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Sample records for architecture collagen structure

  1. COLLAGEN STRUCTURE AND STABILITY

    OpenAIRE

    Shoulders, Matthew D.; Raines, Ronald T.

    2009-01-01

    Collagen is the most abundant protein in animals. This fibrous, structural protein comprises a right-handed bundle of three parallel, left-handed polyproline II-type helices. Much progress has been made in elucidating the structure of collagen triple helices and the physicochemical basis for their stability. New evidence demonstrates that stereoelectronic effects and preorganization play a key role in that stability. The fibrillar structure of type I collagen–the prototypical collagen fibril–...

  2. Photo-active collagen systems with controlled triple helix architecture

    CERN Document Server

    Tronci, Giuseppe; Wood, David J

    2013-01-01

    The design of photo-active collagen systems is presented as a basis for establishing biomimetic materials with varied network architecture and programmable macroscopic properties. Following in-house isolation of type I collagen, reaction with vinyl-bearing compounds of varied backbone rigidity, i.e. 4-vinylbenzyl chloride (4VBC) and glycidyl methacrylate (GMA), was carried out. TNBS colorimetric assay, 1H-NMR and ATR-FTIR confirmed covalent and tunable functionalization of collagen lysines. Depending on the type and extent of functionalization, controlled stability and thermal denaturation of triple helices were observed via circular dichroism (CD), whereby the hydrogen-bonding capability of introduced moieties was shown to play a major role. Full gel formation was observed following photo-activation of functionalized collagen solutions. The presence of a covalent network only slightly affected collagen triple helix conformation (as observed by WAXS and ATR-FTIR), confirming the structural organization of fun...

  3. Assessment of atherosclerotic plaque collagen content and architecture using polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doradla, Pallavi; Villiger, Martin; Tshikudi, Diane M.; Bouma, Brett E.; Nadkarni, Seemantini K.

    2016-02-01

    Acute myocardial infarction, caused by the rupture of vulnerable coronary plaques, is the leading cause of death worldwide. Collagen is the primary extracellular matrix macromolecule that imparts the mechanical stability to a plaque and its reduction causes plaque instability. Intracoronary polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) measures the polarization states of the backscattered light from the tissue to evaluate plaque birefringence, a material property that is elevated in proteins such as collagen with an ordered structure. Here we investigate the dependence of the PS-OCT parameters on the quantity of the plaque collagen and fiber architecture. In this study, coronary arterial segments from human cadaveric hearts were evaluated with intracoronary PS-OCT and compared with Histopathological assessment of collagen content and architecture from picrosirius-red (PSR) stained sections. PSR sections were visualized with circularly-polarized light microscopy to quantify collagen birefringence, and the additional assessment of color hue indicated fibril thickness. Due to the ordered architecture of thick collagen fibers, a positive correlation between PS-OCT retardation and quantity of thick collagen fibers (r=0.54, p=0.04), and similarly with the total collagen content (r=0.51, p=0.03) was observed. In contrast, there was no perceivable relationship between PS-OCT retardation and the presence of thin collagen fibers (r=0.08, p=0.07), suggesting that thin and disorganized collagen fiber architecture did not significantly contribute to the PS-OCT retardation. Further analysis will be performed to assess the relationship between PS-OCT retardation and collagen architecture based on immunohistochemical analysis of collagen type. These results suggest that intracoronary PS-OCT may open the opportunity to assess collagen architecture in addition total collagen content, potentially enabling an improved understanding of coronary plaque rupture.

  4. Collagen fibril architecture, domain organization, and triple-helical conformation govern its proteolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perumal, Shiamalee; Antipova, Olga; Orgel, Joseph P.R.O. (IIT)

    2008-06-24

    We describe the molecular structure of the collagen fibril and how it affects collagen proteolysis or 'collagenolysis.' The fibril-forming collagens are major components of all mammalian connective tissues, providing the structural and organizational framework for skin, blood vessels, bone, tendon, and other tissues. The triple helix of the collagen molecule is resistant to most proteinases, and the matrix metalloproteinases that do proteolyze collagen are affected by the architecture of collagen fibrils, which are notably more resistant to collagenolysis than lone collagen monomers. Until now, there has been no molecular explanation for this. Full or limited proteolysis of the collagen fibril is known to be a key process in normal growth, development, repair, and cell differentiation, and in cancerous tumor progression and heart disease. Peptide fragments generated by collagenolysis, and the conformation of exposed sites on the fibril as a result of limited proteolysis, regulate these processes and that of cellular attachment, but it is not known how or why. Using computational and molecular visualization methods, we found that the arrangement of collagen monomers in the fibril (its architecture) protects areas vulnerable to collagenolysis and strictly governs the process. This in turn affects the accessibility of a cell interaction site located near the cleavage region. Our observations suggest that the C-terminal telopeptide must be proteolyzed before collagenase can gain access to the cleavage site. Collagenase then binds to the substrate's 'interaction domain,' which facilitates the triple-helix unwinding/dissociation function of the enzyme before collagenolysis.

  5. Proline puckering parameters for collagen structure simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collagen is made of triple helices rich in proline residues, and hence is influenced by the conformational motions of prolines. Because the backbone motions of prolines are restricted by the helical structures, the only side chain motion—proline puckering—becomes an influential factor that may affect the stability of collagen structures. In molecular simulations, a proper proline puckering population is desired so to yield valid results of the collagen properties. Here we design the proline puckering parameters in order to yield suitable proline puckering populations as demonstrated in the experimental results. We test these parameters in collagen and the proline dipeptide simulations. Compared with the results of the PDB and the quantum calculations, we propose the proline puckering parameters for the selected collagen model simulations

  6. Proline puckering parameters for collagen structure simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Di, E-mail: diwu@fudan.edu.cn [Department of Physiology and Biophysics, School of Life Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai 200438 (China)

    2015-03-15

    Collagen is made of triple helices rich in proline residues, and hence is influenced by the conformational motions of prolines. Because the backbone motions of prolines are restricted by the helical structures, the only side chain motion—proline puckering—becomes an influential factor that may affect the stability of collagen structures. In molecular simulations, a proper proline puckering population is desired so to yield valid results of the collagen properties. Here we design the proline puckering parameters in order to yield suitable proline puckering populations as demonstrated in the experimental results. We test these parameters in collagen and the proline dipeptide simulations. Compared with the results of the PDB and the quantum calculations, we propose the proline puckering parameters for the selected collagen model simulations.

  7. An evaluation of meniscal collagenous structure using optical projection tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The collagenous structure of menisci is a complex network of circumferentially oriented fascicles and interwoven radially oriented tie-fibres. To date, examination of this micro- architecture has been limited to two-dimensional imaging techniques. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the ability of the three-dimensional imaging technique; optical projection tomography (OPT), to visualize the collagenous structure of the meniscus. If successful, this technique would be the first to visualize the macroscopic orientation of collagen fascicles in 3-D in the meniscus and could further refine load bearing mechanisms in the tissue. OPT is an imaging technique capable of imaging samples on the meso-scale (1-10 mm) at a micro-scale resolution. The technique, similar to computed tomography, takes two-dimensional images of objects from incremental angles around the object and reconstructs them using a back projection algorithm to determine three-dimensional structure. Bovine meniscal samples were imaged from four locations (outer main body, femoral surface, tibial surface and inner main body) to determine the variation in collagen orientation throughout the tissue. Bovine stifles (n = 2) were obtained from a local abattoir and the menisci carefully dissected. Menisci were fixed in methanol and subsequently cut using a custom cutting jig (n = 4 samples per meniscus). Samples were then mounted in agarose, dehydrated in methanol and subsequently cleared using benzyl alcohol benzyl benzoate (BABB) and imaged using OPT. Results indicate circumferential, radial and oblique collagenous orientations at the contact surfaces and in the inner third of the main body of the meniscus. Imaging identified fascicles ranging from 80-420 μm in diameter. Transition zones where fascicles were found to have a woven or braided appearance were also identified. The outer-third of the main body was composed of fascicles oriented predominantly in the circumferential direction. Blood vessels were

  8. The preosteoblast response of electrospinning PLGA/PCL nanofibers: effects of biomimetic architecture and collagen I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian YZ

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Yunzhu Qian,1,2 Hanbang Chen,1 Yang Xu,1 Jianxin Yang,2 Xuefeng Zhou,3 Feimin Zhang,1 Ning Gu3 1Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, 2Center of Stomatology, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou, 3School of Biological Science and Medical Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Constructing biomimetic structure and incorporating bioactive molecules is an effective strategy to achieve a more favorable cell response. To explore the effect of electrospinning (ES nanofibrous architecture and collagen I (COL I-incorporated modification on tuning osteoblast response, a resorbable membrane composed of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid/poly(caprolactone (PLGA/PCL; 7:3 w/w was developed via ES. COL I was blended into PLGA/PCL solution to prepare composite ES membrane. Notably, relatively better cell response was delivered by the bioactive ES-based membrane which was fabricated by modification of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine and COL I. After investigation by field emission scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, contact angle measurement, and mechanical test, polyporous three-dimensional nanofibrous structure with low tensile force and the successful integration of COL I was obtained by the ES method. Compared with traditional PLGA/PCL membrane, the surface hydrophilicity of collagen-incorporated membranes was largely enhanced. The behavior of mouse preosteoblast MC3T3-E1 cell infiltration and proliferation on membranes was studied at 24 and 48 hours. The negative control was fabricated by solvent casting. Evaluation of cell adhesion and morphology demonstrated that all the ES membranes were more favorable for promoting the cell adhesion and spreading than the casting membrane. Cell Counting Kit-8 assays revealed that biomimetic architecture, surface topography, and bioactive properties of membranes were favorable for cell

  9. Collagens

    OpenAIRE

    Gordon, Marion K.; Hahn, Rita A.

    2009-01-01

    The collagens represent a family of trimeric extracellular matrix molecules used by cells for structural integrity and other functions. The three α chains that form the triple helical part of the molecule are composed of repeating peptide triplets of glycine-X-Y. X and Y can be any amino acid but are often proline and hydroxyproline, respectively. Flanking the triple helical regions (i.e., Col domains) are non-glycine-X-Y regions, termed non-collagenous domains. These frequently contain recog...

  10. Three dimensional patient-specific collagen architecture modulates cartilage responses in the knee joint during gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Räsänen, Lasse P; Mononen, Mika E; Lammentausta, Eveliina; Nieminen, Miika T; Jurvelin, Jukka S; Korhonen, Rami K

    2016-08-01

    Site-specific variation of collagen fibril orientations can affect cartilage stresses in knee joints. However, this has not been confirmed by 3-D analyses. Therefore, we present a novel method for evaluation of the effect of patient-specific collagen architecture on time-dependent mechanical responses of knee joint cartilage during gait. 3-D finite element (FE) models of a human knee joint were created with the collagen architectures obtained from T2 mapped MRI (patient-specific model) and from literature (literature model). The effect of accuracy of the implementation of collagen fibril architecture into the model was examined by using a submodel with denser FE mesh. Compared to the literature model, fibril strains and maximum principal stresses were reduced especially in the superficial/middle regions of medial tibial cartilage in the patient-specific model after the loading response of gait (up to -413 and -26%, respectively). Compared to the more coarsely meshed joint model, the patient-specific submodel demonstrated similar strain and stress distributions but increased values particularly in the superficial cartilage regions (especially stresses increased >60%). The results demonstrate that implementation of subject-specific collagen architecture of cartilage in 3-D modulates location- and time-dependent mechanical responses of human knee joint cartilage. Submodeling with more accurate implementation of collagen fibril architecture alters cartilage stresses particularly in the superficial/middle tissue. PMID:26714834

  11. Exploring the Structural Requirements of Collagen-Binding Peptides

    OpenAIRE

    Abd-Elgaliel, Wael R; Tung, Ching-Hsuan

    2013-01-01

    Collagen synthesis and tissue remodeling are involved in many diseases; therefore collagen specific binding agents have been developed to study collagen changes in various tissues. Based on a recently reported collagen binding peptide, which contains unnatural Biphenylalanine (Bip) amino acid residue, constructs with various structure variations were synthesized to explore the contributions of unnatural Bip residue, conformational restrain, and amino acid sequence in collagen recognition. The...

  12. Scanning electron microscopic observation: three-dimensional architecture of the collagen in hepatic fibrosis rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xiao-hong; ZHAO Jing; ZHANG Wei-guang; ZHANG Li-ying; MA Rui-qiong; WANG Li-qin; ZHANG Shu-yong; TIAN Long

    2007-01-01

    Background In the process of hepatic fibrosis, the accumulation of collagen fibers is strongly related to the hepatic function. The aim of this study was to investigate the three-dimensional architecture of the collagen network in the liver of rats with hepatic fibrosis.Methods Healthy adult male Wistar rats (n=32) were randomly divided into a control group (n=16) and a hepatic fibrosis group (n=16). In the control group, the rats were treated with peanut oil while the rats in hepatic fibrosis group were treated for 10 weeks with 60% CCl4 diluted in peanut oil. The quantity of collagen fibers was detected by Western blotting; distribution of the collagen was detected by sirius red staining and polarized microscope; the three-dimensional architecture of collagen in the liver was observed under the scanning electron microscope after fixed tissues were treated with cell-maceration using NaOH. Statistical analysis was performed using the u test.Results The quantity of collagen fibers increased significantly in the hepatic fibrosis group. With the aggravation of hepatic fibrosis, collagen fibers gradually accumulated. They interlaced the reticulation compartment and formed a round or ellipse liver tissue conglomeration like a grape framework that was disparate and wrapped up the normal liver Iobule.The deposition of collagen fibers was obvious in adjacent hepatic parenchyma, especially around the portal tracts.Conclusion Our experiment showed the collagen proliferation and displays clearly the three-dimensional architecture of collagen fibers in rat liver with hepatic fibrosis by scanning electron microscope. It can provide a morphological foundation for the mechanisms of changed haemodynamics and portal hypertension in hepatic fibrosis.

  13. Structural basis of sequence-specific collagen recognition by SPARC

    OpenAIRE

    Hohenester, Erhard; Sasaki, Takako; Giudici, Camilla; Farndale, Richard W.; Bächinger, Hans Peter

    2008-01-01

    Protein interactions with the collagen triple helix play a critical role in collagen fibril formation, cell adhesion, and signaling. However, structural insight into sequence-specific collagen recognition is limited to an integrin-peptide complex. A GVMGFO motif in fibrillar collagens (O denotes 4-hydroxyproline) binds 3 unrelated proteins: von Willebrand factor (VWF), discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2), and the extracellular matrix protein SPARC/osteonectin/BM-40. We report the crystal struc...

  14. The preosteoblast response of electrospinning PLGA/PCL nanofibers: effects of biomimetic architecture and collagen I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Yunzhu; Chen, Hanbang; Xu, Yang; Yang, Jianxin; Zhou, Xuefeng; Zhang, Feimin; Gu, Ning

    2016-01-01

    Constructing biomimetic structure and incorporating bioactive molecules is an effective strategy to achieve a more favorable cell response. To explore the effect of electrospinning (ES) nanofibrous architecture and collagen I (COL I)-incorporated modification on tuning osteoblast response, a resorbable membrane composed of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)/poly(caprolactone) (PLGA/PCL; 7:3 w/w) was developed via ES. COL I was blended into PLGA/PCL solution to prepare composite ES membrane. Notably, relatively better cell response was delivered by the bioactive ES-based membrane which was fabricated by modification of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine and COL I. After investigation by field emission scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, contact angle measurement, and mechanical test, polyporous three-dimensional nanofibrous structure with low tensile force and the successful integration of COL I was obtained by the ES method. Compared with traditional PLGA/PCL membrane, the surface hydrophilicity of collagen-incorporated membranes was largely enhanced. The behavior of mouse preosteoblast MC3T3-E1 cell infiltration and proliferation on membranes was studied at 24 and 48 hours. The negative control was fabricated by solvent casting. Evaluation of cell adhesion and morphology demonstrated that all the ES membranes were more favorable for promoting the cell adhesion and spreading than the casting membrane. Cell Counting Kit-8 assays revealed that biomimetic architecture, surface topography, and bioactive properties of membranes were favorable for cell growth. Analysis of β1 integrin expression level by immunofluorescence indicated that such biomimetic architecture, especially COL I-grafted surface, plays a key role in cell adhesion and proliferation. The real-time polymerase chain reaction suggested that both surface topography and bioactive properties could facilitate the cell adhesion. The combined effect of biomimetic architecture with enhanced

  15. Collagen structural hierarchy and susceptibility to degradation by ultraviolet radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collagen type I is the most abundant extracellular matrix protein in the human body, providing the basis for tissue structure and directing cellular functions. Collagen has complex structural hierarchy, organized at different length scales, including the characteristic triple helical feature. In the present study, the relationship between collagen structure (native vs. denatured) and sensitivity to UV radiation was assessed, with a focus on changes in primary structure, changes in conformation, microstructure and material properties. A brief review of free radical reactions involved in collagen degradation is also provided as a mechanistic basis for the changes observed in the study. Structural and functional changes in the collagens were related to the initial conformation (native vs. denatured) and the energy of irradiation. These changes were tracked using SDS-PAGE to assess molecular weight, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy to study changes in the secondary structure, and atomic force microscopy (AFM) to characterize changes in mechanical properties. The results correlate differences in sensitivity to irradiation with initial collagen structural state: collagen in native conformation vs. heat-treated (denatured) collagen. Changes in collagen were found at all levels of the hierarchical structural organization. In general, the native collagen triple helix is most sensitive to UV-254 nm radiation. The triple helix delays single chain degradation. The loss of the triple helix in collagen is accompanied by hydrogen abstraction through free radical mechanisms. The results received suggest that the effects of electromagnetic radiation on biologically relevant extracellular matrices (collagen in the present study) are important to assess in the context of the state of collagen structure. The results have implications in tissue remodeling, wound repair and disease progression

  16. Decorin core protein (decoron shape complements collagen fibril surface structure and mediates its binding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph P R O Orgel

    Full Text Available Decorin is the archetypal small leucine rich repeat proteoglycan of the vertebrate extracellular matrix (ECM. With its glycosaminoglycuronan chain, it is responsible for stabilizing inter-fibrillar organization. Type I collagen is the predominant member of the fibrillar collagen family, fulfilling both organizational and structural roles in animal ECMs. In this study, interactions between decoron (the decorin core protein and binding sites in the d and e(1 bands of the type I collagen fibril were investigated through molecular modeling of their respective X-ray diffraction structures. Previously, it was proposed that a model-based, highly curved concave decoron interacts with a single collagen molecule, which would form extensive van der Waals contacts and give rise to strong non-specific binding. However, the large well-ordered aggregate that is the collagen fibril places significant restraints on modes of ligand binding and necessitates multi-collagen molecular contacts. We present here a relatively high-resolution model of the decoron-fibril collagen complex. We find that the respective crystal structures complement each other well, although it is the monomeric form of decoron that shows the most appropriate shape complementarity with the fibril surface and favorable calculated energies of interaction. One molecule of decoron interacts with four to six collagen molecules, and the binding specificity relies on a large number of hydrogen bonds and electrostatic interactions, primarily with the collagen motifs KXGDRGE and AKGDRGE (d and e(1 bands. This work helps us to understand collagen-decorin interactions and the molecular architecture of the fibrillar ECM in health and disease.

  17. Effect of Structural Modification on Second Harmonic Generation in Collagen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoller, P C; Reiser, K M; Celliers, P M; Rubenchik, A M

    2003-04-04

    The effects of structural perturbation on second harmonic generation in collagen were investigated. Type I collagen fascicles obtained from rat tails were structurally modified by increasing nonenzymatic cross-linking, by thermal denaturation, by collagenase digestion, or by dehydration. Changes in polarization dependence were observed in the dehydrated samples. Surprisingly, no changes in polarization dependence were observed in highly crosslinked samples, despite significant alterations in packing structure. Complete thermal denaturation and collagenase digestion produced samples with no detectable second harmonic signal. Prior to loss of signal, no change in polarization dependence was observed in partially heated or digested collagen.

  18. New insights into structure and function of type I collagen

    OpenAIRE

    Xiong, Xin

    2008-01-01

    Collagen is one of the most abundant proteins in mammalians and strongly conserved throughout evolution. It constitutes one third of the human proteome and comprises three-quarters of the dry weight of human skin. It is widely accepted as a major structural component in animal body such as in bones, cartilage and skins. More and more studies have shown that, in addition to the structural function, collagens can induce or regulate many cellular functions and processes such as cell differentiat...

  19. Studies on Structural Changes of Collagen in Silicosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIYU-RUI; HUXUN; 等

    1994-01-01

    In order to provide scientific information on the prevention and treatment of silicosis,studies about changes of silicotic collagen in lungs were carried out.In this paper,we present experiments about the structural changes of collagen in silicotic lungs of rats and patients.These included clectron microscopy,circular dichroism and infrared spectroscopy studies of collaeen fibers.The results indicated that fibers of silicotic collagen were shorter in length.smaller in diameter and decreased in α-helix content,The Si-O-R-group and -OH group were found increased and -C-C-backbone shortened.The increase of -Si-O-R-group indicated that silica formed linking bridgen between collagens whih may be the cause of progressive enlargement of nodules.

  20. Discrete geometric structures for architecture

    KAUST Repository

    Pottmann, Helmut

    2010-06-13

    The emergence of freeform structures in contemporary architecture raises numerous challenging research problems, most of which are related to the actual fabrication and are a rich source of research topics in geometry and geometric computing. The talk will provide an overview of recent progress in this field, with a particular focus on discrete geometric structures. Most of these result from practical requirements on segmenting a freeform shape into planar panels and on the physical realization of supporting beams and nodes. A study of quadrilateral meshes with planar faces reveals beautiful relations to discrete differential geometry. In particular, we discuss meshes which discretize the network of principal curvature lines. Conical meshes are among these meshes; they possess conical offset meshes at a constant face/face distance, which in turn leads to a supporting beam layout with so-called torsion free nodes. This work can be generalized to a variety of multilayer structures and laid the ground for an adapted curvature theory for these meshes. There are also efforts on segmenting surfaces into planar hexagonal panels. Though these are less constrained than planar quadrilateral panels, this problem is still waiting for an elegant solution. Inspired by freeform designs in architecture which involve circles and spheres, we present a new kind of triangle mesh whose faces\\' in-circles form a packing, i.e., the in-circles of two triangles with a common edge have the same contact point on that edge. These "circle packing (CP) meshes" exhibit an aesthetic balance of shape and size of their faces. They are closely tied to sphere packings on surfaces and to various remarkable structures and patterns which are of interest in art, architecture, and design. CP meshes constitute a new link between architectural freeform design and computational conformal geometry. Recently, certain timber structures motivated us to study discrete patterns of geodesics on surfaces. This

  1. Structuralism in architecture: a definition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisbeth Söderqvist

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available What structuralism in architecture aimed at has often been misunderstood. Structuralism was not about democracy, giving the users of a building the possibility to make changes in it. On the contrary, structuralism aimed at expressing social patterns and relations and these were apprehended as permanent and invariant and definitely not possible to change. Architects and city planners organized buildings and cities on the basis of communication routes, streets, and squares, what in a structuralist analysis constitutes the invariant structures of a city.Social patterns were apprehended not only as invariant but also as complex and, therefore, ideal buildings and cities should be complex, often visualized as a jumble of corridors, roads, underground-tracks, and footbridges in different levels connected by escalators, stairs, and elevators being stressed by their size, color, or material.To stress binary pairs was another aspect of structuralism in architecture. Outside/inside and nature/culture are examples of this. It lead architects to use materials we normally would associate with exteriors in interiors such as “raw” concrete; that is, concrete walls with no plaster or stonepaving.

  2. Architectural Engineering to Super-Light Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castberg, Niels Andreas

    concept still has a considerable unexploited potential. The thesis contributes with new knowledge on architectural engineering in a Danish context, and how it can positively influence the design process. Furthermore, new knowledge are presented via examples of how Super-Light Structures support...... with architectural engineering as a starting point. The thesis is based on a two stringed hypothesis: Architectural engineering gives rise to better architecture and Super-Light Structures support and enables a static, challenging architecture. The aim of the thesis is to clarify architectural...... engineering's impact on the work process between architects and engineers in the design development. Using architectural engineering, Super-Light Structures are examined in an architectural context, and it is explained how digital tools can support architectural engineering and design of Super...

  3. Synthetic collagen heterotrimers: structural mimics of wild-type and mutant collagen type I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauba, Varun; Hartgerink, Jeffrey D

    2008-06-11

    Collagen type I is an AAB heterotrimer assembled from two alpha1 chains and one alpha2 chain. Missense mutations in either of these chains that substitute a glycine residue in the ubiquitous X-Y-Gly repeat with a bulky amino acid leads to osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) of varying severity. These mutations have been studied in the past using collagen-like peptide homotrimers as a model system. However, homotrimers, which by definition will contain glycine mutations in all the three chains, do not accurately mimic the mutations in their native form and result in an exaggerated effect on stability and folding. In this article, we report the design of a novel model system based upon collagen-like heterotrimers that can mimic the glycine mutations present in either the alpha1 or alpha2 chains of type I collagen. This design utilizes an electrostatic recognition motif in three chains that can force the interaction of any three peptides, including AAA (all same), AAB (two same and one different), or ABC (all different) triple helices. Therefore, the component peptides can be designed in such a way that glycine mutations are present in zero, one, two, or all three chains of the triple helix. With this design, we for the first time report collagen mutants containing one or two glycine substitutions with structures relevant to native forms of OI. Furthermore, we demonstrate the difference in thermal stability and refolding half-life times between triple helices that vary only in the frequency of glycine mutations at a particular position. PMID:18481852

  4. Structural Insights into the Interactions between Platelet Receptors and Fibrillar Collagen*

    OpenAIRE

    Herr, Andrew B.; Farndale, Richard W.

    2009-01-01

    Collagen peptides have been used to identify binding sites for several important collagen receptors, including integrin α2β1, glycoprotein VI, and von Willebrand factor. In parallel, the structures of these collagen receptors have been reported, and their interactions with collagen peptides have been studied. Recently, the three-dimensional structure of the intact type I collagen fiber from rat tail tendon has been resolved by fiber diffraction. It is now possible to map the binding sites of ...

  5. On Control Strategies for Responsive Architectural Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Poul Henning; Parigi, Dario

    2012-01-01

    The present paper considers control of responsive architectural structures for improvement of structural performance by recognizing changes in their environments and loads, adapting to meet goals, and using past events to improve future performance or maintain serviceability. The general scope of...... the paper is to discuss control strategies for responsive architectural structures, particularly reconfigurable architectural structures which can transform body shape, i.e. a transformation into more than one or two different shape alternatives....

  6. On Control Strategies for Responsive Architectural Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Kirkegaard, Poul Henning; Parigi, Dario

    2012-01-01

    The present paper considers control of responsive architectural structures for improvement of structural performance by recognizing changes in their environments and loads, adapting to meet goals, and using past events to improve future performance or maintain serviceability. The general scope of the paper is to discuss control strategies for responsive architectural structures, particularly reconfigurable architectural structures which can transform body shape, i.e. a transformation into mor...

  7. Structure to function: Spider silk and human collagen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabotyagova, Olena S.

    Nature has the ability to assemble a variety of simple molecules into complex functional structures with diverse properties. Collagens, silks and muscles fibers are some examples of fibrous proteins with self-assembling properties. One of the great challenges facing Science is to mimic these designs in Nature to find a way to construct molecules that are capable of organizing into functional supra-structures by self-assembly. In order to do so, a construction kit consisting of molecular building blocks along with a complete understanding on how to form functional materials is required. In this current research, the focus is on spider silk and collagen as fibrous protein-based biopolymers that can shed light on how to generate nanostructures through the complex process of self-assembly. Spider silk in fiber form offers a unique combination of high elasticity, toughness, and mechanical strength, along with biological compatibility and biodegrability. Spider silk is an example of a natural block copolymer, in which hydrophobic and hydrophilic blocks are linked together generating polymers that organize into functional materials with extraordinary properties. Since silks resemble synthetic block copolymer systems, we adopted the principles of block copolymer design from the synthetic polymer literature to build block copolymers based on spider silk sequences. Moreover, we consider spider silk to be an important model with which to study the relationships between structure and properties in our system. Thus, the first part of this work was dedicated to a novel family of spider silk block copolymers, where we generated a new family of functional spider silk-like block copolymers through recombinant DNA technology. To provide fundamental insight into relationships between peptide primary sequence, block composition, and block length and observed morphological and structural features, we used these bioengineered spider silk block copolymers to study secondary structure

  8. Pore architecture and cell viability on freeze dried 3D recombinant human collagen-peptide (RHC)–chitosan scaffolds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jing; Zhou, Aimei; Deng, Aipeng [School of Environmental and Biological Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China); Yang, Yang [Faculty of Engineering, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Gao, Lihu; Zhong, Zhaocai [School of Environmental and Biological Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China); Yang, Shulin, E-mail: yshulin@njust.edu.cn [School of Environmental and Biological Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China)

    2015-04-01

    Pore architecture of 3D scaffolds used in tissue engineering plays a critical role in the maintenance of cell survival, proliferation and further promotion of tissue regeneration. We investigated the pore size and structure, porosity, swelling as well as cell viability of a series of recombinant human collagen-peptide–chitosan (RHCC) scaffolds fabricated by lyophilization. In this paper, freezing regime containing a final temperature of freezing (T{sub f}) and cooling rates was applied to obtain scaffolds with pore size ranging from 100 μm to 120 μm. Other protocols of RHC/chitosan suspension concentration and ratio modification were studied to produce more homogenous and appropriate structural scaffolds. The mean pore size decreased along with the decline of T{sub f} at a slow cooling rate of 0.7 °C/min; a more rapid cooling rate under 5 °C/min resulted to a smaller pore size and more homogenous microstructure. High concentration could reduce pore size and lead to thick well of scaffold, while improved the ratio of RHC, lamellar and fiber structure coexisted with cellular pores. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were seeded on these manufactured scaffolds, the cell viability represented a negative correlation to the pore size. This study provides an alternative method to fabricate 3D RHC–chitosan scaffolds with appropriate pores for potential tissue engineering. - Highlights: • Fabrication of recombinant human collagen-chitosan scaffolds by freezing drying • Influence of freeze drying protocols on lyophilized scaffolds • Pore size, microstructure, porosity, swelling and cell viability were compared. • The optimized porous scaffold is suitable for cell (HUVEC) seeding.

  9. Pore architecture and cell viability on freeze dried 3D recombinant human collagen-peptide (RHC)–chitosan scaffolds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pore architecture of 3D scaffolds used in tissue engineering plays a critical role in the maintenance of cell survival, proliferation and further promotion of tissue regeneration. We investigated the pore size and structure, porosity, swelling as well as cell viability of a series of recombinant human collagen-peptide–chitosan (RHCC) scaffolds fabricated by lyophilization. In this paper, freezing regime containing a final temperature of freezing (Tf) and cooling rates was applied to obtain scaffolds with pore size ranging from 100 μm to 120 μm. Other protocols of RHC/chitosan suspension concentration and ratio modification were studied to produce more homogenous and appropriate structural scaffolds. The mean pore size decreased along with the decline of Tf at a slow cooling rate of 0.7 °C/min; a more rapid cooling rate under 5 °C/min resulted to a smaller pore size and more homogenous microstructure. High concentration could reduce pore size and lead to thick well of scaffold, while improved the ratio of RHC, lamellar and fiber structure coexisted with cellular pores. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were seeded on these manufactured scaffolds, the cell viability represented a negative correlation to the pore size. This study provides an alternative method to fabricate 3D RHC–chitosan scaffolds with appropriate pores for potential tissue engineering. - Highlights: • Fabrication of recombinant human collagen-chitosan scaffolds by freezing drying • Influence of freeze drying protocols on lyophilized scaffolds • Pore size, microstructure, porosity, swelling and cell viability were compared. • The optimized porous scaffold is suitable for cell (HUVEC) seeding

  10. Evaluation of cell binding to collagen and gelatin: a study of the effect of 2D and 3D architecture and surface chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidenko, Natalia; Schuster, Carlos F; Bax, Daniel V; Farndale, Richard W; Hamaia, Samir; Best, Serena M; Cameron, Ruth E

    2016-10-01

    Studies of cell attachment to collagen-based materials often ignore details of the binding mechanisms-be they integrin-mediated or non-specific. In this work, we have used collagen and gelatin-based substrates with different dimensional characteristics (monolayers, thin films and porous scaffolds) in order to establish the influence of composition, crosslinking (using carbodiimide) treatment and 2D or 3D architecture on integrin-mediated cell adhesion. By varying receptor expression, using cells with collagen-binding integrins (HT1080 and C2C12 L3 cell lines, expressing α2β1, and Rugli expressing α1β1) and a parent cell line C2C12 with gelatin-binding receptors (αvβ3 and α5β1), the nature of integrin binding sites was studied in order to explain the bioactivity of different protein formulations. We have shown that alteration of the chemical identity, conformation and availability of free binding motifs (GxOGER and RGD), resulting from addition of gelatin to collagen and crosslinking, have a profound effect on the ability of cells to adhere to these formulations. Carbodiimide crosslinking ablates integrin-dependent cell activity on both two-dimensional and three-dimensional architectures while the three-dimensional scaffold structure also leads to a high level of non-specific interactions remaining on three-dimensional samples even after a rigorous washing regime. This phenomenon, promoted by crosslinking, and attributed to cell entrapment, should be considered in any assessment of the biological activity of three-dimensional substrates. Spreading data confirm the importance of integrin-mediated cell engagement for further cell activity on collagen-based compositions. In this work, we provide a simple, but effective, means of deconvoluting the effects of chemistry and dimensional characteristics of a substrate, on the cell activity of protein-derived materials, which should assist in tailoring their biological properties for specific tissue engineering

  11. The Structure and Function of Non-Collagenous Bone Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hook, Magnus; McQuillan, David J.

    1997-01-01

    The research done under the cooperative research agreement for the project titled 'The structure and function of non-collagenous bone proteins' represented the first phase of an ongoing program to define the structural and functional relationships of the principal noncollagenous proteins in bone. An ultimate goal of this research is to enable design and execution of useful pharmacological compounds that will have a beneficial effect in treatment of osteoporosis, both land-based and induced by long-duration space travel. The goals of the now complete first phase were as follows: 1. Establish and/or develop powerful recombinant protein expression systems; 2. Develop and refine isolation and purification of recombinant proteins; 3. Express wild-type non-collagenous bone proteins; 4. Express site-specific mutant proteins and domains of wild-type proteins to enhance likelihood of crystal formation for subsequent solution of structure.

  12. Structural aspects of the calcification process of lower vertebrate collagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigi, A; Koch, M H; Panzavolta, S; Roveri, N; Rubini, K

    2000-01-01

    In order to investigate the structural relationship between inorganic phase and collagen fibrils in the calcified tissues of lower vertebrates we have carried out a wide and small angle X-ray diffraction investigation on carp scales and bone samples. The small angle patterns from decalcified bone and scales, as well as uncalcified tendon samples from carp are very similar to that of type I collagen from higher vertebrates. The D-axial period, 67 nm, is the same as that of higher vertebrate type I collagen, while the most significant difference is the relatively low intensity of the first order reflection, which is, however, the most intense. The relative intensity distributions of the meridional reflections recorded from fish bone and scales are in agreement with an electron density distribution according to a step function. The calculated step length is very close to the values previously reported for calcified tissues from higher vertebrates. The small angle reflections from calcified, as well as decalcified, scales display different directions of orientation, which could be in agreement with a plywood arrangement of collagen fibrils in successive sheets parallel to the plane of the scale. PMID:10826707

  13. Collagen biosynthesis.

    OpenAIRE

    Last, J A; Reiser, K M

    1984-01-01

    Collagen is the major structural protein of the lung. At least five genetically distinct collagen types have been identified in lung tissue. However, the precise role of collagen in nonrespiratory lung function is not well understood, in part because of the difficulties inherent in studying lung collagen, regardless of the type of assay used. A major problem is the insolubility of lung collagen; generally less than 20% of total lung collagen can be solubilized as intact chains, even with hars...

  14. Regional Mechanics Determine Collagen Fiber Structure in Healing Myocardial Infarcts

    OpenAIRE

    Fomovsky, Gregory M.; Rouillard, Andrew D.; Holmes, Jeffrey W.

    2012-01-01

    Following myocardial infarction, the mechanical properties of the healing infarct are an important determinant of heart function and the risk of progression to heart failure. In particular, mechanical anisotropy (having different mechanical properties in different directions) in the healing infarct can preserve pump function of the heart. Based on reports of different collagen structures and mechanical properties in various animal models, we hypothesized that differences in infarct size, shap...

  15. Corneal Structure and Biomechanics in Collagen Vascular Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Colaço, Maria Luisa; Franco, Mónica; Pinto, Rita; Maia Sêco, José

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate corneal biomechanics and structure in asymptomatic individuals with Collagen Vascular Diseases (CVD), and compare with an age- -matched control group. Methods: In this prospective study 23 patients with the diagnosis of CVD (46 eyes) and 17 healthy age and gender-matched controls (34 eyes) underwent Ocular Response Analyzer and Specular Microscopy measurements. CH and CRF were recorded for each eye using the ORA, pachymetry and endothelial ce...

  16. Bromine is an essential trace element for assembly of collagen IV scaffolds in tissue development and architecture

    OpenAIRE

    McCall, A. Scott; Cummings, Christopher F.; Bhave, Gautam; Vanacore, Roberto; Page-McCaw, Andrea; Hudson, Billy G.

    2014-01-01

    Bromine is ubiquitously present in animals as ionic bromide (Br−) yet has no known essential function. Herein, we demonstrate that Br− is a required cofactor for peroxidasin-catalyzed formation of sulfilimine crosslinks, a post-translational modification essential for tissue development and architecture found within the collagen IV scaffold of basement membranes (BMs). Bromide, converted to hypobromous acid, forms a bromosulfonium-ion intermediate that energetically selects for sulfilimine fo...

  17. A structural finite element model for lamellar unit of aortic media indicates heterogeneous stress field after collagen recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thunes, James R; Pal, Siladitya; Fortunato, Ronald N; Phillippi, Julie A; Gleason, Thomas G; Vorp, David A; Maiti, Spandan

    2016-06-14

    Incorporation of collagen structural information into the study of biomechanical behavior of ascending thoracic aortic (ATA) wall tissue should provide better insight into the pathophysiology of ATA. Structurally motivated constitutive models that include fiber dispersion and recruitment can successfully capture overall mechanical response of the arterial wall tissue. However, these models cannot examine local microarchitectural features of the collagen network, such as the effect of fiber disruptions and interaction between fibrous and non-fibrous components, which may influence emergent biomechanical properties of the tissue. Motivated by this need, we developed a finite element based three-dimensional structural model of the lamellar units of the ATA media that directly incorporates the collagen fiber microarchitecture. The fiber architecture was computer generated utilizing network features, namely fiber orientation distribution, intersection density and areal concentration, obtained from image analysis of multiphoton microscopy images taken from human aneurysmal ascending thoracic aortic media specimens with bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) phenotype. Our model reproduces the typical J-shaped constitutive response of the aortic wall tissue. We found that the stress state in the non-fibrous matrix was homogeneous until the collagen fibers were recruited, but became highly heterogeneous after that event. The degree of heterogeneity was dependent upon local network architecture with high stresses observed near disrupted fibers. The magnitude of non-fibrous matrix stress at higher stretch levels was negatively correlated with local fiber density. The localized stress concentrations, elucidated by this model, may be a factor in the degenerative changes in aneurysmal ATA tissue. PMID:27113538

  18. A VLSI Architecture for Concurrent Data Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Dally, William J.

    1986-01-01

    Concurrent data structures simplify the development of concurrent programs by encapsulating commonly used mechanisms for synchronization and communication into data structures. This thesis develops a notation for describing concurrent data structures, presents examples of concurrent data structures, and describes an architecture to support concurrent data structures. Concurrent Smalltalk (CST), a derivative of Smalltalk-80 with extensions for concurrency, is developed to describe concurre...

  19. Construction of collagen scaffolds that mimic the three-dimensional architecture of specific tissues.

    OpenAIRE

    Faraj, K.A.; Kuppevelt, A. H. M. S. M.; Daamen, W.F.

    2007-01-01

    Every tissue and organ has its own 3-dimensional (3D) extracellular matrix (ECM) organization. Cells in a 3D bioscaffold for tissue engineering typically align new ECM components according to the bioscaffold provided. Therefore, scaffolds with a specific 3D structural design resembling the actual ECM of a particular tissue may have great potential in tissue engineering. Here, we show that, using specific freezing regimes, 3D scaffolds that mimic the 3D architecture of specific tissues can be ...

  20. Structural properties of pepsin-solubilized collagen acylated by lauroyl chloride along with succinic anhydride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Conghu [The Key Laboratory of Leather Chemistry and Engineering of Ministry of Education, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); College of Life Sciences, Anqing Normal University, Anqing 246011 (China); Tian, Zhenhua; Liu, Wentao [The Key Laboratory of Leather Chemistry and Engineering of Ministry of Education, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Li, Guoying, E-mail: liguoyings@163.com [The Key Laboratory of Leather Chemistry and Engineering of Ministry of Education, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China)

    2015-10-01

    The structural properties of pepsin-solubilized calf skin collagen acylated by lauroyl chloride along with succinic anhydride were investigated in this paper. Compared with native collagen, acylated collagen retained the unique triple helix conformation, as determined by amino acid analysis, circular dichroism and X-ray diffraction. Meanwhile, the thermostability of acylated collagen using thermogravimetric measurements was enhanced as the residual weight increased by 5%. With the temperature increased from 25 to 115 °C, the secondary structure of native and acylated collagens using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy measurements was destroyed since the intensity of the major amide bands decreased and the positions of the major amide bands shifted to lower wavenumber, respectively. Meanwhile, two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy revealed that the most sensitive bands for acylated and native collagens were amide I and II bands, respectively. Additionally, the corresponding order of the groups between native and acylated collagens was different and the correlation degree for acylated collagen was weaker than that of native collagen, suggesting that temperature played a small influence on the conformation of acylated collagen, which might be concluded that the hydrophobic interaction improved the thermostability of collagen. - Highlights: • Acylated collagen retained the unique triple helix conformation. • Acylated collagen had stronger thermostability than native collagen. • Amide I was the most sensitive band to the temperature for acylated collagen. • Amide II was the most sensitive band to the temperature for native collagen. • Auto-peak at 1680 cm{sup −1} for acylated collagen disappeared at higher temperature.

  1. In situ forming collagen-hyaluronic acid membrane structures: mechanism of self-assembly and applications in regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Eun Ji; Jakus, Adam E; Shah, Ramille N

    2013-02-01

    Bioactive, in situ forming materials have the potential to complement minimally invasive surgical procedures and enhance tissue healing. For such biomaterials to be adopted in the clinic, they must be cost-effective, easily handled by the surgeon and have a history of biocompatibility. To this end, we report a novel and facile self-assembling strategy to create membranes and encapsulating structures using collagen and hyaluronic acid (HA). Unlike membranes built by layer-by-layer deposition of oppositely charged biomolecules, the collagen-HA membranes described here form a diffusion barrier upon electrostatic interaction of the oppositely charged biomolecules, which is further driven by osmotic pressure imbalances. The resulting membranes have a nanofibrous architecture, a thicknesses of 130 μm and a tensile modulus (0.59±0.06 MPa) that can increase 7-fold using carbodiimide chemistry (4.42±1.46 MPa). Collagen-HA membranes support mesenchymal stem cell proliferation and have a slow and steady protein release profile (7% at day 28), offering opportunities for targeted tissue regeneration. We demonstrate the capacity to encapsulate cells by injecting HA into the collagen solution, and enhance allograft and implant biocompatibility through a coating technique. This study describes a novel mechanism of collagen-HA membrane formation and provides the groundwork to apply these membranes in a variety of tissue engineering applications. PMID:23022546

  2. VLSI architecture for concurrent data structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Concurrent data structures simplify the development of concurrent programs by encapsulating commonly used mechanisms for synchronization and communication into data structures. This thesis develops a notation for describing concurrent data structures, presents examples of concurrent data structures, and describes an architecture to support concurrent data structures. Concurrent Smalltalk (CST), a derivative of Smalltalk-80 with extensions for concurrency, is developed to describe concurrent data structures. CST allows the programmer to specify objects that are distributed over the nodes of a concurrent computer. These distributed objects have many constituent objects and thus can process many messages simultaneously. They are the foundation upon which concurrent data structures are built. Considering graphs as concurrent data structures, graph algorithms are presented for the shortest-path problem, the max-flow problem, and graph partitioning. These algorithms introduce new synchronization techniques to achieve better performance than existing algorithms. A message passing, concurrent architecture is developed that exploits the characteristics of VLSI technology to support concurrent data structures

  3. Imaging and modeling of collagen architecture in living tissue with polarized light transfer (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramella-Roman, Jessica C.; Stoff, Susan; Chue-Sang, Joseph; Bai, Yuqiang

    2016-03-01

    The extra-cellular space in connective tissue of animals and humans alike is comprised in large part of collagen. Monitoring of collagen arrangement and cross-linking has been utilized to diagnose a variety of medical conditions and guide surgical intervention. For example, collagen monitoring is useful in the assessment and treatment of cervical cancer, skin cancer, myocardial infarction, and non-arteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy. We have developed a suite of tools and models based on polarized light transfer for the assessment of collagen presence, cross-linking, and orientation in living tissue. Here we will present some example of such approach applied to the human cervix. We will illustrate a novel Mueller Matrix (MM) imaging system for the study of cervical tissue; furthermore we will show how our model of polarized light transfer through cervical tissue compares to the experimental findings. Finally we will show validation of the methodology through histological results and Second Harmonic imaging microscopy.

  4. Three-dimensional Biomimetic Technology: Novel Biorubber Creates Defined Micro- and Macro-scale Architectures in Collagen Hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Rivera, Veronica; Weidner, John W; Yost, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Tissue scaffolds play a crucial role in the tissue regeneration process. The ideal scaffold must fulfill several requirements such as having proper composition, targeted modulus, and well-defined architectural features. Biomaterials that recapitulate the intrinsic architecture of in vivo tissue are vital for studying diseases as well as to facilitate the regeneration of lost and malformed soft tissue. A novel biofabrication technique was developed which combines state of the art imaging, three-dimensional (3D) printing, and selective enzymatic activity to create a new generation of biomaterials for research and clinical application. The developed material, Bovine Serum Albumin rubber, is reaction injected into a mold that upholds specific geometrical features. This sacrificial material allows the adequate transfer of architectural features to a natural scaffold material. The prototype consists of a 3D collagen scaffold with 4 and 3 mm channels that represent a branched architecture. This paper emphasizes the use of this biofabrication technique for the generation of natural constructs. This protocol utilizes a computer-aided software (CAD) to manufacture a solid mold which will be reaction injected with BSA rubber followed by the enzymatic digestion of the rubber, leaving its architectural features within the scaffold material. PMID:26967145

  5. Backbone Dynamics of Triple-helical Collagen-like Structure

    OpenAIRE

    Lazarev, Yu.A.; Lazareva, A.V.; Komarov, V.M.

    1999-01-01

    Some details of the backbone dynamics in the collagen-like triple helix is discussed and the role of backbone dynamics in functioning collagen proteins is illustrated. On a series of oligotripeptides synthetic analogs of collagen formation of high-frequency vibrational backbone dynamics and low-frequency nonlinear backbone dynamics upon stepwise elongation of peptide chain have been described using infrared spectroscopy and hydrogen-exchange method. In the fully completed triple helix the lev...

  6. Ultrastructural changes in the architecture of collagen in the human cervix treated with urea.

    OpenAIRE

    Kischer, C. W.; Droegemueller, W; Shetlar, M.; Chvapil, M.; Vining, J.

    1980-01-01

    Injection of a solution of 30% urea in acetate buffer at pH 4.0 into the stroma of the uterine cervix results in a marked change in the mechanical properties of the tissue with subsequent easy dilatation. This study analyzes the changes in the collagenous matrix of the cervix by ultrastructural and biochemical methods. Collagen fibrils in urea-treated sections of the cervix are swollen and unravelled, showing spiral configuration of subunits in both cross-sections and longitudinal sections. T...

  7. Structure-property-function relationships in triple helical collagen hydrogels

    CERN Document Server

    Tronci, Giuseppe; Russell, Stephen J; Wood, David J

    2012-01-01

    In order to establish defined biomimetic systems, type I collagen was functionalised with 1,3-Phenylenediacetic acid (Ph) as aromatic, bifunctional segment. Following investigation on molecular organization and macroscopic properties, material functionalities, i.e. degradability and bioactivity, were addressed, aiming at elucidating the potential of this collagen system as mineralization template. Functionalised collagen hydrogels demonstrated a preserved triple helix conformation. Decreased swelling ratio and increased thermo-mechanical properties were observed in comparison to state-of-the-art carbodiimide (EDC)-crosslinked collagen controls. Ph-crosslinked samples displayed no optical damage and only a slight mass decrease (~ 4 wt.-%) following 1-week incubation in simulated body fluid (SBF), while nearly 50 wt.-% degradation was observed in EDC-crosslinked collagen. SEM/EDS revealed amorphous mineral deposition, whereby increased calcium phosphate ratio was suggested in hydrogels with increased Ph content...

  8. Quasi-crystalline geometry for architectural structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weizierl, Barbara; Wester, Ture

    2001-01-01

    Artikel på CD-Rom 8 sider. The quasi-crystal (QC) type of material was discovered in 1983 by Dan Schechtman from Technion, Haifa. This new crystalline structure of material broke totally with the traditional conception of crystals and geometry introducing non-periodic close packing of cells with....... The purpose of the paper is to investigate some possibilities for the application of Quasi-Crystal geometry for structures in architecture. The basis for the investigations is A: to use the Golden Cubes (the two different hexahedra consisting of rhombic facets where the length of the diagonals has the...

  9. PLLA–collagen and PLLA–gelatin hybrid scaffolds with funnel-like porous structure for skin tissue engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongxu Lu, Hwan Hee Oh, Naoki Kawazoe, Kozo Yamagishi and Guoping Chen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In skin tissue engineering, a three-dimensional porous scaffold is necessary to support cell adhesion and proliferation and to guide cells moving into the repair area in the wound healing process. Structurally, the porous scaffold should have an open and interconnected porous architecture to facilitate homogenous cell distribution. Moreover, the scaffolds should be mechanically strong to protect deformation during the formation of new skin. In this study, the hybrid scaffolds were prepared by forming funnel-like collagen or gelatin sponge on a woven poly(l-lactic acid (PLLA mesh. The hybrid scaffolds combined the advantages of both collagen or gelatin (good cell-interactions and PLLA mesh (high mechanical strength. The hybrid scaffolds were used to culture dermal fibroblasts for dermal tissue engineering. The funnel-like porous structure promoted homogeneous cell distribution and extracellular matrix production. The PLLA mesh reinforced the scaffold to avoid deformation. Subcutaneous implantation showed that the PLLA–collagen and PLLA–gelatin scaffolds promoted the regeneration of dermal tissue and epidermis and reduced contraction during the formation of new tissue. These results indicate that funnel-like hybrid scaffolds can be used for skin tissue regeneration.

  10. PLLA-collagen and PLLA-gelatin hybrid scaffolds with funnel-like porous structure for skin tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hongxu; Oh, Hwan Hee; Kawazoe, Naoki; Yamagishi, Kozo; Chen, Guoping

    2012-12-01

    In skin tissue engineering, a three-dimensional porous scaffold is necessary to support cell adhesion and proliferation and to guide cells moving into the repair area in the wound healing process. Structurally, the porous scaffold should have an open and interconnected porous architecture to facilitate homogenous cell distribution. Moreover, the scaffolds should be mechanically strong to protect deformation during the formation of new skin. In this study, the hybrid scaffolds were prepared by forming funnel-like collagen or gelatin sponge on a woven poly(l-lactic acid) (PLLA) mesh. The hybrid scaffolds combined the advantages of both collagen or gelatin (good cell-interactions) and PLLA mesh (high mechanical strength). The hybrid scaffolds were used to culture dermal fibroblasts for dermal tissue engineering. The funnel-like porous structure promoted homogeneous cell distribution and extracellular matrix production. The PLLA mesh reinforced the scaffold to avoid deformation. Subcutaneous implantation showed that the PLLA-collagen and PLLA-gelatin scaffolds promoted the regeneration of dermal tissue and epidermis and reduced contraction during the formation of new tissue. These results indicate that funnel-like hybrid scaffolds can be used for skin tissue regeneration.

  11. Masonry structures between mechanics and architecture

    CERN Document Server

    Pedemonte, Orietta; Williams, Kim

    2015-01-01

    This book provides an overview of state of the art research in the mechanics of masonry structures. It continues the series Between Mechanics and Architecture, initially launched in 1995 from the collaboration of several renowned scholars, including Edoardo Benvenuto and Patricia Radelet-de Grave.   The contributions in this volume represent the main approaches to the complex topic of masonry structures. In addition to historical studies, the mechanical behavior of masonry arches and structures is studied using different approaches (structural analysis, limit analysis, elastic analysis, plasticity, mathematical approaches, etc.), at times difficult to reconcile, at others intertwined and complementary.   Readers will have the opportunity to compare different theoretical lines of inquiry and thus explore new horizons of research.   Contributions by: Danila Aita Andrea Bacigalupo Riccardo Barsotti Stefano Bennati Antonio Brencich Mario Como Salvatore D’Agostino Luigi Gambarotta Jacques Heyman Santiago Huer...

  12. A structural constitutive model considering angular dispersion and waviness of collagen fibres of rabbit facial veins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stergiopulos Nikos

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Structural constitutive models of vascular wall integrate information on composition and structural arrangements of tissue. In blood vessels, collagen fibres are arranged in coiled and wavy bundles and the individual collagen fibres have a deviation from their mean orientation. A complete structural constitutive model for vascular wall should incorporate both waviness and orientational distribution of fibres. We have previously developed a model, for passive properties of vascular wall, which considers the waviness of collagen fibres. However, to our knowledge there is no structural model of vascular wall which integrates both these features. Methods In this study, we have suggested a structural strain energy function that incorporates not only the waviness but also the angular dispersion of fibres. We studied the effect of parameters related to the orientational distribution on macro-mechanical behaviour of tissue during inflation-extension tests. The model was further applied on experimental data from rabbit facial veins. Results Our parametric study showed that the model is less sensitive to the orientational dispersion when fibres are mainly oriented circumferentially. The macro-mechanical response is less sensitive to changes in the mean orientation when fibres are more dispersed. The model accurately fitted the experimental data of veins, while not improving the quality of the fit compared to the model without dispersion. Our results showed that the orientational dispersion of collagen fibres could be compensated by a less abrupt and shifted to higher strain collagen engagement pattern. This should be considered when the model is fitted to experimental data and model parameters are used to study structural modifications of collagen fibre network in physiology and disease. Conclusions The presented model incorporates structural features related to waviness and orientational distribution of collagen fibres and thus offers

  13. STRUCTURING THE INFORMATION SYSTEM ARCHITECTURE USING PATTERNS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shokoofeh Ketabchi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Enterprise Architecture (EA is an approach, which aims to align the business strategy and IT infrastructure in order to maximise the application and investment of IT facilities. In fact, EA is a conceptual framework that defines the structure of an enterprise, its components and their relationships. It involves a considerable amount of work with high level of complexity. Indeed, if proper methods and approaches are not used, a huge amount of chaos and overheads will be caused. This paper aims to introduce a structuring approach for organising EA tasks. This approach provides guidelines on how to organise and document business services. Therefore, a more organised EA process will be carried out and both time and effort are saved. A case study is used to elaborate and explain the structure accompanied by the evaluation and discussion.

  14. Innovated Building Material's Interactions with Structural Form in Architectural Projects

    OpenAIRE

    Mozaikci, Begüm

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT: Interpretation of building materials into architectural form, is gaining greater interest and attention due to the conservation of architectural heritage. This study highlight, the influences of technological developments of building materials and their interactions with structural form in architectural design projects. Architectural form and decisions can potentially effects by introduced new materials and this study focus on the interaction of new material and structural form...

  15. Structural Basis for Platelet Collagen Responses by the Immune-type Receptor Glycoprotein VI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horii,K.; Kahn, M.; Herr, A.

    2006-01-01

    Activation of circulating platelets by exposed vessel wall collagen is a primary step in the pathogenesis of heart attack and stroke, and drugs to block platelet activation have successfully reduced cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. In humans and mice, collagen activation of platelets is mediated by glycoprotein VI (GPVI), a receptor that is homologous to immune receptors but bears little sequence similarity to known matrix protein adhesion receptors. Here we present the crystal structure of the collagen-binding domain of human GPVI and characterize its interaction with a collagen-related peptide. Like related immune receptors, GPVI contains 2 immunoglobulin-like domains arranged in a perpendicular orientation. Significantly, GPVI forms a back-to-back dimer in the crystal, an arrangement that could explain data previously obtained from cell-surface GPVI inhibition studies. Docking algorithms identify 2 parallel grooves on the GPVI dimer surface as collagen-binding sites, and the orientation and spacing of these grooves precisely match the dimensions of an intact collagen fiber. These findings provide a structural basis for the ability of an immunetype receptor to generate signaling responses to collagen and for the development of GPVI inhibitors as new therapies for human cardiovascular disease.

  16. Effects of pretanning processes on collagen structure and reactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    The cattle hide, a major byproduct of the US meat industry, is the tanner’s substrate, and also the source of collagen for the food and biomaterials industries. Conversion of animal hides into leather is a multistep process that continually evolves in response to economic and environmental concerns...

  17. DEPUTY: analysing architectural structures and checking style

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The DepUty (dependencies utility) can be classified as a project and process management tool. The main goal of DepUty is to assist by means of source code analysis and graphical representation using UML, in understanding dependencies of sub-systems and packages in CMS Object Oriented software, to understand architectural structure, and to schedule code release in modularised integration. It also allows a new-comer to more easily understand the global structure of CMS software, and to void circular dependencies up-front or re-factor the code, in case it was already too close to the edge of non-maintainability. The authors will discuss the various views DepUty provides to analyse package dependencies, and illustrate both the metrics and style checking facilities it provides

  18. Micro-structured materials and mechanical cues in 3D collagen gels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, James B; Brown, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Collagen gels provide a versatile and widely used substrate for three-dimensional (3D) cell culture. Here we describe how cell-seeded Type-I collagen gels can be adapted to provide powerful 3D models to support a wide range of research applications where cell/substrate alignment, density, stiffness/compliance, and strain are critical factors. In their fully hydrated form, rectangular collagen gels can be tethered such that endogenous forces generated as resident cells attach to and remodel the fibrillar collagen network can align the substrate in a controllable, predictable, and quantifiable manner. By removing water from collagen gels (plastic compression), their density increases towards that of body tissues, facilitating the engineering of a range of biomimetic constructs with controllable mechanical properties. This dense collagen can be used in combination with other components to achieve a range of functional properties from controlled perfusion, or tensile/compressive strength to new micro-structures. Detailed methodology is provided for the assembly of a range of 3D collagen materials including tethered aligned hydrogels and plastic compressed constructs. A range of techniques for analysing cell behaviour within these models, including microscopy and molecular analyses are described. These systems therefore provide a highly controllable mechanical and chemical micro-environment for investigating a wide range of cellular responses. PMID:21042973

  19. The close-packed triple helix as a possible new structural motif for collagen

    CERN Document Server

    Bohr, Jakob

    2010-01-01

    The one-dimensional problem of selecting the triple helix with the highest volume fraction is solved and hence the condition for a helix to be close-packed is obtained. The close-packed triple helix is shown to have a pitch angle of $v_{CP} =43.3 ^\\circ$. Contrary to the conventional notion, we suggest that close packing form the underlying principle behind the structure of collagen, and the implications of this suggestion are considered. Further, it is shown that the unique zero-twist structure with no strain-twist coupling is practically identical to the close-packed triple helix. Some of the difficulties for the current understanding of the structure of collagen are reviewed: The ambiguity in assigning crystal structures for collagen-like peptides, and the failure to satisfactorily calculate circular dichroism spectra. Further, the proposed new geometrical structure for collagen is better packed than both the 10/3 and the 7/2 structure. A feature of the suggested collagen structure is the existence of a ce...

  20. Architectural Surfaces and Structures from Circular Arcs

    KAUST Repository

    Shi, Ling

    2013-12-01

    In recent decades, the popularity of freeform shapes in contemporary architecture poses new challenges to digital design. One of them is the process of rationalization, i.e. to make freeform skins or structures affordable to manufacture, which draws the most attention from geometry researchers. In this thesis, we aim to realize this process with simple geometric primitives, circular arcs. We investigate architectural surfaces and structures consisting of circular arcs. Our focus is lying on how to employ them nicely and repetitively in architectural design, in order to decrease the cost in manufacturing. Firstly, we study Darboux cyclides, which are algebraic surfaces of order ≤ 4. We provide a computational tool to identify all families of circles on a given cyclide based on the spherical model of M ̈obius geometry. Practical ways to design cyclide patches that pass through certain inputs are presented. In particular, certain triples of circle families on Darboux cyclides may be suitably arranged as 3-webs. We provide a complete classification of all possible 3-webs of circles on Darboux cyclides. We then investigate the circular arc snakes, which are smooth sequences of circu- lar arcs. We evolve the snakes such that their curvature, as a function of arc length, remains unchanged. The evolution of snakes is utilized to approximate given surfaces by circular arcs or to generated freeform shapes, and it is realized by a 2-step pro- cess. More interestingly, certain 6-arc snake with boundary constraints can produce a smooth self motion, which can be employed to build flexible structures. Another challenging topic is approximating smooth freeform skins with simple panels. We contribute to this problem area by approximating a negatively-curved 5 surface with a smooth union of rational bilinear patches. We provide a proof for vertex consistency of hyperbolic nets using the CAGD approach of the rational B ́ezier form. Moreover, we use Darboux transformations for the

  1. Research on the Structure of Fish Collagen Nanofibers Influenced Cell Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Zhou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrospinning is highlighted in biomaterials field. The structures of nanofibers depend on various parameters, which are related closely to the bioactivity of biomaterials. The aim of this research is to analyze the structure of fish collagen nanofibers and to propose the new criterion for cell growth. This paper focused on the flow rate of solvent during the electrospinning. Through the cell culture, the relationship of the structure and cell growth is investigated. The results obtained in this study provide an understanding of the behaviors of cell growth under different structure of fish collagen nanofibers scaffold.

  2. Atomic force microscopy of collagen structure in bone and dentine revealed by osteoclastic resorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mineralised tissues such as bone consist of two material phases: collagen protein fibrils, secreted by osteoblasts, form model structures for subsequent deposition of mineral, calcium hydroxyapatite. Collagen and mineral are removed in a three-dimensional manner by osteoclasts during bone turnover in skeletal growth or repair. Bone active drugs have recently been developed for skeletal diseases, and there is revived interest in changes in the structure of mineralised tissues seen in disease and upon treatment. The resolution of atomic force microscopy and use of unmodified samples has enabled us to image bone and dentine collagen exposed by the natural process of cellular dissolution of mineralised matrix. The morphology of bone and dentine has been analysed when fully mineralised and after osteoclast-mediated bone resorption, and compared with results from other microscopy techniques. Banded type I collagen, with 66.5±1.4 nm axial D-periodicity and 62.2±7.0 nm diameter, has been identified within resorption lacunae in bone and 69.4±4.3 nm axial D-periodicity and 140.6±12.4 nm diameter in dentine substrates formed by human and rabbit osteoclasts, respectively. This observation suggests a route by which the material and morphological properties of bone collagen can be analysed in situ, compared with collagen from non-skeletal sites, and contrasted in diseases of medical importance, such as osteoporosis, where skeletal tissue is mechanically weakened

  3. An Innovative Collagen-Based Cell-Printing Method for Obtaining Human Adipose Stem Cell-Laden Structures Consisting of Core-Sheath Structures for Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, MyungGu; Lee, Ji-Seon; Chun, Wook; Kim, Geun Hyung

    2016-04-11

    Three-dimensional (3D) cell printing processes have been used widely in various tissue engineering applications due to the efficient embedding of living cells in appropriately designed micro- or macro-structures. However, there are several issues to overcome, such as the limited choice of bioinks and tailor-made fabricating strategies. Here, we suggest a new, innovative cell-printing process, supplemented with a core-sheath nozzle and an aerosol cross-linking method, to obtain multilayered cell-laden mesh structure and a newly considered collagen-based cell-laden bioink. To obtain a mechanically and biologically enhanced cell-laden structure, we used collagen-bioink in the core region, and also used pure alginate in the sheath region to protect the cells in the collagen during the printing and cross-linking process and support the 3D cell-laden mesh structure. To achieve the most appropriate conditions for fabricating cell-embedded cylindrical core-sheath struts, various processing conditions, including weight fractions of the cross-linking agent and pneumatic pressure in the core region, were tested. The fabricated 3D MG63-laden mesh structure showed significantly higher cell viability (92 ± 3%) compared with that (83 ± 4%) of the control, obtained using a general alginate-based cell-printing process. To expand the feasibility to stem cell-embedded structures, we fabricated a cell-laden mesh structure consisting of core (cell-laden collagen)/sheath (pure alginate) using human adipose stem cells (hASCs). Using the selected processing conditions, we could achieve a stable 3D hASC-laden mesh structure. The fabricated cell-laden 3D core-sheath structure exhibited outstanding cell viability (91%) compared to that (83%) of an alginate-based hASC-laden mesh structure (control), and more efficient hepatogenic differentiations (albumin: ∼ 1.7-fold, TDO-2: ∼ 7.6-fold) were observed versus the control. The selection of collagen-bioink and the new printing strategy

  4. Biomimetic Self-Templated Hierarchical Structures of Collagen-Like Peptide Amphiphiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Hyo-Eon; Jang, Jaein; Chung, Jinhyo; Lee, Hee Jung; Wang, Eddie; Lee, Seung-Wuk; Chung, Woo-Jae

    2015-10-14

    Developing hierarchically structured biomaterials with tunable chemical and physical properties like those found in nature is critically important to regenerative medicine and studies on tissue morphogenesis. Despite advances in materials synthesis and assembly processes, our ability to control hierarchical assembly using fibrillar biomolecules remains limited. Here, we developed a bioinspired approach to create collagen-like materials through directed evolutionary screening and directed self-assembly. We first synthesized peptide amphiphiles by coupling phage display-identified collagen-like peptides to long-chain fatty acids. We then assembled the amphiphiles into diverse, hierarchically organized, nanofibrous structures using directed self-assembly based on liquid crystal flow and its controlled deposition. The resulting structures sustained and directed the growth of bone cells and hydroxyapatite biominerals. We believe these self-assembling collagen-like amphiphiles could prove useful in the structural design of tissue regenerating materials. PMID:26392232

  5. Second-harmonic generation reveals a relationship between metastatic potential and collagen fiber structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Kathleen A.; Dawes, Ryan P.; Cheema, Mehar K.; Perry, Seth; Brown, Edward

    2014-02-01

    Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) of collagen signals allows for the analysis of collagen structural changes throughout metastatic progression. The directionality of coherent SHG signals, measured through the ratio of the forward-propagating to backward propagating signal (F/B ratio), is affected by fibril diameter, spacing, and order versus disorder of fibril packing within a fiber. As tumors interact with their microenvironment and metastasize, it causes changes in these parameters, and concurrent changes in the F/B ratio. Specifically, the F/B ratio of breast tumors that are highly metastatic to the lymph nodes is significantly higher than those in tumors with restricted lymph node involvement. We utilized in vitro analysis of tumor cell motility through collagen gels of different microstructures, and hence different F/B ratios, to explore the relationship between collagen microstructures and metastatic capabilities of the tumor. By manipulating environmental factors of fibrillogenesis and biochemical factors of fiber composition we created methods of varying the average F/B ratio of the gel, with significant changes in fiber structure occurring as a result of alterations in incubation temperature and increasing type III collagen presence. A migration assay was performed using simultaneous SHG and fluorescent imaging to measure average penetration depth of human tumor cells into the gels of significantly different F/B ratios, with preliminary data demonstrating that cells penetrate deeper into gels of higher F/B ratio caused by lower type III collagen concentration. Determining the role of collagen structure in tumor cell motility will aid in the future prediction metastatic capabilities of a primary tumor.

  6. Pre-adsorbed type-I collagen structure-dependent changes in osteoblastic phenotype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Type-I collagen is the most abundant extracellular matrix in bones and modulates various functions of osteoblasts. We prepared two different structures of type-I collagen on tissue culture grade polystylene (TCPS) surfaces, one is feltwork structure of filamentous molecules from acid solutions (ACs) and the other is network structure of fibrils from neutral solutions (NCs), to examine effects of the structures on the maturation process of osteoblast-like cells. No significant differences of cell proliferation were observed between TCPS and ACs, but NCs delayed the proliferation. In initial cell attachment, the cells on ACs had tense lamellipodia with sharp tips, while those on NCs had loose lamellipodia. No detectable differences in levels of expressed integrin α2- and α5-subunits were observed between the structures. Although the matrix mineralization in NCs was also delayed in comparison with TCPS and ACs, fully mineralized levels in NCs were the same as those of TCPS and ACs. In addition, although we examined the effects of densities of pre-adsorbed collagen molecules on osteoblast maturation, the effects were less serious than those of the structures. This study suggests that the structures of collagen affect proliferation and mineralization of osteoblast-like cells

  7. Specifying structural constraints of architectural patterns in the ARCHERY language

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ARCHERY is an architectural description language for modelling and reasoning about distributed, heterogeneous and dynamically reconfigurable systems in terms of architectural patterns. The language supports the specification of architectures and their reconfiguration. This paper introduces a language extension for precisely describing the structural design decisions that pattern instances must respect in their (re)configurations. The extension is a propositional modal logic with recursion and nominals referencing components, i.e., a hybrid µ-calculus. Its expressiveness allows specifying safety and liveness constraints, as well as paths and cycles over structures. Refinements of classic architectural patterns are specified

  8. Specifying structural constraints of architectural patterns in the ARCHERY language

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez, Alejandro [Departamento de Informática, Universidad Nacional de San Luis, Ejército de los Andes 950, D5700HHW San Luis (Argentina); HASLab INESC TEC and Universidade do Minho, Campus de Gualtar, 4710-057 Braga (Portugal); Barbosa, Luis S. [HASLab INESC TEC and Universidade do Minho, Campus de Gualtar, 4710-057 Braga (Portugal); Riesco, Daniel [Departamento de Informática, Universidad Nacional de San Luis, Ejército de los Andes 950, D5700HHW San Luis (Argentina)

    2015-03-10

    ARCHERY is an architectural description language for modelling and reasoning about distributed, heterogeneous and dynamically reconfigurable systems in terms of architectural patterns. The language supports the specification of architectures and their reconfiguration. This paper introduces a language extension for precisely describing the structural design decisions that pattern instances must respect in their (re)configurations. The extension is a propositional modal logic with recursion and nominals referencing components, i.e., a hybrid µ-calculus. Its expressiveness allows specifying safety and liveness constraints, as well as paths and cycles over structures. Refinements of classic architectural patterns are specified.

  9. An interdisciplinary review structure of architectural sustainability

    OpenAIRE

    Howland, Hans Russell

    1995-01-01

    The production of sustainable architecture has traditionally been inhibited by the inability to formulate a comprehensive scheme of environmental and project review. The environmental constructs(The ways that an environment naturally regulates itself independently from human influences) and the project objectives(The motivations for architectural development) each have aspects that relate to sustainability, some of which are interrelated and dependent on the other aspects for t...

  10. The structural and optical properties of type III human collagen biosynthetic corneal substitutes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Sally; Lewis, Phillip; Islam, M Mirazul; Doutch, James; Sorensen, Thomas; White, Tomas; Griffith, May; Meek, Keith M

    2015-10-01

    The structural and optical properties of clinically biocompatible, cell-free hydrogels comprised of synthetically cross-linked and moulded recombinant human collagen type III (RHCIII) with and without the incorporation of 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC) were assessed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray scattering, spectroscopy and refractometry. These findings were examined alongside similarly obtained data from 21 human donor corneas. TEM demonstrated the presence of loosely bundled aggregates of fine collagen filaments within both RHCIII and RHCIII-MPC implants, which X-ray scattering showed to lack D-banding and be preferentially aligned in a uniaxial orientation throughout. This arrangement differs from the predominantly biaxial alignment of collagen fibrils that exists in the human cornea. By virtue of their high water content (90%), very fine collagen filaments (2-9 nm) and lack of cells, the collagen hydrogels were found to transmit almost all incident light in the visible spectrum. They also transmitted a large proportion of UV light compared to the cornea which acts as an effective UV filter. Patients implanted with these hydrogels should be cautious about UV exposure prior to regrowth of the epithelium and in-growth of corneal cells into the implants. PMID:26159106

  11. Aromatic Interactions Promote Self-association of Collagen Triple-helical Peptides to Higher Order Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Kar, Karunakar; Ibrar, Sajjad; Nanda, Vikas; Getz, Todd M; Kunapuli, Satya P.; Brodsky, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    Aromatic residues are relatively rare within the collagen triple-helix, but they appear to play a specialized role in higher order structure and function. The role of aromatic amino acids in the self-assembly of triple-helical peptides was investigated in terms of the kinetics of self-association, the nature of aggregated species formed, and the ability of these species to activate platelet aggregation. The presence of aromatic residues on both ends of a type IV collagen model peptide is obse...

  12. The Study of Morphological Structure, Phase Structure and Molecular Structure of Collagen-PEO 600K Blends for Tissue Engineering Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. F. Mohd Nasir

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A new material which is collagen/ poly (ethylene oxide (PEO blend was developed to determine its possibility as a promising material for tissue scaffold. PEO with average molecular weight of 600,000 and collagen originated from calf skin were dispersed in 0.1 M acetic acid to prepare a concentration of 1 wt% for PEO and 0.15 wt% for collagen. The collagen-PEO600K blend film was then obtained by solution casting method. SEM results shown that by having certain ratio of collagen and PEO, the membrane began to developed porous structures which are possible to assist tissue attachment on the scaffold. The X-ray diffractograms demonstrate PEO 600K influences on the blend thus enhancing crystallinity of collagen. The Infra red spectrum shows intermolecular interactions of collagen and PEO which alter the collagen structure thus explained the membrane morphological changes. Therefore, we concluded that the phase structure and also the molecular structure of the blend are crucial to produce desirable morphological structure of the membrane which is required for a reliable tissue scaffold.

  13. Effects of Milling on the Fibrous Structure and Mechanical Behaviors of a Collagen Material--Leather

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leather, a fibrous collagen material, is a high value coproduct of the meat industry. Milling is being practiced in the tannery to mechanically tumble and therefore soften leather for adequate stiffness and feel. However, there is no report regarding its effects on the structure change and physica...

  14. Microfibrous {beta}-TCP/collagen scaffolds mimic woven bone in structure and composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Shen; Zhang Xin; Cai Qing; Yang Xiaoping [Key Laboratory of Beijing City on Preparation and Processing of Novel Polymer Materials, College of Materials Science and Engineering, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Wang Bo; Deng Xuliang, E-mail: yangxp@mail.buct.edu.c [Department of VIP Dental Service, School and Hospital of Stomatology, Peking University, Beijing 100081 (China)

    2010-12-15

    Woven bone, as the initial form of bone tissue, is always found in developing and repairing bone. It is thought of as a temporary scaffold for the deposition of osteogenic cells and the laying down of lamellar bone. Thus, we hypothesize that a matrix which resembles the architecture and components of woven bone can provide an osteoblastic microenvironment for bone cell growth and new bone formation. In this study, woven-bone-like beta-tricalcium phosphate ({beta}-TCP)/collagen scaffolds were fabricated by sol-gel electrospinning and impregnating methods. Optimization studies on sol-gel synthesis and electrospinning process were conducted respectively to prepare pure {beta}-TCP fibers with dimensions close to mineralized collagen fibrils in woven bone. The collagen-coating layer prepared by impregnation had an adhesive role that held the {beta}-TCP fibers together, and resulted in rapid degradation and matrix mineralization in in vitro tests. MG63 osteoblast-like cells seeded on the resultant scaffolds showed three-dimensional (3D) morphologies, and merged into multicellular layers after 7 days culture. Cytotoxicity test further revealed that extracts from the resultant scaffolds could promote the proliferation of MG63 cells. Therefore, the woven-bone-like matrix that we constructed favored the attachment and proliferation of MG63 cells in three dimensions. It has great potential ability to shorten the time of formation of new bone.

  15. Architectural Engineering to Super-Light Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Castberg, Niels Andreas; HERTZ, Kristian Dahl

    2013-01-01

    Tilflytning til byerne er en global trend og skaber stor efterspørgsel efter nye bygninger. I forsøget på at efterkomme dette, vil et nye fleksibelt konstruktionssystemer med mulighed for variation uden ekstra omkostninger fremstår fordelagtigt. Super-lette konstruktioner udgør sådan et system.I denne afhandling beskrives Super-lette konstruktioner med udgangspunkt i architectural engineering. Afhandlingen tager afsæt i en tostrenget hypotese; at architectural engineering medfører bedre arkit...

  16. Nonlinear microscopy of collagen fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strupler, M.; Pena, A.-M.; Hernest, M.; Tharaux, P.-L.; Fabre, A.; Marchal-Somme, J.; Crestani, B.; Débarre, D.; Martin, J.-L.; Beaurepaire, E.; Schanne-Klein, M.-C.

    2007-02-01

    We used intrinsic Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) by fibrillar collagen to visualize the three-dimensional architecture of collagen fibrosis at the micrometer scale using laser scanning nonlinear microscopy. We showed that SHG signals are highly specific to fibrillar collagen and provide a sensitive probe of the micrometer-scale structural organization of collagen in tissues. Moreover, recording simultaneously other nonlinear optical signals in a multimodal setup, we visualized the tissue morphology using Two-Photon Excited Fluorescence (2PEF) signals from endogenous chromophores such as NADH or elastin. We then compared different methods to determine accurate indexes of collagen fibrosis using nonlinear microscopy, given that most collagen fibrils are smaller than the microscope resolution and that second harmonic generation is a coherent process. In order to define a robust method to process our three-dimensional images, we either calculated the fraction of the images occupied by a significant SHG signal, or averaged SHG signal intensities. We showed that these scores provide an estimation of the extension of renal and pulmonary fibrosis in murine models, and that they clearly sort out the fibrotic mice.

  17. Collagen-chitosan scaffold modified with Au and Ag nanoparticles: Synthesis and structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubina, M. S.; Kamitov, E. E.; Zubavichus, Ya. V.; Peters, G. S.; Naumkin, A. V.; Suzer, S.; Vasil'kov, A. Yu.

    2016-03-01

    Nowadays, the dermal biomimetic scaffolds are widely used in regenerative medicine. Collagen-chitosan scaffold one of these materials possesses antibacterial activity, good compatibility with living tissues and has been already used as a wound-healing material. In this article, collagen-chitosan scaffolds modified with Ag and Au nanoparticles have been synthesized using novel method - the metal-vapor synthesis. The nanocomposite materials are characterized by XPS, TEM, SEM and synchrotron radiation-based X-ray techniques. According to XRD data, the mean size of the nanoparticles (NPs) is 10.5 nm and 20.2 nm in Au-Collagen-Chitosan (Au-CollCh) and Ag-Collagen-Chitosan (Ag-CollCh) scaffolds, respectively in fair agreement with the TEM data. SAXS analysis of the composites reveals an asymmetric size distribution peaked at 10 nm for Au-CollCh and 25 nm for Ag-CollCh indicative of particle's aggregation. According to SEM data, the metal-carrying scaffolds have layered structure and the nanoparticles are rather uniformly distributed on the surface material. XPS data indicate that the metallic nanoparticles are in their unoxidized/neutral states and dominantly stabilized within the chitosan-rich domains.

  18. The significance of grafting collagen on polycaprolactone composite scaffolds: processing-structure-functional property relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiran, S; Nune, K C; Misra, R D K

    2015-09-01

    The study concerns processing-structure-functional property relationship in organic-inorganic hybrid scaffolds based on grafted collagen for bone tissue engineering. Biodegradable polyester, polycaprolactone (PCL) and nanohydroxyapatite were used to fabricate three-dimensional porous scaffolds by adopting a combination of solvent casting, particulate leaching, and polymer leaching approaches. The PCL scaffold was subsequently surface modified by chemical bonding of 1,6-hexanediamine to the ester groups of PCL to introduce free NH2 groups. The introduction of NH2 groups as active sites enabled immobilization of biocompatible macromolecule, collagen, on the aminolyzed PCL via a cross-linking agent, glutaraldehyde. The osteoblasts' functions, notably cell adhesion, proliferation, and mineralization, were favorably modulated because of the chemical interaction between Arg-Gly-Asp domains in collagen molecule and integrin receptor in the cell membrane. The study underscores the significance of grafting collagen on PCL-nHA scaffold in modulating cellular activity and biological functions expanding its current use in soft tissue engineering to hard tissue regeneration. PMID:25691223

  19. A comparison of glycosaminoglycan distributions, keratan sulphate sulphation patterns and collagen fibril architecture from central to peripheral regions of the bovine cornea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Leona T Y; Harris, Anthony M; Tanioka, Hidetoshi; Yagi, Naoto; Kinoshita, Shigeru; Caterson, Bruce; Quantock, Andrew J; Young, Robert D; Meek, Keith M

    2014-09-01

    This study investigated changes in collagen fibril architecture and the sulphation status of keratan sulphate (KS) glycosaminoglycan (GAG) epitopes from central to peripheral corneal regions. Freshly excised adult bovine corneal tissue was examined as a function of radial position from the centre of the cornea outwards. Corneal thickness, tissue hydration, hydroxyproline content, and the total amount of sulphated GAG were all measured. High and low-sulphated epitopes of keratan sulphate were studied by immunohistochemistry and quantified by ELISA. Chondroitin sulphate (CS) and dermatan sulphate (DS) distributions were observed by immunohistochemistry following specific enzyme digestions. Electron microscopy and X-ray fibre diffraction were used to ascertain collagen fibril architecture. The bovine cornea was 1021±5.42 μm thick at its outer periphery, defined as 9-12 mm from the corneal centre, compared to 844±8.10 μm at the centre. The outer periphery of the cornea was marginally, but not significantly, more hydrated than the centre (H=4.3 vs. H=3.7), and was more abundant in hydroxyproline (0.12 vs. 0.06 mg/mg dry weight of cornea). DMMB assays indicated no change in the total amount of sulphated GAG across the cornea. Immunohistochemistry revealed the presence of both high- and low-sulphated epitopes of KS, as well as DS, throughout the cornea, and CS only in the peripheral cornea before the limbus. Quantification by ELISA, disclosed that although both high- and low-sulphated KS remained constant throughout stromal depth at different radial positions, high-sulphated epitopes remained constant from the corneal centre to outer-periphery, whereas low-sulphated epitopes increased significantly. Both small angle X-ray diffraction and TEM analysis revealed that collagen fibril diameter remained relatively constant until the outer periphery was reached, after which fibrils became more widely spaced (from small angle x-ray diffraction analysis) and of larger diameter

  20. The Structure and Function of Non-Collagenous Bone Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hook, Magnus

    1997-01-01

    The long-term goal for this program is to determine the structural and functional relationships of bone proteins and proteins that interact with bone. This information will used to design useful pharmacological compounds that will have a beneficial effect in osteoporotic patients and in the osteoporotic-like effects experienced on long duration space missions. The first phase of this program, funded under a cooperative research agreement with NASA through the Texas Medical Center, aimed to develop powerful recombinant expression systems and purification methods for production of large amounts of target proteins. Proteins expressed in sufficient'amount and purity would be characterized by a variety of structural methods, and made available for crystallization studies. In order to increase the likelihood of crystallization and subsequent high resolution solution of structures, we undertook to develop expression of normal and mutant forms of proteins by bacterial and mammalian cells. In addition to the main goals of this program, we would also be able to provide reagents for other related studies, including development of anti-fibrotic and anti-metastatic therapeutics.

  1. Design of Carborane Molecular Architectures via Electronic Structure Computations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josep M. Oliva

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Quantum-mechanical electronic structure computations were employed to explore initial steps towards a comprehensive design of polycarborane architectures through assembly of molecular units. Aspects considered were (i the striking modification of geometrical parameters through substitution, (ii endohedral carboranes and proposed ejection mechanisms for energy/ion/atom/energy storage/transport, (iii the excited state character in single and dimeric molecular units, and (iv higher architectural constructs. A goal of this work is to find optimal architectures where atom/ion/energy/spin transport within carborane superclusters is feasible in order to modernize and improve future photoenergy processes.

  2. Biomimetic LBL structured nanofibrous matrices assembled by chitosan/collagen for promoting wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Rong; Li, Wangzhou; Lv, Xiaoxing; Lei, Zhanjun; Bian, Yongqian; Deng, Hongbing; Wang, Hongjun; Li, Jinqing; Li, Xueyong

    2015-06-01

    This paper reports the fabrication of biomimetic nanofibrous matrices via co-electrospinning of polycaprolactone (PCL)/cellulose acetate (CA) and layer-by-layer self-assembly (LBL) of positively charged chitosan (CS) and negatively charged Type Ⅰ collagen on the nanofibrous matrix. FE-SEM images indicate that the average fiber diameter increased from 392 to 541 nm when the coating bilayers varied from 5 to 20.5. Besides, the excellent biocompatibility and enhanced attachment and spreading of normal human dermal fibroblasts (NHDFs) of prepared nanofibrous mats are confirmed by MTT and SEM results. Furthermore, the LBL structured (CS/collagen)n nanofibrous mats greatly improve the cell migration in vitro, promote re-epithelialization and vascularization in vivo, and up-regulate the expression of collagen Ⅳ and α-tubulin, as well as the Integrin β1 and phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) at Tyr-397. The levels of expressed protein are significantly enhanced with increasing coating bilayers via immunohistochemistry and western blotting analyses. Collectively, these results suggest that the LBL structured biomimetic nanofibrous matrices may enhance cell migration and further promote the skin regeneration by up-regulating the secretion of ECM protein and triggering Integrin/FAK signaling pathway, which demonstrate the potential use of the nanofibrous mats to rapidly restore the structural and functional properties of wounded skin. PMID:25890707

  3. The effect of point mutations on structure and mechanical properties of collagen-like fibril: A molecular dynamics study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marlowe, Ashley E.; Singh, Abhishek; Yingling, Yaroslava G., E-mail: yara_yingling@ncsu.edu

    2012-12-01

    Understanding sequence dependent mechanical and structural properties of collagen fibrils is important for the development of artificial biomaterials for medical and nanotechnological applications. Moreover, point mutations are behind many collagen associated diseases, including Osteogenesis Imperfecta (OI). We conducted a combination of classical and steered atomistic molecular dynamics simulations to examine the effect of point mutations on structure and mechanical properties of short collagen fibrils which include mutations of glycine to alanine, aspartic acid, cysteine, and serine or mutations of hydroxyproline to arginine, asparagine, glutamine, and lysine. We found that all mutations disrupt structure and reduce strength of the collagen fibrils, which may affect the hierarchical packing of the fibrils. The glycine mutations were more detrimental to mechanical strength of the fibrils (WT > Ala > Ser > Cys > Asp) than that of hydroxyproline (WT > Arg > Gln > Asn > Lys). The clinical outcome for glycine mutations agrees well with the trend in reduction of fibril's tensile strength predicted by our simulations. Overall, our results suggest that the reduction in mechanical properties of collagen fibrils may be used to predict the clinical outcome of mutations. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer All mutations disrupt structure and bonding pattern and reduce strength of the collagen fibrils. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Gly based mutations are worst to mechanical integrity of fibrils than that of Hyp. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Lys and Arg mutations most dramatically destabilize collagen fibril properties. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Clinical outcome of mutations may be related to the reduced mechanical properties of fibrils.

  4. Differences in collagen architecture between keloid, hypertrophic scar, normotrophic scar, and normal skin: An objective histopathological analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhaegen, P.D.; Zuijlen, van P.P.; Pennings, N.M.; Marle, van J.; Niessen, F.B.; Horst, C.; Middelkoop, E.

    2009-01-01

    Normotrophic, hypertrophic, and keloidal scars are different types of scar formation, which all need a different approach in treatment. Therefore, it is important to differentiate between these types of scar, not only clinically but also histopathologically. Differences were explored for collagen or

  5. Scaffold with a natural mesh-like architecture: isolation, structural, and in vitro characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burugapalli, Krishna; Thapasimuttu, Anilkumar; Chan, Jeffrey C Y; Yao, Li; Brody, Sarah; Kelly, Jack L; Pandit, Abhay

    2007-03-01

    An intact extracellular matrix (ECM) with a mesh-like architecture has been identified in the peri-muscular sub-serosal connective tissue (PSCT) of cholecyst (gallbladder). The PSCT layer of cholecyst wall is isolated by mechanical delamination of other layers and decellularized with a treatment with peracetic acid and ethanol solution (PES) in water to obtain the final matrix, which is referred to as cholecyst-derived ECM (CEM). CEM is cross-linked with different concentrations of glutaraldehyde (GA) to demonstrate that the susceptibility of CEM to degradation can be controlled. Quantitative and qualitative macromolecular composition assessments revealed that collagen is the primary structural component of CEM. Elastin is also present. In addition, the ultra-structural studies on CEM reveal the presence of a three-dimensional fibrous mesh-like network structure with similar nanoscale architecture on both mucosal and serosal surfaces. In vitro cell culture studies show that CEM provides a supporting structure for the attachment and proliferation of murine fibroblasts (3T3) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). CEM is also shown to support the attachment and differentiation of rat adrenal pheochromocytoma cells (PC12). PMID:17309297

  6. Scaffold with a natural mesh-like architecture: isolation, structural, and in vitro characterization.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Burugapalli, Krishna

    2007-03-01

    An intact extracellular matrix (ECM) with a mesh-like architecture has been identified in the peri-muscular sub-serosal connective tissue (PSCT) of cholecyst (gallbladder). The PSCT layer of cholecyst wall is isolated by mechanical delamination of other layers and decellularized with a treatment with peracetic acid and ethanol solution (PES) in water to obtain the final matrix, which is referred to as cholecyst-derived ECM (CEM). CEM is cross-linked with different concentrations of glutaraldehyde (GA) to demonstrate that the susceptibility of CEM to degradation can be controlled. Quantitative and qualitative macromolecular composition assessments revealed that collagen is the primary structural component of CEM. Elastin is also present. In addition, the ultra-structural studies on CEM reveal the presence of a three-dimensional fibrous mesh-like network structure with similar nanoscale architecture on both mucosal and serosal surfaces. In vitro cell culture studies show that CEM provides a supporting structure for the attachment and proliferation of murine fibroblasts (3T3) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). CEM is also shown to support the attachment and differentiation of rat adrenal pheochromocytoma cells (PC12).

  7. Design and Analysis of Architectures for Structural Health Monitoring Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukkamala, Ravi; Sixto, S. L. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    During the two-year project period, we have worked on several aspects of Health Usage and Monitoring Systems for structural health monitoring. In particular, we have made contributions in the following areas. 1. Reference HUMS architecture: We developed a high-level architecture for health monitoring and usage systems (HUMS). The proposed reference architecture is shown. It is compatible with the Generic Open Architecture (GOA) proposed as a standard for avionics systems. 2. HUMS kernel: One of the critical layers of HUMS reference architecture is the HUMS kernel. We developed a detailed design of a kernel to implement the high level architecture.3. Prototype implementation of HUMS kernel: We have implemented a preliminary version of the HUMS kernel on a Unix platform.We have implemented both a centralized system version and a distributed version. 4. SCRAMNet and HUMS: SCRAMNet (Shared Common Random Access Memory Network) is a system that is found to be suitable to implement HUMS. For this reason, we have conducted a simulation study to determine its stability in handling the input data rates in HUMS. 5. Architectural specification.

  8. A structural model for the in vivo human cornea including collagen-swelling interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xi; Petsche, Steven J; Pinsky, Peter M

    2015-08-01

    A structural model of the in vivo cornea, which accounts for tissue swelling behaviour, for the three-dimensional organization of stromal fibres and for collagen-swelling interaction, is proposed. Modelled as a binary electrolyte gel in thermodynamic equilibrium, the stromal electrostatic free energy is based on the mean-field approximation. To account for active endothelial ionic transport in the in vivo cornea, which modulates osmotic pressure and hydration, stromal mobile ions are shown to satisfy a modified Boltzmann distribution. The elasticity of the stromal collagen network is modelled based on three-dimensional collagen orientation probability distributions for every point in the stroma obtained by synthesizing X-ray diffraction data for azimuthal angle distributions and second harmonic-generated image processing for inclination angle distributions. The model is implemented in a finite-element framework and employed to predict free and confined swelling of stroma in an ionic bath. For the in vivo cornea, the model is used to predict corneal swelling due to increasing intraocular pressure (IOP) and is adapted to model swelling in Fuchs' corneal dystrophy. The biomechanical response of the in vivo cornea to a typical LASIK surgery for myopia is analysed, including tissue fluid pressure and swelling responses. The model provides a new interpretation of the corneal active hydration control (pump-leak) mechanism based on osmotic pressure modulation. The results also illustrate the structural necessity of fibre inclination in stabilizing the corneal refractive surface with respect to changes in tissue hydration and IOP. PMID:26156299

  9. Collagencin, an antibacterial peptide from fish collagen: Activity, structure and interaction dynamics with membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ennaas, Nadia; Hammami, Riadh; Gomaa, Ahmed; Bédard, François; Biron, Éric; Subirade, Muriel; Beaulieu, Lucie; Fliss, Ismail

    2016-04-29

    In this study, we first report characterization of collagencin, an antimicrobial peptide identified from fish collagen hydrolysate. The peptide completely inhibited the growth of Staphylococcus aureus at 1.88 mM. Although non-toxic up to 470 μM, collagencin was hemolytic at higher concentrations. The secondary structure of collagencin was mainly composed by β-sheet and β-turn as determined by CD measurements and molecular dynamics. The peptide is likely to form β-sheet structure under hydrophobic environments and interacts with both anionic (phosphatidylglycerol) and zwitterionic (phosphoethanolamine and phosphatidylcholine) lipids as shown with CD spectroscopy and molecular dynamics. The peptide formed several hydrogen bonds with both POPG and POPE lipids and remained at membrane-water interface, suggesting that collagencin antibacterial action follows a carpet mechanism. Collagenous fish wastes could be processed by enzymatic hydrolysis and transformed into products of high value having functional or biological properties. Marine collagens are a promising source of antimicrobial peptides with new implications in food safety and human health. PMID:27038545

  10. Computational Strategies for the Architectural Design of Bending Active Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tamke, Martin; Nicholas, Paul

    2013-01-01

    stiffness, it is possible to control and pre-calibrate the bending behaviour of a composite element. This material capacity challenges architecture’s existing methods for design, specification and prediction. In this paper, we demonstrate how architects might connect the designed nature of composites with...... the design of bending-active structures, through computational strategies. We report three built structures that develop architecturally oriented design methods for bending-active systems using composite materials. These projects demonstrate the application and limits of the introduction of advanced......Active bending introduces a new level of integration into the design of architectural structures, and opens up new complexities for the architectural design process. In particular, the introduction of material variation reconfigures the design space. Through the precise specification of their...

  11. Simulation of Adaptive Kinetic Architectural Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Poul Henning

    2010-01-01

    order to obtain the control forces that must be known in order to control the shape of a real variable geometry truss structure. An experimental test of the of the shape control approach has been implemented using VGT truss structure and a low-cost data acquisition system based on the open...

  12. The close-packed triple helix as a possible new structural motif for collagen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohr, Jakob; Olsen, Kasper

    2010-01-01

    The one-dimensional problem of selecting the triple helix with the highest volume fraction is solved and hence the condition for a helix to be close-packed is obtained. The close-packed triple helix is shown to have a pitch angle of v CP = 43.3°. Contrary to the conventional notion, we suggest that...... close packing form the underlying principle behind the structure of collagen, and the implications of this suggestion are considered. Further, it is shown that the unique zero-twist structure with no strain-twist coupling is practically identical to the close-packed triple helix. Some of the...

  13. Mutation of the 5′-Untranslated Region Stem-Loop Structure Inhibits α1(I) Collagen Expression in Vivo*

    OpenAIRE

    Parsons, Christopher J.; Stefanovic, Branko; Seki, Ekihiro; Aoyama, Tomonori; Latour, Anne M.; Marzluff, William F; Rippe, Richard A.; Brenner, David A.

    2010-01-01

    Type I collagen is a heterotrimeric extracellular matrix protein consisting of two α1(I) chains and one α2(I) chain. During liver fibrosis, activated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) are the major source of the type I collagen that accumulates in the damaged tissue. Expression of α1(I) and α2(I) collagen mRNA is increased 60-fold compared with quiescent stellate cells and is due predominantly to post-transcriptional message regulation. Specifically, a stem-loop structure in the 5′-untranslated r...

  14. Structural Architecture and Evolution of Kumkuli Basin, North Tibet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    He Bizhu; Xu Zhiqin; Jiao Cunli; Cui Junwen; Wang Shenglang; Wang Gonghuai; Li Zhaoyang; Qiu Zhuli

    2009-01-01

    Utilizing the new data of gravity, magnetic, and magnetotelluric survey, we analyzed the characteristics of the three geophysical attribute (gravity, magnetic, and resistivity) interfaces and the deep architecture and structure of Kumkuli basin. The research results can provide basic data for early basin structural study. From coupled basin and mountain system, analysis of the structure, and evolution of Knmknli basin, we found that there was zoning from north to south and from west to east. Kumkuli basin has three structural architecture layers including metamorphic crystallization basement, fold basement and sedimentary cover. Knmkuli basin can be divided into three structural units, two depressions, and one uplift. Structural evolution of the Kumkuli basin can be divided into five evolution stages, including Kumkuli microcontinent formed in Sinian-Ordovician, suture around Kumkuli basin formed in Eopaleozoic, retroarc foreland basin formed in Neopaleozoic, rejuvenated foreland hasin developed in Mesozoic, and strike slip and compression basin developed in Cenozoic.

  15. Analysis of forward and backward Second Harmonic Generation images to probe the nanoscale structure of collagen within bone and cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houle, Marie-Andrée; Couture, Charles-André; Bancelin, Stéphane; Van der Kolk, Jarno; Auger, Etienne; Brown, Cameron; Popov, Konstantin; Ramunno, Lora; Légaré, François

    2015-11-01

    Collagen ultrastructure plays a central role in the function of a wide range of connective tissues. Studying collagen structure at the microscopic scale is therefore of considerable interest to understand the mechanisms of tissue pathologies. Here, we use second harmonic generation microscopy to characterize collagen structure within bone and articular cartilage in human knees. We analyze the intensity dependence on polarization and discuss the differences between Forward and Backward images in both tissues. Focusing on articular cartilage, we observe an increase in Forward/Backward ratio from the cartilage surface to the bone. Coupling these results to numerical simulations reveals the evolution of collagen fibril diameter and spatial organization as a function of depth within cartilage. PMID:26349534

  16. Quasi-crystalline geometry for architectural structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wester, Ture; Weinzieri, Barbara

    The quasi-crystal (QC) type of material was discovered in 1983 by Dan Schechtman from Technion, Haifa. This new crystalline structure of material broke totally with the traditional conception of crystals and geometry introducing non-periodic close packing of cells with fivefold symmetry in 3D spa...

  17. Role of polyols (erythritol, xylitol and sorbitol) on the structural stabilization of collagen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usha, R.; Raman, S. Sundar; Subramanian, V.; Ramasami, T.

    2006-10-01

    The effect of erythritol, xylitol and sorbitol on monomeric collagen solution was evaluated with melting temperature, fluorescence studies, conformational stability and binding energy. The emission intensity and the melting temperature increase as the chain length of polyols increases. Circular dichroism (CD) results indicate the possibility of aggregation of collagen in the presence of polyols. The interaction between collagen and polyols were calculated using binding energy, RMS deviation with collagen like models. Molecular mechanics calculations suggest that polyols bind well with collagen models, that have serine in the X position. The stability of collagen decreases as the number of carbon atoms present in the polyols increases.

  18. Type I collagen α-1 chain C-telopeptide: solution structure determined by 600-MHz proton NMR spectroscopy and implication for its role in collagen fibrillogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The solution conformation of the α-1 chain C-telopeptide has been studied by circular dichroism (CD) and 600-MHz 1H NMR spectroscopy in 60% CD3OH/40% H2O solution. The C-telopeptide contains 27 amino acids which form the C-terminal end of the α-1 collagen polypeptide chain. By the combined application of various two-dimensional, phase-sensitive NMR techniques (COSY, RELAY, NOESY, ROESY), a nearly complete assignment of all proton resonances was achieved. Furthermore, the backbone conformation could be established, on the basis of coupling constant and NOE data. The spectroscopic evidence indicates that large sections of the peptide exist in a nonrandom, extended conformation that there are two segments of higher mobility around the two Gly-Gly units in positions 2,3 and 20,21. Despite these hingelike, flexible sections no measurable fold-back of any of the extended parts was evident. On the basis of this structure, a model is proposed for the simultaneous interaction of the C-telopeptide with two adjacent collagen triple helices within the growing collagen fibril

  19. Advances in structural mechanics of Chinese ancient architectures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Maohong YU; Yoshiya ODA; Dongping FANG; Junhai ZHAO

    2008-01-01

    Chinese ancient architectures are valuable heritage of ancient culture of China. Many historical building have been preserved up to now. The researches on the structural mechanics of ancient architectures show the different aspects of structure and mechanics. Systematical studies on the structural mechanics of ancient architectures have been carried out at Xi'an Jiaotong University since 1982. It is related with the need of repair of some national preservation relics in Xi'an. These studies include: 1) Ancient wooden structures including three national preservation relics Arrow Tower at North City Gate, City Tower at East City Gate, and Baogao Temple in Ningbao, Zhejiang province. 2) Ancient tall masonry building, the Big Goose Pagoda and Small Goose Pagoda in Xi'an. 3) Mechanical characteristics of ancient soil under foundation and city wall; the influence of caves in and under the ancient City Wall on the stability of the wall. 4) The typical Chinese ancient building at the center of city: the Bell Tower and Drum tower. 5) The behavior of Dou-Gong and Joggle joint of Chinese ancient wooden structure. 6) The mechanical behavior of ancient soils under complex stress state. A new systematical strength theory, the unified strength theory, is used to analyze the stability of ancient city wall in Xi'an and foundation of tall pagoda built in Tang dynasty. These researches also concern differential settlements of Arrow Tower and resistance to earthquake of these historical architecture heritages. Some other studies are also introduced. This paper gives a summary of these researches. Preservation and research are nowadays an essential requirement for the famous monuments, buildings, towers and others. Our society is more and more conscious of this necessity, which involves increasing activities of restoration, and then sometimes also of repair, mechanical strengthening and seismic retrofitting. Many historical buildings have in fact problems of structural strength and

  20. Extracellular matrix of adipogenically differentiated mesenchymal stem cells reveals a network of collagen filaments, mostly interwoven by hexagonal structural units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, Mujib; Sittinger, Michael; Ringe, Jochen

    2013-01-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) is the non-cellular component of tissues, which not only provides biological shelter but also takes part in the cellular decisions for diverse functions. Every tissue has an ECM with unique composition and topology that governs the process of determination, differentiation, proliferation, migration and regeneration of cells. Little is known about the structural organization of matrix especially of MSC-derived adipogenic ECM. Here, we particularly focus on the composition and architecture of the fat ECM to understand the cellular behavior on functional bases. Thus, mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) were adipogenically differentiated, then, were transferred to adipogenic propagation medium, whereas they started the release of lipid droplets leaving bare network of ECM. Microarray analysis was performed, to indentify the molecular machinery of matrix. Adipogenesis was verified by Oil Red O staining of lipid droplets and by qPCR of adipogenic marker genes PPARG and FABP4. Antibody staining demonstrated the presence of collagen type I, II and IV filaments, while alkaline phosphatase activity verified the ossified nature of these filaments. In the adipogenic matrix, the hexagonal structures were abundant followed by octagonal structures, whereas they interwoven in a crisscross manner. Regarding molecular machinery of adipogenic ECM, the bioinformatics analysis revealed the upregulated expression of COL4A1, ITGA7, ITGA7, SDC2, ICAM3, ADAMTS9, TIMP4, GPC1, GPC4 and downregulated expression of COL14A1, ADAMTS5, TIMP2, TIMP3, BGN, LAMA3, ITGA2, ITGA4, ITGB1, ITGB8, CLDN11. Moreover, genes associated with integrins, glycoproteins, laminins, fibronectins, cadherins, selectins and linked signaling pathways were found. Knowledge of the interactive-language between cells and matrix could be beneficial for the artificial designing of biomaterials and bioscaffolds. PMID:23851162

  1. Structural cardboard: feasibility study of cardboard as a long-term structural material in architecture

    OpenAIRE

    Sekulic, Branko

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the feasibility of cardboard as a long-term structural material in architecture. Recent experiments with cardboard in architecture are based on assemble of structural elements with existing cardboard products, which are afterwards put to load tests. Obtained results are usually in lack of coherence, making difficult to have precise prediction of structural behavior on a long-term basis. On the other hand, information that comes from packaging industry d...

  2. Structure and formation of the twisted plywood pattern of collagen fibrils in rat lamellar bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Tsuneyuki; Hasegawa, Tomoka; Sasaki, Muneteru; Hongo, Hiromi; Tabata, Chihiro; Liu, Zhusheng; Li, Minqi; Amizuka, Norio

    2012-04-01

    This study was designed to elucidate details of the structure and formation process of the alternate lamellar pattern known to exist in lamellar bone. For this purpose, we examined basic internal lamellae in femurs of young rats by transmission and scanning electron microscopy, the latter employing two different macerations with NaOH at concentrations of 10 and 24%. Observations after the maceration with 10% NaOH showed that the regular and periodic rotation of collagen fibrils caused an alternation between two types of lamellae: one consisting of transversely and nearly transversely cut fibrils, and the other consisting of longitudinally and nearly longitudinally cut fibrils. This finding confirms the consistency of the twisted plywood model. The maceration method with 24% NaOH removed bone components other than cells, thus allowing for three-dimensional observations of osteoblast morphology. Osteoblasts extended finger-like processes paralleling the inner bone surface, and grouped in such a way that, within a group, the processes arranged in a similar direction. Transmission electron microscopy showed that newly deposited fibrils were arranged alongside these processes. For the formation of the alternating pattern, our findings suggest that: (1) osteoblasts control the collagen fibril arrangement through their finger-like process position; (2) osteoblasts behave similarly within a group; (3) osteoblasts move their processes synchronously and periodically to promote alternating different fibril orientation; and (4) this dynamic sequential deposition of fibrils results in the alternate lamellar (or twisted plywood) pattern. PMID:22362877

  3. Mechanical properties of collagen fibrils

    OpenAIRE

    Wenger, M. P. E.; Bozec, L.; Horton, M.A.; Mesquida, P

    2007-01-01

    The formation of collagen fibers from staggered subfibrils still lacks a universally accepted model. Determining the mechanical properties of single collagen fibrils ( diameter 50 - 200 nm) provides new insights into collagen structure. In this work, the reduced modulus of collagen was measured by nanoindentation using atomic force microscopy. For individual type 1 collagen fibrils from rat tail, the modulus was found to be in the range from 5 GPa to 11.5 GPa ( in air and at room temperature)...

  4. Recreation of architectural structures using procedural modeling based on volumes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santiago Barroso Juan

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available While the procedural modeling of buildings and other architectural structures has evolved very significantly in recent years, there is noticeable absence of high-level tools that allow a designer, an artist or an historian, creating important buildings or architectonic structures in a particular city. In this paper we present a tool for creating buildings in a simple and clear, following rules that use the language and methodology of creating their own buildings, and hiding the user the algorithmic details of the creation of the model.

  5. Structural insights into triple-helical collagen cleavage by matrix metalloproteinase 1

    OpenAIRE

    Manka, Szymon W; Carafoli, Federico; Visse, Robert; Bihan, Dominique; Raynal, Nicolas; Farndale, Richard W.; Murphy, Gillian; Enghild, Jan Johannes; Hohenester, Erhard; Nagase, Hideaki

    2012-01-01

    Collagenases of the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) family play major roles in morphogenesis, tissue repair, and human diseases, but how they recognize and cleave the collagen triple helix is not fully understood. Here, we report temperature-dependent binding of a catalytically inactive MMP-1 mutant (E200A) to collagen through the cooperative action of its catalytic and hemopexin domains. Contact between the two molecules was mapped by screening the Collagen Toolkit peptide library and by hydr...

  6. Structural and segregation analysis of the type II collagen gene (COL2A1) in some heritable chondrodysplasias.

    OpenAIRE

    Wordsworth, P; Ogilvie, D.; Priestley, L; Smith, R.; Wynne-Davies, R; Sykes, B

    1988-01-01

    Seventy-seven persons with a variety of heritable chondrodysplasias were screened for gross rearrangements of the structural gene encoding the major cartilage collagen, collagen II. None was found. Segregation of the locus (COL2A1) was studied in 19 pedigrees using three restriction site dimorphisms (shown by PvuII, HindIII, and BamHI) and a length polymorphism as linkage markers. Discordant segregation between COL2A1 and the mutant locus was seen in pedigrees with multiple epiphyseal dysplas...

  7. Structure and supramolecular architecture of membrane channel-forming peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spach, G; Duclohier, H; Molle, G; Valleton, J M

    1989-01-01

    Peptides gathering together to induce channels in lipid bilayers may be classified in several categories according to the spatial structures involved. For example, gramicidin A forms intramolecular tubes, alamethicin, bundles of helical rods with intermolecular pores, porins (being proteins, properly speaking) are rich in beta-sheets that may form barrels, whereas cyclic peptides might stack together resulting in the formation of pores. The chemical structure of these compounds is now well characterized. The transmembrane electrical signals that they transmit are also typical of the particular supramolecular configurations (or architecture). Investigations in this field are thus relevant to structure-function relationship studies due to the availability of natural or synthetic analogues allowing the measurement of the influence of physico-chemical parameters upon the energy profiles of the pores. Consequently, questions such as the existence and probabilities of conductance substrates, their voltage-dependence and their ion or molecular selectivity can be tackled. Today, the loosest aspect of these studies lies in the actual molecular conformations and architecture in the membranes of the peptide aggregates, the knowledge of which remains imprecise, even 'at rest' in the best-studied cases. This review attempts to point out still unresolved questions and to propose some plausible approaches concerning, for example: 1) the configurations of the molecular aggregates responsible for ion transfer; 2) the mechanisms for channel-opening and closing (gating); 3) the eventual cooperative phenomena between channels, via the bilayer or interfacial components. Possible applications of these structures will be tentatively outlined. PMID:2470416

  8. Structure of collagen adsorbed on a model implant surface resolved by polarization modulation infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Izabella; Habecker, Florian; Ahlers, Michael; Klüner, Thorsten

    2015-03-01

    The polarization modulation infrared reflection-absorption spectra of collagen adsorbed on a titania surface and quantum chemical calculations are used to describe components of the amide I mode to the protein structure at a sub-molecular level. In this study, imino acid rich and poor fragments, representing the entire collagen molecule, are taken into account. The amide I mode of the collagen triple helix is composed of three absorption bands which involve: (i) (∼1690cm(-1)) the CO stretching modes at unhydrated groups, (ii) (1655-1673cm(-1)) the CO stretching at carbonyl groups at imino acids and glycine forming intramolecular hydrogen bonds with H atoms at both NH2 and, unusual for proteins, CH2 groups at glycine at a neighbouring chain and (iii) (∼1640cm(-1)) the CO stretching at carbonyl groups forming hydrogen bonds between two, often charged, amino acids as well as hydrogen bonds to water along the entire helix. The IR spectrum of films prepared from diluted solutions (c<50μgml(-1)) corresponds to solution spectra indicating that native collagen molecules interact with water adsorbed on the titania surface. In films prepared from solutions (c⩾50μgml(-1)) collagen multilayers are formed. The amide I mode is blue-shifted by 18cm(-1), indicating that intramolecular hydrogen bonds at imino acid rich fragments are weakened. Simultaneous red-shift of the amide A mode implies that the strength of hydrogen bonds at the imino acid poor fragments increases. Theoretically predicted distortion of the collagen structure upon adsorption on the titania surface is experimentally confirmed. PMID:25498816

  9. Collagen and gelatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dasong; Nikoo, Mehdi; Boran, Gökhan; Zhou, Peng; Regenstein, Joe M

    2015-01-01

    Collagen and gelatin have been widely used in the food, pharmaceutical, and cosmetic industries due to their excellent biocompatibility, easy biodegradability, and weak antigenicity. Fish collagen and gelatin are of renewed interest, owing to the safety and religious concerns of their mammalian counterparts. The structure of collagen has been studied using various modern technologies, and interpretation of the raw data should be done with caution. The structure of collagen may vary with sources and seasons, which may affect its applications and optimal extraction conditions. Numerous studies have investigated the bioactivities and biological effects of collagen, gelatin, and their hydrolysis peptides, using both in vitro and in vivo assay models. In addition to their established nutritional value as a protein source, collagen and collagen-derived products may exert various potential biological activities on cells in the extracellular matrix through the corresponding food-derived peptides after ingestion, and this might justify their applications in dietary supplements and pharmaceutical preparations. Moreover, an increasing number of novel applications have been found for collagen and gelatin. Therefore, this review covers the current understanding of the structure, bioactivities, and biological effects of collagen, gelatin, and gelatin hydrolysates as well as their most recent applications. PMID:25884286

  10. Three-dimensional topology optimisation in architectural and structural design of concrete structures

    OpenAIRE

    DOMBERNOWSKY, Per; SØNDERGAARD, Asbjørn

    2009-01-01

    p. 1066-1077 The present paper proposes the application of topology optimisation software to generate topologically optimised building components in prestressed concrete, and the realisation of optimised shapes via large scale CNC-milling technology. Topology optimisation within architectural design holds a potential for simultaneously reducing material usage and evolving new structural morphologies that challenge the aesthetics of architectural appearance as well as the relate...

  11. Structural architecture of an RNA that competitively inhibits RNase L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keel, Amanda Y; Jha, Babal Kant; Kieft, Jeffrey S

    2012-01-01

    Activation of RNase L endonuclease activity is part of the mammalian innate immune response to viral infection. The poliovirus RNA genome contains a sequence in its protein-coding region that can act as a competitive inhibitor of RNase L. Mutation, sequence, and functional analysis of this competitive inhibitor RNA (ciRNA) revealed that its activity depends on specific sequences, showed that a loop-loop hairpin interaction forms in the ciRNA, and suggested the presence of a loop E motif. These features lead to the hypothesis that the ciRNA's function is conferred in part by a specific three-dimensional folded RNA architecture. By using a combination of biophysical, mutational, and functional studies, we have mapped features of the three-dimensional architecture of the ciRNA in its unbound form. We show that the loop-loop interaction forms in the free ciRNA and affects the overall structure, perhaps forming long-range tertiary interactions with the loop E motif. Local tight RNA-RNA backbone packing occurs in parts of the structure, but the fold appears to be less stable than many other tightly packed RNAs. This feature may allow the ciRNA to accommodate the translocation of ribosomes and polymerase across this multifunctional region of the viral RNA but also to function as an RNase L inhibitor. PMID:22114318

  12. DEPUTY:Analysing Architectural Structures and Checking Style

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    D.Gorshkov; J.P.Wellisch

    2001-01-01

    The DepUty(dependencies utility)can be classified as a project and process management tool.The main goal of DepUty is to assist by means of source code analysis and graphical representation using UML,in understanding dependencies of sub-systems and packages in CMS object Oriented software,to understand architectureal structure,and to schedule code release in modularised integration.It also allows a new-comer to more easily understand the global structure, of CMS software,and to void circular dependencies up-front or re-factor the code,in case it was already too close to the edge of non-maintainability.We will discuss the various views DepUty provides to analyse package dependencies and illustrate both the metrics and style checking facilities it provides.

  13. The architecture of cartilage: Elemental maps and scanning transmission ion microscopy/tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinert, Tilo; Reibetanz, Uta; Schwertner, Michael; Vogt, Jürgen; Butz, Tilman; Sakellariou, Arthur

    2002-04-01

    Articular cartilage is not just a jelly-like cover of the bone within the joints but a highly sophisticated architecture of hydrated macromolecules, collagen fibrils and cartilage cells. Influences on the physiological balance due to age-related or pathological changes can lead to malfunction and subsequently to degradation of the cartilage. Many activities in cartilage research are dealing with the architecture of joint cartilage but have limited access to elemental distributions. Nuclear microscopy is able to yield spatially resolved elemental concentrations, provides density information and can visualise the arrangement of the collagen fibres. The distribution of the cartilage matrix can be deduced from the elemental and density maps. The findings showed a varying content of collagen and proteoglycan between zones of different cell maturation. Zones of higher collagen content are characterised by aligned collagen fibres that can form tubular structures. Recently we focused on STIM tomography to investigate the three dimensional arrangement of the collagen structures.

  14. The architecture of cartilage: Elemental maps and scanning transmission ion microscopy/tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Articular cartilage is not just a jelly-like cover of the bone within the joints but a highly sophisticated architecture of hydrated macromolecules, collagen fibrils and cartilage cells. Influences on the physiological balance due to age-related or pathological changes can lead to malfunction and subsequently to degradation of the cartilage. Many activities in cartilage research are dealing with the architecture of joint cartilage but have limited access to elemental distributions. Nuclear microscopy is able to yield spatially resolved elemental concentrations, provides density information and can visualise the arrangement of the collagen fibres. The distribution of the cartilage matrix can be deduced from the elemental and density maps. The findings showed a varying content of collagen and proteoglycan between zones of different cell maturation. Zones of higher collagen content are characterised by aligned collagen fibres that can form tubular structures. Recently we focused on STIM tomography to investigate the three dimensional arrangement of the collagen structures

  15. Correlation Between Chain Architecture and Hydration Water Structure in Polysaccharides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossutti, Michael; Dutcher, John R

    2016-03-14

    The physical properties of confined water can differ dramatically from those of bulk water. Hydration water associated with polysaccharides provides a particularly interesting example of confined water, because differences in polysaccharide structure provide different spatially confined environments for water sorption. We have used attenuated total reflection infrared (ATR-IR) spectroscopy to investigate the structure of hydration water in films of three different polysaccharides under controlled relative humidity (RH) conditions. We compare the results obtained for films of highly branched, dendrimer-like phytoglycogen nanoparticles to those obtained for two unbranched polysaccharides, hyaluronic acid (HA), and chitosan. We find similarities between the water structuring in the two linear polysaccharides and significant differences for phytoglycogen. In particular, the results suggest that the high degree of branching in phytoglycogen leads to a much more well-ordered water structure (low density, high connectivity network water), indicating the strong influence of chain architecture on the structuring of water. These measurements provide unique insight into the relationship between the structure and hydration of polysaccharides, which is important for understanding and exploiting these sustainable nanomaterials in a wide range of applications. PMID:26859153

  16. A structured architecture for advanced plasma control experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent new and improved plasma control regimes have evolved from enhancements to the systems responsible for managing the plasma configuration on the DIII-D tokamak. The collection of hardware and software components designed for this purpose is known at DIII-D as the Plasma Control System or PCS. Several new user requirements have contributed to the rapid growth of the PCS. Experiments involving digital control of the plasma vertical position have resulted in the addition of new high performance processors to operate in real-time. Recent studies in plasma disruptions involving the use of neural network based software have resulted in an increase in the number of input diagnostic signals sampled. Better methods for estimating the plasma shape and position have brought about numerous software changes and the addition of several new code modules. Furthermore, requests for performing multivariable control and feedback on the current profile are continuing to add to the demands being placed on the PCS. To support all of these demands has required a structured yet flexible hardware and software architecture for maintaining existing capabilities and easily adding new ones. This architecture along with a general overview of the DIII-D Plasma Control System is described. In addition, the latest improvements to the PCS are presented

  17. A structured architecture for advanced plasma control experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penaflor, B.G.; Ferron, J.R.; Walker, M.L.

    1996-10-01

    Recent new and improved plasma control regimes have evolved from enhancements to the systems responsible for managing the plasma configuration on the DIII-D tokamak. The collection of hardware and software components designed for this purpose is known at DIII-D as the Plasma Control System or PCS. Several new user requirements have contributed to the rapid growth of the PCS. Experiments involving digital control of the plasma vertical position have resulted in the addition of new high performance processors to operate in real-time. Recent studies in plasma disruptions involving the use of neural network based software have resulted in an increase in the number of input diagnostic signals sampled. Better methods for estimating the plasma shape and position have brought about numerous software changes and the addition of several new code modules. Furthermore, requests for performing multivariable control and feedback on the current profile are continuing to add to the demands being placed on the PCS. To support all of these demands has required a structured yet flexible hardware and software architecture for maintaining existing capabilities and easily adding new ones. This architecture along with a general overview of the DIII-D Plasma Control System is described. In addition, the latest improvements to the PCS are presented.

  18. Complete genomic structure of mouse lysyl hydroxylase 2 and lysyl hydroxylase 3/collagen glucosyltransferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruotsalainen, H; Vanhatupa, S; Tampio, M; Sipilä, L; Valtavaara, M; Myllylä, R

    2001-04-01

    Lysyl hydroxylase is an enzyme involved in collagen biosynthesis, catalyzing the hydroxylation of lysyl residues as a post-translational event. Three isoforms have been characterized so far (LH1, LH2, LH3). Our recent findings indicate that LH3 possesses, not only lysyl hydroxylase activity, but also galactosylhydroxylysyl glucosyltransferase activity [Heikkinen et al., J. Biol. Chem. 275 (2000) 36158-36163]. We report here the characterization of mouse LH2 (Plod2) and LH3/glucosyltransferase (Plod3) genes. Plod2 spans approximately 50 kb of the genomic DNA, and is organized in 20 exons, one of the exons being alternatively spliced in the RNA processing. Plod3 spans approximately 10 kb of the genomic DNA, and contains 19 exons. Analysis of the 5' flanking region with many transcription start sites reveals the lack of a TATAA box in both genes. Sequence analysis indicated many retroposon-like elements within the Plod3 gene. A comparison was carried out among the LH1, LH2 and LH3 gene structures characterized so far from different species. PMID:11334715

  19. Correlation Between Chain Architecture and Hydration Water Structure in Polysaccharides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossutti, Michael; Dutcher, John

    The physical properties of confined water can differ dramatically from those of bulk water. Hydration water associated with polysaccharides provides a particularly important example of confined water, with differences in polysaccharide structure providing different spatially confined environments for water adsorption. We have used attenuated total reflection infrared (ATR-IR) spectroscopy to investigate the structure of hydration water in films of three different polysaccharides under controlled relative humidity (RH) conditions. We compare the results obtained for films of highly branched, monodisperse phytoglycogen nanoparticles to those obtained for two unbranched polysaccharides, hyaluronic acid (HA) and chitosan. We find similarities between water structuring in the two linear polysaccharides, and significant differences for phytoglycogen. In particular, the phytoglycogen nanoparticles exhibited high network water connectivity, and a large increase in the fraction of multimer water clusters with increasing RH, whereas the water structure for HA and chitosan was found to be insensitive to changes in RH. These measurements provide unique insight into the relationship between the chain architecture and hydration of polysaccharides.

  20. Evidence against the structural gene encoding type II collagen (COL2A1) as the mutant locus in achondroplasia.

    OpenAIRE

    Ogilvie, D.; Wordsworth, P; Thompson, E.; Sykes, B

    1986-01-01

    The structure of the locus encoding the major cartilage collagen gene (COL2A1) was studied in a total of 19 cases of achondroplasia. No gross rearrangements were seen. The segregation of COL2A1 was examined in three affected kindreds using restriction site and length variants as genetic markers. In two kindreds discordant segregation between the achondroplasia and COL2A1 loci was demonstrated. Paternity/maternity was confirmed using a 'minisatellite' core sequence probe which reveals cross hy...

  1. The chemical reactivity and structure of collagen studied by neutron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chemical reactivity of collagen can be studied using neutron diffraction (a non-destructive technique), for certain reaction types. Collagen contains a number of lysine and hydroxylysine side chains that can react with aldehydes and ketones, or these side chains can themselves be converted to aldehydes by lysyl oxidase. The reactivity of these groups not only has an important role in the maintenance of mechanical strength in collagen fibrils, but can also manifest pathologically in the cases of aging, diabetes (reactivity with a variety of sugars) and alcoholism (reactivity with acetaldehyde). The reactivity of reducing groups with collagen can be studied by neutron diffraction, since the crosslink formed in the adduction process is initially of a Schiff base or keto-imine nature. The nature of this crosslink allows it to be deuterated, and the position of this relatively heavy scattering atom can be used in a process of phase determination by multiple isomorphous replacement. This process was used to study the following: the position of natural crosslinks in collagen; the position of adducts in tendon from diabetic rats in vivo and the in vitro position of acetaidehyde adducts in tendon

  2. The chemical reactivity and structure of collagen studied by neutron diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wess, T.J.; Wess, L.; Miller, A. [Univ. of Stirling (United Kingdom)

    1994-12-31

    The chemical reactivity of collagen can be studied using neutron diffraction (a non-destructive technique), for certain reaction types. Collagen contains a number of lysine and hydroxylysine side chains that can react with aldehydes and ketones, or these side chains can themselves be converted to aldehydes by lysyl oxidase. The reactivity of these groups not only has an important role in the maintenance of mechanical strength in collagen fibrils, but can also manifest pathologically in the cases of aging, diabetes (reactivity with a variety of sugars) and alcoholism (reactivity with acetaldehyde). The reactivity of reducing groups with collagen can be studied by neutron diffraction, since the crosslink formed in the adduction process is initially of a Schiff base or keto-imine nature. The nature of this crosslink allows it to be deuterated, and the position of this relatively heavy scattering atom can be used in a process of phase determination by multiple isomorphous replacement. This process was used to study the following: the position of natural crosslinks in collagen; the position of adducts in tendon from diabetic rats in vivo and the in vitro position of acetaidehyde adducts in tendon.

  3. Type IV collagen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Type IV collagen is a highly specialized form of collagen found only in basement membranes. It is one of the major components of all basement membranes together with the glycoproteins laminin, nidogen, entactin, and heparan sulfate proteoglycan. Basement membranes are ubiquitous, thin, sheetlike structures found frequently under epithelial and endothelial cell linings but also surrounding many cell types such as muscle, nerve, and fat. They function as a selective filtration barrier for macromolecules, for example, in the kidney, blood--brain barrier, and placenta, but also separate extracellular matrix from epithelial or endothelial cell layers as in gut, skin, cornea, lung, and blood vessels. Indications that basement membranes contained a collagen came from X-ray studies of intact basement membranes as early as 1951. Later, hydroxyproline and then hydroxylysine were detected in amino acid compositions of whole basement membranes. Because of the insolubility of basement membrane components, attempts were made to solubilize the collagen using Pronase, a method that had proved useful for type I collagen. The material that was isolated and characterized was clearly different from the other interstitial collagens known at that time, i.e., α1(I), α1(II), and α1(III). Basement membrane collagen was therefore designated type IV collagen

  4. Characterisations of collagen-silver-hydroxyapatite nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciobanu, C. S.; Popa, C. L.; Petre, C. C.; Jiga, G.; Trusca, R.; Predoi, D.

    2016-05-01

    The XRD analysis were performed to confirm the formation of hydroxyapatite structure in collagen-silver-hydroxyapatite nanocomposites. The molecular interaction in collagen-hydroxyapatite nanocomposites was highlighted by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis. The SEM showed a nanostructure of collagen-silverhydroxyapatite nanocomposites composed of nano needle-like particles in a veil with collagen texture. The presence of vibrational groups characteristics to the hydroxyapatite structure in collagen-silver-hydroxyapatite (AgHApColl) nanocomposites was investigated by FTIR.

  5. An Integrated Architecture for Enhanced Structuring of Mobile Market Place

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amer Ali Sallam

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims at presenting an integrated architecture for mobile marketplace for efficient transaction and marketing using mobile devices and related infrastructure. This architecture deals with different components of mobile marketplace and it considering a new way of integrating different functionalities of mobile market place. .

  6. An Integrated Architecture for Enhanced Structuring of Mobile Market Place

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amer Ali Sallam

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims at presenting an integrated architecture for mobile marketplace for efficient transaction and marketing using mobile devices and related infrastructure. This architecture deals with different components of mobile marketplace and it considering a new way of integrating different functionalities of mobile market place. .

  7. Collagenous sprue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soendergaard, Christoffer; Riis, Lene Buhl; Nielsen, Ole Haagen

    2014-01-01

    Collagenous sprue is a rare clinicopathological condition of the small bowel. It is characterised by abnormal subepithelial collagen deposition and is typically associated with malabsorption, diarrhoea and weight loss. The clinical features of collagenous sprue often resemble those of coeliac...... disease and together with frequent histological findings like mucosal thinning and intraepithelial lymphocytosis the diagnosis may be hard to reach without awareness of this condition. While coeliac disease is treated using gluten restriction, collagenous sprue is, however, not improved by this...... intervention. In cases of diet-refractory 'coeliac disease' it is therefore essential to consider collagenous sprue to initiate treatment at an early stage to prevent the fibrotic progression. Here, we report a case of a 78-year-old man with collagenous sprue and present the clinical and histological...

  8. Bioinspired nanocomposite structures for bone tissue regeneration based on collagen, gelatin, polyamide and hydroxyapatite

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Suchý, Tomáš; Balík, Karel; Šupová, Monika; Hrušková, Daniela; Sucharda, Zbyněk; Černý, Martin; Sedláček, R.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 12, 89-91 (2009), s. 13-15. ISSN 1429-7248 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA106/09/1000 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30460519 Keywords : nanocomposite * bone regeneration * collagen Subject RIV: JI - Composite Materials

  9. Structure-activity relationships in the hydrophobic interactions of polyphenols with cellulose and collagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, H R; Covington, A D; Hancock, R A

    2003-10-01

    Polyphenol interactions with both cellulose and collagen in the solid state have been studied by using chromatography on cellulose and by evaluating the hydrothermal stability of the polyphenol treated sheepskin collagen. Twenty-four polyphenolic compounds were studied, including seven glucose-based gallotannins, five polyalcohol-based gallotannins, and twelve ellagitannins. In the cellulose-polyphenols systems, the polyphenol's affinity to cellulose is positively correlated with their molecular masses, the number of galloyl groups, and their hydrophobicity (logP). The polyphenol treatment increased the hydrothermal stability of collagen samples, and such effects are also positively correlated with the molecular masses, total number of galloyl groups and the hydrophobicity of polyphenols. Ellagitannins showed much weaker interactions with both biopolymers than gallotannins having similar molecular mass, the same number of galloyl groups, and the same number of phenolic hydroxyl groups. It is concluded that, for the polyphenol interactions with both cellulose and collagen, (1) the galloyl group of polyphenols is the functional group; (2) the strength of interactions are positively correlated with molecular size, the number of galloyl groups and the hydrophobicity of polyphenols; (3) the hydrophobic interactions are of great significance; and (4) the interactions are strongly dependent on the flexibility of galloyl groups. PMID:14579312

  10. A Novel Matrix Protein Hic31 from the Prismatic Layer of Hyriopsis Cumingii Displays a Collagen-Like Structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaojun Liu

    Full Text Available In this study, we clone and characterize a novel matrix protein, hic31, from the mantle of Hyriopsis cumingii. The amino acid composition of hic31 consists of a high proportion of Glycine residues (26.67%. Tissue expression detection by RT-PCR indicates that hic31 is expressed specifically at the mantle edge. In situ hybridization results reveals strong signals from the dorsal epithelial cells of the outer fold at the mantle edge, and weak signals from inner epithelial cells of the same fold, indicating that hic31 is a prismatic-layer matrix protein. Although BLASTP results identify no shared homology with other shell-matrix proteins or any other known proteins, the hic31 tertiary structure is similar to that of collagen I, alpha 1 and alpha 2. It has been well proved that collagen forms the basic organic frameworks in way of collagen fibrils and minerals present within or outside of these fibrils. Therefore, hic31 might be a framework-matrix protein involved in the prismatic-layer biomineralization. Besides, the gene expression of hic31 increase in the early stages of pearl sac development, indicating that hic31 may play important roles in biomineralization of the pearl prismatic layer.

  11. Influences of the Living World on Architectural Structures: An Analytical Insight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gülcan MİNSOLMAZ YELER

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Structures in the nature motivate innovation in architectural and engineering disciplines in termsof aesthetical, functional and structural advantages. Using efficient, lightweight structural forms similar tothose in nature reduces material and energy usage and waste amount. In this sense, it can be clearly seenthat based on learning from nature in relation to meeting gradually increasing and changing requirementsthrough limited resources and creating modern structural designs, biomimicry will provide much morecontribution on architecture and related fields. In this direction, in the study based on comprehensiveliterature research, lots of varying living organisms in the nature have been analyzed in terms of structure;architectural structures developed by inspiring from natural structures have been sampled and influencesof solutions inspired from nature on architectural environment have been focused.

  12. Reestablishment of three-dimensional cardiac tissue architecture in porous collagen scaffolds%在多孔胶原支架上构建三维工程的心肌组织

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘兴茂; 陈昭烈; 刘红; 吴本传; 熊福银; 胥照平

    2004-01-01

    equivalent for scientific studies and tissue repair. Biosynthetic constructs have been described that would replace or augment bone, cartilage, kidney, liver, neuronal tissue and skin.OBJECTIVE: To explore feasibility of porous collagen as three-dimensional cardiac scaffolds for tissue architecture.DESIGN: A non-randomized controlled experimental study.SETTING and PARTICIPANTS: The study was completed in the Institute of Biotechnology, Academy of Military Medical Sciences. Subjects were neonatal Wistar rats(1 day old, 8 - 10 g, clean grade) and adult Wistar (250 g) from the Laboratory Animal Center, Academy of Military Medical Sciences. Temperature and humidity of breeding were 22 - 26 ℃ and 40%- 60% respectively.INTERVENTIONS: Cardiac cells enzymatically digested from neonatal rats were seeded to three-dimensional porous collagen scaffolds and plastic plates. Metabolic characteristics of cardiac cells cultured between two culture modes were compared.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The specific consumption rate of glucose(qg1c), specific production rate of lactate(q1ac), lactate transform rate(Y1aac/g1c), creatine kinase(CK) and lactate dehydrogenase(LDH) activities of cardiac cells.RESULTS: The metabolic characteristic of cardiac cells cultured in collagen scaffolds was similar to that cultured in polystyrene plates in two-dimensional mode.CONCLUSION: Synchronous and rhythmical contractile tissue constructs in vitro can be formed by cultivation of cardiac cells on porous collagen scaffolds. Porous collagen can be used as scaffolds in cardiac tissue engineering.

  13. Cell Proliferation on Macro/Nano Surface Structure and Collagen Immobilization of 3D Polycaprolactone Scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Young-Ouk; Myung, Sung-Woon; Kook, Min-Suk; Jung, Sang-Chul; Kim, Byung-Hoon

    2016-02-01

    In this study, 3D polycaprolactone (PCL) scaffolds were fabricated by 3D printing technique. The macro/nano morphology of, 3D PCL scaffolds surface was etched with oxygen plasma. Acrylic acid (AA) plasma-polymerization was performed to functionalize the macro/nano surface with carboxyl groups and then collagen was immobilized with plasma-polymerized 3D PCL scaffolds. After O2 plasma and AA plasma-polymerization, contact angles were decreased. The FE-SEM and AFM results showed that O2 plasma is increased the surface roughness. The MTT assay results showed that proliferation of the M3CT3-E1 cells increased on the oxygen plasma treated and collagen immobilized 3D PCL scaffolds. PMID:27433597

  14. Study of the collagen structure in the superficial zone and physiological state of articular cartilage using a 3D confocal imaging technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Ming H

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The collagen structure in the superficial zone of articular cartilage is critical to the tissue's durability. Early osteoarthritis is often characterized with fissures on the articular surface. This is closely related to the disruption of the collagen network. However, the traditional histology can not offer visualization of the collagen structure in articular cartilage because it uses conventional optical microscopy that does not have insufficient imaging resolution to resolve collagen from proteoglycans in hyaline articular cartilage. This study examines the 3D collagen network of articular cartilage scored from 0 to 2 in the scoring system of International Cartilage Repair Society, and aims to develop a 3D histology for assessing early osteoarthritis. Methods Articular cartilage was visually classified into five physiological groups: normal cartilage, aged cartilage, cartilage with artificial and natural surface disruption, and fibrillated. The 3D collagen matrix of the cartilage was acquired using a 3D imaging technique developed previously. Traditional histology was followed to grade the physiological status of the cartilage in the scoring system of International Cartilage Repair Society. Results Normal articular cartilage contains interwoven collagen bundles near the articular surface, approximately within the lamina splendens. However, its collagen fibres in the superficial zone orient predominantly in a direction spatially oblique to the articular surface. With age and disruption of the articular surface, the interwoven collagen bundles are gradually disappeared, and obliquely oriented collagen fibres change to align predominantly in a direction spatially perpendicular to the articular surface. Disruption of the articular surface is well related to the disappearance of the interwoven collagen bundles. Conclusion A 3D histology has been developed to supplement the traditional histology and study the subtle changes in

  15. X-ray diffraction study into the effects of liming on the structure of collagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, Clark A; Wess, Tim J; Kennedy, Craig J

    2006-08-01

    The manufacture of parchment from animal skin involves processes that remove hair, fats, and other macromolecules. Although it is well understood that the collagen fibers "open up" during processing, this study uses small and wide-angle X-ray diffraction to measure quantitatively the changes induced at the nanoscopic and microscopic levels. The axial rise per residue distance within the collagen molecules is unaffected by salt and lime treatments. Salting of the hides appears to remove noncollagenous materials. The intermolecular lateral packing distance between the hydrated collagen molecules (1.4 nm) increases after salting ( approximately 1.5 nm) and liming ( approximately 1.55 nm); drying is responsible for a reduction to approximately 1.2 nm in all samples. The axial staggered array (d spacing) is reduced by 1 nm after liming and is unaffected by drying. The average fibril diameter increases from 103.2 to 114.5 nm following liming, and the fibril-to-fibril distance increases from 122.6 to 136.1 nm. PMID:16903677

  16. An equilibrium double-twist model for the radial structure of collagen fibrils

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Aidan I; Rutenberg, Andrew D

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian tissues contain networks and ordered arrays of collagen fibrils originating from the periodic self-assembly of helical 300 nm long tropocollagen complexes. The fibril radius is typically between 25 to 250 nm, and tropocollagen at the surface appears to exhibit a characteristic twist-angle with respect to the fibril axis. Similar fibril radii and twist-angles at the surface are observed in vitro, suggesting that these features are controlled by a similar self-assembly process. In this work, we propose a physical mechanism of equilibrium radius control for collagen fibrils based on a radially varying double-twist alignment of tropocollagen within a collagen fibril. The free-energy of alignment is similar to that of liquid crystalline blue phases, and we employ an analytic Euler-Lagrange and numerical free energy minimization to determine the twist-angle between the molecular axis and the fibril axis along the radial direction. Competition between the different elastic energy components, together with ...

  17. PHAGOCYTOSIS AND REMODELING OF COLLAGEN MATRICES

    OpenAIRE

    Abraham, Leah C.; Dice, J. Fred; Lee, Kyongbum; Kaplan, David L.

    2007-01-01

    The biodegradation of collagen and the deposition of new collagen-based extracellular matrices are of central importance in tissue remodeling and function. Similarly, for collagen-based biomaterials used in tissue engineering, the degradation of collagen scaffolds with accompanying cellular infiltration and generation of new extracellular matrix is critical for integration of in vitro grown tissues in vivo. In earlier studies we observed significant impact of collagen structure on primary lun...

  18. Type III Collagen, a Fibril Network Modifier in Articular Cartilage*

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Jiann-Jiu; Weis, Mary Ann; Kim, Lammy S.; Eyre, David R.

    2010-01-01

    The collagen framework of hyaline cartilages, including articular cartilage, consists largely of type II collagen that matures from a cross-linked heteropolymeric fibril template of types II, IX, and XI collagens. In the articular cartilages of adult joints, type III collagen makes an appearance in varying amounts superimposed on the original collagen fibril network. In a study to understand better the structural role of type III collagen in cartilage, we find that type III collagen molecules...

  19. Collagen macromolecular drug delivery systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this study was to examine collagen for use as a macromolecular drug delivery system by determining the mechanism of release through a matrix. Collagen membranes varying in porosity, crosslinking density, structure and crosslinker were fabricated. Collagen characterized by infrared spectroscopy and solution viscosity was determined to be pure and native. The collagen membranes were determined to possess native vs. non-native quaternary structure and porous vs. dense aggregate membranes by electron microscopy. Collagen monolithic devices containing a model macromolecule (inulin) were fabricated. In vitro release rates were found to be linear with respect to t1/2 and were affected by crosslinking density, crosslinker and structure. The biodegradation of the collagen matrix was also examined. In vivo biocompatibility, degradation and 14C-inulin release rates were evaluated subcutaneously in rats

  20. Collagen based polyurethanes—A review of recent advances and perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuber, Mohammad; Zia, Fatima; Zia, Khalid Mahmood; Tabasum, Shazia; Salman, Mahwish; Sultan, Neelam

    2015-09-01

    Collagen is mostly found in fibrous tissues such as tendons, ligaments and skin. Collagen makes up approximately 30% of the proteins within the body. These are tough and strong structures found all over the body: in bones, tendons and ligaments. Collagen being the most abundant protein provides tensile strength via cell matrix interactions to tissue architecture. Biomimetic materials of collagen origin gained wide spread acceptance in clinical applications. Vitamin C deficiency causes scurvy a serious and painful disease in which defective collagen prevents the formation of strong connective tissue, gums deteriorate and bleed, with loss of teeth; skin discolors, and wounds do not heal. Effective collagens prevent the manifestation of such disorders. Polyurethanes on the other hand are frequently used for various applications as they offered in wide-ranging of compositions, properties and complex structures. Collagen/PU bio-composites have potential array for biomedical applications. Considering versatile properties of the elongated fibrils and wide industrial and biomedical applications including biocompatibility of polyurethane, this review shed a light on collagen based polyurethane materials with their potential applications especially focusing the bio-medical field. PMID:26144910

  1. Magnesium Modifies the Structural Features of Enzymatically Mineralized Collagen Gels Affecting the Retraction Capabilities of Human Dermal Fibroblasts Embedded within This 3D System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Boraldi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Mineralized collagen gels have been developed as in vitro models to better understand the mechanisms regulating the calcification process and the behavior of a variety of cell types. The vast majority of data are related to stem cells and to osteoblast-like cells, whereas little information is available for dermal fibroblasts, although these cells have been associated with ectopic calcification and consequently to a number of pathological conditions. Therefore, we developed and characterized an enzymatically mineralized collagen gel in which fibroblasts were encapsulated within the 3D structure. MgCl2 was also added during gel polymerization, given its role as (i modulator of ectopic calcification; (ii component of biomaterials used for bone replacement; and (iii constituent of pathological mineral deposits. Results demonstrate that, in a short time, an enzymatically mineralized collagen gel can be prepared in which mineral deposits and viable cells are homogeneously distributed. MgCl2 is present in mineral deposits and significantly affects collagen fibril assembly and organization. Consequently, cell shape and the ability of fibroblasts to retract collagen gels were modified. The development of three-dimensional (3D mineralized collagen matrices with both different structural features and mineral composition together with the use of fibroblasts, as a prototype of soft connective tissue mesenchymal cells, may pave new ways for the study of ectopic calcification.

  2. The collagen structure of equine articular cartilage, characterized using polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugryumova, Nadya; Attenburrow, Don P.; Winlove, C. Peter; Matcher, Stephen J.

    2005-08-01

    Optical coherence tomography and polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography images of equine articular cartilage are presented. Measurements were made on intact joint surfaces. Significant (e.g. × 2) variations in the intrinsic birefringence were found over spatial scales of a few millimetres, even on samples taken from young (18 month) animals that appeared visually homogeneous. A comparison of data obtained on a control tissue (equine flexor tendon) further suggests that significant variations in the orientation of the collagen fibres relative to the plane of the joint surface exist. Images of visually damaged cartilage tissue show characteristic features both in terms of the distribution of optical scatterers and of the birefringent components.

  3. Structure and pathogenicity of antibodies specific for citrullinated collagen type II in experimental arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uysal, Hüseyin; Bockermann, Robert; Nandakumar, Kutty S;

    2009-01-01

    Antibodies to citrulline-modified proteins have a high diagnostic value in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, their biological role in disease development is still unclear. To obtain insight into this question, a panel of mouse monoclonal antibodies was generated against a major triple helical...... collagen type II (CII) epitope (position 359-369; ARGLTGRPGDA) with or without arginines modified by citrullination. These antibodies bind cartilage and synovial tissue, and mediate arthritis in mice. Detection of citrullinated CII from RA patients' synovial fluid demonstrates that cartilage-derived CII is...

  4. The collagen structure of equine articular cartilage, characterized using polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Optical coherence tomography and polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography images of equine articular cartilage are presented. Measurements were made on intact joint surfaces. Significant (e.g. x 2) variations in the intrinsic birefringence were found over spatial scales of a few millimetres, even on samples taken from young (18 month) animals that appeared visually homogeneous. A comparison of data obtained on a control tissue (equine flexor tendon) further suggests that significant variations in the orientation of the collagen fibres relative to the plane of the joint surface exist. Images of visually damaged cartilage tissue show characteristic features both in terms of the distribution of optical scatterers and of the birefringent components

  5. Controlled Rate Freezing to Regulate the Structure of Collagen-GAG Scaffolds in Engineered Skin Substitutes

    OpenAIRE

    Lloyd, Christopher; Besse, John; Boyce, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Controlled rate freezing (CRF) of biopolymer scaffolds may increase reproducibility of microstructure compared to analog processes. Freezing of collagen-glycosaminoglycan (CG) scaffolds by CRF with liquid nitrogen at chamber cooling rates of −80°C, −40°C, −20°C, or −10°C/min, was compared to submersion in 95% ethanol at −55°C. Cooling rates of −80°C/min or −40°C/min generated scaffolds with pore areas and pore fractions that were comparable to scaffolds frozen in ethanol. Test and control sca...

  6. Effect of geometrical structure on drug release rate of a three-dimensionally perforated porous apatite/collagen composite cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuka, Makoto; Nakagawa, Hidenori; Ito, Atsuo; Higuchi, William I

    2010-01-01

    To improve the biocompatibility, inter-connective pore structure, and drug delivery ability of self-setting apatite/collagen composite cement (ACC), a three-dimensionally perforated porous apatite/collagen composite cement (TPPACC) containing 3% indomethacin (IMC) was obtained in an arranged multi-cross with 20, 40, and 60 stainless steel needlelike male dies, and stored and hardened at 37 degrees C and 100% relative humidity for 24 h. The mean radius of micro-pores of the TPPACC was evaluated to be 0.125 microm by mercury porosimetry. X-ray powder diffraction and FT-IR spectroscopy suggested that TPPACC consisted of carbonated apatite and had a structure similar to that of natural rat bone. The IMC release rates from a TPPACC block containing the drug were measured in simulated body fluid. The rate of release increased with the number of macro-pores that from planar surface matrix systems followed the Higuchi equation. The relationship between the Higuchi constant and surface area of TPPACC showed a straight line with K = 0.2123 and R(2) = 0.9892. These results indicated that the rate of drug release from TPPACC could be controlled by the number of macro-pores for bone cells. PMID:19821491

  7. Biology, chemistry and pathology of collagen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleischmajer, R.; Olsen, B.R.; Kuhn, K.

    1985-01-01

    This book consists of five parts and a section of poster papers. Some of the articles are: Structure of the Type II Collagen Gene; Structural and Functional Analysis of the Genes for ..cap alpha..2(1) and ..cap alpha..1(III) collagens; Structure and Expression of the Collagen Genes of C. Elegans; Molecular Basis of Clinical Heterogeneity in the Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome; and Normal and Mutant Human Collagen Genes.

  8. Time-evolving collagen-like structural fibers in soft tissues: biaxial loading and spherical inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topol, Heiko; Demirkoparan, Hasan; Pence, Thomas J.; Wineman, Alan

    2016-05-01

    This work considers a previously developed constitutive theory for the time dependent mechanical response of fibrous soft tissue resulting from the time dependent remodeling of a collagen fiber network that is embedded in a ground substance matrix. The matrix is taken to be an incompressible nonlinear elastic solid. The remodeling process consists of the continual dissolution of existing fibers and the creation of new fibers. Motivated by experimental reports on the enzyme degradation of collagen fibers, the remodeling is governed by first order chemical kinetics such that the dissolution rate is dependent upon the fiber stretch. The resulting time dependent mechanical response is sensitive to the natural configuration of the fibers when they are created, and different assumptions on the nature of the fiber's stress free state are considered here. The response under biaxial loading, a type of loading that has particular significance for the characterization of biological materials, is studied. The inflation of a spherical membrane is then analyzed in terms of the equal biaxial stretch that occurs in the membrane approximation. Different assumptions on the natural configuration of the fibers, combined with their time dependent dissolution and reforming, are shown to emulate alternative forms of creep and relaxation response. This formal similarity to viscoelastic phenomena occurs even though the underlying mechanisms are fundamentally different from the mechanism of macromolecular reconfiguration that one typically associates with viscoelastic response.

  9. Efficient VLSI Architecture For CSD Basedsub-Band Tree Structure Using 4-Tap Filter

    OpenAIRE

    Radhe Kant Mishra,; Dr. Subbaratnam Kumar

    2014-01-01

    A sub-band tree structure hardware design based on canonic signed digit (CSD) architecture is presented in this paper. We have proposed based on canonic signed digit (CSD) arithmetic for low complexity and efficient implementation of sub-band tree structure. The canonic signed digit (CSD) technique has been applied to reduce the number of full adders required by 2’s complement based deigns. This architecture is suitable for high speed on-line applications. With this architectu...

  10. Scaffold architecture and fibrin gels promote meniscal cell proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stability of the knee relies on the meniscus, a complex connective tissue with poor healing ability. Current meniscal tissue engineering is inadequate, as the signals for increasing meniscal cell proliferation have not been established. In this study, collagen scaffold structure, isotropic or aligned, and fibrin gel addition were tested. Metabolic activity was promoted by fibrin addition. Cellular proliferation, however, was significantly increased by both aligned architectures and fibrin addition. None of the constructs impaired collagen type I production or triggered adverse inflammatory responses. It was demonstrated that both fibrin gel addition and optimized scaffold architecture effectively promote meniscal cell proliferation

  11. Scaffold architecture and fibrin gels promote meniscal cell proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pawelec, K. M., E-mail: pawelec.km@gmail.com, E-mail: jw626@cam.ac.uk; Best, S. M.; Cameron, R. E. [Cambridge Centre for Medical Materials, Materials Science and Metallurgy Department, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0FS (United Kingdom); Wardale, R. J., E-mail: pawelec.km@gmail.com, E-mail: jw626@cam.ac.uk [Division of Trauma and Orthopaedic Surgery, Department of Surgery, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 2QQ (United Kingdom)

    2015-01-01

    Stability of the knee relies on the meniscus, a complex connective tissue with poor healing ability. Current meniscal tissue engineering is inadequate, as the signals for increasing meniscal cell proliferation have not been established. In this study, collagen scaffold structure, isotropic or aligned, and fibrin gel addition were tested. Metabolic activity was promoted by fibrin addition. Cellular proliferation, however, was significantly increased by both aligned architectures and fibrin addition. None of the constructs impaired collagen type I production or triggered adverse inflammatory responses. It was demonstrated that both fibrin gel addition and optimized scaffold architecture effectively promote meniscal cell proliferation.

  12. Computer architecture evaluation for structural dynamics computations: Project summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standley, Hilda M.

    1989-01-01

    The intent of the proposed effort is the examination of the impact of the elements of parallel architectures on the performance realized in a parallel computation. To this end, three major projects are developed: a language for the expression of high level parallelism, a statistical technique for the synthesis of multicomputer interconnection networks based upon performance prediction, and a queueing model for the analysis of shared memory hierarchies.

  13. Cell Alignment Driven by Mechanically Induced Collagen Fiber Alignment in Collagen/Alginate Coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaubaroux, Christophe; Perrin-Schmitt, Fabienne; Senger, Bernard; Vidal, Loïc; Voegel, Jean-Claude; Schaaf, Pierre; Haikel, Youssef; Boulmedais, Fouzia; Lavalle, Philippe; Hemmerlé, Joseph

    2015-09-01

    For many years it has been a major challenge to regenerate damaged tissues using synthetic or natural materials. To favor the healing processes after tendon, cornea, muscle, or brain injuries, aligned collagen-based architectures are of utmost interest. In this study, we define a novel aligned coating based on a collagen/alginate (COL/ALG) multilayer film. The coating exhibiting a nanofibrillar structure is cross-linked with genipin for stability in physiological conditions. By stretching COL/ALG-coated polydimethylsiloxane substrates, we developed a versatile method to align the collagen fibrils of the polymeric coating. Assays on cell morphology and alignment were performed to investigate the properties of these films. Microscopic assessments revealed that cells align with the stretched collagen fibrils of the coating. The degree of alignment is tuned by the stretching rate (i.e., the strain) of the COL/ALG-coated elastic substrate. Such coatings are of great interest for strategies that require aligned nanofibrillar biological material as a substrate for tissue engineering. PMID:25658028

  14. Common interruptions in the repeating tripeptide sequence of non-fibrillar collagens: Sequence analysis and structural studies on triple-helix peptide models

    OpenAIRE

    Thiagarajan, Geetha; Li, Yingjie; Mohs, Angela; Strafaci, Christopher; Popiel, Magdalena; Baum, Jean; Brodsky, Barbara

    2007-01-01

    Interruptions in the repeating (Gly-X1-X2)n amino acid sequence pattern are found in the triple-helix domains of all non-fibrillar collagens, and perturbations to the triple-helix at such sites are likely to play a role in collagen higher order structure and function. This report defines the sequence features and structural consequences of the most common interruption, where one residue is missing in the tripeptide pattern, Gly-X1-X2-Gly-AA1-Gly-X1-X2, designated as G1G interruptions. Residue...

  15. From mechanical loading to collagen synthesis, structural changes and function in human tendon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, M; Langberg, H; Heinemeier, K;

    2009-01-01

    animal and human models where insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-I) and transforming growth factor-beta-1 (TGF-beta-1) expression increases to accompany or precede an increase in procollagen expression and collagen synthesis. In humans, it can be demonstrated that an increase in the interstitial...... concentration of TGF-beta, PGE2, IGF-I plus its binding proteins and interleukin-6 takes place after exercise. The increase in IGF-I expression in tendon includes the isoform that has so far been thought only to exist in skeletal muscle (mechano growth factor). The increase in IGF-I and procollagen expression...... tissue compared with contractile elements of skeletal muscle or the heart, and only with very prolonged loading are significant changes in gross dimensions of the tendon observed, suggesting that habitual loading is associated with a robust change in the size and mechanical properties of human tendons...

  16. Structural architecture of an RNA that competitively inhibits RNase L

    OpenAIRE

    Keel, Amanda Y.; Jha, Babal Kant; Kieft, Jeffrey S.

    2012-01-01

    Activation of RNase L endonuclease activity is part of the mammalian innate immune response to viral infection. The poliovirus RNA genome contains a sequence in its protein-coding region that can act as a competitive inhibitor (ciRNA) of RNase L, the first example of an RNA that directly inhibits the activity of an RNase. By using a combination of biophysical, mutational, and functional studies, the authors have mapped features of the three-dimensional architecture of the ciRNA in its unbound...

  17. Structural strategies and measures reducing flood action on architectural heritage

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Drdácký, Miloš; Slížková, Zuzana

    Southampton: WIT Press, 2012 - (Brebia, C.; Popov, V.), s. 249-260. ( Information and Communication Technologies. 44). ISBN 978-1-84564-620-2. ISSN 1743-3517. [International Conference on Risk Analysis and Hazard Mitigation 2012 /8./. Brac (HR), 19.09.2012-21.09.2012] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0060 Grant ostatní: Evropská komise(XE) CHEF-SSPI-044251 Institutional support: RVO:68378297 Keywords : cultural heritage protection * flood damage * preventive measures Subject RIV: AL - Art, Architecture, Cultural Heritage http://library.witpress.com/pages/PaperInfo.asp?PaperID=23946

  18. Acceleration of bone union after structural bone grafts with a collagen-binding basic fibroblast growth factor anchored-collagen sheet for critical-size bone defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bone allografts are commonly used for the repair of critical-size bone defects. However, the loss of cellular activity in processed grafts markedly reduces their healing potential compared with autografts. To overcome this obstacle, we developed a healing system for critical-size bone defects that consists of overlaying an implanted bone graft with a collagen sheet (CS) loaded with basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) fused to the collagen-binding domain derived from a Clostridium histolyticum collagenase (CB-bFGF). In a murine femoral defect model, defect sites treated with CS/CB-bFGF had a significantly larger callus volume than those treated with CS/native bFGF. In addition, treatment with CS/CB-bFGF resulted in the rapid formation of a hard callus bridge and a larger total callus volume at the host–graft junction than treatment with CS/bFGF. Our results suggest that the combined use of CS and CB-bFGF helps accelerate the union of allogenic bone grafts. (paper)

  19. First principles structures and circular dichroism spectra for the close-packed and the 7/2 motif of collagen

    CERN Document Server

    Jalkanen, Karl J; Knapp-Mohammady, Michaela; Bohr, Jakob

    2012-01-01

    The recently proposed close-packed motif for collagen is investigated using first principles semi-empirical wave function theory and Kohn-Sham density functional theory. Under these refinements the close-packed motif is shown to be stable. For the case of the 7/2 motif a similar stability exists. The electronic circular dichroism of the close-packed model has a significant negative bias and a large signal. An interesting feature of the close-packed structure is the existence of a central channel. Simulations show that, if hydrogen atoms are placed in the cavity, a chain of molecular hydrogens is formed suggesting a possible biological function for molecular hydrogen.

  20. Binary Morphology With Spatially Variant Structuring Elements: Algorithm and Architecture

    OpenAIRE

    Hedberg, Hugo; Dokladal, Petr; Öwall, Viktor

    2009-01-01

    Mathematical morphology with spatially variant structuring elements outperforms translation-invariant structuring elements in various applications and has been studied in the literature over the years. However, supporting a variable structuring element shape imposes an overwhelming computational complexity, dramatically increasing with the size of the structuring element. Limiting the supported class of structuring elements to rectangles has allowed for a fast algorithm to be developed, which...

  1. Gregarious Data Re-structuring in a Many Core Architecture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shrestha, Sunil; Manzano Franco, Joseph B.; Marquez, Andres; Zuckerman, Stephane; Song, Shuaiwen; Gao, Guang R.

    2015-08-24

    this paper, we have developed a new methodology that takes in consideration the access patterns from a single parallel actor (e.g. a thread), as well as, the access patterns of “grouped” parallel actors that share a resource (e.g. a distributed Level 3 cache). We start with a hierarchical tile code for our target machine and apply a series of transformations at the tile level to improve data residence in a given memory hierarchy level. The contribution of this paper includes (a) collaborative data restructuring for group reuse and (b) low overhead transformation technique to improve access pattern and bring closely connected data elements together. Preliminary results in a many core architecture, Tilera TileGX, shows promising improvements over optimized OpenMP code (up to 31% increase in GFLOPS) and over our own previous work on fine grained runtimes (up to 16%) for selected kernels

  2. The Nature of Tectonic Architecture and Structural Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carter, Adrian; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning; Tyrrell, Roger

    2013-01-01

    “A desire for well-being must be fundamental to all architecture if we are to achieve harmony between the spaces we create and the activities to be undertaken in them. This is quite simple and reasonable. It requires an ability to create harmony from all the de-mands made by the undertaking...... of the machine itself as the source of reference early in the 20th century. However, with our more recent understanding of the actual complexity of mathematics, as expressed in chaos theory and fractals, increasing understanding of complex natural systems, and the evolution of computer technology into a web...... of neural networks, our perception of the world has progressed from a purely mechanistic perspective towards a more organic understanding of existence, and once more, both literal and metaphoric references to nature are gaining pre-eminence. Historically, literal and metaphoric evocations of nature have...

  3. The Yersinia adhesin YadA collagen-binding domain structure is a novel left-handed parallel beta-roll.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nummelin, Heli; Merckel, Michael C; Leo, Jack C; Lankinen, Hilkka; Skurnik, Mikael; Goldman, Adrian

    2004-02-25

    The crystal structure of the recombinant collagen-binding domain of Yersinia adhesin YadA from Yersinia enterocolitica serotype O:3 was solved at 1.55 A resolution. The trimeric structure is composed of head and neck regions, and the collagen binding head region is a novel nine-coiled left-handed parallel beta-roll. Before the beta-roll, the polypeptide loops from one monomer to the rest, and after the beta-roll the neck region does the same, making the transition from the globular head region to the narrower stalk domain. This creates an intrinsically stable 'lock nut' structure. The trimeric form of YadA is required for collagen binding, and mutagenesis of its surface residues allowed identification of a putative collagen-binding surface. Furthermore, a new structure-sequence motif for YadA beta-roll was used to identify putative YadA-head-like domains in a variety of human and plant pathogens. Such domains may therefore be a common bacterial strategy for avoiding host response. PMID:14765110

  4. Collagen in organ development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardman, P.; Spooner, B. S.

    1992-01-01

    It is important to know whether microgravity will adversely affect developmental processes. Collagens are macromolecular structural components of the extracellular matrix (ECM) which may be altered by perturbations in gravity. Interstitial collagens have been shown to be necessary for normal growth and morphogenesis in some embryonic organs, and in the mouse salivary gland, the biosynthetic pattern of these molecules changes during development. Determination of the effects of microgravity on epithelial organ development must be preceded by crucial ground-based studies. These will define control of normal synthesis, secretion, and deposition of ECM macromolecules and the relationship of these processes to morphogenesis.

  5. Influences of the Living World on Architectural Structures: An Analytical Insight

    OpenAIRE

    Gülcan MİNSOLMAZ YELER

    2015-01-01

    Structures in the nature motivate innovation in architectural and engineering disciplines in termsof aesthetical, functional and structural advantages. Using efficient, lightweight structural forms similar tothose in nature reduces material and energy usage and waste amount. In this sense, it can be clearly seenthat based on learning from nature in relation to meeting gradually increasing and changing requirementsthrough limited resources and creating modern structural designs, biomimicry wil...

  6. Femoral bone mesoscale structural architecture prediction using musculoskeletal and finite element modelling

    OpenAIRE

    Phillips, A T M; Villette, C.; Modenese, L.

    2015-01-01

    Through much of the anatomical and clinical literature bone is studied with a focus on its structural architecture, while it is rare for bone to be modelled using a structural mechanics as opposed to a continuum mechanics approach in the engineering literature. A novel mesoscale structural model of the femur is presented in which truss and shell elements are used to represent trabecular and cortical bone, respectively. Structural optimisation using a strain-based bone adaptation algorithm is ...

  7. The Yersinia adhesin YadA collagen-binding domain structure is a novel left-handed parallel β-roll

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nummelin, Heli; Merckel, Michael C; Leo, Jack C; Lankinen, Hilkka; Skurnik, Mikael; Goldman, Adrian

    2004-01-01

    The crystal structure of the recombinant collagen-binding domain of Yersinia adhesin YadA from Yersinia enterocolitica serotype O:3 was solved at 1.55 Å resolution. The trimeric structure is composed of head and neck regions, and the collagen binding head region is a novel nine-coiled left-handed parallel β-roll. Before the β-roll, the polypeptide loops from one monomer to the rest, and after the β-roll the neck region does the same, making the transition from the globular head region to the narrower stalk domain. This creates an intrinsically stable ‘lock nut' structure. The trimeric form of YadA is required for collagen binding, and mutagenesis of its surface residues allowed identification of a putative collagen-binding surface. Furthermore, a new structure–sequence motif for YadA β-roll was used to identify putative YadA-head-like domains in a variety of human and plant pathogens. Such domains may therefore be a common bacterial strategy for avoiding host response. PMID:14765110

  8. The architectural network for protein secondary structure prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anindya Sundar Panja

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Over the past 25 years, the accuracy of proteins secondary structure prediction has improved substantially. Recently evolutionary information taken from the deviation of proteins in some structural family have again enhance prediction accuracy for all these residues predicted correctly is in one of the three sates helix, strands and others . The new methods developed over the past few years may be interesting in context of improvements which is achieved through combination of the existing methods. Evolutionary divergences profile posses’ adequate information to improve protein secondary structure prediction accuracy. These profiles can also able to correctly predict long stretches of identical residues in other secondary structure. This sequence structure relationship may help to help to developed tool which can efficiently predict the protein secondary structure from its amino acid sequence

  9. Mass spectrometry in structural biology and biophysics architecture, dynamics, and interaction of biomolecules

    CERN Document Server

    Kaltashov, Igor A; Desiderio, Dominic M; Nibbering, Nico M

    2012-01-01

    The definitive guide to mass spectrometry techniques in biology and biophysics The use of mass spectrometry (MS) to study the architecture and dynamics of proteins is increasingly common within the biophysical community, and Mass Spectrometry in Structural Biology and Biophysics: Architecture, Dynamics, and Interaction of Biomolecules, Second Edition provides readers with detailed, systematic coverage of the current state of the art. Offering an unrivalled overview of modern MS-based armamentarium that can be used to solve the most challenging problems in biophysics, structural biol

  10. Efficient Multicriteria Protein Structure Comparison on Modern Processor Architectures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Anuj; Manolakos, Elias S

    2015-01-01

    Fast increasing computational demand for all-to-all protein structures comparison (PSC) is a result of three confounding factors: rapidly expanding structural proteomics databases, high computational complexity of pairwise protein comparison algorithms, and the trend in the domain towards using multiple criteria for protein structures comparison (MCPSC) and combining results. We have developed a software framework that exploits many-core and multicore CPUs to implement efficient parallel MCPSC in modern processors based on three popular PSC methods, namely, TMalign, CE, and USM. We evaluate and compare the performance and efficiency of the two parallel MCPSC implementations using Intel's experimental many-core Single-Chip Cloud Computer (SCC) as well as Intel's Core i7 multicore processor. We show that the 48-core SCC is more efficient than the latest generation Core i7, achieving a speedup factor of 42 (efficiency of 0.9), making many-core processors an exciting emerging technology for large-scale structural proteomics. We compare and contrast the performance of the two processors on several datasets and also show that MCPSC outperforms its component methods in grouping related domains, achieving a high F-measure of 0.91 on the benchmark CK34 dataset. The software implementation for protein structure comparison using the three methods and combined MCPSC, along with the developed underlying rckskel algorithmic skeletons library, is available via GitHub. PMID:26605332

  11. Intelligent Interface Architectures for Folksonomy Driven Structure Network

    CERN Document Server

    Mas, Massimiliano Dal

    2012-01-01

    The folksonomy is the result of free personal information or assignment of tags to an object (determined by the URI) in order to find them. The practice of tagging is done in a collective environment. Folksonomies are self constructed, based on co-occurrence of definitions, rather than a hierarchical structure of the data. The downside of this was that a few sites and applications are able to successfully exploit the sharing of bookmarks. The need for tools that are able to resolve the ambiguity of the definitions is becoming urgent as the need of simple instruments for their visualization, editing and exploitation in web applications still hinders their diffusion and wide adoption. An intelligent interactive interface design for folksonomies should consider the contextual design and inquiry based on a concurrent interaction for a perceptual user interfaces. To represent folksonomies a new concept structure called "Folksodriven" is used in this paper. While it is presented the Folksodriven Structure Network (...

  12. Stromal matrix metalloprotease-13 knockout alters Collagen I structure at the tumor-host interface and increases lung metastasis of C57BL/6 syngeneic E0771 mammary tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matrix metalloproteases and collagen are key participants in breast cancer, but their precise roles in cancer etiology and progression remain unclear. MMP13 helps regulate collagen structure and has been ascribed largely harmful roles in cancer, but some studies demonstrate that MMP13 may also protect against tumor pathology. Other studies indicate that collagen’s organizational patterns at the breast tumor-host interface influence metastatic potential. Therefore we investigated how MMP13 modulates collagen I, a principal collagen subtype in breast tissue, and affects tumor pathology and metastasis in a mouse model of breast cancer. Tumors were implanted into murine mammary tissues, and their growth analyzed in Wildtype and MMP13 KO mice. Following extraction, tumors were analyzed for collagen I levels and collagen I macro- and micro-structural properties at the tumor-host boundary using immunocytochemistry and two-photon and second harmonic generation microscopy. Lungs were analyzed for metastases counts, to correlate collagen I changes with a clinically significant functional parameter. Statistical analyses were performed by t-test, analysis of variance, or Wilcoxon-Mann–Whitney tests as appropriate. We found that genetic ablation of host stromal MMP13 led to: 1. Increased mammary tumor collagen I content, 2. Marked changes in collagen I spatial organization, and 3. Altered collagen I microstructure at the tumor-host boundary, as well as 4. Increased metastasis from the primary mammary tumor to lungs. These results implicate host MMP13 as a key regulator of collagen I structure and metastasis in mammary tumors, thus making it an attractive potential therapeutic target by which we might alter metastatic potential, one of the chief determinants of clinical outcome in breast cancer. In addition to identifying stromal MMP13 is an important regulator of the tumor microenvironment and metastasis, these results also suggest that stromal MMP13 may protect against

  13. Efficient Multicriteria Protein Structure Comparison on Modern Processor Architectures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anuj Sharma

    2015-01-01

    F-measure of 0.91 on the benchmark CK34 dataset. The software implementation for protein structure comparison using the three methods and combined MCPSC, along with the developed underlying rckskel algorithmic skeletons library, is available via GitHub.

  14. Structural architecture of the central Brooks Range foothills, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Thomas E.; Potter, Christopher J.; O'Sullivan, Paul B.

    2002-01-01

    Five structural levels underlie the Brooks Range foothills, from lowest to highest: (1) autochthon, at a depth of ~9 km; (2) Endicott Mountains allochthon (EMA), thickest under the northern Brooks Range (>15 km) and wedging out northward above the autochthon; (3) higher allochthons (HA), with a composite thickness of 1.5+ km, wedging out northward at or beyond the termination of EMA; (4) Aptian-Albian Fortress Mountain Formation (FM), deposited unconformably on deformed EMA and HA and thickening northward into a >7-km-thick succession of deformed turbidites (Torok Formation); (5) gently folded Albian-Cenomanian deltaic deposits (Nanushuk Group). The dominant faulting pattern in levels 2-3 is thin-skinned thrusting and thrust-related folds formed before deposition of Cretaceous strata. These structures are cut by younger steeply south-dipping reverse faults that truncate and juxtapose structural levels 1-4 and expose progressively deeper structural levels to the south. Structural levels 4-5 are juxtaposed along a north-dipping zone of south-vergent folds and thrusts. Stratigraphic and fission-track age data suggest a kinematic model wherein the foothills belt was formed first, by thrusting of HA and EMA as deformational wedges onto the regionally south-dipping authochon at 140-120Ma. After deposition of FM and Torok during mid-Cretaceous hinterland extension and uplift, a second episode of contractional deformation at 60 Ma shortened the older allochthonous deformational wedges (EMA, HA) and overlying strata on north-vergent reverse faults. To the north, where the allochthons wedge out, shortening caused duplexing in the Torok and development of a triangle zone south of the Tuktu escarpment.

  15. In vitro formation and thermal transition of novel hybrid fibrils from type I fish scale collagen and type I porcine collagen

    OpenAIRE

    Song Chen, Toshiyuki Ikoma, Nobuhiro Ogawa, Satoshi Migita, Hisatoshi Kobayashi and Nobutaka Hanagata

    2010-01-01

    Novel type I collagen hybrid fibrils were fabricated by neutralizing a mixture of type I fish scale collagen solution and type I porcine collagen solution with a phosphate buffer saline at 28 °C. Their structure was discussed in terms of the volume ratio of fish/porcine collagen solution. Scanning electron and atomic force micrographs showed that the diameter of collagen fibrils derived from the collagen mixture was larger than those derived from each collagen, and all resultant fibrils exhib...

  16. Collagen-like peptides and peptide-polymer conjugates in the design of assembled materials

    OpenAIRE

    Luo, Tianzhi; Kiick, Kristi L.

    2013-01-01

    Collagen is the most abundant protein in mammals, and there has been long-standing interest in understanding and controlling collagen assembly in the design of new materials. Collagen-like peptides (CLP), also known as collagen-mimetic peptides (CMP) or collagen-related peptides (CRP), have thus been widely used to elucidate collagen triple helix structure as well as to produce higher-order structures that mimic natural collagen fibers. This mini-review provides an overview of recent progress...

  17. Exclusion of the alpha 1(II) collagen structural gene as the mutant locus in type II Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Wordsworth, P; Ogilvie, D.; Smith, R.; Sykes, B

    1985-01-01

    We have used a high frequency site polymorphism within the human pro-alpha 1(II) collagen gene (COL2A1) in order to examine the segregation of this gene within a large pedigree with type II Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS). The EDS gene and the collagen gene segregate independently within the pedigree and therefore COL2A1 can be excluded as the mutant locus.

  18. In vitro study of vancomycin release and osteoblast-like cell growth on structured calcium phosphate-collagen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pon-On, Weeraphat, E-mail: wponun@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Kasetsart University, Bangkok 10900 (Thailand); Charoenphandhu, Narattaphol; Teerapornpuntakit, Jarinthorn; Thongbunchoo, Jirawan; Krishnamra, Nateetip [Center of Calcium and Bone Research, Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Department of Physiology, Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Tang, I-Ming [ThEP Center, Commission of Higher Education. 328 Si Ayuthaya Rd., Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand)

    2013-04-01

    A drug delivery vehicle consisting of spherical calcium phosphate-collagen particles covered by flower-like (SFCaPCol) blossoms composed of nanorod building blocks and their cellular response is studied. The spherical structure was achieved by a combination of sonication and freeze-drying. The SFCaPCol blossoms have a high surface area of approximately 280 m{sup 2}g{sup −1}. The blossom-like formation having a high surface area allows a drug loading efficiency of 77.82%. The release profile for one drug, vancomycin (VCM), shows long term sustained release in simulated body fluid (SBF), in a phosphate buffer saline (PBS, pH 7.4) solution and in culture media over 2 weeks with a cumulative release ∼ 53%, 75% and 50%, respectively, over the first 7 days. The biocompatibility of the VCM-loaded SFCaPCol scaffold was determined by in vitro cell adhesion and proliferation tests of rat osteoblast-like UMR-106 cells. MTT tests indicated that UMR-106 cells were viable after exposure to the VCM loaded SFCaPCol, meaning that the scaffold (the flower-like blossoms) did not impair the cell's viability. The density of cells on the substrate was seen to increase with increasing cultured time. - Graphical abstract: A spherical calcium phosphate-collagen with flower-like blossoms consisting of nanorod building blocks (SFCaPCol) particles was achieved by a combination of sonication and freeze-drying. In vitro drug release profile and the biocompatibility of the VCM-loaded SFCaPCol composite cell adhesion and proliferation in rat osteoblast-like UMR-106 cells were determined for biomaterial applications. Highlights: ► SFCaPCol and VCM-loaded SFCaPCol composite were synthesized by a combination of ultra sonication and freeze-drying. ► VCM drug-loaded SFCaPCol composite was used as substrate for the growth of rat osteoblast-like UMR-106 cells. ► Controlled release of VCM from the composite is critically medium dependent. ► The VCM-loaded SFCaPCol composite is also

  19. In vitro study of vancomycin release and osteoblast-like cell growth on structured calcium phosphate-collagen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A drug delivery vehicle consisting of spherical calcium phosphate-collagen particles covered by flower-like (SFCaPCol) blossoms composed of nanorod building blocks and their cellular response is studied. The spherical structure was achieved by a combination of sonication and freeze-drying. The SFCaPCol blossoms have a high surface area of approximately 280 m2g−1. The blossom-like formation having a high surface area allows a drug loading efficiency of 77.82%. The release profile for one drug, vancomycin (VCM), shows long term sustained release in simulated body fluid (SBF), in a phosphate buffer saline (PBS, pH 7.4) solution and in culture media over 2 weeks with a cumulative release ∼ 53%, 75% and 50%, respectively, over the first 7 days. The biocompatibility of the VCM-loaded SFCaPCol scaffold was determined by in vitro cell adhesion and proliferation tests of rat osteoblast-like UMR-106 cells. MTT tests indicated that UMR-106 cells were viable after exposure to the VCM loaded SFCaPCol, meaning that the scaffold (the flower-like blossoms) did not impair the cell's viability. The density of cells on the substrate was seen to increase with increasing cultured time. - Graphical abstract: A spherical calcium phosphate-collagen with flower-like blossoms consisting of nanorod building blocks (SFCaPCol) particles was achieved by a combination of sonication and freeze-drying. In vitro drug release profile and the biocompatibility of the VCM-loaded SFCaPCol composite cell adhesion and proliferation in rat osteoblast-like UMR-106 cells were determined for biomaterial applications. Highlights: ► SFCaPCol and VCM-loaded SFCaPCol composite were synthesized by a combination of ultra sonication and freeze-drying. ► VCM drug-loaded SFCaPCol composite was used as substrate for the growth of rat osteoblast-like UMR-106 cells. ► Controlled release of VCM from the composite is critically medium dependent. ► The VCM-loaded SFCaPCol composite is also bioactive by in vitro

  20. Type I Collagen and Collagen Mimetics as Angiogenesis Promoting Superpolymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Twardowski, T.; Fertala, A.; Orgel, J.P.R.O.; San Antonio, J.D. (TJU); (IIT); (Widener)

    2008-07-18

    Angiogenesis, the development of blood vessels from the pre-existing vasculature, is a key component of embryogenesis and tissue regeneration. Angiogenesis also drives pathologies such as tumor growth and metastasis, and hemangioma development in newborns. On the other hand, promotion of angiogenesis is needed in tissues with vascular insufficiencies, and in bioengineering, to endow tissue substitutes with appropriate microvasculatures. Therefore, much research has focused on defining mechanisms of angiogenesis, and identifying pro- and anti-angiogenic molecules. Type I collagen, the most abundant protein in humans, potently stimulates angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo. Crucial to its angiogenic activity appears to be ligation and possibly clustering of endothelial cell (EC) surface {alpha}1{beta}1/{alpha}2{beta}1 integrin receptors by the GFPGER502-507 sequence of the collagen fibril. However, additional aspects of collagen structure and function that may modulate its angiogenic properties are discussed. Moreover, type I collagen and fibrin, another angiogenic polymer, share several structural features. These observations suggest strategies for creating 'angiogenic superpolymers', including: modifying type I collagen to influence its biological half-life, immunogenicity, and integrin binding capacity; genetically engineering fibrillar collagens to include additional integrin binding sites or angiogenic determinants, and remove unnecessary or deleterious sequences without compromising fibril integrity; and exploring the suitability of poly(ortho ester), PEG-lysine copolymer, tubulin, and cholesteric cuticle as collagen mimetics, and suggesting means of modifying them to display ideal angiogenic properties. The collagenous and collagen mimetic angiogenic superpolymers described here may someday prove useful for many applications in tissue engineering and human medicine.

  1. Intelligent Interface Architectures for Folksonomy Driven Structure Network

    OpenAIRE

    Mas, Massimiliano Dal

    2012-01-01

    The folksonomy is the result of free personal information or assignment of tags to an object (determined by the URI) in order to find them. The practice of tagging is done in a collective environment. Folksonomies are self constructed, based on co-occurrence of definitions, rather than a hierarchical structure of the data. The downside of this was that a few sites and applications are able to successfully exploit the sharing of bookmarks. The need for tools that are able to resolve the ambigu...

  2. Unusual Glycosaminoglycans from a Deep Sea Hydrothermal Bacterium Improve Fibrillar Collagen Structuring and Fibroblast Activities in Engineered Connective Tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Guezennec

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Biopolymers produced by marine organisms can offer useful tools for regenerative medicine. Particularly, HE800 exopolysaccharide (HE800 EPS secreted by a deep-sea hydrothermal bacterium displays an interesting glycosaminoglycan-like feature resembling hyaluronan. Previous studies demonstrated its effectiveness to enhance in vivo bone regeneration and to support osteoblastic cell metabolism in culture. Thus, in order to assess the usefulness of this high-molecular weight polymer in tissue engineering and tissue repair, in vitro reconstructed connective tissues containing HE800 EPS were performed. We showed that this polysaccharide promotes both collagen structuring and extracellular matrix settle by dermal fibroblasts. Furthermore, from the native HE800 EPS, a low-molecular weight sulfated derivative (HE800 DROS displaying chemical analogy with heparan-sulfate, was designed. Thus, it was demonstrated that HE800 DROS mimics some properties of heparan-sulfate, such as promotion of fibroblast proliferation and inhibition of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP secretion. Therefore, we suggest that the HE800EPS family can be considered as an innovative biotechnological source of glycosaminoglycan-like compounds useful to design biomaterials and drugs for tissue engineering and repair.

  3. Using enterprise architecture to analyse how organisational structure impact motivation and learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Närman, Pia; Johnson, Pontus; Gingnell, Liv

    2016-06-01

    When technology, environment, or strategies change, organisations need to adjust their structures accordingly. These structural changes do not always enhance the organisational performance as intended partly because organisational developers do not understand the consequences of structural changes in performance. This article presents a model-based analysis framework for quantitative analysis of the effect of organisational structure on organisation performance in terms of employee motivation and learning. The model is based on Mintzberg's work on organisational structure. The quantitative analysis is formalised using the Object Constraint Language (OCL) and the Unified Modelling Language (UML) and implemented in an enterprise architecture tool.

  4. Mineralization of the metre-long biosilica structures of glass sponges is templated on hydroxylated collagen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ehrlich, Hermann; Deutzmann, Rainer; Brunner, Eike;

    2010-01-01

    of the first skeletal silica-based structures, and the origin of multicellular animals. We have studied anchoring spicules from the metre-long stalk of the glass rope sponge (Hyalonema sieboldi; Porifera, Class Hexactinellida), which are remarkable for their size, durability, flexibility and optical...

  5. Effect of estrogen on tendon collagen synthesis, tendon structural characteristics, and biomechanical properties in postmenopausal women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, M.; Kongsgaard, M; Holm, Lars;

    2009-01-01

    The knowledge about the effect of estradiol on tendon connective tissue is limited. Therefore, we studied the influence of estradiol on tendon synthesis, structure, and biomechanical properties in postmenopausal women. Nonusers (control, n = 10) or habitual users of oral estradiol replacement the...

  6. System engineering in the Nuclear Regulatory Commission licensing process: Program architecture process and structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In October 1987, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) established the Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses at Southwest Research Institute in San Antonio, Texas. The overall mission of the center is to provide a sustained level of high-quality research and technical assistance in support of NRC regulatory responsibilities under the Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA). A key part of that mission is to assist the NRC in the development of the program architecture - the systems approach to regulatory analysis for the NRC high-level waste repository licensing process - and the development and implementation of the computer-based Program Architecture Support System (PASS). This paper describes the concept of program architecture, summarizes the process and basic structure of the PASS relational data base, and describes the applications of the system

  7. Detection of architectural distortion and analysis of mammary gland structure in mammograms using multiple gabor filters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Architectural distortion is one of the most important findings in screening mammograms. Since this finding is related to the risk of malignancy and a poor prognosis, improvement of the detection rate is strongly desired. In this paper, we propose a novel method for detecting architectural distortion by analyzing mammary gland structure using multiple Gabor filters. In our method, multiple Gabor filters with different characteristics are applied, and the filter that matches the mammary gland structure is selected. Then, the degree of concentration is calculated using a filter output image, and a candidate region of spicula and traction of the mammary gland structure caused by the architectural distortion is obtained. In the experiments, we compared the results of the proposed method against interpretation by a physician using 22 images of 6 cases in a digital database of screening mammograms. The results showed a true positive rate of 80% with 1.06 false positives per image. We conclude that this initial candidate detection method for architectural distortion provides an acceptable level of performance. (author)

  8. Structural organization of the human type VII collagen gene (COL7A1), composed of more exons than any previously characterized gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christiano, A.M.; Chung-Honet, L.C.; Greenspan, D.S.; Hoffman, G.G.; Lee, S.; Cheng, W. (Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)); Uitto, J. (Thomas Jefferson Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States))

    1994-05-01

    The human type VII collagen (COL7A1) gene is the locus for mutations in at least some cases of dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa. Here the authors describe the entire intron/exon organization of COL7A1, which is shown to have 118 exons, more than any previously described gene. Despite this complexity, COL7A1 is compact. Consisting of 31,132 bp from transcription start site to polyadenylation site, it is only about three times the size of type VII collagen mRNA. Thus, COL7A1 introns are small. A 71-nucleotide COL7A1 intron is the smallest intron yet reported in a collagen gene, and only one COL7A1 intron is greater than 1 kb in length. All exons in the COL7A1 triple helix coding region that do not begin with sequences corresponding to imperfections of the triple helix begin with intact codons for Gly residues of Gly-X-Y repeats. This is reminiscent of the structure of fibrillar rather than other nonfibrillar collagen genes. In addition, the COL7A1 triple helix coding region contains many exons of recurring sizes (e.g., 25 exons are 36 bp, 12 exons are 45 bp, 8 exons are 63 bp), suggesting an evolutionary origin distinct from those of other nonfibrillar collagen genes. Sequences from the 5[prime] portion of COL7A1 are presented along with the 3766-bp intergenic sequence, which separated COL7A1 from the upstream gene encoding the core I protein of the cytochrome bc[sub 1] complex. The COL7A1 promoter region is found to lack extensive homologies with promoter regions of other genes expressed primarily in skin. 60 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Type I Collagen Structure Regulates Cell Morphology and EGF Signaling in Primary Rat Hepatocytes through cAMP-dependent Protein Kinase A

    OpenAIRE

    Fassett, John; Tobolt, Diane; Hansen, Linda K.

    2006-01-01

    Adhesion to type 1 collagen elicits different responses dependent on whether the collagen is in fibrillar (gel) or monomeric form (film). Hepatocytes adherent to collagen film spread and proliferate, whereas those adherent to collagen gel remain rounded and growth arrested. To explore the role of potential intracellular inhibitory signals responsible for collagen gel-mediated growth arrest, cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) was examined in hepatocytes adherent to collagen film or gel. PKA...

  10. Scalla: Structured Cluster Architecture for Low Latency Access

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanushevsky, Andrew; Wang, Daniel L.; /SLAC

    2012-03-20

    Scalla is a distributed low-latency file access system that incorporates novel techniques that minimize latency and maximize scalability over a large distributed system with a distributed namespace. Scalla's techniques have shown to be effective in nearly a decade of service for the high-energy physics community using commodity hardware and interconnects. We describe the two components used in Scalla that are instrumental in its ability to provide low-latency, fault-tolerant name resolution and load distribution, and enable its use as a high-throughput, low-latency communication layer in the Qserv system, the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope's (LSST's) prototype astronomical query system. Scalla arguably exceeded its three main design objectives: low latency, scaling, and recoverability. In retrospect, these objectives were met using a simple but effective design. Low latency was met by uniformly using linear or constant time algorithms in all high-use paths, avoiding locks whenever possible, and using compact data structures to maximize the memory caching efficiency. Scaling was achieved by architecting the system as a 64-ary tree. Nodes can be added easily and as the number of nodes increases, search performance increases at an exponential rate. Recoverability is inherent in that no permanent state information is maintained and whatever state information is needed it can be quickly constructed or reconstructed in real time. This allows dynamic changes in a cluster of servers with little impact on over-all performance or usability. Today, Scalla is being deployed in environments and for uses that were never conceived in 2001. This speaks well for the systems adaptability but the underlying reason is that the system can meet its three fundamental objectives at the same time.

  11. Chromatin Structure and Dynamics in Hot Environments: Architectural Proteins and DNA Topoisomerases of Thermophilic Archaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Visone

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In all organisms of the three living domains (Bacteria, Archaea, Eucarya chromosome-associated proteins play a key role in genome functional organization. They not only compact and shape the genome structure, but also regulate its dynamics, which is essential to allow complex genome functions. Elucidation of chromatin composition and regulation is a critical issue in biology, because of the intimate connection of chromatin with all the essential information processes (transcription, replication, recombination, and repair. Chromatin proteins include architectural proteins and DNA topoisomerases, which regulate genome structure and remodelling at two hierarchical levels. This review is focussed on architectural proteins and topoisomerases from hyperthermophilic Archaea. In these organisms, which live at high environmental temperature (>80 °C <113 °C, chromatin proteins and modulation of the DNA secondary structure are concerned with the problem of DNA stabilization against heat denaturation while maintaining its metabolic activity.

  12. An original architectured NiTi silicone rubber structure for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, T; Le Cam, J-B; Chagnon, G; Favier, D; Rebouah, M; Razan, F; Robin, E; Didier, P; Heller, L; Faure, S; Janouchova, K

    2014-12-01

    This paper deals with composite structures for biomedical applications. For this purpose, an architectured tubular structure composed of Nickel Titanium (NiTi) Shape Memory Alloy (SMA) and silicone rubber was fabricated. One of the main interests of such structures is to ensure a good adhesion between its two constitutive materials. A previous study of the authors (Rey et al., 2014) has shown that the adhesion between NiTi and silicone rubber can be improved by an adhesion promoter or plasma treatment. However, adhesion promoters are often not biocompatible. Hence, plasma treatment is favored to be used in the present study. Three different gases were tested; air, argon and oxygen. The effects of these treatments on the maximum force required to pull-out a NiTi wire from the silicone rubber matrix were investigated by means of pull-out tests carried out with a self-developed device. Among the three gases, a higher maximum force was obtained for argon gas in the plasma treatment. A tube shaped architectured NiTi/silicone rubber structure was then produced using this treatment. The composite was tested by means of a bulge test. Results open a new way of investigations for architectured NiTi-silicone structures for biomechanical applications. PMID:25491818

  13. Fibrillogenesis in Continuously Spun Synthetic Collagen Fiber

    OpenAIRE

    Caves, Jeffrey M.; Kumar, Vivek A.; Wen, Jing; Cui, Wanxing; Martinez, Adam; Apkarian, Robert; Coats, Julie E.; Berland, Keith; Chaikof, Elliot L.

    2010-01-01

    The universal structural role of collagen fiber networks has motivated the development of collagen gels, films, coatings, injectables, and other formulations. However, reported synthetic collagen fiber fabrication schemes have either culminated in short, discontinuous fiber segments at unsuitably low production rates, or have incompletely replicated the internal fibrillar structure that dictates fiber mechanical and biological properties. We report a continuous extrusion system with an off-li...

  14. Ionic solutes impact collagen scaffold bioactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawelec, K M; Husmann, A; Wardale, R J; Best, S M; Cameron, R E

    2015-02-01

    The structure of ice-templated collagen scaffolds is sensitive to many factors. By adding 0.5 wt% of sodium chloride or sucrose to collagen slurries, scaffold structure could be tuned through changes in ice growth kinetics and interactions of the solute and collagen. With ionic solutes (sodium chloride) the entanglements of the collagen molecule decreased, leading to fibrous scaffolds with increased pore size and decreased attachment of chondrocytes. With non-ionic solutes (sucrose) ice growth was slowed, leading to significantly reduced pore size and up-regulated cell attachment. This highlights the large changes in structure and biological function stimulated by solutes in ice-templating systems. PMID:25649518

  15. An Ultrastructural Analysis of Collagen in Tissue Engineered Arteries

    OpenAIRE

    Dahl, Shannon L. M.; Vaughn, Megann E.; Niklason, Laura E.

    2007-01-01

    Collagen is the structural molecule that is most correlated with strength in blood vessels. In this study, we compared the properties of collagen in engineered and native blood vessels. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to image sections of engineered and native arteries. Band periodicities of engineered and native collagen fibrils indicated that spacing between collagen molecules was similar in engineered and native tissues. Engineered arteries, however, had thinner collagen fi...

  16. Platelet receptor recognition and cross-talk in collagen-induced activation of platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farndale, R W; Slatter, D A; Siljander, P R-M; Jarvis, G E

    2007-07-01

    Comprehensive mapping of protein-binding sites within human collagen III has allowed the recognition motifs for integrin alpha(2)beta(1) and VWF A3 domain to be identified. Glycoprotein VI-binding sites are understood, although less well defined. This information, together with recent developments in understanding collagen fiber architecture, and crystal structures of the receptor collagen-binding domains, allows a coherent model for the interaction of collagen with the platelet surface to be developed. This complements our understanding of the orchestration of receptor presentation by membrane microdomains, such that the polyvalent collagen surface may stabilize signaling complexes within the heterogeneous receptor composition of the lipid raft. The ensuing interactions lead to the convergence of signals from each of the adhesive receptors, mediated by FcR gamma-chain and/or FcgammaRIIa, leading to concerted and co-operative platelet activation. Each receptor has a shear-dependent role, VWF/GpIb essential at high shear, and alpha(2)beta(1) at low and intermediate shear, whilst GpVI provides core signals that contribute to enhanced integrin affinity, tighter binding to collagen and consequent platelet activation. PMID:17635730

  17. Integration of Structural Knowledge in Design Studio Project: Assessment Study of Curriculum In Architecture Course in University Of Malaya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aniza Abdul Aziz

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Architectural education should advance in parallel with the industrial growth of building technology. Universities as producers of future architects have yet to develop curriculums for building technology to suit the growth of the building industry. This gap between education and industrial growth has been a topic of debate for many researchers who are concerned about architectural pedagogy. Architectural instruction further aggravated the problem whereby in most architectural schools worldwide, teaching is divided between the design studio, where the design projects are taught and lecture classes where the technical parts are taught. The latter should be integrated with design studio to enhance design levels. Students face difficulty integrating and applying the structural knowledge gained from structure classes into their design. One explanation for this deficiency is because the current architectural structure subject's content is borrowed from an engineering syllabus. This study will examine the course content, instruction styles and method of teaching structure subjects and will investigate the learning outcomes of design studio through students' performance and perception in integrating structural knowledge in their design projects. Respondents were students from Year 1 to Year 5 doing their Bachelor of Science in Architecture and Bachelor of Architecture degrees in University of Malaya. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with the design studio coordinators and structure lecturers. This study aims to find the ideal course content/method of teaching to facilitate more integration between structure and design studio.

  18. Development of a structured observational method for the systematic assessment of school food-choice architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozturk, Orgul D; McInnes, Melayne M; Blake, Christine E; Frongillo, Edward A; Jones, Sonya J

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study is to develop a structured observational method for the systematic assessment of the food-choice architecture that can be used to identify key points for behavioral economic intervention intended to improve the health quality of children's diets. We use an ethnographic approach with observations at twelve elementary schools to construct our survey instrument. Elements of the structured observational method include decision environment, salience, accessibility/convenience, defaults/verbal prompts, number of choices, serving ware/method/packaging, and social/physical eating environment. Our survey reveals important "nudgeable" components of the elementary school food-choice architecture, including precommitment and default options on the lunch line. PMID:26654767

  19. In vitro formation and thermal transition of novel hybrid fibrils from type I fish scale collagen and type I porcine collagen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Song; Ogawa, Nobuhiro; Migita, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Hisatoshi [Biomaterials Center, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Ikoma, Toshiyuki [Department of Metallurgy and Ceramics Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology, O-okayama 2-12-1, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Hanagata, Nobutaka, E-mail: HANAGATA.Nobutaka@nims.go.j [Nanotechnology Innovation Center, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan)

    2010-06-15

    Novel type I collagen hybrid fibrils were fabricated by neutralizing a mixture of type I fish scale collagen solution and type I porcine collagen solution with a phosphate buffer saline at 28 {sup 0}C. Their structure was discussed in terms of the volume ratio of fish/porcine collagen solution. Scanning electron and atomic force micrographs showed that the diameter of collagen fibrils derived from the collagen mixture was larger than those derived from each collagen, and all resultant fibrils exhibited a typical D-periodic unit of {approx}67 nm, irrespective of volume ratio of both collagens. Differential scanning calorimetry revealed only one endothermic peak for the fibrils derived from collagen mixture or from each collagen solution, indicating that the resultant collagen fibrils were hybrids of type I fish scale collagen and type I porcine collagen.

  20. In vitro formation and thermal transition of novel hybrid fibrils from type I fish scale collagen and type I porcine collagen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Chen, Toshiyuki Ikoma, Nobuhiro Ogawa, Satoshi Migita, Hisatoshi Kobayashi and Nobutaka Hanagata

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Novel type I collagen hybrid fibrils were fabricated by neutralizing a mixture of type I fish scale collagen solution and type I porcine collagen solution with a phosphate buffer saline at 28 °C. Their structure was discussed in terms of the volume ratio of fish/porcine collagen solution. Scanning electron and atomic force micrographs showed that the diameter of collagen fibrils derived from the collagen mixture was larger than those derived from each collagen, and all resultant fibrils exhibited a typical D-periodic unit of ~67 nm, irrespective of volume ratio of both collagens. Differential scanning calorimetry revealed only one endothermic peak for the fibrils derived from collagen mixture or from each collagen solution, indicating that the resultant collagen fibrils were hybrids of type I fish scale collagen and type I porcine collagen.

  1. In vitro formation and thermal transition of novel hybrid fibrils from type I fish scale collagen and type I porcine collagen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Song; Ikoma, Toshiyuki; Ogawa, Nobuhiro; Migita, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Hisatoshi; Hanagata, Nobutaka

    2010-06-01

    Novel type I collagen hybrid fibrils were fabricated by neutralizing a mixture of type I fish scale collagen solution and type I porcine collagen solution with a phosphate buffer saline at 28 °C. Their structure was discussed in terms of the volume ratio of fish/porcine collagen solution. Scanning electron and atomic force micrographs showed that the diameter of collagen fibrils derived from the collagen mixture was larger than those derived from each collagen, and all resultant fibrils exhibited a typical D-periodic unit of ~67 nm, irrespective of volume ratio of both collagens. Differential scanning calorimetry revealed only one endothermic peak for the fibrils derived from collagen mixture or from each collagen solution, indicating that the resultant collagen fibrils were hybrids of type I fish scale collagen and type I porcine collagen.

  2. In vitro formation and thermal transition of novel hybrid fibrils from type I fish scale collagen and type I porcine collagen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novel type I collagen hybrid fibrils were fabricated by neutralizing a mixture of type I fish scale collagen solution and type I porcine collagen solution with a phosphate buffer saline at 28 0C. Their structure was discussed in terms of the volume ratio of fish/porcine collagen solution. Scanning electron and atomic force micrographs showed that the diameter of collagen fibrils derived from the collagen mixture was larger than those derived from each collagen, and all resultant fibrils exhibited a typical D-periodic unit of ∼67 nm, irrespective of volume ratio of both collagens. Differential scanning calorimetry revealed only one endothermic peak for the fibrils derived from collagen mixture or from each collagen solution, indicating that the resultant collagen fibrils were hybrids of type I fish scale collagen and type I porcine collagen.

  3. 3D Structural Patterns in Scalable, Elastomeric Scaffolds Guide Engineered Tissue Architecture

    OpenAIRE

    Kolewe, Martin E.; Park, Hyoungshin; Gray, Caprice; Ye, Xiaofeng; Langer, Robert; Freed, Lisa E.

    2013-01-01

    Microfabricated elastomeric scaffolds with 3D structural patterns are created by semi-automated layer-by-layer assembly of planar polymer sheets with through-pores. The meso-scale interconnected pore architectures governed by the relative alignment of layers are shown to direct cell and muscle-like fiber orientation in both skeletal and cardiac muscle, enabling scale up of tissue constructs towards clinically relevant dimensions.

  4. Kinetic Digitally-Driven Architectural Structures as ‘Marginal’ Objects – a Conceptual Framework

    OpenAIRE

    Sokratis Yiannoudes

    2014-01-01

    Although the most important reasons for designing digitally-driven kinetic architectural structures seem to be practical ones, namely functional flexibility and adaptation to changing conditions and needs, this paper argues that there is possibly an additional socio-cultural aspect driving their design and construction. Through this argument, the paper attempts to debate their status and question their concepts and practices.Looking at the design explorations and discourses of real or visiona...

  5. Combining Dense Structure From Motion and Visual SLAM in a Behavior-Based Robot Control Architecture

    OpenAIRE

    Geert De Cubber; Sid Ahmed Berrabah; Daniela Doroftei; Yvan Baudoin; Hichem Sahli

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we present a control architecture for an intelligent outdoor mobile robot. This enables the robot to navigate in a complex, natural outdoor environment, relying on only a single on-board camera as sensory input. This is achieved through a twofold analysis of the visual data stream: a dense structure from motion algorithm calculates a depth map of the environment and a visual simultaneous localization and mapping algorithm builds a map of the surroundings using image features. T...

  6. Structural Health Monitoring for Preservation and Safeguard of Architectural Cultural Heritage

    OpenAIRE

    Accornero, Federico

    2014-01-01

    The preservation of architectural cultural heritage is a complex problem that requires the use of innovative Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) and non-destructive investigation methodologies to assess the integrity of decorated artworks without altering their state of conservation. A complete diagnosis of crack pattern regarding not only the external decorated surface but also the internal support is of great importance due to the criticality of internal defects and damage phenomena, which m...

  7. Architecture of a System for Interactive Training and Testing in Algorithms and Data Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Tomašević, M.; Đ. Đurđević; M. Milivojević

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we propose the architecture of a new software system for self-directed interactive learning and assessment in the domain of algorithms and data structures. The system extends Visual Simulator of Algorithms (VSA), a tool previously developed at the School of Electrical Engineering, University of Belgrade. The system provides control of trainee's independence level, flexible input data set assignment and configurable automatic assessment of test-taker's actions. The paper describe...

  8. A novel collagen film with micro-rough surface structure for corneal epithelial repair fabricated by freeze drying technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yang [School of Materials Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510641 (China); National Engineering Research Center for Tissue Restoration and Reconstruction, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Guangdong Province Key Laboratory of Biomedical Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Ren, Li, E-mail: psliren@scut.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510641 (China); National Engineering Research Center for Tissue Restoration and Reconstruction, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Guangdong Province Key Laboratory of Biomedical Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Wang, Yingjun, E-mail: imwangyj@163.com [School of Materials Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510641 (China); National Engineering Research Center for Tissue Restoration and Reconstruction, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Guangdong Province Key Laboratory of Biomedical Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006 (China)

    2014-05-01

    Highlights: • Collagen film with micro-rough surface is fabricated by freeze drying technique. • The film has suitable water uptake capability and toughness performance. • The film has good optical performance. • Human corneal epithelial cells studies confirmed the biocompatibility of the film. - Abstract: Corneal epithelial defect is a common disease and keratoplasty is a common treatment method. A collagen film with micro-rough surface was fabricated through a simple freeze drying technique in this study. Compared with the air-dried collagen film (AD-Col), this freeze-dried collagen film (FD-Col) has a more suitable water uptake capability (about 85.5%) and toughness performance. Both of the two films have good optical properties and the luminousness of them is higher than 80%. Besides, the adhesion and proliferation rate of human corneal epithelial cells on the micro-rough surface of FD-Col film is higher than that on the smooth surface of AD-Col film. The results indicate that this FD-Col film may have potential applications for corneal epithelial repair.

  9. A novel collagen film with micro-rough surface structure for corneal epithelial repair fabricated by freeze drying technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Collagen film with micro-rough surface is fabricated by freeze drying technique. • The film has suitable water uptake capability and toughness performance. • The film has good optical performance. • Human corneal epithelial cells studies confirmed the biocompatibility of the film. - Abstract: Corneal epithelial defect is a common disease and keratoplasty is a common treatment method. A collagen film with micro-rough surface was fabricated through a simple freeze drying technique in this study. Compared with the air-dried collagen film (AD-Col), this freeze-dried collagen film (FD-Col) has a more suitable water uptake capability (about 85.5%) and toughness performance. Both of the two films have good optical properties and the luminousness of them is higher than 80%. Besides, the adhesion and proliferation rate of human corneal epithelial cells on the micro-rough surface of FD-Col film is higher than that on the smooth surface of AD-Col film. The results indicate that this FD-Col film may have potential applications for corneal epithelial repair

  10. Collagen arrangement in hepatic granuloma in mice infected with Schistosoma mansoni: dependence on fiber radiation centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.L. Lenzi

    1999-05-01

    Full Text Available The collagen structure of isolated and in situ liver granuloma from Swiss Webster mice infected with Schistosoma mansoni was sequentially and three-dimensionally analyzed during different times of infection (early acute, acute, transitional acute-chronic, and chronic phases by laser scanning confocal microscopy and electron scanning variable vacuum microscopy. The initial granuloma structure is characterized by vascular collagen residues and by anchorage points (or fiber radiation centers, from where collagenous fibers are angularly shed and self-assembled. During the exudative-productive stage, the self-assembly of these fibers minimizes energy and mass through continuous tension and focal compression. The curvature or angles between collagen fibers probably depends on the fibroblastic or myofibroblastic organization of stress fibers. Gradually, the loose unstable lattice of the exudative-productive stage transforms into a highly packed and stable architecture as a result of progressive compactness. The three-dimensional architecture of granulomas provides increased tissue integrity, efficient distribution of soluble compounds and a haptotactic background to the cells.

  11. Recombinant gelatin and collagen from methylotrophic yeasts

    OpenAIRE

    Bruin,, Henk

    2002-01-01

    Based on its structural role and compatibility within the human body, collagen is a commonly used biomaterial in medical applications, such as cosmetic surgery, wound treatment and tissue engineering. Gelatin is in essence denatured and partly degraded collagen and is, as a result of its unique functional and chemical properties, also used in many medical and pharmaceutical products. Collagen and gelatin are traditionally extracted from animal tissues. The quality and the characteristics of t...

  12. Collagen-curcumin interaction - A physico-chemical study

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    N Nishad Fathima; R Saranya Devi; K B Rekha; Aruna Dhathathreyan

    2009-07-01

    Curcumin is a widely used therapeutic agent with a wide spectrum of biological and physiological applications like wound healing and interacts with the skin protein, collagen. This work reports the effect of curcumin on various physico-chemical properties of collagen. The results suggest that significant changes in viscosity and surface tension occur on collagen interacting with curcumin. Secondary structure analysis using circular dichroism shows that curcumin does not alter the triple helical structure of collagen. Increasing concentration of curcumin resulted in aggregation of the protein. Further, curcumin imparts high level of thermal stability to collagen with shrinkage temperature of collagen increasing from 60 to 90°C.

  13. Structural Models that Manage IT Portfolio Affecting Business Value of Enterprise Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamogawa, Takaaki

    This paper examines the structural relationships between Information Technology (IT) governance and Enterprise Architecture (EA), with the objective of enhancing business value in the enterprise society. Structural models consisting of four related hypotheses reveal the relationship between IT governance and EA in the improvement of business values. We statistically examined the hypotheses by analyzing validated questionnaire items from respondents within firms listed on the Japanese stock exchange who were qualified to answer them. We concluded that firms which have organizational ability controlled by IT governance are more likely to deliver business value based on IT portfolio management.

  14. Algorithm-structured computer arrays and networks architectures and processes for images, percepts, models, information

    CERN Document Server

    Uhr, Leonard

    1984-01-01

    Computer Science and Applied Mathematics: Algorithm-Structured Computer Arrays and Networks: Architectures and Processes for Images, Percepts, Models, Information examines the parallel-array, pipeline, and other network multi-computers.This book describes and explores arrays and networks, those built, being designed, or proposed. The problems of developing higher-level languages for systems and designing algorithm, program, data flow, and computer structure are also discussed. This text likewise describes several sequences of successively more general attempts to combine the power of arrays wi

  15. DEVELOPMENT AND RESEARCH MODELS OF BUSINESS ARCHITECTURE OF SUBSYSTEM SALES OF CORPORATE INTEGRATED STRUCTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baranovskaya T. P.

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The article describes basic principles and the results of modeling the business architecture of the company on the example of the subsystem sales of integrated corporate structures. As the object of investigation we have chosen the company called Dinskoy Meatprocessing complex, which is part of Southern diversified Corporation. The main artifacts of the conducted research are: graphical layout of business processes of a subsystem of the sales made in the instrumental environment of All Fusion Process Modeler (BPWin and developed a model of decomposition of business processes, a model of business event, a model for the location of functions and integration model, and to evaluate the relationship between the business processes with the strategic direction of the organization. The source data for the study were collected by conducting a special survey of the organization within which the surveys were conducted, and interviewing of managers and employees of relevant structures of the research object, the study of local normative documents, regulations on departments, job descriptions, etc. The resulting set of artifacts of business architecture can be used further in the process of re-engineering business processes, developing indicators for the effectiveness functions, business processes, organization, and development of requirements for the application systems that automate the processing of data and development of subsequent domains of enterprise architecture

  16. Combining Dense Structure From Motion and Visual SLAM in a Behavior-Based Robot Control Architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geert De Cubber

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present a control architecture for an intelligent outdoor mobile robot. This enables the robot to navigate in a complex, natural outdoor environment, relying on only a single on-board camera as sensory input. This is achieved through a twofold analysis of the visual data stream: a dense structure from motion algorithm calculates a depth map of the environment and a visual simultaneous localization and mapping algorithm builds a map of the surroundings using image features. This information enables a behavior-based robot motion and path planner to navigate the robot through the environment. In this paper, we show the theoretical aspects of setting up this architecture.

  17. The computational structural mechanics testbed architecture. Volume 5: The Input-Output Manager DMGASP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felippa, Carlos A.

    1989-01-01

    This is the fifth of a set of five volumes which describe the software architecture for the Computational Structural Mechanics Testbed. Derived from NICE, an integrated software system developed at Lockheed Palo Alto Research Laboratory, the architecture is composed of the command language (CLAMP), the command language interpreter (CLIP), and the data manager (GAL). Volumes 1, 2, and 3 (NASA CR's 178384, 178385, and 178386, respectively) describe CLAMP and CLIP and the CLIP-processor interface. Volumes 4 and 5 (NASA CR's 178387 and 178388, respectively) describe GAL and its low-level I/O. CLAMP, an acronym for Command Language for Applied Mechanics Processors, is designed to control the flow of execution of processors written for NICE. Volume 5 describes the low-level data management component of the NICE software. It is intended only for advanced programmers involved in maintenance of the software.

  18. Culture of bovine articular chondrocytes in funnel-like collagen-PLGA hybrid sponges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu Hongxu; Ko, Young-Gwang; Kawazoe, Naoki; Chen Guoping, E-mail: Guoping.Chen@nims.go.jp [Tissue Regeneration Materials Unit, International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics (MANA), National Institute for Materials Science, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan)

    2011-08-15

    Three-dimensional porous scaffolds play an important role in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Structurally, these porous scaffolds should have an open and interconnected porous architecture to facilitate a homogeneous cell distribution. Moreover, the scaffolds should be mechanically strong to support new tissue formation. We developed a novel type of funnel-like collagen sponge using embossing ice particulates as a template. The funnel-like collagen sponges could promote the homogeneous cell distribution, ECM production and chondrogenesis. However, the funnel-like collagen sponges deformed during cell culture due to their weak mechanical strength. To solve this problem, we reinforced the funnel-like collagen sponges with a knitted poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) mesh by hybridizing these two types of materials. The hybrid scaffolds were used to culture bovine articular chondrocytes. The cell adhesion, distribution, proliferation and chondrogenesis were investigated. The funnel-like structure promoted the even cell distribution and homogeneous ECM production. The PLGA knitted mesh protected the scaffold from deformation during cell culture. Histological and immunohistochemical staining and cartilaginous gene expression analyses revealed the cartilage-like properties of the cell/scaffold constructs after in vivo implantation. The hybrid scaffold, composed of a funnel-like collagen sponge and PLGA mesh, would be a useful tool for cartilage tissue engineering.

  19. Effects of ultraviolet radiation on the type-I collagen protein triple helical structure: A method for measuring structural changes through optical activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A detailed study of the effects of ultraviolet radiation on type-I collagen has been conducted. We have confirmed that exposure to ultraviolet radiation lowers the denaturation temperature of type-I collagen and that the triple helical state is destroyed provided that the radiation dose exceeds a threshold level, which is defined as the incident radiation dose that raises the sample temperature above the (lower) denaturation temperature. For incident radiation doses below threshold, the collagen molecule remains in a triple helical state. Denaturation is determined by changes in the optical activity of the collagen solution. Furthermore, a new instrument has been developed and tested to measure the optical rotatory dispersion properties of chiral molecules. The advantage of this instrument is that it enables a real-time measurement of the optical activity of chiral macromolecules while exposing samples to ultraviolet radiation and requiring no special sample preparation techniques. Using a differential measurement scheme, system errors have been minimized

  20. Molecular dynamic simulation studies on the effect of one residue chain staggering on the structure and stability of heterotrimeric collagen-like peptides with interruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singam, Ettayapuram Ramaprasad Azhagiya; Balamurugan, Kanagasabai; Gopalakrishnan, Ravimohan; Subramanian, Sundar Raman; Subramanian, Venkatesan; Ramasami, Thirumalachari

    2012-11-01

    A systematic molecular dynamics (MD) simulation has been carried out on collagen-like peptides with different combinations of interruptions in the Gly-X(AA) -Y(AA) repeats. Although experimental studies have been carried out to elucidate the structural consequences of homotrimeric collagen-like peptides, this is the first report on the structural effect on the heterotrimeric models with G4G and G1G breaks present simultaneously in the constituent chains with difference in one residue chain staggering. The results reveal that the axial registry of the interrupted region changes significantly from that of conventional triple helical peptide without interruption. Further, results from MD simulations show the formation of a kink in the interrupted region of the triple-helical peptides. The conformational analysis reveals that the interruption in the Gly-X(AA) -Y(AA) pattern in these peptides induces β-strand conformation in triple helical peptides. The conventional hydrogen bonds in the interrupted triad are affected and new nonconventional H-bonds are formed in the triple helical structure, and as a result interrupted region becomes locally fragile. MM-PBSA calculations on the different systems clearly suggest that the binding affinity varies marginally due to one residue staggering. However, it is found from the structural parameters that hydrogen-bonding pattern differs significantly due to the difference in the staggering of chains. PMID:22899360

  1. Kinetic Digitally-Driven Architectural Structures as ‘Marginal’ Objects – a Conceptual Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sokratis Yiannoudes

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Although the most important reasons for designing digitally-driven kinetic architectural structures seem to be practical ones, namely functional flexibility and adaptation to changing conditions and needs, this paper argues that there is possibly an additional socio-cultural aspect driving their design and construction. Through this argument, the paper attempts to debate their status and question their concepts and practices.Looking at the design explorations and discourses of real or visionary technologically-augmented architecture since the 1960s, one cannot fail to notice the use of biological metaphors and concepts to describe them – an attempt to ‘naturalise’ them which culminates today in the conception of kinetic structures and intelligent environments as literally ‘alive’. Examining these attitudes in contemporary examples, the paper demonstrates that digitally-driven kinetic structures can be conceived as artificial ‘living’ machines that undermine the boundary between the natural and the artificial. It argues that by ‘humanising’ these structures, attributing biological characteristics such as self-initiated motion, intelligence and reactivity, their designers are ‘trying’ to subvert and blur the human-machine (-architecture discontinuity.The argument is developed by building a conceptual framework which is based on evidence from the social studies of science and technology, in particular their critique in modern nature-culture and human-machine distinctions, as well as the history and theory of artificial life which discuss the cultural significance and sociology of ‘living’ objects. In particular, the paper looks into the techno-scientific discourses and practices which, since the 18th century, have been exploring the creation of ‘marginal’ objects, i.e. seemingly alive objects made to challenge the nature-artifice boundary.

  2. Targeting and mimicking collagens via triple helical peptide assembly

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Yang; Yu, S. Michael

    2013-01-01

    As the major structural component of the extracellular matrix, collagen plays a crucial role in tissue development and regeneration. Since structural and metabolic abnormalities of collagen are associated with numerous debilitating diseases and pathologic conditions, the ability to target collagens of diseased tissues could lead to new diagnostics and therapeutics. Collagen is also a natural biomaterial widely used in drug delivery and tissue engineering, and construction of synthetic collage...

  3. A statistically derived parameterization for the collagen triple-helix

    OpenAIRE

    Rainey, Jan K.; Goh, M. Cynthia

    2002-01-01

    The triple-helix is a unique secondary structural motif found primarily within the collagens. In collagen, it is a homo- or hetero-tripeptide with a repeating primary sequence of (Gly-X-Y)n, displaying characteristic peptide backbone dihedral angles. Studies of bulk collagen fibrils indicate that the triple-helix must be a highly repetitive secondary structure, with very specific constraints. Primary sequence analysis shows that most collagen molecules are primarily triple-helical; however, n...

  4. A functional–structural kiwifruit vine model integrating architecture, carbon dynamics and effects of the environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cieslak, Mikolaj; Seleznyova, Alla N.; Hanan, Jim

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims Functional–structural modelling can be used to increase our understanding of how different aspects of plant structure and function interact, identify knowledge gaps and guide priorities for future experimentation. By integrating existing knowledge of the different aspects of the kiwifruit (Actinidia deliciosa) vine's architecture and physiology, our aim is to develop conceptual and mathematical hypotheses on several of the vine's features: (a) plasticity of the vine's architecture; (b) effects of organ position within the canopy on its size; (c) effects of environment and horticultural management on shoot growth, light distribution and organ size; and (d) role of carbon reserves in early shoot growth. Methods Using the L-system modelling platform, a functional–structural plant model of a kiwifruit vine was created that integrates architectural development, mechanistic modelling of carbon transport and allocation, and environmental and management effects on vine and fruit growth. The branching pattern was captured at the individual shoot level by modelling axillary shoot development using a discrete-time Markov chain. An existing carbon transport resistance model was extended to account for several source/sink components of individual plant elements. A quasi-Monte Carlo path-tracing algorithm was used to estimate the absorbed irradiance of each leaf. Key Results Several simulations were performed to illustrate the model's potential to reproduce the major features of the vine's behaviour. The model simulated vine growth responses that were qualitatively similar to those observed in experiments, including the plastic response of shoot growth to local carbon supply, the branching patterns of two Actinidia species, the effect of carbon limitation and topological distance on fruit size and the complex behaviour of sink competition for carbon. Conclusions The model is able to reproduce differences in vine and fruit growth arising from various

  5. Recombinant gelatin and collagen from methylotrophic yeasts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruin, de E.C.

    2002-01-01

    Based on its structural role and compatibility within the human body, collagen is a commonly used biomaterial in medical applications, such as cosmetic surgery, wound treatment and tissue engineering. Gelatin is in essence denatured and partly degraded collagen and is, as a result of

  6. Interactive Modeling of Architectural Freeform Structures - Combining Geometry with Fabrication and Statics

    KAUST Repository

    Jiang, Caigui

    2014-09-01

    This paper builds on recent progress in computing with geometric constraints, which is particularly relevant to architectural geometry. Not only do various kinds of meshes with additional properties (like planar faces, or with equilibrium forces in their edges) become available for interactive geometric modeling, but so do other arrangements of geometric primitives, like honeycomb structures. The latter constitute an important class of geometric objects, with relations to “Lobel” meshes, and to freeform polyhedral patterns. Such patterns are particularly interesting and pose research problems which go beyond what is known for meshes, e.g. with regard to their computing, their flexibility, and the assessment of their fairness.

  7. From Nano to Micro: Importance of Structure and Architecture in Spider Silk Adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahni, Vasav; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2012-02-01

    Spiders have developed outstanding adhesives over millions of years of evolution for prey capture and locomotion. We show that the structure and architecture of these adhesives play an important role in the adhesion. The adhesive produced by orb-weaving spiders to capture prey (viscid glue) is laid on a pair of silk fibers as micron-size glue drops composed of salts and glycoproteins. By stretching single drops, we show that viscid glue behaves like a viscoelastic solid and that elasticity is critical in enhancing adhesion caused by specific adhesive ligands by over 100 times. Comparing viscid glue with gumfoot glue, the glue produced by cob-weavers, the evolutionary descendants of orb-weavers, showed that, in spite of being produced in homologous aggregate glands, gumfoot glue behaves like a viscoelastic liquid. Moreover, gumfoot glue is humidity-resistant and viscid glue is humidity-sensitive. We use a synthetic strategy to spin beads-on-a-string (BOAS) architecture to mimic the adhesive properties of spider silk. Using these mimic threads, we show that the BOAS structure adheres more than a cylindrical structure during contact (collision of prey) and during separation (escape attempt of prey). These results inspire design of novel tunable adhesives.

  8. 3D Digital Design of Cranes' Structures Based on Hybrid Software Architecture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Chonghua; LI Hua

    2006-01-01

    3D digital design for cranes' structures based on hybrid software architecture of Client/Server and Browser/Server is introduced in this paper. Based on Pro/ENGINEER platform, 3D parametric model family is built to allow generation of feasible configurations of cranes' structures in Client/Server framework. Taking use of Visual C++, the second exploiting software kit provided by Pro/ENGINEER and ANSYS GUI/APDL modeling patterns, an integration method of 3D CAD and CAE is achieved, which includes regeneration of 3D parametric model, synchronous updating and analysis of FEA model. As in Browser/Server framework, the 3D CAD models of parts, components and the whole structure could also be displayed in the customer's browser in VRML format.

  9. Collagen vascular disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001223.htm Collagen vascular disease To use the sharing features on this page, ... were previously said to have "connective tissue" or "collagen vascular" disease. We now have names for many of many ...

  10. Architecture and High-Resolution Structure of Bacillus thuringiensis and Bacillus cereus Spore Coat Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plomp, M; Leighton, T; Wheeler, K; Malkin, A

    2005-02-18

    We have utilized atomic force microscopy (AFM) to visualize the native surface topology and ultrastructure of Bacillus thuringiensis and Bacillus cereus spores in water and in air. AFM was able to resolve the nanostructure of the exosporium and three distinctive classes of appendages. Removal of the exosporium exposed either a hexagonal honeycomb layer (B. thuringiensis) or a rodlet outer spore coat layer (B. cereus). Removal of the rodlet structure from B. cereus spores revealed an underlying honeycomb layer similar to that observed with B. thuringiensis spores. The periodicity of the rodlet structure on the outer spore coat of B. cereus was {approx}8 nm, and the length of the rodlets was limited to the cross-patched domain structure of this layer to {approx}200 nm. The lattice constant of the honeycomb structures was {approx}9 nm for both B. cereus and B. thuringiensis spores. Both honeycomb structures were composed of multiple, disoriented domains with distinct boundaries. Our results demonstrate that variations in storage and preparation procedures result in architectural changes in individual spore surfaces, which establish AFM as a useful tool for evaluation of preparation and processing ''fingerprints'' of bacterial spores. These results establish that high-resolution AFM has the capacity to reveal species-specific assembly and nanometer scale structure of spore surfaces. These species-specific spore surface structural variations are correlated with sequence divergences in a spore core structural protein SspE.

  11. JPL control/structure interaction test bed real-time control computer architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Hugh C.

    1989-01-01

    The Control/Structure Interaction Program is a technology development program for spacecraft that exhibit interactions between the control system and structural dynamics. The program objectives include development and verification of new design concepts - such as active structure - and new tools - such as combined structure and control optimization algorithm - and their verification in ground and possibly flight test. A focus mission spacecraft was designed based upon a space interferometer and is the basis for design of the ground test article. The ground test bed objectives include verification of the spacecraft design concepts, the active structure elements and certain design tools such as the new combined structures and controls optimization tool. In anticipation of CSI technology flight experiments, the test bed control electronics must emulate the computation capacity and control architectures of space qualifiable systems as well as the command and control networks that will be used to connect investigators with the flight experiment hardware. The Test Bed facility electronics were functionally partitioned into three units: a laboratory data acquisition system for structural parameter identification and performance verification; an experiment supervisory computer to oversee the experiment, monitor the environmental parameters and perform data logging; and a multilevel real-time control computing system. The design of the Test Bed electronics is presented along with hardware and software component descriptions. The system should break new ground in experimental control electronics and is of interest to anyone working in the verification of control concepts for large structures.

  12. Tree architecture and forest canopy structure obtained from terrestrial LiDAR measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hentschel, Reiner; Bittner, Sebastian; Ritter, Daniel; Priesack, Eckart

    2013-04-01

    The modelling of the water transfer in vegetation on a small scale is important when the interaction of single plants and the competition of species are in focus of interest. Explicit geometrical functional-structural models that simulate the water flow in the single plant components such as roots, stem, and branches have been developed recently. These models need an explicit geometrical model of the plant hydrology, more precisely the possible pathway of the xylem and phloem water flow. Roots, stem, and branches are represented by connected porous cylinder elements that are divided into the inner heartwood cylinders surrounded by xylem and phloem. Terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) has been successfully applied to assess the structure of the aboveground vegetation in situ in the last years. Based on the technique of light detection and ranging (LiDAR) this method provides a set of three dimensional points that are located on the surface of objects such as vegetation. A further data processing of this three dimensional point cloud (typically consistent of some million points) enables to obtain structural properties like the spatial leaf distribution or large scale characteristics such as the stand height or plant density. Whereas the resolution and detection rate of the laser scanners have increased in the last years, there is still a need for a data handling especially in the field of ecology. We present the results of a skeleton extraction algorithm that is able to obtain the position and size of branch and stem cylinder elements from a three-dimensional point cloud obtained by TLS field measurements. No manual data processing is necessary to apply the algorithm allowing the analysis of a high number of individual plants. The resulting hydraulic architecture determines the possible pathway of water through the stem and the branches. It can consist of several thousands of connected cylinders depending on the plants that are observed. Examples are given and discussed

  13. Polycaprolactone nanofiber interspersed collagen type-I scaffold for bone regeneration: a unique injectable osteogenic scaffold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is an increasing demand for an injectable cell coupled three-dimensional (3D) scaffold to be used as bone fracture augmentation material. To address this demand, a novel injectable osteogenic scaffold called PN-COL was developed using cells, a natural polymer (collagen type-I), and a synthetic polymer (polycaprolactone (PCL)). The injectable nanofibrous PN-COL is created by interspersing PCL nanofibers within pre-osteoblast cell embedded collagen type-I. This simple yet novel and powerful approach provides a great benefit as an injectable bone scaffold over other non-living bone fracture stabilization polymers, such as polymethylmethacrylate and calcium content resin-based materials. The advantages of injectability and the biomimicry of collagen was coupled with the structural support of PCL nanofibers, to create cell encapsulated injectable 3D bone scaffolds with intricate porous internal architecture and high osteoconductivity. The effects of PCL nanofiber inclusion within the cell encapsulated collagen matrix has been evaluated for scaffold size retention and osteocompatibility, as well as for MC3T3-E1 cells osteogenic activity. The structural analysis of novel bioactive material proved that the material is chemically stable enough in an aqueous solution for an extended period of time without using crosslinking reagents, but it is also viscous enough to be injected through a syringe needle. Data from long-term in vitro proliferation and differentiation data suggests that novel PN-COL scaffolds promote the osteoblast proliferation, phenotype expression, and formation of mineralized matrix. This study demonstrates for the first time the feasibility of creating a structurally competent, injectable, cell embedded bone tissue scaffold. Furthermore, the results demonstrate the advantages of mimicking the hierarchical architecture of native bone with nano- and micro-size formation through introducing PCL nanofibers within macron-size collagen fibers and in

  14. Polycaprolactone nanofiber interspersed collagen type-I scaffold for bone regeneration: a unique injectable osteogenic scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baylan, Nuray; Bhat, Samerna; Ditto, Maggie; Lawrence, Joseph G; Lecka-Czernik, Beata; Yildirim-Ayan, Eda

    2013-08-01

    There is an increasing demand for an injectable cell coupled three-dimensional (3D) scaffold to be used as bone fracture augmentation material. To address this demand, a novel injectable osteogenic scaffold called PN-COL was developed using cells, a natural polymer (collagen type-I), and a synthetic polymer (polycaprolactone (PCL)). The injectable nanofibrous PN-COL is created by interspersing PCL nanofibers within pre-osteoblast cell embedded collagen type-I. This simple yet novel and powerful approach provides a great benefit as an injectable bone scaffold over other non-living bone fracture stabilization polymers, such as polymethylmethacrylate and calcium content resin-based materials. The advantages of injectability and the biomimicry of collagen was coupled with the structural support of PCL nanofibers, to create cell encapsulated injectable 3D bone scaffolds with intricate porous internal architecture and high osteoconductivity. The effects of PCL nanofiber inclusion within the cell encapsulated collagen matrix has been evaluated for scaffold size retention and osteocompatibility, as well as for MC3T3-E1 cells osteogenic activity. The structural analysis of novel bioactive material proved that the material is chemically stable enough in an aqueous solution for an extended period of time without using crosslinking reagents, but it is also viscous enough to be injected through a syringe needle. Data from long-term in vitro proliferation and differentiation data suggests that novel PN-COL scaffolds promote the osteoblast proliferation, phenotype expression, and formation of mineralized matrix. This study demonstrates for the first time the feasibility of creating a structurally competent, injectable, cell embedded bone tissue scaffold. Furthermore, the results demonstrate the advantages of mimicking the hierarchical architecture of native bone with nano- and micro-size formation through introducing PCL nanofibers within macron-size collagen fibers and in

  15. Proximal collagenous gastroenteritides:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ole Haagen; Riis, Lene Buhl; Danese, Silvio;

    2014-01-01

    AIM: While collagenous colitis represents the most common form of the collagenous gastroenteritides, the collagenous entities affecting the proximal part of the gastrointestinal tract are much less recognized and possibly overlooked. The aim was to summarize the latest information through a syste...

  16. VLSI ARCHITECTURE FOR IMAGE COMPRESSION THROUGH ADDER MINIMIZATION TECHNIQUE AT DCT STRUCTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.R. Divya

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Data compression plays a vital role in multimedia devices to present the information in a succinct frame. Initially, the DCT structure is used for Image compression, which has lesser complexity and area efficient. Similarly, 2D DCT also has provided reasonable data compression, but implementation concern, it calls more multipliers and adders thus its lead to acquire more area and high power consumption. To contain an account of all, this paper has been dealt with VLSI architecture for image compression using Rom free DA based DCT (Discrete Cosine Transform structure. This technique provides high-throughput and most suitable for real-time implementation. In order to achieve this image matrix is subdivided into odd and even terms then the multiplication functions are removed by shift and add approach. Kogge_Stone_Adder techniques are proposed for obtaining a bit-wise image quality which determines the new trade-off levels as compared to the previous techniques. Overall the proposed architecture produces reduced memory, low power consumption and high throughput. MATLAB is used as a funding tool for receiving an input pixel and obtaining output image. Verilog HDL is used for implementing the design, Model Sim for simulation, Quatres II is used to synthesize and obtain details about power and area.

  17. Optimizing Data-Oriented Architecture for Generating Random Numbers Uniform with Stack Machines Indeterminate Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razieh Yosefpoor

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Regarding the importance of statistics and doing statistical calculations by computer, it is necessary to find the ways in accordance with advanced and new computer sciences for calculation. In this research, architecture is presented using data-oriented approach to optimize number distribution and usage of memory and expedite the computing of generating random numbers. To achieve these goals, generating random numbers has been modeled uniformly using data-oriented approach. Data-oriented approach is an approach that models the concepts as data structures and required results can be achieved through data processing and using a special memory instead of excessive calculations. In this paper, to generate uniform random numbers using data-oriented approach, non-precise stack machine structure (ADRNG was used for modeling. Its advantage over previous approach, which was modeling with tree, is to prevent excessive use of data and to save memory and to prevent necessary time for managing excessive data. Finally, a new data-oriented architecture is presented using this model. Results from generating uniform random numbers through new approach in MATLAB stimulated environment and by calculating standard deviation and dispersion and comparing this with previous approach shows the optimization of generating uniform random numbers.

  18. Structural Insight into Cell Wall Architecture of Micanthus sinensis cv. using Correlative Microscopy Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jianfeng; Lv, Xunli; Yang, Shumin; Tian, Genlin; Liu, Xing'e

    2015-10-01

    Structural organization of the plant cell wall is a key parameter for understanding anisotropic plant growth and mechanical behavior. Four imaging platforms were used to investigate the cell wall architecture of Miscanthus sinensis cv. internode tissue. Using transmission electron microscopy with potassium permanganate, we found a great degree of inhomogeneity in the layering structure (4-9 layers) of the sclerenchymatic fiber (Sf). However, the xylem vessel showed a single layer. Atomic force microscopy images revealed that the cellulose microfibrils (Mfs) deposited in the primary wall of the protoxylem vessel (Pxv) were disordered, while the secondary wall was composed of Mfs oriented in parallel in the cross and longitudinal section. Furthermore, Raman spectroscopy images indicated no variation in the Mf orientation of Pxv and the Mfs in Pxv were oriented more perpendicular to the cell axis than that of Sfs. Based on the integrated results, we have proposed an architectural model of Pxv composed of two layers: an outermost primary wall composed of a meshwork of Mfs and inner secondary wall containing parallel Mfs. This proposed model will support future ultrastructural analysis of plant cell walls in heterogeneous tissues, an area of increasing scientific interest particularly for liquid biofuel processing. PMID:26358178

  19. Fracture mechanics of collagen fibrils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, Rene B; Mulder, Hindrik; Kovanen, Vuokko;

    2013-01-01

    Tendons are important load-bearing structures, which are frequently injured in both sports and work. Type I collagen fibrils are the primary components of tendons and carry most of the mechanical loads experienced by the tissue, however, knowledge of how load is transmitted between and within...... fibrils is limited. The presence of covalent enzymatic cross-links between collagen molecules is an important factor that has been shown to influence mechanical behavior of the tendons. To improve our understanding of how molecular bonds translate into tendon mechanics, we used an atomic force microscopy...... technique to measure the mechanical behavior of individual collagen fibrils loaded to failure. Fibrils from human patellar tendons, rat-tail tendons (RTTs), NaBH₄ reduced RTTs, and tail tendons of Zucker diabetic fat rats were tested. We found a characteristic three-phase stress-strain behavior in the human...

  20. Damage mapping in structural health monitoring using a multi-grid architecture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a multi-grid architecture for tomography-based damage mapping of composite aerospace structures. The system employs an array of piezo-electric transducers bonded on the structure. Each transducer may be used as an actuator as well as a sensor. The structure is excited sequentially using the actuators and the guided waves arriving at the sensors in response to the excitations are recorded for further analysis. The sensor signals are compared to their baseline counterparts and a damage index is computed for each actuator-sensor pair. These damage indices are then used as inputs to the tomographic reconstruction system. Preliminary damage maps are reconstructed on multiple coordinate grids defined on the structure. These grids are shifted versions of each other where the shift is a fraction of the spatial sampling interval associated with each grid. These preliminary damage maps are then combined to provide a reconstruction that is more robust to measurement noise in the sensor signals and the ill-conditioned problem formulation for single-grid algorithms. Experimental results on a composite structure with complexity that is representative of aerospace structures included in the paper demonstrate that for sufficiently high sensor densities, the algorithm of this paper is capable of providing damage detection and characterization with accuracy comparable to traditional C-scan and A-scan-based ultrasound non-destructive inspection systems quickly and without human supervision

  1. The Structural Architecture of an Infectious Mammalian Prion Using Electron Cryomicroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Fernández, Ester; Vos, Matthijn R; Afanasyev, Pavel; Cebey, Lino; Sevillano, Alejandro M; Vidal, Enric; Rosa, Isaac; Renault, Ludovic; Ramos, Adriana; Peters, Peter J; Fernández, José Jesús; van Heel, Marin; Young, Howard S; Requena, Jesús R; Wille, Holger

    2016-09-01

    The structure of the infectious prion protein (PrPSc), which is responsible for Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans and bovine spongiform encephalopathy, has escaped all attempts at elucidation due to its insolubility and propensity to aggregate. PrPSc replicates by converting the non-infectious, cellular prion protein (PrPC) into the misfolded, infectious conformer through an unknown mechanism. PrPSc and its N-terminally truncated variant, PrP 27-30, aggregate into amorphous aggregates, 2D crystals, and amyloid fibrils. The structure of these infectious conformers is essential to understanding prion replication and the development of structure-based therapeutic interventions. Here we used the repetitive organization inherent to GPI-anchorless PrP 27-30 amyloid fibrils to analyze their structure via electron cryomicroscopy. Fourier-transform analyses of averaged fibril segments indicate a repeating unit of 19.1 Å. 3D reconstructions of these fibrils revealed two distinct protofilaments, and, together with a molecular volume of 18,990 Å3, predicted the height of each PrP 27-30 molecule as ~17.7 Å. Together, the data indicate a four-rung β-solenoid structure as a key feature for the architecture of infectious mammalian prions. Furthermore, they allow to formulate a molecular mechanism for the replication of prions. Knowledge of the prion structure will provide important insights into the self-propagation mechanisms of protein misfolding. PMID:27606840

  2. Dermatan Sulfate Epimerase 1-Deficient Mice Have Reduced Content and Changed Distribution of Iduronic Acids in Dermatan Sulfate and an Altered Collagen Structure in Skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maccarana, M.; Kalamajski, S.; Kongsgaard, M.; Magnusson, S.P.; Oldberg, A.; Malmstrom, A.

    2009-01-01

    Dermatan sulfate epimerase 1 (DS-epi1) and DS-epi2 convert glucuronic acid to iduronic acid in chondroitin/dermatan sulfate biosynthesis. Here we report on the generation of DS-epi1-null mice and the resulting alterations in the chondroitin/dermatan polysaccharide chains. The numbers of long blocks...... of adjacent iduronic acids are greatly decreased in skin decorin and biglycan chondroitin/dermatan sulfate, along with a parallel decrease in iduronic-2-O-sulfated-galactosamine-4-O-sulfated structures. Both iduronic acid blocks and iduronic acids surrounded by glucuronic acids are also decreased in...... versican-derived chains. DS-epi1-deficient mice are smaller than their wild-type littermates but otherwise have no gross macroscopic alterations. The lack of DS-epi1 affects the chondroitin/dermatan sulfate in many proteoglycans, and the consequences for skin collagen structure were initially analyzed. We...

  3. Complications of collagenous colitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hugh James Freeman

    2008-01-01

    Microscopic forms of colitis have been described, including collagenous colitis. This disorder generally has an apparently benign clinical course. However, a number of gastric and intestinal complications, possibly coincidental, may develop with collagenous colitis. Distinctive inflammatory disorders of the gastric mucosa have been described, including lymphocytic gastritis and collagenous gastritis. Celiac disease and collagenous sprue (or collagenous enteritis) may occur. Colonic ulceration has been associated with use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, while other forms of inflammatory bowel disease, including ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, may evolve from collagenous colitis. Submucosal "dissection", colonic fractures or mucosal tears and perforation from air insufflation during colonoscopy may occur and has been hypothesized to be due to compromise of the colonic wall from submucosal collagen deposition. Similar changes may result from increased intraluminal pressure during barium enema contrast studies. Finally, malignant disorders have also been reported, including carcinoma and lymphoproliferative disease.

  4. Endocytic collagen degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Daniel H.; Jürgensen, Henrik J.; Ingvarsen, Signe;

    2012-01-01

    Fibrosis of the liver and its end-stage, cirrhosis, represent major health problems worldwide. In these fibrotic conditions, activated fibroblasts and hepatic stellate cells display a net deposition of collagen. This collagen deposition is a major factor leading to liver dysfunction, thus making it...... crucially important to understand both the collagen synthesis and turnover mechanisms in this condition. Here we show that the endocytic collagen receptor, uPARAP/Endo180, is a major determinant in governing the balance between collagen deposition and degradation. Cirrhotic human livers displayed a marked...... up-regulation of uPARAP/Endo180 in activated fibroblasts and hepatic stellate cells located close to the collagen deposits. In a hepatic stellate cell line, uPARAP/Endo180 was shown to be active in, and required for, the uptake and intracellular degradation of collagen. To evaluate the functional...

  5. Wireless sensors with dual-controller architecture for active diagnosis in structural health monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wireless sensor technology, which integrates transducers with microcontrollers and wireless communication, has become increasingly vital in structural health monitoring (SHM) applications. However, the low I/O (input/output) throughput of conventional wireless sensors impedes their usage in applications using high-frequency signals, such as active diagnosis and passive acoustic emission (AE). In this paper, the limitations of extending conventional wireless sensors to handle high-speed acquisition are first identified and discussed. Based on the efforts made in improving wireless sensors with centralized system architecture, a novel dual-controller based architecture is proposed to facilitate high-speed data acquisition and improve power efficiency. Then, a wireless sensor platform, specifically designed for active diagnosis employing stress waves to localize damages, is presented. The newly developed wireless sensor with dimensions of 30 mm × 30 mm × 35 mm utilizes a field programmable gate array (FPGA) as a secondary controller and can support a sampling rate up to 20 million samples per second (Msps). Laboratory experiments for verification show that the wireless sensor can explore new applications at the opposite end of the spectrum from conventional applications: those involving high fidelity and high-speed data acquisition

  6. Collagen IV in normal skin and in pathological processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Abreu-Velez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Type IV collagen is a type of collagen found primarily in the skin within the basement membrane zone. The type IV collagen C4 domain at the C-terminus is not removed in post-translational processing, and the fibers are thus link head-to-head, rather than in a parallel fashion. Also, type IV collagen lacks a glycine in every third amino-acid residue necessary for the tight collagen helix. Thus, the overall collagen-IV conformation is structurally more pliable and kinked, relative to other collagen subtypes. These structural features allow collagen IV to form sheets, which is the primary structural form found in the cutaneous basal lamina. There are six human genes associated with collagen IV, specifically COL4A1, COL4A2, COL4A3, COL4A4, COL4A5 and COL4A6. The aim of this review is to highlight the significance of this protein in normal skin, and in selected diseases. Results: The alpha 3 protein constituent of type IV collagen is thought to be the antigen implicated in Goodpasture′s syndrome, wherein the immune system attacks the basement membranes of the renal glomeruli and pulmonary alveoli. In addition, mutations to the genes coding for type IV collagen lead to the Alport syndrome. Furthermore, autoantibodies directed against denatured human type IV collagen have been described in rheumatoid arthritis, scleroderma, and SLE. Structural studies of collagen IV have been utilized to differentiate between subepidermal blistering diseases, including bullous pemphigoid, acquired epidermolysis bullosa, anti-epiligrin cicatricial pemphigoid, and bullous lupus erythematosus. Collagen IV is also of importance in wound healing and in embryogenesis. Conclusions: Pathological studies have demonstrated that minor structural differences in collagen IV can lead to distinct, clinically different diseases.

  7. Daily consumption of the collagen supplement Pure Gold Collagen® reduces visible signs of aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borum

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Maryam Borumand, Sara Sibilla Minerva Research Labs Ltd., London, UK Abstract: With age, changes in the metabolic processes of structural components of the skin lead to visible signs of aging, such as increased dryness and wrinkle formation. The nutritional supplement, Pure Gold Collagen®, which consists of hydrolyzed collagen, hyaluronic acid, vitamins, and minerals, was developed to counteract these signs. An open-label study was conducted to investigate the effects of this nutritional supplement on skin properties. Supplementation with 50 mL of Pure Gold Collagen on a daily basis for 60 days led to a noticeable reduction in skin dryness, wrinkles, and nasolabial fold depth. In addition, a significant increase in collagen density and skin firmness was observed after 12 weeks. The data from this study suggest that Pure Gold Collagen can counteract signs of natural aging. Keywords: hydrolyzed collagen, antiaging, wrinkles, firmness, skin

  8. Framing Architecture

    OpenAIRE

    Shirey, David E.

    2002-01-01

    The following thesis is comprised of a pair of projects focused on the making of architecture through the concept of framing. The work was conducted at the Academia dà ­Architettura in Mendrisio, Switzerland, under the direction of Peter Zumthor, Miguel Kreisler and Myriam Sterling, emphasizing the relationship between ordered structures and contextual propriety. The making of architecture is inherently most pure when approached as the subtraction of unnecessary elements and a distillation ...

  9. The collagen structure of equine articular cartilage characterized using polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography and non-linear microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansfield, Jessica C.; Ugryumova, Nadya; Knapp, Karen M.; Matcher, Stephen J.

    2006-09-01

    Equine articular cartilage has been imaged using both polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) and non-linear microscopy. PS-OCT has been used to spatially map the birefringence in the cartilage and we have found that in the vicinity of the lesion the images display a characteristic disruption in the regular birefringence bands shown by normal cartilage. We also note that significant (e.g. x2) variations in the apparent birefringence of samples taken from young (18 month) animals that otherwise appear visually homogeneous are found over spatial scales of a few millimeters. We have also imaged the cartilage using non-linear microscopy and compare the scans taken with second harmonic generation (SHG) light and the two photon fluorescence (TPF) light. SHG images collected using 800 nm excitation reveals the spatial distribution of collagen fibers, whilst TPF images clearly shows the distribution of intracellular and pericellular fluorophores.

  10. First structure of full-length mammalian phenylalanine hydroxylase reveals the architecture of an autoinhibited tetramer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arturo, Emilia C; Gupta, Kushol; Héroux, Annie; Stith, Linda; Cross, Penelope J; Parker, Emily J; Loll, Patrick J; Jaffe, Eileen K

    2016-03-01

    Improved understanding of the relationship among structure, dynamics, and function for the enzyme phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) can lead to needed new therapies for phenylketonuria, the most common inborn error of amino acid metabolism. PAH is a multidomain homo-multimeric protein whose conformation and multimerization properties respond to allosteric activation by the substrate phenylalanine (Phe); the allosteric regulation is necessary to maintain Phe below neurotoxic levels. A recently introduced model for allosteric regulation of PAH involves major domain motions and architecturally distinct PAH tetramers [Jaffe EK, Stith L, Lawrence SH, Andrake M, Dunbrack RL, Jr (2013) Arch Biochem Biophys 530(2):73-82]. Herein, we present, to our knowledge, the first X-ray crystal structure for a full-length mammalian (rat) PAH in an autoinhibited conformation. Chromatographic isolation of a monodisperse tetrameric PAH, in the absence of Phe, facilitated determination of the 2.9 Å crystal structure. The structure of full-length PAH supersedes a composite homology model that had been used extensively to rationalize phenylketonuria genotype-phenotype relationships. Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) confirms that this tetramer, which dominates in the absence of Phe, is different from a Phe-stabilized allosterically activated PAH tetramer. The lack of structural detail for activated PAH remains a barrier to complete understanding of phenylketonuria genotype-phenotype relationships. Nevertheless, the use of SAXS and X-ray crystallography together to inspect PAH structure provides, to our knowledge, the first complete view of the enzyme in a tetrameric form that was not possible with prior partial crystal structures, and facilitates interpretation of a wealth of biochemical and structural data that was hitherto impossible to evaluate. PMID:26884182

  11. Comparison and functional implications of the 3D architectures of viral tRNA-like structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, John A; Rambo, Robert P; Filbin, Megan E; Kieft, Jeffrey S

    2009-02-01

    RNA viruses co-opt the host cell's biological machinery, and their infection strategies often depend on specific structures in the viral genomic RNA. Examples are tRNA-like structures (TLSs), found at the 3' end of certain plant viral RNAs, which can use the cell's aminoacyl tRNA-synthetases (AARSs) to drive addition of an amino acid to the 3' end of the viral RNA. TLSs are multifunctional RNAs involved in processes such as viral replication, translation, and viral RNA stability; these functions depend on their fold. Experimental result-based structural models of TLSs have been published. In this study, we further examine these structures using a combination of biophysical and biochemical approaches to explore the three-dimensional (3D) architectures of TLSs from the turnip yellow mosaic virus (TYMV), tobacco mosaic virus (TMV), and brome mosaic virus (BMV). We find that despite similar function, these RNAs are biophysically diverse: the TYMV TLS adopts a characteristic tRNA-like L shape, the BMV TLS has a large compact globular domain with several helical extensions, and the TMV TLS aggregates in solution. Both the TYMV and BMV TLS RNAs adopt structures with tight backbone packing and also with dynamic structural elements, suggesting complexities and subtleties that cannot be explained by simple tRNA mimicry. These results confirm some aspects of existing models and also indicate how these models can be improved. The biophysical characteristics of these TLSs show how these multifunctional RNAs might regulate various viral processes, including negative strand synthesis, and also allow comparison with other structured RNAs. PMID:19144910

  12. Modulation of cell attachment and collagen production of anterior cruciate ligament cells via submicron grooves/ridges structures with different cell affinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng-Yuan; Wu, Tsung-Han; Chao, Pen-Hsiu Grace; Kuo, Wei-Hsuan; Wang, Meng-Jiy; Hsu, Cheng-Che; Tsai, Wei-Bor

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of submicron-grooved topography and surface cell affinity on the attachment, proliferation and collagen synthesis of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) cells. Two grooved polystyrene (PS) surfaces (equal groove/ridge width of 800 nm) with a groove depth of 100 or 700 nm were fabricated and modified by oxygen plasma treatment, dopamine deposition and conjugation of RGD-containing peptides to enhance cell affinity. The elongation and alignment of ACL cells was enhanced by grooved structures with increasing groove depths regardless of surface chemistry. On the other hand, cell spreading and proliferation mainly depended on surface chemistry, in accordance with surface cell affinity: O(2) plasma aligned with grooves/ridges. Our results indicated that both ligand presentation and cell alignment are important in the physiological activities of ACL fibroblasts. Such information is critical for design of biomaterials for ACL tissue engineering. PMID:22833331

  13. Additive manufacturing of collagen scaffolds by three-dimensional plotting of highly viscous dispersions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lode, Anja; Meyer, Michael; Brüggemeier, Sophie; Paul, Birgit; Baltzer, Hagen; Schröpfer, Michaela; Winkelmann, Claudia; Sonntag, Frank; Gelinsky, Michael

    2016-03-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) allows the free form fabrication of three-dimensional (3D) structures with distinct external geometry, fitting into a patient-specific defect, and defined internal pore architecture. However, fabrication of predesigned collagen scaffolds using AM-based technologies is challenging due to the low viscosity of collagen solutions, gels or dispersions commonly used for scaffold preparation. In the present study, we have developed a straightforward method which is based on 3D plotting of a highly viscous, high density collagen dispersion. The swollen state of the collagen fibrils at pH 4 enabled the homogenous extrusion of the material, the deposition of uniform strands and finally the construction of 3D scaffolds. Stabilization of the plotted structures was achieved by freeze-drying and chemical crosslinking with the carbodiimide EDC. The scaffolds exhibited high shape and dimensional fidelity and a hierarchical porosity consisting of macropores generated by strand deposition as well as an interconnected microporosity within the strands as result of the freeze-drying process. Cultivation of human mesenchymal stromal cells on the scaffolds, with and without adipogenic or osteogenic stimulation, revealed their cytocompatibility and potential applicability for adipose and bone tissue engineering. PMID:26924825

  14. Molecular architecture and the structural basis for anion interaction in prestin and SLC26 transporters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorbunov, Dmitry; Sturlese, Mattia; Nies, Florian; Kluge, Murielle; Bellanda, Massimo; Battistutta, Roberto; Oliver, Dominik

    2014-04-01

    Prestin (SLC26A5) is a member of the SLC26/SulP anion transporter family. Its unique quasi-piezoelectric mechanical activity generates fast cellular motility of cochlear outer hair cells, a key process underlying active amplification in the mammalian ear. Despite its established physiological role, it is essentially unknown how prestin can generate mechanical force, since structural information on SLC26/SulP proteins is lacking. Here we derive a structural model of prestin and related transporters by combining homology modelling, MD simulations and cysteine accessibility scanning. Prestin’s transmembrane core region is organized in a 7+7 inverted repeat architecture. The model suggests a central cavity as the substrate-binding site located midway of the anion permeation pathway, which is supported by experimental solute accessibility and mutational analysis. Anion binding to this site also controls the electromotile activity of prestin. The combined structural and functional data provide a framework for understanding electromotility and anion transport by SLC26 transporters.

  15. Supramolecular assembly of collagen fibrils into collagen fiber in fish scales of red seabream, Pagrus major.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youn, Hwa Shik; Shin, Tae Joo

    2009-11-01

    Supramolecular assembly of collagen fibrils into collagen fiber and its distribution in fish scales of red seabream, Pagrus major, were investigated. By virtue of Zernike phase-contrast hard X-ray microscopy, it has been firstly observed that collagen fiber consists of helical substructures of collagen fibrils wrapped with incrustation. As it close to the scalar focus (that is, with aging), loosened- and deteriorated-helical assemblies started to be observed with loosing wrapping incrustation, indicative of the distortion of the basic helical assembly. Various distributions and packing arrangements of collagen fibers were observed dependent on subdivisions of fish scale. Freshly growing edge region of fish scale, embedded into fish skin, showed rarely patched and one directionally arranged collagen fibers, in which specifically triple helical assemblies of collagen fibrils were found. On the contrary, relatively aged region of the rostral field close to the scalar focus displayed randomly directed and densely packed collagen fibers, in which loosened- and deteriorated-helical assemblies of collagen fibrils were mostly found. Our results have demonstrated that hard X-ray microscope can be a powerful tool to study in situ internal structure of biological specimens in an atmospheric pressure. PMID:19666125

  16. Preserving Architectural Decisions through Architectural Patterns

    OpenAIRE

    Thon That, Minh Tu; Sadou, Salah; Oquendo, F.; Fleurquin, R

    2014-01-01

    International audience Architectural decisions have emerged as a means to maintain the quality of the architecture during its evolution. One of the most important de-cisions made by architects are those about the design approach such as the use of patterns or styles in the architecture. The structural nature of this type of decisions give them the potential to be controlled systematically. In the litera-ture, there are some works on the automation of architectural decision violation checki...

  17. Crystal architecture of R(2)SnS(5) (R = Pr, Nd, Gd and Tb): crystal structure relationships in chalcogenides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daszkiewicz, Marek; Gulay, Lubomir D; Shemet, Vasylyna Ya

    2008-04-01

    The crystal structure of the R(2)SnS(5) (R = Pr, Nd, Gd and Tb) compounds has been investigated using X-ray single-crystal diffraction. Crystal architecture and structural relationships among U(3)S(5), Y(2)HfS(5), R(2)SnS(5) compounds are discussed and a structural origin is determined. It is shown that the complex architecture of the crystal structure of Eu(5)Sn(3)S(12) is a result of interweaving of the simple crystal structures. The location of the copper ions in the non-stoichiometric compound Y(2)Cu(0.20)Sn(0.95)S(5) is proposed on the basis of comparative analysis of the R-S interatomic distances in the R(2)SnS(5) series of compounds. PMID:18369288

  18. Imaging collagen type I fibrillogenesis with high spatiotemporal resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stamov, Dimitar R, E-mail: stamov@jpk.com [JPK Instruments AG, Bouchéstrasse 12, 12435 Berlin (Germany); Stock, Erik [JPK Instruments AG, Bouchéstrasse 12, 12435 Berlin (Germany); Franz, Clemens M [DFG-Center for Functional Nanostructures (CFN), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Wolfgang-Gaede-Strasse 1a, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Jähnke, Torsten; Haschke, Heiko [JPK Instruments AG, Bouchéstrasse 12, 12435 Berlin (Germany)

    2015-02-15

    Fibrillar collagens, such as collagen type I, belong to the most abundant extracellular matrix proteins and they have received much attention over the last five decades due to their large interactome, complex hierarchical structure and high mechanical stability. Nevertheless, the collagen self-assembly process is still incompletely understood. Determining the real-time kinetics of collagen type I formation is therefore pivotal for better understanding of collagen type I structure and function, but visualising the dynamic self-assembly process of collagen I on the molecular scale requires imaging techniques offering high spatiotemporal resolution. Fast and high-speed scanning atomic force microscopes (AFM) provide the means to study such processes on the timescale of seconds under near-physiological conditions. In this study we have applied fast AFM tip scanning to study the assembly kinetics of fibrillar collagen type I nanomatrices with a temporal resolution reaching eight seconds for a frame size of 500 nm. By modifying the buffer composition and pH value, the kinetics of collagen fibrillogenesis can be adjusted for optimal analysis by fast AFM scanning. We furthermore show that amplitude-modulation imaging can be successfully applied to extract additional structural information from collagen samples even at high scan rates. Fast AFM scanning with controlled amplitude modulation therefore provides a versatile platform for studying dynamic collagen self-assembly processes at high resolution. - Highlights: • Continuous non-invasive time-lapse investigation of collagen I fibrillogenesis in situ. • Imaging of collagen I self-assembly with high spatiotemporal resolution. • Application of setpoint modulation to study the hierarchical structure of collagen I. • Observing real-time formation of the D-banding pattern in collagen I.

  19. Imaging collagen type I fibrillogenesis with high spatiotemporal resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fibrillar collagens, such as collagen type I, belong to the most abundant extracellular matrix proteins and they have received much attention over the last five decades due to their large interactome, complex hierarchical structure and high mechanical stability. Nevertheless, the collagen self-assembly process is still incompletely understood. Determining the real-time kinetics of collagen type I formation is therefore pivotal for better understanding of collagen type I structure and function, but visualising the dynamic self-assembly process of collagen I on the molecular scale requires imaging techniques offering high spatiotemporal resolution. Fast and high-speed scanning atomic force microscopes (AFM) provide the means to study such processes on the timescale of seconds under near-physiological conditions. In this study we have applied fast AFM tip scanning to study the assembly kinetics of fibrillar collagen type I nanomatrices with a temporal resolution reaching eight seconds for a frame size of 500 nm. By modifying the buffer composition and pH value, the kinetics of collagen fibrillogenesis can be adjusted for optimal analysis by fast AFM scanning. We furthermore show that amplitude-modulation imaging can be successfully applied to extract additional structural information from collagen samples even at high scan rates. Fast AFM scanning with controlled amplitude modulation therefore provides a versatile platform for studying dynamic collagen self-assembly processes at high resolution. - Highlights: • Continuous non-invasive time-lapse investigation of collagen I fibrillogenesis in situ. • Imaging of collagen I self-assembly with high spatiotemporal resolution. • Application of setpoint modulation to study the hierarchical structure of collagen I. • Observing real-time formation of the D-banding pattern in collagen I

  20. Software Architecture: Architecture Constraints

    OpenAIRE

    Tibermacine, Chouki

    2014-01-01

    International audience In this chapter, we introduce an additional, yet essential, concept in describing software architectures : architecture constraints. We explain the precise role of these entities and their importance in object-oriented, component-based or service-oriented software engi-neering. We then describe the way in which they are specified and interpreted. An architect can define architecture constraints and then associate them to architectural descriptions to limit their stru...

  1. Qualitative and quantitative assessment of collagen and elastin in annulus fibrosus of the physiologic and scoliotic intervertebral discs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobielarz, Magdalena; Szotek, Sylwia; Głowacki, Maciej; Dawidowicz, Joanna; Pezowicz, Celina

    2016-09-01

    The biophysical properties of the annulus fibrosus of the intervertebral disc are determined by collagen and elastin fibres. The progression of scoliosis is accompanied by a number of pathological changes concerning these structural proteins. This is a major cause of dysfunction of the intervertebral disc. The object of the study were annulus fibrosus samples excised from intervertebral discs of healthy subjects and patients treated surgically for scoliosis in the thoracolumbar or lumbar spine. The research material was subjected to structural analysis by light microscopy and quantitative analysis of the content of collagen types I, II, III and IV as well as elastin by immunoenzymatic test (ELISA). A statistical analysis was conducted to assess the impact of the sampling site (Mann-Whitney test, α=0.05) and scoliosis (Wilcoxon matched pairs test, α=0.05) on the obtained results. The microscopic studies conducted on scoliotic annulus fibrosus showed a significant architectural distortion of collagen and elastin fibres. Quantitative biochemical assays demonstrated region-dependent distribution of only collagen types I and II in the case of healthy intervertebral discs whereas in the case of scoliotic discs region-dependent distribution concerned all examined proteins of the extracellular matrix. Comparison of scoliotic and healthy annulus fibrosus revealed a significant decrease in the content of collagen type I and elastin as well as a slight increase in the proportion of collagen types III and IV. The content of collagen type II did not differ significantly between both groups. The observed anomalies are a manifestation of degenerative changes affecting annulus fibrosus of the intervertebral disc in patients suffering from scoliosis. PMID:27177214

  2. Architecture on Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Karen

    2016-01-01

    how recognising the autonomy of architecture, not as an esoteric concept but as a valid source of information in a pragmatic design practice, may help us overcome the often-proclaimed dichotomy between formal autonomy and a societally committed architecture. It follows that in architectural education...

  3. Linking lipid architecture to bilayer structure and mechanics using self-consistent field modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To understand how lipid architecture determines the lipid bilayer structure and its mechanics, we implement a molecularly detailed model that uses the self-consistent field theory. This numerical model accurately predicts parameters such as Helfrichs mean and Gaussian bending modulus kc and k¯ and the preferred monolayer curvature J0m, and also delivers structural membrane properties like the core thickness, and head group position and orientation. We studied how these mechanical parameters vary with system variations, such as lipid tail length, membrane composition, and those parameters that control the lipid tail and head group solvent quality. For the membrane composition, negatively charged phosphatidylglycerol (PG) or zwitterionic, phosphatidylcholine (PC), and -ethanolamine (PE) lipids were used. In line with experimental findings, we find that the values of kc and the area compression modulus kA are always positive. They respond similarly to parameters that affect the core thickness, but differently to parameters that affect the head group properties. We found that the trends for k¯ and J0m can be rationalised by the concept of Israelachivili's surfactant packing parameter, and that both k¯ and J0m change sign with relevant parameter changes. Although typically k¯0m≫0, especially at low ionic strengths. We anticipate that these changes lead to unstable membranes as these become vulnerable to pore formation or disintegration into lipid disks

  4. Enhancing collagen stability through nanostructures containing chromium(III) oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangeetha, Selvam; Ramamoorthy, Usha; Sreeram, Kalarical Janardhanan; Nair, Balachandran Unni

    2012-12-01

    Stabilization of collagen for various applications employs chemicals such as aldehydes, metal ions, polyphenols, etc. Stability against enzymatic, thermal and mechanical degradation is required for a range of biomedical applications. The premise of this research is to explore the use of nanoparticles with suitable functionalization/encapsulation to crosslink with collagen, such that the three dimensional architecture had the desired stability. Collagen solution prepared as per standard protocols is treated with chromium(III) oxide nanoparticules encapsulated within a polymeric matrix (polystyrene-block-polyacrylic acid copolymer). Selectivity towards encapsulation was ensured by the reaction in dimethyl sulfoxide, where the PS groups popped out and encapsulated the Cr(2)O(3). Subsequently when immersed in aqueous solution, PAA units popped up to react with functional groups of collagen. The interaction with collagen was monitored through techniques such as CD, FTIR, viscosity measurements, stress analysis. CD studies and FTIR showed no degradation of collagen. Thermal stability was enhanced upon interaction of nanostructures with collagen. Self-assembly of collagen was delayed but not inhibited, indicating a compete binding of the metal oxide encapsulated polymer to collagen. Metal oxide nanoparticles encapsulated within a polymeric matrix could provide thermal and mechanical stability to collagen. The formed fibrils of collagen could serve as ideal material for various smart applications such as slow/sustained drug release. The study is also relevant to the leather industry in that the nanostructures can diffuse through the highly networked collagen fibre bundles in skin matrix easily, thus overcoming the rate limiting step of diffusion. PMID:22766281

  5. Architectural pattern generation by discrete wavelet transform and utilisation in structural design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sariyildiz, S.; Ciftcioglu, O.; Durmisevic, S.

    1998-01-01

    Since computers were introduced in architectural design as a valuable tool, there was a growing need to develop tools that would support the designer from the initial phase of the design till the detailing. In a computer aided architectural design environment it is feasible to stimulate the spatial

  6. A role for collagen IV cross-links in conferring immune privilege to the Goodpasture autoantigen: structural basis for the crypticity of B cell epitopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanacore, Roberto M; Ham, Amy-Joan L; Cartailler, Jean-Philippe; Sundaramoorthy, Munirathinam; Todd, Parvin; Pedchenko, Vadim; Sado, Yoshikazu; Borza, Dorin-Bogdan; Hudson, Billy G

    2008-08-15

    The detailed structural basis for the cryptic nature (crypticity) of a B cell epitope harbored by an autoantigen is unknown. Because the immune system may be ignorant of the existence of such "cryptic" epitopes, their exposure could be an important feature in autoimmunity. Here we investigated the structural basis for the crypticity of the epitopes of the Goodpasture autoantigen, the alpha3alpha4alpha5 noncollagenous-1 (NC1) hexamer, a globular domain that connects two triple-helical molecules of the alpha3alpha4alpha5 collagen IV network. The NC1 hexamer occurs in two isoforms as follows: the M-isoform composed of monomer subunits in which the epitopes are accessible to autoantibodies, and the D-isoform composed of both monomer and dimer subunits in which the epitopes are cryptic. The D-isoform was characterized with respect to quaternary structure, as revealed by mass spectrometry of dimer subunits, homology modeling, and molecular dynamics simulation. The results revealed that the D-isoform contains two kinds of cross-links as follows: S-hydroxylysyl-methionine and S-lysyl-methionine cross-links, which stabilize the alpha3alpha5-heterodimers and alpha4alpha4-homodimers, respectively. Construction and analysis of a three-dimensional model of the D-isoform of the alpha3alpha4alpha5 NC1 hexamer revealed that crypticity is a consequence of the following: (a) sequestration of key residues between neighboring subunits that are stabilized by domain-swapping interactions, and (b) by cross-linking of subunits at the trimer-trimer interface, which stabilizes the structural integrity of the NC1 hexamer and protects against binding of autoantibodies. The sequestrated epitopes and cross-linked subunits represent a novel structural mechanism for conferring immune privilege at the level of quaternary structure. Perturbation of the quaternary structure may be a key factor in the etiology of Goodpasture disease. PMID:18499662

  7. Contribution of collagen and elastin fibers to the mechanical behavior of an abdominal connective tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levillain, A; Orhant, M; Turquier, F; Hoc, T

    2016-08-01

    The linea alba is a complex structure commonly involved in hernia formation. Knowledge of its mechanical behavior is essential to design suitable meshes and reduce the risk of recurrence. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationships between the mechanical properties of the linea alba and the organization of collagen and elastin fibers. For that purpose, longitudinal and transversal samples were removed from four porcine and three human linea alba, to perform tensile tests under a biphotonic confocal microscope, in each direction. Microscopic observation revealed a tissue composed of two layers, made of transversal collagen fibers in the dorsal side and oblique collagen fibers in the ventral side. This particular architecture led to an anisotropic mechanical behavior, with higher stress in the transversal direction. During loading, oblique fibers of the ventral layer reoriented toward the tensile axis in both directions, while fibers of the dorsal layer remained in the transversal direction. This rotation of oblique fibers progressively increased the stiffness of the tissue and induced a non-linear stress-stretch relation. Elastin fibers formed a layer covering the collagen fibers and followed their movement, suggesting that they ensure their elastic recoil. All of these results demonstrated the strong relationships between the microstructure and the mechanical behavior of the linea alba. PMID:27100469

  8. Collagen-platelet interactions: recognition and signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farndale, Richard W; Siljander, Pia R; Onley, David J; Sundaresan, Pavithra; Knight, C Graham; Barnes, Michael J

    2003-01-01

    The collagen-platelet interaction is central to haemostasis and may be a critical determinant of arterial thrombosis, where subendothelium is exposed after rupture of atherosclerotic plaque. Recent research has capitalized on the cloning of an important signalling receptor for collagen, glycoprotein VI, which is expressed only on platelets, and on the use of collagen-mimetic peptides as specific tools for both glycoprotein VI and integrin alpha 2 beta 1. We have identified sequences, GPO and GFOGER (where O denotes hydroxyproline), within collagen that are recognized by the collagen receptors glycoprotein VI and integrin alpha 2 beta 1 respectively, allowing their signalling properties and specific functional roles to be examined. Triple-helical peptides containing these sequences were used to show the signalling potential of integrin alpha 2 beta 1, and to confirm its important contribution to platelet adhesion. Glycoprotein VI appears to operate functionally on the platelet surface as a dimer, which recognizes GPO motifs that are separated by four triplets of collagen sequence. These advances will allow the relationship between the structure of collagen and its haemostatic activity to be established. PMID:14587284

  9. Architectural structure and environmental performance of the traditional buildings in Florina, NW Greece

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oikonomou, A. [Department of Architecture, University of Patras (Greece); Bougiatioti, F. [School of Architecture, National Technical University of Athens, 25, Iasonos Street, 166-71 Vouliagmeni, Athens (Greece)

    2011-03-15

    This paper presents various aspects, which characterise the traditional architecture in the town of Florina, north-western Greece, and can be related to bioclimatic and environmental architecture. The study is based on the documentation and the analysis of the architectural and bioclimatic aspects of a sample of forty (40) remaining houses of the 19th and the beginning of the 20th century. The analysis of the architectural aspects concerns the building typology, the form, the materials and the construction techniques, whereas the analysis of bioclimatic aspects involves the thermal behaviour of the building shell, the thermal and the visual comfort conditions. The aim of the study is to document and assess, both qualitatively and quantitatively, all the afore-mentioned aspects in order to draw conclusions concerning the principles, which characterised this architecture and can be integrated to the refurbishment of existing buildings or the design of new ones in traditional surroundings. (author)

  10. Marine Origin Collagens and Its Potential Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, Tiago H.; Joana Moreira-Silva; Marques, Ana L. P.; Alberta Domingues; Yves Bayon; Reis, Rui L.

    2014-01-01

    Collagens are the most abundant high molecular weight proteins in both invertebrate and vertebrate organisms, including mammals, and possess mainly a structural role, existing different types according with their specific organization in distinct tissues. From this, they have been elected as one of the key biological materials in tissue regeneration approaches. Also, industry is constantly searching for new natural sources of collagen and upgraded methodologies for their production. The most ...

  11. Why collagens best survived in fossils?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Shuang-Yin; Cappellini, Enrico; Zhang, Hong-Yu

    2012-01-01

    Explaining why type I collagens are preferentially preserved in the geological time scale remains a challenge. Several pieces of evidence indicate that its rich content in the bone and its unique, stable structure played key roles in its preservation. By considering the distinct thermal stability...... of amino acids, we reveal that the elevated abundance of thermostable amino acid residues in type I collagens also contribute to its survival....

  12. Collagen quantification across human skeletal muscles

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Evie Ya Hui

    2011-01-01

    Intramuscular connective tissue provides structural stability and facilitates force transmission in skeletal muscle. Additionally, it contains extracellular matrix that is crucial for muscle development and regeneration¹. Alterations of collagen content within intramuscular connective tissue have been associated with aging or diseased muscle ²,³. Data of baseline collagen content among different muscles, to provide deeper understanding of normal muscular functions, does not exist. Hence the a...

  13. Insights into plant cell wall structure, architecture, and integrity using glycome profiling of native and AFEXTM-pre-treated biomass

    OpenAIRE

    Pattathil, Sivakumar; Hahn, Michael G.; Dale, Bruce E; Chundawat, Shishir P. S.

    2015-01-01

    Cell walls, which constitute the bulk of plant biomass, vary considerably in their structure, composition, and architecture. Studies on plant cell walls can be conducted on both native and pre-treated plant biomass samples, allowing an enhanced understanding of these structural and compositional variations. Here glycome profiling was employed to determine the relative abundance of matrix polysaccharides in several phylogenetically distinct native and pre-treated plant biomasses. Eight distinc...

  14. Functional architectures based on self-assembly of bio-inspired dipeptides: Structure modulation and its photoelectronic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chengjun; Liu, Kai; Li, Junbai; Yan, Xuehai

    2015-11-01

    Getting inspiration from nature and further developing functional architectures provides an effective way to design innovative materials and systems. Among bio-inspired materials, dipeptides and its self-assembled architectures with functionalities have recently been the subject of intensive studies. However, there is still a great challenge to explore its applications likely due to the lack of effective adaptation of their self-assembled structures as well as a lack of understanding of the self-assembly mechanisms. In this context, taking diphenylalanine (FF, a core recognition motif for molecular self-assembly of the Alzheimer's β-amyloid polypeptides) as a model of bio-inspired dipeptides, recent strategies on modulation of dipeptide-based architectures were introduced with regard to both covalent (architectures modulation by coupling functional groups) and non-covalent ways (controlled architectures by different assembly pathways). Then, applications are highlighted in some newly emerging fields of innovative photoelectronic devices and materials, such as artificial photosynthetic systems for renewable solar energy storage and renewable optical waveguiding materials for optoelectronic devices. At last, the challenges and future perspectives of these bio-inspired dipeptides are also addressed. PMID:26365127

  15. Cellular localisation of type XIII collagen, and its induced expression in human neoplasias and corneal diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Väisänen, T. (Teemu)

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Type XIII collagen belongs to the group of transmembrane collagens. In this thesis the plasma membrane localisation and function of type XIII collagen have been studied using cell biological methods. Type XIII collagen was found to reside in focal adhesions. It appeared in these structures at a very early stage of their assembly and disappeared from them concurrently with focal adhesion proteins talin and vinculin. Insect cells expressing type XIII collagen showed an enhanced ...

  16. Renal Fibrosis : Collagen Composition and Assembly Regulates Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transdifferentiation

    OpenAIRE

    Zeisberg, Michael; Bonner, Gary; Maeshima, Yohei; Colorado, Pablo; Müller, Gerhard A; Strutz, Frank; Kalluri, Raghu

    2001-01-01

    Type IV collagen is a major component of basement membranes and it provides structural and functional support to various cell types. Type IV collagen exists in a highly complex suprastructure form and recent studies implicate that protomer (the trimeric building unit of type IV collagen) assembly is mediated by the NC1 domain present in the C-terminus of each collagen α-chain polypeptide. Here we show that type IV collagen contributes to the maintenance of the epithelial phenotype of proximal...

  17. Macrophage receptor with collagenous structure (MARCO) is a dynamic adhesive molecule that enhances uptake of carbon nanotubes by CHO-K1 Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The toxicity of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), a highly promising nanomaterial, is similar to that of asbestos because both types of particles have a fibrous shape and are biopersistent. Here, we investigated the characteristics of macrophage receptor with collagenous structure (MARCO), a membrane receptor expressed on macrophages that recognizes environmental or unopsonized particles, and we assessed whether and how MARCO was involved in cellular uptake of multi-walled CNTs (MWCNTs). MARCO-transfected Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1) cells took up polystyrene beads irrespective of the particle size (20 nm–1 μm). In the culture of MARCO-transfected CHO-K1 cells dendritic structures were observed on the bottom of culture dishes, and the edges of these dendritic structures were continually renewed as the cell body migrated along the dendritic structures. MWCNTs were first tethered to the dendritic structures and then taken up by the cell body. MWCNTs appeared to be taken up via membrane ruffling like macropinocytosis, rather than phagocytosis. The cytotoxic EC50 value of MWCNTs in MARCO-transfected CHO-K1 cells was calculated to be 6.1 μg/mL and transmission electron microscopic observation indicated that the toxicity of MWCNTs may be due to the incomplete inclusion of MWCNTs by the membrane structure. -- Highlights: ►Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were tethered to MARCO in vitro. ►CNTs were taken up rapidly into the cell body via MARCO by membrane ruffling. ►The incomplete inclusion of CNTs by membranes caused cytotoxicity.

  18. Macrophage receptor with collagenous structure (MARCO) is a dynamic adhesive molecule that enhances uptake of carbon nanotubes by CHO-K1 Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirano, Seishiro, E-mail: seishiro@nies.go.jp [Environmental Nanotoxicology Project, RCER, National Institute for Environmental Studies (Japan); Fujitani, Yuji; Furuyama, Akiko [Environmental Nanotoxicology Project, RCER, National Institute for Environmental Studies (Japan); Kanno, Sanae [Department of Legal Medicine, St. Marianna School of Medicine (Japan)

    2012-02-15

    The toxicity of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), a highly promising nanomaterial, is similar to that of asbestos because both types of particles have a fibrous shape and are biopersistent. Here, we investigated the characteristics of macrophage receptor with collagenous structure (MARCO), a membrane receptor expressed on macrophages that recognizes environmental or unopsonized particles, and we assessed whether and how MARCO was involved in cellular uptake of multi-walled CNTs (MWCNTs). MARCO-transfected Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1) cells took up polystyrene beads irrespective of the particle size (20 nm–1 μm). In the culture of MARCO-transfected CHO-K1 cells dendritic structures were observed on the bottom of culture dishes, and the edges of these dendritic structures were continually renewed as the cell body migrated along the dendritic structures. MWCNTs were first tethered to the dendritic structures and then taken up by the cell body. MWCNTs appeared to be taken up via membrane ruffling like macropinocytosis, rather than phagocytosis. The cytotoxic EC{sub 50} value of MWCNTs in MARCO-transfected CHO-K1 cells was calculated to be 6.1 μg/mL and transmission electron microscopic observation indicated that the toxicity of MWCNTs may be due to the incomplete inclusion of MWCNTs by the membrane structure. -- Highlights: ►Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were tethered to MARCO in vitro. ►CNTs were taken up rapidly into the cell body via MARCO by membrane ruffling. ►The incomplete inclusion of CNTs by membranes caused cytotoxicity.

  19. Structured nucleosome fingerprints enable high-resolution mapping of chromatin architecture within regulatory regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schep, Alicia N; Buenrostro, Jason D; Denny, Sarah K; Schwartz, Katja; Sherlock, Gavin; Greenleaf, William J

    2015-11-01

    Transcription factors canonically bind nucleosome-free DNA, making the positioning of nucleosomes within regulatory regions crucial to the regulation of gene expression. Using the assay of transposase accessible chromatin (ATAC-seq), we observe a highly structured pattern of DNA fragment lengths and positions around nucleosomes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and use this distinctive two-dimensional nucleosomal "fingerprint" as the basis for a new nucleosome-positioning algorithm called NucleoATAC. We show that NucleoATAC can identify the rotational and translational positions of nucleosomes with up to base-pair resolution and provide quantitative measures of nucleosome occupancy in S. cerevisiae, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, and human cells. We demonstrate the application of NucleoATAC to a number of outstanding problems in chromatin biology, including analysis of sequence features underlying nucleosome positioning, promoter chromatin architecture across species, identification of transient changes in nucleosome occupancy and positioning during a dynamic cellular response, and integrated analysis of nucleosome occupancy and transcription factor binding. PMID:26314830

  20. Does Congenital Deafness Affect the Structural and Functional Architecture of Primary Visual Cortex?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smittenaar, C R; MacSweeney, M; Sereno, M I; Schwarzkopf, D S

    2016-01-01

    Deafness results in greater reliance on the remaining senses. It is unknown whether the cortical architecture of the intact senses is optimized to compensate for lost input. Here we performed widefield population receptive field (pRF) mapping of primary visual cortex (V1) with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in hearing and congenitally deaf participants, all of whom had learnt sign language after the age of 10 years. We found larger pRFs encoding the peripheral visual field of deaf compared to hearing participants. This was likely driven by larger facilitatory center zones of the pRF profile concentrated in the near and far periphery in the deaf group. pRF density was comparable between groups, indicating pRFs overlapped more in the deaf group. This could suggest that a coarse coding strategy underlies enhanced peripheral visual skills in deaf people. Cortical thickness was also decreased in V1 in the deaf group. These findings suggest deafness causes structural and functional plasticity at the earliest stages of visual cortex. PMID:27014392

  1. Collagens and proteoglycans of the corneal extracellular matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.M. Michelacci

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available The cornea is a curved and transparent structure that provides the initial focusing of a light image into the eye. It consists of a central stroma that constitutes 90% of the corneal depth, covered anteriorly with epithelium and posteriorly with endothelium. Its transparency is the result of the regular spacing of collagen fibers with remarkably uniform diameter and interfibrillar space. Corneal collagen is composed of heterotypic fibrils consisting of type I and type V collagen molecules. The cornea also contains unusually high amounts of type VI collagen, which form microfibrillar structures, FACIT collagens (XII and XIV, and other nonfibrillar collagens (XIII and XVIII. FACIT collagens and other molecules, such as leucine-rich repeat proteoglycans, play important roles in modifying the structure and function of collagen fibrils.Proteoglycans are macromolecules composed of a protein core with covalently linked glycosaminoglycan side chains. Four leucine-rich repeat proteoglycans are present in the extracellular matrix of corneal stroma: decorin, lumican, mimecan and keratocan. The first is a dermatan sulfate proteoglycan, and the other three are keratan sulfate proteoglycans. Experimental evidence indicates that the keratan sulfate proteoglycans are involved in the regulation of collagen fibril diameter, and dermatan sulfate proteoglycan participates in the control of interfibrillar spacing and in the lamellar adhesion properties of corneal collagens. Heparan sulfate proteoglycans are minor components of the cornea, and are synthesized mainly by epithelial cells. The effect of injuries on proteoglycan synthesis is discussed.

  2. The amino acid alphabet and the architecture of the protein sequence-structure map. I. Binary alphabets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrada, Evandro

    2014-12-01

    The correspondence between protein sequences and structures, or sequence-structure map, relates to fundamental aspects of structural, evolutionary and synthetic biology. The specifics of the mapping, such as the fraction of accessible sequences and structures, or the sequences' ability to fold fast, are dictated by the type of interactions between the monomers that compose the sequences. The set of possible interactions between monomers is encapsulated by the potential energy function. In this study, I explore the impact of the relative forces of the potential on the architecture of the sequence-structure map. My observations rely on simple exact models of proteins and random samples of the space of potential energy functions of binary alphabets. I adopt a graph perspective and study the distribution of viable sequences and the structures they produce, as networks of sequences connected by point mutations. I observe that the relative proportion of attractive, neutral and repulsive forces defines types of potentials, that induce sequence-structure maps of vastly different architectures. I characterize the properties underlying these differences and relate them to the structure of the potential. Among these properties are the expected number and relative distribution of sequences associated to specific structures and the diversity of structures as a function of sequence divergence. I study the types of binary potentials observed in natural amino acids and show that there is a strong bias towards only some types of potentials, a bias that seems to characterize the folding code of natural proteins. I discuss implications of these observations for the architecture of the sequence-structure map of natural proteins, the construction of random libraries of peptides, and the early evolution of the natural amino acid alphabet. PMID:25473967

  3. Influence of neutral salts on the hydrothermal stability of acid-soluble collagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, E M; Farrell, H M; Wildermuth, R J

    2000-02-01

    The thermal stability of acid-soluble collagens was studied by circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. Adult bovine dermal collagen (BDC), rat-tail tendon collagen (RTC), and calf skin collagen (CSC) were compared. Despite some variability in amino acid composition and apparent molecular weight, the CD spectra for helical and unordered collagen structures were essentially the same for all the sources. The melting of these collagens occurs as a two-stage process characterized by a pretransition (Tp) followed by complete denaturation (Td). The characteristic temperatures vary with the source of the collagen; for mature collagens (BDC, RTC) Tp = 30 degrees C and Td = 36 degrees C, and for CSC Tp = 34 degrees C and Td = 40 degrees C. Neutral salts, NaCl or KCl, at low concentrations (0.02-0.2 M) appear to bind to the collagens and shift the thermal transitions of these collagens to lower temperatures. PMID:10945432

  4. Breakdown of cell-collagen networks through collagen remodeling

    OpenAIRE

    Iordan, Andreea; Duperray, Alain; Gérard, Anaïs; Grichine, Alexei; Verdier, Claude

    2010-01-01

    International audience Collagen model tissues are analyzed, which consist of cells embedded in a collagen matrix at different concentrations (of cells and collagen). Rheological properties are measured and complementary confocal microscopy analyses are carried out. An important feature is observed, corresponding to the breakdown of the collagen network (i.e. decrease in network elasticity) for high collagen concentrations, due to the presence of cells. Thanks to confocal microscopy, we sho...

  5. The collagen microfibril model, a tool for biomaterials scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Animal hides, a major byproduct of the meat industry, are a rich source of collagen, a structural protein of the extracellular matrix that gives strength and form to the skin, tendons and bones of mammals. The structure of fibrous collagen, a long triple helix that self-associates in a staggered arr...

  6. The decorin sequence SYIRIADTNIT binds collagen type I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalamajski, Sebastian; Aspberg, Anders; Oldberg, Ake

    2007-01-01

    Decorin belongs to the small leucine-rich repeat proteoglycan family, interacts with fibrillar collagens, and regulates the assembly, structure, and biomechanical properties of connective tissues. The decorin-collagen type I-binding region is located in leucine-rich repeats 5-6. Site......-directed mutagenesis of this 54-residue-long collagen-binding sequence identifies Arg-207 and Asp-210 in leucine-rich repeat 6 as crucial for the binding to collagen. The synthetic peptide SYIRIADTNIT, which includes Arg-207 and Asp-210, inhibits the binding of full-length recombinant decorin to collagen in vitro....... These collagen-binding amino acids are exposed on the exterior of the beta-sheet-loop structure of the leucine-rich repeat. This resembles the location of interacting residues in other leucine-rich repeat proteins....

  7. Insufficient Folding of Type IV Collagen and Formation of Abnormal Basement Membrane-like Structure in Embryoid Bodies Derived from Hsp47-Null Embryonic Stem CellsD⃞

    OpenAIRE

    Matsuoka, Yasuhiro; Kubota, Hiroshi; Adachi, Eijiro; Nagai, Naoko; Marutani, Toshihiro; Hosokawa, Nobuko; Nagata, Kazuhiro

    2004-01-01

    Hsp47 is a molecular chaperone that specifically recognizes procollagen in the endoplasmic reticulum. Hsp47-null mouse embryos produce immature type I collagen and form discontinuous basement membranes. We established Hsp47-/- embryonic stem cell lines and examined formation of basement membrane and production of type IV collagen in embryoid bodies, a model for postimplantation egg-cylinder stage embryos. The visceral endodermal cell layers surrounding Hsp47-/- embryoid bodies were often diso...

  8. 3D-structured illumination microscopy provides novel insight into architecture of human centrosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharina F. Sonnen

    2012-08-01

    Centrioles are essential for the formation of cilia and flagella. They also form the core of the centrosome, which organizes microtubule arrays important for cell shape, polarity, motility and division. Here, we have used super-resolution 3D-structured illumination microscopy to analyse the spatial relationship of 18 centriole and pericentriolar matrix (PCM components of human centrosomes at different cell cycle stages. During mitosis, PCM proteins formed extended networks with interspersed γ-Tubulin. During interphase, most proteins were arranged at specific distances from the walls of centrioles, resulting in ring staining, often with discernible density masses. Through use of site-specific antibodies, we found the C-terminus of Cep152 to be closer to centrioles than the N-terminus, illustrating the power of 3D-SIM to study protein disposition. Appendage proteins showed rings with multiple density masses, and the number of these masses was strongly reduced during mitosis. At the proximal end of centrioles, Sas-6 formed a dot at the site of daughter centriole assembly, consistent with its role in cartwheel formation. Plk4 and STIL co-localized with Sas-6, but Cep135 was associated mostly with mother centrioles. Remarkably, Plk4 formed a dot on the surface of the mother centriole before Sas-6 staining became detectable, indicating that Plk4 constitutes an early marker for the site of nascent centriole formation. Our study provides novel insights into the architecture of human centrosomes and illustrates the power of super-resolution microscopy in revealing the relative localization of centriole and PCM proteins in unprecedented detail.

  9. Three new Ag(I) coordination architectures based on mixed ligands: Syntheses, structures and photoluminescent properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three new silver (I) coordination complexes, [Ag2(1,2-bdc)(phdat)]n (1), [Ag2(NO2-bdc)(phdat)]n (2), [Ag4(nta)3(phdat)NO3]n (3) (1,2-bdc=phthalic acid dianion, NO2-bdc=5-nitro-1,3-benzenedicarboxylic acid dianion, nta=nicotinic acid anion, phdat=2,4-diamine-6-phenyl-1,3,5-triazine) have been hydrothermally synthesized by the reactions of silver nitrate and phdat with the homologous ligands 1,2-H2bdc, NO2-H2bdc, and Hnta, respectively, and characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffractions, IR spectra, elemental analyses thermogravimetric analyses (TGA). The compound 1 exhibits a chiral 3D network with cbs/CrB self-dual topological net, which contains two kinds of single helical chains. For compound 2, the 3D network is comprised of two kinds of similar 2D sheets with the topological symbol of sql-type packed in AABBAA mode by Ag–N/O weakly contacts. And compound 3 has 2D double layer architecture, consisting of the 2D plane with hcb-type topological symbol connected by Ag–O weakly coordinations. The photoluminescent properties associated with the crystal structures of three compounds have also been measured. - Graphical abstract: Three new silver(I) coordination complexes 1–3 have been synthesized and characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffractions, IR spectra, elemental analyses, thermogravimetric analyses (TGA) and photoluminescent spectra. Highlights: ► The compound 1 exhibits a novel chiral 3D network with two kinds of single helical chains. ► 3D or 2D new Ag coordination complexes. ► The photoluminescent properties have been measured

  10. Drug carrier systems based on collagen-alginate composite structures for improving the performance of GDNF-secreting HEK293 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, M; Lo, A C; Cheung, P T; Wong, D; Chan, B P

    2009-02-01

    Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) is a potent neurotrophic factor. Development of drug delivery technologies facilitating controlled release of GDNF is critical to applying GDNF in treating neurodegenerative diseases. We previously developed 3D collagen microspheres and demonstrated enhanced GDNF secretion after encapsulation of HEK293 cells, which were transduced to overexpress GDNF in these microspheres. However, the entrapped HEK293 cells were able to migrate out of the collagen microspheres, making it undesirable for clinical applications. In this report, we investigate two new carrier designs, namely collagen-alginate composite gel and collagen microspheres embedded in alginate gel in preventing cell leakage, maintaining cell growth and controlling GDNF secretion in the HEK293 cells. We demonstrated that inclusion of alginate gel in both designs is efficient in preventing cell leakage to the surrounding yet permitting the GDNF secretion, although the cellular growth rate is reduced in an alginate concentration dependent manner. Differential patterns of GDNF secretion in the two designs were demonstrated. The collagen-alginate composite gel maintains a more or less constant GDNF secretion over time while the collagen microspheres embedded in alginate gel continue to increase the secretion level of GDNF over time. This study contributes towards the development of cell-based GDNF delivery devices for the future therapeutics of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:19059641

  11. Collagenous Colitis and Spondylarthropathy

    OpenAIRE

    Kaouther Ben Abdelghani; Hana Sahli; Leila Souabni; Selma Chekili; Salwa Belhadj; Selma Kassab; Ahmed Laatar; Leith Zakraoui

    2012-01-01

    Collagenous colitis is a recent cause of chronic diarrhea. Cooccurrence with spondylarthropathy is rare. We describe two cases: one man and one woman of 33 and 20 years old were suffering from spondylarthropathy. They then developed collagenous colitis, 4 and 14 years after the onset of spondylarthropathy. The diagnosis was based on histological features. A sicca syndrome and vitiligo were observed with the female case. The presence of colitis leads to therapeutic problems. This association s...

  12. Update on collagenous sprue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hugh; James; Freeman

    2010-01-01

    Collagenous sprue has traditionally been defined as a small intestinal mucosal disorder characterized by persistent diarrhea, severe malabsorption with multiple nutrient def iciencies and progressive weight loss. Pathologically, a severe to variably severe "flattened" mucosal biopsy lesion with distinctive sub-epithelial deposits in the lamina propria region is detected. Histochemical stains and ultrastructural studies have conf irmed that these deposits contain collagens. Often, an initial diagnosis of cel...

  13. Hierarchically porous Co3O4 architectures with honeycomb-like structures for efficient oxygen generation from electrochemical water splitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lili; Tian, Tian; Jiang, Jing; Ai, Lunhong

    2015-10-01

    The development of efficient and cheap anode materials for the utilization in the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) is essential for energy-conversion technologies. In this study, hierarchically porous Co3O4 architectures with honeycomb-like structures are synthesized by employing cobalt-based zeolitic imidazolate framework (ZIF-67-Co) as metal source and sacrificial template. After a simple one-step calcination process, the ZIF-67-Co precursor can be chemically transformed into the Co3O4 architectures with abundant porosity and oxygen vacancy. These easily obtained and earth-abundant Co3O4 architectures present high performance toward the electrochemical water splitting for evolving molecular oxygen, affording a small OER onset potential, large anodic current and long-term durability in 0.1 M KOH solution, which are comparable to the electroactive noble- and transition-metal oxygen evolution catalysts previously reported. These merits suggest that the ZIF-derived Co3O4 architectures are promising electrocatalysts for OER from water splitting.

  14. Architecture on Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Karen

    2016-01-01

    This paper will discuss the challenges faced by architectural education today. It takes as its starting point the double commitment of any school of architecture: on the one hand the task of preserving the particular knowledge that belongs to the discipline of architecture, and on the other hand...... the obligation to prepare students to perform in a profession that is largely defined by forces outside that discipline. It will be proposed that the autonomy of architecture can be understood as a unique kind of information: as architecture’s self-reliance or knowledge-about itself. A knowledge that...... is not scientific or academic but is more like a latent body of data that we find embedded in existing works of architecture. This information, it is argued, is not limited by the historical context of the work. It can be thought of as a virtual capacity – a reservoir of spatial configurations that...

  15. Collagenous gastritis: Review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kenya Kamimura; Masaaki Kobayashi; Yuichi Sato; Yutaka Aoyagi; Shuji Terai

    2015-01-01

    Collagenous gastritis is a rare disease characterizedby the subepithelial deposition of collagen bandsthicker than 10 μm and the infiltration of inflammatorymononuclear cells in the lamina propria. Collagenouscolitis and collagenous sprue have similar histologicalcharacteristics to collagenous gastritis and are thoughtto be part of the same disease entity. However, whilecollagenous colitis has become more common inthe field of gastroenterology, presenting with clinicalsymptoms of chronic diarrhea in older patients,collagenous gastritis is rare. Since the disease was firstreported in 1989, only 60 cases have been documentedin the English literature. No safe and effective treatmentshave been identified from randomized, controlled trials.Therefore, better understanding of the disease and thereporting of more cases will help to establish diagnosticcriteria and to develop therapeutic strategies. Therefore,here we review the clinical characteristics, endoscopicand histological findings, treatment, and clinical outcomesfrom case reports and case series published to date,and provide a summary of the latest information on thedisease. This information will contribute to improvedknowledge of collagenous gastritis so physicians canrecognize and correctly diagnose the disease, and willhelp to develop a standard therapeutic strategy forfuture clinical trials.

  16. Papain-gel Degrades Intact Nonmineralized Type I Collagen Fibrils

    OpenAIRE

    BERTASSONI, L. E.; Marshall, G.W.

    2009-01-01

    Papain-gel has been utilized as a chemomechanical material for caries removal due to its ability to preserve underlying sound dentin. However, little is known about the effect of the papain enzyme on intact type I collagen fibrils that compose the dentin matrix. Here we sought to define structural changes that occur in intact type I collagen fibrils after an enzymatic treatment with a papaingel. Intact and nonmineralized type I collagen fibrils from rat tail were obtained and treated with a p...

  17. Collagens and proteoglycans of the corneal extracellular matrix

    OpenAIRE

    Michelacci Y.M.

    2003-01-01

    The cornea is a curved and transparent structure that provides the initial focusing of a light image into the eye. It consists of a central stroma that constitutes 90% of the corneal depth, covered anteriorly with epithelium and posteriorly with endothelium. Its transparency is the result of the regular spacing of collagen fibers with remarkably uniform diameter and interfibrillar space. Corneal collagen is composed of heterotypic fibrils consisting of type I and type V collagen molecules. Th...

  18. Collagen represses canonical Notch signaling and binds to Notch ectodomain

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Xiaojie; Meng, He; Michael M Wang

    2013-01-01

    The Notch signaling system features a growing number of modulators that include extracellular proteins that bind to the Notch ectodomain. Collagens are a complex, heterogeneous family of secreted proteins that serve both structural and signaling functions, most prominently through binding to integrins and DDR. The shared widespread tissue distribution of Notch and collagen prompted us to investigate the effects of collagen on Notch signaling. In a cell co-culture signaling assay, we found tha...

  19. Glomerular Basement Membrane Type IV Collagen in Health and Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Fish, Alfred J.; Kashtan, Clifford E.; Matsukura, Hiro; Butkowski, Ralph J.

    1991-01-01

    Glomerular basement membrane is the major supporting structural element of the glomerular capillary wall. This is a highly complex locus which functionally serves as a filtration barrier, and has been the subject of detailed investigation. The composition of whole glomerular basement membrane suggests that collagen is a major component. Isolation and characterization of the collagenous domains has revealed that glomerular basement membrane is chiefly composed of type IV collagen. This molecul...

  20. How Different Molecular Architectures Influence the Dynamics of H-Bonded Structures in Glass-Forming Monohydroxy Alcohols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wikarek, M; Pawlus, S; Tripathy, Satya N; Szulc, A; Paluch, M

    2016-06-30

    Primary alcohols have been an active area of research since the beginning of the 20th century. The main problem in studying monohydroxy alcohols is the molecular origin of the slower Debye relaxation, whereas the faster process, recognized as structural relaxation, remains much less investigated. This is because in many primary alcohols the structural process is strongly overlapped by the dominating Debye relaxation. Additionally, there is still no answer for many fundamental questions concerning the origin of the molecular characteristic properties of these materials. One of them is the role of molecular architecture in the formation of hydrogen-bonded structures and its potential connection to the relaxation dynamics of Debye and structural relaxation processes. In this article, we present the results of ambient and high-pressure dielectric studies of monohydroxy alcohols with similar chemical structures but different carbon chain lengths (2-ethyl-1-butanol and 2-ethyl-1-hexanol) and positions of the OH- group (2-methyl-2-hexanol and 2-methyl-3-hexanol). New data are compared with previously collected results for 5-methyl-2-hexanol. We note that differences in molecular architecture have a significant influence on the formation of hydrogen-bonded structures, which is reflected in the behavior of the Debye and structural relaxation processes. Intriguingly, studying the relaxation dynamics in monohydroxy alcohols at high pressures of up to p = 1700 MPa delivers a fundamental bridge to understand the potential connection between molecular conformation and its response to the characteristic properties of these materials. PMID:27254726

  1. Marine Origin Collagens and Its Potential Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago H. Silva

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Collagens are the most abundant high molecular weight proteins in both invertebrate and vertebrate organisms, including mammals, and possess mainly a structural role, existing different types according with their specific organization in distinct tissues. From this, they have been elected as one of the key biological materials in tissue regeneration approaches. Also, industry is constantly searching for new natural sources of collagen and upgraded methodologies for their production. The most common sources are from bovine and porcine origin, but other ways are making their route, such as recombinant production, but also extraction from marine organisms like fish. Different organisms have been proposed and explored for collagen extraction, allowing the sustainable production of different types of collagens, with properties depending on the kind of organism (and their natural environment and extraction methodology. Such variety of collagen properties has been further investigated in different ways to render a wide range of applications. The present review aims to shed some light on the contribution of marine collagens for the scientific and technological development of this sector, stressing the opportunities and challenges that they are and most probably will be facing to assume a role as an alternative source for industrial exploitation.

  2. Linking lipid architecture to bilayer structure and mechanics using self-consistent field modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pera, H.; Kleijn, J. M.; Leermakers, F. A. M., E-mail: Frans.leermakers@wur.nl [Laboratory of Physical Chemistry and Colloid Science, Wageningen University, Dreijenplein 6, 6307 HB Wageningen (Netherlands)

    2014-02-14

    To understand how lipid architecture determines the lipid bilayer structure and its mechanics, we implement a molecularly detailed model that uses the self-consistent field theory. This numerical model accurately predicts parameters such as Helfrichs mean and Gaussian bending modulus k{sub c} and k{sup ¯} and the preferred monolayer curvature J{sub 0}{sup m}, and also delivers structural membrane properties like the core thickness, and head group position and orientation. We studied how these mechanical parameters vary with system variations, such as lipid tail length, membrane composition, and those parameters that control the lipid tail and head group solvent quality. For the membrane composition, negatively charged phosphatidylglycerol (PG) or zwitterionic, phosphatidylcholine (PC), and -ethanolamine (PE) lipids were used. In line with experimental findings, we find that the values of k{sub c} and the area compression modulus k{sub A} are always positive. They respond similarly to parameters that affect the core thickness, but differently to parameters that affect the head group properties. We found that the trends for k{sup ¯} and J{sub 0}{sup m} can be rationalised by the concept of Israelachivili's surfactant packing parameter, and that both k{sup ¯} and J{sub 0}{sup m} change sign with relevant parameter changes. Although typically k{sup ¯}<0, membranes can form stable cubic phases when the Gaussian bending modulus becomes positive, which occurs with membranes composed of PC lipids with long tails. Similarly, negative monolayer curvatures appear when a small head group such as PE is combined with long lipid tails, which hints towards the stability of inverse hexagonal phases at the cost of the bilayer topology. To prevent the destabilisation of bilayers, PG lipids can be mixed into these PC or PE lipid membranes. Progressive loading of bilayers with PG lipids lead to highly charged membranes, resulting in J{sub 0}{sup m}≫0, especially at low ionic

  3. Reconstruction project of a bell tower of Joseph of Volokolamsk monastery: architectural, town-planning and structural aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsvetkov Konstantin Aleksandrovich

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ASPECTS All over the world a lot of unique architectural monuments are lost according to different reasons. The role of cultural objects can hardly be overestimated and their total loss is irretrievable. Preservation of architectural monuments and complexity of their investigation and design solutions development depend on many factors: age of the monument, structural peculiarities, geographical position, their value as objects of cultural heritage, etc. The article offers the description of a reconstruction project of a bell tower in Joseph of Volokolamsk Monastery, which had been destructed in 1941. The bell tower in Joseph of Volokolamsk Monastery situated in Volokolamsk region of the Moscow Region near village Teryaevo is an outstanding example of the architecture and construction technologies of the 16th-17th centuries. The design group conducted extensive research, made a conclusion on the state of the surviving elements and offered several variants of bell tower reconstruction. It was decided to reconstruct the bell tower over the surviving first tier with transferring the loads to the new bearing structure. The first tier is being reconstructed and preserved.

  4. Daily consumption of the collagen supplement Pure Gold Collagen® reduces visible signs of aging

    OpenAIRE

    Sibilla, Sara

    2014-01-01

    Maryam Borumand, Sara Sibilla Minerva Research Labs Ltd., London, UK Abstract: With age, changes in the metabolic processes of structural components of the skin lead to visible signs of aging, such as increased dryness and wrinkle formation. The nutritional supplement, Pure Gold Collagen®, which consists of hydrolyzed collagen, hyaluronic acid, vitamins, and minerals, was developed to counteract these signs. An open-label study was conducted to investigate the effects of this nutrit...

  5. Lamprey type II collagen and Sox9 reveal an ancient origin of the vertebrate collagenous skeleton

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Guangjun; Miyamoto, Michael M.; Cohn, Martin J.

    2006-01-01

    Type II collagen is the major cartilage matrix protein in the jawed vertebrate skeleton. Lampreys and hagfishes, by contrast, are thought to have noncollagenous cartilage. This difference in skeletal structure has led to the hypothesis that the vertebrate common ancestor had a noncollagenous skeleton, with type II collagen becoming the predominant cartilage matrix protein after the divergence of jawless fish from the jawed vertebrates ≈500 million years ago. Here we report that lampreys have ...

  6. Mineralized Collagen: Rationale, Current Status, and Clinical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Ye Qiu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a review of the rationale for the in vitro mineralization process, preparation methods, and clinical applications of mineralized collagen. The rationale for natural mineralized collagen and the related mineralization process has been investigated for decades. Based on the understanding of natural mineralized collagen and its formation process, many attempts have been made to prepare biomimetic materials that resemble natural mineralized collagen in both composition and structure. To date, a number of bone substitute materials have been developed based on the principles of mineralized collagen, and some of them have been commercialized and approved by regulatory agencies. The clinical outcomes of mineralized collagen are of significance to advance the evaluation and improvement of related medical device products. Some representative clinical cases have been reported, and there are more clinical applications and long-term follow-ups that currently being performed by many research groups.

  7. Structural architecture and paleofluid evolution of the Compione fault, Northern Apennines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucca, Alessio; Storti, Fabrizio; Balsamo, Fabrizio; Molli, Giancarlo

    2016-04-01

    The Compione fault (CF) is part of the basin boundary East Lunigiana extensional fault system, active since Early Pliocene. This system is composed of three main fault segments, striking almost NW-SE and dipping 60-70° to the SW. The offset of the CF exceeds 1 km and caused the tectonic juxtaposition of turbiditic sandstones of the Late Oligocene-Early Miocene Macigno Fm. in the footwall, against the calcareous pelites, siltites and fine sandstones of the Ottone Fm. (a Late Cretaceous Ligurian Helminthoid Flysch) in the hangingwall. The CF overprints the previously-formed contractional tectonic stack where the Ottone Fm. overthrusted the Macigno Fm. during Miocene times. We performed a detailed structural analysis along a cross-section perpendicular to the CF in its central part, coupled with laboratory analyses including standard and cold cathodoluminescence petrography, microtermometric and stable isotope analysis of vein cements, and particle size analysis of fault core rocks. Field data show that the architecture of the CF is formed by an about 1.5 km wide asymmetric damage domain, composed of an up to 1 km wide footwall damage zone, an almost 500 m wide hangingwall damage zone and a core domain with variable thickness, up to some tens of meters, mostly composed of cataclastic sandstones and gouge layers, which typically incorporates one or more shear lenses of Macigno sandstones. In the footwall, extensional deformation affecting very thick and coarse sandstone strata caused intense fracturing, mostly by low-displacement conjugate extensional faulting. Hangingwall rocks are less fractured than footwall rocks due to their different composition and rheology, which favoured abundant dissolution-cementation processes and extensional faulting along less numerous, higher displacement shear zones. We propose an evolutionary model of the CF that starts with upward propagation as a blind extensional fault dissecting the previously formed thrust-related anticline

  8. Glossary of class names of polymers based on chemical structure and molecular architecture (IUPAC Recommendations 2009)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Baron, M.; Hellwich, K. H.; Hess, M.; Horie, K.; Jenkins, A.D.; Jones, R. G.; Kahovec, Jaroslav; Kratochvíl, Pavel; Metanomski, W. V.; Mormann, W.; Stepto, R. F. T.; Vohlídal, J.; Wilks, E. S.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 81, č. 6 (2009), s. 1131-1183. ISSN 0033-4545 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LA09028 Keywords : IUPAC Polymer Division * macromolecule architecture * polymer class names Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 2.289, year: 2009

  9. Visual product architecture modelling for structuring data in a PLM system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Hans Peter Lomholt; Mortensen, Niels Henrik

    2012-01-01

    in a company to support the development of a family of products, as well as the reasons leading to the use of the specific model and its terminology. The fundamental idea for using the architecture model is that an improved understanding of the whole product system, will lead to better decision...

  10. The folding mechanism of collagen-like model peptides explored through detailed molecular simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Stultz, Collin M.

    2006-01-01

    Collagen has a unique folding mechanism that begins with the formation of a triple-helical structure near its C terminus followed by propagation of this structure to the N terminus. To elucidate factors that affect the folding of collagen, we explored the folding pathway of collagen-like model peptides using detailed molecular simulations with explicit solvent. Using biased molecular dynamics we examined the latter stages of folding of a peptide model of native collagen, (Pro-Hyp-Gly)10, and ...

  11. Marine-derived collagen biomaterials from echinoderm connective tissues

    KAUST Repository

    Ferrario, Cinzia

    2016-03-31

    The use of marine collagens is a hot topic in the field of tissue engineering. Echinoderms possess unique connective tissues (Mutable Collagenous Tissues, MCTs) which can represent an innovative source of collagen to develop collagen barrier-membranes for Guided Tissue Regeneration (GTR). In the present work we used MCTs from different echinoderm models (sea urchin, starfish and sea cucumber) to produce echinoderm-derived collagen membranes (EDCMs). Commercial membranes for GTR or soluble/reassembled (fibrillar) bovine collagen substrates were used as controls. The three EDCMs were similar among each other in terms of structure and mechanical performances and were much thinner and mechanically more resistant than the commercial membranes. Number of fibroblasts seeded on sea-urchin membranes were comparable to the bovine collagen substrates. Cell morphology on all EDCMs was similar to that of structurally comparable (reassembled) bovine collagen substrates. Overall, echinoderms, and sea urchins particularly, are alternative collagen sources to produce efficient GTR membranes. Sea urchins display a further advantage in terms of eco-sustainability by recycling tissues from food wastes.

  12. Effect of temperature on the changes of structure and molecular weight of Apostichopus japonicus collagen%温度对刺参胶原蛋白结构和分子量变化的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王哲平; 刘淇; 曹荣; 殷邦忠

    2011-01-01

    采用胃蛋白酶在酸性条件下酶解提取刺参体壁胶原蛋白并对其分离纯化,然后将胶原蛋白分别在不同温度下进行热处理,经SDS-PAGE电泳和傅立叶变换红外扫描等方法分析热处理前后胶原蛋白的生化特征.结果显示,提取的胶原蛋白具有较高的纯度,且存在完整的三股螺旋结构;胶原蛋白在40℃热处理条件下不仅二级结构被破坏,一级结构也被部分破坏,α链和β链条带消失,分子量降低(<100kDa);70℃达到了各种肽链叠加所表现出的热收缩温度,肽链发生聚集、收缩,分子量开始升高;80℃加热条件下,肽链进一步收缩,分子量达到120kDa左右,而且仍保持一定量的二级结构;当温度超过100℃时,胶原蛋白一级结构被严重破坏.%The collagen from sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus body wall was extracted by pepsin digestion under acidic condition. After separation and purification, the collagen was heated at varied temperatures, and then the biochemical characteristics were determined by the methods of SDS-PAGE and FT-IR scanning. The result indicated that the extracted collagen was of high purity and with integrated triple-helix structure; After being heated at 40 °C , the secondary structure of the collagen was destroyed, while some primary structure was partially destroyed,with disappearence of α chain and β chain, and the molecular weight of peptide chains reduced(<100kDa); At 70 °C , the peptide chains began to aggregate and shrink, and the molecular weight increased; Up to 80 °C , the peptide chains further contracted with 120kDa MW but still maintained some secondary structure; When heated at above 100 °C , the primary structure of the collagen was destroyed seriously.

  13. The Impact of Collagen Fibril Polarity on Second Harmonic Generation Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couture, Charles-André; Bancelin, Stéphane; Van der Kolk, Jarno; Popov, Konstantin; Rivard, Maxime; Légaré, Katherine; Martel, Gabrielle; Richard, Hélène; Brown, Cameron; Laverty, Sheila; Ramunno, Lora; Légaré, François

    2015-12-15

    In this work, we report the implementation of interferometric second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy with femtosecond pulses. As a proof of concept, we imaged the phase distribution of SHG signal from the complex collagen architecture of juvenile equine growth cartilage. The results are analyzed in respect to numerical simulations to extract the relative orientation of collagen fibrils within the tissue. Our results reveal large domains of constant phase together with regions of quasi-random phase, which are correlated to respectively high- and low-intensity regions in the standard SHG images. A comparison with polarization-resolved SHG highlights the crucial role of relative fibril polarity in determining the SHG signal intensity. Indeed, it appears that even a well-organized noncentrosymmetric structure emits low SHG signal intensity if it has no predominant local polarity. This work illustrates how the complex architecture of noncentrosymmetric scatterers at the nanoscale governs the coherent building of SHG signal within the focal volume and is a key advance toward a complete understanding of the structural origin of SHG signals from tissues. PMID:26682809

  14. Collagen a natural scaffold for biology and engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collagen, the most abundant protein in mammals, constitutes a quarter of the animal's total weight. The unique structure of fibrous collagens, a long triple helix that further associates into fibers, provides an insoluble scaffold that gives strength and form to the skin, tendons, bones, cornea and...

  15. Time · Space · Architecture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    In the 20th century a Swiss writer wrote a book titled Time, Space and Architecture, in which he discussed the relationship between architecture and the times. Fifty years after that, this paper adopts the same title, hoping to deepen the understanding of the space-time structure in architecture and contribute to the new exploration of architectural forms.

  16. Abnormal dentin structure in two novel gene mutations [COL1A1, Arg134Cys] and [ADAMTS2, Trp795-to-ter] causing rare type I collagen disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Coster, P J; Cornelissen, M; De Paepe, A; Martens, L C; Vral, A

    2007-02-01

    Histological and ultrastructural observations of dentin of two patients affected with rare types of type I collagen disorders are presented. In the first case, a homozygous nonsense mutation in ADAMTS2 (substitution of a codon for tryptophan by a stopcodon) causes type VIIC Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) with multiple tooth agenesis and focal dysplastic dentin defects. In the second case, a missense mutation in COL1A1 (substitution of arginine by cysteine) results in a type I EDS phenotype with clinically normal-appearing dentition. Tooth samples are investigated by using light microscopy (LM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and immunostaining for types I and III collagen, and tenascin. These are compared with samples from patients with types III and IV osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) in association with dentinogenesis imperfecta (DI), showing a consistently abnormal appearance of the dentin in all specimens, with variations being primarily those of degree of change. Similarities in histological changes include the alternating presence of normal and severe pathological areas in primary and secondary dentin, the latter being characterized by large canal-like structures in atubular areas. Ultrastructural evidence of pathological dentinogenesis include abnormal distribution, size and organization of collagen fibers, which may also be found in clinically unaffected teeth. The histological and ultrastructural changes seen can be explained on the basis of odontoblast dysfunction which may be secondary to the collagen defect, interfering with different levels of odontoblast cell function and intercellular communication. These observations on (ultra)structural dentin defects associated with the two novel gene mutations are the first ever reported. PMID:17118335

  17. Preventive measures for the protection of architectural heritage structures against flooding

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Drdácký, Miloš; Slížková, Zuzana

    Vol. 60. Mnichov : ICOMOS, Nationalkomitee der Bundesrepublik Deutschland, 2015 - (Will, T.; Lieske, H.), s. 82-89 ISBN 978-3-945880-05-0. - (ICOMOS. Journal of the German national comittee. 60). [Internationale Tagung des Deutschen Nationalkomitees von ICOMOS in Zusammenarbeit mit der Arbeitsgruppe Denkmalpflege und Hochwasserschutz. Drážďany (DE), 13.06.2015-14.06.2015] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP105/12/G059 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) CHEF Source of funding: R - rámcový projekt EK Keywords : architectural heritage * preventive measures * flood protection Subject RIV: AL - Art, Architecture, Cultural Heritage http://www.icomos.de/pdf/Heft_LX.pdf

  18. Preventive measures for the protection of architectural heritage structures against flooding

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Drdácký, Miloš; Slížková, Zuzana

    Vol. 60. Mnichov: ICOMOS, Nationalkomitee der Bundesrepublik Deutschland, 2015 - (Will, T.; Lieske, H.), s. 82-89. (ICOMOS. Journal of the German national comittee. 60). ISBN 978-3-945880-05-0. [Internationale Tagung des Deutschen Nationalkomitees von ICOMOS in Zusammenarbeit mit der Arbeitsgruppe Denkmalpflege und Hochwasserschutz. Drážďany (DE), 13.06.2015-14.06.2015] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP105/12/G059 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) CHEF Source of funding: R - rámcový projekt EK Keywords : architectural heritage * preventive measures * flood protection Subject RIV: AL - Art, Architecture, Cultural Heritage http://www.icomos.de/pdf/Heft_LX.pdf

  19. Formative Assessment Structures in First and Second Year Architectural Technology to Enhance Student Learning

    OpenAIRE

    Prunty, Catherine; Crean, Maire

    2010-01-01

    The multiplicity of learning and teaching theories and strategies that a teacher can use to assist the process of developing greater student learning and engagement is very broad and it can be overwhelming determining what best suits a teacher’s particular environment or the type of learning required to be undertaken by the learners. However some in particular stand out from an Architectural Technology perspective that we believe will benefit many other taught project based Engineering and Bu...

  20. Optimizing Data-Oriented Architecture for Generating Random Numbers Uniform with Stack Machines Indeterminate Structure

    OpenAIRE

    Razieh Yosefpoor; Pouya Derakhshan

    2013-01-01

    Regarding the importance of statistics and doing statistical calculations by computer, it is necessary to find the ways in accordance with advanced and new computer sciences for calculation. In this research, architecture is presented using data-oriented approach to optimize number distribution and usage of memory and expedite the computing of generating random numbers. To achieve these goals, generating random numbers has been modeled uniformly using data-oriented approach. Data-oriented app...

  1. A functional and structural Mongolian Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris var. mongolica) model integrating architecture, biomass and effects of precipitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feng; Letort, Véronique; Lu, Qi; Bai, Xuefeng; Guo, Yan; de Reffye, Philippe; Li, Baoguo

    2012-01-01

    Mongolian Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris var. mongolica) is one of the principal tree species in the network of Three-North Shelterbelt for windbreak and sand stabilisation in China. The functions of shelterbelts are highly correlated with the architecture and eco-physiological processes of individual tree. Thus, model-assisted analysis of canopy architecture and function dynamic in Mongolian Scots pine is of value for better understanding its role and behaviour within shelterbelt ecosystems in these arid and semiarid regions. We present here a single-tree functional and structural model, derived from the GreenLab model, which is adapted for young Mongolian Scots pines by incorporation of plant biomass production, allocation, allometric rules and soil water dynamics. The model is calibrated and validated based on experimental measurements taken on Mongolian Scots pines in 2007 and 2006 under local meteorological conditions. Measurements include plant biomass, topology and geometry, as well as soil attributes and standard meteorological data. After calibration, the model allows reconstruction of three-dimensional (3D) canopy architecture and biomass dynamics for trees from one- to six-year-old at the same site using meteorological data for the six years from 2001 to 2006. Sensitivity analysis indicates that rainfall variation has more influence on biomass increment than on architecture, and the internode and needle compartments and the aboveground biomass respond linearly to increases in precipitation. Sensitivity analysis also shows that the balance between internode and needle growth varies only slightly within the range of precipitations considered here. The model is expected to be used to investigate the growth of Mongolian Scots pines in other regions with different soils and climates. PMID:22927982

  2. A functional and structural Mongolian Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris var. mongolica model integrating architecture, biomass and effects of precipitation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Wang

    Full Text Available Mongolian Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris var. mongolica is one of the principal tree species in the network of Three-North Shelterbelt for windbreak and sand stabilisation in China. The functions of shelterbelts are highly correlated with the architecture and eco-physiological processes of individual tree. Thus, model-assisted analysis of canopy architecture and function dynamic in Mongolian Scots pine is of value for better understanding its role and behaviour within shelterbelt ecosystems in these arid and semiarid regions. We present here a single-tree functional and structural model, derived from the GreenLab model, which is adapted for young Mongolian Scots pines by incorporation of plant biomass production, allocation, allometric rules and soil water dynamics. The model is calibrated and validated based on experimental measurements taken on Mongolian Scots pines in 2007 and 2006 under local meteorological conditions. Measurements include plant biomass, topology and geometry, as well as soil attributes and standard meteorological data. After calibration, the model allows reconstruction of three-dimensional (3D canopy architecture and biomass dynamics for trees from one- to six-year-old at the same site using meteorological data for the six years from 2001 to 2006. Sensitivity analysis indicates that rainfall variation has more influence on biomass increment than on architecture, and the internode and needle compartments and the aboveground biomass respond linearly to increases in precipitation. Sensitivity analysis also shows that the balance between internode and needle growth varies only slightly within the range of precipitations considered here. The model is expected to be used to investigate the growth of Mongolian Scots pines in other regions with different soils and climates.

  3. The Role of Collagen Organization on the Properties of Bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnero, Patrick

    2015-09-01

    Bone is a complex tissue constituted by a collagen matrix filled in with crystal of hydroxyapatite (HAP). Bone mechanical properties are influenced by the collagen matrix which is organized into hierarchical structures from the individual type I collagen heterotrimer flanked by linear telopeptides at each end to the collagen fibrils that are interconnected by enzymatic and non-enzymatic cross-links. Although most studies focused on the role of collagen cross-links in bone strength, other organizational features may also play a role. At the molecular level it has been shown that homotrimer of type I collagen found in bone tissue of some patients with osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is characterized by decreased mechanical competence compared to the regular heterotrimer. The state of C-telopeptide isomerization-which can be estimated by the measurement in body fluids of the native and isomerized isoforms-has also been shown to be associated with bone strength, particularly the post-yield properties independent of bone size and bone mineral density. Other higher hierarchical features of collagen organization have shown to be associated with changes in bone mechanical behavior in ex vivo models and may also be relevant to explain bone fragility in diseases characterized by collagen abnormalities e.g., OI and Paget's disease. These include the orientation of collagen fibrils in a regular longitudinal direction, the D-spacing period between collagen fibrils and the collagen-HAP interfacial bonding. Preliminary data indicate that some of these organizational features can change during treatment with bisphosphonate, raloxifene, and PTH suggesting that they may contribute to their anti-fracture efficacy. It remains however to be determined which of these parameters play a specific and independent role in bone matrix properties, what is the magnitude of mechanical strength explained by collagen organization, whether they are relevant to explain osteoporosis-induced bone

  4. Effect of silver nanoparticles and hydroxyproline, administered in ovo, on the development of blood vessels and cartilage collagen structure in chicken embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Iwona; Hotowy, Anna; Sawosz, Ewa; Grodzik, Marta; Wierzbicki, Mateusz; Kutwin, Marta; Jaworski, Sławomir; Chwalibog, André

    2015-01-01

    It has been considered that concentrations of certain amino acids in the egg are not sufficient to fully support embryonic development of modern broilers. In this study we evaluated embryo growth and development with particular emphasis on one of the major components of connective tissue, collagen. Experiments were performed on Ross 308 chicken embryos from 160 fertilised eggs. Experimental solutions of silver nanoparticles (Ag), hydroxyproline solution (Hyp) and a complex of silver nanoparticles with hydroxyproline (AgHyp) were injected into albumen, and embryos were incubated until day 20. An assessment of the mass of embryo and selected organs was carried out followed by measurements of the expression of the key signalling factors' fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) and vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A). Finally, an evaluation of collagen microstructure using scanning electron microscopy was performed. Our results clearly indicate that Hyp, Ag and AgHyp administered in ovo to chicken embryos did not harm embryos. Comparing to the control group, Hyp, Ag and the AgHyp complex significantly upregulated expression of the FGF-2 at the mRNA and protein levels. Moreover, Hyp, Ag and, in particular, the complex of AgHyp significantly increased blood vessel size, cartilage collagen fibre lattice size and bundle thickness. The general conclusion from this study is that AgHyp treatment may help to build a stronger and longer lasting form of collagen fibres. PMID:25530495

  5. Mechanisms of lamellar collagen formation in connective tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazanfari, Samaneh; Khademhosseini, Ali; Smit, Theodoor H

    2016-08-01

    The objective of tissue engineering is to regenerate functional tissues. Engineering functional tissues requires an understanding of the mechanisms that guide the formation and evolution of structure in the extracellular matrix (ECM). In particular, the three-dimensional (3D) collagen fiber arrangement is important as it is the key structural determinant that provides mechanical integrity and biological function. In this review, we survey the current knowledge on collagen organization mechanisms that can be applied to create well-structured functional lamellar tissues and in particular intervertebral disc and cornea. Thus far, the mechanisms behind the formation of cross-aligned collagen fibers in the lamellar structures is not fully understood. We start with cell-induced collagen alignment and strain-stabilization behavior mechanisms which can explain a single anisotropically aligned collagen fiber layer. These mechanisms may explain why there is anisotropy in a single layer in the first place. However, they cannot explain why a consecutive collagen layer is laid down with an alternating alignment. Therefore, we explored another mechanism, called liquid crystal phasing. While dense concentrations of collagen show such behavior, there is little evidence that the conditions for liquid crystal phasing are actually met in vivo. Instead, lysyl aldehyde-derived collagen cross-links have been found essential for correct lamellar matrix deposition. Furthermore, we suggest that supra-cellular (tissue-level) shear stress may be instrumental in the alignment of collagen fibers. Understanding the potential mechanisms behind the lamellar collagen structure in connective tissues will lead to further improvement of the regeneration strategies of functional complex lamellar tissues. PMID:27162076

  6. Collagen and injectable fillers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jacqueline T; Perkins, Stephen W; Hamilton, Mark M

    2002-02-01

    Soft tissue augmentation of facial rhytids, scars, and deformities is a frequently performed office procedure. This article reviews the available biologic (collagen, Dermalogen, Autologen, Isolagen, autologous fat, Fibrel, hyaluronic acid derivatives, particulate fascia lata, micronized Alloderm) and alloplastic (silicone, Bioplastique, and Artecoll) soft tissue injectable fillers. PMID:11781208

  7. Exploring a role in tanning for the gap region of the collagen fibril

    Science.gov (United States)

    Three-dimensional structures of fibrillar collagens have been the subject of numerous studies for more than 60 years. Electron micrographs of stained collagen fibrils display a pattern of alternating light and dark bands perpendicular to the axis of the collagen fibril. Light bands correspond to r...

  8. Long-term response to genomic selection: effects of estimation method and reference population structure for different genetic architectures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bastiaansen John WM

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genomic selection has become an important tool in the genetic improvement of animals and plants. The objective of this study was to investigate the impacts of breeding value estimation method, reference population structure, and trait genetic architecture, on long-term response to genomic selection without updating marker effects. Methods Three methods were used to estimate genomic breeding values: a BLUP method with relationships estimated from genome-wide markers (GBLUP, a Bayesian method, and a partial least squares regression method (PLSR. A shallow (individuals from one generation or deep reference population (individuals from five generations was used with each method. The effects of the different selection approaches were compared under four different genetic architectures for the trait under selection. Selection was based on one of the three genomic breeding values, on pedigree BLUP breeding values, or performed at random. Selection continued for ten generations. Results Differences in long-term selection response were small. For a genetic architecture with a very small number of three to four quantitative trait loci (QTL, the Bayesian method achieved a response that was 0.05 to 0.1 genetic standard deviation higher than other methods in generation 10. For genetic architectures with approximately 30 to 300 QTL, PLSR (shallow reference or GBLUP (deep reference had an average advantage of 0.2 genetic standard deviation over the Bayesian method in generation 10. GBLUP resulted in 0.6% and 0.9% less inbreeding than PLSR and BM and on average a one third smaller reduction of genetic variance. Responses in early generations were greater with the shallow reference population while long-term response was not affected by reference population structure. Conclusions The ranking of estimation methods was different with than without selection. Under selection, applying GBLUP led to lower inbreeding and a smaller reduction of

  9. Architectural Slicing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Henrik Bærbak; Hansen, Klaus Marius

    2013-01-01

    Architectural prototyping is a widely used practice, con- cerned with taking architectural decisions through experiments with light- weight implementations. However, many architectural decisions are only taken when systems are already (partially) implemented. This is prob- lematic in the context of...... architectural prototyping since experiments with full systems are complex and expensive and thus architectural learn- ing is hindered. In this paper, we propose a novel technique for harvest- ing architectural prototypes from existing systems, \\architectural slic- ing", based on dynamic program slicing. Given a...... system and a slicing criterion, architectural slicing produces an architectural prototype that contain the elements in the architecture that are dependent on the ele- ments in the slicing criterion. Furthermore, we present an initial design and implementation of an architectural slicer for Java....

  10. Neighborhood structure influences the convergence in light capture efficiency and carbon gain: an architectural approach for cloud forest shrubs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán Q, J Antonio; Cordero S, Roberto A

    2016-06-01

    Although plant competition is recognized as a fundamental factor that limits survival and species coexistence, its relative importance on light capture efficiency and carbon gain is not well understood. Here, we propose a new framework to explain the effects of neighborhood structures and light availability on plant attributes and their effect on plant performance in two understory shade-tolerant species (Palicourea padifolia (Roem. & Schult.) C.M. Taylor & Lorence and Psychotria elata (Swartz)) within two successional stages of a cloud forest in Costa Rica. Features of plant neighborhood physical structure and light availability, estimated by hemispherical photographs, were used to characterize the plant competition. Plant architecture, leaf attributes and gas exchange parameters extracted from the light-response curve were used as functional plant attributes, while an index of light capture efficiency (silhouette to total area ratio, averaged over all viewing angles, STAR) and carbon gain were used as indicators of plant performance. This framework is based in a partial least square Path model, which suggests that changes in plant performance in both species were affected in two ways: (i) increasing size and decreasing distance of neighbors cause changes in plant architecture (higher crown density and greater leaf dispersion), which contribute to lower STAR and subsequently lower carbon gain; and (ii) reductions in light availability caused by the neighbors also decrease plant carbon gain. The effect of neighbors on STAR and carbon gain were similar for the two forests sites, which were at different stages of succession, suggesting that the architectural changes of the two understory species reflect functional convergence in response to plant competition. Because STAR and carbon gain are variables that depend on multiple plant attributes and environmental characteristics, we suggest that changes in these features can be used as a whole-plant response approach to

  11. The effect of purity upon the triple-helical stability of collagenous peptides

    OpenAIRE

    David A. Slatter; Bihan, Dominique G.; Farndale, Richard W.

    2011-01-01

    Collagen is the fundamental structural protein, comprising 25–35% of the total body protein, its rod-like triple helix providing support in many tissues. Our laboratory has synthesised 113 Toolkit peptides, each 63 residues long, covering the entirety of the homotrimeric helix sequence of collagen II and collagen III. These are used primarily to investigate protein–collagen interactions, from which biomedical applications are under development. Upon increasing the temperature of a Toolkit pep...

  12. LARP6 Meets Collagen mRNA: Specific Regulation of Type I Collagen Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yujie Zhang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Type I collagen is the most abundant structural protein in all vertebrates, but its constitutive rate of synthesis is low due to long half-life of the protein (60–70 days. However, several hundred fold increased production of type I collagen is often seen in reparative or reactive fibrosis. The mechanism which is responsible for this dramatic upregulation is complex, including multiple levels of regulation. However, posttranscriptional regulation evidently plays a predominant role. Posttranscriptional regulation comprises processing, transport, stabilization and translation of mRNAs and is executed by RNA binding proteins. There are about 800 RNA binding proteins, but only one, La ribonucleoprotein domain family member 6 (LARP6, is specifically involved in type I collagen regulation. In the 5′untranslated region (5’UTR of mRNAs encoding for type I and type III collagens there is an evolutionally conserved stem-loop (SL structure; this structure is not found in any other mRNA, including any other collagen mRNA. LARP6 binds to the 5′SL in sequence specific manner to regulate stability of collagen mRNAs and their translatability. Here, we will review current understanding of how is LARP6 involved in posttranscriptional regulation of collagen mRNAs. We will also discuss how other proteins recruited by LARP6, including nonmuscle myosin, vimentin, serine threonine kinase receptor associated protein (STRAP, 25 kD FK506 binding protein (FKBP25 and RNA helicase A (RHA, contribute to this process.

  13. The role of crown architecture for light harvesting and carbon gain in extreme light environments assessed with a structurally realistic 3-D model

    OpenAIRE

    Valladares, Fernando; Pearcy, Robert W

    2000-01-01

    Main results from different studies of crown architecture adaptation to extreme light environments are presented. Light capture and carbon gain by plants from low (forest understory) and high (open Mediterranean-type ecosystems) light environments were simulated with a 3-D model (YPLANT), which was developed specifically to analyse the structural features that determine light interception and photosynthesis at the whole plant level. Distantly related taxa with contrasting architectures exhibi...

  14. Collagen synthesis in rat gingiva during tooth movement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boisson, M.; Gianelly, A.A.

    1981-09-01

    The response of the gingiva to an increased interdental space was studied by creating a diastema between the central incisors of rats and analyzing autoradiographically the incorporation of H3 proline in the gingiva to detect increased collagen production. In addition, conventional histologic methods were used to determine changes in the gingival architecture. The results indicate that the gingiva responds to an increased space in at least two ways. One is the production of more collagen fibers. The other involves the reorientation of the existing fibers in a horizontal plane as the gingival papilla becomes flattened.

  15. Collagen synthesis in rat gingiva during tooth movement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The response of the gingiva to an increased interdental space was studied by creating a diastema between the central incisors of rats and analyzing autoradiographically the incorporation of H3 proline in the gingiva to detect increased collagen production. In addition, conventional histologic methods were used to determine changes in the gingival architecture. The results indicate that the gingiva responds to an increased space in at least two ways. One is the production of more collagen fibers. The other involves the reorientation of the existing fibers in a horizontal plane as the gingival papilla becomes flattened

  16. Textile Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heimdal, Elisabeth Jacobsen

    2010-01-01

    Textiles can be used as building skins, adding new aesthetic and functional qualities to architecture. Just like we as humans can put on a coat, buildings can also get dressed. Depending on our mood, or on the weather, we can change coat, and so can the building. But the idea of using textiles...... to create human habitation is not new. As Diether S. Hope phrases it, referring to tents: The history of development of humanity would be barely conceivable without free spanning textile membrane structures....

  17. Architectural Prototyping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bardram, Jakob; Christensen, Henrik Bærbak; Hansen, Klaus Marius

    2004-01-01

    A major part of software architecture design is learning how specific architectural designs balance the concerns of stakeholders. We explore the notion of "architectural prototypes", correspondingly architectural prototyping, as a means of using executable prototypes to investigate stakeholders......' concerns with respect to a system under development. An architectural prototype is primarily a learning and communication vehicle used to explore and experiment with alternative architectural styles, features, and patterns in order to balance different architectural qualities. The use of architectural...... prototypes in the development process is discussed, and we argue that such prototypes can play a role throughout the entire process. The use of architectural prototypes is illustrated by three distinct cases of creating software systems. We argue that architectural prototyping can provide key insights that...

  18. Architectural prototyping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bardram, Jakob Eyvind; Christensen, Henrik Bærbak; Hansen, Klaus Marius

    2004-01-01

    A major part of software architecture design is learning how specific architectural designs balance the concerns of stakeholders. We explore the notion of "architectural prototypes", correspondingly architectural prototyping, as a means of using executable prototypes to investigate stakeholders......' concerns with respect to a system under development. An architectural prototype is primarily a learning and communication vehicle used to explore and experiment with alternative architectural styles, features, and patterns in order to balance different architectural qualities. The use of architectural...... prototypes in the development process is discussed, and we argue that such prototypes can play a role throughout the entire process. The use of architectural prototypes is illustrated by three distinct cases of creating software systems. We argue that architectural prototyping can provide key insights that...

  19. Observations on morphologic changes in the aging and degenerating human disc: Secondary collagen alterations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanley Edward N

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the annulus, collagen fibers that make up the lamellae have a wavy, planar crimped pattern. This crimping plays a role in disc biomechanical function by allowing collagen fibers to stretch during compression. The relationship between morphologic changes in the aging/degenerating disc and collagen crimping have not been explored. Methods Ultrastructural studies were performed on annulus tissue from 29 control (normal donors (aged newborn to 79 years and surgical specimens from 49 patients (aged 16 to 77 years. Light microscopy and specialized image analysis to visualize crimping was performed on additional control and surgical specimens. Human intervertebral disc tissue from the annulus was obtained in a prospective morphologic study of the annulus. Studies were approved by the authors' Human Subjects Institutional Review Board. Results Three types of morphologic changes were found to alter the crimping morphology of collagen: 1 encircling layers of unusual matrix disrupted the lamellar collagen architecture; 2 collagen fibers were reduced in amount, and 3 collagen was absent in regions with focal matrix loss. Conclusions Although proteoglycan loss is well recognized as playing a role in the decreased shock absorber function of the aging/degenerating disc, collagen changes have received little attention. This study suggests that important stretch responses of collagen made possible by collagen crimping may be markedly altered by morphologic changes during aging/degeneration and may contribute to the early tissue changes involved in annular tears.

  20. The 3-D collagen structure of equine articular cartilage, characterized using variable-angle-of-incidence polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugryumova, Nadya; Gangnus, Sergei V.; Matcher, Stephen J.

    2005-08-01

    Polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography has been used to spatially map the birefringence of equine articular cartilage. Images obtained in the vicinity of visible osteoarthritic lesions display a characteristic disruption of the regular birefringence bands shown by normal cartilage. We also note that significant (e.g. ×2) variations in the apparent birefringence of samples taken from young (18 month) animals that otherwise appear visually homogeneous are found over spatial scales of a few millimeters. We suggest that whilst some of this variation may be due to changes in the intrinsic birefringence of the tissue, the 3-D orientation of the collagen fibers relative to the plane of the joint surface should also be taken into account. We propose a method based on multiple angles of illumination to determine the polar angle of the collagen fibers.

  1. Variable angle-of-incidence polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography: its use to study the 3D collagen structure of equine articular cartilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugryumova, Nadya; Gangnus, Sergei V.; Matcher, Stephen J.

    2006-02-01

    Polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography has been used to spatially map the birefringence of equine articular cartilage. The polar orientation of the collagen fibers relative to the plane of the joint surface must be taken into account if a quantitative measurement of true birefringence is required. Using a series of images taken at different angles of illumination, we determine the fiber polar angle and true birefringence at one site on a sample of equine cartilage, on the assumption that the fibers lie within the plane of imaging. We propose a more general method based on the extended Jones matrix formalism to determine both the polar and azimuthal orientation of the collagen fibers as well as the true birefringence as functions of depth.

  2. The effect of riboflavin/UVA collagen cross-linking therapy on the structure and hydrodynamic behaviour of the ungulate and rabbit corneal stroma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sally Hayes

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To examine the effect of riboflavin/UVA corneal crosslinking on stromal ultrastructure and hydrodynamic behaviour. METHODS: One hundred and seventeen enucleated ungulate eyes (112 pig and 5 sheep and 3 pairs of rabbit eyes, with corneal epithelium removed, were divided into four treatment groups: Group 1 (28 pig, 2 sheep and 3 rabbits were untreated; Group 2 (24 pig were exposed to UVA light (3.04 mW/cm(2 for 30 minutes and Group 3 (29 pig and Group 4 (31 pig, 3 sheep and 3 rabbits had riboflavin eye drops applied to the corneal surface every 5 minutes for 35 minutes. Five minutes after the initial riboflavin instillation, the corneas in Group 4 experienced a 30 minute exposure to UVA light (3.04 mW/cm(2. X-ray scattering was used to obtain measurements of collagen interfibrillar spacing, spatial order, fibril diameter, D-periodicity and intermolecular spacing throughout the whole tissue thickness and as a function of tissue depth in the treated and untreated corneas. The effect of each treatment on the hydrodynamic behaviour of the cornea (its ability to swell in saline solution and its resistance to enzymatic digestion were assessed using in vitro laboratory techniques. RESULTS: Corneal thickness decreased significantly following riboflavin application (p<0.01 and also to a lesser extent after UVA exposure (p<0.05. With the exception of the spatial order factor, which was higher in Group 4 than Group 1 (p<0.01, all other measured collagen parameters were unaltered by cross-linking, even within the most anterior 300 microns of the cornea. The cross-linking treatment had no effect on the hydrodynamic behaviour of the cornea but did cause a significant increase in its resistance to enzymatic digestion. CONCLUSIONS: It seems likely that cross-links formed during riboflavin/UVA therapy occur predominantly at the collagen fibril surface and in the protein network surrounding the collagen.

  3. Unraveling the Architecture and Structural Dynamics of Pathogens by High-Resolution in vitro Atomic Force Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malkin, A J; Plomp, M; Leighton, T J; McPherson, A; Wheeler, K E

    2005-04-12

    Progress in structural biology very much depends upon the development of new high-resolution techniques and tools. Despite decades of study of viruses, bacteria and bacterial spores and their pressing importance in human medicine and biodefense, many of their structural properties are poorly understood. Thus, characterization and understanding of the architecture of protein surface and internal structures of pathogens is critical to elucidating mechanisms of disease, immune response, physicochemical properties, environmental resistance and development of countermeasures against bioterrorist agents. Furthermore, even though complete genome sequences are available for various pathogens, the structure-function relationships are not understood. Because of their lack of symmetry and heterogeneity, large human pathogens are often refractory to X-ray crystallographic analysis or reconstruction by cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM). An alternative high-resolution method to examine native structure of pathogens is atomic force microscopy (AFM), which allows direct visualization of macromolecular assemblies at near-molecular resolution. The capability to image single pathogen surfaces at nanometer scale in vitro would profoundly impact mechanistic and structural studies of pathogenesis, immunobiology, specific cellular processes, environmental dynamics and biotransformation.

  4. Expression of the Structure Gene (Pro)collagen of Alpaca Skin%羊驼皮肤结构基因(原)胶原的表达特点

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范瑞文; 杜红阳; 刘一飞; 董常生

    2009-01-01

    为了揭示羊驼皮肤胶原蛋白(Collagen)在皮肤结构发生中的分子机制,本研究通过构建羊驼皮肤cD-NA文库并进行大规模测序分析,结果表明:在羊驼皮肤内发现只有纤维类胶原表达,即type Ⅰ,type Ⅲ,type Ⅴ collagen,其中type Ⅰ表达最高,type Ⅲ和type Ⅴ表达低;然而,在羊驼皮肤内未发现各类collagen相对应的原胶原(proeollagen),其成员procollagen type Ⅰ,typeⅢ,type Ⅳ,type Ⅵ,typeⅦ,typeⅤⅧ在表达,且type Ⅰ远远高于其他家族成员的表达,由此推断collagen和procollagen type Ⅰ在羊驼皮肤结构发生中起主要作用,羊驼皮肤内的蛋白水解机制可能使procollagen产生不同类型的collagen.

  5. A new architecture as transparent electrodes for solar and IR applications based on photonic structures via soft lithography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuang, Ping [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Transparent conducting electrodes with the combination of high optical transmission and good electrical conductivity are essential for solar energy harvesting and electric lighting devices. Currently, indium tin oxide (ITO) is used because ITO offers relatively high transparency (>80%) to visible light and low sheet resistance (Rs = 10 ohms/square (Ω /2)) for electrical conduction. However, ITO is costly due to limited indium reserves, and it is brittle. These disadvantages have motivated the search for other conducting electrodes with similar or better properties. There has been research on a variety of electrode structures involving carbon nanotube networks, graphene films, nanowire and nanopatterned meshes and grids. Due to their novel characteristics in light manipulation and collection, photonic crystal structures show promise for further improvement. Here, we report on a new architecture consisting of nanoscale high aspect ratio metallic photonic structures as transparent electrodes fabricated via a combination of processes. For (Au) and silver (Ag) structures, the visible light transmission can reach as high as 80%, and the sheet resistance of the structure can be as low as 3.2Ω /2. The optical transparency of the high aspect ratio metal structures at visible wavelength range is comparable to that of ITO glass, while their sheet resistance is more than 3 times lower, which indicates a much higher electrical conductivity of the metal structures. Furthermore, the high aspect ratio metal structures have very high infrared (IR) reflection (90%) for the transverse magnetic (TM) mode, which can lead to the development of fabrication of metallic structures as IR filters for heat control applications. Investigations of interdigitated structures based on the high aspect ratio metal electrodes are ongoing to study the feasibility in smart window applications in light transmission modulation.

  6. Attachment and conformational changes of collagen on bioactive glass surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magyari, K; Vanea, E; Baia, L; Simon, V

    2016-05-12

    The proteins adsorption on biomaterials surface leads to changes in their structural conformation that may further influence the adhesion, migration and growth of cells. The aim of this study was to examine the attachment of collagen (calf skin type I) on bioactive glass powders and the conformational changes of the protein. Scanning electron microscopy analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements indicate that the collagen cover the glass surface in a nanometric thin layer. The infrared amide I absorption signal shows pronounced changes in the secondary structure of the adsorbed collagen. PMID:27175468

  7. Osmotically driven tensile stress in collagen-based mineralized tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertinetti, Luca; Masic, Admir; Schuetz, Roman; Barbetta, Aurelio; Seidt, Britta; Wagermaier, Wolfgang; Fratzl, Peter

    2015-12-01

    Collagen is the most abundant protein in mammals and its primary role is to serve as mechanical support in many extracellular matrices such as those of bones, tendons, skin or blood vessels. Water is an integral part of the collagen structure, but its role is still poorly understood, though it is well-known that the mechanical properties of collagen depend on hydration. Recently, it was shown that the conformation of the collagen triple helix changes upon water removal, leading to a contraction of the molecule with considerable forces. Here we investigate the influence of mineralization on this effect by studying bone and turkey leg tendon (TLT) as model systems. Indeed, TLT partially mineralizes so that well-aligned collagen with various mineral contents can be found in the same tendon. We show that water removal leads to collagen contraction in all cases generating tensile stresses up to 80MPa. Moreover, this contraction of collagen puts mineral particles under compression leading to strains of around 1%, which implies localized compressive loads in mineral of up to 800MPa. This suggests that collagen dehydration upon mineralization is at the origin of the compressive pre-strains commonly observed in bone mineral. PMID:25862347

  8. Collagen-hyaluronic acid scaffolds for adipose tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidenko, N; Campbell, J J; Thian, E S; Watson, C J; Cameron, R E

    2010-10-01

    Three-dimensional (3-D) in vitro models of the mammary gland require a scaffold matrix that supports the development of adipose stroma within a robust freely permeable matrix. 3-D porous collagen-hyaluronic acid (HA: 7.5% and 15%) scaffolds were produced by controlled freeze-drying technique and crosslinking with 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-carbodiimide hydrochloride. All scaffolds displayed uniform, interconnected pore structure (total porosity approximately 85%). Physical and chemical analysis showed no signs of collagen denaturation during the formation process. The values of thermal characteristics indicated that crosslinking occurred and that its efficiency was enhanced by the presence of HA. Although the crosslinking reduced the swelling of the strut material in water, the collagen-HA matrix as a whole tended to swell more and show higher dissolution resistance than pure collagen samples. The compressive modulus and elastic collapse stress were higher for collagen-HA composites. All the scaffolds were shown to support the proliferation and differentiation 3T3-L1 preadipocytes while collagen-HA samples maintained a significantly increased proportion of cycling cells (Ki-67+). Furthermore, collagen-HA composites displayed significantly raised Adipsin gene expression with adipogenic culture supplementation for 8 days vs. control conditions. These results indicate that collagen-HA scaffolds may offer robust, freely permeable 3-D matrices that enhance mammary stromal tissue development in vitro. PMID:20466086

  9. The Archaeology of Architecture. New models of analysis applied to structures of Alta Andalusia in the Iberian period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sánchez, Julia

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available New theories of architectural space, based on the philosophy of Lao-Tsé emerged at the end of nineteenth century. Interior space was now considered the core of architecture. Developing concepts of the movement of the human body in this space, new contributions focused on the detailed study of architecture have led to the creation of a new discipline called the Archaeology of Architecture. New models of analysis, based on access and visibility, are applied to the interior space of Iberian domestic and funerary structures in Alta Andalusia. The ultimate objective is to identify the interspatial relations on which Iberian society was based, and the similarities and differences which these relations produced in both types of built units.

    Desde finales del siglo XIX surgieron nuevas teorías sobre el espacio arquitectónico, basadas sobre todo en la filosofía de Lao-Tsé. El espacio interior fue considerado la esencia de la arquitectura, estando representado por el cuerpo humano y experimentado como síntesis de todos los sentidos. Posteriormente, el espacio adquirió una dimensión cuatridimensional al incorporar el movimiento a las tres euclidianas. Desarrollando estos conceptos, las nuevas aportaciones enfocadas hacia el estudio pormenorizado de la arquitectura han conducido a la creación de una nueva disciplina denominada Arqueología de la Arquitectura. Desde este área se proponen nuevos modelos de análisis, de accesos y de visibilidad, que se aplican al espacio interior de las estructuras domésticas y funerarias ibéricas de la Alta Andalucía, completándose con el estudio de los principios ordenadores de la forma arquitectónica. Su objetivo final es reconocer las relaciones interespaciales que construyó la sociedad ibérica y las similitudes o diferencias que se producen en ambos tipos de unidades edificadas, cuyos datos podrán ser contrastados en el futuro con los materiales asociados.

  10. Integration of Structural Knowledge in Design Studio Project: Assessment Study of Curriculum In Architecture Course in University Of Malaya

    OpenAIRE

    Aniza Abdul Aziz; Maha Mohani Fahmi; Lim Take Bane

    2010-01-01

    Architectural education should advance in parallel with the industrial growth of building technology. Universities as producers of future architects have yet to develop curriculums for building technology to suit the growth of the building industry. This gap between education and industrial growth has been a topic of debate for many researchers who are concerned about architectural pedagogy. Architectural instruction further aggravated the problem whereby in most architectural schools worldwi...

  11. Shining Light on Collagen: Expressing Collagen in Plants

    OpenAIRE

    Brodsky, Barbara; Kaplan, David L.

    2013-01-01

    Collagens are a remarkable group of proteins that are critical from a physiological perspective due to their diverse and versatile functions in vivo. However, collagens are challenging to generate ex vivo for biomaterials or regenerative medicine due to their complex processing and assembly into functional materials. Therefore, collagen availability remains a major unmet need for biomaterials, as relatively limited supplies of the protein in pure form are available mainly through harvesting b...

  12. Primary hepatocyte culture in collagen gel mixture and collagen sandwich

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying-Jie Wang; Hong-Ling Liu; Hai-Tao Guo; Hong-Wei Wen; Jun Liu

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To explore the methods of hepatocytes culture in a collagen gel mixture or between double layers of collagen sandwich configuration and to examine the functional and cytomorphological characteristics of cultured hepatocytes.METHODS: A two-step collagenase perfusion technique was used to isolate the hepatocytes from Wistar rats or newborn Chinese experimental piglets. The isolated hepatocytes were cultured in a collagen gel mixture or between double layers of collagen sandwich configuration respectively. The former was that rat hepatocytes were mixed with type I rat tail collagen solution till gelled, and the medium was added onto the gel. The latter was that swine hepatocytes were seeded on a plate precoated with collagen gel for 24 h, then another layer of collagen gel was overlaid, resulting in a sandwich configuration. The cytomorphological characteristics, albumin secretion, and LDH-release of the hepatocytes cultured in these two models were examined.RESULTS: Freshly isolated rat hepatocytes were successfully mixed and fixed in collagen gel, and cultured in the gel condition. During the culture period, the urea synthesized and secreted by rat hepatocytes was detected throughout the period. Likewise, newborn experimental piglet hepatocytes were successfully fixed between the double layers of collagen gel, forming a sandwich configuration.Within a week of culture, the albumin secreted by swine hepatocytes was detected by SDS/PAGE analysis. The typical cytomorphological characteristics of the hepatocytes cultured by the above two culture models were found under a phasecontrast microscope. There was little LDH-release during the culture period.CONCLUSION: Both collagen gel mixture and double layers of collagen sandwich configuration can provide cultural conditions much closer to in vivoenvironment, and are helpful for maintaining specific hepatic fiJnctions and cytomorphological characteristics. A collagen gel mixture culture may be more eligible for the

  13. IT Architecture For Dummies

    CERN Document Server

    Hausman, Kalani Kirk

    2010-01-01

    A solid introduction to the practices, plans, and skills required for developing a smart system architecture. Information architecture combines IT skills with business skills in order to align the IT structure of an organization with the mission, goals, and objectives of its business. This friendly introduction to IT architecture walks you through the myriad issues and complex decisions that many organizations face when setting up IT systems to work in sync with business procedures. Veteran IT professional and author Kirk Hausman explains the business value behind IT architecture and provides

  14. Autoantibody recognition of collagen type II in arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Lindh, Ingrid

    2013-01-01

    Autoantibodies against collagen type II (CII), a protein localized in the joint cartilage, play a major role in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA), one of the most commonly used animal models for rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The studies included in this thesis were undertaken to elucidate structural and functional requirements for B and T cells to recognize native CII structures during experimental arthritis as well as in human RA. To reveal in detail how CII-specific autoantibodies recognize CII...

  15. Development, characterization, and applications of self-assembling, photocrosslinkable collagen-based hydrogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudet, Ian Daniel

    Development of functional soft-tissue engineered constructs for use in regenerative medicine is currently limited by homogeneity within scaffolds that fails to recapitulate the complex architecture that supports normal function in healthy tissues. Additionally, recent breakthroughs in our understanding the biomechanical cell-matrix interface have provided insight into the role of substrate compliance during development and in the pathophysiological environment. This thesis is the result of investigation into using type-I collagen as a base material for creating dynamic, self-assembling, mechanically and biochemically tunable 3D hydrogel scaffolds into which instructive cellular cues can be imparted anisotropically via the directed application of light. This overarching goal was approached by (1) evaluating extant methods for photonically manipulating type I collagen mechanical properties, which led us to the conclusion that published methods were inadequate for our purposes. Following this realization, we (2) developed a novel process for derivatizing free amines on collagen amino acid residues to reactive methacrylamide moieties, allowing robust spatiotemporal control of mechanical properties through photocrosslinking with long-wave UV light and the water-soluble photoinitiator Irgacure 2959. Thorough characterization of this material, collagen methacrylamide (CMA), provided the basis for multiple applications in the field of soft tissue engineering. Additionally, (3) CMA was used in conjunction with synthetic photopolymers in an effort to create a hybrid natural/synthetic hydrogel material. CMA was also (4) employed as a dynamic hydrogel scaffold which we showed could be used to culture a number of neurogenic stem and progenitor cell types with a focus on using photomodulation to impart instructive heterogeneity to the mechanical and biochemical microenvironment. Finally, (5) we used a computational modeling approach to explain interesting yet poorly understood

  16. Clinical document architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitmann, Kai

    2003-01-01

    The Clinical Document Architecture (CDA), a standard developed by the Health Level Seven organisation (HL7), is an ANSI approved document architecture for exchange of clinical information using XML. A CDA document is comprised of a header with associated vocabularies and a body containing the structural clinical information. PMID:15061557

  17. Software Architecture Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Jeffrey M.

    2013-01-01

    Many software systems eventually undergo changes to their basic architectural structure. Such changes may be prompted by new feature requests, new quality attribute requirements, changing technology, or other reasons. Whatever the causes, architecture evolution is commonplace in real-world software projects. Today's software architects, however,…

  18. Semantics of immersive web through its architectural structure and graphic primitives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubén González Crespo

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Currently, practices and tools for computer-aided three-dimensional design, do not allow the semantic description of objects constructed in some cases specified notations as handling layers, or labeling of each development itself. The lack of a standard for the description of the elements represents a major drawback for using advanced three-dimensional environments such as the automation of search and construction processes that require semantic knowledge of its elements.This project proposes the development the semantic composition from the hierarchy of three-dimensional visualization of graphics primitives used to construct three-dimensional objects, taking into account the geometric composition architecture of standard 19775-1 of the International Electrotechnical Commission of the International Organization for StandardizationFor the development of semantic composition use the methodology methontology proposed by the Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, because it allows the construction of ontologies about specific domains, limiting the domain by defining classes and subclasses, relationships and the generation of instances a framework for resource description on web ontology language.

  19. Design and thermal testing of smart composite structure for architecture applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lelieveld, C.; Jansen, K.M.B.

    2013-01-01

    A composite structure consisting of a Shape Memory Polymer (SMP) matrix and three Shape Memory Alloy (SMA) strips was constructed. The SMA strips act as actuators which create forward and backward angle bends of 90 degrees of the composite structure. The function of the polymer matrix was to give th

  20. Study of Native Type I Collagen Fibrils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heim, August

    2006-03-01

    Presented in this work is direct imaging and force microscopy of native, intact type I collagen fibrils extracted from the sea cucumber Cucumaria frondosa dermis with affiliated proteoglycan molecules. The prototypical collagen fibril structure is well conserved through higher mammalian species and presents a model for study of the mechanical properties of the primary individual components of the dermis and skeletal ligature. Common practice is to use reconstituted fibrils which lack the precise conformal structure and affiliated proteoglycans. We have performed force microscopy to probe the mechanical properties of native fibrils and extract the elastic modulus under natural conditions. This knowledge is combined transmission and atomic force imaging, in conjunction with applied computation models, to demonstrate an inherent semitubular structure of these fibrils.

  1. About collagen, a tribute to Yves Bouligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charvolin, Jean; Sadoc, Jean-François

    2012-10-01

    Yves Bouligand's analysis of the organizations of biological materials in relation to those of liquid crystals enabled the development of the idea that physical forces exerting their actions under strong spatial constraints determine the structures and morphologies of these materials. The different levels of organization in collagen have preoccupied him for a long time. We present here our recent works in this domain that we were still discussing with him a few months before his death at the age of 76 on 21 January 2011. After recalling the hierarchical set of structures built by collagen molecules, we analyse them, exploiting the properties of the curved space of the hypersphere and of the algorithm of phyllotaxis. Those two geometrical concepts can be proposed as structural archetypes founding the polymorphism of this complex material of biological origin. PMID:24098840

  2. Adaptive Architectural Envelope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foged, Isak Worre; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning

    2010-01-01

    Recent years have seen an increasing variety of applications of adaptive architectural structures for improvement of structural performance by recognizing changes in their environments and loads, adapting to meet goals, and using past events to improve future performance or maintain serviceability....... The general scopes of this paper are to develop a new adaptive kinetic architectural structure, particularly a reconfigurable architectural structure which can transform body shape from planar geometries to hyper-surfaces using different control strategies, i.e. a transformation into more than one or...... two different shape alternatives. The adaptive structure is a proposal for a responsive building envelope which is an idea of a first level operational framework for present and future investigations towards performance based responsive architectures through a set of responsive typologies. A mock- up...

  3. Thermal–electric characterization and modelling of a smart composite structure for architectural applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A composite structure consisting of a shape memory polymer (SMP) matrix with embedded shape memory alloy (SMA) strips was constructed. The SMA strips acted as actuators in order to realize a reversible 90 degree deformation. The deformation was activated by local heating. The polymer matrix enabled the structural fixation of the deformations. The polymer showed rigid characteristics at a low temperature range. During the morphing stage, the polymer was heated locally to a rubbery condition to allow shape changes. The SMA actuators were able to deform the structure upon thermal activation, after which the new structural shape was fixated by cooling the polymer into a rigid, glassy state. Since the exact timing and amount of heating power of both the SMA strips and the SMP matrix was crucial for the functioning of the smart structure, a detailed numerical thermal model was built and validated using thermal imaging. With this validated numerical model the optimum activation conditions were determined. (papers)

  4. The structures of cytosolic and plastid-located glutamine synthetases from Medicago truncatula reveal a common and dynamic architecture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torreira, Eva [Centro de Investigaciones Biológicas – CSIC, Ramiro de Maeztu 9, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Seabra, Ana Rita [IBMC – Instituto de Biologia Molecular e Celular, Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre 823, 4150-180 Porto (Portugal); Marriott, Hazel; Zhou, Min [University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3QZ (United Kingdom); Llorca, Óscar [Centro de Investigaciones Biológicas – CSIC, Ramiro de Maeztu 9, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Robinson, Carol V. [University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3QZ (United Kingdom); Carvalho, Helena G. [IBMC – Instituto de Biologia Molecular e Celular, Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre 823, 4150-180 Porto (Portugal); Fernández-Tornero, Carlos, E-mail: cftornero@cib.csic.es [Centro de Investigaciones Biológicas – CSIC, Ramiro de Maeztu 9, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Pereira, Pedro José Barbosa, E-mail: cftornero@cib.csic.es [IBMC – Instituto de Biologia Molecular e Celular, Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre 823, 4150-180 Porto (Portugal); Centro de Investigaciones Biológicas – CSIC, Ramiro de Maeztu 9, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-04-01

    The experimental models of dicotyledonous cytoplasmic and plastid-located glutamine synthetases unveil a conserved eukaryotic-type decameric architecture, with subtle structural differences in M. truncatula isoenzymes that account for their distinct herbicide resistance. The first step of nitrogen assimilation in higher plants, the energy-driven incorporation of ammonia into glutamate, is catalyzed by glutamine synthetase. This central process yields the readily metabolizable glutamine, which in turn is at the basis of all subsequent biosynthesis of nitrogenous compounds. The essential role performed by glutamine synthetase makes it a prime target for herbicidal compounds, but also a suitable intervention point for the improvement of crop yields. Although the majority of crop plants are dicotyledonous, little is known about the structural organization of glutamine synthetase in these organisms and about the functional differences between the different isoforms. Here, the structural characterization of two glutamine synthetase isoforms from the model legume Medicago truncatula is reported: the crystallographic structure of cytoplasmic GSII-1a and an electron cryomicroscopy reconstruction of plastid-located GSII-2a. Together, these structural models unveil a decameric organization of dicotyledonous glutamine synthetase, with two pentameric rings weakly connected by inter-ring loops. Moreover, rearrangement of these dynamic loops changes the relative orientation of the rings, suggesting a zipper-like mechanism for their assembly into a decameric enzyme. Finally, the atomic structure of M. truncatula GSII-1a provides important insights into the structural determinants of herbicide resistance in this family of enzymes, opening new avenues for the development of herbicide-resistant plants.

  5. The structures of cytosolic and plastid-located glutamine synthetases from Medicago truncatula reveal a common and dynamic architecture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The experimental models of dicotyledonous cytoplasmic and plastid-located glutamine synthetases unveil a conserved eukaryotic-type decameric architecture, with subtle structural differences in M. truncatula isoenzymes that account for their distinct herbicide resistance. The first step of nitrogen assimilation in higher plants, the energy-driven incorporation of ammonia into glutamate, is catalyzed by glutamine synthetase. This central process yields the readily metabolizable glutamine, which in turn is at the basis of all subsequent biosynthesis of nitrogenous compounds. The essential role performed by glutamine synthetase makes it a prime target for herbicidal compounds, but also a suitable intervention point for the improvement of crop yields. Although the majority of crop plants are dicotyledonous, little is known about the structural organization of glutamine synthetase in these organisms and about the functional differences between the different isoforms. Here, the structural characterization of two glutamine synthetase isoforms from the model legume Medicago truncatula is reported: the crystallographic structure of cytoplasmic GSII-1a and an electron cryomicroscopy reconstruction of plastid-located GSII-2a. Together, these structural models unveil a decameric organization of dicotyledonous glutamine synthetase, with two pentameric rings weakly connected by inter-ring loops. Moreover, rearrangement of these dynamic loops changes the relative orientation of the rings, suggesting a zipper-like mechanism for their assembly into a decameric enzyme. Finally, the atomic structure of M. truncatula GSII-1a provides important insights into the structural determinants of herbicide resistance in this family of enzymes, opening new avenues for the development of herbicide-resistant plants

  6. Reevaluation of the role of the polar groups of collagen in the platelet-collagen interaction.

    OpenAIRE

    Chesney, C. M.; Pifer, D D; Crofford, L J; Huch, K. M.

    1983-01-01

    Chemical modification of collagen is a tool for exploring the platelet-collagen interaction. Since collagen must polymerize prior to the initiation of platelet aggregation and secretion, modification must be shown to affect platelet-collagen interaction and not collagen-collagen interaction. To address this point, the authors carried out the following chemical modifications on soluble monomeric collagen and preformed fibrillar collagen in parallel: 1) N-and O-acetylation, 2) esterification of...

  7. Natural variation in four human collagen genes across an ethnically diverse population

    OpenAIRE

    Chan, Ting-Fung; Poon, Annie; Basu, Analabha; Addleman, Nick R.; Chen, Justin; Phong, Angie; Byers, Peter H; Klein, Teri E.; Kwok, Pui-Yan

    2008-01-01

    Collagens are members of one of the most important families of structural proteins in higher organisms. There are 28 types of collagens encoded by 43 genes in humans that fall into several different functional protein classes. Mutations in the major fibrillar collagen genes lead to osteogenesis imperfecta (COL1A1 and COL1A2 encoding the chains of Type I collagen), chondrodysplasias (COL2A1 encoding the chains of Type II collagen), and vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (COL3A1 encoding the chain...

  8. Chemical and biological evaluation of Egyptian Nile Tilapia (Oreochromis niloticas) fish scale collagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Rashidy, Aiah A; Gad, Ahmed; Abu-Hussein, Abd El-Hay G; Habib, Shaymaa I; Badr, Nadia A; Hashem, Azza A

    2015-08-01

    Collagen is considered to be one of the most useful biomaterials with different medical applications. However, collagen properties differ from one source to another. The aim of this study was to extract, purify, characterize and perform preliminary biological evaluation of type I collagen from scales of Egyptian Nile Tilapia. Pepsin-solubilized collagen (PSC) was successfully prepared from Nile Tilapia fish scale waste. Lyophilized collagen was dissolved in dilute HCl to form acidic collagen solutions (ACS) which was neutralized to form gel. To confirm the biocompatibility of the produced gel, baby hamster kidney (BHK-21) fibroblast cells were seeded onto a 3D collagen gel (0.3% and 0.5%, w/v). The results of an SDS-PAGE test showed that the extracted collagens were type I collagen, with α chain composition of (α1)2α2. Thermal analysis showed that the denaturation temperature was 32 °C. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis and Fourier-transform infrared spectra (FTIR) showed that the extracted collagen had a triple helix structure. Active proliferation of BHK-21 cells with no signs of toxicity was evident with both collagen gel concentrations tested. The results show that Nile Tilapia scales can be an effective source of collagen extraction that could be used as a potential biomaterial in biomedical applications. PMID:26026980

  9. Architectural Contestation

    OpenAIRE

    Merle, J.

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation addresses the reductive reading of Georges Bataille's work done within the field of architectural criticism and theory which tends to set aside the fundamental ‘broken’ totality of Bataille's oeuvre and also to narrowly interpret it as a mere critique of architectural form, consequently presenting it either as the negation of all form of architecture or as the critique of 'classical' architectural forms. Against this ‘appropriation’, i.e. this reductive reading and the subse...

  10. Architectural Theatricality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvedebrink, Tenna Doktor Olsen; Fisker, Anna Marie; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning

    2013-01-01

    and recovery through the architecture framing eating experiences, this article examines, from a theoretical perspective, two less debated concepts relating to hospitality called food design and architectural theatricality. In architectural theory the nineteenth century German architect Gottfried...... Semper is known for his writings on theatricality, understood as a holistic design approach emphasizing the contextual, cultural, ritual and social meanings rooted in architecture. Relative hereto, the International Food Design Society recently argued, in a similar holistic manner, that the methodology...

  11. VLSI architecture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Randell, B.; Treleaven, P.C.

    1983-01-01

    This book is a collection of course papers which discusses the latest (1982) milestone of electronic building blocks and its effect on computer architecture. Contributions range from selecting a VLSI process technology to Japan's Fifth Generation Computer Architecture. Contents, abridged: VLSI and machine architecture. Graphic design aids: HED and FATFREDDY. On the LUCIFER system. Clocking of VLSI circuits. Decentralised computer architectures for VLSI. Index.

  12. Morphology Characterization of PP/Clay Nanocomposites Across the Length Scales of the Structural Architecture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Szazdi, Laszlo; Abranyi, Agnes; Pukansky Jr, Bela; Vancso, G. Julius; Pukanszky, Bela

    2006-01-01

    The structure and rheological properties of a large number of layered silicate poly(propylene) nanocomposites were studied with widely varying compositions. Morphology characterization at different length scales was achieved by SEM, TEM, and XRD. Rheological measurements supplied additional informat

  13. Construction of a multidimensional plane network-on-chip architecture based on the hypercube structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chang Wu; Yubai Li; Qicong Peng; Song Chai; Zhongming Yang

    2009-01-01

    In current network-on-chip (NOC) studies and in practical applications,the mesh structure is the most widely used and deeply researched structure.However,the hypercube structure is more symmetrical and regular than the mesh or torus structures.This paper compares the network characteristics of these three direct topologies and proposes a method to compress the hypercube into a plane structure.This structure,which has the multidimensional property based on the hypercube,is called the multidimensional plane (MDP) NOC.The compression process is divided into two steps:the transformation of router denotations and the connection of channels.Then,SystemC is used to implement the MDP NOC and it is compared with the mesh and torus NOCs in terms of four aspects of performance,including average latency time,normalization throughput,energy consumption and area cost.(C) 2008 National Natural Science Foundation of China and Chinese Academy of Sciences.Published by Elsevier Limited and Science in China Press.All rights reserved.

  14. Architecture & Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Mary; Delahunt, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Most art teachers would agree that architecture is an important form of visual art, but they do not always include it in their curriculums. In this article, the authors share core ideas from "Architecture and Environment," a teaching resource that they developed out of a long-term interest in teaching architecture and their fascination with the…

  15. Investigating dynamical information transfer in the brain following a TMS pulse: Insights from structural architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amico, Enrico; Van Mierlo, Pieter; Marinazzo, Daniele; Laureys, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) has been used for more than 20 years to investigate connectivity and plasticity in the human cortex. By combining TMS with high-density electroencephalography (hd-EEG), one can stimulate any cortical area and measure the effects produced by this perturbation in the rest of the cerebral cortex. The purpose of this paper is to investigate changes of information flow in the brain after TMS from a functional and structural perspective, using multimodal modeling of source reconstructed TMS/hd-EEG recordings and DTI tractography. We prove how brain dynamics induced by TMS is constrained and driven by its structure, at different spatial and temporal scales, especially when considering cross-frequency interactions. These results shed light on the function-structure organization of the brain network at the global level, and on the huge variety of information contained in it. PMID:26737511

  16. A biocomposite of collagen nanofibers and nanohydroxyapatite for bone regeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work aims to design a synthetic construct that mimics the natural bone extracellular matrix through innovative approaches based on simultaneous type I collagen electrospinning and nanophased hydroxyapatite (nanoHA) electrospraying using non-denaturating conditions and non-toxic reagents. The morphological results, assessed using scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM), showed a mesh of collagen nanofibers embedded with crystals of HA with fiber diameters within the nanometer range (30 nm), thus significantly lower than those reported in the literature, over 200 nm. The mechanical properties, assessed by nanoindentation using AFM, exhibited elastic moduli between 0.3 and 2 GPa. Fourier transformed infrared spectrometry confirmed the collagenous integrity as well as the presence of nanoHA in the composite. The network architecture allows cell access to both collagen nanofibers and HA crystals as in the natural bone environment. The inclusion of nanoHA agglomerates by electrospraying in type I collagen nanofibers improved the adhesion and metabolic activity of MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts. This new nanostructured collagen–nanoHA composite holds great potential for healing bone defects or as a functional membrane for guided bone tissue regeneration and in treating bone diseases. (paper)

  17. Architectural engineering of FRP bridges

    OpenAIRE

    Smits, J.E.P.

    2014-01-01

    This paper deals with the use of Fibre Reinforced Polymers (FRP's) in architectural and structural bridge design. The challenges and opportunities that come with this relatively new material are discussed. An inventory is made of recent engineers' solutions in FRP, followed by a discussion on architectural application of FRP's derived from the authors architectural practice.

  18. Cytoskeletal organization and collagen orientation in the fish scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zylberberg, L; Bereiter-Hahn, J; Sire, J Y

    1988-09-01

    Immunofluorescence and electron microscopy were used to analyze the relationships between the organization of collagen fibrils in elasmoid scales, and the orientation of microtubules and actin microfilaments in the scleroblasts producing this collagenous stroma. Attention was focused on the basal plate of the scales because of the highly ordered three-dimensional arrangement of the collagen fibrils in superimposed plies forming an acellular plywood-like structure. The collagen fibrils are synthesized by the scleroblasts forming a monolayered pseudo-epithelium, the hyposquama, at the lowest surface of the scale. Fully developed scales with a low collagen deposition rate were compared with regenerating scales active in fibrillogenesis. When an ordered array of the collagen fibrils is found, the innermost collagen fibrils are coaligned with microtubules and actin microfilaments. Thus, because of this coalignment, microtubules and actin microfilaments of the hyposquamal scleroblasts are subjected to consecutive alterations during the formation of the plies of the basal plate. The sequence of events when the collagen fibrils change their direction from one ply to the other in the basal plate is deduced from immunofluorescence and phase-contrast-microscopic observations. During the formation of the orthogonal plywood-like structure in the regenerating scales, first microtubules may change their curse with a rotating angle of about 90 degrees; then, actin microfilaments are disorganized and reorganized by interacting mechanically with the microtubules with which they are coaligned. Collagen fibrils are synthesized in a direction that is roughly perpendicular to that of the preceding ply. The unknown signals inducing the change in direction of the cytoskeleton may be transmitted throughout the hyposquama via gap junctions. PMID:3052849

  19. Collagenous sprue: a clinicopathologic study of 12 cases.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Maguire, Aoife A

    2012-02-01

    Collagenous sprue is a rare form of small bowel enteropathy characterized by chronic diarrhea and progressive malabsorption with little data available on its natural history. The pathologic lesion consists of subepithelial collagen deposition associated with variable alterations in villous architecture. The small bowel biopsies of 12 cases were reviewed. Clinical details, celiac serology, and T-cell receptor gene rearrangement study results, when available, were collated. There were 8 females and 4 males (age ranged from 41 to 84 y) who presented with chronic diarrhea and weight loss. Small intestinal biopsies showed subepithelial collagen deposition with varying degrees of villous atrophy and varying numbers of intraepithelial lymphocytes. Four patients had previous biopsies showing enteropathic changes without collagen deposition. Seven cases were associated with collagenous colitis and 1 also had features of lymphocytic colitis. Three patients also had collagen deposition in gastric biopsies. One case was associated with lymphocytic gastritis. Celiac disease (CD, gluten-sensitive enteropathy) was documented in 4 patients. Five patients made a clinical improvement with combinations of a gluten-free diet and immunosuppressive therapy. Two patients died of complications of malnutrition and 1 of another illness. Clonal T-cell populations were identified in 5 of 6 cases tested. Four of these patients improved clinically after treatment but 1 has died. Collagenous sprue evolved on a background of CD in 4 cases. There was no history of CD in others and these cases may be the result of a biologic insult other than gluten sensitivity. None has developed clinical evidence of lymphoma to date.

  20. Structure of a Rhamnogalacturonan Fragment from Apple Pectin: Implications for Pectin Architecture

    OpenAIRE

    Xiangmei Wu; Andrew Mort

    2014-01-01

    A commercial apple pectin was sequentially digested with the cloned enzymes endopolygalacturonase, galactanase, arabinofuranosidase, xylogalacturonase, and rhamnogalacturonan hydrolase. The rhamnogalacturonan hydrolase-generated oligosaccharides were separated by ultrafiltration, anion exchange, and size-exclusion chromatography. Fractions from the ion exchange chromatography were pooled, lyophilized, and screened by MALDI-TOF MS. An oligosaccharide (RGP14P3) was identified and its structure,...

  1. Structural analysis of the active site architecture of the VapC toxin from Shigella flexneri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kehan; Dedic, Emil; Brodersen, Ditlev E

    2016-07-01

    The VapC toxin from the Shigella flexneri 2a virulence plasmid pMYSH6000 belongs to the PIN domain protein family, which is characterized by a conserved fold with low amino acid sequence conservation. The toxin is a bona fide Mg(2+) -dependent ribonuclease and has been shown to target initiator tRNA(fMet) in vivo. Here, we present crystal structures of active site catalytic triad mutants D7A, D7N, and D98N of the VapC toxin in absence of antitoxin. In all structures, as well as in solution, VapC forms a dimer. In the D98N structure, a Hepes molecule occupies both active sites of the dimer and comparison with the structure of RNase H bound to a DNA/RNA hybrid suggests that the Hepes molecule mimics the position of an RNA nucleotide in the VapC active site. Proteins 2016; 84:892-899. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26833558

  2. Architectural Theatricality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvedebrink, Tenna Doktor Olsen

    This PhD thesis is motived by a personal interest in the theoretical, practical and creative qualities of architecture. But also a wonder and curiosity about the cultural and social relations architecture represents through its occupation with both the sciences and the arts. Inspired by present...... initiatives in Aalborg Hospital to overcome patient undernutrition by refurbishing eating environments, this thesis engages in an investigation of the interior architectural qualities of patient eating environments. The relevance for this holistic perspective, synthesizing health, food and architecture, is...... the current building of a series of Danish ‘super hospitals’ and an increased focus among architectural practices on research-based knowledge produced with the architectural sub-disciplines Healing Architecture and Evidence-Based Design. The problem is that this research does not focus on patient...

  3. Collagen Conduit Versus Microsurgical Neurorrhaphy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boeckstyns, Michel; Sørensen, Allan Ibsen; Viñeta, Joaquin Fores;

    2013-01-01

    To compare repair of acute lacerations of mixed sensory-motor nerves in humans using a collagen tube versus conventional repair.......To compare repair of acute lacerations of mixed sensory-motor nerves in humans using a collagen tube versus conventional repair....

  4. Articular cartilage collagen: an irreplaceable framework?

    OpenAIRE

    Eyre, D. R.; Weis, M A; J-J Wu

    2006-01-01

    Adult articular cartilage by dry weight is two-thirds collagen. The collagen has a unique molecular phenotype. The nascent type II collagen fibril is a heteropolymer, with collagen IX molecules covalently linked to the surface and collagen XI forming the filamentous template of the fibril as a whole. The functions of collagens IX and XI in the heteropolymer are far from clear but, evidently, they are critically important since mutations in COLIX and COLXI genes can result in chondrodysplasia ...

  5. Polarized Raman anisotropic response of collagen in tendon: towards 3D orientation mapping of collagen in tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Galvis

    Full Text Available In this study, polarized Raman spectroscopy (PRS was used to characterize the anisotropic response of the amide I band of collagen as a basis for evaluating three-dimensional collagen fibril orientation in tissues. Firstly, the response was investigated theoretically by applying classical Raman theory to collagen-like peptide crystal structures. The theoretical methodology was then tested experimentally, by measuring amide I intensity anisotropy in rat tail as a function of the orientation of the incident laser polarization. For the theoretical study, several collagen-like triple-helical peptide crystal structures obtained from the Protein Data Bank were rotated "in plane" and "out of plane" to evaluate the role of molecular orientation on the intensity of the amide I band. Collagen-like peptides exhibit a sinusoidal anisotropic response when rotated "in plane" with respect to the polarized incident laser. Maximal intensity was obtained when the polarization of the incident light is perpendicular to the molecule and minimal when parallel. In the case of "out of plane" rotation of the molecular structure a decreased anisotropic response was observed, becoming completely isotropic when the structure was perpendicular to the plane of observation. The theoretical Raman response of collagen was compared to that of alpha helical protein fragments. In contrast to collagen, alpha helices have a maximal signal when incident light is parallel to the molecule and minimal when perpendicular. For out-of-plane molecular orientations alpha-helix structures display a decreased average intensity. Results obtained from experiments on rat tail tendon are in excellent agreement with the theoretical predictions, thus demonstrating the high potential of PRS for experimental evaluation of the three-dimensional orientation of collagen fibers in biological tissues.

  6. Biomimetic silicification of demineralized hierarchical collagenous tissues

    OpenAIRE

    Niu, Li-na; Jiao, Kai; Ryou, Heonjune; Diogenes, Anibal; Yiu, Cynthia K. Y.; Mazzoni, Annalisa; Chen, Ji-hua; Arola, Dwayne D.; Hargreaves, Kenneth M.; Pashley, David H; Franklin R Tay

    2013-01-01

    Unlike man-made composite materials, natural biominerals containing composites usually demonstrate different levels of sophisticated hierarchical structures which are responsible for their mechanical properties and other metabolic functions. However, the complex spatial organizations of the organic-inorganic phases are far beyond what they be achieved by contemporary engineering techniques. Here, we demonstrate that carbonated apatite present in collagen matrices derived from fish scale and b...

  7. Extraction and Characterization of Collagen from Sea Cucumber Flesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alhana

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Sea cucumber (Stichopus variegatus is one of the Echinodermata phylum that grows along Indonesian coastal. Sea cucumber is potential source of collagen. The purposes of this research were to determine the optimal concentration of NaOH and CH3COOH solution in collagen production and analyze the physicochemical characteristics of collagen from S. variegatus. Yield of the collagen was 1.5% (based on wet weight basis, produced by pretreatment with NaOH 0,30%, hydrolysis with CH3COOH 0.10% and extracted using distilled water. Protein, moisture, and ash content of the collagen was 67.68%, 13.64%, and 4.15%, respectively. Collagen was extracted using distilled water at 45°C during 2h and still had triple helix structure ; pH 7.37 ; melting temperature 163.67°C and whiteness 69.25%. The major amino acid content of collagen were glycine, alanine, proline and glutamic acid.

  8. Dynamic interplay between the collagen scaffold and tumor evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egeblad, Mikala; Rasch, Morten G; Weaver, Valerie M

    2010-01-01

    remodeling of the ECM network regulate tissue tension, generate pathways for migration, and release ECM protein fragments to direct normal developmental processes such as branching morphogenesis. Collagens are major components of the ECM of which basement membrane type IV and interstitial matrix type I are...... the most prevalent. Here we discuss how abnormal expression, proteolysis and structure of these collagens influence cellular functions to elicit multiple effects on tumors, including proliferation, initiation, invasion, metastasis, and therapy response....

  9. Synthesis and photoluminescence of wurtzite CdS and ZnS architectural structures via a facile solvothermal approach in mixed solvents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Xinjuan, E-mail: wangxj@hnu.edu.cn [State Key Lab of CBSC, Micronano Research Center, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Zibo Environmental Protection Bureau, Zibo 255030 (China); Zou Bingsuo, E-mail: zoubs@bit.edu.cn [State Key Lab of CBSC, Micronano Research Center, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Micro-nano Technology Center and School of MSE, BIT, Beijing 100081 (China); Zhang Qinglin; Lei Aihua; Zhang Wenjie; Ren Pinyun [State Key Lab of CBSC, Micronano Research Center, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China)

    2011-10-13

    Graphical abstract: Wurtzite CdS and ZnS urchinlike architectures were synthesized by a facile mixed solvothermal process. Highlights: > CdS and ZnS nanostructures with complex urchinlike morphology were synthesized by a facile solvothermal approach in a mixed solvent made of ethylenediamine, ethanolamine and distilled water. > These urchinlike architectures were composed of arranged nanorods with wurtzite structure. > The PL spectrum of the CdS urchinlike architecture displays a very strong red emission band centered at about 706 nm. - Abstract: CdS and ZnS nanostructures with complex urchinlike morphology were synthesized by a facile solvothermal approach in a mixed solvent made of ethylenediamine, ethanolamine and distilled water. No extra capping agent was used in the process. The structure, morphologies and optical properties of these nanostructures were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. The as-synthesized urchinlike architectures were composed of nanorods with wurtzite structure. The preferred growth direction of nanorods was found to be the [0 0 1] direction. The PL spectrum of CdS nanostructures exhibited a highly intense red emission band centered at about 706 nm. On the basis of the experimental results, a possible growth process has been discussed for the formation of the CdS and ZnS urchinlike structures.

  10. Taxadiene Synthase Structure and Evolution of Modular Architecture in Terpene Biosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M Köksal; Y Jin; R Coates; R Croteau; D Christianson

    2011-12-31

    With more than 55,000 members identified so far in all forms of life, the family of terpene or terpenoid natural products represents the epitome of molecular biodiversity. A well-known and important member of this family is the polycyclic diterpenoid Taxol (paclitaxel), which promotes tubulin polymerization and shows remarkable efficacy in cancer chemotherapy. The first committed step of Taxol biosynthesis in the Pacific yew (Taxus brevifolia) is the cyclization of the linear isoprenoid substrate geranylgeranyl diphosphate (GGPP) to form taxa-4(5),11(12)diene, which is catalysed by taxadiene synthase. The full-length form of this diterpene cyclase contains 862 residues, but a roughly 80-residue amino-terminal transit sequence is cleaved on maturation in plastids. We now report the X-ray crystal structure of a truncation variant lacking the transit sequence and an additional 27 residues at the N terminus, hereafter designated TXS. Specifically, we have determined structures of TXS complexed with 13-aza-13,14-dihydrocopalyl diphosphate (1.82 {angstrom} resolution) and 2-fluorogeranylgeranyl diphosphate (2.25 {angstrom} resolution). The TXS structure reveals a modular assembly of three {alpha}-helical domains. The carboxy-terminal catalytic domain is a class I terpenoid cyclase, which binds and activates substrate GGPP with a three-metal ion cluster. The N-terminal domain and a third 'insertion' domain together adopt the fold of a vestigial class II terpenoid cyclase. A class II cyclase activates the isoprenoid substrate by protonation instead of ionization, and the TXS structure reveals a definitive connection between the two distinct cyclase classes in the evolution of terpenoid biosynthesis.

  11. The structural architecture of the Los Humeros volcanic complex and geothermal field, Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt, Central Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norini, Gianluca; Groppelli, Gianluca; Sulpizio, Roberto; Carrasco Núñez, Gerardo; Davila Harris, Pablo

    2014-05-01

    The development of geothermal energy in Mexico is a very important goal, given the presence of a large heat anomaly, associated with the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt, the renewability of the resource and the low environmental impact. The Quaternary Los Humeros volcanic complex is an important geothermal target, whose evolution involved at least two caldera events, that alternated with other explosive and effusive activity. The first caldera forming event was the 460 ka eruption that produced the Xaltipan ignimbrite and formed a 15-20 km wide caldera. The second collapse event occurred 100 ka with the formation of the Zaragoza ignimbrite and a nested 8-10 km wide caldera. The whole volcano structure, the style of the collapses and the exact location of the calderas scarps and ring faults are still a matter of debate. The Los Humeros volcano hosts the productive Los Humeros Geothermal Field, with an installed capacity of 40 MW and additional 75 MW power plants under construction. Recent models of the geothermal reservoir predict the existence of at least two reservoirs in the geothermal system, separated by impermeable rock units. Hydraulic connectivity and hydrothermal fluids circulation occurs through faults and fractures, allowing deep steam to ascend while condensate flows descend. As a consequence, the plans for the exploration and exploitation of the geothermal reservoir have been based on the identification of the main channels for the circulation of hydrothermal fluids, constituted by faults, so that the full comprehension of the structural architecture of the caldera is crucial to improve the efficiency and minimize the costs of the geothermal field operation. In this study, we present an analysis of the Los Humeros volcanic complex focused on the Quaternary tectonic and volcanotectonics features, like fault scarps and aligned/elongated monogenetic volcanic centres. Morphostructural analysis and field mapping reveal the geometry, kinematics and dynamics of

  12. Methods for Producing High-Performance Silicon Carbide Fibers, Architectural Preforms, and High-Temperature Composite Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiCarlo, James A. (Inventor); Yun, Hee-Mann (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Methods are disclosed for producing architectural preforms and high-temperature composite structures containing high-strength ceramic fibers with reduced preforming stresses within each fiber, with an in-situ grown coating on each fiber surface, with reduced boron within the bulk of each fiber, and with improved tensile creep and rupture resistance properties tier each fiber. The methods include the steps of preparing an original sample of a preform formed from a pre-selected high-strength silicon carbide ceramic fiber type, placing the original sample in a processing furnace under a pre-selected preforming stress state and thermally treating the sample in the processing furnace at a pre-selected processing temperature and hold time in a processing gas having a pre-selected composition, pressure, and flow rate. For the high-temperature composite structures, the method includes additional steps of depositing a thin interphase coating on the surface of each fiber and forming a ceramic or carbon-based matrix within the sample.

  13. Isolation, Characterization and Biological Evaluation of Jellyfish Collagen for Use in Biomedical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire Lethias

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Fibrillar collagens are the more abundant extracellular proteins. They form a metazoan-specific family, and are highly conserved from sponge to human. Their structural and physiological properties have been successfully used in the food, cosmetic, and pharmaceutical industries. On the other hand, the increase of jellyfish has led us to consider this marine animal as a natural product for food and medicine. Here, we have tested different Mediterranean jellyfish species in order to investigate the economic potential of their collagens. We have studied different methods of collagen purification (tissues and experimental procedures. The best collagen yield was obtained using Rhizostoma pulmo oral arms and the pepsin extraction method (2–10 mg collagen/g of wet tissue. Although a significant yield was obtained with Cotylorhiza tuberculata (0.45 mg/g, R. pulmo was used for further experiments, this jellyfish being considered as harmless to humans and being an abundant source of material. Then, we compared the biological properties of R. pulmo collagen with mammalian fibrillar collagens in cell cytotoxicity assays and cell adhesion. There was no statistical difference in cytotoxicity (p > 0.05 between R. pulmo collagen and rat type I collagen. However, since heparin inhibits cell adhesion to jellyfish-native collagen by 55%, the main difference is that heparan sulfate proteoglycans could be preferentially involved in fibroblast and osteoblast adhesion to jellyfish collagens. Our data confirm the broad harmlessness of jellyfish collagens, and their biological effect on human cells that are similar to that of mammalian type I collagen. Given the bioavailability of jellyfish collagen and its biological properties, this marine material is thus a good candidate for replacing bovine or human collagens in selected biomedical applications.

  14. Crystal structure and mutational analysis of aminoacylhistidine dipeptidase from Vibrio alginolyticus reveal a new architecture of M20 metallopeptidases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chin-Yuan; Hsieh, Yin-Cheng; Wang, Ting-Yi; Chen, Yi-Chin; Wang, Yu-Kuo; Chiang, Ting-Wei; Chen, Yi-Ju; Chang, Cheng-Hsiang; Chen, Chun-Jung; Wu, Tung-Kung

    2010-12-10

    Aminoacylhistidine dipeptidases (PepD, EC 3.4.13.3) belong to the family of M20 metallopeptidases from the metallopeptidase H clan that catalyze a broad range of dipeptide and tripeptide substrates, including L-carnosine and L-homocarnosine. Homocarnosine has been suggested as a precursor for the neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and may mediate the antiseizure effects of GABAergic therapies. Here, we report the crystal structure of PepD from Vibrio alginolyticus and the results of mutational analysis of substrate-binding residues in the C-terminal as well as substrate specificity of the PepD catalytic domain-alone truncated protein PepD(CAT). The structure of PepD was found to exist as a homodimer, in which each monomer comprises a catalytic domain containing two zinc ions at the active site center for its hydrolytic function and a lid domain utilizing hydrogen bonds between helices to form the dimer interface. Although the PepD is structurally similar to PepV, which exists as a monomer, putative substrate-binding residues reside in different topological regions of the polypeptide chain. In addition, the lid domain of the PepD contains an "extra" domain not observed in related M20 family metallopeptidases with a dimeric structure. Mutational assays confirmed both the putative di-zinc allocations and the architecture of substrate recognition. In addition, the catalytic domain-alone truncated PepD(CAT) exhibited substrate specificity to l-homocarnosine compared with that of the wild-type PepD, indicating a potential value in applications of PepD(CAT) for GABAergic therapies or neuroprotection. PMID:20819954

  15. Polarization-Modulated Second Harmonic Generation Microscopy in Collagen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoller, P C

    2002-09-30

    Collagen is a key structural protein in the body; several pathological conditions lead to changes in collagen. Among imaging modalities that can be used in vivo, second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy has a key advantage: it provides {approx}1 {micro}m resolution information about collagen structure as a function of depth. A new technique--polarization-modulated SHG--is presented: it permits simultaneous measurement of collagen orientation, of a lower bound on the magnitude of the second order nonlinear susceptibility tensor, and of the ratio of the two independent elements in this tensor. It is applied to characterizing SHG in collagen and to determining effects of biologically relevant changes in collagen structure. The magnitude of the second harmonic signal in two dimensional images varies with position even in structurally homogeneous tissue; this phenomenon is due to interference between second harmonic light generated by neighboring fibrils, which are randomly oriented parallel or anti-parallel to each other. Studies in which focal spot size was varied indicated that regions where fibrils are co-oriented are less than {approx}1.5 {micro}m in diameter. A quartz reference was used to determine the spot size as well as a lower limit (d{sub xxx} > 0.3 pm/V) for the magnitude of the second order nonlinear susceptibility. The ratio of the two independent tensor elements ranged between d{sub XYY}/d{sub XXX} = 0.60 and 0.75. SHG magnitude alone was not useful for identifying structural anomalies in collagenous tissue. Instead, changes in the polarization dependence of SHG were used to analyze biologically relevant perturbations in collagen structure. Changes in polarization dependence were observed in dehydrated samples, but not in highly crosslinked samples, despite significant alterations in packing structure. Complete thermal denaturation and collagenase digestion produced samples with no detectable SHG signal. Collagen orientation was measured in thin

  16. Structure of the Rift Valley fever virus nucleocapsid protein reveals another architecture for RNA encapsidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raymond, Donald D.; Piper, Mary E.; Gerrard, Sonja R.; Smith, Janet L. (Michigan)

    2010-07-13

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is a negative-sense RNA virus (genus Phlebovirus, family Bunyaviridae) that infects livestock and humans and is endemic to sub-Saharan Africa. Like all negative-sense viruses, the segmented RNA genome of RVFV is encapsidated by a nucleocapsid protein (N). The 1.93-{angstrom} crystal structure of RVFV N and electron micrographs of ribonucleoprotein (RNP) reveal an encapsidated genome of substantially different organization than in other negative-sense RNA virus families. The RNP polymer, viewed in electron micrographs of both virus RNP and RNP reconstituted from purified N with a defined RNA, has an extended structure without helical symmetry. N-RNA species of {approx}100-kDa apparent molecular weight and heterogeneous composition were obtained by exhaustive ribonuclease treatment of virus RNP, by recombinant expression of N, and by reconstitution from purified N and an RNA oligomer. RNA-free N, obtained by denaturation and refolding, has a novel all-helical fold that is compact and well ordered at both the N and C termini. Unlike N of other negative-sense RNA viruses, RVFV N has no positively charged surface cleft for RNA binding and no protruding termini or loops to stabilize a defined N-RNA oligomer or RNP helix. A potential protein interaction site was identified in a conserved hydrophobic pocket. The nonhelical appearance of phlebovirus RNP, the heterogeneous {approx}100-kDa N-RNA multimer, and the N fold differ substantially from the RNP and N of other negative-sense RNA virus families and provide valuable insights into the structure of the encapsidated phlebovirus genome.

  17. Effects of isopropanol on collagen fibrils in new parchment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalez Lee G

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Isopropanol is widely used by conservators to relax the creases and folds of parchment artefacts. At present, little is known of the possible side effects of the chemical on parchments main structural component- collagen. This study uses X-ray Diffraction to investigate the effects of a range of isopropanol concentrations on the dimensions of the nanostructure of the collagen component of new parchment. Results It is found in this study that the packing features of the collagen molecules within the collagen fibril are altered by exposure to isopropanol. The results suggest that this chemical treatment can induce a loss of structural water from the collagen within parchment and thus a rearrangement of intermolecular bonding. This study also finds that the effects of isopropanol treatment are permanent to parchment artefacts and cannot be reversed with rehydration using deionised water. Conclusions This study has shown that isopropanol induces permanent changes to the packing features of collagen within parchment artefacts and has provided scientific evidence that its use to remove creases and folds on parchment artefacts will cause structural change that may contribute to long-term deterioration of parchment artefacts. This work provides valuable information that informs conservation practitioners regarding the use of isopropanol on parchment artefacts.

  18. Comparison of Structural Architecture of HCV NS3 Genotype 1 versus Pakistani Genotype 3a

    OpenAIRE

    Kaneez Fatima; Esam Azhar; Shilu Mathew; Ghazi Damanhouri; Ishtiaq Qadri

    2014-01-01

    This study described the structural characterization of Pakistani HCV NS3 GT3a in parallel with genotypes 1a and 1b NS3. We investigated the role of amino acids and their interaction patterns in different HCV genotypes by crystallographic modeling. Different softwares were used to study the interaction pattern, for example, CLCBIO sequence viewer, MODELLER, NMRCLUST, ERRAT score, and MODELLER. Sixty models were produced and clustered into groups and the best model of PK-NCVI/Pk3a NS3 was sele...

  19. Outdoor thermal monitoring of large scale structures by infrared thermography integrated in an ICT based architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumoulin, Jean; Crinière, Antoine; Averty, Rodolphe

    2015-04-01

    An infrared system has been developed to monitor transport infrastructures in a standalone configuration. Results obtained on bridges open to traffic allows to retrieve the inner structure of the decks. To complete this study, experiments were carried out over several months to monitor two reinforced concrete beams of 16 m long and 21 T each. Detection of a damaged area over one of the two beams was made by Pulse Phase Thermography approach. Measurements carried out over several months. Finally, conclusion on the robustness of the system is proposed and perspectives are presented.

  20. The High Dielectric Constant of Staphylococcal Nuclease is Encoded in its Structural Architecture

    OpenAIRE

    Goh, Garrett B.; Bertrand, García-Moreno E.; Brooks, Charles L.

    2011-01-01

    The pKa values of Lys-66, Glu-66 and Asp-66 buried in the interior of the staphylococcal nuclease Δ+PHS variant were reported to be shifted by as much as 5 pKa units from their normal values. Reproducing the pKa of these buried ionizable residues using continuum electrostatic calculations required the use of a high protein dielectric constant of 10 or higher. The apparent high dielectric constant has been rationalized as a consequence of a local structural reorganization or increased fluctuat...

  1. Structural architecture and magnetism control of metal oxides using surface grafting techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrophilic iron oxide Fe3O4 nanoparticles (NPs) were prepared by a reverse micro-emulsion method. Functionalization of Fe3O4 NPs was then carried out via surface graft polymerization to achieve outstanding magnetic property. Characterization results indicate that grafted core–shell Fe3O4 displayed inverse spinel crystalline structure, while particle size and it’s distribution were controlled accordingly. The ferromagnetic behavior (60 A m2 kg−1) of grafted Fe3O4 NPs was restored close to bulk value through enhancement of Fe–O ionic bond

  2. Architectural freedom and industrialised architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Inge

    2012-01-01

    Architectural freedom and industrialized architecture. Inge Vestergaard, Associate Professor, Cand. Arch. Aarhus School of Architecture, Denmark Noerreport 20, 8000 Aarhus C Telephone +45 89 36 0000 E-mai l inge.vestergaard@aarch.dk Based on the repetitive architecture from the "building boom" 1960...... to 1973 it is discussed how architects can handle these Danish element and montage buildings through the transformation to upgraded aesthetical, functional and energy efficient architecture. The method used is analysis of cases, parallels to literature studies and producer interviews. This analysis...... compares "best practice" in Denmark and "best practice" in Austria. The modern architects accepted the fact that industrialized architecture told the storey of repetition and monotonous as basic condition. This article aims to explain that architecture can be thought as a complex and diverse design through...

  3. Architecture with GIDEON, a program for design in structural DNA nanotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birac, Jeffrey J; Sherman, William B; Kopatsch, Jens; Constantinou, Pamela E; Seeman, Nadrian C

    2006-12-01

    We present geometry based design strategies for DNA nanostructures. The strategies have been implemented with GIDEON-a graphical integrated development environment for oligonucleotides. GIDEON has a highly flexible graphical user interface that facilitates the development of simple yet precise models, and the evaluation of strains therein. Models are built on a simple model of undistorted B-DNA double-helical domains. Simple point and click manipulations of the model allow the minimization of strain in the phosphate-backbone linkages between these domains and the identification of any steric clashes that might occur as a result. Detailed analysis of 3D triangles yields clear predictions of the strains associated with triangles of different sizes. We have carried out experiments that confirm that 3D triangles form well only when their geometrical strain is less than 4% deviation from the estimated relaxed structure. Thus geometry-based techniques alone, without detailed energetic considerations, can be used to explain certain general trends in DNA structure formation. We have used GIDEON to build detailed models of double crossover and triple crossover molecules, evaluating the non-planarity associated with base tilt and junction misalignments. Computer modeling using a graphical user interface overcomes the limited precision of physical models for larger systems, and the limited interaction rate associated with earlier, command-line driven software. PMID:16630733

  4. Collagen-like proteins in pathogenic E. coli strains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neelanjana Ghosh

    Full Text Available The genome sequences of enterohaemorrhagic E. coli O157:H7 strains show multiple open-reading frames with collagen-like sequences that are absent from the common laboratory strain K-12. These putative collagens are included in prophages embedded in O157:H7 genomes. These prophages carry numerous genes related to strain virulence and have been shown to be inducible and capable of disseminating virulence factors by horizontal gene transfer. We have cloned two collagen-like proteins from E. coli O157:H7 into a laboratory strain and analysed the structure and conformation of the recombinant proteins and several of their constituting domains by a variety of spectroscopic, biophysical, and electron microscopy techniques. We show that these molecules exhibit many of the characteristics of vertebrate collagens, including trimer formation and the presence of a collagen triple helical domain. They also contain a C-terminal trimerization domain, and a trimeric α-helical coiled-coil domain with an unusual amino acid sequence almost completely lacking leucine, valine or isoleucine residues. Intriguingly, these molecules show high thermal stability, with the collagen domain being more stable than those of vertebrate fibrillar collagens, which are much longer and post-translationally modified. Under the electron microscope, collagen-like proteins from E. coli O157:H7 show a dumbbell shape, with two globular domains joined by a hinged stalk. This morphology is consistent with their likely role as trimeric phage side-tail proteins that participate in the attachment of phage particles to E. coli target cells, either directly or through assembly with other phage tail proteins. Thus, collagen-like proteins in enterohaemorrhagic E. coli genomes may have a direct role in the dissemination of virulence-related genes through infection of harmless strains by induced bacteriophages.

  5. A simulation study of the effects of architectural constraints and resource translocation on population structure and competition in clonal plants

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Herben, Tomáš; Suzuki, J. I.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 15, - (2002), s. 403-423. ISSN 0269-7653 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA206/02/0953; GA MŠk ME 197 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z6005908 Keywords : architectural model * architectural rules * competitive ability Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 1.520, year: 2002

  6. Open collagen membrane technique in socket preservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Wen-Yen

    2016-01-01

    Both hard and soft tissue undergo change after tooth extraction. In particular, the bone tissue surrounding teeth with fenestration or dehiscence defects undergoes dramatic change following tooth extraction, which can compromise further rehabilitation of the area. Adequate alveolar bone volume and keratinized mucosa are critical to the success of implant therapy. Therefore, the anatomic dimension of the alveolar ridge must be adequate to achieve an esthetically acceptable outcome of implant therapy. Previous studies have proposed many clinical techniques for preserving the extraction socket. This article presents a procedure in which an open collagen membrane technique was adopted to maintain an adequate volume of hard tissue and a sufficient width of the keratinized mucosa for further esthetic and functional implantation. Through this simple technique, an adequate volume and architecture around the implant can be achieved, with a long-term prognosis for implant therapy expected. PMID:27433553

  7. Three new homochiral coordination polymers involving two three-dimensional structural architectures: Syntheses, structures and magnetic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The preparations and properties of three new homochiral three-dimensional (3D) coordination polymers, [M(D-cam)(pyz)(H2O)2]n (M=Co (1) and Ni (2); D-H2cam=(+) D-camphoric acid; pyz=pyrazine) and [Mn2(D-cam)2(H2O)2] (3), under solvothermal conditions is described. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses revealed that all of compounds are homochiral 3D structure. 1 and 2 are isostructural and crystallize in the trigonal space group P3221, while 3 crystallizes in monoclinic space group P21. The structure of 1 and 2 consists of metal-D-cam helical chains which are pillared with pyrazine ligands into a 3D framework structure and 3 features a 3D homochiral framework involving one-dimensional manganese-carboxylate chains that are aligned parallel to the b axis. Magnetic susceptibility data of all compounds were collected. The findings indicate that μ2-pyrazine dominate weak antiferromagnetic coupling within 1 and 2, while 3 exhibits antiferromagnetic behavior through the carboxylate groups of D-cam ligand. -- Graphical abstract: The preparations and properties of three new homochiral three-dimensional (3D) coordination polymers, [M(D-cam)(pyz)(H2O)2]n (M=Co (1) and Ni (2); D-H2cam=(+) D-camphoric acid; pyz=pyrazine) and [Mn2(D-cam)2(H2O)2] (3), under solvothermal conditions is described. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses revealed that all of compounds are homochiral 3D structure. 1 and 2 are isostructural and crystallize in the trigonal space group P3221, while 3 crystallizes in monoclinic space group P21. The structure of 1 and 2 consists of metal-D-cam helical chains which are pillared with pyrazine ligands into a 3D framework structure and 3 features a 3D homochiral framework involving one-dimensional manganese-carboxylate chains that are aligned parallel to the b axis. Magnetic susceptibility data of all compounds were collected. The findings indicate that μ2-pyrazine dominate weak antiferromagnetic coupling within 1 and 2, while 3 exhibits

  8. Segmentation and measurement of collagen fibers for shoulder and joint therapy studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mascio, L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-11-15

    Various shoulder instabilities are debilitating, especially in individuals who perform overhead activities. Thermal modification of soft tissues in joints may allow precise alteration of these tissues` mechanical and/or structural properties to enhance joint function without inducing cell death or an inflammatory response. Several studies have evaluated laser energy for tissue welding. The collective findings are promising, and the next step is to identify the mechanisms responsible for laser-induced capsular tissue alternation, and the short- and long-term effects of non-ablative laser energy on joint capsular tissue. One step toward this goal is to compare the effect of three laser energy densities on the histologic properties of the tissue evaluating the architecture of the collagen (including density, fibril diameter distribution, and interfibrillar space) in sheep at various time intervals after surgery. The specific computer algorithms that are being used to make these measurements will be described.

  9. Structure of a Rhamnogalacturonan Fragment from Apple Pectin: Implications for Pectin Architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangmei Wu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A commercial apple pectin was sequentially digested with the cloned enzymes endopolygalacturonase, galactanase, arabinofuranosidase, xylogalacturonase, and rhamnogalacturonan hydrolase. The rhamnogalacturonan hydrolase-generated oligosaccharides were separated by ultrafiltration, anion exchange, and size-exclusion chromatography. Fractions from the ion exchange chromatography were pooled, lyophilized, and screened by MALDI-TOF MS. An oligosaccharide (RGP14P3 was identified and its structure, α-D-GalpA-(1→2-α-L-Rhap-(1→4-α-D-GalpA-(1→2-α-L-Rhap-(1→4-α-D-GalpA, determined by 1D and 2D NMR spectrometry. This oligosaccharide probably represents a direct connection between homogalacturonan and rhamnogalacturonan in pectin. Alternatively, it could indicate that the nonreducing end of rhamnogalacturonan starts with a galacturonic acid residue.

  10. Nano-structured noble metal catalysts based on hexametallate architecture for the reforming of hydrocarbon fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Todd H.

    2015-09-15

    Nano-structured noble metal catalysts based on hexametallate lattices, of a spinel block type, and which are resistant to carbon deposition and metal sulfide formation are provided. The catalysts are designed for the reforming of hydrocarbon fuels to synthesis gas. The hexametallate lattices are doped with noble metals (Au, Pt, Rh, Ru) which are atomically dispersed as isolated sites throughout the lattice and take the place of hexametallate metal ions such as Cr, Ga, In, and/or Nb. Mirror cations in the crystal lattice are selected from alkali metals, alkaline earth metals, and the lanthanide metals, so as to reduce the acidity of the catalyst crystal lattice and enhance the desorption of carbon deposit forming moieties such as aromatics. The catalysts can be used at temperatures as high as 1000.degree. C. and pressures up to 30 atmospheres. A method for producing these catalysts and applications of their use also is provided.

  11. Applying traditional architectural rules for energy efficiency and lateral structural stiffness to an 80 story tower

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This design is intended to revive and utilize fundamental principles of tall buildings into a modern design of an 80-story residential tower in Doha. The main goal in this design is to create an innovative and next generation sustainable tower design specifically for the Middle East by taking advantage of cutting-edge technologies while respecting the traditional way of living that reflects the cultural roots. The design utilizes a vertical exterior cable system which is used as a shading device and contributes significantly to the structural lateral load resistance. -- Highlights: → Linguistically paper has been checked and marked up with blue color as can be seen on marked-up manuscript. → All grammar corrections from reviewers have been made on manuscript with red colors. → On page 6 paragraphs has been added to explain e-QUEST basics. → References are being updated. → Fonts in have been changed.

  12. A collagen-binding EGFR antibody fragment targeting tumors with a collagen-rich extracellular matrix

    OpenAIRE

    Hui Liang; Xiaoran Li; Bin Wang; Bing Chen; Yannan Zhao; Jie Sun; Yan Zhuang; Jiajia Shi; He Shen; Zhijun Zhang; Jianwu Dai

    2016-01-01

    Many tumors over-express collagen, which constitutes the physical scaffold of tumor microenvironment. Collagen has been considered to be a target for cancer therapy. The collagen-binding domain (CBD) is a short peptide, which could bind to collagen and achieve the sustained release of CBD-fused proteins in collagen scaffold. Here, a collagen-binding EGFR antibody fragment was designed and expressed for targeting the collagen-rich extracellular matrix in tumors. The antibody fragment (Fab) of ...

  13. Architecture Sustainability

    OpenAIRE

    Avgeriou, Paris; Stal, Michael; Hilliard, Rich

    2013-01-01

    Software architecture is the foundation of software system development, encompassing a system's architects' and stakeholders' strategic decisions. A special issue of IEEE Software is intended to raise awareness of architecture sustainability issues and increase interest and work in the area. The first Web extra at http://youtu.be/wUGHvocfix0 is an audio interview in which Davide Falessi speaks with guest editors Paris Avgeriou and Rich Hilliard about the importance of architecture sustainabil...

  14. Collagen fibril formation during development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies with embryonic skin and bone suggested that the aminopropeptide (AP) and carboxylpropeptide (CP) of type I pro-callagen (pro-col) play a role in fibril formation. Chick leg metatarsal tendons were studied by electron microscopy. AP and CP of type I pro-col were purified from chick leg tendons; antibodies developed in rabbits and purity tested by radioimmunoassays. Antibodies were used for immunofluorescence microscopy (IFM) and immunoblotting (IB). The peritendineum, consisting of thin 20-30 nm fibrils, revealed the AP of type I and type III procol. In the tendon area, collagen fibrils were arranged within small compartments and were of uniform diameter at 10d, 14d and 18d. However, beyond 21d, there was confluency of the compartments and a wide range of fibril diameters. IFM revealed fine streaks of collagen, staining with the AP of type I throughout the tendon. The CP was mainly intracellular with only a small amount present in the extracellular space. IB revealed procollagen, pN-collagen (AP+collagen) and pC-collagen, (CP+collagen) at all stages of development. Ratios of pN/pC collagen, determined by spectrophotometric scanning of autoradiographs, correlated well with the distribution of fibril diameter. This study suggests the hypothesis that AP initiates fibrillogenesis while CP may regulate additional fibril growth

  15. Structure of the hDmc1-ssDNA filament reveals the principles of its architecture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei L Okorokov

    Full Text Available In eukaryotes, meiotic recombination is a major source of genetic diversity, but its defects in humans lead to abnormalities such as Down's, Klinefelter's and other syndromes. Human Dmc1 (hDmc1, a RecA/Rad51 homologue, is a recombinase that plays a crucial role in faithful chromosome segregation during meiosis. The initial step of homologous recombination occurs when hDmc1 forms a filament on single-stranded (ss DNA. However the structure of this presynaptic complex filament for hDmc1 remains unknown. To compare hDmc1-ssDNA complexes to those known for the RecA/Rad51 family we have obtained electron microscopy (EM structures of hDmc1-ssDNA nucleoprotein filaments using single particle approach. The EM maps were analysed by docking crystal structures of Dmc1, Rad51, RadA, RecA and DNA. To fully characterise hDmc1-DNA complexes we have analysed their organisation in the presence of Ca2+, Mg2+, ATP, AMP-PNP, ssDNA and dsDNA. The 3D EM structures of the hDmc1-ssDNA filaments allowed us to elucidate the principles of their internal architecture. Similar to the RecA/Rad51 family, hDmc1 forms helical filaments on ssDNA in two states: extended (active and compressed (inactive. However, in contrast to the RecA/Rad51 family, and the recently reported structure of hDmc1-double stranded (ds DNA nucleoprotein filaments, the extended (active state of the hDmc1 filament formed on ssDNA has nine protomers per helical turn, instead of the conventional six, resulting in one protomer covering two nucleotides instead of three. The control reconstruction of the hDmc1-dsDNA filament revealed 6.4 protein subunits per helical turn indicating that the filament organisation varies depending on the DNA templates. Our structural analysis has also revealed that the N-terminal domain of hDmc1 accomplishes its important role in complex formation through domain swapping between adjacent protomers, thus providing a mechanistic basis for coordinated action of hDmc1 protomers

  16. Isolation, characterization, and in vitro evaluation of bovine rumen submucosa films of collagen or chitosan-treated collagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopal Shankar, K; Udhaya Kumar, S; Sowndarya, S; Suresh Babu, P; Rose, C

    2016-01-01

    Bovine rumen is hitherto considered as an inedible waste of meat industry. The rumen tissues can be used as an alternative source of collagen to produce biocompatible materials for clinical application. In an effort to develop a functional biomaterial from the inedible mammalian tissues, this study aims to isolate and characterize bovine rumen submucosa. Initially, the rumen tissue was sequentially processed using chemical and enzymatic treatment to decellularize, neutralize, stabilize, and to produce a native collagen matrix which is referred as collagen film (COL-F). Thus, prepared matrix was treated with 1% (w/v) chitosan solution to produce a hybrid film which is referred as collagen-chitosan film (COL/CS-F). The comparative study includes the evaluation of physical, chemical, and biological properties of the biofilms prepared. The surface topology of COL-F exhibited a continuous collagenous network with fibrous nature, while the chitosan treatment provided smooth plain surface to the parent film. Incorporation of chitosan in COL-F increased the tensile properties, as well as the thermal stability and durability of the films. The Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy results revealed the presence of respective amide peaks, which corresponds to protein (collagen), and the evidence of collagen-chitosan interlinking. The submucosa layer was electrophoretically found to have type I collagen. The X-ray diffraction data showed the presence of amorphous and crystalline peak which attributes to the triple helical structure of collagen in the films. Cytotoxicity studies on the films were performed in vitro using human keratinocytes. The results of cell viability and proliferation demonstrated that COL-F and COL/CS-F exhibit good biocompatibility and therefore can augment cell infiltration and proliferation. However, enhanced cellular activity was observed on the chitosan treated COL-F. These observations demonstrate that the biofilms prepared in this study can be

  17. Software architecture

    CERN Document Server

    Vogel, Oliver; Chughtai, Arif

    2011-01-01

    As a software architect you work in a wide-ranging and dynamic environment. You have to understand the needs of your customer, design architectures that satisfy both functional and non-functional requirements, and lead development teams in implementing the architecture. And it is an environment that is constantly changing: trends such as cloud computing, service orientation, and model-driven procedures open up new architectural possibilities. This book will help you to develop a holistic architectural awareness and knowledge base that extends beyond concrete methods, techniques, and technologi

  18. Catalyst Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiib, Hans; Marling, Gitte; Hansen, Peter Mandal

    2014-01-01

    How can architecture promote the enriching experiences of the tolerant, the democratic, and the learning city - a city worth living in, worth supporting and worth investing in? Catalyst Architecture comprises architectural projects, which, by virtue of their location, context and their combination...... of programs, have a role in mediating positive social and/or cultural development. In this sense, we talk about architecture as a catalyst for: sustainable adaptation of the city’s infrastructure appropriate renovation of dilapidated urban districts strengthening of social cohesiveness in the city...

  19. Structural architecture and tectonic evolution of the Maghara inverted basin, Northern Sinai, Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moustafa, Adel R.

    2014-05-01

    Large NE-SW oriented asymmetric inversion anticlines bounded on their southeastern sides by reverse faults affect the exposed Mesozoic and Cenozoic sedimentary rocks of the Maghara area (northern Sinai). Seismic data indicate an earlier Jurassic rifting phase and surface structures indicate Late Cretaceous-Early Tertiary inversion phase. The geometry of the early extensional fault system clearly affected the sense of slip of the inverted faults and the geometry of the inversion anticlines. Rift-parallel fault segments were reactivated by reverse slip whereas rift-oblique fault segments were reactivated as oblique-slip faults or lateral/oblique ramps. New syn-inversion faults include two short conjugate strike-slip sets dissecting the forelimbs of inversion anticlines and the inverted faults as well as a set of transverse normal faults dissecting the backlimbs. Small anticline-syncline fold pairs ornamenting the steep flanks of the inversion anticlines are located at the transfer zones between en echelon segments of the inverted faults.

  20. Osmotic pressure induced tensile forces in tendon collagen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masic, Admir; Bertinetti, Luca; Schuetz, Roman; Chang, Shu-Wei; Metzger, Till Hartmut; Buehler, Markus J.; Fratzl, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Water is an important component of collagen in tendons, but its role for the function of this load-carrying protein structure is poorly understood. Here we use a combination of multi-scale experimentation and computation to show that water is an integral part of the collagen molecule, which changes conformation upon water removal. The consequence is a shortening of the molecule that translates into tensile stresses in the range of several to almost 100 MPa, largely surpassing those of about 0.3 MPa generated by contractile muscles. Although a complete drying of collagen would be relevant for technical applications, such as the fabrication of leather or parchment, stresses comparable to muscle contraction already occur at small osmotic pressures common in biological environments. We suggest, therefore, that water-generated tensile stresses may play a role in living collagen-based materials such as tendon or bone.

  1. Bioinformatics in crosslinking chemistry of collagen with selective cross linkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopal Ramesh

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Identifying the molecular interactions using bioinformatics tools before venturing into wet lab studies saves the energy and time considerably. The present study summarizes, molecular interactions and binding energy calculations made for major structural protein, collagen of Type I and Type III with the chosen cross-linkers, namely, coenzyme Q10, dopaquinone, embelin, embelin complex-1 & 2, idebenone, 5-O-methyl embelin, potassium embelate and vilangin. Results Molecular descriptive analyses suggest, dopaquinone, embelin, idebenone, 5-O-methyl embelin, and potassium embelate display nil violations. And results of docking analyses revealed, best affinity for Type I (- 4.74 kcal/mol and type III (-4.94 kcal/mol collagen was with dopaquinone. Conclusions Among the selected cross-linkers, dopaquinone, embelin, potassium embelate and 5-O-methyl embelin were the suitable cross-linkers for both Type I and Type III collagen and stabilizes the collagen at the expected level.

  2. Collagen binding to Staphylococcus aureus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staphylococcus aureus can bind soluble collagen in a specific, saturable manner. We have previously shown that some variability exists in the degree of collagen binding between different strains of heat-killed, formaldehyde-fixed S. aureus which are commercially available as immunologic reagents. The present study demonstrates that live S. aureus of the Cowan 1 strain binds amounts of collagen per organism equivalent to those demonstrated previously in heat-killed, formaldehyde-fixed bacteria but has an affinity over 100 times greater, with Kd values of 9.7 X 10(-11) M and 4.3 X 10(-8) M for live and heat-killed organisms, respectively. Studies were also carried out with S. aureus killed by ionizing radiation, since this method of killing the organism seemed less likely to alter the binding moieties on the surface than did heat killing. Bacteria killed by exposure to gamma radiation bound collagen in a manner essentially indistinguishable from that of live organisms. Binding of collagen to irradiated cells of the Cowan 1 strain was rapid, with equilibrium reached by 30 min at 22 degrees C, and was fully reversible. The binding was not inhibited by fibronectin, fibrinogen, C1q, or immunoglobulin G, suggesting a binding site for collagen distinct from those for these proteins. Collagen binding was virtually eliminated in trypsin-treated organisms, indicating that the binding site has a protein component. Of four strains examined, Cowan 1 and S. aureus ATCC 25923 showed saturable, specific binding, while strains Woods and S4 showed a complete lack of binding. These results suggest that some strains of S. aureus contain high-affinity binding sites for collagen. While the number of binding sites per bacterium varied sixfold in the two collagen-binding strains, the apparent affinity was similar

  3. Architecture and the Ideology of Productivity: Four Public Housing Projects by Groupe Structures in Brussels (1950-65

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven Sterken

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The field of public housing in Belgium formed the backdrop for two crucial phenomena in the shaping of the welfare state: first, the general compartmentalization along ideological lines of all aspects of society, including housing policy and town planning; second, the adaptation of the nation’s industry, and the building trade in particular, to postwar economic conditions. In the study of welfare state housing policies in Belgium, the latter aspect has so far been overlooked. This paper therefore proposes to look into a couple of public housing projects by Groupe Structures, the largest architectural firm in the country in the postwar period. As it will be argued, the stylistic and typological evolution of these schemes reveals the growing impact of a ‘productivist ideology’ on public housing in the 1950s. Paralyzed by the steeply rising building costs, the central buzzwords became standardization, industrialization and prefabrication. However, as the paper argues, the productivity doctrine failed to live up to its expectations as the sector’s turnover remained too marginal to put sufficient pressure on the construction industry.

  4. Flexible free-standing luminescent two-component fiber films with tunable hierarchical structures based on hydrogen-bonding architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Dongpeng; Williams, Gareth R; Zhao, Min; Li, Changming; Fan, Guoling; Yang, Hejia

    2013-12-17

    Although the fabrication of hierarchical architectures with highly ordered functional units is of great importance for both fundamental science and practical application, the development of one-dimensional (1D) organic hierarchical micro/nanostructures based on low-molecular-weight (LMW) building blocks remains at an early stage. Herein, we report two types of micro/nanoscaled multicomponent fluorescent fiber systems with tunable hierarchical morphologies through a one-step coassembly process. With the aid of hydrogen-bonding motifs, LMW precursors (1,4-bis(5-phenyloxazol-2-yl)benzene (A) and two coassembled building blocks: 4-bromotetrafluorobenzene carboxylic acid (B) and 2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorophenol (C)) have been self-organized into fibers and flexible free-standing films, which show hierarchical micro/nanostructures as well as tunable one-/two-photon luminescence. The disassembly of the multicomponent A.B and A.C fibers occurs at high temperature, which further alters the luminescence properties of the multicomponent materials. Therefore, this work provides a facile wet chemical route for fabricating multicomponent LMW self-assembled fibers and free-standing film systems with tunable hierarchical structures and photoemission behaviors, and such self-organized systems may have potential applications in fields of two-photon luminescence and thermal sensors. PMID:24274340

  5. Modulation of collagen by addition of Hofmeister salts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oechsle, Anja Maria; Landenberger, Markus; Gibis, Monika; Irmscher, Stefan Björn; Kohlus, Reinhard; Weiss, Jochen

    2015-08-01

    Collagen can be modified by addition of chaotropic or kosmotropic salts of the reversed Hofmeister series. Hence, telopeptide-poor collagen type I was suspended in H2SO4 (pH 2) and 0.05-0.5 M KCl and KNO3 (chaotropes), as well as KI and KSCN (kosmotropes). Rheological parameters, including storage and loss modulus, intrinsic viscosity, and critical overlap concentration, were assessed and the microstructure was characterized by applying confocal laser scanning microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The addition of up to 0.1 M KCl and 0.05 M KNO3 increased the intrinsic viscosity from 1.22 to 1.51 L/g without salt to a maximal value of 1.74 L/g and decreased the critical overlap concentration from 0.66 to 0.82 g/L to a minimal value of 0.57 g/L. Higher salt concentrations increased the collagen-collagen interactions due to ions withdrawing the water from the collagen molecules. Hence, 0.1 M KSCN delivered the largest structures with the highest structure factor, area value and the highest critical overlap concentration with 17.6 L/g. Overall, 0.5 M salt led to salting out, with chaotropes forming fine precipitates and kosmotropes leading to elastic three-dimensional networks. The study demonstrated that collagen entanglement and microstructure depend strongly on the ionic strength and type of salt. PMID:26014138

  6. Second harmonic generation microscopy differentiates collagen type I and type III in COPD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Masaru; Kayra, Damian; Elliott, W. Mark; Hogg, James C.; Abraham, Thomas

    2012-03-01

    The structural remodeling of extracellular matrix proteins in peripheral lung region is an important feature in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Multiphoton microscopy is capable of inducing specific second harmonic generation (SHG) signal from non-centrosymmetric structural proteins such as fibrillar collagens. In this study, SHG microscopy was used to examine structural remodeling of the fibrillar collagens in human lungs undergoing emphysematous destruction (n=2). The SHG signals originating from these diseased lung thin sections from base to apex (n=16) were captured simultaneously in both forward and backward directions. We found that the SHG images detected in the forward direction showed well-developed and well-structured thick collagen fibers while the SHG images detected in the backward direction showed striking different morphological features which included the diffused pattern of forward detected structures plus other forms of collagen structures. Comparison of these images with the wellestablished immunohistochemical staining indicated that the structures detected in the forward direction are primarily the thick collagen type I fibers and the structures identified in the backward direction are diffusive structures of forward detected collagen type I plus collagen type III. In conclusion, we here demonstrate the feasibility of SHG microscopy in differentiating fibrillar collagen subtypes and understanding their remodeling in diseased lung tissues.

  7. Essential software architecture

    CERN Document Server

    Gorton, Ian

    2011-01-01

    Job titles like ""Technical Architect"" and ""Chief Architect"" nowadays abound in software industry, yet many people suspect that ""architecture"" is one of the most overused and least understood terms in professional software development. Gorton's book tries to resolve this dilemma. It concisely describes the essential elements of knowledge and key skills required to be a software architect. The explanations encompass the essentials of architecture thinking, practices, and supporting technologies. They range from a general understanding of structure and quality attributes through technical i

  8. Development and utilization of a bovine type I collagen microfibril model

    Science.gov (United States)

    The structure of fibrous collagen, a long triple helix that self-associates in a staggered array to form a matrix of fibrils, fibers and fiber bundles, makes it uniquely suitable as a scaffold for biomaterial engineering. A major challenge for this application is to stabilize collagen structure by m...

  9. Mechanical Properties of Collagen Biomimetic Films Formed in the Presence of Calcium, Silica and Chitosan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mihai Chirita

    2008-01-01

    Using eucollagen solutions from ox hide, we cast collagen films to assess the influence of calcium and silica on the re- constitution of the fibrous structure of collagen. The tensile strength and the breaking elongation of the reconstituted collagen films were measured and analysed. Significant differences were observed between reconstituted collagen films with and without calcium and silica. The breaking elongation of the films obtained in the presence of silica was significantly greater, and the degradation was lower than other films of reconstituted collagen. Collagen and chitosan do not exist together as blends in nature, but the specific properties of each may be used to produce in biomimetic way man-made blends with biomedical applications, that confer unique structural, mechanical (detail) and in vivo properties.

  10. Time·Space·Architecture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QI Kang

    2009-01-01

    @@ In the 20th century a Swiss writer wrote a book titled Time, Space and Architecture, in which he discussed the relationship between architecture and the times. Fifty years after that, this paper adopts the same title, hoping to deepen the understanding of the space-time structure in architecture and contribute to the new exploration of architectural forms.

  11. Systemic Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poletto, Marco; Pasquero, Claudia

    2012-01-01

    This is a manual investigating the subject of urban ecology and systemic development from the perspective of architectural design. It sets out to explore two main goals: to discuss the contemporary relevance of a systemic practice to architectural design, and to share a toolbox of informational...... design protocols developed to describe the city as a territory of self-organization. Collecting together nearly a decade of design experiments by the authors and their practice, ecoLogicStudio, the book discusses key disciplinary definitions such as ecologic urbanism, algorithmic architecture, bottom......-up or tactical design, behavioural space and the boundary of the natural and the artificial realms within the city and architecture. A new kind of "real-time world-city" is illustrated in the form of an operational design manual for the assemblage of proto-architectures, the incubation of proto...

  12. A Functional and Structural Mongolian Scots Pine (Pinus sylvestris var. mongolica) Model Integrating Architecture, Biomass and Effects of Precipitation

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Feng; Letort, Veronique; Lu, Qi; Bai, Xuefeng; Guo, Yan; De Reffye, P.; Li, Baoguo

    2012-01-01

    Mongolian Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris var. mongolica) is one of the principal tree species in the network of Three-North Shelterbelt for windbreak and sand stabilisation in China. The functions of shelterbelts are highly correlated with the architecture and eco-physiological processes of individual tree. Thus, model-assisted analysis of canopy architecture and function dynamic in Mongolian Scots pine is of value for better understanding its role and behaviour within shelterbelt ecosystems in...

  13. A Functional and Structural Mongolian Scots Pine (Pinus sylvestris var. mongolica) Model Integrating Architecture, Biomass and Effects of Precipitation

    OpenAIRE

    Feng Wang; Véronique Letort; Qi Lu; Xuefeng Bai; Yan Guo; Philippe de Reffye; Baoguo Li

    2012-01-01

    International audience Mongolian Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris var. mongolica) is one of the principal tree species in the network of Three-North Shelterbelt for windbreak and sand stabilisation in China. The functions of shelterbelts are highly correlated with the architecture and eco-physiological processes of individual tree. Thus, model-assisted analysis of canopy architecture and function dynamic in Mongolian Scots pine is of value for better understanding its role and behaviour within...

  14. Prevention of liver fibrosis by triple helix-forming oligodeoxyribonucleotides targeted to the promoter region of type I collagen gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koilan, Subramaniyan; Hamilton, David; Baburyan, Narina; Padala, Mythili K; Weber, Karl T; Guntaka, Ramareddy V

    2010-10-01

    Hepatic fibrosis leading to cirrhosis remains a global health problem. The most common etiologies are alcoholism and viral infections. Liver fibrosis is associated with major changes in both quantity and composition of extracellular matix and leads to disorganization of the liver architecture and irreversible damage to the liver function. As of now there is no effective therapy to control fibrosis. The end product of fibrosis is abnormal synthesis and accumulation of type I collagen in the extracellular matrix, which is produced by activated stellate or Ito cells in the damaged liver. Therefore, inhibition of transcription of type I collagen should in principle inhibit its production and accumulation in liver. Normally, DNA exists in a duplex form. However, under some circumstances, DNA can assume triple helical (triplex) structures. Intermolecular triplexes, formed by the addition of a sequence-specific third strand to the major groove of the duplex DNA, have the potential to serve as selective gene regulators. Earlier, we demonstrated efficient triplex formation between the exogenously added triplex-forming oligodeoxyribonucleotides (TFOs) and a specific sequence in the promoter region of the COL1A1 gene. In this study we used a rat model of liver fibrosis, induced by dimethylnitrosamine, to test whether these TFOs prevent liver fibrosis. Our results indicate that both the 25-mer and 18-mer TFOs, specific for the upstream nucleotide sequence from -141 to -165 (relative to the transcription start site) in the 5' end of collagen gene promoter, effectively prevented accumulation of liver collagen and fibrosis. We also observed improvement in liver function tests. However, mutations in the TFO that eliminated formation of triplexes are ineffective in preventing fibrosis. We believe that these TFOs can be used as potential antifibrotic therapeutic molecules. PMID:20818932

  15. Supramolecular assembly of electrostatically stabilized, hydroxyproline-lacking collagen-mimetic peptides

    OpenAIRE

    Krishna, Ohm D.; Kiick, Kristi L.

    2009-01-01

    The mechanical and biological functions of the native collagens remain an inspiration in materials design, but widespread application of de novo collagens has been limited in part by the need for hydroxylated proline in the formation of stable triple helical structures. In order to address this continued need and to expand the potential for recombinant expression of functional, hydroxyproline-lacking collagen-mimetic peptides, we have designed a hydrophilic, non-repetitive, and thermally stab...

  16. Interruptions in the collagen repeating tripeptide pattern can promote supramolecular association

    OpenAIRE

    Hwang, Eileen S; Thiagarajan, Geetha; Parmar, Avanish S.; Brodsky, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    The standard collagen triple-helix requires a perfect (Gly-Xaa-Yaa)n sequence, yet all nonfibrillar collagens contain interruptions in this tripeptide repeating pattern. Defining the structural consequences of disruptions in the sequence pattern may shed light on the biological role of sequence interruptions, which have been suggested to play a role in molecular flexibility, collagen degradation, and ligand binding. Previous studies on model peptides with 1- and 4-residue interruptions showed...

  17. Collagen-like antimicrobial peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Ryo; Kudo, Masakazu; Dazai, Yui; Mima, Takehiko; Koide, Takaki

    2016-11-01

    Combinatorial library composed of rigid rod-like peptides with a triple-helical scaffold was constructed. The component peptides were designed to have various combinations of basic and neutral (or hydrophobic) amino acid residues based on collagen-like (Gly-Pro-Yaa)-repeating sequences, inspired from the basic and amphiphilic nature of naturally occurring antimicrobial peptides. Screening of the peptide pools resulted in identification of antimicrobial peptides. A structure-activity relationship study revealed that the position of Arg-cluster at N-terminus and cystine knots at C-terminus in the triple helix significantly contributed to the antimicrobial activity. The most potent peptide RO-A showed activity against Gram-negative Escherichia coli and Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis. In addition, Escherichia coli exposed to RO-A resulted in abnormal elongation of the cells. RO-A was also shown to have remarkable stability in human serum and low cytotoxicity to mammalian cells. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers (Pept Sci) 106: 453-459, 2016. PMID:27271210

  18. Mixed Reality Architecture: a dynamic architectural topology

    OpenAIRE

    Schnädelbach, H.; A Penn; Steadman, P.

    2007-01-01

    Architecture can be shown to structure patterns of co-presence and in turn to be structured itself by the rules and norms of the society present within it. This two-way relationship exists in a surprisingly stable framework, as fundamental changes to buildings are slow and costly. At the same time, change within organisations is increasingly rapid and buildings are used to accommodate some of that change. This adaptation can be supported by the use of telecommunication technolo...

  19. System structures in architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vibæk, Kasper Sánchez

    2012-01-01

    Afhandlingen introducerer begrebet systemstruktur i den arkitektoniske designproces som en måde at indskyde et systemniveau i arkitektur og byggeri, der ligger mellem generel byggeteknik og specifikke arkitektoniske resultater. For at operationalisere en sådan systemstruktur udarbejdes en systems...

  20. The subsurface structure and stratigraphic architecture of rift-related units in the Lishu Depression of the Songliao Basin, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongyu; Fan, Tailiang; Wu, Yue

    2015-03-01

    This contribution reports the basin configuration feature, stratigraphy and sedimentary architecture of the Lishu Depression in the Songliao Basin, China. The activity rate, distribution and style of local faulting demonstrate the timing and extent of regional rifting. Distinct episodes of compressional tectonic activity caused uplift and exposure of strata evident as the traditional syn- and post-rift stages of basin evolution. These episodes led to the sequential denudation of the Upper Jurassic Huoshiling Formation, Lower Cretaceous Yingcheng and Denglouku Formations, and corresponding regional unconformities. Acting in tandem with regional compression, activity along the major boundary faults influenced the evolving basin configuration, as well as seismic sequences and sedimentary patterns. Seismic, well log and drill core data described here show subdivision sections of the Lishu Depression strata according to discrete phases of the traditional syn-rift stage of deposition. We refer to these sub-stages as the initial rifting, the intensive rifting and the recession phases. The basin configuration shifted from a graben/half-graben configuration during the initial rifting phase, to a dustpan-shaped half-graben pattern during the subsequent phase of intensive rifting, and finally into a gentle sedimentary basin during the final recession phase. The early seismic sequence divides into a lowstand systems tract (LST), transgressive systems tract (TST) and highstand systems tract (HST). Evidence of the LST within the seismic sequence becomes less apparent with the intensive rifting phase, while the HST occupied an increasing proportion of the section. The shallow water depositional fill formed during the final recession phase consists only of TST and HST components. Depositional environment then shifts from alluvial fan and shallow lacustrine systems to fan delta, braided delta - lake, and finally to a braided fluvial setting. The vertical stacking pattern shifts

  1. Curcumin cross-linked collagen aerogels with controlled anti-proteolytic and pro-angiogenic efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dharunya, G; Duraipandy, N; Lakra, Rachita; Korapatti, Purna Sai; Jayavel, R; Kiran, Manikantan Syamala

    2016-01-01

    This paper elucidates the development of a curcumin cross-linked collagen aerogel system with controlled anti-proteolytic activity and pro-angiogenic efficacy. The results of this study showed that in situ cross-linking of curcumin with collagen leads to the development of aerogels with enhanced physical and mechanical properties. The integrity of collagen after cross-linking with curcumin was studied via FTIR spectroscopy. The results confirmed that the cross-linking with curcumin did not induce any structural changes in the collagen. The curcumin cross-linked collagen aerogels exhibited potent anti-proteolytic and anti-microbial activity. Scanning electron and atomic force microscopic analysis of curcumin cross-linked collagen aerogels showed a 3D microstructure that enhanced the adhesion and proliferation of cells. The highly organized geometry of collagen-curcumin aerogels enhanced the permeability and water-retaining ability required for the diffusion of nutrients that aid cellular growth. The pro-angiogenic properties of collagen-curcumin aerogels were ascribed to the cumulative effect of the nutraceutical and the collagen molecule, which augmented the restoration of damaged tissue. Further, these aerogels exhibited controlled anti-proteolytic activity, which makes them suitable 3D scaffolds for biomedical applications. This study provides scope for the development of biocompatible and bioresorbable collagen aerogel systems that use a nutraceutical as a cross-linker for biomedical applications. PMID:27509047

  2. Humanizing Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft, Tanya Søndergaard

    2015-01-01

    The article proposes the urban digital gallery as an opportunity to explore the relationship between ‘human’ and ‘technology,’ through the programming of media architecture. It takes a curatorial perspective when proposing an ontological shift from considering media facades as visual spectacles to...... agency and a sense of being by way of dematerializing architecture. This is achieved by way of programming the symbolic to provide new emotional realizations and situations of enlightenment in the public audience. This reflects a greater potential to humanize the digital in media architecture....

  3. Architectural technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2005-01-01

    The booklet offers an overall introduction to the Institute of Architectural Technology and its projects and activities, and an invitation to the reader to contact the institute or the individual researcher for further information. The research, which takes place at the Institute of Architectural...... Technology at the Roayl Danish Academy of Fine Arts, School of Architecture, reflects a spread between strategic, goal-oriented pilot projects, commissioned by a ministry, a fund or a private company, and on the other hand projects which originate from strong personal interests and enthusiasm of individual...

  4. Persian architecture and mathematics

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    This volulme features eight original papers dedicated to the theme “Persian Architecture and Mathematics,” guest edited by Reza Sarhangi. All papers were approved through a rigorous process of blind peer review and edited by an interdisciplinary scientific editorial committee. Topics range from symmetry in ancient Persian architecture to the elaborate geometric patterns and complex three-dimensional structures of standing monuments of historical periods, from the expression of mathematical ideas to architectonic structures, and from decorative ornament to the representation of modern group theory and quasi-crystalline patterns. The articles discuss unique monuments Persia, including domed structures and two-dimensional patterns, which have received significant scholarly attention in recent years. This book is a unique contribution to studies of Persian architecture in relation to mathematics.

  5. Periodontal regeneration with stem cells-seeded collagen-hydroxyapatite scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zeping; Yin, Xing; Ye, Qingsong; He, Wulin; Ge, Mengke; Zhou, Xiaofu; Hu, Jing; Zou, Shujuan

    2016-07-01

    Re-establishing compromised periodontium to its original structure, properties and function is demanding, but also challenging, for successful orthodontic treatment. In this study, the periodontal regeneration capability of collagen-hydroxyapatite scaffolds, seeded with bone marrow stem cells, was investigated in a canine labial alveolar bone defect model. Bone marrow stem cells were isolated, expanded and characterized. Porous collagen-hydroxyapatite scaffold and cross-linked collagen-hydroxyapatite scaffold were prepared. Attachment, migration, proliferation and morphology of bone marrow stem cells, co-cultured with porous collagen-hydroxyapatite or cross-linked collagen-hydroxyapatite, were evaluated in vitro. The periodontal regeneration capability of collagen-hydroxyapatite scaffold with or without bone marrow stem cells was tested in six beagle dogs, with each dog carrying one sham-operated site as healthy control, and three labial alveolar bone defects untreated to allow natural healing, treated with bone marrow stem cells - collagen-hydroxyapatite scaffold implant or collagen-hydroxyapatite scaffold implant, respectively. Animals were euthanized at 3 and 6 months (3 animals per group) after implantation and the resected maxillary and mandibular segments were examined using micro-computed tomography scan, H&E staining, Masson's staining and histometric evaluation. Bone marrow stem cells were successfully isolated and demonstrated self-renewal and multi-potency in vitro. The porous collagen-hydroxyapatite and cross-linked collagen-hydroxyapatite had average pore sizes of 415 ± 20 µm and 203 ± 18 µm and porosity of 69 ± 0.5% and 50 ± 0.2%, respectively. The attachment, proliferation and migration of bone marrow stem cells were satisfactory on both porous collagen-hydroxyapatite and cross-linked collagen-hydroxyapatite scaffolds. Implantation of bone marrow stem cells - collagen-hydroxyapatite or collagen-hydroxyapatite scaffold in

  6. Architectural Mealscapes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvedebrink, Tenna Doktor Olsen; Fisker, Anna Marie; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning

    2012-01-01

    German architect Gottfried Semper developed a theory on the “four elements of Architecture” tracing the origin of architecture back to the rise of the early human settlement and the creation of fire. With the notion ‘hearth’ as the first motive in architecture and the definition of three enclosing...... motives; mounding, enclosure and roof, Semper linked the cultural and social values of the primordial fireplace with the order and shape of architecture. He claimed that any building ever made was nothing but a variation of the first primitive shelters erected around the fireplace, and that the three...... enclosing motives existed only as defenders of the “sacred flame”. In that way Semper developed the idea that any architectural scenery can be described, analyzed and explained by understanding the contextual, symbolic and social values of how the four basic motives of hearth, mounding, enclosure, and roof...

  7. New hydrogels based on maleilated collagen with potential applications in tissue engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New hydrogels based on maleic anhydride (MA) modified collagen were prepared with the aim of overcoming the high degradation rate displayed by collagen that is not otherwise chemically crosslinked. Semi-interpenetrated matrices were obtained by free radical polymerization of maleilated collagen (CM) and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) in the presence of ammonium persulfate (APS) and N,N,N′,N′-tetramethylethylenediamine (TEMED) as initiating system. The resulting matrices (CMH) had a sharp decrease in degradation, when compared to pure collagen. FTIR and H1 NMR spectroscopies were used to confirm the incorporation of MA on the collagen peptide chains. The final composition of CMH was found to be strongly dependent by the concentration of maleilated collagen. The morphology of the hydrogels was studied by Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and the macro-gel structure was confirmed. Water uptake of the synthetised hydrogels is influenced by both composition and the porosity of the matrices.

  8. New hydrogels based on maleilated collagen with potential applications in tissue engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Potorac, Simona; Popa, Marcel [' Gheorghe Asachi' Technical University, Faculty of Chemical Engineering and Environmental Protection, Department of Natural and Synthetic Polymers, 71 Dimitrie Mangeron, 700050 Iasi (Romania); Maier, Vasilica [' Gheorghe Asachi' Technical University, Faculty of Textile, Leather and Industrial Management, Department of Chemical Technology of Leather and Substitutes, 71 Dimitrie Mangeron, 700050, Iasi (Romania); Lisa, Gabriela [' Gheorghe Asachi' Technical University, Faculty of Chemical Engineering and Environmental Protection, Department of Natural and Synthetic Polymers, 71 Dimitrie Mangeron, 700050 Iasi (Romania); Verestiuc, Liliana, E-mail: liliana.verestiuc@bioinginerie.ro [' Gr.T.Popa' University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medical Bioengineering, Department of Biological Sciences, 9-13 Kogalniceanu Street, 700454, Iasi (Romania)

    2012-02-01

    New hydrogels based on maleic anhydride (MA) modified collagen were prepared with the aim of overcoming the high degradation rate displayed by collagen that is not otherwise chemically crosslinked. Semi-interpenetrated matrices were obtained by free radical polymerization of maleilated collagen (CM) and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) in the presence of ammonium persulfate (APS) and N,N,N Prime ,N Prime -tetramethylethylenediamine (TEMED) as initiating system. The resulting matrices (CMH) had a sharp decrease in degradation, when compared to pure collagen. FTIR and H{sup 1} NMR spectroscopies were used to confirm the incorporation of MA on the collagen peptide chains. The final composition of CMH was found to be strongly dependent by the concentration of maleilated collagen. The morphology of the hydrogels was studied by Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and the macro-gel structure was confirmed. Water uptake of the synthetised hydrogels is influenced by both composition and the porosity of the matrices.

  9. Regulation of post-Golgi LH3 trafficking is essential for collagen homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banushi, Blerida; Forneris, Federico; Straatman-Iwanowska, Anna; Strange, Adam; Lyne, Anne-Marie; Rogerson, Clare; Burden, Jemima J.; Heywood, Wendy E.; Hanley, Joanna; Doykov, Ivan; Straatman, Kornelis R.; Smith, Holly; Bem, Danai; Kriston-Vizi, Janos; Ariceta, Gema; Risteli, Maija; Wang, Chunguang; Ardill, Rosalyn E.; Zaniew, Marcin; Latka-Grot, Julita; Waddington, Simon N.; Howe, S. J.; Ferraro, Francesco; Gjinovci, Asllan; Lawrence, Scott; Marsh, Mark; Girolami, Mark; Bozec, Laurent; Mills, Kevin; Gissen, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Post-translational modifications are necessary for collagen precursor molecules (procollagens) to acquire final shape and function. However, the mechanism and contribution of collagen modifications that occur outside the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi are not understood. We discovered that VIPAR, with its partner proteins, regulate sorting of lysyl hydroxylase 3 (LH3, also known as PLOD3) into newly identified post-Golgi collagen IV carriers and that VIPAR-dependent sorting is essential for modification of lysines in multiple collagen types. Identification of structural and functional collagen abnormalities in cells and tissues from patients and murine models of the autosomal recessive multisystem disorder Arthrogryposis, Renal dysfunction and Cholestasis syndrome caused by VIPAR and VPS33B deficiencies confirmed our findings. Thus, regulation of post-Golgi LH3 trafficking is essential for collagen homeostasis and for the development and function of multiple organs and tissues. PMID:27435297

  10. Textile Architecture

    OpenAIRE

    Maurin, Bernard; Motro, René

    2013-01-01

    The basic idea for a textile architecture project originates during early meetings between the architect and the engineer. The morphologic richness of such projects is provided by the varying curvatures of shapes, in contradiction with a classical straight line and orthogonal architecture. However the rules of construction are quite different in terms of realisation and of mechanical behaviour: textile membranes are subjected to a pre-stress conferring them their rigidity, and a major objecti...

  11. Fractal Architecture

    OpenAIRE

    Rumież, Agnieszka

    2013-01-01

    Research focuses on the recognition of the disposition of natural environment, which serves as an inspiration for cultural creation as it has always been in the history of architecture. Modern mathematical model of fractal geometry has been used to understand patterns occurring in the surrounding. The comparative analysis has been conducted between the abstract mathematical model and architectural composition in the view of contemporary cognitive paradigms. In conclusion, a hypothesis of a ne...

  12. IAIMS Architecture

    OpenAIRE

    Hripcsak, George

    1997-01-01

    An information system architecture defines the components of a system and the interfaces among the components. A good architecture is essential for creating an Integrated Advanced Information Management System (IAIMS) that works as an integrated whole yet is flexible enough to accommodate many users and roles, multiple applications, changing vendors, evolving user needs, and advancing technology. Modularity and layering promote flexibility by reducing the complexity of...

  13. Shrinking mechanism of a porous collagen matrix immersed in solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Po-Yang; Hsieh, Hsyue-Jen; Huang, Lynn L H

    2014-12-01

    The porous structure of collagen-based matrices enables the infiltration of cells both in in vitro and clinical applications. Reconstituted porous collagen matrices often collapse when they are in contact with aqueous solutions; however, the mechanism for the collapse of the pores is not understood. We, therefore, investigated the interactions between the collagen matrix and different solutions, and discuss the mechanisms for the change in microstructure of the matrix on immersing it in solution. When a dried collagen matrix was immersed in aqueous solutions, the matrix shrunk and pores close to the surface closed. The shrinkage ratio and thickness of the compact microstructure close to the superficial area decreased with increasing ethanol content in the solution. The original porous structure of the collagen matrix was preserved when the matrix was immersed in absolute ethanol. The shrinkage of a porous collagen matrix in contact with aqueous solutions was attributed to the liquid/gas interfacial tension. The average pore diameter of the matrix also significantly affected the shrinkage of the matrix. The shrinkage of the matrix, explained using the Young-Laplace equation, was found to result from the pressure drop, and especially in the pores located superficially, leading to the collapse of the matrix microstructure. The integrity of the porous microstructure allows better penetration of cells in medical applications. The numbers of NIH/3T3 fibroblasts penetrated through the hydrated Col/PBS porous collagen matrices pre-immersed in absolute ethanol with subsequent water and DMEM culture medium replacements were significantly higher than those through matrices hydrated directly in DMEM. PMID:24678021

  14. Comparative Study of Nest Architecture and Colony Structure of the Fungus-Growing Ants, Mycocepurus goeldii and M. smithii

    OpenAIRE

    Rabeling, C.; Verhaagh, M.; Engels, W

    2007-01-01

    Nest architecture and demography of the non leaf-cutting fungus-growing ant species Mycocepurus goeldii and M. smithii (Attini: Formicidae) were studied in an agroforest habitat near Manaus, Brazil during the excavation of 13 nests. Both species built their nests in two different ways. The first type possessed a “tree-like” architecture, in which a vertical tunnel led downwards and lateral tunnels branched off at 90° angles from the main tunnel, with a chamber at the end of each side branch. ...

  15. Chromosome Architecture and Genome Organization

    OpenAIRE

    Giorgio Bernardi

    2015-01-01

    How the same DNA sequences can function in the three-dimensional architecture of interphase nucleus, fold in the very compact structure of metaphase chromosomes and go precisely back to the original interphase architecture in the following cell cycle remains an unresolved question to this day. The strategy used to address this issue was to analyze the correlations between chromosome architecture and the compositional patterns of DNA sequences spanning a size range from a few hundreds to a few...

  16. UAV-Based Photogrammetry and Integrated Technologies for Architectural Applications—Methodological Strategies for the After-Quake Survey of Vertical Structures in Mantua (Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiana Achille

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the survey of tall buildings in an emergency context like in the case of post-seismic events. The after-earthquake survey has to guarantee time-savings, high precision and security during the operational stages. The main goal is to optimize the application of methodologies based on acquisition and automatic elaborations of photogrammetric data even with the use of Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV systems in order to provide fast and low cost operations. The suggested methods integrate new technologies with commonly used technologies like TLS and topographic acquisition. The value of the photogrammetric application is demonstrated by a test case, based on the comparison of acquisition, calibration and 3D modeling results in case of use of a laser scanner, metric camera and amateur reflex camera. The test would help us to demonstrate the efficiency of image based methods in the acquisition of complex architecture. The case study is Santa Barbara Bell tower in Mantua. The applied survey solution allows a complete 3D database of the complex architectural structure to be obtained for the extraction of all the information needed for significant intervention. This demonstrates the applicability of the photogrammetry using UAV for the survey of vertical structures, complex buildings and difficult accessible architectural parts, providing high precision results.

  17. UAV-Based Photogrammetry and Integrated Technologies for Architectural Applications--Methodological Strategies for the After-Quake Survey of Vertical Structures in Mantua (Italy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achille, Cristiana; Adami, Andrea; Chiarini, Silvia; Cremonesi, Stefano; Fassi, Francesco; Fregonese, Luigi; Taffurelli, Laura

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines the survey of tall buildings in an emergency context like in the case of post-seismic events. The after-earthquake survey has to guarantee time-savings, high precision and security during the operational stages. The main goal is to optimize the application of methodologies based on acquisition and automatic elaborations of photogrammetric data even with the use of Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) systems in order to provide fast and low cost operations. The suggested methods integrate new technologies with commonly used technologies like TLS and topographic acquisition. The value of the photogrammetric application is demonstrated by a test case, based on the comparison of acquisition, calibration and 3D modeling results in case of use of a laser scanner, metric camera and amateur reflex camera. The test would help us to demonstrate the efficiency of image based methods in the acquisition of complex architecture. The case study is Santa Barbara Bell tower in Mantua. The applied survey solution allows a complete 3D database of the complex architectural structure to be obtained for the extraction of all the information needed for significant intervention. This demonstrates the applicability of the photogrammetry using UAV for the survey of vertical structures, complex buildings and difficult accessible architectural parts, providing high precision results. PMID:26134108

  18. UAV-Based Photogrammetry and Integrated Technologies for Architectural Applications—Methodological Strategies for the After-Quake Survey of Vertical Structures in Mantua (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achille, Cristiana; Adami, Andrea; Chiarini, Silvia; Cremonesi, Stefano; Fassi, Francesco; Fregonese, Luigi; Taffurelli, Laura

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines the survey of tall buildings in an emergency context like in the case of post-seismic events. The after-earthquake survey has to guarantee time-savings, high precision and security during the operational stages. The main goal is to optimize the application of methodologies based on acquisition and automatic elaborations of photogrammetric data even with the use of Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) systems in order to provide fast and low cost operations. The suggested methods integrate new technologies with commonly used technologies like TLS and topographic acquisition. The value of the photogrammetric application is demonstrated by a test case, based on the comparison of acquisition, calibration and 3D modeling results in case of use of a laser scanner, metric camera and amateur reflex camera. The test would help us to demonstrate the efficiency of image based methods in the acquisition of complex architecture. The case study is Santa Barbara Bell tower in Mantua. The applied survey solution allows a complete 3D database of the complex architectural structure to be obtained for the extraction of all the information needed for significant intervention. This demonstrates the applicability of the photogrammetry using UAV for the survey of vertical structures, complex buildings and difficult accessible architectural parts, providing high precision results. PMID:26134108

  19. Polarization response of second-harmonic images for different collagen spatial distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ávila, Francisco J.; del Barco, Oscar; Bueno, Juan M.

    2016-06-01

    The response to polarization of second-harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy images of samples with different collagen distributions (quasialigned, partially organized, and nonorganized) has been analyzed. A linear decay relationship between the external arrangement and polarization sensitivity was found. SHG signal from nonorganized samples presented a large structural dispersion and a weak dependence with incident polarization. Polarization dependence is also associated with the internal organization of the collagen fibers, directly related to the ratio of hyperpolarizabilities ρ. This parameter can experimentally be computed from the modulation of the SHG signal. The results show that both external and internal collagen structures are closely related. This provides a tool to obtain information of internal properties from the polarimetric response of the external spatial distribution of collagen, which might be useful in clinical diagnosis of pathologies related to changes in collagen structure.

  20. Structure from Motion Systems for Architectural Heritage. a Survey of the Internal Loggia Courtyard of Palazzo Dei Capitani, Ascoli Piceno, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ippoliti, E.; Meschini, A.; Sicuranza, F.

    2015-02-01

    We present the results of a point-cloud-based survey deriving from the use of image-based techniques, in particular with multi-image monoscopic digital photogrammetry systems and software, the so-called "structure-from-motion" technique. The aim is to evaluate the advantages and limitations of such procedures in architectural surveying, particularly in conditions that are "at the limit". A particular case study was chosen: the courtyard of Palazzo dei Capitani del Popolo in Ascoli Piceno, Italy, which can be considered the ideal example due to its notable vertical, rather than horizontal, layout. In this context, by comparing and evaluating the different results, we present experimentation regarding this single case study with the aim of identifying the best workflow to realise a complex, articulated set of representations—using 3D modelling and 2D processing—necessary to correctly document the particular characteristics of such an architectural object.

  1. Application of Collagen Scaffold in Tissue Engineering: Recent Advances and New Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chanjuan Dong

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Collagen is the main structural protein of most hard and soft tissues in animals and the human body, which plays an important role in maintaining the biological and structural integrity of the extracellular matrix (ECM and provides physical support to tissues. Collagen can be extracted and purified from a variety of sources and offers low immunogenicity, a porous structure, good permeability, biocompatibility and biodegradability. Collagen scaffolds have been widely used in tissue engineering due to these excellent properties. However, the poor mechanical property of collagen scaffolds limits their applications to some extent. To overcome this shortcoming, collagen scaffolds can be cross-linked by chemical or physical methods or modified with natural/synthetic polymers or inorganic materials. Biochemical factors can also be introduced to the scaffold to further improve its biological activity. This review will summarize the structure and biological characteristics of collagen and introduce the preparation methods and modification strategies of collagen scaffolds. The typical application of a collagen scaffold in tissue engineering (including nerve, bone, cartilage, tendon, ligament, blood vessel and skin will be further provided. The prospects and challenges about their future research and application will also be pointed out.

  2. Lysyl oxidase activity is required for ordered collagen fibrillogenesis by tendon cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herchenhan, Andreas; Uhlenbrock, Franziska Katharina; Eliasson, Pernilla;

    2015-01-01

    to structurally abnormal collagen fibrils with irregular profiles and widely dispersed diameters. Of special interest, the abnormal fibril profiles resembled those seen in some Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome phenotypes. Importantly, the total collagen content developed normally, and there was no difference in COL1A1 gene...

  3. Architectural geometry

    KAUST Repository

    Pottmann, Helmut

    2014-11-26

    Around 2005 it became apparent in the geometry processing community that freeform architecture contains many problems of a geometric nature to be solved, and many opportunities for optimization which however require geometric understanding. This area of research, which has been called architectural geometry, meanwhile contains a great wealth of individual contributions which are relevant in various fields. For mathematicians, the relation to discrete differential geometry is significant, in particular the integrable system viewpoint. Besides, new application contexts have become available for quite some old-established concepts. Regarding graphics and geometry processing, architectural geometry yields interesting new questions but also new objects, e.g. replacing meshes by other combinatorial arrangements. Numerical optimization plays a major role but in itself would be powerless without geometric understanding. Summing up, architectural geometry has become a rewarding field of study. We here survey the main directions which have been pursued, we show real projects where geometric considerations have played a role, and we outline open problems which we think are significant for the future development of both theory and practice of architectural geometry.

  4. Crystal architecture of R{sub 2}SnS{sub 5} (R=Pr, Nd, Gd and Tb): crystal structure relationships in chalcogenides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daszkiewicz, M. [Polish Academy of Sciences, Wroclaw (Poland). Inst. of Low Temperature and Structure Research; Gulay, L.D. [Volyn State Univ., Lutsk (Ukraine). Dept. of Ecology and Protection of Environment; Shemet, V.Ya. [Lutsk State Technical Univ. (Ukraine). Dept. of Chemistry

    2008-04-15

    The crystal structure of the R{sub 2}SnS{sub 5} (R=Pr, Nd, Gd and Tb) compounds has been investigated using X-ray singlecrystal diffraction. Crystal architecture and structural relationships among U{sub 3}S{sub 5}, Y{sub 2}HfS{sub 5}, R{sub 2}SnS{sub 5} compounds are discussed and a structural origin is determined. It is shown that the complex architecture of the crystal structure of Eu{sub 5}Sn{sub 3}S{sub 12} is a result of interweaving of the simple crystal structures. The location of the copper ions in the non-stoichiometric compound Y{sub 2}Cu{sub 0.20}Sn{sub 0.95}S{sub 5} is proposed on the basis of comparative analysis of the R-S interatomic distances in the R{sub 2}SnS{sub 5} series of compounds. (orig.)

  5. The process of EDC-NHS cross-linking of reconstituted collagen fibres increases collagen fibrillar order and alignment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Shepherd

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe the production of collagen fibre bundles through a multi-strand, semi-continuous extrusion process. Cross-linking using an EDC (1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropylcarbodiimide, NHS (N-hydroxysuccinimide combination was considered. Atomic Force Microscopy and Raman spectroscopy focused on how cross-linking affected the collagen fibrillar structure. In the cross-linked fibres, a clear fibrillar structure comparable to native collagen was observed which was not observed in the non-cross-linked fibre. The amide III doublet in the Raman spectra provided additional evidence of alignment in the cross-linked fibres. Raman spectroscopy also indicated no residual polyethylene glycol (from the fibre forming buffer or water in any of the fibres.

  6. The process of EDC-NHS cross-linking of reconstituted collagen fibres increases collagen fibrillar order and alignment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe the production of collagen fibre bundles through a multi-strand, semi-continuous extrusion process. Cross-linking using an EDC (1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)carbodiimide), NHS (N-hydroxysuccinimide) combination was considered. Atomic Force Microscopy and Raman spectroscopy focused on how cross-linking affected the collagen fibrillar structure. In the cross-linked fibres, a clear fibrillar structure comparable to native collagen was observed which was not observed in the non-cross-linked fibre. The amide III doublet in the Raman spectra provided additional evidence of alignment in the cross-linked fibres. Raman spectroscopy also indicated no residual polyethylene glycol (from the fibre forming buffer) or water in any of the fibres

  7. The process of EDC-NHS cross-linking of reconstituted collagen fibres increases collagen fibrillar order and alignment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shepherd, D. V., E-mail: dvs23@cam.ac.uk; Shepherd, J. H.; Cameron, R. E.; Best, S. M. [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Ghose, S.; Kew, S. J. [Tigenix Ltd., Byron House, Cambridge Business Park, Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2015-01-01

    We describe the production of collagen fibre bundles through a multi-strand, semi-continuous extrusion process. Cross-linking using an EDC (1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)carbodiimide), NHS (N-hydroxysuccinimide) combination was considered. Atomic Force Microscopy and Raman spectroscopy focused on how cross-linking affected the collagen fibrillar structure. In the cross-linked fibres, a clear fibrillar structure comparable to native collagen was observed which was not observed in the non-cross-linked fibre. The amide III doublet in the Raman spectra provided additional evidence of alignment in the cross-linked fibres. Raman spectroscopy also indicated no residual polyethylene glycol (from the fibre forming buffer) or water in any of the fibres.

  8. Increasing extracellular matrix collagen level and MMP activity induces cyst development in polycystic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Bin

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Polycystic Kidney Disease (PKD kidneys exhibit increased extracellular matrix (ECM collagen expression and metalloproteinases (MMPs activity. We investigated the role of these increases on cystic disease progression in PKD kidneys. Methods We examined the role of type I collagen (collagen I and membrane bound type 1 MMP (MT1-MMP on cyst development using both in vitro 3 dimensional (3D collagen gel culture and in vivo PCK rat model of PKD. Results We found that collagen concentration is critical in controlling the morphogenesis of MDCK cells cultured in 3D gels. MDCK cells did not form 3D structures at collagen I concentrations lower than 1 mg/ml but began forming tubules when the concentration reaches 1 mg/ml. Significantly, these cells began to form cyst when collagen I concentration reached to 1.2 mg/ml, and the ratios of cyst to tubule structures increased as the collagen I concentration increased. These cells exclusively formed cyst structures at a collagen I concentration of 1.8 mg/ml or higher. Overexpression of MT1-MMP in MDCK cells significantly induced cyst growth in 3D collagen gel culture. Conversely, inhibition of MMPs activity with doxycycline, a FDA approved pan-MMPs inhibitor, dramatically slowed cyst growth. More importantly, the treatment of PCK rats with doxycycline significantly decreased renal tubule cell proliferation and markedly inhibited the cystic disease progression. Conclusions Our data suggest that increased collagen expression and MMP activity in PKD kidneys may induce cyst formation and expansion. Our findings also suggest that MMPs may serve as a therapeutic target for the treatment of human PKD.

  9. IAIMS architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hripcsak, G

    1997-01-01

    An information system architecture defines the components of a system and the interfaces among the components. A good architecture is essential for creating an Integrated Advanced Information Management System (IAIMS) that works as an integrated whole yet is flexible enough to accommodate many users and roles, multiple applications, changing vendors, evolving user needs, and advancing technology. Modularity and layering promote flexibility by reducing the complexity of a system and by restricting the ways in which components may interact. Enterprise-wide mediation promotes integration by providing message routing, support for standards, dictionary-based code translation, a centralized conceptual data schema, business rule implementation, and consistent access to databases. Several IAIMS sites have adopted a client-server architecture, and some have adopted a three-tiered approach, separating user interface functions, application logic, and repositories. PMID:9067884

  10. Architectural Anthropology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stender, Marie

    Architecture and anthropology have always had a common focus on dwelling, housing, urban life and spatial organisation. Current developments in both disciplines make it even more relevant to explore their boundaries and overlaps. Architects are inspired by anthropological insights and methods......, while recent material and spatial turns in anthropology have also brought an increasing interest in design, architecture and the built environment. Understanding the relationship between the social and the physical is at the heart of both disciplines, and they can obviously benefit from further...... collaboration: How can qualitative anthropological approaches contribute to contemporary architecture? And just as importantly: What can anthropologists learn from architects’ understanding of spatial and material surroundings? Recent theoretical developments in anthropology stress the role of materials and...

  11. Architectural Narratives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiib, Hans

    2010-01-01

    In this essay, I focus on the combination of programs and the architecture of cultural projects that have emerged within the last few years. These projects are characterized as “hybrid cultural projects,” because they intend to combine experience with entertainment, play, and learning. This essay...... identifies new rationales related to this development, and it argues that “cultural planning” has increasingly shifted its focus from a cultural institutional approach to a more market-oriented strategy that integrates art and business. The role of architecture has changed, too. It not only provides a...... functional framework for these concepts, but tries increasingly to endow the main idea of the cultural project with a spatially aesthetic expression - a shift towards “experience architecture.” A great number of these projects typically recycle and reinterpret narratives related to historical buildings and...

  12. Architectural Engineers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Rikke Premer

    engineering is addresses from two perspectives – as an educational response and an occupational constellation. Architecture and engineering are two of the traditional design professions and they frequently meet in the occupational setting, but at educational institutions they remain largely estranged. The...... paper builds on a multi-sited study of an architectural engineering program at the Technical University of Denmark and an architectural engineering team within an international engineering consultancy based on Denmark. They are both responding to new tendencies within the building industry where the...... role of engineers and architects increasingly overlap during the design process, but their approaches reflect different perceptions of the consequences. The paper discusses some of the challenges that design education, not only within engineering, is facing today: young designers must be equipped with...

  13. Architectural Theatricality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvedebrink, Tenna Doktor Olsen

    initiatives in Aalborg Hospital to overcome patient undernutrition by refurbishing eating environments, this thesis engages in an investigation of the interior architectural qualities of patient eating environments. The relevance for this holistic perspective, synthesizing health, food and architecture...... environments and a knowledge gap therefore exists in present hospital designs. Consequently, the purpose of this thesis has been to investigate if any research-based knowledge exist supporting the hypothesis that the interior architectural qualities of eating environments influence patient food intake, health...... such as a literature review, timeline and historical outline to create a “knowledge map”, which in an eclectic manner merges the positive, normative and polemical knowledge rooted in research, objects and writings. The results of these investigations show that sparse researchbased knowledge exist directly taking...

  14. The synthesis and coupling of photoreactive collagen-based peptides to restore integrin reactivity to an inert substrate, chemically-crosslinked collagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malcor, Jean-Daniel; Bax, Daniel; Hamaia, Samir W; Davidenko, Natalia; Best, Serena M; Cameron, Ruth E; Farndale, Richard W; Bihan, Dominique

    2016-04-01

    Collagen is frequently advocated as a scaffold for use in regenerative medicine. Increasing the mechanical stability of a collagen scaffold is widely achieved by cross-linking using 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)carbodiimide (EDC) and N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS). However, this treatment consumes the carboxylate-containing amino acid sidechains that are crucial for recognition by the cell-surface integrins, abolishing cell adhesion. Here, we restore cell reactivity to a cross-linked type I collagen film by covalently linking synthetic triple-helical peptides (THPs), mimicking the structure of collagen. These THPs are ligands containing an active cell-recognition motif, GFOGER, a high-affinity binding site for the collagen-binding integrins. We end-stapled peptide strands containing GFOGER by coupling a short diglutamate-containing peptide to their N-terminus, improving the thermal stability of the resulting THP. A photoreactive Diazirine group was grafted onto the end-stapled THP to allow covalent linkage to the collagen film upon UV activation. Such GFOGER-derivatized collagen films showed restored affinity for the ligand-binding I domain of integrin α2β1, and increased integrin-dependent cell attachment and spreading of HT1080 and Rugli cell lines, expressing integrins α2β1 and α1β1, respectively. The method we describe has wide application, beyond collagen films or scaffolds, since the photoreactive diazirine will react with many organic carbon skeletons. PMID:26854392

  15. Effects of increased collagen-matrix density on the mechanical properties and in vivo absorbability of hydroxyapatite-collagen composites as artificial bone materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of increased collagen-matrix density on the mechanical properties and in vivo absorbability of porous hydroxyapatite (HAp)-collagen composites as artificial bone materials. Seven types of porous HAp-collagen composites were prepared from HAp nanocrystals and dense collagen fibrils. Their densities and HAp/collagen weight ratios ranged from 122 to 331 mg cm-3 and from 20/80 to 80/20, respectively. The flexural modulus and strength increased with an increase in density, reaching 2.46 ± 0.48 and 0.651 ± 0.103 MPa, respectively. The porous composites with a higher collagen-matrix density exhibited much higher mechanical properties at the same densities, suggesting that increasing the collagen-matrix density is an effective way of improving the mechanical properties. It was also suggested that other structural factors in addition to collagen-matrix density are required to achieve bone-like mechanical properties. The in vivo absorbability of the composites was investigated in bone defects of rabbit femurs, demonstrating that the absorption rate decreased with increases in the composite density. An exhaustive increase in density is probably limited by decreases in absorbability as artificial bones.

  16. Effect of papain-based gel on type I collagen - spectroscopy applied for microstructural analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Júnior, Zenildo Santos Silva; Botta, Sergio Brossi; Ana, Patricia Aparecida; França, Cristiane Miranda; Fernandes, Kristianne Porta Santos; Mesquita-Ferrari, Raquel Agnelli; Deana, Alessandro; Bussadori, Sandra Kalil

    2015-01-01

    Considering the improvement of biomaterials that facilitate atraumatic restorative techniques in dentistry, a papain-based gel can be used in the chemomechanical removal of decayed dental tissue. However, there is no information regarding the influence of this gel on the structure of sound collagen. The aim of the present study was to investigate the adsorption of a papain-based gel (PapacarieTM) to collagen and determine collagen integrity after treatment. A pilot study was first performed with 10 samples of type I collagen membrane obtained from bovine Achilles deep tendon to compare the influence of hydration (Milli-Q water) on infrared bands of collagen. In a further experiment, 10 samples of type I collagen membrane were used to evaluate the effects of PapacarieTM on the collagen microstructure. All analyses were performed using the attenuated total reflectance technique of Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR). The results demonstrated that the application of PapacarieTM does not lead to the degradation of collagen and this product can be safely used in minimally invasive dentistry. As the integrity of sound collagen is preserved after the application of the papain-based gel, this product is indicated for the selective removal of infected dentin, leaving the affected dentin intact and capable of re-mineralization. PMID:26101184

  17. Type IV collagen stimulates pancreatic cancer cell proliferation, migration, and inhibits apoptosis through an autocrine loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pancreatic cancer shows a highly aggressive and infiltrative growth pattern and is characterized by an abundant tumor stroma known to interact with the cancer cells, and to influence tumor growth and drug resistance. Cancer cells actively take part in the production of extracellular matrix proteins, which then become deposited into the tumor stroma. Type IV collagen, an important component of the basement membrane, is highly expressed by pancreatic cancer cells both in vivo and in vitro. In this study, the cellular effects of type IV collagen produced by the cancer cells were characterized. The expression of type IV collagen and its integrin receptors were examined in vivo in human pancreatic cancer tissue. The cellular effects of type IV collagen were studied in pancreatic cancer cell lines by reducing type IV collagen expression through RNA interference and by functional receptor blocking of integrins and their binding-sites on the type IV collagen molecule. We show that type IV collagen is expressed close to the cancer cells in vivo, forming basement membrane like structures on the cancer cell surface that colocalize with the integrin receptors. Furthermore, the interaction between type IV collagen produced by the cancer cell, and integrins on the surface of the cancer cells, are important for continuous cancer cell growth, maintenance of a migratory phenotype, and for avoiding apoptosis. We show that type IV collagen provides essential cell survival signals to the pancreatic cancer cells through an autocrine loop

  18. Architectural Anthropology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stender, Marie

    and other spaces that architects are preoccupied with. On the other hand, the distinction between architecture and design is not merely one of scale. Design and architecture represent – at least in Denmark – also quite different disciplinary traditions and methods. Where designers develop prototypes......, architects tend to work with models and plans that are not easily understood by lay people. Further, many architects are themselves sceptical towards notions of user-involvement and collaborative design. They fear that the imagination of citizens and users is restricted to what they are already familiar with...

  19. Reframing Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riis, Søren

    2013-01-01

    I would like to thank Prof. Stephen Read (2011) and Prof. Andrew Benjamin (2011) for both giving inspiring and elaborate comments on my article “Dwelling in-between walls: the architectural surround”. As I will try to demonstrate below, their two different responses not only supplement my article...... focuses on how the absence of an initial distinction might threaten the endeavour of my paper. In my reply to Read and Benjamin, I will discuss their suggestions and arguments, while at the same time hopefully clarifying the postphenomenological approach to architecture....

  20. Multithreading architecture

    CERN Document Server

    Nemirovsky, Mario

    2013-01-01

    Multithreaded architectures now appear across the entire range of computing devices, from the highest-performing general purpose devices to low-end embedded processors. Multithreading enables a processor core to more effectively utilize its computational resources, as a stall in one thread need not cause execution resources to be idle. This enables the computer architect to maximize performance within area constraints, power constraints, or energy constraints. However, the architectural options for the processor designer or architect looking to implement multithreading are quite extensive and

  1. Collagen gene expression during limb cartilage differentiation

    OpenAIRE

    1986-01-01

    As limb mesenchymal cells differentiate into chondrocytes, they initiate the synthesis of type II collagen and cease synthesizing type I collagen. Changes in the cytoplasmic levels of type I and type II collagen mRNAs during the course of limb chondrogenesis in vivo and in vitro were examined using cloned cDNA probes. A striking increase in cytoplasmic type II collagen mRNA occurs coincident with the crucial condensation stage of chondrogenesis in vitro, in which prechondrogenic mesenchymal c...

  2. Architectural Drawing - an Animate Field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, Anna Katrine

    2015-01-01

    Architectural drawing is changing because architects today draw with computers. Due to this change digital diagrams employed by computational architectural practices are often emphasized as powerful structures of control and organisation in the design process. But there are also diagrams, which do...... important affordance of architectural drawing as a ¬hybrid between the openness of hand-sketching and the rule-based-ness of diagramming, an affordance which might be useful in the migrational zone of current architectural drawing where traditional hand drawing techniques and computer drawing techniques...

  3. On Information System Security Architecture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ChunfangJiang; ChaoyuanYue; JianguoZuo

    2004-01-01

    The current studies on security architecture and information system security architecture (ISSA) are surveyed in this paper, and some types and their features of ISSA are discussed. Then, the structural elements of ISSA are analyzed, and the constructing steps for ISSA are proposed.

  4. Dynamic Weather Routes Architecture Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eslami, Hassan; Eshow, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    Dynamic Weather Routes Architecture Overview, presents the high level software architecture of DWR, based on the CTAS software framework and the Direct-To automation tool. The document also covers external and internal data flows, required dataset, changes to the Direct-To software for DWR, collection of software statistics, and the code structure.

  5. The role of crown architecture for light harvesting and carbon gain in extreme light environments assessed with a structurally realistic 3-D model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valladares, Fernando

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Main results from different studies of crown architecture adaptation to extreme light environments are presented. Light capture and carbon gain by plants from low (forest understory and high (open Mediterranean-type ecosystems light environments were simulated with a 3-D model (YPLANT, which was developed specifically to analyse the structural features that determine light interception and photosynthesis at the whole plant level. Distantly related taxa with contrasting architectures exhibited similar efficiencies of light interception (functional convergence. Between habitats large differences in architecture existed depending on whether light capture must be maximised or whether excess photon flux density must be avoided. These differences are realised both at the species level and within a species because of plastic adjustments of crown architecture to the external light environment. Realistic, 3-D architectural models are indispensable tools in this kind of comparative studies due to the intrinsic complexity of plant architecture. Their efficient development requires a fluid exchange of ideas between botanists, ecologists and plant modellers.Se presentan los resultados principales de varios estudios sobre las adaptaciones del follaje a ambientes lumínicos extremos. Plantas de ambientes oscuros (sotobosques de bosques templados y tropicales y de ambientes muy luminosos (ecosistemas abiertos de tipo Mediterráneo han sido estudiadas mediante un modelo (YPLANT que permite la reconstrucción tridimensional de la parte aérea de las plantas e identificar los rasgos estructurales que determinan la interceptación de luz y la fotosíntesis y transpiraci6n potencial a nivel de toda la copa. Taxones no relacionados y con arquitecturas muy diferentes mostraron una eficiencia en la interceptaci6n de luz similar (convergencia funcional. La comparación entre hábitat revelo grandes diferencias arquitecturales dependiendo de si la absorción de luz deb

  6. Fabrication and evaluation of biomimetic scaffolds by using collagen-alginate fibrillar gels for potential tissue engineering applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pore architecture and its stable functionality under cell culturing of three dimensional (3D) scaffolds are of great importance for tissue engineering purposes. In this study, alginate was incorporated with collagen to fabricate collagen-alginate composite scaffolds with different collagen/alginate ratios by lyophilizing the respective composite gels formed via collagen fibrillogenesis in vitro and then chemically crosslinking. The effects of alginate amount and crosslinking treatment on pore architecture, swelling behavior, enzymatic degradation and tensile property of composite scaffolds were systematically investigated. The relevant results indicated that the present strategy was simple but efficient to fabricate highly interconnected strong biomimetic 3D scaffolds with nanofibrous surface. NIH3T3 cells were used as a model cell to evaluate the cytocompatibility, attachment to the nanofibrous surface and porous architectural stability in terms of cell proliferation and infiltration within the crosslinked scaffolds. Compared with the mechanically weakest crosslinked collagen sponges, the cell-cultured composite scaffolds presented a good porous architecture, thus permitting cell proliferation on the top surface as well as infiltration into the inner part of 3D composite scaffolds. These composite scaffolds with pore size ranging from 150 to 300 μm, over 90% porosity, tuned biodegradability and water-uptake capability are promising for tissue engineering applications.

  7. Fabrication and evaluation of biomimetic scaffolds by using collagen-alginate fibrillar gels for potential tissue engineering applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sang Lin; Luo Dongmei; Xu Songmei; Wang Xiaoliang; Li Xudong, E-mail: xli20004@yahoo.com

    2011-03-12

    Pore architecture and its stable functionality under cell culturing of three dimensional (3D) scaffolds are of great importance for tissue engineering purposes. In this study, alginate was incorporated with collagen to fabricate collagen-alginate composite scaffolds with different collagen/alginate ratios by lyophilizing the respective composite gels formed via collagen fibrillogenesis in vitro and then chemically crosslinking. The effects of alginate amount and crosslinking treatment on pore architecture, swelling behavior, enzymatic degradation and tensile property of composite scaffolds were systematically investigated. The relevant results indicated that the present strategy was simple but efficient to fabricate highly interconnected strong biomimetic 3D scaffolds with nanofibrous surface. NIH3T3 cells were used as a model cell to evaluate the cytocompatibility, attachment to the nanofibrous surface and porous architectural stability in terms of cell proliferation and infiltration within the crosslinked scaffolds. Compared with the mechanically weakest crosslinked collagen sponges, the cell-cultured composite scaffolds presented a good porous architecture, thus permitting cell proliferation on the top surface as well as infiltration into the inner part of 3D composite scaffolds. These composite scaffolds with pore size ranging from 150 to 300 {mu}m, over 90% porosity, tuned biodegradability and water-uptake capability are promising for tissue engineering applications.

  8. Robotically Driven Architectural Production

    OpenAIRE

    Bier, H.H.

    2014-01-01

    Robotically driven architectural production advances seamless, computer-numerically controlled (CNC) and robotically supported design to production and operation processes enabling im-plementation of robotically driven buildings from conceptualisation to use. It enables production of free-formed, heterogeneous, optimized structures in order to address specific requirements in terms of properties (density, consistency, rigidity, etc.) and behaviours (re-configurability, responsiveness, etc.) i...

  9. Investigating the relationship between changes in collagen fiber orientation during skin aging and collagen/water interactions by polarized-FTIR microimaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eklouh-Molinier, Christophe; Happillon, Teddy; Bouland, Nicole; Fichel, Caroline; Diébold, Marie-Danièle; Angiboust, Jean-François; Manfait, Michel; Brassart-Pasco, Sylvie; Piot, Olivier

    2015-09-21

    Upon chronological aging, human skin undergoes structural and molecular modifications, especially at the level of type I collagen. This macromolecule is one of the main dermal structural proteins and presents several age-related alterations. It exhibits a triple helical structure and assembles itself to form fibrils and fibers. In addition, water plays an important role in stabilizing the collagen triple helix by forming hydrogen-bonds between collagen residues. However, the influence of water on changes of dermal collagen fiber orientation with age has not been yet understood. Polarized-Fourier Transform Infrared (P-FTIR) imaging is an interesting biophotonic approach to determine in situ the orientation of type I collagen fibers, as we have recently shown by comparing skin samples of different ages. In this work, P-FTIR spectral imaging was performed on skin samples from two age groups (35- and 38-year-old on the one hand, 60- and 66-year-old on the other hand), and our analyses were focused on the effect of H2O/D2O substitution. Spectral data were processed with fuzzy C-means (FCM) clustering in order to distinguish different orientations of collagen fibers. We demonstrated that the orientation was altered with aging, and that D2O treatment, affecting primarily highly bound water molecules, is more marked for the youngest skin samples. Collagen-bound water-related spectral markers were also highlighted. Our results suggest a weakening of water/collagen interactions with age. This non-destructive and label-free methodology allows us to understand better the importance of bound water in collagen fiber orientation alterations occurring with skin aging. Obtaining such structural information could find benefits in dermatology as well as in cosmetics. PMID:26120602

  10. From green architecture to architectural green

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Earon, Ofri

    2011-01-01

    The paper investigates the topic of green architecture from an architectural point of view and not an energy point of view. The purpose of the paper is to establish a debate about the architectural language and spatial characteristics of green architecture. In this light, green becomes an adjective...... that describes the architectural exclusivity of this particular architecture genre. The adjective green expresses architectural qualities differentiating green architecture from none-green architecture. Currently, adding trees and vegetation to the building’s facade is the main architectural characteristics...... of green architecture. The paper argues that this greenification of facades is insufficient. The green is only a skin cladding the exterior envelope without having a spatial significance. Through the paper it is proposed to flip the order of words from green architecture to architectural green...

  11. Study on Different Modification Methods of Collagen for Tissue Engineering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Xin-yu

    2008-01-01

    Because of the excellent biocompatibility and its specific amino sequences, collagen is an ideal biomedical material for tissue engineering applications. But collagen is usually lack of mechanical strength to form a rigid 3-D matrix and lack of ability to resist collagenase. In order to be a tissue engineering scaffold, collagen must strengthen its structures by modifying with chemical crosslinkers. Chemical crosslinkers used for modif-ying collagen fibers include glutaraldehyde (GA), epoxy compounds (PC) and carbodiim-ides (EDC). The aim of this study is to choose the best chemical crosslinker from the three reagents. In terms of the resistance to collagenase degradation, chemical cross-link-ing with PC provided the best protection; in terms of the mechanical characterization, chemical cross-linking with GA provided the best;and in terms of the biocompatibility, chemical cross-linking with EDC provided the best. There is not a reagent which has all merits for collagen crosslinking, so we should select the crosslinking reagent as the de-mands of use ask.

  12. uPARAP/endo180 directs lysosomal delivery and degradation of collagen IV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjøller, Lars; Engelholm, Lars H; Høyer-Hansen, Maria;

    2004-01-01

    transmembrane glycoprotein urokinase plasminogen activator receptor-associated protein (uPARAP/endo180) directs collagen IV for lysosomal delivery and degradation. In wild-type fibroblasts, fluorescently labeled collagen IV was first internalized into vesicular structures with diffuse fluorescence eventually...... appearing uniformly within the wild-type cells after longer incubation times. In these cells, some collagen-containing vesicles were identified as lysosomes by staining for LAMP-1. In contrast, collagen IV remained extracellular and associated with fiber-like structures on uPARAP/endo180-deficient...... fibroblasts. Blocking lysosomal cysteine proteases with the inhibitor E64d resulted in strong accumulation of collagen IV in lysosomes in wild-type cells, but only very weak intracellular fluorescence accumulation in uPARAP/endo180-deficient fibroblasts. We conclude that uPARAP/endo180 is critical for...

  13. Religious Architecture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    The main religions of ancient China were Buddhism,Taoism and Islam, of which Buddhism was the most widespread. As a result, Buddhist temples and towers are found all over China, and have become important components of the country's ancient architecture.

  14. Extracellular collagenases and the endocytic receptor, urokinase plasminogen activator receptor-associated protein/Endo180, cooperate in fibroblast-mediated collagen degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Daniel H; Engelholm, Lars H; Ingvarsen, Signe;

    2007-01-01

    The collagens of the extracellular matrix are the most abundant structural proteins in the mammalian body. In tissue remodeling and in the invasive growth of malignant tumors, collagens constitute an important barrier, and consequently, the turnover of collagen is a rate-limiting process in these...

  15. The collagen microfibil model as a tool for leather scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collagen, a structural protein of the extracellular matrix, gives strength and form to the skin, tendons, bones, cornea and teeth of mammals. The discovery by early humans that the skin of an animal, slaughtered for meat, could be preserved by exposing it to smoke or rubbing with fat, led to the pr...

  16. New Collagen-Dextran-Zinc Oxide Composites for Wound Dressing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgeta Păunica-Panea

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this paper was the design, development, and characterization of some new composites, based on collagen and dextran as natural polymers and zinc oxide as antimicrobial, to be used in wound healing. Collagen hydrogels with various concentrations of dextran and zinc oxide were investigated in terms of rheological analysis. The spongious composites, obtained by freeze-drying of hydrogels, were evaluated by morphology (SEM, water uptake, and biological (enzymatic biodegradation analysis. All the results were strongly influenced by the nature and concentration of composite components. Based on the performances of the hydrogels, stationary rheometry, porous structure, morphology, and biological behavior, the antimicrobial spongious composite based on collagen and dextran with 50% ZnO were the most promising for future applications in wound dressing and a biomaterial with high potential in skin regeneration.

  17. New Energy Architecture. Myanmar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-06-15

    inform their findings, which have come from national and international public and private sectors and from civil society. This report is structured as follows. First, the New Energy Architecture methodology is outlined. In Step 1, the performance of the country's current energy architecture is assessed. Step 2 describes the setting of the objectives of the New Energy Architecture. Step 3 outlines insights to support the development of a New Energy Architecture, and highlights potential risks in achieving this. Step 4 then discusses the need for leadership and multistakeholder partnerships to support the implementation of a New Energy Architecture in Myanmar.

  18. Synergetics and architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslov, V. P.; Maslova, T. V.

    2008-03-01

    A series of phenomena pertaining to economics, quantum physics, language, literary criticism, and especially architecture is studied from the standpoint of synergetics (the study of self-organizing complex systems). It turns out that a whole series of concrete formulas describing these phenomena is identical in these different situations. This is the case of formulas relating to the Bose-Einstein distribution of particles and the distribution of words from a frequency dictionary. This also allows to apply a "quantized" from of the Zipf law to the problem of the authorship of Quiet Flows the Don and to the "blending in" of new architectural structures in an existing environment.

  19. Collagen and Collagen-derived Fragments Are Chemotactic for Tumor Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Mundy, Gregory R; Demartino, Sandra; Rowe, David W.

    1981-01-01

    Organs that are rich in collagen such as liver, lungs, and bone are frequently sites of tumor cell metastasis. In this study, we have found that cultured tumor cells of human and rat origin migrated unidirectionally in response to collagen in vitro. Synthetic di- and tri-peptides that contained amino acid sequences found frequently in the collagen helix caused similar effects. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that collagen or collagen fragments released during connective tissu...

  20. Collagen breakdown products and lung collagen metabolism: an in vitro study on fibroblast cultures.

    OpenAIRE

    Gardi, C.; Calzoni, P.; Marcolongo, P.; E. Cavarra; Vanni, L.; Lungarella, G.

    1994-01-01

    BACKGROUND--In fibrotic diseases such as pulmonary fibrosis there is evidence suggesting enhanced synthesis and degradation of lung connective tissue components, including collagen. It has therefore been hypothesised that products of collagen degradation may have a role in the promotion of collagen deposition. In support of this hypothesis, it has recently been shown that intravenous injection of lung collagen degradation products in experimental animals stimulated collagen synthesis leading ...