WorldWideScience

Sample records for arctic coastline eroding

  1. Calibrating thermal erosion models along an Arctic coastline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wobus, C. W.; Anderson, R. S.; Overeem, I.; Urban, F. E.; Clow, G. D.; Stanton, T. P.

    2009-12-01

    Coastal erosion rates of 20-30 meters per year have been documented along Alaska’s Beaufort Sea coastline, and a number of studies suggest that erosion rates have accelerated as a result of climate change. However, a lack of direct observational evidence has limited our progress in quantifying the role of climate change on coastal erosion rates in the Arctic. In particular, while longer ice-free periods are likely to lead to both warmer surface waters and longer fetch, the relative roles of thermal and mechanical (wave) erosion in driving coastal retreat have not been comprehensively quantified. We focus on the potential magnitude of thermal erosion along a permafrost coastline in the northern National Petroleum Reserve-Alaska (NPR-A), where erosion rates have averaged 10-15 meters/year over two years of direct monitoring. We take advantage of these extraordinary rates of coastal erosion to directly observe erosion processes via time-lapse photography, while monitoring temperature, solar radiation and wind speed at the same time. These combined observations are used to calibrate models of thermal erosion. Our observations suggest that virtually all of the erosion in this setting can be explained as a purely thermal process. Coastal bluffs are first notched and then topple into the ocean, failing dominantly along ice wedges that serve as planes of weakness. Furthermore, the high ice content and the fine grain size of the coastal plain materials that comprise the bluffs appear to limit any strong negative feedback on erosion rates, since the sediments are readily dispersed on the shallow shelf. Although erosion driven purely by thermal processes may be unique to this particular coastal zone, these observations implicate a direct relationship between climatic warming and landscape change. Erosion of sandy coastlines in other parts of the NPR-A may also be ultimately controlled by thermal energy, once a thin veneer of clastic material is removed by wave action from

  2. Migratory bird use of the coastal lagoon system of the Beaufort Sea coastline within the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska, 1983

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report covers the migratory bird use of the coastal lagoon system of the Beaufort Sea coastline within the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska. Aerial...

  3. Radioecological consequences of a potential accident during transport of spent nuclear fuel along an Arctic coastline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iosjpe, M; Reistad, O; Amundsen, I B

    2009-02-01

    This article presents results pertaining to a risk assessment of the potential consequences of a hypothetical accident occurring during the transportation by ship of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) along an Arctic coastline. The findings are based on modelling of potential releases of radionuclides, radionuclide transport and uptake in the marine environment. Modelling work has been done using a revised box model developed at the Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority. Evaluation of the radioecological consequences of a potential accident in the southern part of the Norwegian Current has been made on the basis of calculated collective dose to man, individual doses for the critical group, concentrations of radionuclides in seafood and doses to marine organisms. The results of the calculations indicate a large variability in the investigated parameters above mentioned. On the basis of the calculated parameters the maximum total activity ("accepted accident activity") in the ship, when the parameters that describe the consequences after the examined potential accident are still in agreement with the recommendations and criterions for protection of the human population and the environment, has been evaluated.

  4. Towards a calculation of organic carbon release from erosion of Arctic coasts using non-fractal coastline datasets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lantuit, H.; Rachold, V.; Pollard, W. H.; Steenhuisen, F.; Odegard, R.; Hubberten, H. -W.

    2009-01-01

    Changing environmental conditions in the Arctic will affect patterns of coastal erosion processes and thus modify the carbon cycle in the Arctic Ocean. To address this issue, a coastal classification of the Arctic was established to provide the first reliable estimate of organic carbon input from co

  5. Erodibility of permafrost exposures in the coasts of Eastern Chukotka

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslakov, Alexey; Kraev, Gleb

    2016-09-01

    Coastal retreat caused by coastal erosion decreases the territory of Russia by 50 km2 annually. Erosion of the Arctic coasts composed by fine-grained permafrost turns coastlines into badlands dozens of meters wide and is harmful to the coastal infrastructure. Regional-level variations in the coastal retreat rate in the Arctic tend to follow the climate change dynamics and its consequences, mainly the shrinkage of the perennial sea ice area. This study considers the lower level local-scale variability linked to permafrost features, lithology, and morphology of the coasts in the remote region on the western shore of the Bering Sea within Lorino settlement (Chukotka, Russia). The coastal dynamics was tracked by means of geodesy and remote sensing in 2012-14, and the archival engineering survey data available since 1967. We have derived the erodibility of sediments from the conventional soil properties measured by engineers, and linked the coastal retreat rates to erodibility of the sediments, so that it could be extrapolated to other coastal areas of Eastern Chukotka with similar sediment structure.

  6. Western Arctic Coastal Plain, IfSAR DSM-derived coastline and coastal features. University of Alaska Fairbanks, Geophysical Institute Permafrost Laboratory (2012).

    Data.gov (United States)

    Arctic Landscape Conservation Cooperative — This dataset consists of a polyline depicting the coast and coastal features of the western Arctic Coastal Plain as derived from a mosaic created from an...

  7. Migratory bird use of the coastal lagoon system of the Beaufort Sea coastline within the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska, 1981 and 1982

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report describes aerial surveys conducted in coastal lagoons of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge during 1982 to obtain an index of relative numbers of...

  8. Our Dynamic Coastline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubrey, David G.

    1980-01-01

    Discusses mechanisms which influence both rapid and gradual modifications of ocean beaches. Among factors described are storms, waves, currents, tides, sediment transport, and climate. Some effects of these forces upon coastline configurations are also presented. (WB)

  9. Our changing coastlines

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    DineshKumar, P.K.

    Our coastlines keep alive the sense of continuing creation and of the relentless drive of life In recent years, much has been done both to understand the processes that underlie their creation and to exploit their environment This article explains...

  10. Frictional convergence at coastlines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roeloffzen, J.C.; Berg, W.D. van den; Oerlemans, J.

    1986-01-01

    The coastline generally represents it marked discontinuity in surface roughness. The resulting mechanical forcing leads to a secondary circulation in the boundary layer, and consequently to a vertical motion field that may have a strong influence on the weather in the coastal zone. In potentially un

  11. Beach morphology and coastline evolution in the southern Bohai Strait

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Wu, Jianzheng; Li, Weiran; Zhu, Longhai; Hu, Rijun; Jiang, shenghui; Sun, Yonggen; Wang, Huijuan

    2015-10-01

    The beach studied in this paper spans a length of 51 km and is one of several long sandy beaches in the southern Bohai Strait. Due to the obstruction of islands in the northeast and the influence of the underwater topography, the wave environment in the offshore area is complex; beach types and sediment transport characteristics vary along different coasts. The coastlines extracted from six aerial photographs in different years were compared to demonstrate the evolving features. Seven typical beach profiles were selected to study the lateral beach variation characteristics. Continuous wind and wave observation data from Beihuangcheng ocean station during 2009 were employed for the hindcast of the local wave environment using a regional spectral wave model. Then the results of the wave hindcast were incorporated into the LITDRIFT model to compute the sediment transport rates and directions along the coasts and analyze the longshore sand movement. The results show that the coastline evolution of sand beaches in the southern Bohai Strait has spatial and temporal variations and the coast can be divided into four typical regions. Region (I), the north coast of Qimudao, is a slightly eroded and dissipative beach with a large sediment transport rate; Region (II), the southwest coast of Gangluan Port, is a slightly deposited and dissipative beach with moderate sediment transport rate; Region (III), in the central area, is a beach that is gradually transformed from a slightly eroded dissipative beach to a moderately or slightly strong eroded bar-trough beach from west to east with a relatively moderate sediment transport rate. Region (IV), on the east coast, is a strongly eroded and reflective beach with a weak sediment transport rate. The wave conditions exhibit an increasing trend from west to east in the offshore area. The distribution of the wave-induced current inside the wave breaking region and the littoral sediment transport in the nearshore region exhibit a gradual

  12. Puerto Rico Soil Erodibility (Kffact)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Puerto Rico soil erodibility (Kffactor) - low values indicate low vulnerability to erosion, higher values mean higher susceptibility to runoff.

  13. Collapsing permafrost coasts in the Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, Michael; Lantuit, Hugues

    2017-04-01

    Arctic warming is exposing permafrost coastlines, which account for 34% of the Earth's coasts, to rapid thaw and erosion. Coastal erosion rates as high as 25 m yr-1 together with the large amount of organic matter frozen in permafrost are resulting in an annual release of 14.0 Tg (1012 gram) particulate organic carbon into the nearshore zone. The nearshore zone is the primary recipient of higher fluxes of carbon and nutrients from thawing permafrost. We highlight the crucial role the nearshore zone plays in Arctic biogeochemical cycling, as here the fate of the released material is determined to: (1) degrade into greenhouse gases, (2) fuel marine primary production, (3) be buried in nearshore sediments or (4) be transported offshore. With Arctic warming, coastal erosion fluxes have the potential to increase by an order of magnitude until 2100. Such increases would result in drastic impacts on global carbon fluxes and their climate feedbacks, on nearshore food webs and on local communities, whose survival still relies on marine biological resources. Quantifying the potential impacts of increasing erosion on coastal ecosystems is crucial for food security of northern residents living in Arctic coastal communities. We need to know how the traditional hunting and fishing grounds might be impacted by high loads of sediment and nutrients released from eroding coasts, and to what extent coastal retreat will lead to a loss of natural habitat. Quantifying fluxes of organic carbon and nutrients is required, both in nearshore deposits and in the water column by sediment coring and systematic oceanographic monitoring. Ultimately, this will allow us to assess the transport and degradation pathways of sediment and organic matter derived from erosion. We need to follow the complete pathway, which is multi-directional including atmospheric release, lateral transport, transitional retention in the food web, and ultimate burial in seafloor sediments. We present numbers of multi

  14. Temporal and spatial evolution of coastline and subaqueous geomorphology in muddy coast of the Yellow River Delta

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG Jun; MA Suisui; CHEN Hongquan; LI Zhiwen

    2013-01-01

    Based on measured data of coastline and bathometry,processed by softwares of Surfer and Mapinfo,and combined with sediment loads in different phases at Lijin gauging station,temporal and spatial evolution of coastline and subaqueous geomorphology in muddy coast of the Yellow River Delta is analyzed.The results show that ~68% of sediments were delivered by the Yellow River deposited around the river mouth and in the littoral area from 1953 to 2000.Coastline in different coasts had distinctive changes in response to shifts of river course.Coastline was stable in the west of the Diaokou river mouth.Coastline from the east of the Diaokou river mouth to the north of the Gudong oilfield had experienced siltation,then serious erosion,and finally kept stable with sea walls conservation.Generally,coastline of the survived river mouth of the Qingshuigou river course stretched seaward,whereas the south side of sand spit at the Qingshuigou old river mouth was eroded after the Yellow River inpouring near the position at the Qing 8.The subaqueous geomorphology off the survived river mouth exhibited siltation from 1976 to 1996,with flat topset beds and steeper foreset beds.From 1996 to 2005,the subaqueous geomorphology off the Qingshuigou old river mouth was eroded in the topset and foreset beds,but silted in the bottomset beds.The subaqueous geomorphology off the new river mouth sequentially performed siltation with small degree compared to that of 1976-1996.

  15. Salt Marshes of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this study was to map all salt marshes along the coastline of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, from the Canning River to the Canadian border....

  16. Drawing the line on coastline recession risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongejan, R.; Ranasinghe, R.W.M.R.J.; Wainwright, D.; Callaghan, D.P.; Reyns, J.

    2016-01-01

    Climate change and the growth of coastal communities will significantly increase the socio-economic risks associated with coastline recession (i.e. the net long term landward movement of the coastline). Coastal setback lines are a commonly adopted management/planning tool to mitigate these risks. Wh

  17. Development of two landscape-scale arctic observatories in northern Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, B. M.; Arp, C. D.; Whitman, M. S.; Grosse, G.

    2016-12-01

    Lake-rich arctic lowland landscapes are particularly sensitive to changes occurring in both summer and winter climate. In northern Alaska, lakes may account for more than 20% of the land surface cover and thus factor prominently in the arctic system. However, long-term, integrated observations from lake-rich arctic landscapes are relatively sparse. During the past decade, we have developed two new landscape-scale arctic observatories in northern Alaska - the Teshekpuk Lake Observatory (TLO) and the Fish Creek Watershed Observatory (FCWO) to help fill critical data gaps associated with these prominent components of the arctic system. The TLO focuses on the largest arctic lake in Alaska and the ice-rich permafrost terrain between it and the Beaufort Sea coast to the north. The FCWO focuses on a 4,500 sq. km. watershed where lakes occupy 19% of the surface cover. Combined, the TLO and FCWO capture the diverse mosaic of terrain units and aquatic habitats that occur on the Arctic Coastal Plain of northern Alaska including deep dune trough lakes, shallow thermokarst lakes, drained thermokarst lake basins, thermokarst pits, beaded streams, both sand and gravel bedded rivers, rapidly eroding coastlines, and deltaic habitats. The TLO and FCWO are also ideal locations for long-term observations as these landscapes are responding rapidly to climate change and are also subject to land use changes associated with petroleum development. Here we provide an overview of the research infrastructure available at the TLO and FCWO and present data and findings from sensor networks, field studies, remotely sensed image analysis, models, limnological surveys, and paleoecological analyses. Ongoing projects at both observatories include establishment of automated and near-real time data transmission stations, detailed field studies, analysis of remotely sensed datasets to quantify regional landscape changes, climatic and hydrologic modeling, and analysis of paleoecological archives that

  18. Fractal Character of China Bedrock Coastline

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱晓华

    2004-01-01

    Fractal theory was applied to a preliminary discussion of the fractal character and formation mechanism of the coastline of the bedrock coast of China on the basis of GIS (Geographical Information System). Some significant conclusions were drawn:(1) The fractal dimensions of the coastline and linear structures of Liaodong Peninsula are 1.0093 and 1.0246 respectively, those of Shandong Peninsula are 1.019 and 1.021 respectively, etc.(2) The fractal dimensions of coastlines of Liaodong Peninsula, Shandong Peninsula, Zhejiang and Fujian-Guangdong tend to increase with the spatial change from north to south.(3)The regional linear structures(including faults)control the basic trends and fractal dimensions of coastlines as a whole in the regions of the bedrock coast of China:the more the controlling effect of linear structures, the smaller the fractal dimensions of coastlines.(4)The substantial constituents of coast and biologic function both play an important role in affecting the fractal dimensions of coastlines of Liaodong Peninsula, Shandong Peninsula, Zhejiang, Fujian-Guangdong and Taiwan Island.

  19. EROD activity in gill filaments of anadromous and marine fish as a biomarker of dioxin-like pollutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jönsson, Maria; Abrahamson, Alexandra; Brunström, Björn; Brandt, Ingvar; Ingebrigtsen, Kristian; Jørgensen, Even H

    2003-11-01

    The applicability of a gill filament-based ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD) assay, originally developed in rainbow trout, was examined in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar), Arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus), Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua), saithe (Pollachius virens) and spotted wolffish (Anarhichas minor). All species but spotted wolffish showed strong EROD induction in tip pieces of gill filaments following 48 h of exposure to waterborne beta-naphthoflavone. Atlantic salmon parr, smolts held in freshwater and smolts transferred to seawater showed EROD induction of similar magnitude. Arctic charr, differing 11-fold in body weight, showed similar EROD activities as expressed per gill filament tip. Laboratory exposure of saithe to water and sediments collected at polluted sites, resulted in strong EROD induction. In conclusion, the gill filament assay seems useful for monitoring exposure to aryl hydrocarbon receptor agonists in various species. Furthermore, smoltification status, water salinity and body size proved to have minor influence on gill filament EROD activity. However, the results in spotted wolffish show that some species may be less suitable for monitoring using the gill assay. Assessment of gill filament EROD activity in fish exposed to polluted water and sediments in the laboratory proved to be an easy and cost-effective way to survey pollution with dioxin-like chemicals.

  20. The Race to Nourish: Exploring resource equity in a coupled human coastline model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Z. C.; McNamara, D.; Murray, A.; Smith, M.

    2011-12-01

    Many coastal communities are faced with eroding shorelines due to gradients in the alongshore transport of sediment and rising sea level. These communities often employ a beach nourishment mitigation strategy to counter erosion from natural forces. These nourishment activities provide economic benefits in the form of protection from storms and enhanced recreation on the stabilized beach. Previous work has shown that economically optimal nourishment decisions indicate that rising nourishment costs can lead to more frequent nourishment. Given that the cost of nourishing is likely to rise as offshore sediment borrow sites become more scarce, this suggests a positive feedback whereby nourishment that dwindles offshore borrow sites causes more frequent nourishment. We explore the dynamics of this feedback in a coupled economic-coastline model and how resulting long term shoreline and economic patterns respond to forcing changes in the form of increased sea level rise and changing storminess along both a straight shoreline and a cuspate Carolina like shoreline. The economic model utilizes myopic manager agents that inform a community of the optimal nourishment interval based on the current cost of sand and locally observed erosion rate since the last nourishment episode. Communities nourish independently but can affect the erosion rate of adjacent communities through alongshore sediment transport dynamics. The coastline model tracks large-scale coastline change via alongshore sediment transport calculations and erosion due to rising sea level. Model experiments show that when the economic model is coupled to a flat coastline, the feedback in sand cost leads to resource inequity as communities that become caught in the feedback nourish frequently while adjacent communities maintain coastline position by "free riding" on these neighbor towns. Model experiments also show that on cuspate coastlines, the emergent cuspate features enhance the cost feedback and create unequal

  1. Climate Change and International Competition: the US Army in the Arctic Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-21

    newly-established Arctic Command.100 As Vladimir Putin continues to publicly express a desire to control the “entire Arctic region,” the perception...Arctic military build-up in 2014,” Russia Today, December 10, 2013, accessed December 14, 2014, http://rt.com/news/arctic- russia -military- putin -000/. 100...commercial shipping routes, the Northern Sea Route (NSR) that parallels the northern coastline of Russia , the Northwest Passage (NWP) that runs along the

  2. Center for Coastline Security Technology, Year 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-05-01

    Figure 2.6.8: Close-Up Photograph of RPUUV Tail Section. Figure 2.6.9: Force and moments applied on a hydrofoil . Figure 2.6.10: The NACA 21016... hydrofoil profile. Florida Atlantic University 4/28/08 Page 10 Center for Coastline Security Technology Year Three-Final Report Figure...as a 3D wing with a NACA 21016 hydrofoil profile (Figure 2.6.10) held by 3 cylinders (Figure 2.6.8). Center for Coastline Security Technology Year

  3. Scale effects of the continental coastline of China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SU Fenzhen; GAO Yi; ZHOU Chenghu; YANG Xiaomei; FEI Xianyun

    2011-01-01

    Spatial scale is a fundamental problem in Geography.Scale effect caused by fractal characteristic of coastline becomes a common focus of coastal zone managers and researchers.In this study,based on DEM and remote sensing images,multi-scale continental coastlines of China were extracted and the fractal characteristic was analyzed.The results are shown as follows.(1) The continental coastline of China fits the fractal model,and the fractal dimension is 1.195.(2) The scale effects with fractal dimensions of coastline have significant differences according to uplift and subsidence segments along the continental coastlines of China.(3) The fractal dimension of coastline has significant spatial heterogeneity according to the coastline types.The fractal dimension of sandy coastline located in Luanhe River plain is 1.109.The dimension of muddy coastline located in northern Jiangsu Plain is 1.059,while that of rocky coastline along southeastern Fujian is 1.293.(4) The length of rocky coastline is affected by scale more than that of muddy and sandy coastline.Since coastline is the conjunction of sea,land and air surface,the study of coastline scale effect is one of the scientific bases for the researches on air-sea-land interaction in multi-scales.

  4. Coastline Community College: An Idea Beyond Tradition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luskin, Bernard J.; Small, James

    Since Coastline Community College (CCC) opened in Fall 1976, CCC has served as a model for the community-based, "college beyond walls" movement. CCC, which has no physical campus, uses 127 existing facilities throughout its service area, including public and private buildings, homes, and businesses. Besides eliminating high construction…

  5. ON FRACTAL MECHANISM OF COASTLINE -A Case Study of China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    MANDELBROT enunciated the uncertainty of the length of a coastline in his paper" How long is the coastline of Britain?" published in " Science" in 1967. The fractal concept was presented for the first time in that paper and has been applied to many fields ever since. According to the fractal theory and conditions of fractal research of coastline, the controls of faults and biologic function on the fractal character of coastline are preliminarily discussed on the basis of GIS in this paper . Finally, some significant conclusions are drawn: 1) the faults control the basic trends of coastlines of two study areas;2) the fractal dimension of coastline of Taiwan is smaller than that of Changle- Lufeng, because the faults of Taiwan more intensely control the trend and fractal dimension of the coastline;3) the larger the fractal dimension of the faults or the major faults, the more the controlling effect of them on the trend and fractal dimension of coastline; 4) the larger fractal dimension of the coastline of Changle- Lufeng indicates that the biologic function intensely shapes the coastline. In a word, the controls of faults and biologic function on the fractal character of coastline are discussed with a case study of China in this paper, it can be seen that faults and biologic function both have influence over the trend and fractal dimension of coastline, the fractal mechanism of coastline of two study areas may be so.

  6. A 150-year record of coastline dynamics within a sediment cell: Eastern England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montreuil, Anne-Lise; Bullard, Joanna E.

    2012-12-01

    Coastal sediment cells reflect processes operating at a range of scales, but it is the medium spatial and temporal scales (decades to centuries) that are of greatest interest for coastal management. This paper focuses on coastline position change within a single sediment cell over 150 years where the geomorphology includes cliffs, beaches and saltmarshes. The focus is the east coast of England from Flamborough Head to Gibraltar Point. Although the updrift sector of this sediment cell has been studied for well over a century, the downdrift sector has attracted significantly less attention. Using topographic profiles, bathymetric profiles, aerial photographs and historical maps we mapped coastline erosion and accretion using the Digital Shoreline Analysis System (DSAS) and calculated volumetric changes for different morphometric units. Rapid erosion of the updrift Holderness cliffs has been counterbalanced with accretion on beaches along the downdrift Lincolnshire coast. The amount of accretion in Lincolnshire corresponds to around 29% of the volume of sediment eroded from Holderness. Much of the eroded cliff material is likely to be deposited temporarily into nearshore and offshore sand banks before being redistributed by cross-shore currents. An exploration of storm surge impact on long-term erosion and accretion rates showed no clear relationship between storm surge frequency and change in coastline position, however this may be in part due to the relative timing of storm occurrence and data acquisition. The Jenkinson daily weather type classification was found to be a reasonable proxy for the occurrence of strong onshore winds which may offer scope for further investigation of the role of forcing factors over time periods beyond the length of the meteorological and tidal station records. Winter North Atlantic Oscillation phase was not a good indicator of storminess on the east coast of England but may be a useful proxy for quiescence.

  7. 7 CFR 12.22 - Highly erodible field determination criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Section 12.22 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture HIGHLY ERODIBLE LAND AND WETLAND CONSERVATION Highly Erodible Land Conservation § 12.22 Highly erodible field determination criteria. (a... included in an approved conservation plan for the entire highly erodible field....

  8. Delineation of tunnel valleys across the North Sea coastline, Denmark based on reflection seismic data, boreholes, TEM and Schlumberger soundings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Theis Raaschou; Jørdensen, Flemming; Christensen, Steen

    Buried tunnel valleys are elongated depressions eroded into the substratum during the Pleistocene glaciations. Nine such valleys are mapped on- and offshore in a 300 km2 area located at the Danish North Sea coast. The delineation of the buried valleys is based on an extensive data set consisting ......, preferred orientations, and morphology support that three of the tunnel valleys cross the North Sea coastline. It is suggested that the nine valleys were formed during at least six events that occurred through one or more pre-Weichselian glaciations...

  9. How quickly do High Arctic coastal environments respond to rapid deglaciation and the paraglacial transformation of proglacial areas? - Answers from Spitsbergen, Svalbard Archipelago

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strzelecki, Matt; Long, Antony; Lloyd, Jerry; Zagórski, Piotr

    2014-05-01

    The coastal zone is one of the most important storage systems for sediments that are eroded and transported by rivers, wind and slope processes from deglacierised valleys and proglacial areas before reaching their final sediment sink (fjords or the open sea. The Svalbard archipelago provides an excellent location to quantify how High Arctic coasts are responding to climate warming and the associated paraglacial landscape transformations. In this paper we summarize the results of several coastal surveys carried out by our research teams along the paraglacial coasts of Spitsbergen during the last decade. We reconstruct the post-Little Ice Age development of selected coastlines in Spitsbergen to illustrate the variable coastal response to paraglacial and periglacial processes activated following the recent retreat of glaciers. Our surveys use aerial photogrammetric and GIS analyses, sedimentological classification of coastal deposits and field-based geomorphological mapping in Kongsfjorden, Billefjorden, Bellsund, Hornsund and Sørkappland. Our results document dramatic changes in sediment flux and coastal response under intervals characterized by a warming climate, retreating local ice masses, a shortened winter sea-ice season and thawing permafrost. The study highlights the need for a greater understanding of the controls on High Arctic coastal geomorphology, especially given the potential for future accelerated warming and sea-level rise.

  10. On the generation of coastline-following grids for ocean models—trade-off between orthogonality and alignment to coastlines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaonan; Ma, Jialiang; Xu, Shiming; Wang, Bin

    2017-08-01

    Regional ocean models usually utilize orthogonal curvilinear grids that are fit to the coastline of the modeled regions. While the orthogonality of the grid is required from the perspective of the numerical algorithms, the alignment to the irregular coastlines improves the characterization of the land-sea distribution and the ocean simulation. In this article, we carry out fractal analysis of two representative coastal regions and discuss the trade-offs between the orthogonality and coastline alignment during the grid generation of these regions. A new grid generation method based on Schwarz-Christoffel conformal mappings is proposed, with automatic coastal boundary retrieval algorithm that generates resolution dependent boundary for grid generation and alleviates the human efforts involved in traditional methods. We show that for the southeastern Pacific region, the coastline is smooth with low fractal dimension and there exists effective trade-off with a coastline boundary that adjusts to the desired grid resolution. On the contrary, there is no effective trade-off for southeast China seas where the coastline is of higher fractal dimension, and a coarser coastline boundary is recommended for better orthogonality with little loss in coastline alignment. Further numerical study of coastal trapped Kelvin waves for the typical regions demonstrate that the new coastline-fitting grids achieve smaller error in numerical dispersion and higher accuracy. Through analysis, we conclude that for grid generation for regional ocean modeling, modelers should bring into consideration of the multi-scale fractal characteristics of the coastline.

  11. Dispersive and erodible soils - fundamental differences

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Paige-Green, P

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Dispersive, erodible and slaking soils are prevalent over wide areas of South Africa. Each of these materials increases the cost of construction, but dispersive soils are likely to lead to far more serious problems, particularly in dam construction...

  12. The growth of headlands in a simple model of rocky coastline evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limber, P. W.; Murray, A. B.; Adams, P. N.

    2009-12-01

    Numerous wave-induced processes drive sea cliff retreat on rocky coastlines. Within the rock/wave interface, beach sand plays a key role: field evidence and laboratory experiments show that beach sediment can either act as an abrasive tool to enhance sea cliff retreat, or, when a beach is sufficiently wide, as a cover to curb retreat. Accordingly, sea cliffs with no fronting beach (and no abrasive tools) can erode more slowly than those where a small, optimal amount of sand is present. The nonlinear relationship between sediment cover and bedrock erosion suggests a mechanism for headland formation — a mechanism that has several terrestrial geomorphic analogs such as tor development in high alpine and desert environments and fluvial bedrock incision. In the rocky-coastline system, beach width is influenced by divergence of alongshore sediment flux (which depends on coastline shape), and sediment supplied by cliff retreat (which depends on beach width as well as cliff height and composition). We present a simple exploratory numerical model of rocky coastline evolution on millennial time scales in which these basic geomorphic processes interact in a kilometer-scale, plan-view domain. In the model, wave power delivered to the cliff depends on time-varying shore platform width, breaking wave height, and beach width. Bare-rock erosion rates vary with wave power, consistent with field observations. A relationship between beach width and sea cliff retreat features maximum and minimum retreat rates that occur when beach height equals the still water level (i.e. mid-tide level), as supported by existing laboratory experiments, and when beach width exceeds the wave run-up limit, respectively. Retreating sea cliffs produce beach sediment, which is then distributed by a diffusional alongshore sediment flux scheme, representing a low-angle-dominated wave climate. Finally, a global beach erosion rate simulates sediment sinks such as nearshore submarine canyons or sea level rise

  13. Tsunami Hazard in the Algerian Coastline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amir, L. A.

    2008-05-01

    The Algerian coastline is located at the border between the African and the Eurasian tectonic plates. The collision between these two plates is approximately 4 to 7 mm/yr. The Alps and the tellian Atlas result from this convergence. Historical and present day data show the occurrence of earthquakes with magnitude up to 7 degrees on Richter scale in the northern part of the country. Cities were destroyed and the number of victims reached millions of people. Recently, small seismic waves generated by a destructive earthquake (Epicenter: 36.90N, 3.71E; Mw=6.8; Algeria, 2003, NEIC) were recorded in the French and Spanish coasts. This event raised again the issue of tsunami hazard in western Mediterranean region. For the Algerian study case, the assessment of seismic and tsunami hazard is a matter of great interest because of fast urban development of cities like Algiers. This study aims to provide scientific arguments to help in the elaboration of the Mediterranean tsunami alert program. This is a real complex issue because (1) the western part of the sea is narrow, (2) constructions on the Algerian coastline do not respect safety standards and (3) the seismic hazard is important. The present work is based on a numerical modeling approach. Firstly, a database is created to gather and list information related to seismology, tectonic, abnormal sea level's variations recorded/observed, submarine and coastal topographic data for the western part of the Mediterranean margin. This database helped to propose series of scenario that could trigger tsunami in the Mediterranean sea. Seismic moment, rake and focal depth are the major parameters that constrain the modeling input seismic data. Then, the undersea earthquakes modeling and the seabed deformations are computed with a program adapted from the rngchn code based on Okada's analytic equations. The last task of this work consisted to calculate the initial water surface displacement and simulate the triggered tsunami

  14. Thermal erosion of a permafrost coastline: Improving process-based models using time-lapse photography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wobus, C.; Anderson, R.; Overeem, I.; Matell, N.; Clow, G.; Urban, F.

    2011-01-01

    Coastal erosion rates locally exceeding 30 m y-1 have been documented along Alaska's Beaufort Sea coastline, and a number of studies suggest that these erosion rates have accelerated as a result of climate change. However, a lack of direct observational evidence has limited our progress in quantifying the specific processes that connect climate change to coastal erosion rates in the Arctic. In particular, while longer ice-free periods are likely to lead to both warmer surface waters and longer fetch, the relative roles of thermal and mechanical (wave) erosion in driving coastal retreat have not been comprehensively quantified. We focus on a permafrost coastline in the northern National Petroleum Reserve-Alaska (NPR-A), where coastal erosion rates have averaged 10-15 m y-1 over two years of direct monitoring. We take advantage of these extraordinary rates of coastal erosion to observe and quantify coastal erosion directly via time-lapse photography in combination with meteorological observations. Our observations indicate that the erosion of these bluffs is largely thermally driven, but that surface winds play a crucial role in exposing the frozen bluffs to the radiatively warmed seawater that drives melting of interstitial ice. To first order, erosion in this setting can be modeled using formulations developed to describe iceberg deterioration in the open ocean. These simple models provide a conceptual framework for evaluating how climate-induced changes in thermal and wave energy might influence future erosion rates in this setting.

  15. Arctic methane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dyupina, E.; Amstel, van A.R.

    2013-01-01

    What are the risks of a runaway greenhouse effect from methane release from hydrates in the Arctic? In January 2013, a dramatic increase of methane concentration up to 2000 ppb has been measured over the Arctic north of Norway in the Barents Sea. The global average being 1750 ppb. It has been

  16. Arctic Newcomers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tonami, Aki

    2013-01-01

    Interest in the Arctic region and its economic potential in Japan, South Korea and Singapore was slow to develop but is now rapidly growing. All three countries have in recent years accelerated their engagement with Arctic states, laying the institutional frameworks needed to better understand an...

  17. Arctic methane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dyupina, E.; Amstel, van A.R.

    2013-01-01

    What are the risks of a runaway greenhouse effect from methane release from hydrates in the Arctic? In January 2013, a dramatic increase of methane concentration up to 2000 ppb has been measured over the Arctic north of Norway in the Barents Sea. The global average being 1750 ppb. It has been sugges

  18. A half-century of coastline change in Diego Garcia - The largest atoll island in the Chagos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purkis, Sam J.; Gardiner, Robert; Johnston, Matthew W.; Sheppard, Charles R. C.

    2016-05-01

    Being low and flat, atoll islands are often used as case studies against which to gauge the likely impacts of future sea-level rise on coastline stability. Furnished with lengthy temporal datasets, Pacific atolls form the majority of studies with scant information published for sites in the Indian Ocean. To address this imbalance, this study considers Diego Garcia, an atoll island situated in the remote equatorial Indian Ocean, which has undergone pronounced natural and anthropogenic change in the last fifty years. To explore the former, time separated remote sensing images spanning the years 1963-2013 are assembled to provide insight into the natural dynamics of the shoreline of this island and ocean climate data are compiled to investigate possible controls. Disregarding the precinct of the atoll on which a military complex has been constructed, overall land area of Diego Garcia decreased by a net value of only 0.92% between 1963 and 2013. While net island area is relatively unchanged, 12% of the shoreline that is not in the military precinct displayed discernible accretion and 15% has receded, with the lagoon-facing coastline having undergone the most pronounced changes and at rates higher than recorded for the island's exterior. Broad trends in the morphological adjustment of the island exist. The north-eastern limb of the atoll has generally receded while the south-eastern limb has extended. The south of the island has also extended, the south-western region has eroded and the north-western part has generally also eroded with the exception of notable shoreline extension at Simpson Point. The most common mechanism by which the lagoon-ward coastline has aggraded is through the in-filling of cuspate embayments with sediment which is later stabilized by the expansion of terrestrial vegetation. This evolution is most active in the complex network of embayments in the south of the atoll lagoon. The ocean-facing coastline, by contrast, typically aggrades and erodes

  19. Assessing the role of Climate Variability in the recent evolution of coastlines in southern Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Paola, Gianluigi; Atkinson, David; Rosskopf, Carmen M.; Walker, Ian

    2016-04-01

    During the last century, Climatic Variability (CV) and change effects have generated a discernable impact on the world's coasts, most notably through changes in the frequency and/or magnitude of storm surges, flooding, coastal erosion and sea-level rise. This study explores CV signals and coastal responses along a 36 km stretch of coast in the Molise region of southern Italy on the Central Adriatic Sea. Two dominant signals of CV in the Mediterranean region of Europe are characterized by the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) and the East Atlantic-West Russia (EAWR) patterns. The NAO is the leading mode of CV in the North Atlantic region and periods with positive NAO index values are typically associated with above average wind speeds across the mid-latitudes of the Atlantic and western Europe, with anomalously northerly flows across the Mediterranean region and enhanced trade winds over the sub-tropical North Atlantic. Although NAO is one of the most prominent patterns in all seasons, its relative role in regulating the variability of the European climate during non-winter months is not as clear as for the winter season. In contrast, the EAWR exerts strong influence on precipitation in the Mediterranean region such that, during the negative phase of EAWR, wetter conditions prevail across central Europe and the Mediterranean region, with precipitation extremes often occurring during these periods. This study examines the effects of NAO and EAWR on coastline response in the Molise region, which has a microtidal regime (ordinary tidal excursions of 30-40 cm). GIS analysis of shoreline changes from historical aerial photography from 1954-2011 was performed and 20 years (1989-2008) of wave data were analysed from the nearby Ortona buoy to define trends and extreme event occurrence in the wave climate in the study area. Finally, statistical associations between NAO, EAWR, and other CV indices of possible influence (e.g. Arctic Oscillation, Scandinavia Pattern, or the East

  20. An automatic coastline detector for use with SAR images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erteza, Ireena A.

    1998-09-01

    SAR imagery for coastline detection has many potential advantages over conventional optical stereoscopic techniques. For example, SAR does not have restrictions on being collected during daylight or when there is no cloud cover. In addition, the techniques for coastline detection witth SAR images can be automated. In this paper, we present the algorithmic development of an automatic coastline detector for use with SAR imagery. Three main algorithms comprise the automatic coastline detection algorithm, The first algorithm considers the image pre-processing steps that must occur on the original image in order to accentuate the land/water boundary. The second algorithm automatically follows along the accentuated land/water boundary and produces a single-pixel-wide coastline. The third algorithm identifies islands and marks them. This report describes in detail the development of these three algorithms. Examples of imagery are used throughout the paper to illustrate the various steps in algorithms. Actual code is included in appendices. The algorithms presented are preliminary versions that can be applied to automatic coastline detection in SAR imagery. There are many variations and additions to the algorithms that can be made to improve robustness and automation, as required by a particular application.

  1. Arctic Watch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orcutt, John; Baggeroer, Arthur; Mikhalevsky, Peter; Munk, Walter; Sagen, Hanne; Vernon, Frank; Worcester, Peter

    2015-04-01

    The dramatic reduction of sea ice in the Arctic Ocean will increase human activities in the coming years. This will be driven by increased demand for energy and the marine resources of an Arctic Ocean more accessible to ships. Oil and gas exploration, fisheries, mineral extraction, marine transportation, research and development, tourism and search and rescue will increase the pressure on the vulnerable Arctic environment. Synoptic in-situ year-round observational technologies are needed to monitor and forecast changes in the Arctic atmosphere-ice-ocean system at daily, seasonal, annual and decadal scales to inform and enable sustainable development and enforcement of international Arctic agreements and treaties, while protecting this critical environment. This paper will discuss multipurpose acoustic networks, including subsea cable components, in the Arctic. These networks provide communication, power, underwater and under-ice navigation, passive monitoring of ambient sound (ice, seismic, biologic and anthropogenic), and acoustic remote sensing (tomography and thermometry), supporting and complementing data collection from platforms, moorings and autonomous vehicles. This paper supports the development and implementation of regional to basin-wide acoustic networks as an integral component of a multidisciplinary, in situ Arctic Ocean Observatory.

  2. Hurricane effects on the coastline from Cabo San Lucas Bay, Baja California Peninsula, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nava-Sanchez, Enrique; Navarro-Lozano, Octavio; Murillo-Jimenez, Janette; Godinez-Orta, Lucio

    2010-05-01

    , responsible for the coastline stability, is sourced by two processes: (1) the littoral drift bringing sand from the Pacific coast, which turns around San Lucas Cape and enters the bay, process that is continuous, with stronger events every 3 to 7 years (matching ENSO cycles) following seasonal periods of heavy cyclonic rains that favor important fluvial sediment discharges; and (2) direct input of fluvial sediments, discharged by the El Salto arroyo during catastrophic hurricane rains with returning periods of 50 years. The canyon head traps most of the sediment "excess" of the beach system. Winter waves erode the beach and generate a weak littoral transport to the south where sediments are trapped by the canyon head. Also, because the mouth of the El Salto arroyo is just in front of the canyon head, the debris flows during catastrophic rains are dumped on the canyon and a small portion remains to form a fan delta whose sediments are later removed by waves to feed the eroded beach in both direccions, as we observed during the path of Hurricane Juliette.

  3. 海岸线分类体系探讨%Discussion on Classification System of Coastline

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    索安宁; 曹可; 马红伟; 王权明; 于永海

    2015-01-01

    对海岸线分类体系进行探讨,依据海岸线自然属性改变与否,将海岸线划分为自然海岸线和人工海岸线;依据海岸底质特征和空间形态,将海岸线划分为基岩海岸线、砂质海岸线、淤泥质海岸线、生物海岸线和河口海岸线;依据海岸线功能用途,将海岸线划分为渔业岸线、港口码头岸线、临海工业岸线、旅游娱乐岸线、城镇岸线、矿产能源岸线、保护岸线、特殊用途岸线和未利用岸线;依据海岸线时间尺度,将海岸线划分为历史海岸线、现状海岸线和未来海岸线;依据海岸线管理实践,将海岸线划分为管理岸线和实际岸线,并就海岸线分类的几点问题进行探讨。%The coastline is interaction zone between land and sea. It is an important ecotone for global ecosys-tem conservation. The coastline classification is organization of varied coastline into classified types according difference rules. It is the foundation for coastline protection, use and marine resources integrated management, however, the coastline classification has stillnot been addressed systematically even nowadays. Aimed to clari-fy the coastline classification system, this article discuss the coastline classification system according to natu-ral attribute and spatial pattern, exploitation, functional use, temporal scale, management requirement, ect of coastline. First, the coastline can be divided into natural coastline and man-made coastline. The natural coast-line is result of natural interaction between sea and land, while the man made coastline is sea-land demarcation line which forms by cofferdam or dyke by human sea exploitation activities. Then the coastline is divided into rocky coastline, sandy coastline, silt coastline, biological coastline and estuary coastline according to geologi-cal characteristics in intertidal zone and coastline spatial pattern. The rocky coastline is comprised by rock in the intertidal

  4. Enhanced dry deposition of nitrogen pollution near coastlines: A case study covering the Chesapeake Bay estuary and Atlantic Ocean coastline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loughner, Christopher P.; Tzortziou, Maria; Shroder, Shulamit; Pickering, Kenneth E.

    2016-12-01

    Atmospheric deposition of nitrogen pollution is one of the major sources of nitrogen to many terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, worldwide. This modeling study suggests that coastlines frequently experience disproportionally high dry deposition of reactive nitrogen. High concentrations of air pollution from coastal cities often accumulate over adjacent estuaries and coastal waters due to low dry deposition rates over the water and a shallow marine boundary layer trapping marine emissions. As high concentrations of pollutants over the water are transported inland, enhanced dry deposition occurs onshore along the coastlines. Large spatial gradients in air pollutants and deposition totals are simulated along the coastline with decreasing concentrations/deposition as the distance from the water increases. As pollutants are transported onshore, air pollution mixing ratios near the surface decrease due to removal by dry deposition, vertical dilution due to deeper mixing layer heights, and decrease in friction velocity as a function of distance inland from the coastline. Ammonium nitrate formation near agricultural ammonia sources, sodium nitrate formation near coastal areas with atmospheric sea-salt loadings, and particulate growth via water uptake also contribute to large nitrate dry deposition totals at the coastline. Gradients in dry N deposition are evident over a monthly time scale and are enhanced during sea and bay breeze events. Current existing N-deposition monitoring networks do not capture the large spatial gradients of ammonium, nitrate, and nitric acid concentrations near coastlines predicted by the model due to the coarse spatial density distribution of monitoring sites.

  5. THE INFLUENCE OF SOME SOIL CHEMICAL PROPERTIES ON THEIR ERODABILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. C. Stanga

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Soils from de hills and tableland regions, as well as those from subcarpathian area are characterized through higher erodability. The soils from mountain area present the lowest erodability, especially districambosol, due to the upper horizons properties. The erodabilidydepends on the ratio of historical geological erosion and surface erosion.

  6. 76 FR 82075 - Highly Erodible Land and Wetland Conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-30

    ... Secretary 7 CFR Part 12 RIN 0560-AH97 Highly Erodible Land and Wetland Conservation AGENCY: Office of the... (HELC) or wetland conservation (WC) provisions to retain eligibility for USDA program benefits if... persons who failed to apply a conservation system on highly erodible land, or who converted wetlands...

  7. Pyrosequencing reveals bacteria carried in different wind eroded sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little is known about the microbial communities carried in wind-eroded sediments from various soil types and land management systems. A novel technique, pyrosequencing, promises to expand our understanding of the vast microbial diversity of soils and eroded sediments as it can sequence between 10-10...

  8. Optimal boundary conditions at the staircase-shaped coastlines

    CERN Document Server

    Kazantsev, Eugene

    2014-01-01

    A 4D-Var data assimilation technique is applied to the rectangular-box configuration of the NEMO in order to identify the optimal parametrization of boundary conditions at lateral boundaries. The case of the staircase-shaped coastlines is studied by rotating the model grid around the center of the box. It is shown that, in some cases, the formulation of the boundary conditions at the exact boundary leads to appearance of exponentially growing modes while optimal boundary conditions allow to correct the errors induced by the staircase-like appriximation of the coastline.

  9. Coastline detection in SAR images using discriminant cuts segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Xianwen; Zou, Xiaolin; Yu, Tan

    2016-11-01

    The discriminant cut algorithm is used to detect coastlines in synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images. The proposed approach is a region-based one, which is able to capture and utilize spatial information in the image. The real SAR images, e.g. ALOS-1 PALSAR and COSMO-SkyMed SAR images, together with in-situ GPS data were collected and used to validate the performance of the proposed approach for coastline detection in SAR images. The accuracy is better than 4 times the image resolution. The efficiency is also tested.

  10. Coastline Extraction from Aerial Images Based on Edge Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paravolidakis, V.; Moirogiorgou, K.; Ragia, L.; Zervakis, M.; Synolakis, C.

    2016-06-01

    Nowadays coastline extraction and tracking of its changes become of high importance because of the climate change, global warming and rapid growth of human population. Coastal areas play a significant role for the economy of the entire region. In this paper we propose a new methodology for automatic extraction of the coastline using aerial images. A combination of a four step algorithm is used to extract the coastline in a robust and generalizable way. First, noise distortion is reduced in order to ameliorate the input data for the next processing steps. Then, the image is segmented into two regions, land and sea, through the application of a local threshold to create the binary image. The result is further processed by morphological operators with the aim that small objects are being eliminated and only the objects of interest are preserved. Finally, we perform edge detection and active contours fitting in order to extract and model the coastline. These algorithmic steps are illustrated through examples, which demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed methodology.

  11. Coastline Community College: A Dream with a Reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luskin, Bernard J.

    Coastline Community College (CCC) is a comprehensive community college without walls, committed to the basic philosophy that every individual shall have the opportunity for appropriate quality education up to the limits of his or her potential and that access to diverse educational opportunities shall be available to all interested adults. Its…

  12. Coastline Community College: An Idea Whose Time Has Come.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luskin, Bernard J.; Chappell, Jack

    1981-01-01

    After tracing the evolution of today's community colleges, describes Coastline Community College. Focuses on its: committed board of trustees, flexible administrative structure, dispersed learning centers, open access philosophy, flexible programing, diverse access systems, largely part-time faculty, commitment to lifelong learning, and students.…

  13. ON FRACTAL MECHANISM OF COASTLINE —A Case Study of China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHUXiao-hua; WANGJian

    2002-01-01

    MANDELBROT enunciated the uncertainty of the length of a coastline in his paper"How long is the coast-line of Britain?" published in "Science"in 1967.The fractal concept was presented for the first time in that paper and has been applied to many fields ever since.According to the fractal theory and conditions of fractal research of coastline,the controls of faults and biologic function on the fractal character of coastline are preliminarily discussed on the basis of GIS in this paper.Finally,some significant conclusions are drawn:1)the faults control the basic trends of coastlines of two study areas;2)the fractal dimension of coastline of Taiwan is smaller than that of Changle-Lufent,because the faults of Taiwan more intensely control the trend and fractal dimension of the coastline;3)the larger the fractal dimension of the faults or the major faults ,the more the controlling effect of them on the trend and fractal dimension of coastline;4)the larger fractal dimension of the coastline of Changle-Lufeng indicates that the biologic function intensely shapes the coastline .In a word ,the controls of faults and biologic function on the fractal character of coastline are discussed with a case study of China in this paper,it can be seen that faults and biologic function both have influence over the trend and fractal dimension of coastline,the fractal mechanism of coastline of two study areas may be so.

  14. Arctic Shipping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Carsten Ørts; Grønsedt, Peter; Lindstrøm Graversen, Christian

    , the latter aiming at developing key concepts and building up a basic industry knowledge base for further development of CBS Maritime research and teaching. This report attempts to map the opportunities and challenges for the maritime industry in an increasingly accessible Arctic Ocean...

  15. U.S.V.I. Soil Erodibility (Kffact)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — U.S.V.I. soil erodibility (Kffactor) - low values indicate low vulnerability to erosion, higher values mean higher susceptibility to runoff.

  16. 77 FR 74167 - Information Collection Request: Highly Erodible Land Conservation and Wetland Conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-13

    ... Farm Service Agency Information Collection Request: Highly Erodible Land Conservation and Wetland... associated with Highly Erodible Land Conservation and Wetland Conservation certification requirements. This.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Highly Erodible Land Conservation and Wetland Conservation Certification....

  17. Relationship between persistent halogenated organic contaminants and TCDD-toxic equivalents on EROD activity and retinoid and thyroid hormone status in northern fulmars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helgason, Lisa B; Verreault, Jonathan; Braune, Birgit M; Borgå, Katrine; Primicerio, Raul; Jenssen, Bjørn M; Gabrielsen, Geir W

    2010-11-15

    We investigated whether the hepatic cytochrome P450 1A activity (measured as 7-ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD)) and plasma thyroid hormone and liver retinoid concentrations were explained by liver and blood levels of halogenated organic contaminants (HOCs) in free-ranging breeding northern fulmars (Fulmarus glacialis) from Bjørnøya in the Norwegian Arctic. Hepatic EROD activity and liver levels of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin toxic equivalents (TEQs) were positively correlated, suggesting that hepatic EROD activity is a good indicator for dioxin and dioxin-like HOC exposure in breeding northern fulmars. There were not found other strong relationships between HOC concentrations and hepatic EROD activity, plasma thyroid or liver retinoid concentrations in the breeding northern fulmars. It is suggested that the HOC levels found in the breeding northern fulmars sampled on Bjørnøya were too low to affect plasma concentrations of thyroid hormones and liver levels of retinol and retinyl palmitate, and that hepatic EROD activity is a poor indicator of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) and pesticide exposure.

  18. Soil Erodibility of Slope Farmland in Guizhou Mountain Areas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian; LI; Li; CHENG; Zhenggang; CHEN; Qing; ZHU

    2014-01-01

    This paper studied soil erodibility of slope farmland in Guizhou mountain areas by the plot runoff method,analysis and test. Results show that the variation coefficient of erodibility K value calculated according to formula introduced by Sharply is low and relatively stable and accurate,so it is a suitable method for calculating erodibility K value of slope farmland in Guizhou mountain areas. K value of layer A slope farmland decreases with increase of years. The erodibility of entire soil layer is high,and the erosion resistance is weak. From the influence of different planting system and use types in 4 years,K values of different soil layers decrease,average reduction of A,B and C layers reaches 3. 17%- 11. 64%( 1. 26%- 12. 34% for layer A,1. 29%- 13. 80% for layer B,and 1. 26%- 10. 80% for layer C). Except engineering terraced treatment,the decline of K value of grassland,zoning crop rotation,economic fruit forest,grain and grass intercropping,plant hedge, and mixed forest treatment is higher than farmers’ treatment,and the decline level is grassland > zoning crop rotation > economic fruit forest > grain and grass intercropping > plant hedge > and mixed forest treatment. Planting grass and trees is favorable for lowering erodibility of slope farmland and improving farmland quality. Interplanting of corns with other plants can increase plant coverage and species,so it is favorable for improving erodibility of slope farmland.

  19. Conceptualizing delta forms and processes in Arctic coastal environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendixen, Mette; Kroon, Aart

    2017-01-01

    Climate warming in the Arctic directly causes two opposite changes in Arctic coastal systems: increased melt-water discharge through rivers induces extra influx of sediments and extended open water season increases wave impact which reworks and erodes the shores. A shoreline change analysis along...... the southern coast of Disko Island in western Greenland was conducted with aerial photographs and satellite images from 1964, 1985, and 2012. The decadal morphologic evolution of this 85km section showed that large parts of the coast had undergone very limited changes. However, two deltas were highly dynamic...

  20. 7 CFR 12.20 - NRCS responsibilities regarding highly erodible land.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... WETLAND CONSERVATION Highly Erodible Land Conservation § 12.20 NRCS responsibilities regarding highly... erodible land; and (d) Provide technical guidance to conservation districts which approve...

  1. Arctic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, Claire L.; Zukor, Dorothy J. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Arctic Ocean is the smallest of the Earth's four major oceans, covering 14x10(exp 6) sq km located entirely within the Arctic Circle (66 deg 33 min N). It is a major player in the climate of the north polar region and has a variable sea ice cover that tends to increase its sensitivity to climate change. Its temperature, salinity, and ice cover have all undergone changes in the past several decades, although it is uncertain whether these predominantly reflect long-term trends, oscillations within the system, or natural variability. Major changes include a warming and expansion of the Atlantic layer, at depths of 200-900 m, a warming of the upper ocean in the Beaufort Sea, a considerable thinning (perhaps as high as 40%) of the sea ice cover, a lesser and uneven retreat of the ice cover (averaging approximately 3% per decade), and a mixed pattern of salinity increases and decreases.

  2. Arctic Diatoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tammilehto, Anna

    are often dominated by diatoms. They are single-celled, eukaryotic algae, which play an essential role in ocean carbon and silica cycles. Many species of the diatom genus Pseudo-nitzschia Peragallo produce a neurotoxin, domoic acid (DA), which can be transferred to higher levels in food webs causing amnesic...... as vectors for DA to higher levels in the arctic marine food web, posing a possible risk also to humans. DA production in P. seriata was, for the first time, found to be induced by chemical cues from C. finmarchicus, C. hyperboreus and copepodite stages C3 and C4, suggesting that DA may be related to defense...... against grazing. This thesis also quantified population genetic composition and changes of the diatom Fragilariopsis cylindrus spring bloom using microsatellite markers. Diatom-dominated spring blooms in the Arctic are the key event of the year, providing the food web with fundamental pulses of organic...

  3. National flood risk mapping of the Danish coastline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jumppanen Andersen, Kaija; Earnshaw, Matthew; Sørensen, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Ocean flooding related to extreme storm surges poses a large damage potential for society. With future climate changes such as sea level rise and increased storminess, ocean flooding becomes one of the largest challenges for Denmark, due to its many islands and long low-lying coastline....... At The Danish Coastal Authority under the Ministry of the Environment we are carrying out a rapid screening of the areas vulnerable to ocean flooding throughout the whole of Denmark; today, in 2065 and in 2100, respectively, to determine hazard areas and vulnerabilities towards floods. With this information we...... can estimate the future requirement for sea defences along the Danish coastline now and into the future. While carrying out this screening we have to assess the factors influencing the flood level. This includes changes in the topography from glacial isostasy and subsidence along with future mean sea...

  4. Reef builders found along southern coastline of Zhejiang

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ Together with a local co-worker, TANG Zhican, a specialist in benthonic bioecology and taxonomy of coral,hydra and other cnidarian organisms from the Qingdao-based CAS Institute of Oceanology, has proved the existence of hermatype (reefbuilding) corals on the seabed in Nanji Islands along the southern coastline of East China's Zhejiang Province, pushing the distribution line of the coastal reef corals in this country further northward.

  5. Hurricane Risk Variability along the Gulf of Mexico Coastline

    OpenAIRE

    Jill C Trepanier; Ellis, Kelsey N.; Clay S Tucker

    2015-01-01

    Hurricane risk characteristics are examined across the U. S. Gulf of Mexico coastline using a hexagonal tessellation. Using an extreme value model, parameters are collected representing the rate or λ (frequency), the scale or σ (range), and the shape or ξ (intensity) of the extreme wind distribution. These latent parameters and the 30-year return level are visualized across the grid. The greatest 30-year return levels are located toward the center of the Gulf of Mexico, and for inland locatio...

  6. Ocean surface waves in an ice-free Arctic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian-Guo

    2016-08-01

    The retreat of the Arctic ice edge implies that global ocean surface wave models have to be extended at high latitudes or even to cover the North Pole in the future. The obstacles for conventional latitude-longitude grid wave models to cover the whole Arctic are the polar problems associated with their Eulerian advection schemes, including the Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy (CFL) restriction on diminishing grid length towards the Pole, the singularity at the Pole and the invalid scalar assumption for vector components defined relative to the local east direction. A spherical multiple-cell (SMC) grid is designed to solve these problems. It relaxes the CFL restriction by merging the longitudinal cells towards the Poles. A round polar cell is used to remove the singularity of the differential equation at the Pole. A fixed reference direction is introduced to define vector components within a limited Arctic part in mitigation of the scalar assumption errors at high latitudes. The SMC grid has been implemented in the WAVEWATCH III model and validated with altimeter and buoy observations, except for the Arctic part, which could not be fully tested due to a lack of observations as the polar region is still covered by sea ice. Here, an idealised ice-free Arctic case is used to test the Arctic part and it is compared with a reference case with real ice coverage. The comparison indicates that swell wave energy will increase near the ice-free Arctic coastlines due to increased fetch. An expanded Arctic part is used for comparisons of the Arctic part with available satellite measurements. It also provides a direct model comparison between the two reference systems in their overlapping zone.

  7. Texture features analysis for coastline extraction in remotely sensed images

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Laurentiis, Raimondo; Dellepiane, Silvana G.; Bo, Giancarlo

    2002-01-01

    The accurate knowledge of the shoreline position is of fundamental importance in several applications such as cartography and ships positioning1. Moreover, the coastline could be seen as a relevant parameter for the monitoring of the coastal zone morphology, as it allows the retrieval of a much more precise digital elevation model of the entire coastal area. The study that has been carried out focuses on the development of a reliable technique for the detection of coastlines in remotely sensed images. An innovative approach which is based on the concepts of fuzzy connectivity and texture features extraction has been developed for the location of the shoreline. The system has been tested on several kind of images as SPOT, LANDSAT and the results obtained are good. Moreover, the algorithm has been tested on a sample of a SAR interferogram. The breakthrough consists in the fact that the coastline detection is seen as an important features in the framework of digital elevation model (DEM) retrieval. In particular, the coast could be seen as a boundary line all data beyond which (the ones representing the sea) are not significant. The processing for the digital elevation model could be refined, just considering the in-land data.

  8. Arctic Social Sciences: Opportunities in Arctic Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arctic Research Consortium of the United States, Fairbanks, AK.

    The U.S. Congress passed the Arctic Research and Policy Act in 1984 and designated the National Science Foundation (NSF) the lead agency in implementing arctic research policy. In 1989, the parameters of arctic social science research were outlined, emphasizing three themes: human-environment interactions, community viability, and rapid social…

  9. Multi-model seasonal forecast of Arctic sea-ice: forecast uncertainty at pan-Arctic and regional scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard-Wrigglesworth, E.; Barthélemy, A.; Chevallier, M.; Cullather, R.; Fučkar, N.; Massonnet, F.; Posey, P.; Wang, W.; Zhang, J.; Ardilouze, C.; Bitz, C. M.; Vernieres, G.; Wallcraft, A.; Wang, M.

    2016-10-01

    Dynamical model forecasts in the Sea Ice Outlook (SIO) of September Arctic sea-ice extent over the last decade have shown lower skill than that found in both idealized model experiments and hindcasts of previous decades. Additionally, it is unclear how different model physics, initial conditions or forecast post-processing (bias correction) techniques contribute to SIO forecast uncertainty. In this work, we have produced a seasonal forecast of 2015 Arctic summer sea ice using SIO dynamical models initialized with identical sea-ice thickness in the central Arctic. Our goals are to calculate the relative contribution of model uncertainty and irreducible error growth to forecast uncertainty and assess the importance of post-processing, and to contrast pan-Arctic forecast uncertainty with regional forecast uncertainty. We find that prior to forecast post-processing, model uncertainty is the main contributor to forecast uncertainty, whereas after forecast post-processing forecast uncertainty is reduced overall, model uncertainty is reduced by an order of magnitude, and irreducible error growth becomes the main contributor to forecast uncertainty. While all models generally agree in their post-processed forecasts of September sea-ice volume and extent, this is not the case for sea-ice concentration. Additionally, forecast uncertainty of sea-ice thickness grows at a much higher rate along Arctic coastlines relative to the central Arctic ocean. Potential ways of offering spatial forecast information based on the timescale over which the forecast signal beats the noise are also explored.

  10. Multi-model seasonal forecast of Arctic sea-ice: forecast uncertainty at pan-Arctic and regional scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard-Wrigglesworth, E.; Barthélemy, A.; Chevallier, M.; Cullather, R.; Fučkar, N.; Massonnet, F.; Posey, P.; Wang, W.; Zhang, J.; Ardilouze, C.; Bitz, C. M.; Vernieres, G.; Wallcraft, A.; Wang, M.

    2017-08-01

    Dynamical model forecasts in the Sea Ice Outlook (SIO) of September Arctic sea-ice extent over the last decade have shown lower skill than that found in both idealized model experiments and hindcasts of previous decades. Additionally, it is unclear how different model physics, initial conditions or forecast post-processing (bias correction) techniques contribute to SIO forecast uncertainty. In this work, we have produced a seasonal forecast of 2015 Arctic summer sea ice using SIO dynamical models initialized with identical sea-ice thickness in the central Arctic. Our goals are to calculate the relative contribution of model uncertainty and irreducible error growth to forecast uncertainty and assess the importance of post-processing, and to contrast pan-Arctic forecast uncertainty with regional forecast uncertainty. We find that prior to forecast post-processing, model uncertainty is the main contributor to forecast uncertainty, whereas after forecast post-processing forecast uncertainty is reduced overall, model uncertainty is reduced by an order of magnitude, and irreducible error growth becomes the main contributor to forecast uncertainty. While all models generally agree in their post-processed forecasts of September sea-ice volume and extent, this is not the case for sea-ice concentration. Additionally, forecast uncertainty of sea-ice thickness grows at a much higher rate along Arctic coastlines relative to the central Arctic ocean. Potential ways of offering spatial forecast information based on the timescale over which the forecast signal beats the noise are also explored.

  11. Estimate Soil Erodibility Factors Distribution for Maioli Block

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wen-Ying

    2014-05-01

    The natural conditions in Taiwan are poor. Because of the steep slopes, rushing river and fragile geology, soil erosion turn into a serious problem. Not only undermine the sloping landscape, but also created sediment disaster like that reservoir sedimentation, river obstruction…etc. Therefore, predict and control the amount of soil erosion has become an important research topic. Soil erodibility factor (K) is a quantitative index of distinguish the ability of soil to resist the erosion separation and handling. Taiwan soil erodibility factors have been calculated 280 soil samples' erodibility factors by Wann and Huang (1989) use the Wischmeier and Smith nomorgraph. 221 samples were collected at the Maioli block in Miaoli. The coordinates of every sample point and the land use situations were recorded. The physical properties were analyzed for each sample. Three estimation methods, consist of Kriging, Inverse Distance Weighted (IDW) and Spline, were applied to estimate soil erodibility factors distribution for Maioli block by using 181 points data, and the remaining 40 points for the validation. Then, the SPSS regression analysis was used to comparison of the accuracy of the training data and validation data by three different methods. Then, the best method can be determined. In the future, we can used this method to predict the soil erodibility factors in other areas.

  12. 7 CFR 12.21 - Identification of highly erodible lands criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ...,” Soil Science Society of America Proceedings, Vol. 29. No. 5, pages 602-608. Values for all the factors...) Basis for identification as highly erodible. Soil map units and an erodibility index will be used as the basis for identifying highly erodible land. The erodibility index for a soil is determined by...

  13. Induction of EROD activity in Paralichthys olivaceus by polychlorinated biphenyl CB- 28

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Juying; Huo Chuanlin; Han Gengchen; Guan Daoming; Yan Qilun

    2003-01-01

    The test organisms (Paralichthys olivaceus ) were exposed to CB- 28 with different spiked concentrations. After 72 h, EROD activities in livers of the test organisms were measured. It was found that EROD activities significantly mounted up with the increase of spiked quantity. Therefore, there existed a dose-response relationship between EROD activities and specific pollutant concentrations. In the meantime, the optimal conditions for the analysis of EROD activity were discussed. The limitation of EROD activities as a monitoring parameter was also analyzed.

  14. Coastline complexity: A parameter for functional classification of coastal environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartley, J.D.; Buddemeier, R.W.; Bennett, D.A.

    2001-01-01

    To understand the role of the world's coastal zone (CZ) in global biogeochemical fluxes (particularly those of carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, and sediments) we must generalise from a limited number of observations associated with a few well-studied coastal systems to the global scale. Global generalisation must be based on globally available data and on robust techniques for classification and upscaling. These requirements impose severe constraints on the set of variables that can be used to extract information about local CZ functions such as advective and metabolic fluxes, and differences resulting from changes in biotic communities. Coastal complexity (plan-view tortuosity of the coastline) is a potentially useful parameter, since it interacts strongly with both marine and terrestrial forcing functions to determine coastal energy regimes and water residence times, and since 'open' vs. 'sheltered' categories are important components of most coastal habitat classification schemes. This study employs the World Vector Shoreline (WVS) dataset, originally developed at a scale of 1:250 000. Coastline complexity measures are generated using a modification of the Angle Measurement Technique (AMT), in which the basic measurement is the angle between two lines of specified length drawn from a selected point to the closest points of intersection with the coastline. Repetition of these measurements for different lengths at the same point yields a distribution of angles descriptive of the extent and scale of complexity in the vicinity of that point; repetition of the process at different points on the coast provides a basis for comparing both the extent and the characteristic scale of coastline variation along different reaches of the coast. The coast of northwestern Mexico (Baja California and the Gulf of California) was used as a case study for initial development and testing of the method. The characteristic angle distribution plots generated by the AMT analysis were

  15. Barry Lopez's Relational Arctic

    OpenAIRE

    Kjeldaas, Sigfrid

    2014-01-01

    "Arctic dreams: imagination and desire in a Northern landscape"(1986) can be read as American nature writer Barry Lopez’s attempt to evoke a more profound and ecologically sound understanding of the North American Arctic. This article investigates how Arctic Dreams uses insights from Jacob von Uexküll’s Umwelt theory, in combination with what Tim Ingold describes as a particular form of animism associated with circumpolar indigenous hunter cultures, to portray the Arctic natur...

  16. Research with Arctic peoples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, H Sally; Bjerregaard, Peter; Chan, Hing Man

    2006-01-01

    Arctic peoples are spread over eight countries and comprise 3.74 million residents, of whom 9% are indigenous. The Arctic countries include Canada, Finland, Greenland (Denmark), Iceland, Norway, Russia, Sweden and the United States. Although Arctic peoples are very diverse, there are a variety of...

  17. Simulation of Extreme Arctic Cyclones in IPCC AR5 Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vavrus, S. J.

    2012-12-01

    Although impending Arctic climate change is widely recognized, a wild card in its expression is how extreme weather events in this region will respond to greenhouse warming. Intense polar cyclones represent one type of high-latitude phenomena falling into this category, including very deep synoptic-scale cyclones and mesoscale polar lows. These systems inflict damage through high winds, heavy precipitation, and wave action along coastlines, and their impact is expected to expand in the future, when reduced sea ice cover allows enhanced wave energy. The loss of a buffering ice pack could greatly increase the rate of coastal erosion, which has already been increasing in the Arctic. These and related threats may amplify if extreme Arctic cyclones become more frequent and/or intense in a warming climate with much more open water to fuel them. This possibility has merit on the basis of GCM experiments, which project that greenhouse forcing causes lower mean sea level pressure (SLP) in the Arctic and a strengthening of the deepest storms over boreal high latitudes. In this study, the latest Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) climate model output is used to investigate the following questions: (1) What are the spatial and seasonal characteristics of extreme Arctic cyclones? (2) How well do GCMs simulate these phenomena? (3) Are Arctic cyclones already showing the expected response to greenhouse warming in climate models? To address these questions, a retrospective analysis is conducted of the transient 20th century simulations among the CMIP5 GCMs (spanning years 1850-2005). The results demonstrate that GCMs are able to reasonably represent extreme Arctic cyclones and that the simulated characteristics do not depend significantly on model resolution. Consistent with observational evidence, climate models generate these storms primarily during winter and within the climatological Aleutian and Icelandic Low regions. Occasionally the cyclones remain very intense

  18. A review of soil erodibility in water and wind erosion research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONGYang; LIULianyou; YANPing; CAOTong

    2005-01-01

    Soil erodibility is an important index to evaluate the soil sensitivity to erosion. The research on soil erodibility is a crucial tache in understanding the mechanism of soil erosion. Soil erodibility can be evaluated by measuring soil physiochemical properties, scouring experiment, simulated rainfall experiment, plot experiment and wind tunnel experiment. We can use soil erosion model and nomogram to calculate soil erodibility. Many soil erodibility indices and formulae have been put forward. Soil erodibility is a complex concept, it is influenced by many factors, such as soil properties and human activities. Several obstacles restrict the research of soil erodibility. Firstly, the research on soil erodibility is mainly focused on farmland; Secondly, soil erodibility in different areas cannot be compared sufficiently; and thirdly, the research on soil erodibility in water-wind erosion is very scarce.In the prospective research, we should improve method to measure and calculate soil erodibility.strengthen the research on the mechanism of soil erodibility, and conduct research on soil erodibility by both water and wind agents.

  19. Random fractal characters and length uncertainty of the continental coastline of China

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jianhua Ma; Dexin Liu; Yanqiu Chen

    2016-12-01

    A coastline is a random fractal object in a geographical system whose length is uncertain. To determine the coastline length of a country or a region, the scaling region and fractal dimension of the coastline is first calculated, and then, the length of the coastline is measured using the scale at the lower limit or near the limit of the scaling region. For this study, the scaling region of the continental coastline of China is determined. The box-counting dimension was calculated with ArcGIS software using 33 scales and a map scale of 1:500,000, and the divider dimension calculated by a C language program. Moreover, the reliability of the Chinese coastline length value, which is widely used currently, is discussed in this paper. The results show that the scaling region of the continental coastline of China is from 0.1 to 400 km. In the scaling region, the box-counting dimension and the divider dimension of the coastline are 1.2004 and 1.0929, respectively. According to fractal theory, the divider dimension more accurately represents the irregularity of a coastline. The length of the continental coastline of China is approximately 21,900 km when the measurement scale is 0.1 km; however, the length is 18,214 km when the scale is 0.25 km, and this value approaches the continental length of China (18,400 km) in popular use today. Although the coastline length is shorter than 21,900 km, the length is acceptable because the measurement scale (0.25 km) is close to the lower limit of the scaling region.

  20. Dynamic intermittency in discrete erodible-bed avalanches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arran, Matthew; Vriend, Nathalie

    2016-11-01

    The coexistence of fluid-like and solid-like behaviour in granular matter allows avalanches of grains to flow on the surface of a static but erodible bed. For sufficiently slow inflow, these avalanches are discrete, with previous experimentalists reporting that avalanche fronts pass a given point quasi-periodically. We report instead observations of dynamic intermittency between two regimes, one in which avalanches occur quasi-periodically and another in which the intervals between them are irregular. Finding the first regime consistent with existing models, we introduce a model for the second regime within the framework of Self-Organised Criticality, and describe the transition between the regimes with reference to the state of the erodible bed.

  1. Reliability assessment of reserved water disposal with erodible fuse plug

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosichenko Yuriy Mikhaylovich

    Full Text Available Water disposal constructions are one of the most responsible constructions of reservoir hydrosystem, that’s why the a lot of attention was always paid to the problems of estimating and providing their reliability and safety. The most important function of such objects is providing reliability and safety of other hydraulic constructions and economic assets in afterbay and water head. The authors offer estimation method for reliability and faultless performance of reserved water disposal with erodible fuse plug on low-head water development. In order to estimate the reliability of reserved water disposal with erodible fuse plug the Bayesian treatment was used. The calculation of diagnoses (states of reserved water disposal isoffered in case of diagnostic properties k 1 and k 2. One of the main demands placed onreserved water disposals is erosion of soil plug in case of flood discharge exeedance over the estimated frequency with the full opening of the waste sluice.

  2. Bonding stability of adhesive systems to eroded dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Janaina Barros; Bonini, Gabriela; Lenzi, Tathiane Larissa; Imparato, José Carlos Pettorossi; Raggio, Daniela Prócida

    2015-01-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the immediate and 6 months microshear bond strength (µSBS) of different adhesive systems to sound and eroded dentin. Sixty bovine incisors were embedded in acrylic resin and ground to obtain flat buccal dentin surfaces. Specimens were randomly allocated into two groups: sound dentin (immersion in artificial saliva) and eroded dentin (erosive challenge following a pH cycling model comprising 4 ×/day Sprite Light® drink for 10 days). Then, specimens were reassigned according to the adhesive system: etch-and-rinse adhesive (Adper Single Bond), two-step self-etch system (Clearfil SE Bond), or one-step self-etch adhesive (Adper Easy One). Polyethylene tubes with an internal diameter of 0.76 mm were placed over pre-treated dentin and filled with resin composite (Z250). Half of the specimens were evaluated by the µSBS test after 24 h, and the other half 6 months later, after water storage at 37 °C. Failure mode was evaluated using a stereomicroscope (400 ×). Data were analyzed by three-way repeated measures analysis of variance and Tukey's post hoc tests (α = 0.05). After 6 months of water aging, marked reductions in µSBS values were observed, irrespective of the substrate. The µSBS values for eroded dentin were lower than those obtained for sound dentin. No difference in bonding effectiveness was observed among adhesive systems. For all groups, adhesive/mixed failure was observed. In conclusion, eroded dentin compromises the bonding quality of adhesive systems over time.

  3. Bonding stability of adhesive systems to eroded dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janaina Barros CRUZ

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This in vitro study evaluated the immediate and 6 months microshear bond strength (µSBS of different adhesive systems to sound and eroded dentin. Sixty bovine incisors were embedded in acrylic resin and ground to obtain flat buccal dentin surfaces. Specimens were randomly allocated into two groups: sound dentin (immersion in artificial saliva and eroded dentin (erosive challenge following a pH cycling model comprising 4 ×/day Sprite Light® drink for 10 days. Then, specimens were reassigned according to the adhesive system: etch-and-rinse adhesive (Adper Single Bond, two-step self-etch system (Clearfil SE Bond, or one-step self-etch adhesive (Adper Easy One. Polyethylene tubes with an internal diameter of 0.76 mm were placed over pre-treated dentin and filled with resin composite (Z250. Half of the specimens were evaluated by the µSBS test after 24 h, and the other half 6 months later, after water storage at 37°C. Failure mode was evaluated using a stereomicroscope (400×. Data were analyzed by three-way repeated measures analysis of variance and Tukey’s post hoc tests (α = 0.05. After 6 months of water aging, marked reductions in µSBS values were observed, irrespective of the substrate. The µSBS values for eroded dentin were lower than those obtained for sound dentin. No difference in bonding effectiveness was observed among adhesive systems. For all groups, adhesive/mixed failure was observed. In conclusion, eroded dentin compromises the bonding quality of adhesive systems over time.

  4. Sculpting of an erodible body by flowing water

    OpenAIRE

    Ristroph, Leif; Moore, Matthew N. J.; Childress, Stephen; Shelley, Michael J.; ZHANG, JUN

    2012-01-01

    Erosion by flowing fluids carves striking landforms on Earth and also provides important clues to the past and present environments of other worlds. In these processes, solid boundaries both influence and are shaped by the surrounding fluid, but the emergence of morphology as a result of this interaction is not well understood. We study the coevolution of shape and flow in the context of erodible bodies molded from clay and immersed in a fast, unidirectional water flow. Although commonly view...

  5. National Highway Alignment from Namakkal to Erode Using GIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Subramani

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The vision of the Highway Alignment is to increase the capacity, connectivity, efficiency and safety of the Highways System so as to enable balanced socioeconomic development of all sections of the people and all regions from NAMAKKAL to ERODE via and to reduce the traffic and travelling of the state. It is to establish shortest path for road network time in the roads which provide a better and comfortable base for updating the traffic and other related information in road administration. It is to identify the short route for the vehicles traveling from NAMAKKAL to ERODE and to reduce the time travel for the vehicles with possible paths or routes or places for laying eco-friendly highway. To optimize the route for the vehicles traveling from NAMAKKAL to ERODE using GIS with Network analysis tools. From this we can find the suitable route for peoples to carry out without any traffic disturbances and protecting the environment. It also took advantages of GIS capabilities that offer the ability to overlay maps, merge them, and perform spatial analysis on various layers of information in either two or three dimensions:

  6. Modeling the formation of undulations of the coastline: the role of tides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Vegt, M.; Schuttelaars, H.; de Swart, H.E.

    2007-01-01

    An idealized model is developed and analyzed to investigate the relevance of tidal motion for the emergence of undulations of a sandy coastline. The model describes feedbacks between tidal and steady flow on the inner shelf, sand transport in the nearshore zone and an irregular coastline. It is demo

  7. Islands of the Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overpeck, Jonathan

    2004-02-01

    Few environments on Earth are changing more dramatically than the Arctic. Sea ice retreat and thinning is unprecedented in the period of the satellite record. Surface air temperatures are the warmest in centuries. The biology of Arctic lakes is changing like never before in millennia. Everything is pointing to the meltdown predicted by climate model simulations for the next 100 years. At the same time, the Arctic remains one of the most pristine and beautiful places on Earth. For both those who know the Arctic and those who want to know it, this book is worth its modest price. There is much more to the Arctic than its islands, but there's little doubt that Greenland and the major northern archipelagos can serve as a great introduction to the environment and magnificence of the Arctic. The book uses the islands of the Arctic to give a good introduction to what the Arctic environment is all about. The first chapter sets the stage with an overview of the geography of the Arctic islands, and this is followed by chapters that cover many key aspects of the Arctic: the geology (origins), weather and climate, glaciers, ice sheets, sea ice, permafrost and other frozen ground issues, coasts, rivers, lakes, animals, people, and environmental impacts. The material is pitched at a level well suited for the interested layperson, but the book will also appeal to those who study the science of the Arctic.

  8. Approaching a Postcolonial Arctic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars

    2016-01-01

    This article explores different postcolonially configured approaches to the Arctic. It begins by considering the Arctic as a region, an entity, and how the customary political science informed approaches are delimited by their focus on understanding the Arctic as a region at the service...... of the contemporary neoliberal order. It moves on to explore how different parts of the Arctic are inscribed in a number of sub-Arctic nation-state binds, focusing mainly on Canada and Denmark. The article argues that the postcolonial can be understood as a prism or a methodology that asks pivotal questions to all...... approaches to the Arctic. Yet the postcolonial itself is characterised by limitations, not least in this context its lack of interest in the Arctic, and its bias towards conventional forms of representation in art. The article points to the need to develop a more integrated critique of colonial and neo...

  9. 7 CFR 760.821 - Compliance with highly erodible land and wetland conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Disaster Program § 760.821 Compliance with highly erodible land and wetland conservation. (a) The highly erodible land and wetland conservation provisions of part 12 of this title apply to the receipt of disaster... participants must be in compliance with the highly erodible land and wetland conservation compliance...

  10. MabCent: Arctic marine bioprospecting in Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svenson, Johan

    2013-01-01

    The deep waters surrounding the coastline of the northern parts of Norway represent an exciting biotope for marine exploration. Dark and cold Arctic water generates a hostile environment where the ability to adapt is crucial to survival. These waters are nonetheless bountiful and a diverse plethora of marine organisms thrive in these extreme conditions, many with the help of specialised chemical compounds. In comparison to warmer, perhaps more inviting shallower tropical waters, the Arctic region has not been as thoroughly investigated. MabCent is a Norwegian initiative based in Tromsø that aims to change this. Since 2007, scientists within MabCent have focussed their efforts on the study of marine organisms inhabiting the Arctic waters with the long term goal of novel drug discovery and development. The activities of MabCent are diverse and range from sampling the Arctic ice shelf to the chemical synthesis of promising secondary metabolites discovered during the screening process. The current review will present the MabCent pipeline from isolation to identification of new bioactive marine compounds via an extensive screening process. An overview of the main activities will be given with particular focus on isolation strategies, bioactivity screening and structure determination. Pitfalls, hard earned lessons and the results so far are also discussed.

  11. Dynamic replacement and loss of soil carbon on eroding cropland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harden, J.W.; Sharpe, J.M.; Parton, W.J.; Ojima, D.S.; Fries, T.L.; Huntington, T.G.; Dabney, S.M.

    1999-01-01

    Links between erosion/sedimentation history and soil carbon cycling were examined in a highly erosive setting in Mississippi loess soils. We sampled soils on (relatively) undisturbed and cropped hillslopes and measured C, N, 14C, and CO2 flux to characterize carbon storage and dynamics and to parameterize Century and spreadsheet 14C models for different erosion and tillage histories. For this site, where 100 years of intensive cotton cropping were followed by fertilization and contour plowing, there was an initial and dramatic decline in soil carbon content from 1870 to 1950, followed by a dramatic increase in soil carbon. Soil erosion amplifies C loss and recovery: About 100% of the original, prehistoric soil carbon was likely lost over 127 years of intensive land use, but about 30% of that carbon was replaced after 1950. The eroded cropland was therefore a local sink for CO2 since the 1950s. However, a net CO2 sink requires a full accounting of eroded carbon, which in turn requires that decomposition rates in lower slopes or wetlands be reduced to about 20% of the upland value. As a result, erosion may induce unaccounted sinks or sources of CO2, depending on the fate of eroded carbon and its protection from decomposition. For erosion rates typical of the United States, the sink terms may be large enough (1 Gt yr-1, back-of-the-envelope) to warrant a careful accounting of site management, cropping, and fertilization histories, as well as burial rates, for a more meaningful global assessment.

  12. SRTM Perspective View with Landsat Overlay: Santa Barbara Coastline, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    This image of the Santa Barbara, California, region provides a beautiful snapshot of the area's rugged mountains and long and varied coastline. Generated using data acquired from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) and an enhanced Landsat image this is a perspective view toward the northeast, from the Goleta Valley in the foreground to a snow-capped Mount Abel (elevation 2,526 m or 8,286 feet) along the skyline at the left. On a clear day, a pilot might see a similar view shortly before touching down on the east-west runway of the Santa Barbara Airport, seen just to the left of the coastline near the center of image. This area is one of the few places along the U.S. West Coast where because of a south-facing beach, fall and winter sunrises occur over the ocean.Landsat has been providing visible and infrared views of the Earth since 1972. SRTM elevation data match the 30-meter(98-foot) resolution of most Landsat images and will substantially help in analyses of the large and growing Landsat image archive. For visualization purposes, topographic heights displayed in this image are exaggerated two times. Colors approximate natural colors.The elevation data used in this image was acquired by SRTM aboard Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on February 11,2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on Endeavour in 1994. SRTM was designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of Earth's land surface. To collect the 3-D SRTM data, engineers added a mast 60 meters (about 200-feet)long, installed additional C-band and X-band antennas, and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between the NASA, the National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA) of the U.S. Department of Defense, and the German and Italian space agencies. It is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif, for NASA's Earth Science Enterprise

  13. Instability and finite-amplitude self-organization of large-scale coastline shapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, A Brad; Ashton, Andrew D

    2013-12-13

    Recent research addresses the formation of patterns on sandy coastlines on alongshore scales that are large compared with the cross-shore extent of active sediment transport. A simple morphodynamic instability arises from the feedback between wave-driven alongshore sediment flux and coastline shape. Coastline segments with different orientations experience different alongshore sediment fluxes, so that curvatures in coastline shape drive gradients in sediment flux, which can augment the shoreline curvatures. In a simple numerical model, this instability, and subsequent finite-amplitude inter-actions between pattern elements, lead to a wide range of different rhythmic shapes and behaviours--ranging from symmetric cuspate capes and bays to alongshore migrating 'flying spits'--depending on the characteristics of the input wave forcing. The scale of the pattern coarsens in some cases because of the merger of migrating coastline features, and in other cases because of non-local screening interactions between coastline protrusions, which affect the waves reaching other parts of the coastline. Features growing on opposite sides of an enclosed water body mutually affect the waves reaching each other in ways that lead to the segmentation of elongated water bodies. Initial tests of model predictions and comparison with observations suggest that modes of pattern formation in the model are relevant in nature.

  14. THE EFFECT OF COASTLINE CHANGES TO LOCAL COMMUNITY’S SOCIAL-ECONOMIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. I. Hassan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The coastal area is absolutely essential for the purposes of resident, recreation, tourism, fisheries and agriculture as a source of socio-economic development of local community. Some of the activities will affect the coastline changes. Coastline changes may occur due to two main factors include natural factors and also by the factor of human activities in coastal areas. Sea level rise, erosion and sedimentation are among the factors that can contribute to the changes in the coastline naturally, while the reclamation and development in coastal areas are factors of coastline changes due to human activities. Resident area and all activities in coastal areas will provide economic resources to the residents of coastal areas. However, coastline changes occur in the coastal areas will affect socio-economic for local community. A significant effect can be seen through destruction of infrastructure, loss of land, and destroy of crops. Batu Pahat is an area with significant changes of coastline. The changes of coastline from 1985 to 2013 can be determined by using topographical maps in 1985 and satellite images where the changes images are taken in 2011 and 2013 respectively. To identify the changes of risk areas, Coastal Vulnerability Index (CVI is used to indicate vulnerability for coastal areas. This change indirectly affects the source of income in their agricultural cash crops such as oil palm and coconut. Their crops destroyed and reduced due to impact of changes in the coastline. Identification of risk coastal areas needs to be done in order for the society and local authorities to be prepared for coastline changes.

  15. The Effect of Coastline Changes to Local Community's Social-Economic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, M. I.; Rahmat, N. H.

    2016-09-01

    The coastal area is absolutely essential for the purposes of resident, recreation, tourism, fisheries and agriculture as a source of socio-economic development of local community. Some of the activities will affect the coastline changes. Coastline changes may occur due to two main factors include natural factors and also by the factor of human activities in coastal areas. Sea level rise, erosion and sedimentation are among the factors that can contribute to the changes in the coastline naturally, while the reclamation and development in coastal areas are factors of coastline changes due to human activities. Resident area and all activities in coastal areas will provide economic resources to the residents of coastal areas. However, coastline changes occur in the coastal areas will affect socio-economic for local community. A significant effect can be seen through destruction of infrastructure, loss of land, and destroy of crops. Batu Pahat is an area with significant changes of coastline. The changes of coastline from 1985 to 2013 can be determined by using topographical maps in 1985 and satellite images where the changes images are taken in 2011 and 2013 respectively. To identify the changes of risk areas, Coastal Vulnerability Index (CVI) is used to indicate vulnerability for coastal areas. This change indirectly affects the source of income in their agricultural cash crops such as oil palm and coconut. Their crops destroyed and reduced due to impact of changes in the coastline. Identification of risk coastal areas needs to be done in order for the society and local authorities to be prepared for coastline changes.

  16. Hurricane Risk Variability along the Gulf of Mexico Coastline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trepanier, Jill C.; Ellis, Kelsey N.; Tucker, Clay S.

    2015-01-01

    Hurricane risk characteristics are examined across the U. S. Gulf of Mexico coastline using a hexagonal tessellation. Using an extreme value model, parameters are collected representing the rate or λ (frequency), the scale or σ (range), and the shape or ξ (intensity) of the extreme wind distribution. These latent parameters and the 30-year return level are visualized across the grid. The greatest 30-year return levels are located toward the center of the Gulf of Mexico, and for inland locations, along the borders of Louisiana, Mississippi, and Alabama. Using a geographically weighted regression model, the relationship of these parameters to sea surface temperature (SST) is found to assess sensitivity to change. It is shown that as SSTs increase near the coast, the frequency of hurricanes in these grids decrease significantly. This reinforces the importance of SST in areas of likely tropical cyclogenesis in determining the number of hurricanes near the coast, along with SSTs along the lifespan of the storm, rather than simply local SST. The range of hurricane wind speeds experienced near Florida is shown to increase with increasing SSTs (insignificant), suggesting that increased temperatures may allow hurricanes to maintain their strength as they pass over the Florida peninsula. The modifiable areal unit problem is assessed using multiple grid sizes. Moran’s I and the local statistic G are calculated to examine spatial autocorrelation in the parameters. This research opens up future questions regarding rapid intensification and decay close to the coast and the relationship to changing SSTs. PMID:25767885

  17. A rugged coastline: the South African [oil spill] experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moldan, A. [South African Oil Industry Environment Committee, Roggebaai, (South Africa)

    1996-12-31

    South Africa has, over the years, experienced a number of large oil spill incidents resulting from shipping casualties in coastal waters. The frequency of incidents is primarily due to the fact that South Africa is situated on a major shipping route, on the southern tip of Africa, where high concentrations of vessels converge at the major turning points. Storm conditions off the Cape coast result in some significant oil spills, the largest being that of the Castillo de Bellver in 1983. This paper describes South Africa` oil spill response strategy, and outlines in detail the Apollo Sea oil spill of 1994 caused by the Castillo de Bellver accident. The clean up operations included the recovery and relocation of 8,500 endangered penguins, the use of oil spill dispersants on the ocean surface, and the clean up of a 22 mile stretch of impacted coastline. It is still too early to ascertain the long-term implications of the oiling on the penguin population. An assessment of the long-term impact is still underway. A study of the impact on inter- and sub-tidal organisms found that there was not a significant impact on these organisms in the affected areas, considered to be due to the relatively low toxicity of the type of oil involved, and that it had been weathered at sea for several days prior to it reaching the shore. A number of deficiencies in oil spill contingency plans were identified as needing further attention. (author).

  18. Hurricane risk variability along the Gulf of Mexico coastline.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill C Trepanier

    Full Text Available Hurricane risk characteristics are examined across the U. S. Gulf of Mexico coastline using a hexagonal tessellation. Using an extreme value model, parameters are collected representing the rate or λ (frequency, the scale or σ (range, and the shape or ξ (intensity of the extreme wind distribution. These latent parameters and the 30-year return level are visualized across the grid. The greatest 30-year return levels are located toward the center of the Gulf of Mexico, and for inland locations, along the borders of Louisiana, Mississippi, and Alabama. Using a geographically weighted regression model, the relationship of these parameters to sea surface temperature (SST is found to assess sensitivity to change. It is shown that as SSTs increase near the coast, the frequency of hurricanes in these grids decrease significantly. This reinforces the importance of SST in areas of likely tropical cyclogenesis in determining the number of hurricanes near the coast, along with SSTs along the lifespan of the storm, rather than simply local SST. The range of hurricane wind speeds experienced near Florida is shown to increase with increasing SSTs (insignificant, suggesting that increased temperatures may allow hurricanes to maintain their strength as they pass over the Florida peninsula. The modifiable areal unit problem is assessed using multiple grid sizes. Moran's I and the local statistic G are calculated to examine spatial autocorrelation in the parameters. This research opens up future questions regarding rapid intensification and decay close to the coast and the relationship to changing SSTs.

  19. Beach litter sourcing: A trawl along the Northern Ireland coastline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, A T; Randerson, P; Allen, C; Cooper, J A G

    2017-09-15

    Fourteen non-recreational coastal locations in Northern Ireland were investigated as to whether beach litter deposition was related to seasonal or site specific factors. Litter items were counted in 100m width transects and 1km strand-line surveys over a five-season period (autumn to autumn). Survey sites comprised fishing ports; estuarine areas, north (high energy) and east coast (low energy) beaches. Fishing ports accumulated the most litter. In the 100m beach surveys, plastics, string and cord, bottle caps, food items, rope, and drink containers dominated. In strand-line surveys, large plastic pieces were dominant, followed by rope, string and cord, strapping bands (absent on beach surveys), cloth, wood (mainly pallets, fish boxes) and metal items. Multivariate analyses revealed major litter category differences between the ports and all other sites, with a lesser distinction between exposed and estuarine sites. There was no simple coastline trend and no apparent effect of seasonality between samples. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Hurricane risk variability along the Gulf of Mexico coastline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trepanier, Jill C; Ellis, Kelsey N; Tucker, Clay S

    2015-01-01

    Hurricane risk characteristics are examined across the U. S. Gulf of Mexico coastline using a hexagonal tessellation. Using an extreme value model, parameters are collected representing the rate or λ (frequency), the scale or σ (range), and the shape or ξ (intensity) of the extreme wind distribution. These latent parameters and the 30-year return level are visualized across the grid. The greatest 30-year return levels are located toward the center of the Gulf of Mexico, and for inland locations, along the borders of Louisiana, Mississippi, and Alabama. Using a geographically weighted regression model, the relationship of these parameters to sea surface temperature (SST) is found to assess sensitivity to change. It is shown that as SSTs increase near the coast, the frequency of hurricanes in these grids decrease significantly. This reinforces the importance of SST in areas of likely tropical cyclogenesis in determining the number of hurricanes near the coast, along with SSTs along the lifespan of the storm, rather than simply local SST. The range of hurricane wind speeds experienced near Florida is shown to increase with increasing SSTs (insignificant), suggesting that increased temperatures may allow hurricanes to maintain their strength as they pass over the Florida peninsula. The modifiable areal unit problem is assessed using multiple grid sizes. Moran's I and the local statistic G are calculated to examine spatial autocorrelation in the parameters. This research opens up future questions regarding rapid intensification and decay close to the coast and the relationship to changing SSTs.

  1. Ecological drivers of shark distributions along a tropical coastline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, Peter M; Heupel, Michelle R; Tobin, Andrew J; Simpfendorfer, Colin A

    2015-01-01

    As coastal species experience increasing anthropogenic pressures there is a growing need to characterise the ecological drivers of their abundance and habitat use, and understand how they may respond to changes in their environment. Accordingly, fishery-independent surveys were undertaken to investigate shark abundance along approximately 400 km of the tropical east coast of Australia. Generalised linear models were used to identify ecological drivers of the abundance of immature blacktip Carcharhinus tilstoni/Carcharhinus limbatus, pigeye Carcharhinus amboinensis, and scalloped hammerhead Sphyrna lewini sharks. Results indicated general and species-specific patterns in abundance that were characterised by a range of abiotic and biotic variables. Relationships with turbidity and salinity were similar across multiple species, highlighting the importance of these variables in the functioning of communal shark nurseries. In particular, turbid environments were especially important for all species at typical oceanic salinities. Mangrove proximity, depth, and water temperature were also important; however, their influence varied between species. Ecological drivers may promote spatial diversity in habitat use along environmentally heterogeneous coastlines and may therefore have important implications for population resilience.

  2. Spatial Changes and Population Movements on the Albanian Coastline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanjir, U.; Gregorič Bon, N.

    2016-06-01

    The last decade has seen a large increase in construction along the southern Albanian coastline, mainly in the rise of large tourist complexes comprising hotels, apartment houses, touristic villages, and so on. These constructions rarely follow urban planning and not only change its landscape but also often threaten the ecological value of the coastal zone. The uncontrolled and devastating construction along the coast has been accompanied by coastal erosion caused by the sea with the intensity up to 50 cm/year. This paper investigates the environmental change monitoring on the Albanian Riviera by analysing optical remote sensing data (Landsat 5 and 8) in the period between 1984 and 2015. The image analysis results grounded on the change vector analysis indicate coastal morphology changes and land cover changes in the coastal environment, which appear mostly due to erosion in river delta and urban growth. Apart from identifying both phenomena through time, the objective of this study is to show that these landscape changes in fact correlate with the population migration as well as to explain why and the extent to which Albania is one of the most migratory countries in Europe. Based on the multidisciplinary research, which combines anthropological method with spatial analysis, this presentation anticipates future changes in this area. It argues that movements of both people and in landscape formations strongly influence each other, constituting a closely corresponding relationship.

  3. Ecological drivers of shark distributions along a tropical coastline.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter M Yates

    Full Text Available As coastal species experience increasing anthropogenic pressures there is a growing need to characterise the ecological drivers of their abundance and habitat use, and understand how they may respond to changes in their environment. Accordingly, fishery-independent surveys were undertaken to investigate shark abundance along approximately 400 km of the tropical east coast of Australia. Generalised linear models were used to identify ecological drivers of the abundance of immature blacktip Carcharhinus tilstoni/Carcharhinus limbatus, pigeye Carcharhinus amboinensis, and scalloped hammerhead Sphyrna lewini sharks. Results indicated general and species-specific patterns in abundance that were characterised by a range of abiotic and biotic variables. Relationships with turbidity and salinity were similar across multiple species, highlighting the importance of these variables in the functioning of communal shark nurseries. In particular, turbid environments were especially important for all species at typical oceanic salinities. Mangrove proximity, depth, and water temperature were also important; however, their influence varied between species. Ecological drivers may promote spatial diversity in habitat use along environmentally heterogeneous coastlines and may therefore have important implications for population resilience.

  4. Modern stromatolite reefs fringing a brackish coastline, Chetumal Bay, Belize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Kenneth A.; MacIntyre, Ian G.; Prufert, Leslie

    1993-03-01

    Reef-forming stromatolites have been discovered along the windward shoreline of Chetumal Bay, Belize, just south of the mouth of the Rio Hondo. The reefs and surrounding sediment are formed by the precipitation of submicrocrystalline calcite upon the sheaths of filamentous cyanobacteria, principally Scytonema, under a seasonally fluctuating, generally brackish salinity regime (0‰10‰). Well-cemented, wave-resistant buttresses of coalesced stromatolite heads form arcuate or club-shaped reefs up to 42 m long and 1.5 m in relief that are partially emergent during low tide. Oncolitic rubble fields are present between well-developed reefs along the 1.5 km trend, which parallels the mangrove coastline 40-100 m offshore. The mode of reef growth, as illustrated by surface relief and internal structure, changes with increasing water depth and energy, proximity to bottom sediments, and dominant cyanobacterial taxa. Sediment trapping and binding by cyanobacteria are of limited importance to reef growth, and occur only where stromatolite heads or oncolites are in direct contact with the sandy sea floor. Radiocarbon-dated mangrove peat at the base of the reef suggests that it began to form about 2300 yr B.P., as shoreline encrustations that were stranded offshore following storm-induced retreat of the mangrove coast.

  5. Observation and Change Analysis of Coastline in the Cisadane Coast, Banten Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Salam Tarigan

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available The observation of coastline in the Cisadane coastal waters, Banten Province from Tanjung Pasir to Rawa Saban were carried out in July, 2005 and November, 2005. Based on the results of observation coastline in the year of 2005 and over lay with the results of coastline digitation analysis from image landsat 5 TM in the year 1997, we found several abration and acration areas, which may be due to the effects of human activities and natural fenomena such as, hight current and hight wave during moonson over that area.

  6. How Welfare Regimes Generate and Erode Social Capital

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Christian Albrekt

    2007-01-01

    Comparative studies of social capital, operationalised as social trust between citizens, have revealed two major puzzles. The first puzzle has to do with the decline in social trust in the USA, which fuelled considerable debate about social capital. The question is why social capital erodes in th...... with the presence or absence of a poor and culturally distinct underclass. The social democratic welfare regimes hinder – while the liberal welfare regime generate – such underclass phenomena.......Comparative studies of social capital, operationalised as social trust between citizens, have revealed two major puzzles. The first puzzle has to do with the decline in social trust in the USA, which fuelled considerable debate about social capital. The question is why social capital erodes...... in the USA and other liberal welfare regimes, while social capital is stable in the so-called social democratic and conservative welfare regimes. The second puzzle is why the group of social democratic regimes have extremely high levels of social trust. It is argued that both puzzles have to do...

  7. Effect of erodent particles on the erosion of metal specimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razzaque, M. Mahbubur; Alam, M. Khorshed; Khan, M. Ishak

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents the experimental results of the measurement of erosion rate of carbon steel specimens in sand water slurry system in a slurry pot tester. Sylhet sand has been sieved to get three sizes of erodent particles; namely, less than 250 micron, 250 to 590 micron and 590 to 1190 micron. Experiments are done with three sand concentrations (10%, 15% and 20%). The rate of erosion of the carbon steel specimens is measured as the loss of weight per unit surface area per unit time under the dynamic action of solid particles. The eroded surfaces of the specimens are examined using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) to visualize the impact of the slurry of various conditions. It is seen that irrespective of the particle size the rate of erosion increases with the increase of slurry concentration. This increment of erosion rate at high concentration is high for large particles. High erosion rate is observed in case of large sand particles. In case of small and fine particles erosion rate is small because of low impact energy as well as the wastage of energy to overcome the hindrance of the finer particles before striking on the specimen surface.

  8. Prediction the soil erodibility and sediments load using soil attributes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uones Mazllom

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Soil erodibility (K factor is the most important tool for estimation the erosion. The aim of this study was to estimate the soil erodibility in Sanganeh area located in Naderi Kalat, Khorasan Razavi Province of northeastern Iran. The sediments load collected during the 17 rainfall events were measured at the end of 12 plots during 2009-2012. The K factor was calculated according to the USLE for each plot and rainfall event. The relationships between K factor and measured sediments load with soil attributes were studied. The results showed that calcium carbonate, SAR (sodium absorption ratio, silt, clay contents, and SI (structural stability index were the most effective soil attributes for estimating the sediments load and OM (organic matter, sand, SI and calcium carbonate, silt, clay contents, and SI for K factor. The results of stepwise regression equations showed that the precision of regression equation derived from PCA for estimating the K factor and sediments load were more than ones derived from correlation test. According to the results of this research, it’s recommended that PCA be applied for determination the effective soil attributes for estimating the K factor in USLE and sediments load in studied area.

  9. Arctic tipping points

    OpenAIRE

    Smolkova, Valentina

    2015-01-01

    The Arctic is warming much faster than the entire planet, and this causes severe melting of sea ice. However, the climate of different regions of the Earth is interconnected, and changes in the amount of ice in the Arctic can dramatically affect the climate across the whole planet. Some scientists claim that a possible tipping point is the event of the ice-free Arctic Ocean in summer. Certain predictions point towards ice-free Arctic summers around the year 2050, whereas others pre- dict this...

  10. Arctic wind energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peltola, E. [Kemijoki Oy (Finland); Holttinen, H.; Marjaniemi, M. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland); Tammelin, B. [Finnish Meteorological Institute, Helsinki (Finland)

    1998-12-31

    Arctic wind energy research was aimed at adapting existing wind technologies to suit the arctic climatic conditions in Lapland. Project research work included meteorological measurements, instrument development, development of a blade heating system for wind turbines, load measurements and modelling of ice induced loads on wind turbines, together with the development of operation and maintenance practices in arctic conditions. As a result the basis now exists for technically feasible and economically viable wind energy production in Lapland. New and marketable products, such as blade heating systems for wind turbines and meteorological sensors for arctic conditions, with substantial export potential, have also been developed. (orig.)

  11. White Arctic vs. Blue Arctic: Making Choices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfirman, S. L.; Newton, R.; Schlosser, P.; Pomerance, R.; Tremblay, B.; Murray, M. S.; Gerrard, M.

    2015-12-01

    As the Arctic warms and shifts from icy white to watery blue and resource-rich, tension is arising between the desire to restore and sustain an ice-covered Arctic and stakeholder communities that hope to benefit from an open Arctic Ocean. If emissions of greenhouse gases to the atmosphere continue on their present trend, most of the summer sea ice cover is projected to be gone by mid-century, i.e., by the time that few if any interventions could be in place to restore it. There are many local as well as global reasons for ice restoration, including for example, preserving the Arctic's reflectivity, sustaining critical habitat, and maintaining cultural traditions. However, due to challenges in implementing interventions, it may take decades before summer sea ice would begin to return. This means that future generations would be faced with bringing sea ice back into regions where they have not experienced it before. While there is likely to be interest in taking action to restore ice for the local, regional, and global services it provides, there is also interest in the economic advancement that open access brings. Dealing with these emerging issues and new combinations of stakeholders needs new approaches - yet environmental change in the Arctic is proceeding quickly and will force the issues sooner rather than later. In this contribution we examine challenges, opportunities, and responsibilities related to exploring options for restoring Arctic sea ice and potential pathways for their implementation. Negotiating responses involves international strategic considerations including security and governance, meaning that along with local communities, state decision-makers, and commercial interests, national governments will have to play central roles. While these issues are currently playing out in the Arctic, similar tensions are also emerging in other regions.

  12. CONCEPTUAL DIFFERENCES BETWEEN THE PACIFIC, ATLANTIC AND ARCTIC TSUNAMI WARNING SYSTEMS FOR CANADA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.S. Murty

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Canada has coastlines on three of the four oceans on the globe, namely, the Pacific, Atlantic and Arctic oceans. The Pacific and Atlantic oceans are connected to the Arctic Ocean in the north, but still they are three distinct oceans, and need three individual tsunami warning systems. Tsunamis in the Arctic Ocean are not as well documented as in the Pacific and Atlantic oceans. From what is known, tsunamis in the Arctic Ocean are rare and probably are small in amplitude. Because of very low population density, around the Canadian Arctic, at present, there is no priority for a tsunami warning system for Arctic Canada. For the Pacific Ocean, a tsunami warning system is in existence since 1948. In at least one sense, the warning aspects of the tsunami warning system for the Pacific coast of Canada, is relatively simple and straight forward, because it involves only the federal government (PSEPC and the provincial government of British Columbia (PEP. For the Atlantic Ocean, A tsunami warning system is now being established. The warning aspects will be some what more complex for eastern Canada, since it not only involves the federal government, but also five provinces, namely, Newfoundland and Labrador, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island and Quebec. The Alaska tsunami warning center (ATWC in Palmer, Alaska, provides tsunami warnings for both Pacific and Atlantic Canada.

  13. September 2002 Lidar Point Data of Southern California Coastline: Dana Point to Point La Jolla

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains lidar point data from a strip of Southern California coastline (including water, beach, cliffs, and top of cliffs) from Dana Point to Point La...

  14. December 2002 Lidar Point Data of Southern California Coastline: Dana Point to Point La Jolla

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains lidar point data (latitude and longitude) from a strip of Southern California coastline (including water, beach, cliffs, and top of cliffs)...

  15. April 2005 Lidar Point Data of Southern California Coastline: Long Beach to US/Mexican Border

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains lidar point data (latitude/longitude) from a strip of Southern California coastline (including water, beach, cliffs, and top of cliffs) from...

  16. March 2003 Lidar Point Data of Southern California Coastline: Dana Point to Point La Jolla

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains lidar point data (Geodetic Coordinates) from a strip of Southern California coastline (including water, beach, cliffs, and top of cliffs) from...

  17. September 2004 Lidar Point Data of Southern California Coastline: Long Beach to US/Mexican Border

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains lidar point data (Geodetic Coordinates) from a strip of Southern California coastline (including water, beach, cliffs, and top of cliffs) from...

  18. April 2004 Lidar Point Data of Southern California Coastline: Dana Point to Point La Jolla

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains lidar point data (Geodetic Coordinates) from a strip of Southern California coastline (including water, beach, cliffs, and top of cliffs) from...

  19. October 2005 Lidar Point Data of Southern California Coastline: Long Beach to US/Mexican Border

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains lidar point data (UTM, Zone 11) from a strip of Southern California coastline (including water, beach, cliffs, and top of cliffs) from Long...

  20. May 2002 Lidar Point Data of Southern California Coastline: Dana Point to Point La Jolla

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains lidar point data from a strip of Southern California coastline (including water, beach, cliffs, and top of cliffs) from Dana Point to Point La...

  1. October 2003 Lidar Point Data of Southern California Coastline: Newport Beach to US/Mexican Border

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains lidar point data (Geodetic Coordinates) from a strip of Southern California coastline (including water, beach, cliffs, and top of cliffs) from...

  2. March 2006 Lidar Point Data of Southern California Coastline: Long Beach to US/Mexican Border

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains lidar point data (Geodetic Coordinates) from a strip of Southern California coastline (including water, beach, cliffs, and top of cliffs) from...

  3. 1:1,000,000-Scale Coastline of the United States - Direct Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This map layer portrays the coastline of the United States, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. The United States shoreline of the Great Lakes is also...

  4. October 2003 Lidar Point Data of Southern California Coastline: Newport Beach to US/Mexican Border

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains lidar point data (Geodetic Coordinates) from a strip of Southern California coastline (including water, beach, cliffs, and top of cliffs)...

  5. September 2002 Lidar Point Data of Southern California Coastline: Dana Point to Point La Jolla

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains lidar point data from a strip of Southern California coastline (including water, beach, cliffs, and top of cliffs) from Dana Point to Point...

  6. March 2003 Lidar Point Data of Southern California Coastline: Dana Point to Point La Jolla

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains lidar point data (Geodetic Coordinates) from a strip of Southern California coastline (including water, beach, cliffs, and top of cliffs) from...

  7. Sea and coastline surveys, Katmai National Monument, Alaska, July 1969 through June 26, 1971

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes sea and coastline surveys in Katmai National Monument from July 1969 through June 1971. Objectives of surveys were to determine seas and land...

  8. THE ROLE OF NATURAL PARKS IN TOURISM DIVERSIFICATION PROCESSES: AN APPLICATION TO THE ALICANTE COASTLINE

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Margarita Capdepón Frías

    2015-01-01

    .... In this context, Frias stresses the importance of revaluing natural parks located along the Alicante province coastline as a strategy for the diversification of the tourism supply provided by mature...

  9. Kinship analyses identify fish dispersal events on a temperate coastline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schunter, C; Pascual, M; Garza, J C; Raventos, N; Macpherson, E

    2014-06-22

    Connectivity is crucial for the persistence and resilience of marine species, the establishment of networks of marine protected areas and the delineation of fishery management units. In the marine environment, understanding connectivity is still a major challenge, due to the technical difficulties of tracking larvae. Recently, parentage analysis has provided a means to address this question effectively. To be effective, this method requires limited adult movement and extensive sampling of parents, which is often not possible for marine species. An alternative approach that is less sensitive to constraints in parental movement and sampling could be the reconstruction of sibships. Here, we directly measure connectivity and larval dispersal in a temperate marine ecosystem through both analytical approaches. We use data from 178 single nucleotide polymorphism markers to perform parentage and sibship reconstruction of the black-faced blenny (Tripterygion delaisi) from an open coastline in the Mediterranean Sea. Parentage analysis revealed a decrease in dispersal success in the focal area over 1 km distance and approximately 6.5% of the juveniles were identified as self-recruits. Sibship reconstruction analysis found that, in general, full siblings did not recruit together to the same location, and that the largest distance between recruitment locations was much higher (11.5 km) than found for parent-offspring pairs (1.2 km). Direct measurements of dispersal are essential to understanding connectivity patterns in different marine habitats, and show the degree of self-replenishment and sustainability of populations of marine organisms. We demonstrate that sibship reconstruction allows direct measurements of dispersal and family structure in marine species while being more easily applied in those species for which the collection of the parental population is difficult or unfeasible.

  10. Extraction of Coastlines with Fuzzy Approach Using SENTINEL-1 SAR Image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir, N.; Kaynarca, M.; Oy, S.

    2016-06-01

    Coastlines are important features for water resources, sea products, energy resources etc. Coastlines are changed dynamically, thus automated methods are necessary for analysing and detecting the changes along the coastlines. In this study, Sentinel-1 C band SAR image has been used to extract the coastline with fuzzy logic approach. The used SAR image has VH polarisation and 10x10m. spatial resolution, covers 57 sqkm area from the south-east of Puerto-Rico. Additionally, radiometric calibration is applied to reduce atmospheric and orbit error, and speckle filter is used to reduce the noise. Then the image is terrain-corrected using SRTM digital surface model. Classification of SAR image is a challenging task since SAR and optical sensors have very different properties. Even between different bands of the SAR sensors, the images look very different. So, the classification of SAR image is difficult with the traditional unsupervised methods. In this study, a fuzzy approach has been applied to distinguish the coastal pixels than the land surface pixels. The standard deviation and the mean, median values are calculated to use as parameters in fuzzy approach. The Mean-standard-deviation (MS) Large membership function is used because the large amounts of land and ocean pixels dominate the SAR image with large mean and standard deviation values. The pixel values are multiplied with 1000 to easify the calculations. The mean is calculated as 23 and the standard deviation is calculated as 12 for the whole image. The multiplier parameters are selected as a: 0.58, b: 0.05 to maximize the land surface membership. The result is evaluated using airborne LIDAR data, only for the areas where LIDAR dataset is available and secondly manually digitized coastline. The laser points which are below 0,5 m are classified as the ocean points. The 3D alpha-shapes algorithm is used to detect the coastline points from LIDAR data. Minimum distances are calculated between the LIDAR points of

  11. Russia in the Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    Jakobson , Linda, “China prepares for an ice-free Arctic,” SIPRI Insights on Peace and Security, No. 2010/2, March 2010, Stockholm International Peace...Governance, October 9, 2008. 23. Linda Jakobson , “China prepares for an ice-free Arctic,” SIPRI Insights on Peace and Security, No. 2010/2

  12. Effects of organic and inorganic amendments on soil erodibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nutullah Özdemir

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present investigation is to find out the effect of incorporating of various organic and inorganic matter sources such as lime (L, zeolit (Z, polyacrylamide (PAM and biosolid (BS on the instability index. A bulk surface (0–20 cm depth soil sample was taken from Samsun, in northern part of Turkey. Some soil properties were determined as follows; fine in texture, modarete in organic matter content, low in pH and free of alkaline problem. The soil samples were treated with the inorganic and organic materials at four different levels including the control treatments in a randomized factorial block design. The soil samples were incubated for ten weeks. After the incubation period, corn was grown in all pots. The results can be summarized as organic and inorganic matter treatments increased structure stability and decreased soil erodibility. Effectiveness of the treatments varied depending on the types and levels of organic and inorganic materials.

  13. Eroding market stability by proliferation of financial instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caccioli, F.; Marsili, M.; Vivo, P.

    2009-10-01

    We contrast Arbitrage Pricing Theory (APT), the theoretical basis for the development of financial instruments, with a dynamical picture of an interacting market, in a simple setting. The proliferation of financial instruments apparently provides more means for risk diversification, making the market more efficient and complete. In the simple market of interacting traders discussed here, the proliferation of financial instruments erodes systemic stability and it drives the market to a critical state characterized by large susceptibility, strong fluctuations and enhanced correlations among risks. This suggests that the hypothesis of APT may not be compatible with a stable market dynamics. In this perspective, market stability acquires the properties of a common good, which suggests that appropriate measures should be introduced in derivative markets, to preserve stability. in here

  14. Ice-Free Arctic Ocean?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Science Teacher, 2005

    2005-01-01

    The current warming trends in the Arctic may shove the Arctic system into a seasonally ice-free state not seen for more than one million years, according to a new report. The melting is accelerating, and researchers were unable to identify any natural processes that might slow the deicing of the Arctic. "What really makes the Arctic different…

  15. On Spatial Fractal Character of Coastline A Case Study of Jiangsu Province, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Xiaohua; YANG Xiuchun; XIE Wenjun; WANG Jian

    2000-01-01

    According to the fractal theory, the spatial fractal character of coastline is preliminarily discussed on the basis of GIS in this paper. Two aspects are considered: one is the length demarcation of coastline with different scales, and the other is the confirmation of existence of the fractal character on different boundaries of tidal flats. Finally, some significant conclusions are drawn: (1) The coastline ofJiangsu Province has the fractal character and its dimension is 1.0696. (2) It conforms to the exponential correlation between different lengths (L) of coastline and scales (k). It conforms to the formula lgL(k) =-1.029 lgk+ 2.9544 in the continental coastline of Jiangsu province. (3) Different boundaries of a tidal flat have fractal characters, and different fractal dimensions indicate different comparative intensities of erosion and deposition on the tidal flat. (4) The reciprocity between land and sea may affect the value of fractal dimension of a coastline, just as the lithology, substantial constituent and geological structure do.

  16. Arctic Sea Level Reconstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Peter Limkilde

    Reconstruction of historical Arctic sea level is very difficult due to the limited coverage and quality of tide gauge and altimetry data in the area. This thesis addresses many of these issues, and discusses strategies to help achieve a stable and plausible reconstruction of Arctic sea level from...... 1950 to today.The primary record of historical sea level, on the order of several decades to a few centuries, is tide gauges. Tide gauge records from around the world are collected in the Permanent Service for Mean Sea Level (PSMSL) database, and includes data along the Arctic coasts. A reasonable...... amount of data is available along the Norwegian and Russian coasts since 1950, and most published research on Arctic sea level extends cautiously from these areas. Very little tide gauge data is available elsewhere in the Arctic, and records of a length of several decades,as generally recommended for sea...

  17. A prototype erodible mask delivery system for the excimer laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloney, R K; Friedman, M; Harmon, T; Hayward, M; Hagen, K; Gailitis, R P; Waring, G O

    1993-04-01

    The authors developed an erodible mask delivery system for the argon-fluoride 193-nm excimer laser, which offers the possibility of correcting hyperopia and astigmatism as well as myopia. Masks were made of polymethylmethacrylate on a quartz window, with intended corrections for myopia and hyperopia of 2.5 and 5 diopters (D). Ablations using the mask and control ablations using an expanding diaphragm were performed in 30 eyes of 15 pigmented rabbits with an Excimed UV200 laser (Summit Technology, Inc, Waltham, MA). The rabbits were followed for 134 days with regular biomicroscopy and retinoscopic examination by two observers. Ablations with the mask to correct myopia were successful and produced stable corrections, although the higher-power mask produced undercorrections. Hyperopic masks produced paradoxic myopic corrections, possibly due to the lack of a transition zone at the edge of the mask. Corneas ablated with the mask had less sub-epithelial haze than those ablated with the diaphragm at all examinations. Results of histopathologic examination showed epithelial hyperplasia over the ablation zone in all eyes. Dichlorotriazinyl aminofluorescein collagen staining showed subepithelial new collagen in all eyes, but there was no relation between the depth of ablation at any point on the cornea and the amount of new collagen deposited there. Myopic ablations are feasible with the erodible mask, although additional calibration is needed. Hyperopic ablations were unsuccessful with the current design. Corneas ablated with the mask may be clearer than corneas ablated with the diaphragm, possibly due to a smoother ablated surface. Regression of effect after laser ablation in the rabbit model is likely due more to epithelial hyperplasia than to stromal remodeling.

  18. Experimental simulation of gravity currents in erodible bed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bateman, A.; La Roca, M.; Medina, V.

    2009-04-01

    Gravity currents are commonly met in nature, when a flow of denser fluid moves into a less dense one. A typical example of a gravity current is given by the sea water which flows into the bottom of a river during the summer, in correspondence of the estuary, when the river's discharge attains low values. In this case, dangerous consequences can occur, because of the polluting of the aquifer caused by the salty water. Density currents also occurs in lakes and reservoirs, because of a change in temperature or because a flood, both can produce some environmental impacts that are of interest to the local water Agency of the different countries. Of particular relevance is also the interaction of the gravity current with the movement of the sediments from the bottom of the bed. The international state of the art is particularly concerned with experimental and numerical investigation on gravity currents on fixed and porous bed [1-2-3], while, to the authors' knowledge, the interaction of a gravity current with an erodible bed is still an open field of investigation. In this paper experiments concerning with the propagation of a gravity current over fixed and erodible bed are presented. The experiments, conducted at the laboratory of Hydraulics of the Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya (actually in the Prof. Bateman's blue room), were concerned with a transparent tank 2 m long, 0.2 m wide and 0.3 m deep, partly filled with salty water and partly with fresh water, up to a depth of 0.28 m. The salty water, whose density was in the range 1050John E. Simpson. Gravity Currents [3] J.J. Monaghan, R.A.F. Cas, A.M. Kos, M. Hallworth, Gravity currents descending a ramp in a stratified tank, The Journal of Fluid Mechanics, Vol. 379, 1999

  19. Biomarker responses associated with halogenated organic contaminants in northern fulmars (Fulmarus glacialis) breeding in the Canadian Arctic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braune, Birgit M., E-mail: birgit.braune@ec.gc.ca [Environment Canada, National Wildlife Research Centre, Carleton University, Raven Road, Ottawa, Ontario, K1A 0H3 (Canada); Trudeau, Suzanne [Environment Canada, National Wildlife Research Centre, Carleton University, Raven Road, Ottawa, Ontario, K1A 0H3 (Canada); Jeffrey, Deborah A. [Bancroft, Ontario, K0L 1C0 (Canada); Mallory, Mark L. [Environment Canada, Box 1714, Iqaluit, Nunavut, X0A 0H0 (Canada)

    2011-10-15

    We examined relationships between hepatic concentrations of halogenated organic contaminants and ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD) activity and retinoid (vitamin A) concentrations in livers, as well as retinol and thyroid hormone (TT{sub 3}, TT{sub 4}) levels in blood plasma, of northern fulmars at two breeding colonies in the Canadian High Arctic. Biomarker levels or responses did not differ significantly between males and females at either colony, nor was there any significant difference between colonies. No significant relationships were found between thyroid hormone or hepatic retinoid concentrations and any of the dioxin-like compounds or their Toxic Equivalents (TEQs) although significant positive correlations were found with plasma retinol (p < 0.03). EROD activity was significantly correlated with hepatic dioxin-like compounds and their TEQs (p < 0.001) as well as total PCBs (p < 0.01), which suggests that EROD induction occurs in northern fulmars at environmentally-relevant concentrations. - Highlights: > EROD induction occurs in northern fulmars at environmentally-relevant concentrations. > No relationships between hepatic retinoid or plasma thyroid hormone levels and dioxin-like compounds or TEQs. > Biomarker responses did not differ between males and females or between colonies. - EROD induction occurs in northern fulmars in the Canadian Arctic at environmentally-relevant concentrations.

  20. Holocene sedimentation processes and environmental changes along the Namibian coastline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schüller, Irka; Belz, Lukas; Wilkes, Heinz; Wehrmann, Achim

    2016-04-01

    The regional oceanic and atmospheric circulation patterns strongly control environmental conditions in southern Africa. Changes in the system may have significant consequences on climate and related processes. The hyper arid coast of Namibia is mainly influenced by (1) the cold Benguela upwelling, (2) the Benguela current and (3) the Angola current. The Benguela current transports the cool, upwelling water from south to north and interacts with the warm, contrary flowing Angola current at the Angola-Benguela Front (ABF). Today the ABF is located around the Namibian-Angolan border with minor seasonal changes. Therefore, climate and environment at the Namibian coast are affected by the cold water conditions. It is known evidently that the location of the ABF changed during the Holocene over several latitudes and enabled warm water species to expand their range farther south. Several (paleo-) lagoons (coastal salt pans) exist along the Namibian coastline. Most of them are already barred and filled by longshore sediment transport processes. Tidal flooding and active sedimentation processes are restricted to the southernmost lagoons. Two different types of sediments occur. The northern pans contain well sorted, siliciclastic medium sands. Fine-layered alternation refers to changes in mineral composition. The southern pans are dominated by typical tidal sediments with a high amount of benthic fauna (mainly bivalves and gastropods). At Cape Cross the distinct shift between both facies is documented in the cores. Age determinations of core material prove a very fast sediment filling of the distinct lagoons with high sedimentation rates. However, the age of closure differs from lagoon to lagoon. Northern pan sediments are much older (Cape Cross: ~ 5000 a BP) than southern (Sandwich Bay and Conception Bay: 1800 - 300 a BP). Additional information are supported by river clay deposits (~ 36600 a BP) and fossil reed systems (~ 47900 a BP) in Conception Bay and peat deposits at

  1. Connecting Indigenous Knowledge to Thaw Lake Cycle Research on the Arctic Coastal Plain of Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisner, W. R.; Cuomo, C. J.; Hinkel, K. M.; Jones, B. M.; Hurd, J.

    2005-12-01

    Thaw lakes cover about 20% of the Arctic Coastal Plain of Alaska. Another 26% is scarred by basins that form when lakes drain, and these drained thaw-lake basins are sites for preferential carbon accumulation as plant biomass. Recent studies in the continuous permafrost zone of Western Siberia suggest that lakes have been expanding in the past several decades in response to regional warming. Anticipated regional warming would likely mobilize sequestered soil organic carbon, resulting in the emission of CO2 and CH4. Our understanding of the processes leading to thaw lake formation, expansion, and drainage in northern Alaska has been limited because models are specific to the flat, young Outer (seaward) Coastal Plain comprising 1/3 of the region. Furthermore, spatial and temporal analysis of lake dynamics is largely restricted to the period since 1948, when aerial photographs first became available across large regions of the Coastal Plain. In order to fill these gaps, we have been interviewing Iñupiaq elders, hunters, and berry pickers from the villages of Atqasuk and Barrow. The objective of these interviews is to obtain accounts of lake formation, expansion and drainage that have occurred within living or oral memory, and extend the record back several generations. To date, we have interviewed fifteen Iñupiat; most of these are people who travel the tundra frequently and have done so for decades. They have first-hand experience of lake drainage, sea cliff and river bank erosion, permafrost degradation, and other landscape changes. Many informants expressed concern that landscape changes are occurring at an increasingly rapid rate. They have identified lakes that have drained, areas where the permafrost is thawing, and places where the sea and river coastline is eroding. We have been able to corroborate reports of lake drainage from our informants with a series of aerial photographs, satellite images, and radiocarbon dates. In many instances, the elders have

  2. Arctic Climate Systems Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivey, Mark D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Robinson, David G. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Boslough, Mark B. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Backus, George A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Peterson, Kara J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); van Bloemen Waanders, Bart G. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Swiler, Laura Painton [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Desilets, Darin Maurice [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Reinert, Rhonda Karen [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-03-01

    This study began with a challenge from program area managers at Sandia National Laboratories to technical staff in the energy, climate, and infrastructure security areas: apply a systems-level perspective to existing science and technology program areas in order to determine technology gaps, identify new technical capabilities at Sandia that could be applied to these areas, and identify opportunities for innovation. The Arctic was selected as one of these areas for systems level analyses, and this report documents the results. In this study, an emphasis was placed on the arctic atmosphere since Sandia has been active in atmospheric research in the Arctic since 1997. This study begins with a discussion of the challenges and benefits of analyzing the Arctic as a system. It goes on to discuss current and future needs of the defense, scientific, energy, and intelligence communities for more comprehensive data products related to the Arctic; assess the current state of atmospheric measurement resources available for the Arctic; and explain how the capabilities at Sandia National Laboratories can be used to address the identified technological, data, and modeling needs of the defense, scientific, energy, and intelligence communities for Arctic support.

  3. Arctic ice management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desch, Steven J.; Smith, Nathan; Groppi, Christopher; Vargas, Perry; Jackson, Rebecca; Kalyaan, Anusha; Nguyen, Peter; Probst, Luke; Rubin, Mark E.; Singleton, Heather; Spacek, Alexander; Truitt, Amanda; Zaw, Pye Pye; Hartnett, Hilairy E.

    2017-01-01

    As the Earth's climate has changed, Arctic sea ice extent has decreased drastically. It is likely that the late-summer Arctic will be ice-free as soon as the 2030s. This loss of sea ice represents one of the most severe positive feedbacks in the climate system, as sunlight that would otherwise be reflected by sea ice is absorbed by open ocean. It is unlikely that CO2 levels and mean temperatures can be decreased in time to prevent this loss, so restoring sea ice artificially is an imperative. Here we investigate a means for enhancing Arctic sea ice production by using wind power during the Arctic winter to pump water to the surface, where it will freeze more rapidly. We show that where appropriate devices are employed, it is possible to increase ice thickness above natural levels, by about 1 m over the course of the winter. We examine the effects this has in the Arctic climate, concluding that deployment over 10% of the Arctic, especially where ice survival is marginal, could more than reverse current trends of ice loss in the Arctic, using existing industrial capacity. We propose that winter ice thickening by wind-powered pumps be considered and assessed as part of a multipronged strategy for restoring sea ice and arresting the strongest feedbacks in the climate system.

  4. Unraveling the dynamics that scale cross-shore headland relief on rocky coastlines: 1. Model development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limber, Patrick W.; Brad Murray, A.; Adams, Peter N.; Goldstein, Evan B.

    2014-04-01

    We have developed an exploratory model of plan view, millennial-scale headland and bay evolution on rocky coastlines. Cross-shore coastline relief, or amplitude, arises from alongshore differences in sea cliff lithology, where durable, erosion-resistant rocks protrude seaward as headlands and weaker rocks retreat landward as bays. The model is built around two concurrent negative feedbacks that control headland amplitude: (1) wave energy convergence and divergence at headlands and bays, respectively, that increases in intensity as cross-shore amplitude grows and (2) the combined processes of beach sediment production by sea cliff erosion, distribution of sediment to bays by waves, and beach accumulation that buffers sea cliffs from wave attack and limits further sea cliff retreat. Paired with the coastline relief model is a numerical wave transformation model that explores how wave energy is distributed along an embayed coastline. The two models are linked through genetic programming, a machine learning technique that parses wave model results into a tractable input for the coastline model. Using a pool of 4800 wave model simulations, genetic programming yields a function that relates breaking wave power density to cross-shore headland amplitude, offshore wave height, approach angle, and period. The goal of the coastline model is to make simple, but fundamental, scaling arguments on how different variables (such as sea cliff height and composition) affect the equilibrium cross-shore relief of headland and bays. The model's generality highlights the key feedbacks involved in coastline evolution and allows its equations (and model behaviors) to be easily modified by future users.

  5. Automated Generation of the Alaska Coastline Using High-Resolution Satellite Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, G.; Porter, C. C.; Cloutier, M. D.; Clementz, M. E.; Reim, C.; Morin, P. J.

    2015-12-01

    Previous campaigns to map Alaska's coast at high resolution have relied on airborne, marine, or ground-based surveying and manual digitization. The coarse temporal resolution, inability to scale geographically, and high cost of field data acquisition in these campaigns is inadequate for the scale and speed of recent coastal change in Alaska. Here, we leverage the Polar Geospatial Center (PGC) archive of DigitalGlobe, Inc. satellite imagery to produce a state-wide coastline at 2 meter resolution. We first select multispectral imagery based on time and quality criteria. We then extract the near-infrared (NIR) band from each processed image, and classify each pixel as water or land with a pre-determined NIR threshold value. Processing continues with vectorizing the water-land boundary, removing extraneous data, and attaching metadata. Final coastline raster and vector products maintain the original accuracy of the orthorectified satellite data, which is often within the local tidal range. The repeat frequency of coastline production can range from 1 month to 3 years, depending on factors such as satellite capacity, cloud cover, and floating ice. Shadows from trees or structures complicate the output and merit further data cleaning. The PGC's imagery archive, unique expertise, and computing resources enabled us to map the Alaskan coastline in a few months. The DigitalGlobe archive allows us to update this coastline as new imagery is acquired, and facilitates baseline data for studies of coastal change and improvement of topographic datasets. Our results are not simply a one-time coastline, but rather a system for producing multi-temporal, automated coastlines. Workflows and tools produced with this project can be freely distributed and utilized globally. Researchers and government agencies must now consider how they can incorporate and quality-control this high-frequency, high-resolution data to meet their mapping standards and research objectives.

  6. Monitoring the coastline change of Hatiya Island in Bangladesh using remote sensing techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Manoj Kumer; Kumar, Lalit; Roy, Chandan

    2015-03-01

    A large percentage of the world's population is concentrated along the coastal zones. These environmentally sensitive areas are under intense pressure from natural processes such as erosion, accretion and natural disasters as well as anthropogenic processes such as urban growth, resource development and pollution. These threats have made the coastal zone a priority for coastline monitoring programs and sustainable coastal management. This research utilizes integrated techniques of remote sensing and geographic information system (GIS) to monitor coastline changes from 1989 to 2010 at Hatiya Island, Bangladesh. In this study, satellite images from Thematic Mapper (TM) and Enhanced Thematic Mapper (ETM) were used to quantify the spatio-temporal changes that took place in the coastal zone of Hatiya Island during the specified period. The modified normalized difference water index (MNDWI) algorithm was applied to TM (1989 and 2010) and ETM (2000) images to discriminate the land-water interface and the on-screen digitizing approach was used over the MNDWI images of 1989, 2000 and 2010 for coastline extraction. Afterwards, the extent of changes in the coastline was estimated through overlaying the digitized maps of Hatiya Island of all three years. Coastline positions were highlighted to infer the erosion/accretion sectors along the coast, and the coastline changes were calculated. The results showed that erosion was severe in the northern and western parts of the island, whereas the southern and eastern parts of the island gained land through sedimentation. Over the study period (1989-2010), this offshore island witnessed the erosion of 6476 hectares. In contrast it experienced an accretion of 9916 hectares. These erosion and accretion processes played an active role in the changes of coastline during the study period.

  7. The Arctic Enigma

    OpenAIRE

    Kiilerich, Kasper; Christensen, Peter; Andreasen, Toke; Csende, Agnes

    2014-01-01

    This paper descripes how the Arctic Council deal with various issues in the arctic region, and how they have dealt with the recent interest in the region, following survey results suggesting there might be large deposits of natural gas, oil and minerals. The goal of the research is to look into how they deal with the rising issues in the arctic and if they live up to the Ottawa delcaration that was the birth of the AC. Our findings showed radically different results depending on t...

  8. Arctic Aerosols and Sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ingeborg Elbæk

    2017-01-01

    winter and spring explained by expansion of the polar dome enabling long-range transport of aerosols from source regions outside the Arctic. This phenomenon is better known as the Arctic haze. Contrary, the summer and fall concentrations were lower due to the retreat of the polar dome. These seasonal...... species. The aerosol concentration decreased during spring as the Arctic haze leveled off. A source apportionment analysis showed that three factors were contributing to organic aerosols. A hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol factor was assigned to fossil fuel combustion and a second factor, less oxygenated...

  9. Rebuilding natural coastlines after sediment mining: the example of the Brittany coasts (English Channel and Atlantic Ocean).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regnauld, Herve

    2016-04-01

    Rebuilding natural coastlines after sediment mining: the example of the Brittany coasts (English Channel and Atlantic Ocean). H.Regnauld (1) , J.N. Proust (2) and H.Mahmoud (1) (1) University of Rennes 2, (2) CNRS-University of Rennes 1, France A large part of the coasts of Brittany (western France) have been very heavily impacted by sand mining for the building of military equipments and of a large tidal power station. In some places more then 90 % of the sediment has been extracted during the late 40ies up to the 60ies. The mined site were all sink sites, were sediment had been accumulating for centuries. After the sand and or gravel extraction was stopped the coastal sites were largely used for tourism and most of the eroded dune fields were turned into car parks. Storms produced large floods inland as most of the gravel or sand barrier didn't exist any more. Some local outcrops of inherited Holocene periglacial material with archaeological remains were eroded, some disappeared. During the 80ies a complete shift in planning policies took place and these sites were progressively changed into nature preserves. The aim was to make them behave in a "natural" way again. The "natural" behaviour was intended in a very precise way: barriers should be able to withstand storms again and to protect inland fields from floods. In order to allow for dune re building wooden fences were erected and marram grass was artificially planted. As, from a sedimentological point of view, these sites were sink sites, accumulation was rather rapid (up to 0.25m a year behind wooden fences) and new barrier began to build. The only problem is that they did not always build-up exactly in the same place or with the same material. Some parts of the coasts were left "unprotected" by these new barriers, ancient exposed sites became protected. Today the system as a whole may be considered as having been able to reach some level of equilibrium with the average wave conditions. It has been able to

  10. Effects of Boreal Timber Rafting on the Composition of Arctic Driftwood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lena Hellmann

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Wood from the boreal forest represents an important resource for paper production and sawmill processing. Due to poor infrastructure and high transportation costs on land, timbers are often transported over long distances along large river systems. Industrial river rafting activities started at the end of the 19th century and were intensified in western Russia and central Siberia from the 1920s to the 1980s. After initial single stem rafting, timber is today mostly floated in ship-guided rafts. Lost wood can be transported further to the Arctic Ocean, where it may drift within sea ice over several years and thousands of kilometers before being deposited along (sub-Arctic coastlines. Here, we introduce dendro-dated tree-ring width series of 383 driftwood samples from logged timber that were collected along different driftwood-recipient coastlines in Greenland, Iceland and Svalbard. The majority of driftwood is Pinus sylvestris from the southern Yenisei region in central Siberia, whereas Larix sp. and Picea sp. from western Russia and eastern Siberia are rare. Although our results are based on a small sample collection, they clearly show the importance of timber rafting on species, age and origin of Arctic driftwood and indicate the immense loss of material during wood industrial river floating.

  11. Context of Carbonate Rocks in Heavily Eroded Martian Terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    The color coding on this composite image of an area about 20 kilometers (12 miles) wide on Mars is based on infrared spectral information interpreted as evidence of various minerals present. Carbonate, which is indicative of a wet and non-acidic history, occurs in very small patches of exposed rock appearing green in this color representation, such as near the lower right corner. The scene is heavily eroded terrain to the west of a small canyon in the Nili Fossae region of Mars. It was one of the first areas where researchers on the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) science team detected carbonate in Mars rocks. The spectral information comes from infrared imaging by CRISM, one of six science instruments on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. That coloring is overlaid on a grayscale image from the same orbiter's Context Camera. The uppermost capping rock unit (purple) is underlain successively by banded olivine-bearing rocks (yellow) and rocks bearing iron-magnesium smectite clay (blue). Where the olivine is a greenish hue, it has been partially altered by interaction with water. The carbonate and olivine occupy the same level in the stratigraphy, and it is thought that the carbonate formed by aqueous alteration of olivine. The channel running from upper left to lower right through the image and eroding into the layers of bedrock testifies to the past presence of water in this region. That some of the channels are closely associated with carbonate (lower right) indicates that waters interacting with the carbonate were neutral to alkaline because acidic waters would have dissolved the carbonate. Information for the color coding came from CRISM images catalogued as FRT0000B438, FRT0000A4FC, and FRT00003E12. This composite was made using 2.38-micrometer-wavelenghth data as red, 1.80 micrometer as green and 1.15 micrometer as blue. The base black-and-white image, acquired at a resolution of 5 meters (16 feet) per pixel, is catalogued as CTX P

  12. Differential effects of biochar on soils within an eroded field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, Thomas; Chintala, Rajesh; Sandhu, Saroop; Kumar, Sandeep; Clay, Dave; Gelderman, Ron; Papiernik, Sharon; Malo, Douglas; Clay, Sharon; Julson, Jim

    2015-04-01

    Future uses of biochar will in part be dependent not only on the effects of biochar on soil processes but also on the availability and economics of biochar production. If pyrolysis for production of bio-oil and syngas becomes wide-spread, biochar as a by-product of bio-oil production will be widely available and relatively inexpensive compared to the production of biochar as primary product. Biochar produced as a by-product of optimized bio-oil production using regionally available feedstocks was examined for properties and for use as an amendment targeted to contrasting soils within an eroded field in an on-farm study initiated in 2013 at Brookings, South Dakota, USA. Three plant based biochar materials produced from carbon optimized gasification of corn stover (Zea mays L.), Ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Lawson and C. Lawson) wood residue, and switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) were applied at a 1% (w/w) rate to a Maddock soil (Sandy, Mixed, Frigid Entic Hapludolls) located in an eroded upper landscape position and a Brookings soil (Fine-Silty, Mixed, Superactive, Frigid Pachic Hapludolls) located in a depositional landscape position. The cropping system within this agricultural landscape was a corn (Zea mays L.) and soybean (Glycine max L.) rotation. Biochar physical and chemical properties for each of the feedstocks were determined including pH, surface area, surface charge potential, C-distribution, ash content, macro and micro nutrient composition. Yields, nutrient content, and carbon isotope ratio measurements were made on the harvested seed. Soil physical properties measured included water retention, bulk density, and water infiltration from a ponded double ring infiltrometer. Laboratory studies were conducted to determine the effects of biochar on partitioning of nitrate and phosphorus at soil surface exchange complex and the extracellular enzymes activity of C and N cycles. Crop yields were increased only in the Maddock soil. Biochar interacted with each

  13. Global compilation of coastline change at river mouths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aadland, Tore; Helland-Hansen, William

    2016-04-01

    We are using Google Earth Engine to analyze Landsat images to create a global compilation of coastline change at river mouths in order to develop scaling relationships between catchment properties and shoreline behaviour. Our main motivation for doing this is to better understand the rates at which shallowing upward successions of deltaic successions are formed. We are also interested in getting an insight into the impact of climate change and human activity on modern shorelines. Google Earth Engine is a platform that offers simple selection of relevant data from an extensive catalog of geospatial data and the tools to analyse it efficiently. We have used Google Earth Engine to select and analyze temporally and geographically bounded sets of Landsat images covering modern deltas included in the Milliman and Farnsworth 2010 database. The part of the shoreline sampled for each delta has been manually defined. The areas depicted in these image sets have been classified as land or water by thresholding a calibrated Modified Normalized Water Index. By representing land and water as 1.0 and 0 respectively and averaging image sets of sufficient size we have generated rasters quantifying the probability of an area being classified as land. The calculated probabilities reflect variation in the shoreline position; in particular, it minimizes the impact of short term-variations produced by tides. The net change in the land area of deltas can be estimated by comparing how the probability changes between image sets spanning different time periods. We have estimated the land area change that occurred from 2000 to 2014 at more than 130 deltas with catchment areas ranging from 470 to 6300000 sqkm. Log-log plots of the land area change of these deltas against their respective catchment properties in the Milliman and Farnsworth 2010 database indicate that the rate of land area change correlates with catchment size and discharge. Useful interpretation of the data requires that we

  14. On the Ages of Resonant, Eroded and Fossil Asteroid Families

    CERN Document Server

    Milani, A; Spoto, F; Cellino, A; Novaković, B; Tsirvoulis, G

    2016-01-01

    In this work we have estimated 10 collisional ages of 9 families for which for different reasons our previous attempts failed. In general, these are difficult cases that required dedicated effort, such as a new family classifications for asteroids in mean motion resonances, as well as a revision of the classification inside the $3/2$ resonance. Of the families locked in mean motion resonances, we succeeded in determining ages of the families of (1911) Schubart and of the "super-Hilda" family, assuming this is actually a severely eroded original family of (153) Hilda. In the Trojan region we found families with almost no Yarkovsky evolution, for which we could compute only physically implausible ages. Hence, we interpreted their modest dispersions of proper eccentricities and inclinations as implying that the Trojan asteroid families are fossil families, frozen at their proper elements determined by the original ejection velocity field. We have found a new family, among the Griquas locked in the 2/1 resonance ...

  15. Soil Strength Characteristics Along an Arable Eroded Slope

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG Xin-Hua; ZHANG Bin; ZHAO Qi-Guo; R. HORN

    2005-01-01

    Undisturbed soil cores were taken from different slope positions (upslope, backslope and footslope) and soil depths (0-15, 20-35 and 100-115 cm) in a soil catena derived from Quaternary red clay to determine the spatial changes in soil strength along the eroded slope and to evaluate an indicator to determine soil strength during compaction. Precompression stress, as an indicator of soil strength, significantly increased from topsoil layer to subsoil layer (P<0.05) and was affected by slope position. In the subsoil layer (20-35 cm), the precompression stress at the footslope position was significantly greater than at the backslope and upslope positions (P<0.05), while there were no significant differences at 0-15 and 100-115 cm. Precompression stress followed the spatial variation of soil clay content with soil depth and had a significant linear relationship with soil porosity (r2 = 0.40, P<0.01). Also, soil cohesion increased with increasing soil clay content.The precompression stress was significantly related to the applied stress corresponding to the highest change of pore water pressure (r2 = 0.69, P<0.01). These results suggested that soil strength induced by soil erosion and soil management varied spatially along the slope and the maximum change in pore water pressure during compaction could be an easy indicator to describe soil strength.

  16. Sculpting of an erodible body by flowing water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ristroph, Leif; Moore, Matthew N J; Childress, Stephen; Shelley, Michael J; Zhang, Jun

    2012-11-27

    Erosion by flowing fluids carves striking landforms on Earth and also provides important clues to the past and present environments of other worlds. In these processes, solid boundaries both influence and are shaped by the surrounding fluid, but the emergence of morphology as a result of this interaction is not well understood. We study the coevolution of shape and flow in the context of erodible bodies molded from clay and immersed in a fast, unidirectional water flow. Although commonly viewed as a smoothing process, we find that erosion sculpts pointed and cornerlike features that persist as the solid shrinks. We explain these observations using flow visualization and a fluid mechanical model in which the surface shear stress dictates the rate of material removal. Experiments and simulations show that this interaction ultimately leads to self-similarly receding boundaries and a unique front surface characterized by nearly uniform shear stress. This tendency toward conformity of stress offers a principle for understanding erosion in more complex geometries and flows, such as those present in nature.

  17. SCOUR DEPTH AND FLOW PATTERN OF ERODING PLANE JETS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A.KURNIAWAN; M.S.ALTINAKAR; W.H.GRAF

    2004-01-01

    Local scour may occur when a hydraulic structure is positioned in a channel with an erodible bed.Herewith investigated experimentally are the erosion and flow pattern due to a water jet passing over a channel bed at the asymptotic (final) state. The development of the scour hole, its maximum scour depth and length, are recorded and compared with available scour-depth relations. Two sets of experiments (see Table 1) were carried out. Set 1 (3 runs) was concerned with measuring the vertical instantaneous velocity distribution in the scour hole. The scour hole at the asymptotic (final) state, t ≈100 [h] was investigated. Set 2 (5 runs) was concerned with studying the physics of scouring. The scour hole at about mid-state, t ≈ 0.5 [h], was investigated; subsequently the scour-hole depth was linearly extended on the semi-log scale to 72 [h]; no velocity measurements were performed. The present data are put in context with some (popular) existing relations; recommended is a modification of some of these relations.

  18. Developing a parameterization approach of soil erodibility for the Rangeland Hydrology and Erosion Model (RHEM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soil erodibility is a key factor for estimating soil erosion using physically based models. In this study, a new parameterization approach for estimating erodibility was developed for the Rangeland Hydrology and Erosion Model (RHEM). The approach uses empirical equations that were developed by apply...

  19. Developing soil erodibility prediction equations for the Rangeland Hydrology and Erosion Model (RHEM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soil erodibility is a key factor for estimating soil erosion using physically based models. In this study, a new parameterization approach for estimating erodibility was developed for the Rangeland Hydrology and Erosion Model (RHEM). The approach uses empirical equations that were developed by apply...

  20. Pyrosequencing reveal distinct bacteria are carried in different wind eroded sediments from the same soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little is known about the microbial communities carried in wind-eroded sediments from various soil types and land management systems. A novel technique, named pyrosequencing, promises to expand our understanding of the vast microbial diversity of soils and eroded sediments as it can sequence between...

  1. Encyclopedia of the Arctic

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nuttall, M

    2005-01-01

    ..., physical processes, life sciences, and environmental change. This work is the result of over 375 international scholars and writers in all fields and relate to the eight Arctic countries: Canada, USA (Alaska), Greenland (Denmark...

  2. Arctic_Bathymetry

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Models project the Arctic Ocean will become undersaturated with respect to carbonate minerals in the next decade. Recent field results indicate parts may already be...

  3. Arctic_Bathymetry

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Models project the Arctic Ocean will become undersaturated with respect to carbonate minerals in the next decade. Recent field results indicate parts may already be...

  4. Arctic Bathymetry (batharcst)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The digitally compiled map includes geology, oil and gas field centerpoints, and geologic provinces of the Arctic (North Pole area encircled by 640 N Latitude). The...

  5. Arctic Geology (geoarcst)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The digitally compiled map includes geology, oil and gas field centerpoints, and geologic provinces of the Arctic (North Pole area encircled by 640 N Latitude). The...

  6. Arctic survey, 1957

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes a survey and game patrol conducted to twelve villages in the Arctic from April 24 to May 2 1957. The report covers animals take for income and...

  7. Arctic Collaborative Environment (ACE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    distribution is unlimited. Key Data Requirements • Sea Ice – Location: Area, Onset, Growth, Drift, and Decay – Characterization: % Coverage, Thickness...Cloud ACE Developmental Server hosted at UAHuntsville ACE User Community Public Internet Tailored Ice Product Generation (NIC) Arctic Research...distribution is unlimited. Arctic Map 26 July 2012 13 Multi-sensor Analyzed Sea Ice Extent; National Data Buoy Center DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A

  8. Arctic freshwater synthesis: Introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prowse, T.; Bring, A.; Mârd, J.; Carmack, E.

    2015-11-01

    In response to a joint request from the World Climate Research Program's Climate and Cryosphere Project, the International Arctic Science Committee, and the Arctic Council's Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Program, an updated scientific assessment has been conducted of the Arctic Freshwater System (AFS), entitled the Arctic Freshwater Synthesis (AFSΣ). The major reason for joint request was an increasing concern that changes to the AFS have produced, and could produce even greater, changes to biogeophysical and socioeconomic systems of special importance to northern residents and also produce extra-Arctic climatic effects that will have global consequences. Hence, the key objective of the AFSΣ was to produce an updated, comprehensive, and integrated review of the structure and function of the entire AFS. The AFSΣ was organized around six key thematic areas: atmosphere, oceans, terrestrial hydrology, terrestrial ecology, resources and modeling, and the review of each coauthored by an international group of scientists and published as separate manuscripts in this special issue of Journal of Geophysical Research-Biogeosciences. This AFSΣ—Introduction reviews the motivations for, and foci of, previous studies of the AFS, discusses criteria used to define the domain of the AFS, and details key characteristics of the definition adopted for the AFSΣ.

  9. Total petroleum hydrocarbons in sediments from the coastline and mangroves of the northern Persian Gulf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohebbi-Nozar, Seyedeh Laili; Zakaria, Mohamad Pauzi; Ismail, Wan Ruslan; Mortazawi, Mohammad Seddiq; Salimizadeh, Maryam; Momeni, Mohammad; Akbarzadeh, Gholamali

    2015-06-15

    To provide baseline information for the marine ecosystem of Hormozgan province, the distribution of petroleum hydrocarbons was evaluated in 52 stations involved in the mangrove and coastline ecosystem. Coastline sampling sites included areas facing harbor, river, domestic and industrial discharge. Sediment samples were analyzed based on ultraviolet fluorescence spectroscopy. Petroleum hydrocarbons showed narrow variations ranging from non-detectable (ND) to 1.71 and from 0.2 to 0.63μg/g dry weight for coastline and mangrove sediments, respectively. The detected concentrations for total petroleum hydrocarbons were lower than guideline values for ecological risk. Furthermore, the minimum environmental risk was confirmed by background levels for the Persian Gulf, the Sea of Oman, and detected values for reference areas. The results were regarded as background data in the studied area, and, considering the rapid expansion of activities related to the petroleum industry in Hormozgan province, the continuous monitoring of pollutants is recommended.

  10. Mechanism of seasonal Arctic sea ice evolution and Arctic amplification

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Kwang-Yul; Hamlington, Benjamin D.; Na, Hanna; Kim, Jinju

    2016-01-01

    Sea ice loss is proposed as a primary reason for the Arctic amplification, although the physical mechanism of the Arctic amplification and its connection with sea ice melting is still in debate. In the present study, monthly ERA-Interim reanalysis data are analyzed via cyclostationary empirical orthogonal function analysis to understand the seasonal mechanism of sea ice loss in the Arctic Ocean and the Arctic amplification. While sea ice loss is widespread over much of the p...

  11. Coastline change mapping using a spectral band method and Sobel edge operator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mansoori, Saeed; Al-Marzouqi, Fatima

    2016-10-01

    Coastline extraction has become an essential activity in wake of the natural disasters taking place in some regions such as tsunami, flooding etc. Salient feature of such catastrophes is lack of reaction time available for combating emergency, thus it is the endeavor of any country to develop constant monitoring mechanism of shorelines. This is a challenging task because of the magnitude of changes taking place to the coastline regularly. Previous research findings highlight a need of formulating automation driven methodology for timely and accurate detection of alterations in the coastline impacting sustainability of mankind operating in the coastal zone. In this study, we propose a new approach for automatic extraction of the coastline using remote sensing data. This approach is composed of three main stages. Firstly, classifying pixels of the image into two categories i.e. land and water body by applying two normalized difference indices i.e. Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) and Normalized Difference Water Index (NDWI). Then, the process of binary conversion of classified image takes place using a local threshold method. Finally, the coastline is extracted by applying Sobel edge operator with a pair of (3×3) kernels. The approach is tested using 2.5m DubaiSat-1 (DS1) and DubaiSat-2 (DS2) images captured to detect and monitor the changes occurring along Dubai coastal zone within a period of six years from 2009 till 2015. Experimental results prove that the approach is capable of extracting the coastlines from DS1 and DS2 images with moderate human interaction. The results of the study show an increase of 6% in Dubai shoreline resulting on account of numerous man-made infrastructure development projects in tourism and allied sectors.

  12. REMOTE SENSING APPLICATION OF THE GEOPHYSICAL CHANGES IN THE COASTLINES AND RIVERS OF ZAMBALES, PHILIPPINES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Paz-Alberto

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Geophysical changes in river outlet, river upstream and coastlines near the rivers of Bucao and Santo Tomas in Zambales, Philippines were analyzed using the Google Earth’s historical satellite imageries from 2004 to 2013. Data in 2015 were gathered from in situ field measurements ground validation. The study aimed to measure and determine changes in the width of river outlet, width of river bank upstream and shifting of coastline. Results revealed that there was a decrease and increase in the width size of the Bucao and Santo Tomas river outlets, respectively during the study period. Geophysical changes occurred in the two rivers due to the continuous supply of lahar as an after effect of the Mount Pinatubo eruption in 1991. Coastline positions near the two rivers also changed. The highest rate of erosion along the coastal area was prevalently observed near the river outlet of both rivers. Moreover, accretion was observed in the coastline of Santo Tomas and erosion phenomenon was observed in the North and South coastlines of Bucao River. The shifting was caused by natural processes such as erosion, sedimentation and natural calamities as well as anthropogenic processes such as reclamation/quarrying. Occurrence of erosion and sedimentation played active roles in the changes of coastlines during the study period. Furthermore, the upstream of the Bucao river changed physically due to deposits of lahar present in the upstream which are being discharged directly and continuously going down to the river. Generally, the width of the Bucao River upstream decreased its size because of the accumulated sediment in the riverbank. On the other hand, the observed erosion is caused by high velocity of river during heavy rains and typhoons. The width of the Santo Tomas river bank upstream did not change due to the construction of concrete dikes which prevent the lahar-filled river from breaching the embankment and flooding the agricultural, residential and

  13. Remote Sensing Application of the Geophysical Changes in the Coastlines and Rivers of Zambales, Philippines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paz-Alberto, Annie Melinda; Sison, Melissa Joy M.; Bulaong, Edmark Pablo; Pakaigue, Marietta A.

    2016-06-01

    Geophysical changes in river outlet, river upstream and coastlines near the rivers of Bucao and Santo Tomas in Zambales, Philippines were analyzed using the Google Earth's historical satellite imageries from 2004 to 2013. Data in 2015 were gathered from in situ field measurements ground validation. The study aimed to measure and determine changes in the width of river outlet, width of river bank upstream and shifting of coastline. Results revealed that there was a decrease and increase in the width size of the Bucao and Santo Tomas river outlets, respectively during the study period. Geophysical changes occurred in the two rivers due to the continuous supply of lahar as an after effect of the Mount Pinatubo eruption in 1991. Coastline positions near the two rivers also changed. The highest rate of erosion along the coastal area was prevalently observed near the river outlet of both rivers. Moreover, accretion was observed in the coastline of Santo Tomas and erosion phenomenon was observed in the North and South coastlines of Bucao River. The shifting was caused by natural processes such as erosion, sedimentation and natural calamities as well as anthropogenic processes such as reclamation/quarrying. Occurrence of erosion and sedimentation played active roles in the changes of coastlines during the study period. Furthermore, the upstream of the Bucao river changed physically due to deposits of lahar present in the upstream which are being discharged directly and continuously going down to the river. Generally, the width of the Bucao River upstream decreased its size because of the accumulated sediment in the riverbank. On the other hand, the observed erosion is caused by high velocity of river during heavy rains and typhoons. The width of the Santo Tomas river bank upstream did not change due to the construction of concrete dikes which prevent the lahar-filled river from breaching the embankment and flooding the agricultural, residential and commercial areas near

  14. Arctic Rabies – A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prestrud Pål

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Rabies seems to persist throughout most arctic regions, and the northern parts of Norway, Sweden and Finland, is the only part of the Arctic where rabies has not been diagnosed in recent time. The arctic fox is the main host, and the same arctic virus variant seems to infect the arctic fox throughout the range of this species. The epidemiology of rabies seems to have certain common characteristics in arctic regions, but main questions such as the maintenance and spread of the disease remains largely unknown. The virus has spread and initiated new epidemics also in other species such as the red fox and the racoon dog. Large land areas and cold climate complicate the control of the disease, but experimental oral vaccination of arctic foxes has been successful. This article summarises the current knowledge and the typical characteristics of arctic rabies including its distribution and epidemiology.

  15. Arctic dimension of global warming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. V. Alekseev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A brief assessment of the global warming in the Arctic climate system with the emphasis on sea ice is presented. The Arctic region is coupled to the global climate system by the atmosphere and ocean circulation that providesa major contribution to the Arctic energy budget. On this basis using of special indices it is shown that amplification of warming in the Arctic is associated with the increasing of meridional heat transport from the low latitudes.

  16. Assessment of soil erodibility and aggregate stability for different parts of a forest road

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Aidin Parsakhoo; Majid Lotfalian; Ataollah Kavian; Seyed Ataollah Hosseini

    2014-01-01

    We measured erodibility and mean weight diameter (MWD) of soil aggregates in different parts of a forest road. Samples of topsoil were collected from cutslope, fillslope, road surface and forest ground to assess the texture, bulk density, moisture, CaCO3 and organic matter. Soil aggregate stability was determined by wet sieving. Soil erodibility on the road surface was 2.3 and 1.3 times higher than on the fillslope and cutslope, respectively. The forest soil had the lowest erodibility. Aggregate stability of cutslope and road surface were low and very low, respectively. There was a significant negative relationship between cutslope erodibility with CaCO3 and sand content. Cutslope erodibility increased with increasing silt, clay and moisture content. On fillslopes, MWD increased with in-creasing rock fragment cover, plant cover, litter cover, organic matter and sand. There was a strong negative correlation between fillslope erodibility and organic matter, sand and MWD. There was no significant difference between erodibility of bare soil and soils beneathRubus hyrcanusL. and Philonotis marchica (Hedw.) Brid.

  17. EXTRACTION OF COASTLINES WITH FUZZY APPROACH USING SENTINEL-1 SAR IMAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Demir

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Coastlines are important features for water resources, sea products, energy resources etc. Coastlines are changed dynamically, thus automated methods are necessary for analysing and detecting the changes along the coastlines. In this study, Sentinel-1 C band SAR image has been used to extract the coastline with fuzzy logic approach. The used SAR image has VH polarisation and 10x10m. spatial resolution, covers 57 sqkm area from the south-east of Puerto-Rico. Additionally, radiometric calibration is applied to reduce atmospheric and orbit error, and speckle filter is used to reduce the noise. Then the image is terrain-corrected using SRTM digital surface model. Classification of SAR image is a challenging task since SAR and optical sensors have very different properties. Even between different bands of the SAR sensors, the images look very different. So, the classification of SAR image is difficult with the traditional unsupervised methods. In this study, a fuzzy approach has been applied to distinguish the coastal pixels than the land surface pixels. The standard deviation and the mean, median values are calculated to use as parameters in fuzzy approach. The Mean-standard-deviation (MS Large membership function is used because the large amounts of land and ocean pixels dominate the SAR image with large mean and standard deviation values. The pixel values are multiplied with 1000 to easify the calculations. The mean is calculated as 23 and the standard deviation is calculated as 12 for the whole image. The multiplier parameters are selected as a: 0.58, b: 0.05 to maximize the land surface membership. The result is evaluated using airborne LIDAR data, only for the areas where LIDAR dataset is available and secondly manually digitized coastline. The laser points which are below 0,5 m are classified as the ocean points. The 3D alpha-shapes algorithm is used to detect the coastline points from LIDAR data. Minimum distances are calculated between the

  18. Acquatorialities of the Arctic Region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harste, Gorm

    2013-01-01

    In order to describe the Arctic system I propose using a concept functionally equivalent to territoriality, namely aquatoriality. Whether communicating about territoriality or aquatoriality, concepts and delimitations are both contingent to forms of communication systems. I will distinguish betwe...... coding of the Arctic. These codes could then appear structurally coupled to a political system that in an organizational way appears in the Arctic Council...

  19. More Arctic research needed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, Susan

    The desire to achieve a balance between Arctic and Antarctic study was the message of the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation, which heard testimony on the need for more Arctic research on April 24. Ted Stevens (R-Alaska) noted that since 1986, study in the area has not increased as the National Science Foundation has claimed, but rather, owing to inflation, has merely kept pace. Robert Correll, assistant director of geosciences at NSF and chair of the Interagency Arctic Oceans Working Group, gave several reasons why the Arctic is an important area for study by the scientific community. Its unique environment, he said, makes it a natural laboratory. And due to its environmental sensitivity, it may provide one of the earliest indicators of global climate change. Also, its geographic location makes it a “window on space,” some of the world's largest mineral and petroleum resources are in the Arctic, and the region has great strategic and military importance.

  20. Arctic security and Norway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamnes, Rolf

    2013-03-01

    Global warming is one of the most serious threats facing mankind. Many regions and countries will be affected, and there will be many losers. The earliest and most intense climatic changes are being experienced in the Arctic region. Arctic average temperature has risen at twice the rate of the global average in the past half century. These changes provide an early indication for the world of the environmental and societal significance of global warming. For that reason, the Arctic presents itself as an important scientific laboratory for improving our understanding of the causes and patterns of climate changes. The rapidly rising temperature threatens the Arctic ecosystem, but the human consequences seem to be far less dramatic there than in many other places in the world. According to the U.S. National Intelligence Council, Russia has the potential to gain the most from increasingly temperate weather, because its petroleum reserves become more accessible and because the opening of an Arctic waterway could provide economic and commercial advantages. Norway might also be fortunate. Some years ago, the Financial Times asked: #Left Double Quotation Mark#What should Norway do about the fact that global warming will make their climate more hospitable and enhance their financial situation, even as it inflicts damage on other parts of the world?#Right Double Quotation Mark#(Author)

  1. On the ages of resonant, eroded and fossil asteroid families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milani, Andrea; Knežević, Zoran; Spoto, Federica; Cellino, Alberto; Novaković, Bojan; Tsirvoulis, Georgios

    2017-05-01

    In this work we have estimated 10 collisional ages of 9 families for which for different reasons our previous attempts failed. In general, these are difficult cases that required dedicated effort, such as a new family classifications for asteroids in mean motion resonances, in particular the 1/1 and 2/1 with Jupiter, as well as a revision of the classification inside the 3/2 resonance. Of the families locked in mean motion resonances, by employing a numerical calibration to estimate the Yarkovsky effect in proper eccentricity, we succeeded in determining ages of the families of (1911) Schubart and of the ;super-Hilda; family, assuming this is actually a severely eroded original family of (153) Hilda. In the Trojan region we found families with almost no Yarkovsky evolution, for which we could compute only physically implausible ages. Hence, we interpreted their modest dispersions of proper elements as implying that the Trojan asteroid families are fossil families, frozen at their proper elements determined by the original ejection velocity field. We have found a new family, among the Griquas locked in the 2/1 resonance with Jupiter, the family of (11097) 1994 UD1. We have estimated the ages of 6 families affected by secular resonances: families of (5) Astraea, (25) Phocaea, (283) Emma, (363) Padua, (686) Gersuind, and (945) Barcelona. By using in all these cases a numerical calibration method, we have shown that the secular resonances do not affect significantly the secular change of proper a. We have confirmed the existence of the family resulting from cratering on (5) Astraea by computing a new set of resonant proper elements adapted to the resonance g +g5 - 2g6 : this new family has a much larger membership and has a shape compatible with simple collisional models. For the family of (145) Adeona we could estimate the age only after removal of a number of assumed interlopers. With the present paper we have concluded the series dedicated to the determination of

  2. An object based approach for coastline extraction from Quickbird multispectral images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimiliano Basile Giannini

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Because of the reduced dimensions of pixels, in the last years high resolution satellite images (Quickbird, IKONOS, GeoEye, ….. are considered very important data to extract information for coastline monitoring and engineering opera planning. They can integrate detail topographic maps and aerial photos so to contribute to modifications recognition and coastal dynamics reconstruction. Many studies have been carried out on coastline detection from high resolution satellite images: unsupervised and supervised classification, segmentation, NDVI (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index and NDWI (Normalized Difference Water Index are only some of the methodological aspects that have been already considered and experimented. This paper is aimed to implement an object based approach to extract coastline from Quickbird multispectral imagery. Domitian area near Volturno River mouth in Campania Region (Italy, an interesting zone for its dynamics and evolution, is considered. Object based approach is developed for automatic detection of coastline from Quickbird imagery using the Feature Extraction Workflow implemented in ENVI Zoom software. The resulting vector polyline is performed using the smoothing algorithm named PAEK (Polynomial Approximation with Exponential Kernel.

  3. English Program Review at Coastline Community College, Fountain Valley, California. [A Preliminary Report, October 1988.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yglesias, Kenneth D., Comp.; Fry, Marilyn, Comp.

    Prepared as part of the program review process at California's Coastline Community College (CCC), this report describes and evaluates CCC's English Department, highlighting problems and successes from 1976 to 1987. Part I offers a narrative account of: (1) the changes that took place in the department between 1976 and 1987, focusing on early…

  4. Oregon's Ever-Changing Coastline. Another Title in the Series "Learning About the Ocean."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Barbara A.; Gabriel, Stephen R.

    This bulletin contains a non-technical introduction to the forces that change the coastline and how engineers can sometimes modify their effects with occasionally unpredicted consequences. This publication introduces the reader to the basic geology of the Oregon coast. Next, an explanation of wave action discussing the changes in a beach due to…

  5. Modelling internal boundary-layer development in a region with a complex coastline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Batchvarova, E.; Cai, X.; Gryning, Sven-Erik

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to test the ability of two quite different models to simulate the combined spatial and temporal variability of the internal boundary layer in an area of complex terrain and coastline during one day. The simple applied slab model of Gryning and Batchvarova, and the Col...

  6. Harlequin duck capture and EROD activity data from Prince William Sound, Alaska, 2011, 2013, 2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set includes capture information and ethoxyresorufin­O­deethylase (EROD) activity results for harlequin ducks sampled during March 2011, 2013, and 2014 in...

  7. Lightweight High Temperature Non-Eroding Throat Materials for Propulsion Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The innovation in this proposed effort is the development of lightweight, non-eroding nozzle materials for use in propulsion systems. Lightweight structures are...

  8. A new method to determine eroded areas in arid environment using Landsat satellite imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    A, Aydda; Ah, Algouti; Ab, Algouti; M, Essemani; Y, Taghya

    2014-06-01

    Erosion (by water or wind) is an increasing problem for many local authorities and government agencies throughout the world. The identification of eroded areas in arid and humid regions can be very useful for environmental planning and can help reduce soil and sediment degradation in these regions. In this work we present a new method to determine eroded areas in arid environment. In this method were explored lithological data to determine eroded areas. These data were collected in the field using GPS (Global Positioning System) checkpoints and geological maps. For that, two lithological maps of the study areas were analysed to determine lithological data change. Those two maps were obtained from the classification algorithm by applying the maximum likelihood on two Landsat satellite images. After images classification and validation a change detection technique was adopted to determine eroded areas. This method was applied in northern part of Atlantic Sahara desert to confirm their potentiality.

  9. Arctic Terrestrial Biodiversity Monitoring Plan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Tom; Payne, J.; Doyle, M.

    The Conservation of Arctic Flora and Fauna (CAFF), the biodiversity working group of the Arctic Council, established the Circumpolar Biodiversity Monitoring Program (CBMP) to address the need for coordinated and standardized monitoring of Arctic environments. The CBMP includes an international...... on developing and implementing long-term plans for monitoring the integrity of Arctic biomes: terrestrial, marine, freshwater, and coastal (under development) environments. The CBMP Terrestrial Expert Monitoring Group (CBMP-TEMG) has developed the Arctic Terrestrial Biodiversity Monitoring Plan (CBMP......-Terrestrial Plan/the Plan) as the framework for coordinated, long-term Arctic terrestrial biodiversity monitoring. The goal of the CBMP-Terrestrial Plan is to improve the collective ability of Arctic traditional knowledge (TK) holders, northern communities, and scientists to detect, understand and report on long...

  10. Human-induced Arctic moistening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Seung-Ki; Zhang, Xuebin; Zwiers, Francis

    2008-04-25

    The Arctic and northern subpolar regions are critical for climate change. Ice-albedo feedback amplifies warming in the Arctic, and fluctuations of regional fresh water inflow to the Arctic Ocean modulate the deep ocean circulation and thus exert a strong global influence. By comparing observations to simulations from 22 coupled climate models, we find influence from anthropogenic greenhouse gases and sulfate aerosols in the space-time pattern of precipitation change over high-latitude land areas north of 55 degrees N during the second half of the 20th century. The human-induced Arctic moistening is consistent with observed increases in Arctic river discharge and freshening of Arctic water masses. This result provides new evidence that human activity has contributed to Arctic hydrological change.

  11. Estimating eroded soil and predicting further erosion in Daisetsuzan National Park in Hokkaido, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Yusuke; Watanabe, Teiji

    2017-04-01

    This study has three objectives: (1) to estimate changes of the eroded volume of mountain trails from 2014 to 2016 by making DSMs, (2) to understand a relationship between the trail erosion and micro-topography, and (3) to predict the volume of soil that can be eroded in future. Trail erosion has been investigated near Mt. Hokkai-dake in Daisetzuzan National Park, Hokkaido, northern Japan, with a drone (UAV) from 2014 to 2016. Seven segments with the soil erosion from starting sites to ending sites were selected to make DSMs and Orthophotographs by Agisoft, which is one of the Structure from Motion (SfM) software. Then, at fourteen points in each of the seven segments were selected to estimate the volume of soil that can be eroded in the future by PANDA2, a soil compaction penetrometer. The eroded volume in the segment with the largest eroded value attained 274.67 m3 for the two-year period although extremely heavy rain hit this area in the 2016 summer. The result obtained by PANDA2 shows that soil more than 100 cm in depth will be potentially eroded at four points in three years to one hundred years.

  12. The sensitivity of Arctic sea ice production to shelf flooding during the early Holocene: a modelling study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaschek, M.; Renssen, H.

    2012-04-01

    During the last deglaciation, the global sea-level started rising, changing the coastlines from an early Holocene stand (40 m lower than today at approximately 10 kyr BP, Siddall et al., 2003) to modern day coastlines. Proxy evidence shows that this transgression occurred non-uniformly over the globe. For instance, Bauch et al. (2001) report for the Laptev Sea (Arctic Ocean), that the modern coastline was only established at 5 kyr BP after a fast transgression from the early Holocene, leading to a flooding of the extensive shelf area. This shelf area is presently regarded to be an important production zone of Arctic sea ice, playing an important role in the dynamics of sea ice in the Arctic, as well as its export to the Nordic Seas along the East Greenland Current (EGC). Through this sea ice export, changes in the Laptev Sea shelf area during the Holocene could potentially have had a substantial impact on the sea surface conditions of the EGC, and the Denmark Strait, which is known to be sensitive to sea ice. This is consistent with a rapid increase in sea ice export through the EGC around 5 kyr BP as reported by Jennings et al. (2002). In this study we investigate the impact of this Arctic shelf flooding on sea ice production in the Holocene, and on the climate of the Nordic Seas in the LOVECLIM1.2 global ocean-atmosphere-vegetation model. We present results of several experiments in which we study the sensitivity of Arctic sea ice production to various Arctic shelf areas under early Holocene conditions (9 kyr BP). We approach this by changing the land-sea mask to represent different lower-than-present sea-level coastlines. For example, we perform experiments with the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) land-sea mask, representing a lowering of the sea-level by 120 m, while keeping other forcings at 9 kyr BP. A further step is to modify selected areas in the Arctic, such as the Laptev Sea area, to examine the importance of different areas. Our results help to explain long

  13. Globalising the Arctic Climate:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Corry, Olaf

    2017-01-01

    This chapter uses an object-oriented approach to explore how the Arctic is being constituted as an object of global governance within an emerging ‘global polity’, partly through geoengineering plans and political visions ('imaginaries'). It suggests that governance objects—the socially constructe...... on world politics. The emergence of the Arctic climate as a potential target of governance provides a case in point. The Arctic climate is becoming globalised, pushing it up the political agenda but drawing it away from its local and regional context.......This chapter uses an object-oriented approach to explore how the Arctic is being constituted as an object of global governance within an emerging ‘global polity’, partly through geoengineering plans and political visions ('imaginaries'). It suggests that governance objects—the socially constructed...... targets of political operations and contestations—are not simple ‘issues’ or ‘problems’ given to actors to deal with. Governance-objects emerge and are constructed through science, technology and politics, and rather than slotting neatly into existing structures, they have their own structuring effects...

  14. Communicating Arctic Change (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serreze, M.

    2009-12-01

    Nowhere on the planet are emerging signals of climate change more visible than in the Arctic. Rapid warming, a quickly shrinking summer sea ice cover, and thawing permafrost, will have impacts that extend beyond the Arctic and may reverberate around the globe. The National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) of the University of Colorado has taken a leading role in trying to effectively communicate the science and importance of Arctic change. Our popular “Sea Ice News and Analysis” web site tracks the Arctic’s shrinking ice cover and provides scientific analysis with language that is accurate yet accessible to a wide audience. Our Education Center provides accessible information on all components of the Earth’s cryosphere, the changes being seen, and how scientists conduct research. A challenge faced by NSIDC is countering the increasing level of confusion and misinformation regarding Arctic and global change, a complex problem that reflects the low level of scientific literacy by much of the public, the difficulties many scientists face in communicating their findings in accurate but understandable terms, and efforts by some groups to deliberately misrepresent and distort climate change science. This talk will outline through examples ways in which NSIDC has been successful in science communication and education, as well as lessons learned from failures.

  15. Arctic Sea Ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroeve, J. C.; Fetterer, F.; Knowles, K.; Meier, W.; Serreze, M.; Arbetter, T.

    2004-12-01

    Of all the recent observed changes in the Arctic environment, the reduction of sea ice cover stands out most prominantly. Several independent analysis have established a trend in Arctic ice extent of -3% per decade from the late 1970s to the late 1990s, with a more pronounced trend in summer. The overall downward trend in ice cover is characterized by strong interannual variability, with a low September ice extent in one year typically followed by recovery the next September. Having two extreme minimum years, such as what was observed in 2002 and 2003 is unusual. 2004 marks the third year in a row of substantially below normal sea ice cover in the Arctic. Early summer 2004 appeared unusual in terms of ice extent, with May a record low for the satellite period (1979-present) and June also exhibiting below normal ice extent. August 2004 extent is below that of 2003 and large reductions in ice cover are observed once again off the coasts of Siberia and Alaska and the Greenland Sea. Neither the 2002 or 2003 anomaly appeared to be strongly linked to the positive phase of the Arctic Oscillation (AO) during the preceding winter. Similarly, the AO was negative during winter 2003/2004. In the previous AO framework of Rigor et al (2002), a positive winter AO implied preconditioning of the ice cover to extensive summer decay. In this hypothesis, the AO does not explain all aspects of the recent decline in Arctic ice cover, such as the extreme minima of 2002, 2003 and 2004. New analysis by Rigor and Wallace (2004) suggest that the very positive AO state from 1989-1995 can explain the recent sea ice minima in terms of changes in the Arctic surface wind field associated with the previous high AO state. However, it is also reasonable to expect that a general decrease in ice thickness accompanying warming would manifest itself as greater sensitivity of the ice pack to wind forcings and albedo feedbacks. The decrease in multiyear ice and attendant changes in ice thickness

  16. The Arctic Circle

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Siobhan

    2016-04-01

    My name is Siobhan McDonald. I am a visual artist living and working in Dublin. My studio is based in The School of Science at University College Dublin where I was Artist in Residence 2013-2015. A fascination with time and the changeable nature of landmass has led to ongoing conversations with scientists and research institutions across the interweaving disciplines of botany, biology and geology. I am developing a body of work following a recent research trip to the North Pole where I studied the disappearing landscape of the Arctic. Prompted by my experience of the Arctic shelf receding, this new work addresses issues of the instability of the earth's materiality. The work is grounded in an investigation of material processes, exploring the dynamic forces that transform matter and energy. This project combines art and science in a fascinating exploration of one of the Earth's last relatively untouched wilderness areas - the High Arctic to bring audiences on journeys to both real and artistically re-imagined Arctic spaces. CRYSTALLINE'S pivotal process is collaboration: with The European Space Agency; curator Helen Carey; palaeontologist Prof. Jenny McElwain, UCD; and with composer Irene Buckley. CRYSTALLINE explores our desire to make corporeal contact with geological phenomena in Polar Regions. From January 2016, in my collaboration with Jenny McElwain, I will focus on the study of plants and atmospheres from the Arctic regions as far back as 400 million years ago, to explore the essential 'nature' that, invisible to the eye, acts as imaginary portholes into other times. This work will be informed by my arctic tracings of sounds and images recorded in the glaciers of this disappearing frozen landscape. In doing so, the urgencies around the tipping of natural balances in this fragile region will be revealed. The final work will emerge from my forthcoming residency at the ESA in spring 2016. Here I will conduct a series of workshops in ESA Madrid to work with

  17. Tsunami in the Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulikov, Evgueni; Medvedev, Igor; Ivaschenko, Alexey

    2017-04-01

    The severity of the climate and sparsely populated coastal regions are the reason why the Russian part of the Arctic Ocean belongs to the least studied areas of the World Ocean. In the same time intensive economic development of the Arctic region, specifically oil and gas industry, require studies of potential thread natural disasters that can cause environmental and technical damage of the coastal and maritime infrastructure of energy industry complex (FEC). Despite the fact that the seismic activity in the Arctic can be attributed to a moderate level, we cannot exclude the occurrence of destructive tsunami waves, directly threatening the FEC. According to the IAEA requirements, in the construction of nuclear power plants it is necessary to take into account the impact of all natural disasters with frequency more than 10-5 per year. Planned accommodation in the polar regions of the Russian floating nuclear power plants certainly requires an adequate risk assessment of the tsunami hazard in the areas of their location. Develop the concept of tsunami hazard assessment would be based on the numerical simulation of different scenarios in which reproduced the hypothetical seismic sources and generated tsunamis. The analysis of available geological, geophysical and seismological data for the period of instrumental observations (1918-2015) shows that the highest earthquake potential within the Arctic region is associated with the underwater Mid-Arctic zone of ocean bottom spreading (interplate boundary between Eurasia and North American plates) as well as with some areas of continental slope within the marginal seas. For the Arctic coast of Russia and the adjacent shelf area, the greatest tsunami danger of seismotectonic origin comes from the earthquakes occurring in the underwater Gakkel Ridge zone, the north-eastern part of the Mid-Arctic zone. In this area, one may expect earthquakes of magnitude Mw ˜ 6.5-7.0 at a rate of 10-2 per year and of magnitude Mw ˜ 7.5 at a

  18. Some discussions on Arctic vortex

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Hai; Sun Lantao; Wu Huiding; Li Xiang

    2006-01-01

    The Arctic vortex is a persistent large-scale cyclonic circulation in the middle and upper troposphere and the stratosphere. Its activity and variation control the semi-permanent active centers of Pan-Arctic and the short-time cyclone activity in the subarctic areas. Its strength variation, which directly relates to the atmosphere, ocean, sea ice and ecosystem of the Arctic, can affect the lower atmospheric circulation, the weather of subarctic area and even the weather of middle latitude areas. The 2003 Chinese Second Arctic Research Expedition experienced the transition of the stratosphereic circulation from a warm anticyclone to a cold cyclone during the ending period of Arctic summertime, a typical establishing process of the polar vortex circulation. The impact of the polar vortex variation on the low-level circulation has been investigated by some scientists through studying the coupling mechanisms of the stratosphere and troposphere. The impact of the Stratospheric Sudden Warming (SFW) events on the polar vortex variation was drawing people's great attention in the fifties of the last century. The Arctic Oscillation (AO) , relating to the variation of the Arctic vortex, has been used to study the impact of the Arctic vortex on climate change. The recent Arctic vortex studies are simply reviewed and some discussions on the Arctic vertex are given in the paper. Some different views and questions are also discussed.

  19. Arctic ice islands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sackinger, W.M.; Jeffries, M.O.; Lu, M.C.; Li, F.C.

    1988-01-01

    The development of offshore oil and gas resources in the Arctic waters of Alaska requires offshore structures which successfully resist the lateral forces due to moving, drifting ice. Ice islands are floating, a tabular icebergs, up to 60 meters thick, of solid ice throughout their thickness. The ice islands are thus regarded as the strongest ice features in the Arctic; fixed offshore structures which can directly withstand the impact of ice islands are possible but in some locations may be so expensive as to make oilfield development uneconomic. The resolution of the ice island problem requires two research steps: (1) calculation of the probability of interaction between an ice island and an offshore structure in a given region; and (2) if the probability if sufficiently large, then the study of possible interactions between ice island and structure, to discover mitigative measures to deal with the moving ice island. The ice island research conducted during the 1983-1988 interval, which is summarized in this report, was concerned with the first step. Monte Carlo simulations of ice island generation and movement suggest that ice island lifetimes range from 0 to 70 years, and that 85% of the lifetimes are less then 35 years. The simulation shows a mean value of 18 ice islands present at any time in the Arctic Ocean, with a 90% probability of less than 30 ice islands. At this time, approximately 34 ice islands are known, from observations, to exist in the Arctic Ocean, not including the 10-meter thick class of ice islands. Return interval plots from the simulation show that coastal zones of the Beaufort and Chukchi Seas, already leased for oil development, have ice island recurrences of 10 to 100 years. This implies that the ice island hazard must be considered thoroughly, and appropriate safety measures adopted, when offshore oil production plans are formulated for the Alaskan Arctic offshore. 132 refs., 161 figs., 17 tabs.

  20. Islands of the Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowdeswell, Julian; Hambrey, Michael

    2002-11-01

    The Arctic islands are characterized by beautiful mountains and glaciers, in which the wildlife lives in delicate balance with its environment. It is a fragile region with a long history of exploration and exploitation that is now experiencing rapid environmental change. All of these themes are explored in Islands of the Arctic, a richly illustrated volume with superb photographs from the Canadian Arctic archipelago, Greenland, Svalbard and the Russian Arctic. It begins with the various processes shaping the landscape: glaciers, rivers and coastal processes, the role of ice in the oceans and the weather and climate. Julian Dowdeswell and Michael Hambrey describe the flora and fauna in addition to the human influences on the environment, from the sustainable approach of the Inuit, to the devastating damage inflicted by hunters and issues arising from the presence of military security installations. Finally, they consider the future prospects of the Arctic islands Julian Dowdeswell is Director of the Scott Polar Research Institute and Professor of Physical Geography at 0he University of Cambridge. He received the Polar Medal from Queen Elizabeth for his contributions to the study of glacier geophysics and the Gill Memorial Award from the Royal Geographical Society. He is chair of the Publications Committee of the International Glaciological Society and head of the Glaciers and Ice Sheets Division of the International Commission for Snow and Ice. Michael Hambrey is Director of the Centre for Glaciology at the University of Wales, Aberystwyth. A past recipient of the Polar Medal, he was also given the Earth Science Editors' Outstanding Publication Award for Glaciers (Cambridge University Press). Hambrey is also the author of Glacial Environments (British Columbia, 1994).

  1. Complex coastlines responding to climate change: do shoreline shapes reflect present forcing or "remember" the distant past?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Christopher W.; Murray, A. Brad; Ashton, Andrew D.; Hurst, Martin D.; Barkwith, Andrew K. A. P.; Ellis, Michael A.

    2016-12-01

    A range of planform morphologies emerge along sandy coastlines as a function of offshore wave climate. It has been implicitly assumed that the morphological response time is rapid compared to the timescales of wave climate change, meaning that coastal morphologies simply reflect the extant wave climate. This assumption has been explored by focussing on the response of two distinctive morphological coastlines - flying spits and cuspate capes - to changing wave climates, using a coastline evolution model. Results indicate that antecedent conditions are important in determining the evolution of morphologies, and that sandy coastlines can demonstrate hysteresis behaviour. In particular, antecedent morphology is particularly important in the evolution of flying spits, with characteristic timescales of morphological adjustment on the order of centuries for large spits. Characteristic timescales vary with the square of aspect ratios of capes and spits; for spits, these timescales are an order of magnitude longer than for capes (centuries vs. decades). When wave climates change more slowly than the relevant characteristic timescales, coastlines are able to adjust in a quasi-equilibrium manner. Our results have important implications for the management of sandy coastlines where decisions may be implicitly and incorrectly based on the assumption that present-day coastlines are in equilibrium with current conditions.

  2. Detecting coastline change with all available Landsat data: a case study for the State of Texas, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, N.; Gong, P.

    2016-12-01

    Tracking coastline change is essential to deepen our understanding of coastal responses to rises in sea level and human activity. In general, more frequent observations are needed for better estimation of the long-term trend due to high short-term variability of coastline position caused by water level fluctuation, seasonal variation, rapid storm erosion, subsequent recovery and other factors. Limited observations have been adopted in many conventional studies, and the coastline change rates obtained from remotely sensed data tends to exhibit large uncertainty. Hence, the purpose of this paper is to collect all available Landsat TM data for improved estimation of the rate of coastline change. The State of Texas was chosen as our study area and all Landsat TM data during the period 1984-2011 were used to derive the change rates. The rates of change were calculated with a simple linear regression model after extracting multi-temporal coastlines using a threshold-based approach. To demonstrate the importance of frequent observations, the results derived from all available Landsat data and from one scene per year were compared. In addition, a significant negative correlation between the observation frequency and the uncertainty of change was uncovered by gradually reducing the used data. The rates of coastline change in Texas varied from -23.73 to 22.90 m/yr with a regionally averaged rate of -0.62 0.021 m/yr, which indicates that the coastline mainly experienced erosion from 1984 to 2011. Specifically, 56.54 % of the entire coastline retreated to the land while a 43.46% portion advanced to the ocean. Overall, our study emphasizes that increasing the observation frequency can effectively improve the accuracy of coastline change rate.

  3. Overarching perspectives of contemporary and future ecosystems in the Arctic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wassmann, Paul

    2015-12-01

    The Arctic region has a number of specific characteristics that provide the region an exceptional global position. It comprises 5% of the earth surface, 1% of world ocean volume, 3% of world ocean area, 25% of world continental shelf, 35% of world coastline, 11% of global river runoff and 20 of worlds 100 longest rivers. The Arctic region encompasses only 0.05% of the global population, but 22% undiscovered petroleum, 15% of global petroleum production, many metals and non-metals resources and support major global fisheries (60 and 80°N). In times of increasing resource demand and limitation the world focuses increasingly onto the Arctic Ocean (AO) and adjacent regions. This development is emphasised by the recent awareness of rapid climate change in the AO, the most significant on the globe, and has resulted in increased attention to the oceanography of the high north. The loss of Arctic sea ice has emerged as a leading signal of global warming. It is taking place at a rate 2-3 times faster than global rates and sea-ice cover has decreased more than 10% per decade, while sea-ice volume may have been reduced by minimum 40% over the last 30 years (Meier et al., 2014). The reduction of ice cover and thickness makes the region available for commercial interest. The region drives also critical effects on the biophysical, political and economic system of the Northern Hemisphere (e.g., Grambling, 2015). These striking changes in physical forcing have left marine ecological footprints of climate change in the Arctic ecosystem (Wassmann et al., 2011). However, predicting the future of the pan-Arctic ecosystem remains a challenge not only because of the ever-accelerating nature of both physical and biological alterations, but also because of lack of marine ecological knowledge, that is staggering for the majority of regions (except the Barents, Chukchi and Beaufort seas).

  4. Determination of the factors governing soil erodibility using hyperspectral visible and near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guoqiang; Fang, Qingqing; Teng, Yanguo; Yu, Jingshan

    2016-12-01

    Soil erodibility, which is difficult to estimate and upscaling, was determined in this study using multiple spectral models of soil properties (soil organic matter (SOM), water-stable aggregates (WSA) > 0.25 mm, the geometric mean radius (Dg)). Herein, the soil erodibility indicators were calculated, and soil properties were quantitatively analyzed based on laboratory simulation experiments involving two selected contrasting soils. In addition, continuous wavelet transformation was applied to the reflectance spectra (350-2500 nm) of 65 soil samples from the study area. To build the relationship, the soil properties that control erodibility were identified prior to the spectral analysis. In this study, the SOM, Dg and WSA >0.25 mm were selected to represent the most significant soil properties controlling erodibility and describe the erodibility indicator based on a logarithmic regression model as a function of SOM or WSA > 0.25 mm. Five, six and three wavelet features were observed to calibrate the estimated soil properties model, and the best performance was obtained with a combination feature regression model for SOM (R2 = 0.86, p 0.25 mm (R2 = 0.61, p 0.25 mm and Dg were not significantly different compared with the calibrated dataset. The synthesized spectral models of soil properties, and the formation of a new equation for soil erodibility transformed from the spectral models of soil properties are presented in this study. These results show that a spectral analytical approach can be applied to complex datasets and provide new insights into emerging dynamic variation with erodibility estimation.

  5. Arctic Terrestrial Biodiversity Monitoring Plan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Tom; Payne, J.; Doyle, M.

    The Conservation of Arctic Flora and Fauna (CAFF), the biodiversity working group of the Arctic Council, established the Circumpolar Biodiversity Monitoring Program (CBMP) to address the need for coordinated and standardized monitoring of Arctic environments. The CBMP includes an international...... network of scientists, conservation organizations, government agencies, Permanent Participants Arctic community experts and leaders. Using an ecosystem-based monitoring approach which includes species, ecological functions, ecosystems, their interactions, and potential drivers, the CBMP focuses...... on developing and implementing long-term plans for monitoring the integrity of Arctic biomes: terrestrial, marine, freshwater, and coastal (under development) environments. The CBMP Terrestrial Expert Monitoring Group (CBMP-TEMG) has developed the Arctic Terrestrial Biodiversity Monitoring Plan (CBMP...

  6. Development of integrated marine monitoring network on southern coastline of Caspian sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Najafi-Jilani

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring of water surfaces through permanent measurement of hydrodynamic and meteorological data is one of the main requirements in safe and sustainable water management. The Caspian Sea, the major surface water body in Iran, significantly affects more than 600 km of urban and industrial coastline. In the present work, an integrated marine monitoring network for the entire southern coastline of the Caspian Sea was developed. The main design concerns centered on the network measuring components and data recording, checking, filtering, gap recognition, and transferring systems. Four coastal monitoring stations were assigned, along with two regional collecting stations and one central data station for gathering, checking and delivering recorded data at different access levels. Applicable guidelines on selection of measuring devices for both shallow and deep water zones are presented herein.

  7. Formation of coastline features by large-scale instabilities induced by high-angle waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashton, A; Murray, A B; Arnault, O

    2001-11-15

    Along shore sediment transport that is driven by waves is generally assumed to smooth a coastline. This assumption is valid for small angles between the wave crest lines and the shore, as has been demonstrated in shoreline models. But when the angle between the waves and the shoreline is sufficiently large, small perturbations to a straight shoreline will grow. Here we use a numerical model to investigate the implications of this instability mechanism for large-scale morphology over long timescales. Our simulations show growth of coastline perturbations that interact with each other to produce large-scale features that resemble various kinds of natural landforms, including the capes and cuspate forelands observed along the Carolina coast of southeastern North America. Wind and wave data from this area support our hypothesis that such an instability mechanism could be responsible for the formation of shoreline features at spatial scales up to hundreds of kilometres and temporal scales up to millennia.

  8. A quantitative analysis of microplastic pollution along the south-eastern coastline of South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nel, H A; Froneman, P W

    2015-12-15

    The extent of microplastic pollution (coastline of South Africa, looking at whether bays are characterised by higher microplastic densities than open stretches of coastline in both beach sediment and surf-zone water. Microplastic (mean ± standard error) densities in the beach sediment ranged between 688.9 ± 348.2 and 3308 ± 1449 particles · m(-2), while those in the water column varied between 257.9 ± 53.36 and 1215 ± 276.7 particles · m(-3). With few exceptions there were no significant spatial patterns in either the sediment or water column microplastic densities; with little differences in density between bays and the open coast (P>0.05). These data indicate that the presence of microplastics were not associated with proximity to land-based sources or population density, but rather is governed by water circulation.

  9. The Fight Against Emissaries across the Black Sea Coastline Area (1834–1847 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir B. Karataev

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The article on the basis of archival sources examines the work of foreign emissaries on the Black Sea coastline in 1834-1847 years. The significant part of sources is introduced into scientific circulation for the first time. The importance is given to the activities of foreign agents, their life among the hillmen, and methods of fighting of the Russian administration with foreign agents. The author comes to the conclusion that in the period of 1834-1847 years, on the Black Sea coastline the emissaries were carried out the diverse activities aimed against the Russian Empire. This activity was shown at the instigation of the hillmen for the war against Russia, the spread of false information, work as instructors, as well as to the personal involvement of emissaries in fighting.

  10. Spatial and temporal distribution of mercury and methylmercury in bivalves from the French coastline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briant, N; Chouvelon, T; Martinez, L; Brach-Papa, C; Chiffoleau, J F; Savoye, N; Sonke, J; Knoery, J

    2017-01-30

    Marine mercury (Hg) concentrations have been monitored in the French coastline for the last half a century using bivalves. The analyses presented in this study concerned 192 samples of bivalves (mussels: Mytilus edulis and Mytilus galloprovincialis and oysters: Crassostrea gigas and Isognomon alatus) from 77 sampling stations along the French coast and in the French Antilles sea. The goals of this study were to assess MeHg levels in various common bivalves from French coastline, and to identify possible geographic, taxonomic or temporal variations of concentrations. We show that the evolution of methylmercury (MeHg) concentrations covary with total mercury (HgT) concentrations. Moreover, in most of the study sites, HgT concentrations have not decreased since 1987, despite regulations to decrease or ban mercury used for anthropic activities.

  11. A Study on Coastline Extraction and Its Trend Based on Remote Sensing Image Data Mining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, data mining theory is applied to carry out the field of the pretreatment of remote sensing images. These results show that it is an effective method for carrying out the pretreatment of low-precision remote sensing images by multisource image matching algorithm with SIFT operator, geometric correction on satellite images at scarce control points, and other techniques; the result of the coastline extracted by the edge detection method based on a chromatic aberration Canny operator has a height coincident with the actual measured result; we found that the coastline length of China is predicted to increase in the future by using the grey prediction method, with the total length reaching up to 19,471,983 m by 2015.

  12. Detection and Analysis of Coastline and Landuse Change from 1960 to 2012 in Pearl River Delta, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Wang; Cao, Wenfang; Wu, Zhifeng; Tarolli, Paolo; Jia, Peng

    2017-04-01

    Coastline is the sea-land demarcation line in coastal regions. The position and shape of coastline depends on various natural and anthropogenic factors. The change of coastline exerts obvious influence on environment and economy in coastal regions. Therefore, it is important to detect and analysis the change of coastline and landuse for coastal environment and sustainable development. Pearl River Delta (PRD) is one of the most prosperous and fastest growing regions in China. The coastline and landuse in PRD have changed remarkably and continuously during the past decades. In this research, the change of coastline and landuse during 1960 to 2012 was detected with RS and GIS. Furthermore, coastline characteristics of temporal and spatial variation were analyzed with quantitative and spatial approach. And the relationship between the changes of coastline and landuse was explored. Therefore, the impact that urban expansion brought to landscape in coastal zone could be quantitatively analyzed. Finally, local government management on coastal wetland was discussed. The main outcomes of this research are summarized in the following points: (1) The length of coastline in PRD increased from 1134.95km to 1508.02km with annul increasing speed of 7.17km/a. Relatively, the coastline changed more obvious in three period (2004 2006, 2006 2008 and 2008 2010).The annual average change rate of coastline in the three period were -3.45%, 2.85% and 2.98%, respectively. After 2010, the speed of coastline change in PRD became lower. (2) The coastline had a greater increasing amount in the cities of Zhuhai, Guangzhou and Shenzhen, where the length of coastline increased 60.81%, 22.00%and 19.71%, respectively. (3) Nansha in Guangzhou, south Zhuhai and Qianhai in Shenzhen gained more newly-added land than any other area in PRD. Their land area increased from 172.34km2 to 303.22km2, 344.70km2 to 603.29km2 and89.62km2 to 145.49km2, respectively. (4) In PRD, construction land expanded 33 times

  13. ESPC Regional Arctic Prediction System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-30

    the Navy the capability to conduct short-term (1 week) to extended (2 weeks) coupled weather forecasts for the Arctic region. APPROACH To...sensitivity of the Arctic weather forecast to key numerical parameters; and 5) conduct extensive validation and verification of the coupled system and...SEP 2014 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2014 to 00-00-2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE ESPC Regional Arctic Prediction System 5a. CONTRACT

  14. Probabilistic projection of sea-level change along the world's coastlines

    OpenAIRE

    Perrette, M.; F. Landerer; Riva, R.; Frieler, K.; Meinshausen, M.

    2012-01-01

    Climate change causes global mean sea level to rise due to thermal expansion of seawater and loss of land ice from mountain glaciers, ice caps and ice-sheets. Locally, sea-level changes can strongly deviate from the global mean due to ocean dynamics. In addition, gravitational adjustments redistribute seawater away from shrinking ice masses, an effect currently not incorporated in climate models. Here, we provide probabilistic projections of sea level changes along the world's coastlines for ...

  15. Assessment of impacts and vulnerability to India's coastline due to climate change

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Unnikrishnan, A.S.

    from infrastructure development, pollution, etc. threatening this sector. Climate change will enhance such already existing problems. One of the impacts of global warming is the increase in sea level. Estimates of sea-level rise along the Indian...- ence, impacts and vulnerability along the Indian coasts has been low. India has a long coastline of about 7500 km and the livelihood of many depends on the activities related to the coast. There are already many anthropogenic problems varying...

  16. A numerical model of coastline deformation for sandy beach at downstream of a jetty

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Linyun; PAN Junning; XING Fu; LIU Jiaju

    2004-01-01

    A reformed numerical model based on the "one-line theory" for beach deformation is presented. In this model, thechange of beach slope during coastline procession is eonsidered. A wave numerical model combined with wave re-fraction, diffraction and reflection is used to simulate wave climate to increase numerical accuracy. The results showthat the numerical model has a good precision based on the adequate field data. The results can be applied to practical engineering.

  17. Holocene evolution of Dahab coastline - Gulf of Aqaba, Sinai Peninsula, Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magdy, Torab

    2016-04-01

    Dahab was a little Bedouin-village in Sinai Peninsula at the mid-western coast of Gulf of Aqaba approx. 90 km north of Sharm-el-Sheikh City and it means "gold" in Arabic language. But in the past 20 years ago it becomes one of the most tourist sites in Egypt. The basement complex is composed mostly of biotiteaplite-granite, mica-aplitegranite, granodiorite, quartzdiorite, alaskite, and diorite. Based on correlation with similar igneous in the most southern part of Sinai and the Red Sea area. Wadi Dahab composed of igneous and metamorphic rocks and the coastline is formed of the fragments of its rocks, mixed with fragments of coral reef and fluvial deposits of Wadi Dahab. The morphology of Dahab coastline is characterized by hooked marine spit, which composed of fluvial sediments carried by marine current from wadi Dahab mouth, this spit encloses shallow lagoon, but the active deposition on the lagoon bottom will evaluate it into saline marsh. This paper dealing with the evolution of Dahab spit and lagoon during the Holocene in addition to the recent time for last 100 years, and it impacts of the future management of the coast area. The coastline mapping during the period of study depends upon GIS technique for data were collected during field measuring by using total station, aerial photo and satellite image interpretation as well as soil sample dating. Suggested geomorphological evolution of Dahab area during the Holocene depending upon geomorphic investigation of the sedimentological process into 6 stages.

  18. Japan’s arctic policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitry V. Streltsov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: The article is devoted to the public policy of modern Japan in the Arctic. The Japanese government has put forward clear and well-specifi ed targets of the intensifi cation of Japan’s efforts in the economic development of the Arctic region. Among the priorities of the Arctic policy one should mention such areas as the development of maritime transportation, development of hydrocarbon deposits of the Arctic shelf, sea fi shing, as well as the preservation and increase of the sea bioresources.

  19. Arctic River organic matter transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, Peter; Gustafsson, Orjan; Vonk, Jorien; Spencer, Robert; McClelland, Jim

    2016-04-01

    Arctic Rivers have unique hydrology and biogeochemistry. They also have a large impact on the Arctic Ocean due to the large amount of riverine inflow and small ocean volume. With respect to organic matter, their influence is magnified by the large stores of soil carbon and distinct soil hydrology. Here we present a recap of what is known of Arctic River organic matter transport. We will present a summary of what is known of the ages and sources of Arctic River dissolved and particulate organic matter. We will also discuss the current status of what is known about changes in riverine organic matter export due to global change.

  20. Soil Erodibility for Water Pollution Management of Melaka Watershed in Peninsular Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Ibrahim Adham

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The relationships between surface runoffand soil erodibility are significant in water pollution and watershed management practices. Land use pattern, soil series and slope percentage are also major factors to develop the relationships. Daily rainfall data were collected and analyzed for variations in precipitation for calculating the surface runoff of these watersheds and surface runoff map was produced by GIS tools. Tew equation was utilized to predict soil erodibility of watershed soils.Results indicated that the weighted curve number varies from 82 to 85 and monthly runoff 23% to 30% among the five watersheds. Soil erodibility varies from 0.038 to 0.06 ton/ha (MJ.mm/ha/h. Linau-Telok-Local Alluvium, Malacca-Munchong, Munchong-Malacca-Serdang and Malacca-Munchong-Tavy are the dominant soil series of this region having the average soil erodibility of about 0.042 ton/ha (MJ.mm/ha/h. The main focus of this study is to provide the information of soil erodibility to reduce the water pollution of a watershed.

  1. The Arctic Circle Revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Colomo, F

    2007-01-01

    The problem of limit shapes in the six-vertex model with domain wall boundary conditions is addressed by considering a specially tailored bulk correlation function, the emptiness formation probability. A closed expression of this correlation function is given, both in terms of certain determinant and multiple integral, which allows for a systematic treatment of the limit shapes of the model for full range of values of vertex weights. Specifically, we show that for vertex weights corresponding to the free-fermion line on the phase diagram, the emptiness formation probability is related to a one-matrix model with a triple logarithmic singularity, or Triple Penner model. The saddle-point analysis of this model leads to the Arctic Circle Theorem, and its generalization to the Arctic Ellipses, known previously from domino tilings.

  2. Research with Arctic peoples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, H Sally; Bjerregaard, Peter; Chan, Hing Man

    2006-01-01

    of environmental and health issues that are unique to the Arctic regions, and research exploring these issues offers significant opportunities, as well as challenges. On July 28-29, 2004, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute and the Canadian Institutes of Health Research co-sponsored a working group...... entitled "Research with Arctic Peoples: Unique Research Opportunities in Heart, Lung, Blood and Sleep Disorders". The meeting was international in scope with investigators from Greenland, Iceland and Russia, as well as Canada and the United States. Multiple health agencies from Canada and the United States...... sent representatives. Also attending were representatives from the International Union for Circumpolar Health (IUCH) and the National Indian Health Board. The working group developed a set of ten recommendations related to research opportunities in heart, lung, blood and sleep disorders; obstacles...

  3. Spatial-temporal coastline evolution of the old Yellow River delta,northern Jiangsu Province%苏北废黄河三角洲海岸线历史时空演化研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐伟; 彭修强; 贾培宏; 王敏京

    2014-01-01

    The old Yellow River delta is associated with muddy coastlines and one of the most severe erosion areas in China.Based on the regional topographic maps,charts,historical atlas,satellite remote sensing images and historical literature,a geodatabase of coastlines was established by GIS/RS technology and statistic principles.Quantitative in-formation of coastline changes was synthesized by using the superposition of different periods of coastline data.The coastlines in consideration have experienced a stable stage from the Chunqiu Period to Northern Song Dynasty and a rapid progradation after Northern Song Dynasty;since then,the coastlines were subj ected to another retreating event and become presently gradually stabilized.This process was under the control of the Yellow River changing its course.Since 1989,the main eroding area is located between the Zhongshan River mouth to the Biandan River mouth.Retrogradation rate varied in different parts,which is lower in the north of the old Yellow River mouth than in the south.North of the Zhongshang River mouth and south of the Kuatao River mouth are siltation dominated. These differences were affected by coastal topography and human activities.%苏北废黄河三角洲属淤泥质海岸类型,是我国海岸侵蚀严重的地区之一.本文根据地形图、海图、历史地图、遥感影像及历史文献等资料,应用 GIS/RS技术及数理统计原理,对废黄河三角洲海岸线空间演化特征进行定量分析,以研究历史时期以来苏北废黄河三角洲岸线的整体演变特征.自春秋以来,废黄河三角洲海岸线经历了春秋至北宋的相对稳定,北宋后快速向海推进,再向陆侵蚀内移并逐渐趋于稳定的过程,这一过程主要受黄河南徙与北归的控制.1989年以来,中山河口至扁担河口岸段是主要侵蚀区,不同部位蚀退速率有差异,北部蚀退速率小于南部,中山河口以北、夸套河口以南则以淤积为主

  4. International Arctic Research Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-07-01

    our re- 27 Demand for multi-disciplinary of the boreal forest zone -, should discuss the feazibility of establishing a mechanism Scientific Cooperation...interactions, very low frequency waves, auroras , and precipitation of energetic particles from the mag- netosphere. Ocean Sciences research has...vestigating the aurora phenomenon, which can have a severe impact on communications, and the dynamics of the upper atmosphere, including the arctic

  5. Disparities in Arctic Health

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2008-02-04

    Life at the top of the globe is drastically different. Harsh climate devoid of sunlight part of the year, pockets of extreme poverty, and lack of physical infrastructure interfere with healthcare and public health services. Learn about the challenges of people in the Arctic and how research and the International Polar Year address them.  Created: 2/4/2008 by Emerging Infectious Diseases.   Date Released: 2/20/2008.

  6. Green Arctic Patrol Vessel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-01

    Search Radar (2D) Non-rotating IFF system Electro- Optical security system Naval Surface Warfare Center Carderock Division Green Arctic Patrol...Speed Endurance Modular Systems and Capabilities UUV Bluefin 21 4.93 0.53 750 kg 4,500 m 25 hours Side scan sonar, multibeam ...sensors, 256 Mb flash card USV ASV 6300 6.30 Beam: 0.65 Height: 3.50 2.0 tonnes 8 kt 96 hours @ 4 kt Multibeam , sidescan sonars, CTD

  7. Summer Arctic sea fog

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Synchronous or quasi-synchronous sea-land-air observations were conducted using advanced sea ice, atmospheric and marine instruments during China' s First Arctic Expedition. Based on the Precious data from the expedition, it was found that in the Arctic Ocean, most part of which is covered with ice or is mixed with ice, various kinds of sea fog formed such as advection fog, radiation fog and vapor fog. Each kind has its own characteristic and mechanics of creation. In the southern part of the Arctic Ocean, due to the sufficient warm and wet flow there, it is favorable for advection fog to form,which is dense and lasts a long time. On ice cap or vast floating ice, due to the strong radiation cooling effect, stable radiating fog is likely to form. In floating ice area there forms vapor fog with the appearance of masses of vapor from a boiling pot, which is different from short-lasting land fog. The study indicates that the reason why there are many kinds of sea fog form in the Arctic Ocean is because of the complicated cushion and the consequent sea-air interaction caused by the sea ice distribution and its unique physical characteristics. Sea fog is the atmospheric phenomenon of sea-air heat exchange. Especially, due to the high albedo of ice and snow surface, it is diffcult to absorb great amount of solar radiation during the polar days. Besides, ice is a poor conductor of heat; it blocks the sea-air heat exchange.The sea-air exchange is active in floating ice area where the ice is broken. The sea sends heat to the atmosphere in form of latent heat; vapor fog is a way of sea-air heat exchange influencing the climate and an indicator of the extent of the exchange. The study also indicates that the sea also transports heat to the atmosphere in form of sensible heat when vapor fog occurs.

  8. March 2009 Scripps Institute of Oceanography (SIO) Lidar of the Southern California Coastline: Long Beach to US/Mexico Border

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This lidar point data set was collected during low tide conditions along an approximately 500-700 meter wide strip of the Southern California coastline within an...

  9. September 2008 Scripps Institute of Oceanography (SIO) Lidar of the Southern California Coastline: Long Beach to US/Mexico Border

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This lidar point data set was collected during low tide conditions along an approximately 500-700 meter wide strip of the Southern California coastline within an...

  10. April 2008 Scripps Institute of Oceanography (SIO) Lidar of the Southern California Coastline: Long Beach to US/Mexico Border

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This lidar point data set collected during low tide conditions along an approximately 500-700 meter wide strip of the Southern California coastline within an area...

  11. November 2007 Scripps Institute of Oceanography (SIO) Lidar of the Southern California Coastline: Long Beach to US/Mexico Border

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This lidar point data set was collected during low tide conditions along an approximately 500-700 meter wide strip of the Southern California coastline within an...

  12. EASE-Grid Land-Ocean-Coastline-Ice Masks Derived from Boston University MODIS/Terra Land Cover Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — These Land-Ocean-Coastline-Ice (LOCI) files provide land classification masks derived from the Boston University MOD12Q1 V004 MODIS/Terra 1 km Land Cover Product...

  13. 1998 Northeast NOAA/USGS/NASA Airborne LiDAR Assessment of Coastal Erosion (ALACE) Project for the US Coastline

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set includes data collected during December 1998 and covers coastline in the states of Maryland, New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio, and Massachusetts. Maryland...

  14. New evidence for ice shelf flow across the Alaska and Beaufort margins, Arctic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engels, Jennifer L.

    The Arctic Ocean may act as a lynchpin for global climate change due to its unique physiography as a mediterranean sea located in polar latitudes. In our modern warming climate, debate over the bounds of natural versus anthropogenically-induced climate variability necessitates a comprehensive understanding of Arctic ice extent and configuration over the last interglacial cycle. Longstanding controversy exists as to the volume, timing, and flow trajectories of ice in the Arctic Ocean during glacial maxima when continental ice sheets mantled circum-arctic landmasses. As a result of the Science Ice Exercise surveys of the Arctic Ocean in 1999, new evidence for ice grounding at depths down to 980 m on the Lomonosov Ridge and 750 m on the Chukchi Borderland indicates the likelihood that large ice shelves flowed into the ocean from both the Barents/Kara Sea and the Canadian Arctic Archipelago or eastern Alaska. Sidescan imagery of ˜14100 km2 of seafloor along the Alaska and Beaufort margins in water depths from 250--2800 m maps a repetitive association of recognizable sub-glacially generated bedforms, ice carved-bathymerry, and ice-marginal turbidite gullies over a 640 km stretch of the margin between Point Barrow and the MacKenzie River delta. Glaciogenic bedforms occur across the surface of a flattened bathymetric bench or 'second shelf break' that is interpreted to have been formed by an ice shelf eroding the continental slope. The glacial geology of surrounding areas suggests that an ice shelf on the Alaska and Beaufort margins likely flowed from the mouths of overdeepened glacial troughs in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago westward and across the Chukchi Borderland due to an obstruction in the central Canadian basin. Evidence for an ice shelf along the Alaska and Beaufort margins supports an expanded interpretation of ice volume and extent during Pleistocene glacial periods. This has far-reaching implications for Arctic climate studies, ocean circulation, sediment

  15. Wind-eroded silicate as a source of hydrogen peroxide on Mars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Ebbe Norskov; Merrison, Jonathan P.; Jensen, Svend Knak

    soil. Methods: We simulated wind-erosion of silicates by tumbling quartz sand in sealed quartz ampoules with defined atmospheres. The eroded sand was suspended in water and the hydrogen peroxide concentration was followed using a sco-poletin/horseradish peroxidase assay. Results: The simulated wind......-erosion effectively eroded the sand over weeks of tumbling and we saw a clear correlation between an increase in surface area and the release of hydrogen peroxide. The production of hydrogen peroxide depended on the presence of atmospheric oxygen and was inhibited by atmospheric carbon dioxide. Nevertheless, taking...... into account the high surface area of Martian soil and the atmospheric oxygen and carbon dioxide content, wind-eroded sili-cate could result in the formation of at least 7 to 31 nmol hydrogen peroxide per cm3 soil, which could explain the amount of 14CO2 released in the Labelled Release Experiments [6...

  16. Water and dissolved carbon transport in an eroding soil landscape using column experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rieckh, Helene; Gerke, Horst; Glæsner, Nadia;

    2014-01-01

    boundary. Breakthrough curves for a pre-applied tracer (Br-) on the soil surface and a tracer applied with irrigation water (3H2O) were modeled analytically using CXTFIT. The heterogeneity of the Luvisol horizons was generally higher than that of the Regosol horizons, which relates to the higher......In the hummocky ground moraine soil landscape, a spatial continuum of more or less eroded soils developed from till under intensive agricultural cultivation. Water flow and solute transport are affected by the variable soil structural and pedological developments, which are posing a challenge...... for flux estimation. The objective of this study was to investigate transport of water, dissolved organic (DOC), and particulate carbon (PC) through soil profiles of an eroded Haplic Luvisol and a heavily eroded Haplic Regosol. We studied 5 soil horizons in three replicates each: Ap (0-20 cm) and E (20...

  17. MAPPING ERODED AREAS ON MOUNTAIN GRASSLAND WITH TERRESTRIAL PHOTOGRAMMETRY AND OBJECT-BASED IMAGE ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Mayr

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In the Alps as well as in other mountain regions steep grassland is frequently affected by shallow erosion. Often small landslides or snow movements displace the vegetation together with soil and/or unconsolidated material. This results in bare earth surface patches within the grass covered slope. Close-range and remote sensing techniques are promising for both mapping and monitoring these eroded areas. This is essential for a better geomorphological process understanding, to assess past and recent developments, and to plan mitigation measures. Recent developments in image matching techniques make it feasible to produce high resolution orthophotos and digital elevation models from terrestrial oblique images. In this paper we propose to delineate the boundary of eroded areas for selected scenes of a study area, using close-range photogrammetric data. Striving for an efficient, objective and reproducible workflow for this task, we developed an approach for automated classification of the scenes into the classes grass and eroded. We propose an object-based image analysis (OBIA workflow which consists of image segmentation and automated threshold selection for classification using the Excess Green Vegetation Index (ExG. The automated workflow is tested with ten different scenes. Compared to a manual classification, grass and eroded areas are classified with an overall accuracy between 90.7% and 95.5%, depending on the scene. The methods proved to be insensitive to differences in illumination of the scenes and greenness of the grass. The proposed workflow reduces user interaction and is transferable to other study areas. We conclude that close-range photogrammetry is a valuable low-cost tool for mapping this type of eroded areas in the field with a high level of detail and quality. In future, the output will be used as ground truth for an area-wide mapping of eroded areas in coarser resolution aerial orthophotos acquired at the same time.

  18. Mapping Eroded Areas on Mountain Grassland with Terrestrial Photogrammetry and Object-Based Image Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayr, Andreas; Rutzinger, Martin; Bremer, Magnus; Geitner, Clemens

    2016-06-01

    In the Alps as well as in other mountain regions steep grassland is frequently affected by shallow erosion. Often small landslides or snow movements displace the vegetation together with soil and/or unconsolidated material. This results in bare earth surface patches within the grass covered slope. Close-range and remote sensing techniques are promising for both mapping and monitoring these eroded areas. This is essential for a better geomorphological process understanding, to assess past and recent developments, and to plan mitigation measures. Recent developments in image matching techniques make it feasible to produce high resolution orthophotos and digital elevation models from terrestrial oblique images. In this paper we propose to delineate the boundary of eroded areas for selected scenes of a study area, using close-range photogrammetric data. Striving for an efficient, objective and reproducible workflow for this task, we developed an approach for automated classification of the scenes into the classes grass and eroded. We propose an object-based image analysis (OBIA) workflow which consists of image segmentation and automated threshold selection for classification using the Excess Green Vegetation Index (ExG). The automated workflow is tested with ten different scenes. Compared to a manual classification, grass and eroded areas are classified with an overall accuracy between 90.7% and 95.5%, depending on the scene. The methods proved to be insensitive to differences in illumination of the scenes and greenness of the grass. The proposed workflow reduces user interaction and is transferable to other study areas. We conclude that close-range photogrammetry is a valuable low-cost tool for mapping this type of eroded areas in the field with a high level of detail and quality. In future, the output will be used as ground truth for an area-wide mapping of eroded areas in coarser resolution aerial orthophotos acquired at the same time.

  19. Discussion on the mapping of coastline%海岸线及其测绘技术探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于彩霞; 许军; 黄文骞; 卢岩; 林林

    2015-01-01

    Coastline is one of the oldest boundaries .However ,because of its dynamic characteristic ,as well as the demand for coast being more and more ,the location of coastline has been disputed ,and how to map it objectively is important .Aimed at the status of obscure coastline definition and its location ,the problems of coastline definition are pointed out ,and then proposals are given .The traditional surveying and mapping methods of coastline are analyzed ,and then the new method of coastline extraction by LiDAR is discussed .%海岸线是人类所使用的最古老的边界线之一,然而,由于其动态特征,加之当今社会对海岸带的需求越来越多,这条边界线的位置存在争议,因而,如何使用客观手段测绘海岸线尤为重要。文中针对海岸线定义及其位置确定不明确的现状,指出海岸线定义存在的问题,给出完善定义的意见;分析海岸线常规的测绘方法,探讨海岸线精确测绘的新方法和技术。

  20. The DNA damage response at eroded telomeres and tethering to the nuclear pore complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khadaroo, Basheer; Teixeira, M Teresa; Luciano, Pierre;

    2009-01-01

    The ends of linear eukaryotic chromosomes are protected by telomeres, which serve to ensure proper chromosome replication and to prevent spurious recombination at chromosome ends. In this study, we show by single cell analysis that in the absence of telomerase, a single short telomere is sufficient...... protein Rad52 into a single focus. Moreover, we show that eroded telomeres, although remaining at the nuclear periphery, move to the nuclear pore complex. Our results link the DNA damage response at eroded telomeres to changes in subnuclear localization and suggest the existence of collapsed replication...

  1. Erodibility controls on the vertical and horizontal scalings of topography : a case study in the Himalayas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godard, V.; Steer, P.

    2011-12-01

    Understanding the scaling properties of topography in actively uplifting areas is a major issue in quantitative geomorphology. Analytical formulations of non-glaciated landscape evolution clearly demonstrate that metrics such as local relief or drainage density are explicitly related to the spatial distribution of tectonic uplift, precipitation, erodibility and local slope across the landscape. However, in most regions, these parameters are seldom documented with enough resolution and precision to allow a systematic and statistically significant investigation of their relationships with both horizontal and vertical scaling properties of topography. A notable exception is the Himalaya of central Nepal, where the last 20 years of tectonic and geomorphological research have produced one of the densest regional data-set and documented major gradients in uplift and precipitation across the range [e.g. Lavé and Avouac, 2001; Bookhagen and Burbank, 2006]. The purpose of our study is to use this data in order to develop a detailed investigation of the influence of the erodibility parameter in controlling the structure and texture of the landscape. We first build on the derivation of total catchment relief of Tucker and Whipple [2002] to include the contribution of precipitation in addition to uplift, erodibility. Then, by minimizing the misfit between observed and predicted catchment relief, we assess the erodibility parameter for each second or third order catchment in our area of investigation. The resultant erodibility map (1) matches the distribution of geological units and (2) reveals a number of interesting second order patterns, such as along-strike fluctuations in the Lesser Himalayas and a significant decrease in erodibility coincident with the location of the MCT zone. This latter result possibly highlights the effect of intense schistosity and fracturation on large scale erosion efficiency [Molnar et al., 2007]. Then to assess the influence of erodibility on

  2. Treatment of myopic astigmatism with photorefractive keratectomy using an erodible mask.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, P M; Tutton, M K; Bell, A; Neave, C; Fichte, C

    1994-01-01

    The Summit Technology erodible mask treatment of astigmatism does not alter the keratometric astigmatism significantly, even though the refractive astigmatism appears to improve by about 50%. Myopia is satisfactorily treated with the erodible mask, but there is slightly more undercorrection compared to photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) using an expanding diaphragm. Increasing the minus power in ordering the mask cylinder improves the myopia result, but not the keratometric astigmatism result. The following factors do not influence the keratometric astigmatism result: 1) The type of astigmatism (with-, against-the-rule, or oblique); 2) The initial keratometry readings; and 3) The time from the commencement of epithelial removal to laser treatment.

  3. Variability of erodibility in rock-floored channels produced by differential weathering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparacino, M. S.; Hancock, G. S.; Small, E. E.; Lamp, L.

    2011-12-01

    The erosion of bedrock-floored channels is a critical process governing the rate of landscape evolution in many settings. Field and modeling studies suggest that bedrock channels evolve toward equilibrium through adjustment of geometry and slope to the imposed discharge, sediment supply, and substrate erodibility conditions. Recent numerical modeling of rock-floored channel cross-sections suggests that equilibrium channel geometry and slope are sensitive to variation in rock erodibility along the channel perimeter. However, few field studies have focused on systematic measurement of rock erodibility across rock-floored channels. We hypothesize variations in weathering intensity and duration across some channels results in variable erodibility. To determine if erodibility varies in some channels, we used a Type N Schmidt hammer to measure in situ compressive strength in channels floored by sandstone (3 sites, Utah), basalt (2 sites, Hawaii), granite (3 sites, Virginia) and limestone (2 sites, Virginia). Rock compressive strength is assumed to be an adequate proxy for erodibility (Sklar et al., 2001). At each site, we collected compressive strength measurements along transects oriented perpendicular to flow direction. We surveyed the transects to determine the position of measurements within cross-sections and to estimate width/depth ratios. Of 19 transects measured in sandstone channels, 10 show significant decreases in compressive strength (up to 60%) with increasing height above the channel thalweg. Five sandstone transects collected from a rapidly eroding slot canyon show no significant change in compressive strength with height. Transects on basalt and 2 of 3 transects on granite show significant compressive strength decreases with increasing height. Transects on limestone, however, reveal compressive strength increases with height above the thalweg. The width-depth ratios in the granite channels are ~10 times greater than the limestone channels, despite similar

  4. Relationships Between Permeability and Erodibility of Cultivated Acrisols and Cambisols in Subtropical China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Dong-Sheng; SHI Xue-Zheng; D. C. WEINDORF

    2006-01-01

    The relationships between soil erodibility factor (K) and soil saturated permeability (Kfs) for cultivated Acrisols derived from Quaternary red clay and Cambisols derived from red sandstone were studied and quantified using a rainfall simulator and Guelph permeameter in a hilly area of subtropical China. A negative correlation existed between Kfs of the topsoil (0-5 cm) and K. The empirical expression K ≈ a × K-b fs + c, where a, b and c are the structural coefficients related to soil properties, such as soil type, soil parent material, organic matter, pH and mechanical composition, best described the relationship between soil saturated permeability and soil erodibility.

  5. Biodiversity of arctic marine fishes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mecklenburg, Catherine W.; Møller, Peter Rask; Steinke, Dirk

    2011-01-01

    Taxonomic and distributional information on each fish species found in arctic marine waters is reviewed, and a list of families and species with commentary on distributional records is presented. The list incorporates results from examination of museum collections of arctic marine fishes dating b...

  6. Mining in the European Arctic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dam, Kim; Scheepstra, Annette; Gille, Johan; Stępień, Adam; Koivurova, Timo

    2014-01-01

    The European Arctic is currently experiencing an upsurge in mining activities, but future developments will be highly sensitive to mineral price fluctuations. The EU is a major consumer and importer of Arctic raw materials. As the EU is concerned about the security of supply, it encourages domestic

  7. Arctic interests and policy of France

    OpenAIRE

    Yuri I. Rubinsky

    2016-01-01

    The author considers scientific, economic and political activities of France for the development and exploration of the Arctic, providing security there. Along with some other non-Arctic countries, France is not ready to accept such a situation when eight members of the Arctic Council solve Arctic problems on behalf of all mankind.

  8. AMAP Assessment 2013: Arctic Ocean acidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    This assessment report presents the results of the 2013 AMAP Assessment of Arctic Ocean Acidification (AOA). This is the first such assessment dealing with AOA from an Arctic-wide perspective, and complements several assessments that AMAP has delivered over the past ten years concerning the effects of climate change on Arctic ecosystems and people. The Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme (AMAP) is a group working under the Arctic Council. The Arctic Council Ministers have requested AMAP to: - produce integrated assessment reports on the status and trends of the conditions of the Arctic ecosystems;

  9. Arctic Ecosystem Integrated Survey (Arctic Eis): Marine ecosystem dynamics in the rapidly changing Pacific Arctic Gateway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueter, Franz J.; Weems, Jared; Farley, Edward V.; Sigler, Michael F.

    2017-01-01

    Arctic Marine Ecosystems are undergoing rapid changes associated with ice loss and surface warming resulting from human activities (IPCC, 2013). The most dramatic changes include an earlier ice retreat and a longer ice-free season, particularly on Arctic inflow shelves such as the Barents Sea in the Atlantic Arctic and the northern Bering Sea and Chukchi Sea in the Pacific Arctic, the two major gateways into the Arctic (Danielson et al., 2016; Frey et al., 2015; Serreze et al., 2007; Wood et al., 2015). The retreat of Arctic sea ice has opened access to the Arctic marine environment and its resources, particularly during summer, and among other changes has brought with it increased research activities. For the Pacific Arctic region, these activities have led to several recent compendiums examining physical, biogeochemical, and biological patterns and trends in this rapidly changing environment (Arrigo, 2015, 2016; Arrigo et al., 2014; Bluhm et al., 2010; Dunton et al., 2014; Grebmeier and Maslowski, 2014; Hopcroft and Day, 2013; Moore and Stabeno, 2015).

  10. Sea level budget in the Arctic during the satellite altimetry era

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carret, Alice; Cazenave, Anny; Meyssignac, Benoît; Prandi, Pierre; Ablain, Michael; Andersen, Ole; Blazquez, Alejandro

    2016-04-01

    Studying sea level variations in the Arctic region is challenging because of data scarcity. Here we present results of the sea level budget in the Arctic (up to 82°N) during the altimetry era. We first investigate closure of the sea level budget since 2002 using altimetry data from Envisat and Cryosat for estimating sea level, temperature and salinity data from the ORAP5 reanalysis and GRACE space gravimetry to estimate the steric and mass components. Two altimetry sea level data sets are considered (from DTU and CLS), based on Envisat waveforms retracking. Regional sea level trends seen in the altimetric map, in particular over the Beaufort Gyre and along the eastern coast of Greenland are of steric origin. However, in terms of regional average, the steric component contributes very little to the observed sea level trend, suggesting a dominant mass contribution in the Arctic region. This is confirmed by GRACE-based ocean mass time series that agree very well with the altimetry-based sea level time series. Direct estimate of the mass component is not possible prior to GRACE. Thus we estimated the mass contribution over the whole altimetry era from the difference between altimetry-based sea level and the ORAP5 steric component. Finally we compared altimetry-based coastal sea level with tide gauge records available along Norwegian, Greenland and Siberian coastlines and investigated whether the Arctic Oscillation that was the main driver of coastal sea level in the Arctic during the past decades still plays a dominant role or if other factors (e.g., of anthropogenic origin) become detectable.

  11. Increasing cadmium and zinc levels in wild common eiders breeding along Canada's remote northern coastline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallory, Mark L; Braune, Birgit M; Robertson, Gregory J; Gilchrist, H Grant; Mallory, Conor D; Forbes, Mark R; Wells, Regina

    2014-04-01

    The common eider (Somateria mollissima) is an abundant sea duck breeding around the circumpolar Arctic, and is an important component of subsistence and sport harvest in some regions. We determined hepatic cadmium (Cd) and zinc (Zn) concentrations in the livers of breeding females sampled during three time periods including 1992/3, 2001/2 and 2008 at three sites spanning 53.7°N-75.8°N in the eastern Canadian Arctic. At all sites, concentrations of both Cd and Zn increased ~300% over this time period. The reasons for this rapid increase in concentrations are unclear.

  12. Eroded dentin does not jeopardize the bond strength of adhesive restorative materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janaina Barros Cruz

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This in vitro study evaluated the bond strength of adhesive restorative materials to sound and eroded dentin. Thirty-six bovine incisors were embedded in acrylic resin and ground to obtain flat buccal dentin surfaces. Specimens were randomly allocated in 2 groups: sound dentin (immersion in artificial saliva and eroded dentin (pH cycling model - 3× / cola drink for 7 days. Specimens were then reassigned according to restorative material: glass ionomer cement (KetacTM Molar Easy Mix, resin-modified glass ionomer cement (VitremerTM or adhesive system with resin composite (Adper Single Bond 2 + Filtek Z250. Polyethylene tubes with an internal diameter of 0.76 mm were placed over the dentin and filled with the material. The microshear bond test was performed after 24 h of water storage at 37ºC. The failure mode was evaluated using a stereomicroscope (400×. Bond strength data were analyzed with two-way ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc tests (α = 0.05. Eroded dentin showed bond strength values similar to those for sound dentin for all materials. The adhesive system showed the highest bond strength values, regardless of the substrate (p < 0.0001. For all groups, the adhesive/mixed failure prevailed. In conclusion, adhesive materials may be used in eroded dentin without jeopardizing the bonding quality. It is preferable to use an etch-and-rinse adhesive system because it shows the highest bond strength values compared with the glass ionomer cements tested.

  13. High resolution satellite derived erodibility factors for WRF/Chem windblown dust simulations in Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremades, Pablo Gabriel; Fernandez, Rafael Pedro; Allend, David; Mulena, Celeste; Puliafito, Salvador Enrique

    2017-04-01

    A proper representation of dust sources is critical to accurately predict atmospheric particle concentrations in regional windblown dust simulations. The Weather Research and Forecasting model with Chemistry (WRF/Chem) includes a topographic-based erodibility map originally conceived for global scale modeling, which fails to identify the geographical location of dust sources in many regions of Argentina. Therefore, this study aims at developing a method to obtain a high-resolution erodibility map suitable for regional or local scale modeling using WRF/Chem. We present two independent approaches based on global methods to estimate soil erodibility using satellite retrievals, i.e. topography from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) and surface reflectance from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). Simulation results of a severe Zonda wind episode in the arid central-west Argentina serve as bases for the analysis of these methods. Simulated dust concentration at surface level is compared with particulate matter measurements at one site in Mendoza city. In addition, we use satellite aerosol optical depth (AOD) retrievals to investigate model performance in reproducing spatial distribution of dust emissions. The erodibility map based on surface reflectance from MODIS improves the representation of small scale features, and increases the overall dust aerosol loading with respect to the standard map included by default. Simulated concentrations are in good agreement with measurements as well as satellite derived dust spatial distribution.

  14. Sediment transport capacity of concentrated flows on steep loessial slope with erodible beds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Hai; Liu, Gang; Liu, Puling; Zheng, Fenli; Zhang, Jiaqiong; Hu, Feinan

    2017-05-24

    Previous research on sediment transport capacity has been inadequate and incomplete in describing the detachment and transport process of concentrated flows on slope farmlands during rill development. An indoor concentrated flow scouring experiment was carried out on steep loessial soil slope with erodible bed to investigate the sediment transport capacity under different flow rates and slope gradients. The results indicated that the sediment transport capacity increases with increasing flow rate and slope gradient, and these relationships can be described by power functions and exponential functions, respectively. Multivariate, nonlinear regression analysis showed that sediment transport capacity was more sensitive to slope gradient than to flow rate, and it was more sensitive to unit discharge per unit width than to slope gradient for sediment transport capacity in this study. When similar soil was used, the results were similar to those of previous research conducted under both erodible and non-erodible bed conditions. However, the equation derived from previous research under non-erodible bed conditions with for river bed sand tends to overestimate sediment transport capacity in our experiment.

  15. Eroded dentin does not jeopardize the bond strength of adhesive restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Janaina Barros; Lenzi, Tathiane Larissa; Tedesco, Tamara Kerber; Guglielmi, Camila de Almeida Brandão; Raggio, Daniela Prócida

    2012-01-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the bond strength of adhesive restorative materials to sound and eroded dentin. Thirty-six bovine incisors were embedded in acrylic resin and ground to obtain flat buccal dentin surfaces. Specimens were randomly allocated in 2 groups: sound dentin (immersion in artificial saliva) and eroded dentin (pH cycling model - 3× / cola drink for 7 days). Specimens were then reassigned according to restorative material: glass ionomer cement (KetacTM Molar Easy Mix), resin-modified glass ionomer cement (VitremerTM) or adhesive system with resin composite (Adper Single Bond 2 + Filtek Z250). Polyethylene tubes with an internal diameter of 0.76 mm were placed over the dentin and filled with the material. The microshear bond test was performed after 24 h of water storage at 37ºC. The failure mode was evaluated using a stereomicroscope (400×). Bond strength data were analyzed with two-way ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc tests (α = 0.05). Eroded dentin showed bond strength values similar to those for sound dentin for all materials. The adhesive system showed the highest bond strength values, regardless of the substrate (p < 0.0001). For all groups, the adhesive/mixed failure prevailed. In conclusion, adhesive materials may be used in eroded dentin without jeopardizing the bonding quality. It is preferable to use an etch-and-rinse adhesive system because it shows the highest bond strength values compared with the glass ionomer cements tested.

  16. Erodibility of a mixed mudflat dominated by microphytobenthos and Cerastoderma edule, East Frisian Wadden Sea, Germany

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Thorbjørn Joest; Lanuru, Mahatma; van Bernem, Carlo

    2010-01-01

    ). The erodibility of the sediment showed strong temporal variation with high erosion thresholds in spring and late summer and significantly lower thresholds during the rest of the study period. The erosion thresholds were strongly dependent on the contents of chlorophyll a (chl a) and colloidal carbohydrates, both...

  17. 7 CFR 1430.225 - Violations of highly erodible land and wetland conservation provisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... wetland conservation provisions. The provisions of part 12 of this title apply to this part. ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Violations of highly erodible land and wetland conservation provisions. 1430.225 Section 1430.225 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of...

  18. 7 CFR 1412.68 - Compliance with highly erodible land and wetland conservation provisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... and wetland conservation provisions. The provisions of part 12 of this title apply to this part. ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Compliance with highly erodible land and wetland conservation provisions. 1412.68 Section 1412.68 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of...

  19. Glyphosate and AMPA distribution in wind-eroded sediment derived from loess soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martins Bento, Celia; Goossens, Dirk; Rezaei, Mahrooz; Riksen, M.J.P.M.; Mol, J.G.J.; Ritsema, C.J.; Geissen, V.

    2017-01-01

    Glyphosate is one of the most used herbicides in agricultural lands worldwide. Wind-eroded sediment and dust, as an environmental transport pathway of glyphosate and of its main metabolite aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA), can result in environmental- and human exposure far beyond the agricultural

  20. Assembling an Arctic Ocean Boundary Monitoring Array

    OpenAIRE

    Tsubouchi, T.

    2014-01-01

    The Arctic Ocean boundary monitoring array has been maintained over many years by six research institutes located worldwide. Our approach to Arctic Ocean boundary measurements is generating significant scientific outcomes. However, it is not always easy to access Arctic data. On the basis of our last five years’ experience of assembling pan-Arctic boundary data, and considering the success of Argo, I propose that Arctic data policy should be driven by specific scientific-based requirements. O...

  1. Oil Spill Detection along the Gulf of Mexico Coastline based on Airborne Imaging Spectrometer Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan, M. D.; Filippi, A. M.; Guneralp, I.

    2013-12-01

    The Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico between April and July 2010 demonstrated the importance of synoptic oil-spill monitoring in coastal environments via remote-sensing methods. This study focuses on terrestrial oil-spill detection and thickness estimation based on hyperspectral images acquired along the coastline of the Gulf of Mexico. We use AVIRIS (Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer) imaging spectrometer data collected over Bay Jimmy and Wilkinson Bay within Barataria Bay, Louisiana, USA during September 2010. We also employ field-based observations of the degree of oil accumulation along the coastline, as well as in situ measurements from the literature. As part of our proposed spectroscopic approach, we operate on atmospherically- and geometrically-corrected hyperspectral AVIRIS data to extract image-derived endmembers via Minimum Noise Fraction transform, Pixel Purity Index-generation, and n-dimensional visualization. Extracted endmembers are then used as input to endmember-mapping algorithms to yield fractional-abundance images and crisp classification images. We also employ Multiple Endmember Spectral Mixture Analysis (MESMA) for oil detection and mapping in order to enable the number and types of endmembers to vary on a per-pixel basis, in contast to simple Spectral Mixture Analysis (SMA). MESMA thus better allows accounting for spectral variabiltiy of oil (e.g., due to varying oil thicknesses, states of degradation, and the presence of different oil types, etc.) and other materials, including soils and salt marsh vegetation of varying types, which may or may not be affected by the oil spill. A decision-tree approach is also utilized for comparison. Classification results do indicate that MESMA provides advantageous capabilities for mapping several oil-thickness classes for affected vegetation and soils along the Gulf of Mexico coastline, relative to the conventional approaches tested. Oil thickness-mapping results from MESMA

  2. Formulation of artificial aggregates from dredged harbour sediments for coastline stabilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brakni, Samira; Abriak, Nor Edine; Hequette, Arnaud

    2009-07-01

    Coastal erosion is a common phenomenon along the shores of the member states of the European Union. In 2004, approximately 20,000 km of coastlines, accounting for 20% of the whole of the EU coastline, were considered particularly affected by this phenomenon. Coastal erosion and shoreline retreat already affect a significant proportion of the French coast, the beaches in the north of France being no exception, and will probably increase during the 21st Century because of climate change. Because erosion is often accentuated by sedimentary deficits, artificial beach replenishment often represents an appropriate engineering solution for coastline stabilization. Meanwhile, large quantities of sediments are dredged every year from ports, with approximately 25 to 45 million tons of sediments (dry matter) per year being dredged for the maintenance of harbours. The purpose of the study presented in this article is to report on the potential use of artificial aggregates formulated with harbour sediments in order to recharge beaches and/or nearshore environments. The manufacture of the aggregates consisted of several stages, beginning with the characterization and the preparation of the sediment before the fabrication of aggregates by extrusion, associating the sediments with a specific hydraulic binder. Various parameters, such as water content of the mixing sediment, the cement content and the shape of the aggregates, were taken into account, in order to ensure the criteria regarding the strength of these aggregates are entirely fulfilled. The first simulations in a wave flume are encouraging and reveal the possibilities for use of the aggregates in coastal engineering.

  3. Arctic hydrology and meteorology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kane, D.L.

    1990-01-01

    During 1990, we have continued our meteorological and hydrologic data collection in support of our process-oriented research. The six years of data collected to data is unique in its scope and continuity in a North Hemisphere Arctic setting. This valuable data base has allowed us to further our understanding of the interconnections and interactions between the atmosphere/hydrosphere/biosphere/lithosphere. The increased understanding of the heat and mass transfer processes has allowed us to increase our model-oriented research efforts.

  4. Arctic Ice Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-02-01

    jFigure 1. NIfS-7 SWr imagery frou 6 July 1983 portrays variat s i ie con.centra- tion across the experiental area Figure 2. Large floes in the East...and P. T. Shaw. Particle pathways in the and by European Community Commission contract CCE CLI-083 F. Gulf Stream. Bull. Am. Meteorol. Soc.. 66, 1106...New York: Academic Press, 1981. pp. 29-62. ice in the arctic," inProc. 4th Symp. Remote Sensing of En viron., 1281 R. T. Lowry, private communication

  5. Arctic Summer Ice Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Benjamin

    1999-01-01

    The primary objective of this study is to estimate the flux of heat and freshwater resulting from sea ice melt in the polar seas. The approach taken is to examine the decay of sea ice in the summer months primarily through the use of spaceborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) imagery. The improved understanding of the dynamics of the melt process can be usefully combined with ice thermodynamic and upper ocean models to form more complete models of ice melt. Models indicate that more heat is absorbed in the upper ocean when the ice cover is composed of smaller rather than larger floes and when there is more open water. Over the course of the summer, floes disintegrate by physical forcing and heating, melting into smaller and smaller sizes. By measuring the change in distribution of floes together with open water over a summer period, we can make estimates of the amount of heating by region and time. In a climatic sense, these studies are intended to improve the understanding of the Arctic heat budget which can then be eventually incorporated into improved global climate models. This work has two focus areas. The first is examining the detailed effect of storms on floe size and open water. A strong Arctic low pressure storm has been shown to loosen up the pack ice, increase the open water concentration well into the pack ice, and change the distribution of floes toward fewer and smaller floes. This suggests episodic melting and the increased importance of horizontal (lateral) melt during storms. The second focus area is related to an extensive ship-based experiment that recently took place in the Arctic called Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic (SHEBA). An icebreaker was placed purposely into the older pack ice north of Alaska in September 1997. The ship served as the base for experimenters who deployed extensive instrumentation to measure the atmosphere, ocean, and ice during a one-year period. My experiment will be to derive similar measurements (floe size, open

  6. Experimental study of rock erodibility - diagenetic grade relationship, application to the Annot sandstone, French-Italian Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steer, P.; Cattin, R.; Gibert, B.; Labaume, P.; Loggia, D.; Soliva, R.; Taboada, A.; Jolivet, M.; Lavé, J.; Sizun, J.

    2009-12-01

    In the large scale studies of landscape evolution, rock erodibility is a key parameter which controls the capacity of a rock to be eroded under the action of erosive agents. This parameter is primary controlled by lithology. However it also integrates both microscopic and macroscopic parameters, as grain cohesion or fracture density. Despite its extensive use in erosion law for field or numerical studies, quantifying river bedrock erodibility is still an ongoing issue. Previous studies have highlighted the first order control of rock nature on bedrock erodibility. Here we rather investigate the effect of diagenetic grade using both laboratory measurements and erodibility data collected on the field with a Schmidt hammer. We consider Scmidt hammer measurements as a proxy for erodibility. Our approach is applied to the well-studied Annot sandstones localized in the southern part of the external French-Italian Alps. Due to thrust front propagation in the external Alpine domain, this Upper Eocene-Lower Oligocene foreland basin formation has been partly buried below allochthonous units during the Oligocene. Exhumed by thrusting during the late Miocene, this formation now exhibits a clear diagenetic gradient increasing from west to east. Taking advantage of availability of a wide petrographic and petrophysical data set, we study the spatial variation of the Annot sandstone erodibility to the estimated diagenetic grade. Our preliminary results reveal that erodibility is closely correlated to the diagenetic grade, with the external (western) part of the Annot sandstones exhibiting higher erodibility than the internal (eastern) part. At the scale of the outcrop, erodibility is characterized by a high variability which statistically does not correlate with density, elastic parameters, porosity or minerals content. We rather suggest that for equivalent diagenetic grade, erodibility is controlled by the density of fracturation.

  7. Landslides falling onto a shallow erodible substrate or water layer: an experimental and numerical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosta, G. B.; De Blasio, F. V.; Locatelli, M.; Imposimato, S.; Roddeman, D.

    2015-09-01

    Landslides often collapse in areas covered by alluvial deposits forming an erodible layer. This erodible substrate may deform plastically under the intense shear stress of the landslide mass. In other cases, the collapse occurs onto a water basin or tidal flat, creating impulse water waves whilst the landslide may be lubricated by a water layer underneath. In either cases the presence of a medium underneath the landslide will change its dynamics introducing complex processes. While frictional, dry masses and taluses generally hamper the landslide motion. In this work, we present some experiments mimicking the collapse of a landslide onto shallow erodible or water layers. The landslide is simulated with a granular material (sand or gravel) flowing on an incline (35-66°) followed by a horizontal sector covered with a granular bed 1 to 2 cm thick or with a 0.5-1 cm of water. Monitoring evolution in time allows us to describe in detail the process of fluidization of the material at impact, the generation of impact waves, and the erosion process. Concerning impact on a sand layer, the apparent friction coefficient (H/L) is found to increase with the chute slope angle and with the thickness of the erodible layer, and to decrease with the volume. At low slope angles, the material accumulates backwards in a shock wave mode, while at larger slope angles (>45°) it accumulates by prograding forward. A granular avalanche falling from the slope is partially reflected at the sharp slope break where erosion occurs and then propagates initially as a wave partially eroding the superficial material. Folding and thrusting occur within the dense shear flow and the erodible layer. Experiments with a water layer show that the dynamics depends much on the permeability of the granular avalanche. FEM numerical simulations replicate and allow to describe and understand both the spreading and the erosion, and internal deformation recorded in the erodible layer. Experimental findings are

  8. Unraveling the dynamics that scale cross-shore headland relief on rocky coastlines: 2. Model predictions and initial tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limber, Patrick W.; Murray, A. Brad

    2014-04-01

    We explore the behavior of a theoretical model of cross-shore headland relief caused by alongshore differences in lithology and rock strength on rocky coastlines. Results address the question of why some rocky coasts exhibit frequent headland and embayment sequences while others evolve to a flat, smooth, and sandy configuration. Main model predictions are that cross-shore headland amplitude is inversely proportional to beach sediment supply and the strength of wave energy convergence and divergence along the headland and bay, and proportional to the alongshore embayment length (or distance between headlands) and the difference between headland and bay rock strength. The coastline's initial physical properties (sea cliff height, composition, etc.) largely determine whether headlands will be persistent or transient landscape features. Model timescales over which the headland and bay reach steady state amplitude, or disappear to a flat coastline, range from 120 to 175,000 years depending on how close the initial amplitude is to steady state. In many cases, the coastline must evolve over several sea level highstands in order to reach equilibrium. A characteristic timescale (independent of initial conditions) shows that the coastline evolves most rapidly when: wave focusing is stronger; sea cliff rock is weaker or retreats faster in a given wave climate; the sea cliff retreat rate decreases rapidly as a function of beach width (i.e., the beach is very effective at dampening wave energy); and the coastline is sediment rich. Comparisons to nature suggest that our model is qualitatively capturing general rocky coastline dynamics and that modeled headland amplitudes are consistent with observed amplitudes.

  9. Assessment of Energy Production Potential from Ocean Currents along the United States Coastline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haas, Kevin A. [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2013-10-03

    Increasing energy consumption and depleting reserves of fossil fuels have resulted in growing interest in alternative renewable energy from the ocean. Ocean currents are an alternative source of clean energy due to their inherent reliability, persistence and sustainability. General ocean circulations exist in the form of large rotating ocean gyres, and feature extremely rapid current flow in the western boundaries due to the Coriolis Effect. The Gulf Stream system is formed by the western boundary current of the North Atlantic Ocean that flows along the east coastline of the United States, and therefore is of particular interest as a potential energy resource for the United States.

  10. Retroflection from a double-slanted coastline: a model for the Agulhas leakage variability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Zharkov

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The Agulhas leakage to the South Atlantic exhibits a strong anti-correlation with the mass flux of the Agulhas Current. When the Agulhas retroflection is in its normal position near Cape Agulhas, leakage is relatively high and the nearby South African coastal slant (angle of derivation from zonal is very small and relatively invariant alongshore. During periods of strong incoming flux (low leakage, the retroflection shifts upstream to Port Elizabeth or East London, where the coastline shape has a "kink", i.e., the slant changes abruptly from small on the west side, to large (about 55° on the east side. Here, we show that the variability of rings shedding and anti-correlation between Agulhas mass flux and leakage to the South Atlantic may be attributed to this kink.

    To do so, we develop a nonlinear analytical model for retroflection near a coastline that consists of two sections, a zonal western section and a strongly slanted eastern section. The principal difference between this and the model of a straight slanted coast (discussed in our earlier papers is that, here, free purely westward propagation of eddies along the zonal coastline section is allowed. This introduces an interesting situation in which strong slant of the coast east of the kink prohibits the formation and shedding of rings, while the almost zonal coastal orientation west of the kink encourages shedding. Therefore, the kink "locks" the position of the retroflection, forcing it to occur just downstream of the kink. Rings are necessarily shed from the retroflection area in our kinked model, regardless of the degree of eastern coast slant. In contrast, a no-kink model with a coastline of intermediate slant indicates that shedding is almost completely arrested by that slant.

    We suggest that the observed difference in ring-shedding intensity during times of normal retroflection position and times when the retroflection is shifted eastward is due to the change in

  11. ENSO signature in the sea level along the coastline of Indian subcontinent

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Srinivas, K.; DineshKumar, P.K.; Revichandran, C.

    was −0.29 (1332 values), indicating a comparatively stronger negative associationship. The sea level on an average, over large areas responds to the atmospheric pressure as an inverted barometer (i.e., 1 cm decrease in sea level for 1mb increase... barometer response was 1.6 cm/mb. Anomalies of sea level along the coastline of the Indian Subcontinent Time series of the detrended and smoothened anomalies of sea level are presented for stations on the west coast in Fig. 3, and in Fig. 4...

  12. Impact of storms on coastlines: preparing for the future without forgetting the past? Examples from European coastlines using a Storm Impact Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciavola, Paolo; Garnier, Emmanuel; Ferreira, Oscar; Spencer, Thomas; Armaroli, Clara

    2017-04-01

    Severe storms have historically affected many European coastlines but the impact of each storm has been evaluated in different ways in different countries, often using local socio-economic impact criteria (e.g. loss of lives and damage to properties). Although the Xynthia (2010) storm, Atlantic coast of France, was the largest coastal disaster of the last 50 years, similar events have previously impacted Europe. The 1953 storm surge in the southern North Sea, resulted in over 2000 deaths and extensive flooding and was the catalyst for post WWII improvements in flood defences and storm early warning systems. On a longer timescale, the very extreme storm of 1634 AD re-configured Wadden Sea coastlines, accompanied by thousands of deaths. Establishing patterns of coastal risk and vulnerability is greatly helped by the use of historical sources, as these allow the development of more complete time series of storm events and their impacts. The work to be presented was supported by the EU RISC-KIT (Resilience-Increasing Strategies for Coasts - toolKIT) Project. RISC-KIT (http://www.risckit.eu/np4/home.html) is a EU FP7 Collaborative project that has developed methods, tools and management approaches to reduce risk and increase resilience to low frequency, high-impact hydro-meteorological events in the coastal zone. These products will enhance forecasting, prediction and early warning capabilities, improve the assessment of long-term coastal risk and optimize the mix of prevention, mitigation and preparedness measures. We analyse historical large-scale events occurred from The Middle Ages to the 1960s at the case study sites of North Norfolk Coast (UK), the Charente-Maritime and Vendée coast (France), the Cinque Terre-Liguria (Italy), the Emilia-Romagna coast (Italy), and the Ria Formosa coast (Portugal). The work presented here uses a database of events built by the project, examining records for the last 300 years, including the characteristics of the storms as well as

  13. The Arctic lithosphere: an overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drachev, S.; Pease, V.; Stephenson, R.

    2012-04-01

    The Arctic is comprised of three deepwater oceanic basins, the Norwegian-Greenland, Eurasia, and Amerasia basins, surrounded by continental masses of the Achaean to Early Proterozoic North American, Baltica and Siberian cratons and intervening Neoproterozoic and Phanerozoic fold belts. Though the tectonic history of the Arctic continental realm spans almost three billions of years, the formation of the Arctic began with the creation of Pangaea-II supercontinent at end of Permian epoch. Between 250 and 150 Ma the Proto-Arctic was represented by the Anyui Ocean, or Angayuchum Sea - a Paleo-Pacific embayment into Pangaea II. During the Mesozoic Pangaea II was destroyed and the Anyi Ocean was isolated from the Paleo-Pacific, finally leading to the separation of Arctic Alaska-Chukchi Microcontinent from the North American side of Laurasia; the collision of this microplate with the Siberian margin occurred at ca. 125 Ma in association with the opening of the Canada Basin. The final stage of the Arctic formation took place in the Cenozoic, and was related to the propagation of the divergent Atlantic lithospheric plate boundary between North America and Baltica with the separation of the Lomonosov continental sliver from the Eurasian margin and opening of the Eurasia oceanic basin between 56 and 0 Ma. The present-day Arctic, especially its shelves and oceanic basins, is one of the least studied places on the Earth. Though we know the geology of the surrounding continental masses, there are still many questions remaining about major lithospheric divides beneath the Arctic seas, such as: • Where are the plate boundaries associated with the Amerasia Basin? • How and when did the Canada Basin open? • What was the pre-drift setting of the Chukchi Borderland? • Which tectonic processes formed the East Siberian shelves? • How and when did the major ridges in the Amerasia Basin form? • Where are the Early Tertiary plate boundaries in the Arctic? • What is the

  14. Coastline evolution of Portuguese low-lying sandy coast in the last 50 years: an integrated approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponte Lira, Cristina; Nobre Silva, Ana; Taborda, Rui; Freire de Andrade, Cesar

    2016-06-01

    Regional/national-scale information on coastline rates of change and trends is extremely valuable, but these studies are scarce. A widely accepted standardized methodology for analysing long-term coastline change has been difficult to achieve, but it is essential to conduct an integrated and holistic approach to coastline evolution and hence support coastal management actions. Additionally, databases providing knowledge on coastline evolution are of key importance to support both coastal management experts and users.The main objective of this work is to present the first systematic, national-scale and consistent long-term coastline evolution data of Portuguese mainland low-lying sandy coasts.The methodology used quantifies coastline evolution using a unique and robust coastline indicator (the foredune toe), which is independent of short-term changes.The dataset presented comprises (1) two polyline sets, mapping the 1958 and 2010 sandy beach-dune system coastline, both optimized for working at 1 : 50 000 scale or smaller; (2) one polyline set representing long-term change rates between 1958 and 2010, each estimated at 250 m; and (3) a table with minimum, maximum and mean of evolution rates for sandy beach-dune system coastline. All science data produced here are openly accessible at https://doi.pangaea.de/10.1594/PANGAEA.859136" target="_blank">https://doi.pangaea.de/10.1594/PANGAEA.859136 and can be used in other studies.Results show beach erosion as the dominant trend, with a mean change rate of -0.24 ± 0.01 m year-1 for all mainland Portuguese beach-dune systems. Although erosion is dominant, this evolution is variable in signal and magnitude in different coastal sediment cells and also within each cell. The most relevant beach erosion issues were found in the coastal stretches of Espinho-Torreira and Costa Nova-Praia de Mira, Cova da Gala-Leirosa, and Cova do Vapor-Costa da Caparica. The coastal segments Minho River-Nazaré and Costa da Caparica adjacent to the

  15. An intelligent coastline interpretation of several types of seacoasts from TM/ETM+images based on rules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Changying; ZHANG Jie; SONG Pingjian

    2014-01-01

    A coastline is defined as the average spring tide line. Different types of seacoast, such as sandy, silty, and bio-logical coast, have different indicators of interpretation. It is very difficult to develop a universal method for interpreting all shorelines. Therefore, the sandy, the silty, and the biological coast are regarded as research objects, and with data mining technology, found the rules of interpretation of those three types of coastlines. Then, an intelligent coastline interpretation method based on rules was proposed. Firstly, the rules for ex-tracting the waterline in Landsat TM/ETM+(Thematic Mapper/Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus) imagery were discovered. Then, through analyzing the features of sandy, silty and biological coast, the indicators of interpreting different types of shoreline were determined. According to the indicators, the waterline could be corrected to the real coastline. In order to verify the validity of the proposed algorithms, three Land-sat TM/ETM+imageries were selected for case studies. The experimental results showed that the proposed methods could interpret the coastlines of sandy, silty, and biological coasts with high precision and without human intervention, which exceeded three pixels.

  16. Prawn biomonitors of nutrient and trace metal pollution along Asia-Pacific coastlines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, Brian; Carter, James F; Tinggi, Ujang; Arman, Ali; Kamal, Masud; Metian, Marc; Waduge, Vajira Ariyaratna; Yaccup, Rahman Bin

    2016-12-01

    To assess coastal ecosystem status and pollution baselines, prawns were collected from the commercial catches of eight Asia-Pacific countries (Australia, Bangladesh, Indonesia, Myanmar, Philippines, Pakistan, Sri Lanka and Thailand). Samples collected from 21 sites along regional coastlines were analysed for trace metal and stable isotopic compositions of H, C, N, O and S. A combination of simple averaging and multivariate analyses was used to evaluate the data. Sites could be assigned to easily recognise polluted and unpolluted groups based on the prawn results. Some filter-feeding clams were also collected and analysed together with the benthic-feeding prawns, and the prawns generally had lower trace metal burdens. Climate change effects were not strongly evident at this time, but altered ocean circulation and watershed run-off patterns accompanying future climate change are expected to change chemical patterns recorded by prawns along these and other coastlines. Stable isotopes, especially (15)N, can help to distinguish between relatively polluted and unpolluted sites.

  17. Silica Sand Identification using ALOS PALSAR Full Polarimetry on The Northern Coastline of Rupat Island, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Husnul Kausarian

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Silica sand is one of the minerals which relatively abundant in Indonesia. One of the areas with abundant of silica sand distribution is the northern coastline of Rupat Island, Bengkalis district, Riau province, Indonesia. The distribution of silica sand in this island identified only on the northern coastline in this island. Some selected sample of silica sand was measured to get the percentage of silica sand mineral’s content using X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF. Two adjacent scenes of ALOS PALSAR full-polarimetry were used. The physical properties of silica sand sample such as dielectric constant were measured using dielectric probe kit in the frequency range from 0.3 to 3.0 GHz and used for calculating the backscattering coefficient and the difference characteristics of silica sand with another object. Freeman-Durdeen and Yamaguchi techniques were used to get the scattering decomposition of physical scattering from the incoherent object model based. Surface scattering is the clearest of Scattering decomposition to show silica sand identification compares with other decompositions. From surface scattering, the backscattering coefficient value of silica sand was calculated starting from -59 dB until -52 dB. These values were given by the surface roughness condition, where the roughness is slightly rough planar. The flat condition supported by the grain size of silica sand particles that have almost the same size and shape, that were conducted by using microscopic photograph testing.

  18. Research and the problems of litter and medical wastes on the UK coastline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philipp, R; Pond, K; Rees, G

    1997-01-01

    Recent research has shown that recreational water and bathing beach quality are associated with injury, infection and personal well-being. Continued surveillance is essential to audit the environmental and associated health trends. In the Coastwatch UK project and since 1989, annual surveys each autumn have been undertaken during a two-week study period, into the extent of littering of the UK coastline. The Public Health Laboratory Service also collects data on the use of hepatitis B immunoglobulin. In these studies it is now possible to examine time trends. The findings are not reassuring. They help to justify present concern about the health effects of discarded litter and medical waste and fears that environmental degradation could lead to loss of income from tourism. In response, some health and local authorities have started public education programmes, supplying litter bins on or near bathing beaches, emptying them regularly and undertaking beach cleansing during the summer months. The UK government is also introducing new legislation that will require 6 mm fine mesh wire screens on all shore-based sewage outlets around the UK coastline. Continued monitoring is needed to assess the effectiveness of these interventions. The need for greater personal responsibility is particularly identified.

  19. Monitoring snow-cover area change in Antarctic coastline region using MODIS product data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Jing; Li Rendong; Ye Ming; Lu Yang

    2009-01-01

    Based on MODIS snow products, this article studied the changes of snow cover area during 2003-2006 along the coastline of the Antarctic, and 18 typical regions were chosen for further analysis. The result showed that the change of snow cover area was in a fluctuant downward trend as a whole, and more fluctuated obviously in warm season than in cold season. In temporal scale: for the season cycle, the snow cover extent increased rapidly in cold season (Apr-Oct), while the performance in warm season (Nov-Mar) was not exactly the same during the four years, the snow cover extent decreased in the first and then increased in 2004 and 2006, however, increased firstly and then decreased but reduced as a whole in 2005, for the inter-annual cycle, snow cover extent was the largest in 2003, but reached to the lowest level in 2004, and then increased gradually in 2005 and 2006, whereas, it declined with fluctuant as a whole. In spatial scale, changes mainly centralized along the coastline, moreover, it was more remarkable in the West Antarctic than in the East Antarctic, especially in the Antarctic Peninsula region.

  20. Airborne measurements of submicron aerosols across the coastline at Bhubaneswar during ICARB

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P Murugavel; V Gopalakrishnan; Vimlesh Pant; A K Kamra

    2008-07-01

    Airborne measurements of the number concentration and size distribution of aerosols from 13 to 700 nm diameter have been made at four vertical levels across a coastline at Bhubaneswar (20° 25′N, 85° 83′E) during the Integrated Campaign for Aerosols, gases and Radiation Budget (ICARB) programme conducted in March–April 2006. The measurements made during the constant-level flights at 0.5, 1, 2 and 3 km altitude levels extend ∼100 km over land and ∼150km over ocean. Aerosol number concentrations vary from 2200 to 4500 cm-3 at 0.5 km level but are almost constant at ∼6000 cm-3 and ∼800 cm-3 at 2 and 3 km levels, respectively. At 1km level, aerosol number concentration shows a peak of 18,070 cm-3 around the coastline. Most of the aerosol size distribution curves at 0.5 km and 1 km levels are monomodal with a maxima at 110nm diameter which shifts to 70 nm diameter at 2 and 3 km levels. However, at the peak at 1 km level, number concentration has a bimodal distribution with an additional maximum appearing in nucleation mode. It is proposed that this maxima in nucleation mode at 1 km level may be due to the formation and transport of new particles from coastal regions.

  1. Incorporation of Fine-Grained Sediment Erodibility Measurements into Sediment Transport Modeling, Capitol Lake, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Andrew W.; Gelfenbaum, Guy; Elias, Edwin; Jones, Craig

    2008-01-01

    Capitol Lake was created in 1951 with the construction of a concrete dam and control gate that prevented salt-water intrusion into the newly formed lake and regulated flow of the Deschutes River into southern Puget Sound. Physical processes associated with the former tidally dominated estuary were altered, and the dam structure itself likely caused an increase in retention of sediment flowing into the lake from the Deschutes River. Several efforts to manage sediment accumulation in the lake, including dredging and the construction of sediment traps upriver, failed to stop the lake from filling with sediment. The Deschutes Estuary Feasibility Study (DEFS) was carried out to evaluate the possibility of removing the dam and restoring estuarine processes as an alternative ongoing lake management. An important component of DEFS was the creation of a hydrodynamic and sediment transport model of the restored Deschutes Estuary. Results from model simulations indicated that estuarine processes would be restored under each of four restoration alternatives, and that over time, the restored estuary would have morphological features similar to the predam estuary. The model also predicted that after dam-removal, a large portion of the sediment eroded from the lake bottom would be deposited near the Port of Olympia and a marina located in lower Budd Inlet seaward of the present dam. The volume of sediment transported downstream was a critical piece of information that managers needed to estimate the total cost of the proposed restoration project. However, the ability of the model to predict the magnitude of sediment transport in general and, in particular, the volume of sediment deposition in the port and marina was limited by a lack of information on the erodibility of fine-grained sediments in Capitol Lake. Cores at several sites throughout Capitol Lake were collected between October 31 and November 1, 2007. The erodibility of sediments in the cores was later determined in the

  2. Potential fate of SOC eroded from natural crusted soil surface under simulated wind driven storm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Liangang; Fister, Wolfgang; Greenwood, Philip; Hu, Yaxian; Kuhn, Nikolaus J.

    2016-04-01

    Improving the assessment of the impact of soil erosion on carbon (C) cycling requires a better understanding of the redistribution of eroded sediment and associated soil organic carbon (SOC) across agricultural landscapes. Recent studies conducted on dry-sieved aggregates in the laboratory demonstrated that aggregation can profoundly skew SOC redistribution and its subsequent fate by accelerating settling velocities of aggregated sediment compared to mineral grains, which in turn can increase SOC mineralization into greenhouse gases. However, the erodibility of the soil in the field is more variable than in the laboratory due to tillage, crus formation, drying-wetting and freeze-thaw cycles, and biological effects. This study aimed to investigate the potential fate of the SOC eroded from naturally developed soil surface and to compare the observations with those made in the laboratory. Simulated, short, high intensity wind driven storms were conducted on a crusted loam in the field. The sediments were fractionated with a settling tube according to their potential transport distances. The soil mass, SOC concentration and cumulative 80-day CO2 emission of each fraction were identified. The results show: 1) 53% of eroded sediment and 62% of eroded SOC from the natural surface in the field would be deposited across landscapes, which is six times and three times higher compared to that implied by mineral grains, respectively; 2) the preferential deposition of SOC-rich fast-settling sediment potentially releases approximately 50% more CO2 than the same layer of the non-eroded soil; 3) the respiration of the slow-settling fraction that is potentially transported to the aquatic systems was much more active compared to the other fractions and the bulk soil. Our results confirm in general the conclusions drawn from laboratory and thus demonstrate that aggregation can affect the redistribution of sediment associated SOC under field conditions, including an increase in

  3. Use of rare earth oxide tracers to determine source areas for sediment eroded from arable hillslopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deasy, C.; Quinton, J. N.

    2009-04-01

    Soil erosion from arable hillslopes has both on-site and off-site effects. On-site, erosion and redistribution of sediment can lead to the loss of productive field area and a reduction in organic matter and nutrient content in topsoil. Off-site, the transport and deposition of eroded sediment in downstream waters is associated with turbidity, sedimentation and reduced water quality, as sediments are associated with the transport of nutrients, particularly phosphorus (P) and nitrogen (N), heavy metals and pesticides. Arable land is a major source for these sediments, with studies in the UK estimating the cultivated fields may be responsible for up to 80% of particulate P in rivers. Previous studies at Loddington in Leicestershire, UK have demonstrated that most of the P and much of the N eroded from hillslope is in particulate form, transported in association with sediment suspended in runoff. Results also suggest that tramlines are the principal pathway for erosion from arable fields containing combinable crops. As tramlines are regularly spaced over the whole field, they potentially act as conduits for runoff, sediment and sediment-associated nutrients to be lost from the hillslope. However, it is not yet clear where the source areas are for sediment eroded via this pathway. To understand the movement of sediment on arable hillslopes, a hillslope-scale tracer experiment was undertaken in one year at the same site. The aims of this study were (1) to develop an application method for rare earth oxide tracers suitable for using on a hillslope scale to assess sediment movement over a number of storm events, (2) to determine the erosion rates of different contributing hillslope areas, (3) to determine the relative contributions of sediment eroded from each of these areas in order to assess the importance of different hillslope source areas for soil erosion. Different rare earth oxide tracers were applied in solution using a knapsack sprayer to four areas of the

  4. The Arctic is no longer put on ice: evaluation of Polar cod (Boreogadus saida) as a monitoring species of oil pollution in cold waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonsson, Henrik; Sundt, Rolf C; Aas, Endre; Sanni, Steinar

    2010-03-01

    The withdrawing Arctic ice edge will facilitate future sea transport and exploration activities in the area, which calls for the establishment of relevant cold water monitoring species. The present study presents first results of field baseline levels for core oil pollution biomarkers in Polar cod (Boreogadussaida) sampled from pristine, Arctic waters. Furthermore, biomarker response levels were characterized in controlled laboratory exposure experiments running over 2 weeks. Fish exposed to a simulated petrogenic spill (1ppm dispersed, crude oil) exhibited elevated hepatic EROD activity, bile PAH-metabolites, and hepatic DNA-adducts, whereas male individuals exposed to simulated produced water (30ppb nonylphenol) exhibited a strong induction of plasma vitellogenin. In conclusion, the results demonstrated low and robust biomarker baseline levels that were clearly different from exposure responses. In combination with its high abundance and circumpolar distribution, the Polar cod seems well qualified for oil pollution monitoring in Arctic waters.

  5. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC in Arctic ground ice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Fritz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermal permafrost degradation and coastal erosion in the Arctic remobilize substantial amounts of organic carbon (OC and nutrients which have been accumulated in late Pleistocene and Holocene unconsolidated deposits. Their vulnerability to thaw subsidence, collapsing coastlines and irreversible landscape change is largely due to the presence of large amounts of massive ground ice such as ice wedges. However, ground ice has not, until now, been considered to be a source of dissolved organic carbon (DOC, dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC and other elements, which are important for ecosystems and carbon cycling. Here we show, using geochemical data from a large number of different ice bodies throughout the Arctic, that ice wedges have the greatest potential for DOC storage with a maximum of 28.6 mg L−1 (mean: 9.6 mg L−1. Variation in DOC concentration is positively correlated with and explained by the concentrations and relative amounts of typically terrestrial cations such as Mg2+ and K+. DOC sequestration into ground ice was more effective during the late Pleistocene than during the Holocene, which can be explained by rapid sediment and OC accumulation, the prevalence of more easily degradable vegetation and immediate incorporation into permafrost. We assume that pristine snowmelt is able to leach considerable amounts of well-preserved and highly bioavailable DOC as well as other elements from surface sediments, which are rapidly stored in ground ice, especially in ice wedges, even before further degradation. In the Yedoma region ice wedges represent a significant DOC (45.2 Tg and DIC (33.6 Tg pool in permafrost areas and a fresh-water reservoir of 4172 km3. This study underlines the need to discriminate between particulate OC and DOC to assess the availability and vulnerability of the permafrost carbon pool for ecosystems and climate feedback upon mobilization.

  6. Development of arctic wind technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holttinen, H.; Marjaniemi, M.; Antikainen, P. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland)

    1998-10-01

    The climatic conditions of Lapland set special technical requirements for wind power production. The most difficult problem regarding wind power production in arctic regions is the build-up of hard and rime ice on structures of the machine

  7. SCICEX: Submarine Arctic Science Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Submarine Arctic Science Program, SCICEX, is a federal interagency collaboration among the operational Navy, research agencies, and the marine research community...

  8. Study on the Influences of Coastline Changes in Hydrodynamic Force and Tidal Prism of Tianjin Offshore Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Honglingyao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerical simulation of Tianjin coastal waters tidal field by using the Mike21 numerical model. The impact of coastline changes in hydrodynamic force and tidal prism of Tianjin offshore area was predicted. Results show that after the change of coastline, there is no obvious change on the form of flow field at each typi-cal moment for sea areas. But the tidal dynamic condition in most of sea area is weakened to some extent, the most obvious change exists in the flow field of the alongshore reclamation engineering areas. The coastline change is caused by sea filling and, the land accretion directly causes the decrease in the area of Tianjin near-shore waters, so as to decrease the tidal prism.

  9. Interaction webs in arctic ecosystems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Niels M.; Hardwick, Bess; Gilg, Olivier;

    2017-01-01

    How species interact modulate their dynamics, their response to environmental change, and ultimately the functioning and stability of entire communities. Work conducted at Zackenberg, Northeast Greenland, has changed our view on how networks of arctic biotic interactions are structured, how they ...... that the combination of long-term, ecosystem-based monitoring, and targeted research projects offers the most fruitful basis for understanding and predicting the future of arctic ecosystems....

  10. Arctic species resilience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Lars O.; Forchhammer, Mads C.; Jeppesen, Erik

    and precipitation. Concurrently, phenological change has been recorded in a wide range of plants and animals, with climate change seemingly being the primary driver of these changes. A major concern is whether species and biological systems embrace the plasticity in their phenological responses needed for tracking......The peak of biological activities in Arctic ecosystems is characterized by a relative short and intense period between the start of snowmelt until the onset of frost. Recent climate changes have induced larger seasonal variation in both timing of snowmelt as well as changes mean temperatures...... the predicted increase in climate variability. Whereas species may show relatively high phenological resilience to climate change per se, the resilience of systems may be more constrained by the inherent dependence through consumer-resource interactions across trophic levels. During the last 15 years...

  11. A review of soil erodibility in water and wind erosion research%水蚀风蚀过程中土壤可蚀性研究述评

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋阳; 刘连友; 严平

    2005-01-01

    Soil erodibility is an important index to evaluate the soil sensitivity to erosion. The research on soil erodibility is a crucial tache in understanding the mechanism of soil erosion. Soil erodibility can be evaluated by measuring soil physiochemical properties, scouring experiment, simulated rainfall experiment, plot experiment and wind tunnel experiment. We can use soil erosion model and nomogram to calculate soil erodibility. Many soil erodibility indices and formulae have been put forward. Soil erodibility is a complex concept, it is influenced by many factors, such as soil properties and human activities. Several obstacles restrict the research of soil erodibility. Firstly, the research on soil erodibility is mainly focused on farmland; Secondly, soil erodibility in different areas cannot be compared sufficiently; and thirdly, the research on soil erodibility in water-wind erosion is very scarce. In the prospective research, we should improve method to measure and calculate soil erodibility, strengthen the research on the mechanism of soil erodibility, and conduct research on soil erodibility by both water and wind agents.

  12. The influence of biochar on substrate erodibility: An experimental approach with simulated rainfall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seitz, Steffen; Geißler, Christian; Goebes, Philipp; Teuber, Sandra; Scholten, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    Biochar is charcoal made from biomass by pyrolysis and used as a soil amendment. The addition of biochar to topsoils can lead to significant changes in soil characteristics. Nevertheless, the impact of biochar on soil functions is a controversial subject. It generally results from specific influences of substrates and biochar on the equilibrium between release (e.g. desorption) and fixation (e.g. adsorption) mechanisms. Furthermore, physical effects between soil and biochar are reported, which affect soil texture and thus mostly the transport and storage of water in substrates. It seems likely that while biochar influences biochemical and -physical processes, it can also affect soil erodibility. To investigate this assumption, an experimental rainfall simulation with splash cups was conducted. Different types ("HTC", "Pyrochar"; Delinat, Switzerland), sizes (biochar (2 %, 6 %, 10 %) were used in two substrates (sand and silt). Rainfall was induced with a single-nozzle rainfall simulator (Tübingen Rainfall Simulator) under a portable light frame tent (16 m3). The simulator was equipped with a Lechler 460.788.30 nozzle and adjusted to a drop falling height of 3.5 m (pressure at nozzle: 150 hPa). The sprinkle area was 1 m2 and rainfall was applied for 10 min with an intensity of 50 mm h-1 for all simulation runs (KE=5.13 J m-2 mm-1). The drop size spectrum and intensity of the simulator were calibrated and continuously checked using a "Laser Precipitation Monitor" (Thies GmbH) to ensure homogeneous rain characteristics. Results showed that the erodibility of both sand (p=0.006) and silt (p=0.094) decreased with biochar addition compared to treatments without biochar addition. The erodibility of sand was lower with HTC-char than with Pyrochar, but in silt it was lower with Pyrochar than with HTC-char. Nevertheless, the biochar type did not affect erodibility significantly. Sediment detachment was three-times higher in silt than in sand, both with and without biochar

  13. Tracing peatland geomorphology: sediment and contaminant movements in eroding and restored systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuttleworth, Emma; Evans, Martin; Hutchinson, Simon; Rothwell, James

    2015-04-01

    Peatlands are an important store of soil carbon, play a vital role in global carbon cycling, and can also act as sinks of atmospherically deposited heavy metals. However, large areas of blanket peat are significantly degraded and actively eroding as a direct result of anthropogenic pressures, which negatively impacts carbon and pollutant storage. The restoration of eroding UK peatlands is a major conservation concern, and over the last decade measures have been taken to control erosion and restore large areas of degraded peat. In severely eroded peatlands, topography is highly variable, and an appreciation of geomorphological form and process is key in understanding the controls on peatland function, and in mitigating the negative impacts of peatland erosion. The blanket peats of the Peak District, Southern Pennines, UK embody many problems and pressures faced by peatlands globally, and are amongst the most heavily eroded and contaminated in the world. The near-surface layer of the peat is contaminated by high concentrations of anthropogenically derived, atmospherically deposited heavy metals which are released into the fluvial system as a consequence of widespread erosion. Whilst not desirable, this legacy of lead pollution and its release offer a unique opportunity to trace peatland sediment movements and thus investigate the controls on sediment and contaminant mobility. A suite of established field, analytical and modelling techniques have been modified and adapted for use in peatland environments and these have been successfully employed in combination to address issues of sediment and contaminant release at a range of scales, including: (i) the development of field portable XRF to assess in situ lead concentrations in wet organic sediments; (ii) adaptation of time integrated mass flux samplers to explore spatial and temporal sediment dynamics in peatland streams; and (iii) the application of sediment source fingerprinting and numerical mixing models to

  14. Mapping erodibility in dust source regions based on geomorphology, meteorology, and remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parajuli, Sagar Prasad; Yang, Zong-Liang; Kocurek, Gary

    2014-09-01

    Mineral dust in the atmosphere has implications for Earth's radiation budget, biogeochemical cycles, hydrological cycles, human health, and visibility. Currently, the simulated vertical mass flux of dust differs greatly among the existing dust models. While most of the models utilize an erodibility factor to characterize dust sources, this factor is assumed to be static, without sufficient characterization of the highly heterogeneous and dynamic nature of dust source regions. We present a high-resolution land cover map of the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) in which the terrain is classified by visually examining satellite images obtained from Google Earth Professional and Environmental Systems Research Institute Basemap. We show that the correlation between surface wind speed and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer deep blue aerosol optical depth (AOD) can be used as a proxy for erodibility, which satisfactorily represents the spatiotemporal distribution of soil-derived dust sources. This method also identifies agricultural dust sources and eliminates the satellite-observed dust component that arises from long-range transport, pollution, and biomass burning. The erodible land cover of the MENA region is grouped into nine categories: (1) bedrock: with sediment, (2) sand deposit, (3) sand deposit: on bedrock, (4) sand deposit: stabilized, (5) agricultural and urban area, (6) fluvial system, (7) stony surface, (8) playa/sabkha, and (9) savanna/grassland. Our results indicate that erodibility is linked to the land cover type and has regional variation. An improved land cover map, which explicitly accounts for sediment supply, availability, and transport capacity, may be necessary to represent the highly dynamic nature of dust sources in climate models.

  15. Density and habitat dependent effects of crab burrows on sediment erodibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Needham, Hazel R.; Pilditch, Conrad A.; Lohrer, Andrew M.; Thrush, Simon F.

    2013-02-01

    Despite biological interactions being highlighted as a key process in determining particle fluxes, relatively few studies have attempted to establish the links between burrow building bioturbators and sediment stability. The mud crab Austrohelice crassa, is a key burrowing species in New Zealand estuaries that has shown context-specific interactions with its environment. Here we use annular flumes to test if sediment stability and erodibility were altered as a function of A. crassa burrow density in two contrasting sediment types: a cohesive sandy-mud and a non-cohesive sand. Three burrow density treatments (n = 3) reflecting the natural density range in each sediment type (sand; 0-100 m- 2, sandy-mud; 0-400 m- 2), were collected from the field and subjected to sequential increases in water flow velocity. Flow profiles were measured and bed shear stresses were calculated for each treatment. Increasing burrow density reduced the mass of sediment eroded at 0.35 m s- 1(ME-35, g m- 2) in cohesive sandy-mud, while in non-cohesive sand a unimodal pattern was observed, whereby erosion rates were greatest at the lowest burrow density (19 m- 2). In the cohesive sediment, the linear decrease in erodibility with increasing burrow density was likely affected by the sluicing of fine particulates (silt-clay) from burrows when the tide was out creating both a smoothing and consolidating effect on the sediment surface. A reduction in flow velocity due to the increased presence of surficial pellets and greater trapping of bedload transported material was attributed to the reduction in the mass of sediment eroded in sand at high burrow densities. This study demonstrates that burrow builders influence sediment transport by more than just vertical particle mixing and highlights some of the complexities of small-scale sediment processes. Knowledge of different organism-sediment interactions among sediment types and spatial scales will enhance the accuracy of sediment transport models.

  16. Alterations to Soil and Eroded Sediment Carbon after the Rim Fire, Yosemite National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lever, R.; Berhe, A. A.; Fogel, M. L.; Hockaday, W. C.; Kuhn, T. J.; Austin, L. J.

    2015-12-01

    The soil system is a critical global carbon (C) pool that is under threat from both fire and erosion perturbations. In the Western United States, forecasted increases in average temperatures, as well as for extended summer growing seasons, indicate that large fuel loads and ideal fire conditions may generate more high intensity wildfires. Understanding how wildfires control soil C storage is critical for both projecting losses of soil C and how to better manage fire regimes to increase soil C storage. This research addresses a topic that has only been briefly addressed by the current body of literature - the erosion of pyrogenic C, or C which has undergone some combustion, which has the potential to affect storage of C within the soil system. The Rim Fire was a wildfire that consumed over 250,000 acres of land in Yosemite National Park and Stanislaus National Forest in 2013. After the fire, sediment traps were established on a hillslope under three treatment conditions: 1) high burn severity — high slope; 2) high burn severity — moderate slope, and; 3) moderate burn severity — high slope. Sediments were collected from these traps after every major precipitation event following the Rim Fire, Additionally, representative soils were collected from the source areas of the eroded material. Differences in chemical composition of organic matter and concentration of pyrogenic matter were determined using 13C Cross-Polarization Magic Angle Spinning (CPMAS) Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, in addition to elemental and stable isotope analysis of carbon and nitrogen. Our results show that carbon eroded from areas of higher burn intensity generally had higher concentration of aromatic functional groups, compared to moderate burn intensity areas. Differences in the form of C eroded from areas of different burn intensity and slope steepness can be used as a proxy for determining how fire severity and geomorphology dictate the amount and nature of C eroded from

  17. Coastline Zones Identification and 3D Coastal Mapping Using UAV Spatial Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apostolos Papakonstantinou

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Spatial data acquisition is a critical process for the identification of the coastline and coastal zones for scientists involved in the study of coastal morphology. The availability of very high-resolution digital surface models (DSMs and orthophoto maps is of increasing interest to all scientists, especially those monitoring small variations in the earth’s surface, such as coastline morphology. In this article, we present a methodology to acquire and process high resolution data for coastal zones acquired by a vertical take off and landing (VTOL unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV attached to a small commercial camera. The proposed methodology integrated computer vision algorithms for 3D representation with image processing techniques for analysis. The computer vision algorithms used the structure from motion (SfM approach while the image processing techniques used the geographic object-based image analysis (GEOBIA with fuzzy classification. The SfM pipeline was used to construct the DSMs and orthophotos with a measurement precision in the order of centimeters. Consequently, GEOBIA was used to create objects by grouping pixels that had the same spectral characteristics together and extracting statistical features from them. The objects produced were classified by fuzzy classification using the statistical features as input. The classification output classes included beach composition (sand, rubble, and rocks and sub-surface classes (seagrass, sand, algae, and rocks. The methodology was applied to two case studies of coastal areas with different compositions: a sandy beach with a large face and a rubble beach with a small face. Both are threatened by beach erosion and have been degraded by the action of sea storms. Results show that the coastline, which is the low limit of the swash zone, was detected successfully by both the 3D representations and the image classifications. Furthermore, several traces representing previous sea states were

  18. Frijolito Watershed: Integrated investigations of a rapidly eroding pinyon-juniper hillslope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilcox, B.P. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Pitlick, J. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States). Dept. of Geography; Allen, C.D. [National Biological Survey, Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The dramatic acceleration of erosion associated with the expansion of pinyon-juniper woodlands over the past 100 years has been widely recognized, but few process-based studies of this phenomenon have been undertaken. In an attempt to identify the underlying causes, and the factors that affect erosion processes, we have initiated an interdisciplinary study of a rapidly eroding pinyon-juniper woodland in northern New Mexico. Since July 1993, we have collected data on runoff, erosion, and weather conditions from a 1-ha catchment study area and have conducted surveys of topography, soils, and vegetation. Our preliminary results indicate that although runoff makes up less than 10% of the annual water budget, runoff events - which are frequent in the summer - are capable of moving large amounts of sediment. We estimate that between July 1993 and October 1994, between 25,000 and 50,000 kg of sediment has eroded and been transported from the catchment. The information gained from such studies is essential to our ability to formulate effective strategies for managing these rapidly eroding woodlands.

  19. Evaluation of flowable resin composite surfaces eroded by acidic and alcoholic drinks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Linlin; Okamoto, Akira; Fukushima, Masayoshi; Okiji, Takashi

    2008-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the morphological changes of the surfaces of flowable resins eroded by orange juice and alcohol drinks. The tested products were Beautifil Flow BF02 and BF10, Clearfil Majesty LV, Filtek Supreme XT Flowable Restorative, Unifil LoFlo Plus and Filtek Supreme. Filler percentages of flowable resins were calculated after the latter were incinerated at 750 degrees C. Specimens were shaped into a disk form with a diameter of 10 mm and a thickness of 1 mm. Morphological changes were evaluated for the following types of flowable resin surfaces: polished surface, surfaces eroded by 100% orange juice, wine and whisky. Filler percentages of the tested flowable resins ranged between 42 and 78%. Surface degradation was observed for the specimens immersed in acidic and alcoholic drinks, and it was thought that the lower the filler percentage, the greater was the surface degradation. Decomposition of the matrix resin and fallout of the fillers were observed in flowable resins that eroded with acidic and alcoholic drinks.

  20. Experimental Investigation of process parameters influence on machining Inconel 800 in the Electrical Spark Eroding Machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karunakaran, K.; Chandrasekaran, M.

    2016-11-01

    The Electrical Spark Eroding Machining is an entrenched sophisticated machining process for producing complex geometry with close tolerances in hard materials like super alloy which are extremely difficult-to-machine by using conventional machining processes. It is sometimes offered as a better alternative or sometimes as an only alternative for generating accurate 3D complex shapes of macro, micro and nano-features in such difficult-to-machine materials among other advanced machining processes. The accomplishment of such challenging task by use of Electrical Spark Eroding Machining or Electrical Discharge Machining (EDM) is depending upon selection of apt process parameters. This paper is about analyzing the influencing of parameter in electrical eroding machining for Inconel 800 with electrolytic copper as a tool. The experimental runs were performed with various input conditions to process Inconel 800 nickel based super alloy for analyzing the response of material removal rate, surface roughness and tool wear rate. These are the measures of performance of individual experimental value of parameters such as pulse on time, Pulse off time, peak current. Taguchi full factorial Design by using Minitab release 14 software was employed to meet the manufacture requirements of preparing process parameter selection card for Inconel 800 jobs. The individual parameter's contribution towards surface roughness was observed from 13.68% to 64.66%.

  1. The Influence of Eroded Blades on Wind Turbine Performance Using Numerical Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Schramm

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available During their operation, wind turbine blades are eroded due to rain and hail, or they are contaminated with insects. Since the relative inflow velocity is higher at the outer than at the inner part of the blades, erosion occurs mostly at the outer blade region. In order to prevent strong erosion, it is possible to install a leading edge protection, which can be applied to the blades after the initial installation, but changes the shape of the initial airfoil sections. It is unclear how this modification influences the aerodynamic performance of the turbine. Hence, it is investigated in this work. The NREL 5 MW turbine is simulated with clean and eroded blades, which are compared to coated blades equipped with leading edge protection. Aerodynamic polars are generated by means of Computational Fluid Dynamics, and load calculations are conducted using the blade element momentum theory. The analysis in this work shows that, compared to clean rotor blades, the worse aerodynamic behaviour of strongly eroded blades can lead to power losses of 9 % . In contrast, coated blades only have a small impact on the turbine power of less than 1 % .

  2. Spatial variability of the soil erodibility parameters and their relation with the soil map at subgroup level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Rodríguez, Raquel; Marques, Maria Jose; Bienes, Ramón

    2007-05-25

    This project takes a look at the variation of the parameters related to soil erodibility (fractions of clay, silt, fine and coarse sand; organic matter, permeability, and structure) coming from soil pits from the Community of Madrid's soil map (Spain), according to Soil Taxonomy at subgroup level. It draws the conclusion that map erodibility shouldn't be estimated from a soil map because the K factor obtained does not present significant differences among the different types of soil. One or more key factors related with soil erodibility must be taken into account if erodibility maps are to be drawn. This research has shown that silt and structure could be considered key factors for erodibility maps of the area, but not significant differences have been found in important factors such as clay or organic matter due to the wide range of data variance. In order to elaborate erosion risk maps the use of the K factor from the physiographical map is a good alternative. When data are grouped according to these criteria significant differences in K factor are shown. Erodibility was greater in soils developed over gypsic material, with a value of 0.63+/-0.28, than in high plateaus (locally know as alcarrias), with a value of 0.40+/-0.18. In order to adequately represent soil erodibility, a kriging geostatistic technique is used, which reduces the variation of the factors considered when they are found to correlate, as is the case with the parameters considered to calculate K factor.

  3. 77 FR 31677 - Request for Public Comment on Interagency Arctic Research Policy Committee (IARPC) Arctic...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-29

    ... TECHNOLOGY POLICY Request for Public Comment on Interagency Arctic Research Policy Committee (IARPC) Arctic... and Policy Act of 1984 (ARPA), Public Law 98-373, established the Interagency Arctic Research Policy Committee (IARPC) to develop national Arctic research policy five-year Federal research plans to...

  4. Global detection and analysis of coastline associated rainfall using objective pattern recognition techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Bergemann, Martin; Lane, Todd P

    2015-01-01

    Coastally induced rainfall is a common feature especially in tropical and subtropical regions. However, it has been difficult to quantify the contribution of coastal rainfall features to the overall local rainfall. We develop a novel technique to objectively identify precipitation associated with land-sea interaction and apply it to satellite based rainfall estimates. The Maritime Continent, the Bight of Panama, Madagascar and the Mediterranean are found to be regions where land-sea interactions plays a crucial role in the formation of precipitation. In these regions $\\approx$ 40\\% to 60\\% of the total rainfall can be related to coastline effects. Due to its importance for the climate system, the Maritime Continent is a particular region of interest with high overall amounts of rainfall and large fractions resulting from land-sea interactions throughout the year. To demonstrate the utility of our identification method we investigate the influence of several modes of variability, such as the Madden-Julian-Osci...

  5. A baseline study of metal contamination along the Namibian coastline for Perna perna and Choromytilus meridionalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahms, S; van der Bank, F H; Greenfield, R

    2014-08-15

    The use of bivalves such as the brown mussel (Perna perna) and the black mussel (Choromytilus meridionalis) is common in the study of marine pollution and the effect of these pollutants on ecosystems and are important in both economic and ecological roles. Namibian marine ecosystems are threatened by pollution from mining, commercial fishing and population growth. The aims of this study were to determine baseline metal concentrations, spatial variation and variation between species. Metal levels in C. meridionalis from Guano Platform (GP) are the lowest of all the sites. The most polluted sites are Rocky Point (RP), Halifax Island (HIL) and between Walvis Bay and Swakopmund (WS). The bioaccumulation of metals between P. perna and C. meridionalis were not uniform for all metals. Overall the study indicates the condition of the coastline to be mostly normal, with Cd and Pb levels being of concern. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Metal contamination of Posidonia oceanica meadows along the Corsican coastline (Mediterranean).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafabrie, C; Pergent-Martini, C; Pergent, G

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine metal (Cd, Co, Cr, Hg, Ni, Pb) concentrations in Posidonia oceanica tissues along the Corsican coastline. The results show that except for Cr, all the metals are preferentially accumulated in the blades; this is particularly interesting as it means that future metal analyses may be carried out only on the blades avoiding thus the removal of the shoots. Moreover, they show that metal concentrations may reflect the "background noise" of the Mediterranean Sea. Station 15 (Canari) can however be distinguished from the others due to its high Co, Cr and Ni concentrations. This result may be related to the presence of a previous asbestos mine, located near this station. Therefore, this study reinforces the usefulness and the relevance of Posidonia oceanica as a tracer of spatial metal contamination and as an interesting tool for water quality evaluation.

  7. The toxic benthic dinoflagellate Ostreopsis ovata: quantification of proliferation along the coastline of Genoa, Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangialajo, L; Bertolotto, R; Cattaneo-Vietti, R; Chiantore, M; Grillo, C; Lemee, R; Melchiorre, N; Moretto, P; Povero, P; Ruggieri, N

    2008-06-01

    Toxic harmful algal bloom (HAB) occurrence is becoming more frequent and problematic in highly urbanized coastal zones. In summer 2005 along the urbanized Genoa coastline (Ligurian Sea, North western Mediterranean Sea), local first aid stations treated about 200 people, who all showed similar symptoms following exposure to marine aerosols. The link with proliferation of Ostreopsis ovata was made, and it highlighted for the first time, the risks that benthic HABs may represent in highly urbanised temperate areas. Subsequently, a specific monitoring plan was designed and implemented in the same area in July 2006, before the first signs of Ostreopsis proliferation were detected. Here we report on this quantification of an Ostreopsis ovata bloom in the Ligurian Sea. Cells were quantified both in the water column and in the epiphytic community on macrophytes. Our results suggest a role of sea water temperature and weather conditions in favouring bloom development.

  8. First results on the study of metal contamination along the Corsican coastline using Posidonia oceanica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafabrie, C; Pergent-Martini, C; Pergent, G

    2008-01-01

    This study aims at determining the metal concentrations in blades and sheaths of Posidonia oceanica adult leaves, in 16 stations of the Corsican coastline. It shows that except for Cr, all the metals are preferentially accumulated in the blades. This result is particularly interesting as it means that trace metals analyses may be carried out only on the blades avoiding thus the removal of the shoots. Moreover, this study shows that metal concentrations generally fall within the range of the lowest values available in literature and may reflect the "background noise" of the Mediterranean. Station 15 (Canari) can however be distinguished from the others due to its high Co, Cr and Ni concentrations. This result may be related to the presence of a previous asbestos mine, located near this station. Therefore, this study reinforces the relevance of the use of P. oceanica as a tracer of metal contamination.

  9. Plastic marine debris on the Portuguese coastline: a matter of size?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, J; Sobral, P

    2011-12-01

    Plastic debris is a worldwide threat to marine environments and Portugal is not immune to it. Though never quantified, items of all sizes can be found in the Portuguese coastline; therefore the objective of this work is the identification of main size classes in stranded plastic debris. Beaches sediment was sampled and in the laboratory plastic items were sorted in 11 classes from 10mm, counted and weighted. Plastic size ranged from 50 μm to 20 cm and microplastics (plastic fits in the smaller size classes, due to expected high residence time in the sea enhancing degradation processes, which increase surface exposure and potentially persistent organic pollutants (POP) adsorption. These results point out the important contribution of microplastics to marine debris pollution, its risks, and the need to set a higher focus on this size class.

  10. Recent benthic foraminifera and sedimentary facies distribution of the Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates) coastline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorini, Flavia; Lokier, Stephen W.

    2014-05-01

    The distribution of benthic foraminifera and sedimentary facies from Recent coastline environments adjacent to the coastline of Abu Dhabi (UAE) was studied in detail with the aim to: 1) provide reliable analogs for understanding and interpreting the depositional environment of ancient shallow-marine sediments from the UAE; 2) assess any modifications in the distribution of benthic environments and sedimentary facies in an area affected by significant anthropogenic activities - particular construction and land reclamation. A total of 100 sea-floor sediment samples were collected in different shallow-marine sedimentary environments (nearshore shelf, beach-front, channels, ooid shoals, lagoon and mangals) close to the coastline of Abu Dhabi Island. Where possible, we revisited the sampling sites used in several studies conducted in the middle of last century (prior to any significant anthropogenic activities) to assess temporal changes in Recent benthic foraminifera and sedimentary facies distribution during the last 50 years. Five foraminiferal assemblages were recognized in the studied area. Species with a porcellaneous test mainly belonging to the genera Quinqueloculina, Triloculina, Spiroloculina, Sigmoilinita are common in all studied areas. Larger benthic foraminifera Peneroplis and Spirolina are particularly abundant in samples collected on seaweed. Hyaline foraminifera mostly belonging to the genera Elphidium, Ammonia, Bolivina and Rosalina are also common together with Miliolidae in the nearshore shelf and beach front. Agglutinated foraminifera (Clavulina, Textularia, Ammobaculites and Reophax) are present in low percentages. The species belonging to the genera Ammobaculites and Reophax are present only in the finest grain samples particularly in lagoons and mangal environments and have not been reported previously in the studied area. The majority of the ooid shoal sediments, the coarser sediments of the beach-front and samples collected in dredged channels

  11. The Arctic policy of China and Japan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tonami, Aki

    2014-01-01

    At the May 2013 Arctic Council Ministerial Meeting, five Asian states, namely China, Japan, India, Singapore and South Korea, were accepted to become new Permanent Observers at the Arctic Council. Nonetheless, little attention has been paid to the Asian states and their interest in the Arctic. Most...... discussions have focused on China and the assessment of China’s interest in the Arctic is divided. This paper attempts to fill this gap by presenting and comparing the various components of the Arctic policies of China and Japan. Referring to Putnam’s model of the “two-level game” and Young’s categorization...... of Arctic stakeholders’ interests, data from policy documents and interviews with relevant stakeholders were analysed. This analysis shows the Chinese and Japanese governments are in the gradual process of consolidating their Arctic policies, but both China and Japan see the Arctic less as a strategically...

  12. Time varying arctic climate change amplification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chylek, Petr [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dubey, Manvendra K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lesins, Glen [DALLHOUSIE U; Wang, Muyin [NOAA/JISAO

    2009-01-01

    During the past 130 years the global mean surface air temperature has risen by about 0.75 K. Due to feedbacks -- including the snow/ice albedo feedback -- the warming in the Arctic is expected to proceed at a faster rate than the global average. Climate model simulations suggest that this Arctic amplification produces warming that is two to three times larger than the global mean. Understanding the Arctic amplification is essential for projections of future Arctic climate including sea ice extent and melting of the Greenland ice sheet. We use the temperature records from the Arctic stations to show that (a) the Arctic amplification is larger at latitudes above 700 N compared to those within 64-70oN belt, and that, surprisingly; (b) the ratio of the Arctic to global rate of temperature change is not constant but varies on the decadal timescale. This time dependence will affect future projections of climate changes in the Arctic.

  13. The Arctic policy of China and Japan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tonami, Aki

    2014-01-01

    At the May 2013 Arctic Council Ministerial Meeting, five Asian states, namely China, Japan, India, Singapore and South Korea, were accepted to become new Permanent Observers at the Arctic Council. Nonetheless, little attention has been paid to the Asian states and their interest in the Arctic. Most...... discussions have focused on China and the assessment of China’s interest in the Arctic is divided. This paper attempts to fill this gap by presenting and comparing the various components of the Arctic policies of China and Japan. Referring to Putnam’s model of the “two-level game” and Young’s categorization...... of Arctic stakeholders’ interests, data from policy documents and interviews with relevant stakeholders were analysed. This analysis shows the Chinese and Japanese governments are in the gradual process of consolidating their Arctic policies, but both China and Japan see the Arctic less as a strategically...

  14. Cohesive Sediment Erodibility and Evolution of a Mud Deposit on the Palos Verdes Shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwood, C. R.; Ferre, B.; Murray, C. J.; Sanford, L. P.; Warner, J. C.; Wiberg, P. L.

    2006-12-01

    We have added a cohesive-sediment erodibility algorithm to ROMS, a three-dimensional numerical model for circulation and sediment transport. The new code implements an algorithm developed by Sanford ("Modeling a dynamically varying mixed sediment bed with erosion, deposition, bioturbation, consolidation, and armoring", Computers and Geosciences, in review.) The algorithm assumes that cohesive sediment has a critical stress for erosion that varies (typically increasing) with depth in the sediment, determined by various physical and biological properties or processes. Erosion and deposition alter this profile, but it is reestablished over a characteristic time scale which is longer than typical resuspension events (a few days) but probably less than a year. The critical stress profile limits the amount of sediment that can be eroded during to the mass available at the maximum stress applied during the event. Because the critical stress profile varies with time, the response to events depends on the history of sediment disturbance and recovery. The shapes of the critical stress profiles can vary both horizontally and vertically. In this pilot application, the shapes of the profiles were determined from geostatistical modeling of field data collected on a mud deposit on the Palos Verdes Shelf off Los Angeles. The data include about 30 traditional grain-size measurements, 10 erosion-chamber experiments, and 160 measurements of the penetration depths of a sediment-profiling camera. The penetration depths were highly correlated (r=0.84) with the slope of the erodibility profiles determined by the erosion chamber. Maps of erodibility (i.e., slope and offset of the critical stress profiles) on the Palos Verdes Shelf were made with Gaussian simulation and collocated cokriging of the erosion-chamber data conditioned on the camera-penetration data. These and maps of bottom grain-size distribution were used to initialize the bed sediment in ROMS. Model runs were made for the

  15. Cryogenic formation of brine and sedimentary mirabilite in submergent coastal lake basins, Canadian Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasby, Stephen E.; Rod Smith, I.; Bell, Trevor; Forbes, Donald L.

    2013-06-01

    Two informally named basins (Mirabilite Basins 1 and 2) along a submergent coastline on Banks Island, Canadian Arctic Archipelago, host up to 1 m-thick accumulations of mirabilite (Na2SO4·10H2O) underlying stratified water bodies with basal anoxic brines. Unlike isostatically uplifting coastlines that trap seawater in coastal basins, these basins formed from freshwater lakes that were transgressed by seawater. The depth of the sill that separates the basins from the sea is shallow (1.15 m), such that seasonal sea ice formation down to 1.6 m isolates the basins from open water exchange through the winter. Freezing of seawater excludes salts, generating dense brines that sink to the basin bottom. Progressive freezing increases salinity of residual brines to the point of mirabilite saturation, and as a result sedimentary deposits of mirabilite accumulate on the basin floors. Brine formation also leads to density stratification and bottom water anoxia. We propose a model whereby summer melt of the ice cover forms a temporary freshwater lens, and rather than mixing with the underlying brines, it is exchanged with seawater once the ice plug that separates the basins from the open sea melts. This permits progressive brine development and density stratification within the basins.

  16. Mechanism of seasonal Arctic sea ice evolution and Arctic amplification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kwang-Yul; Hamlington, Benjamin D.; Na, Hanna; Kim, Jinju

    2016-09-01

    Sea ice loss is proposed as a primary reason for the Arctic amplification, although the physical mechanism of the Arctic amplification and its connection with sea ice melting is still in debate. In the present study, monthly ERA-Interim reanalysis data are analyzed via cyclostationary empirical orthogonal function analysis to understand the seasonal mechanism of sea ice loss in the Arctic Ocean and the Arctic amplification. While sea ice loss is widespread over much of the perimeter of the Arctic Ocean in summer, sea ice remains thin in winter only in the Barents-Kara seas. Excessive turbulent heat flux through the sea surface exposed to air due to sea ice reduction warms the atmospheric column. Warmer air increases the downward longwave radiation and subsequently surface air temperature, which facilitates sea surface remains to be free of ice. This positive feedback mechanism is not clearly observed in the Laptev, East Siberian, Chukchi, and Beaufort seas, since sea ice refreezes in late fall (November) before excessive turbulent heat flux is available for warming the atmospheric column in winter. A detailed seasonal heat budget is presented in order to understand specific differences between the Barents-Kara seas and Laptev, East Siberian, Chukchi, and Beaufort seas.

  17. Spatio-temporal analysis of the coastline of faliro bay, attica, Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bathrellos, G. D.

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Coastal zone of Attica has been subject to constant changes generated by human interference during the last decades of the 20" century. Faliro Bay is located along the southwestern coast of Attica. Important changes are taking place in the area, due to human development that has irreversibly altered the physical features and has shaped the morphology of the bay. The aim of this paper is to record and monitor the coastline changes in Faliro Bay dunng a long-term penod. In order to detect the changes of the coastline, different methods, such as comparing topographical maps, aerial photographs and satellite imagery of different dates have been used.La zona costera de Attika ha sufrido cambios continuos en las últimas décadas del siglo 20 provocados por la intervención humana. La bahía de Faliro está localizada a lo largo de la costa sur-oeste de Attika. Significativas modificaciones han tenido lugar en la región, a causa del desarrollo humano que ha cambiado de forma irrevocable las características naturales y ha configurado la morfología de la bahía. El objeto de este trabajo es la presentación y el control de los cambios de la línea costera en la bahía de Faliro en un período de tiempo largo. Para el estudio de los cambios de la línea costera se ha utilizado la comparación de mapas topográficos, de fotografías aéreas y de imágenes de satélite.

  18. Nutrient and metal pollution of the eastern Gulf of Finland coastline: Sediments, macroalgae, microbiota

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gubelit, Yulia, E-mail: Gubelit@list.ru [Zoological Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Polyak, Yulia [Scientific Research Center for Ecological Safety of the Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Dembska, Grazyna; Pazikowska-Sapota, Grazyna; Zegarowski, Lukasz [Maritime Institute in Gdansk, Department of Environmental Protection, Gdansk (Poland); Kochura, Dmitry; Krivorotov, Denis; Podgornaya, Elena; Burova, Olga [Research Institute of Hygiene, Occupational Pathology and Human Ecology (RIHOPHE), Federal Medical Biological Agency, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Maazouzi, Chafik [Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Laboratoire d' Écologie des Hydrosystèmes Naturels et Anthropisés (LEHNA), Lyon (France)

    2016-04-15

    The anthropogenic pollution along the coastline of the eastern Gulf of Finland was studied through a range of methods, including analyses of metal contamination in water, surface sediments, accumulated algal biomass and its correlation with resistant microbiota. According to concentrations, the main pollutants in water were copper and manganese. Influence of Nuclear Power Plant was remarkable in adjacent areas and was expressed in high concentrations of molybdenum, nickel, copper and other elements in the water. Relatively high concentrations of copper, lead and zinc were found in sediments. Microbial tolerance appeared to be correlated with the concentration of the metals in sediments. Higher tolerance levels were found in sediment samples from more polluted stations. Macroalgae, which were massively developed in the coastal zone, had shown high level of metal bioaccumulation. Analyses of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus content of algal tissues allowed the estimation of additional nutrient loading from accumulated decaying algal biomass on the coastal zone of the eastern Gulf of Finland. Mass development of algae in coastal area may contribute to accumulation of organic matter and associated metals. In our study the highest metal concentrations in sediments were found at the sites with dense and continuous layer of fresh and decaying macroalgal biomass, accompanied by hypoxic conditions. Also our study has shown that accumulated biomass may be a significant source of nutrients in the coastal ecosystem. - Highlights: • We studied heavy metal pollution in the coastline of the eastern Gulf of Finland. • Sediments, water, mass macroalgae and microbiota were included into analyses. • Eutrophication and nutrient loading remain the main problem of the studied area. • Macroalgae contribute to accumulation of organic matter, nutrient, and heavy metal. • Pollution in the studied area is caused by a combination of different factors.

  19. Damage to and recovery of coastlines polluted with C-heavy oil spilled from the Nakhodka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayakawa, Kazuichi; Nomura, Maki; Nakagawa, Takuya; Oguri, Seiji; Kawanishi, Takuya; Toriba, Akira; Kizu, Ryoichi; Sakaguchi, Toshifumi; Tamiya, Eiichi

    2006-03-01

    The damage to and recovery of the Japanese coastline from Suzu, Ishikawa Prefecture to Mikuni, Fukui Prefecture was investigated visually over three years after a C-heavy oil spill from the Russian tanker "Nakhodka" in the Japan Sea on January 2, 1997. The beached C-heavy oil tended to remain for a long time on coasts of bedrock and boulder/cobble/pebble but it was removed rapidly from coasts of gravel/sand and man-made structures such as concrete tetrapods. On the coasts of the latter type, wave energy appeared to be the main force removing the oil. One year after the spill, C-heavy oil tended to remain strongly on the sheltered coasts of bedrock and boulder/cobble/pebble. Even on coasts of this type, the contamination was remarkably absent by 2 years after the spill. The concentration levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in oil lumps, sand and seawater were monitored during 3 years following the spill. The concentrations of PAHs having 2 or 3 rings decreased more quickly than did those of PAHs having 4 or more rings, suggesting that volatilization was the main cause of the decrease. On the other hand, the concentrations of PAHs having 4 to 6 rings did not start to decrease until 7 months after the spill. The main cause of the decrease seemed to be photolysis. The concentration of BaP in seawater off the polluted coasts was high 1 month after the spill and then decreased. Three years after the spill, the level fell to the sub ng/L level, which was as low as the level in seawater along unpolluted clean coasts in Japan. The concentration of BaP in greenling was higher than the normal level only during the first two months after the spill. These results suggest that the coastlines in Ishikawa and Fukui Prefectures that were polluted with C-heavy oil recovered in 3 years.

  20. Effect of long-term wave climate variability on longshore sediment transport along regional coastlines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Piyali; Behera, Manasa Ranjan

    2017-08-01

    Long-term changes in wave climate have potential impacts on the evolution of regional coastlines. This study investigates the impact of variable wave climate on the temporal dynamics of longshore sediment transport (LST), which plays a major role in defining the overall coastal geomorphology of regional coastlines. The central west coast of India is considered as the study region. ERA-Interim wave hindcast dataset over the period of 1979-2015 is used to derive the contemporary wave climate in this region. The annual average significant wave height, period, and direction are computed and used to estimate LST of the study region. This region experiences oblique waves from the W-SW direction with an annual average significant wave height and wave period of 1.32 m and 8.10 s, respectively, that induces a gross northerly transport of approximately 450,000 m3/year. It is found that the total LST is driven by swell waves and wind waves and shows a decreasing trend of about 5% over the analysis period. The decay in LST is found to be linked with decreases in wave activity in this region. The swell wave induced sediment transport is an order of magnitude higher than the wind wave induced LST. It is observed that the swell generation in the lower latitudes has decreased, resulting in reduced swell wave induced LST in the study area. Both swell and wind wave induced LST show seasonal variation. Finally, a link is established between the seasonal variation of swell induced LST and the cyclogenesis periods. In addition, the wind wave induced LST is observed to have a direct link with the latitudinal position of the inter-tropical convergence zone (ITCZ).

  1. Spatial and temporal trends of contaminants in mussel sampled around the Icelandic coastline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturludottir, Erla; Gunnlaugsdottir, Helga; Jorundsdottir, Hronn O; Magnusdottir, Elin V; Olafsdottir, Kristin; Stefansson, Gunnar

    2013-06-01

    Contaminants have been determined in blue mussels (Mytilus edulis) at 11 locations around the Icelandic coastline from 1990 to 2010. The aim of the present study was to investigate if there has been a change in concentration of contaminants around the Icelandic coastline for the last two decades and if the concentrations and changes, if present, were consistent between locations. Concentrations of the persistent organic pollutants, p,p'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethene (p,p'-DDE), hexachlorobenzene (HCB), α-hexachlorocyclohexane (α-HCH), polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB-153) and trans-nonachlor, have decreased at most of the sampling locations in Iceland in recent years. However, an increasing trend was found at a few locations that could be explained by anthropogenic activity. The concentration levels of the persistent organics were much lower than found at the Norwegian, USA and Chinese coasts, especially levels of p,p'-DDE. The concentration of copper and selenium had a consistent pattern of change and concentration between locations over the period which showed a decreasing trend in recent years. The trace elements arsenic, cadmium, mercury and zinc showed more variation in concentration between locations, the concentration of arsenic, mercury and zinc was fairly stable over the period, whereas there were fluctuations in cadmium concentrations. The concentrations of cadmium and zinc were observed to be somewhat higher than found in mussels from Norway, USA and China but values of mercury and lead were much lower in the mussel sampled in Iceland. The higher concentrations of cadmium and zinc can be explained by the volcanic activity in Iceland but no major anthropogenic sources of trace elements are known in Iceland.

  2. Post-release survival and movements patterns of roosterfish (Nematistius pectoralis off the Central American coastline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chugey A Sepulveda

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Acoustic telemetry was used to assess immediate post-release survival and track the short-term movement patterns of roosterfish Nematistius pectoralis between 2008 and 2010. Seven roosterfish (85 to 146 cm fork length, FL were continuously tracked along the Central American coastline for periods of up to 28 h following capture on recreational fishing tackle. All seven roosterfish were initially captured and spent the duration of the track period proximal to the coastline in waters <100 m of depth. From depth records and horizontal movements, it was determined that all seven roosterfish survived the acute effects of capture. The greatest depth achieved by any of the tracked individuals was 62 m and collectively roosterfish spent over 90% of the track records between the surface and 12 m. For all tracks, fish size showed no effect on maximum or average dive depth and the average day (7 ± 2 m and night (6 ± 2 m depths were similar among individuals. Mean water temperature for all tracks was 28 ± 1°C, with the lowest temperature experienced at depth being 23°C. Total horizontal movements from the roosterfish in this study ranged from 14.7 to 42.2 km and averaged 1.5 ± 0.4 km h-1. Data on movements in relation to bathymetry, prey presence and habitat structure are discussed. Collectively, these data provide insight into the immediate post-release disposition and short-term movements of this poorly studied species along the coast of Central America.

  3. Morbillivirus infection in cetaceans stranded along the Italian coastline: pathological, immunohistochemical and biomolecular findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Guardo, Giovanni; Di Francesco, Cristina Esmeralda; Eleni, Claudia; Cocumelli, Cristiano; Scholl, Francesco; Casalone, Cristina; Peletto, Simone; Mignone, Walter; Tittarelli, Cristiana; Di Nocera, Fabio; Leonardi, Leonardo; Fernández, Antonio; Marcer, Federica; Mazzariol, Sandro

    2013-02-01

    Morbilliviruses are recognized as biological agents highly impacting the health and conservation status of free-ranging cetaceans worldwide, as clearly exemplified by the two Dolphin Morbillivirus (DMV) epidemics of 1990-1992 and 2006-2008 among Mediterranean striped dolphins (Stenella coeruleoalba). After these two epidemics, morbilliviral infection (MI) cases with peculiar neurobiological features were reported in striped dolphins stranded along the Spanish coastline. Affected cetaceans showed a subacute-to-chronic, non-suppurative encephalitis, with brain lesions strongly resembling those found in human "subacute sclerosing panencephalitis" and "old dog encephalitis". Brain was the only tissue in which morbilliviral antigen and/or genome could be detected. Beside a case of morbilliviral encephalitis in a striped dolphin's calf stranded in 2009, we observed 5 additional MI cases in 2 striped dolphins, 1 bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) and 2 fin whales (Balaenoptera physalus), all stranded in 2011 along the Italian coastline. Noteworthy, 3 of these animals (2 striped dolphins and 1 bottlenose dolphin) showed immunohistochemical (IHC) and/or biomolecular (PCR) evidence of morbilliviral antigen and/or genome exclusively in their brain, with 1 striped dolphin and 1 bottlenose dolphin also exhibiting a non-suppurative encephalitis. Furthermore, simultaneous IHC and PCR evidence of a Toxoplasma gondii coinfection was obtained in 1 fin whale. The above results are consistent with those reported in striped dolphins after the two MI epidemics of 1990-92 and 2006-2008, with evidence of morbilliviral antigen and/or genome being found exclusively in the brain tissue from affected animals.

  4. Mapping the Coastline Limits of the Mexican State Sinaloa Using GPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez, G. E.

    2007-12-01

    This research work presents the delimitation of the coastline limits of Sinaloa (one of the richest states of northwestern Mexico). In order to achieve this big task, it was required to use GPS (Global Positioning System) together with leveling spirit measurements. Based on the appropriate selection of the cited measurement techniques, the objective was to map the Sinaloa's state coastline to have the cartography of approximate 1600 km of littoral. The GPS measurements were performed and referred with respect to a GPS network located across the state. This GPS network consists of at least one first-order-site at each of the sixteen counties that constitute the state, and three to four second-order-sites of the ten counties of the state surrounded by sea. The leveling spirit measurements were referred to local benchmarks pre-established by the Mexican agency SEMARNAT (SEcretaría Del Medio Ambiente y Recursos NATurales). Within the main specifications of the GPS measurements and equipment, we used geodetic-dual-frequency GPS receivers in kinematic mode for both base stations (first and second order sites of the GPS state network) and rover stations (points forming the state littoral) with 5-sec log-rate interval and 10 deg cut-off angle. The GPS data processing was performed using the commercial software Trimble Geomatics Office (TGO) with Double Differences (DD) in post-processing mode. To this point, the field measurements had been totally covered including the cartography (scale 1:1000) and this includes the specifications and appropriate labeling according to the Mexican norm NOM-146-SEMARNAT-2005.

  5. An International Coastline Collaboratory to Broaden Scientific Impacts of a Subduction Zone Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodin, P.

    2015-12-01

    A global Subduction Zone Observatory (SZO) presents an exciting opportunity to broaden involvement in scientific research and to ensure multidisciplinary impact. Most subduction zones feature dynamic interactions of the seafloor, the coastline, and the onshore environments also being perturbed by global climate change. Tectonic deformation, physical environment changes (temperature and chemistry), and resulting ecological shifts (intertidal population redistribution, etc.) are all basic observables for important scientific investigation. Yet even simple baseline studies like repeated transects of intertidal biological communities are rare. A coordinated program of such studies would document the local variability across time and spatial scales, permit comparisons with other subducting coastlines, and extend the reach and importance of other SZO studies. One goal is to document the patterns, and separate the component causes of, coastal uplift and subsidence and ecological response to a subduction zone earthquake using a database of pre-event biological and surveying observations. Observations would be directed by local scientists using students and trained volunteers as observers, under the auspices of local educational entities and using standardized sampling and reporting methods. The observations would be added to the global, Internet-accessible, database for use by the entire scientific community. Data acquisition and analysis supports the educational missions of local schools and universities, forming the basis for educational programs. All local programs would be coordinated by an international panel convened by the SZO. The facility would include a web-hosted lecture series and an annual web conference to aid organization and collaboration. Small grants could support more needy areas. This SZO collaboratory advances not only scientific literacy, but also multinational collaboration and scholarship, and (most importantly) produces important scientific results.

  6. Evaluation of Soil Erodibility Factor (k forLoess Derived Landforms of Kechik Watershedin Golestan Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanifeh khormai1

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Globally, Soil erosion is a principal degradation process resulting in negative impacts on different soil functions (food and other biomass production, water storing, filtering and transformation, habitat and gene pool, physical and cultural environment for mankind, and source of raw materials which ultimately causes irreversible effect on the poorly renewable soil resource. Determination of the soil erodibility factor (K-factor is a cumbersome and expensive undertaking in the effort to predict the soil loss rates. Soil erodibility (K-value is a key parameter in erosion prediction and is important for conservation planning in the face of a rising need for protecting the limited land resources. The technique proposed by Wischmeier& Smith for estimating the soil erodibility factor is among the most important methods in this regard. Materials and Methods: Given the high amounts of silt and lime content in loess soils of eastern parts of Golestan province, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the ability of Wischmeier& Smith index to estimate the soil erodibility of this region. In this study, soil erodibility was obtained by Wischmeier’s nomograph and then was compared with the actual values obtained by selecting three plots and then performing physical and chemical tests on these samples. The Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE developed by Wischmeier and Smith (1978 is the most frequently used empirical soil erosion model worldwide. Soil erodibility is one of six factors affecting soil erosion in the USLE that reflects the ease with which soil is detached by splash during rainfall, surface flow or both. To check soil erosion,three plots of 15 meters long and three meters wide with a slope of 16 percentwere selected in the next sites of the station. The plots were separated by metal fences to a height of 30 cm,.To measure the soil profile parameters, the sampling was performedin one stage from depth of0-30 cm in the middle of

  7. Modeling ocean and sea ice dynamics of the Canadian Arctic Archipelago: Aspects of forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wekerle, Claudia; Wang, Qiang; Danilov, Sergey; Myers, Paul G.; Jung, Thomas; Schröter, Jens

    2013-04-01

    The Canadian Arctic Archipelago (CAA) is one of the main pathways for freshwater exiting the Arctic Ocean. Freshwater exported to the North Atlantic may influence the deep water formation in the Labrador Sea, and thus the meridional overturning circulation. Modeling ocean and sea ice conditions of the CAA is difficult because of narrow straits and complex coastlines. The Finite-Element Sea-ice Ocean circulation Model (FESOM) configured on a global mesh is applied to assess the volume, freshwater and sea ice transports through the CAA. With a mesh resolution of 5 km in the CAA we are able to accurately resolve complex coastlines. Outside the CAA the mesh is refined to 24 km north of 55°N with a global background resolution of 1.5°. In this study, first, it is shown that the transports modeled with FESOM correlate well with the available observational data. Second, the model is used to learn about the impact of different atmospheric forcing datasets differing in spatial and temporal resolution (CORE 2 and the Reforecast dataset from Environment Canada). The CORE 2 dataset is on the T62 grid, which is coarse compared to the Reforecast dataset with grid resolution of 0.45° longitude and 0.3° latitude. The temporal resolution of the Reforecast dataset is higher than the CORE 2 dataset (one hourly and 6-hourly data, respectively, for wind, surface temperature and specific humidity fields). The representation of sea ice in the CAA can be improved by using the high resolution atmospheric forcing.

  8. History of sea ice in the Arctic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Polyak, Leonid; Alley, Richard B.; Andrews, John T.

    2010-01-01

    Arctic sea-ice extent and volume are declining rapidly. Several studies project that the Arctic Ocean may become seasonally ice-free by the year 2040 or even earlier. Putting this into perspective requires information on the history of Arctic sea-ice conditions through the geologic past. This inf...

  9. 海岸线变化的地质指标体系%Geoindicator system of coastline changes.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王祎萍; 李瑞敏; 王轶; 曹峰; 徐为

    2011-01-01

    海岸带地质环境的演化集中表现是海岸线的变迁.基于对海岸线变迁的影响、演化方式、危害、防治对策等因素的分析,建立影响-状态-结果(CSR)的海岸线变迁的调查指标体系.在调查指标体系的基础上,抽取压力、状态、应对(PSR)指标,建立中国海岸线变迁的监测指标体系.这对科学评价、监测和管理海岸带的环境具有重要意义.%The evolution of geological environment in the coastal zone concentrates on the changes of the coastline. The survey indicator system of coastline changes was established by Cause-State-Result index (CSR model) based on the analysis of impact, evolution means, hazards and control measures and other factors of coastline changes. The monitoring indicator system of coastline changes was also established by the Pressure-State-Response index (PSR model) on the basis of the investigation indicator system. These results are of great significance in assessing, monitoring and managing coastal environment scientifically.

  10. Coastline Community College World Trade Center Institute Business and International Education Program. Final Performance Report: A Summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platt, Chet; Secord, Debra A.

    Under a Title VI-B grant, California's Coastline Community College (CCC) conducted a needs assessment survey establishing a database of international training needs, developed five courses and 10 workshops in international business, and formed the World Trade Center Institute (WTCI). This report provides information on the activities and…

  11. Analysis of the Cost Effectiveness of Awarding Experiential Learning Credit at Coastline Community College. Spring 1981-1982.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedel, J. E.

    Since its first year of operation, Coastline Community College (CCC) has granted students credit based on military experience, licensure, occupational training, credit-by-examination, and assessment of prior learning. In spring 1982, a study was conducted to compare the cost-effectiveness of granting credit for experience with that of the…

  12. The records of coastline changes reflected by mangroves on the Sunda Shelf since the last 40 ka

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG XiaoMei; SUN XiangJun; WANG PinXian; Karl Stattegger

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a 40000-year-long high-resolution mangrove record from sediments of Core 18300,18302 and 18323 on the continental shelf of the southern South China Sea and reconstructs the coast-line changes on Sunda Shelf since the last 40000 years.In the period Marine Isotope 3,the old Sunda Shelf had low sea level,and it was partly exposed.Flourishing vegetations grew on the exposed old land.Mangroves developed along the coastline.On the Last Glacial Maximum,the sea level dropped greatly,coastline moved from inner shelf to outer shelf,the Old Sunda Land exposed further,and the lowering sea level induced the gradual disappearing of mangroves from the inner Sunda Shelf to the outer Sunda Shelf.And pioneer vegetation ferns covered the broadly exposed old land immediately.At the time of the last Deglaciation,sea level rose greatly,the coastline moved to the sea and the Sunda Shelf was drown again.Mangroves were emergent again from outer shelf to inner shelf and developed quickly.

  13. Delineation of tunnel valley across the North Sea coastline, Denmark based on reflection seismic data, boreholes, TEM and Schlumberger soundings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Theis Raaschou; Jørgensen, Flemming; Christensen, Steen

    2016-01-01

    , preferred orientations, and morphology support that three of the tunnel valleys cross the North Sea coastline. It is suggested that the nine valleys were formed during at least six events that occurred through one or more pre-Weichselian glaciations. Key words: Pleistocene valleys, geophysical mapping...

  14. In Brief: Arctic Report Card

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showstack, Randy

    2009-11-01

    The 2009 annual update of the Arctic Report Card, issued on 22 October, indicates that “warming of the Arctic continues to be widespread, and in some cases dramatic. Linkages between air, land, sea, and biology are evident.” The report, a collaborative effort of 71 national and international scientists initiated in 2006 by the Climate Program Office of the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), highlights several concerns, including a change in large-scale wind patterns affected by the loss of summer sea ice; the replacement of multiyear sea ice by first-year sea ice; warmer and fresher water in the upper ocean linked to new ice-free areas; and the effects of the loss of sea ice on Arctic plant, animal, and fish species. “Climate change is happening faster in the Arctic than any other place on Earth-and with wide-ranging consequences,” said NOAA administrator Jane Lubchenco. “This year“s Arctic Report Card underscores the urgency of reducing greenhouse gas pollution and adapting to climate changes already under way.”

  15. EROD activities of liver in Mugil so-iuy exposed to benzo(a) pyrene, pyrene and their mixture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Chonggang; Chen Jixin; Yu Ang; Zheng Weiyun

    2003-01-01

    The effects on hepatic EROD (7-ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase) in Mugil so-iuy exposed to benzo(a)pyrene (BaP), pyrene and their mixtures of equal concentration were investigated, at concentrations of 0.1, 1.0, 5.0, 10.0, 50.0 μg/dm3, in experimental condition. Time-effects and doseresponse of the biochemical indexs were observed. The results showed that the hepatic EROD activities were induced by the exposure of BaP, pyrene and their mixtures at high concentration. Dose-response connections were that the hepatic EROD activities were elevated with increasing concentration of the pollutants. The combined effect of BaP and pyrene at 1:1 concentration ratio on hepatic EROD activity was antagonism.

  16. Ground-based LiDAR application to characterize sea cliff instability processes along a densely populated coastline in Southern Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Giuseppe; Semaan, Fouad; Salvini, Riccardo; Troise, Claudia; Somma, Renato; Matano, Fabio; Sacchi, Marco

    2017-04-01

    Sea cliff retreatment along the coastline of the Campi Flegrei volcanic area (Southern Italy) is becoming a threat for public and private structures due to the massive urbanization occurred in the last few decades. In this area, geological features of the outcropping rocks represent one of the most important factors conditioning the sea cliff retreatment. In fact, pyroclastic deposits formed by pumices, scoria, ashes and lapilli are arranged in weakly to moderately welded layers of variable thicknesses, resulting very erodible and prone to landslide processes. Available methods to evaluate topographic changes and retreat rates of sea cliffs include a variety of geomatic techniques, like terrestrial and aerial photogrammetry and LiDAR (Light Detection And Ranging). By means of such techniques, it is in fact possible to obtain high resolution topography of sea cliffs and perform multi-temporal change detection analysis. In this contribution, we present an application of Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS or ground-based LiDAR) aimed to identify and quantify instability processes acting along the Torrefumo coastal cliff, in the Campi Flegrei area. Specifically, we acquired a series of 3D point clouds on the years 2013 and 2016, and compared them through a cloud-to-cloud distance computation. Furthermore, a statistical analysis was applied to the change detection results. In this way, an inventory of the cliff failures occurred along the Torrefumo cliff in the 2013-2016 time span was created, as well as the spatial and volumetric distribution of these failures was evaluated. The volumetric analysis shows that large collapses occurred rarely, whereas the spatial analysis shows that the majority of failures occurred in the middle and upper parts of the cliff face. Results also show that both rock fall and surficial erosion processes contribute to the cliff retreatment, acting in turn according to the geological properties of the involved pyroclastic deposits. The presented

  17. Arctic hydrology and meteorology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kane, D.L.

    1988-01-01

    The behavior of arctic ecosystems is directly related to the ongoing physical processes of heat and mass transfer. Furthermore, this system undergoes very large fluctuations in the surface energy balance. The buffering effect of both snow and the surface organic soils can be seen by looking at the surface and 40 cm soil temperatures. The active layer, that surface zone above the permafrost table, is either continually freezing or thawing. A large percentage of energy into and out of a watershed must pass through this thin veneer that we call the active layer. Likewise, most water entering and leaving the watershed does so through the active layer. To date, we have been very successful at monitoring the hydrology of Imnavait Creek with special emphasis on the active layer processes. The major contribution of this study is that year-round hydrologic data are being collected. An original objective of our study was to define how the thermal and moisture regimes within the active layer change during an annual cycle under natural conditions, and then to define how the regime will be impacted by some imposed terrain alteration. Our major analysis of the hydrologic data sets for Imnavait Creek have been water balance evaluations for plots during snowmelt, water balance for the watershed during both rainfall and snowmelt, and the application of a hydrologic model to predict the Imnavait Creek runoff events generated by both snowmelt and rainfall.

  18. Uncertainties in Arctic Precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majhi, I.; Alexeev, V. A.; Cherry, J. E.; Cohen, J. L.; Groisman, P. Y.

    2012-12-01

    Arctic precipitation is riddled with measurement biases; to address the problem is imperative. Our study focuses on comparison of various datasets and analyzing their biases for the region of Siberia and caution that is needed when using them. Five sources of data were used ranging from NOAA's product (RAW, Bogdanova's correction), Yang's correction technique and two reanalysis products (ERA-Interim and NCEP). The reanalysis dataset performed better for some months in comparison to Yang's product, which tends to overestimate precipitation, and the raw dataset, which tends to underestimate. The sources of bias vary from topography, to wind, to missing data .The final three products chosen show higher biases during the winter and spring season. Emphasis on equations which incorporate blizzards, blowing snow and higher wind speed is necessary for regions which are influenced by any or all of these factors; Bogdanova's correction technique is the most robust of all the datasets analyzed and gives the most reasonable results. One of our future goals is to analyze the impact of precipitation uncertainties on water budget analysis for the Siberian Rivers.

  19. Arctic hydrology and meteorology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kane, D.L.

    1989-01-01

    To date, five years of hydrologic and meteorologic data have been collected at Imnavait Creek near Toolik Lake, Alaska. This is the most complete set of field data of this type collected in the Arctic of North America. These data have been used in process-oriented research to increase our understanding of atmosphere/hydrosphere/biosphere/lithosphere interactions. Basically, we are monitoring heat and mass transfer between various spheres to quantify rates. These could be rates of mass movement such as hillslope flow or rates of heat transfer for active layer thawing or combined heat and mass processes such as evapotranspiration. We have utilized a conceptual model to predict hydrologic processes. To test the success of this model, we are comparing our predicted rates of runoff and snowmelt to measured valves. We have also used a surface energy model to simulate active layer temperatures. The final step in this modeling effort to date was to predict what impact climatic warming would have on active layer thicknesses and how this will influence the hydrology of our research watershed by examining several streambeds.

  20. Assay for quantitative determination of CYP1A1 enzyme activity using 7-Ethoxyresorufin as standard substrate (EROD assay)

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2014-01-01

    Authors: Afshin Mohammadi-Bardbori ### Abstract The activity of the enzyme 7-ethoxy-resorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) has been extensively employed in biomonitoring studies of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) for more than a decade. Although the procedure is simple, convenient, sensitive and accurate. The cytochrome P450 monooxygenase 1A (CYP1A) is induced by several planar toxic compounds and endogenous chemicals, and the induction of this protein is often measured in terms of EROD a...

  1. Recent advances in understanding the Arctic climate system state and change from a sea ice perspective: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Döscher

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The Arctic sea ice is the central and essential component of the Arctic climate system. The depletion and areal decline of the Arctic sea ice cover, observed since the 1970's, have accelerated after the millennium shift. While a relationship to global warming is evident and is underpinned statistically, the mechanisms connected to the sea ice reduction are to be explored in detail. Sea ice erodes both from the top and from the bottom. Atmosphere, sea ice and ocean processes interact in non-linear ways on various scales. Feedback mechanisms lead to an Arctic amplification of the global warming system. The amplification is both supported by the ice depletion and is at the same time accelerating the ice reduction. Knowledge of the mechanisms connected to the sea ice decline has grown during the 1990's and has deepened when the acceleration became clear in the early 2000's. Record summer sea ice extents in 2002, 2005, 2007 and 2012 provided additional information on the mechanisms. This article reviews recent progress in understanding of the sea ice decline. Processes are revisited from an atmospheric, ocean and sea ice perspective. There is strong evidence for decisive atmospheric changes being the major driver of sea ice change. Feedbacks due to reduced ice concentration, surface albedo and thickness allow for additional local atmosphere and ocean influences and self-supporting feedbacks. Large scale ocean influences on the Arctic Ocean hydrology and circulation are highly evident. Northward heat fluxes in the ocean are clearly impacting the ice margins, especially in the Atlantic sector of the Arctic. Only little indication exists for a direct decisive influence of the warming ocean on the overall sea ice cover, due to an isolating layer of cold and fresh water underneath the sea ice.

  2. The Arctic tourism in Russia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yury F. Lukin

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In the new book "Arctic tourism in Russia" the basic concepts, resource potential, attractiveness (from Lat. Attrahere: to attract, opportunities and threats of environmental, cruise, international, and other types of tourism in the Arctic are system-based analyzed, for the first time in the literature. The sphere of tourism has becoming an integral sector of the economy, having a multiplicative effect for the development of infrastructure, social services, employment. Reference materials about the tourism products in the Russian Arctic and Far North regions are published, including the Arkhangelsk and Murmansk regions; Republic of Karelia, Komi, Sakha (Yakutia; Nenets, the Yamalo-Nenets, Khanty-Mansiysk, the Chukotka Autonomous Districts; Taimyr Dolgan-Nenets Municipal District, Turukhansk district, the city of Norilsk of the Krasnoyarsk region; Magadan region, Kamchatka region.

  3. Relation of hepatic EROD activity and CYP1A level in Sebastiscus marmoratus exposed to benzo[a]pyrene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the in vivo effects of benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) on hepatic ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) activity and its correlation with cytochrome P450 1A (CYP1A) protein levels in Sebastiscus marmoratus, which were exposed through a water column to BaP (10, 100, 1000 ng/L, respectively) or were treated with intraperitoneal injections of BaP (0.5, 1, 5, 10 mg/kg, respectively) every 7 d. The results showed that after 25 d of waterborne exposure to 1000 ng/L BaP, fish hepatic CYP1A levels and EROD activity were significantly induced. In contrast, EROD activity was not altered 7 d after second ip injections, whereas, CYP1A protein levels were increased. Dose-dependent increase of biliary BaP metabolites demonstrated that the catalytic activity of CYP1A was induced by treatment with BaP. The lowest observable effect concentration with regard to biliary BaP metabolites (100 ng/L) was much lower than that with reference to EROD activity (1000 ng/L). The results suggest that biliary polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) metabolites were shown to better reflect the contamination gradients of PAHs than EROD activity. It appeared to be necessary to measure CYP1A protein levels to complement the EROD activity in relevant toxicological assessments.

  4. Induction of EROD and BFCOD activities in tissues of barbel (Barbus callensis) from a water reservoir in Algeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habila, Safia; Leghouchi, Essaid; Valdehita, Ana; Bermejo-Nogales, Azucena; Khelili, Smail; Navas, José M

    2017-08-01

    EROD and BFCOD activities were measured in liver and gills of barbel (Barbus callensis, a native North African species) captured at Beni Haroun lake, the most important water reservoir in Algeria. This lake receives wastewater from different origins. Thus, we assessed the level of pollution through the induction of detoxification activities in tissues of barbel, evaluating simultaneously the suitability of this species to be used as a sentinel. Fish were collected between March 2015 and January 2016 at three locations taking into account the pollution sources and accessibility. In liver, EROD and BFCOD showed the highest induction in October specially in the location of the dam that received pollutants. In gills, only EROD, but not BFCOD, activity was detected. Maximal EROD induction was noted in samples from January. Fish cell lines (RTG-2 and PLHC-1) were exposed to sediments extracts collected at Beni Haroun lake and enzyme activities (EROD and BFCOD, respectively) were measured. Sediment extracts did not induce BFCOD activity. The EROD induction observed in RTG-2 cells was in line with the results observed in fish tissues. Our results suggest that the lake is at risk from pollution and that Barbus callensis is a good sentinel species. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. An assessment of the toxicological significance of anthropogenic contaminants in Canadian arctic wildlife

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisk, Aaron T. [Warnell School of Forest Resources, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602-2152 (United States)]. E-mail: afisk@forestry.uga.edu; Wit, Cynthia A. de [Department of Applied Environmental Science, Stockholm University, Stockholm (Sweden); Wayland, Mark [Prairie and Northern Wildlife Research Centre, Environment Canada, 115 Perimeter Rd., Saskatoon, SK, S7N 0X4 (Canada); Kuzyk, Zou Zou [Environmental Sciences Group, Royal Military College of Canada, Kingston, ON, K7K 7B4 (Canada); Burgess, Neil [Canadian Wildlife Service, Environment Canada, 6 Bruce St. Mt. Pearl, NL, A1N4T3 (Canada); Letcher, Robert [National Wildlife Research Centre, Environment Canada, Ottawa, ON, K1A 0H3 (Canada); Braune, Birgit [National Wildlife Research Centre, Environment Canada, Ottawa, ON, Canada K1A 0H3 (Canada); Norstrom, Ross [National Wildlife Research Centre, Environment Canada, Ottawa, ON, K1A 0H3 (Canada); Blum, Susan Polischuk [Office of Research Services, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, S7N 4J8 (Canada); Sandau, Courtney [Jacques Whitford Limited, Calgary, AB, T2R 0E4 (Canada); Lie, Elisabeth [National Veterinary Institute, P.O. Box 8156, Dep 0033, Oslo (Norway); Larsen, Hans Jorgen S. [Norwegian School of Veterinary Science, P.O. Box 8146, Dep 0033, Oslo (Norway); Skaare, Janneche Utne [National Veterinary Institute, P.O. Box 8156, Dep 0033, Oslo (Norway); Norwegian School of Veterinary Science, P.O. Box 8146, Dep 0033, Oslo (Norway); Muir, Derek C.G. [National Water Research Institute, Environment Canada, Burlington, ON, L7R 4A6 (Canada)

    2005-12-01

    Anthropogenic contaminants have been a concern in the Canadian arctic for over 30 years due to relatively high concentrations of bioaccumulating and biomagnifying organochlorine contaminants (OCs) and toxic metals found in some arctic biota and humans. However, few studies have addressed the potential effects of these contaminants in Canadian arctic wildlife. Prior to 1997, biological effects data were minimal and insufficient at any level of biological organization. The present review summarizes recent studies on biological effects related to contaminant exposure, and compares new tissue concentration data to threshold effects levels. Weak relationships between cadmium, mercury and selenium burdens and health biomarkers in common eider ducks (Somateria mollissima borealis) in Nunavut were found but it was concluded that metals were not influencing the health of these birds. Black guillemots (Cepphus grylle) examined near PCB-contaminated Saglek Bay, Labrador, had enlarged livers, elevated EROD and liver lipid levels and reduced retinol (vitamin A) and retinyl palmitate levels, which correlated to PCB levels in the birds. Circulating levels of thyroid hormones in polar bears (Ursus maritimus) were correlated to PCB and HO-PCB plasma concentrations, but the impact at the population level is unknown. High PCB and organochlorine pesticide concentrations were found to be strongly associated with impaired humoral and cell-mediated immune responses in polar bears, implying an increased infection risk that could impact the population. In beluga whale (Delphinapterus leucas), cytochromes P450 (phase I) and conjugating (phase II) enzymes have been extensively profiled (immunochemically and catalytically) in liver, demonstrating the importance of contaminants in relation to enzyme induction, metabolism and potential contaminant bioactivation and fate. Concentrations of OCs and metals in arctic terrestrial wildlife, fish and seabirds are generally below effects thresholds

  6. Chemical transfers along slowly eroding catenas developed on granitic cratons in southern Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khomo, Lesego; Bern, Carleton R.; Hartshorn, Anthony S.; Rogers, Kevin H.; Chadwick, Oliver A.

    2013-01-01

    A catena is a series of distinct but co-evolving soils arrayed along a slope. On low-slope, slowly eroding catenas the redistribution of mass occurs predominantly as plasma, the dissolved and suspended constituents in soil water. We applied mass balance methods to track how redistribution via plasma contributed to physical and geochemical differentiation of nine slowly eroding (~ 5 mm ky− 1) granitic catenas. The catenas were arrayed in a 3 × 3 climate by relief matrix and located in Kruger National Park, South Africa. Most of the catenas contained at least one illuviated soil profile that had undergone more volumetric expansion and less mass loss, and these soils were located in the lower halves of the slopes. By comparison, the majority of slope positions were eluviated. Soils from the wetter climates (550 and 730 mm precipitation yr− 1) generally had undergone greater collapse and lost more mass, while soils in the drier climate (470 mm yr− 1) had undergone expansion and lost less mass. Effects of differences in catena relief were less clear. Within each climate zone, soil horizon mass loss and strain were correlated, as were losses of most major elements, illustrating the predominant influence of primary mineral weathering. Nevertheless, mass loss and volumetric collapse did not become extreme because of the skeleton of resistant primary mineral grains inherited from the granite. Colloidal clay redistribution, as traced by the ratio of Ti to Zr in soil, suggested clay losses via suspension from catena eluvial zones. Thus illuviation of colloidal clays into downslope soils may be crucial to catena development by restricting subsurface flow there. Our analysis provides quantitative support for the conceptual understanding of catenas in cratonic landscapes and provides an endmember reference point in understanding the development of slowly eroding soil landscapes.

  7. Wind erodibility response of physical and biological crusts to rain and flooding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubault, H.; Bullard, J. E.; Strong, C. L.; Ghadiri, H.; McTainsh, G. H.

    2015-12-01

    Soil surface crusts are important controllers of the small-scale wind entrainment processes that occur across all dust source regions globally. The crust type influences water and wind erosion by impacting infiltration, runoff, threshold wind velocity and surface storage capacity of both water and loose erodible material. The spatial and temporal patterning of both physical and biological crusts is known to change with rainfall and flooding. However, little is known about the impact of differing water quantity (from light rainfall through to flooding) on soil crusting characteristics (strength, roughness, sediment loss). This study compares the response of two soil types (loamy sand - LS, sandy loam - SL) with and without BSCs to three different rainfall events (2mm, 8mm, 15mm). Two BSC treatments were used one that simulated a young cyanobacteria dominated crust and an older flood induced multi species biological crust. For both soil types, soil surface strength increased with increasing rainfall amount with LS having consistently higher resistance to rupture than SL. Regardless of texture, soils with BSCs were more resistant and strength did not change in response to rainfall impact. Soil loss due to wind erosion was substantially higher on bare LS (4 times higher) and SL (3 times higher) soils compared with those with BSCs. Our results also show that young biological crust (formed by the rainfall event) have reduced soil erodibility with notably greater strength, roughness and reduced sediment losses when compared to soils with physical crust. Interestingly though, the erodibility of the old BSC did not differ greatly from that of the young BSC with respect to strength, roughness and sediment loss. This raises questions regarding the rapid soil surface protection offered by young colonising cyanobacteria crusts. Further analyses exploring the role of biological soil crusts on surface response to rainfall and wind saltation impact are ongoing.

  8. New insights into late Neogene glacial dynamics, tectonics, and hydrocarbon migrations in the Atlantic-Arctic gateway region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knies, J.; Baranwal, S.; Fabian, K.; Grøsfjeld, K.; Andreassen, K.; Husum, K.; Mattingsdal, R.; Gaina, C.; De Schepper, S.; Vogt, C.; Andersen, N.

    2012-04-01

    Notwithstanding the recent IODP drilling on the Lomonosov Ridge, the Late Cenozoic history of the Arctic Ocean still remains elusive. The tectonic processes leading to the development of the only deep-water connection to the Arctic Ocean via the Fram Strait are still poorly understood. Also, the influence of the gateway region on changes in Arctic-Atlantic ocean circulation, uplift/erosion on the adjacent hinterland, as well as glacial initiation and its consequences for the petroleum systems in the regions, remain unclear. By revisiting Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Leg 151, holes 911A and 910C and interpreting new multi-channel seismic data, we have now established a new comprehensive chronological framework for the Yermak Plateau and revealed important paleoenvironmental changes for the Atlantic-Arctic gateway during the late Neogene. The improved chronostratigraphic framework is established through continuous paleomagnetic and biostratigraphic data as well as selected intervals with stable ?18O and ?13C data derived from benthic foraminifera Cassidulina teretis. Supported by acoustic profiling, the new data indicate a continuous late Miocene/early Pliocene age (~5-6 Ma) for the base of both holes. The depositional regime north (Yermak Plateau) and south of the Fram Strait (Hovgaard Ridge) was rather shallow during the late Miocene and water mass exchange between the Arctic and Atlantic was restricted. Ice sheets on the Svalbard Platform evolved during the late Miocene, however did not reach the coastline before 3.3 Ma. Migration of gaseous hydrocarbons occurred prior to the intensification of the Northern Hemisphere Glaciations (~2.7 Ma) as indicated by high-amplitude reflections, corroborating the occurrence of greigite mineralization and stable carbon isotope excursions in planktic/benthic foraminifera. The data indicate that Pleistocene erosion and uplift in the Barents Sea region had probably only minor effects on reservoir leakages than previously thought.

  9. Circum-Arctic Map Compilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saltus, Richard W.; Gaina, Carmen

    2007-05-01

    Second Workshop of the Circum-Arctic Geophysical Maps Project, Trondheim, Norway, 12-13 February 2007 The eyes of the world are increasingly focused on the polar regions. Exploration and assessment of energy and mineral resources for the growing world economy are moving to high-latitude frontier areas. The effects of climatic changes are particularly pronounced at these ends of the Earth and have already attracted worldwide attention and concern. Many recent articles related to the International Polar Year underscore the importance of even basic mapping of the Arctic and Antarctic.

  10. Terrestrial photography as method to identify sediment sources in eroding rills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirtz, Stefan; Remke, Alexander; Wengel, René; Seeger, Manuel; Ries, Johannes B.

    2013-04-01

    One weak point in available studies on erosion processes in eroding rills is the lack of information about the real source of transported sediment. So far, such sources can only be identified by observation during the event or the experiment. Quantification is not possible by this way, additionally only large and clear visible changes are considered. In this study we present a method to quantify even small topographical changes in eroding rills during experiments or real rainfall events. We tested the suitability of DEMs created from terrestrial stereo photographies before and after application of artificial runoff to quantify eroded, transported and sedimented material in the rill. In 1 m intervals, pairs of photos are taken along the tested rills. The setup ensures that both cameras are moved with a constant parallax. The height of only about 1 m above ground level ensures that even low quantities of moved material can be identified. Based on technical data of the camera and the shot level, the theoretical accuracy of the images is below 1 mm horizontal ground resolution. The camera carrier bases on a rotating tower crane which has been developed from a customary survey tripod. The stereo images are combined with free-hand photographies from different angles of view to reach overhangs in rill sidewalls and ensure a fully 3D representation of the rill. In the analyses of the photographies 2 different kinds of software are used: The standard software Leica Photogrammetry Suite requires stereo images and ground control points whereas the open source software package is able to handle either stereo images as well as free-hand photographies. Ground control points are not needed, the software identifies point clusters which are to find in overlapping images. Using these feature-points, spatial marks are positioned which are used to match and rectify the single images to get an apposite panorama. By this way images from very different angles of view can be combined. The

  11. Photospheric magnetic field of an eroded-by-solar-wind coronal mass ejection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios, J.; Cid, C.; Saiz, E.; Guerrero, A.

    2017-10-01

    We have investigated the case of a coronal mass ejection that was eroded by the fast wind of a coronal hole in the interplanetary medium. When a solar ejection takes place close to a coronal hole, the flux rope magnetic topology of the coronal mass ejection (CME) may become misshapen at 1 AU as a result of the interaction. Detailed analysis of this event reveals erosion of the interplanetary coronal mass ejection (ICME) magnetic field. In this communication, we study the photospheric magnetic roots of the coronal hole and the coronal mass ejection area with HMI/SDO magnetograms to define their magnetic characteristics.

  12. EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF LANDSLIDE DAM-BREAK FLOOD OVER ERODIBLE BED IN OPEN CHANNELS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Jun; CAO Zhi-xian; LIU Huai-han; CHEN Li

    2009-01-01

    Large-scale landslide dams may block the river flow and cause inundation upstream,and subsequently fail and result in severe flooding and damage in the downstream.The need for enhanced understanding of the inundation and flooding is evident.This article presents an experimental study of the inundation and landslide dam-break flooding over erodible bed in open channels.A set of automatic water-level probes is deployed to record the highly transient stage,and the post-flooding channel bed elevation is measured.New experimental data resources are provided for understanding the processes of landslide-induced flooding and for testing mathematical rivers models.

  13. Numerical simulation of evolutionary erodible bedforms using the particle finite element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo, Rafael; Becker, Pablo; Ortiz, Pablo

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents a numerical strategy for the simulation of flows with evolutionary erodible boundaries. The fluid equations are fully resolved in 3D, while the sediment transport is modelled using the Exner equation and solved with an explicit Lagrangian procedure based on a fixed 2D mesh. Flow and sediment are coupled in geometry by deforming the fluid mesh in the vertical direction and in velocities with the experimental sediment flux computed using the Meyer Peter Müller model. A comparison with real experiments on channels is performed, giving good agreement.

  14. Toxicity and EROD-inducing potency of 24 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in chick embryos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunstroem, B. (Uppsala Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Zoophysiology); Broman, D. (Stockholm Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Zoology); Naef, C. (Stockholm Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Analytical Chemistry)

    1991-08-01

    The toxicities (embryolethality) of 24 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were determined in chick embryos using a 72-h test. The substances, dissolved in peanut oil, were injected into the air sacs of eggs preincubated for 7 days. LD{sub 50} values were determined for the four most toxic of the 24 compounds. Benzo(k)fluoranthene was the most potent, with an LD{sub 50} of 14 {mu}g (56 nmol)/kg egg. Dibenz(a,h)anthracene, benz(a)lanthracene and benzol(b)naphtho(2,3-d)thiophene were a few times less toxic (LD{sub 50} = 39 {mu}g (140 nmol)/kg, 79 {mu}g (349 nmol)/kg and 82 {mu}g (350 nmol)/kg, respectively). The LD{sub 50} of benzo(k)fluoranthene was only about 5 times higher than that previously found for the most potent coplanar polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB), 3,3',4,4',5-pentachlorobiphenyl (LD{sub 50} = 3.1 {mu}g (9.4 nmol)/kg), in the same kind of test. The toxicities of 18 of the PAHs in this study have also been evaluated previously using a 2-week test in chick embryos. Dibenz(a,h)anthracene, which had not been studied earlier in the 2-week test, proved to be almost as toxic as previously found for benzo(k)fluoranthene in that test. Several of the PAHs studied induced EROD activity in chick embryos, and, in general, the most toxic PAHs were also the most potent inducers of EROD. The highest enzyme activities were found after treatment with indeno(1,2,3-c,d)pyrene (12 times the control value) and dibenz(a,h)anthracene (8 times the control value). However, due to the high toxicity of dibenz(a,h)anthracene, the dose used was 7 times lower than that of indeno(1,2,3-c,d)pyrene. Following injection of PAHs on day 7, the EROD activities on day 10 were considerably lower than those obtained after a corresponding treatment with coplanar PCBs in an earlier study. Of the PAHs studied, some exhibited very high embryotoxicity. The most toxic PAHs induced EROD activity, suggesting that their toxicity was at least partly mediated via binding to the Ah receptor

  15. Assessment of Energy Production Potential from Ocean Currents along the United States Coastline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haas, Kevin

    2013-09-15

    Increasing energy consumption and depleting reserves of fossil fuels have resulted in growing interest in alternative renewable energy from the ocean. Ocean currents are an alternative source of clean energy due to their inherent reliability, persistence and sustainability. General ocean circulations exist in the form of large rotating ocean gyres, and feature extremely rapid current flow in the western boundaries due to the Coriolis Effect. The Gulf Stream system is formed by the western boundary current of the North Atlantic Ocean that flows along the east coastline of the United States, and therefore is of particular interest as a potential energy resource for the United States. This project created a national database of ocean current energy resources to help advance awareness and market penetration in ocean current energy resource assessment. The database, consisting of joint velocity magnitude and direction probability histograms, was created from data created by seven years of numerical model simulations. The accuracy of the database was evaluated by ORNL?s independent validation effort documented in a separate report. Estimates of the total theoretical power resource contained in the ocean currents were calculated utilizing two separate approaches. Firstly, the theoretical energy balance in the Gulf Stream system was examined using the two-dimensional ocean circulation equations based on the assumptions of the Stommel model for subtropical gyres with the quasi-geostrophic balance between pressure gradient, Coriolis force, wind stress and friction driving the circulation. Parameters including water depth, natural dissipation rate and wind stress are calibrated in the model so that the model can reproduce reasonable flow properties including volume flux and energy flux. To represent flow dissipation due to turbines additional turbine drag coefficient is formulated and included in the model. Secondly, to determine the reasonableness of the total power

  16. Interaction webs in arctic ecosystems: Determinants of arctic change?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Niels Martin; Hardwick, Bess; Gilg, Olivier

    2017-01-01

    How species interact modulate their dynamics, their response to environmental change, and ultimately the functioning and stability of entire communities. Work conducted at Zackenberg, Northeast Greenland, has changed our view on how networks of arctic biotic interactions are structured, how they ...

  17. Arctic Glass: Innovative Consumer Technology in Support of Arctic Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruthkoski, T.

    2015-12-01

    The advancement of cyberinfrastructure on the North Slope of Alaska is drastically limited by location-specific conditions, including: unique geophysical features, remoteness of location, and harsh climate. The associated cost of maintaining this unique cyberinfrastructure also becomes a limiting factor. As a result, field experiments conducted in this region have historically been at a technological disadvantage. The Arctic Glass project explored a variety of scenarios where innovative consumer-grade technology was leveraged as a lightweight, rapidly deployable, sustainable, alternatives to traditional large-scale Arctic cyberinfrastructure installations. Google Glass, cloud computing services, Internet of Things (IoT) microcontrollers, miniature LIDAR, co2 sensors designed for HVAC systems, and portable network kits are several of the components field-tested at the Toolik Field Station as part of this project. Region-specific software was also developed, including a multi featured, voice controlled Google Glass application named "Arctic Glass". Additionally, real-time sensor monitoring and remote control capability was evaluated through the deployment of a small cluster of microcontroller devices. Network robustness was analyzed as the devices delivered streams of abiotic data to a web-based dashboard monitoring service in near real time. The same data was also uploaded synchronously by the devices to Amazon Web Services. A detailed overview of solutions deployed during the 2015 field season, results from experiments utilizing consumer sensors, and potential roles consumer technology could play in support of Arctic science will be discussed.

  18. Changing Arctic ecosystems: ecology of loons in a changing Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uher-Koch, Brian; Schmutz, Joel; Whalen, Mary; Pearce, John M.

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Changing Arctic Ecosystems (CAE) initiative informs key resource management decisions for Arctic Alaska by providing scientific information on current and future ecosystem response to a changing climate. From 2010 to 2014, a key study area for the USGS CAE initiative has been the Arctic Coastal Plain of northern Alaska. This region has experienced rapid warming during the past 30 years, leading to the thawing of permafrost and changes to lake and river systems. These changes, and projections of continued change, have raised questions about effects on wildlife populations that rely on northern lake ecosystems, such as loons. Loons rely on freshwater lakes for nesting habitat and the fish and invertebrates inhabiting the lakes for food. Loons live within the National Petroleum Reserve-Alaska (NPR-A) on Alaska’s northern coast, where oil and gas development is expected to increase. Research by the USGS examines how breeding loons use the Arctic lake ecosystem and the capacity of loons to adapt to future landscape change.

  19. Radioactivity levels and radiological hazard indices at the Saudi coastline of the Gulf of Aqaba

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Trabulsy, H. A.; Khater, A. E. M.; Habbani, F. I.

    2011-03-01

    The coast of the Gulf of Aqaba is subjected to several sources of pollution due to several activities occurring at the coastal area. The activities vary between industrial, tourist and other development aspects at the Jordanian coastline of the Gulf of Aqaba. Phosphate industry has been considered a major source polluting the marine environment. According to official reports, 4-7 million tons of raw phosphate is exported through the Gulf of Aqaba. During transportation and loading, a small proportion of this enters the waters of the Gulf. Phosphate dust has also been considered another source of nutrients loading to the Gulf. 19 sediment samples were collected along the Saudi Gulf coastline, from the Saudi-Jordan border down to the end of the Gulf at Tiran Strait. Measurements of the activity concentrations of 226Ra, 232Th, 40K and 137Cs in Bq/kg (in dry weight) of the collected samples were carried out using gamma-ray spectrometry based on a highly pure germanium coaxial detector (HPGe). The concentrations of 238U and 232Th were also determined using ICP-MS technique. The average specific activities for 226Ra, 232Th, 40K and 137Cs were found to be 11.4±1.5, 22.5±3.7, 641.1±61.3 and 3.5±0.7 Bq/kg, respectively. The results show that the mean activity of 226Ra and 232Th is lower than the world average of 25 Bq/kg for both of them, whereas the mean value for 40K is about double the world average of 370 Bq/kg. The presence of 137Cs in the analyzed samples is low in most locations. The mean concentrations of 238U and 232Th in the study area are 1.2 and 5.4 mg/kg, respectively, and the ratio 238U/ 232Th is 0.2, which is lower than the global ratio of 0.3. The ratio of 226Ra/ 228Ra was found to decrease southwards in the direction of Tiran Strait, away from the phosphate industry in Jordan. Mean values for radium equivalent, absorbed dose, annual effective dose, external and internal hazard index and representative level index were determined as: 92.9 Bq/kg, 45.6 n

  20. Changes on the coastline of buenaventura bay (colombian pacific) and its relationship with the climatic conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coca-Domínguez, Oswaldo; Ricaurte-Villota, Constanza; Andres Ordoñez, Silvio

    2016-04-01

    Some authors point out that the variability of a coastal system is the response of physical factors (climate, waves, currents, wind, etc.) or combination of some of them, for example long-term variations in the relationship between climate and supply of sedimentary material. For Colombian Pacific coast it has been said that the regimen of meso-tidal is one of the agents that contribute to changes in the morphology of the littoral zone. Between 2012-2015 was conducted a research in the mouth of Buenaventura Bay (Colombia Pacific coast), using two stations: Soldado point (southern point of the bay) and Bazan point (the northern point of the bay), for those stations the digital elevation model (DEM) was performed using a DGPS with technology GNSS the recent evolution of the coastline and changes in volume of sand from beaches for two scalar approaches were determined: annual and intra-annual. The use of ArcGIS 3D Analyst in the DEMs allowed to calculate the cubic area between the raised surfaces each month. Changes in the coastline were made using Digital Shoreline Analysis System (DSAS) an ARCGIS extension. We used zonal and meridional components of the wind data near the coast from WindSat, rainfall and sea level anomaly data from the database AVISO (Archiving, Validation and Interpretation of Satellite Oceanographic), and sea level pressure (SLP) from NCEP/NCAR (National Center for Environmental Prediction/ National Center for Atmospheric Research), in collaboration with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Finally, climatic variables were correlated with the rates of coastal erosion and changes in sand volume of the beaches, because wind and precipitation are some of the factors in sediment transport. The study showed erosion rates with negative values in 2014 and 2015 that represent loss of land, the intra-annual variability in September and October were the highest loss of land, this coincides with the values of the highest tides of the

  1. Akumal's reefs: stony coral communities along the developing Mexican Caribbean coastline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Roshan E

    2004-12-01

    Fringing coral reefs along coastlines experiencing rapid development and human population growth have declined worldwide because of human activity and of natural causes. The "Mayan Riviera" in Quintana Roo, México, attracts large numbers of tourists in part because it still retains some of the natural diversity and it is important to obtain baseline information to monitor changes over time in the area. In this paper, the condition of the stony corals in the developing coastline of the Akumal-area fore reefs is characterized at the start of the new millennium at two depths, and along an inferred sedimentation gradient. Transect surveys were conducted in five fringing reefs starting at haphazardly chosen points, with respect to species composition, live cover, colony density, relative exposure to TAS mats and, for one species (Diploria strigosa, Dana, 1848), tissue regression rates in the presence of TAS mats. Fish population density and herbivory rates are also assessed. Data from line intercept transects (n=74) show that live stony coral cover, density and relative peripheral exposure of colonies to turf algal/sediment (TAS) mats were inversely related to an inferred sediment stress gradient at 13m. In 2000, live stony coral cover had decreased by 40-50% at two sites studied in 1990 by Muñoz-Chagin and de la Cruz-Agüero (1993). About half of this loss apparently occurred between 1998 and 2000 during an outbreak of white plague disease that mostly affected Montastraea faveolata, and M. annularis. At a 13 m site, where inferred sedimentation rates are relatively high, time series photography of tagged Diploria strigosa, (n=38) showed an average loss of 70 cm2 of live tissue/coral/year to encroachment by TAS mats during the same period. Whereas densities of carnivorous fishes and herbivores (echinoids, scarids, acanthurids and Microspathodon chrysurus) in 2000 were low in belt transects at 10-19 m (n=106), turf-algal gardening pomacentrids were relatively common on

  2. Different responses of Ross River virus to climate variability between coastline and inland cities in Queensland, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, S; Hu, W

    2002-11-01

    To examine the potential impact of climate variability on the transmission of Ross River virus (RRv) infection, and to assess the difference in the potential predictors of RRv incidence in coastline and inland regions, Queensland, Australia. Information on the RRv cases notified between 1985 to 1996 was obtained from the Queensland Department of Health. Climate and population data were supplied by the Australian Bureau of Meteorology and the Australia Bureau of Statistics, respectively. The function of cross correlations was used to compute a series of correlations between climate variables (rainfall, maximum temperature, minimum temperature, relative humidity, and high tide) and the monthly incidence of RRv disease over a range of time lags. Time series Poisson regression models were performed to adjust for the autocorrelations of the monthly incidences of RRv disease and the confounding effects of seasonality, the case notification time, and population sizes. The cross correlation function shows rainfall, maximum temperature, minimum temperature, and relative humidity at a lag of 1-2 months and high tide in the current month were significantly associated with the monthly incidence of RRv in the coastline region. Relative humidity and rainfall at a lag of two months was also significantly associated with the monthly incidence of RRv in the inland region. The results of Poisson regressive models show that the incidence of RRv disease was significantly associated with rainfall, maximum temperature, minimum temperature, relative humidity, and high tide in the coastline region, and with rainfall and relative humidity in the inland region. There was a significant interaction between climate variables and locality in RRv transmission. Climate variability may have played a significant role in the transmission of RRv. There appeared to be different responses of RRv to climate variability between coastline and inland cities in Queensland, Australia. Maximum temperature

  3. Monitoring Coastline Change Using Remote Sensing and GIS Technology: A case study of Acıgöl Lake, Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temiz, Fatih; Savaş Durduran, S.

    2016-10-01

    Acıgöl is a lake in Turkey's inner Aegean Region, in an endorheic basin at the junction between Denizli Province, Afyonkarahisar Province and Burdur Province. The lake is notable for its sodium sulphate reserves extensively used in the industry and Turkey's largest commercial sodium sulphate production operations are based here. Coastline changes caused by sediment erosion and accretion have important consequences for coastal ecosystems and coastal communities. Coastlines are the natural borders which separate the water and land. Change of coastline has great importance, therefore it is needed to detect this change and take precautions. In this study, for the purpose of detecting the coastline change of Acıgöl Lake, multispectral Landsat images from the years of 1985, 2000, 2015 were used. Coastline belonging to these years is drawn numerically and coastline change belonging to these years in Acıgöl Lake is provided with the help of Geographic Information Systems and Remote Sensing method and software. After the analysis of the changes, it was determined that there was a significant decline in Acıgöl lake. At the end of the study, significant coastline movements (in some parts more than 200 m) were detected for a 30-year period.

  4. Fluvial organic carbon flux from an eroding peatland catchment, southern Pennines, UK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. R. Pawson

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates for the first time the relative importance of dissolved organic carbon (DOC and particulate organic carbon (POC in the fluvial carbon flux from an actively eroding peatland catchment in the southern Pennines, UK. Event scale variability in DOC and POC was examined and the annual flux of fluvial organic carbon was estimated for the catchment. At the event scale, both DOC and POC were found to increase with discharge, with event based POC export accounting for 95% of flux in only 8% of the time. On an annual cycle, 40.8 t organic carbon (OC is exported from the catchment, which represents an areal value of 107 gC m−2 a−1. POC was the most significant form of organic carbon export, accounting for ~82% of the estimated flux. This suggests that more research is required on both the fate of POC and the rates of POC export in eroding peatland catchments.

  5. Systemic impacts of climate change on an eroding coastal region over the twenty-first century

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dickson, M.E. [National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research, PO Box 8602, Riccarton, Christchurch (New Zealand); Walkden, M.J.A.; Hall, J.W. [Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research, School of Civil Engineering and Geosciences, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne (United Kingdom)

    2007-09-15

    A numerical model detailing the functioning and emergent behaviour of an eroding coastal system is described. Model output from a 50-km study region centred on the soft-rock shore of northeast Norfolk was verified through comparison with cliff recession rates that were extracted from historical maps spanning more than a century. Predictions were then made for the period 2000 to 2100 under combined climatic change and management scenarios. For the scenarios evaluated, the model was relatively insensitive to increases in offshore wave height and moderately sensitive to changes in wave direction, but the most important effects were associated with accelerated sea-level rise (SLR). In contrast to predictions made using a modified version of the Bruun rule, the systems model predicted rather complex responses to SLR. For instance, on some sectors of coast, whereas the Bruun rule predicted increased recession under accelerated SLR, the systems model actually predicted progradation owing to the delivery of sediment from eroding coasts up-drift. By contrast, on coasts where beaches are underlain by shore platforms, both the Bruun rule and the systems model predicted accelerated recession rates. However, explicit consideration of the interaction between beach and shore platform within the systems model indicates that these coasts have a broader range of responses and lower overall vulnerability to SLR than predicted by the Bruun rule.

  6. Sub ablative Er: YAG laser irradiation on surface roughness of eroded dental enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curylofo-Zotti, Fabiana Almeida; Lepri, Taísa Penazzo; Colucci, Vivian; Turssi, Cecília Pedroso; Corona, Silmara Aparecida Milori

    2015-11-01

    This study evaluated the effects of Er:YAG laser irradiation applied at varying pulse repetition rate on the surface roughness of eroded enamel. Bovine enamel slabs (n = 10) were embedded in polyester resin, ground, and polished. To erosive challenges, specimens were immersed two times per day in 20mL of concentrated orange juice (pH = 3.84) under agitation, during a two-day period. Specimens were randomly assigned to irradiation with the Er:YAG laser (focused mode, pulse energy of 60 mJ and energy density of 3.79 J/cm(2) ) operating at 1, 2, 3, or 4 Hz. The control group was left nonirradiated. Surface roughness measurements were recorded post erosion-like formation and further erosive episodes by a profilometer and observed through atomic force microscopy (AFM). Analysis of variance revealed that the control group showed the lowest surface roughness, while laser-irradiated substrates did not differ from each other following post erosion-like lesion formation. According to analysis of covariance, at further erosive episodes, the control group demonstrated lower surface roughness (P > 0.05), than any of the irradiated groups (P dental enamel eroded. The AFM images showed that the specimens irradiated by the Er:YAG laser at 1 Hz presented a less rough surface than those irradiated at 2, 3, and 4 Hz. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Spatial variability of soil properties and soil erodibility in the Alqueva dam watershed, Portugal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, V.; Panagopoulos, T.; Andrade, R.; Guerrero, C.; Loures, L.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work is to investigate how the spatial variability of soil properties and soil erodibility (K factor) were affected by the changes in land use allowed by irrigation with water from a reservoir in a semiarid area. To this, three areas representative of different land uses (agroforestry grassland, Lucerne crop and olive orchard) were studied within a 900 ha farm. The interrelationships between variables were analyzed by multivariate techniques and extrapolated using geostatistics. The results confirmed differences between land uses for all properties analyzed, which was explained mainly by the existence of diverse management practices (tillage, fertilization and irrigation), vegetation cover and local soil characteristics. Soil organic matter, clay and nitrogen content decreased significantly, while K factor increased with intensive cultivation. The HJ-biplot methodology was used to represent the variation of soil erodibility properties grouped in land uses. Native grassland was the least correlated with the other land uses. K factor demonstrated high correlation mainly with very fine sand and silt. The maps produced with geostatistics were crucial to understand the current spatial variability in the Alqueva region. Facing the intensification of land-use conversion, a sustainable management is needed to introduce protective measures to control soil erosion.

  8. Spatial variability of soil properties and soil erodibility in the Alqueva reservoir watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, V.; Panagopoulos, T.; Andrade, R.; Guerrero, C.; Loures, L.

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this work is to investigate how the spatial variability of soil properties and soil erodibility (K factor) were affected by the changes in land use allowed by irrigation with water from a reservoir in a semiarid area. To this end, three areas representative of different land uses (agroforestry grassland, lucerne crop and olive orchard) were studied within a 900 ha farm. The interrelationships between variables were analyzed by multivariate techniques and extrapolated using geostatistics. The results confirmed differences between land uses for all properties analyzed, which was explained mainly by the existence of diverse management practices (tillage, fertilization and irrigation), vegetation cover and local soil characteristics. Soil organic matter, clay and nitrogen content decreased significantly, while the K factor increased with intensive cultivation. The HJ-Biplot methodology was used to represent the variation of soil erodibility properties grouped in land uses. Native grassland was the least correlated with the other land uses. The K factor demonstrated high correlation mainly with very fine sand and silt. The maps produced with geostatistics were crucial to understand the current spatial variability in the Alqueva region. Facing the intensification of land-use conversion, a sustainable management is needed to introduce protective measures to control soil erosion.

  9. Spatial variability of soil properties and soil erodibility in the Alqueva dam watershed, Portugal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Ferreira

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to investigate how the spatial variability of soil properties and soil erodibility (K factor were affected by the changes in land use allowed by irrigation with water from a reservoir in a semiarid area. To this, three areas representative of different land uses (agroforestry grassland, Lucerne crop and olive orchard were studied within a 900 ha farm. The interrelationships between variables were analyzed by multivariate techniques and extrapolated using geostatistics. The results confirmed differences between land uses for all properties analyzed, which was explained mainly by the existence of diverse management practices (tillage, fertilization and irrigation, vegetation cover and local soil characteristics. Soil organic matter, clay and nitrogen content decreased significantly, while K factor increased with intensive cultivation. The HJ-biplot methodology was used to represent the variation of soil erodibility properties grouped in land uses. Native grassland was the least correlated with the other land uses. K factor demonstrated high correlation mainly with very fine sand and silt. The maps produced with geostatistics were crucial to understand the current spatial variability in the Alqueva region. Facing the intensification of land-use conversion, a sustainable management is needed to introduce protective measures to control soil erosion.

  10. Fluvial organic carbon flux from an eroding peatland catchment, southern Pennines, UK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. R. Pawson

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates for the first time the relative importance of dissolved organic carbon (DOC and particulate organic carbon (POC in the fluvial carbon flux from an actively eroding peatland catchment in the southern Pennines, UK. Event scale variability in DOC and POC was examined and the annual flux of fluvial organic carbon was estimated for the catchment. At the event scale, both DOC and POC were found to increase with discharge, with event based POC export accounting for 95% of flux in only 8% of the time. On an annual cycle, exports of 35.14 t organic carbon (OC are estimated from the catchment, which represents an areal value of 92.47 g C m−2 a−1. POC was the most significant form of organic carbon export, accounting for 80% of the estimated flux. This suggests that more research is required on both the fate of POC and the rates of POC export in eroding peatland catchments.

  11. Implications of Texture and Erodibility for Sediment Retention in Receiving Basins of Coastal Louisiana Diversions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kehui Xu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Although the Mississippi River deltaic plain has been the subject of abundant research over recent decades, there is a paucity of data concerning field measurement of sediment erodibility in Louisiana estuaries. Two contrasting receiving basins for active diversions were studied: West Bay on the western part of Mississippi River Delta and Big Mar, which is the receiving basin for the Caernarvon freshwater diversion. Push cores and water samples were collected at six stations in West Bay and six stations in Big Mar. The average erodibility of Big Mar sediment was similar to that of Louisiana shelf sediment, but was higher than that of West Bay. Critical shear stress to suspend sediment in both West Bay and Big Mar receiving basins was around 0.2 Pa. A synthesis of 1191 laser grain size data from surficial and down-core sediment reveals that silt (4–63 μm is the largest fraction of retained sediment in receiving basins, larger than the total of sand (>63 μm and clay (<4 μm. It is suggested that preferential delivery of fine grained sediment to more landward and protected receiving basins would enhance mud retention. In addition, small fetch sizes and fragmentation of large receiving basins are favorable for sediment retention.

  12. Permeability of eroded enamel following application of different fluoride gels and CO2 laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepri, Taísa Penazzo; Colucci, Vivian; Turssi, Cecília Pedroso; Corona, Silmara Aparecida Milori

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the combined effect of fluoride compounds and CO(2) laser in controlling the permeability of eroded enamel. Bovine enamel slabs (3 × 2 mm) were cycled twice through an alternating erosion and remineralization regimen. Slabs were immersed in 20 ml of orange juice (pH 3.84) for 5 min under agitation, rinsed with deionized water, and stored in artificial saliva for 4 h to form erosive lesions. Specimens were then divided into four groups (n = 10), which were treated for 1 min with either a control or with one of the following gels: amine fluoride (AmF), titanium tetrafluoride (TiF(4)), or sodium fluoride (NaF). Half of the specimens were irradiated with a CO(2) laser (λ = 10.6 μm; 2.0 W). Specimens were cycled two more times through the aforementioned erosion-remineralization regimen and were subjected to permeability assessment. ANOVA demonstrated a significant interaction between fluoride and laser treatment (p = 0.0152). Tukey's test showed that when fluoride was applied alone, TiF(4) resulted in lower enamel permeability than that observed after application of the placebo gel. Intermediate permeability values were noted after NaF and AmF had been used. A significant reduction in enamel permeability was obtained when fluoride was combined with CO(2) laser treatment, with no difference between fluoride gels. Permeability of eroded enamel may be reduced by combining the application of fluoride gels with CO(2) laser irradiation.

  13. Arctic resources : a mechatronics opportunity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKean, M.; Baiden, G. [Penguin Automated Systems Inc., Naughton, ON (Canada)

    2008-07-01

    This paper discussed the telerobotic mechatronics opportunities that exist to access mineral resources in the Arctic. The Mining Automation Project (MAP) determined that telerobotics could contribute to productivity gains while providing increased worker safety. The socio-economic benefits of advanced mechatronics for Arctic resource development are particularly attractive due to reduced infrastructure needs; operating costs; and environmental impacts. A preliminary analysis of mining transportation options by the authors revealed that there is a case for in-situ resource utilization (ISRU) for oil and gas processing to address resource development. The ISRU options build on concepts developed to support space exploration and were proposed to reduce or modify transportation loads to allow more sustainable and efficient Arctic resource development. Many benefits in terms of efficiency could be achieved by combining demonstrated mechatronics with ISRU because of the constrained transportation infrastructure in the Arctic. In the context of harsh environment operations, mechatronics may provide an opportunity for undersea resource facilities. 15 refs., 6 figs.

  14. Mining in the European Arctic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dam, Karin; Scheepstra, Adriana; Gille, Johan; Stepien, Adam; Koivurova, Timo; Stepien, Adam; Koivurova, Timo; Kankaanpää, Paula

    2016-01-01

    The European Arctic has been recently experiencing an upsurge in mining activities. This is reflected in an on-going interest from the industry, regulators and the public. However, current and future prospects are highly sensitive to mineral price fluctuations. The EU is a major consumer and importe

  15. Soil erosion increases soil microbial activity at the depositional position of eroding slopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Xu; Cardenas, Laura M.; Donovan, Neil; Zhang, Junling; Murray, Phil; Zhang, Fusuo; Dungait, Jennifer A. J.

    2016-04-01

    Soil erosion is the most widespread form of soil degradation. Estimation of the impact of agricultural soil erosion on global carbon cycle is a topic of scientific debate, with opposing yet similar magnitude estimates of erosion as a net source or sink of atmospheric carbon. The transport and deposition of eroded agricultural soils affects not only the carbon cycle but other nutrient cycles as well. It has been estimated that erosion-induced lateral fluxes of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) could be similar in magnitude to those from fertilizer application and crop removal (Quinton et al., 2010). In particular, the dynamics of soil N in eroding slopes need to be considered because the management of soil N has profound influences on the functioning of soil microorganisms, which are generally considered as the main biotic driver of soil C efflux. Carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions tend to increase in deposition positions of eroded slopes, diminishing the sink potential of eroded soils C (. As the global warming potential of nitrous oxide (N2O) is 310 times relative to that of CO2, the sink potential of agricultural erosion could easily be negated with a small increase in N2O emissions. Therefore, an investigation of the potential emissions of greenhouse gases, and especially N2O from soils affected by agricultural erosion, are required. In the present study, a field experiment was established with contrasting cultivation techniques of a C4 crop (Zea mays; δ13C = -12.2‰) to introduce 13C-enriched SOC to a soil previously cropped with C3 plants (δ13C = -29.3‰). Soils sampled from the top, middle, bottom and foot slope positions along a distinct erosion pathway were analyzed using 13C-phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analysis and incubated to investigate the responses of microorganisms and associated potential emissions of greenhouse gases (GHG). The total C and N contents were greatest in soils at the top slope position, whereas soil mineral N (NO3--N and NH4+-N

  16. A multisource approach for coastline mapping and identification of shoreline changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Zaccagnino

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Coastal dynamics are driven by phenomena of exogenous and endogenous nature. Characterizing factors that influence their equilibrium and continuous monitoring are fundamental for effective environmental planning and management of coastal areas. In order to monitor shoreline changes, we developed a methodology based on a multisource and multitemporal approach. A database, related to the Ionian coast of Basilicata region (about 50 km, was implemented by using cartographic data (IGMI data, satellite imagery (SPOT-PX/XS, Landsat-TM, Corona and aerial data covering the period form 1949 to 2001. In particular, airborne data (1 m spatial resolution were acquired during a specific campaign we performed in 2000 and 2001. To obtain the best performance from the available data, we applied a data fusion procedure on visible and thermal information. Different algorithms were tested, such as band ratios and clustering for extracting the coastline. The best results from multispectral data were obtained using a threshold algorithm we devised by exploiting the green, red and NIR bands, whereas for panchromatic data we selected clustering as the more suitable method. Moreover, a GPS survey was performed to evaluate the influence of tidal effects.

  17. Determination of Outdoor Furniture on Coastline Recreation Area of Asi River (Antakya District and User Satisfaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elif Bozdoğan

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Water surfaces which have significant importance for the acquisition of a city identity are the facts that lead the development of city, allow recreational activities and create visual and psychological effects on urban residents. This study has been conducted on Asi River coastline as it’s an important zone for Antakya city identity, divides new and old settlement areas and provides various recreational activities. The study conducted within 3 stages between April-July 2012. In the first stage of the study, amount and construction materials of existing outdoor furnitures were revealed. The second stage consists of questionnaire including details about user and usage with questions to determine the user satisfaction. According to the findings, the highest level of user satisfaction was found in bridges by all parameters and the lowest satisfaction level was found in sign/information boards by aesthetic and functional features and waste bins by amount. In this scope, the necessity of integration between city history and cultural values was found to be important so as to increase user satisfaction level from outdoor furniture. In addition, it is thought that this study will contribute to create a database for local governments.

  18. Determination temporal changes of the coastline of the Sea of Marmara in Istanbul

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Fatih Döker

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Coastal areas have always been attractive for humankind throughout the history. Today, it is known that nearly half of the population of the world lives on the coasts, and this ratio increases everyday. At the same time, coastal areas are also seen as places exposed to rapid changes in the world. In addition to the formal effects of the natural phenomena, human activities including the filling up projects to get area from the sea are effective factors on the coasts. Emerging technologies in conjunction with the construction of fill in coastal areas continues to increase steadily in recent years. An unplanned construction period has been experienced on the coasts of Istanbul due to rapid urbanization and wrong planning applications. This has led to significant changes in time and shoreline. Detection of temporal changes is critical for sustainable coastal development and planning. Regular data source for the history of this change that allows for the detection of satellite imagery is very important. In this study, Landsat satellite imageries were used to detect the previous and present borders of coastlines and to understand the temporal changes on these areas

  19. Probabilistic projection of sea-level change along the world's coastlines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Perrette

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Climate change causes global mean sea level to rise due to thermal expansion of seawater and loss of land ice from mountain glaciers, ice caps and ice-sheets. Locally, sea-level changes can strongly deviate from the global mean due to ocean dynamics. In addition, gravitational adjustments redistribute seawater away from shrinking ice masses, an effect currently not incorporated in climate models. Here, we provide probabilistic projections of sea level changes along the world's coastlines for the end of the 21st century under the new RCP emission scenarios, taking into account uncertainties across the cause-effect chain from greenhouse-gas emissions to ocean heat uptake and regional land-ice melt. At low latitudes, especially in the Indian Ocean and Western Pacific, sea level will likely rise more than the global mean (mostly by 10–20%, but up to 45% in Tokyo area. Around the North Atlantic and the North-Eastern Pacific coasts, sea level will rise less than the global average or, in some rare cases, even fall. Our probabilistic regional sea level projections provide an improved basis for coastal impact analysis and infrastructure planning for adaptation to climate change.

  20. Determining Ship Position In A Harbour Based On Omnidirectional Image Of The Coastline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naus Krzysztof

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The following article presents researches aimed at the evaluation of precision in determining a ship’s position through comparing a omnidirectional map image to a real vision image of the coast line. The first part establishes the thesis and preparatory forms in conducting the research. It also presents designed and built equipment including a research tool software. A system equipped with a spherical catadioptric camera that aids data collection on board ship designated to processing and analyzing data collected on board in connection with the spherical images of an electronic navigational chart with a software module. The second part explains procedures followed in conducting the research. The foreword note explains the procedure in data collection aboard a ship maneuvering in the port after which the algorithm for position placement and precise parametrical count was presented. The concluding part shows analyses of obtained research result. It bears a performance on the evaluation of precision at determining position. As a measure, an average error value and distance fluctuation of obtained position from referential position. As our conclusion, primary agents having rudimentary influence on the quality of correlating spherical map image to coastline visual image were characterized.

  1. Hazard assessment of the stability of a cavern roof along the coastline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reina, A.; Lollino, P.

    2009-04-01

    This work concerns the hazard assessment about the stability of a large shallow depth cavern, located along the coastline rocky sector of Polignano town (Apulia, Southern Italy) under an intensely urbanised area. This cavern, which lies at the sea level, has been created by a prolonged process of sea erosion within a rock mass formed of a lower stratified limestone mass and an upper Gravina Calcarenite mass. The thickness of the cavern roof, which has a dome shape, is less than 10 metres in the centre. Important buildings, as hotels and private houses, are located just above the top of the roof. Erosion processes have been observed to be still active along the whole cavern due to climate factors and, in particular, to sea salt weathering and sea spray effects. In 2007 a large calcarenite block, 3 m large, fell down from the cavern roof and consequently a field investigation campaign was carried out for a rational stabilization plan in order to understand the current stability conditions of the roof and the potential failure mechanism. Therefore, a thorough geo-structural survey has firstly been carried out, together with laboratory and in-situ testing for measuring the physical and mechanical properties of the calcarenite rock and of the corresponding joints. A monitoring system has also been planned and installed in order to measure the erosional rate and the block displacements in the cavern.

  2. Diversity of Cronobacter spp. isolates from the vegetables in the middle-east coastline of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wanyi; Yang, Jielin; You, Chunping; Liu, Zhenmin

    2016-06-01

    Cronobacter spp. has caused life-threatening neonatal infections mainly resulted from consumption of contaminated powdered infant formula. A total of 102 vegetable samples from retail markets were evaluated for the presence of Cronobacter spp. Thirty-five presumptive Cronobacter isolates were isolated and identified using API 20E and 16S rDNA sequencing analyses. All isolates and type strains were characterized using enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus sequence PCR (ERIC-PCR), and genetic profiles of cluster analysis from this molecular typing test clearly showed that there were differences among isolates from different vegetables. A polymerase chain reaction restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) based on the amplification of the gyrB gene (1258 bp) was developed to differentiate among Cronobacter species. A new PCR-RFLP assay based on the amplification of the gyrB gene using Alu I and Hinf I endonuclease combination is established and it has been confirmed an accurate and rapid subtyping method to differentiate Cronobacter species. Sequence analysis of the gyrB gene was proven to be suitable for the phylogenetic analysis of the Cronobacter strains, which has much better resolution based on SNPs in the identification of Cronobacter species specificity than PCR-RFLP and ERIC-PCR. Our study further confirmed that vegetables are one of the most common habitats or sources of Cronobacter spp. contamination in the middle-east coastline of China.

  3. Nutrient and metal pollution of the eastern Gulf of Finland coastline: Sediments, macroalgae, microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubelit, Yulia; Polyak, Yulia; Dembska, Grazyna; Pazikowska-Sapota, Grazyna; Zegarowski, Lukasz; Kochura, Dmitry; Krivorotov, Denis; Podgornaya, Elena; Burova, Olga; Maazouzi, Chafik

    2016-04-15

    The anthropogenic pollution along the coastline of the eastern Gulf of Finland was studied through a range of methods, including analyses of metal contamination in water, surface sediments, accumulated algal biomass and its correlation with resistant microbiota. According to concentrations, the main pollutants in water were copper and manganese. Influence of Nuclear Power Plant was remarkable in adjacent areas and was expressed in high concentrations of molybdenum, nickel, copper and other elements in the water. Relatively high concentrations of copper, lead and zinc were found in sediments. Microbial tolerance appeared to be correlated with the concentration of the metals in sediments. Higher tolerance levels were found in sediment samples from more polluted stations. Macroalgae, which were massively developed in the coastal zone, had shown high level of metal bioaccumulation. Analyses of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus content of algal tissues allowed the estimation of additional nutrient loading from accumulated decaying algal biomass on the coastal zone of the eastern Gulf of Finland. Mass development of algae in coastal area may contribute to accumulation of organic matter and associated metals. In our study the highest metal concentrations in sediments were found at the sites with dense and continuous layer of fresh and decaying macroalgal biomass, accompanied by hypoxic conditions. Also our study has shown that accumulated biomass may be a significant source of nutrients in the coastal ecosystem.

  4. Do microplastic loads reflect the population demographics along the southern African coastline?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nel, Holly Astrid; Hean, Jeffrey William; Noundou, Xavier Siwe; Froneman, Pierre William

    2017-02-15

    Plastic pollution is a major anthropogenic contaminant effecting the marine environment and is often associated with high human population densities and industrial activities. The microplastic (63 to 5000μm) burden of beach sediment and surf-zone water was investigated at selected sites along the entire length of the South African coastline. It was predicted that samples collected in areas of high population density, would contain a higher microplastic burden than those along coasts that demonstrate very low population densities. With the exception of water column microplastics within Richard's Bay Harbour (413.3±77.53particles·m(-3)) and Durban Harbour (1200±133.2particles·m(-3)), there were no significant spatial differences in microplastic loads. This supports the theory that harbours act as a source of microplastics for the surrounding marine environment. Additionally, the absence of any spatial variation highlights the possible long range distribution of microplastic pollutants by large scale ocean currents.

  5. [Residue characteristics and distributions of perfluorinated compounds in surface seawater along Shenzhen coastline].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qing-Wu; Zhang, Hong; Chai, Zhi-Fang; Shen, Jin-Can; Yang, Bo

    2012-06-01

    In order to explore the residue characteristics and distributions of 15 perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) in 18 surface seawater samples along Shenzhen coastline, high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) combined with solid phase extraction enrichment was applied in this research. The results indicated that residue level of PFCs in coastal surface seawater samples was significantly affected by human activities. Sigma PFCs residue levels in surface seawater from Shenzhen west coast, which locates below the estuary of Pearl River and Donghao River, are much higher than those from the east coast, which has low development and sparse population (P<0.05). Under natural conditions, sigma PFCs residue levels in coastal surface seawater samples from Shenzhen Bays are higher than those out of bays. The major residue species in surface seawater samples along Shenzhen coast were medium- and short-chain PFCs, including perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), perfluorohexanoic acid and perfluoropentanoic acid. Their similar environmental behavior (P<0.05, P<0.01) is likely associated with the production process of PFCs-related products. Furthermore, cluster analysis results show that PFOS (R2 = 0.4092) level can be used as a representative parameter for evaluating PFCs contamination status in surface seawater along Shenzhen coast.

  6. Molecular typing of Vibrio parahaemolyticus isolates from the middle-east coastline of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wanyi; Xie, Yanping; Xu, Jingye; Wang, Qingzhong; Gu, Ming; Yang, Jielin; Zhou, Min; Wang, Dapeng; Shi, Chunlei; Shi, Xianming

    2012-02-15

    The occurrence of outbreaks of Vibrio parahaemolyticus gastroenteritis in China highlights the need for strain characterization and subtyping of this pathogenic species. A total of 56 epidemiologically-unrelated strains of V. parahaemolyticus were isolated from clinical samples, seafood and various environmental sites in the middle-east coastline of China from 2006 to 2008. The isolates were characterized using four molecular typing methods, including ribotyping, enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus sequence PCR (ERIC-PCR), pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), and sequence analysis of the gyrB gene. Genetic profiles of cluster analysis from these molecular typing tests clearly showed that there were differences in potential pathogenicity among isolates from seafood and its environments. Genetic characterization of two isolates (F13 and QS2) that originated from seafood demonstrated that they were potentially pathogenic. Discriminatory indices of four typing methods for the 56 V. parahaemolyticus isolates were differentiated by Simpson's Index of Diversity. The discriminatory index of ERIC-PCR typing was maximal (D=0.942), while that of sequence analysis of the gyrB gene was minimal (D=0.702). The discriminatory ability was greatly enhanced (D=0.966) when ERIC-PCR was coupled with sequence analysis of the gyrB gene. These results suggest that ERIC-PCR combined with sequence analysis of gyrB gene may be a reliable, rapid typing strategy for V. parahaemolyticus strains.

  7. Multiple biomarkers of pollution effects in caged mussels on the Greek coastline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsangaris, C; Kormas, K; Strogyloudi, E; Hatzianestis, I; Neofitou, C; Andral, B; Galgani, F

    2010-04-01

    A suite of biomarkers was measured in caged mussels at areas impacted by different anthropogenic activities along the Greek coastline to assess biological effects of environmental pollution. Mussels were caged at coastal sites in the vicinity of major cities, in areas influenced by major industries, agricultural practices and in islands away from known sources of pollution. Biomarkers indicative of neurotoxicity (acetylcholinesterase, AchE), oxidative stress (catalase, CAT), phase II biotransformation of xenobiotics (glutathione S-transferase, GST), metal exposure (metallothioneins, MTs) and protein synthesis (RNA:DNA ratio) were measured to assess effects of various types of pollutants. AchE activity proved to be the most responsive biomarker with decreased values at sites influenced by agricultural, urban and industrial activities. Decreased CAT and GST activities and increased MTs levels were recorded at a number of anthropogenic-impacted sites. RNA:DNA ratio showed a biphasic response as both high and low values were found at impacted sites. Principal component analysis clearly distinguished sites receiving pollution inputs from non-polluted sites. The combination of the selected biomarkers used in caged mussels resulted useful in the assessment of the effects of environmental pollution.

  8. Brucella ceti from two striped dolphins stranded on the Apulia coastline, Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garofolo, Giuliano; Zilli, Katiuscia; Troiano, Pasquale; Petrella, Antonio; Marotta, Francesca; Di Serafino, Gabriella; Ancora, Massimo; Di Giannatale, Elisabetta

    2014-02-01

    Since 1994, when Brucella ceti was first isolated from an aborted dolphin fetus, several cases have been reported worldwide. The first case of B. ceti in the Mediterranean (and in Italy), however, was recorded only in 2012, off the coast of Tuscany. Extensive studies, using serological and microbiological methods, have documented this bacterium in dolphins and demonstrated its zoonotic potential. We describe the typing of two B. ceti strains isolated from striped dolphins (Stenella coeruleoalba) stranded on the southern Apulia coastline. B. ceti isolates were conventionally typed, and then genotyped by both the multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and the multilocus variable number of tandem repeats typing (MLVA) methodologies to infer phylogeny and potential epidemiological links between the two cases. The two isolates were identified through MLST analysis as belonging to the common sequence type 26 (ST26), while MLVA analysis, having established that the two isolates have identical profiles, assigned them to a novel genotype within cluster A - a unique representative of a new Mediterranean subcluster. The results thus revealed a link between the two cases studied, demonstrating the usefulness of MLST and MLVA for the epidemiological investigation of brucellae among marine mammals.

  9. Antioxidant capacity and lipophilic content of seaweeds collected from the Qingdao coastline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hai-Lan; Wang, Bin-Gui

    2004-08-11

    Lipophilic extracts from 16 species of seaweeds collected along the Qingdao coastline were screened and evaluated for their antioxidant activities (AA) using the beta-carotene-linoleate assay system. The diethyl ether soluble extracts of all selected seaweeds exhibited various degrees of antioxidative efficacy in each screen. The highest antioxidant capacities among the tested samples were observed for Rhodomela confervoides and Symphyocladia latiuscula and were comparable with that of the well-known antioxidant butylated hydroxytoluene and greater than that of propyl gallate. The lipophilic content of all 16 samples and the chemical composition of 4 selected seaweeds, R. confervoidesand S. latiuscula, which had higher AA, Laminaria japonica, which had intermediate AA, and Plocamium telfairiae, which had lower AA, were analyzed by gas chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, respectively. Fatty acids and alkanes were found. The present data indicated an increase in antioxidative property with increasing content of unsaturated fatty acid. The result of this study suggests that seaweeds can be considered as a potential source for the extraction of lipophilic antioxidants, which might be used as dietary supplements or in production in the food industry. This is the first report on the antioxidant activities of lipophilic extracts from seaweeds.

  10. Variation of essential oil composition of Eucalyptus camaldulensis (myrtaceae from the Montengero coastline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grbović Slavenko

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In the current study the essential oil obtained from the leaves of Eucalyptus camaldulensis plants collected from five localities of the Montenegro coastline was analyzed. The oil yield varied from 0.63 % (Kotor up to 1.59% (Tivat. The chemical composition of the leaf essential oil was analyzed using GC-MS technique. Monoterpene hydrocarbons were a major class of compounds. Among them, dominant compounds were p-cymene (17.38-28.60%, ß-phellandrene (12.35-14.47% and ß-pinene (0.94-11.48%. The second largest group was oxygenated monoterpenes with cryptone (4.97-7.25 and terpinene-4-ol (2.75-4.21% as predominant. Besides high content of sesquiterpene alcohol spathulenol (7.83-14.15% was found. According to the results obtained E. camaldulensis from Montenegro can be classified in the chemotype with low 1,8-cineole and high p-cymene and cryptone ratio.

  11. Elemental distribution in seaweed, Gelidium abbottiorum along the KwaZulu-Natal Coastline, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misheer, Natasha; Kindness, Andrew; Jonnalagadda, Sreekanth B

    2006-01-01

    The total concentrations of 7 selected metals, namely manganese, iron, zinc, titanium, boron, arsenic and mercury, were monitored for one annual cycle covering four seasons in the seaweed, Gelidium abbottiorum, at four sampling sites at Zinkwasi, Ballito, Treasure beach and Park Rynie along the South-East coastline of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa to assess the current status of the marine environment. Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrophotometry, Mercury Cold Vapour AAS, and Hydride Generation AAS were used for the determination of metal concentrations. Mn concentrations were particularly high in the G. abbottiorum species, followed by Fe, As and B concentrations which were in the 3-8 ppm range. Ti and Zn were in the 100-400 ppb range, while Hg was low and below 100 ppb. A typical sample of G. abbottiorum at Treasure beach, a site close to Durban metropolis in winter had Mn (8.6 ppm), Fe (4.6 ppm), As (5.6 ppm), B (3.0 ppm), Ti (420 ppb), Zn (167 ppb) and Hg (7.5 ppb). All metals recorded a decrease in concentrations from winter to spring with the exception of Hg. The Hg levels increased considerably from winter to spring.

  12. Patterns of Mass Mortality among Rocky Shore Invertebrates across 100 km of Northeastern Pacific Coastline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurgens, Laura J; Rogers-Bennett, Laura; Raimondi, Peter T; Schiebelhut, Lauren M; Dawson, Michael N; Grosberg, Richard K; Gaylord, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Mass mortalities in natural populations, particularly those that leave few survivors over large spatial areas, may cause long-term ecological perturbations. Yet mass mortalities may remain undocumented or poorly described due to challenges in responding rapidly to unforeseen events, scarcity of baseline data, and difficulties in quantifying rare or patchily distributed species, especially in remote or marine systems. Better chronicling the geographic pattern and intensity of mass mortalities is especially critical in the face of global changes predicted to alter regional disturbance regimes. Here, we couple replicated post-mortality surveys with preceding long-term surveys and historical data to describe a rapid and severe mass mortality of rocky shore invertebrates along the north-central California coast of the northeastern Pacific Ocean. In late August 2011, formerly abundant intertidal populations of the purple sea urchin (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, a well-known ecosystem engineer), and the predatory six-armed sea star (Leptasterias sp.) were functionally extirpated from ~100 km of coastline. Other invertebrates, including the gumboot chiton (Cryptochiton stelleri) the ochre sea star (Pisaster ochraceus), and subtidal populations of purple sea urchins also exhibited elevated mortality. The pattern and extent of mortality suggest the potential for long-term population, community, and ecosystem consequences, recovery from which may depend on the different dispersal abilities of the affected species.

  13. Ticks (Acari: Ixodidae) associated with wildlife and vegetation of Haller park along the Kenyan coastline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanzala, W; Okanga, S

    2006-09-01

    This artcile describes the results obtained from a tick survey conducted in Haller park along the Kenyan coastline. The survey aimed at evaluating tick-host associations, assessing tick population density, and providing baseline information for planning future tick control and management in the park. Ticks (2,968) were collected by handpicking from eight species of wildlife and by dragging in 14 selected sites within the park. A considerable proportion of ticks were also collected from leaves, stems, and bark of most dominant trees, namely, Casuarina equisetifolia L. (Forst. and Forst.), Cocos nucifera L., Adansonia digitata L., Musa paradisiaca L., and Azadiracta indica Adr. Juss. Dragging was conducted in sites predominantly occupied by Cynodon dactylon L. (Pers.), Cenchrus ciliaris L., Stenotaphrum dimidiatum L. (Kuntze.) Brongn., and Brachiaria xantholeuca Hack. Ex Schinz Stapf. and Loudetia kagerensis K. Schum. Hutch. Eight tick species were identified, and the collection included Rhipicephalus pravus Dönitz 1910, Rhipicephalus pulchellus Gerstäcker 1873, Hyalomma marginatum rufipes Koch 1844, Amblyomma gemma Dönitz 1910, Amblyomma hebraeum Koch 1844, Amblyomma sparsum Neumann 1899, Amblyomma nuttalli Dönitz 1909, and Boophilus decoloratus Koch 1844. Given that the identified tick species are known to parasitize humans as well as livestock, there exist risks of emergence of zoonotic infections mediated by tick vectors. In the recreational environment of Haller park, where tick vectors share habitats with hosts, there is a need to develop sustainable and effective tick control and management strategies to minimize economic losses that tick infestation may cause.

  14. Dynamic landscapes and human dispersal patterns: tectonics, coastlines, and the reconstruction of human habitats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Geoffrey N.; King, Geoffrey C. P.

    2011-06-01

    Studies of the impact of physical environment on human evolution usually focus on climate as the main external forcing agent of evolutionary and cultural change. In this paper we focus on changes in the physical character of the landscape driven by geophysical processes as an equally potent factor. Most of the landscapes where finds of early human fossils and artefacts are concentrated are ones that have been subjected to high levels of geological instability, either because of especially active tectonic processes associated with faulting and volcanic activity or because of proximity to coastlines subject to dramatic changes of geographical position and physical character by changes of relative sea level. These processes can have both beneficial effects, creating ecologically attractive conditions for human settlement, and deleterious or disruptive ones, creating barriers to movement, disruption of ecological conditions, or hazards to survival. Both positive and negative factors can have powerful selective effects on human behaviour and patterns of settlement and dispersal. We consider both these aspects of the interaction, develop a framework for the reconstruction and comparison of landscapes and landscape change at a variety of scales, and illustrate this with selected examples drawn from Africa and Arabia.

  15. Sediment microbial activity and its relation to environmental variables along the eastern Gulf of Finland coastline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polyak, Yulia; Shigaeva, Tatyana; Gubelit, Yulia; Bakina, Ludmila; Kudryavtseva, Valentina; Polyak, Mark

    2017-07-01

    Sediment microbial activity and its relationship with the main environmental factors and pollutants were examined in the coastal area of the eastern Gulf of Finland, Baltic Sea. The activity of two common oxidoreductase enzymes: dehydrogenase (DA) and catalase (CA) varied significantly between 13 study sites. In the Neva Bay the highest microbial activities (DA: 2.64 mg TFF (10 g- 1) day- 1, CA: 6.29 mg H2O2 g- 1) were recorded, while in the outer estuary the minimum values of dehydrogenase and catalase were measured. DA, CA, and abundances of culturable heterotrophic bacteria (CHB) were positively correlated with each other, while biomass of green opportunistic algae was independent of both microbial activities and CHB. Enzymatic activity was found to be strongly positively correlated with sediment particle size and organic matter content, but unrelated to the other studied environmental parameters (temperature, pH, and salinity). Principal components analysis (PCA), controlling for environmental variables, supported direct effects of metal and oil contamination on sediment microbial activity. Also it had shown the similar patterns for algal biomass and metals. Our results suggest that copper and hydrocarbons are the main anthropogenic variables influencing enzyme distribution along the eastern Gulf of Finland coastline.

  16. Evaluation of ecotourism potential in the northern coastline of the Persian Gulf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouri, Jafar; Danehkar, Afshin; Sharifipour, Rozita

    2008-08-01

    This research has identified areas located in the northern coastline of the Persian Gulf in the south of Iran, as strategic and ecological sites, based on tourism potential assessing criteria. To this end coastal limits were identified by satellite imagery in terms of shorelines and the maximum extent of water approach into the land and taking into consideration the characteristics of the nearby coastal villages. The studied region was then compared to similar international criteria and experiences. The original criteria were then divided into three main and four sub criteria. The Kangan region was found to have a potential for tourism industry according to the mentioned criteria. Naiband Gulf with a score of 20 was ranked first followed by Asalouyeh with a score of 18 and finally Taheri and Kangan Ports with scores of 16 and 15, respectively. With a high tourism industry potential in the studied region the necessity of ecotourism quality enhancement and environmental management planning for the northern shoreline of the Persian Gulf becomes of vital importance.

  17. Patterns of Mass Mortality among Rocky Shore Invertebrates across 100 km of Northeastern Pacific Coastline.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura J Jurgens

    Full Text Available Mass mortalities in natural populations, particularly those that leave few survivors over large spatial areas, may cause long-term ecological perturbations. Yet mass mortalities may remain undocumented or poorly described due to challenges in responding rapidly to unforeseen events, scarcity of baseline data, and difficulties in quantifying rare or patchily distributed species, especially in remote or marine systems. Better chronicling the geographic pattern and intensity of mass mortalities is especially critical in the face of global changes predicted to alter regional disturbance regimes. Here, we couple replicated post-mortality surveys with preceding long-term surveys and historical data to describe a rapid and severe mass mortality of rocky shore invertebrates along the north-central California coast of the northeastern Pacific Ocean. In late August 2011, formerly abundant intertidal populations of the purple sea urchin (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, a well-known ecosystem engineer, and the predatory six-armed sea star (Leptasterias sp. were functionally extirpated from ~100 km of coastline. Other invertebrates, including the gumboot chiton (Cryptochiton stelleri the ochre sea star (Pisaster ochraceus, and subtidal populations of purple sea urchins also exhibited elevated mortality. The pattern and extent of mortality suggest the potential for long-term population, community, and ecosystem consequences, recovery from which may depend on the different dispersal abilities of the affected species.

  18. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in ocean sediments from the North Pacific to the Arctic Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yuxin; Halsall, Crispin J; Xie, Zhiyong; Koetke, Danijela; Mi, Wenying; Ebinghaus, Ralf; Gao, Guoping

    2017-08-01

    Eighteen polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were measured in surficial sediments along a marine transect from the North Pacific into the Arctic Ocean. The highest average Σ18PAHs concentrations were observed along the continental slope of the Canada Basin in the Arctic (68.3 ± 8.5 ng g(-1) dw), followed by sediments in the Chukchi Sea shelf (49.7 ± 21.2 ng g(-1) dw) and Bering Sea (39.5 ± 11.3 ng g(-1) dw), while the Bering Strait (16.8 ± 7.1 ng g(-1) dw) and Central Arctic Ocean sediments (13.1 ± 9.6 ng g(-1) dw) had relatively lower average concentrations. The use of principal components analysis with multiple linear regression (PCA/MLR) indicated that on average oil related or petrogenic sources contributed ∼42% of the measured PAHs in the sediments and marked by higher concentrations of two methylnaphthalenes over the non-alkylated parent PAH, naphthalene. Wood and coal combustion contributed ∼32%, and high temperature pyrogenic sources contributing ∼26%. Petrogenic sources, such as oil seeps, allochthonous coal and coastally eroded material such as terrigenous sediments particularly affected the Chukchi Sea shelf and slope of the Canada Basin, while biomass and coal combustion sources appeared to have greater influence in the central Arctic Ocean, possibly due to the effects of episodic summertime forest fires. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Changing Arctic Ocean freshwater pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morison, James; Kwok, Ron; Peralta-Ferriz, Cecilia; Alkire, Matt; Rigor, Ignatius; Andersen, Roger; Steele, Mike

    2012-01-04

    Freshening in the Canada basin of the Arctic Ocean began in the 1990s and continued to at least the end of 2008. By then, the Arctic Ocean might have gained four times as much fresh water as comprised the Great Salinity Anomaly of the 1970s, raising the spectre of slowing global ocean circulation. Freshening has been attributed to increased sea ice melting and contributions from runoff, but a leading explanation has been a strengthening of the Beaufort High--a characteristic peak in sea level atmospheric pressure--which tends to accelerate an anticyclonic (clockwise) wind pattern causing convergence of fresh surface water. Limited observations have made this explanation difficult to verify, and observations of increasing freshwater content under a weakened Beaufort High suggest that other factors must be affecting freshwater content. Here we use observations to show that during a time of record reductions in ice extent from 2005 to 2008, the dominant freshwater content changes were an increase in the Canada basin balanced by a decrease in the Eurasian basin. Observations are drawn from satellite data (sea surface height and ocean-bottom pressure) and in situ data. The freshwater changes were due to a cyclonic (anticlockwise) shift in the ocean pathway of Eurasian runoff forced by strengthening of the west-to-east Northern Hemisphere atmospheric circulation characterized by an increased Arctic Oscillation index. Our results confirm that runoff is an important influence on the Arctic Ocean and establish that the spatial and temporal manifestations of the runoff pathways are modulated by the Arctic Oscillation, rather than the strength of the wind-driven Beaufort Gyre circulation.

  20. The Submarine -- The Key to Winning an Arctic Conflict

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-15

    Cold Horizons: Arctic Maritime Security Challenges.” 17 Franklyn Griffiths, Rob Huebert, and P. Whitney Lackenbauer, Canada and the Changing Arctic... Franklyn , Rob Huebert, and P. Whitney Lackenbauer. Canada and the Changing Arctic: Sovereignty, Security, and Stewardship. Waterloo, Ontario

  1. Geologic Provinces of the Circum-Arctic, 2008 (north of the Arctic Circle)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This shapefile includes arcs and polygons that describe U.S. Geological Survey defined 33 geologic provinces of the Circum-Arctic (north of the Arctic Circle). Each...

  2. Determination of interrill soil erodibility coefficient based on Fuzzy and Fuzzy-Genetic Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Habib Palizvan Zand

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Although the fuzzy logic science has been used successfully in various sudies of hydrology and soil erosion, but in literature review no article was found about its performance for estimating of interrill erodibility. On the other hand, studies indicate that genetic algorithm techniques can be used in fuzzy models and finding the appropriate membership functions for linguistic variables and fuzzy rules. So this study was conducted to develop the fuzzy and fuzzy–genetics models and investigation of their performance in the estimation of soil interrill erodibility factor (Ki. Materials and Methods: For this reason 36 soil samples with different physical and chemical properties were collected from west of Azerbaijan province . soilsamples were also taken from the Ap or A horizon of each soil profile. The samples were air-dried , sieved and Some soil characteristics such as soil texture, organic matter (OM, cation exchange capacity (CEC, sodium adsorption ratio (SAR, EC and pH were determined by the standard laboratory methods. Aggregates size distributions (ASD were determined by the wet-sieving method and fractal dimension of soil aggregates (Dn was also calculated. In order to determination of soil interrill erodibility, the flume experiment performed by packing soil a depth of 0.09-m in 0.5 × 1.0 m. soil was saturated from the base and adjusted to 9% slope and was subjected to at least 90 min rainfall . Rainfall intensity treatments were 20, 37 and 47 mm h-1. During each rainfall event, runoff was collected manually in different time intervals, being less than 60 s at the beginning, up to 15 min near the end of the test. At the end of the experiment, the volumes of runoff samples and the mass of sediment load at each time interval were measured. Finally interrill erodibility values were calculated using Kinnell (11 Equation. Then by statistical analyses Dn and sand percent of the soils were selected as input variables and Ki as

  3. Physico-chemical properties and fertility status of water eroded soils of Sharkul area of district Mansehra, Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farmanullah Khan, A. Iqbal

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Soil degradation is the major threat to agricultural sustainability because it affects the soil productivity. Present study was conducted in 2008 to evaluate physico-chemical properties and fertility status of some eroded soil series of Sharkul area district Manshera, Hazara division, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan. Six soil series including slightly eroded (Dosera and Girari, moderately eroded (Nakholi and Sharkul and severely eroded (Ahl and Banser were selected. Soil samples were collected from surface (0-15 cm, subsurface (30-45 cm and substrata soil (60-75cm depths and were analyzed for various soil properties. Due to severity of erosion, bulk density increased, while total porosity, saturation percentage and organic matter decreased significantly. AB-DTPA extractable P, K, Fe, Cu, Zn, and Mn concentrations were decreased due to the severity of erosion in surface and sub surface soils, whereas in the substrata soils (60-75 cm depth, the effect of erosion was almost non significant. Sub-surface and sub-strata soils were found deficient in available P ( Zn > Fe > Mn. The physical and chemical properties of eroded soils varied significantly and the increasing severity of erosion resulted in corresponding deterioration of soil quality.

  4. Domesticating the Arctic: A Discourse Analysis of Canada's Arctic Foreign Policy

    OpenAIRE

    Aaser, Agnes Viktoria

    2014-01-01

    This thesis investigates how the concept the Arctic is utilized in a Canadian Arctic foreign policy context today. The thesis main argument is that the Canadian government discursively represents the Arctic as a domestic space by drawing on cultural references, historical analogies, geopolitical identity and representation of danger and external threats. This argument is based on a qualitative study of key Arctic policy documents produced by the Harper government since 2009. The study is...

  5. The Evolving Arctic: Current State of U.S. Arctic Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    obvious that improvements need to be made to guard U.S. interests While the U.S. procrastinates in taking its rightful place in the Arctic, Russia...foreign policy priority.87 1. Exercising Arctic Sovereignty As an Arctic nation, Canada firmly understands the importance of ensuring and...domain awareness in the region.88 In May 2010, Canadian and Danish military leaders signed a memorandum of understanding on Arctic defense, security

  6. Changes in the Arctic: Background and Issues for Congress

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-30

    established the U.S. Arctic Research Commission (USARC) to promote Arctic research and recommend Arctic research policy ; • designated the National Science...Foundation (NSF) as the lead federal agency for implementing Arctic research policy ; • established the Interagency Arctic Research Policy Committee...IARPC) to develop a national Arctic research policy and a five-year plan to implement that policy, and designated the NSF representative on the IARPC

  7. Coastline change assessment on water reservoirs located in the Konya Basin Area, Turkey, using multitemporal landsat imagery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durduran, S Savas

    2010-05-01

    This paper focuses mainly on the coastline change assessment on water reservoirs located in the Konya Basin Area, Turkey. The Konya Closed Basin exists at the Central Anatolia Region and covers a region of 50,000 km(2) area corresponding to the 7% cumulative area of Turkey in which three million people live, 45% in rural areas and 55% in urban areas. The basin is surrounded with the city centers of Konya, Aksaray, Karaman, Isparta, Niğde, Ankara, Nevşehir, and Antalya cities. In this study, these changes were examined using Landsat TM and ETM+ 1987-2006 and 1990-2000. In the image processing step, image and vectorization of the satellite images were carried out to monitor coastline changes over the lakes located in the Konya Closed Basin Area. At the end of the study, significant coastline movements were detected for a 19-year period due to drought effects, agricultural watering, and planning mistakes experienced in the basin.

  8. Strategic metal deposits of the Arctic Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortnikov, N. S.; Lobanov, K. V.; Volkov, A. V.; Galyamov, A. L.; Vikent'ev, I. V.; Tarasov, N. N.; Distler, V. V.; Lalomov, A. V.; Aristov, V. V.; Murashov, K. Yu.; Chizhova, I. A.; Chefranov, R. M.

    2015-11-01

    Mineral commodities rank high in the economies of Arctic countries, and the status of mineral resources and the dynamics of their development are of great importance. The growing tendency to develop strategic metal resources in the Circumarctic Zone is outlined in a global perspective. The Russian Arctic Zone is the leading purveyor of these metals to domestic and foreign markets. The comparative analysis of tendencies in development of strategic metal resources of the Arctic Zone in Russia and other countries is crucial for the elaboration of trends of geological exploration and research engineering. This paper provides insight into the development of Arctic strategic metal resources in global perspective. It is shown that the mineral resource potential of the Arctic circumpolar metallogenic belt is primarily controlled by large and unique deposits of nonferrous, noble, and rare metals. The prospective types of economic strategic metal deposits in the Russian Arctic Zone are shown.

  9. Arctic tipping points: governance in turbulent times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Oran R

    2012-02-01

    Interacting forces of climate change and globalization are transforming the Arctic. Triggered by a non-linear shift in sea ice, this transformation has unleashed mounting interest in opportunities to exploit the region's natural resources as well as growing concern about environmental, economic, and political issues associated with such efforts. This article addresses the implications of this transformation for governance, identifies limitations of existing arrangements, and explores changes needed to meet new demands. It advocates the development of an Arctic regime complex featuring flexibility across issues and adaptability over time along with an enhanced role for the Arctic Council both in conducting policy-relevant assessments and in promoting synergy in interactions among the elements of the emerging Arctic regime complex. The emphasis throughout is on maximizing the fit between the socioecological features of the Arctic and the character of the governance arrangements needed to steer the Arctic toward a sustainable future.

  10. Arctic whaling : proceedings of the International Symposium Arctic Whaling February 1983

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacob, H.K. s'; Snoeijing, K

    1984-01-01

    Contents: D.M. Hopkins and Louie Marincovich Jr. Whale Biogeography and the history of the Arctic Basin P.M. Kellt, J.H.W. Karas and L.D. Williams Arctic Climate: Past, Present and Future Torgny E. Vinje On the present state and the future fate of the Arctic sea ice cover P.J.H. van Bree On the biol

  11. The motives and interests of non-Arctic states on Arctic development

    OpenAIRE

    Sergey N. Grinyaev

    2016-01-01

    The article summarizes the work of the Center for Strategic Assessments and Forecasts on the study of strategy and policy of the Arctic Council observer countries. It is proposed in the number of the Arctic Council observer organizations include the Russian Geographical Society — internationally recognized and oldest scientific community, which has made a significant contribution to the development of the Arctic.

  12. Sources, degradation and transport of terrigenous organic carbon on the East Siberian Arctic Shelf Seas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesi, Tommaso; Semiletov, Igor; Dudarev, Oleg; Gustafsson, Örjan

    2013-04-01

    Recent studies suggest that the present hydrological regime increase observed in the Arctic rivers is mainly the consequence of the changes in permafrost conditions as a result of climate warming. Given the enormous amount of carbon stored in coastal and terrestrial permafrost the potentially increased supply from this large carbon pool to the coastal Arctic Ocean, possibly associated with a translocated release to the atmosphere as CO2, is considered a plausible scenario in a warming climate. However, there is not sufficient information regarding the reactivity of terrigenous material once supplied to the Arctic Ocean. In this study, we address this critical issue by examining the organic composition of surface sediments collected over extensive scales on the East Siberian Arctic Shelf (ESAS) as part of the International Siberian Shelf Study (ISSS). The ESAS represents by far the largest shelf of the Arctic Ocean. Samples were collected from the inner- to the outer-shelf following the sediment transport pathway in a region between the Lena and the Kolyma rivers. The analytical approach includes the characterization of marine and land-derived carbon using a large number of molecular biomarkers obtained by alkaline CuO oxidation such as lignin-phenols, cutin-derived products, p-hydroxy benzenes, benzoic acids, fatty acids, and dicarboxylic acids. Our results indicated high concentrations of terrigenous material in shallow sediments and a marked decrease of terrestrial biomarkers with increasing distance from the coastline. In parallel, lignin-based degradation proxies suggested highly altered terrigenous carbon in mid- and outer-shelf sediments compared to coastal sediments. Furthermore, the ratio of cutin-derived products over lignin significantly increased along the sediment transport pathway. Considering that cutin is considered to be intrinsically more reactive compared to lignin, high values of this ratio off the coastal region were interpreted as selective

  13. Multiscale Models of Melting Arctic Sea Ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-30

    1 Multiscale Models of Melting Arctic Sea Ice Kenneth M. Golden University of Utah, Department of Mathematics phone: (801) 581-6851...feedback has played a major role in the recent declines of the summer Arctic sea ice pack. However, understanding the evolution of melt ponds and sea...Models of Melting Arctic Sea Ice 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER

  14. Arctic Security in a Warming World

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    is much shallower and littered with small islands. The two northern variants are the primary avenues for growth in international shipping. Figure...in the Arctic is the explosion of opportunities for tourism . This influx of large numbers of people has the potential to be the greatest threat to...lie with expanded Arctic tourism . A distressed tourist vessel in the hostile conditions and remote regions of the Arctic could quickly develop into a

  15. Investigating Coastal Processes and Hazards Along the Coastline of Ghana, West Africa (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hapke, C. J.; Ashton, A. D.; Wiafe, G.; Addo, K. A.; Ababio, S.; Agyekum, K. A.; Lippmann, T. C.; Roelvink, J.

    2010-12-01

    As with many coastlines worldwide, erosion is a chronic issue along the Ghana coast. Erosion is presently impacting coastal infrastructure ranging from urban areas to small fishing villages, and threatening important cultural and historical resources in some locales. The Ghanaian coast displays significant geomorphological variability, ranging from rocky and bluffed shores to low-lying barrier beaches. Rates and trends of coastal change vary along the coast, interacting with physical oceanographic processes, alongshore sediment transport gradients, and anthropogenic disruptions of sediment supply. Little data are available for the systematic assessment of the relative importance of the various factors controlling coastal change, and thus the understanding of erosion threats and the response has been haphazard and inconsiderate of the system as a whole. Information on historical coastal change rates, alongshore geomorphic and geologic variation, sediment budgets, wave climates and other factors that shape the coast is limited. An enhanced understanding of basic coastal processes is critical as development pressures, including eco- and cultural tourism, and oil and gas exploration, continue to increase. An initiative is underway to develop a more comprehensive scientific understanding of coastal processes along the Ghana coastline. An international team of scientists, working in collaboration with researchers at the University of Ghana, are building the data- and knowledge-base required for a holistic and systematic assessment to understand coastal change and its driving forces. The approach includes regional analyses of shoreline change, field mapping of geology and geomorphology, short-term monitoring surveys, collection of geophysical data, deployment of a remote camera system, deployment of a directional wave buoy, and regional hydrodynamic modeling. These data and analyses will ultimately provide the foundation needed to make informed decisions on managing the

  16. The effect of anti-sensitivity dentifrices on brushing abrasion of eroded dentin in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Nathan; Mason, Stephen; Creeth, Jonathan; Hara, Anderson T; Parmar, Madhu; González-Cabezas, Carlos

    2008-01-01

    To investigate the abrasive effects of three marketed anti-sensitivity, and one marketed regular dentifrice on dentin, using an erosion-abrasion in vitro model. Standardized human dentin specimens were prepared and exposed to cycles of erosion, remineralization, and tooth brushing, utilizing the four commercially available dentifrices. Dentin surface loss was then measured by optical profilometry after a total of nine complete cycles. The RDA and pH values of the dentifrices were also measured to assist in the interpretation of results. Profilometry showed significantly greater dentin surface loss for both Colgate Sensitive Fresh Stripe and Colgate Sensitive Multi Protection when compared with Sensodyne Total Protection or Crest Cavity Protection dentifrices. The abrasive level of dentifrices correlated positively (r-squared = 0.66; p < 0.05) with dentin surface loss. This study demonstrated that the abrasivity of dentifrices can have a significant effect on the wear of eroded dentin in vitro.

  17. Natural geo-composites for grassing of eroded and degraded lands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kroumov Victor

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Original, natural grass geocomposites (sods were developed on the basis of combination from unstuffy, needle-drive textile material, geo-net and soil-manure-peat or peat with grass cover from grass mixtures. The natural grass geocomposites have the next priorities: quickly grassing and reinforcing of eroded and degraded terrains; large uniformity and compactness of grass cove; long exploiting period; grassing of terrains with big slopes where the mechanization is difficult to use; the articles are with low mass, small thickness and high stability; they limit the growing of weed. The natural grass geocomposites are intend for control of soil erosion and reconstruction of natural landshaft. They can to reinforce ditches, grass collectors, side of the road slopes, as well as lay out lawn, parks, stadiums, ski racing tourist's beauty spot, etc.

  18. Turnover of eroded soil organic carbon after deposition in terrestrial and aquatic environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkels, Frédérique; Cammeraat, Erik; Kalbitz, Karsten

    The fate of eroded soil organic carbon (SOC) after deposition is a large uncertainty in assessing the impact of soil erosion on C budgets. Globally, large amounts of SOC are transported by erosion and a substantial part is transferred into adjacent inland waters, linking terrestrial and aquatic C...... cellulose. Physical and chemical soil properties and SOC molecular composition were assessed as potential controls on C turnover. SOC deposition in aquatic environments resulted in upto 3.5 times higher C turnover than deposition on downslope soils. Labile C inputs enlarged total CO2 emissions......, with the largest increase for aquatic conditions. Solid-state 13C NMR and FT-IR spectroscopy showed broad similarities in SOC molecular composition. Soil and SOC properties could not (yet) fully explain variation in SOC turnover between the sites. However, temporal trends in CO2 emissions clearly differed between...

  19. Loess Plateau check dams can potentially sequester eroded soil organic carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haicheng; Liu, Shuguang; Yuan, Wenping; Dong, Wenjie; Xia, Jiangzhou; Cao, Yaojun; Jia, Yanwei

    2016-06-01

    Check dams are special soil and water conservation structures in the Loess Plateau, China. They play an important role in intercepting sediments and soil organic carbon (SOC). However, the decomposition of intercepted SOC and the environmental regulations at check dams have not been investigated. We conducted several paired field experiments at both check dams and slope lands in the Yanhe Watershed of the Loess Plateau to examine the characteristics of SOC decomposition at check dams. On average, the SOC mineralization rate in slope lands was approximately three times higher than in check dams. Increased soil moisture and compaction in check dams can constrain carbon mineralization by limiting the oxygen availability of SOC and can isolate substrate carbon from heterotrophic microorganisms. Our results indicate that check dams display a considerable potential for eroded SOC sequestration via reducing the soil respiration rate and highlight the important implications of lateral carbon redistribution and human engineering projects when estimating regional or global ecosystem carbon cycles.

  20. EROD activity and genotoxicity in the seabob shrimp Xiphopenaeus kroyeri exposed to benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva Rocha, Arthur José; Gomes, Vicente; Rocha Passos, Maria José de Arruda Campos; Hasue, Fabio Matsu; Alves Santos, Thaís Cruz; Bícego, Márcia Caruso; Taniguchi, Satie; Van Ngan, Phan

    2012-11-01

    Seabob shrimp Xiphopenaeus kroyeri is a marine species that lives in shallow waters of coastal environments, often impacted by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) pollution. In the present study, seabob shrimp were exposed for 96 h to benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) at the nominal concentrations of 100, 200, 400 and 800 microg-L(-1). Animals of the control groups were exposed either to clean water or to the BaP-carrier (DMSO). At the end of the exposures, muscle tissues were sampled for BaP uptake assessment and hepatopancreas and hemolymph for EROD enzyme activity and hemocytes DNA damage, respectively. EROD activity and DNA damage increased significantly as a function of BaP exposure concentrations. Significant correlations between BaP uptake and both EROD activity and DNA damage suggest that they can be used as suitable tools for integrated levels of study on the biomarkers of PAH exposure.

  1. USGS Small-scale Dataset - 1:1,000,000-Scale Coastline of the United States 201403 FileGDB 10.1

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This map layer portrays the coastline of the United States, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. The United States shoreline of the Great Lakes is also...

  2. March 2007 Scripps Institute of Oceanography (SIO) Lidar of the Southern California Coastline: Long Beach to the US/Mexico Border

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This lidar point data set was collected during low tide conditions along an approximately 500-700 meter wide strip of the Southern California coastline within an...

  3. LIGHT TRANSMISSION and Other Data from CAPE HENLOPEN From North American Coastline-North from 19810416 to 19820312 (NODC Accession 8500080)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Light transmission and other data from Cape Henlopen from North American Coastline. Transmissometer data was collected by Lamont-Doherty Geological Observatory in...

  4. Current meter components and other data from FIXED PLATFORMS from the North American Coastline-South from 01 February 1979 to 10 October 1979 (NODC Accession 9200031)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter components data were collected from FIXED PLATFORMS from the North American Coastline-South from 01 February 1979 to 10 October 1979. Data were...

  5. EASE-Grid 2.0 Land-Ocean-Coastline-Ice Masks Derived from Boston University MODIS/Terra Land Cover Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — These Land-Ocean-Coastline-Ice (LOCI) files provide land classification masks derived from the Boston University MOD12Q1 V004 MODIS/Terra 1 km Land Cover Product...

  6. PHYTOPLANKTON - WET WEIGHT and Other Data from UNKNOWN and Other Platforms From North American Coastline-South and Others from 19860203 to 19860912 (NODC Accession 8700334)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The accession contains chlorophyll-A and phaeophytin data collected by Florida State University in the North American coastline for three time periods in 1986. First...

  7. 1999 Fall Gulf Coast NOAA/USGS/NASA Airborne LiDAR Assessment of Coastal Erosion (ALACE) Project for the US Coastline

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set includes data collected on October 16, 1999 and coastline in the State of Texas from Galveston to the Louisiana border. Laser beach mapping uses a...

  8. 1998 Fall Gulf Coast NOAA/USGS/NASA Airborne LiDAR Assessment of Coastal Erosion (ALACE) Project for the US Coastline

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set includes data collected during Fall 1998 and covers coastlines of the states of Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, and Florida. Laser beach mapping uses...

  9. 1999 Post Hurricane Floyd NOAA/USGS/NASA Airborne LiDAR Assessment of Coastal Erosion (ALACE) Project for the US Coastline

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set includes data collected September 18, 1999 following Hurricane Floyd landfall in North Carolina. The data covers the coastline starting in South...

  10. 2000 Fall East Coast NOAA/USGS/NASA Airborne LiDAR Assessment of Coastal Erosion (ALACE) Project for the US Coastline

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set includes data collected during Fall 2000 and covers coastlines of the states of Maryland, New Jersey, New York, Connecticut, Rhode Island,...

  11. 1998 Winter East Coast NOAA/USGS/NASA Airborne LiDAR Assessment of Coastal Erosion (ALACE) Project for the US Coastline

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set includes data collected in February 1998 and partially covers coastline of the Delmarva peninsula in the states of Virgina, Maryland, and Delaware....

  12. Fall 1999 East Coast NOAA/USGS/NASA Airborne LiDAR Assessment of Coastal Erosion (ALACE) Project for the US Coastline

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set includes data collected in the fall of 1999 and coastlines of the states of Florida, Georgia, North Carolina, and New York. Laser beach mapping uses a...

  13. 2000 Summer East Coast NOAA/USGS/NASA Airborne LiDAR Assessment of Coastal Erosion (ALACE) Project for the US Coastline

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set includes data collected in August 2000 and covers coastlines of the states of South Carolina and North Carolina. Laser beach mapping uses a pulsed...

  14. COMPARISON OF SIMPLE AND MULTIMETRIC DIATOM-BASED INDICES FOR GREAT LAKES COASTLINE DISTURBANCE(1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reavie, Euan D; Kireta, Amy R; Kingston, John C; Sgro, Gerald V; Danz, Nicholas P; Axler, Richard P; Hollenhorst, Thomas P

    2008-06-01

    Because diatom communities are subject to the prevailing water quality in the Great Lakes coastal environment, diatom-based indices can be used to support coastal-monitoring programs and paleoecological studies. Diatom samples were collected from Great Lakes coastal wetlands, embayments, and high-energy sites (155 sites), and assemblages were characterized to the species level. We defined 42 metrics on the basis of autecological and functional properties of species assemblages, including species diversity, motile species, planktonic species, proportion dominant taxon, taxonomic metrics (e.g., proportion Stephanodiscoid taxa), and diatom-inferred (DI) water quality (e.g., DI chloride [Cl]). Redundant metrics were eliminated, and a diatom-based multimetric index (MMDI) to infer coastline disturbance was developed. Anthropogenic stresses in adjacent coastal watersheds were characterized using geographic information system (GIS) data related to agricultural and urban land cover and atmospheric deposition. Fourteen independent diatom metrics had significant regressions with watershed stressor data; these metrics were selected for inclusion in the MMDI. The final MMDI was developed as the weighted sum of the selected metric scores with weights based on a metric's ability to reflect anthropogenic stressors in the adjacent watersheds. Despite careful development of the multimetric approach, verification using a test set of sites indicated that the MMDI was not able to predict watershed stressors better than some of the component metrics. From this investigation, it was determined that simpler, more traditional diatom-based metrics (e.g., DI Cl, proportion Cl-tolerant species, and DI total phosphorus [TP]) provide superior prediction of overall stressor influence at coastal locales.

  15. Investigation of coastline changes in three provinces of Thailand using remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tochamnanvita, T.; Muttitanon, W.

    2014-11-01

    The measuring of coastal in the certain short period of time is almost impossible, but applying the remote sensing with the satellite imagery bring mankind to track down and analyze the approximately length of the coastal changes at the Nano technology speed. An attempt has been made to study the length of shoreline changes along three provinces in the upper gulf of Thailand. The significant purpose is to investigate coastline length changes and to evaluate those different coastal changes at different times. Two specialties of chosen areas are the outstanding location at mouth of river in curve pattern and ecological important mangrove forest, as nominated and designated area listed in Ramsar convention, international wetlands treaty. In employing the remote sensing will help to investigate the shoreline erosion, stable or construction shoreline. Rapid and drastic shoreline changes have been compared and measured base on satellite image Landsat 5 TM on 1994, 2002 and 2007 at path129 row 051. There were geometrically co-registered and, in the process were resampled to 25 m. By composing RGB band, fusion, supervised classification. By apply different theories will give different results but the similarly pattern. Training sites were selected by signature editor, area of interest, evaluate by seperabilitly and contingency. Principle component analysis (PCA) was employed as a method of change detection. This is to conclude that these shoreline areas were in erosion from natural processes and manmade activities, for example, aquaculture and agriculture expansion, such as shrimp farm. These coastal line lost were not just losing the land; it's losing the soul of the cycle of marine life, economically, and environmentally. Moreover, this project, in the future, could benefit to set the recovery buffer zone for mangrove restoration also.

  16. Landslides as weathering reactors; links between physical erosion and weathering in rapidly eroding mountain belts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emberson, R.; Hovius, N.; Galy, A.

    2014-12-01

    The link between physical erosion and chemical weathering is generally modelled with a surface-blanketing weathering zone, where the supply of fresh minerals is tied to the average rate of denudation. In very fast eroding environments, however, sediment production is dominated by landsliding, which acts in a stochastic fashion across the landscape, contrasting strongly with more uniform denudation models. If physical erosion is a driver of weathering at the highest erosion rates, then an alternative weathering model is required. Here we show that landslides can be effective 'weathering reactors'. Previous work modelling the effect of landslides on chemical weathering (Gabet 2007) considered the fresh bedrock surfaces exposed in landslide scars. However, fracturing during the landslide motion generates fresh surfaces, the total surface area of which exceeds that of the exposed scar by many orders of magnitude. Moreover, landslides introduce concavity into hillslopes, which acts to catch precipitation. This is funnelled into a deposit of highly fragmented rock mass with large reactive surface area and limited hydraulic conductivity (Lo et al. 2007). This allows percolating water reaction time for chemical weathering; any admixture of macerated organic debris could yield organic acid to further accelerate weathering. In the South island of New Zealand, seepage from recent landslide deposits has systematically high solute concentrations, far outstripping concentration in runoff from locations where soils are present. River total dissolved load in the western Southern Alps is highly correlated with the rate of recent (erosion; this contrasts with persistent and ubiquitous weathering associated with soil production. Solute fluxes from fast eroding landscapes therefore likely depend on climatic or tectonic forcing of mass wasting; greater precipitation would drive increased weathering, while earthquakes, in generating landslides (Dadson et al. 2003; Chen & Hawkins 2009

  17. Glyphosate and AMPA distribution in wind-eroded sediment derived from loess soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bento, Célia P M; Goossens, Dirk; Rezaei, Mahrooz; Riksen, Michel; Mol, Hans G J; Ritsema, Coen J; Geissen, Violette

    2017-01-01

    Glyphosate is one of the most used herbicides in agricultural lands worldwide. Wind-eroded sediment and dust, as an environmental transport pathway of glyphosate and of its main metabolite aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA), can result in environmental- and human exposure far beyond the agricultural areas where it has been applied. Therefore, special attention is required to the airborne transport of glyphosate and AMPA. In this study, we investigated the behavior of glyphosate and AMPA in wind-eroded sediment by measuring their content in different size fractions (median diameters between 715 and 8 μm) of a loess soil, during a period of 28 days after glyphosate application. Granulometrical extraction was done using a wind tunnel and a Soil Fine Particle Extractor. Extractions were conducted on days 0, 3, 7, 14, 21 and 28 after glyphosate application. Results indicated that glyphosate and AMPA contents were significantly higher in the finest particle fractions (median diameters between 8 and 18 μm), and lowered significantly with the increase in particle size. However, their content remained constant when aggregates were present in the sample. Glyphosate and AMPA contents correlated positively with clay, organic matter, and silt content. The dissipation of glyphosate over time was very low, which was most probably due to the low soil moisture content of the sediment. Consequently, the formation of AMPA was also very low. The low dissipation of glyphosate in our study indicates that the risk of glyphosate transport in dry sediment to off-target areas by wind can be very high. The highest glyphosate and AMPA contents were found in the smallest soil fractions (PM10 and less), which are easily inhaled and, therefore, contribute to human exposure. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The transient response for different types of erodable surface thermocouples using finite element analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Hussein

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The transient response of erodable surface thermocouples has been numerically assessed by using a two dimensional finite element analysis. Four types of base metal erodable surface thermocouples have been examined in this study, included type-K (alumel-chromel, type-E (chromel-constantan, type-T (copper-constantan, and type-J (iron-constantan with 50 mm thick- ness for each. The practical importance of these types of thermocouples is to be used in internal combustion engine studies and aerodynamics experiments. The step heat flux was applied at the surface of the thermocouple model. The heat flux from the measurements of the surface temperature can be commonly identified by assuming that the heat transfer within these devices is one-dimensional. The surface temperature histories at different positions along the thermocouple are presented. The normalized surface temperature histories at the center of the thermocouple for different types at different response time are also depicted. The thermocouple response to different heat flux variations were considered by using a square heat flux with 2 ms width, a sinusoidal surface heat flux variation width 10 ms period and repeated heat flux variation with 2 ms width. The present results demonstrate that the two dimensional transient heat conduction effects have a significant influence on the surface temperature history measurements made with these devices. It was observed that the surface temperature history and the transient response for thermocouple type-E are higher than that for other types due to the thermal properties of this thermocouple. It was concluded that the thermal properties of the surrounding material do have an impact, but the properties of the thermocouple and the insulation materials also make an important contribution to the net response.

  19. Restoration of drastically eroded land using coal fly ash and poultry biosolid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Punshon, Tracy; Adriano, Domy C.; Weber, John T. [The University of Georgia, Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, Drawer E 29808 , SC Aiken (United States)

    2002-09-16

    A 3-year field study was conducted at a 12 ha soil-borrow area adjacent to the Columbia Metropolitan Airport, South Carolina to investigate the restorative effects of co-application of coal fly ash (FA) and a poultry biosolid (PB). FA was applied at 0, 22, 280, 560 and 1120 Mg (tonne) ha{sup -1}, and PB at 5 and 10 Mg ha{sup -1}. The area was seeded with erosion-control species Atlantic Coastal panic grass (Panicum amarum var amarum L.), sericea (Lespedeza cuneata var. appalow [Dumont] G. Don.) and weeping love grass (Eragrostis curvula Wolf.). Plant biomass and elemental composition were analyzed in sequential harvests. Soil and groundwater quality characteristics including pH, EC and elemental composition were also monitored throughout the study. In addition, the effect of amendments on the water holding capacity and bulk density of the soil was investigated. Amendment addition significantly increased plant biomass production by a maximum of 26% using 1120 Mg ha{sup -1} FA and 10 Mg ha{sup -1} PB. Application of the highest rate of FA significantly increased the plant tissue concentrations of Mn, As, Se and B. Soil pH was initially increased from 4.6 to 6.1 by amendments. Soil salinity was increased in the initial year only. Amended soils had higher concentrations of Ca, Mg, P and K, higher organic matter content and water holding capacity than unamended soil. Concentrations of plant-essential trace elements (B, Cu and Zn) that were marginally deficient in the unamended eroded soil increased to within typical soil concentrations following amendment with FA and PB. Groundwater quality was unaffected throughout the study. The co-application of FA and PB successfully promoted the revegetation of the eroded borrow area with no apparent adverse environmental side effects.

  20. Missing-Presumed Eroded: Holocene Sedimentation Patterns in Seneca Lake, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loddengaard, K.; Curtin, T. M.

    2006-12-01

    The Finger Lakes of New York underwent a significant change in climate during the transition from the Hypsithermal to the Neoglacial at ~5 ka. To determine the effects of changes in climate on sedimentation patterns in the northern region of Seneca Lake, NY, we analyzed three cores that were collected along a shallow to deep water transect. Analyses of magnetic susceptibility, organic matter and carbonate content, fossil content, and grain size at a 1-cm interval were used to correlate cores, identify periods of erosion or non- deposition and assess the relative truncation of the Holocene sediment record. The stratigraphy and sedimentology of the cores indicate the lake contains a spatially and temporally discontinuous sediment record. Preliminary results indicate that the early to mid-Holocene sediment record was preferentially eroded in the deepwater cores, between 20 and 50 m water depth. At the deepwater sites, there is a gap in the sediment record that spans between ~12 and ~5 ka. Conversely, the late Holocene record is more complete in the deepwater cores than in the shallow water cores (12-20 m water depth). This data suggests a significant change on the controls and location of erosion and deposition in the lake during the Holocene. We hypothesize that the early to mid-Holocene sediment may have been eroded by strong internal seiches during stormy conditions that were initiated by cooler temperatures and a change in the position of the jet stream during the Hypsithermal-Neoglacial transition. Erosion occurred primarily in shallow water sites (<~30 m) during the Neoglacial, perhaps as a result of a change in the number and frequency of storms or strength of the internal seiche.

  1. Topographic roughness as a signature of the emergence of bedrock in eroding landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milodowski, D. T.; Mudd, S. M.; Mitchard, E. T. A.

    2015-10-01

    Rock is exposed at the Earth surface when rates of erosion locally exceed rates of soil production. The thinning of soils and emergence of bedrock has implications spanning geomorphology, ecology and hydrology. Soil-mantled hillslopes are typically shaped by diffusion-like sediment transport processes that act to smooth topography through time, generating the familiar smooth, convex hillslope profiles that are common in low relief landscapes. Other processes, however, can roughen the landscape. Bedrock emergence can produce rough terrain; in this contribution we exploit the contrast between rough patches of bedrock outcrop and smooth, diffusion-dominated soil to detect bedrock outcrops. Specifically, we demonstrate that the local variability of surface normal vectors, measured from 1 m resolution airborne LiDAR data, can be used as a topographic signature to identify areas within landscapes where rock exposure is present. We then use this roughness metric to investigate the transition from soil-mantled to bedrock hillslopes as erosion rates increase in two transient landscapes, Bald Rock Basin, which drains into the Middle Fork Feather River, California, and Harrington Creek, a tributary of the Salmon River, Idaho. Rather than being abrupt, as predicted by traditional soil production models, in both cases the transition from fully soil-mantled to bedrock hillslopes is gradual and spatially heterogeneous, with rapidly eroding hillslopes supporting a patchwork of bedrock and soil that is well documented by changes in topographic roughness, highlighting the utility of this metric for testing hypotheses concerning the emergence of bedrock and adding to a growing body of evidence that indicates the persistence of partial soil mantles in steep, rapidly eroding landscapes.

  2. Rossby Waves in the Arctic Ocean

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Poul G.; Schmith, Torben

    The Arctic Ocean has a characteristic stable stratification with fresh and cold water occupying the upper few hundred meters and the warm and more saline Atlantic waters underneath. These water masses are separated by the cold halocline. The stability of the cold halocline regulates the upward...... directed turbulent heat flux from the Atlantic water to the Arctic water. This heat flux is a part of the arctic energy budget and is important for large scale sea ice formation and melting. Due to the strong vertical stratification combined with its almost circular boundary, the Arctic Ocean supports...

  3. Arctic tides from GPS on sea ice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kildegaard Rose, Stine; Skourup, Henriette; Forsberg, René

    The presence of sea-ice in the Arctic Ocean plays a significant role in the Arctic climate. Sea ice dampens the ocean tide amplitude with the result that global tidal models which use only astronomical data perform less accurately in the polar regions. This study presents a kinematic processing...... of Global Positioning System (GPS) buoys placed on sea-ice at five different sites north of Greenland for the study of sea level height and tidal analysis to improve tidal models in the Central Arctic. The GPS measurements are compared with the Arctic tidal model AOTIM-5, which assimilates tide...

  4. Rossby Waves in the Arctic Ocean

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Poul G.; Schmith, Torben

    The Arctic Ocean has a characteristic stable stratification with fresh and cold water occupying the upper few hundred meters and the warm and more saline Atlantic waters underneath. These water masses are separated by the cold halocline. The stability of the cold halocline regulates the upward...... directed turbulent heat flux from the Atlantic water to the Arctic water. This heat flux is a part of the arctic energy budget and is important for large scale sea ice formation and melting. Due to the strong vertical stratification combined with its almost circular boundary, the Arctic Ocean supports...... of the thermohaline circulation....

  5. Arctic decadal variability in a warming world

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Linden, Eveline C.; Bintanja, Richard; Hazeleger, Wilco

    2017-06-01

    Natural decadal variability of surface air temperature might obscure Arctic temperature trends induced by anthropogenic forcing. It is therefore imperative to know how Arctic decadal variability (ADV) will change as the climate warms. In this study, we evaluate ADV characteristics in three equilibrium climates with present-day, double, and quadrupled atmospheric CO2 forcing. The dominant region of variability, which is located over the Barents and Greenland Sea at present, shifts to the central Arctic and Siberian regions as the climate warms. The maximum variability in sea ice cover and surface air temperature occurs in the CO2 doubling climate when sea ice becomes more vulnerable to melt over vast stretches of the Arctic. Furthermore, the links between dominant atmospheric circulation modes and Arctic surface climate characteristics vary strongly with climate change. For instance, a positive Arctic Oscillation index is associated with a colder Arctic in warmer climates, instead of a warmer Arctic at present. Such changing relationships are partly related to the retreat of sea ice because altered wind patterns influence the sea ice distribution and hence the associated local surface fluxes. The atmospheric pressure distributions governing ADV and the associated large-scale dynamics also change with climate warming. The changing character of the ADV shows that it is vital to consider (changes in) ADV when addressing Arctic warming in climate model projections.

  6. Plate tectonic history of the Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, K.

    1984-01-01

    Tectonic development of the Arctic Ocean is outlined, and geological maps are provided for the Arctic during the mid-Cenozoic, later Cretaceous, late Jurassic, early Cretaceous, early Jurassic and late Devonian. It is concluded that Arctic basin history is moulded by the events of the following intervals: (1) continental collision and immediately subsequent rifting and ocean formation in the Devonian, and continental rifting ocean formation, rapid rotation of microcontinents, and another episode of collision in the latest Jurassic and Cretaceous. It is noted that Cenozoic Arctic basin formation is a smaller scale event superimposed on the late Mesozoic ocean basin.

  7. China's Developing Arctic Policies: Myths and Misconceptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Lanteigne

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The Arctic and Far North regions of the world have grown in importance for China's international interests in recent years, and in 2013 China became an observer state in the Arctic Council. Beijing has sought to develop an Arctic policy based on scientific research and partnerships, including in the areas of environmental studies and climate change issues, as well as development and economic issues. As the Arctic gains more international attention due to the effects of ice melting and the possibility of the region becoming a new source of resources, concerns have been raised about a scramble for riches and economic advantages. China, as a rising political and economic power, has been subject to much scrutiny, especially from the West, about its emerging agenda in the Arctic region. Although China is not an Arctic state, the concerns are based on predictions that Beijing is seeking to play a stronger and perhaps even dominant role in the Arctic, and this has led to many misconceptions about China's Arctic policy. The result has been a "clash of identities" between Chinese and Western perceptions, and in order to understand why these diverging views have appeared, it is necessary to first examine the origins of "myths" about China's regional Arctic policies, and then examine their roles, using constructivist theory, before suggesting ways for both China and the international community to address this divergence.

  8. Plate tectonic history of the Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, K.

    1984-01-01

    Tectonic development of the Arctic Ocean is outlined, and geological maps are provided for the Arctic during the mid-Cenozoic, later Cretaceous, late Jurassic, early Cretaceous, early Jurassic and late Devonian. It is concluded that Arctic basin history is moulded by the events of the following intervals: (1) continental collision and immediately subsequent rifting and ocean formation in the Devonian, and continental rifting ocean formation, rapid rotation of microcontinents, and another episode of collision in the latest Jurassic and Cretaceous. It is noted that Cenozoic Arctic basin formation is a smaller scale event superimposed on the late Mesozoic ocean basin.

  9. Emergent behavior in a coupled economic and coastline model for beach nourishment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. D. Lazarus

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Developed coastal areas often exhibit a strong systemic coupling between shoreline dynamics and economic dynamics. "Beach nourishment", a common erosion-control practice, involves mechanically depositing sediment from outside the local littoral system onto an actively eroding shoreline to alter shoreline morphology. Natural sediment-transport processes quickly rework the newly engineered beach, causing further changes to the shoreline that in turn affect subsequent beach-nourishment decisions. To the limited extent that this landscape/economic coupling has been considered, evidence suggests that towns tend to employ spatially myopic economic strategies under which individual towns make isolated decisions that do not account for their neighbors. What happens when an optimization strategy that explicitly ignores spatial interactions is incorporated into a physical model that is spatially dynamic? The long-term attractor that develops for the coupled system (the state and behavior to which the system evolves over time is unclear. We link an economic model, in which town-manager agents choose economically optimal beach-nourishment intervals according to past observations of their immediate shoreline, to a simplified coastal-dynamics model that includes alongshore sediment transport and background erosion (e.g. from sea-level rise. Simulations suggest that feedbacks between these human and natural coastal processes can generate emergent behaviors. When alongshore sediment transport and spatially myopic nourishment decisions are coupled, increases in the rate of sea-level rise can destabilize economically optimal nourishment practices into a regime characterized by the emergence of chaotic shoreline evolution.

  10. Scenarios Creation and Use in the Arctic Council's Arctic Marine Shipping Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brigham, L. W.

    2016-12-01

    The Arctic Council's Arctic Marine Shipping Assessment (AMSA), conducted 2004-2009, used a scenarios-based approach to reveal the complexity of future Arctic marine navigation and to develop a set of plausible futures. The initial task was to use experts and stakeholders in brainstorming sessions to identify the key drivers and uncertainties for Arctic marine navigation. AMSA scenario participants identified 120 driving forces or factors that may influence future levels of marine activity. This effort illustrated the broad, global connections that can impact future use of the Arctic Ocean. Two primary factors were selected to anchor, as axes of uncertainty, the scenarios matrix: resources and trade (the level of demand for Arctic natural resources and trade); and, governance (the degree of relative stability of rules and standards for marine use both within the Arctic and internationally). Four scenarios were created by crossing the two primary drivers: a Polar Lows scenario (low demand and unstable governance); an Arctic Race scenario (high demand and unstable governance); a Polar Preserve scenario (low demand and stable governance); and, an Arctic Saga scenario (high demand and stable governance). The AMSA scenarios effort proved to be an effective and powerful way to communicate to the Arctic Council diplomats, Arctic indigenous peoples, maritime stakeholders and many other actors in the global community the complexities influencing the future of Arctic shipping and marine operations. The scenarios approach facilitated unconstrained thinking and identified the many plausible linkages of the Arctic to the global economic system. The AMSA scenarios work was influential in the Arctic ministers' approval of the framework set of AMSA recommendations that are being implemented today to enhance Arctic marine safety and environmental protection.

  11. Nonlinear thermal and moisture dynamics of high Arctic wetland polygons following permafrost disturbance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Godin

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Low-centre polygonal terrain developing within gentle sloping surfaces and lowlands in the high Arctic have a potential to retain snowmelt water in their bowl-shaped centre and as such are considered high latitude wetlands. Such wetlands in the continuous permafrost regions have an important ecological role in an otherwise generally arid region. In the valley of the glacier C-79 on Bylot Island (Nunavut, Canada, thermal erosion gullies are rapidly eroding the permafrost along ice wedges affecting the integrity of the polygons by breaching and collapsing the surrounding rims. While intact polygons were characterized by a relative homogeneity (topography, snow cover, maximum active layer thaw depth, ground moisture content, vegetation cover, eroded polygons had a non-linear response for the same elements following their perturbation. The heterogeneous nature of disturbed terrains impacts active layer thickness, ground ice aggradation in the upper portion of permafrost, soil moisture and vegetation dynamics, carbon storage and terrestrial green-house gas emissions.

  12. Extrapolating future Arctic ozone losses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. M. Knudsen

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Future increases in the concentration of greenhouse gases and water vapour are likely to cool the stratosphere further and to increase the amount of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs. Future Arctic PSC areas have been extrapolated using the highly significant trends in the temperature record from 1958–2001. Using a tight correlation between PSC area and the total vortex ozone depletion and taking the decreasing amounts of ozone depleting substances into account we make empirical estimates of future ozone. The result is that Arctic ozone losses increase until 2010–2020 and only decrease slightly up to 2030. This approach is an alternative method of prediction to that based on the complex coupled chemistry-climate models (CCMs.

  13. Stories from the Arctic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, Michelle

    2016-04-01

    I will discuss my experience co-ordinating a range of communication activities for a multi-university research programme called Methane in the Arctic: Measurements and Modelling. The project included ground- and aircraft-based fieldwork in the European Arctic, as well as computer modelling. Our communication activities included: our own field blog (www.arcticmethane.wordpress.com), which was syndicated to the Scientific American Expeditions blog; writing articles for other blogs with a wider audience than our own; use of twitter; and podcasting our field work. The grand finale to our communications work was a live event at a science festival, in which we took the audience along with us on a recreated research flight, complete with a life-size mock up of a section of our research aircraft. I will discuss my experiences of these forms of communication, and give an evaluation of their successes and failures.

  14. Aerosols indirectly warm the Arctic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Mauritsen

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available On average, airborne aerosol particles cool the Earth's surface directly by absorbing and scattering sunlight and indirectly by influencing cloud reflectivity, life time, thickness or extent. Here we show that over the central Arctic Ocean, where there is frequently a lack of aerosol particles upon which clouds may form, a small increase in aerosol loading may enhance cloudiness thereby likely causing a climatologically significant warming at the ice-covered Arctic surface. Under these low concentration conditions cloud droplets grow to drizzle sizes and fall, even in the absence of collisions and coalescence, thereby diminishing cloud water. Evidence from a case study suggests that interactions between aerosol, clouds and precipitation could be responsible for attaining the observed low aerosol concentrations.

  15. Arctic bioremediation -- A case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smallbeck, D.R.; Ramert, P.C. (Harding Lawson Associates, Novato, CA (United States)); Liddell, B.V.

    1994-05-01

    This paper discusses the use of bioremediation as an effective method to clean up diesel-range hydrocarbon spills in northern latitudes. The results of a laboratory study of microbial degradation of hydrocarbons under simulated arctic conditions showed that bioremediation can be effective in cold climates and led to the implementation of a large-scale field program. The results of 3 years of field testing have led to a significant reduction in diesel-range hydrocarbon concentrations in the contaminated area.

  16. Building Materials in Arctic Climate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Mejlhede

    2005-01-01

    Building in the artic requires special attention on the appropriateness of building materials. The harsh climate makes execution difficult and sets unusual requirements for the pure material properties. In addition, there is a lack of choice of good, natural building materials in the arctic....... This results in high transport costs. The building materials situation in Greenland may potentially be improved by intensifying the reuse of building materials or by promoting the local production of building materials....

  17. Arctic Change Information for a Broad Audience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soreide, N. N.; Overland, J. E.; Calder, J.

    2002-12-01

    Demonstrable environmental changes have occurred in the Arctic over the past three decades. NOAA's Arctic Theme Page is a rich resource web site focused on high latitude studies and the Arctic, with links to widely distributed data and information focused on the Arctic. Included is a collection of essays on relevant topics by experts in Arctic research. The website has proven useful to a wide audience, including scientists, students, teachers, decision makers and the general public, as indicated through recognition by USA Today, Science magazine, etc. (http://www.arctic.noaa.gov) Working jointly with NSF and the University of Washington's Polar Science Center as part of the Study of Environmental Arctic Change (SEARCH) program, NOAA has developed a website for access to pan-Arctic time series spanning diverse data types including climate indices, atmospheric, oceanic, sea ice, terrestrial, biological and fisheries. Modest analysis functions and more detailed analysis results are provided. (http://www.unaami.noaa.gov/). This paper will describe development of an Artic Change Detection status website to provide a direct and comprehensive view of previous and ongoing change in the Arctic for a broad climate community. For example, composite metrics are developed using principal component analysis based on 86 multivariate pan-Arctic time series for seven data types. Two of these metrics can be interpreted as a regime change/trend component and an interdecadal component. Changes can also be visually observed through tracking of 28 separate biophysical indicators. Results will be presented in the form of a web site with relevant, easily understood, value-added knowledge backed by peer review from Arctic scientists and scientific journals.

  18. Seasonal variability and trends in coastal upwelling across the Northwest African coastline, 1981-2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cropper, T. E.; Hanna, E.; Bigg, G. R.

    2013-12-01

    The evolution of coastal upwelling systems under global warming is of huge biological, climatological and socio-economic importance. It was hypothesized in the early 1990's that upwelling might increase as a result of stronger land-ocean pressure gradients, however published results since then have conflicted as to whether coastal upwelling intensity has increased across the NW African coastline. Here, we present seasonal upwelling estimates for NW Africa (11-35°N) from 1981-2012, focusing mainly on changes during summer (JJA). Seasonal coastal upwelling indices are derived or estimated from several near-surface wind, sea-surface temperature (SST), sea-surface height (SSH), geometric vertical velocity and near-surface horizontal current datasets. For the wind-stress upwelling indices we use observational data (ICOADS), forecast model data (PFEL) and five atmospheric reanalysis datasets (ERA-Interim, NCEP-DOE II, 20th Century Reanalysis, MERRA and CFSR). For the SST indices we use the HadISST, Reynolds OISST and ICOADS datasets and for SSH we use satellite altimetry data from AVISO. Ocean reanalysis products (ORS4A, SODA 2.1.6 and GODAS) are used for ocean motion data. The numerous indices generally correlate well spatially, all reflecting a similar pattern induced by the trade wind climatology A statistically significant upwelling increase above 21°N is found in several indices, with a corresponding decrease in upwelling intensity below 20°N as well. This supports the upwelling intensification hypothesis as at approximately 20°N the summer trade winds are displaced by onshore monsoonal winds, which favour downwelling. However, these trend directions aren't ubiquitous across all the datasets, with most of the reanalysis wind indices suggesting no significant trend direction and sea-level height from altimetry showing no signs of lowering at coastal gridpoints (which would potentially indicate an upwelling increase). We attempt to validate if upwelling trends are

  19. Monitoring Australia's Northern Coastline in Advance of Signs from Fukushima

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grzechnik, Marcus P.; Bokor, Ilonka; Urban, David A.; Carpenter, Julia G.; Hirth, Gillian A. [Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency, 619 Lower Plenty Road, Yallambie, Victoria, 3084 (Australia)

    2014-07-01

    Australia has the third largest marine estate of any nation in the world, with a total area of 3.1 million square kilometres of ocean managed primarily for biodiversity conservation as marine reserves. Regular offshore radiological monitoring of the entire Australian coastline is impractical because of its size, however several projects currently under way at the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA) to target areas where background monitoring of caesium ({sup 134}Cs and {sup 137}Cs) could be useful. Of particular interest to ARPANSA and the Australian Public are; - Radiological discharges due to the Japanese nuclear accident, 2011, and their potential effects on Australian seas and aquatic wildlife. - Visits to Australia from Nuclear Powered Warships (NPWs). Significant oceanic discharges from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (in excess of 3.6 PBq {sup 137}Cs) are expected to be dispersed over a number of years. For long term global dispersion, a transit time of about 5 years (i.e. arrival in 2016) has been estimated for radioactive material to reach the northern coast of Western Australia, and about 10 to 15 years to reach the eastern coast of Queensland. It is expected that radioactive material from the Japan accident will have been diluted to such a degree that it will be difficult to detect in Australian waters, however there is limited information on current caesium levels in water and biota to use as a background (or baseline) level. This is also the case for the Australian Ports where NPWs have permission to berth. This paper will describe several projects currently underway at ARPANSA aimed at determining background caesium levels in seawater and aquatic wildlife, as well as detailing future monitoring programmes intended to gather information to demonstrate the protection of the Australian public and aquatic environment. Background levels of caesium that have been collated since the project began in 2012 will also

  20. Local adaptation along a continuous coastline: prey recruitment drives differentiation in a predatory snail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanford, Eric; Worth, David J

    2010-03-01

    Recent work demonstrates that nearshore oceanography can generate strong variation in the delivery of resources (nutrients and larvae) to benthic marine communities over spatial scales of tens to hundreds of kilometers. Moreover, variation in the strength of these bottom-up inputs is often spatially consistent, linked to regional centers of upwelling, coastal topography, and other stable features of the coastline. Whereas the ecological effects of these oceanographic links are increasingly clear, the possibility that these same bottom-up forces might impose spatially varying selection on consumers has not been addressed. Here, we test the hypothesis that a carnivorous snail (Nucella canaliculata) with direct development is locally adapted to persistent differences in prey recruitment within two adjacent oceanographic regions (northern California and Oregon, USA). Previous laboratory studies demonstrated that snails from Oregon rarely drilled the thick-shelled mussel Mytilus californianus, whereas snails from California readily drilled this prey. To test whether these differences reflect local adaptation, snails from two populations in each region were raised through two laboratory generations to minimize the potential influence of nongenetic effects. We then reciprocally outplanted these F2 generation snails to field enclosures at each of the four sites and monitored their growth for 11 months. Recruitment and availability of preferred prey (the acorn barnacle Balanus glandula and blue mussel Mytilus trossulus) at the experimental sites were 1-3 orders of magnitude lower in California than in Oregon. At the California sites, snails that originated from Oregon sources failed to drill larger M. californianus, encountered few alternative prey, and showed almost no growth. In contrast, snails from California drilled M. californianus and showed substantial growth. These results strongly suggest that the capacity of California snails to drill M. californianus allows

  1. Increasing cadmium and zinc levels in wild common eiders breeding along Canada's remote northern coastline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mallory, Mark L., E-mail: mark.mallory@acadiau.ca [Biology Department, Acadia University, Wolfville, Nova Scotia B4P 2R6 (Canada); Braune, Birgit M. [Environment Canada, National Wildlife Research Centre, Carleton University, Raven Road, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0H3 (Canada); Robertson, Gregory J. [Environment Canada, Wildlife Research Division, 6 Bruce Street, Mount Pearl, Newfoundland and Labrador A1N 4T3 (Canada); Gilchrist, H. Grant [Environment Canada, National Wildlife Research Centre, Carleton University, Raven Road, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0H3 (Canada); Mallory, Conor D. [Chemistry Department, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario K1N 6N5 (Canada); Forbes, Mark R. [Biology Department, Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario K1S 5B6 (Canada); Wells, Regina [Environment Canada, Canadian Wildlife Service, 512 Lahr Boulevard, Happy Valley-Goose Bay, Newfoundland and Labrador A0P 1C0 (Canada)

    2014-04-01

    The common eider (Somateria mollissima) is an abundant sea duck breeding around the circumpolar Arctic, and is an important component of subsistence and sport harvest in some regions. We determined hepatic cadmium (Cd) and zinc (Zn) concentrations in the livers of breeding females sampled during three time periods including 1992/3, 2001/2 and 2008 at three sites spanning 53.7°N–75.8°N in the eastern Canadian Arctic. At all sites, concentrations of both Cd and Zn increased ∼ 300% over this time period. The reasons for this rapid increase in concentrations are unclear. - Highlights: • Cd and Zn analyzed in common eider (Somateria mollissima) liver tissue in Canadian Arctic from sites spanning 3000 km. • ∼ 300% increase in concentrations observed over ∼ 20 years • Levels of both elements considered high and near levels thought to pose concerns for wildlife health.

  2. 基于遥感测量的海岸线变化与分析%Analysis of coastline change based on remote sensing measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李静; 张鹰

    2012-01-01

    采用较高分辨率的卫星影像,对影像的空间数据进行挖掘,解译出不同时期的海岸线;在盐城沿海选择12个断面,定量地获取海岸线信息,计算海岸的淤蚀形态和速率变化;分析典型岸段人类活动对海岸线变化的影响.分析结果表明:在人类活动影响下研究区域海岸线形态平直化程度加剧,2007-2009年海岸线平直情况突出,长度缩短近40km;2009-2010年海岸线平直化有所减缓.盐城海岸线年平均淤长速率在44~ 100m.射阳河口北部海岸线变化很小,南部淤长比较明显(其中水龙港—川东港口海岸年淤长速率达到278m).%High-resolution satellite images were used to mine spatial data of images and interpret the coastlines in different periods. Twelve cross-sections in the coastal area of Yancheng City were selected to obtain the coastline information quantitatively and calculate the pattern and speed variation of progradation and erosion of the coastline. The impacts of human activities on changes in the coastline in typical coastal sections were analyzed. The results show that the coastline was intensely straightened due to human activities in the study area. During the period from 2007 to 2009, nearly 40 km of the coastline length was cut down. The straightening process of the coastline slowed down during the period from 2009 to 2010. The annual average progradation rate of the coastline of Yancheng City ranged from 44 m to 100 m. There was a little change in the coastline north of the Sheyang Estuary. The progradation variation was significant in the south, where the annual progradation rate of the coastline from Shuilong Port to Chuandong Port reached 278 m.

  3. Arctic decadal variability in a warming world

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linden, van der Eveline C.; Bintanja, Richard; Hazeleger, Wilco

    2017-01-01

    Natural decadal variability of surface air temperature might obscure Arctic temperature trends induced by anthropogenic forcing. It is therefore imperative to know how Arctic decadal variability (ADV) will change as the climate warms. In this study, we evaluate ADV characteristics in three

  4. Towards a rain-dominated Arctic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bintanja, Richard; Andry, Olivier

    2017-01-01

    Climate models project a strong increase in Arctic precipitation over the coming century1, which has been attributed primarily to enhanced surface evaporation associated with sea-ice retreat2. Since the Arctic is still quite cold, especially in winter, it is often (implicitly) assumed that the

  5. Arctic Planning Scenarios: Scenario #1: Defence Scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    Arctic, it appeared ready for compromises. Minister Cannon did not rule out, after his talks in Moscow, that Canada and Russia could submit a joint...process. Russia’s national ambitions in the region have been summarised by Artur Chilingarov, an Arctic explorer and the State Duma’s vice-spokesman

  6. Pacific Northwest Laboratory Alaska (ARCTIC) research program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanson, W.C.; Eberhardt, L.E.

    1980-03-01

    The current program continues studies of arctic ecosystems begun in 1959 as part of the Cape Thompson Program. Specific ecosystem aspects include studies of the ecology of arctic and red foxes, small mammel and bird population studies, lichen studies, and radiation ecology studies. (ACR)

  7. Traditional Ecological Knowledge in Arctic EIA's

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egede, Parnuna Petrina; Hansen, Anne Merrild

    2017-01-01

    The search for new oil and mineral reserves in the Arctic is increasing. This has called for both local and international concerns and opposition to the activities based on environmental apprehensions. Environmental Impact Assessments (EIA’s) have been implemented in legislations by the Arctic...

  8. Benefit-sharing arrangements in the Arctic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tysyachnyouk, M.

    2016-01-01

    Can the interests of both the extractive industries and Indigenous communities in the Arctic be balanced through the implementation of benefit-sharing practices in the places of resource extraction? Most transnational corporations
    in the Arctic oil and gas sector have declared their commitment

  9. Linking Arctic amplification and local feedbacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2011-11-01

    Climate simulations show that as the Earth warms, the Arctic warms more than the average global warming. However, models differ on how much more the Arctic warms, and although scientists have proposed a variety of mechanisms to explain the Arctic warming amplification, there is no consensus on the main reasons for it. To shed light on this issue, Hwang et al. investigated the relationship between Arctic amplification and poleward energy transport and local Arctic feedbacks, such as changes in cloud cover or ice loss, across a group of models. The researchers noted that differences in atmospheric energy transport did not explain the ranges of polar amplification; rather, models with more amplification showed less energy transport into high latitudes. The authors found that decreasing energy transport is due to a coupled relationship between Arctic amplification and energy transport: Arctic amplification reduces the equator-to-pole temperature gradient, which strongly decreases energy transport. They suggest that this coupled relationship should be taken into account in studies of Arctic amplification. (Geophysical Research Letters, doi:10.1029/2011GL048546, 2011)

  10. Arctic freshwater export: Status, mechanisms, and prospects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haine, T.W.N.; Curry, B.; Gerdes, R.; Hansen, E.; Karcher, M.; Lee, C.; Rudels, B.; Spreen, G.; de Steur, L.; Stewart, K.D.; Woodgate, R.

    2015-01-01

    Large freshwater anomalies clearly exist in the Arctic Ocean. For example, liquid freshwater has accumulated in the Beaufort Gyre in the decade of the 2000s compared to 1980–2000, with an extra ˜ 5000 km3 — about 25% — being stored. The sources of freshwater to the Arctic from precipitation and runo

  11. International Regulation of Central Arctic Ocean Fisheries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molenaar, E.J.

    2016-01-01

    Due in particular to the impacts of climate change, the adequacy of the international regulation of Central Arctic Ocean fisheries has come under increasing scrutiny in recent years. As shown in this article, however, international regulation of Central Arctic Ocean fisheries is by no means entirely

  12. Benefit-sharing arrangements in the Arctic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tysyachnyouk, M.

    2016-01-01

    Can the interests of both the extractive industries and Indigenous communities in the Arctic be balanced through the implementation of benefit-sharing practices in the places of resource extraction? Most transnational corporations
    in the Arctic oil and gas sector have declared their commitment t

  13. Testing phenanthrene distribution properties of virgin plastic pellets and plastic eroded pellets found on lesvos island beaches (Greece)

    OpenAIRE

    Hrissi K. Karapanagioti; Klontza, Irene

    2008-01-01

    Testing phenanthrene distribution properties of virgin plastic pellets and plastic eroded pellets found on lesvos island beaches (Greece) correspondance: Corresponding author. (Karapanagioti, Hrissi K.) (Karapanagioti, Hrissi K.) Department of Chemistry--> , University of Patras--> , Rio--> - GREECE (Karapanagioti, Hrissi K.) GREECE (Karapanagioti, Hrissi K.) Marine Sciences Departmen...

  14. Temporal changes of eroded soils depending on their agricultural use in the southern Cis-Ural region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabbasova, I. M.; Suleimanov, R. R.; Khabirov, I. K.; Komissarov, M. A.; Fruehauf, M.; Liebelt, P.; Garipov, T. T.; Sidorova, L. V.; Khaziev, F. Kh.

    2016-10-01

    Temporal changes of eroded soils in the southern Cis-Ural region (Republic of Bashkortostan) depending on their agricultural use during the period from 1975 to 2011 were studied. In the northern foreststeppe zone, the development of erosion processes was retarded upon the use of soil-saving management practices and grain-fallow-grass crop rotations. In slightly eroded light gray forest soils (Eutric Retisols (Cutanic)), the thickness of humus-accumulative horizons and the content of humus increased; the conversion of cropland into permanent fallow was found to be the most efficient measure to control soil erosion. In podzolized chernozems (Luvic Greyzemic Chernic Phaeozems) and typical chernozems (Haplic Chernozems) of the Cis-Ural steppe, the content of humus in the plow layer under grain-row crop rotation and classical soil management decreased, especially in moderately eroded soils. The development of water and wind erosion on slopes depended on the slope shape: the texture of soils at different degrees of erosion on slopes with free runoff became coarser by one gradation after 35 years; in the presence of linear obstacles in the lower part of slopes, the content of fine fractions in moderately and strongly eroded soils increased.

  15. PAH metabolites, GST and EROD in European eel (Anguilla anguilla) as possible indicators for eel habitat quality in German rivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kammann, Ulrike; Brinkmann, Markus; Freese, Marko; Pohlmann, Jan-Dag; Stoffels, Sandra; Hollert, Henner; Hanel, Reinhold

    2014-02-01

    The stock of the European eel (Anguilla anguilla L.) continues to decline and has reached a new minimum in 2011. Poor health status of the spawners due to organic contaminants is one of the possible causes for this dramatic situation. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are ubiquitous contaminants, which are rapidly metabolized in vertebrates. EROD (ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase) and GST (glutathione-S-transferase) are two enzymes involved in PAH detoxification in fish. In this study, PAH metabolites as well as EROD and GST activity in a large, comprising dataset of more than 260 migratory and pre-migratory eels from five large German river basin districts were used to describe PAH exposure and its metabolism as possible indicators for the habitat quality for eels. Eel from the river Elbe appear to be moderately contaminated with PAH. Highest mean values of PAH metabolites were analysed in fish from the river Rhine. However, the results suggest that contaminants such as PAH are metabolized in the fish and may have contributed to EROD activity in eels caught from the Elbe estuary to 600 km upstream. Since the eel's onset of cessation of feeding is closely linked to maturation and migration, we propose bile pigments as new indicators contributing to identify the proportion of migratory eel, which is crucial information for eel management plans. We showed that PAH metabolites normalized to bile pigments as well as EROD could be used to describe the habitat quality and might be suitable parameters in search for suitable stocking habitats.

  16. Remote sensing and GIS study of an eroded Miocene volcanic area (Hegau, SW Germany)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strehlau, J.; Theilen-Willige, B.

    2009-04-01

    Remote sensing techniques offer useful tools that can aid in evaluating the geomorphologic and geologic evolution of eroded volcanic landforms. Erosion provides insight into subsurface structural levels of a volcanic edifice, but it is difficult to correctly interpret the field observations, particularly if the exposed landforms have been modified by tectonic and fluvioglacial processes. An illustrative example is the Hegau volcanic field, located NW of Lake Constance near the northern margin of the Molasse Basin in the Alpine foreland (e.g., Schreiner, Samml. Geol. Führer 62, 2008). This region, situated on the periphery of the Upper Cretaceous-Quaternary mafic alkaline magmatic province in central Europe (e.g., Blusztajn and Hegner, Chem. Geol. 2002), was episodically active during the Miocene; K-Ar age determinations (mostly obtained in the 1960/70s) indicate emplacement ages ranging from about 15-7 Ma. Several eroded plugs and necks of olivine melilites and phonolites form prominent landmarks rising above the present-day Hegau landscape. The area also contains remnants of dikes, maar crater lakes, basalt flows, travertine and pyroclastic deposits (both pipe-filling and eruptive tuff sheets). The volcanic constructs were largely buried by Molasse sediments, due to continued flexural subsidence of the foreland lithosphere during the Tertiary. Since the cessation of the Molasse phase, the region has undergone exhumation and erosion of up to several hundred meters (increasing towards the Alpine front) as indicated by reconstructions of missing stratigraphic sections based on borehole studies (references in Rahn and Selbekk, Swiss J. Geosci. 2007). Pleistocene ice sheets repeatedly covered parts of the area and deposited moraines, gravel plains, and lake deposits (e.g., Fiebig and Preusser, Geograph. Helv. 2008). Furthermore, deep fluvioglacial valleys were carved out that were sequentially re-filled and partly re-eroded, resulting in a system of narrow basins and

  17. Asteroid surface archaeology: Identification of eroded impact structures by spectral properties on (4) Vesta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, M.; Nathues, A.; Schäfer, M.; Schmedemann, N.; Vincent, J.; Russell, C.

    2014-07-01

    Introduction: Vesta's surface material is characterized as a deep regolith [1,2], mobilized by countless impacts. The almost catastrophic impact near Vesta's south pole, which has created the Rheasilvia basin, and the partly overlapping older impact of similar size, Veneneia, have not only reshaped the areas of their interior (roughly 50 % of the Vesta surface), but also emplaced each time a huge ejecta blanket of similar size, thus covering the whole remaining surface. In this context, pristine and even younger morphologic features have been erased. However, the spectral signatures of the early differentiation and alteration products by impacts have partially remained in situ. While near the north pole several large old eroded impact features are visible, the equatorial zone close to the basin rims seems to be void of those. Since it is unlikely, that this zone has been entirely avoided by large projectiles, in this area the results of such impacts may have left morphologically not detectable remnants: Individual distribution of particle sizes and altered photometric properties, excavated layers, shock metamorphism, melt generation inside particles and on macroscopic scales, and emplacement of exogenous projectile material. An analysis by color ratio images and spatial profiles of diagnostic spectral parameters reveals such features. Results: Based on local spectroscopic evidence we have detected eroded impact features of three categories: 1) Small craters with diameters of a few kilometers, 2) Large craters or, if even larger, incipient impact basins, 3) Sub-global ejecta blankets. The eastern part of Feralia Planitia, diameter 140 km, has little evidence of a round outline in the shape model, but it features spectral gradients towards its center. A feature of similar size, centered north of Lucaria Tholus becomes only visible by a similar spectra gradient and a circular outline in specific spectral ratio mosaics. These features seem to be related to the

  18. 78 FR 12033 - Programs and Research Projects Affecting the Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] ARCTIC RESEARCH COMMISSION Programs and Research Projects Affecting the Arctic Notice is hereby given that the U.S. Arctic Research...) Commissioners and staff reports (4) Discussion and presentations concerning Arctic research activities The...

  19. Establishing Shared Knowledge about Globalization in Asia and the Arctic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Rasmus Gjedssø; Graczyk, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the role of knowledge in relations between Arctic communities and Asia (the Arctic Council observer states: China, India, Japan, Singapore, South Korea). We argue that mutual and shared knowledge between Arctic communities and Asia is necessary for local benefits and comprehensively...... sustainable development for Arctic communities under globalization....

  20. Marine Transportation Implications of the Last Arctic Sea Ice Refuge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brigham, L. W.

    2010-12-01

    Marine access is increasing throughout the Arctic Ocean and the 'Last Arctic Sea Ice Refuge' may have implications for governance and marine use in the region. Arctic marine transportation is increasing due to natural resource developemnt, increasing Arctic marine tourism, expanded Arctic marine research, and a general linkage of the Arctic to the gloabl economy. The Arctic Council recognized these changes with the release of the Arctic Marine Shipping Assessment of 2009. This key study (AMSA)can be viewed as a baseline assessment (using the 2004 AMSA database), a strategic guide for a host of stakeholders and actors, and as a policy document of the Arctic Council. The outcomes of AMSA of direct relevance to the Ice Refuge are within AMSA's 17 recommendations provided under three themes: Enhancing Arctic Marine Safety, Protecting Arctic People and the Environment, and Building the Arctic Marine Infrastructure. Selected recommendations of importance to the Ice Refuge include: a mandatory polar navigation code; identifying areas of heightened ecological and cultural significance; potential designation of special Arctic marine areas; enhancing the tracking and monitoring of Arctic marine traffic; improving circumpolar environmental response capacity; developing an Arctic search and rescue agreement; and, assessing the effects of marine transportation on marine mammals. A review will be made of the AMSA outcomes and how they can influence the governance, marine use, and future protection of this unique Arctic marine environment.

  1. Effect of hydraulic parameters on sediment transport capacity in overland flow over erodible beds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, M.; Sterk, G.; Seeger, M.; Boersema, M.; Peters, P.

    2012-02-01

    Sediment transport is an important component of the soil erosion process, which depends on several hydraulic parameters like unit discharge, mean flow velocity, and slope gradient. In most of the previous studies, the impact of these hydraulic parameters on transport capacity was studied for non-erodible bed conditions. Hence, this study aimed to examine the influence of unit discharge, mean flow velocity and slope gradient on sediment transport capacity for erodible beds and also to investigate the relationship between transport capacity and composite force predictors, i.e. shear stress, stream power, unit stream power and effective stream power. In order to accomplish the objectives, experiments were carried out in a 3.0 m long and 0.5 m wide flume using four well sorted sands (0.230, 0.536, 0.719, 1.022 mm). Unit discharges ranging from 0.07 to 2.07 × 10-3 m2 s-1 were simulated inside the flume at four slopes (5.2, 8.7, 13.2 and 17.6%) to analyze their impact on sediment transport rate. The sediment transport rate measured at the bottom end of the flume by taking water and sediment samples was considered equal to sediment transport capacity, because the selected flume length of 3.0 m was found sufficient to reach the transport capacity. The experimental result reveals that the slope gradient has a stronger impact on transport capacity than unit discharge and mean flow velocity due to the fact that the tangential component of gravity force increases with slope gradient. Our results show that unit stream power is an optimal composite force predictor for estimating transport capacity. Stream power and effective stream power can also be successfully related to the transport capacity, however the relations are strongly dependent on grain size. Shear stress showed poor performance, because part of shear stress is dissipated by bed irregularities, bed form evolution and sediment detachment. An empirical transport capacity equation was derived, which illustrates that

  2. Physical Model and numerical modeling of earth-surface flows on erodible beds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Chaojun; He, Siming; Zhou, Gordan

    2015-04-01

    The bed sediment erosion and depositional processes along the channel play a significant role in geo-hazards like debris flows, landslides and dam failures. Large quantities of theoretical, experimental and field researches have shown that the final debris flow volume could possibly be several-fold beyond its initial volume as it incorporates material from the basal beds. A number of catastrophic events imply the damage is still generally underestimated, especially in the area influenced by strong earthquake such as Wenchuan 5.12 earthquake in 2008. An increasing number of researchers have been dedicated to using depth-integrated Na-vier-Stokes equations to determine the runout distance and final deposition volume of land-slides or debris flows over erodible beds. Nevertheless, it has been found out that the role of mass and momentum exchange at flow-bed boundaries in conservation equations was im-properly exhibited in some literatures, as reviewed by Iverson and Ouyang (2014). In addition, it is also illustrated that erosion or deposition rates at the interface between layers must satisfy three jump conditions which are similar to Rankine-Hugoniot conditions in gas dynamics. Here, several basal entrainment models satisfying the momentum jump conditions are proposed. Coupled mass and momentum equations integrated with sediment transport and morphological evolution are presented. A time and space second-order MacCormack-TVD finite difference method, which does not require the knowledge of the characteristic speeds of the system, is programmed to solve the coupled equations. A series of numerical simulations compared with theoretical solution and laboratory experiments were carried out to verify the accuracy and its robustness. Numerical comparisons with USGS flume experiment and Hongchun gully debris flow in Wenchuan earthquake-induced area are well carried out. It is exhibited the momentum exchange term between the flows and the basal materials has a sig

  3. Erosion characteristics of an erodible tablet incorporated in a time-delayed capsule device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConville, Jason T; Ross, Alistair C; Florence, Alastair J; Stevens, Howard N E

    2005-01-01

    A time-delayed oral drug delivery device was investigated in which an erodible tablet (ET), sealing the mouth of an insoluble capsule, controlled the lag-time prior to drug release. The time-delayed capsule (TDC) lag-time may be altered by manipulation of the excipients used in the preparation of the ET. Erosion rates and drug release profiles from TDCs were investigated with four different excipient admixtures with lactose: calcium sulphate dihydrate (CSD), dicalcium phosphate (DCP), hydroxypropylmethyl cellulose (HPMC; Methocel K100LV grade) and silicified microcrystalline cellulose (SMCC; Prosolv 90 grade). Additionally, the compressibility of different insoluble coated capsules was tested at different moisture levels to determine their overall integrity and suitability for oral delivery. Erosion rates of CSD, DCP, and SMCC displayed a nonlinear relationship to their concentration, while HPMC indicated rapid first-order erosion followed by zero-order erosion, the onset of which was dependent on the HPMC concentration. Capsule integrity was confirmed to be most suitable for oral delivery when the insoluble ethyl cellulose coat was applied to a hard gelatin capsule using an organic spray coating process. T50% drug release times varied between 245 (+/-33.4) and 393 (+/-40.8) minutes for 8% and 20% DCP, respectively, T50% release times of 91 (+/-22.1) and 167 (+/-34.6) were observed for 8% and 20% CSD; both formulations showed incidence of premature drug release. The SMCC formulations showed high variability due to lamination effects. The HPMC formulations had T50% release times of 69 (+/-13.9), 213 (+/-25.4), and 325 (+/-30.3) minutes for 15%, 24%, and 30% HPMC concentrations respectively, with no premature drug release. In conclusion, HPMC showed the highest reproducibility for a range of time-delayed drug release from the assembled capsule formulation. The method of capsule coating was confirmed to be important by investigation of the overall capsule integrity at

  4. Marine Arctic science capability making big strides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Leonard; Brass, Garrett

    The profound influence of the Arctic Ocean on global environment, the rapid variability of Arctic processes, and the unresolved geology of the ocean floor have led to growing scientific interest in this region. Ongoing studies are investigating recent historical processes and modern processes such as changes in ocean circulation and ice cover patterns. Sediments beneath the Arctic Ocean record long- and short-term waxing and waning of the cryosphere in the Northern Hemisphere and its linkages to bottom water renewal and faunal adaptation. Underlying basement rocks reflect the tectonic history of the ocean basin, including its ridges and plateaus, which are unsampled and of unknown composition and origin. The vulnerability of Arctic populations to environmental problems makes the need to understand the region even more compelling (see, for example, Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme, 1997; also see Web site http://www.grida.no/amap).

  5. Tipping elements in the Arctic marine ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Carlos M; Agustí, Susana; Wassmann, Paul; Arrieta, Jesús M; Alcaraz, Miquel; Coello, Alexandra; Marbà, Núria; Hendriks, Iris E; Holding, Johnna; García-Zarandona, Iñigo; Kritzberg, Emma; Vaqué, Dolors

    2012-02-01

    The Arctic marine ecosystem contains multiple elements that present alternative states. The most obvious of which is an Arctic Ocean largely covered by an ice sheet in summer versus one largely devoid of such cover. Ecosystems under pressure typically shift between such alternative states in an abrupt, rather than smooth manner, with the level of forcing required for shifting this status termed threshold or tipping point. Loss of Arctic ice due to anthropogenic climate change is accelerating, with the extent of Arctic sea ice displaying increased variance at present, a leading indicator of the proximity of a possible tipping point. Reduced ice extent is expected, in turn, to trigger a number of additional tipping elements, physical, chemical, and biological, in motion, with potentially large impacts on the Arctic marine ecosystem.

  6. CHARACTERISTICS OF HYDROCARBON EXPLOITATION IN ARCTIC CIRCLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanja Lež

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The existence of large quantities of hydrocarbons is supposed within the Arctic Circle. Assumed quantities are 25% of the total undiscovered hydrocarbon reserves on Earth, mostly natural gas. Over 500 major and minor gas accumulations within the Arctic Circle were discovered so far, but apart from Snøhvit gas field, there is no commercial exploitation of natural gas from these fields. Arctic gas projects are complicated, technically hard to accomplish, and pose a great threat to the return of investment, safety of people and equipment and for the ecosystem. Russia is a country that is closest to the realization of the Arctic gas projects that are based on the giant gas fields. The most extreme weather conditions in the seas around Greenland are the reason why this Arctic region is the least explored and furthest from the realization of any gas project (the paper is published in Croatian .

  7. Geospatial approach in mapping soil erodibility using CartoDEM - A case study in hilly watershed of Lower Himalayan Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Suresh; Gupta, Surya

    2016-10-01

    Soil erodibility is one of the most important factors used in spatial soil erosion risk assessment. Soil information derived from soil map is used to generate soil erodibility factor map. Soil maps are not available at appropriate scale. In general, soil maps at small scale are used in deriving soil erodibility map that largely generalized spatial variability and it largely ignores the spatial variability since soil map units are discrete polygons. The present study was attempted to generate soil erodibilty map using terrain indices derived from DTM and surface soil sample data. Soil variability in the hilly landscape is largely controlled by topography represented by DTM. The CartoDEM (30 m) was used to derive terrain indices such as terrain wetness index (TWI), stream power index (SPI), sediment transport index (STI) and slope parameters. A total of 95 surface soil samples were collected to compute soil erodibility factor ( K) values. The K values ranged from 0.23 to 0.81 t ha-1R-1 in the watershed. Correlation analysis among K-factor and terrain parameters showed highest correlation of soil erodibilty with TWI ( r 2= 0.561) followed by slope ( r 2= 0.33). A multiple linear regression model was developed to derive soil erodibilty using terrain parameters. A set of 20 soil sample points were used to assess the accuracy of the model. The coefficient of determination ( r 2) and RMSE were computed to be 0.76 and 0.07 t ha-1R-1 respectively. The proposed methodology is quite useful in generating soil erodibilty factor map using digital elevation model (DEM) for any hilly terrain areas. The equation/model need to be established for the particular hilly terrain under the study. The developed model was used to generate spatial soil erodibility factor ( K) map of the watershed in the lower Himalayan range.

  8. Effect of Various Organic Matter stimulates Bacteria and Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi Plantations on Eroded Slopes in Nepal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha Vaidya, G.; Shrestha, K.; Wallander, H.

    2009-04-01

    Erosion resulting from landslides is a serious problem in mountainous countries such as Nepal. To restore such sites it is essential to establish plant cover that protects the soil and reduces erosion. Trees and shrubs on the lower hillsides in Nepal form symbiosis with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi and these fungi are important for the uptake of mineral nutrients from the soil. In addition, the mycelia formed by these fungi have an important function in stabilizing the soil. The success of plantations of these eroded slopes is therefore highly dependent on the extent of mycorrhizal colonization of the plants. Mycorrhizal fungi growing in symbiosis with plants are essential in this respect because they improve both plant and nutrient uptake and soil structure. We investigated the influence of organic matter and P amendment on recently produced biomass of bacteria and arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi in eroded slopes in Nepal. Eroded soil mixed with different types of organic matter was placed in mesh bags which were buried around the trees of Bauhinia purpurea and Leucaena diversifolia .This experiment were done in two seasons ( (the wet and the dry season). Signature fatty acids were used to determine bacterial and AM fungal biomass after the six month intervals. The amount and composition of AM fungal spores were analyzed in the mesh bags from the wet and dry seasons. More microbial biomass was produced during wet season than during dry season. Further more, organic matter addition enhanced the production of AM fungal and bacterial biomass during both seasons. The positive influence of organic matter addition on AM fungi could be an important contribution to plant survival, growth and nutrient composition in the soil in plantations on eroded slopes. Different AM spore communities and bacterial profiles were obtained with different organic amendments and this suggests a possible way of selecting for specific microbial communities in the management of eroded

  9. Relationship between environmental conditions and rates of coastal erosion in Arctic Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnhart, K. R.; Anderson, R. S.; Overeem, I.; Wobus, C. W.; Clow, G. D.; Urban, F. E.; LeWinter, A. L.; Stanton, T. P.

    2012-12-01

    Rates of coastal cliff erosion are a function of the geometry and substrate of the coast; storm frequency, duration, magnitude, and wave field; and regional sediment sources. In the Arctic, the duration of sea ice-free conditions limits the time over which coastal erosion can occur, and sea water temperature modulates erosion rates where ice content of coastal bluffs is high. Predicting how coastal erosion rates in this environment will respond to future climate change requires that we first understand modern coastal erosion rates. Arctic coastlines are responding rapidly to climate change. Remotely sensed observations of coastline position indicate that the mean annual erosion rate along a 60-km reach of Alaska's Beaufort Sea coast, characterized by high ice content and small grain size, doubled from 7 m yr-1 for the period 1955-1979 to 14 m yr-1 for 2002-2007. Over the last 30 years the duration of the open water season expanded from ˜45 days to ˜95 days, increasing exposure of permafrost bluffs to seawater by a factor of 2.5. Time-lapse photography indicates that coastal erosion in this environment is a halting process: most significant erosion occurs during storm events in which local water level is elevated by surge, during which instantaneous submarine erosion rates can reach 1-2 m/day. In contrast, at times of low water, or when sea ice is present, erosion rates are negligible. We employ a 1D coastal cross-section numerical model of the erosion of ice-rich permafrost bluffs to explore the sensitivity of the system to environmental drivers. Our model captures the geometry and style of coastal erosion observed near Drew Point, Alaska, including insertion of a melt-notch, topple of ice-wedge-bounded blocks, and subsequent degradation of these blocks. Using consistent rules, we test our model against the temporal pattern of coastal erosion over two periods: the recent past (~30 years), and a short (~2 week) period in summer 2010. Environmental conditions used

  10. Advancing NOAA NWS Arctic Program Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timofeyeva-Livezey, M. M.; Horsfall, F. M. C.; Meyers, J. C.; Churma, M.; Thoman, R.

    2016-12-01

    Environmental changes in the Arctic require changes in the way the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) delivers hydrological and meteorological information to prepare the region's societies and indigenous population for emerging challenges. These challenges include changing weather patterns, changes in the timing and extent of sea ice, accelerated soil erosion due to permafrost decline, increasing coastal vulnerably, and changes in the traditional food supply. The decline in Arctic sea ice is opening new opportunities for exploitation of natural resources, commerce, tourism, and military interest. These societal challenges and economic opportunities call for a NOAA integrated approach for delivery of environmental information including climate, water, and weather data, forecasts, and warnings. Presently the NOAA Arctic Task Force provides leadership in programmatic coordination across NOAA line offices. National Weather Service (NWS) Alaska Region and the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) provide the foundational operational hydro-meteorological products and services in the Arctic. Starting in 2016, NOAA's NWS will work toward improving its role in programmatic coordination and development through assembling an NWS Arctic Task Team. The team will foster ties in the Arctic between the 11 NWS national service programs in climate, water, and weather information, as well as between Arctic programs in NWS and other NOAA line offices and external partners. One of the team outcomes is improving decision support tools for the Arctic. The Local Climate Analysis Tool (LCAT) currently has more than 1100 registered users, including NOAA staff and technical partners. The tool has been available online since 2013 (http://nws.weather.gov/lcat/ ). The tool links trusted, recommended NOAA data and analytical capabilities to assess impacts of climate variability and climate change at local levels. A new capability currently being developed will

  11. Discussion on Dynamic Updating Mechanism of Continental Coastline%大陆海岸线动态更新机制探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗美雪; 张加晋; 任岳森

    2016-01-01

    The delimitation of continental coastline provides the boundary of legal significance for the administration of sea area.Influenced by natural factors and human factors,the coastline is in a dynamic change.This paper used map grid to calculate the change rate of continental coastline, and selected the dynamic updating method to update the coastline.The following key issues should be solved to establish the dynamic updating mechanism of coastline,including the ways to obtain the data reflecting the change in coastline,the standard and the quality control of the upda-ting data,the implementation and the release of the updated coastline data.%大陆海岸线的划定为海域管理提供具有法律地位的海陆边界,然而受自然因素和人为因素的双重影响,海岸线处于动态变化之中,其现势性影响其使用价值。文章提出利用地图格网统计法计算海岸线变化率并对大陆海岸线进行动态更新,从数据资料的获取、数据的质量评价和标准、数据更新的实施和发布等方面提出建立海岸线动态更新机制的建议。

  12. [About the possibility to detect the fact of corpse transportation from the sea coastline with the subsequent burial].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponomarev, D Yu; Nikitaev, A V; Kurch, A M

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present work was to detect and describe the new features characterizing the long-term stay of a corpse in seawater followed by its burial on earth. The bones of the skeletonized corpse were found to be covered with mussels and petrified sea worms that can serve as the indicators of staying the corps in seawater and its subsequent transportation from the sea coastline to the inland. These findings can be used to clarify the circumstances of death of the people found in the illegal burial places at the seacoast of maritime areas.

  13. The Arctic zone: possibilities and risks of development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sentsov, A.; Bolsunovskaya, Y.; Melnikovich, E.

    2016-09-01

    The authors analyze the Arctic region innovative possibilities from the perspective of political ideology and strategy. The Arctic region with its natural resources and high economic potential attracts many companies and it has become an important area of transnational development. At present, the Arctic region development is of great importance in terms of natural resource management and political system development. However, the most important development issue in the Arctic is a great risk of different countries’ competing interests in economic, political, and legal context. These are challenges for international partnership creating in the Arctic zone, Russian future model developing for the Arctic, and recognition of the Arctic as an important resource for the Russians. The Russian economic, military, and political expansion in the Arctic region has the potential to strengthen the national positions. The authors present interesting options for minimizing and eliminating political risks during the Arctic territories development and define an effective future planning model for the Russian Arctic.

  14. Arctic potential - Could more structured view improve the understanding of Arctic business opportunities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hintsala, Henna; Niemelä, Sami; Tervonen, Pekka

    2016-09-01

    The increasing interest towards the Arctic has been witnessed during the past decades. However, the commonly shared definitions of the Arctic key concepts have not yet penetrated national and international arenas for political and economic decision making. The lack of jointly defined framework has made different analyses related to the Arctic quite limited considering the magnitude of economic potential embedded in Arctic. This paper is built on the key findings of two separate, yet connected projects carried out in the Oulu region, Finland. In this paper's approach, the Arctic context has been defined as a composition of three overlapping layers. The first layer is the phenomenological approach to define the Arctic region. The second layer is the strategy-level analysis to define different Arctic paths as well as a national level description of a roadmap to Arctic specialization. The third layer is the operationalization of the first two layers to define the Arctic business context and business opportunities. The studied case from Oulu region indicates that alternative futures for the Arctic competences and business activities are in resemblance with only two of the four identified strategic pathways. Introduction of other pathways to regional level actors as credible and attractive options would require additional, systematic efforts.

  15. Runoff and erosion from a rapidly eroding pinyon-juniper hillslope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilcox, B.P.; Davenport, D. W. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Pitlick, J. [Colorado Univ., Boulder, CO (United States); Allen, C.D. [National Biological Survey, Los Alamos, NM (United States). Jemez Mountain Field Station

    1996-02-01

    The dramatic acceleration of erosion associated with the expansion of pinyon-juniper woodlands over the past 100 years has been a widely recognized but poorly understood phenomenon. A more complete understanding will come only through long-term observations of erosion and related factors. To this end, we are conducting a study of a small (1-ha) catchment in a rapidly eroding pinyon-juniper woodland. Since July 1993, we have been collecting data on runoff, erosion, and weather conditions in the catchment, as well as on the topography, soils, and vegetation. Our preliminary results suggest that (1) the catchment is currently in a cycle of accelerated erosion that began concomitant with a shift from ponderosa pine forest to pinyon-juniper woodland that was initiated by a prolonged drought; (2) the intercanopy soils cannot be sustained at the current erosion rates and will be mostly stripped away in about a century; (3) large summer thunderstorms are the most important agents of erosion (4) erosion increases dramatically as the scale increases; (5) runoff makes up <10% of the water budget.

  16. Effect of Artificial Saliva on the Apatite Structure of Eroded Enamel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaojie Wang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Citric acid-induced changes in the structure of the mineral component of enamel stored in artificial saliva were studied by attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopy as well as complementary electron probe microanalysis and scanning electron microscopy. The results indicate that the application of artificial saliva for several hours (the minimum time period proved is 4 h leads to slight, partial recovering of the local structure of eroded enamel apatite. However, artificial saliva surrounding cannot stop the process of loosening and breaking of P–O–Ca atomic linkages in enamel subjected to multiple citric acid treatments. Irreversible changes in the atomic bonding within 700 nm thick enamel surface layer are observed after three times exposure for 1 min to aqueous solution of citric acid having a pH value of 2.23, with a 24-hour interval between the individual treatments. The additional treatment with basic fluoride-containing solutions (1.0% NaF did not demonstrate a protective effect on the enamel apatite structure per se.

  17. The false claims act and the eroding scienter in healthcare fraud litigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doan, Richard

    2011-01-01

    This article addresses the federal government's expansive methods in tackling healthcare fraud, particularly in misapplying the False Claims Act. Although tasked with the obligation to curtail the fraudulent submission of Medicare & Medicaid claims, the U.S. government must rein in the current trend to utilize the False Claims Act against smaller medical providers. As the Act's original focus has ebbed in significance, the government has increasingly applied the False Claims Act to circumstances that do not evince actual fraud. In doing so, federal courts have effectively eroded the statute's critical scienter requirement. The federal common-law doctrines of "payment by mistake" and "unjust enrichment" adequately address the payment of non-fraudulent, albeit false, Medicare & Medicaid claims. Yet the federal government pursues these appropriate remedies only rarely and in the alternative, essentially when the government fails under the False Claims Act. Thus, this article argues for reform, calling for a clearer delineation between remedial and punitive measures. In cases involving smaller medical providers, courts should strictly limit the False Claims Act to those instances where fraud is clearly manifest.

  18. Effects of different vegetation restoration models on soil microbial biomass in eroded hilly Loess Plateau, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUE Sha; LIU Guobin; DAI Quanhou; LAN Xue; YU Na

    2007-01-01

    Vegetation restoration is a key measure to improve the eco-environment in Loess Plateau,China.In order to find the effect of soil microbial biomass under different vegetation restoration models in this region,six trial sites located in Zhifanggou watershed were selected in this study.Results showed that soil microbial biomass,microbial respiration and physical and chemical properties increased apparently.After 30 years of vegetation restoration,soil microbial biomass C,N,P(SMBC,SMBN,SMBP)and microbial respiration,increased by 109.01%-144.22%,34.17%-117.09%,31.79%-79.94% and 26.78%-87.59% respectively,as compared with the farmland.However,metabolic quotient declined dramatically by 57.45%-77.49%.Effects of different models of vegetation restoration are different on improving the properties of soil.In general,mixed stands of Pinus tabulaeformisAmorpha fruticosa and Robinia pseudoacacia-A,fruticosa had the most remarkable effect,followed by R.pseudoacacia and Caragana korshinkii,fallow land and P.tabulaeformis was the lowest.Restoration of mixed forest had greater effective than pure forest in eroded Hilly Loess Plateau.The significant relationships were observed among SMBC,SMBP,microbial respiration,and physical and chemical properties of soil.It was concluded that microbial biomass can be used as indicators of soil quality.

  19. Sediment transport in an active erodible channel bend of Brahmaputra river

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Tapas Karmaker; Y Ramprasad; Subashisa Dutta

    2010-12-01

    Spatial variation of sediment transport in an alluvial sand-bed river bend needs to be understood with its influencing factors such as bank erosion, secondary current formation, land spur and bed-material characteristics. In this study, detailed hydrographic surveys with Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) were conducted at an active erodible river bend to measure suspended load, velocity, bathymetric profile and characteristics of the bed material. Study indicates the presence of multi-thread flow in the channel bend. Local variation of sediment transport is primarily controlled by active bank erosion, land spur and sand bar formation. Vertical distribution of suspended sediment concentration follows a power function with normalized depth. Average bed-material concentration at the reach level is computed from observed sediment profiles, and is compared against various sediment transport functions. Results show that the sediment transport function suggested by Yang gives better predictions for this reach. Transverse bed slopes at critical survey transects were computed from the bathymetric data and evaluated with analytical approaches. Out of three analytical approaches used, Odgaard’s approach estimates the bed slopes fairly close to the observed one. These two functions are suitable in the Brahmaputra river for further morphological studies.

  20. Measurements of high-frequency acoustic scattering from glacially-eroded rock outcrops

    CERN Document Server

    Olson, Derek R; Sæbo, Torstein

    2016-01-01

    Measurements of acoustic backscattering from glacially-eroded rock outcrops were made off the coast of Sandefjord, Norway using a high-frequency synthetic aperture sonar (SAS) system. A method by which scattering strength can be estimated from data collected by a SAS system is detailed, as well as a method to estimate an effective calibration parameter for the system. Scattering strength measurements from very smooth areas of the rock outcrops agree with predictions from both the small-slope approximation and perturbation theory, and range between -33 and -26 dB at 20$^\\circ$ grazing angle. Scattering strength measurements from very rough areas of the rock outcrops agree with the sine-squared shape of the empirical Lambertian model and fall between -30 and -20 dB at 20$^\\circ$ grazing angle. Both perturbation theory and the small-slope approximation are expected to be inaccurate for the very rough area, and overestimate scattering strength by 8 dB or more for all measurements of very rough surfaces. Supportin...