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Sample records for archips podana scopoli

  1. Sex pheromones of three citrus leafrollers, Archips atrolucens, Adoxophyes privatana, and Homona sp., inhabiting the Mekong Delta of Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Vang, Le; Thuy, Ho Nhu; Khanh, Chau Nguyen Quoc; Son, Pham Kim; Yan, Qi; Yamamoto, Masanobu; Jinbo, Utsugi; Ando, Tetsu

    2013-06-01

    Archips atrolucens, Adoxophyes privatana, and Homona sp. are serious defoliators of citrus trees in the Mekong Delta of Vietnam. In order to establish a sustainable pest-management program for the three species, their female-produced sex pheromones were investigated by GC-EAD and GC-MS analyses, and the following multi-component pheromones were identified: (Z)-11-tetradecenyl acetate (Z11-14:OAc), (E)-11-tetradecenyl acetate (E11-14:OAc), and tetradecyl acetate (14:OAc) in a ratio of 64:32:4 for A. atrolucens; Z11-14:OAc and (Z)-9-tetradecenyl acetate (Z9-14:OAc) in a ratio of 92:8 for A. privatana; and Z11-14:OAc and (Z)-9-dodecenyl acetate (Z9-12:OAc) in a ratio of 96:4 for Homona sp. Each lure baited with synthetic components as a mimic of the natural pheromone attracted males of the target species specifically, indicating that each monounsaturated minor component plays a significant role for mating communication and reproductive isolation of the three species inhabiting the same citrus orchards. In an extract of the pheromone glands of A. atrolucens females, the content of 14:OAc was very low, but a synergistic effect was observed clearly when the saturated compound was mixed at the same level as the E11-14:OAc. The synthetic lures will provide useful tools for monitoring flights of adults of the three species.

  2. Spatial correlation between Phlebotomus papatasi Scopoli (Diptera: Psychodidae) and incidence of zoonotic cutaneous leishmaniasis in Tunisia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chelbi, I; Kaabi, B; Béjaoui, M; Derbali, M; Zhioua, E

    2009-03-01

    The geographical distribution of Phlebotomus papatasi Scopoli, vector of Leishmania major Yakimoff and Schokhor (Kinetoplastida: Trypanosomatidae), the etiologic agent of zoonotic cutaneous leishmaniasis (ZCL), was assessed during September 2006 through a transect from the north to the south of Tunisia using CDC light traps. P. papatasi was found to be abundant in the arid and Saharan bioclimatic zones and rare in the humid, subhumid, and semiarid bioclimatic zones. Similarly, the highest incidence of ZCL was observed in the arid and Saharan bioclimatic zones and the lowest in the humid, subhumid, and semiarid bioclimatic zones. Our overall findings confirm the close spatial association between the abundance of P. papatasi and the incidence of ZCL.

  3. Acetylcholinesterase of the sand fly, Phlebotomus papatasi (Scopoli): cDNA sequence, baculovirus expression, and biochemical properties

    OpenAIRE

    Temeyer, Kevin B; Brake, Danett K; Tuckow, Alexander P; Li, Andrew Y.; Pérez deLeón, Adalberto A

    2013-01-01

    Background Millions of people and domestic animals around the world are affected by leishmaniasis, a disease caused by various species of flagellated protozoans in the genus Leishmania that are transmitted by several sand fly species. Insecticides are widely used for sand fly population control to try to reduce or interrupt Leishmania transmission. Zoonotic cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by L. major is vectored mainly by Phlebotomus papatasi (Scopoli) in Asia and Africa. Organophosphates comp...

  4. Territorial behaviour and food composition of two pairs of the little owl Athene noctua Scopoli, 1769, nesting at a distance of only 40 m apart

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bacia, Daria

    1998-01-01

    The little owl Athene noctua (Scopoli, 1769) is a small, nocturnal predator, most active from dusk to dawn, with a two-hour break after midnight. There is little or no hunting during daytime, not even when the birds are raising young (Cramp, 1985). Contrary to these observations, the histology of

  5. Phylogenetic systematics of Barn Owl (Tyto alba (Scopoli, 1769)) complex inferred from mitochondrial rDNA (16S rRNA) taxonomic implication

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    The Barn owl, Tyto alba (Scopoli, 1769), occurs worldwide and shows a considerable amount of morphological and geographical variations, leading to the recognition of many subspecies throughout the world. Yet, no comprehensive study has not been done on this species. Data from mitochondrial gene (16S Ribosomal RNA (16S)) with 569 bp length were analyzed for 41 individuals around the world. Maximum likelihood (ML), maximum parsimony (MP) and Bayesian analysis showed two distinct clades includin...

  6. Selection of high-yield strain of entomopathogenic bacteria Bacillus thuringiensis ppomising for nature protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. S. Dyrda

    2011-07-01

    means of the ultraviolet irradiation of the В-2 strain Bacillus thuringiensis spores. Insecticidal activity of the obtained variation is characterized by the deaths of 64.3 % of the great brown twist Archips podana at the 3rd day and 97 % at the 10th day after the treatment, which is 20.4 % higher than B-2 strain activity. Possibility of the obtained variation implementation for the natural plants protection against the leaf-eating insects is under discussion.

  7. Observación de leiotrix piquirrojo Leiothrix lutea (Scopoli, 1786) en Irún. Nueva especie de aveexótica en Gipuzkoa

    OpenAIRE

    Sanz-Azkue, I., Michelena, P.L., Esparcia, J.F., Belzunce, J.A.

    2014-01-01

    Se ha observado por primera vez en Gipuzkoa la especie leiotrix piquirrojo Leiothrix lutea (Scopoli, 1786), también conocido como ruiseñor del Japón, paseriforme catalogado como especie exótica invasora en el Catálogo Español de Especies Exóticas Invasoras. Los individuos, encontrados en los municipios de Irún, Hondarribia y Donostia-San Sebastián, han podido migrar de una población naturalizada instalada en el sur de Francia. La expansión hacia el sur de esta población predice una presenc...

  8. First Record of the European Rusted Flea Beetle, Neocrepidodera ferruginea (Scopoli, 1763, in North America (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Galerucinae: Alticini

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent LeSage

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The European rusted flea beetle Neocrepidodera ferruginea (Scopoli, 1763 is reported for the first time from Québec and Ontario, Canada. It was likely introduced into southern Ontario at an international port on the Great Lakes in early 1970s, or possibly earlier in the 1960s. However, the exact location and date of introduction could not be precisely determined. The flea beetle has since dispersed northeastwards and reached Aylmer, north of Ottawa River, in Québec, by 2003. This is about 375 km from Niagara Falls, where the oldest known specimens were collected in 1977. In 2009, various wild habitats and cultivated areas of Aylmer were surveyed. The host plants of the larvae could not be determined, but adults were swept from many plant species including various weeds and cultivated grasses: Alopecurus pratense (meadow foxtail, Dactylis glomerata (orchard-grass, Festuca rubra (red fescue-grass, and Poa pratensis (Kentucky blue-grass. Adults were also collected from flowers of several weeds: Aster sp. (undetermined species, Aster novae-angliae (New England aster, Ambrosia artemisiifolia (small ragweed, Echium vulgare (viper’s bugloss, Nasturtium officinale (water cress, Melilotus alba (white sweet-clover, Hypericum perforatum (common St. John’s-wort, Lythrum salicaria (purple loosestrife, Ranunculus acris (buttercup, and Solidago spp. (goldenrods. Since larvae are known to develop inside the roots and central stems of cereals, this new alien species represents a threat to Canadian agriculture, particularly if it reaches the Prairies in western Canada, where cereals represent a considerable part of their economy. European rusted flea beetle and Altise ferrugineuse européenne are suggested for the English and French common names of this flea beetle, respectively.

  9. Structure and function of the spermathecal complex in the phlebotomine sandfly Phlebotomus papatasi Scopoli (Diptera: Psychodidae): I. Ultrastructure and histology

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K Ilango

    2005-12-01

    Females of phlebotomine sandflies (Diptera: Psychodidae) possess highly variable spermathecae that present several important taxonomic characters. The cause of this diversity remains a neglected field of sandfly biology, but may possibly be due to female post-mating sexual selection. To understand this diversity, a detailed study of the structure and function of the spermathecal complex in at least one of the species was a prerequisite. Using scanning and transmission electron microscopy, described here is ultrastructure of the spermathecal complex in the sand fly, Phlebotomus papatasi Scopoli. The spermathecal complexes are paired; each consists of a long spermathecal duct, a cylindrical spermathecal body, and a spherical spermathecal gland. Muscle fibres, nerves, tracheoles, and vascular sinuses connect the spermathecal body and duct through the epithelial layers. Spermathecal gland is formed by a typical insect epidermis and consisting of an epithelial layer of class-1 epidermal cells and elaborate glandular cells of class-3 epidermal cells, each having both receiving and conducting ductules (i.e. “end apparatus”) and a “cytological apodeme”, which is a newly described cell structure. The spermathecal body and duct are lined by class-1 epidermal cells and a cuticle, and are enveloped by a super-contracting visceral muscular system. The cuticle consists of rubber-like resilin, and its fibrillar arrangement and chemical nature are described. A well-developed neuromuscular junction exists between the spermathecal gland and the spermathecal body, which are connected to each other by a nerve and a muscle. The spermathecal complexes of the sandfly are compared with those of other insect species. The physiological role and possible evolutionary significance of the different parts of spermathecal complex in the sandfly are inferred from the morphology and behaviour. Post-mating sexual selection may be responsible for the structural uniqueness of the spermathecal

  10. Acetylcholinesterase of the sand fly, Phlebotomus papatasi (Scopoli): cDNA sequence, baculovirus expression, and biochemical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temeyer, Kevin B; Brake, Danett K; Tuckow, Alexander P; Li, Andrew Y; Pérez de León, Adalberto A

    2013-02-04

    Millions of people and domestic animals around the world are affected by leishmaniasis, a disease caused by various species of flagellated protozoans in the genus Leishmania that are transmitted by several sand fly species. Insecticides are widely used for sand fly population control to try to reduce or interrupt Leishmania transmission. Zoonotic cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by L. major is vectored mainly by Phlebotomus papatasi (Scopoli) in Asia and Africa. Organophosphates comprise a class of insecticides used for sand fly control, which act through the inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) in the central nervous system. Point mutations producing an altered, insensitive AChE are a major mechanism of organophosphate resistance in insects and preliminary evidence for organophosphate-insensitive AChE has been reported in sand flies. This report describes the identification of complementary DNA for an AChE in P. papatasi and the biochemical characterization of recombinant P. papatasi AChE. A P. papatasi Israeli strain laboratory colony was utilized to prepare total RNA utilized as template for RT-PCR amplification and sequencing of cDNA encoding acetylcholinesterase 1 using gene specific primers and 3'-5'-RACE. The cDNA was cloned into pBlueBac4.5/V5-His TOPO, and expressed by baculovirus in Sf21 insect cells in serum-free medium. Recombinant P. papatasi acetylcholinesterase was biochemically characterized using a modified Ellman's assay in microplates. A 2309 nucleotide sequence of PpAChE1 cDNA [GenBank: JQ922267] of P. papatasi from a laboratory colony susceptible to insecticides is reported with 73-83% nucleotide identity to acetylcholinesterase mRNA sequences of Culex tritaeniorhynchus and Lutzomyia longipalpis, respectively. The P. papatasi cDNA ORF encoded a 710-amino acid protein [GenBank: AFP20868] exhibiting 85% amino acid identity with acetylcholinesterases of Cx. pipiens, Aedes aegypti, and 92% amino acid identity for L. longipalpis. Recombinant P

  11. Sandfly (Diptera, Psychodidae, Phlebotominae) fauna of South-Western Pakistan. 1. Diagnostic morphology of Phlebotomus papatasi (Scopoli), Ph. bergeroti (Parrot) and Ph. salehi (Mesghali).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakarsulemankhel, Juma-Khan

    2003-06-01

    A survey was conducted to study the morphology of the sandfly fauna in South-Western Pakistan (Balochistan). During the revision of different genera of sandflies the specimens of Phlebotomus papatasi (Scopoli) (N = 720), Ph. bergeroti Parrot (N = 30) and Ph. salehi Mesghali (N = 70) were encountered in various localities. These localities appear to be new records of the subgenus in the literature to date. Ph. bergeroti is reported for the first time from Pakistan and Ph. salehi from Balochistan as well. Characters of these three Pakistanese Phlebotomus are compared with the published data of these species from other countries. Keys for the identification of Pakistanese Phlebotomus are also constructed. Two female Ph. papatasi collected from indoors out of 132 female flies (1.5%) were found positive with flagellate infection in pharynx and midgut. The possible vectorial role of these flies is also discussed. Further surveys are necessary in parts of the country that have not been systematically surveyed.

  12. Phylogenetic systematics of Barn Owl (Tyto alba (Scopoli, 1769 complex inferred from mitochondrial rDNA (16S rRNA taxonomic implication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansour Aliabadian

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The Barn owl, Tyto alba (Scopoli, 1769, occurs worldwide and shows a considerable amount of morphological and geographical variations, leading to the recognition of many subspecies throughout the world. Yet, no comprehensive study has not been done on this species. Data from mitochondrial gene (16S Ribosomal RNA (16S with 569 bp length were analyzed for 41 individuals around the world. Maximum likelihood (ML, maximum parsimony (MP and Bayesian analysis showed two distinct clades including alba clad (old world and furcata clad (new world. The amount of genetic variation within each of these clades ranged from 0.5-1.7 but variation between clades was 3.7. This data may suggest that Barn owls of the Old World may be a separate species from those of the New World.

  13. Genetic divergence analysis of the Common Barn Owl Tyto alba (Scopoli, 1769) and the Short-eared Owl Asio flammeus (Pontoppidan, 1763) from southern Chile using COI sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colihueque, Nelson; Gantz, Alberto; Rau, Jaime Ricardo; Parraguez, Margarita

    2015-01-01

    In this paper new mitochondrial COI sequences of Common Barn Owl Tyto alba (Scopoli, 1769) and Short-eared Owl Asio flammeus (Pontoppidan, 1763) from southern Chile are reported and compared with sequences from other parts of the World. The intraspecific genetic divergence (mean p-distance) was 4.6 to 5.5% for the Common Barn Owl in comparison with specimens from northern Europe and Australasia and 3.1% for the Short-eared Owl with respect to samples from north America, northern Europe and northern Asia. Phylogenetic analyses revealed three distinctive groups for the Common Barn Owl: (i) South America (Chile and Argentina) plus Central and North America, (ii) northern Europe and (iii) Australasia, and two distinctive groups for the Short-eared Owl: (i) South America (Chile and Argentina) and (ii) north America plus northern Europe and northern Asia. The level of genetic divergence observed in both species exceeds the upper limit of intraspecific comparisons reported previously for Strigiformes. Therefore, this suggests that further research is needed to assess the taxonomic status, particularly for the Chilean populations that, to date, have been identified as belonging to these species through traditional taxonomy.

  14. Genetic divergence analysis of the Common Barn Owl Tyto alba (Scopoli, 1769) and the Short-eared Owl Asio flammeus (Pontoppidan, 1763) from southern Chile using COI sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colihueque, Nelson; Gantz, Alberto; Rau, Jaime Ricardo; Parraguez, Margarita

    2015-01-01

    Abstract In this paper new mitochondrial COI sequences of Common Barn Owl Tyto alba (Scopoli, 1769) and Short-eared Owl Asio flammeus (Pontoppidan, 1763) from southern Chile are reported and compared with sequences from other parts of the World. The intraspecific genetic divergence (mean p-distance) was 4.6 to 5.5% for the Common Barn Owl in comparison with specimens from northern Europe and Australasia and 3.1% for the Short-eared Owl with respect to samples from north America, northern Europe and northern Asia. Phylogenetic analyses revealed three distinctive groups for the Common Barn Owl: (i) South America (Chile and Argentina) plus Central and North America, (ii) northern Europe and (iii) Australasia, and two distinctive groups for the Short-eared Owl: (i) South America (Chile and Argentina) and (ii) north America plus northern Europe and northern Asia. The level of genetic divergence observed in both species exceeds the upper limit of intraspecific comparisons reported previously for Strigiformes. Therefore, this suggests that further research is needed to assess the taxonomic status, particularly for the Chilean populations that, to date, have been identified as belonging to these species through traditional taxonomy. PMID:26668551

  15. Structure and function of the spermathecal complex in the phlebotomine sandfly Phlebotomus papatasi Scopoli (Diptera: Psychodidae): II. Post-copulatory histophysiological changes during the gonotrophic cycle

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K Ilango

    2005-12-01

    The spermathecal complex of Phlebotomus papatasi Scopoli (Diptera: Psychodidae) undergoes histological and physiological changes during its gonotropic cycle. The present histochemical study revealed a mucopolysaccharide secretory mass in the spermathecae of the newly emerged sandfly. Sperm competition occurs when two or more males compete to fertilize an ovum in the female reproductive tract. In this study, spermatophores of two or more competing males were deposited at the base of the spermathecal ducts, which originate from the female bursa copulatrix. This suggests that females play a role in sperm displacement, which is defined as any situation in which the last male to mate with a female fertilizes maximum number her eggs. A blood meal ingested by the female for ovary development and egg laying stimulates the release of sperm from the spermatophore. The spermatozoa then migrate to the lumen of the spermatheca. The ultrastructure of spermatozoa comprises a head with double-layered acrosomal perforatorium, an elongate nucleus, and the axoneme with a 9 + 9 + 0 flagellar pattern. This axomene differs from the aflagellate axoneme of other Psychodinae. Morphological changes, such as the casting off of the acrosomal membrane, and histological changes in the spermatophore are also described. Mating plugs that have been described previously in sandflies appear to be artefacts. Females of P. papatasi may be inseminated more than once during each gonotrophic cycle, and additional inseminations may be necessary for each cycle. The relationships between the volumes of the sperm and the spermatheca were calculated to determine sperm utilization and fecundity of P. papatasi. As the females of P. papatasi mate polyandrously, the anatomical and physiological complexity of the spermathecal complex may be related to post-copulatory sexual selection.

  16. CELL: Connecting Everyday Life in an archipeLago

    CERN Document Server

    Chorianopoulos, Konstantinos

    2012-01-01

    We explore the design of a seamless broadcast communication system that brings together the distributed community of remote secondary education schools. In contrast to higher education, primary and secondary education establishments should remain distributed, in order to maintain a balance of urban and rural life in the developing and the developed world. We plan to deploy an ambient and social interactive TV platform (physical installation, authoring tools, interactive content) that supports social communication in a positive way. In particular, we present the physical design and the conceptual model of the system.

  17. CAPA-Gene Products in the Haematophagous Sandfly Phlebotomus papatasi (Scopoli) - Vector for Leishmaniasis Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Insti-97 tute of Research (WRAIR, Silver Spring, MA). Larvae were fed with98 a sand fly larval diet, a mixture of fermented rabbit feces and rabbit99... food [26]. Adult males were fed with 30% sucrose water and females100 were fed with defibrinated cattle blood using an in vitro mem-101 brane feeding...spectrometry analysis 140 of nervous tissue from small insect species is given in [25]. 141 2.4. Homology based search of sandfly databases 142 The

  18. CAPA-gene products in the haematophagous sandfly Phlebotomus papatasi (Scopoli)--vector for leishmaniasis disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Predel, Reinhard; Neupert, Susanne; Russell, William K; Hauser, Frank; Russell, David H; Li, Andrew; Nachman, Ronald J

    2013-03-01

    Sandflies (Phlebotominae, Nematocera, Diptera) are responsible for transmission of leishmaniasis and other protozoan-borne diseases in humans, and these insects depend on the regulation of water balance to cope with the sudden and enormous intake of blood over a very short time period. The sandfly inventory of neuropeptides, including those that regulate diuretic processes, is completely unknown. Direct MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometric analysis of dissected ganglia of Phlebotomus papatasi, combined with a data-mining of sandfly genome 'contigs', was used to identify native CAPA-peptides, a peptide class associated with the regulation of diuresis in other hematophagous insects. The CAPA-peptides identified in this study include two CAPA-PVKs, differentially processed CAPA-PK, and an additional CAPA precursor peptide. The mass spectrometric analysis of different parts of the neuroendocrine system of the sandfly indicate that it represents the first insect which accumulates CAPA-PVKs exclusively in hormone release sites of abdominal ganglia and CAPA-PK (nearly) exclusively in the corpora cardiaca. Additionally, sandflies feature the smallest abdominal ganglia (~35 μm) where CAPA-peptides could be detected so far. The small size of the abdominal ganglia does not appear to affect the development of the median neurosecretory system as it obviously does in another comparably small insect species, Nasonia vitripennis, in which no capa-gene expression was found. Rather, immunocytochemical analyses confirm that the general architecture in sandflies appears identical to that of much larger mosquitoes.

  19. CAPA-gene products in the haematophagous sandfly Phlebotomus papatasi (Scopoli) - Vector for leishmaniasis disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandflies (Phlebotominae, Nematocera, Diptera) are responsible for transmission of leishmaniasis and other protozoan-borne diseases in humans, and these insects depend on the regulation of water balance to cope with the sudden and enormous intake of blood over a very short time period. The sandfly ...

  20. Notes on the extinct pigeon from Mauritius, Alectroenas nitidissima (Scopoli, 1786)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuijn, P.

    1969-01-01

    The attention is called to the presence in the “Artis-Bibliotheek” of two representations of the extinct Alectroenas nitidissima and the only known description of its voice. Furthermore two pendrawings, found in a ship’s journal dating from 1601—1603 and very probably representing the same species,

  1. Evaluation of propane combustion traps for collection of Phlebotomus papatasi (Scopoli) in southern Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traps used for mosquitoes can possibly used to capture phlebotomine sand flies as well, but little testing has been done. Traps powered by propane could be extremely useful because most produce their own carbon dioxide (CO2), which can increase the number of sand flies captured. Scientists at the US...

  2. Evaluation of Propane Combustion Traps for the Collection of Phlebotomus papatasi (Scopoli) in Southern Israel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    Ceratopogonidae) biting midges (Cilek and Hallmon 2005, Cilek et al. 2003) in the U.S.; some Lutzomyia have been collaterally collected. To our...Ashbel 1951). Average daily temperature is 20° C from the end of September to Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public

  3. Acetylcholinesterase of the Sand Fly, Phlebotomus papatasi (Scopoli): cDNA Sequence, Baculovirus Expression, and Biochemical Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    a mixture of fermented rabbit feces and rabbit food [27]. Both larvae and adult flies were maintained at 26±2°C and a relative humidity of 85±2...BLAST and PSI-BLAST: a new generation of protein database search programs. Nucleic Acids Res 1997, 25:3389–3402. 31. Temeyer KB, Pruett JH Jr, Untalan PM

  4. Acetylcholinesterase of the Sand Fly Phlebotomus papatasi (Scopoli): cDNA Sequence, Baculovirus Expression and Biochemical Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millions of people and domestic animals around the world are affected by leishmaniasis, a disease caused by various species of flagellated protozoans in the genus Leishmania that are transmitted by several sand fly species. Insecticides are widely used for sand fly population control to try to reduc...

  5. Acetylcholinesterase of the sand fly, Phlebotomus papatasi (Scopoli): construction, expression and biochemical properties of the G119S orthologous mutant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phlebotomus papatasi vectors zoonotic cutaneous leishmaniasis, widespread in intertropical and temperate regions of the world. Previous cloning, expression, and biochemical characterization of recombinant P. papatasi acetylcholinesterase 1 (PpAChE1) revealed 85% amino acid sequence identity to mosq...

  6. Acetylcholinesterase of the Sand Fly, Phlebotomus papatasi (Scopoli): Construction, Expression and Biochemical Properties of the G119S Orthologous Mutant

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-10

    permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly credited. The Creative Commons Public...acetylcholinesterase. Bull Entomol Res 2005, 95:371–380. 24. Hassan MM, Widaa SO, Osman OM, Numiary MSM, Ibrahim MA, Abushama HM: Insecticide resistance in the

  7. Sperm dynamics in spiders (Araneae: ultrastructural analysis of the sperm activation process in the garden spider Argiope bruennichi (Scopoli, 1772.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Vöcking

    Full Text Available Storage of sperm inside the female genital tract is an integral phase of reproduction in many animal species. The sperm storage site constitutes the arena for sperm activation, sperm competition and female sperm choice. Consequently, to understand animal mating systems information on the processes that occur from sperm transfer to fertilization is required. Here, we focus on sperm activation in spiders. Male spiders produce sperm whose cell components are coiled within the sperm cell and that are surrounded by a proteinaceous sheath. These inactive and encapsulated sperm are transferred to the female spermathecae where they are stored for later fertilization. We analyzed the ultrastructural changes of sperm cells during residency time in the female genital system of the orb-web spider Argiope bruennichi. We found three clearly distinguishable sperm conditions: encapsulated sperm (secretion sheath present, decapsulated (secretion sheath absent and uncoiled sperm (cell components uncoiled, presumably activated. After insemination, sperm remain in the encapsulated condition for several days and become decapsulated after variable periods of time. A variable portion of the decapsulated sperm transforms rapidly to the uncoiled condition resulting in a simultaneous occurrence of decapsulated and uncoiled sperm. After oviposition, only decapsulated and uncoiled sperm are left in the spermathecae, strongly suggesting that the activation process is not reversible. Furthermore, we found four different types of secretion in the spermathecae which might play a role in the decapsulation and activation process.

  8. Comparison of various configurations of CDC-type traps for the collection of Phlebotomus papatasi (Scopoli) in southern Israel

    Science.gov (United States)

    We conducted 2 experiments to determine the best configuration of CDC-trap for catching male and female Phlebotomus papatasi. Darker traps caught significantly more male sand flies; significantly more females were captured by traps with either all black or a combination of black and white features. ...

  9. Recombinant acetylcholinesterase 1 of the sand fly Phlebotomus papatasi (Scopoli): expression, biochemical properties, and insensitivity to organophosphate inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phlebotomine sand flies are small hematophagous vectors of human and zoonotic leishmaniases present throughout tropical and subtropical areas of the world. These flies present serious problems for military operations and resident populations in the Middle East and other areas where they are endemic....

  10. Expression and Biochemical Properties of a Recombinant Acetylcholinesterase 1 of the Sand Fly, Phlebotomus papatasi (Scopoli) Insensitive to Organophosphate Inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phlebotomine sand flies are small hematophagous flies present throughout tropical and subtropical areas of the world and are vectors of human and zoonotic leishmaniases. Human cutaneous leishmaniasis is a debilitating disease presenting major problems for U.S. military operations in the Middle East,...

  11. Sperm Dynamics in Spiders (Araneae): Ultrastructural Analysis of the Sperm Activation Process in the Garden Spider Argiope bruennichi (Scopoli, 1772)

    OpenAIRE

    Oliver Vöcking; Gabriele Uhl; Peter Michalik

    2013-01-01

    Storage of sperm inside the female genital tract is an integral phase of reproduction in many animal species. The sperm storage site constitutes the arena for sperm activation, sperm competition and female sperm choice. Consequently, to understand animal mating systems information on the processes that occur from sperm transfer to fertilization is required. Here, we focus on sperm activation in spiders. Male spiders produce sperm whose cell components are coiled within the sperm cell and that...

  12. Comparison of Various Configurations of CDC-type Traps for the Collection of Phlebotomus papatasi Scopoli in Southern Israel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    Prosopis farcta (Macbride) (Mimosaceae). Along the periphery...Innovations LTD., Tel Aviv, Israel) placed beneath a metal jacket of 4 mm iron sheet which fit tightly around the entire trap body. The modified...trap bodies were then covered with a heavy non-glossy black paper. The surface temperature of the covered trap bodies, which was set

  13. CAPA-gene products in the haematophagous sandfly Phlebotomus papatasi (Scopoli) - vector for leishmaniasis disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Predel, Reinhard; Neupert, Susanne; Russell, William K.

    2013-01-01

    Sandflies (Phlebotominae, Nematocera, Diptera) are responsible for transmission of leishmaniasis and other protozoan-borne diseases in humans, and these insects depend on the regulation of water balance to cope with the sudden and enormous intake of blood over a very short time period. The sandfl...... that the general architecture in sandflies appears identical to that of much larger mosquitoes....

  14. Observación de leiotrix piquirrojo Leiothrix lutea (Scopoli, 1786 en Irún. Nueva especie de aveexótica en Gipuzkoa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanz-Azkue, I., Michelena, P.L., Esparcia, J.F., Belzunce, J.A.

    2014-01-01

    municipios de Irún, Hondarribia y Donostia-San Sebastián, han podido migrar de una población naturalizada instalada en el sur de Francia. La expansión hacia el sur de esta población predice una presencia más asidua de esta especie en los próximos años en territorio guipuzcoano. Se deberá prestar especial atención a la evolución de la especie y al impacto que pueda provocar en otras especies autóctonas de fauna y flora en la Comunidad Autónoma del País Vasco.

  15. Der Stellenwert des Lebenszyklus für das Überleben der uferbewohnenden Wolfspinnenarten Pardosa wagleri (Hahn, 1822 und Pirata knorri (Scopoli, 1763

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manderbach, Randolf

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative, time-limited samplings in monthly intervals from June 1995 to August 1996, in combination with the measurement of carapace width of juvenile and adult spiders has revealed the life cycle patterns of the riparian wolf spiders Pardosa wagleri and Pirata knorri and showed the effect of floods on their abundance at the Isar River (Germany, Bavaria. Adults and juvenile spiders are heavily affected by floods but the populations of both species are able to recover quickly. The life cycles of both species are synchronized with the season and display a spring/summer stenochrony. P. wagleri shows a second reproductive phase in early summer. This reproductive behaviour supports the persistence of populations in this disturbed environment.

  16. Sex pheromone of the baldcypress leafroller (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brian T. Sullivan; Jeremy D. Allison; Richard A. Goyer; William P. Shepherd

    2015-01-01

    The baldcypress leafroller, Archips goyerana Kruse (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), is a specialist on Taxodium distichum (L.) Richard and has caused serious defoliation in swamps of southeastern Louisiana, accelerating decline of baldcypress forests concurrently suffering from nutrient depletion, prolonged flooding, and saltwater...

  17. INFORMATIZACIJA LOGISTIČNIH PROCESOV V PODJETJU YDRIA MOTORS D.O.O.

    OpenAIRE

    Intihar, Jan

    2009-01-01

    V diplomskem delu smo obravnavali informatizacijo logističnih procesov v podjetju Ydria Motors d.o.o. Pri tem je bil glavni cilj ustrezno informatizirati procese nabavne logistike, notranje in prodajne logistike. Podana je celovita zasnova izboljšanega procesa, ki temelji na uvedbi črtne kode in sistema WMS za podporo logističnim procesom.

  18. A taxonomic review of the species of CharaxScopoli, 1777 (Teleostei: Characidae: Characinae with description of a new species from the rio Negro bearing superficial neuromasts on body scales, Amazon basin, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naércio A. Menezes

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The species of Charaxwere reviewed by Lucena (1987 who a little later (1989 added three new species to the genus. Examination of recently collected specimens from museum collections documented the more extensive geographic distribution for most species and revealed the existence of a new species in which superficial neuromasts were discovered and are herein described. These skin structures were also detected in C. metae Eigenmann, 1922. Anal- and pelvic-fin hooks previously observed only on the anal-fin of one species of the genus are described herein in some other species. Charax unimaculatus Lucena is considered a junior synonym of C. michaeli Lucena. All the species are redescribed and the new species described.

  19. [Leishmania major Yakimoff et Schokhor, 1914 (Kinetoplastida: Trypanosomatidae) in Meriones shawi Duvernoy, 1842 (Rodentia: Gerbillidae): persistence of the infection in meriones and its infectivity for the sand fly vector (Phlebotomus) papatasi Scopoli, 1786 (Diptera: Psychodidae).

    OpenAIRE

    Derbali, M.; Chelbi, I.; Ben Hadj Ahmed, S.; Zhioua, E.

    2012-01-01

    International audience; The ability of the sand fly Phlebotomus papatasi to transmit Leishmania major, the etiologic agent of zoonotic cutaneous leishmaniasis, to Meriones shawi, the natural reservoir host of this parasite, was studied under laboratory conditions. Sand flies became infected with L. major after feeding on a lesion of needle-inoculated M. shawi. Moreover, P. papatasi, previously infected with L. major, transmitted the parasite to M. shawi by bite during a second bloodmeal. Two ...

  20. Effects of defoliation on growth of certain conifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas W., Jr. Church

    1949-01-01

    In planning forest management of spruce-fir forests in the Northeast, the possibility of recurring epidemics of the spruce budworm (Archips fumiferana) must be considered. Investigations of this insect must take into account not only the effects of defoliation on mortality, but also the growth losses that result from partial defoliation.

  1. Zagotavljanje kakovosti kroglic homokinetičnega zgloba z metodo Poka Yoke

    OpenAIRE

    Kojzek, Dušan

    2016-01-01

    Diplomsko delo opisuje postopek zagotavljanja ustrezne kakovosti kroglic homokinetičnega zgloba in izdelavo PY za avtomatsko kontrolo ustrezne velikosti kroglic. Zaradi stalnih reklamacij našega kupca GKN Driveline Olešnica Poljska in njihovega končnega kupca FIAT Poljska je bila podana zahteva s strani FIAT-a, da moramo v GKN Driveline Slovenija najti ustrezno rešitev in preprečiti reklamacije, ki se nanašajo na – »pomešane kroglice v HKZ«. Za kontrolo ustrezne velikosti kroglic smo izbrali...

  2. Trophic systems and chorology: data from shrews, moles and voles of Italy preyed by the barn owl / Sistemi trofici e corologia: dati su Soricidae, Talpidae ed Arvicolidae d'Italia predati da Tyto alba (Scopoli 1769

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Longino Contoli

    1986-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In small Mammals biogeography, available data are up to now by far too scanty for elucidate the distribution of a lot of taxa, especially with regard to the absence from a given area. In this respect, standardized quantitative sampling techniques, like Owl pellets analysis can enable not only to enhance faunistic knowledges, but also to estimate the actual absence probability of a given taxon "m", lacking from the diet of an individual raptor. For the last purpose, the relevant frequencies of "m" in the other ecologically similar sites of the same raptor species diets are averaged ($f_m$ : the relevant standard error (multiplicated by a coefficient, according to the desired degree of accuracy, in relation of the integral of probabilities subtracted ($overline{F}_m - a E$: then, the probability that a single specimen is not pertaining to "m" is obtained ($P_0 = 1 - F_m + a E$; lastly, the desiderate accuracy probability ($P_d$ is chosen. Now, "$N_d$" (the number of individuals of all prey species in a single site needed for obtain, with the desired probability, a specimen at least of "m" is obtained through $$N = frac{ln P_d}{ln P_0}$$ Obviously, every site-diet with more than "N" preyed individuals and without any "i" specimen is considered to be lacking of such taxon. A "usefulness index" for the above purposes is outlined and checked about three raptors. Some exanples about usefulness of the Owl pellet analysis method in biogeography are given, concerning Tyto alba diets in peninsular Italy about: - Sorex minutus, lacking in some quite insulated areas; - Sorex araneus (sensu stricto, after GRAF et al., 1979, present also in lowland areas in Emilia-Romagna; - Crocidura suaveolens and - Suncus etruscus, present also in the southermost part of Calabria (Reggio province; - Talpa caeca, present also in the Antiapennines of Latium (Cimini mounts; - Talpa romana, present also in the middle of Tuscany; - Clethrionomys glareolus, lacking in few small, insulated areas, but present in coastal woodlands; - Microtus (Pitymys sp., apparently lacking only in some coastal areas of Toscana and Liguria, or in some Etna slopes (Linguaglossa. Riassunto Un metodo standardizzato e quantitativo di raccolta dei dati quale l'esame delle borre di rapaci consente non solo di integrare le conoscenze faunistiche, ma pure di tentare una valutazione della probabilità di assenza di un dato taxon da un'area geografica. In proposito, vengono presentati esempi originali circa Sorex minutus, Sorex araneus, Crocidura suaveolens, Suncus etruscus, Talpa caeca, Microtus (Pitymys savii e Microtus (Pitymys multiplex in Italia peninsulare.

  3. Food habits, schooling and predatory behaviour of the Yellowmouth Barracuda, Sphyraena viridensis Cuvier, 1829 (Perciformes: Sphyraenidae) in the Azores

    OpenAIRE

    Barreiros, João P.; Santos, Ricardo S.; Borba, Alfredo Emílio Silveira de

    2002-01-01

    Copyright © 2002 Société Française d’Ichtyologie. The yellowmouth barracuda is one of the most common coastal pelagic predator in the Azores archipe¬lago which probably constitutes their northernmost range in the Eastern North Atlantic. The biology, behaviour and fee¬ding ecology of this species is virtually unknown. Between 1997 and 1998, 100 individuals of S. viridensis were collected in the Azores islands. Their size ranged from 545 to 1190 mm (TL). Stomach contents were analysed and 66...

  4. Revision of the Lauraceae III. The genera Aiouea, Systemonodaphne, Urbanodendron, Mezilaurus; additions and corrections to Licaria and Cryptocarya

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kostermans, A.J.G.H.

    1938-01-01

    Aiouea Aublet, Hist. Guian. I (1775), p. 310; III, t. 120; Scopoli, Introductio Hist. nat. (Pragae 1777), p. 107, n. 277; Lamarck, Encyclop. méthod. I (1783), p. 72 (Ajúvea); Poiret, Encycl., Suppl. I (1890), p. 274, III (1893), p. 317; Illustrat. Genr. II, p. 395 et 367, t. 360; Jussieu, Genera (17

  5. Revision of the Lauraceae III. The genera Aiouea, Systemonodaphne, Urbanodendron, Mezilaurus; additions and corrections to Licaria and Cryptocarya

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kostermans, A.J.G.H.

    1938-01-01

    Aiouea Aublet, Hist. Guian. I (1775), p. 310; III, t. 120; Scopoli, Introductio Hist. nat. (Pragae 1777), p. 107, n. 277; Lamarck, Encyclop. méthod. I (1783), p. 72 (Ajúvea); Poiret, Encycl., Suppl. I (1890), p. 274, III (1893), p. 317; Illustrat. Genr. II, p. 395 et 367, t. 360; Jussieu, Genera

  6. Acetylcholinesterase mutations and organophosphate resistance in sand flies and mosquitoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    The sand fly, Phlebotomus papatasi (Scopoli) is a major vector of Leishamnia major, the principle causative agent of human cutaneous leishmaniasis in the Middle East, southern Europe, northern Africa, and Southern Asia. Sand fly bites and leishmaniasis significantly impacted U.S. military operations...

  7. Holocnemus pluchei (Araneae, Pholcidae in Getränke- und Baumärkten in Deutschland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reiser, Nils

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Some colonies of spiders belonging to the Mediterranean cellar spider Holocnemus pluchei (Scopoli, 1763, were found in both beverage and do-it-yourself stores in Germany. Among these are the first records of H. pluchei in Berlin, Hamburg, Lower Saxony and Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania.

  8. Revision of the Lauraceae III. The genera Aiouea, Systemonodaphne, Urbanodendron, Mezilaurus; additions and corrections to Licaria and Cryptocarya

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kostermans, A.J.G.H.

    1938-01-01

    Aiouea Aublet, Hist. Guian. I (1775), p. 310; III, t. 120; Scopoli, Introductio Hist. nat. (Pragae 1777), p. 107, n. 277; Lamarck, Encyclop. méthod. I (1783), p. 72 (Ajúvea); Poiret, Encycl., Suppl. I (1890), p. 274, III (1893), p. 317; Illustrat. Genr. II, p. 395 et 367, t. 360; Jussieu, Genera (17

  9. Ocorrência de Binodoxys brevicornis (Haliday, 1833 (Hymenoptera, Braconidae, Aphidiinae no Brasil Occurrence of Binodoxys brevicornis (Haliday, 1833 (Hymenoptera, Braconidae, Aphidiinae in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus V. Sampaio

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Specimens of the aphid parasitoid, Binodoxys brevicornis (Haliday, 1833, were reared from the mummies of Cavariella aegopodii (Scopoli, 1763 collected on Foeniculum vulgare (Apiaceae at the Campus of the Universidade Federal de Lavras, in the city of Lavras, Minas Gerais State on September/2002. This is the first record of B. brevicornis in Brazil.

  10. Field Evaluations of Topical Arthropod Repellents in North, Central, and South America

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    demonstrated that these products are effective against both Old World and NewWorld Leishmania vectors, Phlebotomus papatasi (Scopoli) and Lutzomyia ...Amazon River where the average temperature is 27C and yearly rainfall is 3.2 m. The population is predomi- nantly a mix of European and Amerindian

  11. Las larvas del género Idaea Treitschke, 1825 (Insecta, Lepidoptera, Geometridae): Nuevos datos sobre su morfología y biología

    OpenAIRE

    Viejo Montesinos, J.L.; King, G.E.

    2012-01-01

    The biology and larval chaetotaxy of six species or subspecies were studied in the genus Idaea Treitschke, 1825 through an analysis of the larvae or the larval exuviae of I. sericeata calvaria Wehrli, 1927, I. ochrata albida (Zerny, 1936), I. incisaria (Staudinger, 1892), I. bigladiata Herbulot, 1975, I. cervantaria (Millière, 1869) and I. degeneraria (Hübner, 1799), whilst larval biological data was provided on another six species: I. ochrata (Scopoli, 1763), I. macilentaria (Herrich-Schäffe...

  12. Trogulus martensi Chemini, 1983 im Raum Basel (Arachnida, Opiliones, Trogulidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiss, Ingmar

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available Trogulus martensi Chemini, 1983, formerly thought to be endemic in northern Italy, is recorded from several places near Basle (first records in Switzerland and France. The species is close to T. galasensis Avram, 1971. Important differences to the syntopic T. closanicus Avram, 1971 (first published record in Fance and the sympatric T. nepaeformis (Scopoli, 1763 are shown and discussed. Additional biometric, autecological and phenological data of Trogulus martensi are presented.

  13. Taxonomy of Greater White-fronted Geese (Aves: Anatidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Richard C.

    2011-01-01

    Five subspecies of the Greater White-fronted Goose, Anser albifrons (Scopoli, 1769), have been named, all on the basis of wintering birds, and up to six subspecies have been recognized. There has been confusion over the application of some names, particularly in North America, because of lack of knowledge of the breeding ranges and type localities, and incorrect taxonomic decisions. There is one clinally varying subspecies in Eurasia, one that breeds in Greenland, and three in North America, one newly named herein.

  14. Web architecture alteration of the orb web weaving spider Metellina merianae (Araneae, Tetragnathidae induced by the parasitoid Megaetaira madida (Ichneumonidae, Polysphincta group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korenko, Stanislav

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The polysphinctine wasp Megaetaira madida (Haliday, 1838 is a koinobiont ecto-parasitoid of spiders of the genus Metellina. Under the influence of the parasitoid’s final instar larva, the spider host M. merianae (Scopoli, 1763 built a three-dimensional web architecture, which differed considerably from the capturing orb web. The alteration of spider web behaviour induced by a parasitoid larva in this host-parasitoid pair is described for the first time.

  15. The Primary Investigation on Edible Spider in Folk from Yunnan Province%云南民间食用蜘蛛初报

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    万晓瑜; 廖绍波

    2013-01-01

    笔者通过在采访和文献查阅,初步统计出云南民间常食用的蜘蛛有4种:横纹金蛛Argiope bruennichi(Scopoli,1772)、棒络新妇Nephila clavataL.koch,1878、斑络新妇Nephila pilipes(Fabricius,1793)、大囊地蛛Atypus sacculatus Zhu et al.,2006.

  16. Espaces et aires protégés. Gestion intégrée et gouvernance participative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Marie Breton

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Les atteintes récurrentes et aggravées à la biodiversité et aux écosystèmes naturels, dans les zones ultrapériphériques d’outre mer en particulier, appellent et justifient aujourd’hui une protection adaptée et renforcée des espaces naturels fragiles, sensibles, ou convoités, dont les richesses écologiques sont particulièrement menacées. Les espaces insulaires et archipélagiques du bassin de la Caraïbe n’échappent pas à la problématique gestionnaire complexe issue de la dialectique des exigenc...

  17. De « l’île absolue » à « l’île barrière » : l’exemple de la Caraïbe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascal Saffache

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Les mondes archipélagiques japonais et caribéens s’opposent, tant du point de vue de leur structure intrinsèque que de la vision qu’en ont les populations extérieures. Constitué de 7 000 îles environ (6 852 pour être précis, l’archipel nippon - appelé aussi « Japonésie » - apparaît comme un tout, une entité homogène, une « île absolue » ; ne dit-on pas « le Japon » et non « les Japons ». A contrario, la Caraïbe qui n’est constituée que de 25 îles, s’affirme comme un entité plurielle en quête...

  18. Model for Determining the Stability of Retail Deposits with Higher Outflow Rates / Model za izračun stabilnosti vlog na drobno z višjo stopnjo odliva

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murks Bašič Aleksandra

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Vloge na drobno veljajo za enega najcenejših in tudi najstabilnejših virov financiranja za banke, ki razpolagajo z večjimi vrednostmi teh vlog. Za namen poročanja in izpolnjevanja zahteve glede likvidnostnega kritja definira banka tri glavne skupine vlog na drobno, ki jim pripadajo različne stopnje odlivov. Za prvi dve glavni skupini so značilne stopnje odlivov 5 % oziroma 10 %, za tretjo glavno skupino pa banka sama določi stopnje odlivov. Tretja glavna skupina je tudi predmet obravnave v tem članku. Banka na podlagi števila in dejavnikov tveganja razvrsti vloge na drobno v tri kategorije. Dejavniki tveganja so glede na stopnjo tveganja razdeljeni v dve skupini. V članku je najprej opisan zakonodajni okvir, nato pa način izračuna višjih stopenj odlivov za vloge na drobno v skladu s preteklimi nihanji in pričakovano oceno nestanovitnosti v situaciji stresnih razmer. Na koncu je na kratko podana prihodnja obravnava vlog na drobno z višjimi stopnjami odlivov.

  19. On Gonorynchus, Gonorhynchus, Gonorinchus, Gonorhinchus and Gonorrhynchus, and some other names of labeonine fishes (Teleostei: Gonorynchidae and Cyprinidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kottelat, Maurice

    2016-10-25

    The supposed cyprinid genus 'Gonorhynchus McClelland, 1838' does not exist; the name refers to Gonorhynchus Cuvier, 1816, which is a junior objective synonym of Gonorynchus Scopoli, 1777. The correct family-group name, authorship and date are: Gonorynchidae Fowler, 1941 (1848). Tariqilabeo Mirza & Saboohi, 1990 is the valid genus name for the South Asian species earlier placed in Crossocheilus or 'Gonorhynchus'. The family-group names Garrae Bleeker, 1863 and Labeonini Bleeker, 1859 are declared nomina protecta and Platycarinae Macleay, 1841 is declared nomen oblitum.

  20. Syringophilid mites (Acari: Syringophilidae) associated with the rails (Aves: Rallidae) and a key to the species of the genus Rafapicobia Skoracki, 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoracki, Maciej; Unsoeld, Markus; Skorupski, Maciej; Kavetska, Katarzyna

    2014-07-01

    The fauna of quill mites of the family Syringophilidae Lavoipierre, 1953 (Acari: Prostigmata Cheyletoidea) parasitising birds of the family Rallidae Vigors (Gruiformes) is updated. A new species, Rafapicobia melzeri n. sp. (subfamily Picobiinae), is described from four host species: Rallus aquaticus Linnaeus (type-host) from Germany, Pardirallus sanguinolentus (Swainson) from Chile, Porzana porzana (Linnaeus) from France and P. parva (Scopoli) from Kirghizia. The new species is most similar to R. lepidocolaptesi Skoracki & Solarczyk, 2012 but differs in the absence of agenital plates and the length ratios of setae ag2:g1 and vi:ve:si in females and in the punctate ornament on the hysteronotal and the pygidial shields in males. A key to the species of the genus Rafapicobia is proposed. This is the first record of a representative of the subfamily Picobiinae on gruiform birds. Additionally, new rallid hosts are reported for Charadriphilus ralli Skoracki & Bochkov, 2010 (subfamily Syringophilinae): Gallinula melanops (Vieillot) from Chile, Laterallus melanophaius (Vieillot) from Paraguay, and P. parva (Scopoli) from Kirghizia.

  1. A revision of the bee genus Nomada in Argentina (Hymenoptera, Apidae, Nomadinae Revisión de las abejas del género Nomada en la Argentina (Hymenoptera, Apidae, Nomadinae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arturo Roig Alsina

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available A revision of the bee genus Nomada Scopoli in Argentina is presented. Nine species are recognized in this region, five of which are described as new: N. mesopotamica, N. longula, N. chacoana, N. missionica, and N. turrigera. Lectotypes are designated for N. pampicola Holmberg, 1886, and N. costalis Brèthes, 1909. A new name, N. holmbergiana, is proposed for Hypochrotaenia parvula Holmberg, 1886, preoccupied in Nomada, and a neotype is designated for H. parvula Holmberg. A key to the species, descriptions, distributional data, and illustrations are provided.Se presenta una revisión de las abejas del género Nomada Scopoli en la Argentina. Se reconocen nueve especies en esta región, de las cuales cinco se describen como nuevas: N. mesopotamica, N. longula, N. chacoana, N. missionica y N. turrigera. Se designan lectotipos para N. pampicola Holmberg, 1886, y N. costalis Brèthes, 1909. Se propone un nuevo nombre, N. holmbergiana, para Hypochrotaenia parvula Holmberg, 1886, preocupado en Nomada, y se designa un neotipo para H. parvula Holmberg. Se presenta una clave para las especies, descripciones, datos de distribución e ilustraciones.

  2. Herpersvirus strigis: host spectrum and distribution in infected owls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burtscher, H; Sibalin, M

    1975-04-01

    Herpesvirus strigis, a new species of the genus Herpesvirus, is a pathogen for several species of owls in the order Srigiformes. Natural infection has been observed in the Eagle Owl (Bubo bubo L.), Long-eared Owl (Asio otus L.) and Snowy Owl (nyctea scandiaca L.) In addition the Little Owl (Athene noctua Scopolic) and Tengmalms Owl (Aegolius funereus L.) was experimentally infected. On the other hand the Tawny Owl (Strix aluco L.) and Barn Owl (Tyto albo Scopoli) proved resistant to a massive experimental infection. Of representatives from nine other orders of birds and mammals, only the Old World Kestrel (Falco tinnunculus L.) was found susceptible to this virus. Distribution of viral antigen in various organs of infected owls, as determined by immunofluorescence and by quantitative virus assay, was in accordance with the occurrence of macroscopic and microscopic lesions.

  3. Análise Faunística de Insetos Associados à Cultura do Quiabeiro [Abelmoschus esculentus (L. Moench] em Plantio Comercial, no Município de Canindé de São Francisco, SE, Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Cristina Silva

    2016-08-01

    Abstract. This research aims to study the entomofauna associated with the commercial cultivation of okra in municipality of Canindé do São Francisco, Sergipe State, Brazil, through faunal analysis. The species Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius biotype B, Aphis gossypii (Glover, Phenacoccus sp., Icerya purchasi (Maskell and Lagria villosa (Fabricius were the okra key pests. Diabrotica speciosa (Germar and Gryllus assimilis (Fabricius were plagues of secondary importance. And Leptoglossus zonatus (Dallas, Nezaraviridula L., Pachycoris torridus (Scopoli and Oxycarenus hyalinipennis (Costa were sporadic pests. Four species of predatory insects were found, a constant and dominant (Cycloneda sanguinea L. a dispersed, but constant (Eriopis connexa German and two rare (Hippodamia convergens Guérin-Méneville and Psyllobora confluens F..

  4. Nomenclatural notes about the names in Amaranthaceae published by Roberto de Visiani

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    Iamonico Duilio

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The names in Amaranthaceae published by R. de Visiani are investigated. Amaranthus gangeticus var. cuspidatus is a nomen nudum and thus invalid according to Art. 38.1a of the ICN. Amaranthus hierichuntinus, Atriplex patula var. hastifolia, and Chenopodium album var. oblongum are lectotypified, respectively, on a specimen preserved at PAD, and illustrations by Scopoli and Vahl. We here propose to synonymyze the three names (new synonymies respectively with Amaranthus graecizans subsp. graecizans, Atriplex patula subsp. patula, and the type subspecies of C. album. For nomenclatural purposes, also the name C. lanceolatum Willd. (heterotypic synonym of C. album subsp. album is investigated and lectotypified, on a specimen preserved at B.

  5. Laboratory transmission of Rift Valley fever virus by Phlebotomus duboscqi, Phlebotomus papatasi, Phlebotomus sergenti, and Sergentomyia schwetzi (Diptera: Psychodidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohm, D J; Rowton, E D; Lawyer, P G; O'Guinn, M; Turell, M J

    2000-05-01

    We examined the potential for Phlebotomus papatasi (Scopoli), Phlebotomus duboscqi (Neveu-Lemarie), Phlebotomus sergenti (Parrot), and Sergentomyia schwetzi (Adler, Theodor, & Parrot) to transmit Rift Valley fever (RVF) virus. After feeding on hamsters that had been inoculated with RVF virus, P. papatasi, P. sergenti, and S. schwetzi became infected and developed disseminated infections. All P. papatasi and P. duboscqi inoculated with RVF virus developed high-titer infections. In contrast, only 41% of the inoculated S. schwetzi contained detectable virus, and infected individuals contained significantly less virus than the two Phlebotomus species. Although 50% of the inoculated P. duboscqi transmitted RVF virus to hamsters, only 14% of P. papatasi and none of the S. schwetzi transmitted this virus. Additional studies are needed to determine the role of sand flies as vectors of RVF virus.

  6. Laboratory evaluation of rubidium as a long-lasting marker for bloodfeeding sand flies (Diptera: Psychodidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascari, T M; Stout, R W; Foil, L D

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the use of the trace element rubidium (Rb) as a long-lasting systemic biomarker for bloodfeeding females of the sand fly Phlebotomus papatasi Scopoli. Baits containing Rb chloride were found to be palatable to hamsters in this study. We were able to detect Rb using a portable X-ray fluorescence analyzer in all sand flies that fed on Rb-treated hamsters for at least 14 d postbloodmeal. We also detected Rb in sand flies that took a bloodmeal from hamsters up to 10 d after the hamsters were withdrawn from a Rb-treated diet. Results of this study constitute proof of concept for the incorporation of Rb chloride into rodent baits for marking bloodfeeding sand flies, and suggest that Rb marking could be used as a technique for evaluating rodent-targeted sand fly control methods and in ecological studies on sand flies.

  7. Taxonomia e morfologia de espécies neotropicais de Graphomya Robineau-Desvoidy (Diptera, Muscidae Taxonomic study of neotropical species of Graphomya Robineau-Desvoidy (Diptera, Muscidae

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    Bianca Marques

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Graphomya Robineau-Desvoidy (Diptera, Muscidae pode ser reconhecido por padrões cromáticos característicos no mesonoto e abdômen e pelas cerdas catepisternais 0:2. Das 14 espécies citadas na literatura para a Região Neotropical, sete são redescritas, com descrições das terminálias masculina e feminina - G. analis (Macquart, G. maculata (Scopoli, G. meridionalis Townsend, G. mexicana Giglio-Tos, G. occidentalis Arntfield, G. podexaurea(Enderlein e G. tropicalis Malloch, aqui revalidada. Ilustrações coloridas do mesonoto e do abdômen são apresentadas para facilitar o reconhecimento das espécies. O neótipo de G. maculata é designado. A fêmea de G. podexaurea é registrada pela primeira vez. O registro geográfico das seguintes espécies é ampliado: G. meridionalis para o Equador e Peru; G. mexicana e G. podexaurea para o Brasil; G. tropicalis para Colômbia e Brasil.Graphomya Robineau-Desvoidy (Diptera, Muscidae is recognized by characteristic color patterns on mesonotum and abdomen and by the disposition of the katepisternal setae 0:2. From the 14 species recorded in the Neotropical Region, seven are redescribed with the descriptions of male and female terminalia - G. analis (Macquart, G. maculata (Scopoli, G. meridionalis Townsend, G. mexicana Giglio-Tos, G. occidentalis Arntfield, G. podexaurea(Enderlein and G. tropicalis Malloch, herein revalidated. Colored illustrations of mesonotum and abdomen are presented in order to aid the recognition of the species. The neotype of G. maculata is designated. The female of G. podexaurea is recorded for the first time. The geographic record of the following species is enlarged: G. meridionalis for Ecuador and Peru; G. mexicana and G. podexaurea for Brazil and G. tropicalis for Colombia and Brazil.

  8. Tracking through life stages: adult, immature and juvenile autumn migration in a long-lived seabird.

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    Clara Péron

    Full Text Available Seasonal long-distance migration is likely to be experienced in a contrasted manner by juvenile, immature and adult birds, leading to variations in migratory routes, timing and behaviour. We provide the first analysis of late summer movements and autumn migration in these three life stages, which were tracked concurrently using satellite tags, geolocators or GPS recorders in a long-ranging migratory seabird, the Scopoli's shearwater (formerly named Cory's shearwater, Calonectrisdiomedea breeding on two French Mediterranean islands. During the late breeding season, immatures foraged around their colony like breeding adults, but they were the only group showing potential prospecting movements around non-natal colonies. Global migration routes were broadly comparable between the two populations and the three life stages, with all individuals heading towards the Atlantic Ocean through the strait of Gibraltar and travelling along the West African coast, up to 8000 km from their colony. However, detailed comparison of timing, trajectory and oceanographic conditions experienced by the birds revealed remarkable age-related differences. Compared to adults and immatures, juveniles made a longer stop-over in the Balearic Sea (10 days vs 4 days in average, showed lower synchrony in crossing the Gibraltar strait, had more sinuous pathways and covered longer daily distances (240 km.d(-1 vs 170 km.d(-1. Analysis of oceanographic habitats along migratory routes revealed funnelling selection of habitat towards coastal and more productive waters with increasing age. Younger birds may have reduced navigational ability and learn progressively fine-scale migration routes towards the more profitable travelling and wintering areas. Our study demonstrates the importance of tracking long-lived species through the stages, to better understand migratory behavior and assess differential exposure to at-sea threats. Shared distribution between life stages and populations

  9. Tracking through life stages: adult, immature and juvenile autumn migration in a long-lived seabird.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Péron, Clara; Grémillet, David

    2013-01-01

    Seasonal long-distance migration is likely to be experienced in a contrasted manner by juvenile, immature and adult birds, leading to variations in migratory routes, timing and behaviour. We provide the first analysis of late summer movements and autumn migration in these three life stages, which were tracked concurrently using satellite tags, geolocators or GPS recorders in a long-ranging migratory seabird, the Scopoli's shearwater (formerly named Cory's shearwater, Calonectrisdiomedea) breeding on two French Mediterranean islands. During the late breeding season, immatures foraged around their colony like breeding adults, but they were the only group showing potential prospecting movements around non-natal colonies. Global migration routes were broadly comparable between the two populations and the three life stages, with all individuals heading towards the Atlantic Ocean through the strait of Gibraltar and travelling along the West African coast, up to 8000 km from their colony. However, detailed comparison of timing, trajectory and oceanographic conditions experienced by the birds revealed remarkable age-related differences. Compared to adults and immatures, juveniles made a longer stop-over in the Balearic Sea (10 days vs 4 days in average), showed lower synchrony in crossing the Gibraltar strait, had more sinuous pathways and covered longer daily distances (240 km.d(-1) vs 170 km.d(-1)). Analysis of oceanographic habitats along migratory routes revealed funnelling selection of habitat towards coastal and more productive waters with increasing age. Younger birds may have reduced navigational ability and learn progressively fine-scale migration routes towards the more profitable travelling and wintering areas. Our study demonstrates the importance of tracking long-lived species through the stages, to better understand migratory behavior and assess differential exposure to at-sea threats. Shared distribution between life stages and populations make Scopoli

  10. Addenda and Corrigenda to the Catalogue of Palaearctic Coleoptera, volumes 7 and 8 (Curculionoidea

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    Alonso-Zarazaga, Miguel A.

    2016-06-01

    tricolor Capiomont, 1876 (non L. tricolor (Scopoli, 1771. New combinations are: Cionus affinis (Brahm, 1790, comb. nov. from Curculio; Curculio helleri (Voss, 1932, comb. nov. from Balaninus; Donus diversisquamosus (Legalov, 2012, comb. nov. from Asiodonus; Donus knutelskyi (Legalov, 2012, comb. nov. from Asiodonus; Donus potanini (Legalov, 2012, comb. nov. from Asiodonus; Donus shokhrini (Legalov, 2012, comb. nov. from Asiodonus; Donus streltzovi (Legalov, 2012, comb. nov. from Asiodonus; Donus tshernyshevi (Legalov, 2012, comb. nov. from Asiodonus; Involvulus (Teretriorhynchites icosandriae (Scopoli, 1763, comb. nov. from Curculio; Mecaspis alternans (Hellwig, 1795, comb. nov. from Curculio; Otiorhynchus mucronatus (Paykull, 1792, comb. nov. from Curculio; Pseudopoophagus constricticollis (Kojima & Morimoto, 1993, comb. nov. from Apionodes. Protapion interjectum boreum (GØnget, 1997 is reconsidered as a valid subspecies based on its genitalic characteristics, stat. res. The following names are declared nomina protecta under Art. 23.9.2 of the Code: Apion apricans Herbst, 1797 (now in Protapion over Rhinomacer flavipes O.F. Müller, 1776 (nomen oblitum, Apion genistae Kirby, 1811 (now in Exapion over Curculio astralagi Herbst, 1795 (nomen oblitum, Curculio piceus Pallas, 1771 (now in Sphenophorus over Curculio piceus Wulfen in Scopoli, 1763 (nomen oblitum, Curculio phyllocola Herbst, 1795 (now in Anthonomus over Curculio resinae Fabricius, 1792 (nomen oblitum, and Rhynchaenus posticus Gyllenhal, 1813 (now in Hypera over Curculio denigratus Panzer, 1790 (nomen oblitum. Rhynchites laevior Faust, 1882 is confirmed as the type species of Aphlorhynchites Sawada, 1993 by a First Reviser action. Relevant dating for some works is provided. References have been completed and updated. Current misspellings have been corrected, amongst them, Hylesinus taranio Danthoine (not toranio.Se presentan en este trabajo adiciones, correcciones, comentarios y novedades nomenclaturales que

  11. Repellency Effect of Myrtle Essential Oil and DEET against Phlebotomus papatasi, under Labo-ratory Conditions

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    MR Yaghoobi-Ershadi

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Zoonotic cutaneous leishmaniasis (ZCL is an increasing and important public health problem in Iran. The use of repellents is recommended as one of the important means of personal protection against vectors of ZCL. This paper reports the repellency effect of the plant Myrtle, Myrtus communis (Myrtaceae, essential oil for protection against 3-7-day-old unfed females of the sandfly, Phlebotomus papatasi Scopoli for the first time in Iran. The tests were carried out under laboratory conditions, using dose-response testing procedure on white rabbits and the results were compared with commonly used repellent, diethyl-3-methylbenzamid (DEET. The modified Wirtz method using K & D apparatus was employed. Effective Dose (EDs values were estimated from the probit regression line. ED50 was measured as 0.1140 and 0.0006 mg/cm2 for Myrtle essential oil and DEET, respectively. The laboratory tests showed that both Myrtle essential oil and DEET had repellency effects against P.papatasi. In addition, the insecticidal action of Myrtle oil was also observed. We concluded that the two repellents could be used as a mean of personal protection against sand flies.

  12. Academic roots of chemical engineering in XVIII and XIX century in middle Europe

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    Halasi Tibor

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Roots of chemical engineering in Middle Europe lead to the first mining and metallurgy academies, established in VIII century in Upper Hungaria and in Bohemian Kingdom. Chemical engineering skills originate from ancient Egyptian handicraft, alchemy, technical chemistry, pneumochemistry and phlogiston chemistry. Development of mining and metallurgy coincided with great scientific discoveries and industrial revolution. In Middle Europe, the first such academies were opened in St. Joachimstahl and in Schemnitz, and the first Serbian mining engineers Djordje Branković, Vasilije Božić and Stevan Pavlović studied, as well as the first chemistry professor of the High School in Belgrade, Mihajlo Rašković. Eminent professors were employed by the Schemnitz academy, such as: Nicol Jacquin, Giovanni Scopoli, Ignaz von Born and Christian Doppler. It is important to emphasize that Shemnitz practiced the first modern, practical laboratory education. In VIII century, Schemnitz Mining and metallurgy academy was the most contemporary educational insistution for engineers. However, in XIX century, mining and metallurgy academies stagnated, due to the replacement of professional academies with polytechnic schools, technical universities and scientific research institutes.

  13. Climate-driven vital rates do not always mean climate-driven population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavecchia, Giacomo; Tenan, Simone; Pradel, Roger; Igual, José-Manuel; Genovart, Meritxell; Oro, Daniel

    2016-12-01

    Current climatic changes have increased the need to forecast population responses to climate variability. A common approach to address this question is through models that project current population state using the functional relationship between demographic rates and climatic variables. We argue that this approach can lead to erroneous conclusions when interpopulation dispersal is not considered. We found that immigration can release the population from climate-driven trajectories even when local vital rates are climate dependent. We illustrated this using individual-based data on a trans-equatorial migratory seabird, the Scopoli's shearwater Calonectris diomedea, in which the variation of vital rates has been associated with large-scale climatic indices. We compared the population annual growth rate λi , estimated using local climate-driven parameters with ρi , a population growth rate directly estimated from individual information and that accounts for immigration. While λi varied as a function of climatic variables, reflecting the climate-dependent parameters, ρi did not, indicating that dispersal decouples the relationship between population growth and climate variables from that between climatic variables and vital rates. Our results suggest caution when assessing demographic effects of climatic variability especially in open populations for very mobile organisms such as fish, marine mammals, bats, or birds. When a population model cannot be validated or it is not detailed enough, ignoring immigration might lead to misleading climate-driven projections. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Molecular test to assign individuals within the Cacopsylla pruni complex.

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    Jean Peccoud

    Full Text Available Crop protection requires the accurate identification of disease vectors, a task that can be made difficult when these vectors encompass cryptic species. Here we developed a rapid molecular diagnostic test to identify individuals of Cacopsyllapruni (Scopoli, 1763 (Hemiptera: Psyllidae, the main vector of the European stone fruit yellows phytoplasma. This psyllid encompasses two highly divergent genetic groups that are morphologically similar and that are characterized by genotyping several microsatellite markers, a costly and time-consuming protocol. With the aim of developing species-specific PCR primers, we sequenced the Internal Transcribed Spacer 2 (ITS2 on a collection of C. pruni samples from France and other European countries. ITS2 sequences showed that the two genetic groups represent two highly divergent clades. This enabled us to develop specific primers for the assignment of individuals to either genetic group in a single PCR, based on ITS2 amplicon size. All previously assigned individuals yielded bands of expected sizes, and the PCR proved efficient on a larger sample of 799 individuals. Because none appeared heterozygous at the ITS2 locus (i.e., none produced two bands, we inferred that the genetic groups of C. pruni, whose distribution is partly sympatric, constitute biological species that have not exchanged genes for an extended period of time. Other psyllid species (Cacopsylla, Psylla, Triozidae and Aphalaridae failed to yield any amplicon. These primers are therefore unlikely to produce false positives and allow rapid assignment of C. pruni individuals to either cryptic species.

  15. Dual action of phosphonate herbicides in plants affected by herbivore--model study on black bean aphid Aphis fabae rearing on broad bean Vicia faba plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipok, Jacek

    2009-09-01

    The interactions between plants, herbicides and herbivore insects were studied as an aspect of possible side effect of the using of phosphonate herbicides. The experimental system was composed of phosphonate herbicides, broad bean Vicia faba (L.) plants and black bean aphid Aphis fabae (Scopoli). Two means of herbicide application, namely standard spraying and direct introduction of the herbicide into stem via glass capillary, were examined. The results obtained for N-2-piridylaminomethylene bisphosphonic acid and its derivatives show 10 times higher inhibition of the plant growth if glass capillary mode was used. When plants were infested by aphids 24h after the use of herbicide, a significant decrease in plant growth rate was observed in relation to plants treated with herbicides alone. Moreover, the sensitivity of aphids towards glyphosate, N-2-piridylaminomethylene bisphosphonic acid and its 3-methyl derivative introduced to artificial diet indicated that these herbicidal phosphonates possessed also insecticidal activity if applied in a systemic manner. Additionally, olfactometer measurements revealed that aphids preferred intact V. faba leaves over those that had been treated with sublethal doses of herbicides. The results achieved in these experiments indicate that the use of phosphonate herbicides decreases plant resistance and influences the number of aphids accompanied with treated plants. Regarding these facts it can be concluded that the combined effect of herbicide-induced stress and insect herbivory reduced plant fitness and thus should be considered as also a factor enabling the reduction of herbicide doses.

  16. Infectivity of Metarhizium anisopliae (Hypocreales: Clavicipitaceae) to Phlebotomus papatasi (Diptera: Psychodidae) under laboratory conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zayed, Alia; Soliman, Mustafa M; El-Shazly, Mohamed M

    2013-07-01

    Susceptibility of Phlebotomus papatasi Scopoli (Diptera: Psychodidae) larvae to the entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium anisopliae (Metschinkoff) Sorokin (Ma79) (Hypocreales: Clavicipitaceae) was evaluated at two different temperatures. The ability of the fungus to reinfect healthy sand flies was followed up for approximately 20 wk and the effect of in vivo repassage on the enhancement of its virulence was assessed. The fungus reduced the adult emergence at 26 +/- 1 degrees C when applied to larval diet. Six spore concentrations were used in the bioassays ranging from 1 x 10(6) to 5 x 10(8) spores/ml. Mortality decreased significantly when the temperature was raised to 31 +/- 1 degrees C at all tested concentrations. Fungus-treated vials were assayed against sand fly larvae at different time lapses without additional reapplication of the fungus in the media to determine whether the level of inocula persisting in the media was sufficient to reinfect healthy sand flies. Twenty weeks postapplication, there were still enough infectious propagules of Ma79 to infect 40% of P. papatasi larvae. A comparison between the infectivity of 10 subsequent in vitro cultures and the host-passed inocula of the fungus against sand fly larvae was conducted. Mortalities of P. papatasi larvae changed significantly when exposed to inocula passed through different insects. Presented data can provide vector control decision makers and end users with fundamental information for the introduction and application of M. anisopliae as an effective control agent against the main cutaneous leishmaniasis old-world vector P. papatasi.

  17. Diversity of Quill Mites of the Family Syringophilidae (Acari: Prostigmata) Parasitizing Owls (Aves: Strigiformes) With Remarks on the Host-Parasite Relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoracki, Maciej; Unsoeld, Markus; Marciniak, Natalia; Sikora, Bozena

    2016-07-01

    The quill mite fauna of the family Syringophilidae (Acari: Prostigmata: Cheyletoidea) associated with owls (Aves: Strigiformes) is reviewed. A new genus is proposed, Neobubophilus Skoracki & Unsoeld gen. nov. It differs from closely related Bubophilus (Bubophilus Philips and Norton, 1978) by the absence of leg setae vsII in the both sexes. In addition, four new species are described: (1) Neobubophilus cunicularius Skoracki & Unsoeld sp. nov. from Athene cunicularia (Molina, 1782) (Strigidae) from Paraguay; (2) Neobubophilus atheneus Skoracki & Unsoeld sp. nov. from Athene noctua (Scopoli, 1769) and Athene brama (Temminck, 1821) (Strigidae), both from India; (3) Bubophilus tytonus Skoracki & Unsoeld sp. nov. from Tyto alba affinis (Blyth, 1862) (Tytonidae) from Cameroon, and (4) Megasyringophilus dalmas Skoracki & Unsoeld sp. nov. from Megascops choliba (Vieillot, 1817) (Strigidae) from Venezuela. The following new host species are given: Bubo bubo (Linnaeus, 1758) (Strigidae) from Nepal for Bubophilus ascalaphus (Philips and Norton 1978) and Strix woodfordii (Smith, 1834) (Strigidae) from Tanzania for Bubophilus aluconis (aluconis Nattress and Skoracki 2009). A key for syringophilid genera and species associated with owls is constructed. The host-parasite relationships of syringophilid mites and owls are discussed. © The Authors 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com Version of Record, first published online May 24, 2016 with fixed content and layout in compliance with Art. 8.1.3.2 ICZN.

  18. The potential distribution of Phlebotomus papatasi (Diptera: Psychodidae) in Libya based on ecological niche model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Dayem, M S; Annajar, B B; Hanafi, H A; Obenauer, P J

    2012-05-01

    The increased cases of cutaneous leishmaniasis vectored by Phlebotomus papatasi (Scopoli) in Libya have driven considerable effort to develop a predictive model for the potential geographical distribution of this disease. We collected adult P. papatasi from 17 sites in Musrata and Yefern regions of Libya using four different attraction traps. Our trap results and literature records describing the distribution of P. papatasi were incorporated into a MaxEnt algorithm prediction model that used 22 environmental variables. The model showed a high performance (AUC = 0.992 and 0.990 for training and test data, respectively). High suitability for P. papatasi was predicted to be largely confined to the coast at altitudes Libya may find this information useful in their efforts to control zoonotic cutaneous leishmaniasis. Existing records are strongly biased toward a few geographical regions, and therefore, further sand fly collections are warranted that should include documentation of such factors as soil texture and humidity, land cover, and normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) data to increase the model's predictive power.

  19. Entomological survey of phlebotomine sand flies (Diptera: Psychodidae in a focus of visceral leishmaniasis in central Iran

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    Mohammad Motovali Emami

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Visceral leishmaniasis (VL is a major vector-borne disease in Iran. A focus of VL is present in Shahreza county, Isfahan province, central Iran. The main objective of this study was to determine the probable vectors in this area. Methods: Sand flies were collected biweekly using sticky paper traps, CDC light-traps, and aspirators from outdoors as well as indoors. All female sand flies were dissected and identified. Promastigotes were inoculated to hamsters and detected by Nested PCR. Approximately 7528 sand flies representing 12 species were collected from April 2003 to October 2004. Phlebotomus (Phlebotomus papatasi Scopoli, Phlebotomus (Larroussious major Annandale and Sergentomyia (Sergentomyia sintoni Pringle were the predominant species. Two percent of P. major was found with natural promastigote infections. Interpretation & conclusion: This is the first report of natural promastigote infection in P. major in central Iran. The activity of P. major started from April and ended in October with a peak in September. The parasites were identified as Leishmania infantum using standard PCR. P. major is a possible vector of leishmaniasis and is susceptible to DDT in this area.

  20. Entomological study of sand flies (Diptera:Psychodidae:Phlebotominae) in Asalouyeh, the heartland of an Iranian petrochemical industry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hamzeh Alipour; Hossien Darabi; Tahere Dabbaghmanesh; Mehdi Bonyani

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the fauna and seasonal activity of different species of sand flies (Diptera:Psychodidae: Phlebotominae) in Asalouyeh, the heartland of an Iranian petrochemical industry, Southern Iran, as a oil rich district. Sand flies are the vectors of at least three different kinds of disease, the most important of which is leishmaniasis, and it is a major public health problem in Iran with increased annual occurrence of clinical episodes.Methods:cleared in puris medium and identified morphologically, twice a month from April to March 2008.Results:A total of 3 497 sand flies of rural regions were collected by sticky traps fixed, and Sinton, 1928, Phlebotomus papatasi Scopoli, 1910, Phlebotomus bergeroti Parrot and Phlebotomus sergenti Parrot) and one of genus Sergentomyia (Sergentomyia tiberiadis Alder, Theodor & Lourie, 1930). The most prevalent species was Phlebotomus papatasi, presented 56.4% of the identified flies. The others were Phlebotomus sergenti (22.5%), Phlebotomus alexandri (4.5%), Phlebotomusbergeroti Predominant species included four of genus Phlebotomus (Phlebotomus alexandri than that of males (32%). The abundance of sand flies represented two peaks of activity; one in early May and the other one in the first half of September in the region. (12%) and Sergentomyia tiberiadis (5%) as well. The percentage of females (68%) was more Conclusion: Phlebotomus papatasi is the probable vector of zoonotic cutaneous leishmaniasis in the region. Further molecular studies are needed to determine the definite vector of the region.

  1. First detection of Leishmania infantum DNA in wild caught Phlebotomus papatasi in endemic focus of cutaneous leishmaniasis, South of Iran

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rassi Yavar; Gholami Manuchehr; Karami Hadi; Abai Mohammad Reza; M Mohebali; Bakshi Hasan; Oshaghi Mohammad Ali; Rafizadeh Sina; Bagherpoor Hagigi Habib; Hosseini Abodolrahim

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To identify the vectors and reservoirs of cutaneous leishmaniasis in the endemic focus of Farashband, Fars Province, South of Iran. Methods: Sticky papers and Sherman trap were used for collection of sand flies and rodents, respectively. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of kDNA, ITS1-rDNA were used for identification of Leishmania parasite in sand flies as well as rodents. Results:Totally 2 010 sand flies were collected and the species of Phlebotomus papatasi Scopoli was the common specimen in outdoors and indoors places. PCR technique was employed on 130 females of Phlebotomus papatasi. One of them (0.76%) was positive to parasite Leishmania major (L. major) and one specimen (0.76%) was positive to Leishmania infantum. Microscopic investigation on blood smear of the animal reservoirs for amastigote parasites revealed 16 (44%) infected Tatera indica. Infection of them to L. major was confirmed by PCR against kDNA loci of the parasite. Conclusions: The results indicated that Phlebotomus papatasi was the dominant species circulating two species of parasites including L. major and Leishmania infantum among human and reservoirs. Furthermore, Tatera indica is the only main host reservoir for maintenance of the parasite source in the area.

  2. Predicting the Distribution of Phlebotomus papatasi (Diptera: Psychodidae), the Primary Vector of Zoonotic Cutaneous Leishmaniasis, in Golestan Province of Iran Using Ecological Niche Modeling: Comparison of MaxEnt and GARP Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofizadeh, Aioub; Rassi, Yavar; Vatandoost, Hassan; Hanafi-Bojd, Ahmad Ali; Mollalo, Abolfazl; Rafizadeh, Sayena; Akhavan, Amir Ahmad

    2017-03-01

    Zoonotic cutaneous leishmaniasis (ZCL) is a prevalent vector-borne disease in the Golestan province of Iran, with Phlebotomus papatasi (Scopoli, 1786) serving as the main vector. The aim of this study was to model the probability of presence of this species in the study area, and to determine the underlying factors affecting its distribution. Three villages were selected from each county of the province and visited monthly for investigating ZCL. Sticky paper traps were used for collecting the sand flies to determine the species present. The presence of Ph. papatasi was modeled using genetic algorithm for rule-set production (GARP) and maximum entropy (MaxEnt) techniques. Both models showed the central and northern parts of the province with lowland areas were more vulnerable to Ph. papatasi propagation, in comparison with the southern parts with mountainous and forest areas. The area under curve (AUC) of MaxEnt model for the training points was calculated as 0.90, indicating excellent performance of the model in predicting Ph. papatasi distribution. Jackknife test showed that the factors with the greatest influence in vector distribution were slope, vegetation cover, annual mean temperature, and altitude. By using ecological niche models, it is possible to identify areas with higher probability of presence of Ph. papatasi, which guides public health policy makers for planning better vector control interventions. © The Authors 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Assessing Insecticide Susceptibility of Laboratory Lutzomyia longipalpis and Phlebotomus papatasi Sand Flies (Diptera: Psychodidae: Phlebotominae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denlinger, David S; Lozano-Fuentes, Saul; Lawyer, Phillip G; Black, William C; Bernhardt, Scott A

    2015-09-01

    Chemical insecticides are effective for controlling Lutzomyia and Phlebotomus sand fly (Diptera: Psychodidae) vectors of Leishmania parasites. However, repeated use of certain insecticides has led to tolerance and resistance. The objective of this study was to determine lethal concentrations (LCs) and lethal exposure times (LTs) to assess levels of susceptibility of laboratory Lutzomyia longipalpis (Lutz and Nieva) and Phlebotomus papatasi (Scopoli) to 10 insecticides using a modified version of the World Health Organization (WHO) exposure kit assay and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) bottle bioassay. Sand flies were exposed to insecticides coated on the interior of 0.5-gallon and 1,000-ml glass bottles. Following exposure, the flies were allowed to recover for 24 h, after which mortality was recorded. From dose-response survival curves for L. longipalpis and P. papatasi generated with the QCal software, LCs causing 50, 90, and 95% mortality were determined for each insecticide. The LCs and LTs from this study will be useful as baseline reference points for future studies using the CDC bottle bioassays to assess insecticide susceptibility of sand fly populations in the field. There is a need for a larger repository of sand fly insecticide susceptibility data from the CDC bottle bioassays, including a range of LCs and LTs for more sand fly species with more insecticides. Such a repository would be a valuable tool for vector management.

  4. Oral treatment of rodents with fipronil for feed-through and systemic control of sand flies (Diptera: Psychodidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascari, T M; Stout, R W; Foil, L D

    2013-01-01

    The sand fly Phlebotomus papatasi Scopoli is the vector of Leishmania major (Yakimoff & Schokhor), which is maintained in populations of burrowing rodents. The purpose of this study was to conduct a laboratory study to determine the efficacy of oral treatment of rodents with fipronil for control of sand flies that feed on rodent feces as larvae or on rodent blood as adults. We determined through larval bioassays that fipronil was eliminated in feces of orally-treated hamsters at a level that was significantly toxic to sand fly larvae for 21 d after the hamsters had been withdrawn from a fipronil-treated diet. Through bloodfeeding bioassays, we also found that fipronil was present in the peripheral blood of hamsters at a concentration that was significantly toxic to bloodfeeding adult female sand flies for 49 d after the hamsters had been withdrawn from their treated diet. The results of this study suggest that fipronil acts as well as or better than feed-through or systemic insecticides that previously have been measured against sand flies, and is particularly promising because this single compound acts against both larvae and bloodfeeding adults. An area-wide approach using rodent baits containing a fipronil could suppress vector populations that originate in the vicinity of rodent reservoirs, and could be used to eliminate the most epidemiologically important part of the vector population: female sand flies that take bloodmeals on rodent reservoirs.

  5. Updated distribution of Osmoderma eremita in Abruzzo (Italy and agro-pastoral practices affecting its conservation (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae

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    Patrizia Giangregorio

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available New records of Osmoderma eremita (Scopoli, 1763 (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Cetoniinae are reported for Abruzzo (Italy, together with a review of its distribution in this region. O. eremita is a saproxylic beetle dependent on the presence of hollow deciduous trees with abundant wood mould in their cavities. The major threats for the species are habitat loss and fragmentation. EU Habitats Directive requests to the member States its protection and the monitoring of its conservation status. Detection of its occurrence is the first step to protect the species. The surveys have been carried out in ten sites of Abruzzo by using black cross-windows traps baited with specific pheromone. The species has been recorded for the first time in the Sant’Antonio forest and its presence is confirmed in the Peligna Valley, after a decade. The populations seem to be confined to small patches of suitable habitats. At local level, the abandonment of the pollarding practice (willow and beech forests and the use of pollarded trees as biomass for fuel are the major threats for this species. Indeed some key actions, such as the protection of old hollow trees and the continuation of pollarding practice in rural landscape, could be key factors for the conservation strategies of the species in the study area.

  6. Aspects of the bionomics of Phlebotomus sergenti sandflies from an endemic area of anthroponotic cutaneous leishmaniasis in Aleppo Governorate, Syria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maroli, M; Jalouk, L; Al Ahmed, M; Bianchi, R; Bongiorno, G; Khoury, C; Gradoni, L

    2009-06-01

    Aspects of the bionomics of phlebotomine sandflies (Diptera: Psychodidae) were studied from June to November 2005 in three foci of anthroponotic cutaneous leishmaniasis (ACL) in Aleppo Governorate, Syria, where the agent Leishmania tropica (Wright) (Kinetoplastida: Trypanosomatidae) is transmitted by Phlebotomus sergenti Parrot. Syria has been designated by the World Health Organization as one of four countries in the Old World where cutaneous leishmaniasis is hyperendemic, but little is known about the biology of local vector populations. Standard collections by sticky traps showed two peaks in density, in June and late August. In total, 1840 sandflies were caught, comprising five species: Phlebotomus papatasi (Scopoli) (68.0%); P. sergenti (25.4%); Sergentomyia minuta (Rondani) (6.4%); Phlebotomus tobbi Adler & Theodor (0.1%), and Phlebotomus mascittii canaaniticus Adler & Theodor (0.1%). Similar numbers of P. sergenti were caught indoors (246 specimens) and outdoors (222), whereas P. papatasi was significantly more abundant indoors (1096 specimens) than outdoors (156) (chi(2) = 241, P feline blood, although more bloodmeals were taken from humans and cattle than expected in relation to the relative proportions of potential hosts present (the forage ratio, FR). The bionomics of P. sergenti are discussed in relation to the inefficacy of control campaigns based on indoor spraying with residual insecticides that have been implemented by the Syrian Ministry of Health to control the epidemics of ACL in the Aleppo Governorate.

  7. Characteristic odor of Osmoderma eremita identified as a male-released pheromone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Mattias C; Hedin, Jonas; Svensson, Glenn P; Tolasch, Till; Francke, Wittko

    2003-03-01

    Osmoderma eremita (Scopoli) is an endangered scarab beetle living in hollow trees. It has mainly been known for its characteristic odor, typically described as a fruity, peachlike or plumlike aroma. The odor emanating from a single beetle can sometimes be perceived from a distance of several meters. In this paper, we show that the characteristic odor from O. eremita is caused by the compound (R)-(+)-gamma-decalactone, released in large quantities mainly or exclusively by male beetles. Antennae from male and female beetles responded in a similar way to (R)-(+)-gamma-decalactone in electroantennographic recordings. Field trapping experiments showed that (R)-(+)-gamma-decalactone is a pheromone attracting female beetles. Lactones similar to (R)-(+)-gamma-decalactone are frequently used as female-released sex pheromones by phytophagous scarabs. This is, however, the first evidence of a lactone used as a male-produced pheromone in scarab beetles. We propose that the strong signal from males is a sexually selected trait used to compete for females and matings. The signal could work within trees but also act as a guide to tree hollows, which are an essential resource for O. eremita. Males may, thus, attract females dispersing from their natal tree by advertising a suitable habitat. This signal could also be exploited by other males searching for tree hollows or for females, which would explain the catch of several males in our traps.

  8. Barcoding Fauna Bavarica: 78% of the Neuropterida fauna barcoded!

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    Jérome Morinière

    Full Text Available This publication provides the first comprehensive DNA barcode data set for the Neuropterida of Central Europe, including 80 of the 102 species (78% recorded from Bavaria (Germany and three other species from nearby regions (Austria, France and the UK. Although the 286 specimens analyzed had a heterogeneous conservation history (60% dried; 30% in 80% EtOH; 10% fresh specimens in 95% EtOH, 237 (83% generated a DNA barcode. Eleven species (13% shared a BIN, but three of these taxa could be discriminated through barcodes. Four pairs of closely allied species shared barcodes including Chrysoperla pallida Henry et al., 2002 and C. lucasina Lacroix, 1912; Wesmaelius concinnus (Stephens, 1836 and W. quadrifasciatus (Reuter, 1894; Hemerobius handschini Tjeder, 1957 and H. nitidulus Fabricius, 1777; and H. atrifrons McLachlan, 1868 and H. contumax Tjeder, 1932. Further studies are needed to test the possible synonymy of these species pairs or to determine if other genetic markers permit their discrimination. Our data highlight five cases of potential cryptic diversity within Bavarian Neuropterida: Nineta flava (Scopoli, 1763, Sympherobius pygmaeus (Rambur, 1842, Sisyra nigra (Retzius, 1783, Semidalis aleyrodiformis (Stephens, 1836 and Coniopteryx pygmaea Enderlein, 1906 are each split into two or three BINs. The present DNA barcode library not only allows the identification of adult and larval stages, but also provides valuable information for alpha-taxonomy, and for ecological and evolutionary research.

  9. Barcoding Fauna Bavarica: 78% of the Neuropterida fauna barcoded!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morinière, Jérome; Hendrich, Lars; Hausmann, Axel; Hebert, Paul; Haszprunar, Gerhard; Gruppe, Axel

    2014-01-01

    This publication provides the first comprehensive DNA barcode data set for the Neuropterida of Central Europe, including 80 of the 102 species (78%) recorded from Bavaria (Germany) and three other species from nearby regions (Austria, France and the UK). Although the 286 specimens analyzed had a heterogeneous conservation history (60% dried; 30% in 80% EtOH; 10% fresh specimens in 95% EtOH), 237 (83%) generated a DNA barcode. Eleven species (13%) shared a BIN, but three of these taxa could be discriminated through barcodes. Four pairs of closely allied species shared barcodes including Chrysoperla pallida Henry et al., 2002 and C. lucasina Lacroix, 1912; Wesmaelius concinnus (Stephens, 1836) and W. quadrifasciatus (Reuter, 1894); Hemerobius handschini Tjeder, 1957 and H. nitidulus Fabricius, 1777; and H. atrifrons McLachlan, 1868 and H. contumax Tjeder, 1932. Further studies are needed to test the possible synonymy of these species pairs or to determine if other genetic markers permit their discrimination. Our data highlight five cases of potential cryptic diversity within Bavarian Neuropterida: Nineta flava (Scopoli, 1763), Sympherobius pygmaeus (Rambur, 1842), Sisyra nigra (Retzius, 1783), Semidalis aleyrodiformis (Stephens, 1836) and Coniopteryx pygmaea Enderlein, 1906 are each split into two or three BINs. The present DNA barcode library not only allows the identification of adult and larval stages, but also provides valuable information for alpha-taxonomy, and for ecological and evolutionary research.

  10. Sulfated phenolic acids from Dasycladales siphonous green algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurth, Caroline; Welling, Matthew; Pohnert, Georg

    2015-09-01

    Sulfated aromatic acids play a central role as mediators of chemical interactions and physiological processes in marine algae and seagrass. Among others, Dasycladus vermicularis (Scopoli) Krasser 1898 uses a sulfated hydroxylated coumarin derivative as storage metabolite for a protein cross linker that can be activated upon mechanical disruption of the alga. We introduce a comprehensive monitoring technique for sulfated metabolites based on fragmentation patterns in liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry and applied it to Dasycladales. This allowed the identification of two new aromatic sulfate esters 4-(sulfooxy)phenylacetic acid and 4-(sulfooxy)benzoic acid. The two metabolites were synthesized to prove the mass spectrometry-based structure elucidation in co-injections. We show that both metabolites are transformed to the corresponding desulfated phenols by sulfatases of bacteria. In biofouling experiments with Escherichia coli and Vibrio natriegens the desulfated forms were more active than the sulfated ones. Sulfatation might thus represent a measure of detoxification that enables the algae to store inactive forms of metabolites that are activated by settling organisms and then act as defense. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. A taxonomic catalogue of the Dyspnoi Hansen and Sørensen, 1904 (Arachnida: Opiliones).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schönhofer, Axel L

    2013-01-01

    . (=Paranemastoma quadripunctatum (Perty, 1833)), Crosbycus graecus Giltay, 1932 syn. n. (=Paranemastoma simplex (Giltay, 1932)), Nemastoma bimaculosum Roewer 1951 syn. n. (=Paranemastoma titaniacum (Roewer, 1914)), Trogulocratus tunetanus Roewer, 1950 syn. n. (=Calathocratus africanus (Lucas, 1849)), Trogulus albicerus Sø-rensen, 1873 syn. n. (=Calathocratus sinuosus (Sørensen, 1873)), Metopoctea exarata Simon, 1879a syn. n. (=Trogulus aquaticus Simon, 1879a), Trogulus galasensis Avram, 1971 syn. n. (=Trogulus nepaeformis (Scopoli, 1763)) and Trogulus roeweri Avram, 1971 syn. n. (=Trogulus nepaeformis (Scopoli, 1763)). Paranemastoma werneri (Kulczyński, 1903) is elevated from subspecies to species. Ischyropsalis luteipes Simon, 1872b is proposed as nomen protectum, taking precedence over Lhermia spinipes Lucas 1866 nomen oblitum. The same accounts for Anelasmocephalus cambridgei (Westwood, 1874) nomen protectum, taking precedence over Trogulus violaceus Gervais, 1844 nomen oblitum, Trogulus closanicus Avram, 1971 nomen protectum over Trogulus asperatus C.L. Koch, 1839a nomen oblitum, as well as Trogu-lus martensi Chemini, 1983 nomen protectum over Trogulus tuberculatus Canestrini, 1874 nomen oblitum. New combinations, all from Nemastoma, are Histricostoma anatolicum (Roewer, 1962), Mediostoma globuliferum (L. Koch, 1867), Nemastomella hankiewiczii (Kulczyński, 1909), Nemastomella maarebense (Simon, 1913), Nemastomella monchiquense (Kraus, 1961) and Paranemastoma simplex (Giltay, 1932); from Mitostoma: Nemastomella armatissima (Roewer, 1962). Revived combinations are Nemastomella cristinae (Rambla, 1969) (from Nemastoma) and Nemastomella sexmucronatum (Simon, 1911) (from Nemastoma). The following Nemastoma are transferred to Paranemastoma but suggested as nomina dubia: aeginum (Roewer, 1951), amuelleri (Roewer, 1951), bolei (Hadži, 1973a), caporiaccoi (Roewer, 1951), carneluttii (Hadži, 1973a), ferkeri (Roewer, 1951), gigas montenegrinum (Nosek, 1904), gostivarense (Had

  12. Descripción de una nueva especie de Tropinota Mulsant, 1842 del subgénero Epicometis Burmeister, 1842 del norte de Marruecos (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae, Cetoniinae

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    Ruiz, José L.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A species of the genus Tropinota Mulsant, 1842, T. iec sp. n., is described using specimens from northwestern Morocco (region of Tangier-Tetouan. This new species is included in subgenus Epicometis Burmeister, 1842, because it shows the main diagnostic characters of the subgenus: pronotum without smooth areas and 5th interstria not strongly elevated as a keel and not bifurcated at the base. Diagnostic traits of T. iec sp. n. are defined, and differential characters with respect to all other species of Epicometis discussed. Based on morphological traits, the closest species to T. iec sp. n. is Tropinota (Epicometis hirta (Poda von Neuhaus, 1761. Tropinota iec sp. n. differs from T. hirta in tegument shine, density of corporal pilosity, pronotal and elytral punctuation, tarsal length, punctuation of the mesosternal plate, and also in the structure of the aedeagus, with parameri clearly widening along the apical region in T. iec. Main morphological differences between the new species and the other two species of Tropinota inhabiting northern Africa, T. (Tropinota squalida (Scopoli, 1763 and T. (Hemiopta bleusei (Bedel, 1896, are also indicated. Finally, the presence of T. hirta in Morocco, where possibly it has been confused with T. iec sp. n., is also discussed.Se describe una especie nueva del género Tropinota Mulsant, 1842 a partir de ejemplares del noroeste de Marruecos (región de Tánger-Tetuán: T. iec sp. n. Esta nueva especie se adscribe al subgénero Epicometis Burmeister, 1842 por presentar los principales caracteres diagnósticos del mismo: pronoto sin áreas lisas y la 5ª interestría no fuertemente elevada a modo de costilla ni bifurcada en la base. Se definen los rasgos diagnósticos de T. iec sp. n. y se discuten los caracteres diferenciales respecto a las demás especies de Epicometis. La especie morfológicamente más afín a T. iec sp. n. es Tropinota (Epicometis hirta (Poda von Neuhaus, 1761, de la que se segrega

  13. Toxic and Repellent effecto of Harmal (Peganum harmala L. Acetonic Extract on Several Aphids and Tribolium castaneum (Herbst Efecto Tóxico y Repelente del Extracto Acetónico de Harmal (Peganum harmala L. sobre varias especies de Áfidos y Tribolium castaneum (Herbst

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    Elham Salari

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available To reduce the dependence on the sometimes unwise use of synthetic pesticides in fruit and vegetable plantations, the toxicity and repellence of Peganum harmala L. (Zygophyllaceae acetonic seed extract was assayed against several insect pests. For contact toxicity, 3- to 4-d-old individuals of Aphis fabae Scopoli, A. gossypii Glover, A. nerii Boyer de Fonscolombe, and Myzus persicae (Sulzer were included, as well as 1- to 7-d-old adult Tribolium castaneum (Herbst. Repellent effect experiments were conducted on adult, 1- to 2- and 3- to 4-d old M.persicae individuals. At 60 mg mL4, the topical bioassay mortality percentage was significantly higher in A. gossypii than in A. fabae and A. nerii after 12-72 h. Mortality of the treatments on M.persicae was 87.1% and 90.0% after 24 and 48 h, respectively, and significantly higher than A. fabae and A. nerii during this period. At 60 mg mL-1, the mortality of T. castaneum was much lower than that of the aphid species. The highest repellent index (over 72% was observed on 1- to 2-d-old M. persicae individuals.Para reducir la dependencia de los pesticidas sintéticos en plantaciones frutales y hortalizas, se realizó un ensayo para medir la toxicidad y repelencia de un extracto acetónico obtenido a partir de semillas de Peganum harmala L. (Zygophyllaceae contra diferentes especies de plagas. Para evaluar la toxicidad del extracto al contacto con los insectos, se incluyeron individuos de 3-4 d de edad de Aphis fabae Scopoli, Aphis gossypii Glover, Aphis nerii Boyer de Fonscolombe, y Myzus persicae (Sulzer, así como adultos 1-7 d de edad de Tribolium castaneum (Herbst. Experimentos para medir el efecto repelente se llevaron a cabo con individuos de 1-2 y 3-4 d de edad de M. persicae. En los resultados de los bioensayos tópicos el porcentaje de mortalidad fue significativamente mayor en la especie A. gossypii que en A. fabae y A. nerii, después de 12-72 h con una concentración de 60 mg mL-1. La mortalidad

  14. Diagnostic doses and times for Phlebotomus papatasi and Lutzomyia longipalpis sand flies (Diptera: Psychodidae: Phlebotominae) using the CDC bottle bioassay to assess insecticide resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denlinger, David S; Creswell, Joseph A; Anderson, J Laine; Reese, Conor K; Bernhardt, Scott A

    2016-04-15

    Insecticide resistance to synthetic chemical insecticides is a worldwide concern in phlebotomine sand flies (Diptera: Psychodidae), the vectors of Leishmania spp. parasites. The CDC bottle bioassay assesses resistance by testing populations against verified diagnostic doses and diagnostic times for an insecticide, but the assay has been used limitedly with sand flies. The objective of this study was to determine diagnostic doses and diagnostic times for laboratory Lutzomyia longipalpis (Lutz & Nieva) and Phlebotomus papatasi (Scopoli) to ten insecticides, including pyrethroids, organophosphates, carbamates, and DDT, that are used worldwide to control vectors. Bioassays were conducted in 1,000-ml glass bottles each containing 10-25 sand flies from laboratory colonies of L. longipalpis or P. papatasi. Four pyrethroids, three organophosphates, two carbamates and one organochlorine, were evaluated. A series of concentrations were tested for each insecticide, and four replicates were conducted for each concentration. Diagnostic doses were determined only during the exposure bioassay for the organophosphates and carbamates. For the pyrethroids and DDT, diagnostic doses were determined for both the exposure bioassay and after a 24-hour recovery period. Both species are highly susceptible to the carbamates as their diagnostic doses are under 7.0 μg/ml. Both species are also highly susceptible to DDT during the exposure assay as their diagnostic doses are 7.5 μg/ml, yet their diagnostic doses for the 24-h recovery period are 650.0 μg/ml for Lu. longipalpis and 470.0 μg/ml for P. papatasi. Diagnostic doses and diagnostic times can now be incorporated into vector management programs that use the CDC bottle bioassay to assess insecticide resistance in field populations of Lu. longipalpis and P. papatasi. These findings provide initial starting points for determining diagnostic doses and diagnostic times for other sand fly vector species and wild populations using the CDC

  15. Parasites of Columba livia (Aves: Columbiformes in Tenerife (Canary Islands and their role in the conservation biology of the Laurel pigeons

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    Foronda P.

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence and intensity of the parasites from 50 wild doves (Columba livia from the city of Santa Cruz de Tenerife, in the island of Tenerife (Canary Archipelago, were studied. The following ectoparasites were found in apparently healthy pigeons (prevalences are shown in percentage (% and mean intensities with their standard deviations: the acari Dermanyssus gallinae (De Geer, 1778 (6 241 .0 ± 138.9 and Tinaminyssus melloi Fain, 1962 (10 %, 218.3 ± 117.3; the louses, Columbicola columbae Linnaeus, 1758 (100 %, 111.4 ± 76.8 and Campanulotes bidentatus Scopoli, 1763 (94 %, 48.4 ± 26.6; and the pigeon fly, Pseudolynchia canariensis Macquart, 1839 (36 %, 6.2 ± 1.6. The endoparasites we found, were: a haemoprotozoan species, Haemoproteus columbae Kruze, 1890 (82 %, 14.8 ± 10.3 per 1000; coccidian oocysts, Eimeria sp. (50 %, 0.2 x 103 ± 1.7 x 103 per gr; a cestode species Raillietina micracantha (Fuhrmann, 1909 López Neyra, 1947 (44 %, 12.3 ± 9.4; and four nematode species, Tetrameres (Tetrameres fissispina (Diesing, 1861 Travassos, 1915 (4 %, 99.5 ± 34,1, Synhimantus (Dispharynx spiralis (Molin, 1858 (8 %, 46. 8 ± 11.6, Ascaridia columbae (Gmelin, 1790 Travassos, 1913 (40 %, 8.4 ± 8.8 and Aonchotheca sp. (18 %, 6.0 ± 3.1. Several species detected in our study can be pathogens for C. bollii and C. junoniae, which are endemic pigeons of the Canary Islands, considered endangered species. Parasites (ectoparasites, protozoa and helminths of C. livia found in Tenerife and others from wild and farm birds in the island were considered as healthy controls.

  16. Macrofauna assemblage composition and soil moisture interact to affect soil ecosystem functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collison, E. J.; Riutta, T.; Slade, E. M.

    2013-02-01

    Changing climatic conditions and habitat fragmentation are predicted to alter the soil moisture conditions of temperate forests. It is not well understood how the soil macrofauna community will respond to changes in soil moisture, and how changes to species diversity and community composition may affect ecosystem functions, such as litter decomposition and soil fluxes. Moreover, few studies have considered the interactions between the abiotic and biotic factors that regulate soil processes. Here we attempt to disentangle the interactive effects of two of the main factors that regulate soil processes at small scales - moisture and macrofauna assemblage composition. The response of assemblages of three common temperate soil invertebrates (Glomeris marginata Villers, Porcellio scaber Latreille and Philoscia muscorum Scopoli) to two contrasting soil moisture levels was examined in a series of laboratory mesocosm experiments. The contribution of the invertebrates to the leaf litter mass loss of two common temperate tree species of contrasting litter quality (easily decomposing Fraxinus excelsior L. and recalcitrant Quercus robur L.) and to soil CO2 fluxes were measured. Both moisture conditions and litter type influenced the functioning of the invertebrate assemblages, which was greater in high moisture conditions compared with low moisture conditions and on good quality vs. recalcitrant litter. In high moisture conditions, all macrofauna assemblages functioned at equal rates, whereas in low moisture conditions there were pronounced differences in litter mass loss among the assemblages. This indicates that species identity and assemblage composition are more important when moisture is limited. We suggest that complementarity between macrofauna species may mitigate the reduced functioning of some species, highlighting the importance of maintaining macrofauna species richness.

  17. Parasites of Columba livia (Aves: Columbiformes) in Tenerife (Canary Islands) and their role in the conservation biology of the laurel pigeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foronda, P; Valladares, B; Rivera-Medina, J A; Figueruelo, E; Abreu, N; Casanova, J C

    2004-09-01

    The prevalence and intensity of the parasites from 50 wild doves (Columba livia) from the city of Santa Cruz de Tenerife, in the island of Tenerife (Canary Archipelago), were studied. The following ectoparasites were found in apparently healthy pigeons (prevalences are shown in percentage (%) and mean intensities with their standard deviations): the acari Dermanyssus gallinae (De Geer, 1778) (6, 241.0 +/- 138.9) and Tinaminyssus melloi Fain, 1962 (10%, 218.3 +/- 117.3); the louses, Columbicola columbae Linnaeus, 1758 (100%, 111.4 +/- 76.8) and Campanulotes bidentatus Scopoli, 1763 (94%, 48.4 +/- 26.6); and the pigeon fly, Pseudolynchia canariensis Macquart, 1839 (36%, 6.2 +/- 1.6). The endoparasites we found were: a haemoprotozoan species, Haemoproteus columbae Kruze, 1890 (82%, 14.8 +/- 10.3 per 1000); coccidian oocysts, Eimeria sp. (50%, 0.2 x 10(3) +/- 1.7 x 10(3) per gr); a cestode species Raillietina micracantha (Fuhrmann, 1909) López Neyra, 1947 (44%, 12.3 +/- 9.4); and four nematode species, Tetrameres (Tetrameres) fissispina (Diesing, 1861) Travassos, 1915 (4%, 99.5 +/- 34.1), Synhimantus (Dispharynx) spiralis (Molin, 1858) (8%, 46.8 +/- 11.6), Ascaridia columbae (Gmelin, 1790) Travassos, 1913 (40%, 8.4 +/- 8.8) and Aonchotheca sp. (18%, 6.0 +/- 3.1). Several species detected in our study can be pathogens for C. bollii and C. junoniae, which are endemic pigeons of the Canary Islands, considered endangered species. Parasites (ectoparasites, protozoa and helminths) of C. livia found in Tenerife and others from wild and farm birds in the island were considered as healthy controls.

  18. Ocorrência e conservação de Touit melanonotus (Aves, Psittacidae no sul do Brasil

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    Marcelo A. V. Vallejos

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available O apuim-de-costas-pretas [Touit melanonotus (Wied, 1820] é uma espécie florestal endêmica da Mata Atlântica Brasileira e de relevante interesse conservacionista. Trata-se de uma ave com poucas informações disponíveis acerca de sua história natural e distribuição geográfica e novas observações são importantes fontes de informação para auxiliar na conservação da espécie. Aqui reavaliamos o primeiro registro da espécie e apresentamos novas observações no estado do Paraná, sul do Brasil. As vocalizações atribuídas a T. melanonotus e que consubstanciaram sua ocorrência no estado foram examinadas com auxílio de espectrogramas e identificadas como vozes de Pionopsitta pileata (Scopoli, 1769. Não obstante, T. melanonotus ocorre com certa regularidade no Paraná, como indicado por novos registros da espécie em sete localidades distribuídas por todo o litoral do estado. Esta ave foi registrada principalmente em florestas de terras baixas e, uma vez que esta fisionomia sofre intensas pressões antrópicas, sugerimos que esforços de conservação da espécie devem priorizar a preservação desses hábitats.

  19. Efficacy of commercial mosquito traps in capturing phlebotomine sand flies (Diptera: Psychodidae) in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoel, D F; Kline, D L; Hogsette, J A; Bernier, U R; El-Hossary, S S; Hanafi, H A; Watany, N; Fawaz, E Y; Furman, B D; Obenauer, P J; Szumlas, D E

    2010-11-01

    Four types of commercial mosquito control traps, the Mosquito Magnet Pro (MMP), the Sentinel 360 (S360), the BG-Sentinel (BGS), and the Mega-Catch Ultra (MCU), were compared with a standard Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) light trap for efficacy in collecting phlebotomine sand flies (Diptera: Psychodidae) in a small farming village in the Nile River Valley 10 km north of Aswan, Egypt. Each trap was baited with either carbon dioxide (CO2) from combustion of butane gas (MMP), dry ice (CDC and BGS traps), light (MCU and S360), or dry ice and light (CDC). Traps were rotated through five sites in a5 x 5 Latin square design, repeated four times during the height of the sand fly season (June, August, and September 2007) at a site where 94% of sand flies in past collections were Phlebotomus papatasi (Scopoli). A total of 6,440 sand flies was collected, of which 6,037 (93.7%) were P. papatasi. Of the CO2-baited traps, the BGS trap collected twice as many P. papatasi as the MMP and CDC light traps, and at least three times more P. papatasi than the light-only MCU and S360 traps (P MMP 56.8 (+/- 9.0) > CDC 52.3 (+/- 6.1) > MCU 38.2 (+/- 6.4) > S360 12.6 (+/- 1.8). Results indicate that several types of commercial traps are suitable substitutes for the CDC light trap in sand fly surveillance programs.

  20. Comparative efficacy of three suction traps for collecting phlebotomine sand flies (Diptera: Psychodidae) in open habitats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faiman, Roy; Cuño, Ruben; Warburg, Alon

    2009-06-01

    The efficacy of three suction traps for trapping phlebotomine sand flies (Diptera: Psychodidae) was compared. Traps were baited with Co(2) and used without any light source. CO(2)-baited CDC traps were evaluated either in their standard downdraft orientation or inverted (iCDC traps). Mosquito Magnet-X (MMX) counterflow geometry traps were tested in the updraft orientation only. Both updraft traps (iCDC and MMX) were deployed with their opening ∼10 cm from the ground while the opening of the downdraft (CDC) trap was ∼40 cm above ground. Comparisons were conducted in two arid locations where different sand fly species prevail. In the Jordan Valley, 3,367 sand flies were caught, 2,370 of which were females. The predominant species was Phlebotomus (Phlebotomus) papatasi, Scopoli 1786 (>99%). The updraft-type traps iCDC and MMX caught an average of 118 and 67.1 sand flies per trap night, respectively. The CDC trap caught 32.9 sand flies on average per night, significantly less than the iCDC traps. In the Judean desert, traps were arranged in a 3 × 3 Latin square design. A total of 565 sand flies were caught, 345 of which were females. The predominant species was P. (Paraphlebotomus) sergenti Parrot 1917 (87%). The updraft traps iCDC and MMX caught an average of 25.6 and 17.9 sand flies per trap per night, respectively. The CDC trap caught 7.8 sand flies on average per night, significantly less than the iCDC traps. The female to male ratio was 1.7 on average for all trap types. In conclusion, updraft traps deployed with their opening close to the ground are clearly more effective for trapping sand flies than downdraft CDC traps in open habitats.

  1. Population dynamics of Cyrtomon luridus Boheman (Coloptera: Curculionidae on Duboisia sp. (Solanaceae in Brazil

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    Paulo Tironi

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Cyrtomon luridus (Boheman has adapted to the medicinal plant Duboisia sp., introduced from Australia. Its larvae feed on roots, causing up to 100% mortality damages. The population dynamics and biological cycle were studied to determine future control methods in Duboisia sp., in Arapongas, Paraná State, Brazil, from 1993 to 1996. C. luridus presented annual life cycle in Duboisia sp. under natural conditions. The larval development period was 120 to 150 days, from January to May, reaching an average size of 19.0 ± 2.0 mm in soil depth ranging on 24.9 ± 8.6 cm to 45.0 ± 10.0 cm. The beginning of the pupal phase happened in April. The larval-adult viability ranged on 7.5% to 19.6%. The typical symptoms of attack appeared in an infestation level of 60 larvae per plant. The first adults came out in July, six months after larvae hatching. However, adults came out from soil only in September, at the beginning of the rainy season, reaching the peak of emergency in October, outspreading until January. In laboratory (25ºC, 70% R.H., females longevity averaged 113.7 ± 15.2 days. In this period, laying capacity was 42.7 ± 7.9 egg masses, with 9.4 ± 0.61 eggs each, totaling 402 ± 72.9 eggs per female. Adults C. luridus were found parasitized by Microctonus sp. (Loan (Hymenoptera: Braconidae. Solanaceae species Solanum mauritianum Scopoli and Cestrum intermedium Sendt. were identified as host plants of C. luridus.

  2. Monitoring of aphid flight activities in seed potato crops in Serbia

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    Andja Vucetic

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Aphid flight activities in seed potato fields have been studied by the yellow water traps. It is a good method for monitoring aphids as vectors of viruses, but this study also showed it is a suitable method for insect-diversity research. During the four-year studies, over 11.500 specimens were collected and a total of 107 different taxa of aphids were identified. The most abundant species were polyphagous species, such as: Acyrthosiphon pisum (Haris, Aphis fabae Scopoli, Aphis gossypii Glover and Brachycaudus helichrysi (Kaltenbach. The results of the studies show that diversity of aphids in different regions of Serbia is similar regardless of the altitude and the diversity of terrain. At most sites it ranged from 2 to 3. The highest value was recorded in Begeč, locality in northern part of Serbia, in year 2008, and it was 2.92. The maximum values of the Shannon-Weaver diversity index at all sites were recorded in the first weeks of the monitoring of aphid flight activities. Morisita-Horn similarity index shows no significant differences between sites regardless of altitudes. The sites are grouped by year, not by similarity of relief. In spite of these results, the Chi-square analysis showed highly significant difference in vector frequencies among seasons and sites with more pronounced differences for PVY. As a consequence of differences in vector frequencies, the vector pressure index in some regions was different also. The number of vectors and vector pressure index vary depending on the altitude of localities. At localities at altitudes under 1000 m, they were high. The highest index was at Kotraža, locality in central part of Serbia, in 2007, when PVY index exceeded the value of 180, while for PLRV it was 60. At high altitudes on mountain Golija, above 1100 m, the number of aphids was low, as well as the vector pressure index which indicates that these regions are suitable for producing virus-free seed potato.

  3. Seabird drift as a proxy to estimate surface currents in the western Mediterranean?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Navarro, Laura; Sánchez-Román, Antonio; Pascual, Ananda; Fablet, Ronan; Hernandez-Carrasco, Ismael; Mason, Evan; Arcos, José Manuel; Oro, Daniel

    2017-04-01

    Seabird trajectories can be used as proxies to investigate the dynamics of marine systems and their spatiotemporal evolution. Previous studies have mainly been based on analyses of long range flights, where birds are travelling at high velocities over long time periods. Such data have been used to study wind patterns, and areas of avian feeding and foraging have also been used to study oceanic fronts. Here we focus on "slow moving" periods (which we associate to when birds appear to be drifting on the sea surface), in order to investigate bird drift as a proxy for sea surface currents in the western Mediterranean Sea. We analyse trajectories corresponding to "slow moving" periods recorded by GPSs attached to individuals of the species Calonectris diomedea ( Scopoli's shearwater) from mid August to mid September 2012. The trajectories are compared with sea level anomaly (SLA), sea surface temperature (SST), Finite Size Lyapunov Exponents (FSLE), wind fields, and the outputs from an automated sea-surface-height based eddy tracker. The SLA and SST datasets were obtained from the Copernicus Marine Environment Monitoring Service (CMEMS) with a spatial resolution of 1/8 ̊ and 1/100 ̊ respectively while the FSLEs were computed from the SLA dataset. Finally, the wind data comes from the outputs of the CCMPv2 numerical model. This model has a global coverage with a spatial resolution of 1/4 ̊. Interesting relationships between the trajectories and SLA fields are found. According to the angle between the SLA gradient and the trajectories of birds, we classify drifts into three scenarios: perpendicular, parallel and other, which are associated with different driving forces. The first scenario implies that bird drift is driven by geostrophic sea surface currents. The second we associate with wind drag as the main driving force. This is validated through the wind dataset. Moreover, from the SST, FSLEs and the eddy tracker, we obtain supplementary information on the presence

  4. 甲氰混剂对3种农业害虫的毒力及其增效机理研究%Toxicity and Synergistic Mechanism of Mixed Insecticide Jiaqing against Three Agricultural Pest Insects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    欧晓明; 唐德秀; 林雪梅; 王跃龙

    2000-01-01

    研究了甲基对硫磷、氰戊菊酯及其混剂(10∶1)对3种重要农业害虫粘虫、豆蚜和稻黑尾叶蝉的毒力及其增效机理.生测结果表明:甲基对硫磷与氰戊菊酯混配对粘虫、蚜虫和叶蝉表现出明显的增效作用,其共毒系数分别为179.04、191.12和216.44; 生化测定结果表明,在相同浓度下,甲氰混剂对粘虫活体乙酰胆碱酯酶(AChE)活性的抑制率较单剂高,说明甲氰混剂对AchE抑制作用增强可能是其重要增效机制之一; 根据药剂的毒力值 (LC90)和价格所进行的应用指数评价结果表明,甲氰混剂的应用指数均高于单剂甲基对硫磷,说明该混剂具有潜在的应用价值和经济效益.%Toxicities and synergistic mechanisms of parathion-methyl, fenvalera te and their binary mixture Jiaqing (10∶1) were studied against oriental armywo r m Mythimna separata Walker, black bean aphid Aphis fabae Scopoli and ric e leafho pper Nephotettix cincticeps(Uhler). Bioassay results revealed that mixed in sect icide Jiaqing exhibited a significant synergism against oriental armyworm, bean aphid and rice leafhopper, and its cotoxicity coefficient (CTC) was 179.04, 191. 12 and 216.44 respectively. According to biochemical studies on in v ivo inh ibition of acetylcholinesterase in oriental armyworm, it appeared that the mixed insecticide Jiaqing had a stronger inhibitory effect on the target enzyme than parathion-me t hyl and fenvalerate alone at the same concentration, indicating that increased inhibition to the acetylcholinesterase in the insect was one of the important sy nergistic factors of mixed parathion-methyl and fenvalerate. Based on LC9 0 value to three insects and price of the insecticides, application index analyses sho wed that the mixed insecticide Jiaqing had a greater application index to three pest insects than parathion-methyl applied alone, suggesting the potential econ o mic benefit and application value of the mixed insecticide Jiaqing in

  5. The types of Palaearctic species of the families Apionidae, Rhynchitidae, Attelabidae and Curculionidae in the collection of Étienne Louis Geoffroy (Coleoptera, Curculionoidea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alonso-Zarazaga, M. A.

    2008-06-01

    >Curculio nigrostriatus Goeze, 1777 = Curculio floriger Geoffroy, 1785, nom. oblitum = Curculio subglobosus Gmelin, 1790, nom. oblitum; Anisorhynchus scabrosus (Geoffroy, 1785 = Curculio barbatus Rossi, 1794; Hylobius abietis (Linnaeus, 1758 = Curculio tigris Gmelin, 1790; Sitophilus granarius (Linnaeus, 1758 = Curculio contractus Geoffroy, 1785; Phyllobius pomaceus Gyllenhal, 1834 = Curculio auratus Geoffroy, 1785; Hylobius transversovittatus (Goeze, 1777 = Curculio fascialis Gmelin, 1790. New combinations are: Leucophyes occidentalis (Dieckmann, 1982 (from Leucosomus and Anisorhynchus scabrosus (Geoffroy, 1785 (from Curculio. The following names have been reinstated (stat. res. as valid: Trachyphloeus spinosus (Goeze, 1777 for the species known as Trachyphloeus olivieri Bedel, 1883, Lixus pulverulentus (Scopoli, 1763 for the species known as Lixus angustatus (Fabricius, 1775. Hypera melancholica (Fabricius, 1793 is confirmed as the valid name for the species hitherto named Hypera fuscocinerea (Marsham, 1802 or Hypera murina (Fabricius, 1793. The following names are considered nomina dubia, since there is no identifiable type material: Curculio pulex Goeze, 1777, Rhinomacer minutus Geoffroy, 1785, Curculio pulex Gmelin, 1790 (non Goeze, 1777, Rhinomacer striatusi> Geoffroy, 1785, Rhinomacer fulgidusi> Geoffroy, 1785, Curculio transversofasciatus Goeze, 1777, Curculio fasciatus Geoffroy, 1785 (non Scopoli, 1763, nec Ström, 1768, nec Degeer, 1775, nec Mu.ller, 1776, Curculio fuscatus Gmelin, 1790, Curculio sulcatus Goeze, 1777: 410 (non Fabricius, 1775, nec Goeze, 1777: 381, Curculio incisus Geoffroy, 1785, Curculio exaratus Gmelin, 1790, Curculio quadratus Goeze, 1777, Curculio quadrilis Geoffroy, 1785, Curculio griseosericeus Goeze, 1777,

  6. Macrochelid Mite, Macrocheles muscaedomesticae (Acarina: Macrochelidae as a Biological Control Agent Against House Fly, Musca domestica (Diptera: Muscidae in Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safaa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerous species of macrochelids (Acarina: Mesostigmata have shown capability to attack housefly larvae and eggs but it is presumed that only a few of them play a significant role in the control of flies in nature. Macrocheles muscaedomesticae (Scopoli is one of several mites that feeds on eggs, newly hatched and small larvae of house fly Musca domestica L. This study provide avidence that macrochelid mite is attacking not only housefly larvae and eggs but also on housefly adults. Macrocheles muscaedomesticae mite was reared in the laboratory on house fly frozen eggs and first instar of larvae at constant conditions of 28°C±1 and 90% relative humidity using sterilized artificial diet. The mean incubation period of eggs, total immatures, female longevity were 0.7, 4.0 and 25.2 days, respectively when fed on frozen eggs meanwhile means were 0.8, 7.0 and 22.6 days when fed on first instar larvae of M. domestica. The total consumption of female was 131.1 eggs/female or 82.7 larvae. Results of the present study showed that the mean mortality percentages of eggs due to predation of three levels of predator 2, 5 and 10 individuals were 57.2, 74.9 and 96.5 after 5, 4, 2 days, respectively. Also, the larval stage of M. domestica was introduced with three levels of 10, 20 and 25 individuals for each level of predatory mite 2, 5 and 10 adults, respectively. Results revealed that the best results were recorded at the level of 5 mites, where the mean mortality percentage of larvae was 100% after one day when introduced with 10 housefly’s larvae but it was 96% after two days when introduced with 20 housefly’s larvae and 76.2% after three days when introduced with 25 houseflies larvae at level of 5. In addition, the present study provide evidence that mites can consume the housefly adult stage. Our findings indicated that the best results were recorded at the level of 10 mites where the mean mortality percentages of adults were 83.55%, the fly died after

  7. Monogènes de Clarias (Siluriformes, Clariidae au Cameroun : II. description de trois nouvelles espèces du genre Birgiellus n. gen. (Dactylogyridea, Ancyrocephalidae dans le Bassin du Nyong

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bilong Bilong C.F.

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available L’étude des monogènes parasites branchiaux de trois espèces de poissons du genre Clarias Scopoli, 1777 (Clariidae : C. pachynema, C. jaensis et C. camerunensis, pêchés dans le bassin du Nyong (Cameroun a permis de récolter trois nouvelles espèces placées dans le nouveau genre Birgiellus, respectivement Birgiellus mutatus n. sp. chez Clarias pachynema, B. calaris n. sp. chez C. jaensis et B. kellensis n. sp. chez C. camerunensis. Le genre Birgiellus, voisin du genre Quadriacanthus, s’en distingue par la morphologie de la barre transversale ventrale formée d’une pièce unique (deux bras distincts chez Quadriacanthus et par les uncinuli IV peu différents des autres (plus grands chez les Quadriacanthus. Birgiellus calaris diffère de B. mutatus par les anchors ventraux plus longs et plus épais, la morphologie de la barre transversale ventrale, la taille des pièces sclérifiées des appareils copulateurs mâle et femelle, avec la pièce accessoire mâle munie d’un talon, un manche trapézoïdal plus long et un crochet plus épais. Birgiellus kellensis, proche de B. calaris, s’en écarte par la taille plus faible des anchors dorsaux et ventraux, des barres transversales, du pénis, et de la pièce accessoire male, sans talon, mais avec une lame mince supplémentaire. En référence à l’article 8.5.2 du Code international de nomenclature zoologique (1999, le genre Birgiellus et les espèces B. mutatus et B. calaris remplacent respectivement le genre Claridectes et les espèces C. clarisa et C. alacris, initialement décrits par Birgi (1987, mais dont les spécimens n’ont jamais été déposés dans un musée. L’étude de la spécificité parasitaire de ces trois espèces montre qu’elle est du type oïoxène.

  8. Updated check-list of iberian-balearic Aphidini (Hemiptera, Aphididae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García Prieto, Francisca

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The check-list of species in the Tribe Aphidini (Hemiptera, Aphididae: Aphidinae recorded to date from the Iberian Peninsula and Balearic Isles is presented, 139 species are listed. A list of the countries (Andorra, Spain and Portugal and provinces (Spanish or districts (Portuguese where each species and subspecies is known is also included. Five species are mentioned for the first time in Iberian-Balearic territory: Aphis callunae Theobald, A. comosa (Börner, A. lantanae Koch (with the subspecies A. lantanae coriaria Börner, A. erigerontis Holman and Schizaphis longicaudata Hille Ris Lambers. Nine species have been removed from the check-list: Aphis euphorbiae Kaltenbach, A. genistae Scopoli, A. pilosellae (Börner, A. salsolae (Börner, A. striata Hille Ris Lambers, Brachyunguis zygophylli (Nevsky, B. suaedus (Paik, Protaphis centaurea (Gómez-Menor and Schizaphis pilipes (Ossiannilsson. Aphis ruborum Börner & Schilder, 1931 is recognized as the valid name for Aphis ruborum Börner, 1932 syn. nov. and Rhopalosiphum oxyacanthae (Schrank for Rhopalosiphum insertum (Walker. Two new combinations are established: Xerobion blascoi comb. nov. for Aphis blascoi García Prieto & Sanchís Segovia and Xerobion brutii comb. nov. for Absinthaphis brutii Barbagallo. Five binomens have been re-established: A. althaeae (Nevsky, A. ballotae Passerini, A. longirostris (Börner, A. ononidis (Schouteden and A. picridis (Börner to replace A. davletshinae Hille Ris Lambers, A. balloticola Szelegiewicz, A. longirostrata Hille Ris Lambers, A. kaltenbachi Hille Ris Lambers and A. stroyani Szelegiewicz, respectively. The life cycle of Aphis stachydis Mordvilko is given and its males and oviparous females are described. Taxonomic

  9. 山西省藏山蝇类调查初报

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范志国; 李红岩; 李亚平; 王双福; 栗焕萍; 刘智慧

    2001-01-01

    @@藏山位于太行山西侧,山西省东部盂县境内,东经112°55′~113°49′,北纬37°57′ ~38°31′。最高海拔1 393.4m,年平均降水量400mm以上,年均气温为9.6℃,无 霜期约135d,属温带气候。   1999年6月21~25日,对藏山蝇种进行了调查。调查方法:根据藏山的生态环境,采用人工 网捕法,每天早7时至晚7时采集,捕获蝇放入氰化钾毒瓶毒死后制作标本,并鉴定种群。经 鉴定共捕蝇5科41种。名录如下: 1.花蝇科Anthomyiidae   (1)雨兆花蝇Anthomyia pluvialis linnaeus,1758   (2)灰地种蝇 Delia platura Meigen,1826   (3)亚绒粪泉蝇 Emmesomyia socia suwai Ge et Fan   (4)黄藤经泉蝇 Pegoplata virginea Meigen 2.厕蝇科 Fanniidae   (5)羽芒扁尾厕蝇 Piezura boletorum Rondani   (6)元厕蝇 Fannia prsca Stein   (7)夏厕蝇 Fannia canicularis Linnaeus 3.蝇科 Muscidae   (8)厩腐蝇 Muscina stabulans Fallen   (9)家蝇 Musca domestica Linnaeus   (10)四鬃毛蝇 Dasyphora quadrisetosa Zimin   (11)斑纹蝇 Graphomya maculata Scopoli   (12)欧圆蝇 Myospina meditabunda meditabunda Fab   (13)美丽圆蝇 Mydaea urbana Meign   (14)北方池蝇 Limnophory fallax septentrionalis Xue   (15)鬃脉池蝇 Limnophory setinerva Schnabl   (16)螯溜蝇 Lispe tentaculata De Geer   (17)吸溜蝇 Lispe consanguinea Loew   (18)东方溜蝇 Lispe orientalis Wied

  10. Nomenclatural Studies Toward a World List of Diptera Genus-Group Names. Part V: Pierre-Justin-Marie Macquart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evenhuis, Neal L; Pape, Thomas; Pont, Adrian C

    2016-09-30

    of Phyllomya Robineau-Desvoidy, 1830, n. syn. [Tachinidae]; Physogenia Loew, 1862 of Physegenua Macquart, 1848, n. syn. [Lauxaniidae]; Physogenua Giglio-Tos, 1895 of Physegenua Macquart, 1848, n. syn. [Lauxaniidae]; Phytomiza Macquart, 1835 of Phytomyza Fallén, 1810, n. syn. [Agromyzidae]; Platipalpus Macquart, 1850 of Platypalpus Macquart, 1828, n. syn. [Hybotidae]; Platipeza Macquart, 1850 of Platypeza Meigen, 1803, n. syn. [Platypezidae]; Platynochoetus Macquart, 1834 of Platynochaetus Wiedemann, 1830 [Syrphidae]; Porphirops Macquart, 1838 of Porphyrops Meigen, 1824, n. syn [Dolichopodidae]; Rhinomyia Macquart, 1835 of Rhinomya Robineau-Desvoidy, 1830, n. syn. [Tachinidae]; Rhynomyia Macquart, 1834 of Rhinomya Robineau-Desvoidy, 1830, n. syn. [Tachinidae]; Scathopse Guérin-Méneville, 1839 of Scatopse Geoffroy, 1762, n. syn. [Scatopsidae]; Spherophoria Macquart, 1850 of Sphaerophoria Le Peletier & Audinet-Serville, 1828, n. syn. [Syrphidae]; Sphoerophoria Macquart, 1829 of Sphaerophoria Le Peletier & Audinet-Serville, 1828, n. syn. [Syrphidae]; Stenopteryx Schiner, 1864 of Stenepteryx Leach, 1817, n. syn. [Hippoboscidae]; Stenostoma Mik, 1890 of Senostoma Macquart, 1847, n. syn. [Tachinidae]; Tachydromyia Macquart, 1823 of Tachydromia Meigen, 1803, n. syn. [Hybotidae]; Taenioptera Mik, 1898 of Taeniaptera Macquart, 1835, n. syn. [Micropezidae]; Trinevra Macquart, 1835 of Phora Latreille, 1797, n. syn. [Phoridae]; Uramyia Macquart, 1844 of Uramya Robineau-Desvoidy, 1830, n. syn. [Tachinidae]; Xestomysa Macquart, 1851 of Xestomyza Wiedemann, 1820, n. syn. [Therevidae]; Zygonevra Macquart, 1834 of Zygoneura Meigen, 1803, n. syn. [Sciaridae]. -Species-group names: Calobatemyia nigra Macquart, 1855 of Musca doronici Scopoli, 1763, n. syn. [Calliphoridae]; Cyrtonevra protorum Macquart, 1850 of Musca pratorum Meigen, 1826, n. syn. [Muscidae]; Eumerus oeneus Macquart, 1850 of Eumerus aeneus Macquart, 1829, n. syn. [Syrphidae]; Lucilia ceserion Macquart, 1850 of Musca