate of the Arctic sea ice cover P.J.H. van Bree On the biology of whales Edward Mitchell Ecology of North Atlantic Boreal and Arctic Monodontid and Mysticete Whales Allen P. McCartney History of native whaling in the Arctic and Subarctic Albert A. Dekin Jr...

  8. PLAM - a meteorological pollution index for air quality and its applications in fog-haze forecasts in North China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Y. Q.; Wang, J. Z.; Gong, S. L.; Zhang, X. Y.; Wang, H.; Wang, Y. Q.; Wang, J.; Li, D.; Guo, J. P.

    2016-02-01

    Using surface meteorological observation and high-resolution emission data, this paper discusses the application of the PLAM/h index (Parameter Linking Air-quality to Meteorological conditions/haze) in the prediction of large-scale low visibility and fog-haze events. Based on the two-dimensional probability density function diagnosis model for emissions, the study extends the diagnosis and prediction of the meteorological pollution index PLAM to the regional visibility fog-haze intensity. The results show that combining the influence of regular meteorological conditions and emission factors together in the PLAM/h parameterization scheme is very effective in improving the diagnostic identification ability of the fog-haze weather in North China. The determination coefficients for four seasons (spring, summer, autumn, and winter) between PLAM/h and visibility observation are 0.76, 0.80, 0.96, and 0.86, respectively, and all of their significance levels exceed 0.001, showing the ability of PLAM/h to predict the seasonal changes and differences of fog-haze weather in the North China region. The high-value correlation zones are located in Jing-Jin-Ji (Beijing, Tianjin, Hebei), Bohai Bay rim, and southern Hebei-northern Henan, indicating that the PLAM/h index is related to the distribution of frequent heavy fog-haze weather in North China and the distribution of emission high-value zone. Through comparative analysis of the heavy fog-haze events and large-scale clear-weather processes in winter and summer, it is found that PLAM/h index 24 h forecast is highly correlated with the visibility observation. Therefore, the PLAM/h index has good capability in identification, analysis, and forecasting.

  9. Size-resolved aerosol chemical analysis of extreme haze pollution events during early 2013 in urban Beijing, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Anthropogenic species substantially accumulated in both fine and coarse particles. • Secondary organic carbon in PM1.1 decreased from clear to haze days. • The mass peak shifted to larger particles from clear to haze days. • The NO3−/SO42− ratio decreased with enhanced haze pollution. • Both mobile local and stationary regional sources were vital for haze formation. - Abstract: Using size-resolved filter sampling and chemical characterization, high concentrations of water-soluble ions, carbonaceous species and heavy metals were found in both fine (PM2.1) and coarse (PM2.1–9) particles in Beijing during haze events in early 2013. Even on clear days, average mass concentration of submicron particles (PM1.1) was several times higher than that previously measured in most of abroad urban areas. A high concentration of particulate matter on haze days weakens the incident solar radiation, which reduces the generation rate of secondary organic carbon in PM1.1. We show that the peak mass concentration of particles shifted from 0.43–0.65 μm on clear days to 0.65–1.1 μm on lightly polluted days and to 1.1–2.1 μm on heavily polluted days. The peak shifts were also found for the following species: organic carbon, elemental carbon, NH4+, SO42−, NO3−, K, Cu, Zn, Cd and Pb. Our findings demonstrate that secondary inorganic aerosols (36%) and organic matter (26%) dominated the fine particle mass on heavily polluted days, while their contribution reduced to 29% and 18%, respectively, on clear days. Besides fine particles, anthropogenic chemical species also substantially accumulated in the coarse mode, which suggests that particles with aerodynamic diameter larger than 2.1 μm cannot be neglected during severe haze events

  10. Modeling analysis of the seasonal characteristics of haze formation in Beijing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, X.; Zhang, M.; Gao, J.; Wang, S.; Chai, F.

    2014-09-01

    The air quality modeling system RAMS-CMAQ (Regional Atmospheric Modeling System-Community Multiscale Air Quality), coupled with an aerosol optical property scheme, was applied to simulate the meteorological field, major aerosol components (sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, black carbon, organic carbon, dust, and sea salt), and surface visibility over the North China Plain (NCP) in 2011. The modeled results in February and July 2011 were selected and analyzed to obtain an in-depth understanding of the haze formation mechanism in Beijing for different seasons. The simulation results showed that the visibility was below 10 km for most regions of the NCP, and dropped to less than 5 km over the megacities of Beijing and Tianjin, the whole of Hebei Province, and the northwest part of Shandong Province during pollution episodes in February and July. The heavy mass concentration of PM2.5 ranged from 120 to 300 μg m-3 and was concentrated in the areas with low visibility. The haze formation mechanism in Beijing in winter was different from that in summer. The mass concentration of PM2.5 was higher, and the components more complicated, in winter. While the mass concentration of PM2.5 in summer was lower than that in winter, the mass concentrations of hygroscopic inorganic salts were comparable with those in winter, and the relative humidity was, as expected, higher. Therefore, the water uptake of hygroscopic aerosols played a key role in summer. Moreover, the analysis showed that the influence of the PM2.5 mass burden on visibility was very weak when its value was larger than 100 μg m-3. Only when the mass burden of PM2.5 decreased to a certain threshold interval did the visibility increase rapidly. This indicates that, when emission reduction measures are taken to control haze occurrence, the mass burden of PM2.5 must be cut to below this threshold interval. The relationship between the threshold of haze occurrence and the relative humidity in Beijing was fitted by an

  11. Chemical characteristics of PM2.5 during haze episodes in the urban of Fuzhou,China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fuwang Zhang; Lingling Xu; Jinsheng Chen; Xiaoqiu Chen; Zhenchuan Niu; Tong Lei; Chunming Li

    2013-01-01

    Atmospheric fine particles (PM2.5) were collected in this study with middle volume samplers in Fuzhou,China,during both normal days and haze days in summer (September 2007) and winter (January 2008).The concentrations,distributions,and sources of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs),organic carbon (OC),elemental carbon (EC),and water soluble inorganic ions (WSIIs) were determinated.The results showed that the concentrations of PM2.5,PAHs,OC,EC,and WSIIs were in the orders of haze > normal and winter > summer.The dominant PAHs of PM2.5 in Fuzhou were Fluo,Pyr,Chr,BbF,BkF,BaP,BghiP,and IcdP,which represented about 80.0% of the total PAHs during different sampling periods.The BaPeq concentrations of ∑ PAHs were 0.78,0.99,1.22,and 2.43 ng/m3 in summer normal,summer haze,winter normal,and winter haze,respectively.Secondary pollutants (SO42-,NO3-,NH4+,and OC) were the major chemical compositions of PM2.5,accounting for 69.0%,55.1%,63.4%,and 64.9% of PM2.5 mass in summer normal,summer haze,winter normal,and winter haze,respectively.Correspondingly,secondary organic carbon (SOC) in Fuzhou accounted for 20.1%,48.6%,24.5%,and 50.5% of OC.The average values of nitrogen oxidation ratio (NOR) and sulfur oxidation ratio (SOR) were higher in haze days (0.08 and 0.27) than in normal days (0.05 and 0.22).Higher OC/EC ratios were also found in haze days (5.0) than in normal days (3.3).Correlation analysis demonstrated that visibility had positive correlations with wind speed,and negative correlations with relative humidity and major air pollutants.Overall,the enrichments of PM2.5,OC,EC,SO42-,and NO3-promoted haze formation.Furthermore,the diagnostic ratios of IcdP/(IcdP+ BghiP),IcdP/BghiP,OC/EC,andNO3-/SO42-indicated that vehicle exhaust and coal consumption were the main sources of pollutants in Fuzhou.

  12. Pacific Northwest Laboratory Alaska (ARCTIC) research program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanson, W.C.; Eberhardt, L.E.

    1980-03-01

    The current program continues studies of arctic ecosystems begun in 1959 as part of the Cape Thompson Program. Specific ecosystem aspects include studies of the ecology of arctic and red foxes, small mammel and bird population studies, lichen studies, and radiation ecology studies. (ACR)

  13. International Regulation of Central Arctic Ocean Fisheries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molenaar, E.J.

    2016-01-01

    Due in particular to the impacts of climate change, the adequacy of the international regulation of Central Arctic Ocean fisheries has come under increasing scrutiny in recent years. As shown in this article, however, international regulation of Central Arctic Ocean fisheries is by no means entirely

  14. Traditional Ecological Knowledge in Arctic EIA's

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egede, Parnuna Petrina; Hansen, Anne Merrild

    2016-01-01

    The search for new oil and mineral reserves in the Arctic is increasing. This has called for both local and international concerns and opposition to the activities based on environmental apprehensions. Environmental Impact Assessments (EIA’s) have been implemented in legislations by the Arctic...

  15. Arctic freshwater export: Status, mechanisms, and prospects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haine, T.W.N.; Curry, B.; Gerdes, R.; Hansen, E.; Karcher, M.; Lee, C.; Rudels, B.; Spreen, G.; de Steur, L.; Stewart, K.D.; Woodgate, R.

    2015-01-01

    Large freshwater anomalies clearly exist in the Arctic Ocean. For example, liquid freshwater has accumulated in the Beaufort Gyre in the decade of the 2000s compared to 1980–2000, with an extra ˜ 5000 km3 — about 25% — being stored. The sources of freshwater to the Arctic from precipitation and runo

  16. Linking Arctic amplification and local feedbacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2011-11-01

    Climate simulations show that as the Earth warms, the Arctic warms more than the average global warming. However, models differ on how much more the Arctic warms, and although scientists have proposed a variety of mechanisms to explain the Arctic warming amplification, there is no consensus on the main reasons for it. To shed light on this issue, Hwang et al. investigated the relationship between Arctic amplification and poleward energy transport and local Arctic feedbacks, such as changes in cloud cover or ice loss, across a group of models. The researchers noted that differences in atmospheric energy transport did not explain the ranges of polar amplification; rather, models with more amplification showed less energy transport into high latitudes. The authors found that decreasing energy transport is due to a coupled relationship between Arctic amplification and energy transport: Arctic amplification reduces the equator-to-pole temperature gradient, which strongly decreases energy transport. They suggest that this coupled relationship should be taken into account in studies of Arctic amplification. (Geophysical Research Letters, doi:10.1029/2011GL048546, 2011)

  17. Health in the Arctic and climate change

    OpenAIRE

    Sloth Pedersen, Henning

    2007-01-01

    The Arctic environment is like a magnifying glass. Many of the hazards stemming from industrial activity in the South tend to concentrate in the North. This is true for DDT, PCB, heavy metals and many other substances that may endanger human health. Climate change is yet another example of how the negative impact of industrial activity may be magnified in the Arctic region.

  18. Causation mechanism analysis for haze pollution related to vehicle emission in Guangzhou, China by employing the fault tree approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Weiqing; Fan, Hongbo; Qiu, Yongfu; Cheng, Zhiyu; Xu, Pingru; Qian, Yu

    2016-05-01

    Recently, China has frequently experienced large-scale, severe and persistent haze pollution due to surging urbanization and industrialization and a rapid growth in the number of motor vehicles and energy consumption. The vehicle emission due to the consumption of a large number of fossil fuels is no doubt a critical factor of the haze pollution. This work is focused on the causation mechanism of haze pollution related to the vehicle emission for Guangzhou city by employing the Fault Tree Analysis (FTA) method for the first time. With the establishment of the fault tree system of "Haze weather-Vehicle exhausts explosive emission", all of the important risk factors are discussed and identified by using this deductive FTA method. The qualitative and quantitative assessments of the fault tree system are carried out based on the structure, probability and critical importance degree analysis of the risk factors. The study may provide a new simple and effective tool/strategy for the causation mechanism analysis and risk management of haze pollution in China. PMID:26923237

  19. Process analysis of characteristics of the boundary layer during a heavy haze pollution episode in an inland megacity, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shan; Liao, Tingting; Wang, Lili; Sun, Yang

    2016-02-01

    Ground observation data from 8 meteorological stations in Xi'an, air mass concentration data from 13 environmental quality monitoring sites in Xi'an, as well as radiosonde observation and wind profile radar data, were used in this study. Thereby, the process, causes and boundary layer meteorological characteristics of a heavy haze episode occurring from 16 to 25 December 2013 in Xi'an were analyzed. Principal component analysis showed that this haze pollution was mainly caused by the high-intensity emission and formation of gaseous pollutants (NO2, CO and SO2) and atmospheric particles (PM2.5 (fine particles) and PM10 (respirable suspended particle). The second cause was the relative humidity and continuous low temperature. The third cause was the allocation of the surface pressure field. The presence of a near-surface temperature inversion at the boundary layer formed favorable stratification conditions for the formation and maintenance of heavy haze pollution. The persistent thick haze layer weakened the solar radiation. Meanwhile, a warming effect in the urban canopy layer and in the transition zone from the urban friction sublayer to the urban canopy was indicated. All these conditions facilitated the maintenance and reinforcement of temperature inversion. The stable atmospheric stratification finally acted on the wind field in the boundary layer, and further weakened the exchange capacity of vertical turbulence. The superposition of a wind field with the horizontal gentle wind induced the typical air stagnation and finally caused the deterioration of air quality during this haze event. PMID:26969553

  20. Across the Threshold: A Comparative Analysis of Communitas and Rites of Passage in Sport Hazing and Initiations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jay Johnson

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hazing rituals and ceremonies have been described in traditional,historical world cultures, junior and high school, the military, private schools, paramilitary organizations, fraternities and sororities, as well as sport (Allan and Madden 2008; Bryshun and Young 1999; Campo, Poulos, and Sipple 2005; Fields, Collins, and Comstock 2010; Johnson 2000, 2009; Linhares de Albuquerque and Paes-Machado 2004; Nuwer 1999; Winslow 1999; Zacharda 2009. Student athletes often endure hazing practices with 80% of NCAA athletes reporting some form of initiation (Hoover 1999 in exchange for membership affiliation. This qualitative study compared the similarities and deviationsbetween contemporary initiations and historical traditions defining both the importance of cultures to establish “Rites of Passage” membership gateways and metamorphoses from nonmember to group. Results indicated that despite often abusive hazing ceremonies in sport, marked by hierarchies, power imbalances, and, at times, criminal behaviour, there still exists a demand for an entry ritual by the rookie contingency to mark their membership and identity within theteam structure. Hazing traditions continue in the belief in what Turner (1986describes as Communitas, despite indications from participants that hazing fractured relationships on the team — a marked contradiction of Communitas.

  1. Causation mechanism analysis for haze pollution related to vehicle emission in Guangzhou, China by employing the fault tree approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Weiqing; Fan, Hongbo; Qiu, Yongfu; Cheng, Zhiyu; Xu, Pingru; Qian, Yu

    2016-05-01

    Recently, China has frequently experienced large-scale, severe and persistent haze pollution due to surging urbanization and industrialization and a rapid growth in the number of motor vehicles and energy consumption. The vehicle emission due to the consumption of a large number of fossil fuels is no doubt a critical factor of the haze pollution. This work is focused on the causation mechanism of haze pollution related to the vehicle emission for Guangzhou city by employing the Fault Tree Analysis (FTA) method for the first time. With the establishment of the fault tree system of "Haze weather-Vehicle exhausts explosive emission", all of the important risk factors are discussed and identified by using this deductive FTA method. The qualitative and quantitative assessments of the fault tree system are carried out based on the structure, probability and critical importance degree analysis of the risk factors. The study may provide a new simple and effective tool/strategy for the causation mechanism analysis and risk management of haze pollution in China.

  2. Process analysis of characteristics of the boundary layer during a heavy haze pollution episode in an inland megacity, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shan; Liao, Tingting; Wang, Lili; Sun, Yang

    2016-02-01

    Ground observation data from 8 meteorological stations in Xi'an, air mass concentration data from 13 environmental quality monitoring sites in Xi'an, as well as radiosonde observation and wind profile radar data, were used in this study. Thereby, the process, causes and boundary layer meteorological characteristics of a heavy haze episode occurring from 16 to 25 December 2013 in Xi'an were analyzed. Principal component analysis showed that this haze pollution was mainly caused by the high-intensity emission and formation of gaseous pollutants (NO2, CO and SO2) and atmospheric particles (PM2.5 (fine particles) and PM10 (respirable suspended particle). The second cause was the relative humidity and continuous low temperature. The third cause was the allocation of the surface pressure field. The presence of a near-surface temperature inversion at the boundary layer formed favorable stratification conditions for the formation and maintenance of heavy haze pollution. The persistent thick haze layer weakened the solar radiation. Meanwhile, a warming effect in the urban canopy layer and in the transition zone from the urban friction sublayer to the urban canopy was indicated. All these conditions facilitated the maintenance and reinforcement of temperature inversion. The stable atmospheric stratification finally acted on the wind field in the boundary layer, and further weakened the exchange capacity of vertical turbulence. The superposition of a wind field with the horizontal gentle wind induced the typical air stagnation and finally caused the deterioration of air quality during this haze event.

  3. Clouds in the Forecast? A Joint Spitzer and HST Investigation of Clouds and Hazes for Two Exo-Neptunes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreidberg, Laura; Morley, Caroline; Line, Michael; Stevenson, Kevin; Dragomir, Diana

    2016-08-01

    Recent observations of transiting planets have revealed that clouds and hazes are common in exoplanet atmospheres. Little is known, however, about how the clouds/hazes form, what their composition is, and how their properties vary with planet parameters. We propose to characterize the atmospheres of two exo-Neptunes, GJ 436b and GJ 3470b, both of which show evidence for clouds or hazes in their near-infrared spectra. We will measure precise 3.6 and 4.5 micron transit depths for these planets, to compare with existing high-precision data at shorter wavelengths. We will also obtain a UV spectrum for GJ 3470 with HST/COS to enable accurate models of the planet's photochemistry. These observations will enable us to distinguish at high confidence between a range of physically realistic models for the atmospheric chemistry, including methanogenic photochemical hazes and equilibrium salt/sulfide clouds. The measurements will enable comparative planetology with the handful of other small, cool worlds currently accessible to observation, and serve as a first assessment of the prevalence, origin, and composition of clouds and haze in metal-enriched atmospheres below 1000 K. Our findings will guide the design of future observations of increasingly Earth-like worlds with JWST.

  4. CHARACTERISTICS OF HYDROCARBON EXPLOITATION IN ARCTIC CIRCLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanja Lež

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The existence of large quantities of hydrocarbons is supposed within the Arctic Circle. Assumed quantities are 25% of the total undiscovered hydrocarbon reserves on Earth, mostly natural gas. Over 500 major and minor gas accumulations within the Arctic Circle were discovered so far, but apart from Snøhvit gas field, there is no commercial exploitation of natural gas from these fields. Arctic gas projects are complicated, technically hard to accomplish, and pose a great threat to the return of investment, safety of people and equipment and for the ecosystem. Russia is a country that is closest to the realization of the Arctic gas projects that are based on the giant gas fields. The most extreme weather conditions in the seas around Greenland are the reason why this Arctic region is the least explored and furthest from the realization of any gas project (the paper is published in Croatian .

  5. Arctic ecosystem responses to a warming climate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Lars O.

    The Arctic embraces one of the simplest terrestrial ecosystems in the world and yet it covers roughly 11% of the world’s surface. Summer temperatures rarely exceed 10°C and most of the limited precipitation falls as snow. The landmasses are predominantly polar tundra, while the Arctic Ocean...... is frozen solid for the main part of the year. However, in recent decades, arctic temperatures have in-creased between two and three times that of the global averages, which have had a substantial impact on the physical environment of the arctic ecosystem, such as deglaciation of the Greenland inland ice...... sheet, loss of multiannual sea-ice and significant advances in snowmelt days. The biotic components of the arctic ecosystem have also been affected by the rapid changes in climate, for instance resulting in the collapse of the collared lemming cycle, advances in spring flowering and changes in the intra...

  6. Marine Arctic science capability making big strides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Leonard; Brass, Garrett

    The profound influence of the Arctic Ocean on global environment, the rapid variability of Arctic processes, and the unresolved geology of the ocean floor have led to growing scientific interest in this region. Ongoing studies are investigating recent historical processes and modern processes such as changes in ocean circulation and ice cover patterns. Sediments beneath the Arctic Ocean record long- and short-term waxing and waning of the cryosphere in the Northern Hemisphere and its linkages to bottom water renewal and faunal adaptation. Underlying basement rocks reflect the tectonic history of the ocean basin, including its ridges and plateaus, which are unsampled and of unknown composition and origin. The vulnerability of Arctic populations to environmental problems makes the need to understand the region even more compelling (see, for example, Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme, 1997; also see Web site http://www.grida.no/amap).

  7. Establishing Shared Knowledge about Globalization in Asia and the Arctic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Rasmus Gjedssø; Graczyk, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the role of knowledge in relations between Arctic communities and Asia (the Arctic Council observer states: China, India, Japan, Singapore, South Korea). We argue that mutual and shared knowledge between Arctic communities and Asia is necessary for local benefits and comprehensively...... sustainable development for Arctic communities under globalization....

  8. Marine Transportation Implications of the Last Arctic Sea Ice Refuge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brigham, L. W.

    2010-12-01

    Marine access is increasing throughout the Arctic Ocean and the 'Last Arctic Sea Ice Refuge' may have implications for governance and marine use in the region. Arctic marine transportation is increasing due to natural resource developemnt, increasing Arctic marine tourism, expanded Arctic marine research, and a general linkage of the Arctic to the gloabl economy. The Arctic Council recognized these changes with the release of the Arctic Marine Shipping Assessment of 2009. This key study (AMSA)can be viewed as a baseline assessment (using the 2004 AMSA database), a strategic guide for a host of stakeholders and actors, and as a policy document of the Arctic Council. The outcomes of AMSA of direct relevance to the Ice Refuge are within AMSA's 17 recommendations provided under three themes: Enhancing Arctic Marine Safety, Protecting Arctic People and the Environment, and Building the Arctic Marine Infrastructure. Selected recommendations of importance to the Ice Refuge include: a mandatory polar navigation code; identifying areas of heightened ecological and cultural significance; potential designation of special Arctic marine areas; enhancing the tracking and monitoring of Arctic marine traffic; improving circumpolar environmental response capacity; developing an Arctic search and rescue agreement; and, assessing the effects of marine transportation on marine mammals. A review will be made of the AMSA outcomes and how they can influence the governance, marine use, and future protection of this unique Arctic marine environment.

  9. Heterogeneous chemistry: a mechanism missing in current models to explain secondary inorganic aerosol formation during the January 2013 haze episode in North China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Zheng

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Severe regional haze pollution events occurred in eastern and central China in January 2013, which had adverse effects on the environment and public health. Extremely high levels of particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter of 2.5 μm or less (PM2.5 with dominant components of sulfate and nitrate are responsible for the haze pollution. Although heterogeneous chemistry is thought to play an important role in the production of sulfate and nitrate during haze episodes, few studies have comprehensively evaluated the effect of heterogeneous chemistry on haze formation in China by using the 3-D models due to of a lack of treatments for heterogeneous reactions in most climate and chemical transport models. In this work, the offline-coupled WRF-CMAQ model with newly added heterogeneous reactions is applied to East Asia to evaluate the impacts of heterogeneous chemistry and the meteorological anomaly during January 2013 on regional haze formation. The revised CMAQ with heterogeneous chemistry not only captures the magnitude and temporal variation of sulfate and nitrate, but also reproduces the enhancement of relative contribution of sulfate and nitrate to PM2.5 mass from clean days to polluted haze days. These results indicate the significant role of heterogeneous chemistry in regional haze formation and improve the understanding of the haze formation mechanisms during the January 2013 episode.

  10. Individual particle analysis of aerosols collected under haze and non-haze conditions at a high-elevation mountain site in the North China plain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, W. J.; Zhang, D. Z.; Shao, L. Y.; Zhou, S. Z.; Wang, W. X.

    2011-11-01

    The North China plain is a region with megacities and huge populations. Aerosols over the highly polluted area have a significant impact on the regional and global climate. In order to investigate the physical and chemical characteristics of aerosol particles in elevated layers there, observations were carried out at the summit of Mt. Tai (1534 m a.s.l.) from 19 to 28 April, 2010, when the air masses were advected from the east (phase-I: 19-21 April), from the south (phase-II: 22-25 April), and from the northwest (phase-III: 26-28 April). Individual aerosol particles were identified with transmission electron microscopy (TEM), new particle formation (NPF) and growth events were monitored by a wide-range particle spectrometer, and ion concentrations in PM2.5 were analyzed. During phase-I and phase-II, haze layers caused by anthropogenic pollution were observed, and a high percentage of particles were sulfur-rich (47-49%). In phase-III, the haze disappeared due to the intrusion of cold air from the northwest, and mineral dust particles from deserts were dominant (43%). NPF followed by particle growth during daytime was more pronounced on hazy than on clear days. Particle growth during daytime resulted in an increase of particle geometric mean diameter from 10-22 nm in the morning to 56-96 nm in the evening. TEM analysis suggests that sulfuric acid and secondary organic compounds should be important factors for particle nucleation and growth. However, the presence of fine anthropogenic particles (e.g., soot, metal, and fly ash) embedded within S-rich particles indicates that they could weaken NPF and enhance particle growth through condensation and coagulation. Abundant mineral particles in phase-III likely suppressed the NPF processes because they supplied sufficient area on which acidic gases or acids condensed.

  11. Individual particle analysis of aerosols collected under haze and non-haze conditions at a high-elevation mountain site in the North China plain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. J. Li

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The North China plain is a region with megacities and huge populations. Aerosols over the highly polluted area have a significant impact on the regional and global climate. In order to investigate the physical and chemical characteristics of aerosol particles in elevated layers there, observations were carried out at the summit of Mt. Tai (1534 m a.s.l. from 19 to 28 April, 2010, when the air masses were advected from the east (phase-I: 19–21 April, from the south (phase-II: 22–25 April, and from the northwest (phase-III: 26–28 April. Individual aerosol particles were identified with transmission electron microscopy (TEM, new particle formation (NPF and growth events were monitored by a wide-range particle spectrometer, and ion concentrations in PM2.5 were analyzed. During phase-I and phase-II, haze layers caused by anthropogenic pollution were observed, and a high percentage of particles were sulfur-rich (47–49%. In phase-III, the haze disappeared due to the intrusion of cold air from the northwest, and mineral dust particles from deserts were dominant (43%. NPF followed by particle growth during daytime was more pronounced on hazy than on clear days. Particle growth during daytime resulted in an increase of particle geometric mean diameter from 10–22 nm in the morning to 56–96 nm in the evening. TEM analysis suggests that sulfuric acid and secondary organic compounds should be important factors for particle nucleation and growth. However, the presence of fine anthropogenic particles (e.g., soot, metal, and fly ash embedded within S-rich particles indicates that they could weaken NPF and enhance particle growth through condensation and coagulation. Abundant mineral particles in phase-III likely suppressed the NPF processes because they supplied sufficient area on which acidic gases or acids condensed.

  12. Arctic Visiting Speakers Series (AVS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, S. E.; Griswold, J.

    2011-12-01

    The Arctic Visiting Speakers (AVS) Series funds researchers and other arctic experts to travel and share their knowledge in communities where they might not otherwise connect. Speakers cover a wide range of arctic research topics and can address a variety of audiences including K-12 students, graduate and undergraduate students, and the general public. Host applications are accepted on an on-going basis, depending on funding availability. Applications need to be submitted at least 1 month prior to the expected tour dates. Interested hosts can choose speakers from an online Speakers Bureau or invite a speaker of their choice. Preference is given to individuals and organizations to host speakers that reach a broad audience and the general public. AVS tours are encouraged to span several days, allowing ample time for interactions with faculty, students, local media, and community members. Applications for both domestic and international visits will be considered. Applications for international visits should involve participation of more than one host organization and must include either a US-based speaker or a US-based organization. This is a small but important program that educates the public about Arctic issues. There have been 27 tours since 2007 that have impacted communities across the globe including: Gatineau, Quebec Canada; St. Petersburg, Russia; Piscataway, New Jersey; Cordova, Alaska; Nuuk, Greenland; Elizabethtown, Pennsylvania; Oslo, Norway; Inari, Finland; Borgarnes, Iceland; San Francisco, California and Wolcott, Vermont to name a few. Tours have included lectures to K-12 schools, college and university students, tribal organizations, Boy Scout troops, science center and museum patrons, and the general public. There are approximately 300 attendees enjoying each AVS tour, roughly 4100 people have been reached since 2007. The expectations for each tour are extremely manageable. Hosts must submit a schedule of events and a tour summary to be posted online

  13. An integrated campaign for investigation of winter-time continental haze over Indo-Gangetic Basin and its radiative effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An outflow of continental haze occurs from Indo-Gangetic Basin (IGB) in the North to Bay of Bengal (BoB) in the South. An integrated campaign was organized to investigate this continental haze during December 2013–February 2014 at source and remote regions within IGB to quantify its radiative effects. Measurements were carried out at three locations in eastern India; 1) Kalas Island, Sundarban (21.68°N, 88.57°E) — an isolated island along the north-east coast of BoB, 2) Kolkata (22.57°N, 88.42°E) — an urban metropolis and 3) Siliguri (26.70°N, 88.35°E) — an urban region at the foothills of eastern Himalayas. Ground-based AOD (at 0.5 μm) is observed to be maximum (1.25 ± 0.18) over Kolkata followed by Siliguri (0.60 ± 0.17) and minimum over Sundarban (0.53 ± 0.18). Black carbon concentration is found to be maximum at Kolkata (21.6 ± 6.6 μg·m−3) with almost equal concentrations at Siliguri (12.6 ± 5.2 μg·m−3) and Sundarban (12.3 ± 3.0 μg·m−3). Combination of MODIS-AOD and back-trajectories analysis shows an outflow of winter-time continental haze originating from central IGB and venting out through Sundarban towards BoB. This continental haze with high extinction coefficient is identified up to central BoB using CALIPSO observations and is found to contribute ~ 75% to marine AOD over central BoB. This haze produces significantly high aerosol radiative forcing within the atmosphere over Kolkata (75.4 Wm−2) as well as over Siliguri and Sundarban (40 Wm−2) indicating large forcing over entire IGB, from foothills of the Himalayas to coastal region. This winter-time continental haze also causes about similar radiative heating (1.5 K·day−1) from Siliguri to Sundarban which is enhanced over Kolkata (3 K·day−1) due to large emission of local urban aerosols. This high aerosol heating over entire IGB and coastal region of BoB can have considerable impact on the monsoonal circulation and more importantly, such haze transported over to

  14. Efficiency of enzymatic and other alternative clarification and fining treatments on turbidity and haze in cherry juice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, Anne Boye Strunge; Köser, C.; Adler-Nissen, Jens

    2001-01-01

    function. Individual and interactive effects on turbidity and haze formation in precentrifuged and uncentrifuged cherry juice of treatments with pectinase, acid protease, bromelain, gallic acid, and gelatin-silica sol were investigated in a factorial experimental design with 32 different parameter...... combinations. Gelatin-silica sol consistently had the best effect on juice clarity. Centrifugation of cherry juice (10000g for 15 min) prior to clarification treatment significantly improved juice clarity and diminished the rate of haze formation during cold storage of juice. Both treatment of precentrifuged...... cherry juice with Novozym 89L protease and co- addition of pectinase and gallic acid improved cherry juice clarity and diminished haze levels. None of the alternative treatments produced the unwieldy colloids notorious to gelatin- silica sol treatment. The data suggest that several alternative...

  15. An integrated campaign for investigation of winter-time continental haze over Indo-Gangetic Basin and its radiative effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Sanat Kumar, E-mail: sanatkrdas@gmail.com [Environmental Sciences Section, Bose Institute, Kolkata (India); Center for Astroparticle Physics and Space Science, Bose Institute, Kolkata (India); Chatterjee, Abhijit [Environmental Sciences Section, Bose Institute, Kolkata (India); Center for Astroparticle Physics and Space Science, Bose Institute, Kolkata (India); National Facility on Astroparticle Physics and Space Science, Darjeeling (India); Ghosh, Sanjay K. [Center for Astroparticle Physics and Space Science, Bose Institute, Kolkata (India); National Facility on Astroparticle Physics and Space Science, Darjeeling (India); Raha, Sibaji [Environmental Sciences Section, Bose Institute, Kolkata (India); Center for Astroparticle Physics and Space Science, Bose Institute, Kolkata (India); National Facility on Astroparticle Physics and Space Science, Darjeeling (India)

    2015-11-15

    An outflow of continental haze occurs from Indo-Gangetic Basin (IGB) in the North to Bay of Bengal (BoB) in the South. An integrated campaign was organized to investigate this continental haze during December 2013–February 2014 at source and remote regions within IGB to quantify its radiative effects. Measurements were carried out at three locations in eastern India; 1) Kalas Island, Sundarban (21.68°N, 88.57°E) — an isolated island along the north-east coast of BoB, 2) Kolkata (22.57°N, 88.42°E) — an urban metropolis and 3) Siliguri (26.70°N, 88.35°E) — an urban region at the foothills of eastern Himalayas. Ground-based AOD (at 0.5 μm) is observed to be maximum (1.25 ± 0.18) over Kolkata followed by Siliguri (0.60 ± 0.17) and minimum over Sundarban (0.53 ± 0.18). Black carbon concentration is found to be maximum at Kolkata (21.6 ± 6.6 μg·m{sup −3}) with almost equal concentrations at Siliguri (12.6 ± 5.2 μg·m{sup −3}) and Sundarban (12.3 ± 3.0 μg·m{sup −3}). Combination of MODIS-AOD and back-trajectories analysis shows an outflow of winter-time continental haze originating from central IGB and venting out through Sundarban towards BoB. This continental haze with high extinction coefficient is identified up to central BoB using CALIPSO observations and is found to contribute ~ 75% to marine AOD over central BoB. This haze produces significantly high aerosol radiative forcing within the atmosphere over Kolkata (75.4 Wm{sup −2}) as well as over Siliguri and Sundarban (40 Wm{sup −2}) indicating large forcing over entire IGB, from foothills of the Himalayas to coastal region. This winter-time continental haze also causes about similar radiative heating (1.5 K·day{sup −1}) from Siliguri to Sundarban which is enhanced over Kolkata (3 K·day{sup −1}) due to large emission of local urban aerosols. This high aerosol heating over entire IGB and coastal region of BoB can have considerable impact on the monsoonal circulation and more

  16. THE ARCTIC: AN INDICATOR OF THE PLANET"S HEALTH

    OpenAIRE

    Callaghan, Terry

    2012-01-01

    The Arctic is a critically important component of the earth system and the Arctic is subject to dramatic change due to global warming in particular. To build capacity for better environmental monitoring and research in the Arctic, the EU has funded the SCANNET-INTERACT Consortium, which consists of partners from all the Arctic countries and 33 research infrastructures located throughout the large environmental envelope of the Arctic and a further 8 research facilities have joined as "observer...

  17. TEM Study of Aerosol Particles in Brown Haze Episodes over Northern China in Spring 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, W.; Shao, L.; Buseck, P. R.

    2008-12-01

    Airborne aerosol collections were performed in eight brown haze episodes from 31 May to 21 June 2007 in Beijing, China. Morphologies, compositions, and mixing states of individual aerosol particles having different sizes were obtained using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Aerosol particle types less than 2 μ m in diameter include mineral dust, fly ash, soot, organic material, and K-rich, S-rich, and metal particles (Fe- and Zn-rich). Mineral dust particles dominate in the range of 2 to 10 μ m. In addition to finding contributions from vehicle emissions and soil dust in Beijing, TEM results from the study provide new insights into sources such as agricultural biomass burning, industrial activities, and waste incineration. These sources can contribute not only great amounts of K-rich and metal particles but also reactive gases such as NH3, NOx, SO2, and VOCs to the haze. More than 80% of the analyzed aerosol particles are internally mixed. K- and S-rich particles tend to be coagulated with fly ash, soot, metal, and fine-grained mineral dust particles. Organic materials can act as inclusions in the K- and S-rich particles and their coatings. Over 90% of the analyzed internally mixed mineral particles are covered with Ca-, Mg-, or Na-rich coatings, and only 8% are associated with K- or S-rich coatings. The compositions of Ca-, Mg-, and Na-rich coatings suggest that they are possibly nitrates mixed with minor sulfates and chlorides. Calcium sulfate particles with diameters from 10 to 500 nm were also detected within Ca(NO3)2 and Mg(NO3)2 coatings. These results indicate that mineral dust particles in the brown haze episodes participated in heterogeneous reactions in the atmosphere with one or more of SO2, NO2, HCl, and HNO3. The development of coatings altered some mineral dust particles from hydrophobic to hydrophilic.

  18. Persistent and Widespread Winter Haze & Fog over the Indo-Gangetic Plains: A climatological perspective from satellite observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, R.

    2014-12-01

    Each year during winter season (December-January), dense fog engulfs the Indo-Gangetic Plains (IGP) in southern Asia, for more than a month, disrupting daily life of millions of people inhabiting the IGP. The widespread nature of the fog is frequently visible in satellite imagery, extending over a stretch of ~1500 km; that covers parts of Pakistan, northern India, Nepal and Bangladesh. Both, haze and fog are a tightly-coupled system over the IGP, during winter months, and have been a major environmental/climatic issue since the past several decades. Trends in poor visibility suggest a significant increase in worsening air quality and foggy days over the IGP. The persistent and widespread nature of the winter haze and fog is strongly influenced by the regional meteorology during wintertime, i.e. a stable boundary layer, low temperatures, high relative humidity and light winds. The valley-type topography of the IGP, adjacent to the towering Himalaya, and high concentrations of pollution aerosols, further favors the persistence of hazy/foggy conditions. A satellite-based observational portrayal will be presented, using various cloud, aerosol and radiation datasets, to characterize the widespread nature of winter haze and fog, based on a multi-sensor assessment from MODIS, CERES, AVHRR and CALIPSO datasets. More specifically, based on these observations, we will present results on: long-term trends/variability of winter haze and fog, vertical characterization of aerosol/fog/low-clouds, as well as assessment of the direct radiative effect of the region-wide haze/fog system. Results from this work are anticipated to shed light on the overall interactions within the highly persistent and tightly-coupled haze-fog phenomena. Additionally, against the backdrop of a changing climate scenario, possible linkages between the winter-time fog cover, regional meteorology and aerosol loading will also be discussed over the IGP.

  19. Interannual increase of regional haze-fog in North China Plain in summer by intensified easterly winds and orographic forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Ziqi; Sheng, Lifang; Liu, Qian; Yao, Xiaohong; Wang, Wencai

    2015-12-01

    Regional haze-fog events over the North China Plain (NCP) have attracted much attention in recent years. Their increase has been attributed to anthropogenic emissions of air pollutants and synoptic weather conditions. We investigated the influence of local meteorological conditions and large-scale circulation on the haze-fog events over the NCP during 2001-2012, and found a significant interannual increase in the number of summer regional haze-fog days. Analysis indicated that local meteorological conditions could partly explain the increase but failed to explain the spatial variation; meanwhile, regional circulation change induced by large-scale circulation and orographic forcing unveiled a possible spatiotemporal variation mechanism. In summer, the prevalent southerly winds over the NCP were obstructed by the Taihang and Yanshan mountains, steadying the outflow direction to the southeast, while different inflow direction controlled by large-scale circulation had different effects on regional circulation. In weak (strong) East Asian summer monsoon years, an intensified eastward (westward) zonal inflow wind component reinforced (weakened) the negative vorticity and formed an anomalous anticyclone (cyclone), which strengthened (weakened) the downward motion, so the dissipation capability was weakened (strengthened) and the wind speed decreased (increased), ultimately resulting in the increased (decreased) occurrence of haze-fog. We also found that the circulation anomaly had a good relationship with strong El Niño and La Niña events. There was more haze-fog over the NCP in the summers that followed a La Niña event, and less in summers that followed an El Niño event. This suggested the possibility that summer haze-fog phenomena could be predicted based on the phase of ENSO.

  20. Lucifer's Planet: Photolytic Hazes in the Atmosphere of 51 Eri b

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahnle, Kevin; Marley, Mark; Morley, Caroline; Moses, Julianne I.

    2016-10-01

    The star 51 Eridani is a pre-main-sequence F dwarf that is only 20 million years old. Direct-imaging observations with GPI (Gemini Planet Imager) reveal that the star is orbited by a self-radiant young Jupiter, designated 51 Eri b, that emits with an effective temperature on the order of 700 K (Macintosh et al (2015) Science 350, 64). Thermal evolution models predict that the planet has Jupiter's radius and twice its mass.We use a 1D model to address photochemistry and possible haze formation in the irradiated atmosphere of 51 Eri b (2016arXiv160407388Z). The intended focus was to have been on carbon and organic hazes, but sulfur photochemistry turns out to be interesting and possibly more important. The case for organic photochemical hazes is intriguing but falls short of being compelling. If organic hazes form abundantly, they are likeliest to do so if vertical mixing in 51 Eri b is weaker than in Jupiter, and they would be found below the altitudes where methane and water are photolyzed. The more novel result is that photochemistry turns H2S into elemental sulfur, here treated as S8. In the cooler models, S8 is predicted to condense in optically significant clouds of solid sulfur particles, whilst in the warmer models S8 remains a vapor along with several other sulfur allotropes that are both visually striking and potentially observable. For 51 Eri b, the division between models with and without condensed sulfur is at an effective temperature of 700 K, which is within error its actual effective temperature; the local temperature where sulfur condenses is between 280 and 320 K. The sulfur photochemistry we discuss is quite general and ought to be found in a wide variety of worlds over a broad temperature range, both colder and hotter than the 650-750 K range studied here, and we show that products of sulfur photochemistry will be nearly as abundant on planets where the UV irradiation is orders of magnitude weaker than it is on 51 Eri b.

  1. Aerosol properties in the upper haze of Venus from SPICAV IR data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luginin, M.; Fedorova, A.; Belyaev, D.; Montmessin, F.; Wilquet, V.; Korablev, O.; Bertaux, J.-L.; Vandaele, A. C.

    2016-10-01

    SPICAV IR, a channel of the SPICAV/SOIR suite of instruments onboard Venus Express spacecraft measured spectra in nadir and solar occultation modes in the range of 0.65-1.7 μm. We report results from 222 solar occultations observed from May 2006 to November 2014. The vertical resolution of measurements varies from 1 to 25 km depending on the distance of the spacecraft to the limb of Venus. The vertical profiles of atmospheric extinction were obtained at 10 near-IR wavelengths in the altitude range from 70 to 95 km. This allowed us to derive microphysical properties of the mesospheric haze. The aerosol haze top is higher near the equator than near the pole. In the upper haze, the aerosol scale height is found to be 3.3 ± 0.7 km. Detached haze layers were detected at altitudes from 70 to 90 km. Particle size and number density profiles are retrieved from extinction coefficients using Mie scattering theory adopting H2SO4 refractive indices. Bimodal distribution of particles is consistent with data for some orbits with mean radius for mode 1 reff1 = 0.12 ± 0.03 μm and reff2 = 0.84 ± 0.16 μm for mode 2. Particle radii tend to cluster within occultation campaign and vary on the time scale of several months. The radius for the single mode case equals Reff = 0.54 ± 0.25 μm, and they are also 1.5-2 times smaller in the polar region (60°N-90°N) than in nonpolar regions (60°S-60°N). In bimodal case the number density profiles decrease smoothly for both modes, from ∼500 cm-3 at 75 km to ∼50 cm-3 at 90 km for mode 1, and from ∼1 cm-3 at 75 km to ∼0.1 cm-3 at 90 km for mode 2.

  2. Arctic Energy Resources: Security and Environmental Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Johnston

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available n recent years, there has been considerable interest in the Arctic as a source for resources, as a potential zone for commercial shipping, and as a region that might experience conflict due to its strategic importance. With regards to energy resources, some studies suggest that the region contains upwards of 13 percent of global undiscovered oil, 30 percent of undiscovered gas, and multiples more of gas hydrates. The decreasing amount and duration of Arctic ice cover suggests that extraction of these resources will be increasingly commercially viable. Arctic and non-arctic states wish to benefit from the region's resources and the potential circum-polar navigation possibilities. This has led to concerns about the environmental risks of these operations as well as the fear that competition between states for resources might result in conflict. Unresolved offshore boundaries between the Arctic states exacerbate these fears. Yet, the risk of conflict seems overstated considering the bilateral and multilateral steps undertaken by the Arctic states to resolve contentious issues. This article will examine the potential impact of Arctic energy resources on global security as well as the regional environment and examine the actions of concerned states to promote their interests in the region.

  3. Artificial intelligence based approach to forecast PM2.5 during haze episodes: A case study of Delhi, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Dhirendra; Goyal, P.; Upadhyay, Abhishek

    2015-02-01

    Delhi has been listed as the worst performer across the world with respect to the presence of alarmingly high level of haze episodes, exposing the residents here to a host of diseases including respiratory disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder and lung cancer. This study aimed to analyze the haze episodes in a year and to develop the forecasting methodologies for it. The air pollutants, e.g., CO, O3, NO2, SO2, PM2.5 as well as meteorological parameters (pressure, temperature, wind speed, wind direction index, relative humidity, visibility, dew point temperature, etc.) have been used in the present study to analyze the haze episodes in Delhi urban area. The nature of these episodes, their possible causes, and their major features are discussed in terms of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and relative humidity. The correlation matrix shows that temperature, pressure, wind speed, O3, and dew point temperature are the dominating variables for PM2.5 concentrations in Delhi. The hour-by-hour analysis of past data pattern at different monitoring stations suggest that the haze hours were occurred approximately 48% of the total observed hours in the year, 2012 over Delhi urban area. The haze hour forecasting models in terms of PM2.5 concentrations (more than 50 μg/m3) and relative humidity (less than 90%) have been developed through artificial intelligence based Neuro-Fuzzy (NF) techniques and compared with the other modeling techniques e.g., multiple linear regression (MLR), and artificial neural network (ANN). The haze hour's data for nine months, i.e. from January to September have been chosen for training and remaining three months, i.e., October to December in the year 2012 are chosen for validation of the developed models. The forecasted results are compared with the observed values with different statistical measures, e.g., correlation coefficients (R), normalized mean square error (NMSE), fractional bias (FB) and index of agreement (IOA). The performed

  4. Survival strategies in arctic ungulates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. J. C. Tyler

    1990-09-01

    Full Text Available Arctic ungulates usually neither freeze nor starve to death despite the rigours of winter. Physiological adaptations enable them to survive and reproduce despite long periods of intense cold and potential undernutrition. Heat conservation is achieved by excellent insulation combined with nasal heat exchange. Seasonal variation in fasting metabolic rate has been reported in several temperate and sub-arctic species of ungulates and seems to occur in muskoxen. Surprisingly, there is no evidence for this in reindeer. Both reindeer and caribou normally maintain low levels of locomotor activity in winter. Light foot loads are important for reducing energy expenditure while walking over snow. The significance and control of selective cooling of the brain during hard exercise (e.g. escape from predators is discussed. Like other cervids, reindeer and caribou display a pronounced seasonal cycle of appetite and growth which seems to have an intrinsic basis. This has two consequences. First, the animals evidently survive perfectly well despite enduring negative energy balance for long periods. Second, loss of weight in winter is not necessarily evidence of undernutrition. The main role of fat reserves, especially in males, may be to enhance reproductive success. The principal role of fat reserves in winter appears to be to provide a supplement to, rather than a substitute for, poor quality winter forage. Fat also provides an insurance against death during periods of acute starvation.

  5. Environmental marine geology of the Arctic Ocean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Arctic Ocean and its ice cover are major regulators of Northern Hemisphere climate, ocean circulation and marine productivity. The Arctic is also very sensitive to changes in the global environment because sea ice magnifies small changes in temperature, and because polar regions are sinks for air pollutants. Marine geology studies are being carried out to determine the nature and rate of these environmental changes by study of modern ice and sea bed environments, and by interpretation of geological records imprinted in the sea floor sediments. Sea ice camps, an ice island, and polar icebreakers have been used to study both western and eastern Arctic Ocean basins. Possible early warning signals of environmental changes in the Canadian Arctic are die-back in Arctic sponge reefs, outbreaks of toxic dinoflagellates, and pesticides in the marine food chain. Eastern Arctic ice and surface waters are contaminated by freon and radioactive fallout from Chernobyl. At present, different sedimentary processes operate in the pack ice-covered Canadian polar margin than in summer open waters off Alaska and Eurasia. The geological records, however, suggest that a temperature increase of 1-4C would result in summer open water throughout the Arctic, with major changes in ocean circulation and productivity of waters off Eastern North America, and more widespread transport of pollutants from eastern to western Arctic basins. More studies of longer sediment cores are needed to confirm these interpretations, but it is now clear that the Arctic Ocean has been the pacemaker of climate change during the past 1 million years

  6. Environmental marine geology of the Arctic Ocean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Arctic Ocean and its ice cover are major regulators of Northern Hemisphere climate, ocean circulation and marine productivity. The Arctic is also very sensitive to changes in the global environment because sea ice magnifies small changes in temperature, and because polar regions are sinks for air pollutants. Marine geology studies are being carried out to determine the nature and rate of these environmental changes by study of modem ice and sea-bed environments, and by interpretation of geological records imprinted in the sea-floor sediments. Sea ice camps, an ice island, and polar icebreakers have been used to study both western and eastern Arctic Ocean basins. Possible early warning signals of environmental changes in the Canadian Arctic are die-back in Arctic sponge reefs, outbreaks of toxic dinoflagellates, and pesticides in the marine food chain. Eastern Arctic ice and surface waters are contaminated by freon and radioactive fallout from Chernobyl. At present, different sedimentary processes operate in the pack ice-covered Canadian polar margin than in summer open waters off Alaska and Eurasia. The geological records, however, suggest that a temperature increase of 1-4 degree C would result in summer open water throughout the Arctic, with major changes in ocean circulation and productivity of waters off Eastern North America, and more widespread transport of pollutants from eastern to western Arctic basins. More studies of longer sediment cores are needed to confirm these interpretations, but is is now clear that the Arctic Ocean has been the pacemaker of climate change during the past 1 million years

  7. Introduction: World Routes in the Arctic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Art Leete

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The Arctic is associated in popular perception with a vast frozen snow covered empty place. Everybody who has been in the Arctic, whether in the Eurasian or North American part, knows that this stereotype is correct. Indeed, the Arctic is a place with lots of space that determines the lifestyle of the people in this area. All human activities – whether livelihood or mastering of the territory– are and always have been connected with substantial movement. Hunting, fishing, trading, the establishment of settlements and keeping them alive, all this needs the movement of goods and human resources.

  8. Chemical composition and bioreactivity of PM2.5 during 2013 haze events in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Kin-Fai; Ho, Steven Sai Hang; Huang, Ru-Jin; Chuang, Hsiao-Chi; Cao, Jun-Ji; Han, Yongming; Lui, Ka-Hei; Ning, Zhi; Chuang, Kai-Jen; Cheng, Tsun-Jen; Lee, Shun-Cheng; Hu, Di; Wang, Bei; Zhang, Renjian

    2016-02-01

    Chemical composition and bioreactivity of PM2.5 samples collected from Beijing (BJ), Xi'an (XA), Xiamen (XM) and Hong Kong (HK) in China during haze events were characterized. PM2.5 mass concentrations in BJ, XA, XM and HK in the episodes were found to be 258 ± 100 μg m-3, 233 ± 52 μg m-3, 46 ± 9 μg m-3 and 48 ± 13 μg m-3, respectively. Significant increase of sulfate, nitrate and ammonium concentrations in northern cities were observed. High contributions of biomass burning emissions to organic carbon (OC) in northern cities were estimated in this study implying frequent biomass burning during the haze periods. The urea concentrations in PM2.5 were 1855 ± 755 ng m-3 (BJ), 1124 ± 243 ng m-3 (XA), 543 ± 104 ng m-3 (XM) and 363 ± 61 ng m-3 (HK) suggesting higher or close to upper limits compared to other regions in the world. Dose-dependent alterations in oxidative potential, IL-6, IFN-γ and TNF-α levels were also investigated. The oxidative potential levels are BJ > XM > XA > HK, whereas levels of IL-6, IFN-γ and TNF-α were BJ > XA > XM > HK. The sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, OC, urea and levoglucosan are associated with oxidative-inflammatory responses. These experimental results are crucial for the policymakers to implement cost-effective abatement strategies for improving air quality.

  9. Air quality in Southern Thailand during haze episode in relation to air mass trajectory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prapat Pentamwa

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Southeast Asia haze with elevated particulate matter (PM10 often blankets Southern Thailand during June-Augustperiod. During the haze period of August 2005, the highest 24h PM10 concentration was 92 µg/m3 in Songkhla and 108 µg/m3in Phuket. Though the levels were still below the 24h PM10 National Ambient Air Quality Standard of 120 µg/m3, they wereconsiderably higher than the annual average levels of 32 µg/m3 in Songkhla and 56 µg/m3 in Phuket. The variation in dailyPM10 levels during this period was largely dependent on the prevailing wind directions and the intensity of fire, expressed asthe number of hotspots on NOAA satellite images, at the upwind regions. The backward trajectories obtained by HYSPLIT4model revealed that on the days when PM10 peaked the air masses arriving at the cities passed over the intensive fire regionin Sumatra Island. The peak PM10 levels were observed in Phuket on 16th and in Songkhla on 13th August 2005, i.e. duringthe same period when a large number of hotspots were seen in Sumatra Island of Indonesia (10th-16th August 2005. The PM10level dropped when the wind changed direction from southwesterly to southeasterly hence the air mass trajectory did notpass the fire region. The transport time of air masses from the source region to Southern Thailand during this period wasaround 2-3 days.

  10. Estimating the direct radiative forcing due to haze from the 1997 forest fires in Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davison, P. S.; Roberts, D. L.; Arnold, R. T.; Colvile, R. N.

    2004-05-01

    The El Niño event of 1997-1998 caused a severe reduction of rainfall in Indonesia that promoted the spread of forest fires, leading to a pervasive haze in the region. Here we use fire coverage data from the 1997 World Fire Atlas with a review of other available data and literature to estimate the distribution of particulate emissions from August to November 1997 and the particle size and radiative properties. Our preferred estimate of the total particulate emissions is approximately 41 Tg. The emissions have been used to drive an atmospheric model to simulate the distribution of the haze and its direct radiative effect, with and without allowing for the effects of the smoke on the atmospheric evolution. Model diagnostics of the aerosol and its radiative impact are compared with measurements and output from other models. Large decreases in the incident solar flux at the surface are obtained in the region. The simulated global mean shortwave radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere, averaged over the 4 months, is -0.32 Wm-2. The accuracy of this calculation is discussed, and the importance of the Indonesian fires in particular and of biomass burning in general is assessed.

  11. Mariner 9 television limb observations of dust and ice hazes on Mars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over 3000 Mariner 9 television reflectance profiles crossing the limb of Mars were analyzed statistically during the period from the decaying phase of a global dust storm (southern summer) until southern winter solstice. Most of the profiles were obtained during the first 100 days of the mission. The ''top'' of the dust, as defined by the inflection point in the reflectance profiles, decreased with time during the decay of the dust storm, but more rapidly in the higher latitudes of both hemispheres than in the tropics. The inflection point due to dust haze remained above 20 km in the tropics throughout the period. These variations support the hypothesis that the diurnal tide is the primary agent of vertical dust transport. Scale heights of the upper portion of the dust cloud were highest in the tropics early in the mission, decaying with time and/or depth in the atmosphere. If interpreted in terms of vertical eddy diffusion, the scale heights suggest diffusion coefficients of order 103 m2 s-1 in the 40--60 km height range. Distribution, color and polarization of higher limb hazes were also analyzed. These are interpreted as condensate layers associated with convective overshoot from the dusty lower atmosphere. A long internal gravity wave revealed by one of these layers is discussed

  12. Effect of heavy haze and aerosol pollution on rice and wheat productions in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tie, Xuexi; Huang, Ru-Jin; Dai, Wenting; Cao, Junji; Long, Xin; Su, Xiaoli; Zhao, Shuyu; Wang, Qiyuan; Li, Guohui

    2016-01-01

    In China, regional haze pollution is a serious environmental problem. The impact on ecosystem, however, is not clearly understood. This study investigates the effect of regional haze pollution on the yields of rice and wheat in China. The spatial and temporal distributions of aerosol optical depth (AOD) show high particulate pollution in the North China Plain region, Yangtze River Delta region, the central eastern China, and the Si Chuan Basin, coexisted largely with crop growth in time and space. The solar irradiance reaching these regions is estimated to reduce by up to 28-49%, calculated using the AOD distributions and tropospheric ultraviolet-visible (TUV) model. Reduction of solar irradiance in these regions can depress optimal yields of about 45% of rice and 75% of wheat growth in China, leading to 2% reduction in total rice production and 8% reduction in total wheat production in China. However, there are large uncertainties of the estimate related to the diffuse solar radiation. For high diffuse radiation case, the estimate reductions of rice and wheat decrease to 1% and 4.5%, respectively. A further detailed study is needed to clearly understand this effect to meet the growing food demand in the nation in the coming decades. PMID:27388031

  13. Effect of heavy haze and aerosol pollution on rice and wheat productions in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tie, Xuexi; Huang, Ru-Jin; Dai, Wenting; Cao, Junji; Long, Xin; Su, Xiaoli; Zhao, Shuyu; Wang, Qiyuan; Li, Guohui

    2016-07-01

    In China, regional haze pollution is a serious environmental problem. The impact on ecosystem, however, is not clearly understood. This study investigates the effect of regional haze pollution on the yields of rice and wheat in China. The spatial and temporal distributions of aerosol optical depth (AOD) show high particulate pollution in the North China Plain region, Yangtze River Delta region, the central eastern China, and the Si Chuan Basin, coexisted largely with crop growth in time and space. The solar irradiance reaching these regions is estimated to reduce by up to 28-49%, calculated using the AOD distributions and tropospheric ultraviolet-visible (TUV) model. Reduction of solar irradiance in these regions can depress optimal yields of about 45% of rice and 75% of wheat growth in China, leading to 2% reduction in total rice production and 8% reduction in total wheat production in China. However, there are large uncertainties of the estimate related to the diffuse solar radiation. For high diffuse radiation case, the estimate reductions of rice and wheat decrease to 1% and 4.5%, respectively. A further detailed study is needed to clearly understand this effect to meet the growing food demand in the nation in the coming decades.

  14. Simulating Atmospheric Free-Space Optical Propagation; Part II: Haze, Fog, and Low Clouds Attenuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achour, Maha

    2002-12-01

    One of the biggest challenges facing Free-Space Optics deployment is proper understanding of optical signal propagation in different atmospheric conditions. In an earlier study by the author (30), attenuation by rain was analyzed and successfully modeled for infrared signal transmission. In this paper, we focus on attenuation due to scattering by haze, fog and low clouds droplets using the original Mie Scattering theory. Relying on published experimental results on infrared propagation, electromagnetic waves scattering by spherical droplet, atmospheric physics and thermodynamics, UlmTech developed a computer-based platform, Simulight, which simulates infrared signal (750 nm-12 μm) propagation in haze, fog, low clouds, rain and clear weather. Optical signals are scattered by fog droplets during transmission in the forward direction preventing the receiver from detecting the minimum required power. Weather databases describe foggy conditions by measuring the visibility parameter, which is, in general, defined as the maximum distance that the visible 550 nm signal can travel while distinguishing between the target object and its background at 2% contrast. Extrapolating optical signal attenuations beyond 550 nm using only visibility is not as straightforward as stated by the Kruse equation which is unfortunately widely used. We conclude that it is essential to understand atmospheric droplet sizes and their distributions based on measured attenuations to effectively estimate infrared attenuation. We focus on three types of popular fogs: Evolving, Stable and Selective.

  15. Degradation of white wine haze proteins by Aspergillopepsin I and II during juice flash pasteurization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marangon, Matteo; Van Sluyter, Steven C; Robinson, Ella M C; Muhlack, Richard A; Holt, Helen E; Haynes, Paul A; Godden, Peter W; Smith, Paul A; Waters, Elizabeth J

    2012-12-01

    Bentonite is commonly used to remove grape proteins responsible for haze formation in white wines. Proteases potentially represent an alternative to bentonite, but so far none has shown satisfactory activity under winemaking conditions. A promising candidate is AGP, a mixture of Aspergillopepsins I and II.; a food grade, well characterized and inexpensive protease, active at wine pH and at high temperatures (60-80°C). AGP was added to two clarified grape juices with and without heat treatments (75°C, 1min) prior to fermentation. AGP showed some activity at fermentation temperatures (≈20% total protein reduction compared to control wine) and excellent activity when combined with juice heating (≈90% total protein reduction). The more heat stable grape proteins, i.e. those not contributing to wine hazing, were not affected by the treatments and therefore accounted for the remaining 10% of protein still in solution after the treatments. The main physicochemical parameters and sensorial characteristics of wines produced with AGP were not different from controls.

  16. Approaches to prevent the patients with chronic airway diseases from exacerbation in the haze weather.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Jin; Li, Bo; Yu, Dan; Liu, Jing; Ma, Zhongsen

    2016-01-01

    Haze weather is becoming one of the biggest problems in many big cities in China. It triggers both public anxiety and official concerns. Particulate matter (PM) plays the most important role in causing the adverse health effects. Chemical composition of PM2.5 includes primary particles and secondary particles. The toxicological mechanisms of PM2.5 to the human body include the oxidative stress, inflammation and carcinogenesis. Short or long-term exposure to PM (especially PM2.5) can cause a series of symptoms including respiratory symptoms such as cough, wheezing and dyspnea as well as other symptoms. There are positive associations between PM2.5 and mortality due to a number of causes. PM2.5 is considered to contribute to the onset of asthma, the exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in haze weather. Some approaches including outdoor health care, indoor health care and preventive medications can prevent the patients with chronic airway diseases from exacerbations.

  17. Critical role of meteorological conditions in a persistent haze episode in the Guanzhong basin, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bei, Naifang; Xiao, Bo; Meng, Ning; Feng, Tian

    2016-04-15

    In the present study, the critical role of the meteorological condition in a persistent extreme haze episode that occurred in Guanzhong basin of China on December 16 to 25, 2013 has been investigated. Analyses of the large-scale meteorological conditions on 850hPa during the episode have been performed using the NCEP FNL data set, indicating that synoptic situations generally facilitate the accumulation of pollutants either in horizontal or vertical directions in the basin. The FLEXPART model has been utilized to illustrate the pollutant transport patterns during the episode, further showing the dominant role of synoptic conditions in accumulation of pollutants in the basin. Detailed meteorological conditions, such as temperature inversion, and low-level horizontal wind speed also contribute to the extreme haze episode. In addition, the WRF-CHEM model has been used to evaluate the responses of the surface PM2.5 level to the emission mitigation. Generally, the predicted PM2.5 spatial patterns and temporal variations agree well with the observations at the ambient monitoring sites. Sensitivity studies show that the emissions in the basin need to be mitigated by more than 91% to meet the excellent level of the China National Air Quality Standard under the extremely unfavorable meteorological conditions, demonstrating that it is imperative to implement stringent controls on emissions to improve the air quality.

  18. Impact of haze-fog days to radon progeny equilibrium factor and discussion of related factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Changsong; Shang, Bing; Zhang, Qingzhao; Cui, Hongxing; Wu, Yunyun; Deng, Jun

    2015-11-01

    The equilibrium factor F between radon and its short-lived progenies is an important parameter to estimate radon exposure of humans. Therefore, indoor and outdoor concentrations of radon and its short-lived radon progeny were measured in Beijing area using a continuously measuring device, in an effort to obtain information on the F value. The results showed that the mean values of F were 0.58 ± 0.13 (0.25-0.95, n = 305) and 0.52 ± 0.12 (0.31-0.91, n = 64) for indoor and outdoor, respectively. The indoor F value during haze-fog days was higher than the typical value of 0.4 recommended by the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation, and it was also higher than the values of 0.47 and 0.49 reported in the literature. A positive correlation was observed between indoor F values and PM2.5 concentrations (R (2) = 0.71). Since 2013, owing to frequent heavy haze-fog events in Beijing and surrounding areas, the number of the days with severe pollution remains at a high level. Future studies on the impact of the ambient fine particulate matter on indoor radon progeny equilibrium factor F could be important.

  19. Effect of heavy haze and aerosol pollution on rice and wheat productions in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tie, Xuexi; Huang, Ru-Jin; Dai, Wenting; Cao, Junji; Long, Xin; Su, Xiaoli; Zhao, Shuyu; Wang, Qiyuan; Li, Guohui

    2016-07-08

    In China, regional haze pollution is a serious environmental problem. The impact on ecosystem, however, is not clearly understood. This study investigates the effect of regional haze pollution on the yields of rice and wheat in China. The spatial and temporal distributions of aerosol optical depth (AOD) show high particulate pollution in the North China Plain region, Yangtze River Delta region, the central eastern China, and the Si Chuan Basin, coexisted largely with crop growth in time and space. The solar irradiance reaching these regions is estimated to reduce by up to 28-49%, calculated using the AOD distributions and tropospheric ultraviolet-visible (TUV) model. Reduction of solar irradiance in these regions can depress optimal yields of about 45% of rice and 75% of wheat growth in China, leading to 2% reduction in total rice production and 8% reduction in total wheat production in China. However, there are large uncertainties of the estimate related to the diffuse solar radiation. For high diffuse radiation case, the estimate reductions of rice and wheat decrease to 1% and 4.5%, respectively. A further detailed study is needed to clearly understand this effect to meet the growing food demand in the nation in the coming decades.

  20. Effect of heavy haze and aerosol pollution on rice and wheat productions in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tie, Xuexi; Huang, Ru-Jin; Dai, Wenting; Cao, Junji; Long, Xin; Su, Xiaoli; Zhao, Shuyu; Wang, Qiyuan; Li, Guohui

    2016-07-01

    In China, regional haze pollution is a serious environmental problem. The impact on ecosystem, however, is not clearly understood. This study investigates the effect of regional haze pollution on the yields of rice and wheat in China. The spatial and temporal distributions of aerosol optical depth (AOD) show high particulate pollution in the North China Plain region, Yangtze River Delta region, the central eastern China, and the Si Chuan Basin, coexisted largely with crop growth in time and space. The solar irradiance reaching these regions is estimated to reduce by up to 28–49%, calculated using the AOD distributions and tropospheric ultraviolet-visible (TUV) model. Reduction of solar irradiance in these regions can depress optimal yields of about 45% of rice and 75% of wheat growth in China, leading to 2% reduction in total rice production and 8% reduction in total wheat production in China. However, there are large uncertainties of the estimate related to the diffuse solar radiation. For high diffuse radiation case, the estimate reductions of rice and wheat decrease to 1% and 4.5%, respectively. A further detailed study is needed to clearly understand this effect to meet the growing food demand in the nation in the coming decades.

  1. Approaches to prevent the patients with chronic airway diseases from exacerbation in the haze weather.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Jin; Li, Bo; Yu, Dan; Liu, Jing; Ma, Zhongsen

    2016-01-01

    Haze weather is becoming one of the biggest problems in many big cities in China. It triggers both public anxiety and official concerns. Particulate matter (PM) plays the most important role in causing the adverse health effects. Chemical composition of PM2.5 includes primary particles and secondary particles. The toxicological mechanisms of PM2.5 to the human body include the oxidative stress, inflammation and carcinogenesis. Short or long-term exposure to PM (especially PM2.5) can cause a series of symptoms including respiratory symptoms such as cough, wheezing and dyspnea as well as other symptoms. There are positive associations between PM2.5 and mortality due to a number of causes. PM2.5 is considered to contribute to the onset of asthma, the exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in haze weather. Some approaches including outdoor health care, indoor health care and preventive medications can prevent the patients with chronic airway diseases from exacerbations. PMID:26904232

  2. Organic composition of aerosol particulate matter during a haze episode in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radzi Bin Abas, M.; Rahman, Noorsaadah A.; Omar, Nasr Yousef M. J.; Maah, M. Jamil; Abu Samah, Azizan; Oros, Daniel R.; Otto, Angelika; Simoneit, Bernd R. T.

    The solvent-extractable compounds of urban airborne particulate matter were analyzed to determine the distributions of homologous and biomarker tracers. Samples were collected by high-volume air filtration during the haze episode of 1997 around the University of Malaya campus near Petaling Jaya, a suburb of Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. These results show that the samples contain n-alkanes, n-alkan-2-ones, n-alkanols, methyl n-alkanoates, n-alkyl nitriles, n-alkanals, n-alkanoic acids, levoglucosan, PAHs, and UCM as the dominant components, with minor amounts of terpenoids, glyceryl esters and sterols, all derived from natural biogenic sources (vascular plant wax), from burning of biomass, and from anthropogenic utilization of fossil fuel products (lubricating oil, vehicle emissions, etc.). Some compositional differences are observed in the samples and greater atmospheric concentrations were found for almost all organic components in the samples collected near a roadway. The results interpreted in terms of major sources are due to local build-up of organic contaminants from vehicular emissions, smoke from biomass burning, and natural background as a result of the atmospheric stability during the haze episodes. The organic components transported in from areas outside the region, assuming all smoke components are external to the city, amount to about 30% of the total organic particle burden.

  3. Arctic Landfast Sea Ice 1953-1998

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The files in this data set contain landfast sea ice data (monthly means) gathered from both Russian Arctic and Antarctic Research Institute (AARI) and Canadian Ice...

  4. Arctic Marine Transportation Program 1979-1986

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The purpose of this program was to collect data relevant to developing year-round transportation capabilities in the Arctic Ocean. The US Maritime Administration...

  5. Acoustic Resonance Reaction Control Thruster (ARCTIC) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ORBITEC proposes to develop and demonstrate the innovative Acoustic Resonance Reaction Control Thruster (ARCTIC) to provide rapid and reliable in-space impulse...

  6. Arctic and Southern Ocean Sea Ice Concentrations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Monthly sea ice concentration for Arctic (1901 to 1995) and Southern oceans (1973 to 1990) were digitized on a standard 1-degree grid (cylindrical projection) to...

  7. Arctic parasitology: why should we care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Rebecca; Simard, Manon; Kutz, Susan J; Kapel, Christian M O; Hamnes, Inger S; Robertson, Lucy J

    2011-06-01

    The significant impact on human and animal health from parasitic infections in tropical regions is well known, but parasites of medical and veterinary importance are also found in the Arctic. Subsistence hunting and inadequate food inspection can expose people of the Arctic to foodborne parasites. Parasitic infections can influence the health of wildlife populations and thereby food security. The low ecological diversity that characterizes the Arctic imparts vulnerability. In addition, parasitic invasions and altered transmission of endemic parasites are evident and anticipated to continue under current climate changes, manifesting as pathogen range expansion, host switching, and/or disease emergence or reduction. However, Arctic ecosystems can provide useful models for understanding climate-induced shifts in host-parasite ecology in other regions.

  8. Geologic Provinces of the Arctic, 2000 (prvarcst)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This coverage includes arcs, polygons and polygon labels that describe Arctic portion of the U.S. Geological Survey defined geologic provinces of the World in 2000.

  9. Arctic climate change: Greenhouse warming unleashed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauritsen, Thorsten

    2016-04-01

    Human activity alters the atmospheric composition, which leads to global warming. Model simulations suggest that reductions in emission of sulfur dioxide from Europe since the 1970s could have unveiled rapid Arctic greenhouse gas warming.

  10. Methane from the East Siberian Arctic shelf

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petrenko...[], Vasilii V.; Etheridge, David M.

    2010-01-01

    In their Report “Extensive methane venting to the atmosphere from sediments of the East Siberian Arctic Shelf” (5 March, p. 1246), N. Shakhova et al. write that methane (CH4) release resulting from thawing Arctic permafrost “is a likely positive feedback to climate warming.” They add that the rel......In their Report “Extensive methane venting to the atmosphere from sediments of the East Siberian Arctic Shelf” (5 March, p. 1246), N. Shakhova et al. write that methane (CH4) release resulting from thawing Arctic permafrost “is a likely positive feedback to climate warming.” They add...... we conducted, suggests that a very large (~50%) increase in atmospheric CH4 concentration associated with an abrupt warming event ~11,600 years ago was driven mainly by wetlands, without distinguishing between high and low latitudes. Their reference 9 (3) was published in 1993 and is not relevant...

  11. Boundary survey, Arctic National Wildlife Range

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report is on the geology of the Arctic National Wildlife Range western boundary. The Canning River region and Southern Brooks range are both analyzed,...

  12. Atmospheric dynamics: Arctic winds of change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notz, Dirk

    2016-09-01

    The Earth's climate evolves in response to both externally forced changes and internal variability. Now research suggests that both drivers combine to set the pace of Arctic warming caused by large-scale sea-ice loss.

  13. Revegetation techniques in arctic and subarctic environments

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report covers the revegetation techniques in the arctic and subarctic environments. Background on the subject, as well as a literature reviews concerning...

  14. Politics of sustainability in the Arctic (POSUSA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gad, Ulrik Pram; Jakobsen, Uffe; Strandsbjerg, Jeppe

    The concept of sustainability is of central importance in Arctic politics. However, for different actors (governments, indigenious peoples, NGOs) the concept implies different sets of precautions and opportunities. Sustainability, therefore, is much more a fundamental concept to be further elabor...

  15. Arctic and Aleutian terns, Amchitka Island, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Baird (1980) has recently reported on the ecology of Arctic terns (Sterna paradisaea) and Aleutian terns (Sterna aleutica) from 4 areas of mainland Alaska. However,...

  16. Arctic shipping emissions inventories and future scenarios

    OpenAIRE

    J. J. Corbett; D. A. Lack; J. J. Winebrake; Harder, S; J. A. Silberman; Gold, M.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents 5 km×5 km Arctic emissions inventories of important greenhouse gases, black carbon and other pollutants under existing and future (2050) scenarios that account for growth of shipping in the region, potential diversion traffic through emerging routes, and possible emissions control measures. These high-resolution, geospatial emissions inventories for shipping can be used to evaluate Arctic climate sensitivity to black carbon (a short-lived climate forcing pollutant especial...

  17. Isotopes in the Arctic atmospheric water cycle

    OpenAIRE

    Bonne, Jean-Louis; Werner, Martin; Meyer, Hanno; Kipfstuhl, Sepp; Rabe, Benjamin; Behrens, Melanie; Schönicke, Lutz; Steen-Larsen, Hans Christian; Masson-Delmotte, Valérie

    2016-01-01

    The ISO-ARC project aims at documenting the Arctic atmospheric hydrological cycle, by assessing the imprint of the marine boundary conditions (e.g. temperature variations, circulation changes, or meltwater input) to the isotopic composition of the atmospheric water cycle (H218O and HDO) with a focus on North Atlantic and Arctic oceans. For this purpose, two continuous monitoring water vapour stable isotopes cavity ring-down spectrometers have been installed in July 2015: on-boar...

  18. Studying ocean acidification in the Arctic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) partnership with the U.S. Coast Guard Ice Breaker Healey and its United Nations Convention Law of the Sea (UNCLOS) cruises has produced new synoptic data from samples collected in the Arctic Ocean and insights into the patterns and extent of ocean acidification. This framework of foundational geochemical information will help inform our understanding of potential risks to Arctic resources due to ocean acidification.

  19. The Anatomy of an Arctic Knowledge Debate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sejersen, Frank

    2005-01-01

    Within the last decades, the Arctic research community and the Inuit communities have focused on the question of knowledge to such an extent that we may in fact speak of a knowledge cult.......Within the last decades, the Arctic research community and the Inuit communities have focused on the question of knowledge to such an extent that we may in fact speak of a knowledge cult....

  20. Land-Based Marine Pollution in Arctic

    OpenAIRE

    Haile, Fitsum Gebreselassie

    2014-01-01

    Land-based pollution represents the single most important cause of marine pollution. The threat of land-based pollution to the marine environment is a serious one since it mainly affects coastal waters, which are sites of high biological productivity. The occurrence of high concentrations of pollutants in the Arctic environment has been a concern for many years.. Regional and international actions over the past two decades attempting to manage pollutants in the Arctic environment from land- b...

  1. Fractionation of airborne particulate-bound elements in haze-fog episode and associated health risks in a megacity of southeast China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huiming; Wang, Qin'geng; Shao, Min; Wang, Jinhua; Wang, Cheng; Sun, Yixuan; Qian, Xin; Wu, Hongfei; Yang, Meng; Li, Fengying

    2016-01-01

    Haze caused by high particulate matter loadings is an important environmental issue. PM2.5 was collected in Nanjing, China, during a severe haze-fog event and clear periods. The particulate-bound elements were chemically fractionated using sequential extractions. The average PM2.5 concentration was 3.4 times higher during haze-fog (96-518 μg/m(3)) than non-haze fog periods (49-142 μg/m(3)). Nearly all elements showed significantly higher concentrations during haze-fog than non-haze fog periods. Zn, As, Pb, Cd, Mo and Cu were considered to have higher bioavailability and enrichment degree in the atmosphere. Highly bioavailable fractions of elements were associated with high temperatures. The integrated carcinogenic risk for two possible scenarios to individuals exposed to metals was higher than the accepted criterion of 10(-6), whereas noncarcinogenic risk was lower than the safe level of 1. Residents of a city burdened with haze will incur health risks caused by exposure to airborne metals.

  2. Arctic Ocean data in CARINA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Jutterström

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the steps taken for quality controlling chosen parameters within the Arctic Ocean data included in the CARINA data set and checking for offsets between the individual cruises. The evaluated parameters are the inorganic carbon parameters (total dissolved inorganic carbon, total alkalinity and pH, oxygen and nutrients: nitrate, phosphate and silicate. More parameters can be found in the CARINA data product, but were not subject to a secondary quality control. The main method in determining offsets between cruises was regional multi-linear regression, after a first rough basin-wide deep-water estimate of each parameter. Lastly, the results of the secondary quality control are discussed as well as applied adjustments.

  3. Arctic Ocean data in CARINA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Jutterström

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the steps taken for quality controlling chosen parameters within the Arctic Ocean data included in the CARINA data set and checking for offsets between the individual cruises. The evaluated parameters are the inorganic carbon parameters (total dissolved inorganic carbon, total alkalinity and pH, oxygen and nutrients: nitrate, phosphate and silicate. More parameters can be found in the CARINA data product, but were not subject to a secondary quality control. The main method in determining offsets between cruises was regional multi-linear regression, after a first rough basin-wide deep-water estimate of each parameter. Lastly, the results of the secondary quality control are discussed as well as suggested adjustments.

  4. Zooplankton in the Arctic outflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soloviev, K. A.; Dritz, A. V.; Nikishina, A. B.

    2009-04-01

    Climate changes in the Arctic cause the changes in the current system that may have cascading effect on the structure of plankton community and consequently on the interlinked and delicately balanced food web. Zooplankton species are by definition incapable to perform horizontal moving. Their transport is connected with flowing water. There are zooplankton species specific for the definite water masses and they can be used as markers for the different currents. That allows us to consider zooplankton community composition as a result of water mixing in the studied area. Little is known however about the mechanisms by which spatial and temporal variability in advection affect dynamics of local populations. Ice conditions are also very important in the function of pelagic communities. Melting time is the trigger to all "plankton blooming" processes, and the duration of ice-free conditions determines the food web development in the future. Fram Strait is one of the key regions for the Arctic: the cold water outflow comes through it with the East Greenland Current and meets warm Atlantic water, the West Spitsbergen Current, producing complicated hydrological situation. During 2007 and 2008 we investigated the structure functional characteristics of zooplankton community in the Fram Strait region onboard KV "Svalbard" (April 2007, April and May 2008) and RV "Jan Mayen" (May 2007, August 2008). This study was conducted in frame of iAOOS Norway project "Closing the loop", which, in turn, was a part of IPY. During this cruises multidisciplinary investigations were performed, including sea-ice observations, CTD and ADCP profiling, carbon flux, nutrients and primary production measurements, phytoplankton sampling. Zooplankton was collected with the Hydro-Bios WP2 net and MultiNet Zooplankton Sampler, (mouth area 0.25 m2, mesh size 180 um).Samples were taken from the depth strata of 2000-1500, 1500-1000, 1000-500,500-200, 200-100, 100-60, 60-30, 30-0 m. Gut fluorescence

  5. A model study of smoke-haze influence on clouds and warm precipitation formation in Indonesia 1997/1998

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langmann, Bärbel

    In the last few decades, fire and smoke-haze occurrence increased in Indonesia by intentionally set land clearing fires and higher fire susceptibility of disturbed forests. Particularly, during El Niño years with prolonged droughts in Indonesia, land clearing fires become uncontrolled wildfires and produce large amounts of gaseous and particulate emissions. This paper investigates the influence of smoke-haze aerosols from such fires on clouds and precipitation over Indonesia during the El Niño event 1997/1998 by numerical modelling. Warm precipitation formation in both layered and convective clouds is calculated dependent on the atmospheric aerosol concentration. In the smoke-haze affected regions of Indonesia, aerosol-cloud interactions induce events with both precipitation suppression and increase compared to a reference simulation without aerosol-cloud interactions. The effect of precipitation suppression is found to dominate with about 2/3 of all precipitation modification events pointing to a prolongation of smoke-haze episodes. The corresponding convective cloud top height of shallow clouds is increased whereas distinct lower deep convective cloud top heights are found. The remaining about 1/3 events are characterised by increased precipitation and cloud liquid water content, accompanied by lower convective cloud top heights of shallow clouds and higher deep convective clouds.

  6. Effective prevention of chill-haze in beer using an acid proline-specific endoprotease from Aspergillus niger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Michel; Edens, Luppo

    2005-10-01

    Chill-haze formation during beer production is known to involve polyphenols that interact with proline-rich proteins. We hypothesized that incubating beer wort with a proline-specific protease would extensively hydrolyze these proline-rich proteins, yielding a peptide fraction that is unable to form a haze. Predigestion of the proline-rich wheat gliadin with different proteases pointed toward a strong haze-suppressing effect by a proline-specific enzyme. This finding was confirmed in small-scale brewing experiments using a recently identified proline-specific protease with an acidic pH optimum. Subsequent pilot plant trials demonstrated that, upon its addition during the fermentation phase of beer brewing, even low levels of this acidic enzyme effectively prevented chill-haze formation in bottled beer. Results of beer foam stability measurements indicated that the enzyme treatment leaves the beer foam almost unaffected. In combination with the enzyme's cost-effectiveness and regulatory status, these preliminary test results seem to favor further industrial development of this enzymatic beer stabilization method.

  7. Investigating the impact of haze on cloud detection of passive satellite by comparing MODIS, CloudSat and CALIPSO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, W.; Mao, F.

    2015-12-01

    The cloud detection algorithm for passive sensors is usually based on a fuzzy logic system with thresholds determined from previous observations. In recent years, haze and high aerosol concentrations with high AOD occur frequently in China and may critically impact the accuracy of the MODIS cloud detection. Thus, we comprehensively explore this impact by comparing the results from MODIS/Aqua (passive sensor), CALIOP/CALIPSO (lidar sensor), and CPR/CloudSat (microwave sensor) of the A-Train suite of instruments using an averaged AOD as an index for an aerosol concentration value. Case studies concerning the comparison of the three sensors indicate that MODIS cloud detection is reduced during haze events. In addition, statistical studies show that an increase in AOD creates an increase in the percentage of uncertain flags and a decrease in hit rate, a consistency index between consecutive sets of cloud retrievals. Therefore, we can conclude that the ability of MODIS cloud detection is weakened by large concentrations of aerosols. This suggests that use of the MODIS cloud mask, and derived higher level products, in situations with haze requires caution. Further improvement of this retrieval algorithm, is desired as haze studies based on MODIS products are of great interest in a number of related fields.

  8. Decadal variability in the occurrence of wintertime haze in central eastern China tied to the Pacific Decadal Oscillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Sen; Li, Jianping; Sun, Cheng

    2016-06-10

    Haze is a serious issue in China with increasing concerns, and understanding the factors driving decadal-scale variations in haze occurrence is relevant for government policymaking. Using a comprehensive observational haze dataset, we demonstrate notable decadal fluctuations in the number of haze days (HD) during winter in central eastern China, showing a decline since the mid-1980s. The leading mode of the wintertime HD features an increasing trend for 1959-2012 in eastern China, highly correlated with China's gross domestic product (GDP) that represents increasing trend of pollutant emissions, and to a lesser extent meteorological factors. The second mode shows decadal variations in central eastern China associated with Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO). Observations and numerical simulations suggest that Mongolia High and corresponding descending motion tend to be enhanced (weakened) in central eastern China during the positive (negative) phase of PDO. With PDO shifting towards a negative phase, the weakened Mongolia High and ascending anomalies make the air unstable and conduce to the spread of pollutants, leading to the decline in the wintertime HD over central eastern China since the mid-1980s. Based on above physical mechanisms, a linear model based on PDO and GDP metrics provided a good fit to the observed HD.

  9. Hoe hoger de haze bij diffuus glas, hoe hoger de meerproductie (interview met Jan Janse en Sonny Moerenhout)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kierkels, T.; Janse, J.; Moerenhout, S.

    2012-01-01

    Een vroege komkommerteelt onder diffuus glas gaf vanaf het begin een grotere opbrengst dan onder gewoon glas. Jan Janse van Wageningen UR Glastuinbouw durft na de reeks proeven in de afgelopen jaren de conclusie te trekken: hoe hoger de haze, hoe hoger de meerproductie. Dus ook in een vroege teelt.

  10. Decadal variability in the occurrence of wintertime haze in central eastern China tied to the Pacific Decadal Oscillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Sen; Li, Jianping; Sun, Cheng

    2016-06-01

    Haze is a serious issue in China with increasing concerns, and understanding the factors driving decadal-scale variations in haze occurrence is relevant for government policymaking. Using a comprehensive observational haze dataset, we demonstrate notable decadal fluctuations in the number of haze days (HD) during winter in central eastern China, showing a decline since the mid-1980s. The leading mode of the wintertime HD features an increasing trend for 1959–2012 in eastern China, highly correlated with China’s gross domestic product (GDP) that represents increasing trend of pollutant emissions, and to a lesser extent meteorological factors. The second mode shows decadal variations in central eastern China associated with Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO). Observations and numerical simulations suggest that Mongolia High and corresponding descending motion tend to be enhanced (weakened) in central eastern China during the positive (negative) phase of PDO. With PDO shifting towards a negative phase, the weakened Mongolia High and ascending anomalies make the air unstable and conduce to the spread of pollutants, leading to the decline in the wintertime HD over central eastern China since the mid-1980s. Based on above physical mechanisms, a linear model based on PDO and GDP metrics provided a good fit to the observed HD.

  11. Arctic response strategy: Canadian Coast Guard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The revision of the Canadian Coast Guard's Arctic response strategy was described with particular focus on the consultative method used to ensure that all perspectives were taken into consideration. Some tankers used to re-supply fuel to remote Arctic communities carry more than 30,000 tonnes of product, putting them at risk for major spills. The Arctic response strategy was revised to emphasize recommendations for prevention, preparedness and response. Prevention was recognized as the most effective solution to oil spills in the Arctic. The leadership and coordination roles of the Canadian Coast Guard were demonstrated in relation to ship-source oil pollution. The new strategy also outlined the equipment requirements needed to respond to a large spill in the Arctic. Categorization of spill sizes as tier 1 to 4 was determined by examining southern regimes as was the characterization of corresponding equipment. Implementation of the new recommendations of the revised Arctic response strategy will take place over the next 2 years. The prevention aspect will include some legislative changes or stricter guidelines

  12. Characteristics and formation mechanism of continuous extreme hazes in China: a case study in autumn of 2014 in the North China Plain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. R. Yang

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Four extreme haze episodes occurred in October 2014 in the North China Plain (NCP. To clarify the formation mechanism of hazes in the autumn, strengthened observations were conducted in Beijing from 5 October to 2 November. The meteorological parameters, satellite data, chemical compositions and optical properties of aerosols were obtained. The hazes originated from NCP, developing in the southwest and northeast directions, with the highest concentration of PM2.5 of 469 μg m−3 in Beijing. NCP was dominated by a weak high pressure system during the haze episode, which resulted in low surface wind speed and relatively stagnant weather. Moreover, the wind slowed down around Beijing city. The secondary aerosols NO3− was always higher than that of SO42−, which indicated the motor vehicles played a more important part in the hazes in October 2014, even though the oxidation rate from SO2 to SO42− was faster than that of NOx to NO3−. Sudden increases of the concentrations of organic matter, Cl− and BC (Black carbon before each haze episode implied that regional transport of pollutants by biomass burning was important for haze formation during the autumn. A satellite map of fire points and the backward trajectories of the air masses also indicated this pollution source. The distinct decrease in the PBL (planetary boundary layer height during four haze episodes restrained the vertical dispersion of the air pollutants. Water vapor also played a vital role in the formation of hazes by accelerating the chemical transformation of secondary pollutants, leading to hygroscopic growth of aerosols and altering the thermal balance of the atmosphere.

  13. Characteristics and formation mechanism of continuous hazes in China: a case study during the autumn of 2014 in the North China Plain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Y. R.; Liu, X. G.; Qu, Y.; An, J. L.; Jiang, R.; Zhang, Y. H.; Sun, Y. L.; Wu, Z. J.; Zhang, F.; Xu, W. Q.; Ma, Q. X.

    2015-07-01

    Four extreme haze episodes occurred in October 2014 in the North China Plain (NCP). To clarify the formation mechanism of hazes in autumn, strengthened observations were conducted in Beijing from 5 October to 2 November. The meteorological parameters, satellite data, chemical compositions and optical properties of aerosols were obtained. The hazes originated from the NCP, developing in the southwest and northeast directions, with the highest concentration of PM2.5 of 469 μg m-3 in Beijing. The NCP was dominated by a weak high pressure system during the haze episode, which resulted in low surface wind speed and relatively stagnant weather. Moreover, the wind slowed down around Beijing city. The secondary aerosols NO3- was always higher than that of SO42-, which indicated the motor vehicles played a more important part in the hazes in October 2014, even though the oxidation rate from SO2 to SO42- was faster than that of NOx to NO3-. Sudden increases of the concentrations of organic matter, Cl- and BC (black carbon) before each haze episode implied that regional transport of pollutants by biomass burning was important for haze formation during autumn. A satellite map of fire points and the backward trajectories of the air masses also indicated this pollution source. The distinct decrease in the PBL (planetary boundary layer) height during four haze episodes restrained the vertical dispersion of the air pollutants. Water vapor also played a vital role in the formation of hazes by accelerating the chemical transformation of secondary pollutants, leading to hygroscopic growth of aerosols and altering the thermal balance of the atmosphere.

  14. Size-resolved aerosol chemical analysis of extreme haze pollution events during early 2013 in urban Beijing, China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Shili; Pan, Yuepeng, E-mail: panyuepeng@mail.iap.ac.cn; Liu, Zirui; Wen, Tianxue; Wang, Yuesi, E-mail: wys@mail.iap.ac.cn

    2014-08-30

    Highlights: • Anthropogenic species substantially accumulated in both fine and coarse particles. • Secondary organic carbon in PM{sub 1.1} decreased from clear to haze days. • The mass peak shifted to larger particles from clear to haze days. • The NO{sub 3}{sup −}/SO{sub 4}{sup 2−} ratio decreased with enhanced haze pollution. • Both mobile local and stationary regional sources were vital for haze formation. - Abstract: Using size-resolved filter sampling and chemical characterization, high concentrations of water-soluble ions, carbonaceous species and heavy metals were found in both fine (PM{sub 2.1}) and coarse (PM{sub 2.1–9}) particles in Beijing during haze events in early 2013. Even on clear days, average mass concentration of submicron particles (PM{sub 1.1}) was several times higher than that previously measured in most of abroad urban areas. A high concentration of particulate matter on haze days weakens the incident solar radiation, which reduces the generation rate of secondary organic carbon in PM{sub 1.1}. We show that the peak mass concentration of particles shifted from 0.43–0.65 μm on clear days to 0.65–1.1 μm on lightly polluted days and to 1.1–2.1 μm on heavily polluted days. The peak shifts were also found for the following species: organic carbon, elemental carbon, NH{sub 4}{sup +}, SO{sub 4}{sup 2−}, NO{sub 3}{sup −}, K, Cu, Zn, Cd and Pb. Our findings demonstrate that secondary inorganic aerosols (36%) and organic matter (26%) dominated the fine particle mass on heavily polluted days, while their contribution reduced to 29% and 18%, respectively, on clear days. Besides fine particles, anthropogenic chemical species also substantially accumulated in the coarse mode, which suggests that particles with aerodynamic diameter larger than 2.1 μm cannot be neglected during severe haze events.

  15. Trace element concentrations and gastrointestinal parasites of Arctic terns breeding in the Canadian High Arctic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provencher, J F; Braune, B M; Gilchrist, H G; Forbes, M R; Mallory, M L

    2014-04-01

    Baseline data on trace element concentrations are lacking for many species of Arctic marine birds. We measured essential and non-essential element concentrations in Arctic tern (Sterna paradisaea) liver tissue and brain tissue (mercury only) from Canada's High Arctic, and recorded the presence/absence of gastrointestinal parasites during four different phases of the breeding season. Arctic terns from northern Canada had similar trace element concentrations to other seabird species feeding at the same trophic level in the same region. Concentrations of bismuth, selenium, lead and mercury in Arctic terns were high compared to published threshold values for birds. Selenium and mercury concentrations were also higher in Arctic terns from northern Canada than bird species sampled in other Arctic areas. Selenium, mercury and arsenic concentrations varied across the time periods examined, suggesting potential regional differences in the exposure of biota to these elements. For unknown reasons, selenium concentrations were significantly higher in birds with gastrointestinal parasites as compared to those without parasites, while bismuth concentrations were higher in Arctic terns not infected with gastrointestinal parasites.

  16. Study on governance of water resources and haze pollution%水资源与雾霾污染治理研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张春华

    2015-01-01

    近年来,随着雾霾的频繁发生,水资源的污染更加严重。在阐述雾霾对水资源影响的基础上,提出了水资源与雾霾污染的同步治理。%In recent years, pollution of water resources is more serious with the frequent occurrence of haze, through the analy-sis of influence of haze on water resources, we suggest the simultaneous governance of water resources and haze pollution.

  17. Evolution process and sources of ambient volatile organic compounds during a severe haze event in Beijing, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Rongrong; Li, Jing; Hao, Yufang; Li, Yaqi; Zeng, Limin; Xie, Shaodong

    2016-08-01

    108 ambient volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were measured continuously at a time resolution of an hour using an online gas chromatography-frame ionization detector/mass spectrometry (GC-FID/MS) in October 2014 in Beijing, and positive matrix factorization (PMF) was performed with online data. The evolution process and causes for high levels of VOCs during a haze event were investigated through comprehensive analysis. Results show that mixing ratios of VOCs during the haze event (89.29 ppbv) were 2 to 5 times as that in non-haze days, There was a distinct accumulation process of VOCs at the beginning of the haze event, and the mixing ratios of VOCs maintained at the high levels until to the end of pollution when the mixing ratios of ambient VOCs recovered to the normal concentration levels in a few hours. Some reactive and toxic species increased remarkably as well, which indicates a potential health risk to the public in terms of VOCs. Eight sources were resolved by PMF, and results revealed gasoline exhaust was the largest contributor (32-46%) to the ambient VOCs in Beijing. Emissions of gasoline exhaust surged from 13.46 to 40.36 ppbv, with a similar variation pattern to total VOCs, indicating that high levels of VOCs were largely driven to by expanded vehicular emissions. Emissions of biomass burning also increased noticeably (from 2.32 to 11.12 ppbv), and backward trajectories analysis indicated regional transport of biomass burning emissions. Our findings suggested that extremely high levels of VOCs during the haze event was primarily attributed to vehicular emissions, biomass burning and regional transport, as well as stationary synoptic conditions. PMID:27093124

  18. Evolution process and sources of ambient volatile organic compounds during a severe haze event in Beijing, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Rongrong; Li, Jing; Hao, Yufang; Li, Yaqi; Zeng, Limin; Xie, Shaodong

    2016-08-01

    108 ambient volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were measured continuously at a time resolution of an hour using an online gas chromatography-frame ionization detector/mass spectrometry (GC-FID/MS) in October 2014 in Beijing, and positive matrix factorization (PMF) was performed with online data. The evolution process and causes for high levels of VOCs during a haze event were investigated through comprehensive analysis. Results show that mixing ratios of VOCs during the haze event (89.29 ppbv) were 2 to 5 times as that in non-haze days, There was a distinct accumulation process of VOCs at the beginning of the haze event, and the mixing ratios of VOCs maintained at the high levels until to the end of pollution when the mixing ratios of ambient VOCs recovered to the normal concentration levels in a few hours. Some reactive and toxic species increased remarkably as well, which indicates a potential health risk to the public in terms of VOCs. Eight sources were resolved by PMF, and results revealed gasoline exhaust was the largest contributor (32-46%) to the ambient VOCs in Beijing. Emissions of gasoline exhaust surged from 13.46 to 40.36 ppbv, with a similar variation pattern to total VOCs, indicating that high levels of VOCs were largely driven to by expanded vehicular emissions. Emissions of biomass burning also increased noticeably (from 2.32 to 11.12 ppbv), and backward trajectories analysis indicated regional transport of biomass burning emissions. Our findings suggested that extremely high levels of VOCs during the haze event was primarily attributed to vehicular emissions, biomass burning and regional transport, as well as stationary synoptic conditions.

  19. Long-term trend of haze pollution and impact of particulate matter in the Yangtze River Delta, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haze pollution caused by heavy particulate matter (PM) loading brings significant damage in eastern China. Long-term monitoring from 1980 to 2011 and 1-year field measurement in 2011–2012 are used for investigating visibility variation and the impact of PM pollution for the Yangtze River Delta (YRD). It was found that visual range in the YRD endured a sharp reduction from 13.2 km to 10.5 km during 1980–2000. Average mass extinction efficiency (MEE) for inhalable PM (PM10) is 2.25 m2/g in 2001–2011, and extinction coefficient due to PM10 is 207 Mm−1, accounting for 36.2% of total extinction coefficient. MEE of PM2.5 and PM2.5–10 are 4.08 m2/g and 0.58 m2/g, respectively. Extinction coefficient due to PM2.5 and PM2.5–10 is 198 Mm−1 (39.6%) and 20 Mm−1 (4.0%) in 2011–2012. Maximum daily concentration of PM10 and PM2.5 is estimated to be 63 μg/m3 (RH: 73%) and 38 μg/m3 (RH: 70%) to keep visual range above 10 km. Fine particulate matter is the key factor for haze pollution improvement in the YRD area. -- Highlights: •Long-term visual range variation and its causes in the Yangtze River Delta are analyzed. •Quantitative contribution of particulate matter to haze pollution is estimated. •Mass extinction efficiency of PM10, PM2.5, and PM2.5–10 is estimated. -- The long-term variation of haze pollution in the YRD and its cause is investigated and the quantitative contribution of particulate matter to haze pollution is estimated

  20. Arctic summer school onboard an icebreaker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexeev, Vladimir A.; Repina, Irina A.

    2014-05-01

    The International Arctic Research Center (IARC) of the University of Alaska Fairbanks conducted a summer school for PhD students, post-docs and early career scientists in August-September 2013, jointly with an arctic expedition as a part of NABOS project (Nansen and Amundsen Basin Observational System) onboard the Russian research vessel "Akademik Fedorov". Both the summer school and NABOS expedition were funded by the National Science Foundation. The one-month long summer school brought together graduate students and young scientists with specialists in arctic oceanography and climate to convey to a new generation of scientists the opportunities and challenges of arctic climate observations and modeling. Young scientists gained hands-on experience during the field campaign and learned about key issues in arctic climate from observational, diagnostic, and modeling perspectives. The summer school consisted of background lectures, participation in fieldwork and mini-projects. The mini-projects were performed in collaboration with summer school instructors and members of the expedition. Key topics covered in the lectures included: - arctic climate: key characteristics and processes; - physical processes in the Arctic Ocean; - sea ice and the Arctic Ocean; - trace gases, aerosols, and chemistry: importance for climate changes; - feedbacks in the arctic system (e.g., surface albedo, clouds, water vapor, circulation); - arctic climate variations: past, ongoing, and projected; - global climate models: an overview. An outreach specialist from the Miami Science Museum was writing a blog from the icebreaker with some very impressive statistics (results as of January 1, 2014): Total number of blog posts: 176 Blog posts written/contributed by scientists: 42 Blog views: 22,684 Comments: 1,215 Number of countries who viewed the blog: 89 (on 6 continents) The 33-day long NABOS expedition started on August 22, 2013 from Kirkenes, Norway. The vessel ("Akademik Fedorov") returned to

  1. Typical types and formation mechanisms of haze in an eastern Asia megacity, Shanghai

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Huang

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available An intensive aerosol and gases campaign has been performed at Shanghai in the Yangtze River Delta region over Eastern China from late March to early June 2009. This study provided a complementary picture of typical haze types and formation mechanisms in megacities over China by using a synergy of ground-based monitoring, satellite observation and lidar inversion. During the whole study period, several extreme low visibility periods were observed with distinct characteristics, and three typical haze types were identified, i.e. secondary inorganic pollution, dust, and biomass burning. Sulfate, nitrate and ammonium accounted for a major part of PM2.5 mass during the secondary inorganic pollution, and the good correlation between SO2/NOx/CO and PM2.5 indicated that coal burning and vehicle emission were the major sources. Large-scale regions with high AOD and low Ångström exponent were detected by remote-sensing observation during the dust pollution episode, and this episode corresponded to coarse particles rich in mineral components such as Al and Ca with mineral aerosol contributing 76.8 % to TSP. The relatively low Ca/Al ratio of 0.75 combined with the air mass backward trajectory analysis suggested the dust source from Gobi Desert. Typical tracers for biomass burning from satellite observation (column CO and HCHO and from ground measurement (CO, particulate K+, OC, and EC were greatly enhanced during the biomass burning pollution episode. The exclusive linear correlation between CO and PM2.5 corroborated that organic aerosol dominated aerosol chemistry during biomass burning, and the high concentration and enrichment degree of arsenic (As could be also partly derived from biomass burning. Aerosol optical profile observed by lidar demonstrated that aerosol was mainly constrained below the boundary layer and comprised of spheric aerosol (depolarization ratio <5 % during the

  2. Impact of relative humidity on visibility degradation during a haze event: A case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Hua; Tan, Haobo; Li, Fei; Cai, Mingfu; Chan, P W; Xu, Hanbing; Huang, Xiaoying; Wu, Dui

    2016-11-01

    Light scattering of aerosols depends on ambient relative humidity (RH) since hygroscopic particles absorb significant water at high RH, and this results in low visibility. This paper used custom-made parallel nephelometers (PNEPs) to measure aerosol light scattering enhancement factor ƒ(RH), and utilized data including visibility, PM2.5, black carbon, water-soluble ions mass concentrations and surface meteorological parameters, in conjunction with background weather conditions, to analyze a haze event in Guangzhou during 8th-15th Dec. 2013. Unfavorable weather conditions, such as high RH and low wind speed, were observed during the haze event. The hourly average mass concentration of PM2.5 was 127μg/m(3), with concentration of 192.4μg/m(3) on 9th and 196μg/m(3) on 13th. The ƒ(RH) did not exhibit significant changes during this haze process, with value of ƒ(80%)=1.58±0.07. Although the mass fraction of water-soluble ions to PM2.5 decreased after 12th Dec., the aerosol hygroscopicity might not have changed significantly since the mass fraction of nitrate became more dominant, which has stronger ability to take up water. The best-fitted parameterized function for ƒ(RH) is ƒ(RH)=0.731+0.1375∗(1-RH/100)(-1)+0.00719∗(1-RH/100)(-2). Combining the fixed parameterization of ƒ(RH) above, the visibility was calculated with the measured light scattering and absorption coefficient of particles and gas under dry condition, as well as ambient RH. The predicted visibility range agrees well with the measurements without precipitation. Using ISORROPIA II model, the calculated aerosol liquid water content (ALWC) at ambient RH varied consistently with the PM2.5 under lower RH, while it was more influenced by high RH. This work also show that high RH accompanied with precipitation will enhance aerosol hygroscopic growth effect, leading to further visibility degradation, even if PM2.5 mass decreased due to precipitation. PMID:27395081

  3. Laboratory Investigations of Titan Haze Formation: Characterization of Gas Phase and Particle Phase Nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horst, Sarah; Yoon, Heidi; Li, Rui; deGouw, Joost; Tolbert, Margaret

    2014-11-01

    Prior to the arrival of the Cassini-Huygens spacecraft, aerosol production in Titan’s atmosphere was believed to begin in the stratosphere where chemical processes are predominantly initiated by far ultraviolet (FUV) radiation. However, the discovery of very heavy ions, coupled with Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) occultation measurements that show haze absorption up to 1000 km altitude (Liang et al., 2007), indicates that haze formation initiates in the thermosphere. The energy environment of the thermosphere is significantly different from the stratosphere; in particular there is a greater flux of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) photons and energetic particles available to initiate chemical reactions, including the destruction of N2, in the upper atmosphere. The discovery of previously unpredicted nitrogen species in measurements of Titan’s atmosphere by the Cassini Ion and Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) indicates that nitrogen participates in the chemistry to a much greater extent than was appreciated before Cassini (Vuitton et al., 2007). Additionally, measurements obtained by the Aerosol Collector Pyrolyzer (ACP) carried by Huygens to Titan’s surface may indicate that Titan’s aerosols contain significant amounts of nitrogen (Israël et al., 2005, 2006). The degree of nitrogen incorporation in the haze particles is important for understanding the diversity of molecules that may be present in Titan’s atmosphere and on its surface. We have conducted a series of Titan atmosphere simulation experiments using either spark discharge (tesla coil) or FUV photons (deuterium lamp) to initiate chemistry in CH4/N2 gas mixtures ranging from 0.01% CH4/99.99% N2 to 10% CH4/90% N2. We obtained in situ measurements using a high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) to measure the particle composition as a function of particle size and a proton-transfer ion-trap mass spectrometer (PIT-MS) to measure the composition of gas phase

  4. Impact of relative humidity on visibility degradation during a haze event: A case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Hua; Tan, Haobo; Li, Fei; Cai, Mingfu; Chan, P W; Xu, Hanbing; Huang, Xiaoying; Wu, Dui

    2016-11-01

    Light scattering of aerosols depends on ambient relative humidity (RH) since hygroscopic particles absorb significant water at high RH, and this results in low visibility. This paper used custom-made parallel nephelometers (PNEPs) to measure aerosol light scattering enhancement factor ƒ(RH), and utilized data including visibility, PM2.5, black carbon, water-soluble ions mass concentrations and surface meteorological parameters, in conjunction with background weather conditions, to analyze a haze event in Guangzhou during 8th-15th Dec. 2013. Unfavorable weather conditions, such as high RH and low wind speed, were observed during the haze event. The hourly average mass concentration of PM2.5 was 127μg/m(3), with concentration of 192.4μg/m(3) on 9th and 196μg/m(3) on 13th. The ƒ(RH) did not exhibit significant changes during this haze process, with value of ƒ(80%)=1.58±0.07. Although the mass fraction of water-soluble ions to PM2.5 decreased after 12th Dec., the aerosol hygroscopicity might not have changed significantly since the mass fraction of nitrate became more dominant, which has stronger ability to take up water. The best-fitted parameterized function for ƒ(RH) is ƒ(RH)=0.731+0.1375∗(1-RH/100)(-1)+0.00719∗(1-RH/100)(-2). Combining the fixed parameterization of ƒ(RH) above, the visibility was calculated with the measured light scattering and absorption coefficient of particles and gas under dry condition, as well as ambient RH. The predicted visibility range agrees well with the measurements without precipitation. Using ISORROPIA II model, the calculated aerosol liquid water content (ALWC) at ambient RH varied consistently with the PM2.5 under lower RH, while it was more influenced by high RH. This work also show that high RH accompanied with precipitation will enhance aerosol hygroscopic growth effect, leading to further visibility degradation, even if PM2.5 mass decreased due to precipitation.

  5. What have we learned from HaChi (HAZE IN CHINA) project?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chunsheng; Wiedensohler, Alfred

    2016-04-01

    HaChi (Haze in China) project, a joint research between Chinese NSFC and German DFG, focuses on investigating the aerosol hygroscopic properties in the North China Plain and their relationships to aerosol optics, radiation, cloud physics and ozone photochemistry. As we know, Eastern China has suffered from severe pollution caused by large concentrations of aerosol particles resulting from emissions from fossil fuel and biomass burning, transportation and some other combustion sources. Low visibility events are frequently encountered and mainly accompanied with haze as a result of either high aerosol loading or the strong hygroscopic growth of the aerosol particles. Especially at relative humidities between 90 and 99%, the aerosol particles grow exponentially. The hygroscopic behaviors at relative humidities close to 100% are also strongly linked to the particles ability to grow into cloud droplets at supersaturation. In my talk, I will present an overview of the up to date results from a serial of intensive and comprehensive field campaigns conducted at the sites of Wuqing and Xianghe, China, between 2009 and 2014. The measurements of the ambient aerosol hygroscopic properties at high RH between 90 and 98.5% are reported first. These in situ field measurements of atmospheric aerosol are unique with respect to their high RH range and especially of importance to better understand the widespread anthropogenic haze over the North China Plain. Then I will introduce the methods for calculating of aerosol hygroscopicity and their parameterization schemes derived from size-segregated chemical composition and the light scattering enhancement factor measurements in the North China Plain. A new method was proposed to retrieve the ratio of the externally mixed light absorbing carbon mass to the total mass of light absorbing carbon. A new parameterization scheme of light extinction for low visibilities on hazy days is proposed based on visibility, relative humidity, aerosol

  6. ArcticDEM; A Publically Available, High Resolution Elevation Model of the Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, Paul; Porter, Claire; Cloutier, Michael; Howat, Ian; Noh, Myoung-Jong; Willis, Michael; Bates, Brian; Willamson, Cathleen; Peterman, Kennith

    2016-04-01

    A Digital Elevation Model (DEM) of the Arctic is needed for a large number of reasons, including: measuring and understanding rapid, ongoing changes to the Arctic landscape resulting from climate change and human use and mitigation and adaptation planning for Arctic communities. The topography of the Arctic is more poorly mapped than most other regions of Earth due to logistical costs and the limits of satellite missions with low-latitude inclinations. A convergence of civilian, high-quality sub-meter stereo imagery; petascale computing and open source photogrammetry software has made it possible to produce a complete, very high resolution (2 to 8-meter posting), elevation model of the Arctic. A partnership between the US National Geospatial-intelligence Agency and a team led by the US National Science Foundation funded Polar Geospatial Center is using stereo imagery from DigitalGlobe's Worldview-1, 2 and 3 satellites and the Ohio State University's Surface Extraction with TIN-based Search-space Minimization (SETSM) software running on the University of Illinois's Blue Water supercomputer to address this challenge. The final product will be a seemless, 2-m posting digital surface model mosaic of the entire Arctic above 60 North including all of Alaska, Greenland and Kamchatka. We will also make available the more than 300,000 individual time-stamped DSM strip pairs that were used to assemble the mosaic. The Arctic DEM will have a vertical precision of better than 0.5m and can be used to examine changes in land surfaces such as those caused by permafrost degradation or the evolution of arctic rivers and floodplains. The data set can also be used to highlight changing geomorphology due to Earth surface mass transport processes occurring in active volcanic and glacial environments. When complete the ArcticDEM will catapult the Arctic from the worst to among the best mapped regions on Earth.

  7. The Arctic Grand Challenge: Abrupt Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkniss, P. E.

    2003-12-01

    Trouble in polar paradise (Science, 08/30/02), significant changes in the Arctic environment are scientifically documented (R.E. Moritz et al. ibid.). More trouble, lots more, "abrupt climate change," (R. B. Alley, et al. Science 03/28/03). R. Corell, Arctic Climate Impact Assessment team (ACIA), "If you want to see what will happen in the rest of the world 25 years from now just look what's happening in the Arctic," (Arctic Council meeting, Iceland, 08/03). What to do? Make abrupt Arctic climate change a grand challenge for the IPY-4 and beyond! Scientifically:Describe the "state" of the Arctic climate system as succinctly as possible and accept it as the point of departure.Develop a hypothesis and criteria what constitutes "abrupt climate change," in the Arctic that can be tested with observations. Observations: Bring to bear existing observations and coordinate new investments in observations through an IPY-4 scientific management committee. Make the new Barrow, Alaska, Global Climate Change Research Facility a major U.S. contribution and focal point for the IPY-4 in the U.S Arctic. Arctic populations, Native peoples: The people of the North are living already, daily, with wrenching change, encroaching on their habitats and cultures. For them "the earth is faster now," (I. Krupnik and D. Jolly, ARCUS, 2002). From a political, economic, social and entirely realistic perspective, an Arctic grand challenge without the total integration of the Native peoples in this effort cannot succeed. Therefore: Communications must be established, and the respective Native entities must be approached with the determination to create well founded, well functioning, enduring partnerships. In the U.S. Arctic, Barrow with its long history of involvement and active support of science and with the new global climate change research facility should be the focal point of choice Private industry: Resource extraction in the Arctic followed by oil and gas consumption, return the combustion

  8. Hydrochemical Atlas of the Arctic Ocean (NODC Accession 0044630)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The present Hydrochemical Atlas of the Arctic Ocean is a description of hydrochemical conditions in the Arctic Ocean on the basis of a greater body of hydrochemical...

  9. A quantitative assessment of Arctic shipping in 2010–2014

    KAUST Repository

    Eguíluz, Victor M.

    2016-08-01

    Rapid loss of sea ice is opening up the Arctic Ocean to shipping, a practice that is forecasted to increase rapidly by 2050 when many models predict that the Arctic Ocean will largely be free of ice toward the end of summer. These forecasts carry considerable uncertainty because Arctic shipping was previously considered too sparse to allow for adequate validation. Here, we provide quantitative evidence that the extent of Arctic shipping in the period 2011–2014 is already significant and that it is concentrated (i) in the Norwegian and Barents Seas, and (ii) predominantly accessed via the Northeast and Northwest Passages. Thick ice along the forecasted direct trans-Arctic route was still present in 2014, preventing transit. Although Arctic shipping remains constrained by the extent of ice coverage, during every September, this coverage is at a minimum, allowing the highest levels of shipping activity. Access to Arctic resources, particularly fisheries, is the most important driver of Arctic shipping thus far.

  10. Arctic shipping emissions inventories and future scenarios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. J. Corbett

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The Arctic is a sensitive region in terms of climate change and a rich natural resource for global economic activity. Arctic shipping is an important contributor to the region's anthropogenic air emissions, including black carbon – a short-lived climate forcing pollutant especially effective in accelerating the melting of ice and snow. These emissions are projected to increase as declining sea ice coverage due to climate change allows for increased shipping activity in the Arctic. To understand the impacts of these increased emissions, scientists and modelers require high-resolution, geospatial emissions inventories that can be used for regional assessment modeling. This paper presents 5 km×5 km Arctic emissions inventories of important greenhouse gases, black carbon and other pollutants under existing and future (2050 scenarios that account for growth of shipping in the region, potential diversion traffic through emerging routes, and possible emissions control measures. Short-lived forcing of ~4.5 gigagrams of black carbon from Arctic shipping may increase climate forcing; a first-order calculation of global warming potential due to 2030 emissions in the high-growth scenario suggests that short-lived forcing of ~4.5 gigagrams of black carbon from Arctic shipping may increase climate forcing due to Arctic ships by at least 17% compared to warming from these vessels' CO2 emissions (~42 000 gigagrams. The paper also presents maximum feasible reduction scenarios for black carbon in particular. These emissions reduction scenarios will enable scientists and policymakers to evaluate the efficacy and benefits of technological controls for black carbon, and other pollutants from ships.

  11. Regional Haze

    Science.gov (United States)

    This indicator presents visibility trends measured at 41 locations in National Parks and Wilderness Areas between 1992 and 2008. Visibility impairment is caused by air pollution, especially particulate matter pollution, and limits the distance one can see and degrades the colo...

  12. Arctic aerosol life cycle: linking aerosol size distributions observed between 2000 and 2010 with air mass transport and precipitation at Zeppelin station, Ny-Ålesund, Svalbard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Tunved

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In this study we present a qualitative and quantitative assessment of more the 10 yr of aerosol number size distribution data observed in the Arctic environment (Mt Zeppelin (78°56' N, 11°53' E, 474 m a.s.l., Ny Ålesund, Svalbard. We provide statistics on both seasonal and diurnal characteristics of the aerosol observations and conclude that the Arctic aerosol number size distribution and auxiliary parameters such as integral mass and surface have a very pronounced seasonal variation. This seasonal variation seems to be controlled by both dominating source as well as meteorological conditions in general. In principle, three distinctly different periods can be identified during the Arctic year: the haze period characterized by a dominating accumulation mode aerosol (March–May followed by the sunlit summer period with low abundance of accumulation mode particles but high concentration of small particles which likely are recently and locally formed (June–August. The rest of the year is characterized by comparably low concentration of accumulation mode particles and negligible abundance of ultra fine particles (September–February. Minimum aerosol mass and number concentration is usually observed during September/October. We further show that the transition between the different regimes is fast, suggesting rapid change in conditions defining their appearance. A source climatology based on trajectory analysis is provided and it is shown that there is a strong seasonality of dominating source areas, with dominance of Eurasia during the autumn-winter period and dominance of North Atlantic air during the summer months. We also show that new particle formation events seem to be a rather common phenomenon during the Arctic summer, and this is the result of both photochemical production of nucleating/condensing species and low condensation sink. It is also suggested that wet removal play a key role in defining the Arctic aerosol year, and plays a

  13. Changing geo-political realities in the Arctic region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Camilla T. N.

    2014-01-01

    This article analyzes and discusses how Denmark seeks to manage the changing geopolitical realities in the Arctic region specifically focusing on how Denmark seeks to manage its relations with China in the Arctic region.......This article analyzes and discusses how Denmark seeks to manage the changing geopolitical realities in the Arctic region specifically focusing on how Denmark seeks to manage its relations with China in the Arctic region....

  14. Arctic shipping and China : Governance structure and future developments

    OpenAIRE

    Hjalti Þór Hreinsson 1984

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this thesis is to study China’s shipping ambitions in the Arctic and the pertinent governing instruments. Arctic shipping poses significant challenges for Arctic governance with increased access to its oceans for shipping companies. Arctic transit is driven by demanding world markets in the West and the rising economic powers of the East, looking for the most cost-efficient routes. Rapid ice melt leads to better access for vessels, but other obstacles await those interested in Arc...

  15. A quantitative assessment of Arctic shipping in 2010–2014

    OpenAIRE

    Victor M Eguíluz; Fernández-Gracia, Juan; Irigoien, Xabier; Duarte, Carlos M.

    2016-01-01

    Rapid loss of sea ice is opening up the Arctic Ocean to shipping, a practice that is forecasted to increase rapidly by 2050 when many models predict that the Arctic Ocean will largely be free of ice toward the end of summer. These forecasts carry considerable uncertainty because Arctic shipping was previously considered too sparse to allow for adequate validation. Here, we provide quantitative evidence that the extent of Arctic shipping in the period 2011–2014 is already significant and that ...

  16. Image haze removal using a hybrid of fuzzy inference system and weighted estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jyun-Guo; Tai, Shen-Chuan; Lin, Cheng-Jian

    2015-05-01

    The attenuation of the light transmitted through air can reduce image quality when taking a photograph outdoors, especially in a hazy environment. Hazy images often lack sufficient information for image recognition systems to operate effectively. In order to solve the aforementioned problems, this study proposes a hybrid method combining fuzzy theory with weighted estimation for the removal of haze from images. A transmission map is first created based on fuzzy theory. According to the transmission map, the proposed method automatically finds the possible atmospheric lights and refines the atmospheric lights by mixing these candidates. Weighted estimation is then employed to generate a refined transmission map, which removes the halo artifact from around the sharp edges. Experimental results demonstrate the superiority of the proposed method over existing methods with regard to contrast, color depth, and the elimination of halo artifacts.

  17. Bimodal Distribution of Sulfuric Acid Aerosols in the Upper Haze of Venus

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, Peter; Crisp, David; Bardeen, Charles G; Yung, Yuk L

    2013-01-01

    The upper haze (UH) of Venus is variable on the order of days and it is populated by two particle modes. We use a 1D microphysics and vertical transport model based on the Community Aerosol and Radiation Model for Atmospheres to evaluate whether interaction of upwelled cloud particles and sulfuric acid particles nucleated in situ on meteoric dust are able to generate the two size modes and whether their observed variability are due to cloud top vertical transient winds. Nucleation of photochemically produced sulfuric acid onto polysulfur condensation nuclei generates mode 1 cloud droplets that then diffuse upwards into the UH. Droplets generated in the UH from nucleation of sulfuric acid onto meteoric dust coagulate with the upwelled cloud particles and cannot reproduce the observed bimodal size distribution. The mass transport enabled by cloud top transient winds are able to generate a bimodal size distribution in a time scale consistent with observations. Sedimentation and convection in the middle and lower...

  18. Observing Jupiter's polar stratospheric haze with HST/STIS. An HST White Paper

    CERN Document Server

    Grodent, Denis; Nichols, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this HST white paper is to demonstrate that it is possible to monitor Jupiter's polar haze with HST/STIS without breaking the ground screening limit for bright objects. This demonstration rests on a thorough simulation of STIS output from an existing image obtained with HST/WFPC2. It is shown that the STIS NUV-MAMA + F25CIII filter assembly provides a count rate per pixel ~11 times smaller than that obtained for one pixel of WFPC2 WF3 CCD + F218W corresponding filter. This ratio is sufficiently large to cope with the bright solar light scattered by Jupiter's atmosphere, which was a lesser concern for WFPC2 CCD safety. These STIS images would provide unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution observations of small-scale stratospheric aerosol structures, possibly associated with Jupiter's complex FUV aurora.

  19. Interventions to reduce individual exposure of elderly individuals and children to haze: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Sini; Li, Lingling; Gao, Wei; Wang, Yujie; Yao, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Given rapid economic developments and urbanization over the last few decades, China has experienced frequent haze episodes, which have adverse effects on public health. Children and elderly individuals are more susceptible than the general population to air pollution. In this study, we introduce interventions to reduce the exposure of elderly individuals and children to air pollution during hazy weather. These interventions include avoiding outdoor activities, wearing a dust mask, reducing burning biomass fuels, reducing frying and smoking at home, using an air filtration unit and taking supplemental antioxidants. However, the actual benefits of these measures remain unproven and are unlikely to be adequate. Sustained clean air policies remain the most important and efficient solution to reduce air pollution-related health effects. PMID:26904254

  20. Impact of aerosols on radiation during a heavy haze event in Beijing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to understand the influence of anthropogenic aerosols on radiation in the urban boundary layer, we measured atmospheric aerosol mass concentrations (PM10 and PM2.5), integrated solar radiation, wind and temperature at different layers of a 325-m iron tower. A typical heavy haze process occurring during the period of October 2004 was analyzed. It is observed that the inversion layer and the weak wind was the most important factor causing the accumulation of pollutants. The results show that the PM10 concentrations under polluted day conditions is about 84 times (537.1μgm−3) higher than those on clear weather conditions (6.4μgm−3). The difference in the solar radiation between 2m and 280m became smaller (93.07 Wm−2 to 16.07 Wm−2) when pollution turned heavy, while the attenuations rate changed large (16.76% to 20.96%)

  1. Impact of aerosols on radiation during a heavy haze event in Beijing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Wang; Zhengqiang, Li; Ying, Zhang; Qiang, Wang; Jianzhong, Ma

    2014-03-01

    In order to understand the influence of anthropogenic aerosols on radiation in the urban boundary layer, we measured atmospheric aerosol mass concentrations (PM10 and PM2.5), integrated solar radiation, wind and temperature at different layers of a 325-m iron tower. A typical heavy haze process occurring during the period of October 2004 was analyzed. It is observed that the inversion layer and the weak wind was the most important factor causing the accumulation of pollutants. The results show that the PM10 concentrations under polluted day conditions is about 84 times (537.1μgm-3) higher than those on clear weather conditions (6.4μgm-3). The difference in the solar radiation between 2m and 280m became smaller (93.07 Wm-2 to 16.07 Wm-2) when pollution turned heavy, while the attenuations rate changed large (16.76% to 20.96%)

  2. Tundra Rehabilitation in Alaska's Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynn, L. A.

    2012-12-01

    Oil exploration in Alaska's Arctic has been conducted for more than 40 years, resulting in over 3,640 ha of gravel fill placed for roads, pads, and airstrips to support the industry. Likewise, tundra disturbance from burying power lines and by tundra vehicle travel are also common. Rehabilitation of disturbed sites began around 2002, with well over 150 ha that has been previously treated or is currently being rehabilitated. Two primary goals of rehabilitation efforts have been 1) revegetation by indigenous species, and 2) limiting thermokarst. Early efforts were concerned that removing gravel and having exposed bare ground would lead to extensive subsidence and eolian erosion. Native grass cultivars (e.g. Poa glauca, Arctagrostis latifolia, and Festuca rubra) were seeded to create vegetation cover quickly with the expectation that these grasses would survive only temporarily. The root masses and leaf litter were also expected to trap indigenous seed to enhance natural recolonization by indigenous plants. Due to the remote location of these sites, many of which are only accessible by helicopter, most are visited only two to three times following cultivation treatments, providing a limited data pool. At many sites, the total live seeded grass cover declined about 15% over the first 5¬-6 years (from around 30% to 15% cover), while total live indigenous vascular cover increased from no or trace cover to an average of 10% cover in that time. Cover of indigenous vascular plants at sites that were not seeded with native grass cultivars averaged just less than 10% after 10 years, showing no appreciable difference between the two approaches. Final surface elevations at the sites affect local hydrology and soil moisture. Other factors that influence the success of vegetation cover are proximity to the Arctic coast (salt effects), depth of remaining gravel, and changes in characteristics of the near-surface soil. Further development of rehabilitation techniques and the

  3. Atmospheric deposition of 210Po and 210Pb in Malaysian waters during haze events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biogenic burning as forest fire phenomena occurring from April to August each year in the Sumatra and Borneo islands are major sources of biogenic uranium–thorium decay series in marine systems. 30 samples were collected during the Ekspedisi Pelayaran Saintifik Perdana 2009 cruise (EPSP 2009 cruise) between 12th June and 1st August 2009 from the Straits of Malacca to the Sulu and Sulawesi Seas to study the effect of haze and the monsoon season on the deposition rate of 210Po and 210Pb in Malaysian waters. All samples were spiked with 1 ml of lead [Pb(NO3)2; 25 mg ml-1] and 0.05 ml of Polonium-209 tracer (26.08 dpm ml-1). 210Po activity was determined by auto plating onto silver foil and counting using an alpha spectrometry system (Canberra model Alpha Analyst with a silicon-surface barrier detector). Lead that was collected via electrodeposition, formed lead sulphate (PbSO4) precipitation. This precipitate was wrapped onto plastic discs and counted for 210Pb beta activity using a gross alpha-beta counting system (Tennelec model LB-5100 low background gas-flowing anti-coincidence alpha/beta counter) after 1 month to allow bismuth ingrowths. The range of 210Po activities varied between 51.08 ± 15.1 and 742.08 ± 220.34 Bq/kg, whereas the activity of 210Pb ranged from 31.10 ± 4.20 to 880.23 ± 123.86 Bq/kg and 210Po/210Pb ratio value varied between sampling stations from 0.19 to 13.77. The contents of 210Po were also statistically positively correlated with the amount of total suspended particulate especially those recorded during heavy haze period events. (author)

  4. [Exploring the Severe Haze in Beijing During December, 2015: Pollution Process and Emissions Variation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Yi-feng; Zhou, Zhen; Nie, Teng; Pan, Tao; Qi, Jun; Nie, Lei; Wang, Zhan-shan; Li, Yun-ting; Li, Xue-feng; Tian, He-zhong

    2016-05-15

    Severe haze episodes shrouded Beijing and its surrounding regions again during December, 2015, causing major environmental and health problems. Beijing authorities had launched two red alerts for atmospheric heavy pollution in this period, adopted a series of emergency control measures to reduce the emissions from major pollution sources. To better understand the pollution process and emissions variation during these extreme pollution events, we performed a model-assisted analysis of the hourly observation data of PM₂.₅, and meteorological parameters combined with the emissions variation of pollution sources. The synthetic analysis indicated that: (1) Compared with the same period of last year, the emissions of atmospheric pollution sources decreased in December 2015. However, the emission levels of primary pollutants were still rather high, which were the main intrinsic causes for haze episodes, and the unfavorable diffusion conditions represented the important external factor. High source emissions and meteorological factors together led to this heavy air pollution process. (2) Emergency control measures taken by the red alert for heavy air pollution could decrease the pollutants emission by about 36% and the PM₂.₅ concentrations by 11% to 21%. Though the implementation of red alert could not reverse the evolution trend of heavier pollution, it indeed played an active role in mitigation of PM₂.₅ pollution aggravating. (3) Under the heavy pollution weather conditions, air pollutants continued to accumulate in the atmosphere, and the maximum effect by taking emergency measures occurred 48-72 hours after starting the implementation; therefore, the best time for executing emergency measures should be 36-48 hours before the rapid rise of PM₂.₅ concentration, which requires a more powerful demand on the accuracy of air quality forecast.

  5. [Exploring the Severe Haze in Beijing During December, 2015: Pollution Process and Emissions Variation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Yi-feng; Zhou, Zhen; Nie, Teng; Pan, Tao; Qi, Jun; Nie, Lei; Wang, Zhan-shan; Li, Yun-ting; Li, Xue-feng; Tian, He-zhong

    2016-05-15

    Severe haze episodes shrouded Beijing and its surrounding regions again during December, 2015, causing major environmental and health problems. Beijing authorities had launched two red alerts for atmospheric heavy pollution in this period, adopted a series of emergency control measures to reduce the emissions from major pollution sources. To better understand the pollution process and emissions variation during these extreme pollution events, we performed a model-assisted analysis of the hourly observation data of PM₂.₅, and meteorological parameters combined with the emissions variation of pollution sources. The synthetic analysis indicated that: (1) Compared with the same period of last year, the emissions of atmospheric pollution sources decreased in December 2015. However, the emission levels of primary pollutants were still rather high, which were the main intrinsic causes for haze episodes, and the unfavorable diffusion conditions represented the important external factor. High source emissions and meteorological factors together led to this heavy air pollution process. (2) Emergency control measures taken by the red alert for heavy air pollution could decrease the pollutants emission by about 36% and the PM₂.₅ concentrations by 11% to 21%. Though the implementation of red alert could not reverse the evolution trend of heavier pollution, it indeed played an active role in mitigation of PM₂.₅ pollution aggravating. (3) Under the heavy pollution weather conditions, air pollutants continued to accumulate in the atmosphere, and the maximum effect by taking emergency measures occurred 48-72 hours after starting the implementation; therefore, the best time for executing emergency measures should be 36-48 hours before the rapid rise of PM₂.₅ concentration, which requires a more powerful demand on the accuracy of air quality forecast. PMID:27506009

  6. Effect of Atmospheric Haze on the Deterioration of Visibility over the Pearl River Delta

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The studies on the effect of atmospheric aerosol on climate and environment are hot issues in the current circle of international science and technology. In recent years the pollution of aerosol is getting worse and worse over the Pearl River Delta. The clouds of aerosol occur all year round, with heavy pollution area located at the western side at the mouth of Pearl River. The haze weather mainly occurs from October to April next year, resulting in visibility deterioration. From the beginning of 1980s, visibility dramatically deteriorated, obviously increasing haze weather, in which there are three big fluctuations, showing the periods of pollutions of dust, sulphate and dust, fine particle from photochemical process and sulphate and dust accompanying with the development of economy respectively. The long-term tendency of visibility caused by fog and light fog does not show a tendency due to human activities or economic development, which mainly shows the interannual and interdecadal variation of climate. The deterioration of visibility has close relation to the fine particles over Pearl River Delta, with half of PM10 overpass the limited value set by national second graded standard (150μg m-3), meanwhile, all values of PM2.5 overpass the day-mean limited value of American national standard (65μg m-3), especially from October to January next year, monthly mean values of PM2.5 almost reach two times of standard value, indicating the fine particle concentration is very high. The ratio of PM2.5 to PM10 is also very high, reaching 58%-77%, higher especially in dry season than in rainy season. Thus it is the fine particle pollution in aerosol pollution over the Pearl River Delta.Compared with the data of 15 years ago, the ratio of fine particle to aerosol has obviously increased.

  7. High secondary aerosol contribution to particulate pollution during haze events in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ru-Jin; Zhang, Yanlin; Bozzetti, Carlo; Ho, Kin-Fai; Cao, Jun-Ji; Han, Yongming; Daellenbach, Kaspar R.; Slowik, Jay G.; Platt, Stephen M.; Canonaco, Francesco; Zotter, Peter; Wolf, Robert; Pieber, Simone M.; Bruns, Emily A.; Crippa, Monica; Ciarelli, Giancarlo; Piazzalunga, Andrea; Schwikowski, Margit; Abbaszade, Gülcin; Schnelle-Kreis, Jürgen; Zimmermann, Ralf; An, Zhisheng; Szidat, Sönke; Baltensperger, Urs; Haddad, Imad El; Prévôt, André S. H.

    2014-10-01

    Rapid industrialization and urbanization in developing countries has led to an increase in air pollution, along a similar trajectory to that previously experienced by the developed nations. In China, particulate pollution is a serious environmental problem that is influencing air quality, regional and global climates, and human health. In response to the extremely severe and persistent haze pollution experienced by about 800 million people during the first quarter of 2013 (refs 4, 5), the Chinese State Council announced its aim to reduce concentrations of PM2.5 (particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter less than 2.5 micrometres) by up to 25 per cent relative to 2012 levels by 2017 (ref. 6). Such efforts however require elucidation of the factors governing the abundance and composition of PM2.5, which remain poorly constrained in China. Here we combine a comprehensive set of novel and state-of-the-art offline analytical approaches and statistical techniques to investigate the chemical nature and sources of particulate matter at urban locations in Beijing, Shanghai, Guangzhou and Xi'an during January 2013. We find that the severe haze pollution event was driven to a large extent by secondary aerosol formation, which contributed 30-77 per cent and 44-71 per cent (average for all four cities) of PM2.5 and of organic aerosol, respectively. On average, the contribution of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) and secondary inorganic aerosol (SIA) are found to be of similar importance (SOA/SIA ratios range from 0.6 to 1.4). Our results suggest that, in addition to mitigating primary particulate emissions, reducing the emissions of secondary aerosol precursors from, for example, fossil fuel combustion and biomass burning is likely to be important for controlling China's PM2.5 levels and for reducing the environmental, economic and health impacts resulting from particulate pollution.

  8. Arctic River Mobility: A Baseline Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, J. C.; Wilson, C. J.; Brumby, S. P.; Pope, P. A.

    2009-12-01

    In many arctic river systems, permafrost and the presence of frozen floodplain materials provides a significant source of bank cohesion. Due to this cohesion, permafrost may play an important control of arctic river mobility and meandering dynamics. Whether changes in the rates of permafrost thawing has had or will have as significant a geomorphic impact on arctic river meandering as has already been observed for arctic coastline retreat, lake size and distribution, and hillslope stability is at present an unanswered question. The potential impact of climate driven changes in arctic river meandering has important implications for river planform morphology, floodplain dynamics, river ecology, and the export of carbon and nutrients to coastal oceans. We present results of remote sensing analysis of river mobility for the Yukon River in Alaska and sections of the Siberian Rivers including the Lena, the Kolyma and the Indigirka Rivers. Comparisons of river location at successive intervals in time were conducted using Landsat imagery archives and higher resolution aerial photographs and satellite imagery. Extraction of river channel locations was accomplished using the GeniePro automated feature extraction software. Over the period of Landsat coverage (mid-1980s to present) arctic rivers show limited to no movement at the resolution of the Landsat data (30 m per pixel). On the Yukon Flats regions of the Yukon River, the most mobile sections of the river have migration rates comparable to reach-average values reported for temperate rivers; given that large portions of the Yukon display no detectable movement, reach-averaged values are far less than observed in temperate systems. Field inspection of areas of high erosion along the Yukon River indicate that erosional processes associated with the thermal degradation of permafrost play a dominant role in many of these areas. Thermal niching and large scale bank collapse due to undercutting play a large role in bank erosion

  9. Leading By Example: Canada and its Arctic Stewardship Role

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burke, Danita Catherine

    2016-01-01

    The notion that Canada is the steward of the fragile Arctic environment is a part of the fabric of the Canadian narrative about the country’s relationship with the Arctic region. In light of political, legal and environmental changes impacting Arctic politics, this paper argues that it is importa...

  10. Arctic Ocean freshwater: How robust are model simulations?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jahn, A.; Aksenov, Y.; de Cuevas, B.A.; de Steur, L.; Häkkinen, S.; Hansen, E.; Herbaut, C.; Houssais, M.N.; Karcher, M.; Kauker, F.; Lique, C.; Nguyen, A.; Pemberton, P.; Worthen, D.; Zhang, J.

    2012-01-01

    The Arctic freshwater (FW) has been the focus of many modeling studies, due to the potential impact of Arctic FW on the deep water formation in the North Atlantic. A comparison of the hindcasts from ten ocean-sea ice models shows that the simulation of the Arctic FW budget is quite different in the

  11. After Indonesia’s Ratification: The ASEAN Agreement on Transboundary Haze Pollution and Its Effectiveness As a Regional Environmental Governance Tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Heilmann

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available On 20 January 2015 Indonesia deposited its instrument of ratification for the ASEAN Agreement on Transboundary Haze Pollution with the ASEAN Secretariat, becoming the last ASEAN member state to join the treaty. Haze pollution poses a serious health threat to the people of Indonesia, Singapore and Malaysia, and for decades haze pollution has been a highly contentious issue among ASEAN member states. This article argues that Indonesia’s ratification will not be an immediate game changer. The mechanisms of the agreement are too weak to contribute much to a reduction of haze pollution in the region. The agreement is designed according to the ASEAN way: a non-binding approach that is based on the principles of state sovereignty and non-intervention. This makes it unlikely that the agreement itself will bring about change, even now that all ASEAN member states have ratified it.

  12. 2nd International Arctic Ungulate Conference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Anonymous

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available The 2nd International Arctic Ungulate Conference was held 13-17 August 1995 on the University of Alaska Fairbanks campus. The Institute of Arctic Biology and the Alaska Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit were responsible for organizing the conference with assistance from biologists with state and federal agencies and commercial organizations. David R. Klein was chair of the conference organizing committee. Over 200 people attended the conference, coming from 10 different countries. The United States, Canada, and Norway had the largest representation. The conference included invited lectures; panel discussions, and about 125 contributed papers. There were five technical sessions on Physiology and Body Condition; Habitat Relationships; Population Dynamics and Management; Behavior, Genetics and Evolution; and Reindeer and Muskox Husbandry. Three panel sessions discussed Comparative caribou management strategies; Management of introduced, reestablished, and expanding muskox populations; and Health risks in translocation of arctic ungulates. Invited lectures focused on the physiology and population dynamics of arctic ungulates; contaminants in food chains of arctic ungulates and lessons learned from the Chernobyl accident; and ecosystem level relationships of the Porcupine Caribou Herd.

  13. Arctic shipping emissions inventories and future scenarios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. J. Corbett

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents 5 km×5 km Arctic emissions inventories of important greenhouse gases, black carbon and other pollutants under existing and future (2050 scenarios that account for growth of shipping in the region, potential diversion traffic through emerging routes, and possible emissions control measures. These high-resolution, geospatial emissions inventories for shipping can be used to evaluate Arctic climate sensitivity to black carbon (a short-lived climate forcing pollutant especially effective in accelerating the melting of ice and snow, aerosols, and gaseous emissions including carbon dioxide. We quantify ship emissions scenarios which are expected to increase as declining sea ice coverage due to climate change allows for increased shipping activity in the Arctic. A first-order calculation of global warming potential due to 2030 emissions in the high-growth scenario suggests that short-lived forcing of ~4.5 gigagrams of black carbon from Arctic shipping may increase global warming potential due to Arctic ships' CO2 emissions (~42 000 gigagrams by some 17% to 78%. The paper also presents maximum feasible reduction scenarios for black carbon in particular. These emissions reduction scenarios will enable scientists and policymakers to evaluate the efficacy and benefits of technological controls for black carbon, and other pollutants from ships.

  14. VLF propagation measurements in the Canadian Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauber, Wilfred R.; Bertrand, Jean M.

    1993-05-01

    For the past three years, during a period of high sun spot numbers, propagation measurements were made on the reception of VLF signals in the Canadian Arctic. Between Aug. and Dec. 1989, the received signal strengths were measured on the Canadian Coast Guard icebreaker, John A. MacDonald in the Eastern Canadian Arctic. Between Jul. 1991 and Jun. 1992, the received signal strengths were measured at Nanisivik, Baffin Island. The purposes of this work were to check the accuracy and estimate variances of the Naval Ocean Systems Center's (NOSC) Long Wave Propagation Capability (LWPC) predictions in the Canadian Arctic and to gather ionospheric storm data. In addition, the NOSC data taken at Fort Smith and our data at Nanisivik were used to test the newly developed Longwave Noise Prediction (LNP) program and the CCIR noise predictions, at 21.4 and 24.0 kHz. The results of the work presented and discussed in this paper show that in general the LWPC predicts accurate values of received signal strength in the Canadian Arctic with standard deviations of 1 to 2 dB over several months. Ionospheric storms can gauge the received signal strengths to decrease some 10 dB for a period of several hours or days. However, the effects of these storms are highly dependent on the propagation path. Finally the new LNP atmospheric noise model predicts lower values of noise in the Arctic than the CCIR model and our limited measurements tend to support these lower values.

  15. Arctic Ocean Scientific Drilling: The Next Frontier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruediger Stein

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The modern Arctic Ocean appears to be changing faster than any other region on Earth. To understand the potential extent of high latitude climate change, it is necessary to sample the history stored in the sediments filling the basins and covering the ridges of the Arctic Ocean. These sediments have been imaged with seismic reflection data, but except for the superficial record, which has been piston cored, they have been sampled only on the Lomonosov Ridge in 2004 during the Arctic Coring Expedition (ACEX-IODP Leg 302; Backman et al., 2006 and in 1993 in the ice-free waters in the Fram Strait/Yermak Plateau area (ODP Leg 151; Thiede et al., 1996.Although major progress in Arctic Ocean research has been made during the last few decades, the short- and long-term paleoceanographic and paleoclimatic history as well as its plate-tectonic evolution are poorly known compared to the other oceans. Despite the importance of the Arctic in the climate system, the database we have from this area is still very weak. Large segments of geologic time have not been sampled in sedimentary sections. The question of regional variations cannot be addressed.

  16. TCM Cognition and Treatment Thought to the Disease Caused by the Haze%雾霾的中医认识与防治思路

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程丑夫

    2014-01-01

    Haze is a pathogenic factor w hich is caused by environm ental pollution, falling in to the category of TCM dampness pathogen. Haze can lead to diseases,which is slight to be in-juries and heavy to be ruins, causing severe harm to hum an health. This paper is from strengthen-ing body resistance, getting rid of evil and treatm ent determ ination three aspects to discuss the prevention and treatment of haze disease. Prevention measures mainly contains two aspects:one is strengthening body`s vital qi so as to strengthen the body's resistance to haze;the other is avoid-ing deficient pathogen and evil w ind som etimes, attaching great im portance to the self protection of haze. There are six common kinds of traditional Chinese medicine syndrome type about haze disease caused by dampness pathogen, that is syndrome of haze attacking superficies, syndrome of haze disturbing spleen, syndrome of haze im pairing lung, closing heart yang syn-drome, syndrome of haze disturbing heart-mind, syndrome of haze transform ing into fire.%雾霾是因环境污染而出现的致病因子,归属中医湿邪范畴。雾霾致病,轻则为损,重则为病,严重危害人体健康。就雾霾病的防治从扶正、避邪、论治三方面进行探讨。预防措施主要包含两方面:(1)提高正气,增强人体对雾霾的抵抗能力;(2)虚邪贼风,避之有时,重视对雾霾的自我防护。雾霾病证的治疗按湿浊致病分证论治,常见证型有雾霾遏表证、雾霾困脾证、雾霾损肺证、遏阻心阳证、雾霾郁神证和雾霾化热证。

  17. Using hourly measurements to explore the role of secondary inorganic aerosol in PM2.5 during haze and fog in Hangzhou, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Roeland Cornelis; Shi, Yang; Chen, Jianmin; Hu, YunJie; Xu, Chang; Hong, Shengmao; Li, Jiao; Zhang, Min

    2014-11-01

    This paper explores the role of the secondary inorganic aerosol (SIA) species ammonium, NH{4/+}, nitrate, NO{3/-}, and sulfate, SO{4/2-}, during haze and fog events using hourly mass concentrations of PM2.5 measured at a suburban site in Hangzhou, China. A total of 546 samples were collected between 1 April and 8 May 2012. The samples were analyzed and classified as clear, haze or fog depending on visibility and relative humidity (RH). The contribution of SIA species to PM2.5 mass increased to ˜50% during haze and fog. The mass contribution of nitrate to PM2.5 increased from 11% during clear to 20% during haze episodes. Nitrate mass exceeded sulfate mass during haze, while near equal concentrations were observed during fog episodes. The role of RH on the correlation between concentrations of SIA and visibility was examined, with optimal correlation at 60%-70% RH. The total acidity during clear, haze and fog periods was 42.38, 48.38 and 45.51 nmol m-3, respectively, indicating that sulfate, nitrate and chloride were not neutralized by ammonium during any period. The nitrate to sulfate molar ratio, as a function of the ammonium to sulfate molar ratio, indicated that nitrate formation during fog started at a higher ammonium to sulfate molar ratio compared to clear and haze periods. During haze and fog, the nitrate oxidation ratio increased by a factor of 1.6-1.7, while the sulfur oxidation ratio increased by a factor of 1.2-1.5, indicating that both gaseous NO2 and SO2 were involved in the reduced visibility.

  18. Clinical observation of haze after epipolis laser in situ keratomileusis%Epi-LASIK术后Haze形成的临床观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张亚丽; 左天南; 刘蕾; 胡明; 李招娜

    2009-01-01

    央厚度上无统计学差异.结论 EpiLASIK术后Haze发生率及密度均较低,术后是否发生Haze与屈光度数,切削深度和切削率有关.%ncidence and density of Haze in Epi-LASIK.Higher myopia,deeper ablation and higher ablation depth/corneal thickness ratio obviously influenee the Haze formation.

  19. AROME-Arctic: New operational NWP model for the Arctic region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Süld, Jakob; Dale, Knut S.; Myrland, Espen; Batrak, Yurii; Homleid, Mariken; Valkonen, Teresa; Seierstad, Ivar A.; Randriamampianina, Roger

    2016-04-01

    In the frame of the EU-funded project ACCESS (Arctic Climate Change, Economy and Society), MET Norway aimed 1) to describe the present monitoring and forecasting capabilities in the Arctic; and 2) to identify the key factors limiting the forecasting capabilities and to give recommendations on key areas to improve the forecasting capabilities in the Arctic. We have observed that the NWP forecast quality is lower in the Arctic than in the regions further south. Earlier research indicated that one of the factors behind this is the composition of the observing system in the Arctic, in particular the scarceness of conventional observations. To further assess possible strategies for alleviating the situation and propose scenarios for a future Arctic observing system, we have performed a set of experiments to gain a more detailed insight in the contribution of the components of the present observing system in a regional state-of-the-art non-hydrostatic NWP model using the AROME physics (Seity et al, 2011) at 2.5 km horizontal resolution - AROME-Arctic. Our observing system experiment studies showed that conventional observations (Synop, Buoys) can play an important role in correcting the surface state of the model, but prove that the present upper-air conventional (Radiosondes, Aircraft) observations in the area are too scarce to have a significant effect on forecasts. We demonstrate that satellite sounding data play an important role in improving forecast quality. This is the case with satellite temperature sounding data (AMSU-A, IASI), as well as with the satellite moisture sounding data (AMSU-B/MHS, IASI). With these sets of observations, the AROME-Arctic clearly performs better in forecasting extreme events, like for example polar lows. For more details see presentation by Randriamampianina et al. in this session. The encouraging performance of AROME-Arctic lead us to implement it with more observations and improved settings into daily runs with the objective to

  20. Application of fault tree approach for the causation mechanism of urban haze in Beijing--Considering the risk events related with exhausts of coal combustion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Weiqing; Fan, Hongbo; Qiu, Yongfu; Cheng, Zhiyu; Qian, Yu

    2016-02-15

    Haze weather has become a serious environmental pollution problem which occurs in many Chinese cities. One of the most critical factors for the formation of haze weather is the exhausts of coal combustion, thus it is meaningful to figure out the causation mechanism between urban haze and the exhausts of coal combustion. Based on above considerations, the fault tree analysis (FAT) approach was employed for the causation mechanism of urban haze in Beijing by considering the risk events related with the exhausts of coal combustion for the first time. Using this approach, firstly the fault tree of the urban haze causation system connecting with coal combustion exhausts was established; consequently the risk events were discussed and identified; then, the minimal cut sets were successfully determined using Boolean algebra; finally, the structure, probability and critical importance degree analysis of the risk events were completed for the qualitative and quantitative assessment. The study results proved that the FTA was an effective and simple tool for the causation mechanism analysis and risk management of urban haze in China.

  1. Application of fault tree approach for the causation mechanism of urban haze in Beijing--Considering the risk events related with exhausts of coal combustion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Weiqing; Fan, Hongbo; Qiu, Yongfu; Cheng, Zhiyu; Qian, Yu

    2016-02-15

    Haze weather has become a serious environmental pollution problem which occurs in many Chinese cities. One of the most critical factors for the formation of haze weather is the exhausts of coal combustion, thus it is meaningful to figure out the causation mechanism between urban haze and the exhausts of coal combustion. Based on above considerations, the fault tree analysis (FAT) approach was employed for the causation mechanism of urban haze in Beijing by considering the risk events related with the exhausts of coal combustion for the first time. Using this approach, firstly the fault tree of the urban haze causation system connecting with coal combustion exhausts was established; consequently the risk events were discussed and identified; then, the minimal cut sets were successfully determined using Boolean algebra; finally, the structure, probability and critical importance degree analysis of the risk events were completed for the qualitative and quantitative assessment. The study results proved that the FTA was an effective and simple tool for the causation mechanism analysis and risk management of urban haze in China. PMID:26493345

  2. Chytrids dominate arctic marine fungal communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassett, B T; Gradinger, R

    2016-06-01

    Climate change is altering Arctic ecosystem structure by changing weather patterns and reducing sea ice coverage. These changes are increasing light penetration into the Arctic Ocean that are forecasted to increase primary production; however, increased light can also induce photoinhibition and cause physiological stress in algae and phytoplankton that can favour disease development. Fungi are voracious parasites in many ecosystems that can modulate the flow of carbon through food webs, yet are poorly characterized in the marine environment. We provide the first data from any marine ecosystem in which fungi in the Chytridiomycota dominate fungal communities and are linked in their occurrence to light intensities and algal stress. Increased light penetration stresses ice algae and elevates disease incidence under reduced snow cover. Our results show that chytrids dominate Arctic marine fungal communities and have the potential to rapidly change primary production patterns with increased light penetration. PMID:26754171

  3. Fate of mercury in the Arctic (FOMA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, H.; Christensen, J.; Asmund, G.;

    This report is the final reporting of the project FONA, funded by the Danish Environmental Protection Agency with means from the MIKA/DANCEA funds for Environmental Support to the Arctic Region. The aim of the project is to study the intercompartment mercury transport chain in the arctic area. From...... atmospheric deposition of mercury on sea surfaces to uptake in marine organisms, bio-accumulation, and finally mercury levels in mammals. The studies in the project are focused on the behaviour of mercury during the spring period where special phenomena lead to an enhanced deposition of mercury in the Arctic...... environment, at a time where the marine ecosystem is particularly active. The studies also include a comprehensive time trend study of mercury in top carnivore species. Each of these studies contributes towards establishing the knowledge necessary to develop a general model for transport and uptake of mercury...

  4. Methan Dynamics in an Arctic Wetland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Cecilie Skov

    Rising temperatures in the Arctic have the potential to increase methane (CH4) emissions from arctic wetlands due to increased decomposition, changes in vegetation cover, and increased substrate input from vegetation and thawing permafrost. The effects of warming and changes in vegetation cover on...... be used to oxidize CH4. The over all effect of the presence of sedges on the CH4 budget is unknown for most arctic species. Here the effects of warming and changes in plant cover on CH4 dynamics and emissions in a wetland in Blæsedalen, Disko Island, W. Greenland were investigated. The importance of...... CH4 oxidation in the rhizosphere of Carex aquatilis ssp. stans and Eriophorum angustifolium was quantified using a 13CH4 tracer. The results showed that rhizospheric CH4 oxidation mediated less than 2% of ecosystem CH4 emissions. No significant effects of warming or shrub removal on ecosystem CH4...

  5. Mean Dynamic Topography of the Arctic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Sinead Louise; Mcadoo, David C.; Laxon, Seymour W.; Zwally, H. Jay; Yi, Donghui; Ridout, Andy; Giles, Katherine

    2012-01-01

    ICESat and Envisat altimetry data provide measurements of the instantaneous sea surface height (SSH) across the Arctic Ocean, using lead and open water elevation within the sea ice pack. First, these data were used to derive two independent mean sea surface (MSS) models by stacking and averaging along-track SSH profiles gathered between 2003 and 2009. The ICESat and Envisat MSS data were combined to construct the high-resolution ICEn MSS. Second, we estimate the 5.5-year mean dynamic topography (MDT) of the Arctic Ocean by differencing the ICEn MSS with the new GOCO02S geoid model, derived from GRACE and GOCE gravity. Using these satellite-only data we map the major features of Arctic Ocean dynamical height that are consistent with in situ observations, including the topographical highs and lows of the Beaufort and Greenland Gyres, respectively. Smaller-scale MDT structures remain largely unresolved due to uncertainties in the geoid at short wavelengths.

  6. Predictability of the Arctic sea ice edge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goessling, H. F.; Tietsche, S.; Day, J. J.; Hawkins, E.; Jung, T.

    2016-02-01

    Skillful sea ice forecasts from days to years ahead are becoming increasingly important for the operation and planning of human activities in the Arctic. Here we analyze the potential predictability of the Arctic sea ice edge in six climate models. We introduce the integrated ice-edge error (IIEE), a user-relevant verification metric defined as the area where the forecast and the "truth" disagree on the ice concentration being above or below 15%. The IIEE lends itself to decomposition into an absolute extent error, corresponding to the common sea ice extent error, and a misplacement error. We find that the often-neglected misplacement error makes up more than half of the climatological IIEE. In idealized forecast ensembles initialized on 1 July, the IIEE grows faster than the absolute extent error. This means that the Arctic sea ice edge is less predictable than sea ice extent, particularly in September, with implications for the potential skill of end-user relevant forecasts.

  7. Arctic Ozone Depletion from UARS MLS Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manney, G. L.

    1995-01-01

    Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) measurements of ozone during four Arctic winters are compared. The evolution of ozone in the lower stratosphere is related to temperature, chlorine monoxide (also measured by MLS), and the evolution of the polar vortex. Lagrangian transport calculations using winds from the United Kingdom Meteorological Office's Stratosphere-Troposphere Data Assimilation system are used to estimate to what extent the evolution of lower stratospheric ozone is controlled by dynamics. Observations, along with calculations of the expected dynamical behavior, show evidence for chemical ozone depletion throughout most of the Arctic lower stratospheric vortex during the 1992-93 middle and late winter, and during all of the 1994-95 winter that was observed by MLS. Both of these winters were unusually cold and had unusually cold and had unusually strong Arctic polar vortices compared to meteorological data over the past 17 years.

  8. Projections and predictability of Arctic shipping accessibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melia, Nathanael; Haines, Keith; Hawkins, Ed

    2016-04-01

    The observed reduction in Arctic sea ice opens up the potential for shorter shipping routes across the Arctic Ocean, leading to potentially significant global economic savings. We demonstrate, using bias-corrected global climate models, that the projected sea ice melt through the 21st century increases opportunities for ships to sail through the Arctic between North Atlantic and East Asian ports. Transit potential for Open Water vessels doubles from early to mid-century and coincides with the opening of the trans-polar sea route. Although seasonal, routes become more reliable with an overall increased shipping season length, but with considerable variability from year-to-year. We also demonstrate that there is potential predictability for whether a particular season will be relatively open or closed to shipping access from a few months ahead.

  9. Bioaccumulation of radiocaesium in Arctic seals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carroll, JoLynn; Wolkers, Hans; Andersen, Magnus; Rissanen, Kristina

    2002-12-01

    Seals are high trophic level feeders that bioaccumulate many contaminants to a greater degree than most lower trophic level organisms. Their trophic status in the marine food web and wide-spread distribution make seals useful sentinels of arctic environmental change. The purpose of this investigation is to document the levels and bioaccumulation potential of radiocaesium in high latitude seal species for which data have not previously been available. The study was carried out on harp, ringed, and bearded seals caught north of the island archipelago of Svalbard (82 deg. N) in 1999. The results are then compared with previous studies in order to elucidate factors responsible for bioaccumulation in Arctic seals. Concentrations of {sup 137}Cs were determined in muscle, liver and kidney samples from a total of 10 juvenile and one adult seal. The mean concentration in muscle samples for all animals was 0.23{+-}0.045 Bq/kg f.w. {sup 137}Cs concentrations in both liver and kidney samples were near detection limits ({approx}0.2 Bq/kg f.w.). The results are consistent with previous studies indicating low levels of radiocaesium in Arctic seals in response to a long term trend of decreasing levels of {sup 137}Cs in the Barents Sea region. Bioconcentration factors (BCFs) estimated for seals from NE Svalbard are low, ranging from 34 to 130. Comparing these values with reported BCFs for Greenland seals from other sectors of the European Arctic, we suggest that the combination of physiological and ecological factors on radiocaesium bioaccumulation is comparable among different Arctic seal populations. The application of this work to Arctic monitoring and assessment programs is discussed.

  10. Arctic Warming as News - Perils and Possibilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revkin, A. C.

    2015-12-01

    A science journalist in his 30th year covering human-driven climate change, including on three Arctic reporting trips, reflects on successes and setbacks as news media, environmentalists and Arctic communities have tried to convey the significance of polar change to a public for which the ends of the Earth will always largely be a place of the imagination.Novel challenges are arising in the 24/7 online media environment, as when a paper by a veteran climate scientist proposing a mechanism for abrupt sea-level rise became a big news story before it was accepted by the open-review journal to which it had been submitted. New science is digging in on possible connections between changing Arctic sea ice and snow conditions and disruptive winter weather in more temperate northern latitudes, offering a potential link between this distant region and the lives of ordinary citizens. As cutting-edge research, such work gets substantial media attention. But, as with all new areas of inquiry, uncertainty dominates - creating the potential for distracting the public and policymakers from the many aspects of anthropogenic climate change that are firmly established - but, in a way, boring because of that.With the challenges, there are unprecedented opportunities for conveying Arctic science. In some cases, researchers on expeditions are partnering with media, offering both scientists and news outlets fresh ways to convey the story of Arctic change in an era of resource constraints.Innovative uses of crittercams, webcams, and satellite observations offer educators and interested citizens a way to track and appreciate Arctic change. But more can be done to engage the public directly without the news media as an intermediary, particularly if polar scientists or their institutions test some of the established practices honed by more experienced communicators at NASA.

  11. Role of Greenland meltwater in the changing Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dukhovskoy, Dmitry; Proshutinsky, Andrey; Timmermans, Mary-Louise; Myers, Paul; Platov, Gennady; Bamber, Jonathan; Curry, Beth; Somavilla, Raquel

    2016-04-01

    Observational data show that the Arctic ocean-ice-atmosphere system has been changing over the last two decades. Arctic change is manifest in the atypical behavior of the climate indices in the 21st century. Before the 2000s, these indices characterized the quasi-decadal variability of the Arctic climate related to different circulation regimes. Between 1948 and 1996, the Arctic atmospheric circulation alternated between anticyclonic circulation regimes and cyclonic circulation regimes with a period of 10-15 years. Since 1997, however, the Arctic has been dominated by an anticyclonic regime. Previous studies indicate that in the 20th century, freshwater and heat exchange between the Arctic Ocean and the sub-Arctic seas were self-regulated and their interactions were realized via quasi-decadal climate oscillations. What physical processes in the Arctic Ocean - sub-Arctic ocean-ice-atmosphere system are responsible for the observed changes in Arctic climate variability? The presented work is motivated by our hypothesis that in the 21st century, these quasi-decadal oscillations have been interrupted as a result of an additional freshwater source associated with Greenland Ice Sheet melt. Accelerating since the early 1990s, the Greenland Ice Sheet mass loss exerts a significant impact on thermohaline processes in the sub-Arctic seas. Surplus Greenland freshwater, the amount of which is about a third of the freshwater volume fluxed into the region during the 1970s Great Salinity Anomaly event, can spread and accumulate in the sub-Arctic seas influencing convective processes there. It is not clear, however, whether Greenland freshwater can propagate into the interior convective regions in the Labrador Sea and the Nordic Seas. In order to investigate the fate and pathways of Greenland freshwater in the sub-Arctic seas and to determine how and at what rate Greenland freshwater propagates into the convective regions, several numerical experiments using a passive tracer to

  12. Biodiversity of Arctic marine ecosystems and responses to climate change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michel, C.; Bluhm, B.; Gallucci, V.;

    2012-01-01

    . These changes have important impacts on the chemical and biological processes that are at the root of marine food webs, influencing their structure, function and biodiversity. Here we summarise current knowledge on the biodiversity of Arctic marine ecosystems and provide an overview of fundamental factors...... that structure ecosystem biodiversity in the Arctic Ocean. We also discuss climateassociated effects on the biodiversity of Arctic marine ecosystems and discuss implications for the functioning of Arctic marine food webs. Based on the complexity and regional character of Arctic ecosystem reponses...

  13. Spatial and Temporal Variations of Hazes in Guangxi from 1960 to 2009%1960-2009年广西霾日时空变化特征

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    廖国莲; 曾鹏; 郑凤琴; 韦玉洁

    2011-01-01

    利用1960-2009年广西80个地面观测站资料,运用EOF、线性倾向估计等统计方法,分析了近50年广西霾日数的时空变化特征.结果表明:近50年广西霾日数总体呈上升趋势,与该地区人类活动和经济发展引起的污染排放增长密切相关;空间分布呈现出主要城市及其周边地区霾日多,边远地区及沿海地区霾日少的特点;广西霾天气主要发生在秋、冬季,以轻微霾(能见度为5~10 km)为主,且霾天气发生时的相对湿度8成以上介于70%~90%;除了空气污染之外,近50年风速呈下降趋势可能也导致更多的霾天气.%With the development of Guangxi economy and accelerating urbanization, human activities have discharged various pollutants into the atmosphere, which cause increasing atmospheric haze phenomenon in recent years. The toxic and harmful substances of hazes affect human health and environment a lot, becoming a new kind of severe weather. So it is very important to analyze the spatial-temporal variation characteristics of haze, which provide scientific bases for effective forecasting and controlling haze weather. Based on the data provided by 80 surface observation stations from 1960 to 2009, the haze days in Guangxi are calculated, and the characteristics of spatial-temporal variations of haze in Guangxi and its relationship with climate elements are analyzed by using EOF, linear trend estimation and other analytical methods. The average annual haze days in Guangxi are found to rise gradually over the past 50 years, which is closely related to the human activity and the increase in emissions by economic development. The haze happens more frequently in major cities and their surrounding areas than in remote areas and coastal areas. Comparing the periods of 1960-1979 and 1980-2009, and the remote areas and coastal areas, the haze days increase by different degrees in most parts of Guangxi, especially in Wuzhou, Liuzhou and other industrial

  14. Do Arctic waders use adaptive wind drift?

    OpenAIRE

    Green, M.; Alerstam, T; Gudmundsson, GA; Hedenstrom, A; Piersma, T; Gudmundsson, Gudmundur A.; Hedenström, Anders

    2004-01-01

    We analysed five data sets of night directions of migrating arctic waders ill relation to,winds, recorded by tracking radar and optical range finder, in order to find out if these birds compensate for wind drift, or allow themselves to be drifted by winds. Our purpose was to investigate whether arctic waders use adaptive wind drift strategies or not. The data sets were collected in Siberia (two sets) and Canada during post-breeding (autumn) migration, and in Mauritania and South Sweden during...

  15. Unmanned Platforms Monitor the Arctic Atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Boer, Gijs; Ivey, Mark D.; Schmid, Beat; McFarlane, Sally A.; Petty, Rickey C.

    2016-02-22

    In the Arctic, drones and tethered balloons can make crucial atmospheric measurement to provide a unique perspective on an environment particularly vulnerable to climate change. Climate is rapidly changing all over the globe, but nowhere is that change faster than in the Arctic. The evidence from recent years is clear: Reductions in sea ice (Kwok and Unstersteiner, 2011) and permafrost (Romanovsky et al., 2002), in addition to modification of the terriestrial ecosystem through melting permafrost and shifting vegetation zones (burek et al., 2008; Sturm, et al., 2001), all point to a rapidly evolving.

  16. Temperature and precipitation history of the Arctic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, G.H.; Alley, R.B.; Anderson, L.;

    2010-01-01

    its present extent. With the loss of land ice, sea level was about 5 m higher than present, with the extra melt coming from both Greenland and Antarctica as well as small glaciers. The Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) peaked w21 ka ago, when mean annual temperatures over parts of the Arctic were as much...... limits were substantially smaller than their 20th century average, and the flow of Atlantic water into the Arctic Ocean was substantially greater. As summer solar energy decreased in the second half of the Holocene, glaciers reestablished or advanced, sea ice expanded, and the flow of warm Atlantic water...

  17. The role of the Arctic in future global petroleum supply

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindholt, Lars; Glomsroed, Solveig

    2011-07-01

    The Arctic has a substantial share of global petroleum resources, but at higher costs than in most other petroleum provinces. Arctic states and petroleum companies are carefully considering the potential for future extraction in the Arctic. This paper studies the oil and gas supply from 6 arctic regions during 2010-2050 along with global economic growth and different assumptions regarding petroleum prices and resource endowments. Supply is calculated based on a global model of oil and gas markets. The data on undiscovered resources for the Arctic is based on the estimates by USGS. Sensitivity studies are carried out for two alternative price scenarios and for a 50 per cent reduction of arctic undiscovered resources compared with the USGS 2008 resource estimate. Although a major part of the undiscovered arctic petroleum resources is natural gas, our results show that the relative importance of the Arctic as a world gas supplier will decline, while its importance as a global oil producer may be maintained. We also show that less than full access to undiscovered oil resources will have minor effect on total arctic oil production and a marginal effect on arctic gas extraction. The reason is that Arctic Russia is an important petroleum producer with a sufficiently large stock of already discovered resources to support their petroleum production before 2050. (Author)

  18. Climate Change, Globalization and Geopolitics in the New Maritime Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brigham, L. W.

    2011-12-01

    Early in the 21st century a confluence of climate change, globalization and geopolitics is shaping the future of the maritime Arctic. This nexus is also fostering greater linkage of the Arctic to the rest of the planet. Arctic sea ice is undergoing a historic transformation of thinning, extent reduction in all seasons, and reduction in the area of multiyear ice in the central Arctic Ocean. Global Climate Model simulations of Arctic sea ice indicate multiyear ice could disappear by 2030 for a short period of time each summer. These physical changes invite greater marine access, longer seasons of navigation, and potential, summer trans-Arctic voyages. As a result, enhanced marine safety, environmental protection, and maritime security measures are under development. Coupled with climate change as a key driver of regional change is the current and future integration of the Arctic's natural wealth with global markets (oil, gas and hard minerals). Abundant freshwater in the Arctic could also be a future commodity of value. Recent events such as drilling for hydrocarbons off Greenland's west coast and the summer marine transport of natural resources from the Russian Arctic to China across the top of Eurasia are indicators of greater global economic ties to the Arctic. Plausible Arctic futures indicate continued integration with global issues and increased complexity of a range of regional economic, security and environmental challenges.

  19. Radiative effects of tropospheric aerosols on the evolution of the atmospheric boundary layer and its feedback on the haze formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Chao; Su, Hang; Cheng, Yafang

    2016-04-01

    Planetary boundary layer (PBL) plays a key role in air pollution dispersion and influences day-to-day air quality. Some studies suggest that high aerosol loadings during severe haze events may modify PBL dynamics by radiative effects and hence enhance the development of haze. This study mainly investigates the radiative effects of tropospheric aerosols on the evolution of the atmospheric boundary layer by conducting simulations with Weather Research and Forecasting single-column model (WRF-SCM). We find that high aerosol loading in PBL depressed boundary layer height (PBLH). But the magnitude of the changes of PBLH after adding aerosol loadings in our simulations are small and can't explain extreme high aerosol concentrations observed. We also investigate the impacts of the initial temperature and moisture profiles on the evolution of PBL. Our studies show that the impact of the vertical profile of moisture is comparable with aerosol effects.

  20. HaChi - Size- and time-resolved measurements of submicron winter and summer haze particles from the Beijing area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nekat, B.; van Pinxteren, D.; Iinuma, Y.; Gnauk, T.; Müller, K.; Herrmann, H.

    2010-12-01

    Satellite observations of the Beijing clearly show that this area is frequently plagued with heavy air pollution caused by significantly increased particle emissions. The aerosol affects the regional air quality and impairs the visibility by the formation of haze. This process strongly depends on the chemical, optical, and microphysical properties of particles governing the ability to take up water. Furthermore, these particles play an important role for cloud formation processes, precipitation, and the radiative balance of the atmosphere by subsequently acting as Cloud Condensation Nuclei. The HaChi project (Haze in China) targets to study chemical parameters of submicron aerosol in order to associate the chemical composition with the ability to act as condensation nuclei during the formation of haze. For this purpose, two measurement campaigns were performed at a background site located between Beijing and Tianjin on different meteorological conditions, respectively. The winter campaign was carried out in March 2009 and the summer campaign took place from mid July 2009 to mid August 2009. PM1 samples were continuously sampled every 24 hours using a DIGITEL high volume sampler and size- and time-resolved aerosol samples were collected using a 10-stage Berner impactor in a 6 hours day/night regime. This study presents the results of the chemical characterization of submicron particles from winter haze and summer haze measurements in comparison to clear and dusty day measurements. All samples were analyzed for the mass concentration, inorganic ions and carbon sum parameters such as elemental (EC), organic (OC) and water soluble organic carbon (WSOC). The WSOC fraction of filter samples was analyzed for polar substances such as dicarboxylic acids and saccharides. Fatty acids were determined to investigate surface-active substances and metals from the impactor measurements for crust material. Usually, highest PM1 concentrations are observed during haze periods, while